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Sample records for selenium strontium technetium

  1. Membrane-based separation technologies for cesium, strontium, and technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kafka, T.

    1996-01-01

    This work is one of two parallel projects that are part of an ESP task to develop high-capacity, selective, solid extractants for cesium, strontium, and technetium from nuclear wastes. In this subtask, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is collaborating with 3M, St. Paul, Minnesota, working in cooperation with IBC Advanced Technologies, American Fork, Utah

  2. Magnetite effect in radionuclide retention : cesium, strontium, molybdenum and selenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovira, M.; Casas, I.; Gimenez, J.; Clarens, F.; Pablo, J. de

    2004-01-01

    In this work we have investigated the interaction of magnetite with cesium, strontium, molybdenum and selenium, in the frame of radionuclide retention by canister corrosion products. For each radionuclide, the retention on magnetite has been studied as a function of pH and the mass/ volume ratio. The experimental results have been modeled by means of Surface Complexation Models (SCM), that constitute a tool that allows an approach to sorption mechanisms in a wide range of experimental conditions taking into account electrostatic interactions at the mineral-water interface.(Author)

  3. Selenium-75 and technetium-95m biokinetics in rats at different physiological states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archimbaud, Yves; Grillon, Gerard; Poncy, Jean-Luc; Masse, Roland

    1992-06-01

    Selenium 79 ( 79 Se) and technetium ( 99 Tc), beta emitters, components of nuclear wastes, may increase the dose equivalent to members of the public. Data used by ICRP show that there is relatively little information on Te and Se biokinetics at different physiologic stages. Retention was almost equivalent for young, male adult and pregnant rat. Selenium was concentrated in the testis, the kidneys, the liver and the spleen as technetium was in the skin, the thyroid and the kidneys. The biological half-time for Se and Te was respectively 20 and 41 days for pregnant rats, 33 and 15 days for young rats. Placental transfer per one fetus was 0.56% of the initial activity for Te and 1.27% for Se. These data point out the eventually high doses delivered to the skin for Te and to the testis for Se. They may be taken into consideration in estimating risk by humans at different stages of life [fr

  4. Volatility literature of chlorine, iodine, cesium, strontium, technetium, and rhenium; technetium and rhenium volatility testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langowski, M.H.; Darab, J.G.; Smith, P.A.

    1996-03-01

    A literature review pertaining to the volatilization of Sr, Cs, Tc (and its surrogate Re), Cl, I and other related species during the vitrification of Hanford Low Level Waste (LLW) streams has been performed and the relevant information summarized. For many of these species, the chemistry which occurs in solution prior to the waste stream entering the melter is important in dictating their loss at higher temperatures. In addition, the interactive effects between the species being lost was found to be important. A review of the chemistries of Tc and Re was also performed. It was suggested that Re would indeed act as an excellent surrogate for Tc in non-radioactive materials testing. Experimental results on Tc and Re loss from sodium aluminoborosilicate melts of temperatures ranging from 900--1350 degrees C performed at PNL are reported and confirm that Re behaves in a nearly identical manner to that of technetium

  5. Distribution coefficients of caesium, chlorine, iodine, niobium, selenium and technetium on Olkiluoto soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soederlund, M.; Lusa, M.; Virtanen, S.; Vaelimaa, I.; Hakanen, M.; Lehto, J.; Lahdenperae, A.-M.

    2014-02-01

    Retention of caesium, chlorine, iodine, niobium, selenium and technetium was investigated on soil samples from Olkiluoto using laboratory batch sorption experiments. Distribution coefficients were measured for both dried and sieved and untreated (wet, not sieved) mineral soil and humus in aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Mineralogical composition of the samples was determined by XRD-analysis. Caesium was sorbed efficiently on mineral soil samples and less efficiently on humus. Sorption decreased with decreasing cation exchange capacity and clay fraction content. The effect of competing cations decreased in the order Cs + >NH 4 + >K + >Ca 2+ >Na + . Chlorine was not retained by mineral soil samples, and the sorption was weak on humus. The sorption of iodine was the strongest on humus and the weakest on the untreated mineral soil samples in the anaerobic conditions. In the mineral soil samples, the sorption decreased with decreasing organic matter content and increasing pH. The retention of niobium on soil samples was the most efficient among the studied elements. The retention was high regardless of the aeration conditions. Sorption on humus was smaller. Selenium was retained efficiently on humus. Sorption on mineral soil samples was stronger in aerobic conditions. Sorption increased with time. Technetium was sorbed well on humus and anaerobic, untreated mineral soil samples. Sorption increased with increasing organic matter content and decreasing redox potential. The results from the sorption experiments are used in the site specific radionuclide migration modelling. (orig.)

  6. Influence of microbial activities on the mobility of technetium and selenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merz, C.; Winkler, A.; Pekdeger, A.; Stroetmann, I.; Kaempfer, P.; Dott, W.

    1992-01-01

    Interactions between migration processes and microbiology have become known during the last few years, with an observed immobilization of radionuclides being attributed to the formation of microenvironments. In such microenvironments produced by bacterial accumulations at grain surfaces and in grain gores, changed redox conditions may lead to the precipitation of technetium and selenium. Such microenvironments, however, cannot be detected by measuring the physico-chemical parameters in the macroenvironment, and therefore they may cause misjudgement of the migration behaviour of radionuclides. To study the microbiological effects, batch and column tests were made with unsterile and sterile loose rock, and sterilization methods were tested with soil materials. In order to detect a possible attachment to microorganisms, the sorption behaviour in bacterial suspensions was studied in addition. (orig.) [de

  7. Extraction processes and solvents for recovery of cesium, strontium, rare earth elements, technetium and actinides from liquid radioactive waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, Boris N.; Esimantovskiy, Vyacheslav M.; Lazarev, Leonard N.; Dzekun, Evgeniy G.; Romanovskiy, Valeriy N.; Todd, Terry A.; Brewer, Ken N.; Herbst, Ronald S.; Law, Jack D.

    2001-01-01

    Cesium and strontium are extracted from aqueous acidic radioactive waste containing rare earth elements, technetium and actinides, by contacting the waste with a composition of a complex organoboron compound and polyethylene glycol in an organofluorine diluent mixture. In a preferred embodiment the complex organoboron compound is chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, the polyethylene glycol has the formula RC.sub.6 H.sub.4 (OCH.sub.2 CH.sub.2).sub.n OH, and the organofluorine diluent is a mixture of bis-tetrafluoropropyl ether of diethylene glycol with at least one of bis-tetrafluoropropyl ether of ethylene glycol and bis-tetrafluoropropyl formal. The rare earths, technetium and the actinides (especially uranium, plutonium and americium), are extracted from the aqueous phase using a phosphine oxide in a hydrocarbon diluent, and reextracted from the resulting organic phase into an aqueous phase by using a suitable strip reagent.

  8. Influence of autochthonous micro-organisms on sorption and remobilization of technetium and selenium. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maue, G.; Stroetmann, I.; Dott, W.; Taute, T.; Winkler, A.; Pekdeger, A.

    1996-01-01

    Within this research project the influence of autochthonous mirco-organisms on immobilization and remobilization of Technetium and Selenium was investigated. Both redoxsensitive radionuclides are part of the waste of nuclear fuel (Tc app. 6%). Former investigations have shown, that immobilization behaviour of both elements could be influenced by micro-organisms. It has not been known, if the autochthonous (or in situ) organisms from greater depth do also have an influence on radionuclide mobility. The autochthonous populations of micro-organisms in deep sediments and their influence on the migration of Tc and Se were investigated in this study. For this reason recirculation column experiments were carried out. Absolutely sterile and anaerobic handling was necessary for the sampling and the further treatment of the sediments and waters used in the experiments. Therefore special methods for sampling, storage and handling had been developed. The results of recirculation column test with autochthonous micro-organisms were compared with sterile parallel tests and were verified with the results of an elaborated version of the hydrogeochemical equilibration code PHREEQE. It was shown that the autochthonous micro-organisms had only very little influence on the migration behaviour. The reason is the very low population (less than 10 E+6 CFU). Nevertheless it has to be taken into consideration, that conventional laboratory experiments for the estimation of the retention capacities of sediments for hazardous waste lead to an overestimation, if the sediments are contaminated with allochthonous micro-organisms (CFU=colony forming units). (orig.) [de

  9. Nickel and strontium nitrates as modifiers for the determination of selenium in wine by Zeeman electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cvetkovic, J. [Inst. of Agriculture, Skopje (Yugoslavia); Stafilov, T. [Inst. of Chemistry, Faculty of Science Sts. Cyril and Methodius Univ., Skopje (Yugoslavia); Mihajlovic, D. [RZ Tehnicka Kontrola, Skopje (Yugoslavia)

    2001-08-01

    A mixed matrix modifier of nickel and strontium nitrates was used as a chemical modifier for the determination of selenium in wines by Zeeman electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Wine samples were heated on a boiling water bath with small amounts of nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide. For complete elimination of interference, especially from sulfates and phosphates, selenium is complexed with ammonium pyrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDTC), extracted into methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK), and measured by ETAAS. The graphite furnace temperature program was optimized for both aqueous and organic solutions. Pyrolysis temperatures of 1300 C and 800 C were chosen for aqueous and organic solutions, respectively; 2700 C and 2100 C were used as optimum atomization temperatures for aqueous and organic solutions, respectively. The optimum modifier mass established is markedly lower than those presented in the literature. The platform atomization ensures pretreatment stabilization up to 1100 C and 1600 C, respectively, for organic and aqueous selenium solutions. The procedure was verified by the method of standard addition. The investigated wine samples originated from the different regions of the Republic of Macedonia. The selenium concentration varied from not detectable to 0.93 {mu}g L{sup -1}. (orig.)

  10. Technetium-99 and strontium-90: Abundance determination at ultratrace sensitivity by AMS as signatures of undeclared nuclear reprocessing activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAninch, J.E.; Proctor, I.D.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this White Paper is to examine the use of the ultratrace technique Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) to lower detection limits for 99 Tc and 90 Sr, and to examine the utility of these isotopes as signatures of a convert reprocessing facility. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has committed to improving the effectiveness of the IAEA Safeguards System. This is in some degree a result of the discovery in 1991 of an undeclared Iraqi EMIS program. Recommendations from the March 1993 Consultants Group Meeting have resulted in several studies and follow on field trials to identify environmental signatures from covert nuclear fuel reprocessing activity. In particular, the April, 1993 reports of the Standing Advisory Group on Safeguards Implementation (SAGSI) identified the long-lived radioisotopes Technetium-99 and strontium-90 as two reliable signatures of fuel reprocessing activity. This report also suggested pathways in the chemical processing of irradiated fuel where these elements would be volatilized and potentially released in amounts detectable with ultratrace sensitivity techniques. Based on measured 99 Tc background levels compiled from a variety of sources, it is estimated that AMS can provide 10% measurements of environmental levels of 99 Tc in a few minutes using modestly sized samples: a few grams for soils, plants, or animal tissues; one to several liters for rain or seawater samples; and tens to hundreds of cubic meters for air sampling. Small sample sizes and high sample throughput result in significant increases in feasibility, cost effectiveness, and quality of data for a regional monitoring program. Similar results are expected for 90 Sr

  11. Influence of autochthonous micro-organisms on sorption and remobilization of technetium and selenium in different aquifer materials. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rueden, H.; Maue, G.; Stroetmann, I.; Hornemann, C.; Seichter, M.; Pekdeger, A.; Taute, T.; Winkler, A.; Lange, D.; Majerczyk, D.; Meyer, T.

    1998-01-01

    In this research project the influence of autochthonous micro-organisms on immobilisation and remobilization of Technetium and Selenium was investigated. Both radionuclides are part of the nuclear fuel waste (Tc app. 6%). Former investigations have shown, that immobilisation behaviour of both elements can be influenced by micro-organisms. The autochthonous population of micro-organisms in deep sediments and their influence on immobilisation of Tc and Se was investigated in this study. For this reason recirculation column tests were carried out. Absolutely sterile and anaerobic handling is necessary handling the sediments and waters used for the experiments. Special methods for sampling, storage and handling were developed. More than 30 sediments have been investigated. The number of colony forming units (CFU) has always been relatively low (less than E+06 CFU). The results of recirculation column tests with autochthonous micro-organisms were compared with sterilized (Co-60) parallel tests and were verified with the results of hydrochemical equilibration code PHREEQUE. Instead of the allochthonous micro-orgamisms the autochthonous organisms showed no significant fixation of the radionuclides due to microbial activity. This is true for various temperatures of 10 C (aquifer temperature) and 20 C (normal laboratory temperature). An addition of an inoculum of the autochthonous micro-organisms developed at breeding temperature of 10 and 20 C had no influence on the radionuclide mobility. Performing conventional laboratory experiments you have to consider an overestimated retardation capacity because of an inevitable contamination with allochthonous micro-organisms. (orig.) [de

  12. Selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Information Supplement Fact Sheets Frequently Asked Questions Making Decisions What you Need To Know About Supplements Dietary ... understand how selenium in food and dietary supplements affects heart health. Cognitive decline Blood selenium levels decrease as people age, ...

  13. Selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillings, Lisa L.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Selenium (Se) was discovered in 1817 in pyrite from copper mines in Sweden. It is a trace element in Earth’s crust, with an abundance of three to seven orders of magnitude less than the major rock-forming elements. Commercial use of selenium began in the United States in 1910, when it was used as a pigment for paints, ceramic glazes, and red glass. Since that time, it has had many other economic uses—notably, in the 1930s and 1940s, when it was used in rectifiers (which change alternating current to direct current), and in the 1960s, when it began to be used in the liner of photocopier drums. In the 21st century, other compounds have replaced selenium in these older products; modern uses for selenium include energy-efficient windows that limit heat transfer and thin-film photovoltaic cells that convert solar energy into electricity.In Earth’s crust, selenium is found as selenide minerals, selenate and selenite salts, and as substitution for sulfur in sulfide minerals. It is the sulfide minerals, most commonly those in porphyry copper deposits, that provide the bulk of the selenium produced for the international commodity market. Selenium is obtained as a byproduct of copper refining and recovered from the anode slimes generated in electrolytic production of copper. Because of this, the countries that have the largest resources and (or) reserves of copper also have the largest resources and (or) reserves of selenium.Because selenium occurs naturally in Earth’s crust, its presence in air, water, and soil results from both geologic reactions and human activity. Selenium is found concentrated naturally in soils that overlie bedrock with high selenium concentrations. Selenium mining, processing, use in industrial and agricultural applications, and disposal may all contribute selenium to the environment. A well-known case of selenium contamination from agricultural practices was discovered in 1983 in the Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge in California. There

  14. Technetium and technetium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijdo, W.L.

    1993-10-01

    This report presents the results of a literature survey on technetium and technetium alloys. The literature has been searched through 1993. The survey was focused on technetium and (binary cubic) technetium alloys, but other important information on technetium has not been omitted from this survey. This report has been written with the aim to collect more information about phase systems which could be of importance in the transmutation process by neutrons of technetium. With the information presented in this report, it should be possible to select a suitable technetium alloy for further investigation regarding to the transmutation process. (orig.)

  15. Investigation into the mobility of technetium (and selenium) in aquifers in Northern Germany, and of technetium in contact with natural mineral deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, A.

    1989-01-01

    Technetium is the lightest radio element of the periodic system (No. 43). While primordial Tc doesn't exist in nature (on earth) any longer, it is produced in nuclear reactors with 6.13% of the fission products. Tc-99 has a half life of 2.13 E+5 years. A very poor retardation occurs during transportation through aquifers under oxidizing conditions. Combined with the long half life this is the reason for Tc's great hazard potential. In addition, if there is migration from the disposal site, Tc is one of the problematic elements. In aqueous solutions, Tc (VI) and (VII) are the most important valence states. Other states are only stable in connection with complexing ligands. Under reducing conditions Tc (IV) is more or less immobile. (orig.) With 95 figs., 45 tabs., 5 annexes [de

  16. Influence of microbial activity on the migration behaviour of redox-sensitive radionuclides (technetium and selenium) in loose rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroetmann, I.

    1995-01-01

    In closed cycle column tests under sterile conditions there was no or hardly any sorption of the two radionuclides. In closed cycle column tests with unsterile soils, however, the two radionuclides were extremely immobilised (80 % of the output activity of Tc-95m and 40 % of the output activity of Se-75). By inoculation of the sterile columns with mixed soil cultures an increase in sorption of 40 % of the output activity was achieved which is attributed to the microbial activity. The adsorbed radionuclides in unsterile columns could be remobilized by adding a bactericide. In columns with saline water the sorption of radionuclides was slightly lower. Soils with a 5 % organic carbon content showed extremely increased sorption of the two radionuclides. In comparison with closed cycle columns shake tests were carried out. During turbulent intermixing of water and solid, no sorption of technetium was observed in unsterile tests either, while Se-75 added as selenite was strongly adsorbed to the solid. When adding acetate as a C-source, the microbially conditioned reduction of the redox potential to -100 mV and, subsequently, a strong increase of sorption could be observed. A reduction of the pH value in the soils to pH 4, and simultaneous adding of acetate significally reduced the microbial activity and the sorption of technetium, while selenite sorption remained strong as before. Sorption tests with bacteria-pure and mixed cultures showed no sorption of the pertechnetate anion in the oxidation stage (VII). However, when reducing the pertechnetate by means of SnCl2, up to 40 % of the feed activity of killed and living biomass was immobilized. Between 20-30 % of the adsorbed technetium quantity was outside at the membrane, and 40% inside the cells. After a three-day incubation period in a technetium-containing solution, a factor of 15,5 was achieved as the maximum intracellular concentration factor for the isolate 143 (Xanthomas sp.). (orig./MG) [de

  17. Influence of autochthonous micro-organisms on sorption and remobilization of technetium and selenium. Final report; Einfluss der autochthonen Mikroflora auf die Sorption und Remobilisierung des Technetiums und des Selens. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maue, G.; Stroetmann, I.; Dott, W. [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Fachgebiet Umwelthygiene; Taute, T.; Winkler, A.; Pekdeger, A. [Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany). Fachrichtung Rohstoff- und Umweltgeologie

    1996-10-31

    Within this research project the influence of autochthonous mirco-organisms on immobilization and remobilization of Technetium and Selenium was investigated. Both redoxsensitive radionuclides are part of the waste of nuclear fuel (Tc app. 6%). Former investigations have shown, that immobilization behaviour of both elements could be influenced by micro-organisms. It has not been known, if the autochthonous (or in situ) organisms from greater depth do also have an influence on radionuclide mobility. The autochthonous populations of micro-organisms in deep sediments and their influence on the migration of Tc and Se were investigated in this study. For this reason recirculation column experiments were carried out. Absolutely sterile and anaerobic handling was necessary for the sampling and the further treatment of the sediments and waters used in the experiments. Therefor special methods for sampling, storage and handling had been developed. The results of recirculation column test with autochthonous micro-organisms were compared with sterile parallel tests and were verified with the results of an elaborated version of the hydrogeochemical equilibration code PHREEQE. It was shown that the autochthonous micro-organisms had only very little influence on the migration behaviour. The reason is the very low population (less than 10 E+6 CFU). Nevertheless it has to be taken into consideration, that conventional laboratory experiments for the estimation of the retention capacities of sediments for hazardous waste lead to an overestimation, if the sediments are contaminated with allochthonous micro-organisms (CFU=colony forming units). (orig.) [Deutsch] In dem Forschungsvorhaben wurde der Einfluss der autochthonen Mikroorgansimen auf die Mobilitaet von Technetium und Selen untersucht. Beide redoxsensitiven Radionuklide sind im Abfall von Kernbrennelementen enthalten (Tc ca. 6%). Aus vorangegangenen Forschungsarbeiten ist bekannt, dass die Mobilitaet der beiden Elemente durch

  18. Technetium chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, C.; Bryan, J.; Cotton, F.; Ott, K.; Kubas, G.; Haefner, S.; Barrera, J.; Hall, K.; Burrell, A.

    1996-01-01

    Technetium chemistry is a young and developing field. Despite the limited knowledge of its chemistry, technetium is the workhorse for nuclear medicine. Technetium is also a significant environmental concern because it is formed as a byproduct of nuclear weapons production and fission-power generators. Development of new technetium radio-pharmaceuticals and effective environmental control depends strongly upon knowledge of basic technetium chemistry. The authors performed research into the basic coordination and organometallic chemistry of technetium and used this knowledge to address nuclear medicine and environmental applications. This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

  19. Magnetite effect in radionuclide retention : cesium, strontium, molybdenum and selenium; Efecto de la magnetita en la retencion de los radionucleidos en el campo proximo: cesio, estroncio, molibdeno y selenio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rovira, M.; Casas, I.; Gimenez, J.; Clarens, F.; Pablo, J. de

    2004-07-01

    In this work we have investigated the interaction of magnetite with cesium, strontium, molybdenum and selenium, in the frame of radionuclide retention by canister corrosion products. For each radionuclide, the retention on magnetite has been studied as a function of pH and the mass/ volume ratio. The experimental results have been modeled by means of Surface Complexation Models (SCM), that constitute a tool that allows an approach to sorption mechanisms in a wide range of experimental conditions taking into account electrostatic interactions at the mineral-water interface.(Author)

  20. Combined transuranic-strontium extraction process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1992-01-01

    The transuranic (TRU) elements neptunium, plutonium and americium can be separated together with strontium from nitric acid waste solutions in a single process. An extractant solution of a crown ether and an alkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialkylcarbanylmethylphosphine oxide in an appropriate diluent will extract the TRU's together with strontium, uranium and technetium. The TRU's and the strontium can then be selectively stripped from the extractant for disposal.

  1. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of dissolved arsenic, boron, lithium, selenium, strontium, thallium, and vanadium using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbarino, John R.

    1999-01-01

    The inductively coupled plasma?mass spectrometric (ICP?MS) methods have been expanded to include the determination of dissolved arsenic, boron, lithium, selenium, strontium, thallium, and vanadium in filtered, acidified natural water. Method detection limits for these elements are now 10 to 200 times lower than by former U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) methods, thus providing lower variability at ambient concentrations. The bias and variability of the method was determined by using results from spike recoveries, standard reference materials, and validation samples. Spike recoveries at 5 to 10 times the method detection limit and 75 micrograms per liter in reagent-water, surface-water, and groundwater matrices averaged 93 percent for seven replicates, although selected elemental recoveries in a ground-water matrix with an extremely high iron sulfate concentration were negatively biased by 30 percent. Results for standard reference materials were within 1 standard deviation of the most probable value. Statistical analysis of the results from about 60 filtered, acidified natural-water samples indicated that there was no significant difference between ICP?MS and former USGS official methods of analysis.

  2. Selenium Sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenium sulfide, an anti-infective agent, relieves itching and flaking of the scalp and removes the dry, ... Selenium sulfide comes in a lotion and is usually applied as a shampoo. As a shampoo, selenium ...

  3. STRONTIUM PRECIPITATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, T.R.

    1960-09-13

    A process is given for improving the precipitation of strontium from an aqueous phosphoric-acid-containing solution with nickel or cobalt ferrocyanide by simultaneously precipitating strontium or calcium phosphate. This is accomplished by adding to the ferrocyanide-containing solution calcium or strontium nitrate in a quantity to yield a concentration of from 0.004 to 0.03 and adjusting the pH of the solution to a value of above 8.

  4. Technetium in environmental waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malcolme-Lawes, D.J.; Robb, P.; Warwick, P.

    1983-01-01

    A method for the determination of technetium in a sample of environmental water is described. Technetium, in the TcO 4 - form, is extracted from the sample onto an anion-exchange resin from which it is removed subsequently by washing with 4 M sodium thiocyanate solution. The eluted technetium-thiocyanate complex is then subjected to solvent extraction, where the technetium is further concentrated into butan-2-one. The organic phase is evaporated onto a planchette and the β activity due to the technetium determined by an anticoincidence Geiger counter. Detection limits of 0.5 ng of technetium-99 have been obtained for the counter and sample volumes in excess of 500 cm 3 can be analysed readily. The sorption of several technetium compounds onto soil from a variety of water types has also been investigated. Preliminary results are presented and the importance of the chemical form of technetium used in such studies is discussed briefly. (author)

  5. Technetium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, C.A. de; Ferro F, G.

    2003-01-01

    The first radiopharmaceuticals of 99m Tc, also call of 'first generation' as colloids, aggregates and simple complexes were developed with relative easiness without it was necessary a wide understanding of its chemical structure. In the radiopharmaceuticals of 'second generation' were included those derived of the HIDA for hepatobiliary images, MAG3 and EC for images of tubular renal de purification, HMPAO and ECD for images of cerebral perfusion and MIBI and tetrofosmin for images of heart perfusion, that which implies a bigger demand in terms of the chemical knowledge. At the moment, we can affirm that the future of the radiopharmaceuticals of 99m Tc is based on the use of small and relevant biomolecules with high biological activity that allow the visualization in vivo of specific receiving sites and/or its expression in diverse pathologies. It is for it that with the 'third generation' is necessary a wide one knowledge of the chemistry of the technetium that allows the design and characterization of highly specific bio complexes. In this book, although focused mainly to the chemistry of the Tc, a brief revision is also presented on the main biologically active molecules that, coordinated the 99m Tc, present a high recognition In vivo for specific receivers. (Author)

  6. Nitrosyl complexes of technetium; Nitrosylkomplexe des Technetiums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, Janine

    2016-09-22

    The presented thesis describes syntheses and characterization of novel technetium nitrosyl compounds with various ligand systems. The main focus is the synthesis of low-valent technetium nitrosyl complexes with cyclopentadienyl ligands. [German] Gegenstand der vorliegenden Arbeit ist die Synthese und Charakterisierung neuer Technetiumnitrosylverbindungen mit unterschiedlichen Ligandensystemen. Hauptaugenmerk wurde dabei auf die Darstellung niedervalenter Tc(NO)-Verbindungen mit Cyclopentadienyl-Liganden gelegt.

  7. The regulation of technetium-99 discharges at Sellafield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayall, A.

    2002-01-01

    The reprocessing of spent Magnox fuel at BNFL Sellafield produces a liquid waste concentrate containing technetium-99 and other, more radiotoxic, radionuclides such as plutonium and americium. The concentrate is known as medium active concentrate (MAC). Prior to 1981, MAC was discharged to sea untreated after several years' storage, during which short-lived radionuclides underwent radioactive decay. In the early 1980s, discharges of MAC were suspended and it was retained in storage tanks, pending the construction of a plant to remove the radionuclides of greatest radiological concern (these did not include technetium- 99). The Enhanced Actinide Removal Plant started operation in 1994 and began to clear the backlog of stored waste MAC, as well as current arisings from Magnox reprocessing. As a consequence technetium-99 was once more discharged to sea. Subsequently, concentrations of this radionuclide in the marine environment increased. In particular, there was a significant increase in the concentration of technetium-99 in lobster in the Irish Sea. An increase in technetium-99 has also been detected at locations far distant from Sellafield, e.g. in Scandinavian coastal waters, albeit at very low concentrations. This dispersal of technetium- 99 throughout the Irish Sea and further afield has therefore caused concern, although the radiological impact is low. This paper examines the nature and source of the technetium-99 in sea discharges at Sellafield and the levels of past and current discharges as well as their impact. It goes on to describe the Environment Agency's recent proposals on the future regulation of technetium-99 discharges and how these should lead to substantial reductions in not only technetium-99 discharges, but also of other radionuclides such as caesium-137 and strontium-90. (author)

  8. Radionuclide Basics: Technetium-99

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technetium-99 (chemical symbol Tc-99) is a silver-gray, radioactive metal. It occurs naturally in very small amounts in the earth's crust, but is primarily man-made. Technetium-99m is a short-lived form of Tc-99 that is used as a medical diagnostic tool.

  9. Technetium compounds and their field of application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaitseva, L.L.; Velichko, A.V.; Vinogradov, I.V.

    1988-02-01

    This chapter reviews the different applications of technetium and technetium compounds in catalysis, corrosion inhibition, superconductivity of technetium alloys, diagnostic techniques, radioisotope generators and radiopharmaceuticals. 649 refs [fr

  10. Selenium essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Sams, Prashanth

    2015-01-01

    If you are a developer who wants to migrate from Selenium RC or any other automation tool to Selenium WebDriver, then this book is for you. Knowledge of automation tools is necessary to follow the examples in this book.

  11. Chemistry of Technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omori, Takashi

    2001-01-01

    Since the late 1970's the coordination chemistry of technetium has been developed remarkably. The background of the development is obviously related to the use of technetium radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis in nuclear medicine. Much attention has also been denoted to the chemical behavior of environmental 99 Tc released from reprocessing plants. This review covers the several aspects of technetium chemistry, including production of radioisotopes, analytical chemistry and coordination chemistry. In the analytical chemistry, separation of technetium, emphasizing chromatography and solvent extraction, is described together with spectrophotometric determination of technetium. In the coordination chemistry of technetium, a characteristic feature of the chemistry of Tc(V) complexes is referred from the view point of the formation of a wide variety of highly stable complexes containing the Tc=O or Tc≡N bond. Kinetic studies of the preparation of Tc(III) complexes using hexakis (thiourea) technetium(III) ion as a starting material are summarized, together with the base hydrolysis reactions of Tc(III), Tc(IV) and Tc(V) complexes. (author)

  12. Assessment of Technetium in the Savannah River Site Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlton, W.H.; Denham, M.; Evans, A.G.

    1993-07-01

    Assessment of Technetium in the Savannah River Site Environment is the last in a series of eight documents on individual radioisotopes released to the environment as a result of SRS operations. The earlier documents describe the environmental consequences of tritium cesium, iodine, uranium plutonium, strontium, and carbon. Technetium transport and metabolism have been studied by the nuclear industry because it is a fission product of uranium, and by the medical community because 99m Tc commonly is used as a diagnostic imaging agent in nuclear medicine. Technetium has been produced at SRS during the operation of five production reactors. The only isotope with environmental significance is 99 Tc. Because of the small activities of 99 Tc relative to other fission products, such as 90 Sr and 137 Cs, no measurements were made of releases to either the atmosphere or surface waters. Dose calculations were made in this document using conservative estimates of atmospheric releases and from a few measurements of 99 Tc concentrations in the Savannah River. Technetium in groundwater has been found principally in the vicinity of the separation areas seepage basins. Technetium is soluble in water and follows groundwater flow with little retardation. While most groundwater samples are negative or show little technetium a few samples have levels slightly above the limits set by the EPA for drinking water. The overall radiological impact of SRS 99 Tc releases on the offsite maximally exposed individual during 38 years of operations can be characterized by maximum individual doses of 0.1 mrem (atmospheric) and 0.8 mrem (liquid), compared with a dose of 13,680 mrem from non-SRS sources during the same time period. Technetium releases have resulted in a negligible risk to the environment and the population it supports

  13. Thermal conductivity of technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, K.; Serizawa, H.; Fukuda, K.

    1998-01-01

    The thermal diffusivity of technetium was measured on a disk sample of 5 mm in diameter and 1 mm in thickness by the laser flash method from room temperature to 1173 K, and the thermal conductivity was determined by the measured thermal diffusivity and density, and the reported specific heat capacity. The thermal diffusivity of technetium decreases with increasing temperature though it is almost constant above 600 K. The thermal conductivity of technetium shows a minimum around 400 K, above which the thermal conductivity increases with temperature. The electronic and phonon components of the thermal conductivity were evaluated approximately. The increase in the thermal conductivity of technetium with temperature is due to the increase in the electronic component. (orig.)

  14. Electrochemistry of technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, C.D.; Alabama Univ., Birmingham

    1982-01-01

    Recent work on the electrochemistry of technetium is reviewed, covering the period 1973-1980. Topics include polarographic studies of aqueous pertechnetate, coulometric studies of aqueous pertechnetate at mercury cathodes, and electrochemistry of pertechnetate at solid electrodes. A review is also given of electrochemistry of other technetium compounds, non-aqueous systems, chemical redox reactions, and substitution reactions. Consideration is also given to studies of electrochemistry at tracer concentrations, electrolytic syntheses, standard electrode potentials, and electroanalytical methods. (author)

  15. Final Report Technetium Monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, W.A.

    2003-01-01

    The Hanford River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) is required by the current contract to remove radioactive technetium FR-om stored caustic nuclear waste solutions. The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) has worked with typical envelopes of these wastes to optimize the removal process. To support the studies, SRTC developed a rapid on-line remote analyzer to monitor technetium and rhenium levels in solutions as well as track other metals in the solutions through the process operations. Rhenium was used as a non-radioactive substitute for technetium in process development studies. The remote monitor was based on inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICPES). Fiber optic cable and extended RF cabling removed the plasma source FR-om the spectrometer and instrument electronics

  16. Technetium in chemistry and nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, E.; Nicolini, M.; Wagner, H.N.

    1983-01-01

    This volume explores the potential of technetium radiopharmaceuticals in clinical nuclear medicine. The authors examine the capabilities of synthetic inorganic chemists to synthesize technetium radiopharmaceuticals and the specific requirements of the nuclear medicine practitioner. Sections cover the chemistry of technetium, the production of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with technetium, and the use of technetium radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine

  17. Preliminary study of the migration of technetium in soil under hydrous conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sisson, D.H.; MacLean, S.C.; Schulz, R.K.; Borg, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    The sorption of technetium compared to sodium, cesium, and strontium by a common agricultural soil was measured using a column method. As expected, no sorption of Tc occurred under conditions that substantially removed Na + , Cs + , and Sr ++ . High radioactivity levels were used to establish absorption profiles over six orders of magnitude of tracer concentration. Behavior of initially dry columns was compared with that of initially water-saturated columns; the results were not quantitatively different although there was a qualitative difference in the appearance of the profiles. Technetium tracked the moisture content of the column and hence migrated at the veloccity of the aqueous medium

  18. Selenium biofortification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant foods are the major dietary sources of selenium (Se) in most countries around the world, followed by meats and seafood. For this reason, it is vital to increase Se uptake by plants and to produce crops with higher Se concentrations and bioavailability in their edible tissues. One of the most p...

  19. Fluorido complexes of technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariappan Balasekaran, Samundeeswari

    2013-01-01

    Fluorine chemistry has received considerable interest during recent years due to its significant role in the life sciences, especially for drug development. Despite the great nuclear medicinal importance of the radioactive metal technetium in radiopharmaceuticals, its coordination chemistry with the fluorido ligand is by far less explored than that of other ligands. Up to now, only a few technetium fluorides are known. This thesis contains the synthesis, spectroscopic and structural characterization of novel technetium fluorides in the oxidation states ''+1'', ''+2'', ''+4'' and ''+6''. In the oxidation state ''+6'', the fluoridotechnetates were synthesized either from nitridotechnetic(VI) acid or from pertechnetate by using reducing agent and have been isolated as cesium or tetraethylammonium salts. The compounds were characterized spectroscopically and structurally. In the intermediate oxidation state ''+4'', hexafluoridotechnetate(IV) was known for long time and studied spectroscopically. This thesis reports novel and improved syntheses and solved the critical issues of early publications such as the color, some spectroscopic properties and the structure of this key compound. Single crystal analyses of alkali metal, ammonium and tetramethylammonium salts of hexafluoridotechnetate(IV) are presented. In aqueous alkaline solutions, the ammonium salt of hexafluoridotechnetate(IV) undergoes hydrolysis and forms an oxido-bridged dimeric complex. It is the first step hydrolysis product of hexafluoridotechnetate(IV) and was characterized by spectroscopic and crystallographic methods. Low-valent technetium fluorides with the metal in the oxidation states of ''+2'' or ''+1'' are almost unknown. A detailed description of the synthesis and characterization of pentafluoridonitrosyltechnetate(II) is presented. The complex was isolated as alkali metal salts, and spectroscopic as well as structural features of the complexes are presented. Different salts of the trans

  20. Anomalous properties of technetium clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryuchkov, S.V.

    1985-01-01

    On the basis of critical evaluation of literature data in the field of chemistry of technetium cluster compounds with ligands of a weak field a conclusion is made on specific, ''anomalous'' properties of technetium cluster complexes which consist in an increased ability of the given element to the formation of a series of binuclear and multinuclear clusters, similar in composition and structure and easily transforming in each other. The majority of technetium clusters unlike similar compounds of other elements are paramagnetic with one unpaired electron on ''metallic'' MO of loosening type. All theoretical conceptions known today on the electronic structure of technetium clusters are considered. It is pointed out, that the best results in the explanation of ''anomalous'' properties of technetium clusters can be obtained in the framework of nonempirical methods of self-consistent field taking into account configuration interactions. It is also shown, that certain properties of technetium clusters can be explained on the basis of qualitative model of Coulomb repulsion of metal atoms in clusters. The conclusion is made, that technetium position in the Periodic table, as well as recently detected technetium property to the decrease of effective charge on its atoms during M-M bond formation promote a high ability of the element to cluster formation both with weak field ligands and with strong field one

  1. Technetium discharges into the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luykx, F.

    1986-01-01

    Technetium-99 is the most important technetium isotope released to the environment because of its long life and its relatively high fission yield. Its release to date, mainly as a result of nuclear fuel reprocessing, is estimated to be of the order of 1000 TBq. The quantity from nuclear weapons testing would only be some 10-15% of this value. (author)

  2. Fluorido complexes of technetium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariappan Balasekaran, Samundeeswari

    2013-07-04

    Fluorine chemistry has received considerable interest during recent years due to its significant role in the life sciences, especially for drug development. Despite the great nuclear medicinal importance of the radioactive metal technetium in radiopharmaceuticals, its coordination chemistry with the fluorido ligand is by far less explored than that of other ligands. Up to now, only a few technetium fluorides are known. This thesis contains the synthesis, spectroscopic and structural characterization of novel technetium fluorides in the oxidation states ''+1'', ''+2'', ''+4'' and ''+6''. In the oxidation state ''+6'', the fluoridotechnetates were synthesized either from nitridotechnetic(VI) acid or from pertechnetate by using reducing agent and have been isolated as cesium or tetraethylammonium salts. The compounds were characterized spectroscopically and structurally. In the intermediate oxidation state ''+4'', hexafluoridotechnetate(IV) was known for long time and studied spectroscopically. This thesis reports novel and improved syntheses and solved the critical issues of early publications such as the color, some spectroscopic properties and the structure of this key compound. Single crystal analyses of alkali metal, ammonium and tetramethylammonium salts of hexafluoridotechnetate(IV) are presented. In aqueous alkaline solutions, the ammonium salt of hexafluoridotechnetate(IV) undergoes hydrolysis and forms an oxido-bridged dimeric complex. It is the first step hydrolysis product of hexafluoridotechnetate(IV) and was characterized by spectroscopic and crystallographic methods. Low-valent technetium fluorides with the metal in the oxidation states of ''+2'' or ''+1'' are almost unknown. A detailed description of the synthesis and characterization of pentafluoridonitrosyltechnetate(II) is presented. The

  3. [Selenium treatment in thyreopathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotak, Štefan

    Selenium (latin Selenium) is a micronutrient embedded in several proteins. In adults, the thyroid is the organ with the highest amount of selenium per gram of tissue. Selenium levels in the body depend on the characteristics of the population and its diet and geographic area. In the thyroid, selenium is required for the antioxidant function and for the metabolism of thyroid hormones. The literature suggests that selenium supplementation of patients with Hashimotos thyroiditis is associated with a reduction in antithyroperoxidase antibody levels. Selenium supplementation also in mild Graves orbitopathy is associated with delayed progression of ocular disorders. As a consequence of this observation The European Group on Graves Orbitopathy recommend six months selenium preparates supportive therapy for patients with mild form of Graves orbitopathy.Key words: Graves-Basedows disease - Hashimotos thyroiditis - selenium - supplementation.

  4. Technetium behavior and recovery in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinken, G.E.

    1995-12-01

    Technetium-99 in soils is of great concern because of its long half-life and because it can not be detected readily. This work reviews the behavior of technetium in various types of soils. A method for extracting technetium from soil was developed with the use of technetium-95m and 99m to determine recoveries at each step. Technetium chemistry is very complicated and problem areas in the behavior and recovery have been highlighted. Technetium is widely used in nuclear medicine and a review of its chemistry pertaining to radiopharmaceuticals is relevant and helpful in environmental studies. The technetium behavior in the patented citric acid method for the removal of toxic metals in contaminated soils was studied. An innovative method using solid phase extraction media for the concentration of technetium extracted from soils, with water and hydrogen peroxide, was developed. This technique may have a useful environmental application for this type of remediation of technetium from contaminated

  5. Technetium Behavior and Recovery in Soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinken,G.E.

    1995-12-01

    Technetium-99 in soils is of great concern because of its long half-life and because it can not be detected readily. This work reviews the behavior of technetium in various types of soils. A method for extracting technetium from soil was developed with the use of technetium-95m and 99m to determine recoveries at each step. Technetium chemistry is very complicated and problem areas in the behavior and recovery have been highlighted. Technetium is widely used in nuclear medicine and a review of its chemistry pertaining to radiopharmaceuticals is relevant and helpful in environmental studies. The technetium behavior in the patented citric acid method for the removal of toxic metals in contaminated soils was studied. An innovative method using solid phase extraction media for the concentration of technetium extracted from soils, with water and hydrogen peroxide, was developed. This technique may have a useful environmental application for this type of remediation of technetium from contaminated soils.

  6. Substitution reactions of technetium complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omori, T.

    1997-01-01

    Substitution reactions of a series of technetium complexes are considered in comparison with corresponding reactions of rhenium. Rhenium and technetium complexes are rather inert in substitution reactions, the latter are characterized by greater rate constants when they proceed according to dissociative mechanism. In rare cases when k Tc /k Re id little it is assumed that the reaction proceeds according to the associative mechanism. (author)

  7. Rubidium-strontium method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubansky, A.

    1980-01-01

    The rubidium-strontium geological dating method is based on the determination of the Rb and Sr isotope ratio in rocks, mainly using mass spectrometry. The method is only practical for silicate minerals and rocks, potassium feldspars and slates. Also described is the rubidium-strontium isochrone method. This, however, requires a significant amount of experimental data and an analysis of large quantities of samples, often of the order of tons. The results are tabulated of rubidium-strontium dating of geological formations in the Czech Socialist Republic. (M.S.)

  8. Aquatic Life Criterion - Selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Documents pertaining to the 2016 Acute and Chronic Ambient Aquatic Life Water Quality Criteria for Selenium (Freshwater). These documents include what the safe levels of Selenium are in water for the majority of species.

  9. Selenium content of mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stijve, T

    1977-07-29

    The selenium contents of 83 species of wild mushrooms were determined by oxygen combustion of the sample, followed by conversion of selenite to bromopiazselenol and final estimation by electron capture gas-liquid chromatography. Selenium concentration were found to range from 0.012-20.0 mg/kg dry weight. Selenium content was species-dependent. High concentrations were found in Agaricaceae and in certain Boletaceae of the genus Tubiporus, whereas in Russulaceae, Amanitaceae and Cantharellaceae selenium-rich species were absent or rare. Ascomycetes and all mushrooms growing on wood had a very low selenium content. The highest selenium concentrations (up to 20 ppm) were found in Boletus (Tubiporus) edulis, a most popular edible mushroom. Analyses of various parts of carpophores of B. edulis, Suillus luteus and Amanita muscaria indicate that in all three species the stalk contains less selenium than the fleshy part of the cap. In Boletus and Suillus the highest selenium content was found in the tubes.

  10. Selenium and Human Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Abedi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Selenium is an essential element for human health and it is toxic at high concentrations. Selenium is a constituent component of selenoproteins that have enzymatic and structural roles in human biochemistry. Selenium is a best antioxidant and catalyst for production of thyroid hormone. This element has the key role in the immune function; prevention of AIDS progression and the deactivity of toxins. Furthermore, selenium is essential for sperm motility and can reduce abortions. Selenium deficiency was also associated with adverse mood states. The findings regarding cardiovascular disease risk related to selenium deficiency is unclear, though other conditions such as vascular inflammation, oxidative stress and selenium deficiency can cause this disease too. Moreover, consuming of 60 mg of selenium per day may be associated with reduction of cancer risk. In this study, a review of studies has been performed on the biochemical function of selenium toxicity, and its effects on human health. Furthermore, certain identified cancers associated with selenium have been discussed to absorb more attention to the status of this element and also as a guide for further studies. Selenium plays the dual character (useful and harmful in human health, and then it is necessary to determine the concentration of this element in body fluids and tissues. An appropriate method for routine measurement of selenium in clinical laboratories is electro thermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS with very low detection limit and good precision.

  11. Photostriction of strontium ruthenate

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Tzu-Chiao; Wang, Hsin-Ping; Liu, Heng-Jui; Tsai, Dung-Sheng; Ke, Jr-Jian; Wu, Chung-Lun; Yin, Yu-Peng; Zhan, Qian; Lin, Gong-Ru; Chu, Ying-Hao; He, Jr-Hau

    2017-01-01

    Transition metal oxides with a perovskite crystal structure exhibit a variety of physical properties associated with the lattice. Among these materials, strontium ruthenate (SrRuO3) displays unusually strong coupling of charge, spin and lattice

  12. Band structure of even-even selenium isotopes in the proton-neutron interacting boson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaup, U.; Moenkemeyer, C.; Brentano, P. von

    1983-01-01

    Available systematic IBM calculations [1-6] for Krypton and Strontium isotopes have been extended to Selenium. The analysis in terms of the IBM is complicated by the interplay of collective and noncollective degrees of freedom. However, satisfactory agreement has been obtained for N>=42. (orig.)

  13. Chemistry and structure of technetium complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldas, J.; Boas, J.F.; Bonnyman, J.; Williams, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    The structures of tris(2-aminobenzenethiolato) technetium(VI) and dichlorobis(diethyldithiocarbamato) thionitrosyltechnetium(V) have been determined by single crystal x-ray diffraction analysis. The preparation and chemistry of thiocyanato complexes of technetium have been investigated

  14. Separation, Concentration, and Immobilization of Technetium and Iodine from Alkaline Supernate Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Harvey; Michael Gula

    1998-12-07

    Development of remediation technologies for the characterization, retrieval, treatment, concentration, and final disposal of radioactive and chemical tank waste stored within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex represents an enormous scientific and technological challenge. A combined total of over 90 million gallons of high-level waste (HLW) and low-level waste (LLW) are stored in 335 underground storage tanks at four different DOE sites. Roughly 98% of this waste is highly alkaline in nature and contains high concentrations of nitrate and nitrite salts along with lesser concentrations of other salts. The primary waste forms are sludge, saltcake, and liquid supernatant with the bulk of the radioactivity contained in the sludge, making it the largest source of HLW. The saltcake (liquid waste with most of the water removed) and liquid supernatant consist mainly of sodium nitrate and sodium hydroxide salts. The main radioactive constituent in the alkaline supernatant is cesium-137, but strontium-90, technetium-99, and transuranic nuclides are also present in varying concentrations. Reduction of the radioactivity below Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) limits would allow the bulk of the waste to be disposed of as LLW. Because of the long half-life of technetium-99 (2.1 x 10 5 y) and the mobility of the pertechnetate ion (TcO 4 - ) in the environment, it is expected that technetium will have to be removed from the Hanford wastes prior to disposal as LLW. Also, for some of the wastes, some level of technetium removal will be required to meet LLW criteria for radioactive content. Therefore, DOE has identified a need to develop technologies for the separation and concentration of technetium-99 from LLW streams. Eichrom has responded to this DOE-identified need by demonstrating a complete flowsheet for the separation, concentration, and immobilization of technetium (and iodine) from alkaline supernatant waste.

  15. Strontium-82/rubidium-82 generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gennaro, G.P.; Haney, P.S.

    1986-01-01

    Hydroxylapatite, a compound having the formula: M 10 (PO 4 ) 6 (OH) 2 wherein M is calcium, strontium, barium, lead, iron, sodium, potassium, zinc, cadmium, magnesium, aluminium or a rare earth metal, is provided as a support medium for strontium-82 in a strontium-82/rubidium-82 parent-daughter radionuclide generator

  16. Technetium-aspirin molecule complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shahawy, A.S.; Mahfouz, R.M.; Aly, A.A.M.; El-Zohry, M.

    1993-01-01

    Technetium-aspirin and technetium-aspirin-like molecule complexes were prepared. The structure of N-acetylanthranilic acid (NAA) has been decided through CNDO calculations. The ionization potential and electron affinity of the NAA molecule as well as the charge densities were calculated. The electronic absorption spectra of Tc(V)-Asp and Tc(V)-ATS complexes have two characteristic absorption bands at 450 and 600 nm, but the Tc(V)-NAA spectrum has one characteristic band at 450 nm. As a comparative study, Mo-ATS complex was prepared and its electronic absorption spectrum is comparable with the Tc-ATS complex spectrum. (author)

  17. Selenium in edible mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falandysz, Jerzy

    2008-01-01

    Selenium is vital to human health. This article is a compendium of virtually all the published data on total selenium concentrations, its distribution in fruitbody, bioconcentration factors, and chemical forms in wild-grown, cultivated, and selenium-enriched mushrooms worldwide. Of the 190 species reviewed (belonging to 21 families and 56 genera), most are considered edible, and a few selected data relate to inedible mushrooms. Most of edible mushroom species examined until now are selenium-poor (cesarea, A. campestris, A. edulis, A. macrosporus, and A. silvaticus. A particularly rich source of selenium could be obtained from selenium-enriched mushrooms that are cultivated on a substrate fortified with selenium (as inorganic salt or selenized-yeast). The Se-enriched Champignon Mushroom could contain up to 30 or 110 microg Se/g dw, while the Varnished Polypore (Ganoderma lucidum) could contain up to 72 microg Se/g dw. An increasingly growing database on chemical forms of selenium of mushrooms indicates that the seleno-compounds identified in carpophore include selenocysteine, selenomethionine, Se-methylselenocysteine, selenite, and several unidentified seleno-compounds; their proportions vary widely. Some aspects of environmental selenium occurrence and human body pharmacokinetics and nutritional needs will also be briefly discussed in this review.

  18. Environmental behavior of technetium-99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turcotte, M.D.S.

    1982-12-01

    This report presents a review of the literature on technetium-99. The chemical and physical properties of some technetium compounds are considered, and a discussion of possible source terms is included. Literature on the environmental behavior of technetium is presented, including its behavior in the bodies of animals and humans. The primary sources of Tc-99 in the environment are fallout from atomic detonations and releases from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. The environmental behavior of technetium-99 has been studied predominantly with respect to movement in soil and accumulation in plants. There is a surprising scarcity of data on behavior of Tc-99 in the atmosphere and in aquatic systems. Additional work needs to be conducted in these two areas to determine behavior and to acquire baseline concentration data. Much of the soil work has produced contradictory results. In-depth studies of holdup mechanisms for Tc-99 in both geological repositories and soil need to be conducted. Since plants represent a potential bioaccumulation of Tc-99, plant uptake studies of Tc-99 under field conditions also need to be done

  19. Oscillator strengths for neutral technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garstang, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Oscillator strengths have been calculated for most of the spectral lines of TcI which are of interest in the study of stars of spectral type S. Oscillator strengths have been computed for the corresponding transitions in MnI as a partial check of the technetium calculations

  20. Technetium migration in natural clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luebke, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The present work was performed within the joint research project ''Retention of repository relevant radionuclides in argillaceous rocks and saline systems'' (contract no.: 02E10981), funded by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi). The aim was to obtain first insights into the interaction of the long-lived fission product technetium and natural clay with regard to a repository for high-level nuclear waste. For this purpose Opalinus Clay from Mont Terri (northern Switzerland) was used as a reference material. The nuclide technetium-99 will contribute to the radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuel for more than thousand years due to its long half-live. In case of a leakage of the storage vessels, the geochemistry of technetium is determined by its oxidation state, at which only the oxidation states +IV and +VII are relevant. Because of the high solubility and low affinity to sorption on surfaces of minerals, Tc(VII) is considered to be very mobile and thus the most hazardous species. The focuses of this study therefore are diffusion experiments with this mobile species and investigations of the effect of ferrous iron on the mobility and speciation of technetium.rnThe interaction of technetium and Opalinus Clay was studied in sorption and diffusion experiments varying several parameters (pH value, addition of reducing agents, effect of oxygen, diffusion pathways). In the course of this study spatially resolved investigations of the speciation have been performed on Opalinus Clay thin sections and bore cores for the first time. In addition to the speciation, further information regarding elemental distributions and crystalline phases near technetium enrichments were obtained. Supplementary investigations of powder samples allowed determining the molecular structure of technetium on the clay surface.rnBoth the combination of sorption experiments with spectroscopic investigations and the diffusion experiment exhibit a reduction of Tc

  1. Thermoluminescence of strontium tetraborate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago, M.; Caselli, E.; Lester, M.

    1999-01-01

    The thermoluminescent properties of crystalline strontium tetraborate are reported. Without activators it has an efficiency comparable to that of TLD-700 powder. Its fading after 40 days amount to less than 2%. The isometric plot shows that most of the emitted light is concentrated at wavelengths ranging from 350 to 450 nm, which accounts partially for the high efficiency. (author)

  2. Technetium accumulation, fate, and behavior in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cataldo, D.A.; Wildung, R.E.; Garland, T.R.

    1978-01-01

    Technetium, a product of the nuclear fuel cycle, is highly soluble in water and mobile in soils as the pertechnetate ion (TcO - 4 ). Soluble ions in soil have the potential for competing with nutrient ions for membrane carrier sites involved in ion uptake by plants. A study was, therefore, undertaken to determine the availability, toxicity, and mechanism of pertechnetate uptake by soybean (Glycine max cv. Williams). Technetium was effectively accumulated by plants at soil concentrations of 0.01 to 0.1 μg/g and in nutrient culture at levels as low as 0.02 pg/ml. Plants grown on soils containing technetium at levels below 0.1 μg/g effectively removed up to 90% of the technetium from soil. Minimal mobilization of technetium from vegetative tissues to the seed occurred during senescence. Chemical analyses indicated that the xylem-mobile form of technetium was TcO 4 - . The uptake rate of technetium by intact plants was multiphasic over the concentration range of 0.01 to 10μM; this suggests active uptake and a specificity for technetium in the root absorption process. Because of the efficiency of technetium accumulation and the probability of its chemical toxicity, competition kinetic studies were undertaken to identify possible nutrient analogs. Nutrients effective in reducing technetium uptake included the Mn 2+ , SO 4 2- , H 2 PO 4 - , and MoO 4 2- ions

  3. Selenium in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... how much of the mineral was in the soil where the plants grew. Brazil nuts are a very good source of selenium. Fish, shellfish , red meat, grains, eggs, chicken, liver, and garlic ... soil have higher levels of selenium. Brewer's yeast, wheat ...

  4. Sample preparation and characterization of technetium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, Kazuo; Serizawa, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Kousaku; Itoh, Mitsuo

    1997-10-01

    Technetium-99 is a long-lived fission product with a half-life of about 2.1 x 10 5 years, which decays by β-emission. For the transmutation of 99 Tc, research on solid technetium was started. Technetium metal powder purchased was analyzed by X-ray diffraction, γ-ray spectrometry, and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry and -mass spectrometry. The lattice parameters obtained were agreed with the reported values. The metallic impurity was about 15 ppm, where aluminum and iron contributed mainly. No impurity nuclide with γ-emission was found. Using the technetium metal powder, button-, rod-, and disk-shaped samples of technetium metal were prepared by arc-melting technique. Thermal diffusivity of technetium metal was measured on a disk sample from room temperature to 1173 K by laser flash method. The thermal diffusivity decreased with increasing temperature though it was almost constant above 600 K. (author)

  5. Behaviour of technetium in marine algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonotto, S.; Kirchmann, R.; Van Baelen, J.; Hurtger, C.; Cogneau, M.; Van der Ben, D.; Verthe, C.; Bouquegneau, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Uptake and distribution of technetium were studied in several green (Acetabularia acetabulum, Boergesenia forbesii, Ulva lactuca) and brown (Ascophyllum nodosum, Fucus serratus, Fucus spiralis and Fucus vesiculosus) marine algae. Technetium was supplied to the algae as Tc-95m-pertechnetate. Under laboratory conditions, the algae were capable of accumulating technetium, with the exception, however, of Boergesenia, which showed concentration factors (C.F.) comprised between 0.28 and 0.71. The concentration of technetium-99 in Fucus spiralis, collected along the Belgian coast, was measured by a radiochemical procedure. The intracellular distribution of technetium was studied by differential centrifugation in Acetabularia and by the puncturing technique in Boergesenia. The chemical forms of technetium penetrated into the cells were investigated by selective chemical extractions, molecular sieving and thin layer chromatography

  6. Behaviour of technetium in marine algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonotto, S.; Kirchmann, R.; Baelen, J. van; Hurtgen, C.; Cogneau, M.; Ben, D. van der; Verthe, C.; Bouquegneau, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Uptake and distribution of technetium were studied in several green (Acetabularia acetabulum, Boergesenia forbesii, Ulva lactuca) and brown (Ascophyllum nodosum, Fucus serratus, Fucus spiralis and Fucus vesiculosus) marine algae. Technetium was supplied to the algae as Tc-95-pertechnetate. Under laboratory conditions, the algae were capable of accumulating technetium, with the exception, however, of Boergesenia, which showed concentration factors (C.F.) comprised between 0.28 and 0.71. The concentration of technetium-99 in Fucus spiralis, collected along the Belgian coast, was measured by a radiochemical procedure. The intracellular distribution of technetium was studied by differential centrifugation in Acetabularia and by the puncturing technique in Boergesenia. The chemical forms of technetium penetrated into the cells were investigated by selective chemical extractions, molecular sieving and thin layer chromatography. (author)

  7. Technetium recovery from high alkaline solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, Charles A.

    2016-07-12

    Disclosed are methods for recovering technetium from a highly alkaline solution. The highly alkaline solution can be a liquid waste solution from a nuclear waste processing system. Methods can include combining the solution with a reductant capable of reducing technetium at the high pH of the solution and adding to or forming in the solution an adsorbent capable of adsorbing the precipitated technetium at the high pH of the solution.

  8. Method of producing radioactive technetium-99M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karageozian, H.L.

    1979-01-01

    A chromatographic process of producing high purity and high yield radioactive Technetium-99m. A solution containing Molybdenum-99m and Technetium-99m is placed on a chromatographic column and eluted with a neutral solvent system comprising an organic solvent and from about 0.1 to less than about 10% of water or from about 1 to less than about 70% of a solvent selected from the group consisting of aliphatic alcohols having 1 to 6 carbon atoms. The eluted solvent system containing the Technetium-99m is then removed leaving the Technetium-99m as a dry, particulate residue

  9. Sorption of radionuclide technetium on minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Min; Fan Xianhua; Wei Liansheng; Zhang Yingjie; Jiao Haiyang

    2004-01-01

    The study on adsorption behavior of technetium on antimonial minerals is performed in batch experiments and the influence of adsorption time, mineral granularity, solid-liquid ratio, initial concentration, pH value and reducing ion. On technetium adsorption are considered according to adsorption ratios of hepta valent and quadrivalent technetium on stibnite and antimony ocher, the results show that reduction of technetium from heptavelence to quadrivalence could improve adsorption ratios, which provide reference data for selecting buffer-backfill materials in high level rad waste deep geological diplosal. (author)

  10. Selenium for preventing cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Dennert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Selenium is a trace element essential to humans. Higher selenium exposure and selenium supplements have been suggested to protect against several types of cancers. OBJECTIVE: Two research questions were addressed in this review: What is the evidence for: 1. an aetiological relationship between selenium exposure and cancer risk in women and men?; 2. the efficacy of selenium supplementation for cancer prevention in women and men? SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched electronic databases and bibliographies of reviews and included publications. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included prospective observational studies to answer research question (a and randomised controlled trials (RCTs to answer research question (b. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We conducted random effects meta-analyses of epidemiological data when five or more studies were retrieved for a specific outcome. We made a narrative summary of data from RCTs. MAIN RESULTS: We included 49 prospective observational studies and six RCTs. In epidemiologic data, we found a reduced cancer incidence (summary odds ratio, OR, 0.69; 95% confidence interval, CI, 0.53 to 0.91 and mortality (OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.36 to 0.83 with higher selenium exposure. Cancer risk was more pronouncedly reduced in men (incidence: OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.42 to 1.05 than in women (incidence: OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.45 to 1.77. These findings have potential limitations due to study design, quality and heterogeneity of the data, which complicated the interpretation of the summary statistics. The RCTs found no protective efficacy of selenium yeast supplementation against non-melanoma skin cancer or L-selenomethionine supplementation against prostate cancer. Study results for the prevention of liver cancer with selenium supplements were inconsistent and studies had an unclear risk of bias. The results of the Nutritional Prevention of Cancer Trial (NPCT and SELECT raised concerns about possible harmful effects of selenium supplements. AUTHORS

  11. Technetium removal from aqueous wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, P.A.; Jones, C.P.; Junkison, A.R.; Turner, A.D.; Kavanagh, P.R.

    1992-03-01

    The research discussed in this report has compared several ''state of the art'' techniques for the removal of traces of the radionuclide, technetium, from aqueous wastes. The techniques investigated were: electrochemical reduction to an insoluble oxide, electrochemical ion exchange, seeded ultrafiltration and chemical reduction followed by filtration. Each technique was examined using a simulant based upon the waste generated by the Enhanced Actinide Removal Plant (EARP) at Sellafield. The technique selected for further investigation was direct electrochemical reduction which offers an ideal route for the removal of technetium from the stream (DFs 10-100) and can be operated continuously with a low power consumption 25 kW for the waste generated by EARP. Cell designs for scale up have been suggested to treat the 1000m 3 of waste produced every day. Future work is proposed to investigate the simultaneous removal of other key radionuclides, such as ruthenium, plutonium and cobalt as well as scale up of the resulting process and to investigate the effect of these other radionuclides on the efficiency of the electrochemical reduction technique for the removal of technetium. Total development and full scale plant costs are estimated to be of the order of 5 pounds - 10M, with a time scale of 5 -8 years to realisation. (author)

  12. Technetium complexation by macrocyclic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Fan Yu.

    1983-01-01

    Research in nuclear medicine are directed towards the labelling of biological molecules, however, sup(99m)Tc does not show sufficient affinity for these molecules. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of macrocyclic compounds to bind strongly technetium in order to be used as complexation intermediate. The reducing agents used were a stannous complex and sodium dithionite. Cryptates and polyesters are not good complexing agents. They form two complexes: a 2:1 sandwich complex or 3:2 and a 1:1 complex. Cyclams are good complexing agents for technetium their complexations strength was determined by competition with pyrophosphate, gluconate and DTPA. Using the method of ligand exchange, the oxidation state of technetium in the Tc-cyclam complex was IV or V. They are 1:1 cationic complexes, the complex charge is +1. The biodistribution in rats of labelling solutions containing (cyclam 14 ane N 4 ) C 12 H 25 shows a good urinary excretion without intoxication risks [fr

  13. Analysis of radioactive strontium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    In environmental radiation survey, radioactive strontium has been analyzed in compliance with the manual ''Analyzing methods for radioactive strontium'' published in 1960 by the Science and Technology Agency, Japan, and revised in 1963. However, in a past decade, progress and development in analyzing methods and measuring equipments have been significant, therefore the manual was revised in 1974. Major revisions are as follows. (1) Analysis of 90 Sr with long half life was changed to the main theme and that of 89 Sr with short half life became a subordinate one. (2) Measuring criteria and sampling volume were revised. (3) Sample collection method was unified. (4) Analyzing method for soil was improved to NaOH-HCl method which has good recovery rate. (5) 90 Y separation method of simple operation was added for sea water analysis besides EDTA and fuming nitric acid methods. (6) Flame spectrometry for quantitative analysis of stable strontium was revised to atomic absorption spectrometry. The contents of the manual comprises 11 chapters describing introduction, measuring criteria for 90 Sr ( 89 Sr), rain and dust, land water, sea water, soil, sea bottom and river bottom sediments (changed from human urine and human bones), crops, milk (the previous one chapter was divided into two), marine organisms, and everyday foods, respectively. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  14. Why Nature Chose Selenium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Hans J; Hondal, Robert J

    2016-04-15

    The authors were asked by the Editors of ACS Chemical Biology to write an article titled "Why Nature Chose Selenium" for the occasion of the upcoming bicentennial of the discovery of selenium by the Swedish chemist Jöns Jacob Berzelius in 1817 and styled after the famous work of Frank Westheimer on the biological chemistry of phosphate [Westheimer, F. H. (1987) Why Nature Chose Phosphates, Science 235, 1173-1178]. This work gives a history of the important discoveries of the biological processes that selenium participates in, and a point-by-point comparison of the chemistry of selenium with the atom it replaces in biology, sulfur. This analysis shows that redox chemistry is the largest chemical difference between the two chalcogens. This difference is very large for both one-electron and two-electron redox reactions. Much of this difference is due to the inability of selenium to form π bonds of all types. The outer valence electrons of selenium are also more loosely held than those of sulfur. As a result, selenium is a better nucleophile and will react with reactive oxygen species faster than sulfur, but the resulting lack of π-bond character in the Se-O bond means that the Se-oxide can be much more readily reduced in comparison to S-oxides. The combination of these properties means that replacement of sulfur with selenium in nature results in a selenium-containing biomolecule that resists permanent oxidation. Multiple examples of this gain of function behavior from the literature are discussed.

  15. Recovery of technetium from nuclear fuel wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlin, W.W.

    1975-01-01

    Technetium is removed from aqueous, acidic waste solutions. The acidic waste solution is mixed with a flocculant, e.g., an alkaline earth metal hydroxide or oxide, to precipitate certain fission products. Technetium remains in solution and in the resulting supernatant alkaline aqueous phase. The supernatant alkaline aqueous phase is made acidic and electrolyzed in an electrolytic cell under controlled cathodic potential conditions to deposit technetium on the cathode. Elemental technetium is removed from the cathode. Technetium is separated from other plated fission product metals by extraction from an alkaline solution with an organic extractant, such as pyridine, having affinity for technetium. Technetium is separated from the organic extractant by steam distillation and the resulting aqueous phase treated with ammoniacal reagent to precipitate technetium as ammonium pertechnetate. The precipitate may be acidified to form an aqueous acidic solution of fission product metal values and the solution electrolyzed in an electrolytic cell under controlled cathodic potential conditions and at a potential sufficiently negative to plate out from the solution those fission product metals desired. The metal deposit is stripped from the cathode and stored until its radioactivity has diminished. (U.S.)

  16. Process for producing radioactive technetium 99 m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karageozian, H.L.

    1979-01-01

    Active aluminium oxide containing Molybdenum 99 and technetium 99 m is treated with a neutral solvent consisting of water, methylethylketone and ethanol. Technetium 99 m remains on the chromatographic material after drying, in the form of a dry powder. Other aliphatic alcohols can also be utilised. (DG) [de

  17. Chemistry of technetium in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFadden, K.M.

    1980-08-01

    Technetium release to the environment may occur during separation and recovery of spent nuclear fuels, or in disposal of aqueous waste from nuclear facilities, hospitals, or other users. The chemistry and sources of technetium are reviewed as a basis for prediction of its behavior in the environment

  18. Selenium in Graves' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadwiga Kryczyk

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to present the current state of knowledge of the role of selenium in Graves’ disease. Recently, in the pathogenesis and course of this autoimmune disease, more attention has been paid to the relationship between oxidative stress and the antioxidant system, where selenium compounds play an important role. The thyroid is the organ with the highest selenium concentration in the human body. Selenium compounds, having antioxidant properties, protect thyrocytes against the destructive effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS, which are generated during the synthesis of thyroid hormones. Therefore, strengthening the body’s defense mechanisms, which protect against the formation and activity of ROS during medical treatment of Graves’ disease patients, may be an effective adjuvant in commonly used methods of therapy.

  19. Study of sorption of technetium on pyrrhotine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Dong; Fan Xianhua; Su Xiguang; Zeng Jishu

    2001-01-01

    The sorption behaviors of technetium on pyrrhotine are studied with batch experiment and dilute sulfuric acid is used to dissolve the technetium adsorbed on pyrrhotine. Sorption and desorption experiment are performed under aerobic and anaerobic conditions (inert gas box). The results show that a significant sorption of technetium on pyrrhotine is found under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and the sorption on the mineral is supposed to be due to the reduction of TcO 4 - to insoluble TcO 2 ·nH 2 O. Desorption process of the sorbed technetium into dilute sulfuric acid is found to be different under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. On addition of H 2 O 2 to the leach solution a sudden increase of the technetium concentration is observed

  20. Small-Scale Ion Exchange Removal of Cesium and Technetium from Hanford Tank 241-AN-102

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, N.M.

    2000-01-01

    The pretreatment process for BNFL, Inc.'s Hanford River Protection Project is to provide decontaminated low activity waste and concentrated eluate streams for vitrification into low and high activity waste glass, respectively. The pretreatment includes sludge washing, filtration, precipitation, and ion exchange processes to remove entrained solids, cesium, transuranics, technetium, and strontium. The cesium (Cs-137) and technetium (Tc-99) ion exchange removal is accomplished by using SuperLig 644, and 639 resins from IBC Advanced Technologies, American Fork, Utah. The resins were shown to selectively remove cesium and technetium (as anionic pertechnetate ) from alkaline salt solutions. The efficiency of ion exchange column loading and elution is a complex function involving feed compositions, equilibrium and kinetic behavior of ion exchange resins, diffusion, and the ionic strength and pH of the aqueous solution. A previous experimental program completed at the Savannah River Tech nology Center2 demonstrated the conceptualized flow sheet parameters with an Envelope C sample from Hanford Tank 241-AN-107. Those experiments also included determination of Cs and Tc batch distribution coefficients by SuperLig 644 and 639 resins and demonstration of small-scale column breakthrough and elution. The experimental findings were used in support of preliminary design bases and pretreatment flow sheet development by BNFL, Inc

  1. EPR investigations on technetium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abram, U.; Munze, R.; Kirmse, R.; Stach, J.

    1986-01-01

    Stimulated by the widespread use of the isotope /sup 99m/Tc in the field of nuclear medicine, there has been a substantial growth of interest in the chemistry of this man-made element. A particular need emerges for analytical methods allowing solution investigations of coordination compounds of technetium with low substance use. Considering these facts, Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (EPR) appears to be a very suitable method because only very small amounts of the compounds are needed (lower than 1 mg). The resulting spectra give information regarding the valence state, symmetry and bonding properties of the compounds under study

  2. Technetium removal: preliminary flowsheet options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eager, K.M.

    1995-01-01

    This document presents the results of a preliminary investigation into options for preliminary flowsheets for 99Tc removal from Hanford Site tank waste. A model is created to show the path of 99Tc through pretreatment to disposal. The Tank Waste Remediation (TWRS) flowsheet (Orme 1995) is used as a baseline. Ranges of important inputs to the model are developed, such as 99Tc inventory in the tanks and important splits through the TWRS flowsheet. Several technetium removal options are discussed along with sensitivities of the removal schemes to important model parameters

  3. High-resolution stratigraphy with strontium isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depaolo, D J; Ingram, B L

    1985-02-22

    The isotopic ratio of strontium-87 to strontium-86 shows no detectable variation in present-day ocean water but changes slowly over millions of years. The strontium contained in carbonate shells of marine organisms records the ratio of strontium-87 to strontium-86 of the oceans at the time that the shells form. Sedimentary rocks composed of accumulated fossil carbonate shells can be dated and correlated with the use of high precision measurements of the ratio of strontium-87 to strontium-86 with a resolution that is similar to that of other techniques used in age correlation. This method may prove valuable for many geological, paleontological, paleooceanographic, and geochemical problems.

  4. Methods of Selenium Supplementation: Bioavailability and Determination of Selenium Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnar, Malgorzata; Szczyglowska, Marzena; Konieczka, Piotr; Namiesnik, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Selenium, a "dual-surface" element, maintains a very thin line between a level of necessity and harmfulness. Because of this, a deficiency or excess of this element in an organism is dangerous and causes health-related problems, both physically and mentally. The main source of selenium is a balanced diet, with a proper selection of meat and plant products. Meanwhile, the proper assimilation of selenium into these products depends on their bioavailability, bioaccessibility, and/or bioactivity of a given selenium compound. From the time when it was discovered that selenium and its compounds have a significant influence on metabolic processes and in many countries throughout the world, a low quantity of selenium was found in different parts of the environment, pressure was put upon an effective and fast method of supplementing the environment with the help of selenium. This work describes supplementation methods applied with the use of selenium, as well as new ideas for increasing the level of this element in various organisms. Based on the fact that selenium appears in the environment at trace levels, the determination of total amount of selenium or selenium speciation in a given sample demands the selection of appropriate measurement methods. These methods are most often comprised of a sample preparation technique and/or a separation technique as well as a detection system. The work presents information on the subject of analytical methods used for determining selenium and its compounds as well as examples in literature of their application.

  5. Strontium-90 - ED 4309

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammerich, M.; Frot, P.; Gambini, D.; Gauron, C.; Moureaux, P.; Herbelet, G.; Lahaye, T.; Le Guen, B.; Pihet, P.; Rannou, A.; Vidal, E.

    2012-12-01

    This sheet presents the characteristics of strontium-90, its origin, and its radio-physical and biological properties. It briefly describes its use in nuclear medicine. It indicates its dosimetric parameters for external exposure, cutaneous contamination, and internal exposure due to acute contamination or to chronic contamination. It indicates and comments the various exposure control techniques: ambient dose rate measurement, surface contamination measurement, atmosphere contamination. It addresses the means of protection: premise design, protection against external exposure and against internal exposure. It describes how areas are delimited and controlled within the premises: regulatory areas, controls to be performed. It addresses the personnel classification, training and medical survey. It addresses the issue of wastes and effluents. It briefly recalls the administrative procedures related to the authorization and declaration of possession and use of sealed and unsealed sources. It indicates regulatory aspects related to the transport of strontium-90, describes what is to be done in case of incident or accident (for the different types of contamination or exposure)

  6. Biological selenium removal from wastewaters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenz, M.

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis, microbial conversion of water-soluble, highly toxic forms of selenium (selenate, selenite) to less bioavailable elemental selenium was investigated. By the exploitation of different groups of microorganisms (selenium-respiring, nitrate-reducing and sulfate-reducing bacteria,

  7. Selenium in human mammary carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overvad, Kim; Grøn, P.; Langhoff, Otto

    1991-01-01

    /l and TNM stage II 76 +/- 13 micrograms selenium/l), indicating disease-mediated changes. The evaluation of selenium as a risk indicator in human breast cancer was therefore restricted to TNM stage I patients (n = 36). Multiple logistic regression analyses including variables associated with selenium levels...

  8. Strontium-90 fluoride data sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fullam, H.T.

    1981-06-01

    This report is a compilation of available data and appropriate literature references on the properties of strontium-90 fluoride and nonradioactive strontium fluoride. The objective of the document is to compile in a single source pertinent data to assist potential users in the development, licensing, and use of /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/-fueled radioisotope heat sources for terrestrial power conversion and thermal applications. The report is an update of the Strontium-90 Fluoride Data Sheet (BNWL-2284) originally issued in April 1977.

  9. Selenium for preventing cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinceti, Marco; Filippini, Tommaso; Del Giovane, Cinzia; Dennert, Gabriele; Zwahlen, Marcel; Brinkman, Maree; Zeegers, Maurice Pa; Horneber, Markus; D'Amico, Roberto; Crespi, Catherine M

    2018-01-29

    This review is the third update of the Cochrane review "Selenium for preventing cancer". Selenium is a naturally occurring element with both nutritional and toxicological properties. Higher selenium exposure and selenium supplements have been suggested to protect against several types of cancer. To gather and present evidence needed to address two research questions:1. What is the aetiological relationship between selenium exposure and cancer risk in humans?2. Describe the efficacy of selenium supplementation for cancer prevention in humans. We updated electronic searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2017, Issue 2), MEDLINE (Ovid, 2013 to January 2017, week 4), and Embase (2013 to 2017, week 6), as well as searches of clinical trial registries. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and longitudinal observational studies that enrolled adult participants. We performed random-effects (RE) meta-analyses when two or more RCTs were available for a specific outcome. We conducted RE meta-analyses when five or more observational studies were available for a specific outcome. We assessed risk of bias in RCTs and in observational studies using Cochrane's risk assessment tool and the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale, respectively. We considered in the primary analysis data pooled from RCTs with low risk of bias. We assessed the certainty of evidence by using the GRADE approach. We included 83 studies in this updated review: two additional RCTs (10 in total) and a few additional trial reports for previously included studies. RCTs involved 27,232 participants allocated to either selenium supplements or placebo. For analyses of RCTs with low risk of bias, the summary risk ratio (RR) for any cancer incidence was 1.01 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.93 to 1.10; 3 studies, 19,475 participants; high-certainty evidence). The RR for estimated cancer mortality was 1.02 (95% CI 0.80 to 1.30; 1 study, 17,444 participants). For the most frequently

  10. Selenium for preventing cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinceti, Marco; Dennert, Gabriele; Crespi, Catherine M; Zwahlen, Marcel; Brinkman, Maree; Zeegers, Maurice PA; Horneber, Markus; D'Amico, Roberto; Del Giovane, Cinzia

    2015-01-01

    Background This review is an update of the first Cochrane publication on selenium for preventing cancer (Dennert 2011). Selenium is a metalloid with both nutritional and toxicological properties. Higher selenium exposure and selenium supplements have been suggested to protect against several types of cancers. Objectives Two research questions were addressed in this review: What is the evidence for: an aetiological relation between selenium exposure and cancer risk in humans? andthe efficacy of selenium supplementation for cancer prevention in humans? Search methods We conducted electronic searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, 2013, Issue 1), MEDLINE (Ovid, 1966 to February 2013 week 1), EMBASE (1980 to 2013 week 6), CancerLit (February 2004) and CCMed (February 2011). As MEDLINE now includes the journals indexed in CancerLit, no further searches were conducted in this database after 2004. Selection criteria We included prospective observational studies (cohort studies including sub-cohort controlled studies and nested case-control studies) and randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with healthy adult participants (18 years of age and older). Data collection and analysis For observational studies, we conducted random effects meta-analyses when five or more studies were retrieved for a specific outcome. For RCTs, we performed random effects meta-analyses when two or more studies were available. The risk of bias in observational studies was assessed using forms adapted from the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale for cohort and case-control studies; the criteria specified in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions were used to evaluate the risk of bias in RCTs. Main results We included 55 prospective observational studies (including more than 1,100,000 participants) and eight RCTs (with a total of 44,743 participants). For the observational studies, we found lower cancer incidence (summary odds ratio (OR) 0

  11. Double photoionization of strontium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokell, Emma; Grimm, Michael; Sheridan, Paul, E-mail: emma.sokell@ucd.i [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2010-02-01

    Resonant triple-differential cross-section (TDCS) measurements have been used to study the double photoionization process in strontium. Two sets of measurements were made at the photon energy of the 4p {yields} 4d resonance. The coplanar geometry was used and the fixed analyser, positioned at -90{sup 0} to the main axis of polarization of the photons, detected electrons with {approx}65% of the available excess energy. The mutual angle between the two electrons had a range just short of 90 {yields} 270{sup 0}. The TDCS exhibit unexpected lobes at a mutual angle of 180{sup 0}. Comparison with other measurements made with the same geometry but with different sharings of the available energy indicate that these TDCS all show the unexpected lobe. Some possible explanations for the lobe are considered.

  12. Sorption of radioactive technetium on pyrrhotine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, D.; Fan, X.H.; Su, X.G.; Zeng, J.S.; Dong, Y.

    2002-01-01

    The sorption behavior of technetium on pyrrhotine was studied with batch experiments and diluted sulfuric acid (less than 2.88 mol/l) was used to dissolve the technetium adsorbed on pyrrhotine. A significant sorption of technetium on pyrrhotine was observed under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and the sorption on the mineral was supposed to be due to the reduction of TcO 4 - to insoluble TcO 2 x nH 2 O. Sorbed technetium on the mineral could be desorbed by diluted sulfuric acid. The maximum desorption ratio under aerobic conditions was much higher than that of under anaerobic conditions, meanwhile, the desorption rates under anaerobic conditions were higher than that of under aerobic conditions in the initial stage of the experiments. (author)

  13. Technetium behaviour under deep geological conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumata, M.; Vandergraaf, T.T.

    1993-01-01

    The migration behaviour of technetium under deep geological conditions was investigated by performing column tests using groundwater and altered granitic rock sampled from a fracture zone in a granitic pluton at a depth of about 250 m. The experiment was performed under a pressure of about 0.7 MPa in a controlled atmosphere glove box at the 240 m level of the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) near Pinawa, Manitoba, Canada. The technetium was strongly sorbed on the dark mafic minerals in the column. With the exception of a very small unretarded fraction that was eluted with the tritiated water, no further breakthrough of technetium was observed. This strong sorption of technetium on the mineral surface was caused by reduction of Tc(VII), probably to Tc(IV) even though the groundwater was only mildly reducing. (author) 5 figs., 4 tabs., 15 refs

  14. Radiation decomposition of technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billinghurst, M.W.; Rempel, S.; Westendorf, B.A.

    1979-01-01

    Technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals are shown to be subject to autoradiation-induced decomposition, which results in increasing abundance of pertechnetate in the preparation. This autodecomposition is catalyzed by the presence of oxygen, although the removal of oxygen does not prevent its occurrence. The initial appearance of pertechnetate in the radiopharmaceutical is shown to be a function of the amount of radioactivity, the quantity of stannous ion used, and the ratio of /sup 99m/Tc to total technetium in the preparation

  15. Determination of technetium-99 in environmental and radioactive waste samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferencova, M.; Peter Tkac, P.

    2007-01-01

    Technetium is known for its high mobility in a soil-water system in non-reducing aerobic condition and also high bio-availability for plants, because the most stable form of technetium in natural surface environment is pertechnetate which is highly soluble. The chemical form of technetium changes with environmental conditions. Concentration of technetium in the environment is very low, therefore many separation steps are needed for technetium determination. It has been developed a method for the routine determination of technetium-99 from environmental matrices and radioactive wastes using technetium-99m as an internal yield monitor. Technetium-99 is extracted from the soil samples with nitric acid. Many contaminants are co-precipitated with ferric hydroxide and technetium in the supernatant is pre-concentrated and further purified using anion exchange chromatography. Final separation of technetium was achieved by extraction with tetraphenylarsonium chloride in chloroform from sulphuric acid or pure water. The chemical yield is determined through the measurement of technetium-99m by scintillation counting system and the technetium-99 activity is measured using proportional counter after decay of the technetium-99m activity. Typical recoveries for this method are in the order 50-60 % (authors)

  16. Biomarkers of selenium status

    Science.gov (United States)

    The essential trace element selenium (Se) has multiple biological activities, which depend on the level of Se intake. Relatively low Se intakes determine the expression of selenoenzymes in which it serves as an essential constituent. Higher intakes have been shown to have anti-tumorigenic potentia...

  17. Selenium Treatment Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenium (Se) is a metalloid that is a dietary requirement in small quantities, but toxic at higher quantities. It also is known to bioaccumulate. In oxic environments, it exists as selenate (+6) and selenite (+4), both of which are soluble. Selenite will sorb more strongly to...

  18. Isotope exchange of strontium and molybdate ions in strontium polymolybdates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atun, G.

    2002-01-01

    The heterogeneous isotopic exchange reactions in strontium polymolybdates of Sr 2+ and MoO 4 2- ions in the strontium nitrate and sodium molybdate solutions have been studied using 90 Sr and 99 Mo as tracers. Electrometric methods have been used to study the compositions of strontium molybdates obtained by adding strontium chloride to a progressively acidified solution of sodium molybdate. It has been found that the exchange fraction increases with increasing chain length of strontium polymolybdate. The exchange equilibrium constant (K ex ) has been calculated between 298 and 348 K as well as ΔG deg, ΔH deg and ΔS deg. The results indicate that Sr 2+ cations have a much higher affinity for exchangers than MoO 4 2- anions. By fitting the data to the Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm it has been shown that the exchange capacity (X m ) for both ions is affected by the ion adsorption process at low temperatures and by the ion exchange process at high temperatures. At high concentrations, the recrystallization process contributes to on the cation exchange but is ineffective on the anion exchange mechanism. (author)

  19. Technetium-99m labeled radiodiagnostic agents and method of preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molinski, V.J.; Wilczewski, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    A method of preparing improved technetium-99m labeled radiodiagnostic agents by reducing technetium-99m with stannous tartrate is described. Such radiodiagnostic agents are useful in scintigraphic examinations of the bone and lung

  20. Polymeric strontium ranelate nonahydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenny Stahl

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, poly[[μ-aqua-tetraaqua{μ-5-[bis(carboxylatomethylamino]-3-carboxylatomethyl-4-cyanothiophene-2-carboxylato}distrontium(II] tetrahydrate], [Sr2(C12H6N2O8S(H2O5]·3.79H2O, crystallizes with nine- and eight-coordinated Sr2+ cations. They are bound to seven of the eight ranelate O atoms and five of the water molecules. The SrO8 and SrO9 polyhedra are interconnected by edge-sharing, forming hollow layers parallel to (011. The layers are, in turn, interconnected by ranelate anions, forming a metal–organic framework (MOF structure with channels along the a axis. The four water molecules not coordinated to strontium are located in these channels and hydrogen bonded to each other and to the ranelates. Part of the water H atoms are disordered. The compound dehydrates very easily and 0.210 (4 water molecules out of nine were lost during crystal mounting causing additional disorder in the water structure.

  1. Photostriction of strontium ruthenate

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Tzu-Chiao

    2017-04-24

    Transition metal oxides with a perovskite crystal structure exhibit a variety of physical properties associated with the lattice. Among these materials, strontium ruthenate (SrRuO3) displays unusually strong coupling of charge, spin and lattice degrees of freedom that can give rise to the photostriction, that is, changes in the dimensions of material due to the absorption of light. In this study, we observe a photon-induced strain as high as 1.12% in single domain SrRuO3, which we attribute to a nonequilibrium of phonons that are a result of the strong interaction between the crystalline lattice and electrons excited by light. In addition, these light-induced changes in the SrRuO3 lattice affect its electrical resistance. The observation of both photostriction and photoresistance in SrRuO3 suggests the possibility of utilizing the mechanical and optical functionalities of the material for next-generation optoelectronics, such as remote switches, light-controlled elastic micromotors, microactuators and other optomechanical systems.

  2. Linkable thiocarbamoylbenzamidines as ligands for bioconjugation of Rhenium and Technetium; Kopplungsfaehige Thiocarbamoylbenzamidine als Liganden zur Biokonjugation von Rhenium und Technetium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo Gomez, Juan Daniel

    2015-04-27

    Bioconjugation reactions with Rhenium and Technetium are of high importance for the development of novel radiopharmaceuticals for nuclear medicine. In this thesis the possibilities for bioconjugation using linkable Thiocarmbamoylbenzamidines as ligands for the complexation of Rhenium and Technetium were examined.

  3. Acute selenium poisoning in lambs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabbedy, B J; Dickson, J

    1969-10-01

    An outbreak of sodium selenite poisoning is reported in which 180 of 190 six-weeks-old lambs died. The estimated dose rate of the selenium was 6.4 mg/kg body weight. Liver concentrations of selenium at the time of poisoning averaged 64 ppM and 15 days later liver and kidney concentrations of selenium averaged 26 ppM and 7.4 ppM respectively.

  4. Technetium in the geologic environment - a literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torstenfelt, B.; Allard, B.; Andersson, K.; Olofsson, U.

    1981-07-01

    The authors present a literature survey of technetium, discussing, in particular, the oxidation states, the chemistry of technetium in connection with spent nuclear fuel storage, the sorption of technetium in rock, clay, soil and sea bottom sediments. (G.T.H.)

  5. Selenium in food and health

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reilly, Conor

    2006-01-01

    ...) to be a carcinogen and banned as an additive in food. Selenium is considered by some to be a serious hazard to the environment and to animal health. Selenium-contaminated water has brought deformity and death to wildlife in nature reserves in western USA. There is even concern that because of selenium contamination of soil, crops supplied to the great cities of California could become unfit for human consumption. In large areas of China, endemic selenium toxicity is a hazard for locals who depend on cr...

  6. Technetium compounds; Compuestos de tecnecio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, C.A. de [Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga 15, 14000 Tlalpan D.F. (Mexico); Ferro F, G. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    The first radiopharmaceuticals of {sup 99m} Tc, also call of 'first generation' as colloids, aggregates and simple complexes were developed with relative easiness without it was necessary a wide understanding of its chemical structure. In the radiopharmaceuticals of 'second generation' were included those derived of the HIDA for hepatobiliary images, MAG3 and EC for images of tubular renal de purification, HMPAO and ECD for images of cerebral perfusion and MIBI and tetrofosmin for images of heart perfusion, that which implies a bigger demand in terms of the chemical knowledge. At the moment, we can affirm that the future of the radiopharmaceuticals of {sup 99m} Tc is based on the use of small and relevant biomolecules with high biological activity that allow the visualization in vivo of specific receiving sites and/or its expression in diverse pathologies. It is for it that with the 'third generation' is necessary a wide one knowledge of the chemistry of the technetium that allows the design and characterization of highly specific bio complexes. In this book, although focused mainly to the chemistry of the Tc, a brief revision is also presented on the main biologically active molecules that, coordinated the {sup 99m} Tc, present a high recognition In vivo for specific receivers. (Author)

  7. Technetium Immobilization Forms Literature Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westsik, Joseph H.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Qafoku, Nikolla

    2014-05-01

    Of the many radionuclides and contaminants in the tank wastes stored at the Hanford site, technetium-99 (99Tc) is one of the most challenging to effectively immobilize in a waste form for ultimate disposal. Within the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), the Tc will partition between both the high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions of the tank waste. The HLW fraction will be converted to a glass waste form in the HLW vitrification facility and the LAW fraction will be converted to another glass waste form in the LAW vitrification facility. In both vitrification facilities, the Tc is incorporated into the glass waste form but a significant fraction of the Tc volatilizes at the high glass-melting temperatures and is captured in the off-gas treatment systems at both facilities. The aqueous off-gas condensate solution containing the volatilized Tc is recycled and is added to the LAW glass melter feed. This recycle process is effective in increasing the loading of Tc in the LAW glass but it also disproportionally increases the sulfur and halides in the LAW melter feed which increases both the amount of LAW glass and either the duration of the LAW vitrification mission or the required supplemental LAW treatment capacity.

  8. Ligand-free, protein-bound technetium-99m iron-dextran enhancement of technetium pyrophosphate uptake in tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pojer, P.M.; Jakovljevic, A.C.; Wise, K.N.

    1985-01-01

    The biodistribution of technetium-99m was studied in T-cell lymphoma and selected organs of iron-dextran treated and control mice given technetium-99m pyrophosphate. The results showed that high serum iron levels increased tumour uptake of technetium pyrophosphate. This supports the hypothesis that technetium, in common with other metal-based tumour seeking radiopharmaceuticals, is transported to tumours as a ligand-free protein-bound cation. (U.K.)

  9. Strontium 90 fallout prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarmiento, J.L.; Gwinn, E.

    1986-01-01

    An empirical formula is developed for predicting monthly sea level strontium 90 fallout (F) in the northern hemisphere as a function of time (t), precipitation rate (P), latitude (phi), longitude (lambda), and the sea level concentration of stronium 90 in air (C): F(lambda, phi, t) = C(t, phi)[v /sub d/(phi) + v/sub w/(lambda, phi, t)], where v/sub w/(lambda, phi, t) = a(phi)[P(lambda, phi, t)/P/sub o/]/sup b//sup (//sup phi//sup )/ is the wet removal, v/sub d/(phi) is the dry removal and P 0 is 1 cm/month. The constants v/sub d/, a, and b are determined as functions of latitude by fitting land based observations. The concentration of 90 Sr in air is calculated as a function of the deseasonalized concentration at a reference latitude (C-bar/sub r//sub e//sub f/), the ratio of the observations at the latitude of interest to the reference latitude (R), and a function representing the seasonal trend in the air concentration (1 + g): C-bar(t, phi) = C/sub r//sub e//sub f/(t)R(phi)[1 + g(m, phi)]; m is the month. Zonal trends in C are shown to be relatively small. This formula can be used in conjuction with precipitation observations and/or estimates to predict fallout in the northern hemisphere for any month in the years 1954 to 1974. Error estimates are given; they do not include uncertainty due to errors in precipitation data

  10. Nutrigenetics, Nutrigenomics, and Selenium

    OpenAIRE

    Ferguson, Lynnette R.; Karunasinghe, Nishi

    2011-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is an important micronutrient that, as a component of selenoproteins, influences oxidative and inflammatory processes. Its’ levels vary considerably, with different ethnic and geographic population groups showing varied conditions, ranging from frank Se deficiencies to toxic effects. An optimum Se level is essential for the maintenance of homeostasis, and this optimum may vary according to life stage, general state of health, and genotype. Nutrigenetic studies of different Se le...

  11. The molybdenum-technetium solar neutrino experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, N.C.; Wolfsberg, K.; Rokop, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    The authors are attempting to measure the time-averaged 8 B solar-neutrino flux over 10 Myr by measuring 98 Tc produced through the 98 Mo( nu ,e - ) reaction in a deeply buried molybdenum deposit. This will test the prediction of periodic mixing of the Sun's core over long time intervals. To separate technetium from 10,000-ton quantities of Henderson ore, the authors have taken advantage of the commercial processing of molybdenite. Technetium, volatilized during roasting of molybdenite to MoO 3 , was scrubbed from the gas stream and collected on anion exchange columns. After sample reduction and chemical separation and purification they measured technetium, as TcO 4 - , using negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry. Measurement of 99 Tc in spiked and 98 Tc in unspiked fractions from one sample gives an apparent solar neutrino production rate of 95.8 SNU. However, roaster memory probably invalidates this result

  12. Microbial selenium sulfide reduction for selenium recovery from wastewater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, S.P.W.; Weijden, van der R.D.; Stams, A.J.M.; Cappellen, van P.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2017-01-01

    Microbial reduction of selenium sulfide (SeS2) is a key step in a new treatment process to recover selenium from selenate and selenite streams. In this process, selenate is first reduced to selenite, and subsequently selenite is reduced by sulfide and precipitates from the solution as SeS2. The

  13. Binary mixtures of mercury/ selenium, and lead/selenium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Physiologically-based biokinetic models have been developed for predicting simultaneously the Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism and Elimination (ADME) properties of lead (Pb) and selenium (Se), and mercury (Hg) and selenium in a number of target tissues of humans. This was done for three population groups, ...

  14. Highvalent and organometallic technetium and rhenium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oehlke, Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    Diagnostic methods in nuclear medicine allow a detailed description of morphological organ structures and their function. The beta emitting isotope Tc-99 has optimal physical properties (140 keV gamma rays, half-life 6 h) and is therefore used for radiopharmaceuticals. The thesis is concerned with the search for new technetium complexes and their reproducible production. The (TcO3) core is of main interest. The second part of the thesis deals with organometallic technetium and rhenium complexes with carbonyl ligands and N-heterocyclic carbenes that show stability in aerobic aqueous solutions.

  15. Determination of technetium-99 from complex matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lixiong Wang; Lei Tang; Tongzai Yang; Yanqiu Yang; Liang Yang

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports an approach that can be used for efficient separation and determination of 99 Tc (as pertechnetate) after contamination of the environment by nuclear materials. The samples were decomposed by fusion in a mixture of potassium hydroxide and potassium nitrate. After fusion, technetium remains as the pertechnetate anion (TcO 4 - ). The technetium was isolated from the sample by technique combining solvent extraction, anion exchange, then, again, solvent extraction. After separation, 99 Tc was measured by isotope-dilution mass spectrometry with 97 Tc as spike. This method yielded nanogram detection limits for 99 Tc. (author)

  16. Selenium accumulation in lettuce germplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenium (Se) is an essential micronutrient for animals and humans. Increasing Se content in food crops offers an effective approach to reduce the widespread selenium deficiency problem in many parts of the world. In this study, we evaluated thirty diverse accessions of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) f...

  17. Contributions to the coordination chemistry of technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, B.

    1989-08-01

    New types of technetium complexes were synthesized and analyzed by IR-, 1 H- and 99 Tc nmr as well as EPR spectra. They were tested for their potential catalytic activity in special organic reactions and their relevance to catalytic reactions, for example as intermediate compounds, is discussed in depth. 317 refs., 20 figs. (BBR) [de

  18. Electrochemical preparation of technetium hydroxyethylidene diphosphonate radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    This work describes the liquid chromatographic and electrochemical analysis of electrogenerated technetium hydroxyethylidene diphosphonate (HEDP) complexes, and studies the effectiveness of the resulting bone imaging agents. Anion exchange High Performance Liquid Chromatography is used to separate components, and γ emission is used as the detection mode. The reaction mixtures were prepared at a series of reduction potentials and pH values, at both carrier added and no carrier added technetium levels. The results indicate that all three parameters affect the final complex composition to varying degrees. By optimizing the conditions, a preparation was made which results in a high percentage of a Tc-HEDP complex thought to be a very good home imager. This component was isolated chromatographically and injected into female Sprague-Dawley rats. Comparisons were run on the uptake for seven tissue types at two incubation times. Mercury and Reticulated Vitreous Carbon were used as the working electrode materials, and it is shown how reduced technetium will significantly alter the electrode characteristics, where a conditioned electrode will produce different complexes from those produced at fresh electrode material. By employing coulometric analysis as the preparation was reduced, an n value of 4 was calculated for a particular complex. This procedure involved tracking the radioactive technetium species carefully to account for all electrons used in the system. Finally, an electrochemical detection method for HEDP was explored, utilizing the property of mercury complexation. Anodic sweep Differential Pulse Polarography gives an analytical signal for HEDP at +0.250 V vs Ag/AgCl

  19. Synthesis and characterization of volatile technetium compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, Bradley C.; Poineau, Frederic; Czerwinski, Ken R.

    2013-01-01

    Technetium-99 is an important fission (T 1/2 = 2.13.105 y) product of the nuclear industry. Technetium in its highest oxidation state (VII) is highly mobile and can represent a threat to the environment. There are over 55 million gallons of high level mixed waste located at the Hanford site. Waste tanks at the Hanford site contain Tc that could potentially leak, and in the context of management of technetium, a glass waste form was proposed to counteract the issue. In the process of synthesizing melt glass between the temperatures of 600°C and 1100°C, volatile technetium compounds were observed in the reaction tube. These compounds displayed characteristic colors based upon the reaction environments of either breathing air or nitrogen gas. A breathing air atmosphere produces a red compound that adheres to the walls of the reaction tube. An atmosphere of nitrogen gas produces a white compound that was observed on the walls of the reaction tube. (author)

  20. An introduction to technetium-99m generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrashkin, S.

    1984-02-01

    The role played by technetium-99m generators in diagnostic medicine, their physical and chemical fundamentals and their main technical characteristics are discussed. This report is intended as a general introduction to a group of reports which summarize the work done on the development and production of the generators, and research on the chemical and physical aspects of the generator systems

  1. Concentration of technetium by marine organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyanagi, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Nakamura, R.; Nakahara, M.

    1990-01-01

    Accumulation and excretion of technetium by marine organisms were observed in radioisotope tracer experiments to determine concentration factors for estimating radiation dose to humans from radioactive pollution of marine environments. Marine fish, crustaceans, mollusks, echinoderms, and seaweeds were reared in sea water labeled with 95m Tc to observe uptake from sea water. The organisms were then transferred into unlabeled sea water for depuration experiments. Concentration factors were calculated from uptake and excretion rates. Also considered was the contribution of food-chain transfer of technetium, observed by administering labeled seaweeds to mollusks or echinoderms. Low accumulations were shown by fish, crustaceans, pelecypods and cephalopods, whereas high concentration factors were observed in gastropods and seaweeds. Species specificity or specific accumulation in special organs or tissues was not evident except in seaweed, where the difference was clearly species-associated. Relatively high rates of technetium retention were observed in the organisms administered labeled seaweed. The higher concentrations observed in gastropods, compared to those in pelecypods, were thought to result from different feed habits. The adaptability of some species as indicator organisms for monitoring 99 Tc in sea water was recognized, but the contribution of technetium to radiation dose was considered insignificant

  2. The origins of Technetium in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scoppa, P.

    1986-01-01

    The origins of Technetium in the environment are briefly illustrated, taking into account its main sources represented by same plants of nuclear fuel cycle and by fallout fallowing nuclear explosion in atmosphere. An evaluation is also made of the TC-99 quantitees deriving from the production of nuclear power present in radioactive wastes before their final disposal

  3. Technetium sorption by stibnite from natural water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretroukhine, V.; Sergeant, C.; Deves, G.; Poulain, S.; Vesvres, M.H.; Thomas, B.; Simonoff, M.

    2006-01-01

    The sorption of technetium by powdered and polished mineral stibnite Sb 2 S 3 has been investigated in simulated and natural underground waters from the Meuse/Haute-Marne region (France). The sorption by powdered stibnite has been found to be complete under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions in batch experiments. The sorption rate is higher in the absence of oxygen than under aerobic condition. Increasing the temperature from 30 C to 60 C results in a rise of the sorption rate by 9.1 and 27 times under anaerobic and aerobic conditions, respectively. The observed differences in sorption kinetics in the presence and in absence of oxygen are explained by the interaction of oxygen with sulfide ion in aerobic conditions and by the reduction of technetium(VII) by iron(II) and by other impurities present in natural water and in the mineral, and by the subsequent sorption of Tc(IV) on stibnite under anaerobic conditions. The sorption on a polished mineral surface resulted in the formation of a technetium film, probably Tc 2 S 7 , with a thickness of 1-3 μg Tc/cm 2 pH 3-6 and 4-12 μg Tc/cm 2 at 9-12. The simultaneous formation of stibnite colloids with adsorbed technetium occurs at pH 9-12. The study of the technetium film on the mineral by proton induced X-ray emission analysis showed it to be at least one order of magnitude thinner on the SiO 2 impurities than on the main Sb 2 S 3 component and the iron impurities. (orig.)

  4. Sorption of cesium, strontium, and technetium onto organic-extracted shales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, P.C.

    1992-01-01

    The sorption of Cs(I), Sr(II), and Tc(VII) onto organic-extracted shales from synthetic brine groundwaters and from 0.03-M NaHCO 3 solution under oxid conditions at room temperature has been studied. The shale samples used in this study were Pumpkin Valley, Upper Dowelltown, Pierre and Green River Formation Shales. The organic content of these shales ranges from less than 2 wt% to 13 wt%. Soxhlet extraction with chloroform and a mixture of chloroform and methanol removed 0.07 to 5.9 wt% of the total organic matter from these shales. In comparison with the results of sorption of these three metal ions onto the corresponding untreated shales, it was observed that there were moderate to significant sorption decreases of Cs(I) and Sr(II) on all four organic-extracted shale samples and moderate sorption decrease of Tc(VII) on the organic-extracted Pumpkin Valley, Pierre, and Green River Shale samples, but only moderate sorption increases of Tc(VII) on the organic-extracted Upper Dowelltown Shale samples from the brine groundwaters. Nevertheless, sorption of Cs(I), Sr(II), and Tc(VII) on all four organic-extracted shale samples from the bicarbonate solution in most cases did not show a consistent pattern. (orig.)

  5. Simulating the Transfer of Strontium-90 from Soil to Leafy Vegetables by Using Strontium-88

    OpenAIRE

    Kuke, Ding; Shujuan, Liu; Yingxue, He; Dong, Yan; Fengshou, Zhang; Shuifeng, Wang; Jinghua, Guo; Wei, Zhang; Xin, Wang; Xiaoyan, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    The transfer, from soil to Chinese cabbage and spinach, of radioactive strontium-90 released as a result of accidents in nuclear power stations was studied using a stable isotope of strontium, namely nuclide strontium-88 (88Sr). The study led to an experimental model for assessing the hazard of radionuclide strontium-90 (90Sr) entering the food chain and for predicting the risk to food safety. Chinese cabbage and spinach were grown in pots in a greenhouse and irrigated with deionized water co...

  6. Ion exchange of strontium on synthetic hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazic, S.; Vukovic, Z.

    1991-01-01

    Adsorption of strontium ions on synthetic hydroxyapatite was examined using both batch and column methods. The apatite was prepared from aqueous solutions and characterized by standard analytical methods. The sample obtained had characteristics of well crystallized stoichiometric hydroxyapatite. The experimental data for sorption of strontium can be very well fitted with Langmuir's adsorption isotherm. It was found that sorption occurs by an ion exchange reaction between strontium ions in solution and calcium ions in apatite. (author) 14 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab

  7. Kinetics of strontium sorption in calcium phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacic, S.; Komarov, V.F.; Vukovic, Z.

    1989-01-01

    Kinetics of strontium sorption by highly dispersed solids: tricalcium phosphate (Ca 3 (PO 4 ) 2 , TCP) and hydroxyapatite (Ca 5 (PO 4 ) 3 )H, HAP) were investigated. Analysis of sorption data was made taking into consideration composition and morphology of ultra micro particles. Conclusion is that the isomorphous strontium impurity is structurally sensitive element for calcium phosphate. It was determined that the beginning of strontium desorption corresponds to the beginning of transformation of the TCP - HAP (author)

  8. Strontium sorption on Savannah River Plant soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeffner, S.L.

    1984-12-01

    A laboratory study of strontium-85 sorption was conducted using Savannah River Plant soil and groundwater from the low-level waste burial ground. Systematic variation of soil and water composition indicates that strontium sorption is most strongly a function of pH. Changes in clay content and in K + , Ca 2+ , or Mg 2+ concentrations influence strontium sorption indirectly through the slight pH changes which result. The ions Na + , Cl - , and NO 3 - have no effect. Ferrous ion, added to groundwater to simulate the conditions of water at the bottom of waste trenches, did not account for low strontium sorption observed with some trench waters

  9. Mechanism of Selenium Loss in Copper Slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Bhavin; Tathavadkar, Vilas; Basu, Somnath

    2018-06-01

    During smelting of copper sulfide concentrate, selenium is distributed between silica-saturated iron-silicate slag and copper-iron sulfide matte. The recovery coefficients of selenium between slag and matte were determined as a function of the initial concentration of selenium at 1523 K (1250 °C) under an inert atmosphere in a vertical tubular furnace. The initial concentration of selenium was varied by the addition of metallic selenium as well as selenium dioxide to the mixture of slag and matte. Analysis of the results indicated high affinity of selenium for matte. The apparent loss of selenium with the slag was attributed to the presence of selenium-enriched matte particles entrapped in the slag, rather than dissolved SeO2. The mechanisms proposed by previous investigators were discussed and also compared with the results of the present investigation.

  10. Mechanism of Selenium Loss in Copper Slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Bhavin; Tathavadkar, Vilas; Basu, Somnath

    2018-03-01

    During smelting of copper sulfide concentrate, selenium is distributed between silica-saturated iron-silicate slag and copper-iron sulfide matte. The recovery coefficients of selenium between slag and matte were determined as a function of the initial concentration of selenium at 1523 K (1250 °C) under an inert atmosphere in a vertical tubular furnace. The initial concentration of selenium was varied by the addition of metallic selenium as well as selenium dioxide to the mixture of slag and matte. Analysis of the results indicated high affinity of selenium for matte. The apparent loss of selenium with the slag was attributed to the presence of selenium-enriched matte particles entrapped in the slag, rather than dissolved SeO2. The mechanisms proposed by previous investigators were discussed and also compared with the results of the present investigation.

  11. Optimization of a Strontium Aluminate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bone, Alexandria N. [Maryville College, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Strontium aluminate with Eu2+ and Dy3+ has been at the forefront of emerging applications for storage phosphors since its discovery in 1996. In this study, the emission intensity and luminescence lifetime of SrAl2O4: Eu2+, Dy3+ were enhanced by partial substitution of Ca2+ into Sr2+ sites in the matrix.

  12. Research program to investigate the fundamental chemistry of technetium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuh, David K.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Burns, Carol J.

    2003-12-19

    The objective of this research is to increase the knowledge of the fundamental technetium chemistry that is necessary to address challenges to the safe, long-term remediation of high-level waste posed by this element. These challenges may be divided into two categories: unexpected behavior of technetium in high-level waste tanks at the Hanford and Savannah River Sites and the behavior of technetium in waste forms.

  13. Research program to investigate the fundamental chemistry of technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuh, David K.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Burns, Carol J.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this research is to increase the knowledge of the fundamental technetium chemistry that is necessary to address challenges to the safe, long-term remediation of high-level waste posed by this element. These challenges may be divided into two categories: unexpected behavior of technetium in high-level waste tanks at the Hanford and Savannah River Sites and the behavior of technetium in waste forms

  14. X-ray electron investigation of technetium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerasimov, V.N.; Kryuchkov, S.V.; Kuzina, A.F.; Kulakov, V.M.; Pirozhkov, S.V.; Spitsyn, V.I.; Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol'zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Atomnoj Ehnergii)

    1982-01-01

    Investigation results of a number of technetium compounds using the method of X-ray electron spectroscopy have been presented for the first time. Calculation of effective charge for compounds without Tc-Tc bond and cluster complexes with strong Tc-Tc bond is made. Strong interdependence of effective charge and properties of technetium clusters is shown. Binding energies for certain cluster complexes of technetium with halides are given

  15. Supplemental Report: Application of Emission Spectroscopy to Monitoring Technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, W.A.

    2000-01-01

    This report provides supplemental information to an earlier report BNF-98-003-0199, ''Evaluation of Emission Spectroscopy for the On-Line Analysis of Technetium''. In this report data is included from real Hanford samples as well as for solutions spiked with technetium. This supplemental work confirms the ability of ICP-ES to monitor technetium as it breaks through an ion exchange process

  16. Acute selenium poisoning in cattle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shortridge, E H; O' Hara, P J; Marshall, P M

    1971-01-01

    Three hundred and seventy-six (67%) of 557 calves of approximately 150-200 kg live-weight died following subcutaneous injection of a solution containing 100 mg selenium as sodium selenite. Eight per cent of the 254 heifer calves and 56% of the 303 steers died. The calves had endured the stress of being weaned twice and held in stockyards twice as well as encountering wet weather during the 4 days before receiving the selenium. The heifer calves were also vaccinated with Br. abortus strain 19 vaccine at the same time as receiving the selenium. The clinical signs and pathological findings of circulatory failure and myocardial damage were similar to those previously reported in acute selenium poisoning.

  17. Sulfur, selenium, tellurium and polonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, F.J.

    1987-01-01

    This chapter on the coordination compounds of sulfur, selenium, tellurium and polonium starts with an introduction to the bonding, valence and geometry of the elements. Complexes of the group VIB elements are discussed with particular reference to the halo and pseudohalide complexes, oxo acid complexes, oxygen and nitrogen donor complexes and sulfur and selenium donor complexes. There is a section on the biological properties of the complexes discussed. (UK)

  18. Trace Element Analysis of Selenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliman, M.S.A.

    2010-01-01

    The present thesis divided into four chapters as follows:Chapter (1):This chapter contains an introduction on different oxidation states of organic and inorganic species for selenium in environmental and biological samples, the process for separation of selenium from these samples and the importance of selenium as a component for these samples. Also gives notes about the techniques which are used in the elemental analysis for selenium species and the detection limits for selenium in these techniques, selenium species in human body and the importance of these species in protecting the body from the different types of cancer and the sources of selenium in environmental samples (soil and water) and distribution levels of selenium in these samples.Chapter (2):This chapter is divided into two parts :The first part deals with the sample collection process for environmental samples (underground water, soil) and the wet digestion ( microwave digestion ) process of soil samples. It also contains the theory of work of the closed microwave digestion system.The second part contains detailed information concerning the theoretical considerations of the used analytical techniques. These techniques include Hydride generation - Atomic Absorption Spectrometer (HG-AAS), Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) and Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA).Chapter (3): This chapter includes the methods of sampling, sample preparation, and sample digesition. The measures of quality assurance are disscused in this chapter. It describes in details the closed microwave digestion technique and the analytical methods used in this study which are present in Central Laboratory for Elemental and Isotopic Analysis (CLEIA) and the Egypt Second Research Reactor (ETRR-2). The described techniques are Atomic Absorption Spectrometer (AAS 6 vario, Analytical Jena GmbH, Germany), JMS-PLASMAX2 Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) and the Egypt Second Research Reactor (NAA).

  19. Some aspects of the assay of technetium in environmental waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robb, P.

    1983-09-01

    Technetium, as 99 Tc, was rapidly concentrated from large sample volumes (> 500 cm 3 ) by use of an anion exchange column after removal of ruthenium isotopes by precipitation. The bulk of the technetium can be removed from the resin by elution with sodium thiocyanate followed by further concentration by extraction with butan-2-one. Evaporation of solvent onto a planchette followed by measurement of emitted beta radiation can determine technetium levels. Method is capable of removing between 10 -15 and 10 -6 g of technetium from 500 cm 3 of water. (author)

  20. Sources and behavior of technetium in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte, E.H.; Scoppa, P.

    1987-01-01

    Technetium is a man-made element produced in increasing amounts during the last decades. The chemical and physical properties of some technetium compounds are considered, and a discussion of possible source terms is included. Literature on the environmental behavior of technetium is reviewed to evaluate its transfer and equilibrium distribution in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Considerable effort has been expended in the last years in order to understand the biogeochemical processes responsible for the long-term behavior of technetium in the environment and its transfer through food chains as well as to identify critical pathways of the long-lived radioisotope Tc-99 from the environment to man. (Auth.)

  1. Sorption behaviour of radioactive technetium in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Deying

    1996-01-01

    The sorption behaviour of technetium in different soils has been studied by batch experiments under aerobic conditions. The soil samples have been taken to study the characteristics and to derive the pH-Eh values. In addition, the activated carbon and reduced iron powder have been selected as additives to the JAERI sand according to the former research work, so that the technetium sorption behaviour in the artificial soils can be studied under similar conditions. The experimental results show that all these soil samples except for the gluey soil have a very small distribution coefficient for Tc, while the artificial soils have a very large distribution coefficient for Tc. Besides, for artificial soils, the distribution coefficient (R d ) values will become larger and larger when more additive is added and more contact time is allowed. The physico-chemical fixation processes and possible sorption modes have been discussed as well

  2. Geochemistry of natural technetium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, D.B.; Cappis, J.H.; Perrin, R.E.; Rokop, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    Technetium and plutonium in unprocessed nuclear reactor wastes are major concerns with regard to their containment in the geologic environment. Both nuclides have long half-lives; therefore, they will exist long after engineered barriers can be considered reliable. Consequently, strategies for the containment of these two elements depend on their retention in the geologic barrier until they have decayed to innocuous levels. Because these are the rarest elements in nature, there have been few direct observations of their geochemical behavior; predictions concerning their fate in the repository are based on properties that can be observed in the laboratory. The authors are attempting to complement the laboratory work by studying the geochemistry of natural plutonium and technetium. Ratios of anthropogenic to naturally occurring isotopes are discussed

  3. Technetium-99 m generator safety simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Sang Koo; Kim, Chong Yeal

    2008-01-01

    Technetium ( 99m Tc) is one of the most widely used radioactive isotopes for diagnosis in the world. In general, 99m Tc is produced inside the so called technetium generator where 99Mo decays to 99m Tc. And the generator is usually made out of lead to shield relatively high energy radiation from 99m Tc and 99 Mo. In this paper, a GEANT4 simulation is carried out to test the safety of the 99m Tc generators, taking domestic and Japanese products with radioactivity of 18.50 GBq (500 mCi) for example. According to the domestic regulation on radiation safety, the dose at 10 cm and 100 cm away from the surface of radiation shielder should not exceed 2 mSv∙h -1 and 0.02 mSv∙h -1 , respectively. The simulated dose turned out about only 10% of the limit, satisfying the domestic regulation

  4. Selenium Utilization Strategy by Microalgae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroya Araie

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of selenoproteins raises the question of why so many life forms require selenium. Selenoproteins are found in bacteria, archaea, and many eukaryotes. In photosynthetic microorganisms, the essential requirement for selenium has been reported in 33 species belonging to six phyla, although its biochemical significance is still unclear. According to genome databases, 20 species are defined as selenoprotein-producing organisms, including five photosynthetic organisms. In a marine coccolithophorid, Emiliania huxleyi (Haptophyta, we recently found unique characteristics of selenium utilization and novel selenoproteins using 75Se-tracer experiments. In E. huxleyi, selenite, not selenate, is the main substrate used and its uptake is driven by an ATP-dependent highaffinity, active transport system. Selenite is immediately metabolized to low-molecular mass compounds and partly converted to at least six selenoproteins, named EhSEP1–6. The most (EhSEP2 and second-most abundant selenoproteins (EhSEP1 are disulfide isomerase (PDI homologous protein and thioredoxin reductase (TR 1, respectively. Involvement of selenium in PDI is unique in this organism, while TR1 is also found in other organisms. In this review, we summarize physiological, biochemical, and molecular aspects of selenium utilization by microalgae and discuss their strategy of selenium utilization.

  5. Selenium accumulation by plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Selenium (Se) is an essential mineral element for animals and humans, which they acquire largely from plants. The Se concentration in edible plants is determined by the Se phytoavailability in soils. Selenium is not an essential element for plants, but excessive Se can be toxic. Thus, soil Se phytoavailability determines the ecology of plants. Most plants cannot grow on seleniferous soils. Most plants that grow on seleniferous soils accumulate 100 mg Se kg–1 dry matter. These plants are considered to be Se accumulators. Some species can even accumulate Se concentrations of 1000–15 000 mg Se kg–1 dry matter and are called Se hyperaccumulators. Scope This article provides an overview of Se uptake, translocation and metabolism in plants and highlights the possible genetic basis of differences in these between and within plant species. The review focuses initially on adaptations allowing plants to tolerate large Se concentrations in their tissues and the evolutionary origin of species that hyperaccumulate Se. It then describes the variation in tissue Se concentrations between and within angiosperm species and identifies genes encoding enzymes limiting the rates of incorporation of Se into organic compounds and chromosomal loci that might enable the development of crops with greater Se concentrations in their edible portions. Finally, it discusses transgenic approaches enabling plants to tolerate greater Se concentrations in the rhizosphere and in their tissues. Conclusions The trait of Se hyperaccumulation has evolved several times in separate angiosperm clades. The ability to tolerate large tissue Se concentrations is primarily related to the ability to divert Se away from the accumulation of selenocysteine and selenomethionine, which might be incorporated into non-functional proteins, through the synthesis of less toxic Se metabilites. There is potential to breed or select crops with greater Se concentrations in their edible tissues, which

  6. Study of ammonia synthesis using technetium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitsyn, V.I.; Mikhajlenko, I.E.; Pokrovskaya, O.V.

    1982-01-01

    A study was made on catalytic properties of technetium in ammonia synthesis reaction. The preparation of technetium catalysts on ν-Al 2 O 3 , BaTiO 3 , BaO-ν-Al 2 O 3 substrates is described. The investigation of catalytic activity of catalysts was carried out at a pressure of 1 atm. in vertical reactor with volume rate of 15000 h - 1 in the temperature range of 350-425 deg. The amount of catalyst was 0.5-1 g, the volume- 0.5 ml, the size of granules- 2-3 mm. Rate constants of ammonia synthesis reaction were calculated. Seeming activation energies of the process have meanings wihtin the limits of 40-50 kcal/mol. It was shown that with increase in concentration of Tc on BaTiO 3 the catalytic activity rises in comparison with pure Tc. The reduction of catalytic activity with increase of metal content on Al 2 O 3 begins in the limits of 3.5-6.7% Tc/ν-Al 2 O 3 . The catalyst of 5.3% Tc/4.1% Ba/ν -Al 2 O 3 compound has the maximum activity. Technetium catalysts possess the stable catalytic activity and don't requre its reduction during several months

  7. Simulating the Transfer of Strontium-90 from Soil to Leafy Vegetables by Using Strontium-88.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuke, Ding; Shujuan, Liu; Yingxue, He; Dong, Yan; Fengshou, Zhang; Shuifeng, Wang; Jinghua, Guo; Wei, Zhang; Xin, Wang; Xiaoyan, Jiang

    The transfer, from soil to Chinese cabbage and spinach, of radioactive strontium-90 released as a result of accidents in nuclear power stations was studied using a stable isotope of strontium, namely nuclide strontium-88 ( 88 Sr). The study led to an experimental model for assessing the hazard of radionuclide strontium-90 ( 90 Sr) entering the food chain and for predicting the risk to food safety. Chinese cabbage and spinach were grown in pots in a greenhouse and irrigated with deionized water containing known quantities of strontium. Based on the strontium content of that water, the plants were divided into five groups (treatments) and strontium content of the soil, and 30-day-old plants were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy instrument (ICP-AES). Data on the strontium content of soil and plants enabled the development of a model using MATLAB, a mathematical software package, which included curve fitting and problem solving using regression equations and differential equations. Although strontium curves for leaves, stems, and roots of Chinese cabbage were not exactly the same, all showed a non-linear increase when compared with the increase in the content of strontium in soil. Strontium curves for leaves, stems, and roots of spinach were very similar and showed an initial increase followed by a decrease. Strontium concentrations in both Chinese cabbage and spinach were initially related to the concentrations of sodium and sulfur, the next two relevant nuclides being calcium and magnesium. The relationship between calcium and strontium in Chinese cabbage was different from that in spinach. By using 88 Sr to simulate the transfer of radionuclide 90 Sr from soil to a crop, the relevant data required to deal with accidental release of strontium can be obtained using a fitting curve and regression equations, thereby providing some experimental basis for evaluating the potential hazards posed by such accidents to the food chain.

  8. Strontium 90 in Swedish dairy milk 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillberg-Wickman, M.; Oestergren, I.

    1980-01-01

    The contamination of strontium-90 in Swedish milk during 1978 is practically the same as in 1977. The country-wide mean ratio of strontium-90 to calcium in milk is 0.12 Bq 90 Sr(gCa) -1 , based on monthly determinations of samples obtained from 8 dairy plants situated throughout the country. (author)

  9. Selenium Content, Influential Factors Within the Plant and the Transformation of Different Selenium Specification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Yuan-yuan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper collected relevant literatures on selenium and explored the function to plant, selenium content, influential factors and selenium specification and transformation. We believed that there should be more deep researches on function of selenium to plant. Approaches of molecular, genetic engineering and isotope could be employed to breed selenium rich crops and possibilities in practice. More efforts should be spent on the technologies research for improving selenium level in crops under natural soil conditions to sustainably utilize the selenium resources.

  10. Biomarkers of Selenium Chemoprevention of Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dong, Yan

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the mechanism of selenium growth inhibition in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells Selenium retarded cell cycle progression at multiple transition points...

  11. A Study of Selenium in Leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna Partogi

    2018-03-01

    CONCLUSIONS: Selenium serum levels of patients with PB leprosy are higher than patients with MB leprosy, and high bacteriological index in patients with leprosy were correlated with low selenium serum levels.

  12. Selenium plating of aluminium and nickel surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, N.; Shams, N.; Kamal, A.; Ashraf, A.

    1993-01-01

    Selenium exhibits photovoltaic and photoconductive properties. This makes selenium useful in the production of photocells, exposure meters for photographic use, in solar cells, etc. In commerce, selenium coated surfaces are extensively used as photo receptive drums in the xerography machines for reproducing documents. Laboratory experiments were designed to obtain selenium plating on different materials. Of the various electrodes tested for cathodic deposition, anodized aluminum and nickel plated copper were found to give good results. (author)

  13. Strontium-90 measurements in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedli, C.; Geering, J.J.; Lerch, P.

    1988-01-01

    Strontium-90 contamination in Switzerland has been measured since the sixties. The determination of 90 Sr in human vertebrae, milk-teeth, milk and wine have shown a maximum activity between 1964 and 1966. Since 1976, the survey has been extended to the food chain. After the Chernobyl accident, the measurements indicated a significative 90 Sr contamination in the Tessin and the north-east of Switzerland. The partition of 90 Sr in wheat has been determined and transfer factors are given for the milk - cheese - whey chain

  14. 21 CFR 573.920 - Selenium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... section, or as selenium yeast, as provided in paragraph (h) of this section. (c) It is added to feed as... months.” (h) Selenium yeast is a dried, non-viable yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cultivated in a fed-batch fermentation which provides incremental amounts of cane molasses and selenium salts in a manner...

  15. Measurement and behaviour of technetium in fast reactor fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, C.; Kyffin, T.W.

    1986-02-01

    A method is described for the spectrophotometric measurement of technetium in plant solutions from the reprocessing of fast reactor fuel. The technetium is selectively extracted using tri-iso-octylamine. After back extraction, thiocyanate is added, in the presence of tetrabutyl-ammonium hydroxide, to form the red hexa-thiocyanato anionic complex in a chloroform medium. The concentration of the technetium is then calculated from the spectrophotometric measurement of this complex. This method was applied to bulk samples, collected during a PFR fuel reprocessing campaign, to identify the main routes followed by technetium through the reprocessing plant. In order to understand the probable behaviour of technetium in the process plant streams, an investigation into the influence of plutonium IV nitrate on the extraction of Tc (VII) into 20%v/v tributyl phosphate/odourless kerosene solution from nitric acid solutions, was initiated. The results of this investigation, along with the known distribution coefficient for the extraction of the uranyl/technetium complex U0 2 (N0 3 )(Tc0 4 ).2TBP and the redox chemistry of technetium, are used to predict the probable behaviour of technetium in the process plant streams. This predicted behaviour is compared with the experimental results and reasonable agreement is obtained between experiment and theory, considering the history of the samples analysed. (author)

  16. Transfer of technetium from soil to paddy and upland rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kei; Muramatsu, Yasuyuki

    1995-01-01

    Soil-plant transfer factors (concentration ratio between the plant and soil) of technetium in paddy and upland rice plants were obtained from laboratory experiments. The transfer factor is one of the most important parameters for environmental radiation dose assessment. Technetium tracer ( 95m TcO 4 - ) was added to the soil prior to rice cultivation. The transfer factor of technetium for the hulled grains (brown rice) of paddy rice (≤0.0002) was much lower than for that of upland rice (0.021). The transfer factors for both types of hulled grains were much lower than in the leaves. The technetium decontamination rate from hulled grains by polishing was 34%, the percentage of the weight decrease being 12%. The concentration of technetium in the soil solution collected from the paddy rice soil (flooded conditions) decreased rapidly with time due to its adsorption on the soil. In the upland rice soil (non-flooded) solution, the decrease in the technetium concentration was fairly slow. The low transfer factors for the paddy rice plants could be explained by the immobilization of technetium in the flooded soil. The oxidation-reduction potentials (Eh) in the flooded soil decreased rapidly with time. We conclude that technetium tracer added as TcO 4 - to flooded soil is readily transformed to an insoluble form (e.g.TcO 2 ) under the reducing conditions provided by flooding. (author)

  17. Accelerators for forming cationic technetium complexes useful as radiodiagnostic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tweedle, M.F.

    1985-01-01

    This invention relates to compositions for making cationic radiodiagnostic agents and, in particular, to accelerator compounds for labelling such cationic radiodiagnostic agents, kits for preparing such 99m Tc-labelled cationic radiodiagnostic agents with technetium, and methods for labelling such cationic radiodiagnostic agents with technetium

  18. Search for technetium in natural tin metallurgical residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, C.W.

    1996-07-01

    Possible instability of baryons inside the nuclei might result in accumulation of rare isotopes in natural ores. In this respect, isotopes of technetium have certain advantages that can be useful in the search for technetium in nonradioactive ores by chemical methods. In this paper, we review the history of technetium research and discuss a new approach to the search for natural technetium associated with tin ores which appears to offer a rare possibility of discovering a smelting operation by-product such as flue dust, in which the volatile technetium heptoxide (Tc{sub 2}O{sub 7}), like rhenium heptoxide (Re{sub 2}O{sub 7}), would be expected to concentrate. Our concept of a search for technetium in these materials would be based on the assumption that traces of rhenium could occur in the ore and could be traced most easily by neutron activation of small samples. Such a procedure would confirm that an enrichment from the ore to the flue dust actually occurs with the rhenium and therefore should occur with technetium. Furthermore, this occurrence should identify the best location to search for technetium.

  19. Selenium accumulation by plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Philip J

    2016-02-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential mineral element for animals and humans, which they acquire largely from plants. The Se concentration in edible plants is determined by the Se phytoavailability in soils. Selenium is not an essential element for plants, but excessive Se can be toxic. Thus, soil Se phytoavailability determines the ecology of plants. Most plants cannot grow on seleniferous soils. Most plants that grow on seleniferous soils accumulate plant species have evolved tolerance to Se, and commonly accumulate tissue Se concentrations >100 mg Se kg(-1) dry matter. These plants are considered to be Se accumulators. Some species can even accumulate Se concentrations of 1000-15 000 mg Se kg(-1 )dry matter and are called Se hyperaccumulators. This article provides an overview of Se uptake, translocation and metabolism in plants and highlights the possible genetic basis of differences in these between and within plant species. The review focuses initially on adaptations allowing plants to tolerate large Se concentrations in their tissues and the evolutionary origin of species that hyperaccumulate Se. It then describes the variation in tissue Se concentrations between and within angiosperm species and identifies genes encoding enzymes limiting the rates of incorporation of Se into organic compounds and chromosomal loci that might enable the development of crops with greater Se concentrations in their edible portions. Finally, it discusses transgenic approaches enabling plants to tolerate greater Se concentrations in the rhizosphere and in their tissues. The trait of Se hyperaccumulation has evolved several times in separate angiosperm clades. The ability to tolerate large tissue Se concentrations is primarily related to the ability to divert Se away from the accumulation of selenocysteine and selenomethionine, which might be incorporated into non-functional proteins, through the synthesis of less toxic Se metabilites. There is potential to breed or select crops

  20. Joint refinery selenium treatability study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, C.L.; Folwarkow, S.

    1993-01-01

    The San Francisco Regional Water Quality Control Board recently established mass limits on discharges of selenium to the San Francisco Bay from several petroleum refineries. The refineries had been working independently to develop control strategies, including both source control and treatment options, for removal of selenium from their discharges. By January 1992, over fifty different combinations of treatment technologies, wastewater streams, and pretreatment steps had been investigated to determine their effectiveness and feasibility as selenium removal processes. No treatment process studied could achieve the required mass limits without serious negative environmental consequences, such as generation of large amounts of hazardous sludge. To better facilitate the development of a feasible selenium treatment process, the six Bay Area refineries shared results of their studies and identified several technologies that, with further work, could be developed further. This additional work is currently being carried out as part of a joint selenium treatability study sponsored by the Western States Petroleum Association. A review of the previous source control and treatment studies, along with a description of the current treatability studies will be discussed

  1. A method for the determination of technetium in environmental waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robb, P.; Warwick, P.; Malcolme-Lawes, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    A method is described which can be used to determine technetium-99 levels in a range of water types. Ruthenium isotopes which may interfere in the analysis are removed from the sample by precipitation before concentration of pertechnetate onto an ion-exchange column. Other nuclides can be removed from the column using NaOH before elution of the technetium using NaSCN. The technetium in the NaSNC eluent can then be extracted into butan-2-one which can be evaporated onto a planchette. Technetium-99m is used as a yield tracer and after this has decayed away to negligible levels. The amount of technetium on the planchette can be determined by measuring the rate of beta radiation emission from the final concentrate. (author)

  2. Corrosion and antifouling characteristics of technetium 99 in seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitsyn, V.I.; Strekalov, P.V.; Balakhovskij, O.A.; Mikhajlovskij, Yu.N.

    1982-01-01

    The results are presented of studying the corrosive and antifouling properties of metallic technetium-99 in the Barents Sea and the Sea of Japan. Foil of 99 Tc glued on acrylic plastic served as a sample. High corrosion resistance and antifouling properties exhibited by 99 Tc in seawater point to favorable prospects of further studies aimed at development of new methods for protection against corrosion and fouling of metallic structures and parts with the use of technetium. The antifouling properties of technetium would evidently be used most efficiently when coating materials of high corrosion resistance to seawater (titanium, stainless steels, special alloys, etc.) with layers of technetium. The use of technetium for coating low-alloyed or carbon steels employed in seawater is yet problematic

  3. Strontium metabolism and mechanism of interaction with mineralized tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadkins, C.L.; Fu Peng, C

    1981-01-01

    This paper examines the administration of strontium to birds and mammals which results in limited incorporation into skeletal tissue, depressed intestinal calcium absorption, and development of rachitic bone lesions. Comparison of radiostrontium and radiocalcium incorporation by intact animals reveals discrimination against strontium in favor of calcium. Comparison of the Sr 85 - Ca 2+ and Ca 45 - Ca 2+ exchange reveals discrimination against strontium in favor of calcium. Thus, this system manifests product specificity, strontium inhibition, strontium exchange, and discrimination observed with intact animals

  4. Technetium migration in natural clays; Migration von Technetium in natuerlichem Tongestein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luebke, Maria

    2015-10-01

    The present work was performed within the joint research project ''Retention of repository relevant radionuclides in argillaceous rocks and saline systems'' (contract no.: 02E10981), funded by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi). The aim was to obtain first insights into the interaction of the long-lived fission product technetium and natural clay with regard to a repository for high-level nuclear waste. For this purpose Opalinus Clay from Mont Terri (northern Switzerland) was used as a reference material. The nuclide technetium-99 will contribute to the radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuel for more than thousand years due to its long half-live. In case of a leakage of the storage vessels, the geochemistry of technetium is determined by its oxidation state, at which only the oxidation states +IV and +VII are relevant. Because of the high solubility and low affinity to sorption on surfaces of minerals, Tc(VII) is considered to be very mobile and thus the most hazardous species. The focuses of this study therefore are diffusion experiments with this mobile species and investigations of the effect of ferrous iron on the mobility and speciation of technetium.rnThe interaction of technetium and Opalinus Clay was studied in sorption and diffusion experiments varying several parameters (pH value, addition of reducing agents, effect of oxygen, diffusion pathways). In the course of this study spatially resolved investigations of the speciation have been performed on Opalinus Clay thin sections and bore cores for the first time. In addition to the speciation, further information regarding elemental distributions and crystalline phases near technetium enrichments were obtained. Supplementary investigations of powder samples allowed determining the molecular structure of technetium on the clay surface.rnBoth the combination of sorption experiments with spectroscopic investigations and the diffusion experiment exhibit a reduction of Tc

  5. Selenium and tellurium nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piacenza, Elena; Presentato, Alessandro; Zonaro, Emanuele; Lampis, Silvia; Vallini, Giovanni; Turner, Raymond J.

    2018-04-01

    Over the last 40 years, the rapid and exponential growth of nanotechnology led to the development of various synthesis methodologies to generate nanomaterials different in size, shape and composition to be applied in various fields. In particular, nanostructures composed of Selenium (Se) or Tellurium (Te) have attracted increasing interest, due to their intermediate nature between metallic and non-metallic elements, being defined as metalloids. Indeed, this key shared feature of Se and Te allows us the use of their compounds in a variety of applications fields, such as for manufacturing photocells, photographic exposure meters, piezoelectric devices, and thermoelectric materials, to name a few. Considering also that the chemical-physical properties of elements result to be much more emphasized when they are assembled at the nanoscale range, huge efforts have been made to develop highly effective synthesis methods to generate Se- or Te-nanomaterials. In this context, the present book chapter will explore the most used chemical and/or physical methods exploited to generate different morphologies of metalloid-nanostructures, focusing also the attention on the major advantages, drawbacks as well as the safety related to these synthetic procedures.

  6. Ion exchange removal of strontium from simulated and actual N-Springs well water at the Hanford 100-N Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.N.; Carson, K.J.; DesChane, J.R.; Elovich, R.J.; Kafka, T.M.; White, L.R.

    1996-06-01

    Experimental ion exchange studies are being conducted by the Pacific Northwest national Laboratory (PNNL) under the Efficient Separations and Processing (ESP) Crosscutting Program to evaluate newly emerging materials and technologies for removing cesium, strontium, technetium, and transuranic elements from simulated and actual wastes at Hanford. Previous work focused on applications to treat high-level alkaline tank wastes, but many of the technologies can also be applied in process and ground-water remediation. Ultimately, each process must be evaluated in terms of life-cycle costs, removal efficiency, process chemical consumption and recycle, stability of materials exposed to chemicals and radiation, compatibility with other process streams, secondary waste generation, process and maintenance costs, and final material disposal. This report assesses the performance of the 3M-designed Process Absorber Development Unit (PADU) and the AlliedSignal-produced sodium nonatitanate (NaTi) material in trace quantities of strontium from simulated and actual Hanford N-Springs ground water. The experimental objective was to determine the strontium-loading breakthrough profile of a proprietary 3M-engineered material in either disk or cartridge forms

  7. The relationship between selenium and gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Kuixiong; Ma Guansheng; Zhang Tingyu; Cheng Wufeng; Mao Dajuan; Pan Bixia; Xu Xiuxian

    1993-01-01

    Both sodium selenite and selenium yeast were chosen to block the MNNG mutagenesis. The inhibition rates were 66.5% and 37.9% respectively. The selenium levels in hair, serum and gastric juice, and the contents of nitrosamine in gastric juice were also determined. The results showed that the selenium levels were SG > CAG and Dys > GC (p CAG, Dyas and GC (p < 0.05). 19 cases of CAG patients treated with selenium yeast and 16 cases of the control were observed. After 10 weeks, the selenium levels in serum for the treated group were significantly increased. The symptoms of CAG patients seemed to be alleviated

  8. Fixation of Radioactive Strontium in Soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregers-Hansen, Birte

    1964-01-01

    of the other long-lived fission products. Much work2–5 has, therefore, been concerned with the possibility of bringing down the strontium-90 uptake by plants through ploughing or through the addition of lime or fertilizer to the soil. Another factor, the effect of ageing on the availability of strontium, has...... been considered6,7. In general, these methods appear to be of little practical value, except for deep ploughing and the liming of acid soils, both of which will reduce the strontium uptake by a factor of 3–4....

  9. Ceria and strontium titanate based electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    A ceramic anode structure obtainable by a process comprising the steps of: (a) providing a slurry by dispersing a powder of an electronically conductive phase and by adding a binder to the dispersion, in which said powder is selected from the group consisting of niobium-doped strontium titanate......, vanadium-doped strontium titanate, tantalum-doped strontium titanate, and mixtures thereof, (b) sintering the slurry of step (a), (c) providing a precursor solution of ceria, said solution containing a solvent and a surfactant, (d) impregnating the resulting sintered structure of step (b...

  10. Strontium clusters: electronic and geometry shell effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyalin, Andrey G.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2008-01-01

    charged strontium clusters consisting of up to 14 atoms, average bonding distances, electronic shell closures, binding energies per atom, and spectra of the density of electronic states (DOS). It is demonstrated that the size-evolution of structural and electronic properties of strontium clusters...... is governed by an interplay of the electronic and geometry shell closures. Influence of the electronic shell effects on structural rearrangements can lead to violation of the icosahedral growth motif of strontium clusters. It is shown that the excessive charge essentially affects the optimized geometry...

  11. Sorption isolation of strontium from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avramenko, V.A.; Zheleznov, V.V.; Kaplun, E.V.; Sokol'nitskaya, T.A.; Yukhkam, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    Sorption isolation of strontium from seawater is considered and prospects of use of selective adsorbents for purification of seawater or liquid radioactive wastes mixed with seawater from 90 Sr are discussed. Comparative analysis of sorptive properties of adsorbents of different nature is done. It is shown that sorption-reagent materials developed by authors can to afford effective separation of 90 Sr from seawater. Possible mechanism of strontium sorption by these adsorbents is considered. The prospect of their use for purification of liquid radioactive wastes from strontium is shown [ru

  12. Evolution of technetium speciation in reducing grout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukens, Wayne W.; Bucher, Jerome J.; Shuh, David K.; Edelstein,Norman M.

    2003-11-24

    Cementitious waste forms (CWFs) are an important component of the strategy to immobilize high-level nuclear waste resulting from plutonium production by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Technetium (99Tc) is an abundant fission product of particular concern in CWFs due to the high solubility and mobility of pertechnetate, TcO4-, the stable form of technetium in aerobic environments. CWFs can more effectively immobilize 99Tc if they contain additives that reduce mobile TcO4- to immobile Tc(IV) species. Leaching of 99Tc from reducing CWFs that contain Tc(IV) is much slower than for CWFs containing TcO4-. Previous X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) studies showed that the Tc(IV) species were oxidized to TcO4- in reducing grout samples prepared on a laboratory scale. Whether the oxidizer was atmospheric O2 or NO3- in the waste simulant was not determined. In actual CWFs, rapid oxidation of Tc(IV) by NO3- would be a concern, whereas oxidation by atmospheric O2 would be of less concern due to the slow diffusion and reaction of O2 with the reducing CWF. To address this uncertainty, two series of reducing grouts were prepared using TcO4- containing waste simulants with and without NO3-. In the first series of samples, the TcO4- was completely reduced using Na2S, and the samples were placed in containers that permitted O2 diffusion. In these samples, all of the technetium was initially present as aTc(IV) sulfide compound, TcSx, which was characterized using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, and is likely Tc2S7. The TcSx initially present in the grout samples was steadily oxidized over 4 years. In the second series of samples, all of the TcO4- was not initially reduced, and the grout samples were placed in airtight containers. In these samples, the remaining TcO4- continued to be reduced as the samples aged, presumably due to the presence of reducing blast furnace slag. When samples in the second series were exposed to atmosphere, the

  13. Behavior of technetium in paddy soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, K.; Muramatsu, Y.; Ban-Nai, T.

    1997-01-01

    In order to understand the chemical form of soluble technetium in paddy soil and its availability to a rice plant, soil incubation and uptake experiments have been carried out using 95m Tc as a tracer. The chemical form of the soluble Tc was observed by gel chromatography and found not to be pertechnetate, but rather to be associated with soluble organic matter. An uptake experiment with rice seedlings using nutrient solution showed that this Tc-organic matter complex was less available than pertechnetate. (author)

  14. Selenium-containing indolyl compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casaril, Angela M; Ignasiak, Marta T; Chuang, Christine Y

    2017-01-01

    materials, including extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, within the artery wall. Here we investigated the potential of selenium-containing indoles to afford protection against these oxidants, by determining rate constants (k) for their reaction, and quantifying the extent of damage on isolated ECM proteins......Tyr on HCAEC-ECM were also reduced. These data demonstrate that the novel selenium-containing compounds show high reactivity with oxidants and may modulate oxidative and nitrosative damage at sites of inflammation, contributing to a reduction in tissue dysfunction and atherogenesis....

  15. Long-term selenium status in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baskett, C.K.; Spate, V.L.; Mason, M.M.; Nichols, T.A.; Williams, A.; Dubman, I.M.; Gudino, A.; Denison, J.; Morris, J.S.

    2001-01-01

    The association of sub-optimal selenium status with increased risk factors for some cancers has been reported in two recent epidemiological studies. In both studies the same threshold in selenium status was observed, below which, cancer incidence increased. To assess the use of nails as a biologic monitor to measure the long-term selenium status, an eight-year longitudinal study was undertaken with a group of 11 adult subjects, 5 women and 6 men. Selenium has been measured by instrumental neutron activation analysis. Differences between fingernails and toenails with be discussed. In addition, the results will be discussed in the context of the long-term stability of the nail monitor to measure selenium status during those periods when selenium determinants are static; and the changes that occur as a result of selenium supplementation. (author)

  16. Nutrigenetics, nutrigenomics, and selenium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Lynnette R; Karunasinghe, Nishi

    2011-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is an important micronutrient that, as a component of selenoproteins, influences oxidative and inflammatory processes. Its' levels vary considerably, with different ethnic and geographic population groups showing varied conditions, ranging from frank Se deficiencies to toxic effects. An optimum Se level is essential for the maintenance of homeostasis, and this optimum may vary according to life stage, general state of health, and genotype. Nutrigenetic studies of different Se levels, in the presence of genetic variants in selenoproteins, suggest that an effective dietary Se intake for one individual may be very different from that for others. However, we are just starting to learn the significance of various genes in selenoprotein pathways, functional variants in these, and how to combine such data from genes into pathways, alongside dietary intake or serum levels of Se. Advances in systems biology, genetics, and genomics technologies, including genetic/genomic, epigenetic/epigenomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic information, start to make it feasible to assess a comprehensive spectrum of the biological activity of Se. Such nutrigenomic approaches may prove very sensitive biomarkers of optimal Se status at the individual or population level. The premature cessation of a major human Se intervention trial has led to considerable controversy as to the value of Se supplementation at the population level. New websites provide convenient links to current information on methodologies available for nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics. These new technologies will increasingly become an essential tool in optimizing the level of Se and other micronutrients for optimal health, in individuals and in population groups. However, definitive proof of such effects will require very large collaborative studies, international agreement on study design, and innovative approaches to data analysis.

  17. Nutrigenetics, nutrigenomics and selenium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynnette Robiin Ferguson

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Selenium (Se is an important micronutrient that, as a component of selenoproteins, influences oxidative and inflammatory processes. Its’ levels vary considerably, with different ethnic and geographic population groups showing varied conditions, ranging from frank Se deficiencies to toxic effects. An optimum Se level is essential for the maintenance of homeostasis, and this optimum may vary according to life stage, general state of health and genotype. Nutrigenetic studies of different Se levels, in the presence of genetic variants in selenoproteins, suggest that an effective dietary Se intake for one individual may be very different from that for others. However, we are just starting to learn the significance of various genes in selenoprotein pathways, functional variants in these, and how to combine such data from genes into pathways, alongside dietary intake or serum levels of Se. Advances in systems biology, genetics and genomics technologies, including genetic/genomic, epigenetic/epigenomic, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic information, start to make it feasible to assess a comprehensive spectrum of the biological activity of Se. Such nutrigenomic approaches may prove very sensitive biomarkers of optimal Se status at the individual or population level. The premature cessation of a major human Se intervention trial has led to considerable controversy as to the value of Se supplementation at the population level. New websites provide convenient links to current information on methodologies available for nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics. These new technologies will increasingly become an essential tool in optimising the level of Se and other micronutrients for optimal health, in individuals and in population groups. However, definitive proof of such effects will require very large collaborative studies, international agreement on study design and innovative approaches to data analysis.

  18. Control of technetium at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saraceno, A.J.

    1981-01-01

    Technetium-99 entered the gaseous diffusion complex as a volatile impurity in recycled uranium that was fed to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Subsequently, it entered the Oak Ridge and Portsmouth cascades as an impurity in Paducah product feed. Most of the technetium was adsorbed on cascade equipment in increasingly high concentrations as it moved up the cascade. Since the low energy beta radiation produced by technetium cannot penetrate cascade equipment, it presents no significant hazard to workers as long as it remains inside of equipment. However, when equipment that contains high concentrations of technetium is opened for maintenance or change-out, precautions are taken to ensure worker safety. Traps containing activated alumina are used at the plant vent streams to limit radioactive emissions as far as possible. Annual vent stream emissions have been well below DOE limits. To allow continued compliance, other potential trapping agents have been tested. Several that limit emissions more effectively than activated alumina have been found. Other traps containing magnesium fluoride are used in the upper cascade to reduce the technetium concentration. Waste solutions from decontamination can also contain technetium. These solutions must either be stored for controlled discharge or treated to remove the technetium. To allow the latter, an ion exchange facility is being installed for operation by the end of FY-1982. Liquid discharges at Portsmouth have usually been less than 5% of the DOE imposed limits

  19. Research program to investigate the fundamental chemistry of technetium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeown, David A.; Buechele, Andrew C.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Muller, Isabelle S.; Shuh, David K.; Pegg, Ian L.

    2007-10-12

    The objective of this research is to increase the knowledge of the fundamental technetium chemistry necessary to address challenges to the safe, long-term disposal of high-level nuclear waste posed by this element. The primary issues examined during the course of this project were the behavior of technetium and its surrogate rhenium during waste vitrification and glass corrosion. Since the redox behavior of technetium can play a large role in determining its volatility, one goal of this research was to better understand the behavior of technetium in glass as a function of the redox potential of the glass melt. In addition, the behavior of rhenium was examined, since rhenium is commonly used as a surrogate for technetium in waste vitrification studies. A number of glasses similar to Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) glasses were prepared under controlled atmospheres. The redox state of the glass was determined from the Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio in the cooled glass, and the speciation of technetium and rhenium was determined by x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. The behavior of rhenium and technetium during glass alteration was also examined using the vapor hydration test (VHT).

  20. Separation of cesium and strontium with zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanno, T; Hashimoto, H [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Research Inst. of Mineral Dressing and Metallurgy

    1976-06-01

    The basic studies of separation of cesium and strontium were made with specimens of zeolite, which are synthetic zeolites A, X and Y; synthetic mordenite; natural mordenite; and clinoptilolite. Ammonium chloride was used as eluent, because it was considered to be a most appropriate eluent in alkaline chlorides. Cesium was easily eluted from the zeolites A and X by ammonium chloride solution, but it was difficult to elute from the synthetic mordenite, natural mordenite and clinoptilolite by ammonium chloride solution, but it was difficult to elute from the zeolites A and X. The zeolite Y is the only one zeolite among these zeolites from which both of cesium and strontium were easily eluted by ammonium chloride solution. Strontium could be separated from cesium with zeolites by formation of Sr-EDTA chelate at pH above 11. In this process, cesium was only exchanged in zeolite column, but strontium flow out from it.

  1. Separation of cesium and strontium with zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Takuji; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki

    1976-01-01

    The basic studies of separation of cesium and strontium were made with specimens of zeolite, which are synthetic zeolites A, X and Y; synthetic mordenite; natural mordenite; and clinoptilolite. Ammonium chloride was used as eluent, because it was considered to be a most appropriate eluent in alkaline chlorides. Cesium was easily eluted from the zeolites A and X by ammonium chloride solution, but it was difficult to elute from the synthetic mordenite, natural mordenite and clinoptilolite by ammonium chloride solution, but it was difficult to elute from the zeolites A and X. The zeolite Y is the only one zeolite among these zeolites from which both of cesium and strontium were easily eluted by ammonium chloride solution. Strontium could be separated from cesium with zeolites by formation of Sr-EDTA chelate at pH above 11. In this process, cesium was only exchanged in zeolite column, but strontium flow out from it. (auth.)

  2. Dielectric behaviour of strontium tartrate single crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    dielectric loss (tan δ) as functions of frequency and temperature. Ion core type ... Since the data on dielectric properties of strontium tartrate trihydrate (STT) do not ... through 'AE' make 15-amp dimmerstat, the rate of heating was maintained ...

  3. Hanford waste encapsulation: strontium and cesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, R.R.

    1976-06-01

    The strontium and cesium fractions separated from high radiation level wastes at Hanford are converted to the solid strontium fluoride and cesium chloride salts, doubly encapsulated, and stored underwater in the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). A capsule contains approximately 70,000 Ci of 137 Cs or 70,000 to 140,000 Ci of 90 Sr. Materials for fabrication of process equipment and capsules must withstand a combination of corrosive chemicals, high radiation dosages and frequently, elevated temperatures. The two metals selected for capsules, Hastelloy C-276 for strontium fluoride and 316-L stainless steel for cesium chloride, are adequate for prolonged containment. Additional materials studies are being done both for licensing strontium fluoride as source material and for second generation process equipment

  4. Strontium Diibuprofenate Dihydrate, Strontium Malonate Sesquihydrate, Strontium Diascorbate Dihydrate and Strontium 2-Oxidobenzoate Hydrate at 120 K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahl, Kenny; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Cristgau, Stephan

    2006-01-01

    -sharing to form chains. The Sr coordination chains are packed into layers, which are stacked by van der Waals interactions. Poly[-aqua-diaquadi--malonato-distrontium(II)], [Sr2(C3H2O4)2(H2O)3]n, crystallizes with nine-coordinated Sr atoms three-dimensionally interconnected into a framework structure. One...... of the two crystallographically independent water molecules is located on a twofold axial site. catena-Poly[[diaqua(ascorbato)strontium(II)]--ascorbato], [Sr(C6H7O6)2(H2O)2]n, crystallizes with isolated eight-coordinated Sr polyhedra. One of the ascorbate ligands bridges two Sr atoms, forming zigzag...

  5. Technetium-99 in the Irish marine environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, V.; Fegan, M.; Pollard, D.; Long, S.; Hayden, E.; Ryan, T.P

    2001-07-01

    Technetium-99 activity concentrations in seawater and biota from Irish coastal waters are presented. Time series measurements of {sup 99}Tc in seawater and Fucus vesiculosus from the western Irish Sea show that activity concentrations have increased in line with the increase in discharges of {sup 99}Tc from Sellafield. The peak in activity concentrations in both seawater and Fucus vesiculosus occurred in 1997 approximately two years after the peak in {sup 99}Tc discharges. The highest activity concentration recorded in Fucus vesiculosus showed a 29-fold increase over the mean concentration for the period 1988-1993. Technetium-99 activity concentrations were measured in fish, lobsters, prawns, mussels and oysters landed at major fishing ports on the east and northeast coasts of Ireland between 1996 and 1998. Concentration factors for {sup 99}Tc in the brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus and certain species of fish, crustaceans and molluscs from the Irish Sea were estimated. In general, these concentration factors were higher than those in the literature which were derived from laboratory studies, but agreed well with values which were based on field studies. The mean committed effective doses to Irish typical and heavy seafood consumers due to {sup 99}Tc in the period 1996-1998 were 0.061 and 0.24 {mu}Sv, respectively.

  6. Determination of radioactive strontium in seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grahek, Zeljko; Rozmaric Macefat, Martina

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the procedures of isolating strontium and yttrium from seawater that enable the determination of 89,90 Sr. In one procedure, strontium is directly isolated from seawater on the column filled with Sr resin by binding of strontium to the resin from 3 M HNO 3 in a seawater, and successive elution with HNO 3 . In others, strontium is precipitated from seawater with (NH 4 ) 2 CO 3 , followed by isolation on a Sr column or an anion exchange column. It is shown that strontium precipitation is optimal with concentration of 0.3 M (NH 4 ) 2 CO 3 at pH = 11. In these conditions, 100% Y, 78% Sr, 80% Ca and 50% Mg are precipitated. Strontium is bound on to Sr column from 5 to 8 M HNO 3 , separated from other elements by elution with 3 M HNO 3 and 0.05 M HNO 3 . Strontium and yttrium are bound on to anion exchange column from alcoholic solutions of nitric acid. The optimum mixture of alcohols for sample binding is a mixture of ethanol and methanol with the volume ratio 1:3. Strontium and yttrium are separated from Mg, Ca, K, and other elements by elution with 0.25 M HNO 3 in the mixture of ethanol and methanol. After the separation, yttrium and strontium are eluted from the column with water or methanol. In the procedure of direct isolation from 1 l of the sample, the average recovery of 50% was obtained. In the remaining two procedures, the strontium recovery was about 60% for the Sr column and 65% for anion exchange column. Recovery of yttrium is about 70% for the anion exchange column. It turned out that the procedure with the Sr resin (direct isolation and isolation after precipitation) is simpler and faster in the phase of the isolation on the column in comparison with the procedure with the anion exchanger. The procedure with the anion exchanger, however, enables the simultaneous isolation of yttrium and strontium and rapid determination of 89,90 Sr. These procedures were tested by determination of 89,90 Sr on liquid scintillation counter and Cherenkov

  7. Research Program to Investigate the Fundamental Chemistry of Technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelstein, Norman M.; Burns, Carol J.; Shuh, David D.; Lukens, Wayne

    2000-01-01

    Technetium (99Tc, half-life = 2.13x105 years, b-emitter) is one of the radionuclides of major concern for nuclear waste disposal. This concern is due to the long half-life of 99Tc, the ease with which pertechnetate, TcO4 -, migrates in the geosphere, and the corresponding regulatory considerations. The problem of mobility of pertechnetate in the environment is compounded by the fact that pertechnetate is the thermodynamically stable form of technetium in aerobic environments. These two factors present challenges for the safe, long term immobilization of technetium in waste forms. Because of the stability of pertechnetate, technetium has been assumed to exist as pertechnetate in the aqueous phase of nuclear waste tanks. However, recent studies indicate that a significant fraction of the technetium is in a different chemical form. This program addresses the fundamental solution chemistry of technetium in the waste tank environment, and in a second part, the stability of technetium in various waste forms. The chemistry of this element will be studied in aqueous solutions at high pH, with various added salts such as nitrate, nitrite, and organic complexants, and as a function of radiation dose, to determine whether radiolysis effects can reduce TcO4 -. A separate facet of this research is the search for chemical forms of technetium that may be thermodynamically and/or kinetically stable and may be incorporated in various waste forms for long term storage. This phase of the program will address the problem of the possible oxidation of lower valent technetium species in various waste form matrices and the subsequent leaching of the highly soluble TcO4 -

  8. Strontium-90 migration in Hanford sediments, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steefel, C.I.; Yang, L.; Carroll, S.A.; Roberts, S.; Zachara, J.M.; Yabusaki, S.B.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Strontium-90 is an important risk-driving contaminant at the Hanford site in eastern Washington, USA. Disposal operations at the Hanford 100-N area released millions of liters of reactor cooling water containing high concentrations of strontium-90 into the vadose zone immediately adjacent to the Columbia River. The effectiveness of pump-and-treat methods for remediation have been questioned, largely because the strontium is strongly sorbed on subsurface sediments via ion exchange reactions and co-precipitation in carbonates. In addition, groundwater monitoring wells show a fluctuating seasonal behavior in which high strontium-90 concentrations correlate with high Columbia River stage, even while average concentrations remain approximately constant. A series of fully saturated reactive transport column experiments have been conducted to investigate the important controls on strontium migration in Hanford groundwater [1]. The experiments were designed to investigate the multicomponent cation exchange behavior of strontium in competition with the cations Na + , Ca +2 , and Mg +2 , the concentration of which differs between river water and groundwater. Reactive transport modeling of the experiments indicates that the Sr +2 selectivity coefficient becomes larger with increasing NaNO 3 concentration, a behavior also shown by the divalent cations Ca +2 and Mg +2 . A new set of column experiments investigates the effect of wetting and drying cycles on strontium- 90 sorption and migration by considering episodic flow in Hanford sediments. In addition, the effect of fluctuating aquifer chemistry as a result of changes in the Columbia River stage on Sr +2 sorption is addressed. Modeling of multicomponent reactive transport under variably saturated conditions is used to interpret the results of the episodic flow/chemistry experiments. [1] Experimental and modeling studies of the migration behavior of strontium in Hanford sediments, USA. C

  9. Fracture Phenomena in Amorphous Selenium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard-Andersen, Asger; Dahle, Birgit

    1966-01-01

    Fracture surfaces of amorphous selenium broken in flexure at room temperature have been studied. The fracture velocity was found to vary in different regions of the fracture surface. Peculiar features were observed in a transition zone between fast and slower fracture. In this zone cleavage steps...

  10. Method of stably radiolabeling antibodies with technetium and rhenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paik, C.H.; Reba, R.C.; Eckelman, W.C.

    1987-01-01

    A method is described for labeling antibodies or antibody fragments with radionuclides of technetium or rhenium to obtain stable labeling, comprising: reacting a reduced radioisotope of technetium or rhenium with an antibody or antibody fragment, or a diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid conjugated antibody or antibody fragment, in the presence of free or carrier-bound diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). The amount of DTPA is sufficient to substantially completely inhibit binding of the reduced technetium or rhenium to nonstable binding sites of the antibody or antibody fragment, or the DTPA-conjugated antibody or antibody fragment. The resultant stably labeled antibody or antibody fragment, or DTPA[conjugated antibody or antibody fragment is recovered

  11. The radiopharmaceuticals labelled with technetium-99m and the radiopharmacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodenant, V.

    1998-01-01

    In less than fifty years, the place of nuclear medicine is become primordial. Among all the radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine, the technetium-99m is the most used because of its physico-chemical properties and its great availability with the molybdenum-99m - technetium-99m generator. Since 1992, the radiopharmaceuticals, the packages, the generators are included in the pharmaceutic monopole. They are now under the reliability of the radio-pharmacist. This thesis has for object to introduce these different radiopharmaceuticals labelled with technetium-99m and to show the primordial place of the radio-pharmacist in a service of nuclear medicine. (N.C.)

  12. Ion exchange removal of technetium from salt solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D.D.

    1983-01-01

    Ion exchange methods for removing technetium from waste salt solutions have been investigated by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL). These experiments have shown: Commercially available anion exchange resins show high selectivity and capacity for technetium. In column runs, 150 column volumes of salt solution were passed through an ion exchange column before 50% 99 Tc breakthrough was reached. The technetium can be eluted from the resin with nitric acid. Reducing resins (containing borohydride) work well in simple hydroxide solutions, but not in simulated salt solutions. A mercarbide resin showed a very high selectivity for Tc, but did not work well in column operation

  13. SELENIUM ACCUMULATION BY BASIL PLANTS (OCINUM BASILICUM L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Golubkina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Selenium accumulation level in basil plants is investigated. A direct correlation between selenium concentration and essential oil content is demonstrated for basil and other aroma plants. No correlation is found between selenium and flavonoids.

  14. Chemical Form of Selenium in Naturally Selenium-Rich Lentils (Lens Culinaris L.) From Saskatchewan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thavarajah, D.; Vandenberg, A.; George, G.N.; Pickering, I.J.

    2009-06-04

    Lentils (Lens culinaris L.) are a source of many essential dietary components and trace elements for human health. In this study we show that lentils grown in the Canadian prairies are additionally enriched in selenium, an essential micronutrient needed for general well-being, including a healthy immune system and protection against cancer. Selenium K near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to examine the selenium biochemistry of two lentil cultivars grown in various locations in Saskatchewan, Canada. We observe significant variations in total selenium concentration with geographic location and cultivar; however, almost all the selenium (86--95%) in these field-grown lentils is present as organic selenium modeled as selenomethionine with a small component (5--14%) as selenate. As the toxicities of certain forms of arsenic and selenium are antagonistic, selenium-rich lentils may have a pivotal role to play in alleviating the chronic arsenic poisoning in Bangladesh.

  15. Selenopeptides and elemental selenium in Thunbergia alata after exposure to selenite: quantification method for elemental selenium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aborode, Fatai Adigun; Raab, Andrea; Foster, Simon; Lombi, Enzo; Maher, William; Krupp, Eva M; Feldmann, Joerg

    2015-07-01

    Three month old Thunbergia alata were exposed for 13 days to 10 μM selenite to determine the biotransformation of selenite in their roots. Selenium in formic acid extracts (80 ± 3%) was present as selenopeptides with Se-S bonds and selenium-PC complexes (selenocysteinyl-2-3-dihydroxypropionyl-glutathione, seleno-phytochelatin2, seleno-di-glutathione). An analytical method using HPLC-ICPMS to detect and quantify elemental selenium in roots of T. alata plants using sodium sulfite to quantitatively transform elemental selenium to selenosulfate was also developed. Elemental selenium was determined as 18 ± 4% of the total selenium in the roots which was equivalent to the selenium not extracted using formic acid extraction. The results are in an agreement with the XAS measurements of the exposed roots which showed no occurrence of selenite or selenate but a mixture of selenocysteine and elemental selenium.

  16. The radiopharmaceuticals labelled with technetium-99m and the radiopharmacy; Les radiopharmaceutiques marques au technetium-99m et la radiopharmacie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodenant, V

    1998-10-01

    In less than fifty years, the place of nuclear medicine is become primordial. Among all the radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine, the technetium-99m is the most used because of its physico-chemical properties and its great availability with the molybdenum-99m - technetium-99m generator. Since 1992, the radiopharmaceuticals, the packages, the generators are included in the pharmaceutic monopole. They are now under the reliability of the radio-pharmacist. This thesis has for object to introduce these different radiopharmaceuticals labelled with technetium-99m and to show the primordial place of the radio-pharmacist in a service of nuclear medicine. (N.C.)

  17. Kinetics of isotopic exchange between strontium polymolybdate and strontium ions in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atun, Gulten; Bilgin, Binay; Kilislioglu, Ayben

    2002-01-01

    A heterogeneous isotopic exchange reaction of strontium polymolybdate in strontium chloride solution was studied using 90 Sr as a tracer. The effects of low and high strontium chloride concentration on the rate and mechanism of the isotopic exchange reaction were investigated. It was found that, at high concentrations, the rate is independent of strontium concentration, but, at low concentrations, the rate is proportional to the strontium concentration. These results support a hypothesis that, at low concentrations, the rate is controlled by film diffusion, whereas at high concentrations it is controlled by particle diffusion. Experiments were performed at 293, 303 and 313 K. Activation energy of isotopic exchange reaction and thermodynamic parameters ΔH*, ΔS*, and ΔG* were calculated using the Arrhenius and Eyring equations. The results also indicated that recrystallization is a predominant factor in the present exchange reaction

  18. Kinetics of isotopic exchange between strontium polymolybdate and strontium ions in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atun, Gulten E-mail: gultena@istanbul.edu.tr; Bilgin, Binay; Kilislioglu, Ayben

    2002-06-01

    A heterogeneous isotopic exchange reaction of strontium polymolybdate in strontium chloride solution was studied using {sup 90}Sr as a tracer. The effects of low and high strontium chloride concentration on the rate and mechanism of the isotopic exchange reaction were investigated. It was found that, at high concentrations, the rate is independent of strontium concentration, but, at low concentrations, the rate is proportional to the strontium concentration. These results support a hypothesis that, at low concentrations, the rate is controlled by film diffusion, whereas at high concentrations it is controlled by particle diffusion. Experiments were performed at 293, 303 and 313 K. Activation energy of isotopic exchange reaction and thermodynamic parameters {delta}H*, {delta}S*, and {delta}G* were calculated using the Arrhenius and Eyring equations. The results also indicated that recrystallization is a predominant factor in the present exchange reaction.

  19. Review of technetium behavior in relation to nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paquette, J.; Reid, J.A.K.; Rosinger, E.L.J.

    1992-05-01

    This report contains available information which determine possible methods of the transfer of technetium element from waste disposal facilities to the biosphere. It also includes possible effects upon human beings and environment. 65 refs., 4 tabs., 3 figs

  20. Preparation and quality control of technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuels, D.L.

    1978-11-01

    Appropriate procedures for the production and quality control of technetium-99m based radiopharmaceuticals in hospital radiopharmacy consistent with the recently published Australian Code of Good Manufacturing Practice are discussed

  1. Physical chemical quality control of the molybdenum technetium generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olive, E.; Cruz, J.; Isaac, M.; Gamboa, R.; D'Alessandro, K.; Desdin, L.F.

    1995-01-01

    Comparative operational procedure imported molybdenum technetium generators have been made. Procedures for determination of chemical, radiochemical and radionuclidic purities that may be applied in Hospital's laboratories and in the quality control of generators production are developed

  2. Does selenium supplementation affect thyroid function?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Kristian Hillert; Bonnema, Steen Joop; Cold, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Selenium is present in the active site of proteins important for thyroid hormone synthesis and metabolism. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of selenium supplementation in different doses on thyroid function, under conditions of suboptimal dietary selenium intake....... DESIGN: The Danish PREvention of Cancer by Intervention with SElenium pilot study (DK-PRECISE) is a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial. A total of 491 males and females aged 60-74 years were randomized to 100 μg (n=124), 200 μg (n=122), or 300 μg (n=119) selenium-enriched yeast......=0.015), respectively, per 100 μg/day increase, with insignificant differences between 6 months and 5 years. No significant effects were found for FT3 and FT3:FT4 ratio. CONCLUSIONS: In euthyroid subjects, selenium supplementation minutely and dose-dependently affects thyroid function, when compared...

  3. Under used technetium-99m generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mushtaq, A.

    2001-01-01

    Health care reform truly has become a global issue and it will undoubtedly have a dramatic impact on the future of nuclear medicine business in particular. A bigger concern within the nuclear medicine community is its competitiveness with other modalities and cost effectiveness.Technetium-99m and its generators are playing key role for the majority of diagnostic scans performed in the world today. Availability of ''9''9''mTc can be increased if it is separated from ''9''9Mo after much shorter growth times. After proper planning with the extra ''9''9''mTc, a significant number of scans can be performed or we would be able to order approximately 30% low activity ''9''9Tc generators to fulfill our requirements

  4. Technetium-99m-human fibrinogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, D.W.; Mishkin, F.S.

    1975-01-01

    Exogenous fibrinogen has been successfully labeled with /sup 99m/Tc using a modified electrolytic method. The exact labeling mechanism has not been determined. Experimental data suggest that the labeling process of /99m/Tc-fibrinogen is quite similar to that of /sup 99m/Tc-human serum albumin as reported earlier by Benjamin. Technetium-99m-fibrinogen is stable in human plasma or in 1 percent buffered human serum albumin. A binding efficiency of 76 percent has been achieved with approximately 25 percent clottable protein. The entire labeling procedure requires less than 1 hr of preparation time. This short labeling time in a closed system may allow development of a practical method for labeling autologous fibrinogen, thus eliminating the risk of hepatitis transmission. (U.S.)

  5. Labeling of creatinine with technetium-99m

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yurt Lambrecht, F. [Ege Univ., Bornova, Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Nuclear Applications, Inst. of Nuclear Sciences; Durkan, K. [Dokuz Eylul Univ., Buca, Izmir (Turkey). Chemistry Technicianship Program, Izmir Vocational School; Soylu, A. [Dokuz Eylul Univ., Narlidere, Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Pediatrics, Medical Faculty

    2004-07-01

    Creatinine is a clinically important index of renal glomerular filtration rate. Urine creatinine levels can be used as a screening test to evaluate kidney function or can be part of the creatinine clearance test. In case of kidney dysfunction or muscle disorders the creatinine concentration in serum/plasma may rise to a higher value than in healthy body. Technetium- 99m has been used in nuclear medicine and in biomedical research to label molecular and cellular structures employed as radiotracers. {sup 99m}Tc is utilized to label molecules and cells, used as radiopharmaceuticals, and also to label biological species. It presents many desirable characteristics. SnCl{sub 2} method is frequently used as a reducing agent in the {sup 99m}Tc- labeling process. Creatinine metabolism might be investigated by using labeled {sup 99m}Tc- creatinine in healthy or uremic rats. (orig.)

  6. Amino acid-assisted synthesis of strontium hydroxyapatite bone ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Strontium-incorporated calcium phosphates show potential in biomedical application, particularly the doped stron- tium may ... shows that the addition of glycine plays an important role in reducing the particle size of strontium hydroxyapatite.

  7. Reduced-graphene-oxide-and-strontium-titanate-based double ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GO)/strontium titanate were pre- ... R-GO and strontium titanate were synthesized and characterized before ... Microwave absorption capabilities of the composite absorbers were investigated using a .... was backed with a conducting metal sheet.

  8. Anionic sorbents for arsenic and technetium species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucero, Daniel A.; Moore, Robert Charles; Bontchev, Ranko Panayotov; Hasan, Ahmed Ali Mohamed; Zhao, Hongting; Salas, Fred Manuel; Holt, Kathleen Caroline

    2003-01-01

    Two sorbents, zirconium coated zeolite and magnesium hydroxide, were tested for their effectiveness in removing arsenic from Albuquerque municipal water. Results for the zirconium coated zeolite indicate that phosphate present in the water interfered with the sorption of arsenic. Additionally, there was a large quantity of iron and copper present in the water, corrosion products from the piping system, which may have interfered with the uptake of arsenic by the sorbent. Magnesium hydroxide has also been proven to be a strong sorbent for arsenic as well as other metals. Carbonate, present in water, has been shown to interfere with the sorption of arsenic by reacting with the magnesium hydroxide to form magnesium carbonate. The reaction mechanism was investigated by FT-IR and shows that hydrogen bonding between an oxygen on the arsenic species and a hydrogen on the Mg(OH)2 is most likely the mechanism of sorption. This was also confirmed by RAMAN spectroscopy and XRD. Technetium exists in multiple oxidation states (IV and VII) and is easily oxidized from the relatively insoluble Tc(IV) form to the highly water soluble and mobile Tc(VII) form. The two oxidation states exhibit different sorption characteristics. Tc(VII) does not sorb to most materials whereas Tc(IV) will strongly sorb to many materials. Therefore, it was determined that it is necessary to first reduce the Tc (using SnCl2) before sorption to stabilize Tc in the environment. Additionally, the effect of carbonate and phosphate on the sorption of technetium by hydroxyapatite was studied and indicated that both have a significant effect on reducing Tc sorption

  9. The performance of gel technetium-99m generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yishu

    2004-01-01

    Technetium-99m, as one of the important radionuclides in nuclear medical science, has been widely used for diseases diagnosis in both developed and developing countries for many years. Technetium-99m can be obtained from both fission-type and gel-type Tc-99m generator. Fission-type generator was prepared by Molybdenum-99 separated from fission products of uranium-235 and gel-type was prepared by irradiating nature MoO 3 in reactor, and a series of chemical and physical processes. This paper briefly describes the manufacturing technical process of gel-type Technetium-99 generator, including the preparation of target containing nature MoO 3 , the target irradiation in reactor, gel preparation, gel filtration and drying, dried gel cracking, generator loading and activity calibration of generator. The performances of gel-type Technetium-99m generator, such as elution efficiency, elution profile, the pH, Mo breakthrough, Zirconium content, radiochemical purity, radionuclidic purity, sterility and pyrogencity of eluate, are also expatiated in detail. Comparing with fission-type Technetium-99m generator, the defects of gel-type Technetium-99m generator are enumerated and their overcoming solutions are recommended in this paper. (author)

  10. Study of the synthesis of ammonia over technetium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spetsyn, V.I.; Mikhailenko, I.E.; Pokrovskaya, O.V.

    1982-01-01

    The catalytic properties of technetium in the synthesis of ammonia have been studied in the present work. Technetium catalysts according to specific yield surpass all know catalysts for the synthesis of ammonia. The enhanced catalytic activity of technetium compared to manganese and rhenium is apparently explained by the presence of the radioactivity of 99 Tc. The processes of adsorption, orientation of the adsorbed molecules, and their binding energies can differ during radiation action. Irradiation of the carrier, occurring through #betta#-emission of 99 Tc, with doses of 4-8 x 10 3 rad/day, increased the number of defects in the crystal structure where stabilization of technetium atoms was possible. The existence of charged centers can cause an increase in the dissociative chemisorption of nitrogen, which is the limiting stage of the process. Technetium catalysts possess a stable catalytic activity and do not require its restoration for several months. Results suggest that the use of technetium as a catalyst for the synthesis of ammonia has real advantages and potential possibilities

  11. Measurement of strontium 90 in the rain fall-out

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suratman; Soedyartomo; Suhartono.

    1976-01-01

    The procedure of radioactivity measurement of strontium 90 in the rain fallout as well as the measurement of the fallout gross beta activity have been studied. In the preliminary study strontium 90 is separated from other cations especially fission products by fuming nitric acid, and radioactivity measurement is carried out in the form of strontium oxalate. Data of radioactivity measurement of strontium 90 and the gross beta activity in the fallout are given. (author)

  12. Distribution of strontium in milk component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosskopfova, O.; Galambos, M.; Rajec, P.

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of strontium between the milk components, i.e., serum, casein micelles, whey and hydroxyapatite was determined. The sorption on hydroxyapatite was investigated using batch method and radiotracer technique. The aqueous phase comprised of either milk or whey. The sorption of strontium on hydroxyapatite depended on the method of its preparation and on the composition of the aqueous phase. The sorption of strontium was increased with an increase of pH. The presence of citrate species resulted in decrease of the sorption of strontium on hydroxyapatite. The sorption of 85 Sr on hydroxyapatite decreased with the increasing concentration of Ca 2+ ions. Addition of Ca 2+ ions to milk resulted in milk pH decrease. The decrease in pH value after calcium addition to milk is related to exchanges between added calcium and micellar H + . The average value of strontium sorption on casein micelles in milk with presence of hydroxyapatite was (47.3 ± 5.6) %. The average value of sorption of 85 Sr on casein micelles in milk without the addition of hydroxyapatite was (68.9 ± 2.2) %. (author)

  13. Review on Nano SeleniumProduced by Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Ji-xiang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Selenium (Se is a kind of essential trace element for people and animal, while ionic state of selenium is toxic with high concentrations and will cause the selenium pollution. Nano-selenium is stable, nontoxic with higher biological activity. Application of bacteria reducing selenite or selenate to biological nano-selenium has great potential in selenium pollution control and nano-selenium production. This review summarizes the research progress of the red elemental nano-selenium reduced by bacteria including characteristics and application of nano-selenium, effects of carbon and nitrogen source, oxygen, temperature and pH in bacteria nano-selenium production, and molecular mechanisms of nano-selenium reduced by bacteria.

  14. Shape coexistence in selenium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ying; Cao Zhongbin; Xu Furong

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear shape change and shape coexistence in the Selenium isotopes have been investigated by Total-Routhian-Surface (TRS) calculations. It is found that nuclear shapes vary significantly with increasing neutron number. The TRS calculations for the ground states of 66,72,92,94 Se isotopes show that both neutron-deficient and neutron-dripline Selenium isotopes have oblate and prolate shape coexistence. The cranking shell-model calculations for 72,94 Se give that prolate and oblate shape coexistence in low rotational frequency. However, oblate rotational bands disappear and prolate rotational bands become yrast bands with increasing rotational frequency, which is due to the intrusion of the g 9/2 orbitals. (authors)

  15. Growth and characterization of pure and lithium doped strontium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    Abstract. The effect of lithium ion as dopant on the size and transparency of strontium tartrate tetrahydrate. (SrC4H4O6⋅4H2O) crystals are presented in this paper. Growth of single crystals of undoped and lithium doped strontium tartrate tetrahydrate by controlled diffusion of strontium nitrate into the gel charged with.

  16. Growth of strontium oxalate crystals in agar–agar gel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Growth of strontium oxalate crystals in agar–agar gel. P V DALAL. ∗ and K B SARAF. Postgraduate Department of Physics, Pratap College, Amalner 425 401, India. MS received 16 March 2008; revised 5 April 2010. Abstract. Single crystals of strontium oxalate have been grown by using strontium chloride and oxalic acid in.

  17. Rapid determination of strontium-89 and strontium-90 in food and environmental samples by Cerenkov counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melin, Judith; Suomela, Jorma

    1995-01-01

    The method has been developed for emergency situations. Minimum detectable concentrations of 5 Bq/liter, kilogram of strontium-89 and strontium-90 respectively is achievable in the presence of nuclides considered to be released under accidental conditions. Result on the strontium-89 and strontium-90 content in a sample can be obtained within 12 hours. One technician can easily handle 8-10 samples during a working day of eight hours. The determination of the strontium isotopes is accomplished by monitoring the Cerenkov radiation from strontium-89 and yttrium-90 in a liquid scintillation counter. The latter is the daughter product of strontium-90. Prior to the Cerenkov counting the sample is separated from interfering nuclides by oxalate precipitation, chromate precipitation and HDEHP-extraction. The method has to be further improved and evaluated with respect to different soil types such as forest mineral soil layers, agricultural soils and pastures. Furthermore, the decontamination procedure should be evaluated for a sample containing freshly irradiated uranium. (author)

  18. Selenium determination by fluorimetric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavorenti, A.

    1981-01-01

    A fluorimetric method to determine selenium both in vegetable samples and blood serum is developed. The method consists of a radioisotope 75 Se initially in order to optimize the determination of analytical conditions. Three samples digestion processes and also some factors related to methodology is studied. The nitric-percloric digestion process for 40 samples and the analytical process is shown. (M.J.C.) [pt

  19. Selenium Enrichment of Horticultural Crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puccinelli, Martina; Malorgio, Fernando; Pezzarossa, Beatrice

    2017-06-04

    The ability of some crops to accumulate selenium (Se) is crucial for human nutrition and health. Selenium has been identified as a cofactor of the enzyme glutathione peroxidase, which is a catalyzer in the reduction of peroxides that can damage cells and tissues, and can act as an antioxidant. Plants are the first link in the food chain, which ends with humans. Increasing the Se quantity in plant products, including leafy and fruity vegetables, and fruit crops, without exceeding the toxic threshold, is thus a good way to increase animal and human Se intake, with positive effects on long-term health. In many Se-enriched plants, most Se is in its major organic form. Given that this form is more available to humans and more efficient in increasing the selenium content than inorganic forms, the consumption of Se-enriched plants appears to be beneficial. An antioxidant effect of Se has been detected in Se-enriched vegetables and fruit crops due to an improved antioxidative status and to a reduced biosynthesis of ethylene, which is the hormone with a primary role in plant senescence and fruit ripening. This thus highlights the possible positive effect of Se in preserving a longer shelf-life and longer-lasting quality.

  20. Selenium Enrichment of Horticultural Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Puccinelli

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability of some crops to accumulate selenium (Se is crucial for human nutrition and health. Selenium has been identified as a cofactor of the enzyme glutathione peroxidase, which is a catalyzer in the reduction of peroxides that can damage cells and tissues, and can act as an antioxidant. Plants are the first link in the food chain, which ends with humans. Increasing the Se quantity in plant products, including leafy and fruity vegetables, and fruit crops, without exceeding the toxic threshold, is thus a good way to increase animal and human Se intake, with positive effects on long-term health. In many Se-enriched plants, most Se is in its major organic form. Given that this form is more available to humans and more efficient in increasing the selenium content than inorganic forms, the consumption of Se-enriched plants appears to be beneficial. An antioxidant effect of Se has been detected in Se-enriched vegetables and fruit crops due to an improved antioxidative status and to a reduced biosynthesis of ethylene, which is the hormone with a primary role in plant senescence and fruit ripening. This thus highlights the possible positive effect of Se in preserving a longer shelf-life and longer-lasting quality.

  1. Technetium 99-m labeled radio-diagnostic agents employing stannous tartrate and method of preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molinski, V.J.; Wilczewski, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    A method of preparing improved technetium-99m labeled radiodiagnostic agents by reducing technetium-99m with stannous tartrate. Such radiodiagnostic agents are useful in scintigraphic examinations of the bone and lung. 31 claims, no drawings

  2. Strontium and fluorine in tuatua shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trompetter, W.J.; Coote, G.E.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the research to date on the elemental distributions of strontium, calcium, and fluorine in a collection of 24 tuatua shells (courtesy of National Museum). Variations in elemental concentrations were measured in the shell cross-sections using a scanning proton microprobe (PIXE and PIGME). In this paper we report the findings to date, and present 2-D measurement scans as illustrative grey-scale pictures. Our results support the hypothesis that increased strontium concentrations are deposited in the shells during spawning, and that fluorine concentration is proportional to growth rate. (author). 15 refs.; 13 figs.; 1 appendix

  3. Printed Barium Strontium Titanate capacitors on silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sette, Daniele [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Luxembourg Institute of Science and Technology LIST, Materials Research and Technology Department, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Kovacova, Veronika [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Defay, Emmanuel, E-mail: emmanuel.defay@list.lu [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Luxembourg Institute of Science and Technology LIST, Materials Research and Technology Department, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg)

    2015-08-31

    In this paper, we show that Barium Strontium Titanate (BST) films can be prepared by inkjet printing of sol–gel precursors on platinized silicon substrate. Moreover, a functional variable capacitor working in the GHz range has been made without any lithography or etching steps. Finally, this technology requires 40 times less precursors than the standard sol–gel spin-coating technique. - Highlights: • Inkjet printing of Barium Strontium Titanate films • Deposition on silicon substrate • Inkjet printed silver top electrode • First ever BST films thinner than 1 μm RF functional variable capacitor that has required no lithography.

  4. Surface adsorption in strontium chloride ammines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammitzbøll, Andreas L.; Lysgaard, Steen; Klukowska, Agata

    2013-01-01

    An adsorbed state and its implications on the ab- and desorption kinetics of ammonia in strontium chloride ammine is identified using a combination of ammonia absorption measurements, thermogravimetric analysis, and density functional theory calculations. During thermogravimetric analysis, ammonia...... desorption originating from the adsorbed state is directly observed below the bulk desorption temperature, as confirmed by density functional theory calculations. The desorption enthalpy of the adsorbed state of strontium chloride octa-ammine is determined with both techniques to be around 37-39 k...

  5. Understanding selenium biogeochemistry in engineered ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jain, Rohan; Hullebusch, Van Eric D.; Lenz, Markus; Farges, François

    2017-01-01

    Selenium is used extensively in many industries, and it is necessary for human nutrition. On the other hand, it is also toxic at slightly elevated concentrations. With the advent of industrialisation, selenium concentrations in the environment due to anthropogenic activities have increased.

  6. Selenium in human milk: An Australian study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cumming, F.J.; Fardy, J.J.; Woodward, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    The aims of this Australian study were to determine (total) selenium concentration in breast milk and in maternal blood, and to assess the relationship between the two. The authors also aimed to assess the infants' selenium intake. Twenty lactating women from Brisbane (Queensland) participated in the study, at 6-12 weeks post-partum. Small samples (approximately 10 ml) of breast-milk were manually expressed at the beginning and end of a mid-morning feed, from the first breast offered at that feed. Venous blood samples (10 ml) were also collected from the mothers. Milk and blood samples were analyzed by neutron activation analysis. Babies' milk intake over a 24-hour period was estimated using a modified test-weighing technique. Infant selenium intakes were calculated directly for each infant, using his/her mother's milk selenium level and his/her own 24-hour breast milk intake. The mean selenium concentration in maternal blood was 101 (±SD 19) ng/g and in maternal serum 81 (±15) ng/g. Breast milk selenium concentrations (11.9 ± 3.5 ng/g) were fairly low by international standards. There was no correlation between selenium concentrations in milk and blood (or serum). The infants' 24-hour breast-milk intakes were 856 ± 172 g, and their selenium intakes were 10.7 ± 4.1 μg per day

  7. Learning selenium testing tools with Python

    CERN Document Server

    Gundecha, Unmesh

    2014-01-01

    If you are a quality testing professional, or a software or web application developer looking to create automation test scripts for your web applications, with an interest in Python, then this is the perfect guide for you. Python developers who need to do Selenium testing need not learn Java, as they can directly use Selenium for testing with this book.

  8. Advanced prostate cancer risk in relation to toenail selenium levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geybels, M.S.; Verhage, B.A.J.; Schooten, F.J. van; Goldbohm, A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Selenium may prevent advanced prostate cancer (PCa), but most studies on this topic were conducted in populations with moderate to high selenium status. We investigated the association of toenail selenium, reflecting long-term selenium exposure, and advanced PCa risk in a population from

  9. Technetium-99m Sestamibi in Multiple Myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saber, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    Technetium-99m 2-methoxy - isobutyl - isonitrile (99mTc-MIBI) has been reported to be useful in evaluating patients with multiple myeloma. The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of technetium-99m sestamibi (99mTc-MIBI) scintigraphy in the diagnosis. staging and follow-up of patients with multiple myeloma. Methods and Materials: twenty-five consecutive patients with multiple myeloma were studied using 99mTc- MIBI. Of the 25 patients included in this study, 6 were in stage I, II in stage II and 8 in stage III. Anterior and posterior whole-body imaging were obtained 20 min after I.V. injection of 740 MBq of 99mTc-MIBI. Four different MIBI patterns could be described in our patients: physiological (P), diffuse (D), focal (F) and combined diffuse and focal (D+F). All patients in stages II and III as well as 3 patients in stage I were treated with chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide and prednisone) then 99mTc-MlBI scans were repeated after 6 courses. Results: in comparison to conventional X-ray skeletal survey, 99mTc-MIBI scans showed a higher number of myeloma bone disease at diagnosis. All patients with stage II and III multiple myeloma were positive with 99mTc-MlBl scans at diagnosis. The pattern of positive MIBI accumulation was diffuse in 13 (52%) patients, focal in 4 (16%) and combined focal and diffuse in 6 (24%) patients. The intensity of 99mTc-MIBI correlated with disease activity as determined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), number of plasma cells in bone marrow and serum electrophoresis. There was a direct correlation between 99mTc-MIBI scan result and clinical outcome of patients following 6 courses of chemotherapy. Sensitivity and specificity of 99mTc-MIBI scintigraphy in detecting myeloma bone lesions were 92% and 90% respectively. Conclusion: 99mTc-MIBI scintigraphy is a reliable method to evaluate bone marrow activity in patients with multiple myeloma and follow-up of myeloma bone lesions

  10. Arsenic and selenium in microbial metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, John F.; Basu, Partha; Santini, Joanne M.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2006-01-01

    Arsenic and selenium are readily metabolized by prokaryotes, participating in a full range of metabolic functions including assimilation, methylation, detoxification, and anaerobic respiration. Arsenic speciation and mobility is affected by microbes through oxidation/reduction reactions as part of resistance and respiratory processes. A robust arsenic cycle has been demonstrated in diverse environments. Respiratory arsenate reductases, arsenic methyltransferases, and new components in arsenic resistance have been recently described. The requirement for selenium stems primarily from its incorporation into selenocysteine and its function in selenoenzymes. Selenium oxyanions can serve as an electron acceptor in anaerobic respiration, forming distinct nanoparticles of elemental selenium that may be enriched in (76)Se. The biogenesis of selenoproteins has been elucidated, and selenium methyltransferases and a respiratory selenate reductase have also been described. This review highlights recent advances in ecology, biochemistry, and molecular biology and provides a prelude to the impact of genomics studies.

  11. Deposition of strontium and calcium in snail shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, Jr, G M; Nelson, D J; Gardiner, D A

    1965-07-03

    The relative effects of strontium and calcium concentrations in the environment on their uptake and incorporation into snail shell were investigated. /sup 45/Ca and /sup 85/Sr were used as tracers and specific activities were used to determine deposition. Data are presented in tables and graphs. Deposition of both calcium and strontium in the snail shell depended primarily on the respective concentrations of these elements in the immediate environment. A slight effect of strontium on calcium deposition was observed. There was found to be a minimum strontium deposition for various combinations of strontium and calcium in the environment. It was concluded that strontium uptake is more closely associated with environmental strontium concentrations than with calcium concentrations.

  12. TESTING GUIDELINES FOR TECHNETIUM-99 ADSORPTION ON ACTIVATED CARBON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrnes, M.E.

    2010-01-01

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently evaluating the potential use of activated carbon adsorption for removing technetium-99 from groundwater as a treatment method for the Hanford Site's 200 West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system. The current pump-and-treat system design will include an ion-exchange (IX) system for selective removal of technetium-99 from selected wells prior to subsequent treatment of the water in the central treatment system. The IX resin selected for technetium-99 removal is Purolite A530E. The resin service life is estimated to be approximately 66.85 days at the design technetium-99 loading rate, and the spent resin must be replaced because it cannot be regenerated. The resulting operating costs associated with resin replacement every 66.85 days are estimated at $0.98 million/year. Activated carbon pre-treatment is being evaluated as a potential cost-saving measure to offset the high operating costs associated with frequent IX resin replacement. This document is preceded by the Literature Survey of Technetium-99 Groundwater Pre-Treatment Option Using Granular Activated Carbon (SGW-43928), which identified and evaluated prior research related to technetium-99 adsorption on activated carbon. The survey also evaluated potential operating considerations for this treatment approach for the 200 West Area. The preliminary conclusions of the literature survey are as follows: (1) Activated carbon can be used to selectively remove technetium-99 from contaminated groundwater. (2) Technetium-99 adsorption onto activated carbon is expected to vary significantly based on carbon types and operating conditions. For the treatment approach to be viable at the Hanford Site, activated carbon must be capable of achieving a designated minimum technetium-99 uptake. (3) Certain radionuclides known to be present in 200 West Area groundwater are also likely to adsorb onto activated carbon. (4) Organic solvent contaminants of concern (COCs) will

  13. TESTING GUIDELINES FOR TECHNETIUM-99 ABSORPTION ON ACTIVATED CARBON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BYRNES ME

    2010-09-08

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently evaluating the potential use of activated carbon adsorption for removing technetium-99 from groundwater as a treatment method for the Hanford Site's 200 West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system. The current pump-and-treat system design will include an ion-exchange (IX) system for selective removal of technetium-99 from selected wells prior to subsequent treatment of the water in the central treatment system. The IX resin selected for technetium-99 removal is Purolite A530E. The resin service life is estimated to be approximately 66.85 days at the design technetium-99 loading rate, and the spent resin must be replaced because it cannot be regenerated. The resulting operating costs associated with resin replacement every 66.85 days are estimated at $0.98 million/year. Activated carbon pre-treatment is being evaluated as a potential cost-saving measure to offset the high operating costs associated with frequent IX resin replacement. This document is preceded by the Literature Survey of Technetium-99 Groundwater Pre-Treatment Option Using Granular Activated Carbon (SGW-43928), which identified and evaluated prior research related to technetium-99 adsorption on activated carbon. The survey also evaluated potential operating considerations for this treatment approach for the 200 West Area. The preliminary conclusions of the literature survey are as follows: (1) Activated carbon can be used to selectively remove technetium-99 from contaminated groundwater. (2) Technetium-99 adsorption onto activated carbon is expected to vary significantly based on carbon types and operating conditions. For the treatment approach to be viable at the Hanford Site, activated carbon must be capable of achieving a designated minimum technetium-99 uptake. (3) Certain radionuclides known to be present in 200 West Area groundwater are also likely to adsorb onto activated carbon. (4) Organic solvent contaminants of concern (COCs

  14. Final Report, Research Program to Investigate the Fundamental Chemistry of Technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukens, Wayne W. Jr.; Fickes, Michael J.; Bucher, Jerome J.; Burns, Carol J.; Edelstein, Norman M.; Shuh, David K.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose is to increase the basic scientific understanding of technetium chemistry to better understand the behavior of technetium in chemical environments relevant to DOE. Two important areas in need of study are the behavior of technetium in highly alkaline solutions similar to high-level nuclear waste, and its behavior in different waste forms. This research program addressed these two needs. Two separate approaches were used in this program. The first focus was to understand the basic solution chemistry of technetium, which underlies its behavior in the highly alkaline environment of the nuclear waste tanks located at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites. The specific problems at these sites are related to the anomalous oxidation state of technetium (Schroeder 1995). Although, at high pH, technetium should exist in its highest oxidation state as TcO 4 - , soluble, lower-valent technetium species have been observed in certain wastes. The specific unknowns that this program sought to answer are the nature of lower valent technetium species that can be formed in highly alkaline solution and whether pertechnetate undergoes radiolytic reduction in highly alkaline solution when nitrate is present in excess. The second focus area is the behavior of technetium immobilized in various waste forms. The behavior of technetium in cement wastes was examined to gain information about its long-term stability. Specifically, this research examined the oxidation of reduced technetium species by components present in high-level waste that are incorporated into cement waste along with technetium

  15. The quality control of technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals produced at the AAEC Research Establishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrington, K.J.

    1983-08-01

    The methods of quality control used for technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals produced at the AAEC Research Establishment are described for both non-fission and fission derived sources of sodium pertechnetate, technetium-99m labelled radipopharmaceuticals, and reagent kits produced for technetium-99m labelling

  16. Experimental measurements of the solubility of technetium under near-field conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilkington, N.J.; Wilkins, J.D.

    1988-05-01

    The solubility of technetium in contact with hydrated technetium dioxide under near-field conditions has been measured experimentally. The values obtained were changed little by a change in pH or in the filtration method used. The presence of organic degradation products increased slightly the solution concentration of technetium. (author)

  17. Final Report, Research Program to Investigate the Fundamental Chemistry of Technetium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukens Jr., Wayne W.; Fickes, Michael J.; Bucher, Jerome J.; Burns, Carol J.; Edelstein, Norman M.; Shuh, David K.

    2000-12-23

    The purpose is to increase the basic scientific understanding of technetium chemistry to better understand the behavior of technetium in chemical environments relevant to DOE. Two important areas in need of study are the behavior of technetium in highly alkaline solutions similar to high-level nuclear waste, and its behavior in different waste forms. This research program addressed these two needs. Two separate approaches were used in this program. The first focus was to understand the basic solution chemistry of technetium, which underlies its behavior in the highly alkaline environment of the nuclear waste tanks located at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites. The specific problems at these sites are related to the anomalous oxidation state of technetium (Schroeder 1995). Although, at high pH, technetium should exist in its highest oxidation state as TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, soluble, lower-valent technetium species have been observed in certain wastes. The specific unknowns that this program sought to answer are the nature of lower valent technetium species that can be formed in highly alkaline solution and whether pertechnetate undergoes radiolytic reduction in highly alkaline solution when nitrate is present in excess. The second focus area is the behavior of technetium immobilized in various waste forms. The behavior of technetium in cement wastes was examined to gain information about its long-term stability. Specifically, this research examined the oxidation of reduced technetium species by components present in high-level waste that are incorporated into cement waste along with technetium.

  18. Sorption characteristics of technetium on crosslinked chitosan from aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivarciova, L.; Rosskopfova, O.; Galambos, M.; Rajec, P.

    2014-01-01

    Sorption of technetium on crosslinked chitosan was studied using batch techniques in static arrangement of experiment under aerobic conditions at laboratory temperature. The adsorption of technetium was rapid and the percentage of the technetium sorption was > 98 %. In the pH range of 3-11 adsorption of technetium on crosslinked chitosan was > 98 %. The competition effect of Fe 3+ towards TcO 4 - sorption on crosslinked chitosan was stronger than the competition effect of other observed cations. The selectivity of crosslinked chitosan for these cations in solution with the concentration above 1·10 -3 mol·dm -3 was in the order Fe 3+ > Ca 2+ > Na + > Fe 2+ . The competition effect of (ClO 4 ) - towards TcO 4 - sorption was stronger than the competition effect of (SO 4 ) 2 - ions. From these results it can be expected that crosslinked chitosan could be a suitable sorbent for the immobilization of technetium in the liquid radioactive waste. (authors)

  19. Uptake and distribution of technetium in several marine algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonotto, S.; Gerber, G.B.; Garten, C.T. Jr.; Vandecasteele, C.M.; Myttenaere, C.; Van Baelen, J.; Cogneau, M.; van der Ben, D.

    1983-01-01

    The uptake or chemical form of technetium in different marine algae (Acetabularia, Cystoseira, Fucus) has been examined and a simple model to explain the uptake of technetium in the unicellular alga, Acetabularia, has been conceptualized. At low concentrations in the external medium, Acetabularia can rapidly concentrate technetium. Concentration factors in excess of 400 can be attained after a time of about 3 weeks. At higher mass concentrations in the medium, uptake of technetium by Acetabularia becomes saturated resulting in a decreased concentration factor (approximately 10 after 4 weeks). Approximately 69% of the total radioactivity present in /sup 95m/Tc labelled Acetabularia is found in the cell cytosol. In Fucus vesiculosus, labelled with /sup 95m/Tc, a high percentage of technetium is present in soluble ionic forms while approximately 40% is bound, in this brown alga, in proteins and polysaccharides associated with cell walls. In the algal cytosol of Fucus vesiculosus, about 45% of the /sup 95m/Tc appears to be present as anionic TcO - 4 and the remainder is bound to small molecules. 8 references, 5 figures, 1 table

  20. Blood selenium levels and contribution of food groups to selenium intake in adolescent girls in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsdottir, Edda Y; Gunnarsdottir, Ingibjorg; Thorlacius, Arngrimur; Reykdal, Olafur; Gunnlaugsdottir, Helga; Thorsdottir, Inga; Steingrimsdottir, Laufey

    2012-01-01

    Significant changes have been reported in dietary habits and food availability in Iceland that would be expected to compromise selenium intake and status, especially among young people. These include substantial decreases in the consumption of fish and milk, as well as the selenium content of imported wheat. The aim of this study was to assess selenium in the diet and whole blood of adolescent girls, as well as define the most important foods contributing to intake and blood concentrations of selenium. The subjects were 96 randomly selected girls, aged 16-20, who answered a validated food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) for dietary assessment. Selenium intake from each food group was calculated in µg/day. Blood samples were collected for measurement of whole blood selenium. Mean dietary selenium was 51±25 µg/day. Milk/dairy products, including cheese, contributed 36±14% of total dietary selenium; fish 18±12%; and bread/cereal products 13±6%. Mean whole blood selenium was 117±12 µg/l (range 90-208); nearly 90% of subjects were above the optimal level of 100 µg/l. Fish and bread/cereal products were the only foods significantly correlated with selenium in blood (r=0.32; P=0.002 and r=0.22; P=0.04, respectively) while no correlation was found with milk and dairy products in spite of their greater contribution to total selenium intake. In this population of Icelandic adolescent girls, selenium intake and status seem acceptable. Judging from associations between intake and blood levels, fish and cereals may be the most important contributors to blood selenium.

  1. Blood selenium levels and contribution of food groups to selenium intake in adolescent girls in Iceland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingibjorg Gunnarsdottir

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/objectives: Significant changes have been reported in dietary habits and food availability in Iceland that would be expected to compromise selenium intake and status, especially among young people. These include substantial decreases in the consumption of fish and milk, as well as the selenium content of imported wheat. The aim of this study was to assess selenium in the diet and whole blood of adolescent girls, as well as define the most important foods contributing to intake and blood concentrations of selenium. Design: The subjects were 96 randomly selected girls, aged 16–20, who answered a validated food frequency questionnaire (FFQ for dietary assessment. Selenium intake from each food group was calculated in µg/day. Blood samples were collected for measurement of whole blood selenium. Results: Mean dietary selenium was 51±25 µg/day. Milk/dairy products, including cheese, contributed 36±14% of total dietary selenium; fish 18±12%; and bread/cereal products 13±6%. Mean whole blood selenium was 117±12 µg/l (range 90–208; nearly 90% of subjects were above the optimal level of 100 µg/l. Fish and bread/cereal products were the only foods significantly correlated with selenium in blood (r=0.32; P = 0.002 and r=0.22; P = 0.04, respectively while no correlation was found with milk and dairy products in spite of their greater contribution to total selenium intake. Conclusion: In this population of Icelandic adolescent girls, selenium intake and status seem acceptable. Judging from associations between intake and blood levels, fish and cereals may be the most important contributors to blood selenium.

  2. Measurement of strontium-89 and strontium-90 in environmental waters. A tentative reference method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-03-01

    A tentative reference method for the measurement of 89 Sr and 90 Sr in environmental waters is described. Samples of environmental water sources are collected, preserved with acid-strontium carrier, and analyzed for 89 Sr and/or 90 Sr. The isotopes are separated from the sample water by precipitating with stable strontium carrier as carbonate. The strontium carbonate is dissolved, 90 Sr separated, the strontium reprecipitated as carbonate, filtered, and counted for the combined 89 Sr and 90 Sr activity. The 90 y is allowed to grow in from the 90 y activity; the strontium carbonate is redissolved; the 90 y is separated, precipitated, and counted for the 90 Sr determination. The 89 Sr activity is then determined by difference of the total 89 Sr and 90 y and the separate 90 Sr activities. Recoveries are determined from the added and found (recovered) strontium carrier. Counting efficiencies are determined with prepared standard reference samples. Results are reported in pCi/liter

  3. Calcium and Strontium in Swedish Waters and Fish, and Accumulation of Strontium-90

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnedal, P O

    1966-04-15

    The purpose of this study has been to investigate the correlation between calcium and strontium in fish in relation to the concentration of these elements in the water. An investigation of the uptake of strontium-90 has also been made and permissible levels of strontium-90 in the water is calculated based upon the uptake in fish muscle tissues. Lakes with calcium concentrations between 2 - 63 mg/l have been studied and samples from the Baltic coastal water are also included. Three fish species are studied, viz. pike (Esox lucius (L.)), perch (Perca fluviatilis (L.)) and roach (Leuciscus rutilus (L.)). Bones, muscle tissues and skin + scales have been analysed. Strontium-90 measurements have been made showing an increase in both water and fish. Calculations show that in water with about 2 mg Ca/l a 10-fold increase of the existing strontium-90 level might give strontium-90 concentrations in fish muscle tissues close to what is permissible. In lakes with calcium concentrations 20 - 40 mg/l the permissible levels for drinking water will be exceeded before the fish consumption would have to be restricted.

  4. Calcium and Strontium in Swedish Waters and Fish, and Accumulation of Strontium-90

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agnedal, P.O.

    1966-04-01

    The purpose of this study has been to investigate the correlation between calcium and strontium in fish in relation to the concentration of these elements in the water. An investigation of the uptake of strontium-90 has also been made and permissible levels of strontium-90 in the water is calculated based upon the uptake in fish muscle tissues. Lakes with calcium concentrations between 2 - 63 mg/l have been studied and samples from the Baltic coastal water are also included. Three fish species are studied, viz. pike (Esox lucius (L.)), perch (Perca fluviatilis (L.)) and roach (Leuciscus rutilus (L.)). Bones, muscle tissues and skin + scales have been analysed. Strontium-90 measurements have been made showing an increase in both water and fish. Calculations show that in water with about 2 mg Ca/l a 10-fold increase of the existing strontium-90 level might give strontium-90 concentrations in fish muscle tissues close to what is permissible. In lakes with calcium concentrations 20 - 40 mg/l the permissible levels for drinking water will be exceeded before the fish consumption would have to be restricted

  5. Complexes of technetium with polyhydric ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, L.L.Y.; Ronca, N.; Solomon, N.A.; Steigman, J.

    1985-01-01

    Polyhydric complexes of Tc(V) show absorption bands near 500 nm, with molar absorptivity coefficients of about 100. The shorter-chain compounds like ethylene glycol produce complexes which quickly disproportionate to Tc(IV) (as TcO 2 ) and Tc(VII) (as TcO 4 - ) on acidification. The longer-chain ligands like mannitol and gluconate do not. However, while the mannitol complex shows no change in spectrum from pH 12 to pH 3, the gluconate and glucoheptonate compounds show a definite spectral change on acidification, starting at pH 5. Electrophoresis similarity showed a change in mobility with pH for Tc-glucoheptonate, but none for Tc-mannitol. It was concluded that the carboxylic acid group of glucoheptonate was not binding the technetium. In 25 molal choline chloride the glucoheptonate-Tc mole ratio was 1:1 or less. A similar result emerged from a similar experiment in methylcellosolve as solvent. (author)

  6. Technetium cyanide chemistry: synthesis and characterization of technetium(III) and -(V) cyanide complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trop, H.S.; Jones, A.G.; Davison, A.

    1980-01-01

    Several new technetium cyanide complexes have been prepared and characterized. The reaction of ammonium hexaiodotechnetate(IV) with potassium cyanide in refluxing aqueous methanol under nitrogen yields potassium heptacyanotechnetate(III) dihydrate, K 4 Tc(CN) 7 .2H 2 O (1). Infrared and Raman measurements indicate that 1 has a pentagonal bipyramidal structure (D/sub 5h/) in both solid and solution. Aqueous solutions of 1 are air sensitive, decomposing to potassium oxopentacyanotechnetate(V) tetrahydrate, K 2 TcO(CN) 5 .4H 2 O (2). This species can also be prepared from the reaction of TcO 2 .xH 2 O with hot aqueous potassium cyanide solutions. Hydrolysis of 2 in water yields potassium trans-dioxo-tetracyanotechnetate(V), K 3 TcO 2 (CN) 4 (3). Preparation of 3 can also be achieved from the treatment of [TcO 2 (Py) 4 ]ClO 4 .2H 2 O with aqueous potassium cyanide. Infrared and Raman measurements on 3 are consistent with the proposed trans-dioxo (D/sub 4h/) structure. Reaction of the oxotetrachlorotechnetate(V) anion, TcOCl 4 , with potassium cyanide in methanol produces trans-oxomethoxytetracyanotechnetate(V). [TcO(OMe)(CN) 4 ] (4). The full details of the synthesis and characterization of these interesting technetium(III) and -(V) complexes, as well as observations on the infrared and Raman spectra of trans-dioxo metal complexes and the hydrolysis of species 2, are presented

  7. Adsorption of technetium-99m tetrofosmin and technetium-99m furifosmin on plastic syringes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartosch, R.; Granegger, S.; Sinzinger, H.

    1998-01-01

    Some groups have reported that adsorption of radiopharmaceuticals on disposable plastic syringes can reach levels of almost 50%. This high loss of radioactivity stimulated us to carry out similar studies. Our measurements were done in combination with patient studies. Therefore, we used 2-ml syringes, all of the same brand. The radioactivity in the syringe was measured immediately before and after injection. a total of 500-600 MBq technetium-99m labelled tetrofosmin or technetium-99m furifosmin was administered to 48 patients using four different injection techniques (n = 6 for each technique with each tracer): with needles, 1 min blood incubation at 22 C, 10 or 30 min after preparation of the tracer; with butterflies, 1 min blood incubation at 22 C, 10 or 30 min after preparation of the tracer. Neither in syringes nor in needles or butterflies did more than 7% of the initial radioactivity remain. The entire residual activity in syringe plus needle or syringe plus butterfly together never exceeded the 9% limit. Furthermore, in a pilot study we measured the remaining radioactivity in the vial; here, too, we found no more than 14% of total radioactivity. These findings indicate that total retention of radioactivity during elution and application of 99m Tc-tetrofosmin and 99m Tc-furifosmin with material used in our setting does not approach relevant amounts. (orig.)

  8. Adsorption of technetium-99m tetrofosmin and technetium-99m furifosmin on plastic syringes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartosch, R.; Granegger, S.; Sinzinger, H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Vienna (Austria)

    1998-09-01

    Some groups have reported that adsorption of radiopharmaceuticals on disposable plastic syringes can reach levels of almost 50%. This high loss of radioactivity stimulated us to carry out similar studies. Our measurements were done in combination with patient studies. Therefore, we used 2-ml syringes, all of the same brand. The radioactivity in the syringe was measured immediately before and after injection. a total of 500-600 MBq technetium-99m labelled tetrofosmin or technetium-99m furifosmin was administered to 48 patients using four different injection techniques (n = 6 for each technique with each tracer): with needles, 1 min blood incubation at 22 C, 10 or 30 min after preparation of the tracer; with butterflies, 1 min blood incubation at 22 C, 10 or 30 min after preparation of the tracer. Neither in syringes nor in needles or butterflies did more than 7% of the initial radioactivity remain. The entire residual activity in syringe plus needle or syringe plus butterfly together never exceeded the 9% limit. Furthermore, in a pilot study we measured the remaining radioactivity in the vial; here, too, we found no more than 14% of total radioactivity. These findings indicate that total retention of radioactivity during elution and application of {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin and {sup 99m}Tc-furifosmin with material used in our setting does not approach relevant amounts. (orig.) With 4 figs., 1 tab., 7 refs.

  9. Resonant double photoionisation spectroscopy of strontium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokell, E; Grimm, M; Sheridan, P, E-mail: emma.sokell@ucd.i, E-mail: paul.sheridan@ucd.i [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2009-11-01

    Resonant triple-differential cross-section (TDCS) measurements on atomic strontium on the 4p {yields} 4d resonance are presented. All of these TDCS measurements display unexpected lobes at a mutual emission angle for the two electrons of 180{sup o}. Possible explanations for these lobes are explored.

  10. Strontium Removal: Full-Scale Ohio Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives of this presentation are to present a brief overview of past bench-scale research to evaluate the impact lime softening on strontium removal from drinking water and present full-scale drinking water treatment studies to impact of lime softening and ion exchange sof...

  11. The coprecipitation of strontium with hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujino, Osamu

    1975-01-01

    The distribution behavior of the strontium ion between hydroxyapatite and the parent solution was investigated. The hydroxyapatite was formed by the extremely slow addition of diammonium hydrogenphosphate to solutions of calcium and strontium nitrate buffered with ethylenediamine at 80 0 C. The precipitate yielded a typical X-ray diffraction pattern of hydroxyapatite and had a composition in which the Ca/P molar ratio was 1.67 at pH 6.80. The strontium ion was coprecipitated in the apatite, obeying the Doerner and Hoskins logarithnmic distribution law. The distribution coefficient was scarcely affected by the strontium concentration on the pH value in the parent solution, and had a value of 0.26+-0.02 at 80 0 C. On the other hand, the apparent distribution coefficient was a little affected by such organic anions as acetate, citrate, lactate, glycinate, and glutamate ions. The lattice constants of the precipitates prepared in the research were measured in order to confirm the formation of the solid solutions. (auth.)

  12. Infrared characterization of strontium titanate thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, B.G.; Pietka, A.; Mendes, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Strontium titanate thin films have been prepared at different oxygen pressures with various post-deposition annealing treatments. The films were deposited by pulsed laser ablation at room temperature on Si(0 0 1) substrates with a silica buffer layer. Infrared reflectance measurements were performed in order to determine relevant film parameters such as layer thicknesses and chemical composition. The infrared reflectance spectra were fitted by using adequate dielectric function forms for each layer. The fitting procedure provided the extraction of the dielectric functions of the strontium titanate film, the silica layer and the substrate. The as-deposited films are found to be amorphous, and their infrared spectra present peaks corresponding to modes with high damping constants. As the annealing time and temperature increases the strontium titanate layer becomes more ordered so that it can be described by its SrTiO 3 bulk mode parameters. Also, the silica layer grows along with the ordering of the strontium titanate film, due to oxidation during annealing

  13. Cesium and Strontium Separation Technologies Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. A. Todd; T. A. Todd; J. D. Law; R. S. Herbst

    2004-03-01

    Integral to the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program’s proposed closed nuclear fuel cycle, the fission products cesium and strontium in the dissolved spent nuclear fuel stream are to be separated and managed separately. A comprehensive literature survey is presented to identify cesium and strontium separation technologies that have the highest potential and to focus research and development efforts on these technologies. Removal of these high-heat-emitting fission products reduces the radiation fields in subsequent fuel cycle reprocessing streams and provides a significant short-term (100 yr) heat source reduction in the repository. This, along with separation of actinides, may provide a substantial future improvement in the amount of fuel that could be stored in a geologic repository. The survey and review of the candidate cesium and strontium separation technologies are presented herein. Because the AFCI program intends to manage cesium and strontium together, technologies that simultaneously separate both elements are of the greatest interest, relative to technologies that separate only one of the two elements.

  14. Strontium ranelate in the treatment of osteoporosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-11-05

    Nov 5, 2006 ... postmenopausal women (mean age 69 years) with osteoporosis or osteopenia. Strontium ranelate significantly decreased markers of bone resorption and increased biomarkers of formation. Spinal BMD increased by 14%, while vertebral fractures decreased by 49% within the first year, a reduction that was.

  15. Selenium-75-labelled foliate compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    A saturation method to analyze a foliate is presented; it uses competitive reaction of the compound to be measured and of a radioactive-labelled version of this compound with a reagent specific to this compound present in insufficient quantity to combine with the whole of the compound and its labelled version, separation of the bound compound from its non-bound homologue and measurement of the radioactivity concentration in the bound compound, the non-bound compound or both. The radioactive isotope used in the labelled foliate is selenium 75 [fr

  16. Technetium behaviour in Boom Clay - a laboratory and field study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baston, G.M.N.; Ilett, D.J.; Cowper, M.M.; Pilkington, N.J.; Tweed, C.J.; Williams, S.J. [AEA Technology plc, Harwell, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Canniere, P.R. de; Wang, L. [SCK.CEN, Waste and Disposal Project, Boeretang, Mol (Belgium)

    2002-07-01

    This paper describes a study of technetium solubility and migration under chemical conditions representative of those prevailing in a Boom Clay environment. Laboratory and in situ measurements yielded similar aqueous concentrations of technetium, of about 1 x 10{sup -8} mol dm{sup -3}, close to the concentrations measured for hydrated technetium(IV) oxide TcO{sub 2}.1.6H{sub 2}O in the solubility studies. From fitting the curves of the Tc concentrations as function of time, distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) values were estimated to lie between 0.8 cm{sup 3} g{sup -1} and 1.8 cm{sup 3} g{sup -1}. Exposure of the system at 80 C and to {gamma}-radiation dose rates of several hundred Gy h{sup -1} resulted in only minor differences in behaviour. (orig.)

  17. Technetium behaviour in Boom Clay - a laboratory and field study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baston, G.M.N.; Ilett, D.J.; Cowper, M.M.; Pilkington, N.J.; Tweed, C.J.; Williams, S.J.; Canniere, P.R. de; Wang, L.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a study of technetium solubility and migration under chemical conditions representative of those prevailing in a Boom Clay environment. Laboratory and in situ measurements yielded similar aqueous concentrations of technetium, of about 1 x 10 -8 mol dm -3 , close to the concentrations measured for hydrated technetium(IV) oxide TcO 2 .1.6H 2 O in the solubility studies. From fitting the curves of the Tc concentrations as function of time, distribution coefficient (K d ) values were estimated to lie between 0.8 cm 3 g -1 and 1.8 cm 3 g -1 . Exposure of the system at 80 C and to γ-radiation dose rates of several hundred Gy h -1 resulted in only minor differences in behaviour. (orig.)

  18. Technetium SPECT agents for imaging heart and brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linder, K.E.

    1990-01-01

    One major goal of radiopharmaceutical research has been the development of technetium-based perfusion tracers for SPECT imaging of the heart and brain. The recent clinical introduction of the technetium complexes HM-PAO, ECD and DMG-2MP for brain imaging, and of CDO-MEB and MIBI for heart imaging promises to revolutionize the field of nuclear medicine. All of these agents appear to localize in the target tissue in proportion to blood flow, but their mechanisms of localization and/or retention may differ quite widely. In this talk, a survey of the new technetium SPECT agents will be presented. The inorganic and biological chemistry of these complexes, mechanisms of uptake and retention, QSAR studies, and potential clinical applications are discussed

  19. Dietary selenium in the Glasgow area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, J.D.; Raie, R.M.; Smith, H.

    1978-01-01

    A typical diet for people in the Glasgow area is analysed and an estimate is made of the daily intake of selenium for the average person (234 μg). Meat, poultry and bread products contribute 65% of the total selenium consumed. There is a significant loss of selenium on cooking but the concentration in the diet is high compared with the estimated requirement. Selenium levels in prepared infant foods, artificial milk and natural milk are reported. Those infants on artificial milk feeds have a selenium intake equivalent to that of adults (3 μg/kg) while those on natural milk or prepared infant foods have an intake of 6 μg/kg. Adult and infant tissue selenium levels are established and are shown to be in equilibrium with the diet. There is no concentration in man as a result of his position at the top of the food chain. Sudden infant death cannot be related to selenium levels in human tissue or diet. (author)

  20. In Situ Immobilization of Selenium in Sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Robert C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stewart, Thomas Austin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This project focused on the use of a sorbent, carbonated apatite, to immobilize selenium in the environment. It is know that apatite will sorb selenium and based on the mechanism of sorption it is theorized that carbonated apatite will be more effective that pure apatite. Immobilization of selenium in the environment is through the use of a sorbent in a permeable reactive barrier (PRB). A PRB can be constructed by trenching and backfill with the sorbent or in the case of apatite as the sorbent formed in situ using the apatite forming solution of Moore (2003, 2004). There is very little data on selenium sorption by carbonated apatite in the literature. Therefore, in this work, the basic sorptive properties of carbonated apatite were investigated. Carbonated apatite was synthesized by a precipitation method and characterized. Batch selenium kinetic and equilibrium experiments were performed. The results indicate the carbonated apatite contained 9.4% carbonate and uptake of selenium as selenite was rapid; 5 hours for complete uptake of selenium vs. more than 100 hours for pure hydroxyapatite reported in the literature. Additionally, the carbonated apatite exhibited significantly higher distribution coefficients in equilibrium experiments than pure apatite under similar experimental conditions. The next phase of this work will be to seek additional funds to continue the research with the goal of eventually demonstrating the technology in a field application.

  1. Selenium: its potential role in male infertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguntibeju, O.O.; Esterhuyse, J.S.; Truter, E.J.

    2009-01-01

    Currently, biomedical research is showing interest in the anti-oxidant activity of selenium. This could be due to compelling evidence that reported that oxidative damage to cells and cell membranes is one of the causative agents in the pathogenesis of many disease states including male infertility. Selenium is a trace element which may be found in soil, water and some foods and is considered to be an essential element which plays an active role in several metabolic pathways and is believed to perform several important roles in the human body. These roles include anti-oxidative activities at cellular level and participating in different enzyme systems. Selenium also serves as a vital component in the maintenance of muscle cell and red blood cell integrity, playing a role in the synthesis of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA). It has also been reported that selenium is essential in the detoxification of toxic metals in the human system, foetal respiration and energy transfer reactions as well as in the production of sperm cells. It is thought that male infertility can be the result of a selenium deficiency as the absence of selenium in the testicular tissues induces degeneration which results in the active impairment of sperm motility as the first indication of impending infertility. This review paper investigates the role of selenium in male infertility. (author)

  2. Insolubilization of technetium by microorganisms in waterlogged soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Nobuyoshi; Tagami, Keiko

    2003-01-01

    In order to clarify the technetium behavior in paddy field ecosystem, insolubilization of technetium in the water covering waterlogged soils was studied. Fourteen soils collected from paddy fields (9 samples) and upland fields (5 samples) were waterlogged for 7 days. After the collection of water covering the waterlogged soils, a radio tracer 95m TcO 4 - was added to the water. After 4 days incubation of the water, the tracer was separated into four fractions: insoluble, pertechnetate, cationic, and other forms of technetium. On an average, 13% of the 95m TcO 4 - changed to insoluble forms and the maximum ratio of the insolubilization was 76%. This result shows that insolubilization of technetium can occur in the water covering the waterlogged soils. Subsequently, mechanisms of Tc insolubilization were studied using the sample that showed the maximum insolubilization of Tc among the soil samples. When microorganisms were removed from the water by filtration, insoluble forms of Tc decreased to 3.6%. In contrast, the insolubilization ratio increased to 86% by the addition of organic substrates. The insolubilization, therefore, was caused by microorganisms. Furthermore, the addition of antibiotics on bacteria resulted in 23% of the insolubilization, while the antibiotic on fungi did not affect on the insolubilization. If the insolubilization were caused by biosorption, the insolubilization ratio would not decrease for the sample added antibiotics on bacteria. Therefore, these results suggest that the insolubilization of technetium is caused by bioaccumulation of living bacteria. Because the cultures with 95m TcO 4 - were incubated under aerobic conditions, technetium-insolubilizing microorganisms would presumably be aerobic bacteria. (author)

  3. Absorption of technetium by plants in relation to soil type contamination level and time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousny, J.M.; Myttenaere, C. (Louvain Univ. (Belgium). Lab. de Physiologie Vegetale)

    1981-01-01

    Plants of Pisum sativum (var. Merveille de Kelvedon) were grown on seven typical european soils contaminated with different levels of /sup 99/Tc(0.17; 1.7 and 17 ..mu..Ci/kg). Added initially as pertechnetate, the technetium absorption has been studied for three successive cultures. The translocation of technetium from soil to plant leaves is high, but its transfer is reduced in soils rich in organic matter (Fen) or poorly drained (Braunerde). Aging reduces the technetium transfer and modify its relative distribution in plant (relatively more technetium is found in fruits); these results let suppose some modification of the technetium chemical form in soils with time.

  4. Effects of calcium and magnesium on strontium distribution coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunde, R.L.; Rosentreter, J.J.; Liszewski, M.J.; Hemming, C.H.; Welhan, J.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of calcium and magnesium on the distribution of strontium between a surficial sediment and simulated wastewater solutions were measured as part of an investigation to determine strontium transport properties of surficial sediment at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho. The investigation was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey and Idaho State University, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy. Batch experimental techniques were used to determine strontium linear sorption isotherms and distribution coefficients (K(d)'s) using simulated wastewater solutions prepared at pH 8.0??0.1 with variable concentrations of calcium and magnesium. Strontium linear sorption isotherm K(d)'s ranged from 12??1 to 85??3 ml/g, increasing as the concentration of calcium and magnesium decreased. The concentration of sorbed strontium and the percentage of strontium retained by the sediment were correlated to aqueous concentrations of strontium, calcium, and magnesium. The effect of these cation concentrations on strontium sorption was quantified using multivariate least-squares regression techniques. Analysis of data from these experiments indicates that increased concentrations of calcium and magnesium in wastewater discharged to waste disposal ponds at the INEL increases the availability of strontium for transport beneath the ponds by decreasing strontium sorption to the surficial sediment.

  5. Distribution and mode of occurrence of selenium in US coals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, L.; Bragg, L.J.; Finkelman, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    Selenium excess and deficiency have been established as the cause of various health problems in man and animals. Combustion of fossil fuels, especially coal, may be a major source of the anthropogenic introduction of selenium in the environment. Coal is enriched in selenium relative to selenium's concentration in most other rocks and relative to selenium in the Earth's crust. Data from almost 9,000 coal samples have been used to determine the concentration and distribution of selenium in US coals. The geometric mean concentration of selenium in US coal is 1.7 ppm. The highest mean selenium value (geometric mean 4.7 ppm) is in the Texas Region. Atlantic Coast (Virginia and North Carolina) and Alaska coals have the lowest geometric means (0.2 and 0.42 ppm, respectively). All western coal regions have mean selenium concentrations of less than 2.0 ppm. In contrast, all coal basins east of the Rocky Mountains (except for several small basins in Rhode Island, Virginia, and North Carolina) have mean selenium values of 1.9 or greater. Generally, variations in selenium concentration do not correlate with variations in ash yield, pyritic sulphur, or organic sulphur concentrations. This may be the result of multiple sources of selenium; however, in some non-marine basins with restricted sources of selenium, selenium has positive correlations with other coal quality parameters. Selenium occurs in several forms in coal but appears to be chiefly associated with the organic fraction, probably substituting for organic sulphur. Other important forms of selenium in coal are selenium-bearing pyrite, selenium-bearing galena, and lead selenide (clausthalite). Water-soluble and ion-exchangeable selenium also have been reported. ?? 1993 Copyright Science and Technology Letters.

  6. Study on interference of technetium in spectrophotometric estimation of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revathi, P.; Saipriya, K.; Madhavan Kutty, V.K.; Srinivasa Rao, G.; Vijayakumar, N.; Kumar, T.

    2015-01-01

    Estimation of uranium is essential for process control purposes as well as to arrive optimum parameters for further waste management in reprocessing industry. Uranium estimation is done by spectrophotometry using ammonium thiocyanate, DBM, PAR and Br-PADAP as chromogenic reagents for colour development. Extractive spectrophotometry can also be used to eliminate some of the interfering ions. During inter method comparison, technetium was found to be interfering in the thiocyanate spectrophotometry. This study is an effort to find out the extent of technetium interference in the estimation of uranium by spectrophotometry using the above said chromogenic reagents. (author)

  7. Determination of technetium by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaye, J.H.; Ballou, N.E.

    1978-01-01

    A detection limit of 6 x 10 -11 g has been achieved for measurement of technetium by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. A commercially available, demountable, hollow cathode lamp was used and both argon and neon were used as fill gases for the lamp. The range of applicability of the method, when the unresolved 2614.23 to 2615.87 A doublet is used for analysis, is from 60 pg to at least 3 ng of technetium per aliquot analyzed. 3 figures, 1 table

  8. Selenium supplementation for Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zuuren, Esther J; Albusta, Amira Y; Fedorowicz, Zbys; Carter, Ben; Pijl, Hanno

    2013-06-06

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis is a common auto-immune disorder. The most common presenting symptoms may include anxiety, negative mood, depression, dry skin, cold intolerance, puffy eyes, muscle cramps and fatigue, deep voice, constipation, slow thinking and poor memory. Clinical manifestations of the disease are defined primarily by low levels of thyroid hormones; therefore it is treated by hormone replacement therapy, which usually consists of levothyroxine (LT4). Selenium might reduce antibody levels and result in a decreased dosage of LT4 and may provide other beneficial effects (e.g. on mood and health-related quality of life). To assess the effects of selenium supplementation on Hashimoto's thyroiditis. We searched the following databases up to 2 October 2012: CENTRAL in The Cochrane Library (2012, Issue 10), MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Web of Science; we also screened reference lists of included studies and searched several online trial registries for ongoing trials (5 November 2012). Randomised controlled clinical trials that assessed the effects of selenium supplementation for adults diagnosed with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Study selection, data extraction, assessment of risk of bias, and analyses were carried out by two independent review authors. We assessed the quality of the evidence of included studies using GRADE. We were unable to conduct a meta-analysis because clinical heterogeneity between interventions that were investigated is substantial. Four studies at unclear to high risk of bias comprising 463 participants were included. The mean study duration was 7.5 months (range 3 to 18 months). One of our primary outcomes-'change from baseline in health related quality of life'-and two of our secondary outcomes-'change from baseline in LT4 replacement dosage at end of the study' and 'economic costs'-were not assessed in any of the studies. One study at high risk of bias showed statistically significant improvement in subjective well-being with sodium

  9. Recent trends in selenium regulation and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobolewski, A.

    2010-01-01

    Selenium is a contaminant encountered at uranium mines. When discharged into water, it can build up in the food chain and become toxic to egg-laying fish and shorebirds. This presentation reviews recent developments in its regulation, management and treatment. Selenium will soon be regulated on the basis of its concentration in fish or bird eggs, not its dissolved concentrations, which challenges managers trying to establish acceptable discharge limits. Information supporting this change will be discussed. Recent developments to manage and treat selenium will also be reviewed, emphasizing new chemical and biological treatment processes applicable at uranium mines and mill sites. (author)

  10. Nuclear transformations studies in selenium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez M, B.E.

    1976-01-01

    A compilation is made with regard to the chemical effects produced by nuclear transformations, such as the chemical effects of the beta decay and the chemical effects of the reaction (n,γ) in selenium radioisotopes. As a particular case the chemical effect of the isomeric transition of sup(81m)Se(VI) in potassium selenate crystals marked with radioactive selenium is studied experimentally and the method of adsorption in activated carbon is applied for the analytical separation of the traces of the nuclear isomer tetravalent sup(81b)Se(IV) of one fraction which contains the mixture of the selenium radioisotopes. (author)

  11. Selective sorption of technetium from groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, G.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Groundwater used for processing uranium or plutonium at DOE sites is frequently contaminated with the radionuclide {sup 99}Tc. DOE`s Paducah and Portsmouth sites are typical of the contamination problem. Solutions contaminated with radionuclides were poured into lagoons and burial pits, which created a plume that has seeped into the sandy aquifers below the vadose zone. Technetium is the principal radioactive metal-ion contaminant in Paducah site ground-water, and it is present at a concentration of about 25 ng/L. At Portsmouth, Tc is present in the groundwater at a concentration that varies greatly with distance from the source, and concentrations of >400 ng/L have been reported. Commercially available anion-exchange resins can remove the TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} ion in the presence of typical anions found in groundwater, but improving the selectivity will result in substantial cost savings in terms of the quantity of resin needed and the scale of the equipment required to treat huge flows rates. The pertechnetate anion is strongly sorbed on commercially-available strong-base anion-exchange resins, but in view of the low (typically nanomolar) concentrations of Tc involved, enhanced selectivity for the pertechnetate anion over other anions commonly found in groundwater such as chloride, sulfate, and nitrite will be needed. The authors have prepared and evaluated new anion-exchange resins that were designed to be highly selective for pertechnetate. The technology involves building those features that are known to enhance the selectivity of pertechnetate over other anions into the exchange sites of the resin (hydrophobicity), while at the same time maintaining favorable exchange kinetics.

  12. Behavior of technetium in freshwater environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; Hoffman, F.O.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    In a previous study, /sup 95m/Tc, as a pertechnetate, was released to a small, experimental, freshwater pond, and the concentrations were determined in biotic and abiotic components of the pond ecosystem. A simple mathematical model was developed to predict the concentration of /sup 95m/Tc in fish and snails. Results from this study indicated that uptake through the food chain was an important source of technetium to the higher trophic levels (i.e., fish). In the current study, an experimental pond was spiked with /sup 95m/Tc in the pertechnetate form, and the concentrations of /sup 95m/Tc were measured in the lower trophic levels. Emphasis was placed on measuring the concentration of /sup 95m/Tc in zooplankton, benthic invertebrates, and the aquatic macrophyte Elodea canadensis. Fish were excluded from the pond to allow the development of a large zooplankton population. The concentration of /sup 95m/Tc in water decreased from 0.75 Bq/mL 1 h after the pond was spiked, to 0.21 Bq/mL at 20 d. Throughout the experiment, at least 98% of the /sup 95m/Tc in the water was in the dissolved fraction (0.4 ..mu..m). Zooplankton accumulated /sup 95m/Tc rapidly, having concentration factors (Bq/g sample wet wt. divided by Bq/g water) ranging from 3 at 4 h to 36 at 20 d. Concentration factors ranged from 3 to 8 for benthic insects and from 1 to 62 for the aquatic macrophyte.

  13. Distribution of technetium-99 in surface soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo

    2000-01-01

    Technetium-99 ( 99 Tc) is an important fission product which has been widely distributed in the environment as a result of fallout from nuclear weapons testing. In order to improve our understanding of the behavior of 99 Tc in the environment, it is essential that we obtain more reliable information on the levels, distribution and fate of 99 Tc in the environment. In this study, the concentration of global fallout 99 Tc, in several surface soil samples (0 - 20 cm) collected in Japan, were determined by ICP-MS (inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy). The range of 99 Tc in rice paddy field, upland field and other soils determined in this study were 0.006 - 0.11, 0.004 - 0.008 and 0.007 - 0.02 Bq kg -1 dry, respectively. 137 Cs was used as a comparative indicator for the source of 99 Tc, because the fission yields from 235 U and 239 Pu were about the same (ca. 6%) for the two isotopes, and the behavior and distribution of 137 Cs in the environment is reasonably well understood. The 137 Cs contents in rice paddy field, upland field and other soils range between 1.7 - 28, 1.4 - 9.2 and -1 dry, respectively. The activity ratios of 99 Tc/ 137 Cs in all soil samples were (0.6 - 5.9) x 10 -3 . Most of the measured ratios were one order of magnitude higher than the theoretical one obtained from fission. However, this ratio in soil, presumably depends on not only both the characteristic of radionuclides and the soil, but also on their contents after deposition to the earth's surface. (author)

  14. Configuration Entropy Calculations for Complex Compounds Technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhayatun; Susanto Imam Rahayu; Surdia, N.M.; Abdul Mutalib

    2002-01-01

    Recently, the study of technetium complexes is rapidly increasing, due to the benefit of 99m Tc complexes (one of Tc nuclear isomers), which are widely used for diagnostics. Study of the structure-stability relationship of Tc complexes based on solid angle has been done by Kung using a Solid Angle Factor Sum (SAS). The SAS is hypothesized to be related to stability. SAS has been used by several researchers either for synthesis or designing the reaction route of the Tc complex formation and predicting the geometry of complex structures. Although the advantages of the SAS were very gratifying, but the model does not have the theoretical basis which is able to explain the correlation of steric parameters to physicochemical properties of complexes especially to those connected to a complex's stability. To improve the SAS model, in this research the model was modified by providing a theoretical basis for SAS. The results obtained from the correlation of the SAS value to the thermodynamic stability parameters of simple complexes show the values to have a similar trend as the standard entropy (S 0 ). The entropy approximation model was created by involving some factors which are not used in Kung's model. Entropy optimization to the bond length (ML) has also been done to several complexes. The calculations of SAS value using the calculated R for more than 100 Tc complexes provide a normalized mean value of 0.8545 ± 0.0851 and have similar curve profiles as those of Kung's model. The entropy value can be obtained by multiplying the natural logarithm of the a priori degeneracy of a certain distribution (Ω) and the Boltzmann constant. The results of Ω and In Ω of the Tc complexes have a narrow range. The results of this research are able to provide a basic concept for the SAS to explain the structure-stability relationship and to improve Kung's model. (author)

  15. Behavior of technetium in freshwater environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; Hoffman, F.O.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    In a previous study, /sup 95m/Tc, as a pertechnetate, was released to a small, experimental, freshwater pond, and the concentrations were determined in biotic and abiotic components of the pond ecosystem. A simple mathematical model was developed to predict the concentration of /sup 95m/Tc in fish and snails. Results from this study indicated that uptake through the food chain was an important source of technetium to the higher trophic levels (i.e., fish). In the current study, an experimental pond was spiked with /sup 95m/Tc in the pertechnetate form, and the concentrations of /sup 95m/Tc were measured in the lower trophic levels. Emphasis was placed on measuring the concentration of /sup 95m/Tc in zooplankton, benthic invertebrates, and the aquatic macrophyte Elodea canadensis. Fish were excluded from the pond to allow the development of a large zooplankton population. The concentration of /sup 95m/Tc in water decreased from 0.75 Bq/mL 1 h after the pond was spiked, to 0.21 Bq/mL at 20 d. Throughout the experiment, at least 98% of the /sup 95m/Tc in the water was in the dissolved fraction (0.4 μm). Zooplankton accumulated /sup 95m/Tc rapidly, having concentration factors (Bq/g sample wet wt. divided by Bq/g water) ranging from 3 at 4 h to 36 at 20 d. Concentration factors ranged from 3 to 8 for benthic insects and from 1 to 62 for the aquatic macrophyte

  16. Study of the chemical behaviour of technetium during irradiated fuels reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelverte, A.

    1988-04-01

    This paper deals with the preparation of the lower oxidation states +III +IV and +V of technetium in nitric acid and its behaviour during the reprocessing of nuclear fuels (PUREX process). The first part of this work is a bibliographical study of this element in solution without any strong ligand. By chemical and electrochemical technics, pentavalent, tetravalent and trivalent technetium species, were prepared in nitric acid. The following chemical reactions are studied: - trivalent and tetravalent technetium oxidation by nitrate ion. - hydrazine and tetravalent uranium oxidation catalysed by technetium: in those reactions, we point out unequivocally the prominent part of trivalent and tetravalent technetium, - technetium behaviour towards hydroxylamine. Technetium should not cause any disturbance in the steps where hydroxylamine is employed to destroy nitrous acid and hydrazine replacement by hydroxylamine in uranium-plutonium partition could contribute to a best reprocessing of nuclear fuels [fr

  17. The chemical speciation of technetium in the environment: a literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sparkes, S.T.; Long, S.E.

    1987-07-01

    This report reviews the current understanding of the chemical forms and behaviour of technetium in the environment. Technetium (VII) is the dominant species in most systems, however when reducing conditions arise technetium (IV) species predominate. Pertechnetate is a highly mobile ion in aqueous media and can exhibit significant environmental transfer. Technetium (IV) is readily sorbed by sediments and is able to complex with various ligands which subsequently determine its fate. Complexation with high molecular weight organic moieties reduces the availability of technetium although this is not necessarily the case with smaller molecules. In plants, technetium is absorbed as TcO 4 - and can become incorporated into organic molecules. The technetium present in such forms is generally considered less available for uptake by the ingesting animal than aqueous TcO 4 - , although significant transfer of this element has been reported from food into eggs. Areas of potential future interest are suggested. (author)

  18. Selenium content of foods purchased or produced in Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snook, J T; Kinsey, D; Palmquist, D L; DeLany, J P; Vivian, V M; Moxon, A L

    1987-06-01

    Approximately 450 samples of about 100 types of foods consumed by rural and urban Ohioans were analyzed for selenium. Meat, dairy products, eggs, and grain products produced in Ohio have considerably lower selenium content than corresponding products produced in high selenium areas, such as South Dakota. Retail Ohio foods with interregional distribution tended to be higher in selenium content than corresponding foods produced in Ohio. Best sources of selenium in Ohio foods commonly consumed were meat and pasta products. Poor sources of selenium were fruits, most vegetables, candies, sweeteners, and alcoholic and nonalcoholic beverages. Establishment of an accurate data base for selenium depends on knowledge of the interregional distribution of foods, the selenium content of foods at their production site, and the selenium content of foods with wide local distribution.

  19. Selenium: environmental significance, pollution, and biological treatment technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lea Chua; Nancharaiah, Yarlagadda V; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Lens, Piet N L

    2016-01-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element needed for all living organisms. Despite its essentiality, selenium is a potential toxic element to natural ecosystems due to its bioaccumulation potential. Though selenium is found naturally in the earth's crust, especially in carbonate rocks and volcanic and sedimentary soils, about 40% of the selenium emissions to atmospheric and aquatic environments are caused by various industrial activities such as mining-related operations. In recent years, advances in water quality and pollution monitoring have shown that selenium is a contaminant of potential environmental concern. This has practical implications on industry to achieve the stringent selenium regulatory discharge limit of 5μgSeL(-1) for selenium containing wastewaters set by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. Over the last few decades, various technologies have been developed for the treatment of selenium-containing wastewaters. Biological selenium reduction has emerged as the leading technology for removing selenium from wastewaters since it offers a cheaper alternative compared to physico-chemical treatments and is suitable for treating dilute and variable selenium-laden wastewaters. Moreover, biological treatment has the advantage of forming elemental selenium nanospheres which exhibit unique optical and spectral properties for various industrial applications, i.e. medical, electrical, and manufacturing processes. However, despite the advances in biotechnology employing selenium reduction, there are still several challenges, particularly in achieving stringent discharge limits, the long-term stability of biogenic selenium and predicting the fate of bioreduced selenium in the environment. This review highlights the significance of selenium in the environment, health, and industry and biotechnological advances made in the treatment of selenium contaminated wastewaters. The challenges and future perspectives are overviewed considering recent

  20. Biogeochemical Controls on Technetium Mobility in Biogeochemical Controls on Technetium Mobility in FRC Sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, J.R.; McBeth, J.M.; Livens, F.R.; Bryan, N.D.; Ellis, B.; Sharma, H.; Burke, I.T.; Morris, K.

    2004-01-01

    Technetium-99 is a priority pollutant at numerous DOE sites, due to its long half-life (2.1 x 10 5 years), high mobility as Tc(VII) in oxic waters, and bioavailability as a sulfate analog. 99 Tc is far less mobile under anaerobic conditions, forming insoluble Tc(IV) precipitates. As anaerobic microorganisms can reduce soluble Tc(VII) to insoluble Tc(IV), microbial metabolism may have the potential to treat sediments and waters contaminated with Tc. Baseline studies of fundamental mechanisms of Tc(VII) bioreduction and precipitation (reviewed by Lloyd et al, 2002) have generally used pure cultures of metal-reducing bacteria, in order to develop conceptual models for the biogeochemical cycling of Tc. There is, however, comparatively little known about interactions of metal-reducing bacteria with environmentally relevant trace concentrations of Tc, against a more complex biogeochemical background provided by mixed microbial communities in the subsurface. The objective of this new NABIR project is to probe the site specific biogeochemical conditions that control the mobility of Tc at the FRC (Oak Ridge, TN). This information is required for the rational design of in situ bioremediation strategies for technetium-contaminated subsurface environments. We will use a combination of geochemical, mineralogical, microbiological and spectroscopic techniques to determine the solubility and phase associations of Tc in FRC sediments, and characterize the underpinning biogeochemical controls. A key strength of this project is that many of the techniques we are using have already been optimized by our research team, who are also studying the biogeochemical controls on Tc mobility in marine and freshwater sediments in the UK in a NERC funded companion study.

  1. Fluoridonitrosyl complexes of technetium(I) and technetium(II). Synthesis, characterization, reactions, and DFT calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasekaran, Samundeeswari Mariappan; Spandl, Johann; Hagenbach, Adelheid; Köhler, Klaus; Drees, Markus; Abram, Ulrich

    2014-05-19

    A mixture of [Tc(NO)F5](2-) and [Tc(NO)(NH3)4F](+) is formed during the reaction of pertechnetate with acetohydroxamic acid (Haha) in aqueous HF. The blue pentafluoridonitrosyltechnetate(II) has been isolated in crystalline form as potassium and rubidium salts, while the orange-red ammine complex crystallizes as bifluoride or PF6(-) salts. Reactions of [Tc(NO)F5](2-) salts with HCl give the corresponding [Tc(NO)Cl4/5](-/2-) complexes, while reflux in neat pyridine (py) results in the formation of the technetium(I) cation [Tc(NO)(py)4F](+), which can be crystallized as hexafluoridophosphate. The same compound can be synthesized directly from pertechnetate, Haha, HF, and py or by a ligand-exchange procedure starting from [Tc(NO)(NH3)4F](HF2). The technetium(I) cation [Tc(NO)(NH3)4F](+) can be oxidized electrochemically or by the reaction with Ce(SO4)2 to give the corresponding Tc(II) compound [Tc(NO)(NH3)4F](2+). The fluorido ligand in [Tc(NO)(NH3)4F](+) can be replaced by CF3COO(-), leaving the "[Tc(NO)(NH3)4](2+) core" untouched. The experimental results are confirmed by density functional theory calculations on [Tc(NO)F5](2-), [Tc(NO)(py)4F](+), [Tc(NO)(NH3)4F](+), and [Tc(NO)(NH3)4F](2+).

  2. Selenium supplementation induces mitochondrial biogenesis in trophoblasts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Khera, A.; Dong, L. F.; Holland, O.; Vanderlelie, J.; Pasdar, E.A.; Neužil, Jiří; Perkins, A.V.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 8 (2015), s. 363-369 ISSN 0143-4004 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : Selenium * Reactive oxygen species * Mitochondrial biogenesis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.972, year: 2015

  3. Biofortification and phytoremediation of selenium in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biofortification is an agricultural process that increases the uptake and accumulation of specific nutrients, e.g. selenium (Se), in agricultural food products through plant breeding, genetic engineering, and manipulation of agronomic practices. The development and uses of biofortified agricultural ...

  4. Ameliorative effects of selenium and zinc

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methidathion-induced hematological, biochemical and hepatohistological alterations in rat: Ameliorative effects of selenium and zinc. L Barkat, A Boumendjel, C Abdennour, MS Boulakoud, A El Feki, M Messarah ...

  5. Selenium supplementation for critically ill adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allingstrup, Mikkel; Afshari, Arash

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Selenium is a trace mineral essential to health and has an important role in immunity, defence against tissue damage and thyroid function. Improving selenium status could help protect against overwhelming tissue damage and infection in critically ill adults. This Cochrane review...... was originally published in 2004 updated in 2007 and again 2015. OBJECTIVES: The primary objective was to examine the effect of nutrition supplemented with selenium or ebselen on mortality in critically ill patients.The secondary objective was to examine the relationship between selenium or ebselen...... supplementation and number of infections, duration of mechanical ventilation, length of intensive care unit stay and length of hospital stay. SEARCH METHODS: In this update, we searched the current issue of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Cochrane Library (2014, Issue 5); MEDLINE (Ovid SP...

  6. Thioacetamide-induced cirrhosis in selenium-adequate mice displays rapid and persistent abnormity of hepatic selenoenzymes which are mute to selenium supplementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jinsong; Wang Huali; Yu Hanqing

    2007-01-01

    Selenium reduction in cirrhosis is frequently reported. The known beneficial effect of selenium supplementation on cirrhosis is probably obtained from nutritionally selenium-deficient subjects. Whether selenium supplementation truly improves cirrhosis in general needs additional experimental investigation. Thioacetamide was used to induce cirrhosis in selenium-adequate and -deficient mice. Selenoenzyme activity and selenium content were measured and the influence of selenium supplementation was evaluated. In Se-adequate mice, thioacetamide-mediated rapid onset of hepatic oxidative stress resulted in an increase in thioredoxin reductase activity and a decrease in both glutathione peroxidase activity and selenium content. The inverse activity of selenoenzymes (i.e. TrxR activity goes up and GPx activity goes down) was persistent and mute to selenium supplementation during the progress of cirrhosis; accordingly, cirrhosis was not improved by selenium supplementation in any period. On the other hand, selenium supplementation to selenium-deficient mice always more efficiently increased hepatic glutathione peroxidase activity and selenium content compared with those treated with thioacetamide, indicating that thioacetamide impairs the liver bioavailability of selenium. Although thioacetamide profoundly affects hepatic selenium status in selenium-adequate mice, selenium supplementation does not modify the changes. Selenium supplementation to cirrhotic subjects with a background of nutritional selenium deficiency can improve selenium status but cannot restore hepatic glutathione peroxidase and selenium to normal levels

  7. Isomorfic Substitutions of Calcium by Strontium in Calcium Hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, Hilbert

    1962-12-01

    By means of homogeneous precipitation it has been possible to synthesize crystalline solid solutions of calcium strontium hydroxyapatite from aqueous solutions. The lattice constants for the solid solutions were measured in the range Ca 9 Sr(PO 4 ) 6 (OH) 2 - CaSr 9 (PO 4 ) 6 (OH) 2 . The investigations show that the discrimination of strontium against calcium is considerably smaller than reported elsewhere (1). Strontium is preferentially built into the c-axis direction of the apatite lattice

  8. Selenium nanoparticles: potential in cancer gene and drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiyo, Fiona; Singh, Moganavelli

    2017-05-01

    In recent decades, colloidal selenium nanoparticles have emerged as exceptional selenium species with reported chemopreventative and therapeutic properties. This has sparked widespread interest in their use as a carrier of therapeutic agents with results displaying synergistic effects of selenium with its therapeutic cargo and improved anticancer activity. Functionalization remains a critical step in selenium nanoparticles' development for application in gene or drug delivery. In this review, we highlight recent developments in the synthesis and functionalization strategies of selenium nanoparticles used in cancer drug and gene delivery systems. We also provide an update of recent preclinical studies utilizing selenium nanoparticles in cancer therapeutics.

  9. Is selenium supplementation in autoimmune thyroid diseases justified?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Kristian H.; Bonnema, Steen; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review provides an appraisal of recent evidence for or against selenium supplementation in patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases, and discusses possible effect mechanisms. RECENT FINDINGS: Epidemiological data suggest an increased prevalence of autoimmune thyroid...... diseases under conditions of low dietary selenium intake. Two systematic reviews have evaluated controlled trials among patients with autoimmune thyroiditis and report that selenium supplementation decreases circulating thyroid autoantibodies. The immunomodulatory effects of selenium might involve reducing...... proinflammatory cytokine release. However, clinically relevant effects of selenium supplementation, including improvement in quality of life, are more elusive. In Graves’ disease, some, but not all, trials indicate that adjuvant selenium supplementation enhances the restoration of biochemical euthyroidism...

  10. Production of selenium-72 and arsenic-72

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, D.R.

    1994-12-06

    Methods and apparatus are described for producing selenium-72, separating it from its daughter isotope arsenic-72, and generating multiple portions of a solution containing arsenic-72 from a reusable parent substance comprised of selenium-72. The invention provides apparatus which can be located at a site where arsenic-72 is used, for purposes such as PET imaging, to produce arsenic-72 as needed, since the half-life of arsenic-72 is very short. 2 figures.

  11. The role of selenium in predicting preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Ghaemi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Preeclampsia is a common disorder that is a leading cause of perinatal and maternal morbidity and mortality; however its specific etiology has still remained obscure.The first step in preventing preeclampsia is early detection of women at risk. Since there is no valid and reliable screening test, appropriate diagnostic and screening tests are necessary, which are inexpensive, non-invasive and beneficial for pregnant women. Therefore, regarding the role of selenium as an antioxidant in the prevention preeclampsia, this study was designed which aimed to determine the prognostic value of plasma selenium levels in the diagnosis of preeclampsia in primigravida women Methods: In a nested case control design, a sample of 650 normal primigravida women of 24-28 weeks participated in the study. Subjects who involved the case group were followed up for 3 months and 38 were affected by preeclampsia. Blood samples were obtained from these 38patients as well as from 38 subjects as their matched controls. Moreover, the amount of selenium was measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. Results: The mean level of selenium in blood plasma of the cases was significantly lower than in their matched controls. The present study findings revealed that pregnant women with serum Se < 66.1 μg/L had a significantly increased risk of preeclampsia. Conclusion: Lower plasma selenium level in women destines to suffering from preeclampsia which confirms the destructive effect of selenium deficiency as an antioxidant in etiopathology of preeclampsia. Measurement of plasma selenium can improve the prediction of preeclampsia; thus, it seems that plasma selenium level test owns an acceptable sensitivity and specificity for predicting preeclampsia.

  12. Selenium and tellurium reagents in organic synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comasseto, J.V.

    1984-01-01

    A review of the contribution of the University of Sao Paulo (SP, Brazil) to the organic synthesis of selenium and tellurium reagents is made. Major reactions amoung selenium compounds and insaturated substrates, phosphorus, ester enolates as well as the use of phase transference catalysed reactions to produce arylselenolate are described. For tellurium, interactions of its compounds with organic substrates and reactive intermediates (e.g. benzino diazomethane) are reported. (C.L.B.) [pt

  13. Detection of pulmonary hemorrhage with technetium-labeled red cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winzelberg, G.G.; Laman, D.; Sachs, M.; Miller, W.H.

    1981-01-01

    Noninvasive techniques to aid in the diagnosis of massive pulmonary hemoptysis would be helpful in guiding more-invasive procedures such as bronchial artery angiography, which carries a risk of transverse myelitis. A patient was studied with technetium-labeled red cells and successfully detected a site of intermittent hemorrhage from the lung

  14. Coordination chemistry of technetium as related to nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Richards, P.

    1982-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in the area of technetium coordination chemistry during the last five years. The main driving force behind this recent surge of interest in the field has been due to the practical application of technetium-99m in the rapidly growing speciality of nuclear medicine. Technetium-99 is one of the products of nuclear fission reactions, but it was the development of the molybdenum-99-technetium-99m generator about two decades ago that provided the basis for the development of radiopharmaceuticals routinely used in modern diagnostic applications. The chemistry of this element has proven to be quite rich owing to its multiple oxidation states and variable geometry. This can be attributed to its position in the middle of the periodic table. Diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals comprise predominantly III, IV and V oxidation states of Tc and involve a variety of coordination complexes. Even though the chemistry of Tc has been slow to evolve, recent synthetic advances have provided a more scientific basis for the study of a number of compounds with diverse coordination geometries and structures. Ligands with oxygen, nitrogen and sulfur donor atoms have been utilized to elucidate various aspects of the coordination chemistry of Tc. Single crystal X-ray structural analysis has been extensively used to characterize Tc complexes and thus construct a firm foundation for the study of synthetic and mechanistic aspects of the chemistry of this element. (author)

  15. Evaluation of reflux oesophagitis with technetium-99m-labelled ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sucralfate binds with denuded protein to form a stable complex to protect the damaged mucosa. By utilising this property, technetium-99m-labelled sucraJfate can be used to demonstrate ulceration in the upper gastro-intestinal tract. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate 99mTc-labelled sucralfate in the diagnosis of ...

  16. Investigation on chemistry of model compounds of technetium radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muenze, R.; Hartmann, E.

    1983-01-01

    The report summarized experimental and theoretical results concerning the chemical structures and the biodistribution of hydrophilic technetium chelates with hydroxycarboxylic and aminopolycarboxylic acids, thiol compounds and aliphatic and aromatic nitrogen compounds as ligands. Methods which are suitable for synthesizing and characterizing defined chelates of Tc(V), Tc(IV) and Tc(III) have been developed for crystlline substances and species in solution, respectively. For certain types of technetium chelates three dimensional structure models were calculated from atomic parameters. The electron energies and electron distribution of Tc(V) thiol compounds were calculated by quantum chemical methods in order to interprete physical properties of these substances. Biodistribution studies revealed relationships between the osteotropic behaviour and the structure of phosphorous and non-phosphorous technetium chelates and between the kidney uptake and ligand exchange ability of Tc(V) hydroxycarboxylates. Important parameters for the production of technetium-99m kits have been elaborated and used for the optimization of radiopharmaceuticals (bone-, kidney and hepatobiliaer agents). (author)

  17. Technetium and diazotrophic organisms: toxicity, localization, transfer factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandecasteele, C.M.; Delmotte, A.; Roucoux, P.; Hove, C. van

    1982-01-01

    Three diazotrophic organisms, together with one leguminous organism in symbiosis with one of them, were cultivated in the presence of various quantities of technetium, of which the localization, transfer factors and toxicity were studied in relation to the age of the organisms and their type of metabolism. The paper discusses the biochemical aspects of the results. (author)

  18. Technetium-99m labeled radiodiagnostic agents and method of preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    A method of preparing improved technetium-99m labelled radiodiagnostic agents by reducing sup(99m)Tc-pertechnetate with stannous tartrate is given. Human serum albumine (HSA) and 1-hydroxyethylidene-1,1-disodiumphosphonate (HEDSPA), which are useful in scintigraphic examinations of the lung and bone, were labelled in this way

  19. Technetium: The First Radioelement on the Periodic Table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Erik V.; Yates, Mary Anne; Poineau, Frederic; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Czerwinski, Kenneth R.

    2017-01-01

    The radioactive nature of technetium is discussed using a combination of introductory nuclear physics concepts and empirical trends observed in the chart of the nuclides and the periodic table of the elements. Trends such as the enhanced stability of nucleon pairs, magic numbers, and Mattauch's rule are described. The concepts of nuclear binding…

  20. Immobilization of technetium and nitrate in cement-based materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallent, O.K.; McDaniel, E.W.; Del Cul, G.D.; Dodson, K.E.; Trotter, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The leachabilities of technetium and nitrate wastes immobilized in cement-based grouts have been investigated. Factors found to affect the leachabilities include grout mix ratio, grout fluid density, dry solid blend composition, and waste concentration. 10 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Strontium isotope stratigraphy of the Pelotas Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerfass, Geise de Santana dos Anjos, E-mail: geise.zerfass@petrobras.com.br [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS/CENPES/PDGEO/BPA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas e Desenvolvimento Leopoldo Americo Miguez de Mello; Chemale Junior, Farid, E-mail: fchemale@unb.br [Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), DF (Brazil). Instituto de Geociencias; Moura, Candido Augusto Veloso, E-mail: candido@ufpa.br [Universidade Federal do Para (UFPA), Belem, PA (Brazil). Centro de Geociencias. Dept. de Geoquimica e Petrologia; Costa, Karen Badaraco, E-mail: karen.costa@usp.br [Instituto Oceanografico, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Kawashita, Koji, E-mail: koji@usp.br [Unversidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas Geocronologicas

    2014-07-01

    Strontium isotope data were obtained from foraminifera shells of the Pelotas Basin Tertiary deposits to facilitate the refinement of the chronostratigraphic framework of this section. This represents the first approach to the acquisition of numerical ages for these strata. Strontium isotope stratigraphy allowed the identification of eight depositional hiatuses in the Eocene-Pliocene section, here classified as disconformities and a condensed section. The reconnaissance of depositional gaps based on confident age assignments represents an important advance considering the remarkably low chronostratigraphic resolution in the Cenozoic section of the Pelotas Basin. The recognition of hiatuses that match hiatuses is based on biostratigraphic data, as well as on global events. Furthermore, a substantial increase in the sedimentation rate of the upper Miocene section was identified. Paleotemperature and productivity trends were identified based on oxygen and carbon isotope data from the Oligocene-Miocene section, which are coherent with worldwide events, indicating the environmental conditions during sedimentation. (author)

  2. Critical evaluation of the literature concerning the transfer feed/meat of strontium, radium, technetium in domestic animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fliegl, E.; Schelenz, R.; Fischer, E.

    1981-12-01

    A literature study concerning the transfer of Sr, Ra, Te, Co and Fe from feed to meat of domestic animals has been carried out. Approx. 4200 publications from 1950-1980 have been evaluated. General criteria for the influence of experimental conditions on the transfer factor have been pointed out. The transfer factor of growing animals is greater than that of adult animals. After completion of growth the transfer factor is independent of age. The transfer factors differ with various animal species. From these findings the following average transfer factors meat/feed in d/kg have been derived during steady state equilibrium between daily intake and excretion of the isotope. For Sr: cattle 6x10 -4 , calf 2x10 -3 , sheep 2,1x10 -3 , goat 3.3x10 -3 , pig 3,6x10 -4 , hen 1,8x10 -2 . For Ra: cattle 6x10 -4 , pig 2,6x10 -4 , caribou 2,3x10 -3 . These values have been derived mainly from metabolic experiments and from literature values of concentrations in feed and meat. For Te, Co and Fe it was not possible to find relevant values. A transfer factor for Tc of 8x10 -3 d/kg for beef was derived indirectly using values of meat and vegetables. (orig.) [de

  3. Strontium isotopic study of sediment from the Ross Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovach, J.; Faure, G.

    1977-01-01

    A preliminary report summarizing the results of a study of the strontium-87/strontium-86 ratios and of the rubidium and strontium concentrations of the fine-grained (less than 150 microns) noncarbonate fractions of sediment samples from core E32-25 raised from a depth of 327 fathoms in the Ross Sea at 78 0 31.0'S 164 0 24.7'W was presented. The strontium-87/strontium-86 ratios of the samples analyzed range from 0.7119 to 0.7220. Rubidium and strontium concentrations range, respectively, from 126 to 164 parts per million and from 113 to 174 parts per million. The observed strontium-87/strontium-86 ratios and strontium concentrations in sediment samples from core E32-25 fit a hyperbolic curve. These ratios can be used to estimate the concentrations of volcanogenic detritus in the sediment samples. The results of this study provide additional baseline data for anticipated future studies of sediment cores to be recovered from beneath the Ross Ice Shelf by the Ross Ice Shelf Project. 1 figure

  4. Removal of Strontium from Drinking Water by Conventional ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency Contaminant Candidate List 3 lists strontium as a contaminant for potential regulatory consideration in drinking water. There is very little data available on strontium removal from drinking water. As a result, there is an immediate need to perform treatment studies. The objective of this work is to evaluate the effectiveness of conventional and lime-soda ash softening treatments to remove strontium from surface and ground waters. Conventional drinking water treatment with aluminum and iron coagulants were able to achieve 12% and 5.9% strontium removal at best, while lime softening removed as much as 78% from natural strontium-containing ground water. Systematic fundamental experiments showed that strontium removal during the lime-soda ash softening was related to pH, calcium concentration and dissolved inorganic carbon concentration. Final strontium concentration was also directly associated with initial strontium concentration. Precipitated solids showed well-formed crystals or agglomerates of mixed solids, two polymorphs of calcium carbonate (vaterite and calcite), and strontianite, depending on initial water quality conditions. X-ray diffraction analysis suggested that strontium likely replaced calcium inside the crystal lattice and was likely mainly responsible for removal during lime softening. To inform the public.

  5. Lanthanide doped strontium-barium cesium halide scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizarri, Gregory; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Borade, Ramesh B.; Gundiah, Gautam; Yan, Zewu; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Chaudhry, Anurag; Canning, Andrew

    2015-06-09

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising an optionally lanthanide-doped strontium-barium, optionally cesium, halide, useful for detecting nuclear material.

  6. System of lithium, sodium, and strontium bromides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litvinova, G.N.; Yagub'yan, E.S.; Bukhalova, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    The visual-polythermal and partially differential thermal methods of analysis have been applied to investigate the meltability diagram of the Li 2 Br 2 -Na 2 Br 2 -SrBr 2 ternary system. Three fields of crystallization belonging to strontium bromide, to the compound LiSr 2 Br 5 and solid solutions of lithium and sodium bromides are found. Two points complying with nonvariant equilibria are discovered

  7. Determinants of selenium in the toenail biomonitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, J.S.; Spate, V.L.; Ngwenyama, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    The evaluation of human nails as a measure of selenium intake and to assess selenium status in critical tissues is now being used routinely to investigate hypotheses relating selenium status to chronic disease, especially cancer. In this study we report on our observations of the major determinants of toenail selenium concentrations. Toenail specimens (3575) were, under a protocol we provided, self-collected by adult females (1940, 54.3%) and males (1635, 45.7%) living in 111 of Missouri's 114 counties. The health-conscious participants ranged in age from 18 to 94 years with means of 53.7±14.1 and 56.4±14.2 years for females and males, respectively. Selenium supplement use was over represented, 39.1% and 42.7%, and smoking was under represented, 7.5% and 7.8%, for females and males, respectively. The major determinants of toenail selenium concentration were supplement use, sex and cigarette smoking. We found no overall correlations with age, body mass index or diet selection. (author)

  8. A new method for the preparation of strontium titanate and strontium hypovanadate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, M.R.

    1985-01-01

    Strontium titanate has been a prized chemical by virtue of its dielectric, photoelectric and surface properties. The compound crystallises with the cubic perovskite structure. Till now only two techniques (and a few variants therein) have been employed for its synthesis, one of them is a solid state reaction between SrCO 3 and TiO 2 at 1100deg, and the other is a coprecipitation of strontium titanyl oxalate followed by calcination at 850deg. As ternary oxides, such as copper chromite, have been prepared by complex formation, the author found it interesting to apply this method to the preparation of strontium titanate. The most easily accessible and versatile complexing agent, EDTA, was used. (author)

  9. Technetium-99m ceftizoxime kit preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diniz, Simone Odilia Fernandes; Siqueira, Cristiano Ferrari; Nelson, David Lee; Cardoso, Valbert Nascimento

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work was to prepare a kit of 99 m Tc-ceftizoxime ( 99m Tc-CFT), with stability and biological activity preserved, able to identify a septic focus (E. coli) in the experimental infection model in rats. The preparation of the CFT kit involved the use of lyophilized solutions containing the antibiotic ceftizoxime and the sodium dithionite reducing agent (6.0 mg/m L). After lyophilization, the kit was reconstituted with 1.0 mL of sodium 99m Tc pertechnetate solution (Na 99m Tc O 4- ) with an activity of 370 MBq. The solution was boiled for 10 min and filtered through a cellulose ester filter. The labeling efficiency was on the order of 92%, remaining stable for six hours and the kit remained stable for two months. The biological activity of the 99m Tc-CFT was evaluated by diffusion in agar impregnated with E.coli and S. aureus. Seven Wistar rats, weighing from 200 to 250 g, were used for the development of the septic focus. After 24 hours from the induction of the infectious site (E.coli), the animals were anesthetized and 0.1 mL of 99m Tc-CFT (37 MBq) was injected into the tail veins of the animals. The images were obtained with a gamma camera one, two and six hours after injection and the regions of interest (ROIs) were calculated. The diameters of the inhibition halos for 99 m Tc-CFT were 27.16 ± 0.23 and 27.17 ± 0.20 for S.aureus and E.coli, respectively, while those for the unlabeled CFT were 30.4 ± 0.33 and 29.43 ± 0.26, respectively. The results for the biodistribution of 99m Tc-CFT in infected animals furnished a ratio of 1.97 ± 0.31, 2.10 ± 0.42 and 2.01 ± 0.42 for cpm-target/cpm-no target for the one, two and six-hour periods, respectively. The images showed a clear uptake of labeled antibiotic ( 99m Tc-CFT) by the infectious site during the experiment. The results attest to the viability of producing a kit with 99m technetium-labeled ceftizoxime for the investigation of infectious processes. (author)

  10. Technetium-99m ceftizoxime kit preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diniz, Simone Odilia Fernandes; Siqueira, Cristiano Ferrari; Nelson, David Lee; Cardoso, Valbert Nascimento [Minas Gerais Univ. Federal, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Farmacia]. E-mail: simone@farmacia.ufmg.br; Martin-Comin, Josep [Bellvitge Univ., Barcelona (Spain)

    2005-10-15

    The aim of this work was to prepare a kit of {sup 99}m Tc-ceftizoxime ({sup 99m} Tc-CFT), with stability and biological activity preserved, able to identify a septic focus (E. coli) in the experimental infection model in rats. The preparation of the CFT kit involved the use of lyophilized solutions containing the antibiotic ceftizoxime and the sodium dithionite reducing agent (6.0 mg/m L). After lyophilization, the kit was reconstituted with 1.0 mL of sodium {sup 99m} Tc pertechnetate solution (Na {sup 99m} Tc O{sub 4-}) with an activity of 370 MBq. The solution was boiled for 10 min and filtered through a cellulose ester filter. The labeling efficiency was on the order of 92%, remaining stable for six hours and the kit remained stable for two months. The biological activity of the {sup 99m} Tc-CFT was evaluated by diffusion in agar impregnated with E.coli and S. aureus. Seven Wistar rats, weighing from 200 to 250 g, were used for the development of the septic focus. After 24 hours from the induction of the infectious site (E.coli), the animals were anesthetized and 0.1 mL of {sup 99m} Tc-CFT (37 MBq) was injected into the tail veins of the animals. The images were obtained with a gamma camera one, two and six hours after injection and the regions of interest (ROIs) were calculated. The diameters of the inhibition halos for {sup 99}m Tc-CFT were 27.16 {+-} 0.23 and 27.17 {+-} 0.20 for S.aureus and E.coli, respectively, while those for the unlabeled CFT were 30.4 {+-} 0.33 and 29.43 {+-} 0.26, respectively. The results for the biodistribution of {sup 99m} Tc-CFT in infected animals furnished a ratio of 1.97 {+-} 0.31, 2.10 {+-} 0.42 and 2.01 {+-} 0.42 for cpm-target/cpm-no target for the one, two and six-hour periods, respectively. The images showed a clear uptake of labeled antibiotic ({sup 99m} Tc-CFT) by the infectious site during the experiment. The results attest to the viability of producing a kit with {sup 99m} technetium-labeled ceftizoxime for the

  11. Dietary Selenium and Human Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Schomburg

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Next year (2017, the micronutrient Selenium (Se is celebrating its birthday—i.e., 200 years after first being identified by the Swedish chemist Jöns Jakob Berzelius. Despite its impressive age, research into the functions of this essential trace element is very alive and reaching out for new horizons. This special issue presents some recent fascinating, exciting, and promising developments in Se research in the form of eight original contributions and seven review articles. Collectively, aspects of Se supply, biochemical, physiological, and chemotherapeutic effects, and geobiological interactions are covered by leading scientists in the areas of nutritional, basic, and clinical research. It is obvious from the contributions that the bicentennial anniversary will celebrate a micronutrient still in its infancy with respect to being understood in terms of its biomedical importance.

  12. Selenium Se and tellurium Te

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busev, A.I.; Tiptsova, V.G.; Ivanov, V.M.

    1978-01-01

    The basic methods for determining selenium and tellurium in various objects are presented. The bichromatometric determination of Te in cadmium, zinc and mercury tellurides is based on oxidation of Te(4) to (6) in H 2 SO 4 with potassium bichromate. In steels, Te is determined photometrically with the aid of KI. The determination is hindered by Fe(3), Cu(2), Bi(3) and Se(4) ions, which must be separated. The extraction-photometric determination of Te in native sulfur is carried out with the aid of 5-mercapto-3-(naphthyl-2)-1,3,4-thiadiazolthione-2 (pH=4.8-5.0). The dyed complex is readily extracted with chloroform and benzene. The spectrophotometric determination of Te in selenium is performed with the aid of 3,5-diphenylpyrazoline-1-dithiocarbamate of sodium. Te is determined in commercial indium, arsenic and their semiconductor compounds photometrically with the aid of copper diethyldithiocarbamate. The method permits determining 5x10 -5 % Te in a weighed amount of 0.5 g. The chloride complex of Te(4) with diantipyriodolpropylmethane is quantitatively extracted with dichloroethane from hydrochloric acid solutions. Thus, any amounts of Te can be separated from Se and determined photometrically. The extraction-photometric determination of Te in commercial lead and bismuth is carried out with the aid of pyrazolone derivatives, in commercial copper with the aid of diantipyridolpropylmethane, and in ores (more than 0.01% Te) with the aid of bismuthol 2. Also described is the extraction-polarographic determination of Te in sulfide ores

  13. Thin film solar cells by selenization sulfurization using diethyl selenium as a selenium precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhere, Neelkanth G.; Kadam, Ankur A.

    2009-12-15

    A method of forming a CIGSS absorber layer includes the steps of providing a metal precursor, and selenizing the metal precursor using diethyl selenium to form a selenized metal precursor layer (CIGSS absorber layer). A high efficiency solar cell includes a CIGSS absorber layer formed by a process including selenizing a metal precursor using diethyl selenium to form the CIGSS absorber layer.

  14. New challenge in the speciation of selenium. Measurement and production on nano selenium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokisch, J; Sztrik, A; Babka, B; Zommara, M; Daroczi, L [Debrecen University, Centre for Agricultural Sciences and Engineering, Debrecen (Hungary). Institute of Bio- and Environmental Energetics

    2009-07-01

    Complete text of publication follows. We have found that several species of probiotic bacteria also used in food industry for making yogurts is capable of producing spherical elemental selenium nanospheres having an average diameter in the range of 50-500 nm when 1-1000 mg/L selenium was added to the medium in the form of selenite ions. Elemental selenium produced thereby has a high degree of purity, is spherical, and its size and crystalline form depends on the bacterium species applied. We have found that some species of the probiotic yogurt bacteria (e.g. Bifidobacterium bifidum or Bifidobacterium longum) are capable of producing the grey crystalline form of elemental selenium which is so far unprecedented in the art for any bacteria capable of producing elemental selenium nanoparticles. Our finding, therefore, enables the first time the development of economical industrial bacterial fermentation based processes for the production of a high quality elemental selenium material comprising uniformly sized grey or red nanospheres having an average diameter in the range of 50-500 nm. The size and the crystalline form of the produced nanosized (50-500 nm) spherical particles is defined by the selected microorganism. This genetic pre-determination result in reproducible production of a material having individual characteristics which can be used in numerous fields of industry and research. The produced nano selenium could be a good raw material for a production of certified reference materials. The measurement of the produced elemental nanoselenium is a new challenge for the speciation analysis. A sample preparation and measurement method was developed and investigated for the analysis of different selenium forms by HPLC-AFS system. The atomic fluorescence (AFS) was a reliable and simple detection method for the elemental nano selenium. The elemental selenium can produce hydride in the system or can be converted to selenite with HCl/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} digestion.

  15. Selenium bioavailability from naturally produced high-selenium peas and oats in selenium-deficient rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lin; Johnson, LuAnn K

    2011-06-08

    This study determined the bioavailability of selenium (Se) from yellow peas and oats harvested from the high-Se soil of South Dakota, United States. The Se concentrations were 13.5 ± 0.2 and 2.5 ± 0.1 mg/kg (dry weight) for peas and oats, respectively. Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were depleted of Se by feeding them a 30% Torula yeast-based diet (4.1 μg Se/kg) for 56 days, and then they were replenished with Se for an additional 50 days by feeding them the same diet supplemented with 20, 30, or 40 μg Se/kg from peas or oats, respectively. Selenium bioavailability was determined on the basis of the restoration of Se-dependent enzyme activities and tissue Se concentrations in Se-depleted rats, comparing those responses for yellow peas and oats to those for l-selenomethionine (SeMet; used as a reference) by using a slope-ratio method. Dietary supplementation with peas or oats resulted in linear or log-linear, dose-dependent increases in glutathione peroxidase activities in blood and liver and in thioredoxin reductase activity in liver. Supplementation with peas or oats resulted in linear or log-linear, dose-dependent increases in Se concentrations of plasma, liver, gastrocnemius muscle, and kidneys. The overall bioavailability was approximately 88% for Se from yellow peas and 92% from oats, compared to SeMet. It was concluded that Se from naturally produced high-Se yellow peas or oats is highly bioavailable in this model and that these high-Se foods may be a good dietary source of Se.

  16. Substoichiometric determination of selenium with potassium ethyl xanthate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekhar Reddy, P.; Polaiah, B.; Rangamannar, B.

    1989-01-01

    A substoichiometric radiochemical method was developed for the determination of selenium with potassium ethyl xanthate. The selenium ethyl xanthate complex formed was extracted into chloroform from borate buffer at pH 5. The effect of foreign ions on the extraction was studied. Microgram quantities of selenium could be conveniently determined with a fair degree of accuracy. The method was successfully applied for the determination of selenium content in food stuffs such as 'Jaggery' and 'Wheat powder'. (author) 4 refs.; 3 figs

  17. Cyclotron Production of Technetium-99m

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Katherine M.

    Technetium-99m (99mTc) has emerged as the most widely used radionuclide in medicine and is currently obtained from a 99Mo/ 99mTc generator system. At present, there are only a handful of ageing reactors worldwide capable of producing large quantities of the parent isotope, 99Mo, and owing to the ever growing shutdown periods for maintenance and repair of these ageing reactors, the reliable supply 99mTc has been compromised in recent years. With an interest in alternative strategies for producing this key medical isotope, this thesis focuses on several technical challenges related to the direct cyclotron production of 99mTc via the 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc reaction. In addition to evaluating the 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc and 100Mo(p,x)99Mo reactions, this work presented the first experimental evaluation of the 100Mo(p,2n) 99gTc excitation function in the range of 8-18 MeV. Thick target calculations suggested that large quantities of cyclotron-produced 99mTc may be possible. For example, a 6 hr irradiation at 500 μA with an energy window of 18→10 MeV is expected to yield 1.15 TBq of 99mTc. The level of coproduced 99gTc contaminant was found to be on par with the current 99Mo/99mTc generator standard eluted with a 24 hr frequency. Highly enriched 100Mo was required as the target material for 99mTc production and a process for recycling of this expensive material is presented. An 87% recovery yield is reported, including metallic target preparation, irradiation, 99mTc extraction, molybdate isolation, and finally hydrogen reduction to the metal. Further improvements are expected with additional optimization experiments. A method for forming structurally stable metallic molybdenum targets has also been developed. These targets are capable of withstanding more than a kilowatt of beam power and the reliable production and extraction of Curie quantities of 99mTc has been demonstrated. With the end-goal of using the cyclotron-produced 99mTc clinically, the quality of the cyclotron

  18. Influence of granular strontium chloride as additives on some ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Influence of granular strontium chloride as additives on some electrical and mechanical properties for pure polyvinyl alcohol. A B Elaydy M Hafez ... Keywords. Polyvinyl-alcohol (PVA); granular strontium chloride, SrCl2; a.c. electrical conductivity; dielectric constant; dielectric loss; Young's modulus; creep relaxation curve.

  19. Thermal reactions of some calcium, strontium, and barium chromates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piekarska-Piesse, B.; Gontarz, Z.; Ostrowski, A.; Kucharski, R.

    2000-01-01

    Thermal decomposition of calcium chromates and solid state reactions of barium and strontium chromates(VI) with barium and strontium hydroxides and carbonates, as well as the reduction of chromates by carbon and hydrogen, have been investigated. The mechanisms of individual stages of the thermal decomposition have been proposed on the basis of morphological classification. (author)

  20. Strontium-90 and cesium-137 in powdered milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Japan Chemical Analysis Center has analysed the strontium-90 and cesium-137 content in powdered milk. The samples were purchased on the open market in Tokyo from the powdered milk producers. The analysis of Strontium-90 and Cesium-137 content was carried out using the method recommended by Science and Technology Agency. (author)

  1. Reduced-graphene-oxide-and-strontium-titanate-based double

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Microwave-absorbing materials based on reduced graphene oxide (r-GO)/ strontium titanate were prepared by embedding in epoxy matrix. R-GO and strontium titanate were synthesized and characterized before composite fabrication. Microstructures of the constituent elements were studied by scanning electron ...

  2. Thermal conductivity reduction in oxygen-deficient strontium titanates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Choongho; Scullin, Matthew L.; Huijben, Mark; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Majumdar, Arun

    2008-01-01

    We report significant thermal conductivity reduction in oxygen-deficient lanthanum-doped strontium titanate (Sr1−xLaxTiO3−δ) films as compared to unreduced strontium titanates. Our experimental results suggest that the oxygen vacancies could have played an important role in the reduction. This could

  3. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium calcium...

  4. Uptake behavior of titanium molybdophosphate for cesium and strontium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yavari, R.; Ahmadi, S.J.; Huang, Y.D.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates uptake of cesium and strontium from aqueous solution similar to nuclear waste on three samples of titanium molybdophosphate (TMP) synthesized under various conditions. Effects of concentration of sodium nitrate, pH and contact time on the uptake of cesium and strontium have been studied by bath method. The results showed that TMP has high affinity toward cesium and strontium at pH > 2 and relatively low concentration of sodium nitrate. Kinetic data indicated that cesium uptake process to achieve equilibrium was faster than strontium. Cesium and strontium breakthrough curves were examined at 25 deg C using column packed with H 3 O + form of TMP and breakthrough curves showed symmetrical S-shaped profiles. At the same time, the calculated breakthrough capacity for cesium was higher than strontium. The results of desorption studies showed that over 99% of cesium and strontium was washed out of column by using 4 M NH 4 Cl solution. This study suggests that TMP can have great potential applications for the removal of strontium and specially cesium from nuclear waste solution. (author)

  5. Selenium deficiency and the effects of supplementation on preterm infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Germano B. O. N. Freitas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to review the literature about blood concentrations of selenium associated with gestational age, feeding, supplementation and related clinical features in preterm infants. Data sources: Systematic review in the following databases: MEDLINE, PubMed, Google academics, SciELO. org, ScienceDirect (Elsevier and CINAHL-Plus with Full Text (EBSCO. Articles published up to January 2013 with the keywords "selenium deficiency", "selenium supplementation", "neonates", "infants", "newborn" and "preterm infants" were selected. Data synthesis: The studies reported that low blood selenium levels are associated with increased risk of respiratory diseases. Preterm infants, especially with low birth weight, presented lower selenium levels. Selenium deficiency has also been associated with the use of oral infant formula, enteral and parenteral nutrition (with or without selenium addition. The optimal dose and length of selenium supplementation is not well-established, since they are based only on age group and selenium ingestion by breastfed children. Furthermore, the clinical status of the infant affected by conditions that may increase oxidative stress, and consequently, selenium requirements is not taken into account. Conclusions: Prematurity and low birth weight can contribute to low blood selenium in premature infants. Selenium supplementation seems to minimize or prevent clinical complications caused by prematurity.

  6. EURRECA—Estimating Selenium Requirements for Deriving Dietary Reference Values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurst, R.; Collings, R.; Harvey, L.J.; King, M.; Hooper, L.; Bouwman, J.; Gurinovic, M.; Fairweather-Tait, S.J.

    2013-01-01

    Current reference values for selenium, an essential micronutrient, are based on the intake of selenium that is required to achieve maximal glutathione peroxidase activity in plasma or erythrocytes. In order to assess the evidence of relevance to setting dietary reference values for selenium, the

  7. Selenium supplementation for patients with Graves’ hyperthyroidism (the GRASS trial)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watt, Torquil; Cramon, Per; Bjorner, Jakob Bue

    2013-01-01

    Graves' hyperthyroidism is an autoimmune disease causing hyperfunction of the thyroid gland. The concentration of selenium is high in the thyroid gland and two important groups of enzymes within the thyroid are selenoproteins, that is, they depend on selenium. Selenium may have beneficial effects...

  8. Selenistasis: Epistatic Effects of Selenium on Cardiovascular Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Loscalzo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although selenium metabolism is intricately linked to cardiovascular biology and function, and deficiency of selenium is associated with cardiac pathology, utilization of selenium in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease remains an elusive goal. From a reductionist standpoint, the major function of selenium in vivo is antioxidant defense via its incorporation as selenocysteine into enzyme families such as glutathione peroxidases and thioredoxin reductases. In addition, selenium compounds are heterogeneous and have complex metabolic fates resulting in effects that are not entirely dependent on selenoprotein expression. This complex biology of selenium in vivo may underlie the fact that beneficial effects of selenium supplementation demonstrated in preclinical studies using models of oxidant stress-induced cardiovascular dysfunction, such as ischemia-reperfusion injury and myocardial infarction, have not been consistently observed in clinical trials. In fact, recent studies have yielded data that suggest that unselective supplementation of selenium may, indeed, be harmful. Interesting biologic actions of selenium are its simultaneous effects on redox balance and methylation status, a combination that may influence gene expression. These combined actions may explain some of the biphasic effects seen with low and high doses of selenium, the potentially harmful effects seen in normal individuals, and the beneficial effects noted in preclinical studies of disease. Given the complexity of selenium biology, systems biology approaches may be necessary to reach the goal of optimization of selenium status to promote health and prevent disease.

  9. NAIL KERATIN AS MONITOR-TISSUE FOR SELENIUM EXPOSURE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANNOORD, PAH; MAAS, MJ; DEBRUIN, M

    1992-01-01

    Nail clippings might provide a way to monitor exposure to selenium in the recent past of an individual, since a clipping collected from a toe would reflect exposures months before actual clipping date. The relation between levels of exogenous selenium exposure and selenium levels in nail keratin was

  10. Bio-induced solid selenium for recovery from water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, S.P.W.

    2015-01-01

    Selenium in the form of selenate or selenite in wastewater needs to be removed due to its potential toxicity in the environment. Also, selenium is a valuable element that is used in several industries and current selenium resources are likely to be exhausted in less than 50 years. Waste streams

  11. Method for recovering palladium and technetium values from nuclear fuel reprocessing waste solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Delphin, Walter H.

    1979-07-24

    A method for recovering palladium and technetium values from nuclear fuel reprocessing waste solutions containing these and other values by contacting the waste solution with an extractant of tricaprylmethylammonium nitrate in an inert hydrocarbon diluent which extracts the palladium and technetium values from the waste solution. The palladium and technetium values are recovered from the extractant and from any other coextracted values with a strong nitric acid strip solution.

  12. Toenail mercury and dyslipidemia: Interaction with selenium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyong; Seo, Eunmin

    2017-01-01

    Although compelling evidences from in vivo and in vitro studies exist, limited studies have examined the association between chronic mercury exposure and dyslipidemia. Particularly, data are sparse regarding the influence of selenium on this association of mercury with dyslipidemia in humans. The purpose of the current study was to examine the associations of toenail mercury with dyslipidemia and its components, and to examine whether selenium in toenails modifies these associations. We performed cross-sectional analyses using baseline data from a cohort in the Yeungnam area in South Korea, including 232 men and 269 women. Toenail mercury and selenium concentrations were quantified using neutron activation analysis, and fasting serum lipid measurements were obtained through the medical examination. Odds ratios of the prevalent hypercholesterolemia, hyper-LDL-cholesterolemia, hypo-HDL-cholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and dyslipidemia in correlation with mercury levels were calculated using multivariable logistic regression. The mean levels of toenail mercury were 0.47μg/g for men and 0.34μg/g for women. After adjustment for multiple confounding variables, participants in the highest tertile of toenail mercury levels had 4.08 (95% CI 1.09-15.32, p for trend=0.02) times higher risk of hyper-LDL-cholesterolemia, and 2.24 (95% CI 1.15-4.37, p for trend=0.004) times higher risk of dyslipidemia than those in the lowest tertile. Selenium is a significant effect-modifier for these associations; the highest tertile of toenail mercury were significantly associated with a higher risk of hypercholesterolemia (OR 5.25, 95% CI 1.04-26.38) and dyslipidemia (OR 2.98, 95% CI 1.16-7.66) compared to the lowest tertile at toenail selenium levels ≤0.685μg/g, while these associations became weak and non-significant, showing OR 0.98 and 95% CI 0.25-3.80 for hypercholesterolemia and OR 1.99 and 95% CI 0.73-5.45 for dyslipidemia at toenail selenium levels >0.685μg/g. We

  13. Calcium versus strontium handling by the heart muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrych, Michal; Olejnickova, Veronika; Novakova, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Calcium plays a crucial role in numerous processes in living systems, from both intracellular and intercellular signalling to blood clotting. Calcium can be replaced by strontium in various intracellular processes due to high level of their similarity and strontium thus may serve as a valuable tool for different experimental studies. On the other hand, strontium is also used in clinical medicine and is commonly taken to the human body with food and water. The negative cardiac side effects of strontium therapy of osteoporosis and bone metastases are well known, but still not fully explained. This fact explains enhanced interest in this element and its impact on human body. This article reviews effects of calcium and strontium on several biochemical and physiological processes, with special emphasis on cardiac muscle.

  14. Strontium 90 in silts of the Dnieper cascade water reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanenko, V.D.; Kuz'menko, M.I.; Matvienko, L.P.; Klenus, V.G.; Nasvit, O.I.

    1989-01-01

    The change of strontium-90 content in water and silts of the Dnieper cascade water reservoirs was analyzed. It was shown, that decrease of strontium-90 content in water in time connected basically with ion exchange adsorption of strontium-90 by residues. A high sorption ability of residues made it possible for radioisotopes to reduce sharply their concentration along depth of soils. The highest concentration of radioisotopes was in the upper layers, enriched by silt. It was ascertained, that strontium-90 migration along depth of residues took place rapidly in the Kiev's water reservoir. Down the cascade strontium-90 content reduced in lower layers of residues as well as in upper layers. 4 tabs

  15. Strontium Promotes Cementoblasts Differentiation through Inhibiting Sclerostin Expression In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingfu Bao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cementogenesis, performed by cementoblasts, is important for the repair of root resorption caused by orthodontic treatment. Based on recent studies, strontium has been applied for osteoporosis treatment due to its positive effect on osteoblasts. Although promising, the effect of strontium on cementoblasts is still unclear. So the aim of this research was to clarify and investigate the effect of strontium on cementogenesis via employing cementoblasts as model. A series of experiments including MTT, alkaline phosphatase activity, gene analysis, alizarin red staining, and western blot were carried out to evaluate the proliferation and differentiation of cementoblasts. In addition, expression of sclerostin was checked to analyze the possible mechanism. Our results show that strontium inhibits the proliferation of cementoblasts with a dose dependent manner; however, it can promote the differentiation of cementoblasts via downregulating sclerostin expression. Taking together, strontium may facilitate cementogenesis and benefit the treatment of root resorption at a low dose.

  16. Selenium and Prostate Cancer Prevention: Insights from the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly L. Nicastro

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT was conducted to assess the efficacy of selenium and vitamin E alone, and in combination, on the incidence of prostate cancer. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2 × 2 factorial design clinical trial found that neither selenium nor vitamin E reduced the incidence of prostate cancer after seven years and that vitamin E was associated with a 17% increased risk of prostate cancer compared to placebo. The null result was surprising given the strong preclinical and clinical evidence suggesting chemopreventive activity of selenium. Potential explanations for the null findings include the agent formulation and dose, the characteristics of the cohort, and the study design. It is likely that only specific subpopulations may benefit from selenium supplementation; therefore, future studies should consider the baseline selenium status of the participants, age of the cohort, and genotype of specific selenoproteins, among other characteristics, in order to determine the activity of selenium in cancer prevention.

  17. Selenium and Prostate Cancer Prevention: Insights from the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicastro, Holly L.; Dunn, Barbara K.

    2013-01-01

    The Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT) was conducted to assess the efficacy of selenium and vitamin E alone, and in combination, on the incidence of prostate cancer. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2 × 2 factorial design clinical trial found that neither selenium nor vitamin E reduced the incidence of prostate cancer after seven years and that vitamin E was associated with a 17% increased risk of prostate cancer compared to placebo. The null result was surprising given the strong preclinical and clinical evidence suggesting chemopreventive activity of selenium. Potential explanations for the null findings include the agent formulation and dose, the characteristics of the cohort, and the study design. It is likely that only specific subpopulations may benefit from selenium supplementation; therefore, future studies should consider the baseline selenium status of the participants, age of the cohort, and genotype of specific selenoproteins, among other characteristics, in order to determine the activity of selenium in cancer prevention. PMID:23552052

  18. Speciation of selenium dietary supplements; formation of S-(methylseleno)cysteine and other selenium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amoako, Prince O.; Uden, Peter C.; Tyson, Julian F.

    2009-01-01

    Speciation of selenium is of interest because it is both essential and toxic to humans, depending on the species and the amount ingested. Following indications that selenium supplementation could reduce the incidence of some cancers, selenium-enriched yeast and other materials have been commercialized as supplements. Most dramatically however, the SELECT trial that utilized L-selenomethionine as the active supplement was terminated in 2008 and there is much debate regarding both the planning and the results of efficacy studies. Further, since dietary supplements are not regulated as pharmaceuticals, there are concerns about the quality, storage conditions, stability and selenium content in selenium supplements. Enzymatic hydrolysis enabled selenium speciation profiles to be obtained by high performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) and following derivatization gas chromatography with atomic emission detection (GC-AED). Coated fiber solid phase microextraction (SPME) was used to extract volatile selenium species for determination by GC-AED and GC-MS. Similar speciation patterns were observed between yeast-based supplements subject to extended storage and those heated briefly at elevated temperatures. All the yeast-based supplements and one yeast-free supplement formed S-(methylseleno)cysteine on heating. Evidence was obtained in support of the hypotheses that S-(methylseleno)cysteine is formed from a reaction between dimethyldiselenide and cysteine or cystine.

  19. Impact of Selenium Addition to Animal Feeds on Human Selenium Status in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Pavlovic

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Research conducted during the 1980s demonstrated Se deficiency in humans. Increased inclusion of selenium in animal feeds started from the year 2000 onwards. The aim of this study was to estimate the effects of selenium inclusion in animal feeds on human selenium status and dietary habits of the Serbian population related to food of animal origin. Plasma selenium concentration in healthy adult volunteers, including residents of one of the regions with the lowest (Eastern Serbia, n = 60 and of one of the regions with the highest Se serum levels reported in the past (Belgrade, n = 82, was determined by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. Multivariate analysis was employed to determine the correlation between Se plasma levels and dietary intake data derived from food frequency questionnaires and laboratory tests. The mean plasma Se level of the participants was 84.3 ± 15.9 μg/L (range: 47.3–132.1 μg/L, while 46% of participants had plasma Se levels lower than 80 μg/L. Frequency of meat, egg, and fish consumption was significantly correlated with plasma selenium level (r = 0.437, p = 0.000. Selenium addition to animal feed in the quantity of 0.14 mg/kg contributed to the improvement of human plasma selenium levels by approximately 30 μg/L.

  20. [Pharmaconutrition with parenteral selenium in sepsis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, P L; de Oliveira Figliolino, L F; Hardy, G; Manzanares, W

    2014-04-01

    Critical illness is characterized by oxidative stress which leads to multiple organ failure, and sepsis-related organ dysfunction remains the most common cause of death in the intensive care unit. Over the last 2 decades, different antioxidant therapies have been developed to improve outcomes in septic patients. According to recent evidence, selenium therapy should be considered the cornerstone of the antioxidant strategies. Selenium given as selenious acid or sodium selenite should be considered as a drug or pharmaconutrient with prooxidant and cytotoxic effects when a loading dose in intravenous bolus form is administered, particularly in the early stage of severe sepsis/septic shock. To date, several phase ii trials have demonstrated that selenium therapy may be able to decrease mortality, improve organ dysfunction and reduce infections in critically ill septic patients. The effect of selenium therapy in sepsis syndrome must be confirmed by large, well designed phase iii clinical trials. The purpose of this review is to discuss current evidence on selenium pharmaconutrition in sepsis syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  1. Loss of selenium-binding protein 1 decreases sensitivity to clastogens and intracellular selenium content in HeLa cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenium-binding protein 1 (SBP1) is not a selenoprotein but structurally binds selenium. Loss of SBP1 during carcinogenesis usually predicts poor prognosis. Because genome instability is a hallmark of cancer, we hypothesized that loss of SBP1 modulates cellular selenium content and the response of ...

  2. Selenium balance in the adult cat in relation to intake of dietary sodium selenite and organically bound selenium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Todd, S.E.; Thomas, D.G.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2012-01-01

    The response of cats to dietary sodium selenite (Na2SeO3) and organically bound selenium was studied in two separate studies with four cats per treatment and three levels of selenium supplementation (targets 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 µg/g DM) for each Se source. Whole blood and plasma selenium concentrations

  3. Bronchoalveolar lavage and technetium-99m glucoheptonate imaging in chronic eosinophilic pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieske, T.R.; Sunderrajan, E.V.; Passamonte, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    A patient with chronic eosinophilic pneumonia was evaluated using bronchoalveolar lavage, technetium-99m glucoheptonate, and transbronchial lung biopsy. Bronchoalveolar lavage revealed 43 percent eosinophils and correlated well with results of transbronchial lung biopsy. Technetium-99m glucoheptonate lung imaging demonstrated intense parenchymal uptake. After eight weeks of corticosteroid therapy, the bronchoalveolar lavage eosinophil population and the technetium-99m glucoheptonate uptake had returned to normal. We suggest that bronchoalveolar lavage, with transbronchial lung biopsy, is a less invasive way than open lung biopsy to diagnose chronic eosinophilic pneumonia. The mechanism of uptake of technetium-99m glucoheptonate in this disorder remains to be defined

  4. Method for radiolabeling proteins with technetium-99m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crockford, D.R.; Rhodes, B.A.

    1984-01-01

    In accordance with this invention, a substrate to be radiolabeled with technetium-99m is admixed with a buffered stannous chloride composition having a pH between about 4.5 and about 8.5 wherein the stannous chloride is produced from a non-oxidized tin source, the buffered stannous chloride is purged of oxygen and the buffer comprises a mixture of alkali metal biphthalate and an alkali metal tartrate. Alternatively, the buffer may include alkali metal borate or gentisate. The stannous chloride solution is admixed with the buffer and the resultant mixture is neutralized with sodium hydroxide. The neutralized solution then is admixed with the substrate eventually to be radiolabeled with technetium-99m. This solution is allowed to incubate for several hours (usually over 15 hours) in the absence of oxygen and at room temperature

  5. Determination of technetium-99 in environmental samples: A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Keliang; Hou, Xiaolin; Roos, Per

    2012-01-01

    Due to the lack of a stable technetium isotope, and the high mobility and long half-life, 99Tc is considered to be one of the most important radionuclides in safety assessment of environmental radioactivity as well as nuclear waste management. 99Tc is also an important tracer for oceanographic...... research due to the high technetium solubility in seawater as TcO4−. A number of analytical methods, using chemical separation combined with radiometric and mass spectrometric measurement techniques, have been developed over the past decades for determination of 99Tc in different environmental samples....... This article summarizes and compares recently reported chemical separation procedures and measurement methods for determination of 99Tc. Due to the extremely low concentration of 99Tc in environmental samples, the sample preparation, pre-concentration, chemical separation and purification for removal...

  6. Preparation of a generator of technetium-99m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimeno de Osso, F.

    1981-01-01

    Practical description is given of equipment and operations necessary in the preparation of an isotopic generator of technetium-99m. The preparation and application of the active solution and throughly washed of the chromatographic column have been studied in order to allow molibdenum-99 to be adsorbed on a small band, and the solution of tectium-99m to be eluted with high efficiency and purity. The equipment and accesories used are easy and safety to manage, simplifying operations to be carried out with the active product, eliminating the sterile environment in the shielded cell, and facilitating the preparation of the solution of technetium-99m in sterile and pyrogen-free conditions.(author) [es

  7. Behavior of technetium in nuclear waste vitrification processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegg, Ian L

    Nearly 100 tests were performed with prototypical melters and off-gas system components to investigate the extents to which technetium is incorporated into the glass melt, partitioned to the off-gas stream, and captured by the off-gas treatment system components during waste vitrification. The tests employed several simulants, spiked with 99m Tc and Re (a potential surrogate), of the low activity waste separated from nuclear wastes in storage in the Hanford tanks, which is planned for immobilization in borosilicate glass. Single-pass technetium retention averaged about 35 % and increased significantly with recycle of the off-gas treatment fluids. The fraction escaping the recycle loop was very small.

  8. Physics of the missing atoms: technetium and promethium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspden, H.

    1987-01-01

    Technetium (Z = 43) and promethium (Z = 61) are by far the least abundant of all atoms below the radioactive elements (Z = 84 onwards). Their scarcity confirms theoretical predictions emerging from a theory of the photon derived from synchronous lattice electrodynamics. This theory has given precise theoretical values for the fine-structure constant and the constant of gravitation G and is now shown in this paper to indicate resonant interactions between the vacuum lattice oscillations and technetium and promethium. In the case of promethium there is strong reason for believing that this atom can assume supergravitational or antigravitational properties, accounting for its scarcity. This paper not only adds support to the earlier theoretical work on the photon and gravitation, but suggests a research route that might lead to new technology based on controlled interactions with gravity fields

  9. Nondestructive measurement of environmental radioactive strontium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saiba Shuntaro

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident was triggered by the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake. The main radioactivity concerns after the accident are I-131 (half-life: 8.0 days, Cs-134 (2.1 years, Cs-137 (30 years, Sr-89 (51 days, and Sr-90 (29 years. We are aiming to establish a new nondestructive measurement and detection technique that will enable us to realize a quantitative evaluation of strontium radioactivity without chemical separation processing. This technique is needed to detect radiation contained in foods, environmental water, and soil, to prevent us from undesired internal exposure to radiation.

  10. Strontium-90 and promethium-147 recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoisington, J.E.; McDonell, W.R.

    1982-01-01

    Strontium-90 and promethium-147 are fission product radionuclides with potential for use as heat source materials in high reliability, non-interruptible power supplies. Interest has recently been expressed in their utilization for Department of Defense (DOD) applications. This memorandum summarizes the current inventories, the annual production rates, and the possible recovery of Sr-90 and Pm-147 from nuclear materials production operations at Hanford and Savannah River. Recovery of these isotopes from LWR spend fuel utilizing the Barnwell Nuclear Fuels Plant (BNFP) is also considered. Unit recovery costs at each site are provided

  11. Impact of Selenium Supplementation on Growth and Selenium Accumulation on Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Azadeh SAFFARYAZDI; Mehrdad LAHOUTI; Ali GANJEALI; Hassan BAYAT

    2012-01-01

    Selenium (Se) has been proved to be an essential element for humans and animals. However, less is known about its effects on plants. A hydroponic experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of selenium on growth, selenium accumulation and some physiological characteristics of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. cv. �Missouri�) plants. Plants were grown in Hoagland nutrient solution amended with sodium selenite at 0 (control), 1, 2, 4, 6 and 10 mg.L-1 for 28 days. Growth parameters like sh...

  12. Technetium labelled plasminogen activator - a potential reagent for thrombus detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulsma-De Waal, J.H.; Boer, A.C. de; Cox, P.H.; Pillay, M.; Stassen, J.H.; Collen, D.

    1987-12-01

    The preparation of a technetium labelled plasminogen activator complex using a solid phase labelling technique is described. The labelled complex showed no significant loss of fibrinolytic activity in vitro and showed in vivo a rapid uptake in thrombi in an animal model and in human volunteer patients with known thrombi when injected into a vein draining to the thrombotic region. Systemic injection showed no uptake in the thrombi probably due to rapid sequestration of the complex by the liver.

  13. Overview of nuclear medicine and the role of technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckelman, W.C.

    1987-01-01

    One of the driving forces for the elucidation of the chemistry of 99 Tc was the discovery of the Molybdenum Technetium generator. Since this generator system produces no-carrier-added 99 Tc, these studies at the nanomolar level mostly involve chromatography, and that analytical tool is then used to link the no-carrier added and carrier chemistry. These well-defined 99 Tc compounds are used in vivo to measure perfusion, but biochemical probes offer an exciting target for further exploration

  14. Extraosseous uptake of 99sup(m)technetium methylene diphosphonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sty, J.R.; Kun, L.; Casper, J.; Babbitt, D.P.

    1980-01-01

    A child with a ganglioneuroblastoma and tumor uptake of 99 sup(m)technetium methylene diphosphate ( 99 sup(m)Tc-MDP) is presented. After surgical removal of an encapsulated tumor and radiation therapy, an interval bone scan demonstrated the same presurgical abnormality. Awareness of abnormal uptake of 99 sup(m)Tc-MDP in irradiated renal tissue prevents interpreting radiation nephritis as recurrent tumor. (orig.) [de

  15. Effect of humic acid on sorption of technetium by alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, S.; Rawat, N.; Kar, A.S.; Tomar, B.S.; Manchanda, V.K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Tc sorption on alumina has been studied under aerobic as well anaerobic condition over pH 3-10. → Effect of humic acid on sorption of Tc by alumina has been investigated. → Linear additive modeling and surface complexation modeling were carried out to delineate the role of humic acid in Tc(IV) sorption in ternary system of Tc(IV)-humic acid-alumina. → Sorption of humic acid onto alumina and strong complexation of Tc(IV) with humic acid were found to govern the sorption of Tc(IV) in the ternary system. - Abstract: Sorption of technetium by alumina has been studied in absence as well as in presence of humic acid using 95 Tc m as a tracer. Measurements were carried out at fixed ionic strength (0.1 M NaClO 4 ) under varying pH (3-10) as well as redox (aerobic and reducing anaerobic) conditions. Under aerobic conditions, negligible sorption of technetium was observed onto alumina both in absence and in presence of humic acid. However, under reducing conditions (simulated with [Sn(II)] = 10 -6 M), presence of humic acid enhanced the sorption of technetium in the low pH region significantly and decreased at higher pH with respect to that in absence of humic acid. Linear additive as well as surface complexation modeling of Tc(IV) sorption in presence of humic acid indicated the predominant role of sorbed humic acid in deciding technetium sorption onto alumina.

  16. Multi-organ technetium complexes production and use thereof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, G.A.; Pestel, G.M.

    1976-01-01

    Chemical complexes, useful as radiopharmaceuticals, are formed by reacting technetium-99m with substituted or unsubstituted alkyl monophosphonic acids and certain ester derivatives thereof. The complexes are formed by reducing pertechnetate ion chemically or electrolytically in the presence of the phosphonic acid. By chemical modification of the phosphonic acid complexing agent, it is possible to ''tailor'' complexes for kidney, liver or bone imaging. The complexes are normally used in a physiologically acceptable aqueous medium. 20 Claims, No Drawings

  17. Molecular Engineering of Technetium and Rhenium Based Radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubieta, J.

    2003-01-01

    The research was based on the observation that despite the extraordinarily rich coordination chemistry of technetium and rhenium and several notable successes in reagent design, the extensive investigations by numerous research groups on a variety of N 2 S 2 and N 3 S donor type ligands and on HYNIC have revealed that the chemistries of these ligands with Tc and Re are rather complex, giving rise to considerable difficulties in the development of reliable procedures for the development of radiopharmaceutical reagents

  18. Mew organometallic complexes of technetium in different oxidation states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joachim, J.E.

    1993-09-01

    New organometallic compounds of Tc(I), Tc(III) and Tc(VII) were synthesized and their properties examined. These compounds were correlated with their homologous compounds of manganese and rhenium, which were also synthesized by the same route. The molecular and crystal structures of most technetium complexes and of the homologous complexes of manganese and rhenium were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. (orig.) [de

  19. Investigation of electrical noise in selenium-immersed thermistor bolometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarpley, J. L.; Sarmiento, P. D.

    1980-01-01

    The selenium immersed, thermistor bolometer, IR detector failed due to spurious and escalating electrical noise outburst as a function of time at elevated temperatures during routine ground based testing in a space simulated environment. Spectrographic analysis of failed bolometers revealed selenium pure zones in the insulating selenium arsenic (Se-As) glass film which surrounds the active sintered Mn, Ni, Co oxide flake. The selenium pure film was identified as a potentially serious failure mechanism. Significant changes were instituted in the manufacturing techniques along with more stringent process controls which eliminated the selenium pure film and successfully produced 22study bolometers.

  20. Comparison between selenium and tellurium clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benamar, A.; Rayane, D.; Tribollet, B.; Broyer, M.; Melinon, P.

    1991-01-01

    Selenium and tellurium clusters are produced by the inert gas condensation technique. The mass spectra of both species are completely different and reveal different properties. In selenium, a periodicity of 6-7 is observed and may be interpreted by the binding energy between small cyclic molecules. Moreover, it was very difficult to obtained large clusters probably because the binding energy between these molecules is very small. In tellurium, these periodic structures do not exist and large clusters are easily obtained in nucleation conditions where only small selenium clusters are present. These results are discussed and a simple nucleation model is used to illustrate this different behavior. Finally these clusters properties are correlated to the bulk structure of both materials. (orig.)

  1. HORMONAL REGULATION OF SELENIUM ACCUMULATION BY PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Golubkina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hormonal regulation is considered to be a unique mechanism controlling growth and development of living organism. The review discusses the correlations between pant hormonal status of non-accumulators and hyper-accumulators of Se with the accumulation levels of this microelement. The phenomenon of stimulation and redistribution of selenium as a result of phytohormone treatment, the peculiarities of phytohormones effect among different species and cultivars, and influence of plant sexualization on selenium accumulation are described in article. Data of hormonal regulation of selenium level for spinach, garlic, perennial onion, Brassica chinenesis and Valeriana officialis are presented in the review.

  2. Investigation of strontium accumulation on ovariectomized Sprague–Dawley rat tibia by micro-PIXE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X.; Li, Y. [Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Jin, W. [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zheng, Y.; Rong, C.; Lyu, H. [Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Shen, H., E-mail: haoshen@fudan.edu.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2014-08-01

    Strontium ranelate is a newly developed drug effective in osteoporosis treatment by depressing bone resorption and maintaining bone formation. Strontium accumulation and distribution are determined in bones of rat after strontium ranelate administration by using micro-PIXE. The investigated rats are divided into four groups: (A) control, (B) ovariectomized, (C) ovariectomized followed with strontium chloride, (D) ovariectomized followed with strontium ranelate. It was found that strontium ranelate would result in increasing trabecular volume and decreasing bone resorption to treat osteoporosis. There are similar contours of calcium and strontium in two-dimensional images, while the strontium is not evenly distributed in the bone. It supports the conclusion that strontium has an affinity for bone and it is capable of replacing calcium atoms as a part of the strontium mechanism in the osteoporosis treatment. The results related to biochemistry are also discussed.

  3. Thermal neutron cross section measurements for technetium-99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yates, M.A.; Schroeder, N.C.; Fowler, M.M.

    1993-01-01

    Technetium, because of its long half-like (213,000 years) and ability to migrate in the environment, is a primary contributor to the long-term radioactivity related risk associated with geologic nuclear waste disposal. One proposal for converting technetium to an environmentally benign element investigating transmutation with an accelerator-based system, (i.e., Accelerator Transmutation of Waste, ATW). Planning for efficient processing of technetium through the transmuter will require knowledge of the thermal neutron cross section for the 99 Tc (n,γ) 100 Tc reaction. The authors have recently remeasured this cross section. Weighed aliquots (19-205 μg) of a NIST traceable 99 Tc standard were irradiated for 30-150 sec using the pneumatic open-quotes rabbitclose quotes system of LANL's Omega West Reactor. The two gamma rays from the 15.7-sec half-life product were measured immediately after irradiation on a high-resolution Ge detector. Thermal fluxes were measured using gold foils and Cd wrapped gold foils. The observation cross section is 19 ± 1 b. This agrees well with the 1977 value but has half the uncertainty

  4. Non-Pertechnetate Technetium Sensor Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Samuel A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Crawford, Amanda D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Heineman, William R. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Rapko, Brian M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Branch, Shirmir D. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2014-09-01

    There remain several significant uncertainties in the understanding and modeling of the fate and speciation of 99Tc in Hanford waste tanks, glass, and low-temperature waste forms. A significant (2% to 25%) fraction of the 99Tc in the water-soluble portion of the tank waste may be present as a non-pertechnetate species that has not been identified and, based on experimentation to date, cannot be effectively separated from the wastes. This task will provide a sensor specifically tuned to detect the Tc(I)-carbonyl species believed to constitute the main fraction of the non-pertechnetate form of technetium. By direct measurement of the non-pertechnetate species, such a sensor will help reduce the uncertainties in the modeling of the fate and speciation of 99Tc in Hanford tanks and waste forms. This report summarizes work done in FY 2014 exploring the chemistry of a low-valence technetium species, [Tc(CO)3(H2O)3]+, a compound of interest due to its implication in the speciation of alkaline-soluble technetium in several Hanford tank waste supernatants. Progress made in FY 2014 was sponsored by the Department of Energy’s Office of Environmental Management and is summarized in this report.

  5. Leaching of strontium sulfide from produced clinker in conversion furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghorbanian, S. A.; Salehpour, A. R.; Radpour, S. R.

    2009-01-01

    Iran is rich in mineral resources one of which is mineral Celestine. Basing on current estimations, the capacity of mineral Celestine is over two million tons, 75-95% of which is strontium sulfate. However; in industries such as Color cathode Ray Tubes, pyrochemical processes, ceramics, paint production, zinc purification processes; strontium sulfate is not a direct feed, rather it is largely consumed in the form of strontium carbonate. Two conventional methods are used to produce strontium carbonate from the sulfate; that is direct reaction and black ash methods. Strontium sulfide, as an intermediate component has a key role in black ash process including strontium sulfate reduction by coke, hence producing and leaching the strontium sulfide by hot water. Finally the reaction of strontium sulfate with sodium carbonate lead to strontium carbonate. In this paper, a system was designed to analyze and optimize the process parameters of strontium sulfide production which is less expensive and available solvent in water. Fundamentally, when strontium sulfide becomes in contact with strontium sulfate; Sr(SH) 2 , and Sr(OH) 2 , are produced. The solubility of strontium sulfide depends on water temperature and the maximum solubility achieved at 90 d egree C . The results showed that in the experimental scale, at water to SrS ratio of 6; they sediment for 45 minutes at 95 d egree C in five operational stages; the separation of 95 and 97.1 percent of imported SrS is possible in effluent of fourth and fifth stages, respectively. Thus; four leaching stages could be recommended for pilot scale plants. Also, the results show that at water to SrS ratio of 8, 40 minutes sedimentation at 85-95 d egree C in one operational stage, the separation of 95 percent separation of inputted SrS, is possible. Solvent leaching process is continued till no smell of sulfur components is felt. It could be used as a key role to determine the number of leaching stages in experiments. Finally, the

  6. Technetium-99m ceftizoxime kit preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Odília Fernandes Diniz

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to prepare a kit of 99mTc-ceftizoxime (99mTc-CFT, with stability and biological activity preserved, able to identify a septic focus (E. coli in the experimental infection model in rats. The preparation of the CFT kit involved the use of lyophilized solutions containing the antibiotic ceftizoxime and the sodium dithionite reducing agent (6.0 mg/mL. After lyophilization, the kit was reconstituted with 1.0 mL of sodium 99mTc-pertechnetate solution (Na99mTcO4- with an activity of 370 MBq. The solution was boiled for 10 min and filtered through a cellulose ester filter. The labeling efficiency was on the order of 92%, remaining stable for six hours and the kit remained stable for two months. The biological activity of the 99mTc-CFT was evaluated by diffusion in agar impregnated with E.coli and S. aureus. Seven Wistar rats, weighing from 200 to 250 g, were used for the development of the septic focus. After 24 hours from the induction of the infectious site (E.coli, the animals were anesthetized and 0.1 mL of 99mTc-CFT (37 MBq was injected into the tail veins of the animals. The images were obtained with a gamma camera one, two and six hours after injection and the regions of interest (ROIs were calculated. The diameters of the inhibition halos for 99mTc-CFT were 27.16 ± 0.23 and 27.17 ± 0.20 for S.aureus and E.coli, respectively, while those for the unlabeled CFT were 30.4 ± 0.33 and 29.43 ± 0.26, respectively. The results for the biodistribution of 99mTc-CFT in infected animals furnished a ratio of 1.97 ± 0.31, 2.10 ± 0.42 and 2.01 ± 0.42 for cpm-target/cpm-no target for the one, two and six-hour periods, respectively. The images showed a clear uptake of labeled antibiotic (99mTc-CFT by the infectious site during the experiment. The results attest to the viability of producing a kit with 99m technetium-labeled ceftizoxime for the investigation of infectious processes.O objetivo deste trabalho foi preparar um kit de Tc

  7. Method of preparation of technetium-99m labelled radio-diagnostic agents and a stable non radio-active carrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A method of preparing improved technetium-99m labeled radiodiagnostic agents is described by reducing technetium-99m with stannous tartrate. Such radiodiagnostic agents are useful in scintigraphic examinations of the bone and lung

  8. High pressure liquid chromatographic assay of technetium in solutions of sodium pertechnetate produced at the AAEC Research Establishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrington, K.J.

    1985-12-01

    High pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) is used for the assay of nanogram quantities of technetium and to determine technetium in decayed pharmaceutical products, derived from three methods of manufacture. These methods of manufacture give comparably low levels of technetium-99, at the time of collection of the solution. However, when the solutions are used to produce ready-to-inject technetium-99m, high levels of technetium-99 are present at the time of calibration, which is the day after the collection date. Where sensitive reagent kits are to be labelled, freshly collected solutions of technetium-99m should be used. The HPLC assay is a valuable technique for the quality control of technetium-based radiopharmaceuticals, and for investigation of methods of manufacture of technetium-99m. Experimental studies confirmed the findings of previous workers

  9. [The role of selenium in endocrine system diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balázs, Csaba; Rácz, Károly

    2013-10-13

    Oxygen derived free radicals, generated by a number of cellular reactions, include superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals. They exert their cytotoxic effects mainly via peroxidation of the cell membrane resulting in the loss of membrane integrity. The essential trace element, selenium exerts complex effects on the endocrine systems, partly due to its antioxidant capacity. Well-characterized selenoproteins include iodothyronine deiodinases, glutathione peroxidases and thioredoxin reductases involved in thyroid hormone metabolism and protection from oxidative damage. The value of selenium supplementation in autoimmune thyroid disorders has been investigated and most studies confirmed the beneficial effect of selenium supplementation in Hashimoto's and Graves's diseases. Recently, selenium proved to be effective in mild inflammatory orbitopathy. There are a number of reports about the effect of selenium in diabetes mellitus, but the data are controversial as both insulin-like and diabetes-inducing effects of selenium have been described. Selenium was successfully used in both female and male infertility of autoimmune origin.

  10. Laser Stabilization with Laser Cooled Strontium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bjarke Takashi Røjle

    The frequency stability of current state-of-the-art stabilized clock lasers are limited by thermal fluctuations of the ultra-stable optical reference cavities used for their frequency stabilization. In this work, we study the possibilities for surpassing this thermal limit by exploiting the nonli......The frequency stability of current state-of-the-art stabilized clock lasers are limited by thermal fluctuations of the ultra-stable optical reference cavities used for their frequency stabilization. In this work, we study the possibilities for surpassing this thermal limit by exploiting...... the nonlinear effects from coupling of an optical cavity to laser cooled atoms having a narrow transition linewidth. Here, we have realized such a system where a thermal sample of laser cooled strontium-88 atoms are coupled to an optical cavity. The strontium-88 atoms were probed on the narrow 1S0-3P1 inter......-combination line at 689 nm in a strongly saturated regime. The dynamics of the atomic induced phase shift and absorption of the probe light were experimentally studied in details with the purpose of applications to laser stabilization. The atomic sample temperature was in the mK range which brought this system out...

  11. Determination of selenium via the fluorescence quenching effect of selenium on hemoglobin-catalyzed peroxidative reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ya-Hong; Zhang, Ya-Nan; Tian, Feng-Shou

    2015-05-01

    A new method for the determination of selenium based on its fluorescence quenching on the hemoglobin-catalyzed reaction of H2 O2 and l-tyrosine has been established. The effect of pH, foreign ions and the optimization of variables on the determination of selenium was examined. The calibration curve was found to be linear between the fluorescence quenching (F0 /F) and the concentration of selenium within the range of 0.16-4.00 µg/mL. The detection limit was 1.96 ng/mL and the relative standard deviation was 3.14%. This method can be used for the determination of selenium in Se-enriched garlic bulbs with satisfactory results. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Selenium content in tissues and meat quality in rabbits fed selenium yeast

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dokoupilová, A.; Marounek, Milan; Skřivanová, V.; Březina, P.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 6 (2007), s. 165-169 ISSN 1212-1819 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : rabbits * selenium * meat Subject RIV: GH - Livestock Nutrition Impact factor: 0.633, year: 2007

  13. In vivo and in vitro testing for selenium and selenium compounds bioavailability assessment in foodstuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreda-Piñeiro, Jorge; Moreda-Piñeiro, Antonio; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar

    2017-03-04

    The assessment of selenium and selenium species bioavailability in foodstuff is of special concern on the context of human nutrition. In vivo (human and animal), and in vitro tests are important approaches for estimating the bioavailability of toxic and essential compounds to humans. An overview on in vivo and in vitro bioavailability assays for releasing selenium and selenium species in foodstuffs is summarized. Se and Se species content in a foodstuff critically influence Se bioavailability and bioactivity to humans and animals. Se bioavailability is affected by foodstuff-matrix major composition and minor components. Foodstuffs processing and/or treatments could enhancement or decrease Se bioavailability. Experimental conditions such as the selection of healthy status of examined people (in in vivo humans approaches), the selection of animal model (in vivo animals approaches), or the selection of GI conditions (in in vitro tests) could determines the results. Thus, international standardized protocol for in vivo and in vitro approaches assessment is mandatory.

  14. A study on characteristic of selective membrane for strontium analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Seung Hyun; Choi, Young Woo [Kwang-ju Institute of Science and Technology, Kwangju (Korea)

    1999-04-01

    In this study, supported liquid membranes (SLMs) using crown ether were prepared in order to separate strontium ion selectively from a calcium contained solution However, at the higher than 3 N nitric acid concentration of a strip solution, stability of a SLM was declined remarkably owing to the hasty loss of carrier impregnated in supporter and, on account of this phenomena, facilitated transports were not accomplished. And DC18C6 as a neutral carrier affected remarkably the selectivity of strontium and the factor determining permeabilities of metal ions was as a role of DNNS. Consequently, in order to be a optimal SLM for the high permeability and the stable selectivity of strontium, concentration of DC18C6 and DNNS should be 0.1 M and 25 mM, respectively and, at this condition, the relative removal ratio of strontium to calcium was 93.3%. And the change of calcium concentration in the feed solution affected the permeability of strontium. In particular, when the ratio of strontium to calcium concentration in the feed solution was in the range of 1/5 - 1/50, strontium could be separated selectively at stable permeabilities. (author). 17 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Calcium phosphate cements with strontium halides as radiopacifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Alejandro; Montazerolghaem, Maryam; Engqvist, Håkan; Ott, Marjam Karlsson; Persson, Cecilia

    2014-02-01

    High radiopacity is required to monitor the delivery and positioning of injectable implants. Inorganic nonsoluble radiopacifiers are typically used in nondegradable bone cements; however, their usefulness in resorbable cements is limited due to their low solubility. Strontium halides, except strontium fluoride, are ionic water-soluble compounds that possess potential as radiopacifiers. In this study, we compare the radiopacity, mechanical properties, composition, and cytotoxicity of radiopaque brushite cements prepared with strontium fluoride (SrF2 ), strontium chloride (SrCl2 ·6H2 O), strontium bromide (SrBr2 ), or strontium iodide (SrI2 ). Brushite cements containing 10 wt % SrCl2 ·6H2 O, SrBr2 , or SrI2 exhibited equal to or higher radiopacity than commercial radiopaque cements. Furthermore, the brushite crystal lattice in cements that contained the ionic radiopacifiers was larger than in unmodified cements and in cements that contained SrF2 , indicating strontium substitution. Despite the fact that the strontium halides increased the solubility of the cements and affected their mechanical properties, calcium phosphate cements containing SrCl2 ·6H2 O, SrBr2 , and SrI2 showed no significant differences in Saos-2 cell viability and proliferation with respect to the control. Strontium halides: SrCl2 ·6H2 O, SrBr2 , and SrI2 may be potential candidates as radiopacifiers in resorbable biomaterials although their in vivo biocompatibility, when incorporated into injectable implants, is yet to be assessed. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. High-Resolution Imaging of Selenium in Kidneys: A Localized Selenium Pool Associated with Glutathione Peroxidase 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinouski, Mikalai; Kehr, Sebastian; Finney, Lydia; Vogt, Stefan; Carlson, Bradley A.; Seravalli, Javier; Jin, Richard; Handy, Diane E.; Park, Thomas J.; Loscalzo, Joseph; Hatfield, Dolph L.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Aim: Recent advances in quantitative methods and sensitive imaging techniques of trace elements provide opportunities to uncover and explain their biological roles. In particular, the distribution of selenium in tissues and cells under both physiological and pathological conditions remains unknown. In this work, we applied high-resolution synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) to map selenium distribution in mouse liver and kidney. Results: Liver showed a uniform selenium distribution that was dependent on selenocysteine tRNA[Ser]Sec and dietary selenium. In contrast, kidney selenium had both uniformly distributed and highly localized components, the latter visualized as thin circular structures surrounding proximal tubules. Other parts of the kidney, such as glomeruli and distal tubules, only manifested the uniformly distributed selenium pattern that co-localized with sulfur. We found that proximal tubule selenium localized to the basement membrane. It was preserved in Selenoprotein P knockout mice, but was completely eliminated in glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPx3) knockout mice, indicating that this selenium represented GPx3. We further imaged kidneys of another model organism, the naked mole rat, which showed a diminished uniformly distributed selenium pool, but preserved the circular proximal tubule signal. Innovation: We applied XFM to image selenium in mammalian tissues and identified a highly localized pool of this trace element at the basement membrane of kidneys that was associated with GPx3. Conclusion: XFM allowed us to define and explain the tissue topography of selenium in mammalian kidneys at submicron resolution. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 185–192. PMID:21854231

  17. High-resolution imaging of selenium in kidneys: a localized selenium pool associated with glutathione peroxidase 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinouski, M.; Kehr, S.; Finney, L.; Vogt, S.; Carlson, B.A.; Seravalli, J.; Jin, R.; Handy, D.E.; Park, T.J.; Loscalzo, J.; Hatfield, D.L.; Gladyshev, V.N. (Harvard-Med)

    2012-04-17

    Recent advances in quantitative methods and sensitive imaging techniques of trace elements provide opportunities to uncover and explain their biological roles. In particular, the distribution of selenium in tissues and cells under both physiological and pathological conditions remains unknown. In this work, we applied high-resolution synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) to map selenium distribution in mouse liver and kidney. Liver showed a uniform selenium distribution that was dependent on selenocysteine tRNA{sup [Ser]Sec} and dietary selenium. In contrast, kidney selenium had both uniformly distributed and highly localized components, the latter visualized as thin circular structures surrounding proximal tubules. Other parts of the kidney, such as glomeruli and distal tubules, only manifested the uniformly distributed selenium pattern that co-localized with sulfur. We found that proximal tubule selenium localized to the basement membrane. It was preserved in Selenoprotein P knockout mice, but was completely eliminated in glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPx3) knockout mice, indicating that this selenium represented GPx3. We further imaged kidneys of another model organism, the naked mole rat, which showed a diminished uniformly distributed selenium pool, but preserved the circular proximal tubule signal. We applied XFM to image selenium in mammalian tissues and identified a highly localized pool of this trace element at the basement membrane of kidneys that was associated with GPx3. XFM allowed us to define and explain the tissue topography of selenium in mammalian kidneys at submicron resolution.

  18. Strontium-90 and cesium-137 in freshwater from May 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Strontium-90 and cesium-137 in freshwater measured in May 1984 are given in pCi/l. The sampling point is 1, Kasumigaura-Lake (Ibaraki). Collection and pretreatment of samples, preparation of samples for analysis, separation of strontium-90 and cesium-137, determination of stable strontium, calcium and potassium, and counting are described. The sample was passed through a cation exchange column. After the radiochemical separation, the mounted precipitates were counted for activity using low background beta counters normally for 60 minutes. (Mori, K.)

  19. Crystallization of carbonate hydroxyapatite in the presence of strontium ranelate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izmailov, R. R.; Golovanova, O. A.

    2015-11-01

    The influence of strontium ranelate on the crystallization of carbonate hydroxyapatite from a prototype of synovial fluid of humans has been investigated. The synthesis products are studied by IR Fourier spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and differential thermal analysis. The amount of strontium in the samples is determined by atomic emission analysis. The sizes of crystallites in the synthesized phases are calculated from the Selyakov-Scherrer formula; the lattice parameters are also determined. The phases obtained are found to be species of calcium-deficient strontium-containing carbonate hydroxyapatite of mixed A and B types. Schemes of chemical reactions occurring during heat treatment are proposed.

  20. Isomorfic Substitutions of Calcium by Strontium in Calcium Hydroxyapatite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, Hilbert

    1962-12-15

    By means of homogeneous precipitation it has been possible to synthesize crystalline solid solutions of calcium strontium hydroxyapatite from aqueous solutions. The lattice constants for the solid solutions were measured in the range Ca{sub 9}Sr(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2} - CaSr{sub 9}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}. The investigations show that the discrimination of strontium against calcium is considerably smaller than reported elsewhere (1). Strontium is preferentially built into the c-axis direction of the apatite lattice.

  1. Strontium D-Glutamate Hexahydrate and Strontium Di(hydrogen L-glutamate) Pentahydrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christgau, Stephan; Odderhede, Jette; Stahl, Kenny

    2005-01-01

    Sr(C5H7NO4)] center dot 6H(2)O, ( I), and [Sr(C5H8NO4)(2)] center dot 5H(2)O, (II), both crystallize with similar strontium - glutamate - water layers. In ( I), the neutral layers are connected through hydrogen bonds by water molecules, while in ( II), the positively charged layers are connected...... through hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions by interleaving layers of hydrogen glutamate anions and water molecules....

  2. ASSESSMENT OF TECHNETIUM LEACHABILITY IN CEMENT-STABILIZED BASIN 43 GROUNDWATER BRINE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, J.B.; Cooke, G.A.; Lockrem, L.L.

    2009-01-01

    This report documents the effort to sequester technetium by the use of getters, reductants (tin(II) apatite and ferrous sulfate), sorbents (A530E and A532E ion exchange resins), and cementitious waste form. The pertechnetate form of technetium is highly soluble and mobile in aerobic (oxidizing) environments.

  3. Determination of Technetium-99 in Environmental Samples by Solvent Extraction at Controlled Valence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Q.J.; Aarkrog, A.; Dahlgaard, H.

    1989-01-01

    Distribution coefficients of technetium and ruthenium are determined under different conditions with CCl4, cyclohexanone, and 5% tri-isooctylamine (TIOA)/xylene. A method for analyzing 99Tc in environmental samples has been developed by solvent extraction in which the valences of technetium...

  4. Technetium-99m labeled radiodiagnostic agents for liver and bone marrow scanning and method of preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molinski, V.J.; Peacock, F.R.

    1977-01-01

    An improved technetium-99m labeled colloid and method of preparation comprising reducing technetium-99m with stannous oxalate and stabilizing with sodium phytate are described. This radiodiagnostic agent is useful in the scintigraphic examination of the reticuloendothelial system, particularly the liver. In addition, by autoclaving this product with saline, it becomes a superior bone marrow scanning agent

  5. Ligand-free, protein-bound technetium-99m. Evidence for tumour localisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakovljevic, A.C.; Pojer, P.M.

    1984-11-01

    An hypothesis that cations accumulate in tumours independent of ligand is tested. A preparation of technetium-99m known to be ligand-free (that is, the technetium is protein bound and no other ligand is injected) has been shown to accumulate in a T-cell lymphoma

  6. Status of selenium in cancer prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    An abundance of data indicate that selenium (Se) can be antitumorigenic. Those data, mostly from controlled studies using animal tumor models and some from clinical studies in free-living people, indicate that treatment with Se in the absence of nutritional Se-deficiency, can reduce cancer risk. T...

  7. Chapter 6: Selenium Toxicity to Aquatic Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter addresses the characteristics and nature of organic selenium (Se) toxicity to aquatic organisms, based on the most current state of scientific knowledge. As such, the information contained in this chapter relates to the 'toxicity assessment' phase of aquatic ecologi...

  8. Normal mode calculations of trigonal selenium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; McMurry, H. L.

    1980-01-01

    The phonon dispersion relations for trigonal selenium have been calculated on the basis of a short range potential field model. Electrostatic long range forces have not been included. The force field is defined in terms of symmetrized coordinates which reflect partly the symmetry of the space group...

  9. Overview and prospects of selenium phytoremediation approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evidence is lacking on whether selenium (Se) is essential for vegetation growth, but plants can absorb, assimilate, and accumulate Se in leaves and roots. The capability of plants to take up substantial amount of Se is now being utilized to remove excess Se from contaminated soils. This process has ...

  10. Selenium speciation in anaerobic granular sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenz, M.; Gmerek, A.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2006-01-01

    Chromatographic (IC-CD, GC-FID) and spectroscopic (XRD) techniques that allow the specific determination of several selenium species present or formed during bioremediation processes of selenate contaminated drinking, ground, or wastewaters have been established. The developed techniques are shown

  11. Radio protective effects of selenium on rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakir, A.; Alya, G

    2005-11-01

    Potential radio-protective effects of different selenium supplement concentrations of 4, 8, 15 and 30 ppm were evaluated in rats. Four groups of rats were administered different concentrations of selenium in drinking water for 30 days before irradiation starting from the ablactation which considered as day 0. The results showed that the sodium selenite of 4 ppm and 8 ppm enhance the 30-day survival of irradiated rats at 7 Gy ( sup 6 sup 0 Co source, whole body irradiation dose rate of 1 Gy x min sup - sup 1) compared to the control group. The mean cumulated probability of survival of rats was 69%+-6 (mean+-S.E.) and 77%+-6 in 4 and 8 ppm groups, respectively, versus 42%+-9 for control group (P<0.001). It was also indicated that sodium selenite with concentrations of 15 and 30 ppm had no significant reduction in mortality. The mean cumulated probability of survival of rats was 50%+-12 (P=0.39) and 49%+-14 (P=0.04), respectively. The toxic effects of selenium were observed at 15 ppm and 30 ppm, survivals after 30 days of selenium intake were 76% and 46%, respectively. It was concluded that 4 and 8 ppm sodium selenite have a radio-protective effect. 15 and 30 ppm sodium selenite had no radio-protective effects in rats, this may be due to a synergism of toxicity and radiation effects. (author)

  12. Thyroid hormones regulate selenoprotein expression and selenium status in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Mittag

    Full Text Available Impaired expression of selenium-containing proteins leads to perturbed thyroid hormone (TH levels, indicating the central importance of selenium for TH homeostasis. Moreover, critically ill patients with declining serum selenium develop a syndrome of low circulating TH and a central downregulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis. This prompted us to test the reciprocal effect, i.e., if TH status would also regulate selenoprotein expression and selenium levels. To investigate the TH dependency of selenium metabolism, we analyzed mice expressing a mutant TH receptor α1 (TRα1+m that confers a receptor-mediated hypothyroidism. Serum selenium was reduced in these animals, which was a direct consequence of the mutant TRα1 and not related to their metabolic alterations. Accordingly, hyperthyroidism, genetically caused by the inactivation of TRβ or by oral TH treatment of adult mice, increased serum selenium levels in TRα1+m and controls, thus demonstrating a novel and specific role for TRα1 in selenium metabolism. Furthermore, TH affected the mRNA levels for several enzymes involved in selenoprotein biosynthesis as well as serum selenoprotein P concentrations and the expression of other antioxidative selenoproteins. Taken together, our results show that TH positively affects the serum selenium status and regulates the expression of several selenoproteins. This demonstrates that selenium and TH metabolism are interconnected through a feed-forward regulation, which can in part explain the rapid parallel downregulation of both systems in critical illness.

  13. Recovery of stream communities from experimental selenium exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swift, M.C.; Kuklinskal, B.; Ferkull, K. [Univ. of Minnesota, Monticello, MN (United States); Allen, K.N.; Hermanutz, R.O.; Roush, T.H.; Hedtke, S.F. [Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN (United States). Environmental Research Lab.

    1994-12-31

    The effects of selenium on stream communities and their recovery from those effects were studied at MERS from 1987--1991. Selenium was dosed into two replicate streams each at concentrations of 30, 10, 2.5 and 0 (control) {mu}g L{sup {minus}1} for 18, 30, and 12 months, respectively. Recovery was monitored for three (30) or two (1 0, 2.5) years following cessation of selenium dosing. Selenium rapidly accumulated in the sediment, plants, macroinvertebrates and fish during dosing. Selenium concentrations in sediment, macroinvertebrates, and plants were as high as 2X--4X, 2X--4X, and 1X--1OX the dosed concentration in the 30, 10, and 2.5 treatments, respectively. Selenium decreased relatively rapidly following cessation of dosing. By two years after dosing ceased, selenium concentrations in plants and macroinvertebrates were little different from the controls; selenium in sediment from the 30 and 10 streams was still higher than in the control streams two years after dosing ceased. The macroinvertebrate community changed little during the dosing and recovery period. Commonly used indices of community structure showed no effect of selenium dosing. The isopod Asellus and oligochaetes in the family Tubificidae decreased rapidly following the onset of selenium dosing; their recovery following cessation of dosing was slow.

  14. The Evaluation of Novel Tin Materials for the Removal of Technetium from Groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Kent E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wellman, Dawn M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-06-30

    Technetium-99 (99Tc) is present at several U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, including the Hanford, Oak Ridge, Paducah, Portsmouth, and Savannah River sites. Due to its mobility, persistence, and toxicity in the environment, developing means to immobilize and/or remove technetium from the environment is currently a top priority for DOE. However, there are currently very few approaches that effectively manage the risks of technetium to human health and the environment. The objective of this study is to evaluate novel synthetic materials that could enable direct removal of technetium from groundwater. The following report •assesses the viability of existing methodologies for synthesis of tin (II) apatite for in situ formation and remediation of 99Tc within the subsurface environment •discusses the development of alternative methodologies for production of tin (II) apatite •evaluates nanoporous tin phosphate materials for removal of technetium from groundwater.

  15. Low plasma selenium concentrations in critically ill children: the interaction effect between inflammation and selenium deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Low plasma selenium concentrations are frequent in critically ill patients. However, whether this is due to systemic inflammation, a deficient nutritional state or both is still not clear. We aimed to determine the factors associated with low plasma selenium in critically ill children while considering the inflammatory response and nutritional status. Method A prospective study was conducted in 173 children (median age 34 months) with systemic inflammatory response who had plasma selenium concentrations assessed 48 hours after admission and on the 5th day of ICU stay. The normal reference range was 0.58 μmol/L to 1.6 μmol/L. The outcome variable was ‘low plasma selenium’, which was defined as plasma selenium values below the distribution median during this period. The main explanatory variables were age, malnutrition, sepsis, C-reactive protein (CRP), and clinical severity scores. The data were analyzed using a Binomial Generalized Estimating Equations model, which includes the correlation between admission and 5th day responses. Results Malnutrition and CRP were associated with low plasma selenium. The interaction effect between these two variables was significant. When CRP values were less than or equal to 40 mg/L, malnutrition was associated with low plasma selenium levels (odds ratio (OR) = 3.25, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.39 to 7.63, P = 0.007; OR = 2.98, 95% CI 1.26 to 7.06, P = 0.013; OR = 2.49, 95% CI 1.01 to 6.17, P = 0.049, for CRP = 10, 20 and 40 mg/L, respectively). This effect decreased as CRP concentrations increased and there was loose significance when CRP values were >40 mg/L. Similarly, the effect of CRP on low plasma selenium was significant for well-nourished patients (OR = 1.13; 95% CI 1.06 to 1.22, P selenium. This interaction should be considered when interpreting plasma concentrations as an index of selenium status in patients with systemic inflammation as well as in the decision

  16. Bioavailability of selenium from fish, yeast and selenate: A comparative study in humans using stable isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fox, T.E.; Heuvel, E.G.H.M. van den; Atherton, C.A.; Dainty, J.R.; Lewis, D.J.; Langford, N.J.; Crews, H.M.; Luten, J.B.; Lorentzen, M.; Sieling, F.W.; Aken-Schneyder, P. van; Hoek, M.; Kotterman, M.J.J.; Dael, P. van; Firweather-Tail, S.J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To measure the bioavailability of selenium from cooked and raw fish in humans by estimating and comparing apparent absorption and retention of selenium in biosynthetically labelled fish with labelled selenate and biosynthetically labelled selenium in brewers yeast. Design: The

  17. Bioavailibility of selenium from fish, yeast and selenate: a comparative study in humans using stable isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fox, T.E.; Heuvel, van den E.G.H.M.; Atherton, C.A.; Luten, J.B.; Hoek-van Nieuwenhuizen, van M.; Kotterman, M.J.J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To measure the bioavailability of selenium from cooked and raw fish in humans by estimating and comparing apparent absorption and retention of selenium in biosynthetically labelled fish with labelled selenate and biosynthetically labelled selenium in brewers yeast. Design: The

  18. Strontium-90 and cesium-137 in tea (Japanese tea)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Strontium-90 and cesium-137 in tea (Japanese tea) were determined. Five hundred grams of manufactured green tea was collected from six sampling locations in Japan. The results are shown in a table. (Namekawa, K.)

  19. Reaction of strontium zirconate with refractory borides and carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowker, J.C.; Lane, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    The chemical compatibility of the potential oxide ceramic matrix material, strontium zirconate, and several different potential nonoxide ceramic reinforcement materials was studied by elevated temperature reaction. Results are presented in this paper

  20. Cation interdiffusion in polycrystalline calcium and strontium titanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, E.P.; Jain, H.; Smyth, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses a method that has been developed to study bulk lattice interdiffusion between calcium and strontium titanate by fabrication of a diffusion couple using cosintering. The measured interdiffusion coefficients, D(C), indicate that strontium impurity diffusion in calcium titanate occurs at a faster rate than calcium impurity diffusion in strontium titanate. These interdiffusion coefficients are composition independent when the concentration of the calcium cation exceeds that of the strontium cation; otherwise D(C) is strongly composition dependent. Investigations into the effect of cation nonstoichiometry give results that are consistent with a defect incorporation reaction in which excess TiO 2 , within the solid solubility limit, produces A-site cation vacancies as compensating defects. The interdiffusion coefficients increase with increasing concentrations of TiO 2 , so it is concluded that interdiffusion of these alkaline-earth cations in their titanates occurs via a vacancy mechanism

  1. A combined cesium-strontium extraction/recovery process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.; Jensen, M.P.

    1996-01-01

    A new solvent extraction process for the simultaneous extraction of cesium and strontium from acidic nitrate media is described. This process uses a solvent formulation comprised of 0.05 M di-t-butylcyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6), 0.1 M Crown 100' (a proprietary, cesium-selective derivative of dibenzo-18-crown-6), 1.2 M tributyl phosphate (TBP), and 5% (v/v) lauryl nitrile in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. Distribution ratios for cesium and strontium from 4 M nitric acid are 4.13 and 3.46, respectively. A benchtop batch countercurrent extraction experiment indicates that >98% of the cesium and strontium initially present in the feed solution can be removed in only four extraction stages. Through proper choice of extraction and strip conditions, extracted cesium and strontium can be recovered either together or individually

  2. Strontium removal jar test dataset for all figures and tables.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The datasets where used to generate data to demonstrate strontium removal under various water quality and treatment conditions. This dataset is associated with the...

  3. Strontium-90 Error Discovered in Subcontract Laboratory Spreadsheet. Topical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.D.; Nagel, A.S.

    1999-07-01

    West Valley Demonstration Project health physicists and environment scientists discovered a series of errors in a subcontractor's spreadsheet being used to reduce data as part of their strontium-90 analytical process

  4. Adsorption of strontium (II) metal ions using phosphonate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chelation is a process wherein metalions and a polymer/matrix are bound together ... waste: evaporation, chemical precipitation/flocculation, solid-phase separation ... sary to remove strontium from the waste streams before it is discharged to ...

  5. Secondary laser cooling of strontium-88 atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strelkin, S. A.; Khabarova, K. Yu., E-mail: kseniakhabarova@gmail.com; Galyshev, A. A.; Berdasov, O. I.; Gribov, A. Yu.; Kolachevsky, N. N.; Slyusarev, S. N. [Federal State Unitary Enterprise “All-Russia Research Institute for Physicotechnical and Radio Engineering Measurements” (VNIIFTRI) (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    The secondary laser cooling of a cloud of strontium-88 atoms on the {sup 1}S{sub 0}–{sup 3}P{sub 1} (689 nm) intercombination transition captured into a magneto-optical trap has been demonstrated. We describe in detail the recapture of atoms from the primary trap operating on the strong {sup 1}S{sub 0}–{sup 1}P{sub 1} (461 nm) transition and determine the recapture coefficient κ, the number of atoms, and their temperature in the secondary trap as a function of experimental parameters. A temperature of 2 µK has been reached in the secondary trap at the recapture coefficient κ = 6%, which confirms the secondary cooling efficiency and is sufficient to perform metrological measurements of the {sup 1}S{sub 0}–{sup 3}P{sub 1} (698 nm) clock transition in an optical lattice.

  6. Porous allograft bone scaffolds: doping with strontium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yantao Zhao

    Full Text Available Strontium (Sr can promote the process of bone formation. To improve bioactivity, porous allograft bone scaffolds (ABS were doped with Sr and the mechanical strength and bioactivity of the scaffolds were evaluated. Sr-doped ABS were prepared using the ion exchange method. The density and distribution of Sr in bone scaffolds were investigated by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. Controlled release of strontium ions was measured and mechanical strength was evaluated by a compressive strength test. The bioactivity of Sr-doped ABS was investigated by a simulated body fluid (SBF assay, cytotoxicity testing, and an in vivo implantation experiment. The Sr molar concentration [Sr/(Sr+Ca] in ABS surpassed 5% and Sr was distributed nearly evenly. XPS analyses suggest that Sr combined with oxygen and carbonate radicals. Released Sr ions were detected in the immersion solution at higher concentration than calcium ions until day 30. The compressive strength of the Sr-doped ABS did not change significantly. The bioactivity of Sr-doped material, as measured by the in vitro SBF immersion method, was superior to that of the Sr-free freeze-dried bone and the Sr-doped material did not show cytotoxicity compared with Sr-free culture medium. The rate of bone mineral deposition for Sr-doped ABS was faster than that of the control at 4 weeks (3.28 ± 0.23 µm/day vs. 2.60 ± 0.20 µm/day; p<0.05. Sr can be evenly doped into porous ABS at relevant concentrations to create highly active bone substitutes.

  7. Strontium isotopic stratigraphy utilizing authigenic dolomites in hemipelagic sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, P.A. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (USA)); Kastner, M. (Scripps Institute of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (USA)); Elderfield, H. (Univ. of Cambridge (England))

    1990-05-01

    Authigenic dolomites commonly occur in organic-rich, continental margin marine sediments. These dolomites play a key role in the age dating of stratigraphic sections. The dolomites often are the only lithology amenable to paleomagnetic stratigraphy; they preserve siliceous microfossils against diagenetic; recrystallization, and provide useful strontium isotopic stratigraphic ages. Several potential sources of error frequently are unique to the use of authigenic dolomites in the strontium isotope methods. (1) The dolomites occur as cements of the host lithology, hence, they are not a pure phase. Potentially important contaminants during analysis include gypsum clay minerals, feldspars, and iron and manganese oxides. Strontium may occur as a structural substituent ion in these minerals or as a surface-adsorbed ion. Various leaching techniques have been tested to isolate dolomitic strontium. Purer dolomites and strontium-enriched dolomites often can be selected to ease these problems. (2) The dolomites form after the deposition of the host sediment, therefore, they record the diagenetic age not the depositional age. The stable isotopic composition of the dolomites can aid in selection of early formed samples. (3) The dolomites record pore-water strontium isotope compositions, not seawater isotopic compositions. This problem is also minimized by choosing dolomites formed near the sediment-water interface. (4) The dolomites formed near the sediment-water interface originated as rotodolomites and undergo subsequent burial diagenesis, creating a potential for later strontium isotope exchange. This problem is minimized by selecting fresh samples from the interior of nearly impermeable beds and nodules. Results from the Miocene Monterey Formation of California and from the Eocene through Pliocene Pisco basin of Peru show that authigenic dolomites can provide useful strontium isotopic age estimates.

  8. Separation of fission strontium from nuclear fuels by ammonium molybdatophosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, A.

    1984-01-01

    The separation of fission strontium from solutions of prolonged cooled nuclear fuel has been performed using ammoniummolybdatophosphate (AMP) columns. The sorption mechanism of bivalent ions of AMP has been investigated by column and batch experiments. A pure ion exchange of Sr 2+ for two H + or NH 4 + ions has been established. Conditions for the sepasorption and elution of fission strontium and other fission products on AMP columns are described. (author)

  9. Enrichment of the African catfish Clarias gariepinus (Burchell) with functional selenium originating from garlic: effect of enrichment period and depuration on total selenium level and sensory properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schram, E.; Schelvis-Smit, A.A.M.; Heul, van der J.W.; Luten, J.B.

    2010-01-01

    We wanted to optimize the procedure for the selenium enrichment of farmed African catfish, using garlic as dietary selenium source. In the first experiment we established the relation between the length of the selenium enrichment period and the resulting total selenium level in the fillet of the

  10. Determination of technetium-99 in environmental samples: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Keliang; Hou Xiaolin; Roos, Per; Wu Wangsuo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The source term, physicochemical properties, environmental distribution and behaviour of 99 Tc are presented. ► Various sample pre-treatment and pre-concentration techniques of technetium are discussed. ► Chemical separation and purification techniques for 99 Tc in environmental samples are reviewed. ► Measurement techniques for 99 Tc in environmental level and automated analytical methods are reviewed. ► The reported analytical methods of 99 Tc are critically compared to provide overall information. - Abstract: Due to the lack of a stable technetium isotope, and the high mobility and long half-life, 99 Tc is considered to be one of the most important radionuclides in safety assessment of environmental radioactivity as well as nuclear waste management. 99 Tc is also an important tracer for oceanographic research due to the high technetium solubility in seawater as TcO 4 − . A number of analytical methods, using chemical separation combined with radiometric and mass spectrometric measurement techniques, have been developed over the past decades for determination of 99 Tc in different environmental samples. This article summarizes and compares recently reported chemical separation procedures and measurement methods for determination of 99 Tc. Due to the extremely low concentration of 99 Tc in environmental samples, the sample preparation, pre-concentration, chemical separation and purification for removal of the interferences for detection of 99 Tc are the most important issues governing the accurate determination of 99 Tc. These aspects are discussed in detail in this article. Meanwhile, the different measurement techniques for 99 Tc are also compared with respect to advantages and drawbacks. Novel automated analytical methods for rapid determination of 99 Tc using solid extraction or ion exchange chromatography for separation of 99 Tc, employing flow injection or sequential injection approaches are also discussed.

  11. Non-pertechnetate Technetium Sensor Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Samuel A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rapko, Brian M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Branch, Shirmir D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Lines, Amanda M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Heineman, William R. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Soderquist, Chuck Z. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-03-24

    Several significant uncertainties remain regarding the understanding and modeling of the fate and speciation of technicium-99 (99Tc) in Hanford waste tanks, glass, and low-temperature waste forms. A significant (2% to 25%) fraction of the 99Tc in the water-soluble portion of the tank waste may be present as one or more non pertechnetate species that have not been identified and to date, cannot be effectively separated from the wastes. This task will provide a sensor specifically tuned to detect the Tc(I)-carbonyl species believed to constitute the main fraction of the non-pertechnetate form of technetium. By direct measurement of the non-pertechnetate species, such a sensor will help reduce the uncertainties in the modeling of the fate and speciation of 99Tc in Hanford tanks and waste forms. This report summarizes work performed in FY2016 that was sponsored by the Department of Energy’s Office of Environmental Management and demonstrates the protocol for using fluorescent Tc(I)-tricarbonyl complex as a means to detect the non-pertechnetate species within tank waste solutions. The protocol was optimized with respect to ligand concentration, solvent choice, reaction temperature and time. This work culminated in the quantitation of Tc(I)-tricarbonyl within a waste simulant, using a standard addition method for measurement. This report also summarizes the synthesis and high-yield preparation of the low-valence technetium species, [Tc(CO)3(H2O)3]+, which will be used as the technetium standard material for the demonstration of the non-pertechnetate species in actual wastes.

  12. Technetium and neptunium reactions in basalt/groundwater systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.E.; Arnold, W.D.; Kelmers, A.D.; Kessler, J.H.; Clark, R.J.; Johnson, J.S. Jr.; Young, G.C.; Case, F.I.; Westmoreland, C.G.

    1985-01-01

    Sorption isotherms and apparent concentration limits for Tc(VII) and Np(V) for a variety of groundwater/basalt systems were determined using Grande Ronde basalt samples representative of the Hanford Site candidate high-level waste repository. Under oxic redox conditions (air present), little or no sorption of technetium was observed; neptunium exhibited low to moderate sorption ratios. Under anoxic redox conditions (oxygen-free), low to moderate sorption of technetium was often observed, but the extent of sorption was highly dependent upon the groundwater composition and the method of pretreatment (if any) of the basalt. Sorption isotherms for technetium under reducing redox conditions (hydrazine added) indicate an apparent concentration limit of approximately 10 -6 mol/l Tc. No apparent concentration limit was found for neptunium for concentrations in groundwater up to 10 -6 mol/l and 8 x 10 -7 mol/l under oxic and reducing (hydrazine added) redox conditions, respectively. Valence control and valence analysis experiments suggest that the sorption or precipitation of Tc and Np from groundwater in the presence of basalt may result from a heterogeneous reaction occurring on the surface of the basalt. One of the critical factors of this reduction reaction appears to be the accessibility of the reactive ferrous iron component of the basalt. The laboratory simulation of groundwater redox conditions representative of the repository environment through the use of solution phase redox reagents is of questionable validity, and information obtained by such experimental methods may not be defensible for site performance assessment calculations. Anoxic experiments conducted in an argon-filled glove box appear better suited for the laboratory simulation of in situ redox conditions. 15 references, 6 figures

  13. Technetium and neptunium reactions in basalt/groundwater systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.E.; Arnold, W.D.; Kelmers, A.D.; Kessler, J.H.; Clark, R.J.; Johnson, J.S. Jr.; Young, G.C.; Case, F.I.; Westmoreland, C.G.; Florida State Univ., Tallahassee)

    1984-01-01

    Sorption isotherms and apparent concentration limits for Tc(VII) and Np(V) for a variety of groundwater/basalt systems were determined using Grande Ronde basalt samples representative of the Hanford Site candidate high-level waste repository. Under oxic redox conditions (air present), little or no sorption of technetium was observed; neptunium exhibited low to moderate sorption ratios. Under anoxic redox conditions (oxygen-free), low to moderate sorption of technetium was often observed, but the extent of sorption was highly dependent upon the groundwater composition and the method of pretreatment (if any) of the basalt. Sorption isotherms for technetium under reducing redox conditions (hydrazine added) indicate an apparent concentration limit of approximately 10 -6 mol/L Tc. No apparent concentration limit was found for neptunium for concentrations in groundwater up to approx. 10 -6 mol/L and 8 x 10 -7 mol/L under oxic and reducing (hydrazine added) redox conditions, respectively. Valence control and valence analysis experiments suggest that the sorption or precipitation of Tc and Np from groundwater in the presence of basalt may result from a heterogeneous reaction occurring on the surface of the basalt. One of the critical factors of this reduction reaction appears to be the accessibility of the reactive ferrous iron component of the basalt. The laboratory simulation of groundwater redox conditions representative of the repository environment through the use of solution phase redox reagents is of questionable validity, and information obtained by such experimental methods may not be defensible for site performance assessment calculations. Anoxic experiments conducted in an argon-filled glove box appear better suited for the laboratory simulation of in situ redox conditions. 15 refs., 6 tabs

  14. Strontium ranelate for preventing and treating postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, S; Cranney, A; Wells, G A; Adachi, J D; Reginster, J Y

    2006-10-18

    Strontium ranelate is a new treatment for osteoporosis therefore, its benefits and harms need to be known. To determine the efficacy and safety of strontium ranelate for the treatment and prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis. We searched MEDLINE (1996 to March 2005), EMBASE (1996 to week 9 2005), the Cochrane Library (1996 to Issue 1 2005), reference lists of relevant articles and conference proceedings from the last two years. Additional data was sought from authors. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of at least one year duration comparing strontium ranelate versus placebo reporting fracture incidence, bone mineral density (BMD), health related quality of life or safety in postmenopausal women. Treatment (versus prevention) population was defined as women with prevalent vertebral fractures and/or lumbar spine BMD T score gastritis or death. Additional data suggests that the risk of vascular and nervous system side-effects is slightly increased with taking 2 g of strontium ranelate daily over three to four years. There is silver level evidence (www.cochranemsk.org) to support the efficacy of strontium ranelate for the reduction of fractures (vertebral and to a lesser extent non-vertebral) in postmenopausal osteoporotic women and an increase in BMD in postmenopausal women with/without osteoporosis. Diarrhea may occur however, adverse events leading to study withdrawal were not significantly increased with taking 2 g of strontium ranelate daily. Potential vascular and neurological side-effects need to be further explored.

  15. Flame Spectrophotometric Determination of Strontium in Water and Biological Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joensson, G

    1964-10-15

    A flame spectrophotometric method has been developed for the determination of strontium in biological material and water samples. Strontium is determined in the presence of calcium at a wavelength of 4607 A. The intensity of the strontium emission from the sample is increased if n-butanol is added to a solution of the sample in water. With a 6 vol% solution of n-butanol in water, an optimum intensity of 3.5 times that obtained with pure water solution is obtained. Anions and alkali metals which might interfere with the flame spectrophotometric determination are separated from the sample by a simple ion exchange operation. The method allows determination of strontium in solutions down to 0.1{mu}g/ml. In this case the standard deviation is 3.1 % and with a strontium concentration of 1 {mu}g/ml the deviation is 0.9 %. This method has been used for the determination of strontium in samples of varying composition such as bone, meat and skin from fishes, samples of human bones, shell-fish, milk, and water, in which case Sr quantities of 5{mu}g were determined with an analytical error of less than 5 % and Sr{sub q}uantities greater than 10 {mu}g with an error of less than 3 %.

  16. Strontium-90 (90Sr) determination using liquid scintillation counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheberle, L.T.V.; Rosa, M.M.L.; Ferreira, M.T.; Taddei, M.H.T.

    2015-01-01

    This procedure describes a method for separation and measurement of strontium 90 Sr in water, soils, and biological samples. Water samples may be concentrated using evaporation or calcium phosphate coprecipitation. Soils and biological materials must be dissolved using wet digestion. Tracers and carriers must be added before the attack. Radioactive strontium is separated employing a specific resin before determination by liquid scintillation counting using the double energetic window method. The resin is used to concentrate strontium from samples. Stable strontium is used to monitor method yields and correct results to improve precision and accuracy. The presence of elemental strontium in the sample may bias the gravimetric yield determination. If it is suspected that natural strontium is present in the sample, its concentration should be determined by a suitable means (ICP), and the yield calculation properly modified. Sr-Spec resin with an 8M HNO 3 load solution is used to effectively remove 140 Ba and 40 K isotopes, as well as other interferences from the matrix. Tetravalent plutonium, neptunium, cerium and ruthenium, however, are not removed using nitric acid. The radiochemical procedure was tested using PROCORAD intercomparison exercises and PNI samples. (author)

  17. Flame Spectrophotometric Determination of Strontium in Water and Biological Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joensson, G.

    1964-10-01

    A flame spectrophotometric method has been developed for the determination of strontium in biological material and water samples. Strontium is determined in the presence of calcium at a wavelength of 4607 A. The intensity of the strontium emission from the sample is increased if n-butanol is added to a solution of the sample in water. With a 6 vol% solution of n-butanol in water, an optimum intensity of 3.5 times that obtained with pure water solution is obtained. Anions and alkali metals which might interfere with the flame spectrophotometric determination are separated from the sample by a simple ion exchange operation. The method allows determination of strontium in solutions down to 0.1μg/ml. In this case the standard deviation is 3.1 % and with a strontium concentration of 1 μg/ml the deviation is 0.9 %. This method has been used for the determination of strontium in samples of varying composition such as bone, meat and skin from fishes, samples of human bones, shell-fish, milk, and water, in which case Sr quantities of 5μg were determined with an analytical error of less than 5 % and Sr q uantities greater than 10 μg with an error of less than 3 %

  18. Can aquatic macrophytes mobilize technetium by oxidizing their rhizosphere?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, S.C.; Evenden, W.G.

    1991-01-01

    Technetium (Tc) is very mobile in aerated surface environments, but is essentially immobile and biologically unavailable in anaerobic sediments. Aquatic macrophyte roots penetrate anaerobic sediments, carrying O 2 downward and frequently creating oxidizing conditions in their rhizosphere. The authors hypothesized that this process could mobilize otherwise unavailable Tc, possibly leading to incorporation of Tc into human or animal foods. Through experiments with rice (Oryza sativa L.), and with a novel artificial macrophyte root, they concluded that this pathway is unlikely to be important for annual plants, especially in soils with a high biological oxygen demand. The relatively slow oxidation of Tc limited its mobilization by short-lived root systems

  19. Technetium scanning in Kaposi's sarcoma and its simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunnoe, R.; Kalivas, J.

    1982-01-01

    The clinical picture of ulcerated purple plaques on the legs often suggests several diagnoses: Kaposi's sarcoma, stasis dermatitis, atrophie blanche (livedoid vasculitis), and a poorly understood condition called acroangiodermatitis of Favre-Chaix (pseudo-Kaposi's sarcoma). Even the skin biopsy may not always be conclusive. We describe our experience with three patients with pseudo-Kaposi's sarcoma, one with true Kaposi's sarcoma and two with atrophie blanche. Clinical and histopathologic similarities among these three conditions pointed up the need for additional confirmatory studies, i.e., isotope scanning. The technetium scan was positive in both Kaposi's sarcoma and pseudo-Kaposi's sarcoma but negative in atrophie blanche

  20. Experimental study and quality control of a technetium-99 generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimeno de Osso, F.

    1981-01-01

    The performarce of a generator of technetium-99m to be used in nuclear medicine is studied. The most interesting characteristic of this generator is the use of a U-shaped chromatographuc column so as to improve its efficiency and design without increasing the weight of its shield. With the aim of improving certain aspects of the generator, molibdenum-99 was applied to adecuate pH, pirogens were removed from the column set up before application, application was effected on a dry column, the smallest alumina particles were separated on the column, etc. The most important parameters of an isotopic generator are studied, and the corresponding quality controls performed. (author)

  1. Environmental behavior of technetium-99 and iodine-129

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garland, T.R.; Schreckhise, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    The environmental behavior of technetium-99 and iodine-129 was once thought to be similar, particularly with respect to their soil solubility and biological interactions. Over the past several years, the comparative behavior of these two anions has been studied with respect to their fate in natural environments (both aquatic and terrestrial). The mechanisms studied include physical, chemical and biological parameters that account for differences in soil behavior, cycling between soil and/or air to vegetation, adsorption and metabolism in plants, and their availability and fate following ingestion by animals

  2. Mass spectral analysis of cationic and neutral technetium complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unger, S.E.; McCormick, T.J.; Nunn, A.N.; Treher, E.N.

    1986-01-01

    Cationic and neutral technetium compounds have been characterized by mass spectrometry using a variety of ionization methods. These compounds include octahedral cationic complexes containing phosphorous and arsenic ligands such as DIPHOS and DIARS and neutral complexes containing PnAO and dimethylglyoxime, DMG, or cyclohexanedione dioxime, CDO, ligands. Boronate esters incorporating methyl and butyl derivatives of the DMG and CDO dioximes represent a new class of seven-coordinate Tc radiopharmaceuticals whose characterization by mass spectrometry has not previously been described. These complexes show promise as myocardial imaging agents. (author)

  3. Biogeochemical studies of selenium in the Indian Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, H.; Nakaguchi, Y.; Hiraki, K.; Kimura, M.; Koike, Y.

    1999-01-01

    Selenium that is a one of trace essential elements exists mainly in the chemical form of Se(IV), Se(VI) and organic selenium in ocean. Moreover, the monitoring of the selenium species has become a matter of interest as a mean of estimating their influence in biological processes in ocean. In recent works, some investigators reported that Se(IV) shows nutrient-type especially like silica's behavior, Se(VI) shows an approximately constant value, and the biological activities control the distribution of organic selenium. However, these reports were not included the whole world's oceans. It is necessary to research several oceans for the explication of fate on selenium. We investigated at the most interesting area - the Eastern Indian Ocean where should play a key role in global ocean's cycle for acquiring the new knowledge of selenium species at first

  4. Search for relevant indications for selenium supplementation in thyroid diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowska-Durczynska, Katarzyna; Lewinski, Andrzej

    2017-08-01

    Selenium plays a significant role in the thyroid function and its deficiency is considered by some authors to be a cause of thyroid disorders. The potential therapeutic influence of selenium supplementation in thyroid disease was investigated in several studies and some results were encouraging, however results were inconsistent and did not allow conclusion to be drawn. For that reason, we have performed a review study on relevance of selenium supplementation in thyroid disease. Till now, there is no strong evidence that selenium supplementation leads to clinical improvement in the course of autoimmune thyroiditis, nodular goitre or thyroid cancer. On the other hand, there is some evidence that selenium is effective in the treatment of orbitopathy; thus, the European Group on Graves' Orbitopathy (EUGOGO) recommends selenium administration in mild active orbitopathy.

  5. Effect of long-term selenium supplementation on mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rayman, Margaret P.; Winther, Kristian Hillert; Pastor-Barriuso, Roberto

    2018-01-01

    Background: Selenium, an essential trace element, is incorporated into selenoproteins with a wide range of health effects. Selenoproteins may reach repletion at a plasma selenium concentration of ∼ 125 μg/L, at which point the concentration of selenoprotein P reaches a plateau; whether sustained...... concentrations higher than this are beneficial, or indeed detrimental, is unknown. Objective: In a population of relatively low selenium status, we aimed to determine the effect on mortality of long-term selenium supplementation at different dose levels. Design: The Denmark PRECISE study was a single...... for extension of the study and mortality assessment. Participants were randomly assigned to treatment with 100, 200, or 300 μg selenium/d as selenium-enriched-yeast or placebo-yeast for 5 years from randomization in 1998-1999 and were followed up for mortality for a further 10 years (through March 31, 2015...

  6. Production of selenium-enriched milk and dairy products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csapó J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Until the middle of the last century, selenium was considered to be toxic, but recently it turned out to be a micronutrient with important physiological effects, whose lack impedes the functioning of several enzymes, while in the case of a prolonged deficiency, disease processes can also occur in the body. Hungary belongs to the selenium-deficient regions in Europe; therefore, our aim was to contribute to the improvement of selenium supply of the population through increasing the selenium content of milk and dairy products. A daily supplementation of 1-6 mg organic selenium to the feed of dairy cows increases the selenium content of milk from the value of 18 μg/kg to 94 μg/kg in 8 weeks, decreasing again to the initial value in 6 weeks after stopping the supplementation.

  7. Erythrocytic glutathione peroxidase: Its relationship to plasma selenium in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perona, G.; Cellerino, R.; Guidi, G.C.; Moschini, G.; Stievano, B.M.; Tregnaghi, C.

    1977-01-01

    Erythrocytic glutathione-peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity and plasma selenium concentrations were measured in 14 patients: 7 with iron deficiency and 7 with raised serum iron levels. The decreased enzymatic activity in iron deficiency was confirmed. Plasma selenium was significantly lower in patients with lower serum iron; furthermore there is a significant correlation between serum iron and plasma selenium concentrations. Another correlation even more significant was found between plasma selenium and enzyme activity in all the cases we studied. These data suggests that the importance of iron for GSH-Px activity may be merely due to its relationship with selenium and that plasma selenium concentration may be of critical importance for enzyme activity. (author)

  8. The Strontium Isotope Record of Zavkhan Terrane Carbonates: Strontium Isotope Stability Through the Ediacaran-Cambrian Transition

    OpenAIRE

    Petach, Tanya N.

    2015-01-01

    First order trends in the strontium isotopic (87Sr/86Sr) composition of seawater are controlled by radiogenic inputs from the continent and non-radiogenic inputs from exchange at mid-ocean ridges. Carbonates precipitated in seawater preserve trace amounts of strontium that record this isotope ratio and therefore record the relative importance of mid-ocean ridge and weathering chemical inputs to sea water composition. It has been proposed that environmental changes during the Ediacaran-Cambria...

  9. Selenium's importance in regulatory issues regarding mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, Laura J.; Ralston, Nicholas V.C. [University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center, 15 North 23rd Street, Stop 9018, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9018 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    Current seafood safety and health risk assessment criteria use mercury concentrations as their sole basis. This unfortunate limitation omits consideration of selenium, an essential trace element that appears to be the primary molecular target of mercury toxicity. Although selenium has been recognized for decades as a means of counteracting mercury toxicity, its effects have often been overlooked or misunderstood. Experimental animal studies have demonstrated that increasing concentrations of selenium throughout the normal dietary range increasingly counteracts methylmercury toxicity. Dietary concentrations of selenium that are slightly less than the average amount present in ocean fish have been shown to completely prevent the onset of toxic symptoms of mercury toxicity, while animals fed lesser amounts of selenium rapidly sickened and died. Dietary selenium from a variety of sources including ocean fish such as tuna, swordfish, menhaden, and rockfish has been shown to counteract mercury toxicity. Since ocean fish are among the richest sources of dietary selenium, it is important to include selenium concentration measurements in future mercury risk assessments and seafood safety criteria. Mercury:selenium molar ratios in blood provide far more consistent and physiologically meaningful risk assessments. Comprehensive seafood safety criteria such as the Selenium Health Benefit Value enable clear differentiation between seafoods that are safe and those that are hazardous for human consumption. Use of parameters that integrate mercury-selenium relationships also make it easy to understand the differences between the findings of maternal mercury exposure studies that have been performed in New Zealand, the Faroes, the Seychelles, and the United Kingdom. Development of criteria for evaluating mercury-selenium interactions will enhance environmental protection and improve public safety. (author)

  10. Selenium Poisoning of Wildlife and Western Agriculture: Cause and Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korte, N.E.

    2000-02-01

    This project examined the hypothesis that selenium contamination is not the principal cause of the decline of endemic fish species in the Upper Colorado Basin. Activities employed to test this hypothesis included a reconnaissance of locations altered by recent road construction, a re-interpretation of available literature regarding selenium toxicity, and the interpretation of unpublished data obtained from the Upper Colorado Basin Fish Recovery Program. The project demonstrates that most of the evidence implicating selenium is circumstantial.

  11. Effect of selenium supplementation on pigeon reproductive performance, selenium concentration and antioxidant status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Yang, H M; Cao, W; Li, Y B

    2017-09-01

    The effects of dietary supplementation of sodium selenite (SS) on the reproductive performance and the concentration of selenium, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and malondialdehyde (MDA) were determined, and expression of glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPx4) and bone morphogenic protein 15 (BMP15) was evaluated. Paired pigeons (n = 864) were fed: T1 received no SS, while T2, T3, and T4 received 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mg of SS/kg of dry matter (DM), respectively. Treatments were performed in triplicate with 72 pairs in each replicate. The results showed that selenium supplementation significantly affected pigeon reproductive performance. Birds fed 1.0 mg of SS/kg displayed higher egg production (P > 0.05), higher birth rate, and lower dead sperm rate than the control group (P Selenium and biochemical analyses revealed a higher selenium concentration in the 1.5 mg of SS/kg group than in the control group (P  0.05); however, in plasma, MDA was lower in the control group (P  0.05), while in ovary, BMP15 was down-regulated in the 1.5 mg of SS/kg group (P selenium concentration, and 0.5 mg of SS/kg up-regulated GSH-Px activity. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  12. Ecological Importance of Insects in Selenium Biogenic Cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadezhda Golubkina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is an essential trace element for animal and human beings. Despite the importance of insects in most ecosystems and their significant contribution to the biological cycling of trace elements due to high abundance, population productivity, and diverse ecosystem functions, surprisingly little information is available on selenium bioaccumulation by these arthropods. This review considers selenium essentiality and toxicity to insects as well as insects’ contribution to selenium trophic transfer through the food chains. Data on Se accumulation by insects of the Dniester River Valley with no anthropogenic Se loading reveal typically low Se content in necrophagous insects compared to predators and herbivores and seasonal variations in Se accumulation.

  13. Is selenium supplementation in autoimmune thyroid diseases justified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winther, Kristian H; Bonnema, Steen J; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2017-10-01

    This review provides an appraisal of recent evidence for or against selenium supplementation in patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases, and discusses possible effect mechanisms. Epidemiological data suggest an increased prevalence of autoimmune thyroid diseases under conditions of low dietary selenium intake. Two systematic reviews have evaluated controlled trials among patients with autoimmune thyroiditis and report that selenium supplementation decreases circulating thyroid autoantibodies. The immunomodulatory effects of selenium might involve reducing proinflammatory cytokine release. However, clinically relevant effects of selenium supplementation, including improvement in quality of life, are more elusive. In Graves' disease, some, but not all, trials indicate that adjuvant selenium supplementation enhances the restoration of biochemical euthyroidism, and might benefit patients with mild Graves' orbitopathy. The use of selenium supplementation as adjuvant therapy to standard thyroid medication may be widespread, but a growing body of evidence yields equivocal results. The available evidence from trials does not support routine selenium supplementation in the standard treatment of patients with autoimmune thyroiditis or Graves' disease. However, correction of moderate to severe selenium deficiency may offer benefits in preventing, as well as treating, these disorders. Molecular mechanisms have been proposed, but further studies are needed.

  14. Absorption and retention of selenium from shrimps in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bugel, S. H.; Sandstrom, B.; Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt

    2001-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the bioavailability of selenium in shrimps, a possible good source of selenium, by measurements of the absorption and retention of selenium and the effects on plasma selenium concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity. Twelve healthy young subjects (9F...... of the study, after 2, 4, and 6 weeks. The selenium intake increased from 39.4 +/- 15.3 mug/d to 127 +/- 5.5 mug/d with the addition of shrimps. The apparent absorption of selenium from shrimps was 83 +/- 4%, Faecal and urinary selenium excretion was 32.5 +/- 17.0 mug/d and 21.2 +/- 9.0 mug/d, re spectively...... and the total retention of selenium was 3.1 +/- 1.1 mg. Plasma selenium concentrations were 95.2 +/- 9.7 mug/L and 101.5 +/- 9.7 mug/L before and after six weeks of shrimp intake, respectively (p...

  15. Selenium and phosphorus interaction in pea (pisum sativum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Mahendra; Bhandari, D.K.

    1975-01-01

    The interaction of selenium and phosphorus on the dry matter yield and concentration and uptake of phosphorus, sulfur and selenium was studied in pea (Pisum sativnum) var. T 163. The fertilizer was tagged with P 32 . It was observed that increased concentration of applied selenium in soil decreased the dry matter yield and increased the concentration and uptake of total P, soil P and selenium in pea plants. Increased concentration of P alone increased dry matter yield, concentration and uptake of total, soil and fertilizer P and selenium which was beyond safe limits, and decreased concentration and uptake of sulphur. Selenium and phosphorus showed strong synergetic relationship by increasing the concentration of each other in plants while both showed antagonistic effect on the concentration of sulphur. Phosphorus compensated the toxic effect of selenium and improved the growth and dry matter yield of pea plants. The highest selenium concentration of 22.4 ppm was observed in 100 ppm phosphorus with 5 ppm selenium treated pots while lowest (0.10 ppm) in control. (author)

  16. Does mercury vapor exposure increase urinary selenium excretion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hongo, T; Suzuki, T; Himeno, S; Watanabe, C; Satoh, H; Shimada, Y

    1985-01-01

    It has been reported that an increase of urinary selenium excretion may occur as a result of mercury vapor exposure. However, experimental data regarding the interaction between mercury vapor and selenium have yielded ambiguous results about the retention and elimination of selenium due to mercury vapor exposure and the decrease of selenium excretion due to mercury in the form of mercuric mercury (Hg/sup 2 +/). In this study, the authors measured urinary mercury and selenium in workers with or without exposure to mercury vapor to determine whether or not urinary selenium excretion was increased as a result of mercury vapor exposure. Urine samples were collected from 141 workers, 71 men and 70 women, whose extent of exposure to mercury vapor varied according to their job sites. Workers were divided into five groups according to their urinary mercury levels. The mercury level in group I was less than 2.8 nmol/mmol creatinine which means that this group was mostly free from mercury exposure. The average age was almost identical among the groups. For both sexes, group V (with the highest urinary mercury level) had the lowest urinary selenium level, but one-way variance analysis (ANOVA) did not reveal any significant variations of urinary selenium with urinary mercury levels; however, a weak but significant negative correlation between mercury and selenium was found in men.

  17. Strontium-90 at the Hanford Site and its ecological implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RE Peterson; TM Poston

    2000-01-01

    Strontium-90, a radioactive contaminant from historical operations at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, enters the Columbia River at several locations associated with former plutonium production reactors at the Site. Strontium-90 is of concern to humans and the environment because of its moderately long half-life (29.1 years), its potential for concentrating in bone tissue, and its relatively high energy of beta decay. Although strontium-90 in the environment is not a new issue for the Hanford Site, recent studies of near-river vegetation along the shoreline near the 100 Areas raised public concern about the possibility of strontium-90-contaminated groundwater reaching the riverbed and fall chinook salmon redds. To address these concerns, DOE asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to prepare this report on strontium-90, its distribution in groundwater, how and where it enters the river, and its potential ecological impacts, particularly with respect to fall chinook salmon. The purpose of the report is to characterize groundwater contaminants in the near-shore environment and to assess the potential for ecological impact using salmon embryos, one of the most sensitive ecological indicators for aquatic organisms. Section 2.0 of the report provides background information on strontium-90 at the Hanford Site related to historical operations. Public access to information on strontium-90 also is described. Section 3.0 focuses on key issues associated with strontium-90 contamination in groundwater that discharges in the Hanford Reach. The occurrence and distribution of fall chinook salmon redds in the Hanford Reach and characteristics of salmon spawning are described in Section 4.0. Section 5.0 describes the regulatory standards and criteria used to set action levels for strontium-90. Recommendations for initiating additional monitoring and remedial action associated with strontium-90 contamination at the Hanford Site are presented in Section 6

  18. Strontium-90 at the Hanford Site and its ecological implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RE Peterson; TM Poston

    2000-05-22

    Strontium-90, a radioactive contaminant from historical operations at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, enters the Columbia River at several locations associated with former plutonium production reactors at the Site. Strontium-90 is of concern to humans and the environment because of its moderately long half-life (29.1 years), its potential for concentrating in bone tissue, and its relatively high energy of beta decay. Although strontium-90 in the environment is not a new issue for the Hanford Site, recent studies of near-river vegetation along the shoreline near the 100 Areas raised public concern about the possibility of strontium-90-contaminated groundwater reaching the riverbed and fall chinook salmon redds. To address these concerns, DOE asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to prepare this report on strontium-90, its distribution in groundwater, how and where it enters the river, and its potential ecological impacts, particularly with respect to fall chinook salmon. The purpose of the report is to characterize groundwater contaminants in the near-shore environment and to assess the potential for ecological impact using salmon embryos, one of the most sensitive ecological indicators for aquatic organisms. Section 2.0 of the report provides background information on strontium-90 at the Hanford Site related to historical operations. Public access to information on strontium-90 also is described. Section 3.0 focuses on key issues associated with strontium-90 contamination in groundwater that discharges in the Hanford Reach. The occurrence and distribution of fall chinook salmon redds in the Hanford Reach and characteristics of salmon spawning are described in Section 4.0. Section 5.0 describes the regulatory standards and criteria used to set action levels for strontium-90. Recommendations for initiating additional monitoring and remedial action associated with strontium-90 contamination at the Hanford Site are presented in Section 6

  19. High-Resolution Imaging of Selenium in Kidneys: A Localized Selenium Pool Associated with Glutathione Peroxidase 3

    OpenAIRE

    Malinouski, Mikalai; Kehr, Sebastian; Finney, Lydia; Vogt, Stefan; Carlson, Bradley A.; Seravalli, Javier; Jin, Richard; Handy, Diane E.; Park, Thomas J.; Loscalzo, Joseph; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Recent advances in quantitative methods and sensitive imaging techniques of trace elements provide opportunities to uncover and explain their biological roles. In particular, the distribution of selenium in tissues and cells under both physiological and pathological conditions remains unknown. In this work, we applied high-resolution synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) to map selenium distribution in mouse liver and kidney. Results: Liver showed a uniform selenium distributio...

  20. Determination of technetium by total reflection x-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bermudez, J.I.; Greaves, E.D.; Nemeth, P.

    2000-01-01

    We describe a technique using total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TXRF) for determination of Technetium produced by elution of chromatography generators with physiological saline solutions. The analysis with the 18.41 keV K α line of Technetium was accomplished with monochromatized K α radiation from a silver anode x-ray tube operated at 45 keV and 20 mA. This radiation at 22.104 keV is efficiently coupled to the 21.054 keV absorption edge of Tc. It is also of advantage in the direct analysis of organic and saline properties of the Tc-bearing samples. Quantification was accomplished by internal standard addition of Ga and using an interpolated value of the sensitivity for Tc between Molybdenum and Rhenium. Data processing was carried out with the QXAS-AXIL software package. System sensitivity was found adequate for direct Tc determination of eluted saline solutions. The interest and advantages of the use of the technique as an auxiliary in the synthesis and characterization of Tc-labeled radiopharmaceuticals used for diagnosis in nuclear medicine are discussed. Detection limits in the matrices analyzed are reported. (author)

  1. 99m Technetium pyrophosphate myocardium scintigraphy. First results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toussaint, Paul.

    1976-01-01

    99m technetium pyrophosphate myocardium scintigraphy is a very recent examination technique. This work gives the results obtained on 61 patients. As a vector of the isotope, pyrophosphate has the advantage over polyphosphate of a fast bone uptake there it should be stressed that a 90 minute pause is necessary between the intraveinous injection of the isotope and the photographic recording so that the reading is not troubled by the labelled intracardiac blood pool image, an image quality criterion being the estimation of a good costal fixation which in fact appears sooner or later according to the subject. The role of pyrophosphate, chelator of calcium in fixation of the isotope on the myocardium, could be explained by the fast appearance of 'dense bodies', made up of calcium hydroxyapathice crystals, in the mitochondria of myocardium cells having undergone an irreversible necrotic process. The choice of 99 m technetium is based on its ease of use: 6 hour half-life, high-energy pure gamma emission at 140 keV. The fixed image studied under two incidences, front and left anterior oblique, is obtained from mobile images given by the scintillation camera used in connection with a data processing system. Several facts are underlined, explaining the disadvantages, advantages and indications of the method [fr

  2. The aqueous corrosion behavior of technetium - Alloy and composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvinen, G.; Kolman, D.; Taylor, C.; Goff, G.; Cisneros, M.; Mausolf, E.; Poineau, F.; Koury, D.; Czerwinski, K.

    2013-01-01

    Metal waste forms are under study as possible disposal forms for technetium and other fission products. The alloying of Tc is desirable to reduce the melting point of the Tc-containing metal waste form and potentially improve its corrosion resistance. Technetium-nickel composites were made by mixing the two metal powders and pressing the mixture to make a pellet. The as-pressed composite materials were compared to sintered composites and alloys of identical composition in electrochemical corrosion tests. As-pressed samples were not robust enough for fine polishing and only a limited number of corrosion tests were performed. Alloys and composites with 10 wt% Tc appear to be more corrosion resistant at open circuit than the individual components based on linear polarization resistance and polarization data. The addition of 10 wt% Tc to Ni appears beneficial at open circuit, but detrimental upon anodic polarization. Qualitatively, the polarizations of 10 wt% Tc alloys and composites appear like crude addition of Tc plus Ni. The 1 wt% Tc alloys behave like pure Ni, but some effect of Tc is seen upon polarization. Cathodic polarization of Tc by Ni appears feasible based on open circuit potential measurements, however, zero resistance ammetry and solution measurements are necessary to confirm cathodic protection

  3. Analysis of americium, plutonium and technetium solubility in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Seiji

    1999-08-01

    Safety assessments for geologic disposal of radioactive waste generally use solubilities of radioactive elements as the parameter restricting the dissolution of the elements from a waste matrix. This study evaluated americium, plutonium and technetium solubilities under a variety of geochemical conditions using the geochemical model EQ3/6. Thermodynamic data of elements used in the analysis were provided in the JAERI-data base. Chemical properties of both natural groundwater and interstitial water in buffer materials (bentonite and concrete) were investigated to determine the variations in Eh, pH and ligand concentrations (CO 3 2- , F - , PO 4 3- , SO 4 2- , NO 3 - and NH 4 + ). These properties can play an important role in the complexation of radioactive elements. Effect of the groundwater chemical properties on the solubility and formation of chemical species for americium, plutonium and technetium was predicted based on the solubility analyses under a variety of geochemical conditions. The solubility and speciation of the radioactive elements were estimated, taking into account the possible range of chemical compositions determined from the groundwater investigation. (author)

  4. The retention mechanism of technetium-99m-HM-PAO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neirinckx, R D; Burke, J F; Harrison, R C

    1988-01-01

    Preparations of d,l- and meso-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HM-PAO) labeled with technetium-99m were added to rat brain homogenates diluted with phosphate buffer (1:10). The conversion of d,l-HM-PAO to hydrophilic forms took place with an initial rate constant of 0.12 min-1. Incubation of the b......Preparations of d,l- and meso-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HM-PAO) labeled with technetium-99m were added to rat brain homogenates diluted with phosphate buffer (1:10). The conversion of d,l-HM-PAO to hydrophilic forms took place with an initial rate constant of 0.12 min-1. Incubation....... This correspondence of values supports the notion that GSH may be important for the in vivo conversion of 99mTc-labeled HM-PAO to hydrophilic forms and may be the mechanism of trapping in brain and other cells. A kinetic model for the trapping of d,l- and meso-HM-PAO in tissue is developed that is based on data...

  5. Labelling of metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) with Technetium-99m radionuclide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maula Eka Sriyani; Dini Natanegara; Aang Hanafiah Ws

    2015-01-01

    Various neuroendocrine tumors and their metastases are able to localized and staged by Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG). MIBG is a molecule that has a chemical structure similarities with noradrenaline in the adrenal. The research on 131 I-MIBG has been successfully conducted in the tumor imaging. This research of preparing 99m Tc-MIBG that will be used as a diagnostic agent for adrenal tumors was carried out. MIBG labeling activities with technetium-99m radionuclide were carried out through labeling of MIBG with technetium-99m and radiochemical purity analysis. The labeling of MIBG was carried out using both direct and indirect methods with diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) as a co-ligand. Determination of 99m Tc-MIBG labeling efficiency was performed using paper chromatography with Whatman 3MM/dried acetone and Whatman 31ET/acetonitrile 50%. The results of labeling efficiency using the indirect method with DTPA as a co-ligand was obtained 93.44 ± 1.93%, which the concentration of MIBG was 2 mg/0.5 mL H 2 O, concentration of co-ligand was 37,5 μg of SnCl 2 .2H 2 O and DTPA of 1,125 mg at pH 6.5 for 15 minutes incubation in the room temperature ( 25 °C). (author)

  6. Monoclonal anti-elastin antibody labelled with technetium-99m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Marcia B.N. de; Silva, Claudia R. da; Araujo, Adriano C. de; Bernardo Filho, Mario; Porto, Luis Cristovao M.S.; Gutfilen, Bianca; Souza, J.E.Q.; Frier, Malcolm

    1999-01-01

    Technetium-99m ( 99m Tc) is widely employed in nuclear medicine due to its desirable physical, chemical and biological properties. Moreover, it is easily available and normally is inexpensive. A reducing agent is necessary to label cells and molecules with 99m Tc and stannous chloride (Sn C L 2 ) is usually employed. Elastin is the functional protein component of the elastic fiber and it is related with some diseases such as arteriosclerosis, pulmonary emphysema and others. The present study refers to the preparation of the 99m Tc labeled monoclonal anti-elastin antibody. The monoclonal antibody was incubated with an excess of 2-iminothiolane. The free thiol groups created, were capable of binding with the reduced technetium. Labeling was an exchange reaction with 99m Tc-glucoheptonate. The labeled preparation was left at 4 deg C for one hour. Then, it was passed through a Sephadex G50 column. Various fractions were collected and counted. A peak corresponding to the radiolabeled antibody was obtained. Stability studies of the labelled anti-elastin were performed at 0,3 6, 24 hours, at both 4 deg C or room temperature. The biodistribution pattern of the 99m Tc-anti-elastin was studied in healthy male Swiss mice. The immunoreactivity was also determined. An useful labeled-anti-elastin was obtained to future immunoscintigraphic investigations. (author)

  7. Biomedical tracers: technetium-99 m complexing sulfur polydentate ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendennoune, A.

    1994-01-01

    Cyclic and acyclic tetra sulfur ligands have been synthesized and some of them have been labelled with technetium-99m. These works have two different aims: 1- Development of methods permitting to obtain easily potential technetium complexing sulfur polydentate chelates. 2- Research of positive and neutral complexes of this metal likely to replace thalium-201 in the coronary flow estimation and [TcO-HMPAO] sup 0 complex in the cerebral scintigraphy, respectively. In this work, first, different ways for obtaining dithioetherdithiols and cyclic tetrathioethers containing functional groups have been carried out, then complexation of the core of nitrutechnetium (TcN) sup 2+ at tracers scale, by dithioetherdithiols, using exchange reaction with [sup 9 sup 9 sup m TcNCl sub 4 ] sup - ion complex or sup 99 sup m TcN Cl sub 2 [P(CH sub 2 CH sub 2 CN) sub 3 ] sub 2 has been studied. Finally, biological distribution in swiss mouse of these technetiated complexes has been studied. 135 refs., 30 figs., 13 tabs. (F.M.)

  8. Stripping voltammetric behavior of technetium at various chemically modified electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dick, R.

    1990-09-01

    In monitoring of nuclear processing plants and storage facilities the necessity arises of assaying traces of the artificial radioactive element technetium. The oxidation states IV and VII are of particular interest. Stripping voltammetry is among the methods of assay which are suited for this purpose. It allows an enhanced selectivity to be achieved by preconcentration of the analyte and of an oxidation state of the analyte, respectively, at the electrode used. This specific enrichment is successful after appropriate chemical modification of the electrode through immobilization of a Tc-specific reagent. When various approaches of chemical modification of a glassy carbon electrode were examined, the tetraphenylarsonium chloride extractant, which is highly selective with respect to technetium, proved to be the best suited reagent, capable of fixation both by ionic and by covalent bonding on an electrodeposited polymer film. For ionic immobilization the reagent was reacted to m-sulfophenyltriphenyl arsonium and then bound to a copolymer of vinylferrocene and vinylpyridine, which had been provided with cations. It was possible to enrich Tc(VII) at such an electrode and to determine it by stripping voltammetry down to a concentration of 1x10 -8 M after 5 minutes enrichment time. (orig./EF) [de

  9. Nature`s uncommon elements: Plutonium and technetium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, D.; Fabryka-Martin, J.; Dixon, P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Chemical Science and Technology Div.; Cramer, J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada). Whiteshell Lab.

    1998-01-06

    The authors have taken advantage of the extremely sensitive method of thermal ionization mass spectrometry to measure technetium and plutonium concentrations in sample masses that are smaller by as much as three orders of magnitude than those used in the early research efforts. The work reported in this paper extends the understanding of the geochemistry of plutonium and technetium by developing detailed descriptions of their associations in well characterized geologic samples, and by using modern neutron-transport modeling tools to better interpret the meaning of the results. Analyses were conducted on samples from three uranium ore deposits selected for their contrasting geochemical environments. The Cigar Lake deposit is an unweathered, unaltered primary ore in a reducing environment which is expected to closely approximate a system that is closed with respect to uranium and its products. The Koongarra deposit is a shallow system, both altered and weathered, subject to active ground water flow. Finally, a sample from the Beaverlodge deposit is included because it is a commercially-available uranium ore standard that allows demonstration of the precision of the analytical results.

  10. The aqueous corrosion behavior of technetium - Alloy and composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvinen, G.; Kolman, D.; Taylor, C.; Goff, G.; Cisneros, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Mausolf, E.; Poineau, F.; Koury, D.; Czerwinski, K. [Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Metal waste forms are under study as possible disposal forms for technetium and other fission products. The alloying of Tc is desirable to reduce the melting point of the Tc-containing metal waste form and potentially improve its corrosion resistance. Technetium-nickel composites were made by mixing the two metal powders and pressing the mixture to make a pellet. The as-pressed composite materials were compared to sintered composites and alloys of identical composition in electrochemical corrosion tests. As-pressed samples were not robust enough for fine polishing and only a limited number of corrosion tests were performed. Alloys and composites with 10 wt% Tc appear to be more corrosion resistant at open circuit than the individual components based on linear polarization resistance and polarization data. The addition of 10 wt% Tc to Ni appears beneficial at open circuit, but detrimental upon anodic polarization. Qualitatively, the polarizations of 10 wt% Tc alloys and composites appear like crude addition of Tc plus Ni. The 1 wt% Tc alloys behave like pure Ni, but some effect of Tc is seen upon polarization. Cathodic polarization of Tc by Ni appears feasible based on open circuit potential measurements, however, zero resistance ammetry and solution measurements are necessary to confirm cathodic protection.

  11. Determination of degradation conditions of exchange resins containing technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera S, A.; Monroy G, F.; Quintero P, E.

    2014-10-01

    The quantification of Tc-99 in spent exchange resins, coming from nuclear power plants, is indispensable to define their administration. The Tc-99 is a pure beta emitter of 210000 years of half-life, volatile and of a high mobility in water and soil. For this reason, the objective of this work is to establish a digestion method of ionic exchange resins containing technetium that retains more than 95% of this radioisotope. Mineralization tests were carried out of a resin Amberlite IRN-150 by means of an oxidation heat, in acid medium, varying the resin mass, the medium volume, the media type, the temperature and the digestion time. The digested samples were analyzed by gas chromatography to estimate the grade of their degradation. The 99m Tc was used as tracer to determine the technetium percentage recovered after mineralizing the resin. The digestion process depends on the temperature and the resin mass. At higher temperature better mineralization of samples and to greater resin mass to a constant temperature, less degradation of the resin. The spectra beta of the 99m Tc and 99 Tc are presented. (Author)

  12. Labelling of biological structures with technetium 99 m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardo Filho, M.

    1988-01-01

    The labelling of red blood cells (RBC) with technetium 99m ( 99m Tc) depends on several factors, as the stannous ion (Sn ++ ) concentration, the time and temperature of incubation, the anticoagulant utilized, the presence of plasma proteins (PP) and others. Although the blinding of 99m Tc with hemoglobin and PP are similar, they appear to have specific characteristics as demonstrated by precipitation with alcohol, acetone, trichloroacetic acid, hydrochloric acid and mercury chloride. The bacterial cultures labeled with Technetium- 99m , at optimal Sn ++ ion concentration, presents a large stability and their viability is not altered by this treatment. The electrophoretic mobility, the hydrophobicity, the cationized ferritin distribution and the adherence to human buccal epithelial cells are not modified either. The possibility of labelling with 99m Tc of planaria and cercariae of Schistossoma mansoni evaluative cycle increases the utilization of this radionuclide to an experimental level. The results described with the labelling of these biological structures with 99m Tc demonstrated that stable labeled and viable operations are obtained. (author)

  13. Preparation of selenium coatings onto beryllium foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erikson, E.D.; Tassano, P.L.; Reiss, R.H.; Griggs, G.E.

    1984-09-01

    A technique for preparing selenium films onto 50.8 microns thick beryllium foils is described. The selenium was deposited in vacuum from a resistance heated evaporation source. Profilometry measurements of the coatings indicate deposit thicknesses of 5.5, 12.9, 37.5, 49.8 and 74.5 microns. The control of deposition rate and of coating thickness was facilitated using a commercially available closed-loop programmable thin film controller. The x-ray transmission of the coated substrates was measured using a tritiated zirconium source. The transmissivities of the film/substrate combination are presented for the range of energies from 4 to 20 keV. 15 references, 3 figures

  14. Technetium-99 in lobsters from the western Irish sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fegan, Mary

    1999-05-01

    Technetium-99, the most important radionuclide of technetium release to the environment, is a pure beta emitter with a half-life of 2.13 x 10(5) years. It behaves conservatively in seawater and is likely to remain available to biota for a long time. The dominant and most stable form of technetium in oxygenated seawater is the pertechnetate ion, Tco4. The principle source of radionuclide contamination of the Irish Sea has been the liquid waste discharges of low level radionuclide effluent from the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant at Sellafield on the Cumbria Coast. In 1994 the annual discharge authorization limit for 99Tc was increased from 10 TBq to 200 TBq. Lobster concentrates 99Tc to a high degree with concentration factors of 1x 10(3) reported in the literature. The mean 99Tc activity concentrations in lobsters caught close to Sellafield were reported to have risen by a factor of 20 in 2 years from 390 Bq/kg (wet weight) in 1993 to 8300 Bq/kg (wet weight) in 1995. This study was undertaken to determine the 99Tc activity concentration in lobsters from the western Irish Sea. Lobsters were collected from the east and north east coasts of Ireland over the period June 1997 to July 1998 and analysed using a radioanalytical method which was based on the anion-exchange seperation of technetium as pertechnetate. A gas-flow proportional counter was used to measure to 99Tc activity concentration in each sample. Technetium-99 activity concentrations were measured in the muscle from the tail, the right and the left claws and also in the green gland, the hepatopancreas and the cardiac fore-gut. The results of the measurements showed, as expected, that the 99Tc activity concentrations were not as high as those in the samples from the Cumbrian coast. The mean 99Tc activity concentrations, over the sampling period, in the tail, right and left claw muscles were 214, 124 and 136 BQ/kg (wet weight) respectively. The mean 99Tc activity concentrations in the green gland

  15. The Cultivation and SeleniumEnrichment of SeleniumEnriched Earthworm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUN Xiao-fei

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available As a bio-carrier, Eisenia fetida was fed with cow dung that added with sodium selenite in order to transfer inorganic selenium(Se into organic selenium. Targeting on survival rate and selenium content, the effects of five Se concentrations(0, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100 mg·kg-1 and four cultivation periods(15, 30, 45, 60 don earthworm growth and Se contents were investigated. The cultivation method with high survival rate, high Se content of earthworm and short breeding time would be screened out. The experimental results showed that the earthworm survival rate decreased and the Se content in earthworm increased with the increase of Se application and the extension of breeding time. The most optimummethod was screened out when the Se concentration was 80 mg·kg-1 and the cultivation period was 45 days, Se content in earthworm was up to 33.25 mg·kg-1.

  16. Migration of strontium-90 from a strontium-90 fluoride deep ocean source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yabusaki, S.

    1981-06-01

    A hypothetical rupture of a heat source capsule on the ocean floor is analyzed for strontium-90 migration and attenuation. The evolution of the three-dimensional contaminant plume is simulated by a modified version of the Okubo-Pritchard radially symmetrical, diffusion velocity dispersion model. Results from this study indicate that released solutes are confined vertically to a layer near the level of introduction. Along the plume centerline, however, water quality is affected for considerably distances downstream from the source, with the maximum effect occurring after one year

  17. Optical lattice clock with strontium atoms; Horloge a reseau optique a atomes de strontium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baillard, X.; Le Targat, R.; Fouche, M.; Brusch, A.; Westergaard, Ph.G.; Lecallier, A.; Lodewyck, J.; Lemonde, P. [Observatoire de Paris, LNE-SYRTE, Systemes de Reference Temps Espace, 75 (France)

    2009-07-01

    Optical lattice clocks, which were first imagined in 2000, should allow one to achieve unprecedented performances in the domain of atomic clocks. We present here the Strontium lattice clock, developed at LNE-SYRTE. The principle, in particular trapping atoms in the Lamb-Dicke regime and the notion of magic wavelength, is first explained. We then present the results obtained for the {sup 87}Sr isotope, with a frequency accuracy of 2,6.10{sup -15}, and the {sup 88}Sr isotope, with. which we perform the first frequency measurement of an optical lattice clock with bosonic atoms. (authors)

  18. Polarographic determination of selenium in indium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, B.Ya.; Mikheeva, V.A.; Priz, N.B.

    1978-01-01

    The procedure of determining nx10 -6 % Se in indium after concentrating in an elemental form on arsenic and sulphur has been developed. The selenium content is determined by inversion a.c. polarography on a sulphuric-acid background in the presence of Cu(2), potassium bichromate, and sodium pyrophosphate. 5.7x10 -6 % Se in metal indium has been determined by this procedure, the mean standard deviation being Sr=0.26

  19. Improvement of Selenium Status of Pasture Crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gunnar Gissel

    1984-01-01

    Selenium was applied to pasture crops in a field experiment (1) by foliar application of 10 g Se/ha as selenite in the spring, (2) or by 5 g Se/ha in the spring plus 5 g in early August, (3) as selenite-enriched calcium ammonium nitrate (CAN) at 4 g Se/ha after each cut, and (4) as 4 g Se after...

  20. Effect of competing cations on strontium sorption to surficial sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunde, R.L.; Rosentreter, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    The following study was conducted to determine strontium distribution coefficients (K d 'S) of a surficial sediment at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho. Batch experimental techniques were used to determine K d 's which describe the partitioning of a solute between the solution and solid phase. A surficial sediment was mixed with synthesized aqueous solutions designed to chemically simulate wastewater disposed to infiltrations ponds near the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant at the INEL with respect to major ionic character and pH. The effects of variable concentrations of competing cations (sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium) on strontium sorption were investigated at a fixed pH of 8.00. The pH of the natural system shows no appreciable variation, whereas a marked variability in cation concentration has been noted. Strontium sorption was impacted to a greater degree by the concentration of calcium and magnesium in solution than by the presence of sodium or potassium. However, extreme sodium solution concentrations of 1.0 to 5.0 g/L dramatically reduced strontium sorption. In all cases, strontium K d 's decreased as the concentration of calcium and magnesium in solution increased. Linear isotherm model K d 's ranged from 12.0 to 84.7 mL/g. Analysis of data from these experiments indicated that moderate concentrations of calcium and magnesium (less than 40 mg/L) and high concentrations of sodium (1.0 to 5.0 g/L) in wastewater increase strontium mobility by decreasing the sorption of strontium on surficial sediments beneath infiltration ponds at the INEL

  1. Radiopaque strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram eHöland

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The controlled precipitation of strontium fluoroapatite crystals, was studied in four base glass compositions derived from the SiO2 – Al2O3 – Y2O3 – SrO – Na2O – K2O/Rb2O/Cs2O – P2O5 – F system. The crystal phase formation of these glasses and the main properties of the glass-ceramics, such as thermal and optical properties and radiopacity were compared with a fifth, a reference glass-ceramic. The reference glass-ceramic was characterized as Ca-fluoroapatite glass-ceramic. The four strontium fluoroapatite glass-ceramics showed the following crystal phases: a Sr5(PO43F – leucite, KAlSi2O6 , b Sr5(PO43F – leucite, KAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4 c Sr5(PO43F – pollucite, CsAlSiO4 , and nano-sized NaSrPO4, d Sr5(PO43F – Rb-leucite, RbAlSi2O6, and nano-sized NaSrPO4.The proof of crystal phase formation was possible by X-ray diffraction (XRD. The microstructures, which were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM demonstrated a uniform distribution of the crystals in the glass matrix. The Sr-fluoroapatites were precipitated based on an internal crystallization process, and the crystals demonstrated a needlelike morphology. The study of the crystal growth of needlelike Sr-fluoroapatites gave a clear evidence of an Ostwald ripening mechanism.The formation of leucite, pollucite and Rb-leucite was based on a surface crystallization mechanism. Therefore, a twofold crystallization mechanism was successfully applied to develop these types of glass-ceramics. The main focus of this study was the controlled development of glass-ceramics exhibiting high radiopacity in comparison to the reference glass-ceramic. This goal could be achieved with all four glass-ceramics with the preferred development of the Sr-fluoroapatite – pollucite-type glass-ceramic. In addition to this main development, it was possible to control the thermal properties. Especially the Rb-leucite containing glass-ceramic showed the highest coefficient of thermal

  2. Mechanoluminescence of Dy doped strontium aluminate nanophosphors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Ravi, E-mail: rvsharma65@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Govt. Arts and Commerce Girls College, Raipur, C.G. 492001 (India); Bisen, D.P. [School of Studies in Physics and Astrophysics, Pt. Ravishankar Shukla University, Raipur, C.G. 492010 (India); Chandra, B.P. [Department of Postgraduate Studies and Research in Physics and Electronics, Rani Durgavati University, Jabalpur 482001 (India)

    2015-12-15

    Nanosized strontium aluminate phosphors activated with Dy{sup 3+} were prepared by a combustion method. Nanophosphor was prepared by this method at reaction temperatures as low as 600 °C. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope analysis was used to characterize the prepared product. The monoclinic phase was observed in the XRD pattern. The particle size of the samples was calculated around 35 nm. The SEM images show irregular shape of the prepared nanophosphor. Two peaks were found in the mechanoluminescence (ML) response curve plotted between time and ML intensity. The H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} added strontium aluminate phosphors activated with Dy show more bright ML peak as compared to the powders of SrAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Dy{sup 3+} without H{sub 3}BO{sub 3.} It was found that the PL and ML intensity increases with increasing concentration of Dy, it becomes maximum for 3% of Dy. The photoluminescence emission shows two intense fluorescence transitions peaks at 498 nm and 583 nm, {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}→{sup 6}H{sub 15/2} in the blue and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}→{sup 6}H{sub 13/2} in the yellow-orange wavelength region. - Highlights: • Combustion synthesis route is used to prepare the SrAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}: Dy {sup 3+} nanophosphors. • The size of the synthesized sample was found to be in the nano-meter range. • The mechanoluminescence of SrAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Dy {sup 3+} nanophosphors is studied. • The photoluminescence of SrAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}: Dy {sup 3+} nanophosphors showed blue-shift as compared to bulk. • Effect of H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} on the mechanoluminescence of SrAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Dy{sup 3+} was studied.

  3. The radiochemical purity of technetium-99m-tin-diethylene-triamino-pentaacetic acid (DTPA) complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besnard, M.; Costerousse, O.; Merlin, L.; Coehn, Y.

    1975-01-01

    The effect on radiochemical purity was studied as a function of the storage period of tin-DTPA solution and of the technetium-complex solution. The quantity of the pertechnetate ions present in the solution is determined by ascending paper chromatography, and an attempt was made to clarify the bond type of technetium by a spectrophotometric method. The tin-DTPA solutions for complexing of the reduced technetium are stable over a period of 8 weeks. The yield of the radiopharmaceutical product is better than 95%. (G.Gy.)

  4. Investigation of the interaction of hydroxyapatite with technetium in association with stannous pyrophosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billinghurst, M.W.; Jette, D.; Somers, E.

    1981-01-01

    The individual components of technetium-99m stannous pyrophosphate were studied with respect to their interaction with hydroxyapatite. It is demonstrated that the role of the pyrophosphate molecule is one of a solubilizing and transporting molecule to carry the technetium atom to the site of the hydroxyapatite where the chelate disassociates and both the pyrophosphate and the technetium individually bind to the hydroxyapatite. The stannous ion is shown to associate with the hydroxyapatite also and although also solubilized by the pyrophosphate appears to be less strongly associated with the pyrophosphate. (author)

  5. Measurement of glomerular filtration rate in children using technetium-99m diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaronson, I.A.; Mann, M.D.

    1985-01-01

    During the past 5 years, we have measured the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) by the slope-clearance method using technetium-99m diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid technetium-99m-DTPA in 130 infants and children. The results in 22 children have been compared with inulin clearance, and a very good correlation between the two methods of measurement of GFR was demonstrated (r = 0,9616; P less than 0,0001). This study provides further evidence that technetium-99m-DTPA is a satisfactory agent for the clinical measurement of GFR in children

  6. Impact of Selenium Supplementation on Growth and Selenium Accumulation on Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh SAFFARYAZDI

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Selenium (Se has been proved to be an essential element for humans and animals. However, less is known about its effects on plants. A hydroponic experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of selenium on growth, selenium accumulation and some physiological characteristics of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. cv. Missouri plants. Plants were grown in Hoagland nutrient solution amended with sodium selenite at 0 (control, 1, 2, 4, 6 and 10 mg.L-1 for 28 days. Growth parameters like shoot and root fresh weight, shoot and root dry weight, total dry weight, shoot and root length increased by 17, 15, 38, 19, 18 and 34 percent in response to the lowest concentration of Se (1 mg L-1, respectively over control. However, application of higher Se concentrations reduced these parameters as compared to control. Selenium up to 1 mg L-1 enhanced the levels of chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b by 87 and 165 percent, respectively, while higher levels of Se exert toxic effects. Total phenolic compounds in leaves increased directly by increasing the level of Se and plants treated with 10 mg. L-1 Se had the highest values. Selenium, sodium and calcium content increased, while potassium content decreased, by increasing selenium treatments. The highest amounts of Se in shoots (3.89 mg g-1 DW and roots (4.27 mg g-1 DW were obtained for the highest concentration of Se (10 mg L-1. The present results suggested the beneficial effects of Se on spinach growth and also its contribute ion to improving the nutritional value of spinach for livestock and human nutrition.

  7. Impact of Selenium Supplementation on Growth and Selenium Accumulation on Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh SAFFARYAZDI

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Selenium (Se has been proved to be an essential element for humans and animals. However, less is known about its effects on plants. A hydroponic experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of selenium on growth, selenium accumulation and some physiological characteristics of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. cv. �Missouri� plants. Plants were grown in Hoagland nutrient solution amended with sodium selenite at 0 (control, 1, 2, 4, 6 and 10 mg.L-1 for 28 days. Growth parameters like shoot and root fresh weight, shoot and root dry weight, total dry weight, shoot and root length increased by 17, 15, 38, 19, 18 and 34 percent in response to the lowest concentration of Se (1 mg L-1, respectively over control. However, application of higher Se concentrations reduced these parameters as compared to control. Selenium up to 1 mg L-1 enhanced the levels of chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b by 87 and 165 percent, respectively, while higher levels of Se exert toxic effects. Total phenolic compounds in leaves increased directly by increasing the level of Se and plants treated with 10 mg. L-1 Se had the highest values. Selenium, sodium and calcium content increased, while potassium content decreased, by increasing selenium treatments. The highest amounts of Se in shoots (3.89 mg g-1 DW and roots (4.27 mg g-1 DW were obtained for the highest concentration of Se (10 mg L-1. The present results suggested the beneficial effects of Se on spinach growth and also its contribute ion to improving the nutritional value of spinach for livestock and human nutrition.

  8. Selenium accumulation and metabolism in algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavon, Michela; Ertani, Andrea; Parrasia, Sofia; Vecchia, Francesca Dalla

    2017-08-01

    Selenium (Se) is an intriguing element because it is metabolically required by a variety of organisms, but it may induce toxicity at high doses. Algae primarily absorb selenium in the form of selenate or selenite using mechanisms similar to those reported in plants. However, while Se is needed by several species of microalgae, the essentiality of this element for plants has not been established yet. The study of Se uptake and accumulation strategies in micro- and macro-algae is of pivotal importance, as they represent potential vectors for Se movement in aquatic environments and Se at high levels may affect their growth causing a reduction in primary production. Some microalgae exhibit the capacity of efficiently converting Se to less harmful volatile compounds as a strategy to cope with Se toxicity. Therefore, they play a crucial role in Se-cycling through the ecosystem. On the other side, micro- or macro-algae enriched in Se may be used in Se biofortification programs aimed to improve Se content in human diet via supplementation of valuable food. Indeed, some organic forms of selenium (selenomethionine and methylselenocysteine) are known to act as anticarcinogenic compounds and exert a broad spectrum of beneficial effects in humans and other mammals. Here, we want to give an overview of the developments in the current understanding of Se uptake, accumulation and metabolism in algae, discussing potential ecotoxicological implications and nutritional aspects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Sulfur and selenium isotope separation by distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, T. R.; McInteer, B. B.; Montoya, J. G.

    1988-01-01

    Sulfur and selenium isotopes are used for labeled compounds and as precursors for radioisotope production; however, both limited availability and high costs are problems. A new method is needed for large-scale separation of these isotopes. Experimental distillation columns were used to measure isotopic separations for sulfur and selenium compounds. The maximum total isotope separation of 32 S vs. 34 S were 1.127 for H 2 S, 1.048 for COS, 0.838 for SF 4 , and 1.058 for CH 3 SH. Relative volatilities of 32 S vs. 34 S are 1.0006 for COS and 0.9976 for SF 4 . There is a reverse isotope effect for carbon in COS. No isotopic separation was observed for dimethyl selenide. The lower mass selenium isotopes in H 2 Se are more volatile. Distillation is a promising method for separating sulfur isotopes on a production scale. Existing distillation technology produced separated isotopes with an effect similar to that found for sulfur in SF 4 . 8 refs., 2 tabs

  10. Sulfur and selenium isotope separation by distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, T.R.; McInteer, B.B.; Montoya, J.G.

    1989-01-01

    Sulfur and selenium isotopes are used for labeled compounds and as precursors for radioisotope production; however, both limited availability and high costs are problems. A new method is needed for large-scale separation of theses isotopes. Experimental distillation columns were used to measure isotopic separations for sulfur and selenium compounds. The maximum total isotope separations of 32 S vs. 34 S were 1.127 for H 2 S, 1.048 for COS, 0.838 for SF 4 , and 1.058 for CH 3 SH. Relative volatilities of 32 S and 34 S are 1.0006 for COS and 0.9976 for SF 4 . There is a reverse isotope effect for carbon in COS. No isotopic separation was observed for dimethyl selenide. The lower mass selenium isotopes in H 2 Se are more volatile. Distillation is a promising method for separating sulfur isotopes on a production scale. Existing distillation technology produces separated isotopes with an effect similar to that found for sulfur in SF 4 . (author). 8 refs.; 2 tabs

  11. Stable strontium isotopic ratios from archaeological organic remains from the Thorsberg peat bog

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nosch, Marie-Louise Bech; von Carnap-Bornheim, Claus; Grupe, Gisela

    2007-01-01

    Pilot study analysing stable strontium isotopic ratios from Iron Age textile and leather finds from the Thorsberg peat bog.......Pilot study analysing stable strontium isotopic ratios from Iron Age textile and leather finds from the Thorsberg peat bog....

  12. Studies in technetium chemistry, Project 1: Evaluation of technetium acetylacetonates as potential cerebral blood flow agents, Project 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, A.G.; Packard, A.B.; Treves, S.; Davison, A.

    1990-01-01

    Although the emphasis in our original submission was on N 2 S 2 and N 3 S coordinating ligands in technetium(V), we have now broadened the chemistry studies into areas that encompass new systems that allow the generation of neutral complexes. This change was based upon developments that have taken place in our basic chemistry studies that could bear on one of the original aims of this work, i.e., the design of complexes designed to penetrate cellular membranes and to remain trapped in target tissues. Among these topics are oxotechnetium(V) complexes containing amine and alcoholate ligands, coordination compounds containing the alternative technetium(V) nitrido core and the synthesis at macroscopic levels of a tetradentate ''umbrella'' ligand that successfully binds the metal. Basic studies with the original bisamide-bisthiol ligand system have continued with the identification of the products formed when aqueous solutions of the complex [TcO(ema)] - are acidified. This material is isolatable as yellow/brown crystals when HCl is added to the tetraphenylarsonium salt of the complex synthesized according to published procedures. Elemental analysis, FAB(+) mass spectrometry and 1 H NMR results were consistent with the formulation TcO(ema)H. Infrared spectra showed a dramatic shift in the Tc = O stretch to 966 cm -1 , as distinct from 945 cm -1 in the original complex

  13. Flotation separation of strontium via phosphate precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh, Luong H V; Liu, J C

    2017-06-01

    Flotation separation of strontium (Sr) from wastewater via phosphate precipitation was investigated. While 37.33% of Sr precipitated at highly alkaline pH in the absence of PO 4 3- , it completely precipitated as Sr 3 (PO 4 ) 2 at a molar ratio ([PO 4 3- ]:[Sr 2+ ]) of 0.62 at a lower pH value. The presence of Ca 2+ hindered Sr precipitation, yet it could be overcome by increasing the PO 4 3- dose. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was a better collector for dispersed air flotation of Sr 3 (PO 4 ) 2 than cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide, or mixed collector systems of SDS and saponin. The highest separation efficiency of 97.5% was achieved at an SDS dose of 40 mg/L. The main mechanism in the precipitate flotation is adsorption of anionic SDS on the positively charged surface of colloidal Sr 3 (PO 4 ) 2 via electrostatic interaction. SDS enhanced the aggregation of Sr 3 (PO 4 ) 2 precipitates as the size increased from 1.65 to 28.0 μm, which was beneficial to separation as well.

  14. Optical lattice clock with Strontium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baillard, X.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis presents the latest achievements regarding the optical lattice clock with Strontium atoms developed at LNE-SYRTE. After a review of the different types of optical clocks that are currently under development, we stress on the concept of optical lattice clock which was first imagined for Sr 87 using the 1 S 0 → 3 P 0 transition. We exhibit the features of this atom, in particular the concept of magic wavelength for the trap, and the achievable performances for this kind of clock. The second part presents the experimental aspects, insisting particularly on the ultra-stable laser used for the interrogation of the atoms which is a central part of the experiment. Among the latest improvements, an optical pumping phase and an interrogation phase using a magnetic field have been added in order to refine the evaluation of the Zeeman effect. Finally, the last part presents the experimental results. The last evaluation of the clock using Sr 87 atoms allowed us to reach a frequency accuracy of 2.6*10 -15 and a measurement in agreement with the one made at JILA (Tokyo university) at the 10 -15 level. On another hand, thanks to recent theoretical proposals, we made a measurement using the bosonic isotope Sr 88 by adapting the experimental setup. This measurement represents the first evaluation for this type of clock, with a frequency accuracy of 7*10 -14 . (author)

  15. Measurements of cesium and strontium diffusion in biotite gneiss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skagius, K.; Neretnieks, I.

    1988-01-01

    A significant retardation of radionuclides transported by flowing water from an underground repository can be expected if the nuclides are able to diffuse into the water filled micropores in the rock. This diffusion into the pores will also increase the surface available to interactions between the nuclides in the ground water and the rock material, such as sorption. To calculate the retardation, it is necessary to know the sorption properties and the diffusivities in the rock matrix for the radionuclides. Diffusion experiments with cesium and strontium in biotite gneiss samples have been performed. Both the transport of strontium and cesium through rock samples and the concentration profiles of cesium and strontium inside rock samples have been determined. The result shows that diffusion of cesium and strontium occurs in the rock material. A diffusion model has been used to evaluate the diffusivity. Both pore diffusion and surface diffusion had to be included in the model to give good agreement with the experimental data. If surface diffusion is not included in the model, the effective pore diffusivity that gives the best fit to the experimental data is found to be higher than expected from earlier measurement of iodide diffusion in the same type of rock material. This indicates that the diffusion of cesium and strontium (sorbing components) in rock material is caused by both pore diffusion and surface diffusion acting in parallel

  16. Accumulation of strontium 90 and cesium 137 in some hydrobionts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyadzhiev, A.; Keslev, D.; Kerteva, A.; Novakova, E.

    1974-01-01

    Factors responsible for the accumulation of strontium 90 and cesium 137 in some plant organisms, characteristic for fishes in Bulgarian fresh-water reservoirs and in Black Seawater, were examined. The investigated samples were taken during spring, summer and autumn-winter seasons 1967/1968. Each sample burnt to ashes at 450 0 C was examined for strontium 90 and cesium 137 content as well as stable isotopes of calcuim and potassium. Accumulation factors for strontium 90 and cesium 137 were significantly higher in freshwater hydrobionts than in seawater hydrobionts. This could be explained by variations in the concentration of stable isotopes of calcium and potassium from freshwater reservoirs and from seawater. Potassium and calcium concentrations were relatively constant in seawater while in freshwater they were significantly variable. Accumulation factors for these radionuclides increased according to the amount of rain and the altitude above sea level. Strontium 90 was deposited mostly in fins, less in scales and least in the meat of fishes; cesium 137 was mainly deposited in the meat and less in the other parts of fishes. The highest accumulation factors for strontium 90 were determined in fishes and for cesium 137 in plant organisms. The most convenient plant and fish species for tracing radioactive contamination of freshwater reservoirs and in the Black Sea were indicated. (A.B.)

  17. A process for the development of strontium hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahra, N.; Fayyaz, M.; Iqbal, W.; Irfan, M.; Alam, S.

    2013-01-01

    A procedure for the preparation of Strontium Hydroxyapatite is adapted to produce high purity and better homogeneity ceramic with good Crystallinity. The strontium substituted bone cement has potential for use in orthopedic surgeries. Ionic Strontium (Sr) in humans shares the same physiological pathway as calcium and can be deposited in the mineral structure of the bone. In the present study, a novel concept of preparing Sr-contained Hydroxyapatite bone cement by using a precipitation method is proposed to get an ideal biomaterial that possesses potential degradability and more excellent pharmacological effect. Chemical analysis, Fourier Transform Infra Red analysis and Thermogravimetric/ Differential Scanning Calorimetric studies were conducted on prepared Strontium Hydroxyapatite sample to characterize the incorporation of 15 percentage Sr2+ into the crystal lattice of Hydroxyapatite. Strontium was quantitatively incorporated into Hydroxyapatite where its substitution for calcium provoked a linear shift of the infrared absorption bands of the hydroxyl and phosphate groups. Thus, the formation of Sr-HAp was confirmed by Chemical Analysis, FT-IR and TGA/DSC results. (author)

  18. Investigation of Varied Strontium-Transuranic Precipitation Chemistries for Crossflow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, C.A.

    2000-01-01

    Precipitation chemistries for strontium and transuranic (TRU) removal have been tested for crossflow filterability and lanthanide removal with simulants of Hanford tank 241-AN-107 supernate. This is the initial work indicating the usefulness of a strontium and permanganate precipitation process as applied to the Hanford River Protection Project. Precipitations with both ferric and ferrous iron were shown to be at least two orders of magnitude less filterable than a 0.1 gpm/ft target average flux that was desired at the time. A precipitate from a strontium nitrate strike alone was found to filter easily and to make the desired average flux. Other chemistries tested included precipitant of lanthanum(III), nickel (II), calcium (II), and a redox chemistry using sodium permanganate. Of these chemistries a strontium and permanganate strike including calcium provided the highest filter flux compared to the other chemistries. It showed the most promise in lanthanide removal as well. This work provides a promising direction for further work to achieve both acceptable filterability and decontamination for Envelope C wastes to be treated by the Hanford River Protection Project. The work reported here was originally intended to satisfy needs for crossflow filter testing of a strontium and ferric precipitation method for treating Envelope C using a 241-AN-107 simulant

  19. Method for strontium isolation from high-mineralized water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evzhanov, Kh.; Andriyasova, G.M.

    1983-01-01

    A method to isolate strontium from high-mineralized waters containing sodium, magnesium, calcium and strontium chlorides, which differ from the prototype method in a considerable decrease in energy consumption with the preservation of a high degree of Sr, Mg and Ca isolation selectivity, has been suggested. According to the method suggested mineralized waters are treated with alkali (NaOH) in the amount of 95-97% of stoichiometry by magnesium, then after separation of magnesium hydroxide precipitate mother liquor is treated with sodium carbonate in the amount of 50-60% of stoichiometry by calcium. After separation of calcium carbonate precipitate mother liquor is treated with NaOH in the amount of 130-135% of stoichiometry by calcium. After separation of calcium hydroxide precipitate from mother liquor by means of sodium carbonate introduction strontium carbonate is isolated. The degree of strontium extraction in the form of SrCO 3 constitutes 90.5% of its content in the initial solution. The method presented can be used for strontium separation from natural and waste waters

  20. Diffusion measurements of cesium and strontium in biotite gneiss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skagius, K.; Neretnieks, I.

    1985-01-01

    A significant retardation of radionuclides transported by flowing water from an underground repository can be expected if the nuclides are able to diffuse into the water filled micropores in the rock. This diffusion into the pores will also increase the surface available to interaction between the nuclides in the groundwater and the rock material, such as sorption. To calculate the retardation it is necessary to know the sorption properties and the diffusivities in the rock matrix for the radionuclides. Diffusion experiments with cesium and strontium in biotite gneiss samples have been performed. Both the transport of strontium and cesium through rock samples and the concentration profiles of cesium and strontium inside rock samples have been determined. The result show that diffusion of cesium and strontium occurs in the rock material. A diffusion model has been used to evaluate the diffusivity. Both pore diffusion and surface diffusion had to be included in the model to give good agreement with the experimental data. If surface diffusion is not included in the model, the effective pore diffusivity that gives the best fit to the experimental data is found to be higher than expected from earlier measurements of iodide diffusion in the same type of rock material. This indicates that the diffusion of cesium and strontium (sorbing components) in rock material is caused by both pore diffusion and surface diffusion acting in parallel. (author)

  1. A process for the development of strontium hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahra, N; Fayyaz, M; Iqbal, W; Irfan, M; Alam, S

    2014-01-01

    A procedure for the preparation of Strontium Hydroxyapatite is adapted to produce high purity and better homogeneity ceramic with good Crystallinity. The strontium substituted bone cement has potential for use in orthopedic surgeries. Ionic Strontium (Sr) in humans shares the same physiological pathway as calcium and can be deposited in the mineral structure of the bone. In the present study, a novel concept of preparing Sr-contained Hydroxyapatite bone cement by using a precipitation method is proposed to get an ideal biomaterial that possesses potential degradability and more excellent pharmacological effect. Chemical analysis, Fourier Transform Infra Red analysis and Thermogravimetric/ Differential Scanning Calorimetric studies were conducted on prepared Strontium Hydroxyapatite sample to characterize the incorporation of 15% Sr 2 + into the crystal lattice of Hydroxyapatite. Strontium was quantitatively incorporated into Hydroxyapatite where its substitution for calcium provoked a linear shift of the infrared absorption bands of the hydroxyl and phosphate groups. Thus, the formation of Sr-HAp was confirmed by Chemical Analysis, FT-IR and TGA/DSC results

  2. A process for the development of strontium hydroxyapatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahra, N.; Fayyaz, M.; Iqbal, W.; Irfan, M.; Alam, S.

    2014-06-01

    A procedure for the preparation of Strontium Hydroxyapatite is adapted to produce high purity and better homogeneity ceramic with good Crystallinity. The strontium substituted bone cement has potential for use in orthopedic surgeries. Ionic Strontium (Sr) in humans shares the same physiological pathway as calcium and can be deposited in the mineral structure of the bone. In the present study, a novel concept of preparing Sr-contained Hydroxyapatite bone cement by using a precipitation method is proposed to get an ideal biomaterial that possesses potential degradability and more excellent pharmacological effect. Chemical analysis, Fourier Transform Infra Red analysis and Thermogravimetric/ Differential Scanning Calorimetric studies were conducted on prepared Strontium Hydroxyapatite sample to characterize the incorporation of 15% Sr2+ into the crystal lattice of Hydroxyapatite. Strontium was quantitatively incorporated into Hydroxyapatite where its substitution for calcium provoked a linear shift of the infrared absorption bands of the hydroxyl and phosphate groups. Thus, the formation of Sr-HAp was confirmed by Chemical Analysis, FT-IR and TGA/DSC results.

  3. Spectroscopy and Laser-SNMS on stable and radioactive strontium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosco, Hauke; Walther, Clemens [Institut fuer Radiooekologie und Strahlenschutz, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover (Germany); Franzmann, Michael [Institut fuer Radiooekologie und Strahlenschutz, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover (Germany); Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Kron, Tobias; Wendt, Klaus [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Nuclear accidents as experienced e.g. in Chernobyl or Fukushima and nuclear weapon tests released considerable activity levels and a variety of medium to long-lived radionuclides into the environment. Strontium-90 appears as a significant share of the fission products in spent nuclear fuel and correspondingly in any possible release. Due to its chemical properties it is subject to long range transport through the environment and can cause considerable dose to man when entering the food chain. Correspondingly, the investigation of speciation and migration channels is of major relevance. A radioanalytical approach is severely hampered by the low beta energy of the strontium-90 decay and the need to separate strontium-90 from the secular equilibrated daughter yttrium-90. Hence, application of a mass spectrometric method without chemical separation of the elements is a promising alternative for low-level investigation of strontium-90. Application of the new Laser-SNMS system at IRS Hannover could well suit those needs. It applies three Ti:Sa lasers for resonant ionization of neutral atoms produced by primary ion sputtering in a SIMS together with a time-of-flight mass analysis which provides high spatial resolution. The analytical measurements are preceded by spectroscopic studies on the level structure of strontium to develop a most efficient ionization scheme.

  4. Investigation of Varied Strontium-Transuranic Precipitation Chemistries for Crossflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, C.A.

    2000-07-27

    Precipitation chemistries for strontium and transuranic (TRU) removal have been tested for crossflow filterability and lanthanide removal with simulants of Hanford tank 241-AN-107 supernate. This is the initial work indicating the usefulness of a strontium and permanganate precipitation process as applied to the Hanford River Protection Project. Precipitations with both ferric and ferrous iron were shown to be at least two orders of magnitude less filterable than a 0.1 gpm/ft target average flux that was desired at the time. A precipitate from a strontium nitrate strike alone was found to filter easily and to make the desired average flux. Other chemistries tested included precipitant of lanthanum(III), nickel (II), calcium (II), and a redox chemistry using sodium permanganate. Of these chemistries a strontium and permanganate strike including calcium provided the highest filter flux compared to the other chemistries. It showed the most promise in lanthanide removal as well. This work provides a promising direction for further work to achieve both acceptable filterability and decontamination for Envelope C wastes to be treated by the Hanford River Protection Project. The work reported here was originally intended to satisfy needs for crossflow filter testing of a strontium and ferric precipitation method for treating Envelope C using a 241-AN-107 simulant.

  5. 21 CFR 522.2100 - Selenium, vitamin E injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Selenium, vitamin E injection. 522.2100 Section... § 522.2100 Selenium, vitamin E injection. (a)(1) Specifications. The drug is an emulsion containing in... of vitamin E (68 I.U.) (as d-alpha tocopheryl acetate). (2) Sponsor. See No. 000061 in § 510.600(c...

  6. Low blood selenium: A probable factor in essential hypertension ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood selenium (BSe) and plasma glutathione peroxidase (plGSH-Px) activity were measured as biochemical markers of selenium status of 103 hypertensive patients (44 males and 59 females) and 88 apparently healthy subjects (40 males and 48 females). The hypertensive patients were classified into three groups based ...

  7. Enrichment of African catfish with functional selenium originating from garlic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schram, E.; Pedrero, Z.; Camara, C.; Heul, van der J.W.; Luten, J.B.

    2008-01-01

    We wanted to create functional seafood with high concentrations of organic selenium (seleno-methyl-selenocysteine and ¿-glutamyl-seleno-methyl-selenocysteine) with anti-carcinogenic properties for human consumers. Garlic containing high concentrations of these organic selenium compounds was used as

  8. Relationship between soil contents and plasma levels of selenium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The soil contents of trace elements selenium, chromium and manganese were measured to determine their impact on the plasma levels of 160 healthy adult Nigerians in five different experimental locations in Cross River and Akwa Ibom States, South - South Nigeria. The mean (±SD) soil selenium, chromium and ...

  9. Aquatic selenium pollution is a global environmental safety issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Dennis Lemly

    2004-01-01

    Selenium pollution is a worldwide phenomenon and is associated with a broad spectrum of human activities, ranging from the most basic agricultural practices to the most high-tech industrial processes. Consequently, selenium contamination of aquatic habitats can take place in urban, suburban, and rural settings alike--from mountains to plains, from deserts to...

  10. Selenium enrichment pattern in flowering Chinese cabbage, cabbage and asparagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mo, H.Z.; Yang Zhu, Yang; Zhang, M.

    2006-01-01

    CONCLUSIONS - Within a certain range, selenium accumulation in three studied vegetables was lineally correlated with spraying concentration. However, a too high concentration caused the reduction of vegetable output and damage in quality. - Twice spraying with lower concentration of selenium was a

  11. Molecular neutron activation analysis of selenium metabolites in urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blotcky, A.J.; Hansen, G.T.; Ebrahim, A.; Rack, E.P.

    1988-01-01

    Because of the biological importance of selenium in living biological systems, various analytical procedures have been developed for analysis of microquantities of elemental selenium, in urine, serum, and tissue. For urine selenium, these include atomic absorption spectrometry, solution absorption spectrometry, solution fluorescence spectrometry, volumetry, and neutron activation analysis. Of equal or greater importance is the determination of selenium metabolites present in urine for the purpose of describing the biological pathways for the metabolism of selenium in living organisms. While it is known from previous studies that trimethylselenonium ion (TMSe) is a major metabolite in urine, probably the result of reduction and methylation reaction, there are no definitive results in the literature indicating the nature or quantity of other selenium metabolic products in urine. Early techniques to measure TMSe levels in urine involved the use of the radiotracer 75 Se. Because of the long biological half-life of selenium and issues of radiation exposure, its use in humans has been limited. In this paper, the authors report the experimental procedure for the determination of total selenoamino acid concentration in urine and present total selenium values, and, where applicable, TMSe, SeO 2- 3 , and total selenoamino acid concentrations in the urine of normal and diseased subjects

  12. Preliminary study of daily selenium level intake in algeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benamar, M.A.; Tchantchane, A.; Tobbeche, S.

    1992-10-01

    The amount of selenium in onions and potatoes was measured by Pixe (particle Induced X-ray Emission) in the Nuclear Center at Bordeaux-Gradignan (CNBG). The goal of this work is to investigate the level of selenium concentration that may be consumed by different class of people

  13. Immobilization and Limited Reoxidation of Technetium-99 by Fe(II)-Goethite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Um, Wooyong; Chang, Hyun-shik; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Smith, Steven C.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Buck, Edgar C.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Bowden, Mark E.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Lukens, Wayne W.

    2010-09-30

    This report summarizes the methodology used to test the sequestration of technetium-99 present in both deionized water and simulated Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant waste solutions.

  14. Analysis of one thousand liver scans carried out using technetium phytate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquier, J; de Laforte, C; Roux, F; Bisset, J P; Paulin, R [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de la Timone, 13 - Marseille (France)

    1977-10-01

    One thousand liver scans were carried out using technetium phytate. This soluble compound is transformed in the circulating blood into a colloid by chelation of serum calcium, thereby forming a macromolecular phytate of calcium and technetium. The presenting symptoms are compared with the isotopic findings. This microcolloid has the advantages common to all technetium tracers and, in addition, is easy to prepare and has the advantage of a distribution between the liver, spleen, and bone of the same type as that seen with colloidal gold 198 without the dosimetric problems associated with the latter. Although it has a level of hepatic fixation which is less than that of certain sulphide complexes of technetium it appears to provide a better reflection of the colloidopexic function of the liver.

  15. Analysis of one thousand liver scans carried out using technetium phytate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquier, J.; Laforte, C. de; Roux, F.; Bisset, J.P.; Paulin, R.

    1977-01-01

    One thousand liver scans were carried out using technetium phytate. This soluble compound is transformed in the circulating blood into a colloid by chelation of serum calcium, thereby forming a macromolecular phytate of calcium and technetium. The presenting symptoms are compared with the isotopic findings. This microcolloid has the advantages common to all technetium tracers and, in addition, is easy to prepare and has the advantage of a distribution between the liver, spleen and bone of the same type as that seen with colloidal gold 198 without the dosimetric problems associated with the latter. Although it has a level of hepatic fixation which is less than that of certain sulphide complexes of technetium it appears to provide a better reflection of the colloidopexic function of the liver [fr

  16. Response of selenium changes in blood using cyclic activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spyrou, N.M.; Akanle, O.B.; Damyanova, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    A study was undertaken to investigate the response of selenium uptake and washout in whole blood and its components in healthy subjects, aged 20 to 30 yr, who were given selenium as a supplement to their usual diet, in the form of a yeast tablet (200 mg) containing 100 μg of the element together with vitamins A, C, and E (natural). Selenium has gained worldwide interest not only as an essential trace element but as a potent modifier of environmental hazards and as a naturally occurring toxicant. It is important therefore to investigate the character and the degree of the changes in healthy people on selenium supplementation. Cyclic activation analysis was used for the determination of selenium concentration through the detection of /sup 77m/Se (17.5 s), because of the increased sensitivity of the method and the large number of samples involved

  17. Genome-wide association study of serum selenium concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Jian; Hsu, Li; Harrison, Tabitha

    2013-01-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element and circulating selenium concentrations have been associated with a wide range of diseases. Candidate gene studies suggest that circulating selenium concentrations may be impacted by genetic variation; however, no study has comprehensively investigated...... this hypothesis. Therefore, we conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study to identify genetic variants associated with serum selenium concentrations in 1203 European descents from two cohorts: the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening and the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI). We...... tested association between 2,474,333 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and serum selenium concentrations using linear regression models. In the first stage (PLCO) 41 SNPs clustered in 15 regions had p

  18. Reproduction in eastern screech-owls fed selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiemeyer, Stanley N.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    Raptors are occasionally exposed to excessive selenium from contaminated prey, but the effects of this exposure on reproduction are unknown. Therefore, we fed captive eastern screech-owls (Otus asio) diets containing 0, 4.4, or 13.2 ppm (wet wt) added selenium in the form of seleno-DL-methionine. Adult mass at sacrifice and reproductive success of birds receiving 13.2 ppm selenium were depressed (P biochemistries indicative of oxidative stress were affected (P < 0.05) in 5-day-old nestlings from parents fed 4.4 ppm selenium and included a 19% increase in glutathione peroxidase activity, a 43% increase in the ratio of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) to reduced glutathione (GSH), and a 17% increase in lipid peroxidation. Based on reproductive effects relative to dietary exposure, sensitivity of eastern screech-owls to selenium was similar to that of black-crowned night-herons (Nycticorax nycticorax) but less than that of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos).

  19. Recent Microextraction Techniques for Determination and Chemical Speciation of Selenium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Ahmed S. A.

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Research designed to improve extraction has led to the development of microextraction techniques (ME, which involve simple, low cost, and effective preconcentrationof analytes in various matrices. This review is concerned with the principles and theoretical background of ME, as well as the development of applications for selenium analysis during the period from 2008 to 2016. Among all ME, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction was found to be most favorable for selenium. On the other hand, atomic absorption spectrometry was the most frequently used instrumentation. Selenium ME have rarely been coupled to spectrophotometry and X-ray spectrophotometry methods, and there is no published application of ME with electrochemical techniques. We strongly support the idea of using a double preconcentration process, which consists of microextraction prior to preconcentration, followed by selenium determination using cathodic stripping voltammetry (ME-CSV. More attention should focus on the development of accurate, precise, and green methods for selenium analysis.

  20. Placental transfer of calcium and strontium and of their radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griessl, I.; Stieve, F.E.

    1987-11-01

    The first part of the report deals with the occurrence and the chemistry of strontium and its radioisotopes, and the second part discusses the calcium and the strontium metabolism in man. General information on the biology and physiology of the human skeleton is given in part 3, whereas part 4 again discusses the calcium and strontium metabolism in man, however with particular emphasis on the conditions during pregnancy and lactation. Part 5 presents an evaluation of the literature in this subject field, concentrating on results obtained with experimental animals such as cows, swine, dogs, guinea pigs, rats, and mice, and discusses the applicability of these findings to the conditions in man. An annex presents data on the yttrium metabolism in man and animal. (MG) [de