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Sample records for selective postoperative chemoradiotherapy

  1. Postoperative chemoradiotherapy in high risk locally advanced gastric cancer

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    Song, Sang Hyuk; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kim, Kyu Bo; Lee, Hyuk Joon; Yang, Han Kwang; Han, Sae Won; Oh, Do Youn; Im, Seok Ah; Bang, Yung Jue; Ha, Sung W. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul(Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    To evaluate treatment outcome of patients with high risk locally advanced gastric cancer after postoperative chemoradiotherapy. Between May 2003 and May 2012, thirteen patients who underwent postoperative chemoradiotherapy for gastric cancer with resection margin involvement or adjacent structure invasion were retrospectively analyzed. Concurrent chemotherapy was administered in 10 patients. Median dose of radiation was 50.4 Gy (range, 45 to 55.8 Gy). The median follow-up duration for surviving patients was 48 months (range, 5 to 108 months). The 5-year overall survival rate was 42% and the 5-year disease-free survival rate was 28%. Major pattern of failure was peritoneal seeding with 46%. Loco-regional recurrence was reported in only one patient. Grade 2 or higher gastrointestinal toxicity occurred in 54% of the patients. However, there was only one patient with higher than grade 3 toxicity. Despite reported suggested role of adjuvant radiotherapy with combination chemotherapy in gastric cancer, only very small portion of the patients underwent the treatment. Results from this study show that postoperative chemoradiotherapy provided excellent locoregional control with acceptable and manageable treatment related toxicity in patients with high risk locally advanced gastric cancer. Thus, postoperative chemoradiotherapy may improve treatment result in terms of locoregional control in these high risk patients. However, as these findings are based on small series, validation with larger cohort is suggested.

  2. Chemoradiotherapy

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    Kodaira, Takeshi

    2008-01-01

    Chemoradiotherapy is now thought to be standard treatment for malignant tumors of the head and neck, uterine cervit, esophagus, and lung. Among various surgical approaches, chemoradiotherapy is considered to be a minimally invasive therapy. Chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer seems to be an optimal model of organ and function preservation, because the treatment modality would considerably change the status of swallowing, speech, breathing, mood and cosmetics. Although concurrent chemoradiotherapy is believed to be a standard care, toxicities are sometimes problematic regarding functional deficit and difficulty for salvage surgery. Induction chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy with or without concurrent chemotherapy is an attractive choice to balance efficacy and toxicities. New agents such as taxane and molecular-targeted drugs will strongly enhance treatment efficacy without increasing toxicities. Modern radiotherapy techniques could minimize the adverse effects of chemoradiotherapy. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy is thought to be a promising way to preserve parotid function and quality of life for patients with head and neck malignancy. Cervical cancer is also a good candidate for chemoradiotherapy. Patients with advanced disease should be treated with chemoradiotherapy or surgery followed by adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Surgery with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy would increase toxicities, so careful patient selection for treatment modality becomes more important. Chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer of each stage is thought to achieve comparable surgical outcomes. Especially for patients in the early stage, chemoradiotherapy should be considered the treatment of choice because of less toxicity compared to surgery. Development of radiotherapy techniques and new drugs will open the window for minimum invasive treatment for several types of malignancy. However, more specialists such as radiation oncologists, radiation physicists, medical oncologists and

  3. Prospective study on late renal toxicity following postoperative chemoradiotherapy in gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, Edwin; Saunders, Mark P.; Boot, Henk; Oppedijk, Vera; Dubbelman, Ria; Porritt, Bridget; Cats, Annemieke; Stroom, Joep; Valdes Olmos, Renato; Bartelink, Harry; Verheij, Marcel

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Postoperative chemoradiotherapy in gastric cancer improves locoregional control and survival. Reports on late toxicity, however, have been scarce thus far. Because renal toxicity is one of the most serious late complications in upper abdominal radiotherapy, we prospectively analyzed kidney function in patients who underwent postoperative chemoradiotherapy for gastric cancer. Patients and Methods: In 44 patients, Tc 99m -thiatide renography was performed before and at regular intervals after postoperative chemoradiotherapy. The left-to-right (L/R) ratio was used as an index of the relative kidney function. Mean L/R values were calculated for four follow-up time intervals. For all patients, kidney V 20 (percentage of the volume of the kidney that received more than 20 Gy) and mean dose of both kidneys were retrieved from the three-dimensional dose-volume histograms. Results: We observed a progressive decrease in left renal function of 11% (p = 0.012) after 6 months, up to 52% (p 18 months. The V 20 (left kidney) and mean left kidney dose were identified as parameters associated with decreased kidney function. Mean serum creatinine was increased from 74.6 μmol/L before treatment to 86.1 μmol/L at 1 year after chemoradiotherapy (p < 0.001). In patients with a follow-up of 18-28 months, one case of severe renovascular hypertension was observed. Conclusion: A progressive relative functional impairment of the left kidney in patients after postoperative chemoradiotherapy for gastric cancer is demonstrated. To optimize the survival benefit that can be established with adjuvant regimens, strategies to minimize the dose to the kidneys and other critical organs should be explored

  4. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy versus postoperative chemoradiotherapy for stage II–III resectable rectal cancer: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

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    Song, Jin Ho [Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jae Uk [Chonnam National University School of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Hoon; Kim, Sung Hwan [The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyeon Min [The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Um, Jun Won [University Ansan Hospital, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Hong Seok [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Whether preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is better than postoperative CRT in oncologic outcome and toxicity is contentious in prospective randomized clinical trials. We systematically analyze and compare the treatment result, toxicity, and sphincter preservation rate between preoperative CRT and postoperative CRT in stage II–III rectal cancer. We searched Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Library from 1990 to 2014 for relevant trials. Only phase III randomized studies performing CRT and curative surgery were selected and the data were extracted. Meta-analysis was used to pool oncologic outcome and toxicity data across studies. Three randomized phase III trials were finally identified. The meta-analysis results showed significantly lower 5-year locoregional recurrence rate in the preoperative-CRT group than in the postoperative-CRT group (hazard ratio, 0.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.41–0.84; p = 0.004). The 5-year distant recurrence rate (p = 0.55), relapse-free survival (p = 0.14), and overall survival (p = 0.22) showed no significant difference between two groups. Acute toxicity was significantly lower in the preoperativeCRT group than in the postoperative-CRT group (p < 0.001). However, there was no significant difference between two groups in perioperative and chronic complications (p = 0.53). The sphincter-saving rate was not significantly different between two groups (p = 0.24). The conversion rate from abdominoperineal resection to low anterior resection in low rectal cancer was significantly higher in the preoperative-CRT group than in the postoperative-CRT group (p < 0.001). As compared to postoperative CRT, preoperative CRT improves only locoregional control, not distant control and survival, with similar chronic toxicity and sphincter preservation rate in rectal cancer patients.

  5. Retrospective analysis of treatment outcomes after postoperative chemoradiotherapy in advanced gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sup; Kim, Jun Sang; Jeong, Hyun Yong; Noh, Seung Moo; Kim, Ki Whan; Cho, Moon June

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate retrospectively the survival outcome, patterns of failure, and complications in patients treated with postoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in advanced gastric cancer. Between January 2000 and December 2006, 80 patients with advanced gastric cancer who received postoperative concurrent CRT were included. Pathological staging was IB-II in 9%, IIIA in 38%, IIIB in 33%, and IV in 21%. Radiotherapy consisted of 45 Gy of radiation. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of a continuous intravenous infusion of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin on the first 4 days and last 3 days of radiotherapy. The median follow-up period was 48 months (range, 3 to 83 months). The 5-year overall survival, disease-free survival, and locoregional recurrence-free survivals were 62%, 59%, and 80%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, significant factors for disease-free survival were T stage (hazard ratio [HR], 0.278; p = 0.038), lymph node dissection extent (HR, 0.201; p = 0.002), and maintenance oral chemotherapy (HR, 2.964; p = 0.004). Locoregional recurrence and distant metastasis occurred in 5 (6%) and 18 (23%) patients, respectively. Mixed failure occurred in 10 (16%) patients. Grade 3 leukopenia and thrombocytopenia were observed in 4 (5%) and one (1%) patient, respectively. Grade 3 nausea and vomiting developed in 8 (10%) patients. Intestinal obstruction developed in one (1%). The survival outcome of the postoperative CRT in advanced gastric cancer was similar to those reported previously. Our postoperative CRT regimen seems to be a safe and effective method, reducing locoregional failure without severe treatment toxicity in advanced gastric cancer patients.

  6. Optimal scheme of postoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer: phase III prospective randomized trial

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    Kim, Young Seok; Kim, Jong Hoon; Choi, Eun Kyung

    2002-01-01

    To determine the optimal scheme of postoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer by comparing survival, patterns of failure, toxicities in early and late radiotherapy groups using a phase III randomized prospective clinical trial. From January 1996 to March 1999, 307 patients with curatively resected AJCC stage II and III rectal cancer were assigned randomly to an 'early (151 patients, arm I)' or a 'late (156 patients, arm II)' and were administered combined chemotherapy (5-FU 375 mg/m 2 /day, leucovorin 20 mg/m 2 , IV bolus daily, for 3 days with RT, 5 days without RT, 8 cycles with 4 weeks interval) and radiation therapy (whole pelvis with 45 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks). Patients of arm I received radiation therapy from day 1 of the first cycle of chemotherapy and those of arm II from day 57 with a third cycle of chemotherapy. The median follow-up period of living patients was 40 months. Of the 307 patients enrolled, fifty patients did not receive scheduled radiation therapy or chemotherapy. The overall survival rate and disease free survival rate at 5 years were 78.3% and 68.7% in arm I, and 78.4% and 67.5% in arm II. The local recurrence rate was 6.6% and 6.4% (ρ = 0.46) in arms I and II, respectively, no significant difference was observed between the distant metastasis rates of the two arms (23.8% and 29.5%, ρ = 0.16). During radiation therapy, grade 3 diarrhea or more, by the NCI common toxicity criteria, was observed in 63.0% and 58.2% of the respective arms (ρ = N.S.), but most were controlled with supportive care. Hematologic toxicity (leukopenia) greater than RTOG grade 2 was found in only 1.3% and 2.6% of patients in each respective arm. There was no significant difference in survival, patterns of failure or toxicities between the early and late radiation therapy arms. Postoperative adjuvant chemoradiation was found to be a relatively safe treatment but higher compliance is needed

  7. Modified Weekly Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy Is Acceptable in Postoperative Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

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    Lu, Hsueh-Ju; Yang, Chao-Chun; Wang, Ling-Wei; Chu, Pen-Yuan; Tai, Shyh-Kuan; Chen, Ming-Huang; Yang, Muh-Hwa; Chang, Peter Mu-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    Background. Triweekly cisplatin-based postoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) has high intolerance and toxicities in locally advanced head and neck cancer (LAHNC). We evaluated the effect of a modified weekly cisplatin-based chemotherapy in postoperative CCRT. Methods. A total of 117 patients with LAHNC were enrolled between December 2007 and December 2012. Survival, compliance/adverse events, and independent prognostic factors were analyzed. Results. Median follow-up time was 30.0 (3.1–73.0) months. Most patients completed the entire course of postoperative CCRT (radiotherapy ≥ 60 Gy, 94.9%; ≥6 times weekly chemotherapy, 75.2%). Only 17.1% patients required hospital admission. The most common adverse effect was grade 3/4 mucositis (28.2%). No patient died due to protocol-related adverse effects. Multivariate analysis revealed the following independent prognostic factors: oropharyngeal cancer, extracapsular spread, and total radiation dose. Two-year progression-free survival and overall survival rates were 70.9% and 79.5%, respectively. Conclusion. Modified weekly cisplatin-based chemotherapy is an acceptable regimen in postoperative CCRT for LAHNC. PMID:25793192

  8. Modified Weekly Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy Is Acceptable in Postoperative Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

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    Hsueh-Ju Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Triweekly cisplatin-based postoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT has high intolerance and toxicities in locally advanced head and neck cancer (LAHNC. We evaluated the effect of a modified weekly cisplatin-based chemotherapy in postoperative CCRT. Methods. A total of 117 patients with LAHNC were enrolled between December 2007 and December 2012. Survival, compliance/adverse events, and independent prognostic factors were analyzed. Results. Median follow-up time was 30.0 (3.1–73.0 months. Most patients completed the entire course of postoperative CCRT (radiotherapy ≥ 60 Gy, 94.9%; ≥6 times weekly chemotherapy, 75.2%. Only 17.1% patients required hospital admission. The most common adverse effect was grade 3/4 mucositis (28.2%. No patient died due to protocol-related adverse effects. Multivariate analysis revealed the following independent prognostic factors: oropharyngeal cancer, extracapsular spread, and total radiation dose. Two-year progression-free survival and overall survival rates were 70.9% and 79.5%, respectively. Conclusion. Modified weekly cisplatin-based chemotherapy is an acceptable regimen in postoperative CCRT for LAHNC.

  9. EVALUATION OF N-RATIO IN SELECTING PATIENTS FOR ADJUVANT CHEMORADIOTHERAPY AFTER D2-GASTRECTOMY

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    Wilson Luiz da COSTA JUNIOR

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Context Whether adjuvant chemoradiotherapy may contribute to improve survival outcomes after D2-gastrectomy remains controvertial. Objective To explore the clinical utility of N-Ratio in selecting gastric cancer patients for adjuvant chemoradiotherapy after D2-gastrectomy. Methods A retrospective cohort study was carried out on gastric cancer patients who underwent D2-gastrectomy alone or D2-gastrectomy plus adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (INT-0116 protocol at the Hospital A. C. Camargo from September 1998 to December 2008. Statistical analysis were performed using multiple conventional methods, such as c-statistic, adjusted Cox's regression and stratified survival analysis. Results Our analysis involved 128 patients. According to c-statistic, the N-Ratio (i.e., as a continuous variable presented “area under ROC curve” (AUC of 0.713, while the number of metastatic nodes presented AUC of 0.705. After categorization, the cut-offs provide by Marchet et al. displayed the highest discriminating power – AUC value of 0.702. This N-Ratio categorization was confirmed as an independent predictor of survival using multivariate analyses. There also was a trend of better survival by adding of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy only for patients with milder degrees of lymphatic spread – 5-year survival of 23.1% vs 66.9%, respectively (HR = 0.426, 95% CI 0.150–1.202; P = 0.092. Conclusions This study confirms the N-Ratio as a tool to improve the lymph node metastasis staging in gastric cancer and suggests the cut-offs provided by Marchet et al. as the best way for its categorization after a D2-gastrectomy. In these settings, the N-Ratio appears a useful tool to select patients for adjuvant chemoradiotherapy, and the benefit of adding this type of adjuvancy to D2-gastrectomy is suggested to be limited to patients with milder degrees of lymphatic spread (i.e., NR2, 10%–25%.

  10. Inflammation-based prognostic score, prior to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy, predicts postoperative outcome in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

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    Kobayashi, Takashi; Teruya, Masanori; Kishiki, Tomokazu; Endo, Daisuke; Takenaka, Yoshiharu; Tanaka, Hozumi; Miki, Kenji; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Morita, Koji

    2008-11-01

    Recent studies have revealed that Glasgow prognostic score (GPS), an inflammation-based prognostic score, is associated with poor outcome in a variety of tumors. However, few studies have investigated whether GPS measured prior to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) is useful for postoperative prognosis of patients with advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). GPS was calculated on the basis of admission data as follows: patients with both an elevated C-reactive protein (>10 mg/L) and hypoalbuminaemia (L) were allocated a GPS score of 2. Patients in whom only 1 of these biochemical abnormalities was present were allocated a GPS score of 1, and patients with a normal C-reactive protein and albumin were allocated a score of 0. All patients underwent radical en-bloc resection 3-4 weeks after nCRT. A total of 48 patients with clinical TNM stage II/III were enrolled. Univariate analyses revealed that there were significant differences in cancer-specific survival in relation to grade of response to nCRT (P = .004), lymph node status (P = .0065), lymphatic invasion (P = .0002), venous invasion (P = .0001), pathological TNM classification (P = .015), and GPS (P GPS classification showed a close relationship with lymphatic invasion, venous invasion, and number of lymph node (P = .0292, .0473, and .0485, respectively). GPS was found to be the only independent predictor of cancer-specific survival (odds ratio, 0.17; 95% confidence interval, 0.06-0.52; P = .0019). GPS, measured prior to nCRT, is an independent novel predictor of postoperative outcome in patients with advanced ESCC.

  11. Postoperative Chemotherapy Followed by Conformal Concomitant Chemoradiotherapy in High-Risk Gastric Cancer

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    Quero, Laurent; Bouchbika, Zineb; Kouto, Honorine; Baruch-Hennequin, Valerie; Gornet, Jean-Marc; Munoz, Nicolas; Cojean-Zelek, Isabelle; Houdart, Remi; Panis, Yves; Valleur, Patrice; Aparicio, Thomas; Maylin, Claude; Hennequin, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the efficacy, toxicity, and pattern of relapse after adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed by three-dimensional irradiation and concomitant LV5FU2 chemotherapy (high-dose leucovorin and 5-fluorouracil bolus plus continuous infusion) in the treatment of completely resected high-risk gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective analysis of 52 patients with high-risk gastric cancer initially treated by total/partial gastrectomy and lymphadenectomy between January 2002 and June 2007. Median age was 54 years (range, 36–75 years). Postoperative treatment consisted of 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin chemotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy was followed by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in the tumor bed and regional lymph nodes at 4500 cGy/25 fractions in association with concomitant chemotherapy. Concomitant chemotherapy consisted of a 2-h infusion of leucovorin (200 mg/m²) followed by a bolus of 5-fluorouracil (400 mg/m²) and then a 44-h continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil (2400–3600 mg/m²) given every 14 days, for three cycles (LV5FU2 protocol). Results: Five-year overall and disease-free survival were 50% and 48%, respectively. Distant metastases and peritoneal spread were the most frequent sites of relapse (37% each). After multivariate analysis, only pathologic nodal status was significantly associated with disease-free and overall survival. Acute toxicities were essentially gastrointestinal and hematologic. One myocardial infarction and one pulmonary embolism were also reported. Eighteen patients had a radiotherapy program interruption because of acute toxicity. All patients but 2 have completed radiotherapy. Conclusion: Postoperative cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed by conformal radiotherapy in association with concurrent 5-fluorouracil seemed to be feasible and resulted in successful locoregional control.

  12. High-dose preoperative chemoradiotherapy in esophageal cancer patients does not increase postoperative pulmonary complications: Correlation with dose-volume histogram parameters

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    Hurmuzlu, Meysan; Ovrebo, Kjell; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Muren, Ludvig Paul; Viste, Asgaut; Smaaland, Rune

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association of high-dose preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters of lungs with incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications and to identify predictive clinical factors of pulmonary complications. Methods: Data of 65 patients were collected retrospectively. Thirty-five patients underwent transthoracic esophagectomy (TTE) alone and 30 received cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil, concomitant with radiotherapy, median dose 66 Gy, and followed by TTE. From the DVH for each lung alone and for both lungs together as one organ we generated total lung volume, mean radiotherapy dose, relative and absolute volumes receiving more than a threshold dose, and relative and absolute volumes receiving less than a threshold dose. Postoperative pulmonary complications were defined as pneumonia or respiratory failure. Results: Sixty percent of the patients in the TTE alone group had postoperative pulmonary complications versus 63% in the CRT + TTE group. Postoperative mortality was 8.6% and 16.7% in the respective patient groups (p = NS). None of the DVH parameters was associated with postoperative pulmonary complications. Squamous cell carcinoma was an adverse factor related to increased postoperative pulmonary complications. Conclusion: High-dose preoperative CRT was not associated with increased postoperative pulmonary complications in this cohort of esophageal cancer patients.

  13. Routine versus Selective Postoperative Nasogastric Suction In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2005-12-02

    Dec 2, 2005 ... Mobilization of the patient in the postoperative period is dependent on the presence of a NGT. The longer it is kept in place the longer will be the duration of patients' restriction in bed. Prolonged immobilization after surgery infact enhances the risk of postoperative complication like DVT and delays recovery ...

  14. Impact of age on efficacy of postoperative oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in patients with rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy.

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    Huang, Xuan-Zhang; Gao, Peng; Song, Yong-Xi; Sun, Jing-Xu; Chen, Xiao-Wan; Zhao, Jun-Hua; Ma, Bin; Wang, Jun; Wang, Zhen-Ning

    2016-04-12

    Clinical practice guidelines focusing on age-related adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer are currently limited. The present study aimed to explore the impact of age on the efficacy of adjuvant oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in patients with rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. We performed a retrospective cohort analysis using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare-linked database from 1992-2009. We enrolled patients with yp stages I-III rectal cancer who received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and underwent curative resection. The age-related survival benefit of adding oxaliplatin to adjuvant 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) chemotherapy was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis with propensity score-matching and Cox proportional hazards models. Comparing the oxaliplatin group with the 5-FU group, there were significant interactions between age and chemotherapy efficacy in terms of overall survival (OS) (p for interaction = 0.017) among patients with positive lymph nodes (ypN+). Adding oxaliplatin to 5-FU could prolong survival in patients aged rectal cancer who have already received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and undergone curative resection, adding oxaliplatin to 5-FU could prolong OS in patients aged < 73 years and ypN+ category. However, adding oxaliplatin did not translate into survival benefits in patients age ≥ 73 years and ypN+ category, or in ypN- patients.

  15. Prolonged radiation time and low nadir hemoglobin during postoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy are both poor prognostic factors with synergistic effect on locally advanced head and neck cancer patients

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    Su NW

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nai-Wen Su,1 Chung-Ji Liu,2 Yi-Shing Leu,3 Jehn-Chuan Lee,3 Yu-Jen Chen,4 Yi-Fang Chang1,51Division of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 3Department of Otorhinolaryngology, 4Department of Radiation Oncology, 5Good Clinical Research Center, Department of Medical Research, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, TaiwanBackground: Anemia, a common complication of head and neck cancer treatment, is regarded as a poor prognostic factor. We evaluated the impact of low hemoglobin (Hb levels, measured at different time points, on a consecutive cohort of patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (LA-SCCHN who underwent postoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT.Materials and methods: From 2002 to 2009, 140 patients were enrolled and reviewed retrospectively. Preoperative (pre-op Hb, pre-CCRT Hb, and nadir Hb during CCRT were measured and recorded. The three Hb parameters were analyzed against several well-established pathologic risk factors and radiation-associated variables. Prognostic impacts were investigated with multivariate analysis by Cox proportional hazards model.Results: On Cox regression analysis, significantly higher risk of death was associated with pre-op Hb %13 g/dL (hazard ratio [HR] =1.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1–3.1; P=0.023, nadir Hb %11 g/dL (HR =1.9; 95% CI, 1.1–3.3; P=0.020, radiation treatment time (RTT >7 weeks (HR =1.9; 95% CI, 1.1–3.3; P=0.022, and multiple positive lymph nodes (HR =2.1; 95% CI, 1.2–3.7; P=0.010, after adjusting for primary tumor site and pathologic lymphovascular invasion. Patients with poor prognosticators including low nadir Hb %11 g/dL and RTT >7 weeks had a higher risk of death (HR =4.0; 95% CI =1.6–10.2; P=0.004.Conclusion: In the treatment setting of LA-SCCHN patients who underwent postoperative CCRT, coexistance of lower nadir Hb during CCRT and prolonged RTT resulted in

  16. Investigation of clinical and dosimetric factors associated with postoperative pulmonary complications in esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shulian; Liao Zhongxing; Vaporciyan, Ara A.; Tucker, Susan L.; Liu, Helen; Wei Xiong; Swisher, Stephen; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the association of clinical and especially dosimetric factors with the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications among esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy followed by surgery. Method and Materials: Data from 110 esophageal cancer patients treated between January 1998 and December 2003 were analyzed retrospectively. All patients received concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery; 72 patients also received irinotecan-based induction chemotherapy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-fluorouracil-based and in 97 cases included taxanes. Radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 41.4-50.4 Gy at 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction with a three-dimensional conformal technique. Surgery (three-field, Ivor-Lewis, or transhiatal esophagectomy) was performed 27-123 days (median, 45 days) after completion of radiotherapy. The following dosimetric parameters were generated from the dose-volume histogram (DVH) for total lung: lung volume, mean dose to lung, relative and absolute volumes of lung receiving more than a threshold dose (relative V dose and absolute V dose ), and absolute volume of lung receiving less than a threshold dose (volume spared, or VS dose ). Occurrence of postoperative pulmonary complications, defined as pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) within 30 days after surgery, was the endpoint for all analyses. Fisher's exact test was used to investigate the relationship between categorical factors and incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications. Logistic analysis was used to analyze the relationship between continuous factors (e.g., V dose or VS dose ) and complication rate. Logistic regression with forward stepwise inclusion of factors was used to perform multivariate analysis of those factors having univariate significance (p < 0.05). The Mann-Whitney test was used to compare length of hospital stay in patients with and without lung complications and to compare lung volumes, VS5

  17. Postoperative Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy Versus Postoperative Radiotherapy in High-Risk Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: The Randomized Phase III TROG 05.01 Trial.

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    Porceddu, Sandro Virgilio; Bressel, Mathias; Poulsen, Michael Geoffrey; Stoneley, Adam; Veness, Michael John; Kenny, Lizbeth Moira; Wratten, Chris; Corry, June; Cooper, Stephen; Fogarty, Gerald Blaise; Collins, Marnie; Collins, Michael Kevin; Macann, Andrew Martin John; Milross, Christopher Gerard; Penniment, Michael Gordon; Liu, Howard Yu-Hao; King, Madeleine Trudy; Panizza, Benedict James; Rischin, Danny

    2018-05-01

    Purpose To report the results of the Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group randomized phase III trial designed to determine whether the addition of concurrent chemotherapy to postoperative radiotherapy (CRT) improved locoregional control in patients with high-risk cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Patients and Methods The primary objective was to determine whether there was a difference in freedom from locoregional relapse (FFLRR) between 60 or 66 Gy (6 to 6.5 weeks) with or without weekly carboplatin (area under the curve 2) after resection of gross disease. Secondary efficacy objectives were to compare disease-free survival and overall survival. Results Three hundred twenty-one patients were randomly assigned, with 310 patients commencing allocated treatment (radiotherapy [RT] alone, n = 157; CRT, n = 153). Two hundred thirty-eight patients (77%) had high-risk nodal disease, 59 (19%) had high-risk primary or in-transit disease, and 13 (4%) had both. Median follow-up was 60 months. Median RT dose was 60 Gy, with 84% of patients randomly assigned to CRT completing six cycles of carboplatin. The 2- and 5-year FFLRR rates were 88% (95% CI, 83% to 93%) and 83% (95% CI, 77% to 90%), respectively, for RT and 89% (95% CI, 84% to 94%) and 87% (95% CI, 81% to 93%; hazard ratio, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.46 to 1.55; P = .58), respectively, for CRT. There were no significant differences in disease-free or overall survival. Locoregional failure was the most common site of first treatment failure, with isolated distant metastases as the first site of failure seen in 7% of both arms. Treatment was well tolerated in both arms, with no observed enhancement of RT toxicity with carboplatin. Grade 3 or 4 late toxicities were infrequent. Conclusion Although surgery and postoperative RT provided excellent FFLRR, there was no observed benefit with the addition of weekly carboplatin.

  18. Hospital variation and the impact of postoperative complications on the use of perioperative chemo(radio)therapy in resectable gastric cancer. Results from the Dutch Upper GI Cancer Audit.

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    Schouwenburg, M G; Busweiler, L A D; Beck, N; Henneman, D; Amodio, S; van Berge Henegouwen, M I; Cats, A; van Hillegersberg, R; van Sandick, J W; Wijnhoven, B P L; Wouters, M W J; Nieuwenhuijzen, G A P

    2018-04-01

    Dutch national guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of gastric cancer recommend the use of perioperative chemotherapy in patients with resectable gastric cancer. However, adjuvant chemotherapy is often not administered. The aim of this study was to evaluate hospital variation on the probability to receive adjuvant chemotherapy and to identify associated factors with special attention to postoperative complications. All patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy and underwent an elective surgical resection for stage IB-IVa (M0) gastric adenocarcinoma between 2011 and 2015 were identified from a national database (Dutch Upper GI Cancer Audit). A multivariable linear mixed model was used to evaluate case-mix adjusted hospital variation and to identify factors associated with adjuvant therapy. Of all surgically treated gastric cancer patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (n = 882), 68% received adjuvant chemo(radio)therapy. After adjusting for case-mix and random variation, a large hospital variation in the administration rates for adjuvant was observed (OR range 0.31-7.1). In multivariable analysis, weight loss, a poor health status and failure of neoadjuvant chemotherapy completion were strongly associated with an increased likelihood of adjuvant therapy omission. Patients with severe postoperative complications had a threefold increased likelihood of adjuvant therapy omission (OR 3.07 95% CI 2.04-4.65). Despite national guidelines, considerable hospital variation was observed in the probability of receiving adjuvant chemo(radio)therapy. Postoperative complications were strongly associated with adjuvant chemo(radio)therapy omission, underlining the need to further reduce perioperative morbidity in gastric cancer surgery. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  19. Can concurrent chemoradiotherapy replace surgery and postoperative radiation for locally advanced stage III/IV tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Geumju; Lee, Sang-Wook; Kim, Sang Yoon; Nam, Soon Yuhl; Choi, Seung-Ho; Kim, Sung-Bae; Roh, Jong-Lyel; Yoon, Dok Hyun; Kim, Su Ssan; Park, Jin-Hong; Kim, Young Seok; Yoon, Sang Min; Song, Si Yeol; Kim, Jong Hoon; Choi, Eun Kyung; DO Ahn, Seung

    2013-03-01

    To compare surgery and postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) with the non-surgical combination of chemotherapy and radiation therapy (CCRT) for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the tonsil by measuring treatment outcomes and treatment-related complications. The records of 114 patients with non-metastatic stage III/IV tonsillar SCC treated between July, 1998 and December, 2010 were reviewed retrospectively. Among the 114 patients, 65 received PORT and 49 received CCRT. In the PORT group, treatment included wide surgical resection of the tumor with neck dissection and administration of PORT to the primary tumor bed with a median dose of 60 Gy. In the CCRT group, a median dose of 70 Gy was delivered to the gross tumor, and 46 patients received concurrent chemotherapy with i.v. cisplatin. The median follow-up time was 58 months in the PORT group and 44 months in the CCRT group. There was no significant difference between PORT and CCRT in terms of 5-year locoregional recurrence-free survival (88.4% vs. 91.4%, p=0.68), distant metastasis-free survival (88.9% vs. 92.3%, p=0.60), disease-free survival (79.5% vs. 84.2%, p=0.63) or overall survival (78.9% vs. 88.9%, p=0.45). More CCRT patients than PORT patients experienced grade 3 (or higher) hematological toxicities and grade 2 pharyngitis during treatment. Chronic toxicity, manifested as swallowing difficulty, dry mouth and trismus, was similar between the two treatment groups. CCRT provides similar levels of local and distant control in patients with locally advanced tonsillar SCC as PORT, yet fails to show any superiority in preserving functions such as swallowing, saliva production, and mastication.

  20. Phase II feasibility trial of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy with 3-weekly cisplatin for Japanese patients with post-operative high-risk squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyota, Naomi; Tahara, Makoto; Okano, Susumu

    2012-01-01

    The current standard of care for post-operative high-risk squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck is concurrent chemoradiotherapy with a 3-weekly cycle of cisplatin (3W-CDDP/RT). In previous pivotal trials, the complete delivery rate of three cycles of cisplatin and radiation therapy was only -60%. Here, we evaluated the feasibility and safety of 3W-CDDP/RT in a Japanese population. The study enrolled post-operative high-risk squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck patients. High-risk factors were a microscopically incomplete resection, extracapsular extension and two or more lymph node metastases. Subjects received three cycles of cisplatin at a dose of 100 mg/m 2 concomitant with radiation therapy (66 Gy/33 Fr). From August 2006 to May 2009, 25 eligible subjects were accrued, including 13 males, with a median age of 59 years, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0/1 (18/7), Stage III/IVA/IVB/recurrent (1/18/1/5) and oral cavity/oropharynx/hypopharynx/larynx (17/4/3/1). Protocol completion rate was 80%. The lower limit of the one-sided 90% confidence interval was 66%, which met the predefined statistical criteria. Grade 3/4 acute and late toxicities were almost identical to those in previous pivotal trials. No treatment-related deaths were observed. With a median follow-up of 39 months, 14 have had progression and 10 have died. Estimated 3-year locoregional control rate, relapse-free survival and overall survival were 74, 43 and 60%, respectively. On univariate analysis, oral cavity cancer and a cumulative cisplatin dose below 240 mg/m 2 appeared to be poor prognostic factors. This is the first Phase II feasibility trial of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy with 3-weekly cisplatin for post-operative high-risk squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck in a Japanese population. This treatment was feasible and the safety profile was identical to those in pivotal Phase III trials. (author)

  1. Oxaliplatin added to fluorouracil-based preoperative chemoradiotherapy and postoperative chemotherapy of locally advanced rectal cancer (the German CAO/ARO/AIO-04 study): final results of the multicentre, open-label, randomised, phase 3 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödel, Claus; Graeven, Ullrich; Fietkau, Rainer; Hohenberger, Werner; Hothorn, Torsten; Arnold, Dirk; Hofheinz, Ralf-Dieter; Ghadimi, Michael; Wolff, Hendrik A; Lang-Welzenbach, Marga; Raab, Hans-Rudolf; Wittekind, Christian; Ströbel, Philipp; Staib, Ludger; Wilhelm, Martin; Grabenbauer, Gerhard G; Hoffmanns, Hans; Lindemann, Fritz; Schlenska-Lange, Anke; Folprecht, Gunnar; Sauer, Rolf; Liersch, Torsten

    2015-08-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy with infusional fluorouracil, total mesorectal excision surgery, and postoperative chemotherapy with fluorouracil was established by the German CAO/ARO/AIO-94 trial as a standard combined modality treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Here we compare the previously established regimen with an investigational regimen in which oxaliplatin was added to both preoperative chemoradiotherapy and postoperative chemotherapy. In this multicentre, open-label, randomised, phase 3 study we randomly assigned patients with rectal adenocarcinoma, clinically staged as cT3-4 or any node-positive disease, to two groups: a control group receiving standard fluorouracil-based combined modality treatment, consisting of preoperative radiotherapy of 50·4 Gy in 28 fractions plus infusional fluorouracil (1000 mg/m(2) on days 1-5 and 29-33), followed by surgery and four cycles of bolus fluorouracil (500 mg/m(2) on days 1-5 and 29); or to an investigational group receiving preoperative radiotherapy of 50·4 Gy in 28 fractions plus infusional fluorouracil (250 mg/m(2) on days 1-14 and 22-35) and oxaliplatin (50 mg/m(2) on days 1, 8, 22, and 29), followed by surgery and eight cycles of oxaliplatin (100 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 15), leucovorin (400 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 15), and infusional fluorouracil (2400 mg/m(2) on days 1-2 and 15-16). Randomisation was done with computer-generated block-randomisation codes stratified by centre, clinical T category (cT1-3 vs cT4), and clinical N category (cN0 vs cN1-2) without masking. The primary endpoint was disease-free survival, defined as the time between randomisation and non-radical surgery of the primary tumour (R2 resection), locoregional recurrence after R0/1 resection, metastatic disease or progression, or death from any cause, whichever occurred first. Survival and cumulative incidence of recurrence analyses followed the intention-to-treat principle; toxicity analyses included all patients treated. Enrolment of

  2. T2-weighted signal intensity-selected volumetry for prediction of pathological complete response after preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungwon; Han, Kyunghwa; Seo, Nieun; Kim, Hye Jin; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Koom, Woong Sub; Ahn, Joong Bae; Lim, Joon Seok

    2018-06-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of signal intensity (SI)-selected volumetry findings in T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a potential biomarker for predicting pathological complete response (pCR) to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in patients with rectal cancer. Forty consecutive patients with pCR after preoperative CRT were compared with 80 age- and sex-matched non-pCR patients in a case-control study. SI-selected tumor volume was measured on post-CRT T2-weighted MRI, which included voxels of the treated tumor exceeding the SI (obturator internus muscle SI + [ischiorectal fossa fat SI - obturator internus muscle SI] × 0.2). Three blinded readers independently rated five-point pCR confidence scores and compared the diagnostic outcome with SI-selected volumetry findings. The SI-selected volumetry protocol was validated in 30 additional rectal cancer patients. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) of SI-selected volumetry for pCR prediction was 0.831, with an optimal cutoff value of 649.6 mm 3 (sensitivity 0.850, specificity 0.725). The AUC of the SI-selected tumor volume was significantly greater than the pooled AUC of readers (0.707, p volumetry in post-CRT T2-weighted MRI can help predict pCR after preoperative CRT in patients with rectal cancer. • Fibrosis and viable tumor MRI signal intensities (SIs) are difficult to distinguish. • T2 SI-selected volumetry yields high diagnostic performance for assessing pathological complete response. • T2 SI-selected volumetry is significantly more accurate than readers and non-SI-selected volumetry. • Post-chemoradiation therapy T2-weighted MRI SI-selected volumetry facilitates prediction of pathological complete response.

  3. Can we eliminate neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in favor of neoadjuvant multiagent chemotherapy for select stage II/III rectal adenocarcinomas: Analysis of the National Cancer Data base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Richard J; Liu, Yuan; Patel, Kirtesh; Zhong, Jim; Steuer, Conor E; Kooby, David A; Russell, Maria C; Gillespie, Theresa W; Landry, Jerome C

    2017-03-01

    Stage II and III rectal cancers have been effectively treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NCRT) followed by definitive resection. Advancements in surgical technique and systemic therapy have prompted investigation of neoadjuvant multiagent chemotherapy (NMAC) regimens with the elimination of radiation (RT). The objective of the current study was to investigate factors that predict for the use of NCRT versus NMAC and compare outcomes using the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) for select stage II and III rectal cancers. In the NCDB, 21,707 patients from 2004 through 2012 with clinical T2N1 (cT2N1), cT3N0, or cT3N1 rectal cancers were identified who had received NCRT or NMAC followed by low anterior resection. Kaplan-Meier analyses, log-rank tests, and Cox-proportional hazards regression analyses were conducted along with propensity score matching analysis to reduce treatment selection bias. The 5-year actuarial overall survival (OS) rate was 75% for patients who received NCRT versus 67.2% for those who received NMAC (P elimination of neoadjuvant RT for select patients with stage II and III rectal adenocarcinoma was associated with worse OS and should not be recommended outside of a clinical trial. Cancer 2017;123:783-93. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  4. Role of salvage esophagectomy after definitive chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachimori, Yuji

    2009-01-01

    Chemoradiotherapy has become a popular definitive therapy among many patients and oncologists for potentially resectable esophageal carcinoma. Although the complete response rates are high and short-term survival is favorable after chemoradiotherapy, persistent or recurrent locoregional disease is quite frequent. Salvage surgery is the sole curative intent treatment option for this course. As experience with definitive chemoradiotherapy grows, the number of salvage surgeries may increase. Selected articles about salvage esophagectomy after definitive chemoradiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma are reviewed. The number of salvage surgeries was significantly lower than the number of expected candidates. To identify candidates for salvage surgery, patients undergoing definitive chemoradiotherapy should be followed up carefully. Salvage esophagectomy is difficult when dissecting fibrotic masses from irradiated tissues. Patients who underwent salvage esophagectomy had increased morbidity and mortality. Pulmonary complications such as pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome were common. The anastomotic leak rate was significantly increased because of the effects of the radiation administered to the tissues used as conduits. The most significant factor associated with long-term survival appeared to be complete resection. However, precise evaluation of resectability before operation was difficult. Nevertheless, increased morbidity and mortality will be acceptable in exchange for potential long-term survival after salvage esophagectomy. Such treatment should be considered for carefully selected patients at specialized centers. (author)

  5. Chemoradiotherapy and molecular biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Niibe, Hideo

    2000-01-01

    The current status of chemoradiotherapy was reviewed from the standpoint of molecular biology. Chemoradiotherapy was conducted to achieve systemic tumor control, to intensify the response to irradiation, and to reduce adverse reactions. The mechanisms of the efficacy of chemoradiotherapy were: modification of dose-response relationships, inhibition of tumor cell recovery from sublethal damage or potential lethal damage, effects on cell dynamics and the cell cycle, improvement of blood flow or reoxygenation, recruitment, improvement of drug uptake, increased cell damage. Cell death (necrosis and apoptosis) and cancer-related genes were described, as the essential points, because they are involved in the response to chemoradiotherapy. Cisplatin (platinum compound), 5-fluorouracil, etoposide, and taxoid (paclitaxel, docetaxel) were the principal anticancer agents used for chemoradiotherapy, and they enhanced the effects of irradiation. However, even when good responses or synergism between anticancer drug and radiotherapy was observed in in vitro studies, there was little therapeutic advantage clinically. Data from in vitro and in vivo studies should be collected and systemized, and ''molecular biology in chemotherapy'' that can be applied clinically may become established. (K.H.)

  6. Role of chemoradiotherapy in oesophageal cancer -- adjuvant and neoadjuvant therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gwynne, S.; Wijnhoven, B. P. L.; Hulshof, M.; Bateman, A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite low postoperative mortality rates, the long-term outcomes from surgical-based treatment for oesophageal cancer remain poor. Chemoradiotherapy (CRT), either given before surgical resection as neoadjuvant therapy or after resection as adjuvant therapy, has been postulated to improve these

  7. A prospective randomized study of postoperative adjuvant chemo-radiotherapy (CT+RT) vs. radiotherapy(RT) alone in resected stage II and IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Geol Lee; Joo, Hang Kim; Kyung, Young Chung; Doo, Yun Lee; Kil, Dong Kim; Won, Young Lee; Sung, Kyu Kim; Sei, Kyu Kim; Gwi, Eon Kim

    1995-01-01

    Objective: A prospective randomized study has been conducted to compare the results of treatment between CT+RT and RT alone as an adjuvant setting in completely resected stage II and IIIA NSCLC. Materials and Methods: Patients who had completely resected stage II and IIIA NSCLC were randomized into a CT+RT arm(arm A) and a RT alone arm(arm B) as an adjuvant setting after stratification according to cell type(squamous vs. non-squamous) and stage(II vs. IIIA). CT(Etoposide 100mg/m2 I.V. infusion d1-3, Cisplatin 20mg/m2 I.V. infusion d1-5, total 6cycles) was started in postop. 3 weeks with a 4 weeks interval. RT(5040cGy/5-6wks, 180cGy/fr) was started in postoperative 5 weeks after the first cycle of CT for group A and in postoperative 4 weeks for group B. A total of 69 patients were registered from Sep. 1990 to Jun. 1993. Sixty five of these patients were evaluable because 4 patients were ineligible due to distant metastasis before adjuvant treatment. Two patients who refused adjuvant treatment were included in this study to avoid selection bias. Results: Sixteen patients (48%) have received CT of more than 3 cycles and 51 patients(78%) have received RT of more than 50Gy. Four patients died due to treatment-related complications [broncho-pleural fistula 3(arm A:B=2:1), pneumonia 1(arm A)]. Survival and the patterns of failure are as follows: Conclusion: There is no statistical significance in either the overall survival or the patterns of failure between the CT+RT arm and RT alone arm as an adjuvant setting in resected stage II and IIIA NSCLC

  8. Hip complications following chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, P.J.; Sebag Montefiore, D.J.; Arnott, S.J. [Saint Bartholomew`s Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-01

    Chemoradiotherapy protocols are a recent development in the management of tumours where preservation of organ function is important. It is now recognized that such combined treatment may produce adverse effects below the accepted dose thresholds for either modality. This enhancement of toxicity is generally thought to reflect depletion of stem cells within the tissue concerned. We report four patients who have developed avascular necrosis or fractures of the hip following chemoradiotherapy for carcinoma of the vulva or anus. These complications developed after a radiation dose of 4500 cGy in 20 fractions. The possible role of cytotoxic agents in sensitizing bone to radiation damage is discussed, and a novel mechanism is proposed to account for this phenomenon. (author).

  9. Hip complications following chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, P.J.; Sebag Montefiore, D.J.; Arnott, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    Chemoradiotherapy protocols are a recent development in the management of tumours where preservation of organ function is important. It is now recognized that such combined treatment may produce adverse effects below the accepted dose thresholds for either modality. This enhancement of toxicity is generally thought to reflect depletion of stem cells within the tissue concerned. We report four patients who have developed avascular necrosis or fractures of the hip following chemoradiotherapy for carcinoma of the vulva or anus. These complications developed after a radiation dose of 4500 cGy in 20 fractions. The possible role of cytotoxic agents in sensitizing bone to radiation damage is discussed, and a novel mechanism is proposed to account for this phenomenon. (author)

  10. Adjuvant chemoradiotherapy in gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Herrera, Ileana

    2002-01-01

    The main objetives of this work are to determine the tolerability of the adjuvant chemo-radiotherapy's treatment in Costa Rican patients in the Hospital San Juan de Dios, as well as to value the toxicity's level presented. A bibliographic review is realized to justify the use of this treatment's type and to determine the feasibility of its performance with the different services that are involved. The treatment's plan consisted on: after an undergoing of a gastrectomy, the patients were appointed to receive post-operative treatment combined of 5-F U plus leucovorin and radiation. The fluoracil was injected intravenous in continue infusion. The obtained results prove that the use of a lineal accelerator must be recommended as a standard treatment for this pathology by the region to treat and the complexity of the fields. The ganglion dissection performed with more frequency is inferior to one D 2, and the treatment with radiotherapy cobalt 60 and infusion al 5-F U is well tolerated with moderate-light toxicity and easily manageable [es

  11. Evidence based of chemoradiotherapy in cervix carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joly-Lobbedez, F.

    2009-01-01

    Since 10 years, the combination of chemoradiotherapy has become a standard of treatment of the advanced localized cervical cancer. Two systematic reviews of the literature (including the results of the different clinical trials) have already been published. The aim of this article is to present the results of the recent meta-analysis based on individual patient data and to discuss the perspectives. This meta-analysis was rigorously designed: trials selected had the same control arm with the same radiotherapy without concomitant chemotherapy, the definition of the primary outcome (overall survival) was homogeneous and analysis was made in intent to treat. The results confirm the advantage in overall survival in favor of the chemoradiotherapy with an absolute 5-year overall survival benefit of 6% (60-66%) and 8% of 5-year disease-free survival (50-58%). Interestingly, even if cisplatin seems to be the most active drug, a significant advantage is also observed with no platinum chemotherapy. A polychemotherapy is not more active than a mono chemotherapy and there was a suggestion of a difference in the size of the survival benefit with tumor stage. Larger benefits were seen for the few trials in which additional chemotherapy was administered after chemoradiotherapy, but results have to be confirmed by other clinical trials. Late toxicity was not well evaluated and a long-term follow-up of the patients is important to assess the real incidence of long-term side effects of the chemoradiotherapy and the impact on quality of life. New strategies combining new chemotherapy protocols or targeted therapy with radiation are promising but have to be evaluated in comparative clinical trials before use in routine. (authors)

  12. Chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer. Current status and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtsu, Atsushi

    2004-01-01

    The optimal role of chemoradiotherapy in the multimodality treatment of esophageal cancer is still controversial. According to a series of clinical trials, definitive chemoradiotherapy is considered the standard of care for patients with medically inoperable or surgically unresectable esophageal cancer. This modality provides survivals comparable to those in Western series of surgery alone and is one of the standards of care even for resectable-stage disease. Recent reports of primary chemoradiotherapy from Japan suggest survival comparable to that of surgery in Japanese patients with stage I disease, but radical surgery is still the standard treatment for T2-3NanyM0 disease in Japan. However, it is clear that this approach has limitations in treatment outcomes. Trimodality therapy, i.e., preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery, is more favored than surgery alone in clinical practice, particularly in patients with adenocarcinoma, although current data from randomized trials are insufficient to support this approach. To improve the local control rate of chemoradiotherapy, intensification of the radiation dose has been attempted, but this has failed to demonstrate any superiority in terms of local control or survival. The addition of new agents, including molecular targeting agents, to the current standard chemoradiotherapy has shown more promising results and warrants further investigations in future studies. Salvage treatment for patients who do not achieve a complete response (CR) is necessary to improve the overall treatment results. Salvage surgery, as well as endoscopic resection, in selected patients, may provide an improvement in survival. Until high rates of local control can be consistently achieved with chemoradiotherapy alone, these salvage treatments will be an integral component of multimodality treatment for esophageal cancer, and should be active areas for clinical investigations. (author)

  13. Clinical study of salvage surgery after concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimane, Toshikazu; Nakamura, Taisuke; Shimotatara, Yuko

    2013-01-01

    As the use of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) is becoming more widespread, with numerous facilities performing it to maintain function and form, the number of cases requiring salvage surgery is also increasing. We investigated the postoperative prognosis of patients who experienced complications during salvage surgery after CCRT. Subjects were 27 patients who underwent salvage surgery following CCRT at our department during the 7-year period between January 2005 and December 2011. We selected all cases of salvage surgery, comprising neck dissections, total laryngectomies, partial laryngectomies, esophageal resections, and reconstructive surgeries, for analysis. The results were favorable, with a complication rate during salvage surgery after CCRT of 14.8% and a survival rate of 77.8%. Although it is difficult to compare these complications and outcome findings with available reports on salvage surgery without CCRT, it is believed complications can arise in approximately half of the cases. Thus, surgeons should be cognizant of the potential for serious complications, which are sometimes unexpected. Different from our findings, the prognosis following salvage surgery is generally not thought to be favorable and therefore care should be taken to detect recurrence and provide treatment early in salvage surgery cases. (author)

  14. GLUT-1 expression and response to chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brophy, Sarah

    2009-12-15

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy is used in locally advanced rectal cancer to reduce local recurrence and improve operability, however a proportion of tumors do not undergo significant regression. Identification of predictive markers of response to chemoradiotherapy would improve patient selection and may allow response modification by targeting of specific pathways. The aim of this study was to determine whether expression of glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) and p53 in pretreatment rectal cancer biopsies was predictive of tumor response to chemoradiotherapy. Immunohistochemical staining for GLUT-1 and p53 was performed on 69 pretreatment biopsies and compared to tumor response in the resected specimen as determined by the tumor regression grade (TRG) scoring system. GLUT-1 expression was significantly associated with reduced response to chemoradiotherapy and increasing GLUT expression correlated with poorer response (p=0.02). GLUT-1 negative tumors had a 70% probability of good response (TRG3\\/4) compared to a 31% probability of good response in GLUT-1 positive tumors. GLUT-1 may be a useful predictive marker of response to chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer.

  15. Treatment outcomes after intraluminal brachytherapy following definitive chemoradiotherapy in patients with esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Sharan

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: ILRT boost following concurrent chemoradiotherapy is well tolerated and potentially improves outcomes. It might be beneficial in selected patients with esophageal carcinoma. Further studies are required to identify its role in definitive treatment.

  16. Problems in neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy preceding surgery for advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the thoracic esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Kaoru; Koeda, Keisuke; Sato, Nobuhiro

    1999-01-01

    The adverse effect of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy on the postoperative course in esophageal cancer was studied in 9 patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy preceding surgery for thoracic esophageal carcinoma possibly involving adjacent organs (neoadjuvant group), and 13 patients undergoing surgery without neoadjuvant therapy for same disease (control group). The two groups were compared for volume of intraoperative hemorrhage, surgical duration, frequency of postoperative morbidity, and for postoperative changes in blood platelet counts, and serum thrombopoietin and interleukin-6 levels. Mean intraoperative blood loss was 1121 g (580-1,662 g) in the neoadjuvant group and 546.5 g (274.7-778.3 g) in controls group (Student's T test: p<0.01). No significant difference was seen found between the two groups in the degree of postoperative deterioration in cardiopulmonary function or in interleukin-6 levels. Blood platelet counts decreased in both groups until postoperative day 7, but recovery on postoperative day 14 was significantly depressed in the neoadjuvant group compared to controls. Serum thrombopoietin levels were higher in the neoadjuvant group than in controls (Mann-Whitney U-test: p<0.05). We found that neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy induces latent postoperative myelosuppression and may lead to intractable infection. (author)

  17. Drug therapy for recurrence after chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Most head and neck cancer patients are advanced stage when first diagnosed and about half of them receive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) because the cancer is unresectable or there is hope of functional preservation. In subsequent treatment for recurrence after CRT, many of them receive chemotherapy with or without reirradiation. There are three situations when chemotherapy is used for recurrence after CRT: 1. Re-chemoradiotherapy (Re-CRT) in the adjuvant setting after salvage surgery 2. Re-CRT for cases who cannot receive salvage surgery. 3. Chemotherapy for cases who cannot receive salvage surgery or Re-CRT. In the first situation, Re-CRT is expected to yield a better outcome, but there is concern about severe adverse events, so special care in selecting patients is required. In the second situation, there are some negative comments about Re-CRT, and so cases must be judged individually. In the third situation, there are some choices of treatment, but EBM is based on past large clinical trials, so the treatment based on a guideline or guidance is recommended. Recently, new drugs have been invented and approved in the world, though their cost is increasing rapidly. It is necessary to provide the best treatment that also takes cost-effectiveness into consideration. (author)

  18. Ultrasound assessment of selected peripheral nerve pathologies. Part III: Injuries and postoperative evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Kowalska

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The previous articles of the series devoted to ultrasound diagnostics of peripheral nerves concerned the most common nerve pathologies, i.e. entrapment neuropathies. The aim of the last part of the series is to present ultrasound possibilities in the postoperative control of the peripheral nerves as well as in the diagnostics of the second most common neuropathies of peripheral nerves, i.e. posttraumatic lesions. Early diagnostics of posttraumatic changes is of fundamental importance for the course of treatment and its long-term effects. It aids surgeons in making treatment decisions (whether surgical or conservative. When surgical treatment is necessary, the surgeon, based on US findings, is able to plan a given type of operative method. In certain cases, may even abandon the corrective or reconstructive surgery of the nerve trunk (when there are extensive defects of the nerve trunks and instead, proceed with muscle transfers. Medical literature proposes a range of divisions of the kinds of peripheral nerve injuries depending on, among others, the mechanism or degree of damage. However, the most important issue in the surgeon-diagnostician communication is a detailed description of stumps of the nerve trunks, their distance and location. In the postoperative period, ultrasound is used for monitoring the operative or conservative treatment effects including the determination of the causes of a persistent or recurrent neuropathy. It facilitates decision-making concerning a repeated surgical procedure or assuming a wait-and-see attitude. It is a difficult task for a diagnostician and it requires experience, close cooperation with a clinician and knowledge concerning surgical techniques. Apart from a static assessment, a dynamic assessment of possible adhesions constitutes a crucial element of postoperative examination. This feature distinguishes ultrasound scanning from other methods used in the diagnostics of peripheral neuropathies.

  19. The selective and non-selective cyclooxygenase inhibitors valdecoxib and piroxicam induce the same postoperative analgesia and control of trismus and swelling after lower third molar removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Benetello

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available We compared the clinical efficacy of orally administered valdecoxib and piroxicam for the prevention of pain, trismus and swelling after removal of horizontally and totally intrabony impacted lower third molars. Twenty-five patients were scheduled to undergo removal of symmetrically positioned lower third molars in two separate appointments. Valdecoxib (40 mg or piroxicam (20 mg was administered in a double-blind, randomized and crossed manner for 4 days after the surgical procedures. Objective and subjective parameters were recorded for comparison of postoperative courses. Both agents were effective for postoperative pain relief (N = 19. There was a similar mouth opening at suture removal compared with the preoperative values (86.14 ± 4.36 and 93.12 ± 3.70% of the initial measure for valdecoxib and piroxicam, respectively; ANOVA. There was no significant difference regarding the total amount of rescue medication taken by the patients treated with valdecoxib or piroxicam (173.08 ± 91.21 and 461.54 ± 199.85 mg, respectively; Wilcoxon test. There were no significant differences concerning the swelling observed on the second postoperative day compared to baseline measures (6.15 ± 1.84 and 8.46 ± 2.04 mm for valdecoxib and piroxicam, respectively; ANOVA or on the seventh postoperative day (1.69 ± 1.61 and 2.23 ± 2.09 mm for valdecoxib and piroxicam, respectively; ANOVA. The cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitor valdecoxib is as effective as the non-selective cyclooxygenase inhibitor piroxicam for pain, trismus and swelling control after removal of horizontally and totally intrabony impacted lower third molars.

  20. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced gastric cancer, a phase I/II feasibility and efficacy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trip, Anouk K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Poppema, Boelo J. [Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Centre Groningen (Netherlands); Berge Henegouwen, Mark I. van [Department of Surgical Oncology, Academic Medical Centre – University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Siemerink, Ester [Department of Internal Medicine, Ziekenhuisgroep Twente, Hengelo (Netherlands); Beukema, Jannet C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Centre Groningen (Netherlands); Verheij, Marcel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Plukker, John T.M. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University Medical Centre Groningen (Netherlands); Richel, Dick J. [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Centre – University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Centre – University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sandick, Johanna W. van [Department of Surgical Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Cats, Annemieke [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jansen, Edwin P.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hospers, Geke A.P., E-mail: g.a.p.hospers@umcg.nl [Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Centre Groningen (Netherlands)

    2014-08-15

    Objectives: This study was initiated to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of preoperative radiotherapy with weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin in locally advanced gastric cancer. Methods: In a prospective study, patients with locally advanced gastric cancer stage IB-IV(M0) were treated with chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery 4–6 weeks after the last irradiation. Chemoradiotherapy consisted of radiation to a total dose of 45 Gy given in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy, combined with concurrent weekly carboplatin and paclitaxel. Results: Between December 2007 and January 2012, 25 patients with cT3 (64%) or cT4 (36%) gastric cancer were included. One patient discontinued concurrent chemotherapy in the 4th week due to toxicity, but completed radiotherapy. Another patient discontinued chemoradiotherapy after the 3rd week due to progressive disease. Grade III adverse events of chemoradiotherapy were: gastrointestinal 12%, haematological 12% and other 8%. All patients, except one who developed progressive disease, were operated. Surgical complications were: general/infectious 48%, anastomotic leakage 12%, and bowel perforation 8%. Postoperative mortality was 4%. Microscopically radical resection rate was 72%. Pathological complete response rate was 16% and near complete response rate 24%. Conclusions: In this study, preoperative chemoradiotherapy for patients with locally advanced gastric cancer was associated with manageable toxicity and encouraging pathological response rates.

  1. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced gastric cancer, a phase I/II feasibility and efficacy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trip, Anouk K.; Poppema, Boelo J.; Berge Henegouwen, Mark I. van; Siemerink, Ester; Beukema, Jannet C.; Verheij, Marcel; Plukker, John T.M.; Richel, Dick J.; Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M.; Sandick, Johanna W. van; Cats, Annemieke; Jansen, Edwin P.M.; Hospers, Geke A.P.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study was initiated to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of preoperative radiotherapy with weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin in locally advanced gastric cancer. Methods: In a prospective study, patients with locally advanced gastric cancer stage IB-IV(M0) were treated with chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery 4–6 weeks after the last irradiation. Chemoradiotherapy consisted of radiation to a total dose of 45 Gy given in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy, combined with concurrent weekly carboplatin and paclitaxel. Results: Between December 2007 and January 2012, 25 patients with cT3 (64%) or cT4 (36%) gastric cancer were included. One patient discontinued concurrent chemotherapy in the 4th week due to toxicity, but completed radiotherapy. Another patient discontinued chemoradiotherapy after the 3rd week due to progressive disease. Grade III adverse events of chemoradiotherapy were: gastrointestinal 12%, haematological 12% and other 8%. All patients, except one who developed progressive disease, were operated. Surgical complications were: general/infectious 48%, anastomotic leakage 12%, and bowel perforation 8%. Postoperative mortality was 4%. Microscopically radical resection rate was 72%. Pathological complete response rate was 16% and near complete response rate 24%. Conclusions: In this study, preoperative chemoradiotherapy for patients with locally advanced gastric cancer was associated with manageable toxicity and encouraging pathological response rates

  2. IMRT limits nephrotoxicity after chemoradiotherapy for gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trip, Anouk Kirsten; Nijkamp, Jasper; Tinteren, Harm van; Cats, Annemieke; Boot, Henk; Jansen, Edwin Petrus Marianus; Verheij, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This observational study compares the effect of different radiotherapy techniques on late nephrotoxicity after postoperative chemoradiotherapy for gastric cancer. Patients and methods: Dosimetric parameters were compared between AP–PA, 3D-conformal and IMRT techniques. Renal function was measured by 99m Tc-MAG-3 renography, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and the development of hypertension. Mixed effects models were used to compare renal function over time. Results: Eighty-seven patients treated between 2002 and 2010 were included, AP–PA (n = 31), 3D-conformal (n = 25) and IMRT (n = 31), all 45 Gy in 25 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy: 5FU/leucovorin (n = 4), capecitabine (n = 37), and capecitabine/cisplatin (n = 46). Median follow-up time was 4.7 years (range 0.2–8). With IMRT, the mean dose to the left kidney was significantly lower. Left kidney function decreased progressively in the total study population, however with IMRT this occurred at a lower rate. A dose–effect relationship was present between mean dose to the left kidney and the left kidney function. GFR decreased only moderately in time, which was not different between techniques. Six patients developed hypertension, of whom none in the IMRT group. Conclusions: This study confirms progressive late nephrotoxicity in patients treated with postoperative chemoradiotherapy by different techniques for gastric cancer. Nephrotoxicity was less severe with IMRT and should be considered the preferred technique

  3. IMRT limits nephrotoxicity after chemoradiotherapy for gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trip, Anouk Kirsten; Nijkamp, Jasper; van Tinteren, Harm; Cats, Annemieke; Boot, Henk; Jansen, Edwin Petrus Marianus; Verheij, Marcel

    2014-08-01

    This observational study compares the effect of different radiotherapy techniques on late nephrotoxicity after postoperative chemoradiotherapy for gastric cancer. Dosimetric parameters were compared between AP-PA, 3D-conformal and IMRT techniques. Renal function was measured by (99m)Tc-MAG-3 renography, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and the development of hypertension. Mixed effects models were used to compare renal function over time. Eighty-seven patients treated between 2002 and 2010 were included, AP-PA (n=31), 3D-conformal (n=25) and IMRT (n=31), all 45 Gy in 25 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy: 5FU/leucovorin (n=4), capecitabine (n=37), and capecitabine/cisplatin (n=46). Median follow-up time was 4.7 years (range 0.2-8). With IMRT, the mean dose to the left kidney was significantly lower. Left kidney function decreased progressively in the total study population, however with IMRT this occurred at a lower rate. A dose-effect relationship was present between mean dose to the left kidney and the left kidney function. GFR decreased only moderately in time, which was not different between techniques. Six patients developed hypertension, of whom none in the IMRT group. This study confirms progressive late nephrotoxicity in patients treated with postoperative chemoradiotherapy by different techniques for gastric cancer. Nephrotoxicity was less severe with IMRT and should be considered the preferred technique. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Adjuvant chemotherapy followed by conformal chemoradiotherapy in gastric carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchbika, Z.; Quero, L.; Kouto, H.; Hennequin-Baruch, V.; Sergent, G.; Maylin, C.; Hennequin, C.; Gornet, J.M.; Munoz, N.; Cojean-Zelek, I.; Houdart, R.; Panis, Y.; Valleur, P.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Analysis of the feasibility and results of adjuvant chemotherapy followed by conformal chemoradiotherapy after surgery for gastric carcinoma. Patients and methods Twenty-six patients (R0 or R1) were treated postoperatively by three cycles of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and cisplatin, followed by a concomitant association of LV5FU2 chemotherapy with a conformal radiotherapy of 45 Gy. Results: The tumor was classified pT3-T4 in 77% of the patients and 92.5% had a nodal involvement (pN1: 54%; pN2: 31%). Feasibility (1) Adjuvant chemotherapy: nausea/vomiting grade II/III: 12 patients (48%); neutropenia grade III/IV: two patients; completed in all patients, except one. (2) Chemoradiotherapy: nausea/vomiting grade II/III: 10 patients; diarrhea grade II/3: two patients; oesophagitis grade II/III: two patients; myocardial infarction/pulmonary embolism: two patients. All patients except one received the planned dose of 45 Gy. Radiotherapy was interrupted in six cases, with a median duration of 14 days. Survival: with a median follow-up of 30 months, 65% of the patients were alive without disease; median survival was 32 months. Conclusion: This postoperative schedule was judged feasible. It allowed the deliverance of a more intensified chemotherapy than the classical schedule. Its clinical benefit must be evaluated in a phase III trial. (authors)

  5. Adjuvant chemotherapy versus chemoradiotherapy for small cell lung cancer with lymph node metastasis: a retrospective observational study with use of a national database in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Urushiyama, Hirokazu; Jo, Taisuke; Yasunaga, Hideo; Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Matsui, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Wakae; Takeshima, Hideyuki; Hiraishi, Yoshihisa; Mitani, Akihisa; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Nagase, Takahide

    2017-01-01

    Background The optimal postoperative treatment strategy for small cell lung cancer (SCLC) remains unclear, especially in patients with lymph node metastasis. We aimed to compare the outcomes of patients with SCLC and lymph node metastasis treated with postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Methods We retrospectively collected data on patients with postoperative SCLC diagnosed with N1 and N2 lymph node metastasis from the Diagnosis Procedure Combination database in Japan, be...

  6. Patients survey after concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimane, Toshikazku; Egawa, Syunya; Mori, Tomoaki; Ono, Tomohiro; Monden, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Sei; Sanbe, Takeyuki; Suzaki, Harumi

    2010-01-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for cancer of head and neck is becoming more popular as the treatment of choice. It is considered to maintain the quality of life (QOL) of patients better than operative treatments in terms of preserving the functions, organs, and figure, but recently we cannot necessarily say that it maintains the QOL of patients better than operative treatments because its complications after therapy disturb daily life. We report the results of a questionnaire survey about complications after therapy, problems during therapy, improvements, and satisfaction level directed at patients with cancer of the head and neck who received Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for the purpose of ascertaining if patients can actually maintain their QOL after therapy. As a result, the most controversial problem was mouth dryness, but the symptom improved as the follow-up duration got longer. As for the satisfaction level, 'very-satisfied' and 'almost-satisfied' were more than 90%, so we concluded that the QOL of patients is maintained after therapy, while there are still improvements to be made. We also concluded that we should continue to make improvement and try to improve the QOL of patients during and after therapy. (author)

  7. Postoperative pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, H; Dahl, J B

    1993-01-01

    also modify various aspects of the surgical stress response, and nociceptive blockade by regional anesthetic techniques has been demonstrated to improve various parameters of postoperative outcome. It is therefore stressed that effective control of postoperative pain, combined with a high degree......Treatment of postoperative pain has not received sufficient attention by the surgical profession. Recent developments concerned with acute pain physiology and improved techniques for postoperative pain relief should result in more satisfactory treatment of postoperative pain. Such pain relief may...

  8. Chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer. Current status and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Kanazawa, Takamitsu; Tada, Tomohiro; Komuro, Yasuhiro; Tsurita, Giichiro; Nagawa, Hirokazu; Muto, Tetsuichiro

    2004-01-01

    Lateral node dissection has been widely performed in rectal cancer surgery in Japan. In Western countries, radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy are conducted as adjuvant therapy, and their effectiveness is reviewed and discussed in this paper. First, three modalities, preoperative (PRE), intraoperative and postoperative (POST) radiation, are discussed for their respective benefits and disadvantages. Secondly, randomized trials for PRE vs POST adjuvant radiotherapy are reviewed including earlier one and recent three ones (2 in US and 1 in Germany). The latter three involve conventional doses and radiotherapy techniques, and chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil. Third, the time interval between PRE radiotherapy and surgery is pointed out not fully examined. Fourth, results of studies on PRE and POST radiotherapy are reviewed and, fifth, chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy are also reviewed in relation to recurrence and survival rates. Last, preoperative radiotherapy and lateral node dissection are discussed for effectiveness and adverse effects. In Japan, comparison of the lateral node dissection with or without total mesorectal excision is now studied. Further studies focusing on patient's quality of life are concluded to be necessary. (N.I.)

  9. Concomitant chemoradiotherapy with high dose rate brachytherapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Concomitant chemoradiotherapy with high dose rate brachytherapy as a definitive treatment modality for locally advanced cervical cancer. T Refaat, A Elsaid, N Lotfy, K Kiel, W Small Jr, P Nickers, E Lartigau ...

  10. Prognostic significance of glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1) gene expression in rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saigusa, Susumu; Toiyama, Yuji; Tanaka, Koji; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Fujikawa, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Kohei; Uchida, Keiichi; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Kusunoki, Masato

    2012-01-01

    Most cancer cells exhibit increased glycolysis. The elevated glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) expression has been reported to be associated with resistance to therapeutic agents and a poor prognosis. We wondered whether GLUT1 expression was associated with the clinical outcome in rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT), and whether glycolysis inhibition could represent a novel anticancer treatment. We obtained total RNA from residual cancer cells using microdissection from a total of 52 rectal cancer specimens from patients who underwent preoperative CRT. We performed transcriptional analyzes, and studied the association of the GLUT1 gene expression levels with the clinical outcomes. In addition, we examined each proliferative response of three selected colorectal cancer cell lines to a glycolysis inhibitor, 3-bromopyruvic acid (3-BrPA), with regard to their expression of the GLUT1 gene. An elevated GLUT1 gene expression was associated with a high postoperative stage, the presence of lymph node metastasis, and distant recurrence. Moreover, elevated GLUT1 gene expression independently predicted both the recurrence-free and overall survival. In the in vitro studies, we observed that 3-BrPA significantly suppressed the proliferation of colon cancer cells with high GLUT1 gene expression, compared with those with low expression. An elevated GLUT1 expression may be a useful predictor of distant recurrence and poor prognosis in rectal cancer patients after preoperative CRT. (author)

  11. Super-selective interventional chemotherapy combined with systemic chemotherapy for the treatment of postoperative gliomas:a clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jian; Hu Qinglei; Sun Yanchun; Feng Lei; Liu Yunzhen; Liu Ju; Kong Ruifen

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate super-selective interventional chemotherapy combined with systemic chemotherapy in treating postoperative gliomas. Methods: During the period of 2005-2009, a total of 46 patients with glioma were encountered in our hospital. According to the principle of patient's free will the involved patients were divided into two groups. Study group (n = 25): after operation the patients received routine radiotherapy, which was followed by super-selective interventional chemotherapy combined simultaneously with systemic chemotherapy. Control group (n = 21): after operation the patients received routine radiotherapy, which was followed by systemic chemotherapy only. The patients were regularly followed up. Cranial CT checkups were made to determine the tumor size, and the results were evaluated with Karnofsky scores. The clinical data were analyzed and compared between two groups. Results: In the study group, the side-effects and complications included epileptic seizures (n = 3), eye pain (n = 5), headache (n = 9), nausea and vomiting (n = 8) and thrombopenia (n = 1). In the control group,the side-effects and complications were as follows: epileptic seizures (n = 1), headache (n = 7), nausea and vomiting (n = 6) and thrombopenia(n = 3). No death occurred in either of the two groups. The patients were followed up for an average period of 2.3 years. Before chemotherapy no statistically significant difference in tumor size existed between two groups (P > 0.05). One year after the chemotherapy, the tumor volume in study group was reduced by 67.11%, while it was 45.79% in control group. By using independent sample t test analysis, the difference between two groups was of statistical significance (P < 0.05). Wilcoxon rank sum test and Karnofsky prognostic score analysis indicated that the prognosis of study group was much better than that of control group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: In comparison with routine radiotherapy plus simple systemic chemotherapy, routine

  12. Adjuvant chemotherapy versus chemoradiotherapy for small cell lung cancer with lymph node metastasis: a retrospective observational study with use of a national database in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urushiyama, Hirokazu; Jo, Taisuke; Yasunaga, Hideo; Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Matsui, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Wakae; Takeshima, Hideyuki; Hiraishi, Yoshihisa; Mitani, Akihisa; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Nagase, Takahide

    2017-09-02

    The optimal postoperative treatment strategy for small cell lung cancer (SCLC) remains unclear, especially in patients with lymph node metastasis. We aimed to compare the outcomes of patients with SCLC and lymph node metastasis treated with postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. We retrospectively collected data on patients with postoperative SCLC diagnosed with N1 and N2 lymph node metastasis from the Diagnosis Procedure Combination database in Japan, between July 2010 and March 2015. We extracted data on patient age, sex, comorbidities, and TNM classification at lung surgery; operative procedures, chemotherapy drugs, and radiotherapy during hospitalization; and discharge status. Recurrence-free survival was compared between the chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy groups using multivariable Cox regression analysis. Median recurrence-free survival was 1146 days (95% confidence interval [CI], 885-1407) in the chemotherapy group (n = 489) and 873 days (95% CI, 464-1282) in the chemoradiotherapy group (n = 75). There was no significant difference between these after adjusting for patient backgrounds (hazard ratio, 1.29; 95% CI, 0.91-1.84). There was no significant difference in recurrence-free survival between patients with SCLC and N1-2 lymph node metastasis treated with postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy. Further randomized clinical trials are needed to address this issue.

  13. Colonic anastomotic healing after preoperative chemo-radiotherapy in rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzu, M.A.; Koeksoy, C. [Univ. of Ankara (Turkey). Faculty of Medicine; Akyol, F.H.; Uzal, D.; Kale, I.T.

    1999-03-01

    In order to investigate the effects of neo-adjuvant chemo-radiotherapy on colonic anastomotic healing, an experimental study resembling the clinical use of neo-adjuvant concomitant 5-FU+irradiation treatment of colorectal cancer was conducted. Seventy-one male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: a control group (I) underwent left colon resection and primary anastomosis; a sham-treated group (II); and a study group (III) which received fractionated irradiation to the whole pelvis to a total dose of 22 Gy, 5.5 Gy per fraction, in four consecutive days with linear accelerator and concomitant intra-peritoneal 5-FU for five consecutive days. The last fraction of irradiation and the last injection were given four and three days before colonic resection and anastomosis, respectively. Within each group one-half of the animals were anesthetized on the third postoperative day and one-half on the seventh postoperative day. Abdominal wound healing, intraperitoneal adhesions, anastomotic complications, and anastomotic bursting pressure measurements were recorded. Following these measurements the anastomotic segment was resected for hydroxyproline content, myeloperoxidase activity, and histopathological evaluation. At three and seven days, the mean bursting pressures of the anastomoses were 36.5 mm Hg and 208 mm Hg in group I, 34.5 and 228 in group II, and 27 and 167 in group III, respectively . The burst occurred at the anastomosis in all animals tested on the third postoperative day, and 10% of group I, none in group II, and 40% of group III on the seventh postoperative day. (K.H.)

  14. Colonic anastomotic healing after preoperative chemo-radiotherapy in rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzu, M.A.; Koeksoy, C.; Akyol, F.H.; Uzal, D.; Kale, I.T.

    1999-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of neo-adjuvant chemo-radiotherapy on colonic anastomotic healing, an experimental study resembling the clinical use of neo-adjuvant concomitant 5-FU+irradiation treatment of colorectal cancer was conducted. Seventy-one male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: a control group (I) underwent left colon resection and primary anastomosis; a sham-treated group (II); and a study group (III) which received fractionated irradiation to the whole pelvis to a total dose of 22 Gy, 5.5 Gy per fraction, in four consecutive days with linear accelerator and concomitant intra-peritoneal 5-FU for five consecutive days. The last fraction of irradiation and the last injection were given four and three days before colonic resection and anastomosis, respectively. Within each group one-half of the animals were anesthetized on the third postoperative day and one-half on the seventh postoperative day. Abdominal wound healing, intraperitoneal adhesions, anastomotic complications, and anastomotic bursting pressure measurements were recorded. Following these measurements the anastomotic segment was resected for hydroxyproline content, myeloperoxidase activity, and histopathological evaluation. At three and seven days, the mean bursting pressures of the anastomoses were 36.5 mm Hg and 208 mm Hg in group I, 34.5 and 228 in group II, and 27 and 167 in group III, respectively . The burst occurred at the anastomosis in all animals tested on the third postoperative day, and 10% of group I, none in group II, and 40% of group III on the seventh postoperative day. (K.H.)

  15. Clinical results of salvage surgery in hypopharynx carcinoma after chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitani, Hiroki; Gakibuchi, Masao; Asano, Takayuki; Sakurai, Hiroyuki; Kurita, Tomoyuki; Inoue, Youjiro

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of post-operative complications and treatment results of 60 cases of hypopharynx carcinoma receiving laryngo-pharyngo-esophagectomy followed by reconstruction with jejunum after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) from 1997 to 2006 in 6 hospitals was analyzed. The overall complication rate was 57%. There were 3 cases with carotid artery rupture (5%), 4 with jejunum necrosis (6%), 6 with major salivary fistula (10%), 8 with minor salivary fistula (13%), 8 with abscess alone (13%), 3 with trachea stoma necrosis (5%), and 3 with skin flap necrosis (5%). The death rate due to surgical complications was 3% (2/60). When the cases were divided into two groups, namely the cases with fistula and the cases without fistula, the number of days that permitted drinking was 18.1 in the latter and 81.8 in the former. The 5-year overall survival rate among all cases was 37%. We found that salvage surgery after CRT was effective for recurrent cases. These findings suggest that reconstruction with jejunum is a suitable type of operation with better surgical results. Care is required to reduce the incidence of post-operative complications. (author)

  16. Patterns of recurrence after selective postoperative radiation therapy for patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Naoya; Matsumoto, Fumihiko; Yoshimoto, Seiichi; Ito, Yoshinori; Mori, Taisuke; Ueno, Takao; Tuchida, Keisuke; Kashihara, Tairo; Kobayashi, Kazuma; Harada, Ken; Kitaguchi, Mayuka; Sekii, Shuhei; Umezawa, Rei; Takahashi, Kana; Inaba, Koji; Igaki, Hiroshi; Itami, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The radiation field for patients with postoperative head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is narrower in our institution than in Western countries to reduce late radiation related toxicities. This strategy is at a risk of loco-regional or distant metastasis. However, because patients are more closely checked than in Western countries by every 1 to 2 months intervals and it is supposed that regional recurrences are identified and salvage surgeries are performed more quickly. Therefore, it is considered that patient survival would not be compromised with this strategy. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of this strategy retrospectively. Patients who underwent neck dissection with close or positive margin, extra-capsular spread (ECS), multiple regional lymph node metastasis, pT4, with or without primary tumor resection were treated with postoperative radiation therapy. The volume of radiation field, especially the coverage of prophylactic regional lymph node area, was discussed among head and neck surgeons and radiation oncologists taking into account the clinical factors including patient’s age, performance status, number of positive lymph nodes, size of metastatic lymph nodes, extension of primary tumor beyond the midline, and existence of ECS. Seventy-two patients were identified who were treated with postoperative radiation therapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma between November 2005 and December 2014. There were 20 patients with oropharynx, 19 with hypopharynx, 7 with larynx, 23 with oral cavity, and 3 with other sites. Thirty eight patients had their neck irradiated bilaterally and 34 unilaterally. Median follow-up period for patients without relapse was 20.7 months (5.1–100.7). Thirty two patients had disease relapse after treatment including 22 loco-regional recurrence and 14 distant metastases. Among 22 loco-regional recurrence, seven patients underwent salvage surgery and one of them was no relapse at the time of the

  17. An 80-gene set to predict response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer by principle component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Empuku, Shinichiro; Nakajima, Kentaro; Akagi, Tomonori; Kaneko, Kunihiko; Hijiya, Naoki; Etoh, Tsuyoshi; Shiraishi, Norio; Moriyama, Masatsugu; Inomata, Masafumi

    2016-05-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer not only improves the postoperative local control rate, but also induces downstaging. However, it has not been established how to individually select patients who receive effective preoperative CRT. The aim of this study was to identify a predictor of response to preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer. This study is additional to our multicenter phase II study evaluating the safety and efficacy of preoperative CRT using oral fluorouracil (UMIN ID: 03396). From April, 2009 to August, 2011, 26 biopsy specimens obtained prior to CRT were analyzed by cyclopedic microarray analysis. Response to CRT was evaluated according to a histological grading system using surgically resected specimens. To decide on the number of genes for dividing into responder and non-responder groups, we statistically analyzed the data using a dimension reduction method, a principle component analysis. Of the 26 cases, 11 were responders and 15 non-responders. No significant difference was found in clinical background data between the two groups. We determined that the optimal number of genes for the prediction of response was 80 of 40,000 and the functions of these genes were analyzed. When comparing non-responders with responders, genes expressed at a high level functioned in alternative splicing, whereas those expressed at a low level functioned in the septin complex. Thus, an 80-gene expression set that predicts response to preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer was identified using a novel statistical method.

  18. Postoperative radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burhenne, H.J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on the importance of postoperative radiology. Most surgical procedures on the alimentary tract are successful, but postoperative complications remain a common occurrence. The radiologist must be familiar with a large variety of possible surgical complications, because it is this specialty that is most commonly called on to render a definitive diagnosis. The decision for reoperation, for instance, is usually based on results from radiologic imaging techniques. These now include ultrasonography, CT scanning, needle biopsy, and interventional techniques in addition to contrast studies and nuclear medicine investigation

  19. Continuous Activity Monitoring During Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohri, Nitin, E-mail: ohri.nitin@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Kabarriti, Rafi; Bodner, William R.; Mehta, Keyur J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Shankar, Viswanathan [Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Halmos, Balazs; Haigentz, Missak [Department of Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Rapkin, Bruce [Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Guha, Chandan; Kalnicki, Shalom; Garg, Madhur [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To perform a prospective trial testing the feasibility and utility of acquiring activity data as a measure of health status during concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Ambulatory patients who were planned for treatment with concurrent chemoradiotherapy with curative intent for cancers of the head and neck, lung, or gastrointestinal tract were provided with activity monitors before treatment initiation. Patients were asked to wear the devices continuously throughout the radiation therapy course. Step count data were downloaded weekly during radiation therapy and 2 and 4 weeks after radiation therapy completion. The primary objective was to demonstrate feasibility, defined as collection of step counts for 80% of the days during study subjects' radiation therapy courses. Secondary objectives included establishing step count as a dynamic predictor of unplanned hospitalization risk. Results: Thirty-eight enrolled patients were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Primary diagnoses included head and neck cancer (n=11), lung cancer (n=13), and a variety of gastrointestinal cancers (n=14). Step data were collected for 1524 of 1613 days (94%) during patients' radiation therapy courses. Fourteen patients were hospitalized during radiation therapy or within 4 weeks of radiation therapy completion. Cox regression modeling demonstrated a significant association between recent step counts (3-day average) and hospitalization risk, with a 38% reduction in the risk of hospitalization for every 1000 steps taken each day (hazard ratio 0.62, 95% confidence interval 0.46-0.83, P=.002). Inferior quality of life scores and impaired performance status were not associated with increased hospitalization risk. Conclusion: Continuous activity monitoring during concurrent chemoradiotherapy is feasible and well-tolerated. Step counts may serve as powerful, objective, and dynamic indicators of hospitalization risk.

  20. Continuous Activity Monitoring During Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohri, Nitin; Kabarriti, Rafi; Bodner, William R.; Mehta, Keyur J.; Shankar, Viswanathan; Halmos, Balazs; Haigentz, Missak; Rapkin, Bruce; Guha, Chandan; Kalnicki, Shalom; Garg, Madhur

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a prospective trial testing the feasibility and utility of acquiring activity data as a measure of health status during concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Ambulatory patients who were planned for treatment with concurrent chemoradiotherapy with curative intent for cancers of the head and neck, lung, or gastrointestinal tract were provided with activity monitors before treatment initiation. Patients were asked to wear the devices continuously throughout the radiation therapy course. Step count data were downloaded weekly during radiation therapy and 2 and 4 weeks after radiation therapy completion. The primary objective was to demonstrate feasibility, defined as collection of step counts for 80% of the days during study subjects' radiation therapy courses. Secondary objectives included establishing step count as a dynamic predictor of unplanned hospitalization risk. Results: Thirty-eight enrolled patients were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Primary diagnoses included head and neck cancer (n=11), lung cancer (n=13), and a variety of gastrointestinal cancers (n=14). Step data were collected for 1524 of 1613 days (94%) during patients' radiation therapy courses. Fourteen patients were hospitalized during radiation therapy or within 4 weeks of radiation therapy completion. Cox regression modeling demonstrated a significant association between recent step counts (3-day average) and hospitalization risk, with a 38% reduction in the risk of hospitalization for every 1000 steps taken each day (hazard ratio 0.62, 95% confidence interval 0.46-0.83, P=.002). Inferior quality of life scores and impaired performance status were not associated with increased hospitalization risk. Conclusion: Continuous activity monitoring during concurrent chemoradiotherapy is feasible and well-tolerated. Step counts may serve as powerful, objective, and dynamic indicators of hospitalization risk.

  1. Nutritional support as an obligatory component of accompanying therapy for head and neck tumors during radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Boyko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers supportive therapy in patients with head and neck tumors during radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy. Special attention is given to nutritional support on every stage of patient care. The main methods of evaluation of nutritional status and risks are presented, as well as principles of clinical nutrition selection.

  2. Esophageal bypass after failed chemoradiotherapy for unresectable esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matono, Satoru; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Mori, Naoki; Nagano, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiromasa; Shirouzu, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal stenosis and/or fistula often occur after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for unresectable esophageal cancer. In such patients, an esophageal stent can help achieve oral intake. However an esophageal stent cannot be inserted where there is complete stenosis or where the tumor is located. In such cases, esophageal bypass surgery may be necessary. Here, we investigated the clinical characteristics and outcomes in patients who underwent esophageal bypass surgery in our institution. We reviewed 10 cases of esophageal bypass surgery (gastric tube in 8 cases, colon in 2 cases) after CRT for unresectable esophageal cancer, between 2001 and 2009. There were 5 of stenosis-only cases, 4 fistula-only cases, and 1 case of stenosis and fistula. There were postoperative complications in 5 cases (50%), and all these were treated conservatively and healed. The median survival from surgery to peroral intake was 20 days (range 9-90 days), and the median survival after starting peroral intake was 130 days (range 48-293 days). Esophageal bypass surgery can achieve good performance status and improve peroral intake. (author)

  3. Laparoscopic surgery for lower rectal cancer with neoadjuvant preoperative chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Keisaku; Okuda, Junji; Tanaka, Keitaro

    2012-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NACRT) is an accepted standard treatment for low rectal advanced cancer to improve the local control in western countries. Recently laparoscopy has been recognized as an excellent tool from a view point of its magnification. Therefore, we have performed many laparoscopic surgeries for locally advanced rectal cancer after NACRT, We evaluated our results in this study. We studied 100 patients underwent surgery for locally advanced low rectal cancer after NACRT. Rate of sphincter preserving surgery was 74%. Rate of laparoscopic surgery was 95%. Positive distal resection margins were not identified in all patients. Positive circumferencial resection margins were identified in only two patients. The pathological complete response rate was 15%. The rate of postoperative complications was 15%. Complications were as follows: wound infection (9%), pelvic abscess (2%), ileus (2%) and others (2%), however without mortality. Anastomotic leakage was not observed in all cases, even though we routinely created diverting stoma. Laparoscopic surgery for low rectal cancer after NACRT is considered to be a safe and feasible procedure. (author)

  4. Chemotherapy versus chemoradiotherapy after surgery and preoperative chemotherapy for resectable gastric cancer (CRITICS): an international, open-label, randomised phase 3 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cats, Annemieke; Jansen, Edwin P M; van Grieken, Nicole C T; Sikorska, Karolina; Lind, Pehr; Nordsmark, Marianne; Meershoek-Klein Kranenbarg, Elma; Boot, Henk; Trip, Anouk K; Swellengrebel, H A Maurits; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; Putter, Hein; van Sandick, Johanna W; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I; Hartgrink, Henk H; van Tinteren, Harm; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Verheij, Marcel

    2018-05-01

    Both perioperative chemotherapy and postoperative chemoradiotherapy improve survival in patients with resectable gastric cancer from Europe and North America. To our knowledge, these treatment strategies have not been investigated in a head to head comparison. We aimed to compare perioperative chemotherapy with preoperative chemotherapy and postoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with resectable gastric adenocarcinoma. In this investigator-initiated, open-label, randomised phase 3 trial, we enrolled patients aged 18 years or older who had stage IB- IVA resectable gastric or gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinoma (as defined by the American Joint Committee on Cancer, sixth edition), with a WHO performance status of 0 or 1, and adequate cardiac, bone marrow, liver, and kidney function. Patients were enrolled from 56 hospitals in the Netherlands, Sweden, and Denmark, and were randomly assigned (1:1) with a computerised minimisation programme with a random element to either perioperative chemotherapy (chemotherapy group) or preoperative chemotherapy with postoperative chemoradiotherapy (chemoradiotherapy group). Randomisation was done before patients were given any preoperative chemotherapy treatment and was stratified by histological subtype, tumour localisation, and hospital. Patients and investigators were not masked to treatment allocation. Surgery consisted of a radical resection of the primary tumour and at least a D1+ lymph node dissection. Postoperative treatment started within 4-12 weeks after surgery. Chemotherapy consisted of three preoperative 21-day cycles and three postoperative cycles of intravenous epirubicin (50 mg/m 2 on day 1), cisplatin (60 mg/m 2 on day 1) or oxaliplatin (130 mg/m 2 on day 1), and capecitabine (1000 mg/m 2 orally as tablets twice daily for 14 days in combination with epirubicin and cisplatin, or 625 mg/m 2 orally as tablets twice daily for 21 days in combination with epirubicin and oxaliplatin), received once every three weeks

  5. The Effects of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy on Experimental Colon Anastomosis After Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Ramazan; Can, Mehmet Fatih; Yagci, Gokhan; Ozgurtas, Taner; Guden, Metin; Gamsizkan, Mehmet; Ozturk, Erkan; Cetiner, Sadettin

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) on colon anastomosis after chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Sixty female Wistar-Albino rats were divided into 5 groups and underwent left colon resection and end-to-end anastomosis. CRT simulation was performed on 2 sham groups before the anastomosis, and 1 of these groups was administered additional postoperative HBOT. Two groups were administered CRT before the anastomosis, and 1 of them received additional postoperative HBOT. On postoperative day 5, all groups underwent relaparotomy; burst pressure was measured and samples were obtained for histopathologic and biochemical analysis. There was a significant weight loss in the CRT groups and postoperative HBOT had an improving effect. Significantly decreased burst pressure values increased up to the levels of the controls after HBOT. Hydroxyproline levels were elevated in all groups compared to the control group. Hydroxyproline levels decreased with HBOT after CRT. No significant difference was observed between the groups regarding fibrosis formation at the anastomosis site. However, regression was observed in fibrosis in the group receiving HBOT after CRT. Preoperative CRT affected anastomosis and wound healing unfavorably. These unfavorable effects were alleviated by postoperative HBOT. HBOT improved the mechanical and biochemical parameters of colon anastomosis in rats. PMID:23438274

  6. Postoperative spinal column; Postoperative Wirbelsaeule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaefer, W. [Westpfalzklinikum GmbH, Standort II, Abteilung fuer Wirbelsaeulenchirurgie, Kusel (Germany); Heumueller, I. [Westpfalzklinikum GmbH, Standort II, Institut fuer Radiologie II, Kusel (Germany); Harsch, N.; Kraus, C.; Reith, W. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    As a rule, postoperative imaging is carried out after spinal interventions to document the exact position of the implant material. Imaging is absolutely necessary when new clinical symptoms occur postoperatively. In this case a rebleeding or an incorrect implant position abutting a root or the spinal cord must be proven. In addition to these immediately occurring postoperative clinical symptoms, there are a number of complications that can occur several days, weeks or even months later. These include the failed back surgery syndrome, implant loosening or breakage of the material and relapse of a disc herniation and spondylodiscitis. In addition to knowledge of the original clinical symptoms, it is also important to know the operation details, such as the access route and the material used. In almost all postoperative cases, imaging with contrast medium administration and corresponding correction of artefacts by the implant material, such as the dual energy technique, correction algorithms and the use of special magnetic resonance (MR) sequences are necessary. In order to correctly assess the postoperative imaging, knowledge of the surgical procedure and the previous clinical symptoms are mandatory besides special computed tomography (CT) techniques and MR sequences. (orig.) [German] In der Regel erfolgt bei spinalen Eingriffen eine postoperative Bildgebung, um die exakte Lage des Implantatmaterials zu dokumentieren. Unbedingt notwendig ist die Bildgebung, wenn postoperativ neue klinische Symptome aufgetreten sind. Hier muessen eine Nachblutung bzw. inkorrekte, eine Wurzel oder das Myelon tangierende Implantatlage nachgewiesen werden. Neben diesen direkt postoperativ auftretenden klinischen Symptomen gibt es eine Reihe von Komplikationen, die erst nach mehreren Tagen, Wochen oder sogar nach Monaten auftreten koennen. Hierzu zaehlen das Failed-back-surgery-Syndrom, die Implantatlockerung oder -bruch, aber auch ein Rezidivvorfall und die Spondylodiszitis. Neben der

  7. Postoperative spine infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Domenico Parchi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative spinal wound infection is a potentially devastating complication after operative spinal procedures. Despite the utilization of perioperative prophylactic antibiotics in recent years and improvements in surgical technique and postoperative care, wound infection continues to compromise patients’ outcome after spinal surgery. In the modern era of pending health care reform with increasing financial constraints, the financial burden of post-operative spinal infections also deserves consideration. The aim of our work is to give to the reader an updated review of the latest achievements in prevention, risk factors, diagnosis, microbiology and treatment of post-operative spinal wound infections. A review of the scientific literature was carried out using electronic medical databases Pubmed, Google Scholar, Web of Science and Scopus for the years 1973-2012 to obtain access to all publications involving the incidence, risk factors, prevention, diagnosis, treatment of postoperative spinal wound infections. We initially identified 119 studies; of these 60 were selected. Despite all the measures intended to reduce the incidence of surgical site infections in spine surgery, these remain a common and potentially dangerous complication.

  8. [When Should We Perform Surgery for N2 Lung Cancer?;Induction Chemoradiotherapy or Surgery for Local Recurrence or Residual Tumor after Definitive Chemoradiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Haruhiko

    2018-04-01

    Standard treatment for locally advanced clinical N2 lung cancer is definitive chemoradiotherapy, and induction chemoradiotherapy(IND-CRT) followed by surgery is an option. Most of them recurs remotely within a few years after initial therapy. Patients who received salvage surgery(SAL) after definitive chemoradiotherapy had no remote relapse for some period after definitive chemoradiotherapy, thus the outcome of SAL may be better than those of IND-CRT, but the operative risks of both procedures seem to be high. To compare the prognosis and risk of SAL and IND-CRT. From January 2001 through December 2015, 39 patients with clinical N2 primary lung cancer underwent surgery after chemoradiotherapy. Twenty-six patients received IND-CRT, and 13 underwent SAL. Perioperative factors, overall survival rates at 5 years, lung-cancer-specific mortality, relapse-free survival rates, and the rates of perioperative complications were compared between the groups. The median follow up period was 41.0 months(5~120 months). Twelve patients were women, and 27 were men. The average age was 60.2 years. The patients comprised 1.7% of the 2,330 anatomical resections performed during the same period. The radiation dose was 46.4 Gy who received IND-CRT and 61.4 Gy in those who received SAL(pperformed in 37 patients, pneumonectomy in 2 patients. In patients who received IND-CRT, an average operation time was 236 minutes, mean bleeding volume was 135 g. In patients who underwent SAL, they were 236 minutes and 188 g(p=0.998, p=0.365). There was no perioperative and in-hospital death in either group. Postoperative complications developed in 5 of INDCRT(19.2%)and 3 in SAL(23.1%). The 5-year overall survival rate of all cases was 60.4%(IND-CRT 53.9, SAL 81.8%;p=0.737). The lung cancer-specific survival rate at 5 years was 60.4% overall, 57.5% in IND-CRT, and 90.0% in SAL(p=0.176). The 5-year relapse-free survival rate was 52.7% overall, 37.6% in IND-CRT, 57.7% in SAL(p=0.175). Although the

  9. Postoperative hypoparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    It is essential to preserve as many of the parathyroid glands, as possible, during surgery of the thyroid gland. This is achieved by visualizing them and by minimal handling of the glands. Truncal ligation of the inferior thyroid artery is quite safe. Capsular ligation of the branches of the artery is theoretically superior but requires a greater degree of skill and experience in thyroid surgery. It also puts the recurrent laryngeal nerve at a greater risk of injury. Calcitriol or 1.25 dihydroxy vitamin D is a very useful drug in managing patients with severe post-operative hypoparathyroidism

  10. Laryngeal sensation and pharyngeal delay time after (chemo)radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruo, Takashi; Fujimoto, Yasushi; Ozawa, Kikuko; Hiramatsu, Mariko; Suzuki, Atsushi; Nishio, Naoki; Nakashima, Tsutomu

    2014-08-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the association between changes in laryngeal sensation and initiation of swallowing reflex or swallowing function before and after (chemo)radiotherapy. A prospective study was conducted in a tertiary referral university hospital. Thirteen patients who received (chemo)radiotherapy for treatment of laryngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer were included. Laryngeal sensation was evaluated at the tip of the epiglottis before and 1, 3 months, and 1 year after (chemo)radiotherapy. Videofluoroscopy was performed at the same time. Quantitative determinations included changes in laryngeal sensation, computed analysis of pharyngeal delay time, the distance and velocity of hyoid bone movement during the phase of hyoid excursion, and pharyngeal residue rate (the proportion of the bolus that was left as residue in the pharynx at the first swallow). Laryngeal sensation significantly deteriorated 1 month after (chemo)radiotherapy, but there was a tendency to return to pretreatment levels 1 year after treatment. Neither pharyngeal delay time nor displacement of the hyoid bone changed significantly before and after (chemo)radiotherapy. In addition, there was no significant difference in the mean velocity of hyoid bone movement and the amount of stasis in the pharynx at the first swallow before and after (chemo)radiotherapy. After (chemo)radiotherapy, laryngeal sensation deteriorated. But, in this study, videofluoroscopy showed that swallowing reflex and function were maintained.

  11. YH12852, a potent and highly selective 5-HT4 receptor agonist, significantly improves both upper and lower gastrointestinal motility in a guinea pig model of postoperative ileus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Z; Lee, Y J; Yang, H; Jeong, E J; Sim, J Y; Park, H

    2017-10-01

    Postoperative ileus (POI) is a transient gastrointestinal (GI) dysmotility that commonly develops after abdominal surgery. YH12852, a novel, potent and highly selective 5-hydroxytryptamine 4 (5-HT 4 ) receptor agonist, has been shown to improve both upper and lower GI motility in various animal studies and may have applications for the treatment of POI. Here, we investigated the effects and mechanism of action of YH12852 in a guinea pig model of POI to explore its therapeutic potential. The guinea pig model of POI was created by laparotomy, evisceration, and gentle manipulation of the cecum for 60 seconds, followed by closure with sutures under anesthesia. Group 1 received an oral administration of vehicle or YH12852 (1, 3, 10 or 30 mg/kg) only, while POI Group 2 was intraperitoneally pretreated with vehicle or 5-HT 4 receptor antagonist GR113808 (10 mg/kg) prior to oral dosing of vehicle or YH12852 (3 or 10 mg/kg). Upper GI transit was evaluated by assessing the migration of a charcoal mixture in the small intestine, while lower GI transit was assessed via measurement of fecal pellet output (FPO). YH12852 significantly accelerated upper and lower GI transit at the doses of 3, 10, and 30 mg/kg and reached its maximal effect at 10 mg/kg. These effects were significantly blocked by pretreatment of GR113808 10 mg/kg. Oral administration of YH12852 significantly accelerates and restores delayed upper and lower GI transit in a guinea pig model of POI. This drug may serve as a useful candidate for the treatment of postoperative ileus. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Pathologic complete response in patients with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinola M, Daniela; Espinola M, Daniela; Bellolio R, Felipe; Gellona V, Jose; Bustos C, Mariza; Zuniga D, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    Background: The standard treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer (RC) of the middle and lower third of the rectum is neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (XRQT) follow by oncologic resection. After this treatment in 15-25% of the cases, the pathologist reports complete pathological response (pCR). Aim: To describe demographic, clinical and survival data of patients with pCR undergoing chemoradiotherapy and radical resection for RC. Material and Methods: Historic cohort study. In a prospectively maintained database between 2000 and 2010, we identified patients with RC, who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy according to protocol, followed by radical resection. The preoperative staging was obtained by clinical examination, endoscopy, rectal ultrasound, CT scan of chest, abdomen and pelvis and pelvic MRI. Demographic data, tumor location, time between the end of XRTQ and surgery, postoperative staging (according AJCC) and survival, were collected. Results: 119 patients received preoperative XRTQ, 65% male, with a mean age of 58 years. The most frequent tumor site was the lower third (63%). Surgery was performed 8 weeks after the end of XRTQ. Of 119 patients with XRTQ, 15.1% had a pCR. Overall survival was 75%, and cancer-specific survival was 80.4% at 5 years in patients without pCR. For patients with pCR, the 5 year survival estimates for overall and cancer specific survival was 100%. We did not identify factors associated with pCR. Conclusions: In this study, pCR was comparable to other larger series reported elsewhere. No factors associated with pCR were identified

  13. Dose-dependent deterioration of swallowing function after induction chemotherapy and definitive chemoradiotherapy for laryngopharyngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haderlein, M.; Semrau, S.; Ott, O.; Speer, S.; Fietkau, R. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Bohr, C. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    To evaluate the influence of clinical, treatment- and dose-dependent factors on posttreatment swallowing function after induction chemotherapy and definitive chemoradiotherapy in a group of homogeneously treated laryngopharyngeal cancer patients. From 28 May 2008 to 15 February 2013, 45 patients with borderline inoperable laryngopharyngeal cancer that had responded well to induction chemotherapy were treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy. Median follow-up was 22 months. Swallowing function and clinical data were prospectively analyzed using the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire. Swallowing structures were retrospectively delineated on the original treatment planning CT. Dose-volume histograms were calculated for swallowing structures and D{sub mean}, D{sub max} and V50-V64 values (in 2 Gy increments) were determined for each patient. Tumor volume and infiltration of the swallowing apparatus was defined by CT before induction chemotherapy. Of the 45 patients, 26 (57.8 %) fully regained swallowing function after chemoradiotherapy. A further 12 patients (26.7 %) were able to manage soft, pureed and/or liquid foods; the remaining 7 (15.6 %) were completely dependent on percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). Posttreatment swallowing function was significantly influenced by D{sub mean} to the superior pharyngeal constrictor muscle (PCM, p = 0.041). Correlations between late dysphagia and dose-volume relationships in the superior PCM and soft palate were also observed, which were significant from V60 (p = 0.043) and V58 for the soft palate and superior PCM, respectively. Of the evaluated clinical and tumor-related factors, only alcohol abuse (p = 0.024) had an influence on posttreatment swallowing function. Almost 50 % of patients had deterioration of swallowing function after definitive chemoradiotherapy for laryngopharyngeal cancer. The dose to anatomical structures responsible for swallowing function appears to play a role. Therefore, in selected patients, target

  14. Dose-dependent deterioration of swallowing function after induction chemotherapy and definitive chemoradiotherapy for laryngopharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haderlein, M.; Semrau, S.; Ott, O.; Speer, S.; Fietkau, R.; Bohr, C.

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of clinical, treatment- and dose-dependent factors on posttreatment swallowing function after induction chemotherapy and definitive chemoradiotherapy in a group of homogeneously treated laryngopharyngeal cancer patients. From 28 May 2008 to 15 February 2013, 45 patients with borderline inoperable laryngopharyngeal cancer that had responded well to induction chemotherapy were treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy. Median follow-up was 22 months. Swallowing function and clinical data were prospectively analyzed using the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire. Swallowing structures were retrospectively delineated on the original treatment planning CT. Dose-volume histograms were calculated for swallowing structures and D mean , D max and V50-V64 values (in 2 Gy increments) were determined for each patient. Tumor volume and infiltration of the swallowing apparatus was defined by CT before induction chemotherapy. Of the 45 patients, 26 (57.8 %) fully regained swallowing function after chemoradiotherapy. A further 12 patients (26.7 %) were able to manage soft, pureed and/or liquid foods; the remaining 7 (15.6 %) were completely dependent on percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). Posttreatment swallowing function was significantly influenced by D mean to the superior pharyngeal constrictor muscle (PCM, p = 0.041). Correlations between late dysphagia and dose-volume relationships in the superior PCM and soft palate were also observed, which were significant from V60 (p = 0.043) and V58 for the soft palate and superior PCM, respectively. Of the evaluated clinical and tumor-related factors, only alcohol abuse (p = 0.024) had an influence on posttreatment swallowing function. Almost 50 % of patients had deterioration of swallowing function after definitive chemoradiotherapy for laryngopharyngeal cancer. The dose to anatomical structures responsible for swallowing function appears to play a role. Therefore, in selected patients, target volume

  15. Salivary gland function after concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Kenichiro; Shimane, Toshikazu; Uzuki, Aya; Sugimoto, Akane; Mori, Tomoaki; Akiyama, Rio; Gomibuchi, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Sei; Sanbe, Takeyuki

    2011-01-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for cancer of head and neck is becoming more and more prevalent. In fact, it is considered to better maintain quality of life (QOL) of patients than operative treatment in terms of preserving the functions, organs, and structures, but recently I seems that it does not maintain the QOL of patients better than operative treatment because its complications after therapy disturb daily life. We previously conducted a questionnaire survey that investigated the complications experienced by patients who received concurrent chemoradiotherapy, and reported that xerostomia was markedly reduced QOL in these patients. In this study, we divided patients who were exposed to radiation in both major salivary glands into two groups: 20 patients who received a 36 Gy dose of radiation (36 Gy group) and 15 patients who underwent radiation therapy alone at a dose of 40 Gy (radiotherapy (RT) group). The gum test was conducted with the following results (mean volume of saliva): 11.2 ml in the 36 Gy group, 6.0 ml in the RT group. There was no significant difference between the 36 Gy group and RT group. Our findings suggest that there is no significant difference in the extent of salivary gland dysfunction even after chemotherapy is carried out concurrently with radiotherapy. (author)

  16. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Wakako; Ogino, Takashi; Ishikura, Satoshi; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Ikeda, Hiroshi

    1997-01-01

    To investigate factors influencing response and survival for patients with squamous cell cancer of the esophagus. Forty-nine patients with squamous cell cancer of the esophagus, classified by guidelines for the clinical and pathologic studies on carcinoma of the esophagus published by the Japanese Society for Esophageal Disease, were treated by concurrent chemoradiotherapy using chemotherapy consisting of cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil with definitive irradiation of 60 Gy concurrently. Endoscopic findings and biopsy were used for evaluating the response. Nurse charts recording patient's feeding status were adopted to estimate severity of dysphagia. Complete response (CR) rate was 69.4%, median survival time (MST) was 12.3 months, and median local failure-free survival time 7.3 months. Patients in early stage (= 32.4 months, 20.4 months, 20.4 months, 15.7 months, respectively). Patients in A3 stage were often suffered from severe dysphagia both before and after treatment (81.5%, 70.4%), respectively. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy was effective treatment for esophageal cancer. Degree of dysphagia was considered to be a good prognosticator of patients' survival. (author)

  17. A randomized study to compare sequential chemoradiotherapy with concurrent chemoradiotherapy for unresectable locally advanced esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Arunima; Roy, Somnath; Majumdar, Anup; Hazra, Avijit; Mallik, Chandrani

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy can improve outcome in locally advanced esophageal cancer. This study aimed to compare efficacy and toxicity between concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) and sequential chemoradiotherapy (SCRT) in unresectable, locally advanced, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESSC). Forty-one patients with unresectable, locally advanced ESCC were randomized into two arms. In the CCRT arm (Arm A), 17 patients received 50.4 Gy at 1.8 Gy per fraction over 5.6 weeks along with concurrent cisplatin (75 mg m(-2) intravenously on day 1 and 5-fluorouracil (1000 mg m(-2) continuous intravenous infusion on days 1-4 starting on the first day of irradiation and given after 28 days. In the SCRT arm (Arm B), 20 patients received two cycles of chemotherapy, using the same schedule, followed by radiotherapy fractionated in a similar manner. The endpoints were tumor response, acute and late toxicities, and disease-free survival. With a median follow up of 12.5 months, the complete response rate was 82.4% in Arm A and 35% in Arm B (P = 0.003). Statistically significant differences in frequencies of acute skin toxicity (P = 0.016), gastrointestinal toxicity (P = 0.005) and late radiation pneumonitis (P = 0.002) were found, with greater in the CCRT arm. A modest but non-significant difference was observed in median time to recurrence among complete responders in the two arms (Arm A 13 months and Arm B 15.5 months, P = 0.167) and there was also no significant difference between the Kaplan Meier survival plots (P = 0.641) of disease-free survival. Compared to sequential chemoradiotherapy, concurrent chemoradiotherapy can significantly improve local control rate but with greater risk of adverse reactions.

  18. Downstage migration after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer: the reverse of the Will Rogers phenomenon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokas, Emmanouil; Liersch, Torsten; Fietkau, Rainer; Hohenberger, Werner; Hess, Clemens; Becker, Heinz; Sauer, Rolf; Wittekind, Christian; Rödel, Claus

    2015-06-01

    Downstaging after neoadjuvant treatment is increasingly used as a prognostic factor and surrogate endpoint in clinical trials. However, in recent trials of neoadjuvant 5-fluorouracil-based chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer, downstaging did not translate into a benefit with regard to either disease-free survival (DFS) or overall survival. By analyzing the 10-year outcome data of the German CAO/ARO/AIO-94 phase 3 trial, the authors demonstrated that significantly fewer patients had poor prognostic features (eg, ypT3-4, ypN1-2) after preoperative 5-fluorouracil-based chemoradiotherapy. Nevertheless, these patients with International Union for Cancer Control stage II disease were found to be at a higher risk of developing distant metastases and had poorer DFS compared with patients with corresponding TNM tumor (sub)groups in the postoperative treatment arm, whereas patients with International Union for Cancer Control stage III disease demonstrated a nonsignificant trend toward a worse outcome after preoperative treatment. Overall, DFS remained identical in both treatment arms. Thus, "downstage migration" after neoadjuvant treatment resembles the reverse of the Will Rogers phenomenon and therefore may not be a reliable endpoint for long-term outcomes. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  19. Reducing uncertainties about the effects of chemoradiotherapy for cervical cancer:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vale, Claire; Jakobsen, Anders

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: After a 1999 National Cancer Institute (NCI) clinical alert was issued, chemoradiotherapy has become widely used in treating women with cervical cancer. Two subsequent systematic reviews found that interpretation of the benefits was complicated, and some important clinical questions...

  20. FADS1 rs174549 Polymorphism May Predict a Favorable Response to Chemoradiotherapy in Oral Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fa; He, Baochang; Yan, Lingjun; Qiu, Yu; Lin, Lisong; Cai, Lin

    2017-01-01

    The fatty acid desaturase 1 (FADS1) gene variant is a novel susceptibility marker for laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma identified by a recent genome-wide association study, but it is still unclear whether this genetic variant continues to influence oral cancer recurrence or death. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of FADS1 rs174549 polymorphism and its interaction with postoperative chemoradiotherapy in the prognosis of oral cancer. A prospective cohort study involving 304 oral cancer patients with surgical resection was conducted in Fujian, China. Demographic and clinical data (adjuvant therapy types, histologic types, clinical stage, etc.) were extracted from medical records, and follow-up data were obtained by telephone interviews. We collected 5 to 8 mL of venous blood from all patients for DNA extraction, and rs174549 genotypes were determined by TaqMan assays (Life Technologies, Carlsbad, CA). A Cox proportional hazards model and Kaplan-Meier curve were used to assess the association between FADS1 rs174549 polymorphism and progression-free survival (PFS), as well as overall survival, in oral cancer. Carrying the AA genotype was significantly associated with a decreased risk of PFS: The hazard ratio was 0.52 (95% confidence interval, 0.29 to 0.93) for the codominant model and 0.54 (95% confidence interval, 0.31 to 0.94) for the recessive model. Moreover, better PFS was particularly obvious in patients who had received chemoradiotherapy. A positive multiplicative interaction between FADS1 rs174549 polymorphism and chemoradiotherapy was observed for PFS (P = .036). No significant association was found between FADS1 rs174549 polymorphism and overall survival. Our study suggests, for the first time, that FADS1 rs174549 polymorphism is a potentially independent and favorable factor in predicting oral cancer PFS especially for patients who undergo chemoradiotherapy, and it may serve as a potential target for individualized treatment in the future

  1. [Impact of glutamine, eicosapntemacnioc acid, branched-chain amino acid supplements on nutritional status and treatment compliance of esophageal cancer patients on concurrent chemoradiotherapy and gastric cancer patients on chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Minghua; Song, Chenxin; Zou, Baohua; Deng, Yingbing; Li, Shuluan; Liu, Xuehui; Liu, Weiwei; Liu, Jinying; Yu, Lei; Xu, Binghe

    2015-03-17

    To explore the effects of glutamine, eicosapntemacnioc acid (EPA) and branched-chain amino acids supplements in esophageal cancer patients on concurrent chemoradiotherapy and gastric cancer patients on chemotherapy. From April 2013 to April 2014, a total of 104 esophageal and gastric carcinoma patients on chemotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy were recruited and randomly divided into experimental and control groups. Both groups received dietary counseling and routine nutritional supports while only experimental group received supplements of glutamine (20 g/d), EPA (3.3 g/d) and branched-chain amino acids (8 g/d). And body compositions, blood indicators, incidence of complications and completion rates of therapy were compared between two groups. After treatment, free fat mass and muscle weight increased significantly in experiment group while decreased in control group (P nutrition status, decrease the complications and improve compliance for esophageal cancer patients on concurrent chemo-radiotherapy and gastric cancer patients on postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy.

  2. Selective amygdalohippocampectomy versus standard temporal lobectomy in patients with mesiotemporal lobe epilepsy and unilateral hippocampal sclerosis: post-operative facial emotion recognition abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendling, Anne-Sophie; Steinhoff, Bernhard J; Bodin, Frédéric; Staack, Anke M; Zentner, Josef; Scholly, Julia; Valenti, Maria-Paula; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Hirsch, Edouard

    2015-03-01

    Surgical treatment of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) patients involves the removal either of the left or the right hippocampus. Since the mesial temporal lobe is responsible for emotion recognition abilities, we aimed to assess facial emotion recognition (FER) in two homogeneous patient cohorts that differed only in the administered surgery design since anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) or selective amygdalohippocampectomy (SAH) were performed independently of the underlying electroclinical conditions. The patient selection for the two respective surgical procedures was carried out retrospectively between 2000 and 2009 by two independent epilepsy centres, the Kork Epilepsy Centre, Germany and the University Hospital of Strasbourg, France. All included patients had presented with unilateral hippocampus sclerosis (HS) without associated dysplasia or white matter blurring and had become seizure-free postoperatively. Psychometric evaluation was carried out with the Ekman 60 Faces Test and screened for depression and psychosomatic symptoms with the SCL-90 R and the BDI. Thirty healthy volunteers participated as control subjects. Sixty patients were included, 27 had undergone SAH and 33 ATL. Patients and controls obtained comparable scores in FER for surprise, happiness, anger and sadness. Concerning fear and disgust the patient group scored significantly worse. Left-sided operations led to the the most pronounced impairment. The ATL group scored significantly worse for recognition of fear compared with SAH patients. Inversely, after SAH scores for disgust were significantly lower than after ATL, independently of the side of resection. Unilateral temporal damage impairs FER. Different neurosurgical procedures may affect FER differently. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects on heart function of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy in patients with cancer in the esophagus or gastroesophageal junction – a prospective cohort pilot study within a randomized clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, Mikael; Alexandersson von Döbeln, Gabriella; Nilsson, Magnus; Winter, Reidar; Lundell, Lars; Tsai, Jon A; Kalman, Sigridur

    2015-01-01

    Neoadjuvant therapy for cancer of the esophagus or gastroesophageal (GE)-junction is well established. The pros and cons of chemoradiotherapy and chemotherapy are debated. Chemoradiotherapy might impair cardiac function eliciting postoperative morbidity. The aim of this pilot study was to describe acute changes in left ventricular function following chemoradiotherapy or chemotherapy. Patients with esophageal and (GE)-junction cancer enrolled at our center into a multicenter trial comparing neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and chemotherapy were eligible. Patients were randomized to receive cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil with or without the addition of 40 Gy radiotherapy prior to surgery. Left ventricular function was evaluated using echocardiography and plasma N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide (NT-proBNP) before and after neoadjuvant treatment. The primary outcome measure was left ventricular global strain (GS). Clinical effects were assessed using repeated exercise tests. Linear mixed models were used to analyze the effects of treatment group, and the interaction between groups. 40 patients participated (chemoradiotherapy, n = 17; chemotherapy, n = 23). In the chemoradiotherapy group there was no change in left ventricular global strain but mitral annular plane systolic excursion (MAPSE) of the ventricular septum, early diastolic filling velocity (E-velocity), and the ratio of early to late ventricular filling velocities (E/A ratio) decreased significantly (p = 0.02, p = 0.01, and p = 0.03, respectively). No changes were observed in the chemotherapy group. There was a trend towards an interaction effect for MAPSE sept and E (p = 0.09 and p = 0.09). NT-proBNP increased following chemoradiotherapy (p = 0.05) but not after chemotherapy (p > 0.99), and there was a trend towards an interaction effect (p = 0.07). Working capacity decreased following neoadjuvant treatment (chemoradiotherapy p = 0.001, chemotherapy p = 0.03) and was more pronounced after

  4. Postoperative imaging of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woertler, K.; Rummeny, E.J.

    2004-01-01

    Correct interpretation of imaging findings in the postoperative shoulder is impaired by surgical distortion of normal anatomy and possible artifacts. Advanced postoperative imaging of the shoulder in addition to the selection of the best suited modality necessitates familiarity with the surgical procedure that has been performed and its consecutive morphological changes. This article reviews the most common arthroscopic and open techniques used for treatment of shoulder instability, lesions of the superior labral-bicipital complex, primery impingement, and rotator cuff tears, their typical postoperative imaging findings, as well as the diagnostic performance of cross sectional imaging techniques in the detection of recurrent lesions and complications. (orig.) [de

  5. Results of Preoperative Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for the Treatment of Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Mee Sun; Nam, Taek Keun; Kim, Hyeong Rok; Nah, Byung Sik; Chung, Woong Ki; Kim, Young Jin; Ahn, Sung Ja; Song, Ju Young; Jeong, Jae Uk

    2008-01-01

    .1 % for stage I (n=16), 78.6% for stage II (n=30), 36.9% for stage III (n=23), and one patient with pathologic stage IV was alive for 43 months (p=0.02). The 5-year disease-free survival rates were 77.8% for stage 0, 63.6 % for stage I, 58.9% for stage II, 51.1% for stage III, and 0% for stage IV (p 55), clinical stage (I+II vs. III), radiotherapy to surgery interval (≤6 weeks vs. >6 weeks), operation type (sphincter preservation vs. no preservation), pathologic T stage, pathologic N stage, pathologic overall stage (0 vs. I+II vs. III+IV), and pathologic response (complete vs. non-CR), only age and pathologic N stage were significant predictors of overall survival, pathologic overall stage for disease-free survival, and pathologic N stage for locoregional control rates, respectively. Recurrence was observed in 25 patients (local recurrence in 10 patients, distant metastasis in 13 patients, and both in 2 patients). Acute hematologic toxicity (≥grade 3) during chemoradiotherapy was observed in 2 patients, while skin toxicity was observed in 1 patient. Complications developing within 60 days after surgery and required admission or surgical intervention, were observed in 11 patients: anastomotic leakage in 5 patients, pelvic abscess in 2 patients, and others in 4 patients. Conclusion: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy was an effective modality to achieve downstaging and sphincter preservation in rectal cancer cases with a relatively low toxicity. Pathologic N stage was a statistically significant prognostic factor for survival and locoregional control and so, more intensified postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy should be considered in these patients

  6. Treatment outcomes of neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by esophagectomy for patients with esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Hyub; Song, Sang Yun; Shim, Hyun Jeong; Chung, Woong Ki; Ahn, Sung Ja; Yoon, Mee Sun; Jeong, Jae Uk; Song, Ju Young; Nam, Taek Keun [Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    To evaluate treatment outcomes and determine prognostic factors in patients with esophageal cancer treated with esophagectomy after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NCRT). We retrospectively evaluated 39 patients with esophageal cancer who underwent concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by esophagectomy between 2002 and 2012. Initial clinical stages of patients were stage IB in 1 patient (2.6%), stage II in 5 patients (12.9%), and stage III in 33 patients (84.6%). The median age of all the patients was 62 years, and the median follow-up period was 17 months. The 3-year overall survival (OS) rate was 33.6% in all the patients. The 3-year locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS) rate was 33.7%. In multivariate analysis with covariates of age, the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, tumor length, clinical response, clinical stage, pathological response, pathological stage, lymphovascular invasion, surgical type, and radiotherapy to surgery interval, only pathological stage was an independent significant prognostic factor affecting both OS and LRFS. The complications in postoperative day 90 were pneumonia in 9 patients, anastomotic site leakage in 3 patients, and anastomotic site stricture in 2 patients. Postoperative 30-day mortality rate was 10.3% (4/39); the cause of death among these 4 patients was respiratory failure in 3 patients and myocardial infarction in one patient. Only pathological stage was an independent prognostic factor for both OS and LRFS in patients with esophageal cancer treated with esophagectomy after NCRT. We could confirm the significant role of NCRT in downstaging the initial tumor bulk and thus resulting in better survival of patients who gained earlier pathological stage after NCRT.

  7. Cumulative cisplatin dose in concurrent chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strojan, Primoz; Vermorken, Jan B.; Beitler, Jonathan J.; Saba, Nabil F.; Haigentz, Missak; Bossi, Paolo; Worden, Francis P.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Mendenhall, William M.; Lee, Anne W. M.; Harrison, Louis B.; Bradford, Carol R.; Smee, Robert; Silver, Carl E.; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio

    Background. The optimal cumulative dose and timing of cisplatin administration in various concurrent chemoradiotherapy protocols for nonmetastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has not been determined. Methods. The absolute survival benefit at 5 years of concurrent chemoradiotherapy

  8. A case of recurrent gastric cancer with recurrent celiac lymph node metastasis successfully treated with chemoradiotherapy and CPT-11 plus CDDP therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takachi, Ko; Oshima, Satoshi; Nishioka, Kiyonori; Takemoto, Hiroyoshi; Tsujimura, Naoto; Iijima, Shohei; Uemura, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy is performed for the recurrence of gastric cancer in many cases. We report a case of recurrent lymph node metastasis successfully treated with chemoradiotherapy and chemotherapy. A man in his 60s underwent total gastrectomy and D2 dissection in 2009. The pathological diagnosis was poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, T4a, int, INF, β, ly2, v2, LN no.2: 2/3, no.3: 1/4, no.7, 8, and 9: 3/4, stage IIIB. Although we administered S-1/UFT as postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy, a strong rash appeared and the patient ceased chemotherapy. Eight months later, the rash had disappeared. We started chemotherapy with paclitaxel (PAC). CT performed 1 year postoperatively showed celiac lymph node (no.9) metastasis. Chemoradiotherapy (RT+PAC) and additional CPT-11 (98 mg) and CDDP (49 mg) treatment were administered. The lymph node (no.9) was cicatrized after 8 cycles. Forty-two months after the end of treatment, the patient has had no recurrence. It is thought that chemoradiotherapy is an effective cure for local recurrence of gastric cancer. (author)

  9. Effectiveness of preoperative chemoradiotherapy for advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamane, Masaomi; Mizuta, Minoru; Kaji, Mitsumasa

    2006-01-01

    To determine the pathologic effectiveness of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in patients with advanced rectal carcinoma, we reviewed clinical records of 76 patients who received preoperative pelvic radiation +/- chemotherapy. Since 2 patients refused operation and 2 died before surgery, 72 patients underwent operation with a mean delay of 19.9 days after completion of irradiation. Pathologic tumor regression grade (Grade 0-3) was determined by the amount of viable tumor versus necrosis and fibrosis. Grade 0, 1a, 1b, 2, and 3 (pCR) were observed in 0%, 25.0%, 38.9%, 27.8% and 2.8% of patients, respectively. The pathologic response (PR) rate was 75.0% when PR was defined as greater than grade 1b (tumor regression more than 1/3). Downstaging was observed in 35.8% of patients, in which 5-year overall survival was significantly better than in patients without downstaging (90.0% vs. 50.1%, p<0.05). No correlation could be observed between PR and downstaging. CRT is a useful tool with a high PR rate in patients with advanced rectal cancer. More accurate and careful clinical staging is important to select adequate candidates for CRT. Multi-institutional clinical trials as well as standardizing the surgical procedure including lymph node (LN) dissection are required to validate the advantages of CRT for Japanese patients. (author)

  10. Postoperative Ileus in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Peng Tu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative ileus is among the most common complications after surgery. Aging is associated with an increased colonic transit time, and anesthetic disturbance to colonic motility is often aggravated in the elderly. Postoperative ileus increases morbidity, prolongs the length of hospital stay, and constitutes a significant economic burden on the healthcare system. Multimodal enhanced recovery protocols, or fast-track surgeries, have been developed to improve postoperative recovery. Patient education, avoidance of perioperative fluid overload, selective use of nasogastric decompression, early ambulation, adopting a minimally invasive approach, early initiation of clear fluids, and gum chewing are all possible measures to reduce postoperative ileus. Thoracic epidural anesthesia is a well-established technique to hasten recovery, whereas insufficient data are available to ascertain the safety and efficacy of opioid-sparing analgesia in the elderly. The evidence is clear that traditional prokinetic medications are not helpful in the treatment or prevention of postoperative ileus. Early results suggest that alvimopan is a promising agent to reverse opioid-induced ileus. Since postoperative ileus is a multifactorial condition, a concerted effort is therefore necessary to prevent or decrease the duration of postoperative ileus using multimodal strategies.

  11. Salvage surgery for hypopharyngeal carcinoma and cervical esophageal carcinoma with local recurrence or residual tumor after chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takemura, Hirokazu; Hayashi, Ryuichi; Yamazaki, Mitsuo

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we present the treatment results of salvage surgery in 34 patients with residual primary tumor or local relapse tumor in the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus after radiotherapy (15 patients) or chemoradiotherapy (19 patients) at the Division of Head and Neck Surgery, National Cancer Center Hospital East between 1997 and 2006. All patients underwent total pharyngolaryngoesophagectomy (TPLE) as salvage surgery. Among these patients, postoperative complication was observed in 11 patients (32.4%). Fisher's exact test revealed no significant difference in postoperative complication rate between the radiotherapy (RT) group and chemoradiotherapy (CRT) group. Tumors in the neck recurred in 10 patients (55.6%) after surgical resection. The tumor recurrence control rate for cervical lymph nodes was 84.7% for patients with clinically N0 disease after CRT who had not undergone neck dissection. The median survival time was 392 days. We consider that salvage surgery can he safely performed by considering the necessity and method of operation, and the outcome of patients receiving CRT would he improved by salvage surgery. (author)

  12. Postoperative radiotherapy after laser surgery with or without chemotherapy in head and neck evolved cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryll, L.; Pradier, O.; Nitsche, M.; Christiansen, H.; Hess, C.

    2007-01-01

    We compared concurrent combination chemoradiotherapy and adjuvant radiotherapy after laser surgery in patients with stage 3/4 non metastatic squamous cell head and neck cancer. Combination chemotherapy and concurrent irradiation after laser surgery was not superior to surgery and postoperative radiotherapy for resectable advanced squamous cell head and neck cancer. However, the collective is small, and the follow-up to short to conclude. (authors)

  13. Postoperative MRI of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharabianlou Korth, M.; Fritz, L.B.

    2017-01-01

    Postoperative imaging of the ankle can be challenging, even for the experienced radiologist. Pathological and postoperative changes to the primarily complex anatomy of the ankle with its great variety of bone structures, tendons, ligaments, and soft tissue in a very limited space may cause great difficulty in differentiating underlying pathology from expected postoperative changes and artifacts, especially in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Selecting the appropriate radiological modality is key to making the correct diagnosis. Therefore, knowledge of the initial and current symptoms is just as important as familiarity with the most frequently performed operations in the ankle. This article aims to give its reader a summary of the most important and frequently performed operation techniques of the ankle and discusses the expected appearance and possible complications in postoperative imaging. (orig.) [de

  14. Results of preoperative chemoradiotherapy for T4 rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Harunobu; Maeda, Koutarou; Masumori, Koji; Koide, Yoshikazu; Noro, Tomohito; Honda, Katsuyuki; Shiota, Miho; Matsuoka, Shinji; Toyama, Kunihiro

    2011-01-01

    We reviewed clinical records of 11 cases with preoperative chemoradiotherapy to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of chemoradiotherapy for T4 rectal cancer. The preoperative radiotherapy consisted of 40-50 Gy delivered in fractions of 1.8-2.0 Gy per day, five days per week. A treatment of 5-fluorouracil, 500 mg/body per day intravenously, or oral tegafur-uracil (UFT)-E (300 mg/m 2 ) with l-leucovorin (75 mg) per day, or oral S-1 (80 mg/m 2 ) per day five days per week, was given during radiotherapy. One patient died due to pelvic abscess in 63 days after chemoradiotherapy. Invasive findings to the adjacent organs identified by CT and MRI disappeared in 6 cases with complete or partial response 1 month after chemoradiotherapy. Curative surgery was performed in 7 patients. Although the adjacent organs were also removed during surgery in 7 patients, there was no histological invasion to the adjacent organs in 4 patients, and one patient had histological complete disappearance of tumor. Although complications after surgery were found in all of the patients, they were improved by conservative treatment. Two of 7 patients with curative surgery had recurrence, but the rest of them survived without recurrence. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy was expected to be an effective treatment to improve the resection rate and prognosis for T4 rectal cancer. However, it was thought that it was necessary to be careful about severe toxicity, such as pelvic abscess. (author)

  15. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepek, Joseph M; Chino, Junzo P; Willett, Christopher G; Palta, Manisha; Blazer III, Dan G; Tyler, Douglas S; Uronis, Hope E; Czito, Brian G

    2013-01-01

    To examine toxicity and outcomes for patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for gastric cancer. Patients with gastroesophageal (GE) junction (Siewert type II and III) or gastric adenocarcinoma who underwent neoadjuvant CRT followed by planned surgical resection at Duke University between 1987 and 2009 were reviewed. Overall survival (OS), local control (LC) and disease-free survival (DFS) were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicity was graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Forty-eight patients were included. Most (73%) had proximal (GE junction, cardia and fundus) tumors. Median radiation therapy dose was 45 Gy. All patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Thirty-six patients (75%) underwent surgery. Pathologic complete response and R0 resection rates were 19% and 86%, respectively. Thirty-day surgical mortality was 6%. At 42 months median follow-up, 3-year actuarial OS was 40%. For patients undergoing surgery, 3-year OS, LC and DFS were 50%, 73% and 41%, respectively. Preoperative CRT for gastric cancer is well tolerated with acceptable rates of perioperative morbidity and mortality. In this patient cohort with primarily advanced disease, OS, LC and DFS rates in resected patients are comparable to similarly staged, adjuvantly treated patients in randomized trials. Further study comparing neoadjuvant CRT to standard treatment approaches for gastric cancer is indicated

  16. Salvage esophagectomy post definitive chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosokawa, Masao; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Nisida, Yasunori

    2008-01-01

    Outcome of salvage esophagectomy (SE), which was done due to rest development or recurrence after radical treatment of the esophageal cancer with radio- (RT) or chemoradio-therapy (CRT), was retrospectively studied and discussed. Subjects were 61 patients (M 54, F 7: average age, 63.5 y) with the cancer at Stage I- early IVB who had undergone radical CRT (35 cases) and RT (26) with >50 Gy, had no lymphatic and remote metastases at the diagnosis of the recurrence and then received SE and reconstruction surgery. Rough 5-year survival was found to be 29.2% in CRT group and 32.3% in RT. Operation-related death was 1 case (sepsis) and the rate of complication was slightly higher than the ordinary SE. Based on above outcome, discussion was made on following tasks and/or measures in authors' hospital: diagnostic means like the combination with positron emission tomography (PET), dose/regions of irradiation (dose to the heart and lung should be < TD 5/5=tolerance dose to be <5% incidence of adverse effect within 5 years) and of chemotherapy, decision of the irradiation area with consideration of SE afterward, careful surgery to reduce complication, and sufficient preoperative evaluation for radical surgery by images like PET/CT. Operation with consideration of these items conceivably makes SE safer. (R.T.)

  17. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pepek Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine toxicity and outcomes for patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT for gastric cancer. Methods Patients with gastroesophageal (GE junction (Siewert type II and III or gastric adenocarcinoma who underwent neoadjuvant CRT followed by planned surgical resection at Duke University between 1987 and 2009 were reviewed. Overall survival (OS, local control (LC and disease-free survival (DFS were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicity was graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Results Forty-eight patients were included. Most (73% had proximal (GE junction, cardia and fundus tumors. Median radiation therapy dose was 45 Gy. All patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Thirty-six patients (75% underwent surgery. Pathologic complete response and R0 resection rates were 19% and 86%, respectively. Thirty-day surgical mortality was 6%. At 42 months median follow-up, 3-year actuarial OS was 40%. For patients undergoing surgery, 3-year OS, LC and DFS were 50%, 73% and 41%, respectively. Conclusions Preoperative CRT for gastric cancer is well tolerated with acceptable rates of perioperative morbidity and mortality. In this patient cohort with primarily advanced disease, OS, LC and DFS rates in resected patients are comparable to similarly staged, adjuvantly treated patients in randomized trials. Further study comparing neoadjuvant CRT to standard treatment approaches for gastric cancer is indicated.

  18. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natsugoe, Shoji; Matsumoto, Masataka; Okumura, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    The limitations of surgical treatment for advanced esophageal cancer have been clarified, although esophagectomy with extended lymph node dissection has been widespread in Japan. Preoperative adjuvant therapy has been investigated in Western countries, and recently preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has been introduced for the treatment of resectable esophageal cancer. There are several reports of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing CRT followed by surgery and surgery alone. According to the results of a meta-analysis, preoperative CRT is considered to be the standard therapy in Western countries. However, problems in the clinical heterogeneity of meta-analyses include: small number of patients in each RCT; differences in stage grouping; presence of both squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma; various surgical techniques used; and differences in the amount of radiation administered. Preoperative CRT appears to be a promising method for the treatment of potentially resectable advanced esophageal cancer patients with nodal metastasis. Currently, phase I and II trials of new anticancer agents or molecular targeting agents are ongoing. However, since the surgical procedure in the Western method is still being debated, well-designed RCTs are necessary, especially in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. The effectiveness of CRT followed by surgery should be clarified based on excellent Japanese surgical techniques. (author)

  19. Postoperative MRI of the ankle; Postoperative Magnetresonanztomographie des Sprunggelenks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharabianlou Korth, M.; Fritz, L.B. [Rheinlandaerzte, Willich (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    Postoperative imaging of the ankle can be challenging, even for the experienced radiologist. Pathological and postoperative changes to the primarily complex anatomy of the ankle with its great variety of bone structures, tendons, ligaments, and soft tissue in a very limited space may cause great difficulty in differentiating underlying pathology from expected postoperative changes and artifacts, especially in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Selecting the appropriate radiological modality is key to making the correct diagnosis. Therefore, knowledge of the initial and current symptoms is just as important as familiarity with the most frequently performed operations in the ankle. This article aims to give its reader a summary of the most important and frequently performed operation techniques of the ankle and discusses the expected appearance and possible complications in postoperative imaging. (orig.) [German] Die postoperative radiologische Bildgebung des Sprunggelenks kann auch fuer den erfahrenen Radiologen eine besondere Herausforderung darstellen. Die komplex aufgebaute Anatomie des Sprunggelenks, mit seinen multiplen Gelenkflaechen, Sehnen, Baendern und neurovaskulaeren Strukturen auf engstem Raum, kann durch Operationen signifikant veraendert und insbesondere in der Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) verfaelscht dargestellt werden. Fuer eine fundierte Befundung und Beurteilung der Operationsergebnisse ist die Kenntnis der praeoperativen Diagnose, Zeitpunkt und Technik der durchgefuehrten Operation(en) sowie der aktuellen klinischen Symptomatik von grosser Bedeutung. Dieser Artikel konzentriert sich auf zu erwartende radiologische Veraenderungen und gibt Tipps zur Befundung der postoperativen MRT des Sprunggelenks bei einer Auswahl relevanter operativer Eingriffe. Zudem wird auf moegliche postoperative Komplikationen und ihre radiologische Darstellung hingewiesen. (orig.)

  20. Evaluation of the effect of aromatherapy with Rosa damascena Mill. on postoperative pain intensity in hospitalized children in selected hospitals affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2013: A randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marofi, Maryam; Sirousfard, Motahareh; Moeini, Mahin; Ghanadi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pain is the common complication after a surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of aromatherapy with Rosa damascena Mill. on the postoperative pain in children. Materials and Methods: In a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial, we selected 64 children of 3–6 years of age through convenient sampling and divided them randomly into two groups. Patients in group A were given inhalation aromatherapy with R. damascena Mill., and in group B, the patients were given almond oil as a placebo. Inhalation aromatherapy was used at the first time of subjects’ arrival to the ward and then at 3, 6, 9, and 12 h afterward. Common palliative treatments to relieve pain were used in both groups. Thirty minutes after aromatherapy, the postoperative pain in children was evaluated with the Toddler Preschooler Postoperative Pain Scale (TPPPS). Data were statistically analyzed using Chi-square test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and repeated measures ANOVA. Results: There was no significant difference in pain scores at the first time of subjects’ arrival to the ward (before receiving any aromatherapy or palliative care) between the two groups. After each time of aromatherapy and at the end of treatment, the pain score was significantly reduced in the aromatherapy group with R. damascena Mill. compared to the placebo group. Conclusions: According to our results, aromatherapy with R. damascena Mill. can be used in postoperative pain in children, together with other common treatments without any significant side effects. PMID:25878704

  1. Nomogram for Predicting the Benefit of Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Resected Gallbladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Samuel J.; Lemieux, Andrew; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Ord, Celine B.; Walker, Gary V.; Fuller, C. David; Kim, Jong-Sung; Thomas, Charles R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Although adjuvant chemoradiotherapy for resected gallbladder cancer may improve survival for some patients, identifying which patients will benefit remains challenging because of the rarity of this disease. The specific aim of this study was to create a decision aid to help make individualized estimates of the potential survival benefit of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy for patients with resected gallbladder cancer. Methods Patients with resected gallbladder cancer were selected from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) –Medicare database who were diagnosed between 1995 and 2005. Covariates included age, race, sex, stage, and receipt of adjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Propensity score weighting was used to balance covariates between treated and untreated groups. Several types of multivariate survival regression models were constructed and compared, including Cox proportional hazards, Weibull, exponential, log-logistic, and lognormal models. Model performance was compared using the Akaike information criterion. The primary end point was overall survival with or without adjuvant chemotherapy or CRT. Results A total of 1,137 patients met the inclusion criteria for the study. The lognormal survival model showed the best performance. A Web browser–based nomogram was built from this model to make individualized estimates of survival. The model predicts that certain subsets of patients with at least T2 or N1 disease will gain a survival benefit from adjuvant CRT, and the magnitude of benefit for an individual patient can vary. Conclusion A nomogram built from a parametric survival model from the SEER-Medicare database can be used as a decision aid to predict which gallbladder patients may benefit from adjuvant CRT. PMID:22067404

  2. DNA Repair Biomarkers Predict Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy in Esophageal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, Brian M.; Wang Xiaozhe; Niemierko, Andrzej; Weaver, David T.; Mak, Raymond H.; Roof, Kevin S.; Fidias, Panagiotis; Wain, John; Choi, Noah C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The addition of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy prior to surgical resection for esophageal cancer has improved clinical outcomes in some trials. Pathologic complete response (pCR) following neoadjuvant therapy is associated with better clinical outcome in these patients, but only 22% to 40% of patients achieve pCR. Because both chemotherapy and radiotherapy act by inducing DNA damage, we analyzed proteins selected from multiple DNA repair pathways, using quantitative immunohistochemistry coupled with a digital pathology platform, as possible biomarkers of treatment response and clinical outcome. Methods and Materials: We identified 79 patients diagnosed with esophageal cancer between October 1994 and September 2002, with biopsy tissue available, who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy prior to surgery at the Massachusetts General Hospital and used their archived, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded biopsy samples to create tissue microarrays (TMA). TMA sections were stained using antibodies against proteins in various DNA repair pathways including XPF, FANCD2, PAR, MLH1, PARP1, and phosphorylated MAPKAP kinase 2 (pMK2). Stained TMA slides were evaluated using machine-based image analysis, and scoring incorporated both the intensity and the quantity of positive tumor nuclei. Biomarker scores and clinical data were assessed for correlations with clinical outcome. Results: Higher scores for MLH1 (p = 0.018) and lower scores for FANCD2 (p = 0.037) were associated with pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation on multivariable analysis. Staining of MLH1, PARP1, XPF, and PAR was associated with recurrence-free survival, and staining of PARP1 and FANCD2 was associated with overall survival on multivariable analysis. Conclusions: DNA repair proteins analyzed by immunohistochemistry may be useful as predictive markers for response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in patients with esophageal cancer. These results are hypothesis generating and need

  3. Carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater: patterns of failure following resection and benefit of chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palta, Manisha; Patel, Pretesh; Broadwater, Gloria; Willett, Christopher; Pepek, Joseph; Tyler, Douglas; Zafar, S Yousuf; Uronis, Hope; Hurwitz, Herbert; White, Rebekah; Czito, Brian

    2012-05-01

    Ampullary carcinoma is a rare malignancy. Despite radical resection, survival rates remain low with high rates of local failure. We performed a single-institution outcomes analysis to define the role of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in addition to surgery. A retrospective analysis was performed of all patients undergoing potentially curative pancreaticoduodenectomy for adenocarcinoma of the ampulla of Vater at Duke University Hospitals between 1976 and 2009. Time-to-event analysis was performed comparing all patients who underwent surgery alone to the cohort of patients receiving CRT in addition to surgery. Local control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and metastases-free survival (MFS) were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. A total of 137 patients with ampullary carcinoma underwent Whipple procedure. Of these, 61 patients undergoing resection received adjuvant (n = 43) or neoadjuvant (n = 18) CRT. Patients receiving chemoradiotherapy were more likely to have poorly differentiated tumors (P = .03). Of 18 patients receiving neoadjuvant therapy, 67% were downstaged on final pathology with 28% achieving pathologic complete response (pCR). With a median follow-up of 8.8 years, 3-year local control was improved in patients receiving CRT (88% vs 55%, P = .001) with trend toward 3-year DFS (66% vs 48%, P = .09) and OS (62% vs 46%, P = .074) benefit in patients receiving CRT. Long-term survival rates are low and local failure rates high following radical resection alone. Given patterns of relapse with surgery alone and local control benefit in patients receiving CRT, the use of chemoradiotherapy in selected patients should be considered.

  4. [Occupational cholangiocarcinoma in a printer that responded to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Kei; Katayose, Yu; Ishida, Kazuyuki; Hayashi, Hiroki; Morikawa, Takanori; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Naitoh, Takeshi; Kubo, Shoji; Unno, Michiaki

    2015-07-01

    A 42-year-old man working at a printing company was referred to our hospital for examination and treatment of icterus. We diagnosed resectable hilar cholangiocarcinoma and provided neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy, extended right hepatectomy, and extrahepatic bile duct resection. A detailed history revealed that he had used 1,2-dichloropropane as part of his work as an offset colour proof-printer, and he has subsequently been recognized as having occupational cholangiocarcinoma. He has survived without recurrence for more than 2 and half years since the liver resection. In the present report, we describe our valuable experience of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for occupational cholangiocarcinoma.

  5. Risk Factors in Development of Postoperative Empyema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Ozkan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Many etiological factors play a role in the occurrence of postoperative empyema. We aimed to define the effects of these factors on the development of empyema. Material and Method: Two hundred and eighty-eight cases from our clinic who underwent tube thoracostomy and/or were operated due to any cause out of the primary empyema  between August 2009 and May 2010 were prospectively studied in terms of empyema development. Data comprised gender, age, chemoradiotherapy, surgical procedure, intraoperative thoracic lavage with povidone-iodine, emergency surgery status, sharing the same room with other cases with empyema, primary disease, additional comorbidity, operation duration, drain number, complication, number of patients in the room, and drain discontinuation and hospitalization duration. Blood leukocyte-neutrophil count was ordered in all cases at 3-day intervals, and fluid culture specimens were simultaneously collected from cases with drains. Drainage fluid culture specimens were evaluated with “Automated Identification and Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing” using standard procedures. Empyema cases who developed clinical manifestation and/or with bacterial growth in culture specimens were studied in terms of risk factors. The findings were analyzed using SPSS (version 16. Results: The results showed that gender, age, chemoradiotherapy, surgical procedure, intraoperative thoracic lavage with povidone-iodine, emergency surgery status, and sharing a same room with other empyema cases were not significantly correlated with the risk of empyema development. Contribution of the primary disease (p<0.05, additional comorbidity (p<0.05, operation duration (p<0.05, drain number (p<0.05, complication (p<0.05, number of people in the room (p<0.05, drain discontinuation time (p<0.05 and hospitalization duration (p<0.05 were found to be significant in the development of postoperative empyema. Discussion: Postoperative development of empyema is one

  6. Chemoradiotherapy response in recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Stanley K T; Bhangu, Aneel; Tait, Diana M; Tekkis, Paris; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Brown, Gina

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in recurrent versus primary rectal cancer has not been investigated. We compared radiological downsizing between primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT and determined the optimal size reduction threshold for response validated by survival outcomes. The proportional change in tumor length for primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT was compared using the independent sample t-test. Overall survival (OS) was calculated using the Kaplan–Meier product limit method and differences between survival for tumor size reduction thresholds of 30% (response evaluation criteria in solid tumors [RECIST]), 40%, and 50% after CRT in primary and recurrent rectal cancer groups. A total of 385 patients undergoing CRT were analyzed, 99 with recurrent rectal cancer and 286 with primary rectal cancer. The mean proportional reduction in maximum craniocaudal length was significantly higher for primary rectal tumors (33%) compared with recurrent rectal cancer (11%) (P < 0.01). There was no difference in OS for either primary or recurrent rectal cancer when ≤30% or ≤40% definitions were used. However, for both primary and recurrent tumors, significant differences in median 3-year OS were observed when a RECIST cut-off of 50% was used. OS was 99% versus 77% in primary and 100% versus 42% in recurrent rectal cancer (P = 0.002 and P = 0.03, respectively). Only patients that demonstrated >50% size reduction showed a survival benefit. Recurrent rectal cancer appears radioresistant compared with primary tumors for tumor size after CRT. Further investigation into improving/intensifying chemotherapy and radiotherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer is justified

  7. Chemoradiotherapy response in recurrent rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Stanley K T; Bhangu, Aneel; Tait, Diana M; Tekkis, Paris; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Brown, Gina

    2014-02-01

    The efficacy of response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in recurrent versus primary rectal cancer has not been investigated. We compared radiological downsizing between primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT and determined the optimal size reduction threshold for response validated by survival outcomes. The proportional change in tumor length for primary and recurrent rectal cancers following CRT was compared using the independent sample t-test. Overall survival (OS) was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier product limit method and differences between survival for tumor size reduction thresholds of 30% (response evaluation criteria in solid tumors [RECIST]), 40%, and 50% after CRT in primary and recurrent rectal cancer groups. A total of 385 patients undergoing CRT were analyzed, 99 with recurrent rectal cancer and 286 with primary rectal cancer. The mean proportional reduction in maximum craniocaudal length was significantly higher for primary rectal tumors (33%) compared with recurrent rectal cancer (11%) (P rectal cancer when ≤30% or ≤40% definitions were used. However, for both primary and recurrent tumors, significant differences in median 3-year OS were observed when a RECIST cut-off of 50% was used. OS was 99% versus 77% in primary and 100% versus 42% in recurrent rectal cancer (P = 0.002 and P = 0.03, respectively). Only patients that demonstrated >50% size reduction showed a survival benefit. Recurrent rectal cancer appears radioresistant compared with primary tumors for tumor size after CRT. Further investigation into improving/intensifying chemotherapy and radiotherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer is justified. © 2013 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Systematic review on the treatment of isolated local recurrence of pancreatic cancer after surgery; re-resection, chemoradiotherapy and SBRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot, Vincent P; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Rombouts, Steffi J E; Hagendoorn, Jeroen; Borel Rinkes, Inne H M; van Vulpen, Marco; Herman, Joseph M; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Besselink, Marc G; Molenaar, I Quintus

    2017-02-01

    The majority of patients who have undergone a pancreatic resection for pancreatic cancer develop disease recurrence within two years. In around 30% of these patients, isolated local recurrence (ILR) is found. The aim of this study was to systematically review treatment options for this subgroup of patients. A systematic search was performed in PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Library. Studies reporting on the treatment of ILR after initial curative-intent resection of primary pancreatic cancer were included. Primary endpoints were morbidity, mortality and survival after ILR treatment. After screening 1152 studies, 18 studies reporting on 313 patients undergoing treatment for ILR were included. Treatment options for ILR included surgical re-resection (8 studies, 100 patients), chemoradiotherapy (7 studies, 153 patients) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) (4 studies, 60 patients). Morbidity and mortality were reported for re-resection (29% and 1%, respectively), chemoradiotherapy (54% and 0%) and SBRT (3% and 1%). Most patients had a prolonged disease-free interval before recurrence. Median survival after treatment of ILR of up to 32, 19 and 16 months was reported for re-resection, chemoradiotherapy and SBRT, respectively. In selected patients, treatment of ILR following pancreatic resection for pancreatic cancer seems safe, feasible and associated with relatively good survival. Copyright © 2016 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Postoperative adjuvant therapy of breast cancer. Oncology Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories throughout the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Postoperative chemotherapy; Postoperative radiotherapy; Postoperative hormone therapy; Postoperative immunotherapy and chemoimmunotherapy; Postoperative multimodal therapy; Prognostic factors in postoperative adjuvant therapy

  10. Laparoscopic versus open surgery following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Zhao, Liying; An, Shengli; Wu, Jiaming; Zou, Zhenhong; Liu, Hao; Li, Guoxin

    2014-03-01

    This meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the short-term and pathological outcomes of laparoscopic surgery (LS) versus open surgery (OS) following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NCRT) for rectal cancer. PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and Chinese Biomedicine Literature databases were searched for eligible studies published up to July 2013. The rates of postoperative complication, positive circumferential resection margin (CRM), and the number of lymph nodes harvested were evaluated. Three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and five non-RCTs enrolling 953 patients were included. Compared to OS, LS had similar rate of postoperative complication [odds ratio (OR) 0.86; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.60 to 1.22], comparable rate of positive CRM (OR 0.41; 95% CI, 0.16 to 1.02), and smaller number of lymph nodes (weighted mean difference -0.8; 95% CI, -1.1 to -0.5). LS also had significantly less blood loss, faster bowel movement recovery, and shorter postoperative hospitalization than those of OS. LS is associated with favorable short-term benefits, similar postoperative complication rate, and comparable pathological outcomes for rectal cancer after NCRT compared to OS despite a slight difference in the number of lymph nodes. Additional high-quality studies are needed to validate long-term outcomes of LS following NCRT.

  11. Multicenter phase II study of an opioid-based pain control program for head and neck cancer patients receiving chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenda, Sadamoto; Matsuura, Kazuto; Tachibana, Hiroyuki; Homma, Akihiro; Kirita, Tadaaki; Monden, Nobuya; Iwae, Shigemichi; Ota, Yojiro; Akimoto, Tetsuo; Otsuru, Hiroshi; Tahara, Makoto; Kato, Kengo; Asai, Masao

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aim of this multi-center phase II study was to clarify the clinical benefit of an opioid-based pain control program for head and neck cancer patients during chemoradiotherapy. Patients and methods: Head and neck cancer patients who were to receive definitive or postoperative chemoradiotherapy were enrolled. The opioid-based pain control program consisted of a three-step ladder, with basic regimens of: Step 1: acetaminophen at 500–1000 mg three times a day. Step 2: fast-acting morphine at 5 mg three times a day before meals for a single day. Step 3: long-acting morphine administered around-the-clock, with a starting dosage of 20 mg/day and no upper limit set in principle. The primary endpoint of this study was compliance with radiotherapy. Results: A total of 101 patients from 10 institutions were registered between February 2008 and May 2009 and included in the analysis. The major combination chemotherapy regimen was cisplatin alone (76%). The rate of completion of radiotherapy was 99% and the rate of unplanned breaks in radiotherapy was 13% (13/101, 90% confidence interval: 9.9–16.5%). Median maximum quantity of morphine used per day was 35 mg (range 0–150 mg). Conclusions: Use of a systematic pain control program may improve compliance with CRT.

  12. Treatment Outcomes of Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Ethmoid Sinus Treated with Anterior Craniofacial Resection or Chemoradiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeharu Ono

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We retrospectively analyzed 14 patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of ethmoid sinus (LASCC-ES for the feasibility of anterior craniofacial resection (ACFR. Ethmoid cancer treatment comprised alternating chemoradiotherapy (ALCRT; n = 1, concomitant radiotherapy and intra-arterial cisplatin (RADPLAT; n = 4 and ACFR (n = 9. The 3- and 5-year overall survival (OS rates of patients were 47.6 and 39.6%, respectively. The 3-year local control (LC rates of chemoradiotherapy (CRT; ALCRT and RADPLAT (n = 5 and ACFR (n = 9 groups were 0 and 66.7% (p = 0.012, respectively. The 3-year progression-free survival (PFS rate of the CRT and ACFR groups were 0 and 55.6% (p = 0.018, respectively. The 3-year OS rate of the CRT and ACFR groups were 0 and 76.2% (p = 0.005, respectively. Postoperative pathological examinations confirmed positive margins in 3 (33% of 9 cases. The 3-year LC and PFS rates of cases (n = 3 with positive surgical margins were significantly poorer than those of cases (n = 6 with negative surgical margins. Although ACFR for LASCC-ES is a feasible treatment, cases with positive surgical margins were more prone to local relapse. Therefore, surgical safety margins should be thoroughly assessed.

  13. Neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by definitive high-dose radiotherapy or surgery for operable thoracic esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masao, Murakami; Yasumasa, Kuroda; Yosiaki, Okamoto; Koichi, Kono; Eisaku, Yoden; Fusako, Kusumi; Kiyoshi, Hajiro; Satoru, Matsusue; Hiroshi, Takeda

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: A prospective clinical trial was undertaken to investigate the feasibility of concurrent chemoradiotherapy for the esophageal carcinoma. Materials and Methods: Between June 1989 and May 1996, forty patients with operable squamous cell carcinoma of the thoracic esophagus (stage 0 to III: UICC 1987), aged 45 to 78 (mean:64), were enrolled in a study of neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by definitive high-dose radiotherapy (CRT group) or surgery (CRT-S group). Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy consisted of 44Gy in 40 fractions for 4 weeks (2.2Gy/2Fr./day) through 10MVX rays, with one or two courses of cisplatin (80-150mg/body, mean:90mg/m 2 , day 1, bolus injection) and 5-fluorouracil (500-1500mg/body/day, mean:600mg/m 2 , day 1-4, continuous infusion). After completion of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy, clinical complete response (CR) was observed in 16 patients, partial response (PR) in 22, and no change (NC) in 2. Thirty responding patients (CR:16, PR:14) entered in CRT group, and 10 non-responding patients (PR:8, NC:2) followed by surgery (CRT-S group). A cumulative median dose of 66Gy for Tis,T1 and 71Gy for T2-T4 tumor with/without high-dose-rate intraluminal brachytherapy, and one to three courses of chemotherapy were delivered in CRT group. Intraoperative radiotherapy for abdominal lymphatic system and postoperative supraclavicular irradiation were added in CRT-S group. Results: Clinical CR rate at the completion of treatment showed 90% in CRT group, and pathological CR rate 10% in CRT-S group. The overall median survival was 45 months, survival at 1, 2, 3 years being 100%, 72%, 56%, respectively. Loco-regional failure was observed in 7 patients (all in CRT group), distant failure in 6 (3 in CRT group, 3 in CRT-S group) and loco-regional with distant failure in 1 (CRT group). Four patients of loco-regional recurrence in CRT group were salvaged by surgery. Overall survival at 2-, 3-years for CRT vs. CRT-S group was 72%, 64% vs. (1(1)); 100

  14. Complications After Sphincter-Saving Resection in Rectal Cancer Patients According to Whether Chemoradiotherapy Is Performed Before or After Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chan Wook; Kim, Jong Hoon; Yu, Chang Sik; Shin, Ui Sup; Park, Jin Seok; Jung, Kwang Yong; Kim, Tae Won; Yoon, Sang Nam; Lim, Seok-Byung; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to compare the influence of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with postoperative CRT on the incidence and types of postoperative complications in rectal cancer patients who underwent sphincter-saving resection. Patients and Methods: We reviewed 285 patients who received preoperative CRT and 418 patients who received postoperative CRT between January 2000 and December 2006. Results: There was no between-group difference in age, gender, or cancer stage. In the pre-CRT group, the mean level of anastomosis from the anal verge was lower (3.5 ± 1.4 cm vs. 4.3 ± 1.7 cm, p < 0.001) and the rate of T4 lesion and temporary diverting ileostomy was higher than in the post-CRT group. Delayed anastomotic leakage and rectovaginal fistulae developed more frequently in the pre-CRT group than in the post-CRT group (3.9% vs. 1.2%, p = 0.020, 6.5% vs. 1.3%, p = 0.027, respectively). Small bowel obstruction (arising from radiation enteritis) requiring surgical intervention was more frequent in the post-CRT group (0% in the pre-CRT group vs. 1.4% in the post-CRT group, p = 0.042). Multivariate analysis identified preoperative CRT as an independent risk factor for fistulous complications (delayed anastomotic leakage, rectovaginal fistula, rectovesical fistula), and postoperative CRT as a risk factor for obstructive complications (anastomotic stricture, small bowel obstruction). The stoma-free rates were significantly lower in the pre-CRT group than in the post-CRT group (5-year stoma-free rates: 92.8% vs. 97.0%, p = 0.008). Conclusion: The overall postoperative complication rates were similar between the pre-CRT and the Post-CRT groups. However, the pattern of postoperative complications seen after sphincter- saving resection differed with reference to the timing of CRT.

  15. Efficacy and short-term outcomes of preoperative chemoradiotherapy with intermittent oral tegafur-uracil plus leucovorin in Japanese rectal cancer patients: a single center experience retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Ryosuke; Inoue, Yuji; Ohki, Takeshi; Kaneko, Yuka; Maeda, Fumi; Yamamoto, Masakazu

    2017-05-31

    Various types of preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) have been established for rectal cancer; thus, Physicians will need to refine the selection of appropriate preoperative CRT for different patients since there are various treatment regimens. Oral tegafur-uracil (UFT) plus leucovorin (LV) is commonly used to treat rectal cancer in Japan. Oral chemotherapy offers patients many potential advantages. Since 2008, we have been performing preoperative CRT with intermittent oral UFT plus LV in locally advanced rectal cancer patients to prevent postoperative local recurrence. Here, in a retrospective analysis, we evaluated the efficacy and short-term outcomes of preoperative CRT with intermittent oral UFT plus LV. We analyzed data from 62 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer, including 31 patients who underwent preoperative CRT between 2009 and 2013 (the CRT group) and 31 patients who were treated with surgery alone between 2001 and 2008 (the non-CRT group). Clinicopathologically, both groups included patients with rectal cancer at clinical tumor stages III-IV or clinical node stages 0-III. In the CRT group, curative operations were performed ≥8 weeks after CRT. Patients were concomitantly treated with 2 cycles of oral UFT (300 mg/m 2 /day, days 1-14 and 29-42) plus LV (75 mg/day, days 1-14 and 29-42) and 45 Gy of radiotherapy. Chemotherapy was repeated every 28 days, followed by a 2-week break. The completion rate of CRT was high at 94% (n = 29/31). The downstaging rate of CRT was 61% (n = 19/31). The pathological complete response rate was 6.5% (n = 2/31). Significant differences were observed in the 3-year local recurrence rate between the two groups (P rectal cancer. A further investigation of a diversification of preoperative CRT for Japanese rectal cancer patients is required.

  16. Prediction of Pathological Complete Response Using Endoscopic Findings and Outcomes of Patients Who Underwent Watchful Waiting After Chemoradiotherapy for Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Kazushige; Ishihara, Soichiro; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Hata, Keisuke; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Morikawa, Teppei; Fukayama, Masashi; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2017-04-01

    Nonoperative management for patients with rectal cancer who have achieved a clinical complete response after chemoradiotherapy is becoming increasingly important in recent years. However, the definition of and modality used for patients with clinical complete response differ greatly between institutions, and the role of endoscopic assessment as a nonoperative approach has not been fully investigated. This study aimed to investigate the ability of endoscopic assessments to predict pathological regression of rectal cancer after chemoradiotherapy and the applicability of these assessments for the watchful waiting approach. This was a retrospective comparative study. This study was conducted at a single referral hospital. A total of 198 patients with rectal cancer underwent preoperative endoscopic assessments after chemoradiotherapy. Of them, 186 patients underwent radical surgery with lymph node dissection. The histopathological findings of resected tissues were compared with the preoperative endoscopic findings. Twelve patients refused radical surgery and chose watchful waiting; their outcomes were compared with the outcomes of patients who underwent radical surgery. The endoscopic criteria correlated well with tumor regression grading. The sensitivity and specificity for a pathological complete response were 65.0% to 87.1% and 39.1% to 78.3%. However, endoscopic assessment could not fully discriminate pathological complete responses, and the outcomes of patients who underwent watchful waiting were considerably poorer than the patients who underwent radical surgery. Eventually, 41.7% of the patients who underwent watchful waiting experienced uncontrollable local failure, and many of these occurrences were observed more than 3 years after chemoradiotherapy. The number of the patients treated with the watchful waiting strategy was limited, and the selection was not randomized. Although endoscopic assessment after chemoradiotherapy correlated with pathological response

  17. Thrombolysis in Postoperative Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkel, Nicolas; Hubert, Nikolai Dominik; Backhaus, Roland; Haberl, Roman Ludwig; Hubert, Gordian Jan

    2017-11-01

    Intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) is beneficial in reducing disability in selected patients with acute ischemic stroke. There are numerous contraindications to IVT. One is recent surgery. The aim of this study was to analyze the safety of IVT in patients with postoperative stroke. Data of consecutive IVT patients from the Telemedical Project for Integrative Stroke Care thrombolysis registry (February 2003 to October 2014; n=4848) were retrospectively searched for keywords indicating preceding surgery. Patients were included if surgery was performed within the last 90 days before stroke. The primary outcome was defined as surgical site hemorrhage. Subgroups with major/minor surgery and recent/nonrecent surgery (within 10 days before IVT) were analyzed separately. One hundred thirty-four patients underwent surgical intervention before IVT. Surgery had been performed recently (days 1-10) in 49 (37%) and nonrecently (days 11-90) in 85 patients (63%). In 86 patients (64%), surgery was classified as major, and in 48 (36%) as minor. Nine patients (7%) developed surgical site hemorrhage after IVT, of whom 4 (3%) were serious, but none was fatal. One fatal bleeding occurred remotely from surgical area. Rate of surgical site hemorrhage was significantly higher in recent than in nonrecent surgery (14.3% versus 2.4%, respectively, odds ratio adjusted 10.73; 95% confidence interval, 1.88-61.27). Difference between patients with major and minor surgeries was less distinct (8.1% and 4.2%, respectively; odds ratio adjusted 4.03; 95% confidence interval, 0.65-25.04). Overall in-hospital mortality was 8.2%. Intracranial hemorrhage occurred in 9.7% and was asymptomatic in all cases. IVT may be administered safely in postoperative patients as off-label use after appropriate risk-benefit assessment. However, bleeding risk in surgical area should be taken into account particularly in patients who have undergone surgery shortly before stroke onset. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Geometric changes of parotid glands caused by hydration during chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kager, Petronella M.; Weerdenburg, Sanne C. C. van; Kranen, Simon R. van; Beek, Suzanne van; Lamers-Kuijper, Elisabeth A.; Heemsbergen, Wilma D.; Hamming-Vrieze, Olga; Remeijer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Plan adaptation during the course of (chemo)radiotherapy of H&N cancer requires repeat CT scanning to capture anatomy changes such as parotid gland shrinkage. Hydration, applied to prevent nephrotoxicity from cisplatin, could temporarily alter the hydrogen balance and hence the captured anatomy. The aim of this study was to determine geometric changes of parotid glands as function of hydration during chemoradiotherapy compared to a control group treated with radiotherapy only. This study included an experimental group (n = 19) receiving chemoradiotherapy, and a control group (n = 19) receiving radiotherapy only. Chemoradiotherapy patients received cisplatin with 9 l of saline solution during hydration in the first, fourth and seventh week. The delineations of the parotid glands on the planning CT scan were automatically propagated to Cone Beam CT scans using deformable image registration. Relative volume and position of the parotid glands were determined at the second chemotherapy cycle (week four) and at fraction 35. When saline solution was administrated, the volume temporarily increased on the first day (7.2 %, p < 0.001), second day (10.8 %, p < 0.001) and third day (7.0 %, p = 0.016). The gland positions shifted lateral, the distance between glands increased on the first day with 1.5 mm (p < 0.001), on the second day 2.2 mm (p < 0.001). At fraction 35, with both groups the mean shrinkage was 24 % ± 11 % (1SD) and the mean medial distance between the parotid glands decreased by 0.47 cm ± 0.27 cm. Hydration significantly modulates parotid gland geometry. Unless, in the context of adaptive RT, a repeat CT scan is timed during a chemotherapy cycle, these effects are of minor clinical relevance

  19. Renal Toxicity of Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy With Cisplatin in Gastric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welz, Stefan; Hehr, Thomas; Kollmannsberger, Christian; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Belka, Claus; Budach, Wilfried

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemoradiotherapy for completely resected high-risk gastric adenocarcinoma has been shown to improve survival in a randomized Intergroup trial. However, the results still showed an unsatisfactory outcome. On the basis of previously reported results of a Phase II trial using a more aggressive, cisplatin-containing chemoradiotherapy schedule, we investigated the effects of this approach on long-term renal function. Patients and Methods: Between December 2000 and September 2003, 27 patients were treated at Tuebingen University in a Phase II multicenter trial investigating adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. The adjuvant chemoradiotherapy consisted of two cycles of adjuvant 5-FU, folinic acid, cisplatin (200 mg/m 2 ), and paclitaxel before and after radiotherapy (45 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions) with daily concomitant 5-FU (225 mg/m 2 /24 h). A dose constraint of ≤12 Gy for 37.5% of the functional volume of both kidneys was used. Renal function was assessed by the changes in creatinine and creatinine clearance during follow-up. Results: The prescribed 45 Gy was administered to 100% of the patients, and the cumulative cisplatin dose was 200 mg/m 2 in 74% of all patients. In 89%, the constraints concerning the renal absorbed doses were met. The median follow-up for the creatinine and clearance values was 30 and 26 months, respectively. The creatinine values tended to worsen over time without reaching critical levels. We were unable to demonstrate a significant dose-response relationship for renal damage in the tested dose range. Conclusions: Using a dose constraint of ≤12 Gy for 37.5% of the functional volume of both kidneys appears to be safe at a median follow-up of 2 years for a cumulative cisplatin dose of 200 mg/m 2 administered before and after simultaneous 5-FU and radiotherapy

  20. Rectum-conserving surgery in the era of chemoradiotherapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smith, F M

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: A complete pathological response occurs in 10-30 per cent of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer undergoing neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT). The standard of care has been radical surgery with high morbidity risks and the challenges of stomata despite the favourable prognosis. This review assessed minimalist approaches (transanal excision or observation alone) to tumours with a response to CRT. METHODS: A systematic review was performed using PubMed and Embase databases. Keywords included: \\'rectal\\

  1. Multidisciplinary treatment including chemoradiotherapy for advanced esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Kenji; Fukuda, Kazuhiro; Kikkawa, Nobuteru; Kobayashi, Tetsurou; Yagyu, Toshio; Hasuike, Yasunori; Mishima, Hideyuki; Shin, Eisei [Osaka National Hospital (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    Over 3 years, concurrent chemoradiotherapy was performed in 16 patients with advanced esophageal cancer (clinical Stage IV) and suspected noncurative resection. The subjects were {>=}A3 or N3, or were stage IV with distant metastasis on preoperative diagnosis. Two courses of 5FU and CDDP were given with concurrent radiotherapy. The predominant side effects were nausea, vomiting and anorexia. Mild or moderate leukopenia also occurred. The response was complete remission (CR) in two patients, partial remission (PR) in eight, minor response (MR) in two, no change (NC) in two and progressive disease (PD) in two. The overall response rate was 62.5%. Esophagectomy was performed in four patients (histological stage II in one, stage III in one, and stage IV in two). Two of 4 resected patients are alive (33.8 months), while the other died of unrelated causes. One of the 6 non-resected PR patients has survived for 18 months, but all other patients died of cancer within nine months of starting treatment. The survival rate of 16 patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy was 16.7% at one and two years. Thus, chemoradiotherapy may improve the prognosis of advanced esophageal cancer with suspected noncurative resection by increasing the response rate and the curative resection rate. (author)

  2. Prognostic Role of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Level after Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy in Patients with Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Jung Wook; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Kim, Seok Hyung; Park, Yoon Ah; Cho, Yong Beom; Kim, Hee Cheol; Lee, Woo Yong; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Joon Oh; Park, Young Suk; Chun, Ho-Kyung

    2018-05-29

    The prognostic role of post-chemoradiotherapy (CRT) carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level is not clear. We evaluated the prognostic significance of post-CRT CEA level in patients with rectal cancer after preoperative CRT. We reviewed 659 consecutive patients who underwent preoperative CRT and total mesorectal excision for non-metastatic rectal cancer. Patients were categorized into two groups according to post-CRT serum CEA level: low CEA (level was 1.7 ng/mL (range, 0.1-207.0). A high post-CRT level was significantly associated with ypStage, ypT category, tumor regression grade, and pre-CRT CEA level. The 5-year overall survival rate of the 659 patients was 87.8% with a median follow-up period of 57.0 months (range, 1.4-176.4). When the post-CRT CEA groups were divided into groups according to pre-CRT CEA level, the 5-year overall survival rates were significantly different (P level was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival. Multivariate analysis revealed that operation method, differentiation, perineural invasion, postoperative chemotherapy, tumor regression grade, and post-CRT CEA level were independent prognostic factors for overall survival. The level of serum CEA after preoperative CRT was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival in patients with rectal cancer.

  3. Is Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy Overtreatment in Cervical Cancer Patients With Intermediate Risk Factors?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Sang-Young; Park, Sang-Il; Nam, Byung-Ho; Cho, Chul-Koo; Kim, Kidong; Kim, Beob-Jong; Kim, Moon-Hong; Choi, Seok-Cheol; Lee, Eui-Don; Lee, Kyoung-Hee

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) improves the outcome of cervical cancer patients with intermediate risk factors. Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and June 2006, the medical records of 735 patients who had undergone radical surgery for Stage IB-IIA cervical cancer were reviewed retrospectively. Of the 735 patients, 172 with two or more intermediate risk factors (i.e., lymphovascular space involvement, deep stromal invasion, and tumor size ≥2 cm) were grouped as follows according to the adjuvant treatment received: 34 patients, no further treatment; 49 patients, RT; and 89 patients, CRT. The significance of the clinical parameters and recurrence-free survival of each group were analyzed. Results: Of the 172 patients with any of the intermediate risk factors, 137 (79.6%) had two or more intermediate risk factors. Of the 172 patients, 12 developed recurrences (6.4%)->(7.0%), with 6 in the pelvis and 6 in distant sites. All 12 recurrences occurred in those who had two or more intermediate risk factors (sensitivity, 100%); however, only six recurrences were detected in patients who met the Gynecologic Oncology Group criteria for the intermediate-risk group (sensitivity, 50%; Z test, p .05). Conclusion: Postoperative adjuvant CRT can improve the outcome of cervical cancer patients with intermediate risk factors, with low increase in toxicity.

  4. A multicentre randomised clinical trial of chemoradiotherapy plus hyperthermia versus chemoradiotherapy alone in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Harima, Yoko; Ohguri, Takayuki; Imada, Hajime; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Ohno, Tatsuya; Hiraki, Yoshiyuki; Tuji, Koh; Tanaka, Masahiro; Terashima, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of whole-pelvic hyperthermia (HT) added to standard chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in locally advanced cervical cancer (CC), by investigating the clinical response and survival of patients treated with cisplatin-based CRT vs. CRT with HT (CRT + HT).Materials and methods: This study was conducted at five hospitals in Japan between September 2001 and March 2015 in patients with the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IB (bulky)–IVA CC unde...

  5. The postoperative spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) is one of the most perplexing medical and medicoeconomic problems facing our health system today. In many studies reoperation rates tend to be between 10 and 20%, but as many as 20-45% 3 of patients may have persistent back or radicular pain following what was to have been definitive therapy. The causes for the FBSS are very complex. The Workmen's Compensation system and medicolegal trends toward very high settlements of litigation for injury have provided serious incentive for patients to remain symptomatic. It is difficult to analyze any statistical survey of symptomatic back patients without serious bias from this group of patients. Others suggest that patients with severe psychological problems, drug abuse, and alcoholism are inappropriately selected as surgical candidates. They believe that careful psychological evaluation of patients minimizes FBSS. Even if all extrinsic factors could be eliminated, the problem of failed back surgery would still be a major one. This chapter is based on a review of 300 postoperative lumbar spine multiplanar CT scans performed over a 15-month period. All patients had a complete set of axial images, with sagittal and coronal reformations photographed twice: optimized once for bone definition and once for soft-tissue contrast resolution

  6. Clinical experience with chronomodulated infusional 5-fluorouracil chemoradiotherapy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keene, Kimberly S.; Rich, Tyvin A.; Penberthy, David R.; Shepard, Robert C.; Adams, Reid; Jones, R. Scott

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate retrospectively the efficacy and chronic toxicities of concurrent radiotherapy and chronomodulated infusion 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Twenty-eight patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma were treated between January 1997 and May 2000 with 5-FU chronomodulated chemoradiotherapy. Chronomodulated delivery of chemotherapy was chosen on the basis of a lower toxicity profile in the treatment of GI malignancies. The median age was 64 years. Of the 28 patients, 12 were men and 16 were women. Eight patients had unresectable disease and 20 were treated after pancreatic resection. The median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy given in 28 fractions. The median field length and width was 10.6 cm and 10.9 cm, respectively. Concurrent chemotherapy with 5-FU was administered 5 d/wk, with a median total dose of 8.4 g/m 2 (300 mg/m 2 /d). Chronomodulated 5-FU delivery consisted of a low basal infusion for 16 h followed by an 8-h escalating-deescalating infusion peaking at 10 PM. Survival and recurrence data were evaluated using Kaplan-Meier actuarial analysis. Toxicities were recorded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grading system. Results: The median follow-up for all patients was 26 months (range, 4-68 months). The median overall survival for the 20 patients treated postoperatively was 34 months, with a 3- and 5-year actuarial survival rate of 40% and 21%, respectively. If the 3 patients with carcinoma of the ampulla were removed from the data set, the mean overall survival in the resected patients was 34 months, with a 3-year and 5-year actuarial survival rate of 40% and 17%, respectively. The 8 unresectable patients had a median overall survival of 14 months, and none lived past 2 years. No patient experienced Grade 3 or 4 hematologic toxicity or weight loss. Five patients had nausea and dehydration requiring i.v. fluids; only one (4%) was hospitalized. Four patients required a dose reduction

  7. Understanding postoperative fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, E A; King, T C

    1978-07-01

    Performance characteristics of the central nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory and muscular systems in man postoperatively have received little investigative attention, despite the well known syndrome of postoperative fatigue. The impairmen in perception and psychomotor skills that has been shown to result from caloric restriction, bedrest, sedation and sleep deprivation suggests that a similar deficit may occur after surgical procedures. After a simple elective surgical procedure, maximal oxygen uptake decreases and the adaptability of heart rate to submaximal workloads is impaired. Similar deleterious effects on cardiorespiratory performance have been documented with starvation and bedrest; an understanding of cardiorespiratory performance postoperatively awaits further investigation. Maximal muscular force of contraction is also impaired by caloric restriction and bedrest, suggesting that similar effects may be seen in the postoperative state, although this has not been studied. A better understanding of the syndrome of postoperative fatigue could be achieved by a descriptive analysis of physiologic performance postoperatively. Such descriptive data could form the basis for objective evaluation of therapeutic measures intended to improve performance, such as nutritional supplementation and pharmacologic intervention. The observation that exercise with the patient in the supine position may decrease the impairment in maximal aerobic power otherwise expected in immobilized patients suggests that controlled exercise therapy may be of value in reducing physiologic impairment postoperatively.

  8. Development of a Multicomponent Prediction Model for Acute Esophagitis in Lung Cancer Patients Receiving Chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Ruyck, Kim; Sabbe, Nick; Oberije, Cary; Vandecasteele, Katrien; Thas, Olivier; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Lambin, Phillipe; Van Meerbeeck, Jan; De Neve, Wilfried; Thierens, Hubert

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To construct a model for the prediction of acute esophagitis in lung cancer patients receiving chemoradiotherapy by combining clinical data, treatment parameters, and genotyping profile. Patients and Methods: Data were available for 273 lung cancer patients treated with curative chemoradiotherapy. Clinical data included gender, age, World Health Organization performance score, nicotine use, diabetes, chronic disease, tumor type, tumor stage, lymph node stage, tumor location, and medical center. Treatment parameters included chemotherapy, surgery, radiotherapy technique, tumor dose, mean fractionation size, mean and maximal esophageal dose, and overall treatment time. A total of 332 genetic polymorphisms were considered in 112 candidate genes. The predicting model was achieved by lasso logistic regression for predictor selection, followed by classic logistic regression for unbiased estimation of the coefficients. Performance of the model was expressed as the area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic and as the false-negative rate in the optimal point on the receiver operating characteristic curve. Results: A total of 110 patients (40%) developed acute esophagitis Grade ≥2 (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0). The final model contained chemotherapy treatment, lymph node stage, mean esophageal dose, gender, overall treatment time, radiotherapy technique, rs2302535 (EGFR), rs16930129 (ENG), rs1131877 (TRAF3), and rs2230528 (ITGB2). The area under the curve was 0.87, and the false-negative rate was 16%. Conclusion: Prediction of acute esophagitis can be improved by combining clinical, treatment, and genetic factors. A multicomponent prediction model for acute esophagitis with a sensitivity of 84% was constructed with two clinical parameters, four treatment parameters, and four genetic polymorphisms.

  9. [Characteristics of postoperative peritonitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, J F; Eckmann, C; Germer, C-T

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative peritonitis is still a life-threatening complication after abdominal surgery and approximately 10,000 patients annually develop postoperative peritonitis in Germany. Early recognition and diagnosis before the onset of sepsis has remained a clinical challenge as no single specific screening test is available. The aim of therapy is a rapid and effective control of the source of infection and antimicrobial therapy. After diagnosis of diffuse postoperative peritonitis surgical revision is usually inevitable after intestinal interventions. Peritonitis after liver, biliary or pancreatic surgery is managed as a rule by means of differentiated therapy approaches depending on the severity.

  10. Taxane-containing induction chemotherapy followed by definitive chemoradiotherapy. Outcome in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broemme, J.O.; Schmuecking, M.; Leiser, D.; Geretschlaeger, A.; Ghadjar, P.; Aebersold, D.M. [Bern Univ. Hospital and Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Arnold, A.; Giger, R. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Head and Neck Surgery; Rauch, D. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Medical Oncology; Plasswilm, L. [Kantonsspital, St. Gallen (Switzerland). Radiation Oncology

    2013-08-15

    Background: Induction chemotherapy followed by definitive chemoradiotherapy is an intensified treatment approach for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) that might be associated with high rates of toxicity. Materials and methods: The data of 40 consecutive patients who underwent induction chemotherapy with docetaxel-containing regimens followed by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and concomitant systemic therapy for unresectable locally advanced HNSCC were retrospectively analyzed. Primary objectives were RT-related acute and late toxicity. Secondary objectives were response to induction chemotherapy, locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS), overall survival (OS), and influencing factors for LRRFS and OS. Results: The median follow-up for surviving patients was 21 months (range, 2-53 months). Patients received a median of three cycles of induction chemotherapy followed by IMRT to 72 Gy. Three patients died during induction chemotherapy and one during chemoradiotherapy. Acute RT-related toxicity was of grade 3 and 4 in 72 and 3 % of patients, respectively, mainly dysphagia and dermatitis. Late RT-related toxicity was mainly xerostomia and bone/cartilage necrosis and was of grade 3 and 4 in 15 % of patients. One- and 2-year LRRFS and OS were 72 and 49 % and 77 and 71 %, respectively. Conclusion: Induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiotherapy using IMRT was associated with a high rate of severe acute and late RT-related toxicities in this selected patient cohort. Four patients were lost because of fatal complications. Induction chemotherapy did not compromise the delivery of full-dose RT; however, the use of three cycles of concomitant cisplatin was impaired. (orig.)

  11. MicroRNA expression profile associated with response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svoboda, Marek; Sana, Jiri; Fabian, Pavel; Kocakova, Ilona; Gombosova, Jana; Nekvindova, Jana; Radova, Lenka; Vyzula, Rostislav; Slaby, Ondrej

    2012-01-01

    Rectal cancer accounts for approximately one third of all colorectal cancers (CRC), which belong among leading causes of cancer deaths worldwide. Standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer (cT3/4 and/or cN+) includes neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy with fluoropyrimidines (capecitabine or 5-fluorouracil) followed by radical surgical resection. Unfortunately, a significant proportion of tumors do not respond enough to the neoadjuvant treatment and these patients are at risk of relapse. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs playing significant roles in the pathogenesis of many cancers including rectal cancer. MiRNAs could present the new predictive biomarkers for rectal cancer patients. We selected 20 patients who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for advanced rectal cancer and whose tumors were classified as most sensitive or resistant to the treatment. These two groups were compared using large-scale miRNA expression profiling. Expression levels of 8 miRNAs significantly differed between two groups. MiR-215, miR-190b and miR-29b-2* have been overexpressed in non-responders, and let-7e, miR-196b, miR-450a, miR-450b-5p and miR-99a* have shown higher expression levels in responders. Using these miRNAs 9 of 10 responders and 9 of 10 non-responders (p < 0.05) have been correctly classified. Our pilot study suggests that miRNAs are part of the mechanisms that are involved in response of rectal cancer to the chemoradiotherapy and that miRNAs may be promising predictive biomarkers for such patients. In most miRNAs we identified (miR-215, miR-99a*, miR-196b, miR-450b-5p and let-7e), the connection between their expression and radioresistance or chemoresistance to inhibitors of thymidylate synthetase was already established

  12. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for limited-disease small cell lung cancer in elderly patients aged 75 years or older

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Toshio; Sekine, Ikuo; Sumi, Minako

    2007-01-01

    The optimal treatment for limited-disease small cell lung cancer (LD-SCLC) in patients aged 75 years or older remains unknown. Elderly patients with LD-SCLC who were treated with chemoradiotherapy were retrospectively reviewed to evaluate their demographic characteristics and the treatment delivery, drug toxicities and antitumor efficacy. Of the 94 LD-SCLC patients treated with chemotherapy and thoracic radiotherapy at the National Cancer Center Hospital between 1998 and 2003, seven (7.4%) were 75 years of age or older. All of the seven patients were in good general condition, with a performance status of 0 or 1. Five and two patients were treated with early and late concurrent chemoradiotherapy, respectively. While the four cycles of chemotherapy could be completed in only four patients, the full dose of radiotherapy was completed in all of the patients. Grade 4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia were noted in seven and three patients, respectively. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor support was used in five patients, red blood cell transfusion was administered in two patients and platelet transfusion was administered in one patient. Grade 3 or more severe esophagitis, pneumonitis and neutropenic fever developed in one, two and three patients, respectively, and one patient died of radiation pneumonitis. Complete response was achieved in six patients and partial response in one patient. The median survival time was 24.7 months, with three disease-free survivors for more than 5 years. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy promises to provide long-term benefit with acceptable toxicity for selected patients of LD-SCLC aged 75 years or older. (author)

  13. Novel approaches of chemoradiotherapy in unresectable stage IIIA and stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Bogart, Jeffrey A

    2012-01-01

    Approximately one third of patients with non-small cell lung cancer have unresectable stage IIIA or stage IIIB disease, and appropriate patients are candidates for chemoradiotherapy with curative intent. The optimal treatment paradigm is currently undefined. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy, compared with sequential chemotherapy and thoracic radiation therapy (TRT), results in superior overall survival outcomes as a result of better locoregional control. Recent trials have revealed efficacy for newer chemotherapy combinations similar to that of older chemotherapy combinations with concurrent TRT and a lower rate of some toxicities. Ongoing phase III trials will determine the roles of cisplatin and pemetrexed concurrent with TRT in patients with nonsquamous histology, cetuximab, and the L-BLP25 vaccine. It is unlikely that bevacizumab will have a role in stage III disease because of its toxicity. Erlotinib, gefitinib, and crizotinib have not been evaluated in stage III patients selected based on molecular characteristics. The preliminary results of a phase III trial that compared conventionally fractionated standard-dose TRT (60 Gy) with high-dose TRT (74 Gy) revealed an inferior survival outcome among patients assigned to the high-dose arm. Hyperfractionation was investigated previously with promising results, but adoption has been limited because of logistical considerations. More recent trials have investigated hypofractionated TRT in chemoradiotherapy. Advances in tumor targeting and radiation treatment planning have made this approach more feasible and reduced the risk for normal tissue toxicity. Adaptive radiotherapy uses changes in tumor volume to adjust the TRT treatment plan during therapy, and trials using this strategy are ongoing. Ongoing trials with proton therapy will provide initial efficacy and safety data.

  14. Pre-operative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for stage IIIA (N2) Non-Small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyu Chan; Ahn, Yong Chan; Park, Keun Chil

    1999-01-01

    This is to evaluate the acute complication, resection rate, and tumor down-staging after pre-operative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for stage IIIA (N2) non-small cell lung cancer. Fifteen patients with non-small cell lung cancer were enrolled in this study from May 1997 to June 1998 in Samsung Medical Center. The median age of the patients was 61 (range, 45-67) years and male to female ratio was 12:3. Pathologic types were squamous cell carcinoma (11) and adenocarcinoma (4). Pre-operative clinical tumor stages were cT1 in 2 patients, cT2 in 12, and cT3 in 1 and all were N2. Ten patients were proved to be N2 with mediastinoscopic biopsy and five had clinically evident mediastinal lymph node metastases on the chest CT scans. Pre-operative radiation therapy field included the primary tumor, the ipsilateral hilum, and the mediastinum. Total radiation dose was 45 Gy over 5 weeks with daily dose of 1.8 Gy. Pre-operative concurrent chemotherapy consisted of two cycles of intraventous cis-Platin (100 mg/m 2 ) on day 1 and oral Etoposide (50 mg/m 2 /day) on days 1 through 14 with 4 weeks' interval. Surgery was followed after the pre-operative re-evaluation including chest CT scan in 3 weeks of the completion of the concurrent chemoradiotherapy if there was no evidence of disease progression. Full dose radiation therapy was administered to all the 15 patients. Planned two cycles of chemotherapy was completed in 11 patients and one cycle was given to four. One treatment related death of acute respiratory distress syndrome occurred in 15 days of surgery. Hospital admission was required in three patients including one with radiation pneumonitis and two with neutropenic fever. Hematologic complications and other acute complications including esophagitis were tolerable. Resection rate was 92.3% (12/13) in 13 patients excluding two patients who refused surgery. Pleural seeding was found in one patient after thoracotomy and tumor resection was not feasible. Post-operative tumor

  15. Pre-operative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for stage IIIA (N2) Non-Small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyu Chan; Ahn, Yong Chan; Park, Keun Chil [College of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1999-06-01

    This is to evaluate the acute complication, resection rate, and tumor down-staging after pre-operative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for stage IIIA (N2) non-small cell lung cancer. Fifteen patients with non-small cell lung cancer were enrolled in this study from May 1997 to June 1998 in Samsung Medical Center. The median age of the patients was 61 (range, 45-67) years and male to female ratio was 12:3. Pathologic types were squamous cell carcinoma (11) and adenocarcinoma (4). Pre-operative clinical tumor stages were cT1 in 2 patients, cT2 in 12, and cT3 in 1 and all were N2. Ten patients were proved to be N2 with mediastinoscopic biopsy and five had clinically evident mediastinal lymph node metastases on the chest CT scans. Pre-operative radiation therapy field included the primary tumor, the ipsilateral hilum, and the mediastinum. Total radiation dose was 45 Gy over 5 weeks with daily dose of 1.8 Gy. Pre-operative concurrent chemotherapy consisted of two cycles of intraventous cis-Platin (100 mg/m{sup 2}) on day 1 and oral Etoposide (50 mg/m{sup 2}/day) on days 1 through 14 with 4 weeks' interval. Surgery was followed after the pre-operative re-evaluation including chest CT scan in 3 weeks of the completion of the concurrent chemoradiotherapy if there was no evidence of disease progression. Full dose radiation therapy was administered to all the 15 patients. Planned two cycles of chemotherapy was completed in 11 patients and one cycle was given to four. One treatment related death of acute respiratory distress syndrome occurred in 15 days of surgery. Hospital admission was required in three patients including one with radiation pneumonitis and two with neutropenic fever. Hematologic complications and other acute complications including esophagitis were tolerable. Resection rate was 92.3% (12/13) in 13 patients excluding two patients who refused surgery. Pleural seeding was found in one patient after thoracotomy and tumor resection was not feasible. Post-operative

  16. Future directions in combined modality therapy for rectal cancer: reevaluating the role of total mesorectal excision after chemoradiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solanki AA

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Abhishek A Solanki,1 Daniel T Chang,2 Stanley L Liauw11Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USAAbstract: Most patients who develop rectal cancer present with locoregionally advanced (T3 or node-positive disease. The standard management of locoregionally advanced rectal cancer is neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (nCRT, followed by radical resection (low-anterior resection or abdominoperineal resection with total mesorectal excision. Approximately 15% of patients can have a pathologic complete response (pCR at the time of surgery, indicating that some patients can have no detectable residual disease after nCRT. The actual benefit of surgery in this group of patients is unclear. It is possible that omission of surgery in these patients, termed selective nonoperative management, can limit the toxicities associated with standard, multimodal combined modality therapy without compromising disease control. In this review, we discuss the clinical experiences to date using selective nonoperative management and various attempts at escalation of nCRT to improve the number of patients who have a pCR. We also explore several clinical, laboratory, imaging, histopathologic, and genetic biomarkers that have been tested as tools to predict which patients are most likely to have a pCR after nCRT.Keywords: rectal cancer, chemoradiotherapy, total mesorectal excision, nonoperative management, organ preservation

  17. Locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Chemoradiotherapy, reevaluation and secondary resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delpero, J.R.; Turrini, O.

    2006-01-01

    Induction chemoradiotherapy (CRT) may down-stage locally advanced pancreatic tumors but secondary resections are unfrequent. However some responders' patients may benefit of a RO resection. Patients and methods. We report 18 resections among 29 locally advanced pancreatic cancers; 15 patients were treated with neo-adjuvant 5-FU-cisplatin based (13) or taxotere based (2 patients) chemoradiotherapy (45 Gy), and 3 patients without histologically proven adenocarcinoma were resected without any preoperative treatment. Results. The morbidity rate was 28% and the mortality rate was 7%; one patient died after resection (5.5%) and one died after exploration (9%). The RO resection rate was 50%. The median survival for the resected patients was not reached and the actuarial survival at 3 years was 59%. Two specimens showed no residual tumor and the two patients were alive at 15 and 46 months without recurrence; one specimen showed less than 10% viable tumoral cells and the patient was alive at 36 months without recurrence. A mesenteric infarction was the cause of a late death at 3 years in a disease free patient (radiation induced injury of the superior mesenteric artery). The median survival of the 11 non-resected patients was 21 months and the actuarial survival at 2 years was 0%. When the number of the resected patients (18) was reported to the entire cohort of the patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer treated during the same period in our institution, the secondary resectability rate was 9%. Conclusion. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy identifies poor surgical candidates through observation and may enhance the margin status of patients undergoing secondary resection for locally advanced tumors. However it remains difficult to evaluate the results in the literature because of the variations in the definitions of resectability. The best therapeutic strategy remains to be defined, because the majority of patients ultimately succumb with distant metastatic disease

  18. Chemoradiotherapy for lung cancer. Current status and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohe, Yuichiro

    2004-01-01

    For many years, thoracic radiotherapy had been regarded as the standard treatment for patients with unresectable locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. However, meta-analyses show that cisplatin-containing chemoradiotherapy is significantly superior to radiotherapy alone in terms of survival. Moreover, concurrent chemoradiotherapy yields a significantly increased response rate and enhanced survival duration when compared with the sequential approach. Cisplatin-based chemotherapy with concurrent thoracic radiotherapy yields a 5-year survival rate of approximately 15% for patients with unresectable locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The state-of-the-art treatment for limited-stage small cell lung cancer is considered to be four cycles of combination chemotherapy with cisplatin plus etoposide combined with early concurrent twice-daily thoracic irradiation (45 Gy). If patients achieve complete remission, prophylactic cranial irradiation should be administered. A 5-year survival rate of approximately 25% is expected with the state-of-the-art treatment for limited-stage small cell lung cancer. Chemoradiotherapy is considered to be a standard treatment for both unresectable locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer and limited-stage small cell lung cancer. Several new strategies are currently being investigated to improve the survival of these patients. The incorporation of target-based drugs such as gefitinib is considered to be the most promising strategy for unresectable locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The incorporation of irinotecan is also a promising strategy to improve the survival of patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer. The Japan Clinical Oncology Group is conducting clinical trials to develop new treatment strategies for both unresectable locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer and limited-stage small cell lung cancer. (author)

  19. The postoperative stomach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodfield, Courtney A. [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Levine, Marc S. [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)]. E-mail: marc.levine@uphs.upenn.edu

    2005-03-01

    Gastric surgery may be performed for the treatment of a variety of benign and malignant diseases of the upper gastrointestinal tract, including peptic ulcers and gastric carcinoma. Radiographic studies with water-soluble contrast agents often are obtained to rule out leaks, obstruction, or other acute complications during the early postoperative period. Barium studies may also be obtained to evaluate for anastomotic strictures or ulcers, bile reflux gastritis, recurrent tumor, or other chronic complications during the late postoperative period. Cross-sectional imaging studies such as CT are also helpful for detecting abscesses or other postoperative collections, recurrent or metastatic tumor, or less common complications such as afferent loop syndrome or gastrojejunal intussusception. It is important for radiologists to be familiar not only with the radiographic findings associated with these various abnormalities but also with the normal appearances of the postoperative stomach on radiographic examinations, so that such appearances are not mistaken for pseudoleaks or other postoperative complications. The purpose of this article is to describe the normal postsurgical anatomy after the most commonly performed operations (including partial gastrectomy, esophagogastrectomy and gastric pull-through, and total gastrectomy and esophagojejunostomy) and to review the acute and chronic complications, normal postoperative findings, and major abnormalities detected on radiographic examinations in these patients.

  20. The postoperative stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodfield, Courtney A.; Levine, Marc S.

    2005-01-01

    Gastric surgery may be performed for the treatment of a variety of benign and malignant diseases of the upper gastrointestinal tract, including peptic ulcers and gastric carcinoma. Radiographic studies with water-soluble contrast agents often are obtained to rule out leaks, obstruction, or other acute complications during the early postoperative period. Barium studies may also be obtained to evaluate for anastomotic strictures or ulcers, bile reflux gastritis, recurrent tumor, or other chronic complications during the late postoperative period. Cross-sectional imaging studies such as CT are also helpful for detecting abscesses or other postoperative collections, recurrent or metastatic tumor, or less common complications such as afferent loop syndrome or gastrojejunal intussusception. It is important for radiologists to be familiar not only with the radiographic findings associated with these various abnormalities but also with the normal appearances of the postoperative stomach on radiographic examinations, so that such appearances are not mistaken for pseudoleaks or other postoperative complications. The purpose of this article is to describe the normal postsurgical anatomy after the most commonly performed operations (including partial gastrectomy, esophagogastrectomy and gastric pull-through, and total gastrectomy and esophagojejunostomy) and to review the acute and chronic complications, normal postoperative findings, and major abnormalities detected on radiographic examinations in these patients

  1. Results of preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sang Gyu; Kim, Su Ssan; Bae, Hoon Sik [Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    We performed a retrospective non-randomized clinical study of locally advanced rectal cancer, to evaluate the anal sphincter preservation rates, down staging rates and survival rates of preoperative chemoradiotherapy. From January 2002 to December 2005, patients with pathologically confirmed rectal cancer with clinical stage T2 or higher, or patients with lymph node metastasis were enrolled in this study. A preoperative staging work-up was conducted in 36 patients. All patients were treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy, and curative resection was performed for 26 patients at Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital. Radiotherapy treatment planning was conducted with the use of planning CT for all patients. A total dose of 45.0 {approx} 52.2 Gy conventionally fractionated three-dimensional radiotherapy was delivered to the whole pelvis. Chemotherapy was given at the first and fifth week of radiation therapy with continuous infusion i.v. 5-FU (Fluorouracil) and LV (Leucovorine). Surgical resection was performed 2 to 4 weeks after the completion of the chemoradiotherapy regimen. The complete resection rate with negative resection margin was 100% (26/26). However, a pathologically complete response was not seen after curative resection. Surgery was done by LAR (low anterior resection) in 23 patients and APR (abdomino-perineal resection) in 3 patients. The sphincter preservation rate was 88.5% (23/26), down staging of the tumor occurred in 12 patients (46.2%) and down-sizing of the tumor occurred in 19 patients (73%). Local recurrence after surgical resection developed in 1 patient, and distant metastasis developed in 3 patients. The local recurrence free survival rate, distant metastasis free survival rate, and progression free survival rate were 96.7%, 87% and 83.1%, respectively. Treatment related toxicity was minimal except for one grade 3, one grade 4 anemia, one grade 3 leukopenia, and one grade 3 ileus. Preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for locally

  2. Current progress and future of chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Definitive chemoradiotherapy was a standard care for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients who refuse surgery or are intolerable for surgery. From 1990's, 5-FU and cisplatin (CF) plus radiation at the dose of 60 Gy have been standard procedure. Recently that moved to RTOG regimen which was CF-RT at the dose of 50.4 Gy on the point of late toxicity or salvage surgery. Replacement of cisplatin to oxaliplatin was evaluated in PRODIGE 5 trial. From the results of SCOPE1 and RTOG0436, addition of cetuximab for definitive chemoratiotherapy seemed to be negative effect for survival. More effective drugs or strategy is needed. (author)

  3. Detection of biomarker MNK expression semi quantitatively and quantitatively in cervical cancer response before chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teja Kisnanto; Elisabeth Novianti Simatupang; Budiningsih Siregar; Mellova Amir; Setiawan Soetopo; Irwan Ramli; Tjahya Kurjana; Andrijono; Bethy S Hernowo; Maringan DL Tobing; Devita Tetriana

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a cancer that common in women caused by HPV (Human Papilova Virus). The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship MNK protein expression (Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase) in patients with cervical cancer before chemoradiotherapy treatment. Sample used was the preparation of microscopic cancer tissue biopsies from patients with advanced cervical cancer (IIB-IIIB) is 20 samples. The method used is immunohistochemistry using MNK biomarkers in cervical cancer tissue biopsies. MNK positive protein expression marked with dark brown color that is contained in the cell nucleus. Chemoradiotherapy response obtained from RSUPN Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo and Hasan Sadikin Hospital in Bandung. The results show the value of the IRS (Immuno Reactive Score) MNK protein in response to chemoradiotherapy group either higher than the response to chemoradiotherapy group was bad and did not find any relationship IRS MNK protein with chemoradiotherapy response. While the relationship MNK expression responses show a correlation chemoradiotherapy group differences in chemoradiotherapy response between MNK expression negative and MNK expression positive. (author)

  4. Pre- and long-term postoperative courses of hippocampus-associated memory impairment in epilepsy patients with antibody-associated limbic encephalitis and selective amygdalohippocampectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Niels; Ernst, Leon; Rüber, Theodor; Widman, Guido; Becker, Albert J; Elger, Christian E; Helmstaedter, Christoph

    2018-02-01

    Limbic encephalitis (LE) is defined by mesiotemporal lobe structure abnormalities, seizures, memory, and psychiatric disturbances. This study aimed to identify the long-term clinical and neuropsychological outcome of selective amygdalohippocampectomy (sAH) in drug-resistant patients with temporal lobe epilepsy due to known or later diagnosed subacute LE not responding to immunotherapy associated with neuronal autoantibodies. In seven patients with temporal lobe epilepsy due to antibody positive LE (glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65): n=5; voltage-gated potassium channel complex (VGKC), N-methyl d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR): n=1; Ma-2/Ta: n=1) sAH (6 left, 1 right) was performed. Those patients underwent repeated electroencephalography (EEG) recordings, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) volumetry of the amygdala and hippocampus, and neuropsychological examinations and were followed up for 6-7years on average. Verbal memory and figural memory were affected in 57% of patients at baseline and 71% at the last follow-up. At the last follow-up, 14% of the patients had declined in verbal memory and figural memory. We observed improved memory in 43% of patients regarding figural memory, but not in a single patient regarding verbal memory. Repeated evaluations across the individual courses reveal cognitive and MRI dynamics that appear to be unrelated to surgery and drug treatment. Three of the seven patients with LE with different antibodies (NMDAR: n=1, Ma-2/Ta: n=1 and GAD65: n=1) achieved persistent seizure freedom along with no accelerated memory decline after surgery. Two of the five GAD65-antibody patients positive with LE showed progressive memory decline and a long-term tendency to contralateral hippocampus atrophy. While memory demonstrated some decline in the long run, what is most important is that a progressive decline in memory is seldom found after sAH in patients with LE. Moreover, the dynamics in performance and MRI before and after surgery reveal disease

  5. Evidence based of chemoradiotherapy in cervix carcinoma; Chimioradiotherapie concomitante dans les cancers du col de l'uterus: quels niveaux de preuve?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joly-Lobbedez, F. [CHU de la Cote-de-Nacre, 14 - Caen (France); CLCC Francois-Baclesse, Oncologie Medicale, 14 - Caen (France)

    2009-10-15

    Since 10 years, the combination of chemoradiotherapy has become a standard of treatment of the advanced localized cervical cancer. Two systematic reviews of the literature (including the results of the different clinical trials) have already been published. The aim of this article is to present the results of the recent meta-analysis based on individual patient data and to discuss the perspectives. This meta-analysis was rigorously designed: trials selected had the same control arm with the same radiotherapy without concomitant chemotherapy, the definition of the primary outcome (overall survival) was homogeneous and analysis was made in intent to treat. The results confirm the advantage in overall survival in favor of the chemoradiotherapy with an absolute 5-year overall survival benefit of 6% (60-66%) and 8% of 5-year disease-free survival (50-58%). Interestingly, even if cisplatin seems to be the most active drug, a significant advantage is also observed with no platinum chemotherapy. A polychemotherapy is not more active than a mono chemotherapy and there was a suggestion of a difference in the size of the survival benefit with tumor stage. Larger benefits were seen for the few trials in which additional chemotherapy was administered after chemoradiotherapy, but results have to be confirmed by other clinical trials. Late toxicity was not well evaluated and a long-term follow-up of the patients is important to assess the real incidence of long-term side effects of the chemoradiotherapy and the impact on quality of life. New strategies combining new chemotherapy protocols or targeted therapy with radiation are promising but have to be evaluated in comparative clinical trials before use in routine. (authors)

  6. Down stage and long term results of preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced lower rectal cancer: a cooperative clinical trial of 6 institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jiandong; Wang Qi; Du Tonghai; Cai Youhong; Cao Xiude; Guo Xueheng

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the down stage effect and long-term results of preoperative chemora-diotherapy for locally advanced lower rectal adenocarcinoma. Methods: From Jan. 1989 to Jul 1999, 103 patients suffering from lower rectal carcinoma were treated. Criteria entry: 1. Distance between anal verge and centre of tumor 4-8 cm(median 6.2 cm), 2. Uncertainty in decision of preservation of anus before admission, 3. Lesion belonged to locally advanced type, 4. definitive pathology, clinical stage and presence of objective observation of tumor extent, 5. Performance status proposed by Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group 0-2, 6. Age 2 , calcium folinate 200 mg/ session, iv, totally 5 day). Operation was done 29-58 days (median 38 days) after completion of chemoradiotherapy. Surgery: 53 patients received the anal preserving operation of anterior resection; 50 patients were treated by Mile's operation. Postoperation chemotherapy- a total of 34 patients received postoperative chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy for liver or bony metastasis. 88.3% of patients had complete data of follow-up. Results: The 5-year survival rate, disease-free survival rate for group A and group B were 64.2% and 43.7%, 52.8% and 31.6%, respectively, (P 0.05), 25.5% and 48.5% (P<0.05), respectively. The preoperative clinical stages were: T2 10, T3 31 and T4 12. The postoperative pathological stages were: T0N0 7, T1N0 10, T2N0 14, T3N0 13, T4N0 3, T2N1 5 and T3N11. The pathological response rate after surgery in Group A was 13.2%. All patients in Group A were able to retain the sphincter though 29.3% had various degrees of malfunctions in bowel movement and/or urination. The difference incurred by postoperative chemotherapy/or radiotherapy was insignificant. Conclusions: Showing obvious down stage effect, the preoperative chemoradiotherapy can improve the 5-year survival and disease-free survival, and offer more chance to preserve the sphincter function in locally advanced lower rectal cancer

  7. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Monitoring Rectal Cancer Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbaro, Brunella; Vitale, Renata; Valentini, Vincenzo; Illuminati, Sonia; Vecchio, Fabio M.; Rizzo, Gianluca; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Coco, Claudio; Crucitti, Antonio; Persiani, Roberto; Sofo, Luigi; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively monitor the response in patients with locally advanced nonmucinous rectal cancer after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The histopathologic finding was the reference standard. Methods and Materials: The institutional review board approved the present study. A total of 62 patients (43 men and 19 women; mean age, 64 years; range, 28–83) provided informed consent. T 2 - and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans (b value, 0 and 1,000 mm 2 /s) were acquired before, during (mean 12 days), and 6–8 weeks after CRT. We compared the median apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) between responders and nonresponders and examined the associations with the Mandard tumor regression grade (TRG). The postoperative nodal status (ypN) was evaluated. The Mann-Whitney/Wilcoxon two-sample test was used to evaluate the relationships among the pretherapy ADCs, extramural vascular invasion, early percentage of increases in ADCs, and preoperative ADCs. Results: Low pretreatment ADCs ( −3 mm 2 /s) were correlated with TRG 4 scores (p = .0011) and associated to extramural vascular invasion with ypN+ (85.7% positive predictive value for ypN+). During treatment, the mean percentage of increase in tumor ADC was significantly greater in the responders than in the nonresponders (p 23% ADC increase had a 96.3% negative predictive value for TRG 4. In 9 of 16 complete responders, CRT-related tumor downsizing prevented ADC evaluations. The preoperative ADCs were significantly different (p = .0012) between the patients with and without downstaging (preoperative ADC ≥1.4 × 10 −3 mm 2 /s showed a positive and negative predictive value of 78.9% and 61.8%, respectively, for response assessment). The TRG 1 and TRG 2–4 groups were not significantly different. Conclusion: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging seems to be a promising tool for monitoring the response to CRT.

  8. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in monitoring rectal cancer response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaro, Brunella; Vitale, Renata; Valentini, Vincenzo; Illuminati, Sonia; Vecchio, Fabio M; Rizzo, Gianluca; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Coco, Claudio; Crucitti, Antonio; Persiani, Roberto; Sofo, Luigi; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2012-06-01

    To prospectively monitor the response in patients with locally advanced nonmucinous rectal cancer after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The histopathologic finding was the reference standard. The institutional review board approved the present study. A total of 62 patients (43 men and 19 women; mean age, 64 years; range, 28-83) provided informed consent. T(2)- and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans (b value, 0 and 1,000 mm(2)/s) were acquired before, during (mean 12 days), and 6-8 weeks after CRT. We compared the median apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) between responders and nonresponders and examined the associations with the Mandard tumor regression grade (TRG). The postoperative nodal status (ypN) was evaluated. The Mann-Whitney/Wilcoxon two-sample test was used to evaluate the relationships among the pretherapy ADCs, extramural vascular invasion, early percentage of increases in ADCs, and preoperative ADCs. Low pretreatment ADCs (23% ADC increase had a 96.3% negative predictive value for TRG 4. In 9 of 16 complete responders, CRT-related tumor downsizing prevented ADC evaluations. The preoperative ADCs were significantly different (p = .0012) between the patients with and without downstaging (preoperative ADC ≥1.4 × 10(-3)mm(2)/s showed a positive and negative predictive value of 78.9% and 61.8%, respectively, for response assessment). The TRG 1 and TRG 2-4 groups were not significantly different. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging seems to be a promising tool for monitoring the response to CRT. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin and capecitabine in preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Yong; Jung, Kyung Hae; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Duck-Woo; Chang, Hee Jin; Jeong, Jun Yong; Kim, Young Hoon; Son, Seok-Hyun; Yun, Tak; Hong, Chang Won; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Lim, Seok-Byung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Park, Jae-Gahb

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To describe our experience with a bolus injection of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin (FL) vs. capecitabine in terms of radiologic and pathologic findings in preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods: The study enrolled 278 patients scheduled for preoperative CRT using two protocols with different chemotherapeutic regimens. Pelvic radiotherapy (50.4 Gy) was delivered concurrently with FL (n = 145) or capecitabine (n = 133). Surgery was performed 6 weeks after CRT completion. Tumor responses to CRT were measured using both radiologic and pathologic examination. Magnetic resonance volumetry was performed at the initial workup and just before surgery after completion of preoperative CRT. Post-CRT pathology tests were used to determine tumor stage and regression. Results: Radiologic examination showed that tumor volume decreased by 68.2% ± 20.5% in the FL group and 68.3% ± 22.3% in the capecitabine group (p = 0.970). Postoperative pathologic T stage determination showed that downstaging occurred in 44.3% of FL and 49.9% of capecitabine patients (p = 0.571). The tumor regression grades after CRT were Grade 1 (minimal response) in 22.6% and 21.0%, Grade 2 (moderate response) in 53.2% and 50.0%, Grade 3 (near-complete response) in 12.9% and 12.9%, and Grade 4 (complete response) in 11.3% and 16.1% of the FL and capecitabine groups, respectively (p = 0.758). Conclusion: In the present study, the radiologic and pathologic findings did not reveal significant differences in short-term tumor responses between preoperative FL and capecitabine CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer. Long-term results and a prospective randomized trial are needed

  10. Tumor Volume Reduction Rate After Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy as a Prognostic Factor in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeo, Seung-Gu [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Yong, E-mail: radiopiakim@hanmail.net [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji Won; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sun Young; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Byung Chang; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Kim, Min Ju [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic significance of tumor volume reduction rate (TVRR) after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: In total, 430 primary LARC (cT3-4) patients who were treated with preoperative CRT and curative radical surgery between May 2002 and March 2008 were analyzed retrospectively. Pre- and post-CRT tumor volumes were measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest MR volumetry. Tumor volume reduction rate was determined using the equation TVRR (%) = (pre-CRT tumor volume - post-CRT tumor volume) Multiplication-Sign 100/pre-CRT tumor volume. The median follow-up period was 64 months (range, 27-99 months) for survivors. Endpoints were disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Results: The median TVRR was 70.2% (mean, 64.7% {+-} 22.6%; range, 0-100%). Downstaging (ypT0-2N0M0) occurred in 183 patients (42.6%). The 5-year DFS and OS rates were 77.7% and 86.3%, respectively. In the analysis that included pre-CRT and post-CRT tumor volumes and TVRR as continuous variables, only TVRR was an independent prognostic factor. Tumor volume reduction rate was categorized according to a cutoff value of 45% and included with clinicopathologic factors in the multivariate analysis; ypN status, circumferential resection margin, and TVRR were significant prognostic factors for both DFS and OS. Conclusions: Tumor volume reduction rate was a significant prognostic factor in LARC patients receiving preoperative CRT. Tumor volume reduction rate data may be useful for tailoring surgery and postoperative adjuvant therapy after preoperative CRT.

  11. Treatment outcome in patients with vulvar cancer: comparison of concurrent radiotherapy to postoperative radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ja Young; Kim, Sung Hwan; Kim, Ki Won; Park, Dong Choon; Yoon, Joo Hee; Yoon, Sei Chul [St. Vincent' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Mina [St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    To evaluate outcome and morbidity in patients with vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy, concurrent chemoradiotherapy or postoperative radiotherapy. The records of 24 patients treated with radiotherapy for vulvar cancer between July 1993 and September 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received once daily 1.8-4 Gy fractions external beam radiotherapy to median 51.2 Gy (range, 19.8 to 81.6 Gy) on pelvis and inguinal nodes. Seven patients were treated with primary concurrent chemoradiotherapy, one patient was treated with primary radiotherapy alone, four patients received palliative radiotherapy, and twelve patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy. Twenty patients were eligible for response evaluation. Response rate was 55% (11/20). The 5-year disease free survival was 42.2% and 5-year overall survival was 46.2%, respectively. Fifty percent (12/24) experienced with acute skin complications of grade III or more during radiotherapy. Late complications were found in 8 patients. 50% (6/12) of patients treated with lymph node dissection experienced severe late complications. One patient died of sepsis from lymphedema. However, only 16.6% (2/12) of patients treated with primary radiotherapy developed late complications. Outcome of patients with vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy showed relatively good local control and low recurrence. Severe late toxicities remained higher in patients treated with both node dissection and radiotherapy.

  12. Adjuvant chemoradiotherapy combined with cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil and folinic acid for locally advanced gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muharrem Kocar

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: The addition of combination chemotherapy with cisplatin, infusional 5-fluorouracil and folinic acid before and after chemoradiotherapy was found to be safe and effective in patients with operated gastric cancer.

  13. [Postoperative cognitive deficits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalezić, Nevena; Dimitrijević, Ivan; Leposavić, Ljubica; Kocica, Mladen; Bumbasirević, Vesna; Vucetić, Cedomir; Paunović, Ivan; Slavković, Nemanja; Filimonović, Jelena

    2006-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunctions are relatively common in postoperative and critically ill patients. This complication not only compromises recovery after surgery, but, if persistent, it minimizes and compromises surgery itself. Risk factors of postoperative cognitive disorders can be divided into age and comorbidity dependent, and those related to anesthesia and surgery. Cardiovascular, orthopedic and urologic surgery carries high risk of postoperative cognitive dysfunction. It can also occur in other types of surgical treatment, especially in elderly. Among risk factors of cognitive disorders, associated with comorbidity, underlying psychiatric and neurological disorders, substance abuse and conditions with elevation of intracranial pressure are in the first place in postoperative patients. Preoperative and perioperative predisposing conditions for cognitive dysfunction and their incidence were described in our paper. These are: geriatric patients, patients with substance abuse, preexisting psychiatric or cognitive disorders, neurologic disease with high intracranial pressure, cerebrovascular insufficiency, epilepsia, preeclampsia, acute intermittent porphyria, operation type, brain hypoxia, changes in blood glucose level, electrolyte imbalance, anesthetic agents, adjuvant medication and intraoperative awareness. For each of these factors, evaluation, prevention and treatment strategies were suggested, with special regard on anesthetic technique.

  14. Postoperative Chemotherapy for Medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The survival rate and cognitive function of 43 children, age <3 years, with medulloblastoma treated with intensive postoperative chemotherapy alone, without radiotherapy, were determined at the University of Wurzburg and other centers in Germany Chemotherapy consisted of three two-month cycles of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, vincristine, carboplatin, and etoposide.

  15. Investigation of how to prevent mucositis induced by chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosaka, Chihiro; Tajima, Hakuju; Inoue, Tadao

    2011-01-01

    Chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer is associated with a high incidence of severe oral mucositis; an adverse, painful event. Oral mucositis also causes nutritional deficiency by making oral feeding difficult. This may lead to prolongation of hospitalization due to complications caused by malnutrition. However, an effective way to prevent oral mucositis completely, remains to be found. In this study, we evaluated the occurrence of oral mucositis, and nutritional conditions such as hypoalbuminemia, reduction of body weight, and length of hospital stay (days) when the mouth was rinsed using rebamipide solution (R solution), or Poraprezinc-alginate sodium solution (P-A solution) (both considered to be effective for oral mucositis). A mouth rinsed with sodium azulene sulfonate (S solution) was used as a control. The mouth was rinsed out six times per day continuously during chemoradiotherapy. In the study, 31 patients were assigned to rinse their mouths using R solution, 11 patients using P-A solution, and 15 patients using S solution (reduction rate of body weight in 14 patients). For the evaluation, the criteria for adverse drug reactions CTCAE (v3.0) were used. Grade 1 and over, oral mucositis occurred in 48% of the R solution group, 36% of the P-A solution group, and 80% of the S solution group, indicating that the P-A solution group significantly prevented the occurrence of oral mucositis as opposed to the S solution group. A reduction in body weight was observed in 81% of the R solution group, 82% of the P-A solution group, and 79% of the S solution group, indicating a similar weight reduction rate among individual solution groups. Hypoalbuminemia equal to grade 2 or higher occurred in 3% of the R solution group, 18% of the P-A solution group, and 29% of the S solution group, indicating that the R group significantly prevented the occurrence of hypoalbuminemia compared to the S solution group. In addition, the length of hospital stays were 44±8.0 days for

  16. PLANNING PHASE 2 MULTICENTER RANDOMIZED TRIAL OF NEOADJUVANT CHEMO-RADIOTHERAPY FOLLOWED BY D2 GASTRECTOMY AND ADJUVANT CHEMOTHERAPY FOR LOCALLY ADVANCED GASTRIC CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Yu. Skoropad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The prognosis for surgical treatment of locally advanced gastric cancer remains disappointing. Neoadjuvant chemo-radiation therapy is relatively new and the least researched method of treatment, it is attracting more and more attention, mainly abroad in recent years. The aims of neoadjuvant therapy is the earliest start of systemic therapy, damage of the primary tumor and regional metastases, an increase in the percentage of radical operations, improving treatment outcome. Material and methods. The planning study is a multicenter, randomized clinical phase II trial. Patients of the first (experimental group will be treated as the followes: neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy (total tumor dose of 46 Gy in 23 fractions with the concurrent modified CapOX scheme followed by D2 gastrectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients of the second (control group will be treated with D2 gastrectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy will be carried out under the following schemes (optional for the researchers: CapOX or FOLFOX. Toxicity evaluation of neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy will be conducted with NCI CTC Toxicity Scale Version 3.0. The main objectives of the trial are to assess the safety and immediate effectiveness of neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy according to the criteria of the frequency and severity of postoperative complications and mortality, and tumor response. We are planning to include 80 patients with morphologically confirmed gastric cancer сT2–4N1–3, сT3–4N0–3; М0. The proposed trial will be carried out in accordance with the principles of the Helsinki Declaration, it has been approved by local ethic committees of the participated institutions. Results. As a result of this multicenter randomized trial it is planned to show the reproducibility of obtained in MRRC and a number of foreign centers results – that is, the safety and high immediate effectiveness of neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy

  17. Platinum derivatives in chemoradiotherapy of patients with cancer of esophagus and stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monakhov, B.V.; Chichka, N.A.; Fedina, V.A.

    1989-01-01

    Investigation into the testing of a complex platinum compound-platidiam as part of chemoradiotherapy in 101 patients suffering from cancer of esophagus and stomach is conducted. Schemes of combined chemoradio treatment and evaluation of results of treatment of patients suffering from esophagus and stomach cancer are presented. Side effects under the treatment realized are studied. Advisability of platidiam inclusion into the complex programs of chemoradiotherapy of spread form of esophagus and stomach cancer is demonstrated

  18. Survival after adjuvant chemoradiotherapy or surgery alone in resectable adenocarcinoma at the gastro-esophageal junction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Steen Christian; Muhic, A; Jensen, Lene Bæksgaard

    2012-01-01

    Longterm survival after curative resection for adenocarcinoma at the gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ) range between 18% and 50%. In the pivotal Intergroup-0116 Phase III trial by Macdonald et all, adjuvant chemoradiotherapy improved both disease-free and overall survival in curatively resected pa...... patients with mainly gastric adenocarcinoma. We compared survival data for curatively resected patients with adeno-carcinoma solely at the gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ), treated with surgery alone or surgery and adjuvant chemoradio-therapy....

  19. Current and future state of chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuwa, Nobukazu

    2002-01-01

    Radiation therapy was the conventional treatment for locally advanced, nonresectable head and neck cancer. However, therapeutic results were poor with this treatment modality, and chemoradiotherapy has been used in an effort to improve therapeutic results. Improved local-regional control and disease-free or overall survival have been shown in several randomized trials using a concurrent or alternative approach. Induction chemotherapy (neoadjuvant chemotherapy), however, has not been shown to improve local-regional control or survival. Induction chemotherapy followed by definitive radiotherapy may be useful in the selection of patients who are likely to benefit from non-surgical organ preservation treatment schemes. Further clinical trials are needed to clarify the most suitable combination of chemotherapy and radiation. Intraarterial chemotherapy combined with radiation therapy for head and neck cancer has been attempted for many years. However, the indications, clinical significance, and selection of suitable anti-cancer drugs remain unclarified. The modern superselective intraarterial approach should be re-evaluated. Many head and neck cancers have been found to overexpress the receptor to epidermal growth factor (EGFR). Antibodies such as IMC-C225 that specifically target EGF receptors with radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy may prove to be valuable contributors to the treatment of advanced head and neck cancer. (author)

  20. Analysis of clinical factors for pathological complete response after preoperative neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayiguli Hare; Palida Apizi; Iskandar Abulimiti; Zhang Jinrong; Tian Hanhan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical factors associated with pathological complete response (pCR) after preoperative neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on the clinical data of 116 patients with rectal cancer, who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by radical surgery from January 2009 to December 2012. All patients received pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (50 Gy/25 fractions) with concurrent fluorouracil based chemotherapy and then underwent radical surgery 4-8 weeks later. The clinical factors associated with pCR or non-pCR were analyzed by Logistic regression. Results: Of the 116 patients, 20 (17.2%) achieved a pCR after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. The univariate analysis showed that percentage of circumference of the rectal tube invaded by the tumor, preoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level, T stage, N stage, distance from the anal verge, degree of tumor differentiation, and maximum tumor diameter were associated with pCR or non-pCR after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer. The multivariate analysis revealed that percentage of circumference of the rectal tube invaded by the tumor, preoperative serum CEA level,and T stage were predictive factors for pCR or non-pCR after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer. Conclusions: Non-circumferential tumor (percentage of circumference of the rectal tube invaded by the tumor <75 %), low CEA level, and early T stage before treatment may be associated with pCR after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer. (authors)

  1. Management of Postoperative Respiratory Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Michael S; Berfield, Kathleen S; Abbaszadeh, Ryan V

    2015-11-01

    Despite best efforts, postoperative complications such as postoperative respiratory failure may occur and prompt recognition of the process and management is required. Postoperative respiratory failure, such as postoperative pneumonia, postpneumonectomy pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress-like syndromes, and pulmonary embolism, are associated with high morbidity and mortality. The causes of these complications are multifactorial and depend on preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors, some of which are modifiable. The article identifies some of the risk factors, causes, and treatment strategies for successful management of the patient with postoperative respiratory failure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Swallowing rehabilitation before and during concurrent chemoradiotherapy for oropharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuneyuki, Miki; Yonezawa, Kouichiro; Morimoto, Koichi; Tanimoto, Hitoshi; Saito, Miki; Otsuki, Naoki; Nibu, Ken-ichi

    2011-01-01

    Recently, oropharyngeal cancer is more frequently being managed with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). As more patients receive CCRT, there is increasing attention on dysphagia. Since 2009, speech therapists in our hospital have performed swallowing rehabilitation for dysphagia associated with CCRT. We evaluated dysphagia after CCRT and examined the relationship between swallowing rehabilitation and swallowing disability. A total of 26 patients (22 males and 4 females) with a mean age of 63 years (range, 41 to 79), underwent CCRT between March 2008 and March 2010. Dysphagia after treatment was graded at the end of CCRT and discharge according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4.0 and Fujishima dysphagia grade. Ten of the 26 patients underwent swallowing rehabilitation, exercise and education on muscle strengthening programs before and during CCRT. They tended not to have severe dysphagia, but there were no significant differences. (author)

  3. Superselective intra-arterial chemoradiotherapy for advanced oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Wataru; Sakaki, Hirotaka; Kakehata, Shinya; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Takai, Yoshihiro; Kimura, Hiroto; Teh, Beng Gwan

    2012-01-01

    Functional preservation is important in the treatment of advanced oral cancer in terms of patient's quality of life (QOL), therefore surgery is not ideal for advanced oral cancer. In order to ensure both curability and functional preservation, superselective intra-arterial chemoradiotherapy (SSIACRT), which is considered to be superior to conventional surgical treatment, has been conducted. Thirty-four patients with advanced oral cancer have been treated with SSIACRT with a combination of nedaplatin (CDGP) and docetaxel (DOC) since 2003. Complete response was achieved in 30 (89%) out of the 34 patients. Amongst the 25 patients with positive neck diseases, 23 (92%) were assessed as disease-free. The 5-year overall survival rate was 71.4%. Wide resection of both primary and neck lesions was avoidable and oral cavity function (swallowing, speech, mastication) after SSIACRT was satisfactory. A problem for SSIACRT is the development of late adverse events of xerostomia and osteoradionecrosis. (author)

  4. Video-assisted thoracoscopic pericardial window placement for radiation pericarditis induced by definitive chemoradiotherapy in a patient with thoracic esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hisakura, Katsuji; Terashima, Hideo; Nagai, Kentaro; Nozaki, Reiji; Akashi, Yoshimasa; Tadano, Sosuke; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2007-01-01

    We report surgical management of radiation-induced massive pericardial effusion. A 55-year-old man undergoing definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in the middle thorax was treated with megavoltage equipment using anterior-posterior opposed fields up to 45 Gy, including the primary tumor and regional lymphnodes. A booster dose of 25 Gy was given to the primary tumor for a total dose of 70 Gy, using bilateral oblique fields. Three years and 6 months later, he was treated with an additional 30 Gy for mediastinal lymphnode metastasis, followed by percutaneous pericardiocentesis for cardiac tamponade with massive pericardial effusion 4 times in 5 months. Because medical intervention was inadequate, he underwent pericardial effusion via video-assisted thoracoscopic pericardial window placement 4 years and 6 months after definitive CRT. Histopathological examination of the pericardial tissue specimen showed marked fibrosis but no cancer recurrence, compatible with radiation pericarditis. The postoperative course was uneventful, and pericardial effusion completely disappeared. (author)

  5. Effect of Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy on Health-Related Quality of Life in Esophageal or Junctional Cancer: Results From the Randomized CROSS Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordman, Bo Jan; Verdam, Mathilde G E; Lagarde, Sjoerd M; Hulshof, Maarten C C M; van Hagen, Pieter; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I; Wijnhoven, Bas P L; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A P; Hospers, Geke A P; Bonenkamp, Johannes J; Cuesta, Miguel A; Blaisse, Reinoud J B; Busch, Olivier R; Ten Kate, Fiebo J W; Creemers, Geert-Jan M; Punt, Cornelis J A; Plukker, John Th M; Verheul, Henk M W; Spillenaar Bilgen, Ernst J; van Dekken, Herman; van der Sangen, Maurice J C; Rozema, Tom; Biermann, Katharina; Beukema, Jannet C; Piet, Anna H M; van Rij, Caroline M; Reinders, Janny G; Tilanus, Hugo W; Steyerberg, Ewout W; van der Gaast, Ate; Sprangers, Mirjam A G; van Lanschot, J Jan B

    2018-01-20

    Purpose To compare pre-agreed health-related quality of life (HRQOL) domains in patients with esophageal or junctional cancer who received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) followed by surgery or surgery alone. Secondary aims were to examine the effect of nCRT on HRQOL before surgery and the effect of surgery on HRQOL. Patients and Methods Patients were randomly assigned to nCRT (carboplatin plus paclitaxel with concurrent 41.4-Gy radiotherapy) followed by surgery or surgery alone. HRQOL was measured using the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 (QLQ-C30) and -Oesophageal Cancer Module (QLQ-OES24) questionnaires pretreatment and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months postoperatively. The nCRT group also received preoperative questionnaires. Physical functioning (PF; QLQ-C30) and eating problems (EA; QLQ-OES24) were chosen as predefined primary end points. Predefined secondary end points were global QOL (GQOL; QLQ-C30), fatigue (FA; QLQ-C30), and emotional problems (EM; QLQ-OES24). Results A total of 363 patients were analyzed. No statistically significant differences in postoperative HRQOL were found between treatment groups. In the nCRT group, PF, EA, GQOL, FA, and EM scores deteriorated 1 week after nCRT (Cohen's d: -0.93, P < .001; 0.47, P < .001; -0.84, P < .001; 1.45, P < .001; and 0.32, P = .001, respectively). In both treatment groups, all end points declined 3 months postoperatively compared with baseline (Cohen's d: -1.00, 0.33, -0.47, -0.34, and 0.33, respectively; all P < .001), followed by a continuous gradual improvement. EA, GQOL, and EM were restored to baseline levels during follow-up, whereas PF and FA remained impaired 1 year postoperatively (Cohen's d: 0.52 and -0.53, respectively; both P < .001). Conclusion Although HRQOL declined during nCRT, no effect of nCRT was apparent on postoperative HRQOL compared with surgery alone. In addition to the improvement in survival, these findings support the

  6. The correlation between MIB-1, AgNOR, and caspase-3 apoptosis with chemoradiotherapy response in cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iin Kurnia; Devita Tetriana; Budiningsih Siregar; Irwan Ramli; Andriono; Setiawan Soetopo; Tjahya Kurjana; Maringan DL Tobing; Bethy Suryawathi

    2013-01-01

    Chemoradiotherapy is one of treatments for the locally advanced cervical cancer given by concurrent radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy in the same time. Chemoradiotherapy response is influenced by biological factor i.e. cell kinetic that consists of cell proliferation and death. In this research, the correlation between AgNOR, MIB-1 cell proliferation biomarker and the expression of apoptotic caspase-3 with chemoradiotherapy response of cervical cancer has been studied. Twenty one microscopic tissue samples were taken from cervical cancer biopsies before radiotherapy. The tissue samples were stained with AgNOR, whereas MIB-1 and apoptosis caspase-3 in the tissue samples were detected by immunochemistry technique. After the completion of chemoradiotherapy treatment, the clinical response was observed by pelvic control method. The result of this research show that there is no correlation between AgNOR, MIB-1 value with apoptosis (p>0.05) before chemoradiotherapy. Cell proliferation observed by AgNOR and MIB-1 before chemoradiotherapy indicate no correlation with chemoradiotherapy response, however the apoptotic expression shows positive correlation with chemoradiotherapy response. The index of caspase-3 apoptosis obtained from this research can be used for considering the chemoradiotherapy schedule for the cervical cancer patient. (author)

  7. Pediatric cardiac postoperative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auler Jr. José Otávio Costa

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Heart Institute of the University of São Paulo, Medical School is a referral center for the treatment of congenital heart diseases of neonates and infants. In the recent years, the excellent surgical results obtained in our institution may be in part due to modern anesthetic care and to postoperative care based on well-structured protocols. The purpose of this article is to review unique aspects of neonate cardiovascular physiology, the impact of extracorporeal circulation on postoperative evolution, and the prescription for pharmacological support of acute cardiac dysfunction based on our cardiac unit protocols. The main causes of low cardiac output after surgical correction of heart congenital disease are reviewed, and methods of treatment and support are proposed as derived from the relevant literature and our protocols.

  8. Reporting Quality of Randomized, Controlled Trials Evaluating Combined Chemoradiotherapy in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu-Pei; Chen, Lei; Li, Wen-Fei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Centre, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Centre of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Lee, Anne W.M. [Department of Clinical Oncology, The University of Hong Kong-Shenzhen Hospital, Shenzhen (China); Vermorken, Jan B. [Department of Medical Oncology, Antwerp University Hospital, Edegem (Belgium); Wee, Joseph [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Centre Singapore (Singapore); O' Sullivan, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Ontario Cancer Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Eisbruch, Avraham [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Lin, Jin-Ching [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Mai, Hai-Qiang [Department of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Centre, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Centre of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Zhang, Li [Department of Medical Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Centre, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Centre of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Guo, Ying [Clinical Trials Centre, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Centre, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Centre of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Lin, Ai-Hua [Department of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Sun, Ying [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Centre, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Centre of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou (China); and others

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: To comprehensively assess the reporting quality of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), and to identify significant predictors of quality. Methods and Materials: Two investigators searched MEDLINE and EMBASE for RCTs published between January 1988 and December 2015 that assessed the effect of combined chemoradiotherapy for NPC. The overall quality of each report was assessed using a 28-point overall quality score (OQS) based on the 2010 Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement. To provide baseline data for further evaluation, we also investigated the reporting quality of certain important issues in detail, including key methodologic items (allocation concealment, blinding, intention-to-treat principle), endpoints, follow-up, subgroup analyses, and adverse events. Results: We retrieved 24 relevant RCTs including 6591 patients. Median 2010 OQS was 15.5 (range, 10-24). Half of the items in the 2010 OQS were poorly reported in at least 40% of trials. Multivariable regression models revealed that publication after 2010 and high impact factor were significant predictors of improved 2010 OQS. Additionally, many issues that we consider significant were not reported adequately. Conclusions: Despite publication of the CONSORT statement more than a decade ago, overall reporting quality for RCTs in NPC was unsatisfactory. Additionally, substantial selectivity and heterogeneity exists in reporting of certain crucial issues. This survey provides the first prompt for NPC trial investigators to improve reporting quality according to the CONSORT statement; increased scrutiny and diligence by editors and peer reviewers is also required.

  9. Cost analysis of erythropoietin versus blood transfusions for cervical cancer patients receiving chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavanagh, Brian D.; Fischer, Bernard A.; Segreti, Eileen M.; Wheelock, John B.; Boardman, Cecilia; Roseff, Susan D.; Cardinale, Robert M.; Benedict, Stanley H.; Goram, Adrian L.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Red blood cell (RBC) transfusions or erythropoietin (EPO) can be used to evade the detrimental effects of anemia during radiotherapy, but the economic consequences of selecting either intervention are not well defined. The RBC transfusion needs during chemoradiotherapy for cervix cancer were quantified to allow comparison of RBC transfusion costs with the projected cost of EPO in this setting. Methods and Materials: For patients receiving pelvic radiotherapy, weekly cisplatin, and brachytherapy, the RBC units transfused during treatment were tallied. RBC transfusion costs per unit included the blood itself, laboratory fees, and expected value (risk multiplied by cost) of transfusion-related viral illness. EPO costs included the drug itself and supplemental RBC transfusions when hemoglobin was not adequately maintained. An EPO dosage based on reported usage in cervix cancer patients was applied. Results: Transfusions were given for hemoglobin <10 g/dL. Among 12 consecutive patients, 10 needed at least 1 U of RBC before or during treatment, most commonly after the fifth week. A total of 37 U was given during treatment, for an average of 3.1 U/patient. The sum total of the projected average transfusion-related costs was $990, compared with the total projected EPO-related costs of $3869. Conclusions: Because no proven clinical advantage has been documented for EPO compared with RBC transfusions to maintain hemoglobin during cervix cancer treatment, for most patients, transfusions are an appropriate and appealingly less expensive option

  10. Reporting Quality of Randomized, Controlled Trials Evaluating Combined Chemoradiotherapy in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yu-Pei; Chen, Lei; Li, Wen-Fei; Lee, Anne W.M.; Vermorken, Jan B.; Wee, Joseph; O'Sullivan, Brian; Eisbruch, Avraham; Lin, Jin-Ching; Mai, Hai-Qiang; Zhang, Li; Guo, Ying; Lin, Ai-Hua; Sun, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To comprehensively assess the reporting quality of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), and to identify significant predictors of quality. Methods and Materials: Two investigators searched MEDLINE and EMBASE for RCTs published between January 1988 and December 2015 that assessed the effect of combined chemoradiotherapy for NPC. The overall quality of each report was assessed using a 28-point overall quality score (OQS) based on the 2010 Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement. To provide baseline data for further evaluation, we also investigated the reporting quality of certain important issues in detail, including key methodologic items (allocation concealment, blinding, intention-to-treat principle), endpoints, follow-up, subgroup analyses, and adverse events. Results: We retrieved 24 relevant RCTs including 6591 patients. Median 2010 OQS was 15.5 (range, 10-24). Half of the items in the 2010 OQS were poorly reported in at least 40% of trials. Multivariable regression models revealed that publication after 2010 and high impact factor were significant predictors of improved 2010 OQS. Additionally, many issues that we consider significant were not reported adequately. Conclusions: Despite publication of the CONSORT statement more than a decade ago, overall reporting quality for RCTs in NPC was unsatisfactory. Additionally, substantial selectivity and heterogeneity exists in reporting of certain crucial issues. This survey provides the first prompt for NPC trial investigators to improve reporting quality according to the CONSORT statement; increased scrutiny and diligence by editors and peer reviewers is also required.

  11. Clinical utility of pretreatment prediction of chemoradiotherapy response in rectal cancer: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Byong Chul; Yeo, Seung-Gu

    2017-03-01

    Approximately 20% of all patients with locally advanced rectal cancer experience pathologically complete responses following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and standard surgery. The utility of radical surgery for patients exhibiting good CRT responses has been challenged. Organ-sparing strategies for selected patients exhibiting complete clinical responses include local excision or no immediate surgery. The subjects of this tailored management are patients whose presenting disease corresponds to current indications of neoadjuvant CRT, and their post-CRT tumor response is assessed by clinical and radiological examinations. However, a model predictive of the CRT response, applied before any treatment commenced, would be valuable to facilitate such a personalized approach. This would increase organ preservation, particularly in patients for whom upfront CRT is not generally prescribed. Molecular biomarkers hold the greatest promise for development of a pretreatment predictive model of CRT response. A combination of clinicopathological, radiological, and molecular markers will be necessary to render the model robust. Molecular research will also contribute to the development of drugs that can overcome the radioresistance of rectal tumors. Current treatments for rectal cancer are based on the expected prognosis given the presenting disease extent. In the future, treatment schemes may be modified by including the predicted CRT response evaluated at presentation.

  12. Postoperative X-ray morphology: Thorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, H.

    1987-01-01

    The publication focuses on the X-ray morphology of lungs. While one chapter is dedicated to the diagnoses obtained during the postoperative case of patients operated for the lungs a second chapter deals with the X-ray diagnosis of patients during the first days after lung surgery. Chapter 3 discusses the postoperative medical care of patients in medical intensive case units after operations other than lung surgery. The parallels between the critical care of patients after heart surgery and the critical care after operations other than heart surgery explain their simultaneous discussion in one chapter. Some diagnoses refer to patients subjected to long-term oxygen breathing and patients after abdomen and bone joint surgery. These are parallels between the volume 'Postoperative X-ray morphology: Blood vessels' and the chapter 'Heart' dealing with the coronary vessels; postoperative changes due to cogenital vitiae belong to pediatric radiology. The oesophagus dealt with in 'mediastinum und mediastinal organs' is also discussed in the volume on 'Postoperative X-ray morphology: Abdomen.' In order to avoid repetitions both chapters represent but a selection of facts. The publication focuses on the medical care of adult heat patients after cardiac valve surgery and coronary bypass surgery on the basis of native diagnostics. Methods of a more radical nature (for example those preceding re-operations) are only mentioned briefly. (orig./MG) [de

  13. Effect of rosuvastatin dose-loading on serum sLox-1, hs-CRP, and postoperative prognosis in diabetic patients with acute coronary syndromes undergoing selected percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yungen; Hu, Feng; Zhang, Zhengang; Gong, Kaizheng; Sun, Xiaoning; Li, Aihua; Liu, Naifeng

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of rosuvastatin dose-loading on serum levels of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (Lox-1) and high-sensitivity c-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and postoperative prognosis in patients with diabetes and non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTEACS) undergoing selected percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). A total of 72 patients with diabetes and NSTEACS were randomized to either the group treated with 20 mg rosuvastatin 12 hours prior to PCI with a second dose administered just before PCI (n = 33), or a control group treated with standard method according guideline (n = 39). Serum levels of sLox-1, hs-CRP, CK-MB, and cTnI were measured prior to PCI, and at 24 hours and 30 days after PCI. The 30-day incidence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) was recorded in both groups. Compared to pre-PCI, serum levels of sLox-1 and hs-CRP of the two groups were increased at 24 hours after PCI (P PCI (P PCI, the levels of TC and LDL-C were not changed at 24 hours after PCI (P > 0.05) until 30 days after PCI (P PCI; the 30-day incidence of MACE occurred in 6.06% of patients in the loading-dose rosuvastatin-treated group and in 23.08% of patients in the control-treated group (P PCI, and also reduce the occurrence of MACE 30 days after PCI.

  14. Argon plasma coagulation for a patient with locoregional failure after definitive chemoradiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Tsutomu; Miyashita, Masao; Makino, Hiroshi; Okawa, Keiichi; Katsuta, Miwako; Tajiri, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Patients who undergo definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) face a risk of residual resistant disease or disease recurrence at the primary site; therefore, salvage treatment may be required. An optimum strategy to minimize these risks clearly needs to be established. Argon plasma coagulation (APC) is a safe and convenient procedure now applied widely for therapeutic endoscopy. In this report we describe the successful use of APC over 6 years for the treatment of recurrent esophageal cancer after CRT. A 61-year-old Japanese man underwent CRT for a thoracic esophageal cancer. Pathological examination before CRT revealed a well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. Locoregional failure was observed 2 years after CRT, and an initial APC treatment was performed. The patient has now undergone APC ablation 7 times with no postoperative complications. No metastasis to lymph nodes or to other organs has been detected during the last 6 years. The usefulness of APC as a salvage treatment for locoregional failure after definitive CRT has not been established. In our experience, salvage APC is the best treatment option for some patients. (author)

  15. Preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for advanced oral cancer. Did the cancer cells really disappear in the CR cases?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirita, Tadaaki; Yamanaka, Yasutsugu; Imai, Yuichiro; Aoki, Kumiko; Inoue, Masahide; Yagyuu, Takahiro

    2008-01-01

    We report a series of 136 patients with advanced oral cancer who received preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) followed by surgery and who were studied clinically and histopathologically, and the indication of minimally invasive surgery was evaluated. The results and conclusions were as follows: The CR (complete response) of the primary tumor was 60.3% and the overall response rate was 92.7%. Histological effects were Grade IIb and above, i.e. effective, in 84.6% and Grade III, IV, i.e. pathological CR, in 73 of 82 (89.0%) in CR cases. The CCRT was also very effective histologically, and a correlation was observed between clinical effects and histological effects. The residual tumor grade (R Grade) in the resected specimen is considered to be useful as a prognostic factor. Histological effects were satisfactory in good partial response (PR) and CR cases on CCRT. In such cases, minimally invasive surgery is considered to be applicable even in advanced cases, and improvements in the postoperative quality of life (QOL) can be expected by preservation of the oral organs and functions. (author)

  16. Postoperative radiotherapy after laser surgery with or without chemotherapy in head and neck evolved cancers; Radiotherapie postoperatoire apres chirurgie laser avec ou sans chimiotherapie dans les cancers evolues de la tete et du cou

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryll, L.; Pradier, O. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Morvan, Dept. de Cancerologie, Brest (France); Nitsche, M.; Christiansen, H.; Hess, C. [Universitatsklinikum, Dept. de Cancerologie, Goettingen (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    We compared concurrent combination chemoradiotherapy and adjuvant radiotherapy after laser surgery in patients with stage 3/4 non metastatic squamous cell head and neck cancer. Combination chemotherapy and concurrent irradiation after laser surgery was not superior to surgery and postoperative radiotherapy for resectable advanced squamous cell head and neck cancer. However, the collective is small, and the follow-up to short to conclude. (authors)

  17. Postoperative care in geriatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Ulenberg

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of the elderly is becoming increasingly common problem and is of interest, because in the future this phenomenon will affect most of us. For many years, he observed in different countries increasingly rapid aging of the population, including in Poland. The operation in such a patient poses a high risk of complications and life-threatening conditions. Their age makes in the postoperative period there are many medical problems. Many factors can affect the scope of a different self-care nursing with such a patient.

  18. Postoperative conversion disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afolabi, Kola; Ali, Sameer; Gahtan, Vivian; Gorji, Reza; Li, Fenghua; Nussmeier, Nancy A

    2016-05-01

    Conversion disorder is a psychiatric disorder in which psychological stress causes neurologic deficits. A 28-year-old female surgical patient had uneventful general anesthesia and emergence but developed conversion disorder 1 hour postoperatively. She reported difficulty speaking, right-hand numbness and weakness, and right-leg paralysis. Neurologic examination and imaging revealed no neuronal damage, herniation, hemorrhage, or stroke. The patient mentioned failing examinations the day before surgery and discontinuing her prescribed antidepressant medication, leading us to diagnose conversion disorder, with eventual confirmation by neuroimaging and follow-up examinations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of concurrent chemoradiotherapy versus sequential radiochemotherapy in patients with completely resected non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hwan Ik; Noh, O Kyu; Oh, Young Taek; Chun, Mi Son; Kim, Sang Won; Cho, O Yeon; Heo, Jae Sung [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Our institution has implemented two different adjuvant protocols in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CT-CCRT) and sequential postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) followed by postoperative chemotherapy (POCT). We aimed to compare the clinical outcomes between the two adjuvant protocols. From March 1997 to October 2012, 68 patients were treated with CT-CCRT (n = 25) and sequential PORT followed by POCT (RT-CT; n = 43). The CT-CCRT protocol consisted of 2 cycles of cisplatin-based POCT followed by PORT concurrently with 2 cycles of POCT. The RT-CT protocol consisted of PORT followed by 4 cycles of cisplatin-based POCT. PORT was administered using conventional fractionation with a dose of 50.4–60 Gy. We compared the outcomes between the two adjuvant protocols and analyzed the clinical factors affecting survivals. Median follow-up time was 43.9 months (range, 3.2 to 74.0 months), and the 5-year overall survival (OS), locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) were 53.9%, 68.2%, and 51.0%, respectively. There were no significant differences in OS (p = 0.074), LRFS (p = 0.094), and DMFS (p = 0.490) between the two protocols. In multivariable analyses, adjuvant protocol remained as a significant prognostic factor for LRFS, favouring CT-CCRT (hazard ratio [HR] = 3.506, p = 0.046) over RT-CT, not for OS (HR = 0.647, p = 0.229). CT-CCRT protocol increased LRFS more than RT-CT protocol in patients with completely resected NSCLC, but not in OS. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the benefit of CCRT strategy compared with sequential strategy.

  20. Ultrassom anorretal tri-dimensional pode selecionar pacientes com tumor no reto após neoadjuvância para cirurgia de preservação esfincteriana? Can three-dimensional anorectal ultrasound select patients with rectal tumor for sphincter-saving resection after post-chemoradiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sthela Maria Murad-Regadas

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a resposta pós-quimioradioterapia-QT no tratamento do tumor no reto utilizando ultrassom anorretal tridimensional(US-3-D visando definir a estratégia cirúrgica adequada. MÉTODO: Avaliou-se prospectivamente 32 pacientes com adenocarcinoma no reto médio e inferior. Realizou-se US-3-D para estadiamento e avaliação quanto à invasão no canal anal ou distância(cm entre tumor e esfíncter anal interno-EAI: GrupoI-invasão no canal anal; GrupoII-distância menor-ou-igual 2cm, GrupoIII-distância maior 2. Foram encaminhados neoadjuvância e realizado US-3D após 50-55 dias. A escolha da estratégia cirúrgica baseou-se na resposta pós-QT e achados do US-3-D/pós-QT e comparado com histopatológico. RESULTADOS: O US-3-D/pós-QT coincidiu com histopatológico em 31/32, eficácia de 97%. Evidenciou-se 26/27 casos com lesão residual, sensibilidade de 96%, sendo 19(59% resposta parcial e 07 (22% sem resposta. Em 5/5 o US-3-D/pós-QT demonstrou resposta completa, especificidade e valor preditivo positivo 100%. Valor preditivo negativo 83% pois um(3% caso inconclusivo. Realizou-se cirurgia de preservação esfincteriana em 16 pacientes (05 com resposta completa, 10 com resposta parcial e um inconclusivo com margem maior que 2cm. Confirmados ao histopatológico com margem livre. O índice Kappa na avaliação de linfonodos demonstrou concordância substancial(87,5%. Conclui-se que o US-3D pode ser útil na escolha de pacientes que irão beneficiar-se com a cirurgia de preservação esfincteriana.PROPOSAL: Evaluate the post-chemoradiotherapy response for treatment of rectal tumor using three-dimensional anorectal ultrasound-3D-US to determine the best surgical approach METHODS: 32 patients with lower and middle rectal cancer were prospectively staged using 3D-US to identify anal canal invasion and the distance(cm between tumor and the internal anal sphincter-IAS, Group l:with anal canal invasion; Group II-with distance =2cm; Group

  1. Self-expandable metallic stents for patients with recurrent esophageal carcinoma after failure of primary chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muto, Manabu; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Boku, Narikazu; Yoshida, Shigeaki [National Cancer Center, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan). Hospital East; Miyata, Yoshinori; Shioyama, Yasukazu

    2001-06-01

    Recent advances in chemoradiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma have resulted in improved survival rates. However, there are few options for recurrent dysphagia due to refractory carcinoma after failure of primary chemoradiotherapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of self-expandable metallic stent placement for patients with recurrent esophageal carcinoma where definitive chemoradiotherapy has failed. Thirteen consecutive patients with recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus, in whom self-expandable metallic stents were placed after failure of primary chemoradiotherapy, were studied retrospectively. All patients had esophageal obstruction or malignant fistula. The oral alimentation status of nine of 13 patients (69%) improved after successful placement of the stent. Following placement of the stent, fever (>38 deg C) and severe chest pain occurred in 85% (11/13) of the patients. In all patients examined, C-reactive protein was elevated within 1 week of the operation. Esophageal perforation occurred in three patients. Stent-related mediastinitis and pneumonia developed in six (46%) and three (23%) patients, respectively. Seven of the 13 patients (54%) died of stent-related pulmonary complications. Although the placement of a self-expandable metallic stent for patients with recurrent esophageal carcinoma after failure of chemoradiotherapy improved their oral alimentation status, we found that this treatment increases the risk of life-threatening pulmonary complications. (author)

  2. Sphincter preservation in distal CT2N0 rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasserberg, Nir; Kundel, Yulia; Purim, Ofer; Keidar, Andrei; Kashtan, Hanoch; Sadot, Eran; Fenig, Eyal; Brenner, Baruch

    2014-01-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy is usually not indicated for cT2N0 rectal cancer. Abdominoperineal resection is the standard treatment for distal rectal tumors. The aim of the study was to evaluate the actual sphincter-preservation rate in patients with distal cT2N0 rectal cancer given neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Data were retrospectively collected for all patients who were diagnosed with distal cT2N0 rectal cancer at a tertiary medical center in 2000–2008 and received chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery (5–7 weeks later). Thirty-three patients (22 male) of median age 65 years (range, 32–88) were identified. Tumor distance from the anal verge ranged from 0 to 5 cm. R0 resection with sphincter preservation was accomplished in 22 patients (66%), with a 22% pathological complete response rate. Median follow-up time was 62 months (range 7–120). There were no local failures. Crude disease-free and overall survival were 82% and 86%, respectively. Factors associated with sphincter preservation were tumor location (OR = 0.58, p = 0.02, 95% CI = 0.37-0.91) and pathological downstaging (OR = 7.8, p = 0.02, 95% CI = 1.35-45.85). Chemoradiotherapy was well tolerated. High rates of sphincter preservation can be achieved after preoperative chemoradiotherapy for distal cT2N0 rectal cancer, with tolerable toxicity, without compromising oncological outcome

  3. Self-expandable metallic stents for patients with recurrent esophageal carcinoma after failure of primary chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muto, Manabu; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Boku, Narikazu; Yoshida, Shigeaki; Miyata, Yoshinori; Shioyama, Yasukazu

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in chemoradiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma have resulted in improved survival rates. However, there are few options for recurrent dysphagia due to refractory carcinoma after failure of primary chemoradiotherapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of self-expandable metallic stent placement for patients with recurrent esophageal carcinoma where definitive chemoradiotherapy has failed. Thirteen consecutive patients with recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus, in whom self-expandable metallic stents were placed after failure of primary chemoradiotherapy, were studied retrospectively. All patients had esophageal obstruction or malignant fistula. The oral alimentation status of nine of 13 patients (69%) improved after successful placement of the stent. Following placement of the stent, fever (>38 deg C) and severe chest pain occurred in 85% (11/13) of the patients. In all patients examined, C-reactive protein was elevated within 1 week of the operation. Esophageal perforation occurred in three patients. Stent-related mediastinitis and pneumonia developed in six (46%) and three (23%) patients, respectively. Seven of the 13 patients (54%) died of stent-related pulmonary complications. Although the placement of a self-expandable metallic stent for patients with recurrent esophageal carcinoma after failure of chemoradiotherapy improved their oral alimentation status, we found that this treatment increases the risk of life-threatening pulmonary complications. (author)

  4. CNS tumors: postoperative evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayanir, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Imaging assessment of brain tumors following surgery is complex and depends upon several factors, including the location of the tumor, the surgical procedure and the disease process for which it was performed. Depending upon these factors, one or a combination of complementary imaging modalities may be required to demonstrate any clinically relevant situation, to assist the surgeon in deciding if repeat surgery is necessary. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can show the shape, size, signal intensity, and enhancement of a brain tumor. It has been widely used to diagnose and differentiate brain tumors and to assess the surgery outcomes. Longitudinal MRI scans have also been applied for the assessment of treatment and response to surgery. The newly developed MRI techniques, including diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), perfusion weighted imaging (PWI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), have the potential to provide the molecular, functional and metabolic information of preoperative and postoperative brain tumors. Postoperative diffusion and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging are especially useful in predicting early functional recovery from new deficits after brain tumor surgery.This lecture will stress the principles, applications, and pitfalls of conventional as well as newly developing functional imaging techniques following operation of brain tumors

  5. Concurrent versus Sequential Chemoradiotherapy with Cisplatin and Vinorelbine in Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Randomized Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zatloukal, P.; Petruželka, L.; Zemanová, M.; Havel, L.; Janků, F.; Judas, L.; Kubík, A.; Křepela, E.; Fiala, P.; Pecen, Ladislav

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 46, - (2004), s. 87-98 ISSN 0169-5002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1030915 Keywords : concurrent chemoradiotherapy * sequential chemoradiotherapy * locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer * cisplatin * vinorelbine Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 2.914, year: 2004

  6. Postoperative hypocalcemia after thyroidectomy for Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce, Catherine E; Shiue, Zita; Tsai, Hua-Ling; Umbricht, Christopher B; Tufano, Ralph P; Dackiw, Alan P B; Kowalski, Jeanne; Zeiger, Martha A

    2010-11-01

    It is believed that patients who undergo thyroidectomy for Graves' disease are more likely to experience postoperative hypocalcemia than patients undergoing total thyroidectomy for other indications. However, no study has directly compared these two groups of patients. The aim of this study was to determine whether there was an increased incidence or severity of postoperative hypocalcemia in patients who underwent thyroidectomy for Graves' disease. An institutional review board-approved database was created of all patients who underwent thyroidectomy from 1998 to 2009 at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. There were a total of 68 patients with Graves' disease who underwent surgery. Fifty-five patients who underwent total thyroidectomy were randomly selected and served as control subjects. An analysis was conducted that examined potential covariates for postoperative hypocalcemia, including age, gender, ethnicity, preoperative alkaline phosphatase level, size of goiter, whether parathyroid tissue or glands were present in the specimen, and the reason the patient underwent surgery. Specific outcomes examined were calcium levels on postoperative day 1, whether or not patients experienced symptoms of hypocalcemia, whether or not Rocaltrol was required, the number of calcium tablets prescribed upon discharge, whether or not postoperative tetany occurred, and calcium levels 1 month after discharge. Each outcome was analyzed using a logistic regression. Graves' disease patients had a significantly (p-value Graves' disease and no patient in the control group were readmitted with tetany (p = 0.033). There was a trend, though not significant, toward patients with Graves' disease having a higher prevalence of hypocalcemia the day after thyroidectomy and 1 month later. Patients with Graves' disease are more likely to require increased dosages of calcium as well as experience tetany postoperatively than patients undergoing total thyroidectomy for other indications. This suggests that

  7. Swallowing function before and after concurrent chemoradiotherapy for pharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyuna, Asanori; Hasegawa, Masahiro; Higa, Asano; Shinhama, Akihiko; Suzuki, Mikio

    2010-01-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for patients with advanced head or neck cancer has become popular as an effective treatment that can preserve their organs and functions after treatment. However, severe dysfunctions as the complications related to CCRT, e.g. dysphagia, sometimes appear in spite of preservation of the affected organs. The aim of the present study is to clarify swallowing function during and after CCRT. Medical records of subjects who received CCRT for treatment of oropharyngeal (21 cases) and hypopharyngeal (19 cases) cancer were retrospectively reviewed for mucositis and dysphagia before, during, and after CCRT using National Cancer Institute-Common Toxicity Criteria (NCI-CTC) version 2.0. Severity of mucositis and dysphagia kept deteriorating during CCRT and 27.5% of the subjects required tube feeding at the end of CCRT. The mucositis improved rapidly after treatment, but severe dysphagia still persisted in 7.5% of the subjects 6 months after CCRT. Planned neck dissections were carried out in 14 patients as additional treatment against lymph node involvement. Although severe dysphagia appeared immediately after surgery, swallowing function returned to preoperative condition within 1 month. The majority of patients who receive CCRT recover their swallowing function within 6 months after CCRT. However, since some patients demonstrate prolonged dysphagia after CCRT, we should receive informed consent from patients about their swallowing condition after CCRT. (author)

  8. Alternating chemo-radiotherapy in bladder cancer: a conservative approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orsatti, Marco; Curotto, Antonio; Canobbio, Luciano; Guarneri, Domenico; Scarpati, Daniele; Venturini, Marco; Franzone, Paola; Giudici, Stefania; Martorana, Giuseppe; Boccardo, Francesco; Giuliani, Luciano; Vitale, Vito

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this Phase II study was to determine a bladder-sparing treatment in patients with invasive bladder cancer, allowing a better quality of life. Objectives were to test toxicity and disease-free and overall survival of patients given an alternated chemo-radiotherapy definitive treatment. Methods and Materials: Seventy-six patients with bladder cancer Stage T1G3 through T4 N0 M0 were entered in the same chemotherapy regimen (Cisplatin 20 mg/mq and 5-Fluorouracil 200 mg/mq daily for 5 days) alternated with different radiotherapy scheduling, the first 18 patients received two cycles of 20 Gy/10 fractions/12 days each; the second group of 58 patients received two cycles of 25 Gy/10 fractions/12 days each (the last 21 patients received Methotrexate 40 mg/mq instead of 5-Fluorouracil). Results: A clinical complete response was observed in 57 patients (81%), partial response in 7 patients (10%), and a nonresponse in 6 patients (9%). At a median follow-up of 45 months, 33 patients (47%) were alive and free of tumor. The 6-year overall survival and progression-free survival was 42% and 40%, respectively. Systemic side effects were mild, while a moderate or severe local toxicity was observed in 14 patients and 13 patients (about 20%), respectively. Conclusion: Our conservative combination treatment allowed bladder-sparing in a high rate of patients and resulted in a survival comparable to that reported after radical cystectomy

  9. Oral mucositis frequency in head and neck chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hata, Hironobu; Ota, Yojiro; Ueno, Takao; Kurihara, Kinue; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Onozawa, Yusuke; Zenda, Sadamoto

    2007-01-01

    A retrospective study was performed to determine the frequency and risk factors of oral mucositis in patients receiving radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy for head and neck tumors. We classified all patients into three groups according to the radiation dose given in the oral cavity (Group A: 0 Gy; 73 patients, Group B: <40 Gy; 66 patients, Group C: ≥40 Gy; 110 patients). In group C, the odds ratio of oral mucositis (≥Gr.2) was 5.6 times in the concomitant chemotherapy group (62 patients) (odds ratio (OR) of 5.6; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.1-14.9) compared with the radiotherapy (RT) only group (48 patients). In the case of concomitant chemotherapy group in Group C, the odds ratio of oral mucositis (≥Gr.2) was 17 times (OR of 17.1; 95% CI: 2.8-106.0) that in the group using 5-fluorouracil (FU) (50 patients) compared with the group that did not use it (12 patients). For patients whose accumulated radiation dose in the oral cavity was more than 40 Gy, 5-FU was found to be a significant risk factor for oral mucositis. (author)

  10. [Psychosocial adjustment in colorectal cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Aguilar, Salvador; Guerra-Cruz, Hilda Griselda; Cupil-Rodríguez, Aura Lizbet; Calderillo-Ruiz, Germán; Oñate-Ocaña, Luis Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Psychosocial adaptation is a measurement that represents the patient's adjustment to those changes involved in their illness. We undertook this study to search for individual characteristics and clinical aspects associated with successful psychosocial adjustment in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) undergoing (CT) chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Seventy-five patients with CRC treated with CT or CRT in a cancer center were included. Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale Self-Reporting (PAIS-SR) questionnaire was used as a measurement of psychosocial adjustment. Psychosocial adaptation was successful in 18 patients (24%) and unsuccessful in 57 patients (76%). Young patients, married patients and males showed lower psychosocial adaptation to disease. This is associated with the decrease in sexual relations, economic resources and psychological symptoms. Patients complained that they were unsatisfied due to the lack of disease and treatment information offered by the heath care team. In the process of adaptation, clinical features such as tumor location and treatment scheme are considered basic, as well as age, education, marital status. Areas such as sexuality, interpersonal and family relationships, economic status and emotional state of patients affected by the disease and treatments provide a deep complexity in the study of the psychosocial adaptation process in patients with CRC.

  11. Chemoradiotherapy using platinum analogs/5-FU for advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Shigeru; Kawasaki, Hitoshi; Nakai, Makoto; Morohashi, Hajime; Matsuya, Hideki; Yamada, Kyougo; Morita, Takayuki; Sasaki, Mutsuo

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using cisplatin/nedaplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) for advanced esophageal cancer. Thirteen patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer (T4 cases) and 3 with recurrence of esophageal cancer were treated with radiotherapy (40-70 Gy) and 5-FU combined and cisplatin/nedaplatin concurrently. T4 patients who obtained down-staging by CRT also underwent esophagectomy. A complete response was obtained in one case, partial response in 8 cases, and no change in 7 cases. The overall response rate was 56.3%. A pathological complete response was obtained in one case in which curative resection was performed after CRT. Bone marrow suppression was observed in 68.8% and grade 3 and 4 bone marrow suppression was observed in 43.8%. Concurrent CRT using cisplatin/nedaplatin and 5-FU for advanced esophageal cancer has a high response rate and patients obtaining down-staging by CRT as a neoadjuvant therapy have a chance for long survival after curative resection in locally advanced cases. (author)

  12. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for advanced hypopharyngeal or cervical esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Sohei; Hamada, Norihisa; Shigihara, Shuntaro

    2001-01-01

    Chemotherapy has been shown to be most effective when delivered concurrently with radiation for patients with untreated advanced-stage tumors. We conducted a concurrent chemoradiation protocol using systemic infusion of Cisplatin (CDDP) and 5-Fluorouracil (FU), followed by radical surgery. Thirty-six patients with advanced hypopharyngeal (n=28) or cervical esophageal cancer (n=8) received intravenous administration of CDDP (100 mg/m 2 ), followed by a 120-hour continuous infusion of 5-FU (1000 mg/m 2 /day), and concomitant radiotherapy (200 cGy/day x 20-35 fractions). One patient died of aspiration pneumonia. The rate of grade 3-4 hematological chemotoxicity was 27.8% (10/36). Pharyngo-laryngo-cervical esophagectomies were performed in 23 patients, one received partial resection of the hypopharynx, and one received radical neck dissection. Ten remaining patients refused radical surgery. In the resected specimens, 11 out of 24 (46%) were confirmed as complete response (CR). The median length of follow-up was 74.5 weeks. The projected 5-year survival was 39.7%. When the patients who had refused radical surgery for residual tumor were excluded, the 5-year survival rate rose up to 70.0% in the patients with hypopharyngeal cancer. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy can be safely and effectively applied. Preliminary pathological results indicate the possibility in improving the rate of organ preservation. (author)

  13. Limited accuracy of DCE-MRI in identification of pathological complete responders after chemoradiotherapy treatment for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gollub, Marc J. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Tong, Tong [Fudan University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Weiser, Martin [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Surgery, Divison of Colorectal Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Zheng, Junting; Gonen, Mithat [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, New York, NY (United States); Zakian, Kristen L. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States)

    2017-04-15

    To examine whether post-chemoradiotherapy (CRT) DCE-MRI can identify rectal cancer patients with pathologic complete response (pCR). From a rectal cancer surgery database 2007-2014, 61 consecutive patients that met the following inclusion criteria were selected for analysis: (1) stage II/III primary rectal adenocarcinoma; (2) received CRT; (3) underwent surgery (4); underwent rectal DCE-MRI on a 1.5-T MRI scanner. Two experienced radiologists, in consensus, drew regions of interest (ROI) on the sagittal DCE-MRI image in the tumour bed. These were exported from ImageJ to in-house Matlab code for modelling using the Tofts model. K{sup trans}, K{sub ep} and v{sub e} values were compared to pathological response. Of the 61 initial patients, 37 had data considered adequate for fitting to obtain perfusion parameters. Among the 13 men and 24 women, median age 53 years, there were 8 pCR (22 %). K{sup trans} could not distinguish patients with pCR. For patients with 90 % or greater response, mean K{sup trans} and K{sub ep} values were statistically significant (p = 0.032 and 0.027, respectively). Using a cutoff value of K{sup trans} = 0.25 min{sup -1}, the AUC was 0.71. K{sup trans} could be used to identify patients with 90 % or more response to chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer with an AUC of 0.7. (orig.)

  14. New treatments on the horizon for chemoradiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruhlmann, Christina H; Herrstedt, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    the proper timing, duration, and combination of antiemetic drugs for the prevention of chemoradiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (C-RINV). AREAS COVERED: The article summarises the available antiemetic studies, the evidence for antiemetic prophylaxis of C-RINV, and the future perspectives for antiemetic...... research in chemoradiotherapy. EXPERT OPINION: Antiemetic prophylaxis for patients receiving concomitant chemoradiotherapy has, for many years, been an orphan research area. The distinction between acute and delayed nausea and vomiting does not apply to fractionated radiotherapy, and prophylaxis should...... be considered to cover the entire course of treatment and not only the acute and delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. The best prophylaxis in women receiving fractionated radiotherapy and concomitant weekly cisplatin is a combination of the neurokinin receptor antagonist fosaprepitant...

  15. Sternal wound complications after primary isolated myocardial revascularization: the importance of the post-operative variables.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noyez, L.; Druten, J.A.M. van; Mulder, J.; Schroen, A.M.; Skotnicki, S.H.; Brouwer, R.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Select pre-, peri-, and post-operative variables, predictive for sternal wound complications (SWC), in a clinical setting. METHODS: We analyzed pre-, peri-, and post-operative data of 3815 patients who underwent a primary isolated bypass grafting. 100 patients (2.6%) had post-operative

  16. MDM2, p53 and pRb Expression Prior to Definitive Chemoradiotherapy in Esophageal Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Mee Sun; Nam, Taek Keun; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Cho, Sang Hee; Song, Ju Young; Ahn, Sung Ja; Chung, Ik Joo; Chung, Woong Ki; Nah, Byung Sik

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated the pretreatment expression patterns of MDM2, p53, and pRb proteins to determine if the expression patterns could predict the outcome of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and aid in the decisions for the selection of treatment modalities. Materials and Methods: Fifty-one patients that were treated with definitive hemoradiotherapy for stage I∼ IVa esohageal squamous cell carcinoma were selected for this study. Radiotherapy was administered with daily 1.8∼2 Gy fractions up to a median dose of 54 Gy for primary tumors, and with four cycles of cisplatin/5-fluorouracil chemotherapy that was administered every 4 weeks, the first two cycles of which were administered concurrently with radiotherapy. Expression of MDM2, p53, and pRb was investigated by immunohistochemical analysis using pretreatment biopsy specimens. Results: MDM2, p53, and pRb were detected with high immunoreactivity in 19.6%, 27.5%, and 66.7% of the patients, respectively. However, there was no significant correlation between expression of these factors and clinical outcome. By the use of multivariate analysis with nine covariates-age, tumor location, tumor length, stage, pathological response, clinical response, MDM2 expression, p53 expression, and pRb expression, only pathological response and stage were significant factors for cause-specific survival. Conclusion: Expression of MDM2, p53, and pRb was not found to be clinically significant for predicting outcomes after CCRT in this study. Further studies with a larger patient population and longer follow-up periods are needed to re-evaluate the expression pattern and to identify new predictors for CCRT response

  17. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Monitoring Rectal Cancer Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbaro, Brunella, E-mail: bbarbaro@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Vitale, Renata; Valentini, Vincenzo; Illuminati, Sonia [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Vecchio, Fabio M. [Department of Pathology, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Rizzo, Gianluca [Department of Surgery, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Coco, Claudio; Crucitti, Antonio; Persiani, Roberto; Sofo, Luigi [Department of Surgery, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Bonomo, Lorenzo [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To prospectively monitor the response in patients with locally advanced nonmucinous rectal cancer after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The histopathologic finding was the reference standard. Methods and Materials: The institutional review board approved the present study. A total of 62 patients (43 men and 19 women; mean age, 64 years; range, 28-83) provided informed consent. T{sub 2}- and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans (b value, 0 and 1,000 mm{sup 2}/s) were acquired before, during (mean 12 days), and 6-8 weeks after CRT. We compared the median apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) between responders and nonresponders and examined the associations with the Mandard tumor regression grade (TRG). The postoperative nodal status (ypN) was evaluated. The Mann-Whitney/Wilcoxon two-sample test was used to evaluate the relationships among the pretherapy ADCs, extramural vascular invasion, early percentage of increases in ADCs, and preoperative ADCs. Results: Low pretreatment ADCs (<1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s) were correlated with TRG 4 scores (p = .0011) and associated to extramural vascular invasion with ypN+ (85.7% positive predictive value for ypN+). During treatment, the mean percentage of increase in tumor ADC was significantly greater in the responders than in the nonresponders (p < .0001) and a >23% ADC increase had a 96.3% negative predictive value for TRG 4. In 9 of 16 complete responders, CRT-related tumor downsizing prevented ADC evaluations. The preoperative ADCs were significantly different (p = .0012) between the patients with and without downstaging (preoperative ADC {>=}1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s showed a positive and negative predictive value of 78.9% and 61.8%, respectively, for response assessment). The TRG 1 and TRG 2-4 groups were not significantly different. Conclusion: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging seems to be a promising

  18. Assessment of salivary gland dysfunction following chemoradiotherapy using quantitative salivary gland scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosuda, Shigeru; Satoh, Michinao; Yamamoto, Fuyumi; Uematsu, Minoru; Kusano, Shoichi

    1999-01-01

    Purpose:To assess chemoradiotherapy-induced salivary gland dysfunction using quantitative salivary gland scintigraphy (QSGS), and whether QSGS is capable of predicting the grade of persistent salivary dysfunction after chemoradiotherapy. Methods: From a time-activity curve using a stimulation test, the washout rate (WR) calculated was assessed. All glands (n = 155) were classified into four groups: a no-therapy group (n = 18), a chemotherapy alone group (n = 31), a radiotherapy alone group (n = 50), and a chemoradiotherapy group (n = 56). Subjective descriptions of xerostomia were recorded 1 year after the completion of the treatment period, and the 32 glands subjected to irradiation with or without chemotherapy were assessed. Results: The WR values were significantly lower in glands that received chemoradiotherapy than in glands treated with radiotherapy alone (mean: 0.75 x 10 -3 , n = 40 vs. 0.22, n = 36, p < 0.015), but there was no significant difference in the WR values between the no-therapy group and the chemotherapy alone group. The mean values of WR were lower in the chemoradiotherapy glands than in the radiotherapy alone glands in each of cumulative dose ranges of 1-20, 21-30, and 31-60 Gy. With regard to recovery from xerostomia, the WR values at a cumulative dose range of 20 to 40 Gy were significantly lower in the not improved group (-0.418, n = 16) than in the improved group (0.245, n = 16) (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: Chemotherapy per se has no or little adverse effect on salivary function, but combination chemotherapy can deteriorate radiation-induced injury of the salivary glands. QSGS appears useful in predicting the grade of persistent xerostomia following chemoradiotherapy

  19. Barium enema and CT volumetry for predicting pathologic response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murono, Koji; Kawai, Kazushige; Tsuno, Nelson H; Ishihara, Soichiro; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Sunami, Eiji; Kitayama, Joji; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2014-06-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy has been widely used for the prevention of local recurrence of locally advanced rectal cancer, and the effect of chemoradiotherapy is known to be associated with overall survival. We aimed to evaluate the association of the pathologic response grade with tumor recurrence rate after chemoradiotherapy, using radiographic analysis and the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors as the parameters. This study was conducted at a single tertiary care institution in Japan. This was a retrospective cohort study of patients undergoing preoperative chemoradiotherapy. A total of 101 low rectal cancer patients receiving preoperative chemoradiotherapy from July 2004 to August 2012 were enrolled. The tumor reduction rate was measured with the use of traditional Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, barium enema, and CT volumetry, and the correlation between the reduction rate and the pathologic response grade was examined. The tumor reduction rate assessed according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors showed no association with the pathologic response grade (p =0.61). In contrast, the radiographic response rate by both barium enema and CT volumetry strongly correlated with the pathologic response grade (p volumetry had a lower recurrence rate (p =0.03, p =0.03, p =0.0002, and p =0.001). The difference between high responders and low responders was especially prominent by barium enema and CT volumetry. The study is limited by its retrospective nature. Double-contrast barium enema and CT volumetry were superior to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors in evaluating the effect of chemoradiotherapy and predicting the likelihood of tumor recurrence.

  20. Stent patency in patients with distal malignant biliary obstruction receiving chemo(radio)therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haal, Sylke; van Hooft, Jeanin E.; Rauws, Erik A. J.; Fockens, Paul; Voermans, Rogier P.

    2017-01-01

    Background and study aims  Recent literature suggests that chemo(radio)therapy might reduce the patency of plastic stents in patients with malignant biliary obstruction. Whether this might also be valid for other types of stents is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of chemo(radio)therapy on the patency of fully-covered self-expandable metal stents (FCSEMSs) and plastic stents. Patients and methods  We retrospectively reviewed the electronic medical records of patients with distal malignant biliary obstruction who underwent biliary stent placement between April 2001 and July 2015. Primary outcome was duration of stent patency. Secondary outcome was stent patency at 3 and 6 months. We used Kaplan–Meier survival analyses to compare stent patency rates between patients who received chemo(radio)therapy and patients who did not. Results  A total of 291 biliary stents (151 metal and 140 plastic) were identified. The median cumulative stent patency of FCSEMSs did not differ between patients receiving chemo(radio)therapy (n = 51) and those (n = 100) who did not ( P  = 0.70, log-rank test). The estimated cumulative stent patency of plastic stents was also comparable in 99 patients without and 41 patients with chemo(radio)therapy ( P  = 0.73, log-rank test). At 3 and 6 months, FCSEMS patency rates were 87 % and 83 % in patients without chemo(radio)therapy and 96 % and 83 % in patients with therapy, respectively. Plastic patency rates were 69 % and 55 % in patients without and 85 % and 39 % in patients with therapy, respectively. After 1 year, 78 % of the FCSEMSs were still patent in patients without chemo(radio)therapy and 69 % of the FCSEMSs were still patent in patients with therapy. Conclusion  Our data indicate that chemo(radio)therapy does not reduce the patency of biliary fully-covered metal and plastic stents. PMID:29090242

  1. Adjuvant treatment for resected rectal cancer: impact of standard and intensified postoperative chemotherapy on disease-free survival in patients undergoing preoperative chemoradiation-a propensity score-matched analysis of an observational database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlipp, Benjamin; Ptok, Henry; Benedix, Frank; Otto, Ronny; Popp, Felix; Ridwelski, Karsten; Gastinger, Ingo; Benckert, Christoph; Lippert, Hans; Bruns, Christiane

    2016-12-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy for resected rectal cancer is widely used. However, studies on adjuvant treatment following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and total mesorectal excision (TME) have yielded conflicting results. Recent studies have focused on adding oxaliplatin to both preoperative and postoperative therapy, making it difficult to assess the impact of adjuvant oxaliplatin alone. This study was aimed at determining the impact of (i) any adjuvant treatment and (ii) oxaliplatin-containing adjuvant treatment on disease-free survival in CRT-pretreated, R0-resected rectal cancer patients. Patients undergoing R0 TME following 5-fluorouracil (5FU)-only-based CRT between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2010, were selected from a nationwide registry. After propensity score matching (PSM), comparison of disease-free survival (DFS) using Kaplan-Meier analysis and log-rank test was performed in (i) patients receiving no vs. any adjuvant treatment and (ii) patients treated with adjuvant 5FU/capecitabine without vs. with oxaliplatin. Out of 1497 patients, 520 matched pairs were generated for analysis of no vs. any adjuvant treatment. Mean DFS was significantly prolonged with adjuvant treatment (81.8 ± 2.06 vs. 70.1 ± 3.02 months, p rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant CRT and TME surgery under routine conditions, adjuvant chemotherapy significantly improved DFS. No benefit was observed for the addition of oxaliplatin to adjuvant chemotherapy in this setting.

  2. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy Improves Survival in Patients With Hypopharyngeal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paximadis, Peter, E-mail: ppaximad@med.wayne.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Yoo, George; Lin, Ho-Sheng; Jacobs, John [Department of Otolaryngology, Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, MI (United States); Sukari, Ammar [Department of Medical Oncology, Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, MI (United States); Dyson, Greg [Department of Oncology, Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, MI (United States); Christensen, Michael; Kim, Harold [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively review our institutional experience with hypopharyngeal carcinoma with respect to treatment modality. Methods and Materials: A total of 70 patients with hypopharyngeal cancer treated between 1999 and 2009 were analyzed for functional and survival outcomes. The treatments included surgery alone (n = 5), surgery followed by radiotherapy (RT) (n = 3), surgery followed by chemoradiotherapy (CRT) (n = 13), RT alone (n = 2), CRT alone (n = 22), induction chemotherapy followed by RT (n = 3), and induction chemotherapy followed by CRT (n = 22). Results: The median follow-up was 18 months. The median overall survival and disease-free survival for all patients was 28.3 and 17.6 months, respectively. The 1- and 2-year local control rate for all patients was 87.1% and 80%. CRT, given either as primary therapy or in the adjuvant setting, improved overall survival and disease-free survival compared with patients not receiving CRT. The median overall survival and disease-free survival for patients treated with CRT was 36.7 and 17.6 months vs. 14.0 and 8.0 months, respectively (p < .01). Of the patients initially treated with an organ-preserving approach, 4 (8.2%) required salvage laryngectomy for local recurrence or persistent disease; 8 (16.3%) and 12 (24.5%) patients were dependent on a percutaneous gastrostomy and tracheostomy tube, respectively. The 2-year laryngoesophageal dysfunction-free survival rate for patients treated with an organ-preserving approach was estimated at 31.7%. Conclusions: Concurrent CRT improves survival in patients with hypopharyngeal cancer. CRT given with conventional radiation techniques yields poor functional outcomes, and future efforts should be directed at determining the feasibility of pharyngeal-sparing intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with hypopharyngeal tumors.

  3. Definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Yoo Kang; Lee, Jong Hoon; Lee, Myung Ah; Chun, Hoo Geun; Kim, Dong Goo; You, Young Kyoung; Hong, Tae Ho; Jang, Hong Seok

    2014-01-01

    Survival outcome of locally advanced pancreatic cancer has been poor and little is known about prognostic factors of the disease, especially in locally advanced cases treated with concurrent chemoradiation. This study was to analyze overall survival and prognostic factors of patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Medical records of 34 patients diagnosed with unresectable pancreatic cancer and treated with definitive CCRT, from December 2003 to December 2012, were reviewed. Median prescribed radiation dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 41.4 to 55.8 Gy), once daily, five times per week, 1.8 to 3 Gy per fraction. With a mean follow-up of 10 months (range, 0 to 49 months), median overall survival was 9 months. The 1- and 2-year survival rates were 40% and 10%, respectively. Median and mean time to progression were 5 and 7 months, respectively. Prognostic parameters related to overall survival were post-CCRT CA19-9 (p = 0.02), the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) status (p < 0.01), and radiation dose (p = 0.04) according to univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, post-CCRT CA19-9 value below 180 U/mL and ECOG status 0 or 1 were statistically significant independent prognostic factors associated with improved overall survival (p < 0.01 and p = 0.02, respectively). Overall treatment results in locally advanced pancreatic cancer are relatively poor and few improvements have been accomplished in the past decades. Post-treatment CA19-9 below 180 U/mL and ECOG performance status 0 and 1 were significantly associated with an improved overall survival.

  4. Clinical evaluation of chemoradiotherapy for advanced cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneyasu, Yuko; Okawa, Tomohiko [Tokyo Women`s Medical Coll. (Japan); Okawa-Kita, Midori

    1997-11-01

    Locally advanced cervical cancer has a poor prognosis, poor survival rate, and high local failure rate. A number of questions regarding the optimal agents and schedule of concurrent chemoradiation remain unanswered. To improve the cure rate for advanced or recurrent cervix cancer, we studied intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy (IAIC) with or without radiotherapy. We analyzed 52 cases of advanced or recurrent cervical cancer treated by IAIC with or without radiotherapy. IAIC regimen was separated into two groups: group I consisted of 5-FU+MMC{+-}ADM (30 cases) and group II of CDDP+MMC{+-}5-FU (22 cases). The tip of the catheter was placed in the bifurcation of abdominal aorta or the bilateral internal iliac arteries (7 cases). The overall response rate (CR+PR) was 71%, 87% in patients receiving radiotherapy, 50% in those without radiotherapy, and 100% in primary cases. The five-year survival rate was 20% in primary cases, 14% in recurrent cases, 3% in group I and 38% in group II by chemotherapy regimen. Severe (more than grade III) hematological acute side effects were found in 48% of all cases, but recovered by interruption of drugs. In 7 cases in which the tip of the catheter was placed in internal iliac arteries, there were severe skin ulcers in 2 cases and severe pain of leg or gluteal region which need narcotics in 2 cases. These data suggest that IAIC mainly with cisplatin with or without radiotherapy is one of the effective treatments for advanced or recurrent cervical cancer. But we should check blood flow distribution periodically, and control the concentration of drugs. To improve the survival rate for advanced or recurrent cervical cancer, we should discuss neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by chemoradiotherapy and maintenance systemic chemotherapy. (author)

  5. Late Toxicity After Definitive Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Thoracic Esophageal Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morota, Madoka; Gomi, Kotaro; Kozuka, Takuyo; Chin, Keisho; Matsuura, Masaaki; Oguchi, Masahiko; Ito, Hisao; Yamashita, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate late cardiopulmonary toxicities after concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for esophageal carcinomas. Methods and Materials: From February 2002 through April 2005, 74 patients with clinical Stage I-IVB carcinoma of the esophagus were treated with CCRT. Sixty-nine patients with thoracic squamous cell carcinoma were the core of this analysis. Patients received 60 Gy of radiation therapy in 30 fractions over 8 weeks, including a 2-week break, and received 2 cycles of fluorouracil/cisplatin chemotherapy concomitantly. Initial radiation fields included primary tumors, metastatic lymph nodes, and supraclavicular, mediastinal, and celiac nodes areas. Late toxicities were assessed with the late radiation morbidity scoring scheme of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organiation for Research and Treatment of Cancer. Results: The median age was 67 years (range, 45-83 years). The median follow-up time was 26.1 months for all patients and 51.4 months for patients still alive at the time of analysis. Five cardiopulmonary toxic events of Grade 3 or greater were observed in 4 patients, Grade 5 heart failure and Grade 3 pericarditis in 1 patient, and Grade 3 myocardial infarction, Grade 3 radiation pneumonitis, and Grade 3 pleural effusion. The 2-year cumulative incidence of late cardiopulmonary toxicities of Grade 3 or greater for patients 75 years or older was 29% compared with 3% for younger patients (p = 0.005). Conclusion: The CCRT used in this study with an extensive radiation field is acceptable for younger patients but is not tolerated by patients older than 75 years.

  6. The Results of Curative Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Anal Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae Uk; Yoon, Mee Sun; Song, Ju Young; Ahn, Sung Ja; Chung, Woong Ki; Nah, Byung Sik; Nam, Taek Keun [Chonnam National University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    To evaluate the predictive factors for treatment response and prognostic factors affecting survival outcomes after concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for patients with anal squamous cell carcinoma. Medical records of forty two patients with histologically confirmed analsquamous cell carcinoma, who had complete CCRT between 1993 and 2008, were reviewed retrospectively. Median age was 61.5 years (39-89 years), and median radiotherapy (RT) dose was 50.4 Gy (30.0-64.0 Gy). A total of 36 patients had equal to or less than T2 stage (85.7%). Fourteen patients (33.3%) showed regional nodal metastasis, 36 patients (85.7%) were treated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) plus mitomycin, and the remaining patients were treated by 5-FU plus cisplatinum. The median follow--up time was 62 months (2-202 months).The 5-year overall survival, locoregional relapse-free survival, disease-free survival, and colostomy-free survival rates were 86.0%, 71.7%, 71.7%, 78.2%, respectively. Regarding overall survival, the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status and complete response were found to be significant prognostic factors on univariate analysis. For multivariate analysis, only the ECOG performance status was significant. No significant factor was found for locoregional relapse-free survival or disease-free survival and similarly for treatment response, no significant factor was determined on logistic regression analysis. There were 7 patients who had local or regional recurrences and one patient with distant metastasis. The only evaluable toxicity in all patients was radiation dermatitis of perianal skin (grade 3), which developed in 4 patients (9.5%) and grade 2 in 22 patients (52.4%). This study revealed that patients with a performance score of ECOG 0-1 survived significantly longer than those with a poorer score. Finally, there was no significant predicting factors tested for treatment response.

  7. Definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Yoo Kang; Lee, Jong Hoon; Lee, Myung Ah; Chun, Hoo Geun; Kim, Dong Goo; You, Young Kyoung; Hong, Tae Ho; Jang, Hong Seok [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    Survival outcome of locally advanced pancreatic cancer has been poor and little is known about prognostic factors of the disease, especially in locally advanced cases treated with concurrent chemoradiation. This study was to analyze overall survival and prognostic factors of patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Medical records of 34 patients diagnosed with unresectable pancreatic cancer and treated with definitive CCRT, from December 2003 to December 2012, were reviewed. Median prescribed radiation dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 41.4 to 55.8 Gy), once daily, five times per week, 1.8 to 3 Gy per fraction. With a mean follow-up of 10 months (range, 0 to 49 months), median overall survival was 9 months. The 1- and 2-year survival rates were 40% and 10%, respectively. Median and mean time to progression were 5 and 7 months, respectively. Prognostic parameters related to overall survival were post-CCRT CA19-9 (p = 0.02), the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) status (p < 0.01), and radiation dose (p = 0.04) according to univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, post-CCRT CA19-9 value below 180 U/mL and ECOG status 0 or 1 were statistically significant independent prognostic factors associated with improved overall survival (p < 0.01 and p = 0.02, respectively). Overall treatment results in locally advanced pancreatic cancer are relatively poor and few improvements have been accomplished in the past decades. Post-treatment CA19-9 below 180 U/mL and ECOG performance status 0 and 1 were significantly associated with an improved overall survival.

  8. Treatment outcomes of definitive chemoradiotherapy for patients with hypopharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, Rie; Kodaira, Takeshi; Furutani, Kazuhisa

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed the efficacy of definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for patients with hypopharyngeal cancer (HPC). Subjects comprised 97 patients who were treated with definitive CRT from 1990 to 2006. Sixty-one patients (62.9%) with resectable disease who aimed to preserve the larynx received induction chemotherapy (ICT), whereas 36 patients (37.1%) with resectable disease who refused an operation or who had unresectable disease received primary alternating CRT or concurrent CRT (non-ICT). The median dose to the primary lesion was 66 Gy. The median follow-up time was 77 months. The 5-year rates of overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), local control (LC), and laryngeal preservation were 68.7%, 57.5%, 79.1%, and 70.3%, respectively. The T-stage was a significant prognostic factor in terms of OS, PFS and LC in both univariate and multivariate analyses. The 5-year rates of PFS were 45.4% for the ICT group and 81.9% for the non-ICT group. The difference between these groups was significant with univariate analysis (P=0.006). Acute toxicity of Grade 3 to 4 was observed in 34 patients (35.1%). Grade 3 dysphagia occurred in 20 patients (20.6%). Twenty-nine (29.8%) of 44 patients with second primary cancer had esophageal cancer. Seventeen of 29 patients had manageable superficial esophageal cancer. The clinical efficacy of definitive CRT for HPC is thought to be promising in terms of not only organ preservation but also disease control. Second primary cancer may have a clinical impact on the outcome for HPC patients, and special care should be taken when screening at follow-up. (author)

  9. Chemoradiotherapy for uterine cancer. Current status and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzuya, Kazuo

    2004-01-01

    The conventional local treatment methods (surgery and radiation) for cervical cancer have reached a plateau in terms of survival benefit and, therefore, in this review, new treatment strategies (combined chemotherapy [CT] and local therapy) to overcome the poor prognosis were examined in high-risk groups. The effectiveness of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) administered prior to radiotherapy (RT) has not been confirmed for any disease stages. But NAC followed by surgery may improve survival in patients with stage Ib2 compared with surgery alone; and in patients with stage Ib2 to IIB compared with RT alone. Five large randomized clinical trials (RCTs) demonstrated a significant survival benefit for patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT), using a cisplatin (CDDP)-based regimen, with a 28%-50% relative reduction in the risk of death. In addition, the results of a meta-analysis of 19 RCTs of CCRT (1981-2000) involving 4580 patients showed that CCRT significantly improved overall survival (OS) hazard ratio ([HR] 0.71; P<0.0001), as well as progression-free survival (PFS; HR 0.61; P<0.0001). In line with these results, CCRT is currently recommended as standard therapy for advanced cancer (stage III/IVA) in the United States. However, there remains much controversy and uncertainty regarding the optimal therapeutic approaches, especially for patients with advanced cancer. Additional RCTs should be conducted to find the optimal CT regimen and RT for Japanese patients, considering acute and late complications, as well as differences in pelvic anatomy, total radiation dose, and RT procedures between Japan and other countries. Evidence obtained from such studies should establish the optimal CCRT treatment protocol and define the patient population (disease stage) that the protocol really benefits. (author)

  10. Renal Atrophy Secondary to Chemoradiotherapy of Abdominal Malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Gary Y.; May, Kilian Salerno; Iyer, Renuka V.; Chandrasekhar, Rameela M.A.; Wilding, Gregory E.; McCloskey, Susan A.; Khushalani, Nikhil I.; Yendamuri, Saikrishna S.; Gibbs, John F.; Fakih, Marwan; Thomas, Charles R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To identify factors predictive of renal atrophy after chemoradiotherapy of gastrointestinal malignancies. Methods and Materials: Patients who received chemotherapy and abdominal radiotherapy (RT) between 2002 and 2008 were identified for this study evaluating change in kidney size and function after RT. Imaging and biochemical data were obtained before and after RT in 6-month intervals. Kidney size was defined by craniocaudal measurement on CT images. The primarily irradiated kidney (PK) was defined as the kidney that received the greater mean kidney dose. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated to predict risk for renal atrophy. Results: Of 130 patients, median age was 64 years, and 51.5% were male. Most primary disease sites were pancreas and periampullary tumors (77.7%). Median follow-up was 9.4 months. Creatinine clearance declined 20.89%, and size of the PK decreased 4.67% 1 year after completion of chemoradiation. Compensatory hypertrophy of the non-PK was not seen. Percentage volumes of the PK receiving ≥10 Gy (V 10 ), 15 Gy (V 15 ), and 20 Gy (V 20 ) were significantly associated with renal atrophy 1 year after RT (p = 0.0030, 0.0029, and 0.0028, respectively). Areas under the ROC curves for V 10 , V 15 , and V 20 to predict >5% decrease in PK size were 0.760, 0.760, and 0.762, respectively. Conclusions: Significant detriments in PK size and renal function were seen after abdominal RT. The V 10 , V 15 , and V 20 were predictive of risk for PK atrophy 1 year after RT. Analyses suggest the association of lower-dose renal irradiation with subsequent development of renal atrophy.

  11. Clinical evaluation of chemoradiotherapy for advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneyasu, Yuko; Okawa, Tomohiko; Okawa-Kita, Midori.

    1997-01-01

    Locally advanced cervical cancer has a poor prognosis, poor survival rate, and high local failure rate. A number of questions regarding the optimal agents and schedule of concurrent chemoradiation remain unanswered. To improve the cure rate for advanced or recurrent cervix cancer, we studied intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy (IAIC) with or without radiotherapy. We analyzed 52 cases of advanced or recurrent cervical cancer treated by IAIC with or without radiotherapy. IAIC regimen was separated into two groups: group I consisted of 5-FU+MMC±ADM (30 cases) and group II of CDDP+MMC±5-FU (22 cases). The tip of the catheter was placed in the bifurcation of abdominal aorta or the bilateral internal iliac arteries (7 cases). The overall response rate (CR+PR) was 71%, 87% in patients receiving radiotherapy, 50% in those without radiotherapy, and 100% in primary cases. The five-year survival rate was 20% in primary cases, 14% in recurrent cases, 3% in group I and 38% in group II by chemotherapy regimen. Severe (more than grade III) hematological acute side effects were found in 48% of all cases, but recovered by interruption of drugs. In 7 cases in which the tip of the catheter was placed in internal iliac arteries, there were severe skin ulcers in 2 cases and severe pain of leg or gluteal region which need narcotics in 2 cases. These data suggest that IAIC mainly with cisplatin with or without radiotherapy is one of the effective treatments for advanced or recurrent cervical cancer. But we should check blood flow distribution periodically, and control the concentration of drugs. To improve the survival rate for advanced or recurrent cervical cancer, we should discuss neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by chemoradiotherapy and maintenance systemic chemotherapy. (author)

  12. Preoperative alcoholism and postoperative morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonnesen, H; Kehlet, H

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preoperative risk assessment has become part of daily clinical practice, but preoperative alcohol abuse has not received much attention. METHODS: A Medline search was carried out to identify original papers published from 1967 to 1998. Relevant articles on postoperative morbidity...... in alcohol abusers were used to evaluate the evidence. RESULTS: Prospective and retrospective studies demonstrate a twofold to threefold increase in postoperative morbidity in alcohol abusers, the most frequent complications being infections, bleeding and cardiopulmonary insufficiency. Wound complications...... to postoperative morbidity. CONCLUSION: Alcohol consumption should be included in the preoperative assessment of likely postoperative outcome. Reduction of postoperative morbidity in alcohol abusers may include preoperative alcohol abstinence to improve organ function, or perioperative alcohol administration...

  13. Cryotherapy on postoperative rehabilitation of joint arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Sheng-Hui; Jiang, Wen-Tong; Guo, Lei; Jin, Yu-Heng; Jiang, Tian-Long; Zhao, Yuyan; Zhao, Jie

    2015-11-01

    The effectiveness of cryotherapy on joint arthroplasty recovery remains controversial. This systematic review was conducted to assess the effectiveness of cryotherapy in patients after joint arthroplasty. Comprehensive literature searches of several databases including Cochrane Library (2013), MEDLINE (1950-2013), and Embase (1980-2013) were performed. We sought randomised controlled trials that compared the experimental group received any form of cryotherapy with any control group after joint arthroplasty. The main outcomes were postoperative blood loss, adverse events, and pain. Analyses were performed with Revman 5.0. Results were shown as mean differences (MD) and standard deviations or as risk difference and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). Ten trials comprised 660 total knee arthroplastys and three trials comprised 122 total hip arthroplastys (THAs) met the inclusion criteria. Blood loss was significantly decreased by cryotherapy (MD = -109.68; 95 % CI -210.92 to -8.44; P = 0.03). Cryotherapy did not increase the risk of adverse effect (n.s.). Cryotherapy decreased pain at the second day of postoperative (MD = -1.32; 95 % CI -2.37 to -0.27; P = 0.0003), but did not decreased pain at the first and third day of postoperative (n.s.). Cryotherapy appears effective in these selected patients after joint arthroplasty. The benefits of cryotherapy on blood loss after joint arthroplasty were obvious. However, the subgroup analysis indicated that cryotherapy did not decreased blood loss after THA. Cryotherapy did not increase the risk of adverse effect. Cryotherapy decreased pain at the second day of postoperative, but did not decreased pain at the first and third day of postoperative. II.

  14. Use of sequential endorectal US to predict the tumor response of preoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Dou, Lizhou; Zhang, Yueming; Jin, Jing; Wang, Guiqi; Xiao, Qin; Li, Yexiong; Wang, Xin; Ren, Hua; Fang, Hui; Wang, Weihu; Wang, Shulian; Liu, Yueping; Song, Yongwen

    2017-03-01

    Accurate prediction of the response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) potentially assists in the individualized selection of treatment. Endorectal US (ERUS) is widely used for the pretreatment staging of rectal cancer, but its use for preoperatively predicting the effects of CRT is not well evaluated because of the inflammation, necrosis, and fibrosis induced by CRT. This study assessed the value of sequential ERUS in predicting the efficacy of preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer. Forty-one patients with clinical stage II/III rectal adenocarcinoma were enrolled prospectively. Radiotherapy was delivered to the pelvis with concurrent chemotherapy of capecitabine and oxaliplatin. Total mesorectal excision was performed 6 to 8 weeks later. EUS measurements of primary tumor maximum diameter were performed before (ERUS1), during (ERUS2), and 6 to 8 weeks after (ERUS3) CRT, and the ratios of these were calculated. Correlations between ERUS values, tumor regression grade (TRG), T down-staging rate, and pathologic complete response (pCR) rate were assessed, and survival was analyzed. There was no significant correlation between ERUS2/ERUS1 and TRG. The value of ERUS3/ERUS1 correlated with pCR rate and TRG but not T down-staging rate. An ERUS3 value of 6.3 mm and ERUS3/ERUS1 of 52% were used as the cut-off for predicting pCR, and patients were divided into good and poor prognosis groups. Although not statistically significant, 3-year recurrence and survival rates of the good prognosis group were better than those of the poor prognosis group. Sequential ERUS may predict therapeutic efficacy of preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer. (Clinical trial registration number: NCT01582750.). Copyright © 2017 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Chemoradiotherapy for muscle invading bladder carcinoma. final report of a single institutional organ-sparing program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arias, Fernando; Dominguez, Miguel A.; Martinez, Enrique; Illarramendi, Jose J.; Miquelez, Santiago; Pascual, Ignacio; Marcos, Marta

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Chemoradiotherapy is becoming an alternative to radical cystectomy among patients with muscle invading bladder cancer. We began a prospective study in 1988 to determine the possibilities of conservative treatment and aiming to improve the results obtained by cystectomy alone in invasive bladder cancer. A combination of methotrexate, vinblastine, adriamycin, and cisplatin (M-VAC), followed by radiotherapy and concomitant cisplatin was used. Methods: Fifty patients with good performance status and with stages T2 to T4 operable untreated invasive bladder cancer were entered in the study. Treatment protocol was as follows: (i) cytoreductive transurethral resection; (ii) two cycles of M-VAC chemotherapy; (iii) radiotherapy, 45 Gy on pelvic volume and, at the same time, 20 mg/m 2 cisplatin on days 1 to 5. Cystoscopic evaluation: if there was a complete response, radiotherapy was completed up to 65 Gy; if there was not a complete response, a cystectomy was performed. Median follow-up of the series was 73 months (18-180 m). Results: Tumor response was as follows: 34 complete responses (68%), 9 partial responses (18%), and 7 nonresponses (14%) were observed. The 5-year overall survival and local control were 48% and 47%, respectively. For the complete responder patient, 5-year survival and local control were 65% and 70%, respectively. Severe toxicity was uncommon. The most frequent were leucopenia and cystitis. No treatment-related deaths occurred with either treatment protocol. Conclusions: Conservative combination treatment may be an acceptable alternative to immediate cystectomy in selected patients with bladder cancer, although a randomized clinical trial would be required to produce definitive results

  16. Salvage definitive chemo-radiotherapy for locally recurrent oesophageal carcinoma after primary surgery: retrospective review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxi, S. H.; Burmeister, B.; Harvey, J. A.; Smithers, M.; Thomas, J.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: To determine the overall survival and gastrointestinal toxicity for patients treated with salvage definitive chemo-radiotherapy after primary surgery for locoregional relapse of oesophageal carcinoma. A retrospective review of 525 patients who had a resection for oesophageal or oesophagogastric carcinoma at Princess Alexandra Hospital identified 14 patients treated with salvage definitive radiotherapy or chemo-radiotherapy, following localized recurrence of their disease. We analysed the patient and treatment characteristics to determine the median overall survival as the primary end point. Gastrointestinal toxicity was examined to determine if increased toxicity occurred when the stomach was irradiated within the intrathoracic radiotherapy field. The median overall survival for patients treated with curative intent using salvage definitive chemo-radiotherapy was 16 months and the 2-year overall survival is 21%. One patient is in clinical remission more than 5 years after therapy. Age <60 years old and nodal recurrence were favourable prognostic factors. Treatment compliance was 93% with only one patient unable to complete the intended schedule. Fourteen per cent of patients experienced grade 3 or 4 gastrointestinal toxicity. Salvage definitive chemo-radiotherapy should be considered for good performance status patients with oesophageal carcinoma who have a locoregional relapse after primary surgery. The schedule is tolerable with low toxicity and an acceptable median survival

  17. Treatment results of chemoradiotherapy with 5-FU/CDGP for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himei, Kengo; Katayama, Norihisa; Takemoto, Mitsuhiro; Kuroda, Masahiro; Nomiya, Shigenobu; Onoda, Tomoo; Tominaga, Susumu; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the safety and efficacy of alternative and concurrent chemoradiotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (FU)/nedaplatin (CDGP) for head and neck cancer. From January 2003 to August 2005, 19 patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma were treated in our institution. Alternative chemoradiotherapy (ACRT) was performed for 8 cases of nasopharyngeal cancer. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) was performed for 11 cases of other head and neck cancer. Median total dose of radiotherapy was 63 Gy. ACRT consisted of 5-FU at a dose of 500 mg/m 2 on days 1-5 and 28-32 and CDGP at a dose of 60 mg/m 2 on days 6 and 33. CCRT consisted of 5-FU at a dose of 500 mg/m 2 on days 1-4 and 28-31 and CDGP at a dose of 60 mg/m 2 on days 5 and 32. Median follow-up period was 13 months. CR+PR was admitted in five cases (63%) with ACRT, and in 9 cases (82%) with CCRT. Non-hematological adverse effects of grade 3 were admitted in eight cases (100%) of ACRT, and in 9 cases (82%) of CCRT. Chemoradiotherapy attained good results and non-hematological adverse effects were able to be managed by preserved treatment. (author)

  18. Reduction in cardiac volume during chemoradiotherapy for patients with esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutkenhaus, Lotte J., E-mail: l.j.lutkenhaus@amc.uva.nl; Kamphuis, Martijn; Wieringen, Niek van; Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M.; Bel, Arjan

    2013-11-15

    We investigated the change in cardiac volume over the course of chemoradiotherapy in 26 patients treated for esophageal cancer, using cone beam CT imaging. The cardiac volume reduced significantly, with a median reduction of 8%. A significant relationship with planned cardiac dose was not found.

  19. Reduction in cardiac volume during chemoradiotherapy for patients with esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutkenhaus, Lotte J.; Kamphuis, Martijn; Wieringen, Niek van; Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M.; Bel, Arjan

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the change in cardiac volume over the course of chemoradiotherapy in 26 patients treated for esophageal cancer, using cone beam CT imaging. The cardiac volume reduced significantly, with a median reduction of 8%. A significant relationship with planned cardiac dose was not found

  20. High-dose chemoradiotherapy and watchful waiting for distal rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L; Pløen, John; Harling, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    -dose radiotherapy with concomitant chemotherapy followed by observation (watchful waiting) was successful for non-surgical management of low rectal cancer. METHODS: Patients with primary, resectable, T2 or T3, N0-N1 adenocarcinoma in the lower 6 cm of the rectum were given chemoradiotherapy (60 Gy in 30 fractions...

  1. Risk factors for severe Dysphagia after concurrent chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koiwai, Keiichiro; Shikama, Naoto; Sasaki, Shigeru; Shinoda, Atsunori; Kadoya, Masumi

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the risk factors for dysphagia induced by chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancers. Forty-seven patients with head and neck cancers who underwent definitive chemoradiotherapy from December 1998 to March 2006 were reviewed retrospectively. Median age was 63 years (range, 16-81). The locations of the primary lesion were as follows: larynx in 18 patients, oropharynx in 11, nasopharynx in 7, hypopharynx in 7 and others in 4. Clinical stages were as follows: Stage II in 20 and Stages III-IV in 27. Almost all patients underwent platinum-based concomitant chemoradiotherapy. The median cumulative dose of cisplatin was 100 mg/m 2 (range, 80-300) and median radiation dose was 70 Gy (range, 50-70). Severe dysphagia (Grade 3-4) was observed in 22 patients (47%) as an acute toxic event. One patient required tube feeding even at 12-month follow-up. In univariate analysis, clinical stage (III-IV) (P=0.017), primary site (oro-hypopharynx) (P=0.041) and radiation portal size (>11 cm) (P<0.001) were found to be associated with severe dysphagia. In multivariate analysis, only radiation portal size was found to have a significant relationship with severe dysphagia (P=0.048). Larger radiation portal field was associated with severe dysphagia induced by chemoradiotherapy. (author)

  2. Treatment for cancer in the cervical esophagus. Surgery versus definitive chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umeno, Hirohito; Fujita, Hiromasa; Inoue, Youjirou

    2012-01-01

    Eighty-two patients with cervical esophageal cancer were treated by definitive chemoradiotherapy (10 patients) or surgery (72 patients) between 1989 and 2009 at the Kurume University Hospital. The 3-year overall survival rate after surgery was 51% and that after definitive chemoradiotherapy was 44%, showing no significant difference between the two groups. The 3-year local control rate after surgery was significantly better than that after definitive chemoradiotherapy. The overall 5-year survival rate of patients requiring a mediastinal tracheostomy was 11%, while that of those without a mediastinal tracheostomy was 39%. There was no significant difference between the two groups. The commencement of oral intake took a long time after treatment in patients with a T4 tumor who underwent chemoradiotherapy and who had vocal fold paralysis. Almost all patients who underwent esophageal reconstruction using the alimentary tract after pharyngolaryngoesophagectomy could take food within two weeks after surgery. On the other hand, in patients with vocal cord paralysis after cervical esophagectomy without laryngectomy, several months were needed after surgery to take food orally. (author)

  3. POSTOPERATIVE NAUSEA AND VOMITING | Yusufu | Annals of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antiemetics, acupuncture and other drugs are used to prevent and treat postoperative nausea and vomiting. Those that manage patients in the postoperative period should endeavour to make postoperative nausea and vomiting as unacceptable as postoperative pain. Key words: Postoperative, Nausea, Vomiting, Narcotics, ...

  4. High-dose chemoradiotherapy and watchful waiting for distal rectal cancer: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelt, Ane L; Pløen, John; Harling, Henrik; Jensen, Frank S; Jensen, Lars H; Jørgensen, Jens C R; Lindebjerg, Jan; Rafaelsen, Søren R; Jakobsen, Anders

    2015-08-01

    Abdominoperineal resection is the standard treatment for patients with distal T2 or T3 rectal cancers; however, the procedure is extensive and mutilating, and alternative treatment strategies are being investigated. We did a prospective observational trial to assess whether high-dose radiotherapy with concomitant chemotherapy followed by observation (watchful waiting) was successful for non-surgical management of low rectal cancer. Patients with primary, resectable, T2 or T3, N0-N1 adenocarcinoma in the lower 6 cm of the rectum were given chemoradiotherapy (60 Gy in 30 fractions to tumour, 50 Gy in 30 fractions to elective lymph node volumes, 5 Gy endorectal brachytherapy boost, and oral tegafur-uracil 300 mg/m(2)) every weekday for 6 weeks. Endoscopies and biopsies of the tumour were done at baseline, throughout the course of treatment (weeks 2, 4, and 6), and 6 weeks after the end of treatment. We allocated patients with complete clinical tumour regression, negative tumour site biopsies, and no nodal or distant metastases on CT and MRI 6 weeks after treatment to the observation group (watchful waiting). We referred all other patients to standard surgery. Patients under observation were followed up closely with endoscopies and selected-site biopsies, with surgical resection given for local recurrence. The primary endpoint was local tumour recurrence 1 year after allocation to the observation group. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00952926. Enrolment is closed, but follow-up continues for secondary endpoints. Between Oct 20, 2009, and Dec 23, 2013, we enrolled 55 patients. Patients were recruited from three surgical units throughout Denmark and treated in one tertiary cancer centre (Vejle Hospital, Vejle, Denmark). Of 51 patients who were eligible, 40 had clinical complete response and were allocated to observation. Median follow-up for local recurrence in the observation group was 23·9 months (IQR 15·3-31·0). Local recurrence in the

  5. Treatment results of incomplete chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Y

    2013-04-01

    ; toxicity was acceptable. Disease free survival and overall survival were similar between the treatment groups. Keywords: cervical cancer, chemoradiotherapy, 5-fluorouracil, cisplatin, local control, toxicity

  6. Clinicopathological study of response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy and applicability for minimum invasive surgery on advanced tongue carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohgi, Kazuhiko; Kirita, Tadaaki; Sugimura, Masahito

    2000-01-01

    Forty patients who received chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery for advanced tongue carcinoma were studied clinically and histopathologically, and the minimally invasive treatment for advanced tongue carcinoma was evaluated. Clinical effects on the primary tumor were CR in 22 (55.0%), PR in 15 (37.5%), and NC in 3 (7.5%). The CR rate was nearly 60%, and the overall response rate was 92.5%; the treatment was highly effective. Histological effects on the primary tumor were Grade II b or above, i.e. effective, in 31 (8.6%), and Grade IV, i.e. pathological CR, in 18 (51.4%). The treatment was also very effective histologically, and a correlation was observed between clinical effects and histological effects. Concerning the relationship between histological effects and the regression rate, a regression rate of 85% or higher was needed to obtain a histological effect of Grade II b or above, and a regression rate of 95% or higher was needed to obtain a histological effect of Grade III or above. Investigation of residual tumors showed persistence of cancer cells primarily in the center of the tumor, but both the horizontal and vertical residual rates were low, and cancer cells tended to be limited to the superficial layer of the central area of the primary tumor in the patients who showed a regression rate of 85% or higher. Histopathological malignancy, tumor vessel density (CD31), and p53 were suggested to be potential predictive factors of the effectiveness of preoperative therapy. The residual tumor Grade (R Grade) in the resected specimen is considered to be useful as a prognostic factor after resection of the primary tumor. Histological effects were also satisfactory in patients who showed a clinical effect of 85% or higher on this preoperative therapy. In such patients, minimum invasive surgery is considered to be applicable even in advanced cases, and improvements in the postoperative QOL are expected by oral organ/function preservation. (author)

  7. Chemoradiotherapy of esophagus cancers: prognostic value of anti-P53 and anti-ras circulating antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, P.; Quero, L.; Pacaud, V.; Baruch-Hennequin, V.; Maylin, C.; Hennequin, C.; Schlageter, M.H.

    2007-01-01

    The presence of anti-p53 antibodies makes suspect a resistance to the chemoradiotherapy and has to make envisage other approaches that the chemo - radiotherapy by 5-fluoro-uracil-cisplatin (surgery, intensification, targeted therapeutic). (N.C.)

  8. Prognostic implication of simultaneous anemia and lymphopenia during concurrent chemoradiotherapy in cervical squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Oyeon; Chun, Mison; Oh, Young-Taek; Noh, O Kyu; Chang, Suk-Joon; Ryu, Hee-Sug; Lee, Eun Ju

    2017-10-01

    Radioresistance often leads to poor survival in concurrent chemoradiotherapy-treated cervical squamous cell carcinoma, and reliable biomarkers can improve prognosis. We compared the prognostic potential of hemoglobin, absolute neutrophil count, and absolute lymphocyte count with that of squamous cell carcinoma antigen in concurrent chemoradiotherapy-treated squamous cell carcinoma. We analyzed 152 patients with concurrent chemoradiotherapy and high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy-treated cervical squamous cell carcinoma. Hemoglobin, absolute neutrophil count, absolute lymphocyte count, and squamous cell carcinoma antigen were quantitated and correlated with survival, using Cox regression, receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, and Kaplan-Meier plots. Both hemoglobin and absolute lymphocyte count in the second week of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (Hb2 and ALC2) and squamous cell carcinoma antigen in the third week of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (mid-squamous cell carcinoma antigen) correlated significantly with disease-specific survival and progression-free survival. The ratio of high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy dose to total dose (high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy ratio) correlated significantly with progression-free survival. Patients with both low Hb2 (≤11 g/dL) and ALC2 (≤639 cells/µL) showed a lower 5-year disease-specific survival rate than those with high Hb2 and/or ALC2, regardless of mid-squamous cell carcinoma antigen (mid-squamous cell carcinoma antigen: ≤4.7 ng/mL; 5-year disease-specific survival rate: 85.5% vs 94.6%, p = 0.0096, and mid-squamous cell carcinoma antigen: >4.7 ng/mL; 5-year disease-specific survival rate: 43.8% vs 66.7%, p = 0.192). When both Hb2 and ALC2 were low, the low high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy ratio (≤0.43) subgroup displayed significantly lower 5-year disease-specific survival rate compared to the subgroup high high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy ratio (>0

  9. Older patients with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer. Long-term survival after concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semrau, Sabine; Fietkau, Rainer [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuernberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Zettl, Heike [Rostock Cancer Registry University of Rostock, Rostock (Germany); Hildebrandt, Guido [University of Rostock, Department of Radiation Therapy, Rostock (Germany); Klautke, Gunther [Klinikum Chemnitz, Department of Radiation Therapy, Chemnitz (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Considering the various comorbidities associated with aging, the feasibility and usefulness of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in older patients with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a controversial issue. Here, we compared the feasibility of CRT and the effects of various comorbidities on the prognosis of a minimally selected population of inoperable NSCLC patients aged 60-77 years. The study comprised 161 patients with inoperable NSCLC who received CRT with a target radiation dose greater than 60 Gy and platinum-based chemotherapy from 1998 to 2007. The total population included 69 patients aged 60-69 years and 53 aged 70-77 years. These two age cohorts were included in the study with a follow-up of a median 14.5 months. The two groups showed no differences in long-term survival, as reflected by the 5-year survival rates of 13.0 ± 4.1 % (60- to 69-year-olds) and 14.4 ± 4.9 % (70- to 77-year-olds). During the treatment phase, the groups were comparable in terms of toxicity and the feasibility of chemotherapy. Compared to patients in their 60s, the septuagenarians had more pulmonary comorbidities (p = 0.02), diabetes mellitus (p = 0.04), cardiac comorbidities (p = 0.08), and previous cancer disease (p = 0.08) that exerted a negative effect on survival. In patients without comorbidities, there were no differences between the age groups. Age is not a contraindication for concurrent CRT per se, because elderly patients do not have a worse long-term prognosis than younger seniors. However, ''elderly patients'' (≥ 70-77 years) have more concomitant diseases associated with shorter survival than ''moderately aged patients'' (≥ 60-69 years). (orig.) [German] Hinsichtlich der verschiedenen altersbedingten Komorbiditaeten werden die Durchfuehrbarkeit und der Nutzen einer simultanen Chemoradiotherapie (''concurrent chemoradiotherapy'', CRT) bei alten Patienten mit einem inoperablen nicht

  10. Postoperative ileus: a preventable event

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Kathrine; Kehlet, H

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative ileus has traditionally been accepted as a normal response to tissue injury. No data support any beneficial effect of ileus and indeed it may contribute to delayed recovery and prolonged hospital stay. Efforts should, therefore, be made to reduce such ileus. METHODS......: Material was identified from a Medline search of the literature, previous review articles and references cited in original papers. This paper updates knowledge on the pathophysiology and treatment of postoperative ileus. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Pathogenesis mainly involves inhibitory neural reflexes...... only cisapride is proven beneficial; the effect of early enteral feeding remains unclear. However, postoperative ileus may be greatly reduced when all of the above are combined in a multimodal rehabilitation strategy....

  11. Alcohol abuse and postoperative morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, Hanne

    2003-01-01

    Patients who drink too much have more complications after surgery. The aim of this thesis was to evaluate the evidence, possible mechanisms, and prevention of the increased postoperative morbidity in alcohol abusers, defined by a consumption of at least five drinks per day. The literature could...... be criticised for several methodological flaws. Nevertheless, the results are in agreement showing moderate to strong evidence of increased postoperative morbidity after surgical procedures on alcohol abusers. There is weak to moderate evidence of increased postoperative mortality, hospital stay, and re......-operation. The personal and economic consequences are tremendous. The incidence of alcohol abusers undergoing surgery was 7% to 49%, according to gender and diagnosis. They have been identified by a self-reported alcohol intake, which implies the possibility of underestimation. Alcohol markers could be used for a more...

  12. Effects of omeprazole in improving concurrent chemoradiotherapy efficacy in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-Liang; Liu, Min; Yang, Qing; Lin, Shi-Yong; Shan, Hong-Bo; Wang, Hui-Yun; Xu, Guo-Liang

    2017-04-14

    To explore the effects of omeprazole on chemoradiotherapy efficacy and tumor recurrence in rectal cancer. The medical data of 125 rectal cancer patients who received the same neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) followed by surgery were retrospectively collected. Patients who received omeprazole (OME) orally at a dose of 20 mg at least once daily for six days and/or intravenously at 40 mg a day were recognized as eligible OME users (EOU). Otherwise, patients were regarded as non-eligible OME users (non-EOU). Moreover, a preferred OME dose cut-off of 200 mg on tumor recurrence was obtained by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Patients were divided into two groups: the effective OME group (EOG, OME ≥ 200 mg) and the non-effective OME group (non-EOG, OME cancer treatment for relieving common side effects of chemotherapy, omeprazole has a synergetic effect in improving CRT efficacy and decreasing rectal cancer recurrence.

  13. Midline submental orotracheal intubation in maxillofacial injuries: A substitute to tracheostomy where postoperative mechanical ventilation is not required

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malti Agrawal

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion: There were no significant operative or postoperative complications. Postoperative submental scarring was acceptable [6] . We conclude that midline submental intubation is a simple and useful technique with low morbidity. It can be chosen in selected cases of maxillofacial trauma and is an excellent substitute to tracheostomy where postoperative mechanical ventilation is not required.

  14. Oxygen therapy reduces postoperative tachycardia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stausholm, K; Kehlet, H; Rosenberg, J

    1995-01-01

    Concomitant hypoxaemia and tachycardia in the postoperative period is unfavourable for the myocardium. Since hypoxaemia per se may be involved in the pathogenesis of postoperative tachycardia, we have studied the effect of oxygen therapy on tachycardia in 12 patients randomly allocated to blinded...... air or oxygen by facemask on the second or third day after major surgery. Inclusion criteria were arterial hypoxaemia (oxygen saturation 90 beat.min-1). Each patient responded similarly to oxygen therapy: an increase in arterial oxygen saturation and a decrease...... in heart rate (p oxygen has a positive effect on the cardiac oxygen delivery and demand balance....

  15. Correlation of hedgehog signal activation with chemoradiotherapy sensitivity and survival in esophageal squamous cell carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Weiguo; You Zhenbin; Li Tao; Yu Changhua; Tao Guangzhou; Hu Mingli; Chen Xiaofei

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the significance of hedgehog signaling pathway in chemoradiotherapy sensitivity and its effect on the prognosis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. In the present study, we used the method of immunohistochemistry to examine the expression status of two hedgehog components, PTCH1 and glioma-associated oncogene GLI-1, in 100 pre-treated biopsy specimens of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy. We find that high levels of PTCH1 and GLI-1 were detected in 76.0 and 72.0% of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, respectively. Significant associations of high PTCH1 and GLI-1 expression with large tumor size (both P=0.01), locoregional progression (P=0.001 and 0.003, respectively) and the lack of complete response to chemoradiotherapy (P=0.008 and 0.01, respectively) were observed. Univariate analysis revealed that high PTCH1 and GLI-1 expression was associated with poor locoregional progression-free survival, distant progression-free survival and overall survival. Furthermore, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients with high PTCH1 and GLI-1 expression have the shorter survival time than the subgroups with negative and low PTCH1 and GLI-1 expression. In multivariate analysis, PTCH1 and GLI-1 expression status were both evaluated as independent prognostic factors for locoregional progression-free survival, distant progression-free survival and overall survival. These findings suggest an important role for the activation of hedgehog signaling in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma progression and that PTCH1 and GLI-1 expression may be significantly associated with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma resistance to chemoradiotherapy. (author)

  16. Preclinical Evaluation of Promitil, a Radiation-Responsive Liposomal Formulation of Mitomycin C Prodrug, in Chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Xi; Warner, Samuel B.; Wagner, Kyle T.; Caster, Joseph M. [Laboratory of Nano- and Translational Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Carolina Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence, Carolina Institute of Nanomedicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Zhang, Tian [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Ohana, Patricia [Lipomedix Pharmaceuticals, Jerusalem (Israel); Gabizon, Alberto A. [Lipomedix Pharmaceuticals, Jerusalem (Israel); Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem (Israel); Wang, Andrew Z., E-mail: zawang@med.unc.edu [Laboratory of Nano- and Translational Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Carolina Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence, Carolina Institute of Nanomedicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Purpose: To examine the effect of radiation on in vitro drug activation and release of Promitil, a pegylated liposomal formulation of a mitomycin C (MMC) lipid-based prodrug; and examine the efficacy and toxicity of Promitil with concurrent radiation in colorectal cancer models. Methods and Materials: Promitil was obtained from Lipomedix Pharmaceuticals (Jerusalem, Israel). We tested the effects of radiation on release of active MMC from Promitil in vitro. We next examined the radiosensitization effect of Promitil in vitro. We further evaluated the toxicity of a single injection of free MMC or Promitil when combined with radiation by assessing the effects on blood counts and in-field skin and hair toxicity. Finally, we compared the efficacy of MMC and Promitil in chemoradiotherapy using mouse xenograft models. Results: Mitomycin C was activated and released from Promitil in a controlled-release profile, and the rate of release was significantly increased in medium from previously irradiated cells. Both Promitil and MMC potently radiosensitized HT-29 cells in vitro. Toxicity of MMC (8.4 mg/kg) was substantially greater than with equivalent doses of Promitil (30 mg/kg). Mice treated with human-equivalent doses of MMC (3.3 mg/kg) experienced comparable levels of toxicity as Promitil-treated mice at 30 mg/kg. Promitil improved the antitumor efficacy of 5-fluorouracil–based chemoradiotherapy in mouse xenograft models of colorectal cancer, while equitoxic doses of MMC did not. Conclusions: We demonstrated that Promitil is an attractive agent for chemoradiotherapy because it demonstrates a radiation-triggered release of active drug. We further demonstrated that Promitil is a well-tolerated and potent radiosensitizer at doses not achievable with free MMC. These results support clinical investigations using Promitil in chemoradiotherapy.

  17. Concomitant intraarterial chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer evaluated by FDG-PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitagawa, Yoshimasa; Yonekura, Yoshiharu; Sano, Kazuo; Maruta, Yoshihiro; Ogasawara, Toshiyuki; Ogawa, Toru; Yoshida, Masanori [Fukui Medical Univ., Matsuoka (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of combined intraarterial chemotherapy (THP-ADM, 5-FU, and carboplatin) and radiotherapy on head and neck squamous cell carcinomas using positron emission tomography with {sup 18}F labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET). Twenty-three patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were included in the study. All patients completed the treatment regimen, and underwent 2 FDG-PET prior to and 4 weeks after chemoradiotherapy. The pre- and posttreatment PET images were compared with clinical and histopathological evaluations of the treatment effect. For the quantitative evaluation of regional radioactivity, standardized uptake values (SUVs) were used. The overall clinical response rate to the chemoradiotherapy was 100% (CR rate: 78.3%). Prior to treatment, FDG-PET detected neoplasms in all 23 patients. The neoplastic lesions showed high SUVs (mean: 9.15 mg/ml) prior to treatment, which significantly decreased after therapy (3.60 mg/ml, p<0.01, paired student t-test). Lesions with higher pretreatment SUVs (greater than 7 mg/ml) showed residual viable tumor cells after treatment in 4 out of 15 patients, whereas those with lower SUVs (less than 7 mg/ml 8 patients) were successfully treated. Four out of 9 tumors with posttreatment SUVs greater than 4 mg/ml had viable tumor cells, whereas all (14/14) tumors with post-SUVs less than 4 mg/ml showed no viable cells. With concomitant chemoradiotherapy monitored by FDG-PET, 8 patients avoided operation altogether, and the remaining 15 patients underwent a reduced form of surgery. Twenty patients survived (20/23, 87%) without recurrence. Concomitant chemoradiotherapy is effective for head and neck carcinoma. Pretreatment FDG-PET is useful for predicting the response to treatment. Posttreatment FDG-PET can evaluate residual viable cells. Thus FDG-PET is a valuable tool in the treatment of head and neck tumors. (author)

  18. Quantification of organ motion during chemoradiotherapy of rectal cancer using cone-beam computed tomography.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chong, Irene

    2011-11-15

    There has been no previously published data related to the quantification of rectal motion using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) during standard conformal long-course chemoradiotherapy. The purpose of the present study was to quantify the interfractional changes in rectal movement and dimensions and rectal and bladder volume using CBCT and to quantify the bony anatomy displacements to calculate the margins required to account for systematic (Σ) and random (σ) setup errors.

  19. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy with oral doxifluridine plus low-dose oral leucovorin in unresectable primary rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Jinsil; Cho, Jae Ho; Kim, Nam Kyu; Min, Jin Sik; Suh, Chang Ok

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The use of oral chemotherapeutic agents in chemoradiotherapy provides several advantages. Doxifluridine, an oral 5-FU prodrug, has been shown to be effective in colorectal cancer. We attempted a Phase II trial of preoperative chemoradiotherapy with doxifluridine plus a low-dose oral leucovorin in unresectable primary rectal cancer patients. In this study, toxicity and efficacy were evaluated. Methods and Materials: There were 23 patients with primary unresectable rectal cancer in this trial, 21 of whom were available for analysis. The patients were treated with oral doxifluridine (900 mg/day) plus oral leucovorin (30 mg/day) from days 1 to 35, and pelvic radiation of 45 Gy over 5 weeks. Surgical resection was performed 5-6 weeks after the treatment. Results: Acute toxicity involved thrombocytopenia, nausea/vomiting, diarrhea, and skin reaction. All were in Grade 1/2, except diarrhea, which was not only the most frequent (7 patients, 33.3%), but also the only toxicity of Grade 3 (2 patients). The clinical tumor response was shown in 5 patients (23.8%) as a complete response and 13 patients (61.9%) as a partial response. A complete resection with negative resection margin was done in 18 patients (85.7%), in 2 of whom a pathologic complete response was shown (9.5%). The overall downstaging rate in the T- and N-stage groupings was 71.4% (15 patients). Conclusion: This study demonstrated the efficacy and low toxicity of chemoradiotherapy with doxifluridine. Currently, a Phase III randomized trial of chemoradiotherapy is ongoing at our institute to compare the therapeutic efficacy of oral 5-FU with respect to i.v. 5-FU in locally advanced and unresectable rectal cancer

  20. Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM and extrapontine myelinolysis (EPM following concurrent chemoradiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Hui Chong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM is a disease that may present with coma, quadriplegia, or no symptoms at all. It is an iatrogenic demyelinating disease caused most frequently by overzealous correction of chronic hyponatremia and excessive swings in serum osmolality. Lesions can also occur outside the pons as extrapontine myelinolysis (EPM. Herein we have reported a case of CPM and EPM in a patient after chemoradiotherapy for recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

  1. Effect of early chemoradiotherapy in patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, In Bong; Jeong, Bae Kwon; Jeong, Ho Jin; Choi, Hoon Sik; Chai, Gyu Young; Kang, Myoung Hee; Kim, Hoon Gu; Lee, Gyeong Won; Na, Jae Beom; Kang, Ki Mun [Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    We evaluated the effect of early chemoradiotherapy on the treatment of patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC). Between January 2006 and December 2011, thirty-one patients with histologically proven LS-SCLC who were treated with two cycles of chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy and consolidation chemotherapy were retrospectively analyzed. The chemotherapy regimen was composed of etoposide and cisplatin. Thoracic radiotherapy consisted of 50 to 60 Gy (median, 54 Gy) given in 5 to 6.5 weeks. The follow-up period ranged from 5 to 53 months (median, 22 months). After chemoradiotherapy, 35.5% of the patients (11 patients) showed complete response, 61.3% (19 patients) showed partial response, 3.2% (one patient) showed progressive disease, resulting in an overall response rate of 96.8% (30 patients). The 1-, 2-, and 3-year overall survival (OS) rates were 66.5%, 41.0%, and 28.1%, respectively, with a median OS of 21.3 months. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year progression free survival (PFS) rates were 49.8%, 22.8%, and 13.7%, respectively, with median PFS of 12 months. The patterns of failure were: locoregional recurrences in 29.0% (nine patients), distant metastasis in 9.7% (three patients), and both locoregional and distant metastasis in 9.7% (three patients). Grade 3 or 4 toxicities of leukopenia, anemia, and thrombocytopenia were observed in 32.2%, 29.0%, and 25.8%, respectively. Grade 3 radiation esophagitis and radiation pneumonitis were shown in 12.9% and 6.4%, respectively. We conclude that early chemoradiotherapy for LS-SCLC provides feasible and acceptable local control and safety.

  2. Radiomics analysis of DWI data to identify the rectal cancer patients qualified for local excision after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhenchao; Liu, Zhenyu; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Shi, Yanjie; Wang, Shou; Fang, Mengjie; Sun, Yingshi; Dong, Enqing; Tian, Jie

    2018-02-01

    The Locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) patients were routinely treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) firstly and received total excision afterwards. While, the LARC patients might relieve to T1N0M0/T0N0M0 stage after the CRT, which would enable the patients be qualified for local excision. However, accurate pathological TNM stage could only be obtained by the pathological examination after surgery. We aimed to conduct a Radiomics analysis of Diffusion weighted Imaging (DWI) data to identify the patients in T1N0M0/T0N0M0 stages before surgery, in hope of providing clinical surgery decision support. 223 routinely treated LARC patients in Beijing Cancer Hospital were enrolled in current study. DWI data and clinical characteristics were collected after CRT. According to the pathological TNM stage, the patients of T1N0M0 and T0N0M0 stages were labelled as 1 and the other patients were labelled as 0. The first 123 patients in chronological order were used as training set, and the rest patients as validation set. 563 image features extracted from the DWI data and clinical characteristics were used as features. Two-sample T test was conducted to pre-select the top 50% discriminating features. Least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (Lasso)-Logistic regression model was conducted to further select features and construct the classification model. Based on the 14 selected image features, the area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) of 0.8781, classification Accuracy (ACC) of 0.8432 were achieved in the training set. In the validation set, AUC of 0.8707, ACC (ACC) of 0.84 were observed.

  3. The value of diffusion kurtosis magnetic resonance imaging for assessing treatment response of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jing; Xu, Qing; Song, Jia-Cheng; Li, Yan; Dai, Xin; Zhang, Ling; Shi, Hai-Bin [First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Department of Radiology, Nanjing (China); Huang, Dong-Ya [First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Department of General Surgery, Nanjing (China); Li, Yang [First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Department of Pathology, Nanjing (China)

    2017-05-15

    To evaluate the feasibility and value of diffusion kurtosis (DK) imaging in assessing treatment response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Forty-one patients were included. All patients underwent pre- and post-CRT DCE-MRI on a 3.0-Tesla MRI scanner. Imaging indices (D{sub app}, K{sub app} and ADC values) were measured. Change value (∇X) and change ratio (r ∇X) were calculated. Pathological tumour regression grade scores (Mandard) were the standard reference (good responders: pTRG 1-2; poor responders: pTRG 3-5). Diagnostic performance was compared using ROC analysis. For the pre-CRT measurements, pre-D{sub app-10th} was significantly lower in the good responder group than that of the poor responder group (p = 0.036). For assessing treatment response to neoadjuvant CRT, pre-D{sub app-10th} resulted in AUCs of 0.753 (p = 0.036) with a sensitivity of 66.67 % and a specificity of 77.78 %. The r ∇D{sub app} had a relatively high AUC (0.859) and high sensitivity (100 %) compared with other image indices. DKI is feasible for selecting good responders for neoadjuvant CRT for LARC. (orig.)

  4. Pharmacokinetic parameters derived from dynamic contrast enhanced MRI of cervical cancers predict chemoradiotherapy outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, Erlend K.F.; Hole, Knut Håkon; Lund, Kjersti V.; Sundfør, Kolbein; Kristensen, Gunnar B.; Lyng, Heidi; Malinen, Eirik

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the prognostic value of pharmacokinetic parameters derived from pre-chemoradiotherapy dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) of cervical cancer patients. Materials and methods: Seventy-eight patients with locally advanced cervical cancer underwent DCE-MRI with Gd-DTPA before chemoradiotherapy. The pharmacokinetic Brix and Tofts models were fitted to contrast enhancement curves in all tumor voxels, providing histograms of several pharmacokinetic parameters (Brix: A Brix , k ep , k el , Tofts: K trans , ν e ). A percentile screening approach including log-rank survival tests was undertaken to identify the clinically most relevant part of the intratumoral parameter distribution. Clinical endpoints were progression-free survival (PFS) and locoregional control (LRC). Multivariate analysis including FIGO stage and tumor volume was used to assess the prognostic significance of the imaging parameters. Results: A Brix , k el , and K trans were significantly (P e was significantly positively correlated with PFS only. k ep showed no association with any endpoint. A Brix was positively correlated with K trans and ν e , and showed the strongest association with endpoint in the log-rank testing. k el and K trans were independent prognostic factors in multivariate analysis with LRC as endpoint. Conclusions: Parameters estimated by pharmacokinetic analysis of DCE-MR images obtained prior to chemoradiotherapy may be used for identifying patients at risk of treatment failure

  5. Molecular biomarkers in extrahepatic bile duct cancer patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy for gross residual disease after surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Hyeon Kang; Kim, Kyu Bo; Chie, Eui Kyu; Ha, Sung W. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hae Jin [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    To analyze the outcomes of chemoradiotherapy for extrahepatic bile duct (EHBD) cancer patients who underwent R2 resection or bypass surgery and to identify prognostic factors affecting clinical outcomes, especially in terms of molecular biomarkers. Medical records of 21 patients with EHBD cancer who underwent R2 resection or bypass surgery followed by chemoradiotherapy from May 2001 to June 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. All surgical specimens were re-evaluated by immunohistochemical staining using phosphorylated protein kinase B (pAKT), CD24, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), survivin, and {beta}-catenin antibodies. The relationship between clinical outcomes and immunohistochemical results was investigated. At a median follow-up of 20 months, the actuarial 2-year locoregional progression-free, distant metastasis-free and overall survival were 37%, 56%, and 54%, respectively. On univariate analysis using clinicopathologic factors, there was no significant prognostic factor. In the immunohistochemical staining, cytoplasmic staining, and nuclear staining of pAKT was positive in 10 and 6 patients, respectively. There were positive CD24 in 7 patients, MMP9 in 16 patients, survivin in 8 patients, and {beta}-catenin in 3 patients. On univariate analysis, there was no significant value of immunohistochemical results for clinical outcomes. There was no significant association between clinical outcomes of patients with EHBD cancer who received chemoradiotherapy after R2 resection or bypass surgery and pAKT, CD24, MMP9, survivin, and {beta}-catenin. Future research is needed on a larger data set or with other molecular biomarkers.

  6. A pilot study of rebamipide-gargle for chemoradiotherapy-induced mucositis in oral cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, Takashi; Chiba, Hiroshige; Satomi, Takafumi; Matsuo, Akira; Kaneko, Tadayoshi; Miyamatsu, Hironobu

    2008-01-01

    Mucositis induced by chemoradiotherapy is one of the serious side effects of cancer therapy for oral cancer. It is caused by toxic free radicals (activated oxygen) produced by these therapeutic modalities. Rebamipide is a novel anti-ulcer drug which possesses various cytoprotective activities such as free radical scavenging, induction of prostaglandin-E and acceleration of ulcer healing. We report the results of a pilot study on rebamipide-gargle for inhibition of mucositis induced by chemo-radiotherapy. The present study was conducted on 13 patients (7 men and 6 women; age range 53-88) with oral cancer. They received radiotherapy (30-60 Gy) for the oro-facial area and chemotherapy (docetaxel: 11 cases; tegafur-uracil (UFT): 1 case; radiotherapy alone: 1 case) with simultaneous addition of 1% rebamipide-gargle treatment (10-15 times/day) to prevent the onset of mucositis. Informed consent was obtained prior to entry. Nine cases had grade 1-2 according to the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria, and 4 patients were classified as grade 3-4. No adverse reactions that could be caused by the rebamipide gargle were observed. These results suggested that rebamipide gargle could inhibit the occurrence of stomatitis induced by chemoradiotherapy. (author)

  7. Molecular biomarkers in extrahepatic bile duct cancer patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy for gross residual disease after surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Hyeon Kang; Kim, Kyu Bo; Chie, Eui Kyu; Ha, Sung W.; Park, Hae Jin

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the outcomes of chemoradiotherapy for extrahepatic bile duct (EHBD) cancer patients who underwent R2 resection or bypass surgery and to identify prognostic factors affecting clinical outcomes, especially in terms of molecular biomarkers. Medical records of 21 patients with EHBD cancer who underwent R2 resection or bypass surgery followed by chemoradiotherapy from May 2001 to June 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. All surgical specimens were re-evaluated by immunohistochemical staining using phosphorylated protein kinase B (pAKT), CD24, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), survivin, and β-catenin antibodies. The relationship between clinical outcomes and immunohistochemical results was investigated. At a median follow-up of 20 months, the actuarial 2-year locoregional progression-free, distant metastasis-free and overall survival were 37%, 56%, and 54%, respectively. On univariate analysis using clinicopathologic factors, there was no significant prognostic factor. In the immunohistochemical staining, cytoplasmic staining, and nuclear staining of pAKT was positive in 10 and 6 patients, respectively. There were positive CD24 in 7 patients, MMP9 in 16 patients, survivin in 8 patients, and β-catenin in 3 patients. On univariate analysis, there was no significant value of immunohistochemical results for clinical outcomes. There was no significant association between clinical outcomes of patients with EHBD cancer who received chemoradiotherapy after R2 resection or bypass surgery and pAKT, CD24, MMP9, survivin, and β-catenin. Future research is needed on a larger data set or with other molecular biomarkers.

  8. Targeted intra-arterial carboplatin chemoradiotherapy and tegafur/uracil for oral and oropharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oya, Ryoichi; Takagi, Shinji; Inenaga, Ryuichiro; Nakamura, Shoichi; Ikemura, Kunio; Onari, Nobuhiro; Imada, Hajime; Korogi, Yukunori

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of targeted intra-arterial carboplatin chemoradiotherapy in allowing less invasive surgery for patients with oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Twenty patients with previously untreated squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx (T4; 8, T2; 12 patients) were treated with targeted transfemoral intra-arterial carboplatin infusion with concurrent hyperfractionated radiotherapy and the administration of tegafur/uracil (UFT). Of 20 patients, 15 underwent surgery after completion of one course of targeted chemoradiotherapy, and five were given another course or radiotherapy only. Eighteen (90%) of 20 patients had a clinically complete response at the primary site and two (10%) had a partial response. Of the 15 patients who underwent tumor resection, 11 (73%) showed histopathological disappearance of cancer cells at the primary site. Sixteen (80%) of 20 tumors were controlled at the primary site within a mean follow-up of 30 months. Adverse effects were relatively mild. Targeted intra-arterial chemoradiotherapy caused a down-staging of tumors and facilitated the use of less invasive surgery in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx as a result of its favorable anti-tumor effect. (author)

  9. Occurrence and clinical features of brain metastasis after chemoradiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanemoto, Ayae; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Harada, Hideyuki; Asakura, Hirofumi; Ogawa, Hirofumi; Furutani, Kazuhisa; Boku, Narikazu; Nakasu, Yoko; Nishimura, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    Brain metastasis from esophageal carcinoma has been considered rare and survival following esophageal carcinoma with distant metastasis is poor. The purpose of this report was to clarify cumulative incidence and risk factors for brain metastasis after chemoradiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma, and to consider recommended treatments for brain metastasis from esophageal carcinoma. We reviewed 391 patients treated with chemoradiotherapy. Median age was 65 years. Clinical stages were I, II, III, and IV in 32, 47, 150, and 162 patients, respectively. Brain imaging was performed usually when patients revealed neurological symptoms. The 3-year cumulative incidence of brain metastasis after chemoradiotherapy was 6.6%. There were 4 patients with single metastasis and 8 with multiple metastases. Initial clinical stages were II, III, and IV in 1, 2, and 9 patients, respectively. Histology included squamous cell carcinoma in 10 patients and others in 2 patients. Univariate analysis demonstrated M factor, distant lymph node relapse, and recurrent lung and liver metastasis as significant risk factors of brain metastasis (P<0.05). Median survival time after diagnosis of brain metastasis was 2.1 months. Brain metastasis was not directly related to cause of mortality. The causes were extracranial tumor deterioration in 8 patients and infection in 4 patients. Brain metastasis may increase in the future with improving survival from esophageal carcinoma. However, considering the poor survival after diagnosis of brain metastasis, short-term palliative therapy for brain metastasis appears preferable to vigorous long-term therapy. (author)

  10. Chemoradiotherapy using retrograde superselective intra-arterial infusion for advanced oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsudo, Kenji; Iwai, Toshinori; Mitsunaga, Sachiyo

    2011-01-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy using retrograde superselective intra-arterial infusion demonstrates good local control and overall survival rates due to the advantage of simultaneous infusion of anticancer agent with the synergistic effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. This study evaluated the therapeutic results, overall survival and local control rates in patients with advanced oral cancer treated with definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy using retrograde superselective intra-arterial infusion. A total of 688 patients with carcinoma of the head and neck were referred to our institution between January 2001 and December 2006. Among them, 175 patients with carcinoma of the oral cavity underwent definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy using retrograde superselective intra-arterial infusion. Treatment consisted of superselective intra-arterial infusions (docetaxel, total 60 mg/m 2 , cisplatin, total 125-150 mg/m 2 ) and daily concurrent radiotherapy (total 50-60 Gy) for 5-6 weeks. Four weeks after the completion of all treatments, patients underwent biopsy of the primary lesion and radiological examinations. Complete response (CR) of the primary site was achieved in 160 (91.4%) of the 175 patients. Residual disease at the primary site was seen in 15 patients (8.6%), and 14 patients (8.0%) showed local recurrence during follow-up. Five-year survival and local control rates were 71.6% and 82.2%, respectively. (author)

  11. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced lung carcinoma: present results and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reboul, F.; Vincent, P.; Brewer, Y.; Taulelle, M.

    1997-01-01

    The prognosis of locally advanced lung cancer is reportedly poor in all histologic types. In non-small cell lung cancer, radiation therapy alone results in disappointing long-term survival. Three recent randomized trials, however, have shown a limited but significant improvement of survival with induction chemotherapy, though local control remained poor in these studies as well as in small-cell lung cancer treated with chemotherapy and late radiotherapy. Tow randomized trials focusing on small-cell lung cancer have recently shown significant benefit due to the combination of early concurrent mediastinal irradiation and chemotherapy, with major improvement in local control and a more than 40% 2-year survival rate. The concept of concurrent chemoradiotherapy has also been studied in non-small cell carcinoma with several pilot studies leading to both encouraging results and improved survival rate (up to 40% at 2 years). Ongoing phase III trials are comparing sequential versus concurrent chemoradiotherapy and will define the role of radical surgery after chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. (authors)

  12. PATHOPHYSIOLOGY OF POSTOPERATIVE STRESS REACTION AND MODERN APPROACHES TO NUTRITIVE SUPPORT FOR CHILDREN IN POSTOPERATIVE PERIOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.V. Shumilov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Enteral nutrition is a method best adjusted to human physiology for correcting disorders of homeostasis in the postoperative period. Untimely and inadequate correction of these disorders may fatally affect a child’s health and rates of the child’s further development. Understanding the laws of stress response generation is important in selecting an optimal nutritive support in the postoperative period. It is necessary to take account of neuro-endocrine-immune response, changing metabolism and an impaired function of the gastrointestinal tract. Modern methods of diagnostics and treatment make it possible to resolve most of the arising issues, but it requires physicians to take a comprehensive approach and have knowledge in many areas of theoretical and practical medicine. Key words: stress, metabolism, children, enteral nutrition. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(3:36-45

  13. Intraoperative and early postoperative complications of manual sutureless cataract extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Yasir; Zia, Sohail; Baig Mirza, Aneeq Ullah

    2014-04-01

    To determine the intraoperative and early postoperative complications of manual sutureless cataract extraction. Case series. Redo Eye Hospital, Rawalpindi, Pakistan, from January 2009 to December 2010. Three hundred patients of cataract through purposive non-probability sampling were selected. The patients underwent manual sutureless cataract surgery (MSCS) by single experienced surgeon and intraoperative complications were documented. The surgical technique was modified to deal with any intraoperative complications accordingly. Patients were examined on the first postoperative day and on the first postoperative week for any postoperative complications. The data was entered in Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 13.0 and the results were calculated in frequencies. Among the 300 cases, 81.3% surgeries went uneventful whereas 18.6% had some complication. The common intraoperative complications were superior button-hole formation in 5%; posterior capsular rent in 5% and premature entry with iris prolapse in 3% cases. Postoperatively, the commonly encountered complications were striate keratopathy in 9.6% and hyphema 9%. At first week follow-up, 4% had striate keratopathy and 0.6% had hyphema. Striate keratopathy resolved with topical medication on subsequent follow-up. A total of 9 cases (3%) underwent second surgery: 2 cases for lens matter wash, 2 cases for hyphema and 5 cases needed suturing of wound for shallow anterior chamber due to wound leak. Superior button-hole formation, posterior capsular rent and premature entry were the common intraoperative complications of MSCS whereas the common early postoperative complications were striate keratopathy and hyphema.

  14. Severe Late Toxicities Following Concomitant Chemoradiotherapy Compared to Radiotherapy Alone in Cervical Cancer: An Inter-era Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondi, Vinai; Bentzen, Søren M.; Sklenar, Kathryn L.; Dunn, Emily F.; Petereit, Daniel G.; Tannehill, Scott P.; Straub, Margaret; Bradley, Kristin A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare rates of severe late toxicities following concomitant chemoradiotherapy and radiotherapy alone for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with cervical cancer were treated at a single institution with radiotherapy alone or concomitant chemoradiotherapy for curative intent. Severe late toxicity was defined as grade ≥3 vaginal, urologic, or gastrointestinal toxicity or any pelvic fracture, using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 (CTCAE), occurring ≥6 months from treatment completion and predating any salvage therapy. Severe late toxicity rates were compared after adjusting for pertinent covariates. Results: At 3 years, probability of vaginal severe late toxicity was 20.2% for radiotherapy alone and 35.1% for concomitant chemoradiotherapy (P=.026). At 3 years, probability of skeletal severe late toxicity was 1.6% for radiotherapy alone and 7.5% for concomitant chemoradiotherapy (P=.010). After adjustment for case mix, concomitant chemoradiotherapy was associated with higher vaginal (hazard ratio [HR] 3.0, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7-5.2, P 50 was associated with higher vaginal (HR 1.8, 95% CI 1.1-3.0, P=.013) and skeletal (HR 5.7, 95% CI 1.2-27.0, P=.028) severe late toxicity. Concomitant chemoradiotherapy was not associated with higher gastrointestinal (P=.886) or urologic (unadjusted, P=.053; adjusted, P=.063) severe late toxicity. Conclusion: Compared to radiotherapy alone, concomitant chemoradiotherapy is associated with higher rates of severe vaginal and skeletal late toxicities. Other predictive factors include dilator compliance for severe vaginal late toxicity and age for severe vaginal and skeletal late toxicities.

  15. Postoperative Complications of Beger Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayana Samejima Peternelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Chronic pancreatitis (CP is considered an inflammatory disease that may cause varying degrees of pancreatic dysfunction. Conservative and surgical treatment options are available depending on dysfunction severity. Presentation of Case. A 36-year-old male with history of heavy alcohol consumption and diagnosed CP underwent a duodenal-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR or Beger procedure after conservative treatment failure. Refractory pain was reported on follow-up three months after surgery and postoperative imaging uncovered stones within the main pancreatic duct and intestinal dilation. The patient was subsequently subjected to another surgical procedure and intraoperative findings included protein plugs within the main pancreatic duct and pancreaticojejunal anastomosis stricture. A V-shaped enlargement and main pancreatic duct dilation in addition to the reconstruction of the previous pancreaticojejunal anastomosis were performed. The patient recovered with no further postoperative complications in the follow-up at an outpatient clinic. Discussion. Main duct and pancreaticojejunal strictures are an unusual complication of the Beger procedure but were identified intraoperatively as the cause of patient’s refractory pain and explained intraductal protein plugs accumulation. Conclusion. Patients that undergo Beger procedures should receive close outpatient clinical follow-up in order to guarantee postoperative conservative treatment success and therefore guarantee an early detection of postoperative complications.

  16. Postoperative ileus: a preventable event

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Kathrine; Kehlet, H

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative ileus has traditionally been accepted as a normal response to tissue injury. No data support any beneficial effect of ileus and indeed it may contribute to delayed recovery and prolonged hospital stay. Efforts should, therefore, be made to reduce such ileus. METHODS...

  17. Admission haematological abnormalities and postoperative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admission haematological abnormalities and postoperative outcomes in neonates with acute surgical conditions in Alexandria, Egypt. HL Wella, SMM Farahat. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals ...

  18. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy of rectal carcinoma. Baseline hematologic parameters influencing outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodek, Miroslav; Sirak, Igor; Paluska, Petr; Kopecky, Jindrich; Petera, Jiri; Vosmik, Milan [University Hospital in Hradec Kralove, Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Ferko, Alexander; Oerhalmi, Julius [University Hospital in Hradec Kralove, Department of Surgery, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Hovorkova, Eva; Hadzi Nikolov, Dimitar [University Hospital in Hradec Kralove, Fingerland Department of Pathology, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)

    2016-09-15

    The link between the blood count and a systemic inflammatory response (SIR) is indisputable and well described. Pretreatment hematological parameters may predict the overall clinical outcomes in many types of cancer. Thus, this study aims to systematically evaluate the relationship between baseline blood count levels and treatment response in rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. From 2009-2015, 173 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were retrospectively enrolled in the study and analyzed. The baseline blood count was recorded in all patients 1 week before chemoradiation. Tumor response was evaluated through pathologic findings. Blood count levels which included RBC (red blood cells), Hb (hemoglobin), PLT (platelet count), neutrophil count, WBC (white blood cells), NLR (neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio), and PLR (platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio) were analyzed in relation to tumor downstaging, pCR (pathologic complete response), OS (overall survival), and DFS (disease-free survival). Hb levels were associated with a response in logistic regression analysis: pCR (p = 0.05; OR 1.04, 95 % CI 1.00-1.07); T downstaging (p = 0.006; OR 1.03, 95 % CI 1.01-1.05); N downstaging (p = 0.09; OR 1.02, 95 % CI 1.00-1.04); T or N downstaging (p = 0.007; OR 1.04, 95 % CI 1.01-1.07); T and N downstaging (p = 0.02; OR 1.02, 95 % CI 1.00-1.04); Hb and RBC were the most significant parameters influencing OS; PLT was a negative prognostic factor for OS and DFS (p = 0.008 for OS); an NLR value of 2.8 was associated with the greatest significance for OS (p = 0.03) and primary tumor downstaging (p = 0.02). Knowledge of pretreatment hematological parameters appears to be an important prognostic factor in patients with rectal carcinoma. (orig.) [German] Die Verbindung zwischen dem Blutbild und der systemischen Entzuendungsreaktion (''systemic inflammatory response'', SIR) ist unbestreitbar und gut beschrieben. Aufgrund der

  19. Postoperative radiation in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and target volume delineation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Y

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Yingming Zhu,* Minghuan Li,* Li Kong, Jinming Yu Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Esophageal cancer is the sixth leading cause of cancer death worldwide, and patients who are treated with surgery alone, without neoadjuvant therapies, experience frequent relapses. Whether postoperative therapies could reduce the recurrence or improve overall survival is still controversial for these patients. The purpose of our review is to figure out the value of postoperative adjuvant therapy and address the disputes about target volume delineation according to published data. Based on the evidence of increased morbidity and disadvantages on patient survival caused by postoperative chemotherapy or radiotherapy (RT alone provided by studies in the early 1990s, the use of postoperative adjuvant therapies in cases of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma has diminished substantially and has been replaced gradually by neoadjuvant chemoradiation. With advances in surgery and RT, accumulating evidence has recently rekindled interest in the delivery of postoperative RT or chemoradiotherapy in patients with stage T3/T4 or N1 (lymph node positive carcinomas after radical surgery. However, due to complications with the standard radiation field, a nonconforming modified field has been adopted in most studies. Therefore, we analyze different field applications and provide suggestions on the optimization of the radiation field based on the major sites of relapse and the surgical non-clearance area. For upper and middle thoracic esophageal carcinomas, the bilateral supraclavicular and superior mediastinal areas remain common sites of recurrence and should be encompassed within the clinical target volume. In contrast, a consensus has yet to be reached regarding lower thoracic esophageal carcinomas; the

  20. Long-term bresults of radiotherapy combined with nedaplatin and 5-fluorouracil for postoperative loco-regional recurrent esophageal cancer: update on a phase II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingu Keiichi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2006, we reported the effectiveness of chemoradiotherapy for postoperative recurrent esophageal cancer with a median observation period of 18 months. The purpose of the present study was to update the results of radiotherapy combined with nedaplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU for postoperative loco-regional recurrent esophageal cancer. Methods Between 2000 and 2004, we performed a phase II study on treatment of postoperative loco-regional recurrent esophageal cancer with radiotherapy (60 Gy/30 fractions/6 weeks combined with chemotherapy consisting of two cycles of nedaplatin (70 mg/m2/2 h and 5-FU (500 mg/m2/24 h for 5 days. The primary endpoint was overall survival rate, and the secondary endpoints were progression-free survival rate, irradiated-field control rate and chronic toxicity. Results A total of 30 patients were enrolled in this study. The regimen was completed in 76.7% of the patients. The median observation period for survivors was 72.0 months. The 5-year overall survival rate was 27.0% with a median survival period of 21.0 months. The 5-year progression-free survival rate and irradiated-field control rate were 25.1% and 71.5%, respectively. Grade 3 or higher late toxicity was observed in only one patient. Two long-term survivors had gastric tube cancer more than 5 years after chemoradiotherapy. Pretreatment performance status, pattern of recurrence (worse for patients with anastomotic recurrence and number of recurrent lesions (worse for patients with multiple recurrent lesions were statistically significant prognostic factors for overall survival. Conclusions Radiotherapy combined with nedaplatin and 5-FU is a safe and effective salvage treatment for postoperative loco-regional recurrent esophageal cancer. However, the prognosis of patients with multiple regional recurrence or anastomotic recurrence is very poor.

  1. Postoperative mental confusion--association with postoperative hypoxemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J; Kehlet, H

    1993-01-01

    under general anesthesia, were monitored for oxygen saturation (SpO2) with a pulse oximeter on a preoperative night and on the second night after operation (11:00 PM to 7:00 AM). All patients were tested with a mental test questionnaire (the Hodkinson modification of the original Roth-Hopkins test...... major surgery had decreased mental function on the third day (p operation, whereas minor surgery did not impair mental function. There was a significant correlation between mental function on the third day after operation and mean SpO2 on the second postoperative.......04). During stepwise multiple regression analysis in patients undergoing major surgery, a significant relationship was found between postoperative mental test score and SpO2 (p mental function and other perioperative variables (age, premedication dose, duration of operation...

  2. [Postoperative Chylotholax;Intraoperative Prevention and Postoperative Management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Tomohito; Kariya, Shuji; Murakawa, Tomohiro

    2017-07-01

    Postoperative chylothorax is a relatively rare but potentially fatal complication caused by iatrogenic injury to thoracic duct system, with an incidence ranging from 2 to 4% after major lung surgery or esophagectomy. The pathophysiologic features of chylothorax include dehydration, loss of nutrients and immunological components. Intraopreative prevention is the first step for the management, and treatment options include conservative therapy, percutaneous intervention, and redo-operation. Although the treatment algorithm has not been standardized, chylothorax which is refractory to conservative treatment, or that with high output greater than 1,000 ml/day should be treated aggressively with thoracic duct embolization or redo-operation in a timely fashion. We herein review the anatomy and physiology of thoracic duct system and describe the overview of prevention and each theapeutic options of postoperative chylothorax.

  3. Postoperative diagnosis of the temporomandibular joint; Postoperative Kiefergelenkdiagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, S. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Vienna (Austria). Abt. fuer Osteologie; Undt, G. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Mund-, Kiefer- und Gesichtschirurgie, Vienna (Austria)

    2001-09-01

    Postoperative management of patients suffering from symptoms of the temporomandibular joint does not differ considerably from the one of preoperative examination protocols. Knowledge of previous surgery helps to plan patient work-up and to interpret normal postoperative findings (eminectomy, discectomy, susceptibility artefacts from metallic residues..) and typical complications (intraarticular loose bodies, dislocations, avascular necrosis, foreign body granulomatous reactions) appropriately. (orig.) [German] Wie auch in anderen Koerperregionen differiert das Diagnoseprotokoll von prae- und postoperativen Patienten mit Beschwerden des Kiefergelenks nicht wesentlich voneinander. Die Kenntnis des vorangegangenen Eingriffs hilft allerdings, die Untersuchung entsprechend zu planen und den Befund im Kontext richtig zu bewerten, um moegliche Komplikationen (intraartikulaere Fragmente, Dislokationen, avaskulaere Nekrose, Fremdkoerperreaktionen) und zu erwartende Befunde (Eminektomie, Diskektomie, Metallartefakte usw.) richtig zu interpretieren. (orig.)

  4. SUPREMO (Selective Use of Postoperative Radiotherapy aftEr MastectOmy) - a phase III randomised trial assessing the role of postmastectomy chest wall irradiation in 'intermediate risk' women with operable breast cancer receiving adjuvant systemic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunkler, I.H.; Price, A.; Dixon, M.; Canney, P.; Prescott, R.; Sainsbury, R.; Aird, E.

    2003-01-01

    Danish and Canadian randomised trials of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) have shown the importance of loco-regional control to survival in 'high risk' pre and postmenopausal women receiving adjuvant systemic therapy. The effects of radiotherapy (RT) in terms of improving survival are similar to those of systemic therapy. International consensus now supports the use of postmastectomy chest wall irradiation in women with 4 or more involved axillary nodes or primary tumour size=/> 5cm. The role of PMRT in women at intermediate risk' with 1-3 involved nodes or node negative with other risk factors is controversial. The absolute reduction in risk of loco-regional recurrence varies widely (3-23%) in trials of PMRT in women with 1-3 involved nodes receiving systemic therapy. A UK survey of clinical oncologists (Kunkler et al,The Breast 1999;8:235) showed wide variations in opinion on the use of radiotherapy in these subgroups. It is possible that while RT may confer most benefit in loco-regional control, a greater survival benefit might accrue in patients with smaller tumours and fewer involved nodes. The 2000 Oxford overview of randomised trials of postoperative RT identifies non breast cancer deaths from RT related vascular morbidity as counterbalancing the benefits of RT in reducing breast cancer mortality. With the more extensive use of potentially cardiotoxic anthracycline containing adjuvant systemic therapy there are concerns about greater cardiac morbidity in patients receiving PMRT in addition. A large randomised international trial (SUPREMO) is proposed to recruit 3500 patients with (a) 1-3 involved axillary nodes or (b) node negative with other risk factors (grade 3 or lymphovascular invasion) treated by mastectomy, axillary clearance and appropriate systemic therapy for T0-3,N0-1,MO breast cancer. The primary endpoint is overall survival. Secondary endpoints are disease free survival, quality of life, morbidity (including cardiac), cost per life year saved

  5. An observational study suggesting clinical benefit for adjuvant postoperative chemoradiation in a population of over 500 cases after gastric resection with D2 nodal dissection for adenocarcinoma of the stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung; Lim, Do Hoon; Lee, Jeeyun; Kang, Won Ki; MacDonald, John S.; Park, Chan Hyung; Park, Se Hoon; Lee, Se-Hoon; Kim, Kihyun; Park, Joon Oh; Kim, Won Seog; Jung, Chul Won; Park, Young Suk; Im, Young-Hyuck; Sohn, Tae Sung; Noh, Jae Hyung; Heo, Jin Seok; Kim, Yong Il; Park, Chul Keun; Park, Keunchil

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The role of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in D2-resected gastric-cancer patients has not been defined yet. We investigated the effect of postoperative chemoradiotherapy on the relapse rate and survival rate of patients with D2-resected gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: From August 1995 to April 2001, 544 patients received postoperative CRT after curative D2 resection. During the same period of time, 446 patients received surgery without further adjuvant treatment. The adjuvant CRT consisted of 400 mg/m 2 of fluorouracil plus 20 mg/m 2 of leucovorin for 5 days, followed by 4,500 cGy of radiotherapy for 5 weeks, with fluorouracil and leucovorin on the first 4 and the last 3 days of radiotherapy. Two 5-day cycles of fluorouracil and leucovorin were given 4 weeks after the completion of radiotherapy. Results: The median duration of overall survival was significantly longer in the CRT group than in the comparison group (95.3 months vs. 62.6 months), which corresponds to a hazard ratio for death of 0.80 (p = 0.0200) or a reduction of 20% in the risk of death in the CRT group. The 5-year survival rates were consistently longer in the CRT group at Stages II, IIIA, IIIB, and IV than those in the comparison group. The CRT was associated with increases in the median duration of relapse-free survival (75.6 months vs. 52.7 months; hazard ratio for relapse, 0.80, p = 0.0160). Conclusion: Our results highly suggest that the postoperative chemoradiotherapy in D2-resected gastric-cancer patients can prolong survival and decrease recurrence

  6. Behandling af postoperative, kolorektale anastomosestenoser med selvekspanderende plastikstent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Jakob; Meisner, S.

    2008-01-01

    We report two cases of a benign post-operative stricture of the recto-sigmoid colon managed by insertion of a self-expanding coated plastic stent (SEPS). Both patients presented symptoms of stenosis which dilatation did not relieve. Both patients refused surgical intervention. Instead...... the strictures were managed by insertion of a SEPS. The clinical symptoms disappeared after SEPS insertion. We conclude that SEPS may represent a possible therapeutic tool in selected cases with benign post-operative stenosis of the recto-sigmoid colon Udgivelsesdato: 2008/4/7...

  7. Postoperative imaging of paranasal sinuses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemec, S.; Czerny, C.; Formanek, M.

    2007-01-01

    The radiological interpretation of postoperative changes of the paranasal sinuses requires knowledge of why and how the surgical intervention was performed and what the basic clinical findings were. It is important to know whether there was an inflammation, a reconstructive procedure, or a tumorous process. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) evaluated in a high-resolution bone window level setting represents the method of choice for imaging after nonfunctional and functional procedures after inflammatory changes as well as for imaging after reconstructive surgery because of facial trauma or before dental implantation. In the postoperative follow-up of tumor patients contrast-enhanced MDCT evaluated in a soft tissue window and bone window and especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) represent the standard. In many cases it is possible to differentiate tumor recurrence from inflammation with the help of contrast-enhanced multiplanar MRI and to detect bone marrow changes prior to CT. (orig.)

  8. Postoperative singultus: an osteopathic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petree, Kristie; Bruner, Jonathan

    2015-03-01

    Singultus, or hiccups, is a common medical condition. Despite exponential leaps in medicine, the pathophysiologic cause remains poorly defined. Persistent singultus has been associated with conditions such as pulmonary embolism and myocardial infarction. Singultus is also a well-known postoperative complication. The criterion standard of care for patients with singultus involves ruling out lethal pathologic causes, attempting physical stimulation with Valsava maneuvers or drinking water, and, if no relief has been achieved, administering drugs to ease the symptoms. The authors report a case of a man whose postoperative singultus was successfully managed with osteopathic manipulative treatment. This approach addresses many of the possible underlying neuromechanical causes of the aberrant reflex with minimal potential for adverse effects. Physicians should consider osteopathic manipulative treatment in the care of patients with singultus. © 2015 The American Osteopathic Association.

  9. Postoperative ileus: progress towards effective management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Kathrine; Kehlet, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    The pathogenesis of postoperative ileus (PI) is multifactorial, and includes activation of inhibitory reflexes, inflammatory mediators and opioids (endogenous and exogenous). Accordingly, various strategies have been employed to prevent PI. As single-modality treatment, continuous postoperative e...

  10. Need for postoperative experience in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corcione, S; Api, P; Magnoni, G

    1984-01-01

    A clinical evaluation regarding the efficacy of post-operative radiotherapy in 294 patients with breast cancer is presented. In the Author's opinion post-operative radiotherapy is fundamental in the treatment of this tumor. 21 refs.

  11. Management of pediatric postoperative chylothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, S J; Guzzetta, P C; Snyder, M L; Randolph, J G

    1993-09-01

    Questions persist about the management of postoperative chylothorax in infants and children. Our experience with postoperative chylothorax over the most recent decade (1980 to 1990) has been reviewed. The type and amount of drainage, data from cardiac catheterization and echocardiography, operative decisions and details, and eventual outcomes have been cataloged. All patients were initially treated with total gut rest, with operation reserved for unabated drainage. Chylothorax developed postoperatively in 15 infants and 11 children (18 with a cardiac procedure and 8 with a noncardiac procedure). The average age was 3.1 years. Spontaneous cessation and cure occurred in 19 (73.1%) of these 26 patients, with an average drainage duration of 11.9 days (range, 4 to 30 days). Those for whom operation was chosen drained preoperatively for an average of 29.2 days (range, 25 to 40 days). There were no deaths in either group. Complications were lymphopenia (2 patients) and fungal sepsis (1 patient). The amount of drainage per day was not significantly different between patients treated operatively and those treated nonoperatively. Failure of nonoperative management was associated with venous hypertension from increased right-sided cardiac pressures or central venous thrombosis (p < 0.05, Fisher's exact test). Presumably this increased pressure is transmitted to the lymphatic system. These patients should be identified early and considered for thoracic duct suture or pleuroperitoneal shunting.

  12. Clinical complete response (cCR) after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and conservative treatment in rectal cancer. Findings from the ACCORD 12/PRODIGE 2 randomized trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gérard, Jean-Pierre; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Gourgou-Bourgade, Sophie; Benezery, Karène; Laroche, Guy de; Mahé, Marc-André; Boige, Valérie; Juzyna, Béata

    2015-01-01

    Background: During the ACCORD 12 randomized trial, an evaluation of the clinical tumor response was prospectively performed after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. The correlations between clinical complete response and patient characteristics and treatment outcomes are reported. Material and methods: Between 2005 and 2008 the Accord 12 trial accrued 598 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer and compared two different neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapies (Capox 50: capecitabine + oxaliplatin + 50 Gy vs Cap 45: capecitabine + 45 Gy). An evaluation of the clinical tumor response with rectoscopy and digital rectal examination was planned before surgery. A score to classify tumor response was used adapted from the RECIST definition: complete response: no visible or palpable tumor; partial response, stable and progressive disease. Results: The clinical tumor response was evaluable in 201 patients. Score was: complete response: 8% (16 patients); partial response: 68% (137 patients); stable: 21%; progression: 3%. There was a trend toward more complete response in the Capox 50 group (9.3% vs 6.7% with Cap 45). In the whole cohort of 201 pts complete response was significantly more frequent in T2 tumors (28%; p = 0.025); tumors <4 cm in diameter (14%; p = 0.017), less than half rectal circumference and with a normal CEA level. Clinical complete response observed in 16 patients was associated with more conservative treatment (p = 0.008): 2 patients required an abdomino-perineal resection, 11 an anterior resection and 3 patients benefited from organ preservation (2 local excision, 1 “watch and wait”. A complete response was associated with more ypT0 (73%; p < 0.001); ypNO (92%); R0 circumferential margin (100%). Conclusion: These data support the hypothesis that a clinical complete response assessed using rectoscopy and digital rectal examination after neoadjuvant therapy may increase the chance of a sphincter or organ preservation in selected rectal cancers

  13. Clinical complete response (cCR) after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and conservative treatment in rectal cancer. Findings from the ACCORD 12/PRODIGE 2 randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérard, Jean-Pierre; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Gourgou-Bourgade, Sophie; Benezery, Karène; de Laroche, Guy; Mahé, Marc-André; Boige, Valérie; Juzyna, Béata

    2015-05-01

    During the ACCORD 12 randomized trial, an evaluation of the clinical tumor response was prospectively performed after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. The correlations between clinical complete response and patient characteristics and treatment outcomes are reported. Between 2005 and 2008 the Accord 12 trial accrued 598 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer and compared two different neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapies (Capox 50: capecitabine+oxaliplatin+50Gy vs Cap 45: capecitabine+45Gy). An evaluation of the clinical tumor response with rectoscopy and digital rectal examination was planned before surgery. A score to classify tumor response was used adapted from the RECIST definition: complete response: no visible or palpable tumor; partial response, stable and progressive disease. The clinical tumor response was evaluable in 201 patients. Score was: complete response: 8% (16 patients); partial response: 68% (137 patients); stable: 21%; progression: 3%. There was a trend toward more complete response in the Capox 50 group (9.3% vs 6.7% with Cap 45). In the whole cohort of 201 pts complete response was significantly more frequent in T2 tumors (28%; p=0.025); tumors <4cm in diameter (14%; p=0.017), less than half rectal circumference and with a normal CEA level. Clinical complete response observed in 16 patients was associated with more conservative treatment (p=0.008): 2 patients required an abdomino-perineal resection, 11 an anterior resection and 3 patients benefited from organ preservation (2 local excision, 1 "watch and wait". A complete response was associated with more ypT0 (73%; p<0.001); ypNO (92%); R0 circumferential margin (100%). These data support the hypothesis that a clinical complete response assessed using rectoscopy and digital rectal examination after neoadjuvant therapy may increase the chance of a sphincter or organ preservation in selected rectal cancers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy plus surgery versus active surveillance for oesophageal cancer: a stepped-wedge cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordman, Bo Jan; Wijnhoven, Bas P L; Lagarde, Sjoerd M; Boonstra, Jurjen J; Coene, Peter Paul L O; Dekker, Jan Willem T; Doukas, Michael; van der Gaast, Ate; Heisterkamp, Joos; Kouwenhoven, Ewout A; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A P; Pierie, Jean-Pierre E N; Rosman, Camiel; van Sandick, Johanna W; van der Sangen, Maurice J C; Sosef, Meindert N; Spaander, Manon C W; Valkema, Roelf; van der Zaag, Edwin S; Steyerberg, Ewout W; van Lanschot, J Jan B

    2018-02-06

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) plus surgery is a standard treatment for locally advanced oesophageal cancer. With this treatment, 29% of patients have a pathologically complete response in the resection specimen. This provides the rationale for investigating an active surveillance approach. The aim of this study is to assess the (cost-)effectiveness of active surveillance vs. standard oesophagectomy after nCRT for oesophageal cancer. This is a phase-III multi-centre, stepped-wedge cluster randomised controlled trial. A total of 300 patients with clinically complete response (cCR, i.e. no local or disseminated disease proven by histology) after nCRT will be randomised to show non-inferiority of active surveillance to standard oesophagectomy (non-inferiority margin 15%, intra-correlation coefficient 0.02, power 80%, 2-sided α 0.05, 12% drop-out). Patients will undergo a first clinical response evaluation (CRE-I) 4-6 weeks after nCRT, consisting of endoscopy with bite-on-bite biopsies of the primary tumour site and other suspected lesions. Clinically complete responders will undergo a second CRE (CRE-II), 6-8 weeks after CRE-I. CRE-II will include 18F-FDG-PET-CT, followed by endoscopy with bite-on-bite biopsies and ultra-endosonography plus fine needle aspiration of suspected lymph nodes and/or PET- positive lesions. Patients with cCR at CRE-II will be assigned to oesophagectomy (first phase) or active surveillance (second phase of the study). The duration of the first phase is determined randomly over the 12 centres, i.e., stepped-wedge cluster design. Patients in the active surveillance arm will undergo diagnostic evaluations similar to CRE-II at 6/9/12/16/20/24/30/36/48 and 60 months after nCRT. In this arm, oesophagectomy will be offered only to patients in whom locoregional regrowth is highly suspected or proven, without distant dissemination. The main study parameter is overall survival; secondary endpoints include percentage of patients who do not

  15. Adjuvant chemoradiotherapy instead of revision radical resection after local excision for high-risk early rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jae-Uk; Nam, Taek-Keun; Kim, Hyeong-Rok; Shim, Hyun-Jeong; Kim, Yong-Hyub; Yoon, Mee Sun; Song, Ju-Young; Ahn, Sung-Ja; Chung, Woong-Ki

    2016-09-05

    After local excision of early rectal cancer, revision radical resection is recommended for patients with high-risk pathologic stage T1 (pT1) or pT2 cancer, but the revision procedure has high morbidity rates. We evaluated the efficacy of adjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for reducing recurrence after local excision in these patients. Eighty-three patients with high-risk pT1 or pT2 rectal cancer underwent postoperative adjuvant CCRT after local excision. We defined high-risk features as pT1 having tumor size ≤3 cm, and/or resection margin (RM) ≤3 mm, and/or lymphovascular invasion (LVI), and/or non-full thickness excision such as endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) or endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), or unknown records regarding those features, or pT2 cancer. Radiotherapy was administered with a median dose of 50.4 Gy in 1.8 Gy fraction size over 5-7 weeks. Concurrent 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin were administered for 4 days in the first and fifth weeks of radiotherapy. The median interval between local excision and radiotherapy was 34 (range, 11-104) days. Fifteen patients (18.1 %) had stage pT2 tumors, 22 (26.5 %) had RM of ≥3 mm, and 21 (25.3 %) had tumors of ≥3 cm in size. Thirteen patients (15.7 %) had LVI. Transanal excision was performed in 58 patients (69.9 %) and 25 patients (30.1 %) underwent EMR or ESD. The median follow-up was 61 months. The 5-year overall survival (OS), locoregional relapse-free survival (LRFS), and disease-free survival (DFS) rates for all patients were 94.9, 91.0, and 89.8 %, respectively. Multivariate analysis did not identify any significant factors for OS or LRFS, but the only significant factor affecting DFS was the pT stage (p = 0.027). In patients with high-risk pT1 rectal cancer, adjuvant CCRT after local excision could be an effective alternative treatment instead of revision radical resection. However, patients with pT2 stage showed inferior DFS compared to pT1.

  16. EARLY POSTOPERATIVE COMPLICATIONS AFTER RADICAL CYSTECTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. O. Mager

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Radical cystectomy (RCE is associated with a considerable number of early postoperative complications as before. Based on 10 years’ experience, this paper demonstrates the frequency (33.9 % and types of early complications following RCE, as well as postoperative mortality (5.5 % and its resulting causes. Although postoperative mortality is relatively low today, the frequency of early postoperative complications remains high as before.

  17. Predictive images of postoperative levator resection outcome using image processing software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawatari, Yuki; Fukushima, Mikiko

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of processed images to predict postoperative appearance following levator resection. Analysis involved 109 eyes from 65 patients with blepharoptosis who underwent advancement of levator aponeurosis and Müller's muscle complex (levator resection). Predictive images were prepared from preoperative photographs using the image processing software (Adobe Photoshop ® ). Images of selected eyes were digitally enlarged in an appropriate manner and shown to patients prior to surgery. Approximately 1 month postoperatively, we surveyed our patients using questionnaires. Fifty-six patients (89.2%) were satisfied with their postoperative appearances, and 55 patients (84.8%) positively responded to the usefulness of processed images to predict postoperative appearance. Showing processed images that predict postoperative appearance to patients prior to blepharoptosis surgery can be useful for those patients concerned with their postoperative appearance. This approach may serve as a useful tool to simulate blepharoptosis surgery.

  18. Electroglottographic Comparison of Voice Outcomes in Patients With Advanced Laryngopharyngeal Cancer Treated by Chemoradiotherapy or Total Laryngectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazi, Rehan; Venkitaraman, Ramachandran; Johnson, Catherine; Prasad, Vyas; Clarke, Peter; Rhys-Evans, Peter; Nutting, Christopher M.; Harrington, Kevin J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To conduct prospective electroglottographic analyses of voice outcomes after radical chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced laryngopharyngeal cancers and to compare them with patients who have undergone total laryngectomy (TL). Patients and Methods: Twenty-one patients (19 male, 2 female, median age [range] 65 [50-85] years) with Stage III/IV laryngopharyngeal cancer received induction chemotherapy followed by radical chemoradiotherapy. Electroglottography, using the sustained vowel /i/ and connected speech, was performed before treatment and 1, 6, and 12 months after treatment. In addition, single voice recordings were taken from 21 patients (16 male, 5 female, aged 65 [50-84] years) who had undergone TL and surgical voice restoration and from 21 normal controls (18 male, 3 female, aged 65 [33-80] years). Results: Before treatment the vocal measures for the chemoradiotherapy patients were significantly different from normal controls in jitter (p = 0.02), maximum phonation time (MPT) (p = 0.001), and words per minute (WPM) (p = 0.01). At 12 months after treatment MPT and WPM had normalized, but jitter and normalized noise energy were significantly worse than in normal controls. Comparison of voice outcomes at 12 months for chemoradiotherapy patients revealed superiority over the TL group in all parameters except MPT (18.2 s vs. 10.4 s, p = 0.06). Analysis of the recovery of voice up to 12 months after treatment revealed progressive improvement in most electroglottographic measures. Conclusions: This prospective study demonstrates significantly better outcome for patients treated with chemoradiotherapy as compared with TL. Progressive normalization of many voice parameters occurs over the 12 months following chemoradiotherapy

  19. Prognostic and Predictive Value of Baseline and Posttreatment Molecular Marker Expression in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolini, Federica; Bengala, Carmelo; Losi, Luisa; Pagano, Maria; Iachetta, Francesco; Dealis, Cristina; Jovic, Gordana; Depenni, Roberta; Zironi, Sandra; Falchi, Anna Maria; Luppi, Gabriele; Conte, Pier Franco

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate expression of a panel of molecular markers, including p53, p21, MLH1, MSH2, MIB-1, thymidylate synthase, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and tissue vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), before and after treatment in patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer, to correlate the constitutive profile and dynamics of expression with pathologic response and outcome. Methods and Materials: Expression of biomarkers was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in tumor samples from 91 patients with clinical Stage II and III rectal cancer treated with preoperative pelvic radiotherapy (50 Gy) plus concurrent 5-fluorouracil by continuous intravenous infusion. Results: A pathologic complete remission was observed in 14 patients (15.4%). Patients with MLH1-positive tumors had a higher pathologic complete response rate (24.3% vs. 9.4%; p = 0.055). Low expression of constitutive p21, absence of EGFR expression after chemoradiotherapy, and high Dworak's tumor regression grade (TRG) were significantly associated with improved disease-free survival and overall survival. A high MIB-1 value after chemoradiotherapy was significantly associated with worse overall survival. Multivariate analysis confirmed the prognostic value of constitutive p21 expression as well as EGFR expression and MIB-1 value after chemoradiotherapy among patients not achieving TRG 3-4. Conclusions: In our study, we observed the independent prognostic value of EGFR expression after chemoradiotherapy on disease-free survival. Moreover, our study suggests that a constitutive high p21 expression and a high MIB-1 value after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy treatment could predict worse outcome in locally advanced rectal cancer

  20. Early postoperative cognitive dysfunction and postoperative delirium after anaesthesia with various hypnotics: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial - The PINOCCHIO trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spinelli Allison

    2011-07-01

    preoperative score index for delirium. Discussion The results of this comparative anaesthesiological trial should whether each the three hypnotics tested is related to a significantly different postoperative delirium rate. This information could ultimately allow us to select the most appropriate hypnotic to maintain anaesthesia for specific subgroups of patients and especially for those at high risk of postoperative delirium. Registered at Trial.gov Number ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00507195

  1. Pretreatment HIF-1α and GLUT-1 expressions do not correlate with outcome after preoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havelund, Birgitte Mayland; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Lindebjerg, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) expressions as predictors of response and survival after chemoradiotherapy in pretreatment biopsy specimens from patients with rectal cancer.......The aim of the present study was to investigate hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) expressions as predictors of response and survival after chemoradiotherapy in pretreatment biopsy specimens from patients with rectal cancer....

  2. Clinical evaluation of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy with CDDP, 5-Fu, and VP-16 for advanced esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukaida, Hidenori; Hirai, Toshihiro; Yamashita, Yoshinori; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Hihara, Jun; Kuwahara, Masaki; Inoue, Hideki; Toge, Tetsuya [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Radiation Biology and Medicine

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy following surgery in patients with advanced esophageal cancer. We followed the cases of 57 such patients treated at our hospital, involving 19 who received adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CR group), 19 who received radiotherapy alone (R group), and 19 who did received neither (N group). In the CR group, chemotherapy, consisting of cis-diaminodichloroplatinum (CDDP), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and etoposide (VP-16), was combined with radiotherapy was administered from 4 weeks after surgery. Concurrent radiotherapy was started at 3 weeks after esophagectomy. CDDP at 50 mg/m{sup 2} was administered on days 1 and 7.5-FU at 500 mg/m{sup 2} and VP-16 at 60 mg/m{sup 2} were administered on days 3, 4, and 5. Thirteen patients (68.4%) were treated with more than 2 cycles of chemotherapy combined with radiation. Side-effects of severe anorexia (grade 3) and leukocytopenia (<1900/{mu}l) were observed in 47% and 39% of the patients, respectively. However no treatment-related death was observed. The 5-year-survival rate was 25.2%, 18.9%, and 15.8%, in the CR group, R group, and N group, respectively. The recurrence rate was 66.7% in the CR group, which was higher than in the matched control groups (46.2% in the N group and 54.5% in the R group), but with no significant difference. These results suggested that adjuvant chemoradiotherapy did not contribute to improvement in prognosis for these patients with advanced esophageal cancer. (author)

  3. Clinical evaluation of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy with CDDP, 5-Fu, and VP-16 for advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukaida, Hidenori; Hirai, Toshihiro; Yamashita, Yoshinori; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Hihara, Jun; Kuwahara, Masaki; Inoue, Hideki; Toge, Tetsuya

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy following surgery in patients with advanced esophageal cancer. We followed the cases of 57 such patients treated at our hospital, involving 19 who received adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CR group), 19 who received radiotherapy alone (R group), and 19 who did received neither (N group). In the CR group, chemotherapy, consisting of cis-diaminodichloroplatinum (CDDP), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and etoposide (VP-16), was combined with radiotherapy was administered from 4 weeks after surgery. Concurrent radiotherapy was started at 3 weeks after esophagectomy. CDDP at 50 mg/m 2 was administered on days 1 and 7.5-FU at 500 mg/m 2 and VP-16 at 60 mg/m 2 were administered on days 3, 4, and 5. Thirteen patients (68.4%) were treated with more than 2 cycles of chemotherapy combined with radiation. Side-effects of severe anorexia (grade 3) and leukocytopenia (<1900/μl) were observed in 47% and 39% of the patients, respectively. However no treatment-related death was observed. The 5-year-survival rate was 25.2%, 18.9%, and 15.8%, in the CR group, R group, and N group, respectively. The recurrence rate was 66.7% in the CR group, which was higher than in the matched control groups (46.2% in the N group and 54.5% in the R group), but with no significant difference. These results suggested that adjuvant chemoradiotherapy did not contribute to improvement in prognosis for these patients with advanced esophageal cancer. (author)

  4. Phase II study of concomitant chemoradiotherapy in bulky refractory or chemoresistant relapsed lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girinsky, Theodore; Lapusan, Simona; Ribrag, Vincent; Koscielny, Serge; Ferme, Christophe; Carde, Patrice

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the local efficacy of concomitant chemoradiotherapy in patients with mostly refractory lymphoma. Methods and materials: Patients with refractory or chemoresistant-relapsed lymphoma and bulky life-threatening masses were included in this study. A split course of concomitant radiotherapy and chemotherapy (mostly cisplatin and etoposide) was delivered during a 6-week period. Weekly blood tests and a clinical examination using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group guidelines were performed to assess acute toxicity. The tumor response was evaluated 1-3 months after treatment and at regular follow-up visits. Results: We enrolled 21 patients in the study between January 1998 and April 2003. Of the 21 patients, 60% had disseminated disease with bulky tumor masses and 85% had refractory lymphoma, of which most had been treated with at least two different chemotherapy regimens before concomitant chemoradiotherapy. Seventy-five percent received regimens containing cisplatinum and etoposide. The median radiation dose was 40 Gy (range, 12-62.5 Gy). Grade 3-4 hematologic toxicity and mucositis was observed in 70% and 30% of cases respectively, without any deaths. The overall response and complete remission rate was 70% and 20%, respectively. The 1-year overall survival and local progression-free survival rate was 20.4% and 54%, respectively. Three patients with localized disease were still alive 16, 33, and 48 months after treatment. Conclusion: Concomitant chemoradiotherapy for refractory or chemoresistant-relapsed lymphoma induced high hematologic toxicity, but seemed adequate for controlling local bulky tumor masses. No toxicity-related death was observed

  5. Limited-stage small cell lung cancer: current chemoradiotherapy treatment paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Gore, Elizabeth M

    2010-01-01

    In the U.S., the prevalence of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is declining, probably reflecting the decreasing prevalence of tobacco use. However, a significant number of patients will receive a diagnosis of SCLC, and approximately 40% of patients with SCLC will have limited-stage (LS) disease, which is potentially curable with the combination of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The standard therapy for LS-SCLC is concurrent chemoradiotherapy, and the 5-year survival rate observed in clinical trials is approximately 25%. The standard chemotherapy remains cisplatin and etoposide, but carboplatin is frequently used in patients who cannot tolerate or have a contraindication to cisplatin. Substantial improvements in survival have been made through improvements in radiation therapy. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy is the preferred therapy for patients who are appropriate candidates. The optimal timing of concurrent chemoradiotherapy is during the first or second cycle, based on data from meta-analyses. The optimal radiation schedule and dose remain topics of debate, but 1.5 Gy twice daily to a total of 45 Gy and 1.8-2.0 Gy daily to a total dose of 60-70 Gy are commonly used treatments. For patients who obtain a near complete or complete response, prophylactic cranial radiation reduces the incidence of brain metastases and improves overall survival. The ongoing Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and Cancer and Leukemia Group B and the European and Canadian phase III trials will investigate different radiation treatment paradigms for patients with LS-SCLC, and completion of these trials is critical.

  6. A single centre experience with sequential and concomitant chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced stage IV tonsillar cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coyle Catherine

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemo-radiotherapy offers an alternative to primary surgery and adjuvant therapy for the management of locally advanced stage IV squamous cell carcinomas of the tonsil. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed of the outcomes of 41 patients with locoregionally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil treated non-surgically at the Yorkshire Cancer Centre between January 2004 and December 2005. Due to long radiotherapy waiting times, patients received induction chemotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil followed by either cisplatin concurrent chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy alone. Results Median age was 55 years (range 34-76 years and 28 (68% patients were male. 35/41 patients (85% received 2 or more cycles of induction chemotherapy. Following induction chemotherapy, 32/41 patients (78% had a clinical response. Concomitant chemotherapy was given to 30/41 (73%. All patients received the planned radiotherapy dose with no delays. There were no treatment related deaths. Six (15% patients had gastrostomy tubes placed before treatment, and 22 (54% required nasogastric tube placement during or after treatment for nutritional support. 17 patients required unplanned admissions during treatment for supportive care. At 4 months post treatment assessment 35 out of 41 (85% patients achieved complete clinical and radiographic response. Median follow-up is 38 months (8-61 months. Local and regional control rate in complete responders at 3 years was 91%. Distant metastases have been found in 4 (9.8% patients. Three year progression-free survival rate in all patients is 75%. The 3-year cause specific survival and overall survival are 75% and 66% respectively. Conclusion Cisplatin-based induction and concurrent chemoradiotherapy provides excellent tumour control with acceptable toxicity for patients with locally advanced tonsillar cancer.

  7. The efficacy of a steroid mixture for chemoradiotherapy-induced acute mucositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamamura, Hiroyasu; Ohoguchi, Manabu; Ichioka, Kazuhiro; Ohta, Kiyotaka; Higashi, Kotarou; Tonami, Hisao

    2005-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an important therapeutic tool for malignant tumors in the head and neck and thoracic region. However, radiotherapy has also been known to cause acute mucositis and esophagitis during the early phase of treatment, for which there is no cure to date. A mixture of mucosal protective steroids has been shown to be beneficial in patients with these symptoms receiving radiotherapy alone. The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of this agent to treat the mucositis that accompanies chemoradiotherapy. Moreover, the differences between the curative effects were examined retrospectively, according to the region irradiated. Radiotherapy was administered to the head and neck, and thoracic region, and the steroid mixture was prescribed for patients in the radiotherapy alone and chemoradiotherapy groups that exhibited acute radiation-induced mucositis symptoms. We then evaluated daily food consumption, total serum-protein value, serum-albumin value and body weight of the radiation-induced mucositis patients that were treated with the mixture. Moreover, we also examined the efficacy in patients undergoing irradiation of the oral cavity, and of the esophagus (which did not entail irradiation of the oral cavity). Two hundred and fourteen patients treated with the steroid mixture in this study had no treatment-related adverse events. In comparison between the radiotherapy alone and chemoradiotherapy groups, no significant differences were observed for daily food consumption. However, differences were observed for daily food consumption between the groups undergoing irradiation of the oral cavity and irradiation of the esophagus (p=0.0008). In the group experiencing irradiation of the mouth, decreased ability to swallow and digest food associated with the primary disease was also observed. Total serum-protein values, serum-albumin values and body weight exhibited a slight decrease despite the onset of radiation-induced mucositis, compared with the values

  8. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the HIF-1α gene and chemoradiotherapy of locally advanced rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havelund, Birgitte Mayland; Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Ploen, John

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive impact of polymorphisms in the HIF-1α gene on the response to chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in rectal cancer. This study included two cohorts of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer receiving long-course CRT. The HIF-1α C1772T (rs11549465...... tumour response (P=0.03) in the validation cohort. In conclusion, these results suggest that HIF-1α polymorphisms have no value as predictors of response to neoadjuvant CRT in rectal cancer. The results of the HIF-1α c(*)191T>C in two cohorts differ and emphasise the importance of biomarker validation....

  9. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy and colonic J-pouch anal anastomosis for lower rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Yasuhiro; Okigami, Masato; Kawamoto, Aya; Hiro, Junichiro; Toiyama, Yuji; Kobayashi, Minako; Tanaka, Koji; Miki, Chikao; Kusunoki, Masato

    2011-01-01

    We performed colonic J-pouch anal anastomosis in 61 patients with rectal cancer located <4 cm from the anal verge. Surgical and oncological results were evaluated in multimodality therapy for advanced rectal cancer. According to Wexner's score, 7% of patients were fully continent, 71% had acceptable function with minor continence problems, and 22% were incontinent. No patients required intermittent self-catheterization during follow-up. After a median follow-up of 49 months, there was only 1 case of local recurrence after surgery. Our surgical approach irrespective of internal sphincter resection produces satisfactory functional and oncological results in multimodality therapy using preoperative chemoradiotherapy for lower rectal cancer. (author)

  10. Therapeutic options and postoperative wound complications after extremity soft tissue sarcoma resection and postoperative external beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouarab, Mohamed H; Salem, Iman L; Degheidy, Magdy M; Henn, Dominic; Hirche, Christoph; Eweida, Ahmad; Uhl, Matthias; Kneser, Ulrich; Kremer, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas occur most commonly in the lower and upper extremities. The standard treatment is limb salvage surgery combined with radiotherapy. Postoperative radiotherapy is associated with wound complications. This systematic review aims to summarise the available evidence and review the literature of the last 10 years regarding postoperative wound complications in patients who had limb salvage surgical excision followed by direct closure vs flap coverage together with postoperative radiotherapy and to define the optimal timeframe for adjuvant radiotherapy after soft tissue sarcomas resection and flap reconstruction. A literature search was performed using PubMed. The following keywords were searched: limb salvage, limb-sparing, flaps, radiation therapy, radiation, irradiation, adjuvant radiotherapy, postoperative radiotherapy, radiation effects, wound healing, surgical wound infection, surgical wound dehiscence, wound healing, soft tissue sarcoma and neoplasms. In total, 1045 papers were retrieved. Thirty-seven articles were finally selected after screening of abstracts and applying dates and language filters and inclusion and exclusion criteria. Plastic surgery provides a vast number of reconstructive flap procedures that are directly linked to decreasing wound complications, especially with the expectant postoperative radiotherapy. This adjuvant radiotherapy is better administered in the first 3-6 weeks after reconstruction to allow timely wound healing and avoid local recurrence. © 2017 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Postoperative radiotherapy for intracranial meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Ha Chung; Lee, Myung Za

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and tolerance of postoperative external radiotherapy for patients with intracranial meningiomas. The records of thirty three patients with intracranial meningiomas who were treated with postoperative external irradiation at our institution between Feb, 1988 and Nov, 1999 were retrospectively analyzed. Median age of patients at diagnosis was 53 years with range of 17 to 68 years. Sites of involvement were parasagital, cerebral convexity, sphenoid ridge, parasellar and tentorium cerebella. Of 33 evaluated patients, 15 transitional, 10 meningotheliomatous, 4 hemangiopericytic, 3 atypical and 1 malignant meningioma were identified. Four patients underwent biopsy alone and remaining 29 patients underwent total tumor resection. A dose of 50 to 60 Gy was delivered in 28-35 daily fractions over a period of 5 to 7 weeks. Follow-up period ranged from 12 months to 8 years. The actuarial survival rates at 5 and 7 years for entire group of patients were 78% and 67%, respectively. The corresponding disease free survival rates were 73% and 61 %, respectively. The overall local control rate at 5 years was 83%. One out of 25 patients in benign group developed local failure, while 4 out of 8 patients in malignant group did local failure (p <0.05), Of 4 patients who underwent biopsy alone, 2 developed local failure. There was no significant difference in 5 year actuarial survival between patients who underwent total tumor resection and those who did biopsy alone. Patients whose age is under 60 showed slightly better survival than those whose age is 60 or older, although this was not statistically significant. There was no documented late complications in any patients. Based on our study, we might conclude that postoperative external beam radiotherapy tends to improve survival of patients with intracranial meningiomas comparing with surgery alone

  12. Effects of posture on postoperative pulmonary function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, K G; Holte, Kathrine; Kehlet, H

    2003-01-01

    effect on postoperative pulmonary function in the sitting or standing position compared with the supine. Thus, avoidance of the supine position may improve postoperative pulmonary function. Three of six studies showed a positive effect on postoperative pulmonary function of the lateral side compared......BACKGROUND: Pulmonary morbidity is still a relevant complication to major surgery despite improvements in surgical technique and anaesthetic methods. Postoperative posture may be a pathogenic factor, but the effects of changes in postoperative posture on pulmonary function have not been reviewed...... with the supine. Thus, the lateral position has limited effects on pulmonary function. CONCLUSION: Changes of postoperative position from supine to sitting or standing are of major importance in the interpretation of postoperative pulmonary outcome studies and in future strategies to improve pulmonary outcome....

  13. Multimodal approach to postoperative recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To provide updated information on recent developments within individual components of multimodal interventions to improve postoperative outcome (fast-track methodology). RECENT FINDINGS: The value of the fast-track methodology to improve recovery and decrease hospital stay...... and morbidity has been firmly consolidated, especially in colorectal procedures. An increasing amount of data from other procedures supports the value of the fast-track concept across procedures. Fast-track programs should be based on the analysis of procedure-specific factors that may influence outcome...

  14. Improved oncologic outcome with chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery in unresectable intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Yeona; Kim, Tae Hyung; Seong, Jinsil [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei Cancer Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    To investigate the ability of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) to down-stage unresectable intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (IHCC) to resectable lesions, as well as the factors associated with achieving such down-staging. The study cohort comprised 120 patients diagnosed with stage I-IVA IHCC between 2001 and 2012. Of these patients, 56 underwent surgery and 64 received CRT as their initial treatment. The rate of curative resections for patients who received CRT was assessed, and the locoregional failure-free survival (LRFFS) and overall survival (OS) rates of these patients were compared to those of patients who underwent CRT alone. Median follow-up was 36 months. A partial response after CRT was observed in 25% of patients, whereas a biologic response (a >70% decrease of CA19-9) was observed in 35%. Eight patients (12.5%) received curative resection after CRT and showed significantly improved LRFFS and OS compared to those treated with CRT alone (3-year LRFFS: 50 vs. 15.7%, respectively, p = 0.03; 3-year OS: 50 vs. 11.2%, respectively, p = 0.012); these rates were comparable to those of patients who received initial surgery. Factors associated with curative surgery after CRT were gemcitabine administration, higher radiotherapy dose (biological effective dose ≥55 Gy with α/β = 10), and a >70% reduction of CA19-9. Upfront CRT could produce favorable outcomes by converting unresectable lesions to resectable tumors in selected patients. Higher radiotherapy doses and gemcitabine-based chemotherapy yielded a significant reduction of CA19-9 after CRT; patients with these characteristics had a greater chance of curative resection and improved OS. (orig.) [German] Untersuchung der Faehigkeit der Radiochemotherapie (CRT), unauffaellige intrahepatische Cholangiokarzinome (IHCC) auf resezierbare Laesionen herunterzustufen sowie der Faktoren, die mit dem Erreichen einer solchen Herabstufung verbunden sind. Die Studienkohorte umfasste 120 Patienten mit einem zwischen 2001 und 2012

  15. Association of TP53 and MDM2 polymorphisms with survival in bladder cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Asano; Sakano, Shigeru; Hinoda, Yuji; Nishijima, Jun; Kawai, Yoshihisa; Misumi, Taku; Nagao, Kazuhiro; Hara, Takahiko; Matsuyama, Hideyasu

    2009-01-01

    Platinum-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) as bladder conservation therapy has shown promising results for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. However, CRT might diminish survival as a result of the delay in cystectomy for some patients with non-responding bladder tumors. Because the p53 tumor suppression pathway, including its MDM2 counterpart, is important in chemotherapy- and radiotherapy-associated effects, functional polymorphisms in the TP53 and MDM2 genes could influence the response to treatment and the prognosis following CRT. We investigated associations between two such polymorphisms, and p53 overexpression, and response or survival in bladder cancer patients treated with CRT. The study group comprised 96 patients who underwent CRT for transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in TP53 (codon 72, arginine>proline) and MDM2 (SNP3O9, T>G) were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), and nuclear expression levels of p53 were examined using immunohistochemistry. None of the genotypes or p53 overexpression was significantly associated with response to CRT. However, patients with MDM2 T/G+G/G genotypes had improved cancer-specific survival rates after CRT (P=0.009). In multivariate analysis, the MDM2 T/G+G/G genotypes, and more than two of total variant alleles in TP53 and MDM2, were independently associated with improved cancer-specific survival (P=0.031 and P=0.015, respectively). In addition, MDM2 genotypes were significantly associated with cystectomy-free survival (P=0.030). These results suggest that the TP53 and MDM2 genotypes might be useful prognostic factors following CRT in bladder cancer, helping patient selection for bladder conservation therapy. (author)

  16. [Pay attention to the selective lateral pelvic lymph node dissection in mid-low rectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Wenjian; Wang, Ziqiang

    2017-03-25

    Lateral pelvic lymph node metastasis is an important metastatic mode and a major cause of locoregional recurrence of mid-low rectal cancer. Recently, there is an East-West discrepancy in regard to the diagnosis, clinical significance, treatment and prognosis of lateral pelvic lymph node metastasis. In the West, lateral nodal involvement may represent systemic disease and preoperative chemoradiotherapy can sterilize clinically suspected lateral nodes. Thus, in many Western countries, the standard therapy for lower rectal cancer is total mesorectal excision with chemoradiotherapy, and pelvic sidewall dissection is rarely performed. In the East, and Japan in particular, however, there is a positive attitude in regard to lateral pelvic lymph node dissection (LPND). They consider that lateral pelvic lymph node metastasis is as regional metastasis, and the clinically suspected lateral nodes can not be removed by neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. The selective LPND after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy may be found to be promising treatment for the improvement of therapeutic benefits in these patients. Therefore, the large-scale prospective studies are urgently required to improve selection criteria for LPND and neoadjuvant treatment to prevent overtreatment in the near future. Selective LPND after neoadjuvant treatment based on modern imaging techniques is expected to reduce locoregional recurrence and improve long-term survival in patients with mid-low rectal cancer.

  17. Postoperative Radiation Therapy of Craniopharyngioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Il Han; Park, Charn Il; Cho, Byung Kyu [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Hyong Geln [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-06-15

    Between December 1979 and September 1989, 23 patients with craniopharyngioma who underwent surgery and postoperative radiation therapy were retrospectively evaluated to assess the efficacy of this management at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital. Total removal of tumor was attempted in all patients. Of these, surgeons tried total removal in eight patients, but revealed residual mass by postoperative CT, and partial removal was done in 15 patients. The morphology of tumor on the operative finding was grouped into three types : cystic 13 (57%), solid 4 (17%), and mixed 6 (26%). Cystic type was predominant in {<=}20 years old group. Actuarial overall survival rates at 5 and 10 years were 95% and 81% respectively and actuarial tumor control rates were 74% and 50%. Surgical extent was not related to the survival rates(p=0.41). Pediatric and adolescent Patients(age of {<=}20 year) had a trend of better survival than that of adult patients(p=0.10). The results indicated that limited surgical excision followed by radiation therapy is recommended when total excision is not possible.

  18. Postoperative Radiation Therapy of Craniopharyngioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Il Han; Park, Charn Il; Cho, Byung Kyu; Yun, Hyong Geln

    1993-01-01

    Between December 1979 and September 1989, 23 patients with craniopharyngioma who underwent surgery and postoperative radiation therapy were retrospectively evaluated to assess the efficacy of this management at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital. Total removal of tumor was attempted in all patients. Of these, surgeons tried total removal in eight patients, but revealed residual mass by postoperative CT, and partial removal was done in 15 patients. The morphology of tumor on the operative finding was grouped into three types : cystic 13 (57%), solid 4 (17%), and mixed 6 (26%). Cystic type was predominant in ≤20 years old group. Actuarial overall survival rates at 5 and 10 years were 95% and 81% respectively and actuarial tumor control rates were 74% and 50%. Surgical extent was not related to the survival rates(p=0.41). Pediatric and adolescent Patients(age of ≤20 year) had a trend of better survival than that of adult patients(p=0.10). The results indicated that limited surgical excision followed by radiation therapy is recommended when total excision is not possible

  19. Adenocarcinoma of the cervical esophagus arising in heterotopic gastric mucosa: exclusive chemoradiotherapy following a mucosal resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jestin-Letallec, V.; Muller, M.; Metges, J.P.; Bouchekoua, M.; Albarghach, N.; Pradier, O.

    2007-01-01

    Esophagus adenocarcinomas developing within heterotopic gastric mucosa are very rare and described to be found endoscopically in a prevalence of .29%. We report a case of cervical adenocarcinoma arising in ectopic gastric mucosa in a fifty-four year old man. The patient underwent a mucosal resection followed with exclusive chemoradiotherapy because of infiltration of the sub mucosa layer. A radiotherapy dose of 60 Gy ( 2 Gy/Fr, 30 Fr) was realized with a reduction of the fields at 50 Gy associated with a continuous 5FU-cisplatin combination after eliminating known mutation in the dihydro-pyrimidine of the dehydrogenase gene. for this tumor, surgery is the main treatment, (oesophagectomy associated with laryngo-pharyngectomy) and has an important repercussion on the quality of life. Because of the refusal of our patient, after a mucosal resection attempt, we proposed our patient a chemoradiotherapy. For the first time in the literature, we report the results of radio chemotherapy for this rare tumor. Eighteen months after the treatment, the patient is alive without sign of recurrence. The radio chemotherapy could be a safety treatment for this rare tumor associated with a good quality of life. A review of the literature since 1950 will be shown. (authors)

  20. Metachronous esophageal cancer which occurred after chemoradiotherapy as adjuvant therapy, report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Junko; Momma, Kumiko; Yoshida, Misao

    2007-01-01

    A 53-year-old male. We performed endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) for squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus in June, 2000 [SM1, ly (+), v (+)]. We performed chemoradiotherapy as adjuvant treatment. We diagnosed metachronous esophageal cancer six years later and performed EMR. Pathologically it was diagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma T1a-MM, ly0, v0. A 61-year-old male. We performed EMR for squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus in November, 2000 [SM1, ly (-), v (+)]. We performed chemoradiotherapy as adjuvant treatment. We diagnosed metachronous esophageal cancer five years later, and performed EMR. Pathologically it was diagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma T1a-MM, ly1, v0. The two cases were diagnosed by six monthly endoscopic examination. The carcinoma were small, equal to less than 10 mm, but it was that their growth rate was fast, and it was noted that they were collapsed lesions whose circumference had swelled. In addition, both of the lesions had an invasion depth of T1a-MM. (author)

  1. Adenocarcinoma of the cervical esophagus arising in heterotopic gastric mucosa: exclusive chemoradiotherapy following a mucosal resection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jestin-Letallec, V.; Muller, M.; Metges, J.P.; Bouchekoua, M.; Albarghach, N.; Pradier, O. [Departement de Cancerologie, 29 - Brest (France)

    2007-11-15

    Esophagus adenocarcinomas developing within heterotopic gastric mucosa are very rare and described to be found endoscopically in a prevalence of .29%. We report a case of cervical adenocarcinoma arising in ectopic gastric mucosa in a fifty-four year old man. The patient underwent a mucosal resection followed with exclusive chemoradiotherapy because of infiltration of the sub mucosa layer. A radiotherapy dose of 60 Gy ( 2 Gy/Fr, 30 Fr) was realized with a reduction of the fields at 50 Gy associated with a continuous 5FU-cisplatin combination after eliminating known mutation in the dihydro-pyrimidine of the dehydrogenase gene. for this tumor, surgery is the main treatment, (oesophagectomy associated with laryngo-pharyngectomy) and has an important repercussion on the quality of life. Because of the refusal of our patient, after a mucosal resection attempt, we proposed our patient a chemoradiotherapy. For the first time in the literature, we report the results of radio chemotherapy for this rare tumor. Eighteen months after the treatment, the patient is alive without sign of recurrence. The radio chemotherapy could be a safety treatment for this rare tumor associated with a good quality of life. A review of the literature since 1950 will be shown. (authors)

  2. MRI features of the complete histopathological response of locally advanced rectal cancer to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franklin, J.M., E-mail: jamiemfranklin@hotmail.com [Churchill Hospital, Headington, Oxford (United Kingdom); Anderson, E.M.; Gleeson, F.V. [Churchill Hospital, Headington, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-15

    Aim: To describe the post-chemoradiotherapy magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of locally advanced rectal carcinoma (LARC) in which there has been a complete histopathological response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Materials and methods: This retrospective cohort study was performed between January 2005 and November 2009 at a regional cancer centre. Consecutive patients with LARC and a histopathological complete response to long-course CRT were identified. Pre- and post-treatment MRI images were reviewed using a proforma for predefined features and response criteria. ymrT0 was defined as the absence of residual abnormality on MRI. Results: Twenty patients were included in the study. Seven (35%) ypT0 tumours were ymrT0. All 13 ypT0 tumours not achieving ymrT0 appearances had a good radiological response, with at least 65% tumour reduction. The appearances were heterogeneous: in 11/13 patients the tumour was replaced by a region of at least 50% low signal on MRI, with 8/13 having {>=}80% low signal, and 3/13 with 100% low signal. Conclusion: MRI may be useful in identifying a complete histopathological response. However, the MRI appearances of ypT0 tumours are heterogeneous and conventional MRI complete response criteria will not detect the majority of patients with a complete histopathological response.

  3. MRI features of the complete histopathological response of locally advanced rectal cancer to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin, J.M.; Anderson, E.M.; Gleeson, F.V.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To describe the post-chemoradiotherapy magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of locally advanced rectal carcinoma (LARC) in which there has been a complete histopathological response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Materials and methods: This retrospective cohort study was performed between January 2005 and November 2009 at a regional cancer centre. Consecutive patients with LARC and a histopathological complete response to long-course CRT were identified. Pre- and post-treatment MRI images were reviewed using a proforma for predefined features and response criteria. ymrT0 was defined as the absence of residual abnormality on MRI. Results: Twenty patients were included in the study. Seven (35%) ypT0 tumours were ymrT0. All 13 ypT0 tumours not achieving ymrT0 appearances had a good radiological response, with at least 65% tumour reduction. The appearances were heterogeneous: in 11/13 patients the tumour was replaced by a region of at least 50% low signal on MRI, with 8/13 having ≥80% low signal, and 3/13 with 100% low signal. Conclusion: MRI may be useful in identifying a complete histopathological response. However, the MRI appearances of ypT0 tumours are heterogeneous and conventional MRI complete response criteria will not detect the majority of patients with a complete histopathological response.

  4. Elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for squamous cell carcinoma of the thoracic esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozawa, Masakatsu; Nihei, Keiji; Ishikura, Satoshi; Minashi, Keiko; Yano, Tomonori; Muto, Manabu; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Ogino, Takashi

    2009-08-01

    There are some reports indicating that prophylactic three-field lymph node dissection for esophageal cancer can lead to improved survival. But the benefit of ENI in CRT for thoracic esophageal cancer remains controversial. The purpose of the present study is to retrospectively evaluate the efficacy of elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for thoracic esophageal cancer. Patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the thoracic esophagus newly diagnosed between February 1999 and April 2001 in our institution was recruited from our database. Definitive chemoradiotherapy consisted of two cycles of cisplatin/5FU repeated every 5 weeks, with concurrent radiation therapy of 60 Gy in 30 fractions. Up to 40 Gy radiation therapy was delivered to the cervical, periesophageal, mediastinal and perigastric lymph nodes as ENI. One hundred two patients were included in this analysis, and their characteristics were as follows: median age, 65 years; male/female, 85/17; T1/T2/T3/T4, 16/11/61/14; N0/N1, 48/54; M0/M1, 84/18. The median follow-up period for the surviving patients was 41 months. Sixty patients achieved complete response (CR). After achieving CR, only one (1.0%; 95% CI, 0-5.3%) patient experienced elective nodal failure without any other site of recurrence. In CRT for esophageal SCC, ENI is effective for preventing regional nodal failure. Further evaluation of whether ENI leads to an improved overall survival is needed.

  5. A case of Boerhaave's syndrome during concurrent chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Tatsuya; Iwae, Shigemichi; Hirayama, Yuji; Yonezawa, Koichiro; Morita, Naruhiko

    2014-01-01

    Boerhaave's syndrome is a rare disease involving rupture or perforation of the entire layer of the esophagus caused by rapid increase in pressure. When the proper treatment is delayed, the outcome can be fatal, so early diagnosis is important. We experienced a patient of Boerhaave's syndrome during concurrent chemoradiotherapy for hypopharyngeal cancer. We report a 61-year-old male who underwent concurrent chemoradiotherapy for T3N1M0 hypopharyngeal cancer. He had severe chest pain immediately after vomiting. We initially made a differential diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, which needed emergency treatment. However, his general condition deteriorated markedly, and he went into septic shock. We performed a CT after injection of a contrast medium, and confirmed leakage into the thoracic cavity. We diagnosed Boerhaave's syndrome. We started surgery at 19 hours from the onset and found the rupture site by laparotomy. The ruptured esophagus was repaired by simple suturing and covered by the greater omentum, but the patient was not cured of his leakage even after surgery. Recently antiemetics have improved, but we still experience patients who have difficulty due to vomiting when we use cisplatin (CDDP). Furthermore, gastrostomy and opioids as supportive care cause vomiting. Therefore, we must approach antiemetic therapy cautiously, and we should rule out Boerhaave's syndrome quickly when patients have chest pain. (author)

  6. Nutritional Interventions in Head and Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemoradiotherapy: A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Bossola

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present review aimed to define the role of nutritional interventions in the prevention and treatment of malnutrition in HNC patients undergoing CRT as well as their impact on CRT-related toxicity and survival. Head and neck cancer patients are frequently malnourished at the time of diagnosis and prior to the beginning of treatment. In addition, chemo-radiotherapy (CRT causes or exacerbates symptoms, such as alteration or loss of taste, mucositis, xerostomia, fatigue, nausea and vomiting, with consequent worsening of malnutrition. Nutritional counseling (NC and oral nutritional supplements (ONS should be used to increase dietary intake and to prevent therapy-associated weight loss and interruption of radiation therapy. If obstructing cancer and/or mucositis interfere with swallowing, enteral nutrition should be delivered by tube. However, it seems that there is not sufficient evidence to determine the optimal method of enteral feeding. Prophylactic feeding through nasogastric tube or percutaneous gastrostomy to prevent weight loss, reduce dehydration and hospitalizations, and avoid treatment breaks has become relatively common. Compared to reactive feeding (patients are supported with oral nutritional supplements and when it is impossible to maintain nutritional requirements enteral feeding via a NGT or PEG is started, prophylactic feeding does not offer advantages in terms of nutritional outcomes, interruptions of radiotherapy and survival. Overall, it seems that further adequate prospective, randomized studies are needed to define the better nutritional intervention in head and neck cancer patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy.

  7. Disturbance of food ingestion and swallowing due to late toxicity of concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsu, Masanori; Ishitoya, Junichi; Ikeda, Youichi; Shiono, Osamu; Kawano, Toshirou; Tsukuda, Mamoru

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate late disturbance of food ingestion and swallowing in patients with advanced head and neck carcinoma after concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Patients answered a questionnaire, the Quality of Life Radiation Therapy Instrument (QOL-RTI) for Japanese, and swallowing function was investigated by videoendoscopy (VE) more than 1 year after treatment. The results of patients after CCRT were compared with normal elderly serving as the control group. The total QOL score of the patient group was significantly lower than that of the control group. In terms of the results of the QOL questionnaires, the QOL scores for quantity of saliva, quality of saliva, taste and food swallowing were significantly lower in the patient group. Regarding the VE findings, the control group exhibited almost normal swallowing function, but pooling in the vallecura, laryngeal palsy and pooling in the hypopharynx were observed in the phase of not swallowing. Furthermore, dysfunction of swallowing using the colored water swallowing test was observed in about 40% of the patients. In addition, the factors associated with disturbance of QOL score and swallowing function were analyzed. All factors, id est (i.e.), age, T and N classification, stage, duration after treatment, acute toxicity of chemoradiotherapy and order of chemotherapy, had not influence on food ingestion or swallowing. Patients after CCRT might have potential dysfunction of swallowing. The colored water swallowing test is useful for diagnosis of swallowing dysfunction in head and neck cancer patients after CCRT. (author)

  8. Chemoradiotherapy in patients with anal cancer: Impact of length of unplanned treatment interruption on outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Andreas; Meier Zu Eissen, Juergen; Karstens, Johann H.; Bremer, Michael [Medical School Hannover (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2006-09-15

    The aim of this retrospective analysis was to evaluate feasibility and effectiveness of definitive chemoradiotherapy without split-course technique in anal cancer patients. From 1993 to 2003, 81 patients were treated; 13 were excluded due to various chemotherapeutic regimes, thus 68 patients were analysed. In case of acute grade 3 toxicities, treatment was halted until improvement or resolution independent of dose. Short interruption was defined as completing treatment without exceeding eight cumulative treatment days beyond scheduled plan, other patients were considered to have had prolonged interruption. Median follow-up was 46 months. Median overall treatment time was 53 days corresponding to an interruption of eight cumulative treatment days. Thirty-five patients (51%) had treatment interruption of <8 days. No acute grade 4 toxicities were observed; one fatality occurred during treatment due to ileus-like symptoms according to acute grade 5 toxicity. Comparing patients with short vs. prolonged interruption 5-year actuarial rates for local control were 85% vs. 81% (p{approx}0.605) and for colostomy-free survival 85% vs. 87% (p{approx}0.762), respectively. Chemoradiotherapy with short individualised treatment interruptions seems to be feasible with acceptable acute or late toxicities. Treatment is highly effective in terms of local control and colostomy-free survival.

  9. [A Case of Effective Chemoradiotherapy Using mFOLFOX6 for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuga, Yoshio; Kitamura, Shosuke; Mouri, Teruo; Miwata, Tomohiro; Hirata, Yuzoh; Ishizaki, Yasuyo; Hashimoto, Yasutoshi

    2017-05-01

    We report a case of locally advanced rectal cancer, treated effectively with chemotherapy consisting of mFOLFOX6 combined with radiotherapy. A 63-year-old man was admitted to our hospital in March 2012 for diarrhea and anal and perineal pain. Advanced rectal cancer with invasion ofthe right perineum was diagnosed based on computer tomography(CT) findings. Surgery was performed; however, the rectal cancer was unresectable. A sigmoid colostomy was performed, and a central venous port was implanted. In April 2012, the patient was treated with chemotherapy using 3 courses ofmFOLFOX6 and concurrent radiotherapy. Radiotherapy at 2 Gy/day was administered 25 times(total dose, 50 Gy). After chemoradiotherapy, the patient underwent 3 courses ofmFOLFOX6 as an additional therapy. By June 2012, CT showed resolution ofthe tumor in the right perineum and a marked decrease in the size ofthe primary rectal cancer. Because the patient refused surgery, we started treatment with combination chemotherapy using oral S-1 and intravenous CPT-11 in August 2012. After 18 courses, the treatment was changed to oral administration ofS -1 alone, which was continued for 1 year. The patient remained well without recurrence for 54 months since the original diagnosis. Therefore, chemoradiotherapy with mFOLFOX6 is a possible option for the management of advanced rectal cancer.

  10. A Review of ERCC1 Gene in Bladder Cancer: Implications for Carcinogenesis and Resistance to Chemoradiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsunari Kawashima

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The excision repair cross-complementing group 1 (ERCC1 gene performs a critical incision step in DNA repair and is reported to be correlated with carcinogenesis and resistance to drug or ionizing radiation therapy. We reviewed the correlation between ERCC1 and bladder cancer. In carcinogenesis, several reports discussed the relation between ERCC1 single nucleotide polymorphisms and carcinogenesis in bladder cancer only in case-control studies. Regarding the relation between ERCC1 and resistance to chemoradiotherapy, in vitro and clinical studies indicate that ERCC1 might be related to resistance to radiation therapy rather than cisplatin therapy. It is controversial whether ERCC1 predicts prognosis of bladder cancer treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Tyrosine kinase receptors or endothelial-mesenchymal transition are reported to regulate the expression of ERCC1, and further study is needed to clarify the mechanism of ERCC1 expression and resistance to chemoradiotherapy in vitro and to discover novel therapies for advanced and metastatic bladder cancer.

  11. A Review of ERCC1 Gene in Bladder Cancer: Implications for Carcinogenesis and Resistance to Chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Atsunari; Takayama, Hitoshi; Tsujimura, Akira

    2012-01-01

    The excision repair cross-complementing group 1 (ERCC1) gene performs a critical incision step in DNA repair and is reported to be correlated with carcinogenesis and resistance to drug or ionizing radiation therapy. We reviewed the correlation between ERCC1 and bladder cancer. In carcinogenesis, several reports discussed the relation between ERCC1 single nucleotide polymorphisms and carcinogenesis in bladder cancer only in case-control studies. Regarding the relation between ERCC1 and resistance to chemoradiotherapy, in vitro and clinical studies indicate that ERCC1 might be related to resistance to radiation therapy rather than cisplatin therapy. It is controversial whether ERCC1 predicts prognosis of bladder cancer treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Tyrosine kinase receptors or endothelial-mesenchymal transition are reported to regulate the expression of ERCC1, and further study is needed to clarify the mechanism of ERCC1 expression and resistance to chemoradiotherapy in vitro and to discover novel therapies for advanced and metastatic bladder cancer.

  12. Nomogram for predicting pathologically complete response after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for oesophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toxopeus, Eelke Lucie Anne; Nieboer, Daan; Shapiro, Joel; Biermann, Katharina; Gaast, Ate van der; Rij, Carolien M. van; Steyerberg, Ewout Willem; Lanschot, Joseph Jan Baptiste van; Wijnhoven, Bas Peter Louis

    2015-01-01

    Background: A pathologically complete response (pCR) to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) is seen in 30% of the patients with oesophageal cancer. The aim is to identify patient and tumour characteristics associated with a pCR and to develop a nomogram for the prediction of pCR. Patients and methods: Patients who underwent nCRT followed by surgery were identified and response to nCRT was assessed according to a modified Mandard classification in the resection specimen. A model was developed with age, gender, histology and location of the tumour, differentiation grade, alcohol use, smoking, percentage weight loss, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI), cT-stage and cN-stage as potential predictors for pCR. Probability of pCR was studied via logistic regression. Performance of the prediction nomogram was quantified using the concordance statistic (c-statistic) and corrected for optimism. Results: A total of 381 patients were included. After surgery, 27.6% of the tumours showed a pCR. Female sex, squamous cell histology, poor differentiation grade, and low cT-stage were predictive for a pCR with a c-statistic of 0.64 (corrected for optimism). Conclusion: A nomogram for the prediction of pathologically complete response after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy was developed, with a reasonable predictive power. This nomogram needs external validation before it can be used for individualised clinical decision-making

  13. A case with hypopharyngeal perforation after concurrent chemoradiotherapy for hypopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Masato; Kuwahata, Yuko; Sumi, Takuro; Nishio, Ayako

    2012-01-01

    We present a rare case of a hypopharyngeal perforation after concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). A 69-year-old man with schizophrenia received CCRT with Docetaxel, Cisplatin, and 5-FU following a diagnosis of hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (T3N2bM0). Complete remission was achieved with CCRT, but four months later, he forcibly swallowed a meat bun (Chinese manju) which led to the perforation of his hypopharynx. He was treated with conservative therapy (intravenous antibiotic, fasting and tube feeding). The swelling gradually subsided and the patient was able to consume food naturally after the 13th day of hospitalization. We considered the composite factors had contributed to the pathogenesis of this case: anatomical weakness, pathological weakness after chemoradiotherapy, physical pressure to the hypopharynx due to the metastasis of the cervical spine, and the powerful deglutition pressure caused by his forcible swallowing of the bun. The possibility that such a serious complication might be caused by CCRT was suggested, and we believe that clinicians should have recognition and understanding of how to treat it because of its severe morbidity. (author)

  14. Effects of concurrent enteral hyperalimentation with chemo-radiotherapy in patients with oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, Keiko; Ohno, Seiji; Kohno, Michiko; Narikawa, Gen; Sasabe, Eri; Yamamoto, Tetsuya

    2010-01-01

    We compared the nutritional condition, immunological function, and frequency of adverse effects during concurrent chemoradiotherapy for oral cancer between patients simultaneously receiving enteral hyperalimentation (Racol) (n=20; EHA group) and patients receiving peripheral vein nutrition (n=20; PVN group). Although there was no significant difference in the change of body weight between the two groups, the decrease of plasma albumin values in the EHA group appeared later than in the PVN group. In the PVN group, the number of lymphocytes and lymphocyte blastogenesis significantly decreased on and after day 14. On the other hand, in the EHA group, the number of lymphocytes decreased only on day 14 and no decrease in lymphocyte blastogenesis was observed. While stomatitis developed in all patients, the severity was lower in the EHA group than the PVN one. These results suggest that the simultaneous administration of Racol during concurrent chemoradiotherapy for oral cancer inhibits the deterioration of nutritional and immunological conditions as well as the severity of stomatitis. This nutrient therapy is therefore considered to be a supportive therapy for oral cancer patients. (author)

  15. Intraoperative and Early Postoperative Complications of Manual Sutureless Cataract Extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, Y.; Zia, S.; Mirza, A. B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the intraoperative and early postoperative complications of manual sutureless cataract extraction. Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: Redo Eye Hospital, Rawalpindi, Pakistan, from January 2009 to December 2010. Methodology: Three hundred patients of cataract through purposive non-probability sampling were selected. The patients underwent manual sutureless cataract surgery (MSCS) by single experienced surgeon and intraoperative complications were documented. The surgical technique was modified to deal with any intraoperative complications accordingly. Patients were examined on the first postoperative day and on the first postoperative week for any postoperative complications. The data was entered in Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 13.0 and the results were calculated in frequencies. Results: Among the 300 cases, 81.3% surgeries went uneventful whereas 18.6% had some complication. The common intraoperative complications were superior button-hole formation in 5%; posterior capsular rent in 5% and premature entry with iris prolapse in 3% cases. Postoperatively, the commonly encountered complications were striate keratopathy in 9.6% and hyphema 9%. At first week follow-up, 4% had striate keratopathy and 0.6% had hyphema. Striate keratopathy resolved with topical medication on subsequent follow-up. A total of 9 cases (3%) underwent second surgery: 2 cases for lens matter wash, 2 cases for hyphema and 5 cases needed suturing of wound for shallow anterior chamber due to wound leak. Conclusion: Superior button-hole formation, posterior capsular rent and premature entry were the common intraoperative complications of MSCS whereas the common early postoperative complications were striate keratopathy and hyphema. (author)

  16. 18F-FDG PET-CT after Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy in Esophageal Cancer Patients to Optimize Surgical Decision Making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderegg, Maarten C. J.; de Groof, Elisabeth J.; Gisbertz, Suzanne S.; Bennink, Roel J.; Lagarde, Sjoerd M.; Klinkenbijl, Jean H. G.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; Bergman, Jacques J. G. H. M.; Hulshof, Maarten C. C. M.; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W. M.; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I.

    2015-01-01

    Prognosis of esophageal cancer patients can be significantly improved by neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT). Given the aggressive nature of esophageal tumors, it is conceivable that in a significant portion of patients treated with nCRT, dissemination already becomes manifest during the period of

  17. Ramosetron for the prevention of nausea and vomiting during 5-fluorouracil-based chemoradiotherapy for pancreatico-biliary cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyubo; Chie, Eui-Kyu; Jang, Jin-Young; Kim, Sun-Whe; Oh, Do-Youn; Im, Seock-Ah; Kim, Tae-You; Bang, Yung-Jue; Ha, Sung-W.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of ramosetron for the prevention of chemoradiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CRINV) in patients receiving upper abdominal irradiation with concurrent 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. Between November 2006 and April 2007, 25 patients with pancreatico-biliary cancer underwent adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. A total dose of 40 Gy was delivered using 2 Gy/fraction, 5 days a week, with 2 weeks of planned rest after 20 Gy. Concomitant 5-fluorouracil (500 mg/m 2 /day i.v. bolus) was administered for the first 3 days of each split course. During the first course of chemoradiotherapy, all patients had prophylactic metoclopramide before treatment and those refractory to metoclopramide received rescue medication with ondansetron. During the second course of chemoradiotherapy, prophylactic ramosetron was given to patients who were refractory to ondansetron. Response to antiemetics was scored in four tiers: none, no CRINV; mild, did not interfere with normal daily life; moderate, interfered with normal daily life and severe, patient bedridden because of CRINV. Fifty-six percent of the patients (14 of 25) had moderate CRINV despite metoclopramide, and received ondansetron. Ten patients who experienced moderate CRINV despite the ondansetron had prophylactic ramosetron, and 60% of the patients (6 of 10) had the symptom improved. Ramosetron proved to be an effective alternative for the control of CRINV during upper abdominal irradiation with concurrent 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. (author)

  18. Catalase-loaded cisplatin-prodrug-constructed liposomes to overcome tumor hypoxia for enhanced chemo-radiotherapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Song, Xuejiao; Liang, Chao; Yi, Xuan; Song, Guosheng; Chao, Yu; Yang, Yu; Yang, Kai; Feng, Liangzhu; Liu, Zhuang

    2017-09-01

    Aiming at improved therapeutic efficacies, the combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy (chemo-radiotherapy) has been widely studied and applied in clinic. However, the hostile characteristics of tumor microenvironment such as hypoxia often limit the efficacies in both types of cancer therapies. Herein, catalase (CAT), an antioxidant enzyme, is encapsulated inside liposomes constituted by cisplatin (IV)-prodrug-conjugated phospholipid, forming CAT@Pt (IV)-liposome for enhanced chemo-radiotherapy of cancer. After being loaded inside liposomes, CAT within CAT@Pt (IV)-liposome shows retained and well-protected enzyme activity, and is able to trigger decomposition of H 2 O 2 produced by tumor cells, so as to produce additional oxygen for hypoxia relief. As the result, treatment of CAT@Pt (IV)-liposome induces the highest level of DNA damage in cancer cells after X-ray radiation compared to the control groups. In vivo tumor treatment further demonstrates a remarkably improved therapeutic outcome in chemo-radiotherapy with such CAT@Pt (IV)-liposome nanoparticles. Hence, an exquisite type of liposome-based nanoparticles is developed in this work by integrating cisplatin-based chemotherapy and catalase-induced tumor hypoxia relief together for combined chemo-radiotherapy with great synergistic efficacy, promising for clinical translation in cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Salvage surgery for lymph node metastasis after concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, Hideyuki; Takeuchi, Eiji; Kawamoto, Katsuyuki; Fujiwara, Kazunori; Fukuhara, Takahiro; Miyake, Naritomo; Kitano, Hiroya

    2009-01-01

    Concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) for advanced head and neck cancer is becoming more widely used. CCRT represents an effective treatment for patients with advanced head and neck cancer, and possibly improves survival. In the present study, all of 25 patients underwent planned neck dissection 6-8 weeks after the completion of radiation. Selective neck dissection was performed whenever possible. Radical neck dissection was carried out for patients with residual adenopathy that had invaded the surrounding structures and/or enclosed the carotid arteries. A complete response at the primary sites was achieved in all patients. Of the 25 cases, 7 (28%) showed viable cancer cells within their neck dissection specimens. Local and regional disease control was excellent after CCRT with neck dissection. Unfortunately, CCRT followed by neck dissection sometimes induces stomal infection and swallowing dysfunction. We have been performing additional surgery to improve the swallowing function and bilateral neck dissection simultaneously. (author)

  20. Extrahepatic biliary obstruction; postoperative morbidity and mortality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, Z.; Khan, K.I.; Vaseem, M.; Rana, S.H.

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to evaluate the surgical management, both definitive and palliative, in selected patients with biliary obstruction and to find out the postoperative morbidity and mortality in these patients. Duration of the study is two years conducted from June 2002 to May 2004. The study was carried out at. the surgical. unit 4 of the Combined Military Hospital and surgical department of the Military Hospital. Thirty eight cases of biliary obstruction were included. A convenient sampling technique was followed. Data analyzed by using SPSS version 10.0 for windows on computer. Descriptive statistics like frequency, percentage, average etc were computed for data presentation. Any inferential test-was not found to be applicable for this descriptive type case series. We selected 38 patients with features of extrahepatic biliary obstruction. Out of these (n 38) 15 patients (39.5%) suffered from benign diseases while those having malignant diseases were 23 (60.5%). 19 (50%) patients died within two years of follow up while 19 (50%) were the survivors. Mortality was maximum for the malignant cases. In benign cases only one patient died. Maximum deaths 6 (31.6%) occurred in the period of up to one month of operation. 20 patients had one or another complication of operation and hence the morbidity came out to be 52%. According to our results the mortality and morbidity related to extrahepatic biliary obstruction in our patients was higher compared to other studies which can only be reduced by early detection and treatment. (author)

  1. Lymphovascular space invasion and tumor differentiation are predictors for postoperative recurrence in patients with pathological stage I nonsmall cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Yi Chen

    2014-08-01

    Conclusion: Tumor differentiation and LVSI were predictors of postoperative relapse for patients with pathological stage I NSCLC. Risk factors of postoperative recurrence in patients with pathological Stage I NSCLC may enable us to optimize the patient selection for postoperative adjuvant therapies to prevent possibly occult micrometastases.

  2. Postoperative interstitial radiotherapy of keloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clavere, P.; Bonnafoux-Clavere, A.; Roullet, B.; Morzel, A.; Rhein, B.; Bonnetblanc, J.M.; Olivier, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    During an 8-year period, 21 patients with keloids (27 keloids) were treated with keloidectomy and post-operative interstitial radiotherapy by an iridium 192 wire. Only one patient had been previously treated by corticoids, without results. A dose of 12 Gy (three patients) to 15 Gy (18 patients) was delivered at a point 2.5 mm from the axis of the wire. The follow-up time was from 2 - 104 months. The success rate, at 7 months, was close to 88%. Ao recurrence occurred in three patients without relation to the method used, the lesion-age or the localization of the lesions. There were no side-effects. This method represents an effective, non-constraining and safe treatment for keloids if the contra-indications are respected

  3. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy after concomitant chemoradiotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer: A TITE-CRM phase 1 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyen, Jérôme; Poudenx, Michel; Gal, Jocelyn; Otto, Josiane; Guerder, Caroline; Naghavi, Arash O; Gérard, Anais; Leysalle, Axel; Cohen, Charlotte; Padovani, Bernard; Ianessi, Antoine; Schiappa, Renaud; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Bondiau, Pierre-Yves

    2018-05-01

    Platinum based chemoradiotherapy is the standard of care for inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). With evidence that NSCLC can have a dose dependent response with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), we hypothesize that a SABR boost on residual tumor treated with chemoradiotherapy could increase treatment efficacy. The purpose of this study was to determine feasibility of such an approach. A prospective phase I trial was performed including 26 patients. Time-to-event continual reassessment method (TITE-CRM) was used for dose escalation which ranged from 3 × 7 to 3 × 12 Gy for the stereotactic boost, after 46 Gy (2 Gy per day) of chemoradiotherapy. Median follow-up was of 37.1 months (1.7-60.7), and 3, 4, 3, 3, 9 and 4 patients were included at the dose levels 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, respectively. During chemoradiotherapy, 9 patients experienced grade 3 toxicity. After stereotactic radiotherapy, 1 patient experienced an esophageal fistula (with local relapse) at the 3 × 11 Gy level, and 1 patient died from hemoptysis at the 3 × 12 Gy level. The 2-year rate of local control, locoregional free survival, metastasis-free survival, and overall survival was 70.3%, 55.5%, 44.5% and 50.8%, respectively. In the treatment of NSCLC with chemoradiotherapy followed by a stereotactic boost, the safe recommended dose in our protocol was a boost dose of 3 × 11 Gy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Epidural Analgesia in the Postoperative Period

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mathsen, Curtis

    2001-01-01

    .... This descriptive study was conducted to determine which surgical patients experienced the most analgesia with the fewest side effects when receiving epidural analgesia in the postoperative period...

  5. Trauma and postoperative follow-up; Traumata und postoperative Folgezustaende

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voth, E. [Univ. Koeln (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    1997-10-01

    Indications for the use of nuclear medicine techniques, mostly bone scintigraphy, occur in case of diagnostic problems, especially if there are discrepancies between the clinical symptoms and X-ray findings. This may happen in case of stress fractures, fractures in bones difficult to judge by X-ray imaging, and in the differentation of recent versus old fracture. A further indication for bone scanning is to assess the extent of skeletal lesions in polytrauma and in the battered child syndrome. In postoperative patients bone scanning is most frequently performed in order to assess loosening or infection of endoprosthesis. Due to bone remodelling uptake of Tc-diphosphonates varies between cemented and cementfree implants. This fact should be taken into consideration when interpreting bone scans in areas with endoprostheses. In both trauma and postoperative patients, indications for nuclear medicine imaging exist if healing is complicated. Bone scanning can be used to assess pseudoartrosis or non-union, infection, viability of grafts and bone fragments and reflex sympathetic dystrophy. In suspicious infection with positive bone scan, white blood cell or microcollid scintigraphy can be used for further differentiation. (orig./MG) [Deutsch] Indikationen zum Einsatz nuklearmedizinischer Verfahren, in der Regel der Skelettszintigraphie, ergeben sich bei diagnostischen Problemen, speziell bei Diskrepanzen zwischen der klinischen Symptomatik und dem roentgenologischen Befund. In der Traumatologie kann dies Stressfrakturen, Frakturen in roentgenologisch schwer beurteilbaren Skelettabschnitten, das Ausmass der knoechernen Verletzungen bei Polytraumata oder Kindermisshandlungen sowie die Differenzierung alte versus frische Fraktur betreffen. In der postoperativen Verlaufs- bzw. Therapiekontrolle ist die haeufigste Indikation zur Skelettszintigraphie die Frage nach Lockerung einer Endoprothese. Wegen des aus pathophysiologischen Gruenden unterschiedlichen Anreicherungsmusters

  6. Preoperative chemotherapy versus chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced adenocarcinomas of the oesophagogastric junction (POET): Long-term results of a controlled randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Michael; Walz, Martin K; Riera-Knorrenschild, Jorge; Stuschke, Martin; Sandermann, Andreas; Bitzer, Michael; Wilke, Hansjochen; Budach, Wilfried

    2017-08-01

    Results of the PreOperative therapy in Esophagogastric adenocarcinoma Trial (POET) showed some benefits when including radiotherapy into the preoperative treatment. This article is reporting long-term results of this phase III study. Patients with locally advanced adenocarcinomas of the oesophagogastric junction (Siewert types I-III) were eligible. Randomisation was done to chemotherapy (group A) or induction chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy (CRT; group B) followed by surgery. The primary end-point of the study was overall survival at 3 years. The study was closed early after 119 patients having been randomised and were eligible. Local progression-free survival after tumour resection was significantly improved by CRT (hazard ratio [HR] 0.37; 0.16-0.85, p = value 0.01) and 20 versus 12 patients were free of local tumour progression at 5 years (p = 0.03). Although the rate of postoperative in-hospital mortality was somewhat higher with CRT (10.2% versus 3.8%, p = 0.26), more patients were alive at 3 and 5 years after CRT (46.7% and 39.5%) compared with chemotherapy (26.1% and 24.4%). Thus, overall survival showed a trend in favour of preoperative CRT (HR 0.65, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.42-1.01, p = 0.055). Although the primary end-point overall survival of the study was not met, our long-term follow-up data suggest a benefit in local progression-free survival when radiotherapy was added to preoperative chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the oesophagogastric junction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Two-week course of preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by delayed surgery for rectal cancer: A phase II multi-institutional clinical trial (KROG 11-02)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Hoon; Kim, Jun-Gi; Oh, Seong Taek; Lee, Myung Ah; Chun, Hoo Geun; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Sun Young; Baek, Ji Yeon; Park, Ji Won; Oh, Jae Hwan; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Young Suk; Kim, Hee Cheol; Chie, Eui Kyu; Jang, Hong Seok

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a two-week schedule of radiotherapy with oral capecitabine in locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and materials: Eighty patients with rectal cancer located in the mid to low rectum, staged cT3-4N0-2M0, were prospectively enrolled. They underwent preoperative chemoradiotherapy and delayed surgery 6–8 weeks after the completion of radiation therapy. A radiation dose of 33 Gy in 10 fractions was delivered to the pelvis for 2 weeks. One cycle of oral capecitabine was administered at a dose of 1650 mg/m 2 /day during radiotherapy. Tumor response and toxicity were the study endpoints. This study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (number, (NCT01431599)). Results: All included patients underwent total mesorectal excisions including 12 cases of robot assisted surgery and 50 cases of laparoscopic surgery. Of the 80 patients, 27 (33.8%) achieved downstaging (ypT0-2N0) of a rectal tumor and 11 (13.8%) had a pathologically complete response (ypCR). Downstaging rates were 45% for T classification and 65% for N classification. Sphincter saving was achieved in 73 (91.3%) of the 80 patients. Of the 80 patients, 3 (3.8%) experienced grade 3 hematologic toxicity, and 2 (2.5%) had grade 3 postoperative complications such as ileus and wound dehiscence. There was no grade 4 toxicity. Conclusion: A two-week schedule of radiotherapy with oral capecitabine in locally advanced rectal cancer patients showed low toxicity profiles and promising results in terms of tumor response

  8. Two-week course of preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by delayed surgery for rectal cancer: a phase II multi-institutional clinical trial (KROG 11-02).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Hoon; Kim, Jun-Gi; Oh, Seong Taek; Lee, Myung Ah; Chun, Hoo Geun; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Sun Young; Baek, Ji Yeon; Park, Ji Won; Oh, Jae Hwan; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Young Suk; Kim, Hee Cheol; Chie, Eui Kyu; Jang, Hong Seok

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a two-week schedule of radiotherapy with oral capecitabine in locally advanced rectal cancer. Eighty patients with rectal cancer located in the mid to low rectum, staged cT3-4N0-2M0, were prospectively enrolled. They underwent preoperative chemoradiotherapy and delayed surgery 6-8 weeks after the completion of radiation therapy. A radiation dose of 33 Gy in 10 fractions was delivered to the pelvis for 2 weeks. One cycle of oral capecitabine was administered at a dose of 1650 mg/m(2)/day during radiotherapy. Tumor response and toxicity were the study endpoints. This study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (number, NCT01431599). All included patients underwent total mesorectal excisions including 12 cases of robot assisted surgery and 50 cases of laparoscopic surgery. Of the 80 patients, 27 (33.8%) achieved downstaging (ypT0-2N0) of a rectal tumor and 11 (13.8%) had a pathologically complete response (ypCR). Downstaging rates were 45% for T classification and 65% for N classification. Sphincter saving was achieved in 73 (91.3%) of the 80 patients. Of the 80 patients, 3 (3.8%) experienced grade 3 hematologic toxicity, and 2 (2.5%) had grade 3 postoperative complications such as ileus and wound dehiscence. There was no grade 4 toxicity. A two-week schedule of radiotherapy with oral capecitabine in locally advanced rectal cancer patients showed low toxicity profiles and promising results in terms of tumor response. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A phase II study of HMB/Arg/Gln against oral mucositis induced by chemoradiotherapy for patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Tomoya; Hamauchi, Satoshi; Yoshida, Yukio; Yurikusa, Takashi; Suzuki, Miho; Yamashita, Aiko; Ogawa, Hirofumi; Onoe, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Keita; Onitsuka, Tetsuro

    2018-04-07

    This phase II trial assessed the clinical benefit of beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate, arginine, and glutamine (HMB/Arg/Gln) for preventing chemoradiotherapy (CRT)-induced oral mucositis (OM) in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). Patients with HNC receiving definitive or postoperative cisplatin-based CRT were enrolled. HMB/Arg/Gln was administered orally or per percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy from the first day of CRT up to its completion. All patients received opioid-based pain control and oral care programs that we previously reported. The primary endpoint was the incidence of grade ≥ 3 OM (functional/symptomatic) according to the Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Events version 3.0. Quality of life (EORTC QLQ-C30/PROMS) at baseline and upon radiotherapy at a dosage of 50 Gy were assessed. Thirty-five patients with HNC were enrolled. Sixteen of them (45.7%) developed grade ≥ 3 OM (i.e., functional/symptomatic). The incidence of grade ≤ 1 OM (functional/symptomatic) was 51.5% at 2 weeks and 82.9% at 4 weeks after radiotherapy completion. Clinical examination revealed that 10 patients (28.6%) developed grade ≥ 3 OM. The incidence of grade ≤ 1 OM (clinical exam) was 80.0% at 2 weeks and 100% at 4 weeks after radiotherapy completion. Adverse events related to HMB/Arg/Gln were an increase in blood urea nitrogen and diarrhea, but were easily managed. The addition of HMB/Arg/Gln to opioid-based pain control and oral care programs was feasible but still insufficient at reducing the incidence of CRT-induced severe OM. However, the benefit of HMB/Arg/Gln should not be neglected given the findings of clinical examinations and the rapid recovery from severe OM. UMIN000016453.

  10. Keeping record of the postoperative nursing care of patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Roets

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research project was to evaluate the recordkeeping of postoperative nursing care. A total of 186 randomly selected patient records were evaluated in terms of a checklist that included the most important parameters for postoperative nursing care. All the patients underwent operations under general anaesthetic in one month in a Level 3 hospital and were transferred to general wards after the operations. The data collected was analysed by means of frequencies. One finding was that the neurological status of most patients was assessed but that little attention was paid in the patient records to emotional status and physical comfort. The respiratory and circulatory status of the patients and their fluid balance were inadequately recorded. The patients were well monitored for signs of external haemorrhage, but in most cases haemorrhage was checked only once, on return from the theatre. Although the patients’ pain experience were well-monitored, follow-up actions after the administration of pharmacological agents was poor. The surgical intervention was fully described and, generally speaking, the records were complete and legible, but the signatures and ranks of the nurses were illegible. Allergies were indicated in the most important records. The researchers recommend that a comprehensive and easily usable documentation form be used in postoperative nursing care. Such a form would serve as a checklist and could ensure to a large degree that attention is given to the most important postoperative parameters. Errors and negligence could also be reduced by this means.

  11. Pre- and postoperative MR imaging of craniopharyngiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hald, J.K. [Rijkshospitalet, Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Radiology; Eldevik, O.P. [Rijkshospitalet, Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Quint, D.J. [Rijkshospitalet, Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Chandler, W.F. [Univ. of Michigan Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Kollevold, T. [Univ. of Michigan Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Neurosurgery

    1996-09-01

    Purpose: To compare the pre- and postoperative MR appearance of craniopharyngiomas with respect to lesion size, tumour morphology and identification of surrounding normal structures. Material and Methods: MR images obtained prior to and following craniopharyngioma resection were evaluated retrospectively in 10 patients. Tumour signal charcteristics, size and extension with particular reference to the optic chiasm, the pituitary gland, the pituitary stalk and the third ventricle were evaluated. Results: Following surgery, tumour volume was reduced in all patients. In 6 patients there was further tumour volume reduction between the first and second postoperative images. Two of these patients received radiation therapy between the 2 postoperative studies, while 4 had no adjuvant treatment to the surgical intervention. There was improved visualization of the optic chiasm, in 3, the pituitary stalk in one, and the third ventricle in 9 of the 10 patients. The pituitary gland was identified preoperatively only in one patient, postoperatively only in another, pre- and postoperatively in 5, and neither pre- nor postoperatively in 3 patients. In 3 patients MR imaging 0-7 days postoperatively identified tumour remnants not seen at the end of the surgical procedure. The signal intensities of solid and cystic tumour components were stable from pre- to the first postoperative MR images. Optic tract increased signal prior to surgery was gone 28 days postoperatively in one patient, but persisted on the left side for 197 days after surgery in another. Conclusion: Postoperative MR imaging of craniopharyngiomas demonstrated tumour volume reduction and tumour remnants not seen at surgery. Early postoperative MR imaging of craniopharyngiomas may overestimate the size of residual tumour. Improved visualization of peritumoral structures may be achieved. (orig.).

  12. Outcomes of Chemoradiotherapy in Cervical Cancer—The Western Australian Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Adeline; Sia, Serena

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective review of patients with Stage IB1–IVA cervical cancer treated with combined chemoradiotherapy in Western Australia was conducted with the aim of assessing outcomes and patterns of recurrence. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify potential prognostic factors. Methods and Materials: Patients treated with radical chemoradiotherapy for cervical cancer in Western Australia between June 2005 and November 2008 were analyzed. Treatment consisted of external-beam radiotherapy with concurrent weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m 2 ), followed by high-dose-rate brachytherapy. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to determine overall survival and disease-free survival, and Cox regression analysis was used to identify potential prognostic factors. Results: Sixty-nine patients were included in the analysis. All patients completed external-beam radiotherapy; however, only 43.5% of patients completed the planned course of brachytherapy. At a median follow-up of 27 months, 24- and 48-month overall survival were 68.8% and 61.1%, respectively. Disease-free survival at 24 and 48 months was 59.4% and 56.7%, respectively. The 2-year local control rate was 70.1%. Nodal involvement resulted in increased risk of disease recurrence (hazard ratio [HR] 6.26, p = 0.002) and death (HR 5.15, p = 0.013). Pretreatment hemoglobin <120 g/L was a negative prognostic factor for disease recurrence (HR 4.20, p = 0.031) and death (HR 8.19, p = 0.020). Completion of brachytherapy improved overall survival (p = 0.039), with a trend to reducing disease recurrence (p = 0.052). The risk of relapse increased with treatment time over 8 weeks (HR 8.18, p = 0.019), however treatment time did not affect the risk of death (p = 0.245). Conclusion: The overall survival outcomes in this group of women with locally advanced cervical carcinomas treated with chemoradiotherapy are comparable to worldwide data. Despite the use of modern treatment protocols, a significant proportion of women developed

  13. Preliminary comparative proteomics study of cervical carcinoma tissues with different sensitivity to concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Hong; Liao Yuping; Zeng Liang; Xiao Zhiqiang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the proteomics differences between the high-sensitivity(HS) and the low-sensitivity(LS) groups of cervical carcinoma treated by concurrent chemoradiotherapy, and to confirm the sensitivity associated proteins in intermediate stage and advanced cervical carcinoma. Methods: Fresh carcinoma tissues were collected from 10 untreated cervical carcinoma patients. According to the response to concurrent chemoradiotherapy, the tissues were classified into HS group and LS group. In the first part of our experiment, protein separation was performed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) with Amersham 18 cm linear pH 3-10 immobilized pH gradient(IPG) strips. The images of the gels were analyzed by PD-quest 7.0 software to find the differentially expressed protein-spots in each group. Then the differentially expressed protein-spots were incised from the gels and digested by trypsin. The peptide mass fingerprintings (PMF) was acquired by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). The proteins were identified by data searched in the Mascot-database. Two differentially expressed proteins were assayed by western blot and immunohistochemical methods. Results: Most of the gels were clear and successfully analyzed by PD-quest 7.0 software. Most of the protein-spots concentrated on the area of 20-100 KDa(Mw) and pH4-8. The average number of the protein-spots was 781 ± 74 in HS group and 766 ± 52 in LS group. The match rate was 87.6% between the two groups. Eight proteins highly in HS group but lowly expressed in LS group included hemoglobin subunit beta, caspase-14 precursor, calmodulindike, S100-A9 protein(MRP-14), galectin-7, HSKERC4, keratin 19 and actin. Ten proteins highly in LS group but lowly expression in HS group included anti HBs antibody light-chain Fab, lamin-B1, WARS protein, flavin reductase, glutamate dehydrogenase 1, nuclear matrix protein 238, retinal dehydrogenase 1, AF165172

  14. Results and toxicity of the treatment of anal canal carcinoma by radiation therapy or chemoradiotherapy. Therapieergebniss, Frueh- und Spaettoxizitaet der Behandlung des Analkanalkarzinoms durch Strahlentherapie oder Chemoradiotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, K.; Brockmann, W.P.; Wiegel, T.; Kruell, A.; Huebener, K.H.; Birk, S. (Universitaetskrankenhaus Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Abt. fuer Strahlentherapie)

    1991-08-01

    From 1975 to 1989 114 patients with analcanal carcinoma were treated, 81 of these with radiotherapy (RT) alone and 33 with chemoradiotherapy (CRT). 80% respectively 82% of the patients were colostomy-free at the onset of therapy. RT was given to a total dose of 60 Gy in six weeks, for CRT additional simultaneous 5-fluorouracil (500 mg/m{sup 2} days 1 to 5 and 8 to 12) and mitomycin C (5 mg/m{sup 2} days 5 and 12) was administered. 67% respectively 82% of the patients had UICC stage II to IIIB disease predominantly with G2 and G3 squamous cell carcinomas. Local control after three years was 79% for the RT group vs. 82% for the CRT group. Three-year survival rate was 68% and 71%, respectively. These differences were not signficant. Only for G1-compared to G3-tumors there is a significantly higher survival rate. Acute and late damage was slightly lower for the RT treatment group (77% and 25%) compared to the CRT group (79% and 30%). In both treatment groups there was one patient needing a permanent colostomy due to radiation induced proctitis. In conclusion, RT or CRT should be the primary form of treatment in patients with anal canal carcinoma and abdominoperineal resection should only be performed in case of local recurrence or tumor persitence. The final decision about the indications for RT or CRT can only be made with the results of a prospective randomized trial. (orig.).

  15. Consolidation chemoradiotherapy and autologous bone marrow transplantation versus continued chemotherapy for metastatic neuroblastoma: a report of two concurrent Children's Cancer Group studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stram, D O; Matthay, K K; O'Leary, M; Reynolds, C P; Haase, G M; Atkinson, J B; Brodeur, G M; Seeger, R C

    1996-09-01

    To compare event-free survival (EFS) for patients with stage IV neuroblastoma who were treated with induction chemotherapy followed by additional courses of the same chemotherapy or by intensive chemoradiotherapy and autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT). Two hundred seven children who were diagnosed with stage IV neuroblastoma after 1 year of age were given five to seven courses of induction chemotherapy consisting of cisplatin, etoposide, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide (CCC-321-P2). This chemotherapy was continued for 13 total courses for some patients, whereas intensive chemoradiotherapy with ABMT was given to others (CCG-321-P3). The decision to continue chemotherapy versus to consolidate with chemoradiotherapy was not randomized but was made by parents and physicians. Marrow used for ABMT was purged ex vivo and was free of immunocytologically detectable neuroblastoma cells. One hundred fifty-nine of 207 patients (77%) remained event-free during induction therapy. Of these, 67 received chemoradiotherapy/ABMT (CCG-321-P3) and 74 continued chemotherapy (CCG-321-P2). Using Cox regression analysis, the relative risk (RR) of an event after chemoradiotherapy/ABMT was estimated to be 58% of that for patients who continued chemotherapy (P = .01). Similarly, Kaplan-Meier analysis estimated EFS at four years for the chemoradiotherapy/ABMT and chemotherapy groups to be 40% and 19% respectively (P = .019). Subgroups appearing to benefit from chemoradiotherapy/ABMT were those with only a partial tumor response to induction chemotherapy (RR = 0.43; P = .008; EFS, 29% v 6%) and those whose tumors had amplification of the N-myc gene (RR = 0.26; P = .112; EFS, 67% v 0%). Consolidation with intensive, myeloablative chemoradiotherapy followed by purged ABMT may be more effective than continuing chemotherapy for patients with stage IV neuroblastoma.

  16. Oxaliplatin, fluorouracil, and leucovorin versus fluorouracil and leucovorin as adjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (ADORE): an open-label, multicentre, phase 2, randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yong Sang; Nam, Byung-Ho; Kim, Kyu-Pyo; Kim, Jeong Eun; Park, Seong Joon; Park, Young Suk; Park, Joon Oh; Kim, Sun Young; Kim, Tae-You; Kim, Jee Hyun; Ahn, Joong Bae; Lim, Seok-Byung; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Jin Cheon; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Kim, Jong Hoon; Park, Jin-Hong; Park, Hee Chul; Jung, Kyung Hae; Kim, Tae Won

    2014-10-01

    The role of adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with rectal cancer is controversial, especially when used after preoperative chemoradiotherapy. Fluoropyrimidine-based adjuvant chemotherapy, including fluorouracil and leucovorin, has been widely used; however, the addition of oxaliplatin to fluorouracil and leucovorin (FOLFOX), a standard adjuvant regimen for colon cancer, has not been tested in rectal cancer. We aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of adjuvant fluorouracil and leucovorin with that of FOLFOX in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiotherapy. In this open-label, multicentre, phase 2, randomised trial, patients with postoperative pathological stage II (ypT3-4N0) or III (ypTanyN1-2) rectal cancer after preoperative fluoropyrimidine-based chemoradiotherapy and total mesorectal excision were recruited and randomly assigned (1:1) via a web-based software platform to receive adjuvant chemotherapy with either four cycles of fluorouracil and leucovorin (fluorouracil 380 mg/m(2) and leucovorin 20 mg/m(2) on days 1-5, every 4 weeks) or eight cycles of FOLFOX (oxaliplatin 85 mg/m(2), leucovorin 200 mg/m(2), and fluorouracil bolus 400 mg/m(2) on day 1, and fluorouracil infusion 2400 mg/m(2) for 46 h, every 2 weeks). Stratification factors were pathological stage (II vs III) and centre. Neither patients nor investigators were masked to group assignment. The primary endpoint was 3-year disease-free survival, analysed by intention to treat. This study is fully enrolled, is in long-term follow-up, and is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00807911. Between Nov 19, 2008, and June 12, 2012, 321 patients were randomly assigned to fluorouracil and leucovorin (n=161) and FOLFOX (n=160). 141 (95%) of 149 patients in the fluorouracil plus leucovorin group and 141 (97%) of 146 in the FOLFOX group completed all planned cycles of adjuvant treatment. Median follow-up was 38·2 months (IQR 26·4-50·6). 3-year disease

  17. Neutrophil Lymphocyte Ratio Predicts Postoperative Pain after ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-12-05

    Dec 5, 2017 ... systemic diseases (hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus),. Original Article. INTRODUCTION. Postoperative ... vertigo, etc.) have been shown.[3-15]. In this study, we aimed to investigate possible relationship between preoperative NLR and postoperative pain (which was evaluated by analgesic demand at.

  18. Preoperative Smoking Status and Postoperative Complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marie Grønkjær; Eliasen, Marie; Skov-Ettrup, Lise Skrubbeltrang

    2014-01-01

    To systematically review and summarize the evidence of an association between preoperative smoking status and postoperative complications elaborated on complication type.......To systematically review and summarize the evidence of an association between preoperative smoking status and postoperative complications elaborated on complication type....

  19. Effects of posture on postoperative pulmonary function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, K G; Holte, Kathrine; Kehlet, H

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulmonary morbidity is still a relevant complication to major surgery despite improvements in surgical technique and anaesthetic methods. Postoperative posture may be a pathogenic factor, but the effects of changes in postoperative posture on pulmonary function have not been reviewed...

  20. Predicting postoperative haemoglobin changes after burn surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Burn surgery is associated with significant blood loss and fluid shifts that cause rapid haemoglobin (Hb) changes during and after surgery. Understanding the relationship between intraoperative and postoperative (day 1) Hb changes may assist in avoiding postoperative anaemia and unnecessary ...

  1. Neutrophil Lymphocyte Ratio Predicts Postoperative Pain after ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Aim: Postoperative pain is well known and usually disturbing complication of surgery. Inflammation plays an important role in the development and progression of postoperative pain. We aimed to investigate possible relationship between preoperatively measured neutrophil‑lymphocyte ratio (NLR) – as an ...

  2. Postoperative CT in pancreas transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, F.E.; Harper, S.J.F.; Callaghan, C.J.; Shaw, A.; Godfrey, E.M.; Bradley, J.A.; Watson, C.J.E.; Pettigrew, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To examine the usage and value of computed tomography (CT) following simultaneous pancreas and kidney (SPK) transplantation. Materials and methods: Indications for postoperative CT, key findings, and their influence on management were determined by retrospective analysis. Results: Ninety-eight patients underwent 313 CT examinations. Common indications for the examinations included suspected intra-abdominal collection (31.1%) and elevated serum amylase/lipase (24.1%). CT findings most frequently showed non-specific mild inflammation (27.6%), a normal scan (17.1%) and fluid collections (16.3%). High capillary blood glucose (CBG) was associated with resultant CT demonstration of graft vascular abnormalities, but otherwise, particular clinical indications were not associated with specific CT findings. Conclusion: Clinical findings in patients with SPK transplants are non-specific. The pattern of abnormalities encountered is significantly different to those seen in native pancreatic disease and demands a tailored protocol. CT enables accurate depiction of vascular abnormalities and fluid collections, thus reducing the number of surgical interventions that might otherwise be required. Elevated CBG should prompt urgent CT to exclude potentially reversible vascular complications. - Highlights: • The value of CT following simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplantation was assessed. • 313 CT scans were performed on 98 patients between January 2005 and August 2010. • Elevated blood glucose was associated with CT findings of graft vascular anomalities. • CT was particularly useful in directing operative versus non-operative intervention.

  3. Surgical correction of postoperative astigmatism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindstrom Richard

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available The photokeratoscope has increased the understanding of the aspheric nature of the cornea as well as a better understanding of normal corneal topography. This has significantly affected the development of newer and more predictable models of surgical astigmatic correction. Relaxing incisions effectively flatten the steeper meridian an equivalent amount as they steepen the flatter meridian. The net change in spherical equivalent is, therefore, negligible. Poor predictability is the major limitation of relaxing incisions. Wedge resection can correct large degrees of postkeratoplasty astigmatism, Resection of 0.10 mm of tissue results in approximately 2 diopters of astigmatic correction. Prolonged postoperative rehabilitation and induced irregular astigmatism are limitations of the procedure. Transverse incisions flatten the steeper meridian an equivalent amount as they steepen the flatter meridian. Semiradial incisions result in two times the amount of flattening in the meridian of the incision compared to the meridian 90 degrees away. Combination of transverse incisions with semiradial incisions describes the trapezoidal astigmatic keratotomy. This procedure may correct from 5.5 to 11.0 diopters dependent upon the age of the patient. The use of the surgical keratometer is helpful in assessing a proper endpoint during surgical correction of astigmatism.

  4. Prediction of postoperative pain after percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Katja Venborg; Olesen, Anne Estrup; Osther, Palle Jørn Sloth

    2013-01-01

    Postoperative pain remains a significant problem and the individual variance in postoperative pain is not fully understood. In recent years, there has been focus on identifying risk factors predicting patients with high postoperative pain intensity or consumption of analgesics, which may facilitate...... thresholds were measured using electrical (single and 5 repeated) and pressure pain stimulation over the flank bilaterally (stone-side = operation side and control-side = non-operation side). Postoperative pain scores were recorded on a numerical rating scale and analgesic consumption was registered....... The responses to repeated electrical stimuli (temporal summation) were preoperatively increased on the stone-side compared to the control-side (P = 0.016). Preoperative electrical pain thresholds from the control-side correlated inversely with postoperative opioid consumption (single stimuli: ρ = -0.43, P

  5. Preceding bronchial cutting for exposure of the pulmonary artery buried in scar tissue after chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomori, Hiroaki; Cong, Yue; Sugimura, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    It is often difficult to expose the pulmonary artery buried in a scar tissue, especially in lung cancer patients that responded well to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Difficulty to access pulmonary artery branches may lead to potentially unnecessary pneumonectomy. To complete lobectomy in such cases, a technique with preceding bronchial cutting for exposure of the pulmonary artery is presented. After dissecting the pulmonary vein, the lobar bronchus is cut from the opposite side of the pulmonary artery with scissors. The back wall of the lobar bronchus is cut using a surgical knife from the luminal face, which can expose the pulmonary artery behind the bronchial stump and then complete lobectomy. Fourteen patients have been treated using the present technique, enabling complete resection by lobectomy (including sleeve lobectomy in 3 patients) without major bleeding. The present procedure can expose pulmonary artery buried in scar tissue, resulting in making the lobectomy safer.

  6. A review of toxicity superselective intra-arterial concurrent chemoradiotherapy (SIACC) for oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraishi, Takeshi; Uehara, Masataka; Ikeda, Mihoko; Tajima, Nobutaka; Ikeda, Hideyoshi; Kawasaki, Takako; Asahina, Izumi

    2011-01-01

    Superselective intra-arterial concurrent chemoradiotherapy (SIACC) for oral cancer has been favored for its efficacy and ability to not damage organs. SIACC was applied to 13 previously untreated patients with oral cancer for the purpose of avoiding surgical resection of the primary tumor in our hospital from 2007 to 2009. Although a complete response of the primary tumor was achieved in all cases, various adverse events also occurred. All patients experienced leucopenia, and most patients suffered from mucotitis and dry mouth. One patient had dizziness and nausea due to the catheter insertion into the vertebra artery. Although SIACC is an important treatment strategy for oral cancer, careful attention for adverse events should be taken into account during and after treatment. (author)

  7. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy using superselective intraarterial infusion via superficial temporal artery for stage III, IV oral cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tohnai, Iwai; Shigetomi, Toshio [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine; Hayashi, Yasushi [Nagoya Second Red Cross Hospital (Japan)] (and others)

    2002-03-01

    Thirty-eight patients with stage III, IV oral cancer were treated by preoperative chemoradiotherapy using superselective intraarterial infusion via the superficial temporal artery. Radiotherapy (total dose: 40 Gy) and chemotherapy using CBDCA (total dose: 460 mg/m{sup 2}) were performed daily, followed by surgery. Catheter-insertion of 34 patients was done successfully. Four catheter insertions were not done successfully because of the anomaly of the artery such as common trunk of the lingual artery and the facial artery. The clinical effects were CR in 9 patients (26.5%) and PR in 25 (73.5%), and histopathological effects after surgery were grade III, IV in 10 (29.4%), grade IIb in 23 (67.6%), and grade IIa in 2 (5.8%). The 5-year cumulative survival rate was 67.8%. This superselective intra arterial infusion method could be the technique of choice for the treatment of oral cancer. (author)

  8. Two cases of therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome after concurrent oral cancer chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Katsuyuki; Asano, Takanori; Kinoshita, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS) and therapy-related leukemia (TRL) are reported increasingly often, and we report two cases of T-MDS after concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) with oral cancer. Patients underwent CCRT with cisplatin (CDDP) or carboplatin (CBDCA). The interval between primary CCRT and t-MDS was 11 months in 1 case and 14 years in the other. Chromosomal analysis indicated abnormal karyotypes. Platinum has a relatively lower t-MDS risk than alkylating agents or topoisomerase II inhibitors, but our experience supports concurrent use of radiotherapy with platinum affects the risk of t-MDS. If pancytopenia is detected after CCRT, bone marrow and cytogenetic examinations should be conducted to rule out t-MDS. (author)

  9. Mucinous Adenocarcinoma Arising in Chronic Perianal Fistula: Good Results with Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy Followed by Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa D. Santos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic perianal fistulas are a common clinical condition. However, their evolution to adenocarcinoma is rare. We report the case of a 48-year-old man with perianal chronic fistulas, who developed two perianal ulcerated lesions near the external orifices of the fistulas, which extended proximally as a pararectal tumor. No intestinal lesion was seen at endoscopic examination. Histopathological biopsy indicated mucinous adenocarcinoma. Staging was performed by pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and thoracoabdominal CT scan. The patient underwent a laparoscopic colostomy followed by neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and then laparoscopic abdominoperineal resection followed by adjuvant therapy. We have seen a favorable outcome with no recurrence at 3 years of follow-up.

  10. Chemoradiotherapy in tumours of the oesophagus and gastro-oesophageal junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulshof, M C C M; van Laarhoven, H W M

    2016-08-01

    Oesophageal cancer remains a malignancy with a poor prognosis. However, in the recent 10-15 years relevant progress has been made by the introduction of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for tumours of the oesophagus or gastro-oesophageal junction. The addition of neo-adjuvant CRT to surgery has significantly improved survival and locoregional control, for both adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. For irresectable or medically inoperable patients, definitive CRT has changed the treatment intent from palliative to curative. Definitive CRT is a good alternative for radical surgery in responding patients with squamous cell carcinoma and those running a high risk of surgical morbidity and mortality. For patients with an out-of-field solitary locoregional recurrence after primary curative treatment, definitive CRT can lead to long term survival. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Iliopsoas Abscess Possibly due to Klebsiella pneumoniae Infection after Chemoradiotherapy for Hypopharyngeal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukiyoshi Hyo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Iliopsoas abscess was once an uncommon condition but now occurs somewhat more frequently due to the increasing number of immunocompromised patients, such as those with diabetes. We encountered a case of iliopsoas abscess following chemoradiotherapy for hypopharyngeal cancer. A 60-year-old man was admitted for a sore throat and left neck swelling. Hypopharyngeal cancer was diagnosed, but the patient refused surgery. After two rounds of chemotherapy, febrile neutropenia developed and chest computed tomography (CT revealed an iliopsoas abscess. The platelet count was low but recovered after administration of antibiotics and could not be explained by puncture of the abscess. CT-guided drainage eventually improved his symptoms. Even for disorders of the head and neck region, iliopsoas abscess should be suspected in immunocompromised patients who develop a fever. CT and magnetic resonance imaging should be performed at an early stage as it is important to determine whether surgical drainage is indicated.

  12. Dose-response of acute urinary toxicity of long-course preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L.; Bentzen, Søren M.; Jakobsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-course preoperative chemoradiotherapy (chemo-RT) improves outcomes for rectal cancer patients, but acute side effects during treatment may cause considerable patient discomfort and may compromise treatment compliance. We developed a dose-response model for acute urinary toxicity...... based on a large, single-institution series. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In total 345 patients were treated with (chemo-)RT for primary rectal cancer from January 2007 to May 2012. Urinary toxicity during RT was scored prospectively using the CTCAE v 3.0 cystitis score (grade 0-5). Clinical variables...... and radiation dose to the bladder were related to graded toxicity using multivariate ordinal logistic regression. Three models were optimized, each containing all available clinical variables and one of three dose metrics: Mean dose (Dmean), equivalent uniform dose (EUD), or relative volume given x Gy or above...

  13. Case report of cold-weather-induced radiation recall dermatitis after chemoradiotherapy with cisplatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kindts, Isabelle; Stellamans, Karin; Planckaert, Nikie; Goethals, Laurence; Bonny, Michiel

    2014-01-01

    The radiation recall reaction (RRR) is an inflammatory reaction that occurs in previously irradiated areas. The phenomenon is probably due to an idiosyncratic hypersensitivity reaction, in which a second agent can recall the inflammatory reaction. This case report documents a cold-weather-induced radiation recall dermatitis (RRD). We observed a severe RRD in a patient after chemoradiotherapy treatment with cisplatin for a nasopharyngeal carcinoma, precipitated by cold temperatures, which developed 9 days after completion of therapy. In the medical literature, RRD following extreme cold temperatures seems to be a peculiar event. Until further information on the interaction is available, future studies on combined chemotherapy with cisplatin should be carefully monitored and any side effects clearly documented. This case suggests that environmental conditions may play a contributing role in the development of RRD. This case also implies that neither fraction size nor total radiation dose is a determining factor in the development of the dermatologic reaction. (orig.) [de

  14. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy provides no benefit compared to radiotherapy alone for T2 glottic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanesaka, Naoto; Mikami, Ryuji; Hasegawa, Daisuke

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if chemoradiotherapy improves local control of T2 glottic squamous cell carcinoma. From 1989 to 2003, 61 patients with T2 glottic cancer were treated with radiation alone or radiation in conjunction with various chemotherapy agents. Overall survival and local control rates for all 61 patients were 83.6% and 82.0%, respectively at five years. The addition of chemotherapy offered no survival benefit or improvement in local control rates compared to radiotherapy alone. Extending treatment duration lowered local control rates, however, no survival-related prognostic factors were identified. No treatment-related late toxicity was observed. The addition of chemotherapy in patients with T2 glottic cancer treated with radiation does not improve outcomes. This validates the use of radiotherapy alone as the standard of care for patients with this disease. (author)

  15. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy using superselective intraarterial infusion via superficial temporal artery for stage III, IV oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohnai, Iwai; Shigetomi, Toshio

    2002-01-01

    Thirty-eight patients with stage III, IV oral cancer were treated by preoperative chemoradiotherapy using superselective intraarterial infusion via the superficial temporal artery. Radiotherapy (total dose: 40 Gy) and chemotherapy using CBDCA (total dose: 460 mg/m 2 ) were performed daily, followed by surgery. Catheter-insertion of 34 patients was done successfully. Four catheter insertions were not done successfully because of the anomaly of the artery such as common trunk of the lingual artery and the facial artery. The clinical effects were CR in 9 patients (26.5%) and PR in 25 (73.5%), and histopathological effects after surgery were grade III, IV in 10 (29.4%), grade IIb in 23 (67.6%), and grade IIa in 2 (5.8%). The 5-year cumulative survival rate was 67.8%. This superselective intra arterial infusion method could be the technique of choice for the treatment of oral cancer. (author)

  16. A case of recurrent esophageal cancer treated with salvage lymphadenectomy after definitive chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kano, Kazuki; Sato, Tsutomu; Maezawa, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old man admitted with dysphagia was found to have advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, clinical stage 4 (T4N2M0). We initiated definitive chemoradiotherapy (dCRT) with combined 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin chemotherapy (FP therapy) and 50.4 Gy irradiation, followed by boost FP therapy, to which the patient showed confirmed complete response (CR). Local recurrence was detected in the scar of the primary lesion at 4 months after the boost FP therapy. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) for this lesion resulted in CR. Thirteen months later, right hilar and right pericardial lymph node metastases were found. The right hilar lymph node metastases were not visible on CT after triweekly docetaxel therapy, but the pericardial lesions remained. The patient underwent salvage lymphadenectomy without further chemotherapy, and at 5 months after surgery, he was alive and recurrence-free. (author)

  17. Postoperative radiotherapy-induced morbidity in rectal cancer Morbilidad de la radioterapia postoperatoria en el cáncer de recto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Garay Burdeos

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: we analyzed long-term morbidity and bowel function alteration after postoperative radiotherapy for rectal cancer following resection with anastomosis. Patients and methods: thirty-seven patients who underwent surgery with intention to cure and a minimal follow-up period of 3 years were included. These patients were divided into two groups: in the first group, 14 patients received postoperative chemo-radiotherapy, 5-fluorouracil plus folinic acid, and 45 Gy plus 5 Gy boost. In the second group, there were 23 patients regarded as controls. We designed a questionnaire about their bowel function and analyzed the morbidity detected in their follow-up. Results: the group that was treated with postoperative chemo-radiotherapy had more daily bowel movements (p = 0.03 and night-time movements (p = 0.04; incontinence (69.2 versus 17.4% in the control group; p = 0.002, and perianal skin irritation (p = 0.04 versus the control group. Although without meaningful differences, the group under treatment wore a pad more often, had more defecatory urgency, could distinguish worse gas from stool, and needed more frequently antidiarrheal measures. Major complications were present in 28.6% of the under-treatment group: three intestinal resections were performed due to actinic stenosis; one patient had a residual stercoral fistula; another had several occlusive crises solved with medical treatment. Conclusions: postoperative chemo-radiotherapy had a high morbidity rate, which determined a significant alteration in quality of life. Accuracy in indication is therefore necessary, as well as a consideration of other alternatives for treatment, such as preoperative chemo-radiotherapy and total mesorectal excision.Objetivos: analizar la morbilidad y alteración del funcionalismo rectal a largo plazo de la radioterapia postoperatoria tras resección con anastomosis en el cáncer de recto. Material y métodos: se incluyen 37 pacientes intervenidos con intenci

  18. Surgical complications of salvage surgery following concurrent chemoradiotherapy for laryngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, Yasushi; Homma, Akihiro; Oridate, Nobuhiko

    2007-01-01

    Surgical complication rates of salvage laryngectomy after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) have been reported to be high. Wound complications after salvage laryngectomy following concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) were analyzed. Eighty-six patients who had undergone total laryngectomy for laryngeal cancer at Hokkaido University Hospital between 1990 and 2006 were divided into three groups according to preoperative treatments received: total laryngectomy (TL) group (n=35) without radiotherapy (RT) or CCRT, RT-TL group (n=17) with RT alone, CRT-TL group (n=34) with low-dose CCRT. Major wound complications were defined as major pharyngocutaneous fistulas which caused inpatient care for more than eight weeks or which were closed by surgery, bleeding that required surgical reintervention, and wound infection or skin necrosis that caused inpatient care for more than eight weeks. Minor complications were self-limited, managed with local wound care, and did not prolong inpatient care for more than eight weeks. We also analyzed wound complications of larynx preservation surgery after CCRT. Overall wound complications, both major and minor, were observed in 26% of the TL group, 35% of the RT-TL group, and 47% of the CRT-TL group. Major wound complications were observed in 11%, 18%, and 29%, respectively. A considerable but not statistically significant increase in the incidence of overall and major wound complications was observed between the TL and CRT-TL groups (p=0.082 and 0.078, respectively). Pharyngocutaneous fistulas were the most common complication, occurring in 14/86 (16%) of patients. Patients who developed pharyngocutaneous fistulas after CCRT tended to require surgical reintervention and longer periods before the initiation of oral intake. Wound complications were observed in 2/3 (67%) of patients who had undergone larynx preservation surgery. High incidences of wound complications and poor wound recovery in patients undergoing salvage laryngectomy following CCRT should

  19. Heavy smoking history interacts with chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer prognosis. A retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shitara, Kohei; Hatooka, Shunzo; Matsuo, Keitaro

    2010-01-01

    Smoking is a well-known risk factor for esophageal cancer. However, there are few reports that directly evaluate smoking as a prognostic factor for esophageal cancer. Moreover, scarce evidence is available on whether smoking interacts with major treatment modalities of esophageal cancer. In this study we retrospectively analyzed 364 patients with esophageal squamous cell cancer who were treated between 2001 and 2005 at our institution. Background characteristics, including smoking history, were analyzed as potential prognostic factors. Of the 363 patients, 76 patients (20.9%) were non-smokers or light smokers (non-heavy), whereas 287 patients (79.1%) were heavy smokers. The 5-year survival rate for non-heavy smokers and heavy smokers was 61.8% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 49.1-72.2) vs 44.6% (95% CI: 38.2-50.9), respectively. In a multivariate Cox model (adjusted for age, gender, performance status, alcohol consumption, histology, tumor length, International Union Against Cancer [UICC] stage, and treatment), the hazard ratio for heavy smokers in comparison with non-heavy smokers was 1.73 (95% CI: 1.12-2.68; P=0.013). When we stratified by treatment method, heavy smoking was significantly associated with poor survival only in patients treated by chemoradiotherapy (hazard ratio, 2.43; 95% CI: 1.38-4.27; P=0.002). More importantly, a statistically significant interaction between heavy smoking history and treatment modality was observed (P=0.041). Our results indicated that smoking history is strongly associated with poor prognosis in patients with esophageal cancer, especially those treated by chemoradiotherapy. Further investigation is warranted to explain this different prognosis. (author)

  20. Efficacy of concurrent chemoradiotherapy as a palliative treatment in stage IVB esophageal cancer patients with dysphagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Eiji; Kojima, Takashi; Kaneko, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to retrospectively assess the efficacy and safety of palliative chemoradiotherapy in Stage IVB esophageal cancer patients with dysphagia due to the primary lesion. Forty patients with dysphagia caused by metastatic esophageal cancer, which had been treated between January 2004 and June 2009, were retrospectively investigated. The treatment consisted of two courses of chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil and cisplatin) and concurrent irradiation of 40 Gy in 20 fractions to the esophageal primary tumor. The grade of dysphagia was evaluated; nutrition-support-free survival was evaluated using the status of nutritional support of patients. Response to treatment, overall survival, progression-free survival and toxicities were also evaluated. Dysphagia score improved in 75% of the patients. Seventeen of the 20 patients (85%) who had required nutritional support at baseline improved their oral intake to no longer need the support, in a median time of 43 days. The median nutrition-support-free survival was 301 days in the 20 patients who had had adequate oral intake before the treatment. Disease control rate of the primary lesion was 95%, including 12 patients (30%) who achieved a complete response. The overall response rate was 55%. The median survival was 308 days, and the 1-year-survival rate was 45.0%. The median progression-free survival was 139 days. Toxicities were generally well tolerated. Major toxicities (Grade 3 or 4) involved hemoglobin (23%), leukocytes (15%), neutrophils (20%), anorexia (10%), nausea (3%), esophageal perforation (5%) and febrile neutropenia (3%). Two patients (5%) died within 30 days of terminating radiotherapy. Palliative chemoradiotherapy using 5-fluorouracil plus cisplatin combined with concurrent 40 Gy irradiation effectively improved the symptom of dysphagia in Stage IVB esophageal cancer with acceptable toxicity and favorable survival. (author)

  1. Elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for squamous cell carcinoma of the thoracic esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozawa, Masakatsu; Nihei, Keiji; Ishikura, Satoshi; Minashi, Keiko; Yano, Tomonori; Muto, Manabu; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Ogino, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: There are some reports indicating that prophylactic three-field lymph node dissection for esophageal cancer can lead to improved survival. But the benefit of ENI in CRT for thoracic esophageal cancer remains controversial. The purpose of the present study is to retrospectively evaluate the efficacy of elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for thoracic esophageal cancer. Materials and methods: Patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the thoracic esophagus newly diagnosed between February 1999 and April 2001 in our institution was recruited from our database. Definitive chemoradiotherapy consisted of two cycles of cisplatin/5FU repeated every 5 weeks, with concurrent radiation therapy of 60 Gy in 30 fractions. Up to 40 Gy radiation therapy was delivered to the cervical, periesophageal, mediastinal and perigastric lymph nodes as ENI. Results: One hundred two patients were included in this analysis, and their characteristics were as follows: median age, 65 years; male/female, 85/17; T1/T2/T3/T4, 16/11/61/14; N0/N1, 48/54; M0/M1, 84/18. The median follow-up period for the surviving patients was 41 months. Sixty patients achieved complete response (CR). After achieving CR, only one (1.0%; 95% CI, 0-5.3%) patient experienced elective nodal failure without any other site of recurrence. Conclusion: In CRT for esophageal SCC, ENI is effective for preventing regional nodal failure. Further evaluation of whether ENI leads to an improved overall survival is needed.

  2. Intraoperative Radiotherapy Combined With Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Shen; Lu Jiade; Zhang Qing; Yang Zhe; Peng Lihua; Xiong, Fei

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) followed by concurrent chemotherapy and external beam RT (EBRT) in the treatment of locally advanced gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 97 consecutive and nonselected patients with newly diagnosed Stage T3, T4, or N+ adenocarcinoma of the stomach underwent gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection between March 2003 and October 2005. Of the 97 patients, 51 received adjuvant concurrent chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, docetaxel, and cisplatin) and EBRT (EBRT group) and 46 received IORT (dose range, 12-15 Gy) immediately after gastrectomy and lymph node dissection before concurrent chemoradiotherapy (EBRT+IORT group). Results: After a median follow-up of 24 months, the 3-year locoregional control rate was 77% and 63% in the two groups with or without IORT, respectively (p = 0.05). The 3-year overall survival and disease-free survival rate was 47% and 36% in the EBRT group and 56% and 44% in the EBRT+IORT group, respectively (p > 0.05). Multivariate analyses revealed that the use of IORT, presence of residual disease after surgery, and pN category were independent prognostic factors for locoregional control and that IORT, pN, and pT categories were independent prognostic factors for overall survival (p < 0.05). Four patients experienced Grade 3 or 4 late complications, but no significant difference was observed between the two groups. Conclusions: Radical gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection and IORT followed by adjuvant chemoradiotherapy appeared to be feasible and well-tolerated in the treatment of locally advanced gastric cancer. The addition of IORT to the trimodality treatment significantly improved the 3-year locoregional control rate

  3. Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling of Acute Hematologic Toxicity in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, Brent S.; Aydogan, Bulent; Liang, Yun; Yeginer, Mete; Hasselle, Michael D.; Dandekar, Virag; Bafana, Rounak; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Mundt, Arno J.; Roeske, John C.; Mell, Loren K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that increased pelvic bone marrow (BM) irradiation is associated with increased hematologic toxicity (HT) in cervical cancer patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy and to develop a normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for HT. Methods and Materials: We tested associations between hematologic nadirs during chemoradiotherapy and the volume of BM receiving ≥10 and 20 Gy (V 10 and V 20 ) using a previously developed linear regression model. The validation cohort consisted of 44 cervical cancer patients treated with concurrent cisplatin and pelvic radiotherapy. Subsequently, these data were pooled with data from 37 identically treated patients from a previous study, forming a cohort of 81 patients for normal tissue complication probability analysis. Generalized linear modeling was used to test associations between hematologic nadirs and dosimetric parameters, adjusting for body mass index. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to derive optimal dosimetric planning constraints. Results: In the validation cohort, significant negative correlations were observed between white blood cell count nadir and V 10 (regression coefficient (β) = -0.060, p = 0.009) and V 20 (β = -0.044, p = 0.010). In the combined cohort, the (adjusted) β estimates for log (white blood cell) vs. V 10 and V 20 were as follows: -0.022 (p = 0.025) and -0.021 (p = 0.002), respectively. Patients with V 10 ≥ 95% were more likely to experience Grade ≥3 leukopenia (68.8% vs. 24.6%, p 20 > 76% (57.7% vs. 21.8%, p = 0.001). Conclusions: These findings support the hypothesis that HT increases with increasing pelvic BM volume irradiated. Efforts to maintain V 10 20 < 76% may reduce HT.

  4. Clinicopathological outcomes of preoperative chemoradiotherapy using S-1 plus Irinotecan for T4 lower rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beppu, Naohito; Yoshie, Hidenori; Kimura, Fumihiko; Aihara, Tsukasa; Doi, Hiroshi; Kamikonya, Norihiko; Matsubara, Nagahide; Tomita, Naohiro; Yanagi, Hidenori; Yamanaka, Naoki

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the clinicopathological outcomes of patients with T4 lower rectal cancer treated using preoperative chemoradiotherapy with S-1 plus Irinotecan. Between 2005 and 2011, 35 patients with T4M0 lower rectal cancer, diagnosed initially as T4a in 12 and as T4b in 23, were treated with 45 Gy of radiotherapy concomitantly with S-1 plus Irinotecan. The median follow-up period was 50.6 months (range 2-123 months). A total of 32 patients (91.4 %) completed the radiotherapy and 26 (74.3 %) completed the full chemotherapy regimen. Radical surgery was then performed in 33 (94.3 %) of the 35 patients after the exclusion of two patients, who had macroscopic residual disease. The pathological diagnosis was downstaged from T4a to ypT0-3 in all 12 of those patients (100 %) and from T4b to ypT0-4a in 20 of those 23 patients (87.0 %). The tumor regression grade of 1a/1b/2/3 (complete response) was 10/8/15/2, respectively. In terms of long-term survival, the 5-year local relapse-free survival rate was 74.8 % and the recurrence-free survival rate was 52.0 %. This regimen may result in favorable downstaging. Moreover, in this series, pathological evidence of involvement of adjacent organs was rare following preoperative chemoradiotherapy, in the patients with disease diagnosed as T4b at the initial staging.

  5. Cognitive Functioning After Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gan, Hui K.; Bernstein, Lori J.; Brown, Jennifer; Ringash, Jolie; Vakilha, Mehrdad; Wang, Lisa; Goldstein, David; Kim, John; Hope, Andrew; O'Sullivan, Brian; Waldron, John; Abdul Razak, Albiruni R.; Chen, Eric X.; Siu, Lillian L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a comprehensive cognitive function (CF) assessment in patients who were relapse free after curative intent radiotherapy (RT) or chemoradiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Patients underwent neuropsychological tests to assess their objective CF; completed questionnaires to assess subjective CF, quality of life, and affect; and underwent blood tests to assess hematologic, biochemical, endocrine, and cytokine status. Retrospectively, the dosimetry of incidental radiation to the brain was determined for all patients, and the dose intensity of cisplatin was determined in those who had undergone chemoradiotherapy. Results: A total of 10 patients were enrolled (5 treated with radiotherapy only and 5 with radiotherapy and cisplatin). The mean time from the end of treatment was 20 months (range, 9-41). All patients were able to complete the assessment protocol. Of the 10 patients, 9 had impaired objective CF, with memory the most severely affected. The severity of memory impairment correlated significantly with the radiation dose to the temporal lobes, and impaired dexterity correlated significantly with the radiation dose to the cerebellum, suggesting that these deficits might be treatment related. Patients receiving cisplatin appeared to have poorer objective CF than patients receiving only RT, although this difference did not achieve statistical significance, likely owing to the small sample size. Consistent with the published data, objective CF did not correlate with subjective CF or quality of life. No association was found between objective CF and patients' affect, hematologic, biochemical, endocrine, and cytokine status. Conclusion: Neuropsychological testing is feasible in squamous cell carcinoma of the head-and-neck survivors. The findings were suggestive of treatment-related cognitive dysfunction. These results warrant additional investigation.

  6. Contraindications to cisplatin based chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of cervical cancer in Sub-Saharan Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McArdle, Orla; Kigula-Mugambe, Joseph B.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Purpose: We conducted a prospective study to assess the eligibility of patients presenting with cervical cancer in the developing world for chemoradiotherapy. Material and Methods: Patients with biopsy proven cervical cancer were eligible. Workup included history, examination, pre-treatment Karnofsky performance score, evaluation under anaesthesia to establish FIGO stage, complete blood count, renal and liver functions tests, HIV test and ultrasound of the abdomen and pelvis. Exclusion criteria: stage IA, stage IV, HIV status positive, Karnofsky performance score 70 years, hydronephrosis, haemoglobin 97 μmol/L. Results: 314 patients were included. After workup, 47 patients (15.1%) were eligible for combined modality treatment and 190 (60.5%) were not eligible. Eligibility could not be established in 77 cases (24.4%). 37 (11.6%) of the group were HIV positive, HIV status was not established in 38.4% of cases. The most frequently encountered exclusion criteria were hydronephrosis and anaemia. Application of a haemoglobin cut off point of 8 g/dL for cisplatin based chemotherapy resulted in the exclusion of 55 (17.4%) patients. A limit of 10 g/dL excluded an additional 11 patients. Hydronephrosis was diagnosed on ultrasound in 99 (31.4%) patients. 56% had unilateral hydronephrosis, 44% had bilateral hydronephrosis. Conclusions: A small proportion of our patients with cervical cancer would benefit from chemoradiotherapy with concomitant cisplatin, illustrating the difficulties of applying 'standard' treatment to the developing world. The introduction of national screening programmes and the provision of accessible radiotherapy facilities should be the major priorities in the developing world setting

  7. EVALUATION OF POSTOPERATIVE VISUAL OUTCOME IN TRAUMATIC CATARACT AND A STUDY OF POSTOPERATIVE COMPLICATIONS IN SUCH CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shantanu Bhattacharjee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Cataract formation is commonly observed as a result of blunt or penetrating ocular injury and constitutes one of major causes of acute or longstanding visual loss. The surgical technique, timing of surgery and postoperative complications have all been considered to be significant factors in determining the final visual outcome. The aim of the present study is to evaluate postoperative visual outcome in a series of patients with traumatic cataract and to assess the postoperative complications conducted at IQ City Medical College, Durgapur, West Bengal. MATERIALS AND METHODS A consecutive series of 45 patients with traumatic cataract were carefully selected from outpatient department between May 2015 and April 2017. All the patients had undergone manual Small Incision Cataract Surgery (SICS with IOL implantation. Postoperative visual outcome and postoperative complications were assessed. RESULTS Corrected Visual Acuity (VA at the end of 6th week in 45 cases ranged between 6/6 and 6/60. Subjective correction with glasses ranged from -2 dioptre spherical to +1.5 dioptre spherical. 25 cases (55.5% had VA 6/6-6/9, 15 cases (33.3% had VA of 6/12 to 6/18, 4 cases (8.9% had VA between 6/24 and 6/36 and 1 case had VA 6/60. The group which had VA between 6/12 and 6/18 was due to the presence of posterior capsular opacification. CONCLUSION The present study reveals most of the traumatic cataract cases had favourable visual outcome. Considering the fact that a good number of paediatric patients were treated in this study, it assumes more significance with the favourable visual outcome that could be achieved, thus preventing deprivation amblyopia and blindness.

  8. [Postoperative recurrence of Crohn's disease, and its prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, László; Lakatos, Péter László

    2010-05-23

    Crohn's disease is a chronic, progressive disabling condition ultimately leading to stricturing and/or penetrating complications. The need for surgery may be as high as 70% in patients with severe active disease or complications. However, relapse may develop in a significant proportion of the patients after surgery leading to frequent re-operations. Despite emerging data, postoperative prevention is still controversial. After careful evaluation of the individual risk a tailored therapy should be considered. In patients with small risk for relapse mesalazine or in selected cases no-treatment may be an option. In patients with a moderate-to-high risk azathioprine should be considered together with metronidazole in the three months. Follow-up ileocolonoscopy 6-12 months after the surgery is helpful in the determination of endoscopic severity and may assist in the optimization of the therapy. In most severe cases anti-TNF agents may be appropriate for postoperative prevention and therapy.

  9. Post-operative pain treatment in Denmark from 2000 to 2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, P R; Christensen, P A; Meyhoff, C S

    2012-01-01

    In Denmark, the first acute pain service (APS) was introduced in 1993. An important objective became to facilitate implementation of accelerated post-operative rehabilitation programmes (ACC) in selected procedures in abdominal, gynaecological and orthopaedic surgery. Therefore......, it is of considerable interest to study the association between the developments of post-operative pain management and the ACC by sequential analyses from 2000 to 2009....

  10. Docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy alone in stage III-IV unresectable head and neck cancer. Results of a randomized phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takacsi-Nagy, Zoltan; Polgar, Csaba; Major, Tibor; Fodor, Janos; Hitre, Erika; Remenar, Eva; Kasler, Miklos; Oberna, Ferenc; Goedeny, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is the standard treatment for advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. In this phase II randomized study, the efficacy and toxicity of docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil induction chemotherapy (ICT) followed by concurrent CRT was compared with those after standard CRT alone in patients with locally advanced, unresectable head and neck cancer. Between January 2007 and June 2009, 66 patients with advanced (stage III or IV) unresectable squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, and larynx) were randomly assigned to two groups: one receiving two cycles of docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil ICT followed by CRT with three cycles of cisplatin and one treated by CRT alone. Response rate, local tumor control (LTC), locoregional tumor control (LRTC), overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and toxicity results were assessed. Three patients from the ICT + CRT group did not appear at the first treatment, so a total of 63 patients were evaluated in the study (30 ICT + CRT group and 33 CRT group). Three patients died of febrile neutropenia after ICT. The median follow-up time for surviving patients was 63 months (range 53-82 months). The rate of radiologic complete response was 63 % following ICT + CRT, whereas 70 % after CRT alone. There were no significant differences in the 3-year rates of LTC (56 vs. 57 %), LRTC (42 vs. 50 %), OS (43 vs. 55 %), and PFS (41 vs. 50 %) in the ICT + CRT group and in the CRT group, respectively. The rate of grade 3-4 neutropenia was significantly higher in the ICT + CRT group than in the CRT group (37 and 12 %; p = 0.024). Late toxicity (grade 2 or 3 xerostomia) developed in 59 and 42 % in the ICT + CRT and CRT groups, respectively. The addition of ICT to CRT did not show any advantage in our phase II trial, while the incidence of adverse events increased. The three deaths as a consequence of ICT call attention to the importance of

  11. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT to assess response and guide risk-stratified follow-up after chemoradiotherapy for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, Thomas; Lei, Mary; Guerrero Urbano, Teresa [Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Clinical Oncology, London (United Kingdom); Barrington, Sally [King' s College, PET Imaging Centre at St Thomas' Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Thavaraj, Selvam [Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Head and Neck Pathology Department, London (United Kingdom); Jeannon, Jean-Pierre; Lyons, Andrew; Oakley, Richard; Simo, Ricard [Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Head and Neck Surgery, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-15

    To evaluate the use of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT as the principal investigation to assess tumour response, to determine the need for further surgery and to guide follow-up following radical chemoradiotherapy for stage III/IV oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). A retrospective analysis was undertaken in 146 patients treated at our centre with radical chemoradiotherapy for OPSCC and who had a PET/CT scan to assess response. According to the PET/CT findings, patients were divided into four groups and recommendations: (1) complete metabolic response (enter clinical follow-up); (2) low-level uptake only (follow-up PET/CT scan in 12 weeks); (3) residual uptake suspicious for residual disease (further investigation with or without neck dissection); and (4) new diagnosis of distant metastatic disease (palliative treatment options). The initial PET/CT scan was performed at a median of 12.4 weeks (range 4.3 - 21.7 weeks) following treatment. Overall sensitivity and specificity rates were 92.0 % (74.0 - 99.0 %) and 85 % (77.5 - 90.9 %). Of the 146 patients, 90 (62 %) had a complete response and had estimated 3-year overall and disease-free survival rates of 91.9 % (85.6 - 98.2 %) and 85.6 % (78.0 - 93.2 %), respectively, 17 (12 %) had residual low-level uptake only (with two having confirmed residual disease on subsequent PET/CT, both surgically salvaged), 30 (21 %) had suspicious residual uptake (12 proceeded to neck dissection; true positive rate at surgery 33 %). HPV-positive patients with reassuring PET/CT findings had an estimated 3-year progression-free survival rate of 91.7 % (85.2 - 98.2 %), compared with 66.2 % (41.5 - 90.9 %) of HPV-negative patients. A strategy of using PET/CT results alongside clinical examination to help select patients for salvage surgery appears successful. Despite a complete response on the 12-week PET/CT scan, HPV-negative patients have a significant risk of disease relapse in the following 2 years and further studies to assess whether

  12. Stents in patients with esophageal cancer before chemoradiotherapy: high risk of complications and no impact on the nutritional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mão-de-Ferro, S; Serrano, M; Ferreira, S; Rosa, I; Lage, P; Alexandre, D P; Freire, J; Mirones, L; Casaca, R; Bettencourt, A; Pereira, A D

    2016-03-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy is the standard of care for locally advanced esophageal cancer, causing persistent deterioration in the nutritional status. We performed a prospective study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of esophageal double-covered self-expandable metal stents in patients with esophageal cancer before chemoradiotherapy. The nutritional status and dysphagia were prospectively recorded. Eleven patients were included: eight were moderate and three were severely malnourished. After stent placement, dysphagia improved in all patients. With regard to complications, one patient developed an esophageal perforation that required urgent esophagectomy. Four patients presented stent migration. Three of these patients required enteral nutrition and none was submitted to surgery because of poor nutritional status. Of the other six patients, only four were operated upon. Stent placement presented a high complication rate and did not prevent weight loss or malnutrition. Other alternatives, including naso-gastric tube placement or endoscopic percutaneous gastrostomy or jejunostomy, should be considered.

  13. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy plus adjuvant chemotherapy versus concurrent chemoradiotherapy in locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma. A matched-pair multicenter analysis of outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Yi-Yuan [Affiliated Hospital of Guilin Medical University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Guilin (China); Guilin Medical University Affiliated Hospital, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Guilin (China); Xiang, Chun [Nan Xishan Hospital, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Guilin (China); Lu, Jian-Xun [Affiliated Hospital of Youjiang Medical University for Nationalities, Department of Oncology, Baise (China); Su, Yi-Xin [Lingshan People' s Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Lingshan (China); Pan, Yu-Fei [Nan Xishan Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Guilin (China); Cai, Rui; Zhang, Rong-Jun; He, Zhuo-Kai; Liu, Mei-Lian; Huang, Hui; Bai, Xue; Tang, Hua-Ying; Shi, Yun-Hua; Wang, Yan; Jiang, Wei [Affiliated Hospital of Guilin Medical University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Guilin (China)

    2016-06-15

    The benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) in locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is controversial. This study compared concurrent chemoradiotherapy plus AC (CCRT/AC) with CCRT. Pair-matched analysis based on eight clinicopathological features of 244 patients treated with platinum-based CCRT/AC or CCRT alone was performed. Survival outcomes were assessed using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. Toxicities and response rates were compared using Fisher's exact test. Four-year overall survival, progression-free survival, distant failure-free survival, and locoregional failure-free survival were 72 %, 61 %, 71 %, and 81 %, respectively, for the CCRT arm, compared to 74 % (hazard ratio, HR 0.89; 95 % confidence interval, CI 0.64-1.23; P = 0.474), 62 % (HR 0.91, 95 % CI 0.68-1.20, P = 0.489), 73 % (HR 0.84, 95 % CI 0.59-1.18, P = 0.316), and 84 % (HR 0.84, 95 % CI 0.52-1.24, P = 0.323), respectively, for the CCRT/AC arm. Cox multivariate regression analysis demonstrated AC was not an independent prognostic factor. Overall, there was a higher incidence of grade 3-4 toxicities in the CCRT/AC arm. The most common grade 3-4 adverse events in the CCRT/AC arm were vomiting (27 %), nausea (43 %), leukopenia/neutropenia (23 %), thrombocytopenia (8.8 %), and anemia (6.2 %). Addition of AC to CCRT increased toxicities but did not improve survival in locoregionally advanced NPC. (orig.) [German] Der Nutzen der adjuvanten Chemotherapie (AC) bei lokoregional fortgeschrittenem nasopharyngealem Karzinom (NPC) ist kontrovers. In dieser Studie wurde die simultane Radiochemotherapie (''concurrent chemoradiotherapy'', CCRT) plus adjuvante Chemotherapie (AC) mit einer alleinigen CCRT verglichen. Die Matched-pair-Analyse basiert auf acht klinisch-pathologischen Merkmalen von 244 Patienten, die mit platinbasierter CCRT/AC oder alleiniger CCRT behandelt wurden. Die Ueberlebensendpunkte wurden mit der Kaplan-Meier-Methode und dem Log

  14. Effects of posture on postoperative pulmonary function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, K G; Holte, Kathrine; Kehlet, H

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulmonary morbidity is still a relevant complication to major surgery despite improvements in surgical technique and anaesthetic methods. Postoperative posture may be a pathogenic factor, but the effects of changes in postoperative posture on pulmonary function have not been reviewed....... METHODS: Review of controlled, clinical trials evaluating postoperative pulmonary function in patients positioned in the supine vs. the sitting or standing position and patients positioned in the supine vs. the lateral position. Data were obtained from a search in the Medline and Cochrane databases (1966...

  15. Imaging of the postoperative middle ear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Marc T. [Department of Medical Imaging, Fondation Ophtalmologique Adolphe de Rothschild, 25 rue Manin, 75940, Paris (France); Ayache, Denis [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Fondation Ophtalmologique Adolphe de Rothschild, Paris (France)

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this article is twofold: (a) to present the principles and the indications of surgical treatment of middle ear pathologies; and (b) to review the imaging findings after middle ear surgery, including the normal postoperative aspects and imaging findings in patients presenting with unsatisfactory surgical results or with suspicion of postoperative complications. This review is intentionally restricted to the most common diseases involving the middle ear: chronic otitis media and otosclerosis. In these specific fields of interest, CT and MR imaging play a very important role in the postoperative follow-up and in the work-up of surgical failures and complications. (orig.)

  16. Prediction of 90 Day and Overall Survival after Chemoradiotherapy for Lung Cancer: Role of Performance Status and Body Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, J C S; Williams, L J; Simms, A; Price, A; Campbell, S; Fallon, M T; Fearon, K C H

    2017-09-01

    If appropriate patients are to be selected for lung cancer treatment, an understanding of who is most at risk of adverse outcomes after treatment is needed. The aim of the present study was to identify predictive factors for 30 and 90 day mortality after chemoradiotherapy (CRT), and factors that were prognostic for overall survival. A retrospective cohort study of 194 patients with lung cancer who had undergone CRT in South East Scotland from 2008 to 2010 was undertaken. Gender, age, cancer characteristics, weight loss, body mass index (BMI), performance status (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group; ECOG) and computed tomography-derived body composition variables were examined for prognostic significance using Cox's proportional hazards model and logistic regression. The median overall survival was 19 months (95% confidence interval 16.3, 21.7). Four of 194 patients died within 30 days of treatment completion, for which there were no independent predictive variables; 22/194 (11%) died within 90 days of treatment completion. BMI < 20 and ECOG performance status ≥2 were independent predictors of death within 90 days of treatment completion (P = 0.001 and P = 0.004, respectively). Patients with either BMI < 20 or ECOG performance status ≥ 2 had an odds ratio of death within 90 days of 5.97 (95% confidence interval 2.20, 16.19), rising to an odds ratio of 13.27 (1.70, 103.47) for patients with both BMI < 20 and ECOG performance status ≥ 2. Patients with low muscle attenuation had significantly reduced overall survival (P = 0.004); individuals with low muscle attenuation had a median survival of 15.2 months (95% confidence interval 12.7, 17.7) compared with 23.0 months (95% confidence interval 18.3, 27.8) for those with high muscle attenuation, equating to a hazard ratio of death of 1.62 (95% confidence interval 1.17, 2.23, P = 0.003). Poor performance status, low BMI and low muscle attenuation identify patients at increased risk of premature death after

  17. Clinical implication of negative conversion of predicted circumferential resection margin status after preoperative chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Nam Kwon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea University Medical Center, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chul Yong, E-mail: kcyro@korea.ac.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea University Medical Center, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Je; Yang, Dae Sik; Yoon, Won Sup [Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea University Medical Center, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seon Hahn; Kim, Jin [Division of Colorectal Surgery, Department of Surgery, Korea University Medical Center, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    Objective: To evaluate the prognostic implication of the negative conversion of predicted circumferential resection margin status before surgery in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer with predicted circumferential resection margin involvement. Methods: Thirty-eight patients (28 men, 10 women; median age, 61 years; age range, 39–80 years) with locally advanced rectal cancer with predicted circumferential resection margin involvement who underwent preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by radical surgery were analyzed. Involvement of the circumferential resection margin was predicted on the basis of pre- and post-chemoradiotherapy magnetic resonance imaging. The primary endpoints were 3-year local recurrence-free survival and overall survival. Results: The median follow-up time was 41.1 months (range, 13.9–85.2 months). The negative conversion rate of predicted circumferential resection margin status after preoperative chemoradiotherapy was 65.8%. Patients who experienced negative conversion of predicted circumferential resection margin status had a significantly higher 3-year local recurrence-free survival rate (100.0% vs. 76.9%; P = 0.013), disease-free survival rate (91.7% vs. 59.3%; P = 0.023), and overall survival rate (96.0% vs. 73.8%; P = 0.016) than those who had persistent circumferential resection margin involvement. Conclusions: The negative conversion of the predicted circumferential resection margin status as predicted by magnetic resonance imaging will assist in individual risk stratification as a predictive factor for treatment response and survival before surgery. These findings may help physicians determine whether to administer more intense adjuvant chemotherapy or change the surgical plan for patients displaying resistance to preoperative chemoradiotherapy.

  18. Concomitant chemo-radiotherapy for the locally advanced rectum cancer; Chimioradiotherapie concomitante dans le cancer du rectum localement evolue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haoui, M.; Aksil, N.; Boualga, K.; Moussaoui, D.; Ladj, O. [Service de radiotherapie-oncologie, centre anti-cancer, Blida (Algeria)

    2010-10-15

    The authors report a retrospective study which aimed at assessing the use of a concomitant chemo-radiotherapy, its tolerance and its feasibility in the case of a locally advanced rectum cancer. Based on data obtained among 62 patients presenting a rectum cancer, they analyse the results in terms of tolerance (cases of leukopenia, anemia, diarrhea, radiodermatitis), of relapses, and survival. Toxicity is acceptable and the concomitant treatment renders the tumour operable in many cases. Short communication

  19. Global DNA methylation is altered by neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer and may predict response to treatment - A pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tsang, J S

    2014-07-28

    In rectal cancer, not all tumours display a response to neoadjuvant treatment. An accurate predictor of response does not exist to guide patient-specific treatment. DNA methylation is a distinctive molecular pathway in colorectal carcinogenesis. Whether DNA methylation is altered by neoadjuvant treatment and a potential response predictor is unknown. We aimed to determine whether DNA methylation is altered by neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and to determine its role in predicting response to treatment.

  20. Double-blind randomized phase III study comparing a mixture of natural agents versus placebo in the prevention of acute mucositis during chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marucci, Laura; Farneti, Alessia; Di Ridolfi, Paolo; Pinnaro, Paola; Pellini, Raul; Giannarelli, Diana; Vici, Patrizia; Conte, Mario; Landoni, Valeria; Sanguineti, Giuseppe

    2017-09-01

    There is no widely accepted intervention in the prevention of acute mucositis during chemoradiotherapy for head and neck carcinoma. In the present double-blind study, we tested 4 natural agents, propolis, aloe vera, calendula, and chamomile versus placebo. Patients undergoing concomitant chemo-intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were given natural agent or matched placebo; grade 3 mucositis on physical examination according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 3.0 was the primary endpoint. Various covariates were tested at logistic regression, including the individual amount of mucosa receiving at least 9.5 Gy per week (V9.5w). One hundred seven patients were randomized from January 2011 to July 2014, and 104 were assessable (51%-49% were assigned to the placebo group and 53%-51% were assigned to the natural agent). Overall, 61 patients developed peak grade 3 mucositis with no difference between arms (P = .65). Conversely, V9.5w (P = .007) and primary site (P = .037) were independent predictors. The selected natural agents do not prevent mucositis, whereas the role of V9.5w is confirmed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Clinical Outcome of Patients with Complete Pathological Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancers: The Indian Scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snita Sinukumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and total mesorectal excision are considered the standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Various studies have reported pathological downstaging and a complete pathological response rate of 15%–27% following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy which has translated into improved survival. We endeavour to determine the clinical outcome of patients attaining a complete pathological tumor response following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in the Indian setting where most of our patient population is younger and presents with aggressive tumor biology. Materials and Methods. Clinicopathological and treatment details were recorded for 64 patients achieving pathological complete response from 2010 to 2013. Disease-free survival (DFS, overall survival (OS, and locoregional and systemic recurrence rates were evaluated for these patients. Results. After a median follow-up of 30.5 months (range 11–59 months, the 3-year overall survival (OS was 94.6% and the 3-year disease-free survival (DFS was 88.5%. The locoregional and systemic recurrence rates were 4.7% and 3.1%, respectively. Conclusion. In the Indian subcontinent, despite younger patients with aggressive tumor biology, outcome in complete responders is good.

  2. cDNA microarray analysis of human keratinocytes cells of patients submitted to chemoradiotherapy and oral photobiomodulation therapy: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Heliton S; Wajnberg, Gabriel; Pinho, Marcos B; Jorge, Natasha Andressa Nogueira; de Moraes, Joyce Luana Melo; Stefanoff, Claudio Gustavo; Herchenhorn, Daniel; Araújo, Carlos M M; Viégas, Celia Maria Pais; Rampini, Mariana P; Dias, Fernando L; de Araujo-Souza, Patricia Savio; Passetti, Fabio; Ferreira, Carlos G

    2018-01-01

    Oral mucositis is an acute toxicity that occurs in patients submitted to chemoradiotherapy to treat head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. In this study, we evaluated differences in gene expression in the keratinocytes of the oral mucosa of patients treated with photobiomodulation therapy and tried to associate the molecular mechanisms with clinical findings. From June 2009 to December 2010, 27 patients were included in a randomized double-blind pilot study. Buccal smears from 13 patients were obtained at days 1 and 10 of chemoradiotherapy, and overall gene expression of samples from both dates were analyzed by complementary DNA (cDNA) microarray. In addition, samples from other 14 patients were also collected at D1 and D10 of chemoradiotherapy for subsequent validation of cDNA microarray findings by qPCR. The expression array analysis identified 105 upregulated and 60 downregulated genes in our post-treatment samples when compared with controls. Among the upregulated genes with the highest fold change, it was interesting to observe the presence of genes related to keratinocyte differentiation. Among downregulated genes were observed genes related to cytotoxicity and immune response. The results indicate that genes known to be induced during differentiation of human epidermal keratinocytes were upregulated while genes associated with cytotoxicity and immune response were downregulated in the laser group. These results support previous clinical findings indicating that the lower incidence of oral mucositis associated with photobiomodulation therapy might be correlated to the activation of genes involved in keratinocyte differentiation.

  3. Efficacy and prognostic analysis of chemoradiotherapy in patients with thoracic esophageal squamous carcinoma with cervical lymph nodal metastasis alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Peng; Xi, Mian; Zhao, Lei; Li, Qiao-Qiao; He, Li-Ru; Liu, Shi-Liang; Shen, Jing-Xian; Liu, Meng-Zhong

    2014-01-01

    The prognostic factors of thoracic esophageal squamous carcinoma with cervical lymph nodal metastasis (CLNM) have not been specifically investigated. This study was performed to analyze the efficacy and prognostic factors of chemoradiotherapy for thoracic esophageal carcinoma with CLNM alone. From 2002 to 2011, 139 patients with inoperable esophageal cancer who underwent chemoradiotherapy at the Sun Yat-Sen University were retrospectively analyzed. Median radiation doses were 60 Gy (range: 50–68 Gy). Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to compare overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). The 1- and 3-year OS rates were 68.2% and 27.9%, respectively. The 1- and 3-year PFS rates were 51.9% and 20.1%, respectively. The multivariate analysis demonstrated that response to treatment, T stage, pathological grade, and laterality of cervical lymph nodal metastases were independent prognostic factors for thoracic esophageal carcinoma with CLNM. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy is an important and hopeful treatment option for patients with esophageal cancer with CLNM alone. Our study has revealed that response to treatment, T stage, pathological grade and laterality of cervical lymph nodal metastases are significant prognostic factors for long-term survival

  4. MRI at the completion of chemoradiotherapy can accurately evaluate the extent of disease in women with advanced urethral carcinoma undergoing anterior pelvic exenteration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourtsoyianni, S.; Hudolin, T. [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Centre, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY (United States); Sala, E. [Department of Radiology, Box 218, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Hills Road, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Goldman, D. [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Centre, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY (United States); Bochner, B.H. [Department of Urology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Centre, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY (United States); Hricak, Hedvig, E-mail: muellnea@mskcc.org [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Centre, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Aim: To demonstrate the value of pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in mapping tumour extension after chemoradiotherapy and before anterior pelvic exenteration in patients with primary carcinoma of the urethra. Materials and methods: The Institutional Review Board approved and issued a waiver of informed consent for this retrospective study, which was compliant with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. Six women (median age 51 years, range 39-63 years) with histopathology-proven urethral carcinoma who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy before anterior pelvic exenteration were included in the study. All had MRI performed at first presentation and after completion of chemoradiotherapy. MRI images were analysed by an experienced reader, who was blinded to the clinical data. The tumour location, signal intensity, size, local extension, and presence of enlarged lymph nodes were recorded for each patient at baseline and after chemoradiotherapy. Surgical histopathology constituted the reference standard. Results: All tumours were locally advanced (stage T3) at baseline MRI. The mean maximum diameter of the tumour at baseline MRI was 3.7 cm (range 2.4-5 cm). After chemoradiotherapy, the mean reduction in maximum tumour diameter on MRI was 44% (range 13-67%), but only three cases were down-staged. MRI was accurate in the evaluation of tumour extension after completion of chemoradiotherapy in all cases. Persistence of bladder neck and anterior vaginal wall invasion was correctly identified in three cases. Conclusion: In women with advanced primary urethral cancer, MRI is an excellent tool for monitoring neo-adjuvant chemoradiotherapy changes and evaluating the extent of disease before exenterative surgery.

  5. MRI at the completion of chemoradiotherapy can accurately evaluate the extent of disease in women with advanced urethral carcinoma undergoing anterior pelvic exenteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourtsoyianni, S.; Hudolin, T.; Sala, E.; Goldman, D.; Bochner, B.H.; Hricak, Hedvig

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To demonstrate the value of pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in mapping tumour extension after chemoradiotherapy and before anterior pelvic exenteration in patients with primary carcinoma of the urethra. Materials and methods: The Institutional Review Board approved and issued a waiver of informed consent for this retrospective study, which was compliant with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. Six women (median age 51 years, range 39-63 years) with histopathology-proven urethral carcinoma who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy before anterior pelvic exenteration were included in the study. All had MRI performed at first presentation and after completion of chemoradiotherapy. MRI images were analysed by an experienced reader, who was blinded to the clinical data. The tumour location, signal intensity, size, local extension, and presence of enlarged lymph nodes were recorded for each patient at baseline and after chemoradiotherapy. Surgical histopathology constituted the reference standard. Results: All tumours were locally advanced (stage T3) at baseline MRI. The mean maximum diameter of the tumour at baseline MRI was 3.7 cm (range 2.4-5 cm). After chemoradiotherapy, the mean reduction in maximum tumour diameter on MRI was 44% (range 13-67%), but only three cases were down-staged. MRI was accurate in the evaluation of tumour extension after completion of chemoradiotherapy in all cases. Persistence of bladder neck and anterior vaginal wall invasion was correctly identified in three cases. Conclusion: In women with advanced primary urethral cancer, MRI is an excellent tool for monitoring neo-adjuvant chemoradiotherapy changes and evaluating the extent of disease before exenterative surgery.

  6. Methodological issues of postoperative cognitive dysfunction research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Kamilia S; Steinmetz, Jacob; Rasmussen, Lars S

    2010-01-01

    to reveal postoperative cognitive decline, and questionnaires are not useful for this purpose. There is a profound lack of consensus regarding the research methodology for detection of cognitive deterioration, especially the diagnostic criteria. Issues, such as baseline performance, learning effects...

  7. Surgical Apgar Score Predicts Postoperative Complications in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    complications were determined during the thirty day post operative period. ... An ideal model to predict postoperative complications ... their SAS for purposes of risk stratification; high risk. (0-4), medium .... surgical audit (9,14). Serial monitoring ...

  8. Nursing approaches in the postoperative pain management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevilay Yüceer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Patients frequently experience moderate to severe pain inthe postoperative period. Although the pain managementis an integral and important part of the nursing care, studiessuggest that, nursing management of postoperativepain remains inadequate.Postoperative care nurses are responsible to assess thepatient’s pain, teach the patient strategies to deal with thepain, apply the analgesic treatment plan, monitor the resultsof treatment, educate the patient and the family onpain management and document the pain managementoutcomes. The nurses’ holistic approach to pain managementminimizes the patients’ discomfort caused by pain inthe postoperative period after the surgery. In this article,nurses’ approaches to postoperative pain managementare discussed. J Clin Exp Invest 2011; 2 (4: 474-478

  9. Postoperative neuromuscular function following non-depolarising ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-07-03

    Jul 3, 2016 ... method of neurostimulation in the 1970s.9 A TOF refers to four supramaximal impulses delivered at ..... of postoperative respiratory complications: prospective propensity score matched cohort study. BMJ. 2012;345:e6329. 21.

  10. Three dimensional conformal postoperative radiotherapy for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Azza Helal

    2013-06-17

    Jun 17, 2013 ... during postoperative 3DCRT treatment of parotid gland cancer patients. ... contralateral parotid, oral cavity, cochlea, spinal cord, brain stem, eyes, lenses and ... xerostomia, dry ear, ear infections, hearing deficits and ipsilat-.

  11. Multimodality imaging of the postoperative shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woertler, Klaus [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    Multimodality imaging of the postoperative shoulder includes radiography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, MR arthrography, computed tomography (CT), CT arthrography, and ultrasound. Target-oriented evaluation of the postoperative shoulder necessitates familiarity with surgical techniques, their typical complications and sources of failure, knowledge of normal and abnormal postoperative findings, awareness of the advantages and weaknesses with the different radiologic techniques, and clinical information on current symptoms and function. This article reviews the most commonly used surgical procedures for treatment of anterior glenohumeral instability, lesions of the labral-bicipital complex, subacromial impingement, and rotator cuff lesions and highlights the significance of imaging findings with a view to detection of recurrent lesions and postoperative complications in a multimodality approach. (orig.)

  12. Postoperative opioid analgesia: time for a reconsideration?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, H; Rung, G W; Callesen, T

    1996-01-01

    Postoperative pain relief has improved in recent years with the development of new analgesics, additional routes of administration and the appearance of the hypothesis of preemptive as well as balanced analgesia (Kehlet H; Postoperative pain relief-what is the issue? Br J Anaesth 1994;72:375-8). ......Postoperative pain relief has improved in recent years with the development of new analgesics, additional routes of administration and the appearance of the hypothesis of preemptive as well as balanced analgesia (Kehlet H; Postoperative pain relief-what is the issue? Br J Anaesth 1994......;72:375-8). Many initial improvements simply involved the administration of opioid analgesics in new ways, such as continuous or on demand intravenous (i.v.) or epidural infusion. These methods allow lower total opioid dosages, provide a more stable concentration of opioid at the receptor and correspondingly...

  13. MR imaging of the postoperative spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, J.S.; Modic, M.T.; Masaryk, T.T.; Bohlman, H.

    1986-01-01

    Preoperative, immediate postoperative, and delayed (2-6 months) postoperative MR studies were obtained in 20 patients who had undergone a variety of spinal surgical procedures. In addition, 50 postoperative patients without preoperative studies were also reviewed. MR studies included sagittal T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and axial T1-weighted and multiecho T2-weighted images. The evolution of signal intensity changes with time is demonstrated. Diskectomy produced no significant vertebral body changes and reduced but did not completely remove the extradural mass of herniation. Anterior fusion resulted in decreased signal on T1-weighted and increased signal on T2-weighted images in adjacent vertebral bodies, which were changes that were similar to those seen around bone grafts but distinct from the graft itself. Scar formation was better defined 2-3 months postoperatively

  14. [Postoperative inconveniences after breast cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gartner, R.; Callesen, T.; Kroman, N.

    2008-01-01

    The most common postoperative inconveniences after breast cancer surgery are pain, nausea and vomiting, which contribute to reduced patient satisfaction, prolonged hospital stays and delayed courses of rehabilitation. This article summarizes the literature regarding available procedure...

  15. Postoperative Nosocomial Infections and Antimicrobial Resistance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Postoperative Nosocomial Infections and Antimicrobial Resistance Pattern of Bacteria Isolates among Patients Admitted at Felege Hiwot Referral Hospital, Bahirdar, ... Wound swab and venous blood samples were collected and processed for bacterial isolation and antimicrobial susceptibility testing following standard ...

  16. Preoperative Alcohol Consumption and Postoperative Complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliasen, Marie; Grønkjær, Marie; Skov-Ettrup, Lise Skrubbeltrang

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: To systematically review and summarize the evidence of the association between preoperative alcohol consumption and postoperative complications elaborated on complication type. BACKGROUND:: Conclusions in studies on preoperative alcohol consumption and postoperative complications have...... been inconsistent. METHODS:: A systematic review and meta-analysis based on a search in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO citations. Included were original studies of the association between preoperative alcohol consumption and postoperative complications occurring within 30 days of the operation.......30-2.49), prolonged stay at the hospital (RR = 1.24; 95% CI: 1.18-1.31), and admission to intensive care unit (RR = 1.29; 95% CI: 1.03-1.61). Clearly defined high alcohol consumption was associated with increased risk of postoperative mortality (RR = 2.68; 95% CI: 1.50-4.78). Low to moderate preoperative alcohol...

  17. Abdominal CT findings of delayed postoperative complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zissin, R.; Osadchy, A. [Sapir Medical Center, Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Kfar Saba (Israel)]. E-mail: zisinrivka@clalit.org.il; Gayer, G. [Assaf Harofe Medical Center, Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Zrifin (Israel)

    2007-10-15

    Despite progress in surgical techniques and modern medical treatment, postoperative complications occur not infrequently and vary according to type of surgery, clinical setting, and time elapsed since surgery. In general, they can be divided into early and delayed complications. Delayed postoperative complications can be classified as specific and nonspecific. The common nonspecific delayed complications are incisional hernia and postoperative bowel obstruction. Bowel obstruction can be further categorized as obstruction related to benign or neoplastic etiology, the latter occurring in oncology patients in whom the primary surgery was related to an underlying abdominal neoplasm. Gossypiboma is another, fortunately rare, postoperative complication. Specific complications appear after specific operations and include the following: Splenosis - following splenectomy. Retained gallstones and spilled gallstones - following cholecystectomy, mainly laparoscopic. Dropped appendicolith and stump appendicitis - following appendectomy, mainly laparoscopic. Obturation obstruction by a bezoar - following gastric surgery. Afferent loop syndrome (ALS) - following Bilroth II gastrectomy. (author)

  18. Perioperative complications of radical cystectomy after induction chemoradiotherapy in bladder-sparing protocol against muscle-invasive bladder cancer. A single institutional retrospective comparative study with primary radical cystectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Aki; Koga, Fumitaka; Fujii, Yasuhisa; Masuda, Hitoshi; Saito, Kazutaka; Numao, Noboru; Sakura, Mizuaki; Kawakami, Satoru; Kihara, Kazunori

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare rates of early morbidity after radical cystectomy in patients treated with or without induction chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using a standardized reporting methodology. All 193 consecutive patients undergoing radical cystectomy for bladder cancer between 1989 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Induction chemoradiotherapy consists of radiation at 40 Gy to the small pelvis and two cycles of concurrent cisplatin at 20 mg/day for 5 days. Deaths within 90 days after radical cystectomy and complications arising within 30 days were recorded and graded according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Grades 1-2 were considered minor; Grades 3-5 were considered major. Eighty-seven patients underwent radical cystectomy following chemoradiotherapy (chemoradiotherapy group) while the remaining 106 primarily underwent radical cystectomy (no chemoradiotherapy group). No Grade 4-5 complication was observed. Overall, 118 patients (61%) experienced 36 major and 122 minor complications. There was no significant difference in the incidence of overall complications between the chemoradiotherapy and no chemoradiotherapy groups (67 vs. 57%). Overall urinary anastomosis-related complications and major gastrointestinal complications, most of which were Grade 3 ileus, were more frequent in the chemoradiotherapy group than the no chemoradiotherapy group (11 vs. 2%, P=0.007; and 14 vs. 4%, P=0.02; respectively). Multivariate analysis identified induction chemoradiotherapy as an independent risk factor for overall urinary anastomosis-related complications (relative risk 6.0, P=0.01) but not for major gastrointestinal complications. Induction chemoradiotherapy at 40 Gy in bladder-sparing protocols against MIBC is unlikely to increase the rate of severe complications of radical cystectomy. (author)

  19. Body position and late postoperative nocturnal hypoxaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg-Adamsen, S; Stausholm, K; Edvardsen, L

    1997-01-01

    Thirteen patients were monitored for nocturnal body position (supine vs. side) and arterial oxygen saturation pre-operatively and on the second postoperative night after major abdominal surgery. The number of positional changes were significantly decreased after operation (p ... position than on the side (p movements....... towards more time spent in the supine position (p = 0.1). Individual mean arterial oxygen saturation decreased postoperatively (p positions (p = 0.9). Pre-operatively, episodic desaturations were significantly more frequent in the supine...

  20. Methodological issues of postoperative cognitive dysfunction research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Kamilia S; Steinmetz, Jacob; Rasmussen, Lars S

    2010-01-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a subtle impairment of memory, concentration, and speed of information processing. It is a frequent complication following surgery and can have a debilitating effect on patients' recovery and future prognosis. Neuropsychological testing is needed...... to reveal postoperative cognitive decline, and questionnaires are not useful for this purpose. There is a profound lack of consensus regarding the research methodology for detection of cognitive deterioration, especially the diagnostic criteria. Issues, such as baseline performance, learning effects...

  1. [Post-operative infections after cosmetic tourism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst-Albrechtsen, Sine; Sørensen, Lene Birk; Juel, Jacob

    2018-06-11

    Cosmetic tourism is defined as patient mobility across borders, typically constituted by patients seeking cosmetic surgery at lower costs abroad. The most common procedures are abdominoplasty, fat grafting and breast augmentation. Very little is known about the complication rates after cosmetic tourism, and there is a paucity of evidence in all aspects of cosmetic tourism. In this review, we focus on post-operative complications i.e. post-operative infections, in particular with rare microorganisms such as mycobacteria.

  2. Nursing approaches in the postoperative pain management

    OpenAIRE

    Sevilay Yüceer

    2011-01-01

    Patients frequently experience moderate to severe pain inthe postoperative period. Although the pain managementis an integral and important part of the nursing care, studiessuggest that, nursing management of postoperativepain remains inadequate.Postoperative care nurses are responsible to assess thepatient’s pain, teach the patient strategies to deal with thepain, apply the analgesic treatment plan, monitor the resultsof treatment, educate the patient and the family onpain management and doc...

  3. Circadian variation in unexpected postoperative death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J; Pedersen, M H; Ramsing, T

    1992-01-01

    Unexpected deaths still occur following major surgical procedures. The cause is often unknown but may be cardiac or thromboembolic in nature. Postoperative ischaemia, infarction and sudden cardiac death may be triggered by episodic or constant arterial hypoxaemia, which increases during the night...... deaths occurred at night-time. These results suggest a need for further studies of sleep- and respiration-related effects on postoperative nocturnal cardiac function. The efficacy of monitoring during this apparent high-risk period should be evaluated....

  4. Preoperative nutrition status and postoperative outcome in elderly general surgery patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Stijn, Mireille F M; Korkic-Halilovic, Ines; Bakker, Marjan S M; van der Ploeg, Tjeerd; van Leeuwen, Paul A M; Houdijk, Alexander P J

    2013-01-01

    Poor nutrition status is considered a risk factor for postoperative complications in the adult population. In elderly patients, who often have a poor nutrition status, this relationship has not been substantiated. Thus, the aim of this systematic review was to assess the merit of preoperative nutrition parameters used to predict postoperative outcome in elderly patients undergoing general surgery. A systematic literature search of 10 consecutive years, 1998-2008, in PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases was performed. Search terms used were nutrition status, preoperative assessment, postoperative outcome, and surgery (hip or general), including their synonyms and MeSH terms. Limits used in the search were human studies, published in English, and age (65 years or older). Articles were screened using inclusion and exclusion criteria. All selected articles were checked on methodology and graded. Of 463 articles found, 15 were included. They showed profound heterogeneity in the parameters used for preoperative nutrition status and postoperative outcome. The only significant preoperative predictors of postoperative outcome in elderly general surgery patients were serum albumin and ≥ 10% weight loss in the previous 6 months. This systematic review revealed only 2 preoperative parameters to predict postoperative outcome in elderly general surgery patients: weight loss and serum albumin. Both are open to discussion in their use as a preoperative nutrition parameter. Nonetheless, serum albumin seems a reliable preoperative parameter to identify a patient at risk for nutrition deterioration and related complicated postoperative course.

  5. Risk factors for postoperative liver failure after hepatectomy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yoshitaka; Nishida, Minekatsu; Takao, Takashi; Mori, Naohide; Tamesa, Takao; Tangoku, Akira; Oka, Masaaki

    2004-01-01

    Selection of patients for hepatectomy for hepatocellular carcinoma conventionally has been based upon Child-Pugh grading. However, postoperative liver failure after hepatectomy is a major cause of hospital mortality. A new predictor of postoperative liver failure is required. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors for postoperative liver failure after hepatectomy. Perioperative risk factors for liver failure after hepatectomy were analyzed in 112 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma Eight of these patients died of liver failure. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression was performed to investigate significant independent factors among 17 variables, including the serum alkaline phosphatase ratio (ALPR) on the first day after hepatectomy. ALPR was calculated as the postoperative ALP level divided by the ALP level before surgery. Significant risk factors of postoperative liver failure were ALPR on postoperative day 1 (ALPR1), sex, operative blood loss, and operative procedure. As an indicator of liver failure, the diagnostic accuracy of the ALPR1 was 93.7% when the ALPR was less than 0.4 on the first postoperative day. The ALPR and the serum total bilirubin concentration after hepatectomy were uncorrelated. ALPR1 is a useful predictor of liver failure after hepatectomy.

  6. Influence of Modest Endotoxemia on Postoperative Antithrombin Deficiency and Circulating Secretory Immunoglobulin A Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Tetsuji; Imai, Takashi; Anazawa, Sadao

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the influence of modest endotoxemia on postoperative antithrombin deficiency and cholestasis. Summary Background Data: It has not been determined whether endotoxin translocation in small amounts is a physiological phenomenon or whether it is a potential health hazard. Methods: Blood endotoxin, antithrombin III (ATIII), secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA), which was selected as a marker of cholestasis, C-reactive protein (CRP), and α-1-antitrypsin (AAT) concentrations were measured from the 20 patients undergoing curative gastrectomy for gastric cancer preoperatively and postoperatively. Portal and systemic blood samples were taken for the analysis of endotoxin and interleukin-6 (IL-6) concentrations during surgery in these patients. Results: Although plasma endotoxin levels showed a significant increase during surgery, we did not find a correlation with ATIII, sIgA, CRP, and IL-6 levels. Systemic blood endotoxin levels during surgery correlated with a postoperative rise of serum AAT levels. Plasma ATIII levels transiently decreased on the first and third postoperative day, and sIgA levels were shown to increase on the seventh postoperative day. There was a weak relationship between the extent of postoperative endotoxemia and a reduction in ATIII concentrations. Conclusions: The influence of modest endotoxemia on postoperative antithrombin deficiency and cholestasis was limited, and increased translocational endotoxemia during abdominal surgery may be a physiological phenomenon to trigger off an acute-phase protein response. PMID:12894020

  7. Postoperative information needs and communication barriers of esophageal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henselmans, Inge; Jacobs, Marc; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I; de Haes, Hanneke C J M; Sprangers, Mirjam A G; Smets, Ellen M A

    2012-07-01

    Given the poor prognosis of esophageal cancer and the impact of surgery on health-related quality of life (HRQL), addressing patients' postoperative information needs is important. This study aimed to examine (1) the content and type of patients' information needs and (2) patient perceived facilitators and barriers to patient participation. Interviews were conducted with 20 purposefully selected esophageal cancer patients. Open and structured questions were alternated. The transcribed interviews were analysed inductively and deductively, using MAXqda. Patients' post-operative information needs concerned HRQL, medical care and prognosis, covering several sub-domains. Different types of needs were identified, e.g., requests for information about cause, course and self-management. Barriers to patient participation mostly reflected beliefs and skills, and could be categorized into agenda and communication barriers. Facilitators of patient participation reflected physician, patient and interaction characteristics, companion support and pre-visit preparation. Many patients saw merit in pre-visit preparation interventions; few endorsed skill-building interventions. This study listed the postoperative information needs of esophageal cancer patients. Moreover, it gained insight into patient-perceived barriers and facilitators of patient participation. The findings demonstrate what information physicians should have available and informs interventions to support patients in meeting their information needs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The preventive effect of Rofecoxib in postoperative intraperitoneal adhesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldemir, M; Oztürk, H; Erten, C; Büyükbayram, H

    2004-02-01

    Previous studies showed that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAI) drugs suppressed prostaglandin synthesis and were able to prevent adhesion formation following surgical trauma to the peritoneum. The selective suppression inflammatory cascade may prevent adhesion formation. Therefore, we planned this study to experimentally evaluate the effects of Rofecoxib, the selective cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitor, in postoperative intraperitoneal adhesions in an animal model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups of 10. All rats underwent midline laparotomy under ketamine anaesthesia (25 mg/kg im). In group 1 (n = 10), the sham operation group (SG); abdominal walls were closed without any process after 2 minutes. In Group 2 (n = 10), the control group (CG); standard serosal damage was constituted and the abdominal wall was closed. In group 3 (n = 10), the COX-2 group (COXG), after serosal damage, the abdominal wall was closed. A 12 mg/kg/day dose of was given orally to the rats during one week. On the 7th postoperative day, all rats were sacrificed and intra-abdominal adhesions were evaluated both macroscopically and microscopically. Macroscopically, no serious adhesion formations were seen in the SG. Multiple adhesion formations of the CG were significantly more than those of the SG (p < 0.0001). It was determined that adhesions of the COXG diminished (p < 0.0001) when macromorphological adhesion scale results of the COXG were compared with those of the CG. The adhesion scores of the CG were compared microscopically with those of the COXG and granulation tissue formation and fibrosis in the COXG were found to be significantly less than those of the CG (respectively p = 0.002, p < 0.0001). We were of the opinion that Rofecoxib, the selective cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, was effective in the prevention of postoperative peritoneal adhesions.

  9. [Clinical efficacy of alternating chemo-radiotherapy for locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Xi; Yang, Yucheng

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effective of alternating Chemo-radiotherapy for locally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma. Retrospective analysis 106 cases of patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma between November 2005 and March 2007. All patients received cisplatin-based chemotherapy but 15 patients received radiotherapy(RT) alone. Inducing chemotherapy (IC) + RT + adju-vant chemotherapy (AC) regimen in 36 patients, IC+RT regimen was delivered in 25 patients and AC + RT regimen in 30 patients. 61 patients received 1 to 2 cycles of inducing chemotherapy and 66 patients received 3 to 6 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy after radiotherapy. Chemotherapy started on the first day after the end of the induction chemotherapy, adjuvant chemotherapy begun after radiotherapy for a week. All patients were treated by radiotherapy using 60 Co r-ray, the nasophyarynx primary site was given a total does of 68 -74 Gy. The lymph nodes of the neck was given 60 to 70 Gy. The prophylactic irradiation does of the neck was 48-50 Gy. RESCULT: The median follow up time was 51 months. A total of 58 patients died, the overall survival rate was 45% in whole groups. The 5-year overall survival rates were 33%, 63%, 60% and 50% in RT, IC + RT + AC, IC + RT and RT+AC group, respectively. The 5-year disease-free survival rates were 13%, 56%, 48% and 40% in RT, IC + RT + AC, IC + RT and RT + AC group, respectively. The 5-year relapse-free survival rates were 13%, 53%, 48% and 50% in RT, IC + RT + AC, IC + RT and RT + AC group, respectively. The 5-year metastasis-free survival rates were 6%, 50%, 44% and 47% in RT, IC + RT + AC, IC+ RT and RT + AC group, respectively. There was significant difference in all groups (P 0.05). IC + RT + AC group had heavier acute toxicity effects than other groups, but it did not affect the treatment process, all patients could be tolerated. This retrospective study has demonstrated that alternating Chemo-radiotherapy and early

  10. Acute Cardiac Impairment Associated With Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Esophageal Cancer: Magnetic Resonance Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatakenaka, Masamitsu; Yonezawa, Masato; Nonoshita, Takeshi; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Nagao, Michinobu; Matsuo, Yoshio; Kamitani, Takeshi; Higo, Taiki; Nishikawa, Kei; Setoguchi, Taro; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate acute cardiac effects of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: This prospective study was approved by the institutional review board, and written informed consent was obtained from all participants. The left ventricular function (LVF) of 31 patients with esophageal cancer who received cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil–based CCRT was evaluated using cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging. The patients were classified into two groups according to mean LV dose. The parameters related to LVF were compared between before and during (40 Gy) or between before and after CCRT using a Wilcoxon matched-pairs single rank test, and parameter ratios (during/before CCRT, after/before CCRT) were also compared between the groups with a t test. Data were expressed as mean ± SE. Results: In the low LV-dose group (n = 10; mean LV dose 2 ), LV stroke volume index (38.6 ± 1.56 vs. 29.9 ± 1.60 mL/m 2 ), and LV ejection fraction (56.9% ± 1.79% vs. 52.8% ± 1.15%) decreased significantly (p < 0.05) after CCRT. Heart rate increased significantly (before vs. during vs. after CCRT; 66.8 ± 3.05 vs. 72.4 ± 4.04 vs. 85.4 ± 3.75 beats per minute, p < 0.01). Left ventricle wall motion decreased significantly (p < 0.05) in segments 8 (before vs. during vs. after CCRT; 6.64 ± 0.54 vs. 4.78 ± 0.43 vs. 4.79 ± 0.50 mm), 9 (6.88 ± 0.45 vs. 5.04 ± 0.38 vs. 5.27 ± 0.47 mm), and 10 (9.22 ± 0.48 vs. 8.08 ± 0.34 vs. 8.19 ± 0.56 mm). The parameter ratios of LV end-diastolic volume index, stroke volume index, wall motion in segment 9, and heart rate showed significant difference (p < 0.05) after CCRT between the groups. Conclusions: Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer impairs LVF from an early treatment stage. This impairment is prominent in patients with high LV dose.

  11. Conservative treatment of rectal cancer with local excision and postoperative radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minsky, B.D.

    1995-01-01

    The conventional surgical treatment for patients with potentially curable transmural and/or node positive rectal cancer is a low anterior resection or abdominoperineal resection. Recently, there has been increasing interest in the use of local excision and postoperative radiation therapy as primary therapy for selected rectal cancers. The limited data suggest that the approach of local excision and postoperative radiation therapy should be limited to patients with either T 1 tumours with adverse pathological factors or T 2 tumours. Transmural tumours, which have a 24% local failure rate, are treated more effectively with standard surgery and pre- or postoperative therapy. The results of local excision and postoperative radiation therapy are encouraging, but more experience is needed to determine if this approach ultimately has similar local control and survival rates as standard surgery. (author)

  12. Detection of residual disease after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for oesophageal cancer (preSANO): a prospective multicentre, diagnostic cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordman, Bo Jan; Spaander, Manon C W; Valkema, Roelf; Wijnhoven, Bas P L; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I; Shapiro, Joël; Biermann, Katharina; van der Gaast, Ate; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Hulshof, Maarten C C M; Krishnadath, Kausilia K; Lagarde, Sjoerd M; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A P; Oostenbrug, Liekele E; Siersema, Peter D; Schoon, Erik J; Sosef, Meindert N; Steyerberg, Ewout W; van Lanschot, J Jan B

    2018-05-31

    After neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for oesophageal cancer, roughly half of the patients with squamous cell carcinoma and a quarter of those with adenocarcinoma have a pathological complete response of the primary tumour before surgery. Thus, the necessity of standard oesophagectomy after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy should be reconsidered for patients who respond sufficiently to neoadjuvant treatment. In this study, we aimed to establish the accuracy of detection of residual disease after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy with different diagnostic approaches, and the optimal combination of diagnostic techniques for clinical response evaluations. The preSANO trial was a prospective, multicentre, diagnostic cohort study at six centres in the Netherlands. Eligible patients were aged 18 years or older, had histologically proven, resectable, squamous cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus or oesophagogastric junction, and were eligible for potential curative therapy with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (five weekly cycles of carboplatin [area under the curve 2 mg/mL per min] plus paclitaxel [50 mg/m 2 of body-surface area] combined with 41·4 Gy radiotherapy in 23 fractions) followed by oesophagectomy. 4-6 weeks after completion of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy, patients had oesophagogastroduodenoscopy with biopsies and endoscopic ultrasonography with measurement of maximum tumour thickness. Patients with histologically proven locoregional residual disease or no-pass during endoscopy and without distant metastases underwent immediate surgical resection. In the remaining patients a second clinical response evaluation was done (PET-CT, oesophagogastroduodenoscopy with biopsies, endoscopic ultrasonography with measurement of maximum tumour thickness, and fine-needle aspiration of suspicious lymph nodes), followed by surgery 12-14 weeks after completion of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. The primary endpoint was the correlation between clinical response during

  13. Postoperative evaluation of penetrating hepatic trauma and complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecklitner, M.L.; Dittman, W.

    1984-01-01

    Postoperative hepatobiliary scintigraphy is recommended in selected cases of hepatic trauma to evaluate the integrity and patency of the biliary system. The authors present a patient with a traumatic hematoma that eventuated in a biloma with spontaneous biliary-cutaneous fistula. Repeat study demonstrated biliary obstruction at the canalicular level, which by more invasive imaging was found secondary to toal obstruction of the common hepatic duct. The precise anatomical level and cause of his obstruction were defined by the findings of endoscopic retrograde cannulation of the pancreas, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiongraphy, and surgery

  14. Split-course chemoradiotherapy with S-1, a novel oral fluorouracil, and cisplatin for distant metastases of oesophageal cancer stage IVb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwase H

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of split-course chemoradiotherapy with S-1, a novel oral fluorouracil, together with cisplatin in patients with distant oesophageal cancer stage IVb metastasis. Methods: Forty-one patients with distant oesophageal cancer metastasis and performance status 0 or 1 received split-course chemoradiotherapy with S-1 and cisplatin. All 41 patients were reviewed retrospectively. Chemoradiotherapy comprised two courses of 30-Gy radiotherapy over three weeks plus daily oral S-1 (70mg/m2/day for two weeks and a 24 h cisplatin infusion (70mg/m2 on Day 8, with a two week interval between the two courses. Results: The most frequent adverse events (AEs were grade 3 and 4 neutropenia (29.2%, thrombocytopenia (9.8%, and anaemia (7.3%. Non-haematological AEs were generally mild. AEs in the initial course of chemoradiotherapy remitted during the second interval week. Overall, the complete response rate was 22.0% and endoscopic complete response rate for primary lesion was 65.9%. Thirty-one patients (75.6% became asymptomatic and regained normal swallowing function. The overall median survival time was 12 months. Conclusion: This retrospective investigation showed that split-course chemoradiotherapy with S-1 and cisplatin had an encouraging safety profile together with good efficacy. Potentially, this regimen may become a standard for distant metastasis of oesophageal cancer stage IVb.

  15. Correlation between expression of MVP, index of p53 and AgNOR value with chemoradiotherapy clinical response of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurnia, I.; Tetriana, D.; Siregar, B.; Ramli, I.; Andrijono, A.; Soetopo, S.; Kurjana, T.; Hernowo, B.S.; Tobing, M.D.M.

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the most frequent cancer found in Indonesia. The primary treatment of cervical cancer at the locally advanced stage is usually performed by using radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The combination of the two techniques is often called chemoradiotherapy. The response to chemoradiotherapy is influenced by biological and physical factors. Major vault protein (MVP) is a ribonucleoprotein which contributes to drug resistance in some cancers. The purposes of this research were: (1) to determine the correlation between the expression of MVP and the index of p53, including AgNOR values and index of MIB-1; and (2) between MVP and chemoradiotherapy clinical response of cervical cancer. Twenty-one microscopic slides taken from biopsy tissues of cervical cancer patients before undergoing treatment were stained to identify MVP, p53, and MIB-1 by means of immunohistochemistry techniques and AgNORs staining. After undergoing chemoradiotherapy treatment, the patients’ clinical responses were observed by pelvic control method. Experimental results showed that there was a correlation between MVP and AgNOR value (P=0.05), but no correlation between MVP and index of p53 (P=0.729), including MIB-1 LI (P=0.63), in untreated cervical cancer. In addition, there was no association between MVP and chemoradiotherapy response. In conclusion, MVP expression correlates with the process of cell proliferation before the G2 phase of cell cycle in untreated cancer cells. Those have no association with clinical responses after the completion of treatment. (author)

  16. Postoperative radiation therapy for adenoid cystic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguchi, Masahiko; Shikama, Naoto; Gomi, Koutarou; Shinoda, Atsunori; Nishikawa, Atsushi; Arakawa, Kazukiyo; Sasaki, Shigeru; Takei, Kazuyoshi; Sone, Syusuke

    2000-01-01

    The authors retrospectively assessed the usefulness of postoperative radiation therapy after local resection of adenoid cystic carcinoma, with emphasis on organ-conserving treatment and the cosmetic results. Between 1985 and 1995, 32 patients underwent local resection followed by postoperative radiation therapy with curative and organ-conserving intent. None of patients received any form of chemotherapy as part of their initial treatment. Radiation therapy was carried out by techniques that were appropriate for the site and extension of each tumor. The 5-year local control, disease-free, and overall survival rates of all patients were 76%, 68%, and 86%, respectively. The 5-year local control rate and disease-free survival rate of patients with microscopically positive margins were 89% and 75%, respectively, and higher than in patients with macroscopically residual disease, but no significant difference in 5-year overall survival rate was observed. The postoperative cosmetic results in 29 patients with head and neck lesions were evaluated. No difference was documented between the cosmetic results postoperatively setting and after postoperative radiotherapy, and no significant differences in cosmetic results were observed according to radiation dose. The combination of local resection with organ-conserving intent and postoperative radiation therapy provided good cosmetic results in patients with T1 or T2 lesions. Postoperative radiation therapy with smaller fractions is useful, because good local control can be achieved in patients with adenoid cystic carcinoma having microscopically positive margins without inducing any late adverse reactions. However, the number of patients was too small and the follow-up period was too short to draw any definite conclusion in regard to fraction size. A much longer follow-up study with a larger number patients will be required to accurately determine the optimal treatment intensity and duration of treatment. (K.H.)

  17. Docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy alone in stage III-IV unresectable head and neck cancer. Results of a randomized phase II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takacsi-Nagy, Zoltan; Polgar, Csaba; Major, Tibor; Fodor, Janos [National Institute of Oncology, Center of Radiotherapy, Budapest (Hungary); Hitre, Erika [National Institute of Oncology, Department of Chemotherapy and Clinical Pharmacology, Budapest (Hungary); Remenar, Eva; Kasler, Miklos [National Institute of Oncology, Department of Head and Neck and Maxillofacial Surgery, Budapest (Hungary); Oberna, Ferenc [Bacs-Kiskun County Hospital, Department of Oral, Maxillofacial and Head and Neck Surgery, Kecskemet (Hungary); Goedeny, Maria [National Institute of Oncology, Department of Radiology, Budapest (Hungary)

    2015-08-15

    adequate patient selection if ICT is considered. (orig.) [German] Simultane Chemoradiotherapie (CRT) ist eine Standardtherapie beim fortgeschrittenen Plattenepithelkarzinom im Kopf-Hals-Bereich. In dieser randomisierten Phase-II-Studie wurden die Wirksamkeit und Toxizitaet einer Induktionschemotherapie (ICT) mit Docetaxel, Cisplatin und 5-Fluorouracil gefolgt von simultaner CRT mit der CRT allein bei Patienten mit lokal fortgeschrittenen, irresektablen Kopf-Hals-Tumoren verglichen. Zwischen Januar 2007 und Juni 2009 wurden 66 Patienten mit fortgeschrittenem (Stadium III oder IV), inoperablem Plattenepithelkarzinom im Kopf-Hals-Bereich (Mundhoehle, Oropharynx, Hypopharynx, Larynx) nach dem Zufallsprinzip in 2 Gruppen eingeteilt. Die eine Gruppe erhielt 2 Zyklen der Docetaxel-, Cisplatin- und 5-Fluorouracil-ICT gefolgt von CRT mit 3 Zyklen Cisplatin, die andere Gruppe erhielt nur CRT. Ansprechrate, lokale Tumorkontrolle (LTC), lokoregionale Tumorkontrolle (LRTC), Gesamtueberleben (OS), progressionsfreies Ueberleben (PFS) und toxischer Effekt wurden verglichen. Drei Patienten der Gruppe mit ICT + CRT erschienen bei der ersten Behandlung nicht, so dass insgesamt 63 Patienten in der Studie ausgewertet wurden (30 in der Gruppe ICT + CRT, 33 in der CRT-Gruppe). Drei Patienten starben an febriler Neutropenie nach ICT. Die mediane Nachbeobachtungszeit der ueberlebenden Patienten betrug 63 Monate (Spanne 53-82 Monate). Die Rate des radiologischen vollstaendigen Ansprechens war 63 % nach ICT + CRT vs. 70 % nach CRT allein. Es gab keinen signifikanten Unterschied in der 3-Jahres-Rate bei LTC (56 vs. 57 %), LRTC (42 vs. 50 %), OS (43 vs. 55 %) und PFS (41 vs. 50 %) zwischen der Gruppe mit ICT + CRT und den mit CRT behandelten Patienten. Die Rate von Neutropenie mit einem Grad 3-4 lag in der Gruppe mit ICT + CRT deutlich hoeher als in der CRT-Gruppe (37 und 12 %; p = 0,024). Spaete Toxizitaet (Grad-2- und Grad-3-Xerostomie) ereignete sich in der Gruppe mit ICT + CRT und in der CRT

  18. Postoperative infections in craniofacial reconstructive procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialkov, J A; Holy, C; Forrest, C R; Phillips, J H; Antonyshyn, O M

    2001-07-01

    The rate of, and possible risk factors for, postoperative craniofacial infection is unclear. To investigate this problem, we reviewed 349 cases of craniofacial skeletal procedures performed from 1996 to 1999 at our institution. Infection rate was determined and correlated with the use of implants, operative site, and cause of deformity. The inclusion criteria consisted of all procedures requiring autologous or prosthetic implantation in craniofacial skeletal sites, as well as all procedures involving bone or cartilage resection, osteotomies, debridement, reduction and/or fixation. Procedures that did not involve bone or cartilage surgery were excluded. The criteria for diagnosis of infection included clinical confirmation and one or more of 1) intravenous or oral antibiotic treatment outside of the prophylactic surgical regimen; 2) surgical intervention for drainage, irrigation, and or debridement; and 3) microbiological confirmation. Among the 280 surgical cases that fit the inclusion criteria and had complete records, there were 23 cases of postoperative infection (8.2%). The most common site for postoperative infection was the mandible (infection rate = 16.7%). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed gunshot wound to be the most significant predictor of postoperative infection. Additionally, porous polyethylene implantation through a transoral route was correlated with a significant risk of postoperative infection.

  19. Depressive Symptoms and Risk of Postoperative Delirium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Patrick J; Attix, Deborah K; Weldon, B Craig; Monk, Terri G

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that elevated depressive symptoms are associated with increased risk of postoperative delirium. However, to our knowledge no previous studies have examined whether different components of depression are differentially predictive of postoperative delirium. One thousand twenty patients were screened for postoperative delirium using the Confusion Assessment Method and through retrospective chart review. Patients underwent cognitive, psychosocial, and medical assessments preoperatively. Depression was assessed using the Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form. Thirty-eight patients developed delirium (3.7%). Using a factor structure previously validated among geriatric medical patients, the authors examined three components of depression as predictors of postoperative delirium: negative affect, cognitive distress, and behavioral inactivity. In multivariate analyses controlling for age, education, comorbidities, and cognitive function, the authors found that greater behavioral inactivity was associated with increased risk of delirium (OR: 1.95 [1.11, 3.42]), whereas negative affect (OR: 0.65 [0.31, 1.36]) and cognitive distress (OR: 0.95 [0.63, 1.43]) were not. Different components of depression are differentially predictive of postoperative delirium among adults undergoing noncardiac surgery. Copyright © 2016 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy for anal canal epidermoid cancer in our center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obara, Kunihiko; Sahara, Rikisaburo; Yamana, Tetsuro; Okamoto, Kinya; Takahashi, Tomoko; Furukawa, Satomi; Okada, Daisuke; Kaneko, Yasushi; Matsumoto, Atsuo

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of radiotherapy (RT) and chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for anal canal epidermoid cancer were evaluated. Twenty-four patients with anal canal epidermoid cancer were treated in our center between 1988 and 2006, consisting of 13 patients treated by RT and 11 by CRT. In these patients, the efficacy and safety of RT and CRT were evaluated in terms of adverse events, 5-year local control rates, 5-year disease-free survival rates, and 5-year survival rates. No grade 3 or higher adverse events were noted in patients receiving RT. In contrast, anorexia, diarrhea, neutropenia, and anemia were observed in 33.3%, 10%, 33.3%, and 10%, respectively, of the patients receiving CRT. The anal preserving rate, 5-year local control rate, 5-year disease-free survival rate, and 5-year survival rate were 66.7%, 73%, 77.5%, and 88.4%, respectively. RT and CRT for anal canal epidermoid cancer should be first-line treatments because of their safety and efficacy. (author)

  1. Faecal incontinence after chemoradiotherapy in anal cancer survivors: Long-term results of a national cohort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentzen, Anne Gry; Guren, Marianne G.; Vonen, Barthold; Wanderås, Eva H.; Frykholm, Gunilla; Wilsgaard, Tom; Dahl, Olav; Balteskard, Lise

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the prevalence and severity of faecal incontinence amongst anal cancer survivors after chemoradiotherapy. Material and methods: Anal cancer survivors from a complete, unselected, national cohort, minimum 2-years follow-up, were invited to a cross-sectional study. The St. Mark’s incontinence score was used to evaluate occurrence and degree of faecal incontinence the last four weeks. The results were compared to age- and sex-matched volunteers from the general population. Results: Of 199 invited survivors and 1211volunteers, 66% and 21%, respectively, signed informed consent. The survivors had significantly higher St. Mark’s score than the volunteers (mean 9.7 vs. 1.1, p < 0.001). Incontinence of stool of any degree was reported by 43% vs. 5% (OR 4.0, CI 2.73–6.01), and urgency was reported by 64% vs. 6% (OR 6.6, CI 4.38–9.90) of the survivors and volunteers, respectively. Only 29% of those with leakage of liquid stool used constipating drugs. Survivors of locally advanced tumours had a higher incontinence score (p < 0.01). Conclusions: Moderate to severe faecal incontinence is common amongst anal cancer survivors. Post-treatment follow-up should include the evaluation of continence, and incontinent survivors should be offered better symptom management and multidisciplinary approach if simple measures are insufficient

  2. Outcomes of preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer with invasion to the adjacent organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Harunobu; Koide, Yoshikazu; Shiota, Miho; Endo, Tomoyoshi; Matsuoka, Shinji; Hatta, Kouhei; Mizuno, Masahiro; Maeda, Koutarou; Toyama, Kunihiro

    2013-01-01

    We reviewed the clinical records of 13 patients who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of CRT for T4b rectal cancer. Preoperative radiotherapy consisted of 40-50 Gy delivered in fractions of 1.8-2.0 Gy per day, 5 days per week. Treatment with intravenous 5-fluorouracil, oral tegafur-uracil (UFT-E) with l-leucovorin, oral S-1, or intravenous irinotecan (CPT-11) with oral S-1 was administered during radiotherapy. At 63 days after CRT, 1 patient died because of pelvic abscess. Complete response (CR) or partial response (PR) was observed in 7 patients, 1 month after CRT. Curative surgery was performed in 9 patients. Among 10 patients who underwent surgery 70 days after CRT, 5 who showed PR 1 month after CRT underwent curative surgery; both urinary and anal function were preserved in 4 of these patients. Histological invasion to the adjacent organs was not observed in 6 patients, and 1 patient achieved histological CR. Of the 9 patients who underwent curative surgery, recurrence was observed in 2; however, the other patients survived without recurrence. Preoperative CRT was considered to be effective in improving the resection rate and prognosis in patients with T4b rectal cancer. However, careful attention should be paid to the severe toxicities associated with CRT, such as pelvic abscess. (author)

  3. Recursive Partitioning Analysis for New Classification of Patients With Esophageal Cancer Treated by Chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Motoo; Shitara, Kohei; Kodaira, Takeshi; Kondoh, Chihiro; Takahari, Daisuke; Ura, Takashi; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Kamata, Minoru; Muro, Kei; Sawada, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Background: The 7th edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system does not include lymph node size in the guidelines for staging patients with esophageal cancer. The objectives of this study were to determine the prognostic impact of the maximum metastatic lymph node diameter (ND) on survival and to develop and validate a new staging system for patients with esophageal squamous cell cancer who were treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods: Information on 402 patients with esophageal cancer undergoing CRT at two institutions was reviewed. Univariate and multivariate analyses of data from one institution were used to assess the impact of clinical factors on survival, and recursive partitioning analysis was performed to develop the new staging classification. To assess its clinical utility, the new classification was validated using data from the second institution. Results: By multivariate analysis, gender, T, N, and ND stages were independently and significantly associated with survival (p < 0.05). The resulting new staging classification was based on the T and ND. The four new stages led to good separation of survival curves in both the developmental and validation datasets (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Our results showed that lymph node size is a strong independent prognostic factor and that the new staging system, which incorporated lymph node size, provided good prognostic power, and discriminated effectively for patients with esophageal cancer undergoing CRT.

  4. Chemoradiotherapy of Anal Carcinoma: Survival and Recurrence in an Unselected National Cohort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentzen, Anne Gry; Guren, Marianne G.; Wanderås, Eva H.; Frykholm, Gunilla; Tveit, Kjell M.; Wilsgaard, Tom; Dahl, Olav; Balteskard, Lise

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate treatment results, elucidate whether national guidelines were followed, and identify areas demanding further treatment optimization. Methods and Material: Between July 2000 and June 2007, 328 patients were treated with curatively intended chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for nonmetastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the anal region, according to national treatment guidelines based on tumor stage. Results: Complete response after CRT was obtained in 87% of patients, rising to 93% after salvage surgery. Chemotherapy, elective irradiation of the groin and salvage surgery were performed to a lesser extent in elderly patients, mainly because of frailty and comorbidity. Recurrence occurred in 24% of the patients, resulting in a 3- and 5-year recurrence-free survival (RFS) of 79% and 74%, respectively. Locoregional recurrences dominated, most commonly in the primary tumor site. Recurrence was treated with curative intent in 45% of the cases. The 3- and 5-year overall survival were 79% and 66%, and cancer-specific survival (CSS) were 84% and 75%, respectively. The risk of adverse outcome increased significantly with more locally advanced tumors and for male gender in multivariable analyses for RFS and CSS. Conclusions: The treatment results are in accordance with similar cohorts. The primary treatment control rate was high, but there was a significant risk of locoregional recurrence in advanced tumors. The loyalty to national guidelines was broad, although individual adjustments occurred. However, caution to avoid toxicity must not lead to inadequate treatment. Male gender seems to have inferior outcome.

  5. Effectiveness of prophylactic percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy for oropharyngeal cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teshima, Masanori; Tanimoto, Hitoshi; Saito, Miki; Otsuki, Naoki; Sasaki, Ryohei; Kiyota, Naomi; Okuno, Shinya; Nibu, Ken-ichi

    2009-01-01

    Patients with head and neck carcinoma are often provided concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT), but they experience severe mucositis and dysphagia. These side effects can lead to decreased oral intake, resulting in interruption of treatment. In our hospital, from September 2007, all patients with oropharyngeal cancer who were to receive CCRT, were principally offered percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) before the start of treatment, and tube feeding was started when swallowing became impaired, to accomplish the treatment as planned. To evaluate the effect of prophylactic PEG, outcome measures in this study included the frequency of unplanned break from CCRT, nutritional deterioration and required analgesic during CCRT, complication of PEG, and patient satisfaction between 15 patients with PEG and 11 patients without PEG as a control group. Although no significant weight loss occurred in either group, there were fewer patients with a Body Mass Index <18.5 in the PEG group after CCRT than in the control group. Regarding the treatment, most patients were satisfied with their PEG and considered that prophylactic PEG was necessary and helpful in completing the CCRT. This study suggests that prophylactic PEG helps patients to complete CCRT both mentally and nutritionally. (author)

  6. Increasing antitumor effects of chemoradiotherapy by drug efflux inhibition with encapsulated anti-RLIP-76

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Satoshi; Ehara, Shigeru; Ishii, Keizo

    2011-01-01

    Microencapsulated anti-RLIP76 was tested in vivo using C3He/J mice to determine the increasing of antitumor effects by chemotherapeutic agent efflux inhibition during chemoradiotherapy. Microcapsules were produced by spraying a mixture of 3.0% hyaluronic acid, 2.0% alginate, 3.0% H 2 O 2 , and 0.3 mmol carboplatin onto a mixture of 0.3 mol FeCl 2 and 0.15 mol CaCl 2 . Microcapsules were subcutaneously injected into MM46 tumors previously inoculated into the left hind legs of C3He/J mice. Subsequent radiotherapy consisted of tumor irradiation with 10 Gy or 20 Gy 60 Co. The antitumor effects of microcapsules were tested by measuring tumor size and monitoring tumor growth. Three types of adverse effects were considered: fuzzy hair, loss of body weight, and mortality. Carboplatin levels were monitored using particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and a micro-PIXE camera. Anti-RLIP76 inhibited the efflux of carboplatin from tumor tissue, which led to an increase in the concentration of carboplatin. Higher carboplatin concentration significantly increased the combined antitumor effect of radiation and chemotherapy. A significant decrease in adverse effects was also observed with microencapsulated anti-RLIP76. (author)

  7. Efficacy and safety of chemoradiotherapy when performed by head and neck surgeon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Kazuto; Sagai, Shun; Katagiri, Katsunori; Imai, Takayuki; Ishida, Eiichi; Saijo, Shigeru; Shiga, Kiyoto

    2011-01-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) has been recognized as a standard treatment for the local advanced SCCHN. We perform 40-50 CCRT annually during operations on more than 230 patients in our division. CCRT with high-dose single-agent cisplatin is now the standard of care for nonsurgical treatment for local advanced SCCHN. We use a similar method for eligible cases. All patients were able to receive the full dose of radiotherapy (70 Gy) and completed at least two courses chemotherapy. We were able to perform this regimen with sufficient supportive care. This regimen is feasible for the treatment of Japanese patients with SCCHN, and does not require the modification of the treatment plan to account for racial differences. The introduction of this regimen is expected in the future in many other institutions in Japan. The new CCRT menu has been made by prospective clinical studies and requires a multicenter study. It is necessary to give an opinion from a surgical viewpoint with respect to the structure of the protocol and such matters to clinical oncologists who are expert in protocol formation. Head and neck surgeons constitute the treatment team for patients with head and neck cancer and should control the treatment plan. (author)

  8. Clinical outcome of chemoradiotherapy for T1G3 bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Masaharu; Ishioka, Jun-ichiro; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Kageyama, Yukio; Saito, Yoshihiro; Higashi, Yotsuo

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the clinical outcome of a bladder-sparing approach using chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for T1G3 bladder cancer. Between May 2000 and August 2007, 11 patients with T1G3 bladder cancer and who were negative for macroscopic residual tumor were treated by CRT after transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TUR-Bt). Pelvic irradiation was given at a dose of 40 Gy in 4 weeks. Intra-arterial administration of cisplatin and systemic administration of methotrexate were carried out in the first and third weeks of radiotherapy. One month after CRT, response was evaluated by restaging TUR-Bt. For persistent tumor after CRT or tumor recurrence, patients received additional treatment. Median follow-up was 21.2 months. Complete response was achieved in 10 of 11 patients (90.9%). Local recurrence for the entire group of 11 patients was 22.1% at both 2 and 5 years. Tumor progression was 0% at 5 years. Disease-specific survival rates were 100% at 5 years. All of survivors retained functioning bladders. Bladder preservation by CRT is a curative treatment option for T1G3 bladder cancer and a reasonable alternative to intravesical treatment or early cystectomy. (author)

  9. Concurrent chemo-radiotherapy for stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Ryuji; Takada, Yoshiki; Obayashi, Kayoko; Kado, Tetsuji; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Hirota, Saeko; Soejima, Toshinori; Suzuki, Yasushi; Mimura, Fumitoshi [Hyogo Medical Center for Adult Disease, Akashi (Japan)

    1994-12-01

    In patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer, we performed chemotherapy and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy. Thirty-five registered patients were intravenously treated with cisplatin (80mg/m{sup 2}) on day 1 and vindesine (3mg/m{sup 2}) on days 1, 3 and were irradiated from days 1 to 10 with single doses of 2.5 Gy up to a total dosage of 20 Gy. Each course lasted 28 days. Patients received 3 courses, and a total dosage of 60 Gy was delivered. Response to this treatment was evaluable in terms of results in 35 patients. Twenty-two patients showed partial response (response rate 62.9%), 10 had no change, and 3 cases had progressive disease. In 7.5 to 37.8 months observation, three PR patients are alive for more than 24 months without recurrence, but eight PR patients died of local relapse, and the median survival time was 15.7 months. Throughout this treatment course, grade 4 leukopenia was noted in 66% and grade 3 thrombocytopenia was observed in 3%. However all were reversible condition and no treatment-related death was observed. However, two cases died due to complications of pulmonary abscess, which occurred in the area of radiation pulmonary fibrosis about one year later after treatment. Although this concurrent chemo-radiotherapy is a tolerable treatment for non-small cell lung cancer and obtained a good response rate, it did not improve the survival rate. (author).

  10. Concurrent chemo-radiotherapy for stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Ryuji; Takada, Yoshiki; Obayashi, Kayoko; Kado, Tetsuji; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Hirota, Saeko; Soejima, Toshinori; Suzuki, Yasushi; Mimura, Fumitoshi

    1994-01-01

    In patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer, we performed chemotherapy and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy. Thirty-five registered patients were intravenously treated with cisplatin (80mg/m 2 ) on day 1 and vindesine (3mg/m 2 ) on days 1, 3 and were irradiated from days 1 to 10 with single doses of 2.5 Gy up to a total dosage of 20 Gy. Each course lasted 28 days. Patients received 3 courses, and a total dosage of 60 Gy was delivered. Response to this treatment was evaluable in terms of results in 35 patients. Twenty-two patients showed partial response (response rate 62.9%), 10 had no change, and 3 cases had progressive disease. In 7.5 to 37.8 months observation, three PR patients are alive for more than 24 months without recurrence, but eight PR patients died of local relapse, and the median survival time was 15.7 months. Throughout this treatment course, grade 4 leukopenia was noted in 66% and grade 3 thrombocytopenia was observed in 3%. However all were reversible condition and no treatment-related death was observed. However, two cases died due to complications of pulmonary abscess, which occurred in the area of radiation pulmonary fibrosis about one year later after treatment. Although this concurrent chemo-radiotherapy is a tolerable treatment for non-small cell lung cancer and obtained a good response rate, it did not improve the survival rate. (author)

  11. Multiple primary malignant neoplasms in patients treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Keishi; Muto, Manabu; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Mera, Kiyomi; Doi, Toshihiko; Sano, Yasushi; Yoshida, Shigeaki

    2003-01-01

    We reviewed our clinical experiences of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for esophageal cancer (EC) in 44 patients with multiple primary malignant neoplasms. Among them, 34 were accompanied with synchronous tumors, 8 were accompanied with antecedent tumors and 8 with subsequent tumors. The sites of primary malignant neoplasms were as follows; stomach 24 (43.6%), head and neck 17 (30.9%), colon and rectum 4 (7.3%). Among the 19 patients with synchronous cancer in the stomach, 6 patients underwent gastrectomy or endoscopic mucosal resection before CRT, and the others received definitive CRT as initial treatment. While 5 patients were alive without recurrence of EC and gastric cancer, more than half of the patients died of EC. Among 11 patients with head and neck cancer (HNC), 9 patients underwent surgery for HNC before CRT, because the clinical stages of the HNC was more progressive than that of EC. Only 3 patients achieved complete cure of both EC and HNC. The number of patients who developed subsequent tumors after CRT for EC was too small for us to draw definitive conclusions from our discussion, so further long-term follow-up and analysis based on large-scale surveys are required. Although CRT has become one of the standard treatments for EC, there is no treatment strategy for patients with both EC and other malignant primary neoplasms. Our results suggest that we should consider the curability of EC by CRT when we treat such patients. (author)

  12. Dysphagia and mucositis after concurrent chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuneyuki, Miki; Maeda, Tatsuyoshi; Yonezawa, Koichiro; Morimoto, Koichi; Tanimoto, Hitoshi; Saito, Miki; Otsuki, Naoki; Nibu, Ken-ichi

    2010-01-01

    A speech therapist performs swallowing rehabilitation in this hospital because concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for head and neck cancer is commonly associated with, dysphagia. An evaluation of oral mucositis and dysphagia after CCRT was conducted to determine the relationship between swallowing rehabilitation and swallowing disability. A total of 51 patients (44 males and 7 females) with a mean age of 63 years (range, 39 to 80), underwent CCRT with or without neck dissection between April 2008 and November 2009. Oral mucositis and dysphagia were graded at the end of CCRT according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), version 4.0. Seventeen of 51 patients underwent swallowing rehabilitation, exercise and education on muscle strengthening programs before and during CCRT. The average grades of oral mucositis of patients with nasopharyngeal, oropharyngeal, hypopharyngeal, and laryngeal cancer patients were 1.8, 2.1, 1.8, and 0.8, respectively. There was a lower incidence of oral mucositis in patients with laryngeal cancer than in those with oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer. The average grades of dysphagia of patients with nasopharyngeal, oropharyngeal, hypopharyngeal, and laryngeal cancer were 2.4, 2.7, 2.2, and 1.2. Dysphagia was most severe in the patients with oropharyngeal cancer, while it was minimal in those with laryngeal cancer. Seventeen diligent patients that underwent swallowing rehabilitation every day rarely developed severe dysphagia. (author)

  13. Correlation between tumor regression grade and rectal volume in neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hong Seok; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Chung, Kwang Zoo [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To determine whether large rectal volume on planning computed tomography (CT) results in lower tumor regression grade (TRG) after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in rectal cancer patients. We reviewed medical records of 113 patients treated with surgery following neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer between January and December 2012. Rectal volume was contoured on axial images in which gross tumor volume was included. Average axial rectal area (ARA) was defined as rectal volume divided by longitudinal tumor length. The impact of rectal volume and ARA on TRG was assessed. Average rectal volume and ARA were 11.3 mL and 2.9 cm². After completion of neoadjuvant CCRT in 113 patients, pathologic results revealed total regression (TRG 4) in 28 patients (25%), good regression (TRG 3) in 25 patients (22%), moderate regression (TRG 2) in 34 patients (30%), minor regression (TRG 1) in 24 patients (21%), and no regression (TRG0) in 2 patients (2%). No difference of rectal volume and ARA was found between each TRG groups. Linear correlation existed between rectal volume and TRG (p = 0.036) but not between ARA and TRG (p = 0.058). Rectal volume on planning CT has no significance on TRG in patients receiving neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer. These results indicate that maintaining minimal rectal volume before each treatment may not be necessary.

  14. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for cStage IIIA/IIIB locally advanced gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Tatsushi; Suto, Hiromasa; Kashiwagi, Hirotaka

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the impact of neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NACRT) with radio-enhancing S-1 for locally advanced gastric cancer. Patients who had a gastric cancer infiltrating into other organs (T4) or with bulky N2 were enrolled in this study. They received oral S-1 (65 mg/m 2 /day) administration and 50 Gy radiotherapy followed by radical surgery. In 12 subjects (male:female ratio, 7:5; mean age, 70.0 years), 10 (83.3%) completed NACRT and 12 (100%) underwent curative resection. Histopathological efficacy (≥Grade 1b) and down staging were observed 6 patients (75.0%) and 5 (62.5%), respectively, in 8 T4 patients. The efficacy was ≥Grade 2 in all 4 patients with bulky N2. No extra-nodal invasion was noted. In this series 1-and 3-year survival rates were 90.9% and 60.6%, respectively, during a mean observation period of 18.6 months. This procedure is applicable even to hemorrhaging patients. Outstanding antineoplastic effects are expected in locally advanced gastric cancer. (author)

  15. A phase I study of concurrent chemoradiotherapy and cetuximab for locally advanced esophageal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holländer, Cecilie; Baeksgaard, Lene; Sorensen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) of concurrent chemoradiotherapy and cetuximab in patients with non-resectable locally advanced esophageal cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Escalating doses of oxaliplatin every second week and daily tegafur....../uracil were given concurrently with radiotherapy, 59.4 Gy in 33 fractions. Cetuximab was given on day 15 (400 mg/m(2)) and weekly (250 mg/m(2)) during radiotherapy. Fixed doses of oxaliplatin (130 mg/m(2)) and tegafur/uracil (300 mg/m(2)) were administered before, and after radiotherapy. RESULTS: Eleven...... patients were included in the study; two were excluded due to allergic reactions to cetuximab. In DL2 (tegafur/uracil 300 mg/m(2), oxaliplatin 30 mg/m(2)) two grade 3/4 fistula and one grade 3 neuropathy were observed. Six patients were enrolled in DL1 (tegafur/uracil 150 mg/m(2)/, oxaliplatin 30 mg/m(2...

  16. A case of anal canal cancer which developed fournier's syndrome after chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momma, Tomoyuki; Kikuchi, Daiki; Watanabe, Yohei; Onozawa, Hisashi; Suzuki, Satoshi; Nakamura, Izumi; Ohki, Shinji; Takenoshita, Seiichi; Yoshida, Noriyuki

    2013-01-01

    Fournier's syndrome is an acute necrotizing fasciitis of the perineum which progresses rapidly, resulting in poor prognosis if not treated appropriately at an early stage. Here we report a case of anal canal cancer which developed Fournier's syndrome after chemoradiotherapy (CRT). A 79-year-old man with anal canal cancer received a double-barrel sigmoid colostomy followed by concurrent CRT (50.4 Gy) with S-1 (100 mg/body). Although the patient was discharged after CRT, he developed a fever at 10 days after discharge and visited our hospital complaining of pain in the anal region. He was hospitalized with a diagnosis of Fournier's syndrome. Extensive drainage, administration of antibiotics, additional drainage and continuous irrigation of the affected region improved the symptoms of Fournier's syndrome. Multiple liver metastases were found on a CT scan at 3 months after onset of Fournier's syndrome, and the patient was transferred to another hospital for systemic chemotherapy. There have been no reports on the onset of Fournier's syndrome after CRT for rectal cancer with anal canal involvement; we report this case with a review of the literature. (author)

  17. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by local excision in clinical T2N0 rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Young Seob; Park, Jin Hong; Ahn, Seung Do

    2016-01-01

    To investigate whether preoperative chemoradiotherapy (PCRT) followed by local excision (LE) is feasible approach in clinical T2N0 rectal cancer patients. Patients who received PCRT and LE because of clinical T2 rectal cancer within 7 cm from anal verge between January 2006 and June 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. LE was performed in case of a good clinical response after PCRT. Patients' characteristics, treatment record, tumor recurrence, and treatment-related complications were reviewed at a median follow-up of 49 months. All patients received transanal excision or transanal minimally invasive surgery. Of 34 patients, 19 patients (55.9%) presented pathologic complete response (pCR). The 3-year local recurrence-free survival and disease free-survival were 100.0% and 97.1%, respectively. There was no recurrence among the patients with pCR. Except for 1 case of grade 4 enterovesical fistula, all other late complications were mild and self-limiting. PCRT followed by an LE might be feasible as an alternative to total mesorectal excision in good responders with clinical T2N0 distal rectal cancer

  18. Celecoxib plus chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer: a phase II TCOG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling-Wei; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Chen, William Tzu-Liang; Lee, Hao-Hsien; Lin, Tzu-Chen; Chen, Hung-Chang; Chen, Hong-Hwa; Chien, Chun-Ru; Lin, Tze-Yi; Liu, Tsang-Wu

    2014-05-01

    To report the results of a phase II trial combining celecoxib and preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. Patients with clinical stage II or III rectal cancer were treated with radiotherapy of 44 Gy in 22 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of oral tegafur-uracil and folinate on days 1-30 and 38-65. Celecoxib (400 mg/day) given from days 1 to 65. Surgery was done on day 70. The expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) in tumor tissues was evaluated microscopically as a prognostic factor. From 2008 to 2011, 53 patients completed CRT+ celecoxib therapy and 47 received radical surgery. Grade 3 diarrhea developed in 5 (9%). Grade 4 anemia was seen in 2 (4%). Pathological complete response (pCR) was seen in 6 (13%). T or N downstaging found in 38 (81%). Sphincter preservation was achieved in 77% of low-positioned tumors. Patients with tumors expressing high-level COX-2 after CRT + celecoxib treatment had inferior pelvic control (P = 0.01), disease-free survival (P = 0.04), and overall survival (P = 0.03) than those with low-level expression. Celecoxib can be safely combined with preoperative CRT for rectal cancer. More intensified adjuvant therapy may be considered for tumors expressing high-level COX-2 after CRT and surgery. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Correlation between tumor regression grade and rectal volume in neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hong Seok; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Chung, Kwang Zoo

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether large rectal volume on planning computed tomography (CT) results in lower tumor regression grade (TRG) after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in rectal cancer patients. We reviewed medical records of 113 patients treated with surgery following neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer between January and December 2012. Rectal volume was contoured on axial images in which gross tumor volume was included. Average axial rectal area (ARA) was defined as rectal volume divided by longitudinal tumor length. The impact of rectal volume and ARA on TRG was assessed. Average rectal volume and ARA were 11.3 mL and 2.9 cm². After completion of neoadjuvant CCRT in 113 patients, pathologic results revealed total regression (TRG 4) in 28 patients (25%), good regression (TRG 3) in 25 patients (22%), moderate regression (TRG 2) in 34 patients (30%), minor regression (TRG 1) in 24 patients (21%), and no regression (TRG0) in 2 patients (2%). No difference of rectal volume and ARA was found between each TRG groups. Linear correlation existed between rectal volume and TRG (p = 0.036) but not between ARA and TRG (p = 0.058). Rectal volume on planning CT has no significance on TRG in patients receiving neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer. These results indicate that maintaining minimal rectal volume before each treatment may not be necessary

  20. Outcomes of Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy and Combined Chemotherapy with Radiotherapy Without Surgery for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supaadirek, Chunsri; Pesee, Montien; Thamronganantasakul, Komsan; Thalangsri, Pimsiree; Krusun, Srichai; Supakalin, Narudom

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the treatment outcomes of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) or combined chemotherapy together with radiotherapy (CMTRT) without surgery. A total of 84 patients with locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma (stage II or III) between January 1st, 2003 and December 31st, 2013 were enrolled, 48 treated with preoperative CCRT (Gr.I) and 36 with combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy (CMTRT) without surgery (Gr.II). The chemotherapeutic agents used concurrent with radiotherapy were either 5fluorouracil short infusion plus leucovorin and/or capecitabine or 5fluorouracil infusion alone. All patients received pelvic irradiation. There were 5 patients (10.4%) with a complete pathological response. The 3 yearoverall survival rates were 83.2% in Gr.I and 24.8 % in Gr.II (prectal cancer demonstrated that in preoperative CCRT a sphincter sparing procedure can be performed. The results of treatment with preoperative CCRT for locally advanced rectal cancer showed comparable rates of overall survival and sphincter sparing procedures as compared to previous studies.

  1. The Role of Concomitant Radiation Boost in Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badakhshi, Harun; Ismail, Mahmoud; Boskos, Christos; Zhao, Kuaile; Kaul, David

    2017-06-01

    This study analyzed the impact of concomitant boost on long-term clinical outcomes in locally advanced rectal cancer. A total of 141 patients (median age=61 years) were treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Median total dose was 50.4 Gy. Forty-three patients received a concomitant boost. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), given as a 24-h continuous infusion. Mean follow-up was 83.7 months. The 3, 5-, and 10-year overall survival (OS) rates were 91.9%, 84.6%, and 52.9%, respectively. Recurrence-free survival (RFS) rates at 3, 5, and 10 years were 91.4%, 88.9%, and 79.3%, respectively. Metastasis-free survival (MFS) rates at 3, 5, and 10 years were 84.6%, 75.4%, and 49.9%, respectively. Overall, 9.9% of all patients achieved pathological complete response. Down-staging of T- or N-stage was achieved in 55.1% and 41.5% of patients. Multivariate analysis revealed that female sex (p=0.011), concomitant boost-radiotherapy (p=0.014), and the presence of fewer than five positive lymph nodes (prectal cancer in terms of local outcomes. Intensified radiotherapy using a concomitant boost has a positive effect on OS. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  2. A case of locally advanced sigmoid colon cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshitomi, Mami; Hashida, Hiroki; Nomura, Akinari; Ueda, Shugo; Terajima, Hiroaki; Osaki, Nobuhiro

    2014-01-01

    The patient was a 38-year-old woman who visited our hospital complaining of nausea and abdominal pain. A colonoscopy revealed an advanced cancer in the sigmoid colon. A computed tomography (CT) scan showed left hydronephrosis and lymph node metastasis to the left iliopsoas muscle and left ureter. No distant metastasis was found. Since the surgical margins were likely to be positive with a one-stage resection, 3 cycles of FOLFOX4 (folinic acid, fluorouracil, and oxaliplatin) were administered after creating a transverse loop colostomy. Although the tumor decreased in size, the surgical margins were still suspected to be positive. For further regional tumor control, radiotherapy (1.8 Gy/day for 25 days) to the medial region of the left iliac bone and oral UFT/LV (uracil and tegafur/Leucovorin) were administered. A partial response (PR) was determined in accordance with the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST). Sigmoidectomy with partial resection of the left ureter was performed by laparotomy. The histologic response was assessed as Grade 2 and all surgical margins were negative. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy may be an effective therapeutic option for locally advanced colon cancer resistant to conventional preoperative chemotherapy. (author)

  3. Fatigue during chemoradiotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer and its relationship to radiation dose distribution in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, Ceri; Schick, Ulrike; Morden, James P.; Gulliford, Sarah L.; Miah, Aisha B.; Bhide, Shreerang; Newbold, Kate; Harrington, Kevin J.; Nutting, Chris M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: Fatigue during head and neck radiotherapy may be related to radiation dose to the central nervous system (CNS). The impact of patient, tumour, and dosimetric variables on acute fatigue was assessed in nasopharyngeal cancer patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy. Material and methods: Radiation dose to the following retrospectively-delineated CNS structures; brainstem, cerebellum, pituitary gland, pineal gland, hypothalamus, hippocampus and basal ganglia (BG) and clinical variables were related to incidence of ⩾ grade 2 fatigue in 40 patients. Results: Sixty per cent of patients reported fatigue during and following radiotherapy. Dmean and D2 to the BG and Dmean to the pituitary gland were significantly associated with fatigue during radiation (P < 0.01). Dmean to the cerebellum was associated with fatigue following radiotherapy and at any time (P < 0.01). After adjusting for clinical factors, an association remained between fatigue during radiotherapy and mean dose and D2 to the pituitary gland and BG (P = 0.012, 0.036, 0.009 and 0.018) and mean dose to the cerebellum following radiation and at any time (P = 0.042 and 0.029). Conclusion: Disruption of connections between BG, cerebellum, and higher cortical centres or disruption of pituitary-regulated hormonal balance may be implicated in the pathophysiology of radiation-related fatigue

  4. Chemoradiotherapy of Anal Carcinoma: Survival and Recurrence in an Unselected National Cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentzen, Anne Gry, E-mail: anne.gry.bentzen@unn.no [Department of Oncology, University Hospital of Northern Norway, Tromso (Norway); Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromso, Tromso (Norway); Guren, Marianne G.; Wanderas, Eva H. [Department of Oncology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Frykholm, Gunilla [Department of Oncology, St. Olav' s University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway and The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA), Osteras (Norway); Tveit, Kjell M. [Department of Oncology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Wilsgaard, Tom [Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromso, Tromso (Norway); Dahl, Olav [Section of Oncology, Institute of Medicine, University of Bergen and Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Balteskard, Lise [Department of Oncology, University Hospital of Northern Norway, Tromso (Norway); Centre for Clinical Documentation and Evaluation, Northern Norway Regional Health Authority, Tromso (Norway)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate treatment results, elucidate whether national guidelines were followed, and identify areas demanding further treatment optimization. Methods and Material: Between July 2000 and June 2007, 328 patients were treated with curatively intended chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for nonmetastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the anal region, according to national treatment guidelines based on tumor stage. Results: Complete response after CRT was obtained in 87% of patients, rising to 93% after salvage surgery. Chemotherapy, elective irradiation of the groin and salvage surgery were performed to a lesser extent in elderly patients, mainly because of frailty and comorbidity. Recurrence occurred in 24% of the patients, resulting in a 3- and 5-year recurrence-free survival (RFS) of 79% and 74%, respectively. Locoregional recurrences dominated, most commonly in the primary tumor site. Recurrence was treated with curative intent in 45% of the cases. The 3- and 5-year overall survival were 79% and 66%, and cancer-specific survival (CSS) were 84% and 75%, respectively. The risk of adverse outcome increased significantly with more locally advanced tumors and for male gender in multivariable analyses for RFS and CSS. Conclusions: The treatment results are in accordance with similar cohorts. The primary treatment control rate was high, but there was a significant risk of locoregional recurrence in advanced tumors. The loyalty to national guidelines was broad, although individual adjustments occurred. However, caution to avoid toxicity must not lead to inadequate treatment. Male gender seems to have inferior outcome.

  5. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by local excision in clinical T2N0 rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Young Seob; Park, Jin Hong; Ahn, Seung Do [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2016-09-15

    To investigate whether preoperative chemoradiotherapy (PCRT) followed by local excision (LE) is feasible approach in clinical T2N0 rectal cancer patients. Patients who received PCRT and LE because of clinical T2 rectal cancer within 7 cm from anal verge between January 2006 and June 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. LE was performed in case of a good clinical response after PCRT. Patients' characteristics, treatment record, tumor recurrence, and treatment-related complications were reviewed at a median follow-up of 49 months. All patients received transanal excision or transanal minimally invasive surgery. Of 34 patients, 19 patients (55.9%) presented pathologic complete response (pCR). The 3-year local recurrence-free survival and disease free-survival were 100.0% and 97.1%, respectively. There was no recurrence among the patients with pCR. Except for 1 case of grade 4 enterovesical fistula, all other late complications were mild and self-limiting. PCRT followed by an LE might be feasible as an alternative to total mesorectal excision in good responders with clinical T2N0 distal rectal cancer.

  6. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy with gemcitabine plus regional hyperthermia for locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma. Initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohguri, Takayuki; Imada, Hajime; Yahara, Katsuya; Morioka, Tomoaki; Nakano, Keita; Korogi, Yukunori; Narisada, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with gemcitabine plus regional hyperthermia (HT) for locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC). A total of 29 patients with LAPC treated with concurrent CRT using gemcitabine were retrospectively analyzed. Radiotherapy was administered with a median total dose of 61.2 Gy. Of the 29 patients, 20 (69%) also underwent regional HT during CRT (CRHT group). The remaining 9 patients did not receive regional HT (CRT group) because of a common bile duct stent placement, patient refusal, older age, or obesity. The efficacy and toxicity of the treatments and the predictors of good outcome were evaluated. The median disease progression-free and overall survival times were significantly better for the CRHT group than for the CRT group (8.8 vs. 4.9 months, P=0.02, and 18.6 vs. 9.6 months, P=0.01), respectively. Grade 3-4 hematological toxicities for the CRHT group were detected in eight patients (40%) and grade 3 nonhematologic toxicity in one (diarrhea). Concurrent CRT using gemcitabine with regional HT may be a feasible and promising regimen for LAPC, and the results justified further evaluation in a large number of patients to confirm its definite benefit. (author)

  7. HSP60 may predict good pathological response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urushibara, Masayasu; Kageyama, Yukio; Akashi, Takumi; Otsuka, Yukihiro; Takizawa, Touichiro; Koike, Morio; Kihara, Kazunori

    2007-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) play crucial roles in cellular responses to stressful conditions. Expression of HSPs in invasive or high-risk superficial bladder cancer was investigated to identify whether HSPs predict pathological response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Immunohistochemistry was used to assess expression levels of HSP27, HSP60, HSP70, HSP90 and p53 in 54 patients with invasive or high-risk superficial bladder cancer, prior to low-dose neoadjuvant CRT, followed by radical or partial cystectomy. Patients were classified into two groups (good or poor responders) depending on pathological response to CRT, which was defined as the proportion of morphological therapeutic changes in surgical specimens. Good responders showed morphological therapeutic changes in two-thirds or more of tumor tissues. In contrast, poor responders showed changes in less than two-thirds of tumor tissues. Using a multivariate analysis, positive HSP60 expression prior to CRT was found to be marginally associated with good pathological response to CRT (P=0.0564). None of clinicopathological factors was associated with HSP60 expression level. In the good pathological responders, the 5-year cause-specific survival was 88%, which was significantly better than survival in the poor responders (51%) (P=0.0373). Positive HSP60 expression prior to CRT may predict good pathological response to low-dose neoadjuvant CRT in invasive or high-risk superficial bladder cancer. (author)

  8. Prognostic impact of RITA expression in patients with anal squamous cell carcinoma treated with chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödel, Franz; Steinhäuser, Kerstin; Kreis, Nina-Naomi; Friemel, Alexandra; Martin, Daniel; Wieland, Ulrike; Rave-Fränk, Margret; Balermpas, Panagiotis; Fokas, Emmanouil; Louwen, Frank; Rödel, Claus; Yuan, Juping

    2018-02-01

    RBP-J interacting and tubulin-associated protein (RITA) has been identified as a negative regulator of the Notch signalling pathway and its deregulation is involved in the pathogenesis of several tumour entities. RITA's impact on the response of anal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) to anticancer treatment, however, remains elusive. In our retrospective study immunohistochemical evaluation of RITA was performed on 140 pre-treatment specimens and was correlated with clinical and histopathologic characteristics and clinical endpoints cumulative incidence of local control (LC), distant recurrence (DC), disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). We observed significant inverse correlations between RITA expression and tumour grading, the levels of HPV-16 virus DNA load, CD8 (+) tumour infiltrating lymphocytes and programmed death protein (PD-1) immunostaining. In univariate analyses, elevated levels of RITA expression were predictive for decreased local control (p = 0.001), decreased distant control (p = 0.040), decreased disease free survival (p = 0.001) and overall survival (p RITA expression remained significant for decreased local control (p = 0.009), disease free survival (p = 0.032) and overall survival (p = 0.012). These data indicate that elevated levels of pretreatment RITA expression are correlated with unfavourable clinical outcome in anal carcinoma treated with concomitant chemoradiotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy improves survival outcome in muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byun, Sang Jun; Kim, Jin Hee; Oh, Young Kee; Kim, Byung Hoon

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate survival rates and prognostic factors related to treatment outcomes after bladder preserving therapy including transurethral resection of bladder tumor, radiotherapy (RT) with or without concurrent chemotherapy in bladder cancer with a curative intent. We retrospectively studied 50 bladder cancer patients treated with bladder-preserving therapy at Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center from January 1999 to December 2010. Age ranged from 46 to 89 years (median, 71.5 years). Bladder cancer was the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage II, III, and IV in 9, 27, and 14 patients, respectively. Thirty patients were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) and 20 patients with RT alone. Nine patients received chemotherapy prior to CCRT or RT alone. Radiation was delivered with a four-field box technique (median, 63 Gy; range, 48.6 to 70.2 Gy). The follow-up periods ranged from 2 to 169 months (median, 34 months). Thirty patients (60%) showed complete response and 13 (26%) a partial response. All patients could have their own bladder preserved. Five-year overall survival (OS) rate was 37.2%, and the 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 30.2%. In multivariate analysis, tumor grade and CCRT were statistically significant in OS. Tumor grade was a significant prognostic factor related to OS. CCRT is also considered to improve survival outcomes. Further multi-institutional studies are needed to elucidate the impact of RT in bladder cancer

  10. Efficacy of argon plasma coagulation for locoregional relapse after chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Yoshinori; Domon, Kaoru; Otsuka, Takafumi

    2011-01-01

    Salvage therapy for residual or relapsed esophageal cancer after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has not yet been established. We retrospectively evaluated relapse-free survival (RFS) after local recurrence following CRT and local control rate in patients who underwent argon plasma coagulation (APC). We reviewed the records of 14 patients who underwent APC after CRT for esophageal cancer at our department between 2001 and 2010 and analyzed overall survival (OS), 5-year survival rate, local control rate after APC and RFS-defined as the period between the end of CRT and the time when an iodine-negative area was found. Median OS and median RFS (mRFS) were 33 months and 6 months, respectively. The 5-year survival rate was 16.2%, and the local control rate after APC was 71.4% (10/14). RFS was significantly longer in the T1 group than in the T2/T3 group (p=0.03); the local control rate after APC did not significantly differ between groups. The high-dose (HD) radiation group had a significantly longer RFS and a tendency toward a higher local control rate after APC than did the standard-dose (SD) radiation group. APC was safe and resulted in a high rate of local control, regardless of T factor. HD radiation was associated with longer RFS and greater efficacy of APC treatment for local recurrence. (author)

  11. Negative impact of pretreatment anemia on local control after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and surgery for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hye Bin; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2012-09-15

    Although anemia is considered to be a contributor to intra-tumoral hypoxia and tumor resistance to ionizing radiation in cancer patients, the impact of pretreatment anemia on local control after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (NACRT) and surgery for rectal cancer remains unclear. We reviewed the records of 247 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who were treated with NACRT followed by curative-intent surgery. The patients with anemia before NACRT (36.0%, 89/247) achieved less pathologic complete response (pCR) than those without anemia (p = 0.012). The patients with pretreatment anemia had worse 3-year local control than those without pretreatment anemia (86.0% vs. 95.7%, p = 0.005). Multivariate analysis showed that pretreatment anemia (p = 0.035), pathologic tumor and nodal stage (p = 0.020 and 0.032, respectively) were independently significant factors for local control. Pretreatment anemia had negative impacts on pCR and local control among patients who underwent NACRT and surgery for rectal cancer. Strategies maintaining hemoglobin level within normal range could potentially be used to improve local control in rectal cancer patients.

  12. Negative impact of pretreatment anemia on local control after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and surgery for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hye Bin; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won

    2012-01-01

    Although anemia is considered to be a contributor to intra-tumoral hypoxia and tumor resistance to ionizing radiation in cancer patients, the impact of pretreatment anemia on local control after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (NACRT) and surgery for rectal cancer remains unclear. We reviewed the records of 247 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who were treated with NACRT followed by curative-intent surgery. The patients with anemia before NACRT (36.0%, 89/247) achieved less pathologic complete response (pCR) than those without anemia (p = 0.012). The patients with pretreatment anemia had worse 3-year local control than those without pretreatment anemia (86.0% vs. 95.7%, p = 0.005). Multivariate analysis showed that pretreatment anemia (p = 0.035), pathologic tumor and nodal stage (p = 0.020 and 0.032, respectively) were independently significant factors for local control. Pretreatment anemia had negative impacts on pCR and local control among patients who underwent NACRT and surgery for re