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Sample records for selective serotonin transporter

  1. Common selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor side effects in older adults associated with genetic polymorphisms in the serotonin transporter and receptors: data from a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfield, Lauren D; Dixon, David; Nowotny, Petra; Lotrich, Francis E; Pollock, Bruce G; Kristjansson, Sean D; Doré, Peter M; Lenze, Eric J

    2014-10-01

    Antidepressant side effects are a significant public health issue, associated with poor adherence, premature treatment discontinuation, and, rarely, significant harm. Older adults assume the largest and most serious burden of medication side effects. We investigated the association between antidepressant side effects and genetic variation in the serotonin system in anxious, older adults participating in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) escitalopram. Adults (N = 177) aged ≥ 60 years were randomized to active treatment or placebo for 12 weeks. Side effects were assessed using the Udvalg fur Kliniske Undersøgelser side-effect rating scale. Genetic polymorphisms were putative functional variants in the promoters of the serotonin transporter and 1A and 2A receptors (5-HTTLPR [L/S + rs25531], HTR1A rs6295, HTR2A rs6311, respectively). Four significant drug-placebo side-effect differences were found: increased duration of sleep, dry mouth, diarrhea, and diminished sexual desire. Analyses using putative high- versus low-transcription genotype groupings revealed six pharmacogenetic effects: greater dry mouth and decreased sexual desire for the low- and high-expressing serotonin transporter genotypes, respectively, and greater diarrhea with the 1A receptor low-transcription genotype. Diminished sexual desire was experienced significantly more by high-expressing genotypes in the serotonin transporter, 1A, or 2A receptors. There was not a significant relationship between drug concentration and side effects nor a mean difference in drug concentration between low- and high-expressing genotypes. Genetic variation in the serotonin system may predict who develops common SSRI side effects and why. More work is needed to further characterize this genetic modulation and to translate research findings into strategies useful for more personalized patient care. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Variation in the serotonin transporter gene modulates selective attention to threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osinsky, Roman; Reuter, Martin; Küpper, Yvonne; Schmitz, Anja; Kozyra, Eva; Alexander, Nina; Hennig, Jürgen

    2008-08-01

    The 5-HTTLPR is an insertion/deletion polymorphism in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene. Prior research has revealed associations between the short-allele variant of this polymorphism, enhanced self-reported negative emotionality, and hypersensitivity of fear relevant neural circuits. In a sample of 50 healthy women we examined the role of 5-HTTLPR for cognitive-affective processing of phylogenetical fear-relevant stimuli (spiders) in a dot probe task. In contrast to homozygote long-allele carriers (ll), participants carrying at least 1 short allele (ss and sl) selectively shifted attention toward pictures of spiders, when these were presented for a duration of 2,000 ms. These results argue for an involvement of 5-HTTLPR in cognitive processing of threatening stimuli and thus, underpin its general role for individual differences in negative affect.

  3. The serotonin transporter knockout rat : A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olivier, Jocelien; Cools, Alexander; Ellenbroek, Bart A.; Cuppen, E.; Homberg, Judith; Kalueff, Allan V.; LaPorte, Justin L.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter dicusses the most recent data on the serotonin transporter knock-out rat, a unique rat model that has been generated by target-selected N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) driven mutagenesis. The knock-out rat is the result of a premature stopcodon in the serotonin transporter gene, and the

  4. Serotonin transporter gene promoter polymorphisms modify the association between paroxetine serotonin transporter occupancy and clinical response in major depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruhé, Henricus G.; Ooteman, Wendy; Booij, Jan; Michel, Martin C.; Moeton, Martina; Baas, Frank; Schene, Aart H.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In major depressive disorder, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors target the serotonin transporter (SERT). Their response rates (30-50%) are modified by SERT promotor polymorphisms (5-HTTLPR). OBJECTIVES: To quantify the relationship between SERT occupancy and response, and whether

  5. Structure-activity relationships for serotonin transporter and dopamine receptor selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agatonovic-Kustrin, Snezana; Davies, Paul; Turner, Joseph V

    2009-05-01

    Antipsychotic medications have a diverse pharmacology with affinity for serotonergic, dopaminergic, adrenergic, histaminergic and cholinergic receptors. Their clinical use now also includes the treatment of mood disorders, thought to be mediated by serotonergic receptor activity. The aim of our study was to characterise the molecular properties of antipsychotic agents, and to develop a model that would indicate molecular specificity for the dopamine (D(2)) receptor and the serotonin (5-HT) transporter. Back-propagation artificial neural networks (ANNs) were trained on a dataset of 47 ligands categorically assigned antidepressant or antipsychotic utility. The structure of each compound was encoded with 63 calculated molecular descriptors. ANN parameters including hidden neurons and input descriptors were optimised based on sensitivity analyses, with optimum models containing between four and 14 descriptors. Predicted binding preferences were in excellent agreement with clinical antipsychotic or antidepressant utility. Validated models were further tested by use of an external prediction set of five drugs with unknown mechanism of action. The SAR models developed revealed the importance of simple molecular characteristics for differential binding to the D(2) receptor and the 5-HT transporter. These included molecular size and shape, solubility parameters, hydrogen donating potential, electrostatic parameters, stereochemistry and presence of nitrogen. The developed models and techniques employed are expected to be useful in the rational design of future therapeutic agents.

  6. Characterization of the serotonin transporter knockout rat : A selective change in the functioning of the serotonergic system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homberg, J. R.; Olivier, J.D.A.; Smits, B. M. G.; Mul, J. D.; Mudde, J.; Verheul, M.; Nieuwenhuizen, O. F. M.; Cools, A. R.; Ronken, E; Cremers, Thomas; Schoffelmeere, A. N. M.; Ellenbroeik, B. A.; Cuppen, E.

    2007-01-01

    Serotonergic signaling is involved in many neurobiological processes and disturbed 5-HT homeostasis is implicated in a variety of psychiatric and addictive disorders. Here, we describe the functional characterization of the serotonin transporter (SERT) knockout rat model, that is generated by

  7. Characterization of the serotonin transporter knockout rat: a selective change in the functioning of the serotonergic system.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homberg, J.R.; Olivier, J.D.A.; Smits, B.M.; Mul, J.D.; Mudde, J.; Verheul, M.; Nieuwenhuizen, O.F.; Cools, A.R.; Ronken, E.; Cremers, T.; Schoffelmeer, A.N.; Ellenbroek, B.A.; Cuppen, E.

    2007-01-01

    Serotonergic signaling is involved in many neurobiological processes and disturbed 5-HT homeostasis is implicated in a variety of psychiatric and addictive disorders. Here, we describe the functional characterization of the serotonin transporter (SERT) knockout rat model, that is generated by

  8. Moderation of antidepressant response by the serotonin transporter gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huezo-Diaz, Patricia; Uher, Rudolf; Smith, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    Background: There have been conflicting reports on whether the length polymorphism in the promoter of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) moderates the antidepressant effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). We hypothesised that the pharmacogenetic effect of 5-HTTLPR...... the serotonin transporter gene were genotyped in 795 adults with moderate-to-severe depression treated with escitalopram or nortriptyline in the Genome Based Therapeutic Drugs for Depression (GENDEP) project. Results: The 5-HTTLPR moderated the response to escitalopram, with long-allele carriers improving more...

  9. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and risk for gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batić-Mujanović Olivera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The most of the known effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, beneficial or harmful, are associated with the inhibitory action of the serotonin reuptake transporter. This mechanism is present not only in neurons, but also in other cells such as platelets. Serotoninergic mechanism seems to have an important role in hemostasis, which has long been underestimated. Abnormal activation may lead to a prothrombotic state in patients treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. On one hand there may be an increased risk of bleeding, and on the other hand reduction in thrombotic risk may be possible. Serotonin is critical to maintain a platelet haemostatic function, such as platelet aggregation. Evidences from the studies support the hypothesis that antidepressants with a relevant blockade of action of serotonin reuptake mechanism may increase the risk of bleeding, which can occur anywhere in the body. Epidemiological evidences are, however, the most robust for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. It is estimated that this bleeding can occur in 1 in 100 to 1 in 1.000 patient-years of exposure to the high-affinity selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, with very old patients at the highest risk. The increased risk may be of particular relevance when selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are taken simultaneously with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, low dose of aspirin or warfarin.

  10. The SPECT tracer [123I]ADAM binds selectively to serotonin transporters: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study in healthy young men

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giessen, Elsmarieke van de; Booij, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The tracer 123 I-2-([2-({dimethylamino}methyl)phenyl]thio)-5-iodophenylamine ([ 123 I]ADAM) has been developed to image serotonin transporters (SERTs) with SPECT. Preclinical studies have shown that [ 123 I]ADAM binds selectively to SERTs. Moreover, initial human studies have shown that [ 123 I]ADAM binding could be blocked by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). However, in humans it has not been proven that [ 123 I]ADAM binds selectively to SERTs. We examined the in vivo availability of SERTs in 12 healthy young volunteers 5 h after bolus injection of [ 123 I]ADAM. To evaluate the selectivity of binding, four participants were pretreated (double-blinded design) with placebo, four with paroxetine (20 mg) and four with the dopamine/norepinephrine blocker methylphenidate (20 mg). SPECT studies were performed on a brain-dedicated system (Neurofocus), and the SPECT images were coregistered with individual MR scans of the brain. ADAM binding in SERT-rich brain areas and cerebellar cortex (representing non-specific binding) was assessed by drawing regions of interest (ROIs) on the individual MR images. Specific to non-specific ratios were used as the outcome measure. We found that specific to non-specific ratios were statistically significantly lower in paroxetine-pretreated participants than in placebo- or methylphenidate-pretreated participants. No such difference was found between groups pretreated with placebo or methylphenidate. Our preliminary findings suggest that [ 123 I]ADAM binds selectively to SERTs in human brain. (orig.)

  11. Deletion of the serotonin transporter in rats disturbs serotonin homeostasis without impairing liver regeneration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matondo, R.B.; Punt, C.J.A.; Homberg, J.R.; Toussaint, M.J.; Kisjes, R.; Korporaal, S.J.; Akkerman, J.W.; Cuppen, E.; Bruin, A. de

    2009-01-01

    The serotonin transporter is implicated in the uptake of the vasoconstrictor serotonin from the circulation into the platelets, where 95% of all blood serotonin is stored and released in response to vascular injury. In vivo studies indicated that platelet-derived serotonin mediates liver

  12. Deletion of the serotonin transporter in rats disturbs serotonin homeostasis without impairing liver regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matondo, R.B.; Punt, C.; Homberg, J.R.; Toussaint, M.J.; Kisjes, R.; Korporaal, S.J.; Akkerman, J.W.; Cuppen, E.; de Bruin, A.

    2009-01-01

    The serotonin transporter is implicated in the uptake of the vasoconstrictor serotonin from the circulation into the platelets, where 95% of all blood serotonin is stored and released in response to vascular injury. In vivo studies indicated that platelet-derived serotonin mediates liver

  13. The serotonin transporter in psychiatric disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spies, Marie; Knudsen, Karen Birgitte Moos; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, psychotropics affecting the serotonergic system have been used extensively in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. Molecular imaging, in particular PET, has allowed for elucidation of the essential contribution of the serotonin transporter to the pathophysiology...... of various psychiatric disorders and their treatment. We review studies that use PET to measure cerebral serotonin transporter activity in psychiatric disorders, focusing on major depressive disorder and antidepressant treatment. We also discuss opportunities and limitations in the application...... of this neuroimaging method in clinical practice. Although results from individual studies diverge, meta-analysis indicates a trend towards reduced serotonin transporter availability in patients with major depressive disorder. Inconsistencies in results might suggest symptom heterogeneity in major depressive disorder...

  14. Serotonin-induced down-regulation of cell surface serotonin transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Trine Nygaard; Christensen, Peter Møller; Gether, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) terminates serotonergic signaling and enables refilling of synaptic vesicles by mediating reuptake of serotonin (5-HT) released into the synaptic cleft. The molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling SERT activity and surface expression are not fully understood...

  15. Serotonin transporter and dopamine transporter imaging in the canine brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peremans, Kathelijne [Department of Medical Imaging, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, Ghent University, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Goethals, Ingeborg [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Ghent, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); De Vos, Filip [Laboratory of Radiopharmacy, Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ghent University, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Dobbeleir, A. [Department of Medical Imaging, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, Ghent University, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Ham, Hamphrey [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Ghent, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van Bree, Henri [Department of Medical Imaging, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, Ghent University, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Heeringen, Cees van [Department of Psychiatry and Medical Psychology, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, Ghent University, B-9000, Ghent (Belgium); Audenaert, Kurt [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Ghent, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium) and Department of Psychiatry and Medical Psychology, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, Ghent University, B-9000, Ghent (Belgium)]. E-mail: kurt.audenaert@ugent.be

    2006-10-15

    The serotonergic and dopaminergic systems are involved in a wide range of emotional and behavioral aspects of animals and humans and are involved in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are designed to block the 5-HT transporter (SERT), thereby increasing the available 5-HT in the brain. Functional imaging with specific SERT and dopamine transporter (DAT) ligands contributes to the study of the SSRI-transporter interaction. First, we evaluated the feasibility of a canine model in the study of the SERT and DAT with the radioligands [{sup 123}I]-{beta}-CIT and [{sup 123}I]-FP-CIT as well as single-photon emission computed tomography imaging. Second, we studied the effect of SSRIs (sertraline, citalopram and escitalopram) on the SERT and DAT in two dogs. The position of the canine model in the study of the SERT and DAT is discussed and compared with other animal models.

  16. Serotonin transporter and dopamine transporter imaging in the canine brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peremans, Kathelijne; Goethals, Ingeborg; De Vos, Filip; Dobbeleir, A.; Ham, Hamphrey; Van Bree, Henri; Heeringen, Cees van; Audenaert, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    The serotonergic and dopaminergic systems are involved in a wide range of emotional and behavioral aspects of animals and humans and are involved in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are designed to block the 5-HT transporter (SERT), thereby increasing the available 5-HT in the brain. Functional imaging with specific SERT and dopamine transporter (DAT) ligands contributes to the study of the SSRI-transporter interaction. First, we evaluated the feasibility of a canine model in the study of the SERT and DAT with the radioligands [ 123 I]-β-CIT and [ 123 I]-FP-CIT as well as single-photon emission computed tomography imaging. Second, we studied the effect of SSRIs (sertraline, citalopram and escitalopram) on the SERT and DAT in two dogs. The position of the canine model in the study of the SERT and DAT is discussed and compared with other animal models

  17. The SPECT tracer [{sup 123}I]ADAM binds selectively to serotonin transporters: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study in healthy young men

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giessen, Elsmarieke van de [University of Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Graduate School Neurosciences Amsterdam, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Booij, Jan [University of Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Graduate School Neurosciences Amsterdam, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, F2-236, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-08-15

    The tracer {sup 123}I-2-([2-({l_brace}dimethylamino{r_brace}methyl)phenyl]thio)-5-iodophenylamine ([{sup 123}I]ADAM) has been developed to image serotonin transporters (SERTs) with SPECT. Preclinical studies have shown that [{sup 123}I]ADAM binds selectively to SERTs. Moreover, initial human studies have shown that [{sup 123}I]ADAM binding could be blocked by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). However, in humans it has not been proven that [{sup 123}I]ADAM binds selectively to SERTs. We examined the in vivo availability of SERTs in 12 healthy young volunteers 5 h after bolus injection of [{sup 123}I]ADAM. To evaluate the selectivity of binding, four participants were pretreated (double-blinded design) with placebo, four with paroxetine (20 mg) and four with the dopamine/norepinephrine blocker methylphenidate (20 mg). SPECT studies were performed on a brain-dedicated system (Neurofocus), and the SPECT images were coregistered with individual MR scans of the brain. ADAM binding in SERT-rich brain areas and cerebellar cortex (representing non-specific binding) was assessed by drawing regions of interest (ROIs) on the individual MR images. Specific to non-specific ratios were used as the outcome measure. We found that specific to non-specific ratios were statistically significantly lower in paroxetine-pretreated participants than in placebo- or methylphenidate-pretreated participants. No such difference was found between groups pretreated with placebo or methylphenidate. Our preliminary findings suggest that [{sup 123}I]ADAM binds selectively to SERTs in human brain. (orig.)

  18. Serotonin transporter evolution and impact of polymorphic transcriptional regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søeby, Karen; Larsen, Svend Ask; Olsen, Line

    2005-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) is the primary drug target in the current antidepressant therapy. A functional polymorphism in the 2nd intron of the 5HTT gene encoding the SERT has been identified and associated with susceptibility to affective disorders and treatment response to antidepressants...... in the VNTRs of all mammalian SERT genes. The number of these putative binding sites varies proportionally to the length of the VNTR. We propose that the intronic VNTR have been selectively targeted through mammalian evolution to finetune transcriptional regulation of the serotonin expression....

  19. Mutational scanning of the human serotonin transporter reveals fast translocating serotonin transporter mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders S; Larsen, Mads B; Johnsen, Laust B

    2004-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) belongs to a family of sodium-chloride-dependent transporters responsible for uptake of amino acids and biogenic amines from the extracellular space. SERT represents a major pharmacological target in the treatment of several clinical conditions, including depressi...

  20. The serotonin transporter: Examination of the changes in transporter affinity induced by ligand binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphreys, C.J.

    1989-01-01

    The plasmalemmal serotonin transporter uses transmembrane gradients of Na + , Cl - and K + to accumulate serotonin within blood platelets. Transport is competitively inhibited by the antidepressant imipramine. Like serotonin transport, imipramine binding requires Na + . Unlike serotonin, however, imipramine does not appear to be transported. To gain insight into the mechanism of serotonin transport the author have analyzed the influences of Na + and Cl - , the two ions cotransported with serotonin, on both serotonin transport and the interaction of imipramine and other antidepressant drugs with the plasmalemmal serotonin transporter of human platelets. Additionally, the author have synthesized, purified and characterized the binding of 2-iodoimipramine to the serotonin transporter. Finally, the author have conducted a preliminary study of the inhibition of serotonin transport and imipramine binding produced by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. My results reveal many instances of positive heterotropic cooperativity in ligand binding to the serotonin transporter. Na + binding enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine and several other antidepressant drugs, and also increases the affinity for Cl - . Cl - enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine, as well as for Na + . At concentrations in the range of its K M for transport serotonin is a competitive inhibitor of imipramine binding. At much higher concentrations, however, serotonin also inhibits imipramines dissociation rate constant. This latter effect which is Na + -independent and species specific, is apparently produced by serotonin binding at a second, low affinity site on, or near, the transporter complex. Iodoimipramine competitively inhibit both [ 3 H]imipramine binding and [ 3 H]serotonin transport

  1. Rationality and emotionality: serotonin transporter genotype influences reasoning bias

    OpenAIRE

    Stollstorff, Melanie; Bean, Stephanie E.; Anderson, Lindsay M.; Devaney, Joseph M.; Vaidya, Chandan J.

    2012-01-01

    Reasoning often occurs under emotionally charged, opinion-laden circumstances. The belief-bias effect indexes the extent to which reasoning is based upon beliefs rather than logical structure. We examined whether emotional content increases this effect, particularly for adults genetically predisposed to be more emotionally reactive. SS/SLG carriers of the serotonin transporter genotype (5-HTTLPR) were less accurate selectively for evaluating emotional relational reasoning problems with belief...

  2. Interaction of antidepressants with the serotonin and norepinephrine transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lena; Andersen, Jacob; Thomsen, Mette

    2012-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) and the norepinephrine transporter (NET) are sodium-dependent neurotransmitter transporters responsible for reuptake of released serotonin and norepinephrine, respectively, into nerve terminals in the brain. A wide range of inhibitors of SERT and NET are used...

  3. Looking on the bright side of serotonin transporter gene variation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homberg, J.R.; Lesch, K.P.

    2011-01-01

    Converging evidence indicates an association of the short (s), low-expressing variant of the repeat length polymorphism, serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR), in the human serotonin transporter gene (5-HTT, SERT, SLC6A4) with anxiety-related traits and increased risk for

  4. Phylogenetic selection of target species in Amaryllidaceae tribe Haemantheae for acetylcholinesterase inhibition and affinity to the serotonin reuptake transport protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    We present phylogenetic analyses of 37 taxa of Amaryllidaceae, tribe Haemantheae and Amaryllis belladonna L. as an outgroup, in order to provide a phylogenetic framework for the selection of candidate plants for lead discoveries in relation to Alzheimer´s disease and depression. DNA sequences from t...

  5. Rationality and emotionality: serotonin transporter genotype influences reasoning bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stollstorff, Melanie; Bean, Stephanie E; Anderson, Lindsay M; Devaney, Joseph M; Vaidya, Chandan J

    2013-04-01

    Reasoning often occurs under emotionally charged, opinion-laden circumstances. The belief-bias effect indexes the extent to which reasoning is based upon beliefs rather than logical structure. We examined whether emotional content increases this effect, particularly for adults genetically predisposed to be more emotionally reactive. SS/SL(G) carriers of the serotonin transporter genotype (5-HTTLPR) were less accurate selectively for evaluating emotional relational reasoning problems with belief-logic conflict relative to L(A)L(A) carriers. Trait anxiety was positively associated with emotional belief-bias, and the 5-HTTLPR genotype significantly accounted for the variance in this association. Thus, deductive reasoning, a higher cognitive ability, is sensitive to differences in emotionality rooted in serotonin neurotransmitter function.

  6. Regional distribution of serotonin transporter protein in postmortem human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kish, Stephen J. [Human Neurochemical Pathology Laboratory, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8 (Canada)]. E-mail: Stephen_Kish@CAMH.net; Furukawa, Yoshiaki [Human Neurochemical Pathology Laboratory, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8 (Canada); Chang Lijan [Human Neurochemical Pathology Laboratory, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8 (Canada); Tong Junchao [Human Neurochemical Pathology Laboratory, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8 (Canada); Ginovart, Nathalie [PET Centre, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8 (Canada); Wilson, Alan [PET Centre, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8 (Canada); Houle, Sylvain [PET Centre, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8 (Canada); Meyer, Jeffrey H. [PET Centre, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, M5T 1R8 (Canada)

    2005-02-01

    Introduction: The primary approach in assessing the status of brain serotonin neurons in human conditions such as major depression and exposure to the illicit drug ecstasy has been the use of neuroimaging procedures involving radiotracers that bind to the serotonin transporter (SERT). However, there has been no consistency in the selection of a 'SERT-free' reference region for the estimation of free and nonspecific binding, as occipital cortex, cerebellum and white matter have all been employed. Objective and Methods: To identify areas of human brain that might have very low SERT levels, we measured, by a semiquantitative Western blotting procedure, SERT protein immunoreactivity throughout the postmortem brain of seven normal adult subjects. Results: Serotonin transporter could be quantitated in all examined brain areas. However, the SERT concentration in cerebellar cortex and white matter were only at trace values, being approximately 20% of average cerebral cortex and 5% of average striatum values. Conclusion: Although none of the examined brain areas are completely free of SERT, human cerebellar cortex has low SERT binding as compared to other examined brain regions, with the exception of white matter. Since the cerebellar cortical SERT binding is not zero, this region will not be a suitable reference region for SERT radioligands with very low free and nonspecific binding. For SERT radioligands with reasonably high free and nonspecific binding, the cerebellar cortex should be a useful reference region, provided other necessary radioligand assumptions are met.

  7. Regional distribution of serotonin transporter protein in postmortem human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kish, Stephen J.; Furukawa, Yoshiaki; Chang Lijan; Tong Junchao; Ginovart, Nathalie; Wilson, Alan; Houle, Sylvain; Meyer, Jeffrey H.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: The primary approach in assessing the status of brain serotonin neurons in human conditions such as major depression and exposure to the illicit drug ecstasy has been the use of neuroimaging procedures involving radiotracers that bind to the serotonin transporter (SERT). However, there has been no consistency in the selection of a 'SERT-free' reference region for the estimation of free and nonspecific binding, as occipital cortex, cerebellum and white matter have all been employed. Objective and Methods: To identify areas of human brain that might have very low SERT levels, we measured, by a semiquantitative Western blotting procedure, SERT protein immunoreactivity throughout the postmortem brain of seven normal adult subjects. Results: Serotonin transporter could be quantitated in all examined brain areas. However, the SERT concentration in cerebellar cortex and white matter were only at trace values, being approximately 20% of average cerebral cortex and 5% of average striatum values. Conclusion: Although none of the examined brain areas are completely free of SERT, human cerebellar cortex has low SERT binding as compared to other examined brain regions, with the exception of white matter. Since the cerebellar cortical SERT binding is not zero, this region will not be a suitable reference region for SERT radioligands with very low free and nonspecific binding. For SERT radioligands with reasonably high free and nonspecific binding, the cerebellar cortex should be a useful reference region, provided other necessary radioligand assumptions are met

  8. Occupancy of serotonin transporters in the amygdala by paroxetine in association with attenuation of left amygdala activation by negative faces in major depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruhe, Henricus G.; Koster, Michiel; Booij, Jan; van Herk, Marcel; Veltman, Dick J.; Schene, Aart H.

    2014-01-01

    Amygdala hyperactivation in major depressive disorder (MDD) might be attenuated by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRls), but the working mechanism remains unclear. We hypothesized that higher amygdala serotonin transporter (SERT) occupancy by paroxetine results in greater attenuation of

  9. Occupancy of serotonin transporters in the amygdala by paroxetine in association with attenuation of left amygdala activation by negative faces in major depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruhé, Henricus G.; Koster, Michiel; Booij, Jan; van Herk, Marcel; Veltman, Dick J.; Schene, Aart H.

    2014-01-01

    Amygdala hyperactivation in major depressive disorder (MDD) might be attenuated by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), but the working mechanism remains unclear. We hypothesized that higher amygdala serotonin transporter (SERT) occupancy by paroxetine results in greater attenuation of

  10. SEP-225289 serotonin and dopamine transporter occupancy: a PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLorenzo, Christine; Lichenstein, Sarah; Schaefer, Karen; Dunn, Judith; Marshall, Randall; Organisak, Lisa; Kharidia, Jahnavi; Robertson, Brigitte; Mann, J John; Parsey, Ramin V

    2011-07-01

    SEP-225289 is a novel compound that, based on in vitro potencies for transporter function, potentially inhibits reuptake at dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin transporters. An open-label PET study was conducted during the development of SEP-225289 to investigate its dopamine and serotonin transporter occupancy. Different single doses of SEP-225289 were administered to healthy volunteers in 3 cohorts: 8 mg (n = 7), 12 mg (n = 5), and 16 mg (n = 7). PET was performed before and approximately 24 h after oral administration of SEP-225289, to assess occupancy at trough levels. Dopamine and serotonin transporter occupancies were estimated from PET using (11)C-N-(3-iodoprop-2E-enyl)-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-methylphenyl)nortropane ((11)C-PE2I) and (11)C-N,N-dimethyl-2-(2-amino-4-cyanophenylthio)benzylamine ((11)C-DASB), respectively. Plasma concentration of SEP-225289 was assessed before ligand injection, and subjects were monitored for adverse events. Average dopamine and serotonin transporter occupancies increased with increasing doses of SEP-225289. Mean dopamine and serotonin transporter occupancies were 33% ± 11% and 2% ± 13%, respectively, for 8 mg; 44% ± 4% and 9% ± 10%, respectively, for 12 mg; and 49% ± 7% and 14% ± 15%, respectively, for 16 mg. On the basis of the relationship between occupancy and plasma concentration, dopamine transporter IC(50) (the plasma concentration of drug at 50% occupancy) was determined (4.5 ng/mL) and maximum dopamine transporter occupancy was extrapolated (85%); however, low serotonin transporter occupancy prevented similar serotonin transporter calculations. No serious adverse events were reported. At the doses evaluated, occupancy of the dopamine transporter was significantly higher than that of the serotonin transporter, despite similar in vitro potencies, confirming that, in addition to in vitro assays, PET occupancy studies can be instrumental to the drug development process by informing early decisions about

  11. Hippocampal volume and serotonin transporter polymorphism in major depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahdidan, Jamila; Foldager, Leslie; Rosenberg, Raben

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The main aim of the present study was to replicate a previous finding in major depressive disorder (MDD) of association between reduced hippocampal volume and the long variant of the di- and triallelic serotonin transporter polymorphism in SLC6A4 on chromosome 17q11.2. Secondarily, we...... that we aimed to replicate, and no significant associations with the serotonin transporter polymorphism were found. Conclusions: The present quantitative and morphometric MRI study was not able to replicate the previous finding of association between reduced hippocampal volume in depressed patients...... and the serotonin transporter polymorphism....

  12. The serotonin transporter and early life stress : Translational perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwing, Danielle J; Buwalda, Bauke; Zee, van der Eddy; de Boer, Sietse F; Olivier, Jocelien D A

    2017-01-01

    The interaction between the serotonin transporter (SERT) linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) and adverse early life stressing (ELS) events is associated with enhanced stress susceptibility and risk to develop mental disorders like major depression, anxiety, and aggressiveness. In particular, human

  13. Purification and fluorescent labeling of the human serotonin transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren G F; Gether, Ulrik

    2005-01-01

    To establish a purification procedure for the human serotonin transporter (hSERT) we expressed in Sf9 insect cells an epitope-tagged version of the transporter containing a FLAG epitope at the N-terminus and a polyhistidine tail at the C-terminus (FLAG-hSERT-12H). For purification, the transporter...

  14. Effects of ageing on serotonin transporters in healthy females

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuikka, J.T.; Tammela, L.; Karhunen, L.; Uusitupa, M.; Bergstroem, K.A.; Tiihonen, J.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of ageing on brain serotonin transporters was evaluated in 19 healthy female volunteers (age range 22-74 years) using single-photon emission tomography and [ 123 I] nor-β-CIT. The study subjects were scanned 0.3, 3, 6 and 23 h after injection of 185 MBq of [ 123 I] nor-β-CIT. The ratio of the distribution volume for tracer in the midbrain to that in the cerebellum minus 1 was used as an index for serotonin transporter binding. An age-related decline of 2% per decade (r=-0.47; P 123 I] nor-β-CIT binding in the serotonin transporter-rich area is much less than that in dopamine transporters in the striatum (6% per decade). (orig.)

  15. Approach to novel functional foods for stress control 4. Regulation of serotonin transporter by food factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Mikiko; Haito, Sakiko; Furumoto, Mari; Kawai, Yoshichika; Terao, Junji; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi

    2005-11-01

    Serotonin transporters (SERTs) are pre-synaptic proteins specialized for the clearance of serotonin following vesicular release at central nervous system (CNS) and enteric nervous system synapses. SERTs are high affinity targets in vivo for antidepressants such as serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). These include 'medical' psychopharmacological agents such as analgesics and antihistamines, a plant extract called St John's Wort (Hypericum). Osteoclasts are the primary cells responsible for bone resorption. They arise by the differentiation of osteoclast precursors of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. The expression of SERTs was increased in RANKL-induced osteoclast-like cells. Using RANKL stimulation of RAW264.7 cells as a model system for osteoclast differentiation, we studied the direct effects of food factor on serotonin uptake. The SSRIs (fluoxetine and fluvoxamine) inhibited markedly (approximately 95%) in serotonin transport in differentiated osteoclast cells. The major components of St. John's Wort, hyperforin and hypericine were significantly decreased in serotonin transport activity. Thus, a new in vitro model using RANKL-induced osteoclast-like cells may be useful to analyze the regulation of SERT by food factors and SSRIs.

  16. Effects of citalopram and escitalopram on fMRI response to affective stimuli in healthy volunteers selected by serotonin transporter genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Michael E; Lauriat, Tara L; Lowen, Steven B; Churchill, Jeffrey H; Hodgkinson, Colin A; Goldman, David; Renshaw, Perry F

    2013-09-30

    This study was designed to assess whether functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) following antidepressant administration (pharmaco-fMRI) is sufficiently sensitive to detect differences in patterns of activation between enantiomers of the same compound. Healthy adult males (n=11) participated in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over trial with three medication periods during which they received citalopram (racemic mixture), escitalopram (S-citalopram alone), or placebo for 2 weeks. All participants had high expression serotonin transporter genotypes. An fMRI scan that included passive viewing of overt and covert affective faces and affective words was performed after each medication period. Activation in response to overt faces was greater following escitalopram than following citalopram in the right insula, thalamus, and putamen when the faces were compared with a fixation stimulus. For the rapid covert presentation, a greater response was observed in the left middle temporal gyrus in the happy versus fearful contrast following escitalopram than following citalopram. Thus, the combination of genomics and fMRI was successful in discriminating between two very similar drugs. However, the pattern of activation observed suggests that further studies are indicated to understand how to optimally combine the two techniques. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor suppression of HIV infectivity and replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, Tami; Lynch, Kevin; Dubé, Benoit; Gettes, David R; Tustin, Nancy B; Ping Lai, Jian; Metzger, David S; Blume, Joshua; Douglas, Steven D; Evans, Dwight L

    2010-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram would down-regulate human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infectivity and that the greatest effects would be seen in people with depression. Depression is a risk factor for morbidity and mortality in HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission has been implicated in the pathobiology of depression, and pharmacologic therapies for depression target this system. The 5-HT transporter and 5-HT receptors are widely distributed throughout the central nervous and immune systems. Depression has been associated with suppression of natural killer cells and CD8(+) lymphocytes, key regulators of HIV infection. Ex vivo models for acute and chronic HIV infection were used to study the effects of citalopram on HIV viral infection and replication in 48 depressed and nondepressed women. For both the acute and chronic infection models, HIV reverse transcriptase activity was measured in the citalopram treatment condition and the control condition. The SSRI significantly down-regulated the reverse transcriptase response in both the acute and chronic infection models. Specifically, citalopram significantly decreased the acute HIV infectivity of macrophages. Citalopram also significantly decreased HIV viral replication in the latently infected T-cell line and in the latently infected macrophage cell line. There was no difference in down-regulation by depression status. These studies suggest that an SSRI enhances natural killer/CD8 noncytolytic HIV suppression in HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome and decreases HIV viral infectivity of macrophages, ex vivo, suggesting the need for in vivo studies to determine a potential role for agents targeting serotonin in the host defense against HIV.

  18. A dualistic conformational response to substrate binding in the human serotonin transporter reveals a high affinity state for serotonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Henriette; Severinsen, Kasper; Said, Saida

    2015-01-01

    Serotonergic neurotransmission is modulated by the membrane-embedded serotonin transporter (SERT). SERT mediates the reuptake of serotonin into the presynaptic neurons. Conformational changes in SERT occur upon binding of ions and substrate and are crucial for translocation of serotonin across...... the membrane. Our understanding of these conformational changes is mainly based on crystal structures of a bacterial homolog in various conformations, derived homology models of eukaryotic neurotransmitter transporters, and substituted cysteine accessibility method of SERT. However, the dynamic changes...

  19. Unifying concept of serotonin transporter-associated currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schicker, Klaus; Uzelac, Zeljko; Gesmonde, Joan; Bulling, Simon; Stockner, Thomas; Freissmuth, Michael; Boehm, Stefan; Rudnick, Gary; Sitte, Harald H; Sandtner, Walter

    2012-01-02

    Serotonin (5-HT) uptake by the human serotonin transporter (hSERT) is driven by ion gradients. The stoichiometry of transported 5-HT and ions is predicted to result in electroneutral charge movement. However, hSERT mediates a current when challenged with 5-HT. This discrepancy can be accounted for by an uncoupled ion flux. Here, we investigated the mechanistic basis of the uncoupled currents and its relation to the conformational cycle of hSERT. Our observations support the conclusion that the conducting state underlying the uncoupled ion flux is in equilibrium with an inward facing state of the transporter with K+ bound. We identified conditions associated with accumulation of the transporter in inward facing conformations. Manipulations that increased the abundance of inward facing states resulted in enhanced steady-state currents. We present a comprehensive kinetic model of the transport cycle, which recapitulates salient features of the recorded currents. This study provides a framework for exploring transporter-associated currents.

  20. The serotonin transporter in rhesus monkey brain: comparison of DASB and citalopram binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Zhizhen [Imaging Department, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States)]. E-mail: zhizhen_zeng@merck.com; Chen, T.-B. [Imaging Department, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States); Miller, Patricia J. [Imaging Department, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States); Dean, Dennis [Labeled Compound Synthesis Group, Drug Metabolism, Merck Research Laboratories, Rahway, NJ 07065-0900 (United States); Tang, Y.S. [Labeled Compound Synthesis Group, Drug Metabolism, Merck Research Laboratories, Rahway, NJ 07065-0900 (United States); Sur, Cyrille [Imaging Department, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States); Williams, David L. [Imaging Department, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States)

    2006-05-15

    We have characterized the interaction of the serotonin transporter ligand [{sup 3}H]-N,N-dimethyl-2-(2-amino-4-cyanophenylthio)-benzylamine (DASB) with rhesus monkey brain in vitro using tissue homogenate binding and autoradiographic mapping. [{sup 3}H]-DASB, a tritiated version of the widely used [{sup 11}C] positron emission tomography tracer, was found to selectively bind to a single population of sites with high affinity (K {sub d}=0.20{+-}0.04 nM). The serotonin transporter density (B {sub max}) obtained for rhesus frontal cortex was found to be 66{+-}8 fmol/mg protein using [{sup 3}H]-DASB, similar to the B {sub max} value obtained using the reference radioligand [{sup 3}H]-citalopram, a well-characterized and highly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (83{+-}22 fmol/mg protein). Specific binding sites of both [{sup 3}H]-DASB and [{sup 3}H]-citalopram were similarly and nonuniformly distributed throughout the rhesus central nervous system, in a pattern consistent with serotonin transporter localization reported for human brain. Regional serotonin transporter densities, estimated from optical densities of the autoradiographic images, were well correlated between the two radioligands. Finally, DASB and fluoxetine showed dose-dependent full inhibition of [{sup 3}H]-citalopram binding in a competition autoradiographic study, with K {sub i} values in close agreement with those obtained from rhesus brain homogenates. This side-by-side comparison of [{sup 3}H]-DASB and [{sup 3}H]-citalopram binding sites in rhesus tissue homogenates and in adjacent rhesus brain slices provides additional support for the use of [{sup 11}C]-DASB to assess the availability and distribution of serotonin transporters in nonhuman primates.

  1. The serotonin transporter in rhesus monkey brain: comparison of DASB and citalopram binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Zhizhen; Chen, T.-B.; Miller, Patricia J.; Dean, Dennis; Tang, Y.S.; Sur, Cyrille; Williams, David L.

    2006-01-01

    We have characterized the interaction of the serotonin transporter ligand [ 3 H]-N,N-dimethyl-2-(2-amino-4-cyanophenylthio)-benzylamine (DASB) with rhesus monkey brain in vitro using tissue homogenate binding and autoradiographic mapping. [ 3 H]-DASB, a tritiated version of the widely used [ 11 C] positron emission tomography tracer, was found to selectively bind to a single population of sites with high affinity (K d =0.20±0.04 nM). The serotonin transporter density (B max ) obtained for rhesus frontal cortex was found to be 66±8 fmol/mg protein using [ 3 H]-DASB, similar to the B max value obtained using the reference radioligand [ 3 H]-citalopram, a well-characterized and highly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (83±22 fmol/mg protein). Specific binding sites of both [ 3 H]-DASB and [ 3 H]-citalopram were similarly and nonuniformly distributed throughout the rhesus central nervous system, in a pattern consistent with serotonin transporter localization reported for human brain. Regional serotonin transporter densities, estimated from optical densities of the autoradiographic images, were well correlated between the two radioligands. Finally, DASB and fluoxetine showed dose-dependent full inhibition of [ 3 H]-citalopram binding in a competition autoradiographic study, with K i values in close agreement with those obtained from rhesus brain homogenates. This side-by-side comparison of [ 3 H]-DASB and [ 3 H]-citalopram binding sites in rhesus tissue homogenates and in adjacent rhesus brain slices provides additional support for the use of [ 11 C]-DASB to assess the availability and distribution of serotonin transporters in nonhuman primates

  2. Binding-Induced Fluorescence of Serotonin Transporter Ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, James; Ladefoged, Lucy Kate; Babinchak, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The binding-induced fluorescence of 4-(4-(dimethylamino)-phenyl)-1-methylpyridinium (APP(+)) and two new serotonin transporter (SERT)-binding fluorescent analogues, 1-butyl-4-[4-(1-dimethylamino)phenyl]-pyridinium bromide (BPP(+)) and 1-methyl-4-[4-(1-piperidinyl)phenyl]-pyridinium (PPP(+)), has...

  3. Serotonin transporter genotype, salivary cortisol, neuroticism and life events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinberg, Maj; Miskowiak, Kamilla; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate if cortisol alone or in interaction with other risk factors (familial risk, the serotonin transporter genotype, neuroticism and life events (LEs)) predicts onset of psychiatric disorder in healthy individuals at heritable risk. MATRIAL AND METHODS: In a high-risk study...

  4. Amphetamine Action at the Cocaine- and Antidepressant-Sensitive Serotonin Transporter Is Modulated by αCaMKII

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinkellner, Thomas; Montgomery, Therese R; Hofmaier, Tina

    2015-01-01

    Serotonergic neurotransmission is terminated by reuptake of extracellular serotonin (5-HT) by the high-affinity serotonin transporter (SERT). Selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) such as fluoxetine or escitalopram inhibit SERT and are currently the principal treatment for depression and anx...... and efflux at monoamine transporters are asymmetric processes that can be targeted separately. Ultimately, this may provide a molecular mechanism for putative drug developments to treat amphetamine addiction....

  5. High familial risk for mood disorder is associated with low dorsolateral prefrontal cortex serotonin transporter binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frokjaer, Vibe G; Vinberg, Maj; Erritzoe, David

    2009-01-01

    at risk for developing depression. The aim of this study was to explore whether abnormalities in SERT might be present in healthy individuals with familial predisposition to mood disorder. Nine individuals at high familial risk (mean age 32.2+/-4.2 years) and 11 individuals at low risk (mean age 32......Mood disorders are elicited through a combination of genetic and environmental stress factors, and treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors ameliorates depressive symptoms. Changes in the serotonin transporter (SERT) binding may therefore occur in depressive patients and in subjects.......4+/-5.0 years) for developing mood disorder were included. The subjects were healthy twins with or without a co-twin history of mood disorder identified by linking information from the Danish Twin Register and the Danish Psychiatric Central Register. Regional in vivo brain serotonin transporter binding...

  6. SPECT imaging with the serotonin transporter radiotracer [123I]p ZIENT in nonhuman primate brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosgrove, Kelly P.; Staley, Julie K.; Baldwin, Ronald M.; Bois, Frederic; Plisson, Christophe; Al-Tikriti, Mohammed S.; Seibyl, John P.; Goodman, Mark M.; Tamagnan, Gilles D.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Serotonin dysfunction has been linked to a variety of psychiatric diseases; however, an adequate SPECT radioligand to probe the serotonin transporter system has not been successfully developed. The purpose of this study was to characterize and determine the in vivo selectivity of iodine-123-labeled 2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4'-((Z)-2-iodoethenyl)phenyl)nortropane, [ 123 I]p ZIENT, in nonhuman primate brain. Methods: Two ovariohysterectomized female baboons participated in nine studies (one bolus and eight bolus to constant infusion at a ratio of 9.0 h) to evaluate [ 123 I]p ZIENT. To evaluate the selectivity of [ 123 I]p ZIENT, the serotonin transporter blockers fenfluramine (1.5, 2.5 mg/kg) and citalopram (5 mg/kg), the dopamine transporter blocker methylphenidate (0.5 mg/kg) and the norepinephrine transporter blocker nisoxetine (1 mg/kg) were given at 8 h post-radiotracer injection. Results: In the bolus to constant infusion studies, equilibrium was established by 4-8 h. [ 123 I]p ZIENT was 93% and 90% protein bound in the two baboons and there was no detection of lipophilic radiolabeled metabolites entering the brain. In the high-density serotonin transporter regions (diencephalon and brainstem), fenfluramine and citalopram resulted in 35-71% and 129-151% displacement, respectively, whereas methylphenidate and nisoxetine did not produce significant changes ( 123 I]p ZIENT is a favorable compound for in vivo SPECT imaging of serotonin transporters with negligible binding to norepinephrine and dopamine transporters.

  7. Molecular cloning, expression and characterization of a bovine serotonin transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, O V; Kristensen, A S; Rudnick, G

    1999-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) is a member of a highly homologous family of sodium/chloride dependent neurotransmitter transporters responsible for reuptake of biogenic amines from the extracellular fluid. SERT constitutes the pharmacological target of several clinically important antidepressan......-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) was mainly unchanged. RT-PCR amplification of RNA from different tissues demonstrated expression of SERT in placenta, brain stem, bone marrow, kidney, lung, heart, adrenal gland, liver, parathyroid gland, thyroid gland, small intestine and pancreas....

  8. Treatment of selective mutism: focus on selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaakeh, Yaman; Stumpf, Janice L

    2008-02-01

    Abstract Selective mutism is a pediatric psychiatric disorder that occurs when a child consistently fails to speak in specific situations in which speaking is expected, such as at school and social gatherings, but speaks appropriately in other settings. Selective mutism often is diagnosed when a child starts school and does not talk to teachers or peers, but talks to family members at home; the condition is frequently accompanied by anxiety and shyness. Although the underlying etiology of the condition remains unclear, psychotherapy is the preferred initial treatment, with the support of parents and teachers. If the child does not respond to psychotherapy, addition of pharmacologic treatment should be considered, depending on the severity of symptoms and presence of other illnesses. Although data are limited to case reports and trials with small patient populations and short follow-up periods, some patients with selective mutism respond to therapy with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Fluoxetine is the most studied SSRI as treatment for the condition, although further investigation is required to determine the optimal dosage and duration of therapy.

  9. Brain serotonin and dopamine transporter bindings in adults with high-functioning autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Sekine, Yoshimoto; Ouchi, Yasuomi; Tsujii, Masatsugu; Yoshikawa, Etsuji; Futatsubashi, Masami; Tsuchiya, Kenji J; Sugihara, Genichi; Iwata, Yasuhide; Suzuki, Katsuaki; Matsuzaki, Hideo; Suda, Shiro; Sugiyama, Toshiro; Takei, Nori; Mori, Norio

    2010-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder that is characterized by repetitive and/or obsessive interests and behavior and by deficits in sociability and communication. Although its neurobiological underpinnings are postulated to lie in abnormalities of the serotoninergic and dopaminergic systems, the details remain unknown. To determine the occurrence of changes in the binding of serotonin and dopamine transporters, which are highly selective markers for their respective neuronal systems. Using positron emission tomography, we measured the binding of brain serotonin and dopamine transporters in each individual with the radioligands carbon 11 ((11)C)-labeled trans-1,2,3,5,6,10-beta-hexahydro-6-[4-(methylthio)phenyl]pyrrolo-[2,1-a]isoquinoline ([(11)C](+)McN-5652) and 2beta-carbomethoxy-3-beta-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane ([(11)C]WIN-35,428), respectively. Statistical parametric mapping was used for between-subject analysis and within-subject correlation analysis with respect to clinical variables. Participants recruited from the community. Twenty men (age range, 18-26 years; mean [SD] IQ, 99.3 [18.1]) with autism and 20 age- and IQ-matched control subjects. Serotonin transporter binding was significantly lower throughout the brain in autistic individuals compared with controls (P dopamine transporter binding was significantly higher in the orbitofrontal cortex of the autistic group (P dopamine transporter binding was significantly inversely correlated with serotonin transporter binding (r = -0.61; P = .004). The brains of autistic individuals have abnormalities in both serotonin transporter and dopamine transporter binding. The present findings indicate that the gross abnormalities in these neurotransmitter systems may underpin the neurophysiologic mechanism of autism. Our sample was not characteristic or representative of a typical sample of adults with autism in the community.

  10. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for fibromyalgia syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walitt, Brian; Urrútia, Gerard; Nishishinya, María Betina; Cantrell, Sarah E; Häuser, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia is a clinically well-defined chronic condition with a biopsychosocial aetiology. Fibromyalgia is characterized by chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain, sleep problems, cognitive dysfunction, and fatigue. Patients often report high disability levels and poor quality of life. Since there is no specific treatment that alters the pathogenesis of fibromyalgia, drug therapy focuses on pain reduction and improvement of other aversive symptoms. Objectives The objective was to assess the benefits and harms of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the treatment of fibromyalgia. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 5), MEDLINE (1966 to June 2014), EMBASE (1946 to June 2014), and the reference lists of reviewed articles. Selection criteria We selected all randomized, double-blind trials of SSRIs used for the treatment of fibromyalgia symptoms in adult participants. We considered the following SSRIs in this review: citalopram, fluoxetine, escitalopram, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline. Data collection and analysis Three authors extracted the data of all included studies and assessed the risks of bias of the studies. We resolved discrepancies by discussion. Main results The quality of evidence was very low for each outcome. We downgraded the quality of evidence to very low due to concerns about risk of bias and studies with few participants. We included seven placebo-controlled studies, two with citalopram, three with fluoxetine and two with paroxetine, with a median study duration of eight weeks (4 to 16 weeks) and 383 participants, who were pooled together. All studies had one or more sources of potential major bias. There was a small (10%) difference in patients who reported a 30% pain reduction between SSRIs (56/172 (32.6%)) and placebo (39/171 (22.8%)) risk difference (RD) 0.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.01 to 0.20; number needed to treat for an additional

  11. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for fibromyalgia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Walitt

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Fibromyalgia is a clinically well-defined chronic condition with a biopsychosocial aetiology. Fibromyalgia is characterized by chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain, sleep problems, cognitive dysfunction, and fatigue. Patients often report high disability levels and poor quality of life. Since there is no specific treatment that alters the pathogenesis of fibromyalgia, drug therapy focuses on pain reduction and improvement of other aversive symptoms. OBJECTIVES: To assess the benefits and harms of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs in the treatment of fibromyalgia. METHODS: Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 5, MEDLINE (1966 to June 2014, EMBASE (1946 to June 2014, and the reference lists of reviewed articles. Selection criteria: We selected all randomized, double-blind trials of SSRIs used for the treatment of fibromyalgia symptoms in adult participants. We considered the following SSRIs in this review: citalopram, fluoxetine, escitalopram, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline. Data collection and analysis: Three authors extracted the data of all included studies and assessed the risks of bias of the studies. We resolved discrepancies by discussion. MAIN RESULTS: The quality of evidence was very low for each outcome. We downgraded the quality of evidence to very low due to concerns about risk of bias and studies with few participants. We included seven placebo-controlled studies, two with citalopram, three with fluoxetine and two with paroxetine, with a median study duration of eight weeks (4 to 16 weeks and 383 participants, who were pooled together. All studies had one or more sources of potential major bias. There was a small (10% difference in patients who reported a 30% pain reduction between SSRIs (56/172 (32.6% and placebo (39/171 (22.8% risk difference (RD 0.10, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.01 to 0.20; number needed to treat for an

  12. Use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors reduces fertility in men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørr, L; Bennedsen, Birgit; Fedder, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Clinical review of the present data on the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on male fertility was the objective of the study. PubMed and Scopus were searched for publications in English or Danish and reviewed. Human trials, animal studies and in vitro studies were included...

  13. Genetic polymorphism of serotonin transporter 5-HTTLPR ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    society (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2008). More than 98% of ... smoking addiction (Li 2006). It is well ... neurotransmitter transporter (SLC6) family (Saier 1999). ..... gested that the effects of genotype and treatment may vary.

  14. A Dualistic Conformational Response to Substrate Binding in the Human Serotonin Transporter Reveals a High Affinity State for Serotonin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerregaard, Henriette; Severinsen, Kasper; Said, Saida; Wiborg, Ove; Sinning, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Serotonergic neurotransmission is modulated by the membrane-embedded serotonin transporter (SERT). SERT mediates the reuptake of serotonin into the presynaptic neurons. Conformational changes in SERT occur upon binding of ions and substrate and are crucial for translocation of serotonin across the membrane. Our understanding of these conformational changes is mainly based on crystal structures of a bacterial homolog in various conformations, derived homology models of eukaryotic neurotransmitter transporters, and substituted cysteine accessibility method of SERT. However, the dynamic changes that occur in the human SERT upon binding of ions, the translocation of substrate, and the role of cholesterol in this interplay are not fully elucidated. Here we show that serotonin induces a dualistic conformational response in SERT. We exploited the substituted cysteine scanning method under conditions that were sensitized to detect a more outward-facing conformation of SERT. We found a novel high affinity outward-facing conformational state of the human SERT induced by serotonin. The ionic requirements for this new conformational response to serotonin mirror the ionic requirements for translocation. Furthermore, we found that membrane cholesterol plays a role in the dualistic conformational response in SERT induced by serotonin. Our results indicate the existence of a subpopulation of SERT responding differently to serotonin binding than hitherto believed and that membrane cholesterol plays a role in this subpopulation of SERT. PMID:25614630

  15. Serotonin Transporter Genotype (5-HTTLPR) Predicts Utilitarian Moral Judgments

    OpenAIRE

    Marsh, Abigail A.; Crowe, Samantha L.; Yu, Henry H.; Gorodetsky, Elena K.; Goldman, David; Blair, R. J. R.

    2011-01-01

    Background The psychological and neurobiological processes underlying moral judgment have been the focus of extensive recent research. Here we show that serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR) genotype predicts responses to moral dilemmas featuring foreseen harm to an innocent. Methodology/Principal Findings Participants in this study judged the acceptability of actions that would unintentionally or intentionally harm an innocent victim in order to save others' lives. An analysis of variance reveale...

  16. Characterization of bromine-76-labelled 5-bromo-6-nitroquipazine for PET studies of the serotonin transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundkvist, Camilla E-mail: Lundkvis@shfj.cea.fr; Loc' h, Christian; Halldin, Christer; Bottlaender, Michel; Ottaviani, Michele; Coulon, Christine; Fuseau, Chantal; Mathis, Chester; Farde, Lars; Maziere, Bernard

    1999-07-01

    The development of suitable radioligands for brain imaging of the serotonin transporter is of great importance for the study of depression and other affective disorders. The potent and selective serotonin transporter ligand, 5-iodo-6-nitro-2-piperazinylquinoline, has been labelled with iodine-123 and used as a radioligand for single photon emission computerized tomography. To evaluate the potential of the bromine-76-labelled analogue, 5-bromo-6-nitroquipazine, as a radioligand for positron emission tomography (PET), its brain distribution and binding characteristics were examined in rats. In vivo brain distribution and ex vivo autoradiography demonstrated that [{sup 76}Br]5-bromo-6-nitroquipazine enters the brain rapidly. The regional brain distribution of [{sup 76}Br]5-bromo-6-nitroquipazine was consistent with the known distribution of serotonin transporters in the midbrain, pons, thalamus, striatum, and neocortex. Specific binding was inhibited by the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram. The peripheral metabolism in plasma was rapid, but more than 90% of the radioactivity in brain represented unchanged radioligand 2 h postinjection (p.i.). A preliminary PET study was also performed in a baboon. Following the intravenous injection of [{sup 76}Br]5-bromo-6-nitroquipazine in a baboon, there was a conspicuous accumulation of radioactivity in thalamus, striatum, and pons. The radioactivity in these brain regions was 1.5 times higher than in the cerebellum at 3 h and 2.5-4 times higher at 24 h. A rapid metabolism of the radioligand in plasma was observed (38% unchanged after 5 min). The results indicate that [{sup 76}Br]5-bromo-6-nitroquipazine has potential for PET imaging of the serotonin transporter.

  17. Unifying Concept of Serotonin Transporter-associated Currents*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schicker, Klaus; Uzelac, Zeljko; Gesmonde, Joan; Bulling, Simon; Stockner, Thomas; Freissmuth, Michael; Boehm, Stefan; Rudnick, Gary; Sitte, Harald H.; Sandtner, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) uptake by the human serotonin transporter (hSERT) is driven by ion gradients. The stoichiometry of transported 5-HT and ions is predicted to result in electroneutral charge movement. However, hSERT mediates a current when challenged with 5-HT. This discrepancy can be accounted for by an uncoupled ion flux. Here, we investigated the mechanistic basis of the uncoupled currents and its relation to the conformational cycle of hSERT. Our observations support the conclusion that the conducting state underlying the uncoupled ion flux is in equilibrium with an inward facing state of the transporter with K+ bound. We identified conditions associated with accumulation of the transporter in inward facing conformations. Manipulations that increased the abundance of inward facing states resulted in enhanced steady-state currents. We present a comprehensive kinetic model of the transport cycle, which recapitulates salient features of the recorded currents. This study provides a framework for exploring transporter-associated currents. PMID:22072712

  18. Single-photon emission tomography imaging of serotonin transporters in the non-human primate brain with the selective radioligand [[sup 123]I]IDAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acton, P.D.; Kung Mei-Ping; Mu Mu; Ploessl, K.; Hou, C.; Siciliano, M.; Oya Shunichi (Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)); Kung, H.F. (Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States) Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States))

    1999-08-01

    A new radioligand, 5-iodo-2-[[2-2-[(dimethylamino)methyl]phenyl]thio]benzyl alcohol ([[sup 123]I]IDAM), has been developed for selective single-photon emission tomography (SPET) imaging of SERT. In vitro binding studies suggest a high selectivity of IDAM for SERT (K[sub i]=0.097 nM), with considerably lower affinities for norepinephrine and dopamine transporters (NET K[sub i]= 234 nM and DAT K[sub i]>10 [mu]M, respectively). In this study the biodistribution of SERT in the baboon brain was investigated in vivo using [[sup 123]I]IDAM and SPET imaging. Dynamic sequences of SPET scans were performed on three female baboons (Papio anubis) after injection of 555 MBq of [[sup 123]I]IDAM. Displacing doses (1 mg/kg) of the selective SERT ligand (+)McN5652 were administered 90-120 min after injection of [[sup 123]I]IDAM. Similar studies were performed using a NET inhibitor, nisoxetine, and a DAT blocker, methylphenidate. After 60-120 min, the regional distribution of tracer within the brain reflected the characteristic distribution of SERT, with the highest uptake in the midbrain area (hypothalamus, raphe nucleus, substantia nigra), and the lowest uptake in the cerebellum (an area presumed free of SERT). Peak specific binding in the midbrain occurred at 120 min, with a ratio to the cerebellum of 1.80[+-]0.13. At 30 min, 85% of the radioactivity in the blood was metabolite. Following injection of a competing SERT ligand, (+)McN5652, the tracer exhibited rapid washout from areas with high concentrations of SERT (dissociation rate constant in the midbrain, averaged over three baboons, k[sub off]=0.025[+-]0.002 min[sup -1]), while the cerebellar activity distribution was undisturbed (washout rate 0.0059[+-] 0.0003 min[sup -1]). Calculation of tracer washout rate pixel-by-pixel enabled the generation of parametric images of the dissociation rate constant. Similar studies using nisoxetine and methylphenidate had no effect on the distribution of [[sup 123]I]IDAM in the brain

  19. Coaction of Stress and Serotonin Transporter Genotype in Predicting Aggression at the Transition to Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Christopher C.; Keenan-Miller, Danielle; Hammen, Constance; Lind, Penelope A.; Najman, Jake M.; Brennan, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite consistent evidence that serotonin functioning affects stress reactivity and vulnerability to aggression, research on serotonin gene-stress interactions (G x E) in the development of aggression remains limited. The present study investigated variation in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) as a moderator of the…

  20. Expression analysis for inverted effects of serotonin transporter inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Manabu; Okamura-Oho, Yuko; Shimokawa, Kazuro; Kondo, Shinji; Nakamura, Sakiko; Yokota, Hideo; Himeno, Ryutaro; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2008-01-01

    Inactivation of serotonin transporter (HTT) by pharmacologically in the neonate or genetically increases risk for depression in adulthood, whereas pharmacological inhibition of HTT ameliorates symptoms in depressed patients. The differing role of HTT function during early development and in adult brain plasticity in causing or reversing depression remains an unexplained paradox. To address this we profiled the gene expression of adult Htt knockout (Htt KO) mice and HTT inhibitor-treated mice. Inverted profile changes between the two experimental conditions were seen in 30 genes. Consistent results of the upstream regulatory element search and the co-localization search of these genes indicated that the regulation may be executed by Pax5, Pax7 and Gata3, known to be involved in the survival, proliferation, and migration of serotonergic neurons in the developing brain, and these factors are supposed to keep functioning to regulate downstream genes related to serotonin system in the adult brain

  1. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with depression receiving selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepak; Saaraswat, Tanuj; Sengupta, S N; Mehrotra, Saurabh

    2009-02-01

    Serotonin plays an important role in the normal clotting phenomenon and is released by platelets. Platelets are dependent on a serotonin transporter for the uptake of serotonin, as they cannot synthesize it themselves. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) block the uptake of serotonin into platelets and can cause problems with clotting leading to bleeding. This case report highlights the occurrence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in the index case on initiating SSRI therapy for depression and the prompt resolution of the same on its discontinuation on two separate occasions. SSRIs may cause upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Physicians should be aware of the same and should try to rule out previous episodes of upper GI bleed or the presence of other risk factors which might predispose to it before prescribing SSRIs; they should also warn the patients about this potential side effect. Also, the presence of thalassemia trait in the index patient deserves special attention and needs to be explored to see if it might in any way contribute in potentiating this side effect of SSRIs.

  2. Immunodetection of the serotonin transporter protein is a more valid marker for serotonergic fibers than serotonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten; Brask, Dorthe; Knudsen, Gitte M.

    2006-01-01

    Tracking serotonergic pathways in the brain through immunodetection of serotonin has widely been used for the anatomical characterization of the serotonergic system. Immunostaining for serotonin is also frequently applied for the visualization of individual serotonin containing fibers...... and quantification of serotonin positive fibers has been widely used to detect changes in the serotonergic innervation. However, particularly in conditions with enhanced serotonin metabolism the detection level of serotonin may lead to an underestimation of the true number of serotonergic fibers. The serotonin...... immunostained for serotonin and SERT protein and colocalization was quantified in several brain areas by confocal microscopy. In comparison with untreated rats, MAO inhibitor treated rats had a significantly higher number (almost 200% increase) of serotonin immunopositive fibers whereas no difference...

  3. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI antidepressants, prolactin and breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet eAshbury

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs are a widely prescribed class of anti-depressants. Laboratory and epidemiologic evidence suggests that a prolactin-mediated mechanism secondary to increased serotonin levels at neuronal synapses could lead to a potentially carcinogenic effect of SSRIs. In this population-based case-control study, we evaluated the association between SSRI use and breast cancer risk as a function of their relative degree of inhibition of serotonin reuptake as a proxy for their impact on prolactin levels. Cases were 2,129 women with primary invasive breast cancer diagnosed from 2003-2007, and controls were 21,297 women randomly selected from the population registry. Detailed information for each SSRI prescription dispensed was compiled using the Saskatchewan prescription database. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the impact of use of high and lower inhibitors of serotonin reuptake and duration of use, as well as to assess the effect of individual high inhibitors on the risk of breast cancer. Exclusive users of high or lower inhibitors of serotonin reuptake were not at increased risk for breast cancer compared with nonusers of SSRIs (OR = 1.01, CI = 0.88-1.17 and OR = 0.91, CI = 0.67-1.25 respectively, regardless of their duration of use or menopausal status. While we cannot rule out the possibility of a clinically important risk increase (OR = 1.83, CI = 0.99-3.40 for long-term users of sertraline (≥24 prescriptions, given the small number of exposed cases (n=12, the borderline statistical significance and the wide confidence interval, these results need to be interpreted cautiously. In this large population-based case-control study, we found no conclusive evidence of breast cancer risk associated with the use of SSRIs even after assessing the degree of serotonin reuptake inhibition and duration of use. Our results do not support the serotonin-mediated pathway for the prolactin-breast cancer hypothesis.

  4. Biaryls as potent, tunable dual neurokinin 1 receptor antagonists and serotonin transporter inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degnan, Andrew P; Tora, George O; Han, Ying; Rajamani, Ramkumar; Bertekap, Robert; Krause, Rudolph; Davis, Carl D; Hu, Joanna; Morgan, Daniel; Taylor, Sarah J; Krause, Kelly; Li, Yu-Wen; Mattson, Gail; Cunningham, Melissa A; Taber, Matthew T; Lodge, Nicholas J; Bronson, Joanne J; Gillman, Kevin W; Macor, John E

    2015-08-01

    Depression is a serious illness that affects millions of patients. Current treatments are associated with a number of undesirable side effects. Neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) antagonists have recently been shown to potentiate the antidepressant effects of serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in a number of animal models. Herein we describe the optimization of a biaryl chemotype to provide a series of potent dual NK1R antagonists/serotonin transporter (SERT) inhibitors. Through the choice of appropriate substituents, the SERT/NK1R ratio could be tuned to afford a range of target selectivity profiles. This effort culminated in the identification of an analog that demonstrated oral bioavailability, favorable brain uptake, and efficacy in the gerbil foot tap model. Ex vivo occupancy studies with compound 58 demonstrated the ability to maintain NK1 receptor saturation (>88% occupancy) while titrating the desired level of SERT occupancy (11-84%) via dose selection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Intracellular loop 5 is important for the transport mechanism and molecular pharmacology of the human serotonin transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Said, Saida; Neubauer, Henrik Amtoft; Müller, Heidi Kaastrup

    2015-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) belongs to a family of transport proteins called the neurotransmitter:sodium symporters. The specialized members of this family transport different neurotransmitters across the cell membrane, thereby regulating signaling between neurons. Most of these transporters...

  6. Seasonal difference in brain serotonin transporter binding predicts symptom severity in patients with seasonal affective disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mc Mahon, Brenda; Andersen, Sofie B.; Madsen, Martin K.

    2016-01-01

    controls with low seasonality scores and 17 patients diagnosed with seasonal affective disorder were scanned in both summer and winter to investigate differences in cerebral serotonin transporter binding across groups and across seasons. The two groups had similar cerebral serotonin transporter binding...... between summer and winter (Psex-(P = 0.02) and genotype-(P = 0.04) dependent. In the patients with seasonal affective disorder, the seasonal change in serotonin transporter binding was positively associated with change in depressive symptom...

  7. Altered serotonin transporter availability in patients with multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesse, Swen; Sabri, Osama; Moeller, Franziska; Thomae, Eva; Then Bergh, Florian; Petroff, David; Lobsien, Donald; Luthardt, Julia; Becker, Georg-Alexander; Patt, Marianne; Seese, Anita; Meyer, Philipp M.; Regenthal, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Modulation of the immune system by the CNS may involve serotonergic regulation via the brain serotonin transporters (SERT). This regulation may be disturbed in patients with CNS disorders including multiple sclerosis (MS). Central serotonergic mechanisms have not been investigated in MS by in vivo imaging. The objective of the study was to assess the availability of SERT in antidepressant-naive patients with MS by means of PET. Included in this study were 23 patients with MS and 22 matched healthy volunteers who were investigated with PET and the SERT-selective marker [ 11 C]DASB, and distribution volume ratios were determined. Clinical assessment of the patients included the expanded disability status scale, the MS fatigue scale Wuerzburger Erschoepfungsinventar bei MS (WEIMuS) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The PET data were analysed with both volume-of-interest and voxel-based analyses to determine regional SERT availability. Patients had lower SERT availability in the cingulate cortex, the thalamus and the insula, and increased availability in the orbitofrontal cortex. Patients with relapsing/remitting MS tended to have lower SERT in the hippocampus, whereas patients with primary progressive disease showed increased SERT availability in prefrontal regions. There was a positive correlation between SERT availability in the insula and both depression and fatigue scores (r = 0.56 vs. BDI, p = 0.02; r = 0.49 vs. WEIMuS, p = 0.05). Serotonergic neurotransmission in MS patients is altered in limbic and paralimbic regions as well as in the frontal cortex that this appears to contribute to psychiatric symptoms of MS. (orig.)

  8. Altered serotonin transporter availability in patients with multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesse, Swen; Sabri, Osama [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Integrated Research and Treatment Center (IFB) Adiposity Diseases, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Moeller, Franziska; Thomae, Eva; Then Bergh, Florian [University of Leipzig, Department of Neurology, Leipzig (Germany); Petroff, David [University of Leipzig, Coordinating Centre for Clinical Studies, Leipzig (Germany); Lobsien, Donald [University of Leipzig, Department of Neuroradiology, Leipzig (Germany); Luthardt, Julia; Becker, Georg-Alexander; Patt, Marianne; Seese, Anita; Meyer, Philipp M. [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Regenthal, Ralf [University of Leipzig, Clinical Pharmacology, Rudolf-Boehm-Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Leipzig (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    Modulation of the immune system by the CNS may involve serotonergic regulation via the brain serotonin transporters (SERT). This regulation may be disturbed in patients with CNS disorders including multiple sclerosis (MS). Central serotonergic mechanisms have not been investigated in MS by in vivo imaging. The objective of the study was to assess the availability of SERT in antidepressant-naive patients with MS by means of PET. Included in this study were 23 patients with MS and 22 matched healthy volunteers who were investigated with PET and the SERT-selective marker [{sup 11}C]DASB, and distribution volume ratios were determined. Clinical assessment of the patients included the expanded disability status scale, the MS fatigue scale Wuerzburger Erschoepfungsinventar bei MS (WEIMuS) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The PET data were analysed with both volume-of-interest and voxel-based analyses to determine regional SERT availability. Patients had lower SERT availability in the cingulate cortex, the thalamus and the insula, and increased availability in the orbitofrontal cortex. Patients with relapsing/remitting MS tended to have lower SERT in the hippocampus, whereas patients with primary progressive disease showed increased SERT availability in prefrontal regions. There was a positive correlation between SERT availability in the insula and both depression and fatigue scores (r = 0.56 vs. BDI, p = 0.02; r = 0.49 vs. WEIMuS, p = 0.05). Serotonergic neurotransmission in MS patients is altered in limbic and paralimbic regions as well as in the frontal cortex that this appears to contribute to psychiatric symptoms of MS. (orig.)

  9. Voltammetric and Mathematical Evidence for Dual Transport Mediation of Serotonin Clearance In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Kevin M.; Zeqja, Anisa; Nijhout, H. Frederik; Reed, Michael C.; Best, Janet; Hashemi, Parastoo

    2014-01-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin underlies many of the brain’s functions. Understanding serotonin neurochemistry is important for improving treatments for neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression. Antidepressants commonly target serotonin clearance via serotonin transporters (SERTs) and have variable clinical effects. Adjunctive therapies, targeting other systems including serotonin autoreceptors, also vary clinically and carry adverse consequences. Fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is particularly well suited for studying antidepressant effects on serotonin clearance and autoreceptors by providing real-time chemical information on serotonin kinetics in vivo. However, the complex nature of in vivo serotonin responses makes it difficult to interpret experimental data with established kinetic models. Here, we electrically stimulated the mouse medial forebrain bundle (MFB) to provoke and detect terminal serotonin in the substantia nigra reticulata (SNr). In response to MFB stimulation we found three dynamically distinct serotonin signals. To interpret these signals we developed a computational model that supports two independent serotonin reuptake mechanisms (high affinity, low efficiency reuptake mechanism and low affinity, high efficiency reuptake system) and bolsters an important inhibitory role for the serotonin autoreceptors. Our data and analysis, afforded by the powerful combination of voltammetric and theoretical methods, gives new understanding of the chemical heterogeneity of serotonin dynamics in the brain. This diverse serotonergic matrix likely contributes to clinical variability of antidepressants. PMID:24702305

  10. The Serotonin Transporter Gene Polymorphisms and Risk of Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Janne Kærgård; Kraglund, Kristian Lundsgaard; Johnsen, Søren Paaske

    2018-01-01

    may influence platelet activity, as they result in different levels of transporters and thereby different levels of serotonin in platelets. SERT gene polymorphisms have thus been associated with the risk of myocardial infarction. A similar association may exist between SERT gene polymorphisms...... and stroke. However, to our knowledge, this potential association has not previously been studied. We therefore aimed to investigate the association between polymorphisms in the SERT gene and the risk of ischemic stroke/transitory ischemic attack (TIA). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a case...

  11. Serotonin transporter evolution and impact of polymorphic transcriptional regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søeby, Karen; Larsen, Svend Ask; Olsen, Line

    2005-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) is the primary drug target in the current antidepressant therapy. A functional polymorphism in the 2nd intron of the 5HTT gene encoding the SERT has been identified and associated with susceptibility to affective disorders and treatment response to antidepressants....... This study addresses the possible impact of the variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) to behavior and disease by examining the evolutionary origin and mechanisms of differential transcriptional regulation of SERT. We trace the evolutionary origin of the VNTR and show that it is present and varies...

  12. Differences in serotonin transporter binding affinity in patients with major depressive disorder and night eating syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, J D; Amsterdam, J; Newberg, A; Allison, K C; Wintering, N; Stunkard, A J

    2009-03-01

    We examined serotonin transporter (SERT) binding affinity using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and night eating syndrome (NES). There are similarities between MDD and NES in affective symptoms, appetite disturbance, nighttime awakenings, and, particularly, response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Six non-depressed patients with NES and seven patients with MDD underwent SPECT brain imaging with 123I-ADAM, a radiopharmaceutical agent selective for SERT sites. Uptake ratios of 123I-ADAM SERT binding were obtained for the midbrain, basal ganglia, and temporal lobe regions compared to the cerebellum reference region. Patients with NES had significantly greater SERT uptake ratios (effect size range 0.64-0.84) in the midbrain, right temporal lobe, and left temporal lobe regions than those with MDD whom we had previously studied. Pathophysiological differences in SERT uptake between patients with NES and MDD suggest these are distinct clinical syndromes.

  13. Synthesis and serotonin transporter activity of sulphur-substituted alpha-alkyl phenethylamines as a new class of anticancer agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cloonan, Suzanne M.; Keating, John J.; Butler, Stephen G.

    2009-01-01

    The discovery that some serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) ligands have the potential to act as pro-apoptotic agents in the treatment of cancer adds greatly to their diverse pharmacological application. 4-Methylthioamphetamine (MTA) is a selective ligand for SERT over other monoamine...

  14. Neuroticism Associates with Cerebral in Vivo Serotonin Transporter Binding Differently in Males and Females

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuominen, Lauri; Miettunen, Jouko; Cannon, Dara M

    2017-01-01

    scores from 91 healthy males and 56 healthy females. We specifically tested if the association between neuroticism and serotonin transporter is different in females and males. Results: We found that neuroticism and thalamic serotonin transporter binding potentials were associated in both males......). Conclusions: The finding is in agreement with recent studies showing that the serotonergic system is involved in affective disorders differently in males and females and suggests that contribution of thalamic serotonin transporter to the risk of affective disorders depends on sex....... and females, but with opposite directionality. Higher neuroticism associated with higher serotonin transporter binding potential in males (standardized beta 0.292, P=.008), whereas in females, higher neuroticism associated with lower serotonin transporter binding potential (standardized beta -0.288, P=.014...

  15. The association study between the interaction of serotonin and norepinephrine transporter gene polymorphisms and the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors%5-羟色胺和去甲肾上腺素转运体基因多态性的交互作用与重性抑郁障碍临床疗效的关联研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟亚琴; 孙宁; 王彦芳; 段慧君; 李素萍; 彭菊意; 杜巧荣; 张克让

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the relevance of the interaction of serotonin and norepinephrine transporter gene polymorphisms and the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.Methods The subjects comprised 246 patients according to the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders in the fourth edition (DSM-Ⅳ) criterion for major depressive disorder(MDD).The clinical efficacy were assessed by using 17 Hamilton depression quantity (HAMD) scale after selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors(SSRIs) citalopram (20 to 60 mg/d) or paroxetine (20 to 60 mg/d) were used randomly for 1,2,4,6 weeks.Polymerase chain reaction(PCR),sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis(SDS-PAGE)and DNA sequencing analysis were used to detect the genotype of 5-HTT gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of VNTR and LPR and SNPs at rs2242446 and rs5569 of NET.SPSS13.0 software were used for statistical analysis.Results (1) An association between 5-HTT LPR and the efficacy of SSRIs was found after 6 weeks in these samples (P =0.023).The clinical efficiency of LL genotype was higher than SS + LS genotype(OR =2.225,OR 95% CI=1.118,4.427).(2) The interaction of 5-HTT LPR and NET rs5569 and the SSRIs antidepressant effects was statistical significance (P =0.01).Conclusion Preliminary study found that the interaction of 5-HTT LPR and NET rs5569 may be related to SSRIs antidepressant effects in China' s patients with MDD.%目的 探讨5-羟色胺和去甲肾上腺素转运体基因多态性的交互作用与选择性5-羟色胺再摄取抑制剂临床疗效的关联研究.方法 收集符合美国精神障碍诊断与统计手册第四版(DSM-Ⅳ)重性抑郁障碍(MDD)诊断标准的患者246例,给予选择性5-羟色胺再摄取抑制剂(SSRIs)西酞普兰(20~ 60mg/d)或帕罗西汀(20 ~ 60 mg/d),在治疗后1,2,4,6周运用17项汉密尔顿抑郁量表(HAMD)评定临床疗效;应用聚合酶链反应技术(PCR)、聚丙烯酰胺凝胶电

  16. Positron emission tomography quantification of serotonin transporter in suicide attempters with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jeffrey M; Hesselgrave, Natalie; Ogden, R Todd; Sullivan, Gregory M; Oquendo, Maria A; Mann, J John; Parsey, Ramin V

    2013-08-15

    Several lines of evidence implicate abnormal serotonergic function in suicidal behavior and completed suicide, including low serotonin transporter binding in postmortem studies of completed suicide. We have also reported low in vivo serotonin transporter binding in major depressive disorder (MDD) during a major depressive episode using positron emission tomography (PET) with [(11)C]McN5652. We quantified regional brain serotonin transporter binding in vivo in depressed suicide attempters, depressed nonattempters, and healthy controls using PET and a superior radiotracer, [(11)C]DASB. Fifty-one subjects with DSM-IV current MDD, 15 of whom were past suicide attempters, and 32 healthy control subjects underwent PET scanning with [(11)C]DASB to quantify in vivo regional brain serotonin transporter binding. Metabolite-corrected arterial input functions and plasma free-fraction were acquired to improve quantification. Depressed suicide attempters had lower serotonin transporter binding in midbrain compared with depressed nonattempters (p = .031) and control subjects (p = .0093). There was no difference in serotonin transporter binding comparing all depressed subjects with healthy control subjects considering six a priori regions of interest simultaneously (p = .41). Low midbrain serotonin transporter binding appears to be related to the pathophysiology of suicidal behavior rather than of major depressive disorder. This is consistent with postmortem work showing low midbrain serotonin transporter binding capacity in depressed suicides and may partially explain discrepant in vivo findings quantifying serotonin transporter in depression. Future studies should investigate midbrain serotonin transporter binding as a predictor of suicidal behavior in MDD and determine the cause of low binding. Copyright © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Biodistribution and dosimetry of 123I-mZIENT: a novel ligand for imaging serotonin transporters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicol, Alice; Krishnadas, Rajeev; Champion, Sue; Tamagnan, Gilles; Stehouwer, Jeffrey S.; Goodman, Mark M.; Hadley, Donald M.; Pimlott, Sally L.

    2012-01-01

    123 I-labelled mZIENT (2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(3'-((Z)-2-iodoethenyl)phenyl)nortropane) has been developed as a radioligand for the serotonin transporter. The aim of this preliminary study was to assess its whole-body biodistribution in humans and estimate dosimetry. Three healthy controls and three patients receiving selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) therapy for depression were included (two men, four women, age range 41-56 years). Whole-body imaging, brain SPECT imaging and blood and urine sampling were performed. Whole-body images were analysed using regions of interest (ROIs), time-activity curves were derived using compartmental analysis and dosimetry estimated using OLINDA software. Brain ROI analysis was performed to obtain specific-to-nonspecific binding ratios in the midbrain, thalamus and striatum. Initial high uptake in the lungs decreased in later images. Lower uptake was seen in the brain, liver and intestines. Excretion was primarily through the urinary system. The effective dose was estimated to be of the order of 0.03 mSv/MBq. The organ receiving the highest absorbed dose was the lower large intestine wall. Uptake in the brain was consistent with the known SERT distribution with higher specific-to-nonspecific binding in the midbrain, thalamus and striatum in healthy controls compared with patients receiving SSRI therapy. 123 I-mZIENT may be a promising radioligand for imaging the serotonin transporters in humans with acceptable dosimetry. (orig.)

  18. Citation bias and selective focus on positive findings in the literature on the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR), life stress and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Y A; Roest, A M; Franzen, M; Munafò, M R; Bastiaansen, J A

    2016-10-01

    Caspi et al.'s 2003 report that 5-HTTLPR genotype moderates the influence of life stress on depression has been highly influential but remains contentious. We examined whether the evidence base for the 5-HTTLPR-stress interaction has been distorted by citation bias and a selective focus on positive findings. A total of 73 primary studies were coded for study outcomes and focus on positive findings in the abstract. Citation rates were compared between studies with positive and negative results, both within this network of primary studies and in Web of Science. In addition, the impact of focus on citation rates was examined. In all, 24 (33%) studies were coded as positive, but these received 48% of within-network and 68% of Web of Science citations. The 38 (52%) negative studies received 42 and 23% of citations, respectively, while the 11 (15%) unclear studies received 10 and 9%. Of the negative studies, the 16 studies without a positive focus (42%) received 47% of within-network citations and 32% of Web of Science citations, while the 13 (34%) studies with a positive focus received 39 and 51%, respectively, and the nine (24%) studies with a partially positive focus received 14 and 17%. Negative studies received fewer citations than positive studies. Furthermore, over half of the negative studies had a (partially) positive focus, and Web of Science citation rates were higher for these studies. Thus, discussion of the 5-HTTLPR-stress interaction is more positive than warranted. This study exemplifies how evidence-base-distorting mechanisms undermine the authenticity of research findings.

  19. Serotonin transporters in dopamine transporter imaging: a head-to-head comparison of dopamine transporter SPECT radioligands 123I-FP-CIT and 123I-PE2I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziebell, Morten; Holm-Hansen, Signe; Thomsen, Gerda

    2010-01-01

    Current SPECT radioligands available for in vivo imaging of the dopamine transporter (DAT) also show affinity for monoamine transporters other than DAT, especially the serotonin transporter (SERT). The effect of this lack of selectivity for in vivo imaging is unknown. In this study, we compared...

  20. Alteration of the platelet serotonin transporter in romantic love.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marazziti, D; Akiskal, H S; Rossi, A; Cassano, G B

    1999-05-01

    The evolutionary consequences of love are so important that there must be some long-established biological process regulating it. Recent findings suggest that the serotonin (5-HT) transporter might be linked to both neuroticism and sexual behaviour as well as to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The similarities between an overvalued idea, such as that typical of subjects in the early phase of a love relationship, and obsession, prompted us to explore the possibility that the two conditions might share alterations at the level of the 5-HT transporter. Twenty subjects who had recently (within the previous 6 months) fallen in love, 20 unmedicated OCD patients and 20 normal controls, were included in the study. The 5-HT transporter was evaluated with the specific binding of 3H-paroxetine (3H-Par) to platelet membranes. The results showed that the density of 3H-Par binding sites was significantly lower in subjects who had recently fallen in love and in OCD patients than in controls. The main finding of the present study is that subjects who were in the early romantic phase of a love relationship were not different from OCD patients in terms of the density of the platelet 5-HT transporter, which proved to be significantly lower than in the normal controls. This would suggest common neurochemical changes involving the 5-HT system, linked to psychological dimensions shared by the two conditions, perhaps at an ideational level.

  1. Midbrain serotonin transporter binding potential measured with [11C]DASB is affected by serotonin transporter genotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimold, M.; Bares, R.; Reischl, G.; Solbach, C.; Machulla, H.-J.; Smolka, M.N.; Mann, K.; Schumann, G.; Zimmer, A.; Wrase, J.; Hu, X.-Z.; Goldman, D.; Heinz, A.

    2007-01-01

    Homozygote carriers of two long (L) alleles of the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) regulatory region displayed in vitro a twofold increase in 5-HTT expression compared with carriers of one or two short (S) alleles. However, in vivo imaging studies yielded contradictory results. Recently, an A > G exchange leading to differential transcriptional activation of 5-HTT mRNA in lymphobalstoid cell lines was discovered in the 5-HTT regulatory region. In vitro and in vivo evidence suggests that [ 11 C]DASB, a new 5-HTT ligand offers some advantages over the ligands used in previous studies in measuring 5-HTT density independent of synaptic levels of serotonin. We assessed 5-HTT binding potential (BP 2) in the midbrain of 19 healthy subjects with positron emission tomography and [ 11 C]DASB. Accounting for the hypothesized functional similarity of L G and S in driving 5-HTT transcription, we assessed whether L A L A homozygotes display increased midbrain BP 2 compared with carriers of at least one S allele. BP 2 in the midbrain was significantly increased in L A L A homozygotes compared with carriers of at least one S allele. Interestingly, the genotype effect on the midbrain was significantly different from that on the thalamus and the amygdala where no group differences were detected. This in vivo study provides further evidence that subjects homozygous for the L A allele display increased expression of 5-HTT in the midbrain, the origin of central serotonergic projections. (author)

  2. Ecstasy use and serotonin syndrome: a neglected danger to adolescents and young adults prescribed selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobry, Yuriy; Rice, Timothy; Sher, Leo

    2013-01-01

    At present, there are scarce clinical and basic lab data concerning the risk of acute serotonin toxicity from selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) co-administration. The health care community can strongly benefit from efforts to address the high risks associated with serotonin syndrome from this specific drug combination. The aim of this work is to review the risk of serotonin syndrome in adolescents and young adults prescribed with SSRIs and are concurrently using ecstasy. An electronic search of the major behavioral science bibliographic databases (Pubmed, PsycINFO, Medline) was conducted to retrieve peer-reviewed articles, which detail the clinical characteristics, biological mechanisms and social implications of SSRIs, MDMA, and their potential synergism in causing serotonin syndrome in the pediatric and young adult population. Search terms included "serotonin syndrome", "ecstasy", "MDMA", "pediatric", and "SSRI". Additional references were incorporated from the bibliographies of these retrieved articles. MDMA, in combination with the widely-prescribed SSRI antidepressant class, can lead to rapid, synergistic rise of serotonin (5-HT) concentration in the central nervous system, leading to the acute medical emergency known as serotonin syndrome. This review addresses such complication through an exploration of the theoretical mechanisms and clinical manifestations of this life-threatening pharmacological interaction. The increasing incidences of recreational ecstasy use and SSRI pharmacotherapy among multiple psychiatric disorders in the adolescent population have made this an overlooked yet increasingly relevant danger, which poses a threat to public health. This can be curbed through further research, as well as greater health care provision and attention from a regulatory body owing.

  3. Impulsivity, gender, and the platelet serotonin transporter in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Marazziti

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Donatella Marazziti, Stefano Baroni, Irene Masala, Francesca Golia, Giorgio Consoli, Gabriele Massimetti, Michela Picchetti, Mario Catena Dell’Osso, Gino Giannaccini, Laura Betti, Antonio Lucacchini, Antonio CiapparelliDipartimento di Psichiatria, Neurobiologia, Farmacologia e Biotecnologie, University of Pisa, Pisa, ItalyAbstract: The present study explored the possible relationships between impulsivity, gender, and a peripheral serotonergic marker, the platelet serotonin (5-HT transporter (SERT, in a group of 32 healthy subjects. The impulsivity was measured by means of the Barratt Impulsivity Scale, version 11 (BIS-11, a widely used self-report questionnaire, and the platelet SERT was evaluated by means of the specific binding of 3H-paroxetine (3H-Par to platelet membranes, according to standardized protocols. The results showed that women had a higher BIS-11 total score than men, and also higher scores of two factors of the same scale: the motor impulsivity and the cognitive complexity. The analysis of the correlations revealed that the density of the SERT proteins, as measured by the maximum binding capacity (Bmax of 3H-Par, was significantly and positively related to the cognitive complexity factor, but only in men. Men showed also a significant and negative correlation with the dissociation constant, Kd, of (3H-Par binding, and the motor impulsivity factor. These findings suggest that women are generally more impulsive than men, but that the 5-HT system is more involved in the impulsivity of men than in that of women.Keywords: impulsivity, gender, serotonin transporter, Barratt Impulsivity Scale, platelets, 3H-paroxetine

  4. Estrous cycle modulation of extracellular serotonin in mediobasal hypothalamus: role of the serotonin transporter and terminal autoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maswood, S; Truitt, W; Hotema, M; Caldarola-Pastuszka, M; Uphouse, L

    1999-06-12

    In vivo microdialysis was used to examine extracellular serotonin (5-HT) in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) of male and female Fischer (CDF-344) rats. Females from the stages of diestrus, proestrus, and estrus were used. Additionally, ovariectomized rats, primed subcutaneously (s.c.) with estradiol benzoate or estradiol benzoate plus progesterone were examined. Extracellular 5-HT in the MBH varied with stage of the estrous cycle and with the light/dark cycle. Proestrous females had the highest microdialysate concentrations of 5-HT during the light portion of the light/dark cycle and lowest concentrations during the dark portion of the cycle. Diestrous females had the highest levels during the dark portion of the cycle, while males and estrous females showed little change between light and dark portions of the cycle. In ovariectomized rats, there was no effect of 2.5 microg or 25 microg estradiol benzoate (s.c.) on extracellular 5-HT; but the addition of 500 microg progesterone, 48 h after estrogen priming, reduced microdialysate 5-HT near the threshold for detection. In intact females and in males, reverse perfusion with 3 microM fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), or 2 microM methiothepin, a 5-HT receptor antagonist, increased microdialysate concentrations of 5-HT. Estrous females and males showed nearly a 4-fold increase in microdialysate 5-HT in response to fluoxetine while smaller responses were seen in diestrous and proestrous rats. In contrast, proestrous rats showed the largest response to methiothepin. Estrous females showed a delayed response to methiothepin, but there was no methiothepin-induced increase in extracellular 5-HT in males. These findings are discussed in reference to the suggestion that extracellular 5-HT in the MBH is regulated in a manner that is gender and estrous cycle dependent. The 5-HT terminal autoreceptor may exert a greater role in proestrous females; the serotonin transporter appears to play a more active

  5. SPECT imaging with the serotonin transporter radiotracer [{sup 123}I]p ZIENT in nonhuman primate brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cosgrove, Kelly P., E-mail: kelly.cosgrove@yale.ed [Yale University School of Medicine, VA Connecticut HCS (116A6), West Haven, CT 06516 (United States); Staley, Julie K.; Baldwin, Ronald M.; Bois, Frederic [Yale University School of Medicine, VA Connecticut HCS (116A6), West Haven, CT 06516 (United States); Plisson, Christophe [Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); Al-Tikriti, Mohammed S. [Yale University School of Medicine, VA Connecticut HCS (116A6), West Haven, CT 06516 (United States); Seibyl, John P. [Institute for Neurodegenerative Disorders, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Goodman, Mark M. [Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); Tamagnan, Gilles D. [Yale University School of Medicine, VA Connecticut HCS (116A6), West Haven, CT 06516 (United States); Institute for Neurodegenerative Disorders, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Introduction: Serotonin dysfunction has been linked to a variety of psychiatric diseases; however, an adequate SPECT radioligand to probe the serotonin transporter system has not been successfully developed. The purpose of this study was to characterize and determine the in vivo selectivity of iodine-123-labeled 2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4'-((Z)-2-iodoethenyl)phenyl)nortropane, [{sup 123}I]p ZIENT, in nonhuman primate brain. Methods: Two ovariohysterectomized female baboons participated in nine studies (one bolus and eight bolus to constant infusion at a ratio of 9.0 h) to evaluate [{sup 123}I]p ZIENT. To evaluate the selectivity of [{sup 123}I]p ZIENT, the serotonin transporter blockers fenfluramine (1.5, 2.5 mg/kg) and citalopram (5 mg/kg), the dopamine transporter blocker methylphenidate (0.5 mg/kg) and the norepinephrine transporter blocker nisoxetine (1 mg/kg) were given at 8 h post-radiotracer injection. Results: In the bolus to constant infusion studies, equilibrium was established by 4-8 h. [{sup 123}I]p ZIENT was 93% and 90% protein bound in the two baboons and there was no detection of lipophilic radiolabeled metabolites entering the brain. In the high-density serotonin transporter regions (diencephalon and brainstem), fenfluramine and citalopram resulted in 35-71% and 129-151% displacement, respectively, whereas methylphenidate and nisoxetine did not produce significant changes (<10%). Conclusion: These findings suggest that [{sup 123}I]p ZIENT is a favorable compound for in vivo SPECT imaging of serotonin transporters with negligible binding to norepinephrine and dopamine transporters.

  6. Association of the serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region genotype with lower bone mineral density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapid, M I; Kung, S; Frye, M A; Biernacka, J M; Geske, J R; Drake, M T; Jankowski, M D; Clarke, B L

    2017-08-22

    The serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) of the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) S allele is linked to pathogenesis of depression and slower response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs); depression and SSRIs are independently associated with bone loss. We aimed to determine whether 5-HTTLPR was associated with bone loss. This cross-sectional study included psychiatric patients with both 5-HTTLPR analysis and bone mineral density (BMD) assessment (hip and spine Z-scores if age <50 years and T-scores if ⩾50 years). BMD association with 5-HTTLPR was evaluated under models with additive allele effects and dominant S allele effects using linear regression models. Patients were stratified by age (<50 and ⩾50 years) and sex. Of 3016 patients with 5-HTTLPR genotyping, 239 had BMD assessments. Among the younger patients, the S allele was associated with lower Z-scores at the hip (P=0.002, dominant S allele effects; P=0.004, additive allele effects) and spine (P=0.0006, dominant S allele effects; P=0.01, additive allele effects). In sex-stratified analyses, the association of the S allele with lower BMD in the younger patients was also significant in the subset of women (P⩽0.003 for both hip and spine BMD under the additive allele effect model). In the small group of men younger than 50 years, the S allele was marginally associated with higher spine BMD (P=0.05). BMD T-scores were not associated with 5-HTTLPR genotypes in patients 50 years or older. The 5-HTTLPR variants may modify serotonin effects on bone with sex-specific effects.

  7. Novel and high affinity fluorescent ligands for the serotonin transporter based on (s)-citalopram

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Vivek; Rahbek-Clemmensen, Troels; Billesbølle, Christian B

    2014-01-01

    Novel rhodamine-labeled ligands, based on (S)-citalopram, were synthesized and evaluated for uptake inhibition at the human serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine transporters (hSERT, hDAT, and hNET, respectively) and for binding at SERT, in transiently transfected COS7 cells. Compound 14 demons...... demonstrated high affinity binding and selectivity for SERT (K i = 3 nM). Visualization of SERT, using confocal laser scanning microscopy, validated compound 14 as a novel tool for studying SERT expression and distribution in living cells....

  8. Autoradiographic study of serotonin transporter during memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellez, Ruth; Rocha, Luisa; Castillo, Carlos; Meneses, Alfredo

    2010-09-01

    Serotonin transporter (SERT) has been associated with drugs of abuse like d-methamphetamine (METH). METH is well known to produce effects on the monoamine systems but it is unclear how METH affects SERT and memory. Here the effects of METH and the serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine (FLX) on autoshaping and novel object recognition (NOR) were investigated. Notably, both memory tasks recruit different behavioral, neural and cognitive demand. In autoshaping task a dose-response curve for METH was determined. METH (1.0mg/kg) impaired short-term memory (STM; lasting less of 90min) in NOR and impaired both STM and long-term memory (LTM; lasting 24 and 48h) in autoshaping, indicating that METH had long-lasting effects in the latter task. A comparative autoradiography study of the relationship between the binding pattern of SERT in autoshaping new untrained vs. trained treated (METH, FLX, or both) animals was made. Considering that hemispheric dominance is important for LTM, hence right vs. left hemisphere of the brain was compared. Results showed that trained animals decreased cortical SERT binding relative to untrained ones. In untrained and trained treated animals with the amnesic dose (1.0mg/kg) of METH SERT binding in several areas including hippocampus and cortex decreased, more remarkably in the trained animals. In contrast, FLX improved memory, increased SERT binding, prevented the METH amnesic effect and re-established the SERT binding. In general, memory and amnesia seemed to make SERT more vulnerable to drugs effects. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Prenatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and childhood overweight at 7 years of age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grzeskowiak, Luke E; Gilbert, Andrew L; Sørensen, Thorkild

    2013-01-01

    To investigate a possible association between prenatal selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) exposure and childhood overweight at 7 years of age.......To investigate a possible association between prenatal selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) exposure and childhood overweight at 7 years of age....

  10. Inhibition of serotonin transport by (+)McN5652 is noncompetitive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hummerich, Rene [Biochemical Laboratory, Central Institute of Mental Health, 68159 Mannheim (Germany); Schulze, Oliver [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, D-20246 Hamburg (Germany); Raedler, Thomas [Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, D-20246 Hamburg (Germany); Mikecz, Pal [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, D-20246 Hamburg (Germany); Reimold, Matthias [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Tuebingen, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Brenner, Winfried [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, D-20246 Hamburg (Germany); Clausen, Malte [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, D-20246 Hamburg (Germany); Schloss, Patrick [Biochemical Laboratory, Central Institute of Mental Health, 68159 Mannheim (Germany); Buchert, Ralph [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, D-20246 Hamburg (Germany)]. E-mail: buchert@uke.uni-hamburg.de

    2006-04-15

    Introduction: Imaging of the serotonergic innervation of the brain using positron emission tomography (PET) with the serotonin transporter (SERT) ligand [{sup 11C}] (+)McN5652 might be affected by serotonin in the synaptic cleft if there is relevant interaction between [{sup 11}C] (+)McN5652 and serotonin at the SERT. The aim of the present study therefore was to pharmacologically characterize the interaction of [{sup 11}C] (+)McN5652 and serotonin at the SERT. Methods: In vitro saturation analyses of [{sup 3}H]serotonin uptake into HEK293 cells stably expressing the human SERT were performed in the absence and presence of unlabelled (+)McN5652. Data were evaluated assuming Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Results: Unlabelled (+)McN5652 significantly reduced the maximal rate of serotonin transport V {sub max} of SERT without affecting the Michaelis-Menten constant K {sub M}. Conclusions: This finding indicates that (+)McN5652 inhibits serotonin transport through the SERT in a noncompetitive manner. This might suggest that [{sup 11}C] (+)McN5652 PET is not significantly affected by endogenous serotonin.

  11. Inhibition of serotonin transport by (+)McN5652 is noncompetitive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hummerich, Rene; Schulze, Oliver; Raedler, Thomas; Mikecz, Pal; Reimold, Matthias; Brenner, Winfried; Clausen, Malte; Schloss, Patrick; Buchert, Ralph

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Imaging of the serotonergic innervation of the brain using positron emission tomography (PET) with the serotonin transporter (SERT) ligand [ 11C ] (+)McN5652 might be affected by serotonin in the synaptic cleft if there is relevant interaction between [ 11 C] (+)McN5652 and serotonin at the SERT. The aim of the present study therefore was to pharmacologically characterize the interaction of [ 11 C] (+)McN5652 and serotonin at the SERT. Methods: In vitro saturation analyses of [ 3 H]serotonin uptake into HEK293 cells stably expressing the human SERT were performed in the absence and presence of unlabelled (+)McN5652. Data were evaluated assuming Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Results: Unlabelled (+)McN5652 significantly reduced the maximal rate of serotonin transport V max of SERT without affecting the Michaelis-Menten constant K M . Conclusions: This finding indicates that (+)McN5652 inhibits serotonin transport through the SERT in a noncompetitive manner. This might suggest that [ 11 C] (+)McN5652 PET is not significantly affected by endogenous serotonin

  12. Mutational Mapping and Modeling of the Binding Site for (S)-Citalopram in the Human Serotonin Transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jacob; Olsen, Lars; Hansen, Kasper B.

    2010-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) regulates extracellular levels of the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) in the brain by facilitating uptake of released 5-hydroxytryptamine into neuronal cells. SERT is the target for widely used antidepressant drugs, including imipramine, fluoxetine...

  13. Adaptations in pre- and postsynaptic 5-HT(1A) receptor function and cocaine supersensitivity in serotonin transporter knockout rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homberg, Judith R; De Boer, Sietse F; Raasø, Halfdan S; Olivier, Jocelien D A; Verheul, Mark; Ronken, Eric; Cools, Alexander R; Ellenbroek, Bart A; Schoffelmeer, Anton N M; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J; De Vries, Taco J; Cuppen, Edwin

    2008-01-01

    RATIONALE: While individual differences in vulnerability to psychostimulants have been largely attributed to dopaminergic neurotransmission, the role of serotonin is not fully understood. OBJECTIVES: To study the rewarding and motivational properties of cocaine in the serotonin transporter knockout

  14. Cognitive function is related to fronto-striatal serotonin transporter levels--a brain PET study in young healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Karine; Erritzøe, David Frederik; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    2011-01-01

    Pharmacological manipulation of serotonergic neurotransmission in healthy volunteers impacts on cognitive test performance. Specifically, markers of serotonin function are associated with attention and executive functioning, long-term memory, and general cognitive ability. The serotonin transporter...

  15. Relative contributions of norepinephrine and serotonin transporters to antinociceptive synergy between monoamine reuptake inhibitors and morphine in the rat formalin model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Shen

    Full Text Available Multimodal analgesia is designed to optimize pain relief by coadministering drugs with distinct mechanisms of action or by combining multiple pharmacologies within a single molecule. In clinical settings, combinations of monoamine reuptake inhibitors and opioid receptor agonists have been explored and one currently available analgesic, tapentadol, functions as both a µ-opioid receptor agonist and a norepinephrine transporter inhibitor. However, it is unclear whether the combination of selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibition and µ-receptor agonism achieves an optimal antinociceptive synergy. In this study, we assessed the pharmacodynamic interactions between morphine and monoamine reuptake inhibitors that possess different affinities and selectivities for norepinephrine and serotonin transporters. Using the rat formalin model, in conjunction with measurements of ex vivo transporter occupancy, we show that neither the norepinephrine-selective inhibitor, esreboxetine, nor the serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine, produce antinociceptive synergy with morphine. Atomoxetine, a monoamine reuptake inhibitor that achieves higher levels of norepinephrine than serotonin transporter occupancy, exhibited robust antinociceptive synergy with morphine. Similarly, a fixed-dose combination of esreboxetine and fluoxetine which achieves comparable levels of transporter occupancy potentiated the antinociceptive response to morphine. By contrast, duloxetine, a monoamine reuptake inhibitor that achieves higher serotonin than norepinephrine transporter occupancy, failed to potentiate the antinociceptive response to morphine. However, when duloxetine was coadministered with the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, ondansetron, potentiation of the antinociceptive response to morphine was revealed. These results support the notion that inhibition of both serotonin and norepinephrine transporters is required for monoamine reuptake inhibitor and opioid

  16. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitorprescribing before, during and after pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charlton, Ra; Jordan, S; Pierini, A

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the prescribing patterns of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) before, during and after pregnancy in six European population-based databases. DESIGN: Descriptive drug utilisation study. SETTING: Six electronic healthcare databases in Denmark, the Netherlands......, Italy (Emilia Romagna/Tuscany), Wales and the rest of the UK. POPULATION: All women with a pregnancy ending in a live or stillbirth starting and ending between 2004 and 2010. METHODS: A common protocol was implemented across databases to identify SSRI prescriptions issued (UK) or dispensed (non......-UK) in the year before, during or in the year following pregnancy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The percentage of deliveries in which the woman received an SSRI prescription in the year before, during or in the year following pregnancy. We also compared the choice of SSRIs and changes in prescribing over the study...

  17. An AOP analysis of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, M Danielle

    2017-07-01

    Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) are found in measureable quantities within the aquatic environment. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants are one class of pharmaceutical compound that has received a lot of attention. Consistent with most PPCPs, the pharmacokinetics and physiological impacts of SSRI treatment have been well-studied in small mammals and humans and this, combined with the evolutionary conservation of the serotonergic system across vertebrates, allows for the read-across of known SSRI effects in mammals to potential SSRI impacts on aquatic organisms. Using an Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) framework, this review examines the similarities and differences between the mammalian and teleost fish SSRI target, the serotonin transporter (SERT; SLC6A4), and the downstream impacts of elevated extracellular serotonin (5-HT; 5-hydroxytryptamine), the consequence of SERT inhibition, on organ systems and physiological processes within teleost fish. This review also intends to reveal potentially understudied endpoints for SSRI toxicity based on what is known to be controlled by 5-HT in fish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Implications of genetic research on the role of the serotonin in depression: emphasis on the serotonin type 1A receptor and the serotonin transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumeister, Alexander; Young, Theresa; Stastny, Juergen

    2004-08-01

    Serotonin systems appear to play a key role in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder. Consequently, ongoing research determines whether serotonin related genes account for the very robust differential behavioral and neural mechanisms that discriminate patients with depression from healthy controls. Serotonin type 1(A) receptors and the serotonin transporters are reduced in depression, and recent genetic research in animals and humans has implicated both in depression. Preclinical studies have utilized a variety of animal models that have been used to explain pathophysiological mechanisms in humans, although it is not clear at all whether these models constitute relevant models for depression in humans. However, data from preclinical studies can generate hypotheses that are tested in humans by combining genetic data with behavioral and physiological challenge paradigms and neuroimaging. These studies will enhance our understanding about combined influences from multiple interacting genes, as well as from environmental factors on brain circuits and their function, and about how these mechanisms may contribute to the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  19. High-mesembrine Sceletium extract (Trimesemine™) is a monoamine releasing agent, rather than only a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzee, Dirk D; López, Víctor; Smith, Carine

    2016-01-11

    Extracts from and alkaloids contained in plants in the genus Sceletium have been reported to inhibit ligand binding to serotonin transporter. From this, the conclusion was made that Sceletium products act as selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors. However, other mechanisms which may similarly result in the anxiolytic or anti-depressant effect ascribed to Sceletium, such as monoamine release, have not been investigated. The current study investigated simultaneously and at two consecutive time points, the effect of high-mesembrine Sceletium extract on both monoamine release and serotonin reuptake into both human astrocytes and mouse hippocampal neurons, as well as potential inhibitory effects on relevant enzyme activities. Human astrocytes and mouse hippocampal cells were treated with citalopram or Sceletium extract for 15 and 30min, after which protein expression levels of serotonin transporter (SERT) and vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VAMT-2) was assessed using fluorescent immunocytochemistry and digital image analysis. Efficacy of inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and monoamine oxidate-A (MAO-A) activity were assessed using the Ellman and Olsen methods (and appropriate controls) respectively. We report the first investigation of mechanism of action of Sceletium extract in the context of serotonin transport, release and reuptake in a cellular model. Cell viability was not affected by Sceletium treatment. High-mesembrine Sceletium extract down-regulated SERT expression similarly to citalopram. In addition, VMAT-2 was upregulated significantly in response to Sceletium treatment. The extract showed only relatively mild inhibition of AChE and MAO-A. We conclude that the serotonin reuptake inhibition activity ascribed to the Sceletium plant, is a secondary function to the monoamine-releasing activity of high-mesembrine Sceletium extract (Trimesemine(TM)). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Antidepressant Specificity of Serotonin Transporter Suggested by Three LeuT-SSRI Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Z.; Zhen, J; Karpowich, N; Law, C; Reith, M; Wang, D

    2009-01-01

    Sertraline and fluoxetine are selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) that are widely prescribed to treat depression. They exert their effects by inhibiting the presynaptic plasma membrane serotonin transporter (SERT). All SSRIs possess halogen atoms at specific positions, which are key determinants for the drugs' specificity for SERT. For the SERT protein, however, the structural basis of its specificity for SSRIs is poorly understood. Here we report the crystal structures of LeuT, a bacterial SERT homolog, in complex with sertraline, R-fluoxetine or S-fluoxetine. The SSRI halogens all bind to exactly the same pocket within LeuT. Mutation at this halogen-binding pocket (HBP) in SERT markedly reduces the transporter's affinity for SSRIs but not for tricyclic antidepressants. Conversely, when the only nonconserved HBP residue in both norepinephrine and dopamine transporters is mutated into that found in SERT, their affinities for all the three SSRIs increase uniformly. Thus, the specificity of SERT for SSRIs is dependent largely on interaction of the drug halogens with the protein's HBP.

  1. Perseverative instrumental and Pavlovian responding to conditioned stimuli in serotonin transporter knockout rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nonkes, L.J.P.; Homberg, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental stimuli can influence behavior via the process of Pavlovian conditioning. Recent genetic research suggests that some individuals are more sensitive to environmental stimuli for behavioral guidance than others. One important mediator of this effect is serotonin transporter (5-HTT)

  2. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors for Treatment of Selective Mutism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazlum Çöpür

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Some authors suggest that selective mutism should be considered as a variant of social phobia or a disorder in the obsessive-compulsive spectrum. Recent studies indicate that pharmacological treatments may be effective in the treatment of selective mutism. In this article, four cases who were treated with citalopram and escitalopram are presented. The results indicate that the drugs were well tolerated, and the level of social and verbal interactions improved significantly. These findings have shown that citalopram and escitalopram can be considered in medication of selective mutism; nevertheless, it is essential that research be done with more cases than previous ones, in order to prove their accuracy

  3. Hypolocomotion, anxiety and serotonin syndrome-like behavior contribute to the complex phenotype of serotonin transporter knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalueff, A V; Fox, M A; Gallagher, P S; Murphy, D L

    2007-06-01

    Although mice with a targeted disruption of the serotonin transporter (SERT) have been studied extensively using various tests, their complex behavioral phenotype is not yet fully understood. Here we assess in detail the behavior of adult female SERT wild type (+/+), heterozygous (+/-) and knockout (-/-) mice on an isogenic C57BL/6J background subjected to a battery of behavioral paradigms. Overall, there were no differences in the ability to find food or a novel object, nest-building, self-grooming and its sequencing, and horizontal rod balancing, indicating unimpaired sensory functions, motor co-ordination and behavioral sequencing. In contrast, there were striking reductions in exploration and activity in novelty-based tests (novel object, sticky label and open field tests), accompanied by pronounced thigmotaxis, suggesting that combined hypolocomotion and anxiety (rather than purely anxiety) influence the SERT -/- behavioral phenotype. Social interaction behaviors were also markedly reduced. In addition, SERT -/- mice tended to move close to the ground, frequently displayed spontaneous Straub tail, tics, tremor and backward gait - a phenotype generally consistent with 'serotonin syndrome'-like behavior. In line with replicated evidence of much enhanced serotonin availability in SERT -/- mice, this serotonin syndrome-like state may represent a third factor contributing to their behavioral profile. An understanding of the emerging complexity of SERT -/- mouse behavior is crucial for a detailed dissection of their phenotype and for developing further neurobehavioral models using these mice.

  4. Possibility of Predicting Serotonin Transporter Occupancy From the In Vitro Inhibition Constant for Serotonin Transporter, the Clinically Relevant Plasma Concentration of Unbound Drugs, and Their Profiles for Substrates of Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahata, Masahiro; Chiba, Koji; Watanabe, Takao; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2017-09-01

    Accurate prediction of target occupancy facilitates central nervous system drug development. In this review, we discuss the predictability of serotonin transporter (SERT) occupancy in human brain estimated from in vitro K i values for human SERT and plasma concentrations of unbound drug (C u,plasma ), as well as the impact of drug transporters in the blood-brain barrier. First, the geometric means of in vitro K i values were compared with the means of in vivo K i values (K i,u,plasma ) which were calculated as C u,plasma values at 50% occupancy of SERT obtained from previous clinical positron emission tomography/single photon emission computed tomography imaging studies for 6 selective serotonin transporter reuptake inhibitors and 3 serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors. The in vitro K i values for 7 drugs were comparable to their in vivo K i,u,plasma values within 3-fold difference. SERT occupancy was overestimated for 5 drugs (P-glycoprotein substrates) and underestimated for 2 drugs (presumably uptake transporter substrates, although no evidence exists as yet). In conclusion, prediction of human SERT occupancy from in vitro K i values and C u,plasma was successful for drugs that are not transporter substrates and will become possible in future even for transporter substrates, once the transporter activities will be accurately estimated from in vitro experiments. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The serotonin transporter undergoes constitutive internalization and is primarily sorted to late endosomes and lysosomal degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahbek-Clemmensen, Troels; Bay, Tina; Eriksen, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) plays a critical role in regulating serotonin signaling by mediating reuptake of serotonin from the extracellular space. The molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling SERT levels in the membrane remain poorly understood. To study trafficking of surface resident...... SERT, two functional epitope tagged variants were generated. Fusion of a FLAG-tagged one-transmembrane segment protein Tac to the SERT N-terminus generated a transporter with an extracellular epitope suited for trafficking studies (TacSERT). Likewise, a construct with an extracellular antibody epitope...

  6. Evidence for a role of transporter-mediated currents in the depletion of brain serotonin induced by serotonin transporter substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Michael H; Bulling, Simon; Benaderet, Tova S; Saha, Kusumika; Ayestas, Mario A; Partilla, John S; Ali, Syed F; Stockner, Thomas; Rothman, Richard B; Sandtner, Walter; Sitte, Harald H

    2014-05-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) transporter (SERT) substrates like fenfluramine and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine cause long-term depletion of brain 5-HT, while certain other substrates do not. The 5-HT deficits produced by SERT substrates are dependent upon transporter proteins, but the exact mechanisms responsible are unclear. Here, we compared the pharmacology of several SERT substrates: fenfluramine, d-fenfluramine, 1-(m-chlorophenyl)piperazine (mCPP) and 1-(m-trifluoromethylphenyl)piperainze (TFMPP), to establish relationships between acute drug mechanisms and the propensity for long-term 5-HT depletions. In vivo microdialysis was carried out in rat nucleus accumbens to examine acute 5-HT release and long-term depletion in the same subjects. In vitro assays were performed to measure efflux of [(3)H]5-HT in rat brain synaptosomes and transporter-mediated ionic currents in SERT-expressing Xenopus oocytes. When administered repeatedly to rats (6 mg/kg, i.p., four doses), all drugs produce large sustained elevations in extracellular 5-HT (>5-fold) with minimal effects on dopamine. Importantly, 2 weeks after dosing, only rats exposed to fenfluramine and d-fenfluramine display depletion of brain 5-HT. All test drugs evoke fluoxetine-sensitive efflux of [(3)H]5-HT from synaptosomes, but d-fenfluramine and its bioactive metabolite d-norfenfluramine induce significantly greater SERT-mediated currents than phenylpiperazines. Our data confirm that drug-induced 5-HT release probably does not mediate 5-HT depletion. However, the magnitude of transporter-mediated inward current may be a critical factor in the cascade of events leading to 5-HT deficits. This hypothesis warrants further study, especially given the growing popularity of designer drugs that target SERT.

  7. [Role of Serotonin Transporter Gene in Eating Disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Muñoz, Sandra; Camarena-Medellin, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    The serotoninergic system has been implicated in mood and appetite regulation, and the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) is a commonly studied candidate gene for eating disorders. However, most studies have focused on a single polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) in SLC6A4. We present the studies published on the association between eating disorders (ED) and 5-HTTLPR polymorphism in anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and eating disorders not otherwise specified (EDNOS). Search of databases: MEDLINE, ISI, and PubMed for SLC6A4 and ED. From a review of 37 original articles, it was suggested that carriers of S allele is a risk factor for eating disorders, especially for AN. However, BN did not show any association. Also, BMI, impulsivity, anxiety, depression, and age of onset have been associated with S allele in ED patients. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. Can a Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Act as a Glutamatergic Modulator?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Emilio Frizzo, PhD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sertraline (Zoloft and fluoxetine (Prozac are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors whose antidepressant mechanism of action is classically attributed to an elevation of the extracellular levels of serotonin in the synaptic cleft. However, the biological effects of these drugs seem to be more complex than their traditionally described mechanism of action. Among their actions is the inhibition of different types of Na+ and K+ channels, as well as of glutamate uptake activity. The clearance of extracellular glutamate is essential to maintain the central nervous system within physiological conditions, and this excitatory neurotransmitter is removed from the synaptic cleft by astrocyte transporters. This transport depends upon a hyperpolarized membrane potential in astrocytes that is mainly maintained by Kir4.1 K+ channels. The impairment of the Kir4.1 channel activity reduces driving force for the glutamate transporter, resulting in an accumulation of extracellular glutamate. It has been shown that sertraline and fluoxetine inhibit Kir4.1 K+ channels. Recently, we demonstrated that sertraline reduces glutamate uptake in human platelets, which contain a high-affinity Na+-dependent glutamate uptake system, with kinetic and pharmacological properties similar to astrocytes in the central nervous system. Considering these similarities between human platelets and astrocytes, one might ask if sertraline could potentially reduce glutamate clearance in the synaptic cleft and consequently modulate glutamatergic transmission. This possibility merits investigation, since it may provide additional information regarding the mechanism of action and perhaps the side effects of these antidepressants.

  9. Iodine-123 labelled nor-{beta}-CIT binds to the serotonin transporter in vivo as assessed by biodistribution studies in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booij, J.; Knol, R.J.J.; Reneman, L.; De Bruin, K.; Van Royen, E.A. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Janssen, A.G.M. [Amersham Cygne and Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands)

    1998-12-01

    Iodine-123 labelled 2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)nortropane (nor-{beta}-CIT), a radioiodinated cocaine analogue, was evaluated as an agent for the in vivo labelling of serotonin transporters by biodistribution studies in rats. Intravenous injection of [{sup 123}I]nor-{beta}-CIT resulted in high accumulation of radioactivity in brain areas with high densities of serotonin (hypothalamus) and dopamine transporters (striatum), although the binding was less pronounced in the hypothalamus. While binding of [{sup 123}I]nor-{beta}-CIT in the hypothalamus was blocked significantly by fluvoxamine (a selective serotonin transporter blocker) but not by GBR12,909 (a selective dopamine transporter blocker), the opposite was observed in the striatum. The results of this study indicate that [{sup 123}I]nor-{beta}-CIT, although not being a selective radioligand, binds specifically to serotonin transporters in the hypothalamus in vivo and thus suggest that [{sup 123}I]nor-{beta}-CIT promises to be a suitable radioligand for single-photon emission tomography imaging of serotonin transporters in humans. (orig.) With 1 fig., 2 tabs., 15 refs.

  10. Iodine-123 labelled nor-β-CIT binds to the serotonin transporter in vivo as assessed by biodistribution studies in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booij, J.; Knol, R.J.J.; Reneman, L.; De Bruin, K.; Van Royen, E.A.; Janssen, A.G.M.

    1998-01-01

    Iodine-123 labelled 2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl)nortropane (nor-β-CIT), a radioiodinated cocaine analogue, was evaluated as an agent for the in vivo labelling of serotonin transporters by biodistribution studies in rats. Intravenous injection of [ 123 I]nor-β-CIT resulted in high accumulation of radioactivity in brain areas with high densities of serotonin (hypothalamus) and dopamine transporters (striatum), although the binding was less pronounced in the hypothalamus. While binding of [ 123 I]nor-β-CIT in the hypothalamus was blocked significantly by fluvoxamine (a selective serotonin transporter blocker) but not by GBR12,909 (a selective dopamine transporter blocker), the opposite was observed in the striatum. The results of this study indicate that [ 123 I]nor-β-CIT, although not being a selective radioligand, binds specifically to serotonin transporters in the hypothalamus in vivo and thus suggest that [ 123 I]nor-β-CIT promises to be a suitable radioligand for single-photon emission tomography imaging of serotonin transporters in humans. (orig.)

  11. No link of serotonin 2C receptor editing to serotonin transporter genotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyddon, R.; Cuppen, E.; Haroutunian, V.; Siever, L.J.; Dracheva, S.

    2010-01-01

    RNA editing is a post-transcriptional process, which has the potential to alter the function of encoded proteins. In particular, serotonin 2C receptor (5-HT2cR) mRNA editing can produce 24 protein isoforms of varying functionality. Rodent studies have shown that 5-HT2cR editing is dynamically

  12. Effect of plasma membrane fluidity on serotonin transport by endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, E.R.; Edwards, D.

    1987-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of plasma membrane fluidity of lung endothelial cells on serotonin transport, porcine pulmonary artery endothelial cells were incubated for 3 h with either 0.1 mM cholesterol hemisuccinate, 0.1 mM cis-vaccenic acid, or vehicle (control), after which plasma membrane fluidity and serotinin transport were measured. Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to measure fluidity in the plasma membrane. Serotonin uptake was calculated from the disappearance of [ 14 C]-serotonin from the culture medium. Cholesterol decreased fluidity in the subpolar head group and central and midacyl side-chain regions of the plasma membrane and decreased serotonin transport, whereas cis-vaccenic acid increased fluidity in the central and midacyl side-chain regions of the plasma membrane and also increased serotonin transport. Cis-vaccenic acid had no effect of fluidity in the subpolar head group region of the plasma membrane. These results provide evidence that the physical state of the central and midacyl chains within the pulmonary artery endothelial cell plasma membrane lipid bilayer modulates transmembrane transport of serotonin by these cells

  13. Recent advances in the understanding of the interaction of antidepressant drugs with serotonin and norepinephrine transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jacob; Kristensen, Anders Skov; Bang-Andersen, Benny

    2009-01-01

    The biogenic monoamine transporters are integral membrane proteins that perform active transport of extracellular dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine into cells. These transporters are targets for therapeutic agents such as antidepressants, as well as addictive substances such as cocaine...... and amphetamine. Seminal advances in the understanding of the structure and function of this transporter family have recently been accomplished by structural studies of a bacterial transporter, as well as medicinal chemistry and pharmacological studies of mammalian transporters. This feature article focuses...

  14. Serotonin transporter is not required for the development of severe pulmonary hypertension in the Sugen hypoxia rat model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Raaf, Michiel Alexander; Kroeze, Yvet; Middelman, Anthonieke; de Man, Frances S.; de Jong, Helma; Vonk-Noordegraaf, Anton; de Korte, Chris; Voelkel, Norbert F.; Homberg, Judith; Bogaard, Harm Jan

    2015-01-01

    Increased serotonin serum levels have been proposed to play a key role in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) by regulating vessel tone and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. An intact serotonin system, which critically depends on a normal function of the serotonin transporter (SERT), is

  15. BDNF val66met association with serotonin transporter binding in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisher, P. M.; Ozenne, B.; Svarer, C.

    2017-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (5-HTT) is a key feature of the serotonin system, which is involved in behavior, cognition and personality and implicated in neuropsychiatric illnesses including depression. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) val66met and 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms have predicted......-carriers have increased subcortical 5-HTT binding. The small difference suggests limited statistical power may explain previously reported null effects. Our finding adds to emerging evidence that BDNF val66met contributes to differences in the human brain serotonin system, informing how variability in the 5-HTT...

  16. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and intraoperative blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Haelst, Ingrid M M; van Klei, Wilton A; Doodeman, Hieronymus J; Kalkman, Cor J; Egberts, Toine C G

    2012-02-01

    The influence of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on blood pressure is poorly understood. We hypothesized that if SSRIs have an influence on blood pressure, this might become manifest in changes in intraoperative blood pressure. We aimed to study the association between perioperative use of SSRIs and changes in intraoperative blood pressure by measuring the occurrence of intraoperative hyper- and hypotension. We conducted a retrospective observational follow-up study among patients who underwent elective primary total hip arthroplasty. The index group included users of SSRIs. The reference group included a random sample (ratio 1:3) of nonusers of an antidepressant agent. The outcome was the occurrence of intraoperative hypo- and hypertensive episodes (number, mean and total duration, and area under the curve (AUC)). The outcome was adjusted for confounding factors using regression techniques. The index group included 20 users of an SSRI. The reference group included 60 nonusers. Users of SSRIs showed fewer intraoperative hypotensive episodes, a shorter mean and total duration, and a smaller AUC when compared to the reference group. After adjustment for confounders, SSRI use was associated with a significantly shorter total duration of hypotension: mean difference of -29.4 min (95% confidence interval (CI) -50.4 to -8.3). Two users of an SSRI and two patients in the reference group had a hypertensive episode. Continuation of treatment with SSRIs before surgery was associated with a briefer duration of intraoperative hypotension.

  17. Understanding the pharmacogenetics of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, Chiara; Minarini, Alessandro; Niitsu, Tomihisa; Serretti, Alessandro

    2014-08-01

    The genetic background of antidepressant response represents a unique opportunity to identify biological markers of treatment outcome. Encouraging results alternating with inconsistent findings made antidepressant pharmacogenetics a stimulating but often discouraging field that requires careful discussion about cumulative evidence and methodological issues. The present review discusses both known and less replicated genes that have been implicated in selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) efficacy and side effects. Candidate genes studies and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) were collected through MEDLINE database search (articles published till January 2014). Further, GWAS signals localized in promising genetic regions according to candidate gene studies are reported in order to assess the general comparability of results obtained through these two types of pharmacogenetic studies. Finally, a pathway enrichment approach is applied to the top genes (those harboring SNPs with p pharmacogenetics, the present review discusses the proposal of moving from the analysis of individual polymorphisms to genes and molecular pathways, and from the separation across different methodological approaches to their combination. Efforts in this direction are justified by the recent evidence of a favorable cost-utility of gene-guided antidepressant treatment.

  18. Serotonin transporter (SERT gene polymorphism in Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmut Özkaya

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Parkinson disease (PD is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder with a prevalence of about 2% in persons older than 65 years of age. Neurodegenerative process in PD is not restricted to the dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra but also affects serotoninergic neurons. It has been shown that PD brains with Lewy bodies in the substantia nigra also had Lewy bodies in the raphe nuclei. The re-uptake of 5HT released into the synaptic cleft is mediated by the 5HT transporter (SERT. The SERT gene has been mapped to the chromosome of 17q11.1-q12 and has two main polymorphisms: intron two VNTR polymorphism and promoter region 44 bp insertion/deletion polymorphism. Objective: In this study we investigated whether two polymorphic regions in the serotonin transporter gene are associated with PD. Material and Method: After obtaining informed consent, blood samples were collected from 76 patients and 54 healthy volunteers. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral leucocytes using standard methods. The SERT gene genotypes were determined using polymerase chain reaction (PCR method. Results: Based on the intron 2 VNTR polymorphism of SERT gene, the distribution of 12/12, 12/10 and 10/10 genotypes were found as, 56.6 %, 35.5 %, 7.9 % in patients whereas this genotype distribution in control group was 40.7 %, 46.3 % and 13 %, respectively. According to 5-HTTLPR polymorphism, the distribution of L/L, L/S and S/S genotypes were found as 27.6 % 51.3 % and 21.1 % in patients whereas this genotype distribution in control group was 33.4 %, 50.0 % and 16.6 %, respectively. Despite the fact that the genotype distribution of SERT gene polymorphism in patients and control group seemed to be different from each other, this difference was not found to be statistically significant. Conclusion: This finding suggests that polymorphisms within the SERT gene do not play a major role in PD susceptibility in the Turkish population.

  19. In Vivo Investigation of Escitalopram’s Allosteric Site on the Serotonin Transporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Karen E.; Ressler, Kerry J.; Owens, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Escitalopram is a commonly prescribed antidepressant of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor class. Clinical evidence and mapping of the serotonin transporter (SERT) identified that escitalopram, in addition to its binding to a primary uptake-blocking site, is capable of binding to the SERT via an allosteric site that is hypothesized to alter escitalopram’s kinetics at the SERT. The studies reported here examined the in vivo role of the SERT allosteric site in escitalopram action. A knockin mouse model that possesses an allosteric-null SERT was developed. Autoradiographic studies indicated that the knockin protein was expressed at a lower density than endogenous mouse SERT (approximately 10–30% of endogenous mouse SERT), but the knockin mice are a viable tool to study the allosteric site. Microdialysis studies in the ventral hippocampus found no measurable decrease in extracellular serotonin response after local escitalopram challenge in mice without the allosteric site compared to mice with the site (p = 0.297). In marble burying assays there was a modest effect of the absence of the allosteric site, with a larger systemic dose of escitalopram (10-fold) necessary for the same effect as in mice with intact SERT (p = 0.023). However, there was no effect of the allosteric site in the tail suspension test. Together these data suggest that there may be a regional specificity in the role of the allosteric site. The lack of a robust effect overall suggests that the role of the allosteric site for escitalopram on the SERT may not produce meaningful in vivo effects. PMID:26621784

  20. Chronic blockade or constitutive deletion of the serotonin transporter reduces operant responding for food reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Amy Cecilia; Hussain, Ali J; Hen, René; Zhuang, Xiaoxi

    2007-11-01

    The therapeutic effects of chronic selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are well documented, yet the elementary behavioral processes that are affected by such treatment have not been fully investigated. We report here the effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment and genetic deletion of the serotonin transporter (SERT) on food reinforced behavior in three paradigms: the progressive ratio operant task, the concurrent choice operant task, and the Pavlovian-to-Instrumental transfer task. We consistently find that chronic pharmacological blockade or genetic deletion of SERT result in similar behavioral consequences: reduced operant responding for natural reward. This is in line with previous studies reporting declines in operant responding for drugs and intracranial self-stimulation with fluoxetine treatment, suggesting that the effect of SERT blockade can be generalized to different reward types. Detailed analyses of behavioral parameters indicate that this reduction in operant responding affect both goal-directed and non-goal-directed behaviors without affecting the Pavlovian cue-triggered excessive operant responding. In addition, both pharmacological and genetic manipulations reduce locomotor activity in the open field novel environment. Our data contrast with the effect of dopamine in increasing operant responding for natural reward specifically in goal-directed behaviors and in increasing Pavlovian cue-triggered excessive operant responding. Serotonin and dopamine have been proposed to serve opposing functions in motivational processes. Our data suggest that their interactions do not result in simple opponency. The fact that pharmacological blockade and genetic deletion of SERT have similar behavioral consequences reinforces the utility of the SERT null mice for investigation of the mechanisms underlying chronic SSRIs treatment.

  1. A concise total synthesis of (R)-fluoxetine, a potent and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatima, Angelo de; Lapis, Alexandre Augusto M.; Pilli, Ronaldo A.

    2005-01-01

    (R)-Fluoxetine, potent and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, has been synthesized in six steps, 50% overall yield and 99% ee from benzaldehyde via catalytic asymmetric allylation with Maruoka's catalyst. (author)

  2. A concise total synthesis of (R)-fluoxetine, a potent and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatima, Angelo de; Lapis, Alexandre Augusto M.; Pilli, Ronaldo A. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica]. E-mail: pilli@iqm.unicamp.br

    2005-05-15

    (R)-Fluoxetine, potent and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, has been synthesized in six steps, 50% overall yield and 99% ee from benzaldehyde via catalytic asymmetric allylation with Maruoka's catalyst. (author)

  3. The market dynamics of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The market dynamics of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors: a private sector study in South Africa. Frasia Oosthuizen, Pariksha Jolene Kondiah, Hawa Bibi Moosa, Siddiqa Naroth, Nabeel Ismail Patel, Divashnee Reddy, Amanda Soobramoney ...

  4. In utero exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and risk for autism spectrum disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gidaya, Nicole B; Lee, Brian K; Burstyn, Igor

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether there is an association between increased risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) used during pregnancy. This study used Denmark's health and population registers to obtain information regarding prescription drugs, ASD...

  5. Serotonin transporter occupancy by escitalopram and citalopram in the non-human primate brain: a [(11)C]MADAM PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnema, Sjoerd J; Halldin, Christer; Bang-Andersen, Benny; Bundgaard, Christoffer; Farde, Lars

    2015-11-01

    A number of serotonin receptor positron emission tomography (PET) radioligands have been shown to be sensitive to changes in extracellular serotonin concentration, in a generalization of the well-known dopamine competition model. High doses of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) decrease serotonin receptor availability in monkey brain, consistent with increased serotonin concentrations. However, two recent studies on healthy human subjects, using a single, lower and clinically relevant SSRI dose, showed increased cortical serotonin receptor radioligand binding, suggesting potential decreases in serotonin concentration in projection regions when initiating treatment. The cross-species differential SSRI effect may be partly explained by serotonin transporter (SERT) occupancy in monkey brain being higher than is clinically relevant. We here determine SERT occupancy after single doses of escitalopram or citalopram by conducting PET measurements with [(11)C]MADAM in monkeys. Relationships between dose, plasma concentration and SERT occupancy were estimated by one-site binding analyses. Binding affinity was expressed as dose (ID50) or plasma concentration (K i) where 50 % SERT occupancy was achieved. Estimated ID50 and K i values were 0.020 mg/kg and 9.6 nmol/L for escitalopram and 0.059 mg/kg and 9.7 nmol/L for citalopram, respectively. Obtained K i values are comparable to values reported in humans. Escitalopram or citalopram doses nearly saturated SERT in previous monkey studies which examined serotonin sensitivity of receptor radioligands. PET-measured cross-species differential effects of SSRI on cortical serotonin concentration may thus be related to SSRI dose. Future monkey studies using SSRI doses inducing clinically relevant SERT occupancy may further illuminate the delayed onset of SSRI therapeutic effects.

  6. The Serotonin Transporter and Early Life Stress: Translational Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelien D. A. Olivier

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between the serotonin transporter (SERT linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR and adverse early life stressing (ELS events is associated with enhanced stress susceptibility and risk to develop mental disorders like major depression, anxiety, and aggressiveness. In particular, human short allele carriers are at increased risk. This 5-HTTLPR polymorphism is absent in the rodent SERT gene, but heterozygous SERT knockout rodents (SERT+/− show several similarities to the human S-allele carrier, therefore creating an animal model of the human situation. Many rodent studies investigated ELS interactions in SERT knockout rodents combined with ELS. However, underlying neuromolecular mechanisms of the (maladaptive responses to adversity displayed by SERT rodents remain to be elucidated. Here, we provide a comprehensive review including studies describing mechanisms underlying SERT variation × ELS interactions in rodents. Alterations at the level of translation and transcription but also epigenetic alterations considerably contribute to underlying mechanisms of SERT variation × ELS interactions. In particular, SERT+/− rodents exposed to adverse early rearing environment may be of high translational and predictive value to the more stress sensitive human short-allele carrier, considering the similarity in neurochemical alterations. Therefore, SERT+/− rodents are highly relevant in research that aims to unravel the complex psychopathology of mental disorders. So far, most studies fail to show solid evidence for increased vulnerability to develop affective-like behavior after ELS in SERT+/− rodents. Several reasons may underlie these failures, e.g., (1 stressors used might not be optimal or severe enough to induce maladaptations, (2 effects in females are not sufficiently studied, and (3 few studies include both behavioral manifestations and molecular correlates of ELS-induced effects in SERT+/− rodents. Of course, one should not

  7. The Serotonin Transporter and Early Life Stress: Translational Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houwing, Danielle J.; Buwalda, Bauke; van der Zee, Eddy A.; de Boer, Sietse F.; Olivier, Jocelien D. A.

    2017-01-01

    The interaction between the serotonin transporter (SERT) linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) and adverse early life stressing (ELS) events is associated with enhanced stress susceptibility and risk to develop mental disorders like major depression, anxiety, and aggressiveness. In particular, human short allele carriers are at increased risk. This 5-HTTLPR polymorphism is absent in the rodent SERT gene, but heterozygous SERT knockout rodents (SERT+/−) show several similarities to the human S-allele carrier, therefore creating an animal model of the human situation. Many rodent studies investigated ELS interactions in SERT knockout rodents combined with ELS. However, underlying neuromolecular mechanisms of the (mal)adaptive responses to adversity displayed by SERT rodents remain to be elucidated. Here, we provide a comprehensive review including studies describing mechanisms underlying SERT variation × ELS interactions in rodents. Alterations at the level of translation and transcription but also epigenetic alterations considerably contribute to underlying mechanisms of SERT variation × ELS interactions. In particular, SERT+/− rodents exposed to adverse early rearing environment may be of high translational and predictive value to the more stress sensitive human short-allele carrier, considering the similarity in neurochemical alterations. Therefore, SERT+/− rodents are highly relevant in research that aims to unravel the complex psychopathology of mental disorders. So far, most studies fail to show solid evidence for increased vulnerability to develop affective-like behavior after ELS in SERT+/− rodents. Several reasons may underlie these failures, e.g., (1) stressors used might not be optimal or severe enough to induce maladaptations, (2) effects in females are not sufficiently studied, and (3) few studies include both behavioral manifestations and molecular correlates of ELS-induced effects in SERT+/− rodents. Of course, one should not exclude the

  8. Central serotonin and dopamine transporters in overeating, obesity and insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, K.E.M.

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this thesis were to study cerebral serotonin transporters (SERT) in the diencephalon and striatal dopamine transporters (DAT) in humans in different metabolic conditions (i.e. lean, obese and insulin resistant state) in relation to feeding behavior and to investigate the early

  9. A current view of serotonin transporters [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis J. De Felice

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin transporters (SERTs are largely recognized for one aspect of their function—to transport serotonin back into the presynaptic terminal after its release. Another aspect of their function, however, may be to generate currents large enough to have physiological consequences. The standard model for electrogenic transport is the alternating access model, in which serotonin is transported with a fixed ratio of co-transported ions resulting in net charge per cycle. The alternating access model, however, cannot account for all the observed currents through SERT or other monoamine transporters.  Furthermore, SERT agonists like ecstasy or antagonists like fluoxetine generate or suppress currents that the standard model cannot support.  Here we survey evidence for a channel mode of transport in which transmitters and ions move through a pore. Available structures for dopamine and serotonin transporters, however, provide no evidence for a pore conformation, raising questions of whether the proposed channel mode actually exists or whether the structural data are perhaps missing a transient open state.

  10. The Mechanistic Basis for Noncompetitive Ibogaine Inhibition of Serotonin and Dopamine Transporters*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulling, Simon; Schicker, Klaus; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Steinkellner, Thomas; Stockner, Thomas; Gruber, Christian W.; Boehm, Stefan; Freissmuth, Michael; Rudnick, Gary; Sitte, Harald H.; Sandtner, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Ibogaine, a hallucinogenic alkaloid proposed as a treatment for opiate withdrawal, has been shown to inhibit serotonin transporter (SERT) noncompetitively, in contrast to all other known inhibitors, which are competitive with substrate. Ibogaine binding to SERT increases accessibility in the permeation pathway connecting the substrate-binding site with the cytoplasm. Because of the structural similarity between ibogaine and serotonin, it had been suggested that ibogaine binds to the substrate site of SERT. The results presented here show that ibogaine binds to a distinct site, accessible from the cell exterior, to inhibit both serotonin transport and serotonin-induced ionic currents. Ibogaine noncompetitively inhibited transport by both SERT and the homologous dopamine transporter (DAT). Ibogaine blocked substrate-induced currents also in DAT and increased accessibility of the DAT cytoplasmic permeation pathway. When present on the cell exterior, ibogaine inhibited SERT substrate-induced currents, but not when it was introduced into the cytoplasm through the patch electrode. Similar to noncompetitive transport inhibition, the current block was not reversed by increasing substrate concentration. The kinetics of inhibitor binding and dissociation, as determined by their effect on SERT currents, indicated that ibogaine does not inhibit by forming a long-lived complex with SERT, but rather binds directly to the transporter in an inward-open conformation. A kinetic model for transport describing the noncompetitive action of ibogaine and the competitive action of cocaine accounts well for the results of the present study. PMID:22451652

  11. The mechanistic basis for noncompetitive ibogaine inhibition of serotonin and dopamine transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulling, Simon; Schicker, Klaus; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Steinkellner, Thomas; Stockner, Thomas; Gruber, Christian W; Boehm, Stefan; Freissmuth, Michael; Rudnick, Gary; Sitte, Harald H; Sandtner, Walter

    2012-05-25

    Ibogaine, a hallucinogenic alkaloid proposed as a treatment for opiate withdrawal, has been shown to inhibit serotonin transporter (SERT) noncompetitively, in contrast to all other known inhibitors, which are competitive with substrate. Ibogaine binding to SERT increases accessibility in the permeation pathway connecting the substrate-binding site with the cytoplasm. Because of the structural similarity between ibogaine and serotonin, it had been suggested that ibogaine binds to the substrate site of SERT. The results presented here show that ibogaine binds to a distinct site, accessible from the cell exterior, to inhibit both serotonin transport and serotonin-induced ionic currents. Ibogaine noncompetitively inhibited transport by both SERT and the homologous dopamine transporter (DAT). Ibogaine blocked substrate-induced currents also in DAT and increased accessibility of the DAT cytoplasmic permeation pathway. When present on the cell exterior, ibogaine inhibited SERT substrate-induced currents, but not when it was introduced into the cytoplasm through the patch electrode. Similar to noncompetitive transport inhibition, the current block was not reversed by increasing substrate concentration. The kinetics of inhibitor binding and dissociation, as determined by their effect on SERT currents, indicated that ibogaine does not inhibit by forming a long-lived complex with SERT, but rather binds directly to the transporter in an inward-open conformation. A kinetic model for transport describing the noncompetitive action of ibogaine and the competitive action of cocaine accounts well for the results of the present study.

  12. Combinatorial support vector machines approach for virtual screening of selective multi-target serotonin reuptake inhibitors from large compound libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Z; Ma, X H; Qin, C; Jia, J; Jiang, Y Y; Tan, C Y; Chen, Y Z

    2012-02-01

    Selective multi-target serotonin reuptake inhibitors enhance antidepressant efficacy. Their discovery can be facilitated by multiple methods, including in silico ones. In this study, we developed and tested an in silico method, combinatorial support vector machines (COMBI-SVMs), for virtual screening (VS) multi-target serotonin reuptake inhibitors of seven target pairs (serotonin transporter paired with noradrenaline transporter, H(3) receptor, 5-HT(1A) receptor, 5-HT(1B) receptor, 5-HT(2C) receptor, melanocortin 4 receptor and neurokinin 1 receptor respectively) from large compound libraries. COMBI-SVMs trained with 917-1951 individual target inhibitors correctly identified 22-83.3% (majority >31.1%) of the 6-216 dual inhibitors collected from literature as independent testing sets. COMBI-SVMs showed moderate to good target selectivity in misclassifying as dual inhibitors 2.2-29.8% (majority virtual hits correlate with the reported effects of their predicted targets. COMBI-SVM is potentially useful for searching selective multi-target agents without explicit knowledge of these agents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A novel serotonin transporter ligand: (5-Iodo-2-(2-dimethylaminomethylphenoxy)-benzyl alcohol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Z.-P.; Choi, S.-R.; Hou, Catherine; Mu Mu; Kung, M.-P. E-mail: kunghf@sunmac.spect.upenn.edu; Acton, Paul D.; Kung, Hank F

    2000-02-01

    The serotonin transporters (SERT) are the primary binding sites for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, commonly used antidepressants such as fluoxetine, sertraline, and paroxetine. Imaging of SERT with positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography in humans would provide a useful tool for understanding how alterations of this system are related to depressive illnesses and other psychiatric disorders. In this article the synthesis and characterization of [{sup 125}I]ODAM [(5-iodo-2-(2-dimethylaminomethylphenoxy)-benzyl alcohol, 9)] as an imaging agent in the evaluation of central nervous system SERT are reported. A new reaction scheme was developed for the preparation of compound 9, ODAM, and the corresponding tri-n-butyltin derivative 10. Upon reacting 10 with hydrogen peroxide and sodium[{sup 125}I]iodide, the radiolabeled [{sup 125}I]9 was obtained in good yield (94% yield, radiochemical purity >95%). In an initial binding study using cortical membrane homogenates of rat brain, ODAM displayed a good binding affinity with a value of K{sub i}=2.8{+-}0.88 nM. Using LLC-PK{sub 1} cells specifically expressing the individual transporter (i.e. dopamine [DAT], norepinephrine [NET], and SERT, respectively), ODAM showed a strong inhibition on SERT (K{sub i}=0.12{+-}0.02 nM). Inhibition constants for the other two transporters were lower (K{sub i}=3.9{+-}0.7 {mu}M and 20.0 {+-} 1.9 nM for DAT and NET, respectively). Initial biodistribution study in rats after an intravenous (IV) injection of [{sup 125}I]ODAM showed a rapid brain uptake and washout (2.03, 1.49, 0.79, 0.27, and 0.07% dose/organ at 2, 30, 60, 120, and 240 min, respectively). The hypothalamus region where the serotonin neurons are located exhibited a high specific uptake. Ratios of hypothalamus-cerebellum/cerebellum based on percent dose per gram of these two regions showed values of 0.35, 0.86, 0.86, 0.63, and 0.34 at 2, 30, 60, 120, and 240 min, post-IV injection

  14. A novel serotonin transporter ligand: (5-Iodo-2-(2-dimethylaminomethylphenoxy)-benzyl alcohol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang, Z.-P.; Choi, S.-R.; Hou, Catherine; Mu Mu; Kung, M.-P.; Acton, Paul D.; Kung, Hank F.

    2000-01-01

    The serotonin transporters (SERT) are the primary binding sites for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, commonly used antidepressants such as fluoxetine, sertraline, and paroxetine. Imaging of SERT with positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography in humans would provide a useful tool for understanding how alterations of this system are related to depressive illnesses and other psychiatric disorders. In this article the synthesis and characterization of [ 125 I]ODAM [(5-iodo-2-(2-dimethylaminomethylphenoxy)-benzyl alcohol, 9)] as an imaging agent in the evaluation of central nervous system SERT are reported. A new reaction scheme was developed for the preparation of compound 9, ODAM, and the corresponding tri-n-butyltin derivative 10. Upon reacting 10 with hydrogen peroxide and sodium[ 125 I]iodide, the radiolabeled [ 125 I]9 was obtained in good yield (94% yield, radiochemical purity >95%). In an initial binding study using cortical membrane homogenates of rat brain, ODAM displayed a good binding affinity with a value of K i =2.8±0.88 nM. Using LLC-PK 1 cells specifically expressing the individual transporter (i.e. dopamine [DAT], norepinephrine [NET], and SERT, respectively), ODAM showed a strong inhibition on SERT (K i =0.12±0.02 nM). Inhibition constants for the other two transporters were lower (K i =3.9±0.7 μM and 20.0 ± 1.9 nM for DAT and NET, respectively). Initial biodistribution study in rats after an intravenous (IV) injection of [ 125 I]ODAM showed a rapid brain uptake and washout (2.03, 1.49, 0.79, 0.27, and 0.07% dose/organ at 2, 30, 60, 120, and 240 min, respectively). The hypothalamus region where the serotonin neurons are located exhibited a high specific uptake. Ratios of hypothalamus-cerebellum/cerebellum based on percent dose per gram of these two regions showed values of 0.35, 0.86, 0.86, 0.63, and 0.34 at 2, 30, 60, 120, and 240 min, post-IV injection, respectively. The specific uptake in hypothalamus

  15. Characterization of intracellular regions in the human serotonin transporter for phosphorylation sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lena; Strømgaard, Kristian; Kristensen, Anders S

    2014-01-01

    In the central nervous system, synaptic levels of the monoamine neurotransmitter serotonin are mainly controlled by the serotonin transporter (SERT), and drugs used in the treatment of various psychiatric diseases have SERT as primary target. SERT is a phosphoprotein that undergoes phosphorylation....../dephosphorylation during transporter regulation by multiple pathways. In particular, activation and/or inhibition of kinases including PKC, PKG, p38MAPK, and CaMKII modulate SERT function and trafficking. The molecular mechanisms by which kinase activity is linked to SERT regulation are poorly understood, including...

  16. Effects of [123I]ADAM, a serotonin transporter radiopharmaceutical, on pregnant Sprague–Dawley rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, K.W.; Lin, M.C.; Lee, S.Y.; Chen, H.Y.; Chen, C.C.; Fu, Y.K.

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin transport abnormalities are implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders. [ 123 I]ADAM ([ 123 I]-2-([2-({dimethylamino}methyl)phenyl]thio)-5-iodophenylamine) is a novel radiotracer that targets serotonin transporters. We assessed the toxicity of [ 123 I]ADAM (18.5 MBq) administered in early- and late-phases (8 and 14 day postfertilization, respectively) of pregnancy. The mortality, clinical status, and gross necropsy were measured in pregnant rats, and the fertility index was measured in rat offspring (weight, clinical observations). We found no dosing-related clinical signs. In conclusion, [ 123 I]ADAM was not toxic in an animal pregnancy model.

  17. Looking on the bright side: biased attention and the human serotonin transporter gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Elaine; Ridgewell, Anna; Ashwin, Chris

    2009-05-22

    Humans differ in terms of biased attention for emotional stimuli and these biases can confer differential resilience and vulnerability to emotional disorders. Selective processing of positive emotional information, for example, is associated with enhanced sociability and well-being while a bias for negative material is associated with neuroticism and anxiety. A tendency to selectively avoid negative material might also be associated with mental health and well-being. The neurobiological mechanisms underlying these cognitive phenotypes are currently unknown. Here we show for the first time that allelic variation in the promotor region of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) is associated with differential biases for positive and negative affective pictures. Individuals homozygous for the long allele (LL) showed a marked bias to selectively process positive affective material alongside selective avoidance of negative affective material. This potentially protective pattern was absent among individuals carrying the short allele (S or SL). Thus, allelic variation on a common genetic polymorphism was associated with the tendency to selectively process positive or negative information. The current study is important in demonstrating a genotype-related alteration in a well-established processing bias, which is a known risk factor in determining both resilience and vulnerability to emotional disorders.

  18. Interaction between serotonin transporter gene variants and life events predicts response to antidepressants in the GENDEP project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keers, R.; Uher, R.; Huezo-Diaz, P.

    2011-01-01

    , and several polymorphisms in the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) have been genotyped including the serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR). Stressful life events were shown to predict a significantly better response to escitalopram but had no effect on response to nortriptyline...

  19. Interaction between serotonin transporter and serotonin receptor 1 B genes polymorphisms may be associated with antisocial alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tzu-Yun; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Chen, Shih-Heng; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Huang, San-Yuan; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Wang, Chen-Lin; Lee, I Hui; Yeh, Tzung Lieh; Yang, Yen Kuang; Lu, Ru-Band

    2012-07-11

    Several studies have hypothesized that genes regulating the components of the serotonin system, including serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR) and serotonin 1 B receptor (5-HT1B), may be associated with alcoholism, but their results are contradictory because of alcoholism's heterogeneity. Therefore, we examined whether the 5-HTTLPR gene and 5-HT1B gene G861C polymorphism are susceptibility factors for a specific subtype of alcoholism, antisocial alcoholism in Han Chinese in Taiwan. We recruited 273 Han Chinese male inmates with antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) [antisocial alcoholism (AS-ALC) group (n=120) and antisocial non-alcoholism (AS-N-ALC) group (n=153)] and 191 healthy male controls from the community. Genotyping was done using PCR-RFLP. There were no significant differences in the genotypic frequency of the 5-HT1B G861C polymorphism between the 3 groups. Although AS-ALC group members more frequently carried the 5-HTTLPR S/S, S/LG, and LG/LG genotypes than controls, the difference became non-significant after controlling for the covarying effects of age. However, the 5-HTTLPR S/S, S/LG, and LG/LG genotypes may have interacted with the 5-HT1B G861C C/C polymorphism and increased the risk of becoming antisocial alcoholism. Our study suggests that neither the 5-HTTLPR gene nor the 5-HT1B G861C polymorphism alone is a risk factor for antisocial alcoholism in Taiwan's Han Chinese population, but that the interaction between both genes may increase susceptibility to antisocial alcoholism.

  20. Interaction between Serotonin Transporter and Serotonin Receptor 1 B genes polymorphisms may be associated with antisocial alcoholism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Tzu-Yun

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have hypothesized that genes regulating the components of the serotonin system, including serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR and serotonin 1 B receptor (5-HT1B, may be associated with alcoholism, but their results are contradictory because of alcoholism’s heterogeneity. Therefore, we examined whether the 5-HTTLPR gene and 5-HT1B gene G861C polymorphism are susceptibility factors for a specific subtype of alcoholism, antisocial alcoholism in Han Chinese in Taiwan. Methods We recruited 273 Han Chinese male inmates with antisocial personality disorder (ASPD [antisocial alcoholism (AS-ALC group (n = 120 and antisocial non-alcoholism (AS-N-ALC group (n = 153] and 191 healthy male controls from the community. Genotyping was done using PCR-RFLP. Results There were no significant differences in the genotypic frequency of the 5-HT1B G861C polymorphism between the 3 groups. Although AS-ALC group members more frequently carried the 5-HTTLPR S/S, S/LG, and LG/LG genotypes than controls, the difference became non-significant after controlling for the covarying effects of age. However, the 5-HTTLPR S/S, S/LG, and LG/LG genotypes may have interacted with the 5-HT1B G861C C/C polymorphism and increased the risk of becoming antisocial alcoholism. Conclusion Our study suggests that neither the 5-HTTLPR gene nor the 5-HT1B G861C polymorphism alone is a risk factor for antisocial alcoholism in Taiwan’s Han Chinese population, but that the interaction between both genes may increase susceptibility to antisocial alcoholism.

  1. TRIENNIAL LACTATION SYMPOSIUM/BOLFA: Serotonin and the regulation of calcium transport in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, L L

    2017-12-01

    The mammary gland regulates maternal metabolism during lactation. Numerous factors within the tissue send signals to shift nutrients to the mammary gland for milk synthesis. Serotonin is a monoamine that has been well documented to regulate several aspects of lactation among species. Maintenance of maternal calcium homeostasis during lactation is a highly evolved process that is elegantly regulated by the interaction of the mammary gland with the bone, gut, and kidney tissues. It is well documented that dietary calcium is insufficient to maintain maternal calcium concentrations during lactation, and mammals must rely on bone resorption to maintain normocalcemia. Our recent work focused on the ability of the mammary gland to function as an accessory parathyroid gland during lactation. It was demonstrated that serotonin acts to stimulate parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) in the mammary gland during lactation. The main role of mammary-derived PTHrP during mammalian lactation is to stimulate bone resorption to maintain maternal calcium homeostasis during lactation. In addition to regulating PTHrP, it was shown that serotonin appears to directly affect calcium transporters and pumps in the mammary gland. Our current working hypothesis regarding the control of calcium during lactation is as follows: serotonin directly stimulates PTHrP production in the mammary gland through interaction with the sonic hedgehog signaling pathway. Simultaneously, serotonin directly increases calcium movement into the mammary gland and, subsequently, milk. These 2 direct actions of serotonin combine to induce a transient maternal hypocalcemia required to further stimulate PTHrP production and calcium mobilization from bone. Through these 2 routes, serotonin is able to improve maternal calcium concentrations. Furthermore, we have shown that Holstein and Jersey cows appear to regulate calcium in different manners and also respond differently to serotonergic stimulation of the calcium

  2. Reversibility of ecstasy-induced reduction in serotonin transporter availability in polydrug ecstasy users

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchert, Ralph; Wilke, Florian; Nebeling, Bruno; Clausen, Malte; Thomasius, Rainer; Petersen, Kay; Obrocki, Jost; Wartberg, Lutz; Zapletalova, Pavlina

    2006-01-01

    Animal data suggest that the synthetic drug ecstasy may damage brain serotonin neurons. Previously we reported protracted reductions in the availability of the serotonin transporter (SERT), an index of integrity of the axon terminals of brain serotonergic neurons, in SERT-rich brain regions in current human ecstasy users. Comparison of current ecstasy users and former ecstasy users yielded some evidence that this reduction might be reversible. However, participant selection effects could not be ruled out. Therefore, follow-up examinations were performed in these subjects to test the following a priori hypothesis in a prospective longitudinal design that eliminates participant selection effects to a large extent: availability of the SERT increases towards normal levels when ecstasy use is stopped, and remains unchanged or is further decreased if use is continued. Two follow-up positron emission tomography measurements using the SERT ligand [ 11 C](+)McN5652 were completed by 15 current and nine former ecstasy users. All subjects used illicit drugs other than ecstasy, too. The time interval between repeated measurements was about 1 year. The time course of the availability of the SERT was analysed in the following SERT-rich regions: mesencephalon, putamen, caudate and thalamus. Current ecstasy users showed a consistent increase in the availability of the SERT in the mesencephalon during the study (Friedman test: p=0.010), which most likely was caused by a decrease in the intensity of ecstasy consumption (Spearman correlation coefficient -0.725, p=0.002). Former ecstasy users showed a consistent increase in SERT availability in the thalamus (Friedman test: p=0.006). Ecstasy-induced protracted alterations in the availability of the SERT might be reversible. (orig.)

  3. Reversibility of ecstasy-induced reduction in serotonin transporter availability in polydrug ecstasy users

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchert, Ralph; Wilke, Florian; Nebeling, Bruno; Clausen, Malte [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hamburg (Germany); Thomasius, Rainer; Petersen, Kay; Obrocki, Jost; Wartberg, Lutz; Zapletalova, Pavlina [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Departments of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Hamburg (Germany)

    2006-02-01

    Animal data suggest that the synthetic drug ecstasy may damage brain serotonin neurons. Previously we reported protracted reductions in the availability of the serotonin transporter (SERT), an index of integrity of the axon terminals of brain serotonergic neurons, in SERT-rich brain regions in current human ecstasy users. Comparison of current ecstasy users and former ecstasy users yielded some evidence that this reduction might be reversible. However, participant selection effects could not be ruled out. Therefore, follow-up examinations were performed in these subjects to test the following a priori hypothesis in a prospective longitudinal design that eliminates participant selection effects to a large extent: availability of the SERT increases towards normal levels when ecstasy use is stopped, and remains unchanged or is further decreased if use is continued. Two follow-up positron emission tomography measurements using the SERT ligand [{sup 11}C](+)McN5652 were completed by 15 current and nine former ecstasy users. All subjects used illicit drugs other than ecstasy, too. The time interval between repeated measurements was about 1 year. The time course of the availability of the SERT was analysed in the following SERT-rich regions: mesencephalon, putamen, caudate and thalamus. Current ecstasy users showed a consistent increase in the availability of the SERT in the mesencephalon during the study (Friedman test: p=0.010), which most likely was caused by a decrease in the intensity of ecstasy consumption (Spearman correlation coefficient -0.725, p=0.002). Former ecstasy users showed a consistent increase in SERT availability in the thalamus (Friedman test: p=0.006). Ecstasy-induced protracted alterations in the availability of the SERT might be reversible. (orig.)

  4. Biodistribution and dosimetry of {sup 123}I-mZIENT: a novel ligand for imaging serotonin transporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicol, Alice [NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Southern General Hospital, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Krishnadas, Rajeev [University of Glasgow, Sackler Institute of Psychobiological Research, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Champion, Sue [University of Glasgow, Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Tamagnan, Gilles [Institute for Neurodegenerative Disorders, New Haven, CT (United States); Stehouwer, Jeffrey S.; Goodman, Mark M. [Emory University, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Atlanta, GA (United States); Hadley, Donald M. [NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, Department of Neuro-Radiology, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Pimlott, Sally L. [NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, West of Scotland Radionuclide Dispensary, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2012-05-15

    {sup 123}I-labelled mZIENT (2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(3'-((Z)-2-iodoethenyl)phenyl)nortropane) has been developed as a radioligand for the serotonin transporter. The aim of this preliminary study was to assess its whole-body biodistribution in humans and estimate dosimetry. Three healthy controls and three patients receiving selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) therapy for depression were included (two men, four women, age range 41-56 years). Whole-body imaging, brain SPECT imaging and blood and urine sampling were performed. Whole-body images were analysed using regions of interest (ROIs), time-activity curves were derived using compartmental analysis and dosimetry estimated using OLINDA software. Brain ROI analysis was performed to obtain specific-to-nonspecific binding ratios in the midbrain, thalamus and striatum. Initial high uptake in the lungs decreased in later images. Lower uptake was seen in the brain, liver and intestines. Excretion was primarily through the urinary system. The effective dose was estimated to be of the order of 0.03 mSv/MBq. The organ receiving the highest absorbed dose was the lower large intestine wall. Uptake in the brain was consistent with the known SERT distribution with higher specific-to-nonspecific binding in the midbrain, thalamus and striatum in healthy controls compared with patients receiving SSRI therapy. {sup 123}I-mZIENT may be a promising radioligand for imaging the serotonin transporters in humans with acceptable dosimetry. (orig.)

  5. Recognition of Scared Faces and the Serotonin Transporter Gene in Young Children: The Generation R Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekely, Eszter; Herba, Catherine M.; Arp, Pascal P.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Hofman, Albert; Verhulst, Frank C.; Hudziak, James J.; Tiemeier, Henning

    2011-01-01

    Background: Previous research highlights the significance of a functional polymorphism located in the promoter region (5-HTTLPR) of the serotonin transporter gene in emotional behaviour. This study examined the effect of the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism on emotion processing in a large number of healthy preschoolers. Methods: The 5-HTTLPR genotype was…

  6. Identification of genetic modifiers of behavioral phenotypes in serotonin transporter knockout rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homberg, J.R.; Nijman, I.J.; Kuijpers, S.; Cuppen, E.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genetic variation in the regulatory region of the human serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) has been shown to affect brain functionality and personality. However, large heterogeneity in its biological effects is observed, which is at least partially due to genetic modifiers. To gain

  7. Filling the Gap : Relationship Between the Serotonin-Transporter-Linked Polymorphic Region and Amygdala Activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaansen, Jojanneke A.; Servaas, Michelle N.; Marsman, Jan-Bernard; Ormel, Johan; Nolte, Ilja M.; Riese, Harriette; Aleman, Andre

    2014-01-01

    The alleged association between the serotonin-transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) and amygdala activation forms a cornerstone of the common view that carrying the short allele of this polymorphism is a potential risk factor for affective disorders. The authors of a recent meta-analysis

  8. Filling the Gap : Relationship Between the Serotonin-Transporter-Linked Polymorphic Region and Amygdala Activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaansen, Jojanneke A.; Servaas, Michelle N.; Marsman, Jan-Bernard; Ormel, Johan; Nolte, Ilja M.; Riese, Harriette; Aleman, Andre

    The alleged association between the serotonin-transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) and amygdala activation forms a cornerstone of the common view that carrying the short allele of this polymorphism is a potential risk factor for affective disorders. The authors of a recent meta-analysis

  9. Serotonin Transporter Knockout Rats Show Improved Strategy Set-Shifting and Reduced Latent Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonkes, Lourens J. P.; van de Vondervoort, Ilse I. G. M.; de Leeuw, Mark J. C.; Wijlaars, Linda P.; Maes, Joseph H. R.; Homberg, Judith R.

    2012-01-01

    Behavioral flexibility is a cognitive process depending on prefrontal areas allowing adaptive responses to environmental changes. Serotonin transporter knockout (5-HTT[superscript -/-]) rodents show improved reversal learning in addition to orbitofrontal cortex changes. Another form of behavioral flexibility, extradimensional strategy set-shifting…

  10. FlipADAM: a potential new SPECT imaging agent for the serotonin transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Julie L.; Deutsch, Eric C. [Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Oya, Shunichi [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kung, Hank F., E-mail: kunghf@gmail.co [Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Introduction: Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of the serotonin transporter (SERT) in the brain is a useful tool for examining normal physiological functions and disease states involving the serotonergic system. The goal of this study was to develop an improved SPECT radiotracer with faster kinetics than the current leading SPECT tracer, [{sup 123}I]ADAM, for selective SERT imaging. Methods: The in vitro binding affinities of (2-(2'-((dimethylamino)methyl)-4'-iodophenylthio)benzenamine) (FlipADAM) (1c), were determined using Hampshire pig kidney cells stably overexpressing the serotonin, norepinephrine (NET) or dopamine transporter (DAT). Localization of [{sup 125}I]FlipADAM (1c) was evaluated through biodistribution and autoradiography in male Sprague Dawley rats, and the specificity of binding was assessed by injecting selective SERT or NET inhibitors prior to [{sup 125}I]FlipADAM (1c). Results: FlipADAM (1c) displayed a high binding affinity for SERT (K{sub i}=1.0 nM) and good selectivity over NET and DAT binding (43-fold and 257-fold, respectively). [{sup 125}I]FlipADAM (1c) successfully penetrated the blood brain barrier, as evidenced by the brain uptake at 2 min (1.75% dose/g). [{sup 125}I]FlipADAM(1c) also had a good target to non-target (hypothalamus/cerebellum) ratio of 3.35 at 60 min post-injection. In autoradiography studies, [{sup 125}I]FlipADAM (1c) showed selective localization in SERT-rich brain regions such as the thalamic nuclei, amygdala, dorsal raphe nuclei and other areas. Conclusion: [{sup 125}I]FlipADAM (1c) exhibited faster clearance from the brain and time to binding equilibrium when compared to [{sup 125}I]2-(2'-((dimethylamino)methyl)-phenylthio)-5-iodophenylamine [{sup 125}I]ADAM (1b) and a higher target to non-target ratio when compared to [{sup 125}I]5-iodo-2-(2'-((dimethylamino)methyl)-phenylthio)benzyl alcohol [{sup 125}I]IDAM (1a). Therefore, [{sup 123}I]FlipADAM (1c) may be an improved

  11. Tyrosine Phosphorylation of the Human Serotonin Transporter: A Role in the Transporter Stability and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalai, Balasubramaniam; Mannangatti, Padmanabhan; Arapulisamy, Obulakshmi; Shippenberg, Toni S.; Jayanthi, Lankupalle D.

    2012-01-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) transporter (SERT) regulates serotoninergic neurotransmission by clearing 5-HT released into the synaptic space. Phosphorylation of SERT on serine and threonine mediates SERT regulation. Whether tyrosine phosphorylation regulates SERT is unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that tyrosine-phosphorylation of SERT regulates 5-HT transport. In support of this, alkali-resistant 32P-labeled SERT was found in rat platelets, and Src-tyrosine kinase inhibitor 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo [3,4,d]pyrimidine (PP2) decreased platelet SERT function and expression. In human placental trophoblast cells expressing SERT, PP2 reduced transporter function, expression, and stability. Although siRNA silencing of Src expression decreased SERT function and expression, coexpression of Src resulted in PP2-sensitive increases in SERT function and expression. PP2 treatment markedly decreased SERT protein stability. Compared with WT-SERT, SERT tyrosine mutants Y47F and Y142F exhibited reduced 5-HT transport despite their higher total and cell surface expression levels. Moreover, Src-coexpression increased total and cell surface expression of Y47F and Y142F SERT mutants without affecting their 5-HT transport capacity. It is noteworthy that Y47F and Y142F mutants exhibited higher protein stability compared with WT-SERT. However, similar to WT-SERT, PP2 treatment decreased the stability of Y47F and Y142F mutants. Furthermore, compared with WT-SERT, Y47F and Y142F mutants exhibited lower basal tyrosine phosphorylation and no further enhancement of tyrosine phosphorylation in response to Src coexpression. These results provide the first evidence that SERT tyrosine phosphorylation supports transporter protein stability and 5HT transport. PMID:21992875

  12. Mixture and single-substance toxicity of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors toward algae and crustaceans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne Munch; Faaborg-Andersen, S.; Ingerslev, Flemming

    2007-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are used as antidepressant medications. primarily in the treatment of clinical depression. They are among the pharmaceuticals most often Prescribed in the industrialized countries. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are compounds with an identi......Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are used as antidepressant medications. primarily in the treatment of clinical depression. They are among the pharmaceuticals most often Prescribed in the industrialized countries. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are compounds...... with an identical mechanism of action in mammals (inhibit reuptake of serotonin), and they have been found in different aqeous as well as biological samples collected in the environment. In the present study, we tested the toxicities of five SSRIs (citalopram, fluoxetine, fluoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline.......027 to 1.6 mg/L, and in daphnids, test EC50s ranged from 0.92 to 20 mg/L, with sertraline being one of the most toxic compounds. The test design and statistical analysis of results from mixture tests were based on isobole analysis. It was demonstrated that the mixture toxicity of the SSRIs in the two...

  13. Serotonin selectively influences moral judgment and behavior through effects on harm aversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, Molly J; Clark, Luke; Hauser, Marc D; Robbins, Trevor W

    2010-10-05

    Aversive emotional reactions to real or imagined social harms infuse moral judgment and motivate prosocial behavior. Here, we show that the neurotransmitter serotonin directly alters both moral judgment and behavior through increasing subjects' aversion to personally harming others. We enhanced serotonin in healthy volunteers with citalopram (a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) and contrasted its effects with both a pharmacological control treatment and a placebo on tests of moral judgment and behavior. We measured the drugs' effects on moral judgment in a set of moral 'dilemmas' pitting utilitarian outcomes (e.g., saving five lives) against highly aversive harmful actions (e.g., killing an innocent person). Enhancing serotonin made subjects more likely to judge harmful actions as forbidden, but only in cases where harms were emotionally salient. This harm-avoidant bias after citalopram was also evident in behavior during the ultimatum game, in which subjects decide to accept or reject fair or unfair monetary offers from another player. Rejecting unfair offers enforces a fairness norm but also harms the other player financially. Enhancing serotonin made subjects less likely to reject unfair offers. Furthermore, the prosocial effects of citalopram varied as a function of trait empathy. Individuals high in trait empathy showed stronger effects of citalopram on moral judgment and behavior than individuals low in trait empathy. Together, these findings provide unique evidence that serotonin could promote prosocial behavior by enhancing harm aversion, a prosocial sentiment that directly affects both moral judgment and moral behavior.

  14. Depressed patients have decreased binding of tritiated imipramine to platelet serotonin ''transporter''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, S.M.; Rehavi, M.; Skolnick, P.; Ballenger, J.C.; Goodwin, F.K.

    1981-01-01

    The high-affinity tritiated (3H) imipramine binding sites are functionally (and perhaps structurally) associated with the presynaptic neuronal and platelet uptake sites for serotonin. Since there is an excellent correlation between the relative potencies of a series of antidepressants in displacing 3H-imipramine from binding sites in human brain and platelet, we have examined the binding of 3H-imipramine to platelets from 14 depressed patients and 28 age- and sex-matched controls. A highly significant decrease in the number of 3H-imipramine binding sites, with no significant change in the apparent affinity constants, was observed in platelets from the depressed patients compared with the controls. These results, coupled with previous studies showing a significant decrease in the maximal uptake of serotonin in platelets from depressed patients, suggest that an inherited or acquired deficiency of the serotonin transport protein or proteins may be involved in the pathogenesis of depression

  15. Characterization of an allosteric citalopram-binding site at the serotonin transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Fenghua; Breum Larsen, Mads; Neubauer, Henrik Amtoft

    2005-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT), which belongs to a family of       sodium/chloride-dependent transporters, is the major pharmacological       target in the treatment of several clinical disorders, including       depression and anxiety. In the present study we show that the dissociation       r...

  16. Substrate and Inhibitor-Specific Conformational Changes in the Human Serotonin Transporter Revealed by Voltage-Clamp Fluorometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söderhielm, Pella C; Andersen, Jacob; Munro, Lachlan

    2015-01-01

    of TM6, Ala419 in the interface between TM8 and extracellular loop (EL) 4, and Leu481 in EL5. The reporter positions were used for time-resolved measurement of conformational changes during 5-HT transport and binding of cocaine and the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors fluoxetine and escitalopram...... changes overall, which included movements within or around TM1b, EL4, and EL5. Taken together, our data lead us to suggest that competitive inhibitors stabilize hSERT in a state that is different from the apo outward-open conformation as well as inward-facing conformations....

  17. Association between selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and upper gastrointestinal bleeding: population based case-control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abajo, Francisco José; Rodríguez, Luis Alberto García; Montero, Dolores

    1999-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Design Population based case-control study. Setting General practices included in the UK general practice research database. Subjects 1651 incident cases of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and 248 cases of ulcer perforation among patients aged 40 to 79 years between April 1993 and September 1997, and 10 000 controls matched for age, sex, and year that the case was identified. Interventions Review of computer profiles for all potential cases, and an internal validation study to confirm the accuracy of the diagnosis on the basis of the computerised information. Main outcome measures Current use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or other antidepressants within 30 days before the index date. Results Current exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors was identified in 3.1% (52 of 1651) of patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding but only 1.0% (95 of 10 000) of controls, giving an adjusted rate ratio of 3.0 (95% confidence interval 2.1 to 4.4). This effect measure was not modified by sex, age, dose, or treatment duration. A crude incidence of 1 case per 8000 prescriptions was estimated. A small association was found with non-selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (relative risk 1.4, 1.1 to 1.9) but not with antidepressants lacking this inhibitory effect. None of the groups of antidepressants was associated with ulcer perforation. The concurrent use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs increased the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding beyond the sum of their independent effects (15.6, 6.6 to 36.6). A smaller interaction was also found between selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and low dose aspirin (7.2, 3.1 to 17.1). Conclusions Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors increase the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The absolute effect is, however

  18. A single nucleotide polymorphism in the human serotonin transporter introduces a new site for N-linked glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Trine Nygaard; Plenge, Per; Bay, Tina

    2009-01-01

    The human serotonin transporter (hSERT) is responsible for reuptake of serotonin (5-HT) from the synaptic cleft and is target for antidepressant medicine. Differential hSERT activity caused by genetic polymorphisms is believed to affect the risk of developing depression and, moreover, to affect t...

  19. Culture–gene coevolution of individualism–collectivism and the serotonin transporter gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiao, Joan Y.; Blizinsky, Katherine D.

    2010-01-01

    Culture–gene coevolutionary theory posits that cultural values have evolved, are adaptive and influence the social and physical environments under which genetic selection operates. Here, we examined the association between cultural values of individualism–collectivism and allelic frequency of the serotonin transporter functional polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) as well as the role this culture–gene association may play in explaining global variability in prevalence of pathogens and affective disorders. We found evidence that collectivistic cultures were significantly more likely to comprise individuals carrying the short (S) allele of the 5-HTTLPR across 29 nations. Results further show that historical pathogen prevalence predicts cultural variability in individualism–collectivism owing to genetic selection of the S allele. Additionally, cultural values and frequency of S allele carriers negatively predict global prevalence of anxiety and mood disorder. Finally, mediation analyses further indicate that increased frequency of S allele carriers predicted decreased anxiety and mood disorder prevalence owing to increased collectivistic cultural values. Taken together, our findings suggest culture–gene coevolution between allelic frequency of 5-HTTLPR and cultural values of individualism–collectivism and support the notion that cultural values buffer genetically susceptible populations from increased prevalence of affective disorders. Implications of the current findings for understanding culture–gene coevolution of human brain and behaviour as well as how this coevolutionary process may contribute to global variation in pathogen prevalence and epidemiology of affective disorders, such as anxiety and depression, are discussed. PMID:19864286

  20. Culture-gene coevolution of individualism-collectivism and the serotonin transporter gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiao, Joan Y; Blizinsky, Katherine D

    2010-02-22

    Culture-gene coevolutionary theory posits that cultural values have evolved, are adaptive and influence the social and physical environments under which genetic selection operates. Here, we examined the association between cultural values of individualism-collectivism and allelic frequency of the serotonin transporter functional polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) as well as the role this culture-gene association may play in explaining global variability in prevalence of pathogens and affective disorders. We found evidence that collectivistic cultures were significantly more likely to comprise individuals carrying the short (S) allele of the 5-HTTLPR across 29 nations. Results further show that historical pathogen prevalence predicts cultural variability in individualism-collectivism owing to genetic selection of the S allele. Additionally, cultural values and frequency of S allele carriers negatively predict global prevalence of anxiety and mood disorder. Finally, mediation analyses further indicate that increased frequency of S allele carriers predicted decreased anxiety and mood disorder prevalence owing to increased collectivistic cultural values. Taken together, our findings suggest culture-gene coevolution between allelic frequency of 5-HTTLPR and cultural values of individualism-collectivism and support the notion that cultural values buffer genetically susceptible populations from increased prevalence of affective disorders. Implications of the current findings for understanding culture-gene coevolution of human brain and behaviour as well as how this coevolutionary process may contribute to global variation in pathogen prevalence and epidemiology of affective disorders, such as anxiety and depression, are discussed.

  1. 2-((2-((dimethylamino)methyl)phenyl)thio)-5-iodophenylamine (ADAM): an improved serotonin transporter ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oya, Shunichi; Choi, S.-R.; Hou, Catherine; Mu Mu; Kung, M.-P.; Acton, Paul D.; Siciliano, Michael; Kung, Hank F. E-mail: kunghf@sunmac.spect.upenn.edu

    2000-04-01

    Serotonin transporters (SERT) are target-sites for commonly used antidepressants, such as fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline, and so on. Imaging of these sites in the living human brain may provide an important tool to evaluate the mechanisms of action as well as to monitor the treatment of depressed patients. Synthesis and characterization of an improved SERT imaging agent, ADAM (2-((2-((dimethylamino)methyl)phenyl)thio)-5-iodophenylamine)(7) was achieved. The new compound, ADAM(7), displayed an extremely potent binding affinity toward SERT (K{sub i}=0.013 nM, in membrane preparations of LLC-PK{sub 1}-cloned cell lines expressing the specific monoamine transporter). ADAM(7) also showed more than 1,000-fold selectivity for SERT over norepinephrine transporter (NET) and dopamine transporter (DAT) (K{sub i}=699 and 840 nM, for NET and DAT, respectively). The radiolabeled compound [{sup 125}I]ADAM(7) showed an excellent brain uptake in rats (1.41% dose at 2 min post intravenous [IV] injection), and consistently displayed the highest uptake (between 60-240 min post IV injection) in hypothalamus, a region with the highest density of SERT. The specific uptake of [{sup 125}I]ADAM(7) in the hypothalamus exhibited the highest target-to-nontarget ratio ([hypothalamus - cerebellum]/cerebellum was 3.97 at 120 min post IV injection). The preliminary imaging study of [{sup 123}I]ADAM in the brain of a baboon by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) at 180-240 min post IV injection indicated a specific uptake in midbrain region rich in SERT. These data suggest that the new ligand [{sup 123}I]ADAM(7) may be useful for SPECT imaging of SERT binding sites in the human brain.

  2. 2-((2-((dimethylamino)methyl)phenyl)thio)-5-iodophenylamine (ADAM): an improved serotonin transporter ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oya, Shunichi; Choi, S.-R.; Hou, Catherine; Mu Mu; Kung, M.-P.; Acton, Paul D.; Siciliano, Michael; Kung, Hank F.

    2000-01-01

    Serotonin transporters (SERT) are target-sites for commonly used antidepressants, such as fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline, and so on. Imaging of these sites in the living human brain may provide an important tool to evaluate the mechanisms of action as well as to monitor the treatment of depressed patients. Synthesis and characterization of an improved SERT imaging agent, ADAM (2-((2-((dimethylamino)methyl)phenyl)thio)-5-iodophenylamine)(7) was achieved. The new compound, ADAM(7), displayed an extremely potent binding affinity toward SERT (K i =0.013 nM, in membrane preparations of LLC-PK 1 -cloned cell lines expressing the specific monoamine transporter). ADAM(7) also showed more than 1,000-fold selectivity for SERT over norepinephrine transporter (NET) and dopamine transporter (DAT) (K i =699 and 840 nM, for NET and DAT, respectively). The radiolabeled compound [ 125 I]ADAM(7) showed an excellent brain uptake in rats (1.41% dose at 2 min post intravenous [IV] injection), and consistently displayed the highest uptake (between 60-240 min post IV injection) in hypothalamus, a region with the highest density of SERT. The specific uptake of [ 125 I]ADAM(7) in the hypothalamus exhibited the highest target-to-nontarget ratio ([hypothalamus - cerebellum]/cerebellum was 3.97 at 120 min post IV injection). The preliminary imaging study of [ 123 I]ADAM in the brain of a baboon by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) at 180-240 min post IV injection indicated a specific uptake in midbrain region rich in SERT. These data suggest that the new ligand [ 123 I]ADAM(7) may be useful for SPECT imaging of SERT binding sites in the human brain

  3. Serotonin transporter gene polymorphism and myocardial infarction: Etude Cas-Témoins de l'Infarctus du Myocarde (ECTIM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumeron, Frédéric; Betoulle, Dina; Nicaud, Viviane; Evans, Alun; Kee, Frank; Ruidavets, Jean-Bernard; Arveiler, Dominique; Luc, Gérald; Cambien, François

    2002-06-25

    Depression is a risk factor for myocardial infarction (MI). Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors reduce this risk. The site of action is the serotonin transporter (SLC6A4), which is expressed in brain and blood cells. A functional polymorphism in the promoter region of the SLC6A4 gene has been described. This polymorphism may be associated with the risk of MI. The SLC6A4 polymorphism has been investigated by polymerase chain reaction in 671 male patients with MI and in 688 controls from the Etude Cas-Témoins de l'Infarctus du Myocarde (ECTIM) multicentric study. Percentages for LL, LS, and SS genotypes were 35.5%, 45.4%, and 19.1%, respectively, for cases versus 28.1%, 49.1%, and 22.8%, respectively, for controls. S allele frequency was 41.8% and 47.4% for cases and controls, respectively. After adjustment for age and center by using multivariable logistic regression, the odds ratio for MI associated with the LL genotype was 1.40 (95% CI 1.11 to 1.76, P=0.0047). The LL genotype of the SLC6A4 polymorphism is associated with a higher risk of MI. This could be attributable to the effect of the polymorphism on serotonin-mediated platelet activation or smooth muscle cell proliferation or on other risk factors, such as depression or response to stress.

  4. Dependence and withdrawal reactions to benzodiazepines and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. How did the health authorities react?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Margrethe; Hansen, Ebba Holme; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to explore communications from drug agencies about benzodiazepine dependence and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) withdrawal reactions over time.......Our objective was to explore communications from drug agencies about benzodiazepine dependence and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) withdrawal reactions over time....

  5. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors potentiate the rapid antidepressant-like effects of serotonin4 receptor agonists in the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Lucas

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available We have recently reported that serotonin(4 (5-HT(4 receptor agonists have a promising potential as fast-acting antidepressants. Here, we assess the extent to which this property may be optimized by the concomitant use of conventional antidepressants.We found that, in acute conditions, the 5-HT(4 agonist prucalopride was able to counteract the inhibitory effect of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI fluvoxamine and citalopram on 5-HT neuron impulse flow, in Dorsal Raphé Nucleus (DRN cells selected for their high (>1.8 Hz basal discharge. The co-administration of both prucalopride and RS 67333 with citalopram for 3 days elicited an enhancement of DRN 5-HT neuron average firing rate, very similar to what was observed with either 5-HT(4 agonist alone. At the postsynaptic level, this translated into the manifestation of a tonus on hippocampal postsynaptic 5-HT(1A receptors, that was two to three times stronger when the 5-HT(4 agonist was combined with citalopram. Similarly, co-administration of citalopram synergistically potentiated the enhancing effect of RS 67333 on CREB protein phosphorylation within the hippocampus. Finally, in the Forced Swimming Test, the combination of RS 67333 with various SSRIs (fluvoxamine, citalopram and fluoxetine was more effective to reduce time of immobility than the separate administration of each compound.These findings strongly suggest that the adjunction of an SSRI to a 5-HT(4 agonist may help to optimize the fast-acting antidepressant efficacy of the latter.

  6. Effects of tryptophan depletion on selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor-remitted patients with obsessive compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Sean D; Broyd, Annabel; Robinson, Hayley; Lee, Jessica; Hudaib, Abdul-Rahman; Hince, Dana A

    2017-12-01

    Serotonergic antidepressants are first-line medication therapies for obsessive-compulsive disorder, however it is not known if synaptic serotonin availability is important for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor efficacy. The present study tested the hypothesis that temporary reduction in central serotonin transmission, through acute tryptophan depletion, would result in an increase in anxiety in selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor-remitted obsessive-compulsive disorder patients. Eight patients (four males) with obsessive-compulsive disorder who showed sustained clinical improvement with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment underwent acute tryptophan depletion in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subjects design, over two days one week apart. Five hours after consumption of the depleting/sham drink the participants performed a personalized obsessive-compulsive disorder symptom exposure task. Psychological responses were measured using the Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory, Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale and Visual Analogue Scales. Free plasma tryptophan to large neutral amino acid ratio decreased by 93% on the depletion day and decreased by 1% on the sham day, as anticipated. Psychological rating scores as measured by Visual Analogue Scale showed a significant decrease in perceived control and increase in interfering thoughts at the time of provocation on the depletion day but not on the sham day. A measure of convergent validity, namely Visual Analogue Scale Similar to past, was significantly higher at the time of provocation on both the depletion and sham days. Both the depletion and time of provocation scores for Visual Analogue Scale Anxiety, Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory, Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale and blood pressure were not significant. Acute tryptophan depletion caused a significant decrease in perceived control and increase in interfering thoughts at the time of provocation. Acute tryptophan

  7. CYP450 genotype and aggressive behavior on selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ekhart, Corine; Matic, Maja; Kant, Agnes; Schaik, Ron van; van Puijenbroek, Eugène

    2017-01-01

    AIM: Genetic variants for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) metabolizing enzymes have been hypothesized to be a risk factor for aggression as adverse drug effect of SSRIs. Our aim was to assess the possible involvement of these polymorphisms on aggression when using SSRIs. MATERIALS &

  8. Mechanism-based PK/PD modeling of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geldof, Marian

    2007-01-01

    The main objective of the investigations was to explore the PK/PD correlations of fluvoxamine, as a prototype for the Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs). In the various investigations, a spectrum of different biomarkers was used, each reflecting a specific process on the causal path

  9. Helicobacter pylori and risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding among users of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Michael; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B; Møller Hansen, Jane

    2011-01-01

    A number of studies have reported a possible association between use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serious upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB). We conducted this case-control study to assess if Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) potentiates the risk of serious UGB in SSRI ...

  10. Are Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors Safe for Drivers? What is the Evidence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravera, Silvia; Ramaekers, Johannes G.; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T. W.; de Gier, Johan J.; de Jong-van den Berg, [No Value

    Background: Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely used medications to treat several psychiatric diseases and, above all, depression. They seem to be as effective as older antidepressants but have a different adverse effect profile. Despite their favorable safety profile, little

  11. The effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in healthy subjects. A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knorr, Ulla; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Knorr, Ulla

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) show antidepressant properties in many patients with a diagnosis of depression. An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of the effect of SSRIs in healthy patients may lead to an understanding of the yet unclear pathophysiology of d...

  12. Increased Bleeding Risk With Concurrent Use of Selective Serotonin Reuptake inhibitors and Coumarins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalekamp, Tom; Klungel, Olaf H; Souverein, Patrick C; de Boer, Anthonius

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment with vitamin K antagonists (coumarins) is associated with an increased risk of bleeding. Because use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is also associated with an increased risk of bleeding, we assessed the odds ratio (OR) of abnormal bleeding associated with

  13. The age-dependent effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in humans and rodents: A review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olivier, J.D.A.; Blom, T.; Arentsen, T.; Homberg, J.R.

    2011-01-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) Prozac(R) (fluoxetine) is widely prescribed for the treatment of depression and anxiety-related disorders. While extensive research has established that fluoxetine is safe for adults, safety is not guaranteed for (unborn) children and adolescents.

  14. Anhedonia Predicts Poorer Recovery among Youth with Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Treatment-Resistant Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMakin, Dana L.; Olino, Thomas M.; Porta, Giovanna; Dietz, Laura J.; Emslie, Graham; Clarke, Gregory; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Asarnow, Joan R.; Ryan, Neal D.; Birmaher, Boris; Shamseddeen, Wael; Mayes, Taryn; Kennard, Betsy; Spirito, Anthony; Keller, Martin; Lynch, Frances L.; Dickerson, John F.; Brent, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify symptom dimensions of depression that predict recovery among selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment-resistant adolescents undergoing second-step treatment. Method: The Treatment of Resistant Depression in Adolescents (TORDIA) trial included 334 SSRI treatment-resistant youth randomized to a medication…

  15. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressant use in first trimester pregnancy and risk of specific congenital anomalies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wemakor, Anthony; Casson, Karen; Garne, Ester

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of an association between early pregnancy exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and congenital heart defects (CHD) has contributed to recommendations to weigh benefits and risks carefully. The objective of this study was to determine the specificity of association be...

  16. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor-Induced Sexual Dysfunction in Adolescents: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharko, Alexander M.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To review the existing literature on selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)-induced sexual dysfunction in adolescents. Method: A literature review of SSRI-induced adverse effects in adolescents focusing on sexual dysfunction was done. Nonsexual SSRI-induced adverse effects were compared in adult and pediatric populations.…

  17. Switching antidepressants after a first selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor in major depressive disorder: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruhé, Henricus G.; Huyser, Jochanan; Swinkels, Jan A.; Schene, Aart H.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are frequently used as a first antidepressant for major depressive disorder but have response rates of 50% to 60% in daily practice. For patients with insufficient response to SSRIs, switching is often applied. This article aims to

  18. In Utero Exposure to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidaya, Nicole B.; Lee, Brian K.; Burstyn, Igor; Yudell, Michael; Mortensen, Erik L.; Newschaffer, Craig J.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether there is an association between increased risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) used during pregnancy. This study used Denmark's health and population registers to obtain information regarding prescription drugs, ASD diagnosis, and health and socioeconomic status. There…

  19. Association study of serotonin transporter SLC6A4 gene with Chinese Han irritable bowel syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yuan

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is a common clinical gastrointestinal dysfunction disorders. 5-sertonon (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT is a very important neurotransmitter, which is involved in gastrointestinal motion and sensation. Solute carrier family 6 member 4 (SLC6A4 gene encode serotonin transporter (SERT which function is to rapidly reuptake the most of 5-HT. Therefore, it is needed to explore the association between SLC6A4 gene polymorphisms and IBS. METHODS: 119 patients and 238 healthy controls were administrated to detect the SLC6A4 gene polymorphisms including 5-HT-transporter-gene-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR, variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs and three selected tag Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs rs1042173, rs3794808, rs2020936 by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR and TaqMan® SNP Genotyping. RESULTS: There were significant difference for 5-HTTLPR between IBS and control groups (X2 = 106.168, P<0.0001. In control group, genotypes were mainly L/L (58.4%, however, the genotypes in IBS were S/S (37.8%. The significant difference was shown in D-IBS subjects when compared to the controls (X(2 = 50.850, P<0.0001 for 5-HTTLPR. For STin2 VNTR, rs1042173, rs3794808, and rs2020936 polymorphisms, there were no any significant differences between IBS and control groups. There were no statistical significantly haplotypes for 5-HTTLPR, VNTRs and the three SNPs between IBS and controls. CONCLUSION: The S allele in 5-HTTLPR was a susceptible allele with Chinese Han IBS, but other associations of VNTRs, three selected Tag SNPs and positive haplotype with IBS were not found. It is indicated that much research are needed to study the relationship between other polymorphisms in SLC6A4 gene and IBS.

  20. Acute inescapable stress alleviates fear extinction recall deficits caused by serotonin transporter abolishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, Pieter; Henckens, Marloes J A G; Lopresto, Dora; Kozicz, Tamas; Homberg, Judith R

    2018-07-02

    Life stress increases risk for developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and more prominently so in short-allele carriers of the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR). Serotonin transporter knockout (5-HTT -/- ) rats show compromised extinction (recall) of conditioned fear, which might mediate the increased risk for PTSD and reduce the therapeutic efficacy of exposure therapy. Here, we assessed whether acute inescapable stress (IS) differentially affects fear extinction and extinction recall in 5-HTT -/- rats and wildtype controls. Surprisingly, IS experience improved fear extinction recall in 5-HTT -/- rats to the level of wildtype animals, while wildtypes were unaffected by this IS. Thus, whereas 5-HTT -/- rats evidently were more responsive to the stressor, the behavioral consequences presented themselves as adaptive. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Serotonin transporter genotype (5-HTTLPR): effects of neutral and undefined conditions on amygdala activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Andreas; Smolka, Michael N; Braus, Dieter F; Wrase, Jana; Beck, Anne; Flor, Herta; Mann, Karl; Schumann, Gunter; Büchel, Christian; Hariri, Ahmad R; Weinberger, Daniel R

    2007-04-15

    A polymorphism of the human serotonin transporter gene (SCL6A4) has been associated with serotonin transporter expression and with processing of aversive stimuli in the amygdala. Functional imaging studies show that during the presentation of aversive versus neutral cues, healthy carriers of the short (s) allele showed stronger amygdala activation than long (l) carriers. However, a recent report suggested that this interaction is driven by amygdala deactivation during presentation of neutral stimuli in s carriers. Functional MRI was used to assess amygdala activation during the presentation of a fixation cross or affectively aversive or neutral visual stimuli in 29 healthy men. Amygdala activation was increased in s carriers during undefined states such as the presentation of a fixation cross compared with emotionally neutral conditions. This finding suggests that s carriers show stronger amygdala reactivity to stimuli and contexts that are relatively uncertain, which we propose are stressful.

  2. Effects of LSD on grooming behavior in serotonin transporter heterozygous (Sert⁺/⁻) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyzar, Evan J; Stewart, Adam Michael; Kalueff, Allan V

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) plays a crucial role in the brain, modulating mood, cognition and reward. The serotonin transporter (SERT) is responsible for the reuptake of 5-HT from the synaptic cleft and regulates serotonin signaling in the brain. In humans, SERT genetic variance is linked to the pathogenesis of various psychiatric disorders, including anxiety, autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Rodent self-grooming is a complex, evolutionarily conserved patterned behavior relevant to stress, ASD and OCD. Genetic ablation of mouse Sert causes various behavioral deficits, including increased anxiety and grooming behavior. The hallucinogenic drug lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is a potent serotonergic agonist known to modulate human and animal behavior. Here, we examined heterozygous Sert(+/-) mouse behavior following acute administration of LSD (0.32 mg/kg). Overall, Sert(+/-) mice displayed a longer duration of self-grooming behavior regardless of LSD treatment. In contrast, LSD increased serotonin-sensitive behaviors, such as head twitching, tremors and backwards gait behaviors in both Sert(+/+) and Sert(+/-) mice. There were no significant interactions between LSD treatment and Sert gene dosage in any of the behavioral domains measured. These results suggest that Sert(+/-) mice may respond to the behavioral effects of LSD in a similar manner to wild-type mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Ethanol self-administration in serotonin transporter knockout mice: unconstrained demand and elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, R J; Daws, L C

    2013-10-01

    Low serotonin function is associated with alcoholism, leading to speculation that increasing serotonin function could decrease ethanol consumption. Mice with one or two deletions of the serotonin transporter (SERT) gene have increased extracellular serotonin. To examine the relationship between SERT genotype and motivation for alcohol, we compared ethanol self-administration in mice with zero (knockout, KO), one (HET) or two copies (WT) of the SERT gene. All three genotypes learned to self-administer ethanol. The SSRI, fluvoxamine, decreased responding for ethanol in the HET and WT, but not the KO mice. When tested under a progressive ratio schedule, KO mice had lower breakpoints than HET or WT. As work requirements were increased across sessions, behavioral economic analysis of ethanol self-administration indicated that the decreased breakpoint in KO as compared to HET or WT mice was a result of lower levels of unconstrained demand, rather than differences in elasticity, i.e. the proportional decreases in ethanol earned with increasing work requirements were similar across genotypes. The difference in unconstrained demand was unlikely to result from motor or general motivational factors, as both WT and KO mice responded at high levels for a 50% condensed milk solution. As elasticity is hypothesized to measure essential value, these results indicate that KO value ethanol similarly to WT or HET mice despite having lower break points for ethanol. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  4. Serotonin and Dopamine Transporter Binding in Children with Autism Determined by SPECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makkonen, Ismo; Riikonen, Raili; Kokki, Hannu; Airaksinen, Mauno M.; Kuikka, Jyrki T.

    2008-01-01

    Disturbances in the serotonergic system have been recognized in autism. To investigate the association between serotonin and dopamine transporters and autism, we studied 15 children (14 males, one female; mean age 8y 8mo [SD 3y 10mo]) with autism and 10 non-autistic comparison children (five males, five females; mean age 9y 10mo [SD 2y 8mo]) using…

  5. β-CIT SPECT demonstrates reduced availability of serotonin transporters in patients with fatal familial insomnia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloeppel, S.; Kovacs, G.G.; Pirker, W.; Bruecke, T.; Almer, G.

    2002-01-01

    Fatal familial insomnia (FFI) is a rare hereditary human prion disease with unique clinical features including progressive sleep impairment and autonomic dysfunction. The serotonergic system is considered to be involved in the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle. In this study we demonstrate a reduced availability of serotonin transporters of 57 % and 73 % respectively in a thalamus-hypothalamus region of two FFI patients examined with β-CIT SPECT as compared to age-expected control values. (author)

  6. Computational approaches for the study of serotonin and its membrane transporter SERT: implications for drug design in neurological sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratuangdejkul, J; Schneider, B; Launay, J-M; Kellermann, O; Manivet, P

    2008-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), a monoamine neurotransmitter of the central nervous and peripheral systems (CNS), plays a critical role in a wide variety of physiological and behavioral processes. In the serotonergic system, deregulation of the tightly controlled extracellular concentration of 5-HT appears to be at the origin of a host of metabolic and psychiatric disorders. A key step that regulates 5-HT external level is the re-uptake of 5-HT into cells by the 5-HT transporter (SERT), which is besides the target of numerous drugs interacting with the serotonergic system. Therapeutic strategies have mainly focused on the development of compounds that block the activity of SERT, for instance reuptake inhibitors (e.g. tricyclics, "selective" serotonin reuptake inhibitors) and in the past, specific substrate-type releasers (e.g. amphetamine and cocaine derivatives). Today, generation of new drugs targetting SERT with enhanced selectivity and reduced toxicity is one of the most challenging tasks in drug design. In this context, studies aiming at characterizing the physicochemical properties of 5-HT as well as the biological active conformation of SERT are a prerequisite to the design of new leads. However, the absence of a high-resolution 3D-structure for SERT has hampered the design of new transporter inhibitors. Using computational approaches, numerous efforts were made to shed light on the structure of 5-HT and its transporter. In this review, we compared several in silico methods dedicated to the modeling of 5-HT and SERT with an emphasis on i) quantum chemistry for study of 5-HT conformation and ii) ligand-based (QSAR and pharmacophore models) and transporter-based (homology models) approaches for studying SERT molecule. In addition, we discuss some methodological aspects of the computational work in connection with the construction of putative but reliable 3D structural models of SERT that may help to predict the mechanisms of neurotransmitter transport.

  7. Characterization of an allosteric citalopram-binding site at the serotonin transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Fenghua; Breum Larsen, Mads; Neubauer, Henrik Amtoft

    2005-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT), which belongs to a family of       sodium/chloride-dependent transporters, is the major pharmacological       target in the treatment of several clinical disorders, including       depression and anxiety. In the present study we show that the dissociation......       rate, of [3H]S-citalopram from human SERT, is retarded by the presence of       serotonin, as well as by several antidepressants, when present in the       dissociation buffer. Dissociation of [3H]S-citalopram from SERT is most       potently inhibited by S-citalopram followed by R......-citalopram, sertraline,       serotonin and paroxetine. EC50 values for S- and R-citalopram are 3.6 +/-       0.4 microm and 19.4 +/- 2.3 microm, respectively. Fluoxetine, venlafaxine       and duloxetine have no significant effect on the dissociation of       [3H]S-citalopram. Allosteric modulation of dissociation...

  8. Association of serotonin transporter promoter regulatory region polymorphism and cerebral activity to visual presentation of food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaurijoki, Salla; Kuikka, Jyrki T; Niskanen, Eini; Carlson, Synnöve; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Pesonen, Ullamari; Kaprio, Jaakko M; Rissanen, Aila; Tiihonen, Jari; Karhunen, Leila

    2008-07-01

    Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have revealed links between genetic polymorphisms and cognitive and behavioural processes. Serotonin is a classical neurotransmitter of central nervous system, and it is connected to the control of appetite and satiety. In this study, the relationship between the functional variation in the serotonin transporter gene and the activity in the left posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), a brain area activated by visual food stimuli was explored. Thirty subjects underwent serial fMRI studies and provided DNA for genetic analyses. Subjects homozygous for the long allele exhibited greater left PCC activity in the comparison food > non-food compared with individuals heterozygous or homozygous for the short allele. The association between genotype and activation was linear, the subjects with two copies of the long allele variant having the strongest activation. These results demonstrate the possible genetically driven variation in the response of the left PCC to visual presentation of food in humans.

  9. Emotional voice processing: investigating the role of genetic variation in the serotonin transporter across development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Grossmann

    Full Text Available The ability to effectively respond to emotional information carried in the human voice plays a pivotal role for social interactions. We examined how genetic factors, especially the serotonin transporter genetic variation (5-HTTLPR, affect the neurodynamics of emotional voice processing in infants and adults by measuring event-related brain potentials (ERPs. The results revealed that infants distinguish between emotions during an early perceptual processing stage, whereas adults recognize and evaluate the meaning of emotions during later semantic processing stages. While infants do discriminate between emotions, only in adults was genetic variation associated with neurophysiological differences in how positive and negative emotions are processed in the brain. This suggests that genetic association with neurocognitive functions emerges during development, emphasizing the role that variation in serotonin plays in the maturation of brain systems involved in emotion recognition.

  10. Serotonin and Serotonin Transporters in the Adrenal Medulla: A Potential Hub for Modulation of the Sympathetic Stress Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindley, Rebecca L; Bauer, Mary Beth; Blakely, Randy D; Currie, Kevin P M

    2017-05-17

    Serotonin (5-HT) is an important neurotransmitter in the central nervous system where it modulates circuits involved in mood, cognition, movement, arousal, and autonomic function. The 5-HT transporter (SERT; SLC6A4) is a key regulator of 5-HT signaling, and genetic variations in SERT are associated with various disorders including depression, anxiety, and autism. This review focuses on the role of SERT in the sympathetic nervous system. Autonomic/sympathetic dysfunction is evident in patients with depression, anxiety, and other diseases linked to serotonergic signaling. Experimentally, loss of SERT function (SERT knockout mice or chronic pharmacological block) has been reported to augment the sympathetic stress response. Alterations to serotonergic signaling in the CNS and thus central drive to the peripheral sympathetic nervous system are presumed to underlie this augmentation. Although less widely recognized, SERT is robustly expressed in chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla, the neuroendocrine arm of the sympathetic nervous system. Adrenal chromaffin cells do not synthesize 5-HT but accumulate small amounts by SERT-mediated uptake. Recent evidence demonstrated that 5-HT 1A receptors inhibit catecholamine secretion from adrenal chromaffin cells via an atypical mechanism that does not involve modulation of cellular excitability or voltage-gated Ca 2+ channels. This raises the possibility that the adrenal medulla is a previously unrecognized peripheral hub for serotonergic control of the sympathetic stress response. As a framework for future investigation, a model is proposed in which stress-evoked adrenal catecholamine secretion is fine-tuned by SERT-modulated autocrine 5-HT signaling.

  11. Serotonin/dopamine interactions in a hyperactive mouse: reduced serotonin receptor 1B activity reverses effects of dopamine transporter knockout.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Scott Hall

    Full Text Available Knockout (KO mice that lack the dopamine transporter (SL6A3; DAT display increased locomotion that can be attenuated, under some circumstances, by administration of drugs that normally produce psychostimulant-like effects, such as amphetamine and methylphenidate. These results have led to suggestions that DAT KO mice may model features of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD and that these drugs may act upon serotonin (5-HT systems to produce these unusual locomotor decreasing effects. Evidence from patterns of brain expression and initial pharmacologic studies led us to use genetic and pharmacologic approaches to examine the influence of altered 5-HT1B receptor activity on hyperactivity in DAT KO mice. Heterozygous 5-HT1B KO and pharmacologic 5-HT1B antagonism both attenuated locomotor hyperactivity in DAT KO mice. Furthermore, DAT KO mice with reduced, but not eliminated, 5-HT1B receptor expression regained cocaine-stimulated locomotion, which was absent in DAT KO mice with normal levels of 5-HT1B receptor expression. Further experiments demonstrated that the degree of habituation to the testing apparatus determined whether cocaine had no effect on locomotion in DAT KO or reduced locomotion, helping to resolve differences among prior reports. These findings of complementation of the locomotor effects of DAT KO by reducing 5-HT1B receptor activity underscore roles for interactions between specific 5-HT receptors and dopamine (DA systems in basal and cocaine-stimulated locomotion and support evaluation of 5-HT1B antagonists as potential, non-stimulant ADHD therapeutics.

  12. Genetic variation in the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR, rs25531) influences the analgesic response to the short acting opioid Remifentanil in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Schalling Martin; Lonsdorf Tina B; Jensen Karin B; Kosek Eva; Ingvar Martin

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background There is evidence from animal studies that serotonin (5-HT) can influence the antinociceptive effects of opioids at the spinal cord level. Therefore, there could be an influence of genetic polymorphisms in the serotonin system on individual variability in response to opioid treatment of pain. The serotonin transporter (5-HTT) is a key regulator of serotonin metabolism and availability and its gene harbors several known polymorphisms that are known to affect 5-HTT expressio...

  13. The Serotonin Transporter Undergoes Constitutive Internalization and Is Primarily Sorted to Late Endosomes and Lysosomal Degradation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbek-Clemmensen, Troels; Bay, Tina; Eriksen, Jacob; Gether, Ulrik; Jørgensen, Trine Nygaard

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) plays a critical role in regulating serotonin signaling by mediating reuptake of serotonin from the extracellular space. The molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling SERT levels in the membrane remain poorly understood. To study trafficking of the surface resident SERT, two functional epitope-tagged variants were generated. Fusion of a FLAG-tagged one-transmembrane segment protein Tac to the SERT N terminus generated a transporter with an extracellular epitope suited for trafficking studies (TacSERT). Likewise, a construct with an extracellular antibody epitope was generated by introducing an HA (hemagglutinin) tag in the extracellular loop 2 of SERT (HA-SERT). By using TacSERT and HA-SERT in antibody-based internalization assays, we show that SERT undergoes constitutive internalization in a dynamin-dependent manner. Confocal images of constitutively internalized SERT demonstrated that SERT primarily co-localized with the late endosomal/lysosomal marker Rab7, whereas little co-localization was observed with the Rab11, a marker of the “long loop” recycling pathway. This sorting pattern was distinct from that of a prototypical recycling membrane protein, the β2-adrenergic receptor. Furthermore, internalized SERT co-localized with the lysosomal marker LysoTracker and not with transferrin. The sorting pattern was further confirmed by visualizing internalization of SERT using the fluorescent cocaine analog JHC1-64 and by reversible and pulse-chase biotinylation assays showing evidence for lysosomal degradation of the internalized transporter. Finally, we found that SERT internalized in response to stimulation with 12-myristate 13-acetate co-localized primarily with Rab7- and LysoTracker-positive compartments. We conclude that SERT is constitutively internalized and that the internalized transporter is sorted mainly to degradation. PMID:24973209

  14. The short (S) allele of the serotonin transporter polymorphism and acute tryptophan depletion both increase impulsivity in men

    OpenAIRE

    Walderhaug, Espen; Herman, Aryeh Isaac; Magnusson, Andres; Morgan, Michael John; Landrø, Nils Inge

    2010-01-01

    Reduced serotonergic neurotransmission is implicated in impulsive behavior. We studied the triallelic system of the serotonin transporter gene linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) and acute manipulation of serotonin together to further delineate the mechanisms by which serotonergic neurotransmission affects impulsivity. Fifty-two healthy participants (38 men and 14 women) underwent acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) or placebo in a randomized, double-blind, parallel group experiment. Impulsive ...

  15. Are Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors Safe for Drivers? What is the Evidence?

    OpenAIRE

    Ravera, Silvia; Ramaekers, Johannes G.; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T. W.; de Gier, Johan J.; de Jong-van den Berg, [No Value

    2012-01-01

    Background: Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely used medications to treat several psychiatric diseases and, above all, depression. They seem to be as effective as older antidepressants but have a different adverse effect profile. Despite their favorable safety profile, little is known about their influence on traffic safety. Objective: To conduct a literature review to summarize the current evidence on the role of SSRIs in traffic safety, particularly concerning undesir...

  16. Elevated midbrain serotonin transporter availability in mixed mania: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuikka Jyrki

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Results obtained from brain imaging studies indicate that serotonin transporter (SERT and dopamine transporter (DAT densities are altered in major depression. However, no such studies have been published on current mania or hypomania. Case presentation In this single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT study with [123I]nor-β-CIT we present a case with simultaneous symptoms of major depression and hypomania. She had an elevated serotonin transporter availability (SERT in the midbrain and elevated dopamine transporter availability (DAT in the striatum, which normalised in a one-year follow-up period during which she received eight months of psychodynamic psychotherapy. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first report on SERT and DAT associated with mania. In our case the availability of both SERT in the midbrain and DAT in the striatum were elevated at baseline and declined during psychotherapy, while the SERT and DAT of the depressed controls increased during psychotherapy. Symptoms of hypomania in the case were alleviated during psychotherapy. Clinical recovery was also reflected in the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS scores.

  17. Serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR genotype and childhood trauma are associated with individual differences in decision making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott F Stoltenberg

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The factors that influence individual differences in decision making are not yet fully characterized, but convergent evidence is accumulating that implicates serotonin (5-HT system function. Therefore, both genes and environments that influence serotonin function are good candidates for association with risky decision making. In the present study we examined associations between common polymorphisms in the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4; 5-HTTLPR and rs25531, the experience of childhood trauma and decision making on the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT in 391 (64.5% female healthy Caucasian adults. Homozygosity for the 5-HTTLPR L allele was associated with riskier decision making in the first block of 20 trials (i.e. decision making under ambiguity, p = .004. In addition, mean IGT performance was significantly worse in blocks 3-5 (i.e. decision making under risk, p≤ .05 for those participants who reported experiencing higher levels of childhood trauma. Our findings add to the growing evidence that genetic variation in the 5-HT system is associated with individual differences in decision making under ambiguity; and we report that the experience of childhood trauma is associated with relatively poor decision making under risk.

  18. Serotonin transporter genotype modulates social reward and punishment in rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karli K Watson

    Full Text Available Serotonin signaling influences social behavior in both human and nonhuman primates. In humans, variation upstream of the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR has recently been shown to influence both behavioral measures of social anxiety and amygdala response to social threats. Here we show that length polymorphisms in 5-HTTLPR predict social reward and punishment in rhesus macaques, a species in which 5-HTTLPR variation is analogous to that of humans.In contrast to monkeys with two copies of the long allele (L/L, monkeys with one copy of the short allele of this gene (S/L spent less time gazing at face than non-face images, less time looking in the eye region of faces, and had larger pupil diameters when gazing at photos of a high versus low status male macaques. Moreover, in a novel primed gambling task, presentation of photos of high status male macaques promoted risk-aversion in S/L monkeys but promoted risk-seeking in L/L monkeys. Finally, as measured by a "pay-per-view" task, S/L monkeys required juice payment to view photos of high status males, whereas L/L monkeys sacrificed fluid to see the same photos.These data indicate that genetic variation in serotonin function contributes to social reward and punishment in rhesus macaques, and thus shapes social behavior in humans and rhesus macaques alike.

  19. The Role of Serotonin Transporter in Human Lung Development and in Neonatal Lung Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. C. Castro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Failure of the vascular pulmonary remodeling at birth often manifests as pulmonary hypertension (PHT and is associated with a variety of neonatal lung disorders including a uniformly fatal developmental disorder known as alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of pulmonary veins (ACD/MPV. Serum serotonin regulation has been linked to pulmonary vascular function and disease, and serotonin transporter (SERT is thought to be one of the key regulators in these processes. We sought to find evidence of a role that SERT plays in the neonatal respiratory adaptation process and in the pathomechanism of ACD/MPV. Methods. We used histology and immunohistochemistry to determine the timetable of SERT protein expression in normal human fetal and postnatal lungs and in cases of newborn and childhood PHT of varied etiology. In addition, we tested for a SERT gene promoter defect in ACD/MPV patients. Results. We found that SERT protein expression begins at 30 weeks of gestation, increases to term, and stays high postnatally. ACD/MPV patients had diminished SERT expression without SERT promoter alteration. Conclusion. We concluded that SERT/serotonin pathway is crucial in the process of pulmonary vascular remodeling/adaptation at birth and plays a key role in the pathobiology of ACD/MPV.

  20. Possible association between serotonin transporter promoter region polymorphism and extremely violent crime in Chinese males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ding-Lieh; Hong, Chen-Jee; Shih, Hao-Ling; Tsai, Shih-Jen

    2004-01-01

    The neurotransmitter, serotonin, has been implicated in aggressive behavior. The serotonin transporter (5-HTT), which reuptakes serotonin into the nerve terminal, plays a critical role in the regulation of serotonergic function. Previous western reports have demonstrated that the low-activity short (S) allele of the 5-HTT gene-linked polymorphic-region (5-HTTLPR) polymorphism is associated with aggressive behavior and associated personality traits. In the present study, we investigated this 5-HTTLPR genetic polymorphism in a group of Chinese males who had been convicted for extremely violent crime (n = 135) and a normal control group (n = 111). The proportion of S-allele carriers was significantly higher in the criminal group than in the controls (p = 0.006). A significant association was not demonstrated for the relationship between the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism and antisocial personality disorder, substance abuse or alcohol abuse in the criminal group. Our findings demonstrate that carriage of the low-activity S allele is associated with extremely violent criminal behavior in Chinese males, and suggests that the 5-HTT may be implicated in the mechanisms underlying violent behaviors.

  1. Serotonin transporter gene polymorphism and its association with bipolar disorder across different ethnic groups in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed Saini, Suriati; Nik Jaafar, Nik Ruzyanei; Sidi, Hatta; Midin, Marhani; Mohd Radzi, Azizah; Abdul Rahman, Abdul Hamid

    2014-01-01

    The risk variants have been shown to vary substantially across populations and a genetic study in a heterogeneous population might shed a new light in the disease mechanism. This preliminary study aims to determine the frequency of the serotonin transporter gene polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) in the three main ethnic groups in Malaysia and its association with bipolar disorder. This is a candidate gene association study of randomly selected forty five unrelated bipolar disorder probands and sixty six controls. Diagnosis was evaluated using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I). The control group consisted of healthy volunteers without personal psychiatric history and family history of mood disorder. Patients' whole blood was collected for genotyping. This study revealed that the frequency of the short variant of 5-HTTLPR in healthy control group was highest in Indians (42.9%) followed by Malays (23.5%) and was absent in Chinese. The association between the homozygous ss genotype of the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism with bipolar disorder was not found in the pooled subjects (χ(2)=1.52, d.f.=1, p=0.218, OR=4.67, 95% C.I.=0.69-7.58) and after stratification into Malays (p=0.315, OR=2.03, 95% CI=0.50-8.17), Indians (p=0.310; OR=0.44, 95% CI=0.21-0.92) and Chinese. The differences in the frequency of the short allele of 5-HTTLPR across the three main ethnic groups in Malaysia were noteworthy. The present study showed no significant association between the homozygous short variant of the 5-HTTLPR and bipolar disorder in the pooled subject and after stratification into the three main ethnic groups in Malaysia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Serotonin transporter (SERT and translocator protein (TSPO expression in the obese ob/ob mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santini Ferruccio

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An ever growing body of evidences is emerging concerning metabolism hormones, neurotransmitters or stress-related biomarkers as effective modulators of eating behavior and body weight in mammals. The present study sought at examining the density and affinity of two proteins related to neurotransmission and cell metabolism, the serotonin transporter SERT and the cholesterol import-benzodiazepine site TSPO (translocator protein, in a rodent leptin-lacking mutant, the obese ob/ob mouse. Binding studies were thus carried out in brain or peripheral tissues, blood platelets (SERT and kidneys (TSPO, of ob/ob and WT mice supplied with a standard diet, using the selective radiochemical ligands [3H]-paroxetine and [3H]-PK11195. Results We observed comparable SERT number or affinity in brain and platelets of ob/ob and WT mice, whilst a significantly higher [3H]-PK11195 density was reported in the brain of ob/ob animals. TSPO binding parameters were similar in the kidneys of all tested mice. By [3H]-PK11195 autoradiography of coronal hypothalamic-hippocampal sections, an increased TSPO signal was detected in the dentate gyrus (hippocampus and choroids plexus of ob/ob mice, without appreciable changes in the cortex or hypothalamic-thalamic regions. Conclusions These findings show that TSPO expression is up-regulated in cerebral regions of ob/ob leptin-deficient mice, suggesting a role of the translocator protein in leptin-dependent CNS trophism and metabolism. Unchanged SERT in mutant mice is discussed herein in the context of previous literature as the forerunner to a deeper biochemical investigation.

  3. A radiometabolite study of the serotonin transporter PET radioligand [11C]MADAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourand, F.; Emond, P.; Bergström, J.P.; Takano, A.; Gulyás, B.; Guilloteau, D.; Barré, L.; Halldin, C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: 11 C]MADAM is a radioligand suitable for PET studies of the serotonin transporter (SERT). Metabolite analysis in human and non-human plasma samples using HPLC separation has shown that [ 11 C]MADAM was rapidly metabolized. A possible metabolic pathway is the S-oxidation which could lead to SOMADAM and SO 2 MADAM. In vitro evaluation of these two potential metabolites has shown that SOMADAM exhibited a good affinity for SERT and a good selectivity for SERT over NET and DAT. Methods: Comparative PET imaging studies in non-human primate brain with [ 11 C]MADAM and [ 11 C]SOMADAM were carried out, and plasma samples were analyzed using reverse phase HPLC. We have explored the metabolism of [ 11 C]MADAM in rat brain with a view to understand its possible interference for brain imaging with PET. Results: PET imaging studies in non-human primate brain using [ 11 C]SOMADAM indicated that this tracer does not bind with high amounts to brain regions known to be rich in SERT. The fraction of [ 11 C]SOMADAM in non-human primate plasma was approximately 5% at 4 min and 1% at 15 min after [ 11 C]MADAM injection. HPLC analysis of brain sample after [ 11 C]MADAM injection to rats demonstrated that [ 11 C]SOMADAM was not detected in the brain. Conclusions: 11 C]SOMADAM is not superior over [ 11 C]MADAM as a SERT PET radioligand. Nevertheless, [ 11 C]SOMADAM has been identified as a minor labeled metabolite of [ 11 C]MADAM measured in monkey plasma. [ 11 C]SOMADAM was not detected in rat brain

  4. Modeling serotonin uptake in the lung shows endothelial transporters dominate over cleft permeation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassingthwaighte, James B.

    2013-01-01

    A four-region (capillary plasma, endothelium, interstitial fluid, cell) multipath model was configured to describe the kinetics of blood-tissue exchange for small solutes in the lung, accounting for regional flow heterogeneity, permeation of cell membranes and through interendothelial clefts, and intracellular reactions. Serotonin uptake data from the Multiple indicator dilution “bolus sweep” experiments of Rickaby and coworkers (Rickaby DA, Linehan JH, Bronikowski TA, Dawson CA. J Appl Physiol 51: 405–414, 1981; Rickaby DA, Dawson CA, and Linehan JH. J Appl Physiol 56: 1170–1177, 1984) and Malcorps et al. (Malcorps CM, Dawson CA, Linehan JH, Bronikowski TA, Rickaby DA, Herman AG, Will JA. J Appl Physiol 57: 720–730, 1984) were analyzed to distinguish facilitated transport into the endothelial cells (EC) and the inhibition of tracer transport by nontracer serotonin in the bolus of injectate from the free uninhibited permeation through the clefts into the interstitial fluid space. The permeability-surface area products (PS) for serotonin via the inter-EC clefts were ∼0.3 ml·g−1·min−1, low compared with the transporter-mediated maximum PS of 13 ml·g−1·min−1 (with Km = ∼0.3 μM and Vmax = ∼4 nmol·g−1·min−1). The estimates of serotonin PS values for EC transporters from their multiple data sets were similar and were influenced only modestly by accounting for the cleft permeability in parallel. The cleft PS estimates in these Ringer-perfused lungs are less than half of those for anesthetized dogs (Yipintsoi T. Circ Res 39: 523–531, 1976) with normal hematocrits, but are compatible with passive noncarrier-mediated transport observed later in the same laboratory (Dawson CA, Linehan JH, Rickaby DA, Bronikowski TA. Ann Biomed Eng 15: 217–227, 1987; Peeters FAM, Bronikowski TA, Dawson CA, Linehan JH, Bult H, Herman AG. J Appl Physiol 66: 2328–2337, 1989) The identification and quantitation of the cleft pathway conductance from these

  5. The effect of antenatal depression and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment on nerve growth factor signaling in human placenta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaihola, Helena; Olivier, Jocelien; Poromaa, Inger Sundström; Åkerud, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Depressive symptoms during pregnancy are common and may have impact on the developing child. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most prescribed antidepressant treatment, but unfortunately, these treatments can also negatively affect the behavioral development and health of a

  6. Genetic variation in the serotonin transporter gene influences ERP old/new effects during recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Robert S; Medrano, Paolo; Boyle, Kaitlin; Smolen, Andrew; Curran, Tim; Nyhus, Erika

    2015-11-01

    Recognition memory is defined as the ability to recognize a previously encountered stimulus and has been associated with spatially and temporally distinct event-related potentials (ERPs). Allelic variations of the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) have recently been shown to impact memory performance. Common variants of the serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5HTTLPR) of the SLC6A4 gene result in long (l) and short (s) allelic variants with carriers of the s allele having lowered transcriptional efficiency. Thus, the current study examines the effects polymorphisms of the SLC6A4 gene have on performance and ERP amplitudes commonly associated with recognition memory. Electroencephalogram (EEG), genetic, and behavioral data were collected from sixty participants as they performed an item and source memory recognition task. In both tasks, participants studied and encoded 200 words, which were then mixed with 200 new words during retrieval. Participants were monitored with EEG during the retrieval portion of each memory task. EEG electrodes were grouped into four ROIs, left anterior superior, right anterior superior, left posterior superior, and right posterior superior. ERP mean amplitudes during hits in the item and source memory task were compared to correctly recognizing new items (correct rejections). Results show that s-carriers have decreased mean hit amplitudes in both the right anterior superior ROI 1000-1500ms post stimulus during the source memory task and the left anterior superior ROI 300-500ms post stimulus during the item memory task. These results suggest that individual differences due to genetic variation of the serotonin transporter gene influences recognition memory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Brain dopamine-serotonin vesicular transport disease presenting as a severe infantile hypotonic parkinsonian disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Jessie C; Wilson, Callum; Cunningham, Vicki; Glamuzina, Emma; Prosser, Debra O; Love, Donald R; Burgess, Trent; Taylor, Juliet; Swan, Brendan; Hill, Rosamund; Robertson, Stephen P; Snell, Russell G; Lehnert, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Two male siblings from a consanguineous union presented in early infancy with marked truncal hypotonia, a general paucity of movement, extrapyramidal signs and cognitive delay. By mid-childhood they had made little developmental progress and remained severely hypotonic and bradykinetic. They developed epilepsy and had problems with autonomic dysfunction and oculogyric crises. They had a number of orthopaedic problems secondary to their hypotonia. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neurotransmitters were initially normal, apart from mildly elevated 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid, and the children did not respond favourably to a trial of levodopa-carbidopa. The youngest died from respiratory complications at 10 years of age. Repeat CSF neurotransmitters in the older sibling at eight years of age showed slightly low homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a novel mutation homozygous in both children in the monoamine transporter gene SLC18A2 (p.Pro237His), resulting in brain dopamine-serotonin vesicular transport disease. This is the second family to be described with a mutation in this gene. Treatment with the dopamine agonist pramipexole in the surviving child resulted in mild improvements in alertness, communication, and eye movements. This case supports the identification of the causal mutation in the original case, expands the clinical phenotype of brain dopamine-serotonin vesicular transport disease and confirms that pramipexole treatment may lead to symptomatic improvement in affected individuals.

  8. Synthesis and evaluation of racemic [11C]NS2456 and its enantiomers as selective serotonin reuptake radiotracers for PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.F.; Bender, D.; Marthi, K.; Cumming, P.; Hansen, S.B.; Peters, D.; Oestergaard Nielsen, E.; Scheel-Krueger, J.; Gjedde, A.

    2001-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers are needed for quantifying serotonin uptake sites in the living brain. Therefore, we evaluated a new selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, NS2456, to determine whether it is suited for use in PET. Racemic NS2456 [(1RS,5SR)-8-methyl-3-[4-trifluoromethoxyphenyl]-8-azabicyclo [3.2.1]oct-2-ene] and its N-demethylated analog, racemic NS2463, selectively inhibited serotonin uptake in rat brain synaptosomes; their IC 50 values were 3000-fold lower for [ 3 H]serotonin than for either [ 3 H]dopamine or [ 3 H]noradrenaline. The enantiomers of NS2463 were also potent inhibitors of serotonin uptake in vitro, but they failed to show stereoselectivity. Racemic NS2463 as well as its enantiomers were radiolabelled by N-methylation with C-11, yielding [ 11 C]NS2456 for use in PET of the living porcine brain. The compounds crossed the blood-brain barrier rapidly and accumulated preferentially in regions rich in serotonin uptake sites (e.g., brainstem, subthalamus and thalamus). However, their binding potentials were relatively low and no stereoselectivity was found. Thus, neither racemic [ 11 C]NS2456 nor its [ 11 C]-labelled enantiomers are ideal for PET neuroimaging of neuronal serotonin uptake sites

  9. Affective neural responses modulated by serotonin transporter genotype in clinical anxiety and depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desmond J Oathes

    Full Text Available Serotonin transporter gene variants are known to interact with stressful life experiences to increase chances of developing affective symptoms, and these same variants have been shown to influence amygdala reactivity to affective stimuli in non-psychiatric populations. The impact of these gene variants on affective neurocircuitry in anxiety and mood disorders has been studied less extensively. Utilizing a triallelic assay (5-HTTLPR and rs25531 to assess genetic variation linked with altered serotonin signaling, this fMRI study investigated genetic influences on amygdala and anterior insula activity in 50 generalized anxiety disorder patients, 26 of whom also met DSM-IV criteria for social anxiety disorder and/or major depressive disorder, and 39 healthy comparison subjects. A Group x Genotype interaction was observed for both the amygdala and anterior insula in a paradigm designed to elicit responses in these brain areas during the anticipation of and response to aversive pictures. Patients who are S/L(G carriers showed less activity than their L(A/L(A counterparts in both regions and less activity than S/L(G healthy comparison subjects in the amygdala. Moreover, patients with greater insula responses reported higher levels of intolerance of uncertainty, an association that was particularly pronounced for patients with two LA alleles. A genotype effect was not established in healthy controls. These findings link the serotonin transporter gene to affective circuitry findings in anxiety and depression psychopathology and further suggest that its impact on patients may be different from effects typically observed in healthy populations.

  10. [THE INFLUENCE OF SEROTONIN TRANSPORTER AND MONOAMINE OXIDASE A GENES POLYMORPHISM ON PSYCHO-EMOTION AND KARYOLOGICAL STABILITY OF ATHLETES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaev, V N; Nechaeva, M S; Korneeva, O S; Cherenkov, D A

    2015-11-01

    The influence of polymorphism of the serotonin transporter and monoamine oxidase A genes, associated with man's aggressiveness on the psycho-emotional state and karyological status of single combat athletes. It was revealed that the carriers of less active ("short"), monoamine oxidase A gene variant have a high motivation to succeed and less rigidity and frustrated, compared to the carriers of more active ("long") version of the gene. Heterozygote carriers of less active ("short") variant of the serotonin transporter gene 5-HTTL had more physical aggression, guilt and were less frustrated compared with carriers of two long alleles. It has been revealed the association of studied genes with the karyological status of athletes. So fighters who are carriers of the short and long alleles of the serotonin transporter gene had more cells with nuclear abnormalities in the buccal epithelium than single combat athletes which both alleles were long.

  11. Identification of genetic modifiers of behavioral phenotypes in serotonin transporter knockout rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nijman Isaäc J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic variation in the regulatory region of the human serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4 has been shown to affect brain functionality and personality. However, large heterogeneity in its biological effects is observed, which is at least partially due to genetic modifiers. To gain insight into serotonin transporter (SERT-specific genetic modifiers, we studied an intercross between the Wistar SERT-/- rat and the behaviorally and genetically divergent Brown Norway rat, and performed a QTL analysis. Results In a cohort of >150 intercross SERT-/- and control (SERT+/+ rats we characterized 12 traits that were previously associated with SERT deficiency, including activity, exploratory pattern, cocaine-induced locomotor activity, and abdominal and subcutaneous fat. Using 325 genetic markers, 10 SERT-/--specific quantitative trait loci (QTLs for parameters related to activity and exploratory pattern (Chr.1,9,11,14, and cocaine-induced anxiety and locomotor activity (Chr.5,8 were identified. No significant QTLs were found for fat parameters. Using in silico approaches we explored potential causal genes within modifier QTL regions and found interesting candidates, amongst others, the 5-HT1D receptor (Chr. 5, dopamine D2 receptor (Chr. 8, cannabinoid receptor 2 (Chr. 5, and genes involved in fetal development and plasticity (across chromosomes. Conclusions We anticipate that the SERT-/--specific QTLs may lead to the identification of new modulators of serotonergic signaling, which may be targets for pharmacogenetic and therapeutic approaches.

  12. Attachment and Temperament Revisited: Infant Distress, Attachment Disorganization, and the Serotonin Transporter Polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumariu, Laura E; Bureau, Jean-François; Nemoda, Zsofia; Sasvari-Szekely, Maria; Lyons-Ruth, Karlen

    This study's aim was to evaluate whether infant disorganized attachment and infant proneness to distress exhibited differential relations to infant genetic factors as indexed by the serotonin transporter polymorphism. The role of the short allele of the serotonin transporter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) in enhancing sensitivity to fearful and negative affect has been well-established (Canli & Lesch, 2007). In the current study, we used this known property of the short allele to provide a test of an important postulate of attachment theory, namely that infant attachment security or disorganization is not a function of the infant's proneness to distress. Participants were 39 parents and infants assessed between 12 and 18 months in the Strange Situation procedure. Genotype categories for the 5-HTTLPR (and rs25531) were created by both the original and the reclassified grouping system; infant proneness to distress was assessed directly in the Strange Situation Procedure. We also assessed maternal behavior at 18 months to evaluate whether any observed genetic effect indicated a passive effect through the mother. Consistent with previous findings, the 5-HTTLPR short allele was significantly related to the infant's wariness and distress, but was not related to attachment security or attachment disorganization. In addition, maternal disrupted interaction with the infant was not related to infant genotype or infant distress. Results support the concept that infant proneness to distress is associated with serotonergic factors while infant attachment security or disorganization is not a function of either 5-HTTLPR or behaviorally rated proneness to distress.

  13. A serotonin transporter gene polymorphism predicts peripartum depressive symptoms in an at-risk psychiatric cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Elisabeth B; Newport, D Jeffrey; Zach, Elizabeth B; Smith, Alicia K; Deveau, Todd C; Altshuler, Lori L; Cohen, Lee S; Stowe, Zachary N; Cubells, Joseph F

    2010-07-01

    Peripartum major depressive disorder (MDD) is a prevalent psychiatric disorder with potential detrimental consequences for both mother and child. Despite its enormous health care relevance, data regarding genetic predictors of peripartum depression are sparse. The aim of this study was to investigate associations of the serotonin-transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) genotype with peripartum MDD in an at-risk population. Two hundred and seventy four women with a prior history of MDD were genotyped for 5-HTTLPR and serially evaluated in late pregnancy (gestational weeks 31-40), early post-partum (week 1-8) and late post-partum (week 9-24) for diagnosis of a current major depressive episode (MDE) and depressive symptom severity. 5-HTTLPR S-allele carrier status predicted the occurrence of a MDE in the early post-partum period only (OR=5.13, p=0.017). This association persisted despite continued antidepressant treatment. The 5-HTTLPR genotype may be a clinically relevant predictor of early post-partum depression in an at-risk population. Peripartum major depressive disorder is a prevalent psychiatric disorder with potential detrimental consequences for both mother and child. Despite its enormous health care relevance, data regarding genetic predictors of peripartum depression are sparse. The aim of this study was to investigate associations of the serotonin-transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) genotype with peripartum MDD in an at-risk population. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Polymorphism of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) in major depressive disorder patients in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed Saini, Suriati; Muhamad Radzi, Azizah; Abdul Rahman, Abdul Hamid

    2012-06-01

    The serotonin transporter promoter (5-HTTLPR) is a potential susceptibility locus in the pathogenesis of major depressive disorder. However, data from Malaysia is lacking. The present study aimed to determine the association between the homozygous short variant of the serotonin transporter promoter gene (5-HTTLPR) with major depressive disorder. This is a candidate gene case-control association study. The sample consists of 55 major depressive disorder probands and 66 controls. They were Malaysian descents and were unrelated. The Axis I diagnosis was determined using Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I.). The control group comprised healthy volunteers without personal psychiatric history and family history of mood disorders. Participants' blood was sent to the Institute Medical Research for genotyping. The present study failed to detect an association between 5-HTTLPR ss genotype with major depressive disorder (χ(2)  = 3.67, d.f. = 1, P = 0.055, odds ratio 0.25, 95% confidence interval = 0.07-1.94). Sub-analysis revealed that the frequency of l allele in healthy controls was higher (78.0%) than that of Caucasian and East Asian population. However, in view of the small sample size this study may be prone to type II error (and type I error). This preliminary study suggests that the homozygous short variant of the 5-HTTLPR did not appear to be a risk factor for increasing susceptibility to major depressive disorder. Copyright © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Reduction of intraspecific aggression in adult rats by neonatal treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manhães de Castro R.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Most studies suggest that serotonin exerts an inhibitory control on the aggression process. According to experimental evidence, this amine also influences growth and development of the nervous tissue including serotoninergic neurons. Thus, the possibility exists that increased serotonin availability in young animals facilitates a long-lasting effect on aggressive responses. The present study aimed to investigate the aggressive behavior of adult rats (90-120 days treated from the 1st to the 19th postnatal day with citalopram (CIT, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (20 mg/kg, sc, every 3 days. Aggressive behavior was induced by placing a pair of rats (matched by weight in a box (20 x 20 x 20 cm, and submitting them to a 20-min session of electric footshocks (five 1.6-mA - 2-s current pulses, separated by a 4-min intershock interval. When compared to the control group (rats treated for the same period with equivalent volumes of saline solution, the CIT group presented a 41.4% reduction in the duration of aggressive response. The results indicate that the repeated administration of CIT early in life reduces the aggressive behavior in adulthood and suggest that the increased brain serotoninergic activity could play a role in this effect.

  16. Escitalopram, an antidepressant with an allosteric effect at the serotonin transporter--a review of current understanding of its mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Huailing; Haddjeri, Nasser; Sánchez, Connie

    2012-01-01

    Escitalopram is a widely used antidepressant for the treatment of patients with major depression. It is the pure S-enantiomer of racemic citalopram. Several clinical trials and meta-analyses indicate that escitalopram is quantitatively more efficacious than many other antidepressants with a faster onset of action. This paper reviews current knowledge about the mechanism of action of escitalopram. The primary target for escitalopram is the serotonin transporter (SERT), which is responsible for serotonin (or 5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) reuptake at the terminals and cell bodies of serotonergic neurons. Escitalopram and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors bind with high affinity to the 5-HT binding site (orthosteric site) on the transporter. This leads to antidepressant effects by increasing extracellular 5-HT levels which enhance 5-HT neurotransmission. SERT also has one or more allosteric sites, binding to which modulates activity at the orthosteric binding site but does not directly affect 5-HT reuptake by the transporter. In vitro studies have shown that through allosteric binding, escitalopram decreases its own dissociation rate from the orthosteric site on the SERT. R-citalopram, the nontherapeutic enantiomer in citalopram, is also an allosteric modulator of SERT but can inhibit the actions of escitalopram by interfering negatively with its binding. Both nonclinical studies and some clinical investigations have demonstrated the cellular, neurochemical, neuroadaptive, and neuroplastic changes induced by escitalopram with acute and chronic administration. The findings from binding, neurochemical, and neurophysiological studies may provide a mechanistic rationale for the clinical difference observed with escitalopram compared to other antidepressant therapies.

  17. Tris(2-ethylhexyl)phosphine oxide as an effective solvent mediator for constructing a serotonin-selective membrane electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Keisuke; Yonemoto, Rei; Komagoe, Keiko; Masuda, Kazufumi; Hanioka, Nobumitsu; Narimatsu, Shizuo; Katsu, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    A series of solvent mediators containing a phosphoryl (P=O) group, such as tris(2-ethylhexyl)phosphate, bis(2-ethylhexyl) 2-ethylhexylphosphonate, 2-ethylhexyl bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphinate, and tris(2-ethylhexyl)phosphine oxide, were used to construct serotonin-selective membrane electrodes. We found that replacing the alkoxy groups attached to phosphorus atoms in P=O groups with alkyl groups strengthened the response of the electrode to serotonin, suppressing remarkably interference from inorganic cations, such as Na + . Thus, an electrode combining tris(2-ethylhexyl)phosphine oxide with an ion-exchanger, sodium tetrakis[3,5-bis(2-methoxyhexafluoro-2-propyl)phenyl]borate, gave a detection limit of 9 x 10 -6 M with a slope of 55.2 mV per concentration decade in physiological saline containing 150 mM NaCl and 10 mM NaH 2 PO 4 /Na 2 HPO 4 (pH 7.4). This is the best detection limit of any serotonin-selective electrode developed to date. The selectivity of this electrode for serotonin was over 10 3 times that for inorganic cations, such as Na + and K + , and lipophilic quaternary ammonium ions, such as acetylcholine and (C 2 H 5 ) 4 N + . Using the electrode, we measured the amount of serotonin released from platelets and found that the results agreed well with those obtained by a conventional fluorimetric assay of serotonin

  18. Preclinical pharmacological study on I-ADAM as a serotonin transporter ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Chunying; Lu Chunxiong; Jiang Quanfu; Zou Meifen; Chen Zhengping; Wang Songpei; Li Xiaomin; Zhang Tongxing; Zhu Junqing; Lin Xiangtong

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the new ligand: I-2-( (22( (dimethylamino) methyl) phenyl) thio)-5- iodophenylamine (ADAM) as a serotonin imaging agent. Methods: Biological evaluations were performed in rats and mice. Results: Biodistribution studies in rats showed that the initial uptake of 131 I-ADAM in the brain was high (1.087%ID/organ at 2 min postinjection), and consistently displayed the highest binding (between 60-240 min postinjection) in hypothalamus, a region with the highest density of serotonin transporter (SERT). The specific binding [(TPCB)-1] of 131 I-ADAM in hypothalamus was 2.94, 3.03 and 3.09 at 60, 120 and 240 min postinjection, respectively. The (TPCB)-1 was significantly blocked by pretreatment with Paroxetine, which is known as a serotonin site reuptake inhibitor, while another nonselective competing drug, Ketanserin, showed no blocking effect. The rat brain autoradiography and analysis showed that there was high 131 I-ADAM uptake in hypothalamus, the ratio of hypothalamus/cerebellum was significantly reduced from 7.94 ± 0.39 to 1.30 ± 0.56 by pretreatment with Paroxetine at 60 min postinjection. Blood clearance kinetics was studied in rats, and the initial half-life of 13.79 min and late half-life of 357.14 min were obtained. The kinetic equation was: C=3.6147·e -0.0725t + 1.0413 e -0.0028t . The thyroid uptake was 0.009 and 1.421% ID/organ at 2 min and 120 min postinjection, respectively, suggesting that in vivo deiodination maybe the major route of metabolism. Toxicity trial showed that the dose per kilogram administered to mice was 1000 times greater than that to human beings, assuming a body-weight of 50 kg. Conclusion: These data suggest that 131 I-ADAM may be useful for SPECT imaging of SERT binding sits in the brain. (authors)

  19. Discovery of Indazoles as Potent, Orally Active Dual Neurokinin 1 Receptor Antagonists and Serotonin Transporter Inhibitors for the Treatment of Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degnan, Andrew P; Tora, George O; Huang, Hong; Conlon, David A; Davis, Carl D; Hanumegowda, Umesh M; Hou, Xiaoping; Hsiao, Yi; Hu, Joanna; Krause, Rudolph; Li, Yu-Wen; Newton, Amy E; Pieschl, Rick L; Raybon, Joseph; Rosner, Thorsten; Sun, Jung-Hui; Taber, Matthew T; Taylor, Sarah J; Wong, Michael K; Zhang, Huiping; Lodge, Nicholas J; Bronson, Joanne J; Macor, John E; Gillman, Kevin W

    2016-12-21

    Combination studies of neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor antagonists and serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have shown promise in preclinical models of depression. Such a combination may offer important advantages over the current standard of care. Herein we describe the discovery and optimization of an indazole-based chemotype to provide a series of potent dual NK1 receptor antagonists/serotonin transporter (SERT) inhibitors to overcome issues of ion channel blockade. This effort culminated in the identification of compound 9, an analogue that demonstrated favorable oral bioavailability, excellent brain uptake, and robust in vivo efficacy in a validated depression model. Over the course of this work, a novel heterocycle-directed asymmetric hydrogenation was developed to facilitate installation of the key stereogenic center.

  20. Acute tryptophan depletion dose dependently impairs object memory in serotonin transporter knockout rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olivier, J D A; Jans, L A W; Korte-Bouws, G A H; Korte, S M; Deen, P M T; Cools, A R; Ellenbroek, B A; Blokland, A

    2008-01-01

    RATIONALE: Acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) transiently lowers central serotonin levels and can induce depressive mood states and cognitive defects. Previous studies have shown that ATD impairs object recognition in rats. OBJECTIVES: As individual differences exist in central serotonin

  1. A Concise Total Synthesis of (R)-Fluoxetine, a Potent and Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    de Fátima, Ângelo; Lapis, Alexandre Augusto M.; Pilli, Ronaldo A.

    2005-01-01

    (R)-Fluoxetine, potent and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, has been synthesized in six steps, 50% overall yield and 99% ee from benzaldehyde via catalytic asymmetric allylation with Maruoka's catalyst. (R)-Fluoxetina, um inibidor potente e seletivo da recaptação da serotonina, foi sintetizada em seis etapas, 50% de rendimento total e 99% de excesso enantiomérico a partir do benzaldeído via alilação catalítica assimétrica empregando-se o sistema catalítico desenvolvido por Maruoka e...

  2. Maternal use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and risk of miscarriage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Rie Laurine Rosenthal; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo

    2015-01-01

    -exposed pregnancies were characterised by an unhealthier maternal lifestyle and mental health profile than unexposed pregnancies, whereas no convincing differences were observed between pregnancies exposed to SSRIs during versus before pregnancy. Substantial disagreement was found between prescriptions and self......BACKGROUND: The use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) during pregnancy has been associated with miscarriage, but the association may be biased by maternal mental illness, lifestyle and exposure misclassification. METHODS: A register study on all pregnancies in Denmark between 1996......-reported use of SSRIs, but it did not affect the estimated hazard ratios. CONCLUSION: Confounding by indication and lifestyle in pregnancy may explain the association between SSRI use and miscarriage....

  3. Synthesis and evaluation of iodine-123 labelled tricyclic tropanes as radioligands for the serotonin transporter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinlivan, Mitchell; Mattner, Filomena; Papazian, Vahan; Zhou, Jia; Katsifis, Andrew; Emond, Patrick; Chalon, Sylvie; Kozikowski, Alan; Guilloteau, Denis; Kassiou, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The tricyclic tropane analogues (1S,3S,6R,10S)-(Z)-10-(benzoyloxymethyl)-9-(3-chloro-4-iodobenzylidene)-7 -azatricyclo[4.3.1.0 3,7 ]decane, 1, and (1S,3S,6R,10S)-(Z)-9-(3-chloro-4-iodobenzylidene)-7-azatricyclo[4.3.1.0 3,7 ] = decane-10-carboxylic acid methyl ester, 2, have been shown to be potent and selective serotonin transporter (SERT) ligands. They possess nanomolar affinity for the SERT (Ki = 0.06 nM and 1.8 nM respectively) and are suitable for radiolabelling using iodine-123. In the present study we prepared [ 123 I]1 and [ 123 I]2 from the appropriate tributylstannane precursors using acidic media with chloramine-T as the oxidising agent. The radiochemical yield obtained for [ 123 I]1 varied between 50-60% while for [ 123 I]2 the range was 65-80%. Both radioligands were obtained with radiochemical purity > 97% and specific activity estimated to be > 185 GBq/μmol. The biodistribution of [ 123 I]1 demonstrated low degree of brain penetration at 5 min (0.14%ID/g) with a homogenous distribution. The radioactivity cleared quickly from all brain regions with no preferential localization. In comparison, [ 123 I]2 demonstrated on average a higher brain uptake at 5 min (0.5%ID/g). However the distribution of radioactivity was homogenous and cleared to levels similar to [ 123 I]1 at 1 hr post-injection. Pre-administration of citalopram failed to show any significant inhibition of [ 123 I]2 uptake in the rat brain. The high lipophilicity of 1 and 2 (HPLC-derived log P 7.4 values of 6.41 and 4.25 respectively) and in vivo metabolism, seen by high thyroid uptake would explain the absence of any specific binding observed in the rat brain. In view of these results [ 123 I]1 and [ 123 I]2 do not appear to be suitable radioligands for in vivo studies of the SERT

  4. Synthesis and evaluation of iodine-123 labelled tricyclic tropanes as radioligands for the serotonin transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinlivan, Mitchell; Mattner, Filomena; Papazian, Vahan; Zhou, Jia; Katsifis, Andrew; Emond, Patrick; Chalon, Sylvie; Kozikowski, Alan; Guilloteau, Denis; Kassiou, Michael E-mail: mkassiou@med.usyd.edu.au

    2003-10-01

    The tricyclic tropane analogues (1S,3S,6R,10S)-(Z)-10-(benzoyloxymethyl)-9-(3-chloro-4-iodobenzylidene)-7 -azatricyclo[4.3.1.0{sup 3,7}]decane, 1, and (1S,3S,6R,10S)-(Z)-9-(3-chloro-4-iodobenzylidene)-7-azatricyclo[4.3.1.0{sup 3,7}] = decane-10-carboxylic acid methyl ester, 2, have been shown to be potent and selective serotonin transporter (SERT) ligands. They possess nanomolar affinity for the SERT (Ki = 0.06 nM and 1.8 nM respectively) and are suitable for radiolabelling using iodine-123. In the present study we prepared [{sup 123}I]1 and [{sup 123}I]2 from the appropriate tributylstannane precursors using acidic media with chloramine-T as the oxidising agent. The radiochemical yield obtained for [{sup 123}I]1 varied between 50-60% while for [{sup 123}I]2 the range was 65-80%. Both radioligands were obtained with radiochemical purity > 97% and specific activity estimated to be > 185 GBq/{mu}mol. The biodistribution of [{sup 123}I]1 demonstrated low degree of brain penetration at 5 min (0.14%ID/g) with a homogenous distribution. The radioactivity cleared quickly from all brain regions with no preferential localization. In comparison, [{sup 123}I]2 demonstrated on average a higher brain uptake at 5 min (0.5%ID/g). However the distribution of radioactivity was homogenous and cleared to levels similar to [{sup 123}I]1 at 1 hr post-injection. Pre-administration of citalopram failed to show any significant inhibition of [{sup 123}I]2 uptake in the rat brain. The high lipophilicity of 1 and 2 (HPLC-derived log P{sub 7.4} values of 6.41 and 4.25 respectively) and in vivo metabolism, seen by high thyroid uptake would explain the absence of any specific binding observed in the rat brain. In view of these results [{sup 123}I]1 and [{sup 123}I]2 do not appear to be suitable radioligands for in vivo studies of the SERT.

  5. Effects of the serotonin transporter polymorphism and history of major depression on overgeneral autobiographical memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Jennifer A; Vrshek-Schallhorn, Suzanne; Mineka, Susan; Zinbarg, Richard E; Craske, Michelle G; Redei, Eva E; Wolitzky-Taylor, Kate; Adam, Emma K

    2014-01-01

    Overgeneral autobiographical memory (OGM) is a key memory deficit in major depressive disorder (MDD). Much research has examined cognitive mechanisms underlying OGM, but little work has investigated potential neurobiological influences. There is preliminary evidence that a genetic serotonergic vulnerability coupled with depressive symptoms may be associated with other memory impairments, and experimental research suggests a role for serotonin in OGM. We investigated whether a polymorphism in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) was associated with OGM in interaction with a lifetime history of MDD in 370 young adults in a longitudinal study of risk for emotional disorders. There was a significant interaction between 5-HTTLPR genotype and lifetime history of MDD in predicting OGM. Among S allele homozygotes, MDD history was associated with greater OGM, whereas no significant relationship between MDD history and OGM emerged among L carriers. Furthermore, there was evidence that a greater number of S alleles were associated with greater memory specificity in individuals without a history of MDD. Implications for understanding cognitive and biological risk for depression are discussed.

  6. Association of central serotonin transporter availability and body mass index in healthy Europeans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesse, Swen; van de Giessen, Elsmarieke; Zientek, Franziska

    2014-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Serotonin-mediated mechanisms, in particular via the serotonin transporter (SERT), are thought to have an effect on food intake and play an important role in the pathophysiology of obesity. However, imaging studies that examined the correlation between body mass index (BMI) and SERT...... are sparse and provided contradictory results. The aim of this study was to further test the association between SERT and BMI in a large cohort of healthy subjects. METHODS: 127 subjects of the ENC DAT database (58 females, age 52 ± 18 years, range 20-83, BMI 25.2 ± 3.8 kg/m(2), range 18.2-41.1) were...... associated in the thalamus, but not in the midbrain. In the ROI-analysis, the interaction between gender and BMI showed a trend with higher correlation coefficient for men in the midbrain albeit not significant (0.033SBRm(2)/kg, p=0.1). CONCLUSIONS: The data are in agreement with previous PET findings...

  7. Polymorphisms of the serotonin transporter and receptor genes: susceptibility to substance abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman AI

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aryeh I Herman, Kornelia N BaloghDepartment of Psychiatry, VA Connecticut Healthcare/Yale University School of Medicine, West Haven, CT, USAAbstract: Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT] is an important neurotransmitter implicated in regulating substance-use disorder (SUD acquisition, maintenance, and recovery. During the past several years, an abundance of research has begun discovering and describing specific 5-HT genetic polymorphisms associated with SUDs. Genetic variations in the 5-HT system, such as SLC6A4, HTR1B, HTR2A, HTR2C, HTR3 (HTR3A, HTR3B, HTR3C, HTR3D, and HTR3E, likely play a role contributing to SUD patient heterogeneity. The 5-HT transporter-linked polymorphic region S allele, located in SLC6A4, has now been modestly associated with alcohol dependence in two large meta-analyses. Additional 5-HT genes may also play a role but have not been extensively investigated. A limited number of SUD treatment studies have included 5-HT gene variation as moderating treatment outcomes, but the results have been equivocal. Future research on 5-HT addiction genetics should adopt whole-genome sequencing technology, utilize large study samples, and collect data from multiple ethnic groups. Together, these methods will build on the work already conducted with the aim of utilizing 5-HT genetics in SUD treatment settings.Keywords: serotonin, genetic, substance dependence, addiction, alcohol, drug

  8. Impaired fear extinction in serotonin transporter knockout rats is associated with increased 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in the amygdala

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shan, L.; Guo, Hang-Yuan; van den Heuvel, Corina N A M; van Heerikhuize, J.J.; Homberg, Judith R

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: One potential risk factor for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) involves the low activity (short; s) allelic variant of the serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR), possibly due to reduced prefrontal control over the amygdala. Evidence shows that DNA

  9. Reduced function of the serotonin transporter is associated with decreased expression of BDNF in rodents as well as in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molteni, R.; Cattaneo, A.; Calabrese, F.; Macchi, F.; Olivier, J.D.A.; Racagni, G.; Ellenbroek, A.A.; Gennarelli, M.; Riva, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    In order to identify the molecular mechanisms that may contribute to the enhanced susceptibility to depression under serotonin transporter (SERT) dysfunction, we analyzed the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a key player in neuronal plasticity, which is implicated in the

  10. Altered expression and modulation of activity-regulated cytoskeletal associated protein (Arc) in serotonin transporter knockout rats.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molteni, R.; Calabrese, F.; Maj, P.F.; Olivier, J.D.A.; Racagni, G.; Ellenbroek, A.A.; Riva, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    A gene variant in the human serotonin transporter (SERT) can increase the vulnerability to mood disorders. SERT knockout animals show similarities to the human condition and represent an important tool to investigate the mechanisms underlying the pathologic condition in humans. Along this line of

  11. The serotonin transporter gene polymorphism 5-HTTLPR moderates the effects of stress on attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, D. van der; Hartman, C.A.; Richards, J.; Bralten, J.B.; Franke, B.; Oosterlaan, J.; Heslenfeld, D.J.; Faraone, S.V.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Hoekstra, P.J.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The role of the serotonin transporter gene polymorphism 5-HTTLPR in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is unclear. Heterogeneity of findings may be explained by gene-environment interactions (GxE), as it has been suggested that S-allele carriers are more reactive to

  12. The serotonin transporter gene polymorphism 5-HTTLPR moderates the effects of stress on attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, D.; Hartman, C.A.; Richards, J.; Bralten, J.; Franke, B.; Oosterlaan, J.; Heslenfeld, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The role of the serotonin transporter gene polymorphism 5-HTTLPR in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is unclear. Heterogeneity of findings may be explained by gene-environment interactions (GxE), as it has been suggested that S-allele carriers are more reactive to

  13. The serotonin transporter gene polymorphism 5-HTTLPR moderates the effects of stress on attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, D.; Hartman, C.A.; Richards, J.; Bralten, J.; Franke, B.; Oosterlaan, J.; Heslenfeld, D.J.; Faraone, S.V.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Hoekstra, P.J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The role of the serotonin transporter gene polymorphism 5-HTTLPR in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is unclear. Heterogeneity of findings may be explained by gene-environment interactions (GxE), as it has been suggested that S-allele carriers are more reactive to

  14. Chronic and Acute Stress, Gender, and Serotonin Transporter Gene-Environment Interactions Predicting Depression Symptoms in Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammen, Constance; Brennan, Patricia A.; Keenan-Miller, Danielle; Hazel, Nicholas A.; Najman, Jake M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Many recent studies of serotonin transporter gene by environment effects predicting depression have used stress assessments with undefined or poor psychometric methods, possibly contributing to wide variation in findings. The present study attempted to distinguish between effects of acute and chronic stress to predict depressive…

  15. Association between a serotonin transporter promoter polymorphism (5HTTLPR) and personality disorder traits in a community sample

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, Rianne M.; Samuels, Jack F.; Riddle, Mark A.; Joseph Bienvenu, O.; Grados, Marco A.; Reti, Irving M.; Eaton, William W.; Liang, Kung-Yee; Nestadt, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) polymorphism (5HTTLPR) has been reported to be associated with several psychiatric conditions. Specific personality disorders could be intermediate factors in the known relationship between 5HTTLPR and psychiatric disorders. This is the first study to test the

  16. Lifelong disturbance of serotonin transporter functioning results in fear learning deficits : Reversal by blockade of CRF1 receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, Elisabeth Y; Hendriksen, Hendrikus; Baas, Johanna M P; Millan, Mark J; Groenink, Lucianne

    2015-01-01

    The inability to associate aversive events with relevant cues (i.e. fear learning) may lead to maladaptive anxiety. To further study the role of the serotonin transporter (SERT) in fear learning, classical fear conditioning was studied in SERT knockout rats (SERT(-/-)) using fear potentiation of the

  17. Design and synthesis of dual inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase and serotonin transporter targeting potential agents for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogen, Hiroshi; Toda, Narihiro; Tago, Keiko; Marumoto, Shinji; Takami, Kazuko; Ori, Mayuko; Yamada, Naho; Koyama, Kazuo; Naruto, Shunji; Abe, Kazumi; Yamazaki, Reina; Hara, Takao; Aoyagi, Atsushi; Abe, Yasuyuki; Kaneko, Tsugio

    2002-10-03

    Highly efficient acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and serotonin transporter (SERT) dual inhibitors, (S)-4 and (R)-13 were designed and synthesized on the basis of the hypothetical model of AChE active site. Both compounds showed potent inhibitory activities against AChE and SERT. [structure: see text

  18. The serotonin transporter gene polymorphism 5-HTTLPR moderates the effects of stress on attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Dennis; Hartman, Catharina A.; Richards, Jennifer; Bralten, Janita B.; Franke, Barbara; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Faraone, Stephen V.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.

    2014-01-01

    IntroductionThe role of the serotonin transporter gene polymorphism 5-HTTLPR in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is unclear. Heterogeneity of findings may be explained by gene-environment interactions (GxE), as it has been suggested that S-allele carriers are more reactive to

  19. Relational Security Moderates the Effect of Serotonin Transporter Gene Polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) on Stress Generation and Depression among Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Lisa R.; Hammen, Constance; Brennan, Patricia A.; Najman, Jake M.

    2013-01-01

    Previous research demonstrates that carriers of the short allele of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) show both greater susceptibility to depression in response to stressful life events and higher rates of generation of stressful events in response to depression. The current study examines relational security (i.e., self-reported beliefs…

  20. Interactive Effects of the Serotonin Transporter 5-HTTLPR Polymorphism and Stressful Life Events on College Student Drinking and Drug Use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Covault, J.; Tennen, H.; Armeli, S.; Conner, T.S.; Herman, A.I.; Cillessen, A.H.N.; Kranzler, H.R.

    2007-01-01

    Background - A common functional polymorphism, 5-HTTLPR, in the serotonin transporter gene has been associated with heavy drinking in college students. We examined this polymorphism as it interacted with negative life events to predict drinking and drug use in college students. Methods - Daily

  1. Interactions between Serotonin Transporter Gene Haplotypes and Quality of Mothers' Parenting Predict the Development of Children's Noncompliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulik, Michael J.; Eisenberg, Nancy; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Spinrad, Tracy L.; Silva, Kassondra M.; Eggum, Natalie D.; Betkowski, Jennifer A.; Kupfer, Anne; Smith, Cynthia L.; Gaertner, Bridget; Stover, Daryn A.; Verrelli, Brian C.

    2012-01-01

    The LPR and STin2 polymorphisms of the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) were combined into haplotypes that, together with quality of maternal parenting, were used to predict initial levels and linear change in children's (N = 138) noncompliance and aggression from age 18-54 months. Quality of mothers' parenting behavior was observed when…

  2. Role of Serotonin Transporter Changes in Depressive Responses to Sex-Steroid Hormone Manipulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frokjaer, Vibe Gedsoe; Pinborg, Anja; Holst, Klaus Kähler

    2015-01-01

    .6 ± 2.2) and at follow-up (16.2 ± 2.6 days after intervention start). RESULTS: Sex hormone manipulation with GnRHa significantly triggered subclinical depressive symptoms within-group (p = .003) and relative to placebo (p = .02), which were positively associated with net decreases in estradiol levels (p......BACKGROUND: An adverse response to acute and pronounced changes in sex-hormone levels during, for example, the perimenopausal or postpartum period appears to heighten risk for major depression in women. The underlying risk mechanisms remain elusive but may include transiently compromised...... serotonergic brain signaling. Here, we modeled a biphasic ovarian sex hormone fluctuation using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) and evaluated if emergence of depressive symptoms was associated with change in cerebral serotonin transporter (SERT) binding following intervention. METHODS...

  3. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, escitalopram, enhances inhibition of prepotent responding and spatial reversal learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Holden D.; Amodeo, Dionisio A.; Sweeney, John A.; Ragozzino, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    Previous findings indicate treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) facilitates behavioral flexibility when conditions require inhibition of a learned response pattern. The present experiment investigated whether acute treatment with the SSRI, escitalopram, affects behavioral flexibility when conditions require inhibition of a naturally-biased response pattern (elevated conflict test) and/or reversal of a learned response pattern (spatial reversal learning). An additional experiment was carried out to determine whether escitalopram, at doses that affected behavioral flexibility, also reduced anxiety as tested in the elevated plus-maze. In each experiment, Long-Evans rats received an intraperitoneal injection of either saline or escitalopram (0.03, 0.3 or 1.0 mg/kg) 30 minutes prior to behavioral testing. Escitalopram, at all doses tested, enhanced acquisition in the elevated conflict test, but did not affect performance in the elevated plus-maze. Escitalopram (0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg) did not alter acquisition of the spatial discrimination, but facilitated reversal learning. In the elevated conflict and spatial reversal learning test, escitalopram enhanced the ability to maintain the relevant strategy after being initially selected. The present findings suggest that enhancing serotonin transmission with a SSRI facilitates inhibitory processes when conditions require a shift away from either a naturally-biased response pattern or a learned choice pattern. PMID:22219222

  4. Associations between serotonin transporter gene polymorphisms and heat pain perception in adults with chronic pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The triallelic serotonin transporter gene linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) has been associated with alterations in thermal pain perception. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the associations between heat pain (HP) perception and the triallelic 5-HTTLPR in a large cohort of adults with chronic pain. Methods The cohort included 277 adults with chronic pain who met inclusion criteria, and were consecutively admitted to an outpatient pain rehabilitation program from March 2009 through March 2010. Individuals were genotyped for the triallelic 5-HTTLPR (including rs25531) and categorized as high, intermediate, or low expressors of the serotonin transporter. Standardized measures of HP perception were obtained using a validated quantitative sensory test method of levels. Results The distribution of the high, intermediate, and low expressing genotypes was 61 (22%), 149 (54%) and 67 (24%), respectively. The Hardy-Weinberg P-value was 0.204 which indicated no departure from equilibrium. A significant effect of genotype was observed for values of HP threshold (P = 0.029). Individual group comparisons showed that values of HP threshold were significantly greater in the intermediate compared to the high expressing group (P = 0.009) but not the low expressing group (P > 0.1). In a multiple variable linear regression model, the intermediate group (P = 0.034) and male sex (P = 0.021) were associated with significantly greater values of HP 0.5, but no significant genotype-by-sex interaction effect was observed. Conclusions In this study that involved adults with chronic pain, the intermediate triallelic 5-HTTLPR expressing group, but not the low expressing group, was associated with greater HP thresholds compared to the high expressing group. PMID:23895108

  5. One-step preparation of [18F]FPBM for PET imaging of serotonin transporter (SERT) in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao, Hongwen; Zhang, Yan; Wu, Zehui; Zhu, Lin; Choi, Seok Rye; Ploessl, Karl; Kung, Hank F.

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin transporters (SERT) in the brain play an important role in normal brain function. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors such as fluoxetine, sertraline, paroxetine, escitalopram, etc., specifically target SERT binding in the brain. Development of SERT imaging agents may be useful for studying the function of SERT by in vivo imaging. A one-step preparation of [ 18 F]FPBM, 2-(2′-(dimethylamino)methyl)-4′-(3-([ 18 F]fluoropropoxy)phenylthio) benzenamine, for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of SERT binding in the brain was achieved. An active OTs intermediate, 9, was reacted with [ 18 F]F − /K 222 to produce [ 18 F]FPBM in one step and in high radiochemical yield. This labeling reaction was evaluated and optimized under different temperatures, bases, solvents, and varying amounts of precursor 9. The radiolabeling reaction led to the desired [ 18 F]FPBM in one step and the crude product was purified by HPLC purification to give no-carrier-added [ 18 F]FPBM (radiochemical yield, 24–33%, decay corrected; radiochemical purity > 99%). PET imaging studies in normal monkeys (n = 4) showed fast, pronounced uptakes in the midbrain and thalamus, regions known to be rich in SERT binding sites. A displacement experiment with escitalopram (5 mg/kg iv injection at 30 min after [ 18 F]FPBM injection) showed a rapid and complete reversal of SERT binding, suggesting that binding by [ 18 F]FPBM was highly specific and reversible. A one-step radiolabeling method coupled with HPLC purification for preparation of [ 18 F]FPBM was developed. Imaging studies suggest that it is feasible to use this method to prepare [ 18 F]FPBM for in vivo PET imaging of SERT binding in the brain.

  6. The two Na+ sites in the human serotonin transporter play distinct roles in the ion coupling and electrogenicity of transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felts, Bruce; Pramod, Akula Bala; Sandtner, Walter; Burbach, Nathan; Bulling, Simon; Sitte, Harald H; Henry, L Keith

    2014-01-17

    Neurotransmitter transporters of the SLC6 family of proteins, including the human serotonin transporter (hSERT), utilize Na(+), Cl(-), and K(+) gradients to induce conformational changes necessary for substrate translocation. Dysregulation of ion movement through monoamine transporters has been shown to impact neuronal firing potentials and could play a role in pathophysiologies, such as depression and anxiety. Despite multiple crystal structures of prokaryotic and eukaryotic SLC transporters indicating the location of both (or one) conserved Na(+)-binding sites (termed Na1 and Na2), much remains uncertain in regard to the movements and contributions of these cation-binding sites in the transport process. In this study, we utilize the unique properties of a mutation of hSERT at a single, highly conserved asparagine on TM1 (Asn-101) to provide several lines of evidence demonstrating mechanistically distinct roles for Na1 and Na2. Mutations at Asn-101 alter the cation dependence of the transporter, allowing Ca(2+) (but not other cations) to functionally replace Na(+) for driving transport and promoting 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-dependent conformational changes. Furthermore, in two-electrode voltage clamp studies in Xenopus oocytes, both Ca(2+) and Na(+) illicit 5-HT-induced currents in the Asn-101 mutants and reveal that, although Ca(2+) promotes substrate-induced current, it does not appear to be the charge carrier during 5-HT transport. These findings, in addition to functional evaluation of Na1 and Na2 site mutants, reveal separate roles for Na1 and Na2 and provide insight into initiation of the translocation process as well as a mechanism whereby the reported SERT stoichiometry can be obtained despite the presence of two putative Na(+)-binding sites.

  7. The Two Na+ Sites in the Human Serotonin Transporter Play Distinct Roles in the Ion Coupling and Electrogenicity of Transport*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felts, Bruce; Pramod, Akula Bala; Sandtner, Walter; Burbach, Nathan; Bulling, Simon; Sitte, Harald H.; Henry, L. Keith

    2014-01-01

    Neurotransmitter transporters of the SLC6 family of proteins, including the human serotonin transporter (hSERT), utilize Na+, Cl−, and K+ gradients to induce conformational changes necessary for substrate translocation. Dysregulation of ion movement through monoamine transporters has been shown to impact neuronal firing potentials and could play a role in pathophysiologies, such as depression and anxiety. Despite multiple crystal structures of prokaryotic and eukaryotic SLC transporters indicating the location of both (or one) conserved Na+-binding sites (termed Na1 and Na2), much remains uncertain in regard to the movements and contributions of these cation-binding sites in the transport process. In this study, we utilize the unique properties of a mutation of hSERT at a single, highly conserved asparagine on TM1 (Asn-101) to provide several lines of evidence demonstrating mechanistically distinct roles for Na1 and Na2. Mutations at Asn-101 alter the cation dependence of the transporter, allowing Ca2+ (but not other cations) to functionally replace Na+ for driving transport and promoting 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-dependent conformational changes. Furthermore, in two-electrode voltage clamp studies in Xenopus oocytes, both Ca2+ and Na+ illicit 5-HT-induced currents in the Asn-101 mutants and reveal that, although Ca2+ promotes substrate-induced current, it does not appear to be the charge carrier during 5-HT transport. These findings, in addition to functional evaluation of Na1 and Na2 site mutants, reveal separate roles for Na1 and Na2 and provide insight into initiation of the translocation process as well as a mechanism whereby the reported SERT stoichiometry can be obtained despite the presence of two putative Na+-binding sites. PMID:24293367

  8. An Association Between Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Use and Serious Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Michael; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: In vitro studies have shown that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) inhibit platelet aggregation. It is controversial whether use of SSRIs is a cause of clinically important bleeding; results from observational studies have been equivocal. METHODS: A population......-based case-control study was conducted in the county of Funen, Denmark. The 3652 cases all had a first discharge diagnosis of serious upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB) from 1995 to 2006. All cases were manually validated. Controls (n = 36,502), matched for age and sex, were selected by risk-set sampling....... Data on drug exposure and medical history were retrieved from a prescription database and the county's patient register. Confounders were controlled for by conditional logistic regression and the case-crossover design. RESULTS: The adjusted odds ratio (OR) of UGB among current, recent, and past users...

  9. Maternal use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors during pregnancy is associated with Hirschsprung's disease in newborns - a nationwide cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sebastian Werngreen; Møller Ljungdalh, Pernille; Nielsen, Jan

    2017-01-01

    of the association between maternal use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) during pregnancy and development of Hirschsprung's Disease in the newborn child. The study examined a nationwide, unselected cohort of children born in Denmark from 1 January 1996 until 12 March 2016 (n = 1,256,317). We...... of Hirschsprung's disease was 16/19.807 (0.08%) compared to 584/1.236.510 (0.05%) in the unexposed cohort. In women who redeemed a minimum of one prescription of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, the adjusted odds ratio for development of Hirschsprung's disease was 1.76 (95%CI: 1.07-2.92). In women who...

  10. Serotonin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperserotonemia; Serotonergic syndrome; Serotonin toxicity; SSRI - serotonin syndrome; MAO - serotonin syndrome ... brain area. For example, you can develop this syndrome if you take migraine medicines called triptans together ...

  11. Presynaptic selectivity of a ligand for serotonin 1A receptors revealed by in vivo PET assays of rat brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeaki Saijo

    Full Text Available A novel investigational antidepressant with high affinity for the serotonin transporter and the serotonin 1A (5-HT(1A receptor, called Wf-516 (structural formula: (2S-1-[4-(3,4-dichlorophenylpiperidin-1-yl]-3-[2-(5-methyl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-ylbenzo[b]furan-4-yloxy]propan-2-ol monohydrochloride, has been found to exert a rapid therapeutic effect, although the mechanistic basis for this potential advantage remains undetermined. We comparatively investigated the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of Wf-516 and pindolol by positron emission tomographic (PET and autoradiographic assays of rat brains in order to elucidate their molecular interactions with presynaptic and postsynaptic 5-HT(1A receptors. In contrast to the full receptor occupancy by pindolol in PET measurements, the binding of Wf-516 to 5-HT(1A receptors displayed limited capacity, with relatively high receptor occupancy being achieved in regions predominantly containing presynaptic receptors. This selectivity was further proven by PET scans of neurotoxicant-treated rats deficient in presynaptic 5-HT(1A receptors. In addition, [(35S]guanosine 5'-O-[γ-thio]triphosphate autoradiography indicated a partial agonistic ability of Wf-516 for 5-HT(1A receptors. This finding has lent support to reports that diverse partial agonists for 5-HT(1A receptors exert high sensitivity for presynaptic components. Thus, the present PET data suggest a relatively high capacity of presynaptic binding sites for partial agonists. Since our in vitro and ex vivo autoradiographies failed to illustrate these distinct features of Wf-516, in vivo PET imaging is considered to be, thus far, the sole method capable of pharmacokinetically demonstrating the unique actions of Wf-516 and similar new-generation antidepressants.

  12. Presynaptic selectivity of a ligand for serotonin 1A receptors revealed by in vivo PET assays of rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saijo, Takeaki; Maeda, Jun; Okauchi, Takashi; Maeda, Jun-ichi; Morio, Yasunori; Kuwahara, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Masayuki; Goto, Nobuharu; Fukumura, Toshimitsu; Suhara, Tetsuya; Higuchi, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    A novel investigational antidepressant with high affinity for the serotonin transporter and the serotonin 1A (5-HT(1A)) receptor, called Wf-516 (structural formula: (2S)-1-[4-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)piperidin-1-yl]-3-[2-(5-methyl-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-yl)benzo[b]furan-4-yloxy]propan-2-ol monohydrochloride), has been found to exert a rapid therapeutic effect, although the mechanistic basis for this potential advantage remains undetermined. We comparatively investigated the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of Wf-516 and pindolol by positron emission tomographic (PET) and autoradiographic assays of rat brains in order to elucidate their molecular interactions with presynaptic and postsynaptic 5-HT(1A) receptors. In contrast to the full receptor occupancy by pindolol in PET measurements, the binding of Wf-516 to 5-HT(1A) receptors displayed limited capacity, with relatively high receptor occupancy being achieved in regions predominantly containing presynaptic receptors. This selectivity was further proven by PET scans of neurotoxicant-treated rats deficient in presynaptic 5-HT(1A) receptors. In addition, [(35)S]guanosine 5'-O-[γ-thio]triphosphate autoradiography indicated a partial agonistic ability of Wf-516 for 5-HT(1A) receptors. This finding has lent support to reports that diverse partial agonists for 5-HT(1A) receptors exert high sensitivity for presynaptic components. Thus, the present PET data suggest a relatively high capacity of presynaptic binding sites for partial agonists. Since our in vitro and ex vivo autoradiographies failed to illustrate these distinct features of Wf-516, in vivo PET imaging is considered to be, thus far, the sole method capable of pharmacokinetically demonstrating the unique actions of Wf-516 and similar new-generation antidepressants.

  13. Association between a genetic variant in the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) and suicidal behavior in patients with schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholm Carlstrom, Eva; Saetre, Peter; Rosengren, Anders

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamin; 5-HT) system has a central role in the circuitry of cognition and emotions. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that genetic variation in the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4; 5-HTT) is associated with schizophrenia and suicidal behavior. ...

  14. Serotonin transporter genotype modulates subgenual response to fearful faces using an incidental task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Nions, Elizabeth J P; Dolan, Raymond J; Roiser, Jonathan P

    2011-11-01

    This study assessed the impact of serotonin transporter genotype (5-HTTLPR) on regional responses to emotional faces in the amygdala and subgenual cingulate cortex (sgACC), while subjects performed a gender discrimination task. Although we found no evidence for greater amygdala reactivity or reduced amygdala-sgACC coupling in short variant 5-HTTLPR homozygotes (s/s), we observed an interaction between genotype and emotion in sgACC. Only long variant homozygotes (la/la) exhibited subgenual deactivation to fearful versus neutral faces, whereas the effect in s/s subjects was in the other direction. This absence of subgenual deactivation in s/s subjects parallels a recent finding in depressed subjects [Grimm, S., Boesiger, P., Beck, J., Schuepbach, D., Bermpohl, F., Walter, M., et al. Altered negative BOLD responses in the default-mode network during emotion processing in depressed subjects. Neuropsychopharmacology, 34, 932-943, 2009]. Taken together, the findings suggest that subgenual cingulate activity may play an important role in regulating the impact of aversive stimuli, potentially conferring greater resilience to the effects of aversive stimuli in la/la subjects. Using dynamic causal modeling of functional magnetic resonance imaging data, we explored the effects of genotype on effective connectivity and emotion-specific changes in coupling across a network of regions implicated in social processing. Viewing fearful faces enhanced bidirectional excitatory coupling between the amygdala and the fusiform gyrus, and increased the inhibitory influence of the amygdala over the sgACC, although this modulation of coupling did not differ between the genotype groups. The findings are discussed in relation to the role of sgACC and serotonin in moderating responses to aversive stimuli [Dayan, P., & Huys, Q. J., Serotonin, inhibition, and negative mood. PLoS Comput Biol, 4, e4, 2008; Mayberg, H. S., Liotti, M., Brannan, S. K., McGinnis, S., Mahurin, R. K., Jerabek, P. A., et

  15. Molecular imaging of serotonin degeneration in mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gwenn S; Barrett, Frederick S; Joo, Jin Hui; Nassery, Najlla; Savonenko, Alena; Sodums, Devin J; Marano, Christopher M; Munro, Cynthia A; Brandt, Jason; Kraut, Michael A; Zhou, Yun; Wong, Dean F; Workman, Clifford I

    2017-09-01

    Neuropathological and neuroimaging studies have consistently demonstrated degeneration of monoamine systems, especially the serotonin system, in normal aging and Alzheimer's disease. The evidence for degeneration of the serotonin system in mild cognitive impairment is limited. Thus, the goal of the present study was to measure the serotonin transporter in vivo in mild cognitive impairment and healthy controls. The serotonin transporter is a selective marker of serotonin terminals and of the integrity of serotonin projections to cortical, subcortical and limbic regions and is found in high concentrations in the serotonergic cell bodies of origin of these projections (raphe nuclei). Twenty-eight participants with mild cognitive impairment (age 66.6±6.9, 16 males) and 28 healthy, cognitively normal, demographically matched controls (age 66.2±7.1, 15 males) underwent magnetic resonance imaging for measurement of grey matter volumes and high-resolution positron emission tomography with well-established radiotracers for the serotonin transporter and regional cerebral blood flow. Beta-amyloid imaging was performed to evaluate, in combination with the neuropsychological testing, the likelihood of subsequent cognitive decline in the participants with mild cognitive impairment. The following hypotheses were tested: 1) the serotonin transporter would be lower in mild cognitive impairment compared to controls in cortical and limbic regions, 2) in mild cognitive impairment relative to controls, the serotonin transporter would be lower to a greater extent and observed in a more widespread pattern than lower grey matter volumes or lower regional cerebral blood flow and 3) lower cortical and limbic serotonin transporters would be correlated with greater deficits in auditory-verbal and visual-spatial memory in mild cognitive impairment, not in controls. Reduced serotonin transporter availability was observed in mild cognitive impairment compared to controls in cortical and limbic

  16. Prenatal serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI antidepressant exposure and serotonin transporter promoter genotype (SLC6A4 influence executive functions at 6 years of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitney eWeikum

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Prenatal exposure to serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI antidepressants and maternal depression may affect prefrontal cognitive skills (executive functions; EFs including self-control, working memory and cognitive flexibility. We examined long-term effects of prenatal SRI exposure on EFs to determine whether effects are moderated by maternal mood and/or genetic variations in SLC6A4 (a gene that codes for the serotonin transporter [5-HTT] central to the regulation of synaptic serotonin levels and behavior. Children who were exposed to SRIs prenatally (SRI-exposed N=26 and non-exposed (N=38 were studied at age 6 years (M=6.3 SD=0.5 using the Hearts & Flowers task (H&F to assess EFs. Maternal mood was measured during pregnancy (3rd trimester and when the child was age 6 years (Hamilton Depression Scale. Parent reports of child behavior were also obtained (MacArthur Health & Behavior Questionnaire. Parents of prenatally SRI-exposed children reported fewer child externalizing and inattentive (ADHD behaviors. Generalized estimate equation modeling showed a significant 3-way interaction between prenatal SRI exposure, SLC6A4 variant, and maternal mood at the 6-year time-point on H&F accuracy. For prenatally SRI-exposed children, regardless of maternal mood, the H&F accuracy of children with reduced 5HTT expression (a short [S] allele remained stable. Even with increasing maternal depressive symptoms (though all below clinical threshold, EFs of children with at least one short allele were comparable to children with the same genotype whose mothers reported few if any depressive symptoms – in this sense they showed resilience. Children with two long (L alleles were more sensitive to context. When their mothers had few depressive symptoms, LL children showed extremely good EF performance – better than any other group. When their mothers reported more depressive symptoms, LL children’s EF performance was worse than that of any other group.

  17. Intestinal Serotonin Transporter Inhibition by Toll-Like Receptor 2 Activation. A Feedback Modulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Latorre

    Full Text Available TLR2 is a microbiota recognition receptor that has been described to contribute to intestinal homeostasis and to ameliorate inflammatory intestinal injury. In this context, serotonin (5-HT has shown to be an essential intestinal physiological neuromodulator that is also involved in intestinal inflammatory diseases. Since the interaction between TLR2 activation and the intestinal serotoninergic system remains non-investigated, our main aim was to analyze the effect of TLR2 on intestinal serotonin transporter (SERT activity and expression and the intracellular pathways involved. Caco-2/TC7 cells were used to analyze SERT and TLR2 molecular expression and SERT activity by measuring 5-HT uptake. The results showed that apical TLR2 activation inhibits SERT activity in Caco-2/TC7 cells mainly by reducing SERT protein level either in the plasma membrane, after short-term TLR2 activation or in both the plasma membrane and cell lysate, after long-term activation. cAMP/PKA pathway appears to mediate short-term inhibitory effect of TLR2 on SERT; however, p38 MAPK pathway has been shown to be involved in both short- and long-term TLR2 effect. Reciprocally, 5-HT long-term treatment yielded TLR2 down regulation in Caco-2/TC7 cells. Finally, results from in vivo showed an augmented intestinal SERT expression in mice Tlr2-/-, thus confirming our inhibitory effect of TLR2 on intestinal SERT in vitro. The present work infers that TLR2 may act in intestinal pathophysiology, not only by its inherent innate immune role, but also by regulating the intestinal serotoninergic system.

  18. Cronobacter sakazakii infection alters serotonin transporter and improved fear memory retention in the rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagavathi Sundaram eSivamaruthi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that Cronobacter sakazakii infection cause septicemia, necrotizingenterocolitis (NEC and meningitis. In the present study, we tested whether the C. sakazakii infection alter the learning and memory through serotonin transporter (SERT. To investigate the possible effect on SERT, on postnatal day (PND-15, wistar rat pups were administered with single dose of C. sakazakii culture (Infected group: IF; 107 CFU or 100μL of Luria-Bertani broth (LB; Medium Control: MC or without any treatment (Naïve control: NC. All the individuals were subjected to passive avoidance test on PND-30 to test their fear memory. We show that single dose of C. sakazakii infection improved fear memory retention. Subsequently, we show that C. sakazakii infection induced the activation of Toll-like receptor-3 (TLR-3 and heat-shock proteins-90 (Hsp-90. On the other hand, level of serotonin (5-HT and SERT protein was down-regulated. Furthermore, we show that C. sakazakii infection up-regulate microRNA (miR-16 expression. The observed results highlight that C. sakazakii infections was responsible for improved fear memory retention and may have reduced the level of SERT protein, which is possibly associated with the interaction of up-regulated Hsp-90 with SERT protein or miR-16 with SERT mRNA. Taken together, observed results suggest that C. sakazakkii infection alter the fear memory possibly through SERT. Hence, this model may be effective to test the C. sakazakii infection induced changes in synaptic plasticity through SERT and effect of other pharmacological agents against pathogen induced memory disorder.

  19. Design and Discovery of Functionally Selective Serotonin 2C (5-HT2C) Receptor Agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jianjun; McCorvy, John D; Giguere, Patrick M; Zhu, Hu; Kenakin, Terry; Roth, Bryan L; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2016-11-10

    On the basis of the structural similarity of our previous 5-HT 2C agonists with the melatonin receptor agonist tasimelteon and the putative biological cross-talk between serotonergic and melatonergic systems, a series of new (2,3-dihydro)benzofuran-based compounds were designed and synthesized. The compounds were evaluated for their selectivity toward 5-HT 2A , 5-HT 2B , and 5-HT 2C receptors in the calcium flux assay with the ultimate goal to generate selective 5-HT 2C agonists. Selected compounds were studied for their functional selectivity by comparing their transduction efficiency at the G protein signaling pathway versus β-arrestin recruitment. The most functionally selective compound (+)-7e produced weak β-arrestin recruitment and also demonstrated less receptor desensitization compared to serotonin in both calcium flux and phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis assays. We report for the first time that selective 5-HT 2C agonists possessing weak β-arrestin recruitment can produce distinct receptor desensitization properties.

  20. In vivo imaging of cerebral serotonin transporter and serotonin(2A) receptor binding in 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or "ecstasy") and hallucinogen users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erritzoe, David; Frøkjær, Vibe; Holst, Klaus K

    2011-01-01

    Both hallucinogens and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or "ecstasy") have direct agonistic effects on postsynaptic serotonin(2A) receptors, the key site for hallucinogenic actions. In addition, MDMA is a potent releaser and reuptake inhibitor of presynaptic serotonin.......Both hallucinogens and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or "ecstasy") have direct agonistic effects on postsynaptic serotonin(2A) receptors, the key site for hallucinogenic actions. In addition, MDMA is a potent releaser and reuptake inhibitor of presynaptic serotonin....

  1. Exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and the risk of congenital malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solem, Espen Victor Jimenez; Andersen, Jon Thor Trærup; Petersen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Objectives:To analyse the relation between selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) use and major congenital malformations, with focus on malformations of the heart. DESIGN: Register-based retrospective nationwide cohort study, using the Danish Medical Birth Registry. SETTING: Denmark...... exposure during pregnancy. RESULTS: The authors identified 848¿786 pregnancies; 4183 were exposed to an SSRI throughout the first trimester and 806 pregnancies paused exposure during pregnancy. Risks of congenital malformations of the heart were similar for pregnancies exposed to an SSRI throughout...... the first trimester, adjusted OR 2.01 (95% CI 1.60 to 2.53), and for pregnancies with paused SSRI treatment during pregnancy, adjusted OR 1.85 (95% CI 1.07 to 3.20), p value for difference: 0.94. The authors found similar increased risks of specific congenital malformations of the heart for the individual...

  2. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressant use in first trimester pregnancy and risk of congenital anomalies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wemakor, A.; Casson, K.; Garne, E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective / Background The Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants are widely prescribed in pregnancy, but there is evidence that they may cause congenital anomalies, particularly congenital heart defects (CHD). Objective: To determine the specificity of association between...... first trimester pregnancy exposure to individual SSRI and specific congenital anomalies (CAs). Methods Population-based case-malformed control study covering 3.3 million births from 12 EUROCAT registries 1995-2009. CAs included non-syndromic live births, fetal deaths and terminations of pregnancy......% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated adjusted for registry. Results SSRI use in first trimester pregnancy was associated with CHD overall (OR 1.38, 95 % CI 1.05-1.82, n=109); and with severe CHDs (OR 1.56, 95 % CI 1.03-2.38, n=29). Specific associations between SSRI and Tetralogy of Fallot (OR 3.36, 95...

  3. Possible role of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor sertraline on oxidative stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battal, D; Yalin, S; Eker, E D; Aktas, A; Sahin, N O; Cebo, M; Berköz, M

    2014-01-01

    The naphthylamine derivative sertraline is a potent and selective inhibitor of serotonin reuptake into presynaptic terminals and the most widely used that has been shown to have both antidepressant and antianxiety effects. In the present study the possible role of sertraline (acute and chronically doses) was evaluated on lipid peroxidation levels and antioxidant enzyme activities in plasma and brain tissues of (10, 40, 80 mg/kg) sertraline treated Wistar albino rats (n=48). Lipid peroxidation levels (MDA) of plasma and brain tissue increased in all acute and chronic sertraline treated rats (p Catalase (CAT) levels of plasma and brain tissue and paraoxonase (PON) levels of plasma decreased (p < 0.05) as compared with vehicle group. Based on the data, it can be concluded that high dose sertraline administration enhances oxidative stress. Therefore, dose adjustment in depression patients seems significant as it may help prevention of further prognosis of the diseases.

  4. Exposure to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in Early Pregnancy and the Risk of Miscarriage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jon Thor Trærup; Andersen, Nadia Lyhne; Horwitz, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in early pregnancy is associated with miscarriage. METHODS: This was a nationwide cohort study identifying all registered pregnancies in Denmark from 1997 to 2010. All births were identified using...... the Medical Birth Registry, and all records of induced abortion or miscarriage were gathered from the National Hospital Register. Data on SSRI use were gathered from the National Prescription Register. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to calculate the hazard of miscarriage in women exposed...... to an SSRI in early pregnancy and the hazard of miscarriage in women discontinuing treatment before pregnancy. RESULTS: We identified 1,279,840 pregnancies (911,569 births, 142,093 miscarriages, 226,178 induced abortions). Of the 22,884 exposed to an SSRI during the first 35 days of pregnancy, 12.6% (2...

  5. Great boast, small roast on effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katakam, Kiran Kumar; Sethi, Naqash Javaid; Jakobsen, Janus Christian

    2018-01-01

    Our systematic review in BMC Psychiatry concluded that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) compared with placebo significantly increase the risk of serious adverse events (SAEs) in patients with major depression and the potential beneficial effects of SSRIs seem to be outweighed...... by the harms. Hieronymus et al. accused us of methodological inaccuracies and blatant errors. In their post-hoc analysis of our data, they reported that SSRIs only increase the risk of SAEs in elderly and seems safe for non-elderly patients. They also found our review misleading because our efficacy analyses...... were based on the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale; we included suboptimal SSRI doses; and we missed some 'pivotal trials'. We do not agree with Hieronymus et al. regarding several of the 'errors' they claim that we have made. However, we acknowledge that they have identified minor errors...

  6. QT interval prolongation in users of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in an elderly surgical population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Haelst, Ingrid M M; van Klei, Wilton A; Doodeman, Hieronymus J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between the use of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) and the occurrence of QT interval prolongation in an elderly surgical population. METHOD: A cross-sectional study was conducted among patients (> 60 years) scheduled for outpatient...... preanesthesia evaluation in the period 2007 until 2012. The index group included elderly users of an SSRI. The reference group of nonusers of antidepressants was matched to the index group on sex and year of scheduled surgery (ratio, 1:1). The primary outcome was the occurrence of QT interval prolongation shown...... on electrocardiogram. The QT interval was corrected for heart rate (QTc interval). The secondary outcome was the duration of the QTc interval. The outcomes were adjusted for confounding by using regression techniques. RESULTS: The index and reference groups included 397 users of an SSRI and 397 nonusers, respectively...

  7. Death and dependence: current controversies over the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, David J

    2003-12-01

    Recent years have seen a considerable media interest in the adverse effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). This has led to claims that these antidepressants may lead to suicide and homicide and that they cause dependence or even addiction. Such claims have caused great concerns to many patients and have confused doctors in both primary care and psychiatric practice. In this article I review the basis of these claims and show that many seem to emerge from the misinterpretation of evidence and the use of imprecise definitions. Although the SSRIs are not free of problems they compare very favourably with other antidepressants and other classes of psychotropic drugs. There is no evidence they are addictive in the formal sense of leading to a drug dependence syndrome. Some suggestions on the way these issues can be more precisely defined and studied in future are given.

  8. Interferon and ribavarin associated depression in hcv patients and role of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashir, K.; Hussain, C.A.; Amer, K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency and severity of depression associated with antiviral therapy of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection and effect of selective serotonin reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) to treat these depressive symptoms. Type of Study: Observational Analytical study. Place of Study and Duration: The study was conducted at Psychiatry, Medicine and Pathology department of Combined Military Hospital Sialkot Pakistan from February 2009 to July 2010. Subjects and Methods: All the patients in this study were suffering from HCV infection and were managed with Interferon (3 m.i.u. s/c thrice weekly) and Cap Ribavirin (400 mg bid) for six months. Patients were assessed by Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) - Urdu Version and Beck's Depressive Inventory (BDI) Scores after twelve weeks of antiviral therapy. Depressed patients were managed with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for six weeks and again evaluated on HADS and BDI Scores. Response to SSRIs was defined as complete response, partial response and no response. Results: A total of 105 patients were studied out of which 75 were male and 30 were female with mean age 29.4 years. Out of these 54 (51.43%) patients developed depression and this tendency to develop depression was not related with the age and sex of the patients. The mean HADS and BDI scores before and after treatments with SSRIs were compared for significance and it was quite significant. There was not a single patient who did not show response to SSRIs. Conclusion: Depression is frequently associated with antiviral therapy of HCV RNA viraemia with interferon and SSRIs have proved an effective and safe remedy in these patients. (author)

  9. Early Neurological Outcome of Young Infants Exposed to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors during Pregnancy : Results from the Observational SMOK Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, N.K.S.; van der Veere, C.N.; Reijneveld, S.A.; Bos, A.F.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) during pregnancy is common while the effect on the infant's neurological outcome is unknown. Our objective was to determine the effects of prenatal SSRI-exposure on the infants' neurological functioning, adjusted for maternal mental

  10. Treatment of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor-Resistant Depression in Adolescents: Predictors and Moderators of Treatment Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Emslie, Graham; Clarke, Greg; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Spirito, Anthony; Vitiello, Benedetto; Iyengar, Satish; Shamseddeen, Wael; Ritz, Louise; Birmaher, Boris; Ryan, Neal; Kennard, Betsy; Mayes, Taryn; DeBar, Lynn; McCracken, James; Strober, Michael; Suddath, Robert; Leonard, Henrietta; Porta, Giovanna; Keller, Martin; Brent, David

    2009-01-01

    Adolescents who did not improve with Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI) were provided an alternative SSRI plus cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). The superiority of the CBT/combined treatment as compared to medication alone is more evident in youths who had more comorbid disorders, no abuse history, and lower hopelessness.

  11. Effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibition on neural activity related to risky decisions and monetary rewards in healthy males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macoveanu, Julian; Fisher, Patrick M; Haahr, Mette E

    2014-01-01

    the involvement of the normally functioning 5HT-system in decision-making under risk and processing of monetary rewards. The data suggest that prolonged SSRI treatment might reduce emotional engagement by reducing the impact of risk during decision-making or the impact of reward during outcome evaluation.......Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) such as fluoxetine are commonly prescribed antidepressant drugs targeting the dysfunctional serotonin (5-HT) system, yet little is known about the functional effects of prolonged serotonin reuptake inhibition in healthy individuals. Here we used...... functional MRI (fMRI) to investigate how a three-week fluoxetine intervention influences neural activity related to risk taking and reward processing. Employing a double-blinded parallel-group design, 29 healthy young males were randomly assigned to receive 3 weeks of a daily dose of 40 mg fluoxetine...

  12. Relationships between Serotonin Transporter Binding in the Raphe Nuclei, Basal Ganglia, and Hippocampus with Clinical Symptoms in Cervical Dystonia : A [C]DASB Positron Emission Tomography Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Marenka; Vállez García, David; de Jong, Bauke M; Zoons, Evelien; Booij, Jan; Dierckx, Rudi A; Willemsen, Antoon T; de Vries, Erik F; Bartels, Anna L; Tijssen, Marina A

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Alterations of the central serotonergic system have been implicated in the pathophysiology of dystonia. In this molecular imaging study, we assessed whether altered presynaptic serotonin transporter (SERT) binding contributes to the pathophysiology of cervical dystonia (CD), concerning both

  13. Variant at serotonin transporter gene predicts increased imitation in toddlers: relevance to the human capacity for cumulative culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Kari Britt; Asherson, Philip; Blake, Peter R; Fenstermacher, Susan K; Saudino, Kimberly J

    2016-04-01

    Cumulative culture ostensibly arises from a set of sociocognitive processes which includes high-fidelity production imitation, prosociality and group identification. The latter processes are facilitated by unconscious imitation or social mimicry. The proximate mechanisms of individual variation in imitation may thus shed light on the evolutionary history of the human capacity for cumulative culture. In humans, a genetic component to variation in the propensity for imitation is likely. A functional length polymorphism in the serotonin transporter gene, the short allele at 5HTTLPR, is associated with heightened responsiveness to the social environment as well as anatomical and activational differences in the brain's imitation circuity. Here, we evaluate whether this polymorphism contributes to variation in production imitation and social mimicry. Toddlers with the short allele at 5HTTLPR exhibit increased social mimicry and increased fidelity of demonstrated novel object manipulations. Thus, the short allele is associated with two forms of imitation that may underlie the human capacity for cumulative culture. The short allele spread relatively recently, possibly due to selection, and its frequency varies dramatically on a global scale. Diverse observations can be unified via conceptualization of 5HTTLPR as influencing the propensity to experience others' emotions, actions and sensations, potentially through the mirror mechanism. © 2016 The Author(s).

  14. The Effects of Serotonin in Immune Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Herr, Nadine; Bode, Christoph; Duerschmied, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] plays an important role in many organs as a peripheral hormone. Most of the body’s serotonin is circulating in the bloodstream, transported by blood platelets and is released upon activation. The functions of serotonin are mediated by members of the 7 known mammalian serotonin receptor subtype classes (15 known subtypes), the serotonin transporter (SERT), and by covalent binding of serotonin to different effector proteins. Almost all immune cells express...

  15. Dissociable roles of dopamine and serotonin transporter function in a rat model of negative urgency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Justin R; Darna, Mahesh; Gipson, Cassandra D; Dwoskin, Linda P; Bardo, Michael T

    2015-09-15

    Negative urgency is a facet of impulsivity that reflects mood-based rash action and is associated with various maladaptive behaviors in humans. However, the underlying neural mechanisms of negative urgency are not fully understood. Several brain regions within the mesocorticolimbic pathway, as well as the neurotransmitters dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT), have been implicated in impulsivity. Extracellular DA and 5-HT concentrations are regulated by DA transporters (DAT) and 5-HT transporters (SERT); thus, these transporters may be important molecular mechanisms underlying individual differences in negative urgency. The current study employed a reward omission task to model negative urgency in rats. During reward trials, a cue light signaled the non-contingent delivery of one sucrose pellet; immediately following the non-contingent reward, rats responded on a lever to earn sucrose pellets (operant phase). Omission trials were similar to reward trials, except that non-contingent sucrose was omitted following the cue light prior to the operant phase. As expected, contingent responding was higher following omission of expected reward than following delivery of expected reward, thus reflecting negative urgency. Upon completion of behavioral training, Vmax and Km were obtained from kinetic analysis of [(3)H]DA and [(3)H]5-HT uptake using synaptosomes prepared from nucleus accumbens (NAc), dorsal striatum (Str), medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) isolated from individual rats. Vmax for DAT in NAc and for SERT in OFC were positively correlated with negative urgency scores. The current findings suggest that mood-based impulsivity (negative urgency) is associated with enhanced DAT function in NAc and SERT function in OFC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. In vivo quantification by SPECT of [{sup 123}I] ADAM bound to serotonin transporters in the brains of rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, X.-X. [Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Hwang, J.-J. [Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, J.-F. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chi-Mei Foundation Medical Center, Yungkang City 710, Taiwan (China); Chen, J.-C. [Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: jcchen@ym.edu.tw; Chou, Y.-T. [Institute of Physiology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Tu, K.-Y. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Mackey Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan 104 (China); Wey, S.-P. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang-Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan 333 (China); Ting Gann [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Tao- Yuan 335, Taiwan (China)

    2004-11-01

    Background: A novel radioiodine ligand [{sup 123}I] ADAM (2-((2-((dimethylamino)methyl)phenyl)thio)-5-iodophenylamine) has been suggested as a promising serotonin transporter (SERT) imaging agent for the central nervous system. In this study, the biodistribution of SERTs in the rabbit brain was investigated using [{sup 123}I] ADAM and mapping images of the same animal produced by both single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and microautoradiography. A semiquantification method was adopted to deduce the optimum time for SPECT imaging, whereas the input for a simple fully quantitative tracer kinetic model was provided from arterial blood sampling data. Methods: SPECT imaging was performed on female rabbits postinjection of 185 MBq [{sup 123}I] ADAM. The time-activity curve obtained from the SPECT images was used to quantify the SERTs, for which the binding potential was calculated from the kinetic modeling of [{sup 123}I] ADAM. The kinetic data were analyzed by the nonlinear least squares method. The effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors fluoxetine and p-chloroamphetamine (PCA) on rabbits were also evaluated. After scanning, the same animal was sacrificed and the brain was removed for microautoradiography. Regions-of-interest were analyzed using both SPECT and microautoradiography images. The SPECT images were coregistered manually with the corresponding microautoradiography images for comparative study. Results: During the time interval 90-100 min postinjection, the peak specific binding levels in different brain regions were compared and the brain stem was shown to have the highest activity. The target-to-background ratio was 1.89{+-}0.02. Similar studies with fluoxetine and PCA showed a background level for SERT occupation. Microautoradiography demonstrated a higher level of anatomical details of the [{sup 123}I] ADAM distribution than that obtained by SPECT imaging of the rabbit brain. Conclusion: SPECT imaging of the rabbit brain with

  17. In vivo quantification by SPECT of [123I] ADAM bound to serotonin transporters in the brains of rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, X.-X.; Hwang, J.-J.; Hsieh, J.-F.; Chen, J.-C.; Chou, Y.-T.; Tu, K.-Y.; Wey, S.-P.; Ting Gann

    2004-01-01

    Background: A novel radioiodine ligand [ 123 I] ADAM (2-((2-((dimethylamino)methyl)phenyl)thio)-5-iodophenylamine) has been suggested as a promising serotonin transporter (SERT) imaging agent for the central nervous system. In this study, the biodistribution of SERTs in the rabbit brain was investigated using [ 123 I] ADAM and mapping images of the same animal produced by both single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and microautoradiography. A semiquantification method was adopted to deduce the optimum time for SPECT imaging, whereas the input for a simple fully quantitative tracer kinetic model was provided from arterial blood sampling data. Methods: SPECT imaging was performed on female rabbits postinjection of 185 MBq [ 123 I] ADAM. The time-activity curve obtained from the SPECT images was used to quantify the SERTs, for which the binding potential was calculated from the kinetic modeling of [ 123 I] ADAM. The kinetic data were analyzed by the nonlinear least squares method. The effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors fluoxetine and p-chloroamphetamine (PCA) on rabbits were also evaluated. After scanning, the same animal was sacrificed and the brain was removed for microautoradiography. Regions-of-interest were analyzed using both SPECT and microautoradiography images. The SPECT images were coregistered manually with the corresponding microautoradiography images for comparative study. Results: During the time interval 90-100 min postinjection, the peak specific binding levels in different brain regions were compared and the brain stem was shown to have the highest activity. The target-to-background ratio was 1.89±0.02. Similar studies with fluoxetine and PCA showed a background level for SERT occupation. Microautoradiography demonstrated a higher level of anatomical details of the [ 123 I] ADAM distribution than that obtained by SPECT imaging of the rabbit brain. Conclusion: SPECT imaging of the rabbit brain with [ 123 I] ADAM showed

  18. Modulation of Human Serotonin Transporter Expression by 5-HTTLPR in Colon Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tewin Tencomnao

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin (5-HT is a monoamine neurotransmitter and plays important roles in several of the human body’s systems. Known as a primary target for psychoactive drug development, the 5-HT transporter (5-HTT, SERT plays a critical role in the regulation of serotonergic function by reuptaking 5-HT. The allelic variation of 5-HTT expression is caused by functional gene promoter polymorphism with two principal variant alleles, 5-HTT gene-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR. It has been demonstrated that 5-HTTLPR is associated with numerous neuropsychiatric disorders. The functional roles of 5-HTTLPR have been reported in human choriocarcinoma (JAR, lymphoblast and raphe cells. To date, the significance of 5-HTTLPR in gastrointestinal tract-derived cells has never been elucidated. Thus, the impact of 5-HTTLPR on 5-HTT transcription was studied in SW480 human colon carcinoma cells, which were shown to express 5-HTT. We found 42-bp fragment in long (L allele as compared to short (S allele, and this allelic difference resulted in 2-fold higher transcriptional efficiency of L allele (P < 0.05 as demonstrated using a functional reporter gene assay. Nevertheless, the transcriptional effect of estrogen and glucocorticoid on 5-HTT expression via 5-HTTLPR was not found in this cell line. Our study was the first to demonstrate the molecular role of this allelic variation in gastrointestinal tract cells.

  19. Thermal balneotherapy induces changes of the platelet serotonin transporter in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marazziti, Donatella; Baroni, Stefano; Giannaccini, Gino; Catena Dell'Osso, Mario; Consoli, Giorgio; Picchetti, Michela; Carlini, Marina; Massimetti, Gabriele; Provenzano, Serafina; Galassi, Antonio

    2007-10-01

    Although the beneficial effects of balneotherapy have been recognized since a long time, a few information is available on the biological mechanisms underlying them and the subjective feelings of increased well-being and mood. The links between the serotonin (5-HT) system and mood prompted us to investigate the 5-HT platelet transporter (SERT), which is considered a reliable, peripheral marker of the same structure present in presynaptic neurons, in 20 healthy volunteers before (t0) and 30 min after (t1) thermal balneotherapy with ozonized water of Montecatini spa, as compared with a similar group who underwent a bath in non-mineral water. The SERT was evaluated by means of the specific binding of (3)H-paroxetine ((3)H-Par) to platelet membranes. Equilibrium-saturation binding data, the maximal binding capacity (Bmax) and the dissociation constant (Kd), were obtained by means of the Scatchard analysis. The results showed that, while Bmax values did not change in both groups, the Kd values decreased significantly at t1 only in those subjects who bathed in ozonized water. The results of this study, while showing a decrease of the dissociation constant (Kd) which is the inverse of affinity constant, of (3)H-Par binding to SERT in all subjects after balneotherapy and not in those bathing in normal water, suggest that SERT modifications may be related to a specific effect of ozonized water and, perhaps, also to the increased sense of well-being.

  20. Modulation of the platelet serotonin transporter by thermal balneotherapy: a study in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroni, S; Marazziti, D; Consoli, G; Picchetti, M; Catena-Dell'Osso, M; Galassi, A

    2012-05-01

    Although the beneficial effects of balneotherapy have been recognized since a long time, a few information is available on the biological mechanisms underlying them and the subjective feelings of increased well-being and mood. The links between the serotonin (5-HT) system and mood prompted us to investigate the 5-HT platelet transporter (SERT), which is considered a reliable, peripheral marker of the same structure present in presynaptic neurons, in 30 healthy volunteers before (t0) and 30 minutes after (t1) thermal balneotherapy with ozonized water, as compared with a similar group who underwent a bath in non-mineral water. MATERIALS AN METHODS: The SERT was evaluated by means of the specific binding of 3H-paroxetine (3H-Par) to platelet membranes. Equilibrium-saturation binding data, the maximal binding capacity (Bmax) and the dissociation constant (Kd), were obtained by means of the Scatchard analysis. The results showed that, while Bmax values did not change in both groups, the Kd values decreased significantly at t1 only in those subjects who bathed in ozonized water. The results of this study, while showing a decrease of the dissociation constant (Kd) which is the inverse of affinity constant, of 3H-Par binding to SERT in all subjects after balneotherapy and not in those bathing in normal water, suggest that SERT modifications may be related to a specific effect of ozonized water and, perhaps, also to the increased sense of well-being.

  1. Perceived discrimination, serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region status, and the development of conduct problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Gene H; Beach, Steven R H; Chen, Yi-Fu; Obasi, Ezemenari; Philibert, Robert A; Kogan, Steven M; Simons, Ronald L

    2011-05-01

    This study examined the prospective relations of adolescents' perceptions of discrimination and their genetic status with increases in conduct problems. Participants were 461 African American youths residing in rural Georgia (Wave 1 mean age = 15.5 years) who provided three waves of data and a saliva sample from which a polymorphism in the SCL6A4 (serotonin transporter [5-HTT]) gene polymorphism known as the 5-HTT linked promoter region (5-HTTLPR) was genotyped. Data analyses using growth curve modeling indicated that perceived discrimination was significantly related to the slope of conduct problems. As hypothesized, interactions between perceived discrimination and genetic status emerged for male but not female youths. Compared with those carrying two copies of the long allele variant of 5-HTTLPR, male youths carrying one or two copies of its short allele variant evinced higher rates of conduct problems over time when they perceived high levels of racial discrimination. These findings are consistent with resilience and differential susceptibility propositions stating that genes can both foster sensitivity to adverse events and confer protection from those events.

  2. Genetic contributions of the serotonin transporter to social learning of fear and economic decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crişan, Liviu G; Pana, Simona; Vulturar, Romana; Heilman, Renata M; Szekely, Raluca; Druğa, Bogdan; Dragoş, Nicolae; Miu, Andrei C

    2009-12-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) modulates emotional and cognitive functions such as fear conditioning (FC) and decision making. This study investigated the effects of a functional polymorphism in the regulatory region (5-HTTLPR) of the human 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) gene on observational FC, risk taking and susceptibility to framing in decision making under uncertainty, as well as multidimensional anxiety and autonomic control of the heart in healthy volunteers. The present results indicate that in comparison to the homozygotes for the long (l) version of 5-HTTLPR, the carriers of the short (s) version display enhanced observational FC, reduced financial risk taking and increased susceptibility to framing in economic decision making. We also found that s-carriers have increased trait anxiety due to threat in social evaluation, and ambiguous threat perception. In addition, s-carriers also show reduced autonomic control over the heart, and a pattern of reduced vagal tone and increased sympathetic activity in comparison to l-homozygotes. This is the first genetic study that identifies the association of a functional polymorphism in a key neurotransmitter-related gene with complex social-emotional and cognitive processes. The present set of results suggests an endophenotype of anxiety disorders, characterized by enhanced social learning of fear, impaired decision making and dysfunctional autonomic activity.

  3. Serotonin transporter variant drives preventable gastrointestinal abnormalities in development and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Kara Gross; Li, Zhishan; Stevanovic, Korey; Saurman, Virginia; Anderson, George M.; Snyder, Isaac; Blakely, Randy D.; Gershon, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is an increasingly common behavioral condition that frequently presents with gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances. It is not clear, however, how gut dysfunction relates to core ASD features. Multiple, rare hyperfunctional coding variants of the serotonin (5-HT) transporter (SERT, encoded by SLC6A4) have been identified in ASD. Expression of the most common SERT variant (Ala56) in mice increases 5-HT clearance and causes ASD-like behaviors. Here, we demonstrated that Ala56-expressing mice display GI defects that resemble those seen in mice lacking neuronal 5-HT. These defects included enteric nervous system hypoplasia, slow GI transit, diminished peristaltic reflex activity, and proliferation of crypt epithelial cells. An opposite phenotype was seen in SERT-deficient mice and in progeny of WT dams given the SERT antagonist fluoxetine. The reciprocal phenotypes that resulted from increased or decreased SERT activity support the idea that 5-HT signaling regulates enteric neuronal development and can, when disturbed, cause long-lasting abnormalities of GI function. Administration of a 5-HT4 agonist to Ala56 mice during development prevented Ala56-associated GI perturbations, suggesting that excessive SERT activity leads to inadequate 5-HT4–mediated neurogenesis. We propose that deficient 5-HT signaling during development may contribute to GI and behavioral features of ASD. The consequences of therapies targeting SERT during pregnancy warrant further evaluation. PMID:27111230

  4. Serotonin transporter gene-linked polymorphism affects detection of facial expressions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai Koizumi

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated that the serotonin transporter gene-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR affects the recognition of facial expressions and attention to them. However, the relationship between 5-HTTLPR and the perceptual detection of others' facial expressions, the process which takes place prior to emotional labeling (i.e., recognition, is not clear. To examine whether the perceptual detection of emotional facial expressions is influenced by the allelic variation (short/long of 5-HTTLPR, happy and sad facial expressions were presented at weak and mid intensities (25% and 50%. Ninety-eight participants, genotyped for 5-HTTLPR, judged whether emotion in images of faces was present. Participants with short alleles showed higher sensitivity (d' to happy than to sad expressions, while participants with long allele(s showed no such positivity advantage. This effect of 5-HTTLPR was found at different facial expression intensities among males and females. The results suggest that at the perceptual stage, a short allele enhances the processing of positive facial expressions rather than that of negative facial expressions.

  5. Serotonin transporter genotype linked to adolescent substance use treatment outcome through externalizing behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tammy eChung

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Meta-analyses suggest that the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR short (S allele, relative to the long (L allele, is associated with risk for alcohol dependence, particularly among individuals with early onset antisocial alcoholism. Youth in substance use treatment tend to show antisocial or externalizing behaviors, such as conduct problems, which predict worse treatment outcome. This study examined a pathway in which 5-HTTLPR genotype is associated with externalizing behavior, and the intermediate phenotype of externalizing behavior serves as a link between 5-HTTLPR genotype and substance use treatment outcome in youth. Adolescents (n=142 who were recruited from addictions treatment were genotyped for 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms (S and LG carriers vs. LALA, assessed for externalizing and internalizing behaviors shortly after starting treatment, and followed over 6-months. 5-HTTLPR genotype was not associated with internalizing behaviors, and was not directly associated with 6-month substance use outcomes. However, 5-HTTLPR genotype was associated with externalizing behaviors (S and LG > LALA, and externalizing behaviors predicted alcohol and marijuana problem severity at 6-month follow-up. Results indicated an indirect (p<.05 and non-specific (i.e., both alcohol and marijuana severity effect of 5-HTTLPR genotype on youth substance use treatment outcomes, with externalizing behaviors as an important linking factor. Adolescents in substance use treatment with low expressing (S and LG 5-HTTLPR alleles and externalizing behavior might benefit from intervention that addresses serotonergic functioning, externalizing behaviors, and substance use to improve outcomes.

  6. Serotonin Transporter Genotype (5HTTLPR) Moderates the Longitudinal Impact of Atypical Attachment on Externalizing Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Kathryn L; Zeanah, Charles H; Nelson, Charles A; Fox, Nathan A; Drury, Stacy S

    2015-01-01

    To test whether genotype of the serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5HTTLPR) and atypical attachment interact to predict externalizing psychopathology prospectively in a sample of children with a history of early institutional care. Caregiver report of externalizing behavior at 54 months was examined in 105 children initially reared in institutional care and enrolled in the Bucharest Early Intervention Project, a randomized controlled trial of high quality foster care. 5HTTLPR genotype, attachment status at 42 months of age (typical [secure, avoidant, or ambivalent] or atypical [disorganized-controlling, insecure-other]), and their interaction were examined as predictors of externalizing behavior at age 54 months. 5HTTLPR genotype and atypical attachment at age 42 months interacted to predict externalizing behavior at age 54 months. Specifically, children with the s/s genotype with an atypical attachment had the highest externalizing scores. However, s/s children with a typical attachment demonstrated the lowest externalizing scores, even after controlling for intervention group status. There was no association between attachment status and externalizing behavior among children carrying at least 1 copy of the l allele. These findings indicate that genetic variation in the serotonergic system moderates the association between atypical attachment status and externalizing in young children. Our findings suggest that children, as a result of genetic variability in the serotonergic system, demonstrate differential sensitivity to the attachment relationship.

  7. Abnormal serotonin transporter availability in the brains of adults with conduct disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chieh; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Huang, Wen-Sheng; Shiue, Chyng-Yann; Yeh, Chin-Bin

    2017-06-01

    The aims of the current study were to determine whether patients with conduct disorder (CD) showed an abnormal availability of serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT), and if their hyperkinetic symptoms, impulsivity, and quality of life were correlated with the availability of SERT. We recruited 14 drug-naïve patients with CD and eight age-matched healthy controls (HCs). The adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) self-report scale (ASRS), Barrett impulsivity scale (BIS), and the World Health Organization quality of life-brief version (WHOQOL-BREF) scale were administered. Positron emission tomography (PET) of the brain with 4-[ 18 F]-ADAM was arranged for SERT imaging. SERT availability was significantly reduced in the striatum and midbrain of patients with CD. Quality of life and inattention symptoms were also significantly correlated with the availability of SERT in the prefrontal cortex. The study suggested that a reduction in the availability of SERT might be associated with CD and could potentially predict poor quality of life or symptoms of inattention for these patients. The implications of our results might be limited to individuals with CD; a future study with a larger sample to validate our preliminary results is warranted. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Serotonin Transporter Genotype (5HTTLPR) Moderates the Longitudinal Impact of Atypical Attachment on Externalizing Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Kathryn L.; Zeanah, Charles H.; Nelson, Charles A.; Fox, Nathan A.; Drury, Stacy S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test whether genotype of the serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5HTTLPR) and atypical attachment interact to predict externalizing psychopathology prospectively in a sample of children with a history of early institutional care. Methods Caregiver report of externalizing behavior at 54 months was examined in 105 children initially reared in institutional care and enrolled in the Bucharest Early Intervention Project, a randomized controlled trial of high quality foster care. 5HTTLPR genotype, attachment status at 42 months of age (typical [secure, avoidant, or ambivalent] or atypical [disorganized-controlling, insecure-other]), as well as their interaction, were examined as predictors of externalizing behavior at age 54 months. Results 5HTTLPR genotype and atypical attachment at age 42 months interacted to predict externalizing behavior at age 54 months. Specifically, children with the s/s genotype with an atypical attachment had the highest externalizing scores. However, s/s children with a typical attachment demonstrated the lowest externalizing scores, even after controlling for intervention group status. There was no association between attachment status and externalizing behavior among children carrying at least one copy of the l allele. Discussion These findings indicate that genetic variation in the serotonergic system moderates the association between atypical attachment status and externalizing in young children. Our findings suggest that children, as a result of genetic variability in the serotonergic system, demonstrate differential sensitivity to the attachment relationship. PMID:25933228

  9. An improved synthesis of 4-[18F]-ADAM, a potent serotonin transporter imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Y.-Y.; Huang, W.-S.; Chu, T.-C.; Shiue, C.-Y.

    2009-01-01

    An improved synthesis of N,N-dimethyl-2-(2-amino-4-[ 18 F]fluorophenylthio)benzylamine (4-[ 18 F]-ADAM, 2) as a potent serotonin transporter (SERT) imaging agent is described. Molecular orbital (MO) calculation predicts that N,N-dimethyl-2- (2-nitro-4-trimethylammoniumtrifluoromethanesulfonylphenylthio)benzamide (8) is probably a better precursor than N,N-dimethyl-2-(2,4-dinitrophenylthio)benzylamine (1) for preparing 2. Radioligand 2 was synthesized by the reaction of either precursor 1 or precursor 8 with K[ 18 F]/K 2.2.2 at 120 deg. C followed by reduction with BH 3 at 80 deg. C. The radiochemical yield (EOB) of 2 synthesized from precursor 1 and 8 was 5.7±2.4% (n=6) and 14.8±4.0% (n=5), respectively, in a synthesis time of 120 min from EOB. The specific activity of 2 was 3 Ci/μmol or 111 GBq/μmol (EOB). Thus, this new synthetic method has significantly improved the radiochemical yield of 4-[ 18 F]-ADAM and makes this radioligand more accessible to PET Centers without a cyclotron.

  10. An improved synthesis of 4-[{sup 18}F]-ADAM, a potent serotonin transporter imaging agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Y.-Y. [PET Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Tri-Service General Hospital 325 Section 2, Cheng-Kung Road, Neihu 114, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Thising Hua University, 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Huang, W.-S. [PET Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Tri-Service General Hospital 325 Section 2, Cheng-Kung Road, Neihu 114, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chu, T.-C. [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Thising Hua University, 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Shiue, C.-Y. [PET Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Tri-Service General Hospital 325 Section 2, Cheng-Kung Road, Neihu 114, Taipei, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: shiue@ndmctsgh.edu.tw

    2009-06-15

    An improved synthesis of N,N-dimethyl-2-(2-amino-4-[{sup 18}F]fluorophenylthio)benzylamine (4-[{sup 18}F]-ADAM, 2) as a potent serotonin transporter (SERT) imaging agent is described. Molecular orbital (MO) calculation predicts that N,N-dimethyl-2- (2-nitro-4-trimethylammoniumtrifluoromethanesulfonylphenylthio)benzamide (8) is probably a better precursor than N,N-dimethyl-2-(2,4-dinitrophenylthio)benzylamine (1) for preparing 2. Radioligand 2 was synthesized by the reaction of either precursor 1 or precursor 8 with K[{sup 18}F]/K{sub 2.2.2} at 120 deg. C followed by reduction with BH{sub 3} at 80 deg. C. The radiochemical yield (EOB) of 2 synthesized from precursor 1 and 8 was 5.7{+-}2.4% (n=6) and 14.8{+-}4.0% (n=5), respectively, in a synthesis time of 120 min from EOB. The specific activity of 2 was 3 Ci/{mu}mol or 111 GBq/{mu}mol (EOB). Thus, this new synthetic method has significantly improved the radiochemical yield of 4-[{sup 18}F]-ADAM and makes this radioligand more accessible to PET Centers without a cyclotron.

  11. Serotonin transporter protects the placental cells against apoptosis in caspase 3-independent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, Coedy; Fahmi, Tariq; Cooper, Anthonya; Savenka, Alena V; Lupashin, Vladimir V; Roberts, Drucilla J; Maroteaux, Luc; Hauguel-de Mouzon, Sylvie; Kilic, Fusun

    2017-12-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) and its specific transporter, SERT play important roles in pregnancy. Using placentas dissected from 18d gestational SERT-knock out (KO), peripheral 5-HT (TPH1)-KO, and wild-type (WT) mice, we explored the role of 5-HT and SERT in placental functions in detail. An abnormal thick band of fibrosis and necrosis under the giant cell layer in SERT-KO placentas appeared only moderately in TPH1-KO and minimally present in WT placentas. The majority of the changes were located at the junctional zone of the placentas in SERT. The etiology of these findings was tested with TUNEL assays. The placentas from SERT-KO and TPH1-KO showed 49- and 8-fold increase in TUNEL-positive cells without a concurrent change in the DNA repair or cell proliferation compared to WT placentas. While the proliferation rate in the embryos of TPH1-KO mice was 16-fold lower than the rate in gestational age matched embryos of WT or SERT-KO mice. These findings highlight an important role of continuous 5-HT signaling on trophoblast cell viability. SERT may contribute to protecting trophoblast cells against cell death via terminating the 5-HT signaling which changes cell death ratio in trophoblast as well as proliferation rate in embryos. However, the cell death in SERT-KO placentas is in caspase 3-independent pathway. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Heart valve cardiomyocytes of mouse embryos express the serotonin transporter SERT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavone, Luigi Michele; Spina, Anna; Lo Muto, Roberta; Santoro, Dionea; Mastellone, Vincenzo; Avallone, Luigi

    2008-01-01

    Multiple evidence demonstrate a role for serotonin and its transporter SERT in heart valve development and disease. By utilizing a Cre/loxP system driven by SERT gene expression, we recently demonstrated a regionally restricted distribution of SERT-expressing cells in developing mouse heart. In order to characterize the cell types exhibiting SERT expression within the mouse heart valves at early developmental stages, in this study we performed immunohistochemistry for Islet1 (Isl1) and connexin-43 (Cx-43) on heart sections from SERT Cre/+ ;ROSA26R embryos previously stained with X-gal. We observed the co-localization of LacZ staining with Isl1 labelling in the outflow tract, the right ventricle and the conal region of E11.5 mouse heart. Cx-43 labelled cells co-localized with LacZ stained cells in the forming atrioventricular valves. These results demonstrate the cardiomyocyte phenotype of SERT-expressing cells in heart valves of the developing mouse heart, thus suggesting an active role of SERT in early heart valve development.

  13. Serotonin synthesis, release and reuptake in terminals: a mathematical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Best Janet

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that has been linked to a wide variety of behaviors including feeding and body-weight regulation, social hierarchies, aggression and suicidality, obsessive compulsive disorder, alcoholism, anxiety, and affective disorders. Full understanding of serotonergic systems in the central nervous system involves genomics, neurochemistry, electrophysiology, and behavior. Though associations have been found between functions at these different levels, in most cases the causal mechanisms are unknown. The scientific issues are daunting but important for human health because of the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and other pharmacological agents to treat disorders in the serotonergic signaling system. Methods We construct a mathematical model of serotonin synthesis, release, and reuptake in a single serotonergic neuron terminal. The model includes the effects of autoreceptors, the transport of tryptophan into the terminal, and the metabolism of serotonin, as well as the dependence of release on the firing rate. The model is based on real physiology determined experimentally and is compared to experimental data. Results We compare the variations in serotonin and dopamine synthesis due to meals and find that dopamine synthesis is insensitive to the availability of tyrosine but serotonin synthesis is sensitive to the availability of tryptophan. We conduct in silico experiments on the clearance of extracellular serotonin, normally and in the presence of fluoxetine, and compare to experimental data. We study the effects of various polymorphisms in the genes for the serotonin transporter and for tryptophan hydroxylase on synthesis, release, and reuptake. We find that, because of the homeostatic feedback mechanisms of the autoreceptors, the polymorphisms have smaller effects than one expects. We compute the expected steady concentrations of serotonin transporter knockout mice and compare to

  14. Epidermal growth factor upregulates serotonin transporter and its association with visceral hypersensitivity in irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiu-Fang; Zhou, Wei-Mei; Yang, Yan; Zhou, Jun; Li, Xue-Liang; Lin, Lin; Zhang, Hong-Jie

    2014-10-07

    To investigate the role of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in visceral hypersensitivity and its effect on the serotonin transporter (SERT). A rat model for visceral hypersensitivity was established by intra-colonic infusion of 0.5% acetic acid in 10-d-old Sprague-Dawley rats. The visceral sensitivity was assessed by observing the abdominal withdrawal reflex and recording electromyographic activity of the external oblique muscle in response to colorectal distension. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure the EGF levels in plasma and colonic tissues. SERT mRNA expression was detected by real-time PCR while protein level was determined by Western blot. The correlation between EGF and SERT levels in colon tissues was analyzed by Pearson's correlation analysis. SERT function was examined by tritiated serotonin (5-HT) uptake experiments. Rat intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) were used to examine the EGF regulatory effect on SERT expression and function via the EGF receptor (EGFR). EGF levels were significantly lower in the rats with visceral hypersensitivity as measured in plasma (2.639 ± 0.107 ng/mL vs 4.066 ± 0.573 ng/mL, P < 0.01) and in colonic tissue (3.244 ± 0.135 ng/100 mg vs 3.582 ± 0.197 ng/100 mg colon tissue, P < 0.01) compared with controls. Moreover, the EGF levels were positively correlated with SERT levels (r = 0.820, P < 0.01). EGF displayed dose- and time-dependent increased SERT gene expressions in IEC-6 cells. An EGFR kinase inhibitor inhibited the effect of EGF on SERT gene upregulation. SERT activity was enhanced following treatment with EGF (592.908 ± 31.515 fmol/min per milligram vs 316.789 ± 85.652 fmol/min per milligram protein, P < 0.05) and blocked by the EGFR kinase inhibitor in IEC-6 cells (590.274 ± 25.954 fmol/min per milligram vs 367.834 ± 120.307 fmol/min per milligram protein, P < 0.05). A decrease in EGF levels may contribute to the formation of visceral hypersensitivity through downregulation of SERT

  15. Serotonin transporter gene polymorphism may be associated with functional dyspepsia in a Japanese population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsumoto Takayuki

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although familial clustering of functional dyspepsia (FD has been reported, the role of genetics in the susceptibility to FD is still not well understood. In the present study, the association between serotonin transporter (SERT gene (SLC6A4 polymorphism and FD was explored. Methods Subjects were divided into either a postprandial distress syndrome (PDS group or an epigastric pain syndrome (EPS group according to the Rome III criteria. The healthy controls were those who had visited a hospital for an annual health check-up. The presence of the SLC6A4 promoter polymorphism, 5-hydroxytryptamin transporter gene linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR, was then evaluated, and logistic regression analysis was used to test all variables. Results The 5-HTTLPR genotype distribution was 448 SS, 174 SL, and 24 LL in controls and 30 SS, 20 SL, and 3 LL in FD subjects. No significant correlation was found between the 5-HTTLPR genotype and FD. When the genotypes and subtypes of FD were exploratory evaluated, the SL genotype was significantly associated with PDS [odds ratio (OR = 2.24, 95% confidence interval (CI; 1.16-4.32, P = 0.034 after Bonferroni correction] compared to the SS genotype adjusted for sex and age. Comparison of the SS genotype with the SL/LL genotype also showed a significant association of genotype with PDS (OR = 2.32, 95% CI; 1.23-4.37, P = 0.009. Conclusion The present results suggest that 5-HTTLPR L allele may influence the susceptibility to PDS.

  16. Functional Coding Variation in Recombinant Inbred Mouse Lines Reveals Novel Serotonin Transporter-Associated Phenotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carneiro, Ana [Vanderbilt University; Airey, David [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Thompson, Brent [Vanderbilt University; Zhu, C [Vanderbilt University; Rinchik, Eugene M [ORNL; Lu, Lu [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Chesler, Elissa J [ORNL; Erikson, Keith [University of North Carolina; Blakely, Randy [Vanderbilt University

    2009-01-01

    The human serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) transporter (hSERT, SLC6A4) figures prominently in the etiology or treatment of many prevalent neurobehavioral disorders including anxiety, alcoholism, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Here we utilize naturally occurring polymorphisms in recombinant inbred (RI) lines to identify novel phenotypes associated with altered SERT function. The widely used mouse strain C57BL/6J, harbors a SERT haplotype defined by two nonsynonymous coding variants (Gly39 and Lys152 (GK)). At these positions, many other mouse lines, including DBA/2J, encode Glu39 and Arg152 (ER haplotype), assignments found also in hSERT. Synaptosomal 5-HT transport studies revealed reduced uptake associated with the GK variant. Heterologous expression studies confirmed a reduced SERT turnover rate for the GK variant. Experimental and in silico approaches using RI lines (C57Bl/6J X DBA/2J=BXD) identifies multiple anatomical, biochemical and behavioral phenotypes specifically impacted by GK/ER variation. Among our findings are multiple traits associated with anxiety and alcohol consumption, as well as of the control of dopamine (DA) signaling. Further bioinformatic analysis of BXD phenotypes, combined with biochemical evaluation of SERT knockout mice, nominates SERT-dependent 5-HT signaling as a major determinant of midbrain iron homeostasis that, in turn, dictates ironregulated DA phenotypes. Our studies provide a novel example of the power of coordinated in vitro, in vivo and in silico approaches using murine RI lines to elucidate and quantify the system-level impact of gene variation.

  17. Cerebral serotonin transporter binding is inversely related to body mass index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erritzoe, D; Frokjaer, V G; Haahr, M T

    2010-01-01

    Overweight and obesity is a health threat of increasing concern and understanding the neurobiology behind obesity is instrumental to the development of effective treatment regimes. Serotonergic neurotransmission is critically involved in eating behaviour; cerebral level of serotonin (5-HT...

  18. Selective labeling of serotonin uptake sites in rat brain by [3H]citalopram contrasted to labeling of multiple sites by [3H]imipramine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Amato, R.J.; Largent, B.L.; Snowman, A.M.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    Citalopram is a potent and selective inhibitor of neuronal serotonin uptake. In rat brain membranes [ 3 H]citalopram demonstrates saturable and reversible binding with a KD of 0.8 nM and a maximal number of binding sites (Bmax) of 570 fmol/mg of protein. The drug specificity for [ 3 H]citalopram binding and synaptosomal serotonin uptake are closely correlated. Inhibition of [ 3 H]citalopram binding by both serotonin and imipramine is consistent with a competitive interaction in both equilibrium and kinetic analyses. The autoradiographic pattern of [ 3 H]citalopram binding sites closely resembles the distribution of serotonin. By contrast, detailed equilibrium-saturation analysis of [ 3 H]imipramine binding reveals two binding components, i.e., high affinity (KD = 9 nM, Bmax = 420 fmol/mg of protein) and low affinity (KD = 553 nM, Bmax = 8560 fmol/mg of protein) sites. Specific [ 3 H]imipramine binding, defined as the binding inhibited by 100 microM desipramine, is displaced only partially by serotonin. Various studies reveal that the serotonin-sensitive portion of binding corresponds to the high affinity sites of [ 3 H]imipramine binding whereas the serotonin-insensitive binding corresponds to the low affinity sites. Lesioning of serotonin neurons with p-chloroamphetamine causes a large decrease in [ 3 H]citalopram and serotonin-sensitive [ 3 H]imipramine binding with only a small effect on serotonin-insensitive [ 3 H]imipramine binding. The dissociation rate of [ 3 H]imipramine or [ 3 H]citalopram is not altered by citalopram, imipramine or serotonin up to concentrations of 10 microM. The regional distribution of serotonin sensitive [ 3 H]imipramine high affinity binding sites closely resembles that of [ 3 H]citalopram binding

  19. In Vivo Imaging of Cerebral Serotonin Transporter and Serotonin(2A) Receptor Binding in 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or "Ecstasy") and Hallucinogen Users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erritzoe, David; Frokjaer, Vibe G.; Holst, Klaus K.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Both hallucinogens and 3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine( MDMA or "ecstasy") have direct agonistic effects on postsynaptic serotonin(2A) receptors, the key site for hallucinogenic actions. In addition, MDMA is a potent releaser and reuptake inhibitor of presynaptic serotonin.Objective: ......Context: Both hallucinogens and 3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine( MDMA or "ecstasy") have direct agonistic effects on postsynaptic serotonin(2A) receptors, the key site for hallucinogenic actions. In addition, MDMA is a potent releaser and reuptake inhibitor of presynaptic serotonin...

  20. Altered interregional molecular associations of the serotonin transporter in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder assessed with PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanicek, Thomas; Kutzelnigg, Alexandra; Philippe, Cecile; Sigurdardottir, Helen L; James, Gregory M; Hahn, Andreas; Kranz, Georg S; Höflich, Anna; Kautzky, Alexander; Traub-Weidinger, Tatjana; Hacker, Marcus; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Mitterhauser, Markus; Kasper, Siegfried; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2017-02-01

    Altered serotonergic neurotransmission has been found to cause impulsive and aggressive behavior, as well as increased motor activity, all exemplifying key symptoms of ADHD. The main objectives of this positron emission tomography (PET) study were to investigate the serotonin transporter binding potential (SERT BP ND ) in patients with ADHD and to assess associations of SERT BP ND between the brain regions. 25 medication-free patients with ADHD (age ± SD; 32.39 ± 10.15; 10 females) without any psychiatric comorbidity and 25 age and sex matched healthy control subjects (33.74 ± 10.20) were measured once with PET and the highly selective and specific radioligand [ 11 C]DASB. SERT BP ND maps in nine a priori defined ROIs exhibiting high SERT binding were compared between groups by means of a linear mixed model. Finally, adopted from structural and functional connectivity analyses, we performed correlational analyses using regional SERT binding potentials to examine molecular interregional associations between all selected ROIs. We observed significant differences in the interregional correlations between the precuneus and the hippocampus in patients with ADHD compared to healthy controls, using SERT BP ND of the investigated ROIs (P < 0.05; Bonferroni corrected). When correlating SERT BP ND and age in the ADHD and the healthy control group, we confirmed an age-related decline in brain SERT binding in the thalamus and insula (R 2  = 0.284, R 2  = 0.167, Ps < 0.05; Bonferroni corrected). The results show significantly different interregional molecular associations of the SERT expression for the precuneus with hippocampus in patients with ADHD, indicating presumably altered functional coupling. Altered interregional coupling between brain regions might be a sensitive approach to demonstrate functional and molecular alterations in psychiatric conditions. Hum Brain Mapp 38:792-802, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley

  1. Testing bidirectional effects between cannabis use and depressive symptoms: moderation by the serotonin transporter gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, Roy; Engels, Rutger C M E

    2013-09-01

    Evidence for the assumption that cannabis use is associated with depression and depressive symptoms is inconsistent and mostly weak. It is likely that the mixed results are due to the fact that prior studies ignored the moderating effects of an individual's genetic vulnerability. The present study takes a first step in scrutinizing the relationship between cannabis use and depressive symptoms by taking a developmental molecular-genetic perspective. Specifically, we concentrated on changes in cannabis use and depressive symptoms over time in a simultaneous manner and differences herein for individuals with and without the short allele of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) transporter gene-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) genotype. Data were from 310 adolescents over a period of 4 years. We used a parallel-process growth model, which allows co-development of cannabis use and depressive symptoms throughout adolescence, and the possible role of the 5-HTTLPR genotype in this process. We used data from the younger siblings of these adolescents in an attempt to replicate potential findings. The parallel-process growth model shows that cannabis use increases the risk for an increase in depressive symptoms over time but only in the presence of the short allele of the 5-HTTLPR genotype. This effect remained significant after controlling for covariates. We did not find conclusive support for the idea that depressive symptoms affect cannabis use. These findings were replicated in the sample of the younger siblings. The findings of the present study show first evidence that the links between cannabis use and depressive symptoms are conditional on the individual's genetic makeup. © 2011 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2011 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  2. Physical Interactions and Functional Relationships of Neuroligin 2 and Midbrain Serotonin Transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran eYe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT modulates many key brain functions including those subserving sensation, emotion, reward and cognition. Efficient clearance of 5-HT after release is achieved by the antidepressant-sensitive 5-HT transporter (SERT, SLC6A4. To identify novel SERT regulators, we pursued a proteomic analysis of mouse midbrain SERT complexes, evaluating findings in the context of prior studies that established a SERT-linked transcriptome. Remarkably, both efforts converged on a relationship of SERT with the synaptic adhesion protein neuroligin 2 (NLGN2, a postsynaptic partner for presynaptic neurexins, and a protein well known to organize inhibitory GABAergic synapses. Western blots of midbrain reciprocal immunoprecipitations confirmed SERT/NLGN2 associations, and also extended to other NLGN2 associated proteins (e.g. -neurexin (NRXN, gephyrin. Midbrain SERT/NLGN2 interactions were found to be Ca2+-independent, supporting cis versus trans-synaptic interactions, and were absent in hippocampal preparations, consistent with interactions arising in somatodendritic compartments. Dual color in situ hybridization confirmed co-expression of Tph2 and Nlgn2 mRNA in the dorsal raphe, with immunocytochemical studies confirming SERT:NLGN2 co-localization in raphe cell bodies but not axons. Consistent with correlative mRNA expression studies, loss of NLGN2 expression in Nlgn2 null mice produced significant reductions in midbrain and hippocampal SERT expression and function. Additionally, dorsal raphe 5-HT neurons from Nlgn2 null mice exhibit reduced excitability, a loss of GABAA receptor-mediated IPSCs, and increased 5-HT1A autoreceptor sensitivity. Finally, Nlgn2 null mice display significant changes in behaviors known to be responsive to SERT and/or 5-HT receptor manipulations. We discuss our findings in relation to the possible coordination of intrinsic and extrinsic regulation afforded by somatodendritic SERT:NLGN2

  3. Epigenetic adaptation of the placental serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4 to gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Blazevic

    Full Text Available We tested the hypothesis that gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM alters the DNA methylation pattern of the fetal serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4, and examined the functional relevance of DNA methylation for regulation of the SLC6A4 expression in the human placenta. The study included 50 mother-infant pairs. Eighteen mothers were diagnosed with GDM and 32 had normal glucose tolerance (NGT. All neonates were of normal birth weight and born at term by planned Cesarean section. DNA and RNA were isolated from samples of tissue collected from the fetal side of the placenta immediately after delivery. DNA methylation was quantified at 7 CpG sites within the SLC6A4 distal promoter region using PCR amplification of bisulfite treated DNA and subsequent DNA sequencing. SLC6A4 mRNA levels were measured by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR. Functional SLC6A4 polymorphisms (5HTTLPR, STin2, rs25531 were genotyped using standard PCR-based procedures. Average DNA methylation across the 7 analyzed loci was decreased in the GDM as compared to the NGT group (by 27.1%, p = 0.037 and negatively correlated, before and after adjustment for potential confounder/s, with maternal plasma glucose levels at the 24th to 28th week of gestation (p0.05. The results suggest that DNA methylation of the fetal SLC6A4 gene is sensitive to the maternal metabolic state in pregnancy. They also indicate a predominant role of epigenetic over genetic mechanisms in the regulation of SLC6A4 expression in the human placenta. Longitudinal studies in larger cohorts are needed to verify these results and determine to which degree placental SLC6A4 changes may contribute to long-term outcomes of infants exposed to GDM.

  4. Gender differences in association between serotonin transporter gene polymorphism and resting-state EEG activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volf, N V; Belousova, L V; Knyazev, G G; Kulikov, A V

    2015-01-22

    Human brain oscillations represent important features of information processing and are highly heritable. Gender has been observed to affect association between the 5-HTTLPR (serotonin-transporter-linked polymorphic region) polymorphism and various endophenotypes. This study aimed to investigate the effects of 5-HTTLPR on the spontaneous electroencephalography (EEG) activity in healthy male and female subjects. DNA samples extracted from buccal swabs and resting EEG recorded at 60 standard leads were collected from 210 (101 men and 109 women) volunteers. Spectral EEG power estimates and cortical sources of EEG activity were investigated. It was shown that effects of 5-HTTLPR polymorphism on electrical activity of the brain vary as a function of gender. Women with the S/L genotype had greater global EEG power compared to men with the same genotype. In men, current source density was markedly different among genotype groups in only alpha 2 and alpha 3 frequency ranges: S/S allele carriers had higher current source density estimates in the left inferior parietal lobule in comparison with the L/L group. In women, genotype difference in global power asymmetry was found in the central-temporal region. Contrasting L/L and S/L genotype carriers also yielded significant effects in the right hemisphere inferior parietal lobule and the right postcentral gyrus with L/L genotype carriers showing lower current source density estimates than S/L genotype carriers in all but gamma bands. So, in women, the effects of 5-HTTLPR polymorphism were associated with modulation of the EEG activity in a wide range of EEG frequencies. The significance of the results lies in the demonstration of gene by sex interaction with resting EEG that has implications for understanding sex-related differences in affective states, emotion and cognition. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The serotonin transporter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) and personality: response style as a new endophenotype for anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plieger, Thomas; Montag, Christian; Felten, Andrea; Reuter, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Although the serotonin transporter length polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) polymorphism is an extensively-investigated genetic marker of anxiety related personality traits (neuroticism and harm avoidance) and affective disorders, effect sizes in meta-analyses are small, if present at all, and all available primary studies to date lack mandatory statistical power. Moreover, questionnaire data is prone to confounding by variables such as social desirability. Therefore, extreme response style (ERS) is suggested as a new approach to elucidate the relationship between 5-HTTLPR and negative emotionality, as it is more implicit and of high reliability. N = 1075 healthy subjects were genotyped for 5-HTTLPR and a flanking polymorphism (rs25531) and filled out the NEO Five Factor Inventory and the Temperament Character Inventory. As dependent variable the number of extreme responses across all items was calculated. Using the common genotype or the triallelic approach (including rs25531) the meta-analytic findings could not be replicated. However, there was a significant association between 5-HTTLPR and extreme response style. Carriers of the L-allele or the L'-allele, respectively, had a significantly higher number of extreme responses than homozygous SS carriers across all items of the NEO Five Factor Inventory. This finding could be replicated in an alternative personality questionnaire (Affective Neuroscience Personality Scales, ANPS). There is a long tradition in psychological assessment indicating that ERS is an implicit measure of personality. Given the positive findings of the present study, ERS qualifies as a promising endophenotype in future genetic association studies on personality and affective disorders.

  6. A nonlinear relationship between cerebral serotonin transporter and 5-HT(2A) receptor binding: an in vivo molecular imaging study in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erritzoe, David; Holst, Klaus; Frokjaer, Vibe G.

    2010-01-01

    Serotonergic neurotransmission is involved in the regulation of physiological functions such as mood, sleep, memory, and appetite. Within the serotonin transmitter system, both the postsynaptically located serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor and the presynaptic serotonin transporter (SERT) are sensitive...... tomography. Within each individual, a regional intercorrelation for the various brain regions was seen with both markers, most notably for 5-HT2A receptor binding. An inverted U-shaped relationship between the 5-HT2A receptor and the SERT binding was identified. The observed regional intercorrelation...

  7. Synthesis of 14C- and 3H-labeled fluoxetine, a selective serotonin uptake inhibitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, D.W.; Krushinski, J.H.; Wong, D.T.; Kau, D.

    1987-01-01

    Fluoxetine (N-methyl-γ-(4-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy) benzenepropanamine) is a potent, highly selective serotonin uptake inhibitor that is useful in treating a variety of major psychiatric derangements. We have synthesized this compound in 14 C- and 3 H-labeled forms. The tritium label was introduced in the final step by catalytic dehalogenation of the brominated fluoxetine precursor. Reaction conditions could be controlled such that catalytic hydrogenolysis of the labile C-O benzylic bond was minimized. Following HPLC purification, [ 3 H]-fluoxetine was obtained in a state of high radiochemical purity (98%) and specific activity (20.4 Ci/mmol). The 14 C-label was introduced in the final step via a nucleophilic aromatic substitution reaction between the sodium salt of α-(2-(methylamino)ethyl)benzenemethanol and uniformly ring-labeled p-chlorobenzotrifluoride. Following purification by flash chromatography, [ 14 C]-fluoxetine was obtained in 98.3% radiochemical purity with a specific activity of 5.52 mCi/mmol. (author)

  8. Does selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine affects mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Rey, Maria; Bebianno, Maria João

    2013-01-01

    Fluoxetine (FLX) the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) in Prozac ® is a widely prescribed psychoactive drug which ubiquitous occurrence in the aquatic environment is associated to a poor removal rate in waste-water treatment plant (WWTP) systems. This API acts as a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) frequently reported to cause disrupting effects in non-target species. The objective of this study includes a multibiomarker response evaluation on mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis during two weeks exposure to 75 ng L −1 FLX assessing antioxidant enzymes activities – superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST); lipid peroxidation (LPO), acetylcholinesterase (AChE) neurotoxic response and endocrine disruption through alkali-labile phosphates (ALP) indirect measurement of vitellogenin-like proteins. Results show transient tissue-specific enzymatic responses and damage affecting mostly mussel gills. However, the clear ALP levels inhibition throughout time in both sex-differentiated gonads gives evidence to FLX reinforced action as an endocrine disruptor rather than an oxidative or neurotoxic inducer. - Highlights: ► Short-time exposure of Mytilus galloprovincialis to antidepressant fluoxetine. ► Tissue-specific transient antioxidant enzymes activities alteration. ► Lipid peroxidation (LPO) induction in exposed-tissues. ► Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity upregulation in exposed gills. ► ALP levels downregulation in exposed sex-differentiated mussels. - Exposure to 75 ng L −1 antidepressant fluoxetine (FLX) induces tissue-specific multibiomarker responses alteration in mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

  9. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in Human Pregnancy: To Treat or Not to Treat?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orna Diav-Citrin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs are increasingly prescribed during pregnancy. The purpose of the present paper is to summarize and evaluate the current evidence for the risk/benefit analysis of SSRI use in human pregnancy. The literature has been inconsistent. Although most studies have not shown an increase in the overall risk of major malformations, several studies have suggested that SSRIs may be associated with a small increased risk for cardiovascular malformations. Others have noted associations between SSRIs and specific types of rare major malformations. In some studies, there appears to be a small increased risk for miscarriages, which may be associated with the underlying maternal condition. Neonatal effects have been described in up to 30% of neonates exposed to SSRIs late in pregnancy. Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn has also been described with an absolute risk of <1%. The risk associated with treatment discontinuation, for example, higher frequency of relapse and increased risk of preterm delivery, should also be considered. The overall benefit of treatment seems to outweigh the potential risks.

  10. Social inequalities in suicide: the role of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouston, Sean A P; Rubin, Marcie S; Colen, Cynthia G; Link, Bruce G

    2014-10-01

    We aimed to examine the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and suicide associated with the introduction and diffusion of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Negative binomial regression was used to estimate county-level suicide rates among persons aged 25 years or older using death certificate data collated by the National Center for Health Statistics from 1968 to 2009; SES was measured using the decennial US Census. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey were used to measure SSRI use. Once SSRIs became available in 1988, a 1% increase in SSRI usage was associated with a 0.5% lower suicide rate. Prior to the introduction of SSRIs, SES was not related to suicide. However, with each 1% increase in SSRI use, a 1-standard deviation (SD) higher SES was associated with a 0.6% lower suicide rate. In 2009, persons living in counties with SES 1 SD above the national average were 13.6% less likely to commit suicide than those living in counties with SES 1 SD below the national average--a difference of 1.9/100,000 adults aged ≥25 years. Higher SSRI use was associated with lower suicide rates among US residents aged ≥25 years; however, SES inequalities modified the association between SSRI use and suicide. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Plasma cytokine profiles in depressed patients who fail to respond to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, Sinead M

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: Approximately 30% of patients with depression fail to respond to a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). Few studies have attempted to define these patients from a biological perspective. Studies suggest that overall patients with depression show increased production of proinflammatory cytokines. We examined pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels in patients who were SSRI resistant. METHODS: Plasma concentrations of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, TNF-alpha and sIL-6R were measured with enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) in DSM-1V major depressives who were SSRI resistant, in formerly SSRI resistant patients currently euthymic and in healthy controls. RESULTS: Patients with SSRI-resistant depression had significantly higher production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 (p=0.01) and TNF-alpha (p=0.004) compared to normal controls. Euthymic patients who were formerly SSRI resistant had proinflammatory cytokine levels which were similar to the healthy subject group. Anti-inflammatory cytokine levels did not differ across the 3 groups. CONCLUSION: Suppression of proinflammatory cytokines does not occur in depressed patients who fail to respond to SSRIs and is necessary for clinical recovery.

  12. The effects of maternal depression and maternal selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor exposure on the offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelien DA Olivier

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available It has been estimated that 20% of pregnant women suffer from depression and it is well documented that maternal depression can have long-lasting effects on the child. Currently, common treatment for maternal depression has been the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor medications (SSRIs which are used by 2-3% of pregnant women in the Nordic countries and by up to 10% of pregnant women in the United States. Antidepressants cross the placenta and are transferred to the fetus, thus, the question arises as to whether children of women taking antidepressants are at risk for altered neurodevelopmental outcomes and, if so, whether the risks are due to SSRI medication exposure or to the underlying maternal depression. This review considers the effects of maternal depression and SSRI exposure on offspring development in both clinical and preclinical populations. As it is impossible in humans to study the effects of SSRIs without taking into account the possible underlying effects of maternal depression (healthy pregnant women do not take SSRIs, animal models are of great value. For example, rodents can be used to determine the effects of maternal depression and/or perinatal SSRI exposure on offspring outcomes. Unraveling the joint (or separate effects of maternal depression and SSRI exposure will provide more insights into the risks or benefits of SSRI exposure during gestation and will help women make informed decisions about using SSRIs during pregnancy.

  13. Impact of prestroke selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment on stroke severity and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Janne Kaergaard; Larsson, Heidi; Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Andersen, Grethe

    2014-07-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have been associated with an increased risk of bleeding but also a possible neuroprotective effect in stroke. We aimed to examine the implications of prestroke SSRI use in hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke. We conducted a registry-based propensity score-matched follow-up study among first-ever patients with hemorrhage and ischemic stroke in Denmark (2003-2012). Multiple conditional logistic regression was used to compute adjusted odds ratios of severe stroke and death within 30 days. Among 1252 hemorrhagic strokes (626 prestroke SSRI users and 626 propensity score-matched nonusers), prestroke SSRI use was associated with an increased risk of the strokes being severe (adjusted propensity score-matched odds ratios, 1.41; confidence interval, 1.08-1.84) and an increased risk of death within 30 days (adjusted propensity score-matched odds ratios, 1.60; confidence interval, 1.17-2.18). Among 8956 patients with ischemic stroke (4478 prestroke SSRI users and 4478 propensity score-matched nonusers), prestroke SSRI use was not associated with the risk of severe stroke or death within 30 days. Prestroke SSRI use is associated with increased stroke severity and mortality in patients with hemorrhagic stroke. Although prestroke depression in itself may increase stroke severity and mortality, this was not found in SSRI users with ischemic stroke. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Altered Circulating Levels of Serotonin and Immunological Changes in Laying Hens Divergently Selected for Feather Pecking Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buitenhuis, Albert Johannes; Kjaer, Jørgen B.; Labouriau, Rodrigo

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in immunological parameters as well as changes with respect to plasma levels of serotonin and tryptophan in lines selected for and against feather pecking (FP) behavior [high FP (HP) line and low FP (LP) line] for 5 generations. The hens from...... response to infectious bursal disease virus vaccination after 1 wk post-vaccination compared with the control and LP lines. The number of white blood cells (P

  15. Comparative efficacy and safety of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors in older adults: a network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorlund, Kristian; Druyts, Eric; Wu, Ping; Balijepalli, Chakrapani; Keohane, Denis; Mills, Edward

    2015-05-01

    To establish the comparative efficacy and safety of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors in older adults using the network meta-analysis approach. Systematic review and network meta-analysis. Individuals aged 60 and older. Data on partial response (defined as at least 50% reduction in depression score from baseline) and safety (dizziness, vertigo, syncope, falls, loss of consciousness) were extracted. A Bayesian network meta-analysis was performed on the efficacy and safety outcomes, and relative risks (RRs) with 95% credible intervals (CrIs) were produced. Fifteen randomized controlled trials were eligible for inclusion in the analysis. Citalopram, escitalopram, paroxetine, duloxetine, venlafaxine, fluoxetine, and sertraline were represented. Reporting on partial response and dizziness was sufficient to conduct a network meta-analysis. Reporting on other outcomes was sparse. For partial response, sertraline (RR=1.28), paroxetine (RR=1.48), and duloxetine (RR=1.62) were significantly better than placebo. The remaining interventions yielded RRs lower than 1.20. For dizziness, duloxetine (RR=3.18) and venlafaxine (RR=2.94) were statistically significantly worse than placebo. Compared with placebo, sertraline had the lowest RR for dizziness (1.14) and fluoxetine the second lowest (1.31). Citalopram, escitalopram, and paroxetine all had RRs between 1.4 and 1.7. There was clear evidence of the effectiveness of sertraline, paroxetine, and duloxetine. There also appears to be a hierarchy of safety associated with the different antidepressants, although there appears to be a dearth of reporting of safety outcomes. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  16. Serotonin transporter density in binge eating disorder and pathological gambling: A PET study with [11C]MADAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majuri, Joonas; Joutsa, Juho; Johansson, Jarkko; Voon, Valerie; Parkkola, Riitta; Alho, Hannu; Arponen, Eveliina; Kaasinen, Valtteri

    2017-12-01

    Behavioral addictions, such as pathological gambling (PG) and binge eating disorder (BED), appear to be associated with specific changes in brain dopamine and opioid function, but the role of other neurotransmitter systems is less clear. Given the crucial role of serotonin in a number of psychiatric disorders, we aimed to compare brain serotonergic function among individuals with BED, PG and healthy controls. Seven BED patients, 13 PG patients and 16 healthy controls were scanned with high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) using the serotonin transporter (SERT) tracer [ 11 C]MADAM. Both region-of-interest and voxel-wise whole brain analyses were performed. Patients with BED showed increased SERT binding in the parieto-occipital cortical regions compared to both PG and healthy controls, with parallel decreases in binding in the nucleus accumbens, inferior temporal gyrus and lateral orbitofrontal cortex. No differences between PG patients and controls were observed. None of the subjects were on SSRI medications at the time of imaging, and there were no differences in the level of depression between PG and BED patients. The results highlight differences in brain SERT binding between individuals with BED and PG and provide further evidence of different neurobiological underpinnings in behavioral addictions that are unrelated to the co-existing mood disorder. The results aid in the conceptualization of behavioral addictions by characterizing the underlying serotonin changes and provide a framework for additional studies to examine syndrome-specific pharmaceutical treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  17. Differences in the dynamics of serotonin reuptake transporter occupancy may explain superior clinical efficacy of escitalopram versus citalopram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Siegfried; Sacher, Julia; Klein, Nikolas; Mossaheb, Nilufar; Attarbaschi-Steiner, Trawat; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Spindelegger, Christoph; Asenbaum, Susanne; Holik, Alexander; Dudczak, Robert

    2009-05-01

    Escitalopram the S-enantiomer of the racemate citalopram, is clinically more effective than citalopram in the treatment of major depressive disorder. However, the precise mechanism by which escitalopram achieves superiority over citalopram is yet to be determined. It has been hypothesized that the therapeutically inactive R-enantiomer competes with the serotonin-enhancing S-enantiomer at a low-affinity allosteric site on serotonin reuptake transporters (SERTs), and reduces the effectiveness of the S-enantiomer at the primary, high-affinity serotonin-binding site. This study summarizes the results of two recent single-photon emission computerized tomography studies measuring SERT occupancy in citalopram-treated and escitalopram-treated healthy volunteers, after a single dose and multiple doses (i.e. under steady-state conditions). The single-dose study showed no attenuating effect of R-citalopram. After multiple dosing, however, SERT occupancy was significantly reduced in the presence of R-citalopram. Under steady-state conditions, R-enantiomer concentrations were greater than for the S-enantiomer because of slower clearance of R-citalopram. A pooled analysis suggests that build-up of the R-enantiomer after repeated citalopram dosing may lead to increased inhibition of S-enantiomer occupancy of SERT. This review adds to the growing body of evidence regarding differences in the dynamics of SERT occupancy, that is, molecular mechanisms underlying the often-observed superior clinical efficacy of escitalopram compared with citalopram in major depressive disorder.

  18. In vivo evaluation of [123I]mZIENT as a SPECT radioligand for the serotonin transporter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batis, Jeffery; Barret, Olivier; Alagille, David; Koren, Andrei O.; Stehouwer, Jeffrey S.; Cosgrove, Kelly; Goodman, Mark; Seibyl, John; Tamagnan, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: In vivo imaging of the serotonin transporter continues to be a valuable tool in drug development and in monitoring diseases that alter serotonergic function. The purposes of this study were to: 1) evaluate the test/retest reproducibility of [ 123 I] 2β-Carbomethoxy-3β-(3′-((Z)-2-iodoethenyl)phenyl)nortropane ([ 123 I]mZIENT); and 2) to assess displacement of [ 123 I]mZIENT following administration of SERT specific drugs. Methods: Six female baboons (Papio anubis) were scanned following i.v. administration of [ 123 I]mZIENT. The regional binding potential (BP nd ) was determined using a simplified reference tissue model, with the cerebellum used as a reference region. The test/retest reproducibility of BP nd was determined following repeated injection of [ 123 I]mZIENT on a different day. To assess the displacement of [ 123 I]mZIENT from SERT, citalopram (0.01–5 mg/kg) or sertraline (0.01–0.5 mg/kg) was given as iv bolus at ∼ 4 h following administration of [ 123 I]mZIENT. Results: The test/retest variability of BP nd was less than 10% for all SERT-rich brain regions. Estimates of ED50 for displacement of [ 123 I]mZIENT in SERT-rich regions were consistent with previous reports for the [ 11 C] analog of [ 123 I]mZIENT. Both citalopram and sertraline displaced [ 123 I]mZIENT from SERT in a dose-dependent manner, with maximal observed displacements of greater than 80% in the diencephalon and greater than 75% in brainstem for both citalopram and sertraline. Conclusions: [ 123 I] mZIENT demonstrates good test–retest reproducibility; and initial displacement studies suggest that this compound is highly selective for SERT. Overall, this radioligand has favorable characteristics for use in drug development studies and/or longitudinal studies interrogating SERT.

  19. Serotonin transporter bi- and triallelic genotypes and their relationship with anxiety and academic performance: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calapoğlu, Mustafa; Sahin-Calapoğlu, Nilufer; Karaçöp, Ataman; Soyöz, Mustafa; Elyıldırım, Umit Y; Avşaroğlu, Selahattin

    2011-01-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that variation of the serotonin-transporter-linked promoter region (5- HTTLPR) is associated with anxiety-related traits. Academic outcomes are also more closely related to trait anxiety. This preliminary study aimed to explore the association between academic performance and levels of anxiety with respect to the bi- and triallelic classification of 5-HTTLPR polymorphism of the 5-HTT gene in teacher candidates. In our study, Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Selection Examination for Professional Posts in Public Organizations (KPSS) and 5-HTTLPR genotypes were used to investigate a group of 94 healthy teacher candidates. Higher anxiety scores were significantly associated with the S'S' genotype. There was no direct, statistically significant association between academic performance and genotypic groups regarding bi- and triallelic classification. However, the students who have L'L' or LL genotypes had the lowest levels of trait anxiety and the poorest academic performance. Additionally, there was a significant positive correlation between academic performance and anxiety levels. These findings support the idea that S and L(G) alleles are associated with anxiety-related traits, and that the S'S' genotype may be a good indicator for anxiety-related traits in a sample from the Turkish population. A specific degree of anxiety is considered to be a motivation for learning and high academic performance. However, 5-HTTLPR polymorphism of the 5-HTT gene may be one of the genetic factors affecting academic performance in connection with anxiety levels. Implications for incorporating anxiety management training in the educational process in terms of both environmental and individual factors will have a very important role in improving effective strategies for student personality services, as well as for development and planning. © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and venlafaxine in pregnancy: Changes in drug disposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Austgulen Westin

    Full Text Available Pregnancy may cause changes in drug disposition. The clinical consequences may be profound and even counterintuitive; in some cases pregnant women may need more than twice their usual drug dose in order to maintain therapeutic drug levels. For antidepressants, evidence on drug disposition in pregnancy is scarce. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of pregnancy on serum levels of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs and venlafaxine in a large and naturalistic patient material, in order to provide tentative dose recommendations for pregnant women.Using patient data from two routine therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM services in Norway with linkage to the national birth registry, dose-adjusted serum drug concentrations of SSRIs and venlafaxine during pregnancy were compared to the women's own baseline (non-pregnant values, using a linear mixed model.Overall, the TDM databases contained 196,726 serum concentration measurements from 54,393 women. After data linkage and drug selection (SSRIs or venlafaxine only, we identified 367 analyses obtained from a total of 290 pregnancies in 281 women, and 420 baseline observations from the same women. Serum concentrations in the third trimester were significantly lower than baseline for paroxetine (-51%; 95% confidence interval [CI], -66%, -30%; p<0.001, fluvoxamine (-56%; CI, -75%, -23%; p = 0.004 and citalopram (-24%; CI, -38%, -7%; p = 0,007, and higher than baseline for sertraline (+68%; CI, +37%, +106%; p<0.001. For escitalopram, fluoxetine and venlafaxine concentrations did not change significantly.For paroxetine and fluvoxamine the pronounced decline in maternal drug serum concentrations in pregnancy may necessitate a dose increase of about 100% during the third trimester in order to maintain stable concentrations. For fluoxetine, venlafaxine, citalopram, escitalopram and sertraline, the present study indicates that dose adjustments are generally not necessary during pregnancy.

  1. 5-Chloro-2-(2'-((dimethylamino)methyl)-4'-iodophenylthio)benzenamine: a new serotonin transporter ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oya, Shunichi; Choi, Seok-Rye; Kung, Mei-Ping; Kung, Hank F.

    2007-01-01

    Two novel ligands with 4' substitution on the Phenyl Ring B of biphenylthiol, 5-chloro-2-(2'-((dimethylamino)methyl)-4'-iodophenylthio)benzenamine (7) and 2-(2'-((dimethylamino)methyl)-4'-methoxyphenylthio)-5-iodobenzenamine (8), were prepared and tested as potential serotonin transporter (SERT) imaging agents. The new ligands displayed extremely high binding affinities to SERT (K i =0.22±0.09 and 0.11±0.04 nM, respectively), with very low binding affinities to dopamine and norepinephrine transporters (K i >1000 nM). The corresponding [ 125 I]7 and [ 125 I]8 were successfully prepared from tri-n-butyltin derivatives. They showed good brain uptakes and prolonged retention after intravenous injection in rats (brain uptake was 1.77% and 0.98% dose/g for [ 125 I]7, and 0.92% and 0.29% dose/g for [ 125 I]8, at 2 and 120 min, respectively). Significantly, [ 125 I]7 showed excellent uptake and prolonged retention in the hypothalamus, where SERT concentration was highest. The hypothalamus/cerebellum (HY/CB) ratios (target/background ratios) were 4.24, 7.10, 8.24 and 12.6 at 2, 4, 6 and 12 h, respectively. The HY/CB ratios for [ 125 I]8 were 3.97, 5.57 and 5.06 at 1, 2 and 4 h, respectively. Adding the 4'-iodo group to the Phenyl Ring B of Compound (7) appeared to reduce the rate of clearance from the brain, and kinetics favored uptake and retention in the hypothalamus. The localization of [ 125 I]7 in the hypothalamus region in the rat brain could be blocked by pretreatment with (+)McN5652, escitalopram and ADAM (2), which are all selective SERT ligands (at 2 mg/kg iv, 5 min pretreatment). Ex vivo autoradiograms of rat brain sections (at 4 h after intravenous injection of [ 125 I]7) showed intense labeling in regions of the brain known to have high SERT density. The excellent selective uptake and retention in the hypothalamus region suggest that [ 123 I]7 is a potential lead compound for developing new imaging agents targeting SERT-binding sites with single

  2. 5-Chloro-2-(2'-((dimethylamino)methyl)-4'-iodophenylthio)benzenamine: a new serotonin transporter ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oya, Shunichi [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Choi, Seok-Rye [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kung, Mei-Ping [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kung, Hank F. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2007-02-15

    Two novel ligands with 4' substitution on the Phenyl Ring B of biphenylthiol, 5-chloro-2-(2'-((dimethylamino)methyl)-4'-iodophenylthio)benzenamine (7) and 2-(2'-((dimethylamino)methyl)-4'-methoxyphenylthio)-5-iodobenzenamine (8), were prepared and tested as potential serotonin transporter (SERT) imaging agents. The new ligands displayed extremely high binding affinities to SERT (K {sub i}=0.22{+-}0.09 and 0.11{+-}0.04 nM, respectively), with very low binding affinities to dopamine and norepinephrine transporters (K {sub i}>1000 nM). The corresponding [{sup 125}I]7 and [{sup 125}I]8 were successfully prepared from tri-n-butyltin derivatives. They showed good brain uptakes and prolonged retention after intravenous injection in rats (brain uptake was 1.77% and 0.98% dose/g for [{sup 125}I]7, and 0.92% and 0.29% dose/g for [{sup 125}I]8, at 2 and 120 min, respectively). Significantly, [{sup 125}I]7 showed excellent uptake and prolonged retention in the hypothalamus, where SERT concentration was highest. The hypothalamus/cerebellum (HY/CB) ratios (target/background ratios) were 4.24, 7.10, 8.24 and 12.6 at 2, 4, 6 and 12 h, respectively. The HY/CB ratios for [{sup 125}I]8 were 3.97, 5.57 and 5.06 at 1, 2 and 4 h, respectively. Adding the 4'-iodo group to the Phenyl Ring B of Compound (7) appeared to reduce the rate of clearance from the brain, and kinetics favored uptake and retention in the hypothalamus. The localization of [{sup 125}I]7 in the hypothalamus region in the rat brain could be blocked by pretreatment with (+)McN5652, escitalopram and ADAM (2), which are all selective SERT ligands (at 2 mg/kg iv, 5 min pretreatment). Ex vivo autoradiograms of rat brain sections (at 4 h after intravenous injection of [{sup 125}I]7) showed intense labeling in regions of the brain known to have high SERT density. The excellent selective uptake and retention in the hypothalamus region suggest that [{sup 123}I]7 is a potential lead compound for

  3. cGMP-dependent protein kinase Iα associates with the antidepressant-sensitive serotonin transporter and dictates rapid modulation of serotonin uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steiner Jennifer A

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Na+/Cl--dependent serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT transporter (SERT is a critical element in neuronal 5-HT signaling, being responsible for the efficient elimination of 5-HT after release. SERTs are not only targets for exogenous addictive and therapeutic agents but also can be modulated by endogenous, receptor-linked signaling pathways. We have shown that neuronal A3 adenosine receptor activation leads to enhanced presynaptic 5-HT transport in vitro and an increased rate of SERT-mediated 5-HT clearance in vivo. SERT stimulation by A3 adenosine receptors derives from an elevation of cGMP and subsequent activation of both cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. PKG activators such as 8-Br-cGMP are known to lead to transporter phosphorylation, though how this modification supports SERT regulation is unclear. Results In this report, we explore the kinase isoform specificity underlying the rapid stimulation of SERT activity by PKG activators. Using immortalized, rat serotonergic raphe neurons (RN46A previously shown to support 8-Br-cGMP stimulation of SERT surface trafficking, we document expression of PKGI, and to a lower extent, PKGII. Quantitative analysis of staining profiles using permeabilized or nonpermeabilized conditions reveals that SERT colocalizes with PKGI in both intracellular and cell surface domains of RN46A cell bodies, and exhibits a more restricted, intracellular pattern of colocalization in neuritic processes. In the same cells, SERT demonstrates a lack of colocalization with PKGII in either intracellular or surface membranes. In keeping with the ability of the membrane permeant kinase inhibitor DT-2 to block 8-Br-cGMP stimulation of SERT, we found that DT-2 treatment eliminated cGMP-dependent kinase activity in PKGI-immunoreactive extracts resolved by liquid chromatography. Similarly, treatment of SERT-transfected HeLa cells with small interfering RNAs targeting

  4. Selective decrease in central nervous system serotonin turnover in children with dopa-nonresponsive dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assmann, Birgit; Köhler, Martin; Hoffmann, Georg F; Heales, Simon; Surtees, Robert

    2002-07-01

    Childhood dystonia that does not respond to treatment with levodopa (dopa-nonresponsive dystonia, DND) has an unclear pathogenesis and is notoriously difficult to treat. To test the hypothesis that there may be abnormalities in serotonin turnover in DND we measured cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of homovanillic (HVA) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic (HIAA) acids, metabolites of dopamine and serotonin, respectively, in 18 children with dystonia not responsive to levodopa. These were combined with a reference population of 85 children with neurologic or metabolic disease known not to affect dopamine or serotonin metabolism. Because of the known natural age-related decrement in HVA and HIAA concentrations, the results were analyzed using multiple regression using age and DND as predictors of CSF HIAA and HVA concentrations. DND was a highly significant predictor of CSF HIAA concentration (p model, the geometric mean ratio of CSF HIAA in DND compared with the reference range was 0.53 whereas that for CSF HVA was 0.95. We also analyzed CSF HIAA/HVA ratios. After fitting a regression model, we found no dependence on age, and the mean of CSF HIAA/HVA in DND was 0.28 whereas that for the reference range was 0.49 (p < 0.001). We conclude that a significant number of children with DND have reduced CNS serotonin turnover. Treatment with drugs that increase serotonin concentration in the synaptic cleft should be considered in this group of patients.

  5. A rhodamine-labeled citalopram analogue as a high-affinity fluorescent probe for the serotonin transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Peng; Jørgensen, Trine Nygaard; Løland, Claus Juul

    2013-01-01

    A novel fluorescent ligand was synthesized as a high-affinity, high specificity probe for visualizing the serotonin transporter (SERT). The rhodamine fluorophore was extended from an aniline substitution on the 5-position of the dihydroisobenzofuran ring of citalopram (2, 1-(3-(dimethylamino......)propyl)-1-(4-fluorophenyl)-1,3-dihydroisobenzofuran-5-carbonitrile), using an ethylamino linker. The resulting rhodamine-labeled ligand 8 inhibited [3H]5-HT uptake in COS-7 cells (Ki = 225 nM) with similar potency to the tropane-based JHC 1-064 (1), but with higher specificity towards the SERT relative...

  6. Allosteric Binding in the Serotonin Transporter - Pharmacology, Structure, Function and Potential Use as a Novel Drug Target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loland, Claus J.; Sanchez, Connie; Plenge, Per

    2017-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) is an important drug target and the majority of currently used antidepressants are potent inhibitors of SERT, binding primarily to the substrate binding site. However, even though the existence of an allosteric modulator site was realized more than 30 years ago......, the research into this mechanism is still in its early days. The current knowledge about the allosteric site with respect to pharmacology, structure and function, and pharmacological tool compounds, is reviewed and a perspective is given on its potential as a drug target....

  7. Are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors safe for drivers? What is the evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravera, Silvia; Ramaekers, Johannes G; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje T W; de Gier, Johan J

    2012-05-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely used medications to treat several psychiatric diseases and, above all, depression. They seem to be as effective as older antidepressants but have a different adverse effect profile. Despite their favorable safety profile, little is known about their influence on traffic safety. To conduct a literature review to summarize the current evidence on the role of SSRIs in traffic safety, particularly concerning undesirable effects that could potentially impair fitness to drive, experimental and pharmacoepidemiologic studies on driving impairment, 2 existing categorization systems for driving-impairing medications, and the European legislative procedures for assessing fitness to drive before issuing a driver's license and driving under the influence of medicines. The article search was performed in the following electronic databases: MEDLINE, PsycINFO, ScienceDirect, and SafetyLit. The English-language scientific literature was searched using key words such as SSRIs and psychomotor performance, car crash or traffic accident, and adverse effects. For inclusion in this review, papers had to be full-text articles, refer to possible driving-related adverse effects, and be experimental or pharmacoepidemiologic studies on SSRIs and traffic accident risks. No restrictions concerning publication year were applied. Ten articles were selected as background information on driving-related adverse effects, and 15 articles were selected regarding experimental and pharmacoepidemiologic work. Regarding SSRI adverse effects, the most reported undesirable effects referring to driving impairment were anxiety, agitation, sleep disturbances, headache, increased risk of suicidal behavior, and deliberate self-harm. Regarding the remaining issues addressed in this article, inconsistencies were found between the outcomes of the selected experimental and epidemiologic studies and between the 2 existing categorization systems under

  8. SPECT imaging of dopamine and serotonin transporters with [[sup 123]I][beta]-CIT. Binding kinetics in the human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruecke, T; Asenbaum, S; Frassine, H; Podreka, I [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Neurologische Klinik; Kornhuber, J [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany); Angelberger, P [Oesterreichisches Forschungszentrum Seibersdorf GmbH (Austria)

    1993-01-01

    Single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) studies in non-human primates have previously shown that the cocaine derivative [[sup 123]I]-2-[beta]-carbomethoxy-3-[beta]-(4-iodophenyl)-tropane ([[sup 123]I][beta]-CIT) labels dopamine transporters in the striatum and serotonin transporters in the hypothalamus-midbrain area. Here, we report on the regional kinetic uptake of [[sup 123]I][beta]-CIT in the brain of 4 normal volunteers and 2 patients with Parkinson's disease. In healthy subjects striatal activity increased slowly to reach peak values at about 20 hours post injection. In the hypothalamus-midbrain area peak activities were observed at about 4 hours with a slow decrease thereafter. Low activity was observed in cortical and cerebellar areas. The striatal to cerebellar ratio was about 4 after 5 hours and 9 after 20 hours. In 2 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease striatal activity was markedly decreased while the activity in hypothalamus-midbrain areas was only diminished. Uptake into cortical and cerebellar areas appeared to be unchanged in Parkinson's disease. Consequently, in Parkinson's disease the striatal to cerebellar ratio was decreased to values around 2.5 after 20 hours. These preliminary methodological studies suggest that [[sup 123]I][beta]-CIT is a useful SPECT ligand for studying dopamine and possibly also serotonin transporters in the living human brain.

  9. Dual-isotope single-photon emission computed tomography for dopamine and serotonin transporters in normal and parkinsonian monkey brains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, I-H.; Huang, W.-S.; Yeh, C.-B.; Liao, M.-H.; Chen, C.-C.; Shen, L.-H.; Liu, J.-C.; Ma, K.-H.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Parkinson's disease (PD) affects both dopaminergic and serotonergic systems. In this study, we simultaneously evaluated dopamine and serotonin transporters in primates using dual-isotope single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging and compared the results with traditional single-isotope imaging. Methods: Four healthy and one 6-OHDA-induced PD monkeys were used for this study. SPECT was performed over 4 h after individual or simultaneous injection of [ 99m Tc]TRODAT-1 (a dopamine transporter imaging agent) and [ 123 I]ADAM (a serotonin transporter imaging agent). Results: The results showed that the image quality and uptake ratios in different brain regions were comparable between single- and dual-isotope studies. The striatal [ 99m Tc]TRODAT-1 uptake in the PD monkey was markedly lower than that in normal monkeys. The uptake of [ 123 I]ADAM in the midbrain of the PD monkey was comparable to that in the normal monkeys, but there were decreased uptakes in the thalamus and striatum of the PD monkey. Conclusions: Our results suggest that dual-isotope SPECT using [ 99m Tc]TRODAT-1 and [ 123 I]ADAM can simultaneously evaluate changes in dopaminergic and serotonergic systems in a PD model.

  10. Dual-isotope single-photon emission computed tomography for dopamine and serotonin transporters in normal and parkinsonian monkey brains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, I-H. [Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 114, Taiwan (China); Huang, W.-S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, 114, Taiwan (China); Yeh, C.-B. [Department of Psychiatry, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, 114, Taiwan (China); Liao, M.-H.; Chen, C.-C.; Shen, L.-H. [Division of Isotope Application, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taoyaun, 325 Taiwan (China); Liu, J.-C. [Department of Biology and Anatomy, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 114, Taiwan (China); Ma, K.-H. [Department of Biology and Anatomy, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 114, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: kuohsing91@yahoo.com.tw

    2009-08-15

    Introduction: Parkinson's disease (PD) affects both dopaminergic and serotonergic systems. In this study, we simultaneously evaluated dopamine and serotonin transporters in primates using dual-isotope single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging and compared the results with traditional single-isotope imaging. Methods: Four healthy and one 6-OHDA-induced PD monkeys were used for this study. SPECT was performed over 4 h after individual or simultaneous injection of [{sup 99m}Tc]TRODAT-1 (a dopamine transporter imaging agent) and [{sup 123}I]ADAM (a serotonin transporter imaging agent). Results: The results showed that the image quality and uptake ratios in different brain regions were comparable between single- and dual-isotope studies. The striatal [{sup 99m}Tc]TRODAT-1 uptake in the PD monkey was markedly lower than that in normal monkeys. The uptake of [{sup 123}I]ADAM in the midbrain of the PD monkey was comparable to that in the normal monkeys, but there were decreased uptakes in the thalamus and striatum of the PD monkey. Conclusions: Our results suggest that dual-isotope SPECT using [{sup 99m}Tc]TRODAT-1 and [{sup 123}I]ADAM can simultaneously evaluate changes in dopaminergic and serotonergic systems in a PD model.

  11. Bioimpedance in monitoring of effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznecova LV

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Vasiliy Grigorievich Alexeev, Ludmila Vasilievna KuznecovaDepartment of Physiology, SP Botkin Moscow City Clinical Hospital, Moscow, RussiaBackground: Bioimpedance has been shown to be a safe technique when used in a number of biomedical applications. In this study, we used the Electro Interstitial Scan (EIS to perform bioimpedance measurements to follow up the efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI treatment in subjects diagnosed to have major depressive disorder.Methods: We recruited 59 subjects (38 women, 21 men aged 17–76 (mean 47 years diagnosed with major depressive disorder by psychiatric assessment at the Botkin Hospital according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV. Baseline Clinical Global Impression scores and EIS (electrical conductivity and dispersion α parameter measurements were done before starting SSRI therapy. Treatment follow-up was undertaken using EIS bioimpedance measurements and by treatment response based on the Hamilton Depression Scale and Clinical Global Impression, every 15 days for 60 days. At day 45, we classified the patients into two groups, ie, Group 1, including treatment responders, and Group 2, including nonresponders. At day 60, patients were classified into two further groups, ie, Group 3, comprising treatment responders, and Group 4, comprising nonresponders.Results: Comparing Group 1 and Group 2, electrical conductivity measurement of the pathway between the two forehead electrodes had a specificity of 72% and a sensitivity of 85.3% (P < 0.0001, with a cutoff >4.32. Comparing Group 3 and Group 4, electrical conductivity measurements in the same pathway had a specificity of 47.6% and a sensitivity of 76.3% (P < 0.16, with a cutoff >5.92. Comparing Group 1 and Group 2, the electrical dispersion α parameter of the pathway between the two disposable forehead electrodes had a specificity of 80% and a sensitivity of 85.2% (P < 0.0001 with a

  12. Memory function and serotonin transporter promoter gene polymorphism in ecstasy (MDMA) users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reneman, Liesbeth; Schilt, T.; de Win, Maartje M.; Booij, Jan; Schmand, Ben; van den Brink, Wim; Bakker, Onno

    2006-01-01

    Although 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or ecstasy) has been shown to damage brain serotonin (5-HT) neurons in animals and possibly humans, little is known about the long-term consequences of MDMA-induced 5-HT neurotoxic lesions on functions in which 5-HT is involved, such as cognitive

  13. Effect of the 5-HT4 receptor and serotonin transporter on visceral hypersensitivity in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Yan; Liu, Xin-Guang; Wang, Hua-Hong; Li, Jun-Xia; Li, Yi-Xuan

    2012-01-01

    Visceral hypersensitivity plays an important role in motor and sensory abnormalities associated with irritable bowel syndrome, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. The present study was designed to evaluate the expression of the 5-HT 4 receptor and the serotonin transporter (SERT) as well as their roles in chronic visceral hypersensitivity using a rat model. Neonatal male Sprague-Dawley rats received intracolonic injections of 0.5% acetic acid (0.3-0.5 mL at different times) between postnatal days 8 and 21 to establish an animal model of visceral hypersensitivity. On day 43, the threshold intensity for a visually identifiable contraction of the abdominal wall and body arching were recorded during rectal distention. Histological evaluation and the myeloperoxidase activity assay were performed to determine the severity of inflammation. The 5-HT 4 receptor and SERT expression of the ascending colon were monitored using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses; the plasma 5-HT levels were measured using an ELISA method. As expected, transient colonic irritation at the neonatal stage led to visceral hypersensitivity, but no mucosal inflammation was later detected during adulthood. Using this model, we found reduced SERT expression (0.298 ± 0.038 vs 0.634 ± 0.200, P < 0.05) and increased 5-HT 4 receptor expression (0.308 ± 0.017 vs 0.298 ± 0.021, P < 0.05). Treatment with fluoxetine (10 mg·kg −1 ·day −1 , days 36-42), tegaserod (1 mg·kg −1 ·day −1 , day 43), or the combination of both, reduced visceral hypersensitivity and plasma 5-HT levels. Fluoxetine treatment increased 5-HT 4 receptor expression (0.322 ± 0.020 vs 0.308 ± 0.017, P < 0.01) but not SERT expression (0.219 ± 0.039 vs 0.298 ± 0.038, P = 0.654). These results indicate that both the 5-HT 4 receptor and SERT play a role in the pathogenesis of visceral hypersensitivity, and its mechanism may be involved in the local 5-HT level

  14. Prior fear conditioning does not impede enhanced active avoidance in serotonin transporter knockout rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, Pieter; Henckens, Marloes J A G; Borghans, Bart; Hiemstra, Marlies; Kozicz, Tamas; Homberg, Judith R

    2017-05-30

    Stressors can be actively or passively coped with, and adequate adaption of the coping response to environmental conditions can reduce their potential deleterious effects. One major factor influencing stress coping behaviour is serotonin transporter (5-HTT) availability. Abolishment of 5-HTT is known to impair fear extinction but facilitates acquisition of signalled active avoidance (AA), a behavioural task in which an animal learns to avoid an aversive stimulus that is predicted by a cue. Flexibility in adapting coping behaviour to the nature of the stressor shapes resilience to stress-related disorders. Therefore, we investigated the relation between 5-HTT expression and ability to adapt a learned coping response to changing environmental conditions. To this end, we first established and consolidated a cue-conditioned passive fear response in 5-HTT -/- and wildtype rats. Next, we used the conditioned stimulus (CS) to signal oncoming shocks during signalled AA training in 5-HTT -/- and wildtype rats to study their capability to acquire an active coping response to the CS following fear conditioning. Finally, we investigated the behavioural response to the CS in a novel environment and measured freezing, exploration and self-grooming, behaviours reflective of stress coping strategy. We found that fear conditioned and sham conditioned 5-HTT -/- animals acquired the signalled AA response faster than wildtypes, while prior conditioning briefly delayed AA learning similarly in both genotypes. Subsequent exposure to the CS in the novel context reduced freezing and increased locomotion in 5-HTT -/- compared to wildtype rats. This indicates that improved AA performance in 5-HTT -/- rats resulted in a weaker residual passive fear response to the CS in a novel context. Fear conditioning prior to AA training did not affect freezing upon re-encountering the CS, although it did reduce locomotion in 5-HTT -/- rats. We conclude that independent of 5-HTT signalling, prior fear

  15. Effect of the 5-HT4 receptor and serotonin transporter on visceral hypersensitivity in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Yan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Visceral hypersensitivity plays an important role in motor and sensory abnormalities associated with irritable bowel syndrome, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. The present study was designed to evaluate the expression of the 5-HT4 receptor and the serotonin transporter (SERT as well as their roles in chronic visceral hypersensitivity using a rat model. Neonatal male Sprague-Dawley rats received intracolonic injections of 0.5% acetic acid (0.3-0.5 mL at different times between postnatal days 8 and 21 to establish an animal model of visceral hypersensitivity. On day 43, the threshold intensity for a visually identifiable contraction of the abdominal wall and body arching were recorded during rectal distention. Histological evaluation and the myeloperoxidase activity assay were performed to determine the severity of inflammation. The 5-HT4 receptor and SERT expression of the ascending colon were monitored using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses; the plasma 5-HT levels were measured using an ELISA method. As expected, transient colonic irritation at the neonatal stage led to visceral hypersensitivity, but no mucosal inflammation was later detected during adulthood. Using this model, we found reduced SERT expression (0.298 ± 0.038 vs 0.634 ± 0.200, P < 0.05 and increased 5-HT4 receptor expression (0.308 ± 0.017 vs 0.298 ± 0.021, P < 0.05. Treatment with fluoxetine (10 mg·kg-1·day-1, days 36-42, tegaserod (1 mg·kg-1·day-1, day 43, or the combination of both, reduced visceral hypersensitivity and plasma 5-HT levels. Fluoxetine treatment increased 5-HT4 receptor expression (0.322 ± 0.020 vs 0.308 ± 0.017, P < 0.01 but not SERT expression (0.219 ± 0.039 vs 0.298 ± 0.038, P = 0.654. These results indicate that both the 5-HT4 receptor and SERT play a role in the pathogenesis of visceral hypersensitivity, and its mechanism may be involved in the local 5-HT level.

  16. Effects of Genotype and Child Abuse on DNA Methylation and Gene Expression at the Serotonin Transporter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meeshanthini eVijayendran

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Altered regulation of the serotonin transporter (SLC6A4 is hypothesized to be a key event in many forms of neuropsychiatric illness, yet our understanding of the molecular mechanisms through which changes in gene function could lead to illness remains incomplete. In prior studies, we and others have demonstrated that methylation of CpG residues in the promoter associated CpG island alters SLC6A4 gene expression, that the extent of that DNA methylation in child abuse is genotype dependent, and that adverse childhood experiences such as child sex abuse are related to methylation. However, we have not examined whether these effects are splice variant specific, whether the association of methylation to gene expression varies as a function of genotype, and whether methylation in other SLC6A4 gene regions are more likely candidates for GxE effects. In the current investigation we measured methylation in lymphoblast DNA from 158 female subjects in the Iowa Adoption Studies at 16 CpG residues spread across the SLC6A4 locus, and analyzed their relationship to gene expression for two SLC6A4 splice variants. Methylation of two CpG residues in the shore of the CpG island (cg22584138 and cg05951817, a location immediately upstream from exon 1A, predicted gene expression for the splice variant containing Exon 1A + 1B. Methylation at two residues in the CpG island itself (cg 25769822 and cg05016953 was associated with total SLC6A4 expression. Examination of these four CpG residues indicated that methylation of cg22584138 was influenced by both genotype and sex abuse, whereas methylation of cg05016953 was influenced only by sex abuse history. Factors influencing methylation at other CpG dinucleotide pairs were not identified. We conclude that methylation effects on transcription may vary as a function of underlying gene motif and splice variant, and that the shore of CpG islands, upstream of TSS, may be of particular interest in examining environmental effects

  17. Effects of acute administration of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on sympathetic nerve activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiradentes, R.V.; Pires, J.G.P.; Silva, N.F.; Ramage, A.G.; Santuzzi, C.H.; Futuro, H.A. Neto

    2014-01-01

    Serotonergic mechanisms have an important function in the central control of circulation. Here, the acute effects of three selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on autonomic and cardiorespiratory variables were measured in rats. Although SSRIs require 2-3 weeks to achieve their full antidepressant effects, it has been shown that they cause an immediate inhibition of 5-HT reuptake. Seventy male Wistar rats were anesthetized with urethane and instrumented to record blood pressure, heart rate, renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), and respiratory frequency. At lower doses, the acute cardiovascular effects of fluoxetine, paroxetine and sertraline administered intravenously were insignificant and variable. At middle and higher doses, a general pattern was observed, with significant reductions in sympathetic nerve activity. At 10 min, fluoxetine (3 and 10 mg/kg) reduced RSNA by -33±4.7 and -31±5.4%, respectively, without changes in blood pressure; 3 and 10 mg/kg paroxetine reduced RSNA by -35±5.4 and -31±5.5%, respectively, with an increase in blood pressure +26.3±2.5; 3 mg/kg sertraline reduced RSNA by -59.4±8.6%, without changes in blood pressure. Sympathoinhibition began 5 min after injection and lasted approximately 30 min. For fluoxetine and sertraline, but not paroxetine, there was a reduction in heart rate that was nearly parallel to the sympathoinhibition. The effect of these drugs on the other variables was insignificant. In conclusion, acute peripheral administration of SSRIs caused early autonomic cardiovascular effects, particularly sympathoinhibition, as measured by RSNA. Although a peripheral action cannot be ruled out, such effects are presumably mostly central

  18. Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) administration selectively downregulates serotonin2 receptors in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckholtz, N S; Zhou, D F; Freedman, D X; Potter, W Z

    1990-04-01

    A dosage regimen of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) that reliably produces behavioral tolerance in rats was evaluated for effects on neurotransmitter receptor binding in rat brain using a variety of radioligands selective for amine receptor subtypes. Daily administration of LSD [130 micrograms/kg (0.27 mumol/kg) intraperitoneally (IP)] for 5 days produced a decrease in serotonin2 (5-hydroxytryptamine2, 5-HT2) binding in cortex (measured 24 hours after the last drug administration) but did not affect binding to other receptor systems (5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, beta-adrenergic, alpha 1- or alpha 2-adrenergic, D2-dopaminergic) or to a recognition site for 5-HT uptake. The decrease was evident within 3 days of LSD administration but was not demonstrable after the first LSD dose. Following 5 days of LSD administration the decrease was still present 48 hours, but not 96 hours, after the last administration. The indole hallucinogen psilocybin [1.0 mg/kg (3.5 mumol/kg) for 8 days] also produced a significant decrease in 5HT2 binding, but neither the nonhallucinogenic analog bromo-LSD [1.3 mg/kg (2.4 mumol/kg) for 5 days] nor mescaline [10 mg/kg (40.3 mumol/kg) for 5 or 10 days] affected 5-HT2 binding. These observations suggest that LSD and other indole hallucinogens may act as 5-HT2 agonists at postsynaptic 5-HT2 receptors. Decreased 5-HT2 binding strikingly parallels the development and loss of behavioral tolerance seen with repeated LSD administration, but the decreased binding per se cannot explain the gamut of behavioral tolerance and cross-tolerance phenomena among the indole and phenylethylamine hallucinogens.

  19. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and gastrointestinal bleeding: a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Carvajal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs have been associated with upper gastrointestinal (GI bleeding. Given their worldwide use, even small risks account for a large number of cases. This study has been conducted with carefully collected information to further investigate the relationship between SSRIs and upper GI bleeding. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study in hospitals in Spain and in Italy. Cases were patients aged ≥18 years with a primary diagnosis of acute upper GI bleeding diagnosed by endoscopy; three controls were matched by sex, age, date of admission (within 3 months and hospital among patients who were admitted for elective surgery for non-painful disorders. Exposures to SSRIs, other antidepressants and other drugs were defined as any use of these drugs in the 7 days before the day on which upper gastrointestinal bleeding started (index day. RESULTS: 581 cases of upper GI bleeding and 1358 controls were considered eligible for the study; no differences in age or sex distribution were observed between cases and controls after matching. Overall, 4.0% of the cases and 3.3% of controls used an SSRI antidepressant in the week before the index day. No significant risk of upper GI bleeding was encountered for SSRI antidepressants (adjusted odds ratio, 1.06, 95% CI, 0.57-1.96 or for whichever other grouping of antidepressants. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this case-control study showed no significant increase in upper GI bleeding with SSRIs and provide good evidence that the magnitude of any increase in risk is not greater than 2.

  20. [Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in the therapy of various types of endogenous depressions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panteleeva, G P; Abramova, L I; Korenev, A N

    2000-01-01

    In order to specify differential indications for the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) their therapeutic effect was investigated in apathic-adynamic, melancholic and anxious depressions. Group of 151 patients received monotherapy with one of SSRI-drugs: citalopram--22 patients (mean daily dosage--27.4 mg), paroxetine--47 patients (23 mg), sertraline--19 patients (107 mg), fluvoxamine--28 patients (162 mg), fluoxetine--35 patients (20 mg). The state of the patients was estimated 5 times during 42 days of therapy by clinical estimations and according to Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D). Therapeutic effects of the drugs were determined according to the degree of reduction of the total HAM-D scores and they were considered as "significant" (a reduction of the scores by 50% and more), "moderate" (by 21-49%), and "insignificant" (by 1-20%). Positive antidepressive effect, including "significant" was obtained in the case of the use of all the drugs studied. Differential evaluation of the three components of antidepressive activity (thymoleptic, sedative-anxiolytic, and stimulative) according to the degrees and data of expression of drugs' therapeutic effect has allowed to determine indications for the therapy of endogenous depressions by each of SSRI: to recommend cytalopram for the treatment of various types of depressive states mainly, for anxious and apatho-adynamic types; paroxetin--for treatment of melancholic depressions as well as for anxious and apatho-dynamic ones; sertralin++--for depression with anxiety and fobic disorders; fluvoxamine--for melancholic and anxious depression; fluoxetine--for apatho-adynamic depressions.

  1. Effects of acute administration of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on sympathetic nerve activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiradentes, R.V. [Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Centro Universitário do Espírito Santo, Colatina, ES (Brazil); Pires, J.G.P. [Centro Universitário do Espírito Santo, Colatina, ES (Brazil); Escola de Medicina da Empresa Brasileira de Ensino, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Silva, N.F. [Departamento de Morfologia, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Ramage, A.G. [Department of Neuroscience, Physiology and Pharmacology, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Santuzzi, C.H. [Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Centro Universitário do Espírito Santo, Colatina, ES (Brazil); Futuro, H.A. Neto [Escola de Medicina da Empresa Brasileira de Ensino, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Departamento de Morfologia, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Escola Superior de Ciências da Saúde, Santa Casa de Misericórdia de Vitória, Vitória, ES (Brazil)

    2014-05-30

    Serotonergic mechanisms have an important function in the central control of circulation. Here, the acute effects of three selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on autonomic and cardiorespiratory variables were measured in rats. Although SSRIs require 2-3 weeks to achieve their full antidepressant effects, it has been shown that they cause an immediate inhibition of 5-HT reuptake. Seventy male Wistar rats were anesthetized with urethane and instrumented to record blood pressure, heart rate, renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), and respiratory frequency. At lower doses, the acute cardiovascular effects of fluoxetine, paroxetine and sertraline administered intravenously were insignificant and variable. At middle and higher doses, a general pattern was observed, with significant reductions in sympathetic nerve activity. At 10 min, fluoxetine (3 and 10 mg/kg) reduced RSNA by -33±4.7 and -31±5.4%, respectively, without changes in blood pressure; 3 and 10 mg/kg paroxetine reduced RSNA by -35±5.4 and -31±5.5%, respectively, with an increase in blood pressure +26.3±2.5; 3 mg/kg sertraline reduced RSNA by -59.4±8.6%, without changes in blood pressure. Sympathoinhibition began 5 min after injection and lasted approximately 30 min. For fluoxetine and sertraline, but not paroxetine, there was a reduction in heart rate that was nearly parallel to the sympathoinhibition. The effect of these drugs on the other variables was insignificant. In conclusion, acute peripheral administration of SSRIs caused early autonomic cardiovascular effects, particularly sympathoinhibition, as measured by RSNA. Although a peripheral action cannot be ruled out, such effects are presumably mostly central.

  2. Selective oxidation of serotonin and norepinephrine over eriochrome cyanine R film modified glassy carbon electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao Hong; Li Shaoguang [Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, Faculty of Pharmacy, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350004 (China); Tang Yuhai [Institute of Analytical Sciences, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710061 (China); Chen Yan [Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, Faculty of Pharmacy, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350004 (China); Chen Yuanzhong [Fujian Institute of Hematology, The Affiliated Union Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350001 (China)], E-Mail: chenyz@pub3.fz.fj.cn; Lin Xinhua [Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, Faculty of Pharmacy, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350004 (China)], E-mail: xhlin1963@sin.com

    2009-08-01

    A novel ECR-modified electrode is fabricated by electrodeposition of Eriochrome Cyanine R (ECR) at a glassy carbon (GC) electrode by cyclic voltammetry (CV) in double-distilled water. The characterization of the ECR film modified electrode is carried out by atomic force microscopy (AFM), infrared spectra (IR), spectroelectrochemistry and cyclic voltammetry. The results show that a slightly heterogeneous film formed on the surface of the modified electrode, and the calculated surface concentration of ECR is 2 x 10{sup -10} mol/cm{sup -2}. The ECR film modified GC electrode shows excellent electrocatalytic activities toward the oxidation of serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE). Furthermore, the modified electrode can separately detect 5-HT and NE, even in the presence of 200-fold concentration of ascorbic acid (AA) and 25-fold concentration of uric acid (UA). Using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV), the peak currents of 5-HT and NE recorded in pH 7 solution are linearly dependent on their concentrations in the range of 0.05-5 {mu}M and 2-50 {mu}M, respectively. The limits of detection are 0.05 and 1.5 {mu}M for 5-HT and NE, respectively. The ECR film modified electrode can be stored stable for at least 1 week in 0.05 M PBS (pH 7) at 4 {sup o}C in a refrigerator. Owing to its excellent selectivity and sensitivity, the modified electrode could provide a promising tool for the simultaneous determination of 5-HT and NE in complex biosamples.

  3. Diminished Neural Processing of Aversive and Rewarding Stimuli During Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Ciara; Mishor, Zevic; Cowen, Philip J.; Harmer, Catherine J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are popular medications for anxiety and depression, but their effectiveness, particularly in patients with prominent symptoms of loss of motivation and pleasure, has been questioned. There are few studies of the effect of SSRIs on neural reward mechanisms in humans. Methods We studied 45 healthy participants who were randomly allocated to receive the SSRI citalopram, the noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor reboxetine, or placebo for 7 days in a double-blind, parallel group design. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure the neural response to rewarding (sight and/or flavor of chocolate) and aversive stimuli (sight of moldy strawberries and/or an unpleasant strawberry taste) on the final day of drug treatment. Results Citalopram reduced activation to the chocolate stimuli in the ventral striatum and the ventral medial/orbitofrontal cortex. In contrast, reboxetine did not suppress ventral striatal activity and in fact increased neural responses within medial orbitofrontal cortex to reward. Citalopram also decreased neural responses to the aversive stimuli conditions in key “punishment” areas such as the lateral orbitofrontal cortex. Reboxetine produced a similar, although weaker effect. Conclusions Our findings are the first to show that treatment with SSRIs can diminish the neural processing of both rewarding and aversive stimuli. The ability of SSRIs to decrease neural responses to reward might underlie the questioned efficacy of SSRIs in depressive conditions characterized by decreased motivation and anhedonia and could also account for the experience of emotional blunting described by some patients during SSRI treatment. PMID:20034615

  4. Novel 2-aminotetralin and 3-aminochroman derivatives as selective serotonin 5-HT7 receptor agonists and antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Pär; Sohn, Daniel; Leideborg, Robert; Caldirola, Patrizia; Zlatoidsky, Pavel; Hanson, Sverker; Mohell, Nina; Rosqvist, Susanne; Nordvall, Gunnar; Johansson, Anette M; Johansson, Rolf

    2004-07-29

    The understanding of the physiological role of the G-protein coupled serotonin 5-HT(7) receptor is largely rudimentary. Therefore, selective and potent pharmacological tools will add to the understanding of serotonergic effects mediated through this receptor. In this report, we describe two compound classes, chromans and tetralins, encompassing compounds with nanomolar affinity for the 5-HT(7) receptor and with good selectivity. Within theses classes, we have discovered both agonists and antagonists that can be used for further understanding of the pharmacology of the 5-HT(7) receptor.

  5. Does prenatal valproate interact with a genetic reduction in the serotonin transporter?A rat study on anxiety and cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart A Ellenbroek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available There is ample evidence that prenatal exposure to valproate (or valproic acid, VPA enhances the risk of developing Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD. In line with this, a single injection of VPA induces a multitude of ASD-like symptoms in animals such as rats and mice. However, there is equally strong evidence that genetic factors contribute significantly to the risk of ASD and indeed, like most other psychiatric disorders, ASD is now generally thought to results from an interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Given that VPA significantly impacts on the serotonergic system, and serotonin has strong biochemical and genetic links to ASD, we aimed to investigate the interaction between genetic reduction in the serotonin transporter and prenatal valproate administration. More specifically, we exposed both wildtype (SERT+/+ rats and rats heterozygous for the serotonin transporter deletion (SERT+/- to a single injection of 400 mg/kg VPA at gestational day (GD 12. The offspring, in adulthood, was assessed in four different tests: Elevated Plus Maze and Novelty Suppressed Feeding as measures for anxiety and prepulse inhibition (PPI and latent inhibition as measures for cognition and information processing. The results show that prenatal VPA significantly increased anxiety in both paradigm, reduced PPI and reduced conditioning in the latent inhibition paradigm. However, we failed to find a significant gene – environment interaction. We propose that this may be related to the timing of the VPA injection and suggest that whereas GD12 might be optimal for affecting normal rat, rats with a genetically compromised serotonergic system may be more sensitive to VPA at earlier time points during gestation. Overall our data are the first to investigate gene * environmental interactions in a genetic rat model for ASD suggest that timing may be of crucial importance to the long-term outcome.

  6. 17β-Estradiol augments antidepressant efficacy of escitalopram in ovariectomized rats: Neuroprotective and serotonin reuptake transporter modulatory effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Weam W; Safar, Marwa M; Khattab, Mahmoud M; Agha, Azza M

    2016-12-01

    The prevalence or recurrence of depression is seriously increased in women during the transition to and after menopause. The chronic hypo-estrogenic state of menopause may reduce the response to antidepressants; however the influence of estrogen therapy on their efficacy is still controversial. This study aimed at investigating the effects of combining escitalopram with 17β-estradiol on depression and cognitive impairment induced by ovariectomy, an experimental model of human menopause. Young adult female Wistar rats were subjected to either sham operation or ovariectomy. Ovariectomized animals were treated chronically with escitalopram (10mg/kg/day, i.p) alone or with four doses of 17β-estradiol (40μg/kg, s.c) given prior to the behavioral tests. Co-administration of 17β-estradiol improved escitalopram-induced antidepressant effect in forced swimming test verified as more prominent decrease in the immobility time without opposing its memory enhancing effect in Morris water maze. 17β-estradiol augmented the modulatory effects of escitalopram on the hippocampal levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and serotonin reuptake transporter as well as tumor necrosis factor-alpha without altering its effects on the gene expressions of serotonin receptor 1A, estrogen receptors alpha and beta, or acetylcholinestearase content. This combined therapy afforded synergistic protective effects on the brain histopathological architecture, particularly, the hippocampus. The antidepressant effect of 17β-estradiol was abolished by pretreatment with estrogen receptor antagonist, tamoxifen (10mg/kg, p.o). In conclusion, 17β-estradiol-induced antidepressant effect was confined to intracellular estrogen receptors activation. Moreover, 17β-estradiol enhanced escitalopram's efficiency in ameliorating menopausal-like depression, via exerting synergistic neuroprotective and serotonin reuptake transporter modulatory effects, without impeding escitalopram-mediated cognitive

  7. Cortisol responses to chronic stress in adult macaques: moderation by a polymorphism in the serotonin transporter gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Dongdong; Rizak, Joshua; Feng, Xiaoli; Yang, Shangchuan; Yang, Lichuan; Fan, Xiaona; Lü, Longbao; Chen, Lin; Hu, Xintian

    2015-02-01

    Accumulating evidence has shown that a polymorphism in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) moderates the association between stress and depressive symptoms. However, the exact etiologies underlying this moderation are not well understood. Here it is reported that among adult female rhesus macaques, an orthologous polymorphism (rh5-HTTLPR) exerted an influence on cortisol responses to chronic stress. It was found that females with two copies of the short allele were associated with increased cortisol responses to chronic stress in comparison to their counterparts who have one or two copies of the long allele. In the absence of stress, no differences related to genotype were observed in these females. This genetic moderation was found without a genetic influence on exposure to stressful situations. Rather it was found to be a genetic modulation of cortisol responses to chronic stress. These findings indicate that the rh5-HTTLPR polymorphism is closely related to hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis reactivity, which may increase susceptibility to depression in females with low serotonin transporter efficiency and a history of stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) genotype moderates the longitudinal impact of early caregiving on externalizing behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Zoë H; Humphreys, Kathryn L; Smyke, Anna T; Gleason, Mary Margaret; Nelson, Charles A; Zeanah, Charles H; Fox, Nathan A; Drury, Stacy S

    2015-02-01

    We examined caregiver report of externalizing behavior from 12 to 54 months of age in 102 children randomized to care as usual in institutions or to newly created high-quality foster care. At baseline no differences by group or genotype in externalizing were found. However, changes in externalizing from baseline to 42 months of age were moderated by the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region genotype and intervention group, where the slope for short-short (S/S) individuals differed as a function of intervention group. The slope for individuals carrying the long allele did not significantly differ between groups. At 54 months of age, S/S children in the foster care group had the lowest levels of externalizing behavior, while children with the S/S genotype in the care as usual group demonstrated the highest rates of externalizing behavior. No intervention group differences were found in externalizing behavior among children who carried the long allele. These findings, within a randomized controlled trial of foster care compared to continued care as usual, indicate that the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region genotype moderates the relation between early caregiving environments to predict externalizing behavior in children exposed to early institutional care in a manner most consistent with differential susceptibility.

  9. Comparison of the neurobiological effects of attribution retraining group therapy with those of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of attribution retraining group therapy (ARGT with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD, and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD. Subjects were sequentially recruited and randomized into two groups, one receiving ARGT (n = 63 and the other SSRIs (n = 66 for 8 weeks. Fifty-four ARGT outpatients with MDD (n = 19, GAD (n = 19, and OCD (n = 16 and 55 SSRI outpatients with MDD (n = 19, GAD (n = 19, and OCD (n = 17 completed the study. All subjects were assessed using the Hamilton Depression Scale and Hamilton Anxiety Scale before and after treatment. The 10-item Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale was employed only for OCD subjects. Plasma levels of serotonin, norepinephrine, cortisol, and adrenocorticotropic hormone were also measured at baseline and 8 weeks after completion of treatment. Symptom scores were significantly reduced (P < 0.001 in both the ARGT and SSRI groups at the end of treatment. However, MDD, GAD and OCD patients in the ARGT group had significantly lower plasma cortisol concentrations compared to baseline (P < 0.05, whereas MDD and OCD patients receiving SSRIs showed significantly increased plasma levels of serotonin (P < 0.05. These findings suggest that ARGT may modulate plasma cortisol levels and affect the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis as opposed to SSRIs, which may up-regulate plasma serotonin levels via a different pathway to produce an overall improvement in the clinical condition of the patients.

  10. Comparison of the neurobiological effects of attribution retraining group therapy with those of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wang

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of attribution retraining group therapy (ARGT with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD, and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD. Subjects were sequentially recruited and randomized into two groups, one receiving ARGT (n = 63 and the other SSRIs (n = 66 for 8 weeks. Fifty-four ARGT outpatients with MDD (n = 19, GAD (n = 19, and OCD (n = 16 and 55 SSRI outpatients with MDD (n = 19, GAD (n = 19, and OCD (n = 17 completed the study. All subjects were assessed using the Hamilton Depression Scale and Hamilton Anxiety Scale before and after treatment. The 10-item Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale was employed only for OCD subjects. Plasma levels of serotonin, norepinephrine, cortisol, and adrenocorticotropic hormone were also measured at baseline and 8 weeks after completion of treatment. Symptom scores were significantly reduced (P < 0.001 in both the ARGT and SSRI groups at the end of treatment. However, MDD, GAD and OCD patients in the ARGT group had significantly lower plasma cortisol concentrations compared to baseline (P < 0.05, whereas MDD and OCD patients receiving SSRIs showed significantly increased plasma levels of serotonin (P < 0.05. These findings suggest that ARGT may modulate plasma cortisol levels and affect the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis as opposed to SSRIs, which may up-regulate plasma serotonin levels via a different pathway to produce an overall improvement in the clinical condition of the patients.

  11. Timing of caloric intake during weight loss differentially affects striatal dopamine transporter and thalamic serotonin transporter binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteeg, Ruth I.; Schrantee, Anouk; Adriaanse, Sofie M.; Unmehopa, Unga A.; Booij, Jan; Reneman, Liesbeth; Fliers, Eric; la Fleur, Susanne E.; Serlie, Mireille J.

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that meal timing throughout the day contributes to maintaining or regaining weight after hypocaloric diets. Although brain serotonin and dopamine are well known to be involved in regulating feeding, it is unknown whether meal timing during energy restriction affects these

  12. Mapping the Binding Site for Escitalopram and Paroxetine in the Human Serotonin Transporter Using Genetically Encoded Photo-Cross-Linkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rannversson, Hafsteinn; Andersen, Jacob; Bang-Andersen, Benny

    2017-01-01

    amber codon suppression in hSERT to encode the photo-cross-linking unnatural amino acid p-azido-l-phenylalanine into the suggested high- and low-affinity binding sites. We then employ UV-induced cross-linking with azF to map the binding site of escitalopram and paroxetine, two prototypical selective...... serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). We find that the two antidepressant drugs exclusively cross-link to azF incorporated at the high-affinity binding site of hSERT, while cross-linking is not observed at the low-affinity binding site. Combined with previous homology models and recent structural data on h...

  13. Serotonin transporter gene polymorphisms and brain function during emotional distraction from cognitive processing in posttraumatic stress disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauser Michael A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serotonergic system dysfunction has been implicated in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. Genetic polymorphisms associated with serotonin signaling may predict differences in brain circuitry involved in emotion processing and deficits associated with PTSD. In healthy individuals, common functional polymorphisms in the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4 have been shown to modulate amygdala and prefrontal cortex (PFC activity in response to salient emotional stimuli. Similar patterns of differential neural responses to emotional stimuli have been demonstrated in PTSD but genetic factors influencing these activations have yet to be examined. Methods We investigated whether SLC6A4 promoter polymorphisms (5-HTTLPR, rs25531 and several downstream single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs modulated activity of brain regions involved in the cognitive control of emotion in post-9/11 veterans with PTSD. We used functional MRI to examine neural activity in a PTSD group (n = 22 and a trauma-exposed control group (n = 20 in response to trauma-related images presented as task-irrelevant distractors during the active maintenance period of a delayed-response working memory task. Regions of interest were derived by contrasting activation for the most distracting and least distracting conditions across participants. Results In patients with PTSD, when compared to trauma-exposed controls, rs16965628 (associated with serotonin transporter gene expression modulated task-related ventrolateral PFC activation and 5-HTTLPR tended to modulate left amygdala activation. Subsequent to combat-related trauma, these SLC6A4 polymorphisms may bias serotonin signaling and the neural circuitry mediating cognitive control of emotion in patients with PTSD. Conclusions The SLC6A4 SNP rs16965628 and 5-HTTLPR are associated with a bias in neural responses to traumatic reminders and cognitive control of emotions in patients with PTSD. Functional MRI may help identify

  14. A non-selective (amitriptyline), but not a selective (citalopram), serotonin reuptake inhibitor is effective in the prophylactic treatment of chronic tension-type headache.

    OpenAIRE

    Bendtsen, L; Jensen, R; Olesen, J

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Although the tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline is extensively used in the prophylactic treatment of chronic tension-type headache, only few studies have investigated the efficacy of this treatment and the results are contradictory. In addition, the new selective serotonin reuptake inhibiting antidepressants, which are widely used in depression and of potential value in pain management, have never been investigated in a placebo controlled study of tension-type headache. The ai...

  15. Use of selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitors and platelet aggregation inhibitors among individuals with co-occurring atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and depression or anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Douglas Thornton

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Medications commonly used to treat heart disease, anxiety, and depression can interact resulting in an increased risk of bleeding, warranting a cautious approach in medical decision making. This retrospective, descriptive study examined the prevalence and the factors associated with the use of both selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor and platelet aggregation inhibitor among individuals with co-occurring atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and anxiety or depression. Methods: Respondents aged 22 years and older, alive throughout the study period, and diagnosed with co-occurring atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and anxiety or depression (n = 1507 in years 2007 through 2013 of the Medical Expenditures Panel Survey were included. The use of treatment was grouped as follows: selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor and platelet aggregation inhibitor, selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor or platelet aggregation inhibitor, and neither selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor nor platelet aggregation inhibitor. Results: Overall, 16.5% used both selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor and platelet aggregation inhibitor, 61.2% used selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor or platelet aggregation inhibitor, and 22.3% used neither selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor nor platelet aggregation inhibitor. Respondents aged over 65 years (adjusted odds ratio = 1.93 (95% confidence interval = 1.08–3.45 and having a diagnosis of diabetes (adjusted odds ratio = 1.63 (95% confidence interval = 1.15–2.31 and hypertension (adjusted odds ratio = 1.84 (95% confidence interval = 1.04–3.27 were more likely to be prescribed the combination. Conclusion: The drug interaction was prevalent in patients who are already at higher risk of health disparities and worse outcomes thus requiring vigilant evaluation.

  16. Antidepressant-like drug effects in juvenile and adolescent mice in the tail suspension test: Relationship with hippocampal serotonin and norepinephrine transporter expression and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan C Mitchell

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a major health problem for which most patients are not effectively treated. This problem is further compounded in children and adolescents where only two antidepressants [both selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs] are currently approved for clinical use. Mouse models provide tools to identify mechanisms that might account for poor treatment response to antidepressants. However, there are few studies in adolescent mice and none in juvenile mice. The tail suspension test (TST is commonly used to assay for antidepressant-like effects of drugs in adult mice. Here we show that the TST can also be used to assay antidepressant-like effects of drugs in C57Bl/6 mice aged 21 (juvenile and 28 (adolescent days post-partum (P. We found that the magnitude of antidepressant-like response to the SSRI escitalopram was less in P21 mice than in P28 or adult mice. The smaller antidepressant response of juveniles was not related to either maximal binding (Bmax or affinity (Kd for [3H]citalopram binding to the serotonin transporter (SERT in hippocampus, which did not vary significantly among ages. Magnitude of antidepressant-like response to the tricyclic desipramine was similar among ages, as were Bmax and Kd values for [3H]nisoxetine binding to the norepinephrine transporter (NET in hippocampus. Together, these findings suggest that juvenile mice are less responsive to the antidepressant-like effects of escitalopram than adults, but that this effect is not due to delayed maturation of SERT in hippocampus. Showing that the TST is a relevant behavioral assay of antidepressant-like activity in juvenile and adolescent mice sets the stage for future studies of the mechanisms underlying the antidepressant response in these young populations.

  17. Effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment on plasma oxytocin and cortisol in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Charlotte; Dawood, Tye; Barton, David A; Lambert, Gavin W; Tilbrook, Alan J

    2013-04-29

    Oxytocin is known for its capacity to facilitate social bonding, reduce anxiety and for its actions on the stress hypothalamopituitary adrenal (HPA) axis. Since oxytocin can physiologically suppress activity of the HPA axis, clinical applications of this neuropeptide have been proposed in conditions where the function of the HPA axis is dysregulated. One such condition is major depressive disorder (MDD). Dysregulation of the HPA system is the most prominent endocrine change seen with MDD, and normalizing the HPA axis is one of the major targets of recent treatments. The potential clinical application of oxytocin in MDD requires improved understanding of its relationship to the symptoms and underlying pathophysiology of MDD. Previous research has investigated potential correlations between oxytocin and symptoms of MDD, including a link between oxytocin and treatment related symptom reduction. The outcomes of studies investigating whether antidepressive treatment (pharmacological and non-pharmacological) influences oxytocin concentrations in MDD, have produced conflicting outcomes. These outcomes suggest the need for an investigation of the influence of a single treatment class on oxytocin concentrations, to determine whether there is a relationship between oxytocin, the HPA axis (e.g., oxytocin and cortisol) and MDD. Our objective was to measure oxytocin and cortisol in patients with MDD before and following treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, SSRI. We sampled blood from arterial plasma. Patients with MDD were studied at the same time twice; pre- and post- 12 weeks treatment, in an unblinded sequential design (clinicaltrials.govNCT00168493). Results did not reveal differences in oxytocin or cortisol concentrations before relative to following SSRI treatment, and there were no significant relationships between oxytocin and cortisol, or these two physiological variables and psychological symptom scores, before or after treatment. These outcomes

  18. Importance of the Extracellular Loop 4 in the Human Serotonin Transporter for Inhibitor Binding and Substrate Translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rannversson, Hafsteinn; Wilson, Pamela; Kristensen, Kristina Birch; Sinning, Steffen; Kristensen, Anders Skov; Strømgaard, Kristian; Andersen, Jacob

    2015-06-05

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) terminates serotonergic neurotransmission by performing reuptake of released serotonin, and SERT is the primary target for antidepressants. SERT mediates the reuptake of serotonin through an alternating access mechanism, implying that a central substrate site is connected to both sides of the membrane by permeation pathways, of which only one is accessible at a time. The coordinated conformational changes in SERT associated with substrate translocation are not fully understood. Here, we have identified a Leu to Glu mutation at position 406 (L406E) in the extracellular loop 4 (EL4) of human SERT, which induced a remarkable gain-of-potency (up to >40-fold) for a range of SERT inhibitors. The effects were highly specific for L406E relative to six other mutations in the same position, including the closely related L406D mutation, showing that the effects induced by L406E are not simply charge-related effects. Leu(406) is located >10 Å from the central inhibitor binding site indicating that the mutation affects inhibitor binding in an indirect manner. We found that L406E decreased accessibility to a residue in the cytoplasmic pathway. The shift in equilibrium to favor a more outward-facing conformation of SERT can explain the reduced turnover rate and increased association rate of inhibitor binding we found for L406E. Together, our findings show that EL4 allosterically can modulate inhibitor binding within the central binding site, and substantiates that EL4 has an important role in controlling the conformational equilibrium of human SERT. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Importance of the Extracellular Loop 4 in the Human Serotonin Transporter for Inhibitor Binding and Substrate Translocation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rannversson, Hafsteinn; Wilson, Pamela; Kristensen, Kristina Birch; Sinning, Steffen; Kristensen, Anders Skov; Strømgaard, Kristian; Andersen, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) terminates serotonergic neurotransmission by performing reuptake of released serotonin, and SERT is the primary target for antidepressants. SERT mediates the reuptake of serotonin through an alternating access mechanism, implying that a central substrate site is connected to both sides of the membrane by permeation pathways, of which only one is accessible at a time. The coordinated conformational changes in SERT associated with substrate translocation are not fully understood. Here, we have identified a Leu to Glu mutation at position 406 (L406E) in the extracellular loop 4 (EL4) of human SERT, which induced a remarkable gain-of-potency (up to >40-fold) for a range of SERT inhibitors. The effects were highly specific for L406E relative to six other mutations in the same position, including the closely related L406D mutation, showing that the effects induced by L406E are not simply charge-related effects. Leu406 is located >10 Å from the central inhibitor binding site indicating that the mutation affects inhibitor binding in an indirect manner. We found that L406E decreased accessibility to a residue in the cytoplasmic pathway. The shift in equilibrium to favor a more outward-facing conformation of SERT can explain the reduced turnover rate and increased association rate of inhibitor binding we found for L406E. Together, our findings show that EL4 allosterically can modulate inhibitor binding within the central binding site, and substantiates that EL4 has an important role in controlling the conformational equilibrium of human SERT. PMID:25903124

  20. Novel procedure for genotyping of the human serotonin transporter gene-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR)--a region with a high level of allele diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik B; Werge, Thomas M

    2007-01-01

    determination. After having developed a 5-HTTLPR genotyping assay, we examined all samples of DNA in two separate rounds of analyses and found complete agreement between the results from these two rounds. CONCLUSION: On the basis of simultaneous analysis of tandem repeat size variation and variation of single......BACKGROUND: The serotonin transporter, the target of a group of antidepressant drugs, is involved in the regulation of the availability and reuptake of serotonin. A variable number of tandem repeats in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene, designated 5-HTTLPR, affects...... for detailed genotyping of 5-HTTLPR based upon simultaneous analysis of tandem repeat size variation and single nucleotide variations. METHODS: We elaborated a list of all known 5-HTTLPR alleles to provide an overview of the allele repertoire at this polymorphic locus. Fragments of 5-HTTLPR were PCR...

  1. Lack of association between serotonin transporter gene polymorphism 5-HTTLPR and smoking among Polish population: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jassem Ewa

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A better understanding of the genetic determinants of tobacco smoking might help in developing more effective cessation therapies, tailored to smokers' genotype. Insertion/deletion polymorphism in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR has been linked to vulnerability to smoking and ability to quit. We aimed to determine whether 5-HTTLPR genotype is associated with smoking behavior in Caucasians from Northern Poland and to investigate other risk factors for tobacco smoking. Methods 5-HTTLPR genotypes were determined in 149 ever smokers (66 females; mean age 53.0 years and 158 gender and ethnicity matched never smoking controls (79 females; mean age 45.0 years to evaluate the association of this polymorphism with ever smoking status. Analysis of smokers was performed to evaluate the role of 5-HTTLPR in the age of starting regular smoking, the number of cigarettes smoked daily, pack-years, FTND score, duration of smoking, and the mean length of the longest abstinence on quitting. Genotype was classified according to the presence or absence of the short (S allele vs. the long (L allele of 5-HTTLPR (i.e., S/S + S/L vs. L/L. Logistic regression analysis was also used to evaluate correlation between ever smoking and several selected variables. Results We found no significant differences in the rates of S allele carriers in ever smokers and never smokers, and no relationship was observed between any quantitative measures of smoking and the polymorphism. Multivariate analysis demonstrated significant association between the older age (OR = 4.03; 95% CI: 2.33–6.99 and alcohol dependence (OR = 10.23; 95% CI: 2.09–50.18 and smoking. Conclusion 5-HTTLPR seems to be not a major factor determining cigarette smoking in Poles. Probably, the risk of smoking results from a large number of genes, each contributing a small part of the overall risk, while numerous non-genetic factors might strongly influence these

  2. The short (S) allele of the serotonin transporter polymorphism and acute tryptophan depletion both increase impulsivity in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walderhaug, Espen; Herman, Aryeh Isaac; Magnusson, Andres; Morgan, Michael John; Landrø, Nils Inge

    2010-04-12

    Reduced serotonergic neurotransmission is implicated in impulsive behavior. We studied the triallelic system of the serotonin transporter gene linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) and acute manipulation of serotonin together to further delineate the mechanisms by which serotonergic neurotransmission affects impulsivity. Fifty-two healthy participants (38 men and 14 women) underwent acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) or placebo in a randomized, double-blind, parallel group experiment. Impulsive response style was measured on two versions of the Continuous Performance Task (CPT), and calculated using signal detection theory. We observed a dose-dependent effect for the short (S') allele of the 5-HTTLPR on impulsive response style. Individuals who had the S'/S' genotype were more impulsive than individuals with the L/S' genotype. Participants with the L/S' genotype were more impulsive than those with the L/L genotype. ATD increased impulsivity in men, and decreased impulsivity in women. These data demonstrate for the first time that reduced serotonergic tone as a result of either 5-HTTLPR genotype, or experimental ATD, are both independently and additively, associated with elevated impulsive response style in Caucasian men. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Action potential-independent and pharmacologically unique vesicular serotonin release from dendrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, Lesley A.; Cavolo, Samantha L.; Commons, Kathryn G.; Levitan, Edwin S.

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin released within the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) induces feedback inhibition of serotonin neuron activity and consequently regulates mood-controlling serotonin release throughout the forebrain. Serotonin packaged in vesicles is released in response to action potentials by the serotonin neuron soma and terminals, but the potential for release by dendrites is unknown. Here three-photon (3P) microscopy imaging of endogenous serotonin in living rat brain slice, immunofluorescence and immuno-gold electron microscopy detection of VMAT2 (vesicular monoamine transporter 2) establish the presence of vesicular serotonin within DR dendrites. Furthermore, activation of glutamate receptors is shown to induce vesicular serotonin release from dendrites. However, unlike release from the soma and terminals, dendritic serotonin release is independent of action potentials, relies on L-type Ca2+ channels, is induced preferentially by NMDA, and displays distinct sensitivity to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant fluoxetine. The unique control of dendritic serotonin release has important implications for DR physiology and the antidepressant action of SSRIs, dihydropyridines and NMDA receptor antagonists. PMID:23136413

  4. Location of the Antidepressant Binding Site in the Serotonin Transporter IMPORTANCE OF SER-438 IN RECOGNITION OF CITALOPRAM AND TRICYCLIC ANTIDEPRESSANTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jacob; Taboureau, Olivier; Hansen, Kasper B.

    2009-01-01

    antidepressants, including the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram and the tricyclic antidepressants imipramine, clomipramine, and amitriptyline. A conservative mutation of Ser-438 to threonine (S438T) selectively increased the K-i values for these antidepressants up to 175-fold. The effects...

  5. Unbiased simulations reveal the inward-facing conformation of the human serotonin transporter and Na(+ ion release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Koldsø

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Monoamine transporters are responsible for termination of synaptic signaling and are involved in depression, control of appetite, and anxiety amongst other neurological processes. Despite extensive efforts, the structures of the monoamine transporters and the transport mechanism of ions and substrates are still largely unknown. Structural knowledge of the human serotonin transporter (hSERT is much awaited for understanding the mechanistic details of substrate translocation and binding of antidepressants and drugs of abuse. The publication of the crystal structure of the homologous leucine transporter has resulted in homology models of the monoamine transporters. Here we present extended molecular dynamics simulations of an experimentally supported homology model of hSERT with and without the natural substrate yielding a total of more than 1.5 µs of simulation of the protein dimer. The simulations reveal a transition of hSERT from an outward-facing occluded conformation to an inward-facing conformation in a one-substrate-bound state. Simulations with a second substrate in the proposed symport effector site did not lead to conformational changes associated with translocation. The central substrate binding site becomes fully exposed to the cytoplasm leaving both the Na(+-ion in the Na2-site and the substrate in direct contact with the cytoplasm through water interactions. The simulations reveal how sodium is released and show indications of early events of substrate transport. The notion that ion dissociation from the Na2-site drives translocation is supported by experimental studies of a Na2-site mutant. Transmembrane helices (TMs 1 and 6 are identified as the helices involved in the largest movements during transport.

  6. Serotonin Transporter (5-HTT) and gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Receptor Subunit beta3 (GABRB3) Gene Polymorphisms are not Associated with Autism in the IMGSA Families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maestrini, E.; Lai, C.; Marlow, A.

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) gene and the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor subunit beta3 (GABRB3) gene, or other genes in the 15q11-q13 region, are possibly involved in susceptibility to autism. To test this hypothesis we performed an association study on...

  7. Genetic moderation of the association between adolescent romantic involvement and depression: Contributions of serotonin transporter gene polymorphism, chronic stress, and family discord

    OpenAIRE

    Starr, Lisa R.; Hammen, Constance

    2015-01-01

    Studies support a link between adolescent romantic involvement and depression. Adolescent romantic relationships may increase depression risk by introducing chronic stress, and genetic vulnerability to stress reactivity/emotion dysregulation may moderate these associations. We tested genetic moderation of longitudinal associations between adolescent romantic involvement and later depressive symptoms by a polymorphism in the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region gene (5-HTTLPR), and ...

  8. Iodine-123 labelled nor-beta-CIT binds to the serotonin transporter in vivo as assessed by biodistribution studies in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, J.; Knol, R. J.; Reneman, L.; de Bruin, K.; Janssen, A. G.; van Royen, E. A.

    1998-01-01

    Iodine-123 labelled 2beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-4-iodophenylnortropane (nor-beta-CIT), a radioiodinated cocaine analogue, was evaluated as an agent for the in vivo labelling of serotonin transporters by biodistribution studies in rats. Intravenous injection of [123I]nor-beta-CIT resulted in high

  9. Serotonin Transporter-Linked Polymorphic Region (5-HTTLPR) Genotype and Stressful Life Events Interact to Predict Preschool-Onset Depression: A Replication and Developmental Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdan, Ryan; Agrawal, Arpana; Gaffrey, Michael S.; Tillman, Rebecca; Luby, Joan L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Scientific enthusiasm about gene × environment interactions, spurred by the 5-HTTLPR (serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region) × SLEs (stressful life events) interaction predicting depression, have recently been tempered by sober realizations of small effects and meta-analyses reaching opposing conclusions. These mixed findings…

  10. Serotonin Transporter Gene ("SLC6A4") Methylation Associates with Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Stay and 3-month-old Temperament in Preterm Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montirosso, Rosario; Provenzi, Livio; Fumagalli, Monica; Sirgiovanni, Ida; Giorda, Roberto; Pozzoli, Uberto; Beri, Silvana; Menozzi, Giorgia; Tronick, Ed; Morandi, Francesco; Mosca, Fabio; Borgatti, Renato

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) stay are early adverse stressful experiences, which may result in an altered temperamental profile. The serotonin transporter gene ("SLC6A4"), which has been linked to infant temperament, is susceptible to epigenetic regulation associated with early stressful experience. This study…

  11. Early life adversity and serotonin transporter gene variation interact to affect DNA methylation of the corticotropin-releasing factor gene promoter region in the adult rat brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doelen, R.H.A. van der; Arnoldussen, I.A.C.; Ghareh, H.; Och, L. van; Homberg, J.R.; Kozicz, L.T.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between childhood maltreatment and the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) gene linked polymorphic region has been associated with increased risk to develop major depression. This Gene x Environment interaction has furthermore been linked with increased levels of anxiety and glucocorticoid

  12. Early life adversity and serotonin transporter gene variation interact at the level of the adrenal gland to affect the adult hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doelen, R.H.A. van der; Deschamps, W.; D'Annibale, C.; Peeters, D.; Wevers, R.A.; Zelena, D.; Homberg, J.R.; Kozicz, L.T.

    2014-01-01

    The short allelic variant of the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) promoter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) has been associated with the etiology of major depression by interaction with early life stress (ELS). Furthermore, 5-HTTLPR has been associated with abnormal functioning of the

  13. The Interplay between Peer Rejection and Acceptance in Preadolescence and Early Adolescence, Serotonin Transporter Gene, and Antisocial Behavior in Late Adolescence: The TRAILS Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretschmer, Tina; Sentse, Miranda; Dijkstra, Jan Kornelius; Veenstra, Rene´

    2014-01-01

    Gene-environment studies on adolescents' peer contexts are important for understanding the interplay between biological and social antecedents of adolescent psychopathology. To this end, this study examined the roles of serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR) and preadolescent and early adolescent peer rejection and acceptance, as well as the interaction…

  14. Efficiency, selectivity, and robustness of nucleocytoplasmic transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Zilman

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available All materials enter or exit the cell nucleus through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs, efficient transport devices that combine high selectivity and throughput. NPC-associated proteins containing phenylalanine-glycine repeats (FG nups have large, flexible, unstructured proteinaceous regions, and line the NPC. A central feature of NPC-mediated transport is the binding of cargo-carrying soluble transport factors to the unstructured regions of FG nups. Here, we model the dynamics of nucleocytoplasmic transport as diffusion in an effective potential resulting from the interaction of the transport factors with the flexible FG nups, using a minimal number of assumptions consistent with the most well-established structural and functional properties of NPC transport. We discuss how specific binding of transport factors to the FG nups facilitates transport, and how this binding and competition between transport factors and other macromolecules for binding sites and space inside the NPC accounts for the high selectivity of transport. We also account for why transport is relatively insensitive to changes in the number and distribution of FG nups in the NPC, providing an explanation for recent experiments where up to half the total mass of the FG nups has been deleted without abolishing transport. Our results suggest strategies for the creation of artificial nanomolecular sorting devices.

  15. Serotonin-mediated central fatigue underlies increased endurance capacity in mice from lines selectively bred for high voluntary wheel running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claghorn, Gerald C; Fonseca, Ivana A T; Thompson, Zoe; Barber, Curtis; Garland, Theodore

    2016-07-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) is implicated in central fatigue, and 5-HT1A pharmaceuticals are known to influence locomotor endurance in both rodents and humans. We studied the effects of a 5-HT1A agonist and antagonist on both forced and voluntary exercise in the same set of mice. This cohort of mice was taken from 4 replicate lines of mice that have been selectively bred for high levels of voluntary wheel running (HR) as compared with 4 non-selected control (C) lines. HR mice run voluntarily on wheels about 3× as many revolutions per day as compared with C, and have greater endurance during forced treadmill exercise. We hypothesized that drugs targeting serotonin receptors would have differential effects on locomotor behavior of HR and C mice. Subcutaneous injections of a 5-HT1A antagonist (WAY-100,635), a combination of 5-HT1A agonist and a 5-HT1A/1B partial agonist (8-OH-DPAT+pindolol), or physiological saline were given to separate groups of male mice before the start of each of three treadmill trials. The same manipulations were used later during voluntary wheel running on three separate nights. WAY-100,635 decreased treadmill endurance in HR but not C mice (dose by linetype interaction, P=0.0014). 8-OH-DPAT+pindolol affected treadmill endurance (PWheel running was reduced in HR but not C mice at the highest dose of 8-OH-DPAT+pindolol (dose by linetype, P=0.0221), but was not affected by WAY-100,635 treatment. These results provide further evidence that serotonin signaling is an important determinant of performance during both forced and voluntary exercise. Although the elevated wheel running of HR mice does not appear related to alterations in serotonin signaling, their enhanced endurance capacity does. More generally, our results indicate that both forced and voluntary exercise can be affected by an intervention that acts (primarily) centrally. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Acute pharmacologically induced shifts in serotonin availability abolish emotion-selective responses to negative face emotions in distinct brain networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grady, Cheryl Lynn; Siebner, Hartwig R; Hornboll, Bettina

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacological manipulation of serotonin availability can alter the processing of facial expressions of emotion. Using a within-subject design, we measured the effect of serotonin on the brain's response to aversive face emotions with functional MRI while 20 participants judged the gender...... of neutral, fearful and angry faces. In three separate and counterbalanced sessions, participants received citalopram (CIT) to raise serotonin levels, underwent acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) to lower serotonin, or were studied without pharmacological challenge (Control). An analysis designed to identify...

  17. The serotonin transporter promoter variant (5-HTTLPR) and childhood adversity are associated with the personality trait openness to experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Shafiqur; Guban, Peter; Wang, Mei; Melas, Philippe A; Forsell, Yvonne; Lavebratt, Catharina

    2017-11-01

    There is evidence supporting an association between the serotonin-transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) and the Five Factor Model (FFM) of human personality. 5-HTTLPR has also been found to interact with stressful life events to increase risk of psychopathology. In the present study, by taking into account stressful life events in the form of childhood adversity, we examined the association between 5-HTTLPR and FFM traits using an adult Swedish cohort (N = 3112). We found that 5-HTTLPR was significantly associated with openness (to experience). Specifically, homozygote carriers of the short allele had lower levels of openness compared to carriers of the long allele. In addition, childhood adversity was found to influence openness. These findings support a previously reported association of 5-HTTLPR with openness in a younger cohort and may provide insights into the neurobiological basis of human personality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The serotonin transporter 5-HTTPR polymorphism is associated with current and lifetime depression in persons with chronic psychotic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, J; Hare, L; Camarena, B; Glahn, D; Dassori, A; Medina, R; Contreras, S; Ramirez, M; Armas, R; Munoz, R; Mendoza, R; Raventos, H; Ontiveros, A; Nicolini, H; Palmer, R; Escamilla, M

    2009-02-01

    Variation in the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) promoter region has been shown to influence depression in persons who have been exposed to a number of stressful life events. We evaluated whether genetic variation in 5-HTTLPR, influences current depression, lifetime history of depression and quantitative measures of depression in persons with chronic psychotic disorders. This is an association study of a genetic variant with quantitative and categorical definitions of depression conducted in the southwest US, Mexico and Costa Rica. We analyzed 260 subjects with a history of psychosis, from a sample of 129 families. We found that persons carrying at least one short allele had a statistically significant increased lifetime risk for depressive syndromes (P depression during the course of their illness.

  19. Interrogating the Molecular Basis for Substrate Recognition in Serotonin and Dopamine Transporters with High-Affinity Substrate-Based Bivalent Ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jacob; Ladefoged, Lucy Kate; Kristensen, Trine N. Bjerre

    2016-01-01

    insight into substrate recognition in SERT and DAT. An optimized bivalent ligand comprising two serotonin moieties binds SERT with 3,800-fold increased affinity compared to that of serotonin, suggesting that the human transporters have two distinct substrate binding sites. We show that the bivalent...... ligands are inhibitors of SERT and an experimentally validated docking model suggests that the bivalent compounds bind with one substrate moiety in the central binding site (the S1 site), whereas the other substrate moiety binds in a distinct binding site (the S2 site). A systematic study of nonconserved...

  20. A role for the serotonin reuptake transporter in the brain and intestinal features of autism spectrum disorders and developmental antidepressant exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Kara Gross

    2017-10-01

    Many disease conditions considered CNS-predominant harbor significant intestinal comorbidities. Serotonin (5-HT) and the serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) have increasingly been shown to play important roles in both brain and intestinal development and long-term function. 5-HT and SERT may thus modulate critical functions in the development and perpetuation of brain-gut axis disease. We discuss the potential roles of 5-HT and SERT in the brain and intestinal manifestations of autism spectrum disorders and developmental antidepressant exposure. The potential therapeutic value of 5-HT 4 modulation in the subsequent treatment of these conditions is also addressed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Transient Serotonin Syndrome by Concurrent Use of Electroconvulsive Therapy and Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagahisa Okamoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The serotonin syndrome, which is characterized by psychiatric, autonomic nervous and neurological symptoms, is considered to be caused by excessive stimulation of the 5-HT1A and 5-HT2 receptors in the gray matter and spinal cord of the central nervous system, after the start of dosing or increase of the dose of a serotoninergic drug. There have been hardly any reports of induction of serotonin syndrome by electroconvulsive therapy (ECT in combination with antidepressant. We present the case of a female patient with major depressive disorder (MDD who developed transient serotonin syndrome soon after the first session of ECT in combination with paroxetine. Paroxetine was discontinued, and her psychiatric, autonomic nervous and neurological symptoms were gradually relieved and disappeared within 2 days. We performed the second ECT session 5 days after the initial session and performed 12 sessions of ECT without any changes in the procedure of ECT and anesthesia, but no symptoms of SS were observed. Finally, her MDD remitted. ECT might cause transiently increased blood-brain barrier (BBB permeability and enhance the transmissivity of the antidepressant in BBB. Therefore, it is necessary to pay attention to rare side effect of serotonin syndrome by ECT in combination with antidepressant.

  2. Transient serotonin syndrome by concurrent use of electroconvulsive therapy and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Nagahisa; Sakamoto, Kota; Yamada, Maki

    2012-01-01

    The serotonin syndrome, which is characterized by psychiatric, autonomic nervous and neurological symptoms, is considered to be caused by excessive stimulation of the 5-HT1A and 5-HT2 receptors in the gray matter and spinal cord of the central nervous system, after the start of dosing or increase of the dose of a serotoninergic drug. There have been hardly any reports of induction of serotonin syndrome by electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in combination with antidepressant. We present the case of a female patient with major depressive disorder (MDD) who developed transient serotonin syndrome soon after the first session of ECT in combination with paroxetine. Paroxetine was discontinued, and her psychiatric, autonomic nervous and neurological symptoms were gradually relieved and disappeared within 2 days. We performed the second ECT session 5 days after the initial session and performed 12 sessions of ECT without any changes in the procedure of ECT and anesthesia, but no symptoms of SS were observed. Finally, her MDD remitted. ECT might cause transiently increased blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and enhance the transmissivity of the antidepressant in BBB. Therefore, it is necessary to pay attention to rare side effect of serotonin syndrome by ECT in combination with antidepressant.

  3. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) for the prevention of tension-type headache in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banzi, Rita; Cusi, Cristina; Randazzo, Concetta; Sterzi, Roberto; Tedesco, Dario; Moja, Lorenzo

    2015-05-01

    This is an updated version of the Cochrane review published in 2005 on selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for preventing migraine and tension-type headache. The original review has been split in two parts and this review now only regards tension-type headache prevention. Another updated review covers migraine. Tension-type headache is the second most common disorder worldwide and has high social and economic relevance. As serotonin and other neurotransmitters may have a role in pain mechanisms, SSRIs and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) have been evaluated for the prevention of tension-type headache. To determine the efficacy and tolerability of SSRIs and SNRIs compared to placebo and other active interventions in the prevention of episodic and chronic tension-type headache in adults. For the original review, we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2003, Issue 4), MEDLINE (1966 to January 2004), EMBASE (1994 to May 2003), and Headache Quarterly (1990 to 2003). For this update, we revised the original search strategy to reflect the broader type of intervention (SSRIs and SNRIs). We searched CENTRAL (2014, Issue 10) on the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (1946 to November 2014), EMBASE (1980 to November 2014), and PsycINFO (1987 to November 2014). We also checked the reference lists of retrieved articles and searched trial registries for ongoing trials. We included randomised controlled trials comparing SSRIs or SNRIs with any type of control intervention in participants 18 years and older, of either sex, with tension-type headache. Two authors independently extracted data (headache frequency, index, intensity, and duration; use of symptomatic/analgesic medication; quality of life; and withdrawals) and assessed the risk of bias of trials. The primary outcome is tension-type headache frequency, measured by the number of headache attacks or the number of days with headache per evaluation period. The original

  4. Mechanisms of Intestinal Serotonin Transporter (SERT Upregulation by TGF-β1 Induced Non-Smad Pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Nazir

    Full Text Available TGF-β1 is an important multifunctional cytokine with numerous protective effects on intestinal mucosa. The influence of TGF-β1 on serotonin transporter (SERT activity, the critical mechanism regulating the extracellular availability of serotonin (5-HT, is not known. Current studies were designed to examine acute effects of TGF-β1 on SERT. Model human intestinal Caco-2 cells grown as monolayer's or as cysts in 3D culture and ex vivo mouse model were utilized. Treatment of Caco-2 cells with TGF-β1 (10 ng/ml, 60 min stimulated SERT activity (~2 fold, P<0.005. This stimulation of SERT function was dependent upon activation of TGF-β1 receptor (TGFRI as SB-431542, a specific TGF-βRI inhibitor blocked the SERT stimulation. SERT activation in response to TGF-β1 was attenuated by inhibition of PI3K and occurred via enhanced recruitment of SERT-GFP to apical surface in a PI3K dependent manner. The exocytosis inhibitor brefeldin A (2.5 μM attenuated the TGF-β1-mediated increase in SERT function. TGF-β1 increased the association of SERT with the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE syntaxin 3 (STX3 and promoted exocytosis of SERT. Caco-2 cells grown as cysts in 3D culture recapitulated the effects of TGF-β1 showing increased luminal staining of SERT. Ussing chamber studies revealed increase in 3H-5-HT uptake in mouse ileum treated ex vivo with TGF-β1 (10 ng/ml, 1h. These data demonstrate a novel mechanism rapidly regulating intestinal SERT via PI3K and STX3. Since decreased SERT is implicated in various gastro-intestinal disorders e.g IBD, IBS and diarrhea, understanding mechanisms stimulating SERT function by TGF-β1 offers a novel therapeutic strategy to treat GI disorders.

  5. Human fear acquisition deficits in relation to genetic variants of the corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 and the serotonin transporter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Heitland

    Full Text Available The ability to identify predictors of aversive events allows organisms to appropriately respond to these events, and failure to acquire these fear contingencies can lead to maladaptive contextual anxiety. Recently, preclinical studies demonstrated that the corticotropin-releasing factor and serotonin systems are interactively involved in adaptive fear acquisition. Here, 150 healthy medication-free human subjects completed a cue and context fear conditioning procedure in a virtual reality environment. Fear potentiation of the eyeblink startle reflex (FPS was measured to assess both uninstructed fear acquisition and instructed fear expression. All participants were genotyped for polymorphisms located within regulatory regions of the corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1 - rs878886 and the serotonin transporter (5HTTLPR. These polymorphisms have previously been linked to panic disorder and anxious symptomology and personality, respectively. G-allele carriers of CRHR1 (rs878886 showed no acquisition of fear conditioned responses (FPS to the threat cue in the uninstructed phase, whereas fear acquisition was present in C/C homozygotes. Moreover, carrying the risk alleles of both rs878886 (G-allele and 5HTTLPR (short allele was associated with increased FPS to the threat context during this phase. After explicit instructions regarding the threat contingency were given, the cue FPS and context FPS normalized in all genotype groups. The present results indicate that genetic variability in the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1, especially in interaction with the 5HTTLPR, is involved in the acquisition of fear in humans. This translates prior animal findings to the human realm.

  6. Selective Ionic Transport Pathways in Phosphorene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Anmin; Cheng, Yingchun; Ning, Shoucong; Foroozan, Tara; Yasaei, Poya; Li, Wen; Song, Boao; Yuan, Yifei; Chen, Lin; Salehi-Khojin, Amin; Mashayek, Farzad; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza

    2016-04-13

    Despite many theoretical predictions indicating exceptionally low energy barriers of ionic transport in phosphorene, the ionic transport pathways in this two-dimensional (2D) material has not been experimentally demonstrated. Here, using in situ aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and density functional theory, we studied sodium ion transport in phosphorene. Our high-resolution TEM imaging complemented by electron energy loss spectroscopy demonstrates a precise description of anisotropic sodium ions migration along the [100] direction in phosphorene. This work also provides new insight into the effect of surface and the edge sites on the transport properties of phosphorene. According to our observation, the sodium ion transport is preferred in zigzag edge rather than the armchair edge. The use of this highly selective ionic transport property may endow phosphorene with new functionalities for novel chemical device applications.

  7. Use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and risk of re-operation due to post-surgical bleeding in breast cancer patients: a Danish population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gärtner, Rune; Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre; Hundborg, Heidi Holmager

    2010-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) decrease platelet-function, which suggests that SSRI use may increase the risk of post-surgical bleeding. Few studies have investigated this potential association.......Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) decrease platelet-function, which suggests that SSRI use may increase the risk of post-surgical bleeding. Few studies have investigated this potential association....

  8. Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D QSAR) and pharmacophore elucidation of tetrahydropyran derivatives as serotonin and norepinephrine transporter inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharkar, Prashant S.; Reith, Maarten E. A.; Dutta, Aloke K.

    2008-01-01

    Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D QSAR) using comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) was performed on a series of substituted tetrahydropyran (THP) derivatives possessing serotonin (SERT) and norepinephrine (NET) transporter inhibitory activities. The study aimed to rationalize the potency of these inhibitors for SERT and NET as well as the observed selectivity differences for NET over SERT. The dataset consisted of 29 molecules, of which 23 molecules were used as the training set for deriving CoMFA models for SERT and NET uptake inhibitory activities. Superimpositions were performed using atom-based fitting and 3-point pharmacophore-based alignment. Two charge calculation methods, Gasteiger-Hückel and semiempirical PM3, were tried. Both alignment methods were analyzed in terms of their predictive abilities and produced comparable results with high internal and external predictivities. The models obtained using the 3-point pharmacophore-based alignment outperformed the models with atom-based fitting in terms of relevant statistics and interpretability of the generated contour maps. Steric fields dominated electrostatic fields in terms of contribution. The selectivity analysis (NET over SERT), though yielded models with good internal predictivity, showed very poor external test set predictions. The analysis was repeated with 24 molecules after systematically excluding so-called outliers (5 out of 29) from the model derivation process. The resulting CoMFA model using the atom-based fitting exhibited good statistics and was able to explain most of the selectivity (NET over SERT)-discriminating factors. The presence of -OH substituent on the THP ring was found to be one of the most important factors governing the NET selectivity over SERT. Thus, a 4-point NET-selective pharmacophore, after introducing this newly found H-bond donor/acceptor feature in addition to the initial 3-point pharmacophore, was proposed.

  9. Meta-analysis of molecular imaging of serotonin transporters in ecstasy/polydrug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Carl Alexander; Jones, Andrew; Montgomery, Catharine

    2016-04-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis on the available data from studies investigating SERTs in ecstasy users and polydrug using controls. From 7 studies we compared data from 157 ecstasy users and 148 controls across 14 brain regions. The main effect suggested ecstasy/MDMA related SERT reductions (SMD=0.52, 95% CIs [0.40, 0.65]; Z=8.36, pEcstasy users showed significant SERT reductions in 11 out of the 14 regions, including every neocortical and limbic region analysed. Greatest effects were observed in the occipital cortex (SMD=1.09, 95% CIs [0.70, 1.48]). No group effects were observed in subcortical areas of the caudate, putamen and midbrain. Literature on Postsynaptic 5HT2A receptor imaging was synthesised with these results. We conclude that, in line with preclinical data, serotonin axons with the longest projections from the raphe nuclei appear to be most affected by ecstasy/MDMA use. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Face and emotion expression processing and the serotonin transporter polymorphism 5-HTTLPR/rs22531.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, A; Kiy, A; Reuter, M; Sommer, W; Wilhelm, O

    2016-06-01

    Face cognition, including face identity and facial expression processing, is a crucial component of socio-emotional abilities, characterizing humans as highest developed social beings. However, for these trait domains molecular genetic studies investigating gene-behavior associations based on well-founded phenotype definitions are still rare. We examined the relationship between 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 polymorphisms - related to serotonin-reuptake - and the ability to perceive and recognize faces and emotional expressions in human faces. For this aim we conducted structural equation modeling on data from 230 young adults, obtained by using a comprehensive, multivariate task battery with maximal effort tasks. By additionally modeling fluid intelligence and immediate and delayed memory factors, we aimed to address the discriminant relationships of the 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 polymorphisms with socio-emotional abilities. We found a robust association between the 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 polymorphism and facial emotion perception. Carriers of two long (L) alleles outperformed carriers of one or two S alleles. Weaker associations were present for face identity perception and memory for emotional facial expressions. There was no association between the 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 polymorphism and non-social abilities, demonstrating discriminant validity of the relationships. We discuss the implications and possible neural mechanisms underlying these novel findings. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  11. Increased risk of severe congenital heart defects in offspring exposed to selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors in early pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Tanja Majbrit; Hansen, Anne Vinkel; Garne, Ester

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies suggest a possible association between maternal use of selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) during early pregnancy and congenital heart defects (CHD). The purpose of this study was to verify this association by using validated data from the Danish EUROCAT...... terminated due to congenital anomalies. The study population consisted of all registered pregnancies (n = 72,280) in Funen, Denmark in the period 1995-2008. SSRI-use was assessed using The Danish National Prescription Registry, information on marital status, maternal educational level, income, and country...... of origin from Statistics Denmark was used as indicators of socioeconomic situation, and the CHD were studied in subgroups defined by EUROCAT. Logistic Regression was used to investigate the association between redeemed prescriptions for SSRIs and CHD. RESULTS: The risk of severe CHD in the offspring...

  12. Effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on thought-action fusion, metacognitions, and thought suppression in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besiroglu, Lutfullah; Çetinkaya, Nuralay; Selvi, Yavuz; Atli, Abdullah

    2011-01-01

    We aimed to assess whether cognitive processes change over time in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) receiving selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors without cognitive behavioral therapy and to investigate the factors associated with probable cognitive changes. During the 16 weeks of the study, 55 patients who met the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, criteria for OCD received open-label treatment with sertraline (100-200 mg/d) or fluoxetine (40-80 mg/d) and were assessed using the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Thought-Action Fusion Scale (TAFS), Metacognitions Questionnaire (MCQ-30), and White Bear Suppression Inventory (WBSI). The Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (P < .001), BDI (P < .001), TAFS morality (P < .005), MCQ-30 (P < .01), and WBSI (P < .005) scores at follow-up were significantly lower than baseline scores. When we excluded OCD patients with depressive disorder (n = 12), statistical significance in paired comparisons for MCQ and WBSI disappeared. Similarly, when OCD patients with religious obsessions (n = 16) were excluded, paired comparisons for MCQ and TAF morality were not statistically significant. Changes in BDI, TAFS morality, MCQ-30, and WBSI (P < .005) were significantly correlated with changes in severity of obsessions, but not that of compulsions. After controlling for the change in depression severity, significant correlations between changes in obsessive and cognitive scales did not continue to have statistical significance. The BDI changes (P < .05) significantly explained the changes in symptom severity in a linear regression model. Our findings suggest that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors can change appraisals of obsessive intrusions via their effects on negative emotions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine does not change rectal sensitivity and symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome: a double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiken, Sjoerd D.; Tytgat, Guido N. J.; Boeckxstaens, Guy E. E.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Although widely prescribed, the evidence for the use of antidepressants for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is limited. In this study, we hypothesized that fluoxetine (Prozac), a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, has visceral analgesic properties, leading to

  14. Simultaneous initiation (coinitiation) of pharmacotherapy with triiodothyronine and a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor for major depressive disorder: a quantitative synthesis of double-blind studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papakostas, George I.; Cooper-Kazaz, Rena; Appelhof, Bente C.; Posternak, Michael A.; Johnson, Daniel P.; Klibanski, Anne; Lerer, Bernard; Fava, Maurizio

    2009-01-01

    To examine the efficacy and overall tolerability of the simultaneous initiation of treatment (coinitiation) with triiodothyronine (T3) and a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) for major depressive disorder (MDD). Sources of date were Medline/Pubmed, EMBASE, the Cochrane database, and

  15. Rate of improvement during and across three treatments for panic disorder with or without agoraphobia : Cognitive behavioral therapy, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor or both combined

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Apeldoorn, Franske J.; Van Hout, Wiljo J. P. J.; Timmerman, Marieke E.; Mersch, Peter Paul A.; den Boer, Johan A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Existing literature on panic disorder (PD) yields no data regarding the differential rates of improvement during Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI) or both combined (CBT+SSRI). Method: Patients were randomized to CBT, SSRI or CBT+SSRI which

  16. MS-377, a novel selective sigma(1) receptor ligand, reverses phencyclidine-induced release of dopamine and serotonin in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, S; Horikomi, K; Kato, T

    2001-09-21

    A novel selective sigma(1) receptor ligand, (R)-(+)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-[4-(2-methoxyethyl)piperazin-1-yl]methyl-2-pyrrolidinone L-tartrate (MS-377), inhibits phencyclidine (1-(1-phenylcyclohexyl)piperidine; PCP)-induced behaviors in animal models. In this study, we measured extracellular dopamine and serotonin levels in the rat brain after treatment with MS-377 alone, using in vivo microdialysis. We also examined the effects of MS-377 on extracellular dopamine and serotonin levels in the rat medial prefrontal cortex after treatment with PCP. MS-377 itself had no significant effects on dopamine release in the striatum (10 mg/kg, p.o.) nor on dopamine or serotonin release in the medial prefrontal cortex (1 and 10 mg/kg, p.o.). PCP (3 mg/kg, i.p.) markedly increased dopamine and serotonin release in the medial prefrontal cortex. MS-377 (1 mg/kg, p.o.), when administered 60 min prior to PCP, significantly attenuated this effect of PCP. These results suggest that the inhibitory effects of MS-377 on PCP-induced behaviors are partly mediated by inhibition of the increase in dopamine and serotonin release in the rat medial prefrontal cortex caused by PCP.

  17. Homology modeling of the serotonin transporter: Insights into the primary escitalopram-binding Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anne Marie; Tagmose, L.; Jørgensen, A.M.M.

    2007-01-01

    -ray structure of the closely related amino acid transporter, Aquifex aeolicus leucine transporter (LeuT), provides an opportunity to develop a three-dimensional model of the structure of SERT. We present herein a homology model of SERT using LeuT as the template and containing escitalopram as a bound ligand...

  18. Depletion of serotonin selectively impairs short-term memory without affecting long-term memory in odor learning in the terrestrial slug Limax valentianus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirahata, Takaaki; Tsunoda, Makoto; Santa, Tomofumi; Kirino, Yutaka; Watanabe, Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    The terrestrial slug Limax is able to acquire short-term and long-term memories during aversive odor-taste associative learning. We investigated the effect of the selective serotonergic neurotoxin 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) on memory. Behavioral studies indicated that 5,7-DHT impaired short-term memory but not long-term memory. HPLC (high-performance liquid chromatography) analysis revealed that 5,7-DHT significantly reduced serotonin content in the central nervous system. The present study suggests that acquisition, retention, and/or retrieval of short-term memory involves serotonin, and neither acquisition nor retrieval of long-term memory requires serotonin at a level as high as that required for short-term memory.

  19. Serotonin metabolism in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schutte, H.H.

    1976-01-01

    The metabolism of serotonin in rat brain was studied by measuring specific activities of tryptophan in plasma and of serotonin, 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid and tryptophan in the brain after intravenous injection of tritiated tryptophan. For a detailed analysis of the specific activities, a computer simulation technique was used. It was found that only a minor part of serotonin in rat brain is synthesized from tryptophan rapidly transported from the blood. It is suggested that the brain tryptophan originates from brain proteins. It was also found that the serotonin in rat brain is divided into more than one metabolic compartment

  20. [{sup 11}C]SMe-ADAM, an imaging agent for the brain serotonin transporter: synthesis, pharmacological characterization and microPET studies in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zessin, Joerg [Institut fuer Bioanorganische und Radiopharmazeutische Chemie, Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, 01314 Dresden (Germany)]. E-mail: j.zessin@fz-rossendorf.de; Deuther-Conrad, Winnie [Institut fuer Interdisziplinaere Isotopenforschung, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Kretzschmar, Marion [Institut fuer Bioanorganische und Radiopharmazeutische Chemie, Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Wuest, Frank [Institut fuer Bioanorganische und Radiopharmazeutische Chemie, Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Pawelke, Beate [Institut fuer Bioanorganische und Radiopharmazeutische Chemie, Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Brust, Peter [Institut fuer Interdisziplinaere Isotopenforschung, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Steinbach, Joerg [Institut fuer Interdisziplinaere Isotopenforschung, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Bergmann, Ralf [Institut fuer Bioanorganische und Radiopharmazeutische Chemie, Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, 01314 Dresden (Germany)

    2006-01-15

    N,N-Dimethyl-2-(2-amino-4-methylthiophenylthio)benzylamine (S Me-Adam, 1) is a highly potent and selective inhibitor of the serotonin transporter (SPERT). This compound was labeled with carbon-11 by methylation of the S-desmethyl precursor 10 with [{sup 11}C]methyl iodide to obtain the potential positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand [{sup 11}C]S Me-Adam. The radiochemical yield was 27{+-}5%, and the specific radioactivity was 26-40 GBq/{mu}mol at the end of synthesis. Ex vivo and in vivo biodistribution experiments in rats demonstrated a rapid accumulation of the radiotracer in brain regions known to be rich in SPERT, such as the thalamus/hypothalamus region (3.59{+-}0.41%ID/g at 5 min after injection). The specific uptake reached a thalamus to cerebellum ratio of 6.74{+-}0.95 at 60 min postinjection. The [{sup 11}C]SMe-ADAM uptake in the thalamus was significantly decreased by pretreatment with fluoxetine to 38{+-}11% of the control value. Furthermore, no metabolites of [{sup 11}C]SMe-ADAM could be detected in the SERT-rich regions of the rat brain. It is concluded that [{sup 11}C]SMe-ADAM may be a suitable PET ligand for SERT imaging in the living brain.

  1. [11C]SMe-ADAM, an imaging agent for the brain serotonin transporter: synthesis, pharmacological characterization and microPET studies in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zessin, Joerg; Deuther-Conrad, Winnie; Kretzschmar, Marion; Wuest, Frank; Pawelke, Beate; Brust, Peter; Steinbach, Joerg; Bergmann, Ralf

    2006-01-01

    N,N-Dimethyl-2-(2-amino-4-methylthiophenylthio)benzylamine (S Me-Adam, 1) is a highly potent and selective inhibitor of the serotonin transporter (SPERT). This compound was labeled with carbon-11 by methylation of the S-desmethyl precursor 10 with [ 11 C]methyl iodide to obtain the potential positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand [ 11 C]S Me-Adam. The radiochemical yield was 27±5%, and the specific radioactivity was 26-40 GBq/μmol at the end of synthesis. Ex vivo and in vivo biodistribution experiments in rats demonstrated a rapid accumulation of the radiotracer in brain regions known to be rich in SPERT, such as the thalamus/hypothalamus region (3.59±0.41%ID/g at 5 min after injection). The specific uptake reached a thalamus to cerebellum ratio of 6.74±0.95 at 60 min postinjection. The [ 11 C]SMe-ADAM uptake in the thalamus was significantly decreased by pretreatment with fluoxetine to 38±11% of the control value. Furthermore, no metabolites of [ 11 C]SMe-ADAM could be detected in the SERT-rich regions of the rat brain. It is concluded that [ 11 C]SMe-ADAM may be a suitable PET ligand for SERT imaging in the living brain

  2. [11C]SMe-ADAM, an imaging agent for the brain serotonin transporter: synthesis, pharmacological characterization and microPET studies in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zessin, Jörg; Deuther-Conrad, Winnie; Kretzschmar, Marion; Wüst, Frank; Pawelke, Beate; Brust, Peter; Steinbach, Jörg; Bergmann, Ralf

    2006-01-01

    N,N-Dimethyl-2-(2-amino-4-methylthiophenylthio)benzylamine (SMe-ADAM, 1) is a highly potent and selective inhibitor of the serotonin transporter (SERT). This compound was labeled with carbon-11 by methylation of the S-desmethyl precursor 10 with [(11)C]methyl iodide to obtain the potential positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand [(11)C]SMe-ADAM. The radiochemical yield was 27 +/- 5%, and the specific radioactivity was 26-40 GBq/micromol at the end of synthesis. Ex vivo and in vivo biodistribution experiments in rats demonstrated a rapid accumulation of the radiotracer in brain regions known to be rich in SERT, such as the thalamus/hypothalamus region (3.59 +/- 0.41%ID/g at 5 min after injection). The specific uptake reached a thalamus to cerebellum ratio of 6.74 +/- 0.95 at 60 min postinjection. The [(11)C]SMe-ADAM uptake in the thalamus was significantly decreased by pretreatment with fluoxetine to 38 +/- 11% of the control value. Furthermore, no metabolites of [(11)C]SMe-ADAM could be detected in the SERT-rich regions of the rat brain. It is concluded that [(11)C]SMe-ADAM may be a suitable PET ligand for SERT imaging in the living brain.

  3. Synthesis and evaluation of 125I 2-aminophenylthio-5-iodo-N,N-dimethyl benzylamine for Exploration of Serotonin Transporter Exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palakas, S.; Vercouillie, J; Emond, P.; Guilloteau, D

    2009-07-01

    Full text: Serotonin transporter (T-5-HT) plays an important roles in the control of serotoninergic neurotransmission in both amplitude and interaction period. The imbalance in serotoninergic neurotransmission leads to neuropsychiatric symptom such as depression and in neuro degenerative diseases, Parkinson and Alzheimer diseases. In the present study, the [125 I ] 2-aminophenylthio-5-iodo-N,N-dimethyl benzylamine, a derivative of the 2-[[2-((dimethylamino)methyl)phenyl]thio]-5-iodo phenylamine (ADAM) was synthesized with iodine atom transferred from aniline ring of ADAM to the N,N-dimethyl benzylamine ring by chemical synthesis. The I-125 labeling efficiency was 60%. It is expected that this will be useful for serotonin transporter exploration

  4. Serotonin regulates brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in select brain regions during acute psychological stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-guo Jiang; Shi-li Jin; Gong-ying Li; Qing-qing Li; Zhi-ruo Li; Hong-xia Ma; Chuan-jun Zhuo; Rong-huan Jiang; Min-jie Ye

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that serotonin (5-HT) might interact with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) during the stress response. However, the relationship between 5-HT and BDNF expression under purely psychological stress is unclear. In this study, one hour before psychological stress exposure, the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT or antagonist MDL73005, or the 5-HT2A receptor agonist DOI or antagonist ketanserin were administered to rats exposed to psychological stress. Immunohistochemistry andin situ hybridization revealed that after psychological stress, with the exception of the ventral tegmental area, BDNF protein and mRNA expression levels were higher in the 5-HT1A and the 5-HT2A receptor agonist groups compared with the solvent control no-stress or psychological stress group in the CA1 and CA3 of the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, central amygdaloid nucleus, dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus, dentate gyrus, shell of the nucleus accumbens and the midbrain periaqueductal gray. There was no signiifcant difference between the two agonist groups. In contrast, after stress exposure, BDNF protein and mRNA expression levels were lower in the 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor antagonist groups than in the solvent control non-stress group, with the exception of the ventral tegmental area. Our ifndings suggest that 5-HT regulates BDNF expression in a rat model of acute psychological stress.

  5. An Open-Label Pilot Study of Combined Augmentation With Creatine Monohydrate and 5-Hydroxytryptophan for Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor- or Serotonin-Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitor-Resistant Depression in Adult Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kious, Brent M; Sabic, Hana; Sung, Young-Hoon; Kondo, Douglas G; Renshaw, Perry

    2017-10-01

    Many women with major depressive disorder (MDD) respond inadequately to standard treatments. Augmentation of conventional antidepressants with creatine monohydrate and 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) could correct deficits in serotonin production and brain bioenergetics associated with depression in women, yielding synergistic benefit. We describe an open-label study of 5-HTP and creatine augmentation in women with MDD who had failed selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) or serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) monotherapy. Fifteen women who were adequately adherent to an SSRI or SNRI and currently experiencing MDD, with a 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) score of 16 or higher, were treated with 5 g of creatine monohydrate daily and 100 mg of 5-HTP twice daily for 8 weeks, with 4 weeks of posttreatment follow-up. The primary outcome was change in mean HAM-D scores. Mean HAM-D scores declined from 18.9 (SD, 2.5) at pretreatment visits to 7.5 (SD, 4.4) (P creatine and 5-HTP may represent an effective augmentation strategy for women with SSRI- or SNRI-resistant depression. Given the limitations of this small, open-label trial, future study in randomized, placebo-controlled trials is warranted.

  6. The effect of antenatal depression and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment on nerve growth factor signaling in human placenta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Kaihola

    Full Text Available Depressive symptoms during pregnancy are common and may have impact on the developing child. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs are the most prescribed antidepressant treatment, but unfortunately, these treatments can also negatively affect the behavioral development and health of a child during pregnancy. In addition, serotonin (5-HT exerts neurotrophic actions with thus far not fully known effects in the offspring. The neurotrophic growth factor (NGF is involved in neuronal cell survival and differentiation, and altered placenta levels have been found to increase the risk for pregnancy complications, similar to those found in women treated with SSRIs. We therefore investigated whether the NGF signaling pathway was altered in the placenta from women treated with SSRIs (n = 12 and compared them with placenta from depressed (n = 12 and healthy mothers (n = 12. Results from immunohistochemical stainings revealed that placental NGF protein levels of SSRI-treated women were increased in both trophoblasts and endothelial cells compared with depressed and control women. In addition, downstream of the NGF receptor TrkA, increased levels of the signaling proteins ROCK2 and phosphorylated Raf-1 were found in stromal cells and a tendency towards increased levels of ROCK2 in trophoblasts and endothelial cells in SSRI-treated women when compared to healthy controls. SSRI-treated women also displayed increased levels of phosphorylated ROCK2 in all placental cell types studied in comparison with depressed and control women. Interestingly, in placental endothelial cells from depressed women, NGF levels were significantly lower compared to control women, but ROCK2 levels were increased compared with control and SSRI-treated women. Taken together, these results show that the NGF signaling and downstream pathways in the placenta are affected by SSRI treatment and/or antenatal depression. This might lead to an altered placental function, although the

  7. Non-tricyclic and Non-selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Antidepressants and Recurrent Falls in Frail Older Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naples, Jennifer G; Kotlarczyk, Mary P; Perera, Subashan; Greenspan, Susan L; Hanlon, Joseph T

    2016-12-01

    To determine the risk of recurrent falls associated with antidepressants other than tricyclics (TCAs) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) among frail older women. This is a secondary analysis of the Zoledronic acid in frail Elders to STrengthen bone, or ZEST, trial data treated as a longitudinal cohort in 181 frail, osteoporotic women aged ≥65 years in long-term care. The primary exposure was individual non-TCA/non-SSRI antidepressants (i.e., serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, mirtazapine, trazodone, and bupropion) at baseline and 6 months. The main outcome was recurrent (at least two) falls within 6 months after antidepressant exposure. Adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were derived using a generalized estimating equations model. At least 15% of women experienced recurrent falls between 0-6 and 6-12 months. At baseline and 6 months, 18.2% and 6.9% had a non-TCA/non-SSRI antidepressant, respectively. Adjusting for demographics, health status, and other drugs that increase risk of falls, non-TCA/non-SSRI antidepressant exposure significantly increased the risk of recurrent falls (AOR: 2.14; 95% CI: 1.01-4.54). Fall risk further increased after removing bupropion from the non-TCA/non-SSRI antidepressant group in sensitivity analyses (AOR: 2.73; 95% CI: 1.24-6.01). Other antidepressant classes may not be safer than TCAs/SSRIs with respect to recurrent falls in frail older women. Copyright © 2016 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Individual differences in scanpaths correspond with serotonin transporter genotype and behavioral phenotype in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert R Gibboni

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Scanpaths (the succession of fixations and saccades during spontaneous viewing contain information about the image but also about the viewer. To determine the viewer-dependent factors in the scanpaths of monkeys, we trained three adult males (Macaca mulatta to look for 3 s at images of conspecific facial expressions with either direct or averted gaze. The subjects showed significant differences on four basic scanpath parameters (number of fixations, fixation duration, saccade length, and total scanpath length when viewing the same facial expression/gaze direction combinations. Furthermore, we found differences between monkeys in feature preference and in the temporal order in which features were visited on different facial expressions. Overall, the between-subject variability was larger than the within- subject variability, suggesting that scanpaths reflect individual preferences in allocating visual attention to various features in aggressive, neutral, and appeasing facial expressions. Individual scanpath characteristics were brought into register with the genotype for the serotonin transporter regulatory gene (5-HTTLPR and with behavioral characteristics such as expression of anticipatory anxiety and impulsiveness/hesitation in approaching food in the presence of a potentially dangerous object.

  9. Boys' serotonin transporter genotype affects maternal behavior through self-control: a case of evocative gene-environment correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pener-Tessler, Roni; Avinun, Reut; Uzefovsky, Florina; Edelman, Shany; Ebstein, Richard P; Knafo, Ariel

    2013-02-01

    Self-control, involving processes such as delaying gratification, concentrating, planning, following instructions, and adapting emotions and behavior to situational requirements and social norms, may have a profound impact on children's adjustment. The importance of self-control suggests that parents are likely to modify their parenting based on children's ability for self-control. We study the effect of children's self-control, a trait partially molded by genetics, on their mothers' parenting, a process of evocative gene-environment correlation. Israeli 3.5-year-old twins (N = 320) participated in a lab session in which their mothers' parenting was observed. DNA was available from most children (N = 228). Mothers described children's self-control in a questionnaire. Boys were lower in self-control and received less positive parenting from their mothers, in comparison with girls. For boys, and not for girls, the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region gene predicted mothers' levels of positive parenting, an effect mediated by boys' self-control. The implications of this evocative gene-environment correlation and the observed sex differences are discussed.

  10. Association between a serotonin transporter promoter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) and personality disorder traits in a community sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Rianne M.; Samuels, Jack F.; Riddle, Mark A.; Bienvenu, O. Joseph; Grados, Marco A.; Reti, Irving M.; Eaton, William W.; Liang, Kung-Yee; Nestadt, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    Background The serotonin transporter (SERT) polymorphism (5HTTLPR) has been reported to be associated with several psychiatric conditions. Specific personality disorders could be intermediate factors in the known relationship between 5HTTLPR and psychiatric disorders. This is the first study to test the association between this polymorphism and dimensions of all DSM-IV personality disorders in a community sample. Methods 374 white participants were assessed by clinical psychologists using the International Personality Disorder Examination (IPDE). Associations between dimensions of each DSM-IV personality disorder and the long (l) and short (s) alleles of the 5HTTLPR were evaluated using nonparametric tests and regression models. Results The s allele of the 5HTTLPR polymorphism was significantly associated with higher avoidant personality trait scores in the whole sample. Males with the s allele had a significantly lower likelihood of higher obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD) trait scores, whereas females with the s allele were likely to have higher OCPD personality trait scores. Conclusion This paper provides preliminary data on the relationship between personality disorders and the 5HTTLPR polymorphism. The relationship of the s allele and avoidant PD is consistent with findings of a nonspecific relationship of this polymorphism to anxiety and depressive disorders. Concerning the unusual sexual dimorphic result with OCPD, several hypotheses are presented. These findings need further replication, including a more detailed study of additional variants in SERT. PMID:21450307

  11. Association between a serotonin transporter promoter polymorphism (5HTTLPR) and personality disorder traits in a community sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Rianne M; Samuels, Jack F; Riddle, Mark A; Joseph Bienvenu, O; Grados, Marco A; Reti, Irving M; Eaton, William W; Liang, Kung-Yee; Nestadt, Gerald

    2011-09-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) polymorphism (5HTTLPR) has been reported to be associated with several psychiatric conditions. Specific personality disorders could be intermediate factors in the known relationship between 5HTTLPR and psychiatric disorders. This is the first study to test the association between this polymorphism and dimensions of all DSM-IV personality disorders in a community sample. 374 white participants were assessed by clinical psychologists using the International Personality Disorder Examination (IPDE). Associations between dimensions of each DSM-IV personality disorder and the long (l) and short (s) alleles of the 5HTTLPR were evaluated using non-parametric tests and regression models. The s allele of the 5HTTLPR polymorphism was significantly associated with higher avoidant personality trait scores in the whole sample. Males with the s allele had a significantly lower likelihood of higher obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD) trait scores, whereas females with the s allele were likely to have higher OCPD personality trait scores. This paper provides preliminary data on the relationship between personality disorders and the 5HTTLPR polymorphism. The relationship of the s allele and avoidant PD is consistent with findings of a nonspecific relationship of this polymorphism to anxiety and depressive disorders. Concerning the unusual sexual dimorphic result with OCPD, several hypotheses are presented. These findings need further replication, including a more detailed study of additional variants in SERT. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Variations in the serotonin-transporter gene are associated with attention bias patterns to positive and negative emotion faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Edgar, Koraly; Bar-Haim, Yair; McDermott, Jennifer Martin; Gorodetsky, Elena; Hodgkinson, Colin A; Goldman, David; Ernst, Monique; Pine, Daniel S; Fox, Nathan A

    2010-03-01

    Both attention biases to threat and a serotonin-transporter gene polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) have been linked to heightened neural activation to threat and the emergence of anxiety. The short allele of 5-HTTLPR may act via its effect on neurotransmitter availability, while attention biases shape broad patterns of cognitive processing. We examined individual differences in attention bias to emotion faces as a function of 5-HTTLPR genotype. Adolescents (N=117) were classified for presumed SLC6A4 expression based on 5-HTTLPR-low (SS, SL(G), or L(G)L(G)), intermediate (SL(A) or L(A)L(G)), or high (L(A)L(A)). Participants completed the dot-probe task, measuring attention biases toward or away from angry and happy faces. Biases for angry faces increased with the genotype-predicted neurotransmission levels (low>intermediate>high). The reverse pattern was evident for happy faces. The data indicate a linear relation between 5-HTTLPR allelic status and attention biases to emotion, demonstrating a genetic mechanism for biased attention using ecologically valid stimuli that target socioemotional adaptation. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Meta-analysis of the serotonin transporter promoter variant (5-HTTLPR) in relation to adverse environment and antisocial behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tielbeek, Jorim J; Karlsson Linnér, Richard; Beers, Koko; Posthuma, Danielle; Popma, Arne; Polderman, Tinca J C

    2016-07-01

    Several studies have suggested an association between antisocial, aggressive, and delinquent behavior and the short variant of the serotonin transporter gene polymorphism (5-HTTLPR). Yet, genome wide and candidate gene studies in humans have not convincingly shown an association between these behaviors and 5-HTTLPR. Moreover, individual studies examining the effect of 5-HTTLPR in the presence or absence of adverse environmental factors revealed inconsistent results. We therefore performed a meta-analysis to test for the robustness of the potential interaction effect of the "long-short" variant of the 5-HTTLPR genotype and environmental adversities, on antisocial behavior. Eight studies, comprising of 12 reasonably independent samples, totaling 7,680 subjects with an effective sample size of 6,724, were included in the meta-analysis. Although our extensive meta-analysis resulted in a significant interaction effect between the 5-HTTLPR genotype and environmental adversities on antisocial behavior, the methodological constraints of the included studies hampered a confident interpretation of our results, and firm conclusions regarding the direction of effect. Future studies that aim to examine biosocial mechanisms that influence the etiology of antisocial behavior should make use of larger samples, extend to genome-wide genetic risk scores and properly control for covariate interaction terms, ensuring valid and well-powered research designs. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The serotonin transporter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) and cortisol stress responsiveness: preliminary evidence for a modulating role for sleep quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dalfsen, Jens H; Markus, C Rob

    2018-05-23

    The short (S) allele of a functional polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) within the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) is found to predispose the risk for stress-related affective disorders relative to the long (L) allele. Evidence suggests that elevated stress reactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis might underlie this association although there is little understanding about the origin of inconsistent findings. Since inadequate sleep is commonly known to promote HPA stress reactivity, it might well play an important modulating role. The present study tested this hypothesis by investigating whether sleep quality moderates the relationship between 5-HTTLPR and cortisol stress responsiveness. From a large 5-HTTLPR database (n = 771), a sample of healthy male and female participants homozygous for either the 5-HTTLPR S-allele (n = 25) or L-allele (n = 25) were assessed for sleep quality and salivary cortisol secretion during acute laboratory stress. Diminished sleep quality was found to exclusively potentiate cortisol stress reactivity in the homozygous L-allele genotype. Accounting for this 5-HTTLPR-dependent influence enhanced the predictive value of 5-HTTLPR on cortisol stress responsiveness, revealing greater HPA reactivity in S-allele relative to L-allele carriers. Current findings suggest that variations in sleep quality may serve as a confounding factor in the search for genetic differences in stress sensitivity and related affective disorders.

  15. Adolescent Loneliness and the Interaction between the Serotonin Transporter Gene (5-HTTLPR and Parental Support: A Replication Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette W M Spithoven

    Full Text Available Gene-by-environment interaction (GxEs studies have gained popularity over the last decade, but the robustness of such observed interactions has been questioned. The current study contributes to this debate by replicating the only study on the interaction between the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR and perceived parental support on adolescents' peer-related loneliness. A total of 1,111 adolescents (51% boys with an average age of 13.70 years (SD = 0.93 participated and three annual waves of data were collected. At baseline, adolescent-reported parental support and peer-related loneliness were assessed and genetic information was collected. Assessment of peer-related loneliness was repeated at Waves 2 and 3. Using a cohort-sequential design, a Latent Growth Curve Model was estimated. Overall, a slight increase of loneliness over time was found. However, the development of loneliness over time was found to be different for boys and girls: girls' levels of loneliness increased over time, whereas boys' levels of loneliness decreased. Parental support was inversely related to baseline levels of loneliness, but unrelated to change of loneliness over time. We were unable to replicate the main effect of 5-HTTLPR or the 5-HTTLPR x Support interaction effect. In the Discussion, we examine the implications of our non-replication.

  16. Biologically inspired water purification through selective transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, E C; Soncini, R M; Weiland, L M

    2013-01-01

    Biologically inspired systems based on cellular mechanics demonstrate the ability to selectively transport ions across a bilayer membrane. These systems may be observed in nature in plant roots, which remove select nutrients from the surrounding soil against significant concentration gradients. Using biomimetic principles in the design of tailored active materials allows for the development of selective membranes for capturing and filtering targeted ions. Combining this biomimetic transport system with a method for reclaiming the captured ions will allow for increased removal potential. To illustrate this concept, a device for removing nutrients from waterways to aid in reducing eutrophication is outlined and discussed. Presented is a feasibility study of various cellular configurations designed for this purpose, focusing on maximizing nutrient uptake. The results enable a better understanding of the benefits and obstacles when developing these cellularly inspired systems. (paper)

  17. Biophysics of active vesicle transport, an intermediate step that couples excitation and exocytosis of serotonin in the neuronal soma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco F De-Miguel

    Full Text Available Transmitter exocytosis from the neuronal soma is evoked by brief trains of high frequency electrical activity and continues for several minutes. Here we studied how active vesicle transport towards the plasma membrane contributes to this slow phenomenon in serotonergic leech Retzius neurons, by combining electron microscopy, the kinetics of exocytosis obtained from FM1-43 dye fluorescence as vesicles fuse with the plasma membrane, and a diffusion equation incorporating the forces of local confinement and molecular motors. Electron micrographs of neurons at rest or after stimulation with 1 Hz trains showed cytoplasmic clusters of dense core vesicles at 1.5±0.2 and 3.7±0.3 µm distances from the plasma membrane, to which they were bound through microtubule bundles. By contrast, after 20 Hz stimulation vesicle clusters were apposed to the plasma membrane, suggesting that transport was induced by electrical stimulation. Consistently, 20 Hz stimulation of cultured neurons induced spotted FM1-43 fluorescence increases with one or two slow sigmoidal kinetics, suggesting exocytosis from an equal number of vesicle clusters. These fluorescence increases were prevented by colchicine, which suggested microtubule-dependent vesicle transport. Model fitting to the fluorescence kinetics predicted that 52-951 vesicles/cluster were transported along 0.60-6.18 µm distances at average 11-95 nms(-1 velocities. The ATP cost per vesicle fused (0.4-72.0, calculated from the ratio of the ΔG(process/ΔG(ATP, depended on the ratio of the traveling velocity and the number of vesicles in the cluster. Interestingly, the distance-dependence of the ATP cost per vesicle was bistable, with low energy values at 1.4 and 3.3 µm, similar to the average resting distances of the vesicle clusters, and a high energy barrier at 1.6-2.0 µm. Our study confirms that active vesicle transport is an intermediate step for somatic serotonin exocytosis by Retzius neurons and provides a

  18. Inhibition of serotonin but not norepinephrine transport during development produces delayed, persistent perturbations of emotional behaviors in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansorge, Mark S; Morelli, Emanuela; Gingrich, Jay A

    2008-01-02

    Serotonin (5-HT) acts as a neurotransmitter, but also modulates brain maturation during early development. The demonstrated influence of genetic variants on brain function, personality traits, and susceptibility to neuropsychiatric disorders suggests a critical importance of developmental mechanisms. However, little is known about how and when developmentally perturbed 5-HT signaling affects circuitry and resulting behavior. The 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) is a key regulator of extracellular 5-HT levels and we used pharmacologic strategies to manipulate 5-HTT function during development and determine behavioral consequences. Transient exposure to the 5-HTT inhibitors fluoxetine, clomipramine, and citalopram from postnatal day 4 (P4) to P21 produced abnormal emotional behaviors in adult mice. Similar treatment with the norepinephrine transporter (NET) inhibitor, desipramine, did not adversely affect adult behavior, suggesting that 5-HT and norepinephrine (NE) do not share the same effects on brain development. Shifting our period of treatment/testing to P90/P185 failed to mimic the effect of earlier exposure, demonstrating that 5-HT effects on adult behavior are developmentally specific. We have hypothesized that early-life perturbations of 5-HT signaling affect corticolimbic circuits that do not reach maturity until the peri-adolescent period. In support of this idea, we found that abnormal behaviors resulting from postnatal fluoxetine exposure have a post-pubescent onset and persist long after reaching adult age. A better understanding of the underlying 5-HT sensitive circuits and how they are perturbed should lead to new insights into how various genetic polymorphisms confer their risk to carriers. Furthermore, these studies should help determine whether in utero exposure to 5-HTT blocking drugs poses a risk for behavioral abnormalities in later life.

  19. Brain dopamine and serotonin transporter binding are associated with visual attention bias for food in lean men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopman, K E; Roefs, A; Elbers, D C E; Fliers, E; Booij, J; Serlie, M J; la Fleur, S E

    2016-06-01

    In rodents, the striatal dopamine (DA) system and the (hypo)thalamic serotonin (5-HT) system are involved in the regulation of feeding behavior. In lean humans, little is known about the relationship between these brain neurotransmitter systems and feeding. We studied the relationship between striatal DA transporters (DAT) and diencephalic 5-HT transporters (SERT), behavioral tasks and questionnaires, and food intake. We measured striatal DAT and diencephalic SERT binding with [123I]FP-CIT SPECT in 36 lean male subjects. Visual attention bias for food (detection speed and distraction time) and degree of impulsivity were measured using response-latency-based computer tasks. Craving and emotional eating were assessed with questionnaires and ratings of hunger by means of VAS scores. Food intake was assessed through a self-reported online diet journal. Striatal DAT and diencephalic SERT binding negatively correlated with food detection speed (p = 0.008, r = -0.50 and p = 0.002, r = -0.57, respectively), but not with food distraction time, ratings of hunger, craving or impulsivity. Striatal DAT and diencephalic SERT binding did not correlate with free choice food intake, whereas food detection speed positively correlated with total caloric intake (p = 0.001, r = 0.60), protein intake (p = 0.01, r = 0.44), carbohydrate intake (p = 0.03, r = 0.39) and fat intake (p = 0.06, r = 0.35). These results indicate a role for the central 5-HT and DA system in the regulation of visual attention bias for food, which contributes to the motivation to eat, in non-obese, healthy humans. In addition, this study confirms that food detection speed, measured with the latency-based computer task, positively correlates with total food and macronutrient intake.

  20. Common SSRI side-effects in older adults associated with genetic polymorphisms in the serotonin transporter and receptors: Data from a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfield, Lauren D.; Dixon, David; Nowotny, Petra; Lotrich, Francis E.; Pollock, Bruce G.; Kristjansson, Sean D.; Doré, Peter M.; Lenze, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Antidepressant side-effects are a significant public health issue, associated with poor adherence, premature treatment discontinuation and in rare cases significant harm. This is especially relevant for older adults, who assume the largest and most serious burden of medication side-effects. We investigated the association between antidepressant side-effects and genetic variation in the serotonin system in anxious, older adults participating in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of the SSRI escitalopram. Method Adults (n=177) aged ≥ 60 years were randomized to active treatment or placebo for 12-weeks. Side-effects were assessed using the UKU side effect rating scale. Genetic polymorphisms were putative functional variants in the promoters of the serotonin transporter and 1A and 2A receptors (5-HTTLPR (L/S + rs25531), HTR1A rs6295, HTR2A rs6311, respectively). Results Four significant drug-placebo side-effect differences were found, including increased duration of sleep, dry mouth, diarrhea and diminished sexual desire. Analyses using putative high- vs low-transcription genotype groupings revealed 6 pharmacogenetic effects: greater dry mouth and decreased sexual desire for the low- and high-expressing genotypes of the serotonin transporter, respectively, and greater diarrhea with the low-transcription genotype of the 1A receptor. Diminished sexual desire was experienced significantly more in those with high-expressing genotype and either the serotonin transporter, 1A or 2A receptors. There was not a significant relationship between drug concentration and side-effects nor a mean difference in drug concentration between low- and high-expressing genotypes. Conclusion Genetic variation in the 5HT system may predict who develops common SSRI side-effects and why. More work is needed to further characterize this genetic modulation and to translate research findings into strategies useful for more personalized patient care. PMID:24021217

  1. Radiation-induced dysfunction of colonic transport: role of enteric nervous system and of serotonine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, Agnes

    1998-01-01

    One of the most commonly observed features of radiation-induced injury of the gastrointestinal tract is the appearance of severe diarrhea. One difficulty in understanding the origin of radiation-induced diarrhea is the multiplicity of factors implicated, depending on the type of radiation, the dose received and the irradiated field. Colonic transport is regulated for a great part by the enteric nervous system (ENS), in close association with immunocompetent cells, especially mast cells. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the neuro-immune regulation of colonic transport could be implicated in radiation-induced attenuation and recovery of colonic functions. Male Wistar rats were whole-body irradiated at 3.8 Gy neutron or 5 and 10 Gy gamma. At 1 and 3 days after exposure, the colonic epithelium was hypo-responsive to neural stimulation (submucosal plexus). Mechanistic studies were performed after 10 Gy exposure. The decreased colonic transport was associated with the disappearance of both submucosal mast cells and histamine-mediated pathway, together with decreased responses to exogenous histamine. Similarly, the response to exogenous 5-HT was decreased, without any modification of either the neural (5-HT 3 ) or non-neural (5-HT 4 ) pathways. Seven days after exposure, colonic transport capacity returned to normal in spite of the absence of mast cells. However these observations were associated with the reappearance of a histaminergic pathway, the origin of which is still unknown. The part played by 5-HT 3 receptors was increased, together with the appearance of a neurally-associated 5-HT4 receptor-pathway. These results suggest that the decreased influence of the ENS on colonic transport observed 1 and 3 days after exposure may be due to both the disappearance of neuro-immune links and the hypo-responsiveness of colonic epithelium to the mediators released by ENS. The functional recovery at seven days may be related on one hand to the return of altered

  2. Looking on the bright side: biased attention and the human serotonin transporter gene

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Elaine; Ridgewell, Anna; Ashwin, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Humans differ in terms of biased attention for emotional stimuli and these biases can confer differential resilience and vulnerability to emotional disorders. Selective processing of positive emotional information, for example, is associated with enhanced sociability and well-being while a bias for negative material is associated with neuroticism and anxiety. A tendency to selectively avoid negative material might also be associated with mental health and well-being. The neurobiological mecha...

  3. In vitro and in vivo characterisation of nor-{beta}-CIT: a potential radioligand for visualisation of the serotonin transporter in the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, K.A. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden)]|[Kuopio University Hospital, Clinical Physiology, FIN-70210 Kuopio (Finland); Halldin, C. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Hall, H. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Lundkvist, C. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Ginovart, N. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Swahn, C.G. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Farde, L. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-06-10

    Radiolabelled 2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)tropane ({beta}-CIT) has been used in clinical studies for the imaging of dopamine and serotonin transporters with single-photon emission tomography (SPET). 2{beta}-Carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)nortropane (nor-{beta}-CIT) is a des-methyl analogue of {beta}-CIT, which in vitro has tenfold higher affinity (IC{sub 50}=0.36 nM) to the serotonin transporter than {beta}-CIT (IC{sub 50}=4.2 nM). Nor-{beta}-CIT may thus be a useful radioligand for imaging of the serotonin transporter. In the present study iodine-125 and carbon-11 labelled nor-{beta}-CIT were prepared for in vitro autoradiographic studies on post-mortem human brain cryosections and for in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) studies in Cynomolgus monkeys. Whole hemisphere autoradiography with [{sup 125}I]nor-{beta}-CIT demonstrated high binding in the striatum, the thalamus and cortical regions of the human brain. Addition of a high concentration (1 {mu}M) of citalopram inhibited binding in the thalamus and the neocortex, but not in the striatum. In PET studies with [{sup 11}C]nor-{beta}-CIT there was rapid uptake of radioactivity in the monkey brain (6% of injected dose at 15 min) and high accumulation of radioactivity in the striatum, thalamus and neocortex. Thalamus to cerebellum and cortex to cerebellum ratios were 2.5 and 1.8 at 60 min, respectively. The ratios obtained with [{sup 11}C]nor-{beta}-CIT were 20%-40% higher than those previously obtained with [{sup 11}C]{beta}-CIT. Radioactivity in the thalamus and the neocortex but not in the striatum was displaceable with citalopram (5 mg/kg). In conclusion, nor-{beta}-CIT binds to the serotonin transporter in the primate brain in vitro and in vivo and has potential for PET and SPET imaging of the serotonin transporter in human brain. (orig.). With 4 figs.

  4. In vitro and in vivo characterisation of nor-β-CIT: a potential radioligand for visualisation of the serotonin transporter in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstroem, K.A.; Halldin, C.; Hall, H.; Lundkvist, C.; Ginovart, N.; Swahn, C.G.; Farde, L.

    1997-01-01

    Radiolabelled 2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl)tropane (β-CIT) has been used in clinical studies for the imaging of dopamine and serotonin transporters with single-photon emission tomography (SPET). 2β-Carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl)nortropane (nor-β-CIT) is a des-methyl analogue of β-CIT, which in vitro has tenfold higher affinity (IC 50 =0.36 nM) to the serotonin transporter than β-CIT (IC 50 =4.2 nM). Nor-β-CIT may thus be a useful radioligand for imaging of the serotonin transporter. In the present study iodine-125 and carbon-11 labelled nor-β-CIT were prepared for in vitro autoradiographic studies on post-mortem human brain cryosections and for in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) studies in Cynomolgus monkeys. Whole hemisphere autoradiography with [ 125 I[nor-β-CIT demonstrated high binding in the striatum, the thalamus and cortical regions of the human brain. Addition of a high concentration (1 μM) of citalopram inhibited binding in the thalamus and the neocortex, but not in the striatum. In PET studies with [ 11 C[nor-β-CIT there was rapid uptake of radioactivity in the monkey brain (6% of injected dose at 15 min) and high accumulation of radioactivity in the striatum, thalamus and neocortex. Thalamus to cerebellum and cortex to cerebellum ratios were 2.5 and 1.8 at 60 min, respectively. The ratios obtained with [ 11 C[nor-β-CIT were 20%-40% higher than those previously obtained with [ 11 C[β-CIT. Radioactivity in the thalamus and the neocortex but not in the striatum was displaceable with citalopram (5 mg/kg). In conclusion, nor-β-CIT binds to the serotonin transporter in the primate brain in vitro and in vivo and has potential for PET and SPET imaging of the serotonin transporter in human brain. (orig.). With 4 figs

  5. Single photon emission computed tomography before and after treatment of anxiety using a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warwick, J.M.; Heerden, B.B. van; Stein, D.J.; Niehaus, D.J.H.; Seedat, S.; Linden, G. van der; Harvey, B.A.

    2002-01-01

    Background: The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are currently recommended as first line medications for a number of different anxiety disorders, including obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and social anxiety disorder (social phobia) (SAD). This raises the question of what effects these agents have on the functional neuroanatomy of anxiety disorders. Methods: Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) brain scanning was undertaken in patients with OCD, PTSD, and SAD before and after treatment with citalopram, the most selective of the SSRIs. Statistical parametric mapping (SPM) was used to compare scans (pre- vs post-medication, and responders vs nonresponders) in the combined group of subjects. Results: Citalopram pharmacotherapy resulted in significant deactivation within anterior and superior cingulate and left hippocampus. Deactivation within the anterior cingulate, left paracingular cortex, and right inferior frontal cortex was more marked in treatment responders. Baseline activation did not, however, predict response to pharmacotherapy. Conclusion: Although each of the anxiety disorders may be mediated by different neurocircuits, there are some overlaps in the functional neuroanatomy of their response to SSRI treatment. The current data is consistent with previous work demonstrating the importance of limbic circuits in this spectrum of disorders. These play a crucial role in cognitive-affective processing, and are innervated by serotonergic neurons

  6. Discovery of novel-scaffold monoamine transporter ligands via in silico screening with the S1 pocket of the serotonin transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Tammy L; Geffert, Laura M; Kolber, Benedict J; Madura, Jeffry D; Surratt, Christopher K

    2014-09-17

    Discovery of new inhibitors of the plasmalemmal monoamine transporters (MATs) continues to provide pharmacotherapeutic options for depression, addiction, attention deficit disorders, psychosis, narcolepsy, and Parkinson's disease. The windfall of high-resolution MAT structural information afforded by X-ray crystallography has enabled the construction of credible computational models. Elucidation of lead compounds, creation of compound structure-activity series, and pharmacologic testing are staggering expenses that could be reduced by using a MAT computational model for virtual screening (VS) of structural libraries containing millions of compounds. Here, VS of the PubChem small molecule structural database using the S1 (primary substrate) ligand pocket of a serotonin transporter homology model yielded 19 prominent "hit" compounds. In vitro pharmacology of these VS hits revealed four structurally unique MAT substrate uptake inhibitors with high nanomolar affinity at one or more of the three MATs. In vivo characterization of three of these hits revealed significant activity in a mouse model of acute depression at doses that did not elicit untoward locomotor effects. This constitutes the first report of MAT inhibitor discovery using exclusively the primary substrate pocket as a VS tool. Novel-scaffold MAT inhibitors offer hope of new medications that lack the many classic adverse effects of existing antidepressant drugs.

  7. Pharmacokinetics and tolerability of DA-8031, a novel selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor for premature ejaculation in healthy male subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin D

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Dongseong Shin,1 SeungHwan Lee,2 Sojeong Yi,2 Seo Hyun Yoon,2 Joo-Youn Cho,2 Mi Young Bahng,3 In-Jin Jang,2 Kyung-Sang Yu2 1Clinical Trials Center, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon, 2Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Seoul National University College of Medicine and Hospital, 3Department of Product Development, Dong-A ST, Seoul, Korea Objective: DA-8031 is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor under development for the treatment of premature ejaculation. This is the first-in-human study aimed at evaluating the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of DA-8031 and its metabolites (M1, M2, M4, and M5 in the plasma and urine after administration of a single oral dose in healthy male subjects.Methods: A dose block-randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single ascending dose study was conducted. Subjects received either placebo or a single dose of DA-8031 at 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, or 120 mg. DA-8031 and its four metabolites were analyzed in the plasma and urine for pharmacokinetic evaluation. The effect of genetic polymorphisms of cytochrome-P450 (CYP enzymes on the pharmacokinetics of DA-8031 was evaluated.Results: After a single dose, plasma DA-8031 reached the maximum concentration at a median of 2–3 h and was eliminated with terminal elimination half-life of 17.9–28.7 h. The mean renal clearance was 3.7–5.6 L/h. Dose-proportional pharmacokinetics was observed over the dose range of 20–80 mg. Among the metabolites, M4 had the greatest plasma concentration, followed by M5 and M1. Subjects with CYP2D6 intermediate metabolizer had significantly greater dose-normalized Cmax and AUC0–t of DA-8031 as well as smaller metabolic ratios than those subjects with CYP2D6 extensive metabolizer. The most common adverse events were nausea, dizziness, and headache, and no serious adverse events were reported.Conclusion: In conclusion, the systemic exposure of DA-8031 was increased proportionally to the dose within 20

  8. Cerebral 5-HT2A receptor and serotonin transporter binding in humans are not affected by the val66met BDNF polymorphism status or blood BDNF levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Anders Bue; Trajkovska, Viktorija; Erritzoe, David

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have proposed an interrelation between the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) val66met polymorphism and the serotonin system. In this study, we investigated whether the BDNF val66met polymorphism or blood BDNF levels are associated with cerebral 5-hydroxytryptamine 2A (5-HT(2A......)) receptor or serotonin transporter (SERT) binding in healthy subjects. No statistically significant differences in 5-HT(2A) receptor or SERT binding were found between the val/val and met carriers, nor were blood BDNF values associated with SERT binding or 5-HT(2A) receptor binding. In conclusion, val66met...... BDNF polymorphism status is not associated with changes in the serotonergic system. Moreover, BDNF levels in blood do not correlate with either 5-HT(2A) or SERT binding....

  9. Functional mining of transporters using synthetic selections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genee, Hans Jasper; Bali, Anne Pihl; Petersen, Søren Dalsgård

    2016-01-01

    transporters, PnuT, which is widely distributed across multiple bacterial phyla. We demonstrate that with modular replacement of the biosensor, we could expand our method to xanthine and identify xanthine permeases from gut and soil metagenomes. Our results demonstrate how synthetic-biology approaches can......-responsive biosensor systems that enable selective growth of cells only if they encode a ligand-specific importer. We developed such a synthetic selection system for thiamine pyrophosphate and mined soil and gut metagenomes for thiamine-uptake functions. We identified several members of a novel class of thiamine...

  10. Molecular basis for selective serotonin reuptake inhibition by the antidepressant agent fluoxetine (prozac)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jacob; Stuhr-Hansen, Nicolai; Zachariassen, Linda Grønborg

    2014-01-01

    X-ray crystal structures of LeuBAT, an engineered monoamine-like version of the bacterial amino acid transporter LeuT. However, the binding orientation of fluoxetine is reversed in our experimentally supported model compared with the LeuBAT structures, emphasizing the need for careful experimental...

  11. Hypovitaminosis D3, Leukopenia, and Human Serotonin Transporter Polymorphism in Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasegian, Anna; Curcio, Francesco; Dalla Ragione, Laura; Rossetti, Francesca; Cataldi, Samuela; Codini, Michela; Ambesi-Impiombato, Francesco Saverio; Beccari, Tommaso; Albi, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D3 has been described to have different extraskeletal roles by acting as parahormone in obesity, diabetes, cancer, cognitive impairment, and dementia and to have important regulatory functions in innate immunity. There are no studies showing extraskeletal changes associated with hypovitaminosis D3 in eating disorders. Methods. We have analyzed the blood of 18 patients affected by anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa collected over a 15-month period. We performed a panel of chemical and clinical analyses: the assay of vitamin D3, the immunoblotting of vitamin D receptor and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, and the genotyping of 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter linked polymorphic region. Results. We choose 18 patients with a normal blood test profile such as thyroid hormones, hepatic and renal parameters, triglycerides, proteins, vitamin B12, and folic acid. Among these emerged the case of a woman with long-term anorexia nervosa and the case of a woman with long-term bulimia nervosa both complicated by anxiety and depression, severe hypovitaminosis D3, decrease of vitamin D receptor, leukopenia, and 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter linked polymorphic region short allele. Conclusion. The results induce hypothesising that the severe hypovitaminosis D3 might be responsible for the lack of the inflammatory response and the depressive symptoms in patients with long-term eating disorders.

  12. Hypovitaminosis D3, Leukopenia, and Human Serotonin Transporter Polymorphism in Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Tasegian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D3 has been described to have different extraskeletal roles by acting as parahormone in obesity, diabetes, cancer, cognitive impairment, and dementia and to have important regulatory functions in innate immunity. There are no studies showing extraskeletal changes associated with hypovitaminosis D3 in eating disorders. Methods. We have analyzed the blood of 18 patients affected by anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa collected over a 15-month period. We performed a panel of chemical and clinical analyses: the assay of vitamin D3, the immunoblotting of vitamin D receptor and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, and the genotyping of 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter linked polymorphic region. Results. We choose 18 patients with a normal blood test profile such as thyroid hormones, hepatic and renal parameters, triglycerides, proteins, vitamin B12, and folic acid. Among these emerged the case of a woman with long-term anorexia nervosa and the case of a woman with long-term bulimia nervosa both complicated by anxiety and depression, severe hypovitaminosis D3, decrease of vitamin D receptor, leukopenia, and 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter linked polymorphic region short allele. Conclusion. The results induce hypothesising that the severe hypovitaminosis D3 might be responsible for the lack of the inflammatory response and the depressive symptoms in patients with long-term eating disorders.

  13. Serotonin Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... microscope. (For more, see the article on Anatomic Pathology .) See More Common Questions See Less Common Questions ... tumor. Accessed December 2010. Vorvick, L. (Updated 2009 March 14). Serum serotonin level. MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia [On- ...

  14. A serotonin transporter gene polymorphism (5-HTTLPR), drinking-to-cope motivation, and negative life events among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armeli, Stephen; Conner, Tamlin S; Covault, Jonathan; Tennen, Howard; Kranzler, Henry R

    2008-11-01

    This study was performed to examine whether a polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) in the serotonin transporter gene was related to college students' reports of relief drinking (drinking-to-cope motives) and whether it moderated the associations between negative life events and drinking to cope. We examined reward drinking (drinking-to-enhance motives) as a comparison and to see whether these effects varied across gender. Using an Internet-based survey, college students (N = 360; 192 women) self-reported on drinking motives and negative life events for up to 4 years. Study participants provided saliva for genotyping the triallelic (LA vs LG or S) variants of 5-HTTLPR. Among men, individuals with two risk alleles (LG or S), compared with individuals with the LA/LA allele, displayed lower drinking-to-cope motives. Among women, individuals with one risk allele (either LG or S), compared with individuals with the LA/LA allele, displayed stronger drinking-to-enhance motives. The association between yearly changes in negative life events and drinking-to-cope motives varied across 5-HTTLPR genotype and gender and was strongest in the positive direction for women with the LA/LA variant. Our findings are not consistent with prior speculation that stronger positive associations between life stress and alcohol use among individuals with the LG or S allele are the result of increased use of alcohol as a method for coping with stress. The importance of examining gender differences in the relations between 5-HTTLPR, substance use, and related constructs is also noted.

  15. Study of the serotonin transporter (SLC6A4 and BDNF genes in French patients with non syndromic mental deficiency

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    Mignon Laurence

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mental deficiency has been linked to abnormalities in cortical neuronal network connectivity and plasticity. These mechanisms are in part under the control of two interacting signalling pathways, the serotonergic and the brain-derived neurotrophic (BDNF pathways. The aim of the current paper is to determine whether particular alleles or genotypes of two crucial genes of these systems, the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4 and the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene (BDNF, are associated with mental deficiency (MD. Methods We analyzed four functional polymorphisms (rs25531, 5-HTTLPR, VNTR, rs3813034 of the SLC6A4 gene and one functional polymorphism (Val66 Met of the BDNF gene in 98 patients with non-syndromic mental deficiency (NS-MD and in an ethnically matched control population of 251 individuals. Results We found no significant differences in allele and genotype frequencies in the five polymorphisms studied in the SLC6A4 and BDNF genes of NS-MD patients versus control patients. While the comparison of the patterns of linkage disequilibrium (D' in the control and NS-MD populations revealed a degree of variability it did not, however, reach significance. No significant differences in frequencies of haplotypes and genotypes for VNTR/rs3813034 and rs25531/5-HTTLPR were observed. Conclusion Altogether, results from the present study do not support a role for any of the five functional polymorphisms of SLC6A4 and BDNF genes in the aetiology of NS-RM. Moreover, they suggest no epistatic interaction in NS-MD between polymorphisms in BDNF and SLC6A4. However, we suggest that further studies on these two pathways in NS-MD remain necessary.

  16. The interaction of escitalopram and R-citalopram at the human serotonin transporter investigated in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Jacob P R; Plenge, Per; Sachs, Benjamin D; Pehrson, Alan L; Cajina, Manuel; Du, Yunzhi; Roberts, Wendy; Rudder, Meghan L; Dalvi, Prachiti; Robinson, Taylor J; O'Neill, Sharon P; Khoo, King S; Morillo, Connie Sanchez; Zhang, Xiaodong; Caron, Marc G

    2014-12-01

    Escitalopram appears to be a superior antidepressant to racemic citalopram. It has been hypothesized that binding of R-citalopram to the serotonin transporter (SERT) antagonizes escitalopram binding to and inhibition of the SERT, there by curtailing the elevation of extracellular 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HTExt), and hence anti-depressant efficacy. Further, it has been suggested that a putative allosteric binding site is important for binding of escitalopram to the primary, orthosteric, site, and for R-citalopram's inhibition here of. Primary: Investigate at the human (h)SERT, at clinical relevant doses, whether R-citalopram antagonizes escitalopram-induced 5-HTExt elevation. Secondary: Investigate whether abolishing the putative allosteric site affects escitalopram-induced 5-HTExt elevation and/or modulates the effect of R-citalopram. Recombinant generation of hSERT transgenic mice; in vivo microdialysis; SERT binding; pharmacokinetics; 5-HT sensitive behaviors (tail suspension, marble burying). We generated mice expressing either the wild-type human SERT (hSERT(WT)) or hSERT carrying amino acid substitutions (A505V, L506F, I507L, S574T and I575T) collectively abolishing the putative allosteric site (hSERT(ALI/VFL+SI/TT)). One mg/kg escitalopram yielded clinical relevant plasma levels and brain levels consistent with therapeutic SERT occupancy. The hSERT mice showed normal basal 5-HTExt levels. Escitalopram-induced 5-HTExt elevation was not decreased by R-citalopram co-treatment and was unaffected by loss of the allosteric site. The behavioral effects of the clinically relevant escitalopram dose were small and tended to be enhanced by R-citalopram co-administration. We find no evidence that R-citalopram directly antagonizes escitalopram or that the putative allosteric site is important for hSERT inhibition by escitalopram.

  17. The effects of the serotonin transporter polymorphism and age on frontal white matter integrity in healthy adult women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rune eJonassen

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Studies of populations at genetic risk have the potential to explore the underlying structural and functional mechanisms in the development of psychological disorders. The polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR in the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4 has been associated with major depression (Caspi et al., 2003. In healthy women, variation in the human brain white matter microstructure integrity in the uncinate fascicule (UF has been suggested as an endophenotypes in the development of major depression (MDD. Pacheco et al. (2009 found a unique effect of age and 5-HTTLPR within the left frontal UF. The present study examined whether these associations persist along the adult life span. Thirty-seven right-handed healthy women between 21 and 61 years of age were invited for a diffusion MRI study. The functional polymorphism 5-HTTLPR located in the promoter region of the SLC6A4 gene was genotyped using polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Fractional anisotropy (FA was generated for the UF based on Tract-Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS. Models of emotion regulation circuitry suggest that working memory is important in conscious emotion regulation (Price and Drevets, 2010. To explore if 5-HTTLPR is related to this aspects of emotion processing, a working memory pathway, the superior longitudinal fascicule (SLF was included. The results demonstrate that age may explain the hypothesized association between 5-HTTLPR and frontal uncinate fascicule white matter integrity in healthy adult women. Both white matter changes associated with the aging process and those associated with growth and development may explain why the earlier reported unique effects of genotype in frontal UF FA do not persist into adulthood.

  18. Environmental enrichment reduces innate anxiety with no effect on depression-like behaviour in mice lacking the serotonin transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Jake; Li, Shanshan; Lanfumey, Laurence; Hannan, Anthony J; Renoir, Thibault

    2017-08-14

    Along with being the main target of many antidepressant medications, the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) is known to be involved in the pathophysiology of depression and anxiety disorders. In line with this, mice with varying 5-HTT genotypes are invaluable tools to study depression- and anxiety-like behaviours as well as the mechanisms mediating potential therapeutics. There is clear evidence that both genetic and environmental factors play a role in the aetiology of psychiatric disorders. In that regard, housing paradigms which seek to enhance cognitive stimulation and physical activity have been shown to exert beneficial effects in animal models of neuropsychiatric disorders. In the present study, we examined the effects of environmental enrichment on affective-like behaviours and sensorimotor gating function of 5-HTT knock-out (KO) mice. Using the elevated-plus maze and the light-dark box, we found that environmental enrichment ameliorated the abnormal innate anxiety of 5-HTT KO mice on both tests. In contrast, environmental enrichment did not rescue the depression-like behaviour displayed by 5-HTT KO mice in the forced-swim test. Finally, measuring pre-pulse inhibition, we found no effect of genotype or treatment on sensorimotor gating. In conclusion, our data suggest that environmental enrichment specifically reduces innate anxiety of 5-HTT KO mice with no amelioration of the depression-like behaviour. This has implications for the current use of clinical interventions for patients with symptoms of both anxiety and depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The serotonin transporter gene polymorphism 5-HTTLPR moderates the effects of stress on attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Dennis; Hartman, Catharina A; Richards, Jennifer; Bralten, Janita B; Franke, Barbara; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Faraone, Stephen V; Buitelaar, Jan K; Hoekstra, Pieter J

    2014-12-01

    The role of the serotonin transporter gene polymorphism 5-HTTLPR in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is unclear. Heterogeneity of findings may be explained by gene-environment interactions (GxE), as it has been suggested that S-allele carriers are more reactive to psychosocial stress than L-allele homozygotes. This study aimed to investigate whether 5-HTTLPR genotype moderates the effects of stress on ADHD in a multisite prospective ADHD cohort study. 5-HTTLPR genotype, as well as the number of stressful life events in the past 5 years and ongoing long-term difficulties, was determined in 671 adolescents and young adults with ADHD, their siblings, and healthy controls (57.4% male, average age 17.3 years). Linear mixed models, accounting for family relatedness, were applied to investigate the effects of genotype, experienced stress, and their interaction on ADHD severity at time point T2, while controlling for ADHD severity at T1 (mean follow-up time 5.9 years) and for comorbid internalizing problems at T2. The interaction between genotype and stress significantly predicted ADHD severity at T2 (p = .006), which was driven by the effect on hyperactivity-impulsivity (p = .004). Probing of the interaction effect made clear that S-allele carriers had a significantly more positive correlation between stress and ADHD severity than L-allele homozygotes. The results show that the interaction between 5-HTTLPR and stress is a mechanism involved particularly in the hyperactivity/impulsivity dimension of ADHD, and that this is independent of comorbid internalizing problems. Further research into the neurobiological mechanisms underlying this interaction effect is warranted. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry. © 2014 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  20. Synthesis of /sup 14/C- and /sup 3/H-labeled fluoxetine, a selective serotonin uptake inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, D.W.; Krushinski, J.H.; Wong, D.T.; Kau, D.

    1987-11-01

    Fluoxetine (N-methyl-..gamma..-(4-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy) benzenepropanamine) is a potent, highly selective serotonin uptake inhibitor that is useful in treating a variety of major psychiatric derangements. We have synthesized this compound in /sup 14/C- and /sup 3/H-labeled forms. The tritium label was introduced in the final step by catalytic dehalogenation of the brominated fluoxetine precursor. Reaction conditions could be controlled such that catalytic hydrogenolysis of the labile C-O benzylic bond was minimized. Following HPLC purification, (/sup 3/H)-fluoxetine was obtained in a state of high radiochemical purity (98%) and specific activity (20.4 Ci/mmol). The /sup 14/C-label was introduced in the final step via a nucleophilic aromatic substitution reaction between the sodium salt of ..cap alpha..-(2-(methylamino)ethyl)benzenemethanol and uniformly ring-labeled p-chlorobenzotrifluoride. Following purification by flash chromatography, (/sup 14/C)-fluoxetine was obtained in 98.3% radiochemical purity with a specific activity of 5.52 mCi/mmol.

  1. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for post-partum depression (PPD): a systematic review of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Crescenzo, Franco; Perelli, Federica; Armando, Marco; Vicari, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of postpartum depression with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) has been claimed to be both efficacious and well tolerated, but no recent systematic reviews have been conducted. A qualitative systematic review of randomized clinical trials on women with postpartum depression comparing SSRIs to placebo and/or other treatments was performed. A comprehensive literature search of online databases, the bibliographies of published articles and grey literature were conducted. Data on efficacy, acceptability and tolerability were extracted and the quality of the trials was assessed. Six randomised clinical trials, comprising 595 patients, met quality criteria for inclusion in the analysis. Cognitive-behavioural intervention, psychosocial community-based intervention, psychodynamic therapy, cognitive behavioural therapy, a second-generation tricyclic antidepressant and placebo were used as comparisons. All studies demonstrated higher response and remission rates among those treated with SSRIs and greater mean changes on depression scales, although findings were not always statistically significant. Dropout rates were high in three of the trials but similar among treatment and comparison groups. In general, SSRIs were well tolerated and trial quality was good. There are few trials, patients included in the trials were not representative of all patients with postpartum depression, dropout rates in three trials were high, and long-term efficacy and tolerability were assessed in only two trials. SSRIs appear to be efficacious and well tolerated in the treatment of postpartum depression, but the available evidence fails to demonstrate a clear superiority over other treatments. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of paroxetine and dapoxetine, a novel selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor in the treatment of premature ejaculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulmuttalip Simsek

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Dapoxetine hydrochloride is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and the first drug approved for the on-demand treatment of premature ejaculation (PE. Our objective in this study was to characterize the efficacy of on-demand dapoxetine (30 and 60 mg and daily paroxetine (20 mg usage in treating PE. We conducted a 1 month study involving a total of 150 patients. Patients were divided into three groups of 50. Group 1 were treated with on-demand dapoxetine (30 mg, Group 2 with on-demand dapoxetine (60 mg and Group 3 with daily paroxetine (20 mg. Our outcome measurement was increased from baseline intravaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT after treatment. The IELT increased from baseline to posttreatment by 117%, 117% and 170% in the paroxetine group (P 0.05, while the 60 mg dapoxetine group had a larger posttreatment IELT increase compared with the 30 mg dapoxetine (P < 0.05 and paroxetine (P < 0.01 groups. Dapoxetine (60 mg 1-3 h before planned intercourse is a very effective treatment modality for PE. However, an on-demand dose of 30 mg dapoxetine is no more effective than the currently prescribed paroxetine treatment.

  3. Effect of proton pump inhibitors on the serum concentrations of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors citalopram, escitalopram, and sertraline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjestad, Caroline; Westin, Andreas A; Skogvoll, Eirik; Spigset, Olav

    2015-02-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) citalopram, escitalopram, and sertraline are all metabolized by the cytochrome P-450 isoenzyme CYP2C19, which is inhibited by the proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) omeprazole, esomeprazole, lansoprazole, and pantoprazole. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of these PPIs on the serum concentrations of citalopram, escitalopram, and sertraline. Serum concentrations from patients treated with citalopram, escitalopram, or sertraline were obtained from a routine therapeutic drug monitoring database, and samples from subjects concomitantly using PPIs were identified. Dose-adjusted SSRI serum concentrations were calculated to compare data from those treated and those not treated with PPIs. Citalopram concentrations were significantly higher in patients treated with omeprazole (+35.3%; P Escitalopram concentrations were significantly higher in patients treated with omeprazole (+93.9%; P escitalopram is affected to a greater extent than are citalopram and sertraline. When omeprazole or esomeprazole are used in combination with escitalopram, a 50% dose reduction of the latter should be considered.

  4. Dependence and withdrawal reactions to benzodiazepines and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. How did the health authorities react?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Margrethe; Hansen, Ebba Holme; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to explore communications from drug agencies about benzodiazepine dependence and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) withdrawal reactions over time. Documentary study. We searched the web-sites of the European Medicines Agency and the drug agencies in USA, UK, and Denmark for documents mentioning benzodiazepines or SSRIs. We supplemented with other relevant literature that could contribute to our study. The searches were performed in 2009 in PubMed, Google, BMJ and JAMA. It took many years before the drug regulators acknowledged benzodiazepine dependence and SSRI withdrawal reactions and before the prescribers and the public were informed. Drug regulators relied mainly on the definitions of dependence and withdrawal reactions from the diagnostic psychiatric manuals, which contributed to the idea that SSRIs do not cause dependence, although it is difficult for many patients to stop treatment. In the perspective of a precautionary principle, drug agencies have failed to acknowledge that SSRIs can cause dependence and have minimised the problem with regard to its frequency and severity. In the perspective of a risk management principle, the drug agencies have reacted in concordance with the slowly growing knowledge of adverse drug reactions and have sharpened the information to the prescribers and the public over time. However, solely relying on spontaneous reporting of adverse effects leads to underestimation and delayed information about the problems. Given the experience with the benzodiazepines, we believe the regulatory bodies should have required studies from the manufacturers that could have elucidated the dependence potential of the SSRIs before marketing authorization was granted.

  5. An analysis of psychotropic drug sales. Increasing sales of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are closely related to number of products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Margrethe; Gøtzsche, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Prescribing of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) has increased dramatically. To compare the sales of benzodiazepines and SSRIs within the primary care sector in Denmark and relate changes in usage to number of indications and products on the market. We used data from various sources to establish the sales curves of psychotropic drugs in the period 1970 to 2007, based on the Anatomic Therapeutic Classification system and Defined Daily Doses. Fluctuations in sales of psychotropic drugs that cannot be explained by disease prevalence were caused by changes in sales of the benzodiazepines and SSRIs. We found a decline in the sales of benzodiazepines after a peak in 1986, likely due to the recognition that they cause dependence. From a low level in 1992, we found that the sales of SSRIs increased almost linearly by a factor of 18, up to 44 DDD per 1000 inhabitants, which was closely related to the number of products on the market that increased by a factor of 16. Sales of antidepressant drugs are mainly determined by market availability of products indicating that marketing pressures are playing an important role. Thus the current level of use of SSRIs may not be evidence-based, which is supported by studies showing that the effect of SSRIs has been overestimated.

  6. Action of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor on aggressive behavior in adult rat submitted to the neonatal malnutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medeiros Jairza Maria Barreto

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the malnutrition during suckling on the aggressiveness was investigated in adult rats treated or not with citalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI. The animals were divided into two groups according to the diet used: nourished group-- the rats received the control diet with 23% protein during the life; and malnourished group-- the rats had its mothers submitted to diet with 7.8% protein during suckling. At 120 days of age, each group was sub-divided according to the treatment: acute -- consisting a single i.p. injection of saline solution or 20-mg/Kg citalopram; chronic -- consisting the single injections (1 per day during 14 days of saline or 20 mg/Kg citalopram. The acute or chronic treatment with SSRI reduces aggressive response in nourished rats, but not in malnourished ones. Thus, the malnutrition during the critical period of brain development seems to induce durable alterations in the function of the serotoninergic neurotransmission

  7. Rapid Onset of the Effects of Combined Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Electroacupuncture on Primary Depression: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Qu, Shan-shan; Zhang, Ji-ping; Sun, Ya-ling; Liu, Wei-lu; Xie, Ling; Huang, Yong; Chen, Jun-qi

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of combined selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and electroacupuncture therapies for the early treatment of primary depression. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were analyzed to compare therapy combining SSRIs and electroacupuncture to SSRI therapy alone. The RCTs were identified by searching, among others, PubMed, the Cochrane Library, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, the Chongqing VIP database for Chinese Technical Periodicals, WANFANG DATA, and the Chinese Biological Medical Literature Database. Scores from Self-Rated Depression Scale (SDS), the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD), the Side Effect Rating Scale (SERS), and the Treatment Emergent Symptom Scale (TESS) were analyzed and coded by two independent investigators and used to evaluate the safety and efficacy of treatment. Statistical analyses were performed using RevMan 5.2 software. Six RCTs were analyzed. The meta-analysis revealed that the combined therapy of SSRIs and electroacupuncture were associated with superior scores on the HAMD, SDS, and SERS measures compared with SSRIs alone after 1-4 weeks of treatment: HAMD scores, mean difference (MD)(1 week), 2.32 (95% confidence interval [CI](1 week), 1.47-3.16, p(1 week)electroacupuncture therapies is more efficient than treatments with SSRIs alone and leads to a better and earlier control of depressive symptoms.

  8. Morphological changes of intestinal mucosa in patients with different clinical variants of irritable bowel syndrome using tetracyclic antidepressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Nagieva S.; Svintsitskyy A.; Kuryk O.; Korendovych I.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess histological changes of colonic mucosa in patients with clinically different types of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) before and after the treatment with tetracyclic antidepressant and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. Methods. Adult patients (over 18 years) with confirmed diagnosis of IBS were examined. Biopsy specimens were taken from colon during colonoscopy for the next histological examination. One expert gastrointestinal pathologist assessed all tissue samples....

  9. Serum Prolactin Levels in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder Receiving Selective Serotonin-Reuptake Inhibitor Monotherapy for 3 Months: A Prospective Study

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Young-Min

    2017-01-01

    Objective It is unclear whether selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) can significantly increase the prolactin level. The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship between the prolactin level and the administration of SSRIs such as escitalopram and sertraline. An additional purpose was to determine whether the elevation of prolactin differs between escitalopram and sertraline treatment. Methods Serum prolactin levels were measured at baseline and after 3 months in 23 pa...

  10. Global gene expression in larval zebrafish (Danio rerio) exposed to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (fluoxetine and sertraline) reveals unique expression profiles and potential biomarkers of exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, June-Woo; Heah, Tze Ping; Gouffon, Julia S.; Henry, Theodore B.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2012-01-01

    Larval zebrafish (Danio rerio) were exposed (96 h) to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) fluoxetine and sertraline and changes in transcriptomes analyzed by Affymetrix GeneChip ® Zebrafish Array were evaluated to enhance understanding of biochemical pathways and differences between these SSRIs. The number of genes differentially expressed after fluoxetine exposure was 288 at 25 μg/L and 131 at 250 μg/L; and after sertraline exposure was 33 at 25 μg/L and 52 at 250 μg/L. Same five genes were differentially regulated in both SSRIs indicating shared molecular pathways. Among these, the gene coding for FK506 binding protein 5, annotated to stress response regulation, was highly down-regulated in all treatments (results confirmed by qRT-PCR). Gene ontology analysis indicated at the gene expression level that regulation of stress response and cholinesterase activities were influenced by these SSRIs, and suggested that changes in transcription of these genes could be used as biomarkers of SSRI exposure. - Highlights: ► Exposure of zebrafish to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). ► Fluoxetine and sertraline generate different global gene expression profiles. ► Genes linked to stress response and acetylcholine esterase affected by both SSRIs. - Global gene expression profiles in zebrafish exposed to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

  11. Reduced availability of serotonin transporters in obsessive-compulsive disorder correlates with symptom severity - a [11C]DASB PET study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimold, M.; Smolka, M.N.; Zimmer, A.

    2007-01-01

    Reduced availability of brainstem serotonin transporters (5-HTT) has been observed in vivo in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). However, results vary and may be influenced by competition with endogenous serotonin. Using positron emission tomography (PET) and [ 11 C]DASB, a specific 5-HTT ligand that showed no competition with serotonin for 5-HTT binding in vitro, we tested the hypothesis that 5-HTT availability is reduced in OCD patients and correlated with OCD severity. 5-HTT availability in the thalamus and the midbrain was measured in nine drug-free OCD patients and compared with 19 healthy controls, matched for the individual combination of 5-HTT genotype, gender and smoking status. OCD severity was assessed with the Yale-Brown obsessive compulsive scale (Y-BOCS). 5-HTT availability was significantly reduced in the thalamus and midbrain of OCD patients. Age and 5-HTT in the thalamus explained 83 % of OCD severity in patients that were drug-free for at least 1 year. This PET study confirms a central role of the serotonergic system, particularly the thalamus in the pathogenesis of obsessive compulsive disorder. (author)

  12. Aggravation by paroxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, of antral lesions generated by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Koji; Tanaka, Akiko; Nukui, Kazuo; Kojo, Azusa; Gyenge, Melinda; Amagase, Kikuko

    2011-09-01

    Recent clinical studies have suggested a risk of adverse gastric reactions from the concomitant use of selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). We examined the adverse effects of SSRIs on antral lesions produced by indomethacin in rats. Rats fasted for 24 h were refed for 1 h, then administered indomethacin (30 mg/kg s.c.) 1 h after the refeeding and killed 6 h later. Paroxetine (1-10 mg/kg) was given orally 30 min before indomethacin. Indomethacin caused antral lesions in refed rats. Paroxetine dose-dependently aggravated these lesions, despite provoking no damage by itself. Similar results were obtained when other NSAIDs such as diclofenac, flurbiprofen, and loxoprofen were coadministered with paroxetine or when indomethacin was coadministered with other antidepressants such as fluvoxamine and milnacipran, but not imipramine or maprotiline. Exogenous 5-HT also worsened the indomethacin-induced antral damage, whereas the aggravating effect of paroxetine was attenuated by ondansetron, a selective 5-HT(3) antagonist, but not antagonists for other 5-HT receptor subtypes. Indomethacin plus paroxetine had no effect on gastric secretion but significantly decreased mucosal superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity as well as GSH content. The antral damage induced by indomethacin plus paroxetine was significantly prevented by antisecretory (acid or pepsin) agents and mucosal protective agents as well as SOD and allopurinol. These results suggest that SSRIs aggravate NSAID-induced antral lesions, probably via the activation of 5HT(3) receptors, and the mechanism of aggravation may involve the corrosive action of acid/pepsin as well as an impaired antioxidative system.

  13. Central serotonin transporter availability in highly obese individuals compared with non-obese controls: A [11C] DASB positron emission tomography study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesse, Swen; Sabri, Osama; Rullmann, Michael; Luthardt, Julia; Becker, Georg-Alexander; Bresch, Anke; Patt, Marianne; Meyer, Philipp M.; Winter, Karsten; Hankir, Mohammed K.; Zientek, Franziska; Reissig, Georg; Drabe, Mandy; Regenthal, Ralf; Schinke, Christian; Arelin, Katrin; Lobsien, Donald; Fasshauer, Mathias; Fenske, Wiebke K.; Stumvoll, Michael; Blueher, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The role of the central serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) system in feeding has been extensively studied in animals with the 5-HT family of transporters (5-HTT) being identified as key molecules in the regulation of satiety and body weight. Aberrant 5-HT transmission has been implicated in the pathogenesis of human obesity by in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging techniques. However, results obtained thus far from studies of central 5-HTT availability have been inconsistent, which is thought to be brought about mainly by the low number of individuals with a high body mass index (BMI) previously used. The aim of this study was therefore to assess 5-HTT availability in the brains of highly obese otherwise healthy individuals compared with non-obese healthy controls. We performed PET using the 5-HTT selective radiotracer [ 11 C] DASB on 30 highly obese (BMI range between 35 and 55 kg/m 2 ) and 15 age- and sex-matched non-obese volunteers (BMI range between 19 and 27 kg/m 2 ) in a cross-sectional study design. The 5-HTT binding potential (BP ND ) was used as the outcome parameter. On a group level, there was no significant difference in 5-HTT BP ND in various cortical and subcortical regions in individuals with the highest BMI compared with non-obese controls, while statistical models showed minor effects of age, sex, and the degree of depression on 5-HTT BP ND . The overall finding of a lack of significantly altered 5-HTT availability together with its high variance in obese individuals justifies the investigation of individual behavioral responses to external and internal cues which may further define distinct phenotypes and subgroups in human obesity. (orig.)

  14. Central serotonin transporter availability in highly obese individuals compared with non-obese controls: A [{sup 11}C] DASB positron emission tomography study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesse, Swen; Sabri, Osama [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Integrated Research and Treatment Centre Adiposity Diseases Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Rullmann, Michael [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Integrated Research and Treatment Centre Adiposity Diseases Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Luthardt, Julia; Becker, Georg-Alexander; Bresch, Anke; Patt, Marianne; Meyer, Philipp M. [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Winter, Karsten [University of Leipzig, Centre for Translational Regenerative Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); University of Leipzig, Institute for Medical Informatics, Statistics, and Epidemiology, Leipzig (Germany); Hankir, Mohammed K.; Zientek, Franziska; Reissig, Georg; Drabe, Mandy [Integrated Research and Treatment Centre Adiposity Diseases Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Regenthal, Ralf [University of Leipzig, Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Rudolf Boehm Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Leipzig (Germany); Schinke, Christian [University of Leipzig, Department of Neurology, Leipzig (Germany); Arelin, Katrin [Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); University of Leipzig, Day Clinic for Cognitive Neurology, Leipzig (Germany); Lobsien, Donald [University of Leipzig, Department of Neuroradiology, Leipzig (Germany); Fasshauer, Mathias; Fenske, Wiebke K.; Stumvoll, Michael [Integrated Research and Treatment Centre Adiposity Diseases Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); University of Leipzig, Medical Department III, Leipzig (Germany); Blueher, Matthias [University of Leipzig, Medical Department III, Leipzig (Germany); University of Leipzig, Collaborative Research Centre 1052 Obesity Mechanisms, Leipzig (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    The role of the central serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) system in feeding has been extensively studied in animals with the 5-HT family of transporters (5-HTT) being identified as key molecules in the regulation of satiety and body weight. Aberrant 5-HT transmission has been implicated in the pathogenesis of human obesity by in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging techniques. However, results obtained thus far from studies of central 5-HTT availability have been inconsistent, which is thought to be brought about mainly by the low number of individuals with a high body mass index (BMI) previously used. The aim of this study was therefore to assess 5-HTT availability in the brains of highly obese otherwise healthy individuals compared with non-obese healthy controls. We performed PET using the 5-HTT selective radiotracer [{sup 11}C] DASB on 30 highly obese (BMI range between 35 and 55 kg/m{sup 2}) and 15 age- and sex-matched non-obese volunteers (BMI range between 19 and 27 kg/m{sup 2}) in a cross-sectional study design. The 5-HTT binding potential (BP{sub ND}) was used as the outcome parameter. On a group level, there was no significant difference in 5-HTT BP{sub ND} in various cortical and subcortical regions in individuals with the highest BMI compared with non-obese controls, while statistical models showed minor effects of age, sex, and the degree of depression on 5-HTT BP{sub ND}. The overall finding of a lack of significantly altered 5-HTT availability together with its high variance in obese individuals justifies the investigation of individual behavioral responses to external and internal cues which may further define distinct phenotypes and subgroups in human obesity. (orig.)

  15. Genetic variation in the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR, rs25531) influences the analgesic response to the short acting opioid Remifentanil in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosek, Eva; Jensen, Karin B; Lonsdorf, Tina B; Schalling, Martin; Ingvar, Martin

    2009-07-01

    There is evidence from animal studies that serotonin (5-HT) can influence the antinociceptive effects of opioids at the spinal cord level. Therefore, there could be an influence of genetic polymorphisms in the serotonin system on individual variability in response to opioid treatment of pain. The serotonin transporter (5-HTT) is a key regulator of serotonin metabolism and availability and its gene harbors several known polymorphisms that are known to affect 5-HTT expression (e.g. 5-HTTLPR, rs25531). The aim of this study was to investigate if the triallelic 5-HTTLPR influences pain sensitivity or the analgesic effect of opioids in humans. 43 healthy volunteers (12 men, 31 women, mean age 26 years) underwent heat pain stimulations before and after intravenous injection of Remifentanil; a rapid and potent opioid drug acting on micro-type receptors. Subjects rated their perceived pain on a visual analogue scale (VAS). All participants were genotyped for the 5-HTTLPR and the rs25531 polymorphism. We recruited by advertising, with no history of drug abuse, chronic pain or psychiatric disorders. At baseline, there was no difference in pain ratings for the different triallelic 5-HTTLPR genotype groups. However, the opiod drug had a differential analgesic effect depending on the triallelic 5-HTTLPR genotype. Remifentanil had a significantly better analgesic effect in individuals with a genotype coding for low 5-HTT expression (SA/SA and SA/LG) as compared to those with high expression(LA/LA), p desensitization of 5-HT1 receptors have an increased analgesic response to opioids during acute pain stimuli, but may still be at increased risk of developing chronic pain conditions.

  16. Fetzima (levomilnacipran), a drug for major depressive disorder as a dual inhibitor for human serotonin transporters and beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Syed Mohd Danish; Shaikh, Sibhghatulla; Khan, Mahiuddin; Biswas, Deboshree; Hameed, Nida; Shakil, Shazi

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacological management of Major Depressive Disorder includes the use of serotonin reuptake inhibitors which targets serotonin transporters (SERT) to increase the synaptic concentrations of serotonin. Beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme-1 (BACE-1) is responsible for amyloid β plaque formation. Hence it is an interesting target for Alzheimer's disease (AD) therapy. This study describes molecular interactions of a new Food and Drug Administration approved antidepressant drug named 'Fetzima' with BACE-1 and SERT. Fetzima is chemically known as levomilnacipran. The study has explored a possible link between the treatment of Depression and AD. 'Autodock 4.2' was used for docking study. The free energy of binding (ΔG) values for 'levomilnacipran-SERT' interaction and 'levomilnacipran-BACE1' interaction were found to be -7.47 and -8.25 kcal/mol, respectively. Levomilnacipran was found to interact with S438, known to be the most important amino acid residue of serotonin binding site of SERT during 'levomilnacipran-SERT' interaction. In the case of 'levomilnacipran-BACE1' interaction, levomilnacipran interacted with two very crucial aspartic acid residues of BACE-1, namely, D32 and D228. These residues are accountable for the cleavage of amyloid precursor protein and the subsequent formation of amyloid β plaques in AD brain. Hence, Fetzima (levomilnacipran) might act as a potent dual inhibitor of SERT and BACE-1 and expected to form the basis of a future dual therapy against depression and AD. It is an established fact that development of AD is associated with Major Depressive Disorder. Therefore, the design of new BACE-1 inhibitors based on antidepressant drug scaffolds would be particularly beneficial.

  17. Chronic effects of fluoxetine, a selective inhibitor of serotonin uptake, on neurotransmitter receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, D.T.; Reid, L.R.; Bymaster, F.P.; Threlkeld, P.G.

    1985-01-01

    Fluoxetine administration to rats dose of 10mg/kg i.p. daily up to 12 or 24 days failed to change the concentration-dependent binding of [ 3 H]WB4101, [ 3 H]clonidine and [ 3 H]dihydroalprenolol to α 1 -, α 2 - and β-adrenergic receptors, respectively; [ 3 H]quinuclidinyl benzilate to muscarinic receptors; [ 3 H]pyrilamine to histamine H 1 receptors and [ 3 H]naloxone to opiate receptors. Persistent and significant decreases in receptor number (Bsub(max) value) without changes in the dissociation constant (Ksub(D) value) of [ 3 H]5-HT binding in cortical membranes were observed upon chronic treatment with fluoxetine administered either by intraperitoneal injection or incorporation in the diet. A detectable reduction of 5-HT 1 receptor number occured after once-daily injections of fluoxetine at 10mg/kg i.p. within 49 hours. After pretreatment for 3 days with p-chlorophenylalanine, an inhibitor of 5-HT synthesis, followed by repeated administration of fluoxetine, 5-HT 1 receptor numbers were higher than those of normal rats, suggesting a dependence on synaptic concentration of 5-HT for fluoxetine to affect a receptor down-regulation. These studies provide further evidence for the selectivity of fluoxetine as an inhibitor of 5-HT reuptake, resulting in a selective down-regulation of 5-HT 1 receptors in the cerebal cortex of rat brain. (Author)

  18. Selective Determination of Serotonin on Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxy pyrrole)-single-walled Carbon Nanotube-Modified Glassy Carbon Electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seul Ki; Bae, Si Ra; Ahmed, Mohammad Shamsuddin; You, Jung Min; Jeon, Seung Won

    2011-01-01

    An electrochemically-modified electrode [P(EDOP-SWNTs)/GCE] was prepared by electropolymerization of 3,4-ethylenedioxy pyrrole (EDOP) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and characterized by SEM, CV, and DPV. This modified electrode was employed as an electrochemical biosensor for the selective determination of serotonin concentrations at pH 7.4 and exhibited a typical enhanced effect on the current response of serotonin with a lower oxidation overpotential. The linear response was in the range of 1.0 x 10"-"7 to 1.0 x 10"-"5 M, with a correlation coefficient of 0.998 on the anodic current. The lower detection limit was calculated as 5.0 nM. Due to the relatively low currents and difference of potentials in the electrochemical responses of uric acid (UA), ascorbic acid (AA), and dopamine (DA), the modified electrode was a useful and effective sensing device for the selective and sensitive serotonin determination in the presence of UA, AA, and DA

  19. Selective Determination of Serotonin on Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxy pyrrole)-single-walled Carbon Nanotube-Modified Glassy Carbon Electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seul Ki; Bae, Si Ra; Ahmed, Mohammad Shamsuddin; You, Jung Min; Jeon, Seung Won [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    An electrochemically-modified electrode [P(EDOP-SWNTs)/GCE] was prepared by electropolymerization of 3,4-ethylenedioxy pyrrole (EDOP) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and characterized by SEM, CV, and DPV. This modified electrode was employed as an electrochemical biosensor for the selective determination of serotonin concentrations at pH 7.4 and exhibited a typical enhanced effect on the current response of serotonin with a lower oxidation overpotential. The linear response was in the range of 1.0 x 10{sup -7} to 1.0 x 10{sup -5} M, with a correlation coefficient of 0.998 on the anodic current. The lower detection limit was calculated as 5.0 nM. Due to the relatively low currents and difference of potentials in the electrochemical responses of uric acid (UA), ascorbic acid (AA), and dopamine (DA), the modified electrode was a useful and effective sensing device for the selective and sensitive serotonin determination in the presence of UA, AA, and DA.

  20. A dynamic view of molecular switch behavior at serotonin receptors: implications for functional selectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Martí-Solano

    Full Text Available Functional selectivity is a property of G protein-coupled receptors that allows them to preferentially couple to particular signaling partners upon binding of biased agonists. Publication of the X-ray crystal structure of serotonergic 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptors in complex with ergotamine, a drug capable of activating G protein coupling and β-arrestin signaling at the 5-HT1B receptor but clearly favoring β-arrestin over G protein coupling at the 5-HT2B subtype, has recently provided structural insight into this phenomenon. In particular, these structures highlight the importance of specific residues, also called micro-switches, for differential receptor activation. In our work, we apply classical molecular dynamics simulations and enhanced sampling approaches to analyze the behavior of these micro-switches and their impact on the stabilization of particular receptor conformational states. Our analysis shows that differences in the conformational freedom of helix 6 between both receptors could explain their different G protein-coupling capacity. In particular, as compared to the 5-HT1B receptor, helix 6 movement in the 5-HT2B receptor can be constrained by two different mechanisms. On the one hand, an anchoring effect of ergotamine, which shows an increased capacity to interact with the extracellular part of helices 5 and 6 and stabilize them, hinders activation of a hydrophobic connector region at the center of the receptor. On the other hand, this connector region in an inactive conformation is further stabilized by unconserved contacts extending to the intracellular part of the 5-HT2B receptor, which hamper opening of the G protein binding site. This work highlights the importance of considering receptor capacity to adopt different conformational states from a dynamic perspective in order to underpin the structural basis of functional selectivity.

  1. Synthesis and biological evaluation of I-125/I-123-labelled analogues of citalopram and escitalopram as potential radioligands for imaging of the serotonin transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob; Elfving, Betina; Frokjaer, Vibe G.

    2011-01-01

    Two novel radioligands for the serotonin transporter (SERT), [I-125]{3-[5-iodo-1-(4-fluorophenyl)-1,3-dihydroisobenzofuran-1-yl]-propyl}-dimethylamine ([I-125]-2) and S-[I-125]{3-[5-iodo-1-(4-fluorophenyl)-1,3-dihydroisobenzofuran-1-yl]-propyl}-dimethylamine ([I-125]-(S)-2) were synthesized in a ...... of the radioligand in imaging cortical SERT distribution in vivo. These data suggest that the iodine-labelled derivatives of citalopram and escitalopram are not superior to another SPECT tracer for the SERT, namely [I-123] ADAM....

  2. Synthesis and serotonin transporter activity of 1,3-bis(aryl)-2-nitro-1-propenes as a new class of anticancer agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McNamara, Yvonne M.; Cloonan, Suzanne M.; Knox, Andrew J.S.

    2011-01-01

    of the serotonin transporter, a high affinity target for amphetamines and independent of protein tyrosine phosphatases and tubulin dynamics both of which have been previously associated with nitrostyrene-induced cell death. We demonstrate that a number of these compounds induce caspase activation, PARP cleavage...... containing a classic nitrostyrene structure are shown to have antiproliferative activities in vitro in a range of malignant cell lines, particularly against Burkitt’s lymphoma derived cell lines, whilst having no effect on ‘normal’ peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Such effects appear to be independent...

  3. Peripheral serotonin regulates maternal calcium trafficking in mammary epithelial cells during lactation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimena Laporta

    Full Text Available Lactation is characterized by massive transcellular flux of calcium, from the basolateral side of the mammary alveolar epithelium (blood into the ductal lumen (milk. Regulation of calcium transport during lactation is critical for maternal and neonatal health. The monoamine serotonin (5-HT is synthesized by the mammary gland and functions as a homeostatic regulation of lactation. Genetic ablation of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1, which encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in non-neuronal serotonin synthesis, causes a deficiency in circulating serotonin. As a consequence maternal calcium concentrations decrease, mammary epithelial cell morphology is altered, and cell proliferation is decreased during lactation. Here we demonstrate that serotonin deficiency decreases the expression and disrupts the normal localization of calcium transporters located in the apical (PMCA2 and basolateral (CaSR, ORAI-1 membranes of the lactating mammary gland. In addition, serotonin deficiency decreases the mRNA expression of calcium transporters located in intracellular compartments (SERCA2, SPCA1 and 2. Mammary expression of serotonin receptor isoform 2b and its downstream pathways (PLCβ3, PKC and MAP-ERK1/2 are also decreased by serotonin deficiency, which might explain the numerous phenotypic alterations described above. In most cases, addition of exogenous 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan to the Tph1 deficient mice rescued the phenotype. Our data supports the hypothesis that serotonin is necessary for proper mammary gland structure and function, to regulate blood and mammary epithelial cell transport of calcium during lactation. These findings can be applicable to the treatment of lactation-induced hypocalcemia in dairy cows and can have profound implications in humans, given the wide-spread use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors as antidepressants during pregnancy and lactation.

  4. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in hepatitis B virus-infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang CM

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Chia-Ming Chang,1–3 Ming-Shun Hsieh,1–4 Tsung-Chieh Yang,3,5 Vivian Chia-Rong Hsieh,6 Jen-Huai Chiang,7 Hsien-Hao Huang,1,3 Chorng-Kuang How,1,3 Sung-Yuan Hu,8 David Hung-Tsang Yen1,3 1Department of Emergency Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, 2Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, National Taiwan University College of Public Health, 3College of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, 4Department of Emergency Medicine, 5Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taoyuan Branch, Taoyuan, 6Department of Health Services Administration, 7Management Office for Health Data, China Medical University, 8Department of Emergency Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan, Republic of China Background: This study aimed to investigate the association between the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs and the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection.Methods: We conducted a population-based cohort study by using claims data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD. The study cohort comprised 1380 newly diagnosed HBV-infected patients with SSRI use who were frequency matched by age, sex, liver cirrhosis, and index year with HBV-infected patients without SSRI use in the comparison cohort. Each patient case was followed from 2000 to 2012 to identify incident HCC cases. Cox proportional hazards regression was performed to evaluate the association between SSRI use and HCC risk. The further sensitivity analysis used case-control study design. A total of 9070 HCC subjects retrieved from NHIRD, and equal non-HCC subjects were analyzed after matching for age and sex.Results: We identified 9 and 24 HCC cases in the study and comparison cohorts during the follow-up period of 7056 and 6845 person-years, respectively. The incidence rate of HCC was 1.28 and 3

  5. Triptans, serotonin agonists, and serotonin syndrome (serotonin toxicity): a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillman, P Ken

    2010-02-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have suggested that fatal serotonin syndrome (SS) is possible with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and triptans: this warning affects millions of patients as these drugs are frequently given simultaneously. SS is a complex topic about which there is much misinformation. The misconception that 5-HT1A receptors can cause serious SS is still widely perpetuated, despite quality evidence that it is activation of the 5-HT2A receptor that is required for serious SS. This review considers SS involving serotonin agonists: ergotamine, lysergic acid diethylamide, bromocriptine, and buspirone, as well as triptans, and reviews the experimental foundation underpinning the latest understanding of SS. It is concluded that there is neither significant clinical evidence, nor theoretical reason, to entertain speculation about serious SS from triptans and SSRIs. The misunderstandings about SS exhibited by the FDA, and shared by the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (in relation to methylene blue), are an important issue with wide ramifications.

  6. Cellular correlates of enhanced anxiety caused by acute treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa eRavinder

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs are used extensively in the treatment of depression and anxiety disorders. The therapeutic benefits of SSRIs typically require several weeks of continuous treatment. Intriguingly, according to clinical reports, symptoms of anxiety may actually increase during the early stages of treatment although more prolonged treatment alleviates affective symptoms. Consistent with earlier studies that have used animal models to capture this paradoxical effect of SSRIs, we find that rats exhibit enhanced anxiety-like behavior on the elevated plus-maze one hour after a single injection of the SSRI fluoxetine. Next we investigated the potential neural substrates underlying the acute anxiogenic effects by analyzing the morphological and physiological impact of acute fluoxetine treatment on principal neurons of the basolateral amygdala (BLA, a brain area that plays a pivotal role in fear and anxiety. Although earlier studies have shown that behavioral or genetic perturbations that are anxiogenic for rodents also increase dendritic spine-density in the BLA, we find that a single injection of fluoxetine does not cause spinogenesis on proximal apical dendritic segments on BLA principal neurons an hour later. However, at the same time point when a single dose of fluoxetine caused enhanced anxiety, it also enhanced action potential firing in BLA neurons in ex vivo slices. Consistent with this finding, in vitro bath application of fluoxetine caused higher spiking frequency and this increase in excitability was correlated with an increase in the input resistance of these neurons. Our results suggest that enhanced excitability of amygdala neurons may contribute to the increase in anxiety-like behavior observed following acute fluoxetine treatment.

  7. An association between initiation of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and suicide - a nationwide register-based case-crossover study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Björkenstam

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI is one of the most common treatments for depression. It is however not clear whether or not there is an increased short-term suicide risk during initiation with SSRI. METHODS: A register-based nationwide case-crossover study including 5,866 suicides, 1,698 women and 4,168 men, from the Death Register 2007-2010 in Sweden. SSRI initiation was defined as a dispensed prescription of SSRI within 28 days prior to the date of suicide with no previous dispensed prescription of SSRI within 4 months prior that prescription. The control period took place one year earlier. Odds ratio (OR was estimated using conditional logistic regression. RESULT: During the 28 day period prior to suicide 48 women and 138 men were exposed to SSRI initiation (while not being exposed in the control period and 22 women and 43 men were exposed in the control period (while not being exposed in the case period. The OR for suicide after initiation with SSRI was 2.7 (95% CI: 1.6-44 for women, and 4.3 (95% CI: 3.0-6.1 for men. The highest OR was found 8-11 days after initiation with SSRI 9.7 (95% CI: 3.0-31.7 for women and men combined. CONCLUSION: The main limitation in this study is confounding by indication, but the descriptive question is however not confounded by indication. Together with plausible biological mechanisms and previous clinical and epidemiological observations our findings, linking initiation of SSRI to increased short-term suicide risk, deserve further attention specifically in the clinical setting.

  8. Brain dopamine and serotonin transporter binding are associated with visual attention bias for food in lean men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, K. E.; Roefs, A.; Elbers, D. C. E.; Fliers, E.; Booij, J.; Serlie, M. J.; La Fleur, S. E.

    2016-01-01

    In rodents, the striatal dopamine (DA) system and the (hypo)thalamic serotonin (5-HT) system are involved in the regulation of feeding behavior. In lean humans, little is known about the relationship between these brain neurotransmitter systems and feeding. We studied the relationship between

  9. Mood disorders and serotonin transporter density in ecstasy users - the influence of long-term abstention, dose, and gender

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Win, Maartje M. L.; Reneman, Liesbeth; Reitsma, Johannes B.; den Heeten, Gerard J.; Booij, Jan; van den Brink, Wim

    2004-01-01

    Rationale. Neurotoxic effects of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "ecstasy") on the serotonin (5-HT) system have been described in animals and humans, but little is known about long-term effects of ecstasy use on mood. Objectives. To investigate short-term and long-term effects of ecstasy

  10. Effect of the 5-HT{sub 4} receptor and serotonin transporter on visceral hypersensitivity in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Yan; Liu, Xin-Guang; Wang, Hua-Hong; Li, Jun-Xia; Li, Yi-Xuan [Department of Gastroenterology, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2012-07-27

    Visceral hypersensitivity plays an important role in motor and sensory abnormalities associated with irritable bowel syndrome, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. The present study was designed to evaluate the expression of the 5-HT{sub 4} receptor and the serotonin transporter (SERT) as well as their roles in chronic visceral hypersensitivity using a rat model. Neonatal male Sprague-Dawley rats received intracolonic injections of 0.5% acetic acid (0.3-0.5 mL at different times) between postnatal days 8 and 21 to establish an animal model of visceral hypersensitivity. On day 43, the threshold intensity for a visually identifiable contraction of the abdominal wall and body arching were recorded during rectal distention. Histological evaluation and the myeloperoxidase activity assay were performed to determine the severity of inflammation. The 5-HT{sub 4} receptor and SERT expression of the ascending colon were monitored using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses; the plasma 5-HT levels were measured using an ELISA method. As expected, transient colonic irritation at the neonatal stage led to visceral hypersensitivity, but no mucosal inflammation was later detected during adulthood. Using this model, we found reduced SERT expression (0.298 ± 0.038 vs 0.634 ± 0.200, P < 0.05) and increased 5-HT{sub 4} receptor expression (0.308 ± 0.017 vs 0.298 ± 0.021, P < 0.05). Treatment with fluoxetine (10 mg·kg{sup −1}·day{sup −1}, days 36-42), tegaserod (1 mg·kg{sup −1}·day{sup −1}, day 43), or the combination of both, reduced visceral hypersensitivity and plasma 5-HT levels. Fluoxetine treatment increased 5-HT{sub 4} receptor expression (0.322 ± 0.020 vs 0.308 ± 0.017, P < 0.01) but not SERT expression (0.219 ± 0.039 vs 0.298 ± 0.038, P = 0.654). These results indicate that both the 5-HT{sub 4} receptor and SERT play a role in the pathogenesis of visceral hypersensitivity, and its mechanism may be involved in the local 5-HT

  11. Effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant on serotonin transporter expression in rats with post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ya-Nan; Feng, Li-Juan; Liu, Yuan-Yuan; Jiang, Kui; Zhang, Mao-Jun; Gu, Yi-Xin; Wang, Bang-Mao; Gao, Jia; Wang, Ze-Lan; Wang, Yu-Ming

    2018-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant (LGG-s) on the expression of serotonin transporter (SERT) in rats with post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS). METHODS Campylobacter jejuni 81-176 (1010 CFU/mL) was used to induce intestinal infection to develop a PI-IBS model. After evaluation of the post-infectious phase by biochemical tests, DNA agarose gel electrophoresis, abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) test, and the intestinal motility test, four PI-IBS groups received different concentrations of LGG-s for 4 wk. The treatments were maintained for 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 or 4.0 wk during the experiment, and the colons and brains were removed for later use each week. SERT mRNA and protein levels were detected by real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. RESULTS The levels of SERT mRNA and protein in intestinal tissue were higher in rats treated with LGG-s than in control rats and PI-IBS rats gavaged with PBS during the whole study. Undiluted LGG-s up-regulated SERT mRNA level by 2.67 times compared with the control group by week 2, and SERT mRNA expression kept increasing later. Double-diluted LGG-s was similar to undiluted-LGG-s, resulting in high levels of SERT mRNA. Triple-diluted LGG-s up-regulated SERT mRNA expression level by 6.9-times compared with the control group, but SERT mRNA expression decreased rapidly at the end of the second week. At the first week, SERT protein levels were basically comparable in rats treated with undiluted LGG-s, double-diluted LGG-s, and triple-diluted LGG-s, which were higher than those in the control group and PBS-treated PI-IBS group. SERT protein levels in the intestine were also comparable in rats treated with undiluted LGG-s, double-diluted LGG-s, and triple-diluted LGG-s by the second and third weeks. SERT mRNA and protein levels in the brain had no statistical difference in the groups during the experiment. CONCLUSION LGG-s can up-regulate SERT mRNA and protein levels in intestinal tissue but

  12. Temperament, character and serotonin activity in the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuominen, L; Salo, J; Hirvonen, J

    2013-01-01

    The psychobiological model of personality by Cloninger and colleagues originally hypothesized that interindividual variability in the temperament dimension 'harm avoidance' (HA) is explained by differences in the activity of the brain serotonin system. We assessed brain serotonin transporter (5-HTT...

  13. Highly selective determination of dopamine in the presence of ascorbic acid and serotonin at glassy carbon electrodes modified with carbon nanotubes dispersed in polyethylenimine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Marcela C; Rubianes, María D; Rivas, Gustavo A

    2008-11-01

    We report the highly selective and sensitive voltammetric dopamine quantification in the presence of ascorbic acid and serotonin by using glassy carbon electrodes modified with a dispersion of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) in polyethylenimine, PEI (GCE/MWCNT-PEI). The electrocatalytic activity of the MWCNT deposited on the glassy carbon electrode has allowed an important decrease in the overvoltages for the oxidation of ascorbic acid and dopamine, making possible a clear definition of dopamine, serotonin and ascorbic acid oxidation processes. The sensitivities for dopamine in the presence and absence of 1.0 mM ascorbic acid and serotonin were (2.18 +/- 0.03) x 10(5) microAM(-1) (r = 0.9998); and (2.10 +/- 0.07) x 10(5) miroAM(-1) (r=0.9985), respectively, demonstrating the excellent performance of the GCE/MWCNT-PEI. The detection limit for dopamine in the mixture was 9.2 x 10(-7) M. The R. S. D. for the determination of 50 microM dopamine using four different electrodes was 3.9% when modified with the same MWCNT/PEI dispersion, and 4.6% when using four different dispersions. The modified electrode has been successfully applied for recovery assays of dopamine in human blood serum. Therefore, the new sensor represents an interesting and promising alternative for the electrochemical quantification of neurotransmitters and other analytes of clinical interest.

  14. Self-esteem in remitted patients with mood disorders is not associated with the dopamine receptor D4 and the serotonin transporter genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serretti, A; Macciardi, F; Di Bella, D; Catalano, M; Smeraldi, E

    1998-08-17

    Disturbances of the dopaminergic and serotoninergic neurotransmitter systems have been implicated in the pathogenesis of depressive symptoms. Associations have been reported between markers of the two neurotransmitter systems and the presence of illness or severity of depressive episodes, but no attention has been focused on the periods of remission. The present report focuses on a possible association of self-esteem in remitted mood disorder patients with the functional polymorphism located in the upstream regulatory region of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) and the dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4). Inpatients (N=162) affected by bipolar (n=103) and unipolar (n=59) disorder (DSM III-R) were assessed by the Self-Esteem Scale (SES, Rosenberg, 1965) and were typed for DRD4 and 5-HTTLPR (n=58 subjects) variants at the third exon using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques. Neither DRD4 nor 5-HTTLPR variants were associated with SES scores, and consideration of possible stratification effects such as sex and psychiatric diagnosis did not reveal any association either. The serotonin transporter and dopamine receptor D4 genes do not, therefore, influence self-esteem in remitted mood disorder subjects.

  15. Binding-Induced Fluorescence of Serotonin Transporter Ligands: A Spectroscopic and Structural Study of 4-(4-(Dimethylamino)phenyl)-1-methylpyridinium (APP+) and APP+ Analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The binding-induced fluorescence of 4-(4-(dimethylamino)-phenyl)-1-methylpyridinium (APP+) and two new serotonin transporter (SERT)-binding fluorescent analogues, 1-butyl-4-[4-(1-dimethylamino)phenyl]-pyridinium bromide (BPP+) and 1-methyl-4-[4-(1-piperidinyl)phenyl]-pyridinium (PPP+), has been investigated. Optical spectroscopy reveals that these probes are highly sensitive to their chemical microenvironment, responding to variations in polarity with changes in transition energies and responding to changes in viscosity or rotational freedom with emission enhancements. Molecular docking calculations reveal that the probes are able to access the nonpolar and conformationally restrictive binding pocket of SERT. As a result, the probes exhibit previously not identified binding-induced turn-on emission that is spectroscopically distinct from dyes that have accumulated intracellularly. Thus, binding and transport dynamics of SERT ligands can be resolved both spatially and spectroscopically. PMID:24460204

  16. ROLE OF SEROTONIN IN FISH REPRODUCTION

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    Parvathy ePrasad

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The neuroendocrine mechanism regulates reproduction through the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis which is evolutionarily conserved in vertebrates. The HPG axis is regulated by a variety of internal as well as external factors. Serotonin, a monoamine neurotransmitter, is involved in a wide range of reproductive functions. In mammals, serotonin regulates sexual behaviours, gonadotropin release and gonadotropin-release hormone (GnRH secretion. However, the serotonin system in teleost may play unique role in the control of reproduction as the mechanism of reproductive control in teleosts is not always the same as in the mammalian models. In fish, the serotonin system is also regulated by natural environmental factors as well as chemical substances. In particular, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs are commonly detected as pharmaceutical contaminants in the natural environment. Those factors may influence fish reproductive functions via the serotonin system. This review summarizes the functional significance of serotonin in the teleosts reproduction.

  17. Inhibition of serotonin transporters disrupts the enhancement of fear memory extinction by 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA).

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    Young, Matthew B; Norrholm, Seth D; Khoury, Lara M; Jovanovic, Tanja; Rauch, Sheila A M; Reiff, Collin M; Dunlop, Boadie W; Rothbaum, Barbara O; Howell, Leonard L

    2017-10-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) persistently improves symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) when combined with psychotherapy. Studies in rodents suggest that these effects can be attributed to enhancement of fear memory extinction. Therefore, MDMA may improve the effects of exposure-based therapy for PTSD, particularly in treatment-resistant patients. However, given MDMA's broad pharmacological profile, further investigation is warranted before moving to a complex clinical population. We aimed to inform clinical research by providing a translational model of MDMA's effect, and elucidating monoaminergic mechanisms through which MDMA enhances fear extinction. We explored the importance of monoamine transporters targeted by MDMA to fear memory extinction, as measured by reductions in conditioned freezing and fear-potentiated startle (FPS) in mice. Mice were treated with selective inhibitors of individual monoamine transporters prior to combined MDMA treatment and fear extinction training. MDMA enhanced the lasting extinction of FPS. Acute and chronic treatment with a 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) inhibitor blocked MDMA's effect on fear memory extinction. Acute inhibition of dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) transporters had no effect. 5-HT release alone did not enhance extinction. Blockade of MDMA's effect by 5-HTT inhibition also downregulated 5-HT 2A -mediated behavior, and 5-HT 2A antagonism disrupted MDMA's effect on extinction. We validate enhancement of fear memory extinction by MDMA in a translational behavioral model, and reveal the importance of 5-HTT and 5-HT 2A receptors to this effect. These observations support future clinical research of MDMA as an adjunct to exposure therapy, and provide important pharmacological considerations for clinical use in a population frequently treated with 5-HTT inhibitors.

  18. Heuristic Optimization Approach to Selecting a Transport Connection in City Public Transport

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    Kul’ka Jozef

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a heuristic optimization approach to select a suitable transport connection in the framework of a city public transport. This methodology was applied on a part of the public transport in Košice, because it is the second largest city in the Slovak Republic and its network of the public transport creates a complex transport system, which consists of three different transport modes, namely from the bus transport, tram transport and trolley-bus transport. This solution focused on examining the individual transport services and their interconnection in relevant interchange points.

  19. Genetic variation in the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR, rs25531 influences the analgesic response to the short acting opioid Remifentanil in humans

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    Schalling Martin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is evidence from animal studies that serotonin (5-HT can influence the antinociceptive effects of opioids at the spinal cord level. Therefore, there could be an influence of genetic polymorphisms in the serotonin system on individual variability in response to opioid treatment of pain. The serotonin transporter (5-HTT is a key regulator of serotonin metabolism and availability and its gene harbors several known polymorphisms that are known to affect 5-HTT expression (e.g. 5-HTTLPR, rs25531. The aim of this study was to investigate if the triallelic 5-HTTLPR influences pain sensitivity or the analgesic effect of opioids in humans. 43 healthy volunteers (12 men, 31 women, mean age 26 years underwent heat pain stimulations before and after intravenous injection of Remifentanil; a rapid and potent opioid drug acting on μ-type receptors. Subjects rated their perceived pain on a visual analogue scale (VAS. All participants were genotyped for the 5-HTTLPR and the rs25531 polymorphism. We recruited by advertising, with no history of drug abuse, chronic pain or psychiatric disorders. Results At baseline, there was no difference in pain ratings for the different triallelic 5-HTTLPR genotype groups. However, the opiod drug had a differential analgesic effect depending on the triallelic 5-HTTLPR genotype. Remifentanil had a significantly better analgesic effect in individuals with a genotype coding for low 5-HTT expression (SA/SA and SA/LG as compared to those with high expression(LA/LA, p Conclusion This is the first report showing an influence of the triallelic 5-HTTLPR on pain sensitivity or the analgesic effect of opioids in humans. Previously the 5-HTTLPR s-allele has been associated with higher risk of developing chronic pain conditions but in this study we show that the genotype coding for low 5-HTT expression is associated with a better analgesic effect of an opioid. The s-allele has been associated with downregulation of

  20. Serotonin transporter polymorphism modifies the association between depressive symptoms and sleep onset latency complaint in elderly people: results from the 'InveCe.Ab' study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polito, Letizia; Davin, Annalisa; Vaccaro, Roberta; Abbondanza, Simona; Govoni, Stefano; Racchi, Marco; Guaita, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies have documented the involvement of the central nervous system serotonin in promoting wakefulness. There are few and conflicting results over whether there is an actual association between bearing the short allele of serotonin transporter promoter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) and worse sleep quality. This study examined whether sleep onset latency complaint is associated with the 5-HTTLPR triallelic polymorphism in the SLC6A4 gene promoter and whether this polymorphism influences the relationship between sleep onset latency complaint and depressive symptoms in elderly people. A total of 1321 community-dwelling individuals aged 70-74 years were interviewed for sleep onset latency complaint and for sleep medication consumption. Participants' genomic DNA was typed for 5-HTTLPR and rs25531 polymorphisms. Depressive symptoms were evaluated with the Geriatric Depression Scale Short form and general medical comorbidity was assessed by the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale. The presence of a past history of depression was recorded. The S' allele of the 5-HTTLPR triallelic polymorphism was associated with sleep onset latency complaint. This association was maintained after adjusting for depressive symptoms, sex, age, history of depression and medical comorbidity. After stratification for 5-HTTLPR/rs25531, only in S'S' individuals high depressive symptoms were actually associated with sleep onset latency complaint. These data indicate that the low-expressing 5-HTTLPR triallelic polymorphism is an independent risk factor for sleep onset latency disturbance. Furthermore, the 5-HTTLPR genotype influences the association between depressive symptoms and sleep onset latency complaint. © 2014 European Sleep Research Society.