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Sample records for self diagnostic routines

  1. Pharmaceutical care and the use of routine diagnostic tools by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the use of routine diagnostic tools among community pharmacists in Ibadan,. Nigeria. ... measurement, and tests for serum cholesterol, capillary .... Development .... Duweijua M, Dodoo A, Plange R. Quality Counseling on.

  2. Circulating tumor cell isolation and diagnostics: toward routine clinical use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolpe, van de A.; Pantel, K.; Sleijfer, S.; Terstappen, L.W.; Toonder, den J.M.J.

    2011-01-01

    From February 7–11, 2011, the multidisciplinary Lorentz Workshop Circulating Tumor Cell (CTC) Isolation and Diagnostics: Toward Routine Clinical Use was held in Leiden (The Netherlands) to discuss progress and define challenges and potential solutions for development of clinically useful circulating

  3. Fundamentals for routined utilization of tomography in beam diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichau, Hermine

    2012-01-01

    A general and systematic approach to implement tomography for beam diagnostics has been invented and exemplarily shown for the invention of beam tomography for the Frankfurt Neutron Source. Following the diagnostic pipeline the first step was to prepare the data basis for the tomography reconstruction. For the monitoring, standard parameters have to be obtained with sufficient accuracy. In the context of this work, tomography has been kept as flexible as possible. Firstly, it will be used for the analysis of beam dynamics but also for the further development of beam tomography for routined utilization. Later on it will have to serve as a monitoring system at the end of the LEBT of FRANZ. The data preparation for tomography was demonstrated step by step. The iterated backprojection (FBP) algorithm was derived to show the basic idea of tomography which is contained in all forms of tomography algorithms. In connection with data exhibiting a high signal to noise ratio the FBP obtains the result with the highest accuracy, beyond that the accuracy can be controlled by the number of projections. The algebraic reconstruction and maximum entropy approach were outlined in a nutshell. By the introduction of the diagnostic pipeline in combination with the decision systematics the basis for a routined utilization of tomography in ion beam diagnostics have been established and exemplarily demonstrated on the introduction of beam tomography for FRANZ. A rotatable vacuum chamber has been developed to close a gap between the availability of projections to use the FBP and the small physical space on which they have to be determined. (orig.)

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of routine blood examinations and CSF lactate level for post-neurosurgical bacterial meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions: The PBM diagnostic accuracy of routine blood examinations was relatively low, whereas the accuracy of CSF lactate level was high. Some variables that are involved in the incidence of PBM can also affect the diagnostic accuracy for PBM. Taking into account the effects of these variables significantly improves the diagnostic accuracies of routine blood examinations and CSF lactate level.

  5. Diagnostic accuracy of routine postoperative body temperature measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, Hester; Storm-Versloot, Marja N.; Goossens, Astrid; Speelman, Peter; Legemate, Dink A.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: On surgical wards, body temperature is routinely measured, but there is no proof that this is useful for detecting postoperative infection. The aim of this study was to compare temperature measurements (the test) with the confirmed absence or presence of a postoperative infection (the

  6. Valeur de l'endoscopie de routine dans le diagnostic de la gastrite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Valeur de l'endoscopie de routine dans le diagnostic de la gastrite chronique antrale à Yaoundé. D Noah Noah, F Ankouane Andoulo, SAF Eloumou Bagnaka, PJA Atangana, C Tzeuton, EC Ndjitoyap Ndam ...

  7. Diagnostic accuracy of routine blood examinations and CSF lactate level for post-neurosurgical bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Xiao, Xiong; Zhang, Junting; Gao, Zhixian; Ji, Nan; Zhang, Liwei

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of routine blood examinations and Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) lactate level for Post-neurosurgical Bacterial Meningitis (PBM) at a large sample-size of post-neurosurgical patients. The diagnostic accuracies of routine blood examinations and CSF lactate level to distinguish between PAM and PBM were evaluated with the values of the Area Under the Curve of the Receiver Operating Characteristic (AUC -ROC ) by retrospectively analyzing the datasets of post-neurosurgical patients in the clinical information databases. The diagnostic accuracy of routine blood examinations was relatively low (AUC -ROC CSF lactate level achieved rather high diagnostic accuracy (AUC -ROC =0.891; CI 95%, 0.852-0.922). The variables of patient age, operation duration, surgical diagnosis and postoperative days (the interval days between the neurosurgery and examinations) were shown to affect the diagnostic accuracy of these examinations. The variables were integrated with routine blood examinations and CSF lactate level by Fisher discriminant analysis to improve their diagnostic accuracy. As a result, the diagnostic accuracy of blood examinations and CSF lactate level was significantly improved with an AUC -ROC value=0.760 (CI 95%, 0.737-0.782) and 0.921 (CI 95%, 0.887-0.948) respectively. The PBM diagnostic accuracy of routine blood examinations was relatively low, whereas the accuracy of CSF lactate level was high. Some variables that are involved in the incidence of PBM can also affect the diagnostic accuracy for PBM. Taking into account the effects of these variables significantly improves the diagnostic accuracies of routine blood examinations and CSF lactate level. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Isothermal multiple displacement amplification: a methodical approach enhancing molecular routine diagnostics of microcarcinomas and small biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairinger, Fabian D; Walter, Robert Fh; Vollbrecht, Claudia; Hager, Thomas; Worm, Karl; Ting, Saskia; Wohlschläger, Jeremias; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Schmid, Kurt W

    2014-01-01

    Isothermal multiple displacement amplification (IMDA) can be a powerful tool in molecular routine diagnostics for homogeneous and sequence-independent whole-genome amplification of notably small tumor samples, eg, microcarcinomas and biopsies containing a small amount of tumor. Currently, this method is not well established in pathology laboratories. We designed a study to confirm the feasibility and convenience of this method for routine diagnostics with formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples prepared by laser-capture microdissection. A total of 250 μg DNA (concentration 5 μg/μL) was generated by amplification over a period of 8 hours with a material input of approximately 25 cells, approximately equivalent to 175 pg of genomic DNA. In the generated DNA, a representation of all chromosomes could be shown and the presence of elected genes relevant for diagnosis in clinical samples could be proven. Mutational analysis of clinical samples could be performed without any difficulty and showed concordance with earlier diagnostic findings. We established the feasibility and convenience of IMDA for routine diagnostics. We also showed that small amounts of DNA, which were not analyzable with current molecular methods, could be sufficient for a wide field of applications in molecular routine diagnostics when they are preamplified with IMDA.

  9. Isothermal multiple displacement amplification: a methodical approach enhancing molecular routine diagnostics of microcarcinomas and small biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mairinger FD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Fabian D Mairinger,1 Robert FH Walter,2 Claudia Vollbrecht,3 Thomas Hager,1 Karl Worm,1 Saskia Ting,1 Jeremias Wohlschläger,1 Paul Zarogoulidis,4 Konstantinos Zarogoulidis,4 Kurt W Schmid1 1Institute of Pathology, 2Ruhrlandklinik, West German Lung Center, University Hospital Essen, Essen, 3Institute of Pathology, University Hospital Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 4Pulmonary Department, Oncology Unit, G Papanikolaou General Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece Background and methods: Isothermal multiple displacement amplification (IMDA can be a powerful tool in molecular routine diagnostics for homogeneous and sequence-independent whole-genome amplification of notably small tumor samples, eg, microcarcinomas and biopsies containing a small amount of tumor. Currently, this method is not well established in pathology laboratories. We designed a study to confirm the feasibility and convenience of this method for routine diagnostics with formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples prepared by laser-capture microdissection. Results: A total of 250 µg DNA (concentration 5 µg/µL was generated by amplification over a period of 8 hours with a material input of approximately 25 cells, approximately equivalent to 175 pg of genomic DNA. In the generated DNA, a representation of all chromosomes could be shown and the presence of elected genes relevant for diagnosis in clinical samples could be proven. Mutational analysis of clinical samples could be performed without any difficulty and showed concordance with earlier diagnostic findings. Conclusion: We established the feasibility and convenience of IMDA for routine diagnostics. We also showed that small amounts of DNA, which were not analyzable with current molecular methods, could be sufficient for a wide field of applications in molecular routine diagnostics when they are preamplified with IMDA. Keywords: isothermal multiple displacement amplification, isothermal, whole

  10. Sequencing-based breast cancer diagnostics as an alternative to routine biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantalainen, Mattias; Klevebring, Daniel; Lindberg, Johan; Ivansson, Emma; Rosin, Gustaf; Kis, Lorand; Celebioglu, Fuat; Fredriksson, Irma; Czene, Kamila; Frisell, Jan; Hartman, Johan; Bergh, Jonas; Grönberg, Henrik

    2016-11-30

    Sequencing-based breast cancer diagnostics have the potential to replace routine biomarkers and provide molecular characterization that enable personalized precision medicine. Here we investigate the concordance between sequencing-based and routine diagnostic biomarkers and to what extent tumor sequencing contributes clinically actionable information. We applied DNA- and RNA-sequencing to characterize tumors from 307 breast cancer patients with replication in up to 739 patients. We developed models to predict status of routine biomarkers (ER, HER2,Ki-67, histological grade) from sequencing data. Non-routine biomarkers, including mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2 and ERBB2(HER2), and additional clinically actionable somatic alterations were also investigated. Concordance with routine diagnostic biomarkers was high for ER status (AUC = 0.95;AUC(replication) = 0.97) and HER2 status (AUC = 0.97;AUC(replication) = 0.92). The transcriptomic grade model enabled classification of histological grade 1 and histological grade 3 tumors with high accuracy (AUC = 0.98;AUC(replication) = 0.94). Clinically actionable mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2 and ERBB2(HER2) were detected in 5.5% of patients, while 53% had genomic alterations matching ongoing or concluded breast cancer studies. Sequencing-based molecular profiling can be applied as an alternative to histopathology to determine ER and HER2 status, in addition to providing improved tumor grading and clinically actionable mutations and molecular subtypes. Our results suggest that sequencing-based breast cancer diagnostics in a near future can replace routine biomarkers.

  11. Practical issues in implementing whole-genome-sequencing in routine diagnostic microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossen, J W A; Friedrich, A W; Moran-Gilad, J

    2018-04-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) is increasingly being used in clinical microbiology. Like every new technology adopted in microbiology, the integration of NGS into clinical and routine workflows must be carefully managed. To review the practical aspects of implementing bacterial whole genome sequencing (WGS) in routine diagnostic laboratories. Review of the literature and expert opinion. In this review, we discuss when and how to integrate whole genome sequencing (WGS) in the routine workflow of the clinical laboratory. In addition, as the microbiology laboratories have to adhere to various national and international regulations and criteria for their accreditation, we deliberate on quality control issues for using WGS in microbiology, including the importance of proficiency testing. Furthermore, the current and future place of this technology in the diagnostic hierarchy of microbiology is described as well as the necessity of maintaining backwards compatibility with already established methods. Finally, we speculate on the question of whether WGS can entirely replace routine microbiology in the future and the tension between the fact that most sequencers are designed to process multiple samples in parallel whereas for optimal diagnosis a one-by-one processing of the samples is preferred. Special reference is made to the cost and turnaround time of WGS in diagnostic laboratories. Further development is required to improve the workflow for WGS, in particular to shorten the turnaround time, reduce costs, and streamline downstream data analyses. Only when these processes reach maturity will reliance on WGS for routine patient management and infection control management become feasible, enabling the transformation of clinical microbiology into a genome-based and personalized diagnostic field. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Implementation of TMA and digitalization in routine diagnostics of breast pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossing, Henrik Holm; Talman, Maj-Lis; Laenkholm, Anne-Vibeke

    2012-01-01

    To ensure optimal treatment of breast cancer patients, breast tumours are classified based on clinico-pathological features. As part of this process, routine diagnostics of breast tumours includes histological typing and grading, as well as profiling by use of an immunohistochemistry panel...... of antibodies, probes and in situ hybridization. This will, as a minimum, include assessment of oestrogen receptor (OR) and HER2. The individual preparation and staining of many breast tumours in a large laboratory with this standard panel is thus time consuming and costly. Herein, we show that in breast cancer...... routine diagnostics the use of the tissue microarray technique in combination with digitalization of the stained multi-slides is not only economical, with a considerable cost reduction, but it also enhances standardization of tumour profiling. We demonstrate that 2 mm breast tumour cores correlate...

  13. Diagnostic value of radionuclide imaging combined with routine CT in detecting hepatic focal nodular hyperplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xuemin; Yu Shuhong; Han Jiankui

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate radionuclide imaging and routine CT in diagnosing hepatic focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) and the combined diagnostic value of the two modalities. Methods: Thirty-two patients with hepatic FNH were retrospectively studied. All patients underwent routine CT scan. Twenty-four patients were examined by 99 Tc m -sulfur colloid (SC) hepatic planar scintigraphy and SPECT/CT imaging, and then patients who had abnormal foci underwent 99 Tc m -diethyl iminodiacetic acid (EHIDA) triple-phase hepatobiliary imaging. χ 2 -test of four-table or Fisher exact probabilities in 2 × 2 table was applied for statistical analysis. Results: Of all 32 patients pathologically diagnosed as FNH with single solitary nodule, 25 were classified as classic type and the rest 7 as non-classic type. Although routine CT found all hepatic lesions, only 15 cases were diagnosed pathologically as FNH classic type but the rest were either misdiagnosed or left as indeterminate. On radionuclide imaging (hepatic colloid scintigraphy plus triple-phase hepatobiliary images), 11 patients with big foci (with maximal diameter >3 cm) out of 24 patients were correctly diagnosed as FNH, with 7 diagnosed as classic type FNH and 4 as non-classic. Other 13 patients were either misdiagnosed or simply missed. The diagnosing rates of routine CT and radionuclide imaging were 60.0% (15/25) and 38.9% (7/18) for FNH classic type, 0/7 and 4/6 for non-classic type, 50.0% (10/20) and 73.3% (11/15) for big foci, 41.7% (5/12) and 0/9 for small foci (with maximal diameter ≤3 cm), respectively. The total diagnosing rate of radionuclide imaging combined with routine CT was significantly higher than that of routine CT or radionuclide imaging alone (χ 2 =4.48, P<0.05; χ 2 =4.27, P<0.05). Conclusion: Radionuclide imaging in combination with routine CT may improve the diagnostic accuracy for hepatic FNH patients. (authors)

  14. A clinical perspective on the 2016 WHO brain tumor classification and routine molecular diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bent, Martin J; Weller, Michael; Wen, Patrick Y; Kros, Johan M; Aldape, Ken; Chang, Susan

    2017-05-01

    The 2007 World Health Organization (WHO) classification of brain tumors did not use molecular abnormalities as diagnostic criteria. Studies have shown that genotyping allows a better prognostic classification of diffuse glioma with improved treatment selection. This has resulted in a major revision of the WHO classification, which is now for adult diffuse glioma centered around isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) and 1p/19q diagnostics. This revised classification is reviewed with a focus on adult brain tumors, and includes a recommendation of genes of which routine testing is clinically useful. Apart from assessment of IDH mutational status including sequencing of R132H-immunohistochemistry negative cases and testing for 1p/19q, several other markers can be considered for routine testing, including assessment of copy number alterations of chromosome 7 and 10 and of TERT promoter, BRAF, and H3F3A mutations. For "glioblastoma, IDH mutated" the term "astrocytoma grade IV" could be considered. It should be considered to treat IDH wild-type grades II and III diffuse glioma with polysomy of chromosome 7 and loss of 10q as glioblastoma. New developments must be more quickly translated into further revised diagnostic categories. Quality control and rapid integration of molecular findings into the final diagnosis and the communication of the final diagnosis to clinicians require systematic attention. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Implementation of TMA and digitalization in routine diagnostics of breast pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossing, Henrik Holm; Talman, Maj-Lis Møller; Laenkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Wielenga, Vera Timmermans

    2012-04-01

    To ensure optimal treatment of breast cancer patients, breast tumours are classified based on clinico-pathological features. As part of this process, routine diagnostics of breast tumours includes histological typing and grading, as well as profiling by use of an immunohistochemistry panel of antibodies, probes and in situ hybridization. This will, as a minimum, include assessment of oestrogen receptor (OR) and HER2. The individual preparation and staining of many breast tumours in a large laboratory with this standard panel is thus time consuming and costly. Herein, we show that in breast cancer routine diagnostics the use of the tissue microarray technique in combination with digitalization of the stained multi-slides is not only economical, with a considerable cost reduction, but it also enhances standardization of tumour profiling. We demonstrate that 2 mm breast tumour cores correlate with the corresponding tumour on whole mount slides, regarding staining/hybridizing results with the biomarkers in our panel consisting of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, OR and Topiomerase IIa. Furthermore, we show that simultaneous staining/hybridizing of multiple breast tumour specimens reduces variation of staining/hybridizing quality, hereby increasing reliability of interpretation. By scanning and digitalization of the stained and hybridized multi-slides, we could optimize documentation and filing of the results. Our work is an example of translational research by implementing a tool in daily diagnostics originally developed for high throughput analyses in the search for prognostic and predictive markers in targeted medicine. © 2012 The Authors APMIS © 2012 APMIS.

  16. How characteristic routines of clinical departments influence students' self-regulated learning : A grounded theory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, J J; Slootweg, I. A.; Helmich, Esther; Teunissen, P W; van der Vleuten, C. P. M.; Jaarsma, A. D. C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: In clerkships, students are expected to self-regulate their learning. How clinical departments and their routine approach on clerkships influences students' self-regulated learning (SRL) is unknown.Aim: This study explores how characteristic routines of clinical departments influence

  17. Diagnostic impact of routine Lyme serology in recent-onset arthritis: results from the ESPOIR cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guellec, Dewi; Narbonne, Valérie; Cornec, Divi; Marhadour, Thierry; Varache, Sophie; Dougados, Maxime; Daurès, Jean Pierre; Jousse-Joulin, Sandrine; Devauchelle-Pensec, Valérie; Saraux, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Lyme disease may be considered by rheumatologists in patients with recent-onset arthritis, even in the absence of suggestive symptoms. The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic impact of routine Lyme serology in a French cohort of patients with recent-onset arthritis affecting at least 2 joints. Methods We performed an ancillary study of a French prospective multicentre cohort established to monitor clinical, biological and radiographic data in patients with inflammatory arthritis in at least 2 joints, lasting for 6 weeks to 6 months. Borrelia IgM and IgG antibodies were sought routinely at baseline, using ELISA tests, independently from the physician's strategy for detecting a spirochetal infection. We recorded the proportion of patients with a final diagnosis of Lyme arthritis and evaluated the diagnostic performance of Lyme serology in this particular context. The clinical and biological characteristics of patients according to the Lyme serology results were analysed. Results Of 810 patients, 657 (81.1%) were negative for IgM and IgG antibodies, 91 (11.2%) had only IgM antibodies, 49 (6%) had only IgG antibodies, and 13 (1.6%) had IgG and IgM antibodies. Thus, 7.6% had IgG positivity, consistent with exposure to Borrelia infection. IgG positivity was significantly more prevalent in the North and North-East regions of France (χ2=14.6, pLyme arthritis. Conclusions This study does not support routine Lyme serological testing in patients with recent-onset inflammatory arthritis affecting more than 1 joint. PMID:26819751

  18. Diagnostic outcome following routine genetics clinic referral for the assessment of global developmental delay.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shahdadpuri, R

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the diagnostic yield following a routine genetics clinic referral for the assessment of global developmental delay. Detailed retrospective review of 119 complete consecutive case notes of patients referred to one single clinical geneticist over a 14 month time period was undertaken (n = 119; 54 males, 65 females). The age at initial review ranged from 2 months to 37 years 3 months (mean 8 y 3 mo [SD 7 y 10 mo]). We made a diagnosis in 36\\/119 (30%); 21\\/36 were new diagnoses and 15\\/36 were confirmations of diagnoses. We removed a wrong diagnostic label in 8\\/119 (7%). In 3\\/8 we were able to achieve a diagnosis but in 5\\/8 no alternative diagnosis was reached. We had a better diagnostic rate where the patients were dysmorphic (odds ratio [OR] 1.825; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.065 to 3.128, p = 0.044). In the majority, the diagnosis was made by clinical examination only. Molecular diagnosis was reached in seven cases. Five cases were confirmed by cytogenetic analysis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a diagnosis in three cases. This study confirms the importance of a clinical genetics assessment in the investigation of global developmental delay.

  19. Self-adapted thermocouple-diagnostic complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, S.V.; Grankovskij, K.Eh.; Olejnikov, P.P.; Prijmak, S.V.; Shikalov, V.F.

    2003-01-01

    A self-adapted thermocouple-diagnostic complex (STDC) for obtaining the reliable data on the coolant temperature in the reactors of NPP is described. The STDC in based on the thermal pulse monitoring of a thermocouple in the measuring channel of a reactor. Measurement method and STDC composition are substantiated. It is shown that introduction of the developed STDC ensures realization of precise and reliable temperature monitoring in the reactors of all types [ru

  20. Unrequested information from routine diagnostic chest CT predicts future cardiovascular events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, Peter C.; Gondrie, Martijn J.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Graaf, Yolanda van der; Mali, Willem P.; Oen, Ayke L.; Prokop, Mathias

    2011-01-01

    An increase in the number of CT investigations will likely result in a an increase in unrequested information. Clinical relevance of these findings is unknown. This is the first follow-up study to investigate the prognostic relevance of subclinical coronary (CAC) and aortic calcification (TAC) as contained in routine diagnostic chest CT in a clinical care population. The follow-up of 10,410 subjects (>40 years) from a multicentre, clinical care-based cohort of patients included 240 fatal to 275 non-fatal cardiovascular disease (CVD) events (mean follow-up 17.8 months). Patients with a history of CVD were excluded. Coronary (0-12) and aortic calcification (0-8) were semi-quantitatively scored. We used Cox proportional-hazard models to compute hazard ratios to predict CVD events. CAC and TAC were significantly and independently predictive of CVD events. Compared with subjects with no calcium, the adjusted risk of a CVD event was 3.7 times higher (95% CI, 2.7-5.2) among patients with severe coronary calcification (CAC score ≥6) and 2.7 times higher (95% CI, 2.0-3.7) among patients with severe aortic calcification (TAC score ≥5). Subclinical vascular calcification on CT is a strong predictor of incident CVD events in a routine clinical care population. (orig.)

  1. Virtual microscopy: an evaluation of its validity and diagnostic performance in routine histologic diagnosis of skin tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Patricia Switten; Lindebjerg, Jan; Rasmussen, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Digitization of histologic slides is associated with many advantages, and its use in routine diagnosis holds great promise. Nevertheless, few articles evaluate virtual microscopy in routine settings. This study is an evaluation of the validity and diagnostic performance of virtual microscopy...... in routine histologic diagnosis of skin tumors. Our aim is to investigate whether conventional microscopy of skin tumors can be replaced by virtual microscopy. Ninety-six skin tumors and skin-tumor-like changes were consecutively gathered over a 1-week period. Specimens were routinely processed, and digital...... slides were captured on Mirax Scan (Carl Zeiss MicroImaging, Göttingen, Germany). Four pathologists evaluated the 96 virtual slides and the associated 96 conventional slides twice with intermediate time intervals of at least 3 weeks. Virtual slides that caused difficulties were reevaluated to identify...

  2. The potential of high resolution melting analysis (hrma) to streamline, facilitate and enrich routine diagnostics in medical microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruskova, Lenka; Raclavsky, Vladislav

    2011-09-01

    Routine medical microbiology diagnostics relies on conventional cultivation followed by phenotypic techniques for identification of pathogenic bacteria and fungi. This is not only due to tradition and economy but also because it provides pure culture needed for antibiotic susceptibility testing. This review focuses on the potential of High Resolution Melting Analysis (HRMA) of double-stranded DNA for future routine medical microbiology. Search of MEDLINE database for publications showing the advantages of HRMA in routine medical microbiology for identification, strain typing and further characterization of pathogenic bacteria and fungi in particular. The results show increasing numbers of newly-developed and more tailor-made assays in this field. For microbiologists unfamiliar with technical aspects of HRMA, we also provide insight into the technique from the perspective of microbial characterization. We can anticipate that the routine availability of HRMA in medical microbiology laboratories will provide a strong stimulus to this field. This is already envisioned by the growing number of medical microbiology applications published recently. The speed, power, convenience and cost effectiveness of this technology virtually predestine that it will advance genetic characterization of microbes and streamline, facilitate and enrich diagnostics in routine medical microbiology without interfering with the proven advantages of conventional cultivation.

  3. Child Routines and Self-Regulation Serially Mediate Parenting Practices and Externalizing Problems in Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bater, Lovina Rose; Jordan, Sara Sytsma

    2017-01-01

    Background: Studies clearly indicate that parenting practices relate to child externalizing behaviors, although the mechanisms underlying this relation are less well understood. There has been limited evaluation of child routines and self-regulation in relation to these variables, and no known studies have evaluated all of these variables…

  4. A Self-Diagnostic System for the M6 Accelerometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Patrick M.; Lekki, John

    2001-01-01

    The design of a Self-Diagnostic (SD) accelerometer system for the Space Shuttle Main Engine is presented. This retrofit system connects diagnostic electronic hardware and software to the current M6 accelerometer system. This paper discusses the general operation of the M6 accelerometer SD system and procedures for developing and evaluating the SD system. Signal processing techniques using M6 accelerometer diagnostic data are explained. Test results include diagnostic data responding to changing ambient temperature, mounting torque and base mounting impedance.

  5. Performance of a real-time PCR assay in routine bovine mastitis diagnostics compared with in-depth conventional culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiitiö, Heidi; Riva, Rauna; Autio, Tiina; Pohjanvirta, Tarja; Holopainen, Jani; Pyörälä, Satu; Pelkonen, Sinikka

    2015-05-01

    Reliable identification of the aetiological agent is crucial in mastitis diagnostics. Real-time PCR is a fast, automated tool for detecting the most common udder pathogens directly from milk. In this study aseptically taken quarter milk samples were analysed with a real-time PCR assay (Thermo Scientific PathoProof Mastitis Complete-12 Kit, Thermo Fisher Scientific Ltd.) and by semi-quantitative, in-depth bacteriological culture (BC). The aim of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the real-time PCR assay in routine use. A total of 294 quarter milk samples from routine mastitis cases were cultured in the national reference laboratory of Finland and examined with real-time PCR. With BC, 251 out of 294 (85.7%) of the milk samples had at least one colony on the plate and 38 samples were considered contaminated. In the PCR mastitis assay, DNA of target species was amplified in 244 samples out of 294 (83.0%). The most common bacterial species detected in the samples, irrespective of the diagnostic method, was the coagulase negative staphylococci (CNS) group (later referred as Staphylococcus spp.) followed by Staphylococcus aureus. Sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) for the PCR assay to provide a positive Staph. aureus result was 97.0 and 95.8% compared with BC. For Staphylococcus spp., the corresponding figures were 86.7 and 75.4%. Our results imply that PCR performed well as a diagnostic tool to detect Staph. aureus but may be too nonspecific for Staphylococcus spp. in routine use with the current cut-off Ct value (37.0). Using PCR as the only microbiological method for mastitis diagnostics, clinical relevance of the results should be carefully considered before further decisions, for instance antimicrobial treatment, especially when minor pathogens with low amount of DNA have been detected. Introducing the concept of contaminated samples should also be considered.

  6. SU-E-P-10: Establishment of Local Diagnostic Reference Levels of Routine Exam in Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, M; Wang, Y; Weng, H

    2015-01-01

    Introduction National diagnostic reference levels (NDRLs) can be used as a reference dose of radiological examination can provide radiation dose as the basis of patient dose optimization. Local diagnostic reference levels (LDRLs) by periodically view and check doses, more efficiency to improve the way of examination. Therefore, the important first step is establishing a diagnostic reference level. Computed Tomography in Taiwan had been built up the radiation dose limit value,in addition, many studies report shows that CT scan contributed most of the radiation dose in different medical. Therefore, this study was mainly to let everyone understand DRL’s international status. For computed tomography in our hospital to establish diagnostic reference levels. Methods and Materials: There are two clinical CT scanners (a Toshiba Aquilion and a Siemens Sensation) were performed in this study. For CT examinations the basic recommended dosimetric quantity is the Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI). Each exam each different body part, we collect 10 patients at least. Carried out the routine examinations, and all exposure parameters have been collected and the corresponding CTDIv and DLP values have been determined. Results: The majority of patients (75%) were between 60–70 Kg of body weight. There are 25 examinations in this study. Table 1 shows the LDRL of each CT routine examination. Conclusions: Therefore, this study would like to let everyone know DRL’s international status, but also establishment of computed tomography of the local reference levels for our hospital, and providing radiation reference, as a basis for optimizing patient dose

  7. SU-E-P-10: Establishment of Local Diagnostic Reference Levels of Routine Exam in Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, M; Wang, Y; Weng, H [Chiayi Chang Gung Memorial Hospital of The C.G.M.F, Puzi City, Chiayi County, Taiwan (China)

    2015-06-15

    Introduction National diagnostic reference levels (NDRLs) can be used as a reference dose of radiological examination can provide radiation dose as the basis of patient dose optimization. Local diagnostic reference levels (LDRLs) by periodically view and check doses, more efficiency to improve the way of examination. Therefore, the important first step is establishing a diagnostic reference level. Computed Tomography in Taiwan had been built up the radiation dose limit value,in addition, many studies report shows that CT scan contributed most of the radiation dose in different medical. Therefore, this study was mainly to let everyone understand DRL’s international status. For computed tomography in our hospital to establish diagnostic reference levels. Methods and Materials: There are two clinical CT scanners (a Toshiba Aquilion and a Siemens Sensation) were performed in this study. For CT examinations the basic recommended dosimetric quantity is the Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI). Each exam each different body part, we collect 10 patients at least. Carried out the routine examinations, and all exposure parameters have been collected and the corresponding CTDIv and DLP values have been determined. Results: The majority of patients (75%) were between 60–70 Kg of body weight. There are 25 examinations in this study. Table 1 shows the LDRL of each CT routine examination. Conclusions: Therefore, this study would like to let everyone know DRL’s international status, but also establishment of computed tomography of the local reference levels for our hospital, and providing radiation reference, as a basis for optimizing patient dose.

  8. Routine ventilation scans in children with cystic fibrosis: diagnostic usefulness and prognostic value

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaffe, A.; Hamutcu, R.; Adler, B.; Rosenthal, M.; Bush, A. [Dept. of Respiratory Paediatrics, Royal Brompton and Harefield, London (United Kingdom); Dhawan, R.T. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Royal Brompton and Harefield, London (United Kingdom)

    2001-09-01

    Krypton ventilation scans (VS) provide an index of peripheral lung function, and may be particularly useful in children unable to perform pulmonary function testing. This communication reports on three linked studies which investigated whether a routine VS in young children with cystic fibrosis (CF) is diagnostically or prognostically useful. Study 1: In a preliminary study in 1991, VS were compared with clinical examination and chest radiography (CXR) in 50 CF children (29 females, 21 males) aged 0.4-5.2 years (median 2.2 years). The chest was divided into six zones, and abnormalities scored from 0 (normal) to 2 (very abnormal). Clinical examination was unhelpful in predicting abnormalities on imaging. In five children (10%) with a normal CXR, VS was abnormal, and in a further eight children (16%), CXR markedly underestimated VS changes. Study 2: In order to determine the long-term prognostic significance of VS abnormalities, we followed up 27 (19 females, 8 males) of the children from study 1, who had had their first VS at presentation at median age 1.6 years (range 0.4-5.2), scoring the same six zones from 0 to 2. Follow-up was for a mean of 11.6 years (range 7.8-14.8). Spirometry at age 7 years showed a mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV{sub 1}) of 96% (range 46%-145%) and a mean forced vital capacity (FVC) of 96% (range 46%-145%). A poor VS score at presentation was correlated with percent predicted FEV{sub 1} at age 7 (r=0.4, P=0.042, 16% of variance explained). Those with a normal VS at presentation had a mean FEV{sub 1} at presentation of 99% (range 80%-129%). Whereas four patients had an abnormal VS, a normal CXR and a low FEV{sub 1} at age 7 years, no patient had a normal VS, an abnormal CXR and a low FEV{sub 1}at age 7 years. Study 3: Fifty children (29 females, 21 males) aged 0.5-6.0 years (median 3.8) were prospectively studied in 1998, to determine whether the findings in study 1 were stable over time, and to assess whether VS altered clinical

  9. Clinical outcomes and cost effectiveness of accelerated diagnostic protocol in a chest pain center compared with routine care of patients with chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Elad; Reuveni, Haim; Shlomo, Nir; Gerber, Yariv; Beigel, Roy; Narodetski, Michael; Eldar, Michael; Or, Jacob; Hod, Hanoch; Shamiss, Arie; Matetzky, Shlomi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare in patients presenting with acute chest pain the clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness of an accelerated diagnostic protocol utilizing contemporary technology in a chest pain unit versus routine care in an internal medicine department. Hospital and 90-day course were prospectively studied in 585 consecutive low-moderate risk acute chest pain patients, of whom 304 were investigated in a designated chest pain center using a pre-specified accelerated diagnostic protocol, while 281 underwent routine care in an internal medicine ward. Hospitalization was longer in the routine care compared with the accelerated diagnostic protocol group (pdiagnostic protocol patients (98%) vs. 57 (20%) routine care patients underwent non-invasive testing, (pdiagnostic imaging testing was performed in 125 (44%) and 26 (9%) patients in the routine care and accelerated diagnostic protocol patients, respectively (pdiagnostic protocol patients compared with those receiving routine care was associated with a lower incidence of readmissions for chest pain [8 (3%) vs. 24 (9%), pdiagnostic protocol remained a predictor of lower acute coronary syndromes and readmissions after propensity score analysis [OR = 0.28 (CI 95% 0.14-0.59)]. Cost per patient was similar in both groups [($2510 vs. $2703 for the accelerated diagnostic protocol and routine care group, respectively, (p = 0.9)]. An accelerated diagnostic protocol is clinically superior and as cost effective as routine in acute chest pain patients, and may save time and resources.

  10. Practical Issues in Implementing Whole-Genome-Sequencing in Routine Diagnostic Microbiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, John W A; Friedrich, Alexander W; Moran-Gilad, Jacob

    BACKGROUND: next generation sequencing (NGS) is increasingly being used in clinical microbiology. Like every new technology that is being adopted in microbiology, the integration of NGS into clinical and routine workflows needs to be carefully managed. AIM: to review the practical aspects of

  11. The Diagnostic Value of Routine Contrast Esophagram in Anastomotic Leaks After Esophagectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhongwu; Wang, Xiaowe; An, Xush; Li, Wenjin; Feng, Yun; You, Zhenbing

    2017-08-01

    Routine contrast esophagram has been shown to be increasingly limited in diagnosing anastomotic leaks after esophagectomy. Patients undergoing esophagectomy from 2013 to 2014 at Huai'an First Peoples' Hospital were identified. We retrospectively analyzed patients who underwent routine contrast esophagram on postoperative day 7 (range 6-10) to preclude anastomotic leaks after esophagectomy. In 846 patients who underwent esophagectomy, a cervical anastomosis was performed in 286 patients and an intrathoracic anastomosis in 560 patients. There were 57 (6.73%) cases with anastomotic leaks, including cervical leaks in 36 and intrathoracic leaks in 21 patients. In the cervical anastomotic leak patients, 13 were diagnosed by early local clinical symptoms and 23 underwent routine contrast esophagram. There were 7 (30.4%) true-positive, 11 (47.8%) false-negative, and five (21.8%) equivocal cases. In the intrathoracic anastomotic leak patients, four (19%) were diagnosed by clinical symptoms, 16 (76.2%) were true positives, and one (4.8%) was a false negative. Aspiration occurred in five patients with cervical anastomoses and in eight patients with intrathoracic anastomoses; aspiration pneumonitis did not occur in these cases. Gastrografin and barium are safe contrast agents to use in post-esophagectomy contrast esophagram. Because of the low sensitivity in detecting cervical anastomotic leaks, routine contrast esophagram is not advised. For patients with intrathoracic anastomoses, it is still an effective method for detecting anastomotic leaks.

  12. Practical issues in implementing whole-genome-sequencing in routine diagnostic microbiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, J. W. A.; Friedrich, A. W.; Moran-Gilad, J.

    Background: Next generation sequencing (NGS) is increasingly being used in clinical microbiology. Like every new technology adopted in microbiology, the integration of NGS into clinical and routine workflows must be carefully managed. Aim: To review the practical aspects of implementing bacterial

  13. Are self-report scales as effective as clinician rating scales in measuring treatment response in routine clinical practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Mark; Walsh, Emily; Friedman, Michael; Boerescu, Daniela A; Attiullah, Naureen

    2018-01-01

    Recent treatment guidelines have suggested that outcome should be measured in routine clinical practice. In the present report from the Rhode Island Methods to Improve Diagnostic Assessment and Services (MIDAS) project, we compared three self-report scales of depressive symptoms and the two most widely used clinician administered scales in treatment studies in their sensitivity to change and evaluation of treatment response in depressed patients treated in routine practice. At baseline and 4-month follow-up 153 depressed outpatients with DSM-IV MDD completed the Clinically Useful Depression Outcome Scale (CUDOS), Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self-report version (QIDS-SR), and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). The patients were rated on the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) and the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). On each scale treatment response was defined as a 50% or greater reduction in scores from baseline. While there were some differences in the percentage of patients considered to be responders on the different scales, a large effect size was found for each scale, with little variability amongst the scales. The level of agreement between the three self-report scales and the clinician rating scales was approximately the same LIMITATIONS: The present study was conducted in a single clinical practice in which the majority of the patients were white, female, and had health insurance. When measuring outcome in clinical practice the magnitude of change in depressive symptoms is as great on self-report scales as on clinician rating scales. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. How characteristic routines of clinical departments influence students' self-regulated learning: A grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkhout, J J; Slootweg, I A; Helmich, E; Teunissen, P W; van der Vleuten, C P M; Jaarsma, A D C

    2017-11-01

    In clerkships, students are expected to self-regulate their learning. How clinical departments and their routine approach on clerkships influences students' self-regulated learning (SRL) is unknown. This study explores how characteristic routines of clinical departments influence medical students' SRL. Six focus groups including 39 purposively sampled participants from one Dutch university were organized to study how characteristic routines of clinical departments influenced medical students' SRL from a constructivist paradigm, using grounded theory methodology. The focus groups were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim and were analyzed iteratively using constant comparison and open, axial and interpretive coding. Students described that clinical departments influenced their SRL through routines which affected the professional relationships they could engage in and affected their perception of a department's invested effort in them. Students' SRL in a clerkship can be supported by enabling them to engage others in their SRL and by having them feel that effort is invested in their learning. Our study gives a practical insight in how clinical departments influenced students' SRL. Clinical departments can affect students' motivation to engage in SRL, influence the variety of SRL strategies that students can use and how meaningful students perceive their SRL experiences to be.

  15. An oligonucleotide-tagged microarray for routine diagnostics of colon cancer by genotyping KRAS mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yuliang; Guðnason, Haukur; Li, Yiping

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most prevalent types of cancer, causing significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. CRC is curable if diagnosed at an early stage. Mutations in the oncogene KRAS play a critical role in early development of CRC. Detection of activated KRAS is of diagnostic...

  16. Radiation Measurement And Risk Estimation For Pediatric Patients During Routine Diagnostic Examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushra, E.; Sulieman, A.; Osman, H.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to evaluate Entrance Surface Dose (ESD) to the patient using Thermo luminescence dosimeters (TLD) during some common routine pediatrics X-ray examinations in main pediatrics hospitals in Sudan. ESD and Effective Dose (E) for pediatrics have been carried out for 250 patients undergoing five different examinations. The mean ESD ranged for neonates ranged between 0.17 mGy-0.30 mGy per radiograph with scattered thyroid dose 0.01 to 0.19 mGy. The risk of radiation induced cancer of was 0.13 x 10-6.

  17. Proton (1H) MR spectroscopy for routine diagnostic evaluation of brain lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burtscher, I.M.; Holtaas, S.; Staahlberg, F.; Univ. Hospital, Lund

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the introduction and performance of proton MR spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS) in the daily routine of a modern standard MR unit. Material and Methods: Over an 8-month period, 52 patients with brain lesions were studied with 1 H-MRS, using SE and STEAM sequences for chemical-shift imaging and single-volume spectroscopy. The quality of the spectra was graded from 1 (best) to 3, and the main factors influencing the quality of the spectra were evaluated. Results: Of the measurements: 85% were graded as 1; 12% as 2; and 3% as 3. The main reasons for poor spectral quality were: the unfortunate positioning of the VOI; hemorrhage; and/or postoperative changes within the VOI. Of 40 patients with a final diagnosis: MRS provided an increased confidence in MR diagnosis in 18 cases; MRS contributed significantly to preoperative diagnosis in 3 cases; and the spectra were not specific (n=10) or were difficult to evaluate (n=9) owing to reduced quality (grade 2 or 3) in 19 cases. Conclusion: MRS of the brain can provide a high percentage of interpretable spectra and frequently can increase confidence in the MR diagnosis of brain lesions in clinical routine. (orig.)

  18. Rapid targeted somatic mutation analysis of solid tumors in routine clinical diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magliacane, Gilda; Grassini, Greta; Bartocci, Paola; Francaviglia, Ilaria; Dal Cin, Elena; Barbieri, Gianluca; Arrigoni, Gianluigi; Pecciarini, Lorenza; Doglioni, Claudio; Cangi, Maria Giulia

    2015-10-13

    Tumor genotyping is an essential step in routine clinical practice and pathology laboratories face a major challenge in being able to provide rapid, sensitive and updated molecular tests. We developed a novel mass spectrometry multiplexed genotyping platform named PentaPanel to concurrently assess single nucleotide polymorphisms in 56 hotspots of the 5 most clinically relevant cancer genes, KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, EGFR and PIK3CA for a total of 221 detectable mutations. To both evaluate and validate the PentaPanel performance, we investigated 1025 tumor specimens of 6 different cancer types (carcinomas of colon, lung, breast, pancreas, and biliary tract, and melanomas), systematically addressing sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of our platform. Sanger sequencing was also performed for all the study samples. Our data showed that PentaPanel is a high throughput and robust tool, allowing genotyping for targeted therapy selection of 10 patients in the same run, with a practical turnaround time of 2 working days. Importantly, it was successfully used to interrogate different DNAs isolated from routinely processed specimens (formalin-fixed paraffin embedded, frozen, and cytological samples), covering all the requirements of clinical tests. In conclusion, the PentaPanel platform can provide an immediate, accurate and cost effective multiplex approach for clinically relevant gene mutation analysis in many solid tumors and its utility across many diseases can be particularly relevant in multiple clinical trials, including the new basket trial approach, aiming to identify appropriate targeted drug combination strategies.

  19. Diagnostic issues in self-mutilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favazza, A R; Rosenthal, R J

    1993-02-01

    Pathological self-mutilation--the deliberate alteration or destruction of body tissue without conscious suicidal intent--was examined both as a symptom of mental disorders and as a distinct syndrome. Data from more than 250 articles and books were reviewed, as well as data obtained by the authors from their extensive clinical experience in treating self-mutilating patients. The diverse behaviors that constitute pathological self-mutilation can be categorized into three basic types: major--infrequent acts that result in significant tissue damage, usually associated with psychoses and acute intoxications; stereotypic--fixed, rhythmic behavior seemingly devoid of symbolism, commonly associated with mental retardation; and superficial or moderate--behavior such as skin cutting, burning, and scratching associated with a variety of mental disorders. The authors propose that a syndrome of repetitive superficial or moderate self-mutilation should be regarded as an axis I impulse disorder. In most cases, the syndrome coexists with character pathology.

  20. A new generation of cancer genome diagnostics for routine clinical use: overcoming the roadblocks to personalized cancer medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuckmann, J M; Thomas, R K

    2015-09-01

    The identification of 'druggable' kinase gene alterations has revolutionized cancer treatment in the last decade by providing new and successfully targetable drug targets. Thus, genotyping tumors for matching the right patients with the right drugs have become a clinical routine. Today, advances in sequencing technology and computational genome analyses enable the discovery of a constantly growing number of genome alterations relevant for clinical decision making. As a consequence, several technological approaches have emerged in order to deal with these rapidly increasing demands for clinical cancer genome analyses. Here, we describe challenges on the path to the broad introduction of diagnostic cancer genome analyses and the technologies that can be applied to overcome them. We define three generations of molecular diagnostics that are in clinical use. The latest generation of these approaches involves deep and thus, highly sensitive sequencing of all therapeutically relevant types of genome alterations-mutations, copy number alterations and rearrangements/fusions-in a single assay. Such approaches therefore have substantial advantages (less time and less tissue required) over PCR-based methods that typically have to be combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization for detection of gene amplifications and fusions. Since these new technologies work reliably on routine diagnostic formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens, they can help expedite the broad introduction of personalized cancer therapy into the clinic by providing comprehensive, sensitive and accurate cancer genome diagnoses in 'real-time'. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Description, operation, and diagnostic routines for the adaptive intrusion data system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corlis, N.E.; Johnson, C.S.

    1978-03-01

    An Adaptive Intrusion Data System (AIDS) was developed to collect data from intrusion alarm sensors as part of an evaluation system to improve sensor performance. AIDS is a unique digital data compression, storage, and formatting system. It also incorporates a capability for video selection and recording for assessment of the sensors monitored by the system. The system is software reprogrammable to numerous configurations that may be utilized for the collection of environmental, bi-metal, analog, and video data. This manual covers the procedures for operating AIDS. Instructions are given to guide the operator in software programming and control option selections required to program AIDS for data collection. Software diagnostic programs are included in this manual as a method of isolating system problems

  2. System for routine testing of self-contained and airline breathing equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDermott, H.J.; Hermens, G.A.

    1980-07-01

    A system for routine testing of self-contained and airline breathing equipment, developed by Shell Oil Co., for testing breathing equipment at one of its refineries, consists of an 80 psig air supply for airline respirators; a 500-2100 psig air supply for self-contained units; a regulator test system which uses a mannequin head that simulates human inhalation and which tests the ability of the regulator to keep the mask interior at the correct positive pressure; and an exhalation valve test system which identifies a leaky or sticking valve. The testing system has been in use for about 30 mo and has led to increased acceptance of respiratory protective equipment by workers.

  3. AN EXPLANATION OF THE CYBERCRIME VICTIMISATION: SELF-CONTROL AND LIFESTILE/ROUTINE ACTIVITY THEORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Ilievski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the current paper is to examine the causes of cybercrime victimisation, to highlight limitations of the existing cybercrime victimisation etiological studies and provide guidance for further research. The general findings are reported on the basis of a review of previous empirical studies. In addition to minor deficiencies, elements of self-control and lifestyle/routine activity theory together can be applied to the study of cybercrime victimisation. On the basis of the review of existing research, six main conclusions have been drawn. The limitation of the current research is that examines only the causes of cybercrime victimisation through the application of self-control and lifestyle/routine activity theory as the most useful for this purpose. Future research should take into account all the conclusions discussed in the paper and test new or other existing victimological theories for the purpose of better explaining cybercrime victimisation. This study contributes to improved etiological exploration of cybercrime victimisation and, consequently, to the creation of effective measures to prevent it.

  4. Is 123-J-heptadecanoic acid suitable for routine diagnostic myocardial imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, J.

    1984-01-01

    2 mCi of 123-I-HDA were injected with the patient reclining. Static images were obtained at 400.000 counts in the ap, 45 degree and 60 degree LAO and the left lateral projections. To reduce penetration effects a 400 KeV collimator was used. At 30 minutes p.i. images were repeated in the same sequence. After background correction and smoothing color print-outs were obtained. Counts rates were analyzed across myocardial areas with normal and reduced uptake and fatty acid retention and elimination were determined. Scintigraphic data were compared with measured results. In terms of the diagnostic information obtainable, early images are comparable to 201-T1 scans after stress exposure, but superior to 201-T1 scans at rest. 123-I-HDA retention images recorded at 30 minutes p.i. often correspond to T1-201 scans at rest. Ischemic areas usually show a more pronounced retention than well perfused areas. Findings are comparable with the socalled redistribution phenomenon on 201-T1 stress scanning. Data obtained are correlated with experimental results by others. 123-I-HDA has been found to be particularly usefule for patients unable to tolerate stress. Image quality was often superior to that on 201-T1 stress studies. The title question can, therefore, be answered in the affirmative. Patients did not complain of subjective side effects. A reproducible imaging technique and swift working during early phase imaging as essential. Generating parametric statistical images to detect normal and abnormal fatty acid turnover is our next goal. (Author)

  5. Difficult identification of Haemophilus influenzae, a typical cause of upper respiratory tract infections, in the microbiological diagnostic routine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Rebecca; Zautner, Andreas Erich; Hagen, Ralf Matthias; Frickmann, Hagen

    2015-03-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a key pathogen of upper respiratory tract infections. Its reliable discrimination from nonpathogenic Haemophilus spp. is necessary because merely colonizing bacteria are frequent at primarily unsterile sites. Due to close phylogenetic relationship, it is not easy to discriminate H. influenzae from the colonizer Haemophilus haemolyticus. The frequency of H. haemolyticus isolations depends on factors like sampling site, patient condition, and geographic region. Biochemical discrimination has been shown to be nonreliable. Multiplex PCR including marker genes like sodC, fucK, and hpd or sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, the P6 gene, or multilocus-sequence-typing is more promising. For the diagnostic routine, such techniques are too expensive and laborious. If available, matrix-assisted laser-desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry is a routine-compatible option and should be used in the first line. However, the used database should contain well-defined reference spectra, and the spectral difference between H. influenzae and H. haemolyticus is small. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization is an option for less well-equipped laboratories, but the available protocol will not lead to conclusive results in all instances. It can be used as a second line approach. Occasional ambiguous results have to be resolved by alternative molecular methods like 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

  6. Integration and acceleration of virtual microscopy as the key to successful implementation into the routine diagnostic process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienert, Stephan; Beil, Michael; Saeger, Kai; Hufnagl, Peter; Schrader, Thomas

    2009-01-09

    The virtual microscopy is widely accepted in Pathology for educational purposes and teleconsultation but is far from the routine use in surgical pathology due to the technical requirements and some limitations. A technical problem is the limited bandwidth of a usual network and the delayed transmission rate and presentation time on the screen. In this study the process of secondary diagnostic was evaluated using the "T.Konsult Pathologie" service of the Professional Association of German Pathologists within the German breast cancer screening program. The characteristics of the access to the WSI (Whole Slide Images) have been analyzed to explore the possibilities of prefetching and caching to reduce the presentation and transfer time with the goal to increase user acceptance. The log files of the web server were analyzed to reconstruct the movements of the pathologist on the WSI and to create the observation path. Using a specialized tool the observation paths were extracted automatically from the log files. The attributes linearity, 3-point-linearity, changes per request, and number of consecutive requests were calculated to design, develop and evaluate different caching and prefetching strategies. The analysis of the observation paths showed that a complete accordance of two image requests is a very rare event. But more frequently a partial covering of two requested image areas can be found. In total 257 diagnostic paths from 131 WSI have been extracted and analysed. On average a diagnostic path consists of 16 image requests and takes 189 seconds between first and last image request. The mean linearity was 0,41 and the mean 3-point-linearity 0,85. Three different caching algorithms have been compared with respect to hit rate and additional image requests on the WSI server. Tests demonstrated that 95% of the diagnostic paths could be loaded without any deletion of entries in the cache (cache size 12,2 Megapixel). If the image parts are stored after JPEG compression

  7. Integration and acceleration of virtual microscopy as the key to successful implementation into the routine diagnostic process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hufnagl Peter

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The virtual microscopy is widely accepted in Pathology for educational purposes and teleconsultation but is far from the routine use in surgical pathology due to the technical requirements and some limitations. A technical problem is the limited bandwidth of a usual network and the delayed transmission rate and presentation time on the screen. Methods In this study the process of secondary diagnostic was evaluated using the "T.Konsult Pathologie" service of the Professional Association of German Pathologists within the German breast cancer screening program. The characteristics of the access to the WSI (Whole Slide Images have been analyzed to explore the possibilities of prefetching and caching to reduce the presentation and transfer time with the goal to increase user acceptance. The log files of the web server were analyzed to reconstruct the movements of the pathologist on the WSI and to create the observation path. Using a specialized tool the observation paths were extracted automatically from the log files. The attributes linearity, 3-point-linearity, changes per request, and number of consecutive requests were calculated to design, develop and evaluate different caching and prefetching strategies. Results The analysis of the observation paths showed that a complete accordance of two image requests is a very rare event. But more frequently a partial covering of two requested image areas can be found. In total 257 diagnostic paths from 131 WSI have been extracted and analysed. On average a diagnostic path consists of 16 image requests and takes 189 seconds between first and last image request. The mean linearity was 0,41 and the mean 3-point-linearity 0,85. Three different caching algorithms have been compared with respect to hit rate and additional image requests on the WSI server. Tests demonstrated that 95% of the diagnostic paths could be loaded without any deletion of entries in the cache (cache size 12,2 Megapixel

  8. Comparison of Pre-Analytical FFPE Sample Preparation Methods and Their Impact on Massively Parallel Sequencing in Routine Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydt, Carina; Fassunke, Jana; Künstlinger, Helen; Ihle, Michaela Angelika; König, Katharina; Heukamp, Lukas Carl; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Odenthal, Margarete; Büttner, Reinhard; Merkelbach-Bruse, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Over the last years, massively parallel sequencing has rapidly evolved and has now transitioned into molecular pathology routine laboratories. It is an attractive platform for analysing multiple genes at the same time with very little input material. Therefore, the need for high quality DNA obtained from automated DNA extraction systems has increased, especially to those laboratories which are dealing with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) material and high sample throughput. This study evaluated five automated FFPE DNA extraction systems as well as five DNA quantification systems using the three most common techniques, UV spectrophotometry, fluorescent dye-based quantification and quantitative PCR, on 26 FFPE tissue samples. Additionally, the effects on downstream applications were analysed to find the most suitable pre-analytical methods for massively parallel sequencing in routine diagnostics. The results revealed that the Maxwell 16 from Promega (Mannheim, Germany) seems to be the superior system for DNA extraction from FFPE material. The extracts had a 1.3–24.6-fold higher DNA concentration in comparison to the other extraction systems, a higher quality and were most suitable for downstream applications. The comparison of the five quantification methods showed intermethod variations but all methods could be used to estimate the right amount for PCR amplification and for massively parallel sequencing. Interestingly, the best results in massively parallel sequencing were obtained with a DNA input of 15 ng determined by the NanoDrop 2000c spectrophotometer (Thermo Fisher Scientific, Waltham, MA, USA). No difference could be detected in mutation analysis based on the results of the quantification methods. These findings emphasise, that it is particularly important to choose the most reliable and constant DNA extraction system, especially when using small biopsies and low elution volumes, and that all common DNA quantification techniques can be used for

  9. Comparison of pre-analytical FFPE sample preparation methods and their impact on massively parallel sequencing in routine diagnostics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Heydt

    Full Text Available Over the last years, massively parallel sequencing has rapidly evolved and has now transitioned into molecular pathology routine laboratories. It is an attractive platform for analysing multiple genes at the same time with very little input material. Therefore, the need for high quality DNA obtained from automated DNA extraction systems has increased, especially to those laboratories which are dealing with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE material and high sample throughput. This study evaluated five automated FFPE DNA extraction systems as well as five DNA quantification systems using the three most common techniques, UV spectrophotometry, fluorescent dye-based quantification and quantitative PCR, on 26 FFPE tissue samples. Additionally, the effects on downstream applications were analysed to find the most suitable pre-analytical methods for massively parallel sequencing in routine diagnostics. The results revealed that the Maxwell 16 from Promega (Mannheim, Germany seems to be the superior system for DNA extraction from FFPE material. The extracts had a 1.3-24.6-fold higher DNA concentration in comparison to the other extraction systems, a higher quality and were most suitable for downstream applications. The comparison of the five quantification methods showed intermethod variations but all methods could be used to estimate the right amount for PCR amplification and for massively parallel sequencing. Interestingly, the best results in massively parallel sequencing were obtained with a DNA input of 15 ng determined by the NanoDrop 2000c spectrophotometer (Thermo Fisher Scientific, Waltham, MA, USA. No difference could be detected in mutation analysis based on the results of the quantification methods. These findings emphasise, that it is particularly important to choose the most reliable and constant DNA extraction system, especially when using small biopsies and low elution volumes, and that all common DNA quantification techniques can

  10. Radiation measurement and risk estimation for pediatrics during routine diagnostic examination in some hospitals of Khartoum state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeed, E. B. Y.

    2010-01-01

    Patient dose monitoring was formalized in the national protocol for patient dose measurement in Diagnostic Radiology. Entrance Skin Dose (ESD) and Effective Dose have been measured for pediatric patient under going some routine pediatric x-ray examination in five Hospitals in Sudan namely (Ahmed Gasim for Paediatric Hospital, Khartoum state for main paediatric Hospital (Omdurman, Khartoum , Ah Gassim, Ab naof) Paediatric Hospitals. Two examination projection have been investigated, namely anterior posterior (AP) and posterior Anterior ( PA). Patient were classed into three different age groups 0-2 year, 2-5 year, 5-15 year. The result have been obtained with the use of the TLD as first time in Sudan. The mean of ESD and thyroid dose are represented and comparisons were made between these dose and international standard dose, local study also between doses and those from other counters. The mean of ESD and ED in Ah Gasim and Khartoum Hospital are higher than reference dose and low than other counters. The reason for the higher dose have been discussed and suggestions are given to reduced dosed to pediatric patient during x-ray examination especially in developing countries. (Author)

  11. Molecular diagnosis of microbial aetiologies using SepsiTest™ in the daily routine of a diagnostic laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Heike; Locher, Franziska; Nolte, Oliver

    2013-08-01

    A universal PCR and sequencing test, SepsiTest™ (Molzym, Germany) was evaluated for its applicability during daily diagnostic routine in a privately operated laboratory. In total, 96 specimens originating from 66 patients under suspect of infectious endocarditis, infections of joints, encephalitis/meningitis, systemic infections and infections of unknown genesis were PCR analysed and compared to culture results. Samples comprised cultured and non-cultured blood, synovial fluid, synovial tissue, heart valves, pacemakers, spinal tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, and swabs. PCR and culture were concordant in 26 negative and 8 positive cases (51.5%). A group of 25 patients was culture-negative but PCR-positive (37.9%). In at least 14 of these, common and/or rare aetiologies were identified, while for 4 patients the results of 16S PCR could not be unequivocally linked with the underlying disease. Benefits and limitations of the molecular test are discussed with special emphasis on technical and economic issues. In conclusion, SepsiTest™ proved to be a valuable tool for the diagnosis of aetiologies, particularly in cases of culture-negative patients who are under strong suspicion for an infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Evidence of dose saving in routine CT practice using iterative reconstruction derived from a national diagnostic reference level survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, P; Hayton, A; Beveridge, T; Marks, P; Wallace, A

    2015-09-01

    To assess the influence and significance of the use of iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms on patient dose in CT in Australia. We examined survey data submitted to the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) National Diagnostic Reference Level Service (NDRLS) during 2013 and 2014. We compared median survey dose metrics with categorization by scan region and use of IR. The use of IR results in a reduction in volume CT dose index of between 17% and 44% and a reduction in dose-length product of between 14% and 34% depending on the specific scan region. The reduction was highly significant (p sum test) for all six scan regions included in the NDRLS. Overall, 69% (806/1167) of surveys included in the analysis used IR. The use of IR in CT is achieving dose savings of 20-30% in routine practice in Australia. IR appears to be widely used by participants in the ARPANSA NDRLS with approximately 70% of surveys submitted employing this technique. This study examines the impact of the use of IR on patient dose in CT on a national scale.

  13. Functional protease profiling with reporter peptides in serum specimens of colorectal cancer patients: demonstration of its routine diagnostic applicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findeisen, Peter; Costina, Victor; Yepes, Diego; Hofheinz, Ralf; Neumaier, Michael

    2012-06-08

    been developed that allows the quantification of proteolytic fragments in serum specimens. The preanalytical impact of sample handling is minimal as the tumor-associated proteolytic activity towards the reporter peptide is stable for at least up to 24 h. Taken together, the functional protease profiling shows characteristics that are in line with routinely performed diagnostic assays. Further work will focus on the identification of additional reporter peptides for the construction of a multiplex assay to increase diagnostic accuracy of the functional protease profiling.

  14. Functional protease profiling with reporter peptides in serum specimens of colorectal cancer patients: demonstration of its routine diagnostic applicability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Findeisen Peter

    2012-06-01

    simple, robust and highly reproducible LC/MS method has been developed that allows the quantification of proteolytic fragments in serum specimens. The preanalytical impact of sample handling is minimal as the tumor-associated proteolytic activity towards the reporter peptide is stable for at least up to 24 h. Taken together, the functional protease profiling shows characteristics that are in line with routinely performed diagnostic assays. Further work will focus on the identification of additional reporter peptides for the construction of a multiplex assay to increase diagnostic accuracy of the functional protease profiling.

  15. Self Diagnostic Adhesive for Bonded Joints in Aircraft Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-04

    validated under the fatigue /dynamic loading condition. 3) Both SEM (Spectral Element Modeling) and FEM (Finite Element Modeling) simulation of the...between input voltage and output charge provide the real and imaginary impedance as illustrated in Figure 3. (a) Adhesive + plate (ΩS) PZT (ΩP...3 m m 0.45mm Adhesive 3.18mm dia. PZT disc (0.25mm thick) 8 Self-Diagnostic Adhesive for Bonded Joints in Aircraft Structures

  16. Evaluation of the Roche prototype 454 HIV-1 ultradeep sequencing drug resistance assay in a routine diagnostic laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Diaz, A; Guerrero-Ramos, A; McCormick, A L; Macartney, M; Conibear, T; Johnson, M A; Haque, T; Webster, D P

    2013-10-01

    Studies have shown that low-frequency resistance mutations can influence treatment outcome. However, the lack of a standardized high-throughput assay has precluded their detection in clinical settings. To evaluate the performance of the Roche prototype 454 UDS HIV-1 drug resistance assay (UDS assay) in a routine diagnostic laboratory. 50 plasma samples, previously characterized by population sequencing and that had shown ≥1 resistance associated mutation (RAM), were retrospectively tested by the UDS assay, including 18 B and 32 non-B subtypes; viral loads between 114-1,806,407 cp/ml; drug-naive (n=27) and drug-experienced (n=23) individuals. The UDS assay was successful for 37/50 (74%) samples. It detected all RAMs found by population sequencing at frequencies above 20%. In addition, 39 low-frequency RAMs were exclusively detected by the UDS assay at frequencies below 20% in both drug-naïve (19/26, 73%) and drug-experienced (9/18, 50%) individuals. UDS results would lead to changes from susceptible to resistant to efavirenz (EFV) in one drug-naive individual with suboptimal response to an EFV-containing regimen and from susceptible to resistance to lamivudine (3TC) in one drug naïve subject who subsequently failed a 3TC-containing regimen and in a treatment experienced subject who had failed a 3TC-containing regimen. The UDS assay performed well across a wide range of subtypes and viral loads; it showed perfect agreement with population sequencing for all RAMs analyzed. In addition, the UDS assay detected additional mutations at frequencies below 20% which correlate with patients' treatment history and had in some cases important prognostic implications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Piezo-sensor self-diagnostics using electrical impedance measurements.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, G. H. (Gyu Hae); Farrar, C. R. (Charles R.); Rutherford, A. C. (Amanda C.); Robertson, A. N. (Amy N.)

    2004-01-01

    This paper present the piezoelectric sensor self-diagnostic procedure that performs in-situ monitoring of the operational status of piezoelectric materials (PZT) used for sensors and actuators in structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. The use of active-sensing piezoelectric materials has received considerable attention in the SHM community. A critical aspect of the piezoelectric active-sensing technologies is that usually large numbers of distributed sensors and actuators are needed to perform the required monitoring process. The sensor/actuator self-diagnostic procedure, where the sensors/actuators are confirmed to be functioning properly during operation, is therefore a critical component to successfully complete the SHM process and to minimize the false indication regarding the structural health. The basis of this procedure is to track the changes in the capacitive value of piezoelectric materials resulting from the sensor failure, which is manifested in the imaginary part of the measured electrical admittances. Furthermore, through the analytical and experimental investigation, it is confirmed that the bonding layer between the PZT and a host structure significantly contributes to the measured capacitive values. Therefore, by monitoring the imaginary part of the admittances, one can quantitatively assess the degradation of the mechanical/electrical properties of the PZT and its attachment to a host structure. This paper concludes with an experimental example to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed sensor-diagnostic procedure.

  18. The role of self-efficacy, self-esteem and optimism for using routine health check-ups in a population-based sample. A longitudinal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajek, André; Hans-Helmut-König

    2017-12-01

    While several cross-sectional studies have shown that self-efficacy, self-esteem and optimism are associated with the use of routine health check-ups, little is known about this relationship based on longitudinal studies. Consequently, the purpose of this study was to examine whether these factors are associated with routine health check-ups longitudinally. Data were retrieved from a population-based longitudinal study of individuals (≥40years of age) residing in private households in Germany (two waves: 2008 and 2011). Widely established scales were used to quantify self-efficacy, self-esteem, and optimism. Respondents reported whether they used a health check-up in the last two years. Conditional fixed-effects logistic regressions were used (n=1504), adjusting for socio-demographic, lifestyle and health-related variables. After adjusting for various potential confounders, regression analysis revealed that the use of routine health check-ups increased with self-efficacy [OR: 1.71 (95%-CI: 1.14-2.55)], self-esteem [OR: 1.78 (1.16-2.73)], and optimism [OR: 1.37 (1.01-1.86)]. Furthermore, the use of routine health check-ups increased with changes from employment to retirement [OR: 2.60 (1.34-5.03)], whereas it was not associated with changes in age, marital status, smoking status, the number of physical illnesses, self-rated health and body-mass index. The current study stresses the importance of an association between screening behavior and self-efficacy, self-esteem and optimism longitudinally. Interventions aiming at modifying these psychological factors might help to increase the use of routine health check-ups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Diagnostic Performance of Self-Assessment for Constipation in Patients With Long-Term Opioid Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafelski, Sascha; Bellin, Felicitas; Denke, Claudia; Beutlhauser, Torsten; Fritzsche, Thomas; West, Christina; Schäfer, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Constipation is a prevalent comorbidity affecting ∼50% of patients with long-term opioid therapy. In clinical routine different diagnostic instruments are in use to identify patients under risk. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of an 11-item Likert scale for constipation used as a self-assessment in opioid-treated patients. This trial was conducted as a retrospective cohort study in Berlin, Germany. Patients with long-term opioid therapy treated in 2 university-affiliated outpatient pain facilities at the Charité hospital were included from January 2013 to August 2013. Constipation was rated in a self-assessment using a numeric rating scale from 0 to 10 (Con-NRS) and compared with results from a structured assessment based on ROME-III criteria. Altogether, 171 patients were included. Incidence of constipation was 49% of patients. The receiver-operating characteristic of Con-NRS achieved an area under the curve of 0.814 (AUC 95% confidence interval 0.748-0.880, P < 0.001). Con-NRS ≥ 1 achieved sensitivity and specificity of 79.7% and 77.2%, respectively. The positive predictive value and the negative predictive value were 70.3% and 81.6%, respectively. Overall diagnostic performance of a concise 11-item Likert scale for constipation was moderate. Although patients with long-term opioid therapy are familiar with numeric rating scales, a significant number of patients with constipation were not identified. The instrument may be additionally useful to facilitate individualized therapeutic decision making and to control therapeutic success when measured repetitively.

  20. Reactor protection system with automatic self-testing and diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaubatz, D.C.

    1996-01-01

    A reactor protection system is disclosed having four divisions, with quad redundant sensors for each scram parameter providing input to four independent microprocessor-based electronic chassis. Each electronic chassis acquires the scram parameter data from its own sensor, digitizes the information, and then transmits the sensor reading to the other three electronic chassis via optical fibers. To increase system availability and reduce false scrams, the reactor protection system employs two levels of voting on a need for reactor scram. The electronic chassis perform software divisional data processing, vote 2/3 with spare based upon information from all four sensors, and send the divisional scram signals to the hardware logic panel, which performs a 2/4 division vote on whether or not to initiate a reactor scram. Each chassis makes a divisional scram decision based on data from all sensors. Automatic detection and discrimination against failed sensors allows the reactor protection system to automatically enter a known state when sensor failures occur. Cross communication of sensor readings allows comparison of four theoretically ''identical'' values. This permits identification of sensor errors such as drift or malfunction. A diagnostic request for service is issued for errant sensor data. Automated self test and diagnostic monitoring, sensor input through output relay logic, virtually eliminate the need for manual surveillance testing. This provides an ability for each division to cross-check all divisions and to sense failures of the hardware logic. 16 figs

  1. Emotional eating and routine restraint scores are associated with activity in brain regions involved in urge and self-control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Samantha M W; Schembre, Susan M; He, Qinghua; Engelmann, Jeffrey M; Ames, Susan L; Bechara, Antoine

    2016-10-15

    Researchers have proposed a variety of behavioral traits that may lead to weight gain and obesity; however, little is known about the neurocognitive mechanisms underlying these weight-related eating behaviors. In this study, we measured activation of reward circuitry during a task requiring response and inhibition to food stimuli. We assessed participants' emotional eating, external eating, and two subscales of dietary restraint-routine restraint and compensatory restraint-using the Weight-Related Eating Questionnaire. For routine restraint, we found positive associations with activation in the insula, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, orbitofrontal cortex and ventromedial prefrontal cortex in response to high-calorie versus low-calorie foods. For emotional eating, we found positive associations with insula and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activation in response to high-calorie versus low-calorie foods. We also found positive associations between emotional eating and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activation in response to approach versus inhibition towards high-calorie foods. Thus, our results demonstrate an increase in activation across brain regions related to self-control and urges in response to high-calorie food associated with both emotional eating and routine restraint. Overall, these results support the construct validity of both emotional eating and routine restraint and provide preliminary evidence that these subscales have similar neural correlates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A comprehensive custom panel design for routine hereditary cancer testing: preserving control, improving diagnostics and revealing a complex variation landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Elisabeth; Gel, Bernat; Rosas, Inma; Tornero, Eva; Santín, Sheila; Pluvinet, Raquel; Velasco, Juan; Sumoy, Lauro; Del Valle, Jesús; Perucho, Manuel; Blanco, Ignacio; Navarro, Matilde; Brunet, Joan; Pineda, Marta; Feliubadaló, Lidia; Capellá, Gabi; Lázaro, Conxi; Serra, Eduard

    2017-01-04

    We wanted to implement an NGS strategy to globally analyze hereditary cancer with diagnostic quality while retaining the same degree of understanding and control we had in pre-NGS strategies. To do this, we developed the I2HCP panel, a custom bait library covering 122 hereditary cancer genes. We improved bait design, tested different NGS platforms and created a clinically driven custom data analysis pipeline. The I2HCP panel was developed using a training set of hereditary colorectal cancer, hereditary breast and ovarian cancer and neurofibromatosis patients and reached an accuracy, analytical sensitivity and specificity greater than 99%, which was maintained in a validation set. I2HCP changed our diagnostic approach, involving clinicians and a genetic diagnostics team from panel design to reporting. The new strategy improved diagnostic sensitivity, solved uncertain clinical diagnoses and identified mutations in new genes. We assessed the genetic variation in the complete set of hereditary cancer genes, revealing a complex variation landscape that coexists with the disease-causing mutation. We developed, validated and implemented a custom NGS-based strategy for hereditary cancer diagnostics that improved our previous workflows. Additionally, the existence of a rich genetic variation in hereditary cancer genes favors the use of this panel to investigate their role in cancer risk.

  3. Self-calibrating magnetic field diagnostics in beam emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voslamber, D.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic field diagnostics in tokamaks using the motional Stark effect in fast neutral beams have been based on two kinds of polarimetry which we call ''static'' and ''dynamic.'' A detailed analysis shows that static polarimetry presents a number of advantages over dynamic polarimetry, provided it is made complete in the sense that a sufficient number of polarization analyzers are installed and different parts of the spectrum are explored to yield full information on the set of unknowns inherent in the problem. A detailed scheme of complete static polarimetry is proposed, including the case where an in-vessel mirror with changing characteristics (coating by impurities) is placed in front of the optical detection system. The main merit of this scheme relies on the fact that it is self-calibrating with respect to both the characteristics of the mirror and the transmission of the different polarization channels, the latter item implying that it is uniquely based on relative measurements of spectra. Further advantages are a greater flexibility with regard to different kinds of diagnostics and the circumstance that the technical equipment is less involved. The above scheme is based on a detection system of moderate etendue exploiting a large spectral domain, which is the regime where static polarimetry usually operates. It is also possible, however, to work with large etendue and a small spectral domain, such as commonly adopted in dynamic polarimetry. Using such a regime, static polarimetry loses the advantages mentioned above but gains, as a new advantage, the benefit of a comparatively lower level of photon noise. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  4. Translational HIV-1 research: from routine diagnostics to new virology insights in Amsterdam, the Netherlands during 1983-2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kuyl, Antoinette C.; Bakker, Margreet; Jurriaans, Suzanne; Back, Nicole K. T.; Pasternak, Alexander O.; Cornelissen, Marion; Berkhout, Ben

    2013-01-01

    An HIV-1 diagnostic laboratory was established in the Academic Medical Center (AMC) of the University of Amsterdam after the discovery of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as the cause of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The first AIDS patients were diagnosed here in 1981 and since

  5. Comparison of selected diagnostic methods for identification of Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium andersoni in routine examination of faeces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kváč, Martin; Květoňová, Dana; Půžová, Gabriela; Ditrich, Oleg

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 8 (2003), s. 405-411 ISSN 0931-1793 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS6022006 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6022909 Keywords : cryptosporidiosis * diagnostic methods * cattle Subject RIV: DJ - Water Pollution ; Quality Impact factor: 0.656, year: 2003

  6. The role of routine preoperative EUS when performed after contrast enhanced CT in the diagnostic work-up in patients suspected of pancreatic or periampullary cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieslak, Kasia P; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Vleggaar, Frank P; van Leeuwen, Maarten S; ten Kate, Fibo J; Besselink, Marc G; Molenaar, I Quintus

    2014-01-01

    In patients suspected of pancreatic or periampullary cancer, abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) is the standard diagnostic modality. A supplementary endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is often performed, although there is only limited evidence of its additional diagnostic value. The aim of the study is to evaluate the additional diagnostic value of EUS over CT in deciding on exploratory laparotomy in patients suspected of pancreatic or periampullary cancer. We retrospectively analyzed 86 consecutive patients who routinely underwent CT and EUS before exploratory laparotomy with or without pancreatoduodenectomy for suspected pancreatic or periampullary carcinoma between 2007 and 2010. Primary outcomes were visibility of a mass, resectability on CT/EUS and resection with curative intent. A mass was visible on CT in 72/86 (84%) patients. In these 72 patients, EUS demonstrated a mass in 64/72 (89%) patients. Resectability was accurately predicted by CT in 65/72 (90%) and by EUS in 58/72 (81%) patients. In 14/86 (16%) patients no mass was seen on CT. EUS showed a mass in 12/14 (86%) of these patients. A malignant lesion was histological proven in 11/12 (92%) of these patients. Overall, resectability was accurately predicted by CT and EUS in 90% (77/86) and 84% (72/86), respectively. In patients with a visible mass on CT, suspected for pancreatic or periampullary cancer, EUS has no additional diagnostic value, does not influence the decision to perform laparotomy and should therefore not be performed routinely. In patients without a visible mass on CT, EUS is useful to confirm the presence of a tumor. Copyright © 2014 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Routine internal- and external-quality control data in clinical laboratories for estimating measurement and diagnostic uncertainty using GUM principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Bertil; Ossowicki, Haakan; Rienitz, Olaf; Theodorsson, Elvar

    2012-05-01

    Healthcare laboratories are increasingly joining into larger laboratory organizations encompassing several physical laboratories. This caters for important new opportunities for re-defining the concept of a 'laboratory' to encompass all laboratories and measurement methods measuring the same measurand for a population of patients. In order to make measurement results, comparable bias should be minimized or eliminated and measurement uncertainty properly evaluated for all methods used for a particular patient population. The measurement as well as diagnostic uncertainty can be evaluated from internal and external quality control results using GUM principles. In this paper the uncertainty evaluations are described in detail using only two main components, within-laboratory reproducibility and uncertainty of the bias component according to a Nordtest guideline. The evaluation is exemplified for the determination of creatinine in serum for a conglomerate of laboratories both expressed in absolute units (μmol/L) and relative (%). An expanded measurement uncertainty of 12 μmol/L associated with concentrations of creatinine below 120 μmol/L and of 10% associated with concentrations above 120 μmol/L was estimated. The diagnostic uncertainty encompasses both measurement uncertainty and biological variation, and can be estimated for a single value and for a difference. This diagnostic uncertainty for the difference for two samples from the same patient was determined to be 14 μmol/L associated with concentrations of creatinine below 100 μmol/L and 14 % associated with concentrations above 100 μmol/L.

  8. Current levels of gonadal irradiation from a selection of routine diagnostic X-ray examinations in Great Britain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, B.F.; Fisher, E.S.; Shrimpton, P.C.; Rae, S.

    1980-07-01

    The gonadal doses from 13 types of diagnostic examination have been measured at 21 hospitals throughout the country in preparation for a new assessment of the genetically significant dose to the population of Great Britain from diagnostic radiology. Thermoluminescent dosemeters, consisting of lithium borate powder contained in adhesive polythene sachets, were used for the measurements. They were attached to patients to monitor the testes dose directly or the entrance skin dose at the level of the ovaries. Skin doses were converted to ovarian doses using factors obtained by measurements in an anthropomorphic phantom exposed to a range of typical diagnostic X-ray fields. The results indicate that for some types of examination there has been an increase and for others there has been a reduction in the mean gonadal dose delivered per examination since a similar survey was made 20 years ago. Individual gonadal doses for the same examination still ranged over 3 or 4 orders of magnitude throughout the country with distributions described by coefficients of variation that were no less than those found in the late 1950s. This large variability in patient exposure, together with the observation that examinations were satisfactorily conducted on children with a much higher degree of gonadal protection than that offered to young adults, indicates that many patients must be receiving doses that are unnecessarily high. (author)

  9. Proposed Diagnostic Criteria for the DSM-5 of Nonsuicidal Self-Injury in Female Adolescents: Diagnostic and Clinical Correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina In-Albon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI is included as conditions for further study in the DSM-5. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the proposed diagnostic criteria and the diagnostic and clinical correlates for the validity of a diagnostic entity. The authors investigated the characteristics of NSSI disorder and the proposed diagnostic criteria. A sample of 73 female inpatient adolescents and 37 nonclinical adolescents (aged 13 to 19 years was recruited. Patients were classified into 4 groups (adolescents with NSSI disorder, adolescents with NSSI without impairment/distress, clinical controls without NSSI, and nonclinical controls. Adolescents were compared on self-reported psychopathology and diagnostic cooccurrences. Results indicate that adolescents with NSSI disorder have a higher level of impairment than adolescents with other mental disorders without NSSI. Most common comorbid diagnoses were major depression, social phobia, and PTSD. There was some overlap of adolescents with NSSI disorder and suicidal behaviour and borderline personality disorder, but there were also important differences. Results further suggest that the proposed DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for NSSI are useful and necessary. In conclusion, NSSI is a highly impairing disorder characterized by high comorbidity with various disorders, providing further evidence that NSSI should be a distinct diagnostic entity.

  10. Self Diagnostic Accelerometer Testing on the C-17 Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokars, Roger P.; Lekki, John D.

    2013-01-01

    The self diagnostic accelerometer (SDA) developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center was tested for the first time in an aircraft engine environment as part of the Vehicle Integrated Propulsion Research (VIPR) program. The VIPR program includes testing multiple critical flight sensor technologies. One such sensor, the accelerometer, measures vibrations to detect faults in the engine. In order to rely upon the accelerometer, the health of the accelerometer must be ensured. The SDA is a sensor system designed to actively determine the accelerometer structural health and attachment condition, in addition to vibration measurements. The SDA uses a signal conditioning unit that sends an electrical chirp to the accelerometer and recognizes changes in the response due to changes in the accelerometer health and attachment condition. To demonstrate the SDAs flight worthiness and robustness, multiple SDAs were mounted and tested on a C-17 aircraft engine. The engine test conditions varied from engine off, to idle, to maximum power. The SDA attachment conditions were varied from fully tight to loose. The newly developed SDA health algorithm described herein uses cross correlation pattern recognition to discriminate a healthy from a faulty SDA. The VIPR test results demonstrate for the first.

  11. A motional Stark effect diagnostic analysis routine for improved resolution of iota in the core of the large helical device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbins, T J; Ida, K; Suzuki, C; Yoshinuma, M; Kobayashi, T; Suzuki, Y; Yoshida, M

    2017-09-01

    A new Motional Stark Effect (MSE) analysis routine has been developed for improved spatial resolution in the core of the Large Helical Device (LHD). The routine was developed to reduce the dependency of the analysis on the Pfirsch-Schlüter (PS) current in the core. The technique used the change in the polarization angle as a function of flux in order to find the value of diota/dflux at each measurement location. By integrating inwards from the edge, the iota profile can be recovered from this method. This reduces the results' dependency on the PS current because the effect of the PS current on the MSE measurement is almost constant as a function of flux in the core; therefore, the uncertainty in the PS current has a minimal effect on the calculation of the iota profile. In addition, the VMEC database was remapped from flux into r/a space by interpolating in mode space in order to improve the database core resolution. These changes resulted in a much smoother iota profile, conforming more to the physics expectations of standard discharge scenarios in the core of the LHD.

  12. Development and validation of a bowel-routine-based self-report questionnaire for sacral sparing after spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, N; Xing, H; Zhou, M-W

    2017-01-01

    -report questionnaire was developed based on several events that most patients might experience during bowel routine. 102 participants who sustained SCI within 12 months were asked to complete the questionnaire followed by an anorectal examination. Agreements of answers to the questionnaire and the physical examination......STUDY DESIGN: An observational study. OBJECTIVE: To develop a self-administered tool for assessment of sacral sparing after spinal cord injury (SCI) and to test its validity in individuals with SCI. SETTING: Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing, China. METHODS: A 5-item SCI sacral sparing self......: The validity of this questionnaire for the assessment of sacral sparing in up to 12 months post injury is good except for the motor function when there was increased AST. In some situations it could be considered as an alternative tool for digital rectal examination, especially when repeated examinations...

  13. Development of laser-based technology for the routine first wall diagnostic on the tokamak EAST: LIBS and LIAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Z.; Gierse, N.; Li, C.; Liu, P.; Zhao, D.; Sun, L.; Oelmann, J.; Nicolai, D.; Wu, D.; Wu, J.; Mao, H.; Ding, F.; Brezinsek, S.; Liang, Y.; Ding, H.; Luo, G.; Linsmeier, C.; EAST Team

    2017-12-01

    A laser based method combined with spectroscopy, such as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser-induced ablation spectroscopy (LIAS), is a promising technology for plasma-wall interaction studies. In this work, we report the development of in situ laser-based diagnostics (LIBS and LIAS) for the assessment of static and dynamic fuel retention on the first wall without removing the tiles between and during plasma discharges in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). The fuel retention on the first wall was measured after different wall conditioning methods and daily plasma discharges by in situ LIBS. The result indicates that the LIBS can be a useful tool to predict the wall condition in EAST. With the successful commissioning of a refined timing system for LIAS, an in situ approach to investigate fuel retention is proposed.

  14. Comparison of Diagnostic Algorithms for Detecting Toxigenic Clostridium difficile in Routine Practice at a Tertiary Referral Hospital in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hee-Won; Kim, Hyeong Nyeon; Hur, Mina; Shim, Hee Sook; Kim, Heejung; Yun, Yeo-Min

    2016-01-01

    Since every single test has some limitations for detecting toxigenic Clostridium difficile, multistep algorithms are recommended. This study aimed to compare the current, representative diagnostic algorithms for detecting toxigenic C. difficile, using VIDAS C. difficile toxin A&B (toxin ELFA), VIDAS C. difficile GDH (GDH ELFA, bioMérieux, Marcy-l'Etoile, France), and Xpert C. difficile (Cepheid, Sunnyvale, California, USA). In 271 consecutive stool samples, toxigenic culture, toxin ELFA, GDH ELFA, and Xpert C. difficile were performed. We simulated two algorithms: screening by GDH ELFA and confirmation by Xpert C. difficile (GDH + Xpert) and combined algorithm of GDH ELFA, toxin ELFA, and Xpert C. difficile (GDH + Toxin + Xpert). The performance of each assay and algorithm was assessed. The agreement of Xpert C. difficile and two algorithms (GDH + Xpert and GDH+ Toxin + Xpert) with toxigenic culture were strong (Kappa, 0.848, 0.857, and 0.868, respectively). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of algorithms (GDH + Xpert and GDH + Toxin + Xpert) were 96.7%, 95.8%, 85.0%, 98.1%, and 94.5%, 95.8%, 82.3%, 98.5%, respectively. There were no significant differences between Xpert C. difficile and two algorithms in sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV. The performances of both algorithms for detecting toxigenic C. difficile were comparable to that of Xpert C. difficile. Either algorithm would be useful in clinical laboratories and can be optimized in the diagnostic workflow of C. difficile depending on costs, test volume, and clinical needs.

  15. Oligo-based High-resolution aCGH Analysis Enhances Routine Cytogenetic Diagnostics in Haematological Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeldsen, Eigil

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the detection rate of genomic aberrations in haematological malignancies using oligobased array-CGH (oaCGH) analysis in combination with karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses, and its feasibility in a clinical pragmatic approach. The 4x180K Cancer Cytochip array was applied in 96 patients with various haematological malignancies in a prospective setting and in 41 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients retrospectively. Combined use of oaCGH analysis and karyotyping improved the overall detection rate in comparison to karyotyping-alone and vice versa. In cases with normal karyotypes oaCGH analysis detected genomic aberrations in 66% (39/60) of cases. In the group of simple karyotypes oaCGH analysis extended karyotypic findings in 39% (12/31) while oaCGH analysis extended the karyotypic findings in 89% (39/44) of cases with complex karyotypes. In 7% (5/75) of cases oaCGH analysis failed in detecting the observed abnormalities by karyotyping. oaCGH analysis is a valuable asset in routine cytogenetics of haematological malignancies. Copyright© 2015, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  16. SU-E-P-08: Establishment of Local Diagnostic Reference Levels of Routine Abdomen Exam in Computed Tomography According to Body Weight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H; Wang, Y; Weng, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The national diagnostic reference levels (NDRLs) is an efficient, concise and powerful standard for optimizing radiation protection of a patient. However, for each hospital the dose-reducing potential of focusing on establishment of local DRLs (LDRLs). A lot of study reported that Computed tomography exam contributed majority radiation dose in different medical modalities, therefore, routine abdomen CT exam was choose in initial pilot study in our study. Besides the mAs of routine abdomen CT exam was decided automatic exposure control by linear attenuation is relate to body shape of patient. In this study we would like to establish the local diagnostic reference levels of routine abdomen exam in computed tomography according to body weight of patient. Methods and Materials: There are two clinical CT scanners (a Toshiba Aquilion and a Siemens Sensation) were performed in this study. For CT examinations the basic recommended dosimetric quantity is the Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI). The patient sample involved 82 adult patients of both sexes and divided into three groups by their body weight (50–60 kg, 60–70 kg, 70–80 kg).Carried out the routine abdomen examinations, and all exposure parameters have been collected and the corresponding CTDIv and DLP values have been determined. The average values were compared with the European DRLs. Results: The majority of patients (75%) were between 50–70 Kg of body weight, the numbers of patient in each group of weight were 40–50:7; 50–60:29; 60–70:33; 70–80:13. The LDRLs in each group were 10.81mGy, 14.46mGy, 20.27mGy and 21.04mGy, respectively. The DLP were 477mGy, 630mGy, 887mGy and 959mGy, respectively. No matter which group the LDRLs were lower than European DRLs. Conclusions: We would like to state that this was a pioneer work in local hospital in Chiayi. We hope that this may lead the way to further developments in Taiwan

  17. SU-E-P-08: Establishment of Local Diagnostic Reference Levels of Routine Abdomen Exam in Computed Tomography According to Body Weight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H; Wang, Y; Weng, H [Chiayi Chang Gung Memorial Hospital of The C.G.M.F, Puzi City, Chiayi County, Taiwan (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The national diagnostic reference levels (NDRLs) is an efficient, concise and powerful standard for optimizing radiation protection of a patient. However, for each hospital the dose-reducing potential of focusing on establishment of local DRLs (LDRLs). A lot of study reported that Computed tomography exam contributed majority radiation dose in different medical modalities, therefore, routine abdomen CT exam was choose in initial pilot study in our study. Besides the mAs of routine abdomen CT exam was decided automatic exposure control by linear attenuation is relate to body shape of patient. In this study we would like to establish the local diagnostic reference levels of routine abdomen exam in computed tomography according to body weight of patient. Methods and Materials: There are two clinical CT scanners (a Toshiba Aquilion and a Siemens Sensation) were performed in this study. For CT examinations the basic recommended dosimetric quantity is the Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI). The patient sample involved 82 adult patients of both sexes and divided into three groups by their body weight (50–60 kg, 60–70 kg, 70–80 kg).Carried out the routine abdomen examinations, and all exposure parameters have been collected and the corresponding CTDIv and DLP values have been determined. The average values were compared with the European DRLs. Results: The majority of patients (75%) were between 50–70 Kg of body weight, the numbers of patient in each group of weight were 40–50:7; 50–60:29; 60–70:33; 70–80:13. The LDRLs in each group were 10.81mGy, 14.46mGy, 20.27mGy and 21.04mGy, respectively. The DLP were 477mGy, 630mGy, 887mGy and 959mGy, respectively. No matter which group the LDRLs were lower than European DRLs. Conclusions: We would like to state that this was a pioneer work in local hospital in Chiayi. We hope that this may lead the way to further developments in Taiwan.

  18. The diagnostic value and accuracy of conjunctival impression cytology, dry eye symptomatology, and routine tear function tests in computer users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Rahul; Kumar, Prachi; Kaur, Avinash; Kumar, Manjushri; Mishra, Anurag

    2014-07-01

    To compare the diagnostic value and accuracy of dry eye scoring system (DESS), conjunctival impression cytology (CIC), tear film breakup time (TBUT), and Schirmer's test in computer users. A case-control study was done at two referral eye centers. Eyes of 344 computer users were compared to 371 eyes of age and sex matched controls. Dry eye questionnaire (DESS) was administered to both groups and they further underwent measurement of TBUT, Schirmer's, and CIC. Correlation analysis was performed between DESS, CIC, TBUT, and Schirmer's test scores. A Pearson's coefficient of the linear expression (R (2)) of 0.5 or more was statistically significant. The mean age in cases (26.05 ± 4.06 years) was comparable to controls (25.67 ± 3.65 years) (P = 0.465). The mean symptom score in computer users was significantly higher as compared to controls (P computer users (P computer users respectively as compared to 8%, 6.7%, and 7.3% symptomatic controls respectively. On correlation analysis, there was a significant (inverse) association of dry eye symptoms (DESS) with TBUT and CIC scores (R (2) > 0.5), in contrast to Schirmer's scores (R(2) computer usage had a significant effect on dry eye symptoms severity, TBUT, and CIC scores as compared to Schirmer's test. DESS should be used in combination with TBUT and CIC for dry eye evaluation in computer users.

  19. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for MDM2 Amplification as a Routine Ancillary Diagnostic Tool for Suspected Well-Differentiated and Dedifferentiated Liposarcomas: Experience at a Tertiary Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khin Thway

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The assessment of MDM2 gene amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH has become a routine ancillary tool for diagnosing atypical lipomatous tumor (ALT/well-differentiated liposarcoma and dedifferentiated liposarcoma (WDL/DDL in specialist sarcoma units. We describe our experience of its utility at our tertiary institute. Methods. All routine histology samples in which MDM2 amplification was assessed with FISH over a 2-year period were included, and FISH results were correlated with clinical and histologic findings. Results. 365 samples from 347 patients had FISH for MDM2 gene amplification. 170 were positive (i.e., showed MDM2 gene amplification, 192 were negative, and 3 were technically unsatisfactory. There were 122 histologically benign cases showing a histology:FISH concordance rate of 92.6%, 142 WDL/DDL (concordance 96.5%, and 34 cases histologically equivocal for WDL (concordance 50%. Of 64 spindle cell/pleomorphic neoplasms (in which DDL was a differential diagnosis, 21.9% showed MDM2 amplification. Of the cases with discrepant histology and FISH, all but 3 had diagnoses amended following FISH results. For discrepancies of benign histology but positive FISH, lesions were on average larger, more frequently in “classical” (intra-abdominal or inguinal sites for WDL/DDL and more frequently core biopsies. Discrepancies of malignant histology but negative FISH were smaller, less frequently in “classical” sites but again more frequently core biopsies. Conclusions. FISH has a high correlation rate with histology for cases with firm histologic diagnoses of lipoma or WDL/DDL. It is a useful ancillary diagnostic tool in histologically equivocal cases, particularly in WDL lacking significant histologic atypia or DDL without corresponding WDL component, especially in larger tumors, those from intra-abdominal or inguinal sites or core biopsies. There is a significant group of well-differentiated adipocytic neoplasms

  20. Indications and expectations for neuropsychological assessment in routine epilepsy care: Report of the ILAE Neuropsychology Task Force, Diagnostic Methods Commission, 2013-2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sarah J; Baxendale, Sallie; Barr, William; Hamed, Sherifa; Langfitt, John; Samson, Séverine; Watanabe, Masako; Baker, Gus A; Helmstaedter, Christoph; Hermann, Bruce P; Smith, Mary-Lou

    2015-05-01

    The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) Diagnostic Methods Commission charged the Neuropsychology Task Force with the job of developing a set of recommendations to address the following questions: (1) What is the role of a neuropsychological assessment? (2) Who should do a neuropsychological assessment? (3) When should people with epilepsy be referred for a neuropsychological assessment? and (4) What should be expected from a neuropsychological assessment? The recommendations have been broadly written for health care clinicians in established epilepsy settings as well as those setting up new services. They are based on a detailed survey of neuropsychological assessment practices across international epilepsy centers, and formal ranking of specific recommendations for advancing clinical epilepsy care generated by specialist epilepsy neuropsychologists from around the world. They also incorporate the latest research findings to establish minimum standards for training and practice, reflecting the many roles of neuropsychological assessment in the routine care of children and adults with epilepsy. The recommendations endorse routine screening of cognition, mood, and behavior in new-onset epilepsy, and describe the range of situations when more detailed, formal neuropsychological assessment is indicated. They identify a core set of cognitive and psychological domains that should be assessed to provide an objective account of an individual's cognitive, emotional, and psychosocial functioning, including factors likely contributing to deficits identified on qualitative and quantitative examination. The recommendations also endorse routine provision of feedback to patients, families, and clinicians about the implications of the assessment results, including specific clinical recommendations of what can be done to improve a patient's cognitive or psychosocial functioning and alleviate the distress of any difficulties identified. By canvassing the breadth and depth

  1. Can rapid integrated polymerase chain reaction-based diagnostics for gastrointestinal pathogens improve routine hospital infection control practice? A diagnostic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankhurst, Louise; Macfarlane-Smith, Louissa; Buchanan, James; Anson, Luke; Davies, Kerrie; O'Connor, Lily; Ashwin, Helen; Pike, Graham; Dingle, Kate E; Peto, Timothy Ea; Wordsworth, Sarah; Walker, A Sarah; Wilcox, Mark H; Crook, Derrick W

    2014-08-01

    Every year approximately 5000-9000 patients are admitted to a hospital with diarrhoea, which in up to 90% of cases has a non-infectious cause. As a result, single rooms are 'blocked' by patients with non-infectious diarrhoea, while patients with infectious diarrhoea are still in open bays because of a lack of free side rooms. A rapid test for differentiating infectious from non-infectious diarrhoea could be very beneficial for patients. To evaluate MassCode multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the simultaneous diagnosis of multiple enteropathogens directly from stool, in terms of sensitivity/specificity to detect four common important enteropathogens: Clostridium difficile, Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp. and norovirus. A retrospective study of fixed numbers of samples positive for C. difficile (n = 200), Campylobacter spp. (n = 200), Salmonella spp. (n = 100) and norovirus (n = 200) plus samples negative for all these pathogens (n = 300). Samples were sourced from NHS microbiology laboratories in Oxford and Leeds where initial diagnostic testing was performed according to Public Health England methodology. Researchers carrying out MassCode assays were blind to this information. A questionnaire survey, examining current practice for infection control teams and microbiology laboratories managing infectious diarrhoea, was also carried out. MassCode assays were carried out at Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust. Further multiplex assays, carried out using Luminex, were run on the same set of samples at Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust. The questionnaire was completed by various NHS trusts. Sensitivity and specificity to detect C. difficile, Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp., and norovirus. Nucleic acids were extracted from 948 clinical samples using an optimised protocol (200 Campylobacter spp., 199 C. difficile, 60 S. enterica, 199 norovirus and 295 negative samples; some samples contained more than one pathogen). Using the Mass

  2. Routine clinical knee MR reports: comparison of diagnostic performance at 1.5 T and 3.0 T for assessment of the articular cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandell, Jacob C.; Rhodes, Jeffrey A.; Shah, Nehal; Gaviola, Glenn C.; Smith, Stacy E. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Gomoll, Andreas H. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Cartilage Repair Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Accurate assessment of knee articular cartilage is clinically important. Although 3.0 Tesla (T) MRI is reported to offer improved diagnostic performance, literature regarding the clinical impact of MRI field strength is lacking. The purpose of this study is to compare the diagnostic performance of clinical MRI reports for assessment of cartilage at 1.5 and 3.0 T in comparison to arthroscopy. This IRB-approved retrospective study consisted of 300 consecutive knees in 297 patients who had routine clinical MRI and arthroscopy. Descriptions of cartilage from MRI reports of 165 knees at 1.5 T and 135 at 3.0 T were compared with arthroscopy. The sensitivity, specificity, percent of articular surfaces graded concordantly, and percent of articular surfaces graded within one grade of the arthroscopic grading were calculated for each articular surface at 1.5 and 3.0 T. Agreement between MRI and arthroscopy was calculated with the weighted-kappa statistic. Significance testing was performed utilizing the z-test after bootstrapping to obtain the standard error. The sensitivity, specificity, percent of articular surfaces graded concordantly, and percent of articular surfaces graded within one grade were 61.4%, 82.7%, 62.2%, and 77.5% at 1.5 T and 61.8%, 80.6%, 59.5%, and 75.6% at 3.0 T, respectively. The weighted kappa statistic was 0.56 at 1.5 T and 0.55 at 3.0 T. There was no statistically significant difference in any of these parameters between 1.5 and 3.0 T. Factors potentially contributing to the lack of diagnostic advantage of 3.0 T MRI are discussed. (orig.)

  3. An audit to investigate the impact of false positive breast screening results and diagnostic work-up on re-engagement with subsequent routine screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nightingale, Julie M.; Borgen, Rita; Porter-Bennett, Lisa; Szczepura, Katy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Women attending breast screening may have suspicious mammographic findings that are subsequently found at assessment clinic to be normal (false positive, FP). A false positive diagnosis is not harmless, with short and long term negative psychosocial consequences reported. Women are at increased relative risk of breast cancer therefore their attendance at subsequent screening is essential. Aims: To assess the impact of FP breast screening diagnosis and diagnostic work-up on re-attendance rates across four consecutive screening rounds at a typical breast screening centre. Method: Diagnostic interventions and screening re-attendance rates at one prior and two consecutive rounds were analysed for women receiving an FP diagnosis between 2004 and 2006. Results: 397 women (5.57%) were referred for further assessment, including 228 (57.43%) false positives. 34 eligible women failed to re-attend routine screening (+3 years), with 17 failing to re-attend subsequently (+6 years). 70.6% (24/34) of non-attenders had attended at least two screening rounds prior to FP assessment. 75% of FP women had an imaging-only assessment with 17.5% (30/171) failing to re-attend, and 25% received a biopsy, with 7% (4/57) failing to re-attend subsequently. Conclusion: This study is unique as it follows FP women through four consecutive screening rounds. FP non-attendance rates were considerably lower compared to the general screening population, with diagnostic work-up having limited influence. FP non-attendance may appear insignificant in comparison to total screened population, but these women are at greater risk of subsequent cancer so should be actively encouraged to re-engage with the screening programme

  4. Comparison of microbiological diagnosis of urinary tract infection in young children by routine health service laboratories and a research laboratory: Diagnostic cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnie, Kate; Hay, Alastair D.; Wootton, Mandy; Howe, Robin; MacGowan, Alasdair; Whiting, Penny; Lawton, Michael; Delaney, Brendan; Downing, Harriet; Dudley, Jan; Hollingworth, William; Lisles, Catherine; Little, Paul; O’Brien, Kathryn; Pickles, Timothy; Rumsby, Kate; Thomas-Jones, Emma; Van der Voort, Judith; Waldron, Cherry-Ann; Harman, Kim; Hood, Kerenza; Butler, Christopher C.; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To compare the validity of diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI) through urine culture between samples processed in routine health service laboratories and those processed in a research laboratory. Population and methods We conducted a prospective diagnostic cohort study in 4808 acutely ill children aged <5 years attending UK primary health care. UTI, defined as pure/predominant growth ≥105 CFU/mL of a uropathogen (the reference standard), was diagnosed at routine health service laboratories and a central research laboratory by culture of urine samples. We calculated areas under the receiver-operator curve (AUC) for UTI predicted by pre-specified symptoms, signs and dipstick test results (the “index test”), separately according to whether samples were obtained by clean catch or nappy (diaper) pads. Results 251 (5.2%) and 88 (1.8%) children were classified as UTI positive by health service and research laboratories respectively. Agreement between laboratories was moderate (kappa = 0.36; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.29, 0.43), and better for clean catch (0.54; 0.45, 0.63) than nappy pad samples (0.20; 0.12, 0.28). In clean catch samples, the AUC was lower for health service laboratories (AUC = 0.75; 95% CI 0.69, 0.80) than the research laboratory (0.86; 0.79, 0.92). Values of AUC were lower in nappy pad samples (0.65 [0.61, 0.70] and 0.79 [0.70, 0.88] for health service and research laboratory positivity, respectively) than clean catch samples. Conclusions The agreement of microbiological diagnosis of UTI comparing routine health service laboratories with a research laboratory was moderate for clean catch samples and poor for nappy pad samples and reliability is lower for nappy pad than for clean catch samples. Positive results from the research laboratory appear more likely to reflect real UTIs than those from routine health service laboratories, many of which (particularly from nappy pad samples) could be due to contamination. Health service

  5. Comparison of microbiological diagnosis of urinary tract infection in young children by routine health service laboratories and a research laboratory: Diagnostic cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Birnie

    Full Text Available To compare the validity of diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI through urine culture between samples processed in routine health service laboratories and those processed in a research laboratory.We conducted a prospective diagnostic cohort study in 4808 acutely ill children aged <5 years attending UK primary health care. UTI, defined as pure/predominant growth ≥105 CFU/mL of a uropathogen (the reference standard, was diagnosed at routine health service laboratories and a central research laboratory by culture of urine samples. We calculated areas under the receiver-operator curve (AUC for UTI predicted by pre-specified symptoms, signs and dipstick test results (the "index test", separately according to whether samples were obtained by clean catch or nappy (diaper pads.251 (5.2% and 88 (1.8% children were classified as UTI positive by health service and research laboratories respectively. Agreement between laboratories was moderate (kappa = 0.36; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.29, 0.43, and better for clean catch (0.54; 0.45, 0.63 than nappy pad samples (0.20; 0.12, 0.28. In clean catch samples, the AUC was lower for health service laboratories (AUC = 0.75; 95% CI 0.69, 0.80 than the research laboratory (0.86; 0.79, 0.92. Values of AUC were lower in nappy pad samples (0.65 [0.61, 0.70] and 0.79 [0.70, 0.88] for health service and research laboratory positivity, respectively than clean catch samples.The agreement of microbiological diagnosis of UTI comparing routine health service laboratories with a research laboratory was moderate for clean catch samples and poor for nappy pad samples and reliability is lower for nappy pad than for clean catch samples. Positive results from the research laboratory appear more likely to reflect real UTIs than those from routine health service laboratories, many of which (particularly from nappy pad samples could be due to contamination. Health service laboratories should consider adopting procedures used

  6. Routine outcome measurement in mental health service consumers: who should provide support for the self-assessments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelkopf, Marc; Pagorek-Eshel, Shira; Trauer, Tom; Roe, David

    2015-06-01

    This study examined whether mental health community service users completed outcome self-reports differently when assessments were supervised by internal vs. external staff. The examination of potential differences between the two has useful implications for mental health systems that take upon themselves the challenge of Routine Outcome Measurement (ROM), as it might impact allocation of public resources and managed care program planning. 73 consumers completed the Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life (MANSA), a shortened version of the Recovery Assessment Scale (RAS), and a functioning questionnaire. Questionnaires were administered, once using support provided by internal staff and once using support provided by external professional staff, with a one-month time interval and in random order. A MANOVA Repeated Measures showed no differences in outcomes of quality of life and recovery between internal and external support. Functioning scores were higher for the internal support when the internal assessments were performed first. Overall, except for the differences in functioning assessment, outcome scores were not determined by the supporting agency. This might indicate that when measuring quality of life and recovery, different supporting methods can be used to gather outcome measures and internal staff might be a good default agency to do this. Differences found in functioning assessment are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donné, A.J.H.; Costley, A.E.; Barnsley, R.

    2007-01-01

    of the measurements—time and spatial resolutions, etc—will in some cases be more stringent. Many of the measurements will be used in the real time control of the plasma driving a requirement for very high reliability in the systems (diagnostics) that provide the measurements. The implementation of diagnostic systems...... on ITER is a substantial challenge. Because of the harsh environment (high levels of neutron and gamma fluxes, neutron heating, particle bombardment) diagnostic system selection and design has to cope with a range of phenomena not previously encountered in diagnostic design. Extensive design and R......&D is needed to prepare the systems. In some cases the environmental difficulties are so severe that new diagnostic techniques are required. The starting point in the development of diagnostics for ITER is to define the measurement requirements and develop their justification. It is necessary to include all...

  8. Congenital self-healing reticulohistiocytosis - an important diagnostic challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Marie Louise Slott; Bygum, Anette; Clemmensen, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Aim:  To present current and new knowledge on congenital self-healing reticulohistiocytosis, a benign variant of cutaneous Langerhans cell histiocytosis presenting with skin lesions in the neonatal period. Methods:  We describe and photo document two cases of this rare disease and review the lite......Aim:  To present current and new knowledge on congenital self-healing reticulohistiocytosis, a benign variant of cutaneous Langerhans cell histiocytosis presenting with skin lesions in the neonatal period. Methods:  We describe and photo document two cases of this rare disease and review...... the literature. Results:  Only few newborns have acute access to a neonatal dermatologist and we demonstrate how the spontaneous cutaneous involution may happen even prior to the first dermatological assessment. As no sole criterion can reliably distinguish the self-healing form from disseminated disease......, multidisciplinary assessment and follow up are essential. Conclusion:  Our data document how easily the diagnosis congenital self-healing reticulocytosis may be missed and emphasize the importance and value of instant clinical photographing at the neonatal unit and the use of teledermatology whenever congenital...

  9. Diagnostic accuracy, incremental yield and prognostic value of Determine TB-LAM for routine diagnostic testing for tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients requiring acute hospital admission in South Africa: a prospective cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawn, Stephen D; Kerkhoff, Andrew D; Burton, Rosie; Schutz, Charlotte; Boulle, Andrew; Vogt, Monica; Gupta-Wright, Ankur; Nicol, Mark P; Meintjes, Graeme

    2017-03-21

    We previously reported that one-third of HIV-positive adults requiring medical admission to a South African district hospital had laboratory-confirmed tuberculosis (TB) and that almost two-thirds of cases could be rapidly diagnosed using Xpert MTB/RIF-testing of concentrated urine samples obtained on the first day of admission. Implementation of urine-based, routine, point-of-care TB screening is an attractive intervention that might be facilitated by use of a simple, low-cost diagnostic tool, such as the Determine TB-LAM lateral-flow rapid test for HIV-associated TB. Sputum, urine and blood samples were systematically obtained from unselected HIV-positive adults within 24 hours of admission to a South African township hospital. Additional clinical samples were obtained during hospitalization as clinically indicated. TB was defined by the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in any sample using Xpert MTB/RIF or liquid culture. The diagnostic yield, accuracy and prognostic value of urine-lipoarabinomannan (LAM) testing were determined, but urine-LAM results did not inform treatment decisions. Consecutive HIV-positive adult acute medical admissions not already receiving TB treatment (n = 427) were enrolled regardless of clinical presentation or symptoms. TB was diagnosed in 139 patients (TB prevalence 32.6%; median CD4 count 80 cells/μL). In the first 24 hours of admission, sputum (spot and/or induced) samples were obtained from 37.0% of patients and urine samples from 99.5% of patients (P < 0.001). The diagnostic yields from these specimens were 19.4% (n = 27/139) for sputum-microscopy, 26.6% (n = 37/139) for sputum-Xpert, 38.1% (n = 53/139) for urine-LAM and 52.5% (n = 73/139) for sputum-Xpert/urine-LAM combined (P < 0.01). Corresponding yields among patients with CD4 counts <100 cells/μL were 18.9%, 24.3%, 55.4% and 63.5%, respectively (P < 0.01). The diagnostic yield of urine-LAM was unrelated to respiratory symptoms, and

  10. Clinical Diagnostic and Sociocultural Dimensions of Deliberate Self-Harm in Mumbai, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkar, Shubhangi R.; Dawani, Varsha; Weiss, Mitchell G.

    2006-01-01

    Patients' accounts complement psychiatric assessment of deliberate self-harm (DSH). In this study we examined psychiatric disorders, and sociocultural and cross-cultural features of DSH. SCID diagnostic interviews and a locally adapted EMIC interview were used to study 196 patients after DSH at a general hospital in Mumbai, India. Major depression…

  11. The Reliability and Validity of the Panic Disorder Self-Report: A New Diagnostic Screening Measure of Panic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Michelle G.; Holmes, Marilyn; Zuellig, Andrea R.; Kachin, Kevin E.; Behar, Evelyn

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the Panic Disorder Self-Report (PDSR), a new self-report diagnostic measure of panic disorder based on the 4th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (American Psychiatric Association, 1994). PDSR diagnoses were compared with structured interview diagnoses of individuals with generalized anxiety…

  12. [Validity of self-perceived dental caries as a diagnostic test and associated factors in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haikal, Desirée Sant'Ana; Roberto, Luana Leal; Martins, Andréa Maria Eleutério de Barros Lima; Paula, Alfredo Maurício Batista de; Ferreira, Efigênia Ferreira E

    2017-08-21

    This study aimed to analyze the validity of self-perceived dental caries and associated factors in a sample of 795 adults (35-44 years). The dependent variable was self-perceived dental caries, and the independent variables were combined in blocks. Three logistic models were performed: (1) all adults; (2) adults with a formal diagnosis of caries; and (3) adults without such caries. Self-perceived dental caries showed 77.7% sensitivity, 58% specificity, 65% accuracy, 52% positive predictive value, and 81% negative predictive value. In Model 1, self-perceived dental caries was associated with time of use of dental services, access to information, flossing, formal diagnosis of caries, self-perceived need for treatment, toothache, and dissatisfaction with oral health and general health. In Model 2, self-perceived dental caries was associated with time of use of dental services, self-perceived need for treatment, and dissatisfaction with oral health and general health. In Model 3, self-perceived dental caries was associated with time of use of dental services, access to information, flossing, self-perceived need for treatment, and dissatisfaction with oral health. Self-perceived dental caries showed limited utility as a diagnostic method.

  13. Official criteria for diagnostics of diabetes mellitus, normoglycemia and glycemic self-control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Kaminskiy

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the questions of diagnostics of diabetes mellitus (DM and early violations of carbohydrate metabolism. Venous plasma was underlined to be the only commonly accepted standard for blood glucose determination for prediabetes and diabetes mellitus diagnosis. In the third world countries (including Ukraine peripheral (capillary plasma of blood can be used for self-control and diagnostics of prediabetes and DM as their fasting values correspond to those of venous plasma and do not require revaluation. While using portable glucometers for carbohydrate violations diagnostics postprandial glucose value and after meal should be estimated in conversion. Normoglycemia is glucose concentration in venous plasma from 3.9 mmol/l (ADA criteria to 6.0 mmol/l (WHO criteria.

  14. Using routine diagnostic data as a method of surveillance of arboviral infection in travellers: A comparative analysis with a focus on dengue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleton, Natalie; Reusken, Chantal; Murk, Jean-Luc; de Jong, Menno; Reimerink, Johan; van der Eijk, Annemiek; Koopmans, Marion

    2014-01-01

    Background: In a large part of the developing world, limited infectious disease surveillance is performed. In laboratory information management systems data on diagnostic requests is available and may be amenable to trend analyses. We explored this potential, using DENV diagnostic requests as a

  15. Enzymatic Fuel Cells: Towards Self-Powered Implantable and Wearable Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Gonzalez-Solino

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid progress in nanotechnology and microengineering, point-of-care and personalised healthcare, based on wearable and implantable diagnostics, is becoming a reality. Enzymatic fuel cells (EFCs hold great potential as a sustainable means to power such devices by using physiological fluids as the fuel. This review summarises the fundamental operation of EFCs and discusses the most recent advances for their use as implantable and wearable self-powered sensors.

  16. Enzymatic Fuel Cells: Towards Self-Powered Implantable and Wearable Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Solino, Carla; Lorenzo, Mirella Di

    2018-01-01

    With the rapid progress in nanotechnology and microengineering, point-of-care and personalised healthcare, based on wearable and implantable diagnostics, is becoming a reality. Enzymatic fuel cells (EFCs) hold great potential as a sustainable means to power such devices by using physiological fluids as the fuel. This review summarises the fundamental operation of EFCs and discusses the most recent advances for their use as implantable and wearable self-powered sensors. PMID:29382147

  17. Enzymatic Fuel Cells: Towards Self-Powered Implantable and Wearable Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Solino, Carla; Lorenzo, Mirella Di

    2018-01-29

    With the rapid progress in nanotechnology and microengineering, point-of-care and personalised healthcare, based on wearable and implantable diagnostics, is becoming a reality. Enzymatic fuel cells (EFCs) hold great potential as a sustainable means to power such devices by using physiological fluids as the fuel. This review summarises the fundamental operation of EFCs and discusses the most recent advances for their use as implantable and wearable self-powered sensors.

  18. Enzymatic Fuel Cells: Towards Self-Powered Implantable and Wearable Diagnostics

    OpenAIRE

    Carla Gonzalez-Solino; Mirella Di Lorenzo

    2018-01-01

    With the rapid progress in nanotechnology and microengineering, point-of-care and personalised healthcare, based on wearable and implantable diagnostics, is becoming a reality. Enzymatic fuel cells (EFCs) hold great potential as a sustainable means to power such devices by using physiological fluids as the fuel. This review summarises the fundamental operation of EFCs and discusses the most recent advances for their use as implantable and wearable self-powered sensors.

  19. Reliability of self-reported diagnostic radiation history in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pijpe, Anouk; Manders, Peggy; Mulder, Renee L.; Leeuwen, Flora E. van; Rookus, Matti A.

    2010-01-01

    We assessed reliability of self-reported diagnostic radiation history in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers with and without breast cancer. Within the frame-work of the HEBON study, 401 BRCA1/2 mutation carriers completed a baseline (1999-2004) and a follow-up questionnaire (2006-2007). Test-retest reliability of self-reported exposure to chest X-rays, fluoroscopies and mammograms was assessed for the entire study population and by case status. Overall proportion agreement on reporting ever/never exposure was good (> 75%), while the corresponding kappa coefficients were between 0.40 and 0.75, indicating at least moderate reliability beyond chance. Reliability of number of exposures was also good (> 75%). Proportion agreement on reporting age at first mammogram was low (40%) for exact consistency and moderate (60%) for consistency ± 1 year. Reliability of age at first mammogram was higher for cases than for unaffected carriers (P < 0.001) but this difference disappeared when excluding diagnostic mammograms (P = 0.60). In unaffected carriers proportion agreement on age at last mammogram was 50%. In general, the direction of disagreement on all items was equally distributed. More consistent reporting was mainly determined by a younger age at questionnaire completion. In conclusion, inconsistent self-report of diagnostic radiation by BRCA1/2 mutation carriers was mainly non-differential by disease status.

  20. Deciphering the Theobroma cacao self-incompatibility system: from genomics to diagnostic markers for self-compatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanaud, Claire; Fouet, Olivier; Legavre, Thierry; Lopes, Uilson; Sounigo, Olivier; Eyango, Marie Claire; Mermaz, Benoit; Da Silva, Marcos Ramos; Loor Solorzano, Rey Gaston; Argout, Xavier; Gyapay, Gabor; Ebaiarrey, Herman Ebai; Colonges, Kelly; Sanier, Christine; Rivallan, Ronan; Mastin, Géraldine; Cryer, Nicholas; Boccara, Michel; Verdeil, Jean-Luc; Efombagn Mousseni, Ives Bruno; Peres Gramacho, Karina; Clément, Didier

    2017-10-13

    Cocoa self-compatibility is an important yield factor and has been described as being controlled by a late gameto-sporophytic system expressed only at the level of the embryo sac. It results in gametic non-fusion and involves several loci. In this work, we identified two loci, located on chromosomes 1 and 4 (CH1 and CH4), involved in cocoa self-incompatibility by two different processes. Both loci are responsible for gametic selection, but only one (the CH4 locus) is involved in the main fruit drop. The CH1 locus acts prior to the gamete fusion step and independently of the CH4 locus. Using fine-mapping and genome-wide association studies, we focused analyses on restricted regions and identified candidate genes. Some of them showed a differential expression between incompatible and compatible reactions. Immunolocalization experiments provided evidence of CH1 candidate genes expressed in ovule and style tissues. Highly polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR) diagnostic markers were designed in the CH4 region that had been identified by fine-mapping. They are characterized by a strong linkage disequilibrium with incompatibility alleles, thus allowing the development of efficient diagnostic markers predicting self-compatibility and fruit setting according to the presence of specific alleles or genotypes. SSR alleles specific to self-compatible Amelonado and Criollo varieties were also identified, thus allowing screening for self-compatible plants in cocoa populations. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  1. A Self-diagnostic Method for the Electrode Adhesion of an Electromagnetic Flow-meter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Hua Cui

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Electrodes of electromagnetic flow-meter are subject to contamination in sewage measurement. In this paper, the relationship between the internal resistance of the flow-induced voltage and the electrode contamination is analyzed on the basis of numerical analysis. A new self- diagnostic method for electrode adhesion with additional excitation based on photovoltaic cell is proposed, in which magnetic excitation for flow-rate measurement and electric excitation for electrode self-diagnosis is divided in both time domain and frequency domain. A dual-excited electromagnetic flow-meter with electrode self-diagnosis was designed and validated. Simulation experiments based on the change of the internal resistance of the flow-induced voltage were carried out. And the experimental results fully show that this new method is feasible and promising.

  2. The role of students’ self-confidence in relation with swimming routines, frequency, and tutor in swimming class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartoto, S.; Khory, F. D.; Prakoso, B. B.

    2018-01-01

    It is compulsory for prospective physical education teachers to have the ability to perform swimming. The average of students’ passing in swimming class has reached 72%. Most students who failed to pass the class are those who have had aquaphobia, the condition in which one failed to perceive a situation in a positive and objective, some of which are hard to detect. This perception may come from past experience and it could diminish students’ confidence. Furthermore, the lack of confidence in students may cause unsatisfactory learning results. Therefore it is critical for the teachers to have a comprehensive knowledge of their students’ past experience in formulating a lesson. This research used descriptive qualitative approach. The aim of this article is to investigate the correlation between students’ confidence level and swimming routines, frequency, and tutors in order to succeed swimming class. This article will attempt to describe the results of a research conducted to 139 students of Department of Sport Education Universitas Negeri Surabaya as prospective physical education teachers in Indonesia who took swimming class. Past experience and confidence level are measured by a questionnaire. The results of the research show that students who have a higher level of confidence are those who follow practice routines with adequate frequency and helped by a compatible tutor.

  3. Family member accompaniment to routine medical visits is associated with better self-care in heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cené, Crystal W; Haymore, Laura Beth; Lin, Feng-Chang; Laux, Jeffrey; Jones, Christine Delong; Wu, Jia-Rong; DeWalt, Darren; Pignone, Mike; Corbie-Smith, Giselle

    2015-03-01

    To examine the association between frequency of family member accompaniment to medical visits and heart failure (HF) self-care maintenance and management and to determine whether associations are mediated through satisfaction with provider communication. Cross-sectional survey of 150 HF patients seen in outpatient clinics. HF self-care maintenance and management were assessed using the Self-Care of Heart Failure Index. Satisfaction with provider communication was assessed using a single question originally included in the American Board of Internal Medicine Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire. Frequency of family member accompaniment to visits was assessed using a single-item question. We performed regression analyses to examine associations between frequency of accompaniment and outcomes. Mediation analysis was conducted using MacKinnon's criteria. Overall, 61% reported accompaniment by family members to some/most/every visit. Accompaniment to some/most/every visit was associated with higher self-care maintenance (β = 6.4, SE 2.5; p = 0.01) and management (β = 12.7, SE 4.9; p = 0.01) scores. Satisfaction with provider communication may mediate the association between greater frequency of accompaniment to visits and self-care maintenance (1.092; p = 0.06) and self-care management (1.428; p = 0.13). Accompaniment to medical visits is associated with better HF self-care maintenance and management, and this effect may be mediated through satisfaction with provider communication. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  4. Routine Self-administered, Touch-Screen Computer Based Suicidal Ideation Assessment Linked to Automated Response Team Notification in an HIV Primary Care Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Sarah T.; Willig, James H.; Crane, Heidi M.; Ye, Jiatao; Aban, Inmaculada; Lober, William; Nevin, Christa R.; Batey, D. Scott; Mugavero, Michael J.; McCullumsmith, Cheryl; Wright, Charles; Kitahata, Mari; Raper, James L.; Saag, Micheal S.; Schumacher, Joseph E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The implementation of routine computer-based screening for suicidal ideation and other psychosocial domains through standardized patient reported outcome instruments in two high volume urban HIV clinics is described. Factors associated with an increased risk of self-reported suicidal ideation were determined. Background HIV/AIDS continues to be associated with an under-recognized risk for suicidal ideation, attempted as well as completed suicide. Suicidal ideation represents an important predictor for subsequent attempted and completed suicide. We sought to implement routine screening of suicidal ideation and associated conditions using computerized patient reported outcome (PRO) assessments. Methods Two geographically distinct academic HIV primary care clinics enrolled patients attending scheduled visits from 12/2005 to 2/2009. Touch-screen-based, computerized PRO assessments were implemented into routine clinical care. Substance abuse (ASSIST), alcohol consumption (AUDIT-C), depression (PHQ-9) and anxiety (PHQ-A) were assessed. The PHQ-9 assesses the frequency of suicidal ideation in the preceding two weeks. A response of “nearly every day” triggered an automated page to pre-determined clinic personnel who completed more detailed self-harm assessments. Results Overall 1,216 (UAB= 740; UW= 476) patients completed initial PRO assessment during the study period. Patients were white (53%; n=646), predominantly males (79%; n=959) with a mean age of 44 (± 10). Among surveyed patients, 170 (14%) endorsed some level of suicidal ideation, while 33 (3%) admitted suicidal ideation nearly every day. In multivariable analysis, suicidal ideation risk was lower with advancing age (OR=0.74 per 10 years;95%CI=0.58-0.96) and was increased with current substance abuse (OR=1.88;95%CI=1.03-3.44) and more severe depression (OR=3.91 moderate;95%CI=2.12-7.22; OR=25.55 severe;95%CI=12.73-51.30). Discussion Suicidal ideation was associated with current substance abuse and

  5. Parents with Intellectual Disabilities Experiencing Challenging Child Routines: A Pilot Study Using Embedded Self-Determination Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Christen; Blakely, Allison; Hansen, Sarah; Machalicek, Wendy

    2017-01-01

    Background: Practices to facilitate self-determination have not received appropriate attention in research concerning parents with intellectual disabilities (ID). Likewise, parenting interventions for adults with intellectual disabilities have seldom observed both parent and child behavioural outcomes. Methods: This study evaluated the…

  6. A promising routine to fabricate GeSi nanowires via self-assembly on miscut Si (001) substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Zhenyang; Gong, Hua; Ma, Yingjie; Fan, Yongliang; Jiang, Zuimin

    2011-04-11

    : Very small and compactly arranged GeSi nanowires could self-assembled on vicinal Si (001) substrates with ~8° off toward ⟨110⟩ during Ge deposition. The nanowires were all oriented along the miscut direction. The small ration of height over width of the nanowire indicated that the nanowires were bordered partly with {1 0 5} facets. These self-assembled small nanowires were remarkably influenced by the growth conditions and the miscut angle of substrates in comparison with large dome-like islands obtained after sufficient Ge deposition. These results proposed that the formation of the nanowire was energetically driven under growth kinetic assistance. Three-dimensionally self-assembled GeSi nanowires were first realized via multilayer Ge growth separated with Si spacers. These GeSi nanowires were readily embedded in Si matrix and compatible with the sophisticated Si technology, which suggested a feasible strategy to fabricate nanowires for fundamental studies and a wide variety of applications.PACS: 81.07.Gf, 81.16.Dn, 68.65.-k, 68.37.Ps.

  7. A promising routine to fabricate GeSi nanowires via self-assembly on miscut Si (001 substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Zhenyang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Very small and compactly arranged GeSi nanowires could self-assembled on vicinal Si (001 substrates with ~8° off toward ⟨110⟩ during Ge deposition. The nanowires were all oriented along the miscut direction. The small ration of height over width of the nanowire indicated that the nanowires were bordered partly with {1 0 5} facets. These self-assembled small nanowires were remarkably influenced by the growth conditions and the miscut angle of substrates in comparison with large dome-like islands obtained after sufficient Ge deposition. These results proposed that the formation of the nanowire was energetically driven under growth kinetic assistance. Three-dimensionally self-assembled GeSi nanowires were first realized via multilayer Ge growth separated with Si spacers. These GeSi nanowires were readily embedded in Si matrix and compatible with the sophisticated Si technology, which suggested a feasible strategy to fabricate nanowires for fundamental studies and a wide variety of applications. PACS: 81.07.Gf, 81.16.Dn, 68.65.-k, 68.37.Ps

  8. Intelligent Routines

    CERN Document Server

    Anastassiou, George A

    “Intelligent Routines II: Solving Linear Algebra and Differential Geometry with Sage” contains numerous of examples and problems as well as many unsolved problems. This book extensively applies the successful software Sage, which can be found free online http://www.sagemath.org/. Sage is a recent and popular software for mathematical computation, available freely and simple to use. This book is useful to all applied scientists in mathematics, statistics and engineering, as well for late undergraduate and graduate students of above subjects. It is the first such book in solving symbolically with Sage problems in Linear Algebra and Differential Geometry. Plenty of SAGE applications are given at each step of the exposition.

  9. Lessons learned from trait self-control in well-being : Making the case for routines and initiation as important components of trait self-control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridder, Denise De; Gillebaart, Marleen

    2017-01-01

    It seems common knowledge that trait self-control helps people to achieve the things they find important in their lives by not being distracted by immediate pleasures and temptations. Initial evidence suggests that trait self-control is important in wellbeing as well, with people high in

  10. Transitioning high sensitivity cardiac troponin I (hs-cTnI) into routine diagnostic use: More than just a sensitivity issue

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lee, Graham R

    2016-04-01

    High sensitivity cardiac troponin T and I (hs-cTnT and hs-cTnI) assays show analytical, diagnostic and prognostic improvement over contemporary sensitive cTn assays. However, given the importance of troponin in the diagnosis of myocardial infarction, implementing this test requires rigorous analytical and clinical verification across the total testing pathway. This was the aim of this study.

  11. Diagnostic Accuracy of a Self-Report Measure of Patellar Tendinopathy in Youth Basketball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owoeye, Oluwatoyosi B A; Wiley, J Preston; Walker, Richard E A; Palacios-Derflingher, Luz; Emery, Carolyn A

    2018-04-27

    Study Design Prospective diagnostic accuracy validation study. Background Engaging clinicians for diagnosis of patellar tendinopathy in large surveillance studies is often impracticable. A self-report measure, the Oslo Sports Research Trauma Centre patellar tendinopathy (OSTRC-P) Questionnaire, an adaptation of the OSTRC Questionnaire may provide a viable alternative. Objectives To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the OSTRC-P Questionnaire in detecting patellar tendinopathy in youth basketball players when compared to clinical evaluation. Methods Following the Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies guidelines, 208 youth basketball players (aged 13-18 years) were recruited. Participants completed the OSTRC-P Questionnaire (index test) prior to a clinical evaluation (reference standard) by a physiotherapist blinded to OSTRC-P Questionnaire results. Sensitivity, specificity, predictive values (PVs), likelihood ratios (LRs) and posttest probabilities were calculated. Linear regression was used to examine the association between OSTRC-P Questionnaire severity score and patellar tendinopathy severity rating during single leg decline squat (SLDS). Results The final analysis included 169 players. The OSTRC-P Questionnaire had a sensitivity of 79% (95%CI: 65%, 90%), specificity of 98% (95%CI: 94%, 100%), positive PV of 95%, negative PV of 92%, positive LR of 48 and negative LR of 0.21. The posttest probabilities were 95% and 8% given positive and negative results, respectively. A positive association was found between OSTRC-P Questionnaire and SLDS rating [(β = .08 (95%CI: .03, .12) (p = .001)]. Conclusions The OSTRC-P Questionnaire is an acceptable alternative to clinical evaluation for self-reporting patellar tendinopathy and grading its severity in settings involving youth basketball players. Level of Evidence Diagnosis, level 1b. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther, Epub 27 Apr 2018. doi:10.2519/jospt.2018.8088.

  12. Manifestations, acquisition and diagnostic categories of dental fear in a self-referred population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R; Brødsgaard, I; Birn, H

    1991-01-01

    This study aimed to clarify how manifestations and acquisition relate to diagnostic categories of dental fear in a population of self-referred dental fear patients, since diagnostic criteria specifically related to dental fear have not been validated. DSM III-R diagnostic criteria for phobias were used to compare with four existing dental fear diagnostic categories, referred to as the Seattle system. Subjects were 208 persons with dental fear who were telephone interviewed, of whom a subsample of 155 responded to a mailed Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and a modified FSS-II Geer Fear Scale (GFS). Personal interviews and a Dental Beliefs Scale of perceived trust and social interaction with dentists were also used to evaluate a subsample of 80 patients selected by sex and high dental fear. Results showed that the majority of the 80 patients (66%), suffered from social embarrassment about their dental fear problem and their inability to do something about it. The largest cause of their fear (84%) was reported to be traumatic dental experiences, especially in childhood (70%). A minority of patients (16%) could not isolate traumatic experiences and had a history of general fearfulness or anxiety. Analysis of GFS data for the 155 subjects showed that fear of snakes and injuries were highest among women; heights and injections among men. Fear of blood was rarely reported. Spearman correlations between GFS individual items and DAS scores indicated functional independence between dental fear and common fears such as blood, injections and enclosures in most cases. Only in specific types of dental fear did these results support Rachman and Lopatka's contention that fears are thought to summate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. [The Offer of Medical-Diagnostic Self-Tests on German Language Websites: Results of a Systematic Internet Search].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuecuekbalaban, P; Schmidt, S; Muehlan, H

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the current study was to provide an overview of medical-diagnostic self-tests which can be purchased without a medical prescription on German language websites. From September 2014 to March 2015, a systematic internet research was conducted with the following search terms: self-test, self-diagnosis, home test, home diagnosis, quick test, rapid test. 513 different self-tests for the diagnostics of 52 diverse diseases or health risks were identified, including chronic diseases (e. g. diabetes, chronic disease of the kidneys, liver, and lungs), sexually transmitted diseases (e. g. HIV, chlamydia, gonorrhea), infectious diseases (e. g. tuberculosis, malaria, Helicobacter pylori), allergies (e. g. house dust, cats, histamine) and cancer as well as tests for the diagnostics of 12 different psychotropic substances. These were sold by 90 companies in Germany and by other foreign companies. The number of medical-diagnostic self-tests which can be bought without a medical prescription on the Internet has increased enormously in the last 10 years. Further studies are needed for the identification of the determinants of the use of self-tests as well as the impact of the application on the experience and behavior of the user. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Molecular allergy diagnostics using IgE singleplex determinations: methodological and practical considerations for use in clinical routine: Part 18 of the Series Molecular Allergology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Jakob, Thilo

    Allergen molecules (synonyms: single allergens, allergen components) open up new horizons for the targeted allergen-specific diagnostics of immunoglobulin E (IgE) in singleplex determination. The following rationales support the targeted use of allergen molecules and, more importantly, improve test properties: (1) increased test sensitivity ("analytical sensitivity"), particularly when important allergens are under-represented or lacking in the extract; (2) improved test selectivity (analytical specificity), particularly when the selected IgE repertoire against an allergen yields additional information on: (a) potential risk, (b) possible cross-reactivity, or (c) primary (species-specific) sensitization. However, the appropriate indication for the use of single allergens can only be established on a case-by-case basis (depending on the clinical context and previous history) and in an allergen-specific manner (depending on the allergen source and the single allergens available), rather than in a standardized way. Numerous investigations on suspected food allergy, insect venom allergy, or sensitization to respiratory allergens have meanwhile demonstrated the successful use of defined molecules for allergen-specific singleplex IgE diagnosis. Specific IgE to single allergens is limited in its suitability to predict the clinical relevance of sensitivity on an individual basis. In food allergies, one can at best identify the relative risk of a clinical reaction on the basis of an IgE profile, but no absolutely reliable prediction on (future) tolerance can be made. Ultimately, the clinical relevance of all IgE findings depends on the presence of corresponding symptoms and can only be assessed on an individual basis (previous history, symptom log, and provocation testing with the relevant allergen source where appropriate). Thus, also in molecular allergology, the treating physician and not the test result should determine the clinical relevance of diagnostic findings

  15. Latex glove sensitivity amongst diagnostic imaging healthcare personnel: a self-reporting investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Healy, Jan; Brennan, Patrick C.; Bowden, Julie Anne

    2003-01-01

    The use of latex gloves has risen dramatically among healthcare workers resulting in an increase in the number of workers experiencing reactions to gloves. Little evidence of reactions among Irish healthcare workers is available. The current, self-reporting study investigated the prevalence to latex gloves amongst four professional groups within three Diagnostic Imaging Departments. Prevalence is similar to that demonstrated elsewhere with 18.3% of individuals expressing latex associated symptoms. Symptoms included itching and redness of hands, dry cracked skin, soreness of eyes and upper respiratory tract complaints. These results indicate that latex hypersensitivity is a real problem amongst Irish healthcare workers. This preliminary work provides the basis of a much larger controlled study currently being planned

  16. Clinical diagnostic and sociocultural dimensions of deliberate self-harm in Mumbai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkar, Shubhangi R; Dawani, Varsha; Weiss, Mitchell G

    2006-04-01

    Patients' accounts complement psychiatric assessment of deliberate self-harm (DSH). In this study we examined psychiatric disorders, and sociocultural and cross-cultural features of DSH. SCID diagnostic interviews and a locally adapted EMIC interview were used to study 196 patients after DSH at a general hospital in Mumbai, India. Major depression was the most common diagnosis (38.8%), followed by substance use disorders (16.8%), but 44.4% of patients did not meet criteria for an enduring Axis-I disorder (no diagnosis, V-code, or adjustment disorder). Psychache arising from patient-identified sociocultural contexts and stressors complements, but does not necessarily fulfill, criteria for explanatory psychiatric disorders.

  17. Marker allergens of weed pollen - basic considerations and diagnostic benefits in the clinical routine: Part 16 of the Series Molecular Allergology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemeseder, Teresa; Hemmer, Wolfgang; Hawranek, Thomas; Gadermaier, Gabriele

    The term weed is referring to plants used as culinary herbs and medicinal plants as well as ecologically adaptive and invasive segetal plants. In Europe, pollen of ragweed, mugwort, English plantain and pellitory are the main elicitors of weed pollen allergies. Presently, 35 weed pollen allergens have been identified. The most relevant belong to the protein families of pectate lyases, defensin-like proteins, non-specific lipid transfer proteins, and Ole e 1-like proteins. The sensitization frequency depends on geographic regions and might affect more than 50 % of pollen allergic patients in distinct regions. Due to overlapping flowering seasons, similar habitats, polysensitizations and cross-reactive (pan)-allergens, it is difficult to diagnose genuine weed pollen sensitization using pollen extracts. Marker allergens for component-resolved diagnostics are available for the important weed pollen. These are Amb a 1 (ragweed), Art v 1 (mugwort), Pla l 1 (English plantain) and Par j 2 (pellitory). Molecule-based approaches can be used to identify the primary sensitizer and thus enable selection of the appropriate weed pollen extracts for allergen immunotherapy.

  18. Routine Responses to Disruption of Routines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Mahua

    2015-01-01

    "Organisational routines" is a widely studied research area. However, there is a dearth of research on disruption of routines. The few studies on disruption of routines discussed problem-solving activities that are carried out in response to disruption. In contrast, this study develops a theory of "solution routines" that are a…

  19. Agent-based station for on-line diagnostics by self-adaptive laser Doppler vibrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, S; Paone, N; Castellini, P

    2013-12-01

    A self-adaptive diagnostic system based on laser vibrometry is proposed for quality control of mechanical defects by vibration testing; it is developed for appliances at the end of an assembly line, but its characteristics are generally suited for testing most types of electromechanical products. It consists of a laser Doppler vibrometer, equipped with scanning mirrors and a camera, which implements self-adaptive bahaviour for optimizing the measurement. The system is conceived as a Quality Control Agent (QCA) and it is part of a Multi Agent System that supervises all the production line. The QCA behaviour is defined so to minimize measurement uncertainty during the on-line tests and to compensate target mis-positioning under guidance of a vision system. Best measurement conditions are reached by maximizing the amplitude of the optical Doppler beat signal (signal quality) and consequently minimize uncertainty. In this paper, the optimization strategy for measurement enhancement achieved by the down-hill algorithm (Nelder-Mead algorithm) and its effect on signal quality improvement is discussed. Tests on a washing machine in controlled operating conditions allow to evaluate the efficacy of the method; significant reduction of noise on vibration velocity spectra is observed. Results from on-line tests are presented, which demonstrate the potential of the system for industrial quality control.

  20. Agent-based station for on-line diagnostics by self-adaptive laser Doppler vibrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, S.; Paone, N.; Castellini, P.

    2013-12-01

    A self-adaptive diagnostic system based on laser vibrometry is proposed for quality control of mechanical defects by vibration testing; it is developed for appliances at the end of an assembly line, but its characteristics are generally suited for testing most types of electromechanical products. It consists of a laser Doppler vibrometer, equipped with scanning mirrors and a camera, which implements self-adaptive bahaviour for optimizing the measurement. The system is conceived as a Quality Control Agent (QCA) and it is part of a Multi Agent System that supervises all the production line. The QCA behaviour is defined so to minimize measurement uncertainty during the on-line tests and to compensate target mis-positioning under guidance of a vision system. Best measurement conditions are reached by maximizing the amplitude of the optical Doppler beat signal (signal quality) and consequently minimize uncertainty. In this paper, the optimization strategy for measurement enhancement achieved by the down-hill algorithm (Nelder-Mead algorithm) and its effect on signal quality improvement is discussed. Tests on a washing machine in controlled operating conditions allow to evaluate the efficacy of the method; significant reduction of noise on vibration velocity spectra is observed. Results from on-line tests are presented, which demonstrate the potential of the system for industrial quality control.

  1. [Therapeutic goals and indications: psychotherapy patient's self-reports during diagnostic assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, H

    2000-07-01

    Although individual therapeutic goals are considered to be important factors motivating patients to engage in therapeutic work, they have gained little attention in empirical research. In the present study, patients were given a questionnaire containing 24 therapeutic goals which could be rated according to their subjective relevance on a 5-point scale. N = 152 patients (mean age 34.5 years, 59.2% female) who presented at a university psychotherapy outpatient department to attend a diagnostic interview participated in the study. "To solve my problems" and "to get relief from my complaints" were the goals that were rated as most important. Goals pertaining to mental health such as more contentness and calmness, self-assertion and insight scored high, too. Three rational scales were constructed: 1. insight, 2. sociability, and 3. self-assertion. These scales were correlated with both patients' causal attributions and therapy expectations in plausible ways. However, the general strength of intercorrelations point of the conception patients goals were not very succinct at the time of the intake interview. Indication groups regarding specific therapeutic measures did not differ with respect to therapy goals. Only the general decision whether to recommend a psychotherapeutic intervention or not seemed to be influenced by patients' therapeutic aims.

  2. Combating stress risks with the job stress self diagnostic method: paper XV World Congress of Sociology 2002

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oeij, P.R.A.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper of the World Congress of Sociology 2002 of ISA (International Sociological Association), the content and uses of the Job Stress Self Diagnostic Method (JSSDM) are described. The JSSDM aim is (a) to diagnose work processes to determine the presence of conditions for control problems and

  3. Routine clinical knee MR reports: comparison of diagnostic performance at 1.5 T and 3.0 T for assessment of the articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandell, Jacob C; Rhodes, Jeffrey A; Shah, Nehal; Gaviola, Glenn C; Gomoll, Andreas H; Smith, Stacy E

    2017-11-01

    Accurate assessment of knee articular cartilage is clinically important. Although 3.0 Tesla (T) MRI is reported to offer improved diagnostic performance, literature regarding the clinical impact of MRI field strength is lacking. The purpose of this study is to compare the diagnostic performance of clinical MRI reports for assessment of cartilage at 1.5 and 3.0 T in comparison to arthroscopy. This IRB-approved retrospective study consisted of 300 consecutive knees in 297 patients who had routine clinical MRI and arthroscopy. Descriptions of cartilage from MRI reports of 165 knees at 1.5 T and 135 at 3.0 T were compared with arthroscopy. The sensitivity, specificity, percent of articular surfaces graded concordantly, and percent of articular surfaces graded within one grade of the arthroscopic grading were calculated for each articular surface at 1.5 and 3.0 T. Agreement between MRI and arthroscopy was calculated with the weighted-kappa statistic. Significance testing was performed utilizing the z-test after bootstrapping to obtain the standard error. The sensitivity, specificity, percent of articular surfaces graded concordantly, and percent of articular surfaces graded within one grade were 61.4%, 82.7%, 62.2%, and 77.5% at 1.5 T and 61.8%, 80.6%, 59.5%, and 75.6% at 3.0 T, respectively. The weighted kappa statistic was 0.56 at 1.5 T and 0.55 at 3.0 T. There was no statistically significant difference in any of these parameters between 1.5 and 3.0 T. Factors potentially contributing to the lack of diagnostic advantage of 3.0 T MRI are discussed.

  4. Self Diagnostic Accelerometer Ground Testing on a C-17 Aircraft Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokars, Roger P.; Lekki, John D.

    2013-01-01

    The self diagnostic accelerometer (SDA) developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center was tested for the first time in an aircraft engine environment as part of the Vehicle Integrated Propulsion Research (VIPR) program. The VIPR program includes testing multiple critical flight sensor technologies. One such sensor, the accelerometer, measures vibrations to detect faults in the engine. In order to rely upon the accelerometer, the health of the accelerometer must be ensured. Sensor system malfunction is a significant contributor to propulsion in flight shutdowns (IFSD) which can lead to aircraft accidents when the issue is compounded with an inappropriate crew response. The development of the SDA is important for both reducing the IFSD rate, and hence reducing the rate at which this component failure type can put an aircraft in jeopardy, and also as a critical enabling technology for future automated malfunction diagnostic systems. The SDA is a sensor system designed to actively determine the accelerometer structural health and attachment condition, in addition to making vibration measurements. The SDA uses a signal conditioning unit that sends an electrical chirp to the accelerometer and recognizes changes in the response due to changes in the accelerometer health and attachment condition. In an effort toward demonstrating the SDAs flight worthiness and robustness, multiple SDAs were mounted and tested on a C-17 aircraft engine. The engine test conditions varied from engine off, to idle, to maximum power. The two SDA attachment conditions used were fully tight and loose. The newly developed SDA health algorithm described herein uses cross correlation pattern recognition to discriminate a healthy from a faulty SDA. The VIPR test results demonstrate for the first time the robustness of the SDA in an engine environment characterized by high vibration levels.

  5. Diagnostic labelling influences self-rated health. A prospective cohort study: the HUNT Study, Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Pål; Langhammer, Arnulf; Krokstad, Steinar; Forsmo, Siri

    2015-10-01

    Studies have shown an independent association between poor self-rated health (SRH) and increased mortality. Few studies, however, have investigated any possible impact on SRH of diagnostic labelling. To test whether SRH differed in persons with known and unknown hypothyroidism, diabetes mellitus (DM) or hypertension, opposed to persons without these conditions, after 11-year follow-up. Prospective population-based cohort study in North-Trøndelag County, Norway, HUNT2 (1995-97) to HUNT3 (2006-08). All inhabitants aged 20 years and older were invited. The response rate was 69.5% in HUNT2 and 54.1% in HUNT3. In total, 34144 persons aged 20-70 years were included in the study population. The outcome was poor SRH. Persons with known disease had an increased odds ratio (OR) to report poor SRH at follow-up; figures ranging from 1.11 (0.68-1.79) to 2.52 (1.46-4.34) (men with hypothyroidism kept out owing to too few numbers). However, in persons not reporting, but having laboratory results indicating these diseases (unknown disease), no corresponding associations with SRH were found. Contrary, the OR for poor SRH in women with unknown hypothyroidism and unknown hypertension was 0.64 (0.38-1.06) and 0.89 (0.79-1.01), respectively. Awareness opposed to ignorance of hypothyroidism, DM and hypertension seemed to be associated with poor perceived health, suggesting that diagnostic labelling could have a negative effect on SRH. This relationship needs to be tested more thoroughly in future research but should be kept in mind regarding the benefits of early diagnosing of diseases. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  6. Self-diagnosis of malaria by travelers and expatriates: assessment of malaria rapid diagnostic tests available on the internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltha, Jessica; Gillet, Philippe; Heutmekers, Marloes; Bottieau, Emmanuel; Van Gompel, Alfons; Jacobs, Jan

    2013-01-01

    In the past malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for self-diagnosis by travelers were considered suboptimal due to poor performance. Nowadays RDTs for self-diagnosis are marketed and available through the internet. The present study assessed RDT products marketed for self-diagnosis for diagnostic accuracy and quality of labeling, content and instructions for use (IFU). Diagnostic accuracy of eight RDT products was assessed with a panel of stored whole blood samples comprising the four Plasmodium species (n = 90) as well as Plasmodium negative samples (n = 10). IFUs were assessed for quality of description of procedure and interpretation and for lay-out and readability level. Errors in packaging and content were recorded. Two products gave false-positive test lines in 70% and 80% of Plasmodium negative samples, precluding their use. Of the remaining products, 4/6 had good to excellent sensitivity for the diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum (98.2%-100.0%) and Plasmodium vivax (93.3%-100.0%). Sensitivity for Plasmodium ovale and Plasmodium malariae diagnosis was poor (6.7%-80.0%). All but one product yielded false-positive test lines after reading beyond the recommended reading time. Problems with labeling (not specifying target antigens (n = 3), and content (desiccant with no humidity indicator (n = 6)) were observed. IFUs had major shortcomings in description of test procedure and interpretation, poor readability and lay-out and user-unfriendly typography. Strategic issues (e.g. the need for repeat testing and reasons for false-negative tests) were not addressed in any of the IFUs. Diagnostic accuracy of RDTs for self-diagnosis was variable, with only 4/8 RDT products being reliable for the diagnosis of P. falciparum and P. vivax, and none for P. ovale and P. malariae. RDTs for self-diagnosis need improvements in IFUs (content and user-friendliness), labeling and content before they can be considered for self-diagnosis by the traveler.

  7. An open-source, self-explanatory touch screen in routine care. Validity of filling in the Bath measures on Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, Function Index, the Health Assessment Questionnaire and Visual Analogue Scales in comparison with paper versions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schefte, David B; Hetland, Merete L

    2010-01-01

    The Danish DANBIO registry has developed open-source software for touch screens in the waiting room. The objective was to assess the validity of outcomes from self-explanatory patient questionnaires on touch screen in comparison with the traditional paper form in routine clinical care....

  8. Group based diabetes self-management education compared to routine treatment for people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A systematic review with meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Diabetes self-management education (DSME) can be delivered in many forms. Group based DSME is widespread due to being a cheaper method and the added advantages of having patient meet and discuss with each other. assess effects of group-based DSME compared to routine treatment on clinical, lifestyle and psychosocial outcomes in type-2 diabetes patients. Methods A systematic review with meta-analysis. Computerised bibliographic database were searched up to January 2008 for randomised controlled trials evaluating group-based DSME for adult type-2 diabetics versus routine treatment where the intervention had at least one session and =/>6 months follow-up. At least two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed study quality. Results In total 21 studies (26 publications, 2833 participants) were included. Of all the participants 4 out of 10 were male, baseline age was 60 years, BMI 31.6, HbA1c 8.23%, diabetes duration 8 years and 82% used medication. For the main clinical outcomes, HbA1c was significantly reduced at 6 months (0.44% points; P = 0.0006, 13 studies, 1883 participants), 12 months (0.46% points; P = 0.001, 11 studies, 1503 participants) and 2 years (0.87% points; P 1, 3 studies, 397 participants) and fasting blood glucose levels were also significantly reduced at 12 months (1.26 mmol/l; P 1, 5 studies, 690 participants) but not at 6 months. For the main lifestyle outcomes, diabetes knowledge was improved significantly at 6 months (SMD 0.83; P = 0.00001, 6 studies, 768 participants), 12 months (SMD 0.85; P 1, 5 studies, 955 participants) and 2 years (SMD 1.59; P = 0.03, 2 studies, 355 participants) and self-management skills also improved significantly at 6 months (SMD 0.55; P = 0.01, 4 studies, 534 participants). For the main psychosocial outcomes, there were significant improvement for empowerment/self-efficacy (SMD 0.28, P = 0.01, 2 studies, 326 participants) after 6 months. For

  9. Gonadal dose in routine diagnostic examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, J.; Koen, J.A.; Akkermans, J.A.

    1974-01-01

    Gonadal doses caused by stray radiation produced during radiodiagnostic investigations were measured with thermoluminescent dosemeters in various hospitals in the Netherlands. Significantly different gonadal doses were measured depending upon the hospital where the investigations were carried out. The mean dose of an examination type in one country can only be determined with any accuracy if measurements in a large number of hospitals are performed

  10. Combating stress risks with the job stress self diagnostic method: paper XV World Congress of Sociology 2002

    OpenAIRE

    Oeij, P.R.A.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper of the World Congress of Sociology 2002 of ISA (International Sociological Association), the content and uses of the Job Stress Self Diagnostic Method (JSSDM) are described. The JSSDM aim is (a) to diagnose work processes to determine the presence of conditions for control problems and stress risks, and (b) to develop solutions to combat stress risks on organisational level. The method is based on three theories of job and organisation design and on the insight to combine viewpo...

  11. The impact of health on individual retirement plans: self-reported versus diagnostic measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Datta Gupta, Nabanita; Larsen, Mona

    2009-01-01

    provides evidence that men's self-report of myalgia and back problems and women's self-report of osteoarthritis possibly yield biased estimates of the impact on planned retirement age, and that this bias ranges between 1.5 and 2 years, suggesting that users of survey data should be wary of applying self...

  12. Study on a self diagnostic monitoring system for an air-operated valve: development of a fault library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai, Jang Bom; Kim, Yun Chul; Kim, Woo Shik; Cho, Hang Duke

    2004-01-01

    In the interest of nuclear power plant safety, a Self-Diagnostic Monitoring System (SDMS) is needed to monitor defects in safety-related components. An Air-Operated Valve (AOV) is one of the components to be monitored since the failure of its operation could potentially have catastrophic consequences. In this paper, a model of the AOV is developed with the parameters that affect the operational characteristics. The model is useful for both understanding the operation and correlating parameters and defects. Various defects are introduced in the experiments to construct a fault library, which will be used in a pattern recognition approach. Finally, the validity of the fault library is examined

  13. Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI): On-Line Intelligent Self-Diagnostic Monitoring for Next Generation Nuclear Plants - Phase I Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. J. Bond; S. R. Doctor; R. W. Gilbert; D. B. Jarrell; F. L. Greitzer; R. J. Meador

    2000-09-01

    OAK-B135 This OSTI ID belongs to an IWO and is being released out of the system. The Program Manager Rebecca Richardson has confirmed that all reports have been received. The objective of this project is to design and demonstrate the operation of the real-time intelligent self-diagnostic and prognostic system for next generation nuclear power plant systems. This new self-diagnostic technology is titled, ''On-Line Intelligent Self-Diagnostic Monitoring System'' (SDMS). This project provides a proof-of-principle technology demonstration for SDMS on a pilot plant scale service water system, where a distributed array of sensors is integrated with active components and passive structures typical of next generation nuclear power reactor and plant systems. This project employs state-of-the-art sensors, instrumentation, and computer processing to improve the monitoring and assessment of the power reactor system and to provide diagnostic and automated prognostics capabilities.

  14. Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI): On-Line Intelligent Self-Diagnostic Monitoring for Next Generation Nuclear Plants - Phase I Annual Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, L.G.; Doctor, S.R.; Gilbert, R.W.; Jarrell, D.B.; Greitzer, F.L.; Meador, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    OAK-B135 This OSTI ID belongs to an IWO and is being released out of the system. The Program Manager Rebecca Richardson has confirmed that all reports have been received. The objective of this project is to design and demonstrate the operation of the real-time intelligent self-diagnostic and prognostic system for next generation nuclear power plant systems. This new self-diagnostic technology is titled, ''On-Line Intelligent Self-Diagnostic Monitoring System'' (SDMS). This project provides a proof-of-principle technology demonstration for SDMS on a pilot plant scale service water system, where a distributed array of sensors is integrated with active components and passive structures typical of next generation nuclear power reactor and plant systems. This project employs state-of-the-art sensors, instrumentation, and computer processing to improve the monitoring and assessment of the power reactor system and to provide diagnostic and automated prognostics capabilities

  15. Measuring Self-Directed Learning: A Diagnostic Tool for Adult Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khiat, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Self-directed learning is an important form of adult learning (Caffarella, 1993; Knowles, 1975; Knowles, Holton & Swanson, 2005; Merriam, 2001; Merriam & Caffarella, 1999). The strategies of self-directed learning allow adult learners to cope better with their studies while fulfilling family, work and other commitments. This study…

  16. Australian diagnostic radiographers' attitudes and perceptions of imaging obese patients: A study of self, peers and students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aweidah, L.; Robinson, J.; Cumming, S.; Lewis, S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and Objective: Imaging obese patients poses a number of challenges for diagnostic radiographers through positioning, radiation exposure, communication and care. Furthermore, the increasing prevalence of obesity in Australian society ensures these imaging challenges are more frequent however little is known about this area. This study aims to explore the attitudes and perceptions of diagnostic radiographers toward imaging obese patients through a mixed methods study. Methods: Ethics approval was granted to interview and survey diagnostic radiographers about their attitudes and perceptions of imaging obese patients. Twelve diagnostic radiographers who are designated clinical educators (DR CEs) took part in a 30–45 min semi-structured interview as well as a 20 min computer-based Weight Implicit Association Test (Weight-IAT) and self-report questionnaire of explicit attitudes. An additional 25 experienced Diagnostic Radiographers who were associate supervisors completed the Weight-IAT/explicit questionnaire only. Results: Thematic analysis of the interviews revealed that DR CEs adopted an image-focussed or patient-focussed approach to obese patients. Key themes with a negative bias included blame, tolerance and insecurity of skill. Positively associated key themes were empathy and experience in radiography. The sample overall showed a significant negative implicit weight bias (P = 0.016) as measured by the Weight-IAT and there was no evidence of negative explicit attitudes. Conclusion: Australian diagnostic radiographers in this study exhibited significant negative implicit weight bias, with interview results highlighting attitudes of blame and frustration towards obese patients. DR CEs were more likely to be focussed on image acquisition rather than patient considerations, with fewer responses related to empathy and equity. - Highlights: • Mixed-methods study combining qualitative interviews and implicit–explicit bias towards imaging obese

  17. Routine hospital data - is it good enough for trials? An example using England's Hospital Episode Statistics in the SHIFT trial of Family Therapy vs. Treatment as Usual in adolescents following self-harm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright-Hughes, Alexandra; Graham, Elizabeth; Cottrell, David; Farrin, Amanda

    2018-04-01

    Use of routine data sources within clinical research is increasing and is endorsed by the National Institute for Health Research to increase trial efficiencies; however there is limited evidence for its use in clinical trials, especially in relation to self-harm. One source of routine data, Hospital Episode Statistics, is collated and distributed by NHS Digital and contains details of admissions, outpatient, and Accident and Emergency attendances provided periodically by English National Health Service hospitals. We explored the reliability and accuracy of Hospital Episode Statistics, compared to data collected directly from hospital records, to assess whether it would provide complete, accurate, and reliable means of acquiring hospital attendances for self-harm - the primary outcome for the SHIFT (Self-Harm Intervention: Family Therapy) trial evaluating Family Therapy for adolescents following self-harm. Participant identifiers were linked to Hospital Episode Statistics Accident and Emergency, and Admissions data, and episodes combined to describe participants' complete hospital attendance. Attendance data were initially compared to data previously gathered by trial researchers from pre-identified hospitals. Final comparison was conducted of subsequent attendances collected through Hospital Episode Statistics and researcher follow-up. Consideration was given to linkage rates; number and proportion of attendances retrieved; reliability of Accident and Emergency, and Admissions data; percentage of self-harm episodes recorded and coded appropriately; and percentage of required data items retrieved. Participants were first linked to Hospital Episode Statistics with an acceptable match rate of 95%, identifying a total of 341 complete hospital attendances, compared to 139 reported by the researchers at the time. More than double the proportion of Hospital Episode Statistics Accident and Emergency episodes could not be classified in relation to self-harm (75%) compared

  18. Self-Discrepancy and Eating Disorder Symptoms Across Eating Disorder Diagnostic Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Tyler B; Lavender, Jason M; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Crosby, Ross D; Engel, Scott G; Strauman, Timothy J; Mitchell, James E; Crow, Scott J; Le Grange, Daniel; Klein, Marjorie H; Smith, Tracey L; Peterson, Carol B

    2016-11-01

    This study examined self-discrepancy, a construct of theoretical relevance to eating disorder (ED) psychopathology, across different types of EDs. Individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN; n = 112), bulimia nervosa (BN; n = 72), and binge eating disorder (BED; n = 199) completed semi-structured interviews assessing specific types of self-discrepancies. Results revealed that actual:ideal (A:I) discrepancy was positively associated with AN, actual:ought (A:O) discrepancy was positively associated with BN and BED, and self-discrepancies did not differentiate BN from BED. Across diagnoses, A:O discrepancy was positively associated with severity of purging, binge eating, and global ED psychopathology. Further, there were significant interactions between diagnosis and A:O discrepancy for global ED psychopathology and between diagnosis and A:I discrepancy for binge eating and driven exercise. These results support the importance of self-discrepancy as a potential causal and maintenance variable in EDs that differentiates among different types of EDs and symptom severity. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  19. Improving glycaemic control and life skills in adolescents with type 1 diabetes: A randomised, controlled intervention study using the Guided Self-Determination-Young method in triads of adolescents, parents and health care providers integrated into routine paediatric outpatient clinics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Gitte; Thorsteinsson, Birger; Esbensen, Bente Appel

    2011-01-01

    visits will reduce haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) concentrations and improve adolescents' life skills compared with a control group. METHODS: Using a mixed methods design comprising a randomised controlled trial and a nested qualitative evaluation, we will recruit 68 adolescents age 13 - 18 years with type 1......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Adolescents with type 1 diabetes face demanding challenges due to conflicting priorities between psychosocial needs and diabetes management. This conflict often results in poor glycaemic control and discord between adolescents and parents. Adolescent-parent conflicts are thus...... are lacking. The Guided Self-Determination method is proven effective in adult care and has been adapted to adolescents and parents (Guided Self-Determination-Young (GSD-Y)) for use in paediatric diabetes outpatient clinics. Our objective is to test whether GSD-Y used in routine paediatric outpatient clinic...

  20. Self-consistent beam halo studies ampersand halo diagnostic development in a continuous linear focusing channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jameson, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    Beam halos are formed via self-consistent motion of the beam particles. Interactions of single particles with time-varying density distributions of other particles are a major source of halo. Aspects of these interactions are studied for an initially equilibrium distribution in a radial, linear, continuous focusing system. When there is a mismatch, it is shown that in the self-consistent system, there is a threshold in space-charge and mismatch, above which a halo is formed that extends to ∼1.5 times the initial maximum mismatch radius. Tools are sought for characterizing the halo dynamics. Testing the particles against the width of the mismatch driving resonance is useful for finding a conservative estimate of the threshold. The exit, entering and transition times, and the time evolution of the halo, are also explored using this technique. Extension to higher dimensions is briefly discussed

  1. Clustering of the Self-Organizing Map based Approach in Induction Machine Rotor Faults Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed TOUMI

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Self-Organizing Maps (SOM is an excellent method of analyzingmultidimensional data. The SOM based classification is attractive, due to itsunsupervised learning and topology preserving properties. In this paper, theperformance of the self-organizing methods is investigated in induction motorrotor fault detection and severity evaluation. The SOM is based on motor currentsignature analysis (MCSA. The agglomerative hierarchical algorithms using theWard’s method is applied to automatically dividing the map into interestinginterpretable groups of map units that correspond to clusters in the input data. Theresults obtained with this approach make it possible to detect a rotor bar fault justdirectly from the visualization results. The system is also able to estimate theextent of rotor faults.

  2. New cancer diagnostics and therapeutics from a ninth 'hallmark of cancer': symmetric self-renewal by mutated distributed stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherley, James L

    2013-11-01

    A total of eight cellular alterations associated with human carcinogenesis have been framed as the 'hallmarks of cancer'. This representation overlooks a ninth hallmark of cancer: the requirement for tumor-originating distributed stem cells to shift sufficiently from asymmetric to symmetric self-renewal kinetics for attainment of the high cell production rate necessary to form clinically significant tumors within a human lifespan. Overlooking this ninth hallmark costs opportunities for discovery of more selective molecular targets for development of improved cancer therapeutics and missing cancer stem cell biomarkers of greater specificity. Here, the biological basis for the ninth hallmark of cancer is considered toward highlighting its importance in human carcinogenesis and, as such, its potential for revealing unique molecules for targeting cancer diagnostics and therapeutics.

  3. Self-inflicted skin lesions: the importance of a proper diagnostic and therapeutic approach

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitre Dimitrov; Radomir Reszke; Jacek Szepietowski

    2016-01-01

    Introduction . Patients with self-inflicted skin lesions (SISL) are most often referred to dermatologists. Since psychological and psychiatric conditions might be the underlying reasons for the behavior of these patients, the psychology-associated component should always be kept in mind when approaching such individuals. Objective. To discuss distinctive aspects of the approach towards patients with SISL and emphasize the most relevant issues concerning the management of psychodermatose...

  4. Data format translation routines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burris, R.D.

    1981-02-01

    To enable the effective connection of several dissimilar computers into a network, modification of the data being passed from one computer to another may become necessary. This document describes a package of routines which permit the translation of data in PDP-8 formats to PDP-11 or DECsystem-10 formats or from PDP-11 format to DECsystem-10 format. Additional routines are described which permit the effective use of the translation routines in the environment of the Fusion Energy Division (FED) network and the Elmo Bumpy Torus (EBT) data base

  5. Routines and Organizational Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yi, Sangyoon; Becker, Markus; Knudsen, Thorbjørn

    2014-01-01

    Routines have been perceived as a source of inertia in the process of organizational change. In this study, we suggest an overlooked, but prevalent, mechanism by which the inertial nature of routines helps, rather than hinders, organizational adaptation. Routine-level inertia plays a hidden role...... to cope with its task environment. In our nuanced perspective, inertia is not only a consequence of adaptation but also a source of adaptation. This logic is helpful to understand why reliable but apparently inertial organizations keep surviving and often exhibit outstanding performance. We conclude...

  6. MFP scanner diagnostics using a self-printed target to measure the modulation transfer function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weibao; Bauer, Peter; Wagner, Jerry; Allebach, Jan P.

    2014-01-01

    In the current market, reduction of warranty costs is an important avenue for improving profitability by manufacturers of printer products. Our goal is to develop an autonomous capability for diagnosis of printer and scanner caused defects with mid-range laser multifunction printers (MFPs), so as to reduce warranty costs. If the scanner unit of the MFP is not performing according to specification, this issue needs to be diagnosed. If there is a print quality issue, this can be diagnosed by printing a special test page that is resident in the firmware of the MFP unit, and then scanning it. However, the reliability of this process will be compromised if the scanner unit is defective. Thus, for both scanner and printer image quality issues, it is important to be able to properly evaluate the scanner performance. In this paper, we consider evaluation of the scanner performance by measuring its modulation transfer function (MTF). The MTF is a fundamental tool for assessing the performance of imaging systems. Several ways have been proposed to measure the MTF, all of which require a special target, for example a slanted-edge target. It is unacceptably expensive to ship every MFP with such a standard target, and to expect that the customer can keep track of it. To reduce this cost, in this paper, we develop new approach to this task. It is based on a self-printed slanted-edge target. Then, we propose algorithms to improve the results using a self-printed slanted-edge target. Finally, we present experimental results for MTF measurement using self-printed targets and compare them to the results obtained with standard targets.

  7. Routine sputum culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sputum culture ... There, it is placed in a special dish (culture). It is then watched to see if bacteria ... Elsevier; 2018:chap 36. Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Culture, routine. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. Laboratory ...

  8. The problem of sexual imbalance and techniques of the self in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flore, Jacinthe

    2016-09-01

    This article examines the problematization of sexual appetite and its imbalances in the development of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The dominant strands of historiographies of sexuality have focused on historicizing sexual object choice and understanding the emergence of sexual identities. This article emphasizes the need to contextualize these histories within a broader frame of historical interest in the problematization of sexual appetite. The first part highlights how sexual object choice, as a paradigm of sexual dysfunctions, progressively receded from medical interest in the twentieth century as the clinical gaze turned to the problem of sexual appetite and its imbalances. The second part uses the example of the newly introduced Female Sexual Interest/Arousal Disorder in the DSM-5 to explore how the Manual functions as a technique for taking care of the self. I argue that the design of the Manual and associated inventories and questionnaires paved the way for their interpretation and application as techniques for self-examination. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Consuming technologies - developing routines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram-Hanssen, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    technologies and in this article these processes will be investigated from three different perspectives: an historical perspective of how new technologies have entered homes, a consumer perspective of how both houses and new technologies are purchased and finally, as the primary part of the article, a user...... perspective of how routines develop while these technologies are being used. In the conclusion these insights are discussed in relation to possible ways of influencing routines....

  10. Self-inflicted skin lesions: the importance of a proper diagnostic and therapeutic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitre Dimitrov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction . Patients with self-inflicted skin lesions (SISL are most often referred to dermatologists. Since psychological and psychiatric conditions might be the underlying reasons for the behavior of these patients, the psychology-associated component should always be kept in mind when approaching such individuals. Objective. To discuss distinctive aspects of the approach towards patients with SISL and emphasize the most relevant issues concerning the management of psychodermatoses. Case report. We present a case of a 13-year-old girl with a 6-month history of skin lesions misdiagnosed as allergic contact dermatitis. Conscientious history taking and physical examination enabled the diagnosis of SISL. Conclusions. The proper approach to patients presenting with psychodermatoses differs from that for other dermatological patients and requires considering several additional aspects. We would like to emphasize the distinguishing aspects and importance of the proper approach to patients with SISL that might aid clinicians in diagnosing and treating these individuals in the future.

  11. A self-diagnostic adhesive for monitoring bonded joints in aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Yitao; Li, Yu-hung; Kopsaftopoulos, Fotis; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2016-04-01

    Bondline integrity is still one of the most critical concerns in the design of aircraft structures up to date. Due to the lack of confidence on the integrity of the bondline both during fabrication and service, the industry standards and regulations still require assembling the composite using conventional fasteners. Furthermore, current state-of-the-art non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques are incapable of offering mature solutions on the issue of bondline integrity monitoring. Therefore, the objective of this work is the development of an intelligent adhesive film with integrated micro-sensors for monitoring the integrity of the bondline interface. The proposed method makes use of an electromechanical-impedance (EMI) based method, which is a rapidly evolving approach within the SHM family. Furthermore, an innovative screen-printing technique to fabricate piezoelectric ceramic sensors with minimal thickness has been developed at Stanford. The approach presented in this study is based on the use of (i) micro screen-printed piezoelectric sensors integrated into adhesive leaving a minimal footprint on the material, (ii) numerical and analytical modeling of the EMI spectrum of the adhesive bondline, (iii) novel diagnostic algorithms for monitoring the bondline integrity based on advanced signal processing techniques, and (iv) the experimental assessment via prototype adhesively bonded structures in static (varying loads) and dynamic (fatigue) environments. The proposed method will provide a huge confidence on the use of bonded joints for aerospace structures and lead to a paradigm change in their design by enabling enormous weight savings while maximizing the economic and performance efficiency.

  12. Improving glycaemic control and life skills in adolescents with type 1 diabetes: A randomised, controlled intervention study using the Guided Self-Determination-Young method in triads of adolescents, parents and health care providers integrated into routine paediatric outpatient clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esbensen Bente

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adolescents with type 1 diabetes face demanding challenges due to conflicting priorities between psychosocial needs and diabetes management. This conflict often results in poor glycaemic control and discord between adolescents and parents. Adolescent-parent conflicts are thus a barrier for health care providers (HCPs to overcome in their attempts to involve both adolescents and parents in improvement of glycaemic control. Evidence-based interventions that involve all three parties (i.e., adolescents, parents and HCPs and are integrated into routine outpatient clinic visits are lacking. The Guided Self-Determination method is proven effective in adult care and has been adapted to adolescents and parents (Guided Self-Determination-Young (GSD-Y for use in paediatric diabetes outpatient clinics. Our objective is to test whether GSD-Y used in routine paediatric outpatient clinic visits will reduce haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c concentrations and improve adolescents' life skills compared with a control group. Methods/Design Using a mixed methods design comprising a randomised controlled trial and a nested qualitative evaluation, we will recruit 68 adolescents age 13 - 18 years with type 1 diabetes (HbA1c > 8.0% and their parents from 2 Danish hospitals and randomise into GSD-Y or control groups. During an 8-12 month period, the GSD-Y group will complete 8 outpatient GSD-Y visits, and the control group will completes an equal number of standard visits. The primary outcome is HbA1c. Secondary outcomes include the following: number of self-monitored blood glucose values and levels of autonomous motivation, involvement and autonomy support from parents, autonomy support from HCPs, perceived competence in managing diabetes, well-being, and diabetes-related problems. Primary and secondary outcomes will be evaluated within and between groups by comparing data from baseline, after completion of the visits, and again after a 6-month follow-up. To

  13. Development of a majority vote decision module for a self-diagnostic monitoring system for an air-operated valve system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woo Shin; Chai, Jang Bom; Kim, In Taek

    2015-01-01

    A self-diagnostic monitoring system is a system that has the ability to measure various physical quantities such as temperature, pressure, or acceleration from sensors scattered over a mechanical system such as a power plant, in order to monitor its various states, and to make a decision about its health status. We have developed a self-diagnostic monitoring system for an air-operated valve system to be used in a nuclear power plant. In this study, we have tried to improve the self-diagnostic monitoring system to increase its reliability. We have implemented three different machine learning algorithms, i.e., logistic regression, an artificial neural network, and a support vector machine. After each algorithm performs the decision process independently, the decision-making module collects these individual decisions and makes a final decision using a majority vote scheme. With this, we performed some simulations and presented some of its results. The contribution of this study is that, by employing more robust and stable algorithms, each of the algorithms performs the recognition task more accurately. Moreover, by integrating these results and employing the majority vote scheme, we can make a definite decision, which makes the self-diagnostic monitoring system more reliable

  14. Development of a majority vote decision module for a self-diagnostic monitoring system for an air-operated valve system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Woo Shin [Dept. of Information and Communication Engineering, Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chai, Jang Bom [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, In Taek [Dept. of Information and Communication Engineering, Myongji University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    A self-diagnostic monitoring system is a system that has the ability to measure various physical quantities such as temperature, pressure, or acceleration from sensors scattered over a mechanical system such as a power plant, in order to monitor its various states, and to make a decision about its health status. We have developed a self-diagnostic monitoring system for an air-operated valve system to be used in a nuclear power plant. In this study, we have tried to improve the self-diagnostic monitoring system to increase its reliability. We have implemented three different machine learning algorithms, i.e., logistic regression, an artificial neural network, and a support vector machine. After each algorithm performs the decision process independently, the decision-making module collects these individual decisions and makes a final decision using a majority vote scheme. With this, we performed some simulations and presented some of its results. The contribution of this study is that, by employing more robust and stable algorithms, each of the algorithms performs the recognition task more accurately. Moreover, by integrating these results and employing the majority vote scheme, we can make a definite decision, which makes the self-diagnostic monitoring system more reliable.

  15. Impact of Diagnostic Practices on the Self-Reported Health of Mothers of Recently Diagnosed Children with ASD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phil Reed

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Obtaining a diagnosis of an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD for a child is a pivotal point in developing the treatment plan for the child but can also be regarded as highly stressful by parents. The current study examined the impact of different aspects of the diagnosis process on the self-reported mental health of mothers of children undergoing a diagnosis for ASD in a cross-sectional cohort design. Methods: One-hundred-fifty-eight mothers of consequently diagnosed children with ASD participated. The severity of the children’s ASD and their intellectual functioning was assessed within twelve months of the diagnosis, and the mothers completed a psychometric assessment battery including the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, General Health Questionnaire, and Questionnaire on Resources and Stress. Results: The actual time from first reporting a problem to obtaining a diagnosis, and the speed of the diagnostic process from first to last appointment, were both negatively related to patenting stress. In contrast, mothers’ perceptions of the speed and helpfulness of the process were negatively related to levels of anxiety and depression. The number of professionals involved in the process and the perceived coherence of the diagnosis were also negatively related to aspects of mothers’ functioning. Conclusions: Care is needed to help mothers through the diagnostic process with regard to their own functioning. Providing information and help sources throughout the process, while keeping the number of professionals involved to a minimum, may improve the parent perception of the process and reduce the negative impacts of the diagnosis on the family as a whole.

  16. An open-source, self-explanatory touch screen in routine care. Validity of filling in the Bath measures on Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, Function Index, the Health Assessment Questionnaire and Visual Analogue Scales in comparison with paper versions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schefte, David B; Hetland, Merete L

    2010-01-01

    The Danish DANBIO registry has developed open-source software for touch screens in the waiting room. The objective was to assess the validity of outcomes from self-explanatory patient questionnaires on touch screen in comparison with the traditional paper form in routine clinical care. Fifty-two AS patients and 59 RA patients completed Visual Analogue Scales (VASs) for pain, fatigue and global health, and Bath measures on Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) and Function Index (BASFI) (AS patients) or HAQs (RA patients) on touch screen and paper form in random order with a 1-h interval. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs), 95% CIs and smallest detectable differences (SDDs) were calculated. ICC ranged from 0.922 to 0.988 (P health when compared with the traditional paper form. Implementation of touch screens in clinical practice is feasible and patients need no instruction.

  17. Modeling the longitudinal latent effect of pregabalin on self-reported changes in sleep disturbances in outpatients with generalized anxiety disorder managed in routine clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz MA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Miguel A Ruiz,1 Enrique Álvarez,2 Jose L Carrasco,3 José M Olivares,4 María Pérez,5 Javier Rejas6 1Department of Methodology, School of Psychology, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, 2Department of Psychiatry, Hospital de la Santa Creu i San Pau, Barcelona, 3Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Clínico San Carlos, Madrid, 4Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Meixoeiro, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario, Vigo, 5Medical Department, Pfizer, S.L.U., Alcobendas, Madrid, 6Health Economics and Outcomes Research Department, Pfizer, S.L.U., Alcobendas, Madrid, Spain Background: Anxiety disorders are among the most common psychiatric illnesses, with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD being one of the most common. Sleep disturbances are highly prevalent in GAD patients. While treatment with pregabalin has been found to be associated with significant improvement in GAD-related sleep disturbance across many controlled clinical trials, mediational analysis has suggested that a substantial portion of this effect could be the result of a direct effect of pregabalin. Thus, the objective of this study was to model the longitudinal latent effect of pregabalin or usual care (UC therapies on changes in sleep in outpatients with GAD under routine clinical practice. Methods: Male and female GAD outpatients, aged 18 years or above, from a 6-month prospective noninterventional trial were analyzed. Direct and indirect effects of either pregabalin or UC changes in anxiety symptoms (assessed with Hamilton Anxiety Scale and sleep disturbances (assessed with Medical Outcomes Study-Sleep Scale [MOS-S] were estimated by a conditional latent curve model applying structural equation modeling. Results: A total of 1,546 pregabalin-naïve patients were analyzed, 984 receiving pregabalin and 562 UC. Both symptoms of anxiety and sleep disturbances were significantly improved in both groups, with higher mean (95% confidence interval score reductions in subjects receiving

  18. Self-referencing Mach-Zehnder interferometer as a laser system diagnostic: Active and adaptive optical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, M.; Mockler, D.J.; English, R.E. Jr.; Byrd, J.L.; Salmon, J.T.

    1991-01-01

    We are incorporating a novel self-referencing Mach-Zehnder interferometer into a large scale laser system as a real time, interactive diagnostic tool for wavefront measurement. The instrument is capable of absolute wavefront measurements accurate to better than λ/10 pv over a wavelength range > 300 nm without readjustment of the optical components. This performance is achieved through the design of both refractive optics and catadioptric collimator to achromatize the Mach-Zehnder reference arm. Other features include polarization insensitivity through the use of low angles of incidence on all beamsplitters as well as an equal path length configuration that allows measurement of either broad-band or closely spaced laser-line sources. Instrument accuracy is periodically monitored in place by means of a thermally and mechanically stable wavefront reference source that is calibrated off-line with a phase conjugate interferometer. Video interferograms are analyzed using Fourier transform techniques on a computer that includes dedicated array processor. Computer and video networks maintain distributed interferometers under the control of a single analysis computer with multiple user access. 7 refs., 11 figs

  19. Risk, reassurance and routine: a qualitative study of narrative understandings of the potential for HIV self-testing among men who have sex with men in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Charles Witzel

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV testing has seen a rapid evolution over the last decade with multiple modalities now in use globally. In recent years HIV self-testing (HIVST has been legalised in the UK paving the way for further expansion of testing. Interventions are delivered in particular social contexts which shape uptake. It is therefore important to understand how novel interventions are likely to be received by their intended users. This study aims to understand how HIVST compliments existing testing strategies considered or adopted by men who have sex with men (MSM. We do this by analysing normative discourses surrounding HIV testing and their perceptions of HIVST’s potential future roles. Methods Six focus group discussions (FGDs were conducted with 47 MSM in London, Manchester and Plymouth. One focus group included only MSM who reported higher risk behaviours and one with those who had never tested for HIV. Data were analysed through a thematic framework analysis. Results Three main narratives for testing for HIV were identified: (i testing in response to a specific risk event; (ii as reassurance when there was a small amount of doubt or anxiety related to HIV; and (iii in response to social norms perpetuated through peers, HIV community groups and the medical establishment to test regularly for HIV. HIVST had limited utility for men when testing in response to specific risk events except in the case of significant structural barriers to other testing opportunities. HIVST was considered to have utility when seeking reassurance, and was thought to be very useful when testing to satisfy the needs and expectations of others around regular testing. There was some ambivalence about the incursion of a clinical intervention into the home. Conclusions HIVST following risk events will likely be limited to those for whom existing service provision is insufficient to meet immediate needs based on structural or personal barriers to testing. Obligations

  20. Computer assisted self interviewing in a sexual health clinic as part of routine clinical care; impact on service and patient and clinician views.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka A Vodstrcil

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Computer assisted self interviewing (CASI has been used at the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre (MSHC since 2008 for obtaining sexual history and identifying patients' risk factors for sexually transmitted infections (STIs. We aimed to evaluate the impact of CASI operating at MSHC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The proportion of patients who decline to answer questions using CASI was determined. We then compared consultation times and STI-testing rates during comparable CASI and non-CASI operating periods. Patients and staff completed anonymous questionnaires about their experience with CASI. 14,190 patients completed CASI during the audit period. Men were more likely than women to decline questions about the number of partners they had of the opposite sex (4.4% v 3.6%, p=0.05 and same sex (8.9% v 0%, p<0.001. One third (34% of HIV-positive men declined the number of partners they had and 11-17% declined questions about condom use. Women were more likely than men to decline to answer questions about condom use (2.9% v 2.3%, p=0.05. There was no difference in the mean consultation times during CASI and non-CASI operating periods (p≥0.17. Only the proportion of women tested for chlamydia differed between the CASI and non-CASI period (84% v 88% respectively, p<0.01. 267 patients completed the survey about CASI. Most (72% men and 69% women were comfortable using the computer and reported that all their answers were accurate (76% men and 71% women. Half preferred CASI but 18% would have preferred a clinician to have asked the questions. 39 clinicians completed the staff survey. Clinicians felt that for some STI risk factors (range 11%-44%, face-to-face questioning was more accurate than CASI. Only 5% were unsatisfied with CASI. CONCLUSIONS: We have demonstrated that CASI is acceptable to both patients and clinicians in a sexual health setting and does not adversely affect various measures of clinical output.

  1. The embeddedness of selfish Routines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Houman

    2001-01-01

    Routines have traditionally been seen as an organisational feature. However, like genes, routines may be carriers and initiators of organisations as well......Routines have traditionally been seen as an organisational feature. However, like genes, routines may be carriers and initiators of organisations as well...

  2. Effect of verbal persuasion on self-efficacy for pain-related diagnostic sensory testing in individuals with chronic neck pain and healthy controls - a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderlund, Anne; Sterling, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in cold pain threshold (CTh), pressure pain threshold (PPT), cold pain tolerance (CPTo) tests, and the level of self-efficacy when self-efficacy for diagnostic sensory testing was manipulated by verbal persuasion before a testing situation in persons with neck pain and in healthy controls. A randomized experimental design was used. Twenty-one healthy volunteers and 22 individuals with either traumatic or nontraumatic chronic neck pain were recruited to participate in the study. The intervention consisted of two experimental verbal persuasion conditions: Increase self-efficacy and Decrease self-efficacy. The PPT was measured using a pressure algometer, the CTh was measured using a thermo test system, and CPTo was measured by submerging the participant's hand in ice water up to the elbow joint. On three occasions, the participants reported their self-efficacy level in performing the sensory tests. In the chronic neck pain group, there were no differences in pain threshold or tolerance. There was a difference in the self-efficacy level after verbal persuasion between the experimental conditions. In the healthy control group, the CThs increased following the condition that aimed to increase self-efficacy. No other differences were observed in the healthy controls. A short verbal persuasion in the form of manipulative instructions seems to have a marginal effect on the individual's self-efficacy levels in the chronic neck pain group and a slight influence on the results of sensory testing in healthy controls.

  3. Which adherence measure - self-report, clinician recorded or pharmacy refill - is best able to predict detectable viral load in a public ART programme without routine plasma viral load monitoring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekuria, Legese A; Prins, Jan M; Yalew, Alemayehu W; Sprangers, Mirjam A G; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T

    2016-07-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) suppresses viral replication to an undetectable level if a sufficiently high level of adherence is achieved. We investigated which adherence measurement best distinguishes between patients with and without detectable viral load in a public ART programme without routine plasma viral load monitoring. We randomly selected 870 patients who started cART between May 2009 and April 2012 in 10 healthcare facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Six hundred and sixty-four (76.3%) patients who were retained in HIV care and were receiving cART for at least 6 months were included and 642 had their plasma HIV-1 RNA concentration measured. Patients' adherence to cART was assessed according to self-report, clinician recorded and pharmacy refill measures. Multivariate logistic regression model was fitted to identify the predictors of detectable viremia. Model accuracy was evaluated by computing the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. A total of 9.2% and 5.5% of the 642 patients had a detectable viral load of ≥40 and ≥400 RNA copies/ml, respectively. In the multivariate analyses, younger age, lower CD4 cell count at cART initiation, being illiterate and widowed, and each of the adherence measures were significantly and independently predictive of having ≥400 RNA copies/ml. The ROC curve showed that these variables altogether had a likelihood of more than 80% to distinguish patients with a plasma viral load of ≥400 RNA copies/ml from those without. Adherence to cART was remarkably high. Self-report, clinician recorded and pharmacy refill non-adherence were all significantly predictive of detectable viremia. The choice for one of these methods to detect non-adherence and predict a detectable viral load can therefore be based on what is most practical in a particular setting. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Does a pre-treatment diagnostic interview affect the outcome of internet-based self-help for social anxiety disorder? a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettcher, Johanna; Berger, Thomas; Renneberg, Babette

    2012-10-01

    Numerous studies suggest that Internet-based self-help treatments are effective in treating anxiety disorders. Trials evaluating such interventions differ in their screening procedures and in the amount of clinician contact in the diagnostic assessment phase. The present study evaluates the impact of a pre-treatment diagnostic interview on the outcome of an Internet-based treatment for Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD). One hundred and nine participants seeking treatment for SAD were randomized to either an interview-group (IG, N = 53) or to a non-interview group (NIG, N = 56). All participants took part in the same 10-week cognitive-behavioural unguided self-help programme. Before receiving access to the programme, participants of the IG underwent a structured diagnostic interview. Participants of the NIG started directly with the programme. Participants in both groups showed significant and substantial improvement on social anxiety measures from pre- to post-assessment (d IG = 1.30-1.63; d NIG = 1.00-1.28) and from pre- to 4-month follow-up assessment (d IG = 1.38-1.87; d NIG = 1.10-1.21). Significant between-groups effects in favour of the IG were found on secondary outcome measures of depression and general distress (d = 0.18-0.42). These findings suggest that Internet-based self-help is effective in treating SAD, whether or not a diagnostic interview is involved. However, the pre-treatment interview seems to facilitate change on secondary outcomes such as depression and general distress.

  5. Diagnostic accuracy of self-report and subjective history in the diagnosis of low back pain with non-specific lower extremity symptoms: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Susan; Averell, Kristina; Eickelman, Angela; Sanker, Holly; Donaldson, Megan Burrowbridge

    2015-02-01

    Subjective history questions/self-report items are commonly used to triage the patient with low back pain and related leg symptoms. However the value of the history taking process for decision-making to identify common classifications/diagnosis for patients presenting with low back related leg pain (LBRLP) have not been considered. The purpose of this study was to investigate the diagnostic accuracy of self-report items/history-taking questions used to identify patients with LBRLP. Eligible studies included: 1)subjects with low back pain AND related lower extremity pain, 2)details of subjective examination/self-report items, 3)cohort, prospective/longitudinal studies, and randomized control trials, 4)use of statistical reporting, 5)an acceptable reference standard. Quality was evaluated using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies 2. A synthesis of history items that met the threshold for at least a small shift in the likelihood of the condition with a +LR ≥ 2 or -LR ≤ 0.5 were reported. Conditions commonly reported in the literature: lumbar spinal stenosis, lumbosacral nerve root compression/radiculopathy, disc herniation and neurophysiological low back pain ± leg pain. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria. This is the first systematic review of diagnostic accuracy studies that examined only the history-taking items for their ability to identify LBRLP conditions. Clustering key items may provide a more precise clinical picture necessary to detect and treat a patient's presentation. History questions formed within the interview and their contributing value for decision-making remain understudied. There is a need for better designs to determine a more accurate diagnostic power to identify conditions with LBRLP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Validation of the Gambling Disorder Screening Questionnaire, a self-administered diagnostic questionnaire for gambling disorder based on the DSM-5 criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villella, Corrado; Pascucci, Marco; de Waure, Chiara; Bellomo, Antonello; Conte, Gianluigi

    2016-01-01

    The DSM-5 has modified the diagnostic criteria for gambling disorder, compared to the fourth edition of the manual; new diagnostic instruments are therefore needed. This study evaluated the psychometric characteristics of the Gambling Disorder Screening Questionnaire (GDSQ), a self-report questionnaire based on the DSM-IV and DSM-5 criteria for Gambling Disorder, measuring its validity, internal consistency, and submitting the questionnaire to a principal components analysis. 71 patients from a gambling disorder outpatient clinic and 70 controls were evaluated with the GDSQ, the South Oaks Gambling Screen (SOGS), and a psychiatric interview. The test showed a good sensibility, specificity, internal consistency, concurrent validity with the SOGS. The exclusion of the “illegal acts” item, and the lowering of the cut-off score to four positive items, as suggested by the DSM-5 criteria, improved the test sensibility and internal consistency. The GDSQ can be considered a useful screening test for Gambling Disorder. Furthermore, this study confirms the improved diagnostic accuracy of the criteria listed in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, compared to the previous edition.

  7. Rapid and Accurate Behavioral Health Diagnostic Screening: Initial Validation Study of a Web-Based, Self-Report Tool (the SAGE-SR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodey, Benjamin; Purcell, Susan E; Rhea, Karen; Maier, Philip; First, Michael; Zweede, Lisa; Sinisterra, Manuela; Nunn, M Brad; Austin, Marie-Paule; Brodey, Inger S

    2018-03-23

    The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM (SCID) is considered the gold standard assessment for accurate, reliable psychiatric diagnoses; however, because of its length, complexity, and training required, the SCID is rarely used outside of research. This paper aims to describe the development and initial validation of a Web-based, self-report screening instrument (the Screening Assessment for Guiding Evaluation-Self-Report, SAGE-SR) based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) and the SCID-5-Clinician Version (CV) intended to make accurate, broad-based behavioral health diagnostic screening more accessible within clinical care. First, study staff drafted approximately 1200 self-report items representing individual granular symptoms in the diagnostic criteria for the 8 primary SCID-CV modules. An expert panel iteratively reviewed, critiqued, and revised items. The resulting items were iteratively administered and revised through 3 rounds of cognitive interviewing with community mental health center participants. In the first 2 rounds, the SCID was also administered to participants to directly compare their Likert self-report and SCID responses. A second expert panel evaluated the final pool of items from cognitive interviewing and criteria in the DSM-5 to construct the SAGE-SR, a computerized adaptive instrument that uses branching logic from a screener section to administer appropriate follow-up questions to refine the differential diagnoses. The SAGE-SR was administered to healthy controls and outpatient mental health clinic clients to assess test duration and test-retest reliability. Cutoff scores for screening into follow-up diagnostic sections and criteria for inclusion of diagnoses in the differential diagnosis were evaluated. The expert panel reduced the initial 1200 test items to 664 items that panel members agreed collectively represented the SCID items from the 8 targeted modules and DSM criteria for the covered

  8. Computer-aided diagnosis in routine mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sittek, H.; Perlet, C.; Helmberger, R.; Linsmeier, E.; Kessler, M.; Reiser, M.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Computer-aided diagnosis in mammography is a topic many study groups have been concerned with since the first presentation of a system for computer-aided interpretation in 1967. Currently, there is only one system avilable for clinical use in mammography, the CAD-System Image Checker (R2 Technology). The purpose of our prospective study was to evaluate whether the integration of the CAD-system into the routine of a radiological breast diagnosis unit is feasible. Results: After the installation of the CAD-system, 300 patients with 1110 mammograms were included for evaluation in the present study. In 54 of these cases histological examination was indicated due to suspect criteria on conventional mammography. In 39 of 54 cases (72,2%) malignancy could be proven histologically. The CAD-system marked 82,1% of the histologically verified carcinomas correctly 94,3% of all 1797 marks made by the CAD-system indicated normal or benign structures. Routinely performed CAD analysis prolonged patients waiting time by about 15 min because the marks of the CAD system had to be interpreted in addition to the routine diagnostic investigations. Conclusion: Our experience with the use of the CAD-system in daily routine showed that CAD analysis can easily be integrated into a preexisting mammography unit. However, the diagnostic benefit is not yet clearly established. Since the rate of false negative marks by the CAD-system Image Checker is still high, the results of CAD analysis must be checked and corrected by an observer well experienced in mammography reading. (orig.) [de

  9. Adaptive intrusion data system (AIDS) software routines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corlis, N.E.

    1980-07-01

    An Adaptive Intrusion Data System (AIDS) was developed to collect information from intrusion alarm sensors as part of an evaluation system to improve sensor performance. AIDS is a unique digital data-compression, storage, and formatting system; it also incorporates a capability for video selection and recording for assessment of the sensors monitored by the system. The system is software reprogrammable to numerous configurations that may be used for the collection of environmental, bilevel, analog, and video data. This report describes the software routines that control the different AIDS data-collection modes, the diagnostic programs to test the operating hardware, and the data format. Sample data printouts are also included

  10. A standardized crisis management model for self-harming and suicidal individuals with three or more diagnostic criteria of borderline personality disorder: The Brief Admission Skane randomized controlled trial protocol (BASRCT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liljedahl, S.I.; Helleman, M.; Daukantaite, D.; Westrin, A.; Westling, S.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brief Admission is a crisis and risk management strategy in which self-harming and suicidal individuals with three or more diagnostic criteria of borderline personality disorder self-admit to hospital at times of increasing risk when other efforts to stay safe are failing. Standardized

  11. Diagnostic Validity of the Eppendorf Schizophrenia Inventory (ESI): A Self-Report Screen for Ultrahigh Risk and Acute Psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, Maurice A. J.; Dingemans, Peter M. A. J.; van de Fliert, Reinaud; Becker, Hiske E.; Nieman, Dorien H.; Linszen, Don

    2010-01-01

    Providers of mental health services need tools to screen for acute psychosis and ultrahigh risk (UHR) for transition to psychosis in help-seeking individuals. In this study, the Eppendorf Schizophrenia Inventory (ESI) was examined as a screening tool and for its ability to correctly predict diagnostic group membership (e.g., help seeking, mild…

  12. Bedtime routines child wellbeing & development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsaras, George; Goodwin, Michaela; Allan, Julia; Kelly, Michael P; Pretty, Iain A

    2018-03-21

    Bedtime routines has shown important associations with areas associated with child wellbeing and development. Research into bedtime routines is limited with studies mainly focusing on quality of sleep. The objectives of the present study were to examine the relationship between bedtime routines and a variety of factors associated with child wellbeing and to examine possible determinants of bedtime routines. A total of 50 families with children between 3 and 5 years old took part in the study. Data on bedtime routines, parenting styles, school readiness, children's dental health, and executive function were collected. Children in families with optimal bedtime routines showed better performance in terms of executive function, specifically working memory (t (44)= - 8.51, p ≤ .001), inhibition and attention (t (48)= - 9.70, p ≤ .001) and cognitive flexibility (t (48)= - 13.1, p ≤ .001). Also, children in households with optimal bedtime routines scored higher in their readiness for school (t (48)= 6.92, p ≤ .001) and had better dental health (U = 85.5, p = .011). Parents in households with suboptimal bedtime routines showed worse performance on all measures of executive function including working memory (t (48)= - 10.47, p ≤ .001), inhibition-attention (t (48)= - 10.50, p ≤ .001) and cognitive flexibility (t (48)= - 13.6, p ≤ .001). Finally, parents with optimal bedtime routines for their children deployed a more positive parenting style in general (i.e. authoritative parenting) compared to those with suboptimal bedtime routines (t (48)= - 6.45, p ≤ .001). The results of the present study highlight the potentially important role of bedtime routines in a variety of areas associated with child wellbeing and the need for further research.

  13. Assessment of patient radiation doses during routine diagnostic radiography examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, Asim Karam Aldden Adam

    2015-11-01

    Medical applications of radiation represent the largest source of exposure to general population. Accounting for 3.0 mSv against an estimated 2.4 mSv from a natural back ground in United States. The association of ionizing radiation an cancer risk is assumed to be continuos and graded over the entire range of exposure, The objective of this study is to evaluate the patient radiation doses in radiology departments in Khartoum state. A total of 840 patients ? during two in the following hospitals Khartoum Teaching Hospital (260 patients), Fedail specialized hospital ( 261 patients). National Ribat University hospital ( 189 patients) and Engaz hospital (130 patients). Patient doses were measured for 9 procedures. The Entrance surface Air Kerma (ESAK) was quantified using x-ray unit output by Unifiers xi dose rate meter( Un fore inc. Billdal. Sweden) and patient exposure parameters. The mean patient age. Weight and Body Mass index (BMI) were 42.6 year 58/4 kg and 212 kg/m respectively. The mean patient doses, kv and MAS and E.q was 0.35 mGy per procedures 59.9 volt 19.8 Ampere per second 0.32 Sv . Patient doses were comparable with previous studies. Patient radiation doses showed considerable difference between hospitals due to x- ray systems exposure settings and patient weight. Patient are exposed to unnecessary radiation.(Author)

  14. How conservative is routine personal dosimetry monitoring in diagnostic radiology?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boetticher, H. von; Lachmund, J.; Hoffmann, W.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Dose values obtained by official personal radiation exposure monitoring are often considered equivalent to the effective dose of a person. This paper provides estimates of the extent of deviation between the two dose concepts under various conditions. Materials and Methods: Doses for patients and personnel were measured using thermoluminescence dosimeters for five different geometries at three work settings in a radiology department. Patients and personnel were simulated with anthropomorphic phantoms. Different types of protective clothing as well as permanent protection shields were considered in the calculations. Results: Dose values obtained by official personal dose monitoring are conservative only for specific radiation protection situations. With state-of-the-art personal protective equipment (wrap-around style lead apron with thyroid shield), the ratio between effective dose and personal dose varies between 0.6 and 1.25. Without thyroid protection the official personal dose systematically underestimates the effective dose: for protective clothing with 0.5 mm lead equivalent without thyroid shielding, the effective dose exceeds the personal dose by factors between 1.7 and 3.1. If protective clothing with lead equivalent 0.35 mm is used, this factor varies between 1.1 and 1.82. (orig.)

  15. Microfoundations of Routines and Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felin, Teppo; Foss, Nicolai Juul; Heimriks, Koen H.

    We discuss the microfoundations of routines and capabilities, including why a microfoundations view is needed and how it may inform work on organizational and competitive heterogeneity. Building on extant research, we identify three primary categories of micro-level components underlying routines...

  16. A simple data acquisition system based on arduino platform for non-self-sustained gas discharge plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misiruk, I.O.; Garkusha, I.E.; Timoshenko, O.I.; Taran, V.S.

    2016-01-01

    A simple data acquisition system based on Arduino Nano platform is developed. Bluetooth wireless protocol is used for data transmission. Android OS application for data visualization and recording is developed. The system was success-fully applied for acquiring data of Langmuir probe measurements in the non-self-sustained discharge with a hollow anode.

  17. Mechanical Design, Simulation, and Testing of Self-Aligning Gaussian Telescope and Stand for ITER LFS Reflectometer Diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughton, Rachel; Gomez, Michael; Zolfaghari, Ali; Morris, Lewis

    2016-10-01

    A self-aligning Gaussian telescope has been designed to compensate for the effect of movement in the ITER vacuum vessel on the transmission line. The purpose of the setup is to couple microwaves into and out of the vessel across the vacuum windows while allowing for both slow movements of the vessel, due to thermal growth, and rapid movements, due to vibrations and disruptions. Additionally, a test stand has been designed specifically to hold this telescope in order to imitate these movements. Consequently, this will allow for the assessment of the efficacy in applying the self-aligning Gaussian telescope approach. The motions of the test stand, as well as the stress on the telescope mechanism, have been virtually simulated using ANSYS workbench. A prototype of this test stand and self-aligning telescope will be built using a combination of custom machined parts and ordered parts. The completed mechanism will be tested at the lab in four different ways: slow single- and multi-direction movements, rapid multi-direction movement, functional laser alignment and self-aligning tests, and natural frequency tests. Once the prototype successfully passes all requirements, it will be tested with microwaves in the LFSR transmission line test stand at General Atomics. This work is supported by US DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  18. Thirty years of research on diagnostic and therapeutic thresholds for the self-measured blood pressure at home.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staessen, J.A.; Thijs, L.; Ohkubo, T.; Kikuya, M.; Richart, T.; Boggia, J.; Adiyaman, A.; Dechering, D.G.; Kuznetsova, T.; Thien, Th.; Leeuw, P. de; Imai, Y.; O'brien, E.; Parati, G.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The goal of this review study is to summarize 30 years of research on cut-off limits for the self-measured blood pressure. METHODS: We reviewed two meta-analyses, several prospective outcome studies in populations and hypertensive patients, studies in pregnant women, three clinical trials

  19. Do men with prostate cancer and their partners receive the information they need for optimal illness self-management in the immediate post-diagnostic phase?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Janelle V; Lambert, Sylvie D; Girgis, Afaf; Turner, Jane; McElduff, Patrick; Kayser, Karen

    2015-01-01

    To (a) determine whether the information provided to men with prostate cancer and their partners in the immediate postdiagnostic phase met their needs; and (b) examine patient and partner satisfaction with the information received. Pre-intervention survey data from a pilot randomized controlled trial of a self-directed coping skills intervention involving 42 patients with prostate cancer, and their partners were collected to examine their psychosocial concerns/needs. The main concerns for patients and partners were psychosocial in nature such as managing emotions, concern about the future, and losing control. Overall, patients and partners received most information about tests and treatment options. Partners reported receiving significantly less information about support services ( P = 0.03) and self-care strategies ( P = 0.03) compared to patients. Partners also reported being significantly less satisfied with the information they received ( P = 0.007). Whereas medical information is routinely given, patients and partners may benefit from greater information about psychosocial issues arising from cancer. Despite increased recognition of partner's information needs these still remain unmet.

  20. Do men with prostate cancer and their partners receive the information they need for optimal illness self-management in the immediate post-diagnostic phase?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janelle V Levesque

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To (a determine whether the information provided to men with prostate cancer and their partners in the immediate postdiagnostic phase met their needs; and (b examine patient and partner satisfaction with the information received. Methods: Pre-intervention survey data from a pilot randomized controlled trial of a self-directed coping skills intervention involving 42 patients with prostate cancer, and their partners were collected to examine their psychosocial concerns/needs. Results: The main concerns for patients and partners were psychosocial in nature such as managing emotions, concern about the future, and losing control. Overall, patients and partners received most information about tests and treatment options. Partners reported receiving significantly less information about support services (P = 0.03 and self-care strategies (P = 0.03 compared to patients. Partners also reported being significantly less satisfied with the information they received (P = 0.007. Conclusions: Whereas medical information is routinely given, patients and partners may benefit from greater information about psychosocial issues arising from cancer. Despite increased recognition of partner′s information needs these still remain unmet.

  1. Development of a Real-Time Thermal Performance Diagnostic Monitoring system Using Self-Organizing Neural Network for Kori-2 Nuclear Power Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Hyun Gook; Seong, Poong Hyun

    1996-01-01

    In this work, a PC-based thermal performance monitoring system is developed for the nuclear power plants. the system performs real-time thermal performance monitoring and diagnosis during plant operation. Specifically, a prototype for the Kori-2 nuclear power unit is developed and examined is very difficult because the system structure is highly complex and the components are very much inter-related. In this study, some major diagnostic performance parameters are selected in order to represent the thermal cycle effectively and to reduce the computing time. The Fuzzy ARTMAP, a self-organizing neural network, is used to recognize the characteristic pattern change of the performance parameters in abnormal situation. By examination, the algorithm is shown to be ale to detect abnormality and to identify the fault component or the change of system operation condition successfully. For the convenience of operators, a graphical user interface is also constructed in this work. 5 figs., 3 tabs., 11 refs. (Author)

  2. A study of a self diagnostic platform for the detection of A2 biomarker for Leishmania donovani

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Philip J. R.; Cheung, Maurice C.; Najih, Mohamed; McCall, Laura-Isobel; Fakih, Ibrahim; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P.; Ward, Brian; Ndao, Momar; Kirk, Andrew G.

    2012-03-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (L.donovani) is a protozoan infection that attacks mononuclear phagocytes and causes the liver and spleen damage that can cause death. The investigation presented is a proof of concept development applying a plasmonic diagnostic platform with simple microfluidic sample delivery and optical readout. An immune-assay method is applied to the quantification of A2 protein, a highly immunogenic biomarker for the pathogen. Quantification of A2 was performed in the ng/ml range, analysis by ELISA suggested that a limit of 0.1ng/ml of A2 is approximate to 1 pathogen per ml and the sensing system shows the potential to deliver a similar level of quantification. Significant reduction in assay complexity as further enzyme linked enhancement is not required when applying a plasmonic methodology to an immunoassay. The basic instrumentation required for a portable device and potential dual optical readout where both plasmonic and photoluminescent response are assessed and investigated including consideration of the application of the device to testing where non-literate communication of results is considered and issues of performance are addressed.

  3. Radiation dose monitoring in the clinical routine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guberina, Nika [UK Essen (Germany). Radiology

    2017-04-15

    Here we describe the first clinical experiences regarding the use of an automated radiation dose management software to monitor the radiation dose of patients during routine examinations. Many software solutions for monitoring radiation dose have emerged in the last decade. The continuous progress in radiological techniques, new scan features, scanner generations and protocols are the primary challenge for radiation dose monitoring software systems. To simulate valid dose calculations, radiation dose monitoring systems have to follow current trends and stay constantly up-to-date. The dose management software is connected to all devices at our institute and conducts automatic data acquisition and radiation dose calculation. The system incorporates 18 virtual phantoms based on the Cristy phantom family, estimating doses in newborns to adults. Dose calculation relies on a Monte Carlo simulation engine. Our first practical experiences demonstrate that the software is capable of dose estimation in the clinical routine. Its implementation and use have some limitations that can be overcome. The software is promising and allows assessment of radiation doses, like organ and effective doses according to ICRP 60 and ICRP 103, patient radiation dose history and cumulative radiation doses. Furthermore, we are able to determine local diagnostic reference doses. The radiation dose monitoring software systems can facilitate networking between hospitals and radiological departments, thus refining radiation doses and implementing reference doses at substantially lower levels.

  4. Routine digital pathology workflow: The Catania experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Fraggetta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Successful implementation of whole slide imaging (WSI for routine clinical practice has been accomplished in only a few pathology laboratories worldwide. We report the transition to an effective and complete digital surgical pathology workflow in the pathology laboratory at Cannizzaro Hospital in Catania, Italy. Methods: All (100% permanent histopathology glass slides were digitized at ×20 using Aperio AT2 scanners. Compatible stain and scanning slide racks were employed to streamline operations. eSlide Manager software was bidirectionally interfaced with the anatomic pathology laboratory information system. Virtual slide trays connected to the two-dimensional (2D barcode tracking system allowed pathologists to confirm that they were correctly assigned slides and that all tissues on these glass slides were scanned. Results: Over 115,000 glass slides were digitized with a scan fail rate of around 1%. Drying glass slides before scanning minimized them sticking to scanner racks. Implementation required introduction of a 2D barcode tracking system and modification of histology workflow processes. Conclusion: Our experience indicates that effective adoption of WSI for primary diagnostic use was more dependent on optimizing preimaging variables and integration with the laboratory information system than on information technology infrastructure and ensuring pathologist buy-in. Implementation of digital pathology for routine practice not only leveraged the benefits of digital imaging but also creates an opportunity for establishing standardization of workflow processes in the pathology laboratory.

  5. Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechtel Nevada

    1998-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy manages the Nevada Test Site in a manner that meets evolving DOE Missions and responds to the concerns of affected and interested individuals and agencies. This Routine Radiological Monitoring Plan addressess complicance with DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 and other drivers requiring routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance on the Nevada Test Site. This monitoring plan, prepared in 1998, addresses the activities conducted onsite NTS under the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision. This radiological monitoring plan, prepared on behalf of the Nevada Test Site Landlord, brings together sitewide environmental surveillance; site-specific effluent monitoring; and operational monitoring conducted by various missions, programs, and projects on the NTS. The plan provides an approach to identifying and conducting routine radiological monitoring at the NTS, based on integrated technical, scientific, and regulatory complicance data needs

  6. Diagnostics on Z (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, T. J.; Derzon, M. S.; Chandler, G. A.; Fehl, D. L.; Leeper, R. J.; Porter, J. L.; Spielman, R. B.; Ruiz, C.; Cooper, G.; McGurn, J.

    2001-01-01

    The 100 ns, 20 MA pinch-driver Z is surrounded by an extensive set of diagnostics. There are nine radial lines of sight set at 12 o above horizontal and each of these may be equipped with up to five diagnostic ports. Instruments routinely fielded viewing the pinch from the side with these ports include x-ray diode arrays, photoconducting detector arrays, bolometers, transmission grating spectrometers, time-resolved x-ray pinhole cameras, x-ray crystal spectrometers, calorimeters, silicon photodiodes, and neutron detectors. A diagnostic package fielded on axis for viewing internal pinch radiation consists of nine lines of sight. This package accommodates virtually the same diagnostics as the radial ports. Other diagnostics not fielded on the axial or radial ports include current B-dot monitors, filtered x-ray scintillators coupled by fiber optics to streak cameras, streaked visible spectroscopy, velocity interferometric system for any reflector, bremsstrahlung cameras, and active shock breakout measurement of hohlraum temperature. The data acquisition system is capable of recording up to 500 channels and the data from each shot is available on the Internet. A major new diagnostic presently under construction is the BEAMLET backlighter. We will briefly describe each of these diagnostics and present some of the highest-quality data from them

  7. The institutionalization of a routine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickelsen, Niels Christian

    2008-01-01

    -which has before largely been treated in overview by institutionalism-plays an important role in the making of a routine. In my empirical study, I demonstrate that the concept and practice of the valve changes, and that it is identified in a number of ways, as it passes through the testing phase...... of production. I argue that the negotiation of these changes during test production is the fulcrum in the routinization of the production procedure. It is through these identity shifts that the valve is both reified, and rendered producible and applicable in the customer world....

  8. Microfoundations of Routines and Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felin, Tippo; Foss, Nicolai Juul; Heimericks, Koen H.

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces the Special Issue and discusses the microfoundations of routines and capabilities, including why a microfoundations view is needed and how it may inform work on organizational and competitive heterogeneity. Building on extant research, we identify three primary categories ...

  9. Employment of a self-made probe in galactography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Meihua; Lv Dunzhao; Yang Zhihong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the usefulness of a self-made probe in galactography. Methods: 45 cases performed galactography with self-made probe and other 56 cases performed routine galactography were compared. The occurrence of pain and ductal injuries during galactography and the rate of satisfactory between the two groups were noted. Results: In the group using self-made probe, pain was revealed in 2 cases without ductal injuries and satisfactory galactography was performed in 43 cases. In the routine group, pain was revealed in 15 cases, with ductal injuries in 3 cases during galactography and satisfactory galactography was performed in 41 cases. Significant difference was found in the occurrence of pain and the rate of satisfactory galactorgraphy. Conclusion: Galactography with self-made probe can greatly lessen the appearance of pain and ductal injuries during galactography and increase the rate of satisfactory examination and diagnostic accuracy of galactography. (authors)

  10. Reversed field pinch diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, P.G.

    1986-01-01

    The Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) is a toroidal, axisymmetric magnetic confinement configuration characterized by a magnetic field configuration in which the toroidal magnetic field is of similar strength to the poloidal field, and is reversed at the edge compared to the center. The RFP routinely operates at high beta, and is a strong candidate for a compact fusion device. Relevant attributes of the configuration will be presented, together with an overview of present and planned experiments and their diagnostics. RFP diagnostics are in many ways similar to those of other magnetic confinement devices (such as tokamaks); these lectures will point out pertinent differences, and will present some diagnostics which provide special insights into unique attributes of the RFP

  11. GRALIB, DISSPLA Plot Routines Emulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunford, L.

    1999-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: GRALIB is a library of graphics subroutines used by PLOTEF. 2 - Method of solution: The PLOTEF library contains routines to generate and manipulate data which are independent of the output graphics device. In order to produce output for a given graphics device - which interact with GRALIB using the DISSPLA conventions - a device driver must be written by the user for this device

  12. Routine Design for Mechanical Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Brinkop, Axel; Laudwein, Norbert; Maasen, Rudiger

    1995-01-01

    COMIX (configuration of mixing machines) is a system that assists members of the EKATO Sales Department in designing a mixing machine that fulfills the requirements of a customer. It is used to help the engineer design the requested machine and prepare an offer that's to be submitted to the customer. comix integrates more traditional software techniques with explicit knowledge representation and constraint propagation. During the process of routine design, some design decisions have to be mad...

  13. Self-diagnosis of malaria by travellers: a cohort study on the use of malaria rapid diagnostic tests provided by a Swiss travel clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthod, Delphine; Rochat, Jacynthe; Voumard, Rachel; Rochat, Laurence; Genton, Blaise; D'Acremont, Valérie

    2017-10-28

    The WHO recommends that all suspect malaria cases be tested before receiving treatment. Rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) for malaria can be performed reliably by community health workers with no formal medical background and thus, RDTs could also be provided to travellers for self-diagnosis during visits to endemic regions. RDTs were proposed during pre-travel consultations to pre-defined categories of travellers. A training run on their own blood was performed and, if carried out correctly, the traveller was given a written procedure on how to perform the test and act on its result. The travellers were then proposed to buy a malaria RDT kit and were interviewed upon their return. From February 2012 to February 2017, 744 travellers were proposed RDTs and 692 performed the training run (one could not complete it due to a hand tremor). Among the 691 subjects included, 69% travelled to moderate- or low-risk areas of malaria, 18% to high-risk areas and 13% to mixed-risk areas. The two most frequent categories of travellers to whom RDTs were proposed were long-term travellers (69%) and those travelling to remote areas (57%). 543 travellers (79%) were interviewed upon return. During their trip, 17% (91/543) had a medical problem with fever and 12% (65/543) without fever. Among 91 febrile patients, 57% (52/91) performed an RDT, 22% (20/91) consulted immediately without using the test, and 21% (19/91) did neither. Four RDTs (4/52; 8%) were positive: 2 in low-risk and 2 in high-risk areas (0.7% attack rate of self-documented malaria). Two travellers could not perform the test correctly and attended a facility or took standby emergency treatment. Four travellers with negative results repeated the test after 24 h; all were still negative. Carrying RDTs made travellers feel more secure, especially when travelling with children. 1/6 travellers experienced fever and 4/5 of those reacted appropriately: more than half used RDTs and a quarter consulted immediately. Four travellers

  14. Resource geometry and provisioning routines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ydenberg, R.C.; Davies, W.E.

    2010-01-01

    Provisioners capture items both for delivery and for self-feeding. In doing so, they may travel directly to and from a single location, visit several patches on each excursion from a delivery point, or alternate excursions to different destinations. Prey suitable for self-feeding versus delivery

  15. "Ion" B-Dot and Faraday Cup Results Located Inside The Cathode Knob Of The Self Magnetic Pinch (Smp) Diode (A New Diagnostic For Diode Behavior?)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazarakis, Michael G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kiefer, Mark L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Leckbee, Joshua J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nielsen, Dan S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ziska, Derek [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-08-01

    This paper describes our effort to measure the back-streaming ions emitted from the target x-ray convertor and thus estimate the ion contribution to the A-K gap bipolar current flow. Knowing the ion contribution is quite important in order to calculate the expected x-ray dose and compare it with the actual measurements. Our plans were first to measure the total ion current using B-dot monitors, Rogowski coils, and Faraday cups and then to utilize filtered Faraday cups and time of flight techniques to identify and measure the various ionic species. The kinetic energy (velocities) of the ions should help evaluate the actual voltage applied at the anode-cathode (A-K) gap. LSP simulations found that the most prominent ions are protons and carbon single plus (C+). For an 8-MV A-K voltage, the estimated proton current back-streaming through an 1 cm in diameter hollow cathode tip was on the average 3 kA and the carbon current 0.7 kA. Since only a small fraction of the ions will make it through the cylindrical aperture, the corresponding total currents were calculated to be respectively 25kA for proton and 7 kA for carbon ions, a quite substantial contribution to the total bipolar beam current. Hence, approximately only 10% of the total back-streaming ionic currents could make it through the hollow cathode tip aperture. Unfortunately the diagnostic cables connecting the Faraday cup and the B-dot monitors to the screen room scopes experienced a large amount of charge pick-up that obliterated our effort to directly measure those relatively small currents. However, we succeeded in measuring those currents indirectly with activation techniques [Contribution of the back-streaming ions to the self-magnetic pinch (SMP) diode Current., M. G. Mazarakis, M. G. Mazarakis, M. E. Cuneo, S. D. Fournier, M. D. Johnston, M. L. Kiefer, J. J. Leckbee, D. S. Nielsen, B.V.Oliver, M. E. Sceiford, S. C. Simpson, T. J. Renk, C. L. Ruiz, T. J. Webb, and D. Ziska. Subitted for publication.]. In

  16. The significance of routines in nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rytterström, Patrik; Unosson, Mitra; Arman, Maria

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to illuminate the significance of routines in nursing practice. Clinical nursing is performed under the guidance of routines to varying degrees. In the nursing literature, routine is described as having both negative and positive aspects, but use of the term is inconsistent, and empirical evidence is sparse. In the research on organisational routines, a distinction is made between routine as a rule and routine as action. A qualitative design using a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach. Data collection from three focus groups focused on nurses' experience of routines. Seventeen individual interviews from a previous study focusing on caring culture were also analysed in a secondary qualitative analysis. All participants were employed as 'qualified nursing pool' nurses. Routines are experienced as pragmatic, obstructive and meaningful. The aim of the pragmatic routine was to ensure that daily working life works; this routine is practised more on the basis of rational arguments and obvious intentions. The obstructive routine had negative consequences for nursing practice and was described as nursing losing its humanity and violating the patient's integrity. The meaningful routine involved becoming one with the routine and for the nurses, it felt right and meaningful to adapt to it. Routines become meaningful when the individual action is in harmony with the cultural pattern on which the nursing work is based. Instead of letting contemporary practice passively become routine, routines can be assessed and developed using research and theoretical underpinnings as a starting point for nursing practice. Leaders have a special responsibility to develop and support meaningful routines. One approach could be to let wards examine their routines from a patient perspective on the basis of the themes of pragmatic, meaningful and obstructive routine. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Recent diagnostic developments on LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, S.; Nagayama, Y.; Peterson, B.J.

    2003-01-01

    Standard diagnostics for fundamental plasma parameters and for plasma physics are routinely utilized for daily operation and physics study in the large helical device (LHD) with high reliability. Diagnostics for steady state plasma are intensively developed, especially for T e , n e (YAG laser Thomson, CO 2 laser polarimeter), data acquisition in steady state, heat resistant probes. To clarify the plasma property of the helical structure, 2-D or 3-D diagnostics are intensively developed: Tangential cameras (Fast SX TV, Photon counting CCD, H α TV); Tomography (Tangential SX CCD, Bolometer); Imaging (Bolometer, ECE, Reflectometer). Divertor and edge physics are one of important key issues for steady state operation. Diagnostics for neutral flux (H α array, Zeeman spectroscopy) and n e (Fast scanning probe, Li beam probe, Pulsed radar reflectometer). In addition to these, advanced diagnostics are being intensively developed with national and international collaborations in LHD. (author)

  18. Routine Early Angioplasty after Fibrinolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhipeng; Liang, Bo; Mei, Qibing

    2009-01-01

    patients in the group that underwent routine early PCI than in the group that received standard treatment received clopidogrel (Ppatients who undergo PCI, as well as in those who do not, is well established,1...... with early beta-blocker therapy is taken into consideration.3 The overall benefit of clopidogrel and beta-blocker therapy could have influenced the outcome in patients who underwent early PCI. These facts leave the conclusion of the TRANSFER-AMI trial still highly uncertain.......To the Editor: Cantor et al. report that there is a significantly reduced rate of ischemic complications among patients with myocardial infarction with ST-segment elevation who are transferred for PCI within 6 hours after fibrinolysis. However, Table 2 of the article shows that significantly more...

  19. Fit Between Organization Design and Organizational Routines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constance E. Helfat

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite decades of research on both organization design and organizational routines, little research has analyzed the relationship between them. Here we propose a normative theory in which the effectiveness of organization design and redesign depends on the characteristics of routines. The analysis shows which types of organization designs may be useful as well as which design changes may or may not succeed depending on (a the specificity of routines and (b the dynamic versus static purposes of organizational routines.

  20. Nanobiosensors in diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Chamorro-Garcia

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Medical diagnosis has been greatly improved thanks to the development of new techniques capable of performing very sensitive detection and quantifying certain parameters. These parameters can be correlated with the presence of specific molecules and their quantity. Unfortunately, these techniques are demanding, expensive, and often complicated. On the other side, progress in other fields of science and technology has contributed to the rapid growth of nanotechnology. Although being an emerging discipline, nanotechnology has raised huge interest and expectations. Most of the enthusiasm comes from new possibilities and properties of nanomaterials. Biosensors (simple, robust, sensitive, cost-effective combined with nanomaterials, also called nanobiosensors, are serving as bridge between advanced detection/diagnostics and daily/routine tests. Here we review some of the latest applications of nanobiosensors in diagnostics field.

  1. Routines Are the Foundation of Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Robin Rawlings; Allanson, Patricia Bolton; Notar, Charles E.

    2017-01-01

    Classroom management is the key to learning. Routines are the foundation of classroom management. Students require structure in their lives. Routines provide that in all of their life from the time they awake until the time they go to bed. Routines in a school and in the classroom provide the environment for learning to take place. The paper is…

  2. 42 CFR 493.931 - Routine chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Routine chemistry. 493.931 Section 493.931 Public... Proficiency Testing Programs by Specialty and Subspecialty § 493.931 Routine chemistry. (a) Program content and frequency of challenge. To be approved for proficiency testing for routine chemistry, a program...

  3. The cognitive role of routine activities: the case of familiar field interventions in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noizet, A.

    2000-01-01

    Routine works incorporate part of the environment as their own control (exo-monitoring). The routine activity is itself in the self-monitoring situation of a cognitive control, which moves with the constraints, and which is not in direct relation with the errors made and detected, but which is in relation with the check of mastery. (J.S.)

  4. Molecular Diagnostics

    OpenAIRE

    Choe, Hyonmin; Deirmengian, Carl A.; Hickok, Noreen J.; Morrison, Tiffany N.; Tuan, Rocky S.

    2015-01-01

    Orthopaedic infections are complex conditions that require immediate diagnosis and accurate identification of the causative organisms to facilitate appropriate management. Conventional methodologies for diagnosis of these infections sometimes lack accuracy or sufficient rapidity. Current molecular diagnostics are an emerging area of bench-to-bedside research in orthopaedic infections. Examples of promising molecular diagnostics include measurement of a specific biomarker in the synovial fluid...

  5. Effect of verbal persuasion on self-efficacy for pain-related diagnostic sensory testing in individuals with chronic neck pain and healthy controls – a randomized, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Söderlund A

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Anne Söderlund,1 Michele Sterling,2 1Physiotherapy, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden; 2Centre for National Research on Disability and Rehabilitation Medicine (CONROD, Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Parklands, Australia Abstract: The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in cold pain threshold (CTh, pressure pain threshold (PPT, cold pain tolerance (CPTo tests, and the level of self-efficacy when self-efficacy for diagnostic sensory testing was manipulated by verbal persuasion before a testing situation in persons with neck pain and in healthy controls. A randomized experimental design was used. Twenty-one healthy volunteers and 22 individuals with either traumatic or nontraumatic chronic neck pain were recruited to participate in the study. The intervention consisted of two experimental verbal persuasion conditions: Increase self-efficacy and Decrease self-efficacy. The PPT was measured using a pressure algometer, the CTh was measured using a thermo test system, and CPTo was measured by submerging the participant's hand in ice water up to the elbow joint. On three occasions, the participants reported their self-efficacy level in performing the sensory tests. In the chronic neck pain group, there were no differences in pain threshold or tolerance. There was a difference in the self-efficacy level after verbal persuasion between the experimental conditions. In the healthy control group, the CThs increased following the condition that aimed to increase self-efficacy. No other differences were observed in the healthy controls. A short verbal persuasion in the form of manipulative instructions seems to have a marginal effect on the individual's self-efficacy levels in the chronic neck pain group and a slight influence on the results of sensory testing in healthy controls. Keywords: pressure pain threshold, cold pain threshold, cold pain tolerance, self

  6. Routine chest X-ray in the allergy clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Barredo, M.R.; Usamentiaga, E.; Fidalgo, I.

    1997-01-01

    To determine whether routine chest X-ray is indicated in allergy patients when there is no evidence of cardiopulmonary involvement. A retrospective study to analyze the indications and radiologic findings in 515 consecutive patients who underwent chest X-ray: Positive findings were considered to be any radiological sing that led to the performance of additional diagnostic measures or a change in the therapeutic management of the patient. Positive radiologic findings were observed in 39 cases (7.59%). Only two patients (0.38%) were diagnosed as having diseases that were susceptible to proper treatment. In one of them (0.19%), the failure to perform chest X-ray would have impeded the introduction of proper treatment. We do not recommend carrying out routine chest X-ray in this patient population. (Author) 7 refs

  7. Routine pharmacogenetic testing in clinical practice: dream or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Iris

    2007-10-01

    Pharmacogenetics (PGx) has become progressively popular in recent years, thanks to growing anticipation among scientists, healthcare providers and the general public for the incorporation of genetic tests into the diagnostic arsenal at the physician's disposal. Indeed, much research has been dedicated to elucidation of genetic determinants underlying interindividual variability in pharmacokinetic parameters, as well as drug safety and efficacy. However, few PGx applications have thus far been realized in healthcare management. This review uses examples from PGx research of psychiatric drugs to illustrate why the current published findings are inadequate and insufficient for utilization as routine clinical predictors of treatment safety, efficacy or dosing. I therefore suggest the necessary steps to demonstrate the validity, utility and cost-effectiveness of PGx. These recommendations include a whole range of aspects, starting from standardization of criteria and assessment of the technical quality of genotyping assays, up to design of prospective PGx studies, providing the basis for reimbursement programs to be recognized in routine clinical practice.

  8. [Everyday stress, routines and bipolar spectrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gindre, C; Swendsen, J

    2010-06-01

    Bipolar patients relapse more frequently under conditions of stress, even when compliant with prescribed medication. Although the biological bases of stress reactivity remain widely debated, the disruption of biological or circadian rhythms has been suggested as one possible mechanism through which stress increases the risk of episodes. This hypothesis has gained support from recent evidence demonstrating that the disruption of social rhythms is particularly implicated in the onset of manic episodes. However, it is currently unknown to what extent bipolar patients may differ from normal controls in terms of the basic prevalence and nature of daily life routines, or if such individuals are more sensitive to the disruption of such rhythms following exposure to stress. Using a dimensional perspective of bipolar disorder, 1728 French university students were first screened concerning diverse psychological and clinical characteristics. Two hundred and twelve individuals at high or low-risk for mood and substance use disorders were then invited to participate in a week-long period of ambulatory monitoring using the experience sampling method (ESM). During this phase, participants were given a preprogrammed PDA microcomputer which provided ambulatory assessments of behaviour and stress at fixed intervals (randomized across participants). At the end of the ESM phase, the microcomputers were collected and structured diagnostic interviews were administered to each participant. For the purposes of the current study, analyses focused on a subsample of 92 individuals, reflecting the 28 participants who met lifetime criteria for a manic (n=15) or hypomanic episode (n=13), and the 64 individuals who were free of any lifetime disorder. Data were analyzed using hierarchical nonlinear (Bernoulli) models for repeated measures. Covariates included age, sex, frequency of substance use and cognitive vulnerabilities assessed at screening. A Bonferroni correction was applied to adjust

  9. Real-time whole-genome sequencing for routine typing, surveillance, and outbreak detection of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Joensen, Katrine Grimstrup; Scheutz, Flemming; Lund, Ole; Hasman, Henrik; Kaas, Rolf Sommer; Nielsen, Eva M.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2014-01-01

    Fast and accurate identification and typing of pathogens are essential for effective surveillance and outbreak detection. The current routine procedure is based on a variety of techniques, making the procedure laborious, time-consuming, and expensive. With whole-genome sequencing (WGS) becoming cheaper, it has huge potential in both diagnostics and routine surveillance. The aim of this study was to perform a real-time evaluation of WGS for routine typing and surveillance of verocytotoxin-prod...

  10. Real-Time Whole-Genome Sequencing for Routine Typing, Surveillance, and Outbreak Detection of Verotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Joensen, Katrine Grimstrup; Scheutz, Flemming; Lund, Ole; Hasman, Henrik; Kaas, Rolf S.; Nielsen, Eva M.; Aarestrup, Frank M.

    2014-01-01

    Fast and accurate identification and typing of pathogens are essential for effective surveillance and outbreak detection. The current routine procedure is based on a variety of techniques, making the procedure laborious, time-consuming, and expensive. With whole-genome sequencing (WGS) becoming cheaper, it has huge potential in both diagnostics and routine surveillance. The aim of this study was to perform a real-time evaluation of WGS for routine typing and surveillance of verocytotoxin-prod...

  11. Choice of measuring site in external personnel routine dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothe, W.

    1975-01-01

    In personnel routine dosimetry the choice of a suitable measuring site is of great importance because there may be great differences between the measured doses and the equivalent doses of the whole body and of single organs, respectively. In the literature there are different points of view with regard to the measuring site particularly if diagnostic X-radiation is used and the body is partly covered with protective clothing. Likewise in most cases the conclusions regarding the most suitable measuring site drawn from measurements of dose distributions on the body surface are not in agreement. (author)

  12. Socio-demographic, health-related, and individual correlates of diagnostic self-testing by lay people: Results from a representative survey in Germany.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Kuecuekbalaban

    Full Text Available A broad range of self-tests (testing for e.g. HIV, cancer, hepatitis B/C have become available and can be conducted by lay consumers without the help of a health professional. The aims of this study were to (a investigate the prevalence of self-testing, (b identify the most frequently used self-tests, and (c explore the associations between socio-demographic, health-related and individual factors with self-testing.A face-to-face plus paper-pencil cross-sectional survey was conducted. The sample consisted of 2.527 respondents who were representative of the German population in terms of the age, sex, and residence. Basic descriptive statistics and univariate logistic regression analyses were performed.8.5% of the participants reported having used one or more self-tests in the past, totalling 363 self-tests, with a mean of 1.7 (min. = 1, max. = 6. The three self-tests most frequently indicated were for detecting diabetes, bowel cancer, and allergies. Self-testers were older (Nagelkerke R2 = .006, p < .01, had a higher BMI (Nagelkerke R2 = .013, p < .001 and displayed more physical and mental fatigue (Nagelkerke R2 = .031, p < .001 than non-testers. Self-testers also reported higher global life satisfaction values (Nagelkerke R2 = .008, p < .01 and a higher educational level (Nagelkerke R2 = .015, p < .01.Self-testing is fairly prevalent in Germany Given the current shortage of physicians in Germany, especially in rural areas, and recent studies on the use of self-medication, the topic of self-testing has a great practical and socio-political relevance. Future studies should investigate further predictors of self-testing (e.g. contextual, situational and individual factors as well as the emotional consequences of testing as a layperson without the attendance of a health professional.

  13. T2 black lesions on routine knee MRI: differential considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadhwa, Vibhor; Cho, Gina; Moore, Daniel; Pezeshk, Parham; Coyner, Katherine; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2016-01-01

    The majority of abnormal findings or lesions on T2-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are hyperintense due to increased perfusion or fluid content, such as infections, tumours or synovitis. Hypointense lesions on T2-weighted images (both fat-suppressed and non-fat-suppressed) are less common and can sometimes be overlooked. Such lesions have limited differential diagnostic possibilities, and include vacuum phenomenon, loose body, tenosynovial giant cell tumour, rheumatoid arthritis, haemochromatosis, gout, amyloid, chondrocalcinosis, hydroxyapetite deposition disease, lipoma arborescens, arthrofibrosis and iatrogenic lesions. These lesions often show characteristic appearances and predilections in the knee. In this article, the authors describe the MRI features of hypointense T2 lesions on routine knee MRI and outline a systematic diagnostic approach towards their evaluation. (orig.)

  14. Companion diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jan Trøst; Hersom, Maria

    2016-01-01

    of disease mechanisms, things are slowly changing. Within the last few years, we have seen an increasing number of predictive biomarker assays being developed to guide the use of targeted cancer drugs. This type of assay is called companion diagnostics and is developed in parallel to the drug using the drug-diagnostic...... co-development model. The development of companion diagnostics is a relatively new discipline and in this review, different aspects will be discussed including clinical and regulatory issues. Furthermore, examples of drugs, such as the ALK and PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors, that have been approved recently....... Despite having discussed personalized medicine for more than a decade, we still see that most drug prescriptions for severe chronic diseases are largely based on 'trial and error' and not on solid biomarker data. However, with the advance of molecular diagnostics and a subsequent increased understanding...

  15. Technique for comparing automatic quadrature routines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyness, J N; Kaganove, J J

    1976-02-01

    The present unconstrained proliferation of automatic quadrature routines is a phenomenon which is wasteful in human time and computing resources. At the root of the problem is an absence of generally acceptable standards or benchmarks for comparing or evaluating such routines. In this paper a general technique, based on the nature of the performance profile, is described which can be used for evaluation of routines.

  16. Plasma Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaveryaev, V [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); others, and

    2012-09-15

    The success in achieving peaceful fusion power depends on the ability to control a high temperature plasma, which is an object with unique properties, possibly the most complicated object created by humans. Over years of fusion research a new branch of science has been created, namely plasma diagnostics, which involves knowledge of almost all fields of physics, from electromagnetism to nuclear physics, and up-to-date progress in engineering and technology (materials, electronics, mathematical methods of data treatment). Historically, work on controlled fusion started with pulsed systems and accordingly the methods of plasma parameter measurement were first developed for short lived and dense plasmas. Magnetically confined hot plasmas require the creation of special experimental techniques for diagnostics. The diagnostic set is the most scientifically intensive part of a plasma device. During many years of research operation some scientific tasks have been solved while new ones arose. New tasks often require significant changes in the diagnostic system, which is thus a very flexible part of plasma machines. Diagnostic systems are designed to solve several tasks. As an example here are the diagnostic tasks for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor - ITER: (1) Measurements for machine protection and basic control; (2) Measurements for advanced control; (3) Additional measurements for performance evaluation and physics. Every new plasma machine is a further step along the path to the main goal - controlled fusion - and nobody knows in advance what new phenomena will be met on the way. So in the planning of diagnostic construction we should keep in mind further system upgrading to meet possible new scientific and technical challenges. (author)

  17. A problem-solving routine for improving hospital operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Manimay; Sobek Ii, Durward K

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine empirically why a systematic problem-solving routine can play an important role in the process improvement efforts of hospitals. Data on 18 process improvement cases were collected through semi-structured interviews, reports and other documents, and artifacts associated with the cases. The data were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Adherence to all the steps of the problem-solving routine correlated to greater degrees of improvement across the sample. Analysis resulted in two models. The first partially explains why hospital workers tended to enact short-term solutions when faced with process-related problems; and tended not seek longer-term solutions that prevent problems from recurring. The second model highlights a set of self-reinforcing behaviors that are more likely to address problem recurrence and result in sustained process improvement. The study was conducted in one hospital setting. Hospital managers can improve patient care and increase operational efficiency by adopting and diffusing problem-solving routines that embody three key characteristics. This paper offers new insights on why caregivers adopt short-term approaches to problem solving. Three characteristics of an effective problem-solving routine in a healthcare setting are proposed.

  18. Progress in diagnostic techniques for sc cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reece, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    While routinely achieved performance characteristics of superconducting cavities have now reached a level which makes them useful in large scale applications, achieving this level has come only through the knowledge gained by systematic studies of performance limiting phenomena. Despite the very real progress that has been made, the routine performance of superconducting cavities still falls far short of both the theoretical expectations and the performance of a few exception examples. It is the task of systematically applied diagnostic techniques to reveal additional information concerning the response of superconducting surfaces to applied RF fields. Here recent developments in diagnostic techniques are discussed. 18 references, 12 figures

  19. Diagnostic development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, C.F.; Brisson, D.A.; Greco, S.E.

    1978-01-01

    During the past year the far-infrared or submillimeter diagnostic research program resulted in three major developments: (1) an optically pumped 0.385-μm D 2 O-laser oscillator-amplifier system was operated at a power level of 1 MW with a line width of less than 50 MHz; (2) a conical Pyrex submillimeter laser beam dump with a retention efficiency greater than 10 4 was developed for the ion temperature Thompson scattering experiment; and (3) a new diagnostic technique was developed that makes use of the Faraday rotation of a modulated submillimeter laser beam to determine plasma current profile. Measurements of the asymmetric distortion of the H/sub α/ (6563 A) spectral line profile show that the effective toroidal drift velocity, dv/sub two vertical bars i/dT/sub i/, may be used as an indicator of plasma quality and as a complement to other ion temperature diagnostics

  20. 40 CFR 141.621 - Routine monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Routine monitoring. 141.621 Section....621 Routine monitoring. (a) Monitoring. (1) If you submitted an IDSE report, you must begin monitoring..., you must monitor at the location(s) and dates identified in your monitoring plan in § 141.132(f...

  1. Active Movement Warm-Up Routines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Teri; Quint, Ashleigh; Fischer, Kim; Kiger, Joy

    2011-01-01

    This article presents warm-ups that are designed to physiologically and psychologically prepare students for vigorous physical activity. An active movement warm-up routine is made up of three parts: (1) active warm-up movement exercises, (2) general preparation, and (3) the energy system. These warm-up routines can be used with all grade levels…

  2. Should the lateral chest radiograph be routinely performed?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, Fatuma; Williams, Imelda

    2014-01-01

    Background: The chest x-ray is one of the most common plain film radiographic examinations performed. Inclusion of the lateral chest radiograph varies internationally and nationally across radiology departments and states in Australia. Search strategy: A search strategy of the databases Cochrane Library, Ovid Medline/Medline, PubMed, Scopus and Science Direct was conducted. The results were restricted to those published between 1985 and 2013 and those published in English. The following search terms were used: ‘lateral chest’, ‘radiograph’, ‘digital radiography’, ‘chest x-ray’, ‘plain film radiography’, ‘ionising radiation’. The results were restricted to publications with these terms in the title, abstract and/or keywords. Main findings: There are few national or international guidelines pertaining to the inclusion of the lateral chest x-ray as routine. Primary concerns are the increased radiation dose associated with the additional chest view and reduction of medical imaging services cost. Modern digital imaging systems result in a lower radiation dose. The diagnostic yield of the lateral chest x-ray is highly dependent on the clinical indications of the patient. Further research into the routine inclusion of the lateral chest x-ray is recommended. Conclusion: Review of the literature suggests that the lateral chest radiograph should not be performed routinely unless clinically indicated

  3. Biomarkers in routine diagnosis of pleural effusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiva Nemanič

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pleural fluid biochemical analysis is the first step in pleural effusion (PE diagnostics. Our purpose was to analyse the utility of the biomarkers used at our clinic in the routine diagnosis of PE. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the PE levels of proteins, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, alpha amylase (AA, pH and glucose in 433 patients who were treated at the University Clinic Golnik in a one-year period and compared these values with the final identified aetiology of the effusions. Results: The majority of the effusions were determined to be a consequence of malignancy (n = 154 or infection (n = 108. In 94 cases the aetiology of the effusions was heart failure and in 54 cases other diseases, while 23 effusions remained aetiologically undetermined. Considering Light’s criteria, the vast majority of the effusions were correctly classified as exudates or transudates (97.1 %. Comparing paramalignant and malignant effusions, we detected significantly lower values of pleural fluid LDH (p < 0.0005 and proteins (p < 0.0005, and higher pH (p < 0.0005 values in the paramalignant effusions. Conclusion: We have found that pleural LDH and proteins are the most helpful biochemical parameters in our routine diagnosis of pleural effusions and helped us to correctly narrow the aetiological spectrum. Furthermore, significantly higher pleural LDH and protein values and a pH below 7.32 additionally facilitated distinguishing between malignant and paramalignant effusions. Parameters such as glucose and AA are useful in selected cases and have a limited role in routine diagnostics.

  4. The Bosnian version of the international self-report measure of posttraumatic stress disorder, the Posttraumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale, is reliable and valid in a variety of different adult samples affected by war

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosner Rita

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the present study was to assess the internal consistency and discriminant and convergent validity of the Bosnian version of a self-report measure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, the Posttraumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale (PTDS. The PTDS yields both a PTSD diagnosis according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th edition (DSM-IV and a measure of symptom severity. Methods 812 people living in Sarajevo or in Banja Luka in Bosnia-Herzegovina, of whom the majority had experienced a high number of traumatic war events, were administered the PTDS and other measures of trauma-related psychopathology. The psychometric properties of the instrument were assessed using Cronbach's alpha and principal components analysis, and its construct validity was assessed via Spearman correlation coefficients with the other instruments. Results The PTDS and its subscales demonstrated high internal consistency. The principal components revealed by an exploratory analysis are broadly consistent with the DSM-IV subscales except that they reproduce some previously reported difficulties with the "numbing" items from the avoidance subscale. The construct validity of the PTDS was supported by appropriate correlations with other relevant measures of trauma related psychopathology. Conclusion The Bosnian version of the PTDS thus appears to be a time-economic and psychometrically sound measure for screening and assessing current PTSD. This self-report measure awaits further validation by interview methods.

  5. Developing non-routine problems for assessing students’ mathematical literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdiyani, N. M.

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop non-routine problems for assessing the mathematics literacy skills of students, which is valid, practical, and effective. It is based on the previous research said that Indonesian students’ mathematical literacy is still low. The results of this study can be used as a guide in developing the evaluation questions that can train students to improve the ability of solving non-routine problems in everyday life. This research type is formative evaluation that consists of preliminary, self evaluation, expert reviews, one-to-one, small group, and field test. The sample of this research is grade 8 students at one of Junior High School in Yogyakarta. This study results in mathematics literacy problems prototype consisting of level 1 to level 6 problems similar to PISA problems. This study also discusses the examples of students’ answer and their reasoning.

  6. External Agents' Effect on Routine Dynamics:Lack of Compliance Resulting in Routine Breakdown

    OpenAIRE

    Busse Hansen, Nicolai

    2014-01-01

    Prior investigations on organizational routines have called for re- search to enlighten our understanding of how social actors establish and main- tain of routines as well as the causes of their disruption. The present paper con- tributes to this call by conducting systematic microethnographic analyses of naturally occurring interactional routine data in the form of recordings of job interviews in an international oil contractor company. The term interactional routine is used to describe recu...

  7. Diagnostic dilemma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Dobrovolny, Robert; Nazarenko, Irina

    2011-01-01

    Fabry disease, an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder, results from the deficient activity of a-galactosidase A (a-Gal A). In affected males, the clinical diagnosis is confirmed by the markedly decreased a-Gal A activity. However, in female heterozygotes, the a-Gal A activity can range from low t...... on enzyme replacement therapy. Thus, gene dosage analyses can detect large deletions (>50bp) in suspect heterozygotes for X-linked and autosomal dominant diseases that are "sequencing cryptic," resolving molecular diagnostic dilemmas....... to normal due to random X-chromosomal inactivation, and diagnostic confirmation requires identification of the family's a-Gal A gene mutation. In a young female who had occasional acroparesthesias, corneal opacities, and 15 to 50% of the lower limit of normal leukocyte a-Gal A activity, a-Gal A sequencing...... in two expert laboratories did not identify a confirmatory mutation, presenting a diagnostic dilemma. A renal biopsy proved diagnostic and renewed efforts to detect an a-Gal A mutation. Subsequent gene dosage analyses identified a large a-Gal A deletion confirming her heterozygosity, and she was started...

  8. Implementation aspects of image management, archiving, and communication systems in routine clinical use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haar Romenij, ter B.M.

    1991-01-01

    Implementation of a digital imaging network in routine clinical use is a difficult task. Not only the high technical requirements, but especially the complexity of the organization of the diagnostic information flow in a hospital makes commitment essential in PACS implementation. The application of

  9. Routine perinatal and paediatric post-mortem radiography: detection rates and implications for practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthurs, Owen J. [NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom); University College London, Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Calder, Alistair D. [NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom); Kiho, Liina [Camelia Botnar Laboratories Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Paediatric Pathology, London (United Kingdom); Taylor, Andrew M. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Cardiorespiratory Unit, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science, London (United Kingdom); University College London, Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Sebire, Neil J. [Camelia Botnar Laboratories Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Paediatric Pathology, London (United Kingdom); University College London, Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-15

    Routine perinatal and paediatric post-mortem plain radiography allows for the diagnosis and assessment of skeletal dysplasias, fractures and other bony abnormalities. The aim of this study was to review the diagnostic yield of this practice. We identified 1,027 cases performed in a single institution over a 21/2-year period, including babygrams (whole-body examinations) and full skeletal surveys. Images were reported prior to autopsy in all cases. Radiology findings were cross-referenced with the autopsy findings using an autopsy database. We scored each case from 0 to 4 according to the level of diagnostic usefulness. The overall abnormality rate was 126/1,027 (12.3%). There was a significantly higher rate of abnormality when a skeletal survey was performed (18%) rather than a babygram (10%; P < 0.01); 90% (665/739) of babygrams were normal. Of the 74 abnormal babygrams, we found 33 incidental non-contributory cases, 19 contributory, 20 diagnostic, and 2 false-positive cases. There were only 2 cases out of 739 (0.27%) in whom routine post-mortem imaging identified potentially significant abnormalities that would not have been detected if only selected imaging had been performed. A policy of performing selected, rather than routine, foetal post-mortem radiography could result in a significant cost saving. Routine post-mortem paediatric radiography in foetuses and neonates is neither diagnostically useful nor cost-effective. A more evidence-based, selective protocol should yield significant cost savings. (orig.)

  10. Routine perinatal and paediatric post-mortem radiography: detection rates and implications for practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthurs, Owen J.; Calder, Alistair D.; Kiho, Liina; Taylor, Andrew M.; Sebire, Neil J.

    2014-01-01

    Routine perinatal and paediatric post-mortem plain radiography allows for the diagnosis and assessment of skeletal dysplasias, fractures and other bony abnormalities. The aim of this study was to review the diagnostic yield of this practice. We identified 1,027 cases performed in a single institution over a 21/2-year period, including babygrams (whole-body examinations) and full skeletal surveys. Images were reported prior to autopsy in all cases. Radiology findings were cross-referenced with the autopsy findings using an autopsy database. We scored each case from 0 to 4 according to the level of diagnostic usefulness. The overall abnormality rate was 126/1,027 (12.3%). There was a significantly higher rate of abnormality when a skeletal survey was performed (18%) rather than a babygram (10%; P < 0.01); 90% (665/739) of babygrams were normal. Of the 74 abnormal babygrams, we found 33 incidental non-contributory cases, 19 contributory, 20 diagnostic, and 2 false-positive cases. There were only 2 cases out of 739 (0.27%) in whom routine post-mortem imaging identified potentially significant abnormalities that would not have been detected if only selected imaging had been performed. A policy of performing selected, rather than routine, foetal post-mortem radiography could result in a significant cost saving. Routine post-mortem paediatric radiography in foetuses and neonates is neither diagnostically useful nor cost-effective. A more evidence-based, selective protocol should yield significant cost savings. (orig.)

  11. Increased Exposure to Rigid Routines Can Lead to Increased Challenging Behavior Following Changes to Those Routines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Leah E.; Oliver, Chris; Callaghan, Eleanor; Woodcock, Kate A.

    2015-01-01

    Several neurodevelopmental disorders are associated with preference for routine and challenging behavior following changes to routines. We examine individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome, who show elevated levels of this behavior, to better understand how previous experience of a routine can affect challenging behavior elicited by disruption to…

  12. Fetal exposure in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, M.L.; Vandergrift, J.F.; Dalrymple, G.V.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of possible radiation damage to the fetus or embryo as a result of diagnostic radiography during pregnancy, particularly in the early stages, is discussed. Recommendations of therapeutic abortion after fetal exposure require an adequate knowledge of the doses involved. In the absence of actual dose measurements or estimates, approximate exposure levels may be determined from the literature. A summary of published values for radiography involving the lower abdomen is given. Data is also presented from a series of fetal exposures resulting mostly from routine diagnostic radiography when pregnancy was not known at the time but was established later. Results of actual dose measurements using a phantom and of dose calculations based on published values are in reasonable agreement indicating that literature values of dose provide a satisfactory alternative to measurement. These data suggest that diagnostic radiography rarely, if ever, results in fetal exposures high enough to justify therapeutic abortion. (author)

  13. System for remote routine monitoring of power equipment at TPP and NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantsedalov, V.G.; Samojlenko, V.P.; Doroshenko, V.A.

    1988-01-01

    A system for remote routine monitoring of TPP and NPP pipeline metals is described. The principal functional unit of the system is the unit of remote routine methods and techniques for studying and monitoring the metal and properties. The system is equipped with 5 types of routine monitoring equipment: robots, remote aggregated complexes, periodical diagnostic monitors, other means of metal diagnostics (endoscopes, introscopes). All current information enters the unit for estimating and forecasting the service life of power unit, where it is compared with the standard indices of reliability, duravility and efficiency. The system considered permits to reduce significantly or minimize the scope of works on metal monitoring during overhauls, increase intermonitoring and interrepairing compaigns to 8 years

  14. XML Diagnostics Description Standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neto, A.; Fernandes, H.; Varandas, C.; Lister, J.; Yonekawa, I.

    2006-01-01

    A standard for the self-description of fusion plasma diagnostics will be presented, based on the Extensible Markup Language (XML). The motivation is to maintain and organise the information on all the components of a laboratory experiment, from the hardware to the access security, to save time and money when problems arises. Since there is no existing standard to organise this kind of information, every Association stores and organises each experiment in different ways. This can lead to severe problems when the organisation schema is poorly documented or written in national languages. The exchange of scientists, researchers and engineers between laboratories is a common practice nowadays. Sometimes they have to install new diagnostics or to update existing ones and frequently they lose a great deal of time trying to understand the currently installed system. The most common problems are: no documentation available; the person who understands it has left; documentation written in the national language. Standardisation is the key to solving all the problems mentioned. From the commercial information on the diagnostic (component supplier; component price) to the hardware description (component specifications; drawings) to the operation of the equipment (finite state machines) through change control (who changed what and when) and internationalisation (information at least in the native language and in English), a common XML schema will be proposed. This paper will also discuss an extension of these ideas to the self-description of ITER plant systems, since the problems will be identical. (author)

  15. Are daily routine chest radiographs useful in critically ill, mechanically ventilated patients? A randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clec'h, Christophe; Simon, Paul; Hamdi, Aïcha; Hamza, Lilia; Karoubi, Philippe; Fosse, Jean-Philippe; Gonzalez, Frédéric; Vincent, François; Cohen, Yves

    2008-02-01

    Whether chest radiographs (CXRs) in mechanically ventilated patients should be routinely obtained or only when an abnormality is anticipated remains debated. We aimed to compare the diagnostic, therapeutic and outcome efficacy of a restrictive prescription of CXRs with that of a routine prescription, focusing on delayed diagnoses and treatments potentially related to the restrictive prescription. Randomized controlled trial. Intensive care unit of the Avicenne Teaching Hospital, Bobigny, France. All consecutive patients mechanically ventilated for > or = 48h between January and June 2006. Patients were randomly assigned to have daily routine CXRs (routine prescription group) or clinically indicated CXRs (restrictive prescription group). For each CXR, a questionnaire was completed addressing the reason for the CXR, the new findings, and any subsequent therapeutic intervention. The endpoints were the rates of new findings, the rates of new findings that prompted therapeutic intervention, the rate of delayed diagnoses, and mortality. Eighty-four patients were included in the routine prescription group and 81 in the restrictive prescription group. The rates of new findings and the rates of new findings that prompted therapeutic intervention in the restrictive prescription group and in the routine prescription group were 66% vs. 7.2% (p < 0.0001), and 56.4% vs. 5.5% (p < 0.0001) respectively. The rate of delayed diagnoses in the restrictive prescription group was 0.7%. Mortality was similar. Restrictive use of CXRs in mechanically ventilated patients was associated with better diagnostic and therapeutic efficacies without impairing outcome.

  16. Development and Evaluation of Sensor Concepts for Ageless Aerospace Vehicles: Report 6 - Development and Demonstration of a Self-Organizing Diagnostic System for Structural Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batten, Adam; Edwards, Graeme; Gerasimov, Vadim; Hoschke, Nigel; Isaacs, Peter; Lewis, Chris; Moore, Richard; Oppolzer, Florien; Price, Don; Prokopenko, Mikhail; hide

    2010-01-01

    This report describes a significant advance in the capability of the CSIRO/NASA structural health monitoring Concept Demonstrator (CD). The main thrust of the work has been the development of a mobile robotic agent, and the hardware and software modifications and developments required to enable the demonstrator to operate as a single, self-organizing, multi-agent system. This single-robot system is seen as the forerunner of a system in which larger numbers of small robots perform inspection and repair tasks cooperatively, by self-organization. While the goal of demonstrating self-organized damage diagnosis was not fully achieved in the time available, much of the work required for the final element that enables the robot to point the video camera and transmit an image has been completed. A demonstration video of the CD and robotic systems operating will be made and forwarded to NASA.

  17. Instrumental neutron activation analysis - a routine method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruin, M. de.

    1983-01-01

    This thesis describes the way in which at IRI instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) has been developed into an automated system for routine analysis. The basis of this work are 20 publications describing the development of INAA since 1968. (Auth.)

  18. External Agents' Effect on Routine Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busse Hansen, Nicolai

    Prior investigations on organizational routines have called for re- search to enlighten our understanding of how social actors establish and main- tain of routines as well as the causes of their disruption. The present paper con- tributes to this call by conducting systematic microethnographic...... and affiliation are central to how routines are maintained but also susceptible to disruption in case of mis- management. Also the paper contributes with a more fine-tuned understanding of action in terms of them being organized in accordance with preference, which basically means that some actions are preferred...... over others. In producing an action, the relevant next action is projected. However the relevant next action is projected in a specific way and if this is not taken in to account then the routine becomes disrupted. Another core aspect is the notion of deontics that lends itself towards describing who...

  19. Taking medicine at home - create a routine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000613.htm Taking medicine at home - create a routine To use the ... teeth. Find Ways to Help You Remember Your Medicines You can: Set the alarm on your clock, ...

  20. PAT challenges routine techniques on defect spectroscopy in material science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badawi, E.A.

    2005-01-01

    Atomic or Point Defects are the most simple defects in solids. Due to the small size their direct observation by the routine techniques is not possible. A single type of defects (thermal defect) was observed in the quenching process. Using the Arrhenius method and threshold method we recommended the accurate both method of treatments. The calculated values for formation enthalpies and self-diffusion using positron lifetime and Doppler broadening in a good agreement in (A356.0) and (A413.1). Specifically it is show how PAT detect defect concentrations, (formation- migration) enthalpies and grain size for the material under investigation. Most of the these data are reported

  1. Routine environmental monitoring schedule, calendar year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markes, B.M., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-12-10

    This document provides the Environmental Restorations Contractor (ERC) and the Project Hanford Management Contractor.(PHMC) a schedule in accordance with the WHC-CM-7-5, Environmental Compliance` and BHI- EE-02, Environmental Requirements, of monitoring and sampling routines for the Near-Field Monitoring (NFM) program during calendar year (CY) 1997. Every attempt will be made to consistently follow this schedule; any deviation from this schedule will be documented by an internal memorandum (DSI) explaining the reason for the deviation. The DSI will be issued by the scheduled performing organization and directed to Near-Field Monitoring. The survey frequencies for particular sites are determined by the technical judgment of Near- Field Monitoring and may depend on the site history, radiological status, use, and general conditions. Additional surveys may be requested at irregular frequencies if conditions warrant. All radioactive wastes sites are scheduled to be surveyed at least annually. Any newly discovered wastes sites not documented by this schedule will be included in the revised schedule for CY 1998. The outside perimeter road surveys of 200 East and West Area and the rail survey from the 300 Area to Columbia Center will be performed in the year 2000 per agreement with Department of Energy. Richland Field Office. This schedule does not discuss staffing needs, nor does it list the monitoring equipment to be used in completing specific routines. Personnel performing routines to meet this schedule shall communicate any need for assistance in completing these routines to Radiological Control management and Near-Field Monitoring. After each routine survey is completed, a copy of the survey record, maps, and data sheets will be forwarded to Near-Field Monitoring. These routine surveys will not be considered complete until this documentation is received. At the end of each month, the ERC and PHMC radiological control organizations shall forward a copy of the Routine

  2. A Novel Optical Diagnostic for In Situ Measurements of Lithium Polysulfides in Battery Electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saqib, Najmus; Silva, Cody J; Maupin, C Mark; Porter, Jason M

    2017-07-01

    An optical diagnostic technique to determine the order and concentration of lithium polysulfides in lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery electrolytes has been developed. One of the major challenges of lithium-sulfur batteries is the problem of polysulfide shuttling between the electrodes, which leads to self-discharge and loss of active material. Here we present an optical diagnostic for quantitative in situ measurements of lithium polysulfides using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Simulated infrared spectra of lithium polysulfide molecules were generated using computational quantum chemistry routines implemented in Gaussian 09. The theoretical spectra served as a starting point for experimental characterization of lithium polysulfide solutions synthesized by the direct reaction of lithium sulfide and sulfur. Attenuated total reflection FT-IR spectroscopy was used to measure absorption spectra. The lower limit of detection with this technique is 0.05 M. Measured spectra revealed trends with respect to polysulfide order and concentration, consistent with theoretical predictions, which were used to develop a set of equations relating the order and concentration of lithium polysulfides in a sample to the position and area of a characteristic infrared absorption band. The diagnostic routine can measure the order and concentration to within 5% and 0.1 M, respectively.

  3. Improving care coordination using organisational routines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prætorius, Thim

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to systematically apply theory of organisational routines to standardised care pathways. The explanatory power of routines is used to address open questions in the care pathway literature about their coordinating and organising role, the way they change and can be replicated, the way they are influenced by the organisation and the way they influence health care professionals. Theory of routines is systematically applied to care pathways in order to develop theoretically derived propositions. Care pathways mirror routines by being recurrent, collective and embedded and specific to an organisation. In particular, care pathways resemble standard operating procedures that can give rise to recurrent collective action patterns. In all, 11 propositions related to five categories are proposed by building on these insights: care pathways and coordination, change, replication, the organisation and health care professionals. Research limitations/implications - The paper is conceptual and uses care pathways as illustrative instances of hospital routines. The propositions provide a starting point for empirical research. The analysis highlights implications that health care professionals and managers have to consider in relation to coordination, change, replication, the way the organisation influences care pathways and the way care pathways influence health care professionals. Originality/value - Theory on organisational routines offers fundamental, yet unexplored, insights into hospital processes, including in particular care coordination.

  4. Self-Reported Functional Status as Predictor of Observed Functional Capacity in Subjects with Early Osteoarthritis of the Hip and Knee : A Diagnostic Study in the CHECK Cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bieleman, H. J.; Reneman, M. F.; van Ittersum, M. W.; van der Schans, C. P.; Groothoff, J. W.; Oosterveld, F. G. J.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) may experience functional limitations in work settings. In the Cohort Hip and Cohort Knee study (CHECK) physical function was both self-reported and measured performance-based, using Functional Capacity Evaluation (FCE). Relations between

  5. Teaching Early Readers to Self-Monitor and Self-Correct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Sharon M.; Urbanowski, Melena

    2016-01-01

    Proficient readers self-monitor and self-correct to derive meaning from text. This article reviews research on how students learn to self-monitor and self-correct and describes a Reciprocal Teaching (RT) instructional routine that was successfully used with early readers to build their metacognitive processes. The RT routine included teacher…

  6. A portable and independent edge fluctuation diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsui, H.Y.W.; Ritz, C.P.; Wootton, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    The measurements of fluctuations and its associated transport with Langmuir probes have provided essential experimental information for some understanding of the turbulent transport. While such measurements have been conducted in the edge region of several tokamaks, only limited effort has been devoted to link and to consolidate these results: such effort can provide information for a more global understanding of the transport process. The purpose of this project is to provide a portable diagnostic facility to measure the edge turbulence on different devices, a signal processing package to analyze the data in a systematic manner and a database to consolidate the experimental results. The end product which provides a collection of information for the comparisons with the theoretical models may lead to a more global understanding of the transport process. A compact self contained portable system has been designed and developed to diagnose the edge plasma of devices with a wide range of sizes and configurations. The system is capable of measuring both the mean and the fluctuation quantities of density, temperature and potential from a standardized Langmuir probe array using a fast reciprocating probe drive. The system can also be used for other fluctuation diagnostics, such as magnetic probes, if necessary. The data acquisition and analysis is performed on a Macintosh 2fx which provides a user-friendly environment. The results obtained by the signal processing routines are stored in a tabloid format to allow comparative studies. The database is a core part of the portable signal analysis system. It allows a fast display of shot data versus each other, as well as comparison between different devices

  7. Examining daily activity routines of older adults using workflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jane; Ozkaynak, Mustafa; Demiris, George

    2017-07-01

    We evaluated the value of workflow analysis supported by a novel visualization technique to better understand the daily routines of older adults and highlight their patterns of daily activities and normal variability in physical functions. We used a self-reported activity diary to obtain data from six community-dwelling older adults for 14 consecutive days. Workflow for daily routine was analyzed using the EventFlow tool, which aggregates workflow information to highlight patterns and variabilities. A total of 1453 events were included in the data analysis. To demonstrate the patterns and variability of each individual's daily activities, participant activity workflows were visualized and compared. The workflow analysis revealed great variability in activity types, regularity, frequency, duration, and timing of performing certain activities across individuals. Also, when workflow approach was applied to spatial information of activities, the analysis revealed the ability to provide meaningful data on individuals' mobility in different levels of life spaces from home to community. Results suggest that using workflows to characterize the daily activities of older adults will be helpful for clinicians and researchers in understanding their daily routines and preparing education and prevention strategies tailored to each individual's activity level. This tool also has the potential to be integrated into consumer informatics technologies, such as patient portals or personal health records, so that consumers may be encouraged to become actively involved in monitoring and managing their health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Significance of Tailored, Web-Based Information on Experiences Regarding Perceived Self-Management in Ovarian Cancer Patients in the Diagnostic Phase-An Experimental Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Marianne Kirstine; Holt, Kamila Adellund; Mogensen, Ole

    2016-01-01

    provided data for statistical analysis. Patients’ difference in change in Sense of Coherence over time was statistically significant in favor of those who had used the website (mean difference 4.42, pwebsite prevented a decrease in self-management of Danish...... of a healthcare-professional developed website, available to both patients and relatives, on patients’ experienced self-management before surgery for ovarian cancer. In an experimental study, Danish women with ovarian cancer were consecutively included if they would participate and had a relative, willing...... to offer attention to the cancer situation. The control group had standard care, the intervention group plus their relatives had additional access to a website with cancer-specific physical, psychical, and practical information. The validated questionnaires Cancer Behavior Inventory and Sense of Coherence...

  9. Diagnostic accuracy in virtual dermatopathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mooney, E.; Kempf, W.; Jemec, G.B.E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Virtual microscopy is used for teaching medical students and residents and for in-training and certification examinations in the United States. However, no existing studies compare diagnostic accuracy using virtual slides and photomicrographs. The objective of this study was to compare...... diagnostic accuracy of dermatopathologists and pathologists using photomicrographs vs. digitized images, through a self-assessment examination, and to elucidate assessment of virtual dermatopathology. Methods Forty-five dermatopathologists and pathologists received a randomized combination of 15 virtual...... slides and photomicrographs with corresponding clinical photographs and information in a self-assessment examination format. Descriptive data analysis and comparison of groups were performed using a chi-square test. Results Diagnostic accuracy in dermatopathology using virtual dermatopathology...

  10. Non-suicidal self-injury in Mexican young adults: Prevalence, associations with suicidal behavior and psychiatric disorders, and DSM-5 proposed diagnostic criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjet, Corina; González-Herrera, Irene; Castro-Silva, Everardo; Méndez, Enrique; Borges, Guilherme; Casanova, Leticia; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena

    2017-06-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) may lead to scarring, infection, accidental death and psychological distress. Little is known about NSSI in the general population of young adults in developing countries like Mexico. The current study examined the prevalence of any NSSI and each type of NSSI, the prevalence of meeting DSM-5 proposed criteria, and finally the association of NSSI with socio-demographic variables, suicidal behavior and psychiatric disorders. This study was conducted in a community sample of 1071 young adults between 19 and 26 years of age residents of Mexico City. The lifetime prevalence of NSSI was 18.56% with females having 87% greater odds. The 12-month prevalence was 3.19%. Only 0.22% of the total sample and 6.96% of those that self-injured in the past 12 months met full criteria proposed by DSM-5, in part due to the lack of reported impairment; 39.99% of those that self-injured reported impairment. Suicidal behavior commonly co-occurred with NSSI. All lifetime anxiety, mood, disruptive behavior and substance use disorders were associated with greater risk for lifetime NSSI whereas only 12-month depression and substance use disorder was associated with greater risk of 12-month NSSI. The cross-sectional nature of the study precludes conclusions of causality and directionality and the study excluded institutionalized and homeless young adults. NSSI is a concerning problem in young adults from Mexico City due to the important associations with all types of psychiatric disorders and suicidal behavior. Because many who self-injure do not perceive impairment, they are unlikely to seek treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Diagnostic value of self-reported mechanical symptoms for diagnosing large meniscal tears in patients aged 40 years or older with meniscal tears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Kenneth; Englund, Martin; Lohmander, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Meniscal tears, which are longitudinal-vertical tears (e.g. bucket-handle tears) and/or involve all three meniscal sub regions (anterior horn, body and posterior horn), are typically large and assumed to cause patient perceived mechanical knee symptoms (knee grinding or clicking and knee...... catching or locking). However, whether the presence of such mechanical symptoms is useful for diagnosing these forms of meniscus tears is unknown. Therefore, we investigated the diagnostic values of having mechanical symptoms in diagnosing a bucket-handle tear and/or a tear involving all three meniscal sub...... regions in middle-aged and older patients undergoing arthroscopic meniscal surgery. Methods: This study is a secondary analysis of Pihl et al. OARSI 2017. The study included patients aged 40 years or older undergoing surgery for a meniscal tear from Knee Arthroscopy Cohort Southern Denmark (KACS...

  12. Informational Aspects of Telepathology in Routine Surgical Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Gombas

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Application of computer and telecommunication technology calls serious challenges in routine diagnostic pathology. Complete data integration, fast access patients' data to usage of diagnosis thesaurus labeled with standardized codes and free text supplements, complex inquiry of the data contents, data exchange via teleconsultation and multilevel data protection are required functions of an integrated information system. Increasing requirement for teleconsultation transferring a large amount of multimedia data among different pathology information systems raises new questions in telepathology. Creation of complex telematic systems in pathology requires efficient methods of software engineering and implementation. Information technology of object‐oriented modeling, usage of client server architecture and relational database management systems enables more compatible systems in field of telepathology. The aim of this paper is to present a practical example how to unify text based database, image archive and teleconsultation in a frame of an integrated telematic system and to discuss the main conceptual questions of information technology of telepathology.

  13. A low cost, safe, disposable, rapid and self-sustainable paper-based platform for diagnostic testing: lab-on-paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, M N; Veigas, B; Jacob, J M; Santos, D S; Martins, R; Fortunato, E; Gomes, J; Inácio, J; Baptista, P V

    2014-01-01

    There is a strong interest in the use of biopolymers in the electronic and biomedical industries, mainly towards low-cost applications. The possibility of developing entirely new kinds of products based on cellulose is of current interest, in order to enhance and to add new functionalities to conventional paper-based products. We present our results towards the development of paper-based microfluidics for molecular diagnostic testing. Paper properties were evaluated and compared to nitrocellulose, the most commonly used material in lateral flow and other rapid tests. Focusing on the use of paper as a substrate for microfluidic applications, through an eco-friendly wax-printing technology, we present three main and distinct colorimetric approaches: (i) enzymatic reactions (glucose detection); (ii) immunoassays (antibodies anti-Leishmania detection); (iii) nucleic acid sequence identification (Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex detection). Colorimetric glucose quantification was achieved through enzymatic reactions performed within specific zones of the paper-based device. The colouration achieved increased with growing glucose concentration and was highly homogeneous, covering all the surface of the paper reaction zones in a 3D sensor format. These devices showed a major advantage when compared to the 2D lateral flow glucose sensors, where some carryover of the coloured products usually occurs. The detection of anti-Leishmania antibodies in canine sera was conceptually achieved using a paper-based 96-well enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay format. However, optimization is still needed for this test, regarding the efficiency of the immobilization of antigens on the cellulose fibres. The detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis nucleic acids integrated with a non-cross-linking gold nanoprobe detection scheme was also achieved in a wax-printed 384-well paper-based microplate, by the hybridization with a species-specific probe. The obtained results with the above

  14. A low cost, safe, disposable, rapid and self-sustainable paper-based platform for diagnostic testing: lab-on-paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, M. N.; Veigas, B.; Jacob, J. M.; Santos, D. S.; Gomes, J.; Baptista, P. V.; Martins, R.; Inácio, J.; Fortunato, E.

    2014-03-01

    There is a strong interest in the use of biopolymers in the electronic and biomedical industries, mainly towards low-cost applications. The possibility of developing entirely new kinds of products based on cellulose is of current interest, in order to enhance and to add new functionalities to conventional paper-based products. We present our results towards the development of paper-based microfluidics for molecular diagnostic testing. Paper properties were evaluated and compared to nitrocellulose, the most commonly used material in lateral flow and other rapid tests. Focusing on the use of paper as a substrate for microfluidic applications, through an eco-friendly wax-printing technology, we present three main and distinct colorimetric approaches: (i) enzymatic reactions (glucose detection); (ii) immunoassays (antibodies anti-Leishmania detection); (iii) nucleic acid sequence identification (Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex detection). Colorimetric glucose quantification was achieved through enzymatic reactions performed within specific zones of the paper-based device. The colouration achieved increased with growing glucose concentration and was highly homogeneous, covering all the surface of the paper reaction zones in a 3D sensor format. These devices showed a major advantage when compared to the 2D lateral flow glucose sensors, where some carryover of the coloured products usually occurs. The detection of anti-Leishmania antibodies in canine sera was conceptually achieved using a paper-based 96-well enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay format. However, optimization is still needed for this test, regarding the efficiency of the immobilization of antigens on the cellulose fibres. The detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis nucleic acids integrated with a non-cross-linking gold nanoprobe detection scheme was also achieved in a wax-printed 384-well paper-based microplate, by the hybridization with a species-specific probe. The obtained results with the above

  15. Thyroid diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scriba, P C; Boerner, W; Emrich, S; Gutekunst, R; Herrmann, J; Horn, K; Klett, M; Krueskemper, H L; Pfannenstiel, P; Pickardt, C R

    1985-03-01

    None of the in-vitro and in-vivo methods listed permits on unambiguous diagnosis when applied alone, owing to the fact that similar or even identical findings are obtained for various individual parameters in different thyroid diseases. Further, especially the in-vitro tests are also subject to extrathyroidal effects which may mask the typical findings. The limited and varying specificity and sensitivity of the tests applied, as well as the falsification of results caused by the patients' idiosyncracies and the methodology, make it necessary to interpret and evaluate the in-vivo and in-vitro findings only if the clinical situation (anamnesis and physical examination) is known. For maximum diagnostic quality of the tests, the initial probability of the assumed type of thyroid disease must be increased (formulation of the clinical problem). The concepts of exclusion diagnosis and identification must be distinguished as well as the diagnosis of functional disturbances on the one hand and of thyroid diseases on the other. Both of this requires a qualified, specific and detailed anamnesis and examination procedure, and the clinical examination remains the obligatory basis of clinical diagnostics. In case of inexplicable discrepancies between the clinical manifestations and the findings obtained with specific methods, or between the findings obtained with a specific method, the patient should be referred to an expert institution, or the expert institution should be consulted.

  16. Thyroid diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scriba, P.C.; Boerner, W.; Emrich, S.; Gutekunst, R.; Herrmann, J.; Horn, K.; Klett, M.; Krueskemper, H.L.; Pfannenstiel, P.; Pickardt, C.R.; Reiners, C.; Reinwein, D.; Schleusener, H.

    1985-01-01

    None of the in-vitro and in-vivo methods listed permits on unambiguous diagnosis when applied alone, owing to the fact that similar or even identical findings are obtained for various individual parameters in different thyroid diseases. Further, especially the in-vitro tests are also subject to extrathyroidal effects which may mask the typical findings. The limited and varying specificity and sensitivity of the tests applied, as well as the falsification of results caused by the patients' idiosyncracies and the methodology, make it necessary to interpret and evaluate the in-vivo and in-vitro findings only if the clinical situation (anamnesis and physical examination) is known. For maximum diagnostic quality of the tests, the initial probability of the assumed type of thyroid disease must be increased (formulation of the clinical problem). The concepts of exclusion diagnosis and identification must be distinguished as well as the diagnosis of functional disturbances on the one hand and of thyroid diseases on the other. Both of this requires a qualified, specific and detailed anamnesis and examination procedure, and the clinical examination remains the obligatory basis of clinical diagnostics. In case of inexplicable discrepancies between the clinical manifestations and the findings obtained with specific methods, or between the findings obtained with a specific method, the patient should be referred to an expert institution, or the expert institution should be consulted. (orig./MG) [de

  17. Ambient diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Part I. FundamentalsIntroductionWhat is Ambient Diagnostics?Diagnostic ModelsMultimedia IntelligenceCrowd SourcingSoft SensorsScience of SimplicityPersonal DiagnosesBasic AlgorithmsBasic ToolsSummaryProblemsTransformationEarly Discoveries of Heartbeat PatternsTransforms, Features, and AttributesSequential FeaturesSpatiotemporal FeaturesShape FeaturesImagery FeaturesFrequency Domain FeaturesMulti-Resolution FeaturesSummaryProblemsPattern RecognitionSimilarities and DistancesClustering MethodsClassification MethodsClassifier Accuracy MeasuresSummaryProblemsPart II. Multimedia IntelligenceSound RecognitionMicrophone AppsModern Acoustic Transducers (Microphones)Frequency Response CharacteristicsDigital Audio File FormatsHeart Sound SensingLung Sound SensingSnore MeterSpectrogram (STFT)Ambient Sound AnalysisSound RecognitionRecognizing Asthma SoundPeak ShiftFeature CompressionRegroupingNoise IssuesFuture ApplicationsSummaryProblemsColor SensorsColor SensingHuman Color VisionColor SensorsColor Matching ExperimentsC...

  18. Selected versus routine use of intraoperative cholangiography during laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickuth, D

    1995-12-01

    Routine use of intraoperative cholangiography during laparoscopic cholecystectomy is still widely advocated and standard in many departments, however, this is discussed controversially. We have developed a new diagnostic strategy to detect bile duct stones. The concept is based on an ultrasound examination and on a screening for the presence of six risk indicators of choledocholithiasis. 120 consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were prospectively screened for the presence of six risk indicators of choledocholithiasis: history of jaundice; history of pancreatitis; hyperbilirubinemia; hyperamylasemia; dilated bile duct; unclear ultrasound findings. The sensitivity of ultrasound and of intraoperative cholangiography in diagnosing bile duct stones was also evaluated. For the detection of bile duct stones, the sensitivity was 77% for ultrasound and 100% for intraoperative cholangiography. 20% of all patients had at least one risk indicator. The presence of a risk indicator correlated significantly with the presence of choledocholithiasis (p concept, we would have avoided 80% of intraoperative cholangiographies without missing a stone in the bile duct. This study lends further support to the view that the routine use of intraoperative cholangiography in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy is not necessary.

  19. Management implications from routine needle biopsy of hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walfish, P G; Strawbridge, H T; Rosen, I B

    1985-12-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic and treatment consequences of using a routine needle biopsy procedure on all thyroid nodules without a radioisotopic scintigraphic study, 12 patients with documented hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules were retrospectively evaluated regarding the physical and cytologic observations obtained after a fine-needle (22 to 27-gauge) aspiration biopsy (FNB) procedure. Among the seven solid lesions, features of marked cellularity and nuclear pleomorphism were present in three and moderate sheets of epithelium in four raising the suspicion of underlying malignancy, while five mixed (cystic and solid) lesions were larger than 3 cm, hemorrhagic, and recurrent, with two having detectable sheets of epithelium. Evidence for concomitant lymphocytic thyroiditis was seen in five of 12 (42%) patients, and nine had positive serum antithyroid antibody titers as well. In conclusion, total reliance on FNB without scintigraphy could lead to operations on hyperfunctioning thyroid adenomas for suspected malignancy, of whom the vast majority would be benign, and could expose some unprepared patients with thyrotoxicosis to surgical morbidity. Routine thyroid hormone suppression therapy for apparently benign inflammatory or cystic degenerative lesions could also induce hyperthyroidism in patients with hyperfunctional or autonomous (nonsuppressible) nodules. When using an initial FNB approach, the need for thyroid function studies and scintigraphy before undertaking surgery or thyroid hormone feeding, as well as the consequences of omitting such studies, should be considered.

  20. Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Nevada

    1999-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy manages the Nevada Test Site in a manner that meets evolving DOE Missions and responds to the concerns of affected and interested individuals and agencies. This Routine Radiological Monitoring Plan addressess complicance with DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 and other drivers requiring routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance on the Nevada Test Site. This monitoring plan, prepared in 1998, addresses the activities conducted onsite NTS under the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision. This radiological monitoring plan, prepared on behalf of the Nevada Test Site Landlord, brings together sitewide environmental surveillance; site-specific effluent monitoring; and operational monitoring conducted by various missions, programs, and projects on the NTS. The plan provides an approach to identifying and conducting routine radiological monitoring at the NTS, based on integrated technical, scientific, and regulatory complicance data needs.

  1. Improving care coordination using organisational routines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prætorius, Thim

    2016-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to systematically apply theory of organisational routines to standardised care pathways. The explanatory power of routines is used to address open questions in the care pathway literature about their coordinating and organising role, the way they change......: care pathways and coordination, change, replication, the organisation and health care professionals. Research limitations/implications – The paper is conceptual and uses care pathways as illustrative instances of hospital routines. The propositions provide a starting point for empirical research....... Practical implications – The analysis highlights implications that health care professionals and managers have to consider in relation to coordination, change, replication, the way the organisation influences care pathways and the way care pathways influence health care professionals. Originality...

  2. Auto e hetero-avaliação no diagnóstico de necessidades de treinamento Self and hetero assessment in training needs diagnostic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Lemes Magalhães

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo teve como objetivos: desenvolver uma metodologia de avaliação de necessidades de treinamento que incluísse atitudes; estudar a relação entre auto e hetero-avaliação, buscando avaliar conhecimentos, habilidades e atitudes; e avaliar a relação entre a auto-avaliação e algumas variáveis preditoras (tempo de trabalho na organização e na função, emprego anterior, gênero, estado civil, escolaridade e idade. Foram desenvolvidos questionários, de acordo com o método de análise de papel ocupacional. Esses questionários foram aplicados em 898 bancários e seus supervisores imediatos. Os resultados sugeriram que a metodologia parece ser adequada para analisar necessidades de treinamento. Mostraram também que existe relação significativa entre auto e hetero-avaliação de necessidades de treinamento, embora supervisores tendam a apontar maiores necessidades de treinamento, em seus subordinados, do que as auto-avaliações destes mesmos.The objectives of the present study were: to develop a training needs assessment methodology that included attitudes; to study the relationship between self and hetero assessment, by assessing knowledge, skills and attitudes; and to evaluate the relationship between self-assessment and some predicting variables (work experience at the organizational and occupational levels, prior job experience, gender, marital status, schooling and age. Questionnaires were developed, following the method of occupational role analysis. These questionnaires were applied in 898 bank employees and their immediate supervisors. Results have suggested that the methodology seems to be appropriate for analyzing training needs. They have also shown that there is a significant relationship between self and hetero assessments of training needs. However, supervisors tend to point higher training needs, in their subordinates, than the self-assessments made by the latter.

  3. Conversational routines in English convention and creativity

    CERN Document Server

    Aijmer, Karin

    2014-01-01

    It is surprising how much of everyday conversation consists of repetitive expressions such as 'thank you', 'sorry', would you mind?' and their many variants. However commonplace they may be, they do have important functions in communication.This thorough study draws upon original data from the London-Lund Corpus of Spoken English to provide a discoursal and pragmatic account of the more common expressions found in conversational routines, such as apologising, thanking, requesting and offering.The routines studied in this book range from conventionalized or idiomatized phrases t

  4. Routine maintenance prolongs ESP time between failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, T.; Lannom, R.W.; Divine, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that routine maintenance of electric submersible motors (ESPs) significantly lengthened the mean time between motor failures (MTBF), decreased operating costs, and extended motor run life in the Sacroc Unit of the Kelly-Snyder field in West Texas. After the oil price boom of the early 1980s. rapidly eroding profit margins from producing properties caused a much stronger focus on reducing operating costs. In Sacroc, ESP operating life and repair costs became a major target of cost reduction efforts. The routine ESP maintenance program has been in place for over 3 years

  5. Absorptive routines and international patent performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando E. García-Muiña

    2017-04-01

    We enrich the treatment of the absorptive capacity phases including the moderating effects between routines associated to the traditional potential-realized absorptive capacities. Taking into account external knowledge search strategies, the deeper external relationships, the better transference and appropriation of specific external knowledge. Nevertheless, when the moderating role of assimilation is included, cooperation agreements appear as the most efficient source of external knowledge. Finally, we show that technological tools let firms store and structure the information making easier its use for international patenting. This positive effect is reinforced in the presence of exploitation routines, since technological knowledge will better fit to the industry's key factors of success.

  6. Diagnostic accuracy of organ electrodermal diagnostics | Szopinski ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To estimate the diagnostic accuracy as well as the scope of utilisation of a new bio-electronic method of organ diagnostics. Design. Double-blind comparative study of the diagnostic results obtained by means of organ electrodermal diagnostics (OED) and clinical diagnoses, as a criterion standard. Setting.

  7. SNS Diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shea, T.J.; Cameron, P.; Doolittle, L.; Power, J.

    2000-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Project is a collaborative effort to build the next generation neutron science facility at Oak Ridge, TN. The facility will deliver a 2 MW proton beam to a liquid mercury target. Neutrons from this target will be moderated and sent to several state-of-the-art instruments. Six national laboratories are involved in SNS construction. Berkeley (LBNL) will build the front end that produces a 2.5 MeV, 52 mA H-beam. Los Alamos (LANL) is responsible for the 1 GeV linac with a superconducting section provided by Thomas Jefferson (JLab). Brookhaven (BNL) is building the transfer lines and accumulator ring. Oak Ridge (ORNL) and Argonne (ANL) have responsibility for the target and instruments. All activities are coordinated by the SNS project office at Oak Ridge. The high beam power, a desired availability of 95%, and an aggressive commissioning schedule lead to some interesting challenges in beam diagnostics

  8. Psychometric properties of the Japanese version of the Adult Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) Self-Report Scale (ASRS-J) and its short scale in accordance with DSM-5 diagnostic criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Toshinobu; Tsuji, Yui; Kurita, Hiroshi

    2017-04-01

    We developed the Japanese version of the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS-J) and report its psychometric properties. The ASRS-J and other questionnaires were administered to 48 adults with ADHD, 46 adults with non-ADHD psychiatric disorders, 96 non-clinical adults, and 894 university students. ADHD diagnoses were made using the Japanese semi-structured diagnostic interview for adult ADHD, which is compatible with the DSM-5. The ASRS-J, its subscales, and the short form, all had Cronbach's α values of around 0.80. Total scores on the ASRS-J and the ASRS-J-6 were highly correlated with readministration after a two-week interval. The total and 18 individual item scores in the ASRS-J were significantly higher in the ADHD group than the other three groups. ASRS-J scores were correlated with scores on the Japanese version of Conners' Adult ADHD Rating Scales-Self Report subscales (0.59≤r≤0.77), with one exception. ASRS-J scores were also correlated (albeit more weakly; r=0.38) with Beck Depression Inventory-II total scores. Employing optimal cut-offs, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the ASRS-J and ASRS-J-6 are all above 0.69. The ASRS-J and ASRS-J-6 showed acceptable psychometric properties, although further study is necessary. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. routine saline infusion sonohysterography prior to assisted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, University College Hospital, Ibadan. 2. Department of Obstetrics ... tenaculum, and a Wallace classic embryo replacement catheter (Smith .... thorough diagnostic procedures, including modern imaging ...

  10. Generating Novelty Through Interdependent Routines: A Process Model of Routine Work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deken, F.; Carlile, P.R.; Berends, H.; Lauche, K.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate how multiple actors accomplish interdependent routine performances directed at novel intended outcomes and how this affects routine dynamics over time. We report findings from a longitudinal ethnographic study in an automotive company where actors developed a new business model around

  11. Community Pharmacies As Possible Centres For Routine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: Sixty (60) pre-tested questionnaires were randomly administered to community pharmacists. Forty-three (43) questionnaires were retrieved for analysis. Results: The study revealed that the use of community pharmacies as places where routine immunization services can be provided is feasible as shown by 95.3% ...

  12. Age at BCG administration during routine immunization.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Age at BCG administration during routine immunization. R.D. Wammanda , M.J. Gambo and I. Abdulkadir. Department of Paediatrics,. Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital,. Zaria. Correspondence to: Dr.R.D. Wammanda. Email: wammanda@yahoo.com. Summary. In Nigeria, as part of the National Programme on ...

  13. Individual Values, Learning Routines and Academic Procrastination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Franziska; Hofer, Manfred; Fries, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Background: Academic procrastination, the tendency to postpone learning activities, is regarded as a consequence of postmodern values that are prominent in post-industrialized societies. When students strive for leisure goals and have no structured routines for academic tasks, delaying strenuous learning activities becomes probable. Aims: The…

  14. Individual values, learning routines and academic procrastination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Franziska; Hofer, Manfred; Fries, Stefan

    2007-12-01

    Academic procrastination, the tendency to postpone learning activities, is regarded as a consequence of postmodern values that are prominent in post-industrialized societies. When students strive for leisure goals and have no structured routines for academic tasks, delaying strenuous learning activities becomes probable. The model tested in this study posits that postmodern value orientations are positively related to procrastination and to a lack of daily routines concerning the performance of academic activities. In contrast, modern values are negatively related to procrastination and positively to learning routines. Academic procrastination, in-turn, should be associated with the tendency to prefer leisure activities to schoolwork in case of conflicts between these two life domains. Seven hundred and four students from 6th and 8th grade with a mean age of 13.5 years participated in the study. The sample included students from all tracks of the German educational system. Students completed a questionnaire containing two value prototypes as well as scales on learning routines and procrastination. Decisions in motivational conflicts were measured using two vignettes. Results from structural equation modelling supported the proposed model for the whole sample as well as for each school track. A planned course of the day can prevent procrastination and foster decisions for academic tasks in case of conflicts. Students' learning takes place within a societal context and reflects the values held in the respective culture.

  15. Development and validation of the Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale: a brief self-report measure of anorexia, bulimia, and binge-eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, E; Telch, C F; Rizvi, S L

    2000-06-01

    This article describes the development and validation of a brief self-report scale for diagnosing anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge-eating disorder. Study 1 used a panel of eating-disorder experts and provided evidence for the content validity of this scale. Study 2 used data from female participants with and without eating disorders (N = 367) and suggested that the diagnoses from this scale possessed temporal reliability (mean kappa = .80) and criterion validity (with interview diagnoses; mean kappa = .83). In support of convergent validity, individuals with eating disorders identified by this scale showed elevations on validated measures of eating disturbances. The overall symptom composite also showed test-retest reliability (r = .87), internal consistency (mean alpha = .89), and convergent validity with extant eating-pathology scales. Results implied that this scale was reliable and valid in this investigation and that it may be useful for clinical and research applications.

  16. Family routine moderates the relation between child impulsivity and oppositional defiant disorder symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, H Isabella; Drabick, Deborah A G

    2011-01-01

    Although child impulsivity is associated with oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) symptoms, few studies have examined whether family processes moderate this association. To address this gap, we tested whether child-reported family routine moderated the relation between child hyperactivity/impulsivity (HI) and ODD symptoms among a sample of low-income, urban, ethnic-minority children (N = 87, 51% male). Child HI and ODD symptoms were assessed using parent and teacher reports. HI also was indexed by a laboratory task. Family routine was assessed using child self-report. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that family routine moderated child HI. Among children with higher levels of teacher-reported HI symptoms, lower levels of family routine were associated with higher levels of teacher-reported ODD symptoms compared to children with lower levels of teacher-reported HI symptoms. Children who self-reported higher levels of family routine were rated as low on teacher-reported ODD symptoms, regardless of teacher-reported HI levels. Parent report and laboratory measures of child HI did not produce significant interactions. Lower levels of family routine may confer risk for ODD symptoms among low-income, urban, ethnic-minority children experiencing higher levels of HI.

  17. A standardized crisis management model for self-harming and suicidal individuals with three or more diagnostic criteria of borderline personality disorder: The Brief Admission Skåne randomized controlled trial protocol (BASRCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljedahl, Sophie I; Helleman, Marjolein; Daukantaité, Daiva; Westrin, Åsa; Westling, Sofie

    2017-06-15

    Brief Admission is a crisis and risk management strategy in which self-harming and suicidal individuals with three or more diagnostic criteria of borderline personality disorder self-admit to hospital at times of increasing risk when other efforts to stay safe are failing. Standardized in the current randomized controlled trial, the intensity of Brief Admission Skåne is implemented in durations of three days, with a maximum frequency of three times a month. Brief Admission is integrated into existing treatment plans in advance of crises to prevent reliance on general psychiatric admissions for risk management, as these may be lengthy, unstructured, and of uncertain therapeutic value. The overall objective of the Brief Admission Skåne randomized controlled trial is to determine if Brief Admission can replace general psychiatric admission for self-harming and suicidal individuals with complex mental illness at times of escalating risk. Other objectives of the study are to evaluate whether Brief Admission increases daily functioning and enhances coping, reduces psychiatric symptoms including frequency and severity of self-harm and suicidal behaviours. A final objective is to determine if Brief Admission is an effective crisis management model for this population. Participants are randomized at an individual level to either Brief Admission Skåne plus Treatment as Usual or Treatment As Usual. Based on a priori power analyses, N = 124 participants will be recruited to the study. Data collection is in progress, and will continue until June 2018. All participant data are single-blinded and will be handled with intention-to-treat analysis. Based on the combined clinical experience of our international research group, the Brief Admission Skåne randomized controlled trial upon which the current protocol is based represents the first initiative to standardize, implement and evaluate Brief Admission amongst self-harming and suicidal individuals, including those with

  18. Diagnostic and treatment characteristics of polycystic ovary syndrome: descriptive measurements of patient perception and awareness from 657 confidential self-reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sills, E Scott; Perloe, Mark; Tucker, Michael J; Kaplan, Carolyn R; Genton, Marc Georges; Schattman, Glenn L

    2001-01-01

    Background This investigation was undertaken to describe patient perception and awareness of the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the most common cause of anovulation/oligoovulation among women of reproductive age. Methods Fifteen parameters were evaluated by a computer-based research instrument accessed by a large, unscreened population. Incomplete questionnaires were not entered, and responses were electronically tabulated to block duplicate submissions. Results From 657 participants, the majority (63%) were between 26–34 years old; mean BMI was 30.4 kg/m2. 343 of 657 had at least one pregnancy and 61% of the study group had taken fertility medicine (any type) at least once. Physicians were the most common provider of PCOS information for all study participants, irrespective of age. Patient emotions associated with the diagnosis of PCOS included "frustration" (67%), "anxiety" (16%), "sadness" (10%), and "indifference" (2%). Self-reported patient aptitude regarding PCOS was scored as high or "very aware" in >60% of women. Respondents were also asked: "If your PCOS could be safely and effectively helped by something else besides fertility drugs or birth control pills, would that interest you?" Interest in alternative PCOS treatments was expressed by 99% of the sample (n = 648). Conclusions In our study population, most women associated negative emotions with PCOS although the self-reported knowledge level for the disorder was high. While these women regarded their obstetrician-gynecologist as integral to their PCOS education, traditional PCOS therapies based on oral contraceptives or ovulation induction agents were regarded as unsatisfactory by most women. PMID:11545683

  19. Patient dosimetry in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrimpton, P.C.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: X-ray examinations remain an essential and widely used diagnostic tool in medicine and hence the most significant source of exposure to man-made radiation for populations. Patterns of practice in diagnostic radiology continue to evolve, with overall growth in the numbers of procedures worldwide and, particularly in developed countries, increasing importance for complex procedures such as computed tomography (CT) and interventional techniques. In order to maximise the benefits from x-rays relative to the associated radiation risks, there is a need to ensure the prior justification of all examinations and the optimisation of patient protection such that doses are as low as reasonably practicable to meet specific clinical requirements. Accordingly, patient dosimetry is a fundamental requirement in diagnostic radiology. Detailed measurements for the assessment of risks or comparison of different types of procedure require the estimation of organ and effective doses. Such comprehensive dosimetry necessarily involves the simulation of clinical practice using anthropomorphic phantoms, with either measurements in a physical phantom or calculations utilising a mathematical phantom. Simpler measurements for the routine monitoring of dose in x-ray departments can be based on practical quantities such as entrance surface dose, dose-area product and, for CT, weighted CT dose index and dose-length product. Widescale surveys reveal significant variations between departments in the typical doses for a given type of procedure and potential scope for dose reductions. In order to promote improvements in practice, the results of periodic dose surveys in departments should be compared with appropriate standards, such as diagnostic reference levels for adult and paediatric patients, that are set nationally or locally for the purposes of promoting critical review of the equipment and techniques in use. Patient dosimetry should form an essential element of routine quality

  20. Opportunistic screening for osteoporosis on routine computed tomography? An external validation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckens, Constantinus F. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Universitair Medisch Centrum Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Dijkhuis, Gawein; Jong, Pim A. de [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Keizer, Bart de [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); Verhaar, Harald J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-07-15

    Opportunistic screening for osteoporosis using computed tomography (CT) examinations that happen to visualise the spine can be used to identify patients with osteoporosis. We sought to verify the diagnostic performance of vertebral Hounsfield unit (HU) measurements on routine CT examinations for diagnosing osteoporosis in a separate, external population. Consecutive patients who underwent a CT examination of the chest or abdomen and had also received a dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) test were retrospectively included. CTs were evaluated for vertebral fractures and vertebral attenuation (density) values were measured. Diagnostic performance measures and the area under the receiver operator characteristics curve (AUC) for diagnosing osteoporosis were calculated. Three hundred and two patients with a mean age of 57.9 years were included, of which 82 (27 %) had osteoporosis according to DXA and 65 (22 %) had vertebral fractures. The diagnostic performance for vertebral HU measurements was modest, with a maximal AUC of 0.74 (0.68 - 0.80). At that optimal threshold the sensitivity was 62 % (51 - 72 %) and the specificity was 79 % (74 - 84 %). We confirmed that simple trabecular vertebral density measurements on routine CT contain diagnostic information related to bone mineral density as measured by DXA, albeit with substantially lower diagnostic accuracy than previously reported. (orig.)

  1. Opportunistic screening for osteoporosis on routine computed tomography? An external validation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckens, Constantinus F.; Dijkhuis, Gawein; Jong, Pim A. de; Keizer, Bart de; Verhaar, Harald J.

    2015-01-01

    Opportunistic screening for osteoporosis using computed tomography (CT) examinations that happen to visualise the spine can be used to identify patients with osteoporosis. We sought to verify the diagnostic performance of vertebral Hounsfield unit (HU) measurements on routine CT examinations for diagnosing osteoporosis in a separate, external population. Consecutive patients who underwent a CT examination of the chest or abdomen and had also received a dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) test were retrospectively included. CTs were evaluated for vertebral fractures and vertebral attenuation (density) values were measured. Diagnostic performance measures and the area under the receiver operator characteristics curve (AUC) for diagnosing osteoporosis were calculated. Three hundred and two patients with a mean age of 57.9 years were included, of which 82 (27 %) had osteoporosis according to DXA and 65 (22 %) had vertebral fractures. The diagnostic performance for vertebral HU measurements was modest, with a maximal AUC of 0.74 (0.68 - 0.80). At that optimal threshold the sensitivity was 62 % (51 - 72 %) and the specificity was 79 % (74 - 84 %). We confirmed that simple trabecular vertebral density measurements on routine CT contain diagnostic information related to bone mineral density as measured by DXA, albeit with substantially lower diagnostic accuracy than previously reported. (orig.)

  2. Recent Progress in the Development of Diagnostic Tests for Malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krampa, Francis D; Aniweh, Yaw; Awandare, Gordon A; Kanyong, Prosper

    2017-09-19

    The impact of malaria on global health has continually prompted the need to develop effective diagnostic strategies. In malaria endemic regions, routine diagnosis is hampered by technical and infrastructural challenges to laboratories. These laboratories lack standard facilities, expertise or diagnostic supplies; thus, therapy is administered based on clinical or self-diagnosis. There is the need for accurate diagnosis of malaria due to the continuous increase in the cost of medication, and the emergence and spread of drug resistant strains. However, the widely utilized Giemsa-stained microscopy and immunochromatographic tests for malaria are liable to several drawbacks, including inadequate sensitivity and false-positive outcomes. Alternative methods that offer improvements in performance are either expensive, have longer turnaround time or require a level of expertise that makes them unsuitable for point-of-care (POC) applications. These gaps necessitate exploration of more efficient detection techniques with the potential of POC applications, especially in resource-limited settings. This minireview discusses some of the recent trends and new approaches that are seeking to improve the clinical diagnosis of malaria.

  3. Recent Progress in the Development of Diagnostic Tests for Malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis D. Krampa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The impact of malaria on global health has continually prompted the need to develop effective diagnostic strategies. In malaria endemic regions, routine diagnosis is hampered by technical and infrastructural challenges to laboratories. These laboratories lack standard facilities, expertise or diagnostic supplies; thus, therapy is administered based on clinical or self-diagnosis. There is the need for accurate diagnosis of malaria due to the continuous increase in the cost of medication, and the emergence and spread of drug resistant strains. However, the widely utilized Giemsa-stained microscopy and immunochromatographic tests for malaria are liable to several drawbacks, including inadequate sensitivity and false-positive outcomes. Alternative methods that offer improvements in performance are either expensive, have longer turnaround time or require a level of expertise that makes them unsuitable for point-of-care (POC applications. These gaps necessitate exploration of more efficient detection techniques with the potential of POC applications, especially in resource-limited settings. This minireview discusses some of the recent trends and new approaches that are seeking to improve the clinical diagnosis of malaria.

  4. Routine oblique radiography of the pediatric lumbar spine: is it necessary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, F.F.; Kishore, P.R.S.; Cunningham, M.E.

    1978-01-01

    A series of 86 pediatric lumbar spine abnormalities was evaluated to determine the diagnostic benefit of radiography in oblique projection as compared to frontal-lateral projections alone. In only four patients was an abnormality apparent on the oblique view which had not already been demonstrated by the frontal-lateral series; each of these represented an isolated spondylolysis. Because the diagnostic yield was low at a patient cost of more than double the gonadal radiation dose, it is recommended that oblique views be eliminated in the routine radiography of the pediatric lumbar spine

  5. Diagnostic thoracoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plavec Goran

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnostic thoracoscopy in patients with pleural effusion of unclear origin mostly provides the correct diagnosis. Results from published reports of previous researches are not uniform. In 47 male and 20 female patients with pleural effusion of unknown etiology, after receiving negative results obtained from cytological finding of pleural effusion and percutaneous needle biopsy, thoracoscopy with biopsy of one or both pleurae was performed. Procedure was done in local anesthesia using Stortz rigid thoracoscope. In 37 patients with malignant disease (primary or metastatic diagnosis was confirmed histopathologically in 31 patient (81.12%. In 27 patients with inflammatory pleural disease diagnosis was confirmed histopathologically in 22 patients (81.4%. Among 11 patients with specific pleural effusions, tuberculosis was confirmed in 10 (90.91%. Normal finding in cases of spontaneous pneumothorax and pulmonary embolism was taken as a positive result. Total number of positive findings was 55 (82.10%. In one patient, the third spontaneous pneumothorax was the indication for thoracoscopy, and after numerous bullae were seen during the procedure, talcum powder pleurodesis was done. In four patients low intensity subcutaneous emphysema occurred one day after thoracoscopy. It can be concluded that thoracoscopy in local anesthesia out of the operating room is good and practical method for solving the unclear pleural effusions, with neglectable rate of complications.

  6. Mitigation diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, S.T.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that experience in the remediation of schools and other large buildings has shown the importance of the effects of both the location of geologic sources and HVAC-induced distribution of indoor radon. In general, elevated radon in areas of schools with evenly distributed HVAC pressures are correlated with maximum soil radon emanations. However, strong or unequal HVAC effects can redistribute indoor radon to areas away from the direct source. Effective remediation required a complete understanding of both contributions. In some schools, highest indoor radon levels were located near large return ducts and were attributed to proximity to negative HVAC pressure. Successful sub-slab depressurization systems were installed, however, in rooms with lower indoor but greatest sub-slab radon levels, closest to the source. This shows the inadequacy of using indoor radon levels alone as a basis for remediation. Wings of two other schools with radon problems have equivalent window fan coil units in rooms of equal size and no central HVAC system. Highest indoor radon levels correlated well with highest sub-slab radon levels due to the equivalent effects of the window units. Diagnostic tests in other schools have revealed: blockwall radon transport to upper floors; high blockwall radon adjacent to sub-slab sources; and elevated indoor radon over crawlspace being drawn upward by HVAC-induced negative pressure, determined from indoor to outdoor micromanometer measurements

  7. Molecular diagnostic PCR handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viljoen, G.J.; Crowther, J.R.; Nel, L.H.

    2005-01-01

    The uses of nucleic acid-directed methods have increased significantly in the past five years and have made important contributions to disease control country programmes for improving national and international trade. These developments include the more routine use of PCR as a diagnostic tool in veterinary diagnostic laboratories. However, there are many problems associated with the transfer and particularly, the application of this technology. These include lack of consideration of: the establishment of quality-assured procedures, the required set-up of the laboratory and the proper training of staff. This can lead to a situation where results are not assured. This book gives a comprehensive account of the practical aspects of PCR and strong consideration is given to ensure its optimal use in a laboratory environment. This includes the setting-up of a PCR laboratory; Good Laboratory Practice and standardised PCR protocols to detect animal disease pathogens. Examples of Standard Operating Procedures as used in individual specialist laboratories and an outline of training materials necessary for PCR technology transfer are presented. The difficulties, advantages and disadvantages in PCR applications are explained and placed in context with other test systems. Emphasis is placed on the use of PCR for detection of pathogens, with a particular focus on diagnosticians and scientists from the developing world. It is hoped that this book will enable readers from various disciplines and levels of expertise to better judge the merits of PCR and to increase their skills and knowledge in order to assist in a more logical, efficient and assured use of this technology

  8. Radiogenomics: Creating a link between molecular diagnostics and diagnostic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutman, Aaron M. [Department of Radiology, University of California San Diego Medical Center, San Diego, CA 92103 (United States); Kuo, Michael D. [Department of Radiology, University of California San Diego Medical Center, San Diego, CA 92103 (United States); Center for Translational Medical Systems, University of California San Diego Medical Center, San Diego, CA 92103 (United States)], E-mail: mkuo@ucsd.edu

    2009-05-15

    Studies employing high-throughput biological techniques have recently contributed to an improved characterization of human cancers, allowing for novel sub-classification, better diagnostic accuracy, and more precise prognostication. However, requirement of surgical procurement of tissue among other things limits the clinical application of such methods in everyday patient care. Radiographic imaging is routine in clinical practice but is currently histopathology based. The use of routine radiographic imaging provides a potential platform for linking specific imaging traits with specific gene expression patterns that inform the underlying cellular pathophysiology; imaging features could then serve as molecular surrogates that contribute to the diagnosis, prognosis, and likely gene-expression-associated treatment response of various forms of human cancer. This review focuses on high-throughput methods such as microarray analysis of gene expression, their role in cancer research, and in particular, on novel methods of associating gene expression patterns with radiographic imaging phenotypes, known as 'radiogenomics.' These findings underline a potential future role of both diagnostic and interventional radiologists in genetic assessment of cancer patients with radiographic imaging studies.

  9. Radiogenomics: Creating a link between molecular diagnostics and diagnostic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutman, Aaron M.; Kuo, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Studies employing high-throughput biological techniques have recently contributed to an improved characterization of human cancers, allowing for novel sub-classification, better diagnostic accuracy, and more precise prognostication. However, requirement of surgical procurement of tissue among other things limits the clinical application of such methods in everyday patient care. Radiographic imaging is routine in clinical practice but is currently histopathology based. The use of routine radiographic imaging provides a potential platform for linking specific imaging traits with specific gene expression patterns that inform the underlying cellular pathophysiology; imaging features could then serve as molecular surrogates that contribute to the diagnosis, prognosis, and likely gene-expression-associated treatment response of various forms of human cancer. This review focuses on high-throughput methods such as microarray analysis of gene expression, their role in cancer research, and in particular, on novel methods of associating gene expression patterns with radiographic imaging phenotypes, known as 'radiogenomics.' These findings underline a potential future role of both diagnostic and interventional radiologists in genetic assessment of cancer patients with radiographic imaging studies.

  10. Routine clinical heart examinations using SQUID magnetocardiography at University of Tsukuba Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, T.; Nakazawa, Y.; Yoshida, K.; Kato, Y.; Hattori, A.; Kimura, T.; Hoshi, T.; Ishizu, T.; Seo, Y.; Sato, A.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Nogami, A.; Watanabe, S.; Horigome, H.; Kawakami, Y.; Aonuma, K.

    2017-11-01

    A 64-channel Nb-based DC-SQUID magnetocardiography (MCG) system was installed at the University of Tsukuba Hospital (UTH) in March 2007 after obtaining Japanese pharmaceutical approval and insurance reimbursement approval. In the period between 2008 and 2016, the total number of patients was 10 085. The heart diseases diagnosed in fetuses as well as adults are mainly atrial arrhythmia, abnormal repolarization, ventricular arrhythmia, and fetal arrhythmia. In most cases of insufficient diagnostic accuracy with electrocardiography, SQUID MCG precisely revealed these heart diseases as an abnormal electrical current distribution. Based on success in routine examinations, SQUID MCG is now an indispensable clinical instrument with diagnostic software tuned up during routine use at UTH.

  11. Diagnostic Categories in Autobiographical Accounts of Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Working within frameworks drawn from the writings of Immanuel Kant, Alfred Schutz, and Kenneth Burke, this article examines the role that diagnostic categories play in autobiographical accounts of illness, with a special focus on chronic disease. Four lay diagnostic categories, each with different connections to formal medical diagnostic categories, serve as typifications to make sense of the way the lifeworld changes over the course of chronic illness. These diagnostic categories are used in conjunction with another set of typifications: lay epidemiologies, lay etiologies, lay prognostics, and lay therapeutics. Together these serve to construct and reconstruct the self at the center of the lifeworld. Embedded within the lay diagnostic categories are narratives of progression, regression, or stability, forms of typification derived from literary and storytelling genres. These narratives are developed by the self in autobiographical accounts of illness.

  12. Bedside Ultrasonography as an Adjunct to Routine Evaluation of Acute Appendicitis in the Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Samuel H.F.; Grippo, Anthony; Kerwin, Chistopher; Konicki, P. John; Goodwine, Diana; Lambert, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Appendicitis is a common condition presenting to the emergency department (ED). Increasingly emergency physicians (EP) are using bedside ultrasound (BUS) as an adjunct diagnostic tool. Our objective is to investigate the test characteristics of BUS for the diagnosis of appendicitis and identify components of routine ED workup and BUS associated with the presence of appendicitis. Methods: Patients four years of age and older presenting to the ED with suspect...

  13. Probability and statistics with integrated software routines

    CERN Document Server

    Deep, Ronald

    2005-01-01

    Probability & Statistics with Integrated Software Routines is a calculus-based treatment of probability concurrent with and integrated with statistics through interactive, tailored software applications designed to enhance the phenomena of probability and statistics. The software programs make the book unique.The book comes with a CD containing the interactive software leading to the Statistical Genie. The student can issue commands repeatedly while making parameter changes to observe the effects. Computer programming is an excellent skill for problem solvers, involving design, prototyping, data gathering, testing, redesign, validating, etc, all wrapped up in the scientific method.See also: CD to accompany Probability and Stats with Integrated Software Routines (0123694698)* Incorporates more than 1,000 engaging problems with answers* Includes more than 300 solved examples* Uses varied problem solving methods

  14. Assessment of three frequently used blood glucose monitoring devices in clinical routine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zueger, Thomas; Schuler, Vanessa; Stettler, Christoph; Diem, Peter; Christ, Emanuel R

    2012-07-12

    Self-monitoring of blood glucose plays an important role in the management of diabetes and has been shown to improve metabolic control. The use of blood glucose meters in clinical practice requires sufficient reliability to allow adequate treatment. Direct comparison of different blood glucose meters in clinical practice, independent of the manufactures is scarce. We, therefore, aimed to evaluate three frequently used blood glucose meters in daily clinical practice. Capillary blood glucose was measured simultaneous using the following glucose meters: Contour® (Bayer Diabetes Care, Zürich, Switzerland), Accu-Chek® aviva (Roche Diagnostics, Rotkreuz, Switzerland), Free-Style® lite (Abbott Diabetes Care, Baar, Switzerland). The reference method consisted of the HemoCue® Glucose 201+ System (HemoCue® AB, Ängelholm, Sweden) with plasma conversion. The devices were assessed by comparison of the Mean Absolute Relative Differences (MARD), the Clarke Error Grid Analysis (EGA) and the compliance with the International Organization of Standardization criteria (ISO 15197:2003). Capillary blood samples were obtained from 150 patients. MARD was 10.1 ± 0.65%, 7.0 ± 0.62% and 7.8 ± 0.48% for Contour®, Accu-Chek® and Free-Style®, respectively. EGA showed 99.3% (Contour®), 98.7% (Accu-Chek®) and 100% (Free-Style®) of all measurements in zone A and B (clinically acceptable). The ISO criteria were fulfilled by Accu-Chek® (95.3%) and Free-Style® (96%), but not by Contour® (92%). In the present study the three glucose meters provided good agreement with the reference and reliable results in daily clinical routine. Overall, the Free-Style® and Accu-Chek® device slightly outperformed the Contour® device.

  15. Investigation of quality assurance routines of DAP-meters in Swedish hospitals; Kartlaeggning av kvalitetssaekringsrutiner foer DAP-maetare i svensk sjukvaard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almen, Anja; Grindborg, Jan-Erik; Leitz, Wolfram

    2005-11-01

    The Swedish Radiation Protection Authority has investigated quality control of dose area product meters (DAP meters) used in x-ray diagnostics. A questionnaire was sent out to medical physics experts who are working with diagnostic radiology in Swedish hospitals. This report presents information about the routines practised and gives examples of measures to improve the quality of these practices.

  16. The (Proper) Microfoundations of Routines and Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felin, Teppo; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    2012-01-01

    Sidney Winter (2011), Brian Pentland (2011), and Geoffrey Hodgson and Thorbjørn Knudsen (2011) take issue with the arguments in Teppo Felin and Nicolai J. Foss (2011), along with more generally critiquing the ‘microfoundations project’ related to routines and capabilities. In this rejoinder we ar...... chauvinism; (3) models of mind and man; (4) levels of analysis; (5) agency and uncaused causes; and then further discuss (6) a rationalist alternative....

  17. Peri-colonic haematoma following routine colonoscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Felicity Page; Olfunso Adedeji

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: We present a case of an extra-luminal haematoma following routine colonoscopy. This case highlights an uncommon but potentially life threatening complication in which there is little published literature to date. Presentation of case: A 73 year old male presented with abdominal pain and a reduction in haemoglobin following an uneventful colonoscopy. The imaging had been required as part of colorectal cancer follow up. Initial differential diagnosis included colonic perforatio...

  18. [Routine fluoroscopic investigations after primary bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärtner, D; Ernst, A; Fedtke, K; Jenkner, J; Schöttler, A; Reimer, P; Blüher, M; Schön, M R

    2016-03-01

    Staple line and anastomotic leakages are life-threatening complications after bariatric surgery. Upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract X-ray examination with oral administration of a water-soluble contrast agent can be used to detect leaks. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of routine upper GI tract fluoroscopy after primary bariatric surgery. Between January 2009 and December 2014 a total of 658 bariatric interventions were carried out of which 442 were primary bariatric operations. Included in this single center study were 307 sleeve gastrectomies and 135 Roux-en-Y gastric bypasses. Up to December 2012 upper GI tract fluoroscopy was performed routinely between the first and third postoperative days and the detection of leakages was evaluated. In the investigation period 8 leakages (2.6 %) after sleeve gastrectomy, 1 anastomotic leakage in gastrojejunostomy and 1 in jejunojejunostomy after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass occurred. All patients developed clinical symptoms, such as abdominal pain, tachycardia or fever. In one case the leakage was detected by upper GI fluoroscopy and in nine cases radiological findings were unremarkable. No leakages were detected in asymptomatic patients. Routine upper GI fluoroscopy is not recommended for uneventful postoperative courses after primary bariatric surgery.

  19. Contextualising renal patient routines: Everyday space-time contexts, health service access, and wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuoid, Julia; Jowsey, Tanisha; Talaulikar, Girish

    2017-06-01

    Stable routines are key to successful illness self-management for the growing number of people living with chronic illness around the world. Yet, the influence of chronically ill individuals' everyday contexts in supporting routines is poorly understood. This paper takes a space-time geographical approach to explore the everyday space-time contexts and routines of individuals with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We ask: what is the relationship between renal patients' space-time contexts and their ability to establish and maintain stable routines, and, what role does health service access play in this regard? We draw from a qualitative case study of 26 individuals with CKD in Australia. Data comprised self-reported two day participant diaries and semi-structured interviews. Thematic analysis of interview transcripts was guided by an inductive-deductive approach. We examined the embeddedness of routines within the space-time contexts of participants' everyday lives. We found that participants' everyday space-time contexts were highly complex, especially for those receiving dialysis and/or employed, making routines difficult to establish and vulnerable to disruption. Health service access helped shape participants' everyday space-time contexts, meaning that incidences of unpredictability in accessing health services set-off 'ripple effects' within participants' space-time contexts, disrupting routines and making everyday life negotiation more difficult. The ability to absorb ripple effects from unpredictable health services without disrupting routines varied by space-time context. Implications of these findings for the deployment of the concept of routine in health research, the framing of patient success in self-managing illness, and health services design are discussed. In conclusion, efforts to understand and support individuals in establishing and maintaining routines that support health and wellbeing can benefit from approaches that contextualise and de

  20. Routine saline infusion sonohysterography prior to assisted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    53.85%), 8 (30.77%) and 4 (15.38%) respectively. The average duration of the procedure was 6 minutes with a range of 4-9 minutes. Saline infusion sonohysterography is a reliable, cost effective and safe diagnostic tool in the evaluation of the ...

  1. Diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome in routine clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, J; Machin, SJ; Cohen, H

    2013-01-01

    The updated international consensus criteria for definite antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) are useful for scientific clinical studies. However, there remains a need for diagnostic criteria for routine clinical use. We audited the results of routine antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) in a cohort of 193 consecutive patients with aPL positivity-based testing for lupus anticoagulant (LA), IgG and IgM anticardiolipin (aCL) and anti-ß2glycoprotein-1 antibodies (aß2GPI). Medium/high-titre aCL/aβ2GPI was defined as >99th percentile. Low-titre aCL/aβ2GPI positivity (>95th < 99th percentile) was considered positive for obstetric but not for thrombotic APS. One hundred of the 145 patients fulfilled both clinical and laboratory criteria for definite APS. Twenty-six women with purely obstetric APS had persistent low-titre aCL and/or aβ2GPI. With the inclusion of these patients, 126 of the 145 patients were considered to have APS. Sixty-seven out of 126 patients were LA-negative, of whom 12 had aCL only, 37 had aβ2GPI only and 18 positive were for both. The omission of aCL or aβ2GPI testing from investigation of APS would have led to a failure to diagnose APS in 9.5% and 29.4% of patients, respectively. Our data suggest that LA, aCL and aβ2GPI testing are all required for the accurate diagnosis of APS and that low-titre antibodies should be included in the diagnosis of obstetric APS. PMID:22988029

  2. Radiological diagnostic in acute chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawel, Nadine; Bremerich, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Acute chest pain is one of the main symptoms leading to a consultation of the emergency department. Main task of the initial diagnostic is the confirmation or exclusion of a potentially life threatening cause. Conventional chest X-ray and computed tomography are the most significant techniques. Due to limited availability and long examination times magnetic resonance tomography rather plays a limited role in routine clinical workup. In the following paper we will systematically review the radiological diagnostic of the acute life threatening causes of chest pain. Imaging modalities, technical aspects and image interpretation will be discussed. (orig.)

  3. Instrumentation for localized superconducting cavity diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conway, Z. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Physics Division; Ge, M. [Cornell Lab. for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, NY (United States); Iwashita, Y. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    2017-01-12

    Superconducting accelerator cavities are now routinely operated at levels approaching the theoretical limit of niobium. To achieve these operating levels more information than is available from the RF excitation signal is required to characterize and determine fixes for the sources of performance limitations. This information is obtained using diagnostic techniques which complement the analysis of the RF signal. In this paper we describe the operation and select results from three of these diagnostic techniques: the use of large scale thermometer arrays, second sound wave defect location and high precision cavity imaging with the Kyoto camera.

  4. Diagnostic Devices for Isothermal Nucleic Acid Amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Chen Chang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the development of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR technique, genomic information has been retrievable from lesser amounts of DNA than previously possible. PCR-based amplifications require high-precision instruments to perform temperature cycling reactions; further, they are cumbersome for routine clinical use. However, the use of isothermal approaches can eliminate many complications associated with thermocycling. The application of diagnostic devices for isothermal DNA amplification has recently been studied extensively. In this paper, we describe the basic concepts of several isothermal amplification approaches and review recent progress in diagnostic device development.

  5. Diagnostic devices for isothermal nucleic acid amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Chen; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Wei, Shih-Chung; Lu, Hui-Hsin; Liang, Yang-Hung; Lin, Chii-Wann

    2012-01-01

    Since the development of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique, genomic information has been retrievable from lesser amounts of DNA than previously possible. PCR-based amplifications require high-precision instruments to perform temperature cycling reactions; further, they are cumbersome for routine clinical use. However, the use of isothermal approaches can eliminate many complications associated with thermocycling. The application of diagnostic devices for isothermal DNA amplification has recently been studied extensively. In this paper, we describe the basic concepts of several isothermal amplification approaches and review recent progress in diagnostic device development.

  6. The added value of hepatitis E diagnostics in determining causes of hepatitis in routine diagnostic settings in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doting, M. H. E.; Weel, J.; Niesters, H. G. M.; Riezebos-Brilman, A.; Brandenburg, A.

    OBJECTIVES: Hepatitis E virus (HEV) genotype 3 is endemic in Europe and an underdiagnosed and emerging (public) health issue. In recent years commercial enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) that detect antibodies to HEV more adequately, became available. We investigated the added value of this HEV serology in

  7. Lectures in plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, I.H.

    1990-06-01

    This paper discusses the following topics on plasma diagnostics: Electric probes in flowing and magnetized plasmas; Electron cyclotron emission absorption; Magnetic diagnostics; Spectroscopy; and Thomson Scattering

  8. On the validity of the Middlesex Hospital Questionnaire: a comparison of diagnostic self-ratings in psychiatric out-patients, general practice patients, and 'normals' based on the Hebrew version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasberg, H; Shalif, I

    1978-09-01

    The short clinical diagnostic self-rating scale for psycho-neurotic patients (The Middlesex Hospital Questionnaire) was translated into everyday Hebrew and tested on 216 subjects for: (1) concurrent validity with clinical diagnoses; (2) discriminatory validity on a psychoneurotic gradient of psychiatric out-patients, general practice patients, and normal controls; (3) validity of subscales and discrete items using matrices of Spearman rank correlation coefficients; (4) construct validity using Guttman's smallest space analysis based on coefficients of similarity. The Hebrew MHQ was found to retain its validity and to be easily applicable in waiting-room situations. It is a useful method for generating and substantiating hypotheses on psychosomatic and psychosocial interrelationships. The MHQ seems to enable the expression of the 'neurotic load' of a general practice subpopulation as a centile on a scale, thereby corroborating previous epidemiological findings on the high prevalence of neurotic illness in general practice. There is reason to believe that the MHQ is a valid instrument for the analysis of symptom profiles of subjects involved in future drug trials.

  9. [Advances of Molecular Diagnostic Techniques Application in Clinical Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Bin-Wu

    2016-11-01

    Over the past 20 years,clinical molecular diagnostic technology has made rapid development,and became the most promising field in clinical laboratory medicine.In particular,with the development of genomics,clinical molecular diagnostic methods will reveal the nature of clinical diseases in a deeper level,thus guiding the clinical diagnosis and treatments.Many molecular diagnostic projects have been routinely applied in clinical works.This paper reviews the advances on application of clinical diagnostic techniques in infectious disease,tumor and genetic disorders,including nucleic acid amplification,biochip,next-generation sequencing,and automation molecular system,and so on.

  10. Is Routine Duodenal Biopsy Necessary for the Detection of Celiac Disease in Patients Presenting with Iron Deficiency Anemia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hassan Emami

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: CD should be considered in any adult patient presenting with unexplained IDA, even if not accompanied with gastrointestinal symptoms. Routine duodenal biopsy performed during diagnostic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is worthwhile in order to investigate for CD as an underlying cause of IDA in adult patients.

  11. Development and implementation of tools for self-monitoring of staff exposed to 131I in nuclear medicine centres of Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz-Londono, G.; Garcia, M.; Astudillo, R.; Hermosilla, A.

    2017-01-01

    Currently in Chile, there are about 42 nuclear medicine centres that mainly use 99m Tc and 131 I in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Therefore, staff performs various tasks that increase the risk of internal incorporation and the need to implement routine monitoring programmes. This article shows tools for self-monitoring of staff who exposed to 131 I from measurements in thyroid and urine samples, using the gamma cameras of Nuclear Medicine Units. Then, the calibration factors of gamma cameras of participating units were determined, and a one-worker dose was calculated due to internal incorporation, using an Excel spreadsheet for self-monitoring. The worker who handles 131 I in one of the studied units was monitored for 6 months. The goal of this study is to implement a routine self-monitoring programme for the estimation of committed effective dose of staff exposed to 131 I using gamma cameras in Nuclear Medicine Units of clinical centres in Chile. (authors)

  12. Adiponectin as a routine clinical biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishida, Ken; Funahashi, Tohru; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2014-01-01

    Adiponectin is a protein synthesized and secreted predominantly by adipocytes into the peripheral blood. However, circulating adiponectin level is inversely related with body weight, especially visceral fat accumulation. The mechanism of this paradoxical relation remains obscure. Low circulating adiponectin concentrations (hypoadiponectinemia; osteoporosis, and cancer (endometrial cancer, postmenopausal breast cancer, leukemia, colon cancer, gastric cancer, prostate cancer). On the other hand, hyperadiponectinemia is associated with cardiac, renal and pulmonary diseases. This review article focuses on the significance of adiponectin as a clinical biomarker of obesity-related diseases. Routine measurement of adiponectin in patients with lifestyle-related diseases is highly recommended. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Self-Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parnas, Josef; Jansson, Lennart B

    2015-01-01

    category boundaries, comorbidity, diagnostic 'epidemics' and differential diagnostic dilemmas. We argue that many of those problems stem from the polythetic-operational definitions of psychiatric categories, which thereby come to lack an organizing prototype-directed or gestaltic intelligibility principle...... diagnostic weight to a certain prototypical trait core of the illness, phenomenologically indispensable for its demarcation from other, nonschizophrenic psychotic conditions. We believe that the notion of self-disorder (reflective of the structural alterations of subjectivity), itemized into its various...

  14. Development and Validation of the Pediatric Diabetes Routines Questionnaire for Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Jessica S; Jordan, Sara S; Arnau, Randolph C

    2018-04-06

    This study describes the development and psychometric evaluation of an adolescent self-report version of the Pediatric Diabetes Routines Questionnaire (PDRQ:A), a measure of diabetes-specific routines for youth with type 1 diabetes, and further validation of the parent-version (PDRQ:P) in an adolescent sample. Participants included 120 parent-adolescent dyads (ages 12-17) and an additional 24 parents who completed measures of diabetes-specific adolescent routines, general adolescent routines, diabetes self-care, and family support of youth diabetes care. The PDRQ:P/A demonstrated good internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and parent-child agreement, and adequate validity coefficients. Confirmatory factor analysis supported a one-factor model. Promising results were obtained. The PDRQ:P/A is a clinically feasible parent- and self-report measure that can provide valuable information regarding how frequently adolescents engage in their diabetes management tasks in a consistent manner. Addition of an adolescent report format will enhance the utility of the measure for clinical and research use.

  15. Radiation exposure in diagnostic medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haehnel, S.; Michalczak, H.; Reinoehl-Kompa, S.

    1995-01-01

    This volume includes the manuscripts of the papers read at the conference as well as a summary and assessment of its results. The scientific discussions were centred upon the following issues: - International surveys and comparisons of rdiation exposures in diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine, frequency of the individual diagnostic procedures and age distribution of patients examined; - policies and regulations for the radiation protection of patients, charcteristic dosimetric values and practical usefulness of the effective dose concept during medical examinations; - assessments of the relative benefits and risks and measures to reduce the radiation exposure in the light of quality assurance aspects. The main objective of this conference not only was to evaluate the risks from diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine but also to encourgage a critical analysis and adjustment of examination routines followed in everyday practice. Among the measures recommended were quality assurance, maintenace of international standards, development of guidelines, introduction of standard doses, improved training and professional education of personnel as well as surveys and analyses of certain examination procedures associated with substantial radiation exposure. (orig./MG) [de

  16. Demonstration of the renal venous system at routine nephroangiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, P.E.; Aspelin, P.; Holtas, S.

    1985-01-01

    The demonstration of renal veins during routine nephroangiography was retrospectively investigated and blindly scored in 60 patients. Three different types of contrast media were used: one high-osmolar ionic monomeric (metrozoate) and two low-osmolar, the non-ionic monomeric (metrizamide) and the ionic monoacidic dimeric (ioxalate). The renal veins and the inferior vena cava were significantly better and more often demonstrated when ioxaglate was used compared with metrizoate and metrizmide. There was no significant difference between metrizoate and metrizamide. Following semiselective renal artery injection, the main renal veins were demonstrated with a diagnostically acceptable quality with ioxaglate in 76 per cent, with metrizamide in 40 per cent and with metrizoate in 29 per cent. On selective renal artery injection the demonstration of renal veins increased to 85 per cent with ioxaglate and remained unchanged with metrizmide (38%) and metrizoate(26%). Semiselective or selective nephroangiography with ioxaglate at an ordinary dose was in most patients sufficient to allow evaluation of renal vein involvement in disease, rendering high dose selective nephroangiography or selective nephrophlebography unnecessary. A slower diffusion rate of ioxaglate compared with metrizoate and metrizamide is considered to be the major explanation for the better demonstration of the renal veins. (orig.)

  17. Integration of CBIR in radiological routine in accordance with IHE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welter, Petra; Deserno, Thomas M.; Fischer, Benedikt; Wein, Berthold B.; Ott, Bastian; Günther, Rolf W.

    2009-02-01

    Increasing use of digital imaging processing leads to an enormous amount of imaging data. The access to picture archiving and communication systems (PACS), however, is solely textually, leading to sparse retrieval results because of ambiguous or missing image descriptions. Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) systems can improve the clinical diagnostic outcome significantly. However, current CBIR systems are not able to integrate their results with clinical workflow and PACS. Existing communication standards like DICOM and HL7 leave many options for implementation and do not ensure full interoperability. We present a concept of the standardized integration of a CBIR system for the radiology workflow in accordance with the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) framework. This is based on the IHE integration profile 'Post-Processing Workflow' (PPW) defining responsibilities as well as standardized communication and utilizing the DICOM Structured Report (DICOM SR). Because nowadays most of PACS and RIS systems are not yet fully IHE compliant to PPW, we also suggest an intermediate approach with the concepts of the CAD-PACS Toolkit. The integration is independent of the particular PACS and RIS system. Therefore, it supports the widespread application of CBIR in radiological routine. As a result, the approach is exemplarily applied to the Image Retrieval in Medical Applications (IRMA) framework.

  18. Antikeratin antibodies in routine diagnostic pathology. A comparison of 10 different commercial antikeratins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, H; Nielsen, B; Moe, D

    1988-01-01

    Ten commercially available antikeratin antisera were tested immunohistochemically on fresh frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. Eight of the antisera were in addition tested on protein-immunoblottings. For six of the antisera a good correspondence was found between our immunoblots ...

  19. The Visualization of Biofilms in Chronic Diabetic Foot Wounds Using Routine Diagnostic Microscopy Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Oates

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic foot wounds are commonly colonised by taxonomically diverse microbial communities and may additionally be infected with specific pathogens. Since biofilms are demonstrably less susceptible to antimicrobial agents than are planktonic bacteria, and may be present in chronic wounds, there is increasing interest in their aetiological role. In the current investigation, the presence of structured microbial assemblages in chronic diabetic foot wounds is demonstrated using several visualization methods. Debridement samples, collected from the foot wounds of diabetic patients, were histologically sectioned and examined using bright-field, fluorescence, and environmental scanning electron microscopy and assessed by quantitative differential viable counting. All samples (n = 26 harboured bioburdens in excess of 5 log10 CFU/g. Microcolonies were identified in 4/4 samples by all three microscopy methods, although bright-field and fluorescence microscopy were more effective at highlighting putative biofilm morphology than ESEM. Results in this pilot study indicate that bacterial microcolonies and putative biofilm matrix can be visualized in chronic wounds using florescence microscopy and ESEM, but also using the simple Gram stain.

  20. Patient's experience with blended video- and internet based cognitive behavioural therapy service in routine care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Etzelmueller

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Internet-based guided self-help and face-to-face CBT have shown to be effective in the treatment of depression, but both approaches might not be an available treatment option for all patients. A treatment which blends internet-based guided self-help with video-based psychotherapy might reduce potential disadvantages of both approaches, while maintaining major advantages such as being location-independent. Additionally, it could provide a stronger focus on patient empowerment and lower resource use compared to traditional face-to-face treatment. Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate patient's experiences with blended internet- and video-based CBT (blended iCBT treatment and to derive suggestions for the improvement of such services. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 participants of the blended iCBT treatment as part of the European MasterMind trial. Participants included adults suffering from Major Depressive Disorder. The interview guide assessed patient's experiences regarding the four treatment components program, 1. face-to-face diagnostic interviews, 2. video-based synchronous therapy sessions (VTS, 3. online self-help treatment modules (OTM as well as 4. behaviour diaries and symptom monitoring. Interviews were analyzed using the framework method and outcomes regarding connections within and between participants and categories were generated by counting the statements within relevant themes. Results: Overall, patients indicated to have been satisfied with all components of the treatment, highlighting the option to independently work from home in their own pace. While the OTMs allowed for a deeper reflection of the content, the VTS with the therapist were mentioned to provide the personal character of the service. The working alliance with the therapist was experienced as fostering the individual fit of the treatment. Patients reported a high self-perceived treatment effectiveness. Negative effects

  1. Improved quality of patient care through routine second review of histopathology specimens prior to multidisciplinary meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijpers, Chantal C H J; Burger, Gerard; Al-Janabi, Shaimaa; Willems, Stefan M; van Diest, Paul J; Jiwa, Mehdi

    2016-10-01

    Double reading may be a valuable tool for improving quality of patient care by identifying diagnostic errors before final sign-out, but standard double reading would significantly increase costs of pathology. We assessed the added value of intradepartmental routine double reading of histopathology specimens prior to multidisciplinary meetings. Diagnoses, treatment plans and prognoses of patients are often discussed at multidisciplinary meetings. As part of the daily routine, all pathology specimens to be discussed at upcoming multidisciplinary meetings undergo prior intradepartmental double reading. We identified all histopathology specimens from 2013 that underwent such double reading and determined major and minor discordance rates based on clinical relevance between the initial and consensus sign-out diagnoses. We included 6796 histopathology specimens that underwent double reading, representing approximately 8% of all histopathology cases at our institution in 2013. Double reading diagnoses were concordant in 6566 specimens (96.6%). Major and minor discordances were observed in 60 (0.9%) and 170 (2.5%) specimens, respectively. Urology specimens had significantly more discordances than other tissues of origin, Gleason grading of prostate cancer biopsies being the most frequent diagnostic problem. Furthermore, premalignant and malignant cases showed significantly higher discordance rates than the rest. The vast majority (90%) of discordances represented changes within the same diagnostic category (eg, malignant to malignant). Routine double reading of histopathology specimens prior to multidisciplinary meetings prevents diagnostic errors. It resulted in about 1% discordant diagnoses of potential clinical significance, indicating that second review is worthwhile in terms of patient safety and quality of patient care. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  2. Diagnostic reasoning strategies and diagnostic success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coderre, S; Mandin, H; Harasym, P H; Fick, G H

    2003-08-01

    Cognitive psychology research supports the notion that experts use mental frameworks or "schemes", both to organize knowledge in memory and to solve clinical problems. The central purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between problem-solving strategies and the likelihood of diagnostic success. Think-aloud protocols were collected to determine the diagnostic reasoning used by experts and non-experts when attempting to diagnose clinical presentations in gastroenterology. Using logistic regression analysis, the study found that there is a relationship between diagnostic reasoning strategy and the likelihood of diagnostic success. Compared to hypothetico-deductive reasoning, the odds of diagnostic success were significantly greater when subjects used the diagnostic strategies of pattern recognition and scheme-inductive reasoning. Two other factors emerged as independent determinants of diagnostic success: expertise and clinical presentation. Not surprisingly, experts outperformed novices, while the content area of the clinical cases in each of the four clinical presentations demonstrated varying degrees of difficulty and thus diagnostic success. These findings have significant implications for medical educators. It supports the introduction of "schemes" as a means of enhancing memory organization and improving diagnostic success.

  3. ACCULIB, Program Library of Mathematical Routines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Kats, J.M.; Rusman, C.J.; Van der Vorst, H.A.

    1987-01-01

    Description of program or function - ACCULIB is a collection of programs and subprograms for: - approximation and interpolation problems; - the evaluation of series of orthogonal polynomials; - evaluation of the complementary error function; - sorting problems and permutations; - differential equation problems; - linear algebra eigenvalue problems; - optimization problems; - fast Fourier transformations and Fourier series; - numerical quadrature of continuous functions; - linear systems and other linear algebra problems; - bit manipulation and character handling/transmission; - systems of nonlinear equations, in particular the determination of zeros of polynomials; - solution of over-complete systems; - plotting routines for contouring and surface representation; - statistical investigation of data. In addition, many utilities such as code conversion, microfiche production, disk file surveys, layout improvements for ALGOL60 and FORTRAN programs, and the conversion of IBM FORTRAN programs to CDC FORTRAN are included in the collection

  4. Radioligand purification prior to routine receptor assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Goff, J.-M.; Berthois, Y.; Martin, P.-M.

    1988-01-01

    The need to repurify the commercially available radioligands [ 3 H]estradiol and [ 3 H]testosterone before use in routine assays was investigated. Storage of these products for 2 months after delivery led to appreciable degradation of [ 3 H]estradiol compared to [ 3 H]testosterone. Unexpectedly, TLC and even HPLC procedures were ineffective in completely restoring the purity of [ 3 H]-estradiol and the unremoved polar products induced important variations in our estrogen receptor assays. An increase in non-specific binding and a concomitant decrease in total binding were observed resulting in an underestimation of specific binding sites and of the affinity constant. In some cases Scatchard analysis was not possible. The authors therefore strongly recommend the repurification of low-stability radioligands and propose an economic time-saving procedure for the purification of [ 3 H]estradiol by solvent differential partition which requires no high-cost investment in apparatus. (author)

  5. ITMETH, Iterative Routines for Linear System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenbaum, A.

    1989-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: ITMETH is a collection of iterative routines for solving large, sparse linear systems. 2 - Method of solution: ITMETH solves general linear systems of the form AX=B using a variety of methods: Jacobi iteration; Gauss-Seidel iteration; incomplete LU decomposition or matrix splitting with iterative refinement; diagonal scaling, matrix splitting, or incomplete LU decomposition with the conjugate gradient method for the problem AA'Y=B, X=A'Y; bi-conjugate gradient method with diagonal scaling, matrix splitting, or incomplete LU decomposition; and ortho-min method with diagonal scaling, matrix splitting, or incomplete LU decomposition. ITMETH also solves symmetric positive definite linear systems AX=B using the conjugate gradient method with diagonal scaling or matrix splitting, or the incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient method

  6. Routine environmental monitoring schedule, calendar year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.W.; Markes, B.M.; McKinney, S.M.

    1994-12-01

    This document provides Bechtel Hanford, Inc. (BHI) and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) a schedule of monitoring and sampling routines for the Operational Environmental Monitoring (OEM) program during calendar year (CY) 1995. Every attempt will be made to consistently follow this schedule; any deviation from this schedule will be documented by an internal memorandum (DSI) explaining the reason for the deviation. The DSI will be issued by the scheduled performing organization and directed to Near-Field Monitoring. The survey frequencies for particular sites are determined by the technical judgment of Near-Field Monitoring and may depend on the site history, radiological status, use and general conditions. Additional surveys may be requested at irregular frequencies if conditions warrant. All radioactive wastes sites are scheduled to be surveyed at least annually. Any newly discovered wastes sites not documented by this schedule will be included in the revised schedule for CY 1995

  7. ROUTINE IMMUNIZATION IN INDIA: A PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Taneja

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The Universal Immunization Programme is possibly the longest and one of the biggest public health intervention measures undertaken in India. To improve immunization coverage in the country various initiatives have been undertaken since the inception of the programme in 1985; key inputs being strengthening and expanding the cold chain system, establishing a network of outreach immunization sites, alternate vaccine delivery model, capacity building of health functionaries and medical officers and intensified polio control measures. Introduction of new and underutilized vaccines, drafting of the national vaccine policy, tracking of beneficiaries through the Maternal and Child Tracking system are some of the recent developments. However in spite of more than 25 years since inception the programme is still adversely impacted by challenges across key thematic areas of programme management, cold chain and vaccine management, recording and reporting and injection safety. To further strengthen and improve service delivery 2012-13 has been declared as the “Year of Intensification of Routine Immunization” with the objective of improving immunization coverage rates across poor performing districts and states so as to attain Global Immunization Vision and Strategy goals of 90% coverage at national and more than 80% coverage at district level. Key activities planned during the year include sustained advocacy at all levels, improved communication and social mobilization, robust and regular program reviews, comprehensive microplanning, strengthening cold chain and vaccine logistics system, special catch up rounds through immunization weeks, piloting the teeka express, improved surveillance systems, strengthened partnerships and operational research activities. The current review pertains to the existing scenario of Universal Immunization Program in the country with impetus on the existing challenges, progress achieved till date as a result of various

  8. Routine airway surveillance in pediatric tracheostomy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergin, Ozgul; Adil, Eelam; Kawai, Kosuke; Watters, Karen; Moritz, Ethan; Rahbar, Reza

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study is to review airway findings in children with tracheostomies who underwent surveillance direct laryngoscopy and bronchoscopy (DLB) to determine the yield of routine airway evaluation in these patients. Retrospective chart review at tertiary referral children's hospital. A retrospective chart review was conducted of all of the children with tracheostomies who underwent DLB after tracheostomy between 1984 and 2015. A total of 303 patients met inclusion criteria. The median time interval between tracheostomy and first follow-up DLB was 12.0 months (IQR 4.8-28.9 months). There was no significant difference in the incidence of airway lesions between patients who underwent endoscopy tracheostomy versus those who had a longer time interval between tracheostomy and DLB (p = 0.16). One hundred sixty seven patients (55.1%) were diagnosed with lesions, with suprastomal granulation (39.9%) being the most common. Symptomatic patients were significantly more likely to have an airway lesion identified (69.9% versus 42.0%; p tracheostomy were significantly more likely to have an airway lesion (p = 0.01). The high incidence of airway lesions noted during surveillance DLB support the utility of routine airway endoscopy in pediatric tracheostomy patients. Symptomatic patients, those with ventilator dependence, or cardiopulmonary or trauma indications for tracheostomy are more likely to have airway lesions and should be monitored closely. The ideal time interval between surveillance endoscopies needs to be examined further. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Treatment goals in psoriasis routine care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, M A; Reich, K; Spehr, C; Augustin, Matthias

    2015-07-01

    The treatment goal algorithm for psoriasis, first originated in 2007, has ever since been adopted into treatment guidelines. It remained unclear how many patients have experienced the use of treatment goals in routine care and how these are perceived. The aim of the pilot study was to get first insight in the use and impact of therapeutic goals in a large cohort of patients with psoriasis in routine care. This study is a multicenter, non-interventional, cross-sectional health care study in n = 213 dermatology centers across Germany. A standardized physician and patient questionnaire was used, including demographics, disease and treatment characteristics. To evaluate patient treatment perception and satisfaction, a questionnaire (PsoSat) addressing 8 specific items was designed. Consistency and validity of the questionnaire were controlled by factor analyses and reliability tests. In total n = 1,883 patients were included for analysis (54.2% male). Mean age was 52 years, mean disease duration 19 years. In total 45.5% (n = 856) stated an improvement of psoriatic symptoms in the last 4 weeks. In patients including treatment goals, the course of psoriasis in the last 4 weeks was rated significantly better and predicted significantly higher patient satisfaction. Patients reporting periodic outcomes measurement of psoriasis treatment, also had significantly better course of disease, higher satisfaction and a lower psoriasis severity. A majority of patients experienced the use of treatment goals in practice. The association of using treatment goals with clinical outcomes and treatment satisfaction was markedly positive. These findings indicate that the use of treatment goals and outcome measurements in fact improve psoriasis management.

  10. Master schedule for CY-1978. Hanford Environmental Surveillance Routine Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumer, P.J.; Myers, D.A.; Fix, J.J.

    1977-12-01

    This report provides the current schedule of data collection for the routine environmental surveillance program at the Hanford Site. No results are presented in this report. The data collected are available in routine reports issued by the Environmental Evaluations staff

  11. Patterns of diagnostic marker assessment in adult diffuse glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woehrer, Adelheid; Kristensen, Bjarne W.; Vital, Anne

    2017-01-01

    The 2016 update of the WHO classification has introduced an integrated diagnostic approach that incorporates both tumor morphology and molecular information. This conceptual change has far-reaching implications, especially for neuropathologists who are in the forefront of translating molecular...... markers to routine diagnostic use. Adult diffuse glioma is a prototypic example for a group of tumors that underwent substantial regrouping, and it represents a major workload for surgical neuropathologists. Hence, we conducted a survey among members of the European Confederation of Neuropathological...

  12. Randomised controlled trial of routine individual feedback to improve rationality and reduce numbers of test requests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkens, R A; Pop, P; Bugter-Maessen, A M; Grol, R P; Kester, A D; Beusmans, G H; Knottnerus, J A

    1995-02-25

    Feedback can be described as a way to provide information on doctors' performance to enable changes in future behaviour. Feedback is used with the aim of changing test-ordering behaviour. It can lead to reductions in test usage and cost savings. It is not sufficiently clear, however, whether feedback leads to more appropriate test use. Since 1985, the Diagnostic Coordinating Center Maastricht has been giving feedback on diagnostic tests as a routine health care activity to all family doctors in its region. Both quantity and quality of requests are discussed. In a randomised, controlled trial over 2.5 years, discussion of tests not included previously was added to the existing routine feedback. One group of family doctors (n = 39) received feedback on test-group A (electrocardiography, endoscopy, cervical smears, and allergy tests), the other (n = 40) on test-group B (radiographic and ultrasonographic tests). Thus, each group of doctors acted as a control group for the other. Changes in volume and rationality of requests were analysed. The number of requests decreased during the trial (p = 0.036). Request numbers decreased particularly for test-group A (p = 0.04). The proportion of requests that were non-rational decreased more in the intervention than in the control groups (p = 0.009). Rationality improved predominantly for test-group B (p = 0.043). Thus, routine feedback can change the quantity and quality of requests.

  13. Bayesian analysis of ion beam diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toussaint, U. von; Fischer, R.; Dose, V.

    2001-01-01

    Ion beam diagnostics are routinely used for quantitative analysis of the surface composition of mixture materials up to a depth of a few μm. Unfortunately, advantageous properties of the diagnostics, like high depth resolution in combination with a large penetration depth, no destruction of the surface, high sensitivity for large as well as for small atomic numbers, and high sensitivity are mutually exclusive. Among other things, this is due to the ill-conditioned inverse problem of reconstructing depth distributions of the composition elements. Robust results for depth distributions are obtained with adaptive methods in the framework of Bayesian probability theory. The method of adaptive kernels allows for distributions which contain only the significant information of the data while noise fitting is avoided. This is achieved by adaptively reducing the degrees of freedom supporting the distribution. As applications for ion beam diagnostics Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and particle induced X-ray emission are shown

  14. Breaking the Waves: Routines and Rituals in Entrepreneurship Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neergaard, Helle; Christensen, Dorthe Refslund

    2017-01-01

    Learning is related to the environment created for the learning experience. This environment is often highly routinized and involves a certain social structure, but in entrepreneurship education, such routinization and structure may actually counteract the learning goals. This article investigates how classroom routines and rituals impact on…

  15. [The controversy of routine articulator mounting in orthodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Han, Xianglong; Bai, Ding

    2013-06-01

    Articulators have been widely used by clinicians of dentistry. But routine articulator mounting is still controversial in orthodontics. Orthodontists oriented by gnathology approve routine articulator mounting while nongnathologic orthodontists disapprove it. This article reviews the thoughts of orthodontist that they agree or disagree with routine articulator mounting based on the considerations of biting, temporomandibular disorder (TMD), periodontitis, and so on.

  16. 42 CFR 493.1210 - Condition: Routine chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Routine chemistry. 493.1210 Section 493....1210 Condition: Routine chemistry. If the laboratory provides services in the subspecialty of Routine chemistry, the laboratory must meet the requirements specified in §§ 493.1230 through 493.1256, § 493.1267...

  17. Rational use of diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racoveanu, N.T.; Volodin, V.

    1992-01-01

    Radiologists in USA and UK have since early 1970 questioned the efficacy of various radiological investigations and produced substantial evidence that more rational approaches are necessary. WHO initiated, in 1977, a programme which has issued four technical reports giving practical recommendations on how to rationalise the use of radiological examinations. Three main directions are considered: (1) Abandonment of routine radiological examinations, as procedures with no clinical or epidemiologic significance and which represent a waste of resources and patient dose. (2) Patient selection for various radiological investigations based on clinical criteria (high, intermediate, low yield). Selected patients have an increased prevalence of the given disease and the predictive value of radiological investigation is much higher. (3) Use of diagnostic algorithms with higher cost/efficiency and risk/benefit ratios, improving the outcome of radiological examinations. (author)

  18. Rational use of diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racoveanu, N.T.; Volodin, V.

    1992-01-01

    The escalating number of radiodiagnostic investigations has, as a consequence, an increase in medical irradiation of patients and of cost of radiological services. Radiologists in USA and UK have since early 1970 questioned the efficacy of various radiological investigations and produced substantial evidence that more rational approaches are necessary. WHO initiated, in 1977, a programme in this direction which has issued four technical reports which give practical recommendations on how to rationalize the use of radiological examinations. Three main directions are considered: (1) Abandonment of routine radiological examinations, as procedures with no clinical or epidemiologic significance and which represent a waste of resources and patient dose. (2) Patient selection for various radiological investigations based on clinical criteria (high, intermediate, low yield). Selected patients have an increased prevalence of the given disease and the predictive value of radiological investigation is much higher. (3) Use of diagnostic algorithms with higher cost/efficiency and risk/benefit ratios, improving the outcome of radiological examinations

  19. Recent developments of ECE diagnostics at JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna, E. de la; Sanchez, J. [Association Euratom-Ciemat para Fusion, Ciemant (Spain); Cientoli, C.; Blanchard, P.; Joffrin, E.; Mazon, D. [Association Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, IFP-CNR, Milano (Italy); Riva, M.; Zerbini, M. [Association Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione Centro Ricerche Energia Frascati (Italy); Conway, G. [IPP-Euratom Association, Garching (Germany); Felton, R.; Fessey, J.; Gowers, C. [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Murari, A. [Consorzio RFX, Association Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, Padova (Italy)

    2004-07-01

    In JET, two types of ECE (electron cyclotron emission) instruments are routinely operated to provide electron temperature measurements: a Michelson interferometer and a heterodyne radiometer. ECE diagnostics are able to provide time-resolved electron temperature profiles with high spatial and temporal resolution, and have proven to play a fundamental role in the investigation and development of internal transport barriers (ITBs) in JET. In this paper we report on the major upgrade of the ECE diagnostics systems currently in progress at JET. Diagnostic developments include an upgrade of the multi-channel heterodyne radiometer, aimed at extending the radial region over which T{sub e} measurement can be performed, and the installation of a new Michelson interferometer with fast scanning capability, to improve the frequency and temporal resolution of the multi-harmonic ECE measurements at JET. Moreover, a future extension of the ECE system, an oblique ECE diagnostic to measure the ECE spectra at different angles with respect to the normal to the magnetic field, is being developed. This diagnostic is expected to give valuable insight into the interpretation of ECE measurements in high T{sub e}-plasmas and should be available for measurements once JET resumes operation in 2005.In this paper, the recent developments in the JET ECE diagnostic system will be described and illustrated with some recent results, with an emphasis on issues related with calibration stability, high-Te plasmas and ITB studies. Some of these issues will be discussed in the context of ITER.

  20. Routine general practice care for panic disorder within the lifestyle approach to managing panic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney A. Lambert

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Routine general practice (GP care is rarely comprehensively described in clinical trials. This paper examines routine GP care within the lifestyle approach to managing panic (LAMP study. The aim of this paper is to describe/discuss routine GP care for panic disorder (PD patients within both study arms in the LAMP study. An unblinded pragmatic randomised controlled trial in 15 East of England GP practices (2 primary care trusts. Participants met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria for PD with/without agoraphobia. Follow-up measures recorded at 20 weeks/10 months following randomisation. Control arm, unrestricted routine GP care (practice appointments, referrals and prescriptions. Trial arm, occupational therapyled lifestyle treatment comprising lifestyle review of fluid intake, diet pattern, exercise, caffeine, alcohol and nicotine. Primary outcome measure: beck anxiety inventory. At baseline, participants attended 2-3 times more GP appointments than population average, reducing at 10 months to 1.6 times population average for routine GP care and 0.97 population average for lifestyle arm. At 10 months, 33% fewer referrals (6 referrals; 0 mental health than at baseline (9 referrals; 2 mental health were made for lifestyle arm patients compared with 42% increase (from 12 referrals; 8 mental health at baseline to 17 referrals; 7 mental health in GP care arm. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors were prescribed most often. Benzodiazepines and beta-blockers were prescribed more often than tricyclic against current clinical guidelines. In conclusion, we found that PD patients at baseline were high healthcare resource users. Treatment in both study arms reduced resource use. Routine GP care requires further review for this patient group.

  1. Errorless (re)learning of daily living routines by a woman with impaired memory and initiation: transferrable to a new home?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferland, Mark B; Larente, Johanne; Rowland, Julia; Davidson, Patrick S R

    2013-01-01

    To use errorless learning to train a memory- and initiation-impaired woman on two activities of daily living routines and then to transfer these routines to a new home. Single case quasi-experimental. Over 9 months, a young woman with an anterior cerebral haemorrhagic stroke (secondary to a ruptured arteriovenous malformation) was trained on routines of morning self-care and diabetes management, involving extensive practice on a structured series of steps with intervention as needed to prevent errors. Once routines were established, family members were trained in the supervision and rating of the routines at home. Following discharge, caregivers continued to monitor the routines daily for 3 months. Errorless learning of self-care and diabetes routines was successful. The routines were transferred to a new home environment and maintained at a near perfect level over a 3-month follow-up period. The patient remained severely memory-impaired, indicating that her functional gains were not attributable to any recovery of her memory abilities over time. This case offers evidence that even people with severe memory and initiation impairments can be trained on new routines using errorless learning and that, once learned, these routines can be carried out in novel contexts.

  2. Intelligent stochastic optimization routine for in-core fuel cycle design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, G.T.

    1988-01-01

    Any reactor fuel management strategy must specify the fuel design, batch sizes, loading configurations, and operational procedures for each cycle. To permit detailed design studies, the complex core characteristics must necessarily be computer modeled. Thus, the identification of an optimal fuel cycle design represents an optimization problem with a nonlinear objective function (OF), nonlinear safety constraints, many control variables, and no direct derivative information. Most available library routines cannot tackle such problems; this paper introduces an intelligent stochastic optimization routine that can. There has been considerable interest recently in the application of stochastic methods to difficult optimization problems, based on the statistical mechanics algorithms originally attributed to Metropolis. Previous work showed that, in optimizing the performance of a British advanced gas-cooled reactor fuel stringer, a rudimentary version of the Metropolis algorithm performed as efficiently as the only suitable routine in the Numerical Algorithms Group library. Since then the performance of the Metropolis algorithm has been considerably enhanced by the introduction of self-tuning capabilities by which the routine adjusts its control parameters and search pattern as it progresses. Both features can be viewed as examples of artificial intelligence, in which the routine uses the accumulation of data, or experience, to guide its future actions

  3. In search for effective methods of routine formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandora Marcin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Organizational routines are a frequently researched phenomenon in contemporary management science. Although the available theoretical foundations of Routine Theory seem to have reached a significant degree of maturity over the last thirty years, the same could not be said about the availability of material advice for the management practice. This paper addresses this gap and proposes a framework for an effective routine shaping process. It builds on a brief analysis of available literature on routine formation, supported by case study findings. The approach proposed stresses the importance of the controlled learning process and underlines the importance of deliberate implementation, in contrast to the evolutionary and engineering views on routine emergence.

  4. FASTPLOT, Interface Routines to MS FORTRAN Graphics Library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: FASTPLOT is a library of routines that can be used to interface with the Microsoft FORTRAN Graphics library (GRAPHICS.LIB). The FASTPLOT routines simplify the development of graphics applications and add capabilities such as histograms, Splines, symbols, and error bars. FASTPLOT also includes routines that can be used to create menus. 2 - Methods: FASTPLOT is a library of routines which must be linked with a user's FORTRAN programs that call any FASTPLOT routines. In addition, the user must link with the Microsoft FORTRAN Graphics library (GRAPHICS.LIB). 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: None noted

  5. Lunate chondromalacia: evaluation of routine MRI sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordalo-Rodrigues, Marcelo; Schweitzer, Mark; Bergin, Diane; Culp, Randall; Barakat, Mohamed S

    2005-05-01

    Chondromalacia is a commonly encountered abnormality at arthroscopy and may be responsible for significant clinical symptoms and disability. In the wrist, the most common location for chondromalacia is the lunate bone. Consequently, we sought to study the accuracy of clinical MRI in the assessment of lunate articular cartilage. MR images of 34 patients who underwent arthroscopy and had an MRI examination within 1 month of surgery were evaluated by two reviewers for the presence and location of lunate cartilage defects and subchondral edema. Lunate cartilage defects were seen on MRI in 10 of the 13 patients with chondromalacia, but these defects were also incorrectly noted in three of 21 of patients without chondromalacia. The visible locations for cartilage defects were the ulnar aspect of the proximal lunate bone (n = 3), radial aspect of the proximal lunate bone (n = 4), ulnar aspect of the distal lunate bone (n = 2), and radial aspect of the distal lunate bone (n = 1). Subchondral marrow edema was observed in six of the 10 patients with chondromalacia seen on MRI; in all six patients, the edema was seen in the same quadrant as the cartilage defect. Marrow edema was detected in one patient without chondromalacia. We conclude that lunate chondromalacia can be accurately assessed using routine MRI sequences, although there are occasional false-positive interpretations.

  6. Routine dosimetry in a nuclear medicine department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreuille, O. de; Carbonieres, H. de; Briand-Champlong, J.; Foehrenbach, H.; Guevel, E.; Maserlin, P.; Gaillard, J.F.; Treguier, J.Y.

    2002-01-01

    The nuclear medicine department of the Val de Grace Hospital, in cooperation with the Radiological Protection Army Service, has performed an evaluation of the staff's radio-exposure based on routine dosimetry for six months. The most exposed people are the technicians (2.6 mSv/yr) and the nurse (1.7 mS/yr). The nuclear medicine physicians (0.6 mSv/yr) and the secretaries (0.07 mSv/yr) are far less exposed. The most irradiant occupations are the preparation and the injection of the radiopharmaceuticals (18 mSv/dy) and the realization of the Positron Emission Tomography examinations (19 mSv/dy). The increasing number of PET exams and the development of new tomographs, requiring higher activities, will still increase the exposition level of this working post. This study demonstrates that the exposition doses in nuclear medicine are low compared to the regular limits. Based on these results, only the technicians and the nurse are relevant to the A class. However, these dose levels cannot be neglected for particular positions such as the injection and the PET management. (author)

  7. Routine medicare and radiation exposure. Introductory remarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Hideki; Saito, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    As an introduction of the title series, outlines of radiation in physics, chemistry, biochemistry, biological effect and protection are explained from the clinical doctors' aspect of routine medicare, and of radiation exposure in which people's interest is raised after the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Accident in 2011. For physics, ionizing effects of radiation are described in relation to its quantum energy transfer and its medical utilization like imaging and radiotherapy. Then mentioned in brief is the radiation from elements consisting of human body, cosmic ray and background radiation from the earth, with reference to natural and standardized limits of exposure doses. Radiations from 226 Rn and 40 K are explained as an instance of environmental natural sources together with the concepts of radioactive decay series/scheme, of internal exposure, of hazard like double strand break (DSB) and of medical use such as boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). For an artifact radiation source, shown are fission products of 235 U by neutron, first yielded in 1945. Evidence of evolution in biochemical repair mechanisms of DSB is explained with a comparison of irradiated drosophila mutation where linear non-threshold (LNT) hypothesis is proposed, and human non-homologous end joining and homologous recombination. Historical process of occupational, medical, public exposures and their protection is finally described from the discovery of X-ray in 1895 to the first ICRP publication in 1958 via the A-bomb explosion in 1945. (T.T.)

  8. Procedures in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, T.; Hare, W.S.C.; Thomson, K.; Tess, B.

    1989-01-01

    This book outlines the various procedures necessary for the successful practice of diagnostic radiology. Topics covered are: general principles, imaging of the urinary and gastrointestinal tracts, vascular radiology, arthrography, and miscellaneous diagnostic radiologic procedures

  9. Diagnostic Algorithm Benchmarking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poll, Scott

    2011-01-01

    A poster for the NASA Aviation Safety Program Annual Technical Meeting. It describes empirical benchmarking on diagnostic algorithms using data from the ADAPT Electrical Power System testbed and a diagnostic software framework.

  10. Veterinary Molecular Diagnostics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roest, H.I.J.; Engelsma, M.Y.; Weesendorp, E.; Bossers, A.; Elbers, A.R.W.

    2017-01-01

    In veterinary molecular diagnostics, samples originating from animals are tested. Developments in the farm animals sector and in our societal attitude towards pet animals have resulted in an increased demand for fast and reliable diagnostic techniques. Molecular diagnostics perfectly matches this

  11. Diagnostic and therapeutic radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, W J [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)

    1975-09-01

    Diagnostic and therapeutic radiology were studied as possible contaminants in the evaluations of A-bomb survivors in the ABCC-JNIH Adult Health Study for radiation effects. Hiroshima and Nagasaki subjects received X-ray examinations elsewhere within three months of their ABCC visits at rates of 23 and 12%, respectively. Medical X-ray examinations were more frequent among survivors than comparison subjects. Hiroshima and Nagasaki radiologic practice steadily increased since 1948, and differed markedly by city. From 1946-70 the Hiroshima and Nagasaki X-ray bone marrow doses were 2,300 and 1,000 g-rads, respectively. By 1970, cumulated medical X-ray doses approximated A-bomb doses at distances from the hypocenters of 2,000 m in Hiroshima and 2,800 m in Nagasaki. ABCC X-ray examination doses per subject are routinely updated for comparison with A-bomb doses. Each subject's reported fluoroscopy, photofluorography and radiation therapy exposure elsewhere are for future reference. Dental radiography, though increasing, was not currently an important contributor to survivors' overall exposure. Radiation therapy exposures of 137 subjects were confirmed, and doses estimated for most. Two-thirds the treatments were for malignancies; therapy differed markedly by city; and five cancers possibly arose from earlier radiation therapy. This underscores the importance of considering diagnostic and therapeutic radiology when attributing diseases to the atomic bombs.

  12. Diagnostic evaluation of left-sided prosthetic heart valve dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habets, Jesse; Budde, Ricardo P.; Symersky, Petr; van den Brink, Renee B.; de Mol, Bas A.; Mali, Willem P.; van Herwerden, Lex A.; Chamuleau, Steven A.

    Prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction is a rare, but potentially life-threatening, complication. In clinical practice, PHV dysfunction poses a diagnostic dilemma. Echocardiography and fluoroscopy are the imaging techniques of choice and are routinely used in daily practice. However, these

  13. Diagnostic evaluation of left-sided prosthetic heart valve dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habets, Jesse; Budde, Ricardo P.; Symersky, Petr; van den Brink, Renee B.; de Mol, Bas A.; Mali, Willem P.; van Herwerden, Lex A.; Chamuleau, Steven A.

    2011-01-01

    Prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction is a rare, but potentially life-threatening, complication. In clinical practice, PHV dysfunction poses a diagnostic dilemma. Echocardiography and fluoroscopy are the imaging techniques of choice and are routinely used in daily practice. However, these

  14. Assessment of the Diagnostic Potential of Clinotech TB Screen Test ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Clinotech TB Screen test, a 3rd generation multi-antigen rapid chromatographic immunoassay for detection of IgG antibodies in serum against recombinant protein antigens 38kDa, 16kDa and 6kDa, was assessed for its diagnostic potential for diagnosis of active pulmonary TB in routine TB control programme in Abia ...

  15. Diagnostic value of high strength MRCP in the obstructive jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yang; Dong Yuhai; Yin Jie; Lv Guoyi

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic value of high strength MRCP in patients with obstructive jaundice. Methods: Routine MRI and MRCP examination on 161 patients with obstructive jaundice were carded out with 1.5T Siemens super-conductive magnetic resonance machine. Of them, 103 cases were benign lesions and 58 were malignant after surgical and ERCP pathological confirmation. Results: The diagnostic accuracy of MRCP was 100%, with the qualitative diagnostic accuracy at 90.2%. Conclusion: MRCP was the best method in diagnosing patients with obstructive jaundice, the concerned performances of MRCP could provide the dependable basis for surgical operation project. (authors)

  16. Towards increase of diagnostic efficacy in gynecologic OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirillin, Mikhail; Panteleeva, Olga; Eliseeva, Darya; Kachalina, Olga; Sergeeva, Ekaterina; Dubasova, Lyubov; Agrba, Pavel; Mikailova, Gyular; Prudnikov, Maxim; Shakhova, Natalia

    2013-06-01

    Gynecologic applications of optical coherence tomography (OCT) are usually performed in combination with routine diagnostic procedures: laparoscopy and colposcopy. In combination with laparoscopy OCT is employed for inspection of fallopian tubes in cases of unrecognized infertility while in colposcopy it is used to identify cervix pathologies including cancer. In this paper we discuss methods for increasing diagnostic efficacy of OCT application in these procedures. For OCT-laparoscopy we demonstrate independent criteria for pathology recognition which allow to increase accuracy of diagnostics. For OCT-colposcopy we report on application of device for controlled compression allowing to sense the elasticity of the inspected cervix area and distinguish between neoplasia and inflammatory processes.

  17. Routine environmental reaudit of the Argonne National Laboratory - West

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This report documents the results of the Routine Environmental Reaudit of the Argonne National Laboratory - West (ANL-W), Idaho Falls, Idaho. During this audit, the activities conducted by the audit team included reviews of internal documents and reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), State of Idaho Department of Health and Welfare (IDHW), and DOE contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the audit was conducted from October 11 to October 22, 1993, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). DOE 5482.113, {open_quotes}Environment, Safety, and Health Appraisal Program,{close_quotes} established the mission of EH-24 to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of Department-wide environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and minimization of risk to public health and the environment. EH-24 accomplishes its mission by conducting systematic and periodic evaluations of the Department`s environmental programs within line organizations, and by utilizing supplemental activities that serve to strengthen self-assessment and oversight functions within program, field, and contractor organizations.

  18. Routine environmental reaudit of the Argonne National Laboratory - West

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Routine Environmental Reaudit of the Argonne National Laboratory - West (ANL-W), Idaho Falls, Idaho. During this audit, the activities conducted by the audit team included reviews of internal documents and reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), State of Idaho Department of Health and Welfare (IDHW), and DOE contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the audit was conducted from October 11 to October 22, 1993, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). DOE 5482.113, open-quotes Environment, Safety, and Health Appraisal Program,close quotes established the mission of EH-24 to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of Department-wide environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and minimization of risk to public health and the environment. EH-24 accomplishes its mission by conducting systematic and periodic evaluations of the Department's environmental programs within line organizations, and by utilizing supplemental activities that serve to strengthen self-assessment and oversight functions within program, field, and contractor organizations

  19. Early studies of instant-fMRI for routine examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Yuuki; Harada, Kuniaki; Nagahama, Hiroshi; Akatsuka, Yoshihiro; Shinozaki, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Authors are developing a low-burden, short-time acquisition method of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with 3T machine, named ''Instant-fMRI'', aiming for its application to routine examinations, of which results of early studies on identification of the language hemisphere are reported. Subjects were 10 healthy volunteers (8 males, 2 females, mean age 34.2 y, 8 right-handers) and 5 right-hander patients with brain tumor (4 males, 1 female, mean age 50 y). The machine was GE Signa HDx 3.0T ver. 14, using 8 channel head coil. For Instant-fMRI, T1-weighted imaging sequence for mapping was in fast spoiled gradient recalled acquisition in the steady state (fSPGR) mode (scan time: 1 min 44 sec) and fMRI sequence, in GRE-EPI (scan time: 1 min), which thus required only about 3 min in total. Reference was defined to be the anterior-posterior commissure line, to which parallel sections involving centriciput and cerebellum were acquired. Rest (30 sec)-task (shiritori language game, 30 sec) cycle was to be one in instant-fMRI in contrast to three in the conventional fMRI. Volunteers received both instant-fMRI and conventional fMRI and patients, the former alone. Data were analyzed by GE Brain Wave PA. Right and left hemisphere of the left and right hander, respectively, was identified to be activated by instant-fMRI in 9 of 10 volunteers and in all patients, and by the conventional fMRI, in all volunteers. The instant-fMRI can be a useful examination of other brain functions as well as identifying the language field when acquisition parameters for desired diagnostic purpose are optimized. (T.T.)

  20. Evaluation of macrocytosis in routine hemograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veda, P

    2013-03-01

    Macrocytosis, a condition in which erythrocytes are larger than normal manifests as an increase in mean corpuscular volume (MCV) more than 100 fl. The aim of this study was to identify the underlying causes of macrocytosis, detected in routine hemograms and to evaluate the hematological features in different etiologies. This study included 178 adult patients whose detailed medical history was recorded, and Vitamin B12 assay, folate assay, thyroid function tests, liver function tests, complete blood counts and peripheral smear evaluation was performed. Alcoholism was identified as the etiological factor in 65 cases (36.5%), Vitamin B12 deficiency in 43 cases (24.1%) and drug related in 23 cases (12.9%). These three conditions accounted for 73.6% of macrocytosis. Other causes identified were folate deficiency, liver disease, Myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic renal failure and Aplastic anemia. In 41 cases, the cause of macrocytosis could not be explained. Anemia was observed in 95 cases (53.3%) being most common in Vitamin B12 deficiency. 9 cases (20.9%) of Vitamin B12 deficiency presented with isolated macrocytosis without anemia. It was observed that mean hemoglobin was lower and red cell distribution width (RDW) higher in megaloblastic conditions. Peripheral smear revealed hypersegmented neutrophils in 86% and macro-ovalocytes in 72% of the megaloblastic cases. Complete medical history, red cell parameters and peripheral blood smear are simple, inexpensive tools which assist in identifying the underlying cause of macrocytosis, particularly in resource limited settings. Macrocytosis needs to be evaluated even in the absence of anemia, as it may be the first clue to an underlying pathology.

  1. Routine screening for fetal anomalies: expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, James D

    2004-03-01

    Ultrasound has become a routine part of prenatal care. Despite this, the sensitivity and specificity of the procedure is unclear to many patients and healthcare providers. In a small study from Canada, 54.9% of women reported that they had received no information about ultrasound before their examination. In addition, 37.2% of women indicated that they were unaware of any fetal problems that ultrasound could not detect. Most centers that perform ultrasound do not have their own statistics regarding sensitivity and specificity; it is necessary to rely on large collaborative studies. Unfortunately, wide variations exist in these studies with detection rates for fetal anomalies between 13.3% and 82.4%. The Eurofetus study is the largest prospective study performed to date and because of the time and expense involved in this type of study, a similar study is not likely to be repeated. The overall fetal detection rate for anomalous fetuses was 64.1%. It is important to note that in this study, ultrasounds were performed in tertiary centers with significant experience in detecting fetal malformations. The RADIUS study also demonstrated a significantly improved detection rate of anomalies before 24 weeks in tertiary versus community centers (35% versus 13%). Two concepts seem to emerge from reviewing these data. First, patients must be made aware of the limitations of ultrasound in detecting fetal anomalies. This information is critical to allow them to make informed decisions whether to undergo ultrasound examination and to prepare them for potential outcomes.Second, to achieve the detection rates reported in the Eurofetus study, ultrasound examination must be performed in centers that have extensive experience in the detection of fetal anomalies.

  2. Reference values for anxiety questionnaires: the Leiden Routine Outcome Monitoring Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte-van Maaren, Yvonne W M; Giltay, Erik J; van Hemert, Albert M; Zitman, Frans G; de Waal, Margot W M; Carlier, Ingrid V E

    2013-09-25

    The monitoring of patients with an anxiety disorder can benefit from Routine Outcome Monitoring (ROM). As anxiety disorders differ in phenomenology, several anxiety questionnaires are included in ROM: Brief Scale for Anxiety (BSA), PADUA Inventory Revised (PI-R), Panic Appraisal Inventory (PAI), Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ), Worry Domains Questionnaire (WDQ), Social Interaction, Anxiety Scale (SIAS), Social Phobia Scale (SPS), and the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R). We aimed to generate reference values for both 'healthy' and 'clinically anxious' populations for these anxiety questionnaires. We included 1295 subjects from the general population (ROM reference-group) and 5066 psychiatric outpatients diagnosed with a specific anxiety disorder (ROM patient-group). The MINI was used as diagnostic device in both the ROM reference group and the ROM patient group. To define limits for one-sided reference intervals (95th percentile; P95) the outermost 5% of observations were used. Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) analyses were used to yield alternative cut-off values for the anxiety questionnaires. For the ROM reference-group the mean age was 40.3 years (SD=12.6), and for the ROM patient-group it was 36.5 years (SD=11.9). Females constituted 62.8% of the reference-group and 64.4% of the patient-group. P95 ROM reference group cut-off values for reference versus clinically anxious populations were 11 for the BSA, 43 for the PI-R, 37 for the PAI Anticipated Panic, 47 for the PAI Perceived Consequences, 65 for the PAI Perceived Self-efficacy, 66 for the PSWQ, 74 for the WDQ, 32 for the SIAS, 19 for the SPS, and 36 for IES-R. ROC analyses yielded slightly lower reference values. The discriminative power of all eight anxiety questionnaires was very high. Substantial non-response and limited generalizability. For eight anxiety questionnaires a comprehensive set of reference values was provided. Reference values were generally higher in women than in men

  3. Safety of Medical Diagnostic Ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breyer, B.

    1998-01-01

    Large numbers of people (both sick and healthy) are routinely exposed to ultrasound waves. We shall discuss wave parameters and scanner properties that are relevant to the safety aspect. This includes central pulse frequency, pulse length, intensity (ISPTA and others), focusing, pulse repetition frequency, pulse pressure, etc. Since the transmitted ultrasound power has steadily been increasing during the last two decades, the problems are becoming more serious with time. Doppler methods have gained importance and 'popularity, which additionally increases ultrasound power requirements since the reflectivity of red blood cells is so small that the backscattered pressure is about 100 times less than that from soft tissue structures in the body. Main mechanisms that can potentially present hazard are heating and cavitation. The basic parameter used to assess thermal hazard is ISPTA and the optimal predictor of cavitation hazard is the peak rarefractional pressure. The hazard of heating-up can be summarized in saying that temperatures up to 38.5 o C are safe, while temperatures above 41 o C are definitely not. Care must be taken to stay within the safe zone. However, there does not exist a confirmed report of any type of hazardous effects on humans using intensities presently applied in diagnostic ultrasound scanners. Taking this into account, various international bodies have put limits to the application of ultrasound, which is best summarized in the FDA (USA) regulation that diagnostic apparatus may have an output of maximally 720 mW/cm 2 (derated) provided thermal and mechanical properties are indicated (onscreen) by properly defined Thermal Indices (TI) and Mechanical Index (MI). These aspects shall be discussed in some detail. We shall give the rules for the operator to apply ultrasound with minimal hazard. The general conclusion is that diagnostic ultrasound, as presently known, may be used whenever a qualified expert expects essential medical benefit for the

  4. Understanding Smart Home Sensor Data for Ageing in Place Through Everyday Household Routines: A Mixed Method Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kasteren, Yasmin; Bradford, Dana; Zhang, Qing; Karunanithi, Mohan; Ding, Hang

    2017-06-13

    An ongoing challenge for smart homes research for aging-in-place is how to make sense of the large amounts of data from in-home sensors to facilitate real-time monitoring and develop reliable alerts. The objective of our study was to explore the usefulness of a routine-based approach for making sense of smart home data for the elderly. Maximum variation sampling was used to select three cases for an in-depth mixed methods exploration of the daily routines of three elderly participants in a smart home trial using 180 days of power use and motion sensor data and longitudinal interview data. Sensor data accurately matched self-reported routines. By comparing daily movement data with personal routines, it was possible to identify changes in routine that signaled illness, recovery from bereavement, and gradual deterioration of sleep quality and daily movement. Interview and sensor data also identified changes in routine with variations in temperature and daylight hours. The findings demonstrated that a routine-based approach makes interpreting sensor data easy, intuitive, and transparent. They highlighted the importance of understanding and accounting for individual differences in preferences for routinization and the influence of the cyclical nature of daily routines, social or cultural rhythms, and seasonal changes in temperature and daylight hours when interpreting information based on sensor data. This research has demonstrated the usefulness of a routine-based approach for making sense of smart home data, which has furthered the understanding of the challenges that need to be addressed in order to make real-time monitoring and effective alerts a reality. ©Yasmin van Kasteren, Dana Bradford, Qing Zhang, Mohan Karunanithi, Hang Ding. Originally published in JMIR Mhealth and Uhealth (http://mhealth.jmir.org), 13.06.2017.

  5. Microfluidic Sample Preparation for Diagnostic Cytopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, Albert J.; Adeyiga, Oladunni B.; Di Carlo, Dino

    2014-01-01

    The cellular components of body fluids are routinely analyzed to identify disease and treatment approaches. While significant focus has been placed on developing cell analysis technologies, tools to automate the preparation of cellular specimens have been more limited, especially for body fluids beyond blood. Preparation steps include separating, concentrating, and exposing cells to reagents. Sample preparation continues to be routinely performed off-chip by technicians, preventing cell-based point-of-care diagnostics, increasing the cost of tests, and reducing the consistency of the final analysis following multiple manually-performed steps. Here, we review the assortment of biofluids for which suspended cells are analyzed, along with their characteristics and diagnostic value. We present an overview of the conventional sample preparation processes for cytological diagnosis. We finally discuss the challenges and opportunities in developing microfluidic devices for the purpose of automating or miniaturizing these processes, with particular emphases on preparing large or small volume samples, working with samples of high cellularity, automating multi-step processes, and obtaining high purity subpopulations of cells. We hope to convey the importance of and help identify new research directions addressing the vast biological and clinical applications in preparing and analyzing the array of available biological fluids. Successfully addressing the challenges described in this review can lead to inexpensive systems to improve diagnostic accuracy while simultaneously reducing overall systemic healthcare costs. PMID:23380972

  6. Work routines moderate the association between eveningness and poor psychological well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Felipe Gutiérrez; de Souza, Camila Morelatto; Hidalgo, Maria Paz Loayza

    2018-01-01

    Well-being is a useful screening method for the detection of mood disorders. Evidence associating psychological well-being with sleep-wake patterns exists, as well as associations with sleep-wake patterns, work-related parameters, and perceived self-efficacy. Despite the growing research regarding the relationship between these factors and mental health, there are few studies that analyze them together. To investigate if the association between sleep-wake patterns and psychological well-being is mediated or moderated by perceived self-efficacy, work flexibility and work routines. This cohort study was performed in southern Brazil. A sample of 987 individuals was analyzed (66.9% women; mean age = 43.9 years). Work routines parameters and work schedule flexibility were evaluated, most participants were farmers (46%) and most worked 7 days a week (69.1%). Munich Chronotype Questionnaire (MCTQ) was administered for evaluation of sleep-wake patterns, General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSE) for assessment the participants' beliefs about how they coped with daily hassles, and World Health Organization Five-item Well-being Index (WHO-5) for evaluation of psychological well-being levels. Moderation and mediation models were tested. The moderation model showed influences of work end time on the relationship between sleep onset time and psychological well-being (R2 = 0.147; F = 24.16; ppsychological well-being with sex (Beta = -0.086; p = 0.004), sleep onset time (Beta = -0.086; p = 0.006), and self-efficacy (Beta = 0.316; ppsychological well-being with sleep-wake patterns and self-efficacy, and show an interaction between work routines and sleep-wake patterns. Our results draw attention to the importance of the interplay between individual and social rhythms in relation to psychological well-being.

  7. The Endogenous Origins of Experience, Routines and Organizational Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Juul; Felin, Teppo

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the origins and emergence of organizational routines and capabilities. We first argue that there are theoretical and endogeneity-related concerns associated with the key antecedents and mechanisms specified by the extant routines and capabilities literature. Specifically,...... or rationalist, choice-based approach can provide a more fruitful (though preliminary) foundation for understanding organizational behavior and capabilities.......In this paper we discuss the origins and emergence of organizational routines and capabilities. We first argue that there are theoretical and endogeneity-related concerns associated with the key antecedents and mechanisms specified by the extant routines and capabilities literature. Specifically......, we explicate the behaviorist and empiricist foundations of the organizational routines and capabilities literature and the extant emphasis placed on experience, repetition, and observation as the key antecedents and mechanisms of routines and capabilities. Based on this discussion we highlight...

  8. Accuracy of routine cytology and immunocytochemistry in preoperative diagnosis of oral amelanotic melanomas in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przeździecki, Rafał; Czopowicz, Michał; Sapierzyński, Rafał

    2015-12-01

    Amelanotic melanomas are one of the most common oral malignancies. The cytologic and histopathologic differentiation between amelanotic melanoma, sarcoma, and poorly differentiated carcinoma is often difficult or even impossible. The aim of this study was to assess the reliability of routine cytology and immunocytochemistry in preoperative diagnosis of canine oral amelanotic melanoma. Cytologic preparations from undifferentiated canine oral tumors were stained with Giemsa and by immunocytochemistry (ICC) using anti-cytokeratin, anti-vimentin, and anti-Melan A antibodies. The final cytologic diagnosis (including ICC) was compared to the final diagnosis based on histopathology and immunohistochemistry (IHC) results, and sensitivity and specificity of cytologic examination were determined. Final cytologic diagnoses of 38 cases agreed well with the histopathologic/immunohistochemical diagnoses, thus both specificity and sensitivity of combined routine cytology and ICC were 100% (95% confidence interval 90.8-100%). Of 32 oral tumors, diagnosis of amelanotic melanoma, sarcoma, and carcinoma was made using routine cytology and ICC. In 4 of 6 aspirates taken from lymph nodes, a preliminary diagnosis of metastatic amelanotic melanoma corresponded with the final diagnosis. Both sensitivity and specificity of routine cytology in diagnosis of amelanotic melanomas were considered moderate (66.7% and 85.7%, respectively). In conclusion, routine cytology is a reliable diagnostic method for canine oral amelanotic melanoma and metastatic amelanotic melanoma, and ICC, using anti-cytokeratin, anti-vimentin, and anti-Melan A antibodies, is an excellent supporting method for presurgical diagnosis of poorly differentiated oral malignancies in dogs. © 2015 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  9. On-line diagnostics for a real time system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreenivasan, P.

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of an on-line diagnostics is to infuse the ability of self diagnosing in an online computer to enhance its dependability in a real time system. Such a diagnostics evolved for the CDPS of the Fast Breeder Test Reactor at Kalpakkam is reported. The two phases of the diagnostics, i.e., the malfunction detection and post detection action are described in some detail. (A.K.)

  10. Routine intracranial pressure monitoring in acute coma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Rob J; Raper, Joseph; Todhunter, Emma

    2015-11-02

    We know that the brain damage resulting from traumatic and other insults is not due solely to the direct consequences of the primary injury. A significant and potentially preventable contribution to the overall morbidity arises from secondary hypoxic-ischaemic damage. Brain swelling accompanied by raised intracranial pressure (ICP) prevents adequate cerebral perfusion with well-oxygenated blood.Detection of raised ICP could be useful in alerting clinicians to the need to improve cerebral perfusion, with consequent reductions in brain injury. To determine whether routine ICP monitoring in severe coma of any cause reduces the risk of all-cause mortality or severe disability at final follow-up. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (OvidSP), EMBASE (OvidSP), CINAHL Plus, ISI Web of Science (SCI-EXPANDED & CPCI-S), clinical trials registries and reference lists. We ran the most recent search on 22 May 2015. All randomised controlled studies of real-time ICP monitoring by invasive or semi-invasive means in acute coma (traumatic or non-traumatic aetiology) versus clinical care without ICP monitoring (that is, guided only by clinical or radiological inference of the presence of raised ICP). Two authors (ET and RF) worked independently to identify the one study that met inclusion criteria. JR and RF independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias. We contacted study authors for additional information, including details of methods and outcome data. One randomized controlled trial (RCT) meeting the selection criteria has been identified to date.The included study had 324 participants. We judged risk of bias to be low for all categories except blinding of participants and personnel, which is not feasible for this intervention. There were few missing data, and we analysed all on an intention-to-treat basis.Participants could be 13 years of age or older (mean age of sample 29

  11. Modeling Routinization in Games: An Information Theory Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallner, Simon; Pichlmair, Martin; Hecher, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Routinization is the result of practicing until an action stops being a goal-directed process. This paper formulates a definition of routinization in games based on prior research in the fields of activity theory and practice theory. Routinization is analyzed using the formal model of discrete......-time, discrete-space Markov chains and information theory to measure the actual error between the dynamically trained models and the player interaction. Preliminary research supports the hypothesis that Markov chains can be effectively used to model routinization in games. A full study design is presented...

  12. Evaluating next-generation sequencing for direct clinical diagnostics in diarrhoeal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joensen, Katrine Grimstrup; Engsbro, A L Ø; Lukjancenko, Oksana

    2017-01-01

    The accurate microbiological diagnosis of diarrhoea involves numerous laboratory tests and, often, the pathogen is not identified in time to guide clinical management. With next-generation sequencing (NGS) becoming cheaper, it has huge potential in routine diagnostics. The aim of this study...... was to evaluate the potential of NGS-based diagnostics through direct sequencing of faecal samples. Fifty-eight clinical faecal samples were obtained from patients with diarrhoea as part of the routine diagnostics at Hvidovre University Hospital, Denmark. Ten samples from healthy individuals were also included...

  13. Family Routines and Parental Monitoring as Protective Factors among Early and Middle Adolescents Affected by Maternal HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Debra A.; Marelich, William D.; Herbeck, Diane M.; Payne, Diana L.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of parenting skills on adolescent outcomes among children affected by maternal HIV/AIDS (N = 118, M age = 13) was investigated. Among families with more frequent family routines, over time adolescents showed lower rates of aggression, anxiety, worry, depression, conduct disorder, binge drinking, and increased self-concept. Among…

  14. Taking a new biomarker into routine use – A perspective from the routine clinical biochemistry laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgeon, Catharine; Hill, Robert; Hortin, Glen L; Thompson, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing pressure to provide cost-effective healthcare based on “best practice.” Consequently, new biomarkers are only likely to be introduced into routine clinical biochemistry departments if they are supported by a strong evidence base and if the results will improve patient management and outcome. This requires convincing evidence of the benefits of introducing the new test, ideally reflected in fewer hospital admissions, fewer additional investigations and/or fewer clinic visits. Carefully designed audit and cost-benefit studies in relevant patient groups must demonstrate that introducing the biomarker delivers an improved and more effective clinical pathway. From the laboratory perspective, pre-analytical requirements must be thoroughly investigated at an early stage. Good stability of the biomarker in relevant physiological matrices is essential to avoid the need for special processing. Absence of specific timing requirements for sampling and knowledge of the effect of medications that might be used to treat the patients in whom the biomarker will be measured is also highly desirable. Analytically, automation is essential in modern high-throughput clinical laboratories. Assays must therefore be robust, fulfilling standard requirements for linearity on dilution, precision and reproducibility, both within- and between-run. Provision of measurements by a limited number of specialized reference laboratories may be most appropriate, especially when a new biomarker is first introduced into routine practice. PMID:21137030

  15. Diagnostic Development on NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A.L. Roquemore; D. Johnson; R. Kaita; et al

    1999-01-01

    Diagnostics are described which are currently installed or under active development for the newly commissioned NSTX device. The low aspect ratio (R/a less than or equal to 1.3) and low toroidal field (0.1-0.3T) used in this device dictate adaptations in many standard diagnostic techniques. Technical summaries of each diagnostic are given, and adaptations, where significant, are highlighted

  16. TFTR diagnostic vacuum controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, D.; Persons, R.

    1981-01-01

    The TFTR diagnostic vacuum controller (DVC) provides in conjunction with the Central Instrumentation Control and Data Acquisition System (CICADA), control and monitoring for the pumps, valves and gauges associated with each individual diagnostic vacuum system. There will be approximately 50 systems on TFTR. Two standard versions of the controller (A and B) wil be provided in order to meet the requirements of two diagnostic manifold arrangements. All pump and valve sequencing, as well as protection features, will be implemented by the controller

  17. Diagnostic ultrasound in pregnancy - ethical problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sande, H.A.

    1991-01-01

    Foetal diagnostics has changed prenatal checkups beyond the point of no return. The practice of offering ultrasound screening involves great responsibility. Routine ultrasound screening requires a high level of competency. Four main ethical issues are discussed; life or death, malformations, the foetus as patient, and the feotus as donor. Other issues discussed are verifying the diagnosis of death, how to inform the parents, procedures in connection with pathological findings, procedures in connection with stillbirth, and the legal rights of the foetus, as well as three recommendations focussing on the above-mentioned issues. 9 refs

  18. Literature Review Lifestyles and routine activities of South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Child and Adolescent Mental Health ... Lifestyles and routine activities of South African teenagers at risk of being trafficked for involuntary prostitution. Thozama ... Actual lifestyle and routine activities of South African teenagers and risky behaviours (substance abuse, intergenerational sex and child prostitution) are ...

  19. Factors for Radical Creativity, Incremental Creativity, and Routine, Noncreative Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madjar, Nora; Greenberg, Ellen; Chen, Zheng

    2011-01-01

    This study extends theory and research by differentiating between routine, noncreative performance and 2 distinct types of creativity: radical and incremental. We also use a sensemaking perspective to examine the interplay of social and personal factors that may influence a person's engagement in a certain level of creative action versus routine,…

  20. Endocarditis : Effects of routine echocardiography during Gram-positive bacteraemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, F J; Bleeker-Rovers, C P; Sturm, P D; Krabbe, P F M; van Dijk, A P J; Oyen, W J G; Kullberg, B J

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite firm recommendations to perform echocardiography in high-risk patients with Gram-positive bacteraemia, routine echocardiography is not embedded in daily practice in many settings. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a regime including routine echocardiography results in

  1. Thinking Routines: Replicating Classroom Practices within Museum Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolberg, Rochelle Ibanez; Goff, Allison

    2012-01-01

    This article describes thinking routines as tools to guide and support young children's thinking. These learning strategies, developed by Harvard University's Project Zero Classroom, actively engage students in constructing meaning while also understanding their own thinking process. The authors discuss how thinking routines can be used in both…

  2. Understanding teachers’ routines to inform classroom technology design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    An, P.; Bakker, S.; Eggen, J.H.

    2017-01-01

    Secondary school teachers have quite busy and complex routines in their classrooms. However, present classroom technologies usually require focused attention from teachers while being interacted with, which restricts their use in teachers’ daily routines. Peripheral interaction is a human-computer

  3. Understanding Teachers' Routines to Inform Classroom Technology Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Pengcheng; Bakker, Saskia; Eggen, Berry

    2017-01-01

    Secondary school teachers have quite busy and complex routines in their classrooms. However, present classroom technologies usually require focused attention from teachers while being interacted with, which restricts their use in teachers' daily routines. Peripheral interaction is a human-computer interaction style that aims to enable interaction…

  4. An Element of Practical Knowledge in Education: Professional Routines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacourse, France

    2011-01-01

    The question of practical knowledge and its teaching has arisen more perceptibly since the appearance of the aim to professionalize teachers. How can imperceptible knowledge such as professional routines be taught? To establish a social fabric and effective class management, it is essential to call on creative and adaptive professional routines.…

  5. See, Say, Write: A Writing Routine for the Preschool Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copp, Stefanie B.; Cabell, Sonia Q.; Tortorelli, Laura S.

    2016-01-01

    See, Say, Write is an adaptable classroom writing routine that teachers can use across a range of activities in the preschool classroom. This preschool writing routine offers an opportunity for teachers to build on a shared experience through engagement in rich conversation and writing. After a shared experience, teachers will provide a visual…

  6. The emergence and change of management accounting routines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Steen, M.P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore the dynamics involved in the emergence and change of management accounting routines. It seeks to provide an understanding of the ways in which these complex routines foster stability and change in management accounting practices.

  7. Family routines and rituals following separation: continuity and change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, W.; Karsten, L.; Mulder, C.H.

    2015-01-01

    Separation always changes family life. The aim of this study is to gain insight into the everyday practices of ‘doing family’ after separation. We focus on two central elements of family life: routines and rituals. While in most families both parents are involved in family routines and rituals, this

  8. 42 CFR 493.1267 - Standard: Routine chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard: Routine chemistry. 493.1267 Section 493.1267 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Systems § 493.1267 Standard: Routine chemistry. For blood gas analyses, the laboratory must perform the...

  9. 42 CFR 493.841 - Standard; Routine chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard; Routine chemistry. 493.841 Section 493.841 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... These Tests § 493.841 Standard; Routine chemistry. (a) Failure to attain a score of at least 80 percent...

  10. Serumferritin - diagnostic relevance and clinical usefulness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linkesch, W [Vienna Univ. (Austria). 2. Medizinische Klinik

    1984-01-01

    The introduction of a WHO Standard for serumferritin effected a standardisation of different methods, improving quality and security for clinical routine diagnostic purposes. Therefore the clinical evaluation of serumferritin gained even more importance. For evaluation of iron stores of children, pregnant women, population studies, patients on hemodialysis or patients with rheumatoid arthritis low serumferritin values give safe results. In addition serumferritin is of clinical usefulness in monitoring therapy of both iron deficiency and iron overload. Evaluating a single serumferritin value one should consider the total clinical situation of the patient. As some tumors can produce and secrete serumferritin, e.g. acute myeloblastic leukemia, germ cell tumors, malignant melanoma, serumferritin might be helpful in monitoring the malignant disease. The ongoing characterization of tissue isoferritin, especially acidic isoferritin, may eventually lead to a clinically significant diagnostic marker of neoplasia.

  11. Serumferritin - diagnostic relevance and clinical usefulness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linkesch, W.

    1984-01-01

    The introduction of a WHO Standard for serumferritin effected a standardisation of different methods, improving quality and security for clinical routine diagnostic purposes. Therefore the clinical evaluation of serumferritin gained even more importance. For evaluation of iron stores of children, pregnant women, population studies, patients on hemodialysis or patients with rheumatoid arthritis low serumferritin values give safe results. In addition serumferritin is of clinical usefulness in monitoring therapy of both iron deficiency and iron overload. Evaluating a single serumferritin value on should consider the total clinical situation of the patient. As some tumors can produce and secrete serumferritin, e. g. acute myeloblastic leukemia, germ cell tumors, malignant melanoma, serumferritin might be helpful in monitoring the malignant disease. The ongoing characterization of tissue isoferritin, especially acidic isoferritin, may eventually lead to a clinically significant diagnostic marker of neoplasia. (Author)

  12. Routine colonic endoscopic evaluation following resolution of acute diverticulitis: Is it necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Amit K; Karanjawala, Burzeen E; Maykel, Justin A; Johnson, Eric K; Steele, Scott R

    2014-01-01

    Diverticular disease incidence is increasing up to 65% by age 85 in industrialized nations, low fiber diets, and in younger and obese patients. Twenty-five percent of patients with diverticulosis will develop acute diverticulitis. This imposes a significant burden on healthcare systems, resulting in greater than 300000 admissions per year with an estimated annual cost of $3 billion USD. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) is the diagnostic study of choice, with a sensitivity and specificity greater than 95%. Unfortunately, similar CT findings can be present in colonic neoplasia, especially when perforated or inflamed. This prompted professional societies such as the American Society of Colon Rectal Surgeons to recommend patients undergo routine colonoscopy after an episode of acute diverticulitis to rule out malignancy. Yet, the data supporting routine colonoscopy after acute diverticulitis is sparse and based small cohort studies utilizing outdated technology. While any patient with an indication for a colonoscopy should undergo appropriate endoscopic evaluation, in the era of widespread use of high-resolution computed tomography, routine colonic endoscopic evaluation following resolution of acute uncomplicated diverticulitis poses additional costs, comes with inherent risks, and may require further study. In this manuscript, we review the current data related to this recommendation. PMID:25253951

  13. User manual for two simple postscript output FORTRAN plotting routines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T. X.

    1991-01-01

    Graphics is one of the important tools in engineering analysis and design. However, plotting routines that generate output on high quality laser printers normally come in graphics packages, which tend to be expensive and system dependent. These factors become important for small computer systems or desktop computers, especially when only some form of a simple plotting routine is sufficient. With the Postscript language becoming popular, there are more and more Postscript laser printers now available. Simple, versatile, low cost plotting routines that can generate output on high quality laser printers are needed and standard FORTRAN language plotting routines using output in Postscript language seems logical. The purpose here is to explain two simple FORTRAN plotting routines that generate output in Postscript language.

  14. An intelligent stochastic optimization routine for nuclear fuel cycle design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, G.T.

    1990-01-01

    A simulated annealing (Metropolis algorithm) optimization routine named AMETROP, which has been developed for use on realistic nuclear fuel cycle problems, is introduced. Each stage of the algorithm is described and the means by which it overcomes or avoids the difficulties posed to conventional optimization routines by such problems are explained. Special attention is given to innovations that enhance AMETROP's performance both through artificial intelligence features, in which the routine uses the accumulation of data to influence its future actions, and through a family of simple performance aids, which allow the designer to use his heuristic knowledge to guide the routine's essentially random search. Using examples from a typical fuel cycle optimization problem, the performance of the stochastic Metropolis algorithm is compared to that of the only suitable deterministic routine in a standard software library, showing AMETROP to have many advantages

  15. Comparison of different references for brain perfusion SPECT quantification in clinical routine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivera J, P.; Acton, P.; Costa, D.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: We used 40 brain perfusion SPECT studies from the INM, UCL database to investigate the performance of several references (denominators) in the calculation of perfusion ratios with single photon emission tomography (S PET) within a routine clinical service. According to clinical diagnosis and previous SPECT findings 4 groups were identified composed of: 10 controls (C, 23 to 84 y old); 10 myalgic-encephalomyelitis / chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS, 22 to 61 y old); 10 major depression (MD, 24 to 68 y old); and 10 temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE, 19 to 39 y old). Routine protocols for processing were used and the analysis was blind to group classification. Brain perfusion ratios were calculated using 7 different references: hemi cerebellum with higher counts (Cer), total counts in a 4 pixel slice through the basal ganglia slice (BG), average counts per pixel in the visual cortex (VC), average counts per pixel in the white matter (WM), total acquired counts (TAC), total reconstructed counts (TRC) and maximum counts per pixel in the entire study (MAXX). Unpaired test to compare different diagnostic groups, coefficient of variation (CV) to assess the reliability to each references followed by ANOVA were the statistical test used. The lowest mean CV's were found with VC (4.8%) and TRC (5.1%), with all the others significantly higher (p<0.0001). The range of CV's for Cer was the lowest (3.7% to 5.9%). Consistent differentiation between diagnostic groups and controls was only obtained with Cer. In conclusion, it appears that for clinical routine services Cer is the most reliable reference, exception made for all diseases affecting the cerebellum. In these cases TRC or VC should be preferred. (authors)

  16. Study of dosimetric quantities applied to patient undergoing routine chest examinations by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzaga, Natalia Barbosa

    2012-01-01

    The radiological protection system has established a standard to protect persons against the harmful effects caused by ionizing radiation that is based on the justification, optimization and dose limitation principles. The increasing use of radiation in medicine and the related risks have stressed the discussion on patient radiation protection. The computed tomography (CT) is the diagnostic radiology technique that most contributes to patient doses and it requires optimization efforts. Diagnostic reference levels (DRL) has been established in many countries in terms of CT dosimetric quantities; in Brazil, the DRLs are still under investigation since the culture of patient protection is not very strong yet. The objective of this work was to investigate the dosimetric and protection quantities related to patients undergoing CT routine chest examinations. The ImPACT CT, CT Expo and ImpactDose softwares were used for calculations of the weight and volumetric air-kerma indexes (CW and CVOL), the air kerma - length product (P K,L ), organ equivalent dose (H T ) and the effective dose (E) for CT routine chest protocols in 19 tomographs in Belo Horizonte city. The CT Expo was selected to be validated against experimental measurements in three hospitals with thermoluminescent dosimeters and CT pencil ionization chamber in anthropomorphic and standard CT body phantoms. Experimental and calculated results indicated differences up to 97% for H T and E and acceptable agreement for C W ,C VOL and P K,L . All data from 19 tomographs showed that local DRLs for CT routine chest examinations may be chosen smaller than DRLs adopted in other countries; this would contribute to increase the radiological protection of patients. (author)

  17. Evaluating the Factor Structure of "Self-Concept" in Children: A Cautionary Note

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Robert J.; McIntire, Walter G.

    1977-01-01

    This article examines the factor structure of two measures of self-concept routinely used with elementary school children: the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory and the Self-Concept and Motivation Inventory. (Author)

  18. Protocol investigating the clinical utility of an objective measure of activity and attention (QbTest) on diagnostic and treatment decision-making in children and young people with ADHD-'Assessing QbTest Utility in ADHD' (AQUA): a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Charlotte L; Walker, Gemma M; Valentine, Althea Z; Guo, Boliang; Kaylor-Hughes, Catherine; James, Marilyn; Daley, David; Sayal, Kapil; Hollis, Chris

    2014-12-01

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) state that young people need to have access to the best evidence-based care to improve outcome. The current 'gold standard' ADHD diagnostic assessment combines clinical observation with subjective parent, teacher and self-reports. In routine practice, reports from multiple informants may be unavailable or contradictory, leading to diagnostic uncertainty and delay. The addition of objective tests of attention and activity may help reduce diagnostic uncertainty and delays in initiating treatment leading to improved outcomes. This trial investigates whether providing clinicians with an objective report of levels of attention, impulsivity and activity can lead to an earlier, and more accurate, clinical diagnosis and improved patient outcome. This multisite randomised controlled trial will recruit young people (aged 6-17 years old) who have been referred for an ADHD diagnostic assessment at Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) and Community Paediatric clinics across England. Routine clinical assessment will be augmented by the QbTest, incorporating a continuous performance test (CPT) and infrared motion tracking of activity. The participant will be randomised into one of two study arms: QbOpen (clinician has immediate access to a QbTest report): QbBlind (report is withheld until the study end). Primary outcomes are time to diagnosis and diagnostic accuracy. Secondary outcomes include clinician's diagnostic confidence and routine clinical outcome measures. Cost-effective analysis will be conducted, alongside a qualitative assessment of the feasibility and acceptability of incorporating QbTest in routine practice. The findings from the study will inform commissioners, clinicians and managers about the feasibility, acceptability, clinical utility and cost-effectiveness of incorporating QbTest into routine diagnostic assessment of young

  19. Psychologists' diagnostic processes during a diagnostic interview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenier, Marleen; Beerthuis, Vos R.J.; Pieters, Julius Marie; Witteman, C.L.M.; Witteman, Cilia L.M.; Swinkels, Jan A.

    2011-01-01

    In mental health care, psychologists assess clients’ complaints, analyze underlying problems, and identify causes for these problems, to make treatment decisions. We present a study on psychologists’ diagnostic processes, in which a mixed-method approach was employed. We aimed to identify a common

  20. Diagnostic nerve ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeumer, T.; Grimm, A.; Schelle, T.

    2017-01-01

    For the diagnostics of nerve lesions an imaging method is necessary to visualize peripheral nerves and their surrounding structures for an etiological classification. Clinical neurological and electrophysiological investigations provide functional information about nerve lesions. The information provided by a standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination is inadequate for peripheral nerve diagnostics; however, MRI neurography is suitable but on the other hand a resource and time-consuming method. Using ultrasonography for peripheral nerve diagnostics. With ultrasonography reliable diagnostics of entrapment neuropathies and traumatic nerve lesions are possible. The use of ultrasonography for neuropathies shows that a differentiation between different forms is possible. Nerve ultrasonography is an established diagnostic tool. In addition to the clinical examination and clinical electrophysiology, structural information can be obtained, which results in a clear improvement in the diagnostics. Ultrasonography has become an integral part of the diagnostic work-up of peripheral nerve lesions in neurophysiological departments. Nerve ultrasonography is recommended for the diagnostic work-up of peripheral nerve lesions in addition to clinical and electrophysiological investigations. It should be used in the clinical work-up of entrapment neuropathies, traumatic nerve lesions and spacy-occupying lesions of nerves. (orig.) [de

  1. Ongoing experiments: diagnostics requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickerman, C.E.

    1976-01-01

    The paper reviews the fuel motion diagnostics needs for ongoing LMFBR safety experiments over approximately the next five years, with the discussion centered on TREAT. Brief comments on the direction in which clad motion diagnostics requirements are expected to develop are also presented

  2. Clinical diagnostic ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, E.; Morley, P.

    1986-01-01

    This textbook on diagnostic ultrasound covers the main systems, with emphasis being placed on the clinical application of diagnostic ultrasound in everyday practice. It provides not only a textbook for postgraduates (particularly FRCR candidates), but also a reference work for practitioners of clinical ultrasound and clinicians generally

  3. Gearbox vibration diagnostic analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the Gearbox Vibration Diagnostic Analyzer installed in the NASA Lewis Research Center's 500 HP Helicopter Transmission Test Stand to monitor gearbox testing. The vibration of the gearbox is analyzed using diagnostic algorithms to calculate a parameter indicating damaged components.

  4. The value of routine bone marrow biopsy in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma staged with PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alzahrani, M; El-Galaly, T C; Hutchings, M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The added diagnostic and prognostic value of routine bone marrow biopsy (BMB) in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) undergoing positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT) staging is controversial. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with newly d...

  5. Evaluation of a commercial microarray as a confirmation test for the presence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases in isolates from the routine clinical setting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Platteel, T.N.; Stuart, J.W.; Voets, G.M.; Scharringa, J.; Sande, N. van de; Fluit, A.C.; Leverstein-van Hall, M.A.; Sturm, P.D.J.; et al.,

    2011-01-01

    Since the diagnostic characteristics of the Check-KPC ESBL microarray as a confirmation test on isolates obtained in a routine clinical setting have not been determined, we evaluated the microarray in a random selection of 346 clinical isolates with a positive ESBL screen test (MIC >1 mg/L for

  6. Performance Evaluation of an Automated ELISA System for Alzheimer's Disease Detection in Clinical Routine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiasserini, Davide; Biscetti, Leonardo; Farotti, Lucia; Eusebi, Paolo; Salvadori, Nicola; Lisetti, Viviana; Baschieri, Francesca; Chipi, Elena; Frattini, Giulia; Stoops, Erik; Vanderstichele, Hugo; Calabresi, Paolo; Parnetti, Lucilla

    2016-07-22

    The variability of Alzheimer's disease (AD) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers undermines their full-fledged introduction into routine diagnostics and clinical trials. Automation may help to increase precision and decrease operator errors, eventually improving the diagnostic performance. Here we evaluated three new CSF immunoassays, EUROIMMUNtrademark amyloid-β 1-40 (Aβ1-40), amyloid-β 1-42 (Aβ1-42), and total tau (t-tau), in combination with automated analysis of the samples. The CSF biomarkers were measured in a cohort consisting of AD patients (n = 28), mild cognitive impairment (MCI, n = 77), and neurological controls (OND, n = 35). MCI patients were evaluated yearly and cognitive functions were assessed by Mini-Mental State Examination. The patients clinically diagnosed with AD and MCI were classified according to the CSF biomarkers profile following NIA-AA criteria and the Erlangen score. Technical evaluation of the immunoassays was performed together with the calculation of their diagnostic performance. Furthermore, the results for EUROIMMUN Aβ1-42 and t-tau were compared to standard immunoassay methods (INNOTESTtrademark). EUROIMMUN assays for Aβ1-42 and t-tau correlated with INNOTEST (r = 0.83, p ratio measured with EUROIMMUN was the best parameter for AD detection and improved the diagnostic accuracy of Aβ1-42 (area under the curve = 0.93). In MCI patients, the Aβ1-42/Aβ1-40 ratio was associated with cognitive decline and clinical progression to AD.The diagnostic performance of the EUROIMMUN assays with automation is comparable to other currently used methods. The variability of the method and the value of the Aβ1-42/Aβ1-40 ratio in AD diagnosis need to be validated in large multi-center studies.

  7. Evaluation of Elecsys Syphilis Assay for Routine and Blood Screening and Detection of Early Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremastinou, J; Polymerou, V; Lavranos, D; Aranda Arrufat, A; Harwood, J; Martínez Lorenzo, M J; Ng, K P; Queiros, L; Vereb, I; Cusini, M

    2016-09-01

    Treponema pallidum infections can have severe complications if not diagnosed and treated at an early stage. Screening and diagnosis of syphilis require assays with high specificity and sensitivity. The Elecsys Syphilis assay is an automated treponemal immunoassay for the detection of antibodies against T. pallidum The performance of this assay was investigated previously in a multicenter study. The current study expands on that evaluation in a variety of diagnostic settings and patient populations, at seven independent laboratories. The samples included routine diagnostic samples, blood donation samples, samples from patients with confirmed HIV infections, samples from living organ or bone marrow donors, and banked samples, including samples previously confirmed as syphilis positive. This study also investigated the seroconversion sensitivity of the assay. With a total of 1,965 syphilis-negative routine diagnostic samples and 5,792 syphilis-negative samples collected from blood donations, the Elecsys Syphilis assay had specificity values of 99.85% and 99.86%, respectively. With 333 samples previously identified as syphilis positive, the sensitivity was 100% regardless of disease stage. The assay also showed 100% sensitivity and specificity with samples from 69 patients coinfected with HIV. The Elecsys Syphilis assay detected infection in the same bleed or earlier, compared with comparator assays, in a set of sequential samples from a patient with primary syphilis. In archived serial blood samples collected from 14 patients with direct diagnoses of primary syphilis, the Elecsys Syphilis assay detected T. pallidum antibodies for 3 patients for whom antibodies were not detected with the Architect Syphilis TP assay, indicating a trend for earlier detection of infection, which may have the potential to shorten the time between infection and reactive screening test results. Copyright © 2016 Kremastinou et al.

  8. Value of routine investigations to predict loop diuretic down-titration success in stable heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Pieter; Verbrugge, Frederik H; Boonen, Levinia; Nijst, Petra; Dupont, Matthias; Mullens, Wilfried

    2018-01-01

    Guidelines advocate down-titration of loop diuretics in chronic heart failure (CHF) when patients have no signs of volume overload. Limited data are available on the expected success rate of this practice or how routine diagnostic tests might help steering this process. Fifty ambulatory CHF-patients on stable neurohumoral blocker/diuretic therapy for at least 3months without any clinical sign of volume overload were prospectively included to undergo loop diuretic down-titration. All patients underwent a similar pre-down-titration evaluation consisting of a dyspnea scoring, physical examination, transthoracic echocardiography (diastolic function, right ventricular function, cardiac filling pressures and valvular disease), blood sample (serum creatinine, plasma NT-pro-BNP and neurohormones). Loop diuretic maintenance dose was subsequently reduced by 50% or stopped if dose was ≤40mg furosemide equivalents. Successful down-titration was defined as a persistent dose reduction after 30days without weight increase >1.5kg or new-onset symptoms of worsening heart failure. At 30-day follow-up, down-titration was successful in 62% (n=31). In 12/19 patients exhibiting down-titration failure, this occurred within the first week. Physical examination, transthoracic echocardiography and laboratory analysis had limited predictive capability to detect patients with down-titration success/failure (positive likelihood-ratios below 1.5, or area under the curve [AUC] non-statically different from AUC=0.5). Loop diuretic down-titration is feasible in a majority of stable CHF patients in which the treating clinician felt continuation of loops was unnecessary to sustain euvolemia. Importantly, routine diagnostics which suggest euvolemia, have limited diagnostic impact on the post-test probability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of Elecsys Syphilis Assay for Routine and Blood Screening and Detection of Early Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremastinou, J.; Polymerou, V.; Lavranos, D.; Aranda Arrufat, A.; Harwood, J.; Martínez Lorenzo, M. J.; Ng, K. P.; Queiros, L.; Vereb, I.

    2016-01-01

    Treponema pallidum infections can have severe complications if not diagnosed and treated at an early stage. Screening and diagnosis of syphilis require assays with high specificity and sensitivity. The Elecsys Syphilis assay is an automated treponemal immunoassay for the detection of antibodies against T. pallidum. The performance of this assay was investigated previously in a multicenter study. The current study expands on that evaluation in a variety of diagnostic settings and patient populations, at seven independent laboratories. The samples included routine diagnostic samples, blood donation samples, samples from patients with confirmed HIV infections, samples from living organ or bone marrow donors, and banked samples, including samples previously confirmed as syphilis positive. This study also investigated the seroconversion sensitivity of the assay. With a total of 1,965 syphilis-negative routine diagnostic samples and 5,792 syphilis-negative samples collected from blood donations, the Elecsys Syphilis assay had specificity values of 99.85% and 99.86%, respectively. With 333 samples previously identified as syphilis positive, the sensitivity was 100% regardless of disease stage. The assay also showed 100% sensitivity and specificity with samples from 69 patients coinfected with HIV. The Elecsys Syphilis assay detected infection in the same bleed or earlier, compared with comparator assays, in a set of sequential samples from a patient with primary syphilis. In archived serial blood samples collected from 14 patients with direct diagnoses of primary syphilis, the Elecsys Syphilis assay detected T. pallidum antibodies for 3 patients for whom antibodies were not detected with the Architect Syphilis TP assay, indicating a trend for earlier detection of infection, which may have the potential to shorten the time between infection and reactive screening test results. PMID:27358468

  10. [Determinants of task preferences when performance is indicative of individual characteristics: self-assessment motivation and self-verification motivation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numazaki, M; Kudo, E

    1995-04-01

    The present study was conducted to examine determinants of information-gathering behavior with regard to one's own characteristics. Four tasks with different self-congruent and incongruent diagnosticity were presented to subjects. As self-assessment theory predicted, high diagnostic tasks were preferred to low tasks. And as self-verification theory predicted, self-congruent diagnosticity had a stronger effect on task preference than self-incongruent diagnosticity. In addition, subjects who perceived the relevant characteristics important inclined to choose self-assessment behavior more than who did not. Also, subjects who were certain of their self-concept inclined to choose self-verification behavior more than who were not. These results suggest that both self-assessment and self-verification motivations play important roles in information-gathering behavior regarding one's characteristics, and strength of the motivations is determined by the importance of relevant characteristics or the certainty of self-concept.

  11. Parents’ Traditional Cultural Values and Mexican-Origin Young Adults’ Routine Health and Dental Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Updegraff, Kimberly A.; Kuo, Sally I-Chun; McHale, Susan M.; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J.; Wheeler, Lorey A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the prospective associations between Mexican-origin mothers’ and fathers’ traditional cultural values and young adults’ health and dental care utilization and to test the moderating role of youth gender. Methods Mexican-origin parents and youth (N = 246 families) participated in home interviews and provided self-reports of parents’ cultural values (time 1) and young adults’ health status and routine health and dental care (time 2; 5 years later). Logistic regressions tested parents’ traditional cultural values as predictors of routine health and dental care, accounting for parent nativity, parent acculturation, family socioeconomic status, youth gender, youth age, and youth physical health status. We also tested whether youth gender moderated the associations between parents’ cultural values and young adults’ routine care. Results Young adults whose mothers endorsed strong familism values when they were in mid-to-late adolescence were more likely to report at least one routine physician visit in the past year as young adults (odds ratio [OR] = 3.47, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.23–9.83, p = .019). Furthermore, for females only, mothers’ more traditional gender role attitudes predicted reduced odds of receiving routine health (OR = .22; 95% CI: .08–.64, p = .005) and dental care (OR = .26; 95% CI: .09–.75, p = .012) in young adulthood. Conclusions Our findings highlight the importance of examining intragroup variability in culturally specific mechanisms to identify targets for addressing ethnic/racial disparities in health care utilization among Mexican-origin young adults, during a period of increased risk for health-compromising behaviors and reduced access to care. PMID:27988108

  12. Parents' Traditional Cultural Values and Mexican-Origin Young Adults' Routine Health and Dental Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Updegraff, Kimberly A; Kuo, Sally I-Chun; McHale, Susan M; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J; Wheeler, Lorey A

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the prospective associations between Mexican-origin mothers' and fathers' traditional cultural values and young adults' health and dental care utilization and to test the moderating role of youth gender. Mexican-origin parents and youth (N = 246 families) participated in home interviews and provided self-reports of parents' cultural values (time 1) and young adults' health status and routine health and dental care (time 2; 5 years later). Logistic regressions tested parents' traditional cultural values as predictors of routine health and dental care, accounting for parent nativity, parent acculturation, family socioeconomic status, youth gender, youth age, and youth physical health status. We also tested whether youth gender moderated the associations between parents' cultural values and young adults' routine care. Young adults whose mothers endorsed strong familism values when they were in mid-to-late adolescence were more likely to report at least one routine physician visit in the past year as young adults (odds ratio [OR] = 3.47, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.23-9.83, p = .019). Furthermore, for females only, mothers' more traditional gender role attitudes predicted reduced odds of receiving routine health (OR = .22; 95% CI: .08-.64, p = .005) and dental care (OR = .26; 95% CI: .09-.75, p culturally specific mechanisms to identify targets for addressing ethnic/racial disparities in health care utilization among Mexican-origin young adults, during a period of increased risk for health-compromising behaviors and reduced access to care. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms and coeliac disease: no role for routine duodenal biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Peter D; Evans, Kate E; Kurien, Matthew; Hopper, Andrew D; Sanders, David S

    2015-06-01

    Coeliac disease (CD) has been linked to gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). Previous studies have demonstrated an increased prevalence of reflux in patients with CD. However data on the risk for CD in patients presenting with reflux are conflicting. The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of CD in patients with GORD and to elucidate the mechanisms for reflux symptoms in newly diagnosed CD patients. Group A: patients who had undergone routine duodenal biopsy were prospectively recruited between 2004 and 2014. Diagnostic yield was compared with that of a screening cohort. Group B: 32 patients with newly diagnosed CD who had undergone oesophageal manometry and 24-h pH studies were prospectively recruited. Group A: 3368 patients (58.7% female, mean age 53.4 years) underwent routine duodenal biopsy. Of these patients, 850 (25.2%) presented with GORD. The prevalence of CD among GORD patients was 1.3% (0.7-2.4%), which was not significantly higher than that in the general population (P=0.53). Within the context of routine duodenal biopsy at endoscopy (when corrected for concurrent symptoms, age and sex), reflux was found to be negatively associated with CD [adjusted odds ratio 0.12 (0.07-0.23), Preflux. On manometry, 9% had a hypotensive lower oesophageal sphincter and 40.6% had oesophageal motor abnormalities, with 25% significantly hypocontractile. On pH studies, 33% demonstrated reflux episodes. The prevalence of undiagnosed CD among GORD patients is similar to that in the general population, and routine duodenal biopsy cannot be recommended. A significant number of patients with newly diagnosed CD were found to have reflux and/or oesophageal dysmotility on pH/manometry studies; this may explain the high prevalence of reflux symptoms in CD.

  14. Imaging features suggestive of a conjoined nerve root on routine axial MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Su Jin; Lee, Joon Woo; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Gyeongi-do (Korea); Choi, Ja-Young; Hong, Sung Hwan; Kim, Na Ra [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Ki-Jeong; Chung, Sang-Ki; Kim, Hyun-Jib [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Gyeongi-Do (Korea)

    2008-02-15

    The purpose of our study is to evaluate imaging features suggestive of a conjoined nerve root on routine axial MRI. Two radiologists and two surgeons retrospectively reviewed the MRI of three cases in which a conjoined nerve root was discovered during operation and found three suggestive signs on routine axial MR images: ''corner'' (asymmetric morphology of the anterolateral corner of the dural sac), ''fat crescent'' (intervening extradural fat between the asymmetric dura and the nerve root), and ''parallel'' signs (visualization of the entire parallel course of the nerve root at the disc level). Two radiologists prospectively found these signs during routine MRI interpretation sessions over a period of 6 months. If one or a combination of signs were noted on axial MR images, contiguous axial scans were additionally obtained. Three cases that were previously found during operations were also included. Prevalence and confidence scores for each sign were assessed on axial T1- and T2-weighted images. Twelve patients showed one or a combination of the three signs, 9 had contiguous axial MR scans. Five cases were confirmed by operation. The prevalence of the corner, fat crescent, and parallel signs were 12 out of 12 (100%), 6 out of 12 (50%), and 8 out of 12 (67.7%) on axial T1-weighted images. The overall diagnostic confidence was higher on T1- than on T2-weighted images (P < 0.05). On routine axial L-spine MRI, corner, fat crescent, and parallel signs are suggestive of and assist in the recognition of a conjoined nerve root. (orig.)

  15. The diagnostic value of troponin in critically ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voga, Gorazd

    2010-01-01

    Troponin T and I are sensitive and specific markers of myocardial necrosis. They are used for the routine diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome. In critically ill patients they are basic diagnostic tool for diagnosis of myocardial necrosis due to myocardial ischemia. Moreover, the increase of troponin I and T is related with adverse outcome in many subgroups of critically ill patients. The new, high sensitivity tests which have been developed recently allow earlier and more accurate diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome. The use of the new tests has not been studied in critically ill patients, but they will probably replace the old tests and will be used on the routine basis.

  16. Fetal Cholelithiasis: A Diagnostic Update and a Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Triunfo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fetal gallstones and cholelithiasis, detected by routine third trimester ultrasound, have been described in the literature with controversial clinical significance. We report a case of fetal cholelithiasis detected at 35 weeks gestation during a routine scan. The diagnosis was performed using an integrated 2-dimensional (2-D and 3-dimensional (3-D ultrasound approach in order to obtain a better definition of the fetal gallbladder and its content. A neonatal follow-up was achieved. The present study has a twofold purpose: firstly, to update the diagnostic approach using the innovative 3-D modalities and secondly, to review the management of this condition during fetal and postnatal life.

  17. The clinical value of daily routine chest radiographs in a mixed medical-surgical intensive care unit is low.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graat, Marleen E; Choi, Goda; Wolthuis, Esther K; Korevaar, Johanna C; Spronk, Peter E; Stoker, Jaap; Vroom, Margreeth B; Schultz, Marcus J

    2006-02-01

    The clinical value of daily routine chest radiographs (CXRs) in critically ill patients is unknown. We conducted this study to evaluate how frequently unexpected predefined major abnormalities are identified with daily routine CXRs, and how often these findings lead to a change in care for intensive care unit (ICU) patients. This was a prospective observational study conducted in a 28-bed, mixed medical-surgical ICU of a university hospital. Over a 5-month period, 2,457 daily routine CXRs were done in 754 consecutive ICU patients. The majority of these CXRs did not reveal any new predefined major finding. In only 5.8% of daily routine CXRs (14.3% of patients) was one or more new and unexpected abnormality encountered, including large atelectases (24 times in 20 patients), large infiltrates (23 in 22), severe pulmonary congestion (29 in 25), severe pleural effusion (13 in 13), pneumothorax/pneumomediastinum (14 in 13), and malposition of the orotracheal tube (32 in 26). Fewer than half of the CXRs with a new and unexpected finding were ultimately clinically relevant; in only 2.2% of all daily routine CXRs (6.4% of patients) did these radiologic abnormalities result in a change to therapy. Subgroup analysis revealed no differences between medical and surgical patients with regard to the incidence of new and unexpected findings on daily routine CXRs and the effect of new and unexpected CXR findings on daily care. In the ICU, daily routine CXRs seldom reveal unexpected, clinically relevant abnormalities, and they rarely prompt action. We propose that this diagnostic examination be abandoned in ICU patients.

  18. The rapid evolution of molecular genetic diagnostics in neuromuscular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Alexander E; Kubisch, Christian

    2017-10-01

    The development of massively parallel sequencing (MPS) has revolutionized molecular genetic diagnostics in monogenic disorders. The present review gives a brief overview of different MPS-based approaches used in clinical diagnostics of neuromuscular disorders (NMDs) and highlights their advantages and limitations. MPS-based approaches like gene panel sequencing, (whole) exome sequencing, (whole) genome sequencing, and RNA sequencing have been used to identify the genetic cause in NMDs. Although gene panel sequencing has evolved as a standard test for heterogeneous diseases, it is still debated, mainly because of financial issues and unsolved problems of variant interpretation, whether genome sequencing (and to a lesser extent also exome sequencing) of single patients can already be regarded as routine diagnostics. However, it has been shown that the inclusion of parents and additional family members often leads to a substantial increase in the diagnostic yield in exome-wide/genome-wide MPS approaches. In addition, MPS-based RNA sequencing just enters the research and diagnostic scene. Next-generation sequencing increasingly enables the detection of the genetic cause in highly heterogeneous diseases like NMDs in an efficient and affordable way. Gene panel sequencing and family-based exome sequencing have been proven as potent and cost-efficient diagnostic tools. Although clinical validation and interpretation of genome sequencing is still challenging, diagnostic RNA sequencing represents a promising tool to bypass some hurdles of diagnostics using genomic DNA.

  19. Diagnostic grand rounds: A new teaching concept to train diagnostic reasoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stieger, Stefan; Praschinger, Andrea; Kletter, Kurt; Kainberger, Franz

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Diagnostic reasoning is a core skill in teaching and learning in undergraduate curricula. Diagnostic grand rounds (DGRs) as a subform of grand rounds are intended to train the students' skills in the selection of appropriate tests and in the interpretation of test results. The aim of this study was to test DGRs for their ability to improve diagnostic reasoning by using a pre-post-test design. Methods: During one winter term, all 398 fifth-year students (36.1% male, 63.9% female) solved 23 clinical cases presented in 8 DGRs. In an online questionnaire, a Diagnostic Thinking Inventory (DTI) with 41 items was evaluated for flexibility in thinking and structure of knowledge in memory. Results were correlated with those from a summative multiple-choice knowledge test and of the learning objectives in a logbook. Results: The students' DTI scores in the post-test were significantly higher than those reported in the pre-test. DTI scores at either testing time did not correlate with medical knowledge as assessed by a multiple-choice knowledge test. Abilities acquired during clinical clerkships as documented in a logbook could only account for a small proportion of the increase in the flexibility subscale score. This effect still remained significant after accounting for potential confounders. Conclusion: Establishing DGRs proofed to be an effective way of successfully improving both students' diagnostic reasoning and the ability to select the appropriate test method in routine clinical practice.

  20. Diagnostic grand rounds: A new teaching concept to train diagnostic reasoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stieger, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.stieger@univie.ac.at [Department of Basic Psychological Research, School of Psychology, University of Vienna, Liebiggasse 5, A-1010 Vienna (Austria); Praschinger, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.praschinger@meduniwien.ac.at [Core Unit for Medical Education (BEMAW), Medical University of Vienna, Spitalgasse 23, BT87, P.O. 10, A-1097 Vienna (Austria); Kletter, Kurt, E-mail: kurt.kletter@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Nuclear Medicine, General Hospital of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Kainberger, Franz, E-mail: franz.kainberger@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, General Hospital of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2011-06-15

    Introduction: Diagnostic reasoning is a core skill in teaching and learning in undergraduate curricula. Diagnostic grand rounds (DGRs) as a subform of grand rounds are intended to train the students' skills in the selection of appropriate tests and in the interpretation of test results. The aim of this study was to test DGRs for their ability to improve diagnostic reasoning by using a pre-post-test design. Methods: During one winter term, all 398 fifth-year students (36.1% male, 63.9% female) solved 23 clinical cases presented in 8 DGRs. In an online questionnaire, a Diagnostic Thinking Inventory (DTI) with 41 items was evaluated for flexibility in thinking and structure of knowledge in memory. Results were correlated with those from a summative multiple-choice knowledge test and of the learning objectives in a logbook. Results: The students' DTI scores in the post-test were significantly higher than those reported in the pre-test. DTI scores at either testing time did not correlate with medical knowledge as assessed by a multiple-choice knowledge test. Abilities acquired during clinical clerkships as documented in a logbook could only account for a small proportion of the increase in the flexibility subscale score. This effect still remained significant after accounting for potential confounders. Conclusion: Establishing DGRs proofed to be an effective way of successfully improving both students' diagnostic reasoning and the ability to select the appropriate test method in routine clinical practice.

  1. Comparison of clinical judgment and diagnostic ultrasonography in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahn, H; Mathiesen, F K; Neckelmann, K

    1997-01-01

    , and diagnostic aids are desirable to reduce the negative appendicectomy rate. Diagnostic US performed poorly as a routine procedure. Application of an up to date scoring system might be of some help to patients with a high or low probability of acute appendicitis, but any conclusion about its clinical......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of clinical judgment and diagnostic ultrasonography (US) used routinely and to create a scoring system to aid diagnosis. DESIGN: Prospective, double-blind study. SETTING: University hospital, Denmark. SUBJECTS: 222 Consecutive patients suspected...... of having acute appendicitis admitted between 0800 and midnight from June 1990 to June 1992. INTERVENTIONS: 148 Patients (67%) underwent appendicectomy and the remaining 74 patients were observed. 193 Patients (87%) had a diagnostic US examination. 21 Predictive variables were collected prospectively...

  2. Is routine karyotyping required in prenatal samples with a molecular or metabolic referral?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kooper Angelique JA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As a routine, karyotyping of invasive prenatal samples is performed as an adjunct to referrals for DNA mutation detection and metabolic testing. We performed a retrospective study on 500 samples to assess the diagnostic value of this procedure. These samples included 454 (90.8% chorionic villus (CV and 46 (9.2% amniocenteses specimens. For CV samples karyotyping was based on analyses of both short-term culture (STC and long-term culture (LTC cells. Overall, 19 (3.8% abnormal karyotypes were denoted: four with a common aneuploidy (trisomy 21, 18 and 13, two with a sex chromosomal aneuploidy (Klinefelter syndrome, one with a sex chromosome mosaicism and twelve with various autosome mosaicisms. In four cases a second invasive test was performed because of an abnormal finding in the STC. Taken together, we conclude that STC and LTC karyotyping has resulted in a diagnostic yield of 19 (3.8% abnormal cases, including 12 cases (2.4% with an uncertain significance. From a diagnostic point of view, it is desirable to limit uncertain test results as secondary test findings. Therefore, we recommend a more targeted assay, such as e.g. QF-PCR, as a replacement of the STC and to provide parents the autonomy to choose between karyotyping and QF-PCR.

  3. Cable Diagnostic Focused Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartlein, R.A.; Hampton, R.N.

    2010-12-30

    This report summarizes an extensive effort made to understand how to effectively use the various diagnostic technologies to establish the condition of medium voltage underground cable circuits. These circuits make up an extensive portion of the electric delivery infrastructure in the United States. Much of this infrastructure is old and experiencing unacceptable failure rates. By deploying efficient diagnostic testing programs, electric utilities can replace or repair circuits that are about to fail, providing an optimal approach to improving electric system reliability. This is an intrinsically complex topic. Underground cable systems are not homogeneous. Cable circuits often contain multiple branches with different cable designs and a range of insulation materials. In addition, each insulation material ages differently as a function of time, temperature and operating environment. To complicate matters further, there are a wide variety of diagnostic technologies available for assessing the condition of cable circuits with a diversity of claims about the effectiveness of each approach. As a result, the benefits of deploying cable diagnostic testing programs have been difficult to establish, leading many utilities to avoid the their use altogether. This project was designed to help address these issues. The information provided is the result of a collaborative effort between Georgia Tech NEETRAC staff, Georgia Tech academic faculty, electric utility industry participants, as well as cable system diagnostic testing service providers and test equipment providers. Report topics include: •How cable systems age and fail, •The various technologies available for detecting potential failure sites, •The advantages and disadvantages of different diagnostic technologies, •Different approaches for utilities to employ cable system diagnostics. The primary deliverables of this project are this report, a Cable Diagnostic Handbook (a subset of this report) and an online

  4. Severe oligohydramnios with intact membranes: an indication for diagnostic amnioinfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryde, P G; Hallak, M; Lauria, M R; Littman, L; Bottoms, S F; Johnson, M P; Evans, M I

    2000-01-01

    To quantify the improvement in ultrasonographic fetal imaging following diagnostic amnioinfusion for the indication of unexplained midtrimester oligohydramnios. Patients referred for unexplained midtrimester oligohydramnios were retrospectively reviewed. Videotapes of those undergoing diagnostic antenatal amnioinfusion were analyzed for quality of visualization of routinely imaged structures before and after the infusion procedure. The overall rate of adequate visualization of fetal structures improved from 50.98 to 76.79% (p amnioinfusion can facilitate fetal imaging and increase diagnostic precision in the setting of unexplained severe oligohydramnios. We have quantified the improvement in the rate of optimal visualization of fetal structures which likely translates, in experienced hands, into this observed improved diagnostic precision. Of particular importance is the improvement in appreciation of associated anomalies in cases of obstructive uropathy in which such findings may determine whether or not invasive fetal therapy is indicated. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Single-cell proteomics: potential implications for cancer diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavasso, Sonia; Gullaksen, Stein-Erik; Skavland, Jørn; Gjertsen, Bjørn T

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell proteomics in cancer is evolving and promises to provide more accurate diagnoses based on detailed molecular features of cells within tumors. This review focuses on technologies that allow for collection of complex data from single cells, but also highlights methods that are adaptable to routine cancer diagnostics. Current diagnostics rely on histopathological analysis, complemented by mutational detection and clinical imaging. Though crucial, the information gained is often not directly transferable to defined therapeutic strategies, and predicting therapy response in a patient is difficult. In cancer, cellular states revealed through perturbed intracellular signaling pathways can identify functional mutations recurrent in cancer subsets. Single-cell proteomics remains to be validated in clinical trials where serial samples before and during treatment can reveal excessive clonal evolution and therapy failure; its use in clinical trials is anticipated to ignite a diagnostic revolution that will better align diagnostics with the current biological understanding of cancer.

  6. Evidence and diagnostic reporting in the IHE context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loef, Cor; Truyen, Roel

    2005-05-01

    Capturing clinical observations and findings during the diagnostic imaging process is increasingly becoming a critical step in diagnostic reporting. Standards developers-notably HL7 and DICOM-are making significant progress toward standards that enable exchanging clinical observations and findings among the various information systems of the healthcare enterprise. DICOM-like the HL7 Clinical Document Architecture (CDA) -uses templates and constrained, coded vocabulary (SNOMED, LOINC, etc.). Such a representation facilitates automated software recognition of findings and observations, intrapatient comparison, correlation to norms, and outcomes research. The scope of DICOM Structured Reporting (SR) includes many findings that products routinely create in digital form (measurements, computed estimates, etc.). In the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) framework, two Integration Profiles are defined for clinical data capture and diagnostic reporting: Evidence Document, and Simple Image and Numeric Report. This report describes these two DICOM SR-based integration profiles in the diagnostic reporting process.

  7. Plasma diagnostic reflectometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.I.; Afeyan, B.B.; Garrison, J.C.; Kaiser, T.B.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Domier, C.W.; Chou, A.E.; Baang, S.

    1996-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies of plasma diagnostic reflectometry have been undertaken as a collaborative research project between the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the University of California Department of Applied Science Plasma Diagnostics Group under the auspices of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at LLNL. Theoretical analyses have explored the basic principles of reflectometry to understand its limitations, to address specific gaps in the understanding of reflectometry measurements in laboratory experiments, and to explore extensions of reflectometry such as ultra-short-pulse reflectometry. The theory has supported basic laboratory reflectometry experiments where reflectometry measurements can be corroborated by independent diagnostic measurements

  8. Various dedicated imaging systems for routine nuclear medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bela Kari; Tamas Gyorke; Erno Mako; Laszlo Nagy; Jozsef Turak; Oszkar Partos

    2004-01-01

    The most essential problems of nuclear medical imaging are resolution, signal/noise ratio (S/N) and sensitivity. Nowadays, the vast majority of the Anger system gamma cameras in clinical application are using parallel projection. The main problem of this projection method is the highly dependence of the image quality on the distance from the collimator surface as well as any improvement in the resolution with the distance -i.e. reduction of image blur- significantly reduces sensitivity. The aim of our research and development work was to create imaging geometry, collimator and detector constructions optimized to particular organs (brain, heart, thyroid), where it is simultaneously possible to increase the resolution and sensitivity. Main concept of the imaging geometry construction is based on the size, location and shape of a particular organ. In case of brain SPECT imaging a multiple head (4 heads in cylinder symmetric approximation) arrangement with extra high intrinsic resolution (<2.5 mm) dedicated detector design provide feasible solution for routine clinical application. The imaging system was essentially designed for Tc-99m and I-123 isotopes. The application field can be easily extended for functional small animal research and new born baby studies. Very positive feedbacks were received from both technical (stability and reproducibility of the technical parameters) and clinical sides in the past 2 years routine applications. A unique, novel conception ultra compact dedicated dual head SPECT system has been created only for 2D, 3D nuclear cardiac applications for Tc-99m and T1-201 labeled radio-pharmaceuticals. The two rectangular detectors (with <2.6 mm intrinsic resolution) are mounted fix in 90 degree geometry and move inside the special formed gantry arrangement. The unique and unusual gantry is designed to keep the detector heads as close as possible to the patient, while the patient is not exposed by any moving part. This special construction also

  9. Evaluation of a direct immunofluorescent antibody (difma test using Leishmania genus - specific monoclonal antibody in the routine diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha E. Chico

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available A direct immunofluorescent antibody (DIFMA test using a Leishmania genus- specific monoclonal antibody was evaluated in the routine diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL in Ecuador. This test was compared with the standard diagnostic techniques of scrapings, culture and histology. Diagnostic samples were taken from a total of 90 active dermal ulcers from patients from areas of Ecuador known to be endemic for cutaneous leishmaniasis. DIFMA was positive in all lesions. It was shown to be significantly superior to standard diagnostic methods either alone or in combination. The sensitivity of DIFMA did not diminish with chronicity of lesions. This test proved to be extremely useful in the routine diagnosis of CL because it is highly sensitive, is easy to use and produces rapid results.

  10. Verification and quality control of routine hematology analyzers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis, J Y; Huisman, A

    2016-01-01

    Verification of hematology analyzers (automated blood cell counters) is mandatory before new hematology analyzers may be used in routine clinical care. The verification process consists of several items which comprise among others: precision, accuracy, comparability, carryover, background and

  11. ORGANIZATIONAL ROUTINES IN RUSSIAN COMPANIES: REVIEW OF PRACTICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Valieva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Results of the first stage of the researches conducted in 2012-2013 are presented in article. Researches are connected with studying of transformational processes intra corporate of managemetn practices in the Russian companies and their subsequent institutionalization. Preliminary results showed that in the companies there is a standard set of organizational routines which part are information, and administrative routines, routines of the power of the founder, genetic, institutional and development routines. During research statistically significant connection between types of organizational structures, the sizes of the organization, information processing and administrative practices is established. It is revealed as change of approaches to management of the organization can affect a corruption component.

  12. Evaluation of Eigenvalue Routines for Large Scale Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Tischler

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available The NASA structural analysis (NASTRAN∗ program is one of the most extensively used engineering applications software in the world. It contains a wealth of matrix operations and numerical solution techniques, and they were used to construct efficient eigenvalue routines. The purpose of this article is to examine the current eigenvalue routines in NASTRAN and to make efficiency comparisons with a more recent implementation of the block Lanczos aLgorithm. This eigenvalue routine is now availabLe in several mathematics libraries as well as in severaL commerciaL versions of NASTRAN. In addition, the eRA Y library maintains a modified version of this routine on their network. Several example problems, with a varying number of degrees of freedom, were selected primarily for efficiency bench-marking. Accuracy is not an issue, because they all gave comparable results. The block Lanczos algorithm was found to be extremely efficient, particularly for very large problems.

  13. Routine hemoglobin electrophoresis for pediatric surgery day case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-09-25

    Sep 25, 2015 ... 2016 Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow ... surgery day case in at-risk populations: Suggested algorithm for screening .... HBE is a routine preoperative investigation before a surgical ...

  14. Unsupervised daily routine and activity discovery in smart homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie Yin; Qing Zhang; Karunanithi, Mohan

    2015-08-01

    The ability to accurately recognize daily activities of residents is a core premise of smart homes to assist with remote health monitoring. Most of the existing methods rely on a supervised model trained from a preselected and manually labeled set of activities, which are often time-consuming and costly to obtain in practice. In contrast, this paper presents an unsupervised method for discovering daily routines and activities for smart home residents. Our proposed method first uses a Markov chain to model a resident's locomotion patterns at different times of day and discover clusters of daily routines at the macro level. For each routine cluster, it then drills down to further discover room-level activities at the micro level. The automatic identification of daily routines and activities is useful for understanding indicators of functional decline of elderly people and suggesting timely interventions.

  15. User's Manual: Routines for Radiative Heat Transfer and Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risch, Timothy K.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the intensity and spectral distribution of radiation emanating from a heated surface has applications in many areas of science and engineering. Areas of research in which the quantification of spectral radiation is used routinely include thermal radiation heat transfer, infrared signature analysis, and radiation thermometry. In the analysis of radiation, it is helpful to be able to predict the radiative intensity and the spectral distribution of the emitted energy. Presented in this report is a set of routines written in Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington) and incorporating functions specific to Microsoft Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington) that are useful for predicting the radiative behavior of heated surfaces. These routines include functions for calculating quantities of primary importance to engineers and scientists. In addition, the routines also provide the capability to use such information to determine surface temperatures from spectral intensities and for calculating the sensitivity of the surface temperature measurements to unknowns in the input parameters.

  16. Use of WGS in Mycobacterium tuberculosis routine diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela M Cirillo

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: WGS is a rapid, cost-effective technique that promises to integrate and replace the other tests in routine laboratories for an accurate diagnosis of DR-TB, although it is suitable nowadays for cultured samples only.

  17. Family routines within the ecological niche: An analysis of the psychological well-being of U.S. caregivers of children with disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Ann Larson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Using mixed methods, this study examined the relationship of caregivers of children with disabilities’ psychological well-being and their orchestration of daily routines within their ecological niche. Thirty-nine U.S. caregivers completed in-depth interviews, Psychological Well-being Scales (PWB, and Family Time and Routines Index (FTRI. We used a multi-step analysis. Interview data was coded and vignettes created without knowledge of PWB and FTRI ratings. Next, the relationship of quantitative measures was analyzed. Four groups were created using FTRI-extent and PWB means: (1 low routine-low PWB, (2 low routine-high PWB, (3 high routine-low PWB, and (4 high routine-high PWB. We examined qualitative differences in key features between groups. Findings: Total PWB and FTRI scores were not significantly correlated, PWB Purpose in Life and FTRI-extent scores were moderately positively correlated, and PWB Environmental Mastery and FTRI-extent correlation approached significance. Qualitative findings describe caregivers’ structuring of routines, intensity of oversight, support in routines, management of dinner, paid work, and needs for respite. The four groups differed in paid work, household support, degree the child could self-occupy, Environmental Mastery, and opportunities to recuperate. Caregivers with higher levels of well-being and more regular routines did paid work, had supportive spouses, had children who more often could follow routines, had higher Environmental Mastery, could orchestrate a family meal, and had breaks from care in either work or leisure. All Native American caregivers and Mexican American caregivers with spouses were in the high routine-high PWB group. Insight into this complex negotiation between family members within daily routines may provide practitioners a better understanding of how to work within family circles to foster therapeutic alliances, identify focused intervention targets, and promote positive family

  18. [Analysis of correlative factors of sterility in males undergoing routine sperm inspection by masturbation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Liyuan; Shi, Xiaobo; Wang, Xin; Liu, Dan

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the factors influencing sterility in males undergoing routine sperm inspection by masturbation. Scales for demographic data, self-compiled infertility questionnaire, Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90) , and sexual life subscale of Olson Marital Quality Questionnaire (ENRICH) were assessed in 220 cases of sterility in males who had undergone sperm examination after ejaculation. The total SCL-90 scores and the factor scores of anxiety, phobia, somatization, obsessive compulsive behavior, interpersonal-sensitivity, hostility, and depression were significantly higher than the norm (Pmasturbation have negative emotions such as anxiety, phobia, somatization, and interpersonal sensitivities. The defective ejaculation may be the influential factor at the stage.

  19. Radioprotective shield - an adequate radioprotective device for routine stomatological radiodiagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiltschke, F [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Univ., Greifswald (German Democratic Republic); Taschner, P; Koenig, W; Menzel, B [Staatliches Amt fuer Atomsicherheit und Strahlenschutz, Berlin (German Democratic Republic)

    1975-01-01

    Starting from the shortcomings of the radioprotective devices at present used in routine stomatological radiodiagnosis, the authors describe the advantages of a radioprotective shield which has been produced in the Greifswald University Stomatological Clinic. On the basis of dosimetric studies, the National Board for Nuclear Safety and Radiological Protection of the GDR (Staatliches Amt fuer Atomsicherheit und Strahlenschutz der DDR) could demonstrate the suitability of this shield as a radioprotective device for routine stomatological radiodiagnosis.

  20. Equipment recommendations for uniform work places for routine stomatological radiodiagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rother, U [Rostock Univ. (German Democratic Republic). Radiologische Klinik; Taschner, P [Staatliches Amt fuer Atomsicherheit und Strahlenschutz, Berlin (German Democratic Republic); Wiltschke, F; Tonne, E; Kuehling, U; Nenning, K

    1977-03-01

    Corresponding to the different objectives, the Working Group on Radiology of the Stomatological Society has designed 6 standardized work places for routine radiodiagnosis in stomatology. Apart from the objectives, the problems related to the division of rooms, equipment, radioprotection and film processing are dealt with separately and specifically. The work places for routine stomatological radiodiagnosis are intended for achieving an improvement in a sector of stomatological care.

  1. Novel structuring routines of titania films for application in photovoltaics

    OpenAIRE

    Niedermeier, Martin A.

    2014-01-01

    Novel routines to structure titania thin films on various length scales are investigated regarding photovoltaic applications. The main focus of the investigations lies on the custom-tailoring of the morphologies of the titania films using sol-gel chemistry in combination with block copolymer templating. Additionally, a low-temperature routine for functional hybrid films as well as the growth of gold as electrode material on top of an organic hole-conductor are investigated. Im Hinblick auf...

  2. Non-routine activities in RP Group in 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefert, M.; Stevenson, G.R.

    1996-01-01

    The activities not directly concerned with the daily routine, but nevertheless essential to ensure a steady progress in radiation protection at CERN, concern mostly tests and intercomparisons of existing methods (quality control), development of new ideas, methods, and instruments. New projects, another non-routine activity, require in most cases profound studies to prove their feasibility with respect to radiation protection requirements. All these activities are documented in Divisional Reports, Internal Reports and Technical Memoranda, and are listed

  3. Cyclotrons, radionuclides, precursors, and demands for routine versus research compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, A.P.

    1984-01-01

    Accelerators for producing commonly used short-lived positron emitters for positron emission tomography are addressed in the context of their use for the preparation of labeled compounds for research and routine biomedical applications. Progress and direction in the preparation and use of radiotracers for studies of the brain are discussed. Advancement to complete automation is stressed as an important factor for the eventual use of positron emission tomography as a routine clinical tool in universities and major medical centers

  4. IONEOS: a fast, analytic, ion equation-of-state routine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cranfill, C.W.; More, R.

    1978-10-01

    A routine IONEOS has been developed to compute ion pressure and specific energy along with their derivatives. The theoretical model used is due to R.D. Cowan and includes non-ideal-gas behavior. The routine is designed for use in large hydrodynamics codes as an improved procedure for splitting the total pressure and specific energy (which are usually tabulated) into ion and electron components

  5. Understanding teachers’ routines to inform classroom technology design

    OpenAIRE

    An, P.; Bakker, S.; Eggen, J.H.

    2017-01-01

    Secondary school teachers have quite busy and complex routines in their classrooms. However, present classroom technologies usually require focused attention from teachers while being interacted with, which restricts their use in teachers’ daily routines. Peripheral interaction is a human-computer interaction style that aims to enable interaction to take place both in the center and periphery of users’ attention and naturally shift between the two. We believe that classroom technologies emplo...

  6. Adoption of routine telemedicine in Norway: the current picture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanaboni, Paolo; Knarvik, Undine; Wootton, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Background Telemedicine appears to be ready for wider adoption. Although existing research evidence is useful, the adoption of routine telemedicine in healthcare systems has been slow. Objective We conducted a study to explore the current use of routine telemedicine in Norway, at national, regional, and local levels, to provide objective and up-to-date information and to estimate the potential for wider adoption of telemedicine. Design A top-down approach was used to collect official data on the national use of telemedicine from the Norwegian Patient Register. A bottom-up approach was used to collect complementary information on the routine use of telemedicine through a survey conducted at the five largest publicly funded hospitals. Results Results show that routine telemedicine has been adopted in all health regions in Norway and in 68% of hospitals. Despite being widely adopted, the current level of use of telemedicine is low compared to the number of face-to-face visits. Examples of routine telemedicine can be found in several clinical specialties. Most services connect different hospitals in secondary care, and they are mostly delivered as teleconsultations via videoconference. Conclusions Routine telemedicine in Norway has been widely adopted, probably for geographical reasons, as in other settings. However, the level of use of telemedicine in Norway is rather low, and it has significant potential for further development as an alternative to face-to-face outpatient visits. This study is a first attempt to map routine telemedicine at regional, institutional, and clinical levels, and it provides useful information to understand the adoption of telemedicine in routine healthcare and to measure change in future updates. PMID:24433942

  7. Diagnostics of vector magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenflo, J. O.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that the vector magnetic fields derived from observations with a filter magnetograph will be severely distorted if the spatially unresolved magnetic structure is not properly accounted for. Thus the apparent vector field will appear much more horizontal than it really is, but this distortion is strongly dependent on the area factor and the temperature line weakenings. As the available fluxtube models are not sufficiently well determined, it is not possible to correct the filter magnetograph observations for these effects in a reliable way, although a crude correction is of course much better than no correction at all. The solution to this diagnostic problem is to observe simultaneously in suitable combinations of spectral lines, and/or use Stokes line profiles recorded with very high spectral resolution. The diagnostic power of using a Fourier transform spectrometer for polarimetry is shown and some results from I and V spectra are illustrated. The line asymmetries caused by mass motions inside the fluxtubes adds an extra complication to the diagnostic problem, in particular as there are indications that the motions are nonstationary in nature. The temperature structure appears to be a function of fluxtube diameter, as a clear difference between plage and network fluxtubes was revealed. The divergence of the magnetic field with height plays an essential role in the explanation of the Stokes V asymmetries (in combination with the mass motions). A self consistent treatment of the subarcsec field geometry may be required to allow an accurate derivation of the spatially averaged vector magnetic field from spectrally resolved data.

  8. Equipment for radiation diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschunt, E.; Platz, W.

    1976-01-01

    The invention relates to an improvement of the line type of the plotter in an X-ray diagnostics apparatus enabling the production of distinguishable recordings by means of a single plot type. The construction is described explicitly. (UWI) [de

  9. National Convective Weather Diagnostic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current convective hazards identified by the National Convective Weather Detection algorithm. The National Convective Weather Diagnostic (NCWD) is an automatically...

  10. Diagnostic radiology: I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    This chapter describes the historic development of diagnostic equipment for radiology. The problems associated with fluoroscope design are detailed and the current uses of updated technology, particularly digitization, are considered. Numerous historical photographs are included. 13 refs

  11. Prenatal Genetic Diagnostic Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are available for many inherited disorders. The main disadvantage is that diagnostic testing carries a very small ... chromosomes, arranged in order of size. Microarray: A technology that examines all of a person’s genes to ...

  12. Molecular diagnostics of periodontitis

    OpenAIRE

    Izabela Korona-Głowniak; Radosław Siwiec; Marcin Berger; Anna Malm; Jolanta Szymańska

    2017-01-01

    The microorganisms that form dental plaque are the main cause of periodontitis. Their identification and the understanding of the complex relationships and interactions that involve these microorganisms, environmental factors and the host’s health status enable improvement in diagnostics and targeted therapy in patients with periodontitis. To this end, molecular diagnostics techniques (both techniques based on the polymerase chain reaction and those involving nucleic acid analysis via hybridi...

  13. Electroencephalography as a diagnostic technique for canine neurological diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wrzosek Marcin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalography (EEG is a non-invasive examination method for the assessment of functional central nervous system (CNS disturbances. In human medicine it has a special importance as a diagnostic tool for epilepsy. Although many studies were done on the use of EEG for diagnostics of canine central nervous system disorders, the technique is still not applied routinely. The purpose of this paper was to review the use of the electroencephalography in canine neurological disorders of central nervous system diagnosis and assess the future perspectives of this technique in veterinary medicine.

  14. Progress in diagnostic techniques for SC [superconducting] cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reece, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    Despite the very real progress that has been made, the routine performance of superconducting cavities still falls far short of both the theoretical expectations and the performance of afew exceptional examples. It is the task of systematically applied diagnostic techniques to reveal additional information concerning the response of superconducting surfaces to applied RF fields. In this paper we will direct our attention to discussions of recent developments in diagnostic techniqeus, such as thermometry in superfluid helium, and scanning laser acoustic microscopy. 18 refs., 12 figs

  15. Optics/Optical Diagnostics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Optics/Optical Diagnostics Laboratory supports graduate instruction in optics, optical and laser diagnostics and electro-optics. The optics laboratory provides...

  16. Reference values for generic instruments used in routine outcome monitoring: the leiden routine outcome monitoring study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulte-van Maaren Yvonne WM

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI, Mood & Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire −30 (MASQ-D30, Short Form Health Survey 36 (SF-36, and Dimensional Assessment of Personality Pathology-Short Form (DAPP-SF are generic instruments that can be used in Routine Outcome Monitoring (ROM of patients with common mental disorders. We aimed to generate reference values usually encountered in 'healthy' and ‘psychiatrically ill’ populations to facilitate correct interpretation of ROM results. Methods We included the following specific reference populations: 1294 subjects from the general population (ROM reference group recruited through general practitioners, and 5269 psychiatric outpatients diagnosed with mood, anxiety, or somatoform (MAS disorders (ROM patient group. The outermost 5% of observations were used to define limits for one-sided reference intervals (95th percentiles for BSI, MASQ-D30 and DAPP-SF, and 5th percentiles for SF-36 subscales. Internal consistency and Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC analyses were performed. Results Mean age for the ROM reference group was 40.3 years (SD=12.6 and 37.7 years (SD=12.0 for the ROM patient group. The proportion of females was 62.8% and 64.6%, respectively. The mean for cut-off values of healthy individuals was 0.82 for the BSI subscales, 23 for the three MASQ-D30 subscales, 45 for the SF-36 subscales, and 3.1 for the DAPP-SF subscales. Discriminative power of the BSI, MASQ-D30 and SF-36 was good, but it was poor for the DAPP-SF. For all instruments, the internal consistency of the subscales ranged from adequate to excellent. Discussion and conclusion Reference values for the clinical interpretation were provided for the BSI, MASQ-D30, SF-36, and DAPP-SF. Clinical information aided by ROM data may represent the best means to appraise the clinical state of psychiatric outpatients.

  17. What is the added value of combined core biopsy and fine needle aspiration in the diagnostic process of renal tumours?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barwari, K.; Kümmerlin, I.P.E.D.; Ten Kate, F.J.; Algaba, F.; Trias, I.; Wijkstra, H.; Rosette, de la J.J.M.C.H.; Laguna, M.P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Non-diagnostic results still hinder the routine use of core biopsy (CB) and fine needle aspiration (FNA) in the diagnostic process of renal tumours. Furthermore, substantial interobserver variability has been reported. We assessed the added value of combining the results of CB and FNA by

  18. What is the added value of combined core biopsy and fine needle aspiration in the diagnostic process of renal tumours?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barwari, K.; Kummerlin, I. P.; ten Kate, F. J.; Algaba, F.; Trias, I.; Wijkstra, H.; de la Rosette, J. J.; Laguna, P.

    2013-01-01

    Non-diagnostic results still hinder the routine use of core biopsy (CB) and fine needle aspiration (FNA) in the diagnostic process of renal tumours. Furthermore, substantial interobserver variability has been reported. We assessed the added value of combining the results of CB and FNA by five

  19. Self-Care through Self-Compassion: A Balm for Burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coaston, Susannah C.

    2017-01-01

    Counselors are routinely exposed to painful situations and overwhelming emotions that can, over time, result in burnout. Although counselors routinely promote self-care, many struggle to practice such wellness regularly, putting themselves at increased risk for burning out. Compassion is essential to the helper's role, as it allows counselors to…

  20. Impact of routine cerebral CT angiography on treatment decisions in infective endocarditis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwa Sayed Meshaal

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis (IE is commonly complicated by cerebral embolization and hemorrhage secondary to intracranial mycotic aneurysms (ICMAs. These complications are associated with poor outcome and may require diagnostic and therapeutic plans to be modified. However, routine screening by brain CT and CT angiography (CTA is not standard practice. We aimed to study the impact of routine cerebral CTA on treatment decisions for patients with IE.From July 2007 to December 2012, we prospectively recruited 81 consecutive patients with definite left-sided IE according to modified Duke's criteria. All patients had routine brain CTA conducted within one week of admission. All patients with ICMA underwent four-vessel conventional angiography. Invasive treatment was performed for ruptured aneurysms, aneurysms ≥ 5 mm, and persistent aneurysms despite appropriate therapy. Surgical clipping was performed for leaking aneurysms if not amenable to intervention.The mean age was 30.43 ± 8.8 years and 60.5% were males. Staph aureus was the most common organism (32.3%. Among the patients, 37% had underlying rheumatic heart disease, 26% had prosthetic valves, 23.5% developed IE on top of a structurally normal heart and 8.6% had underlying congenital heart disease. Brain CT/CTA revealed that 51 patients had evidence of cerebral embolization, of them 17 were clinically silent. Twenty-six patients (32% had ICMA, of whom 15 were clinically silent. Among the patients with ICMAs, 11 underwent endovascular treatment and 2 underwent neurovascular surgery. The brain CTA findings prompted different treatment choices in 21 patients (25.6%. The choices were aneurysm treatment before cardiac surgery rather than at follow-up, valve replacement by biological valve instead of mechanical valve, and withholding anticoagulation in patients with prosthetic valve endocarditis for fear of aneurysm rupture.Routine brain CT/CTA resulted in changes in the treatment plan in a significant

  1. Real-Time Whole-Genome Sequencing for Routine Typing, Surveillance, and Outbreak Detection of Verotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheutz, Flemming; Lund, Ole; Hasman, Henrik; Kaas, Rolf S.; Nielsen, Eva M.; Aarestrup, Frank M.

    2014-01-01

    Fast and accurate identification and typing of pathogens are essential for effective surveillance and outbreak detection. The current routine procedure is based on a variety of techniques, making the procedure laborious, time-consuming, and expensive. With whole-genome sequencing (WGS) becoming cheaper, it has huge potential in both diagnostics and routine surveillance. The aim of this study was to perform a real-time evaluation of WGS for routine typing and surveillance of verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC). In Denmark, the Statens Serum Institut (SSI) routinely receives all suspected VTEC isolates. During a 7-week period in the fall of 2012, all incoming isolates were concurrently subjected to WGS using IonTorrent PGM. Real-time bioinformatics analysis was performed using web-tools (www.genomicepidemiology.org) for species determination, multilocus sequence type (MLST) typing, and determination of phylogenetic relationship, and a specific VirulenceFinder for detection of E. coli virulence genes was developed as part of this study. In total, 46 suspected VTEC isolates were characterized in parallel during the study. VirulenceFinder proved successful in detecting virulence genes included in routine typing, explicitly verocytotoxin 1 (vtx1), verocytotoxin 2 (vtx2), and intimin (eae), and also detected additional virulence genes. VirulenceFinder is also a robust method for assigning verocytotoxin (vtx) subtypes. A real-time clustering of isolates in agreement with the epidemiology was established from WGS, enabling discrimination between sporadic and outbreak isolates. Overall, WGS typing produced results faster and at a lower cost than the current routine. Therefore, WGS typing is a superior alternative to conventional typing strategies. This approach may also be applied to typing and surveillance of other pathogens. PMID:24574290

  2. Real-time whole-genome sequencing for routine typing, surveillance, and outbreak detection of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joensen, Katrine Grimstrup; Scheutz, Flemming; Lund, Ole; Hasman, Henrik; Kaas, Rolf S; Nielsen, Eva M; Aarestrup, Frank M

    2014-05-01

    Fast and accurate identification and typing of pathogens are essential for effective surveillance and outbreak detection. The current routine procedure is based on a variety of techniques, making the procedure laborious, time-consuming, and expensive. With whole-genome sequencing (WGS) becoming cheaper, it has huge potential in both diagnostics and routine surveillance. The aim of this study was to perform a real-time evaluation of WGS for routine typing and surveillance of verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC). In Denmark, the Statens Serum Institut (SSI) routinely receives all suspected VTEC isolates. During a 7-week period in the fall of 2012, all incoming isolates were concurrently subjected to WGS using IonTorrent PGM. Real-time bioinformatics analysis was performed using web-tools (www.genomicepidemiology.org) for species determination, multilocus sequence type (MLST) typing, and determination of phylogenetic relationship, and a specific VirulenceFinder for detection of E. coli virulence genes was developed as part of this study. In total, 46 suspected VTEC isolates were characterized in parallel during the study. VirulenceFinder proved successful in detecting virulence genes included in routine typing, explicitly verocytotoxin 1 (vtx1), verocytotoxin 2 (vtx2), and intimin (eae), and also detected additional virulence genes. VirulenceFinder is also a robust method for assigning verocytotoxin (vtx) subtypes. A real-time clustering of isolates in agreement with the epidemiology was established from WGS, enabling discrimination between sporadic and outbreak isolates. Overall, WGS typing produced results faster and at a lower cost than the current routine. Therefore, WGS typing is a superior alternative to conventional typing strategies. This approach may also be applied to typing and surveillance of other pathogens.

  3. Implementation of Health Information Technology in Routine Care for Fibromyalgia: Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Toni; Kawi, Jennifer; Menzel, Nancy Nivison; Hartley, Kendall

    2016-02-01

    Fibromyalgia management remains complicated and challenging. Health information technology is an evidence-based, nonpharmacological self and symptom management strategy, but few studies have evaluated its feasibility for managing fibromyalgia patients in clinical practice. FibroGuide is an example of an evidence-based, interactive, and computer-based program comprised of 10 educational modules on fibromyalgia. Study aims were to: (1) develop a process for implementing FibroGuide into the routine care of patients with fibromyalgia, (2) evaluate the overall impact on fibromyalgia before and after a 12-week implementation, and (3) assess patient perspectives on using FibroGuide health information technology to assist in self-management. In this pilot study, 35 participants with fibromyalgia were recruited from an Advanced Practice Registered Nurse's outpatient clinic. Using a descriptive design, quantitative data analysis was employed to address study aims. Based on data collection pre- and post-intervention using paired samples testing, a statistically significant change (p = .017) was observed in overall fibromyalgia impact (improved symptom severity, activity, and function). Majority felt that FibroGuide was helpful as part of their routine care, and nearly half reported that it assisted in their self-management. Although 65% noted that technology was an effective and efficient way to receive education for fibromyalgia management, 57% preferred talking to healthcare providers. Larger longitudinal studies are needed on the use of health information technology in fibromyalgia, evaluating both statistical and clinical significance, while decreasing barriers to participant use for this promising adjunct to clinical management. Providers need to be well educated on supporting self-management strategies and health information technology. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of reviewing routine practices on learning outcomes in continuing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamede, Silvia; Loyens, Sofie; Ezequiel, Oscarina; Tibiriçá, Sandra; Penaforte, Júlio; Schmidt, Henk

    2013-07-01

    Conventional continuing medical education (CME) has been shown to have modest effects on doctor performance. New educational approaches based on the review of routine practices have brought better results. Little is known about factors that affect the outcomes of these approaches, especially in middle-income countries. This study aimed to investigate factors that influence the learning and quality of clinical performance in CME based on reflection upon experiences. A questionnaire and a clinical performance test were administered to 165 general practitioners engaged in a CME programme in Brazil. The questionnaire assessed behaviours related to four input variables (individual reflection on practices, peer review of experiences, self-regulated learning and learning skills) and two mediating variables (identification of learning needs and engagement in learning activities, the latter consisting of self-study of scientific literature, consultations about patient problems, and attendance at courses). Structural equation modelling was used to test a hypothesised model of relationships between these variables and the outcome variable of clinical performance, measured by the clinical performance test. After minor adjustments, the hypothesised model fit the empirical data well. Individual reflection fostered identification of learning needs, but also directly positively influenced the quality of clinical performance. Peer review did not affect identification of learning needs, but directly positively affected clinical performance. Learning skills and self-regulation did not help in identifying learning needs, but self-regulation enhanced study of the scientific literature, the learning activity that most positively influenced clinical performance. Consultation with colleagues, the activity most frequently triggered by the identification of learning needs, did not affect performance, and attendance of courses had only limited effect. This study shed light on the factors

  5. [Diagnostic imaging of breast cancer : An update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funke, M

    2016-10-01

    Advances in imaging of the female breast have substantially influenced the diagnosis and probably also the therapy and prognosis of breast cancer in the past few years. This article gives an overview of the most important imaging modalities in the diagnosis of breast cancer. Digital mammography is considered to be the gold standard for the early detection of breast cancer. Digital breast tomosynthesis can increase the diagnostic accuracy of mammography and is used for the assessment of equivocal or suspicious mammography findings. Other modalities, such as ultrasound and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) play an important role in the diagnostics, staging and follow-up of breast cancer. Percutaneous needle biopsy is a rapid and minimally invasive method for the histological verification of breast cancer. New breast imaging modalities, such as contrast-enhanced spectral mammography, diffusion-weighted MRI and MR spectroscopy can possibly further improve breast cancer diagnostics; however, further studies are necessary to prove the advantages of these methods so that they cannot yet be recommended for routine clinical use.

  6. Diagnostic nuclear medicine. 2. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiepers, C.

    2006-01-01

    The field of nuclear medicine is undergoing rapid expansion, and is evolving into diagnostic molecular imaging. During recent years, dual-modality imaging with PET/CT has gained acceptance and this is currently the fastest-growing technique for oncological imaging applications. The glucose analogue FDG has held its place in diagnostic oncology, assessment of myocardial viability and diagnosis of neuro-degenerative disorders. Peptides have become even more important as imaging agents. The accuracy of hepatobiliary scintigraphy has been enhanced by cholecystokinin. The use of ACE inhibitors in the evaluation of renovascular hypertension has become the standard in renography. New instrumentation has led to faster scanners, and computer development to better image processing software. Automatic processing is more common, and standardization of protocols can be accomplished easily. The field of gene imaging has progressed, although routine clinical applications are not yet available. The present text, supplemented with many detailed and informative illustrations, represents an adjunct to the standard knowledge of diagnostic nuclear medicine and provides both the student and the professional with an overview of developments during the past decade. (orig.)

  7. Vanishing "tattoo" multisensor for biomedical diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moczko, E.; Meglinski, I.; Piletsky, S.

    2008-02-01

    Currently, precise non-invasive diagnostics systems for the real-time multi detection and monitoring of physiological parameters and chemical analytes in the human body are urgently required by clinicians, physiologists and bio-medical researchers. We have developed a novel cost effective smart 'vanishing tattoo' (similar to temporary child's tattoos) consisting of environmental-sensitive dyes. Painlessly impregnated into the skin the smart tattoo is capable of generating optical/fluorescence changes (absorbance, transmission, reflectance, emission and/or luminescence within UV, VIS or NIR regions) in response to physical or chemical changes. These changes allow the identification of colour pattern changes similar to bar-code scanning. Such a system allows an easy, cheap and robust comprehensive detection of various parameters and analytes in a small volume of sample (e.g. variations in pH, temperature, ionic strength, solvent polarity, presence of redox species, surfactants, oxygen). These smart tattoos have possible applications in monitoring the progress of disease and transcutaneous drug delivery. The potential of this highly innovative diagnostic tool is wide and diverse and can impact on routine clinical diagnostics, general therapeutic management, skin care and cosmetic products testing as well as fundamental physiological investigations.

  8. Cyclophosphamide administration routine in autoimmune rheumatic diseases: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaian Amorim Teles

    Full Text Available Abstract Cyclophosphamide is an alkylating agent widely used for the treatment of malignant neoplasia and which can be used in the treatment of multiple rheumatic diseases. Medication administration errors may lead to its reduced efficacy or increased drug toxicity. Many errors occur in the administration of injectable drugs. The present study aimed at structuring a routine for cyclophosphamide use, as well as creating a document with pharmacotherapeutic guidelines for the patient. The routine is schematized in three phases: pre-chemotherapy, administration of cyclophosphamide, and post-chemotherapy, taking into account the drugs to be administered before and after cyclophosphamide in order to prevent adverse effects, including nausea and hemorrhagic cystitis. Adverse reactions can alter laboratory tests; thus, this routine included clinical management for changes in white blood cells, platelets, neutrophils, and sodium, including cyclophosphamide dose adjustment in the case of kidney disease. Cyclophosphamide is responsible for other rare - but serious - side effects, for instance, hepatotoxicity, severe hyponatremia and heart failure. Other adverse reactions include hair loss, amenorrhea and menopause. In this routine, we also entered guidelines to post-chemotherapy patients. The compatibility of injectable drugs with the vehicle used has been described, as well as stability and infusion times. The routine aimed at the rational use of cyclophosphamide, with prevention of adverse events and relapse episodes, factors that may burden the health care system.

  9. Improving Automation Routines for Automatic Heating Load Detection in Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Timlin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Energy managers use weather compensation data and heating system cut off routines to reduce heating energy consumption in buildings and improve user comfort. These routines are traditionally based on the calculation of an estimated building load that is inferred from the external dry bulb temperature at any point in time. While this method does reduce heating energy consumption and accidental overheating, it can be inaccurate under some weather conditions and therefore has limited effectiveness. There remains considerable scope to improve on the accuracy and relevance of the traditional method by expanding the calculations used to include a larger range of environmental metrics. It is proposed that weather compensation and automatic shut off routines that are commonly used could be improved notably with little additional cost by the inclusion of additional weather metrics. This paper examines the theoretical relationship between various external metrics and building heating loads. Results of the application of an advanced routine to a recently constructed building are examined, and estimates are made of the potential savings that can be achieved through the use of the routines proposed.

  10. Diagnostic Efficiency among Psychiatric Outpatients of a Self-Report Version of a Subset of Screen Items of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Personality Disorders (SCID-II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germans, Sara; Van Heck, Guus L.; Masthoff, Erik D.; Trompenaars, Fons J. W. M.; Hodiamont, Paul P. G.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the identification of a 10-item set of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders (SCID-II) items, which proved to be effective as a self-report assessment instrument in screening personality disorders. The item selection was based on the retrospective analyses of 495 SCID-II interviews. The…

  11. LHD neutron diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isobe, M.; Ogawa, K.; Kobuchi, T.

    2015-01-01

    The Large Helical Device (LHD) project will step into a next stage, i.e. experiment by using deuterium gases after two years of preparation. A comprehensive set of neutron and γ-ray diagnostics is going to be installed on the LHD towards extension of energetic-particle (EP) physics research in heliotron plasmas. Conceptual design of fusion products diagnostics for the LHD was made in late 1990s. After conclusion of agreements for the LHD deuterium experiment with local government bodies, development of FPs diagnostics has begun lately. Because there are a lot of tasks to do, all Japan fusion neutron and γ-ray diagnostics team has been organized in the collaboration framework of National Institute for Fusion Science. FPs diagnostics system on the LHD will consist of 1) wide dynamic range neutron flux monitor (NFM), 2) neutron activation system (NAS), 3) vertical neutron camera (VNC). In addition to these, we are developing a directional scintillating fiber detector, an artificial diamond detector and a γ-ray scintillation detector for confinement study of MeV ions. A neutron energy spectrometer prototype is also being developed and tested in KSTAR. In this paper, roles of NFM, NAS and VNC and current status of implementation onto the LHD are briefly described. (author)

  12. Pitfalls in diagnostic radiology

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    Peh, Wilfred C.G. (ed.) [Khoo Teck Puat Hospital (Singapore). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    2015-04-01

    Only textbook to focus primarily on the topic of pitfalls in diagnostic radiology. Highlights the pitfalls in a comprehensive and systematic manner. Written by experts in different imaging modalities and subspecialties from reputable centers across the world. The practice of diagnostic radiology has become increasingly complex, with the use of numerous imaging modalities and division into many subspecialty areas. It is becoming ever more difficult for subspecialist radiologists, general radiologists, and residents to keep up with the advances that are occurring year on year, and this is particularly true for less familiar topics. Failure to appreciate imaging pitfalls often leads to diagnostic error and misinterpretation, and potential medicolegal problems. Diagnostic errors may be due to various factors such as inadequate imaging technique, imaging artifacts, failure to recognize normal structures or variants, lack of correlation with clinical and other imaging findings, and poor training or inexperience. Many, if not most, of these factors are potentially recognizable, preventable, or correctable. This textbook, written by experts from reputable centers across the world, systematically and comprehensively highlights the pitfalls that may occur in diagnostic radiology. Both pitfalls specific to different modalities and techniques and those specific to particular organ systems are described with the help of numerous high-quality illustrations. Recognition of these pitfalls is crucial in helping the practicing radiologist to achieve a more accurate diagnosis.

  13. Pitfalls in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peh, Wilfred C.G.

    2015-01-01

    Only textbook to focus primarily on the topic of pitfalls in diagnostic radiology. Highlights the pitfalls in a comprehensive and systematic manner. Written by experts in different imaging modalities and subspecialties from reputable centers across the world. The practice of diagnostic radiology has become increasingly complex, with the use of numerous imaging modalities and division into many subspecialty areas. It is becoming ever more difficult for subspecialist radiologists, general radiologists, and residents to keep up with the advances that are occurring year on year, and this is particularly true for less familiar topics. Failure to appreciate imaging pitfalls often leads to diagnostic error and misinterpretation, and potential medicolegal problems. Diagnostic errors may be due to various factors such as inadequate imaging technique, imaging artifacts, failure to recognize normal structures or variants, lack of correlation with clinical and other imaging findings, and poor training or inexperience. Many, if not most, of these factors are potentially recognizable, preventable, or correctable. This textbook, written by experts from reputable centers across the world, systematically and comprehensively highlights the pitfalls that may occur in diagnostic radiology. Both pitfalls specific to different modalities and techniques and those specific to particular organ systems are described with the help of numerous high-quality illustrations. Recognition of these pitfalls is crucial in helping the practicing radiologist to achieve a more accurate diagnosis.

  14. Factors associated with willingness to accept a routine offer of HIV test in a large referral hospital in Western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangeni, J N; Ballidawa, J B; Ndege, S

    2012-03-01

    Although Voluntary Counseling and Testing (VCT) has existed for more than 10 years, majority of Kenyans still do not know their HIV status, thus necessitating the introduction of other testing strategies to increase the number of people taking the test. The routine offer of an HIV test to all patients in health-care settings has been proposed to increase access to care. The main objective of this study was to identify factors associated with willingness to accept a routine offer of an HIV test. This was a cross sectional study. The Setting was in the Outpatient department at a large Referral Hospital in Western Kenya. A total of 384 adult patients (both males and females) were recruited using systematic random sampling. Information was collected on basic socio demographic characteristics, knowledge about the routine offer of an HIV test, attitudes towards the testing and HIV testing practise. Of the 384 respondents, 64.3% were unaware about the routine offer of HIV testing in Health facilities. Multivariate analysis identified the main predictors of willingness to accept an HIV test offered in hospital as the age (OR 3.7, C.I 0.068-1.075), level of education (OR 3.4, C.I 0.186-62.602), Knowledge about the routine HIV testing (OR 4.6,C.I 2.118-9.847), self-perception of HIV risk (OR 8.4,C.I 3.424-20.496) and attitude towards routine offer of HIV testing (OR 9.2, C.I 0.042-0.284). There is a need to come up with tailored training on the routine offer of an HIV test and devising strategies to address the main factors that influence the decision for patients to test as identified above.

  15. A national physician survey of diagnostic error in paediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrem, Lucy M; Fanshawe, Thomas R; Sharif, Farhana; Plüddemann, Annette; O'Neill, Michael B

    2016-10-01

    This cross-sectional survey explored paediatric physician perspectives regarding diagnostic errors. All paediatric consultants and specialist registrars in Ireland were invited to participate in this anonymous online survey. The response rate for the study was 54 % (n = 127). Respondents had a median of 9-year clinical experience (interquartile range (IQR) 4-20 years). A diagnostic error was reported at least monthly by 19 (15.0 %) respondents. Consultants reported significantly less diagnostic errors compared to trainees (p value = 0.01). Cognitive error was the top-ranked contributing factor to diagnostic error, with incomplete history and examination considered to be the principal cognitive error. Seeking a second opinion and close follow-up of patients to ensure that the diagnosis is correct were the highest-ranked, clinician-based solutions to diagnostic error. Inadequate staffing levels and excessive workload were the most highly ranked system-related and situational factors. Increased access to and availability of consultants and experts was the most highly ranked system-based solution to diagnostic error. We found a low level of self-perceived diagnostic error in an experienced group of paediatricians, at variance with the literature and warranting further clarification. The results identify perceptions on the major cognitive, system-related and situational factors contributing to diagnostic error and also key preventative strategies. • Diagnostic errors are an important source of preventable patient harm and have an estimated incidence of 10-15 %. • They are multifactorial in origin and include cognitive, system-related and situational factors. What is New: • We identified a low rate of self-perceived diagnostic error in contrast to the existing literature. • Incomplete history and examination, inadequate staffing levels and excessive workload are cited as the principal contributing factors to diagnostic error in this study.

  16. Rotorcraft Diagnostics, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A versatile self-sustained health management (HM) solution comprising of lightweight, power efficient, portable hardware and highly accurate analytic and reasoning...

  17. Routine filtration for decubitus radiography during double contrast barium enema examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camellini, V.; Abelli, P.; Marconi, G.

    1987-01-01

    A wedge-shaped plexiglass compensation filter for use in lateral decubitus radiographs of double contrast barium enema examinations has been designed. This filter, which has been used since February 1985, was compared with a second plexiglass filter, made by E-Z-EM. Voltage and amperage were kept contrast. Two different experiments were conducted in order to demonstrate the benefits of routine use of this compensation filter. First, the changes in skin dose were assessed using an ionization chamber on phantom. Secondly, three radiologists examined a series of 80 consecutive barium enemas without knowing which had been performed using the new filter. Out of the 70 examinations they considered excellent, as many as 45 had been performed with the new filter. Personal experience and the studies described show that the use of a compensation filter improves the accuracy and thus the diagnostic quality of the examinations as it enhances the detail of the anatomic structure of the colon; moreover the filter reduces skin exposure by up to 73.1% (EZ-E-EM filter 47.3%) and, at the same time, less radiographic films are needed. Routine use of a plexiglass compensation filter in lateral decubitus radiographs while performing a double contrast barium enema examination, is strongly recommended especially in obese patients

  18. Omitting cytogenetic assessment from routine treatment response monitoring in chronic myeloid leukemia is safe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geelen, Inge G P; Thielen, Noortje; Janssen, Jeroen J W M; Hoogendoorn, Mels; Roosma, Tanja J A; Valk, Peter J M; Visser, Otto; Cornelissen, Jan J; Westerweel, Peter E

    2018-04-01

    The monitoring of response in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is of great importance to identify patients failing their treatment in order to adjust TKI choice and thereby prevent progression to advanced stage disease. Cytogenetic monitoring has a lower sensitivity, is expensive, and requires invasive bone marrow sampling. Nevertheless, chronic myeloid leukemia guidelines continue to recommend performing routine cytogenetic response assessments, even when adequate molecular diagnostics are available. In a population-based registry of newly diagnosed CML patients in the Netherlands, all simultaneous cytogenetic and molecular assessments performed at 3, 6, and 12 months were identified and response of these matched assessments was classified according to European Leukemia Net (ELN) recommendations. The impact of discrepant cytogenetic and molecular response classifications and course of patients with additional chromosomal abnormalities were evaluated. The overall agreement of 200 matched assessments was 78%. In case of discordant responses, response at 24 months was consistently better predicted by the molecular outcome. Cytogenetic response assessments provided relevant additional clinical information only in some cases of molecular "warning." The development of additional cytogenetic abnormalities was always accompanied with molecular failure. We conclude that it is safe to omit routine cytogenetics for response assessment during treatment and to only use molecular monitoring, in order to prevent ambiguous classifications, reduce costs, and reduce the need for invasive bone marrow sampling. Cytogenetic re-assessment should still be performed when molecular response is suboptimal. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Impact of psychological screening on routine outpatient care of hematopoietic cell transplantation survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoodin, Flora; Zhao, Lili; Carey, Jillian; Levine, John E; Kitko, Carrie

    2013-10-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation recipients are at high risk for psychological distress, with reported prevalence rates as high as 40%. Although published guidelines advocate periodic routine screening, it is unclear how screening affects management of psychological symptoms at routine post-HCT outpatient clinic visits. We hypothesized that providers will be more likely to act on patients' psychological symptoms if a screening survey is completed and reviewed before a clinic visit. We used a brief, diagnostically focused Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ), to assess for depressive disorders, anxiety, substance abuse, and problems in occupational or interpersonal functioning (functional disruption). Adult HCT survivors were randomized to complete the PHQ before meeting with their medical provider (n = 50; experimental group) or afterwards (n = 51; control group). Providers used the experimental group PHQ results at their discretion during the visits. Both providers and patients rated their satisfaction with management of psychological concerns after the visit. The prevalence of clinically significant depression (21%), anxiety (14%), or suicidal ideation (8%) did not differ between the 2 groups. Patients in the experimental group were significantly more likely to have discussion of psychological symptoms than the control group (68% versus 49%, P = .05). Medical providers were significantly more satisfied with the management of psychological issues for the experimental group (P routine care of hematopoietic cell transplantation survivors, stimulates discussion of psychological symptoms, and improves provider satisfaction with psychological symptom management. Future research will evaluate whether serial prospective administration improves patient outcomes. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Prospective evaluation of the utility of routine postoperative cystogram after traumatic bladder injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Kenji; Okoye, Obi T; Browder, Timothy; Best, Charles; Branco, Bernardino C; Teixeira, Pedro G; Barmparas, Galinos; Reddy, Sravanthi; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2013-12-01

    The value of routinely testing bladder repair integrity with a cystogram before urinary catheter removal is unclear. The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate the utility of routine postoperative cystogram after traumatic bladder injury. All patients sustaining a bladder injury requiring operative repair at two Level I trauma centers were prospectively enrolled during a 62-month study period ending on January 2011. Injury demographics, imaging data, and outcomes were extracted. All patients were evaluated with either a plain or a computed tomography cystogram. A total of 127 patients were enrolled (mean [SD] age, 30.4 [13.5] years; blunt trauma, 63.8%, mean [SD] Injury Severity Score [ISS], 17.7 [10.6]). A total of 75 patients (59.1%) had an intraperitoneal (IP) bladder injury, 44 (34.6%) had an extraperitoneal (EP) bladder injury, and 8 had a (6.3%) combined IP/EP bladder injury. All patients with IP and IP/EP injuries (n = 83) underwent operative repair and a postoperative cystogram at 8.6 (1.8) days (range, 5-13 days). Sixty-nine IP injuries (83.1%) were simple (dome or body disruption/penetrating injury), while 14 (16.9%) were complex (trigone/requiring ureter implantation). There were no deaths during the follow-up period. With the exception of one patient (1.2%) with a complex injury requiring ureteric implantation, there were no leaks demonstrated on postoperative cystogram, and the urinary catheters were successfully removed. In this prospective evaluation of the role of bladder evaluation after operative repair, routine use of follow-up cystograms for simple injuries did not impact clinical management. For complex repairs to the trigone or those requiring ureter implantation, a follow-up cystogram should be obtained before catheter removal. Diagnostic study, level II.

  1. Routine intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography for pediatric open heart surgery: Is it justifiable?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elgamal, Mohamed-Adel F.; Najm, Hani K.; Abid-Allah, M.; Omran, Ahmad S.

    2007-01-01

    The routine use of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography (IO TEE) in children is still debatable. The aim of this study was to determine the safety, benefit and the possible risk of the routine use of IO TEE. It was performed in all children under the age of 14 years with a complex congenital heart defects undergoing open heart surgery, from July 2001 to December 2002. Simple lesions such as secundum atrial septal defects or simple perimembraneous ventricular septal defects (VSD) and neonates less than 2.7 kg were excluded. All children underwent a pre-repair and post-repair complete IO TEE study. There were 112 children, 65 males and 47 females. Ages ranged from 4 days to 156 month, a median of 9 months. A full study was not done in three neonates (3%) because the probe could not be inserted in one, and because of airway compression resulting in desaturation in another two. A pre-repair study confirmed the preoperative transthoracic echocardiographic findings in 105 children (95%). Diagnostic discrepancy or unexpected lesions not reported preoperative were found in six children (5%). Of the 109 children who had full post-repair studies, 67 (60%) showed optimum repair with no residual lesions and 26 (23%) showed trivial or mild residual lesions accepted by the team. Going back on pump to fix moderate or severe residual lesions occurred in 16 (14%) children. In all of these children, the decision for going back on pump was prompted by the IO TEE examination alone. Mild complications occurred in two children (2%). Based on our results, we recommend the routine use of IO TEE. It is safe, has a low complication rate, adds additional information and has a high impact on the diagnosis of residual lesions required in the operating room. However, careful monitoring of the ventilation and airway pressure, particularly during probe insertion and manipulation in small children, is very essential. (author)

  2. Quantifying low-value services by using routine data from Austrian primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, Martin; Robausch, Martin; Moser, Adrian

    2016-12-01

    Open debates about the reduction of low-value services, unnecessary diagnostic tests and ineffective therapeutic procedures and initiatives like "Choosing Wisely "in the USA and Canada are still absent in Austria. The objectives of this study are: (i) to establish a list of ineffective or low-value services possibly provided in Austrian primary care, (ii) to explore how many of these services are quantifiable using routine data and (iii) to estimate the number of affected beneficiaries and avoidable costs arising from the provision of these services. In May 2014, we identified low-value care services relevant for primary care in Austria. For our analysis we used routine data sets from the Austrian health insurance. All analysis refer to the insured population of the Lower Austrian Sickness Fund (n = 1 168 433) in the year 2013. (i) We found 453 low-value services possibly offered in Austrian primary care. (ii) Only 34 (7.5%) services were quantifiable using routine data. (iii) In the year 2013, these 34 services were provided to at least 246 131 beneficiaries and the estimated avoidable costs arising were at least 11.38 million Euros. This accounts for 1.2% of overall spending of the Lower Austrian Sickness Fund for drugs and services provided by primary care doctors in the year 2013. The absence of a homogeneous, transparent and accessible coding system for diagnosis in Austrian primary care restrained our assessment. However, our study findings illustrate the potential utility and limitations of using claims-based measures to identify low-value care. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  3. Polychromatic holographic plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhiglinskij, A.G.; Morozov, A.O.

    1992-01-01

    Review of holographic interferometry properties is performed and advantages of this method by plasma diagnostics are indicated. Main results obtained by the method of holographic interferometry in studies of various-type plasmas are considered. Special attention is paid to multiwave plasma diagnostics, the necessity of which is related as a rule to multicomponent composition of plasma. The eight laser and gas-discharge sources and holographic schemes, which make it possible to realize plasma polychromatic and holographic interferometry, are considered. The advantages of the method are demonstrated by examples of polychromatic holographic diagnostics of arc discharge and discharge in a hollow cathode. Review of theoretical works determining the applicability area of resonance polychromatic interferometry is carried out

  4. Metabolomics for laboratory diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujak, Renata; Struck-Lewicka, Wiktoria; Markuszewski, Michał J; Kaliszan, Roman

    2015-09-10

    Metabolomics is an emerging approach in a systems biology field. Due to continuous development in advanced analytical techniques and in bioinformatics, metabolomics has been extensively applied as a novel, holistic diagnostic tool in clinical and biomedical studies. Metabolome's measurement, as a chemical reflection of a current phenotype of a particular biological system, is nowadays frequently implemented to understand pathophysiological processes involved in disease progression as well as to search for new diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers of various organism's disorders. In this review, we discussed the research strategies and analytical platforms commonly applied in the metabolomics studies. The applications of the metabolomics in laboratory diagnostics in the last 5 years were also reviewed according to the type of biological sample used in the metabolome's analysis. We also discussed some limitations and further improvements which should be considered taking in mind potential applications of metabolomic research and practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Corpuscular plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afrosimov, V.; Petrov, M.

    1984-01-01

    An elementary explanation is presented of the physical principles and important methods of corpuscular plasma diagnostics. The invaluable role of corpuscular methods for measuring the hot plasma ion component in thermonuclear facilities, especially hydrogen ions in tokamaks, is emphasized. All corpuscular methods employ analysis of fast neutral atoms and therefore the mechanism of their creation inside a hot plasma is explained first. The ammount of information obtainable from spectra of fast neutrals is discussed. Multichannel analyzers developed at the FTI A.F. Ioffe in Leningrad are described in detail. Classical passive corpuscular diagnostics are examined as are active methods using artifitial beams of hydrogen atoms. The method used for obtaining local values of ion temperature and density is explained. Corpuscular spectroscopic diagnostics and its application for measuring impurities is mentioned. (J.U.)

  6. [Cytology in uropathological diagnostics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaisa, N T; Lindemann-Docter, K

    2015-11-01

    Cytology in uropathological diagnostics is mainly performed for oncological purposes. The assessment of malignancy by urothelial cell morphology is therefore decisive; however, cytology is only sensitive enough to detect high-grade tumor cells and the different low-grade tumors cannot be reliably diagnosed. Thus, the four-tier classification system of cytological findings (i.e. negative, atypical cells but significance uncertain, suspicious and positive) refers to high-grade tumor cells only. Furthermore, for valid cytological diagnostics not only the cytological specimen but also clinical information on cystoscopy findings and, if applicable, a biopsy should be evaluated together. In difficult differential diagnostic settings, e.g. differentiation between reactive versus neoplastic atypia or difficult to access lesions in the upper urinary tract, additional fluorescence in situ hybridization of cytological preparations might be helpful. At the moment there are no indications for further immunocytology or additional biomarker tests.

  7. ORION laser target diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentley, C. D.; Edwards, R. D.; Andrew, J. E.; James, S. F.; Gardner, M. D.; Comley, A. J.; Vaughan, K.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. S.; Rothman, S. D.; Daykin, S.; Masoero, S. J.; Palmer, J. B.; Meadowcroft, A. L.; Williams, B. M.; Gumbrell, E. T.; Fyrth, J. D.; Brown, C. R. D.; Hill, M. P.; Oades, K.

    2012-01-01

    The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics.

  8. ORION laser target diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, C D; Edwards, R D; Andrew, J E; James, S F; Gardner, M D; Comley, A J; Vaughan, K; Horsfield, C J; Rubery, M S; Rothman, S D; Daykin, S; Masoero, S J; Palmer, J B; Meadowcroft, A L; Williams, B M; Gumbrell, E T; Fyrth, J D; Brown, C R D; Hill, M P; Oades, K; Wright, M J; Hood, B A; Kemshall, P

    2012-10-01

    The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics.

  9. Nova diagnostics summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slivinsky, V.W.; Drake, R.P.

    1985-01-01

    The authors intend that Nova be the best diagnosed ICF research facility in operation today. The authors experience in providing advanced diagnostics for previous laser systems will be extended at Nova, and will be challenged by the development of new instrumentation to diagnose the more advanced targets made possible by this powerful laser. Previous experience has shown that to understand target performance, the authors must have as complete a set of diagnostics as possible. The Nova diagnostics are divided into two sets: the basic set required for the initial Nova experiments and the more advanced set for later, generally more complex, experiments. The basic set will be operational for the first Nova shots; it was a Nova line item funded with Nova construction money. This basic set is presented in a table

  10. Angiography - interventional diagnostic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schild, H.

    1994-01-01

    The angiography system is very different from the other systems used in diagnostic radiology. The invasivity of angiography requires special, high standards in theoretical and practical training and experience both of beginners and experienced personnel. This textbook fully meets the demand for in-depth and exhaustive information, as it presents: - The fundamentals and techniques of angiography, the vascular anatomy, and many hints and tips of great help in practice. - A comprehensive survey of diagnostic problems and examination approaches, including neuro-angiography, with 221 reproductions of original angiographs, and additional schematic representations. - A special chapter devoted to indication and relevant techniques for the major vascular interventional examinations. - A great number of tables explain at a glance standard examination techniques, indications and diagnostic criteria. (orig./CB) [de

  11. Older adults' personal routine at time of hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zisberg, Anna; Gur-Yaish, Nurit

    This study is the first to explore whether hospitalization disrupts the daily routines of dependent and independent older adults. Data were collected as part of a prospectively designed study from 330 hospitalized older adults age 70+. Patients reported prehospitalization frequency, duration, and timing of basic activities of daily living and leisure activities at hospital admission. Hospital routine was assessed on day of discharge. Results indicated that frequency and duration of most basic activities decreased during hospitalization; the sharpest decrease was in frequency of getting dressed. Showering occurred 2 h earlier in the hospital setting, and getting dressed occurred an hour and a half later. For dependent respondents, the greatest change was in duration; for independent respondents, the greatest change was in frequency. Given the importance of routine maintenance to health and well-being, understanding the dynamics of its disruption in the hospital setting is imperative. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Master schedule for CY-1982 Hanford environmental surveillance routine program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumer, P.J.; Sula, M.J.; Eddy, P.A.

    1981-12-01

    This report provides the current schedule of data collection for the routine environmental surveillance program at the Hanford Site. The environmental surveillance program objectives are to evaluate and report the levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs, as required in DOE Order 5484.1. The routine sampling schedule provided does not include samples which are planned to be collected during FY-1982 in support of special studies or for quality control purposes. In addition, the routine program outlined in this schedule is subject to modification during the year in response to changes in Site operations, program requirements, or unusual sample results. Sampling schedules are presented for the following: air; Columbia River; sanitary water; surface water; ground water; foodstuffs; wildlife; soil and vegetation; external radiation measurements; portable instrument surveys; and surveillance of waste disposal sites

  13. Pulse processing routines for neutron time-of-flight data

    CERN Document Server

    Žugec, P; Guerrero, C; Gunsing, F; Vlachoudis, V; Sabate-Gilarte, M; Stamatopoulos, A; Wright, T; Lerendegui-Marco, J; Mingrone, F; Ryan, J A; Warren, S G; Tsinganis, A; Barbagallo, M

    2016-01-01

    A pulse shape analysis framework is described, which was developed for n_TOF-Phase3, the third phase in the operation of the n_TOF facility at CERN. The most notable feature of this new framework is the adoption of generic pulse shape analysis routines, characterized by a minimal number of explicit assumptions about the nature of pulses. The aim of these routines is to be applicable to a wide variety of detectors, thus facilitating the introduction of the new detectors or types of detectors into the analysis framework. The operational details of the routines are suited to the specific requirements of particular detectors by adjusting the set of external input parameters. Pulse recognition, baseline calculation and the pulse shape fitting procedure are described. Special emphasis is put on their computational efficiency, since the most basic implementations of these conceptually simple methods are often computationally inefficient.

  14. Beam Instrumentation and Diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Strehl, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This treatise covers all aspects of the design and the daily operations of a beam diagnostic system for a large particle accelerator. A very interdisciplinary field, it involves contributions from physicists, electrical and mechanical engineers and computer experts alike so as to satisfy the ever-increasing demands for beam parameter variability for a vast range of operation modi and particles. The author draws upon 40 years of research and work, most of them spent as the head of the beam diagnostics group at GSI. He has illustrated the more theoretical aspects with many real-life examples that will provide beam instrumentation designers with ideas and tools for their work.

  15. Diagnostic Imaging Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sociedad Argentina de Fisica Medica

    2012-01-01

    The American Association of Physicist in Medicine (AAPM), the International Organization for Medical Physics (IOMP) and the Argentina Society of Medical Physics (SAFIM) was organized the Diagnostic Imaging Workshop 2012, in the city of Buenos Aires, Argentina. This workshop was an oriented training and scientific exchange between professionals and technicians who work in medical physics, especially in the areas of diagnostic imaging, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy, with special emphasis on the use of multimodal imaging for radiation treatment, planning as well of quality assurance associates.

  16. Marshalling embedded routines in support of firm creation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houman Andersen, Poul; Norus, Jesper

    2003-01-01

    The paper has a dual purpose. First, we suggest that entrepreneurs in their establishment of new businesses draw on a range of pre-existing socially embedded routines for creating acceptance by their environment. Also they draw upon external resources that are used in patterning specific practices....... This ability is treated as entrepreneurial assets. Secondly, we argue that the existence and patterning of these socially embedded routines used in new business development are contingent on the institutional context. We see the institutional context as complex and fragmented, composed and shaped by different...

  17. The Emergence of Routines: Entrepreneurship, Organization, and Business History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lubinski, Christina

    2018-01-01

    Book review of: The Emergence of Routines: Entrepreneurship, Organization, and Business History. Edited by Daniel M. G. Raff and Philip Scranton. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017. xii + 358 pp. Figures, notes, index. Cloth, $90.00. ISBN: 978-0-19-878776-1.......Book review of: The Emergence of Routines: Entrepreneurship, Organization, and Business History. Edited by Daniel M. G. Raff and Philip Scranton. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017. xii + 358 pp. Figures, notes, index. Cloth, $90.00. ISBN: 978-0-19-878776-1....

  18. Linking child travel routes and routine health data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Mizen

    2017-04-01

    Depending on modelled accuracy, a GIS and data linkage approach may allow the investigation of natural experiments and intervention evaluation at the scale of the total population. This is the first step towards anonymously modelling part of the daily exposure environment using routine data. A limitation is the lack of routinely collected BMI data for older children and teenagers an age when they are more likely to have the option to choose to buy food on the school route. This work will have many potential applications, including the delivery and evaluation of multiple school and workplace commuting interventions.

  19. Ion diode diagnostics to resolve beam quality issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluhm, H; Buth, L; Hoppe, P [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany). Institut fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik; and others

    1997-12-31

    Various diagnostic methods and instruments are under development at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe to measure important physical quantities in the accelerating gap of high power diodes on KALIF with a high spatial and temporal resolution. The methods include optical spectroscopy, refractive index measurements, dispersion interferometry, and high resolution energy analysis. The setup of these diagnostic tools and the first results obtained for applied and self-magnetically insulated diodes are presented. (author). 6 figs., 5 refs.

  20. Self-pinched transport of intense ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottinger, P.F.; Neri, J.M.; Stephanakis, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    Electron beams with substantial net currents have been routinely propagated in the self-pinched mode for the past two decades. However, as the physics of gas breakdown and beam neutralization is different for ion beams, previous predictions indicated insufficient net current for pinching so that ion beam self-pinched transport (SPT) was assumed impossible. Nevertheless, recent numerical simulations using the IPROP code have suggested that ion SPT is possible. These results have prompted initial experiments to investigate SPT of ion beams. A 100-kA, 1.2-MeV, 3-cm-radius proton beam, generated on the Gamble II pulsed-power accelerator at NRL, has been injected into helium in the 30- to 250-mTorr regime to study this phenomenon. Evidence of self-pinched ion beam transport was observed in the 35- to 80-mTorr SPT pressure window predicted by IPROP. Measured signals from a time- and space-resolved scattered proton diagnostic and a time-integrated Li(Cu) nuclear activation diagnostic, both of which measure protons striking a 10-cm diameter target 50 cm into the transport region, are significantly larger in this pressure window than expected for ballistic transport. These results are consistent with significant self-magnetic fields and self-pinching of the ion beam. On the other hand, time-integrated signals from these same two diagnostics are consistent with ballistic transport at pressures above and below the SPT window. Interferometric electron line-density measurements, acquired during beam injection into the helium gas, show insignificant ionization below 35 mTorr, a rapidly rising ionization fraction with pressure in the SPT window, and a plateau in ionization fraction at about 2% for pressures above 80 mTorr. These and other results are consistent with the physical picture for SPT. IPROP simulations, which closely model the Gamble II experimental conditions, produce results that are in qualitative agreement with the experimental results. The advantages of SPT for