WorldWideScience

Sample records for selective world experience

  1. Selecting lineup foils in eyewitness identification experiments: experimental control and real-world simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, S E; Tunnicliff, J L

    2001-06-01

    Experimental research on eyewitness identification follows a standard principle of experimental design. Perpetrator-present and perpetrator-absent lineups are constructed with the same foils, so that the two conditions are identical except for the presence or absence ofthe trueperpetrator ofthe crime. However, this aspect of the design simulates conditions that do not correspond to those of real criminal investigations. Specifically, these conditions can create perp-absent lineups in which the foils are selected based on their similarity to an unknown person--the real perpetrator. Analysis of the similarity relations predicts that when foils for perp-absent lineups are selected based on their match to the perpetrator the false identification rate will be lower than if the foils are selected based on their match to the innocent suspect. This prediction was confirmed in an experiment that compared these two perp-absent lineup conditions. These results suggest that false identification rates in previous experiments would have been higher if the foils had been selected based on their match to the innocent suspect, rather than the absent perpetrator.

  2. The world's biggest experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Gregson, Liz

    2008-01-01

    According to CERN, our understanding of the Universe is about the change. Meet the Imperial alumni and staff who are involved in CERN's Large Hadron Collider, the world's biggest experiment. (3 pages)

  3. Learning Experience with Virtual Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Virtual worlds create a new opportunity to enrich the educational experience through media-rich immersive learning. Virtual worlds have gained notoriety in games such as World of Warcraft (WoW), which has become the most successful online game ever, and in "general purpose" worlds, such as Second Life (SL), whose participation levels (more than 10…

  4. Interrelationships among Growth, Confidence and Governance in the Globalized World-An experiment of some selected countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Chandra Das

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The countries in the world in the globalized era have faced heterogeneity in challenges in managing their growth factors as well as the stake holders of such growth profiles. The political and economic turmoil of the last two decades around the world have opened the eyes of the consumers, business houses and the governments of different countries to read and follow the economic events. The paper has tried to study the causal relation and interrelationships among different growth factors like the confidence levels of the consumers and business houses, inflation, unemployment like economic factors and governance like non-economic factors over a selection of 17 countries across all continents for the period 1996-2010. Because of limited sources of data we have applied the pooled regression technique to justify our study. Confidence levels of both the consumers and business houses cause the growth rates whereas governance causes growth only under pooled data. But for individual country data we observe that in majority of the countries there are absences of causalities between the variables. It has been observed that pooled annual growth rates of GDP of the countries are significantly related to the business and consumer confidence indexes, unemployment rate, debt ratio and overall governance indicators that shows improvement over the individual country analysis where in majority of the cases there is no significant factor for growth and confidence. By segregating the entire data the study find a few countries where a few variables like BCI, stock prices and governance make significant impact upon growth rates. In majority of the countries BCI is explained by CCI, Stock prices and governance while CCI is explained by stock prices, governance and debt ratio.

  5. Kin Selection in the RNA World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Samuel R; West, Stuart A

    2017-12-05

    Various steps in the RNA world required cooperation. Why did life's first inhabitants, from polymerases to synthetases, cooperate? We develop kin selection models of the RNA world to answer these questions. We develop a very simple model of RNA cooperation and then elaborate it to model three relevant issues in RNA biology: (1) whether cooperative RNAs receive the benefits of cooperation; (2) the scale of competition in RNA populations; and (3) explicit replicator diffusion and survival. We show: (1) that RNAs are likely to express partial cooperation; (2) that RNAs will need mechanisms for overcoming local competition; and (3) in a specific example of RNA cooperation, persistence after replication and offspring diffusion allow for cooperation to overcome competition. More generally, we show how kin selection can unify previously disparate answers to the question of RNA world cooperation.

  6. Infusing Real World Experiences into Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academies Press, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this report is to encourage enhanced richness and relevance of the undergraduate engineering education experience, and thus produce better-prepared and more globally competitive graduates, by providing practical guidance for incorporating real world experience in US engineering programs. The report, a collaborative effort of the…

  7. Smashing physics inside the world's biggest experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Butterworth, Jon

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson made headlines around the world. Two scientists, Peter Higgs and Francois Englert, whose theories predicted its existence, shared a Nobel Prize. The discovery was the culmination of the largest experiment ever run, the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. But what really is a Higgs boson and what does it do? How was it found? And how has its discovery changed our understanding of the fundamental laws of nature? And what did it feel like to be part of it? Jon Butterworth is one of the leading physicists at CERN and this book is the first popular inside account of the hunt for the Higgs. It is a story of incredible scientific collaboration, inspiring technological innovation and ground-breaking science. It is also the story of what happens when the world's most expensive experiment blows up, of neutrinos that may or may not travel faster than light, and the reality of life in an underground bunker in Switzerland. This book will also leave you with a working...

  8. Selected Papers Presented at MODSIM World 2011 Conference and Expo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E. (Compiler); Bullock, Leanna S. (Compiler)

    2012-01-01

    Selected papers from MODSIM World 2011 Conference & Expo are contained in this NASA Conference Publication (CP). MODSIM World 2011 was held in Virginia Beach, Virginia, October 11-14, 2011. The theme of the 2011 conference & expo was "Overcoming Critical Global Challenges with Modeling & Simulation". The conference program consisted of five technical tracks - Defense, Homeland Security & First Responders; Education; Health & Medicine; The Human Dimension; and Serious Games & Virtual Worlds.

  9. Experiences of Two UNESCO World Heritage Cities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shevren, Lai; Ooi, Can-Seng

    This paper critically examines the relationship between federal and local‐state level governments in interpreting and presenting the World Heritage brand at two Malaysian World Heritage sites, George Town and Melaka. The World Heritage status is internationally recognised. Although the World...... Heritage brand offers many advantages in tourism development and destination marketing, what and how the local heritage is conserved, interpreted and appreciated remains open. This article shows that the mechanisms of interpreting and presenting the WH status vary according to the agendas and needs...

  10. WORLD EXPERIENCE OF FINANCIAL SUPPORT OF INNOVATIVE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Kornilova

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines and summarizes the experience of the financial support of innovative development of the world economy, which occupied a high position in the world economy and demonstrates active dynamics of innovation growth. We consider the financial advantage of direct and indirect actions, which are often used in the practice of the regulation of innovation-studied countries.

  11. World Business Leaders Interaction in Higher Education: A Novel Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronel, Gustavo; Mathai, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a disruptive approach that offers higher education students and faculty the experience of learning from world business leaders and interacting with fellow members at their institutions. The World Business Forum event was transmitted live to 36 higher education institutions in 19 countries. Webcast and social media…

  12. Spectator experience management at FIA World Rally Championship events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Hans Erik Næss

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In light of the Fédération Internationale de l’Automobile’s (FIA call for research into what is needed to make world motorsport championships grow towards 2025, this paper responds by offering a framework for improving spectator experiences at the service parks of the FIA World Rally Championship (WRC events based on five design principles of ‘the experience economy’: 1 theme the experience, 2 harmonise impressions with positive cues, 3 eliminate negative cues, 4 mix in memorabilia and 5 engage the senses. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork on seven WRC events in the period 2009-15, the result is a comprehensive set of findings that, while tailored to meet the WRC’s challenges, also includes theoretical and methodological insights relevant to other sporting bodies on how to manage spectator experiences to competitive advantage.

  13. Social Experience in "World of Warcraft": Technological and Ideological Mediations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crenshaw, Nicole Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    As society shifts towards spending more time online for business and leisure, examining human behavior in virtual environments is crucial. To better understand the role that games play in our society, I analyze social experience in World of Warcraft (WoW), one of the longest running massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMO). Since its…

  14. An experience in World Nuclear University-Summer Institute 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzilawati Mohd Sarowi

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: World Nuclear University-Summer Institute (WNU-SI) has been held annually since 2005 in Cristchurh College, Oxford, London. This six weeks course is attended by 80-90 young professionals, or fellow from 20-25 countries across the world. The WNU-SI is designed not only to discuss the full spectrum of issues surrounding nuclear energy, but also emphasis on team building, cultural awareness and the development of leadership potential in multinational environment. Interestingly, the mentors play their role base on their experience in leading the nuclear industry throughout the globe. At the end of the course, the participant could understand the most important issues address in the industry with global perspective, experience and learn from practical teamwork internationally. Finally, this course is believed to be a step in developing a worldwide network among the fellows to support each other in their careers. This paper will discuss the experience gained in WNU-SI 2012. (author)

  15. Real-world scenarios help improve selection of radiology employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, C L; Groff, K; Phillips, M

    1998-01-01

    Choosing the right candidate through the interview process is critical, particularly in light of rapidly changing skills in various technologies. The authors have changed the interviewing process at Jeanes Hospital in Philadelphia in order to examine and evaluate multiple objectives simultaneously. To do this, they created an instrument that elicits impromptu responses to real-world radiology situations. Such responses help assess a potential candidate's training, emotional strength, technical experience and growth potential. They also determine how much additional training the potential candidate will need to be effective in the department. Using the instrument helps sharpen the assessment of candidate traits such as face-to-face communication skills and response time. The impact on hiring is positive. Quality staff, improved patient care and improved patient safety are only some of the results. Many of the questions included on the instrument come from past problem situations and help the interviewers to determine whether a candidate understands underlying issues and the seriousness of situations. The goal is to ensure that patient care and productivity are not hampered by unusual situations. When a concrete difference is detected between a candidate's response and the department's needs, it is possible to assess the cost-effectiveness of training for the discrepancy. For entry-level candidates, the question is whether the person is trainable. Consistently using this interview document forces hiring managers to identify specific abilities, traits and experience desirable in the workplace.

  16. On the directional selectivity of tunneling experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beuermann, G.; Goettingen Univ.

    1981-01-01

    Using realistic parameters in a simplified model the directional selectivity of tunneling experiments is discussed. Although perfect surfaces and barriers are assumed, quasiparticles coming from a wide solid angle may contribute essentially to the tunnel current. This must be taken into consideration in the case of gap anisotropy. (orig.)

  17. The Bluebirds: World War I Soldiers' Experiences of Occupational Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, Judith; Robinson, Katie; Moloney, Stephanie

    More is known about the experience of occupational therapists than the experience of patients during the profession's early years. We examined soldiers' experiences of occupational therapy in American Base Hospital 9 in France during World War I through analysis of a 53-line poem by Corporal Frank Wren contained in the unpublished memoir of occupational therapy reconstruction aide Lena Hitchcock. Historical documentary research methods and thematic analysis were used to analyze the poem, the memoir, and the hospital's published history. The poem describes the activities engaged in during occupational therapy, equipment used, and the context of therapy. It articulates positive dimensions of the experience of engaging in activities, including emotional benefits, diversion, and orthopedic benefits. Previous historical research has identified core philosophical premises about the use of occupational therapy; in this article, the enactment of these principles is established through the analysis of a soldier's account of receiving occupational therapy. Copyright © 2017 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  18. World Nuclear University School of Uranium Production: Eight years' experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trojacek, J.

    2014-01-01

    The World Nuclear University School of Uranium Production was established by DIAMO, state enterprise in 2006 year under the auspices of the World Nuclear University in London in partnership with international nuclear organizations – OECD/NEA and IAEA. Using the expertise and infrastructure of DIAMO State Enterprise, in conjuction with national and international universities, scientific institutions, regulatory authorities and other individual experts, the “school” covers its mission with the aim to provide world-class training on all aspects of uranium production cycle to equip operators, regulators and executives with the knowledge and expertise needed to provide expanded, environmentally-sound uranium mining throughout the world: • to educate students on all aspects of uranium production cycle including exploration, planning, development, operation, remediation and closure of uranium production facilities; • to improve the state of the art of uranium exploration, mining and mine remediation through research and development; • to provide a forum for the exchange of information on the latest uranium mining technologies and experiences – best practices.

  19. Worlds largest particle physics laboratory selects Proxim Wireless Mesh

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Proxim Wireless has announced that the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), the world's largest particle physics laboratory and the birthplace of the World Wide Web, is using it's ORiNOCO AP-4000 mesh access points to extend the range of the laboratory's Wi-Fi network and to provide continuous monitoring of the lab's calorimeters" (1/2 page)

  20. World-wide online monitoring interface of the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kolos, S; The ATLAS collaboration; Mineev, M; Hauser, R; Salnikov, A

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration accounts for more than 3000 members located all over the world. The efficiency of the experiment can be improved allowing system experts not present on site to follow the ATLAS operations in real-time, spotting potential problems which otherwise may remain unattended for a non-negligible time. Taking into account the wide geographical spread of the ATLAS collaboration, the solution of this problem is to have all monitoring information with minimal access latency available world-wide. We have implemented a framework which defines a standard approach for retrieving arbitrary monitoring information from the ATLAS private network via HTTP. An information request is made by specifying one of the predefined URLs with some optional parameters refining data which has to be shipped back in XML format. The framework takes care of receiving, parsing and forwarding such requests to the appropriate plugins. The plugins retrieve the requested data and convert it to XML (or optionally to JSON) format...

  1. Hard and Soft Selection Revisited: How Evolution by Natural Selection Works in the Real World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznick, David

    2016-01-01

    The modern synthesis of evolutionary biology unified Darwin's natural selection with Mendelian genetics, but at the same time it created the dilemma of genetic load. Lewontin and Hubby's (1966) and Harris's (1966) characterization of genetic variation in natural populations increased the apparent burden of this load. Neutrality or near neutrality of genetic variation was one mechanism proposed for the revealed excessive genetic variation. Bruce Wallace coined the term "soft selection" to describe an alternative way for natural selection to operate that was consistent with observed variation. He envisioned nature as presenting ecological vacancies that could be filled by diverse genotypes. Survival and successful reproduction was a combined function of population density, genotype, and genotype frequencies, rather than a fixed value of the relative fitness of each genotype. My goal in this review is to explore the importance of soft selection in the real world. My motive and that of my colleagues as described here is not to explain what maintains genetic variation in natural populations, but rather to understand the factors that shape how organisms adapt to natural environments. We characterize how feedbacks between ecology and evolution shape both evolution and ecology. These feedbacks are mediated by density- and frequency-dependent selection, the mechanisms that underlie soft selection. Here, I report on our progress in characterizing these types of selection with a combination of a consideration of the published literature and the results from my collaborators' and my research on natural populations of guppies. © The American Genetic Association. 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Smashing physics. Inside the world's biggest experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butterworth, Jon

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson made headlines around the world. Two scientists, Peter Higgs and Francois Englert, whose theories predicted its existence, shared a Nobel Prize. The discovery was the culmination of the largest experiment ever run, the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. But what really is a Higgs boson and what does it do? How was it found? And how has its discovery changed our understanding of the fundamental laws of nature? And what did it feel like to be part of it? Jon Butterworth is one of the leading physicists at CERN and this book is the first popular inside account of the hunt for the Higgs. It is a story of incredible scientific collaboration, inspiring technological innovation and ground-breaking science. It is also the story of what happens when the world's most expensive experiment blows up, of neutrinos that may or may not travel faster than light, and the reality of life in an underground bunker in Switzerland. This book will also leave you with a working knowledge of the new physics and what the discovery of the Higgs particle means for how we define the laws of nature. It will take you to the cutting edge of modern scientific thinking.

  3. assessment of selected world bank policies and their implications

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LUCY

    U. Akah, Department of Human Kinetics and Health Education, University of Calabar, Calabar,. Nigeria .... (SAP) policies by the World Bank which was aimed at streamlining the ... of water resources to her citizens as a conation for assessing ...

  4. The World of Great Wines: The Douro Valley Experience

    OpenAIRE

    A. Oliveira-Brochado; R. Silva; C. Paulino

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to use an experiential view of wine tourism to develop a battery of items that can potentially capture the overall Douro Valley experience from the tourist’s perspective. The Douro Valley, a UNESCO World Heritage region located in Portugal, was the target of this study. The research took a mixed approach using both qualitative and quantitative designs. Firstly, we combine the literature review on service quality scales with a content analysis of five in-depth intervie...

  5. The World Climate Exercise: Is (Simulated) Experience Our Best Teacher?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, K.; Rooney-varga, J. N.; Jones, A.; Johnston, E.; Sterman, J.

    2015-12-01

    Meeting the challenge of climate change will clearly require 'deep learning' - learning that motivates a search for underlying meaning, a willingness to exert the sustained effort needed to understand complex problems, and innovative problem-solving. This type of learning is dependent on the level of the learner's engagement with the material, their intrinsic motivation to learn, intention to understand, and relevance of the material to the learner. Here, we present evidence for deep learning about climate change through a simulation-based role-playing exercise, World Climate. The exercise puts participants into the roles of delegates to the United Nations climate negotiations and asks them to create an international climate deal. They find out the implications of their decisions, according to the best available science, through the same decision-support computer simulation used to provide feedback for the real-world negotiations, C-ROADS. World Climate provides an opportunity for participants have an immersive, social experience in which they learn first-hand about both the social dynamics of climate change decision-making, through role-play, and the dynamics of the climate system, through an interactive computer simulation. Evaluation results so far have shown that the exercise is highly engaging and memorable and that it motivates large majorities of participants (>70%) to take action on climate change. In addition, we have found that it leads to substantial gains in understanding key systems thinking concepts (e.g., the stock-flow behavior of atmospheric CO2), as well as improvements in understanding of climate change causes and impacts. While research is still needed to better understand the impacts of simulation-based role-playing exercises like World Climate on behavior change, long-term understanding, transfer of systems thinking skills across topics, and the importance of social learning during the exercise, our results to date indicate that it is a

  6. Selecting journals for a third world mathematics library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahshahani, S.

    1989-10-01

    We wish to provide the kind of background and data on mathematics periodicals that will enable the third-world mathematicians (a) to better articulate their need for a large supply of journals and (b) to help them develop a rational policy. (author). 4 refs, 2 tabs

  7. Multilevel and kin selection in a connected world

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wade, Michael J; Wilson, David S; Goodnight, Charles

    2010-01-01

    in the opposition of two processes: within-group and among-group selection. This distinction is important in light of the current controversy among evolutionary biologists in which some continue to affirm that natural selection centres only and always at the level of the individual organism or gene, despite......Wild et al. argue that the evolution of reduced virulence can be understood from the perspective of inclusive fitness, obviating the need to evoke group selection as a contributing causal factor. Although they acknowledge the mathematical equivalence of the inclusive fitness and multilevel...... selection approaches, they conclude that reduced virulence can be viewed entirely as an individual-level adaptation by the parasite. Here we show that their model is a well-known special case of the more general theory of multilevel selection, and that the cause of reduced virulence resides...

  8. Merger and Acquisition Market: from World Experience to National Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrechana Svitlana I.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the article lies in identification of tendencies and prospects of development of the merger and acquisition market of Ukraine in the context of influence of the world M and A experience upon this process under conditions of globalisation. In the result of the study the article analyses the most significant merger and acquisition operations that took place in the world practice and in Ukraine in recent years. The article reveals and deeply assesses the variety of motives and mechanisms of their realisation from the position of practice of developed countries and trans-national corporations and also domestic associations of enterprises. It shows that transactions of tough or forced character of acquisition prevail in Ukraine, specific features of which are not only the reduced cost but also direct belonging of buyers to oligarchic-political structures. It explains negative influence of these specific features upon volume and activity of the national M and A market. It formulates and offers a system of state and economic subjects measures, immediate application of which would allow creation of favourable conditions for development of the national merger and acquisition market.

  9. Is the real world something more than the world of our experience? Relations between neodarwinism, transcendental philosophy and cognitive sciences.

    OpenAIRE

    Wozniak , Adrianna

    2006-01-01

    The question I will deal with concerns the nature of the phylogenetically acquired knowledge and the assumptions of Biological Evolutionary Epistemology. EE constitutes a direct extension of the Synthetic Theory of Evolution and supposes, that (1) some external world exists and that; (2) knowledge about the external world has been shaped by the external world itself, i.e. through natural selection. If Evolutionary Epistemology accepts the evolution as a fact and admits the influence of the na...

  10. Online Event Selection at the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Konecki, M

    2004-01-01

    Triggering in the high-rate environment of the LHC is a challenging task. The CMS experiment has developed a two-stage trigger system. The Level-1 Trigger is based on custom hardware devices and is designed to reduce the 40 MHz LHC bunch-crossing rate to a maximum event rate of ~100 kHz. The further reduction of the event rate to O(100 Hz), suitable for permanent storage, is performed in the High-Level Trigger (HLT) which is based on a farm of commercial processors. The methods used for object identification and reconstruction are presented. The CMS event selection strategy is discussed. The performance of the HLT is also given.

  11. Proceedings of the first world mining environment congress. Select papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhar, B.B.; Thakur, D.N.

    1996-01-01

    The themes covered at the conference were: environmental problems and issues; environmental management practices; environmental policy and legislation; sustainable development vis-a-vis environmental management; environmental training and education; and future strategies. Selected papers have been abstracted separately on the IEA Coal Research CD-ROM

  12. Occupational toxicant inhalation injury: the World Trade Center (WTC) experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Hoz, Rafael E; Shohet, Michael R; Chasan, Rachel; Bienenfeld, Laura A; Afilaka, Aboaba A; Levin, Stephen M; Herbert, Robin

    2008-02-01

    Clinical descriptive data is presented on a group of 554 former workers and volunteers (with more than 90 different occupations) at the World Trade Center (WTC) disaster site. A subsample of 168 workers (30% of the group) was selected to examine lower airway disease risk in relation to smoking and WTC exposure variables. Five diagnostic categories clearly predominate: upper airway disease (78.5%), gastroesophageal reflux disease (57.6%), lower airway disease (48.9%), psychological (41.9%) and chronic musculoskeletal illnesses (17.8%). The most frequent pattern of presentation was a combination of the first three of those categories (29.8%). Associations were found between arrival at the WTC site within the first 48 h of the terrorist attack and lower airway and gastroesophageal reflux disease, and between past or present cigarette smoking and lower airway disease. Occupational exposures at the WTC remain consistently associated with a disease profile, which includes five major diagnostic categories. These conditions often coexist in different combinations, which (as expected) mutually enhances their clinical expression, complicates medical management, and slows recovery. Cigarette smoking and early arrival at the WTC site appear to be risk factors for lower airway disease diagnosis.

  13. Attitudes towards sex selection in the Western world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Balen, Frank

    2006-07-01

    It appears that in most Western countries, son preference is somewhat stronger than daughter preference. However, when one considers the preference of women it looks as though the opposite pattern is emerging. There is a considerable social acceptance of 'light' methods of sex selection (such as diets), even though these methods are not proven to be effective. The inclination to use sperm separation methods appears to be greater in the United States than in some European countries. There are indications that a preference for boys or for girls is associated with attitudes towards technology, child-rearing style and the stereotyping of boys or girls. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. World Bank support for renewable energy - the ASTAE experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaeffer, L.

    1999-01-01

    Historically, the World Bank has helped finance the generation, transmission and distribution of electricity as well as improvements in supply-side energy efficiency. The World Bank's ability to mainstream renewable energy technologies in developing countries is enhanced by the Global Energy Facility (GEF), the World Bank Solar Initiative (and the nascent Solar Development Corporation), the International Finance Corporation and the Asia Alternative Energy Unit (ASTAE). (orig./RHM)

  15. World Bank support for renewable energy - the ASTAE experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaeffer, L. [World Bank, Washington, DC (United States). Asia Alternative Energy Unit

    1999-07-01

    Historically, the World Bank has helped finance the generation, transmission and distribution of electricity as well as improvements in supply-side energy efficiency. The World Bank's ability to mainstream renewable energy technologies in developing countries is enhanced by the Global Energy Facility (GEF), the World Bank Solar Initiative (and the nascent Solar Development Corporation), the International Finance Corporation and the Asia Alternative Energy Unit (ASTAE). (orig./RHM)

  16. Selected Papers and Presentations Presented at MODSIM World 2010 Conference and Expo. Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E. (Editor)

    2011-01-01

    MODSIM World 2010 was held in Hampton, Virginia, October 13-15, 2010. The theme of the 2010 conference & expo was "21st Century Decision-Making: The Art of Modeling& Simulation". The conference program consisted of seven technical tracks - Defense, Engineering and Science, Health & Medicine, Homeland Security & First Responders, The Human Dimension, K-20 STEM Education, and Serious Games & Virtual Worlds. Selected papers and presentations from MODSIM World 2010 Conference & Expo are contained in this NASA Conference Publication (CP). Section 8.0 of this CP contains papers from MODSIM World 2009 Conference & Expo that were unavailable at the time of publication of NASA/CP-2010-216205 Selected Papers Presented at MODSIM World 2009 Conference and Expo, March 2010.

  17. Selected Papers and Presentations Presented at MODSIM World 2010 Conference Expo. Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E. (Editor)

    2011-01-01

    MODSIM World 2010 was held in Hampton, Virginia, October 13-15, 2010. The theme of the 2010 conference & expo was "21st Century Decision-Making: The Art of Modeling& Simulation". The conference program consisted of seven technical tracks - Defense, Engineering and Science, Health & Medicine, Homeland Security & First Responders, The Human Dimension, K-20 STEM Education, and Serious Games & Virtual Worlds. Selected papers and presentations from MODSIM World 2010 Conference & Expo are contained in this NASA Conference Publication (CP). Section 8.0 of this CP contains papers from MODSIM World 2009 Conference & Expo that were unavailable at the time of publication of NASA/CP-2010-216205 Selected Papers Presented at MODSIM World 2009 Conference and Expo, March 2010.

  18. Selection as a learning experience: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Visser, Marieke; Laan, Roland F; Engbers, Rik; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke; Fluit, Cornelia

    2018-01-01

    Research on selection for medical school does not explore selection as a learning experience, despite growing attention for the learning effects of assessment in general. Insight in the learning effects allows us to take advantage of selection as an inclusive part of medical students' learning process to become competent professionals. The aims of this study at Radboud University Medical Center, the Netherlands, were 1) to determine whether students have learning experiences in the selection process, and, if so, what experiences; and 2) to understand what students need in order to utilize the learning effects of the selection process at the start of the formal curriculum. We used focus groups to interview 30 students admitted in 2016 about their learning experiences in the selection process. Thematic analysis was used to explore the outcomes of the interviews and to define relevant themes. In the selection process, students learned about the curriculum, themselves, their relation to others, and the profession they had been selected to enter, although this was not explicitly perceived as learning. Students needed a connection between selection and the curriculum as well as feedback to be able to really use their learning experiences for their further development. Medical school selection qualifies as a learning experience, and students as well as medical schools can take advantage of this. We recommend a careful design of the selection procedure, integrating relevant selection learning experiences into the formal curriculum, providing feedback and explicitly approaching the selection and the formal curriculum as interconnected contributors to students' development.

  19. Sacubitril/Valsartan: From Clinical Trials to Real-world Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Joanna M; Desai, Akshay S

    2018-04-23

    Compared to enalapril, use of angiotensin-receptor blocker and neprilysin inhibitor sacubitril/valsartan to treat patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) is associated with substantial reductions in both cardiovascular mortality and heart failure progression. The purpose of this review is to discuss the real-world experience of sacubitril/valsartan. In the years following the publication of the landmark PARADIGM-HF trial in 2014 and its subsequent FDA approval, a growing evidence base supports the safety and efficacy of sacubitril/valsartan in a broad spectrum of patients with HFrEF. Updated clinical practice guidelines have embraced the use of sacubitril/valsartan in preference to ACE inhibitors or ARBs in selected patients. In this review, we highlight the clinical trials that led to these key updates to clinical guidelines, offer practical strategies for patient selection and utilization in clinical practice, and identify important areas of uncertainty that require future research.

  20. Photo screening around the world: Lions Club International Foundation experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Sean P; Lorenz, Sylvia; Johnson, Tammy

    2008-01-01

    To describe the use of photoscreening for preschool vision screening in several diverse locations throughout the world. The MTI photo screener was used to screen pre-verbal children; photographs were interpreted using standard criteria. The Tennessee vision screening program remains successful, screening over 200,000 children during the past 8 years. Similar programs modeled across the United States have screened an additional 500,000 children. A pilot demonstration project in Hong Kong, Beijing, and Brazil screened over 5000 additional children with good success and appropriately low referral rates. Photoscreening can be an appropriate technique for widespread vision screening of preschool children throughout the world.

  1. Determination of yield related traits of sesame genotypes selected from world collection and mutant material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silme, R. S.; Cagirgan, M. I.

    2009-01-01

    Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) is an important plant of Turkey that secondary gen center and very used of food industry's a lot of area. Mutation breeding of sesame research continued coordinately with IAEA since 1993. it is aimed in these breeding programmes to improve lines that have dehiscent capsule, determinate growth and resistance to wilting traits. This study was conducted in Antalya City, at Akdeniz University Agricultural Faculty experiment fields under second crop conditions in 2007. At this study, 19 genotypes selected from world sesame collection, 4 mutant genotypes and 2 local cultivars were sown. The experiments were conducted according to Complete Randomized Block Design with three replications. It was found that first flowering date varied between 35 to 45 days, 50% flowering date from 39 to 54 days, last flowering date from 63 to 88 days, first capsule date from 42 to 51 days, first capsule height from 44 to 116 cm, plant height from 102 to 177 cm, number of branch per plant from 0.1 to 2.7, number of pod per plant from 28 to 63, number of seeds in capsule 2.3-4.3 g, 1000 seed weight ranged from 2.3 to 4.3 g, seed yield per da from 18 to 77 kg. The highest yield per da (77 kg/da) was obtained from mutant genotype, wt-5.

  2. 1D experiments with multiply selective excitation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    solution, leading to the determination of four rate parameters, is presented for proton exchange studies on these systems ... patterns within a single experiment entailing a total time of ca. ..... surements. For the acid–base reaction given in (6).

  3. Musical journey: a virtual world gamification experience for music learning

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, José; Figueiredo, Mauro; Amante, Lúcia

    2014-01-01

    Games are an integral part of the learning process of humans, in particular for children, who exploit the imagery as an intrinsic part of their lives. Features from games have been successfully implemented as a means to captivate and motivate students to perform learning at various levels of education in traditional schools. This paper presents a virtual world – Musical Journey – representing the Aesthetic Periods of Music History. This virtual environment allows students to freely explore an...

  4. Commercialization of education: world experience and ukrainian context

    OpenAIRE

    O. A. Khomeriki

    2015-01-01

    The world popularity and effectiveness of the American system of higher education encourages other countries to use its borrowed elements in the national education systems. The issues of integration within a single reform, within a single national education system cannot be solved because it is accompanied by the need to overcome a number of related conceptual problems. One of the major conceptual problems of national education is its commercialization. The example of education is where comme...

  5. Complex Behavior in a Selective Aging Neuron Model Based on Small World Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guiqing; Chen Tianlun

    2008-01-01

    Complex behavior in a selective aging simple neuron model based on small world networks is investigated. The basic elements of the model are endowed with the main features of a neuron function. The structure of the selective aging neuron model is discussed. We also give some properties of the new network and find that the neuron model displays a power-law behavior. If the brain network is small world-like network, the mean avalanche size is almost the same unless the aging parameter is big enough.

  6. First Experience from the World Largest fully commercial Solar Heating Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heller, Alfred; Furbo, Simon

    1997-01-01

    The first experience from the largest solar heating plant in the world is given. The plant is situated in Marstal and is has a total area of 8000 square m.......The first experience from the largest solar heating plant in the world is given. The plant is situated in Marstal and is has a total area of 8000 square m....

  7. Adverse Selection in Health Insurance Markets: A Classroom Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    Adverse selection as it relates to health care policy will be a key economic issue in many upcoming elections. In this article, the author lays out a 30-minute classroom experiment designed for students to experience the kind of elevated prices and market collapse that can result from adverse selection in health insurance markets. The students…

  8. Emotional experiences beyond the classroom: Interactions with the social world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S. Ross

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Research into the emotional experiences of language learners and their impact upon the language-learning process remains relatively undernourished within second language education. The research available focuses primarily on emotions experienced within the classroom, rather than in the daily lives of learners within various social contexts. This article contends that the focus placed upon emotions within the relatively structured environment of the formal classroom is problematic, particularly within an ESL environment, as the target language is more frequently experienced beyond the classroom. Drawing on data collected within Australia, the study explored the emotional experiences of a small cohort of eight university-level ESL learners experienced within their various social interactions beyond the classroom with a specific focus on the emotions of hope, enjoyment and frustration. Semi-structured interviews revealed that their emotional experiences beyond the classroom were particularly intense in comparison to emotional experiences within the formal language-learning classroom.

  9. An action selection architecture for autonomous virtual humans in persistent worlds

    OpenAIRE

    Sevin, Etienne de; Thalmann, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays, virtual humans such as non-player characters in computer games need to have a strong autonomy in order to live their own life in persistent virtual worlds. When designing autonomous virtual humans, the action selection problem needs to be considered, as it is responsible for decision making at each moment in time. Indeed action selection architectures for autonomous virtual humans need to be reactive, proactive, motivational, and emotional to obtain a high degree of autonomy and ind...

  10. Selection of operations staff, qualifications and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutmann, H.

    1977-01-01

    Requirements and suggestions have been made by authorities and various organisations in a number of countries which define necessary experience and training for the various groups of nuclear power plant personnel. For two countries, the USA and the FRG, a comparison has been made which shows that there is only a slight deviation, taking into account the different education systems. With the example of the Biblis nuclear power plant the training on the job is described. Especially the production or operation department is looked at in more detail. The training is split up into several parts: a general part, such as nuclear physics, reactor physics and engineering, reactor safety, radiation protection and so on and a plant related part, such as arrangement and mode of operation of the plant under normal and accident conditions, license conditions and so on. (orig.) [de

  11. Project governance: selected South African government experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. van der Walt

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Some form of accountability and power structure binds all organisations. Such structures are typically referred to as the “governance” structure of the organisation. In organisations that have relatively mature project applications and methodologies in place, governance mechanisms are established on more permanent bases. With its focus on performance, results and outcomes, project governance establishes decision-making structures, as well as accountability and responsibility mechanisms in public institutions to oversee projects. As government institutions increasingly place emphasis on project applications for policy implementation and service delivery initiatives, mechanisms or structures should be established to facilitate clear interfaces between the permanent organisation and the temporary project organisation. Such mechanisms or structures should enhance the governance of projects, that is, the strategic alignment of projects, the decentralisation of decision- making powers, rapid resource allocation, and the participation of external stakeholders. The purpose of this article is to explore the concept “project governance”, and to highlight examples of project governance as applied in selected government departments in provincial and national spheres. This would enable the establishment of best practice examples and assist to develop benchmarks for effective project applications for service delivery improvement.

  12. Construction of the World Health Organization child growth standards: Selection of methods for attained growth curves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borghi, E.; Onis, M. de; Garza, C.; Broeck, J. van den; Frongillo, E.A.; Grummer-Strawn, L.; Buuren, S. van; Pan, H.; Molinari, L.; Martorell, R.; Onyango, A.W.; Martines, J.C.; Pinol, A.; Siyam, A.; Victoria, C.G.; Bhan, M.K.; Araújo, C.L.; Lartey, A.; Owusu, W.B.; Bhandari, N.; Norum, K.R.; Bjoerneboe, G.-E.Aa.; Mohamed, A.J.; Dewey, K.G.; Belbase, K.; Chumlea, C.; Cole, T.; Shrimpton, R.; Albernaz, E.; Tomasi, E.; Cássia Fossati da Silveira, R. de; Nader, G.; Sagoe-Moses, I.; Gomez, V.; Sagoe-Moses, C.; Taneja, S.; Rongsen, T.; Chetia, J.; Sharma, P.; Bahl, R.; Baerug, A.; Tufte, E.; Alasfoor, D.; Prakash, N.S.; Mabry, R.M.; Al Rajab, H.J.; Helmi, S.A.; Nommsen-Rivers, L.A.; Cohen, R.J.; Heinig, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO), in collaboration with a number of research institutions worldwide, is developing new child growth standards. As part of a broad consultative process for selecting the best statistical methods, WHO convened a group of statisticians and child growth experts to

  13. Touch the World - and communicate the experience via Mobile Phones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Jørgen; Dalsgaard, Christian; Engelbrecht, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents a project involving school children’s use of mobile phones at Moesgaard Museum, in Aarhus, Denmark. A special anthropological exhibition called “Touch the World” is arranged around items supplied by UNESCO. The paper will discuss the pedagogical perspective of using mobile phones...... as a vehicle to enhance pupil’s learning by making their own documentation of their experiences and by communicating these experiences to fellow pupils. We argue that mobile phones have a potential to support these learning processes as a personalised tool for documentation and communication....

  14. Computations, Complexity, Experiments, and the World Outside Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadanoff, L.P

    2009-01-01

    Computer Models in the Sciences and Social Sciences. 1. Simulation and Prediction in Complex Systems: the Good the Bad and the Awful. This lecture deals with the history of large-scale computer modeling mostly in the context of the U.S. Department of Energy's sponsorship of modeling for weapons development and innovation in energy sources. 2. Complexity: Making a Splash-Breaking a Neck - The Making of Complexity in Physical System. For ages thinkers have been asking how complexity arise. The laws of physics are very simple. How come we are so complex? This lecture tries to approach this question by asking how complexity arises in physical fluids. 3. Forrester, et. al. Social and Biological Model-Making The partial collapse of the world's economy has raised the question of whether we could improve the performance of economic and social systems by a major effort on creating understanding via large-scale computer models. (author)

  15. Expatriate Experience and the Fictional World of Diaspora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyas, Mohammed

    2018-01-01

    Expatriate Writing, diaspora writing or immigrant writing is yet to be established as an independent genre of study. It came into origin as a result of "marginalization" or "hyphenated" existence of such immigrants and expatriates that narrated their traumatic experiences of multiple racial discrimination, ethnicity, nostalgia,…

  16. Emotional Experiences beyond the Classroom: Interactions with the Social World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Andrew S.; Rivers, Damian J.

    2018-01-01

    Research into the emotional experiences of language learners and their impact upon the language-learning process remains relatively undernourished within second language education. The research available focuses primarily on emotions experienced within the classroom, rather than in the daily lives of learners within various social contexts. This…

  17. World and experiences of AIDS orphans in north central Namibia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brug, van der M.

    2007-01-01

    How do young AIDS orphans deal with the loss of their parents and their changed circumstances? This thesis discusses the social environment, experiences and perceptions of fourteen orphans in north central Namibia. The author followed the children for five months from September 2003 until March

  18. Commercialization of education: world experience and ukrainian context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Khomeriki

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The world popularity and effectiveness of the American system of higher education encourages other countries to use its borrowed elements in the national education systems. The issues of integration within a single reform, within a single national education system cannot be solved because it is accompanied by the need to overcome a number of related conceptual problems. One of the major conceptual problems of national education is its commercialization. The example of education is where commercialization is the mechanism and the result of the reform American education. In American society there are two approaches to the issue of obtaining higher education. First, the so­called “Jeffersonville”, provides for equality of access to higher education, but subject to the production of high demands for qualities (abilities. Second, the so­called “Jacksonville”, also recognized the equality of access to higher education, but it is believed that the University should be free for everyone who has completed secondary education, regardless of ability. Despite the undeniable efficiency, impressive achievements in science, structural diversity and structure on democratic principles of the higher education system, the last few decades in American society does not cease its criticism, because universities and colleges are only indirectly fulfill the function of serving society.

  19. Exploring key determinants of virtual worlds business success based on users' experience and perception

    OpenAIRE

    Xu , Xiaobo (Bob)

    2010-01-01

    Given the growth and popularity of virtual worlds, companies have a strong interest in presenting themselves successfully in virtual worlds. We designed an experimental study to identify the key determinants of virtual worlds business success based on users’ experience and perception. The preliminary results indicate that Starbucks, McDonalds, and Paris are the 3 most favorite sites. Furthermore, 5 key determinants (entertainment, functionality, interactivity, reality, and s...

  20. Long-term selection experiment with Afrikaner cattle

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mario Beffa

    Long-term selection experiment with Afrikaner cattle. 3. Selection applied and response in calf growth traits. L.M. Beffa. 1,2,3. , J.B. van Wyk. 1# and G.J. Erasmus. 1. 1 University of the Free State, P.O. Box 339, Bloemfontein 9300, South Africa. 2 Matopos Research Station, P. Bag K5137, Bulawayo, Zimbabwe ...

  1. The Analysis of World Experiences in Promoting Export Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotysh Olena M.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a theoretical analysis of the scientific approaches to defining concepts such as «exports» and «export activity». The results of the study helped to reveal that these concepts are identical, although this approach is criticized by many scientists. In the publication presented, the export activity is understood as a combination of actions on the part of the enterprises – foreign economic actors, involved in organizational arrangements aimed at preparation and marketing of goods to foreign economic actors. The article calculates the macro indicators in dynamics in order to characterize the status of Ukraine’s export activities. Its main development tendencies have been identified, the main challenges and directions for further development have been indicated. The article provides the international experience in promoting exports worldwide, the main tasks and functions of export promotion institutions have been explained, thus creating possibility to form recommendations for further actions on the part of the State to support and develop the export activity of Ukraine.

  2. Undergraduate Student Self-Efficacy and Perceptions of Virtual World Learning Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Lorraine May

    2017-01-01

    Virtual worlds are innovative teaching and learning methods that can provide immersive and engaging learning experiences (Lu, 2010). Though they have potential benefits, students sometimes experience a steep learning curve and discomfort with the technology (Warburton, 2009). This study explored how students in two American Studies classes using…

  3. Neural network real time event selection for the DIRAC experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kokkas, P; Tauscher, Ludwig; Vlachos, S

    2001-01-01

    The neural network first level trigger for the DIRAC experiment at CERN is presented. Both the neural network algorithm used and its actual hardware implementation are described. The system uses the fast plastic scintillator information of the DIRAC spectrometer. In 210 ns it selects events with two particles having low relative momentum. Such events are selected with an efficiency of more than 0.94. The corresponding rate reduction for background events is a factor of 2.5. (10 refs).

  4. Temporality in the Manic Experience: A Selective Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Trancas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The human experience of time has been the object of study since antiquity, ranging from philosophers to contemporary neuroscience researchers. Some experiences may disturb the relation than Man has with Time, be they general and mundane situations – like a child playing with his toy (Thomas Fuchs – to diseases, such as depressive or manic experiences or the schizophrenic way-of-being-in-theworld. We outline some concepts regarding temporality and shortly after we head on to the disturbance of temporality in the manic experience, both in the world-time (chronometric, explicit and lived time (implicit dimensions, with contributions from several authors, such as Eugène Minkowski, Leston Havens, Ludwig Binswanger, Medard Boss and Thomas Fuchs.

  5. Natural selection on immune defense: A field experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeloh, Laura; Behrmann-Godel, Jasminca; Seppälä, Otto

    2017-02-01

    Predicting the evolution of phenotypic traits requires an understanding of natural selection on them. Despite its indispensability in the fight against parasites, selection on host immune defense has remained understudied. Theory predicts immune traits to be under stabilizing selection due to associated trade-offs with other fitness-related traits. Empirical studies, however, report mainly positive directional selection. This discrepancy could be caused by low phenotypic variation in the examined individuals and/or variation in host resource level that confounds trade-offs in empirical studies. In a field experiment where we maintained Lymnaea stagnalis snails individually in cages in a lake, we investigated phenotypic selection on two immune defense traits, phenoloxidase (PO)-like activity and antibacterial activity, in hemolymph. We used a diverse laboratory population and manipulated snail resource level by limiting their food supply. For six weeks, we followed immune activity, growth, and two fitness components, survival and fecundity of snails. We found that PO-like activity and growth were under stabilizing selection, while antibacterial activity was under positive directional selection. Selection on immune traits was mainly driven by variation in survival. The form of selection on immune defense apparently depends on the particular trait, possibly due to its importance for countering the present parasite community. © 2016 The Author(s). Evolution © 2016 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  6. Development and human resources in the Islamic world: a study of selected countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duza, M B

    1987-01-01

    "The present paper attempts to provide an analytical profile of development and human resources in [12] selected [Islamic] countries." The countries--Bangladesh, Somalia, Pakistan, Indonesia, Egypt, Turkey, Malaysia, Algeria, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, and United Arab Emirates--vary in income levels from low to high and in population size from 1 million to 159 million. Using data from the World Bank and the Population Council, comparisons are made on the basis of mortality and fertility levels, family size, income, urbanization, labor force size and growth, education, nutrition, and health. Governmental policy changes and future directions are discussed. excerpt

  7. Target selection biases from recent experience transfer across effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moher, Jeff; Song, Joo-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    Target selection is often biased by an observer's recent experiences. However, not much is known about whether these selection biases influence behavior across different effectors. For example, does looking at a red object make it easier to subsequently reach towards another red object? In the current study, we asked observers to find the uniquely colored target object on each trial. Randomly intermixed pre-trial cues indicated the mode of action: either an eye movement or a visually guided reach movement to the target. In Experiment 1, we found that priming of popout, reflected in faster responses following repetition of the target color on consecutive trials, occurred regardless of whether the effector was repeated from the previous trial or not. In Experiment 2, we examined whether an inhibitory selection bias away from a feature could transfer across effectors. While priming of popout reflects both enhancement of the repeated target features and suppression of the repeated distractor features, the distractor previewing effect isolates a purely inhibitory component of target selection in which a previewed color is presented in a homogenous display and subsequently inhibited. Much like priming of popout, intertrial suppression biases in the distractor previewing effect transferred across effectors. Together, these results suggest that biases for target selection driven by recent trial history transfer across effectors. This indicates that representations in memory that bias attention towards or away from specific features are largely independent from their associated actions.

  8. Greenhouse Effect Detection Experiment (GEDEX). Selected data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Lola M.; Warnock, Archibald, III

    1992-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains selected data sets compiled by the participants of the Greenhouse Effect Detection Experiment (GEDEX) workshop on atmospheric temperature. The data sets include surface, upper air, and/or satellite-derived measurements of temperature, solar irradiance, clouds, greenhouse gases, fluxes, albedo, aerosols, ozone, and water vapor, along with Southern Oscillation Indices and Quasi-Biennial Oscillation statistics.

  9. The Living Dead: Transformative Experiences in Modelling Natural Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Morten Rask

    2017-01-01

    This study considers how students change their coherent conceptual understanding of natural selection through a hands-on simulation. The results show that most students change their understanding. In addition, some students also underwent a transformative experience and used their new knowledge in a leisure time activity. These transformative…

  10. Presence of inbreeding during a selection experiment with Merino ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Presence of inbreeding during a selection experiment with Merino sheep. GJ Erasmus, AO de Lange, GJ Delport, JJ Olivier. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL.

  11. The Impact of Customer Experience Toward Customer Satisfaction and Loyalty of Ciputra World Surabaya

    OpenAIRE

    Chandra, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Ciputra World Surabaya is facing a tense competition, especially with the upcoming new shopping malls. Author believes that customer satisfaction and loyalty is the ultimate solutions to maintain the visitors traffic, which can be achieved by encouraging customer experience. The research succeeds to gather 142 respondents using simple random sampling method. Thus, by applying the Path Analysis with Regression, it is able to prove that customer experience has significant impact towa...

  12. The experiments and analysis of several selective video encryption methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Yang, Cheng; Wang, Lei

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents four methods for selective video encryption based on the MPEG-2 video compression,including the slices, the I-frames, the motion vectors, and the DCT coefficients. We use the AES encryption method for simulation experiment for the four methods on VS2010 Platform, and compare the video effects and the processing speed of each frame after the video encrypted. The encryption depth can be arbitrarily selected, and design the encryption depth by using the double limit counting method, so the accuracy can be increased.

  13. Argentinian experience in selecting sites for nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csik, B.J.

    1975-01-01

    One nuclear power station is in operation in the Republic of Argentina, a second is under construction, and the decision to build a third has been taken. According to existing plans, about ten nuclear power stations should go into operation during the next decade. The present paper analyses the experience acquired in selecting sites for the first units, commenting on the criteria and methods applied, the studies that were carried out, the specific problems encountered and the solutions adopted, as well as on the question of acceptance of the chosen sites by the public. It goes on to describe the current programme of selection and study of sites for future nuclear power stations

  14. Trauma and psychotic experiences: transnational data from the World Mental Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, John J; Saha, Sukanta; Lim, Carmen C W; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Alonso, Jordi; Andrade, Laura H; Bromet, Evelyn J; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Caldas de Almeida, José M; Cardoso, Graça; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Fayyad, John; Florescu, Silvia; Gureje, Oye; Haro, Josep M; Kawakami, Norito; Koenen, Karestan C; Kovess-Masfety, Viviane; Lee, Sing; Lepine, Jean-Pierre; McLaughlin, Katie A; Medina-Mora, Maria E; Navarro-Mateu, Fernando; Ojagbemi, Akin; Posada-Villa, Jose; Sampson, Nancy; Scott, Kate M; Tachimori, Hisateru; Ten Have, Margreet; Kendler, Kenneth S; Kessler, Ronald C

    2017-12-01

    Background Traumatic events are associated with increased risk of psychotic experiences, but it is unclear whether this association is explained by mental disorders prior to psychotic experience onset. Aims To investigate the associations between traumatic events and subsequent psychotic experience onset after adjusting for post-traumatic stress disorder and other mental disorders. Method We assessed 29 traumatic event types and psychotic experiences from the World Mental Health surveys and examined the associations of traumatic events with subsequent psychotic experience onset with and without adjustments for mental disorders. Results Respondents with any traumatic events had three times the odds of other respondents of subsequently developing psychotic experiences (OR = 3.1, 95% CI 2.7-3.7), with variability in strength of association across traumatic event types. These associations persisted after adjustment for mental disorders. Conclusions Exposure to traumatic events predicts subsequent onset of psychotic experiences even after adjusting for comorbid mental disorders. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017.

  15. The world at 7:00 : Comparing the experience of situations across 20 countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guillaume, Esther; Baranski, Erica; Todd, Elysia; Bastian, Brock; Bronin, Igor; Ivanova, Christina; Cheng, Joey T.; de Kock, Francois S.; Denissen, J. J.A.; Gallardo-Pujol, David; Halama, Peter; Han, Gyuseog Q.; Bae, Jaechang; Moon, Jungsoon; Hong, Ryan Y.; Hrebickova, Martina; Graf, Sylvie; Izdebski, Pawel; Lundmann, Lars; Penke, Lars; Perugini, Marco; Costantini, Giulio; Rauthmann, John; Ziegler, Matthias; Realo, Anu; Elme, Liisalotte; Sato, Tatsuya; Kawamoto, Shizuka; Szarota, Piotr; Tracy, Jessica L.; van Aken, Marcel A. G.; Yang, Yu; Funder, David C.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to quantitatively compare everyday situational experience around the world. Local collaborators recruited 5,447 members of college communities in 20 countries, who provided data via a Web site in 14 languages. Using the 89 items of the Riverside Situational Q-sort

  16. Experience the world with archetypal symbols : an new form of aesthetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, H.M.; Ivonin, L.; Diaz, M.; Català, A.; Chen, W.; Rauterberg, G.W.M.; Streitz, N.; Stephanides, C.

    2013-01-01

    According to the theories of symbolic interactionism, phenomenology of perception and archetypes, we argue that symbols play the key role in translating the information from the physical world to the human experience, and archetypes are the universal knowledge of cognition that generates the

  17. The association between psychotic experiences and disability : Results from the WHO World Mental Health Surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Navarro-Mateu, F.; Alonso, J.; Lim, C. C. W.; Saha, S.; Aguilar-Gaxiola, S.; Al-Hamzawi, A.; Andrade, L. H.; Bromet, E. J.; Bruffaerts, R.; Chatterji, S.; Degenhardt, L.; de Girolamo, G.; de Jonge, P.; Fayyad, J.; Florescu, S.; Gureje, O.; Haro, J. M.; Hu, C.; Karam, E. G.; Kovess-Masfety, V.; Lee, S.; Medina-Mora, M. E.; Ojagbemi, A.; Pennell, B. -E.; Piazza, M.; Posada-Villa, J.; Scott, K. M.; Stagnaro, J. C.; Xavier, M.; Kendler, K. S.; Kessler, R. C.; McGrath, J. J.

    Objective: While psychotic experiences (PEs) are known to be associated with a range of mental and general medical disorders, little is known about the association between PEs and measures of disability. We aimed to investigate this question using the World Mental Health surveys. Method: Lifetime

  18. Virtual worlds. Meta-analysis of educational experiences from its beginnings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Manuel DÍAZ FERNÁNDEZ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Over a decade has passed since the specialized scientific literature presented in 2004 the first educational experience with virtual worlds. An evolutionary period that requires analysis to determine the adequacy of the developed experiences so far, enabling the formulation of guidelines and / or aspects to consider in future experiences to achieve better adjustment and adaptation to the specific framework.The investigation lies within the meta-analytic paradigm, with a quantitative and systematic review of the results of the 36 experiences that have been accessed, projecting an analysis and review of the same by using a form of observation, new and validated, in which a number of desirable compliance parameters are set, based on the current framework established by different experts.The results show a high degree of adaptation in didactic and pedagogical aspects, as well as communication and interaction, being lower in technical and support aspects, which can influence the work in virtual worlds. On the other hand, errors not meet the characteristics of the participants are detected. Failure to take into account their degree of socialization, their digital knowledge or communication skills in these environments, determines the validity of the designs and implementations, being important to consider in future experiences with virtual worlds.

  19. Miller-Urey spark-discharge experiments in the deuterium world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Geoffrey J.T.; Surman, Andrew J.; McIver, Jim; Colon-Santos, Stephanie M.; Gromski, Piotr S.; Buchwald, Saskia; Suarez Marina, Irene; Cronin, Leroy [WestCHEM, School of Chemistry, University of Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2017-07-03

    We designed and conducted a series of primordial-soup Miller-Urey style experiments with deuterated gases and reagents to compare the spark-discharge products of a ''deuterated world'' with the standard reaction in the ''hydrogenated world''. While the deuteration of the system has little effect on the distribution of amino acid products, significant differences are seen in other regions of the product-space. Not only do we observe about 120 new species, we also see significant differences in their distribution if the two hydrogen isotope worlds are compared. Several isotopologue matches can be identified in both, but a large proportion of products have no equivalent in the corresponding isotope world with ca. 43 new species in the D world and ca. 39 new species in the H world. This shows that isotopic exchange (the addition of only one neutron) may lead to significant additional complexity in chemical space under otherwise identical reaction conditions. (copyright 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA.)

  20. Seven experiments that could change the world a do-it-yourself guide to revolutionary science

    CERN Document Server

    Sheldrake, Rupert

    1994-01-01

    Seven experiments are proposed in this book that the author believes, if any are successful, will alter how the reader perceives the world. The purpose of the book is to draw attention to areas of research neglected as a result of conventional habits of thought. The descriptions of the experiments are intended to focus the topics under discussion. One of the experiments in the book aims to test the hypothesis that many dogs and cats know that their owners are coming home before they actually arrive. Rupert Sheldrake has also written "The Presence of the Past" and "The Rebirth of Nature".

  1. Beams of mass-selected clusters: realization and first experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamalou, O.

    2007-04-01

    The main objective of this work concerns the production of beams of mass-selected clusters of metallic and semiconductor materials. Clusters are produced in magnetron sputtering source combined with a gas aggregation chamber, cooled by liquid nitrogen circulation. Downstream of the cluster source, a Wiley-McLaren time-of-flight setup allows to select a given cluster size or a narrow size range. The pulsed mass-selected cluster ion beam is separated from the continuous neutral one by an electrostatic 90-quadrupole deflector. After the deflector, the density of the pulsed beam amounts to about 10 3 particles/cm 3 . Preliminary deposition experiments of mass-selected copper clusters with a deposition energy of about 0.5 eV/atom have ben performed on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) substrates, indicating that copper clusters are evidently mobile on the HOPG-surface until they reach cleavage steps, dislocation lines or other surface defects. In order to lower the cluster mobility on the HOPG-surface, we have first irradiated HOPG samples with slow highly charged ions (high dose) in order to create superficial defects. In a second step we have deposited mass-selected copper clusters on these pre-irradiated samples. The first analysis by AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) techniques showed that the copper clusters are trapped on the defects produced by the highly charged ions. (author)

  2. Vaginal birth after cesarean section—The world trend and local experience in Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Hsiu-Ting Tsai; Chia-Hsun Wu

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The trend of increasing cesarean section rates had evoked worldwide attention. Many approaches were introduced to diminish cesarean section rates. Vaginal birth after cesarean section (VBAC) is a route of delivery with diverse agreements. In this study, we try to reveal the world trend in VBAC and our experience of a 10-year period in a medical center in northern Taiwan. Materials and methods: This is a retrospective study of all women who underwent elective repeat cesarean deli...

  3. EPRtm project experience: selection of partners and supply chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzo, D. de

    2012-01-01

    With 4 EPR T M units under construction, the new plants to be built in the following years will benefit from the return on experience of the work already performed. The knowledge about licensing processes, detail engineering, supply chain, logistics and on-site work gathered from the Olkiluoto 3 and Flamanville 3 projects has already been used in the Taishan 1 and 2 project, resulting in a project that is on schedule and on budget. This article will show how the advantage of such broad experience gained will be used to benefit future projects to ensure certainty of completion, leaving few and limited unresolved issues even before the beginning of the project. Several areas that are not usually tackled when speaking of a New Build project will be covered by this text from the point of view of a nuclear vendor: Project Partnership Selection and the Gate Review Process applied by AREVA in the supply chain of the main components. (Author)

  4. Customer Journey and Experience in The FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 2017

    OpenAIRE

    Pelttari, Johanna

    2017-01-01

    This report covers a research of a Customer Journey and Customer Experience in the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships 2017. The key aim of this research is to do a research for the event and analyse their customer journey and customer experience. In that way aim is also to help event organizers with de-veloping events in the future. Specific service points and service touch points along the customer journey are analysed in this research. Commissioner of this research is the FIS Nordic Wo...

  5. Children's experiences of war: handicapped children in England during the Second World War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatcroft, Sue

    2008-01-01

    The experiences of children during the Second World War have attracted considerable attention, both scholarly and popular. Not all children however, have received equal attention. Handicapped children are conspicuous by their absence from all types of literature, both on evacuation and on children's experiences of the Second World War. This article restores these children to the story of wartime England and assesses their experiences. It examines the plans that were made for their evacuation and how they were carried out, and compares their lives, both individually and institutionally (i.e. in the various types of 'special' school) with those who, for various reasons, were not evacuated. It also compares their experiences, to a lesser degree, with those of their non-handicapped counterparts. The article argues that for many handicapped children it was a positive experience but one which depended on specific aspects, such as the attitudes of the authorities and of the general public, and perhaps more importantly, the attitudes and quality of the teaching and nursing staff, who were responsible for the children on a daily basis.

  6. Can We Model Driver Perceptions? An In-Situ Experiment in Real-World Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aly M. Tawfik, PhD

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It is clear that perceptions play a significant role in traveler decisions. Consequently, traveler perceptions are a corner stone in the feasibility of traveler information systems; for traveler information systems are only valuable if the drivers are incapable of accurately acquiring the provided information on their own, and if the provided information is relevant for the drivers' decision criteria. Accuracy of traveler perceptions has been repeatedly researched in public transportation, and has been found to vary according to different reasons. However, in spite of the clear significance of traveler perceptions, minimal effort has been put into modeling it. Almost all travel behavior models are based on traveler experiences, which are assumed to reflect traveler perceptions via the addition of some random error component. This works introduces an alternative approach: instead of adding an error component to represent driver perceptions, it proposes to model driver perceptions. This work is based on a real-world route choice experiment of a sample of 20 drivers who made more than 2,000 real-world route choices. Each of the drivers' experiences, perceptions, and choices were recorded, analyzed and cross examined. The paper demonstrates that: i driver experiences are different from driver perceptions, ii driver perceptions explain driver choices better than driver experiences, iii it is possible to model and predict driver perceptions of travel distance, time and speed.

  7. The associations between psychotic experiences and substance use and substance use disorders: findings from the World Health Organization World Mental Health surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenhardt, Louisa; Saha, Sukanta; Lim, Carmen C W; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Al-Hamzawi, Ali; Alonso, Jordi; Andrade, Laura H; Bromet, Evelyn J; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Caldas-de-Almeida, José Miguel; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Florescu, Silvia; Gureje, Oye; Haro, Josep M; Karam, Elie G; Karam, Georges; Kovess-Masfety, Viviane; Lee, Sing; Lepine, Jean-Pierre; Makanjuola, Victor; Medina-Mora, Maria E; Mneimneh, Zeina; Navarro-Mateu, Fernando; Piazza, Marina; Posada-Villa, José; Sampson, Nancy A; Scott, Kate M; Stagnaro, Juan Carlos; Ten Have, Margreet; Kendler, Kenneth S; Kessler, Ronald C; McGrath, John J

    2018-05-01

    Prior research has found bidirectional associations between psychotic experiences (PEs) and selected substance use disorders. We aimed to extend this research by examining the bidirectional association between PEs and various types of substance use (SU) and substance use disorders (SUDs), and the influence of antecedent mental disorders on these associations. We used data from the World Health Organization World Mental Health surveys. A total of 30 902 adult respondents across 18 countries were assessed for (a) six types of life-time PEs, (b) a range of types of SU and DSM-IV SUDs and (c) mental disorders using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Discrete-time survival analyses based on retrospective age-at-onset reports examined the bidirectional associations between PEs and SU/SUDs controlling for antecedent mental disorders. After adjusting for demographics, comorbid SU/SUDs and antecedent mental disorders, those with prior alcohol use disorders [odds ratio (OR) = 1.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.2-2.0], extra-medical prescription drug use (OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.1-1.9), alcohol use (OR = 1.4, 95% CI = 1.1-1.7) and tobacco use (OR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1.0-1.8) had increased odds of subsequent first onset of PEs. In contrast, those with temporally prior PEs had increased odds of subsequent onset of tobacco use (OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.2-1.9), alcohol use (OR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1.1-1.6) or cannabis use (OR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1.0-1.5) as well as of all substance use disorders (ORs ranged between 1.4 and 1.5). There was a dose response relationship between both count and frequency of PEs and increased subsequent odds of selected SU/SUDs. Associations between psychotic experiences (PEs) and substance use/substance use disorders (SU/SUDs) are often bidirectional, but not all types of SU/SUDs are associated with PEs. These findings suggest that it is important to be aware of the presence of PEs within those with SUDs or at risk of SUDs

  8. Development, Implementation, and Assessment of General Chemistry Lab Experiments Performed in the Virtual World of Second Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, Kurt; Keeney-Kennicutt, Wendy; Fowler, Debra; Macik, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Virtual worlds are a potential medium for teaching college-level chemistry laboratory courses. To determine the feasibility of conducting chemistry experiments in such an environment, undergraduate students performed two experiments in the immersive virtual world of Second Life (SL) as part of their regular General Chemistry 2 laboratory course.…

  9. An angular selective electron gun for the KATRIN experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacher, Michael; Ortjohann, Hans-Werner; Steinbrink, Nicholas; Josten, Lorenz; Hannen, Volker; Weinheimer, Christian; Winzen, Daniel [Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet, Muenster (Germany); Collaboration: KATRIN-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    The KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment aims for a measurement of the electron anti-neutrino mass with a sensitivity of 200 meV/c{sup 2} (95% C.L.) by analysing the endpoint region of the tritium β-decay. The main spectrometer (MAC-E filter type, 23m length) is one of the central parts of the experiment, featuring an energy resolution of Δ E<1 eV. For commissioning of the spectrometer a well defined electron source is needed that allows to determine the transmission characteristics and compare the electromagnetic properties to simulations. For this purpose an angular selective electron gun was developed. A pulsed UV-Laser produces electrons via the photo-electric effect, which are then accelerated electrostatically in a magnetic field. It features a small energy spread, a sharp selectable emission angle and covers the whole magnetic flux tube of KATRIN. By that, the characteristics of the spectrometer can be investigated with high precision. The time structure of the electron pulses allows time of flight measurements, offering enhanced sensitivity. The talk gives an overview about the e-gun design and its properties.

  10. Experiment and exploration forms of world-disclosure : from epistemology to Bildung

    CERN Document Server

    Ahrens, Sönke

    2014-01-01

    This book deals with contemporary epistemological questions, connecting Educational Philosophy with the field of Science- and Technology Studies. It can be understood as a draft of a general theory of world-disclosure, which is in its core a distinction between two forms of world-disclosure: experiment and exploration. These two forms have never been clearly distinguished before. The focus lies on the experimental form of world-disclosure, which is described in detail and in contrast to the explorational form along the line of twenty-one characteristics, which are mainly derived from empirical studies of experimental work in the field of natural sciences. It can also be understood as an attempt to integrate elements of the Anglo-Saxon Philosophy of Science with elements of the German tradition of Educational Philosophy. This is also reflected in the style of writing. In accordance to the content-level of the book, the argument for experimental forms of world-disclosure is written in an essayistic, readable st...

  11. Influence of World and Gravity Model Selection on Surface Interacting Vehicle Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Michael M.

    2007-01-01

    A vehicle simulation is surface-interacting if the state of the vehicle (position, velocity, and acceleration) relative to the surface is important. Surface-interacting simulations perform ascent, entry, descent, landing, surface travel, or atmospheric flight. Modeling of gravity is an influential environmental factor for surface-interacting simulations. Gravity is the free-fall acceleration observed from a world-fixed frame that rotates with the world. Thus, gravity is the sum of gravitation and the centrifugal acceleration due to the world s rotation. In surface-interacting simulations, the fidelity of gravity at heights above the surface is more significant than gravity fidelity at locations in inertial space. A surface-interacting simulation cannot treat the gravity model separately from the world model, which simulates the motion and shape of the world. The world model's simulation of the world's rotation, or lack thereof, produces the centrifugal acceleration component of gravity. The world model s reproduction of the world's shape will produce different positions relative to the world center for a given height above the surface. These differences produce variations in the gravitation component of gravity. This paper examines the actual performance of world and gravity/gravitation pairs in a simulation using the Earth.

  12. Isotopes as tracers of the oceanic circulation: Results from the World Ocean Circulation Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlosser, P.; Jenkins, W.J.; Key, R.; Lupton, J.

    2002-01-01

    During the past decades, natural and anthropogenic isotopes such as tritium ( 3 H), radiocarbon ( 14 C), 3 He, or the stable isotopes of water have been used in studies of the dynamics of natural systems. Early applications of tracers to studies of the ocean were directed at determination of circulation patterns and mean residence times of specific water masses, as well as estimates of mixing coefficients. These exploratory studies suggested that tracers can add significantly to our understanding of the oceanic circulation. In order to fully exploit this potential, the first global tracer study, the GEochemical Ocean SECtions Study (GEOSECS), was launched. From the GEOSECS results it was immediately apparent that very close coordination of tracer programs with physical oceanography studies is required for full utilization of tracer data. During the 1980s plans for the World OCean Experiment (WOCE) were developed. As part of its Hydrographic Program (WHP), especially during the one-time survey, a set of tracers were measured on a global scale with unprecedented spatial resolution (both lateral and vertical). The original plan included a larger number of tracers (CFCs, 3 H/ 3 He, 14 C, 39 Ar, stable isotopes of water, helium isotopes, 228 Ra, 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 85 Kr) than could actually be measured systematically (CFCs, 3 H/ 3 He, 14 C, H 2 18 O/H 2 16 O, helium isotopes). Nevertheless, the resulting data set, which presently is under evaluation, exceeds those obtained from pre-WOCE tracer studies by a wide margin. In this contribution, we describe the existing WOCE data set and demonstrate the type of results that can be expected from its interpretation on the basis of a few selected examples. These examples include: (1) the application of tritium and 3 He to studies of the ventilation of the upper waters in the Pacific Ocean, (2) the spreading of intermediate water in the Pacific and Indian oceans as derived from the distribution of 3 He, and (3) the evaluation of

  13. Correlation experiments and the nonvalidity of ordinary ideas about the physical world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stapp, H.P.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that the predictions of quantum theory in certain correlations experiments are incompatible with ordinary ideas about the physical world. In particular the following theorem is proved: Consider situations involving two experimenters, one working in each of two space-like separated regions. Suppose each is apparently free to choose to perform in his region one of two alternative experiments. Assume that the results that would be obtained in each of the alternative cases conform to the statistical predictions of quantum theory. Then the experimental results in one region must, in some cases, depend on which experiment is performed in the space-like separated region. This theorem is akin to a theorem of J. S. Bell. However, Bell's theorem refers to hidden-variables, which may not exist in nature, whereas the present theorem deals directly with connections between the (macroscopic) results of possible measurements and physical variables subject to the control of experimenters

  14. Introducing chinese treatment experience of Budd-Chiari syndrome to world wide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Linsun

    2008-01-01

    During the latest 20 years, the crucial progress has been made in the field of treatment for Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS)in China with therapeutic methods transferring from surgical to interventional and achieving successful rate of 96%. Our unique contribution to the BCS interventional therapy should have made ourselves proud for being as a superior world position on account of large number of cases, abundant therapeutic contents and consummate skills. What a pity is that our achievement was not appreciated by international colleagues because of only a few papers published in SCI journals. So that, Chinese scholars ought to have doing more necessarily through diligently learning English, doing long term follow-up and performing more basic researches and actively joining international academic exchanges, let our good experiences of treatment for BCS be introduced to the world-wide. (authors)

  15. The long-term impact of war experiences and evacuation on people who were children during World War Two.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, Melinda J; Robbins, Ian; Davies, Stephen; Feigenbaum, Janet

    2007-03-01

    During World War Two 1.9 million people were evacuated from British cities where the risk of bombing was perceived to be highest. 1.5 million of these were children who, often unaccompanied, were sent to live with strangers. Two hundred and forty-five people who were evacuated as children were compared with 96 of similar age who did not experience evacuation. Within this self-selected sample, significant numbers of the evacuees were found to have experienced abuse and neglect. Pre-evacuation abuse made continued abuse likely during evacuation, while abuse during evacuation led to children being more likely to continue to be abused on their return home. Abuse during evacuation led to increased scores on the Impact of Event Scale and General Health Questionnaire, and to insecure attachment patterns. The role of evacuation and abuse in the maintenance of long-term psychological problems is discussed.

  16. Emotionally Excited Eyeblink-Rate Variability Predicts an Experience of Transportation into the Narrative World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryota eNomura

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Collective spectator communications such as oral presentations, movies, and storytelling performances are ubiquitous in human culture. This study investigated the effects of past viewing experiences and differences in expressive performance on an audience’s transportive experience into a created world of a storytelling performance. In the experiment, 60 participants (mean age = 34.12 yrs., SD = 13.18 yrs., range 18–63 yrs. were assigned to watch one of two videotaped performances that were played (1 in an orthodox way for frequent viewers and (2 in a modified way aimed at easier comprehension for first-time viewers. Eyeblink synchronization among participants was quantified by employing distance-based measurements of spike trains, Dspike and Dinterval (Victor & Purpura, 1997. The results indicated that even non-familiar participants’ eyeblinks were synchronized as the story progressed and that the effect of the viewing experience on transportation was weak. Rather, the results of a multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the degrees of transportation could be predicted by a retrospectively reported humor experience and higher real-time variability (i.e., logarithmic transformed standard deviation of inter blink intervals during a performance viewing. The results are discussed from the viewpoint in which the extent of eyeblink synchronization and eyeblink-rate variability acts as an index of the inner experience of audience members.

  17. Real World SharePoint 2010 Indispensable Experiences from 22 MVPs

    CERN Document Server

    Hillier, Scot; Bishop, Darrin; Bleeker, Todd; Bogue, Robert; Bosch, Karine; Brotto, Claudio; Buenz, Adam; Connell, Andrew; Drisgill, Randy; Lapointe, Gary; Medero, Jason; Molnar, Agnes; O'Brien, Chris; Klindt, Todd; Poelmans, Joris; Rehmani, Asif; Ross, John; Swan, Nick; Walsh, Mike; Williams, Randy; Young, Shane; Macori, Igor

    2010-01-01

    Proven real-world best practices from leading Microsoft SharePoint MVPsSharePoint enables Web sites to host shared workspaces and is a leading solution for Enterprise Content Management. The newest version boasts significant changes, impressive enhancements, and new features, requiring developers and administrators of all levels of experience to quickly get up to speed on the latest changes. This book is a must-have anthology of current best practices for SharePoint 2010 from 20 of the top SharePoint MVPs. They offer insider advice on everything from installation, workflow, and Web parts to bu

  18. STEM and ICT Instructional Worlds: The 3D Experience, The impact on today’s students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Edward Roberts

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In our project, 3D immersive virtual worlds have been implemented in middle schools for instruction in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM.  The learning and playing, as a curricular tool, has enormous potential for engaging children of all ages in deep learning (Lim, Nonis, &  Hedberg 2006. STEM and ICT Instructional Worlds: The 3D Experience (STEM-ICT 3D is funded by the National Science Foundation Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST program. The project is intended to inspire middle school students to pursue studies and careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics – particularly information and communication technology (ICT fields - as well as prepare students with the skills necessary to succeed in STEM education and careers. The project, based on research suggesting student gains in engagement, efficacy, and achievement (Barab, et al, 2005; Educause, 2006; Ketelhut, et al, 2006 proposes to translate the success of an earlier pilot toward a model that can be replicated in other middle schools over time.

  19. MCTP Summer Research Internship Program. Research Presentation Day: Experience Mathematics and Science in the Real World

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the summaries of the MCTP Summer Research Internship Program. Technological areas discussed include: Mathematical curriculum development for real world problems; Rain effects on air-water gas exchange; multi-ring impact basins on mars; developing an interactive multimedia educational cd-rom on remote sensing; a pilot of an activity for for the globe program; fossils in maryland; developing children's programming for the american horticultural society at river farm; children's learning, educational programs of the national park service; a study of climate and student satisfaction in two summer programs for disadvantaged students interested in careers in mathematics and science; the maryland governor's academy, integrating technology into the classroom; stream sampling with the maryland biological stream survey (MBSS); the imaging system inspection software technology, the preparation and detection of nominal and faulted steel ingots; event-based science, the development of real-world science units; correlation between anxiety and past experiences; environmental education through summer nature camp; enhancing learning opportunities at the Salisbury zoo; plant growth experiment, a module for the middle school classroom; the effects of proxisome proliferators in Japanese medaka embryos; development of a chapter on birth control and contraceptive methodologies as part of an interactive computer-based education module on hiv and aids; excretion of gentamicin in toadfish and goldfish; the renaissance summer program; and Are field trips important to the regional math science center?

  20. The impacts of the global economic crisis on selected segments of the world trade in commodities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Horská

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the impacts of the economic crisis on the world trade in order to highlight the mutual interdependence of the development of the world output and trade. The paper observes mutual correlation in development of the world trade and output. The results of the analysis indicate that changes in the value of world GDP and world trade are correlated by more than 90%. It is important to mention that in the years 2000–2009, the value of world trade and world output increased significantly (although in 2009, a significant decline in both value and volume of global production and trade was recorded due to the crisis. In relation to the world trade, it should be noted that its commodity structure is dominated by trade in manufactures. The crisis that occurred in the period 2008–2009 greatly affected the world economy and trade in particular. In this respect it should be pointed out that the crisis mainly affected trade in manufactures and then trade in fuels and mining outputs in terms of both absolute and relative indicators. Agrarian trade dealt with the crisis the best and the impact of the crisis on development of its values and volume was the least significant. This verifies the fact that agrarian and food products tend to be the most resistant to the crisis (on contrary, in times of global economic growth or reconstruction, the trade in agrarian and food products shows lower degree of elasticity in relation to the global GDP growth in comparison to other segments of commodities trade.

  1. Using the computer-driven VR environment to promote experiences of natural world immersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Lisa A.

    2013-03-01

    In December, 2011, over 800 people experienced the exhibit, :"der"//pattern for a virtual environment, created for the fully immersive CAVETM at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. This exhibition took my nature-based photographic work and reinterpreted it for virtual reality (VR).Varied responses such as: "It's like a moment of joy," or "I had to see it twice," or "I'm still thinking about it weeks later" were common. Although an implied goal of my 2D artwork is to create a connection that makes viewers more aware of what it means to be a part of the natural world, these six VR environments opened up an unexpected area of inquiry that my 2D work has not. Even as the experience was mediated by machines, there was a softening at the interface between technology and human sensibility. Somehow, for some people, through the unlikely auspices of a computer-driven environment, the project spoke to a human essence that they connected with in a way that went beyond all expectations and felt completely out of my hands. Other interesting behaviors were noted: in some scenarios some spoke of intense anxiety, acrophobia, claustrophobia-even fear of death when the scene took them underground. These environments were believable enough to cause extreme responses and disorientation for some people; were fun, pleasant and wonder-filled for most; and were liberating, poetic and meditative for many others. The exhibition seemed to promote imaginative skills, creativity, emotional insight, and environmental sensitivity. It also revealed the CAVETM to be a powerful tool that can encourage uniquely productive experiences. Quite by accident, I watched as these nature-based environments revealed and articulated an essential relationship between the human spirit and the physical world. The CAVETM is certainly not a natural space, but there is clear potential to explore virtual environments as a path to better and deeper connections between people and nature. We've long associated contact

  2. Volvo and Infiniti drivers' experiences with select crash avoidance technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braitman, Keli A; McCartt, Anne T; Zuby, David S; Singer, Jeremiah

    2010-06-01

    Vehicle-based crash avoidance systems can potentially reduce crashes, but success depends on driver acceptance and understanding. This study gauged driver use, experience, and acceptance among early adopters of select technologies. Telephone interviews were conducted in early 2009 with 380 owners of Volvo vehicles equipped with forward collision warning with autobrake, lane departure warning, side-view assist, and/or active bi-xenon headlights and 485 owners of Infiniti vehicles with lane departure warning/prevention. Most owners kept systems turned on most of the time, especially forward collision warning with autobrake and side-view assist. The exception was lane departure prevention; many owners were unaware they had it, and the system must be activated each time the vehicle is started. Most owners reported being safer with the technologies and would want them again on their next vehicles. Perceived false or unnecessary warnings were fairly common, particularly with side-view assist. Some systems were annoying, especially lane departure warning. Many owners reported safer driving behaviors such as greater use of turn signals (lane departure warning), increased following distance (forward collision warning), and checking side mirrors more frequently (side-view assist), but some reported driving faster at night (active headlights). Despite some unnecessary or annoying warnings, most Volvo and Infiniti owners use crash avoidance systems most of the time. Among early adopters, the first requirement of effective warning systems (that owners use the technology) seems largely met. Systems requiring activation by drivers for each trip are used less often. Owner experience with the latest technologies from other automobile manufacturers should be studied, as well as for vehicles on which technologies are standard (versus optional) equipment. The effectiveness of technologies in preventing and mitigating crashes and injuries, and user acceptance of interfaces, should be

  3. Association of DSM-IV Posttraumatic Stress Disorder With Traumatic Experience Type and History in the World Health Organization World Mental Health Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Howard; Petukhova, Maria V; Sampson, Nancy A; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Alonso, Jordi; Andrade, Laura Helena; Bromet, Evelyn J; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Haro, Josep Maria; Hinkov, Hristo; Kawakami, Norito; Koenen, Karestan C; Kovess-Masfety, Viviane; Lee, Sing; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; Navarro-Mateu, Fernando; O'Neill, Siobhan; Piazza, Marina; Posada-Villa, José; Scott, Kate M; Shahly, Victoria; Stein, Dan J; Ten Have, Margreet; Torres, Yolanda; Gureje, Oye; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Kessler, Ronald C

    2017-03-01

    Previous research has documented significant variation in the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) depending on the type of traumatic experience (TE) and history of TE exposure, but the relatively small sample sizes in these studies resulted in a number of unresolved basic questions. To examine disaggregated associations of type of TE history with PTSD in a large cross-national community epidemiologic data set. The World Health Organization World Mental Health surveys assessed 29 TE types (lifetime exposure, age at first exposure) with DSM-IV PTSD that was associated with 1 randomly selected TE exposure (the random TE) for each respondent. Surveys were administered in 20 countries (n = 34 676 respondents) from 2001 to 2012. Data were analyzed from October 1, 2015, to September 1, 2016. Prevalence of PTSD assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Among the 34 676 respondents (55.4% [SE, 0.6%] men and 44.6% [SE, 0.6%] women; mean [SE] age, 43.7 [0.2] years), lifetime TE exposure was reported by a weighted 70.3% of respondents (mean [SE] number of exposures, 4.5 [0.04] among respondents with any TE). Weighted (by TE frequency) prevalence of PTSD associated with random TEs was 4.0%. Odds ratios (ORs) of PTSD were elevated for TEs involving sexual violence (2.7; 95% CI, 2.0-3.8) and witnessing atrocities (4.2; 95% CI, 1.0-17.8). Prior exposure to some, but not all, same-type TEs was associated with increased vulnerability (eg, physical assault; OR, 3.2; 95% CI, 1.3-7.9) or resilience (eg, participation in sectarian violence; OR, 0.3; 95% CI, 0.1-0.9) to PTSD after the random TE. The finding of earlier studies that more general history of TE exposure was associated with increased vulnerability to PTSD across the full range of random TE types was replicated, but this generalized vulnerability was limited to prior TEs involving violence, including participation in organized violence (OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.0-1.6), experience of

  4. ICP MS selection of radiopure materials for the GERDA experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Vacri, M. L.; Nisi, S.; Cattadori, C.; Janicsko, J.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Smolnikov, A.; Walter, M.

    2015-08-01

    The GERDA (GERmanium Detector Array) experiment, located in the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory (LNGS, Italy) aims to search for neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of the 76Ge isotope. Both an ultra-low radioactivity background environment and active techniques to abate the residual background are required to reach the background index (of 10-3 counts/keV kg y) at the Qββ. In order to veto and suppress those events that partially deposit energy in Ge detectors, the readout of liquid argon (LAr) scintillation light (SL) has been implemented for the second GERDA experimental Phase. A double veto system has been designed and constructed using highly radiopure materials (scintillating fibers, wavelength shifters, polymeric foils, reflective foils). This work describes the study of lead, thorium and uranium ultra-trace content, performed at the LNGS Chemistry Laboratory by High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (HR ICP MS), for the selection of all materials involved in the construction of the veto system

  5. ICP MS selection of radiopure materials for the GERDA experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Vacri, M. L., E-mail: divacrim@lngs.infn.it [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, via G.Acitelli 22, 67100 Assergi (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche e Chimiche, University of L’Aquila, via Vetoio, 67100 L’Aquila (Italy); Nisi, S., E-mail: nisi@lngs.infn.it [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, via G.Acitelli 22, 67100 Assergi (AQ) (Italy); Cattadori, C., E-mail: cattadori@lngs.infn.it [INFN Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Janicsko, J. [TUM Munich (Germany); Lubashevskiy, A. [MPIK, Heidelberg (Germany); JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation); Smolnikov, A. [MPIK, Heidelberg (Germany); Walter, M. [Physik-Institut, Universitat Zurich, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-08-17

    The GERDA (GERmanium Detector Array) experiment, located in the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory (LNGS, Italy) aims to search for neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of the {sup 76}Ge isotope. Both an ultra-low radioactivity background environment and active techniques to abate the residual background are required to reach the background index (of 10{sup −3} counts/keV kg y) at the Q{sub ββ}. In order to veto and suppress those events that partially deposit energy in Ge detectors, the readout of liquid argon (LAr) scintillation light (SL) has been implemented for the second GERDA experimental Phase. A double veto system has been designed and constructed using highly radiopure materials (scintillating fibers, wavelength shifters, polymeric foils, reflective foils). This work describes the study of lead, thorium and uranium ultra-trace content, performed at the LNGS Chemistry Laboratory by High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (HR ICP MS), for the selection of all materials involved in the construction of the veto system.

  6. Increasing compliance with the World Health Organization Surgical Safety Checklist-A regional health system's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitelis, Matthew E; Kaczynski, Adelaide; Shear, Torin; Deshur, Mark; Beig, Mohammad; Sefa, Meredith; Silverstein, Jonathan; Ujiki, Michael

    2017-07-01

    In 2009, NorthShore University HealthSystem adapted the World Health Organization Surgical Safety Checklist (SSC) at each of its 4 hospitals. Despite evidence that SSC reduces intraoperative mistakes and increase patient safety, compliance was found to be low with the paper form. In November 2013, NorthShore integrated the SSC into the electronic health record (EHR). The aim was to increase communication between operating room (OR) personnel and to encourage best practices during the natural workflow of surgeons, anesthesiologists, and nurses. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of an electronic SSC on compliance and patient safety. An anonymous OR observer selected cases at random and evaluated the compliance rate before the rollout of the electronic SSC. In June 2014, an electronic audit was performed to assess the compliance rate. Random OR observations were also performed throughout the summer in 2014. Perioperative risk events, such as consent issues, incorrect counts, wrong site, and wrong procedure were compared before and after the electronic SSC rollout. A perception survey was also administered to NorthShore OR personnel. Compliance increased from 48% (n = 167) to 92% (n = 1,037; P World Health Organization SSC is a validated tool to increase patient safety and reduce intraoperative complications. The electronic SSC has demonstrated an increased compliance rate, a reduced number of risk events, and most OR personnel believe it will have a positive impact on patient safety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A Teacher Research Experience: Immersion Into the World of Practicing Ocean Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, D. L.

    2006-12-01

    Professional development standards for science teachers encourage opportunities for intellectual professional growth, including participation in scientific research (NRC, 1996). Strategies to encourage the professional growth of teachers of mathematics and science include partnerships with scientists and immersion into the world of scientists and mathematicians (Loucks-Horsley, Love, Stiles, Mundry, & Hewson, 2003). A teacher research experience (TRE) can often offer a sustained relationship with scientists over a prolonged period of time. Research experiences are not a new method of professional development (Dubner, 2000; Fraser-Abder & Leonhardt, 1996; Melear, 1999; Raphael et al., 1999). Scientists serve as role models and "coaches" for teachers a practice which has been shown to dramatically increase the transfer of knowledge, skill and application to the classroom (Joyce & Showers, 2002). This study investigated if and how secondary teachers' beliefs about science, scientific research and science teaching changed as a result of participation in a TRE. Six secondary science teachers participated in a 12 day research cruise. Teachers worked with scientists, the ships' crew and other teachers conducting research and designing lessons for use in the classroom. Surveys were administered pre and post TRE to teachers and their students. Additionally, teachers were interviewed before, during and after the research experience, and following classroom observations before and after the research cruise. Teacher journals and emails, completed during the research cruise, were also analyzed. Results of the study highlight the use of authentic research experiences to retain and renew science teachers, the impact of the teachers' experience on students, and the successes and challenges of implementing a TRE during the academic year.

  8. An observational comparison of the older and younger bus passenger experience in a developing world city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceves-González, Carlos; May, Andrew; Cook, Sharon

    2016-06-01

    This study was an unobtrusive observational analysis of 333 older and younger bus passengers in Guadalajara, Mexico. A set of data were collected for each observed passenger, as well as more general observations related to driver behaviour, bus design and bus service characteristics. There were significant differences between older and younger passengers in terms of boarding and alighting times, use of handrails, seat location preferences, passenger stability and coping strategies in order to maintain postural stability. The conditions of travel are conducive to a poor passenger experience for the older passengers in particular. Although the problems may be attributed to bus design and driver behaviour typical of that in developing countries, they are also influenced by the wider transport infrastructure, and a lack of a regulatory regime which places drivers under time pressure and in direct competition with each other. Practitioner Summary: Bus services must cater for all ages of passengers, including the elderly. This unobtrusive observational study investigated the passenger experience in a developing world city. Bus and wider service design were found to compromise the journey experience, with the older users being particularly negatively impacted. Design recommendations are provided.

  9. Barriers to implementing the World Health Organization's Trauma Care Checklist: A Canadian single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Brodie; Zakirova, Rimma; Bridge, Jennifer; Nathens, Avery B

    2014-11-01

    Management of trauma patients is difficult because of their complexity and acuity. In an effort to improve patient care and reduce morbidity and mortality, the World Health Organization developed a trauma care checklist. Local stakeholder input led to a modified 16-item version that was subsequently piloted. Our study highlights the barriers and challenges associated with implementing this checklist at our hospital. The checklist was piloted over a 6-month period at St. Michael's Hospital, a Level 1 trauma center in Toronto, Canada. At the end of the pilot phase, individual, semistructured interviews were held with trauma team leaders and nursing staff regarding their experiences with the checklist. Axial coding was used to create a typology of attitudes and barriers toward the checklist, and then, vertical coding was used to further explore each identified barrier. Checklist compliance was assessed for the first 7 months. Checklist compliance throughout the pilot phase was 78%. Eight key barriers to implementing the checklist were identified as follows: perceived lack of time for the use of the checklist in critically ill patients, unclear roles, no memory trigger, no one to enforce completion, not understanding its importance or purpose, difficulty finding physicians at the end of resuscitation, staff/trainee changes, and professional hierarchy. The World Health Organization Trauma Care Checklist was a well-received tool; however, consideration of barriers to the implementation and staff adoption must be done for successful integration, with special attention to its use in critically ill patients. Therapeutic/care management, level V.

  10. Earth Experiments in a Virtual World: Introducing Climate & Coding to High School Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, H. A.; Twedt, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    In our increasingly technologically-driven and information-saturated world, literacy in STEM fields can be crucial for career advancement. Nevertheless, both systemic and interpersonal barriers can prevent individuals, particularly members of under-represented groups, from engaging in these fields. Here, we present a high school-level workshop developed to foster basic understanding of climate science while exposing students to the Python programming language. For the past four years, the workshop has been a part of the annual Expanding Your Horizons conference for high school girls, whose mission is to spark interest in STEM fields. Moving through current events in the realm of global climate policy, the fundamentals of climate, and the mathematical representation of planetary energy balance, the workshop culminates in an under-the-hood exploration of a basic climate model coded in the Python programming language. Students interact directly with the underlying code to run `virtual world' experiments that explore the impact of solar insolation, planetary albedo, the greenhouse effect, and meridional energy transport on global temperatures. Engagement with Python is through the Jupyter Notebook interface, which permits direct interaction with the code but is more user-friendly for beginners than a command-line approach. We conclude with further ideas for providing online access to workshop materials for educators, and additional venues for presenting such workshops to under-represented groups in STEM.

  11. The association between psychotic experiences and disability: results from the WHO World Mental Health Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Mateu, Fernando; Alonso, Jordi; Lim, Carmen C. W.; Saha, Sukanta; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Al-Hamzawi, Ali; Andrade, Laura H.; Bromet, Evelyn J.; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Chatterji, Somnath; Degenhardt, Louisa; de Girolamo, Giovanni; de Jonge, Peter; Fayyad, John; Florescu, Silvia; Gureje, Oye; Haro, Josep M.; Hu, Chiyi; Karam, Elie G.; Kovess-Masfety, Viviane; Lee, Sing; Medina-Mora, Maria E.; Ojagbemi, Akin; Pennell, Beth-Ellen; Posada-Villa, Jose; Scott, Kate M.; Stagnaro, Juan Carlos; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Kessler, Ronald C.; McGrath, John J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective While psychotic experiences (PEs) are known to be associated with a range of mental and general medical disorders, little is known about the association between PEs and measures of disability. We aimed to investigate this question using the World Mental Health surveys. Method Lifetime occurrences of 6 types of PEs were assessed along with 21 mental disorders and 14 general medical conditions. Disability was assessed with a modified version of the WHO Disability Assessment Schedule. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression models were used to investigate the association between PEs and high disability scores (top quartile) with various adjustments. Results Respondents with PEs were more likely to have top quartile scores on global disability than respondents without PEs (19.1% vs. 7.5%; χ2 = 190.1, pmental or general medical disorders. PMID:28542726

  12. Community Engagement using World Café: The Well London Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Kevin; Adams-Eaton, Faye; Trimble, Allison; Renton, Adrian; Bertotti, Marcello

    2010-01-01

    The Well London programme was launched across twenty boroughs in London during late 2007 to improve the health and well-being of residents living in some of the most deprived communities in London. Well London employed a multi-stage community engagement process which informed the overall project strategy for each intervention area. In this article we establish and describe the key principles that guided the design of this innovative community engagement process. Principles included building collaborative partnerships, working with whole-systems, privileging community knowledge and working with the deficit of experience in each area. The article then describes in detail how these principles were operationalised throughout the preparation and delivery of forty World Cafes, which were the first open community activities of the Well London community engagement process. Finally, this article reflects on and summarises the lessons learned when employing innovative, inclusive and transparent community engagement for health promotion.

  13. The association between psychotic experiences and disability: results from the WHO World Mental Health Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Mateu, F; Alonso, J; Lim, C C W; Saha, S; Aguilar-Gaxiola, S; Al-Hamzawi, A; Andrade, L H; Bromet, E J; Bruffaerts, R; Chatterji, S; Degenhardt, L; de Girolamo, G; de Jonge, P; Fayyad, J; Florescu, S; Gureje, O; Haro, J M; Hu, C; Karam, E G; Kovess-Masfety, V; Lee, S; Medina-Mora, M E; Ojagbemi, A; Pennell, B-E; Piazza, M; Posada-Villa, J; Scott, K M; Stagnaro, J C; Xavier, M; Kendler, K S; Kessler, R C; McGrath, J J

    2017-07-01

    While psychotic experiences (PEs) are known to be associated with a range of mental and general medical disorders, little is known about the association between PEs and measures of disability. We aimed to investigate this question using the World Mental Health surveys. Lifetime occurrences of six types of PEs were assessed along with 21 mental disorders and 14 general medical conditions. Disability was assessed with a modified version of the WHO Disability Assessment Schedule. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression models were used to investigate the association between PEs and high disability scores (top quartile) with various adjustments. Respondents with PEs were more likely to have top quartile scores on global disability than respondents without PEs (19.1% vs. 7.5%; χ 2  = 190.1, P mental or general medical disorders. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. SEMINAR ABOUT SERIOUS GAMES AND VIRTUAL WORLDS: An Experience of International Collaboration And Reflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram LAASER

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The educational possibilities of ICT, dizzying and exponentially growing every day, offer multiple alternatives of mediation for teaching, learning and communication.Thus, the inclusion of video games and virtual worlds into educational context represents a qualitative leap that claims to significantly boost ways of communication and knowledge representation of the scenarios involved. Aware of this reality, in the framework of the Master of Technology Enhanced Learning at the National University of Cordoba, Argentina, a virtual seminar was offered to students to address the issue on the basis of invited lectures of worldwide recognized experts. The format chosen for the seminar allowed the treatment of subjects not only through reading assignments and web quests to be discussed collaboratively but also included the state of the art experience of developers working in the field. The paper describes didactic design and technical solutions of the seminar format.

  15. Experiences from Real-World Deployment of Context-Aware Technologies in a Hospital Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Hansen, Thomas Riisgaard; Mogensen, Martin

    2006-01-01

    and discuss our experiences from an ongoing deployment of a suite of context-aware technologies and applications in a hospital environment, including a context-awareness infrastructure, a location tracking system, and two context-aware applications running on interactive wall displays and mobile phones. Based......Context-aware computing is a central concept in ubiquitous computing and many suggestions for context-aware technologies and applications have been proposed. There is, however, little evidence on how these concepts and technologies play out in a real-world setting. In this paper we describe...... on an analysis of the use of these systems, we observe that many of the ideas behind context-aware computing are valid, and that the context-aware applications are useful for clinicians in their work. By reflecting on the nature of the designed context-aware technologies, we present a model which states...

  16. Real-world experiences of nuclear science in the classroom - What an individual can do

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, M.R.

    1991-01-01

    Experience is showing that the public has yet to learn about the natural world, radiation, risk analysis, and energy, as well as other issues. This has occurred during a time in which the quality of education has declined in the US. As a former college professor who is married to a schoolteacher, the author realized that the two observations are linked. A communications gap has developed between science and the schools. Scientists perceive that once scientific advancements have taken place, new curriculum materials for schools automatically adapt to include these advancements. Teachers' schedules are typically so filled during and after school that new curriculum material is slowed in being introduced in the classroom. Thus, the question becomes, how do we bridge the gulf between scientists and the classroom? Scientists can be helpful to teachers in many ways. This paper is a summary of some of the activities and lessons learned in strengthening teacher-scientist relationships

  17. The Analysis of the Experience in Commercialization of Indirect Coal Liquefaction Technologies in the World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudyka Viktor I.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available It is substantiated that, taking into account the world trends in the development of fuel and energy complexes, in the near future the most preferable direction in using solid fossil fuels will become not just their burning but advanced thermochemical processing, which will result in obtaining such end products as substitutes for natural gas, electricity, and synthetic analogues of hydrocarbons. There analyzed foreign experience on commercialization of indirect coal gasification technologies, among which the technologies of traditional and plasma gasification are singled out. The advantages and disadvantages of these technologies are systematized, and the hypothesis about better prospects for using the technology of plasma gasification of coal in comparison with the traditional analogues that are based on the Fischer-Tropsch process is put forward.

  18. CERN, World's largest particle physics lab, selects Progress SonicMQ

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    "Progress Software Corporation (NADAQ: PRGS), a global supplier of application insfrastructure software used to develop, deploy, integrate and manage business applications, today announced that CERN the world's largest physis laboratory and particle accelerator, has chosen Progress® SonicMQ® for mission-critical message delivery." (1 page)

  19. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory selects Intel Itanium 2 processors for world's most powerful Linux cluster

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Intel Corporation, system manufacturer California Digital and the University of California at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) today announced they are building one of the world's most powerful supercomputers. The supercomputer project, codenamed "Thunder," uses nearly 4,000 Intel® Itanium® 2 processors... is expected to be complete in January 2004" (1 page).

  20. Review of experience of major reform of railways of the world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.V.Martsenyuk

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the possibility of the foreign countries experience in the reforming of railway transport of Ukraine. Methodology. On the basis of comparative analysis the suitability of foreign experience of infrastructure branches reformation, dividing the range of problems to the questions of ideological and methodological character, and of course, taking into account the peculiarities of the situation in Ukraine is estimated. As for the first range of problems, it is, first of all, the choice of the form of ownership. Findings. Experience shows that both types of property have not only the beneficial but also the negative impacts. On the one hand, it is the state railways have the conditions for development and implementation of the new technologies such as high-speed trains, construction of which, as well as construction of specialized lines would be impossible without appropriate research base, and without public funding. On the other – private companies. operating on a concession basis, usually provide a higher level of services at affordable rates. Originality. It can be concluded that there is no direct correlation between the ownership form of railroads and economic or qualitative characteristics of their work. The necessity of various forms of technical and economic relationships, the existence of separate railways at the regional and local levels, which offers a great opportunity to overcome the monotony of operation, in the development of railways towards greater differentiation of service levels is proved. This however does not mean that the only alternative is to sell concessions to private enterprises, especially if the transfer of ownership is not supplemented by commitments to support public transport at a certain level. Practical value. Examples of positive governance are opposed to the equal examples of private management and vice versa. Deep analysis of reforming experience of world leading railways will prevent from

  1. Seeing the World through Another Person's Eyes: Simulating Selective Attention via Action Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frischen, Alexandra; Loach, Daniel; Tipper, Steven P.

    2009-01-01

    Selective attention is usually considered an egocentric mechanism, biasing sensory information based on its behavioural relevance to oneself. This study provides evidence for an equivalent allocentric mechanism that allows passive observers to selectively attend to information from the perspective of another person. In a negative priming task,…

  2. Grappling with 'Natural Selection' – Experiences of a Teacher Since ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    biology teaching. . Abdul Jamil Urfi. Department of Environmental. Studies, University of Delhi. New Delhi 110007, India. Email: ajurfi@rediffmail.com ..... correct method. In the manner in which professional science is conducted the world over, learning the 'correct method' is no doubt important but equally important is to let ...

  3. Studying Acute Coronary Syndrome Through the World Wide Web: Experiences and Lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Angelo A

    2017-10-13

    This study details my viewpoint on the experiences, lessons, and assessments of conducting a national study on care-seeking behavior for heart attack in the United States utilizing the World Wide Web. The Yale Heart Study (YHS) was funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Grounded on two prior studies, the YHS combined a Web-based interview survey instrument; ads placed on the Internet; flyers and posters in public libraries, senior centers, and rehabilitation centers; information on chat rooms; a viral marketing strategy; and print ads to attract potential participants to share their heart attack experiences. Along the way, the grant was transferred from Ohio State University (OSU) to Yale University, and significant administrative, information technology, and personnel challenges ensued that materially delayed the study's execution. Overall, the use of the Internet to collect data on care-seeking behavior is very time consuming and emergent. The cost of using the Web was approximately 31% less expensive than that of face-to-face interviews. However, the quality of the data may have suffered because of the absence of some data compared with interviewing participants. Yet the representativeness of the 1154 usable surveys appears good, with the exception of a dearth of African American participants. ©Angelo A Alonzo. Originally published in JMIR Research Protocols (http://www.researchprotocols.org), 13.10.2017.

  4. [Selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT): our experience in African blacks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seck, S M; Agboton, G; Dieng, M; Ndiaye Sow, M N; Diakhate, M; Gueye, N N; Seck, C M; Lam, A

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate in the short and medium term, intraocular pressure results after selective laser trabeculoplasty in black patients with chronic open angle glaucoma or isolated ocular hypertension. We conducted a retrospective study with a mean 12.5-month follow-up in black patients who underwent SLT. Inclusion criteria were: an open iridocorneal angle greater than or equal to Schaeffer grade 3, data recorded and available on trabecular pigmentation, data on SLT parameters available, and intraocular pressure by Goldmann applanation tonometry recorded.A positive result was defined as a post-laser IntraOcular Pressure (IOP) less than 21 mmHg after 1-month follow-up. The main motivation was the reduction of number of eye drops used. Performed first was a treatment of the inferior 180° (3:00-9:00), possibly supplemented by a second session at 15 days or 1 month if a pressure decrease was noted after the first session. IOP results were evaluated prior to SLT, immediately following SLT and then depending on the drop in pressure. Statistical analysis was performed using the EPI.info 7 software. A total of 69 eyes of 40 patients treated with SLT were identified. The mean IOP prior to SLT was 18.3 mmHg ± 4. Our results showed 90% of patients who positively responded to the treatment (10% failure) with a mean IOP decrease of 2.3 ± 1 mmHg, that is 13%, by the second week. The mean pressure decrease continued to 4.78 ± 1 mmHg for patients (30%) in the group treated for 360°, that is 27% in the same period of time. SLT permitted discontinuation of a prostaglandin in 60% (42 cases). Eyes on triple-drug therapy went from 23 before SLT to 5 following SLT (a 26% decline), eyes on two medications went from 32 to 16 (24% decline). In result association tests, only pigmentation of the angle and visual field stage had a statistically significant probability. In our experience, SLT is indicated in black patients to potentiate less effective treatments, to

  5. Selection of the all-time best World XI Test cricket team using the TOPSIS method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar Chakraborty

    2019-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to apply the technique for order preference by similarity to ideal solution (TOPSIS as a multi-criteria decision making tool to form the all-time best World XI Test cricket team while taking into consideration over 2600 cricketers participated in Test matches for more than 100 years of cricket history. From the voluminous database containing the performance of numerous Test cricketers, separate lists are first prepared for different positions in the batting and bowling orders consisting of manageable numbers of candidate alternatives while imposing some constraints with respect to the minimum number of innings played (for batsmen, minimum number of tests played (for wicketkeepers and bowlers, and minimum numbers of runs scored and wickets taken (for all-rounders. The TOPSIS method is later adopted to rank those shortlisted cricketers and identify the best performers for inclusion in the proposed World XI Test team. The best World Test cricket team is thus formed as Alastair Cook (ENG (c, Sunil Gavaskar (IND, Rahul Dravid (IND (vc, Sachin Tendulkar (IND, Shivnarine Chanderpaul (WI, Jacques Kallis (SA, Adam Gilchrist (AUS (wk, Glenn McGrath (AUS, Courtney Walsh (WI, Muttiah Muralitharan (SL and Shane Warne (AUS.

  6. Site selection for controversial projects: reflections on the MRS experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigmon, E.B.; Marland, G.

    1987-01-01

    Projects for waste management, power production, and a host of other socially useful functions frequently falter because of local opposition. Students of the siting dilemma have prescribed accommodation of local interests through negotiation and compensation, but they offer little advice on the site selection itself. The negotiated compensation approach to siting frequently fails because localities refuse to negotiate. The authors argue that methods of site selection and developers' initial stance toward local communities affect communities' propensity to negotiate. Site selection strategies and their influence on project acceptability are examined, using the Department of Energy's Monitored Retrievable Storage proposal as a point of departure. 14 refs

  7. Walter B. Cannon's World War I experience: treatment of traumatic shock then and now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Kathy L

    2018-06-01

    Walter B. Cannon (1871-1945), perhaps America's preeminent physiologist, volunteered for service with the Army Expeditionary Force (AEF) during World War I. He initially served with Base Hospital No. 5, a unit made up of Harvard clinicians, before moving forward to the front lines to serve at a casualty clearing station run by the British. During his time there, he performed research on wounded soldiers to understand the nature and causes of traumatic shock. Subsequently, Cannon performed animal experimentation on the causes of traumatic shock in the London laboratory of Dr. William Bayliss before being assigned to the AEF Central Medical Laboratory in Dijon, France, where he continued his experimental studies. During this time, he also developed and taught a curriculum on resuscitation of wounded soldiers to medical providers. Although primarily a researcher and teacher, Cannon also performed clinical duties throughout the war, serving with distinction under fire. After the war, Cannon wrote a monograph entitled Traumatic Shock (New York: Appleton, 1923), which encapsulated the knowledge that had been gained during the war, both from direct observation of wounded soldiers, as well as laboratory experimentation on the causes and treatment of traumatic shock. In his monograph, Cannon elucidates a number of principles concerning hemorrhagic shock that were later forgotten, only to be "rediscovered" during the current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. This paper summarizes Cannon's wartime experiences and the knowledge gained concerning traumatic shock during World War I, with a comparison of current combat casualty care practices and knowledge to that which Cannon and his colleagues understood a century ago.

  8. Long-term selection experiment with Afrikaner cattle

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mario Beffa

    A selection and line x environment interaction study with grade Afrikaner cattle ... Relatively large negative (-0.4) direct-maternal genetic correlations were indicated for .... or management groups which inflate the variance between paternal.

  9. Rapid prototyping, astronaut training, and experiment control and supervision: distributed virtual worlds for COLUMBUS, the European Space Laboratory module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Eckhard; Rossmann, Juergen

    2002-02-01

    In 2004, the European COLUMBUS Module is to be attached to the International Space Station. On the way to the successful planning, deployment and operation of the module, computer generated and animated models are being used to optimize performance. Under contract of the German Space Agency DLR, it has become IRF's task to provide a Projective Virtual Reality System to provide a virtual world built after the planned layout of the COLUMBUS module let astronauts and experimentators practice operational procedures and the handling of experiments. The key features of the system currently being realized comprise the possibility for distributed multi-user access to the virtual lab and the visualization of real-world experiment data. Through the capabilities to share the virtual world, cooperative operations can be practiced easily, but also trainers and trainees can work together more effectively sharing the virtual environment. The capability to visualize real-world data will be used to introduce measured data of experiments into the virtual world online in order to realistically interact with the science-reference model hardware: The user's actions in the virtual world are translated into corresponding changes of the inputs of the science reference model hardware; the measured data is than in turn fed back into the virtual world. During the operation of COLUMBUS, the capabilities for distributed access and the capabilities to visualize measured data through the use of metaphors and augmentations of the virtual world may be used to provide virtual access to the COLUMBUS module, e.g. via Internet. Currently, finishing touches are being put to the system. In November 2001 the virtual world shall be operational, so that besides the design and the key ideas, first experimental results can be presented.

  10. INFORMATION THREATS IN A GLOBALIZED WORLD: ECONOMICS, POLITICS, SOCIETY (EXPERIENCE OF UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoliy Holovka

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The scientific article deals with both integral vision of the contemporary informative risks in the globalized world and their classification. The essence of the informative security is exposed, which is one of main factors of steady development of the modern informative society. In consideration of the foreign practice, the experience of Ukraine is also analyzed in counteraction to the contemporary informative threats. The effective policy of safety and counteraction to the informative threats is one of the basic constituents of the state national safety system and at the same time testifies to the correct character of connections between the public organs and the society. Under the conditions of unrestrained progress of information technologies and general informatization in all sectors of people’s life (politics, economy, defense, energy etc., providing of control and defense of informative space of the country becomes much more difficult task. Modern Ukrainian realities certify convincingly, that Ukraine is in an extremely difficult political situation that influences all spheres of Ukrainians’ life. The key reason of such situation is a military-informative aggression against Ukraine from Russia, which is the fact of waging a «hybrid war». As it is known, this type of war combines the application of both classic soldiery instruments (military technique, firearms, regular troops and methods of informative influence (cyber-attack, informative diversions, aggressive propaganda, impact on public opinion. This factor encourages such research. The object of the study is the phenomenon of information risks in the modern world. Subject of research – is the impact of modern information threats to the state and society, namely the economic, political and social spheres. For a holistic analysis of the subject of research was used appropriate methodology – systematic approach, method of comparative analysis, general scientific methods

  11. Financial management information systems 25 years of World Bank experience on what works and what doesn't

    CERN Document Server

    Dener, Cem; Dorotinsky, William Leslie

    2011-01-01

    Since 1984, the World Bank has financed 87 Financial Management Information System (FMIS) projects in 51 countries totaling over US 2.2 billion, of which US 938 million was for FMIS related information and communication technology (ICT) solutions. This study presents the World Bank?s experience with these investment operations to share the achievements and challenges observed, and provide guidance for improving the performance of future projects. The report is structured according to four overarching questions:?What historical patterns emerge from World Bank financed Treasury/FMIS projects?Thi

  12. World Experience in Using Education and Science in the Process of Building the State Intellectual Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krupka Mykhaylo I.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to analyze the world experience in using education and science in the processes of increasing the intellectual potential of the state and prospects of its application in Ukraine. The article describes features of the continental, Atlantic and the East Asian models of higher education management with emphasis on the key points, which can be useful for reforming the Ukrainian system of education. It has been noted that the problem of higher education quality in Ukraine lies in fundamental principles of its functioning, because development of the national education system for a long time took place under conditions of administrative system, while the European system of education is built on principles of competition and free market. On the basis of comparative characteristics of sources of finance in the United States there has been determined a dominant role of the federal government and it has been found that among the branches of science the leading positions are occupied by the life sciences. The experience of reforming science in countries of the Central and Eastern Europe, which took place on the model of functioning of the research institutes and research process in the EU countries, has been analyzed. Particular attention is paid to the successful experience of reforming the education and science in China. Taking into account the international experience the author has substantiated the directions of increasing the intellectual potential in Ukraine by deepening the integration of education and science, in particular: the creation of a wide network of research universities and conducting of a fair share of fundamental research on their base; accelerated development of public-private partnership in education and science; quick updating of the curricula adequate to the requirements of time and introduction of interdisciplinary courses; competitive financing of scientific programs with participation of the state and

  13. Electrochemistry Experiments to Develop Novel Sensors for Real-World Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Lunsford

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available These novel STEM (Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics Electrochemistry experiments have been designed to increase the integrated science content, pedagogical, and technological knowledge for real-world applications. This study has focused on (1 the fundamental understanding on the relationship of metal oxide films and polymers to electrochemical sensors, and (2 the development of new materials which have great application of electrode materials. Following the inquiry based learning strategy the research students learn to develop and study the electrode surfaces to meet the needs of stability and low detection limits. Recently, new advances in environmental health are revealing the anthropogenic or naturally occurring harmful organic chemicals in sources of water supply expose a great health threat to human and aquatic life. Due to their well-known carcinogenic and lethal properties, the presence of human produced toxic chemicals such as phenol and its derivatives poses a critical threat to human health and aquatic life in such water resources. In order to achieve effective assessment and monitoring of these toxic chemicals there is a need to develop in-situ (electrochemical sensors methods to detect rapidly. Electrochemical sensors have attracted more attention to analytical chemist and electrochemistry engineers due to its simplicity, rapidness and high sensitivity. However, there will be real challenges of achieving successful analysis of chemicals (phenol in the presence of common interferences in water resources, which will be discussed regarding the students challenging learning experiences in developing an electrochemical sensor. The electrochemical sensor developed (TiO2 , ZrO2 or sol-gel mixture TiO2/ZrO2 will be illustrated and the successes will be shown by cyclic voltammetry data in detection of 1,2-dihydroxybenzenes (catechol, dopamine and phenol.

  14. Contemporary Parenteral Antiplatelet Bridging Strategies: A Single-Center Real-World Experience at a Tertiary Care Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Gretchen; Rimsans, Jessica; Qamar, Arman; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Bhatt, Deepak L

    2018-03-13

    Oral antiplatelet therapy may require interruption soon after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or acute coronary syndrome. The optimal parenteral antiplatelet bridge strategy with glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors or cangrelor, a P2Y12 inhibitor, is unclear. We explore real-world use of cangrelor or eptifibatide for antiplatelet bridging at a large tertiary-care center. Thirty-one patients (9 eptifibatide, 20 cangrelor, and 2 both) received bridge therapy from October 2015 to June 2017. Primary bridge therapy indications included surgery (68%), limited enteral access/absorption (16%), and high-perceived bleed risk (16%). Median duration of bridge therapy was 61 (20-100) hours for cangrelor and 83 (19-98) hours for eptifibatide. Severe/life-threatening bleeding or stent thrombosis was not observed. GUSTO-defined bleeding occurred in 30% (cangrelor) and 27% (eptifibatide). Initial dosing errors occurred in 23% of patients. Death during hospitalization occurred in 16% of patients. Parenteral antiplatelet bridging was used for ~3 days in this single-center, tertiary care experience, commonly for unplanned surgery following PCI. Despite high-risk presentations with >15% in-hospital mortality, efficacy profiles were reassuring with no identified stent thrombosis, but bleeding and dosing errors were common. Antiplatelet bridging should only be used in well-selected patients at the appropriate dose for the minimal necessary duration.

  15. The experience of being an Anishinabe man healer: ancient healing in a modern world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struthers, Roxanne; Eschiti, Valerie S; Patchell, Beverly

    2008-01-01

    The purpose was to understand the experience of being an Anishinabe man healer. Of particular relevance, healers explained how they provide Indigenous health care in a world dominated by Western biomedicine. A phenomenological approach was utilized to interview four Anishinabe men healers who reside in the United States and Canada. In-person interviews were conducted using an interview guide. The interviews were audiotaped when permitted; otherwise notes were taken. Data analysis was conducted using techniques from Colaizzi and van Manen. Seven themes were identified: (1) The Healer's Path, (2) Health as Wholeness, (3) Healing Ways, (4) Healing Stories, (5) Culture Interwoven with Healing, (6) Healing Exchange, and (7) Connection with Western Medicine. The themes identified inform nursing practice by pointing out the importance of culture within traditional Indigenous healing, as well as the need for a holistic approach when caring for Indigenous people. Additionally, the Indigenous men healers acknowledged their connection with Western medicine as part of the process of healing for their clients. This emphasizes the need for nurses and other health care providers to become knowledgeable regarding traditional Indigenous healing that their clients may be receiving, in order to foster open communication.

  16. Popular theatre and nonformal education in the Third World: Five strands of experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Ross

    1985-09-01

    Popular theatre is gaining increasing attention in the Third World as a tool for popular education and community organizing. It finds expression in a number of forms including drama, music dance, puppetry and poetry and is performed for — and often by — ordinary peasants and workers. Popular theatre is used as a means of bringing people together, building confidence and solidarity, stimulating discussion, exploring alternative options for action, and building a collective commitment to change: starting with people's urgent concerns and issues, it encourages reflection on these issues and possible strategies for change. Popular theatre, however, is not a unified discipline. It is used by different groups for different interests, ranging from a technocratic, message-oriented `domestication theatre' at one end of the spectrum to a process of consciousness-raising, organization-building and struggle at the other end. Five main strands of popular theatre can be distinguished: (a) the struggle for national liberation; (b) mass education and rural extension; (c) community or participatory development; (d) `conscientization' or popular education; and (e) popular education and organizing. At its best, popular theatre is not an isolated performance or a cathartic experience, but part of an ongoing process of education and organizing, aimed at overcoming oppression and dependence, and at securing basic rights.

  17. John Dewey in Mexico: A Shared Experience in the Rural World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xóchil Taylor

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This work examines the influence of John Dewey’s ideas on the Mexican pedagogical theories and rural schools in the first decades of the twentieth century, and Dewey’s own experience in Mexico. We look at how Deweyan thought was expressed mainly through educational ideas that shaped the design of policies aimed at improving schooling in rural areas, promoting practices based on community-based «active learning». One of John Dewey’s peculiarities is that the American pedagogue had the opportunity to see how some of his main ideas were appropriated and implemented in the real world, generally in situations fuelled by the desire for social change. In the Mexican context in particular, such change was impelled by the social ideology of the Mexican Revolution, and the life stories of the protagonists of the ensuing pedagogical transformation, the conditions furthering the possibility of new education policies, and above all, the communities who participated in the material and symbolic construction of a new form of schooling are discussed.

  18. The fester locus in Botryllus schlosseri experiences selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nydam Marie L

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allorecognition, the ability of an organism to distinguish self from non-self, occurs throughout the entire tree of life. Despite the prevalence and importance of allorecognition systems, the genetic basis of allorecognition has rarely been characterized outside the well-known MHC (Major Histocompatibility Complex in vertebrates and SI (Self-Incompatibility in plants. Where loci have been identified, their evolutionary history is an open question. We have previously identified the genes involved in self/non-self recognition in the colonial ascidian Botryllus schlosseri, and we can now begin to investigate their evolution. In B. schlosseri, colonies sharing 1 or more alleles of a gene called FuHC (Fusion Histocompatibility will fuse. Protein products of a locus called fester, located ~300 kb from FuHC, have been shown to play multiple roles in the histocompatibility reaction, as activating and/or inhibitory receptors. We test whether the proteins encoded by this locus are evolving neutrally or are experiencing balancing, directional, or purifying selection. Results Nearly all of the variation in the fester locus resides within populations. The 13 housekeeping genes (12 nuclear genes and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I have substantially more structure among populations within groups and among groups than fester. All polymorphism statistics (Tajima's D, Fu and Li's D* and F* are significantly negative for the East Coast A-type alleles, and Fu and Li's F* statistic is significantly negative for the West Coast A-type alleles. These results are likely due to selection rather than demography, given that 10 of the housekeeping loci have no populations with significant values for any of the polymorphism statistics. The majority of codons in the fester proteins have ω values 95% posterior probability of ω values > 1. Conclusion Fester proteins are evolving non-neutrally. The polymorphism statistics are consistent with either

  19. Coping with Capital Inflows; Experiences of Selected European Countries

    OpenAIRE

    David Vávra; Inci Ötker; Barry Topf; Zbigniew Polanski

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the experiences of a number of European countries in coping with capital inflows. It describes the nature of the inflows, their implications for macroeconomic and financial stability, and the policy responses used to cope with them. The experiences suggest that as countries become more integrated with international financial markets, there is little room to regulate capital flows effectively. The most effective ways to deal with capital inflows would be to deepen the financ...

  20. Presence of inbreeding during a selection experiment with Merino ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    192 individual inbreeding coefficients on natural and artificial selection cannot be ruled out. The effect of inbreeding on production and reproduction traits in Merino sheep has been the subject of many studies and reviews (Morley, 1954; Doney,. 1957; Lax & Brown, 1967; Turner & Young, 1969; Dolling,. 1970' Lamberson ...

  1. World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for SelectedIndustrial Sectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Neelis, Maarten; Galitsky,Christina; Zhou, Nan

    2007-06-05

    "World best practice" energy intensity values, representingthe most energy-efficient processes that are in commercial use in atleast one location worldwide, are provided for the production of iron andsteel, aluminium, cement, pulp and paper, ammonia, and ethylene. Energyintensity is expressed in energy use per physical unit of output for eachof these commodities; most commonly these are expressed in metric tonnes(t). The energy intensity values are provided by major energy-consumingprocesses for each industrial sector to allow comparisons at the processlevel. Energy values are provided for final energy, defined as the energyused at the production facility as well as for primary energy, defined asthe energy used at the production facility as well as the energy used toproduce the electricity consumed at the facility. The "best practice"figures for energy consumption provided in this report should beconsidered as indicative, as these may depend strongly on the materialinputs.

  2. The life-world of mothers who care for mentally retarded children: the Katutura township experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntswane, A M; van Rhyn, L

    2007-03-01

    This article reports on a research study done in Katutura Township, near Windhoek. A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual design was followed to answer the research question investigating experiences of mothers caring for mentally retarded children at home. Phenomenological interviews were conducted with a purposefully selected sample of twelve mothers. The meaning of their experiences was analysed by using Teschxs method (1990 in Creswell, 1994:155) of analysing qualitative data. The results indicated various emotions and challenges experienced by these mothers during the care of their children. Feelings of shock, despondency and sadness dominated the early stages when the retarded children were still young. During later years, as the children were growing up, the mothers felt shame, fear, frustration, anger, disappointment and worry. However, acceptance followed, as the children grew older. Stigma seemed to affect all the respondents. Support in any form or lack thereof seemed to be the decisive factor-positioning mothers along a continuum of two extremes, namely despairing isolation and integrated happiness. Recommendations were made regarding the improvement of heath care services and education of the mothers and their families.

  3. The life-world of mothers who care for mentally retarded children: the Katutura township experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Ntswane

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on a research study done in Katutura Township, near Windhoek. A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual design was followed to answer the research question investigating experiences of mothers caring for mentally retarded children at home. Phenomenological interviews were conducted with a purposefully selected sample of twelve mothers. The meaning of their experiences was analysed by using Teschxs method (1990 in Creswell, 1994:155 of analysing qualitative data. The results indicated various emotions and challenges experienced by these mothers during the care of their children. Feelings of shock, despondency and sadness dominated the early stages when the retarded children were still young. During later years, as the children were growing up, the mothers felt shame, fear, frustration, anger, disappointment and worry. However, acceptance followed, as the children grew older. Stigma seemed to affect all the respondents. Support in any form or lack thereof seemed to be the decisive factor-positioning mothers along a continuum of two extremes, namely despairing isolation and integrated happiness. Recommendations were made regarding the improvement of heath care services and education of the mothers and their families.

  4. Strategies for Selecting Routes through Real-World Environments: Relative Topography, Initial Route Straightness, and Cardinal Direction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tad T Brunyé

    Full Text Available Previous research has demonstrated that route planners use several reliable strategies for selecting between alternate routes. Strategies include selecting straight rather than winding routes leaving an origin, selecting generally south- rather than north-going routes, and selecting routes that avoid traversal of complex topography. The contribution of this paper is characterizing the relative influence and potential interactions of these strategies. We also examine whether individual differences would predict any strategy reliance. Results showed evidence for independent and additive influences of all three strategies, with a strong influence of topography and initial segment straightness, and relatively weak influence of cardinal direction. Additively, routes were also disproportionately selected when they traversed relatively flat regions, had relatively straight initial segments, and went generally south rather than north. Two individual differences, extraversion and sense of direction, predicted the extent of some effects. Under real-world conditions navigators indeed consider a route's initial straightness, cardinal direction, and topography, but these cues differ in relative influence and vary in their application across individuals.

  5. Efficacy and safety of tenofovir in chronic hepatitis B: Australian real world experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovett, Grace C; Nguyen, Tin; Iser, David M; Holmes, Jacinta A; Chen, Robert; Demediuk, Barbara; Shaw, Gideon; Bell, Sally J; Desmond, Paul V; Thompson, Alexander J

    2017-01-08

    : 0.833-0.967, P = 0.0046) and HBeAg positive status (OR = 0.373, 95%CI: 0.183-0.762, P = 0.0069). There was no difference in response comparing treatment-naïve and treatment-experienced patients. Three episodes of virological breakthrough occurred in the setting of non-compliance. Tenofovir therapy was well tolerated. Tenofovir is an efficacious, safe and well-tolerated treatment in an Australian real-world tertiary care setting. Our data are similar to the reported experience from registration trials.

  6. On the plurality of (methodological worlds: Estimating the analytic flexibility of fMRI experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua eCarp

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available How likely are published findings in the functional neuroimaging literature to be false? According to a recent mathematical model, the potential for false positives increases with the flexibility of analysis methods. Functional MRI (fMRI experiments can be analyzed using a large number of commonly used tools, with little consensus on how, when, or whether to apply each one. This situation may lead to substantial variability in analysis outcomes. Thus, the present study sought to estimate the flexibility of neuroimaging analysis by submitting a single event-related fMRI experiment to a large number of unique analysis procedures. Ten analysis steps for which multiple strategies appear in the literature were identified, and two to four strategies were enumerated for each step. Considering all possible combinations of these strategies yielded 6,912 unique analysis pipelines. Activation maps from each pipeline were corrected for multiple comparisons using five thresholding approaches, yielding 34,560 significance maps. While some outcomes were relatively consistent across pipelines, others showed substantial methods-related variability in activation strength, location, and extent. Some analysis decisions contributed to this variability more than others, and different decisions were associated with distinct patterns of variability across the brain. Qualitative outcomes also varied with analysis parameters: many contrasts yielded significant activation under some pipelines but not others. Altogether, these results reveal considerable flexibility in the analysis of fMRI experiments. This observation, when combined with mathematical simulations linking analytic flexibility with elevated false positive rates, suggests that false positive results may be more prevalent than expected in the literature. This risk of inflated false positive rates may be mitigated by constraining the flexibility of analytic choices or by abstaining from selective analysis

  7. Strategic Public Management - Selected Experiences with BSC Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan PŮČEK

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Elements associated with modern approaches towards public management have been gaining ground in various forms in the Czech public administration, especially in the last decade. They reflect the priorities of the public administration reform and the enhanced opportunities for co-financing the implementation of new management tools from European funds. This article summarizes the experience of strategic management, based on the analysis of secondary sources and on the experience of one of the authors who has worked as manager in several public administration/public sector institutions. In the practical part, the article focuses on the potential and limits of implementation of the Balanced Scorecard using the practical experience together with the implementation of this instrument at the level of city and ministry.

  8. Get immersed and black in fire ash world. Field Wildgeographers experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Cerdà, Artemi; Misiune, Ieva; Jordan, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Ash is the footprint left by the fire. This residue is very important to landscape recover and is an important source of soil protection after the fire. Get immersed in fire ash world is the same thing of get dirty and do not be recognizable in a fire affected area. To measure ash in the field we have to be careful where to step, how to do the experimental design, collect samples and find with accuracy the places measured before. A good methodology is needed in design field experiments, collect ash samples and monitoring ash evolution (Cerdà and Doerr, 2008; Bodi et al., 2014; Pereira and Ubeda, 2010; Pereira et al. 2011; 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015). The objective of this work is to share with the Avatar world the methodologies used when wildgeographers get immersed in fire ash world, including: 1) Identify the best study area 2) Experimental design 3) Sample collection 4) Get dirty and have fun in the field 5) Laboratory, Statistical and spatial analysis Acknoledgements The author are thankful for the support of the projects POSTFIRE (Soil quality, erosion control and plant cover recovery under different post-fire management scenarios, CGL2013-47862-C2-1-R) funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness; GL2008-02879/BTE, LEDDRA 243857, RECARE (Preventing and Remediating Degradation of Soils in Europe Through Land Care, FP7-ENV-2013-TWO STAGE), funded by the European Commission; and for the COST action ES1306 (Connecteur: Connecting European Connectivity Research), FUEGORED (Spanish Network of Forest Fire Effects on Soils, http://grupo.us.es/fuegored/) and to Comissionat per a Universitats i Recerca del DIUE de la Generalitat de Catalunya. References Bodi, M., Martin, D.A., Santin, C., Balfour, V., Doerr, S.H., Pereira, P., Cerda, A., Mataix-Solera, J. (2014) Wildland fire ash: production, composition and eco-hydro-geomorphic effects. Earth-Science Reviews, 130, 103-127. Cerdà, A. y Doerr, S.H. 2008. The effect of ash and needle cover on surface

  9. Theories that narrate the world: Ronald A. Fisher's mass selection and Sewall Wright's shifting balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Alirio

    2017-04-01

    Theories are composed of multiple interacting components. I argue that some theories have narratives as essential components, and that narratives function as integrative devices of the mathematical components of theories. Narratives represent complex processes unfolding in time as a sequence of stages, and hold the mathematical elements together as pieces in the investigation of a given process. I present two case studies from population genetics: R. A. Fisher's "mas selection" theory, and Sewall Wright's shifting balance theory. I apply my analysis to an early episode of the "R. A. Fisher - Sewall Wright controversy." Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Energy fair - further selection from the 15th world energy conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heck, H.

    1993-01-01

    As a quintessence the author quotes the statement made by Knizia in November 1992 before the Nuclear Society: Problems such as population growth, impending distribution wars and enormous migration movements or atmosphere damaging seem to be of secondary importance if in the public the hazards of nuclear energy are conjured up. Isn't that the only way of understanding that many hundreds of politicians met in Rio in order to deplore the threat to the atmosphere by CO 2 overloading, but none of the statesmen of the Western world, which because of its scientific, technological and investigation potentials would be able to do so, mentions the utilization of nuclear energy as a possible remedy. Is it not the only way of understanding that an appeal by various hundreds of scientists, among them more than 50 Nobel prize winners, to the heads of state assembled in Rio, goes unheard, may be because it contained sentences such as: We view with concern how on the threshold of the 21st century an irrational ideology is spreading which counteracts scientific and industrial progress, thus hindering economic and social development. (orig./HSCH) [de

  11. Experience inheritance from famous specialists based on real-world clinical research paradigm of traditional Chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guanli; Wang, Yinghui; Zhang, Runshun; Liu, Baoyan; Zhou, Xuezhong; Zhou, Xiaji; Zhang, Hong; Guo, Yufeng; Xue, Yanxing; Xu, Lili

    2014-09-01

    The current modes of experience inheritance from famous specialists in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) include master and disciple, literature review, clinical-epidemiology-based clinical research observation, and analysis and data mining via computer and database technologies. Each mode has its advantages and disadvantages. However, a scientific and instructive experience inheritance mode has not been developed. The advent of the big data era as well as the formation and practice accumulation of the TCM clinical research paradigm in the real world have provided new perspectives, techniques, and methods for inheriting experience from famous TCM specialists. Through continuous exploration and practice, the research group proposes the innovation research mode based on the real-world TCM clinical research paradigm, which involves the inheritance and innovation of the existing modes. This mode is formulated in line with its own development regularity of TCM and is expected to become the main mode of experience inheritance in the clinical field.

  12. Real-world exhaust temperature profiles of on-road heavy-duty diesel vehicles equipped with selective catalytic reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boriboonsomsin, Kanok; Durbin, Thomas; Scora, George; Johnson, Kent; Sandez, Daniel; Vu, Alexander; Jiang, Yu; Burnette, Andrew; Yoon, Seungju; Collins, John; Dai, Zhen; Fulper, Carl; Kishan, Sandeep; Sabisch, Michael; Jackson, Doug

    2018-09-01

    On-road heavy-duty diesel vehicles are a major contributor of oxides of nitrogen (NO x ) emissions. In the US, many heavy-duty diesel vehicles employ selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology to meet the 2010 emission standard for NO x . Typically, SCR needs to be at least 200°C before a significant level of NO x reduction is achieved. However, this SCR temperature requirement may not be met under some real-world operating conditions, such as during cold starts, long idling, or low speed/low engine load driving activities. The frequency of vehicle operation with low SCR temperature varies partly by the vehicle's vocational use. In this study, detailed vehicle and engine activity data were collected from 90 heavy-duty vehicles involved in a range of vocations, including line haul, drayage, construction, agricultural, food distribution, beverage distribution, refuse, public work, and utility repair. The data were used to create real-world SCR temperature and engine load profiles and identify the fraction of vehicle operating time that SCR may not be as effective for NO x control. It is found that the vehicles participated in this study operate with SCR temperature lower than 200°C for 11-70% of the time depending on their vocation type. This implies that real-world NO x control efficiency could deviate from the control efficiency observed during engine certification. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Selected Measurements of Rare Decays at the LHCb Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Pikies, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Experimental results of rare decays B$^0$$\\to K*^0\\mu\\mu$, B$^0 \\to K*^0$ee, $\\Lambda_b\\to\\Lambda\\mu\\mu$ and B$^0_s$ governed by Flavour Changing Neutral Current transitions are discussed in this paper. The angular distributions and differential branching fractions measurements were performed using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3:0 fb$^{-1}$ collected at the LHCb experiment.

  14. Pilot Overmyer looks over food selections and experiments with beverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Pilot Overmyer, using beverage container and drinking straw secured in meal tray assembly (ASSY), experiments with microgravity chararcteristics of liquid on middeck in front of forward lockers. Overmyer also looks over packages of food attached to middeck lockers in meal tray assemblies. Carry-on food warmer appears overhead and other meal tray assemblies, personal hygiene mirror assy, personal hygiene kit, and portrait of G.W.S. Abbey, JSC's Director of Flight Operations, appear on lockers.

  15. Readers as Place-Makers: The Experience of Place in the Literacy Life-Worlds of Middle Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    This study explored five adults' experiences of place within their middle childhood literacy life-worlds. Middle childhood, the stage of development in which children often acquire reading independence, is also characterized by significant increases in children's geographic accessibility and independence. The findings propose that in the literacy…

  16. The Design of an Instructional Model Based on Connectivism and Constructivism to Create Innovation in Real World Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirasatjanukul, Kanokrat; Jeerungsuwan, Namon

    2018-01-01

    The objectives of the research were to (1) design an instructional model based on Connectivism and Constructivism to create innovation in real world experience, (2) assess the model designed--the designed instructional model. The research involved 2 stages: (1) the instructional model design and (2) the instructional model rating. The sample…

  17. [The transgenerational transmission of traumatic experiences of the Second World War over three generations--a psychoanalytical perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silke, Wiegand-Grefe; Möller, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents some reflections on the transgenerational transmission of traumatic experiences of war and in particular bombing during Second World War. These theoretical considerations are based on a case study (family interview) deriving from the research project "Kriegskindheit im Hamburger Feuersturm" additionally illustrated and complemented with impressions based on interviews with three generations in context of the project.

  18. Propaganda, Censorship, and Civic Education in Rural Missouri Schools during World War I: The Benton County Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, William I.

    This study describes the patriotic public rituals, the propaganda materials, and the censorship activities that were part of the school experience in Missouri during World War I. It also examines the apparent responses of two rural Benton County communities to those rituals, materials and activities. Benton County is a rural area of central…

  19. Categories of Experience: A Paradigm for the Study of Contemporary World Cultures at Western State College of Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Robert

    1992-01-01

    Presents a framework used at Western State College to teach an interdisciplinary general education course. The framework helps students organize a large volume of material about Contemporary World Cultures according to a taxonomy of human experience, including artistic/literary expression; thought and belief; relationships/associations with…

  20. Educational Research with Real-World Data: Reducing Selection Bias with Propensity Scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill L. Adelson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Often it is infeasible or unethical to use random assignment in educational settings to study important constructs and questions. Hence, educational research often uses observational data, such as large-scale secondary data sets and state and school district data, and quasi-experimental designs. One method of reducing selection bias in estimations of treatment effects is propensity score analysis. This method reduces a large number of pretreatment covariates to a single scalar function and allows researchers to compare subjects with similar probability to receive the treatment. This article provides an introduction to propensity score analysis and stratification, an example illustrating its use, and suggestions for using propensity score analysis in educational research.

  1. Darwin's goldmine is still open: variation and selection run the world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forterre, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The scientific contribution of Darwin, still agonized in many religious circles, has now been recognized and celebrated by scientists from various disciplines. However, in recent years, several evolutionists have criticized Darwin as outdated, arguing that “Darwinism,” assimilated to the “tree of life,” cannot explain microbial evolution, or else was not operating in early life evolution. These critics either confuse “Darwinism” and old versions of “neo-Darwinism” or misunderstand the role of gene transfers in evolution. The core of Darwin explanation of evolution (variation/selection) remains necessary and sufficient to decipher the history of life. The enormous diversity of mechanisms underlying variations has been successfully interpreted by evolutionists in this framework and has considerably enriched the corpus of evolutionary biology without the necessity to kill the father. However, it remains for evolutionists to acknowledge interactions between cells and viruses (unknown for Darwin) as a major driving force in life evolution. PMID:22919695

  2. [Professor WANG Fuchun's experience in the acupoint selection of clinical treatment with acupuncture and moxibustion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hailin; Liu, Chengyu; Ha, Lijuan; Li, Tie

    2017-11-12

    Professor WANG Fuchun 's experience in the acupoint selection of clinical treatment with acupuncture and moxibustion was summarized. The main acupoints are selected by focusing on the chief symptoms of disease, the supplementary points are selected by differentiating the disorders. The acupoints are modified in terms of the changes of sickness. The effective acupoints are selected flexibly in accordance with the specific effects of points. The summary on the acupoint selection reflects professor WANG Fuchun 's academic thoughts and clinical experience and effectively instructs the clinical practice of acupuncture and moxibustion.

  3. Learners' experiences of learning support in selected Western Cape schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaniyi Bojuwoye

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study explored Western Cape primary and secondary school learners' experiences regarding the provision and utilization of support services for improving learning. A qualitative interpretive approach was adopted and data gathered through focus group interviews involving 90 learners. Results revealed that learners received and utilized various forms of learning support from their schools, teachers, and peers. The learning support assisted in meeting learners' academic, social and emotional needs by addressing barriers to learning, creating conducive learning environments, enhancing learners' self-esteem and improving learners' academic performance.

  4. The role of building societies on the market of hypothec loaning: world experience and Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellada Georgiyevna Pilavova

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the study of international experience in modeling residential mortgage, the need to develop savings and loan institutions is justified - banks of building savings - as an institution to meet mass demand of the general population of Russia on the improvement of living conditions. In particular, the history of mortgage lending in Asia and Europe is described in details. Particular attention is paid to the models of the Eastern Europe (Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary and Poland and Germany. The percentage volume of housing loans to GDP in transition and developed countries is compared. The reasons for the backlog of Poland and the Czech Republic from more developed countries are investigated. It is concluded that exactly the building society was the starting point for the rapid evolution of housing finance in different countries. The advantageous features of this institution as reducing credit risk through specialization, providing a source of long-term money and effective tool for the selection of reliable borrowers to the banking sector, as well as beneficial effects on the economic culture of borrowers are indicated.

  5. Optimisation of selection cuts for MUCH detector of CBM experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooq, M.; Ahmad, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    2015-01-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment is one of the future research program scheduled at FAIR, Darmstadt Germany. The aim of the planned experiment is to explore the Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) phase diagram in the regions of high baryonic densities and moderate temperatures in the beam energy range of 10-45 AGeV. This approach is complementary to the studies of matter at high temperatures and low net baryon densities performed at RHIC and LHC. CBM will also search for the critical point, the first order deconfinement phase transition from the hadronic matter to the partonic matter and the study of equation-of-state of dense baryonic matter. Comprehensive scan of observables, beam energies and collision systems is realised. The observables include: low mass dilepton pairs, charmonia and open charm, collective flow of rare and bulk particles, correlations and fluctuations etc. Low yield measurements of rare probes, like charmonium and low mass vector mesons, have to be performed at very high reaction rates ∼10 MHz. These conditions demand for fast and radiation hard detectors and associated fast electronics, readout and online event reconstruction. Low material budget is required with in the detector acceptance to avoid multiple scattering which would limit high precision measurements

  6. Does Sexual Selection Influence Ornamentation of Hemipenes in Old World Snakes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andonov, Kostadin; Natchev, Nikolay; Kornilev, Yurii V; Tzankov, Nikolay

    2017-09-01

    In the present study, we investigated and documented the morphology of the male copulatory organs (hemipenes) in fifteen wide-ranging snake species. The species represent four families (Boidae, Colubridae, Lamprophiidae, and Viperidae) and ten genera. We applied the same preparation techniques for all species, successfully everting and expanding the organs completely. The detailed description of the general morphology of the male copulatory organs was based on 31 specimens. Our data were compared with published observations and we point out some incorrectly described details in previous investigations. We provide the first description of the hemipenial morphology for three ophidian species (Elaphe sauromates, Telescopus fallax, and Malpolon insignitus). In addition to the morphological characteristics of the hemipenes presented in the research, we propose the adoption of a standardized index describing the hemipenial proportions. The immense variation in hemipenial morphology presupposes its dynamic evolution, but we suggest that many of the significant structures observed here may have escaped previous researchers due to differing methodologies. Some of the highly ornamented morphologies that we describe are consistent with a locking mechanism during copulation. However, other morphologies may relate to the variety of mating behaviors observed. As a result, we propose that sexual selection is the major driver affecting the hemipenial ornamentation in snakes. Anat Rec, 300:1680-1694, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. WORLD EXPERIENCE OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION LAND USE AND PROTECTIONTAKING INTO ACCOUNT THE REQUIREMENTS OF ECOLOGICAL SAFETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    l. Sviridova

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Studied global trends of public administration land use and protection. In particular, zemleohoronni measures in the developed world are implemented through rural development policy, based on the conduct of the common agricultural policy, the creation of funds to support farmers, provide technical assistance, development of national programs and future development plans. For the European Union development policy documents on the development of land areas for 5-10 years - the overall trend. Land management activities are conducted in foreign countries on the basis of approved design documentation for land management different direction. Found that the use of land and resource potential in the world is subject to the requirements of environmental safety. Agrarian relations in these countries are based on incentive levers, with direct execution of the rules of use and protection of land. By 2020, the strategy of the Common Agricultural Policy of the European Union provides funding for joint agricultural market, direct subsidies to farmers and stimulate agricultural development. Common Agricultural Policy of the European Union for its activities fully demonstrates the ability of European economies to maintain the same level of development. State administration of environmental impact on the economic interests of the tenure or land use in countries with market economies include: tax exemptions (to make environmentally oriented activities, soft loans (available on interest rates for environmental investments, subsidies (for the implementation of environmental programs and subsidies (for growing products without pesticides entities. It is proved that the system of economic instruments in environmental policy Ukraine needs to improve, because it is poorly developed. Experience in other countries shows that as we strengthen land management tools (instruments for land administration, and its supporting tools to succeed in the system of rational land use

  8. Excellence Initiatives to Establish World-Class Universities: Evaluation of Recent Experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Jamil Salmi; Isak Froumin

    2013-01-01

    Jamil Salmi, Ph. D., coordinator of the World Banks tertiary education program (NW, Washington, D.C., United States), member of the International Advisory Panel, National Research University -Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russian Federation. Email: Address: The World Bank Institute, 1818 H Street, NW, Washington, D.C. 20433, United States.Isak Froumin, Ped.D., Professor, Director of Research and Development at the Education Institute, National Research Unive...

  9. Selected event reconstruction algorithms for the CBM experiment at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, Semen; Höhne, Claudia; Lebedev, Andrey; Ososkov, Gennady

    2014-01-01

    Development of fast and efficient event reconstruction algorithms is an important and challenging task in the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future FAIR facility. The event reconstruction algorithms have to process terabytes of input data produced in particle collisions. In this contribution, several event reconstruction algorithms are presented. Optimization of the algorithms in the following CBM detectors are discussed: Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector, Transition Radiation Detectors (TRD) and Muon Chamber (MUCH). The ring reconstruction algorithm in the RICH is discussed. In TRD and MUCH track reconstruction algorithms are based on track following and Kalman Filter methods. All algorithms were significantly optimized to achieve maximum speed up and minimum memory consumption. Obtained results showed that a significant speed up factor for all algorithms was achieved and the reconstruction efficiency stays at high level.

  10. A review of odour impact criteria in selected countries around the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancher, Marlon; Griffiths, K David; Franco, Davide; de Melo Lisboa, Henrique

    2017-02-01

    Exposure to environmental odour can result in annoyance, health effects and depreciation of property values. Therefore, many jurisdictions classify odour as an atmospheric pollutant and regulate emissions and/or impacts from odour generating activities at a national, state or municipal level. In this work, a critical review of odour regulations in selected jurisdictions of 28 countries is presented. Individual approaches were identified as: comparing ambient air odour concentration and individual chemicals statistics against impact criteria (maximum impact standard); using fixed and variable separation distances (separation distance standard); maximum emission rate for mixtures of odorants and individual chemical species (maximum emission standard); number of complaints received or annoyance level determined via community surveys (maximum annoyance standard); and requiring use of best available technologies (BAT) to minimize odour emissions (technology standard). The comparison of model-predicted odour concentration statistics against odour impact criteria (OIC) is identified as one of the most common tools used by regulators to evaluate the risk of odour impacts in planning stage assessments and is also used to inform assessment of odour impacts of existing facilities. Special emphasis is given to summarizing OIC (concentration percentile and threshold) and the manner in which they are applied. The way short term odour peak to model time-step mean (peak-to-mean) effects is also captured. Furthermore, the fundamentals of odorant properties, dimensions of nuisance odour, odour sampling and analysis methods and dispersion modelling guidance are provided. Common elements of mature and effective odour regulation frameworks are identified and an integrated multi-tool strategy is recommended. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Experience of Barometric Drifter Application for Investigating the World Ocean Arctic Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Motyzhev

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency of the problem solution to create a regionally-oriented data computing system for marine dynamics and ecosystem evolution modeling and forecasting (that should be capable for providing reliable information for managerial decision making, justifying future economic projects and adjusting the existing ones depends on development level of observational systems, environmental evolution, mathematical models and techniques for observational data assimilation. The analysis of the system as an observational segment of modern geo-informational technology allows us to draw a conclusion that the system of drifter observations is one of the most effective ones nowadays. Surface drifter network, continuously operating in the World Ocean, provides systematic operational data on the surface water circulation, thermal processes in the upper ocean and air pressure. Drifter data, acquired over the past 15 years, allowed one to improve and even change the existing concepts of patterns and mechanisms of regional climatic trend and hydrometeorological anomaly formation under effect of global processes in the Ocean – Atmosphere model (in the high latitudes as well. In the present paper the principle results of the analysis of expediency and feasibility of drifting systematic operative pressure field monitoring establishment in the near-surface atmosphere layer over the Arctic Ocean and the seas of the Russian Federation Arctic Zone have been considered. More than 30 drifters of BTC60/GPS/ice type, whose summarized lifetime as for June 2015 exceeded 6500 days, were deployed in the Arctic in 2012–2015. According to data acquired from the drifters, more than 155 000 air pressure readings were received. The most intensive drifter observations were carried out in two regions: in the Beaufort Sea – Canada Basin and in the Central Arctic. The results of experiments revealed that hardware-software solutions implemented in polar modifications of barometric

  12. Visual perception: digital imagination and sensitive experience of the social world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio La Rocca

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available With every historical epoch comes a different way of thinking, a different way of seeing, capable of identifying the fundamental elements of a change of paradigm. Any discussion of ‘paradigm’ in relation to the contemporary world must include the development of the digital realm and its technological apparatus, which transform vision and influence how we perceive the world. Central to this development has been the emergence of myriad new forms of communication and a culture of sharing life, which characterize the process of seeing.Technology opens up new horizons in terms of how we expose our presence in the world: via digital photography and video, in every instant of everyday life we are in a position to expose our social world, the fragments of our existence. This cultural effect is not merely a consequence of ways of structuring existence, but also constitutes a change in the way we think about our relationship with the world. Every cultural and technical change brings together a variation of thought and perception, and this represents a basis on which to understand and interrogate the continual mutation of our social imaginary and the process of building, producing and transforming the Real.

  13. Real World NET, C#, and Silverlight Indispensible Experiences from 15 MVPs

    CERN Document Server

    Evjen, Bill; Balassy, Gyorgy; Gleeren, Gill; Giard, David; Golesh, Alex; Grossnicklaus, Kevin; Jenkins, Caleb; Juday, Jeffrey; Lele, Vishwas; Likness, Jeremy; Millett, Scott; Nagel, Christian; Yöndem , Daron; Weyer, Christian

    2011-01-01

    A team of MVP authors guides you through the .NET 4 Framework Written by a group of experienced MVPs, this unparalleled book delves into the intricate-and often daunting-world of .NET 4. Each author draws from a particular area of expertise to provide invaluable information on using the various .NET 4, C# 4, Silverlight 4, and Visual Studio tools in the real world. The authors break down the vast .NET 4 Framework into easily digestible portions to offer you a strong foundation on what makes .NET such a popular and successful framework for building a wide range of solutions.Breaks down the .NET

  14. Growing Global Citizens: Young Children's Lived Experiences with the Development of Their Own Social World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twigg, Danielle; Pendergast, Donna; Twigg, Justin

    2015-01-01

    As the result of an increasingly technologically "connected" world, citizens are finding it difficult to effectively exercise civic responsibilities in relation to global issues such as climate change, poverty, and warfare (Tully, 2009). New understandings of the concept of "citizenship" are being extended beyond traditional…

  15. Virtual Worlds: Relationship between Real Life and Experience in Second Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anstadt, Scott P.; Bradley, Shannon; Burnette, Ashley; Medley, Lesley L.

    2013-01-01

    Due to the unique applications of virtual reality in many modern contexts, Second Life (SL) offers inimitable opportunities for research and exploration and experiential learning as part of a distance learning curriculum assignment. A review of current research regarding SL examined real world social influences in online interactions and what the…

  16. Medical Science Liaisons in Real-World Evidence Studies: Experience of AstraZeneca Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvorov, Nikolay; Karaseva, Vera; Stukalina, Ekaterina; Sanay, Elkhan; Petrakovskaya, Vera; Bulatov, Vladimir

    2018-01-01

    There is no doubt that real-world evidence studies have the potential to improve and accelerate the development and delivery of safe and cost-effective innovative medicines to patients as well as influence the way we approach health and health care. Real-world evidence studies are a great challenge in terms of development and conduct, so there should be a good collaboration between the study team and clinical sites at all times, resulting eventually in timely and efficient enrollment. Engaging the sites and key external experts as early as possible during feasibility and routine visits, as well as highlighting the science rationale behind AstraZeneca's portfolio at investigator meetings and during medical science liaison (MSL) interactions, can create a positive impact on physician perception of a particular study and prioritization of patient recruitment in such studies. Therefore, we would like to underline the important role of MSLs in the risk-based monitoring setting of real-world evidence studies, with special attention to the studies with complicated patient profiles, tough timelines, and/or seasonal factors. This approach will be used further for other real world evidence projects of AstraZeneca Russia MC to ensure timelines and budget deliverables are met for the generation of high-quality evidence and eventually better health care for all of us.

  17. Psychological experiences in South African society before the 2010 FIFA World Cup from the systems psychodynamic and positive psychology perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter Koortzen

    2012-05-01

    Research purpose: The objective of this study was to analyse and describe the psychological experiences of South Africans before the 2010 FIFA World Cup. Research design, approach and method: The researchers conducted the study from the systems psychodynamic and positive psychology perspectives. The study comprised a qualitative, explorative and social phenomenological study. The researchers conducted interviews with a wide range of their colleagues and clients. Main findings: The results seemed to indicate that South Africans had had a number of positive and negative experiences before the 2010 FIFA World Cup. Practical/managerial implications: The researchers presented the findings as a number of systems psychodynamic and positive psychology themes. Contribution/value-add: This study presents original research that contributes valuable new knowledge to the positive psychology and systems psychodynamic perspectives.

  18. Good Work--But Not Enough of It : A Review of the World Bank's Experience in Nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Heaver, Richard

    2006-01-01

    The World Bank has been a leader in nutrition policy analysis, and many of the nutrition projects it has supported have been innovative and successful. But though the Bank has developed the economic justification for large-scale investment in nutrition, and has the experience needed to scale up, it has failed to do so. Nutrition lending is an insignificant proportion of the Bank's business...

  19. Selection and Mode Effects in Risk Preference Elicitation Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Gaudecker, Hans-Martin; van Soest, Arthur; Wengström, Erik Roland

    2008-01-01

    experiment is drastically below that of the representative sample in the Internet experiment, and average risk aversion is also lower. Considering the student-like subsample of the Internet subjects and comparing a traditional lab design with an Internet-like design in the lab gives two ways to decompose......We combine data from a risk preference elicitation experiment conducted on a representative sample via the Internet with laboratory data on students for the same experiment to investigate effects of implementation mode and of subject pool selection. We find that the frequency of errors in the lab...... shows that these processes are selective in selecting subjects who make fewer errors, but do not lead to biased conclusions on risk preferences. These findings point at the usefulness of the Internet survey as an alternative to a student pool in the laboratory if the ambition is to use the experiments...

  20. Feature selection using genetic algorithm for breast cancer diagnosis: experiment on three different datasets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalaei, Shokoufeh; Shahraki, Hadi; Rowhanimanesh, Alireza; Eslami, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    This study addresses feature selection for breast cancer diagnosis. The present process uses a wrapper approach using GA-based on feature selection and PS-classifier. The results of experiment show that the proposed model is comparable to the other models on Wisconsin breast cancer datasets. To

  1. The instability of world oil market and its impact on economic development: Indonesia's experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patmosukismo, S.

    1991-01-01

    The world oil market has been characterized by fluctuating prices which have a direct impact on the world economy. If the world oil price rises in real terms, upstream activities become more attractive to producers, and if the price declines, downstream opportunities become more attractive. The world oil market is currently determined not only by producers and consumers, but also by the futures trade. In addition, the elasticity of oil prices has increased since the 1970s through competition among producers and competition from other energy sources. The Asia Pacific countries are experiencing rapid economic growth, and are thus heavily dependent on oil, but generally have small reserves. Their reserves/production ratio is ca 20 years, with a major share coming from China and Indonesia. The current situation of tight and inadequate supply may increase the region's dependence on Middle East sources. The effects of the three recent major oil crises on the Asia Pacific countries are reviewed and the role of oil and gas in Indonesia's economic development is described. Export earnings from oil and gas represent a major share of total Indonesian export revenues, and taxes and receipts from oil companies continue to be the largest receipts in Indonesian government revenues. Slow changes in the primary fuel mix and high growth in domestic consumption may turn Indonesia into a net oil importer before the year 2000. A major effort to decrease domestic oil consumption has been implemented by using natural gas and coal in the power generation sector. On the supply side, recoverable oil and gas reserves of 50 billion bbl and 200 trillion ft 3 respectively may be present but their development depends on the investment scheme of the continuing exploration program

  2. Knowledge-Based Country Programs : An Evaluation of World Bank Group Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Independent Evaluation Group

    2013-01-01

    The World Bank Group is currently engaged in reflection and debate on how to improve the delivery of development support. Part of this debate concerns strengthening the knowledge agenda. The findings of this evaluation are particularly relevant because they speak directly to questions that the institution is deliberating. In particular, they address four key aspects of the “science of delivery”: the role of local partners or local knowledge hubs; consultation with clients and other stakeholde...

  3. Experiences in Automation and Control in Engineering Education with Real-world Based Educational Kits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filomena SOARES

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The well-known paradigm learning by doing is particularly important in engineering courses. Still, in some situations, there is a lack of real-world didactic workbenches due to the absence of financial support, human resources or maintenances restrictions. The authors of this paper have been overcome this difficulty by designing and implementing virtual and remote laboratories in Process Monitoring, Control and Automation teaching applied to Mechanical, Electronics and Biomedical Engineering. The goal of this paper is to present the work developed regarding the real-world workbenches to be used in automation and control practical classes as an integrated virtual and remote laboratory. Some important points include the modelling and control of Discrete Event Systems, Continuous Systems and Real-Time Systems as well as Industrial Control Networks. The physical parts were developed and connected, in a closed-loop configuration, with the respective controllers. The developed kits and systems were geared towards the engineering students’ needs. This integrated approach is very useful for providing students with a global set of skills in this domain. Quantitative and qualitative studies are continuously applied not only for obtaining students feedback but also to gather information to devise strategies for future virtual and remote laboratory applications development suitable for the target public. The positive results achieved so far are very encouraging attesting its efficiency not only in terms of students’ learning but also as a first contact to face real-world problems. The less positive identified point is concerned with technical aspects.

  4. Experiment selection for the discrimination of semi-quantitative models of dynamical systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vatcheva, [No Value; de Jong, H; Bernard, O; Mars, NJI

    Modeling an experimental system often results in a number of alternative models that are all justified by the available experimental data. To discriminate among these models, additional experiments are needed. Existing methods for the selection of discriminatory experiments in statistics and in

  5. Association Between Psychotic Experiences and Subsequent Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors: A Cross-National Analysis From the World Health Organization World Mental Health Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromet, Evelyn J; Nock, Matthew K; Saha, Sukanta; Lim, Carmen C W; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Al-Hamzawi, Ali; Alonso, Jordi; Borges, Guilherme; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Degenhardt, Louisa; de Girolamo, Giovanni; de Jonge, Peter; Florescu, Silvia; Gureje, Oye; Haro, Josep M; He, Yanling; Hu, Chiyi; Karam, Elie G; Kovess-Masfety, Viviane; Lee, Sing; Lepine, Jean-Pierre; Mneimneh, Zeina; Navarro-Mateu, Fernando; Ojagbemi, Akin; Posada-Villa, José; Sampson, Nancy A; Scott, Kate M; Stagnaro, Juan C; Viana, Maria C; Xavier, Miguel; Kessler, Ronald C; McGrath, John J

    2017-11-01

    Community-based studies have linked psychotic experiences (PEs) with increased risks of suicidal thoughts and behaviors (STBs). However, it is not known if these associations vary across the life course or if mental disorders contribute to these associations. To examine the temporal association between PEs and subsequent STBs across the life span as well as the influence of mental disorders (antecedent to the STBs) on these associations. A total of 33 370 adult respondents across 19 countries from the World Health Organization World Mental Health Surveys were assessed for PEs, STBs (ie, ideation, plans, and attempts), and 21 DSM-IV mental disorders. Discrete-time survival analysis was used to investigate the associations of PEs with subsequent onset of STBs. Prevalence and frequency of STBs with PEs, and odds ratios and 95% CIs. Of 33 370 included participants, among those with PEs (n = 2488), the lifetime prevalence (SE) of suicidal ideation, plans, and attempts was 28.5% (1.3), 10.8% (0.7), and 10.2% (0.7), respectively. Respondents with 1 or more PEs had 2-fold increased odds of subsequent STBs after adjusting for antecedent or intervening mental disorders (suicidal ideation: odds ratio, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.8-2.6; suicide plans: odds ratio, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.7-2.6; and suicide attempts: odds ratio, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.5-2.5). There were significant dose-response relationships of number of PE types with subsequent STBs that persisted after adjustment for mental disorders. Although PEs were significant predictors of subsequent STB onset across all life stages, associations were strongest in individuals 12 years and younger. After adjustment for antecedent mental disorders, the overall population attributable risk proportions for lifetime suicidal ideation, plans, and attempts associated with temporally prior PEs were 5.3%, 5.7%, and 4.8%, respectively. Psychotic experiences are associated with elevated odds of subsequent STBs across the life course that cannot be

  6. Operational plans for life science payloads - From experiment selection through postflight reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccollum, G. W.; Nelson, W. G.; Wells, G. W.

    1976-01-01

    Key features of operational plans developed in a study of the Space Shuttle era life science payloads program are presented. The data describes the overall acquisition, staging, and integration of payload elements, as well as program implementation methods and mission support requirements. Five configurations were selected as representative payloads: (a) carry-on laboratories - medical emphasis experiments, (b) mini-laboratories - medical/biology experiments, (c) seven-day dedicated laboratories - medical/biology experiments, (d) 30-day dedicated laboratories - Regenerative Life Support Evaluation (RLSE) with selected life science experiments, and (e) Biomedical Experiments Scientific Satellite (BESS) - extended duration primate (Type I) and small vertebrate (Type II) missions. The recommended operational methods described in the paper are compared to the fundamental data which has been developed in the life science Spacelab Mission Simulation (SMS) test series. Areas assessed include crew training, experiment development and integration, testing, data-dissemination, organization interfaces, and principal investigator working relationships.

  7. Semiperipheries in the World-System: Reflecting Eastern European and Latin American Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Boatca

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper claims that, since many of the concepts relevant to our analysis of systemic change were coined in and about the core, the potential with which solutions to world-systemic crisis are credited in the long run should be assessed differently depending on the structural location of their origin. In the periphery, such concepts as conservatism, socialism and even liberalism took forms that often retained nothing of the original model but the name, such that strategies of applying them to (semiperipheral situations ranged from “stretching the ideology” to “discarding the (liberal myth” altogether. In a first step, “the hypothesis of semiperipheral development” (Chase-Dunn and Hall, according to which the semiperiphery represents the most likely locus of political, economical, and institutional change, is amended to say that, at least for the late modern world-system, the strength of the semiperiphery resides primarily in the cultural and epistemic sphere. In a second step, this contention is illustrated with the help of major challenges that the Eastern European and Latin American (semiperipheries have posed to the world-system’s political fields and institutional settings both in the past and to date—with different degrees of success corresponding to their respective structural position. In light of these examples, it is argued that a comparative analysis of continuities among political epistemologies developed in the semiperiphery can help us understand the ways in which similar attempts can become antisystemic today.

  8. Death and bereavement in the First World War: the Australian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalland, Pat

    2014-06-01

    The First World War was a turning point in the cultural history of death and bereavement in Australia. The mass deaths of some 60,000 soldiers overseas led to communal rituals of mourning for the war dead and minimal public expressions of private grief. The mass slaughter of so many young men and the interminable grief of so many families devalued the deaths of civilians at home and helped to create a new cultural model of suppressed and privatised grieving which deeply constrained the next two generations. Emotional and expressive grieving became less common, mourning ritual was minimised and sorrow became a private matter. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Virtual Worlds: Relationship Between Real Life and Experience in Second Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott P. Anstadt

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to the unique applications of virtual reality in many modern contexts, Second Life (SL offers inimitable opportunities for research and exploration and experiential learning as part of a distance learning curriculum assignment. A review of current research regarding SL examined real world social influences in online interactions and what the effects on users may be. This aids students in understanding the social constructionist perceptions and worldview of those persons they may serve in social services. This suggests the importance of developing an understanding of the relationship between users’ real life (RL and their SL. Some research has begun to reveal the effectiveness of telecommunication and computer simulation with certain clients in the fields of mental health and social work, yet there is a lack of sufficient research done within the context of virtual worlds. The current study surveyed users of several educationally and health focused SIMS (simulations as to what motivates their SL and RL interactions. The data explores associations between users’ RL and their SL in several areas,potentially addressing the future role of educating social work students regarding research methodology in online virtual reality interactions. Implications for social work are discussed including engaging clients using incentives for social participation built into the SL milieu.

  10. Long-Term Experience With World Health Organization Grade III (Malignant) Meningiomas at a Single Institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, Lewis A.; Prayson, Richard A.; Lee, Joung; Reddy, Chandana; Chao, Samuel T.; Barnett, Gene H.; Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Suh, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes for patients with Grade III meningiomas as defined by the 2007 World Health Organization standards. Methods and Materials: The slides from patients who had been treated at the Cleveland Clinic for malignant meningiomas were reviewed by a single neuropathologist. The data from 13 patients treated between 1984 and 2006 satisfied the World Health Organization 2007 definition of Grade III meningioma. A total of 24 surgeries were performed, including 13 primary, 7 salvage, and 4 second salvage. Also, 14 courses of radiotherapy (RT) were administered, including fractionated RT in 3 patients after primary surgery, fractionated RT in 4 patients after salvage surgery, salvage stereotactic radiosurgery to six separate areas in 3 patients, and salvage intensity-modulated RT in 1 patient. Results: From the primary surgery, the median survival was 3.4 years, the 5-year survival rate was 47.2%, and the 8-year survival rate was 12.2%. The median time to recurrence was 9.6 months. A trend was seen toward longer survival for patients who had received adjuvant RT after initial surgery compared with those treated with surgery alone. Two patients developed radiation necrosis, and three had surgical complications. Conclusion: This is one of the few studies reporting the outcomes for malignant meningioma patients according to recent definitions. Our results are consistent with existing reports of the overall poor outcomes for atypical and malignant meningioma patients. From the available data, surgical resection followed by RT and salvage therapy can lead to extended survival.

  11. Divergent evolution and purifying selection of the H (FUT1 gene in New World monkeys (Primates, Platyrrhini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara do Nascimento Borges

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the coding region of the H gene was sequenced and analyzed in fourteen genera of New World primates (Alouatta, Aotus, Ateles, Brachyteles, Cacajao, Callicebus, Callithrix, Cebus, Chiropotes, Lagothrix, Leontopithecus, Pithecia, Saguinus, and Saimiri, in order to investigate the evolution of the gene. The analyses revealed that this coding region contains 1,101 nucleotides, with the exception of Brachyteles, the callitrichines (Callithrix, Leontopithecus, and Saguinus and one species of Callicebus (moloch, in which one codon was deleted. In the primates studied, the high GC content (63%, the nonrandom distribution of codons and the low evolution rate of the gene (0.513 substitutions/site/MA in the order Primates suggest the action of a purifying type of selective pressure, confirmed by the Z-test. Our analyses did not identify mutations equivalent to those responsible for the H-deficient phenotypes found in humans, nor any other alteration that might explain the lack of expression of the gene in the erythrocytes of Neotropical monkeys. The phylogenetic trees obtained for the H gene and the distance matrix data suggest the occurrence of divergent evolution in the primates.

  12. Employment in the research and development sector in selected countries of the European Union and the world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Turczak

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to determine how particular factors affect the diversity of countries in terms of the number of employees in the research and development (R&D sector compared with the number of their overall populations. Two factors are analysed in the study: the proportion of employment in the R&D sector to the total number of people employed (i.e. the factor showing the importance given to R&D in the country concerned and the proportion of the total number of people employed to the number of inhabitants aged 15 and more (i.e. the employment rate. The logarithmic method has been used to assess the impact of deviations of these factors on the deviation of employment in the R&D sector in relation to the number of inhabitants. The causal analysis has allowed for answering the question of how each factor affects the variable in the selected twenty-six countries of the European Union and the world, i.e. what are the direction and strength of the influence. The results obtained for Poland are compared with those received for other countries covered by the analysis and the final conclusions are drawn on this basis.

  13. Musical anhedonia: selective loss of emotional experience in listening to music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Masayuki; Nakase, Taizen; Nagata, Ken; Tomimoto, Hidekazu

    2011-10-01

    Recent case studies have suggested that emotion perception and emotional experience of music have independent cognitive processing. We report a patient who showed selective impairment of emotional experience only in listening to music, that is musical anhednia. A 71-year-old right-handed man developed an infarction in the right parietal lobe. He found himself unable to experience emotion in listening to music, even to which he had listened pleasantly before the illness. In neuropsychological assessments, his intellectual, memory, and constructional abilities were normal. Speech audiometry and recognition of environmental sounds were within normal limits. Neuromusicological assessments revealed no abnormality in the perception of elementary components of music, expression and emotion perception of music. Brain MRI identified the infarct lesion in the right inferior parietal lobule. These findings suggest that emotional experience of music could be selectively impaired without any disturbance of other musical, neuropsychological abilities. The right parietal lobe might participate in emotional experience in listening to music.

  14. Smashing physics. Inside the world's biggest experiment; Der Kosmos im Crashtest. So haben wir das Higgs gejagt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterworth, Jon [University College, London (United Kingdom). Fachbereich Physik und Astronomie

    2015-11-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson made headlines around the world. Two scientists, Peter Higgs and Francois Englert, whose theories predicted its existence, shared a Nobel Prize. The discovery was the culmination of the largest experiment ever run, the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. But what really is a Higgs boson and what does it do? How was it found? And how has its discovery changed our understanding of the fundamental laws of nature? And what did it feel like to be part of it? Jon Butterworth is one of the leading physicists at CERN and this book is the first popular inside account of the hunt for the Higgs. It is a story of incredible scientific collaboration, inspiring technological innovation and ground-breaking science. It is also the story of what happens when the world's most expensive experiment blows up, of neutrinos that may or may not travel faster than light, and the reality of life in an underground bunker in Switzerland. This book will also leave you with a working knowledge of the new physics and what the discovery of the Higgs particle means for how we define the laws of nature. It will take you to the cutting edge of modern scientific thinking.

  15. Student-Run Communications Agencies: Providing Students with Real-World Experiences That Impact Their Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Lee; Haygood, Daniel; Vincent, Harold

    2017-01-01

    While several studies have examined the learning outcomes of student-run communications agencies, these studies have mostly been from the perspective of faculty advisors. Through in-depth interviews with student agency graduates, this study examined how current industry professionals perceive the benefits of their student agency experiences and…

  16. The emotional world of kinship: Children’s experiences of fosterage in East Cameroon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notermans, C.D.

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on children's narrated experiences of fosterage in East Cameroon. It seeks to complement the predominantly adult approaches to fosterage with children's views of the intimate, emotional and competitive aspects of kinship in everyday life. As kinship evolves in homes through

  17. The Emotional World of Kinship: Children's Experiences of Fosterage in East Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notermans, Catrien

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on children's narrated experiences of fosterage in East Cameroon. It seeks to complement the predominantly adult approaches to fosterage with children's views of the intimate, emotional and competitive aspects of kinship in everyday life. As kinship evolves in homes through sharing food and intimacy, children directly…

  18. Real-world experience of MitraClip for treatment of severe mitral regurgitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Pak Hei; She, Hoi Lam; Alegria-Barrero, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

     Percutaneous edge-to-edge mitral valve repair with the MitraClip(®) was shown to be a safe and feasible alternative compared to conventional surgical mitral valve repair. Herein is reported our experience on MitraClip(®) for high-risk surgical candidates with severe mitral regurgitation (MR)....

  19. Standing genetic variation as a major contributor to adaptation in the Virginia chicken lines selection experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Zheya; Pettersson, Mats E; Honaker, Christa F; Siegel, Paul B; Carlborg, Örjan

    2015-10-01

    Artificial selection provides a powerful approach to study the genetics of adaptation. Using selective-sweep mapping, it is possible to identify genomic regions where allele-frequencies have diverged during selection. To avoid false positive signatures of selection, it is necessary to show that a sweep affects a selected trait before it can be considered adaptive. Here, we confirm candidate, genome-wide distributed selective sweeps originating from the standing genetic variation in a long-term selection experiment on high and low body weight of chickens. Using an intercross between the two divergent chicken lines, 16 adaptive selective sweeps were confirmed based on their association with the body weight at 56 days of age. Although individual additive effects were small, the fixation for alternative alleles across the loci contributed at least 40 % of the phenotypic difference for the selected trait between these lines. The sweeps contributed about half of the additive genetic variance present within and between the lines after 40 generations of selection, corresponding to a considerable portion of the additive genetic variance of the base population. Long-term, single-trait, bi-directional selection in the Virginia chicken lines has resulted in a gradual response to selection for extreme phenotypes without a drastic reduction in the genetic variation. We find that fixation of several standing genetic variants across a highly polygenic genetic architecture made a considerable contribution to long-term selection response. This provides new fundamental insights into the dynamics of standing genetic variation during long-term selection and adaptation.

  20. Experience World War II like never before!” : A systematic content analysis of promotional materials surrounding World War II-themed digital games.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Heede, Pieter; Ribbens, Kees; Jeroen, Jansz

    2016-01-01

    Especially since the 1990s, World War II has been one of the most popular historical conflicts to be represented and simulated in digital games (Mobygames, 2016). Yet, in the current body of research about these games, mainly aspects of individual games or game types, such as the World War II-themed

  1. The weight of the visual world is modified by recent experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ásgeirsson, Árni Gunnar; Kyllingsbæk, Søren; Kristjánsson, Árni

    . Recent proposals assume that repetition priming operates at multiple levels. Here we focus on two questions: (1) does repetition priming have a purely perceptual component? and (2) how does such a component fit into the TVA framework? (Bundesen, C. 1990. Psychological bulletin and Review, 97, 523...... not ruling out repetition benefits at other levels. Furthermore, color repetition was only beneficial when the task required attentional selection. The results were fitted to a TVA-based model from which we provided estimates of weights. The results from the modeling procedure indicate that the perceptual...

  2. Steam-generator tube performance: world experience with water-cooled nuclear power reactors during 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatone, O.S.; Pathania, R.S.

    1980-01-01

    The performance of steam-generator tubes in water-cooled nuclear power reactors during 1978 is reviewed. Tube failures occurred at 31 of the 86 reactors surveyed. The causes of these failures and the procedures designed to deal with them are described. The number of tubes plugged has decreased dramatically in 1978 compared to the previous year. This is attributed to the diligent application of techniques developed through in-plant experience and research and development programs over the past several years

  3. Experiencing-in-the-World : Using Pragmatist Philosophy to Design for Aesthetic Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Vyas, Dhaval; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Eliens, A.P.W.; Eliëns, A.; Nijholt, Antinus; Kames, J.M.; Novotny, M.

    2007-01-01

    With the growing use of personal and ubiquitous computing technology, an increase is seen in utilizing aesthetic aspects for designing interactive systems. The use of aesthetic interpretations, however, has differed in different applications, often lacking a coherent and holistic meaning of aesthetics. In this paper we provide an account on aesthetics, utilizing the pragmatist perspective, which can be used as a framework to design for aesthetic experience in interactive systems. We discuss s...

  4. Millennials and the World of Work: Experiences in Paid Work During Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staff, Jeremy; Schulenberg, John E

    2010-06-01

    PURPOSE: This article considers some important questions faced by youth as they enter and adapt to paid work. We focus on two key questions: (1) how many hours should teenagers work during the school year and (2) what available jobs are desirable? DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: To help answer these questions, we review studies that have examined the effects of early work experiences on academic achievement, positive youth development, and health-risk behaviors. We also draw upon nationally representative data from the Monitoring the Future (MTF) study to illustrate some new findings on youth employment. FINDINGS: Moderate work hours, especially in jobs of higher-quality, are associated with a broad range of positive developmental outcomes. IMPLICATIONS: These questions are not only important to teenagers and their parents, they also reflect key debates among scholars in sociology, developmental psychology, and economics regarding the potential short- and long-term consequences of early work experiences for social development and socioeconomic achievement. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: Although work intensity is an important dimension of adolescent work experience, it is clearly not the only one and we argue that it may not even be the most important one. By focusing on types and qualities of jobs, more can be gained in terms of understanding for whom and under what conditions teenage work does provide benefits for and detriments to youth development.

  5. Millennials and the World of Work: Experiences in Paid Work During Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulenberg, John E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose This article considers some important questions faced by youth as they enter and adapt to paid work. We focus on two key questions: (1) how many hours should teenagers work during the school year and (2) what available jobs are desirable? Design/Methodology/Approach To help answer these questions, we review studies that have examined the effects of early work experiences on academic achievement, positive youth development, and health-risk behaviors. We also draw upon nationally representative data from the Monitoring the Future (MTF) study to illustrate some new findings on youth employment. Findings Moderate work hours, especially in jobs of higher-quality, are associated with a broad range of positive developmental outcomes. Implications These questions are not only important to teenagers and their parents, they also reflect key debates among scholars in sociology, developmental psychology, and economics regarding the potential short- and long-term consequences of early work experiences for social development and socioeconomic achievement. Originality/Value Although work intensity is an important dimension of adolescent work experience, it is clearly not the only one and we argue that it may not even be the most important one. By focusing on types and qualities of jobs, more can be gained in terms of understanding for whom and under what conditions teenage work does provide benefits for and detriments to youth development. PMID:20495611

  6. Improving nomenclatural consistency: a decade of experience in the World Register of Marine Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tammy Horton

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The World Register of Marine species (WoRMS has been established for a decade. The early history of the database involved compilation of existing global and regional species registers. This aggregation, combined with changes to data types and the changing needs of WoRMS users, has resulted in an evolution of data-entry consistency over time. With the task of aggregating the accepted species names for all marine species approaching completion, our focus has shifted to improving the consistency and quality of data held while keeping pace with the addition of > 2000 new marine species described annually. This paper defines priorities and longer-term aims that promote standardisation within and interoperability among biodiversity databases, provides editors with further information on how to input nomenclatural data in a standardised way and clarifies for users of WoRMS how and why names are represented as they are. We 1 explain the categories of names included; 2 list standard reasons used to explain why a name is considered ‘unaccepted’ or ‘uncertain’; 3 present and explain the more difficult situations encountered; 4 describe categories of sources and notes linked to a taxon; and 5 recommend how type material, type locality and environmental information should be entered.

  7. The experience of Story Worlds across Media - A conversation with Aaron Smith

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Trento

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Aaron Smith has been known in the academic environment because of this texts about structures within transmedia narratives. His most famous work is “Transmedia Storytelling in Television 2.0”; a thesis for the Middlebury College presented in Spring, 2009, in which he discuss canonicity and world building processes in transmedia storytelling. One of the examples analyzed is the TV series Lost (ABC, 2004-2010 and its narrative extensions in other platforms, like mobile phones, books, games and ARGs (Alternate Reality Games. At this time, Smith is working at the advertising agency; having clients like ABC Entertainment and Disney XD. In this interview for GEMInIS journal, among other things, he talked about his theoretical influences, differences between concepts of transmedia narrative and transmediation, and the definition of Narrativized Geography of Play.The opinions given in this interview do not necessarily reflect the views of the employers in which Aaron works or has worked.

  8. Monitoring the World Health Organization Global Target 2025 for Exclusive Breastfeeding: Experience From the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Priya M; Perrine, Cria G; Chen, Jian; Elam-Evans, Laurie D; Flores-Ayala, Rafael

    2017-08-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding under 6 months, calculated from a single 24-hour recall among mothers of children 0 to 5 months of age, is a World Health Organization (WHO) indicator used to monitor progress on the 2025 global breastfeeding target. Many upper-middle-income and high-income countries, including the United States, do not have estimates for this indicator. Research aim: To describe the prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding under 6 months in the United States. We used a single 24-hour dietary recall from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009-2012 to calculate the prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding under 6 months. We discuss our results in the context of routine breastfeeding surveillance, which is reported from a national survey with different methodology. Among children younger than 6 months, 24.4%, 95% confidence interval [17.6, 31.1], were exclusively breastfed the previous day. To our knowledge, this is the first estimate of the WHO indicator of exclusive breastfeeding under 6 months for the United States. This study supports the global surveillance and data strategy for reporting to the WHO on the 2025 target for exclusive breastfeeding.

  9. World-wide French experience in research reactor fuel cycle transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raisonnier, D.

    1997-01-01

    Since 1963 Transnucleaire has safely performed a large number of national and international transports of radioactive material. Transnucleaire has also designed and supplied suitable packagings for all types of nuclear fuel cycle radioactive material from front-end and back-end products and for power or for research reactors. Transportation of the nuclear fuel material for power reactors is made on a regular and industrial basis. The transportation of material for the research reactor fuel cycle is quite different due to the small quantities involved, the categorisation of material and the numerous places of delivery world-wide. Adapted solutions exist, which require a reactive organisation dealing with all the transportation issues for LEU and HEU products as metal, oxide, fresh fuel elements, spent fuel elements including supply of necessary transport packaging and equipment. This presentation will: - explain the choices made by Transnucleaire and its associates to provide and optimise the corresponding services, - demonstrate the capability to achieve, through reliable partnership, transport operations involving new routes, specific equipment and new political constraints while respecting sophisticated safety and security regulations. (author)

  10. Terror Weapons: The British Experience of Gas and Its Treatment in the First World War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Edgar

    2014-07-01

    Chemical weapons accounted for only 1 per cent of the 750,000 British troops killed in the First World War and yet caused disproportionate casualties (estimated at 180,100). The considerable investment in the development of new toxins and methods of delivery was designed to maintain the elements of surprise and uncertainty as these accentuated their psychological effect. Soldiers were continually challenged on the battlefield by combinations of different types of agent designed to undermine their confidence in respirators, disorientate them, and erode their morale. At first, army doctors practised defensive medicine, invaliding their patients for protracted periods to the UK or base hospitals. By 1917, progressive study of the physical and psychological effects of different types of toxin allowed physicians to design new management strategies. Borrowing ideas from shell shock, specialist units were set up closer to the front line and medical officers taught to identify crucial points in the course of illness to accelerate recovery times and forestall the accretion of psychosomatic symptoms.

  11. Empowerment or endurance? War wives' experiences of independence during and after the Second World War in Germany, 1939-1948.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaizey, Hester

    2011-01-01

    As German men were conscripted into the armed forces during the Second World War, more and more wives were left to manage their families alone. At the same time more women than ever entered paid employment to fill the gaps in the market left by their soldier husbands. Scholars working in the field have made much of the dislocation to gender roles prompted by the Second World War. This article questions whether women's wartime experiences changed their views on being confined to the home. Ultimately, this article argues, women wanted to return to a sense of normality at the end of the war. In the aftermath of defeat, in which mere survival rather than speculation about potentially improved models of the family set-up were paramount, "normality" was most obviously represented by prewar gender roles. Women were hoping for normalization, not only in the public sphere in the sense of a flourishing economy, but also in the private sphere with the return of the men and a resumption of the old role divisions. It was therefore not only conservative politicians who wished to preserve prewar structures within the home - so too did women themselves. The re-emergence of the traditional family model in the wake of the Second World War was thus as much the result of popular aspirations "from below" as of government policies imposed "from above".

  12. World Wind

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — World Wind allows any user to zoom from satellite altitude into any place on Earth, leveraging high resolution LandSat imagery and SRTM elevation data to experience...

  13. Selection, trans-species polymorphism, and locus identification of major histocompatibility complex class IIβ alleles of New World ranid frogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiemnec-Tyburczy, Karen M.; Richmond, Jonathan Q.; Savage, Anna E.; Zamudio, Kelly R.

    2010-01-01

    Genes encoded by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) play key roles in the vertebrate immune system. However, our understanding of the evolutionary processes and underlying genetic mechanisms shaping these genes is limited in many taxa, including amphibians, a group currently impacted by emerging infectious diseases. To further elucidate the evolution of the MHC in frogs (anurans) and develop tools for population genetics, we surveyed allelic diversity of the MHC class II ??1 domain in both genomic and complementary DNA of seven New World species in the genus Rana (Lithobates). To assign locus affiliation to our alleles, we used a "gene walking" technique to obtain intron 2 sequences that flanked MHC class II?? exon 2. Two distinct intron sequences were recovered, suggesting the presence of at least two class II?? loci in Rana. We designed a primer pair that successfully amplified an orthologous locus from all seven Rana species. In total, we recovered 13 alleles and documented trans-species polymorphism for four of the alleles. We also found quantitative evidence of selection acting on amino acid residues that are putatively involved in peptide binding and structural stability of the ??1 domain of anurans. Our results indicated that primer mismatch can result in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) bias, which influences the number of alleles that are recovered. Using a single locus may minimize PCR bias caused by primer mismatch, and the gene walking technique was an effective approach for generating single-copy orthologous markers necessary for future studies of MHC allelic variation in natural amphibian populations. ?? 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  14. Generalization of the World Experience in Differentiation of Regions on Account of Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blahun Ivan S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main strategic objectives of our State is to promote innovation, which should include development and launch of new products at the national market, development and introduction of new technologies, creation and application of new knowledge. In accordance with the said above, the article has examined the experience of European Union Member States to improve the efficiency of innovation and differentiation of regions in terms of innovation, tools for evaluation of the innovation activity status has been determined in relation to the territories of the European Union at the level of regions.

  15. Malaria and World War II: German malaria experiments 1939-45.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckart, W U; Vondra, H

    2000-06-01

    The epidemiological and pharmacological fight against malaria and German malaria research during the Nazi dictatorship were completely under the spell of war. The Oberkommando des Heeres (German supreme command of the army) suffered the bitter experience of unexpected high losses caused by malaria especially at the Greek front (Metaxes line) but also in southern Russia and in the Ukraine. Hastily raised anti-malaria units tried to teach soldiers how to use the synthetic malaria drugs (Plasmochine, Atebrine) properly. Overdoses of these drugs were numerous during the first half of the war whereas in the second half it soon became clear that it would not be possible to support the army due to insufficient quantities of plasmochine and atebrine. During both running fights and troop withdrawals at all southern and southeastern fronts there was hardly any malaria prophylaxis or treatment. After war and captivity many soldiers returned home to endure heavy malaria attacks. In German industrial (Bayer, IG-Farben) and military malaria laboratories of the Heeres-Sanitäts-Akademie (Army Medical Academy) the situation was characterised by a hasty search for proper dosages of anti-malaria drugs, adequate mechanical and chemical prophylaxis (Petroleum, DDT, and other insecticides) as well as an anti-malaria vaccine. Most importantly, large scale research for proper atebrine and plasmochine dosages was conducted in German concentration camps and mental homes. In Dachau Professor Claus Schilling tested synthetic malaria drugs and injected helpless prisoners with high and sometimes lethal doses. Since the 1920s he had been furiously looking for an anti-malaria vaccine in Italian mental homes and from 1939 he continued his experiments in Dachau. Similar experiments were also performed in Buchenwald and in a psychiatric clinic in Thuringia, where Professor Gerhard Rose tested malaria drugs with mentally ill Russian prisoners of war. Schilling was put to death for his criminal

  16. Sociological Transition and Breast Cancer in the Arab World: the Experience of Lebanon

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Lakkis, Najla; Adib, Salim M; Hamadeh, Ghassan; El Jarrah, Rana; H Osman, Mona

    2017-05-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among females in Lebanon. This study aimed at analyzing its epidemiology in the country over time. Methods: Data were extracted from the Lebanese National Cancer Registry (NCR) for the years 2004 through 2010. Age-standardized and age-specific incidence rates for cancers per 100,000 population were calculated. Results: Breast cancer ranked first, accounting for an average of 37.6% of all new female cancer cases in Lebanon during the period of 2004-2010. Breast cancer was found to have been increasing faster than other hormone-related women’s cancers (i.e. of the ovaries and corpus uteri). The breast cancer age-standardized incidence rates (world population) (ASRw) increased steadily from 2004 (71.0) to 2010 (105.9), making the burden comparable to that in developed countries, reflecting the influence of sociological and reproductive patterns transitioning from regional norms to global trends. The age-specific incidence rates for breast cancer rose steeply from around age 35-39 years, to reach a first peak in the age group 45-49 years, and then dropped slightly between 50 and 64 years to rise again thereafter and reach a second peak in the 75+ age group. Five-year age-specific rates among Lebanese women between 35 and 49 years were among the highest observed worldwide in 2008. Conclusion: Breast cancer is continuously on the rise in Lebanon. The findings of this study support the national screening recommendation of starting breast cancer screening at the age of 40 years. It is mandatory to conduct an in-depth analysis of contributing factors and develop consequently a comprehensive National Breast Cancer Control strategy. Creative Commons Attribution License

  17. The influence of selected senses on consumer experience: A brandy case

    OpenAIRE

    Chris Pentz; Charlene Gerber

    2013-01-01

    Orientation: Sensory marketing has become a popular marketing technique to enhance consumer experience. Researchers have suggested that marketers should incorporate as many senses as possible in order for sensory marketing to be effective. Research purpose: To investigate the influence of selected senses – sight, sound and smell – on consumers’ experience, specifically in terms of the tastiness of brandy. Motivation for the study: Even though the use of the senses such as sight, sound ...

  18. [Long-term effects of traumatic experiences on somatic and psychic complaints of German World War Two refugees].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, C J; Struwe, J; Lemke, M R

    2006-01-01

    The effects of expulsion from German territories following World War Two have not been studied systematically, and little is known about long-term effects of this potentially traumatic experience. Via mail, 600 refugees from former German territories due to World War Two were asked to complete questionnaires about biographic data, somatic and psychic health (SCL-90-R questionnaire), and specific aspects related to traumatic experiences (post-traumatic stress disorder questionnaire). Of those contacted, 25% participated in the investigation. Of them, 9.8% fulfilled diagnostic criteria of post-traumatic stress disorder according to DSM IV. Only 1.8% of an age-matched control group met these criteria. Analysis of the SCL-90-R questionnaire showed higher scores for former refugees in somatic and psychic complaints than the control group. We show that expulsion following war may lead to symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder and somatic and psychic complaints after more than 50 years. Our investigation supports the necessity of adequate care for subjects expelled from their home countries and the psychologically traumatised.

  19. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training by Avatars: A Qualitative Study of Medical Students' Experiences Using a Multiplayer Virtual World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creutzfeldt, Johan; Hedman, Leif; Felländer-Tsai, Li

    2016-12-16

    Emergency medical practices are often team efforts. Training for various tasks and collaborations may be carried out in virtual environments. Although promising results exist from studies of serious games, little is known about the subjective reactions of learners when using multiplayer virtual world (MVW) training in medicine. The objective of this study was to reach a better understanding of the learners' reactions and experiences when using an MVW for team training of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Twelve Swedish medical students participated in semistructured focus group discussions after CPR training in an MVW with partially preset options. The students' perceptions and feelings related to use of this educational tool were investigated. Using qualitative methodology, discussions were analyzed by a phenomenological data-driven approach. Quality measures included negotiations, back-and-forth reading, triangulation, and validation with the informants. Four categories characterizing the students' experiences could be defined: (1) Focused Mental Training, (2) Interface Diverting Focus From Training, (3) Benefits of Practicing in a Group, and (4) Easy Loss of Focus When Passive. We interpreted the results, compared them to findings of others, and propose advantages and risks of using virtual worlds for learning. Beneficial aspects of learning CPR in a virtual world were confirmed. To achieve high participant engagement and create good conditions for training, well-established procedures should be practiced. Furthermore, students should be kept in an active mode and frequent feedback should be utilized. It cannot be completely ruled out that the use of virtual training may contribute to erroneous self-beliefs that can affect later clinical performance. ©Johan Creutzfeldt, Leif Hedman, Li Felländer-Tsai. Originally published in JMIR Serious Games (http://games.jmir.org), 16.12.2016.

  20. Experience affects the outcome of agonistic contests without affecting the selective advantage of size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasumovic, Michael M; Elias, Damian O; Punzalan, David; Mason, Andrew C; Andrade, Maydianne C B

    2009-06-01

    In the field, phenotypic determinants of competitive success are not always absolute. For example, contest experience may alter future competitive performance. As future contests are not determined solely on phenotypic attributes, prior experience could also potentially alter phenotype-fitness associations. In this study, we examined the influence of single and multiple experiences on contest outcomes in the jumping spider Phidippus clarus. We also examined whether phenotype-fitness associations altered as individuals gained more experience. Using both size-matched contests and a tournament design, we found that both winning and losing experience affected future contest success; males with prior winning experience were more likely to win subsequent contests. Although experience was a significant determinant of success in future contests, male weight was approximately 1.3 times more important than experience in predicting contest outcomes. Despite the importance of experience in determining contest outcomes, patterns of selection did not change between rounds. Overall, our results show that experience can be an important determinant in contest outcomes, even in short-lived invertebrates, and that experience alone is unlikely to alter phenotype-fitness associations.

  1. Operational experience feedback in the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revuelta, Ramon

    2004-01-01

    Operators in high-risk industries need to be learning organisations, learning from themselves and from the others. This presentation will describe how the nuclear industry is dealing in an integrated manner with the feedback of operating experience (OE), both internal and external, to increase the safety and reliability of power plants; it will describe how it: - investigates events; - reports events and analyses trends; - shares information to prevent recurrence; - performs corrective action and training; - performs assessments to verify effectiveness. The plants have achieved great improvements in performance overall, and to improve further, the industry is evolving. Instead of just learning from past events (reactive) it is now focusing on lower level indications of problems (precursors) through low level events reporting, trending and analysis. A hallmark of the industry is its desire to be self-critical. Emphasis is placed on improving the bottom quartile performing plants

  2. The world can look better: enhancing beauty experience with brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Zaira; Lega, Carlotta; Flexas, Albert; Nadal, Marcos; Munar, Enric; Cela-Conde, Camilo J

    2014-11-01

    Aesthetic appreciation is part of our everyday life: it is a subjective judgment we make when looking at a painting, a landscape, or--in fact--at another person. Neuroimaging and electrophysiological evidence suggests that the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) plays a critical role in aesthetic judgments. Here, we show that the experience of beauty can be artificially enhanced with brain stimulation. Specifically, we show that aesthetic appreciation of representational paintings and photographs can be increased by applying anodal (excitatory) transcranial direct current stimulation on the left DLPFC. Our results thus show that beauty is in the brain of the beholder, and offer a novel view on the neural networks underlying aesthetic appreciation. © The Author (2013). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. 'I have the world's best job' - staff experience of the advantages of caring for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldh, Ann Catrine; van der Zijpp, Teatske; McMullan, Christel; McCormack, Brendan; Seers, Kate; Rycroft-Malone, Jo

    2016-06-01

    Besides a growing demand for safe high-quality care for older people, long-term care (LTC) often struggles to recruit appropriately qualified nursing staff. Understanding what LTC staff value in their work may contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of what can attract staff and support person-centred care. To explore staff experience of the advantages of working in LTC settings for older people. Narrative descriptions of 85 LTC staff in Ireland, the Netherlands and Sweden on what they value in their work were analysed with qualitative content analysis. Ethical approval was obtained according to the requirements of each country, and participants provided informed consent prior to the individual interviews. Working in LTC signifies bonding with the older people residing there, their next of kin and the team members. It means autonomy in one's daily tasks amalgamated with being a part of an affirmative team. Participants reported a sense of accomplishment and fulfilment; caring meant consideration and recognition of the older people and the relationships formed, which provided for professional and personal growth. The sharing of compassion between staff and residents indicated reciprocity of the relationship with residents. The findings may be transferable to LTC in general although they address only the positive aspects of caring for older people and only the experiences of those staff who had consented to take part in the study. The findings add to what underpins the quality of care in nursing homes: compassion in the nurse-resident relationship and person-centred care in LTC. They indicate reciprocity in the relations formed that may contribute to the empowerment of older people, but further studies are needed to explore this in more detail. © 2015 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  4. The Effect of Conceptual Advancement in Jazz Music Selections and Jazz Experience on Musicians' Aesthetic Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggiola, John C.

    2004-01-01

    This study is an investigation of what musicians consider to be their aesthetic experience with jazz music selections that vary in level of conceptual advancement (melodic complexity during improvised solos). Music major participants (N = 128) were assigned to either the jazz musician (n = 64) or nonjazz musician (n = 64) group. Data were gathered…

  5. Grow Rich while you sleep: Selection in Experiments with Voluntary Participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gautier, Pieter; Klaauw, van der Bas

    2006-01-01

    We use data from a promotion campaign of NH-Hoteles to study self-selection of participants in a gift-exchange experiment. The promotion campaign allowed guests to pay any non negative amount of money for a stay in one of 36 hotels in Belgium and the Netherlands. The data allow us to distinguish

  6. A conjoint choice experiment to study attributes related to the selection of stores in shopping centres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oppewal, H.; Louviere, J.J.; Timmermans, H.J.P.; Chias, J.; Sureda, J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper first reviews approaches to modeHing consumer choice of shopping destination and argues that models typically have included only few attributes related to the selection or variety of stores in a shopping centre. Next a conjoint choice experiment is described in which profiles of

  7. The Experience of Low-Income College Students at a Selective University: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Paula Ribeiro

    2017-01-01

    Low-income students at selective institutions report feeling a sense of isolation, alienation, and marginalization. However, it is essential that the voices of low-income students that have successfully navigated the college experience be part of the conversation. Rather than approach the study from a deficit perspective, this Interpretative…

  8. Experiences of risk in connection with site selection for a repository for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biel, A.; Dahlstrand, U.

    1991-03-01

    Describes an investigation of the experiences of risks the the Swedish inhabitants have in connection with site selection for a repository for radioactive waste. The attitudes show a rather complicated picture. It is influenced by such factors as: sex, education and distance to the facility. (KAE)

  9. Operating results and experience and operating regimes in changing demands of energy world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobza, L.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, there are stated some operating results and experience obtained from trial operation of Temelin NPP. In Europe, Temelin NPP is presently one of the latest implemented projects of the series of VVER 1000 nuclear units with proven V-320 pressurized water reactor. The distinction between Temelin NPP and original project lays mainly in supply of nuclear fuel and in I and C systems delivered by Westinghouse Company. Temelin NPP has passed through commissioning period and trial operation. The main goal of the trial operation was to meet the requirements of section 2, par. 4, point b) of Decree No. 106/98 Sb. and verification of project parameters and stability of operation, and the situation leading to violation of safety functions fulfilment according to Pre-operational Safety Report should not occur. The integral part of trial operation assessment was also successful performing of determined monitoring programmes, first refuelling and performing of prescribed tests and operational inspections. Simultaneously, first experience was obtained with nuclear fuel; providing of ancillary services; reliability of important components; operation of turbine-generator 1000 MW; chemical regime; influence to environment; and quality of contractors. As safety is the most important indicator, it can be stated that: no facts which would lead to decreasing of safety systems operability have been detected; no facts which would lead to negative affecting of barriers against fading the radioactivity into both working areas and environment, have been detected; good condition of fire safety has been continuously documented; requirements of limits for releasing waste water into environment have been continuously complied with; requirements of limits for releasing radioactive substances (in gaseous and/or liquid state) into environment have been continuously complied with. From the operation regimes point of view is clear, that it would be suitable for the power plant if the

  10. Omalizumab in children with uncontrolled allergic asthma: Review of clinical trial and real-world experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipps, Bradley E; Lanier, Bob; Milgrom, Henry; Deschildre, Antoine; Hedlin, Gunilla; Szefler, Stanley J; Kattan, Meyer; Kianifard, Farid; Ortiz, Benjamin; Haselkorn, Tmirah; Iqbal, Ahmar; Rosén, Karin; Trzaskoma, Benjamin; Busse, William W

    2017-05-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases of childhood. Allergen sensitization and high frequencies of comorbid allergic diseases are characteristic of severe asthma in children. Omalizumab, an anti-IgE mAb, is the first targeted biologic therapeutic approved for the treatment of moderate-to-severe persistent allergic asthma (AA) that remains uncontrolled despite high-dose inhaled corticosteroids plus other controller medications. Since its initial licensing for use in adults and adolescents 12 years of age and older, the clinical efficacy, safety, and tolerability of omalizumab have been demonstrated in several published clinical trials in children aged 6 to less than 12 years with moderate-to-severe AA. These studies supported the approval of the pediatric indication (use in children aged ≥6 years) by the European Medicines Agency in 2009 and the US Food and Drug Administration in 2016. After this most recent change in licensing, we review the outcomes from clinical trials in children with persistent AA receiving omalizumab therapy and observational studies from the past 7 years of clinical experience in Europe. Data sources were identified by using PubMed in 2016. Guidelines and management recommendations and materials from the recent US Food and Drug Administration's Pediatric Advisory Committee meeting are also reviewed. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Storage of water reactor spent fuel in water pools. Survey of world experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Following discharge from a nuclear reactor, spent fuel has to be stored in water pools at the reactor site to allow for radioactive decay and cooling. After this initial storage period, the future treatment of spent fuel depends on the fuel cycle concept chosen. Spent fuel can either be treated by chemical processing or conditioning for final disposal at the relevant fuel cycle facilities, or be held in interim storage - at the reactor site or at a central storage facility. Recent forecasts predict that, by the year 2000, more than 150,000 tonnes of heavy metal from spent LWR fuel will have been accumulated. Because of postponed commitments regarding spent fuel treatment, a significant amount of spent fuel will still be held in storage at that time. Although very positive experience with wet storage has been gained over the past 40 years, making wet storage a proven technology, it appears desirable to summarize all available data for the benefit of designers, storage pool operators, licensing agenices and the general public. Such data will be essential for assessing the viability of extended water pool storage of spent nuclear fuel. In 1979, the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD jointly issued a questionnaire dealing with all aspects of water pool storage. This report summarizes the information received from storage pool operators

  12. The uninsured and Medicaid Oregon tobacco user experience in a real world, phone based cessation programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bastawissi, Ay; McAfee, T; Zbikowski, S M; Hollis, J; Stark, M; Wassum, K; Clark, N; Barwinski, R; Broughton, E

    2003-03-01

    To describe the experience of uninsured and Medicaid Oregon tobacco users who registered in Free & Clear (F&C), a telephone based cessation programme including five scheduled outbound calls. Using a retrospective cohort design, 1334 (423 uninsured, 806 Medicaid, and 105 commercially insured) Oregon tobacco users who registered in F&C between 18 November 1998 and 28 February 2000 were identified and followed for 12 months post-registration; 648 (48.6%) were successfully contacted at 12 months. Information was collected from the F&C database. Unconditional logistic regression, adjusted for race and education, was used. The seven day quit rate at 12 months, assuming non-respondents were smokers, was 14.8% (95% confidence interval (CI) 13.0 to 16.9). This rate was significantly higher among commercially insured participants (v Medicaid but not uninsured) and among participants who completed > or = 5 calls (v or = 5 calls were 60% more likely to quit tobacco (odds ratio (OR) 1.6, 95% CI 0.9 to 3.1), and uninsured respondents who completed > or = 5 calls were 70% more likely to quit tobacco (OR 1.7, 95% CI 0.9 to 3.5), relative to those who completed < 5 calls, but the difference was not significant. The quit rates are similar to those reported in efficacy trials. The observed variation in quitting tobacco for respondents by number of calls completed and by insurance merits further investigation concentrating on increasing compliance with the call schedule, particularly for the uninsured.

  13. Complementary social science? Quali-quantitative experiments in a Big Data world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Blok

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The rise of Big Data in the social realm poses significant questions at the intersection of science, technology, and society, including in terms of how new large-scale social databases are currently changing the methods, epistemologies, and politics of social science. In this commentary, we address such epochal (“large-scale” questions by way of a (situated experiment: at the Danish Technical University in Copenhagen, an interdisciplinary group of computer scientists, physicists, economists, sociologists, and anthropologists (including the authors is setting up a large-scale data infrastructure, meant to continually record the digital traces of social relations among an entire freshman class of students ( N  > 1000. At the same time, fieldwork is carried out on friendship (and other relations amongst the same group of students. On this basis, the question we pose is the following: what kind of knowledge is obtained on this social micro-cosmos via the Big (computational, quantitative and Small (embodied, qualitative Data, respectively? How do the two relate? Invoking Bohr’s principle of complementarity as analogy, we hypothesize that social relations, as objects of knowledge, depend crucially on the type of measurement device deployed. At the same time, however, we also expect new interferences and polyphonies to arise at the intersection of Big and Small Data, provided that these are, so to speak, mixed with care. These questions, we stress, are important not only for the future of social science methods but also for the type of societal (self-knowledge that may be expected from new large-scale social databases.

  14. Inner Experience and Worldly Revolt: Arendt’s Bearings on Kristeva’s Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noëlle McAfee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available What is at stake when political revolt depends upon radical inner experience? Is the only route to cultural and political change, as Kristeva seems to argue, through personal introspection and revolt? If we want more from life than the freedom to channel surf, as she says, need the direction of inquiry be primarily inward? Need there be an either/or of psychical versus public life? Is the only answer to social and political dead ends really found by turning inward? Is the micropolitics of the couch the path to freedom? “Today,” Kristeva writes, “psychical life knows that it will only be saved if it gives itself the time and space of revolt: to break off, remember, re-form. From prayer to dialogue, through art and analysis, the crucial event is always the great infinitesimal emancipation: to be endlessly recommenced.” In this essay I ask whether we might move Kristeva’s “New Forms of Revolt” from the couch to the polis with the help of one of her major interlocutors, Hannah Arendt, who reminds us that thinking is always a plural affair. I develop a link between Arendt’s thinking and Kristeva’s revoltto show how thinking-as-revolt puts subjects in relation to each other and to the political. Such a political culture of revolt can engage in the work needed to move beyond adolescent fixations in melancholic times. And with it we might in fact create more meaning for our lives. 

  15. Selective Medical Library on Microfiche. An international experiment supported by the Rockefeller Foundation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracevic, T

    1988-01-01

    The Selective Medical Library on Microfiche (SMLM) project is designed to improve access to the world's significant biomedical literature in developing countries' medical school libraries through the provision of a first-rate, low-cost core collection of journals. One hundred and five journals representing thirty-six biomedical specialties were selected using a method designed specifically for SMLM. The journals are provided on microfiche because of its relative low cost, durability, easy reproduction, and rapid delivery by air mail. SMLMs have been established at test and demonstration sites in four medical schools in Egypt, Indonesia, Mexico, and Colombia. SMLMs are delivered as turnkey systems consisting of the microfiche collection, a reader-printer, four fiche readers, necessary furniture, and promotional and training materials. The project involves extensive evaluation. PMID:3370375

  16. The care connection: The World Bank and women's unpaid care work in select sub-Saharan African countries

    OpenAIRE

    Bibler, Sarah; Zuckerman, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    With the aim of reducing women's greater unpaid care work than men&'s and increasing women's paid employment, this paper examines the extent to which World Bank investments address unpaid care work. The paper conducts an in-depth gender analysis of 36 World Bank employment-related projects in Malawi, Mali, Niger, and Rwanda. It concludes that the vast majority (92 per cent) of reviewed projects fail to account for unpaid care work. Exceptionally, Malawi's Shire River Basin Management Program ...

  17. Connecting Educators with Inter-Disciplinary Inquiry-Based Science and Students with STEM Careers with Real-World Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Lunsford

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Our professional development workshops have provided participating teachers (inservice and pre-service with interdisciplinary experiences in earth and environmental science that have built their content into real-world problem based research initiatives (STEM, Science Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. One of our real-world issues has been the detection of phenol since it has been a concern in the real-world coal mining industry. Coal tars are a complex of variable mixtures of phenols. Phenol and phenol derivative compounds are widely used in the production of polymers, drugs, dyes, explosives, pesticides, stabilizers and antioxidants. These phenolic compounds are discharged into the environment and can represent a serious hazard, mainly by the contamination of superficial and underground waters. The toxic effect of phenol can cause comas, convulsions, cyanosis, liver damage, kidney damage, lung damage and death. The mining industry for coal is an alternative source of energy and used in thermoelectric power plants. However, the pollutant phenol that can be found in coal has high need to be detected and is an important aspect to keep an eye on due to these harmful chemicals such as phenol discharging into the environment. Our inquiry-based labs have engaged our inservice and pre-service students by visiting a mine and learning the positive and negative aspects of mining and the importance of water quality. Thus, this inquiry-based module will illustrate the use of an electrochemistry modified carbon nanotube poly-3-hexylthiophene electrode to detect such harmful chemicals as phenol by unique electrochemistry techniques such as Differential Pulse Voltammetry (DPV.

  18. The photon identification loophole in EPRB experiments: computer models with single-wing selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Raedt, Hans; Michielsen, Kristel; Hess, Karl

    2017-11-01

    Recent Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohm experiments [M. Giustina et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 250401 (2015); L. K. Shalm et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 250402 (2015)] that claim to be loophole free are scrutinized. The combination of a digital computer and discrete-event simulation is used to construct a minimal but faithful model of the most perfected realization of these laboratory experiments. In contrast to prior simulations, all photon selections are strictly made, as they are in the actual experiments, at the local station and no other "post-selection" is involved. The simulation results demonstrate that a manifestly non-quantum model that identifies photons in the same local manner as in these experiments can produce correlations that are in excellent agreement with those of the quantum theoretical description of the corresponding thought experiment, in conflict with Bell's theorem which states that this is impossible. The failure of Bell's theorem is possible because of our recognition of the photon identification loophole. Such identification measurement-procedures are necessarily included in all actual experiments but are not included in the theory of Bell and his followers.

  19. A personal experience in the presence of a man who transformed a nation and changed the world: Nelson Mandela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Geraldine

    2014-01-01

    At this time in history, I consider myself very privileged to have spent some three hours in the presence of President Nelson Mandela as a Howard University faculty member in the late 1990s. Then, President of Howard University, H. Patrick Swygert bestowed upon President Nelson Mandela, Esquire an Honorary Doctorate of Human Letters. I can only equate this experience to my four mile walk up the Bedaling Wall (Great Wall) in China (a magnificent ancient wonder of the world), and trying to relate this event to something only fortunate souls have had the chance to enjoy. I also treasure the once in a lifetime visit to the Republic of South Africa in 1998 when the Association of Black Nursing Faculty, Inc., Chi Eta Phi Nursing Sorority, Inc., and the Department of Nursing (University of Botswana) sponsored the trip as an attempt to establish partnerships, share common interests and discussion in how to meet health needs of emerging majority and disadvantaged populations in the world, including mainly, the continent of Africa, in the 21st century. This short memoir can only piggy-back the massive coverage in the media that began almost instantly as a long anticipated event (death of Nelson Mandela), but startled upon its occurrence.

  20. Basic Research on Selecting ISDC Activity for Decommissioning Costing in KRR-2 Decommissioning Project Experience Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Chan-Ho; Park, Hee-Seong; Jin, Hyung-Gon; Park, Seung-Kook [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    KAERI is performing research for calculation of expected time of a decommissioning work and evaluation of decommissioning cost and this research calculate a decommissioning work unit productivity based on the experience data of decommissioning activity for KRR-2. The KAERI be used to calculate the decommissioning cost and manage the experience data from the decommissioning activity through the Decommissioning Information Management System (DECOMMIS), Decommissioning Facility Characterization DB System (DEFACS), and Decommissioning Work-unit Productivity Calculation System (DEWOCS). In this paper, the methodology was presented how select the ISDC activities in dismantling work procedures of a 'removal of radioactive concrete'. The reason to select the 'removal of radioactive concrete' is main key activity and generates the amount of radioactive waste. This data will take advantage of the cost estimation after the code for the selected items derived ISDC. There are various efforts for decommissioning costing in each country. In particular, OECD/NEA recommends decommissioning cost estimation using the ISDC and IAEA provides for Cost Estimation for Research Reactors in Excel (CERREX) program that anyone is easy to use the cost evaluation from a limited decommissioning experience in domestic. In the future, for the decommissioning cost evaluation, the ISDC will be used more widely in a strong position. This paper has described a method for selecting the ISDC item from the actual dismantling work procedures.

  1. Health care provider experience with canagliflozin in real-world clinical practice: favorability, treatment patterns, and patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolge SC

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Susan C Bolge,1 Natalia M Flores,2 Shu Huang,3 Jennifer Cai1 1Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, Titusville, NJ, 2Kantar Health, Foster City, CA, 3Kantar Health, New York, NY, USA Purpose: This study describes how health care providers approach canagliflozin for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM in the real world.Patients and methods: An Internet-based questionnaire was completed by 101 endocrinologists, 101 primary care physicians, and 100 nurse practitioners/physician assistants (NP/PAs. Health care providers were required to have experience prescribing or managing patients using canagliflozin to be included in the study. Health care providers compared canagliflozin with other T2DM medication classes on clinical characteristics, costs, and patient satisfaction. Confidence in canagliflozin was also measured. Health care providers reported their canagliflozin prescribing experience and good candidate characteristics for treatment. Finally, providers reported on patient outcomes among those receiving canagliflozin. All variables were compared across provider type.Results: Health care providers reported higher favorability for canagliflozin for blood pressure and body weight compared with dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitors and higher favorability for effect on blood pressure, body weight, treatment satisfaction, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c compared with sulfonylureas (SUs, with differences observed for effect on blood pressure. Health care providers reported being very/extremely confident (55%–74% with canagliflozin as a second- to fourth-line treatment. The top 3 characteristics reported by the providers, in terms of describing a good candidate for canagliflozin, include those concerned about their weight, insurance coverage/affordability, and avoiding injectable treatments. Finally, providers reported often/always observing patients’ lowering or controlling HbA1c (82%–88% and improvement in overall

  2. The LILIA experiment: Energy selection and post-acceleration of laser generated protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchetti, Giorgio; Sinigardi, Stefano; Londrillo, Pasquale; Rossi, Francesco; Sumini, Marco; Giove, Dario; De Martinis, Carlo

    2012-12-01

    The LILIA experiment is planned at the SPARCLAB facility of the Frascati INFN laboratories. We have simulated the laser acceleration of protons, the transport and energy selection with collimators and a pulsed solenoid and the post-acceleration with a compact high field linac. For the highest achievable intensity corresponding to a = 30 over 108 protons at 30 MeV with a 3% spread are selected, and at least107 protons are post-accelerated up to 60 MeV. If a 10 Hz repetition rated can be achieved the delivered dose would be suitable for the treatment of small superficial tumors.

  3. The LILIA experiment: Energy selection and post-acceleration of laser generated protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchetti, Giorgio; Sinigardi, Stefano; Londrillo, Pasquale; Rossi, Francesco; Sumini, Marco; Giove, Dario; De Martinis, Carlo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Bologna and INFN Sezione di Bologna (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, Universita di Bologna and INFN Sezione di Bologna (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano and INFN Sezione di Milano (Italy)

    2012-12-21

    The LILIA experiment is planned at the SPARCLAB facility of the Frascati INFN laboratories. We have simulated the laser acceleration of protons, the transport and energy selection with collimators and a pulsed solenoid and the post-acceleration with a compact high field linac. For the highest achievable intensity corresponding to a= 30 over 10{sup 8} protons at 30 MeV with a 3% spread are selected, and at least10{sup 7} protons are post-accelerated up to 60 MeV. If a 10 Hz repetition rated can be achieved the delivered dose would be suitable for the treatment of small superficial tumors.

  4. Perceived social pressure not to experience negative emotion is linked to selective attention for negative information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Brock; Pe, Madeline Lee; Kuppens, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Social norms and values may be important predictors of how people engage with and regulate their negative emotional experiences. Previous research has shown that social expectancies (the perceived social pressure not to feel negative emotion (NE)) exacerbate feelings of sadness. In the current research, we examined whether social expectancies may be linked to how people process emotional information. Using a modified classical flanker task involving emotional rather than non-emotional stimuli, we found that, for those who experienced low levels of NE, social expectancies were linked to the selective avoidance of negative emotional information. Those who experienced high levels of NE did not show a selective avoidance of negative emotional information. The findings suggest that, for people who experience many NEs, social expectancies may lead to discrepancies between how they think they ought to feel and the kind of emotional information they pay attention to.

  5. The management of the household demand for electricity: a review of 30 years of experiments around the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesgards, V.; Frachet, L.

    2012-01-01

    Since the end of 1970's, experiments to test the impact of providing information, then of variable pricing, on the demand for electricity by households have developed considerably around the world. Initially undertaken in the USA and in the UK, where they analysed the impact of consumer information on overall demand, after the year 2000 these pilot efforts have been extended to most OECD member countries and aim too to reduce peak demand with appropriate price incentives. In recent years methodological improvements have been made in establishing the cause and effect relationship between these stimuli and the induced modification in consumption (internal validity). On top of methodological gains, the analysis of these experiments reveals some salient characteristics of the residential consumers' behaviour: the absence of any tangible and durable impact of solely using information on demand, the lasting incentive effect of variable pricing on reducing consumption at peak times, often creating a trend, as well as a strong heterogeneity of household reactions to these different stimuli. (authors)

  6. Two quantitative character selection following neutron and EMS treatment in malt barley. An applied micromutation experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haensel, H; Simon, W; Ehrendorfer, K [Hochschule fuer Bodenkultur, Vienna (Austria)

    1975-01-01

    Mutation experiments in spring barley are described aimed at increasing the grain yield and ''classification'' (i.e. weight percent of caryopsis greater than 2.5 mm). The course of selection up to the M/sub 8/-generation obtained by self-pollination is given. A comparison is presented with materials obtained after neutron and ethyl methanesulfonate treatment. The possibilities are also discussed of using the methods of micromutation breeding for barley crop yield and its malt quality improvement.

  7. Experience in selection and characterization of sites for geological disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-12-01

    An important matter in the development of a geological repository for disposal radioactive waste is the selection of a site that has characteristics that are favorable for isolation. A number of Member States have had national programmes under way for several decades to investigate sites to gather the geological information needed to design and construct a safe repository. The purpose of this report is to document this experience and to summarize what has been learned about the site selection and investigation process. It is hoped it will be of interest to scientists and engineers working in national disposal programmes by providing them information and key references regarding the disposal programmes in other countries. It may also be of interest to members of the public and to decision makers wanting an overview of the worldwide status of programmes to select and characterize geological disposal sites for radioactive waste

  8. Computational Experiment Study on Selection Mechanism of Project Delivery Method Based on Complex Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Ding

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Project delivery planning is a key stage used by the project owner (or project investor for organizing design, construction, and other operations in a construction project. The main task in this stage is to select an appropriate project delivery method. In order to analyze different factors affecting the PDM selection, this paper establishes a multiagent model mainly to show how project complexity, governance strength, and market environment affect the project owner’s decision on PDM. Experiment results show that project owner usually choose Design-Build method when the project is very complex within a certain range. Besides, this paper points out that Design-Build method will be the prior choice when the potential contractors develop quickly. This paper provides the owners with methods and suggestions in terms of showing how the factors affect PDM selection, and it may improve the project performance.

  9. A simultaneous multi-slice selective J-resolved experiment for fully resolved scalar coupling information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qing; Lin, Liangjie; Chen, Jinyong; Lin, Yanqin; Barker, Peter B.; Chen, Zhong

    2017-09-01

    Proton-proton scalar coupling plays an important role in molecular structure elucidation. Many methods have been proposed for revealing scalar coupling networks involving chosen protons. However, determining all JHH values within a fully coupled network remains as a tedious process. Here, we propose a method termed as simultaneous multi-slice selective J-resolved spectroscopy (SMS-SEJRES) for simultaneously measuring JHH values out of all coupling networks in a sample within one experiment. In this work, gradient-encoded selective refocusing, PSYCHE decoupling and echo planar spectroscopic imaging (EPSI) detection module are adopted, resulting in different selective J-edited spectra extracted from different spatial positions. The proposed pulse sequence can facilitate the analysis of molecular structures. Therefore, it will interest scientists who would like to efficiently address the structural analysis of molecules.

  10. Pixel sensor evaluation and online event selection for the Mu3e experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruch, Dorothea vom

    2017-10-27

    Despite having survived numerous experimental tests, the standard model of particle physics is not a complete description of nature. The Mu3e experiment tests theories beyond the standard model by searching for the lepton flavour violating decay μ→e{sup +}e{sup -}e{sup +}, aiming at a branching ratio sensitivity of 2.10{sup -15} in a first phase of the experiment. A high precision magnetic spectrometer combined with scintillation detectors will measure the momenta, vertices and timing of the decay products of 1.10{sup 8} μ/s stopped on a target. In this work, a prototype of the high voltage monolithic active pixel sensor envisaged for the spectrometer was characterised. With an efficiency >99% and a time resolution of 14 ns, it meets the requirements imposed on the final sensor. Furthermore, an online signal selection process was developed and implemented on a graphics processing unit (GPU), keeping 98% of signal decays, while reducing the data rate of 80 Gbit/s by a factor of 140; resulting in a rate that can be stored to disk. With the computing performance achieved on the GPU, the selection process can run on the hardware planned for the experiment. Both the online selection and the silicon sensor are key aspects for the success of Mu3e.

  11. Selective bird predation on the peppered moth: the last experiment of Michael Majerus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, L M; Grant, B S; Saccheri, I J; Mallet, J

    2012-08-23

    Colour variation in the peppered moth Biston betularia was long accepted to be under strong natural selection. Melanics were believed to be fitter than pale morphs because of lower predation at daytime resting sites on dark, sooty bark. Melanics became common during the industrial revolution, but since 1970 there has been a rapid reversal, assumed to have been caused by predators selecting against melanics resting on today's less sooty bark. Recently, these classical explanations of melanism were attacked, and there has been general scepticism about birds as selective agents. Experiments and observations were accordingly carried out by Michael Majerus to address perceived weaknesses of earlier work. Unfortunately, he did not live to publish the results, which are analysed and presented here by the authors. Majerus released 4864 moths in his six-year experiment, the largest ever attempted for any similar study. There was strong differential bird predation against melanic peppered moths. Daily selection against melanics (s ≈ 0.1) was sufficient in magnitude and direction to explain the recent rapid decline of melanism in post-industrial Britain. These data provide the most direct evidence yet to implicate camouflage and bird predation as the overriding explanation for the rise and fall of melanism in moths.

  12. 'Sometimes it feels as if the world goes on without me': adolescents' experiences of living with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winger, Anette; Ekstedt, Mirjam; Wyller, Vegard B; Helseth, Sølvi

    2014-09-01

    To explore the experience of being an adolescent with chronic fatigue syndrome. Despite ample research, chronic fatigue syndrome is still poorly understood, and there are still controversies related to the illness. Adolescents with chronic fatigue syndrome are often unable to attend school and lose social relations with friends. The challenges they face will affect their quality of life. A qualitative, phenomenological hermeneutical design. Six boys and twelve girls, aged 12-18, were interviewed, emphasising their own experiences living with chronic fatigue syndrome. Analyses were performed using a phenomenological hermeneutical method. The core theme, 'Sometimes it feels as if the world goes on without me', encompasses the feelings an adolescent living with chronic fatigue syndrome might have about life. The core theme was supported by four subthemes: 'On the side of life--locked in and shut out'; 'the body, the illness and me'; 'if the illness is not visible to others, does it exist?'; and 'handling life while hoping for a better future'. The subthemes reflect the experience of social isolation, their own and others' understanding of the illness and hope for the future. Not being able to be with friends, or attend school, made the adolescents feel different and forgotten. They felt alienated in their own bodies and were struggling to be visible to themselves and to their surroundings. Spending less time with friends and more time with their parents constituted a threat to independence and development. Yet they managed to envision a better future despite all the difficulties. To provide effective support and constructive relations to adolescents with chronic fatigue syndrome, all health professions involved need insight from the persons who are themselves ill. Health centres could function as resource centres for patients and healthcare professionals. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. An antimicrobial stewardship program's real-world experience with fidaxomicin for treatment of Clostridium difficile infection: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargo, Craig A; Bauer, Karri A; Mangino, Julie E; Johnston, Jessica E W; Goff, Debra A

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate real-world clinical and economic outcomes in patients with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) treated with fidaxomicin. Retrospective case series. Academic medical center. A total of 61 patients with CDI who were treated with fidaxomicin monotherapy or combination therapy from September 2011 to December 2012. Data on demographics, infection characteristics, and clinical and economic outcomes were evaluated. Clinical cure was defined as resolution of diarrhea (less than or equal to three unformed stools for at least 2 consecutive days) maintained for the duration of therapy with no further requirement for CDI therapy and was achieved in 44 (72.1%) patients. Clinical cure was significantly higher for patients receiving fidaxomicin monotherapy compared with fidaxomicin combination therapy (25/29 [86.2%] patients vs 19/32 [59.4%] patients, p=0.04). Clinical cure was similar in patients with a first or prior CDI episode (65.5% vs 78.1%, p=0.27) and in patients with severe versus nonsevere disease (68.4% vs 73.8%, p=0.66). Recurrence occurred in 6 (13.6%) of the 44 patients who achieved clinical cure. Mortality attributable to CDI was 11.5%, and 30-day readmission rate was 4.9%. Median cost accrued during CDI was $19,483/patient. Our real-world experience with fidaxomicin significantly differs from the findings of phase III clinical trials. Fidaxomicin is also associated with substantial costs. Multicenter studies are needed to determine the optimal role of fidaxomicin in the treatment of CDI. © 2014 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  14. Experiments on state selection and Penning ionisation with fast metastable rare gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroon, J.P.C.

    1985-01-01

    This thesis describes experiments with metastable He/Ne atoms. The experiments are performed in a crossed beam machine. Two different sources are used for the production of metastable atoms: a source for the production of metastable atoms in the thermal energy range and a hollow cathode arc for the production of metastable atoms in the superthermal energy range (1-7 eV). The progress made in the use of the hollow cathode arc is described as well as the experimental set-up. The rare gas energy-level diagram is characterized by two metastable levels. By optical pumping it is possible to select a single metastable level, both for He and Ne. For the case of He this is done by a recently built He quenchlamp which selectively quenches the metastable 2 1 S level population. In the thermal energy range the quenching is complete; in the superthermal energy range the 2 1 S level population is only partly quenched. For the optical pumping of Ne* atoms a cw dye laser is used. New experiments have been started on the measurement, in a crossed beam machine, of the fluorescence caused by inelastic collisions where metastable atoms are involved. The He* + Ne system is used as a pilot study for these experiments. The He-Ne laser is based on this collision system. (Auth.)

  15. Exploring the Relationship of Motivation, Anxiety, and Virtual Worlds in the Experiences of Two Spanish Language Learners: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehner, Amy Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Virtual Worlds (VWs) in foreign language education are slowly becoming more popular. Many studies have looked at the affordances of these worlds and how they affect some aspects of language acquisition. However, it is still unknown to what extent, if any, these virtual worlds can play a role in affecting motivation and anxiety. The purpose of this…

  16. Structuring the Environmental Experience Design Research Framework through Selected Aged Care Facility Data Analyses in Victoria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Ma

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Humans relate to the living environment physically and psychologically. Environmental psychology has a rich developed history while experience design emerged recently in the industrial design domain. Nonetheless, these approaches have barely been merged, understood or implemented in architectural design practices. This study explored the correlation between experience design and environmental psychology. Moreover, it conducted literature reviews on theories about emotion, user experience design, experience design and environmental psychology, followed by the analyses of spatial settings and environmental quality data of a selected aged care facility in Victoria, Australia, as a case study. Accordingly, this study led to proposing a research framework on environmental experience design (EXD. It can be defined as a deliberate attempt that affiliates experience design and environmental psychology with creation of the built environment that should accommodate user needs and demands. The EXD research framework proposed in this study was tailored for transforming related design functions into the solutions that contribute to improving the built environment for user health and wellbeing.

  17. The photon identification loophole in EPRB experiments: computer models with single-wing selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Raedt Hans

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohm experiments [M. Giustina et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 250401 (2015; L. K. Shalm et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 250402 (2015] that claim to be loophole free are scrutinized. The combination of a digital computer and discrete-event simulation is used to construct a minimal but faithful model of the most perfected realization of these laboratory experiments. In contrast to prior simulations, all photon selections are strictly made, as they are in the actual experiments, at the local station and no other “post-selection” is involved. The simulation results demonstrate that a manifestly non-quantum model that identifies photons in the same local manner as in these experiments can produce correlations that are in excellent agreement with those of the quantum theoretical description of the corresponding thought experiment, in conflict with Bell’s theorem which states that this is impossible. The failure of Bell’s theorem is possible because of our recognition of the photon identification loophole. Such identification measurement-procedures are necessarily included in all actual experiments but are not included in the theory of Bell and his followers.

  18. The Real World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, John Sears

    1981-01-01

    Relates personal experiences about what constitutes the "real world." Shows how experiences from philosophy, history, literature, art, and the movies add meaning to "reality." Stresses a compromise of imagination and sensation to make the real world palatable. (RL)

  19. Online Selection of J/ψ → μ+μ− Decays in the CBM Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ablyazimov T.O.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM experimental setup is currently being constructed at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR acceleration complex at GSI (Darmstadt, Germany by an international collaboration that includes a team from JINR. One of the main goals of this experiment is to study the charmonium production in high-energy nuclear collisions. The experiment will operate at extreme interaction rates of up to 10 MHz. The expected dataflow rate will be of the order of 1 TB/s, making it impossible to store all the raw data from detectors in long-term buffers. It will demand the selection of J/ψ → μ+μ− decays in real-time. This paper presents criteria for the fast and effective selection of signal events by using exclusively data on charged muon hits collected in the Muon Chamber (MUCH coordinate stations and describes the software implementing these criteria. The possibility of this software to solve the problem of the online selection J/ψ → μ+μ− decays is proven.

  20. When Field Experiments Yield Unexpected Results: Lessons Learned from Measuring Selection in White Sands Lizards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardwick, Kayla M.; Harmon, Luke J.; Hardwick, Scott D.; Rosenblum, Erica Bree

    2015-01-01

    Determining the adaptive significance of phenotypic traits is key for understanding evolution and diversification in natural populations. However, evolutionary biologists have an incomplete understanding of how specific traits affect fitness in most populations. The White Sands system provides an opportunity to study the adaptive significance of traits in an experimental context. Blanched color evolved recently in three species of lizards inhabiting the gypsum dunes of White Sands and is likely an adaptation to avoid predation. To determine whether there is a relationship between color and susceptibility to predation in White Sands lizards, we conducted enclosure experiments, quantifying survivorship of Holbrookia maculate exhibiting substrate-matched and substrate-mismatched phenotypes. Lizards in our study experienced strong predation. Color did not have a significant effect on survival, but we found several unexpected relationships including variation in predation over small spatial and temporal scales. In addition, we detected a marginally significant interaction between sex and color, suggesting selection for substrate matching may be stronger for males than females. We use our results as a case study to examine six major challenges frequently encountered in field-based studies of natural selection, and suggest that insight into the complexities of selection often results when experiments turn out differently than expected. PMID:25714838

  1. RESEARCH: Influence of Social, Biophysical, and Managerial Conditions on Tourism Experiences Within the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer; Inglis

    2000-07-01

    / Managing protected areas involves balancing the enjoyment of visitors with the protection of a variety of cultural and biophysical resources. Tourism pressures in the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area (GBRWHA) are creating concerns about how to strike this balance in a marine environment. Terrestrial-based research has led to conceptual planning and management frameworks that address issues of human use and resource protection. The limits of acceptable change (LAC) framework was used as a conceptual basis for a study of snorkeling at reef sites in the GBRWHA. The intent was to determine if different settings existed among tourism operators traveling to the reef and, if so, to identify specific conditions relating to those settings. Snorkelers (N = 1475) traveling with tourism operations of different sizes who traveled to different sites completed surveys. Results indicated that snorkelers who traveled with larger operations (more people and infrastructure) differed from those traveling with smaller operations (few people and little on-site infrastructure) on benefits received and in the way that specific conditions influenced their enjoyment. Benefits related to nature, escape, and family helped to define reef experiences. Conditions related to coral, fish, and operator staff had a positive influence on the enjoyment of most visitors but, number of people on the trip and site infrastructure may have the greatest potential as setting indicators. Data support the potential usefulness of visitor input in applying the LAC concept to a marine environment where tourism and recreational uses are rapidly changing.

  2. Characterization and selection of CZT detector modules for HEX experiment onboard Chandrayaan-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vadawale, S.V.; Purohit, S.; Shanmugam, M.; Acharya, Y.B.; Goswami, J.N.; Sudhakar, M.; Sreekumar, P.

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of characterization of a large sample of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detector modules planned to be used for the HEX (High Energy X-ray spectrometer) experiment onboard India's first mission to the Moon, Chandrayaan-1. We procured forty modules from Orbotech Medical Solutions Ltd. and carried out a detailed characterization of each module at various temperatures and selected final nine detector modules for the flight model of HEX. Here we present the results of the characterization of all modules and the selection procedure for the HEX flight detector modules. These modules show 5-6% energy resolution (at 122 keV, for best 90% of pixels) at room temperature which is improved to ∼4% when these modules are cooled to sub-0 deg. C temperature. The gain and energy resolution were stable during the long duration tests.

  3. Method of a fast selection of inelastic nucleus-nucleus collisions for the CMS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnov, V.A.; Malakhov, A.I.; Savina, M.V.; Shmatov, S.V.; Zarubin, P.I.

    1998-01-01

    On the basis of the HIJING generator simulation of heavy ion collisions at ultrarelativistic energy scale, a method of a fast selection of inelastic nucleus-nucleus interactions is proposed for the CMS experiment at LHC. The basic idea is to use the time coincidence of signals with resolution better than 1 ns from the two very forward calorimeter arms covering the acceptance 3<|η|<5. The method efficiency is investigated by variation of energy thresholds in the calorimeters for different colliding ion species, namely, PbPb, NbNb, CaCa, OO, pPb, pCa, pp. It is shown that a stable efficiency of event selection (∼98%) is provided in an energy threshold range up to 100 GeV for nuclear collisions at 5 TeV/nucleon in the centre of mass system. In the pp collision case the relevant efficiency drops from 93% down to 80%

  4. An Evaluative Look Behind the Curtain : World Bank Group Staff's Early Experience with the Shared Prosperity Goal

    OpenAIRE

    Smets, Lodewijk; Bogetic, Zeljko

    2018-01-01

    In 2013, the Board of Executive Directors of the World Bank Group endorsed two ambitious goals: eliminating extreme poverty in the world by 2030 and boosting shared prosperity. The latter is defined as fostering the growth in the income of the poorest 40 percent of the population in each country. In 2016-17, the World Bank's Independent Evaluation Group conducted an evaluation on how well ...

  5. Material radioassay and selection for the XENON1T dark matter experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aprile, E.; Anthony, M.; De Perio, P.; Gao, F.; Goetzke, L.W.; Greene, Z.; Lin, Q.; Messina, M.; Plante, G.; Rizzo, A.; Zhang, Y. [Columbia University, Physics Department, New York, NY (United States); Aalbers, J.; Breur, P.A.; Brown, A.; Colijn, A.P.; Decowski, M.P.; Hogenbirk, E.; Tiseni, A. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Agostini, F. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Bologna (Italy); INFN-Bologna (Italy); Alfonsi, M.; Geis, C.; Grignon, C.; Oberlack, U.; Scheibelhut, M.; Schindler, S. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Amaro, F.D.; Cardoso, J.M.R.; Lopes, J.A.M.; Santos, J.M.F. dos; Silva, M. [University of Coimbra, LIBPhys, Department of Physics, Coimbra (Portugal); Arneodo, F.; Benabderrahmane, M.L.; Maris, I. [New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Di Giovanni, A.; Franco, D.; Galloway, M.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Mayani, D.; Pakarha, P.; Piastra, F.; Wei, Y.; Wulf, J. [University of Zurich, Physik Institut, Zurich (Switzerland); Bauermeister, B. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik and Exzellenzcluster PRISMA, Mainz (Germany); Stockholm University, AlbaNova, Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Berger, T.; Brown, E.; Piro, M.C. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Troy, NY (United States); Sivers, M. von [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy; Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics; Bruenner, S.; Cichon, D.; Eurin, G.; Hasterok, C.; Lindemann, S.; Lindner, M.; Marrodan Undagoitia, T.; Pizzella, V.; Rauch, L.; Rupp, N.; Schreiner, J.; Simgen, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Bruno, G.; Gallo Rosso, A.; Molinario, A.; Laubenstein, M.; Nisi, S. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); Budnik, R.; Itay, R.; Landsman, H.; Lellouch, D.; Levinson, L.; Manfredini, A.; Priel, N. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Rehovot (Israel); Buetikofer, L.; Coderre, D.; Kaminsky, B.; Schumann, M. [Universitaet Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Calven, J.; Conrad, J.; Ferella, A.D.; Pelssers, B. [Stockholm University, AlbaNova, Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Cervantes, M.; Lang, R.F.; Masson, D.; Pienaar, J.; Reichard, S.; Reuter, C. [Purdue University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Cussonneau, J.P.; Diglio, S.; Le Calloch, M.; Masbou, J.; Micheneau, K.; Persiani, R.; Thers, D. [Universite de Nantes, SUBATECH, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, CNRS/IN2P3, Nantes (France); Di Gangi, P.; Garbini, M.; Massoli, F.V.; Sartorelli, G.; Selvi, M. [University of Bologna, Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Bologna (Italy); INFN-Bologna (Italy); Fei, J.; Ni, K.; Ye, J. [University of California, Department of Physics, San Diego, CA (United States); Fieguth, A.; Murra, M.; Rosendahl, S.; Weinheimer, C. [Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Muenster (Germany); Fulgione, W. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, L' Aquila (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, L' Aquila (Italy); INFN-Torino (Italy); Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Torino (Italy); Grandi, L.; Saldanha, R.; Shockley, E.; Upole, N. [University of Chicago, Department of Physics and Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics, Chicago, IL (United States); Miguez, B.; Trinchero, G. [INFN-Torino (Italy); Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Torino (Italy); Naganoma, J.; Shagin, P. [Rice University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Houston, TX (United States); Scotto Lavina, L. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Universite Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, LPNHE, Paris (France); Stein, A.; Wang, H. [University of California, Physics and Astronomy Department, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Tunnell, C. [Nikhef and the University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Chicago, Department of Physics and Kavli Institute of Cosmological Physics, Chicago, IL (United States); Collaboration: XENON Collaboration

    2017-12-15

    The XENON1T dark matter experiment aims to detect weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) through low-energy interactions with xenon atoms. To detect such a rare event necessitates the use of radiopure materials to minimize the number of background events within the expected WIMP signal region. In this paper we report the results of an extensive material radioassay campaign for the XENON1T experiment. Using gamma-ray spectroscopy and mass spectrometry techniques, systematic measurements of trace radioactive impurities in over one hundred samples within a wide range of materials were performed. The measured activities allowed for stringent selection and placement of materials during the detector construction phase and provided the input for XENON1T detection sensitivity estimates through Monte Carlo simulations. (orig.)

  6. Genome-Wide Analysis of the World's Sheep Breeds Reveals High Levels of Historic Mixture and Strong Recent Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijas, James W.; Lenstra, Johannes A.; Hayes, Ben; Boitard, Simon; Porto Neto, Laercio R.; San Cristobal, Magali; Servin, Bertrand; McCulloch, Russell; Whan, Vicki; Gietzen, Kimberly; Paiva, Samuel; Barendse, William; Ciani, Elena; Raadsma, Herman; McEwan, John; Dalrymple, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Through their domestication and subsequent selection, sheep have been adapted to thrive in a diverse range of environments. To characterise the genetic consequence of both domestication and selection, we genotyped 49,034 SNP in 2,819 animals from a diverse collection of 74 sheep breeds. We find the majority of sheep populations contain high SNP diversity and have retained an effective population size much higher than most cattle or dog breeds, suggesting domestication occurred from a broad genetic base. Extensive haplotype sharing and generally low divergence time between breeds reveal frequent genetic exchange has occurred during the development of modern breeds. A scan of the genome for selection signals revealed 31 regions containing genes for coat pigmentation, skeletal morphology, body size, growth, and reproduction. We demonstrate the strongest selection signal has occurred in response to breeding for the absence of horns. The high density map of genetic variability provides an in-depth view of the genetic history for this important livestock species. PMID:22346734

  7. Genome-wide analysis of the world's sheep breeds reveals high levels of historic mixture and strong recent selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W Kijas

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Through their domestication and subsequent selection, sheep have been adapted to thrive in a diverse range of environments. To characterise the genetic consequence of both domestication and selection, we genotyped 49,034 SNP in 2,819 animals from a diverse collection of 74 sheep breeds. We find the majority of sheep populations contain high SNP diversity and have retained an effective population size much higher than most cattle or dog breeds, suggesting domestication occurred from a broad genetic base. Extensive haplotype sharing and generally low divergence time between breeds reveal frequent genetic exchange has occurred during the development of modern breeds. A scan of the genome for selection signals revealed 31 regions containing genes for coat pigmentation, skeletal morphology, body size, growth, and reproduction. We demonstrate the strongest selection signal has occurred in response to breeding for the absence of horns. The high density map of genetic variability provides an in-depth view of the genetic history for this important livestock species.

  8. Experiences of primary health care nurses in implementing integrated management of childhood illnesses strategy at selected clinics of Limpopo Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vhuromu, E N; Davhana-Maselesele, M

    2009-09-01

    Treatment of the under five years is a national priority as an attempt in curbing deaths and deformities affecting children. Primary health care was implemented in the clinics in order to help in the treatment of illnesses affecting the community, including children. As a result of childhood illnesses; the World Health Organization (WHO) and United Nation Children's Fund (UNICEF) came up with Integrated Management of Childhood illnesses (IMCI) strategy to enhance treatment of such illnesses in developing countries. Primary health care nurses (PHCNS) in Limpopo Province were also trained to implement the strategy. This study is intended to explore and describe the experiences of PHCNS in implementing the IMCI strategy at selected clinics in Vhembe District in the Limpopo Province. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual design was used. In-depth interviews were conducted with PHCNS who are IMCI trained and have implemented the strategy for a period of not less than two years. Data analysis was done through using Tesch 's method of open coding for qualitative analysis. Findings revealed that PHCNS had difficulty in rendering IMCI services due to lack of resources and poor working conditions. Recommendations address the difficulties experienced by PHCNS when implementing the IMCI strategy.

  9. Control of selected VVER components life time SKODA JS a.s. experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zdebor, J.; Pribulla, E.

    2005-01-01

    Experience from the operation of nuclear power plants with type VVER reactors has shown that the life time management of a number of nuclear reactor components is technically as well as with respect to safety substantiated even at the time which exceeds their originally designed life time. To accept such solution it was necessary to develop and implement a number of programs based on which it was possible to evaluate the actual condition of monitored equipment. It is a condition allowing to adopt solution concerning the possibility of their further operation. Experience from the manufacture of 21 sets of reactor equipment for VVER 440 and 3 sets VVER 1000 has been gathered in SKODA JS a.s. which have been completed by experience from service activities performed at operated nuclear power plants. Analyses of manufacturing data and in-service inspection results completed by a lot of laboratory tests have become the basis for the development of selected VVER components life time management programs. The paper focuses on the life time management of those VVER components which SKODA JS a.s. has most experience with. (authors)

  10. The influence of selected senses on consumer experience: A brandy case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Pentz

    2013-05-01

    Research purpose: To investigate the influence of selected senses – sight, sound and smell – on consumers’ experience, specifically in terms of the tastiness of brandy. Motivation for the study: Even though the use of the senses such as sight, sound and smell is a popular sensory marketing tool in the field of experiential marketing, applying such marketing techniques is a challenging and costly exercise for marketers, and researchers have called for more studies on senses and consumer experience. Research design, approach and method: A full factorial laboratory experiment (2 x 2 x 2 was conducted where 240 spirits consumers indicated the tastiness of a brandy sample under certain conditions. Main findings: Results revealed that, within a laboratory setting, consumers recorded lower levels of tastiness under conditions where more senses were manipulated than in conditions where less senses were manipulated. Practical/managerial implications: The results of the study coincided with previous results, which indicated that, within certain product categories, sensory marketing could actually decrease the consumer’s experience as sensory overload could occur. Contribution/value-add: In the endeavour to reduce possible sensory overload in the alcohol industry, the findings suggest that marketers should not apply sensory marketing indiscriminately to all product categories. For example, on a retail level, where experimental marketing might be too costly or even too complex to apply to some product categories, marketers should rather rethink the use of sensory marketing strategies within certain industries and focus on other marketing strategies, such a brand building.

  11. Directional Track Selection Technique in CR39 SSNTD for lowyield reaction experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingenito, Francesco; Andreoli, Pierluigi; Batani, Dimitri; Bonasera, Aldo; Boutoux, Guillaume; Burgy, Frederic; Cipriani, Mattia; Consoli, Fabrizio; Cristofari, Giuseppe; De Angelis, Riccardo; Di Giorgio, Giorgio; Ducret, Jean Eric; Giulietti, Danilo; Jakubowska, Katarzyna

    2018-01-01

    There is a great interest in the study of p-11B aneutronic nuclear fusion reactions, both for energy production and for determination of fusion cross-sections at low energies. In this context we performed experiments at CELIA in which energetic protons, accelerated by the laser ECLIPSE, were directed toward a solid Boron target. Because of the small cross-sections at these energies the number of expected reactions is low. CR39 Solid-State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTD) were used to detect the alpha particles produced. Because of the low expected yield, it is difficult to discriminate the tracks due to true fusion products from those due to natural background in the CR39. To this purpose we developed a methodology of particle recognition according to their direction with respect to the detector normal, able to determine the position of their source. We applied this to the specific experiment geometry, so to select from all the tracks those due to particles coming from the region of interaction between accelerated protons and solid boron target. This technique can be of great help on the analysis of SSNTD in experiments with low yield reactions, but can be also generally applied to any experiment where particles reach the track detector with known directions, and for example to improve the detection limit of particle spectrometers using CR39.

  12. [Selected pages of history of vascular surgery in Russia (contribution of Russian surgeons to world vascular surgery)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokrovskiĭ, A V; Gliantsev, S P

    2014-01-01

    The article describes the most significant for Russian surgery personalities, facts, and events of the last 180years. An emphasis is placed upon those works, discoveries or operations made by Russians for the first timein the world's practice. To such we refer N.J. Pirogov's topographical anatomy of vessels (1837), N. V. Ekk's portocaval anastomosis (1877), A.A. Yanovsky's lateral arterial suture (1889), S.S. Bryukhonenko's artificial circulation unit (1923-1924), Yu. Yu. Voronoy's renal replantation onto femoral vessels (1933), V.P. Demikhov'stransplantation of vital organs (1946-1959), V.I. Kolesov's mammary-coronary anastomosis (1964),F.A. Serbinenko's endovascular neurosurgery ( 1979), E. I. Chasov's intracoronary thrombolysis by E.I. Chazov( 1974), endovascular prosthetic repair of the thoracic aorta by N.L. Volodos ( 1985) and a series of other facts.

  13. Designing and Developing Game-Like Learning Experience in Virtual Worlds: Challenges and Design Decisions of Novice Instructional Designers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Turkan Karakus; Cagiltay, Kursat

    2016-01-01

    Many virtual worlds have been adopted for implementation within educational settings because they are potentially useful for building effective learning environments. Since the flexibility of virtual worlds challenges to obtain effective and efficient educational outcomes, the design of such platforms need more attention. In the present study, the…

  14. World Health Organization Estimates of the Relative Contributions of Food to the Burden of Disease Due to Selected Foodborne Hazards: A Structured Expert Elicitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hald, Tine; Aspinall, Willy; Devleesschauwer, Brecht; Cooke, Roger; Corrigan, Tim; Havelaar, Arie H; Gibb, Herman J; Torgerson, Paul R; Kirk, Martyn D; Angulo, Fred J; Lake, Robin J; Speybroeck, Niko; Hoffmann, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    The Foodborne Disease Burden Epidemiology Reference Group (FERG) was established in 2007 by the World Health Organization (WHO) to estimate the global burden of foodborne diseases (FBDs). This estimation is complicated because most of the hazards causing FBD are not transmitted solely by food; most have several potential exposure routes consisting of transmission from animals, by humans, and via environmental routes including water. This paper describes an expert elicitation study conducted by the FERG Source Attribution Task Force to estimate the relative contribution of food to the global burden of diseases commonly transmitted through the consumption of food. We applied structured expert judgment using Cooke's Classical Model to obtain estimates for 14 subregions for the relative contributions of different transmission pathways for eleven diarrheal diseases, seven other infectious diseases and one chemical (lead). Experts were identified through international networks followed by social network sampling. Final selection of experts was based on their experience including international working experience. Enrolled experts were scored on their ability to judge uncertainty accurately and informatively using a series of subject-matter specific 'seed' questions whose answers are unknown to the experts at the time they are interviewed. Trained facilitators elicited the 5th, and 50th and 95th percentile responses to seed questions through telephone interviews. Cooke's Classical Model uses responses to the seed questions to weigh and aggregate expert responses. After this interview, the experts were asked to provide 5th, 50th, and 95th percentile estimates for the 'target' questions regarding disease transmission routes. A total of 72 experts were enrolled in the study. Ten panels were global, meaning that the experts should provide estimates for all 14 subregions, whereas the nine panels were subregional, with experts providing estimates for one or more subregions

  15. World Health Organization Estimates of the Relative Contributions of Food to the Burden of Disease Due to Selected Foodborne Hazards: A Structured Expert Elicitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tine Hald

    Full Text Available The Foodborne Disease Burden Epidemiology Reference Group (FERG was established in 2007 by the World Health Organization (WHO to estimate the global burden of foodborne diseases (FBDs. This estimation is complicated because most of the hazards causing FBD are not transmitted solely by food; most have several potential exposure routes consisting of transmission from animals, by humans, and via environmental routes including water. This paper describes an expert elicitation study conducted by the FERG Source Attribution Task Force to estimate the relative contribution of food to the global burden of diseases commonly transmitted through the consumption of food.We applied structured expert judgment using Cooke's Classical Model to obtain estimates for 14 subregions for the relative contributions of different transmission pathways for eleven diarrheal diseases, seven other infectious diseases and one chemical (lead. Experts were identified through international networks followed by social network sampling. Final selection of experts was based on their experience including international working experience. Enrolled experts were scored on their ability to judge uncertainty accurately and informatively using a series of subject-matter specific 'seed' questions whose answers are unknown to the experts at the time they are interviewed. Trained facilitators elicited the 5th, and 50th and 95th percentile responses to seed questions through telephone interviews. Cooke's Classical Model uses responses to the seed questions to weigh and aggregate expert responses. After this interview, the experts were asked to provide 5th, 50th, and 95th percentile estimates for the 'target' questions regarding disease transmission routes. A total of 72 experts were enrolled in the study. Ten panels were global, meaning that the experts should provide estimates for all 14 subregions, whereas the nine panels were subregional, with experts providing estimates for one or more

  16. A Juridical Insight of Brave New World: The Eugenics Found on the Selection Criteria of Genetic Material for the Assisted Human Reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo de Oliveira Alban

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Following the teachings of the “Law in the Literature” movement, as well as the method of the Phemenological Hermeneutics, the present essay intends to discuss the eugenics content present in the abstract criteria for donating genetic material in Brazil. In order to present this problem clearly for the reader, the novel Brave New World, from Aldous Huxley, will be used as an example. Opportunely, it will deal with the recent situation regarding the investigation of the London Sperm Bank donators’ politics, in which important debates related to the genetic selection aiming for avoiding congenital diseases appear.

  17. Widening access through openness in higher education in the developing world: A Bourdieusian field analysis of experiences from the National Open University of Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Kayode Olakulehin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bourdieu has argued that higher education is a field that reproduces social inequality, thus complicating how openness widens access to higher education in the developing world. Drawing on the experiences of the National Open University of Nigeria (NOUN, this paper critically analyses and evaluates the rationale, approach, difficulties, opportunities, outcomes and benefits of NOUN’s experience in widening access to higher education in Nigeria using Bourdieu’s field theory. We argue that the success of efforts for openness in higher education in a developing world context involves steering the contradictory tensions of openness and access across competing policy and practice fields. We offer this theorisation as a future social theoretical agenda for reflexive research for improving the effectiveness of praxis to widen access through openness in higher education in the developing world.

  18. Evolution of basal metabolic rate in bank voles from a multidirectional selection experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowska, Edyta T.; Stawski, Clare; Rudolf, Agata; Dheyongera, Geoffrey; Chrząścik, Katarzyna M.; Baliga-Klimczyk, Katarzyna; Koteja, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    A major theme in evolutionary and ecological physiology of terrestrial vertebrates encompasses the factors underlying the evolution of endothermy in birds and mammals and interspecific variation of basal metabolic rate (BMR). Here, we applied the experimental evolution approach and compared BMR in lines of a wild rodent, the bank vole (Myodes glareolus), selected for 11 generations for: high swim-induced aerobic metabolism (A), ability to maintain body mass on a low-quality herbivorous diet (H) and intensity of predatory behaviour towards crickets (P). Four replicate lines were maintained for each of the selection directions and an unselected control (C). In comparison to C lines, A lines achieved a 49% higher maximum rate of oxygen consumption during swimming, H lines lost 1.3 g less mass in the test with low-quality diet and P lines attacked crickets five times more frequently. BMR was significantly higher in A lines than in C or H lines (60.8, 56.6 and 54.4 ml O2 h−1, respectively), and the values were intermediate in P lines (59.0 ml O2 h−1). Results of the selection experiment provide support for the hypothesis of a positive association between BMR and aerobic exercise performance, but not for the association of adaptation to herbivorous diet with either a high or low BMR. PMID:25876844

  19. Seizing the Future: How Ohio's Career-Technical Education Programs Fuse Academic Rigor and Real-World Experiences to Prepare Students for College and Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, Heidi; Yoder, Shaun

    2015-01-01

    "Seizing the Future: How Ohio's Career and Technical Education Programs Fuse Academic Rigor and Real-World Experiences to Prepare Students for College and Work," demonstrates Ohio's progress in developing strong policies for career and technical education (CTE) programs to promote rigor, including college- and career-ready graduation…

  20. Widening Access through Openness in Higher Education in the Developing World: A Bourdieusian Field Analysis of Experiences from the National Open University of Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olakulehin, Felix Kayode; Singh, Gurmit

    2013-01-01

    Bourdieu has argued that higher education is a field that reproduces social inequality, thus complicating how openness widens access to higher education in the developing world. Drawing on the experiences of the National Open University of Nigeria (NOUN), this paper critically analyses and evaluates the rationale, approach, difficulties,…

  1. Host selection by the pine processionary moth enhances larval performance: An experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Contreras, Tomás; Soler, Juan J.; Soler, Manuel

    2014-02-01

    The development of a phytophagous insect depends on the nutritional characteristics of plants on which it feeds. Offspring from different females, however, may vary in their ability to develop in different host species and therefore females should place their eggs on host plants that result in the highest performance for the insect offspring. Causes underlying the predicted relationships between host selection and offspring performance may be: (1) a genetic association between larval ability to exploit particular hosts and the female insect's host preference; and (2) phenotypic plasticity of larvae that may be due to (a) maternal effects (e.g. differential investment in eggs) or (b) diet. In this work, we analyse the performance (i.e. hatching success and larval size and mortality) of the pine processionary (Thaumetopoea pityocampa) caterpillar developing in Aleppo (Pinus halepensis) or maritime (Pinus pinaster) pines. Larvae of this moth species do not move from the individual pine selected by the mother for oviposition. By means of cross-fostering experiments of eggs batches and silk nests of larvae between these two pine species, we explored whether phenotypic plasticity of offspring traits or genetic correlations between mother and offspring traits account for variation in developmental characteristics of caterpillars. Our results showed that females preferentially selected Aleppo pine for oviposition. Moreover, the offspring had the highest probability of survival and reached a larger body size in this pine species independently of whether or not batches were experimentally cross-fostered. Notably, the interaction between identity of donor and receiver pine species of larvae nests explained a significant proportion of variance of larval size and mortality, suggesting a role of diet-induced phenotypic plasticity of the hatchlings. These results suggest that both female selection of the more appropriate pine species and phenotypic plasticity of larva explain the

  2. Recycling and social technologies for sustainability: The Brazilian experience of wastepickers' inclusion in selective collection programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Francisco de Paula Antunes; de Oliveira, Fabiana Goulart

    2017-01-01

    Alternatives are being developed for waste treatment all over the world. Solidary selective collection is a recognized social technology for taking millions of people out of absolute poverty. However, this technology raises crucial questions regarding its nature and development perspective. What can be said of the legitimacy of a social technology that is born from misery and maintains wastepickers in precarious work conditions? This article approaches issues based on the analysis of the wastepickers' work process, highlighting the difficulties and interpersonal conflicts, the strong social bonds and creativity that reveal the potential of efficiency and solidarity of this social technology. The analyses are founded on empirical descriptions of work situations and organizational arrangements that the wastepickers themselves have developed. The observations were made during the work, followed by interviews focused on significant events and behaviors. The contradiction between efficiency and solidarity, which excludes workers from the formal labor market, finds in the associations a solution for people with different capacities. This social technology offers much more than simple survival or exoticism. The wastepickers create a sustainable mode of production, putting together economic, social and environmental criteria in an innovative and fair production technology.

  3. Stable lead isotope compositions in selected coals from around the world and implications for present day aerosol source tracing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Diaz-Somoano; M.E. Kylander; M.A. Lopez-Anton; I. Suarez-Ruiz; M.R. Martinez-Tarazona; M. Ferrat; B. Kober; D.J. Weiss [Instituto Nacional del Carbon (INCAR-CSIC), Oviedo (Spain)

    2009-02-15

    The phasing out of leaded gasoline in many countries around the world at the end of the last millennium has resulted in a complex mixture of lead sources in the atmosphere. Recent studies suggest that coal combustion has become an important source of Pb in aerosols in urban and remote areas. Lead concentration and isotopic composition is reported for 59 coal samples representing major coal deposits worldwide in an attempt to characterize this potential source. The average concentration in these coals is 35 {mu}g Pb g{sup -1}, with the highest values in coals from Spain and Peru and the lowest in coals from Australia and North America. The {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb isotope ratios range between 1.15 and 1.24, with less radiogenic Pb in coals from Europe and Asia compared to South and North America. Comparing the Pb isotopic signatures of coals from this and previous studies with those published for Northern and Southern Hemisphere aerosols, we hypothesize that coal combustion might now be an important Pb source in China, the eastern U.S., and to some extent, in Europe but not as yet in other regions including South Africa, South America, and western U.S. This supports the notion that 'old Pb pollution' from leaded gasoline reemitted into the atmosphere or long-range transport (i.e., from China to the western U.S.) is important. Comparing the isotope ratios of the coals, the age of the deposits, and Pb isotope evolution models for the major geochemical reservoirs suggests that the lead isotope ratios (PbIC) in coals is strongly influenced by the depositional coal forming environment. 47 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Problematizing the world around us and thinking otherwise: an experience of philosophy with children in dialogue with Michel Foucault’s thoughts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Guardado Mendoza

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available During a school cycle of a year we implemented an experience of philosophy with children inspired by the thoughts of Michel Foucault. The objective of our meetings was to foster thought-experiments aimed at problematizing the world around us and thinking otherwise. In the course of our experience, the thoughts of children led to different questions and reflections which we have organized according to five categories in dialogue with the ideas of Foucault: 1 critical thinking, 2 self-criticism, 3 curiosity, 4 relationship with the truth and 5 thinking otherwise. In this paper, we share a part of the expressions that, from our perspective, show how children thought differently about the world that surrounds us, and their own thinking.

  5. Long-term outcomes of acute ischemic stroke patients treated with endovascular thrombectomy: A real-world experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenbo; Shang, Shuyi; Li, Chuanhui; Wu, Longfei; Wu, Chuanjie; Chen, Jian; Song, Haiqing; Zhang, Hongqi; Zhang, Yunzhou; Duan, Jiangang; Feng, Wuwei; Ji, Xunming

    2018-07-15

    Long-term follow-up of large trials have confirmed the superiority of endovascular thrombectomy (ET) for treating acute ischemic stroke (AIS). However, it is still unknown whether these results can be generalized to clinical practice. In this study, we aimed to determine the long-term outcomes of AIS post-ET in the real-world clinical practice. This observational study is based on a single-center prospective registry study. AIS patients were treated with second-generation stent retrievers from December 2012 to April 2016. The primary outcome was modified Ranks scale (mRS) at the time of the latest assessment. Favorable outcome was defined as mRS scores 0-2, and the unfavorable outcome was defined as mRS scores 3-6. Eighty-nine AIS subjects with large artery occlusion in anterior circulation undergoing ET were eligible for analysis. Median follow-up duration was 20 months (interquartile range 6-32), and 47 subjects (53%) achieved favorable outcome whereas 17 subjects (19%) were functional dependence and 25 subjects (28%) died. Independent predicators for long-term unfavorable outcome were higher baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score (odd ratio:1.21;95% confidence interval 1.09-1.35; p < 0.001) and symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) (odd ratio:16.45;95% confidence interval 1.34-193.44; p = 0.026). More subjects of large-artery-atherosclerosis underwent permanent intracranial stenting (22%vs.10%) as compared with those of cardioembolism, while subjects of cardioembolism were more likely to experience sICH (13%vs.8%) and died (32%vs.16%). Over half of AIS patients can achieve favorable long-term outcomes post-ET. Higher baseline NIHSS scores and sICH are independently associated with unfavorable outcome. Overall, clinical practice in this single canter can replicate the long-term outcomes from the published endovascular clinical trials. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Revisiting the Stanford prison experiment: could participant self-selection have led to the cruelty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnahan, Thomas; McFarland, Sam

    2007-05-01

    The authors investigated whether students who selectively volunteer for a study of prison life possess dispositions associated with behaving abusively. Students were recruited for a psychological study of prison life using a virtually identical newspaper ad as used in the Stanford Prison Experiment (SPE; Haney, Banks & Zimbardo, 1973) or for a psychological study, an identical ad minus the words of prison life. Volunteers for the prison study scored significantly higher on measures of the abuse-related dispositions of aggressiveness, authoritarianism, Machiavellianism, narcissism, and social dominance and lower on empathy and altruism, two qualities inversely related to aggressive abuse. Although implications for the SPE remain a matter of conjecture, an interpretation in terms of person-situation interactionism rather than a strict situationist account is indicated by these findings. Implications for interpreting the abusiveness of American military guards at Abu Ghraib Prison also are discussed.

  7. Scale-ups, scarcity, and selections: the experience of doctors in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Ronald; Oppenheimer, Gerald M

    2007-10-01

    To present the ethical and clinical experience of public sector physicians during the post-Apartheid period in South Africa, who were faced with poverty, medical scarcity and unexpected government resistance in treating individuals with HIV infection. Oral history interviews with 73 physicians from major cities, mine company clinics, and rural hospitals selected because of their long-standing commitment to treating people with AIDS. The onset of the government's 'rollout' of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in 2003, providing drugs to public sector patients, has not put an end to the rationing of care that characterised the pre-ART period. Subsequently, rules were established to guide such rationing in an equitable fashion. But there are occasions when doctors override their own rules, demonstrating the complex interplay between principles of equity and the claims of moral duty to patients, especially in instances of life and death.

  8. Development of algorithms for real time track selection in the TOTEM experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Minafra, Nicola; Radicioni, E

    The TOTEM experiment at the LHC has been designed to measure the total proton-proton cross-section with a luminosity independent method and to study elastic and diffractive scattering at energy up to 14 TeV in the center of mass. Elastic interactions are detected by Roman Pot stations, placed at 147m and 220m along the two exiting beams. At the present time, data acquired by these detectors are stored on disk without any data reduction by the data acquisition chain. In this thesis several tracking and selection algorithms, suitable for real-time implementation in the firmware of the back-end electronics, have been proposed and tested using real data.

  9. Our World Their World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisco, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    Build, create, make, blog, develop, organize, structure, perform. These are just a few verbs that illustrate the visual world. These words create images that allow students to respond to their environment. Visual culture studies recognize the predominance of visual forms of media, communication, and information in the postmodern world. This…

  10. An experiment on selecting most informative variables in socio-economic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Jenkins

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In many studies where data are collected on several variables, there is a motivation to find if fewer variables would provide almost as much information. Variance of a variable about its mean is the common statistical measure of information content, and that is used here. We are interested whether the variability in one variable is sufficiently correlated with that in one or more of the other variables that the first variable is redundant. We wish to find one or more ‘principal variables’ that sufficiently reflect the information content in all the original variables. The paper explains the method of principal variables and reports experiments using the technique to see if just a few variables are sufficient to reflect the information in 11 socioeconomic variables on 130 countries from a World Bank (WB database. While the method of principal variables is highly successful in a statistical sense, the WB data varies greatly from year to year, demonstrating that fewer variables wo uld be inadequate for this data.

  11. Ties of silence--Family lived experience of selective mutism in identical twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrigtsen, Vårin; Eskeland, Benedicte; Mæhle, Magne

    2016-04-01

    This article is based on an in-depth interview with a pair of twins diagnosed with selective mutism and their parents 2 years after recovery. Selective mutism (SM) is a rare disorder, and identical twins sharing the condition are extremely rare. The twins developed SM simultaneously during their first year of school. The treatment and follow-up they received for several years are briefly described in this article. The interview explored the children's and their parents' narratives about the origin of the condition, the challenges it entailed in their daily lives, and what they found helpful in the treatment they were offered. In the interview, the children conveyed experiences that even the parents were unaware of and revealed examples of daily life-traumas for which they were unable to obtain support and help. The whole family was trapped in the silence. The twins and their parents emphasized different aspects in terms of what they believed were helpful. The implications of these findings for our understanding and treatment of children with SM are discussed, as well as the potential of service user involvement in child and adolescent mental health research. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. World Health Organization Estimates of the Relative Contributions of Food to the Burden of Disease Due to Selected Foodborne Hazards: A Structured Expert Elicitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Tine; Aspinall, Willy; Devleesschauwer, Brecht

    2016-01-01

    transmission routes. These findings are essential for global burden of FBD estimates. While gaps exist, we believe the estimates presented here are the best current source of guidance to support decision makers when allocating resources for control and intervention, and for future research initiatives......., seven other infectious diseases and one chemical (lead). Experts were identified through international networks followed by social network sampling. Final selection of experts was based on their experience including international working experience. Enrolled experts were scored on their ability to judge...

  13. Experience of selective collection of urban solid wastes in Vitoria-Gasteiz (Spain); Experiencia de recogida selective de RSU en un barrio de Vitoria-Gasteiz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil Franco, R.; Urrutxi, J.P.; Becerra, L.; Mtnez de Sarria, J. [Area de Reciclaje de Productos de Consumo Masivo. Fundacion LEAIA. Centro de Desarrollo Tecnologico, Alava (Spain)

    1997-06-01

    Administration concern about the MSW has lead to the performance of an experience of selective collection. The awakening campaign developed and the conclusions of it have been the beginning of the actions to carry out in the future to process the MSW spilled onto the landfill of Gardelegui (Alava). (Author) 10 refs.

  14. Experiments for practical education in process parameter optimization for selective laser sintering to increase workpiece quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reutterer, Bernd; Traxler, Lukas; Bayer, Natascha; Drauschke, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) is considered as one of the most important additive manufacturing processes due to component stability and its broad range of usable materials. However the influence of the different process parameters on mechanical workpiece properties is still poorly studied, leading to the fact that further optimization is necessary to increase workpiece quality. In order to investigate the impact of various process parameters, laboratory experiments are implemented to improve the understanding of the SLS limitations and advantages on an educational level. Experiments are based on two different workstations, used to teach students the fundamentals of SLS. First of all a 50 W CO2 laser workstation is used to investigate the interaction of the laser beam with the used material in accordance with varied process parameters to analyze a single-layered test piece. Second of all the FORMIGA P110 laser sintering system from EOS is used to print different 3D test pieces in dependence on various process parameters. Finally quality attributes are tested including warpage, dimension accuracy or tensile strength. For dimension measurements and evaluation of the surface structure a telecentric lens in combination with a camera is used. A tensile test machine allows testing of the tensile strength and the interpreting of stress-strain curves. The developed laboratory experiments are suitable to teach students the influence of processing parameters. In this context they will be able to optimize the input parameters depending on the component which has to be manufactured and to increase the overall quality of the final workpiece.

  15. Electron microprobe analyses of selected samples from deep rock disposal experiment No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hlava, P.F.; Chambers, W.F.

    1976-04-01

    Deep Rock Disposal Experiment No. 1 was designed to provide information about the interaction between a molten, glass-based, nuclear waste simulant and rock material. Selected samples from this experiment were examined by optical microscopy and electron probe microanalysis. Analysis of the homogenized material in the convection cell that was created in the central portion of the melt region shows that an amount of rock equal to about one-half of the original amount of waste simulant was incorporated in the melt during the experiment. Stagnant melt at the sides of the cell formed a glass with large compositional gradients. A white band separated the convected and stagnant materials. The color of the band is attributed to light scattering by small crystallites formed during cooling. Four types of crystallites grew from the melt: two oxides, a Mg--Fe borate, and a silicate. Spinel (MgO, Cr 2 O 3 , FeO (Fe 2 O 3 ), and NiO) was the most common crystallite in the glass. The spinel crystallites found within the convection cell displayed skeletal morphology and oscillatory zoning which indicates growth at varying temperatures as they were carried along by convection. A single cluster of nonskeletal (Fe,Cr) 2 O 3 crystallites was found at the bottom of the melt zone where convection did not occur. Mg--Fe borate crystallites grew in clusters in the central portion of the convection cell after convection ceased. A silicate similar to Fe-rich diopside (CaMgSi 2 O 6 ) with unusual amounts of Ce 2 O 3 and other heavy metal oxides formed as larger crystallites in the stagnant melt at the side of the convection cell and as many very small crystallites in the white band

  16. Dietary experience modifies horses' feeding behavior and selection patterns of three macronutrient rich diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redgate, S E; Cooper, J J; Hall, S; Eady, P; Harris, P A

    2014-04-01

    Choice feeding is often used to investigate an animal's nutritional requirements and dietary preferences. A problem with this approach is that animals with long gut transit times, such as the horse, may find it difficult to associate a chosen food with its nutritional consequence when alternative foods are presented simultaneously. One solution is to present foods singly for a period of time before a simultaneous choice session to allow the development of learned associations. This method was used to determine if horse's voluntary intake and feeding behavior was influenced by the macronutrient composition of the diet. Seven stabled horses, maintained on a low intensity exercise regimen, were allowed, on an ad libitum basis, haylage and 3 isocaloric forage based diets that were rich in 1 of 3 macronutrients (protein, lipid, and hydrolyzable carbohydrate). Initially, diets were presented as a 3-way choice for 5 d (self-selection a [SSa]), then singly (monadic phase) with exposure to each diet for 2 separate periods of 3 d each, and finally again as a choice for 5 d (self-selection b [SSb]). The total amount of trial diet offered differed with trial phase, with 2 to 2.5% of BW during SSa and the monadic phase, increasing to ad libitum access during SSb. To control differences in the total amount of trial diet offered, 2 measurements of voluntary intake were taken at 4 and 22 h postpresentation. Daily macronutrient and energy intakes were estimated from proximate analysis of the trial diets and batches of haylage fed. Feeding behavior was observed over a single 4-h period during both self-selection phases. Horses showed no initial preference after 4 h for any 1 diet during SSa. Following the monadic phase, horses demonstrated a preference for the protein and hydrolyzable carbohydrate rich diets over the lipid rich diet (P < 0.001). Dietary experience modified foraging behavior as the total number of visits to the diets decreased during SSb (P < 0.005). Analysis of 24

  17. World Literature - World Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Offering their own twenty-first-century perspectives - across generations, nationalities and disciplines -, the contributors to this anthology explore the idea of world literature for what it may add of new connections and itineraries to the study of literature and culture today. Covering a vast...... historical material these essays, by a diverse group of scholars, examine the pioneers of world literature and the roles played by translation, migration and literary institutions in the circulation and reception of both national and cosmopolitan literatures....

  18. A Higher Education Case: Millennial Experience toward Learning in a Virtual World Designed as an Authentic Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franetovic, Marija

    2012-01-01

    Current educational initiatives encourage the use of authentic learning environments to realistically prepare students for jobs in a constantly changing world. Many students of the Millennial generation may be social media savvy. However, what can be said about learning conditions and student readiness for active, reflective and collaborative…

  19. AOD Distributions and Trends of Major Aerosol Species over a Selection of the World's Most Populated Cities Based on the 1st Version of NASA's MERRA Aerosol Reanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provencal, Simon; Kishcha, Pavel; da Silva, Arlindo M.; Elhacham, Emily; Alpert, Pinhas

    2017-01-01

    NASA recently extended the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Application (MERRA) with an atmospheric aerosol reanalysis which includes five particulate species: sulfate, organic matter, black carbon, mineral dust and sea salt. The MERRA Aerosol Reanalysis (MERRAero) is an innovative tool to study air quality issues around the world for its global and constant coverage and its distinction of aerosol speciation expressed in the form of aerosol optical depth (AOD). The purpose of this manuscript is to apply MERRAero to the study of urban air pollution at the global scale by analyzing the AOD over a period of 13 years (2003-2015) and over a selection of 200 of the world's most populated cities in order to assess the impacts of urbanization, industrialization, air quality regulations and regional transport which affect urban aerosol load. Environmental regulations and the recent global economic recession have helped to decrease the AOD and sulfate aerosols in most cities in North America, Europe and Japan. Rapid industrialization in China over the last two decades resulted in Chinese cities having the highest AOD values in the world. China has nevertheless recently implemented emission control measures which are showing early signs of success in many cities of Southern China where AOD has decreased substantially over the last 13 years. The AOD over South American cities, which is dominated by carbonaceous aerosols, has also decreased over the last decade due to an increase in commodity prices which slowed deforestation activities in the Amazon rainforest. At the opposite, recent urbanization and industrialization in India and Bangladesh resulted in a strong increase of AOD, sulfate and carbonaceous aerosols in most cities of these two countries. The AOD over most cities in Northern Africa and Western Asia changed little over the last decade. Emissions of natural aerosols, which cities in these two regions tend to be mostly composed of, don't tend to

  20. Qualitative assessment of selected areas of the world for undiscovered sediment-hosted stratabound copper deposits: Chapter Y in Global mineral resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zientek, Michael L.; Wintzer, Niki E.; Hayes, Timothy S.; Parks, Heather L.; Briggs, Deborah A.; Causey, J. Douglas; Hatch, Shyla A.; Jenkins, M. Christopher; Williams, David J.; Zientek, Michael L.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Johnson, Kathleen M.

    2015-12-14

    A qualitative mineral resource assessment of sediment-hosted stratabound copper mineralized areas for undiscovered copper deposits was performed for 10 selected areas of the world. The areas, in alphabetical order, are (1) Belt-Purcell Basin, United States and Canada; (2) Benguela and Cuanza Basins, Angola; (3) Chuxiong Basin, China; (4) Dongchuan Group rocks, China; (5) Egypt–Israel–Jordan Rift, Egypt, Israel, and Jordan; (6) Maritimes Basin, Canada; (7) Neuquén Basin, Argentina; (8) Northwest Botswana Rift, Botswana and Namibia; (9) Redstone Copperbelt, Canada; and (10) Salta Rift System, Argentina. This assessment (1) outlines the main characteristics of the areas, (2) classifies known deposits by deposit model subtypes, and (3) ranks the areas according to their potential to contain undiscovered copper deposits.

  1. Diagnostic imaging to select the candidates to orthotopic transplantation: Experience in a general hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozzato, Carlo; Baldini, Umberto; Gattoni, Filippo; Raiteri, Riccardo; Lazzerini, Francesco; Uslenghi, Carlo Matteo; Mevoli, Alessandra

    1997-01-01

    The authors report the experience of our general hospital in selecting the patients for orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). The accuracy of duplex Doppler and color flow Doppler for portal and/or mesenteric vein thrombosis was evaluated by correlation with resected livers, computerized tomography and angiographic findings. Pathologic examinations diagnosed HCC in 5/20 transplant recipients: 2 lesions were found in 2 resected specimens (total hepatectomy) and 1 lesion was found in 3 cases. The sensitivity of US, plain and dynamic computerized tomography in identifying HCC patients was 20%; US and computerized tomography specificity rates were 100% and 87%, respectively. CTAP sensitivity was 75% and the sensitivity of Lipiodol computerized tomography and angiography was 100%. Therefore, in our series, US was poorly sensitivity in the detection of liver cancers, which may depend on the small number of patients, lesion size and the radiologists ignoring clinical and laboratory data on purpose. Nevertheless, the patients with a single HCC not exceeding 5 cm in diameter or with no more than 3 tumors, none of them exceeding 3 cm in diameter, are generally considered eligible for transplantation: therefore, our patients chosen for OLT on the basis of US and computerized tomography findings were actually eligible for transplantation in spite of US and computerized tomography false negative results. In conclusion, considering also the long stand-by list for OLT, the first selection of transplant candidates could be performed with US and color flow Doppler, plain and dynamic computerized tomography. The patients who are not ruled out as candidates for OLT on the basis of the findings of these imaging techniques and of clinical and laboratory findings are submitted to no further examination and referred to the transplantation unit. Otherwise, if conventional and color flow Doppler US and conventional computerized tomography are not enough to exclude a patient from OLT, the

  2. A comparison of two methods for prediction of response and rates of inbreeding in selected populations with the results obtained in two selection experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verrier Etienne

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Selection programmes are mainly concerned with increasing genetic gain. However, short-term progress should not be obtained at the expense of the within-population genetic variability. Different prediction models for the evolution within a small population of the genetic mean of a selected trait, its genetic variance and its inbreeding have been developed but have mainly been validated through Monte Carlo simulation studies. The purpose of this study was to compare theoretical predictions to experimental results. Two deterministic methods were considered, both grounded on a polygenic additive model. Differences between theoretical predictions and experimental results arise from differences between the true and the assumed genetic model, and from mathematical simplifications applied in the prediction methods. Two sets of experimental lines of chickens were used in this study: the Dutch lines undergoing true truncation mass selection, the other lines (French undergoing mass selection with a restriction on the representation of the different families. This study confirmed, on an experimental basis, that modelling is an efficient approach to make useful predictions of the evolution of selected populations although the basic assumptions considered in the models (polygenic additive model, normality of the distribution, base population at the equilibrium, etc. are not met in reality. The two deterministic methods compared yielded results that were close to those observed in real data, especially when the selection scheme followed the rules of strict mass selection: for instance, both predictions overestimated the genetic gain in the French experiment, whereas both predictions were close to the observed values in the Dutch experiment.

  3. Celebrating UNAM-Oshakati Campus health day/world health day: a community service: professional and personal life experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Lusia N. Ndahambelela Pinehas; NN. Shifiona; KKI. Shikongo

    2013-01-01

    Background: The University of Namibia-Oshakati Campus has a tradition to celebrate UNAM Health Day which coincided with the World Health Day annually. The day had always been celebrated within the Oshakati Campus premises. Nurse lecturers from the School of Nursing and Public Health always decide on the activities of the day and they volunteered themselves to take part in the event. The activities conducted were such as blood pressure monitoring, taking of weigh and giving general health edu...

  4. Academic Career Selection and Retention in Radiation Oncology: The Joint Center for Radiation Therapy Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balboni, Tracy A.; Chen, M.-H.; Harris, Jay R.; Recht, Abram; Stevenson, Mary Ann; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The United States healthcare system has witnessed declining reimbursement and increasing documentation requirements for longer than 10 years. These have decreased the time available to academic faculty for teaching and mentorship. The impact of these changes on the career choices of residents is unknown. The purpose of this report was to determine whether changes have occurred during the past decade in the proportion of radiation oncology trainees from a single institution entering and staying in academic medicine. Methods and Materials: We performed a review of the resident employment experience of Harvard Joint Center for Radiation Therapy residents graduating during 13 recent consecutive years (n = 48 residents). The outcomes analyzed were the initial selection of an academic vs. nonacademic career and career changes during the first 3 years after graduation. Results: Of the 48 residents, 65% pursued an academic career immediately after graduation, and 44% remained in academics at the last follow-up, after a median of 6 years. A later graduation year was associated with a decrease in the proportion of graduates immediately entering academic medicine (odds ratio, 0.78; 95% confidence interval, 0.65-0.94). However, the retention rate at 3 years of those who did immediately enter academics increased with a later graduation year (p = 0.03). Conclusion: During a period marked by notable changes in the academic healthcare environment, the proportion of graduating Harvard Joint Center for Radiation Therapy residents pursuing academic careers has been declining; however, despite this decline, the retention rates in academia have increased

  5. Pregnancy planning and risk behaviours - a survey of women's experiences in selected European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesińska-Sawicka, Małgorzata; Nagórska, Małgorzata

    2018-03-14

    Pregnancy, a special period in a woman's life, should be preceded by proper preparation: a positive attitude to procreation, selection of optimum time for becoming pregnant, starting prevention of neural tube defects, restriction of the use of drugs, smoking, etc. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of pregnancy planning and antenatal classes on the use of stimulants during pregnancy. The study group included 877 women living in 7 European countries, and their experiences of planning pregnancy and substance abuse during pregnancy were investigated. In about a half (50.3%) of respondents the pregnancy was planned. The highest percentage of mothers who planned pregnancy was recorded in Poland and Bulgaria (about 76%). By contrast, in Germany the proportion of mothers who planned pregnancy was the lowest (46.2%). Surprisingly, they became pregnant despite very frequent use of birth control (96.7%). On average, 17.3% of respondents disclosed that they drank alcohol or coffee, smoked cigarettes or used psychoactive drugs during pregnancy. Among women who did not plan to be pregnant, the use of stimulants was recorded more often. However, pregnancy planning only slightly inclined women to stop the consumption of stimulants. Attendance at antenatal classes did not have any significant effect on the use of stimulants.

  6. Analysis of selected critical experiments using ENDF/B-IV and ENDF/B-V data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crump, M.W.; Durston, C.; Jonsson, A.; Singh, U.N.

    1983-01-01

    Selected critical experiments were analyzed using ENDF/B-V data and results compared with measured parameters and with values obtained using ENDF/B-IV. The TRX-1 and -2 U-metal criticals were reanalyzed using ENDF/B-V with consistent multilevel processing of U-238 resonance data and increased spatial detail in the resonance slowing down calculations. The improved resonance treatment was applied in TRX cell calculations performed with the DIT code, and resulted in reduced predictions of U-238 capture by more than two percent relative to previous calculations. The results of the TRX analyses using ENDF/B-V indicate calculated rho 28 values 2 to 3% higher than measurements, and are found in overall agreement with results reported by other laboratories. Full core calculations for the TRX criticals were performed with the ANISN code using cross sections obtained from DIT core-reflector lattice calculations. An evaluation of core versus cell calculations for these criticals indicates differences corresponding to about one half percent in predicted reactivity

  7. The reactor kinetics code tank: a validation against selected SPERT-1b experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    The two-dimensional space-time analysis code TANK is being developed for the simulation of transient behaviour in the MAPLE class of research reactors. MAPLE research reactor cores are compact, light-water-cooled and -moderated, with a high degree of forced subcooling. The SPERT-1B(24/32) reactor core had many similarities to MAPLE-X10, and the results of the SPERT transient experiments are well documented. As a validation of TANK, a series of simulations of certain SPERT reactor transients was undertaken. Special features were added to the TANK code to model reactors with plate-type fuel and to allow for the simulation of rapid void production. The results of a series of super-prompt-critical reactivity step-insertion transient simulations are presented. The selected SPERT transients were all initiated from low power, at ambient temperatures, and with negligible coolant flow. Th results of the TANK simulations are in good agreement with the trends in the experimental SPERT data

  8. Assessing Prior Experience in the Selection of Air Traffic Control Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) human resources personnel. In addition to general and specialized experience and education requirements , the ATC...experience. The alternate requirements also include the general experience requirement , accompanied by an additional written test requirement ...had attended the Academy and did not have IFR experience. Alternate Requirement 2. Hold or have held an FAA certificate as a dispatcher for an air

  9. Experience as a doctor in the developing world: does it benefit the clinical and organisational performance in general practice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Wit Niek J

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many physicians have medical experience in developing countries early in their career, but its association with their medical performance later is not known. To explore possible associations we compared primary care physicians (GPs with and without professional experience in a developing country in performance both clinical and organisational. Methods A retrospective survey using two databases to analyse clinical and organisational performance respectively. Analysis was done at the GP level and practice level. 517 GPs received a questionnaire regarding relevant working experience in a developing country. Indicators for clinical performance were: prescription, referral, external diagnostic procedures and minor procedures. We used the district health insurance data base covering 570.000 patients. Explorative secondary analysis of practice visits of 1004 GPs in 566 practices in the Netherlands from 1999 till 2001. We used a validated practice visit method (VIP; 385 indicators in 51 dimensions of practice management to compare having experience in a developing country or not. Results Almost 8% of the GPs had experience in a developing country of at least two years. These GPs referred 9,5% less than their colleagues and did more surgical procedures. However, in the multivariate analysis 'experience in a developing country' was not significantly associated with clinical performance or with other GP- and practice characteristics. 16% of the practices a GP or GPs with at least two years experience in a developing country. They worked more often in group and rural practices with less patients per fte GP and more often part-time. These practices are more hygienic, collaborate more with the hospital and score better on organisation of the practice. These practices score less on service and availability, spend less time on patients in the consultation and the quality of recording in the EMD is lower. Conclusions We found interesting

  10. Seismarmara experiment: results from reprocessing of selected multi-channel seismic reflection profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, S.; Voogd, B.; Carton, H.; Laigle, M.; Becel, A.; Saatcilar, R.; Singh, S.; Hirn, A.

    2003-04-01

    The North Anatolian Fault (NAF) has been responsible for the earthquakes of Izmit and Duzce in 1999. The occurrence of these earthquakes has drawn scientific attention into the Sea of Marmara since the NAF enters into the Sea of Marmara where the latest Izmit earthquake rupture stopped. The SEISMARMARA-2001 survey is a combined seismic reflection, refraction and earthquake experiment carried out in 2001 in the Marmara Region in Turkey by French-Turkish scientific cooperation. The objectives of this survey were to image the various branches of the NAF and related other fault systems. R/V Le Nadir was equipped with a 4.5 km long streamer with 360 channels and a large airgun source. During Leg 1, a grid of large regional lines encompassing the whole Marmara trough was shot. For part of them a strong 8100 cu.in. source for deepest penetration was used, with a 150 m shot interval giving a 15-fold coverage. Another part was shot for a higher resolution with a 2900 cu. in. array at a 50m or 38 m interval to give a 45 or 60-fold coverage. The latter acquisition parameters were used for Leg 2 that was devoted to a very dense grid of lines in the Cinarcik Basin Reprocessing of the multi-channel seismic data is currently being undertaken in several Institutions using different seismic processing softwares (GeoVecteur, ProMAX, Focus), to take advantage of the diverse acquisitions and cope with their limitations, for instance high fold-order for Leg 2 and strength of signal but loose spatial sampling for the bigger source. The main objectives of the reprocessing of the selected profiles are to do a detailed velocity analysis and stacking after deconvolution, filtering to remove or suppress deep sea bottom multiples and out of plane reflections, and time-migration and depth conversion and thus reveal both the shallow and deeper reflection image of the crust in the Sea of Marmara. We show that choosing an appropriate processing sequence for different sources and acquisition

  11. Single center experience in selecting the laparoscopic Frey procedure for chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chun-Lu; Zhang, Hao; Li, Ke-Zhou

    2015-11-28

    To share our experience regarding the laparoscopic Frey procedure for chronic pancreatitis (CP) and patient selection. All consecutive patients undergoing duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection from July 2013 to July 2014 were reviewed and those undergoing the Frey procedure for CP were included in this study. Data on age, gender, body mass index (BMI), American Society of Anesthesiologists score, imaging findings, inflammatory index (white blood cells, interleukin (IL)-6, and C-reaction protein), visual analogue score score during hospitalization and outpatient visit, history of CP, operative time, estimated blood loss, and postoperative data (postoperative mortality and morbidity, postoperative length of hospital stay) were obtained for patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery. The open surgery cases in this study were analyzed for risk factors related to extensive bleeding, which was the major reason for conversion during the laparoscopic procedure. Age, gender, etiology, imaging findings, amylase level, complications due to pancreatitis, functional insufficiency, and history of CP were assessed in these patients. Nine laparoscopic and 37 open Frey procedures were analyzed. Of the 46 patients, 39 were male (85%) and seven were female (16%). The etiology of CP was alcohol in 32 patients (70%) and idiopathic in 14 patients (30%). Stones were found in 38 patients (83%). An inflammatory mass was found in five patients (11%). The time from diagnosis of CP to the Frey procedure was 39 ± 19 (9-85) mo. The BMI of patients in the laparoscopic group was 20.4 ± 1.7 (17.8-22.4) kg/m(2) and was 20.6 ± 2.9 (15.4-27.7) kg/m(2) in the open group. All patients required analgesic medication for abdominal pain. Frequent acute pancreatitis or severe abdominal pain due to acute exacerbation occurred in 20 patients (43%). Pre-operative complications due to pancreatitis were observed in 18 patients (39%). Pancreatic functional insufficiency was observed in 14 patients (30

  12. Clinical profile of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus treated with sodium- glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors and experience in real-world clinical practice in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuatrecasas, Gabriel; Goñi-Goicoechea, Fernando

    2016-11-01

    The main aim of the treatment of type 2 diabetes is overall control of cardiovascular risk factors. Almost 50% of patients with type 2 diabetes do not achieve glycaemic targets, and a much higher percentage do not achieve weight and blood pressure targets, despite the therapeutic arsenal that has appeared in the last decade for the treatment of this disease. In addition, antidiabetic secretatogues and insulin are associated with weight gain and an increased risk of hyperglycaemic episodes. Clinical practice guidelines recommend sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors (SGLT2i) as an alternative in the same therapeutic step as the other options after initiation of metformin therapy. The present study reviews the most appropriate patient profile for SGLT2i therapy, based on their safety and efficacy demonstrated in controlled clinical trials. The article discusses which patients are at risk of experiencing the possible secondary effects due to the mechanism of action of this new therapeutic class, in whom SGLT2i should be used with caution. These considerations on the profile of patients suitable for SGLT2i therapy are contrasted with the results obtained in daily clinical practice, both in retrospective studies from other countries and from real-world experiences in Spain. This article presents a selection of studies performed in distinct centres with a minimum follow-up of 6 months and compares their results with those from clinical trials. SGLT2i are used in clinical practice in any therapeutic step and the efficacy results are very similar to those reported by controlled clinical trials, with a slightly higher proportion of genitourinary infections and a low dropout rate. Half the reported patients are diabetics receiving insulin therapy plus a gliflozin, showing the wide uptake of this therapeutic strategy by clinicians. SGLT2i are especially attractive due to their additional effectiveness in weight and blood pressure control and the possibility of using them

  13. Assessment of GOTHIC and TRACE codes against selected PANDA experiments on a Passive Containment Condenser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papini, Davide, E-mail: davide.papini@psi.ch; Adamsson, Carl; Andreani, Michele; Prasser, Horst-Michael

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Code comparison on the performance of a Passive Containment Condenser. • Simulation of separate effect tests with pure steam and non-condensable gases. • Role of the secondary side and accuracy of pool boiling models are discussed. • GOTHIC and TRACE predict the experimental performance with slight underestimation. • Recirculatory flow pattern with injection of light non-condensable gas is inferred. - Abstract: Typical passive safety systems for ALWRs (Advanced Light Water Reactors) rely on the condensation of steam to remove the decay heat from the core or the containment. In the present paper the three-dimensional containment code GOTHIC and the one-dimensional system code TRACE are compared on the calculation of a variety of phenomena characterizing the response of a passive condenser submerged in a boiling pool. The investigation addresses the conditions of interest for the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) proposed for the ESBWR (Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor). The analysis of selected separate effect tests carried out on a PCC (Passive Containment Condenser) unit in the PANDA large-scale thermal-hydraulic facility is presented to assess the code predictions. Both pure steam conditions (operating pressure of 3 bar, 6 bar and 9 bar) and the effect on the condensation heat transfer of non-condensable gases heavier than steam (air) and lighter than steam (helium) are considered. The role of the secondary side (pool side) heat transfer on the condenser performance is examined too. In general, this study shows that both the GOTHIC and TRACE codes are able to reasonably predict the heat transfer capability of the PCC as well as the influence of non-condensable gas on the system. A slight underestimation of the condenser performance is obtained with both codes. For those tests where the experimental and simulated efficiencies agree better the possibility of compensating errors among different parts of the heat transfer

  14. Partner Selection and the Division of Surplus: Evidence from Ultimatum and Dictator Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyodorshi Banerjee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study ultimatum and dictator environments with one-way, unenforceable pre-play communication from the proposer to the recipient, semantically framed as a promise. After observing this promise regarding how much the proposer will offer if selected, in our treatment conditions, recipients choose whether or not to select a particular proposer. We find that offers can increase in the ultimatum game both with non-competitive selection with a single potential proposer, and more so with competition, where the recipient chooses one of two potential proposers, as compared to the no selection baseline. Furthermore, the offer is rejected with higher probability if the promisemade by the selected proposer is higher than the eventual offer. Our dictator environment does not give the power to reject offers, thus selection power carries no benefits in the dictator game. Finally, independent of the game institution or proposer selection mechanism, promises provide credible signals for offers.

  15. Gas Reactor International Cooperative Program. Interim report. Construction and operating experience of selected European Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    The construction and operating experience of selected European Gas-Cooled Reactors is summarized along with technical descriptions of the plants. Included in the report are the AVR Experimental Pebble Bed Reactor, the Dragon Reactor, AGR Reactors, and the Thorium High Temperature Reactor (THTR). The study demonstrates that the European experience has been favorable and forms a good foundation for the development of Advanced High Temperature Reactors

  16. The multiple mini-interview for selecting medical residents: first experience in the Middle East region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ashraf; Qayed, Khalil Ibrahim; Abdulrahman, Mahera; Tavares, Walter; Rosenfeld, Jack

    2014-08-01

    Numerous studies have shown that multiple mini-interviews (MMI) provides a standard, fair, and more reliable method for assessing applicants. This article presents the first MMI experience for selection of medical residents in the Middle East culture and an Arab country. In 2012, we started using the MMI in interviewing applicants to the residency program of Dubai Health Authority. This interview process consisted of eight, eight-minute structured interview scenarios. Applicants rotated through the stations, each with its own interviewer and scenario. They read the scenario and were requested to discuss the issues with the interviewers. Sociodemographic and station assessment data provided for each applicant were analyzed to determine whether the MMI was a reliable assessment of the non-clinical attributes in the present setting of an Arab country. One hundred and eighty-seven candidates from 27 different countries were interviewed for Dubai Residency Training Program using MMI. They were graduates of 5 medical universities within United Arab Emirates (UAE) and 60 different universities outside UAE. With this applicant's pool, a MMI with eight stations, produced absolute and relative reliability of 0.8 and 0.81, respectively. The person × station interaction contributed 63% of the variance components, the person contributed 34% of the variance components, and the station contributed 2% of the variance components. The MMI has been used in numerous universities in English speaking countries. The MMI evaluates non-clinical attributes and this study provides further evidence for its reliability but in a different country and culture. The MMI offers a fair and more reliable assessment of applicants to medical residency programs. The present data show that this assessment technique applied in a non-western country and Arab culture still produced reliable results.

  17. Can barley (Hordeum vulgare L. s.l.) adapt to fast climate changes? A controlled selection experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alemayehu, Fikadu Reta; Frenck, Georg; van der Linden, Leon

    2013-01-01

    to environmental stress, we conducted a selection experiment over five plant generations (G0–G4) in three scenarios, where atmospheric [CO2] and temperature were increased as single factors and in combination. The treatments represented the expected environmental characteristics in Northern Europe around year 2075...... to environmental change needs to be explored in order to select the most productive genotypes. Presently, it is unknown whether cereal crops like spring barley can adapt to climate stressors over relatively few generations. To evaluate if strong selection pressures could change the performance of barley......, the G4-generation of selected plants did not improve its reproductive output compared to the G0-generation, as G4 produced less seeds and had a lower yield than unselected plants. These results indicate that barley might not respond positively to rapid and strong selection by elevated [CO2...

  18. Dynamic Interactive Educational Diabetes Simulations Using the World Wide Web: An Experience of More Than 15 Years with AIDA Online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Eldon D; Dewolf, Dennis K; Novotny, Christopher A; Reed, Karen; Gotwals, Robert R

    2014-01-01

    Background. AIDA is a widely available downloadable educational simulator of glucose-insulin interaction in diabetes. Methods. A web-based version of AIDA was developed that utilises a server-based architecture with HTML FORM commands to submit numerical data from a web-browser client to a remote web server. AIDA online, located on a remote server, passes the received data through Perl scripts which interactively produce 24 hr insulin and glucose simulations. Results. AIDA online allows users to modify the insulin regimen and diet of 40 different prestored "virtual diabetic patients" on the internet or create new "patients" with user-generated regimens. Multiple simulations can be run, with graphical results viewed via a standard web-browser window. To date, over 637,500 diabetes simulations have been run at AIDA online, from all over the world. Conclusions. AIDA online's functionality is similar to the downloadable AIDA program, but the mode of implementation and usage is different. An advantage to utilising a server-based application is the flexibility that can be offered. New modules can be added quickly to the online simulator. This has facilitated the development of refinements to AIDA online, which have instantaneously become available around the world, with no further local downloads or installations being required.

  19. Dynamic Interactive Educational Diabetes Simulations Using the World Wide Web: An Experience of More Than 15 Years with AIDA Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Eldon D.; DeWolf, Dennis K.; Novotny, Christopher A.; Reed, Karen; Gotwals, Robert R.

    2014-01-01

    Background. AIDA is a widely available downloadable educational simulator of glucose-insulin interaction in diabetes. Methods. A web-based version of AIDA was developed that utilises a server-based architecture with HTML FORM commands to submit numerical data from a web-browser client to a remote web server. AIDA online, located on a remote server, passes the received data through Perl scripts which interactively produce 24 hr insulin and glucose simulations. Results. AIDA online allows users to modify the insulin regimen and diet of 40 different prestored “virtual diabetic patients” on the internet or create new “patients” with user-generated regimens. Multiple simulations can be run, with graphical results viewed via a standard web-browser window. To date, over 637,500 diabetes simulations have been run at AIDA online, from all over the world. Conclusions. AIDA online's functionality is similar to the downloadable AIDA program, but the mode of implementation and usage is different. An advantage to utilising a server-based application is the flexibility that can be offered. New modules can be added quickly to the online simulator. This has facilitated the development of refinements to AIDA online, which have instantaneously become available around the world, with no further local downloads or installations being required. PMID:24511312

  20. A User’s Guide to the Brave New World of Designing Simulation Experiments. State-of-the-Art Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Bardhan 1995, Saltelli et al. 1999, or Sanchez and Wu 2003). 4.8. Crossed and Combined Array Designs Selecting designs for finding robust solutions falls...5th ed. Wiley, New York. Morrice, D. J., I. R. Bardhan . 1995. A weighted least squares approach to computer simulation factor screening. Oper. Res

  1. The national sports policies and the sustainable development issue in a globalized world: 2007 – 2013, the experience of an Intergovernmental Organization (IGO-WSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Klein

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In 2007, the Intergovernmental Organization, the World Sports Alliance (IGO-WSA, was founded with the support of international civil society (AICESIS, UN-NGO-IRENE and the United Nations. It is entrusted with the mission of educating youth and training the executives of the national sports system to deal with human development issues (education, equity, health, gender, environment while also contributing to the economic development of its Member States (partnerships, poverty reduction.A number of lessons can be drawn from this experience about support to national sports policies in a globalized world, more generally about the contribution to national development by and through sport.  We identify seven engines of an integrated approach to a sustainable development of sport in the developing countries.For the foreseeable future, the WSA-IGO faces six challenges, as tools for a renewed program: sustainability, infrastructures, education, equity, employment and training.Key words:

  2. A Spatio-Temporal Model of Phenotypic Evolution in the Atlantic Silverside (Menidia menidia) and Its Implications for Size-Selective Fishing in a Warmer World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbrocco, E. J.

    2016-02-01

    A pervasive phenotypic pattern observed across marine fishes is that vertebral number increases with latitude. Jordan's Rule, as it is known, holds true both within and across species, and like other ecogeographic principles (e.g., Bergmann's Rule), it is presumed to be an adaptive response to latitudinal gradients in temperature. As such, future ocean warming is expected to impact not only the geographic range limits of marine fishes that conform to Jordan's Rule, but also their phenotype, with warmer waters selecting for fish with fewer vertebrae at any given latitude. Here I present a model of phenotypic evolution over space and time for the Atlantic silverside (Menidia menidia), a common marine fish found in coastal waters along the western North Atlantic. This species has long served as a model organism for the study of fisheries-induced selection and exhibits numerous latitudinal clines in phenotypic and life-history traits, including vertebral number. Common garden experiments have shown that vertebral number is genetically determined in this species, but correlative models of observed vertebral counts and climate reveal that SST is the single strongest predictor of phenotype, even after accounting for gene flow. This result indicates that natural selection is responsible for maintaining vertebral clines in the silverside, and allows for the prediction of phenotypic responses to ocean warming. By integrating genetic estimates of population connectivity, species distribution models, and statistical models, I find that by the end of the 21st century, ocean warming will select for silversides with up to 8% fewer vertebrae. Mid-Atlantic populations are the most mal-adapted for future conditions, but may be rescued by migration from small-phenotype southern neighbors or by directional selection. Despite smaller temperature anomalies, the strongest impacts of warming will be felt at both northern and southern edges of the distribution, where genetic rescue from

  3. Risk Attitudes, Sample Selection and Attrition in a Longitudinal Field Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrison, Glenn W.; Lau, Morten Igel

    with respect to risk attitudes. Our design builds in explicit randomization on the incentives for participation. We show that there are significant sample selection effects on inferences about the extent of risk aversion, but that the effects of subsequent sample attrition are minimal. Ignoring sample...... selection leads to inferences that subjects in the population are more risk averse than they actually are. Correcting for sample selection and attrition affects utility curvature, but does not affect inferences about probability weighting. Properly accounting for sample selection and attrition effects leads...... to findings of temporal stability in overall risk aversion. However, that stability is around different levels of risk aversion than one might naively infer without the controls for sample selection and attrition we are able to implement. This evidence of “randomization bias” from sample selection...

  4. Evaluation of rational drug use based on World Health Organization core drug use indicators in selected public hospitals of eastern Ethiopia: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisay, Mekonnen; Mengistu, Getnet; Molla, Bereket; Amare, Firehiwot; Gabriel, Tesfaye

    2017-02-23

    Despite the complexity of drug use, a number of indicators have been developed, standardized and evaluated by the World Health Organization (WHO). These indicators are grouped in to three categories namely: prescribing indicators, patient care indicators and facility indicators. The study was aimed to evaluate rational drug use based on WHO-core drug use indicators in Dilchora referral hospital, Dire Dawa; Hiwot Fana specialized university hospital, Harar and Karamara general hospital, Jigjiga, eastern Ethiopia. Hospital based quantitative cross sectional study design was employed to evaluate rational drug use based on WHO core drug use indicators in selected hospitals. Systematic random sampling for prescribing indicators and convenient sampling for patient care indicators was employed. Taking WHO recommendations in to account, a total of 1,500 prescription papers (500 from each hospitals) were investigated. In each hospital, 200 outpatient attendants and 30 key essential drugs were also selected using the WHO recommendation. Data were collected using retrospective and prospective structured observational check list. Data were entered to EPI Data Version 3.1, exported and analyzed using SPSS version 16.0. Besides, the data were evaluated as per the WHO guidelines. Statistical significance was determined by one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) for some variables. P-value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Finally, tabular presentation was used to present the data. Mean, 2.34 (±1.08) drugs were prescribed in the selected hospitals. Prescriptions containing antibiotics and that of injectables were 57.87 and 10.9% respectively. The average consultation and dispensing time were 276.5 s and 61.12 s respectively. Besides, 75.77% of the prescribed drugs were actually dispensed. Only 3.3% of prescriptions were adequately labeled and 75.7% patients know about the dosage of the prescription. Not more than, 20(66.7%) key drugs were available in

  5. Recreating the World(s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giseli do Prado Siqueira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Created in 2007 , the project extension Itinerant Workshops : recreating the world ( s of the Catholic University of Minas Gerais , Campus Poços de Caldas is an inseparable experience in research of teaching and extension. With this title " recreating worlds " seek to express the experience that has been possible for us to live over the years of execution of this project . Our experience is theoretically referenced by understanding that German thinkers Meister Eckhart (1260-1327 and Martin Heidegger (1889-1976 shows us about what is the man in they on existence. Such an understanding is expressed in the phenomenon of serenity ( Gelassenheit , let it be understood as simply what we are . Our research on this phenomenon Gelassenheit (Serenity , guide the relationships we establish with the external community , where we understand that the existence of man in his essential condition , is a shared existence. The other is imposed on us and we never fail to be sympathetic to their fears and anxieties , because these same fears and anxieties are also ours possibilities . This relationship of consideration makes us all ( teachers , students , community solidarity in our existential angst before the unexpected, the unknown . It is when we can see ourselves through another , in what we truly are and can be.

  6. It's Not Easy Being a Girl in a Man's World: The Daily Experience of Sexual Harassment for Adolescent Girls

    OpenAIRE

    Spears Brown, Christia

    2007-01-01

    Girls experience sexual harassment every day in middle school. This harassment does not just affect a few girls- 90 percent of girls share this experience. More than half of all girls have been called a nasty or demeaning name or teased about their appearance by a male. Slightly fewer girls have been told a mean or embarrassing joke about their gender or sexuality. By high school, the harassment is more frequent and more extreme. By the end of high school, one-quarter of all girls have been t...

  7. Family health nurse project--an education program of the World Health Organization: the University of Stirling experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Ian

    2008-11-01

    This article outlines the delivery of the Family Health Nurse Education Programme of the World Health Organization (WHO) at the University of Stirling, Scotland, from 2001 to 2005. The program was part of the WHO European Family Health Nurse pilot project. The curriculum outlined by the WHO Curriculum Planning Group detailed the broad thrust of the Family Health Nurse Education Programme and was modified to be responsive to the context in which it was delivered, while staying faithful to general principles and precepts. The Family Health Nurse Education Programme is described in its evolving format over the two phases of the project; the remote and rural context occurred from 2001 to 2003, and the modification of the program for the urban phase of the project occurred during 2004 and 2005. The conceptual framework that was foundational to the development of the curriculum to prepare family health nurses will be described.

  8. Working mothers of the World Health Organization Western Pacific offices: lessons and experiences to protect, promote, and support breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iellamo, Alessandro; Sobel, Howard; Engelhardt, Katrin

    2015-02-01

    Optimal breastfeeding saves lives. However, suboptimal breastfeeding is prevalent, primarily resulting from inappropriate promotion of infant formula and challenges of working mothers to continue breastfeeding. The article aims to determine the extent to which World Health Organization (WHO) policies protect, promote, and support breastfeeding women working at the WHO, Western Pacific Region. An online survey targeted all female WHO and contractual staff in all country and regional offices, who delivered a baby between July 24, 2008 and July 24, 2013. Respondents advised on how the worksite could better support breastfeeding. Thirty-two female staff from 11 of the 12 WHO offices within the Western Pacific Region responded. "Returning to work" (44%) and "not having enough milk" (17%) were the most commonly reported reasons for not breastfeeding. Eighteen (56%) reported using infant formula and 8 (44%) reported that the product was prescribed. Among the suggestions given to better support breastfeeding, 10 (32%) recommended having a private room with a chair, table, electric outlet, and refrigerator. The findings show that women working at the WHO face similar challenges to mothers outside the WHO. Based on the findings, we recommend the following: (1) provide prenatal/postpartum breastfeeding counseling services for employees; (2) establish breastfeeding rooms in country offices and regularly orient staff on agency policies to protect, promote, and support breastfeeding; (3) annually celebrate World Breastfeeding Week with employees; (4) encourage other public and private institutions to conduct online surveys and elicit recommendations from mothers on how their workplace can support breastfeeding; and (5) conduct a larger survey among UN agencies on how to better protect, promote, and support breastfeeding. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Reduction of burden of hemolyzed specimens in a large urban emergency department: A real-world, five years’ experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Cervellin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In vitro hemolysis may jeopardize patient care because tests results generated using unsuitable specimens may lead to inappropriate patient management. The prevalence of hemolyzed specimens is high in the emergency department (ED. We previously showed that collecting blood by means of a closed system entailing manual aspiration of blood instead of using conventional evacuated systems was effective to cut-down by nearly half the rate of hemolysis. Aim of this real world study was to verify whether longterm replacement of standard evacuated blood collection systems may be really effective to reduce the burden of spurious hemolysis. Starting from May 2014 in the ED of our Hospital vacuum tubes were replaced with S-Monovette serum tubes. We compared data about hemolyzed specimens entered in the two years before the implementation of the new device (i.e., 2012 and 2013 and the two years after introducing SMonovette in manual aspiration mode (i.e. 2015 and 2016. The year 2014 was not considered due to mixed data. The rate of hemolyzed specimens decreased from 4.36% to 3.07% with the use of S-Monovette in manual aspiration mode (Chi squared, 183.8; P<0.001. The likelihood of obtaining hemolyzed specimens was hence reduced by approximately 30% (relative risk, 0.707, with an expected economic saving of approximately 510€/year. The results of this real-world study demonstrate that the use of an alternative closed device encompassing manual aspiration for drawing blood from intravenous catheters may reduce hemolyzed samples by approximately 30%, so representing a valuable perspective for safeguarding patient safety and improving ED efficiency.

  10. Is Performance in Task-Cuing Experiments Mediated by Task Set Selection or Associative Compound Retrieval?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Charlotte L. D.; Monsell, Stephen; McLaren, Ian P. L.

    2014-01-01

    Task-cuing experiments are usually intended to explore control of task set. But when small stimulus sets are used, they plausibly afford learning of the response associated with a combination of cue and stimulus, without reference to tasks. In 3 experiments we presented the typical trials of a task-cuing experiment: a cue (colored shape) followed,…

  11. The Models and Hard Cores: Selective Acculturation and Racial Stratification in Chinese Students' School Experience in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kee, Geok Hwa

    2010-01-01

    Are the academic and social experiences of Chinese Malaysian students as much an outcome of the selective acculturation strategy of their parents as the linguistic assimilation policy of the government? Driven by economic necessity on one hand and pressured by cultural preservation on the other, Chinese parents first send their sons and daughters…

  12. The Experience of Place in Childhood Literacy Life-Worlds: A Phenomenological Study of Readers as Place-Makers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Sarah B.

    2015-01-01

    Current educational policy in the United States supports the standardization of school curricula and promotes a high-stakes testing culture that reinforces the ideologies of market fundamentalism. This accountability movement has resulted in school curriculum that aims to transcend children's diverse lived experiences and the local contexts in…

  13. Negotiating Worlds, Managing Subjectivities, and Redefining Selves: The Lived Experiences of African American Undergraduate Females at Predominately White Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Ayana Ma-el

    2010-01-01

    A narrative analysis of the lived experiences of seven undergraduate African American females at Predominately White Institutions (PWIs) is presented in this study. The purpose of the study was to explore the ways the seven women constructed their identity and self-concept in the context of their PWI environment. Other key purposes of the study…

  14. Stress, Coping, and Emotions on the World Stage : The Experience of Participating in a Major Soccer Tournament Penalty Shootout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jordet, Geir; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T.

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to capture the first-hand experiences of stressors, coping, and emotions that elite professional soccer players have during a major soccer penalty shootout. Eight players who each took part in an important European Championships penalty shootout were interviewed. The results

  15. Being a Girl in a Boys' World: Investigating the Experiences of Girls with Autism Spectrum Disorders during Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cridland, Elizabeth K.; Jones, Sandra C.; Caputi, Peter; Magee, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the experiences of adolescent girls with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) during adolescence. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with three mother-daughter dyads and two additional mothers. A range of issues were highlighted covering physical, emotional, social and sexual domains. Some of these issues were similar to…

  16. Can We Generalize from Student Experiments to the Real World in Political Science, Military Affairs, and International Relations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz, Alex; Redd, Steven B.; Vedlitz, Arnold

    2006-01-01

    The authors conducted an experiment with a group of military officers and replicated it with a group of students at a public university in the United States. The experimental scenario dealt with a decision problem in the area of counterterrorism. The authors found that while more than one-third of students recommended doing nothing, the…

  17. Health and illness in a connected world: how might sharing experiences on the internet affect people's health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziebland, Sue; Wyke, Sally

    2012-06-01

    The use of the Internet for peer-to-peer connection has been one of its most dramatic and transformational features. Yet this is a new field with no agreement on a theoretical and methodological basis. The scientific base underpinning this activity needs strengthening, especially given the explosion of web resources that feature experiences posted by patients themselves. This review informs a National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) (UK) research program on the impact of online patients' accounts of their experiences with health and health care, which includes the development and validation of a new e-health impact questionnaire. We drew on realist review methods to conduct a conceptual review of literature in the social and health sciences. We developed a matrix to summarize the results, which we then distilled from a wide and diverse reading of the literature. We continued reading until we reached data saturation and then further refined the results after testing them with expert colleagues and a public user panel. We identified seven domains through which online patients' experiences could affect health. Each has the potential for positive and negative impacts. Five of the identified domains (finding information, feeling supported, maintaining relationships with others, affecting behavior, and experiencing health services) are relatively well rehearsed, while two (learning to tell the story and visualizing disease) are less acknowledged but important features of online resources. The value of first-person accounts, the appeal and memorability of stories, and the need to make contact with peers all strongly suggest that reading and hearing others' accounts of their own experiences of health and illnesss will remain a key feature of e-health. The act of participating in the creation of health information (e.g., through blogging and contributing to social networking on health topics) also influences patients' experiences and has implications for our

  18. World law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold J. Berman

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In the third millennium of the Christian era, which is characterised by the emergence of a world economy and eventually a world society, the concept of world law is needed to embrace not only the traditional disciplines of public international law, and comparative law, but also the common underlying legal principles applicable in world trade, world finance, transnational transfer of technology and other fields of world economic law, as well as in such emerging fields as the protection of the world's environment and the protection of universal human rights. World law combines inter-state law with the common law of humanity and the customary law of various world communities.

  19. Long-term selection experiment with Afrikaner cattle 4. Cow fertility ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A selection and line x environment interaction study with grade Afrikaner cattle was established in 1956 at the Matopos Research Station, Zimbabwe. Two selection lines of 100 cows each were reared in different management environments. The non-supplemented (NS) line relied on the range throughout the year and was ...

  20. Use of pragmatism to explore women's experiences of traumatic brain injury: a kaleidoscopic view of the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Kate; Peters, Kath; Wilson, Nathan; Kwok, Cannas

    2018-03-16

    Although more men than women sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI), approximately one quarter of people with TBIs are women. The experiences of TBI reported in the literature are informed from the masculine perspective and do not adequately represent women's experiences. Pragmatism provides an overarching methodological framework to explore and critique a broader perspective of health, including psychosocial, cultural, spiritual, political and environmental factors, while attempting to address gender inequity. To describe the philosophical background validating the use of pragmatism to research women's experiences of TBI. Given the limited understanding of the interplay of socially constructed barriers with the complex impairments women have following TBI, a novel approach to research is required. Pragmatism offers a way to incorporate critical thinking and advocacy into research designs. The critical feminist transformative framework presented in this paper demonstrates the strengths of using pragmatism as a framework to explore complex phenomena. This paper illustrates how methodology, which is influenced by various philosophical perspectives, can be woven throughout the design of a research project. ©2018 RCN Publishing Company Ltd. All rights reserved. Not to be copied, transmitted or recorded in any way, in whole or part, without prior permission of the publishers.

  1. The diagnostic journey of patients with mucopolysaccharidosis I: A real-world survey of patient and physician experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Bruni

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I is an inherited lysosomal storage disease. Affected individuals have disease ranging from attenuated to severe with significant disease burden, disability, and premature death. Early treatment with enzyme replacement therapy and/or stem cell transplantation can reduce disease progression and improve outcomes. However, diagnosis is often delayed, particularly for patients with attenuated phenotypes. We conducted a survey of 168 patients and 582 physicians to explore health care seeking patterns and familiarity of physicians with MPS I symptoms. Patients with attenuated MPS I typically first presented with stiff joints or hernia/bulging abdomen, and patients with severe disease with noisy/difficult breathing, or hernia/bulging abdomen. There was a mean delay from time of symptom presentation to diagnosis of 2.7 years for patients with attenuated disease, with a mean of 5 physicians consulted before receiving a correct diagnosis. MPS I was most commonly misidentified by physicians as rheumatoid arthritis (48–72%, with a wide variety of suspected diseases, including lupus. CONCLUSION: Patient and physician real-world surveys show that MPS I is under-recognized and diagnosis of MPS I remains delayed, particularly in patients with attenuated disease. Across regions and specialties, physicians require differential diagnosis education in order to improve early detection and early treatment initiation of MPS I.

  2. World Experience of Introduction of Socio-Economic Responsibility of Entrepreneurship as a Long-Term Strategy of its Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Datskevych Nataliya O.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of the article is analysis of existing models of social responsibility of entrepreneurship (American, European, British and Asian with consideration of regional specific features of its application. The article uses methods of abstraction and synthesis along with historical and practical approaches. In the conclusions the article generalises prospects for further search for the most optimal variants of development of this concept under conditions of development of the modern society. It also provides principal differences and main forms of realisation of social responsibility in such countries as USA, France, Germany, China and Japan. Social consequence of the article is re-consideration of the role of entrepreneurship as an important component of effective development of the society and observance of the concept of sustainable development as strategically important in the scale of the world. Value of the article is a proof of urgency of consideration of the issue of the socio-economic responsibility of entrepreneurship under conditions of modern global challenges and a necessity of their effective solution both from the side of the state and business.

  3. Evaluation of performance of select fusion experiments and projected reactors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, G.H.

    1978-10-01

    The performance of NASA Lewis fusion experiments (SUMMA and Bumpy Torus) is compared with other experiments and that necessary for a power reactor. Key parameters cited are gain (fusion power/input power) and the time average fusion power, both of which may be more significant for real fusion reactors than the commonly used Lawson parameter. The NASA devices are over 10 orders of magnitude below the required powerplant values in both gain and time average power. The best experiments elsewhere are also as much as 4 to 5 orders of magnitude low. However, the NASA experiments compare favorably with other alternate approaches that have received less funding than the mainline experiments. The steady-state character and efficiency of plasma heating are strong advantages of the NASA approach. The problem, though, is to move ahead to experiments of sufficient size to advance in gain and average power parameters

  4. Selfing for the design of genomic selection experiments in biparental plant populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClosky, Benjamin; LaCombe, Jason; Tanksley, Steven D

    2013-11-01

    Self-fertilization (selfing) is commonly used for population development in plant breeding, and it is well established that selfing increases genetic variance between lines, thus increasing response to phenotypic selection. Furthermore, numerous studies have explored how selfing can be deployed to maximal benefit in the context of traditional plant breeding programs (Cornish in Heredity 65:201-211,1990a, Heredity 65:213-220,1990b; Liu et al. in Theor Appl Genet 109:370-376, 2004; Pooni and Jinks in Heredity 54:255-260, 1985). However, the impact of selfing on response to genomic selection has not been explored. In the current study we examined how selfing impacts the two key aspects of genomic selection-GEBV prediction (training) and selection response. We reach the following conclusions: (1) On average, selfing increases genomic selection gains by more than 70 %. (2) The gains in genomic selection response attributable to selfing hold over a wide range population sizes (100-500), heritabilities (0.2-0.8), and selection intensities (0.01-0.1). However, the benefits of selfing are dramatically reduced as the number of QTLs drops below 20. (3) The major cause of the improved response to genomic selection with selfing is through an increase in the occurrence of superior genotypes and not through improved GEBV predictions. While performance of the training population improves with selfing (especially with low heritability and small population sizes), the magnitude of these improvements is relatively small compared with improvements observed in the selection population. To illustrate the value of these insights, we propose a practical genomic selection scheme that substantially shortens the number of generations required to fully capture the benefits of selfing. Specifically, we provide simulation evidence that indicates the proposed scheme matches or exceeds the selection gains observed in advanced populations (i.e. F 8 and doubled haploid) across a broad range of

  5. Application of high Tc superconductors as frequency selective surfaces: Experiment and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawei Zhang; Yahya Rahmat-Samii; Fetterman, H.R.

    1993-01-01

    YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x and Tl 2 CaBa 2 Cu 2 O 8 high temperature superconducting thin films were utilized to fabricate frequency selective surfaces (FSS) at millimeter-wave frequencies (75--110 GHz). An analytical/numerical model was applied, using a Floquet expansion and the Method of Moments, to analyze bandstop superconducting frequency selective surfaces. Experimental results were compared with the model, and showed a good agreement with resonant frequency prediction with an accuracy of better than 1%. The use of the superconducting frequency selective surfaces as quasi-optical millimeter-wave bandpass filters was also demonstrated

  6. Aridity and grazing as convergent selective forces: an experiment with an Arid Chaco bunchgrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, R Emiliano; Golluscio, Rodolfo A; Blanco, Lisandro J; Fernández, Roberto J

    2010-10-01

    It has been proposed that aridity and grazing are convergent selective forces: each one selects for traits conferring resistance to both. However, this conceptual model has not yet been experimentally validated. The aim of this work was to experimentally evaluate the effect of aridity and grazing, as selective forces, on drought and grazing resistance of populations of Trichloris crinita, a native perennial forage grass of the Argentinean Arid Chaco region. We collected seeds in sites with four different combinations of aridity and grazing history (semiarid/ subhumid x heavily grazed/lightly grazed), established them in pots in a common garden, and subjected the resulting plants to different combinations of drought and defoliation. Our results agreed with the convergence model. Aridity has selected T. crinita genotypes that respond better to drought and defoliation in terms of sexual reproduction and leaf growth, and that can evade grazing due to a lower shoot: root ratio and a higher resource allocation to reserves (starch) in stem bases. Similarly, grazing has selected genotypes that respond better to drought and defoliation in terms of sexual reproduction and that can evade grazing due to a lower digestibility of leaf blades. These results allow us to extend concepts of previous models in plant adaptation to herbivory to models on plant adaptation to drought. The only variable in which we obtained a result opposite to predictions was plant height, as plants from semiarid sites were taller (and with more erect tillers) than plants from subhumid sites; we hypothesize that this result might have been a consequence of the selection exerted by the high solar radiation and soil temperatures of semiarid sites. In addition, our work allows for the prediction of the effects of dry or wet growing seasons on the performance of T. crinita plants. Our results suggest that we can rely on dry environments for selecting grazing-resistant genotypes and on high grazing pressure

  7. Early, real-world experience with direct oral anticoagulants in the treatment of intermediate-high risk acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sónia Martins; Cunha, Susana; Baptista, Rui; Monteiro, Sílvia; Monteiro, Pedro; Gonçalves, Francisco; Pêgo, Mariano

    2017-11-01

    Intermediate-high risk pulmonary embolism (IHR-PE) has a poor prognosis, but is under-represented in trials of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) in venous thromboembolic disease (VTE). We aimed to assess whether the administration of DOACs was equivalent to the conventional (CONV) treatment of low-molecular weight heparin bridged with warfarin for treating IHR-PE. We conducted a retrospective cohort study including 59 consecutive patients admitted with IHR-PE and followed for up to three months after discharge. Two groups were created based on the anticoagulant strategy: CONV (n=35) and DOAC (n=24). The efficacy endpoints were death, recurrent PE, estimated pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP), right ventricular systolic function (RVSF) at discharge, and length of stay; the safety endpoint was major bleeding. The two groups were similar regarding demographics, PE etiology and markers of clinical severity. There were four in-hospital deaths in the CONV group and none in the DOAC group. No recurrent PE or major bleeding event was recorded in either group. At discharge, neither PASP nor RVSF was different between the groups. Patients in the DOAC group were discharged 1.7 days earlier on average than patients in the CONV group (4.7±2.4 vs. 3.0±1.5 days, p=0.002). The adoption of a DOAC treatment strategy in this real-world cohort of IHR-PE patients was associated with similar efficacy and safety to the CONV approach. The fact that monitoring of anticoagulation effect was unnecessary probably led to the significant reduction in length of stay. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. “Reffos, Wogs and Dagoes:” The Immigration Experience in Post-World War II Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Jacobowitz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-8026.2016v69n2p77 This article seeks to analyze the ways in which immigrants experienced Australia in the years following World War II, when the makeup of Australian society changed. In The Voyage of Their Life: The Story of the SS Derna and Its Passengers, Diane Armstrong – a child immigrant to Australia – writes, “Homogenous, conservative and almost entirely Anglo-Saxon in its origin, Australians were about to awake from there illusion of perfection” (274. Focusing on memoir, poetry and short stories, this article analyzes Andra Kins’ memoir Coming and Going: A Family Quest; Serge Liberman’s short stories “Home,” “Greetings, Australia!  To You I Have Come,” “The Fortress” and “Two Years in Exile;” Peter Skrzynecki’s The Sparrow Garden; Lily Brett’s poetry; and Susan Varga’s memoir Heddy and Me.  Jewish and non-Jewish immigrants from Russia, Poland, Latvia, Hungary and Ukriane struggled with trying to build new lives in a new land in the face of prejudice and “anti-refo” feeling. Measures were introduced to limit severely the number of Jewish refugees allowed to travel to Australia. Despite these obstacles, Australia was transformed.  According to Mark Wyman, “Eventually, 182,159 DPs emigrated to Australia, led by 60,000 Poles and 36,000 Balts.  Enough of an Eastern European mixture was admitted through Australian gates to constitute a small revolution in the nation’s much-publicized homogeneity.  The long tradition of allowing only British stock down under was broken.  By 1966 almost one in five Australians was a postwar immigrant or the child of one, and 60 percent of this group had non-British ethnic backgrounds” (191.

  9. A Window Toward the World: Older Adults' Experiences of Becoming in Health and Developing as Human Beings Through Interacting With Others Using Real Video Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemberg, Jessica; Santamäki Fischer, Regina

    The population in the Nordic countries, as well as globally, is increasingly becoming older. Concurrently, with an increased aging population, there is an increase in poor health and loneliness among older adults. The aim of this study was to uncover, from a caring science perspective, community-living older adults' experiences of interacting with others via real video communication. The study uses a hermeneutical approach. The material consists of interviews with older adults regarding their experiences of using real video communication. The texts were interpreted through hermeneutical reading. Study participation and data storage and handling for research purposes were approved by the participants when they provided their informed consent. Ethical permission to conduct this study was granted by a research board. The findings uncovered that welfare technology offers a metaphor-a window toward the world-that comprises the overarching core theme "Being in a movement toward becoming a unity as a human being," and 3 main themes: "Alleviating suffering through beating involuntary solitude," "Being in the world as an equal and dignified human being," and "Dedicating new perspectives and meaning in life." Welfare technology seems to be an important means to improve the quality of life for older adults living at home. Welfare technology enables older people to be in contact with other people in an easy way. Further research is needed to uncover issues of welfare technology from different perspectives.

  10. Quality control in environmental radioactivity measurements: experience of the Central Service for Protection against Ionizing Radiation, acting as International Reference Center Of the World Health Organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remy, M L; Gahinet, M E; Moroni, J P; De Zertucha, J; Pellerin, P [Service Central de Protection contre les Rayonnements Ionisants, 78 - Le Vesinet (France)

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to make known the experiences in the Central Service for Protection against Ionizing Radiation (SCPRI) in two fields: (i)in relation to the survey of, and research on, environmental radiation in France for 15 years, and (ii) as the International Reference Center (IRC), a responsibility which has been assigned to it by the World Health Organisation (WHO) for more than 7 years. The SCPRI has no permanent activity in pure metrology but the control which it exerts on a national scale (more than 30,000 environmental samples analyzed each year) and the periodic intercomparisons which it organizes with a large number of foreign Public Health Laboratories have led to the development of a strict quality control program for the techniques of preparation and verification of standard sources and reference samples which are essential in the use of counters, the application and development of spectrometric and radiochemical analytical methods and in the distribution of samples for intercomparison purposes. A description is given of practical experience of quality control in the preparation of standards and in international inter-comparisons organized under the sponsorship of the World Health Organization.

  11. Challenging nurse student selection policy: Using a lifeworld approach to explore the link between care experience and student values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scammell, Janet; Tait, Desiree; White, Sara; Tait, Michael

    2017-10-01

    This study uses a lifeworld perspective to explore beginning students' values about nursing. Internationally, increasing care demand, a focus on targets and evidence of dehumanized care cultures have resulted in scrutiny of practitioner values. In England, selection policy dictates that prospective nursing students demonstrate person-centred values and care work experience. However, there is limited recent evidence exploring values at programme commencement or the effect of care experience on values. Mixed method study. A total of 161 undergraduate nursing students were recruited in 2013 from one English university. Thematic content analysis and frequency distribution to reveal descriptive statistics were used. Statistical analysis indicated that most of the values identified in student responses were not significantly affected by paid care experience. Five themes were identified: How I want care to be; Making a difference; The value of learning; Perceived characteristics of a nurse; and Respecting our humanity. Students readily drew on their experience of living to identify person-centred values about nursing.

  12. The UNDP/World Bank monitoring program on small scale biomass gasifiers (BTG's experience on tar measurements)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoef, H.A.M. [Biomass Technology Group BTG, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2000-07-01

    By the time that small-scale biomass gasifiers were 'rediscovered' and promoted for use in developing countries (1970s), UNDP and the World Bank were well aware of the pitfalls of previous attempts to diffuse decentralized energy technologies. Therefore they decided to initiate a technology assessment programme before endorsing and/or stimulating a widespread gasifier introduction programme in developing countries. On July 1, 1983, the UNDP/WB worldwide Small-scale biomass gasifier monitoring was initiated, which was to {sup c}ollect uniform data on the actual field performance, economics, safety and public acceptability of biomass gasifiers currently operating in developing countries{sup .} For the UNDP/WB program BTG developed a tar measuring protocol which was used at twenty gasifiers worldwide (Indonesia, Philippines, Brazil, Mali, Seychelles, Vanuatu and Burundi). Other parameters monitored include pressure and temperatures at various spots, gasflow, fuel consumption, lubrication oil analyses, gas-composition analyses, emission measurements. The seven year programme showed that most of donor funded projects failed, mainly because there was not sufficient commitment from involved parties. National programs on the utilization of loca available biomass resources mostly failed because the fuel did not suit the requirements of gasifier reactor. In case of proper project design/set-up most of the small scale biomass gasifiers operated without major problems. Examples of such projects are the ones in Balong and Majalengka (Indonesia) Onesua (Vanuatu), Espara Feliz (Brazil) and Dogofiry (Mali). A motivated team of technicians, operators, managers is one the most important items within this respect. Most of the heat gasifiers are installed commercially and are much more successful compared to the subsidized power gasifiers. Local manufactured gasifiers are generally constructed of low quality materials causing frequent technical problems. However, locally

  13. A retrospective multicentric observational study of trastuzumab emtansine in HER2 positive metastatic breast cancer: a real-world experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vici, Patrizia; Pizzuti, Laura; Michelotti, Andrea; Sperduti, Isabella; Natoli, Clara; Mentuccia, Lucia; Lauro, Luigi Di; Sergi, Domenico; Marchetti, Paolo; Santini, Daniele; Magnolfi, Emanuela; Iezzi, Laura; Moscetti, Luca; Fabbri, Agnese; Cassano, Alessandra; Grassadonia, Antonino; Omarini, Claudia; Piacentini, Federico; Botticelli, Andrea; Bertolini, Ilaria; Scinto, Angelo Fedele; Zampa, Germano; Mauri, Maria; D’Onofrio, Loretta; Sini, Valentina; Barba, Maddalena; Maugeri-Saccà, Marcello; Rossi, Ernesto; Landucci, Elisabetta; Tomao, Silverio; Alberti, Antonio Maria; Giotta, Francesco; Ficorella, Corrado; Adamo, Vincenzo; Russo, Antonio; Lorusso, Vito; Cannita, Katia; Barni, Sandro; Laudadio, Lucio; Greco, Filippo; Garrone, Ornella; Giulia, Marina Della; Marolla, Paolo; Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Cocco, Barbara Di; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Maria, Ruggero De; Gamucci, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    We addressed trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) efficacy in HER2+ metastatic breast cancer patients treated in real-world practice, and its activity in pertuzumab-pretreated patients. We conducted a retrospective, observational study involving 23 cancer centres, and 250 patients. Survival data were analyzed by Kaplan Meier curves and log rank test. Factors testing significant in univariate analysis were tested in multivariate models. Median follow-up was 15 months and median T-DM1 treatment-length 4 months. Response rate was 41.6%, clinical benefit 60.9%. Median progression-free and median overall survival were 6 and 20 months, respectively. Overall, no differences emerged by pertuzumab pretreatment, with median progression-free and median overall survival of 4 and 17 months in pertuzumab-pretreated (p=0.13), and 6 and 22 months in pertuzumab-naïve patients (p=0.27). Patients who received second-line T-DM1 had median progression-free and median overall survival of 3 and 12 months (p=0.0001) if pertuzumab-pretreated, and 8 and 26 months if pertuzumab-naïve (p=0.06). In contrast, in third-line and beyond, median progression-free and median overall survival were 16 and 18 months in pertuzumab-pretreated (p=0.05) and 6 and 17 months in pertuzumab-naïve patients (p=0.30). In multivariate analysis, lower ECOG performance status was associated with progression-free survival benefit (p<0.0001), while overall survival was positively affected by lower ECOG PS (p<0.0001), absence of brain metastases (p 0.05), and clinical benefit (p<0.0001). Our results are comparable with those from randomized trials. Further studies are warranted to confirm and interpret our data on apparently lower T-DM1 efficacy when given as second-line treatment after pertuzumab, and on the optimal sequence order. PMID:28915642

  14. Beyond the others’ world : An essay about the experience of social work with a diagnosis of Asperger syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Shavrina

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The essay presents a reflection on being a foreign and inexperienced social worker within a Norwegian social work context. I discuss challenges I have met in my work with when Asperger syndrome is diagnosed and reflect on power relations and the issue of self-determination within the field, in addition to analysing some critical incidents that made me rethink and reconstruct all of my experiences. I view my story from different angles and find different perspectives that show various ways of perceiving one thing. I discover the dangerousness of thinking in “black and white” and placing things in exclusive extremes, and lastly, I understand that I need to learn to solve problems by changing attitudes towards them.

  15. Contemporary strategies for repair of complex thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms: real-world experiences and multilayer stents as an alternative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Robert Kolvenbach

    Full Text Available Abstract Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA present special challenges for repair due to their extent, their distinctive pathology, and the fact that they typically cross the ostia of one or more visceral branch vessels. Historically, the established treatment for TAAA was open surgical repair, with the first procedure reported in 1955. Endovascular repair of TAAA with fenestrated and/ or branched endografts, has been studied since the beginning of the current century as a means of mechanical aneurysm exclusion. More recently, flow modulator stents have been employed with the aim at reducing shear stress on aortic aneurysmal wall. In this review we present technical and main results of these techniques, based on literature review and personal experience.

  16. Why sample selection matters in exploratory factor analysis: implications for the 12-item World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Cadeyrn J; Lambert, Sylvie D; Bowe, Steven J; Orellana, Liliana

    2017-03-11

    Sample selection can substantially affect the solutions generated using exploratory factor analysis. Validation studies of the 12-item World Health Organization (WHO) Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0 (WHODAS 2.0) have generally involved samples in which substantial proportions of people had no, or minimal, disability. With the WHODAS 2.0 oriented towards measuring disability across six life domains (cognition, mobility, self-care, getting along, life activities, and participation in society), performing factor analysis with samples of people with disability may be more appropriate. We determined the influence of the sampling strategy on (a) the number of factors extracted and (b) the factor structure of the WHODAS 2.0. Using data from adults aged 50+ from the six countries in Wave 1 of the WHO's longitudinal Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE), we repeatedly selected samples (n = 750) using two strategies: (1) simple random sampling that reproduced nationally representative distributions of WHODAS 2.0 summary scores for each country (i.e., positively skewed distributions with many zero scores indicating the absence of disability), and (2) stratified random sampling with weights designed to obtain approximately symmetric distributions of summary scores for each country (i.e. predominantly including people with varying degrees of disability). Samples with skewed distributions typically produced one-factor solutions, except for the two countries with the lowest percentages of zero scores, in which the majority of samples produced two factors. Samples with approximately symmetric distributions, generally produced two- or three-factor solutions. In the two-factor solutions, the getting along domain items loaded on one factor (commonly with a cognition domain item), with remaining items loading on a second factor. In the three-factor solutions, the getting along and self-care domain items loaded separately on two factors and three other domains

  17. Characterization of Emissions from Building Products: Selection Criteria, Storage and Handling of Indoor Materials for Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Ulla Dorte; Nielsen, Peter A.; Marcussen, Lis

    1996-01-01

    In research projects it is usually impossible to study more than a very limited aount of different products. Care and consideration must therefore be taken in the selection. The following criteria were used to select five products for chemical and sensory emission testing: The products should...... be indoor climate relevant, meaning that they should be in direct contact with indoor air when used in buildings, and their emission should contribute significantly to the indoor air concentrations for instance due to a large surface area. They should be representative in terms of being widely used, now...... that the emission mechanisms do not change as a consequence of physical processes or chemical reactions. The five products selected were PVC flooring, waterborne varnish on beechwood parquet, carpet, sealant, and waterborne paint on gypsum board. The products were brought to the laboratory immediately after...

  18. Bridge scour and stream instability countermeasures : experience, selection, and design guidance : third edition. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    This document identifies and provides design guidelines for bridge scour and stream instability countermeasures that have been implemented by various State departments of transportation (DOTs) in the United States. Countermeasure experience, selectio...

  19. Bridge scour and stream instability countermeasures : experience, selection, and design guidance : third edition. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    This document identifies and provides design guidelines for bridge scour and stream instability countermeasures that have been implemented by various State departments of transportation (DOTs) in the United States. Countermeasure experience, selectio...

  20. Does tree harvesting in riparian areas increase stream sedimentation and turbidity - world-wide experience relative to Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neary, D.; Smethurst, P.; Petrone, K.

    2009-04-01

    A typical improved-pasture property in the high-rainfall zone of Australia contains 0.5-2.0 km of waterways per 100 ha. Nationwide, some 25-30 million ha of improved pasture contains about 100,000 km of streams, of which about 75% are currently un-buffered and contributing to soil and water degradation. Farmers and natural resource managers are considering ways to enhance environmental outcomes at farm and catchment scales using stream-side buffers of trees and other perennial vegetation. Benefits of buffers include improved water quality, biodiversity, carbon sequestration and aesthetics. Lack of sound information and funding for establishing and managing buffer zones is hindering wide-scale adoption of this practice. Stream-side areas of farms are generally highly productive (wet and nutrient-rich) and contain a high biodiversity, but they are also high-risk zones for soil and water values and stock safety. Development of options based on a balance between environmental and economic outcomes would potentially promote wider adoption. Australian codes of forest practice currently discourage or prevent harvesting of trees in streamside buffers. These codes were developed exclusively for large-scale native forests and industrial-scale plantations, and were applicable to farm forestry as now required. In countries including USA and Germany trees in stream-side buffers are harvested using Best Management Practices. Trees may grow at a faster rate in riparian zones and provide a commercial return, but the impacts of tree establishment and harvesting on water yield and quality must be evaluated. However, there have been few designed experiments investigating this problem. Australia has recently initiated studies to explore the use of high-value timber species and associated vegetation in riparian zones to improve water quality, particularly suspended sediment. Preliminary information from the Yan Yan Gurt Catchment in Victoria indicate that forested riparian strips can

  1. Online selection of short-lived particles on many-core computer architectures in the CBM experiment at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zyzak, Maksym

    2016-07-07

    Modern experiments in heavy ion collisions operate with huge data rates that can not be fully stored on the currently available storage devices. Therefore the data flow should be reduced by selecting those collisions that potentially carry the information of the physics interest. The future CBM experiment will have no simple criteria for selecting such collisions and requires the full online reconstruction of the collision topology including reconstruction of short-lived particles. In this work the KF Particle Finder package for online reconstruction and selection of short-lived particles is proposed and developed. It reconstructs more than 70 decays, covering signals from all the physics cases of the CBM experiment: strange particles, strange resonances, hypernuclei, low mass vector mesons, charmonium, and open-charm particles. The package is based on the Kalman filter method providing a full set of the particle parameters together with their errors including position, momentum, mass, energy, lifetime, etc. It shows a high quality of the reconstructed particles, high efficiencies, and high signal to background ratios. The KF Particle Finder is extremely fast for achieving the reconstruction speed of 1.5 ms per minimum-bias AuAu collision at 25 AGeV beam energy on single CPU core. It is fully vectorized and parallelized and shows a strong linear scalability on the many-core architectures of up to 80 cores. It also scales within the First Level Event Selection package on the many-core clusters up to 3200 cores. The developed KF Particle Finder package is a universal platform for short- lived particle reconstruction, physics analysis and online selection.

  2. Online selection of short-lived particles on many-core computer architectures in the CBM experiment at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zyzak, Maksym

    2016-01-01

    Modern experiments in heavy ion collisions operate with huge data rates that can not be fully stored on the currently available storage devices. Therefore the data flow should be reduced by selecting those collisions that potentially carry the information of the physics interest. The future CBM experiment will have no simple criteria for selecting such collisions and requires the full online reconstruction of the collision topology including reconstruction of short-lived particles. In this work the KF Particle Finder package for online reconstruction and selection of short-lived particles is proposed and developed. It reconstructs more than 70 decays, covering signals from all the physics cases of the CBM experiment: strange particles, strange resonances, hypernuclei, low mass vector mesons, charmonium, and open-charm particles. The package is based on the Kalman filter method providing a full set of the particle parameters together with their errors including position, momentum, mass, energy, lifetime, etc. It shows a high quality of the reconstructed particles, high efficiencies, and high signal to background ratios. The KF Particle Finder is extremely fast for achieving the reconstruction speed of 1.5 ms per minimum-bias AuAu collision at 25 AGeV beam energy on single CPU core. It is fully vectorized and parallelized and shows a strong linear scalability on the many-core architectures of up to 80 cores. It also scales within the First Level Event Selection package on the many-core clusters up to 3200 cores. The developed KF Particle Finder package is a universal platform for short- lived particle reconstruction, physics analysis and online selection.

  3. Job Satisfaction and Self-Selection into the Public or Private Sector: Evidence from a Natural Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Danzer, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    Are public sector jobs better than private sector jobs? To answer this question, this paper investigates observed differences in job satisfaction between public- and private-sector workers and disentangles the effect of worker sorting from the one caused by sector-specific job characteristics. A natural experiment – the massive privatization process in post-Soviet countries – allows correcting potential self-selection bias. Industry-specific privatization probabilities are assigned to workers...

  4. Pregnancy planning and risk behaviours – a survey of women’s experiences in selected European countries

    OpenAIRE

    Małgorzata Lesińska-Sawicka; Małgorzata Nagórska

    2018-01-01

    Pregnancy, a special period in a woman’s life, should be preceded by proper preparation: a positive attitude to procreation, selection of optimum time for becoming pregnant, starting prevention of neural tube defects, restriction of the use of drugs, smoking, etc. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of pregnancy planning and antenatal classes on the use of stimulants during pregnancy. The study group included 877 women living in 7 European countries, and their experiences of pla...

  5. Using a Prescreening Rubric for All-State Violin Selection: Influences of Performance and Teaching Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geringer, John M.; Allen, Michael L.; MacLeod, Rebecca B.; Scott, Laurie

    2009-01-01

    Performance assessment is an integral part of young musicians' development. Students enrolled in music programs frequently participate in adjudication festivals and many audition for select ensembles. Outcomes of such events are deemed consequential among all concerned: students, parents, teachers, and administrators. Furthermore, the number of…

  6. Inclusive assessment in a site-selection process. Approach, experience, reflections and some lessons beyond boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flueeler, Thomas [Directorate of Public Works, Nuclear Technology Unit, Zurich (Switzerland). Energy Dept.; ETH Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. for Environmental Decisions

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear waste disposal indisputably is a controversial socio-technical issue in most societies widely using nuclear technology. All the more it is pivotal to proceed in a comprehensive, transparent and participative manner. The contribution suggests fundamental rules to follow and confronts them with the currently ongoing site-selection process in Switzerland. Finally it draws some lessons for the audience.

  7. Student-selected components in surgery: providing practical experience and increasing student confidence.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Falk, G A

    2009-09-01

    Reviews of the medical school curriculum in the UK and Ireland have recommended the introduction of student-selected components (SSCs). The Department of Surgery in The Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) has introduced a 6-week surgical SSC, which aims to develop practical clinical skills, provide mentorship and prepare students for internship.

  8. Selective Narrowing of Social Networks across Adulthood is Associated with Improved Emotional Experience in Daily Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Tammy; Carstensen, Laura L.

    2014-01-01

    Past research has documented age differences in the size and composition of social networks that suggest that networks grow smaller with age and include an increasingly greater proportion of well-known social partners. According to socioemotional selectivity theory, such changes in social network composition serve an antecedent emotion regulatory…

  9. A Developed Meta-model for Selection of Cotton Fabrics Using Design of Experiments and TOPSIS Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Shankar; Chatterjee, Prasenjit

    2017-12-01

    Selection of cotton fabrics for providing optimal clothing comfort is often considered as a multi-criteria decision making problem consisting of an array of candidate alternatives to be evaluated based of several conflicting properties. In this paper, design of experiments and technique for order preference by similarity to ideal solution (TOPSIS) are integrated so as to develop regression meta-models for identifying the most suitable cotton fabrics with respect to the computed TOPSIS scores. The applicability of the adopted method is demonstrated using two real time examples. These developed models can also identify the statistically significant fabric properties and their interactions affecting the measured TOPSIS scores and final selection decisions. There exists good degree of congruence between the ranking patterns as derived using these meta-models and the existing methods for cotton fabric ranking and subsequent selection.

  10. Thermal adaptation and phenotypic plasticity in a warming world: Insights from common garden experiments on Alaskan sockeye salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Morgan M.; Westley, Peter A. H.; Falke, Jeffrey A.; Quinn, Thomas P.

    2017-01-01

    An important unresolved question is how populations of coldwater-dependent fishes will respond to rapidly warming water temperatures. For example, the culturally and economically important group, Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.), experience site-specific thermal regimes during early development that could be disrupted by warming. To test for thermal local adaptation and heritable phenotypic plasticity in Pacific salmon embryos, we measured the developmental rate, survival, and body size at hatching in two populations of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) that overlap in timing of spawning but incubate in contrasting natural thermal regimes. Using a split half-sibling design, we exposed embryos of 10 families from each of two populations to variable and constant thermal regimes. These represented both experienced temperatures by each population, and predicted temperatures under plausible future conditions based on a warming scenario from the downscaled global climate model (MIROC A1B scenario). We did not find evidence of thermal local adaptation during the embryonic stage for developmental rate or survival. Within treatments, populations hatched within 1 day of each other, on average, and amongtreatments, did not differ in survival in response to temperature. We did detect plasticity to temperature; embryos developed 2.5 times longer (189 days) in the coolest regime compared to the warmest regime (74 days). We also detected variation in developmental rates among families within and among temperature regimes, indicating heritable plasticity. Families exhibited a strong positive relationship between thermal variability and phenotypic variability in developmental rate but body length and mass at hatching were largely insensitive to temperature. Overall, our results indicated a lack of thermal local adaptation, but a presence of plasticity in populations experiencing contrasting conditions, as well as family-specific heritable plasticity that could

  11. Majoring in Selection, and Minoring in Socialization: The Role of the College Experience in Goal Change Post-High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Patrick L; Jackson, Joshua J; Nagy, Nicole; Nagy, Gabriel; Roberts, Brent W; Lüdtke, Oliver; Trautwein, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    Though it is frequently assumed that the college experience can influence our life goals, this claim has been relatively understudied. The current study examined the role of goals in college major selection, as well as whether major selection influences later goal change. In addition, we examined whether a person's perceptions of his or her peers' goals influence goal setting. Using a sample of German students (Mage  = 19 years; n = 3,023 at Wave 1), we assessed life goal levels and changes from high school into college across three assessment occasions. Participants reported their current aspirations, along with the perceived goals of their peers during the college assessments. Using latent growth curve models, findings suggest that life goals upon entering college significantly predict the majors students select. However, this major selection had limited influence on later changes in life goals. Stronger effects were found with respect to perceptions of peers' goals, with students tending to change their goals to better align with their peers. The current study provides evidence that life goals are relatively stable and yet can change during the emerging adult years, in ways that demonstrate the potential influence of the college experience. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Selective incivility: immigrant groups experience subtle workplace discrimination at different rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krings, Franciska; Johnston, Claire; Binggeli, Steve; Maggiori, Christian

    2014-10-01

    Immigrants play an increasingly important role in local labor markets. Not only do they grow steadily in number but also in cultural, educational, and skill diversity, underlining the necessity to distinguish between immigrant groups when studying discrimination against immigrants. We examined immigrant employees' subtle discrimination experiences in a representative sample in Switzerland, controlling for dispositional influences. Results showed that mainly members of highly competitive immigrant groups, from immediate neighbor countries, experienced workplace incivility and that these incivility experiences were related to higher likelihoods of perceived discrimination at work. This research confirms recent accounts that successful but disliked groups are particularly likely to experience subtle interpersonal discrimination. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. L1-Penalized N-way PLS for subset of electrodes selection in BCI experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliseyev, Andrey; Moro, Cecile; Faber, Jean; Wyss, Alexander; Torres, Napoleon; Mestais, Corinne; Benabid, Alim Louis; Aksenova, Tetiana

    2012-08-01

    Recently, the N-way partial least squares (NPLS) approach was reported as an effective tool for neuronal signal decoding and brain-computer interface (BCI) system calibration. This method simultaneously analyzes data in several domains. It combines the projection of a data tensor to a low dimensional space with linear regression. In this paper the L1-Penalized NPLS is proposed for sparse BCI system calibration, allowing uniting the projection technique with an effective selection of subset of features. The L1-Penalized NPLS was applied for the binary self-paced BCI system calibration, providing selection of electrodes subset. Our BCI system is designed for animal research, in particular for research in non-human primates.

  14. The Value of Outsourcing Selected Cases in a Medical Examiner Population: A 10-Year Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleskey, Brandi C; Reilly, Stephanie D; Atherton, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Due to increasing caseloads and inadequate staffing, the burden on Coroner/Medical Examiner Offices to comply with recommended autopsy limits for forensic pathologists (FPs) has been difficult. Since 2006, pathologists at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have performed select autopsies for the Alabama Department of Forensic Sciences. Each case was reviewed by a state FP and scene investigator to determine appropriateness for referral. All referred cases received full postmortem examination including microscopic examination and collection of toxicological samples, and toxicology was ordered by the referring FP as appropriate. The final cause and manner of death were determined by the referring state FP after review of all findings. A majority of the 421 cases were ruled accidental deaths (233), most due to drug toxicity. Of the 178 natural deaths, 118 were attributed to cardiovascular disease. Outsourcing select forensic cases can be educational and an effective tool to manage workflow without compromising quality. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  15. Reporting Military Sexual Trauma: A Mixed-Methods Study of Women Veterans' Experiences Who Served From World War II to the War in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Kristina B; Mills, Peter D

    2016-08-01

    Since 2004, there has been increased effort to reduce military sexual trauma (MST) in the U.S. military. Although MST covers a range of inappropriate behaviors, the majority of research, treatment, and outreach are focused on sexual assault and the experiences of individuals serving in Afghanistan and Iraq. During a study on veterans' involvement in a national peace organization, participants were asked about their military experiences. Veterans served from World War II to current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Emerging out of the responses were descriptions of women's experiences with MST, barriers to reporting incidents of sexual misconduct and sexual assault, and the challenges they faced when seeking care. Data were gathered using anonymous questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. Out of 52 female veterans, the majority (90%) was subjected to at least one form of MST, and 15% (8) attempted to report the incident(s). Over half of the assailants were of a higher rank than the survivors. The majority of veterans remained silent due to lack of options to report, the status of perpetrators, and fear of retaliation. These data provide a glimpse into the challenges many women veterans faced when seeking assistance reporting incidents or obtaining health care for their MST. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  16. SIMULATION EXPERIMENT ON LANDING SITE SELECTION USING A SIMPLE GEOMETRIC APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Zhao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Safe landing is an important part of the planetary exploration mission. Even fine scale terrain hazards (such as rocks, small craters, steep slopes, which would not be accurately detected from orbital reconnaissance could also pose a serious risk on planetary lander or rover and scientific instruments on-board it. In this paper, a simple geometric approach on planetary landing hazard detection and safe landing site selection is proposed. In order to achieve full implementation of this algorithm, two easy-to-compute metrics are presented for extracting the terrain slope and roughness information. Unlike conventional methods which must do the robust plane fitting and elevation interpolation for DEM generation, in this work, hazards is identified through the processing directly on LiDAR point cloud. For safe landing site selection, a Generalized Voronoi Diagram is constructed. Based on the idea of maximum empty circle, the safest landing site can be determined. In this algorithm, hazards are treated as general polygons, without special simplification (e.g. regarding hazards as discrete circles or ellipses. So using the aforementioned method to process hazards is more conforming to the real planetary exploration scenario. For validating the approach mentioned above, a simulated planetary terrain model was constructed using volcanic ash with rocks in indoor environment. A commercial laser scanner mounted on a rail was used to scan the terrain surface at different hanging positions. The results demonstrate that fairly hazard detection capability and reasonable site selection was obtained compared with conventional method, yet less computational time and less memory usage was consumed. Hence, it is a feasible candidate approach for future precision landing selection on planetary surface.

  17. Selective Narrowing of Social Networks Across Adulthood is Associated With Improved Emotional Experience in Daily Life

    OpenAIRE

    English, Tammy; Carstensen, Laura L.

    2014-01-01

    Past research has documented age differences in the size and composition of social networks that suggest that networks grow smaller with age and include an increasingly greater proportion of well-known social partners. According to socioemotional selectivity theory, such changes in social network composition serve an antecedent emotion regulatory function that supports an age-related increase in the priority that people place on emotional well-being. The present study employed a longitudinal ...

  18. Measurement of collisional self broadening of atomic resonance lines in selective reflection experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papoyan, A.V.

    1998-01-01

    A method is developed to measure directly the collisional self broadening rate for a dense atomic vapor from selective reflection spectra. Experimental realization for the atomic D 1 and D 2 resonance lines of Rb confirms a validity of the proposed technique. The deflection of experimentally measured values is not more than 20% from theoretically predicted ones in the atomic number density range of 7· 10 16 - 7· 10 17 cm - 3 . 10 refs

  19. Simulation Experiment on Landing Site Selection Using a Simple Geometric Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, W.; Tong, X.; Xie, H.; Jin, Y.; Liu, S.; Wu, D.; Liu, X.; Guo, L.; Zhou, Q.

    2017-07-01

    Safe landing is an important part of the planetary exploration mission. Even fine scale terrain hazards (such as rocks, small craters, steep slopes, which would not be accurately detected from orbital reconnaissance) could also pose a serious risk on planetary lander or rover and scientific instruments on-board it. In this paper, a simple geometric approach on planetary landing hazard detection and safe landing site selection is proposed. In order to achieve full implementation of this algorithm, two easy-to-compute metrics are presented for extracting the terrain slope and roughness information. Unlike conventional methods which must do the robust plane fitting and elevation interpolation for DEM generation, in this work, hazards is identified through the processing directly on LiDAR point cloud. For safe landing site selection, a Generalized Voronoi Diagram is constructed. Based on the idea of maximum empty circle, the safest landing site can be determined. In this algorithm, hazards are treated as general polygons, without special simplification (e.g. regarding hazards as discrete circles or ellipses). So using the aforementioned method to process hazards is more conforming to the real planetary exploration scenario. For validating the approach mentioned above, a simulated planetary terrain model was constructed using volcanic ash with rocks in indoor environment. A commercial laser scanner mounted on a rail was used to scan the terrain surface at different hanging positions. The results demonstrate that fairly hazard detection capability and reasonable site selection was obtained compared with conventional method, yet less computational time and less memory usage was consumed. Hence, it is a feasible candidate approach for future precision landing selection on planetary surface.

  20. Implementation and Performance of the Event Filter Muon Selection for the ATLAS experiment at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Ventura, A; Assamagan, Ketevi A; Baines, J T M; Bee, C P; Bellomo, M; Biglietti, M; Bogaerts, J A C; Boisvert, V; Bosman, M; Carlino, G; Caron, B; Casado, M P; Cataldi, G; Cavalli, D; Cervetto, M; Comune, G; Conde-Muíño, P; Conventi, F; De Santo, A; De Seixas, J M; Díaz-Gómez, M; Di Mattia, A; Dos Anjos, A; Dosil, M; Ellis, Nick; Emeliyanov, D; Epp, B; Falciano, S; Farilla, A; George, S; Ghete, V M; González, S; Grothe, M; Kabana, S; Khomich, A; Kilvington, G; Konstantinidis, N P; Kootzw, A; Lowe, A; Luminari, L; Maeno, T; Masik, J; Meessen, C; Mello, A G; Merino, G; Moore, R; Morettini, P; Negri, A; Nikitin, N V; Nisati, A; Padilla, C; Panikashvili, N; Parodi, F; Pérez-Réale, V; Pinfold, J L; Pinto, P; Primavera, M; Qian, Z; Resconi, S; Rosati, S; Sánchez, C; Santamarina-Rios, C; Scannicchio, D A; Schiavi, C; Segura, E; Sivoklokov, S Yu; Soluk, R A; Stefanidis, E; Sushkov, S; Sutton, M; Tapprogge, Stefan; Thomas, E; Touchard, F; Venda-Pinto, B; Vercesi, V; Werner, P; 2004 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium And Medical Imaging Conference

    2005-01-01

    The ATLAS Trigger system is composed of three levels: an initial hardware trigger level (LVL1) followed by two software-based stages (LVL2 trigger and Event Filter) included in the High Level Trigger (HLT) and implemented on processor farms. The LVL2 trigger starts from LVL1 information concerning pointers to restricted so-called Regions of Interest (ROI) and performs event selection by means of optimized algorithms. If the LVL2 is passed, the full event is built and sent to the Event Filter (EF) algorithms for further selection and classification. After that, events are finally collected and put into mass storage for subsequent physics analysis. Even if many differences arise in the requirements and in the interfaces between the two HLT stages, they have a coherent approach to event selection. Therefore, the design of a common core software framework has been implemented in order to allow the HLT architecture to be flexible to changes (background conditions, luminosity, description of the detector, etc.). Al...

  1. A modified strategy for sequence specific assignment of protein NMR spectra based on amino acid type selective experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, Mario; Labudde, Dirk; Leitner, Dietmar; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Schmieder, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The determination of the three-dimensional structure of a protein or the study of protein-ligand interactions requires the assignment of all relevant nuclei as an initial step. This is nowadays almost exclusively performed using triple-resonance experiments. The conventional strategy utilizes one or more pairs of three dimensional spectra to obtain redundant information and thus reliable assignments. Here, a modified strategy for obtaining sequence specific assignments based on two dimensional amino acid type selective triple-resonance experiments is proposed. These experiments can be recorded with good resolution in a relatively short time. They provide very specific and redundant information, in particular on sequential connectivities, that drastically increases the ease and reliability of the assignment procedure, done either manually or in an automated fashion. The new strategy is demonstrated with the protein domain PB1 from yeast CDC24p

  2. Discrimination of Semi-Quantitative Models by Experiment Selection: Method Application in Population Biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vatcheva, Ivayla; Bernard, Olivier; de Jong, Hidde; Gouze, Jean-Luc; Mars, Nicolaas; Nebel, B.

    2001-01-01

    Modeling an experimental system often results in a number of alternative models that are justified equally well by the experimental data. In order to discriminate between these models, additional experiments are needed. We present a method for the discrimination of models in the form of

  3. Selective Attention to a Talker's Mouth in Infancy: Role of Audiovisual Temporal Synchrony and Linguistic Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillairet de Boisferon, Anne; Tift, Amy H.; Minar, Nicholas J.; Lewkowicz, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have found that infants shift their attention from the eyes to the mouth of a talker when they enter the canonical babbling phase after 6 months of age. Here, we investigated whether this increased attentional focus on the mouth is mediated by audio-visual synchrony and linguistic experience. To do so, we tracked eye gaze in 4-,…

  4. The Baltic Sea experiment BALTEX: a brief overview and some selected results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raschke, E.; Karstens, U.; Nolte-Holube, R.; Brandt, R.; Isemer, H.J.; Lohmann, D.; Lobmeyr, M.; Rockel, B.; Stuhlmann, R. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Atmosphaerenphysik

    1997-12-31

    The mechanisms responsible for the transfer of energy and water within the climate system are under worldwide investigation within the framework of the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) to improve the predictability of natural and man-made climate changes at short and long ranges and their impact on water resources. Five continental-scale experiments have been established within GEWEX to enable a more complete coupling between atmospheric and hydrodlogical models. One of them is the Baltic Sea Experiment (BALTEX). In this paper, the goals and structure of BALTEX are outlined. A short overview of measuring and modelling strategies is given. Atmospheric and hydrological model results of the authors are presented. This includes validation of precipitation using station measurements as well as validation of modelled cloud cover with cloud estimates form satellite data. Furthermore, results of a large-scale grid based hydrological model to be coupled to atmospheric models are presented. (orig.) [Deutsch] Im Rahmen des Programmes GEWEX (Globales Energie- und Wasserkreislauf-Experiment) werden weltweite Untersuchungen derjenigen Mechanismen unternommen, die die Uebertragung von Energie und Wasser innerhalb des Klimasystems bestimmen. Dadurch soll die Vorhersagebarkeit von natuerlichen und anthropogenen Klimaaenderungen in kurzen und laengeren Zeitraeumen und deren Wirkung auf die verfuegbaren Wasservorraete verbessert werden. Insgesamt fuenf kontinentweite Experimente wurden innerhalb von GEWEX fuer diese Zwecke begonnen. In ihnen soll vordringlich eine Kopplung von Hydrologiemodellen an Atmosphaermodelle erfolgen. Eines dieser Experimente ist das BALTEX (Baltic Sea Experiment). In dieser Arbeit werden die Ziele und die Struktur von BALTEX vorgestellt. Es wird auch ein kurzer Ueberblick ueber die Mess- und Modellierstrategie vermittelt. Ferner werden erste Ergebnisse der Autoren vorgestellt. Diese schliessen auch einen Vergleich zwischen gemessenen und

  5. Selection of an omnivorous diet by the mangrove tree crab Aratus pisonii in laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Amy A.; Feller, Ilka C.; Paul, Valerie J.; Kwiatkowski, Lisa M.; Lee, Woody

    2008-02-01

    Observational studies on leaf damage, gut content analyses, and crab behaviour have demonstrated that like numerous other mangrove and salt-marsh generalists, the mangrove tree crab Aratus pisonii feeds on a variety of food resources. This study is the first that experimentally tests feeding preferences of A. pisonii, as well as the first to test experimentally whether chemical composition of food resources is responsible for food selection. Feeding preferences were determined among a variety of plant, algal, and animal resources available in the field both in Florida and Belize, using multiple-choice feeding assays, where male and female crabs simultaneously were offered a variety of food items. To test whether chemistry of food resources was responsible for feeding preferences, chemical extracts of food resources were incorporated in an agar-based artificial food, and used in feeding assays. Results of feeding assays suggest that crabs prefer animal matter from ˜ 2.5 to 13× more than other available resources, including leaves of the red mangrove Rhizophora mangle, which contribute the most to their natural diet. Artificial feeding assays also demonstrated that chemical cues were responsible for selection of animal matter, up to 25× more than other available resources. Non-polar extracts (derived from extraction in 1:1 ethyl actetate:methanol) stimulated feeding the most, suggesting that fatty acids, triglycerides, or sterols may be important for growth, reproduction, or survival. Results for both sexes were similar across most assays. While chemical composition of food resources appears to play some role in selection, this does not discount the potential role of other factors, such as resource availability, competition, predation, or reproductive requirements in influencing feeding preferences. Bioassay-guided fractionation of extracts should aid in determining chemical constituents that play the greatest role in determining feeding preferences.

  6. Parameter subset selection for the dynamic calibration of activated sludge models (ASMs): experience versus systems analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruano, MV; Ribes, J; de Pauw, DJW

    2007-01-01

    to describe nitrogen and phosphorus removal in the Haaren WWTP (The Netherlands). The parameter significance ranking shows that the temperature correction coefficients are among the most influential parameters on the model output. This outcome confronts the previous identifiability studies and the experience...... based approaches which excluded them from their analysis. Systems analysis reveals that parameter significance ranking and size of the identifiable parameter subset depend on the information content of data available for calibration. However, it suffers from heavy computational demand. In contrast......, although the experience-based approach is computationally affordable, it is unable to take into account the information content issue and therefore can be either too optimistic (giving poorly identifiable sets) or pessimistic (small size of sets while much more can be estimated from the data...

  7. Selection of Design Power of Wave Energy Converters Based on Wave Basin Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinelli, L.; Zanuttigh, B.; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2011-01-01

    of the measured efficiency; description of the energy production by means of a function of the design capacity; application of a simple formula for cost benefit analysis. The analyses here proposed are based on the experimental results of 3D tests on two floating wave energy devices, named LEANCON and DEXA......Aim of this paper is to develop a method for selecting the optimal power generation capacity for which a wave energy converter (WEC) should be rated. This method is suitable for the earliest stages of development, when several studies are missing, including design of the Power Take Off (PTO) system...

  8. Choice Experiment Analysis of Outdoor Decking Material Selection in E-Commerce Market in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Holopainen, Jani Markus; Toppinen, Anne Maarit Kristiina; Lähtinen, Katja Päivikki; Rekola, Mika Olavi

    2017-01-01

    Since the early 1990s, there has been hope that the uptake of certified forest products would ensure more sustainable forest management and also deliver business benefits along the value chain. Our study applies a Discrete Choice Experiment (DCE) to model an e-commerce purchase in the case of multiple products with various attribute and certification combinations in the Finnish retail outdoor decking material market. We received 2772 responses from 231 participants in an online survey. Applyi...

  9. Selective adaptation in networks of heterogeneous populations: model, simulation, and experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avner Wallach

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Biological systems often change their responsiveness when subject to persistent stimulation, a phenomenon termed adaptation. In neural systems, this process is often selective, allowing the system to adapt to one stimulus while preserving its sensitivity to another. In some studies, it has been shown that adaptation to a frequent stimulus increases the system's sensitivity to rare stimuli. These phenomena were explained in previous work as a result of complex interactions between the various subpopulations of the network. A formal description and analysis of neuronal systems, however, is hindered by the network's heterogeneity and by the multitude of processes taking place at different time-scales. Viewing neural networks as populations of interacting elements, we develop a framework that facilitates a formal analysis of complex, structured, heterogeneous networks. The formulation developed is based on an analysis of the availability of activity dependent resources, and their effects on network responsiveness. This approach offers a simple mechanistic explanation for selective adaptation, and leads to several predictions that were corroborated in both computer simulations and in cultures of cortical neurons developing in vitro. The framework is sufficiently general to apply to different biological systems, and was demonstrated in two different cases.

  10. Composing Distributed Services for Selection and Retrieval of Event Data in the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Vinek, E; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    TAGs are event-level metadata allowing a quick search for interesting events for further analysis, based on selection criteria defined by the user. They are stored in a file-based format as well as in relational databases. The overall TAG system encompasses a range of web services providing functionality for the required use cases. The data as well as the services are replicated to several ATLAS sites, i.e. inside each service group there exist several concrete deployments, differing only in site-related non-functional attributes. In order to satisfy a user's request, the above mentioned atomic data sources and web services have to be composed on demand to provide the required functionality. As several instances of each service exist, one service has to be selected out of each group. The overall goal is to maximize the system’s throughput, in order to give to as many users as possible efficient access to the TAGs, while meeting end-to-end quality of service (QoS) requirements. Many approaches can be found t...

  11. Composing Distributed Services for Selection and Retrieval of Event Data in the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Vinek, E; The ATLAS collaboration; Zhang, Q

    2010-01-01

    TAGs are event-level metadata allowing a quick search for interesting events for further analysis, based on selection criteria defined by the user. They are stored in a file-based format as well as in relational databases. The overall TAG system encompasses a range of web services providing functionality for the required use cases. The data as well as the services are replicated to several ATLAS sites, i.e. inside each service group there exist several concrete deployments, differing only in site-related non-functional attributes. In order to satisfy a user’s request, the above mentioned atomic data sources and web services have to be composed on demand to provide the full functionality. As several instances of each service exist, one service has to be selected out of each group. The overall goal is to maximize the system’s throughput, in order to give to as many users as possible efficient access to the TAGs, while meeting end-to-end quality of service (QoS) requirements. Many approaches can be found to ...

  12. World of antimatter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, S.

    1998-01-01

    Every particle in nature has an antimatter partner in a curious world. when the two meet, they vanish in a flash of radiation. Physicists create antiparticles for their experiments, and can even build antimatter atoms. (author). 4 Figs

  13. Transfer Rate Edited experiment for the selective detection of Chemical Exchange via Saturation Transfer (TRE-CEST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Joshua I.; Xia, Ding; Regatte, Ravinder R.; Jerschow, Alexej

    2015-07-01

    Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) magnetic resonance experiments have become valuable tools in magnetic resonance for the detection of low concentration solutes with far greater sensitivity than direct detection methods. Accurate measures of rates of chemical exchange provided by CEST are of particular interest to biomedical imaging communities where variations in chemical exchange can be related to subtle variations in biomarker concentration, temperature and pH within tissues using MRI. Despite their name, however, traditional CEST methods are not truly selective for chemical exchange and instead detect all forms of magnetization transfer including through-space NOE. This ambiguity crowds CEST spectra and greatly complicates subsequent data analysis. We have developed a Transfer Rate Edited CEST experiment (TRE-CEST) that uses two different types of solute labeling in order to selectively amplify signals of rapidly exchanging proton species while simultaneously suppressing 'slower' NOE-dominated magnetization transfer processes. This approach is demonstrated in the context of both NMR and MRI, where it is used to detect the labile amide protons of proteins undergoing chemical exchange (at rates ⩾ 30 s-1) while simultaneously eliminating signals originating from slower (∼5 s-1) NOE-mediated magnetization transfer processes. TRE-CEST greatly expands the utility of CEST experiments in complex systems, and in-vivo, in particular, where it is expected to improve the quantification of chemical exchange and magnetization transfer rates while enabling new forms of imaging contrast.

  14. Transfer Rate Edited experiment for the selective detection of Chemical Exchange via Saturation Transfer (TRE-CEST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Joshua I; Xia, Ding; Regatte, Ravinder R; Jerschow, Alexej

    2015-07-01

    Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) magnetic resonance experiments have become valuable tools in magnetic resonance for the detection of low concentration solutes with far greater sensitivity than direct detection methods. Accurate measures of rates of chemical exchange provided by CEST are of particular interest to biomedical imaging communities where variations in chemical exchange can be related to subtle variations in biomarker concentration, temperature and pH within tissues using MRI. Despite their name, however, traditional CEST methods are not truly selective for chemical exchange and instead detect all forms of magnetization transfer including through-space NOE. This ambiguity crowds CEST spectra and greatly complicates subsequent data analysis. We have developed a Transfer Rate Edited CEST experiment (TRE-CEST) that uses two different types of solute labeling in order to selectively amplify signals of rapidly exchanging proton species while simultaneously suppressing 'slower' NOE-dominated magnetization transfer processes. This approach is demonstrated in the context of both NMR and MRI, where it is used to detect the labile amide protons of proteins undergoing chemical exchange (at rates⩾30s(-1)) while simultaneously eliminating signals originating from slower (∼5s(-1)) NOE-mediated magnetization transfer processes. TRE-CEST greatly expands the utility of CEST experiments in complex systems, and in-vivo, in particular, where it is expected to improve the quantification of chemical exchange and magnetization transfer rates while enabling new forms of imaging contrast. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. JET ({sup 3}He)-D scenarios relying on RF heating: survey of selected recent experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Eester, D; Lerche, E; Andrew, Y; Biewer, T M; Casati, A; Crombe, K; De la Luna, E; Ericsson, G; Felton, R; Giacomelli, L; Giroud, C; Hawkes, N; Hellesen, C; Hjalmarsson, A; Joffrin, E; Kaellne, J; Kiptily, V; Lomas, P; Mantica, P; Marinoni, A [JET-EFDA Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)] (and others)

    2009-04-15

    Recent JET experiments have been devoted to the study of ({sup 3}He)-D plasmas involving radio frequency (RF) heating. This paper starts by discussing the RF heating efficiency theoretically expected in such plasmas, covering both relevant aspects of wave and of particle dynamics. Then it gives a concise summary of the main conclusions drawn from recent experiments that were either focusing on studying RF heating physics aspects or that were adopting RF heating as a tool to study plasma behavior. Depending on the minority concentration chosen, different physical phenomena are observed. At very low concentration (X[{sup 3}He] < 1%), energetic tails are formed which trigger MHD activity and result in loss of fast particles. Alfven cascades were observed and gamma ray tomography indirectly shows the impact of sawtooth crashes on the fast particle orbits. Low concentration (X[{sup 3}He] < 10%) favors minority heating while for X[{sup 3}He] >> 10% electron mode conversion damping becomes dominant. Evidence for the Fuchs et al standing wave effect (Fuchs et al 1995 Phys. Plasmas 2 1637-47) on the absorption is presented. RF induced deuterium tails were observed in mode conversion experiments with large X[{sup 3}He] ({approx}18%). As tentative modeling shows, the formation of these tails can be explained as a consequence of wave power absorption by neutral beam particles that efficiently interact with the waves well away from the cold D cyclotron resonance position as a result of their substantial Doppler shift. As both ion and electron RF power deposition profiles in ({sup 3}He)-D plasmas are fairly narrow-giving rise to localized heat sources-the RF heating method is an ideal tool for performing transport studies. Various of the experiments discussed here were done in plasmas with internal transport barriers (ITBs). ITBs are identified as regions with locally reduced diffusivity, where poloidal spinning up of the plasma is observed. The present know-how on the role of

  16. The measurement of internal conversion electrons of selected nuclei: A physics undergraduate laboratory experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, P.; Duggan, J.L.; Desmarais, D.

    1992-01-01

    Thin sources are now commercially available for a wide variety of isotopes that have measurable internal conversion coefficients. The authors have used standard surface barrier detectors, NIM electronics, and a personal computer analyzer to measure conversion electrons from a few of these sources. Conversion electrons energy and intensity were measured for 113 Sn, 133 Ba, 137 Cs, and 207 Bi. From the measured spectra the innershell binding energies of the K ampersand L Shell electrons from the daughter nuclei were determined and compared to theory. The relative conversion coefficients a k /a L and the K/L ration were also measured. The spin and parity change of the transitions will also be assigned based on the selection rules of the transitions

  17. Experience from a multi-country initiative to improve the monitoring of selected reproductive health indicators in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreix, Maria; Tunçalp, Özge; Mutombo, Namuunda; Adegboyega, Ayotunde A; Say, Lale

    2017-05-01

    Universal access to sexual and reproductive health remains part of the unfinished business of global development in Africa. To achieve it, health interventions should be monitored using programmatic indicators. WHO's Strengthening Measurement of Reproductive Health Indicators in Africa initiative, implemented in Ghana, Nigeria, Kenya, Uganda, and Zimbabwe, aimed to improve national information systems for routine monitoring of reproductive health indicators. Participating countries developed action plans employing a two-pronged strategy: (1) revising, standardizing, and harmonizing existing reproductive health indicators captured through routine information-systems; and (2) building data-collection capacity through training and supervision at select pilot sites. Country teams evaluated existing and new indicators, and outlined barriers to strengthening routine measurement. Activities included updating abortion-care guidelines (spontaneous and induced abortions), providing training on laws surrounding induced abortions, and improving feedback mechanisms. The country teams updated monitoring and evaluation frameworks, and attempted to build recording/reporting capacity in selected pilot areas. Barriers to implementing the initiative that were encountered included restrictive induced-abortion laws, staff turn-over, and administrative delays, including low capacity among healthcare staff and competing priorities for staff time. The areas identified for further improvement were up-scaling programs to a national level, creating scorecards to record data, increasing collaborations with the private sector, conducting related costing exercises, and performing ex-post evaluations. © 2017 World Health Organization; licensed by Wiley on behalf of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  18. Acorn selection by the wood mouse Apodemus sylvaticus: a semi-controlled experiment in a Mediterranean environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosalino, Luís Miguel; Nóbrega, Filomena; Santos-Reis, Margarida; Teixeira, Generosa; Rebelo, Rui

    2013-09-01

    Fruits are highly important food resources for mammals in Mediterranean Europe, and due to the dominance of oaks (Quercus sp.), acorns are among those used by a vast array of species, including rodents. The metabolic yield of acorn intake may determine a selection pattern: preference for fat, carbohydrate, and consequently energy-rich fruits; or avoidance of fruits containing high concentrations of secondary chemical compounds (e.g., tannic acid). We studied the acorn feeding selection pattern of wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus) inhabiting a mixed oak woodland, southwest Portugal, using an experiment conducted in an open-air enclosure. We tested which variables associated with the wood mouse (e.g., sex) and acorns (e.g., size and nutrient content) from three oak species (holm Q. rotundifolia, Portuguese Q. faginea and cork Q. suber oak) could be constraining acorn consumption. Our results indicate that wood mice are selecting acorns of the most common oak species (Q. suber), probably due to their previous familiarization with the fruit due to its dominance in the ecosystem but probably also because its chemical characteristics (sugar contents). Rodent gender and acorn morphology (width) are also influential, with females more prone to consume acorns with smaller width, probably due to handling limitation. This selective behaviour may have consequences for dispersion and natural regeneration of the different oak species.

  19. Mutual Learning and Exchange of Health Informatics Experiences from Around the World - Evaluation of a Massive Open Online Course in eHealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Sabine; Hägglund, Maria

    2017-01-01

    We report our experiences from the Massive Open Online Course (MOOC), "eHealth - Opportunities and Challenges", run by Karolinska Institutet using the edx platform both as session-based and self-paced versions between 2015 and 2016. In total, 13,302 students from 162 different countries were enrolled in our courses during the two-year period whereof 573 completed them. 331 students answered an exit survey after finishing the course which was analysed using quantitative and qualitative methods. As positive outcomes of the course, students highlighted set-up and content of the course, the pedagogical approach and the consistent international focus. Students lacked more practical case studies, more interactive discussions and proposed advanced follow-up courses on certain topics. Faculty lacked better functions for management of the discussion forum. Major advantages of the MOOC were mutual learning and exchange of health informatics experiences from around the world that would have been difficult to achieve in traditional learning contexts.

  20. Socioemotional selectivity in older adults: Evidence from the subjective experience of angry memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzer, Tugba; Gulgoz, Sami

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have compared the phenomenological properties of younger and older adults' memories for emotional events. Some studies suggest that younger adults remember negative information more vividly than positive information whereas other studies suggest that positive emotion yields phenomenologically richer memories than negative emotion for both younger and older adults. One problem with previous studies is a tendency to treat emotion as a dichotomous variable. In contrast, emotional richness demands inclusion of assessments beyond just a positive and negative dimension (e.g., assessing specific emotions like anger, fear and happiness). The present study investigated different properties of autobiographical remembering as a function of discrete emotions and age. Thirty-two younger and thirty-one older adults participated by recalling recent and remote memories associated with six emotional categories and completed the Memory Characteristics Questionnaire for each. Results demonstrated that older adults' angry memories received lower ratings on some phenomenological properties than other emotional memories whereas younger adults' angry memories did not show this same pattern. These results are discussed within the context of socioemotional selectivity theory.

  1. Pilot plant experience on anaerobic codigestion of source selected OFMSW and sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabbai, Valentina; De Bortoli, Nicola; Goi, Daniele

    2016-03-01

    Anaerobic codigestion of source selected organic fraction of municipal solid waste (SS-OFMSW) and sewage sludge may be one of the most viable solutions to optimize oversized digesters efficiency in wastewater treatment plants. Based on results of BMP tests obtained for sewage sludge and SS-OFMSW, pilot plant tests were carried out by 3.4 m(3) CSTR reactor at mesophilic temperature. A mix of fruit and vegetable waste from wholesale market and canteen waste was used as SS-OFMSW substrate. Tests were conducted applying an OLR (organic loading rate) ramp with 6 different phases until a value of 3.2 kgVS/m(3) d. Feedstock and digestate characteristics, efficiency and process parameters were monitored. The anaerobic codigestion development was stable in each phase: early indicators like VFA (volatile fatty acids) and FOS/TAC ratio were always below instability threshold values. The maximum OLR tested determined a GPR (gas production rate) of 0.95 N m(3)/m(3) d and SGP (specific gas production) of 0.49 N m(3)/kgVS with a VS abatement of 67.3%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Selecting methods and awaiting growth: the teaching experience of fundamental nursing practicum instructors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui-Chen; Lin, Chi-Yi; Chien, Tsui-Wei; Liu, Kuei-Fen; Chen, Miao-Yen; Lin, Wen-Chuan

    2013-02-01

    A constellation of factors accounts for teaching efficacy in the fundamental nursing practicum. Teachers play a critical role in terms of designing and executing an appropriate teaching plan, choosing effective methods, and holding appropriate teaching attitudes. It is thus extremely important that clinical teachers master the core characteristics of basic nursing practice. This study aimed to illuminate the core characteristics of basic nursing practice for students for reference by clinical practicum teachers. Qualitative research was used to identify the fundamentals of nursing practice by clinical teacher. Five focus group meetings were convened during the practice period. The researchers presided over group discussions held during the normal weekly teaching schedule and lasting approximately 2-4 hours each. The content analysis was adopted to analyze the data. Three major themes were proposed, including (1) student status: "novices were stymied by problems and thus improved slowly"; (2) teacher awareness: "teachers need to be aware of student capabilities, mood, and discomfort"; and (3) teaching style: "a good choice of methods should support and encourage students. To cultivate professional nursing knowledge and self-confidence for future professional commitment, clinical teachers must first understand the characteristics and motivations of learning of their students and then select the, skills, and attitudes appropriate to provide step-by-step guidance. Communication with staffs and the preparation of atmosphere prior to nursing practice are also essential for students. Results provide insights into the technical college environment with regard to basic-level clinical nursing practice.

  3. Rapid Improvement in Visual Selective Attention Related to Action Video Gaming Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Qiu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A central issue in cognitive science is understanding how learning induces cognitive and neural plasticity, which helps illuminate the biological basis of learning. Research in the past few decades showed that action video gaming (AVG offered new, important perspectives on learning-related cognitive and neural plasticity. However, it is still unclear whether cognitive and neural plasticity is observable after a brief AVG session. Using behavioral and electrophysiological measures, this study examined the plasticity of visual selective attention (VSA associated with a 1 h AVG session. Both AVG experts and non-experts participated in this study. Their VSA was assessed prior to and after the AVG session. Within-group comparisons on the participants' performance before and after the AVG session showed improvements in response time in both groups and modulations of electrophysiological measures in the non-experts. Furthermore, between-group comparisons showed that the experts had superior VSA, relative to the non-experts, prior to the AVG session. These findings suggested an association between the plasticity of VSA and AVG. Most importantly, this study showed that the plasticity of VSA was observable after even a 1 h AVG session.

  4. Rapid Improvement in Visual Selective Attention Related to Action Video Gaming Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Nan; Ma, Weiyi; Fan, Xin; Zhang, Youjin; Li, Yi; Yan, Yuening; Zhou, Zhongliang; Li, Fali; Gong, Diankun; Yao, Dezhong

    2018-01-01

    A central issue in cognitive science is understanding how learning induces cognitive and neural plasticity, which helps illuminate the biological basis of learning. Research in the past few decades showed that action video gaming (AVG) offered new, important perspectives on learning-related cognitive and neural plasticity. However, it is still unclear whether cognitive and neural plasticity is observable after a brief AVG session. Using behavioral and electrophysiological measures, this study examined the plasticity of visual selective attention (VSA) associated with a 1 h AVG session. Both AVG experts and non-experts participated in this study. Their VSA was assessed prior to and after the AVG session. Within-group comparisons on the participants' performance before and after the AVG session showed improvements in response time in both groups and modulations of electrophysiological measures in the non-experts. Furthermore, between-group comparisons showed that the experts had superior VSA, relative to the non-experts, prior to the AVG session. These findings suggested an association between the plasticity of VSA and AVG. Most importantly, this study showed that the plasticity of VSA was observable after even a 1 h AVG session.

  5. Problems and Prospects of the Whole Language Approach to Literacy Education in the Depressed Economies of the Third World: The Nigerian Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onukaogu, C. E.

    Whole language has the potential to boost literacy in Third World countries like Nigeria, where the language curriculum has not been given the political and economic support it deserves. The economic depression in the Third World may not allow for a robust development of whole language. One effect of the decay of education in the Third World is…

  6. Thermal behavior and densification mechanism during selective laser melting of copper matrix composites: Simulation and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Donghua; Gu, Dongdong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal behavior and densification activity during SLM of composites are simulated. • Temperature distributions and melt pool dimensions during SLM are disclosed. • Motion behaviors of gaseous bubbles in laser induced melt pool are elucidated. • Simulation results show good agreement with the obtained experimental results. - Abstract: Simulation of temperature distribution and densification process of selective laser melting (SLM) WC/Cu composite powder system has been performed, using a finite volume method (FVM). The transition from powder to solid, the surface tension induced by temperature gradient, and the movement of laser beam power with a Gaussian energy distribution are taken into account in the physical model. The effect of the applied linear energy density (LED) on the temperature distribution, melt pool dimensions, behaviors of gaseous bubbles and resultant densification activity has been investigated. It shows that the temperature distribution is asymmetric with respect to the laser beam scanning area. The center of the melt pool does not locate at the center of the laser beam but slightly shifts towards the side of the decreasing X-axis. The dimensions of the melt pool are in sizes of hundreds of micrometers and increase with the applied LED. For an optimized LED of 17.5 kJ/m, an enhanced efficiency of gas removal from the melt pool is realized, and the maximum relative density of laser processed powder reaches 96%. As the applied LED surpasses 20 kJ/m, Marangoni flow tends to retain the entrapped gas bubbles. The flow pattern has a tendency to deposit the gas bubbles at the melt pool bottom or to agglomerate gas bubbles by the rotating flow in the melt pool, resulting in a higher porosity in laser processed powder. The relative density and corresponding pore size and morphology are experimentally acquired, which are in a good agreement with the results predicted by simulation

  7. Primary experiment aimed at selecting the suitable dose to mutation induction in two soybean cultivars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabulsi, I.; Mir Ali, N

    1991-07-01

    Seeds from two soybean [Glycine Max L. (Merrill)] cultivars K-25 and K-38 were irradiated with the following doses of gamma rays: 100, 150, 200, 250, 300, 350, 400 and 500 Gy. The dose rate was 9.25 Gy/minute. A week after irradiation 25 seeds were sown from each variety in pots (26.5 x 26.5 cm) with 4 replicates in a randomized complete block design under greenhouse conditions. The distance between the cotyledon and the first leaf was measured 4 weeks after sowing and the results showed stimualtion effect in the 100 and 150 Gy doses in comparison to the control whereas in the higher doses, a gradual reduction was realized in addition to the appearance of the necrotic spots on the leaves which was increased in percentages along with the dose. The results indicated that doses between 100 and 200 Gy achieved the highest rate of mutations with minimal rate of lethality hence achieving the aim of this preliminary experiment. (author). 5 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs

  8. Armastusest: tõerežiimid, kultuurilised kujutelmad ja kehaline ilmakogemus / On Love: Regimes of Truth, Cultural Imaginaries and the Bodily Experience of Being in the World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epp Annus

    2016-12-01

    s situatedness in the world becomes a defining part of the amorous relationship. Novels and films offer also a model of love which runs against Badiou’s ideal model of existential love: in some texts, the reader witnesses the birth of agency through love. In Asta Willmann’s short story “Patu vili”, the main character Berit grows from a passive, suffering, violated woman into an active, powerful figure who has strength enough to make groundbreaking decisions. She does not experience love as an existential relationship that offers her the possibility to relate to the world through the two, but she does grow as a human being and she finds strength and support in her relationship. The article concludes with the analysis of Mäetaguse vanad by Anton Hansen Tammsaare – in face of the death of one of the longterm partners, this short story exemplifies important qualities of shared life.

  9. EDITORIAL: Artificial Muscles: Selected papers from the 5th World Congress on Biomimetics, Artificial Muscles and Nano-Bio (Osaka, Japan, 25-27 November 2009) Artificial Muscles: Selected papers from the 5th World Congress on Biomimetics, Artificial Muscles and Nano-Bio (Osaka, Japan, 25-27 November 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen

    2011-12-01

    The 5th World Congress on Biomimetics, Artificial Muscles and Nano-Bio and the 4th International Conference on Artificial Muscles were held in Osaka, Japan, 23-27 November 2009. This special section of Smart Materials and Structures is devoted to a selected number of research papers presented at this international conference and congress. Of the 76 or so papers presented at the conference, only 10 papers were finally selected, reviewed and accepted for this special section, following the regular reviewing procedures of the journal. This special section is focused on polymeric artificial muscles, electroactive polymers, multifunctional nanocomposites and their applications. In particular, an electromechanical model for self-sensing ionic polymer-metal composite actuating devices with patterned surface electrodes is presented which discusses the concept of creating self-sensing ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) actuating devices with patterned surface electrodes where actuator and sensor elements are separated by a grounded shielding electrode. Eventually, an electromechanical model of the device is also proposed and validated. Following that, there is broad coverage of polytetrahydrofurane-polyethylene oxide-PEDOT conducting interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) for high speed actuators. The conducting polymer (poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)) is incorporated within the IPNs, which are synthesized from polyethylene oxide (PEO)/polytetrahydrofurane (PTHF) networks. PEO/PTHF IPNs are prepared using poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate and dimethacrylate and hydroxythelechelic PTHF as starting materials. The conducting IPN actuators are prepared by oxidative polymerization of 3,4-ethylenedioxithiophene (EDOT) using FeCl3 as an oxidizing agent within the PEO/PTHF IPN host matrix. Subsequently, giant and reversible magnetorheology of carrageenan/iron oxide magnetic gels are discussed and the effect of magnetic fields on the viscoelastic properties

  10. Food and nutrition security public initiatives from a human and socioeconomic development perspective: mapping experiences within the 1996 World Food Summit signatories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliaga, Marie Agnès; Chaves-Dos-Santos, Sandra Maria

    2014-03-01

    Food security exists when all people, at all times, have physical and economic access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food to meet their dietary needs and food preferences for an active and healthy life. In a global scenario where hunger and obesity affect millions of people, public actions have been developed towards Food and Nutrition Security (FNS). In 1996 during the World Food Summit, 186 countries signed the Rome Declaration, committing themselves to assess and address Food and Nutrition Insecurity. In this exploratory study, we compile secondary internet data using keywords in four languages to map the global distribution, among signatories, of FNS public initiatives and assess their association with key national-level socioeconomic indicators. As a result, we found FNS public policies in 123 countries, reports on the state of FNS in 139 countries, and the presence of both in 114 countries (61%). The proportion of countries with any type of, as well as with specific, FNS policy or diagnostic was higher in least developed countries. There was a statistically significant association between these proportions and selected national-level socioeconomic variables. The results are discussed along with population vulnerability, international cooperation mechanisms and political discourse and how these factors impact the existence of FNS public actions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. On the value of foreign PhDs in the developing world : Training versus selection effects in the case of South Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, M.; Cowan, R.; Barnard, H.

    2018-01-01

    When seeking to improve science in emerging economies, uncertainty exists whether PhD training in an emerging economy can yield comparable results to PhD training in the developed world. Scientific achievements may vary because of excellent training at good universities, but also because excellent

  12. Instructional Complements for Undergraduate World History or Western Civilization Courses: Selected Topics in the Ancient, Medieval, and Modern History of India: A Curriculum Supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Wayne Hamilton

    This curriculum supplement on India consists of three modules that have been used with undergraduates in introductory world civilization courses. Module 1, "Ancient Period: Hinduism and the Caste System in India: Origin, Development, and Social Functions" discusses the religious doctrines of Hinduism, the caste system, and its structure.…

  13. World Health Organization Estimates of the Relative Contributions of Food to the Burden of Disease Due to Selected Foodborne Hazards : A Structured Expert Elicitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hald, Tine; Aspinall, Willy; Devleesschauwer, Brecht; Cooke, Roger; Corrigan, Tim; Havelaar, Arie H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072306122; Gibb, Herman J; Torgerson, Paul R; Kirk, Martyn D; Angulo, Fred J; Lake, Robin J; Speybroeck, Niko; Hoffmann, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Foodborne Disease Burden Epidemiology Reference Group (FERG) was established in 2007 by the World Health Organization (WHO) to estimate the global burden of foodborne diseases (FBDs). This estimation is complicated because most of the hazards causing FBD are not transmitted solely by

  14. Work experience and seniority in health care vs. medical students’ knowledge of selected hand hygiene procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Różańska

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hand hygiene (HH is the most important element of infection prevention. The aim of the study was to analyze the level of HH knowledge among medical students of Jagiellonian University Medical College in correlation with their clinical experience and the presence and extent of trainings in hospital hygiene prior to internships, as well as with HH practice among medical staff perceived by students. Material and Methods: The study was carried out in a group of 414 students from October to December, 2014. The questionnaire built of 14 questions was used as a study tool. Results: Absolutely correct answers to questions about HH were given by 52.9%, and about HH technique by 6.5% of respondents. The degree of accuracy of answers to questions concerning HH did not correlate with the gender of the respondents or with the fact that work placement had been preceded by training in the field of HH or with its scope. A statistically significant correlation was found between the year, the field, and the type of the study. Students with greater professional practice, significantly less often claimed that medical workers comply with HH. Professional practice of 22.9% of students was not preceded by any training in the field of hospital hygiene and in 28% of cases training did not cover HH. Nearly half of the respondents declared that pre-internship training had not addressed the problem of occupational exposure to biological agents. Conclusions: The results of the study shows that knowledge gained by students participating in the study was not satisfactory. Moreover, there is a need for improving the educational scheme in the discussed subject at all levels of basic and clinical subjects as well as during internships. Med Pr 2016;67(5:623–633

  15. [Work experience and seniority in health care vs. medical students' knowledge of selected hand hygiene procedures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Różańska, Anna; Wójkowska-Mach, Jadwiga; Bulanda, Małgorzata

    Hand hygiene (HH) is the most important element of infection prevention. The aim of the study was to analyze the level of HH knowledge among medical students of Jagiellonian University Medical College in correlation with their clinical experience and the presence and extent of trainings in hospital hygiene prior to internships, as well as with HH practice among medical staff perceived by students. The study was carried out in a group of 414 students from October to December, 2014. The questionnaire built of 14 questions was used as a study tool. Absolutely correct answers to questions about HH were given by 52.9%, and about HH technique by 6.5% of respondents. The degree of accuracy of answers to questions concerning HH did not correlate with the gender of the respondents or with the fact that work placement had been preceded by training in the field of HH or with its scope. A statistically significant correlation was found between the year, the field, and the type of the study. Students with greater professional practice, significantly less often claimed that medical workers comply with HH. Professional practice of 22.9% of students was not preceded by any training in the field of hospital hygiene and in 28% of cases training did not cover HH. Nearly half of the respondents declared that pre-internship training had not addressed the problem of occupational exposure to biological agents. The results of the study shows that knowledge gained by students participating in the study was not satisfactory. Moreover, there is a need for improving the educational scheme in the discussed subject at all levels of basic and clinical subjects as well as during internships. Med Pr 2016;67(5):623-633. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  16. World lines.

    OpenAIRE

    Waser Jürgen; Fuchs Raphael; Ribicic Hrvoje; Schindler Benjamin; Blöschl Günther; Gröller Eduard

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present World Lines as a novel interactive visualization that provides complete control over multiple heterogeneous simulation runs. In many application areas decisions can only be made by exploring alternative scenarios. The goal of the suggested approach is to support users in this decision making process. In this setting the data domain is extended to a set of alternative worlds where only one outcome will actually happen. World Lines integrate simulation visualization and...

  17. Heritability, covariation and natural selection on 24 traits of common evening primrose (Oenothera biennis) from a field experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M T J; Agrawal, A A; Maron, J L; Salminen, J-P

    2009-06-01

    This study explored genetic variation and co-variation in multiple functional plant traits. Our goal was to characterize selection, heritabilities and genetic correlations among different types of traits to gain insight into the evolutionary ecology of plant populations and their interactions with insect herbivores. In a field experiment, we detected significant heritable variation for each of 24 traits of Oenothera biennis and extensive genetic covariance among traits. Traits with diverse functions formed several distinct groups that exhibited positive genetic covariation with each other. Genetic variation in life-history traits and secondary chemistry together explained a large proportion of variation in herbivory (r(2) = 0.73). At the same time, selection acted on lifetime biomass, life-history traits and two secondary compounds of O. biennis, explaining over 95% of the variation in relative fitness among genotypes. The combination of genetic covariances and directional selection acting on multiple traits suggests that adaptive evolution of particular traits is constrained, and that correlated evolution of groups of traits will occur, which is expected to drive the evolution of increased herbivore susceptibility. As a whole, our study indicates that an examination of genetic variation and covariation among many different types of traits can provide greater insight into the evolutionary ecology of plant populations and plant-herbivore interactions.

  18. Nominal group technique to select attributes for discrete choice experiments: an example for drug treatment choice in osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiligsmann M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Mickael Hiligsmann,1-3 Caroline van Durme,2 Piet Geusens,2 Benedict GC Dellaert,4 Carmen D Dirksen,3 Trudy van der Weijden,5 Jean-Yves Reginster,6 Annelies Boonen21Department of Health Services Research, School for Public Health and Primary Care (CAPHRI, Maastricht University, The Netherlands, 2Department of Internal Medicine, CAPHRI, Maastricht University, The Netherlands, 3Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Medical Technology Assessment, CAPHRI, Maastricht University, The Netherlands, 4Department of Business Economics, Erasmus Rotterdam University, The Netherlands, 5Department of General Practice, CAPHRI, Maastricht University, The Netherlands, 6Department of Public Health, Epidemiology and Health Economics, University of Liege, BelgiumBackground: Attribute selection represents an important step in the development of discrete-choice experiments (DCEs, but is often poorly reported. In some situations, the number of attributes identified may exceed what one may find possible to pilot in a DCE. Hence, there is a need to gain insight into methods to select attributes in order to construct the final list of attributes. This study aims to test the feasibility of using the nominal group technique (NGT to select attributes for DCEs.Methods: Patient group discussions (4–8 participants were convened to prioritize a list of 12 potentially important attributes for osteoporosis drug therapy. The NGT consisted of three steps: an individual ranking of the 12 attributes by importance from 1 to 12, a group discussion on each of the attributes, including a group review of the aggregate score of the initial rankings, and a second ranking task of the same attributes.Results: Twenty-six osteoporotic patients participated in five NGT sessions. Most (80% of the patients changed their ranking after the discussion. However, the average initial and final ranking did not differ markedly. In the final ranking, the most important medication attributes were

  19. Command World

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wong, Leah Y; Lange, Douglas S; Sebastyn, Jerome T; Roof, William H

    2006-01-01

    .... The Command World scenario was expressly designed as a crisis action planning exercise in order to replicate the communications, collaboration, and information requirements inherent in a military...

  20. Sampling in the Snow: High School Winter Field Experiences Provide Relevant, Real World Connections Between Scientific Practices and Disciplinary Core Ideas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, E. W.; Burakowski, E. A.

    2014-12-01

    For much of the northern United States, the months surrounding the winter solstice are times of increased darkness, low temperatures, and frozen landscapes. It's a time when many high school science educators, who otherwise would venture outside with their classes, hunker down and are wary of the outdoors. However, a plethora of learning opportunities lies just beyond the classroom. Working collaboratively, a high school science teacher and a snow scientist have developed multiple activities to engage students in the scientific process of collecting, analyzing and interpreting the winter world using snow data to (1) learn about the insulative properties of snow, and (2) to learn about the role of snow cover on winter climate through its reflective properties while participating in a volunteer network that collects snow depth, albedo (reflectivity), and density data. These outdoor field-based snow investigations incorporate Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and disciplinary core ideas, including ESS2.C: The roles of water in Earth's surface processes and ESS2.D: Weather and Climate. Additionally, the lesson plans presented address Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in Mathematics, including the creation and analysis of bar graphs and time series plots (CCSS.Math.HSS-ID.A.1) and xy scatter plots (CCSS.Math.HSS-ID.B.6). High school students participating in the 2013/2014 snow sampling season described their outdoor learning experience as "authentic" and "hands-on" as compared to traditional class indoors. They emphasized that learning outdoors was essential to their understanding of underlying content and concepts because they "learn through actual experience."

  1. Predicting subject-driven actions and sensory experience in a virtual world with relevance vector machine regression of fMRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Giancarlo; De Martino, Federico; Esposito, Fabrizio; Goebel, Rainer; Formisano, Elia

    2011-05-15

    In this work we illustrate the approach of the Maastricht Brain Imaging Center to the PBAIC 2007 competition, where participants had to predict, based on fMRI measurements of brain activity, subject driven actions and sensory experience in a virtual world. After standard pre-processing (slice scan time correction, motion correction), we generated rating predictions based on linear Relevance Vector Machine (RVM) learning from all brain voxels. Spatial and temporal filtering of the time series was optimized rating by rating. For some of the ratings (e.g. Instructions, Hits, Faces, Velocity), linear RVM regression was accurate and very consistent within and between subjects. For other ratings (e.g. Arousal, Valence) results were less satisfactory. Our approach ranked overall second. To investigate the role of different brain regions in ratings prediction we generated predictive maps, i.e. maps of the weighted contribution of each voxel to the predicted rating. These maps generally included (but were not limited to) "specialized" regions which are consistent with results from conventional neuroimaging studies and known functional neuroanatomy. In conclusion, Sparse Bayesian Learning models, such as RVM, appear to be a valuable approach to the multivariate regression of fMRI time series. The implementation of the Automatic Relevance Determination criterion is particularly suitable and provides a good generalization, despite the limited number of samples which is typically available in fMRI. Predictive maps allow disclosing multi-voxel patterns of brain activity that predict perceptual and behavioral subjective experience. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. First Step to Understand Intergroup Bias and Cohesion from the One World Experiment: A Pilot Project to Evaluate the Effect of the 'Pale Blue Dot' Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, K.; Venugopal, R.

    2018-02-01

    The One World Experiment was carried out as a pilot effort in Cape Town, South Africa, to test whether exposure to an astronomy intervention affects empathy and altruism in children. The intervention focused on introducing children to knowledge around the Earth's position in the Universe and collecting data to assess the effect. This paper presents the project background as well as the methodology and results from the project's first phase, designed to understand the possible difference in empathetic response between a child and other 'ingroup' and 'outgroup' children; for any child, an 'ingroup' child is one belonging to their own social group (in this case, nationality), and an 'outgroup' child is one belonging to a social group other than their own. It is found that the students across the study have a strong cohesion to those of the same nationality but that there is no nationality bias in their feelings towards how other children share their joy with them. Full analysis of the data, which will compare the control group and experimental group results and focuses on the impact of astronomy intervention, is underway for future publication.

  3. Social Learning in the Real-World: 'Over-Imitation' Occurs in Both Children and Adults Unaware of Participation in an Experiment and Independently of Social Interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Whiten

    Full Text Available The current study avoided the typical laboratory context to determine instead whether over-imitation-the disposition to copy even visibly, causally unnecessary actions-occurs in a real-world context in which participants are unaware of being in an experiment. We disguised a puzzle-box task as an interactive item available to the public within a science engagement zone of Edinburgh Zoo. As a member of the public approached, a confederate acting as a zoo visitor retrieved a reward from the box using a sequence of actions containing both causally relevant and irrelevant elements. Despite the absence of intentional demonstration, or social pressure to copy, a majority of both child and even adult observers included all causally irrelevant actions in their reproduction. This occurred even though causal irrelevance appeared manifest because of the transparency of the puzzle-box. That over-imitation occurred so readily in a naturalistic context, devoid of social interaction and pressure, suggests that humans are opportunistic social learners throughout the lifespan, copying the actions of other individuals even when these actions are not intentionally demonstrated, and their causal significance is not readily apparent. The disposition to copy comprehensively, even when a mere onlooker, likely provides humans, irrespective of their age, with a powerful mechanism to extract maximal information from the social environment.

  4. The family's experience of the child and/or teenager in palliative care: fluctuating between hope and hopelessness in a world changed by losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misko, Maira Deguer; dos Santos, Maiara Rodrigues; Ichikawa, Carolliny Rossi de Faria; de Lima, Regina Aparecida Garcia; Bousso, Regina Szylit

    2015-01-01

    to understand the family's experience of the child and/or teenager in palliative care and building a representative theoretical model of the process experienced by the family. for this purpose the Symbolic Interactionism and the Theory Based on Data were used. Fifteen families with kids and/or teenagers in palliative care were interviewed, and data were collected through semi-structured interviews. after the comparative analysis of the data, a substantive theory was formed "fluctuating between hope and hopelessness in a world changed by losses", composed by: "having a life shattered ", "managing the new condition", "recognizing the palliative care" and "relearning how to live". Hope, perseverance and spiritual beliefs are determining factors for the family to continue fighting for the life of their child in a context of uncertainty, anguish and suffering, due to the medical condition of the child. Along the way, the family redefines values and integrates palliative care in their lives. staying with the child at home is what was set and kept hope of dreaming about the recovery and support of the child's life, but above all, what takes it away even though temporarily is the possibility of their child's death when staying within the context of the family.

  5. The family's experience of the child and/or teenager in palliative care: fluctuating between hope and hopelessness in a world changed by losses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maira Deguer Misko

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to understand the family's experience of the child and/or teenager in palliative care and building a representative theoretical model of the process experienced by the family.METHODOLOGY: for this purpose the Symbolic Interactionism and the Theory Based on Data were used. Fifteen families with kids and/or teenagers in palliative care were interviewed, and data were collected through semi-structured interviews.RESULTS: after the comparative analysis of the data, a substantive theory was formed "fluctuating between hope and hopelessness in a world changed by losses", composed by: "having a life shattered ", "managing the new condition", "recognizing the palliative care" and "relearning how to live". Hope, perseverance and spiritual beliefs are determining factors for the family to continue fighting for the life of their child in a context of uncertainty, anguish and suffering, due to the medical condition of the child. Along the way, the family redefines values and integrates palliative care in their lives.CONCLUSION: staying with the child at home is what was set and kept hope of dreaming about the recovery and support of the child's life, but above all, what takes it away even though temporarily is the possibility of their child's death when staying within the context of the family.

  6. The family's experience of the child and/or teenager in palliative care: fluctuating between hope and hopelessness in a world changed by losses1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misko, Maira Deguer; dos Santos, Maiara Rodrigues; Ichikawa, Carolliny Rossi de Faria; de Lima, Regina Aparecida Garcia; Bousso, Regina Szylit

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to understand the family's experience of the child and/or teenager in palliative care and building a representative theoretical model of the process experienced by the family. METHODOLOGY: for this purpose the Symbolic Interactionism and the Theory Based on Data were used. Fifteen families with kids and/or teenagers in palliative care were interviewed, and data were collected through semi-structured interviews. RESULTS: after the comparative analysis of the data, a substantive theory was formed "fluctuating between hope and hopelessness in a world changed by losses", composed by: "having a life shattered ", "managing the new condition", "recognizing the palliative care" and "relearning how to live". Hope, perseverance and spiritual beliefs are determining factors for the family to continue fighting for the life of their child in a context of uncertainty, anguish and suffering, due to the medical condition of the child. Along the way, the family redefines values and integrates palliative care in their lives. CONCLUSION: staying with the child at home is what was set and kept hope of dreaming about the recovery and support of the child's life, but above all, what takes it away even though temporarily is the possibility of their child's death when staying within the context of the family. PMID:26312639

  7. Superhabitable worlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, René; Armstrong, John

    2014-01-01

    To be habitable, a world (planet or moon) does not need to be located in the stellar habitable zone (HZ), and worlds in the HZ are not necessarily habitable. Here, we illustrate how tidal heating can render terrestrial or icy worlds habitable beyond the stellar HZ. Scientists have developed a language that neglects the possible existence of worlds that offer more benign environments to life than Earth does. We call these objects "superhabitable" and discuss in which contexts this term could be used, that is to say, which worlds tend to be more habitable than Earth. In an appendix, we show why the principle of mediocracy cannot be used to logically explain why Earth should be a particularly habitable planet or why other inhabited worlds should be Earth-like. Superhabitable worlds must be considered for future follow-up observations of signs of extraterrestrial life. Considering a range of physical effects, we conclude that they will tend to be slightly older and more massive than Earth and that their host stars will likely be K dwarfs. This makes Alpha Centauri B, which is a member of the closest stellar system to the Sun and is supposed to host an Earth-mass planet, an ideal target for searches for a superhabitable world.

  8. Network based on statistical multiplexing for event selection and event builder systems in high energy physics experiments; Reseau a multiplexage statistique pour les systemes de selection et de reconstruction d'evenements dans les experiences de physique des hautes energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvet, D

    2000-03-01

    Systems for on-line event selection in future high energy physics experiments will use advanced distributed computing techniques and will need high speed networks. After a brief description of projects at the Large Hadron Collider, the architectures initially proposed for the Trigger and Data AcQuisition (TD/DAQ) systems of ATLAS and CMS experiments are presented and analyzed. A new architecture for the ATLAS T/DAQ is introduced. Candidate network technologies for this system are described. This thesis focuses on ATM. A variety of network structures and topologies suited to partial and full event building are investigated. The need for efficient networking is shown. Optimization techniques for high speed messaging and their implementation on ATM components are described. Small scale demonstrator systems consisting of up to 48 computers ({approx}1:20 of the final level 2 trigger) connected via ATM are described. Performance results are presented. Extrapolation of measurements and evaluation of needs lead to a proposal of implementation for the main network of the ATLAS T/DAQ system. (author)

  9. Selectivity of diacylhydrazine insecticides to the predatory bug Orius laevigatus: in vivo and modelling/docking experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, Fermín; Christiaens, Olivier; Bengochea, Paloma; Medina, Pilar; Rougé, Pierre; Viñuela, Elisa; Smagghe, Guy

    2012-12-01

    Knowledge of pesticide selectivity to natural enemies is necessary for a successful implementation of biological and chemical control methods in integrated pest management (IPM) programmes. Diacylhydrazine (DAH)-based ecdysone agonists, also known as moulting-accelerating compounds (MACs), are considered to be a selective group of insecticides, and their compatibility with predatory Heteroptera, which are used as biological control agents, is known. However, their molecular mode of action has not been explored in beneficial insects such as Orius laevigatus (Fieber) (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae). In this project, in vivo toxicity assays demonstrated that the DAH-based RH-5849, tebufenozide and methoxyfenozide have no toxic effect against O. laevigatus. The ligand-binding domain (LBD) of the ecdysone receptor (EcR) of O. laevigatus was sequenced, and a homology protein model was constructed that confirmed a cavity structure with 12 α-helices, harbouring the natural insect moulting hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone. However, docking studies showed that a steric clash occurred for the DAH-based insecticides owing to a restricted extent of the ligand-binding cavity of the EcR of O. laevigatus. The insect toxicity assays demonstrated that MACs are selective for O. laevigatus. The modelling/docking experiments are indications that these pesticides do not bind with the LBD-EcR of O. laevigatus and support the supposition that they show no biological effects in the predatory bug. These data help in explaining the compatible use of MACs together with predatory bugs in IPM programmes. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Virtual Worlds as a Context Suited for Information Systems Education: Discussion of Pedagogical Experience and Curriculum Design with Reference to Second Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreher, Carl; Reiners, Torsten; Dreher, Naomi; Dreher, Heinz

    2009-01-01

    The context of Information Communication Technology (ICT) is changing dramatically. Today, Web 2.0 applications such as Facebook and MySpace are used ubiquitously in the general population, and Virtual Worlds are becoming increasingly popular in business, for example via simulations in Second Life. However the capacity of Virtual Worlds is…

  11. Trends in the forecast of the world prices for selected metals and their influence on the exploitation of the Slovak raw mineral base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavkovský Jozef

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper is given a basic information about the situation in the ore raw material base of the Slovak republic, after its transition to the market economy in the years 1990 – 1994. By dumping the ore mining, a decrease in the ore production, especially their sortiment, also started. Therefore only two ore mines – Nižná Slaná (Fe ores and Banská Hodruša (Au ores are in operation in Slovakia at present time. The rest of Slovak ores are economically not viable after present criteria. Besides the evaluation of balanced and unbalanced ore deposits, and the deposit´s parameters, the knowledge about trends of world ores and metal prices are very important. From this point of view, ores and metals which have a great importance (Fe, Al, Cu, Sb, Ag, Au for Slovakia are discussed. The obtained results have a prognostic character and they should be considered at the utilisation of own mineral base, as well as when buying mineral raw materials from abroad. In both cases the information about trends of world prices of raw materials play an important role.

  12. An Experiment to Observe Directly Beauty Particles Selected by Muonic Decay in Emulsion & to Estimate their Lifetimes

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    A hybrid experiment to observe directly particles with open beauty and estimate their lifetimes is proposed. The experiment will take place in a @p|- beam at 360 GeV/c. Events of the type @p|-N @A B$\\bar{B}$X will be produced in a thick emulsion, allowing for a lifetime range of 10|-|1|5~-~10|-|1|2~s. The decay vertices of B and $\\bar{B}$ and of the subsequent charm decays will be identified in emulsion. \\\\ \\\\ The precise location of the production vertex will be measured by high precision (50@mm~pitch) silicon microstrip detectors. A set of planes of such detectors will be placed in front of the target to measure the incoming beam particle, and another set of planes, together with 16~planes of MWPC's will be plac target to measure the secondaries. \\\\ \\\\ The semi-leptonic decays of B's and C's are used to create a selective trigger. The data taking will be triggered by l@m with an angle to the beam @a~$>$~30~mrad, or by~@$>$~2@m. Transverse momentum cuts will be applied off-line.\\\\ \\\\ The muons are identified...

  13. Network based on statistical multiplexing for event selection and event builder systems in high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvet, D.

    2000-03-01

    Systems for on-line event selection in future high energy physics experiments will use advanced distributed computing techniques and will need high speed networks. After a brief description of projects at the Large Hadron Collider, the architectures initially proposed for the Trigger and Data AcQuisition (TD/DAQ) systems of ATLAS and CMS experiments are presented and analyzed. A new architecture for the ATLAS T/DAQ is introduced. Candidate network technologies for this system are described. This thesis focuses on ATM. A variety of network structures and topologies suited to partial and full event building are investigated. The need for efficient networking is shown. Optimization techniques for high speed messaging and their implementation on ATM components are described. Small scale demonstrator systems consisting of up to 48 computers (∼1:20 of the final level 2 trigger) connected via ATM are described. Performance results are presented. Extrapolation of measurements and evaluation of needs lead to a proposal of implementation for the main network of the ATLAS T/DAQ system. (author)

  14. A Foreground Masking Strategy for [C II] Intensity Mapping Experiments Using Galaxies Selected by Stellar Mass and Redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, G.; Moncelsi, L.; Viero, M. P.; Silva, M. B.; Bock, J.; Bradford, C. M.; Chang, T.-C.; Cheng, Y.-T.; Cooray, A. R.; Crites, A.; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Uzgil, B.; Hunacek, J. R.; Zemcov, M.

    2018-04-01

    Intensity mapping provides a unique means to probe the epoch of reionization (EoR), when the neutral intergalactic medium was ionized by energetic photons emitted from the first galaxies. The [C II] 158 μm fine-structure line is typically one of the brightest emission lines of star-forming galaxies and thus a promising tracer of the global EoR star formation activity. However, [C II] intensity maps at 6 ≲ z ≲ 8 are contaminated by interloping CO rotational line emission (3 ≤ J upp ≤ 6) from lower-redshift galaxies. Here we present a strategy to remove the foreground contamination in upcoming [C II] intensity mapping experiments, guided by a model of CO emission from foreground galaxies. The model is based on empirical measurements of the mean and scatter of the total infrared luminosities of galaxies at z {10}8 {M}ȯ selected in the K-band from the COSMOS/UltraVISTA survey, which can be converted to CO line strengths. For a mock field of the Tomographic Ionized-carbon Mapping Experiment, we find that masking out the “voxels” (spectral–spatial elements) containing foreground galaxies identified using an optimized CO flux threshold results in a z-dependent criterion {m}{{K}}AB}≲ 22 (or {M}* ≳ {10}9 {M}ȯ ) at z cost of a moderate ≲8% loss of total survey volume.

  15. Psychotic experiences and general medical conditions: a cross-national analysis based on 28 002 respondents from 16 countries in the WHO World Mental Health Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Kate M; Saha, Sukanta; Lim, Carmen C W; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Al-Hamzawi, Ali; Alonso, Jordi; Benjet, Corina; Bromet, Evelyn J; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Caldas-de-Almeida, José Miguel; de Girolamo, Giovanni; de Jonge, Peter; Degenhardt, Louisa; Florescu, Silvia; Gureje, Oye; Haro, Josep M; Hu, Chiyi; Karam, Elie G; Kovess-Masfety, Viviane; Lee, Sing; Lepine, Jean-Pierre; Mneimneh, Zeina; Navarro-Mateu, Fernando; Piazza, Marina; Posada-Villa, José; Sampson, Nancy A; Stagnaro, Juan Carlos; Kessler, Ronald C; McGrath, John J

    2018-02-26

    Previous work has identified associations between psychotic experiences (PEs) and general medical conditions (GMCs), but their temporal direction remains unclear as does the extent to which they are independent of comorbid mental disorders. In total, 28 002 adults in 16 countries from the WHO World Mental Health (WMH) Surveys were assessed for PEs, GMCs and 21 Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) mental disorders. Discrete-time survival analyses were used to estimate the associations between PEs and GMCs with various adjustments. After adjustment for comorbid mental disorders, temporally prior PEs were significantly associated with subsequent onset of 8/12 GMCs (arthritis, back or neck pain, frequent or severe headache, other chronic pain, heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes and peptic ulcer) with odds ratios (ORs) ranging from 1.3 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-1.5] to 1.9 (95% CI 1.4-2.4). In contrast, only three GMCs (frequent or severe headache, other chronic pain and asthma) were significantly associated with subsequent onset of PEs after adjustment for comorbid GMCs and mental disorders, with ORs ranging from 1.5 (95% CI 1.2-1.9) to 1.7 (95% CI 1.2-2.4). PEs were associated with the subsequent onset of a wide range of GMCs, independent of comorbid mental disorders. There were also associations between some medical conditions (particularly those involving chronic pain) and subsequent PEs. Although these findings will need to be confirmed in prospective studies, clinicians should be aware that psychotic symptoms may be risk markers for a wide range of adverse health outcomes. Whether PEs are causal risk factors will require further research.

  16. Real-world experience of women using extended-cycle vs monthly-cycle combined oral contraception in the United States: the National Health and Wellness Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nappi, Rossella E; Lete, Iñaki; Lee, Lulu K; Flores, Natalia M; Micheletti, Marie-Christine; Tang, Boxiong

    2018-01-18

    The real-world experience of women receiving extended-cycle combined oral contraception (COC) versus monthly-cycle COC has not been reported. Data were from the United States 2013 National Health and Wellness Survey. Eligible women (18-50 years old, premenopausal, without hysterectomy) currently using extended-cycle COC (3 months between periods) were compared with women using monthly-cycle COC. Treatment satisfaction (1 "extremely dissatisfied" to 7 "extremely satisfied"), adherence (8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale © ), menstrual cycle-related symptoms, health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and health state utilities (Medical Outcomes Short Form Survey-36v2®), depression (9-item Patient Health Questionnaire), sleep difficulties, Work Productivity and Activity Impairment-General Health, and healthcare resource use were assessed using one-way analyses of variance, chi-square tests, and generalized linear models (adjusted for covariates). Participants included 260 (6.7%) women using extended-cycle and 3616 (93.3%) using monthly-cycle COC. Women using extended-cycle COC reported significantly higher treatment satisfaction (P = 0.001) and adherence (P = 0.04) and reduced heavy menstrual bleeding (P = 0.029). A non-significant tendency toward reduced menstrual pain (39.5% versus 47.3%) and menstrual cycle-related symptoms (40.0% versus 48.7%) was found in women using extended-cycle versus monthly-cycle COC. Significantly more women using extended-cycle COC reported health-related diagnoses, indicating preferential prescription for extended-cycle COC among women reporting more health problems. Consistent with this poorer health, more women using extended-cycle COC reported fatigue, headache, and activity impairment (P values cycle COC as a valuable treatment option with high satisfaction, high adherence, and reduced heavy menstrual bleeding.

  17. Za hranice fikčního světa: od ozvláštnění k estetické zkušenosti // Beyond a fictional world: From defamiliarization to aesthetic experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Skalický

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The study turns back to Shklovkyʼs term defamiliarization and Jakobsonʼs poetic function to show that, despite they are still stimulating aesthetic conceptions exposing the social role of art, they cannot wholly explain what happens during reading a work of art. Theories of fictional worlds can clarify more, showing that the semantic energy rising from defamiliarization makes us to create an autonomous fictional world. However, the semantic energy of art goes also beyond such a world — it becomes a part of our experience resonating in our future life. A few conceptions of aesthetic experience that try to explain such a resonance are discussed in the last part of the study

  18. World science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of the Third World Network of Scientific Organizations (TWNSO), established last year with its headquarters in Trieste, Italy, is to promote the role of science and technology in developing countries. TWNSO, under the presidency of Abdus Salam, is an offshoot of the Third World Academy of Sciences, which has pushed the cause of international scientific collaboration since its establishment in 1983. (orig./HSI).

  19. The Best of All Worlds: Immersive Interfaces for Art Education in Virtual and Real World Teaching and Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenfell, Janette

    2013-01-01

    Selected ubiquitous technologies encourage collaborative participation between higher education students and educators within a virtual socially networked e-learning landscape. Multiple modes of teaching and learning, ranging from real world experiences, to text and digital images accessed within the Deakin studies online learning management…

  20. Real-world outcomes of unrestricted direct-acting antiviral treatment for hepatitis C in Australia: The South Australian statewide experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haridy, James; Wigg, Alan; Muller, Kate; Ramachandran, Jeyamani; Tilley, Emma; Waddell, Victoria; Gordon, David; Shaw, David; Huynh, Dep; Stewart, Jeffrey; Nelson, Renjy; Warner, Morgyn; Boyd, Mark; Chinnaratha, Mohamed A; Harding, Damian; Ralton, Lucy; Colman, Anton; Liew, Danny; Iyngkaran, Guru; Tse, Edmund

    2018-06-11

    In March 2016, the Australian government offered unrestricted access to direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapy for chronic hepatitis C (HCV) to the entire population. This included prescription by any medical practitioner in consultation with specialists until sufficient experience was attained. We sought to determine the outcomes and experience over the first twelve-months for the entire state of South Australia. We performed a prospective, observational study following outcomes of all treatments associated with the state's four main tertiary centres. 1909 subjects initiating DAA therapy were included, representing an estimated 90% of all treatments in the state. Overall, SVR12 was 80.4% in all subjects intended for treatment and 95.7% in those completing treatment and follow-up. 14.2% were lost to follow-up (LTFU) and did not complete SVR12 testing. LTFU was independently associated with community treatment via remote consultation (OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.04-2.18, p=0.03), prison-based treatment (OR 2.02, 95% CI 1.08-3.79, p=0.03) and younger age (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.97-0.99, p=0.05). Of the 1534 subjects completing treatment and follow-up, decreased likelihood of SVR12 was associated with genotype 2 (OR 0.23,95% CI 0.07-0.74, p=0.01) and genotype 3 (OR 0.23 95% CI 0.12-0.43, p=<0.01). A significant decrease in treatment initiation was observed over the twelve-month period in conjunction with a shift from hospital to community-based treatment. Our findings support the high responses observed in clinical trials, however a significant gap exists in SVR12 in our real-world cohort due to LTFU. A declining treatment initiation rate and shift to community-based treatment highlights the need to explore additional strategies to identify, treat and follow-up remaining patients in order to achieve elimination targets. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. A comparison of two methods for prediction of response and rates of inbreeding in selected populations with the results obtained in two selection experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loywyck, V.; Bijma, P.; Pinard-van der Laan, M.H.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.; Verrier, E.

    2005-01-01

    Selection programmes are mainly concerned with increasing genetic gain. However, short-term progress should not be obtained at the expense of the within-population genetic variability. Different prediction models for the evolution within a small population of the genetic mean of a selected trait,

  2. Diversity in the glucose transporter-4 gene (SLC2A4 in humans reflects the action of natural selection along the old-world primates evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Tarazona-Santos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glucose is an important source of energy for living organisms. In vertebrates it is ingested with the diet and transported into the cells by conserved mechanisms and molecules, such as the trans-membrane Glucose Transporters (GLUTs. Members of this family have tissue specific expression, biochemical properties and physiologic functions that together regulate glucose levels and distribution. GLUT4 -coded by SLC2A4 (17p13 is an insulin-sensitive transporter with a critical role in glucose homeostasis and diabetes pathogenesis, preferentially expressed in the adipose tissue, heart muscle and skeletal muscle. We tested the hypothesis that natural selection acted on SLC2A4. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We re-sequenced SLC2A4 and genotyped 104 SNPs along a approximately 1 Mb region flanking this gene in 102 ethnically diverse individuals. Across the studied populations (African, European, Asian and Latin-American, all the eight common SNPs are concentrated in the N-terminal region upstream of exon 7 ( approximately 3700 bp, while the C-terminal region downstream of intron 6 ( approximately 2600 bp harbors only 6 singletons, a pattern that is not compatible with neutrality for this part of the gene. Tests of neutrality based on comparative genomics suggest that: (1 episodes of natural selection (likely a selective sweep predating the coalescent of human lineages, within the last 25 million years, account for the observed reduced diversity downstream of intron 6 and, (2 the target of natural selection may not be in the SLC2A4 coding sequence. CONCLUSIONS: We propose that the contrast in the pattern of genetic variation between the N-terminal and C-terminal regions are signatures of the action of natural selection and thus follow-up studies should investigate the functional importance of different regions of the SLC2A4 gene.

  3. Better Measurement for Performance Improvement in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: The Primary Health Care Performance Initiative (PHCPI) Experience of Conceptual Framework Development and Indicator Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veillard, Jeremy; Cowling, Krycia; Bitton, Asaf; Ratcliffe, Hannah; Kimball, Meredith; Barkley, Shannon; Mercereau, Laure; Wong, Ethan; Taylor, Chelsea; Hirschhorn, Lisa R; Wang, Hong

    2017-12-01

    Policy Points: Strengthening accountability through better measurement and reporting is vital to ensure progress in improving quality primary health care (PHC) systems and achieving universal health coverage (UHC). The Primary Health Care Performance Initiative (PHCPI) provides national decision makers and global stakeholders with opportunities to benchmark and accelerate performance improvement through better performance measurement. Results from the initial PHC performance assessments in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are helping guide PHC reforms and investments and improve the PHCPI's instruments and indicators. Findings from future assessment activities will further amplify cross-country comparisons and peer learning to improve PHC. New indicators and sources of data are needed to better understand PHC system performance in LMICs. The Primary Health Care Performance Initiative (PHCPI), a collaboration between the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, The World Bank, and the World Health Organization, in partnership with Ariadne Labs and Results for Development, was launched in 2015 with the aim of catalyzing improvements in primary health care (PHC) systems in 135 low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), in order to accelerate progress toward universal health coverage. Through more comprehensive and actionable measurement of quality PHC, the PHCPI stimulates peer learning among LMICs and informs decision makers to guide PHC investments and reforms. Instruments for performance assessment and improvement are in development; to date, a conceptual framework and 2 sets of performance indicators have been released. The PHCPI team developed the conceptual framework through literature reviews and consultations with an advisory committee of international experts. We generated 2 sets of performance indicators selected from a literature review of relevant indicators, cross-referenced against indicators available from international sources, and evaluated through

  4. Top Tips for Senior Leaders in Schools and Colleges: How to Provide Meaningful Experience of the World of Work for Young People as Part of 16 to 19 Study Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Foundation for Educational Research, 2015

    2015-01-01

    A core part of 16 to 19 study programmes is the provision of work experience for all young people. It is increasingly recognised that young people need to develop their employability skills, alongside qualifications, in preparation for the world of work and securing a job. This top tips guide offers advice to schools and colleges wishing to…

  5. 1',5'-Anhydro-L-ribo-hexitol Adenine Nucleic Acids (α-L-HNA-A): Synthesis and Chiral Selection Properties in the Mirror Image World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alonzo, Daniele; Froeyen, Mathy; Schepers, Guy; Di Fabio, Giovanni; Van Aerschot, Arthur; Herdewijn, Piet; Palumbo, Giovanni; Guaragna, Annalisa

    2015-05-15

    The synthesis and a preliminary investigation of the base pairing properties of (6' → 4')-linked 1',5'-anhydro-L-ribo-hexitol nucleic acids (α-L-HNA) have herein been reported through the study of a model oligoadenylate system in the mirror image world. Despite its considerable preorganization due to the rigidity of the "all equatorial" pyranyl sugar backbone, α-L-HNA represents a versatile informational biopolymer, in view of its capability to cross-communicate with natural and unnatural complements in both enantiomeric forms. This seems the result of an inherent flexibility of the oligonucleotide system, as witnessed by the singular formation of iso- and heterochiral associations composed of regular, enantiomorphic helical structures. The peculiar properties of α-L-HNA (and most generally of the α-HNA system) provide new elements in our understanding of the structural prerequisites ruling the stereoselectivity of the hybridization processes of nucleic acids.

  6. The impact of search engine selection and sorting criteria on vaccination beliefs and attitudes: two experiments manipulating Google output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allam, Ahmed; Schulz, Peter Johannes; Nakamoto, Kent

    2014-04-02

    During the past 2 decades, the Internet has evolved to become a necessity in our daily lives. The selection and sorting algorithms of search engines exert tremendous influence over the global spread of information and other communication processes. This study is concerned with demonstrating the influence of selection and sorting/ranking criteria operating in search engines on users' knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes of websites about vaccination. In particular, it is to compare the effects of search engines that deliver websites emphasizing on the pro side of vaccination with those focusing on the con side and with normal Google as a control group. We conducted 2 online experiments using manipulated search engines. A pilot study was to verify the existence of dangerous health literacy in connection with searching and using health information on the Internet by exploring the effect of 2 manipulated search engines that yielded either pro or con vaccination sites only, with a group receiving normal Google as control. A pre-post test design was used; participants were American marketing students enrolled in a study-abroad program in Lugano, Switzerland. The second experiment manipulated the search engine by applying different ratios of con versus pro vaccination webpages displayed in the search results. Participants were recruited from Amazon's Mechanical Turk platform where it was published as a human intelligence task (HIT). Both experiments showed knowledge highest in the group offered only pro vaccination sites (Z=-2.088, P=.03; Kruskal-Wallis H test [H₅]=11.30, P=.04). They acknowledged the importance/benefits (Z=-2.326, P=.02; H5=11.34, P=.04) and effectiveness (Z=-2.230, P=.03) of vaccination more, whereas groups offered antivaccination sites only showed increased concern about effects (Z=-2.582, P=.01; H₅=16.88, P=.005) and harmful health outcomes (Z=-2.200, P=.02) of vaccination. Normal Google users perceived information quality to be positive despite a

  7. World energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    Three major concerns face mankind's future: the impending energy crisis as caused by the depletion of the world's fossil fuel reserves, world atmospheric pollution as caused by the burning of these fuels, and mankind's destruction if the vast energy contained in nuclear weapons stockpiles is released in a global conflict. This paper describes an ambitious, combined solution to these problems by the use of deep underground detonations of thermonuclear devices/bombs to provide a virtually pollution free, world energy source into the far distant future, while achieving a significant increase in mutual trust between the superpowers and all nations. The key is believed to be thermonuclear geothermal stimulation to produce the electrical power needed for a hydrogen economy

  8. Effects of voluntary exercise on spontaneous physical activity and food consumption in mice: Results from an artificial selection experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copes, Lynn E; Schutz, Heidi; Dlugosz, Elizabeth M; Acosta, Wendy; Chappell, Mark A; Garland, Theodore

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated the effect of voluntary exercise on spontaneous physical activity (SPA) and food consumption in mice from 4 replicate lines bred for 57 generations for high voluntary wheel running (HR) and from 4 non-selected control (C) lines. Beginning at ~24 days of age, mice were housed in standard cages or in cages with attached wheels. Wheel activity and SPA were monitored in 1-min intervals. Data from the 8th week of the experiment were analyzed because mice were sexually mature and had plateaued in body mass, weekly wheel running distance, SPA, and food consumption. Body mass, length, and masses of the retroperitoneal fat pad, liver, and heart were recorded after the 13th week. SPA of both HR and C mice decreased with wheel access, due to reductions in both duration and average intensity of SPA. However, total activity duration (SPA+wheel running; min/day) was ~1/3 greater when mice were housed with wheels, and food consumption was significantly increased. Overall, food consumption in both HR and C mice was more strongly affected by wheel running than by SPA. Duration of wheel running had a stronger effect than average speed, but the opposite was true for SPA. With body mass as a covariate, chronic wheel access significantly reduced fat pad mass and increased heart mass in both HR and C mice. Given that both HR and C mice housed with wheels had increased food consumption, the energetic cost of wheel running was not fully compensated by concomitant reductions in SPA. The experiment demonstrates that both duration and intensity of both wheel running and SPA were significant predictors of food consumption. This sort of detailed analysis of the effects of different aspects of physical activity on food consumption has not previously been reported for a non-human animal, and it sets the stage for longitudinal examination of energy balance and its components in rodent models. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Gender difference in response predictors after 1-year exenatide therapy twice daily in type 2 diabetic patients: a real world experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anichini, Roberto; Cosimi, Sabrina; Di Carlo, Alberto; Orsini, Paola; De Bellis, Alessandra; Seghieri, Giuseppe; Franconi, Flavia; Baccetti, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    To investigate whether gender affects therapeutic response by exenatide twice a day (BID) in type 2 diabetes by using a database concerning patients monitored by five outpatient clinics in Tuscany, Italy. We considered a cohort of 315 (154 male/161 female) patients experiencing therapeutic failure while on oral therapy (metformin, or combination therapy metformin + sulphonylureas), who were given exenatide (10 μg/BID) and who fully completed 4 months, 8 months, and 12 months of follow-ups. Among patients stratified by gender and well matched for age, body mass index, and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), it was found that the length of disease was longer in females than in males (12 ± 8 years versus 10 ± 7 years; P = 0.037), and the ratio of patients on metformin to those on combination therapy was higher in men (P = 0.018). Target glycemic response (1-year HbA1c ≤ 7%) was achieved in a significantly higher proportion of males than females (38% versus 27%; χ(2) = 4.66; P = 0.03). Target weight loss expressed as 1-year weight percent fall from baseline ≥ 75th percentile (8.5%) was significantly higher in females at 8 and 12 months (P < 0.05; for both). One-year glycemic target response was inversely related to baseline HbA1c levels and diabetes duration among males, while metformin therapy (compared to oral combination therapy) was a significant predictor of better glycemic targets among females. Homeostasis model assessment-B, measured in 117 patients, predicted hypoglycemic response only in women (P = 0.009). Target 1-year weight loss was predicted by longer diabetes duration among males and by lower baseline HbA1c among females. Finally, no significant difference between genders was noted as to gastrointestinal side effects after exenatide therapy. According to this "real world" experience, predictors of glycemic control and body weight loss after 12 months of exenatide BID therapy are different between genders in type 2 diabetes.

  10. Gender difference in response predictors after 1-year exenatide therapy twice daily in type 2 diabetic patients: a real world experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anichini R

    2013-04-01

    response only in women (P = 0.009. Target 1-year weight loss was predicted by longer diabetes duration among males and by lower baseline HbA1c among females. Finally, no significant difference between genders was noted as to gastrointestinal side effects after exenatide therapy. Conclusion: According to this “real world” experience, predictors of glycemic control and body weight loss after 12 months of exenatide BID therapy are different between genders in type 2 diabetes. Keywords: GLP-1 agonist therapy, exenatide BID, type 2 diabetes, real world setting

  11. 13C spin relaxation measurements in RNA: Sensitivity and resolution improvement using spin-state selective correlation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boisbouvier, Jerome; Brutscher, Bernhard; Simorre, Jean-Pierre; Marion, Dominique

    1999-01-01

    A set of new NMR pulse sequences has been designed for the measurement of 13 C relaxation rate constants in RNA and DNA bases: the spin-lattice relaxation rate constant R(C z ), the spin-spin relaxation rate constant R(C + ), and the CSA-dipolar cross-correlated relaxation rate constant Γ C,CH xy . The use of spin-state selective correlation techniques provides increased sensitivity and spectral resolution. Sensitivity optimised C-C filters are included in the pulse schemes for the suppression of signals originating from undesired carbon isotopomers. The experiments are applied to a 15% 13 C-labelled 33-mer RNA-theophylline complex. The measured R(C + )/Γ C,CH xy ratios indicate that 13 C CSA tensors do not vary significantly for the same type of carbon (C 2 , C 6 , C 8 ), but that they differ from one type to another. In addition, conformational exchange effects in the RNA bases are detected as a change in the relaxation decay of the narrow 13 C doublet component when varying the spacing of a CPMG pulse train. This new approach allows the detection of small exchange effects with a higher precision compared to conventional techniques

  12. From Natural to Artificial Selection: A Chaotic Reading of Shelagh Stephenson’s An Experiment with an Air Pump (1998

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Ahmad Yas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to utilise chaos theory as a methodology and perspective to analyse Shelagh Stephenson’s science drama An Experiment with an Air Pump thematically and structurally. It is highly pertinent to mention here that the discovery of the DNA structure in 1953 by Watson and Crick coincided with the development of a new paradigm shift in science, chaos theory.  The discovery of the DNA structure, on the other hand, led to the birth of the science of genetics which reached its peak in the late 1990s when Human Genome Project was completed. Theatre did not stand aloof from this radical shift. Mapping human genome might lead to appalling ethical dilemmas. Topics related to the cold war and nuclear-bomb were replaced with ones quoted from biology, genetics and cloning. Stephenson’s play brings to light the danger of turning from natural to artificial selection as science, now, has access not only to the DNA structure but also how to manipulate it.  The drama’s extensive debate focuses mainly on the risk of genome-related discrimination.

  13. Sensitivity analysis of efficiency thermal energy storage on selected rock mass and grout parameters using design of experiment method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wołoszyn, Jerzy; Gołaś, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Paper propose a new methodology to sensitivity study of underground thermal storage. • Using MDF model and DOE technique significantly shorter of calculations time. • Calculation of one time step was equal to approximately 57 s. • Sensitivity study cover five thermo-physical parameters. • Conductivity of rock mass and grout material have a significant impact on efficiency. - Abstract: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of selected parameters on the efficiency of underground thermal energy storage. In this paper, besides thermal conductivity, the effect of such parameters as specific heat, density of the rock mass, thermal conductivity and specific heat of grout material was investigated. Implementation of this objective requires the use of an efficient computational method. The aim of the research was achieved by using a new numerical model, Multi Degree of Freedom (MDF), as developed by the authors and Design of Experiment (DoE) techniques with a response surface. The presented methodology can significantly reduce the time that is needed for research and to determine the effect of various parameters on the efficiency of underground thermal energy storage. Preliminary results of the research confirmed that thermal conductivity of the rock mass has the greatest impact on the efficiency of underground thermal energy storage, and that other parameters also play quite significant role

  14. Pregnancy planning and risk behaviours – a survey of women’s experiences in selected European countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Lesińska-Sawicka

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy, a special period in a woman’s life, should be preceded by proper preparation: a positive attitude to procreation, selection of optimum time for becoming pregnant, starting prevention of neural tube defects, restriction of the use of drugs, smoking, etc. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of pregnancy planning and antenatal classes on the use of stimulants during pregnancy. The study group included 877 women living in 7 European countries, and their experiences of planning pregnancy and substance abuse during pregnancy were investigated. In about a half (50.3% of respondents the pregnancy was planned. The highest percentage of mothers who planned pregnancy was recorded in Poland and Bulgaria (about 76%. By contrast, in Germany the proportion of mothers who planned pregnancy was the lowest (46.2%. Surprisingly, they became pregnant despite very frequent use of birth control (96.7%. On average, 17.3% of respondents disclosed that they drank alcohol or coffee, smoked cigarettes or used psychoactive drugs during pregnancy. Among women who did not plan to be pregnant, the use of stimulants was recorded more often. However, pregnancy planning only slightly inclined women to stop the consumption of stimulants. Attendance at antenatal classes did not have any significant effect on the use of stimulants.

  15. World armament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolle, H.

    1977-01-01

    Summary of consequences on: Armament expenditure of the world, arms trade, arms race and nuclear weapon arsenals, nuclear weapon proliferation, nuclear safety controls, nuclear carrier systems, international nuclear trade, nuclear weapon accidents, chemical wars, war law, ecological wars, armament limitations. (HP) [de

  16. Spinning worlds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwarz, H.

    2017-01-01

    The thesis "Spinning Worlds" is about the characterisation of two types of gas-giant exoplanets: Hot Jupiters, with orbital periods of fewer than five days, and young, wide-orbit gas giants, with orbital periods as long as thousands of years. The thesis is based on near-infrared observations of 1

  17. Antinuclear and third world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pak, Haegu

    1986-02-01

    The first part of this book is about antinuclear, which describes nuclear and nuclear war, the lesson out of history, an idea of neutron bomb and antinuclear through life and thoughts. The second part of this book includes the relationship between human and antinuclear, threat of nuclear, third world and popular literature, for conversion of Japan, an atomic experience and literature and experience and testimony in Nagasaki.

  18. RAIRS2 a new expert system for diagnosing tuberculosis with real-world tournament selection mechanism inside artificial immune recognition system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saybani, Mahmoud Reza; Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Golzari, Shahram; Wah, Teh Ying; Saeed, Aghabozorgi; Mat Kiah, Miss Laiha; Balas, Valentina Emilia

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis is a major global health problem that has been ranked as the second leading cause of death from an infectious disease worldwide, after the human immunodeficiency virus. Diagnosis based on cultured specimens is the reference standard; however, results take weeks to obtain. Slow and insensitive diagnostic methods hampered the global control of tuberculosis, and scientists are looking for early detection strategies, which remain the foundation of tuberculosis control. Consequently, there is a need to develop an expert system that helps medical professionals to accurately diagnose the disease. The objective of this study is to diagnose tuberculosis using a machine learning method. Artificial immune recognition system (AIRS) has been used successfully for diagnosing various diseases. However, little effort has been undertaken to improve its classification accuracy. In order to increase the classification accuracy, this study introduces a new hybrid system that incorporates real tournament selection mechanism into the AIRS. This mechanism is used to control the population size of the model and to overcome the existing selection pressure. Patient epacris reports obtained from the Pasteur laboratory in northern Iran were used as the benchmark data set. The sample consisted of 175 records, from which 114 (65 %) were positive for TB, and the remaining 61 (35 %) were negative. The classification performance was measured through tenfold cross-validation, root-mean-square error, sensitivity, and specificity. With an accuracy of 100 %, RMSE of 0, sensitivity of 100 %, and specificity of 100 %, the proposed method was able to successfully classify tuberculosis cases. In addition, the proposed method is comparable with top classifiers used in this research.

  19. Tokamak Physics EXperiment (TPX): Toroidal field magnet design, development and manufacture. SDRL 21, Materials and processes selection. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B.R.

    1995-01-01

    This document identifies the candidate materials and manufacturing processes selected for development of the TPX Toroidal Field (TF) Magnet. Supporting rationale and selection criteria are provided for justification and the materials properties database report is included for completeness. Specific properties for each material selection are included in this document

  20. Quantum Worlds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A. Barrett

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1808-1711.2016v20n1p45 Because of the conceptual difficulties it faces, quantum mechanics provides a salient example of how alternative metaphysical commitments may clarify our understanding of a physical theory and the explanations it provides. Here we will consider how postulating alternative quantum worlds in the context of Hugh Everett III’s pure wave mechanics may serve to explain determinate measurement records and the standard quantum statistics. We will focus on the properties of such worlds, then briefly consider other metaphysical options available for interpreting pure wave mechanics. These reflections will serve to illustrate both the nature and the limits of naturalized metaphysics.

  1. Third World

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K, Peng K

    1980-12-01

    The disparity between the consumption patterns of industrialized and Third World countries reflects an increase in the numbers of people living in poverty who have yet to achieve basic needs. Third World planning, encouraged by transnational companies, too often model their development goals on importing artificial life styles. This exploits poor nations by creating unrealistic demands as well as by creating a market for products that are unacceptable elsewhere. The health and environmental effects of these practices prompted the formation of consumers' association of Penang (CAP), which is trying to make people aware of the need to give basic needs the highest priority. The CAP handles complaints, tests products, and studies the socio-economic-environmental implications of development as well as conducting a far-ranging educational program. Its procedures can be adapted by any country to examine consumer awareness and to press for social reform. (DCK)

  2. Illness in Travelers Returned From Brazil: The GeoSentinel Experience and Implications for the 2014 FIFA World Cup and the 2016 Summer Olympics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilson, Mary E.; Chen, Lin H.; Han, Pauline V.; Keystone, Jay S.; Cramer, Jakob P.; Segurado, Aluisio; Hale, DeVon; Jensenius, Mogens; Schwartz, Eli; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Leder, Karin; Burchard, Gerd-Dieter; Anand, Rahul; Gelman, Stephanie S.; Kain, Kevin; Boggild, Andrea; Perret, Cecilia; Valdivieso, Francisca; Loutan, Louis; Chappuis, François; Schlagenhauf, Patricia; Weber, Rainer; Steffen, Robert; Caumes, Eric; Pérignon, Alice; Libman, Michael D.; Ward, Brian; Maclean, J. Dick; Grobusch, Martin C.; Goorhuis, Abram; de Vries, Peter; Gadroen, Kartini; Mockenhaupt, Frank; Harms, Gunder; Parola, Philippe; Simon, Fabrice; Delmont, Jean; Carosi, Giampiero; Castelli, Francesco; Connor, Bradley A.; Kozarsky, Phyllis E.; Wu, Henry; Fairley, Jessica; Franco-Paredes, Carlos; Using, Johan; Fröberg, Gabrielle; Askling, Helena Hervius; Bronner, Ulf; Haulman, N. Jean; Roesel, David

    2014-01-01

    Background. Brazil will host the 2014 FIFA World Cup and the 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games, events that are expected to attract hundreds of thousands of international travelers. Travelers to Brazil will encounter locally endemic infections as well as mass event-specific risks. Methods. We

  3. Presence of Old Individuals in a Population Accelerates and Optimizes the Process of Selection: in silico Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistyakov, V A; Denisenko, Y V; Bren, A B

    2018-02-01

    One of the important components of the concept of aging-phenoptosis (programmed aging) is the notion of aging as an accelerator of evolution having the rank of subconcept. For many reasons, the main being the problematic experimental testing of evolutionary hypotheses, verification of the above-mentioned subconcept can be based primarily on analysis of the internal inconsistency of heuristic models and their correspondence to undisputedly observed facts. To illustrate the acceleration mechanism, and most importantly to structure the evolutionary process in communities that include naturally weakened individuals, V. P. Skulachev offered in 2003 a conceptual model that he later called a "fable about hares". Despite its simplicity, this model has undoubted internal logic. The natural trend in the development of conceptual models is their translation into the language of mathematics. The purpose of the present work was to create a variation of the known multi-agent model "predator-prey" that would allow us to "see" how the presence in the prey population of naturally weakened (old) members stimulates the selection of individuals with traits whose adaptive potential is not devaluated with age. The model (http://homebear.ru/PD) was developed on the Java platform, version 6, NetBeans development environment 8.2. Statistical analysis and preparation of illustrative materials were carried out using environment R, version 3.4.1. The results of numerical experiments set using our model correspond in principle to the provisions of the heuristic model of Skulachev and, consequently, confirm the absence in it of logical contradictions.

  4. Economic considerations and patients' preferences affect treatment selection for patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a discrete choice experiment among European rheumatologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hifinger, M; Hiligsmann, M; Ramiro, S; Watson, V; Severens, J L; Fautrel, B; Uhlig, T; van Vollenhoven, R; Jacques, P; Detert, J; Canas da Silva, J; Scirè, C A; Berghea, F; Carmona, L; Péntek, M; Keat, A; Boonen, A

    2017-01-01

    To compare the value that rheumatologists across Europe attach to patients' preferences and economic aspects when choosing treatments for patients with rheumatoid arthritis. In a discrete choice experiment, European rheumatologists chose between two hypothetical drug treatments for a patient with moderate disease activity. Treatments differed in five attributes: efficacy (improvement and achieved state on disease activity), safety (probability of serious adverse events), patient's preference (level of agreement), medication costs and cost-effectiveness (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER)). A Bayesian efficient design defined 14 choice sets, and a random parameter logit model was used to estimate relative preferences for rheumatologists across countries. Cluster analyses and latent class models were applied to understand preference patterns across countries and among individual rheumatologists. Responses of 559 rheumatologists from 12 European countries were included in the analysis (49% females, mean age 48 years). In all countries, efficacy dominated treatment decisions followed by economic considerations and patients' preferences. Across countries, rheumatologists avoided selecting a treatment that patients disliked. Latent class models revealed four respondent profiles: one traded off all attributes except safety, and the remaining three classes disregarded ICER. Among individual rheumatologists, 57% disregarded ICER and these were more likely from Italy, Romania, Portugal or France, whereas 43% disregarded uncommon/rare side effects and were more likely from Belgium, Germany, Hungary, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden or UK. Overall, European rheumatologists are willing to trade between treatment efficacy, patients' treatment preferences and economic considerations. However, the degree of trade-off differs between countries and among individuals. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted

  5. Site selection experience for a new low-level radioactive waste storage/disposal facility at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towler, O.A.; Cook, J.R.; Helton, B.D.

    1985-10-01

    Preliminary performance criteria and site selection guides specific to the Savannah River Plant, were developed for a new low-level radioactive waste storage/disposal facility. These site selection guides were applied to seventeen potential sites identified at SRP. The potential site were ranked based on how well they met a set of characteristics considered important in site selection for a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. The characteristics were given a weighting factor representing its relative importance in meeting site performance criteria. A candidate site was selected and will be the subject of a site characterization program

  6. Giving voice to wildlands visitors: Selecting indicators to protect and sustain experiences in the eastern arctic of Nunavut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan Watson; Brian Glaspell; Neal Christensen; Paul Lachapelle; Vicki Sahanatien; Frances Gertsch

    2007-01-01

    Many public land management agencies are committed to understanding and protecting recreation visitor experiences. Parks Canada is deeply committed to that objective for visitors to Canada's National Parks. This 2004 study, informed by a 2003 qualitative study of visitor experiences and influences on those experiences at Auyuittuq National Park in Nunavut, worked...

  7. Introduction of a Simple Experiment for the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory Demonstrating the Lewis Acid and Shape-Selective Properties of Zeolite Na-Y

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Vincent; Szczepanski, Zach

    2017-01-01

    A simple, inexpensive, discovery-based experiment for undergraduate organic laboratories has been developed that demonstrates the Lewis acid and shape-selective properties of zeolites. Calcined zeolite Na-Y promotes the electrophilic aromatic bromination of toluene with a significantly higher para/ortho ratio than observed under conventional…

  8. The role of safety analyses in site selection. Some personal observations based on the experience from the Swiss site selection process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuidema, Piet [Nagra, Wettingen (Switzerland)

    2015-07-01

    In Switzerland, the site selection process according to the ''Sectoral Plan for Deep Geological Repositories'' (BFE 2008) is underway since 2008. This process takes place in three stages. In stage 1 geological siting regions (six for the L/ILW repository and three for the HLW repository) have been identified, in stage 2 sites for the surface facilities have been identified for all siting regions in close co-operation with the sting regions and a narrowing down of the number of siting regions based on geological criteria will take place. In stage 3 the sites for a general license application are selected and the general license applications will be submitted which eventually will lead to the siting decision for both repository types. In the Swiss site selection process, safety has the highest priority. Many factors affect safety and thus a whole range of safety-related issues are considered in the identification and screening of siting possibilities. Besides dose calculations a range of quantitative and qualitative issues are considered. Dose calculations are performed in all three stages of the site selection process. In stage 1 generic safety calculations were made to develop criteria to be used for the identification of potential siting regions. In stage 2, dose calculations are made for comparing the different siting regions according to a procedure prescribed in detail by the regulator. Combined with qualitative evaluations this will lead to a narrowing down of the number of siting regions to at least two siting regions for each repository type. In stage 3 full safety cases will be prepared as part of the documentation for the general license applications. Besides the dose calculations, many other issues related to safety are analyzed in a quantitative and qualitative manner. These consider the 13 criteria defined in the Sectoral Plan and the corresponding indicators. The features analyzed cover the following broad themes: efficiency of

  9. The role of safety analyses in site selection. Some personal observations based on the experience from the Swiss site selection process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuidema, Piet

    2015-01-01

    In Switzerland, the site selection process according to the ''Sectoral Plan for Deep Geological Repositories'' (BFE 2008) is underway since 2008. This process takes place in three stages. In stage 1 geological siting regions (six for the L/ILW repository and three for the HLW repository) have been identified, in stage 2 sites for the surface facilities have been identified for all siting regions in close co-operation with the sting regions and a narrowing down of the number of siting regions based on geological criteria will take place. In stage 3 the sites for a general license application are selected and the general license applications will be submitted which eventually will lead to the siting decision for both repository types. In the Swiss site selection process, safety has the highest priority. Many factors affect safety and thus a whole range of safety-related issues are considered in the identification and screening of siting possibilities. Besides dose calculations a range of quantitative and qualitative issues are considered. Dose calculations are performed in all three stages of the site selection process. In stage 1 generic safety calculations were made to develop criteria to be used for the identification of potential siting regions. In stage 2, dose calculations are made for comparing the different siting regions according to a procedure prescribed in detail by the regulator. Combined with qualitative evaluations this will lead to a narrowing down of the number of siting regions to at least two siting regions for each repository type. In stage 3 full safety cases will be prepared as part of the documentation for the general license applications. Besides the dose calculations, many other issues related to safety are analyzed in a quantitative and qualitative manner. These consider the 13 criteria defined in the Sectoral Plan and the corresponding indicators. The features analyzed cover the following broad themes: efficiency of

  10. Estimation of Genetic Variance Components Including Mutation and Epistasis using Bayesian Approach in a Selection Experiment on Body Weight in Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Widyas, Nuzul; Jensen, Just; Nielsen, Vivi Hunnicke

    Selection experiment was performed for weight gain in 13 generations of outbred mice. A total of 18 lines were included in the experiment. Nine lines were allotted to each of the two treatment diets (19.3 and 5.1 % protein). Within each diet three lines were selected upwards, three lines were...... selected downwards and three lines were kept as controls. Bayesian statistical methods are used to estimate the genetic variance components. Mixed model analysis is modified including mutation effect following the methods by Wray (1990). DIC was used to compare the model. Models including mutation effect...... have better fit compared to the model with only additive effect. Mutation as direct effect contributes 3.18% of the total phenotypic variance. While in the model with interactions between additive and mutation, it contributes 1.43% as direct effect and 1.36% as interaction effect of the total variance...

  11. Is It a Different World? Providing a Holistic Understanding of the Experiences and Perceptions of Non-Black Students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, Andrew T.; Palmer, Robert T.; Maramba, Dina C.

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study contributes an original holistic understanding of the perceptions and experiences of non-Black students (e.g., Asian American, Latino, and White) as they matriculate into historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs), persist to graduation, and reflect on their experiences as graduates at HBCUs. Findings from this…

  12. Virtual worlds for people with autism spectrum disorder: a case study in Second Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stendal, Karen; Balandin, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the use of virtual worlds by people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), with a particular focus on the virtual world Second Life™. Case study methodology was selected to explore the experiences of Wolf, a participant with ASD, in Second Life. Wolf participated in three in-depth interviews. The interviews were analyzed using a content analysis to identify themes and sub-themes. Analysis identified four main themes: social factors and communication, empowerment, virtual world versus physical world, and social cues and body language. Anecdotally Wolf's experiences suggest that people with ASD enjoy using a virtual world and may feel more comfortable communicating in the virtual world context than the physical world. Virtual worlds offer a venue for people with ASD to be a part of a virtual society, lowers communication barriers experienced in the physical world, and gives the participant a unique opportunity to create and maintain friendships. Virtual worlds offer an arena for people with ASD to meet their peers on equal terms, not being dependent on social cues, which in the physical world can be a barrier for communication for this group. Further research in this area is required.

  13. Attracting Health Insurance Buyers through Selective Contracting: Results of a Discrete-Choice Experiment among Users of Hospital Services in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelien Bergrath

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In 2006, the Netherlands commenced market based reforms in its health care system. The reforms included selective contracting of health care providers by health insurers. This paper focuses on how health insurers may increase their market share on the health insurance market through selective contracting of health care providers. Selective contracting is studied by eliciting the preferences of health care consumers for attributes of health care services that an insurer could negotiate on behalf of its clients with health care providers. Selective contracting may provide incentives for health care providers to deliver the quality that consumers need and demand. Selective contracting also enables health insurers to steer individual patients towards selected health care providers. We used a stated preference technique known as a discrete choice experiment to collect and analyze the data. Results indicate that consumers care about both costs and quality of care, with healthy consumers placing greater emphasis on costs and consumers with poorer health placing greater emphasis on quality of care. It is possible for an insurer to satisfy both of these criteria by selective contracting health care providers who consequently purchase health care that is both efficient and of good quality.

  14. Laurel Clark Earth Camp: A Program for Teachers and Students to Explore Their World and Study Global Change Through Field-Experience and Satellite Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxner, S.; Orchard, A.; Colodner, D.; Schwartz, K.; Crown, D. A.; King, B.; Baldridge, A.

    2012-03-01

    The Laurel Clark Earth Camp program provides middle and high school students and teachers opportunities to explore local environmental issues and global change through field-experiences, inquiry exercises, and exploring satellite images.

  15. This will the world what will be the biggest experiment in ... and we don't really know happen when we turn it on!

    CERN Multimedia

    Leighton, Barry

    2007-01-01

    Jim Brooke gazed admiringly at the 12'500 tonne time machine which is slowly taking shape in an eerie subterranean vault and declared: "This is the biggest physics experiment ever and will be for years to come. (2pages)

  16. [International experience in the legal regulation of the circulation of medicines through the prism of the law of the world trade organization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasechnyk, Olena V; Hendel, Nataliia V

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: The development of international legal cooperation in the field of health has largely been driven by the trade interests of states. The aim: The article analyzes the legal regulation of the circulation of medicines through the prism of the law of the World Trade Organization. Materials and methods: Using the historical legal method has allowed to analyze the genesis of legal regulation of the circulation of medicines through the prism of the law of the World Trade Organization. The dialectical method is widely used, in particular, when it comes to the issue of the ratio of market regulation of medicines circulation and public health protection, the formal logic method, in particular, in formulating the general principles, principles and methods of legal regulation in the field of medicines, as well as the systemic method, in particular, in defining the institutional component of legal regulation in the field of medicines. Review: The activities of the WTO include several areas related to health protection: international control over infectious diseases, international legal regulation of food safety (food security), tobacco control, environmental protection, international legal aspects of access and treatment of medicinal and pharmaceutical products, international legal regulation of medical services provision. Conclusions: It is proved that the right to health is a right to access to medicines. However, for many developing countries, it is problematic to obtain patents for the production of necessary medicines or to pay a license fee, which creates a barrier to the realization of the right to health.

  17. The Japanese Experience of the NameExoWorlds Competition: Translating Official Information into Japanese to Enable Domestic Groups to Participate in a Global Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usuda-Sato, K.; Iizuka, R.; Yamaoka, H.; Handa, T.

    2018-02-01

    Translation of information from English is an essential step toward ensuring the involvement of non-English speakers in global events. The NameExoWorlds competition, led by the International Astronomical Union (IAU), was held from 9 July 2014 to 15 December 2015. It was a unique event that invited the public to name celestial bodies. In Japan, language acts as a significant barrier for amateur astronomers and school students to participate in global events hosted in English. To address this concern, we established a domestic working group to set up a Japanese website and provided a translation of the IAU's official site for the NameExoWorlds competition. We also developed additional original information in Japanese when needed and sent announcements to a mailing lists of astronomy societies in Japan. As a result, 28% of the registered groups and 47% of proposals for names were from Japan, making Japan the most active country for these stages of the competition. After the competition had ended, we carried out a survey in the Japanese astronomy community and received 124 responses. We found that most of the Japanese participants referred to our official Japanese website in order to overcome the language barrier and participate in the competition. This article explores our work of translating the competition information into Japanese and our evaluation of the impact of this action on the uptake by Japanese astronomy enthusiasts.

  18. On the selection and validation of biological treatment processes. The GDF experience; Le choix et la validation des procedes de traitement biologique. L`experience de GDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druelle, V. [Gaz de France (GDF), 75 - Paris (France)

    1996-12-31

    The biological treatment process was selected by Gaz de France (GDF), the French national gas utility, for the de-pollution of an old gas works where the main pollutants are coal tars containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Microorganism-based biological treatment techniques may involve bio-reactors, static ground knolls (where oxygen is brought through drains) and dynamic knolls (where oxygenation is carried out by turning up the soil). Issues on sampling, sorting, process testing, site preparation, process control, etc. are reviewed

  19. On the selection and validation of biological treatment processes. The GDF experience; Le choix et la validation des procedes de traitement biologique. L`experience de GDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druelle, V [Gaz de France (GDF), 75 - Paris (France)

    1997-12-31

    The biological treatment process was selected by Gaz de France (GDF), the French national gas utility, for the de-pollution of an old gas works where the main pollutants are coal tars containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Microorganism-based biological treatment techniques may involve bio-reactors, static ground knolls (where oxygen is brought through drains) and dynamic knolls (where oxygenation is carried out by turning up the soil). Issues on sampling, sorting, process testing, site preparation, process control, etc. are reviewed

  20. The new world disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checa, Nicolas; Maguire, John; Barney, Jonathan

    2003-08-01

    On January 1, 1995, representatives from 76 countries signed the World Trade Organization charter, which for years had been part of a temporary trade agreement. The WTO's emergence as a fully empowered supranational body seemed to reflect the triumph of what the first President Bush had described as the "new world order." That order was based on two assumptions: that a healthy economy and a sound financial system make for political stability, and that countries in business together do not fight each other. The number one priority of U.S. foreign policy was thus to encourage the former Communist countries of Europe and the developing nations in Latin America, Asia, and Africa to adopt business-friendly policies. Private capital would flow from the developed world into these countries, creating economic growth. It sounded too good to be true, and so it proved. The new world order of Bush père and his successor, Bill Clinton, has been replaced by the new world disorder of Bush fils. Under the second Bush's administration, the economic and political rationale-behind the Washington consensus of the 1990s has unraveled, forcing a radical change in our perceptions of which countries are safe for business. Negotiating this new environment will require companies to more rigorously evaluate political events and more carefully assess the links between political, economic, and financial risk factors. They'll need to be more selective about which markets to enter, and they'll need to think differently about how to position themselves in those markets. The geopolitical events of the past year, the Bush administration's global war on terror, as well as ongoing convulsions in traditional political and economic relationships must be understood and managed by corporate leaders worldwide. With careful analysis, business leaders can increase their companies' visibility and better respond to the uncertainties of the new world disorder.

  1. Resource allocation for maximizing prediction accuracy and genetic gain of genomic selection in plant breeding: a simulation experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Aaron J

    2013-03-01

    Allocating resources between population size and replication affects both genetic gain through phenotypic selection and quantitative trait loci detection power and effect estimation accuracy for marker-assisted selection (MAS). It is well known that because alleles are replicated across individuals in quantitative trait loci mapping and MAS, more resources should be allocated to increasing population size compared with phenotypic selection. Genomic selection is a form of MAS using all marker information simultaneously to predict individual genetic values for complex traits and has widely been found superior to MAS. No studies have explicitly investigated how resource allocation decisions affect success of genomic selection. My objective was to study the effect of resource allocation on response to MAS and genomic selection in a single biparental population of doubled haploid lines by using computer simulation. Simulation results were compared with previously derived formulas for the calculation of prediction accuracy under different levels of heritability and population size. Response of prediction accuracy to resource allocation strategies differed between genomic selection models (ridge regression best linear unbiased prediction [RR-BLUP], BayesCπ) and multiple linear regression using ordinary least-squares estimation (OLS), leading to different optimal resource allocation choices between OLS and RR-BLUP. For OLS, it was always advantageous to maximize population size at the expense of replication, but a high degree of flexibility was observed for RR-BLUP. Prediction accuracy of doubled haploid lines included in the training set was much greater than of those excluded from the training set, so there was little benefit to phenotyping only a subset of the lines genotyped. Finally, observed prediction accuracies in the simulation compared well to calculated prediction accuracies, indicating these theoretical formulas are useful for making resource allocation

  2. 2014 World Conference on Information Systems and Technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Correia, Ana; Tan, Felix; Stroetmann, Karl

    2014-01-01

    This book contains a selection of articles from The 2014 World Conference on Information Systems and Technologies (WorldCIST'14), held between the 15th and 18th of April in Funchal, Madeira, Portugal, a global forum for researchers and practitioners to present and discuss recent results and innovations, current trends, professional experiences and challenges of modern Information Systems and Technologies research, technological development and applications. The main topics covered are: Information and Knowledge Management; Organizational Models and Information Systems; Intelligent and Decision Support Systems; Software Systems, Architectures, Applications and Tools; Computer Networks, Mobility and Pervasive Systems; Radar Technologies; Human-Computer Interaction; Health Informatics; and Information Technologies in Education.

  3. Intuitive experimentation in the physical world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramley, Neil R; Gerstenberg, Tobias; Tenenbaum, Joshua B; Gureckis, Todd M

    2018-06-06

    Many aspects of our physical environment are hidden. For example, it is hard to estimate how heavy an object is from visual observation alone. In this paper we examine how people actively "experiment" within the physical world to discover such latent properties. In the first part of the paper, we develop a novel framework for the quantitative analysis of the information produced by physical interactions. We then describe two experiments that present participants with moving objects in "microworlds" that operate according to continuous spatiotemporal dynamics similar to everyday physics (i.e., forces of gravity, friction, etc.). Participants were asked to interact with objects in the microworlds in order to identify their masses, or the forces of attraction/repulsion that governed their movement. Using our modeling framework, we find that learners who freely interacted with the physical system selectively produced evidence that revealed the physical property consistent with their inquiry goal. As a result, their inferences were more accurate than for passive observers and, in some contexts, for yoked participants who watched video replays of an active learner's interactions. We characterize active learners' actions into a range of micro-experiment strategies and discuss how these might be learned or generalized from past experience. The technical contribution of this work is the development of a novel analytic framework and methodology for the study of interactively learning about the physical world. Its empirical contribution is the demonstration of sophisticated goal directed human active learning in a naturalistic context. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The future of scientific, technical and industrial information to Third World users - A donors view. The experience of the International Development Research Centre (IDRC), Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadbent, K.P.; Lafond, R.

    1990-05-01

    Access to scientific information by poorer countries, sometimes referred to as the ''South'', is limited in contrast to the countries in the ''North''. The South lacks the infrastructure, management and technical expertise to develop and support the range of services now commonplace in the information rich industrial countries of the ''North''. The programme of support to information systems and services in poorer countries by the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) is described with specific examples drawn from its industry and technology information programme. Third world countries are in a difficult position and need help to keep on the cutting edge of new information-communication technologies. Any help, however must focus on such factors as persistence, impact and sustainability of information systems and services. (author). 5 refs

  5. The future of scientific, technical and industrial information to Third World users - A donors view. The experience of the International Development Research Centre (IDRC), Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broadbent, K P [International Development Research Centre, Ottawa (Canada). Science and Technology Information; Lafond, R [International Development Research Centre, Ottawa (Canada). Industry and Technology Programme

    1990-05-01

    Access to scientific information by poorer countries, sometimes referred to as the ``South``, is limited in contrast to the countries in the ``North``. The South lacks the infrastructure, management and technical expertise to develop and support the range of services now commonplace in the information rich industrial countries of the ``North``. The programme of support to information systems and services in poorer countries by the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) is described with specific examples drawn from its industry and technology information programme. Third world countries are in a difficult position and need help to keep on the cutting edge of new information-communication technologies. Any help, however must focus on such factors as persistence, impact and sustainability of information systems and services. (author). 5 refs.

  6. Experiences Using Hybrid MPI/OpenMP in the Real World: Parallelization of a 3D CFD Solver for Multi-Core Node Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Jost

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Today most systems in high-performance computing (HPC feature a hierarchical hardware design: shared-memory nodes with several multi-core CPUs are connected via a network infrastructure. When parallelizing an application for these architectures it seems natural to employ a hierarchical programming model such as combining MPI and OpenMP. Nevertheless, there is the general lore that pure MPI outperforms the hybrid MPI/OpenMP approach. In this paper, we describe the hybrid MPI/OpenMP parallelization of IR3D (Incompressible Realistic 3-D code, a full-scale real-world application, which simulates the environmental effects on the evolution of vortices trailing behind control surfaces of underwater vehicles. We discuss performance, scalability and limitations of the pure MPI version of the code on a variety of hardware platforms and show how the hybrid approach can help to overcome certain limitations.

  7. Evaluating the Effectiveness and the Impact of Donated Neurosurgical Equipment on Neurosurgical Units in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: The World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturini, Sara; Park, Kee B

    2018-01-01

    Surgical practice highly depends on the availability of surgical equipment; this is particularly relevant to low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), where resources are limited. A key part of the efforts to improve surgical provision globally include providing affordable equipment to LMICs; however, the effectiveness and the impact of these initiatives have not yet been assessed. We aimed to evaluate the World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies neurosurgical equipment program in this context. Recipients were identified from the World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies records; contact details were gathered. An online survey was used to collect data on equipment, including its current use, any malfunctioning issues, suitability, reliability, serviceability, and the impact it has had on the unit. Responses were received from 16 units, totaling 28 pieces of equipment. A total of 75% of the equipment is still in use; of this, 57% is fully functioning, and 43% is used despite some malfunction. We found that 25% of the equipment is broken and unusable; high-maintenance items, such as high-speed drills, feature in this category (100% broken, n = 3). Units reported an increase in number of operation performed in 74% cases, improved surgery quality in 78%, and breadth of operations in 44%. Satisfaction, equipment suitability, reliability, and serviceability scored highly, with median values of 9 for all fields on a 10-point scale. Equipment donation positively impacts neurosurgical units in LMICs by allowing expansion of neurosurgical practice, improved safety and quality, and affordability. Adequate follow-up, considerations regarding equipment durability and maintenance needs, and improved support for repairs should be prioritized to ensure maximal benefit. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Economic considerations and patients' preferences affect treatment selection for patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a discrete choice experiment among European rheumatologists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hifinger, M.; Hiligsmann, M.; Ramiro, S.; Watson, V.; Severens, J. L.; Fautrel, B.; Uhlig, T.; van Vollenhoven, R.; Jacques, P.; Detert, J.; Canas da Silva, J.; Scirè, C. A.; Berghea, F.; Carmona, L.; Péntek, M.; Keat, A.; Boonen, A.

    2017-01-01

    To compare the value that rheumatologists across Europe attach to patients' preferences and economic aspects when choosing treatments for patients with rheumatoid arthritis. In a discrete choice experiment, European rheumatologists chose between two hypothetical drug treatments for a patient with

  9. Use of Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis to Select Benchmark Experiments for the Validation of Computer Codes and Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elam, K.R.; Rearden, B.T.

    2003-01-01

    Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis methodologies under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were applied to determine whether existing benchmark experiments adequately cover the area of applicability for the criticality code and data validation of PuO 2 and mixed-oxide (MOX) powder systems. The study examined three PuO 2 powder systems and four MOX powder systems that would be useful for establishing mass limits for a MOX fuel fabrication facility. Using traditional methods to choose experiments for criticality analysis validation, 46 benchmark critical experiments were identified as applicable to the PuO 2 powder systems. However, only 14 experiments were thought to be within the area of applicability for dry MOX powder systems.The applicability of 318 benchmark critical experiments, including the 60 experiments initially identified, was assessed. Each benchmark and powder system was analyzed using the Tools for Sensitivity and UNcertainty Analysis Methodology Implementation (TSUNAMI) one-dimensional (TSUNAMI-1D) or TSUNAMI three-dimensional (TSUNAMI-3D) sensitivity analysis sequences, which will be included in the next release of the SCALE code system. This sensitivity data and cross-section uncertainty data were then processed with TSUNAMI-IP to determine the correlation of each application to each experiment in the benchmarking set. Correlation coefficients are used to assess the similarity between systems and determine the applicability of one system for the code and data validation of another.The applicability of most of the experiments identified using traditional methods was confirmed by the TSUNAMI analysis. In addition, some PuO 2 and MOX powder systems were determined to be within the area of applicability of several other benchmarks that would not have been considered using traditional methods. Therefore, the number of benchmark experiments useful for the validation of these systems exceeds the number previously expected. The TSUNAMI analysis

  10. Coupling of continuum mechanics and electrodynamics:an investigation of electromagnetic force models by means of experiments and selected problems

    OpenAIRE

    Reich, Felix Alexander

    2017-01-01

    In the literature, many models of electromagnetic momentum are proposed. Each model implies a form of the electromagnetic force density, which acts as a source in the mechanical momentum balance. The debate as to which model of the electromagnetic force is "correct" for arbitrary materials and processes is ongoing. Most authors argue in favor or against specific models by virtue of thought experiments, e.g, with light waves. The topic of this work is to show that experiments conducted on a ma...

  11. Realization and utilization of a harmonic light scattering experiment to select new molecules with great optical nonlinearity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhenaut, Christophe

    1995-01-01

    Conception of new organic materials for nonlinear optics is generally driven by a molecular engineering approach. The usual technique for determining the quadratic hyper polarizability of designed molecules is the electric field induced second harmonic (EFISH) experiment. However this technique is limited to neutral molecules with a permanent dipole moment. We have realized an harmonic light scattering (HLS) experiment which allow the measurement of any kind of molecules, polar or non polar, neutral or ionic. Using this technique we have been able to demonstrate experimentally the validity of the octupole concept (molecules without dipole moment) which has been proposed recently. We have studied molecules corresponding to various octupolar geometries. Nonlinearities are found to be comparable to those of the best dipolar compounds. We have also investigated other molecular families with different symmetry such as polyenes, sub-phthalocyanines and phthalocyanines by EFISH and HLS techniques. We have confronted results obtained by the two experiments. It appears that these results are not easy to compare, the tensorial components accessible by each experiment being different. The two experiments seems complementary. HLS experiments allow the observation of a quadratic hyper polarizability for centrosymmetric molecules. This surprising observation could be explained by the contribution of a vibration al part to the hyper polarizability measured by HLS (but not present in EFISH). Interpretation of this dynamic process is still in progress. (author) [fr

  12. "It's One of the Hardest Jobs in the World": The Experience and Understanding of Qualified Nurses Who Work with Individuals Diagnosed with Both Learning Disability and Personality Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Amy; Kiemle, Gundi

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study examines the experiences of qualified nurses working with individuals diagnosed with both intellectual disability and personality disorder (PD) in a medium-secure forensic intellectual disability setting. Potential training needs are highlighted, as well as other ways in which services could better support staff to work…

  13. Effect of Learning Achievement of the Eye of Productive Training, Prakerin Experience, and Interests in Student Readiness Entering the World of Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dita Nur Faizah

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study is a quantitative research by using descriptive and ex-post facto. The purpose of this research is to know how: (1 the description of learning achievement, description of internship experience, description of working interest, and description of working readiness; (2 the effect of productive learning achievement, internship experience, and working interest partially on the readiness of work for the students of SMK Negeri 1 Kraksaan Probolinggo. Data collection techniques used are questionnaire and documentation method. The sampling technique used is proportional random sampling. The result of the analysis shows that: (1 student learning achievement of productive, student internship experience, students working interest, and readiness of student work is in good category; (2 there is a negative and not significant influence between learning achievement of productive education and training on job readiness; (3 there is a positive but insignificant influence between internship experience on job readiness; (4 there is a positive but not significant influence between the interest of work to the readiness of class XII business management students in SMK Negeri 1 Kraksaan Probolinggo.

  14. Refining the Results of a Classical SELEX Experiment by Expanding the Sequence Data Set of an Aptamer Pool Selected for Protein A

    OpenAIRE

    Regina Stoltenburg; Beate Strehlitz

    2018-01-01

    New, as yet undiscovered aptamers for Protein A were identified by applying next generation sequencing (NGS) to a previously selected aptamer pool. This pool was obtained in a classical SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment) experiment using the FluMag-SELEX procedure followed by cloning and Sanger sequencing. PA#2/8 was identified as the only Protein A-binding aptamer from the Sanger sequence pool, and was shown to be able to bind intact cells of Staphylococcus aur...

  15. Analogous Mechanisms of Selection and Updating in Declarative and Procedural Working Memory: Experiments and a Computational Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberauer, Klaus; Souza, Alessandra S.; Druey, Michel D.; Gade, Miriam

    2013-01-01

    The article investigates the mechanisms of selecting and updating representations in declarative and procedural working memory (WM). Declarative WM holds the objects of thought available, whereas procedural WM holds representations of what to do with these objects. Both systems consist of three embedded components: activated long-term memory, a…

  16. Experience with the selection method in pine stands in the southern United States, with implications for future application

    Science.gov (United States)

    James M. Guldin

    2011-01-01

    The selection method applied in shade-intolerant pine stands in the southern United States has been shown to be an effective method of uneven-aged silviculture, but it is becoming less frequently practiced for a variety of reasons. Economically, the high value of standing timber puts fully stocked uneven-aged pine stands at risk of liquidation if the timberland is sold...

  17. Rational Action Selection in 1 1/2- to 3-Year-Olds Following an Extended Training Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klossek, Ulrike M. H.; Dickinson, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies failed to find evidence for rational action selection in children under 2 years of age. The current study investigated whether younger children required more training to encode the relevant causal relationships. Children between 1 1/2 and 3 years of age were trained over two sessions to perform actions on a touch-sensitive screen…

  18. Intensified Local Resource Mobilization for the Polio Eradication Initiative: The Experience of World Health Organization in Nigeria During 2008-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehualashet, Yared G; Horton, Janet; Mkanda, Pascal; Vaz, Rui G; Afolabi, Oluwole; Gashu, Sisay G; Banda, Richard; O'Malley, Helena; Nsubuga, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Since the World Health Assembly (WHA) resolved in 1988 to eradicate poliovirus, several rounds of immunization campaigns have been conducted by member states. By 2000, with the support of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) partners, the number of polio cases decreased by 99%. Eradicating the remaining 1% proved to be more challenging. Although the GPEI, being the largest public health project, required >$9 billion between 1988 and 2012, economic analysis showed the estimated incremental net benefits of $40 billion-$50 billion between 1988 and 2035. In 2012, the WHA declared that the completion of poliovirus eradication is a programmatic emergency for global public health. Nigeria, as one of 3 remaining polio-endemic countries, developed an emergency plan to interrupt the transmission of poliovirus. The plan included the introduction or scale-up of various new innovations and strategies, which had substantial financial implication. This is a retrospective study to document the intensified resource mobilization efforts made by the World Health Organization (WHO) in Nigeria to meet the increased financial requirements and bridge the remaining gap in funding. In addition to the established coordination platforms, the WHO Nigeria Country Office team directly engaged with national authorities, donors, and partners throughout the process of resource requirement analysis, project appraisals, proposal development, and implementation of activities, joint monitoring, and evaluation exercises. The office strengthened its capacity for direct funds disbursement and systematic implementation of a rigorous accountability framework. Between 2008 and May 2015, $538 million was mobilized locally, of which 82% was mobilized since 2012. The percentage of the total funding requirements that were locally mobilized averaged 31% between 2008 and 2011 and increased to 70% between 2012 and May 2015. During the same period, the WHO Nigeria Country Office team produced and

  19. Physiological Sensing Now Open to the World: New Resources Are Allowing Us to Learn, Experiment, and Create Imaginative Solutions for Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Hugo Placido

    2018-01-01

    With the advent of low-cost computing platforms, such as Arduino (http://www.arduino.cc) and Raspberry Pi (http://www.raspberrypi.org), it has become clear that lowering the cost barrier and shortening the learning curve, with the backing of a motivated community, would play a transformational role in the way people learn, experiment, and create imaginative solutions to outstanding problems that can benefit from embedded systems.

  20. Analysis of world experience in constructing underground small nuclear power plants and assessment of its potential use in the Russian Arctic regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smirnov Yu. G.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the common ideology and main idea of locating underground nuclear plants. Specific examples in domestic and foreign experience have been analyzed. It has been established that underground small nuclear power plants can be used as an alternative source of electric and thermal energy for solving defense-strategic and social-economic tasks particularly when developing mineral raw material resources in the Russian Arctic regions