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Sample records for selective pharmacological antagonists

  1. Pharmacological profile of CS-3150, a novel, highly potent and selective non-steroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Kiyoshi; Homma, Tsuyoshi; Morikawa, Yuka; Ubukata, Naoko; Tsuruoka, Hiyoyuki; Aoki, Kazumasa; Ishikawa, Hirokazu; Mizuno, Makoto; Sada, Toshio

    2015-08-15

    The present study was designed to characterize the pharmacological profile of CS-3150, a novel non-steroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist. In the radioligand-binding assay, CS-3150 inhibited (3)H-aldosterone binding to mineralocorticoid receptor with an IC50 value of 9.4nM, and its potency was superior to that of spironolactone and eplerenone, whose IC50s were 36 and 713nM, respectively. CS-3150 also showed at least 1000-fold higher selectivity for mineralocorticoid receptor over other steroid hormone receptors, glucocorticoid receptor, androgen receptor and progesterone receptor. In the reporter gene assay, CS-3150 inhibited aldosterone-induced transcriptional activation of human mineralocorticoid receptor with an IC50 value of 3.7nM, and its potency was superior to that of spironolactone and eplerenone, whose IC50s were 66 and 970nM, respectively. CS-3150 had no agonistic effect on mineralocorticoid receptor and did not show any antagonistic or agonistic effect on glucocorticoid receptor, androgen receptor and progesterone receptor even at the high concentration of 5μM. In adrenalectomized rats, single oral administration of CS-3150 suppressed aldosterone-induced decrease in urinary Na(+)/K(+) ratio, an index of in vivo mineralocorticoid receptor activation, and this suppressive effect was more potent and longer-lasting than that of spironolactone and eplerenone. Chronic treatment with CS-3150 inhibited blood pressure elevation induced by deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)/salt-loading to rats, and this antihypertensive effect was more potent than that of spironolactone and eplerenone. These findings indicate that CS-3150 is a selective and highly potent mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist with long-lasting oral activity. This agent could be useful for the treatment of hypertension, cardiovascular and renal disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Pharmacology of JB-9315, a new selective histamine H2-receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, B; Montero, M J; Sevilla, M A; San Román, L

    1998-02-01

    1. The histamine H2-receptor antagonistic activity and antisecretory and antiulcer effects of JB-9315 were studied in comparison with the standard H2 blocker ranitidine. 2. In vitro, JB-9315 is a competitive antagonist of histamine H2 receptors in the isolated, spontaneously beating guinea-pig right atrium, with a pA2 value of 7.30 relative to a value of 7.36 for ranitidine. JB-9315 was specific for the histamine H2 receptor because, at high concentration, it did not affect histamine- or acetylcholine-induced contractions in guinea-pig isolated ileum or rat isolated duodenum, respectively. 3. JB-9315 dose dependently inhibited histamine-, pentagastrin- or carbachol-stimulated acid secretion and basal secretion in the perfused stomach preparation of the anesthetized rat. In the pylorus-ligated rat after intraperitoneal administration, total acid output over 4 h was inhibited by JB-9315 with an ID50 of 32.8 mg/kg, confirming its H2-receptor antagonist properties. 4. JB-9315 showed antiulcer activity against cold stress plus indomethacin-induced lesions with an ID50 of 6.8 mg/kg. 5. JB-9315, 50 and 100 mg/kg, inhibited macroscopic gastric hemorrhagic lesions induced by ethanol. In contrast, ranitidine (50 mg/kg) failed to reduce these lesions. 6. These results indicate that JB-9315 is a new antiulcer drug that exerts a cytoprotective effect in addition to its gastric antisecretory activity.

  3. New selective and potent 5-HT1B/1D antagonists : Chemistry and pharmacological evaluation of N-piperazinylphenyl biphenylcarboxamides and biphenylsulfonamides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liao, Y; Bottcher, H; Harting, J; Greiner, H; van Amsterdam, C; Cremers, T; Sundell, S; Marz, J; Rautenberg, W; Wikstrom, H

    2000-01-01

    A series of new analogues of N-[4-methoxy-3-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)phenyl] 2'-methyl-4'-(5-methyl-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl)biphenyl-4-carboxamide (1; GR127935) as potent and selective 5-HT1B/1D antagonists were synthesized and evaluated pharmacologically. Their receptor binding profiles were comparable

  4. Selective antagonists at group I metabotropic glutamate receptors: synthesis and molecular pharmacology of 4-aryl-3-isoxazolol amino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann, Hasse; Sløk, Frank A; Stensbøl, Tine B

    2002-01-01

    Homologation of (S)-glutamic acid (Glu, 1) and Glu analogues has previously provided ligands with activity at metabotropic Glu receptors (mGluRs). The homologue of ibotenic acid (7), 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (HIBO, 8), and the 4-phenyl derivative of 8, compound 9a, are bot...... antagonists at group I mGluRs. Here we report the synthesis and molecular pharmacology of HIBO analogues 9b-h containing different 4-aryl substituents. All of these compounds possess antagonist activity at group I mGluRs but are inactive at group II and III mGluRs....

  5. Human fat cell alpha-2 adrenoceptors. I. Functional exploration and pharmacological definition with selected alpha-2 agonists and antagonists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galitzky, J.; Mauriege, P.; Berlan, M.; Lafontan, M.

    1989-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate more fully the pharmacological characteristics of the human fat cell alpha-2 adrenoceptor. Biological assays were performed on intact isolated fat cells while radioligand binding studies were carried out with [ 3 H]yohimbine in membranes. These pharmacological studies brought: (1) a critical definition of the limits of the experimental conditions required for the exploration of alpha-2 adrenergic responsiveness on human fat cells and membranes; (2) an improvement in the pharmacological definition of the human fat cell postsynaptic alpha-2 adrenoceptor. Among alpha-2 agonists, UK-14,304 was the most potent and the relative order of potency was: UK-14,304 greater than p-aminoclonidine greater than clonidine = B-HT 920 greater than rilmenidine. For alpha-2 antagonists, the potency order was: yohimbine greater than idazoxan greater than SK ampersand F-86,466 much greater than benextramine; (3) a description of the impact of benextramine (irreversible alpha-1/alpha-2 antagonist) on human fat cell alpha-2 adrenergic receptors and on human fat cell function; the drug inactivates the alpha-2 adrenergic receptors with a minor impact on beta adrenergic receptors and without noticeable alterations of fat cell function as assessed by preservation of beta adrenergic and Al-adenosine receptor-mediated lipolytic responses; and (4) a definition of the relationship existing between alpha-2 adrenergic receptor occupancy, inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity and antilipolysis with full and partial agonists. The existence of a receptor reserve must be taken into account when evaluating alpha-2 adrenergic receptor distribution and regulation of human fat cells

  6. Synthesis and pharmacology of 3-isoxazolol amino acids as selective antagonists at group I metabotropic glutamic acid receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, U; Bräuner-Osborne, H; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea

    2001-01-01

    Using ibotenic acid (2) as a lead, two series of 3-isoxazolol amino acid ligands for (S)-glutamic acid (Glu, 1) receptors have been developed. Whereas analogues of (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid [AMPA, (RS)-3] interact selectively with ionotropic Glu receptors (i......GluRs), the few analogues of (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-isoxazolyl)propionic acid [HIBO, (RS)-4] so far known typically interact with iGluRs as well as metabotropic Glu receptors (mGluRs). We here report the synthesis and pharmacology of a series of 4-substituted analogues of HIBO. The hexyl analogue 9 was shown...... to originate in (S)-11 (EC(50) = 395 microM, K(b) = 86 and 90 microM, respectively). Compound 9, administered icv, but not sc, was shown to protect mice against convulsions induced by N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA). Compounds 9 and 11 were resolved using chiral HPLC, and the configurational assignments...

  7. Novel selective and potent 5-HT reuptake inhibitors with 5-HT1D antagonist activity: chemistry and pharmacological evaluation of a series of thienopyran derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrado, Alicia; Lamas, Carlos; Agejas, Javier; Jiménez, Alma; Diaz, Nuria; Gilmore, Jeremy; Boot, John; Findlay, Jeremy; Hayhurst, Lorna; Wallace, Louise; Broadmore, Richard; Tomlinson, Rosemarie

    2004-10-15

    A series of compounds combining the naphthylpiperazine and thienopyran scaffolds has been prepared and evaluated for 5-HT reuptake inhibition with 5-HT1D antagonist activity. The design of these compounds has been based on the 'overlapping type' strategy where two pharmacophores are linked in a single molecule. The resultant dual pharmacological profile has the potential to deliver a more efficient treatment for depression.

  8. Solid-phase synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of analogues of PhTX-12-A potent and selective nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømgaard, Kristian; Mellor, Ian R; Andersen, Kim

    2002-01-01

    Philanthotoxin-12 (PhTX-12) is a novel potent and selective, noncompetitive antagonist of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Homologues of PhTX-12 with 7-11 methylene groups between the primary amino group and the aromatic head-group were synthesized using solid-phase methodology. In vitro...

  9. Pharmacological analysis of calcium antagonist receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, I.J.

    1987-01-01

    This work focuses on two aspects of the action of calcium antagonist drugs, namely, the interaction of drugs with receptors for verapamil-like calcium antagonists, and the interactions of drugs with voltage-sensitive calcium fluxes in rat brain synaptosomes. From binding studies I have found that the ligand of choice for labeling the verapamil receptor is (-)[ 3 H]desmethoxy-verapamil. This drug labels potently, reversibly and stereoselectively two receptors in membranes prepared from rat brain and rabbit skeletal muscle tissues. In equilibrium studies dihydropyridine calcium antagonists interact in a non-competitive fashion, while many non-DHPs are apparently competitive. In-depth kinetic studies in skeletal muscle membranes indicate that the two receptors are linked in a negative heterotropic fashion, and that low-affinity binding of (-) [ 3 H]desmethoxy-verapamil may be to the diltiazem receptor. However, these studies were not able to distinguish between the hypothesis that diltiazem binds to spatially separate, allosterically coupled receptors, and the hypothesis that diltiazem binds to a subsite of the verapamil receptor

  10. Differences in pharmacology of tumor necrosis factor (TNF antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bombardieri

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The commercially available inhibitors of TNF are constituted by two classes of molecules: the soluble receptors (Etanercept: Amgen Inc. Wyeth and the monoclonal antibodies (Adalimumab: Abbott Laboratories and Infliximab: Centocor, Inc.. The differences in their molecular structure, mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics (PK and pharmacodynamics (PD are discussed, along with the differences concerning dose, administration regimens, drug concentrations and pharmacological interactions. In order to explain the clinical differences observed when these agents are used in the “real world”, which can arise from the respective PK characteristics (kinetics, route and frequency of administration, type of TNF binding, effects on cytokines and PD responses and peculiar mechanisms of action, with distinctive immune function (LFTa inactivation; apoptosis induction, TNF immunoprecipitation, C1q binding and CDC induction; Fcg cross-linking and ADCC induction, the dynamics of interaction of the two classes of neutralizing molecules with TNF, and the ability in restoring TNF homeostasis, are outlined.

  11. Tying up Nicotine: New Selective Competitive Antagonist of the Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ida Nymann; Crestey, François; Jensen, Anders A

    2015-01-01

    Conformational restriction of the pyrrolidine nitrogen in nicotine by the introduction of an ethylene bridge provided a potent and selective antagonist of the α4β2-subtype of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Resolution by chiral SFC, pharmacological characterization of the two enantiomers...

  12. Sexually antagonistic selection in human male homosexuality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Camperio Ciani

    Full Text Available Several lines of evidence indicate the existence of genetic factors influencing male homosexuality and bisexuality. In spite of its relatively low frequency, the stable permanence in all human populations of this apparently detrimental trait constitutes a puzzling 'Darwinian paradox'. Furthermore, several studies have pointed out relevant asymmetries in the distribution of both male homosexuality and of female fecundity in the parental lines of homosexual vs. heterosexual males. A number of hypotheses have attempted to give an evolutionary explanation for the long-standing persistence of this trait, and for its asymmetric distribution in family lines; however a satisfactory understanding of the population genetics of male homosexuality is lacking at present. We perform a systematic mathematical analysis of the propagation and equilibrium of the putative genetic factors for male homosexuality in the population, based on the selection equation for one or two diallelic loci and Bayesian statistics for pedigree investigation. We show that only the two-locus genetic model with at least one locus on the X chromosome, and in which gene expression is sexually antagonistic (increasing female fitness but decreasing male fitness, accounts for all known empirical data. Our results help clarify the basic evolutionary dynamics of male homosexuality, establishing this as a clearly ascertained sexually antagonistic human trait.

  13. Pharmacological characterization of BR-A-657, a highly potent nonpeptide angiotensin II receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Yong Ha; Lee, Joo Han; Kim, Je Hak; Tan, Hyun Kwang; Kim, Sang Lin; Lee, Jae Yeol; Rim, Hong-Kun; Paik, Soo Heui; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2013-01-01

    The pharmacological profile of BR-A-657, 2-n-butyl-5-dimethylamino-thiocarbonyl-methyl-6-methyl-3-{[2-(1H-tetrazole-5-yl)biphenyl-4-yl]methyl}-pyrimidin-4(3H)-one, a new nonpeptide AT1-selective angiotensin receptor antagonist, has been investigated in a variety of in vitro and in vivo experimental models. In the present study, BR-A-657 displaced [(125)I][Sar(1)-Ile(8)]angiotensin II (Ang II) from its specific binding sites to AT1 subtype receptors in membrane fractions of HEK-293 cells with an IC50 of 0.16 nM. In a functional assay using isolated rabbit thoracic aorta, BR-A-657 inhibited the contractile response to Ang II (pD'2: 9.15) with a significant reduction in the maximum. In conscious rats, BR-A-657 (0.01, 0.1, 1 mg/kg; intravenously (i.v.)) dose-dependently antagonized Ang II-induced pressor responses. In addition, BR-A-657 dose-dependently decreased mean arterial pressure in furosemide-treated rats and renal hypertensive rats. Moreover, BR-A-657 given orally at 1 and 3 mg/kg reduced blood pressure in conscious renal hypertensive rats. Taken together, these findings indicate that BR-A-657 is a potent and specific antagonist of Ang II at the AT1 receptor subtype, and reveal the molecular basis responsible for the marked lowering of blood pressure in conscious rats.

  14. 5-HT7 Receptor Antagonists with an Unprecedented Selectivity Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Ali; Burssens, Pierre; Lorthioir, Olivier; Lo Brutto, Patrick; Dehon, Gwenael; Keyaerts, Jean; Coloretti, Francis; Lallemand, Bénédicte; Verbois, Valérie; Gillard, Michel; Vermeiren, Céline

    2018-04-23

    Selective leads: In this study, we generated a new series of serotonin 5-HT 7 receptor antagonists. Their synthesis, structure-activity relationships, and selectivity profiles are reported. This series includes 5-HT 7 antagonists with unprecedented high selectivity for the 5-HT 7 receptor, setting the stage for lead optimization of drugs acting on a range of neurological targets. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. A SELECTIVE ANTAGONIST OF MINERALOCORTICOID RECEPTOR EPLERENONE IN CARDIOLOGY PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Gegenava

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of aldosterone in pathophysiological processes is considered. The effects of the selective antagonist of mineralocorticoid receptor eplerenone are analyzed. The advantages of eplerenone compared with spironolactone are discussed.

  16. Caffeine and Selective Adenosine Receptor Antagonists as New Therapeutic Tools for the Motivational Symptoms of Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura López-Cruz

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Major depressive disorder is one of the most common and debilitating psychiatric disorders. Some of the motivational symptoms of depression, such anergia (lack of self-reported energy and fatigue are relatively resistant to traditional treatments such as serotonin uptake inhibitors. Thus, new pharmacological targets are being investigated. Epidemiological data suggest that caffeine consumption can have an impact on aspects of depressive symptomatology. Caffeine is a non-selective adenosine antagonist for A1/A2A receptors, and has been demonstrated to modulate behavior in classical animal models of depression. Moreover, selective adenosine receptor antagonists are being assessed for their antidepressant effects in animal studies. This review focuses on how caffeine and selective adenosine antagonists can improve different aspects of depression in humans, as well as in animal models. The effects on motivational symptoms of depression such as anergia, fatigue, and psychomotor slowing receive particular attention. Thus, the ability of adenosine receptor antagonists to reverse the anergia induced by dopamine antagonism or depletion is of special interest. In conclusion, although further studies are needed, it appears that caffeine and selective adenosine receptor antagonists could be therapeutic agents for the treatment of motivational dysfunction in depression.

  17. The pharmacological rationale for combining muscarinic receptor antagonists and beta-adrenoceptor agonists in the treatment of airway and bladder disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dale, Philippa R.; Cernecka, Hana; Schmidt, Martina; Dowling, Mark R.; Charlton, Steven J.; Pieper, Michael P.; Michel, Martin C.

    Muscarinic receptor antagonists and beta-adrenoceptor agonists are used in the treatment of obstructive airway disease and overactive bladder syndrome. Here we review the pharmacological rationale for their combination. Muscarinic receptors and beta-adrenoceptors are physiological antagonists for

  18. Antibacterial and antagonistic activity of selected traditional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    S.pneumonia was found to be the most susceptible bacteria for the methanol extract of the root of Ricinus communis with inhibition zones of 20mm and MIC of 25 mg/mL. However; S.tphyrium was the most resistant to all extracts of the selected plants with no inh bition zone. The methanol extracts of all plants were most ...

  19. Pharmacological profiling an abundantly expressed schistosome serotonergic GPCR identifies nuciferine as a potent antagonist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Chan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT is a key regulator of muscle contraction in parasitic flatworms. In Schistosoma mansoni, the myoexcitatory action of 5-HT is effected through activation of a serotonergic GPCR (Sm.5HTRL, prioritizing pharmacological characterization of this target for anthelmintic drug discovery. Here, we have examined the effects of several aporphine alkaloids on the signaling activity of a heterologously expressed Sm.5HTRL construct using a cAMP biosensor assay. Four structurally related natural products – nuciferine, D-glaucine, boldine and bulbocapnine – were demonstrated to block Sm.5HTRL evoked cAMP generation with the potency of GPCR blockade correlating well with the ability of each drug to inhibit contractility of schistosomule larvae. Nuciferine was also effective at inhibiting both basal and 5-HT evoked motility of adult schistosomes. These data advance our understanding of structure-affinity relationships at Sm.5HTRL, and demonstrate the effectiveness of Sm.5HTRL antagonists as hypomotility-evoking drugs across different parasite life cycle stages.

  20. Novel 2-aminotetralin and 3-aminochroman derivatives as selective serotonin 5-HT7 receptor agonists and antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Pär; Sohn, Daniel; Leideborg, Robert; Caldirola, Patrizia; Zlatoidsky, Pavel; Hanson, Sverker; Mohell, Nina; Rosqvist, Susanne; Nordvall, Gunnar; Johansson, Anette M; Johansson, Rolf

    2004-07-29

    The understanding of the physiological role of the G-protein coupled serotonin 5-HT(7) receptor is largely rudimentary. Therefore, selective and potent pharmacological tools will add to the understanding of serotonergic effects mediated through this receptor. In this report, we describe two compound classes, chromans and tetralins, encompassing compounds with nanomolar affinity for the 5-HT(7) receptor and with good selectivity. Within theses classes, we have discovered both agonists and antagonists that can be used for further understanding of the pharmacology of the 5-HT(7) receptor.

  1. In vitro pharmacological characterization of a novel TRPA1 antagonist and proof of mechanism in a human dental pulp model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyman E

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Eva Nyman,1,* Bo Franzén,1,* Andreas Nolting,1 Göran Klement,1 Gang Liu,1 Maria Nilsson,1 Annika Rosén,2 Charlotta Björk,3 Dirk Weigelt,4 Patrik Wollberg,1 Paul Karila,1 Patrick Raboisson11Neuroscience, Innovative Medicines CNS/Pain, AstraZeneca R&D, Södertälje, Sweden; 2Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Karolinska Institute/Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden; 3Clinical TA NS Early Development, 4Medicinal Chemistry, Innovative Medicines CNS/Pain, AstraZeneca R&D, Södertälje, Sweden*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: AZ465 is a novel selective transient receptor potential cation channel, member A1 (TRPA1 antagonist identified during a focused drug discovery effort. In vitro, AZ465 fully inhibits activation by zinc, O-chlorobenzylidene malononitrile (CS, or cinnamaldehyde of the human TRPA1 channel heterologously expressed in human embryonic kidney cells. Our data using patch-clamp recordings and mouse/human TRPA1 chimeras suggest that AZ465 binds reversibly in the pore region of the human TRPA1 channel. Finally, in an ex vivo model measuring TRPA1 agonist-stimulated release of neuropeptides from human dental pulp biopsies, AZD465 was able to block 50%–60% of CS-induced calcitonin gene-related peptide release, confirming that AZ465 inhibits the native human TRPA1 channel in neuronal tissue.Keywords: pain, pharmacology, antagonist, chimeric proteins, dental pulp, inflammation, neuropeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide, CGRP

  2. Nonpeptidic urotensin-II receptor antagonists I: in vitro pharmacological characterization of SB-706375

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Stephen A; Behm, David J; Aiyar, Nambi V; Naselsky, Diane; Disa, Jyoti; Brooks, David P; Ohlstein, Eliot H; Gleason, John G; Sarau, Henry M; Foley, James J; Buckley, Peter T; Schmidt, Dulcie B; Wixted, William E; Widdowson, Katherine; Riley, Graham; Jin, Jian; Gallagher, Timothy F; Schmidt, Stanley J; Ridgers, Lance; Christmann, Lisa T; Keenan, Richard M; Knight, Steven D; Dhanak, Dashyant

    2005-01-01

    SB-706375 potently inhibited [125I]hU-II binding to both mammalian recombinant and ‘native' UT receptors (Ki 4.7±1.5 to 20.7±3.6 nM at rodent, feline and primate recombinant UT receptors and Ki 5.4±0.4 nM at the endogenous UT receptor in SJRH30 cells). Prior exposure to SB-706375 (1 μM, 30 min) did not alter [125I]hU-II binding affinity or density in recombinant cells (KD 3.1±0.4 vs 5.8±0.9 nM and Bmax 3.1±1.0 vs 2.8±0.8 pmol mg−1) consistent with a reversible mode of action. The novel, nonpeptidic radioligand [3H]SB-657510, a close analogue of SB-706375, bound to the monkey UT receptor (KD 2.6±0.4 nM, Bmax 0.86±0.12 pmol mg−1) in a manner that was inhibited by both U-II isopeptides and SB-706375 (Ki 4.6±1.4 to 17.6±5.4 nM) consistent with the sulphonamides and native U-II ligands sharing a common UT receptor binding domain. SB-706375 was a potent, competitive hU-II antagonist across species with pKb 7.29–8.00 in HEK293-UT receptor cells (inhibition of [Ca2+]i-mobilization) and pKb 7.47 in rat isolated aorta (inhibition of contraction). SB-706375 also reversed tone established in the rat aorta by prior exposure to hU-II (Kapp∼20 nM). SB-706375 was a selective U-II antagonist with ⩾100-fold selectivity for the human UT receptor compared to 86 distinct receptors, ion channels, enzymes, transporters and nuclear hormones (Ki/IC50>1 μM). Accordingly, the contractile responses induced in isolated aortae by KCl, phenylephrine, angiotensin II and endothelin-1 were unaltered by SB-706375 (1 μM). In summary, SB-706375 is a high-affinity, surmountable, reversible and selective nonpeptide UT receptor antagonist with cross-species activity that will assist in delineating the pathophysiological actions of U-II in mammals. PMID:15852036

  3. Ionotropic excitatory amino acid receptor ligands. Synthesis and pharmacology of a new amino acid AMPA antagonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, U; Sløk, F A; Stensbøl, T B

    2000-01-01

    We have previously described the potent and selective (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptor agonist, (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-carboxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (ACPA), and the AMPA receptor antagonist (RS)-2-amino-3-[3-(carboxymethoxy)-5-methyl-4...... excitatory amino acid (EAA) receptors using receptor binding and electrophysiological techniques, and for activity at metabotropic EAA receptors using second messenger assays. Compounds 1 and 4 were essentially inactive. (RS)-2-Amino-3-[3-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl]propionic acid (ACMP, 2......-isoxazolyl]propionic acid (AMOA). Using these AMPA receptor ligands as leads, a series of compounds have been developed as tools for further elucidation of the structural requirements for activation and blockade of AMPA receptors. The synthesized compounds have been tested for activity at ionotropic...

  4. Stimulant effects of adenosine antagonists on operant behavior: differential actions of selective A2A and A1 antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Patrick A.; Nunes, Eric J.; Janniere, Simone L.; Stopper, Colin M.; Farrar, Andrew M.; Sager, Thomas N.; Baqi, Younis; Hockemeyer, Jörg; Müller, Christa E.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Adenosine A2A antagonists can reverse many of the behavioral effects of dopamine antagonists, including actions on instrumental behavior. However, little is known about the effects of selective adenosine antagonists on operant behavior when these drugs are administered alone. Objective The present studies were undertaken to investigate the potential for rate-dependent stimulant effects of both selective and nonselective adenosine antagonists. Methods Six drugs were tested: two nonselective adenosine antagonists (caffeine and theophylline), two adenosine A1 antagonists (DPCPX and CPT), and two adenosine A2A antagonists (istradefylline (KW6002) and MSX-3). Two schedules of reinforcement were employed; a fixed interval 240-s (FI-240 sec) schedule was used to generate low baseline rates of responding and a fixed ratio 20 (FR20) schedule generated high rates. Results Caffeine and theophylline produced rate-dependent effects on lever pressing, increasing responding on the FI-240 sec schedule but decreasing responding on the FR20 schedule. The A2A antagonists MSX-3 and istradefylline increased FI-240 sec lever pressing but did not suppress FR20 lever pressing in the dose range tested. In fact, there was a tendency for istradefylline to increase FR20 responding at a moderate dose. A1 antagonists failed to increase lever pressing rate, but DPCPX decreased FR20 responding at higher doses. Conclusions These results suggest that adenosine A2A antagonists enhance operant response rates, but A1 antagonists do not. The involvement of adenosine A2A receptors in regulating aspects of instrumental response output and behavioral activation may have implications for the treatment of effort-related psychiatric dysfunctions, such as psychomotor slowing and anergia in depression. PMID:21347642

  5. Medicinal Chemistry, Pharmacology, and Clinical Implications of TRPV1 Receptor Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghazadeh Tabrizi, Mojgan; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Baraldi, Stefania; Gessi, Stefania; Merighi, Stefania; Borea, Pier Andrea

    2017-07-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is an ion channel expressed on sensory neurons triggering an influx of cations. TRPV1 receptors function as homotetramers responsive to heat, proinflammatory substances, lipoxygenase products, resiniferatoxin, endocannabinoids, protons, and peptide toxins. Its phosphorylation increases sensitivity to both chemical and thermal stimuli, while desensitization involves a calcium-dependent mechanism resulting in receptor dephosphorylation. TRPV1 functions as a sensor of noxious stimuli and may represent a target to avoid pain and injury. TRPV1 activation has been associated to chronic inflammatory pain and peripheral neuropathy. Its expression is also detected in nonneuronal areas such as bladder, lungs, and cochlea where TRPV1 activation is responsible for pathology development of cystitis, asthma, and hearing loss. This review offers a comprehensive overview about TRPV1 receptor in the pathophysiology of chronic pain, epilepsy, cough, bladder disorders, diabetes, obesity, and hearing loss, highlighting how drug development targeting this channel could have a clinical therapeutic potential. Furthermore, it summarizes the advances of medicinal chemistry research leading to the identification of highly selective TRPV1 antagonists and their analysis of structure-activity relationships (SARs) focusing on new strategies to target this channel. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Central actions of a novel and selective dopamine antagonist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    Receptors for the neurotransmitter dopamine traditionally have been divided into two subgroups: the D 1 class, which is linked to the stimulation of adenylate cyclase-activity, and the D 2 class which is not. There is much evidence suggesting that it is the D 2 class which is not. There is much evidence suggesting that it is the D 2 dopamine receptor that mediates the physiological and behavioral actions of dopamine in the intact animal. However, the benzazepine SCH23390 is a dopamine antagonist which has potent behavioral actions while displaying apparent neurochemical selectivity for the D 1 class of dopamine receptors. The purpose of this dissertation was to (1) confirm and characterize this selectivity, and (2) test certain hypothesis related to possible modes of action of SCH233390. The inhibition of adenylate cyclase by SCH23390 occurred via an action at the dopamine receptor only. A radiolabeled analog of SCH23390 displayed the receptor binding properties of a specific high-affinity ligand, and regional receptor densities were highly correlated with dopamine levels. The subcellular distribution of [ 3 H]-SCH23390 binding did not correspond completely with that of dopamine-stimulated adenylate cyclase. The neurochemical potency of SCH23390 as a D 1 receptor antagonist was preserved following parental administration. A variety of dopamine agonists and antagonists displayed a high correlation between their abilities to compete for [ 3 H]-SCH23390 binding in vitro and to act at an adenylate cyclase-linked receptor. Finally, the relative affinities of dopamine and SCH23390 for both D 1 receptors and [ 3 H]-SCH23390 binding sites were comparable. It is concluded that the behavioral effects of SCH23390 are mediated by actions at D 1 dopamine receptors only, and that the physiological importance of this class of receptors should be reevaluated

  7. Opioid antagonists for pharmacological treatment of gambling disorder: Are they relevant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victorri-Vigneau, Caroline; Spiers, Andrew; Caillet, Pascal; Bruneau, Mélanie; Challet-Bouju, Gaëlle; Grall-Bronnec, Marie

    2017-07-18

    Background: To date, no drugs have been approved for gambling disorder. Numerous publications have described the value of opioid antagonists. Indeed, the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic pathway has been suggested as the underlying cause of reward-seeking behaviour, and it is modulated by the opioid system. Objective: This study aims to evaluate the relevance of opioid antagonists for treating GD. Method A systematic literature review was conducted. A search of the PubMed electronic database, PsycINFO and the Cochrane Systematic Review Database without any limits was performed. Results: There is little information concerning the effects of opioid antagonists on GD. The total search with "nalmefene and gambling" without any limits revealed only 11 articles. The search with "naltrexone and gambling" without any limits generated 47 articles. Nevertheless, the best available data support the use of opioid antagonists, particularly in individuals with a history of alcohol use disorder or strong gambling urges. Conclusion: Future trials are still needed. Indeed, opioid antagonists effectiveness has been investigated in only a limited number of patients, clinical trials do not reflect the heterogeneity of GD and there is little knowledge of the predictive factors of response to treatments. Moreover, differential affinity to nalmefene for kappa receptors may be associated with a particular effect in a yet to be defined addiction phenotype. Head to head comparisons between naltrexone and nalmefene would be helpful in combining with other medication or psychotherapy. The identification of subgroups of patients that are more likely to benefit from opioid antagonists should be a goal. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of DHβE analogs as neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Tue H.; Jensen, Anders A.; Lund, Mads Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE) is a member of the Erythrina family of alkaloids and a potent competitive antagonist of the α4β2-subtype of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Guided by an X-ray structure of DHβE in complex with an ACh binding protein, we detail the design, synthesis...

  9. Structural determinants for antagonist pharmacology that distinguish the rho1 GABAC receptor from GABAA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianliang; Xue, Fenqin; Chang, Yongchang

    2008-10-01

    GABA receptor (GABAR) types C (GABACR) and A (GABAAR) are both GABA-gated chloride channels that are distinguished by their distinct competitive antagonist properties. The structural mechanism underlying these distinct properties is not well understood. In this study, using previously identified binding residues as a guide, we made individual or combined mutations of nine binding residues in the rho1 GABACR subunit to their counterparts in the alpha1beta2gamma2 GABAAR or reverse mutations in alpha1 or beta2 subunits. The mutants were expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and tested for sensitivities of GABA-induced currents to the GABAA and GABAC receptor antagonists. The results revealed that bicuculline insensitivity of the rho1 GABACR was mainly determined by Tyr106, Phe138 and Phe240 residues. Gabazine insensitivity of the rho1 GABACR was highly dependent on Tyr102, Tyr106, and Phe138. The sensitivity of the rho1 GABACR to 3-aminopropyl-phosphonic acid and its analog 3-aminopropyl-(methyl)phosphinic acid mainly depended on residues Tyr102, Val140, FYS240-242, and Phe138. Thus, the residues Tyr102, Tyr106, Phe138, and Phe240 in the rho1 GABACR are major determinants for its antagonist properties distinct from those in the GABAAR. In addition, Val140 in the GABACR contributes to 3-APA binding. In conclusion, we have identified the key structural elements underlying distinct antagonist properties for the GABACR. The mechanistic insights were further extended and discussed in the context of antagonists docking to the homology models of GABAA or GABAC receptors.

  10. Tetrazolyl isoxazole amino acids as ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists: synthesis, modelling and molecular pharmacology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølund, Bente; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Holm, Mai Marie

    2005-01-01

    and 1b were pharmacologically characterized in receptor binding assays, and electrophysiologically on homomeric AMPA receptors (GluR1-4), homomeric (GluR5 and GluR6) and heteromeric (GluR6/KA2) kainic acid receptors, using two-electrode voltage-clamped Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing these receptors...

  11. Oleoylethanolamide: A Novel Potential Pharmacological Alternative to Cannabinoid Antagonists for the Control of Appetite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele Romano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The initial pharmaceutical interest for the endocannabinoid system as a target for antiobesity therapies has been restricted by the severe adverse effects of the CB1 antagonist rimonabant. This study points at oleoylethanolamide (OEA, a monounsaturated analogue, and functional antagonist of anandamide, as a potential and safer antiobesity alternative to CB1 antagonism. Mice treated with equal doses (5 or 10 mg/kg, i.p. of OEA or rimonabant were analyzed for the progressive expression of spontaneous behaviors (eating, grooming, rearing, locomotion, and resting occurring during the development of satiety, according to the paradigm called behavioral satiety sequence (BSS. Both drugs reduced food (wet mash intake to a similar extent. OEA treatment decreased eating activity within the first 30 min and caused a temporary increase of resting time that was not accompanied by any decline of horizontal, vertical and total motor activity. Besides decreasing eating activity, rimonabant caused a marked increase of the time spent grooming and decreased horizontal motor activity, alterations that might be indicative of aversive nonmotivational effects on feeding. These results support the idea that OEA suppresses appetite by stimulating satiety and that its profile of action might be predictive of safer effects in humans as a novel antiobesity treatment.

  12. Dual Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor α4β2 Antagonists/α7 Agonists: Synthesis, Docking Studies, and Pharmacological Evaluation of Tetrahydroisoquinolines and Tetrahydroisoquinolinium Salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crestey, François; Jensen, Anders A; Soerensen, Christian

    2018-01-01

    We describe the synthesis of tetrahydroisoquinolines and tetrahydroisoquinolinium salts together with their pharmacological properties at various nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. In general, the compounds were α4β2 nAChR antagonists, with the tetrahydroisoquinolinium salts being more potent than...

  13. A general population genetic framework for antagonistic selection that accounts for demography and recurrent mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connallon, Tim; Clark, Andrew G

    2012-04-01

    Antagonistic selection--where alleles at a locus have opposing effects on male and female fitness ("sexual antagonism") or between components of fitness ("antagonistic pleiotropy")--might play an important role in maintaining population genetic variation and in driving phylogenetic and genomic patterns of sexual dimorphism and life-history evolution. While prior theory has thoroughly characterized the conditions necessary for antagonistic balancing selection to operate, we currently know little about the evolutionary interactions between antagonistic selection, recurrent mutation, and genetic drift, which should collectively shape empirical patterns of genetic variation. To fill this void, we developed and analyzed a series of population genetic models that simultaneously incorporate these processes. Our models identify two general properties of antagonistically selected loci. First, antagonistic selection inflates heterozygosity and fitness variance across a broad parameter range--a result that applies to alleles maintained by balancing selection and by recurrent mutation. Second, effective population size and genetic drift profoundly affect the statistical frequency distributions of antagonistically selected alleles. The "efficacy" of antagonistic selection (i.e., its tendency to dominate over genetic drift) is extremely weak relative to classical models, such as directional selection and overdominance. Alleles meeting traditional criteria for strong selection (N(e)s > 1, where N(e) is the effective population size, and s is a selection coefficient for a given sex or fitness component) may nevertheless evolve as if neutral. The effects of mutation and demography may generate population differences in overall levels of antagonistic fitness variation, as well as molecular population genetic signatures of balancing selection.

  14. Pharmacological Characterization of H05, a Novel Serotonin and Noradrenaline Reuptake Inhibitor with Moderate 5-HT2A Antagonist Activity for the Treatment of Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiangqing; Wei, Yaqin; Guo, Qiang; Zhao, Song; Liu, Zhiqiang; Xiao, Ting; Liu, Yani; Qiu, Yinli; Hou, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Guisen; Wang, KeWei

    2018-06-01

    Multitarget antidepressants selectively inhibiting monoaminergic transporters and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) 2A receptor have demonstrated higher efficacy and fewer side effects than selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. In the present study, we synthesized a series of novel 3-(benzo[d][1,3]dioxol-4-yloxy)-3-arylpropyl amine derivatives, among which compound H05 was identified as a lead, exhibiting potent inhibitory effects on both serotonin ( K i = 4.81 nM) and norepinephrine (NE) ( K i = 6.72 nM) transporters and moderate 5-HT 2A antagonist activity (IC 50 = 60.37 nM). H05 was able to dose-dependently reduce the immobility duration in mouse forced swimming test and tail suspension test, with the minimal effective doses lower than those of duloxetine, and showed no stimulatory effect on locomotor activity. The administration of H05 (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg, by mouth) significantly shortened the immobility time of adrenocorticotropin-treated rats that serve as a model of treatment-resistant depression, whereas imipramine (30 mg/kg, by mouth) and duloxetine (30 mg/kg, by mouth) showed no obvious effects. Chronic treatment with H05 reversed the depressive-like behaviors in a rat model of chronic unpredictable mild stress and a mouse model of corticosterone-induced depression. Microdialysis analysis revealed that the administration of H05 at either 10 or 20 mg/kg increased the release of 5-HT and NE from the frontal cortex. The pharmacokinetic (PK) and brain penetration analyses suggest that H05 has favorable PK properties with good blood-brain penetration ability. Therefore, it can be concluded that H05, a novel serotonin and NE reuptake inhibitor with 5-HT 2A antagonist activity, possesses efficacious activity in the preclinical models of depression and treatment-resistant depression, and it may warrant further evaluation for clinical development. Copyright © 2018 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  15. The selective orexin receptor 1 antagonist ACT-335827 in a rat model of diet-induced obesity associated with metabolic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Steiner, Michel A.; Sciarretta, Carla; Pasquali, Anne; Jenck, Francois

    2013-01-01

    The orexin system regulates feeding, nutrient metabolism and energy homeostasis. Acute pharmacological blockade of orexin receptor 1 (OXR-1) in rodents induces satiety and reduces normal and palatable food intake. Genetic OXR-1 deletion in mice improves hyperglycemia under high-fat (HF) diet conditions. Here we investigated the effects of chronic treatment with the novel selective OXR-1 antagonist ACT-335827 in a rat model of diet-induced obesity (DIO) associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS...

  16. GABAA receptor partial agonists and antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krall, Jacob; Balle, Thomas; Krogsgaard-Larsen, Niels

    2015-01-01

    to the local temporal pattern of GABA impact, enabling phasic or tonic inhibition. Specific GABAAR antagonists are essential tools for physiological and pharmacological elucidation of the different type of GABAAR inhibition. However, distinct selectivity among the receptor subtypes (populations) has been shown...... antagonists have been essential in defining the tonic current but both remaining issues concerning the GABAARs involved and the therapeutic possibilities of modulating tonic inhibition underline the need for GABAAR antagonists with improved selectivity....

  17. 4-(2-Chloro-4-methoxy-5-methylphenyl)-N-[(1S)-2-cyclopropyl-1-(3-fluoro-4-methylphenyl)ethyl]5-methyl-N-(2-propynyl)-1,3-thiazol-2-amine hydrochloride (SSR125543A): a potent and selective corticotrophin-releasing factor(1) receptor antagonist. I. Biochemical and pharmacological characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gully, Danielle; Geslin, Michel; Serva, Laurence; Fontaine, Evelyne; Roger, Pierre; Lair, Christine; Darre, Valerie; Marcy, Claudine; Rouby, Pierre-Eric; Simiand, Jacques; Guitard, Josette; Gout, Georgette; Steinberg, Regis; Rodier, Daniel; Griebel, Guy; Soubrie, Philippe; Pascal, Marc; Pruss, Rebecca; Scatton, Bernard; Maffrand, Jean-Pierre; Le Fur, Gerard

    2002-04-01

    4-(2-Chloro-4-methoxy-5-methylphenyl)-N-[(1S)-2-cyclopropyl-1- (3-fluoro-4-methylphenyl)ethyl]5-methyl-N-(2-propynyl)-1,3-thiazol-2-amine hydrochloride (SSR125543A), a new 2-aminothiazole derivative, shows nanomolar affinity for human cloned or native corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF)(1) receptors (pK(i) values of 8.73 and 9.08, respectively), and a 1000-fold selectivity for CRF(1) versus CRF(2 alpha) receptor and CRF binding protein. SSR125543A antagonizes CRF-induced stimulation of cAMP synthesis in human retinoblastoma Y 79 cells (IC(50) = 3.0 +/- 0.4 nM) and adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) secretion in mouse pituitary tumor AtT-20 cells. SSR125543A is devoid of agonist activity in these models. Its brain penetration was demonstrated in rats by using an ex vivo [(125)I-Tyr(0)] ovine CRF binding assay. SSR125543A displaced radioligand binding to the CRF(1) receptor in the brain with an ID(50) of 6.5 mg/kg p.o. (duration of action >24 h). SSR125543A also inhibited the increase in plasma ACTH levels elicited in rats by i.v. CRF (4 microg/kg) injection (ID(50) = 1, 5, or 5 mg/kg i.v., i.p., and p.o., respectively); this effect lasted for more than 6 h when the drug was given orally at a dose of 30 mg/kg. SSR125543A (10 mg/kg p.o.) reduced by 73% the increase in plasma ACTH levels elicited by a 15-min restraint stress in rats. Moreover, SSR125543A (20 mg/kg i.p.) also antagonized the increase of hippocampal acetylcholine release induced by i.c.v. injection of 1 microg of CRF in rats. Finally, SSR125543A reduced forepaw treading induced by i.c.v. injection of 1 microg of CRF in gerbils (ID(50) = approximately 10 mg/kg p.o.). Altogether, these data indicate that SSR125543A is a potent, selective, and orally active CRF(1) receptor antagonist.

  18. Radiodinated L-703,606: a potent selective antagonist to the human NK[sub 1] receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, B E; Burns, H D [Merck Research Labs., West Point, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiopharmacology; Swain, C; Sabin, V [Merck Sharp and Dohme Research Labs., Harlow (United Kingdom). The Neuroscience Centre

    1994-01-01

    A new, radioiodinated, NK[sub 1] selective radiotracer ([[sup 125]I]L-703,606) was prepared. L-703,606 is an iodinated analog of the NK[sub 1] antagonist CP-96,345 in which the methoxy group has been replaced by an iodine substituent. [[sup 125]I]L-703,606 was made from the corresponding trimethylsilyl compound by treatment with no carrier added Na[sub 125]I and an Iodobead in TFA. The tracer was prepared at a specific activity of approx. 1100 Ci/mmol and preliminary binding studies demonstrated that [[sup 125]I]L=703,606 binds selectively to NK[sub 1] receptors. These results suggest that this radioligand will be useful for the biochemical and pharmacological characterization of the human NK[sub 1] receptor and, if labeled with I-123, may be useful for non-invasive NK[sub 1] receptor imaging via SPECT. (author).

  19. Pharmacological significance of the interplay between angiotensin receptors: MAS receptors as putative final mediators of the effects elicited by angiotensin AT1 receptors antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernomian, Larissa; Pernomian, Laena; Gomes, Mayara S; da Silva, Carlos H T P

    2015-12-15

    The interplay between angiotensin AT1 receptors and MAS receptors relies on several inward regulatory mechanisms from renin-angiotensin system (RAS) including the functional crosstalk between angiotensin II and angiotensin-(1-7), the competitive AT1 antagonism exhibited by angiotensin-(1-7), the antagonist feature assigned to AT1/MAS heterodimerization on AT1 signaling and the AT1-mediated downregulation of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Recently, such interplay has acquired an important significance to RAS Pharmacology since a few studies have supporting strong evidences that MAS receptors mediate the effects elicited by AT1 antagonists. The present Perspective provides an overview of the regulatory mechanisms involving AT1 and MAS receptors, their significance to RAS Pharmacology and the future directions on the interplay between angiotensin receptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Pharmacological properties of angiotensin II antagonists: Examining all the therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Unger

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II (Ang II, the effector peptide of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS, exerts a variety of actions in physiological blood pressure and body fluid regulation, and is implicated as a major pathogenic factor in the development of cardiovascular disease. Inhibition of the RAS, via treatment with the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I, or more recently the Ang II AT1-receptor blockers (ARBs, has been used as a therapeutic approach to the treatment of hypertension and other cardiovascular dysfunction. Evidence from animal and clinical studies shows that the antihypertensive and overall organ-protective actions of the ARBs are similar to those of ACE-I. However, as the ARBs selectively block the AT1-receptor, which is responsible for the known cardiovascular actions of Ang II, leave the AT2-receptor unopposed and do not interfere with the breakdown of bradykinin, there is the potential for beneficial effects in hypertensive patients with cardiovascular diseases such as left ventricular hypertrophy. Furthermore, there may be additional benefits when the ARBs are combined with ACE-I in such patients. Animal studies contribute to the elucidation and understanding of the role of AT1- and AT2-receptors in the cardiovascular system, and may help in the design of clinical studies aimed at investigating the effects of ACE-I, ARBs, and their combination, on cardiovascular outcomes in hypertensive patients.

  1. Pharmacological properties of angiotensin II antagonists: examining all the therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Unger

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II (Ang II, the effector peptide of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS, exerts a variety of actions in physiological blood pressure and body fluid regulation, and is implicated as a major pathogenic factor in the development of cardiovascular disease. Inhibition of the RAS, via treatment with the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I, or more recently the Ang II AT1-receptor blockers (ARBs, has been used as a therapeutic approach to the treatment of hypertension and other cardiovascular dysfunction. Evidence from animal and clinical studies shows that the antihypertensive and overall organ-protective actions of the ARBs are similar to those of ACE-I. However, as the ARBs selectively block the AT1-receptor, which is responsible for the known cardiovascular actions of Ang II, leave the AT2-receptor unopposed and do not interfere with the breakdown of bradykinin, there is the potential for beneficial effects in hypertensive patients with cardiovascular diseases such as left ventricular hypertrophy. Furthermore, there may be additional benefits when the ARBs are combined with ACE-I in such patients. Animal studies contribute to the elucidation and understanding of the role of AT1- and AT2-receptors in the cardiovascular system, and may help in the design of clinical studies aimed at investigating the effects of ACE-I, ARBs, and their combination, on cardiovascular outcomes in hypertensive patients.

  2. Pharmacological characterization of an imidazolopyrazole as novel selective androgen receptor modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuqing; Allan, George F; Tannenbaum, Pamela; Sbriscia, Tifanie; Linton, Olivia; Lai, Muh-Tsann; Haynes-Johnson, Donna; Bhattacharjee, Sheela; Lundeen, Scott G; Sui, Zhihua

    2013-03-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are androgens with tissue-selective activity. SARMs that have anabolic activity on muscle while having minimal stimulatory activity on prostate are classified as SARM agonists. They can be used to prevent the loss of lean body mass that is associated with cancer, immunodeficiency, renal disease and aging. They may also have anabolic activity on bone; thus, unlike estrogens, they may reverse the loss of bone strength associated with aging or hypogonadism. Our in-house effort on SARM program discovers a nonsteroidal androgen receptor ligand with a unique imidazolopyrazole moiety in its structure. In vitro, this compound is a weak androgen receptor binder and a weak androgen agonist. Despite this, in orchidectomized mature rats it is an effective SARM agonist, with an ED(50) on levator ani muscle of 3.3mg/kg and an ED(50) on ventral prostate of >30mg/kg. It has its maximal effect on muscle at the dose of 10mg/kg. In addition, this compound has mixed agonistic and antagonistic activities on prostate, reducing the weight of that tissue in intact rats by 22% at 10mg/kg. The compound does not have significant effect on gonadotropin levels or testosterone levels in both orchidectomized and intact male rats. It does not have notable progestin, estrogen or glucocorticoid agonistic or antagonistic activity in rats. In a female sexual behavior model, it improves the sexual desire of ovariectomized female rats for sexually mature intact males over nonsexually ovariectomized females. Overall, the imidazolopyrazole is a potent prostate-sparing candidate for development as a SARM agonist with an appropriate pharmacological profile for clinical benefit in muscle-wasting conditions and female sexual function disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. ADN-1184 a monoaminergic ligand with 5-HT(6/7) receptor antagonist activity: pharmacological profile and potential therapeutic utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kołaczkowski, M; Mierzejewski, P; Bieńkowski, P; Wesołowska, A; Newman-Tancredi, A

    2014-02-01

    Many dementia patients exhibit behavioural and psychological symptoms (BPSD) that include psychosis, aggressivity, depression and anxiety. Antipsychotic drugs are frequently prescribed but fail to significantly attenuate mood deficits, may interfere with cognitive function and are associated with motor and cardiac side effects, which are problematic in elderly patients. A need therefore exists for drugs that are better suited for the treatment of BPSD. We used in vitro cellular and in vivo behavioural tests to characterize ADN-1184, a novel arylsulfonamide ligand with potential utility for treatment of BPSD. ADN-1184 exhibits substantial 5-HT6 /5-HT7 /5-HT2A /D2 receptor affinity and antagonist properties in vitro. In tests of antipsychotic-like activity, it reversed MK-801-induced hyperactivity and stereotypies and inhibited conditioned avoidance response (MED = 3 mg·kg(-1) i.p.). Remarkably, ADN-1184 also reduced immobility time in the forced swim test at low doses (0.3 and 1 mg·kg(-1) i.p.; higher doses were not significantly active). Notably, up to 30 mg·kg(-1) ADN-1184 did not impair memory performance in the passive avoidance test or elicit significant catalepsy and only modestly inhibited spontaneous locomotor activity (MED = 30 mg·kg(-1) i.p.). ADN-1184 combines antipsychotic-like with antidepressant-like properties without interfering with memory function or locomotion. This profile is better than that of commonly used atypical antipsychotics tested under the same conditions and suggests that it is feasible to identify drugs that improve BPSD, without exacerbating cognitive deficit or movement impairment, which are of particular concern in patients with dementia. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  4. Characterization of the binding of [3H]-(+/-)-L-364,718: a new potent, nonpeptide cholecystokinin antagonist radioligand selective for peripheral receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, R.S.; Lotti, V.J.; Chen, T.B.; Kunkel, K.A.

    1986-01-01

    [3H]-(+/-)-L-364,718 a new, potent and selective nonpeptide peripheral cholecystokinin (CCK) antagonist bound saturably and reversibly to rat pancreatic membranes. The radioligand recognized a single class of binding sites with a high affinity (Kd = 0.23 nM). The binding of [ 3 H]-(+/-)-L-364,718 was stereospecific in that the more biologically active (-)-enantiomer demonstrated greater potency than the (+)-enantiomer. The rank order of potency of various CCK agonists and antagonists in displacing [ 3 H]-(+/-)-L-364,718 correlated with their ability to displace [ 125 I]CCK-8 and their known pharmacological activities in peripheral tissues. However, the absolute potencies of agonists were greater in displacing [ 125 I]CCK-8 than [ 3 H]-(+/-)-L-364,718. As described for other physiologically relevant receptor systems, the potency for displacement of [ 3 H]-(+/-)-L-364,718 binding by CCK agonists, but not antagonists, was reduced by guanosine 5'-(beta, gamma-imido)triphosphate and NaCl and enhanced by MgCl 2 . [ 3 H]-(+/-)-L-364,718 also demonstrated specific binding to bovine gall bladder tissue but not guinea pig brain or gastric glands, consistent with its selectivity as a peripheral CCK antagonist. [ 3 H]-(+/-)-L-364,718 binding to pancreatic membranes was not affected by various pharmacological agents known to interact with other common peptide and nonpeptide receptor systems. These data indicate that [ 3 H]-(+/-)-L-364,718 represents a new potent nonpeptide antagonist radioligand for the study of peripheral CCK receptors which may allow differentiation of agonist and antagonist interactions

  5. Meiotic drive influences the outcome of sexually antagonistic selection at a linked locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, M M

    2014-11-01

    Most meiotic drivers, such as the t-haplotype in Mus and the segregation distorter (SD) in Drosophila, act in a sex-specific manner, gaining a transmission advantage through one sex although suffering only the fitness costs associated with the driver in the other. Their inheritance is thus more likely through one of the two sexes, a property they share with sexually antagonistic alleles. Previous theory has shown that pairs of linked loci segregating for sexually antagonistic alleles are more likely to remain polymorphic and that linkage disequilibrium accrues between them. I probe this similarity between drive and sexual antagonism and examine the evolution of chromosomes experiencing these selection pressures simultaneously. Reminiscent of previous theory, I find that: the opportunity for polymorphism increases for a sexually antagonistic locus that is physically linked to a driving locus; the opportunity for polymorphism at a driving locus also increases when linked to a sexually antagonistic locus; and stable linkage disequilibrium accompanies any polymorphic equilibrium. Additionally, I find that drive at a linked locus favours the fixation of sexually antagonistic alleles that benefit the sex in which drive occurs. Further, I show that under certain conditions reduced recombination between these two loci is selectively favoured. These theoretical results provide clear, testable predictions about the nature of sexually antagonistic variation on driving chromosomes and have implications for the evolution of genomic architecture. © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  6. Characterization of JNJ-42847922, a Selective Orexin-2 Receptor Antagonist, as a Clinical Candidate for the Treatment of Insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaventure, Pascal; Shelton, Jonathan; Yun, Sujin; Nepomuceno, Diane; Sutton, Steven; Aluisio, Leah; Fraser, Ian; Lord, Brian; Shoblock, James; Welty, Natalie; Chaplan, Sandra R; Aguilar, Zuleima; Halter, Robin; Ndifor, Anthony; Koudriakova, Tatiana; Rizzolio, Michele; Letavic, Michael; Carruthers, Nicholas I; Lovenberg, Timothy; Dugovic, Christine

    2015-09-01

    Dual orexin receptor antagonists have been shown to promote sleep in various species, including humans. Emerging research indicates that selective orexin-2 receptor (OX2R) antagonists may offer specificity and a more adequate sleep profile by preserving normal sleep architecture. Here, we characterized JNJ-42847922 ([5-(4,6-dimethyl-pyrimidin-2-yl)-hexahydro-pyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrol-2-yl]-(2-fluoro-6-[1,2,3]triazol-2-yl-phenyl)-methanone), a high-affinity/potent OX2R antagonist. JNJ-42847922 had an approximate 2-log selectivity ratio versus the human orexin-1 receptor. Ex vivo receptor binding studies demonstrated that JNJ-42847922 quickly occupied OX2R binding sites in the rat brain after oral administration and rapidly cleared from the brain. In rats, single oral administration of JNJ-42847922 (3-30 mg/kg) during the light phase dose dependently reduced the latency to non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and prolonged NREM sleep time in the first 2 hours, whereas REM sleep was minimally affected. The reduced sleep onset and increased sleep duration were maintained upon 7-day repeated dosing (30 mg/kg) with JNJ-42847922, then all sleep parameters returned to baseline levels following discontinuation. Although the compound promoted sleep in wild-type mice, it had no effect in OX2R knockout mice, consistent with a specific OX2R-mediated sleep response. JNJ-42847922 did not increase dopamine release in rat nucleus accumbens or produce place preference in mice after subchronic conditioning, indicating that the compound lacks intrinsic motivational properties in contrast to zolpidem. In a single ascending dose study conducted in healthy subjects, JNJ-42847922 increased somnolence and displayed a favorable pharmacokinetic and safety profile for a sedative/hypnotic, thus emerging as a promising candidate for further clinical development for the treatment of insomnia. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  7. Bicyclams, selective antagonists of the human chemokine receptor CXCR4, potently inhibit feline immunodeficiency virus replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Egberink, H.F.; Clercq, E. de; Vliet, A.L.W. van; Balzarini, J.; Bridger, G.J.; Henson, G.; Schols, D.

    1999-01-01

    Bicyclams are low-molecular-weight anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) agents that have been shown to act as potent and selective CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) antagonists. Here, we demonstrate that bicyclams are potent inhibitors of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) replication when

  8. SELECTIVITY PROFILE OF SOME RECENT MUSCARINIC ANTAGONISTS IN BOVINE AND GUINEA-PIG TRACHEA AND HEART

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ROFFEL, AF; HAMSTRA, JJ; ELZINGA, CRS; ZAAGSMA, J

    1994-01-01

    The functional affinities of some recently developed subtype-selective muscarinic antagonists towards bovine tracheal smooth muscle muscarinic M(3) receptors were established and compared to binding affinities for bovine cardiac M(2) and functional affinities for guinea-pig tracheal smooth muscle

  9. N1-Substituted 2,3-Quinoxalinediones as Kainate Receptor Antagonists: X-ray Crystallography, Structure-Affinity Relationships and in vitro Pharmacology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Jakob Staun; Møllerud, Stine; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea

    2018-01-01

    Among the ionotropic glutamate receptors, the physiological role of kainate receptors is less well understood than AMPA and NMDA receptors, partly due to a lack of selective pharmacological tool compounds. Although ligands with selectivity towards the kainate receptor subtype GluK1 are available,...

  10. Identification of ligand-selective peptidic ActRIIB-antagonists using phage display technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotaro Sakamoto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ActRIIB (activin receptor type-2B is an activin receptor subtype constitutively expressed in the whole body, playing a role in cellular proliferation, differentiation, and metabolism. For its various physiological activities, ActRIIB interacts with activin and multiple other ligands including myostatin (MSTN, growth differentiation factor 11 (GDF11, and bone morphogenetic protein 9 (BMP9. Notably, the protein-protein interaction (PPI between ActRIIB and MSTN negatively controls muscular development. Therefore, this PPI has been targeted for effective treatment of muscle degenerative diseases such as muscular dystrophy and sarcopenia. Here, we report the identification of ligand-selective peptidic ActRIIB-antagonists by phage display technology. Our peptides bound to the extracellular domain of ActRIIB, inhibited PPIs between ActRIIB expressed on the cell surface and its ligands, and subsequently suppressed activation of Smad that serves as the downstream signal of the ActRIIB pathway. Interestingly, these peptidic antagonists displayed different ligand selectivities; the AR2mini peptide inhibited multiple ligands (activin A, MSTN, GDF11, and BMP9, AR9 inhibited MSTN and GDF11, while AR8 selectively inhibited MSTN. This is the first report of artificial peptidic ActRIIB-antagonists possessing ligand-selectivity.

  11. Antagonistic Activity of Lactobacillus reuteri Strains on the Adhesion Characteristics of Selected Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Tejinder P.; Kaur, Gurpreet; Kapila, Suman; Malik, Ravinder K.

    2017-01-01

    Adhesion ability of probiotics is the key factor that decides their colonization in the gastrointestinal tract and potential to inhibit pathogens. Therefore, adhesion ability can be considered as a key determinant for probiotic efficacy. Presents study documents the antagonistic activity of viable/untreated, Lithium chloride (LiCl) treated or heat-killed forms of eight probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri strains on the adhesion characteristics of selected pathogens. All strains investigated were ...

  12. Antagonistic natural and sexual selection on wing shape in a scrambling damselfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outomuro, David; Söderquist, Linus; Nilsson-Örtman, Viktor; Cortázar-Chinarro, María; Lundgren, Cecilia; Johansson, Frank

    2016-07-01

    Wings are a key trait underlying the evolutionary success of birds, bats, and insects. For over a century, researchers have studied the form and function of wings to understand the determinants of flight performance. However, to understand the evolution of flight, we must comprehend not only how morphology affects performance, but also how morphology and performance affect fitness. Natural and sexual selection can either reinforce or oppose each other, but their role in flight evolution remains poorly understood. Here, we show that wing shape is under antagonistic selection with regard to sexual and natural selection in a scrambling damselfly. In a field setting, natural selection (survival) favored individuals with long and slender forewings and short and broad hindwings. In contrast, sexual selection (mating success) favored individuals with short and broad forewings and narrow-based hindwings. Both types of selection favored individuals of intermediate size. These results suggest that individuals face a trade-off between flight energetics and maneuverability and demonstrate how natural and sexual selection can operate in similar directions for some wing traits, that is, wing size, but antagonistically for others, that is, wing shape. Furthermore, they highlight the need to study flight evolution within the context of species' mating systems and mating behaviors. © 2016 The Author(s).

  13. Antagonistic Activity of Lactobacillus reuteri Strains on the Adhesion Characteristics of Selected Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tejinder P; Kaur, Gurpreet; Kapila, Suman; Malik, Ravinder K

    2017-01-01

    Adhesion ability of probiotics is the key factor that decides their colonization in the gastrointestinal tract and potential to inhibit pathogens. Therefore, adhesion ability can be considered as a key determinant for probiotic efficacy. Presents study documents the antagonistic activity of viable/untreated, Lithium chloride (LiCl) treated or heat-killed forms of eight probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri strains on the adhesion characteristics of selected pathogens. All strains investigated were able to adhere to Caco-2 cells. L. reuteri strains tested were able to inhibit and displace ( P strain L. reuteri LR6 showed the strongest adhesion and pathogen inhibition ability among the eight L. reuteri strains tested. In addition, the abilities to inhibit and to displace adhered pathogens depended on both the probiotic and the pathogen strains tested suggesting the involvement of various mechanisms. The adhesion and antagonistic potential of the probiotic strains were significantly decreased upon exposure to 5 M LiCl, showing that surface molecules, proteinaceous in nature, are involved. The heat-killed forms of the probiotic L. reuteri strains also inhibited the attachment of selected pathogens to Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, in vitro assays showed that L. reuteri strains, as viable or heat-killed forms, are adherent to Caco-2 cells and are highly antagonistic to pathogens tested in which surface associated proteins play an important role.

  14. The incentive amplifying effects of nicotine are reduced by selective and non-selective dopamine antagonists in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmatier, Matthew I; Kellicut, Marissa R; Brianna Sheppard, A; Brown, Russell W; Robinson, Donita L

    2014-11-01

    Nicotine is a psychomotor stimulant with 'reinforcement enhancing' effects--the actions of nicotine in the brain increase responding for non-nicotine rewards. We hypothesized that this latter effect of nicotine depends on increased incentive properties of anticipatory cues; consistent with this hypothesis, multiple laboratories have reported that nicotine increases sign tracking, i.e. approach to a conditioned stimulus (CS), in Pavlovian conditioned-approach tasks. Incentive motivation and sign tracking are mediated by mesolimbic dopamine (DA) transmission and nicotine facilitates mesolimbic DA release. Therefore, we hypothesized that the incentive-promoting effects of nicotine would be impaired by DA antagonists. To test this hypothesis, separate groups of rats were injected with nicotine (0.4mg/kg base) or saline prior to Pavlovian conditioning sessions in which a CS (30s illumination of a light or presentation of a lever) was immediately followed by a sweet reward delivered in an adjacent location. Both saline and nicotine pretreated rats exhibited similar levels of conditioned approach to the reward location (goal tracking), but nicotine pretreatment significantly increased approach to the CS (sign tracking), regardless of type (lever or light). The DAD1 antagonist SCH-23390 and the DAD2/3 antagonist eticlopride reduced conditioned approach in all rats, but specifically reduced goal tracking in the saline pretreated rats and sign tracking in the nicotine pretreated rats. The non-selective DA antagonist flupenthixol reduced sign-tracking in nicotine rats at all doses tested; however, only the highest dose of flupenthixol reduced goal tracking in both nicotine and saline groups. The reductions in conditioned approach behavior, especially those by SCH-23390, were dissociated from simple motor suppressant effects of the antagonists. These experiments are the first to investigate the effects of dopaminergic drugs on the facilitation of sign-tracking engendered by

  15. Synthesis and Pharmacology of Halogenated δ-Opioid-Selective [D-Ala2]Deltorphin II Peptide Analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pescatore, Robyn; Marrone, Gina F.; Sedberry, Seth; Vinton, Daniel; Finkelstein, Netanel; Katlowitz, Yitzchak E.; Pasternak, Gavril W.; Wilson, Krista R.; Majumdar, Susruta

    2015-01-01

    Deltorphins are naturally occurring peptides produced by the skin of the giant monkey frog (Phyllomedusa bicolor). They are δ-opioid receptor-selective agonists. Herein, we report the design and synthesis of a peptide, Tyr-D-Ala-(pI)Phe-Glu-Ile-Ile-Gly-NH2 3 (GATE3-8), based on the [D-Ala2]deltorphin II template, which is δ-selective in in vitro radioligand binding assays over the μ- and κ-opioid receptors. It is a full agonist in [35S]GTPγS functional assays and analgesic when administered supraspinally to mice. Analgesia of 3 (GATE3-8) is blocked by the selective δ receptor antagonist naltrindole, indicating that the analgesic action of 3 is mediated by the δ-opioid receptor. We have established a radioligand in which 125I isincorporated into 3 (GATE3-8). The radioligand has a KD of 0.1 nM in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing the δ receptor. Additionally, a series of peptides based on 3 (GATE3-8) was synthesized by incorporating various halogens in the para position on the aromatic ring of Phe3. The peptides were characterized for binding affinity at the μ-, δ-, and κ-opioid receptors, which showed a linear correlation between binding affinity and the size of the halogen substituent. These peptides may be interesting tools for probing δ-opioid receptor pharmacology. PMID:25844930

  16. Synthesis and pharmacology of halogenated δ-opioid-selective [d-Ala(2)]deltorphin II peptide analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pescatore, Robyn; Marrone, Gina F; Sedberry, Seth; Vinton, Daniel; Finkelstein, Netanel; Katlowitz, Yitzchak E; Pasternak, Gavril W; Wilson, Krista R; Majumdar, Susruta

    2015-06-17

    Deltorphins are naturally occurring peptides produced by the skin of the giant monkey frog (Phyllomedusa bicolor). They are δ-opioid receptor-selective agonists. Herein, we report the design and synthesis of a peptide, Tyr-d-Ala-(pI)Phe-Glu-Ile-Ile-Gly-NH2 3 (GATE3-8), based on the [d-Ala(2)]deltorphin II template, which is δ-selective in in vitro radioligand binding assays over the μ- and κ-opioid receptors. It is a full agonist in [(35)S]GTPγS functional assays and analgesic when administered supraspinally to mice. Analgesia of 3 (GATE3-8) is blocked by the selective δ receptor antagonist naltrindole, indicating that the analgesic action of 3 is mediated by the δ-opioid receptor. We have established a radioligand in which (125)I is incorporated into 3 (GATE3-8). The radioligand has a KD of 0.1 nM in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing the δ receptor. Additionally, a series of peptides based on 3 (GATE3-8) was synthesized by incorporating various halogens in the para position on the aromatic ring of Phe(3). The peptides were characterized for binding affinity at the μ-, δ-, and κ-opioid receptors, which showed a linear correlation between binding affinity and the size of the halogen substituent. These peptides may be interesting tools for probing δ-opioid receptor pharmacology.

  17. Pharmacological modulation of the short-lasting effects of antagonistic direct current-stimulation over the human motor cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila eChaieb

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Combined administration of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS with either pergolide (PGL or D-cycloserine (D-CYC can prolong the excitability-diminishing effects of cathodal, or the excitability enhancing effect of anodal stimulation for up to 24hrs poststimulation. However, it remains unclear whether the potentiation of the observed aftereffects is dominated by the polarity and duration of the stimulation, or the dual application of combined stimulation and drug administration. The present study looks at whether the aftereffects of oral administration of PGL (a D1/D2 agonist or D-CYC (a partial NMDA receptor agonist, in conjunction with the short duration antagonistic application of tDCS (either 5 min cathodal followed immediately by 5 min anodal or vice versa, that alone only induces short lasting aftereffects, can modulate cortical excitability in healthy human subjects, as revealed by a single-pulse MEP (motor-evoked-potential paradigm. Results indicate that the antagonistic application of DC currents induces short-term neuroplastic aftereffects that are dependent upon the polarity of the second application of short-duration tDCS. The application of D-cycloserine resulted in a reversal of this trend and so consequently a marked inhibition of cortical excitability with the cathodal-anodal stimulation order was observed. The administration of pergolide showed no significant aftereffects in either case. These results emphasise that the aftereffects of tDCS are dependent upon the stimulation orientation, and mirror the findings of other studies reporting the neuroplasticity inducing aftereffects of tDCS, and their prolongation when combined with the administration of CNS active drugs.

  18. Structure-based prediction of subtype selectivity of histamine H3 receptor selective antagonists in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Kyung; Fristrup, Peter; Abrol, Ravinder; Goddard, William A

    2011-12-27

    Histamine receptors (HRs) are excellent drug targets for the treatment of diseases, such as schizophrenia, psychosis, depression, migraine, allergies, asthma, ulcers, and hypertension. Among them, the human H(3) histamine receptor (hH(3)HR) antagonists have been proposed for specific therapeutic applications, including treatment of Alzheimer's disease, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), epilepsy, and obesity. However, many of these drug candidates cause undesired side effects through the cross-reactivity with other histamine receptor subtypes. In order to develop improved selectivity and activity for such treatments, it would be useful to have the three-dimensional structures for all four HRs. We report here the predicted structures of four HR subtypes (H(1), H(2), H(3), and H(4)) using the GEnSeMBLE (GPCR ensemble of structures in membrane bilayer environment) Monte Carlo protocol, sampling ∼35 million combinations of helix packings to predict the 10 most stable packings for each of the four subtypes. Then we used these 10 best protein structures with the DarwinDock Monte Carlo protocol to sample ∼50 000 × 10(20) poses to predict the optimum ligand-protein structures for various agonists and antagonists. We find that E206(5.46) contributes most in binding H(3) selective agonists (5, 6, 7) in agreement with experimental mutation studies. We also find that conserved E5.46/S5.43 in both of hH(3)HR and hH(4)HR are involved in H(3)/ H(4) subtype selectivity. In addition, we find that M378(6.55) in hH(3)HR provides additional hydrophobic interactions different from hH(4)HR (the corresponding amino acid of T323(6.55) in hH(4)HR) to provide additional subtype bias. From these studies, we developed a pharmacophore model based on our predictions for known hH(3)HR selective antagonists in clinical study [ABT-239 1, GSK-189,254 2, PF-3654746 3, and BF2.649 (tiprolisant) 4] that suggests critical selectivity directing elements are: the basic proton

  19. Potent and long-acting corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) receptor 2 selective peptide competitive antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivier, J; Gulyas, J; Kirby, D; Low, W; Perrin, M H; Kunitake, K; DiGruccio, M; Vaughan, J; Reubi, J C; Waser, B; Koerber, S C; Martinez, V; Wang, L; Taché, Y; Vale, W

    2002-10-10

    We present evidence that members of the corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) family assume distinct structures when interacting with the CRF(1) and CRF(2) receptors. Predictive methods, physicochemical measurements, and structure-activity relationship studies have suggested that CRF, its family members, and competitive antagonists such as astressin [cyclo(30-33)[DPhe(12),Nle(21),Glu(30),Lys(33),Nle(38)]hCRF((12-41))] assume an alpha-helical conformation when interacting with their receptors. We had shown that alpha-helical CRF((9-41)) and sauvagine showed some selectivity for CRF receptors other than that responsible for ACTH secretion(1) and later for CRF2.(2) More recently, we suggested the possibility of a helix-turn-helix motif around a turn encompassing residues 30-33(3) that would confer high affinity for both CRF(1) and CRF(2)(2,4) in agonists and antagonists of all members of the CRF family.(3) On the other hand, the substitutions that conferred ca. 100-fold CRF(2) selectivity to the antagonist antisauvagine-30 [[DPhe(11),His(12)]sauvagine((11-40))] did not confer such property to the corresponding N-terminally extended agonists. We find here that a Glu(32)-Lys(35) side chain to side chain covalent lactam constraint in hCRF and the corresponding Glu(31)-Lys(34) side chain to side chain covalent lactam constraint in sauvagine yield potent ligands that are selective for CRF(2). Additionally, we introduced deletions and substitutions known to increase duration of action to yield antagonists such as cyclo(31-34)[DPhe(11),His(12),C(alpha)MeLeu(13,39),Nle(17),Glu(31),Lys(34)]Ac-sauvagine((8-40)) (astressin(2)-B) with CRF(2) selectivities greater than 100-fold. CRF receptor autoradiography was performed in rat tissue known to express CRF(2) and CRF(1) in order to confirm that astressin(2)-B could indeed bind to established CRF(2) but not CRF(1) receptor-expressing tissues. Extended duration of action of astressin(2)-B vs that of antisauvagine-30 is demonstrated in

  20. Does a selective 5-hydroxytryptamine antagonist (ICI 169, 369) lower blood pressure in hypertensive patients?

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, A K; Roy-Chaudhury, P; Webster, J; Petrie, J C

    1989-01-01

    1. The effect of single doses (10, 30 and 50 mg) of a selective 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, ICI 169, 369, on blood pressure, heart rate and the electrocardiogram was studied using a double-blind, placebo-controlled, within subject design in hypertensive patients. 2. ICI 169, 369 did not reduce blood pressure or increase QT interval as has been reported with ketanserin. This suggests that it is the other properties of ketanserin which are responsible for its antihypertensive effect. 3. Plasma c...

  1. Structure-Based Prediction of Subtype Selectivity of Histamine H3 Receptor Selective Antagonists in Clinical Trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Soo-Kyung; Fristrup, Peter; Abrol, Ravinder

    2011-01-01

    applications, including treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), epilepsy, and obesity.(1) However, many of these drug candidates cause undesired side effects through the cross-reactivity with other histamine receptor subtypes. In order to develop improved selectivity...... and antagonists. We find that E2065.46 contributes most in binding H3 selective agonists (5, 6, 7) in agreement with experimental mutation studies. We also find that conserved E5.46/S5.43 in both of hH3HR and hH4HR are involved in H3/ H4 subtype selectivity. In addition, we find that M3786.55 in hH3HR provides...... additional hydrophobic interactions different from hH4HR (the corresponding amino acid of T3236.55 in hH4HR) to provide additional subtype bias. From these studies, we developed a pharmacophore model based on our predictions for known hH3HR selective antagonists in clinical study [ABT-239 1, GSK-189,254 2...

  2. Successful strategy for the selection of new strawberry-associated rhizobacteria antagonistic to Verticillium wilt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, G; Kurze, S; Buchner, A; Wellington, E M; Smalla, K

    2000-12-01

    In order to isolate and characterize new strawberry-associated bacteria antagonistic to the soil-borne pathogenic fungus Verticillium dahliae Kleb., rhizobacterial populations from two different strawberry species, Greenish Strawberry (Fragaria viridis) and Garden Strawberry (F. x ananassa) obtained after plating onto King's B and glycerol-arginine agar, were screened for in vitro antagonism toward V. dahliae. The proportion of isolates with antifungal activity determined in in vitro assay against V. dahliae was higher for the Garden Strawberry than for the Greenish Strawberry. From 300 isolates, 20 isolates with strong antifungal activity were selected characterized by physiological profiling and molecular fingerprinting methods. Diversity among the isolates was characterized with molecular fingerprints using amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) and the more discriminating BOX-PCR fingerprint method. The physiological profiles were well correlated with molecular fingerprinting pattern analysis. Significant reduction of Verticillium wilt by bacterial dipping bath treatment was shown in the greenhouse and in fields naturally infested by V. dahliae. The relative increase of yield ranged from 117% (Streptomyces albidoflavus S1) to 344% (Pseudomonas fluorescens P10) in greenhouse trials, and 113% (Streptomyces albidoflavus S1) to 247% (Pseudomonas fluorescens P6) in field trials. Evaluation resulted in the selection of three effective biocontrol agents (Pseudomonas fluorescens P6, P10, and Streptomyces diastatochromogenes S9) antagonistic to the Verticillium wilt pathogen.

  3. ADN-1184 a monoaminergic ligand with 5-HT6/7 receptor antagonist activity: pharmacological profile and potential therapeutic utility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kołaczkowski, M; Mierzejewski, P; Bieńkowski, P; Wesołowska, A; Newman-Tancredi, A

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Many dementia patients exhibit behavioural and psychological symptoms (BPSD) that include psychosis, aggressivity, depression and anxiety. Antipsychotic drugs are frequently prescribed but fail to significantly attenuate mood deficits, may interfere with cognitive function and are associated with motor and cardiac side effects, which are problematic in elderly patients. A need therefore exists for drugs that are better suited for the treatment of BPSD. Experimental Approach We used in vitro cellular and in vivo behavioural tests to characterize ADN-1184, a novel arylsulfonamide ligand with potential utility for treatment of BPSD. Key Results ADN-1184 exhibits substantial 5-HT6/5-HT7/5-HT2A/D2 receptor affinity and antagonist properties in vitro. In tests of antipsychotic-like activity, it reversed MK-801-induced hyperactivity and stereotypies and inhibited conditioned avoidance response (MED = 3 mg·kg−1 i.p.). Remarkably, ADN-1184 also reduced immobility time in the forced swim test at low doses (0.3 and 1 mg·kg−1 i.p.; higher doses were not significantly active). Notably, up to 30 mg·kg−1 ADN-1184 did not impair memory performance in the passive avoidance test or elicit significant catalepsy and only modestly inhibited spontaneous locomotor activity (MED = 30 mg·kg−1 i.p.). Conclusions and Implications ADN-1184 combines antipsychotic-like with antidepressant-like properties without interfering with memory function or locomotion. This profile is better than that of commonly used atypical antipsychotics tested under the same conditions and suggests that it is feasible to identify drugs that improve BPSD, without exacerbating cognitive deficit or movement impairment, which are of particular concern in patients with dementia. PMID:24199650

  4. Biocontrol of Phytophthora Blight and Anthracnose in Pepper by Sequentially Selected Antagonistic Rhizobacteria against Phytophthora capsici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Mee Kyung; Shrestha, Anupama; Kim, Du-Yeon; Park, Kyungseok; Pak, Chun Ho; Kim, Ki Deok

    2013-06-01

    We previously developed a sequential screening procedure to select antagonistic bacterial strains against Phytophthora capsici in pepper plants. In this study, we used a modified screening procedure to select effective biocontrol strains against P. capsici; we evaluated the effect of selected strains on Phytophthora blight and anthracnose occurrence and fruit yield in pepper plants under field and plastic house conditions from 2007 to 2009. We selected four potential biocontrol strains (Pseudomonas otitidis YJR27, P. putida YJR92, Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvens YJR102, and Novosphingobium capsulatum YJR107) among 239 bacterial strains. In the 3-year field tests, all the selected strains significantly (P anthracnose incidence in at least one of the test years, but their biocontrol activities were variable. In addition, strains YJR27, YJR92, and YJR102, in certain harvests, increased pepper fruit numbers in field tests and red fruit weights in plastic house tests. Taken together, these results indicate that the screening procedure is rapid and reliable for the selection of potential biocontrol strains against P. capsici in pepper plants. In addition, these selected strains exhibited biocontrol activities against anthracnose, and some of the strains showed plant growth-promotion activities on pepper fruit.

  5. Discovery, synthesis, selectivity modulation and DMPK characterization of 5-azaspiro[2.4]heptanes as potent orexin receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasi, Luigi Piero; Artusi, Roberto; Bovino, Clara; Buzzi, Benedetta; Canciani, Luca; Caselli, Gianfranco; Colace, Fabrizio; Garofalo, Paolo; Giambuzzi, Silvia; Larger, Patrice; Letari, Ornella; Mandelli, Stefano; Perugini, Lorenzo; Pucci, Sabrina; Salvi, Matteo; Toro, PierLuigi

    2013-05-01

    Starting from a orexin 1 receptor selective antagonist 4,4-disubstituted piperidine series a novel potent 5-azaspiro[2.4]heptane dual orexin 1 and orexin 2 receptor antagonist class has been discovered. SAR and Pharmacokinetic optimization of this series is herein disclosed. Lead compound 15 exhibits potent activity against orexin 1 and orexin 2 receptors along with low cytochrome P450 inhibition potential, good brain penetration and oral bioavailability in rats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Crystal structure and pharmacological characterization of a novel N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist at the GluN1 glycine binding site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, Trine; Steffensen, Thomas Bielefeldt; Greenwood, Jeremy R

    2013-01-01

    NMDA receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate excitatory neurotransmission in the brain. They are tetrameric complexes composed of glycine-binding GluN1 and GluN3 subunits together with glutamate-binding GluN2 subunits. Subunit-selective antagonists that discriminate between the glyci...... screening. Furthermore, the structure reveals that the imino acetamido group of TK40 acts as an α-amino acid bioisostere, which could be of importance in bioisosteric replacement strategies for future ligand design....

  7. Pharmacological characterization and binding modes of novel racemic and optically active phenylalanine-based antagonists of AMPA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szymańska, Ewa; Nielsen, Birgitte; Johansen, Tommy Nørskov

    2017-01-01

    affinity and preference for AMPA receptors. Individual stereoisomers of selected compounds were further evaluated at recombinant homomeric rat GluA2 and GluA3 receptors. The most potent compound, (–)-2-amino-3-(6-chloro-2',5'-dihydroxy-5-nitro-[1,1'-biphenyl]-3-yl)propanoic acid, the expected R...

  8. Selective Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR-II Antagonist Reduces Body Weight Gain in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Asagami

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that mifepristone can prevent and reverse weight gain in animals and human subjects taking antipsychotic medications. This proof-of-concept study tested whether a more potent and selective glucocorticoid receptor antagonist could block dietary-induced weight gain and increase insulin sensitivity in mice. Ten-week-old, male, C57BL/6J mice were fed a diet containing 60% fat calories and water supplemented with 11% sucrose for 4 weeks. Groups (=8 received one of the following: CORT 108297 (80 mg/kg QD, CORT 108297 (40 mg/kg BID, mifepristone (30 mg/kg BID, rosiglitazone (10 mg/kg QD, or vehicle. Compared to mice receiving a high-fat, high-sugar diet plus vehicle, mice receiving a high-fat, high-sugar diet plus either mifepristone or CORT 108297 gained significantly less weight. At the end of the four week treatment period, mice receiving CORT 108297 40 mg/kg BID or CORT 108297 80 mg/kg QD also had significantly lower steady plasma glucose than mice receiving vehicle. However, steady state plasma glucose after treatment was not highly correlated with reduced weight gain, suggesting that the effect of the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist on insulin sensitivity may be independent of its mitigating effect on weight gain.

  9. Sex differences in immune responses: Hormonal effects, antagonistic selection, and evolutionary consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roved, Jacob; Westerdahl, Helena; Hasselquist, Dennis

    2017-02-01

    Males and females differ in both parasite load and the strength of immune responses and these effects have been verified in humans and other vertebrates. Sex hormones act as important modulators of immune responses; the male sex hormone testosterone is generally immunosuppressive while the female sex hormone estrogen tends to be immunoenhancing. Different sets of T-helper cells (Th) have important roles in adaptive immunity, e.g. Th1 cells trigger type 1 responses which are primarily cell-mediated, and Th2 cells trigger type 2 responses which are primarily humoral responses. In our review of the literature, we find that estrogen and progesterone enhance type 2 and suppress type 1 responses in females, whereas testosterone suppresses type 2 responses and shows an inconsistent pattern for type 1 responses in males. When we combine these patterns of generally immunosuppressive and immunoenhancing effects of the sex hormones, our results imply that the sex differences in immune responses should be particularly strong in immune functions associated with type 2 responses, and less pronounced with type 1 responses. In general the hormone-mediated sex differences in immune responses may lead to genetic sexual conflicts on immunity. Thus, we propose the novel hypothesis that sexually antagonistic selection may act on immune genes shared by the sexes, and that the strength of this sexually antagonistic selection should be stronger for type 2- as compared with type 1-associated immune genes. Finally, we put the consequences of sex hormone-induced effects on immune responses into behavioral and ecological contexts, considering social mating system, sexual selection, geographical distribution of hosts, and parasite abundance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Selective delivery of interleukine-1 receptor antagonist to inflamed joint by albumin fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Mengyuan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, a cytokine that is highly therapeutic to rheumatoid arthritis and several other inflammatory diseases, exhibits rapid blood clearance and poor retention time on the target in clinical application due to its small size and lack of specificity to target tissue. Albumin has been widely employed as macromolecular carrier for drug delivery purpose to extend the plasma half-life of therapeutic molecules and has been shown to selectively accumulate and to be metabolized in the inflamed joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. This suggests that genetic fusion of IL-1ra to albumin can probably overcome the drawbacks of in vivo application of IL-1ra. Result A recombinant protein, engineered by fusing human serum albumin (HSA to the carboxyl terminal of IL-1ra, was produced in Pichia pastoris and purified to homogeneity. The fusion protein retained the antagonist activity of IL-1ra and had a plasma half-life of approximately 30-fold more than that of IL-1ra in healthy mice. In vivo bio-distribution studies demonstrated that the fusion protein selectively accumulated in arthritic paws for a long period of time in mice with collagen-induced arthritis, showing low uptake rates in normal organs such as liver, kidney, spleen and lung in contrast to IL-1ra alone. Moreover, this fusion protein was able to significantly improve the therapeutic efficacy of IL-1ra in collagen-induced arthritis mouse model. Conclusions The fusion protein described here, able to selectively deliver IL-1ra to inflamed tissue, could yield important contributions for the therapy of rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory diseases.

  11. Effects of a selective cannabinoid CB2 agonist and antagonist on intravenous nicotine self administration and reinstatement of nicotine seeking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam Gamaleddin

    Full Text Available Over the last decade there have been significant advances in the discovery and understanding of the cannabinoid system along with the development of pharmacologic tools that modulate its function. Characterization of the crosstalk between nicotine addiction and the cannabinoid system may have significant implications on our understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying nicotine dependence. Two types of cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2 have been identified. CB1 receptors are expressed in the brain and modulate drug taking and drug seeking for various drugs of abuse, including nicotine. CB2 receptors have been recently identified in the brain and have been proposed to play a functional role in mental disorders and drug addiction. Our objective was to explore the role of CB2 receptors on intravenous nicotine self administration under two schedules of reinforcement (fixed and progressive ratio and on nicotine seeking induced by nicotine priming or by nicotine associated cues. For this, we evaluated the effects of various doses of the selective CB2 antagonist AM630 (1.25 to 5 mg/kg and CB2 agonist AM1241 (1 to 10 mg/kg on these behavioral responses in rats. Different groups of male Long Evans rats were trained to lever press for nicotine at a unit dose of 30 µg/kg/infusion. Subsequently, animals were randomized using a Latin-square design and injected with either AM1241 or AM630 using a counterbalanced within subject design. Administration of the CB2 ligands did not affect either nicotine-taking nicotine-seeking behavior. Our results do not support the involvement of CB2 receptors in nicotine-taking or nicotine-seeking behavior.

  12. Pharmacological characterization of LY233053: A structurally novel tetrazole-substituted competitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid antagonist with a short duration of action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoepp, D.D.; Ornstein, P.L.; Leander, J.D.; Lodge, D.; Salhoff, C.R.; Zeman, S.; Zimmerman, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    This study reports the activity of a structurally novel excitatory amino acid receptor antagonist, LY233053 [cis-(+-)-4-[(2H-tetrazol-5-yl)methyl]piperidine-2-carboxylic acid], the first tetrazole-containing competitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) antagonist. LY233053 potently inhibited NMDA receptor binding to rat brain membranes as shown by the in vitro displacement of [3H] CGS19755 (IC50 = 107 +/- 7 nM). No appreciable affinity in [3H]alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) or [3H]kainate binding assays was observed (IC50 values greater than 10,000 nM). In vitro NMDA receptor antagonist activity was further demonstrated by selective inhibition of NMDA-induced depolarization in cortical wedges (IC50 = 4.2 +/- 0.4 microM vs. 40 microM NMDA). LY233053 was effective after in vivo systemic administration in a number of animal models. In neonatal rats, LY233053 selectively blocked NMDA-induced convulsions (ED50 = 14.5 mg/kg i.p.) with a relatively short duration of action (2-4 hr). In pigeons, LY233053 potently antagonized (ED50 = 1.3 mg/kg i.m.) the behavioral suppressant effects of 10 mg/kg of NMDA. However, a dose of 160 mg/kg, i.m., was required to produce phencyclidine-like catalepsy in pigeons. In mice, LY233053 protected against maximal electroshock-induced seizures at lower doses (ED50 = 19.9 mg/kg i.p.) than those that impaired horizontal screen performance (ED50 = 40.9 mg/kg i.p.). Cholinergic and GABAergic neuronal degenerations after striatal infusion of NMDA were prevented by single or multiple i.p. doses of LY233053. In summary, the antagonist activity of LY233053 after systemic administration demonstrates potential therapeutic value in conditions of neuronal cell loss due to NMDA receptor excitotoxicity

  13. Pharmacological Characterization of 30 Human Melanocortin-4 Receptor Polymorphisms with the Endogenous Proopiomelanocortin Derived Agonists, Synthetic Agonists, and the Endogenous Agouti-Related Protein (AGRP) Antagonist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Zhimin; Proneth, Bettina; Dirain, Marvin L.; Litherland, Sally A.; Haskell-Luevano, Carrie

    2010-01-01

    The melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that is expressed in the central nervous system and has a role in regulating feeding behavior, obesity, energy homeostasis, male erectile response, and blood pressure. Since the report of the MC4R knockout mouse in 1997, the field has been searching for links between this genetic bio marker and human obesity and type 2 diabetes. More then 80 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been identified from human patients, both obese and non-obese controls. Many significant studies have been performed examining the pharmacological characteristics of these hMC4R SNPs in attempts to identify a molecular defects/insights that might link a genetic factor to the obese phenotype observed in patients possessing these mutations. Our laboratory has previously reported the pharmacological characterization of 40 of these polymorphic hMC4 receptors with multiple endogenous and synthetic ligands. The goal of the current study is to perform a similar comprehensive side-by-side characterization of 30 additional human hMC4R with single nucleotide polymorphisms using multiple endogenous agonists [α-, β, γ2-melanocyte stimulating hormones (MSH) and adrenocorticotropin (ACTH)], the antagonist agouti-related protein hAGRP(87-132), and synthetic agonists [NDP-MSH, MTII, and the tetrapeptide Ac-His-DPhe-Arg-Trp-NH2 (JRH887-9)]. These in vitro data, in some cases, provide a putative molecular link between dysfunctional hMC4R's and human obesity. These 30 hMC4R SNPs include R7H, R18H, R18L, S36Y, P48S, V50M, F51L, E61K, I69T, D90N, S94R, G98R, I121T, A154D, Y157S, W174C, G181D, F202L, A219V, I226T, G231S, G238D, N240S, C271R, S295P, P299L, E308K, I317V, L325F and 750DelGA. All but the N240S hMC4R were identified in obese patients. Additionally, we have characterized a double I102T/V103I hMC4R. In addition to the pharmacological characterization, the hMC4R variants were evaluated for cell surface expression by flow

  14. Pharmacological characterization of 30 human melanocortin-4 receptor polymorphisms with the endogenous proopiomelanocortin-derived agonists, synthetic agonists, and the endogenous agouti-related protein antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Zhimin; Proneth, Bettina; Dirain, Marvin L; Litherland, Sally A; Haskell-Luevano, Carrie

    2010-06-08

    The melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is expressed in the central nervous system and has a role in regulating feeding behavior, obesity, energy homeostasis, male erectile response, and blood pressure. Since the report of the MC4R knockout mouse in 1997, the field has been searching for links between this genetic biomarker and human obesity and type 2 diabetes. More then 80 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been identified from human patients, both obese and nonobese controls. Many significant studies have been performed examining the pharmacological characteristics of these hMC4R SNPs in attempts to identify a molecular defects/insights that might link a genetic factor to the obese phenotype observed in patients possessing these mutations. Our laboratory has previously reported the pharmacological characterization of 40 of these polymorphic hMC4 receptors with multiple endogenous and synthetic ligands. The goal of the current study is to perform a similar comprehensive side-by-side characterization of 30 additional human hMC4R with single nucleotide polymorphisms using multiple endogenous agonists [alpha-, beta-, and gamma(2)-melanocyte stimulating hormones (MSH) and adrenocorticotropin (ACTH)], the antagonist agouti-related protein hAGRP(87-132), and synthetic agonists [NDP-MSH, MTII, and the tetrapeptide Ac-His-dPhe-Arg-Trp-NH(2) (JRH887-9)]. These in vitro data, in some cases, provide a putative molecular link between dysfunctional hMC4R's and human obesity. These 30 hMC4R SNPs include R7H, R18H, R18L, S36Y, P48S, V50M, F51L, E61K, I69T, D90N, S94R, G98R, I121T, A154D, Y157S, W174C, G181D, F202L, A219 V, I226T, G231S, G238D, N240S, C271R, S295P, P299L, E308K, I317V, L325F, and 750DelGA. All but the N240S hMC4R were identified in obese patients. Additionally, we have characterized a double I102T/V103I hMC4R. In addition to the pharmacological characterization, the hMC4R variants were evaluated for cell surface

  15. 4-(Phenylsulfonyl)piperidines: novel, selective, and bioavailable 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Stephen R; Burkamp, Frank; Blurton, Peter; Cheng, Susan K F; Clarkson, Robert; O'Connor, Desmond; Spinks, Daniel; Tudge, Matthew; van Niel, Monique B; Patel, Smita; Chapman, Kerry; Marwood, Rose; Shepheard, Sara; Bentley, Graham; Cook, Gina P; Bristow, Linda J; Castro, Jose L; Hutson, Peter H; MacLeod, Angus M

    2002-01-17

    On the basis of a spirocyclic ether screening lead, a series of acyclic sulfones have been identified as high-affinity, selective 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonists. Bioavailability lacking in the parent, 1-(2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)ethyl)-4-(phenylsulfonyl)piperidine (12), was introduced by using stability toward rat liver microsomes as a predictor of bioavailability. By this means, the 4-cyano- and 4-carboxamidophenylsulfonyl derivatives 26 and 31 were identified as orally bioavailable, brain-penetrant analogues suitable for evaluation in animal models. Bioavailability was also attainable by N substitution leading to the N-phenacyl derivative 35. IKr activity detected through counterscreening was reduced to insignificant levels in vivo with the latter compound.

  16. Effect of the selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonists in hepatic cirrhosis patients with ascites: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-hui TANG

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonists in the treatment of hepatic cirrhosis patients with ascites. Methods PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Database for Chinese Technical Periodical (VIP, Chinese Journal Full-Text Database (CNKI, and Wan Fang Digital Journal Full-text Database were retrieved to collect clinical randomized controlled trials of hepatic cirrhosis with ascites treated by selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonists. Meta analysis was performed by using Review Manager 5.0. Results Nine randomized controlled trials including 1884 patients met the inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis showed that: 1 The selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonists were associated with a significant reduction in body weight compared with placebo (WMD=–1.98kg, 95%CI:–3.24-–0.72kg, P=0.002. Treatment with selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonists was associated with an improvement of low serum sodium concentration compared to placebo (WMD=3.74mmol/L, 95%CI: 0.91-6.58mmol/L, P=0.01. The percentage of patients with worsening ascites was higher in the group of patients treated with placebo (RR=0.51, 95%CI: 0.34-0.77, P=0.001. 2 The amplitude of increased urine volume was obviously higher in selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonists group than in placebo group (WMD=1437.65ml, 95%CI: 649.01-2226.30ml, P=0.0004. The difference of serum creatinine in the selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonists group was not statistically significant compared with the control group (WMD=–3.49μmol/L, 95%CI: –12.54¬5.56μmol/L, P=0.45. 3 There was no statistical significance between the two groups in the heart rate, systolic pressure, diastolic pressure and mortality (P>0.05. The rate of other adverse reactions was higher in the selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonists group compared with that of placebo group (P=0.003. Conclusion

  17. Structural Insights into Selective Ligand-Receptor Interactions Leading to Receptor Inactivation Utilizing Selective Melanocortin 3 Receptor Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Minying; Marelli, Udaya Kiran; Mertz, Blake; Beck, Johannes G; Opperer, Florian; Rechenmacher, Florian; Kessler, Horst; Hruby, Victor J

    2017-08-15

    Systematic N-methylated derivatives of the melanocortin receptor ligand, SHU9119, lead to multiple binding and functional selectivity toward melanocortin receptors. However, the relationship between N-methylation-induced conformational changes in the peptide backbone and side chains and melanocortin receptor selectivity is still unknown. We conducted comprehensive conformational studies in solution of two selective antagonists of the third isoform of the melanocortin receptor (hMC3R), namely, Ac-Nle-c[Asp-NMe-His 6 -d-Nal(2') 7 -NMe-Arg 8 -Trp 9 -Lys]-NH 2 (15) and Ac-Nle-c[Asp-His 6 -d-Nal(2') 7 -NMe-Arg 8 -NMe-Trp 9 -NMe-Lys]-NH 2 (17). It is known that the pharmacophore (His 6 -DNal 7 -Arg 8 -Trp 9 ) of the SHU-9119 peptides occupies a β II-turn-like region with the turn centered about DNal 7 -Arg 8 . The analogues with hMC3R selectivity showed distinct differences in the spatial arrangement of the Trp 9 side chains. In addition to our NMR studies, we also carried out molecular-level interaction studies of these two peptides at the homology model of hMC3R. Earlier chimeric human melanocortin 3 receptor studies revealed insights regarding the binding and functional sites of hMC3R selectivity. Upon docking of peptides 15 and 17 to the binding pocket of hMC3R, it was revealed that Arg 8 and Trp 9 side chains are involved in a majority of the interactions with the receptor. While Arg 8 forms polar contacts with D154 and D158 of hMC3R, Trp 9 utilizes π-π stacking interactions with F295 and F298, located on the transmembrane domain of hMC3R. It is hypothesized that as the frequency of Trp 9 -hMC3R interactions decrease, antagonistic activity increases. The absence of any interactions of the N-methyl groups with hMC3R suggests that their primary function is to modulate backbone conformations of the ligands.

  18. Reversal of sibutramine-induced anorexia with a selective 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgs, Suzanne; Cooper, Alison J; Barnes, Nicholas M

    2011-04-01

    The monoamine reuptake inhibitor sibutramine reduces food intake but the receptor subtypes mediating the effects of sibutramine on feeding remain to be clearly identified. The involvement of the 5-HT(2C) receptor subtype in the satiety-enhancing effects of sibutramine was investigated by examining the effects of co-administration of sibutramine with the selective 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonist SB 242084 Microstructural analyses of licking for a glucose solution by non-deprived, male rats were performed over a range of doses of sibutramine to identify a selective satiety-enhancing dose (experiment 1). Similar analyses were performed after administration of a vehicle control, two doses of SB 242084 alone or two doses of SB 242084 in combination with sibutramine (experiment 2). Sibutramine at doses of 1-3 mg/kg selectively reduced glucose consumption via a reduction in the number of bouts of licking. Non-selective effects to increase latency to lick were only observed at the higher dose of 6 mg/kg. Co-administration of sibutramine (3 mg/kg) with SB 242084 (1 or 3 mg/kg) reversed the effect of sibutramine on bout number whereas either dose of SB 242084 alone had no significant effect. We confirm behaviourally selective effects of sibutramine on feeding and provide further support for the satiety-enhancing effects of sibutramine. Our data also provide evidence for the involvement of the 5-HT(2C) receptor in the satiety-enhancing effects of sibutramine although additional targets may have an impact, and further investigation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the efficacy of sibutramine as an anorectic is warranted.

  19. Residues remote from the binding pocket control the antagonist selectivity towards the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xianqiang; Cheng, Jianxin; Wang, Xu; Tang, Yun; Ågren, Hans; Tu, Yaoquan

    2015-01-01

    The corticotropin releasing factors receptor-1 and receptor-2 (CRF1R and CRF2R) are therapeutic targets for treating neurological diseases. Antagonists targeting CRF1R have been developed for the potential treatment of anxiety disorders and alcohol addiction. It has been found that antagonists targeting CRF1R always show high selectivity, although CRF1R and CRF2R share a very high rate of sequence identity. This has inspired us to study the origin of the selectivity of the antagonists. We have therefore built a homology model for CRF2R and carried out unbiased molecular dynamics and well-tempered metadynamics simulations for systems with the antagonist CP-376395 in CRF1R or CRF2R to address this issue. We found that the side chain of Tyr6.63 forms a hydrogen bond with the residue remote from the binding pocket, which allows Tyr6.63 to adopt different conformations in the two receptors and results in the presence or absence of a bottleneck controlling the antagonist binding to or dissociation from the receptors. The rotameric switch of the side chain of Tyr3566.63 allows the breaking down of the bottleneck and is a perquisite for the dissociation of CP-376395 from CRF1R.

  20. Direct demonstration of D1 dopamine receptors in the bovine parathyroid gland using the D1 selective antagonist [125I]-SCH 23982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monsma, F.J. Jr.; Sibley, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of D1 dopamine receptors in the parathyroid gland has been proposed based on the demonstration of dopaminergic regulation of adenylate cyclase activity and parathyroid hormone release in dispersed bovine parathyroid cells. Using a radioiodinated D1 selective antagonist [125I]-SCH 23982, we have now directly labeled and characterized the D1 dopamine receptors in bovine parathyroid gland membranes. [125I]-SCH 23982 binds in a saturable manner with high affinity and low nonspecific binding to membranes prepared from bovine parathyroid glands. D1 dopamine receptors are present in this preparation at a concentration of approximately 130 fMoles/mg protein and [125I]-SCH 23982 binding increases with increasing protein concentration in a linear fashion. Determination of the Kd using the association (k1) and dissociation (k-1) rate constants revealed good agreement with the Kd determined by saturation analysis (390 pM vs. 682 pM, respectively). Inhibition of 0.3 nM [125I]-SCH 23982 binding by a series of dopaminergic antagonists verified the D1 nature of this binding site, exhibiting appropriate affinities and rank order of potency. The competition curves of all antagonists exhibited Hill coefficients that were not significantly different from 1. Inhibition of [125I]-SCH 23982 binding by dopamine and other dopaminergic agonists revealed the presence of high and low affinity agonist binding sites. Addition of 200 microM GppNHp effected a complete conversion of high affinity dopamine binding sites to a homogeneous population of low affinity dopamine sites. The D1 receptors identified in the parathyroid gland with [125I]-SCH 23982 appear to be pharmacologically identical with those previously characterized in the central nervous system

  1. The GABAA Antagonist DPP-4-PIOL Selectively Antagonises Tonic over Phasic GABAergic Currents in Dentate Gyrus Granule Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boddum, Kim; Frølund, Bente; Kristiansen, Uffe

    2014-01-01

    that phasic and tonic GABAA receptor currents can be selectively inhibited by the antagonists SR 95531 and the 4-PIOL derivative, 4-(3,3-diphenylpropyl)-5-(4-piperidyl)-3-isoxazolol hydrobromide (DPP-4-PIOL), respectively. In dentate gyrus granule cells, SR 95531 was found approximately 4 times as potent...

  2. Design and synthesis of labeled analogs of PhTX-56, a potent and selective AMPA receptor antagonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Trine F; Vogensen, Stine B; Jensen, Lars S

    2005-01-01

    Polyamines and polyamine toxins are biologically important molecules, having modulatory effects on nucleotides and proteins. The wasp toxin, philanthotoxin-433 (PhTX-433), is a non-selective and uncompetitive antagonist of ionotropic receptors, such as ionotropic glutamate receptors and nicotinic...

  3. Discovery of MK-3697: a selective orexin 2 receptor antagonist (2-SORA) for the treatment of insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roecker, Anthony J; Reger, Thomas S; Mattern, M Christa; Mercer, Swati P; Bergman, Jeffrey M; Schreier, John D; Cube, Rowena V; Cox, Christopher D; Li, Dansu; Lemaire, Wei; Bruno, Joseph G; Harrell, C Meacham; Garson, Susan L; Gotter, Anthony L; Fox, Steven V; Stevens, Joanne; Tannenbaum, Pamela L; Prueksaritanont, Thomayant; Cabalu, Tamara D; Cui, Donghui; Stellabott, Joyce; Hartman, George D; Young, Steven D; Winrow, Christopher J; Renger, John J; Coleman, Paul J

    2014-10-15

    Orexin receptor antagonists have demonstrated clinical utility for the treatment of insomnia. The majority of clinical efforts to date have focused on the development of dual orexin receptor antagonists (DORAs), small molecules that antagonize both the orexin 1 and orexin 2 receptors. Our group has recently disclosed medicinal chemistry efforts to identify highly potent, orally bioavailable selective orexin 2 receptor antagonists (2-SORAs) that possess acceptable profiles for clinical development. Herein we report additional SAR studies within the 'triaryl' amide 2-SORA series focused on improvements in compound stability in acidic media and time-dependent inhibition of CYP3A4. These studies resulted in the discovery of 2,5-disubstituted isonicotinamide 2-SORAs such as compound 24 that demonstrated improved stability and TDI profiles as well as excellent sleep efficacy across species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of a NR2B Selective NMDA Glutamate Antagonist, CP-101,606, on Dyskinesia and Parkinsonism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, John G.; Gunzler, Steven A; Kirchhoff, Trish; Hogarth, Penelope; Weaver, Jerry L.; Krams, Michael; Jamerson, Brenda; Menniti, Frank S.; Landen, Jaren W.

    2011-01-01

    Glutamate antagonists decrease dyskinesia and augment the antiparkinsonian effects of levodopa in animal models of Parkinson’s disease (PD). In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial we investigated the acute effects of placebo and two doses of a NR2B subunit selective NMDA glutamate antagonist, CP-101,606, on the response to two-hour levodopa infusions in 12 PD subjects with motor fluctuations and dyskinesia. Both doses of CP-101,606 reduced the maximum severity of levodopa-induced dyskinesia approximately 30% but neither dose improved parkinsonism. CP-101,606 was associated with a dose-related dissociation and amnesia. These results support the hypothesis that glutamate antagonists may be useful antidyskinetic agents. However, future studies will have to determine if the benefits of dyskinesia suppression can be achieved without adverse cognitive effects. PMID:18759356

  5. AVN-492, A Novel Highly Selective 5-HT6R Antagonist: Preclinical Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivachtchenko, Alexandre V; Okun, Ilya; Aladinskiy, Vladimir; Ivanenkov, Yan; Koryakova, Angela; Karapetyan, Ruben; Mitkin, Oleg; Salimov, Ramiz; Ivashchenko, Andrey

    2017-01-01

    Discovery of 5-HT6 receptor subtype and its exclusive localization within the central nervous system led to extensive investigations of its role in Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, and obesity. In the present study, we present preclinical evaluation of a novel highly-potent and highly-selective 5-HT6R antagonist, AVN-492. The affinity of AVN-492 to bind to 5-HT6R (Ki = 91 pM) was more than three orders of magnitude higher than that to bind to the only other target, 5-HT2BR, (Ki = 170 nM). Thus, the compound displayed great 5-HT6R selectivity against all other serotonin receptor subtypes, and is extremely specific against any other receptors such as adrenergic, GABAergic, dopaminergic, histaminergic, etc. AVN-492 demonstrates good in vitro and in vivo ADME profile with high oral bioavailability and good brain permeability in rodents. In behavioral tests, AVN-492 shows anxiolytic effect in elevated plus-maze model, prevents an apomorphine-induced disruption of startle pre-pulse inhibition (the PPI model) and reverses a scopolamine- and MK-801-induced memory deficit in passive avoidance model. No anti-obesity effect of AVN-492 was found in a murine model. The data presented here strongly indicate that due to its high oral bioavailability, extremely high selectivity, and potency to block the 5-HT6 receptor, AVN-492 is a very promising tool for evaluating the role the 5-HT6 receptor might play in cognitive and neurodegenerative impairments. AVN-492 is an excellent drug candidate to be tested for treatment of such diseases, and is currently being tested in Phase I trials.

  6. Benzazepines: Structure-activity relationships between D1 receptor blockade and selected pharmacological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iorio, L.C.; Billiard, W.; Gold, E.H.

    1986-01-01

    This chapter describes the displacement of 3 H-23390 and 3 H-spiperone binding by dopamine agonists and antagonists. The authors undertook an evaluation of the ability of selected analogs of SCH 23390 to displace 3 H-SCH 23390 and 3 H-spiperone. Structure-activity relationships of SCH 23390 analogs: 7-position substituents, is shown. It is shown that, in general, benzazepines with a variety of substituents in the 7-position retain their selectivity for D 1 sites. Substituents at the 8-position and at the N-position are also discussed. The authors determine a correlation between displacement of 3 H-SCH 23390 and blockade of dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase (DSAC). These effects and inhibition of conditioned avoidance responsing (CAS) in rats was also studied. A detailed evaluation is presented of the effects of SCH 23390 and haloperidol in the Inclined Screen and CAR tests

  7. Muscarinic Receptor Agonists and Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Kelly

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive review of pharmacological and medical aspects of the muscarinic class of acetylcholine agonists and antagonists is presented. The therapeutic benefits of achieving receptor subtype selectivity are outlined and applications in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease are discussed. A selection of chemical routes are described, which illustrate contemporary methodology for the synthesis of chiral medicinal compounds (asymmetric synthesis, chiral pool, enzymes. Routes to bicyclic intrannular amines and intramolecular Diels-Alder reactions are highlighted.

  8. Pharmacologic perspectives of functional selectivity by the angiotensin II type 1 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aplin, Mark; Christensen, Gitte Lund; Hansen, Jakob Lerche

    2008-01-01

    and to sudden injury occurring in the circulatory system. Hence, current drugs that block all AT(1) receptor actions most likely leave room for improvement. Recent developments show that two major signaling pathways used by the AT(1) receptor may be dissected by pharmacologic means. Key pathologic responses...... protein actions and simultaneous activation of G protein-dependent or -independent signaling could therefore be desirable in certain situations. The previously unappreciated concept of "functional selectivity" makes this exact strategy feasible and may yield improved drugs for cardiovascular therapy....

  9. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modelling of Receptor Internalization with CRTH2 Antagonists to Optimize Dose Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Andreas; Zisowsky, Jochen; Strasser, Daniel S; Gehin, Martine; Sidharta, Patricia N; Groenen, Peter M A; Dingemanse, Jasper

    2016-07-01

    The chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on T helper-2 cells (CRTH2) is a G-protein-coupled receptor for prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), a key mediator in inflammatory disorders. Two selective and potent CRTH2 antagonists currently in clinical development, ACT-453859 and setipiprant, were compared with respect to their (predicted) clinical efficacy. Population pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) models were developed to characterize how plasma concentrations (PK) of ACT-453859, its active metabolite ACT-463036 and setipiprant related to their effect on blocking PGD2-induced internalization of CRTH2 on eosinophils (PD). Simulations were used to identify doses and dosing regimens leading to 90 % of maximum blockade of CRTH2 internalization at trough. A combined concentration of ACT-453859 and its metabolite ACT-463036, with weights proportional to potency (based on an eosinophil shape change assay), enabled good characterization of the PD effect. The modelling and simulation results facilitated decision making by suggesting an ACT-453859 dose of 400 mg once daily (or 100 mg twice daily) for clinically relevant CRTH2 antagonism. Pharmacometric quantification demonstrated that CRTH2 internalization is a useful new biomarker to study CRTH2 antagonism. Ninety percent of maximum blockade of CRTH2 internalization at trough is suggested as a quantitative PD target in clinical studies.

  10. JB-9322, a new selective histamine H2-receptor antagonist with potent gastric mucosal protective properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, B; Montero, M J; Sevilla, M A; Román, L S

    1995-05-01

    1. JB-9322 is a selective histamine H2-receptor antagonist with gastric antisecretory activity and mucosal protective properties. 2. The affinity of JB-9322 for the guinea-pig atria histamine H2-receptor was approximately 2 times greater than that of ranitidine. 3. In vivo, the ID50 value for the inhibition of gastric acid secretion in pylorus-ligated rats was 5.28 mg kg-1 intraperitoneally. JB-9322 also dose-dependently inhibited gastric juice volume and pepsin secretion. In gastric lumen-perfused rats, intravenous injection of JB-9322 dose-dependently reduced histamine-, pentagastrin- and carbachol-stimulated gastric acid secretion. 4. JB-9322 showed antiulcer activity against aspirin and indomethacin-induced gastric lesions and was more potent than ranitidine. 5. JB-9322 effectively inhibited macroscopic gastric haemorrhagic lesions induced by ethanol. Intraperitoneal injection was effective in preventing the lesions as well as oral treatment. The oral ID50 value for these lesions was 1.33 mg kg-1. By contrast, ranitidine (50 mg kg-1) failed to reduce these lesions. In addition, the protective effect of JB-9322 was independent of prostaglandin synthesis. 6. These results indicate that JB-9322 is a new antiulcer drug that exerts a potent cytoprotective effect in addition to its gastric antisecretory activity.

  11. Pharmacological Treatment for Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaoru Sugi, MD PhD

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacological treatment for atrial fibrillation has a variety of purposes, such as pharmacological defibrillation, maintenance of sinus rhythm, heart rate control to prevent congestive heart failure and prevention of both cerebral infarction and atrial remodeling. Sodium channel blockers are superior to potassium channel blockers for atrial defibrillation, while both sodium and potassium channel blockers are effective in the maintenance of sinus rhythm. In general, digitalis or Ca antagonists are used to control heart rate during atrial fibrillation to prevent congestive heart failure, while amiodarone or bepridil also reduce heart rates during atrial fibrillation. Anticoagulant therapy with warfarin is recommended to prevent cerebral infarction and angiotensin converting enzyme antagonists or angiotensin II receptor blockers are also used to prevent atrial remodeling. One should select appropriate drugs for treatment of atrial fibrillation according to the patient's condition.

  12. SR 144528, the first potent and selective antagonist of the CB2 cannabinoid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi-Carmona, M; Barth, F; Millan, J; Derocq, J M; Casellas, P; Congy, C; Oustric, D; Sarran, M; Bouaboula, M; Calandra, B; Portier, M; Shire, D; Brelière, J C; Le Fur, G L

    1998-02-01

    Based on both binding and functional data, this study introduces SR 144528 as the first, highly potent, selective and orally active antagonist for the CB2 receptor. This compound which displays subnanomolar affinity (Ki = 0.6 nM) for both the rat spleen and cloned human CB2 receptors has a 700-fold lower affinity (Ki = 400 nM) for both the rat brain and cloned human CB1 receptors. Furthermore it shows no affinity for any of the more than 70 receptors, ion channels or enzymes investigated (IC50 > 10 microM). In vitro, SR 144528 antagonizes the inhibitory effects of the cannabinoid receptor agonist CP 55,940 on forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity in cell lines permanently expressing the h CB2 receptor (EC50 = 10 nM) but not in cells expressing the h CB1 (no effect at 10 microM). Furthermore, SR 144528 is able to selectively block the mitogen-activated protein kinase activity induced by CP 55,940 in cell lines expressing h CB2 (IC50 = 39 nM) whereas in cells expressing h CB1 an IC50 value of more than 1 microM is found. In addition, SR 144528 is shown to antagonize the stimulating effects of CP 55,940 on human tonsillar B-cell activation evoked by cross-linking of surface Igs (IC50 = 20 nM). In vivo, after oral administration SR 144528 totally displaced the ex vivo [3H]-CP 55,940 binding to mouse spleen membranes (ED50 = 0.35 mg/kg) with a long duration of action. In contrast, after the oral route it does not interact with the cannabinoid receptor expressed in the mouse brain (CB1). It is expected that SR 144528 will provide a powerful tool to investigate the in vivo functions of the cannabinoid system in the immune response.

  13. SVM Based Descriptor Selection and Classification of Neurodegenerative Disease Drugs for Pharmacological Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Mohammad; Shahzad Cheema, Muhammad; Klenner, Alexander; Younesi, Erfan; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Systems pharmacological modeling of drug mode of action for the next generation of multitarget drugs may open new routes for drug design and discovery. Computational methods are widely used in this context amongst which support vector machines (SVM) have proven successful in addressing the challenge of classifying drugs with similar features. We have applied a variety of such SVM-based approaches, namely SVM-based recursive feature elimination (SVM-RFE). We use the approach to predict the pharmacological properties of drugs widely used against complex neurodegenerative disorders (NDD) and to build an in-silico computational model for the binary classification of NDD drugs from other drugs. Application of an SVM-RFE model to a set of drugs successfully classified NDD drugs from non-NDD drugs and resulted in overall accuracy of ∼80 % with 10 fold cross validation using 40 top ranked molecular descriptors selected out of total 314 descriptors. Moreover, SVM-RFE method outperformed linear discriminant analysis (LDA) based feature selection and classification. The model reduced the multidimensional descriptors space of drugs dramatically and predicted NDD drugs with high accuracy, while avoiding over fitting. Based on these results, NDD-specific focused libraries of drug-like compounds can be designed and existing NDD-specific drugs can be characterized by a well-characterized set of molecular descriptors. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Selective CD28 Antagonist Blunts Memory Immune Responses and Promotes Long-Term Control of Skin Inflammation in Nonhuman Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Nicolas; Chevalier, Melanie; Mary, Caroline; Hervouet, Jeremy; Minault, David; Baker, Paul; Ville, Simon; Le Bas-Bernardet, Stephanie; Dilek, Nahzli; Belarif, Lyssia; Cassagnau, Elisabeth; Scobie, Linda; Blancho, Gilles; Vanhove, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Novel therapies that specifically target activation and expansion of pathogenic immune cell subsets responsible for autoimmune attacks are needed to confer long-term remission. Pathogenic cells in autoimmunity include memory T lymphocytes that are long-lived and present rapid recall effector functions with reduced activation requirements. Whereas the CD28 costimulation pathway predominantly controls priming of naive T cells and hence generation of adaptive memory cells, the roles of CD28 costimulation on established memory T lymphocytes and the recall of memory responses remain controversial. In contrast to CD80/86 antagonists (CTLA4-Ig), selective CD28 antagonists blunt T cell costimulation while sparing CTLA-4 and PD-L1-dependent coinhibitory signals. Using a new selective CD28 antagonist, we showed that Ag-specific reactivation of human memory T lymphocytes was prevented. Selective CD28 blockade controlled both cellular and humoral memory recall in nonhuman primates and induced long-term Ag-specific unresponsiveness in a memory T cell-mediated inflammatory skin model. No modification of memory T lymphocytes subsets or numbers was observed in the periphery, and importantly no significant reactivation of quiescent viruses was noticed. These findings indicate that pathogenic memory T cell responses are controlled by both CD28 and CTLA-4/PD-L1 cosignals in vivo and that selectively targeting CD28 would help to promote remission of autoimmune diseases and control chronic inflammation. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  15. In vitro pharmacological characterization of a novel selective alpha7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist ABT-107.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malysz, John; Anderson, David J; Grønlien, Jens H; Ji, Jianguo; Bunnelle, William H; Håkerud, Monika; Thorin-Hagene, Kirten; Ween, Hilde; Helfrich, Rosalind; Hu, Min; Gubbins, Earl; Gopalakrishnan, Sujatha; Puttfarcken, Pamela S; Briggs, Clark A; Li, Jinhe; Meyer, Michael D; Dyhring, Tino; Ahring, Philip K; Nielsen, Elsebet Ø; Peters, Dan; Timmermann, Daniel B; Gopalakrishnan, Murali

    2010-09-01

    Enhancement of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) activity is considered a therapeutic approach for ameliorating cognitive deficits present in Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. In this study, we describe the in vitro profile of a novel selective alpha7 nAChR agonist, 5-(6-[(3R)-1-azabicyclo[2,2,2]oct-3-yloxy]pyridazin-3-yl)-1H-indole (ABT-107). ABT-107 displayed high affinity binding to alpha7 nAChRs [rat or human cortex, [(3)H](1S,4S)-2,2-dimethyl-5-(6-phenylpyridazin-3-yl)-5-aza-2-azoniabicyclo[2.2.1]heptane (A-585539), K(i) = 0.2-0.6 nM or [(3)H]methyllycaconitine (MLA), 7 nM] that was at least 100-fold selective versus non-alpha7 nAChRs and other receptors. Functionally, ABT-107 did not evoke detectible currents in Xenopus oocytes expressing human or nonhuman alpha3beta4, chimeric (alpha6/alpha3)beta4, or 5-HT(3A) receptors, and weak or negligible Ca(2+) responses in human neuroblastoma IMR-32 cells (alpha3* function) and human alpha4beta2 and alpha4beta4 nAChRs expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. ABT-107 potently evoked human and rat alpha7 nAChR current responses in oocytes (EC(50), 50-90 nM total charge, approximately 80% normalized to acetylcholine) that were enhanced by the positive allosteric modulator (PAM) 4-[5-(4-chloro-phenyl)-2-methyl-3-propionyl-pyrrol-1-yl]-benzenesulfonamide (A-867744). In rat hippocampus, ABT-107 alone evoked alpha7-like currents, which were inhibited by the alpha7 antagonist MLA. In dentate gyrus granule cells, ABT-107 enhanced spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic current activity when coapplied with A-867744. In the presence of an alpha7 PAM [A-867744 or N-[(3R)-1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl]-4-chlorobenzamide hydrochloride (PNU-120596)], the addition of ABT-107 elicited MLA-sensitive alpha7 nAChR-mediated Ca(2+) signals in IMR-32 cells and rat cortical cultures and enhanced extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation in differentiated PC-12 cells. ABT-107 was also effective in protecting rat

  16. Structure of the Human Dopamine D3 Receptor in Complex with a D2/D3 Selective Antagonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien, Ellen Y.T.; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Qiang; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Hanson, Michael A.; Shi, Lei; Newman, Amy Hauck; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C. (Cornell); (Scripps); (NIDA); (Columbia); (UCSD); (Receptos)

    2010-11-30

    Dopamine modulates movement, cognition, and emotion through activation of dopamine G protein-coupled receptors in the brain. The crystal structure of the human dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) in complex with the small molecule D2R/D3R-specific antagonist eticlopride reveals important features of the ligand binding pocket and extracellular loops. On the intracellular side of the receptor, a locked conformation of the ionic lock and two distinctly different conformations of intracellular loop 2 are observed. Docking of R-22, a D3R-selective antagonist, reveals an extracellular extension of the eticlopride binding site that comprises a second binding pocket for the aryl amide of R-22, which differs between the highly homologous D2R and D3R. This difference provides direction to the design of D3R-selective agents for treating drug abuse and other neuropsychiatric indications.

  17. Discovery and characterization of ACT-335827, an orally available, brain penetrant orexin receptor type 1 selective antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Michel A; Gatfield, John; Brisbare-Roch, Catherine; Dietrich, Hendrik; Treiber, Alexander; Jenck, Francois; Boss, Christoph

    2013-06-01

    Stress relief: Orexin neuropeptides regulate arousal and stress processing through orexin receptor type 1 (OXR-1) and 2 (OXR-2) signaling. A selective OXR-1 antagonist, represented by a phenylglycine-amide substituted tetrahydropapaverine derivative (ACT-335827), is described that is orally available, penetrates the brain, and decreases fear, compulsive behaviors and autonomic stress reactions in rats. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Effects of the selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist SB-269970 and amisulpride on ketamine-induced schizophrenia-like deficits in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Nikiforuk

    Full Text Available A wide body of evidence suggests that 5-HT7 receptors are implicated in a variety of central nervous system functions, including control of learning and memory processes. According to recent preclinical data, the selective blockade of these receptors may be a potential target for cognitive improvement in schizophrenia. The first aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of the selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist, SB-269970, and the antipsychotic drug with a high affinity for 5-HT7 receptors, amisulpride, on ketamine-induced deficits in attentional set-shifting and novel object recognition tasks in rats. Because the role of 5-HT7 receptor blockade in ameliorating positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia remains equivocal, the second aim of these experiments was to examine the effectiveness of SB-269970 and amisulpride in reversing ketamine-induced deficits in prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex and in social interaction test in rats. The study revealed that acute administration of SB-269970 (1 mg/kg or amisulpride (3 mg/kg ameliorated ketamine-induced cognitive inflexibility and novel object recognition deficit in rats. Both compounds were also effective in attenuating ketamine-evoked disruption of social interactions. In contrast, neither SB-269970 nor amisulpride affected ketamine-disrupted prepulse inhibition or 50 kHz USVs accompanying social behaviour. In conclusion, antagonism of 5-HT7 receptors may represent a useful pharmacological approach in the treatment of cognitive deficits and some negative symptoms of schizophrenia.

  19. 4-Alkylated homoibotenic acid (HIBO) analogues: versatile pharmacological agents with diverse selectivity profiles towards metabotropic and ionotropic glutamate receptor subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ulf; Pickering, Darryl S; Nielsen, Birgitte

    2005-01-01

    4-Alkylated analogues of homoibotenic acid (HIBO) have previously shown high potency and selectivity at ionotropic and metabotropic glutamic acid receptor (iGluR and mGluR) subtypes. Compounds with different selectivity profiles are valuable pharmacological tools for neuropharmacological studies...

  20. Novel selective thiazoleacetic acids as CRTH2 antagonists developed from in silico derived hits. Part 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rist, Oystein; Grimstrup, Marie; Receveur, Jean-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Structure-activity relationships of three related series of 4-phenylthiazol-5-ylacetic acids, derived from two hits emanating from a focused library obtained by in silico screening, have been explored as CRTH2 (chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on Th2 cells) antagonists....... Several compounds with double digit nanomolar binding affinity and full antagonistic efficacy for human CRTH2 receptor were obtained in all subclasses. The most potent compound was [2-(4-chloro-benzyl)-4-(4-phenoxy-phenyl)-thiazol-5-yl]acetic acid having an binding affinity of 3.7nM and functional...

  1. Efficient Generation and Selection of Virtual Populations in Quantitative Systems Pharmacology Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, R J; Rieger, T R; Musante, C J

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative systems pharmacology models mechanistically describe a biological system and the effect of drug treatment on system behavior. Because these models rarely are identifiable from the available data, the uncertainty in physiological parameters may be sampled to create alternative parameterizations of the model, sometimes termed "virtual patients." In order to reproduce the statistics of a clinical population, virtual patients are often weighted to form a virtual population that reflects the baseline characteristics of the clinical cohort. Here we introduce a novel technique to efficiently generate virtual patients and, from this ensemble, demonstrate how to select a virtual population that matches the observed data without the need for weighting. This approach improves confidence in model predictions by mitigating the risk that spurious virtual patients become overrepresented in virtual populations.

  2. Novel selective thiazoleacetic acids as CRTH2 antagonists developed from in silico derived hits. Part 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimstrup, Marie; Rist, Øystein; Receveur, Jean-Marie

    2010-01-01

    Structure-activity relationships have been established by exploring the eastern and western side of 5-thiazolyleacetic acids as CRTH2 (chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on Th2 cells) antagonists. Benzhydryl motifs in the 2-position of the thiazole was found to be most advanta...

  3. Radiosynthesis of [11C]SB-705498, a selective transient receptor potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptor antagonist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolle, F.; Bramoulle, Y.; Deverre, J.R.; Bottlaender, M.; Passchier, J.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows: Objectives: The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptor, previously known as the vanilloid receptor 1 (VR1), is a non-selective cation channel activated by a range of noxious stimuli and highly expressed in nociceptive fibres. TRPV1 receptor is involved in pain and sensitisation associated with tissue injury and inflammation and therefore represents a pharmacological target of choice for the development of novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of chronic pain, migraine and gastrointestinal disorders. Among a novel series of pyrrolidinyl ureas recently discovered by GSK, SB-705498 (1, namely 1-(2-bromophenyl)-3-[(R)-1-(5- trifluoromethylpyridin-2-yl)pyrrolidin-3-yl]urea) has been identified as a potent, selective and orally bioavailable TRPV1 antagonist and considered for positron emission tomography studies. SB-705498 (1) has therefore been isotopically labelled with the short-lived positron-emitter carbon-11 (t1/2: 20.38 min) at its urea site using [ 11 C]phosgene in a one-pot two-step process, via the intermediate preparation of 2-bromophenyl [ 11 C]isocyanate. Methods: Carbon-11-labeling of SB-705498 comprises: (A) Trapping of [ 11 C]phosgene (radio-synthesized from cyclotron-produced [ 11 C]methane via [ 11 C]carbon tetrachloride using minor modifications of published processes) at room temperature for 1 to 2 minutes in 250 μL of acetonitrile containing 0.6 μmole of 2-bromoaniline (2) giving 2-bromophenyl [ 11 C]isocyanate ([ 11 C]-3), followed by (B) addition of an excess of chiral (R)-1-(5- trifluoromethylpyridin-2-yl)pyrrolidin-3-ylamine (4, 40 μmoles in 500 μL of acetonitrile) as the second amine and reaction at room temperature for an additional one minute giving the desired urea derivative ([ 11 C]SB-705498 ([ 11 C]-1)), (C) dilution of the crude reaction mixture with water (500 μL) containing 4% (v:v) of DEA, injection and purification on a semi-preparative Waters Symmetry R C18 HPLC

  4. The selective orexin receptor 1 antagonist ACT-335827 in a rat model of diet-induced obesity associated with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Michel A; Sciarretta, Carla; Pasquali, Anne; Jenck, Francois

    2013-01-01

    The orexin system regulates feeding, nutrient metabolism and energy homeostasis. Acute pharmacological blockade of orexin receptor 1 (OXR-1) in rodents induces satiety and reduces normal and palatable food intake. Genetic OXR-1 deletion in mice improves hyperglycemia under high-fat (HF) diet conditions. Here we investigated the effects of chronic treatment with the novel selective OXR-1 antagonist ACT-335827 in a rat model of diet-induced obesity (DIO) associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS). Rats were fed either standard chow (SC) or a cafeteria (CAF) diet comprised of intermittent human snacks and a constant free choice between a HF/sweet (HF/S) diet and SC for 13 weeks. Thereafter the SC group was treated with vehicle (for 4 weeks) and the CAF group was divided into a vehicle and an ACT-335827 treatment group. Energy and water intake, food preference, and indicators of MetS (abdominal obesity, glucose homeostasis, plasma lipids, and blood pressure) were monitored. Hippocampus-dependent memory, which can be impaired by DIO, was assessed. CAF diet fed rats treated with ACT-335827 consumed less of the HF/S diet and more of the SC, but did not change their snack or total kcal intake compared to vehicle-treated rats. ACT-335827 increased water intake and the high-density lipoprotein associated cholesterol proportion of total circulating cholesterol. ACT-335827 slightly increased body weight gain (4% vs. controls) and feed efficiency in the absence of hyperphagia. These effects were not associated with significant changes in the elevated fasting glucose and triglyceride (TG) plasma levels, glucose intolerance, elevated blood pressure, and adiposity due to CAF diet consumption. Neither CAF diet consumption alone nor ACT-335827 affected memory. In conclusion, the main metabolic characteristics associated with DIO and MetS in rats remained unaffected by chronic ACT-335827 treatment, suggesting that pharmacological OXR-1 blockade has minimal impact in this model.

  5. The selective orexin receptor 1 antagonist ACT-335827 in a rat model of diet-induced obesity associated with metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Alexander Steiner

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The orexin system regulates feeding, nutrient metabolism and energy homeostasis. Acute pharmacological blockade of orexin receptor 1 (OXR-1 in rodents induces satiety and reduces normal and palatable food intake. Genetic OXR-1 deletion in mice improves hyperglycemia under high-fat (HF diet conditions. Here we investigated the effects of chronic treatment with the novel selective OXR-1 antagonist ACT-335827 in a rat model of diet-induced obesity (DIO associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS. Rats were fed either standard chow (SC or a cafeteria (CAF diet comprised of intermittent human snacks and a constant free choice between a HF/sweet (HF/S diet and SC for 13 weeks. Thereafter the SC group was treated with vehicle (for 4 weeks and the CAF group was divided into a vehicle and an ACT-335827 treatment group. Energy and water intake, food preference, and indicators of MetS (abdominal obesity, glucose homeostasis, plasma lipids, and blood pressure were monitored. Hippocampus-dependent memory, which can be impaired by DIO, was assessed. CAF diet fed rats treated with ACT-335827 consumed less of the HF/S diet and more of the SC, but did not change their snack or total kcal intake compared to vehicle-treated rats. ACT-335827 increased water intake and the high-density lipoprotein associated cholesterol proportion of total circulating cholesterol. ACT-335827 slightly increased body weight gain (4% versus controls and feed efficiency in the absence of hyperphagia. These effects were not associated with significant changes in the elevated fasting glucose and triglyceride (TG plasma levels, glucose intolerance, elevated blood pressure, and adiposity due to CAF diet consumption. Neither CAF diet consumption alone nor ACT-335827 affected memory. In conclusion, the main metabolic characteristics associated with DIO and MetS in rats remained unaffected by chronic ACT-335827 treatment, suggesting that pharmacological OXR-1 blockade has minimal impact in this

  6. Impact of selected antagonistic fungi on Fusarium species – toxigenic cereal pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delfina Popiel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium-ear blight is a destructive disease in various cereal-growing regions and leads to significant yield and quality losses for farmers and to contamination of cereal grains with mycotoxins, mainly deoxynivalenol and derivatives, zearalenone and moniliformin. Fusarium pathogens grow well and produce significant inoculum on crop resiudues. Reduction of mycotoxins production and pathogen sporulation may be influenced by saprophytic fungi, exhibiting antagonistic effect. Dual culture bioassays were used to examine the impact of 92 isolates (belonging to 29 fungal species against three toxigenic species, i.e. Fusarium avenaceum (Corda Saccardo, F. culmorum (W.G.Smith Saccardo and F. graminearum Schwabe. Both F.culmorum and F. graminearum isolates produce trichothecene mycotoxins and mycohormone zearalenone and are considered to be the most important cereal pathogens worldwide. Infection with those pathogens leads to accumulation of mycotoxins: deoxynivalenol (DON and zearalenone (ZEA in grains. Fusarium avenaceum isolates are producers of moniliformin (MON and enniatins. Isolates of Trichoderma sp. were found to be the most effective ones to control the growth of examined Fusarium species. The response of Fusarium isolates to antagonistic activity of Trichoderma isolates varied and also the isolates of Trichoderma differed in their antagonistic activity against Fusarium isolates. The production of MON by two isolates of F. avenaceum in dual culture on rice was reduced by 95% to 100% by T. atroviride isolate AN 35. The same antagonist reduced the amount of moniliformin from 100 μg/g to 6.5 μg/g when inoculated to rice culture contaminated with MON, which suggests the possible decomposition of this mycotoxin.

  7. Effects of three antagonists on selected pharmacodynamic effects of sublingually administered detomidine in the horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knych, Heather K; Stanley, Scott D

    2014-01-01

    To describe the effects of alpha2 -adrenergic receptor antagonists on the pharmacodynamics of sublingual (SL) detomidine in the horse. Randomized crossover design. Nine healthy adult horses with an average age of 7.6 ± 6.5 years. Four treatment groups were studied: 1) 0.04 mg kg(-1) detomidine SL; 2) 0.04 mg kg(-1) detomidine SL followed 1 hour later by 0.075 mg kg(-1) yohimbine intravenously (IV); 3) 0.04 mg kg(-1) detomidine SL followed 1 hour later by 4 mg kg(-1) tolazoline IV; and 4) 0.04 mg kg(-1) detomidine SL followed 1 hour later by 0.12 mg kg(-1) atipamezole IV. Each horse received all treatments with a minimum of 1 week between treatments. Blood samples were obtained and plasma analyzed for yohimbine, atipamezole and tolazoline concentrations by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Behavioral effects, heart rate and rhythm, glucose, packed cell volume (PCV) and plasma proteins were monitored. Chin-to-ground distance increased following administration of the antagonists, however, this effect was transient, with a return to pre-reversal values as early as 1 hour. Detomidine induced bradycardia and increased incidence of atrioventricular blocks were either transiently or incompletely antagonized by all antagonists. PCV and glucose concentrations increased with tolazoline administration, and atipamezole subjectively increased urination frequency but not volume. At the doses administered in this study, the alpha2 -adrenergic antagonistic effects of tolazoline, yohimbine and atipamezole on cardiac and behavioral effects elicited by SL administration of detomidine are transient and incomplete. © 2013 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  8. The alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-selective antagonist, methyllycaconitine, partially protects against beta-amyloid1-42 toxicity in primary neuron-enriched cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Shelley E; de Fiebre, Nancy Ellen C; de Fiebre, Christopher M

    2004-10-01

    Studies have suggested that the neuroprotective actions of alpha7 nicotinic agonists arise from activation of receptors and not from the extensive desensitization which rapidly follows activation. Here, we report that the alpha7-selective nicotinic antagonist, methyllycaconitine (MLA), protects against beta-amyloid-induced neurotoxicity; whereas the alpha4beta2-selective antagonist, dihydro-beta-erythroidine, does not. These findings suggest that neuroprotective actions of alpha7-acting agents arise from receptor inhibition/desensitization and that alpha7 antagonists may be useful neuroprotective agents.

  9. Acute D3 Antagonist GSK598809 Selectively Enhances Neural Response During Monetary Reward Anticipation in Drug and Alcohol Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Anna; Nestor, Liam J; McGonigle, John; Paterson, Louise; Boyapati, Venkataramana; Ersche, Karen D; Flechais, Remy; Kuchibatla, Shankar; Metastasio, Antonio; Orban, Csaba; Passetti, Filippo; Reed, Laurence; Smith, Dana; Suckling, John; Taylor, Eleanor; Robbins, Trevor W; Lingford-Hughes, Anne; Nutt, David J; Deakin, John FW; Elliott, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    Evidence suggests that disturbances in neurobiological mechanisms of reward and inhibitory control maintain addiction and provoke relapse during abstinence. Abnormalities within the dopamine system may contribute to these disturbances and pharmacologically targeting the D3 dopamine receptor (DRD3) is therefore of significant clinical interest. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the acute effects of the DRD3 antagonist GSK598809 on anticipatory reward processing, using the monetary incentive delay task (MIDT), and response inhibition using the Go/No-Go task (GNGT). A double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design approach was used in abstinent alcohol dependent, abstinent poly-drug dependent and healthy control volunteers. For the MIDT, there was evidence of blunted ventral striatal response to reward in the poly-drug-dependent group under placebo. GSK598809 normalized ventral striatal reward response and enhanced response in the DRD3-rich regions of the ventral pallidum and substantia nigra. Exploratory investigations suggested that the effects of GSK598809 were mainly driven by those with primary dependence on alcohol but not on opiates. Taken together, these findings suggest that GSK598809 may remediate reward deficits in substance dependence. For the GNGT, enhanced response in the inferior frontal cortex of the poly-drug group was found. However, there were no effects of GSK598809 on the neural network underlying response inhibition nor were there any behavioral drug effects on response inhibition. GSK598809 modulated the neural network underlying reward anticipation but not response inhibition, suggesting that DRD3 antagonists may restore reward deficits in addiction. PMID:28042871

  10. Stereochemistry and molecular pharmacology of (S)-thio-ATPA, a new potent and selective GluR5 agonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensbøl, T B; Jensen, H S; Nielsen, B

    2001-01-01

    )-Glu) receptors (EC(50)=14 microM), comparable in potency with ATPA (EC(50)=34 microM). Recent findings, that (S)-ATPA is a potent (EC(50)=0.48 microM) and selective agonist at homomerically expressed ionotropic GluR5, prompted us to resolve thio-ATPA using chiral chromatography and pharmacologically characterize...

  11. Role of dopamine D4 receptors in copulatory behavior: Studies with selective D4 agonists and antagonists in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, Fabrizio; Contini, Andrea; Melis, Maria Rosaria; Argiolas, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Dopamine influences the anticipatory and consummatory phases of sexual behavior, by acting on receptors of the D2 family (D2, D3 and D4) and in particular of the D2 subtype, although evidence for a role of D4 receptors in erectile function and copulatory behavior is also available. In order to clarify such a role of D4 receptors, the effect of selective D4 receptor agonists and antagonists on copulatory behavior of sexually potent male rats in classic copulation tests with a receptive female, was compared with that of apomorphine and haloperidol, a classic dopamine receptor agonist and antagonist, respectively. PD-168,077 (0.05-0.2mg/kg) and ABT-724 (0.01-0.04mg/kg), two selective D4 receptor agonists, given subcutaneously, improved dose-dependently copulatory behavior as shown by the decrease of mount frequency and post ejaculatory interval induced by PD-168,077, and of mount frequency, ejaculation latency, post ejaculatory and inter intromission intervals induced by ABT-724, and by the increase of ejaculation frequency and copulatory efficacy induced by both drugs. Conversely, L-745,870 (1-5mg/kg), a selective D4 receptor antagonist, given intraperitoneally, impaired dose-dependently copulatory behavior, as shown by the increase in intromission and ejaculation latencies, mount frequency, post ejaculatory interval and the decrease in ejaculation frequency and copulatory efficacy induced by this drug. L-745,870 (5mg/kg) administered before PD-168,077 (0.2mg/kg) or ABT-724 (0.04mg/kg), also abolished completely the facilitatory effects of both PD-168,077 and ABT-724 on sexual behavior. These results confirm the involvement of D4 receptors in specific aspects of male rat copulatory behavior that overlap only partially with those influenced by apomorphine and haloperidol. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Blocking S1P interaction with S1P1 receptor by a novel competitive S1P1-selective antagonist inhibits angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Yasuyuki; Ueda, Yasuji; Ohtake, Hidenori; Ono, Naoya; Takayama, Tetsuo; Nakazawa, Kiyoshi; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Goitsuka, Ryo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The effect of a newly developed S1P 1 -selective antagonist on angiogenic responses. ► S1P 1 is a critical component of VEGF-related angiogenic responses. ► S1P 1 -selective antagonist showed in vitro activity to inhibit angiogenesis. ► S1P 1 -selective antagonist showed in vivo activity to inhibit angiogenesis. ► The efficacy of S1P 1 -selective antagonist for anti-cancer therapies. -- Abstract: Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor type 1 (S1P 1 ) was shown to be essential for vascular maturation during embryonic development and it has been demonstrated that substantial crosstalk exists between S1P 1 and other pro-angiogenic growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor. We developed a novel S1P 1 -selective antagonist, TASP0277308, which is structurally unrelated to S1P as well as previously described S1P 1 antagonists. TASP0277308 inhibited S1P- as well as VEGF-induced cellular responses, including migration and proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Furthermore, TASP0277308 effectively blocked a VEGF-induced tube formation in vitro and significantly suppressed tumor cell-induced angiogenesis in vivo. These findings revealed that S1P 1 is a critical component of VEGF-related angiogenic responses and also provide evidence for the efficacy of TASP0277308 for anti-cancer therapies.

  13. Selective adenosine A2A receptor agonists and antagonists protect against spinal cord injury through peripheral and central effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esposito Emanuela

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Permanent functional deficits following spinal cord injury (SCI arise both from mechanical injury and from secondary tissue reactions involving inflammation. Enhanced release of adenosine and glutamate soon after SCI represents a component in the sequelae that may be responsible for resulting functional deficits. The role of adenosine A2A receptor in central ischemia/trauma is still to be elucidated. In our previous studies we have demonstrated that the adenosine A2A receptor-selective agonist CGS21680, systemically administered after SCI, protects from tissue damage, locomotor dysfunction and different inflammatory readouts. In this work we studied the effect of the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261, systemically administered after SCI, on the same parameters. We investigated the hypothesis that the main action mechanism of agonists and antagonists is at peripheral or central sites. Methods Spinal trauma was induced by extradural compression of SC exposed via a four-level T5-T8 laminectomy in mouse. Three drug-dosing protocols were utilized: a short-term systemic administration by intraperitoneal injection, a chronic administration via osmotic minipump, and direct injection into the spinal cord. Results SCH58261, systemically administered (0.01 mg/kg intraperitoneal. 1, 6 and 10 hours after SCI, reduced demyelination and levels of TNF-α, Fas-L, PAR, Bax expression and activation of JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK 24 hours after SCI. Chronic SCH58261 administration, by mini-osmotic pump delivery for 10 days, improved the neurological deficit up to 10 days after SCI. Adenosine A2A receptors are physiologically expressed in the spinal cord by astrocytes, microglia and oligodendrocytes. Soon after SCI (24 hours, these receptors showed enhanced expression in neurons. Both the A2A agonist and antagonist, administered intraperitoneally, reduced expression of the A2A receptor, ruling out the possibility that the

  14. Naloxone : actions of an antagonist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorp, Eveline Louise Arianna van

    2009-01-01

    The opioid antagonist naloxone has a special place in pharmacology – it has no intrinsic action of its own, but it is able to save lives in the case of life threatening side-effects caused by other drugs. Naloxone is an antagonist for all opioid receptors, but most specifically for the μ-opioid

  15. Effects of oral cetirizine, a selective H1 antagonist, on allergen- and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in subjects with asthma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gong, H

    1990-03-01

    The protective efficacy of oral cetirizine, a selective and potent H1-receptor antagonist, against the immediate bronchoconstrictive response to allergen inhalation and exercise challenge was evaluated in 16 subjects with stable, predominantly mild asthma. The subjects underwent double-blind, crossover pretreatments in randomized order in two separate protocols with (1) three daily oral doses of 20 mg of cetirizine and placebo, followed by allergen inhalation, and (2) single oral doses of cetirizine (5, 10, and 20 mg), albuterol (4 mg), and placebo, followed by exercise with cold-air inhalation. Cetirizine failed to decrease bronchial sensitivity to inhaled allergen in eight of 10 subjects. Neither cetirizine nor albuterol uniformly inhibited exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Serum concentrations of cetirizine were consistent with systemic H1-blocking activity. Modest bronchodilation occurred after administration of cetirizine and albuterol before exercise but not after the third dose of cetirizine in the allergen protocol. One subject developed moderate drowsiness during multiple dosing with cetirizine. Thus, cetirizine, in the doses studied, is not uniformly effective in preventing allergen- or exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Histamine is one of many mediators participating in immediate asthmatic responses, and selective H1 antagonists do not completely block these airway events. However, cetirizine may still clinically benefit some patients with asthma, such as patients with allergic rhinitis or urticaria.

  16. (-)[125I]-iodopindolol, a new highly selective radioiodinated beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist: measurement of beta-receptors on intact rat astrocytoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barovsky, K.; Brooker, G.

    1980-01-01

    (-)-Pindolol, one of the most potent beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists, was radioiodinated using chloramine-T oxidation of carrier-free Na 125I and separated from unreacted pindolol to yield 2200 Ci/mmole (-)-[125I]-iodopindolol ((-)-[125I]-IPin). Mass and ultraviolet spectra confirmed that the iodination occurred on the indole ring, presumably at the 3 position. The binding of radiolabeled (-)-[125I]-IPin to beta-adrenergic receptors has been studied using intact C6 rat astrocytoma cells (2B subclone) grown in monolayer cultures. Binding of (-)[125IPin was saturable with time and concentration. Using 13 pM (-)-[125I]IPin, binding equilibrium was reached in 90 min at 21-22 degrees C. The reverse rate constant was 0.026 min-1 at 21 0 C. Specific binding (expressed as 1 microM(-)-propranolol displaceable counts) of (-)-[125I]-IPin was 95% of total binding. Scatchard analysis of (-)-[125I]-I]Pin binding revealed approximately 4300 receptors/cell and a dissociation constant of 30 pM. This was in excellent agreement with the kinetically determined dissociation constant of 35 pM. Displacement by propranolol and isoproterenol showed that (-)-[125I]-IPin binding sites were pharmacologically and stereospecifically selective. These results indicate that (-)-[125I]-IPin, a pure (-)-stereoisomer, high specific activity radioligand, selectively binds to beta-adrenergic receptors in whole cells with a high percentage of specific binding and should therefore be useful in the study and measurement of cellular beta-adrenergic receptors

  17. Administration of a selective β2 adrenergic receptor antagonist exacerbates neuropathology and cognitive deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branca, Caterina; Wisely, Elena V; Hartman, Lauren K; Caccamo, Antonella; Oddo, Salvatore

    2014-12-01

    Currently, there are no available approaches to cure or slow down the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which is characterized by the accumulation of extracellular amyloid-β (Aβ) deposits and intraneuronal tangles that comprised hyperphosphorylated tau. The β2 adrenergic receptors (β2ARs) are expressed throughout the cortex and hippocampus and play a key role in cognitive functions. Alterations in the function of these receptors have been linked to AD; however, these data remain controversial as apparent contradicting reports have been published. Given the current demographics of growing elderly population and the high likelihood of concurrent β-blocker use for other chronic conditions, more studies into the role of this receptor in AD animal models are needed. Here, we show that administration of ICI 118,551 (ICI), a selective β2AR antagonist, exacerbates cognitive deficits in a mouse model of AD, the 3xTg-AD mice. Neuropathologically, ICI increased Aβ levels and Aβ plaque burden. Concomitantly, ICI-treated 3xTg-AD mice showed an increase in tau phosphorylation and accumulation. Mechanistically, these changes were linked to an increase in amyloidogenic amyloid precursor protein processing. These results suggest that under the conditions used here, selective pharmacologic inhibition of β2ARs has detrimental effects on AD-like pathology in mice. Overall, these studies strengthen the notion that the link between β2ARs and AD is likely highly complex and suggest caution in generalizing the beneficial effects of β blockers on AD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Acute inhibition of selected membrane-proximal mouse T cell receptor signaling by mitochondrial antagonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwangmi Kim

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available T cells absorb nanometric membrane vesicles, prepared from plasma membrane of antigen presenting cells, via dual receptor/ligand interactions of T cell receptor (TCR with cognate peptide/major histocompatibility complex (MHC plus lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1 with intercellular adhesion molecule 1. TCR-mediated signaling for LFA-1 activation is also required for the vesicle absorption. Exploiting those findings, we had established a high throughput screening (HTS platform and screened a library for isolation of small molecules inhibiting the vesicle absorption. Follow-up studies confirmed that treatments (1 hour with various mitochondrial antagonists, including a class of anti-diabetic drugs (i.e., Metformin and Phenformin, resulted in ubiquitous inhibition of the vesicle absorption without compromising viability of T cells. Further studies revealed that the mitochondrial drug treatments caused impairment of specific membrane-proximal TCR signaling event(s. Thus, activation of Akt and PLC-gamma1 and entry of extracellular Ca(2+ following TCR stimulation were attenuated while polymerization of monomeric actins upon TCR triggering progressed normally after the treatments. Dynamic F-actin rearrangement concurring with the vesicle absorption was also found to be impaired by the drug treatments, implying that the inhibition by the drug treatments of downstream signaling events (and the vesicle absorption could result from lack of directional relocation of signaling and cell surface molecules. We also assessed the potential application of mitochondrial antagonists as immune modulators by probing effects of the long-term drug treatments (24 hours on viability of resting primary T cells and cell cycle progression of antigen-stimulated T cells. This study unveils a novel regulatory mechanism for T cell immunity in response to environmental factors having effects on mitochondrial function.

  19. Neuroprotective activity of selective mGlu1 and mGlu5 antagonists in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szydlowska, Kinga; Kaminska, Bozena; Baude, Andrea; Parsons, Chris G; Danysz, Wojciech

    2007-01-05

    The neuroprotective potential of allosteric mGlu5 and mGlu1 antagonists such as 6-methyl-2-(phenylethynyl)-pyridin (MPEP)/[(2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl)ethynyl]pyridine (MTEP) and (3-ethyl-2-methyl-quinolin-6-yl)-(4-methoxy-cyclohexyl)-methanone methanesulfonate (EMQMCM), was tested in vitro in organotypic hippocampal cultures and in the middle cerebral artery occlusion model of stroke in vivo. Both classes of agent have high selectivity toward mGlu sub-types and are active in animal models of various diseases indicating satisfactory CNS penetration. In organotypic hippocampal cultures MPEP showed high neuroprotective potency against sub-chronic (12 days) insult produced by 3-NP with an IC50 of c.a. 70 nM. In contrast, although the mGlu1 antagonist EMQMCM was also protective, it seems to be weaker yielding an IC50 of c.a. 1 microM. Similarly, in the transient (90 min) middle cerebral artery occlusion model of ischaemia in rats, MTEP seems to be more effective than EMQMCM. MTEP, at 2.5 mg/kg and at 5 mg/kg provided 50 and 70% neuroprotection if injected 2 h after the onset of ischaemia. At a dose of 5 mg/kg, significant (50%) neuroprotection was also seen if the treatment was delayed by 4 h. EMQMCM was not protective at 5 mg/kg (given 2 h after occlusion) but at 10 mg/kg 50% of neuroprotection was observed. The present data support stronger neuroprotective potential of mGlu5 than mGlu1 antagonists.

  20. Selective Toll-Like Receptor 4 Antagonists Prevent Acute Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Takeshi; Kawakita, Fumihiro; Nishikawa, Hirofumi; Nakano, Fumi; Liu, Lei; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2018-05-31

    There are no direct evidences showing the linkage between Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The purpose of this study was to examine if selective blockage of TLR4 prevents BBB disruption after SAH in mice and if the TLR4 signaling involves mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). One hundred and fifty-one C57BL/6 male mice underwent sham or endovascular perforation SAH operation, randomly followed by an intracerebroventricular infusion of vehicle or two dosages (117 or 585 ng) of a selective TLR4 antagonist IAXO-102 at 30 min post-operation. The effects were evaluated by survival rates, neurological scores, and brain water content at 24-72 h and immunoglobulin G immunostaining and Western blotting at 24 h post-SAH. IAXO-102 significantly prevented post-SAH neurological impairments, brain edema, and BBB disruption, resulting in improved survival rates. IAXO-102 also significantly suppressed post-SAH activation of a major isoform of MAPK p46 c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 as well as periostin induction and preserved tight junction protein zona occludens-1. Another selective TLR4 antagonist TAK-242, which has a different binding site from IAXO-102, also showed similar effects to IAXO-102. This study first provided the evidence that TLR4 signaling is involved in post-SAH acute BBB disruption and that the signaling is mediated at least partly by JNK activation. TLR4-targeted therapy may be promising to reduce post-SAH morbidities and mortalities.

  1. Guanidine-acylguanidine bioisosteric approach in the design of radioligands: synthesis of a tritium-labeled N(G)-propionylargininamide ([3H]-UR-MK114) as a highly potent and selective neuropeptide Y Y1 receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Max; Pop, Nathalie; Hutzler, Christoph; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G; Bernhardt, Günther; Buschauer, Armin

    2008-12-25

    Synthesis and characterization of (R)-N(alpha)-(2,2-diphenylacetyl)-N-(4-hydroxybenzyl)-N(omega)-([2,3-(3)H]-propanoyl)argininamide ([(3)H]-UR-MK114), an easily accessible tritium-labeled NPY Y(1) receptor (Y(1)R) antagonist (K(B): 0.8 nM, calcium assay, HEL cells) derived from the (R)-argininamide BIBP 3226, is reported. The radioligand binds with high affinity (K(D), saturation: 1.2 nM, kinetic experiments: 1.1 nM, SK-N-MC cells) and selectivity for Y(1)R over Y(2), Y(4), and Y(5) receptors. The title compound is a useful pharmacological tool for the determination of Y(1)R ligand affinities, quantification of Y(1)R binding sites, and autoradiography.

  2. Molecular pharmacology of the AMPA agonist, (S)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-phenyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid [(S)-APPA] and the AMPA antagonist, (R)-APPA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebert, B; Madsen, U; Lund, Trine Meldgaard

    1994-01-01

    )-APPA, whereas (R)-APPA is a non-N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (non-NMDA) receptor antagonist showing preferential AMPA blocking effects. In agreement with classical theories for competitive interaction between agonists and antagonists, the efficacy of depolarizations produced by (S)-APPA in the rat cortical wedge......The heterocyclic analogue of (S)-glutamic acid, (S)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid [(S)-AMPA] is a potent and selective AMPA receptor agonist, whereas the enantiomeric compound, (R)-AMPA, is virtually inactive. We have previously characterized (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5......-phenyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid [(RS)-APPA] as a partial AMPA receptor agonist showing about 60% of the efficacy of (RS)-AMPA. This partial agonism produced by (RS)-APPA is, however, only apparent, since resolution of (RS)-APPA has now been shown to provide the full AMPA receptor agonist, (S...

  3. Increased orbitofrontal brain activation after administration of a selective adenosine A2A antagonist in cocaine dependent subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gerard eMoeller

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Positron Emission Tomography imaging studies provide evidence of reduced dopamine function in cocaine dependent subjects in the striatum, which is correlated with prefrontal cortical glucose metabolism, particularly in the orbitofrontal cortex. However, whether enhancement of dopamine in the striatum in cocaine dependent subjects would be associated with changes in prefrontal cortical brain activation is unknown. One novel class of medications that enhance dopamine function via heteromer formation with dopamine receptors in the striatum is the selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonists. This study sought to determine the effects administration of the selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonist SYN115 on brain function in cocaine dependent subjects. Methodology/Principle Findings: Twelve cocaine dependent subjects underwent two fMRI scans (one after a dose of placebo and one after a dose of 100 mg of SYN115 while performing a working memory task with 3 levels of difficulty (3, 5, and 7 digits. fMRI results showed that for 7-digit working memory activation there was significantly greater activation from SYN115 compared to placebo in portions of left (L lateral orbitofrontal cortex, L insula, and L superior and middle temporal pole. Conclusion/Significance: These findings are consistent with enhanced dopamine function in the striatum in cocaine dependent subjects via blockade of adenosine A2A receptors producing increased brain activation in the orbitofrontal cortex and other cortical regions. This suggests that at least some of the changes in brain activation in prefrontal cortical regions in cocaine dependent subjects may be related to altered striatal dopamine function, and that enhancement of dopamine function via adenosine A2A receptor blockade could be explored further for amelioration of neurobehavioral deficits associated with chronic cocaine use.

  4. The highly selective orexin/hypocretin 1 receptor antagonist GSK1059865 potently reduces ethanol drinking in ethanol dependent mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Marcelo F; Moorman, David E; Aston-Jones, Gary; Becker, Howard C

    2016-04-01

    The orexin/hypocretin (ORX) system plays a major role in motivation for natural and drug rewards. In particular, a number of studies have shown that ORX signaling through the orexin 1 receptor (OX1R) regulates alcohol seeking and consumption. Despite the association between ORX signaling and motivation for alcohol, no study to date has investigated what role the ORX system plays in alcohol dependence, an understanding of which would have significant clinical relevance. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of the highly selective OX1R antagonist GSK1059865 on voluntary ethanol intake in ethanol-dependent and control non-dependent mice. Mice were subjected to a protocol in which they were evaluated for baseline ethanol intake and then exposed to intermittent ethanol or air exposure in inhalation chambers. Each cycle of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE), or air, exposure was followed by a test of ethanol intake. Once the expected effect of increased voluntary ethanol intake was obtained in ethanol dependent mice, mice were tested for the effect of GSK1059865 on ethanol and sucrose intake. Treatment with GSK1059865 significantly decreased ethanol drinking in a dose-dependent manner in CIE-exposed mice. In contrast GSK1059865 decreased drinking in air-exposed mice only at the highest dose used. There was no effect of GSK1059865 on sucrose intake. Thus, ORX signaling through the OX1R, using a highly-selective antagonist, has a profound influence on high levels of alcohol drinking induced in a dependence paradigm, but limited or no influence on moderate alcohol drinking or sucrose drinking. These results indicate that the ORX system may be an important target system for treating disorders of compulsive reward seeking such as alcoholism and other addictions in which motivation is strongly elevated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparative Structural Analysis of ERa and ERb Bound to Selective Estrogen Agonists and Antagonists

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Greene, Geoffrey

    2001-01-01

    ...) complexed with receptor-selective estrogens and antiestrogens (SERMs) The crystallographic structures of ERalpha and ERbeta ligand binding domains complexed with cis-R,R-diethyl-tetrahydrochrysene-2,8-diol (R,R-THC...

  6. Comparative Structural Analysis of ERa and ERb Bound to Selective Estrogen Agonists and Antagonists

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Greene, Geoggrey

    2000-01-01

    ...) complexed with receptor-selective estrogens and antiestrogens (SERMs). The crystallographic structures of ERalpha and ERbeta ligand binding domains complexed with cis- R,R-diethyl-tetrahydrochrysene-2, 8 -diol (R,R-THC...

  7. Blocking S1P interaction with S1P{sub 1} receptor by a novel competitive S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist inhibits angiogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Yasuyuki, E-mail: y.fujii@po.rd.taisho.co.jp [Department of Molecular Function and Pharmacology Laboratories, Taisho Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., 1-403 Saitama, Saitama 331-9530 (Japan); Ueda, Yasuji; Ohtake, Hidenori; Ono, Naoya; Takayama, Tetsuo; Nakazawa, Kiyoshi [Department of Molecular Function and Pharmacology Laboratories, Taisho Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., 1-403 Saitama, Saitama 331-9530 (Japan); Igarashi, Yasuyuki [Laboratory of Biomembrane and Biofunctional Chemistry, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0812 (Japan); Goitsuka, Ryo [Division of Development and Aging, Research Institute for Biological Sciences, Tokyo University of Science, Noda, Chiba 278-0022 (Japan)

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of a newly developed S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist on angiogenic responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1} is a critical component of VEGF-related angiogenic responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist showed in vitro activity to inhibit angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist showed in vivo activity to inhibit angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The efficacy of S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist for anti-cancer therapies. -- Abstract: Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor type 1 (S1P{sub 1}) was shown to be essential for vascular maturation during embryonic development and it has been demonstrated that substantial crosstalk exists between S1P{sub 1} and other pro-angiogenic growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor. We developed a novel S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist, TASP0277308, which is structurally unrelated to S1P as well as previously described S1P{sub 1} antagonists. TASP0277308 inhibited S1P- as well as VEGF-induced cellular responses, including migration and proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Furthermore, TASP0277308 effectively blocked a VEGF-induced tube formation in vitro and significantly suppressed tumor cell-induced angiogenesis in vivo. These findings revealed that S1P{sub 1} is a critical component of VEGF-related angiogenic responses and also provide evidence for the efficacy of TASP0277308 for anti-cancer therapies.

  8. Chemogenomic discovery of allosteric antagonists at the GPRC6A receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gloriam, David E.; Wellendorph, Petrine; Johansen, Lars Dan

    2011-01-01

    and pharmacological character: (1) chemogenomic lead identification through the first, to our knowledge, ligand inference between two different GPCR families, Families A and C; and (2) the discovery of the most selective GPRC6A allosteric antagonists discovered to date. The unprecedented inference of...... pharmacological activity across GPCR families provides proof-of-concept for in silico approaches against Family C targets based on Family A templates, greatly expanding the prospects of successful drug design and discovery. The antagonists were tested against a panel of seven Family A and C G protein-coupled receptors...

  9. Quantitative structure-activity relationships of selective antagonists of glucagon receptor using QuaSAR descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoj Kumar, Palanivelu; Karthikeyan, Chandrabose; Hari Narayana Moorthy, Narayana Subbiah; Trivedi, Piyush

    2006-11-01

    In the present paper, quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) approach was applied to understand the affinity and selectivity of a novel series of triaryl imidazole derivatives towards glucagon receptor. Statistically significant and highly predictive QSARs were derived for glucagon receptor inhibition by triaryl imidazoles using QuaSAR descriptors of molecular operating environment (MOE) employing computer-assisted multiple regression procedure. The generated QSAR models revealed that factors related to hydrophobicity, molecular shape and geometry predominantly influences glucagon receptor binding affinity of the triaryl imidazoles indicating the relevance of shape specific steric interactions between the molecule and the receptor. Further, QSAR models formulated for selective inhibition of glucagon receptor over p38 mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase of the compounds in the series highlights that the same structural features, which influence the glucagon receptor affinity, also contribute to their selective inhibition.

  10. Imaging dopamine D3 receptors in the human brain with positron emission tomography, [11C]PHNO, and a selective D3 receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searle, Graham; Beaver, John D; Comley, Robert A; Bani, Massimo; Tziortzi, Andri; Slifstein, Mark; Mugnaini, Manolo; Griffante, Cristiana; Wilson, Alan A; Merlo-Pich, Emilio; Houle, Sylvain; Gunn, Roger; Rabiner, Eugenii A; Laruelle, Marc

    2010-08-15

    Dopamine D(3) receptors are involved in the pathophysiology of several neuropsychiatric conditions. [(11)C]-(+)-PHNO is a radiolabeled D(2) and D(3) agonist, suitable for imaging the agonist binding sites (denoted D(2HIGH) and D(3)) of these receptors with positron emission tomography (PET). PET studies in nonhuman primates documented that, in vivo, [(11)C]-(+)-PHNO displays a relative selectivity for D(3) compared with D(2HIGH) receptor sites and that the [(11)C]-(+)-PHNO signal is enriched in D(3) contribution compared with conventional ligands such as [(11)C] raclopride. To define the D(3) contribution (f(PHNO)(D3)) to [(11)C]-(+)-PHNO binding potential (BP(ND)) in healthy humans, 52 PET scans were obtained in 19 healthy volunteers at baseline and following oral administration of various doses of the selective D(3) receptor antagonist, GSK598809. The impact of GSK598809 on [(11)C]-(+)-PHNO was regionally selective. In dorsal regions of the striatum, GSK598809 did not significantly affect [(11)C]-(+)-PHNO BP(ND) (f(PHNO)(D3) approximately 0%). Conversely, in the substantia nigra, GSK598809 dose-dependently reduced [(11)C]-(+)-PHNO binding to nonspecific level (f(PHNO)(D3) approximately 100%). In ventral striatum (VST), globus pallidus and thalamus (THA), [(11)C]-(+)-PHNO BP(ND) was attributable to a combination of D(2HIGH) and D(3) receptor sites, with f(PHNO)(D3) of 26%, 67% and 46%, respectively. D(3) receptor binding potential (BP(ND)(D3)) was highest in globus pallidus (1.90) and substantial nigra (1.39), with lower levels in VST (.77) and THA (.18) and negligible levels in dorsal striatum. This study elucidated the pharmacologic nature of the [(11)C]-(+)-PHNO signal in healthy subjects and provided the first quantification of D(3) receptor availability with PET in the living human brain. Copyright 2010 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Novel antagonistic interactions associated with plant polyploidization influence trait selection and habitat preference

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Arvanitis, L.; Wiklund, C.; Münzbergová, Zuzana; Dahlgren, J. P.; Ehrlén, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2010), s. 330-337 ISSN 1461-023X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/08/0706 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : herbivore * trait * selection Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 15.253, year: 2010

  12. Discovery that theonellasterol a marine sponge sterol is a highly selective FXR antagonist that protects against liver injury in cholestasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Renga

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The farnesoid-x-receptor (FXR is a bile acid sensor expressed in the liver and gastrointestinal tract. Despite FXR ligands are under investigation for treatment of cholestasis, a biochemical condition occurring in a number of liver diseases for which available therapies are poorly effective, mice harboring a disrupted FXR are protected against liver injury caused by bile acid overload in rodent models of cholestasis. Theonellasterol is a 4-methylene-24-ethylsteroid isolated from the marine sponge Theonella swinhoei. Here, we have characterized the activity of this theonellasterol on FXR-regulated genes and biological functions. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Interrogation of HepG2 cells, a human hepatocyte cell line, by microarray analysis and transactivation assay shows that theonellasterol is a selective FXR antagonist, devoid of any agonistic or antagonistic activity on a number of human nuclear receptors including the vitamin D receptor, PPARs, PXR, LXRs, progesterone, estrogen, glucorticoid and thyroid receptors, among others. Exposure of HepG2 cells to theonellasterol antagonizes the effect of natural and synthetic FXR agonists on FXR-regulated genes, including SHP, OSTα, BSEP and MRP4. A proof-of-concept study carried out to investigate whether FXR antagonism rescues mice from liver injury caused by the ligation of the common bile duct, a model of obstructive cholestasis, demonstrated that theonellasterol attenuates injury caused by bile duct ligation as measured by assessing serum alanine aminostrasferase levels and extent of liver necrosis at histopathology. Analysis of genes involved in bile acid uptake and excretion by hepatocytes revealed that theonellasterol increases the liver expression of MRP4, a basolateral transporter that is negatively regulated by FXR. Administering bile duct ligated mice with an FXR agonist failed to rescue from liver injury and downregulated the expression of MRP4. CONCLUSIONS: FXR antagonism in vivo

  13. A selective review of glutamate pharmacological therapy in obsessive–compulsive and related disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Grados, Marco; Atkins,Elizabeth; Kovacikova,Gabriela Ika; McVicar,Erin

    2015-01-01

    Marco A Grados,1 Elizabeth B Atkins,2 Gabriela I Kovacikova,3 Erin McVicar4 1Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 2Department of Psychology, Smith College, Northampton, MA, 3Department of Psychology, Wellesley College, Wellesley, MA, 4Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove, PA, USA Abstract: Glutamate, an excitatory central nervous system neurotransmitter, is emerging as a potential alternative pharmacological treatment when co...

  14. Synthesis and Pharmacological Evaluation of Selective Histone Deacetylase 6 Inhibitors in Melanoma Models

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tavares, M. T.; Shen, S.; Knox, T.; Hadley, M.; Kutil, Zsofia; Bařinka, Cyril; Villagra, A.; Kozikowski, A. P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 10 (2017), s. 1031-1036 ISSN 1948-5875 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-19640S; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : HDAC6 inhibitors * nexturastat A * melanoma Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 3.746, year: 2016

  15. In vitro and in vivo biotransformation of WMS-1410, a potent GluN2B selective NMDA receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falck, Evamaria; Begrow, Frank; Verspohl, Eugen J; Wünsch, Bernhard

    2014-06-01

    Structural modification of the GluN2B selective NMDA receptor antagonist ifenprodil led to the 3-benzazepine WMS-1410 with similar GluN2B affinity but higher receptor selectivity. Herein the in vitro and in vivo biotransformation of WMS-1410 is reported. Incubation of WMS-1410 with rat liver microsomes and different cofactors resulted in four hydroxylated phase I metabolites, two phase II metabolites and five combined phase I/II metabolites. With exception of catechol 4, these metabolites were also identified in the urine of a rat treated with WMS-1410. However the metabolites 7, 8 and 12 clearly show that the catechol metabolite 4 was also formed in vivo. As shown for ifenprodil the phenol of WMS-1410 represents the metabolically most reactive structural element. The biotransformation of WMS-1410 is considerably slower than the biotransformation of ifenprodil indicating a higher metabolic stability. From the viewpoint of metabolic stability the bioisosteric replacement of the phenol of WMS-1410 by a metabolically more stable moiety should be favourable. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Synthesis of [3]DIPPA: a potent irreversible antagonist selective for the κ opioid receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Anchih; Portoghese, P.S.

    1995-01-01

    2-(3,4-Dichlorophenyl)-N-methyl-N-[(1S)-1-(3-isothiocyanatophe nyl)-2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)ethyl]acetamide (1,DIPPA) has been previously reported to be an opioid receptor affinity label that produces selective and long-lasting κ opioid receptor antagonism in mice. High specific activity [ 3 H]DIPPA (39.7 Ci/mmol) was prepared by bromination and catalytic tritiation of the amino precursor of DIPPA followed by conversion to the isothiocyanate with thiophosgene. (Author)

  17. Chemically engineering ligand selectivity at the free fatty acid receptor 2 based on pharmacological variation between species orthologs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hudson, Brian D; Christiansen, Elisabeth; Tikhonova, Irina G

    2012-01-01

    When it is difficult to develop selective ligands within a family of related G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), chemically engineered receptors activated solely by synthetic ligands (RASSLs) are useful alternatives for probing receptor function. In the present work, we explored whether a RASSL...... on this receptor and demonstrates that exploitation of pharmacological variation between species orthologs is a powerful method to generate novel chemically engineered GPCRs.-Hudson, B. D., Christiansen, E., Tikhonova, I. G., Grundmann, M., Kostenis, E., Adams, D. R., Ulven, T., Milligan, G. Chemically engineering...

  18. Selection of antagonistic bacteria isolated from the Physalis peruviana rhizosphere against Fusarium oxysporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrea, R; Cabezas, L; Sierra, R; Cárdenas, M; Restrepo, S; Jiménez, P

    2011-09-01

    Cape gooseberries (Physalis peruviana) have become increasingly important in Colombia for both domestic consumption and the international export market. Vascular wilting caused by Fusarium oxysporum is the most damaging disease to P. peruviana crops in Colombia. The control of this pathogen is mainly carried out by chemical and cultural practices, increasing production costs and generating resistance. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to test rhizobacteria isolates from P. peruviana rhizosphere against F. oxysporum under in vitro and in vivo conditions. Over 120 strains were isolated, and five were selected for their high inhibition of F. oxysporum growth and conidia production under in vitro conditions. These strains inhibited growth by 41-58% and reduced three- to fivefold conidia production. In the in vivo assays, all the tested isolates significantly reduced fungal pathogenicity in terms of virulence. Isolate B-3.4 was the most efficient in delaying the onset of the first symptoms. All isolates were identified as belonging to the genus Pseudomonas except for A-19 (Bacillus sp.). Our results confirmed that there are prospective rhizobacteria strains that can be used as biological control agents; some of them being able to inhibit in vitro F. oxysporum growth and sporulation. Incorporating these bacteria into biological control strategies for the disease that causes high economical losses in the second most exported fruit from Colombia would result in a reduced impact on environment and economy. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. A single extracellular amino acid in Free Fatty Acid Receptor 2 defines antagonist species selectivity and G protein selection bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sergeev, Eugenia; Hansen, Anders Højgaard; Bolognini, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    selectivity and mutational swap studies confirmed this hypothesis. Extending these studies to agonist function indicated that although the lysine - arginine variation between human and mouse orthologs had limited effect on G protein-mediated signal transduction, removal of positive charge from this residue...... produced a signalling-biased variant of Free Fatty Acid Receptor 2 in which Gi-mediated signalling by both short chain fatty acids and synthetic agonists was maintained whilst there was marked loss of agonist potency for signalling via Gq/11 and G12/13 G proteins. A single residue at the extracellular face...

  20. Selective pharmacological blockade of the 5-HT7 receptor attenuates light and 8-OH-DPAT induced phase shifts of mouse circadian wheel running activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan eShelton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent reports have illustrated a reciprocal relationship between circadian rhythm disruption and mood disorders. The 5-HT7 receptor may provide a crucial link between the two sides of this equation since the receptor plays a critical role in sleep, depression, and circadian rhythm regulation. To further define the role of the 5-HT7 receptor as a potential pharmacotherapy to correct circadian rhythm disruptions, the current study utilized the selective 5-HT7 antagonist JNJ-18038683 (10 mg/kg in three different circadian paradigms. While JNJ-18038683 was ineffective at phase shifting the onset of wheel running activity in mice when administered at different circadian time (CT points across the circadian cycle, pretreatment with JNJ-18038683 blocked non-photic phase advance (CT6 induced by the 5-HT1A/7 receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT (3 mg/kg. Since light induced phase shifts in mammals are partially mediated via the modulation of the serotonergic system, we determined if JNJ-18038683 altered phase shifts induced by a light pulse at times known to phase delay (CT15 or advance (CT22 wheel running activity in free running mice. Light exposure resulted in a robust shift in the onset of activity in vehicle treated animals at both times tested. Administration of JNJ-18038683 significantly attenuated the light-induced phase delay and completely blocked the phase advance. The current study demonstrates that pharmacological blockade of the 5-HT7 receptor by JNJ-18038683 blunts both non-photic and photic phase shifts of circadian wheel running activity in mice. These findings highlight the importance of the 5-HT7 receptor in modulating circadian rhythms. Due to the opposite modulating effects of light resetting between diurnal and nocturnal species, pharmacotherapy targeting the 5-HT7 receptor in conjunction with bright light therapy may prove therapeutically beneficial by correcting the desynchronization of internal rhythms observed in depressed individuals.

  1. Antagonistic effect of disulfide-rich peptide aptamers selected by cDNA display on interleukin-6-dependent cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemoto, Naoto; Tsutsui, Chihiro; Yamaguchi, Junichi; Ueno, Shingo; Machida, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Toshikatsu; Sakai, Takafumi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Disulfide-rich peptide aptamer inhibits IL-6-dependent cell proliferation. ► Disulfide bond of peptide aptamer is essential for its affinity to IL-6R. ► Inhibitory effect of peptide depends on number and pattern of its disulfide bonds. -- Abstract: Several engineered protein scaffolds have been developed recently to circumvent particular disadvantages of antibodies such as their large size and complex composition, low stability, and high production costs. We previously identified peptide aptamers containing one or two disulfide-bonds as an alternative ligand to the interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R). Peptide aptamers (32 amino acids in length) were screened from a random peptide library by in vitro peptide selection using the evolutionary molecular engineering method “cDNA display”. In this report, the antagonistic activity of the peptide aptamers were examined by an in vitro competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and an IL-6-dependent cell proliferation assay. The results revealed that a disulfide-rich peptide aptamer inhibited IL-6-dependent cell proliferation with similar efficacy to an anti-IL-6R monoclonal antibody.

  2. Two selective HPTLC methods for determination of some angiotensin II receptor antagonists in tablets and biological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salah, Gamal A; Abd El-Wadood, Hanaa M; Khairy, Mohamed; Khorshed, Ahmed A

    2017-07-01

    Two simple, selective, precise and highly sensitive high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) methods have been developed and validated for analysis of five angiotensin II receptor antagonists, namely losartan, irbesartan valsartan, candesartan and olmesartan, which are widely used in clinical practice. HPTLC of the drugs was performed on pre-coated silica gel HPTLC plates 60 F 254 by development using a mobile phase composed of chloroform-acetone-glacial acetic acid (7.8:1.5:0.7m v/v/v), which was suitable for all of the studied drugs. The first method depended on utilizing reflectance/fluorescence mode for detection while the second method depended on using 2,3,5,6-tetrachloro-1,4-benzoquinone as spraying reagent for the first time to form orange spots scanned at 460 nm. A good linear relationship was obtained over the concentration ranges of 1.2-60 and 360-3000 ng/band while detection and quantification limits were in the ranges of 0.07-0.43, 45.2-140.49 and 0.21-1.29, 137.05-425.74 ng/band for reflectance/fluorescence and reflectance/absorbance methods respectively. The developed methods were applied successfully for their determination in tablets and spiked human plasma for reflectance/fluorescence method with good accuracy and precision, and so can be applied in the pharmacokinetic and bioavailability studies. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Radiosynthesis of (E)-N-(2-[{sup 11}C]methoxybenzyl)-3-phenyl-acrylamidine, a novel subnanomolar NR2B subtype-selective NMDA receptor antagonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thominiaux, Cyrille [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Departement de Recherche Medicale, CEA/DSV, 4 place du General Leclerc, F-91401 Orsay (France); Bruin, Beatrice de [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Departement de Recherche Medicale, CEA/DSV, 4 place du General Leclerc, F-91401 Orsay (France); Bramoulle, Yann [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Departement de Recherche Medicale, CEA/DSV, 4 place du General Leclerc, F-91401 Orsay (France); Hinnen, Francoise [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Departement de Recherche Medicale, CEA/DSV, 4 place du General Leclerc, F-91401 Orsay (France); Demphel, Stephane [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Departement de Recherche Medicale, CEA/DSV, 4 place du General Leclerc, F-91401 Orsay (France); Valette, Heric [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Departement de Recherche Medicale, CEA/DSV, 4 place du General Leclerc, F-91401 Orsay (France); Bottlaender, Michel [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Departement de Recherche Medicale, CEA/DSV, 4 place du General Leclerc, F-91401 Orsay (France); Besret, Laurent [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Departement de Recherche Medicale, CEA/DSV, 4 place du General Leclerc, F-91401 Orsay (France); Departement de Recherche Medicale, URA CEA/CNRS 2210, Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, CEA/DSV, 4 Place du General Leclerc, F-91401 Orsay (France); Kassiou, Michael [Department of PET and Nuclear Medicine, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Missenden Road, Camperdown, NSW 2050 (Australia); Department of Pharmacology, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Dolle, Frederic [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Departement de Recherche Medicale, CEA/DSV, 4 place du General Leclerc, F-91401 Orsay (France)]. E-mail: frederic.dolle@cea.fr

    2006-03-15

    Recently, a novel series of amidines has been described, exhibiting high NR2B-subtype selective N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist activity with nanomolar or subnanomolar affinity. Within the styrylamidine subclass (E)-N-(2-methoxybenzyl)-3-phenyl-acrylamidine (1), displayed the highest affinity (Ki=0.7nM versus [{sup 3}H]ifenprodil) and was considered an appropriate candidate for isotopic labelling with carbon-11 (T{sub 1/2}: 20.38min) at its methoxy group for imaging of NMDA receptors with PET. Derivative 1 has been labelled from the corresponding nor-analogue using [{sup 11}C]methyl triflate and the following experimental conditions : (1) trapping at -10{sup o}C of [{sup 11}C]methyl triflate in 300{mu}L of acetone containing 0.6-0.8mg of precursor 5 (2.4-3.2{mu}mol) and 5{mu}L of a 3M solution of NaOH in water (about 5eq.); (2) concentration to dryness of the reaction mixture (at 110{sup o}C, using a helium stream for 1-2min); (3) taking up the residue with 0.5mL of the HPLC mobile phase and (4) purification using semi-preparative HPLC (SymmetryPrep{sup (}R) C-18, Waters, 300x7.8mm). Typically, starting from a 1.5 Ci (55.5GBq) [{sup 11}C]CO{sub 2} production batch, 120-240m Ci (4.44-8.88GBq) of [{sup 11}C]-1 (20-40% decay-corrected radiochemical yield, n=5) was obtained within a total synthesis time of 25-30min. Specific radioactivities ranged from 0.8 to 1.2Ci/{mu}mol (29.6-44.4GBq/{mu}mol) at the end of radiosynthesis. No attempts were made to further optimise these reactions, as sufficient material was obtained to allow for preliminary pharmacological characterisation.

  4. AVN-211, Novel and Highly Selective 5-HT6 Receptor Small Molecule Antagonist, for the Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivachtchenko, Alexandre V; Lavrovsky, Yan; Ivanenkov, Yan A

    2016-03-07

    Within the past decade several novel targets have been indicated as key players in Alzheimer-type dementia and associated conditions, including a "frightening" memory loss as well as severe cognitive impairments. These proteins are deeply implicated in crucial cell processes, e.g., autophagy, growth and progression, apoptosis, and metabolic equilibrium. Since recently, 5-HT6R has been considered as one of the most prominent biological targets in AD drug therapy. Therefore, we investigated the potential procognitive and neuroprotective effects of our novel selective 5-HT6R antagonist, AVN-211. During an extensive preclinical evaluation the lead compound demonstrated a relatively high therapeutic potential and improved selectivity toward 5-HT6R as compared to reference drug candidates. It was thoroughly examined in different in vivo behavioral models directly related to AD and showed evident improvements in cognition and learning. In many cases, the observed effect was considerably greater than that determined for the reported drugs and drug candidates, including memantine, SB-742457, and Lu AE58054, evaluated under the same conditions. In addition, AVN-211 showed a similar or better anxiolytic efficacy than fenobam, rufinamide, lorazepam, and buspirone in an elevated plus-maze model, elevated platform, and open field tests. The compound demonstrated low toxicity and no side effects in vivo, an appropriate pharmacokinetic profile, and stability. In conclusion, AVN-211 significantly delayed or partially halted the progressive decline in memory function associated with AD, which makes it an interesting drug candidate for the treatment of neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. Advanced clinical trials are currently under active discussion and in high priority.

  5. Substituted 7-amino-5-thio-thiazolo[4,5-d]pyrimidines as potent and selective antagonists of the fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlström, Sofia; Nordvall, Gunnar; Sohn, Daniel; Hettman, Andreas; Turek, Dominika; Åhlin, Kristofer; Kers, Annika; Claesson, Martina; Slivo, Can; Lo-Alfredsson, Yvonne; Petersson, Carl; Bessidskaia, Galina; Svensson, Per H; Rein, Tobias; Jerning, Eva; Malmberg, Åsa; Ahlgen, Charlotte; Ray, Colin; Vares, Lauri; Ivanov, Vladimir; Johansson, Rolf

    2013-04-25

    We have developed two parallel series, A and B, of CX3CR1 antagonists for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. By modifying the substituents on the 7-amino-5-thio-thiazolo[4,5-d]pyrimidine core structure, we were able to achieve compounds with high selectivity for CX3CR1 over the closely related CXCR2 receptor. The structure-activity relationships showed that a leucinol moiety attached to the core-structure in the 7-position together with α-methyl branched benzyl derivatives in the 5-position displayed promising affinity, and selectivity as well as physicochemical properties, as exemplified by compounds 18a and 24h. We show the preparation of the first potent and selective orally available CX3CR1 antagonists.

  6. SSR240612 [(2R)-2-[((3R)-3-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-3-[[(6-methoxy-2-naphthyl)sulfonyl]amino]propanoyl)amino]-3-(4-[[2R,6S)-2,6-dimethylpiperidinyl]methyl]phenyl)-N-isopropyl-N-methylpropanamide hydrochloride], a new nonpeptide antagonist of the bradykinin B1 receptor: biochemical and pharmacological characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gougat, Jean; Ferrari, Bernard; Sarran, Lionel; Planchenault, Claudine; Poncelet, Martine; Maruani, Jeanne; Alonso, Richard; Cudennec, Annie; Croci, Tiziano; Guagnini, Fabio; Urban-Szabo, Katalin; Martinolle, Jean-Pierre; Soubrié, Philippe; Finance, Olivier; Le Fur, Gérard

    2004-05-01

    The biochemical and pharmacological properties of a novel non-peptide antagonist of the bradykinin (BK) B(1) receptor, SSR240612 [(2R)-2-[((3R)-3-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-3-[[(6-methoxy-2-naphthyl)sulfonyl]amino]propanoyl)amino]-3-(4-[[2R,6S)-2,6-dimethylpiperidinyl]methyl]phenyl)-N-isopropyl-N-methylpropanamide hydrochloride] were evaluated. SSR240612 inhibited the binding of [(3)H]Lys(0)-des-Arg(9)-BK to the B(1) receptor in human fibroblast MRC5 and to recombinant human B(1) receptor expressed in human embryonic kidney cells with inhibition constants (K(i)) of 0.48 and 0.73 nM, respectively. The compound selectivity for B(1) versus B(2) receptors was in the range of 500- to 1000-fold. SSR240612 inhibited Lys(0)-desAr(9)-BK (10 nM)-induced inositol monophosphate formation in human fibroblast MRC5, with an IC(50) of 1.9 nM. It also antagonized des-Arg(9)-BK-induced contractions of isolated rabbit aorta and mesenteric plexus of rat ileum with a pA(2) of 8.9 and 9.4, respectively. Antagonistic properties of SSR240612 were also demonstrated in vivo. SSR240612 inhibited des-Arg(9)-BK-induced paw edema in mice (3 and 10 mg/kg p.o. and 0.3 and 1 mg/kg i.p.). Moreover, SSR240612 reduced capsaicin-induced ear edema in mice (0.3, 3 and 30 mg/kg p.o.) and tissue destruction and neutrophil accumulation in the rat intestine following splanchnic artery occlusion/reperfusion (0.3 mg/kg i.v.). The compound also inhibited thermal hyperalgesia induced by UV irradiation (1 and 3 mg/kg p.o.) and the late phase of nociceptive response to formalin in rats (10 and 30 mg/kg p.o.). Finally, SSR240612 (20 and 30 mg/kg p.o.) prevented neuropathic thermal pain induced by sciatic nerve constriction in the rat. In conclusion, SSR240612 is a new, potent, and orally active specific non-peptide bradykinin B(1) receptor antagonist.

  7. Amelioration of cold injury-induced cortical brain edema formation by selective endothelin ETB receptor antagonists in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michinaga, Shotaro; Nagase, Marina; Matsuyama, Emi; Yamanaka, Daisuke; Seno, Naoki; Fuka, Mayu; Yamamoto, Yui; Koyama, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Brain edema is a potentially fatal pathological condition that often occurs in stroke and head trauma. Following brain insults, endothelins (ETs) are increased and promote several pathophysiological responses. This study examined the effects of ETB antagonists on brain edema formation and disruption of the blood-brain barrier in a mouse cold injury model (Five- to six-week-old male ddY mice). Cold injury increased the water content of the injured cerebrum, and promoted extravasation of both Evans blue and endogenous albumin. In the injury area, expression of prepro-ET-1 mRNA and ET-1 peptide increased. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of BQ788 (ETB antagonist), IRL-2500 (ETB antagonist), or FR139317 (ETA antagonist) prior to cold injury significantly attenuated the increase in brain water content. Bolus administration of BQ788, IRL-2500, or FR139317 also inhibited the cold injury-induced extravasation of Evans blue and albumin. Repeated administration of BQ788 and IRL-2500 beginning at 24 h after cold injury attenuated both the increase in brain water content and extravasation of markers. In contrast, FR139317 had no effect on edema formation when administrated after cold injury. Cold injury stimulated induction of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive reactive astrocytes in the injured cerebrum. Induction of reactive astrocytes after cold injury was attenuated by ICV administration of BQ788 or IRL-2500. These results suggest that ETB receptor antagonists may be an effective approach to ameliorate brain edema formation following brain insults.

  8. Amelioration of cold injury-induced cortical brain edema formation by selective endothelin ETB receptor antagonists in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shotaro Michinaga

    Full Text Available Brain edema is a potentially fatal pathological condition that often occurs in stroke and head trauma. Following brain insults, endothelins (ETs are increased and promote several pathophysiological responses. This study examined the effects of ETB antagonists on brain edema formation and disruption of the blood-brain barrier in a mouse cold injury model (Five- to six-week-old male ddY mice. Cold injury increased the water content of the injured cerebrum, and promoted extravasation of both Evans blue and endogenous albumin. In the injury area, expression of prepro-ET-1 mRNA and ET-1 peptide increased. Intracerebroventricular (ICV administration of BQ788 (ETB antagonist, IRL-2500 (ETB antagonist, or FR139317 (ETA antagonist prior to cold injury significantly attenuated the increase in brain water content. Bolus administration of BQ788, IRL-2500, or FR139317 also inhibited the cold injury-induced extravasation of Evans blue and albumin. Repeated administration of BQ788 and IRL-2500 beginning at 24 h after cold injury attenuated both the increase in brain water content and extravasation of markers. In contrast, FR139317 had no effect on edema formation when administrated after cold injury. Cold injury stimulated induction of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive reactive astrocytes in the injured cerebrum. Induction of reactive astrocytes after cold injury was attenuated by ICV administration of BQ788 or IRL-2500. These results suggest that ETB receptor antagonists may be an effective approach to ameliorate brain edema formation following brain insults.

  9. Novel Peripherally Restricted Cannabinoid 1 Receptor Selective Antagonist TXX-522 with Prominent Weight-Loss Efficacy in Diet Induced Obese Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The clinical development of the first generation of globally active cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R antagonists was suspended because of their adverse neuropsychiatric effects. Selective blockade of peripheral CB1Rs has the potential to provide a viable strategy for the treatment of severe obesity while avoiding these central nervous system side effects. In the current study, a novel compound (TXX-522 was rationally designed based on the parent nucleus of a classical CB1R-selective antagonist/inverse agonist, rimonabant (SR141716A. Docking assays indicate that TXX-522 was bound with the CB1R in a mode similar to that of SR141716A. TXX-522 showed good binding, CB1R-selectivity (over the CB2R, and functional antagonist activities in a range of in vitro molecular and cellular assays. In vivo analysis of the steady state distribution of TXX-522 in the rat brain and blood tissues and the assay of its functional effects on CB1R activity collectively showed that TXX-522 showed minimal brain penetration. Moreover, the in vivo pharmacodynamic study further revealed that TXX-522 had good oral bioavailability and a potent anti-obesity effect, and ameliorated insulin resistance in high-fat diet-induced obese mice. No impact on food intake was observed in this model, confirming the limited brain penetration of this compound. Thus, the current study indicates that TXX-522 is a novel and potent peripherally acting selective CB1R antagonist with the potential to control obesity and related metabolic disorders.

  10. Medicinal Chemistry of Competitive Kainate Receptor Antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Kainic acid (KA) receptors belong to the group of ionotropic glutamate receptors and are expressed throughout in the central nervous system (CNS). The KA receptors have been shown to be involved in neurophysiological functions such as mossy fiber long-term potentiation (LTP) and synaptic plasticity and are thus potential therapeutic targets in CNS diseases such as schizophrenia, major depression, neuropathic pain and epilepsy. Extensive effort has been made to develop subtype-selective KA receptor antagonists in order to elucidate the physiological function of each of the five subunits known (GluK1−5). However, to date only selective antagonists for the GluK1 subunit have been discovered, which underlines the strong need for continued research in this area. The present review describes the structure−activity relationship and pharmacological profile for 10 chemically distinct classes of KA receptor antagonists comprising, in all, 45 compounds. To the medicinal chemist this information will serve as reference guidance as well as an inspiration for future effort in this field. PMID:22778857

  11. ACTH antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian John Clark

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ACTH acts via a highly selective receptor that is a member of the melanocortin receptor subfamily of type 1 G protein-coupled receptors. The ACTH receptor, also known as the melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R is unusual in that it is absolutely dependent on a small accessory protein, melanocortin receptor accessory protein (MRAP for cell surface expression and function. ACTH is the only known naturally occurring agonist for this receptor. This lack of redundancy and high degree of ligand specificity suggests that antagonism of this receptor could provide a useful therapeutic aid and a potential investigational tool. Clinical situations in which this could be useful include (1 Cushing’s disease and ectopic ACTH syndrome – especially whilst preparing for definitive treatment of a causative tumour, or in refractory cases, or (2 congenital adrenal hyperplasia – as an adjunct to glucocorticoid replacement. A case for antagonism in other clinical situations in which there is ACTH excess can also be made. In this article we will explore the scientific and clinical case for an ACTH antagonist, and will review the evidence for existing and recently described peptides and modified peptides in this role.

  12. Testing of selected pharmacological agents for capturing waterfowl [Annual Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, D.R.

    1970-01-01

    The response of game-farm mallards (Frost strain) to seven pharmacological immobilizing agents was evaluated in Phase I of a planned four-phase study. A limited amount of testing was also done with wild mallards. Single dosages were administered to determine the mean effective dose (ED50) and mean lethal dose (LD50), The therapeutic index, or safety factor (LD50/ED50), and palatability were also established. Optimum dosage rates of compounds administered orally on baits were not considered in this phase of the study. Compounds were-administered by intubation and calculated in terms of mg/kg. All except one compound produced narcosis within 5 minutes at the effective dose rate.Immobilization periods for the seven compounds ranged from 7-24 minutes, and recovery periods from 1.0-6.5 hours. Such wide variations in actions of the compounds can be attributed to a compound's rate of absorption, the ease with which it passes the blood-brain barrier, its solubility in tissues, and its rate of metabolism in the liver and kidneys. Length of both the immobilization and recovery periods were extended when dosages were increased. There was no delayed mortality among survivors with any of the seven compounds at either the ED50 or LD50. Females were generally more sensitive to the anesthetizing agents than males. The ED50 for wild mallards was substantially higher than that for the experimental game-farm birds for the two compounds on which this was tested.Tribromoethanol (Avertin of Winthrop Laboratories) satisfied all test criteria an Phase I and will be subjected to more intensive investigation in ensuing tests. Thiopental sodium (Pentothal of Amdal Company) and pentobarbital sodium (Nembutal of Abbott Laboratories) were judged to be marginal. Although their therapeutic indexes were good (5.00), recovery periods were prolonged and toxic convulsions occurred at medium to high dose rates as the LD50 was approached.Alpha-chloralose (Fisher Scientific) proved least promising of

  13. Implementation of a fluorescence-based screening assay identifies histamine H3 receptor antagonists clobenpropit and iodophenpropit as subunit-selective N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kasper Bø; Mullasseril, Praseeda; Dawit, Sara

    2010-01-01

    N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate a slow, Ca(2+)-permeable component of excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system and play a pivotal role in synaptic plasticity, neuronal development, and several neurological diseases. We describe...... a fluorescence-based assay that measures NMDA receptor-mediated changes in intracellular calcium in a BHK-21 cell line stably expressing NMDA receptor NR2D with NR1 under the control of a tetracycline-inducible promoter (Tet-On). The assay selectively identifies allosteric modulators by using supramaximal...

  14. The Current State of Empirical Support for the Pharmacological Treatment of Selective Mutism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, John S.; Mitchell, Angela D.; Segool, Natasha

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the current state of evidence for the psychopharmacological treatment of children diagnosed with selective mutism within the context of its link to social anxiety disorder. An increased focus on potential medication treatment for this disorder has resulted from significant monetary and resource limitations in typical practice,…

  15. Analogues of arginine vasopressin modified at position 2 with proline derivatives: selective antagonists of oxytocin in vitro

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sobolewski, D.; Prahl, A.; Slaninová, Jiřina; Lammek, B.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 611, - (2009), s. 503-504 ISSN 0065-2598. [American Peptide Society Symposium /20./. 26.06.2007-30.06.2007, Montreal] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : vasopressin * proline derivatives * oxytocin antagonists Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  16. Selective pharmacological modulation of renal peripheral-type benzodiazepine binding by treatment with diuretic drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukeman, D.S.; Vaughn, D.A.; Fanestil, D.D.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have assessed the effects of in vivo administration of different classes of diuretic drugs on the expression of the peripheral-type benzodiazepine binding site (PBBS) in crude membranes derived from the cortex and outer medulla of rat kidney by saturation analysis with the PBBS-selective ligands [ 3 H]RO5-4864 and [ 3 H]PH 11195 in cortex and [ 3 H]RO5-4864 in outer medulla. Administration for 14-15 days of furosemide, a drug that blocks NaCl-KCl coupled transport in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle, produced a significant doubling in the PBBS density (B/sub max/) in outer medulla, a region of the kidney rich in thick ascending limbs, and produced a lesser but significant increase in PBBS density in the cortex. Conversely, administration for 14-15 days of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide, which acts predominantly in the proximal tubule, and hydrochlorothiazide, which acts predominantly in the early distal tubule, elicited statistically significant increases in PBBS density in renal cortex but not in renal outer medulla. Furthermore, all drug treatments were without effect on the equilibrium dissociation constants (K/sub d/s) of [ 3 H]RO5-4864 and [ 3 H]PK 11195 binding to cortical and outer medullary membrane preparations. These findings demonstrate that the PBBS can be selectively up-regulated in different regions of the kidney by diuretic drugs with different modes/sites of action. 50 references, 1 table

  17. Skin-targeted inhibition of PPAR β/δ by selective antagonists to treat PPAR β/δ-mediated psoriasis-like skin disease in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Hack

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that peroxisome proliferator activating receptor ß/δ (PPAR β/δ is overexpressed in psoriasis. PPAR β/δ is not present in adult epidermis of mice. Targeted expression of PPAR β/δ and activation by a selective synthetic agonist is sufficient to induce an inflammatory skin disease resembling psoriasis. Several signalling pathways dysregulated in psoriasis are replicated in this model, suggesting that PPAR β/δ activation contributes to psoriasis pathogenesis. Thus, inhibition of PPAR β/δ might harbour therapeutical potential. Since PPAR β/δ has pleiotropic functions in metabolism, skin-targeted inhibition offer the potential of reducing systemic adverse effects. Here, we report that three selective PPAR β/δ antagonists, GSK0660, compound 3 h, and GSK3787 can be formulated for topical application to the skin and that their skin concentration can be accurately quantified using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UPLC/mass spectrometry. These antagonists show efficacy in our transgenic mouse model in reducing psoriasis-like changes triggered by activation of PPAR β/δ. PPAR β/δ antagonists GSK0660 and compound 3 do not exhibit systemic drug accumulation after prolonged application to the skin, nor do they induce inflammatory or irritant changes. Significantly, the irreversible PPAR β/δ antagonist (GSK3787 retains efficacy when applied topically only three times per week which could be of practical clinical usefulness. Our data suggest that topical inhibition of PPAR β/δ to treat psoriasis may warrant further exploration.

  18. Evaluation of JNJ-54717793 a Novel Brain Penetrant Selective Orexin 1 Receptor Antagonist in Two Rat Models of Panic Attack Provocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Bonaventure

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Orexin neurons originating in the perifornical and lateral hypothalamic area are highly reactive to anxiogenic stimuli and have strong projections to anxiety and panic-associated circuitry. Recent studies support a role for the orexin system and in particular the orexin 1 receptor (OX1R in coordinating an integrative stress response. However, no selective OX1R antagonist has been systematically tested in two preclinical models of using panicogenic stimuli that induce panic attack in the majority of people with panic disorder, namely an acute hypercapnia-panic provocation model and a model involving chronic inhibition of GABA synthesis in the perifornical hypothalamic area followed by intravenous sodium lactate infusion. Here we report on a novel brain penetrant, selective and high affinity OX1R antagonist JNJ-54717793 (1S,2R,4R-7-([(3-fluoro-2-pyrimidin-2-ylphenylcarbonyl]-N-[5-(trifluoromethylpyrazin-2-yl]-7-azabicyclo[2.2.1]heptan-2-amine. JNJ-54717793 is a high affinity/potent OX1R antagonist and has an excellent selectivity profile including 50 fold versus the OX2R. Ex vivo receptor binding studies demonstrated that after oral administration JNJ-54717793 crossed the blood brain barrier and occupied OX1Rs in the rat brain. While JNJ-54717793 had minimal effect on spontaneous sleep in rats and in wild-type mice, its administration in OX2R knockout mice, selectively promoted rapid eye movement sleep, demonstrating target engagement and specific OX1R blockade. JNJ-54717793 attenuated CO2 and sodium lactate induced panic-like behaviors and cardiovascular responses without altering baseline locomotor or autonomic activity. These data confirm that selective OX1R antagonism may represent a novel approach of treating anxiety disorders, with no apparent sedative effects.

  19. A Review of Pharmacologic Treatment for Compulsive Buying Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Célia; Fernandes, Natália; Morgado, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    At present, no treatment recommendations can be made for compulsive buying disorder. Recent studies have found evidence for the efficacy of psychotherapeutic options, but less is known regarding the best pharmacologic treatment. The purpose of this review is to present and analyze the available published evidence on the pharmacological treatment of compulsive buying disorder. To achieve this, we conducted a review of studies focusing on the pharmacological treatment of compulsive buying by searching the PubMed/MEDLINE database. Selection criteria were applied, and 21 studies were identified. Pharmacological classes reported included antidepressants, mood stabilizers, opioid antagonists, second-generation antipsychotics, and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists. We found only placebo-controlled trials for fluvoxamine; none showed effectiveness against placebo. Three open-label trials reported clinical improvement with citalopram; one was followed by a double-blind discontinuation. Escitalopram was effective in an open-label trial but did not show efficacy in the double-blind phase. Memantine was identified as effective in a pilot open-label study. Fluoxetine, bupropion, nortriptyline, clomipramine, topiramate and naltrexone were only reported to be effective in clinical cases. According to the available literature, there is no evidence to propose a specific pharmacologic agent for compulsive buying disorder. Future research is required for a better understanding of both pathogenesis and treatment of this disorder.

  20. Pharmacology and crystal structure of novel 2,3-quinoxalinediones at kainate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllerud, Stine; Pallesen, Jakob Staun; Pasini, Diletta

    2017-01-01

    , within the KA receptor family (GluK1-5) only compounds with selectivity towards GluK1 exist [1]. Thus, there is an unmet need for Tool compounds with selectivity towards the remaining KA receptor subunits. Here we report the pharmacology of a series of novel N1-substituted 2,3-quinoxalinediones, as well....... Functional electrophysiological (TEVC) experiments indeed showed these compounds to be antagonists at cloned, homomeric KA receptors. The structure and pharmacology will be valuable for design of new and more GluK3-selective quinoxalinedione analogues....

  1. Structural basis of subunit selectivity for competitive NMDA receptor antagonists with preference for GluN2A over GluN2B subunits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, Genevieve E.; Mou, Tung-Chung; Tamborini, Lucia; Pomper, Martin G.; De Micheli, Carlo; Conti, Paola; Pinto, Andrea; Hansen, Kasper B. (JHU); (Milan); (Montana)

    2017-07-31

    NMDA-type glutamate receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that contribute to excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system (CNS). Most NMDA receptors comprise two glycine-binding GluN1 and two glutamate-binding GluN2 subunits (GluN2A–D). We describe highly potent (S)-5-[(R)-2-amino-2-carboxyethyl]-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxylic acid (ACEPC) competitive GluN2 antagonists, of which ST3 has a binding affinity of 52 nM at GluN1/2A and 782 nM at GluN1/2B receptors. This 15-fold preference of ST3 for GluN1/2A over GluN1/2B is improved compared with NVP-AAM077, a widely used GluN2A-selective antagonist, which we show has 11-fold preference for GluN1/2A over GluN1/2B. Crystal structures of the GluN1/2A agonist binding domain (ABD) heterodimer with bound ACEPC antagonists reveal a binding mode in which the ligands occupy a cavity that extends toward the subunit interface between GluN1 and GluN2A ABDs. Mutational analyses show that the GluN2A preference of ST3 is primarily mediated by four nonconserved residues that are not directly contacting the ligand, but positioned within 12 Å of the glutamate binding site. Two of these residues influence the cavity occupied by ST3 in a manner that results in favorable binding to GluN2A, but occludes binding to GluN2B. Thus, we reveal opportunities for the design of subunit-selective competitive NMDA receptor antagonists by identifying a cavity for ligand binding in which variations exist between GluN2A and GluN2B subunits. This structural insight suggests that subunit selectivity of glutamate-site antagonists can be mediated by mechanisms in addition to direct contributions of contact residues to binding affinity.

  2. Pharmacological benefits of selective modulation of cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2) in experimental Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayant, Shalini; Sharma, Brij Mohan; Bansal, Rani; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that pervasively affects the population across the world. Currently, there is no effective treatment available for this and existing drugs merely slow the progression of cognitive function decline. Thus, massive effort is required to find an intended therapeutic target to overcome this condition. The present study has been framed to investigate the ameliorative role of selective modulator of cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2), 1-phenylisatin in experimental AD condition. We have induced experimental AD in mice by using two induction models viz., intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of streptozotocin (STZ) and aluminum trichloride (AlCl3)+d-galactose. Morris water maze (MWM) and attentional set shifting test (ASST) were used to assess learning and memory. Hematoxylin-eosin and Congo red staining were used to examine the structural variation in brain. Brain oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive substance and glutathione), nitric oxide levels (nitrites/nitrates), acetyl cholinesterase activity, myeloperoxidase and calcium levels were also estimated. i.c.v. STZ as well as AlCl3+d-galactose have impaired spatial and reversal learning with executive functioning, increased brain oxidative and nitrosative stress, cholinergic activity, inflammation and calcium levels. Furthermore, these agents have also enhanced the burden of Aβ plaque in the brain. Treatment with 1-phenylisatin and donepezil attenuated i.c.v. STZ as well as AlCl3+d-galactose induced impairment of learning-memory, brain biochemistry and brain damage. Hence, this study concludes that CB2 receptor modulation can be a potential therapeutic target for the management of AD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. NESS038C6, a novel selective CB1 antagonist agent with anti-obesity activity and improved molecular profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastinu, Andrea; Pira, Marilena; Pani, Luca; Pinna, Gérard Aimè; Lazzari, Paolo

    2012-10-01

    The present work aims to study the effects induced by a chronic treatment with a novel CB1 antagonist (NESS038C6) in C57BL/6N diet-induced obesity (DIO) mice. Mice treated with NESS038C6 and fed with a fat diet (NESS038C6 FD) were compared with the following three reference experimental groups: DIO mice fed with the same fat diet used for NESS038C6 and treated with vehicle or the reference CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist rimonabant, "VH FD" and "SR141716 FD", respectively; DIO mice treated with vehicle and switched to a normal diet (VH ND). NESS038C6 chronic treatment (30 mg/kg/day for 31 days) determined a significant reduction in DIO mice weight relative to that of VH FD. The entity of the effect was comparable to that detected in both SR141716 FD and VH ND groups. Moreover, if compared to VH FD, NESS038C6 FD evidenced: (i) improvement of cardiovascular risk factors; (ii) significant decrease in adipose tissue leptin expression; (iii) increase in mRNA expression of hypothalamic orexigenic peptides and a decrease of anorexigenic peptides; (iv) expression increase of metabolic enzymes and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α in the liver; (v) normalization of monoaminergic transporters and neurotrophic expression in mesolimbic area. However, in contrast to the case of rimonabant, the novel CB1 antagonist improved the disrupted expression profile of genes linked to the hunger-satiety circuit, without altering monoaminergic transmission. In conclusion, the novel CB1 antagonist compound NESS038C6 may represent a useful candidate agent for the treatment of obesity and its metabolic complications, without or with reduced side effects relative to those instead observed with rimonabant. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Affinity and selectivity of PD156707, a novel nonpeptide endothelin antagonist, for human ET(A) and ET(B) receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, J J; Kuc, R E; Davenport, A P

    1997-02-01

    We have determined the affinity and selectivity of a new nonpeptide antagonist PD156707 (sodium 2-benzo(1,3ioxol-5-yl-4-(4-methoxy-pheny l)-4-oxo-3-(3,4,5-trime tho xybenzyl)-but-2-enoate) for human endothelin (ET)(A) and ET(B) receptors. In human coronary artery and saphenous vein the affinity of the ET(A) receptor for PD156707 was 0.15 +/- 0.06 nM and 0.5 +/- 0.13 nM, respectively. Competition experiments in human left ventricle and kidney revealed that PD156707 had 1,000- to 15,000-fold selectivity for the ET(A) receptor over the ET(B) receptor. This selectivity was confirmed autoradiographically. In human coronary artery, mammary artery and saphenous vein PD156707 (3-300 nM) potently antagonized the vasoconstrictor responses to ET-1. The pA2 values estimated from the Gaddum-Schild equation were 8.07 +/- 0.09, 8.45 +/- 0.11 and 8.70 +/- 0.13, respectively. The concentration-response curves to ET-1 were shifted to the right in parallel fashion, without reduction of the maximum response. However, the regression lines fitted to the resulting Schild data deviated significantly from one. PD156707 appeared to be a more effective antagonist at lower concentrations than at the higher ones. It is possible that PD156707, a sodium salt, was reverting to a less soluble form which results in underestimation of its potency. These data show that PD156707 is a potent and selective antagonist at human ET(A) receptors and will be useful in clarifying the role of the endothelin peptides in human cardiovascular disease.

  5. Pharmacological targeting of valosin containing protein (VCP) induces DNA damage and selectively kills canine lymphoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadeau, Marie-Ève; Rico, Charlène; Tsoi, Mayra; Vivancos, Mélanie; Filimon, Sabin; Paquet, Marilène; Boerboom, Derek

    2015-01-01

    lymphoma. The selective activity of EER-1 against lymphoma cells suggests that VCP will represent a clinically useful therapeutic target for the treatment of lymphoma. We further suggest a mechanism of EER-1 action centered on the DNA repair response that may be of central importance for the design and characterization of VCP inhibitory compounds for therapeutic use. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1489-1) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  6. The pharmacology of TD-8954, a potent and selective 5-HT4 receptor agonist with gastrointestinal prokinetic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David T Beattie

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the in vitro and in vivo pharmacological properties of TD-8954, a potent and selective 5-HT4 receptor agonist. TD-8954 had high affinity (pKi = 9.4 for human recombinant 5-HT4(c (h5-HT4(c receptors, and selectivity (> 2,000-fold over all other 5-HT receptors and non-5-HT receptors, ion channels, enzymes and transporters tested (n = 78. TD-8954 produced an elevation of cAMP in HEK-293 cells expressing the h5-HT4(c receptor (pEC50 = 9.3, and contracted the guinea pig colonic longitudinal muscle/myenteric plexus (LMMP preparation (pEC50 = 8.6. TD-8954 had moderate intrinsic activity (IA in the in vitro assays. In conscious guinea pigs, subcutaneous (s.c. administration of TD 8954 (0.03 - 3 mg/kg increased the colonic transit of carmine red dye, reducing the time taken for its excretion. Following intraduodenal (i.d. dosing to anesthetized rats, TD 8954 (0.03 - 10 mg/kg evoked a dose-dependent relaxation of the esophagus. Following oral administration to conscious dogs, TD 8954 (10 and 30 µg/kg produced an increase in contractility of the antrum, duodenum and jejunum. In a single ascending oral dose study in healthy human subjects, TD-8954 (0.1 - 20 mg increased bowel movement frequency and reduced the time to first stool. It is concluded that TD-8954 is a potent and selective 5-HT4 receptor agonist in vitro, with robust in vivo stimulatory activity in the gastrointestinal (GI tract of guinea pigs, rats, dogs and humans. TD-8954 may have clinical utility in patients with disorders of reduced GI motility.

  7. Design and Synthesis of a Series of L-trans-4-Substituted Prolines as Selective Antagonists for the Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors Including Functional and X-ray Crystallographic Studies of New Subtype Selective Kainic Acid Receptor Subtype 1 (GluK1) Antagonist (2S,4R)-4-(2-Carboxyphenoxy)pyrrolidine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard-Larsen, Niels; Delgar, Claudia; Koch, Karina

    2017-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists are valuable tool compounds for studies of neurological pathways in the central nervous system. On the basis of rational ligand design, a new class of selective antagonists, represented by (2S,4R)-4-(2-carboxy-phenoxy)pyrrolidine-2-carboxylic acid (1b...... to the structure with glutamate, consistent with 1b being an antagonist. A structure-activity relationship study showed that the chemical nature of the tethering atom (C,O, or S) linking the pyrrolidine ring and the phenyl ring plays a key role in the receptor selectivity profile and that substituents......), for cloned homomeric kainic acid receptor subtype 1 (GluK1) was attained (Ki = 4 µM). In a functional assay, 1b displayed full antagonist activity with IC50 = 6 ± 2 µM. A crystal structure was obtained of 1b when bound in the ligand binding domain of GluK1. A domain opening of 13-14° was seen compared...

  8. Selective and rapid monitoring of dual platelet inhibition by aspirin and P2Y12 antagonists by using multiple electrode aggregometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenz Reinhard

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poor platelet inhibition by aspirin or clopidogrel has been associated with adverse outcomes in patients with cardiovascular diseases. A reliable and facile assay to measure platelet inhibition after treatment with aspirin and a P2Y12 antagonist is lacking. Multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA, which is being increasingly used in clinical studies, is sensitive to platelet inhibition by aspirin and clopidogrel, but a critical evaluation of MEA monitoring of dual anti-platelet therapy with aspirin and P2Y12 antagonists is missing. Design and Methods By performing in vitro and ex vivo experiments, we evaluated in healthy subjects the feasibility of using MEA to monitor platelet inhibition of P2Y12 antagonists (clopidogrel in vivo, cangrelor in vitro and aspirin (100 mg per day in vivo, and 1 mM or 5.4 mM in vitro alone, and in combination. Statistical analyses were performed by the Mann-Whitney rank sum test, student' t-test, analysis of variance followed by the Holm-Sidak test, where appropriate. Results ADP-induced platelet aggregation in hirudin-anticoagulated blood was inhibited by 99.3 ± 1.4% by in vitro addition of cangrelor (100 nM; p 95% and 100 ± 3.2%, respectively (p in vitro or ex vivo. Oral intake of clopidogrel did not significantly reduce AA-induced aggregation, but P2Y12 blockade by cangrelor (100 nM in vitro diminished AA-stimulated aggregation by 53 ± 26% (p Conclusions Selective platelet inhibition by aspirin and P2Y12 antagonists alone and in combination can be rapidly measured by MEA. We suggest that dual anti-platelet therapy with these two types of anti-platelet drugs can be optimized individually by measuring platelet responsiveness to ADP and AA with MEA before and after drug intake.

  9. Discovery and characterization of NVP-QAV680, a potent and selective CRTh2 receptor antagonist suitable for clinical testing in allergic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandham, David A; Arnold, Nicola; Aschauer, Heinrich; Bala, Kamlesh; Barker, Lucy; Brown, Lyndon; Brown, Zarin; Budd, David; Cox, Brian; Docx, Cerys; Dubois, Gerald; Duggan, Nicholas; England, Karen; Everatt, Brian; Furegati, Marcus; Hall, Edward; Kalthoff, Frank; King, Anna; Leblanc, Catherine J; Manini, Jodie; Meingassner, Josef; Profit, Rachael; Schmidt, Alfred; Simmons, Jennifer; Sohal, Bindi; Stringer, Rowan; Thomas, Matthew; Turner, Katharine L; Walker, Christoph; Watson, Simon J; Westwick, John; Willis, Jennifer; Williams, Gareth; Wilson, Caroline

    2013-11-01

    Optimization of a 7-azaindole-3-acetic acid CRTh2 receptor antagonist chemotype derived from high throughput screening furnished a highly selective compound NVP-QAV680 with low nM functional potency for inhibition of CRTh2 driven human eosinophil and Th2 lymphocyte activation in vitro. The molecule exhibited good oral bioavailability in the rat, combined with efficacy in rodent CRTh2-dependent mechanistic and allergic disease models and was suitable for clinical development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Synthesis and preliminary evaluation of [3H]PSB-0413, a selective antagonist radioligand for platelet P2Y12 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Tayeb, Ali; Griessmeier, Kerstin J; Müller, Christa E

    2005-12-15

    The selective antagonist radioligand [(3)H]2-propylthioadenosine-5'-adenylic acid (1,1-dichloro-1-phosphonomethyl-1-phosphonyl) anhydride ([(3)H]PSB-0413) was prepared by catalytic hydrogenation of its propargyl precursor with a high specific radioactivity of 74Ci/mmol. In preliminary saturation binding studies, [(3)H]PSB-0413 showed high affinity for platelet P2Y(12) receptors with a K(D) value of 4.57nM. Human platelets had a high density of P2Y(12) receptors exhibiting a B(max) value of 7.66pmol/mg of protein.

  11. Comparison of combinatorial clustering methods on pharmacological data sets represented by machine learning-selected real molecular descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Borroto, Oscar Miguel; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; García-de la Vega, José Manuel; Grau-Ábalo, Ricardo del Corazón

    2011-12-27

    Cluster algorithms play an important role in diversity related tasks of modern chemoinformatics, with the widest applications being in pharmaceutical industry drug discovery programs. The performance of these grouping strategies depends on various factors such as molecular representation, mathematical method, algorithmical technique, and statistical distribution of data. For this reason, introduction and comparison of new methods are necessary in order to find the model that best fits the problem at hand. Earlier comparative studies report on Ward's algorithm using fingerprints for molecular description as generally superior in this field. However, problems still remain, i.e., other types of numerical descriptions have been little exploited, current descriptors selection strategy is trial and error-driven, and no previous comparative studies considering a broader domain of the combinatorial methods in grouping chemoinformatic data sets have been conducted. In this work, a comparison between combinatorial methods is performed,with five of them being novel in cheminformatics. The experiments are carried out using eight data sets that are well established and validated in the medical chemistry literature. Each drug data set was represented by real molecular descriptors selected by machine learning techniques, which are consistent with the neighborhood principle. Statistical analysis of the results demonstrates that pharmacological activities of the eight data sets can be modeled with a few of families with 2D and 3D molecular descriptors, avoiding classification problems associated with the presence of nonrelevant features. Three out of five of the proposed cluster algorithms show superior performance over most classical algorithms and are similar (or slightly superior in the most optimistic sense) to Ward's algorithm. The usefulness of these algorithms is also assessed in a comparative experiment to potent QSAR and machine learning classifiers, where they perform

  12. Selective Granulocyte and Monocyte Apheresis as a Non-Pharmacological Option for Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Leitner, Gerda; Worel, Nina; Vogelsang, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are the two most prevalent inflammatory bowel diseases. In both cases, the medically refractory and steroid-dependent type presents a therapeutic challenge. To help resolve this problem, a mainly Japanese team developed a new therapeutic option. There are two systems, both of which are able to selectively remove the main mediators of the disease, namely the activated pro-inflammatory cytokine-producing granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages, from the patient's blood circulation (GMA = granulocyte monocyte apheresis). One of the two systems is the Adacolumn® (Immunoresearch Laboratories, Takasaki, Japan) consisting of the ADA-monitor and a single-use column, which contains approximately 35,000 cellulose acetate beads. The exact mode of action is not yet sufficiently understood, but however, a modulation of the immune system takes place. As a result, less pro-inflammatory cytokines are released. Furthermore, the production of anti-inflammatory interleukin-1 receptor antagonist is increased, and the apoptosis of granulocytes boosted. The decreased LECAM-1-expression on leukocytes impedes the leukotaxis to the inflamed tissue, and CD10-negative immature granulocytes appear in the peripheral blood. Another effect to be mentioned is the removal of the peripheral dendritic cells and the leachate of regulatory T cells (T-regs). The second system is the Cellsorba® FX Filter (Asahi Medical, Tokyo, Japan). The range of efficiency, the indication, and the procedure are very similar to the Adacolumn. Solely the additional removal of lymphocytes can possibly limit the implementation since lymphopenia can increase the risk of autoimmune disease. Both systems provide a low-risk therapy with few adverse reactions. ASFA recommendations for GMA in inflammatory bowel disease are 2B due to the fact that not enough randomized double-blind studies are available to proof the efficacy of this treatment. PMID:22969694

  13. Molecular Pharmacology of CXCR4 inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen, Anne; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2012-01-01

    pharmacology of well-known CXCR4 antagonists in order to augment the potency and affinity and to increase the specificity of future CXCR4-targeting compounds. In this chapter, binding modes of CXCR4 antagonists that have been shown to mobilize stem cells are discussed. In addition, comparisons between results...

  14. Selection and differentiation of Bacillus spp. Antagonistic to Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici and Alternaria solani infecting Tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Veerubommu; Atri, Kamini; Gupta, Samriti; Kanoujia, Nandina; Naruka, Digvijay Singh

    2011-03-01

    Antagonistic Bacillus spp. displaying in vitro production of siderophore, chitinase, and β-1,3-glucanase were identified from dual culture assays. In independent greenhouse studies, seed bacterization and soil application of Bacillus atrophaeus S2BC-2 challenge inoculated with Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici (FOL) and Alternaria solani (AS) recorded low percent disease index of 25.3 and 28.7, respectively, over nonbacterised pathogen control (44.3 and 56.4). The low disease incidence corroborated with tomato growth promotion with high vigor index (8,041.2) and fresh plant weight (82.5 g) on challenge inoculation with FOL. Analysis of root and leaf samples in rhizobacterial treatment challenged with FOL and AS revealed maximum induction of chitinase (1.9 and 1.7 U/mg of protein, respectively) and β-1,3-glucanase (23.5 and 19.2 U/mg of protein, respectively). In native gel activity assays, the rhizobacterial treatment on challenge inoculation strongly expressed three high intensity PO isoforms along with one low intensity isoform. In studies on genetic diversity of the Bacillus strains by repetitive extragenomic palindromic-polymerase chain reaction (REP-PCR) and amplified rDNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) patterns, ARDRA was more highly discriminant than REP-PCR and allowed grouping of the strains and differentiation of the antagonistic strains from other isolates.

  15. Cellular and behavioural profile of the novel, selective neurokinin1 receptor antagonist, vestipitant: a comparison to other agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocco, Mauricette; Dekeyne, Anne; Mannoury la Cour, Clotilde; Touzard, Manuelle; Girardon, Sylvie; Veiga, Sylvie; de Nanteuil, Guillaume; deJong, Trynke R; Olivier, Berend; Millan, Mark J

    2008-10-01

    This study characterized the novel neurokinin (NK)(1) antagonist, vestipitant, under clinical evaluation for treatment of anxiety and depression. Vestipitant possessed high affinity for human NK(1) receptors (pK(i), 9.4), and potently blocked Substance P-mediated phosphorylation of Extracellular-Regulated-Kinase. In vivo, it occupied central NK(1) receptors in gerbils (Inhibitory Dose(50), 0.11 mg/kg). At similar doses, it abrogated nociception elicited by formalin in gerbils, and blocked foot-tapping and locomotion elicited by the NK(1) agonist, GR73632, in gerbils and guinea pigs, respectively. Further, vestipitant attenuated fear-induced foot-tapping in gerbils, separation-induced distress-vocalizations in guinea pigs, marble-burying behaviour in mice, and displayed anxiolytic actions in Vogel conflict and fear-induced ultrasonic vocalization procedures in rats. These actions were mimicked by CP99,994, L733,060 and GR205,171 which acted stereoselectively vs its less active isomer, GR226,206. In conclusion, vestipitant is a potent NK(1) receptor antagonist: its actions support the utility of NK(1) receptor blockade in the alleviation of anxiety and, possibly, depression.

  16. Acute pharmacologically induced shifts in serotonin availability abolish emotion-selective responses to negative face emotions in distinct brain networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grady, Cheryl Lynn; Siebner, Hartwig R; Hornboll, Bettina

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacological manipulation of serotonin availability can alter the processing of facial expressions of emotion. Using a within-subject design, we measured the effect of serotonin on the brain's response to aversive face emotions with functional MRI while 20 participants judged the gender...... of neutral, fearful and angry faces. In three separate and counterbalanced sessions, participants received citalopram (CIT) to raise serotonin levels, underwent acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) to lower serotonin, or were studied without pharmacological challenge (Control). An analysis designed to identify...

  17. Combination of Pharmacophore Matching, 2D Similarity Search, and In Vitro Biological Assays in the Selection of Potential 5-HT6 Antagonists from Large Commercial Repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobi, Krisztina; Flachner, Beáta; Pukáncsik, Mária; Máthé, Enikő; Bognár, Melinda; Szaszkó, Mária; Magyar, Csaba; Hajdú, István; Lőrincz, Zsolt; Simon, István; Fülöp, Ferenc; Cseh, Sándor; Dormán, György

    2015-10-01

    Rapid in silico selection of target-focused libraries from commercial repositories is an attractive and cost-effective approach. If structures of active compounds are available, rapid 2D similarity search can be performed on multimillion compound databases, but the generated library requires further focusing. We report here a combination of the 2D approach with pharmacophore matching which was used for selecting 5-HT6 antagonists. In the first screening round, 12 compounds showed >85% antagonist efficacy of the 91 screened. For the second-round (hit validation) screening phase, pharmacophore models were built, applied, and compared with the routine 2D similarity search. Three pharmacophore models were created based on the structure of the reference compounds and the first-round hit compounds. The pharmacophore search resulted in a high hit rate (40%) and led to novel chemotypes, while 2D similarity search had slightly better hit rate (51%), but lacking the novelty. To demonstrate the power of the virtual screening cascade, ligand efficiency indices were also calculated and their steady improvement was confirmed. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Studies on an (S)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptor antagonist IKM-159

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juknaite, Lina; Sugamata, Yutaro; Tokiwa, Kazuya

    2013-01-01

    IKM-159 was developed and identified as a member of a new class of heterotricyclic glutamate analogs that act as AMPA receptor-selective antagonists. However, it was not known which enantiomer of IKM-159 was responsible for its pharmacological activities. Here, we report in vivo and in vitro neur...

  19. BF2.649 [1-{3-[3-(4-Chlorophenyl)propoxy]propyl}piperidine, hydrochloride], a nonimidazole inverse agonist/antagonist at the human histamine H3 receptor: Preclinical pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligneau, X; Perrin, D; Landais, L; Camelin, J-C; Calmels, T P G; Berrebi-Bertrand, I; Lecomte, J-M; Parmentier, R; Anaclet, C; Lin, J-S; Bertaina-Anglade, V; la Rochelle, C Drieu; d'Aniello, F; Rouleau, A; Gbahou, F; Arrang, J-M; Ganellin, C R; Stark, H; Schunack, W; Schwartz, J-C

    2007-01-01

    Histamine H3 receptor inverse agonists are known to enhance the activity of histaminergic neurons in brain and thereby promote vigilance and cognition. 1-{3-[3-(4-Chlorophenyl)propoxy]propyl}piperidine, hydrochloride (BF2.649) is a novel, potent, and selective nonimidazole inverse agonist at the recombinant human H3 receptor. On the stimulation of guanosine 5'-O-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate binding to this receptor, BF2.649 behaved as a competitive antagonist with a Ki value of 0.16 nM and as an inverse agonist with an EC50 value of 1.5 nM and an intrinsic activity approximately 50% higher than that of ciproxifan. Its in vitro potency was approximately 6 times lower at the rodent receptor. In mice, the oral bioavailability coefficient, i.e., the ratio of plasma areas under the curve after oral and i.v. administrations, respectively, was 84%. BF2.649 dose dependently enhanced tele-methylhistamine levels in mouse brain, an index of histaminergic neuron activity, with an ED50 value of 1.6 mg/kg p.o., a response that persisted after repeated administrations for 17 days. In rats, the drug enhanced dopamine and acetylcholine levels in microdialysates of the prefrontal cortex. In cats, it markedly enhanced wakefulness at the expense of sleep states and also enhanced fast cortical rhythms of the electroencephalogram, known to be associated with improved vigilance. On the two-trial object recognition test in mice, a promnesiant effect was shown regarding either scopolamine-induced or natural forgetting. These preclinical data suggest that BF2.649 is a valuable drug candidate to be developed in wakefulness or memory deficits and other cognitive disorders.

  20. The opiate antagonist, naltrexone, in the treatment of trichotillomania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grant, Jon E; Odlaug, Brian Lawrence; Schreiber, Liana R N

    2014-01-01

    Trichotillomania (TTM) is characterized by repetitive hair pulling resulting in hair loss. Data on the pharmacological treatment of TTM are limited. This study examined the opioid antagonist, naltrexone, in adults with TTM who had urges to pull their hair. Fifty-one individuals with TTM were...... randomized to naltrexone or placebo in an 8-week, double-blind trial. Subjects were assessed with measures of TTM severity and selected cognitive tasks. Naltrexone failed to demonstrate significantly greater reductions in hair pulling compared to placebo. Cognitive flexibility, however, significantly...

  1. Antagonist Anti-CD28 Therapeutics for the Treatment of Autoimmune Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Vanhove

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The effector functions of T lymphocytes are responsible for most autoimmune disorders and act by directly damaging tissues or by indirectly promoting inflammation and antibody responses. Co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory T cell receptor molecules are the primary pharmacological targets that enable interference with immune-mediated diseases. Among these, selective CD28 antagonists have drawn special interest, since they tip the co-stimulation/co-inhibition balance towards efficiently inhibiting effector T cells while promoting suppression by pre-existing regulatory T-cells. After having demonstrated outstanding therapeutic efficacy in multiple models of autoimmunity, inflammation and transplantation, and safety in phase-I studies in humans, selective CD28 antagonists are currently in early clinical development for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematous and rheumatoid arthritis. Here, we review the available proof of concept studies for CD28 antagonists in autoimmunity, with a special focus on the mechanisms of action.

  2. Novel and validated titrimetric method for determination of selected angiotensin-II-receptor antagonists in pharmaceutical preparations and its comparison with UV spectrophotometric determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrikant H. Patil

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel and simple titrimetric method for determination of commonly used angiotensin-II-receptor antagonists (ARA-IIs is developed and validated. The direct acid base titration of four ARA-IIs, namely eprosartan mesylate, irbesartan, telmisartan and valsartan, was carried out in the mixture of ethanol:water (1:1 as solvent using standardized sodium hydroxide aqueous solution as titrant, either visually using phenolphthalein as an indicator or potentiometrically using combined pH electrode. The method was found to be accurate and precise, having relative standard deviation of less than 2% for all ARA-IIs studied. Also, it was shown that the method could be successfully applied to the assay of commercial pharmaceuticals containing the above-mentioned ARA-IIs. The validity of the method was tested by the recovery studies of standard addition to pharmaceuticals and the results were found to be satisfactory. Results obtained by this method were found to be in good agreement with those obtained by UV spectrophotometric method. For UV spectrophotometric analysis ethanol was used as a solvent and wavelength of 233 nm, 246 nm, 296 nm, and 250 nm was selected for determination of eprosartan mesylate, irbesartan, telmisartan, and valsartan respectively. The proposed titrimetric method is simple, rapid, convenient and sufficiently precise for quality control purposes. Keywords: Angiotensin-II-receptor antagonists, Titrimetric assay, UV spectrophotometry, Validation

  3. Rimonabant, a selective cannabinoid1 receptor antagonist, protects against light-induced retinal degeneration in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Tomoyo; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Yuki; Otsuka, Tomohiro; Ohno, Yuta; Ogami, Shiho; Yamane, Shinsaku; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2017-05-15

    The endocannabinoid system is involved in some neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. An endogenous constellation of proteins related to cannabinoid 1 receptor signaling, including free fatty acids, diacylglycerol lipase, and N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase, are localized in the murine retina. Moreover, the expression levels of endogenous agonists of cannabinoid receptors are changed in the vitreous fluid. However, the role of the endocannabinoid system in the retina, particularly in the light-induced photoreceptor degeneration, remains unknown. Therefore, we investigated involvement of the cannabinoid 1 receptor in light-induced retinal degeneration using in vitro and in vivo models. To evaluate the effect of cannabinoid 1 receptors in light irradiation-induced cell death, the mouse retinal cone-cell line (661W) was treated with a cannabinoid 1 receptor antagonist, rimonabant. Time-dependent changes of expression and localization of retinal cannabinoid 1 receptors were measured using Western blot and immunostaining. Retinal damage was induced in mice by exposure to light, followed by intravitreal injection of rimonabant. Electroretinograms and histologic analyses were performed. Rimonabant suppressed light-induced photoreceptor cell death. Cannabinoid 1 receptor expression was upregulated by light exposure. Treatment with rimonabant improved both a- and b-wave amplitudes and the thickness of the outer nuclear layer. These results suggest that the cannabinoid 1 receptor is involved in light-induced retinal degeneration and it may represent a therapeutic target in the light-induced photoreceptor degeneration related diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Chronic administration of the selective P2X3, P2X2/3 receptor antagonist, A-317491, transiently attenuates cancer-induced bone pain in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rikke Rie; Nasser, Arafat; Falk, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    The purinergic P2X3 and P2X2/3 receptors are in the peripheral nervous system almost exclusively confined to afferent sensory neurons, where they are found both at peripheral and central synapses. The P2X3 receptor is implicated in both neuropathic and inflammatory pain. However, the role of the ......X3 receptor in chronic cancer-induced bone pain is less known. Here we investigated the effect of systemic acute and chronic administration of the selective P2X3, P2X2/3 receptor antagonist (5-[[[(3-Phenoxyphenyl)methyl][(1S)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-1-naphthalenyl]amino]carbonyl]-1...

  5. Pharmacological interactions of anti-inflammatory-analgesics in odontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Moreno, Gerardo; Guardia, Javier; Cutando, Antonio; Calvo-Guirado, José Luis

    2009-02-01

    In this second article we describe the more interesting pharmacological interactions in dental practice based on the prescription of analgesic narcotics, paracetamol and non-selective non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAI) (which inhibit cyclooxigenase 1 -COX 1- and cyclooxigenase 2 -COX 2-) and selective NSAIs (COX 2 inhibitors). The importance of preventing the appearance of these pharmacological interactions is because these are medicaments prescribed daily in odontology for moderate pain treatment and inflammation in the oral cavity. Paracetamol can interact with warfarin and therefore care should be taken with chronic alcoholic patients. All NSAIs reduce renal blood flow and consequently are capable of reducing the efficacy of medicaments used for treating arterial hypertension, which act via a renal mechanism. Especial attention should be taken considering the risk of interaction between the antagonists of AT1 receptors of angiostensin II (ARAII) and the NSAIs.

  6. Biocontrol of Fusarium graminearum sensu stricto, Reduction of Deoxynivalenol Accumulation and Phytohormone Induction by Two Selected Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzini, Juan; Roncallo, Pablo; Cantoro, Renata; Chiotta, Maria; Yerkovich, Nadia; Palacios, Sofia; Echenique, Viviana; Torres, Adriana; Ramírez, María; Karlovsky, Petr; Chulze, Sofia

    2018-02-20

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a devastating disease that causes extensive yield and quality losses to wheat and other small cereal grains worldwide. Species within the Fusarium graminearum complex are the main pathogens associated with the disease, F. graminearum sensu stricto being the main pathogen in Argentina. Biocontrol can be used as part of an integrated pest management strategy. Phytohormones play a key role in the plant defense system and their production can be induced by antagonistic microorganisms. The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of the inoculation of Bacillus velezensis RC 218, F. graminearum and their co-inoculation on the production of salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) in wheat spikes at different periods of time under greenhouse conditions, and to evaluate the effect of B. velezensis RC 218 and Streptomyces albidoflavus RC 87B on FHB disease incidence, severity and deoxynivalenol accumulation on Triticum turgidum L. var. durum under field conditions. Under greenhouse conditions the production of JA was induced after F. graminearum inoculation at 48 and 72 h, but JA levels were reduced in the co-inoculated treatments. No differences in JA or SA levels were observed between the B. velezensis treatment and the water control. In the spikes inoculated with F. graminearum, SA production was induced early (12 h), as it was shown for initial FHB basal resistance, while JA was induced at a later stage (48 h), revealing different defense strategies at different stages of infection by the hemibiotrophic pathogen F. graminearum. Both B. velezensis RC 218 and S. albidoflavus RC 87B effectively reduced FHB incidence (up to 30%), severity (up to 25%) and deoxynivalenol accumulation (up to 51%) on durum wheat under field conditions.

  7. Biocontrol of Fusarium graminearum sensu stricto, Reduction of Deoxynivalenol Accumulation and Phytohormone Induction by Two Selected Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Palazzini

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium head blight (FHB is a devastating disease that causes extensive yield and quality losses to wheat and other small cereal grains worldwide. Species within the Fusarium graminearum complex are the main pathogens associated with the disease, F. graminearum sensu stricto being the main pathogen in Argentina. Biocontrol can be used as part of an integrated pest management strategy. Phytohormones play a key role in the plant defense system and their production can be induced by antagonistic microorganisms. The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of the inoculation of Bacillus velezensis RC 218, F. graminearum and their co-inoculation on the production of salicylic acid (SA and jasmonic acid (JA in wheat spikes at different periods of time under greenhouse conditions, and to evaluate the effect of B. velezensis RC 218 and Streptomyces albidoflavus RC 87B on FHB disease incidence, severity and deoxynivalenol accumulation on Triticum turgidum L. var. durum under field conditions. Under greenhouse conditions the production of JA was induced after F. graminearum inoculation at 48 and 72 h, but JA levels were reduced in the co-inoculated treatments. No differences in JA or SA levels were observed between the B. velezensis treatment and the water control. In the spikes inoculated with F. graminearum, SA production was induced early (12 h, as it was shown for initial FHB basal resistance, while JA was induced at a later stage (48 h, revealing different defense strategies at different stages of infection by the hemibiotrophic pathogen F. graminearum. Both B. velezensis RC 218 and S. albidoflavus RC 87B effectively reduced FHB incidence (up to 30%, severity (up to 25% and deoxynivalenol accumulation (up to 51% on durum wheat under field conditions.

  8. Selection and identification of non-pathogenic bacteria isolated from fermented pickles with antagonistic properties against two shrimp pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zokaeifar, Hadi; Balcázar, José Luis; Kamarudin, Mohd Salleh; Sijam, Kamaruzaman; Arshad, Aziz; Saad, Che Roos

    2012-06-01

    In this study, potential probiotic strains were isolated from fermented pickles based on antagonistic activity against two shrimp pathogens (Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio parahaemolyticus). Two strains L10 and G1 were identified by biochemical tests, followed by16S ribosomal RNA gene sequence analysis as Bacillus subtilis, and characterized by PCR amplification of repetitive bacterial DNA elements (Rep-PCR). Subsequently, B. subtilis L10 and G1 strains were tested for antibacterial activity under different physical conditions, including culture medium, salinity, pH and temperature using the agar well diffusion assay. Among the different culture media, LB broth was the most suitable medium for antibacterial production. Both strains showed the highest level of antibacterial activity against two pathogens at 30 °C and 1.0% NaCl. Under the pH conditions, strain G1 showed the greatest activity against V. harveyi at pH 7.3-8.0 and against V. parahaemolyticus at pH 6.0-8.0, whereas strain L10 showed the greatest activity against two pathogens at pH 7.3. The cell-free supernatants of both strains were treated with four different enzymes in order to characterize the antibacterial substances against V. harveyi. The result showed considerable reduction of antibacterial activity for both strains, indicating the proteinaceous nature of the antibacterial substances. A wide range of tolerance to NaCl, pH and temperature was also recorded for both strains. In addition, both strains showed no virulence effect in juvenile shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei. On the basis of these results and safety of strains to L. vannamei, they may be considered for future challenge experiments in shrimp as a very promising alternative to the use of antibiotics.

  9. Effects of the brain-penetrant and selective 5-HT6 receptor antagonist SB-399885 in animal models of anxiety and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesołowska, Anna; Nikiforuk, Agnieszka

    2007-04-01

    The effects of a selective 5-HT(6) receptor antagonist, SB-399885 (N-[3,5-dichloro-2-(methoxy)phenyl]-4-(methoxy)-3-(1-piperazinyl)benzenesulfonamide), were evaluated in behavioural tests sensitive to clinically effective anxiolytic- and antidepressant-compounds using diazepam and imipramine as reference drugs. In the Vogel conflict drinking test in rats, SB-399885 (1-3mg/kg i.p.) caused an anxiolytic-like activity comparable to that of diazepam (2.5-5mg/kg i.p.). An anxiolytic-like effect was also seen in the elevated plus-maze test in rats, where SB-399885 (0.3-3mg/kg i.p.) was slightly weaker than diazepam (2.5-5mg/kg i.p.). In the four-plate test in mice, SB-399885 (3-20mg/kg i.p.) showed an anxiolytic-like effect which was weaker than that produced by diazepam (2.5-5mg/kg i.p.). In the forced swim test in rats, SB-399885 (10mg/kg i.p.) significantly shortened the immobility time and the effect was stronger than that of imipramine (30mg/kg i.p.). In the forced swim test in mice, SB-399885 (20-30mg/kg i.p.) had an anti-immobility action, comparable to imipramine (30mg/kg i.p.) and also in the tail suspension test in mice, SB-399885 (10-30mg/kg i.p.) had an antidepressant-like effect, though was weaker than imipramine (10-20mg/kg i.p.). The tested 5-HT(6) antagonist (3-20mg/kg i.p.) shortened the walking time of rats in the open field test and, at a dose of 30mg/kg i.p. reduced the locomotor activity of mice. SB-399885 (in doses up to 30mg/kg i.p.) did not affect motor coordination in mice and rats tested in the rota-rod test. Such data indicate that the selective 5-HT(6) receptor antagonist SB-399885had specific effects, indicative of this compound's anxiolytic and antidepressant potential.

  10. Acute oral administration of the novel, competitive and selective glucocorticoid receptor antagonist ORG 34517 reduces the severity of ethanol withdrawal and related hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Anna R; Saunders, Meredith A; Brewton, Honoree' W; Winchester, Sydney R; Elgumati, Ibrahim S; Prendergast, Mark A

    2015-09-01

    The development of ethanol dependence is associated with alterations in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and activation of type II glucocorticoid receptors (GR). These effects may contribute to withdrawal-associated anxiety, craving and relapse to drinking. The present studies examined acute and oral administration of the novel, selective and competitive GR antagonist ORG 34517 on the severity of ethanol withdrawal. Adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered ethanol (4g/kg/i.g.) twice daily for 5 days followed by 2 days of withdrawal for 1, 2 or 3 consecutive cycles. Blood ethanol levels (BELs) were determined at 0930 on Day 4 of each week, while blood corticosterone levels (BCLs) were obtained at 11:00hours on the first day of each ethanol withdrawal. During early withdrawal, subjects received oral administration of ORG 345617 (60mg/kg/i.g.) or a placebo and withdrawal was monitored. Peak BELs of 225.52mg/dl were observed during the third week. Withdrawal from three cycles of the regimen produced marked behavioral abnormalities (e.g., aggression, rigidity, and hypoactivity) and significant increases in BCLs of ethanol-dependent subjects. Acute, oral administration of ORG 34517 during early withdrawal significantly reduced both the severity of ethanol withdrawal, as reflected in reduced rigidity, aggression, and hypoactivity, and elevations in BCL without producing any sedative-like effects. The present findings demonstrate that repeated ethanol exposure and withdrawal is associated with significant behavioral abnormalities and dysregulation of HPA axis activation. Further these data suggest that selective GR antagonists should be further considered as putative pharmacotherapies for treatment of ethanol dependence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Selective D3 Receptor Antagonist SB277011A Attenuates Morphine-Triggered Reactivation of Expression of Cocaine-Induced Conditioned Place Preference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Onarae V.; Heidbreder, Christian A.; Gardner, Eliot L.; Schonhar, Charles D.; Ashby, Charles R.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the effect of acute administration of the selective D3 receptor antagonist SB277011A on morphine-triggered reactivation of cocaine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Repeated pairing of animals with 15 mg/kg i.p. of cocaine HCl or vehicle to cue-specific CPP chambers produced a significant CPP response compared to animals paired only with vehicle in both chambers. Expression of the CPP response to cocaine was then extinguished by repeatedly giving the animals vehicle injections in the cocaine-paired chambers. The magnitude of the CPP response after extinction was not significantly different from that of animals paired only with vehicle. Expression of the extinguished CPP response was reactivated by acute administration of 5 mg/kg i.p. of morphine but not by vehicle. Acute administration of 6 or 12 mg/kg i.p. (but not 3 mg/kg) of SB277011A significantly attenuated morphine-triggered reactivation of the cocaine-induced CPP. SB277011A itself (12 mg/kg i.p.) did not reactivate the extinguished CPP response. Overall, SB277011 decreases the incentive motivational actions of morphine. The present findings suggest that central D3 dopamine receptors are involved in relapse to cocaine-seeking behavior that a final common neural mechanism exists to mediate the incentive motivational effects of psychostimulants and opiates, and that selective dopamine D3 receptor antagonists constitute promising compounds for treating addiction. PMID:23404528

  12. Nonpeptidic angiotensin II AT₁ receptor antagonists derived from 6-substituted aminocarbonyl and acylamino benzimidazoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Wang, Jin-Liang; Yu, Wei-Fa; Zhou, Zhi-Ming; Tao, Wen-Chang; Wang, Yi-Cheng; Xue, Wei-Zhe; Xu, Di; Hao, Li-Ping; Han, Xiao-Feng; Fei, Fan; Liu, Ting; Liang, Ai-Hua

    2013-11-01

    Both 6-substituted aminocarbonyl and acylamino benzimidazole derivatives were designed and synthesized as nonpeptidic angiotensin II AT₁ receptor antagonists. Compounds 6f, 6g, 11e, 11f, 11g, and 12 showed nanomolar AT₁ receptor binding affinity and high AT₁ receptor selectivity over AT₂ receptor in a preliminary pharmacological evaluation. Among them, the two most active compounds 6f (AT₁ IC₅₀ = 3 nM, AT₂ IC₅₀ > 10,000 nM, PA₂ = 8.51) and 11g (AT₁ IC₅₀ = 0.1 nM, AT₂ IC₅₀ = 149 nM, PA₂ = 8.43) exhibited good antagonistic activity in isolated rabbit aortic strip functional assay. In addition, they were orally active AT₁ receptor antagonists in spontaneous hypertensive rats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. The selective metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 antagonist mavoglurant (AFQ056) reduces the incidence of reflux episodes in dogs and patients with moderate to severe gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouzade-Dominguez, M-L; Pezous, N; David, O J; Tutuian, R; Bruley des Varannes, S; Tack, J; Malfertheiner, P; Allescher, H-D; Ufer, M; Rühl, A

    2017-08-01

    Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) induced by gastric distension are modulated by the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) that influences the vagal reflex loop. We therefore aimed to examine the effects of the selective mGluR5 antagonist mavoglurant (AFQ056) on the number of TLESRs in dogs and reflux episodes in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In a dog model, the number of meal-induced TLESRs was determined after intravenous (0.03, 0.1, 0.3, and 1 mg kg -1 ) and oral (1, 3, and 10 mg kg -1 ) doses of mavoglurant with reference to vehicle. In a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, three-period crossover study, the incidence of meal-induced reflux episodes was assessed by esophageal impedance monitoring after single, oral doses of mavoglurant (50 and 400 mg) or baclofen (40 mg) in 30 patients with moderate to severe GERD. In dogs, mavoglurant reduced the number of TLESRs after intravenous and oral administration. In patients with GERD, the incidence of postprandial reflux episodes was significantly lower at a dose of 400 mg mavoglurant (-37.5% ; 90% confidence interval [CI]: -57.8, -17.2), whereas there was no significant difference at 50 mg of mavoglurant compared to placebo. A significantly lower incidence of reflux episodes was also noted with the active comparator baclofen (-50.3%; 90% CI: -66.2, -34.3), thereby validating this study. These data suggest a potential clinical benefit of mGluR5 antagonists such as mavoglurant in patients with GERD, particularly in those with persisting symptoms despite treatment with proton pump inhibitors. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Effects of a newly developed potent orexin-2 receptor-selective antagonist Compound1m on sleep/wake states in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keishi eEtori

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Orexins (also known as hypocretins, which are hypothalamic neuropeptides, play critical roles in the regulation of sleep/wakefulness states by activating two G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs, orexin 1 (OX1R and orexin 2 receptors (OX2R. In order to know the difference between effects of OX2R-selective antagonists (2-SORA and dual orexin receptor antagonists (DORA, and to understand the mechanisms underlying orexin-mediated regulation of sleep/wakefulness states, we examined the effects of a newly developed 2-SORA, Compound 1m (C1m, and a DORA, suvorexant, on sleep/wakefulness states in C57BL/6J mice. After oral administration in the dark period, both C1m and suvorexant exhibited potent sleep-promoting properties with similar efficacy in a dose-dependent manner. While C1m did not increase NREM and REM sleep episode durations, suvorexant induced longer episode durations of NREM and REM sleep as compared with both the vehicle- and C1m-administered groups. When compounds were injected during light period, C1m did not show a significant change in sleep/wakefulness states in the light period, whereas suvorexant slightly but significantly increased the sleep time. We also found that C1m did not affect the time of REM sleep, while suvorexant markedly increased it. This suggests that although OX1R-mediated pathway plays a pivotal role in promoting wakefulness, OX1R-mediated pathway also plays an additional role. OX1R-mediated pathway also plays a role in suppression of REM sleep. Fos-immunostaining showed that both compounds affected the activity of arousal-related neurons with different patterns. These results suggest partly overlapping and partly distinct roles of orexin receptors in the regulation of sleep/wakefulness states.

  15. A potent and selective calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist, MK-8825, inhibits responses to nociceptive trigeminal activation: Role of CGRP in orofacial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Reyes, Marcela; Pardi, Vanessa; Akerman, Simon

    2015-09-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are orofacial pains within the trigeminal distribution, which involve the masticatory musculature, the temporomandibular joint or both. Their pathophysiology remains unclear, as inflammatory mediators are thought to be involved, and clinically TMD presents pain and sometimes limitation of function, but often appears without gross indications of local inflammation, such as visible edema, redness and increase in temperature. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) has been implicated in other pain disorders with trigeminal distribution, such as migraine, of which TMD shares a significant co-morbidity. CGRP causes activation and sensitization of trigeminal primary afferent neurons, independent of any inflammatory mechanisms, and thus may also be involved in TMD. Here we used a small molecule, selective CGRP receptor antagonist, MK-8825, to dissect the role of CGRP in inducing spontaneous nociceptive facial grooming behaviors, neuronal activation in the trigeminal nucleus, and systemic release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, in a mouse model of acute orofacial masseteric muscle pain that we have developed, as a surrogate of acute TMD. We show that CFA masseteric injection causes significant spontaneous orofacial pain behaviors, neuronal activation in the trigeminal nucleus, and release of interleukin-6 (IL-6). In mice pre-treated with MK-8825 there is a significant reduction in these spontaneous orofacial pain behaviors. Also, at 2 and 24h after CFA injection the level of Fos immunoreactivity in the trigeminal nucleus, used as a marker of neuronal activation, was much lower on both ipsilateral and contralateral sides after pre-treatment with MK-8825. There was no effect of MK-8825 on the release of IL-6. These data suggest that CGRP may be involved in TMD pathophysiology, but not via inflammatory mechanisms, at least in the acute stage. Furthermore, CGRP receptor antagonists may have therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of TMD, as they

  16. Dual antagonists of integrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadrah, K; Dolenc, M Sollner

    2005-01-01

    The roles of integrins in pathologies have been studied intensively and only partially explained. This has resulted in the development of several nanomolar antagonists to certain integrins. In most cases, the aim was to produce compounds which are highly selective towards specific integrins. This paradigm has recently shifted a little. Targeting two or more integrins with one compound has become a very attractive concept, especially since it has become clear that several severe disorders, such as pathological angiogenesis, cannot be treated just with highly specific integrin antagonists. This review is aimed to elucidate some aspects regarding the design of drugs with dual activity towards integrins. Integrin structure and tissue distribution will first be described, in order to provide the basis for their functions in various pathologies which will follow. Inhibitors of several pairs of integrins will be described.

  17. Anesthetic pharmacology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Evers, Alex S; Maze, M; Kharasch, Evan D

    2011-01-01

    ...: Section 1 introduces the principles of drug action, Section 2 presents the molecular, cellular and integrated physiology of the target organ/functional system and Section 3 reviews the pharmacology...

  18. NETUPITANT, A POTENT AND HIGHLY SELECTIVE NK1 RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST, ALLEVIATES ACETIC ACID-INDUCED BLADDER OVERACTIVITY IN ANESTHETIZED GUINEA-PIGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Palea

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Tachykinins potently contract the isolated urinary bladder from a number of animal species and play an important role in the regulation of the micturition reflex. On the guinea-pig isolated urinary bladder we examined the effects of a new potent and selective NK1 receptor antagonist (netupitant on the contractions induced by a selective NK1 receptor agonist, SP-methylester (SP-OMe. Moreover, the effects of netupitant and another selective NK1 antagonist (L-733,060 were studied in anesthetized guinea-pigs using two experimental models, the isovolumetric bladder contractions and a model of bladder overactivity induced by intravesical administration of acetic acid (AA. Methods and Results. Detrusor muscle strips were mounted in 5 mL organ baths and isometric contractions to cumulative concentrations of SP-OME were recorded before and after incubation with increasing concentrations of netupitant. In anesthetized female guinea-pigs, reflex bladder activity was examined under isovolumetric conditions with the bladder distended with saline or during cystometry using intravesical infusion of acetic acid (AA. After a 30 min stabilization period, netupitant (0.1-3 mg/kg, i.v. or L-733,060 (3-10 mg/kg, i.v. were administered. In the detrusor muscle, netupitant produced a concentration-dependent inhibition (mean pKB = 9.24 of the responses to SP-OMe. Under isovolumetric conditions, netupitant or L-733,060 reduced bladder contraction frequency in a dose-dependent manner, but neither drug changed bladder contraction amplitude. In the AA model, netupitant dose-dependently increased intercontraction interval (ICI but had no effect on the amplitude of micturition (AM. L-733,060 dose-dependently increased ICI also but this effect was paralleled by a significant reduction of AM. Conclusion. Netupitant decreases the frequency of reflex bladder contractions without altering their amplitude, suggesting that this drug targets the afferent limb of the

  19. A cell shrinkage-induced non-selective cation conductance with a novel pharmacology in Ehrlich-Lettre-ascites tumour cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawonn, Peter; Hoffmann, Else K; Hougaard, Charlotte

    2003-01-01

    In whole-cell recordings on Ehrlich-Lettre-ascites tumour (ELA) cells, the shrinkage-induced activation of a cation conductance with a selectivity ratio P(Na):P(Li):P(K):P(choline):P(NMDG) of 1.00:0.97:0.88:0.03:0.01 was observed. In order of potency, this conductance was blocked by Gd(3+)=benzam......-sensitive and -insensitive channels. In addition, because of its pharmacological profile, it may possibly be related to epithelial Na+ channels (ENaCs)....

  20. An improved method to prepare an injectable microemulsion of the galanin-receptor 3 selective antagonist, SNAP 37889, using Kolliphor® HS 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, Karlene J.; Williams, Spencer J.; Lawrence, Andrew J.; Jarrott, Bevyn; Djouma, Elvan

    2014-01-01

    Research into the galanin-3 (GAL3) receptor has many challenges, including the lack of commercially available selective ligands. While the identification of non-peptidergic GAL3 receptor-selective antagonists, 1-phenyl-3-[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]iminoindol-2-one (SNAP 37889) and 1-[3-(2-pyrrolidin-1-ylethoxy)phenyl]-3-[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]iminoindol-2-one (SNAP 398299) have implicated a role for GAL3 receptors in anxiety, depression and drug-seeking behaviour, a major limitation of their use is poor aqueous solubility. Previously we have used 5% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) with 1% hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose in saline to dissolve SNAP 37889 for intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of rats; however this produced a micro-suspension that was not ideal. The injectable formulation of SNAP 37889 was improved as follows:•30% (w/v) Kolliphor® HS 15 (Solutol HS® 15) and sodium phosphate buffer (0.01 M, pH 7.4) were used as vehicles.•A smooth glass mortar and pestle was used to triturate the Kolliphor® HS 15 and SNAP 37889 into a paste before addition to the sodium phosphate buffer at room temperature (RT).•The resulting mixture was vortexed until the paste was fully dissolved and the microemulsion was allowed to sit for 20 min to allow air bubbles to coalesce. PMID:26150955

  1. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad eKhanfar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®, the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex neurotransmitter regulations. The polypharmacological approaches on histamine H3 receptor antagonists on different G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes as well as on NO-signaling mechanism are described, supported with some lead structures.

  2. Azemiopsin, a Selective Peptide Antagonist of Muscle Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor: Preclinical Evaluation as a Local Muscle Relaxant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina V. Shelukhina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Azemiopsin (Az, a linear peptide from the Azemiops feae viper venom, contains no disulfide bonds, is a high-affinity and selective inhibitor of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR of muscle type and may be considered as potentially applicable nondepolarizing muscle relaxant. In this study, we investigated its preclinical profile in regard to in vitro and in vivo efficacy, acute and chronic toxicity, pharmacokinetics, allergenic capacity, immunotoxicity and mutagenic potency. The peptide effectively inhibited (IC50 ~ 19 nM calcium response of muscle nAChR evoked by 30 μM (EC100 acetylcholine but was less potent (IC50 ~ 3 μM at α7 nAChR activated by 10 μM (EC50 acetylcholine and had a low affinity to α4β2 and α3-containing nAChR, as well as to GABAA or 5HT3 receptors. Its muscle relaxant effect was demonstrated at intramuscular injection to mice at doses of 30–300 µg/kg, 30 µg/kg being the initial effective dose and 90 µg/kg—the average effective dose. The maximal muscle relaxant effect of Az was achieved in 10 min after the administration and elimination half-life of Az in mice was calculated as 20–40 min. The longest period of Az action observed at a dose of 300 µg/kg was 55 min. The highest acute toxicity (LD50 510 μg/kg was observed at intravenous injection of Az, at intramuscular or intraperitoneal administration it was less toxic. The peptide showed practically no immunotoxic, allergenic or mutagenic capacity. Overall, the results demonstrate that Az has good drug-like properties for the application as local muscle relaxant and in its parameters, is not inferior to the relaxants currently used. However, some Az modification might be effective to extend its narrow therapeutic window, a typical characteristic and a weak point of all nondepolarizing myorelaxants.

  3. RC-3095, a Selective Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptor Antagonist, Does Not Protect the Lungs in an Experimental Model of Lung Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

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    Vera L. Oliveira-Freitas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available RC-3095, a selective GRPR antagonist, has been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties in different models of inflammation. However, its protective effect on lungs submitted to lung ischemia-reperfusion injury has not been addressed before. Then, we administrated RC-3095 intravenously before and after lung reperfusion using an animal model of lung ischemia-reperfusion injury (LIRI by clamping the pulmonary hilum. Twenty Wistar rats were subjected to an experimental model in four groups: SHAM, ischemia-reperfusion (IR, RC-Pre, and RC-Post. The final mean arterial pressure significantly decreased in IR and RC-Pre compared to their values before reperfusion (P<0.001. The RC-Post group showed significant decrease of partial pressure of arterial oxygen at the end of the observation when compared to baseline (P=0.005. Caspase-9 activity was significantly higher in the RC-Post as compared to the other groups (P<0.013. No significant differences were observed in eNOS activity among the groups. The groups RC-Pre and RC-Post did not show any significant decrease in IL-1β (P=0.159 and TNF-α (P=0.260, as compared to IR. The histological score showed no significant differences among the groups. In conclusion, RC-3095 does not demonstrate a protective effect in our LIRI model. Additionally, its use after reperfusion seems to potentiate cell damage, stimulating apoptosis.

  4. A phase 2 study of the first imipridone ONC201, a selective DRD2 antagonist for oncology, administered every three weeks in recurrent glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrillaga-Romany, Isabel; Chi, Andrew S; Allen, Joshua E; Oster, Wolfgang; Wen, Patrick Y; Batchelor, Tracy T

    2017-10-03

    ONC201 is an oral, small molecule selective antagonist of the G protein-coupled receptor DRD2 that causes p53-independent apoptosis in tumor cells via integrated stress response activation and Akt/ERK inactivation. We performed a Phase II study that enrolled 17 patients with recurrent, bevacizumab-naïve, IDH1/2 WT glioblastoma who received 625mg ONC201 every three weeks. Median OS was 41.6 weeks with OS6 of 71% and OS9 of 53%. Seven of 17 patients are alive. PFS6 was 11.8% with two patients remaining on study who continue to receive ONC201 for >12 months. One of these patients had a durable objective response with a secondary glioblastoma possessing a H3.3 K27M mutation, exhibiting regression by 85% in one lesion and 76% in the second lesion. The second patient who continues to receive ONC201 for >12 months remains disease-free after enrolling on this trial following a re-resection. No drug-related SAEs or treatment discontinuation due to toxicity occurred. Plasma PK at 2 hours post-dose was 2.6 ug/mL, serum prolactin induction was observed as a surrogate marker of target engagement, and DRD2 was expressed in all evaluated archival tumor specimens. In summary, ONC201 is well tolerated and may have single agent activity in recurrent glioblastoma patients.

  5. Protective effect of caffeine and a selective A2A receptor antagonist on impairment of memory and oxidative stress of aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Marlon Régis; Wilhelm, Ethel A; Jesse, Cristiano R; Brandão, Ricardo; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne

    2011-04-01

    In this study, the effects of caffeine (CAF) and SCH58261, a selective A(2A) receptor antagonist, on memory impairment and oxidative stress generated by aging in rats were investigated. Young and aged rats were treated daily per 10 days with CAF (30 mg/kg p.o.) or SCH58261 (0.5mg/kg, p.o.) or vehicle (1 ml/kg p.o.). Rats were trained and tested in a novel object recognition task. After the behavioral test, ascorbic acid and oxygen and nitrogen reactive species levels as well as Na(+)K(+) ATPase activity were determined in rat brain. The results demonstrated that the age-related memory deficit was reversed by treatment with CAF or SCH58261. Treatment with CAF or SCH58261 significantly normalized oxygen and nitrogen reactive species levels increased in brains of aged rats. Na(+)K(+) ATPase activity inhibited in brains of aged rats was also normalized by CAF or SCH58261 treatment. A decrease in basal ascorbic acid levels in brains of aged rats was not changed by CAF or SCH58261. These results demonstrated that CAF and SCH58261, modulators of adenosinergic receptors, were able to reverse age-associated memory impairment and to partially reduce oxidative stress. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Discovery of Mixed Pharmacology Melanocortin-3 Agonists and Melanocortin-4 Receptor Tetrapeptide Antagonist Compounds (TACOs) Based on the Sequence Ac-Xaa1-Arg-(pI)DPhe-Xaa4-NH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doering, Skye R; Freeman, Katie T; Schnell, Sathya M; Haslach, Erica M; Dirain, Marvin; Debevec, Ginamarie; Geer, Phaedra; Santos, Radleigh G; Giulianotti, Marc A; Pinilla, Clemencia; Appel, Jon R; Speth, Robert C; Houghten, Richard A; Haskell-Luevano, Carrie

    2017-05-25

    The centrally expressed melanocortin-3 and -4 receptors (MC3R/MC4R) have been studied as possible targets for weight management therapies, with a preponderance of studies focusing on the MC4R. Herein, a novel tetrapeptide scaffold [Ac-Xaa 1 -Arg-(pI)DPhe-Xaa 4 -NH 2 ] is reported. The scaffold was derived from results obtained from a MC3R mixture-based positional scanning campaign. From these results, a set of 48 tetrapeptides were designed and pharmacologically characterized at the mouse melanocortin-1, -3, -4, and -5 receptors. This resulted in the serendipitous discovery of nine compounds that were MC3R agonists (EC 50 DPhe-Tic-NH 2 ], 1 [Ac-His-Arg-(pI)DPhe-Tic-NH 2 ], and 41 [Ac-Arg-Arg-(pI)DPhe-DNal(2')-NH 2 ] were more potent (EC 50 DPhe-Arg-Trp-NH 2 . This template contains a sequentially reversed "Arg-(pI)DPhe" motif with respect to the classical "Phe-Arg" melanocortin signaling motif, which results in pharmacology that is first-in-class for the central melanocortin receptors.

  7. Differential pharmacology and clinical utility of rolapitant in chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapoport BL

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Bernardo Leon Rapoport The Medical Oncology Centre of Rosebank, Johannesburg, South Africa Abstract: Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV is a debilitating side effect of many cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens. CINV typically manifests during two well-defined time periods (acute and delayed phases. The acute phase is the first 24 hours after chemotherapy and is largely managed with 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor antagonists. The delayed phase, a 5-day at-risk period during which patients are not often in direct contact with their health care provider, remains a significant unmet medical need. Neurokinin-1 (NK-1 receptor antagonists have demonstrated protection against acute and delayed CINV in patients treated with highly emetogenic chemotherapy and moderately emetogenic chemotherapy when used in combination with a 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor antagonist and dexamethasone. Furthermore, recent data indicate that this protection is maintained over multiple treatment cycles. Rolapitant, a selective and long-acting NK-1 receptor antagonist, is approved as oral formulation for the prevention of delayed CINV in adults. This review discusses the differential pharmacology and clinical utility of rolapitant in preventing CINV compared with other NK-1 receptor antagonists. Keywords: antiemetics, highly emetogenic chemotherapy, moderately emetogenic chemotherapy, delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, emesis, neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists

  8. The effects of the selective 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonist SB 242084 on learned helplessness in male Fischer 344 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Paul V; Greenwood, Benjamin N; Fleshner, Monika

    2009-05-01

    Rats exposed to an uncontrollable stressor demonstrate a constellation of behaviors such as exaggerated freezing and deficits in shuttle box escape learning. These behaviors in rats have been called learned helplessness and have been argued to model human stress-related mood disorders. Learned helplessness is thought to be caused by hyperactivation of serotonin (5-HT) neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) and a subsequent exaggerated release of 5-HT in DRN projection sites. Blocking 5-HT(2C) receptors in the face of an increase in serotonin can alleviate anxiety behaviors in some animal models. However, specific 5-HT receptor subtypes involved in learned helplessness remain unknown. The current experiments tested the hypothesis that 5-HT(2C) receptor activation is necessary and sufficient for the expression of learned helplessness. The selective 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonist SB 242084 (1.0 mg/kg) administered i.p. to adult male Fischer 344 rats prior to shuttle box behavioral testing, but not before stress, blocked stress-induced deficits in escape learning but had no effect on the exaggerated shock-elicited freezing. The selective 5-HT(2C) receptor agonist CP-809101 was sufficient to produce learned helplessness-like behaviors in the absence of prior stress and these effects were blocked by pretreatment with SB 242084. Results implicate the 5-HT(2C) receptor subtype in mediating the shuttle box escape deficits produced by exposure to uncontrollable stress and suggest that different postsynaptic 5-HT receptor subtypes underlie the different learned helplessness behaviors.

  9. Combined genetic and pharmacological inhibition of TRPV1 and P2X3 attenuates colorectal hypersensitivity and afferent sensitization

    OpenAIRE

    Kiyatkin, Michael E.; Feng, Bin; Schwartz, Erica S.; Gebhart, G. F.

    2013-01-01

    The ligand-gated channels transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and P2X3 have been reported to facilitate colorectal afferent neuron sensitization, thus contributing to organ hypersensitivity and pain. In the present study, we hypothesized that TRPV1 and P2X3 cooperate to modulate colorectal nociception and afferent sensitivity. To test this hypothesis, we employed TRPV1-P2X3 double knockout (TPDKO) mice and channel-selective pharmacological antagonists and evaluated combined chann...

  10. Orexin 1 receptor antagonists in compulsive behaviour and anxiety: possible therapeutic use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio eMerlo-Pich

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Fifteen years after the discovery of hypocretin/orexin a large body of evidence has been collected supporting its critical role in the modulation of several regulatory physiological functions. While reduced levels of hypocretin/orexin were early on associated with narcolepsy, increased levels have been linked in recent years to pathological states of hypervigilance and, in particular, to insomnia. The filing to FDA of the dual-activity orexin receptor antagonist (DORA suvorexant for the indication of insomnia further corroborates the robustness of such evidences. However, as excessive vigilance is also typical of anxiety and panic episodes, as well as of abstinence and craving in substance misuse disorders, in this review we briefly discuss the evidence supporting the development of hypocretin/orexin receptor 1 (OX1 antagonists for these indications. Experiments using the OX1 antagonist SB-334867 and mutant mice have involved the OX1 receptor in mediating the compulsive reinstatement of drug seeking for ethanol, nicotine, cocaine, cannabinoids and morphine. More recently, data have been generated with the novel selective OX1 antagonists GSK1059865 and ACT-335827 on behavioural and cardiovascular response to stressors and panic-inducing agents in animals. Concluding, while waiting for pharmacologic data to become available in humans, risks and benefits for the development of an OX1 receptor antagonist for Binge Eating and Anxiety Disorders are discussed.

  11. Pharmacological Characterization of 5-Substituted 1-[(2,3-dihydro-1-benzofuran-2-ylmethyl]piperazines: Novel Antagonists for the Histamine H3 and H4 Receptors with Anti-inflammatory Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle F. Corrêa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The histamine receptors (HRs are traditional G protein-coupled receptors of extensive therapeutic interest. Recently, H3R and H4R subtypes have been targeted in drug discovery projects for inflammation, asthma, pain, cancer, Parkinson’s, and Alzheimer’s diseases, which includes searches for dual acting H3R/H4R ligands. In the present work, nine 1-[(2,3-dihydro-1-benzofuran-2-ylmethyl]piperazine (LINS01 series molecules were synthesized and evaluated as H3R and H4R ligands. Our data show that the N-allyl-substituted compound LINS01004 bears the highest affinity for H3R (pKi 6.40, while the chlorinated compound LINS01007 has moderate affinity for H4R (pKi 6.06. In addition, BRET assays to assess the functional activity of Gi1 coupling indicate that all compounds have no intrinsic activity and act as antagonists of these receptors. Drug-likeness assessment indicated these molecules are promising leads for further improvements. In vivo evaluation of compounds LINS01005 and LINS01007 in a mouse model of asthma showed a better anti-inflammatory activity of LINS01007 (3 g/kg than the previously tested compound LINS01005. This is the first report with functional data of these compounds in HRs, and our results also show the potential of their applications as anti-inflammatory.

  12. Pharmacological Identification of a Guanidine-Containing β-Alanine Analogue with Low Micromolar Potency and Selectivity for the Betaine/GABA Transporter 1 (BGT1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Khawaja, Anas Mohammad Ali; Petersen, Jette Gellert; Damgaard, Maria

    2014-01-01

    of the amino group in β-alanine or GABA, a series of compounds was generated, and their pharmacological activity assessed at human GAT subtypes. Using a cell-based [(3)H]GABA uptake assay, several selective inhibitors at human BGT1 were identified. The guanidine-containing compound 9 (2-amino-1......,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidine-5-carboxylic acid hydrochloride) displayed more than 250 times greater potency than the parent compound β-alanine at BGT1 and is thus the most potent inhibitor reported to date for this subtype (IC50 value of 2.5 µM). In addition, compound 9 displayed about 400, 16 and 40 times lower inhibitory...

  13. Selective kainate receptor (GluK1) ligands structurally based upon1H-Cyclopentapyrimidin-2,4(1H,3H)-dione: synthesis, molecular modeling, and pharmacological and biostructural characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venskutonyte, Raminta; Butini, Stefania; Coccone, Salvatore Sanna

    2011-01-01

    The physiological function of kainate receptors (GluK1- GluK5) in the central nervous system is not fully understood yet. With the aim of developing potent and selective GluK1 ligands, we have synthesized a series of new thiophene-based GluK1 agonists (6a-c) and antagonists (7a-d). Pharmacologica...

  14. Plant cannabinoids: a neglected pharmacological treasure trove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechoulam, Raphael

    2005-12-01

    Most of the cannabinoids in Cannabis sativa L. have not been fully evaluated for their pharmacological activity. A publication in this issue presents evidence that a plant cannabinoid, Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabivarin is a potent antagonist of anandamide, a major endogenous cannabinoid. It seems possible that many of the non-psychoactive constituents of this plant will be of biological interest.

  15. The platelet P2Y(12) receptor under normal and pathological conditions. Assessment with the radiolabeled selective antagonist [(3)H]PSB-0413.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlmann, Philippe; Lecchi, Anna; El-Tayeb, Ali; Müller, Christa E; Cattaneo, Marco; Gachet, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Various radioligands have been used to characterize and quantify the platelet P2Y(12) receptor, which share several weaknesses: (a) they are metabolically unstable and substrates for ectoenzymes, (b) they are agonists, and (c) they do not discriminate between P2Y(1) and P2Y(12). We used the [(3)H]PSB-0413 selective P2Y(12) receptor antagonist radioligand to reevaluate the number of P2Y(12) receptors in intact platelets and in membrane preparations. Studies in humans showed that: (1) [(3)H]PSB-0413 bound to 425 ± 50 sites/platelet (K (D) = 3.3 ± 0.6 nM), (2) 0.5 ± 0.2 pmol [(3)H]PSB-0413 bound to 1 mg protein of platelet membranes (K (D) = 6.5 ± 3.6 nM), and (3) competition studies confirmed the known features of P2Y(12), with the expected rank order of potency: AR-C69931MX > 2MeSADP ≫ ADPβS > ADP, while the P2Y(1) ligand MRS2179 and the P2X(1) ligand α,β-Met-ATP did not displace [(3)H]PSB-0413 binding. Patients with severe P2Y(12) deficiency displayed virtually no binding of [(3)H]PSB-0413 to intact platelets, while a patient with a dysfunctional P2Y(12) receptor had normal binding. Studies in mice showed that: (1) [(3)H]PSB-0413 bound to 634 ± 87 sites/platelet (K (D) = 14 ± 4.5 nM) and (2) 0.7 pmol ± 0.3 [(3)H]PSB-0413 bound to 1 mg protein of platelet membranes (K (D) = 9.1 ± 5.3 nM). Clopidogrel and other thiol reagents like pCMBS or DTT abolished the binding both to intact platelets and membrane preparations. Therefore, [(3)H]PSB-0413 is an accurate and selective tool for radioligand binding studies aimed at quantifying P2Y(12) receptors, to identify patients with P2Y(12) deficiencies or quantify the effect of P2Y(12) targeting drugs.

  16. Use of mathematics to guide target selection in systems pharmacology; application to receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Neil; van der Graaf, Piet H; Peletier, Lambertus A

    2017-11-15

    A key element of the drug discovery process is target selection. Although the topic is subject to much discussion and experimental effort, there are no defined quantitative rules around optimal selection. Often 'rules of thumb', that have not been subject to rigorous exploration, are used. In this paper we explore the 'rule of thumb' notion that the molecule that initiates a pathway signal is the optimal target. Given the multi-factorial and complex nature of this question, we have simplified an example pathway to its logical minimum of two steps and used a mathematical model of this to explore the different options in the context of typical small and large molecule drugs. In this paper, we report the conclusions of our analysis and describe the analysis tool and methods used. These provide a platform to enable a more extensive enquiry into this important topic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Pharmacological characterisation of the highly NaV1.7 selective spider venom peptide Pn3a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuis, Jennifer R; Dekan, Zoltan; Wingerd, Joshua S; Smith, Jennifer J; Munasinghe, Nehan R; Bhola, Rebecca F; Imlach, Wendy L; Herzig, Volker; Armstrong, David A; Rosengren, K Johan; Bosmans, Frank; Waxman, Stephen G; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Escoubas, Pierre; Minett, Michael S; Christie, Macdonald J; King, Glenn F; Alewood, Paul F; Lewis, Richard J; Wood, John N; Vetter, Irina

    2017-01-20

    Human genetic studies have implicated the voltage-gated sodium channel Na V 1.7 as a therapeutic target for the treatment of pain. A novel peptide, μ-theraphotoxin-Pn3a, isolated from venom of the tarantula Pamphobeteus nigricolor, potently inhibits Na V 1.7 (IC 50 0.9 nM) with at least 40-1000-fold selectivity over all other Na V subtypes. Despite on-target activity in small-diameter dorsal root ganglia, spinal slices, and in a mouse model of pain induced by Na V 1.7 activation, Pn3a alone displayed no analgesic activity in formalin-, carrageenan- or FCA-induced pain in rodents when administered systemically. A broad lack of analgesic activity was also found for the selective Na V 1.7 inhibitors PF-04856264 and phlotoxin 1. However, when administered with subtherapeutic doses of opioids or the enkephalinase inhibitor thiorphan, these subtype-selective Na V 1.7 inhibitors produced profound analgesia. Our results suggest that in these inflammatory models, acute administration of peripherally restricted Na V 1.7 inhibitors can only produce analgesia when administered in combination with an opioid.

  18. Catecholic amides as potential selective phosphodiesterase 4D inhibitors: Design, synthesis, pharmacological evaluation and structure-activity relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhong-Zhen; Ge, Bing-Chen; Chen, Yu-Fang; Shi, Xiu-Dong; Yang, Xue-Mei; Xu, Jiang-Ping

    2015-11-15

    In this study, a series of catechol-based amides (8a-n) with different amide linkers linking the catecholic moiety to the terminal phenyl ring was designed and synthesized as potent phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4D inhibitors. The inhibitory activities of these compounds were evaluated against the core catalytic domains of human PDE4 (PDE4CAT), full-length PDE4B1 and PDE4D7 enzymes, and other PDE family members. The results indicated the majority of compounds 8a-n displayed moderate to good inhibitory activities against PDE4CAT. Among these compounds, compound 8 j with a short amide linker (-CONHCH2-) displayed comparable PDE4CAT inhibitory activity (IC50=410 nM) with rolipram. More interestingly, compound 8 g, a potent and selective PDE4D inhibitor (IC50=94 nM), exhibited a 10-fold selectivity over the PDE4B subtypes and an over 1000-fold selectivity against other PDE family members. Docking simulations suggested that 8 g forms three extra H-bonds with the N-H of residue Asn487 and two water molecules. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Pharmacological treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriola Manchola, Enrique; Álaba Trueba, Javier

    2016-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic degenerative and inflammatory process leading to synapticdysfunction and neuronal death. A review about the pharmacological treatment alternatives is made: acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEI), a nutritional supplement (Souvenaid) and Ginkgo biloba. A special emphasis on Ginkgo biloba due to the controversy about its use and the approval by the European Medicines Agency is made. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Geriatría y Gerontología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Pharmacological characterisation of the highly NaV1.7 selective spider venom peptide Pn3a

    OpenAIRE

    Deuis, J. R.; Dekan, Z.; Wingerd, J. S.; Smith, J. J.; Munasinghe, N. R.; Bhola, R. F.; Imlach, W. L.; Herzig, V.; Armstrong, D. A.; Rosengren, K. J.; Bosmans, F.; Waxman, S. G.; Dib-Hajj, S. D.; Escoubas, P.; Minett, M. S.

    2017-01-01

    Human genetic studies have implicated the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.7 as a therapeutic target for the treatment of pain. A novel peptide, μ-theraphotoxin-Pn3a, isolated from venom of the tarantula Pamphobeteus nigricolor, potently inhibits NaV1.7 (IC50 0.9 nM) with at least 40-1000-fold selectivity over all other NaV subtypes. Despite on-target activity in small-diameter dorsal root ganglia, spinal slices, and in a mouse model of pain induced by NaV1.7 activation, Pn3a alone displayed...

  1. Pharmacological characterisation of the highly NaV1.7 selective spider venom peptide Pn3a

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer R. Deuis; Zoltan Dekan; Joshua S. Wingerd; Jennifer J. Smith; Nehan R. Munasinghe; Rebecca F. Bhola; Wendy L. Imlach; Volker Herzig; David A. Armstrong; K. Johan Rosengren; Frank Bosmans; Stephen G. Waxman; Sulayman D. Dib-Hajj; Pierre Escoubas; Michael S. Minett

    2017-01-01

    Human genetic studies have implicated the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.7 as a therapeutic target for the treatment of pain. A novel peptide, ?-theraphotoxin-Pn3a, isolated from venom of the tarantula Pamphobeteus nigricolor, potently inhibits NaV1.7 (IC50 0.9?nM) with at least 40?1000-fold selectivity over all other NaV subtypes. Despite on-target activity in small-diameter dorsal root ganglia, spinal slices, and in a mouse model of pain induced by NaV1.7 activation, Pn3a alone displayed...

  2. Binding of [3H]MSX-2 (3-(3-hydroxypropyl)-7-methyl-8-(m-methoxystyryl)-1-propargylxanthine) to rat striatal membranes--a new, selective antagonist radioligand for A(2A) adenosine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, C E; Maurinsh, J; Sauer, R

    2000-01-01

    The present study describes the preparation and binding properties of a new, potent, and selective A(2A) adenosine receptor (AR) antagonist radioligand, [3H]3-(3-hydroxypropyl)-7-methyl-8-(m-methoxystyryl)-1-propargy lxanth ine ([3H]MSX-2). [3H]MSX-2 binding to rat striatal membranes was saturable and reversible. Saturation experiments showed that [3H]MSX-2 labeled a single class of binding sites with high affinity (K(d)=8.0 nM) and limited capacity (B(max)=1.16 fmol.mg(-1) of protein). The presence of 100 microM GTP, or 10 mM magnesium chloride, respectively, had no effect on [3H]MSX-2 binding. AR agonists competed with the binding of 1 nM [3H]MSX-2 with the following order of potency: 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA)>2-[4-(carboxyethyl)phenylethylamino]-5'-N-ethylcarboxami doaden osine (CGS-21680)>2-chloroadenosine (2-CADO)>N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA). AR antagonists showed the following order of potency: 8-(m-bromostyryl)-3, 7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (BS-DMPX)>1, 3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (DPCPX)>(R)-5, 6-dimethyl-7-(1-phenylethyl)-2-(4-pyridyl)-7H-pyrrolo[2, 3-d]pyrimidine-4-amine (SH-128)>3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (DMPX)>caffeine. The K(i) values for antagonists were in accordance with data from binding studies with the agonist radioligand [3H]CGS21680, while agonist affinities were 3-7-fold lower. [3H]MSX-2 is a highly selective A(2A) AR antagonist radioligand exhibiting a selectivity of at least two orders of magnitude versus all other AR subtypes. The new radioligand shows high specific radioactivity (85 Ci/mmol, 3150 GBq/mmol) and acceptable nonspecific binding at rat striatal membranes of 20-30%, at 1 nM.

  3. Selective Allosteric Antagonists for the G Protein-Coupled Receptor GPRC6A Based on the 2-Phenylindole Privileged Structure Scaffold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Henrik; Boesgaard, Michael Worch; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Lenea

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent a biological target class of fundamental importance in drug therapy. The GPRC6A receptor is a newly deorphanized class C GPCR that we recently reported for the first allosteric antagonists based on the 2-arylindole privileged structure scaffold (e.g., 1...

  4. Inhibition of human prostate cancer cells proliferation by a selective alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist labedipinedilol-A involves cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liou, S.-F.; Lin, H.-H.; Liang, J.-C.; Chen, I.-J.; Yeh, J.-L.

    2009-01-01

    In this research, we conducted an in vitro analysis to evaluate the prostate cancer cells response to labedipinedilol-A in order to determine the effect of this selective α 1 -adrenoceptor antagonist to suppress prostate cancer cell growth by affecting cell proliferation and apoptosis. Here, we report that treatment of androgen-sensitive (LNCaP) and androgen-insensitive (PC-3) prostate cancer cells with labedipinedilol-A inhibited cell proliferation in concentration-dependent and time-dependent manners. Moreover, norepinephrine-stimulated proliferation of both cell lines are markedly inhibited by labedipinedilol-A. The probable involvement of α 1 -adrenoceptors in this cellular response is suggested. Labedipinedilol-A-induced growth inhibition was associated with G 0 /G 1 arrest, and G 2 /M arrest depending upon concentrations. Cell cycle blockade was associated with reduced amounts of cyclin D1/2, cyclin E, Cdk2, Cdk4, and Cdk6 and increased levels of the Cdk inhibitory proteins (Cip1/p21 and Kip1/p27). In addition, labedipinedilol-A also induced apoptosis in PC-3 cells, as determined by using Hoechst 33342 staining, DNA fragmentation, and Annexin V staining assay. Furthermore, labedipinedilol-A triggered the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, as indicated by increasing the expression of Bax, but decreasing the level of Bcl-2, resulting in mitochondrial membrane potential loss, cytochrome c release, and activation of caspase-9 and -3. We further investigated the role of MAPK cascades in the anti-proliferative and apoptosis effects of labedipinedilol-A, and confirmed that labedipinedilol-A could activate JNK1/2 but not p38 in both cell lines. Unlike JNK1/2, however, labedipinedilol-A treatment resulted in down-regulation of phospho-ERK1/2 expression. We concluded that labedipinedilol-A possessed the growth-suppressive and apoptotic effects on LNCaP and PC-3 cells by its α 1 -adrenoceptor blockade, and the apoptotic effects of labedipinedilol-A primarily through

  5. Betaxolol, a selective beta(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist, diminishes anxiety-like behavior during early withdrawal from chronic cocaine administration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudoy, C A; Van Bockstaele, E J

    2007-06-30

    Anxiety has been indicated as one of the main symptoms of the cocaine withdrawal syndrome in human addicts and severe anxiety during withdrawal may potentially contribute to relapse. As alterations in noradrenergic transmission in limbic areas underlie withdrawal symptomatology for many drugs of abuse, the present study sought to determine the effect of cocaine withdrawal on beta-adrenergic receptor (beta(1) and beta(2)) expression in the amygdala. Male Sprague Dawley rats were administered intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of cocaine (20 mg/kg) once daily for 14 days. Two days following the last cocaine injection, amygdala brain regions were micro-dissected and processed for Western blot analysis. Results showed that beta(1)-adrenergic receptor, but not beta(2)-adrenergic receptor expression was significantly increased in amygdala extracts of cocaine-withdrawn animals as compared to controls. This finding motivated further studies aimed at determining whether treatment with betaxolol, a highly selective beta(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist, could ameliorate cocaine withdrawal-induced anxiety. In these studies, betaxolol (5 mg/kg via i.p. injection) was administered at 24 and then 44 h following the final chronic cocaine administration. Anxiety-like behavior was evaluated using the elevated plus maze test approximately 2 h following the last betaxolol injection. Following behavioral testing, betaxolol effects on beta(1)-adrenergic receptor protein expression were examined by Western blotting in amygdala extracts from rats undergoing cocaine withdrawal. Animals treated with betaxolol during cocaine withdrawal exhibited a significant attenuation of anxiety-like behavior characterized by increased time spent in the open arms and increased entries into the open arms compared to animals treated with only saline during cocaine withdrawal. In contrast, betaxolol did not produce anxiolytic-like effects in control animals treated chronically with saline. Furthermore

  6. Betaxolol, a selective β1-adrenergic receptor antagonist, diminishes anxiety-like behavior during early withdrawal from chronic cocaine administration in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudoy, C.A.; Van Bockstaele, E.J.

    2007-01-01

    Background Anxiety has been indicated as one of the main symptoms of the cocaine withdrawal syndrome in human addicts and severe anxiety during withdrawal may potentially contribute to relapse. As alterations in noradrenergic transmission in limbic areas underlie withdrawal symptomatology for many drugs of abuse, the present study sought to determine the effect of cocaine withdrawal on β-adrenergic receptor (β1 and β2) expression in the amygdala. Methods Male Sprague Dawley rats were administered intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of cocaine (20 mg/kg) once daily for 14 days. Two days following the last cocaine injection, amygdala brain regions were micro-dissected and processed for Western blot analysis. Results showed that β1–adrenergic receptor, but not β2–adrenergic receptor expression was significantly increased in amygdala extracts of cocaine-withdrawn animals as compared to controls. This finding motivated further studies aimed at determining whether treatment with betaxolol, a highly selective β1–adrenergic receptor antagonist, could ameliorate cocaine withdrawal-induced anxiety. In these studies, betaxolol (5 mg/kg via i.p. injection) was administered at 24 and then 44 hours following the final chronic cocaine administration. Anxiety-like behavior was evaluated using the elevated plus maze test approximately 2 hours following the last betaxolol injection. Following behavioral testing, betaxolol effects on β1-adrenergic receptor protein expression were examined by Western blotting in amygdala extracts from rats undergoing cocaine withdrawal. Results Animals treated with betaxolol during cocaine withdrawal exhibited a significant attenuation of anxiety-like behavior characterized by increased time spent in the open arms and increased entries into the open arms compared to animals treated with only saline during cocaine withdrawal. In contrast, betaxolol did not produce anxiolytic-like effects in control animals treated chronically with saline

  7. Function of brain α2B-adrenergic receptor characterized with subtype-selective α2B antagonist and KO mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhrs, Lauren; Manlapaz, Cynthia; Kedzie, Karen; Rao, Sandhya; Cabrera-Ghayouri, Sara; Donello, John; Gil, Daniel

    2016-12-17

    Noradrenergic signaling, through the α 2A and α 2C adrenergic receptors modulates the cognitive and behavioral symptoms of disorders such as schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and addiction. However, it is unknown whether the α 2B receptor has any significant role in CNS function. The present study elucidates the potential role of the α 2B receptor in CNS function via the discovery and use of the first subtype-selective α 2B antagonist (AGN-209419), and behavioral analyses of α-receptor knockout (KO) mice. Using AGN-209419 as radioligand, α 2B receptor binding sites were identified within the olfactory bulb, cortex, thalamus, cerebellum, and striatum. Based on the observed expression patterns of α 2 subtypes in the brain, we compared α 2B KO, α 2A KO and α 2C KO mice behavioral phenotypes with their respective wild-type lines in anxiety (plus maze), compulsive (marble burying), and sensorimotor (prepulse inhibition) tasks. α 2B KO mice exhibited increased marble burying and α 2C KO mice exhibited an increased startle response to a pulse stimulus, but otherwise intact prepulse inhibition. To further explore compulsive behavior, we evaluated novelty-induced locomotor hyperactivity and found that α 2B KO and α 2C KO mice exhibited increased locomotion in the open field. Interestingly, when challenged with amphetamine, α 2C KO mice increased activity at lower doses relative to either α 2A KO or WT mice. However, α 2B KO mice exhibited stereotypy at doses of amphetamine that were only locomotor stimulatory to all other genotypes. Following co-administration of AGN-209419 with low-dose amphetamine in WT mice, stereotypy was observed, mimicking the α 2B KO phenotype. These findings suggest that the α 2B receptor is involved in CNS behaviors associated with sensorimotor gating and compulsivity, and may be therapeutically relevant for disorders such as schizophrenia, ADHD, post-traumatic stress disorder, addiction, and

  8. Enantiomers of HA-966 (3-amino-1-hydroxypyrrolid-2-one) exhibit distinct central nervous system effects: (+)-HA-966 is a selective glycine/N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, but (-)-HA-966 is a potent gamma-butyrolactone-like sedative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, L.; Donald, A.E.; Foster, A.C.; Hutson, P.H.; Iversen, L.L.; Iversen, S.D.; Kemp, J.A.; Leeson, P.D.; Marshall, G.R.; Oles, R.J.; Priestley, T.; Thorn, L.; Tricklebank, M.D.; Vass, C.A.; Williams, B.J.

    1990-01-01

    The antagonist effect of ±-3-amino-1-hydroxypyrrolid-2-one (HA-966) at the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor occurs through a selective interaction with the glycine modulatory site within the receptor complex. When the enantiomers of ±-HA-966 were resolved, the (R)-(+)-enantiomer was found to be a selective glycine/NMDA receptor antagonist, a property that accounts for its anticonvulsant activity in vivo. In contrast, the (S)-(-)-enantiomer was only weakly active as an NMDA-receptor antagonist, but nevertheless it possessed a marked sedative and muscle relaxant action in vivo. In radioligand binding experiments, (+)-HA-966 inhibited strychnine-insensitive [ 3 H]glycine binding to rat cerebral cortex synaptic membranes with an IC 50 of 12.5 μM, whereas (-)-HA-966 had an IC 50 value of 339 μM. In mice, (+)-HA-966 antagonized sound and N-methyl-DL-aspartic acid (NMDLA)-induced seizures. The coadministration of D-serine dose-dependently antagonized the anticonvulsant effect of a submaximal dose of (+)-HA-966 against NMDLA-induced seizures. The sedative/ataxic effect of racemic HA-966 was mainly attributable to the (-)-enantiomer. It is suggested that, as in the case of the sedative γ-butyrolactone, disruption of striatal dopaminergic mechanisms may be responsible for this action

  9. Discovery and preclinical pharmacology of a selective ATP-competitive Akt inhibitor (GDC-0068) for the treatment of human tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, James F; Xu, Rui; Bencsik, Josef R; Xiao, Dengming; Kallan, Nicholas C; Schlachter, Stephen; Mitchell, Ian S; Spencer, Keith L; Banka, Anna L; Wallace, Eli M; Gloor, Susan L; Martinson, Matthew; Woessner, Richard D; Vigers, Guy P A; Brandhuber, Barbara J; Liang, Jun; Safina, Brian S; Li, Jun; Zhang, Birong; Chabot, Christine; Do, Steven; Lee, Leslie; Oeh, Jason; Sampath, Deepak; Lee, Brian B; Lin, Kui; Liederer, Bianca M; Skelton, Nicholas J

    2012-09-27

    The discovery and optimization of a series of 6,7-dihydro-5H-cyclopenta[d]pyrimidine compounds that are ATP-competitive, selective inhibitors of protein kinase B/Akt is reported. The initial design and optimization was guided by the use of X-ray structures of inhibitors in complex with Akt1 and the closely related protein kinase A. The resulting compounds demonstrate potent inhibition of all three Akt isoforms in biochemical assays and poor inhibition of other members of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase/protein kinase G/protein kinase C extended family and block the phosphorylation of multiple downstream targets of Akt in human cancer cell lines. Biological studies with one such compound, 28 (GDC-0068), demonstrate good oral exposure resulting in dose-dependent pharmacodynamic effects on downstream biomarkers and a robust antitumor response in xenograft models in which the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt-mammalian target of rapamycin pathway is activated. 28 is currently being evaluated in human clinical trials for the treatment of cancer.

  10. Pharmacologically relevant intake during chronic, free-choice drinking rhythms in selectively bred high alcohol-preferring mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Liana M; Grahame, Nicholas J

    2013-11-01

    Multiple lines of high alcohol-preferring (HAP) mice were selectively bred for their intake of 10% ethanol (v/v) during 24-hour daily access over a 4-week period, with the highest drinking lines exhibiting intakes in excess of 20 g/kg/day. We observed circadian drinking patterns and resulting blood ethanol concentrations (BECs) in the HAP lines. We also compared the drinking rhythms and corresponding BECs of the highest drinking HAP lines to those of the C57BL/6J (B6) inbred strain. Adult male and female crossed HAP (cHAP), HAP replicate lines 1, 2, 3 and B6 mice had free-choice access to 10% ethanol and water for 3 weeks prior to bi-hourly assessments of intake throughout the dark portion of the light-dark cycle. All HAP lines reached and maintained a rate of alcohol intake above the rate at which HAP1 mice metabolize alcohol, and BECs were consistent with this finding. Further, cHAP and HAP1 mice maintained an excessive level of intake throughout the dark portion of the cycle, accumulating mean BEC levels of 261.5 ± 18.09 and 217.9 ± 25.02 mg/dl, respectively. B6 mice drank comparatively modestly, and did not accumulate high BEC levels (53.63 + 8.15 mg/dl). Free-choice drinking demonstrated by the HAP1 and cHAP lines may provide a unique opportunity for modeling the excessive intake that often occurs in alcohol-dependent individuals, and allow for exploration of predisposing factors for excessive consumption, as well as the development of physiological, behavioral and toxicological outcomes following alcohol exposure. © 2011 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2011 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  11. Balancing selected medication costs with total number of daily injections: a preference analysis of GnRH-agonist and antagonist protocols by IVF patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sills E

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During in vitro fertilization (IVF, fertility patients are expected to self-administer many injections as part of this treatment. While newer medications have been developed to substantially reduce the number of these injections, such agents are typically much more expensive. Considering these differences in both cost and number of injections, this study compared patient preferences between GnRH-agonist and GnRH-antagonist based protocols in IVF. Methods Data were collected by voluntary, anonymous questionnaire at first consultation appointment. Patient opinion concerning total number of s.c. injections as a function of non-reimbursed patient cost associated with GnRH-agonist [A] and GnRH-antagonist [B] protocols in IVF was studied. Results Completed questionnaires (n = 71 revealed a mean +/− SD patient age of 34 +/− 4.1 yrs. Most (83.1% had no prior IVF experience; 2.8% reported another medical condition requiring self-administration of subcutaneous medication(s. When out-of-pocket cost for [A] and [B] were identical, preference for [B] was registered by 50.7% patients. The tendency to favor protocol [B] was weaker among patients with a health occupation. Estimated patient costs for [A] and [B] were $259.82 +/− 11.75 and $654.55 +/− 106.34, respectively (p  Conclusions This investigation found consistently higher non-reimbursed direct medication costs for GnRH-antagonist IVF vs. GnRH-agonist IVF protocols. A conditional preference to minimize downregulation (using GnRH-antagonist was noted among some, but not all, IVF patient sub-groups. Compared to IVF patients with a health occupation, the preference for GnRH-antagonist was weaker than for other patients. While reducing total number of injections by using GnRH-antagonist is a desirable goal, it appears this advantage is not perceived equally by all IVF patients and its utility is likely discounted heavily by patients when nonreimbursed medication costs

  12. Balancing selected medication costs with total number of daily injections: a preference analysis of GnRH-agonist and antagonist protocols by IVF patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sills, E Scott; Collins, Gary S; Salem, Shala A; Jones, Christopher A; Peck, Alison C; Salem, Rifaat D

    2012-08-30

    During in vitro fertilization (IVF), fertility patients are expected to self-administer many injections as part of this treatment. While newer medications have been developed to substantially reduce the number of these injections, such agents are typically much more expensive. Considering these differences in both cost and number of injections, this study compared patient preferences between GnRH-agonist and GnRH-antagonist based protocols in IVF. Data were collected by voluntary, anonymous questionnaire at first consultation appointment. Patient opinion concerning total number of s.c. injections as a function of non-reimbursed patient cost associated with GnRH-agonist [A] and GnRH-antagonist [B] protocols in IVF was studied. Completed questionnaires (n = 71) revealed a mean +/- SD patient age of 34 +/- 4.1 yrs. Most (83.1%) had no prior IVF experience; 2.8% reported another medical condition requiring self-administration of subcutaneous medication(s). When out-of-pocket cost for [A] and [B] were identical, preference for [B] was registered by 50.7% patients. The tendency to favor protocol [B] was weaker among patients with a health occupation. Estimated patient costs for [A] and [B] were $259.82 +/- 11.75 and $654.55 +/- 106.34, respectively (p cost difference increased. This investigation found consistently higher non-reimbursed direct medication costs for GnRH-antagonist IVF vs. GnRH-agonist IVF protocols. A conditional preference to minimize downregulation (using GnRH-antagonist) was noted among some, but not all, IVF patient sub-groups. Compared to IVF patients with a health occupation, the preference for GnRH-antagonist was weaker than for other patients. While reducing total number of injections by using GnRH-antagonist is a desirable goal, it appears this advantage is not perceived equally by all IVF patients and its utility is likely discounted heavily by patients when nonreimbursed medication costs reach a critical level.

  13. Injections of the selective adenosine A2A antagonist MSX-3 into the nucleus accumbens core attenuate the locomotor suppression induced by haloperidol in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiwari, Keita; Madson, Lisa J; Farrar, Andrew M; Mingote, Susana M; Valenta, John P; DiGianvittorio, Michael D; Frank, Lauren E; Correa, Merce; Hockemeyer, Jörg; Müller, Christa; Salamone, John D

    2007-03-28

    There is considerable evidence of interactions between adenosine A2A receptors and dopamine D2 receptors in striatal areas, and antagonists of the A2A receptor have been shown to reverse the motor effects of DA antagonists in animal models. The D2 antagonist haloperidol produces parkinsonism in humans, and also induces motor effects in rats, such as suppression of locomotion. The present experiments were conducted to study the ability of the adenosine A2A antagonist MSX-3 to reverse the locomotor effects of acute or subchronic administration of haloperidol in rats. Systemic (i.p.) injections of MSX-3 (2.5-10.0 mg/kg) were capable of attenuating the suppression of locomotion induced by either acute or repeated (i.e., 14 day) administration of 0.5 mg/kg haloperidol. Bilateral infusions of MSX-3 directly into the nucleus accumbens core (2.5 microg or 5.0 microg in 0.5 microl per side) produced a dose-related increase in locomotor activity in rats treated with 0.5 mg/kg haloperidol either acutely or repeatedly. There were no overall significant effects of MSX-3 infused directly into the dorsomedial nucleus accumbens shell or the ventrolateral neostriatum. These results indicate that antagonism of adenosine A2A receptors can attenuate the locomotor suppression produced by DA antagonism, and that this effect may be at least partially mediated by A2A receptors in the nucleus accumbens core. These studies suggest that adenosine and dopamine systems interact to modulate the locomotor and behavioral activation functions of nucleus accumbens core.

  14. Stereochemical studies of the monocyclic agouti-related protein (103-122) Arg-Phe-Phe residues: conversion of a melanocortin-4 receptor antagonist into an agonist and results in the discovery of a potent and selective melanocortin-1 agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Christine G; Wang, Xiang S; Scott, Joseph W; Bauzo, Rayna M; Xiang, Zhimin; Richards, Nigel G; Haskell-Luevano, Carrie

    2004-12-30

    The agouti-related protein (AGRP) is an endogenous antagonist of the centrally expressed melanocortin receptors. The melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) is involved in energy homeostasis, food intake, sexual function, and obesity. The endogenous hAGRP protein is 132 amino acids in length, possesses five disulfide bridges at the C-terminus of the molecule, and is expressed in the hypothalamus of the brain. We have previously reported that a monocyclic hAGRP(103-122) peptide is an antagonist at the melanocortin receptors expressed in the brain. Stereochemical inversion from the endogenous l- to d-isomers of single or multiple amino acid modifications in this monocyclic truncated hAGRP sequence resulted in molecules that are converted from melanocortin receptor antagonists into melanocortin receptor agonists. The Asp-Pro-Ala-Ala-Thr-Ala-Tyr-cyclo[Cys-Arg-DPhe-DPhe-Asn-Ala-Phe-Cys]-Tyr-Ala-Arg-Lys-Leu peptide resulted in a 60 nM melanocortin-1 receptor agonist that is 100-fold selective versus the mMC4R, 1000-fold selective versus the mMC3R, and ca. 180-fold selective versus the mMC5R. In attempts to identify putative ligand-receptor interactions that may be participating in the agonist induced stimulation of the MC4R, selected ligands were docked into a homology molecular model of the mMC4R. These modeling studies have putatively identified hAGRP ligand DArg111-mMC4RAsn115 (TM3) and the hAGRP DPhe113-mMC4RPhe176 (TM4) interactions as important for agonist activity.

  15. Structure-based discovery of antagonists for GluN3-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, Trine; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Hansen, Kasper B

    2013-01-01

    . In the subsequent pharmacological evaluation of 99 selected compounds, we identified 6-hydroxy-[1,2,5]oxadiazolo[3,4-b]pyrazin-5(4H)-one (TK80) a novel competitive antagonist with preference for the GluN3B subunit. Serendipitously, we also identified [2-hydroxy-5-((4-(pyridin-3-yl)thiazol-2-yl)amino]benzoic acid...... (TK13) and 4-(2,4-dichlorobenzoyl)-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid (TK30), two novel non-competitive GluN3 antagonists. These findings demonstrate that structural differences between the orthosteric binding site of GluN3 and GluN1 can be exploited to generate selective ligands....

  16. [Pharmacological therapy of obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagotto, Uberto; Vanuzzo, Diego; Vicennati, Valentina; Pasquali, Renato

    2008-04-01

    uric acid as well and it increases HDL cholesterol; in diabetics it improves glycated hemoglobin. Sibutramine has conflicting effects on blood pressure: in some studies there was a minimal decrease, in some others a modest increase. In all the studies this drug increased pulse rate. Sibutramine is not recommended in patients with uncontrolled hypertension, or in case of history of cardio- and cerebrovascular disease. Orlistat is a pancreatic lipase inhibitor that reduces fat absorption by partially blocking the hydrolysis of dietary triglycerides. A recent meta-analysis evaluated 22 studies lasting for at least 12 months, in obese patients with a mean body mass index of 36.7 kg/m2, where orlistat was associated with hypocaloric diet or behavioral interventions: the net average weight loss was 2.89 kg (confidence interval 2.27-3.51 kg). Considering the principal studies, attrition rate ranged from 33 to 57%. Orlistat significantly decreases waist circumference, blood pressure, total and LDL cholesterol, but has no effect on HDL and triglycerides. This drug significantly reduced the incidence of diabetes only in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance. The major adverse effects with orlistat are mainly gastrointestinal (fatty and oily stool, fecal urgency, oily spotting, fecal incontinence) and attenuate over time. Orlistat should be avoided in patients with chronic malabsorption and cholestasis. Rimonabant is a selective antagonist of cannabinoid type 1 receptor. This drug, by inhibiting the overactivation of the endocannabinoid system, produces anorectic stimuli at the central nervous level, but also has effects on the peripheral systems involved in metabolism control, such as liver, adipose tissue, skeletal muscles, endocrine pancreas, and gastrointestinal apparatus, influencing many processes partially unknown. An ample experimental program named RIO (Rimonabant In Obesity) involved about 6600 obese or overweight patients to identify the effects of rimonabant in

  17. Validation and pharmacological characterisation of MK-801-induced locomotor hyperactivity in BALB/C mice as an assay for detection of novel antipsychotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Andrea M; Savage, Kevin M; Jones, Declan N C; Kalinichev, Mikhail

    2010-10-01

    We evaluated locomotor hyperactivity induced in BALB/C mice by an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801 as an assay for the detection of antipsychotic drugs. We assessed the effects of antipsychotic drugs to validate the assay (study 1), selective dopamine and serotonin ligands for pharmacological characterisation of the model (study 2) and a number of compounds with efficacy in models of schizophrenia to understand the predictive validity of the model (study 3). Adult males (n  = 9/group) were pretreated with a test compound, habituated to locomotor activity cages before receiving MK-801 (0.32 mg/kg) and activity recorded for a further 75 or 120 min. In study 1, we tested haloperidol, clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, ziprasidone, aripiprazole, sertindole and quetiapine. In study 2, we tested SCH23390 (D(1) antagonist), sulpiride (D(2)/D(3) antagonist), raclopride (D(2)/D(3) antagonist), SB-277011 (D(3) antagonist), L-745,870 (D(4) antagonist), WAY100635 (5-HT(1A) antagonist), 8-OH-DPAT (5-HT(1A) agonist), ketanserin (5-HT(2A)/5-HT(2C) antagonist) and SB-242084 (5-HT(2C) antagonist). In study 3, we tested xanomeline (M(1)/M(4) receptor agonist), LY379268 (mGluR2/3 receptor agonist), diazepam (GABA(A) modulator) and thioperamide (H(3) receptor antagonist). All antipsychotics suppressed MK-801-induced hyperactivity in a dose-dependent and specific manner. The effects of antipsychotics appear to be mediated via dopamine D(1), D(2) and 5-HT(2) receptors. Xanomeline, LY379268 and diazepam were active in this assay while thioperamide was not. MK-801-induced hyperactivity in BALB/C mice model of positive symptoms has shown predictive validity with novel compounds acing at M(1)/M(4), mGluR2/3 and GABA(A) receptors and can be used as a screening assay for detection of novel pharmacotherapies targeting those receptors.

  18. Actions of alpha2 adrenoceptor ligands at alpha2A and 5-HT1A receptors: the antagonist, atipamezole, and the agonist, dexmedetomidine, are highly selective for alpha2A adrenoceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman-Tancredi, A; Nicolas, J P; Audinot, V; Gavaudan, S; Verrièle, L; Touzard, M; Chaput, C; Richard, N; Millan, M J

    1998-08-01

    This study examined the activity of chemically diverse alpha2 adrenoceptor ligands at recombinant human (h) and native rat (r) alpha2A adrenoceptors compared with 5-HT1A receptors. First, in competition binding experiments at h alpha2A and h5-HT1A receptors expressed in CHO cells, several compounds, including the antagonists 1-(2-pyrimidinyl)piperazine (1-PP), (+/-)-idazoxan, benalfocin (SKF 86466), yohimbine and RX 821,002, displayed preference for h alpha2A versus h5-HT1A receptors of only 1.4-, 3.6-, 4-, 10- and 11-fold, respectively (based on differences in pKi values). Clonidine, brimonidine (UK 14304), the benzopyrrolidine fluparoxan and the guanidines guanfacine and guanabenz exhibited intermediate selectivity (22- to 31-fold) for h alpha2A receptors. Only the antagonist atipamezole and the agonist dexmedetomidine (DMT) displayed high preference for alpha2 adrenoceptors (1290- and 91-fold, respectively). Second, the compounds were tested for their ability to induce h5-HT1A receptor-mediated G-protein activation, as indicated by the stimulation of [35S]GTPgammaS binding. All except atipamezole and RX 821,002 exhibited agonist activity, with potencies which correlated with their affinity for h5-HT1A receptors. Relative efficacies (Emax values) were 25-35% for guanabenz, guanfacine, WB 4101 and benalfocin, 50-65% for 1-PP, (+/-)-idazoxan and clonidine, and over 70% for fluparoxan, oxymetazoline and yohimbine (relative to 5-HT = 100%). Yohimbine-induced [35S]GTPgammaS binding was inhibited by the selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY 100,635. In contrast, RX 821,002 was the only ligand which exhibited antagonist activity at h5-HT1A receptors, inhibiting 5-HT-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding. Atipamezole, which exhibited negligeable affinity for 5-HT1A receptors, was inactive. Third, the affinities for r alpha2A differed considerably from the affinities for h alpha2A receptors whereas the affinities for r5-HT1A differed much less from the affinities for h5-HT

  19. Selective improvement of pulmonary arterial hypertension with a dual ETA/ETB receptors antagonist in the apolipoprotein E-/- model of PAH and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renshall, Lewis; Arnold, Nadine; West, Laura; Braithwaite, Adam; Pickworth, Josephine; Walker, Rachel; Alfaidi, Mabruka; Chamberlain, Janet; Casbolt, Helen; Thompson, A A Roger; Holt, Cathy; Iglarz, Marc; Francis, Sheila; Lawrie, Allan

    2018-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is increasingly diagnosed in elderly patients who also have an increased risk of co-morbid atherosclerosis. Apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE -/- ) mice develop atherosclerosis with severe PAH when fed a high-fat diet (HFD) and have increased levels of endothelin (ET)-1. ET-1 receptor antagonists (ERAs) are used for the treatment of PAH but less is known about whether ERAs are beneficial in atherosclerosis. We therefore examined whether treatment of HFD-ApoE -/- mice with macitentan, a dual ET A /ET B receptor antagonist, would have any effect on both atherosclerosis and PAH. ApoE -/- mice were fed chow or HFD for eight weeks. After four weeks of HFD, mice were randomized to a four-week treatment of macitentan by food (30 mg/kg/day dual ET A /ET B antagonist), or placebo groups. Echocardiography and closed-chest right heart catheterization were used to determine PAH phenotype and serum samples were collected for cytokine analysis. Thoracic aortas were harvested to assess vascular reactivity using wire myography, and histological analyses were performed on the brachiocephalic artery and aortic root to assess atherosclerotic burden. Macitentan treatment of HFD-fed ApoE -/- mice was associated with a beneficial effect on the PAH phenotype and led to an increase in endothelial-dependent relaxation in thoracic aortae. Macitentan treatment was also associated with a significant reduction in interleukin 6 (IL-6) concentration but there was no significant effect on atherosclerotic burden. Dual blockade of ET A /ET B receptors improves endothelial function and improves experimental PAH but had no significant effect on atherosclerosis.

  20. Pharmacological identification of β-adrenoceptor subtypes mediating isoprenaline-induced relaxation of guinea pig colonic longitudinal smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chino, Daisuke; Sone, Tomoyo; Yamazaki, Kumi; Tsuruoka, Yuri; Yamagishi, Risa; Shiina, Shunsuke; Obara, Keisuke; Yamaki, Fumiko; Higai, Koji; Tanaka, Yoshio

    2018-01-01

    Object We aimed to identify the β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) subtypes involved in isoprenaline-induced relaxation of guinea pig colonic longitudinal smooth muscle using pharmacological and biochemical approaches. Methods Longitudinal smooth muscle was prepared from the male guinea pig ascending colon and contracted with histamine prior to comparing the relaxant responses to three catecholamines (isoprenaline, adrenaline, and noradrenaline). The inhibitory effects of subtype-selective β-AR antagonists on isoprenaline-induced relaxation were then investigated. Results The relaxant potencies of the catecholamines were ranked as: isoprenaline > noradrenaline ≈ adrenaline, whereas the rank order was isoprenaline > noradrenaline > adrenaline in the presence of propranolol (a non-selective β-AR antagonist; 3 × 10 -7 M). Atenolol (a selective β 1 -AR antagonist; 3 × 10 -7 -10 -6  M) acted as a competitive antagonist of isoprenaline-induced relaxation, and the pA 2 value was calculated to be 6.49 (95% confidence interval: 6.34-6.83). The relaxation to isoprenaline was not affected by ICI-118,551 (a selective β 2 -AR antagonist) at 10 -9 -10 -8  M, but was competitively antagonized by 10 -7 -3 × 10 -7  M, with a pA 2 value of 7.41 (95% confidence interval: 7.18-8.02). In the presence of propranolol (3 × 10 -7 M), the relaxant effect of isoprenaline was competitively antagonized by bupranolol (a non-selective β-AR antagonist), with a pA 2 value of 5.90 (95% confidence interval: 5.73-6.35). Conclusion These findings indicated that the β-AR subtypes involved in isoprenaline-induced relaxation of colonic longitudinal guinea pig muscles are β 1 -AR and β 3 -AR.

  1. Melanocortin Tetrapeptide Ac-His-DPhe-Arg-Trp-NH2 Modified at the Para Position of the Benzyl Side Chain (DPhe): Importance for Mouse Melanocortin-3 Receptor Agonist versus Antagonist Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Proneth, Bettina; Pogozheva, Irina D.; Portillo, Federico P.; Mosberg, Henry I.; Haskell-Luevano, Carrie

    2008-01-01

    The melanocortin-3 and -4 receptors (MC3R, MC4R) have been implicated in energy homeostasis and obesity. Whereas the physiological role of the MC4R is extensively studied, little is known about the MC3R. One caveat is the limited availability of ligands that are selective for the MC3R. Previous studies identified Ac-His-DPhe(p-I)-Arg-Trp-NH2, which possessed partial agonist/antagonist pharmacology at the mMC3R while retaining full nanomolar agonist pharmacology at the mMC4R. These data allowe...

  2. Changes in the levels of kynurenic acid and selected proinflammatory cytokines after pharmacological treatment and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT in patients with depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olajossy Marcin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to compare the concentrations of KYNA, 3-OH-KYN and the cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 in patients with depression vs. healthy controls as well as in patients with depression treated pharmacologically vs. those treated using ECT. We also evaluated the relationship between the concentrations of KYNA, 3-OH-KYN and the cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 and clinical improvement measured on the MADRS scale in patients treated pharmacologically and those treated with ECT.

  3. NMDA receptor antagonists inhibit catalepsy induced by either dopamine D1 or D2 receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, N A; Blackman, A; Awere, S; Leander, J D

    1993-06-11

    In the present study, we investigated the ability of NMDA receptor antagonists to inhibit catalepsy induced by haloperidol, or SCH23390 and clebopride, selective dopamine D1 and D2 receptor antagonists respectively. Catalepsy was measured by recording the time the animal remained with its forepaws placed over a rod 6 cm above the bench. Pretreatment with either the non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801 (0.25-0.5 mg/kg i.p.) or the competitive antagonist, LY274614 (10-20 mg/kg i.p.) reduced the cataleptic response produced by haloperidol (10 mg/kg), SCH23390 (2.5-10 mg/kp i.p.) or clebopride (5-20 mg/kg i.p.). This demonstrates that NMDA receptor antagonists will reduce both dopamine D1 and D2 receptor antagonist-induced catalepsy. Muscle relaxant doses of chlordiazepoxide (10 mg/kg i.p.) failed to reduce the catalepsy induced by haloperidol, suggesting that the anticataleptic effect of the NMDA receptor antagonists was not due to a non-specific action. These results support the hypothesis that NMDA receptor antagonists may have beneficial effects in disorders involving reduced dopaminergic function, such as Parkinson's disease.

  4. Tc-labeling of Peptidomimetic Antagonist to Selectively Target alpha(v)beta(3) Receptor-Positive Tumor: Comparison of PDA and EDDA as co-Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, In Soo; Maeng, Jin Soo; Jang, Beom-Su; You, Eric; Cheng, Kenneth; Li, King C P; Wood, Bradford; Carrasquillo, Jorge A; Danthi, S Narasimhan; Paik, Chang H

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this research was to synthesize radiolabeled peptidomimetic integrin alpha(v)beta(3) antagonist with (99m)Tc for rapid targeting of integrin alpha(v)beta(3) receptors in tumor to produce a high tumor to background ratio. METHODS: The amino terminus of 4-[2-(3,4,5,6-tetra-hydropyrimidin-2-ylamino)-ethyloxy]benzoyl-2-(S)-[N-(3-amino-neopenta-1-carbamyl)]-aminoethylsulfonyl-amino-beta-alanine hydrochloride (IAC) was conjugated with N-hydroxysuccinimide ester of HYNIC and labeled with (99m)Tc using tricine with either 1,5-pyridinedicarboxylic acid (PDA) or ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid (EDDA) as the co-ligand. The products, (99m)Tc EDDA(2)/HYNIC-IAC (P1) and (99m)Tc PDA (tricin)/HYNIC-IAC (P2) were subjected to in vitro serum stability, receptor-binding, biodistribution and imaging studies. RESULTS: P1 and P2 were synthesized with an overall yield of >80%. P1 was slightly more stable than P2 when incubated in serum at 37 degrees C for 18 hrs (84 vs 77% intact). The In vitro receptor-binding of P1 was higher than that of P2 (78.02 +/- 13.48 vs 51.05 +/- 14.05%) when incubated with alpha(v)beta(3) at a molar excess (0.8 muM). This receptor binding was completely blocked by a molar excess of an unlabeled peptidomimetic antagonist. Their differences shown in serum stability and the receptor-binding appeared to be related to their biological behaviors in tumor uptake and retention; the 1 h tumor uptakes of P1 and P2 were 3.17+/-0.52 and 2.13+/-0.17 % ID/g, respectively. P1 was retained in the tumor longer than P2. P1 was excreted primarily through the renal system whereas P2 complex was excreted equally via both renal and hepatobiliary systems. Thus, P1 was retained in the whole-body with 27.25 +/- 3.67% ID at 4 h whereas 54.04 +/- 3.57% ID of P2 remained in the whole-body at 4 h. This higher whole-body retention of P2 appeared to be resulted from a higher amount of radioactivity retained in liver and intestine. These findings were supported by

  5. AVN-322 is a Safe Orally Bio-Available Potent and Highly Selective Antagonist of 5-HT6R with Demonstrated Ability to Improve Impaired Memory in Animal Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivachtchenko, Alexandre V; Ivanenkov, Yan A; Veselov, Mark S; Okun, I M

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, 5-hydroxytryptamine subtype 6 receptor (5-HT6 receptor, 5- HT6R) has emerged as a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of neuropathological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and schizophrenia. 5-HT6 receptors were hypothesized to be implicated in the processes of learning, memory, and cognition with 5-HT6R antagonists being effective in animal models of cognition and memory impairment. Several selective 5-HT6R ligands are currently undergoing clinical trials for treatment of AD. We describe results of preclinical development of a novel and highly selective and potent 5- HT6R antagonist, AVN-322, as a clinical candidate for the treatment of AD to improve concurrent debilitation of memory and cognition in the AD patients, and schizophrenia as a substance with antipsychotic effect. In the manuscript, we present its in vitro and vivo efficacy, ADME, pharmacokinetics in animals and in humans, and toxicity. While having high binding affinity in medium picomolar range, the lead compound demonstrates substantially better selectivity index then the reference drug candidates currently being tested in clinical studies. AVN-322 showed high oral bioavailability and favorable blood-brain barrier (BBB) penetration. In vivo testing revealed its clear cognition enhancing effect. AVN-322 significantly restored both scopolamine- and MK-801-induced cognitive dysfunction and demonstrated antipsychotic potential. Taking into account its good safety profile and favorable pharmacokinetics, AVN-322 can be reasonably considered as a novel drug candidate for the treatment of neurological disorders such as AD and/or schizophrenia. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Add-on clinical effects of selective antagonist of 5HT6 receptors AVN-211 (CD-008-0173) in patients with schizophrenia stabilized on antipsychotic treatment: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, Margarita A; Lepilkina, Taisiya A; Rupchev, Georgy E; Beniashvily, Allan G; Burminskiy, Denis S; Potanin, Sergey S; Bondarenko, Evgeny V; Kazey, Vasily I; Lavrovsky, Yan; Ivachtchenko, Alexandre V

    2014-08-01

    The serotoninergic system as a target for add-on treatment seems to be a promising approach in patients with schizophrenia. To clarify if selective 5HT-6 antagonist AVN-211 (CD-008-0173) adds clinical and cognitive effects to stable antipsychotic treatment. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, add-on, 4r-week trial in 47 schizophrenia patients (21 patients receiving study drug and 26 receiving placebo) who were stabilized on antipsychotic medication was performed. Seventeen patients from the study drug group and 25 patients from the placebo group completed the trial. Treatment effects were measured using clinical rating scales and attention tests. With no differences at baseline, there was a significant difference between the groups in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) positive subscale score (p = 0.058) in favor of patients in the treatment group at the endpoint. The PANSS positive subscore (p = 0.0068) and Clinical Global Impression-Severity (CGI-S) (p = 0.048) score significantly changed only in the treatment group. Only in the placebo group were significant changes in Calgary Depression Rating Scale (CDRS) total score registered. The indices of attention tests at endpoint did not show differences between the groups, with the exception of the scope of change in the results of the subtest VIII of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS), which showed difference between the groups (p = 0.02) and was significantly larger in the treatment group. Only inside the study drug group, significant changes in selectivity and continuous attention were observed regarding total correct responses (p = 0.0038) and reaction time (p = 0.058) in the Continuous Attention Task (CAT) test. Selective 5HT6 antagonist AVN-211 (CD-008-0173) added antipsychotic and some procognitive (attention) effects to antipsychotic medication.

  7. Anticonvulsant and reproductive toxicological studies of the imidazole-based histamine H3R antagonist 2-18 in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastaki SM

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Salim M Bastaki,1 Yousef M Abdulrazzaq,2 Mohamed Shafiullah,1 Małgorzata Więcek,3 Katarzyna Kieć-Kononowicz,3 Bassem Sadek1 1Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, College of Medicine and Health Science, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, 2Department of Medical Education, Dubai Health Authority, Dubai, UAE; 3Department of Technology and Biotechnology of Drugs, Faculty of Pharmacy, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Medyczna, Kraków, Poland Abstract: The imidazole-based H3R antagonist 2-18 with high in vitro H3R antagonist affinity, excellent in vitro selectivity profile, and high in vivo H3R antagonist potency was tested for its anticonvulsant effect in maximal electroshock (MES-induced convulsions in mice having valproic acid (VPA as a reference antiepileptic drug (AED. Additionally, H3R antagonist 2-18 was evaluated for its reproductive toxicity in the same animal species. The results show that acute systemic administration (intraperitoneal; i.p. of H3R antagonist 2-18 (7.5, 15, 30, and 60 mg/kg, i.p. significantly and dose dependently protected male as well as female mice against MES-induced convulsion. The protective action observed for H3R antagonist 2-18 in both mice sexes was comparable to that of VPA and was reversed when mice were pretreated with the selective H3R agonist (R-alpha-methylhistamine (RAMH, 10 mg/kg, i.p.. Moreover, the results show that acute systemic administration of single (7.5, 15, 30, or 60 mg/kg, i.p. or multiple doses (15×3 mg/kg, i.p. of H3R antagonist 2-18 on gestation day (GD 8 or 13 did not affect the maternal body weight of mice when compared with the control group. Furthermore, no significant differences were observed in the average number of implantations and resorptions between the control and H3R antagonist 2-18-treated group at the early stages of gestation and the organogenesis period. However, oral treatment with H3R antagonist 2-18 (15 mg/kg on GD 8 induced a reduced number of

  8. Pharmacological interventions in the treatment of the acute effects of cannabis: a systematic review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crippa José AS

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cannabis intoxication is related to a number of physical and mental health risks with ensuing social costs. However, little attention has been given to the investigation of possible pharmacological interactions in this condition. Objective To review the available scientific literature concerning pharmacological interventions for the treatment of the acute effects of cannabis. Methods A search was performed on the Pubmed, Lilacs, and Scielo online databases by combining the terms cannabis, intoxication, psychosis, anxiety, and treatment. The articles selected from this search had their reference lists checked for additional publications related to the topic of the review. Results The reviewed articles consisted of case reports and controlled clinical trials and are presented according to interventions targeting the physiological, psychiatric, and cognitive symptoms provoked by cannabis. The pharmacological interventions reported in these studies include: beta-blockers, antiarrhythmic agents, antagonists of CB-1 and GABA-benzodiazepine receptors, antipsychotics, and cannabidiol. Conclusion Although scarce, the evidence on pharmacological interventions for the management of cannabis intoxication suggests that propanolol and rimonabant are the most effective compounds currently available to treat the physiological and subjective effects of the drug. Further studies are necessary to establish the real effectiveness of these two medications, as well as the effectiveness of other candidate compounds to counteract the effects of cannabis intoxication, such as cannabidiol and flumazenil.

  9. Selected Abstracts of the 2nd Congress of joint European Neonatal Societies (jENS 2017; Venice (Italy; October 31-November 4, 2017; Session "Perinatal Pharmacology and Anesthesia"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    --- Various Authors

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Selected Abstracts of the 2nd Congress of joint European Neonatal Societies (jENS 2017; Venice (Italy; October 31-November 4, 201758th ESPR Annual Meeting, 7th International Congress of UENPS, 3rd International Congress of EFCNIORGANIZING INSTITUTIONSEuropean Society for Paediatric Research (ESPR, European Society for Neonatology (ESN, Union of European Neonatal & Perinatal Societies (UENPS, European Foundation for the Care of Newborn Infants (EFCNIORGANIZING COMMITTEELuc Zimmermann (President of ESPR, Morten Breindahl (President of ESN, Manuel Sánchez Luna (President of UENPS, Silke Mader (Chairwoman of the Executive Board and Co-Founder of EFCNISCIENTIFIC COMMITTEEVirgilio P. Carnielli (Congress President Chair, Pierre Gressens (Past Scientific President, Umberto Simeoni, Manon Benders, Neil Marlow, Ola D. Saugstad, Petra Hüppi, Agnes van den HoogenSession "Perinatal Pharmacology and Anesthesia"ABS 1. UNDERSTANDING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN DOPAMINE CONCENTRATION AND BLOOD PRESSURE IN NEONATES: INCUBATORS VERSUS COT • K. Kirupakaran, H. Rabe, B. PatelABS 2. IBUPROFEN PHARMACOGENETIC STUDY IN HUMAN MILK SAMPLES • V. Rigourd, C. Verstyuft, J.F. Méritet, P. Seraissol, B. De Villepin, A. Amirouche, R. SerreauABS 3. EFFECT OF POSTNATAL CORTICOSTEROID ON BROWN ADIPOSE TISSUE THERMOGENESIS IN NEONATAL RAT • Y.-S. Chang, C.-H. Lin, Y.-S. TsaiABS 4. URINARY 17-α-HYDROXY-PROGESTERONE AS A POTENTIAL MARKER OF NEONATAL PAIN • M. Brasseler, T. HoehnABS 5. PHARMACOKINETIC AND PHARMACODYNAMIC STUDIES AIMING FOR RATIONAL DRUG DOSING IN PRETERM NEONATES: THE DINO STUDY • R.B. Flint, S. Völler, R. de Groot, D. Liem, P. Andriessen, P. Degrauewe, I. Reiss, D. Burger, D. Tibboel, C.A.J. Knibbe, S.H.P. Simons and DINO Research groupABS 6. VENO-ARTERIAL EXTRACORPOREAL MEM­BRANE OXYGENATION IMPAIRS ACETYL­CHOLINE-INDUCED CONTRACTION IN NEONATAL PORCINE CORONARY ARTERIES • L. Provitera, G. Cavallaro, G. Raffaeli, I. Amodeo, S. Gulden, G. Zuanetti, V

  10. Development of specific dopamine D-1 agonists and antagonists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakolchai, S.

    1987-01-01

    To develop potentially selective dopamine D-1 agonists and to investigate on the structural requirement for D-1 activity, the derivatives of dibenzocycloheptadiene are synthesized and pharmacologically evaluated. The target compounds are 5-aminomethyl-10,11-dihydro-1,2-dihydroxy-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cycloheptene hydrobromide 10 and 9,10-dihydroxy-1,2,3,7,8,12b-hexahydrobenzo[1,2]cyclohepta[3,4,5d,e]isoquinoline hydrobromide 11. In a dopamine-sensitive rat retinal adenylate cyclase assay, a model for D-1 activity, compound 10 is essentially inert for both agonist and antagonist activity. In contrast, compound 11 is approximately equipotent to dopamine in activation of the D-1 receptor. Based on radioligand and binding data, IC 50 of compound 11 for displacement of 3 H-SCH 23390, a D-1 ligand, is about 7 fold less than that for displacement of 3 H-spiperone, a D-2 ligand. These data indicate that compound 11 is a potent selective dopamine D-1 agonist. This study provides a new structural class of dopamine D-1 acting agent: dihydroxy-benzocycloheptadiene analog which can serve as a lead compound for further drug development and as a probe for investigation on the nature of dopamine D-1 receptor

  11. Pharmacological chaperoning: a primer on mechanism and pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidenheimer, Nancy J; Ryder, Katelyn G

    2014-05-01

    Approximately forty percent of diseases are attributable to protein misfolding, including those for which genetic mutation produces misfolding mutants. Intriguingly, many of these mutants are not terminally misfolded since native-like folding, and subsequent trafficking to functional locations, can be induced by target-specific, small molecules variably termed pharmacological chaperones, pharmacoperones, or pharmacochaperones (PCs). PC targets include enzymes, receptors, transporters, and ion channels, revealing the breadth of proteins that can be engaged by ligand-assisted folding. The purpose of this review is to provide an integrated primer of the diverse mechanisms and pharmacology of PCs. In this regard, we examine the structural mechanisms that underlie PC rescue of misfolding mutants, including the ability of PCs to act as surrogates for defective intramolecular interactions and, at the intermolecular level, overcome oligomerization deficiencies and dominant negative effects, as well as influence the subunit stoichiometry of heteropentameric receptors. Not surprisingly, PC-mediated structural correction of misfolding mutants normalizes interactions with molecular chaperones that participate in protein quality control and forward-trafficking. A variety of small molecules have proven to be efficacious PCs and the advantages and disadvantages of employing orthostatic antagonists, active-site inhibitors, orthostatic agonists, and allosteric modulator PCs are considered. Also examined is the possibility that several therapeutic agents may have unrecognized activity as PCs, and this chaperoning activity may mediate/contribute to therapeutic action and/or account for adverse effects. Lastly, we explore evidence that pharmacological chaperoning exploits intrinsic ligand-assisted folding mechanisms. Given the widespread applicability of PC rescue of mutants associated with protein folding disorders, both in vitro and in vivo, the therapeutic potential of PCs is vast

  12. 1H-cyclopentapyrimidine-2,4(1H,3H)-dione-related ionotropic glutamate receptors ligands. Structure-activity relationships and identification of potent and selective iGluR5 modulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butini, Stefania; Pickering, Darryl S; Morelli, Elena

    2008-01-01

    (S)-CPW399 ((S)-1) is a potent and excitotoxic AMPA receptor partial agonist. Modifying the cyclopentane ring of (S)-1, we developed two of the most potent and selective functional antagonists (5 and 7) for kainate receptor (KA-R) subunit iGluR5. Derivatives 5 and 7, with their unique pharmacolog...

  13. Pharmacological isolation of postsynaptic currents mediated by NR2A- and NR2B-containing NMDA receptors in the anterior cingulate cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao Xiaoyan

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract NMDA receptors (NMDARs are involved in excitatory synaptic transmission and plasticity associated with a variety of brain functions, from memory formation to chronic pain. Subunit-selective antagonists for NMDARs provide powerful tools to dissect NMDAR functions in neuronal activities. Recently developed antagonist for NR2A-containing receptors, NVP-AAM007, triggered debates on its selectivity and involvement of the NMDAR subunits in bi-directional synaptic plasticity. Here, we re-examined the pharmacological properties of NMDARs in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC using NVP-AAM007 as well as ifenprodil, a selective antagonist for NR2B-containing NMDARs. By alternating sequence of drug application and examining different concentrations of NVP-AAM007, we found that the presence of NVP-AAM007 did not significantly affect the effect of ifenprodil on NMDAR-mediated EPSCs. These results suggest that NVP-AAM007 shows great preference for NR2A subunit and could be used as a selective antagonist for NR2A-containing NMDARs in the ACC.

  14. Human Secreted Ly-6/uPAR Related Protein-1 (SLURP-1) Is a Selective Allosteric Antagonist of α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Shulepko, Mikhail A; Kudryavtsev, Denis

    2016-01-01

    of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, respectively, and anti-α7-nAChRs antibodies revealed α7 type nAChRs as an rSLURP-1 target in keratinocytes. Using affinity purification from human cortical extracts, we confirmed that rSLURP-1 binds selectively to the α7-n...

  15. Effects of chronic sazetidine-A, a selective α4β2 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors desensitizing agent on pharmacologically-induced impaired attention in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani, Amir H; Cauley, Marty; Xiao, Yingxian; Kellar, Kenneth J; Levin, Edward D

    2013-03-01

    Nicotine and nicotinic agonists have been shown to improve attentional function. Nicotinic receptors are easily desensitized, and all nicotinic agonists are also desensitizing agents. Although both receptor activation and desensitization are components of the mechanism that mediates the overall effects of nicotinic agonists, it is not clear how each of the two opposed actions contributes to attentional improvements. Sazetidine-A has high binding affinity at α4β2 nicotinic receptors and causes a relatively brief activation followed by a long-lasting desensitization of the receptors. Acute administration of sazetidine-A has been shown to significantly improve attention by reversing impairments caused by the muscarinic cholinergic antagonist scopolamine and the NMDA glutamate antagonist dizocilpine. In the current study, we tested the effects of chronic subcutaneous infusion of sazetidine-A (0, 2, or 6 mg/kg/day) on attention in Sprague-Dawley rats. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of chronic sazetidine-A treatment on attentional impairment induced by an acute administration of 0.02 mg/kg scopolamine. During the first week period, the 6-mg/kg/day sazetidine-A dose significantly reversed the attentional impairment induced by scopolamine. During weeks 3 and 4, the scopolamine-induced impairment was no longer seen, but sazetidine-A (6 mg/kg/day) significantly improved attentional performance on its own. Chronic sazetidine-A also reduced response latency and response omissions. This study demonstrated that similar to its acute effects, chronic infusions of sazetidine-A improve attentional performance. The results indicate that the desensitization of α4β2 nicotinic receptors with some activation of these receptors may play an important role in improving effects of sazetidine-A on attention.

  16. Antagonist profile of ibodutant at the tachykinin NK2 receptor in guinea pig isolated bronchi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santicioli, Paolo; Meini, Stefania; Giuliani, Sandro; Lecci, Alessandro; Maggi, Carlo Alberto

    2013-10-24

    In this study we have characterized the pharmacological profile of the non-peptide tachykinin NK 2 receptor antagonist ibodutant (MEN15596) in guinea pig isolated main bronchi contractility. The antagonist potency of ibodutant was evaluated using the selective NK 2 receptor agonist [βAla 8 ]NKA(4-10)-mediated contractions of guinea pig isolated main bronchi. In this assay ibodutant (30, 100 and 300nM) induced a concentration-dependent rightward shift of the [βAla 8 ]NKA(4-10) concentration-response curves without affecting the maximal contractile effect. The analysis of the results yielded a Schild-plot linear regression with a slope not different from unity (0.95, 95% c.l. 0.65-1.25), thus indicating a surmountable behaviour. The calculated apparent antagonist potency as pK B value was 8.31±0.05. Ibodutant (0.3-100nM), produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of the nonadrenergic-noncholinergic (NANC) contractile response induced by electrical field stimulation (EFS) of intrinsic airway nerves in guinea pig isolated main bronchi. At the highest concentration tested (100nM) ibodutant almost abolished the EFS-induced bronchoconstriction (95±4% inhibition), the calculated IC 50 value was 2.98nM (95% c.l. 1.73-5.16nM). In bronchi from ovalbumin (OVA) sensitized guinea pigs ibodutant (100nM) did not affect the maximal contractile response to OVA, but completely prevented the slowing in the fading of the motor response induced by phosphoramidon pretreatment linked to the endogenous neurokinin A release. Altogether, the present study demonstrate that ibodutant is a potent NK 2 receptor antagonist in guinea pig airways. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. A review of granisetron, 5-hydroxytryptamine3 receptor antagonists, and other antiemetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Eric S

    2010-01-01

    Nausea and vomiting are 2 of the most upsetting adverse reactions of chemotherapy. Current guidelines propose 5-hydroxytryptamine3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists as a pharmacologic intervention for acute and delayed nausea and vomiting [chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV)] associated with moderately and highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Meanwhile, both postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) and postdischarge nausea and vomiting are challenging situations after surgeries and procedures. Prophylactic and therapeutic combinations of antiemetics are recommended in patients at high risk of suffering from PONV and postdischarge nausea and vomiting. Granisetron (Kytril) is a selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonist that does not induce or inhibit the hepatic cytochrome P-450 system in vitro. There are also 4 other antagonists of 5-HT3 receptor (dolasetron, ondansetron, palonosetron, and tropisetron) being metabolized via the CYP2D6 and are subject to potential genetic polymorphism. The launch of a new class of antiemetics, the substance P/neurokinin1 receptor antagonists, was attributed to the scientific update on the central generator responsible for emesis and role of substance P. There has been mounting interest in exploring integrative medicine, either acupuncture or acustimulation of P6 (Nei-Kuwan), to complement the western medicine for prevention and management of nausea and vomiting. The potential application of cannabinoids, either alone or in combination with other agents of different mechanism, could contribute further to improve outcome in CINV. Implementation of future treatment guidelines for more effective management of CINV and PONV could certainly improve the efficacy and outcome of cancer and postoperative care.

  18. The Acute Administration of the Selective Dopamine D3 Receptor Antagonist SB-277011A Reverses Conditioned Place Aversion Produced by Naloxone Precipitated Withdrawal From Acute Morphine Administration in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    RICE, ONARAE V.; GARDNER, ELIOT L.; HEIDBREDER, CHRISTIAN A.; ASHBY, CHARLES R.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the effect of SB-277011A, a selective D3 receptor antagonist, on the conditioned place aversion (CPA) response associated with naloxone-induced withdrawal from acute morphine administration in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Morphine (5.6 mg/kg i.p.) was given, followed 4 hrs later by naloxone (0.3 mg/kg i.p.) and prior to placing the animals in one specific chamber of the test apparatus. All animals were subjected to 2 of these trials. A significant CPA occurred in animals that received an i.p. injection of vehicle 30 minutes prior to the measurement of chamber preference. The pretreatment of animals (30 minutes prior to testing) with 3 mg/kg i.p. of SB-277011A did not significantly alter the CPA compared to animals treated with vehicle (1 ml/kg i.p. of deionized distilled water). In contrast, the acute pretreatment of animals with 6, 12 or 24 mg/kg i.p. of SB-277011A significantly decreased the CPA compared to vehicle-treated animals. In fact, the 12 and 24 mg/kg doses of SB-277011A significantly increased the time spent in the chamber where animals were paired with morphine and naloxone. These results suggest that the selective antagonism of D3 receptors attenuates the CPA produced by a model of naloxone-induced withdrawal from acute morphine dependence. PMID:21905128

  19. Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpes virus targets the lymphotactin receptor with both a broad spectrum antagonist vCCL2 and a highly selective and potent agonist vCCL3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüttichau, Hans R; Johnsen, Anders H; Jurlander, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    virus (KSHV) encodes three chemokine-like proteins named vCCL1, vCCL2, and vCCL3. In this study vCCL3 was probed in parallel with vCCL1 and vCCL2 against a panel of the 18 classified human chemokine receptors. In calcium mobilization assays vCCL1 acted as a selective CCR8 agonist, whereas vCCL2......Large DNA viruses such as herpesvirus and poxvirus encode proteins that target and exploit the chemokine system of their host. These proteins have the potential to block or change the orchestrated recruitment of leukocytes to sites of viral infection. The genome of Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpes...... was found to act as a broad spectrum chemokine antagonist of human chemokine receptors, including the lymphotactin receptor. In contrast vCCL3 was found to be a highly selective agonist for the human lymphotactin receptor XCR1. The potency of vCCL3 was found to be 10-fold higher than the endogenous human...

  20. QSAR of adenosine receptor antagonists. Part 3: Exploring physicochemical requirements for selective binding of 1,2,4-triazolo[5,1-i]purine derivatives with human adenosine A3 receptor subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Kunal; Leonard, J Thomas; Sengupta, Chandana

    2004-07-16

    Considering potential of selective adenosine A3 receptor antagonists in the development of prospective therapeutic agents, an attempt has been made to explore selectivity requirements of 1,2,4-triazolo[5,1-i]purine derivatives for binding with cloned human adenosine A3 receptor subtype. In this study, partition coefficient (logP) values of the molecules (calculated by Crippen's fragmentation method) and Wang-Ford charges of the common atoms of the triazolopurine nucleus (calculated from molecular electrostatic potential surface of energy minimized geometry using AM1 technique) were used as independent variables along with suitable dummy parameters. The best equation describing A3 binding affinity [n=29, Q2=0.796, Ra2=0.853, R2=0.874, R=0.935, s=0.342, F=41.5 (df 4,24), SDEP=0.396] showed parabolic relation with logP (optimum value being 4.134). Further, it was found that an aromatic substituent conjugated with the triazole nucleus should be present at R2 position for A3 binding affinity. Again, high negative charges on N2 and N4 are conducive to the binding affinity. While exploring selectivity requirements of the compounds for binding with A3 receptor over that with A2A receptor, the selectivity relation [n=23, Q2=0.909, Ra2=0.918, R2=0.933, R=0.966, s=0.401, F=62.4 (df 4,18), SDEP=0.412] showed that an aromatic R2 substituent conjugated with the triazole nucleus contributes significantly to the selectivity. Again, presence of a 4-substituted-phenyl ring (except 4-OH-phenyl and 4-CH3-phenyl) at R2 position also increases selectivity. Further, charge difference between N2 and N11 (negative charge on the former should be higher and that on the latter should be less) contributes significantly to the selectivity. In addition, negative charge on N7 is conducive while presence of substituents like propyl, butyl, pentyl or phenyl at R1 position is detrimental for the A3 selectivity.

  1. The Non-Peptide Arginine-Vasopressin v1a Selective Receptor Antagonist, SR49059, Blocks the Rewarding, Prosocial, and Anxiolytic Effects of 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine and Its Derivatives in Zebra Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Ponzoni

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA and its derivatives, 2,5-dimethoxy-4-bromo-amphetamine hydrobromide (DOB and para-methoxyamphetamine (PMA, are recreational drugs whose pharmacological effects have recently been attributed to serotonin 5HT2A/C receptors. However, there is growing evidence that the oxytocin (OT/vasopressin system can modulate some the effects of MDMA. In this study, MDMA (2.5–10 mg/kg, DOB (0.5 mg/kg, or PMA (0.005, 0.1, or 0.25 mg/kg were administered intramuscularly to adult zebra fish, alone or in combination with the V1a vasopressin antagonist, SR49059 (0.01–1 ng/kg, before carrying out conditioned place preference (CPP, social preference, novel tank diving, and light–dark tests in order to evaluate subsequent rewarding, social, and emotional-like behavior. The combination of SR49059 and each drug progressively blocked: (1 rewarding behavior as measured by CPP in terms of time spent in drug-paired compartment; (2 prosocial effects measured on the basis of the time spent in the proximity of a nacre fish picture; and (3 anxiolytic effects in terms of the time spent in the upper half of the novel tank and in the white compartment of the tank used for the light–dark test. Antagonism was obtained at SR49059 doses which, when given alone, did not change motor function. In comparison with a control group, receiving vehicle alone, there was a three to five times increase in the brain release of isotocin (the analog of OT in fish after treatment with the most active doses of MDMA (10 mg/kg, DOB (0.5 mg/kg, and PMA (0.1 mg/kg as evaluated by means of bioanalytical reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Taken together, these findings show that the OT/vasopressin system is involved in the rewarding, prosocial, and anxiolytic effects of MDMA, DOB, and PMA in zebra fish and underline the association between this system and the behavioral alterations associated with disorders related to substance

  2. Melanocortin tetrapeptide Ac-His-DPhe-Arg-Trp-NH2 modified at the para position of the benzyl side chain (DPhe): importance for mouse melanocortin-3 receptor agonist versus antagonist activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proneth, Bettina; Pogozheva, Irina D; Portillo, Federico P; Mosberg, Henry I; Haskell-Luevano, Carrie

    2008-09-25

    The melanocortin-3 and -4 receptors (MC3R, MC4R) have been implicated in energy homeostasis and obesity. Whereas the physiological role of the MC4R is extensively studied, little is known about the MC3R. One caveat is the limited availability of ligands that are selective for the MC3R. Previous studies identified Ac-His-DPhe(p-I)-Arg-Trp-NH 2, which possessed partial agonist/antagonist pharmacology at the mMC3R while retaining full nanomolar agonist pharmacology at the mMC4R. These data allowed for the hypothesis that the DPhe position in melanocortin tetrapeptides can be used to examine ligand side-chain determinants important for differentiation of mMC3R agonist versus antagonist activity. A series of 15 DPhe (7) modified Ac-His-DPhe (7)-Arg-Trp-NH 2 tetrapeptides has been synthesized and pharmacologically characterized. Most notable results include the identification of modifications that resulted in potent antagonists/partial agonists at the mMC3R and full, potent agonists at the mMC4R. These SAR studies provide experimental evidence that the molecular mechanism of antagonism at the mMC3R differentiates this subtype from the mMC4R.

  3. The effect of different classes of beta-antagonists on clinical and experimental hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, J D

    1982-01-01

    The reference beta adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol reduces blood pressure in about 60% of patients with essential hypertension. Pressure is reduced in the supine, and erect positions without postural hypotension as well as during exercise. The average extent of pressure reduction is approximately 26/16 mm.Hg. Though all clinically available beta antagonists reduce blood pressure, the profile may be modified by both adrenotropic and non-adrenotropic ancillary properties. Of the adrenotropic properties, potency influences dose frequency and total body burden of drug. Selective beta 1 antagonism may enhance safety without reducing efficacy in patients with obstructive airways disease. Selective beta 2 blockade does not reduce blood pressure in experimental models or normal subjects, but the response in patients is unknown. Partial agonism may reduce efficacy if the degree of stimulant activity is too great. Of the non-adrenotropic properties, membrane stabilising properties are of relevance only in so far as such agents undergo extensive biotransformation resulting in either reduced efficacy when drugs are used at fixed doses or the formation of biologically active metabolites. The additional properties of either alpha adrenergic blockade or inhibition of vascular smooth muscle tone modify both the speed of onset and the haemodynamic profile. The interaction of these ancillary pharmacological properties is evaluated in this review.

  4. Combined genetic and pharmacological inhibition of TRPV1 and P2X3 attenuates colorectal hypersensitivity and afferent sensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyatkin, Michael E.; Feng, Bin; Schwartz, Erica S.

    2013-01-01

    The ligand-gated channels transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and P2X3 have been reported to facilitate colorectal afferent neuron sensitization, thus contributing to organ hypersensitivity and pain. In the present study, we hypothesized that TRPV1 and P2X3 cooperate to modulate colorectal nociception and afferent sensitivity. To test this hypothesis, we employed TRPV1-P2X3 double knockout (TPDKO) mice and channel-selective pharmacological antagonists and evaluated combined channel contributions to behavioral responses to colorectal distension (CRD) and afferent fiber responses to colorectal stretch. Baseline responses to CRD were unexpectedly greater in TPDKO compared with control mice, but zymosan-produced CRD hypersensitivity was absent in TPDKO mice. Relative to control mice, proportions of mechanosensitive and -insensitive pelvic nerve afferent classes were not different in TPDKO mice. Responses of mucosal and serosal class afferents to mechanical probing were unaffected, whereas responses of muscular (but not muscular/mucosal) afferents to stretch were significantly attenuated in TPDKO mice; sensitization of both muscular and muscular/mucosal afferents by inflammatory soup was also significantly attenuated. In pharmacological studies, the TRPV1 antagonist A889425 and P2X3 antagonist TNP-ATP, alone and in combination, applied onto stretch-sensitive afferent endings attenuated responses to stretch; combined antagonism produced greater attenuation. In the aggregate, these observations suggest that 1) genetic manipulation of TRPV1 and P2X3 leads to reduction in colorectal mechanosensation peripherally and compensatory changes and/or disinhibition of other channels centrally, 2) combined pharmacological antagonism produces more robust attenuation of mechanosensation peripherally than does antagonism of either channel alone, and 3) the relative importance of these channels appears to be enhanced in colorectal hypersensitivity. PMID:23989007

  5. The opioid receptor pharmacology of GSK1521498 compared to other ligands with differential effects on compulsive reward-related behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Eamonn; Mundell, Stuart J; Sava, Anna; Roth, Adelheid L; Felici, Antonio; Maltby, Kay; Nathan, Pradeep J; Bullmore, Edward T; Henderson, Graeme

    2015-01-01

    The novel opioid receptor antagonist, GSK1421498, has been shown to attenuate reward-driven compulsive behaviours, such as stimulant drug seeking or binge eating, in animals and humans. Here, we report new data on the receptor pharmacology of GSK121498, in comparison to naltrexone, naloxone, 6-β-naltrexol and nalmefene. To determine whether the novel opioid antagonist, GSK1521498, is an orthosteric or allosteric antagonist at the μ opioid receptor (MOPr) and whether it has neutral antagonist or inverse agonist properties. A combination of radioligand binding assays and [(35)S]GTPγS binding assays was employed. GSK1521498 completely displaced [(3)H]naloxone binding to MOPr and did not alter the rate of [(3)H]naloxone dissociation from MOPr observations compatible with it binding to the orthosteric site on MOPr. GSK1521498 exhibited inverse agonism when MOPr was overexpressed but not when the level of MOPr expression was low. In parallel studies under conditions of high receptor expression density, naloxone, naltrexone, 6-β-naltrexol and nalmefene exhibited partial agonism, not inverse agonism as has been reported previously for naloxone and naltrexone. In brain tissue from mice receiving a prolonged morphine pre-treatment, GSK1521498 exhibited slight inverse agonism. Differences between GSK1521498 and naltrexone in their effects on compulsive reward seeking are arguably linked to the more selective and complete MOPr antagonism of GSK1521498 versus the partial MOPr agonism of naltrexone. GSK1521498 is also pharmacologically differentiated by its inverse agonist efficacy at high levels of MOPr expression, but this may be less likely to contribute to behavioural differentiation at patho-physiological levels of expression.

  6. Sarpogrelate hydrochloride, a selective 5-hydroxytryptamine(2A) antagonist, augments autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell implantation-induced improvement in endothelium-dependent vasodilation in patients with critical limb ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Yukihito; Miyazaki, Masanori; Goto, Chikara; Sanada, Hiroaki; Sueda, Taijiro; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a combination of bone marrow mononuclear cell (BM-MNC) implantation and sarpogrelate, a selective 5-HT(2A) antagonist, on endothelial function in patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI). We evaluated the leg blood flow (LBF) responses to acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside before and after BM-MNC implantation in 16 patients with CLI. We divided patients with CLI into 2 groups: those cotreated with sarpogrelate orally for 12 weeks (sarpogrelate group, n = 8) and those who remained on conventional therapy (control group, n = 8). LBF was measured by strain gauge plethysmography. BM-MNC implantation improved ankle brachial pressure index, transcutaneous oxygen pressure, and pain-free walking time. There was no significant difference in these parameters between the 2 groups. Before BM-MNC implantation, LBF responses to ACh were similar in the sarpogrelate group and control group. Twelve weeks of BM-MNC implantation enhanced LBF responses to ACh in the sarpogrelate and control groups. After 12 weeks of BM-MNC implantation, LBF response to ACh was significantly greater in the sarpogrelate group than in the control group. BM-MNC implantation did not alter the LBF responses to sodium nitroprusside in either group. These findings suggest that BM-MNC implantation improved not only limb ischemic symptoms but also endothelium-dependent vasodilation in patients with CLI. A combination of BM-MNC implantation and sarpogrelate had a more beneficial effect on vascular function in these patients.

  7. Pharmacological Mechanisms of Cortical Enhancement Induced by the Repetitive Pairing of Visual/Cholinergic Stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Il Kang

    Full Text Available Repetitive visual training paired with electrical activation of cholinergic projections to the primary visual cortex (V1 induces long-term enhancement of cortical processing in response to the visual training stimulus. To better determine the receptor subtypes mediating this effect the selective pharmacological blockade of V1 nicotinic (nAChR, M1 and M2 muscarinic (mAChR or GABAergic A (GABAAR receptors was performed during the training session and visual evoked potentials (VEPs were recorded before and after training. The training session consisted of the exposure of awake, adult rats to an orientation-specific 0.12 CPD grating paired with an electrical stimulation of the basal forebrain for a duration of 1 week for 10 minutes per day. Pharmacological agents were infused intracortically during this period. The post-training VEP amplitude was significantly increased compared to the pre-training values for the trained spatial frequency and to adjacent spatial frequencies up to 0.3 CPD, suggesting a long-term increase of V1 sensitivity. This increase was totally blocked by the nAChR antagonist as well as by an M2 mAChR subtype and GABAAR antagonist. Moreover, administration of the M2 mAChR antagonist also significantly decreased the amplitude of the control VEPs, suggesting a suppressive effect on cortical responsiveness. However, the M1 mAChR antagonist blocked the increase of the VEP amplitude only for the high spatial frequency (0.3 CPD, suggesting that M1 role was limited to the spread of the enhancement effect to a higher spatial frequency. More generally, all the drugs used did block the VEP increase at 0.3 CPD. Further, use of each of the aforementioned receptor antagonists blocked training-induced changes in gamma and beta band oscillations. These findings demonstrate that visual training coupled with cholinergic stimulation improved perceptual sensitivity by enhancing cortical responsiveness in V1. This enhancement is mainly mediated by n

  8. Traxoprodil, a selective antagonist of the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor, potentiates the antidepressant-like effects of certain antidepressant drugs in the forced swim test in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poleszak, Ewa; Stasiuk, Weronika; Szopa, Aleksandra; Wyska, Elżbieta; Serefko, Anna; Oniszczuk, Anna; Wośko, Sylwia; Świąder, Katarzyna; Wlaź, Piotr

    2016-08-01

    One of the newest substances, whose antidepressant activity was shown is traxoprodil, which is a selective antagonist of the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor. The main goal of the present study was to evaluate the effect of traxoprodil on animals' behavior using the forced swim test (FST), as well as the effect of traxoprodil (10 mg/kg) on the activity of antidepressants, such as imipramine (15 mg/kg), fluoxetine (5 mg/kg), escitalopram (2 mg/kg) and reboxetine (2.5 mg/kg). Serotonergic lesion and experiment using the selective agonists of serotonin receptors 5-HT1A and 5-HT2 was conducted to evaluate the role of the serotonergic system in the antidepressant action of traxoprodil. Brain concentrations of tested agents were determined using HPLC. The results showed that traxoprodil at a dose of 20 and 40 mg/kg exhibited antidepressant activity in the FST and it was not related to changes in animals' locomotor activity. Co-administration of traxoprodil with imipramine, fluoxetine or escitalopram, each in subtherapeutic doses, significantly affected the animals' behavior in the FST and, what is important, these changes were not due to the severity of locomotor activity. The observed effect of traxoprodil is only partially associated with serotonergic system and is independent of the effect on the 5-HT1A and 5-HT2 serotonin receptors. The results of an attempt to assess the nature of the interaction between traxoprodil and the tested drugs show that in the case of joint administration of traxoprodil and fluoxetine, imipramine or escitalopram, there were interactions in the pharmacokinetic phase.

  9. Targeting Adenosine Signaling in Parkinson's Disease: From Pharmacological to Non-pharmacological Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiza R. Nazario

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is one of the most prevalent neurodegenerative disease displaying negative impacts on both the health and social ability of patients and considerable economical costs. The classical anti-parkinsonian drugs based in dopaminergic replacement are the standard treatment, but several motor side effects emerge during long-term use. This mini-review presents the rationale to several efforts from pre-clinical and clinical studies using adenosine receptor antagonists as a non-dopaminergic therapy. As several studies have indicated that the monotherapy with adenosine receptor antagonists reaches limited efficacy, the usage as a co-adjuvant appeared to be a promising strategy. The formulation of multi-targeted drugs, using adenosine receptor antagonists and other neurotransmitter systems than the dopaminergic one as targets, have been receiving attention since Parkinson's disease presents a complex biological impact. While pharmacological approaches to cure or ameliorate the conditions of PD are the leading strategy in this area, emerging positive aspects have arisen from non-pharmacological approaches and adenosine function inhibition appears to improve both strategies.

  10. Pharmacology of a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, HN-56249: a novel compound exhibiting a marked preference for the human enzyme in intact cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, J; Fellier, H; Christoph, T; Kremminger, P; Hartmann, M; Blaschke, H; Rovensky, F; Towart, R; Stimmeder, D

    2000-04-01

    HN-56249 (3-(2,4-dichlorothiophenoxy)-4-methylsulfonylamino-benzenesu lfonamide), a highly selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor, is the prototype of a novel series of COX inhibitors comprising bicyclic arylethersulfonamides; of this series HN-56249 is the most potent and selective human COX-2 inhibitor. HN-56249 inhibited platelet aggregation as a measure of COX-1 activity only moderately (IC50 26.5+/-1.7 microM). In LPS-stimulated monocytic cells the release of prostaglandin (PG) F1alpha as a measure of COX-2 was markedly inhibited (IC50 0.027+/-0.001 microM). Thus, HN-56249 showed an approximately 1000-fold selectivity for COX-2 in intact cells. In whole blood assays HN-56249 showed a potent inhibitory activity for COX-2 (IC50 0.78+/-0.37 microM) only. COX-1 was only weakly inhibited (IC50 867+/-181 microM). Hence, HN-56249 exhibited a greater than 1000-fold selectivity for whole blood COX-2. HN-56249 surpassed the COX-2 selectivities of the COX-2 selective inhibitors 3-cyclohexyloxy-4-methylsulfonylamino-nitrobenzene (NS-398) and 6-(2,4-difluorophenoxy)-5-methyl-sulfonylamino-1-indanone (flosulide) in the intact cell assays by eight- and threefold, respectively, and in the whole blood assays by approximately 40-fold. Following i.v. administration HN-56249 inhibited carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema only moderately (ID50 26.2+/-5.7 mg/kg, mean +/- SEM), approximately tenfold less potent than indomethacin (ID50 2.1+/-0.2 mg/kg, mean +/- SEM). After oral administration HN-56249 reversed thermal hyperalgesia in the carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema test, however, some 30-fold less potently than diclofenac. Comparing the inhibitory potency of HN-56249 against human COX-2 with that against murine COX-2 in intact cells revealed a 300-fold selectivity for the human enzyme. Similar effects were observed with other COX-2-selective arylethersulfonamides. In contrast, non-COX-2-selective arylethersulfonamides, including a highly selective COX-1 inhibitor, inhibited

  11. Adverse cutaneous reactions induced by TNF-alpha antagonist therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrás-Blasco, Joaquín; Navarro-Ruiz, Andrés; Borrás, Consuelo; Casterá, Elvira

    2009-11-01

    To review adverse cutaneous drug reactions induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) antagonist therapy. A literature search was performed using PubMed (1996-March 2009), EMBASE, and selected MEDLINE Ovid bibliography searches. All language clinical trial data, case reports, letters, and review articles identified from the data sources were used. Since the introduction of TNF-alpha antagonist, the incidence of adverse cutaneous drug reactions has increased significantly. A wide range of different skin lesions might occur during TNF-alpha antagonist treatment. New onset or exacerbation of psoriasis has been reported in patients treated with TNF-alpha antagonists for a variety of rheumatologic conditions. TNF-alpha antagonist therapy has been associated with a lupus-like syndrome; most of these case reports occurred in patients receiving either etanercept or infliximab. Serious skin reactions such as erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and toxic epidermal necrolysis have been reported rarely with the use of TNF-alpha antagonists. As the use of TNF-alpha antagonists continues to increase, the diagnosis and management of cutaneous side effects will become an increasingly important challenge. In patients receiving TNF-alpha antagonist treatment, skin disease should be considered, and clinicians need to be aware of the adverse reactions of these drugs.

  12. Neonatal irradiation: neurotoxicity and modulation of pharmacological response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zieher, Luis M.; Guelman, Laura R.

    2001-01-01

    Neuronal loss may be responsible of many acute and chronic diseases. For this reason, is very important to understand the mechanisms that contribute to neuronal cell death in order to develop pharmacological strategies for the treatment of these disorders. Developing CNS is very sensitive to ionizing radiations. In particular, irradiation of immature cerebellum induce motor (impaired gait), morphological (disarrangement of cytoarchitecture) and biochemical (increase in noradrenaline levels) alterations, mainly related to cerebellar granule cell death induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated after radiation exposure. Cellular changes triggered by ROS include increased intracellular Ca 2+ levels, activation of NMDA glutamatergic receptors and apoptosis. With an excitatory neurotransmitter as glutamate and a multifacetic ion as calcium, their regulation in synapses and cytoplasm, respectively, is very vulnerable. Moreover, the highly aerobic condition of neuronal metabolism determines that an oxidative injury lead to ROS accumulation. The neuro protection therapy attempts to interfere with these few processes by using antioxidants, metal chelators, calcium antagonists or glutamatergic antagonists. In the protocol used in our laboratory, neonatal rats were irradiated with 5 Gy gamma radiations in their cephalic ends, and pre or post-treated with selected putative neuro protective agents. After 30-90 days, motor, morphological and biochemical parameters were measured and compared with irradiated and sham-irradiated (control) animals. Drugs as GM1 ganglioside or amifostine were able to restore abnormal parameters. Cerebellar granule cell irradiated 'in vitro' were treated with neuro protective agents prior or after irradiation. Cell viability and several biochemical parameters were analysed after 48 hours. GM1 ganglioside and amifostine were effective in preventing cell death and increase in ROS induced by ionizing radiation exposure. (author)

  13. Small molecule antagonists of integrin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdih, A; Dolenc, M Sollner

    2010-01-01

    The complex and widespread family of integrin receptors is involved in numerous physiological processes, such as tissue remodeling, angiogenesis, development of the immune response and homeostasis. In addition, their key role has been elucidated in important pathological disorders such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, autoimmune and inflammatory diseases and in the pathogenesis of infectious diseases, making them highly important targets for modern drug design campaigns. In this review we seek to present a concise overview of the small molecule antagonists of this diverse and highly complex receptor family. Integrin antagonists are classified according to the targeted integrin receptor and are discussed in four sections. First we present the fibrinogen alpha(IIb)beta3 and the vitronectin alpha (V)beta(3) receptor antagonists. The remaining selective integrin antagonists are examined in the third section. The final section is dedicated to molecules with dual or multiple integrin activity. In addition, the use of antibodies and peptidomimetic approaches to modulate the integrin receptors are discussed, as well providing the reader with an overall appreciation of the field.

  14. Future pharmacological therapy in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Merrill H; Lavie, Carl J; Ventura, Hector O

    2018-04-26

    Hypertension (HTN) is a widespread and growing disease, with medication intolerance and side-effect present among many. To address these obstacles novel pharmacotherapy is an active area of drug development. This review seeks to explore future drug therapy for HTN in the preclinical and clinical arenas. The future of pharmacological therapy in HTN consists of revisiting old pathways to find new targets and exploring wholly new approaches to provide additional avenues of treatment. In this review, we discuss the current status of the most recent drug therapy in HTN. New developments in well trod areas include novel mineralocorticoid antagonists, aldosterone synthase inhibitors, aminopeptidase-A inhibitors, natriuretic peptide receptor agonists, or the counter-regulatory angiotensin converting enzyme 2/angiotensin (Ang) (1-7)/Mas receptor axis. Neprilysin inhibitors popularized for heart failure may also still hold HTN potential. Finally, we examine unique systems in development never before used in HTN such as Na/H exchange inhibitors, vasoactive intestinal peptide agonists, and dopamine beta hydroxylase inhibitors. A concise review of future directions of HTN pharmacotherapy.

  15. Hypocretin antagonists in insomnia treatment and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoff, Chad; Cao, Michelle; Guilleminault, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Hypocretin neuropeptides have been shown to regulate transitions between wakefulness and sleep through stabilization of sleep promoting GABAergic and wake promoting cholinergic/monoaminergic neural pathways. Hypocretin also influences other physiologic processes such as metabolism, appetite, learning and memory, reward and addiction, and ventilatory drive. The discovery of hypocretin and its effect upon the sleep-wake cycle has led to the development of a new class of pharmacologic agents that antagonize the physiologic effects of hypocretin (i.e. hypocretin antagonists). Further investigation of these agents may lead to novel therapies for insomnia without the side-effect profile of currently available hypnotics (e.g. impaired cognition, confusional arousals, and motor balance difficulties). However, antagonizing a system that regulates the sleep-wake cycle while also influencing non-sleep physiologic processes may create an entirely different but equally concerning side-effect profile such as transient loss of muscle tone (i.e. cataplexy) and a dampened respiratory drive. In this review, we will discuss the discovery of hypocretin and its receptors, hypocretin and the sleep-wake cycle, hypocretin antagonists in the treatment of insomnia, and other implicated functions of the hypocretin system.

  16. Pharmacological characterization of potent and selective NaV1.7 inhibitors engineered from Chilobrachys jingzhao tarantula venom peptide JzTx-V.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan D Moyer

    Full Text Available Identification of voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.7 inhibitors for chronic pain therapeutic development is an area of vigorous pursuit. In an effort to identify more potent leads compared to our previously reported GpTx-1 peptide series, electrophysiology screening of fractionated tarantula venom discovered the NaV1.7 inhibitory peptide JzTx-V from the Chinese earth tiger tarantula Chilobrachys jingzhao. The parent peptide displayed nominal selectivity over the skeletal muscle NaV1.4 channel. Attribute-based positional scan analoging identified a key Ile28Glu mutation that improved NaV1.4 selectivity over 100-fold, and further optimization yielded the potent and selective peptide leads AM-8145 and AM-0422. NMR analyses revealed that the Ile28Glu substitution changed peptide conformation, pointing to a structural rationale for the selectivity gains. AM-8145 and AM-0422 as well as GpTx-1 and HwTx-IV competed for ProTx-II binding in HEK293 cells expressing human NaV1.7, suggesting that these NaV1.7 inhibitory peptides interact with a similar binding site. AM-8145 potently blocked native tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S channels in mouse dorsal root ganglia (DRG neurons, exhibited 30- to 120-fold selectivity over other human TTX-S channels and exhibited over 1,000-fold selectivity over other human tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R channels. Leveraging NaV1.7-NaV1.5 chimeras containing various voltage-sensor and pore regions, AM-8145 mapped to the second voltage-sensor domain of NaV1.7. AM-0422, but not the inactive peptide analog AM-8374, dose-dependently blocked capsaicin-induced DRG neuron action potential firing using a multi-electrode array readout and mechanically-induced C-fiber spiking in a saphenous skin-nerve preparation. Collectively, AM-8145 and AM-0422 represent potent, new engineered NaV1.7 inhibitory peptides derived from the JzTx-V scaffold with improved NaV selectivity and biological activity in blocking action potential firing in both

  17. Biological and Pharmacological properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Biological and Pharmacological properties. NOEA inhibits Ceramidase. Anandamide inhibits gap junction conductance and reduces sperm fertilizing capacity. Endogenous ligands for Cannabinoid receptors (anandamide and NPEA). Antibacterial and antiviral ...

  18. In vitro study on the effects of some selected agonists and antagonists of alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors on the contractility of the aneurysmally-changed aortic smooth muscle in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnus, J; Czerski, A; Ferenc, S; Zawadzki, W; Witkiewicz, W; Hauzer, W; Rusiecka, A; Bujok, J

    2012-02-01

    The study included 18 sections of the aneurysmally-changed abdominal aortas, obtained from patients of the Provincial Specialist Hospital in Wroclaw and 18 sections of normal abdominal aortas obtained from swine. The collected samples were placed horizontally in the incubation chamber. Changes in their transverse section area were registered. They were stretched to a tension of 5 mN. Krebs-Henseleit buffer was used as the incubatory environment. Incubation of the sections was performed at a temperature of 37°C, in the gaseous mixture of oxygen and carbon dioxide used in the following proportion: 95% of O(2) and 5% of CO(2). Contractions of the aorta were registered with isotonic transducers (Letica Scientific Instruments). In the studies, we examined the influence of α(1)-adrenergic receptors (and their subtypes α(1A), α(1B), α(1D)) on the contractility of the aortic muscle in humans and swine by their stimulation or inhibition with some selected agonists or antagonists. This time, it was shown that the stimulation of α(1)-adrenergic receptors leads to contractions of the human and swine aortic muscle; the observed increase in the muscle tone may follow from the stimulation of all subtypes of alpha-1 receptor (α(1A), α(1B), α(1D)). All three subtypes of 1-adrenergic receptor are engaged in vasoconstriction, especially of α(1A) and α(1D) subtypes; the α(1B) subtype is less significant for aortic contractility. The contractile response of the aneurysmally-changed abdominal aorta in humans to agonists of α-adrenergic receptors was significantly less intense than that of the normal porcine aorta. It can be concluded that aneurysms influence the contractile response of the aorta.

  19. Pharmacological treatments for tobacco dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. O. Fagerström

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available There are currently three licensed therapies for smoking cessation: nicotine replacement (NR, bupropion and varenicline. NR can be indicated for: 1 aid in abrupt cessation; 2 gradual reduction in order to quit smoking; 3 temporary abstinence; and 4 smoking reduction maintenance. A meta-analysis has found that the relative risk of abstinence for any form of NR relative to control was 1.6. It has been found that starting NR treatment 1–3 weeks before smoking cessation and combining NR products, usually patch and gum, increases efficacy. Recently some new nicotine administration forms, i.e. lozenge, mouth spray and a pouch, have been developed. They seem to have the potential to relieve cravings faster than the current high-dose gum, and also be more preferred. Varenicline is a selective partial agonist at the 4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR. It decreases cravings and alleviates the symptoms of withdrawal. It can also reduce the rewarding and reinforcing effects of nicotine. Trials have shown varenicline to have increased efficacy relative to bupropion. Varenicline has also been compared with NR (21 mg transdermal patch in one randomised study. Abstinence at the end of treatment at 12 weeks was significantly increased for varenicline (56% compared with for nicotine patch (43%. Some post-marketing reports have expressed concern about psychiatric adverse effects, such as aggression, depression and suicides. The European Medicines Agency and the Food and Drug Administration of the USA are monitoring reported side-effects, but so far no confirmed casual relationship between these adverse effects and varenicline has been established. Bupropion inhibits neuronal re-uptake of dopamine and norepinephrine and is an antagonist on the nAChR. Its efficacy, compared with placebo, has been proved in several meta-analyses. A recent study suggests that longer pre-cessation use of bupropion, e.g. for 4 weeks, can improve efficacy results. Under

  20. Pharmacology and function of melatonin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubocovich, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    The hormone melatonin is secreted primarily from the pineal gland, with highest levels occurring during the dark period of a circadian cycle. This hormone, through an action in the brain, appears to be involved in the regulation of various neural and endocrine processes that are cued by the daily change in photoperiod. This article reviews the pharmacological characteristics and function of melatonin receptors in the central nervous system, and the role of melatonin in mediating physiological functions in mammals. Melatonin and melatonin agonists, at picomolar concentrations, inhibit the release of dopamine from retina through activation of a site that is pharmacologically different from a serotonin receptor. These inhibitory effects are antagonized by the novel melatonin receptor antagonist luzindole (N-0774), which suggests that melatonin activates a presynaptic melatonin receptor. In chicken and rabbit retina, the pharmacological characteristics of the presynaptic melatonin receptor and the site labeled by 2-[125I]iodomelatonin are identical. It is proposed that 2-[125I]iodomelatonin binding sites (e.g., chicken brain) that possess the pharmacological characteristics of the retinal melatonin receptor site (order of affinities: 2-iodomelatonin greater than 6-chloromelatonin greater than or equal to melatonin greater than or equal to 6,7-di-chloro-2-methylmelatonin greater than 6-hydroxymelatonin greater than or equal to 6-methoxymelatonin greater than N-acetyltryptamine greater than or equal to luzindole greater than N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine greater than 5-methoxytryptamine much greater than 5-hydroxytryptamine) be classified as ML-1 (melatonin 1). The 2-[125I]iodomelatonin binding site of hamster brain membranes possesses different binding and pharmacological characteristics from the retinal melatonin receptor site and should be classified as ML-2. 64 references

  1. MIBE acts as antagonist ligand of both estrogen receptor α and GPER in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappano, Rosamaria; Santolla, Maria Francesca; Pupo, Marco; Sinicropi, Maria Stefania; Caruso, Anna; Rosano, Camillo; Maggiolini, Marcello

    2012-01-17

    The multiple biological responses to estrogens are mainly mediated by the classical estrogen receptors ERα and ERβ, which act as ligand-activated transcription factors. ERα exerts a main role in the development of breast cancer; therefore, the ER antagonist tamoxifen has been widely used although its effectiveness is limited by de novo and acquired resistance. Recently, GPR30/GPER, a member of the seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor family, has been implicated in mediating the effects of estrogens in various normal and cancer cells. In particular, GPER triggered gene expression and proliferative responses induced by estrogens and even ER antagonists in hormone-sensitive tumor cells. Likewise, additional ER ligands showed the ability to bind to GPER eliciting promiscuous and, in some cases, opposite actions through the two receptors. We synthesized a novel compound (ethyl 3-[5-(2-ethoxycarbonyl-1-methylvinyloxy)-1-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl]but-2-enoate), referred to as MIBE, and investigated its properties elicited through ERα and GPER in breast cancer cells. Molecular modeling, binding experiments and functional assays were performed in order to evaluate the biological action exerted by MIBE through ERα and GPER in MCF7 and SkBr3 breast cancer cells. MIBE displayed the ability to act as an antagonist ligand for ERα and GPER as it elicited inhibitory effects on gene transcription and growth effects by binding to both receptors in breast cancer cells. Moreover, GPER was required for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and ERK activation by EGF as ascertained by using MIBE and performing gene silencing experiments. Our findings provide novel insights on the functional cross-talk between GPER and EGFR signaling. Furthermore, the exclusive antagonistic activity exerted by MIBE on ERα and GPER could represent an innovative pharmacological approach targeting breast carcinomas which express one or both receptors at the beginning and/or during tumor

  2. Rational design, synthesis, and pharmacological properties of new 1,8-naphthyridin-2(1H)-on-3-carboxamide derivatives as highly selective cannabinoid-2 receptor agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manera, Clementina; Saccomanni, Giuseppe; Adinolfi, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The CB(2) receptor activation can be exploited for the treatment of diseases such as chronic pain and tumors of immune origin, devoid of psychotropic activity. On the basis of our already reported 1,8-naphthyridin-4(1H)-on-3-carboxamide derivatives, new 1,8-naphthyridin-2(1H)-on-3-carboxamide......-dependent decrease of cell viability. The obtained results suggest that 1,8-naphthyridin-2(1H)-on-3-carboxamides represent a new scaffold very suitable for the development of new promising CB(2) agonists....... derivatives were designed, synthesized, and tested for their affinities toward the human CB(1) and CB(2) cannabinoid receptors. Some of the reported compounds showed a subnanomolar CB(2) affinity with a CB(1)/CB(2) selectivity ratio greater than 200 (compounds 6, 12, cis-12, 13, and cis-13). Further studies...

  3. Carbon adaptation influence the antagonistic ability of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-24

    Oct 24, 2011 ... INTRODUCTION. The use of antagonistic bacteria to control soil-borne ... plant was used to evaluate the antifungal activities of antagonistic bacteria. ..... antagonistic bacteria and cloning of its phenazine carboxylic acid genes.

  4. Pharmacologic study of calcium influx pathways in rabbit aortic smooth muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukeman, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    Functional characteristics and pharmacologic domains of receptor-operated and potential-sensitive calcium (Ca 2+ ) channels (ROCs and PSCs, respectively) were derived via measurements of 45 Ca 2+ influx (M/sup Ca/) during activation by the neurotransmitters norepinephrine (NE), histamine (HS), and serotonin (5-HT) and by elevated extracellular potassium (K + ) in the individual or combined presence of organic Ca 2+ channel antagonists (CAts), calmodulin antagonists (Calm-ants), lanthanum (La 3+ ), and agents that increase intracellular levels of cyclic AMP

  5. Antagonistic parent-offspring co-adaptation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Kölliker

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In species across taxa, offspring have means to influence parental investment (PI. PI thus evolves as an interacting phenotype and indirect genetic effects may strongly affect the co-evolutionary dynamics of offspring and parental behaviors. Evolutionary theory focused on explaining how exaggerated offspring solicitation can be understood as resolution of parent-offspring conflict, but the evolutionary origin and diversification of different forms of family interactions remains unclear.In contrast to previous theory that largely uses a static approach to predict how "offspring individuals" and "parental individuals" should interact given conflict over PI, we present a dynamic theoretical framework of antagonistic selection on the PI individuals obtain/take as offspring and the PI they provide as parents to maximize individual lifetime reproductive success; we analyze a deterministic and a stochastic version of this dynamic framework. We show that a zone for equivalent co-adaptation outcomes exists in which stable levels of PI can evolve and be maintained despite fast strategy transitions and ongoing co-evolutionary dynamics. Under antagonistic co-adaptation, cost-free solicitation can evolve as an adaptation to emerging preferences in parents.We show that antagonistic selection across the offspring and parental life-stage of individuals favors co-adapted offspring and parental behavior within a zone of equivalent outcomes. This antagonistic parent-offspring co-adaptation does not require solicitation to be costly, allows for rapid divergence and evolutionary novelty and potentially explains the origin and diversification of the observed provisioning forms in family life.

  6. Identification and in vitro pharmacological characterization of a novel and selective α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist, Br-IQ17B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing-shu; Xie, Bing-xue; Bian, Xi-ling; Xue, Yu; Wei, Ning-ning; Zhou, Jing-heng; Hao, Yu-chen; Li, Gang; Zhang, Liang-ren; Wang, Ke-wei

    2015-07-01

    Alpha7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR) is a ligand-gated Ca(2+)-permeable ion channel implicated in cognition and neuropsychiatric disorders. Activation of α7 nAChR improves learning, memory, and sensory gating in animal models. To identify novel α7 nAChR agonists, we synthesized a series of small molecules and characterized a representative compound, Br-IQ17B, N-[(3R)-1-azabicyclo[2,2,2]oct-3-yl]-5-bromoindolizine-2-carboxamide, which specifically activates α7 nAChR. Two-electrode voltage clamp (TEVC) recordings were primarily used for screening in Xenopus oocytes expressing human α7 nAChR. Assays, including radioisotope ligand binding, Western blots, whole-cell recordings of hippocampal culture neurons, and spontaneous IPSC recordings of brain slices, were also utilized to evaluate and confirm the specific activation of α7 nAChR by Br-IQ17B. Br-IQ17B potently activates α7 nAChR with an EC50 of 1.8±0.2 μmol/L. Br-IQ17B is selective over other subtypes such as α4β2 and α3β4, but it blocks 5-HT3A receptors. Br-IQ17B displaced binding of the α7 blocker [(3)H]-MLA to hippocampal crude membranes with a Ki of 14.9±3.2 nmol/L. In hippocampal neurons, Br-IQ17B evoked α7-like currents that were inhibited by MLA and enhanced in the presence of the α7 PAM PNU-120596. In brain slice recordings, Br-IQ17B enhanced GABAergic synaptic transmission in CA1 neurons. Mechanistically, Br-IQ17B increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation that was MLA-sensitive. We identified the novel, potent, and selective α7 agonist Br-IQ17B, which enhances synaptic transmission. Br-IQ17B may be a helpful tool to understand new aspects of α7 nAChR function, and it also has potential for being developed as therapy for schizophrenia and cognitive deficits.

  7. Once-daily glycopyrronium bromide, a long-acting muscarinic antagonist, for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2012-01-01

    Long-acting bronchodilators are central in the pharmacological management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of this systematic review is to provide an overview of the studies evaluating the safety and clinical efficacy of inhaled glycopyrronium bromide, a novel...... long-acting muscarinic antagonist, in patients with COPD....

  8. Characterization of Pharmacologic and Pharmacokinetic Properties of CCX168, a Potent and Selective Orally Administered Complement 5a Receptor Inhibitor, Based on Preclinical Evaluation and Randomized Phase 1 Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekker, Pirow; Dairaghi, Daniel; Seitz, Lisa; Leleti, Manmohan; Wang, Yu; Ertl, Linda; Baumgart, Trageen; Shugarts, Sarah; Lohr, Lisa; Dang, Ton; Miao, Shichang; Zeng, Yibin; Fan, Pingchen; Zhang, Penglie; Johnson, Daniel; Powers, Jay; Jaen, Juan; Charo, Israel; Schall, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    The complement 5a receptor has been an attractive therapeutic target for many autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. However, development of a selective and potent C5aR antagonist has been challenging. Here we describe the characterization of CCX168 (avacopan), an orally administered selective and potent C5aR inhibitor. CCX168 blocked the C5a binding, C5a-mediated migration, calcium mobilization, and CD11b upregulation in U937 cells as well as in freshly isolated human neutrophils. CCX168 retains high potency when present in human blood. A transgenic human C5aR knock-in mouse model allowed comparison of the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of the molecule. CCX168 effectively blocked migration in in vitro and ex vivo chemotaxis assays, and it blocked the C5a-mediated neutrophil vascular endothelial margination. CCX168 was effective in migration and neutrophil margination assays in cynomolgus monkeys. This thorough in vitro and preclinical characterization enabled progression of CCX168 into the clinic and testing of its safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic profiles in a Phase 1 clinical trial in 48 healthy volunteers. CCX168 was shown to be well tolerated across a broad dose range (1 to 100 mg) and it showed dose-dependent pharmacokinetics. An oral dose of 30 mg CCX168 given twice daily blocked the C5a-induced upregulation of CD11b in circulating neutrophils by 94% or greater throughout the entire day, demonstrating essentially complete target coverage. This dose regimen is being tested in clinical trials in patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis. Trial Registration ISRCTN registry with trial ID ISRCTN13564773.

  9. Characterization of Pharmacologic and Pharmacokinetic Properties of CCX168, a Potent and Selective Orally Administered Complement 5a Receptor Inhibitor, Based on Preclinical Evaluation and Randomized Phase 1 Clinical Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirow Bekker

    Full Text Available The complement 5a receptor has been an attractive therapeutic target for many autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. However, development of a selective and potent C5aR antagonist has been challenging. Here we describe the characterization of CCX168 (avacopan, an orally administered selective and potent C5aR inhibitor. CCX168 blocked the C5a binding, C5a-mediated migration, calcium mobilization, and CD11b upregulation in U937 cells as well as in freshly isolated human neutrophils. CCX168 retains high potency when present in human blood. A transgenic human C5aR knock-in mouse model allowed comparison of the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of the molecule. CCX168 effectively blocked migration in in vitro and ex vivo chemotaxis assays, and it blocked the C5a-mediated neutrophil vascular endothelial margination. CCX168 was effective in migration and neutrophil margination assays in cynomolgus monkeys. This thorough in vitro and preclinical characterization enabled progression of CCX168 into the clinic and testing of its safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic profiles in a Phase 1 clinical trial in 48 healthy volunteers. CCX168 was shown to be well tolerated across a broad dose range (1 to 100 mg and it showed dose-dependent pharmacokinetics. An oral dose of 30 mg CCX168 given twice daily blocked the C5a-induced upregulation of CD11b in circulating neutrophils by 94% or greater throughout the entire day, demonstrating essentially complete target coverage. This dose regimen is being tested in clinical trials in patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis. Trial Registration ISRCTN registry with trial ID ISRCTN13564773.

  10. Characterization and design of antagonistic shape memory alloy actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georges, T; Brailovski, V; Terriault, P

    2012-01-01

    Antagonistic shape memory actuators use opposing shape memory alloy (SMA) elements to create devices capable of producing differential motion paths and two-way mechanical work in a very efficient manner. There is no requirement for additional bias elements to ‘re-arm’ the actuators and allow repetitive actuation. The work generation potential of antagonistic shape memory actuators is determined by specific SMA element characteristics and their assembly conditions. In this study, the selected SMA wires are assembled in antagonistic configuration and characterized using a dedicated test bench to evaluate their stress–strain characteristics as a function of the number of cycles. Using these functional characteristics, a so-called ‘working envelope’ is built to assist in the design of such an actuator. Finally, the test bench is used to simulate a real application of an antagonistic actuator (case study). (paper)

  11. Combinatorial assembly of small molecules into bivalent antagonists of TrkC or TrkA receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouad Brahimi

    Full Text Available A library of peptidomimetics was assembled combinatorially into dimers on a triazine-based core. The pharmacophore corresponds to β-turns of the neurotrophin polypeptides neurotrophin-3 (NT-3, nerve growth factor (NGF, or brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. These are the natural ligands for TrkC, TrkA, and TrkB receptors, respectively. The linker length and the side-chain orientation of each monomer within the bivalent mimics were systematically altered, and the impact of these changes on the function of each ligand was evaluated. While the monovalent peptidomimetics had no detectable binding or bioactivity, four bivalent peptidomimetics (2c, 2d, 2e, 3f are selective TrkC ligands with antagonistic activity, and two bivalent peptidomimetics (1a, 1b are TrkC and TrkA ligands with antagonistic activity. All these bivalent compounds block ligand-dependent receptor activation and cell survival, without affecting neuritogenic differentiation. This work adds to our understanding of how the neurotrophins function through Trk receptors, and demonstrates that peptidomimetics can be designed to selectively disturb specific biological signals, and may be used as pharmacological probes or as therapeutic leads. The concept of altering side-chain, linker length, and sequence orientation of a subunit within a pharmacophore provides an easy modular approach to generate larger libraries with diversified bioactivity.

  12. ANTAGONISTIC POTENTIAL OF FLUORESCENT Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    GROWTH OF TOMATO CHALLENGED WITH PHTOPATHOGENS ... This study focused on the antagonistic potential of fluorescent Pseudomonas in vitro, and its inoculation effect on growth .... the 5 days old culture in starch agar with Lugol's.

  13. Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Antagonists and Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Lyeth

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a leading cause of death and disability in the United States. Despite more than 30 years of research, no pharmacological agents have been identified that improve neurological function following TBI. However, several lines of research described in this review provide support for further development of voltage gated calcium channel (VGCC antagonists as potential therapeutic agents. Following TBI, neurons and astrocytes experience a rapid and sometimes enduring increase in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i. These fluxes in [Ca2+]i drive not only apoptotic and necrotic cell death, but also can lead to long-term cell dysfunction in surviving cells. In a limited number of in vitro experiments, both L-type and N-type VGCC antagonists successfully reduced calcium loads as well as neuronal and astrocytic cell death following mechanical injury. In rodent models of TBI, administration of VGCC antagonists reduced cell death and improved cognitive function. It is clear that there is a critical need to find effective therapeutics and rational drug delivery strategies for the management and treatment of TBI, and we believe that further investigation of VGCC antagonists should be pursued before ruling out the possibility of successful translation to the clinic.

  14. CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY OF DIURETICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Soldatenko

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Clinical pharmacology of diuretics in the international system of ATC (anatomic-therapeutic-chemical is presented. Classification of this group by the action mechanism and caused effects is provided. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics features, indications and principles of diuretics usage in clinics are considered. Contraindications, side effects and interaction with other drugs of this group are discussed in detail.

  15. Developmental paediatric anaesthetic pharmacology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tom Giedsing

    2015-01-01

    Safe and effective drug therapy in neonates, infants and children require detailed knowledge about the ontogeny of drug disposition and action as well how these interact with genetics and co-morbidity of children. Recent advances in developmental pharmacology in children follow the increased...

  16. Anticonvulsant effects of isomeric nonimidazole histamine H3 receptor antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadek B

    2016-11-01

    , in which 3-piperidinopropan-1-ol in ligand 2 was replaced by (4-(3-(piperidin-1-ylpropoxyphenylmethanol, and its (S-enantiomer (4 significantly and in a dose-dependent manner reduced convulsions or exhibited full protection in MES and PTZ convulsions model, respectively. Interestingly, the protective effects observed for the (R-enantiomer (3 in MES model were significantly greater than those of the standard H3R inverse agonist/antagonist pitolisant, comparable with those observed for PHT, and reversed when rats were pretreated with the selective H3R agonist R-(α-methyl-histamine. Comparisons of the observed antagonistic in vitro affinities among the ligands 1–6 revealed profound stereoselectivity at human H3Rs with varying preferences for this receptor subtype. Moreover, the in vivo anticonvulsant effects observed in this study for ligands 1–6 showed stereoselectivity in different convulsion models in male adult rats. Keywords: histamine, H3 receptor, isomeric antagonists, anticonvulsant activity, stereo­selectivity

  17. The novel non-imidazole histamine H3 receptor antagonist DL77 reduces voluntary alcohol intake and ethanol-induced conditioned place preference in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahi, Amine; Sadek, Bassem; Nurulain, Syed M; Łażewska, Dorota; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2015-11-01

    It has become clear that histamine H3 receptors (H3R) have been implicated in modulating ethanol intake and preference in laboratory animals. The novel non-imidazole H3R antagonist DL77 with excellent selectivity profile shows high in-vivo potency as well as in-vitro antagonist affinity with ED50 of 2.1 ± 0.2 mg/kg and pKi=8.08, respectively. In the present study, and applying an unlimited access two-bottle choice procedure, the anti-alcohol effects of the H3R antagonist, DL77 (0, 3, 10 and 30 mg/kg; i.p.), were investigated in adult mice. In this C57BL/6 line, effects of DL77 on voluntary alcohol intake and preference, as well as on total fluid intake were evaluated. Results have shown that DL77, dose-dependently, reduced both ethanol intake and preference. These effects were very selective as both saccharin and quinine, used to control for taste sensitivity, and intakes were not affected following DL77 pre-application. More importantly, systemic administration of DL77 (10 mg/kg) during acquisition inhibited ethanol-induced conditioned-place preference (EtOH-CPP) as measured using an unbiased protocol. The anti-alcohol activity observed for DL77 was abrogated when mice were pretreated with the selective H3R agonist R-(α)-methyl-histamine (RAMH) (10 mg/kg), or with the CNS penetrant H1R antagonist pyrilamine (PYR) (10mg/kg). These results suggest that DL77 has a predominant role in two in vivo effects of ethanol. Therefore, signaling via H3R is essential for ethanol-related consumption and conditioned reward and may represent a novel therapeutic pharmacological target to tackle ethanol abuse and alcoholism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Sex differences in the pharmacological treatment of hypertension : a review of population-based studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klungel, O.H.; de Boer, A; Paes, A.H.P.; Seidell, J C; Bakker, A

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize all available literature on sex differences in the pharmacological treatment of hypertension with respect to the percentage of hypertensive patients treated pharmacologically and the selection of antihypertensive drugs. The influences of the calendar period, age, definition

  19. Drug safety is a barrier to the discovery and development of new androgen receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, William R; Car, Bruce D; Shi, Hong; Levesque, Paul C; Obermeier, Mary T; Gan, Jinping; Arezzo, Joseph C; Powlin, Stephanie S; Dinchuk, Joseph E; Balog, Aaron; Salvati, Mark E; Attar, Ricardo M; Gottardis, Marco M

    2011-04-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) antagonists are part of the standard of care for prostate cancer. Despite the almost inevitable development of resistance in prostate tumors to AR antagonists, no new AR antagonists have been approved for over a decade. Treatment failure is due in part to mutations that increase activity of AR in response to lower ligand concentrations as well as to mutations that result in AR response to a broader range of ligands. The failure to discover new AR antagonists has occurred in the face of continued research; to enable progress, a clear understanding of the reasons for failure is required. Non-clinical drug safety studies and safety pharmacology assays were performed on previously approved AR antagonists (bicalutamide, flutamide, nilutamide), next generation antagonists in clinical testing (MDV3100, BMS-641988), and a pre-clinical drug candidate (BMS-501949). In addition, non-clinical studies with AR mutant mice, and EEG recordings in rats were performed. Non-clinical findings are compared to disclosures of clinical trial results. As a drug class, AR antagonists cause seizure in animals by an off-target mechanism and are found in vitro to inhibit GABA-A currents. Clinical trials of candidate next generation AR antagonists identify seizure as a clinical safety risk. Non-clinical drug safety profiles of the AR antagonist drug class create a significant barrier to the identification of next generation AR antagonists. GABA-A inhibition is a common off-target activity of approved and next generation AR antagonists potentially explaining some side effects and safety hazards of this class of drugs. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Assessment of Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacological Effect of Orally Administered CORT125134: An Adaptive, Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Phase 1 Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Hazel; Donaldson, Kirsteen; Strem, Mark; Zann, Vanessa; Leung, Pui; Sweet, Suzanne; Connor, Alyson; Combs, Dan; Belanoff, Joseph

    2018-05-01

    CORT125134 is an orally active, high-affinity, selective antagonist of the glucocorticoid receptor that is being developed for indications that may benefit from the modulation of cortisol activity. This first-in-human study was conducted to evaluate the dose-related safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacological effects of CORT125134 and its active metabolite CORT125201. Eighty-one healthy male or female subjects received a single dose of 5 to 500 mg CORT125134 or matching placebo across 9 cohorts; 1 cohort received 150 mg CORT125134 after a high-fat breakfast; and 46 subjects received 50 to 500 mg CORT125134 or matching placebo once daily for up to 14 days across 4 cohorts. CORT125134 was well tolerated at doses up to 250 mg per day for 14 days. CORT125134 was absorbed rapidly and eliminated with a mean half-life ranging from 11 to 19 hours. Steady state was achieved by day 7. Exposure increased in a greater than proportional manner, particularly at lower doses. Exposure to CORT125201 at steady state was less than 5% that of parent CORT125134. Evidence for the desired pharmacological effect (glucocorticoid receptor antagonism) was demonstrated by the ability of CORT125134 to prevent several effects of the glucocorticoid receptor agonist prednisone. © 2018 The Authors. Clinical Pharmacology in Drug Development Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  1. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Review: WNT/Frizzled signalling: receptor–ligand selectivity with focus on FZD-G protein signalling and its physiological relevance: IUPHAR Review 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijksterhuis, J P; Petersen, J; Schulte, G

    2014-01-01

    The wingless/int1 (WNT)/Frizzled (FZD) signalling pathway controls numerous cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, cell-fate decisions, migration and plays a crucial role during embryonic development. Nineteen mammalian WNTs can bind to 10 FZDs thereby activating different downstream pathways such as WNT/β-catenin, WNT/planar cell polarity and WNT/Ca2+. However, the mechanisms of signalling specification and the involvement of heterotrimeric G proteins are still unclear. Disturbances in the pathways can lead to various diseases ranging from cancer, inflammatory diseases to metabolic and neurological disorders. Due to the presence of seven-transmembrane segments, evidence for coupling between FZDs and G proteins and substantial structural differences in class A, B or C GPCRs, FZDs were grouped separately in the IUPHAR GPCR database as the class FZD within the superfamily of GPCRs. Recently, important progress has been made pointing to a direct activation of G proteins after WNT stimulation. WNT/FZD and G protein coupling remain to be fully explored, although the basic observation supporting the nature of FZDs as GPCRs is compelling. Because the involvement of different (i) WNTs; (ii) FZDs; and (iii) intracellular binding partners could selectively affect signalling specification, in this review we present the current understanding of receptor/ligand selectivity of FZDs and WNTs. We pinpoint what is known about signalling specification and the physiological relevance of these interactions with special emphasis on FZD–G protein interactions. LINKED ARTICLESThis article is part of a themed section on Molecular Pharmacology of GPCRs. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-5 PMID:24032637

  2. Delirium in the elderly: A systematic review of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília Carboni Tardelli Cerveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Delirium is a common disorder associated with poor prognosis, especially in the elderly. The impact of different treatment approaches for delirium on morbimortality and long-term welfare is not completely understood. OBJECTIVE: To determine the efficacy of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments in elderly patients with delirium. METHODS: This systematic review compared pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments in patients over 60 years old with delirium. Databases used were: MEDLINE (PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL and LILACS from inception to January 6th, 2016. RESULTS: A total of ten articles were selected. The six non-pharmacological intervention studies showed no impact on duration of delirium, mortality or institutionalization, but a decrease in severity of delirium and improvement in medium-term cognitive function were observed. The most commonly used interventions were temporal-spatial orientation, orientation to self and others, early mobilization and sleep hygiene. The four studies with pharmacological interventions found that rivastigmine reduced the duration of delirium, improved cognitive function and reduced caregiver burden; olanzapine and haloperidol decreased the severity of delirium; droperidol reduced length of hospitalization and improved delirium remission rate. CONCLUSION: Although the pharmacological approach has been used in the treatment of delirium among elderly, there have been few studies assessing its efficacy, involving a small number of patients. However, the improvements in delirium duration and severity suggest these drugs are effective in treating the condition. Once delirium has developed, non-pharmacological treatment seems less effective in controlling symptoms, and there is a lack of studies describing different non-pharmacological interventions.

  3. Pharmacological or genetic orexin 1 receptor inhibition attenuates MK-801 induced glutamate release in mouse cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah eAluisio

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The orexin/hypocretin neuropeptides are produced by a cluster of neurons within the lateral posterior hypothalamus and participate in neuronal regulation by activating their receptors (OX1 and OX2 receptors. The orexin system projects widely through the brain and functions as an interface between multiple regulatory systems including wakefulness, energy balance, stress, reward and emotion. Recent studies have demonstrated that orexins and glutamate interact at the synaptic level and that orexins facilitate glutamate actions. We tested the hypothesis that orexins modulate glutamate signaling via OX1 receptors by monitoring levels of glutamate in frontal cortex of freely moving mice using enzyme coated biosensors under inhibited OX1 receptor conditions. MK-801, an NMDA receptor antagonist, was administered subcutaneously (0.178 mg/kg to indirectly disinhibit pyramidal neurons and therefore increase cortical glutamate release. In wild-type mice, pretreatment with the OX1 receptor antagonist GSK-1059865 (10 mg/kg S.C. which had no effect by itself, significantly attenuated the cortical glutamate release elicited by MK-801. OX1 receptor knockout mice had a blunted glutamate release response to MK-801 and exhibited about half of the glutamate release observed in wild-type mice in agreement with the data obtained with transient blockade of OX1 receptors. These results indicate that pharmacological (transient or genetic (permanent inhibition of the OX1 receptor similarly interfere with glutamatergic function in the cortex. Selectively targeting the OX1 receptor with an antagonist may normalize hyperglutamatergic states and thus may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of various psychiatric disorders associated with hyperactive states.

  4. Pharmacological analysis of paregoric elixir and its constituents: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Edinéia Lemos; Ferreira, Juliano; Santos, Adair R S; Calixto, João B

    2007-11-01

    Paregoric elixir is a phytomedicinal product which is used widely as an analgesic, antispasmodic and antidiarrheal agent. Here, we investigated the pharmacological actions and some of the mechanisms of action of paregoric elixir and compared its action with some of its components, the alkaloids morphine and papaverine. The paregoric elixir given orally to mice did not present relevant toxic effects, even when administered in doses up to 2000-fold higher than those used clinically. However, it showed an antinociceptive action that was more potent, but less efficacious, than morphine. In contrast to morphine, its effect was not dose-dependent and not reversed by the non-selective opioid antagonist naloxone. Moreover, paregoric elixir produced tolerance, but did not cause cross-tolerance, with the antinociceptive actions of morphine. When assessed in the gastrointestinal motility in vivo, paregoric elixir elicited graduated reduction of gastrointestinal transit. Finally, like morphine and papaverine, paregoric elixir concentration-dependently inhibited electrically-induced contraction of the guinea pig isolated ileum. In vivo and in vitro gastrointestinal actions of paregoric elixir were not reversed by naloxone. Collectively, the present findings lead us to suggest that the pharmacological actions produced by paregoric elixir are probably due to a synergic action of its constituents.

  5. Pharmacological Investigation of Selected Medicinal Plants of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    noticeable decrease of exploratory behavior in the test animals from its initial value at 0 to 120 min (Table 2). The results were dose-dependent and significant at p < 0.05 level, At 30 min,. VNME (500 mg/ kg) and VNPE (250 mg/ kg) are significant compared to standard. At 60 min, all test samples are significant compared to.

  6. Pharmacological and non- pharmacological treatment of hypertension: A review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Seyedmazhari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypertension is a worldwide epidemic disease. It is more common and more severe in elderly persons. Various studies however have estimated 41.9 million men and 27.8 million women to have prehypertension. Diagnosis and early treatment of prehypertension are of utmost importance. Although hypertension is usually divided into 2 general categories of essential (primary and secondary hypertension, the initial treatment for hypertension often depends on its stage which is determined by systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Lifestyle modification is the first step in treating stage one hypertension. Pharmaceutical treatments including diuretics, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors, calcium blockers, beta blockers, and angiotensin receptor blockers will be recommended if lifestyle modification fails to control blood pressure.    METHODS: The PubMed database was searched by a number of keywords including hypertension, pharmaceutical treatment, and non-pharmaceutical treatment. The results were limited by determining a date range of 2008-11.    RESULTS: High blood pressure causes major health problems for many people around the world. It should be controlled because of its high mortality and morbidity. However, in order to select an appropriate treatment modality, it is initially important to diagnose the kinds and stages of hypertension. Pharmaceutical or non-pharmaceutical treatments can then be employed to control this serious disease.    CONCLUSION: Treating hypertension depends on the kinds and stages of this disease. Several tips should be considered when selecting a method of treatment.       Keywords: Hypertension, Pharmacological treatment, Non-pharmacological treatment

  7. Non Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancers - Current Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Ankur; Kumar, Kuldip; Anand, Kuljeet Singh

    2015-07-01

    Cognition refers to the mental processes involved in thinking, knowing, remembering, judging, and problem solving. Cognitive dysfunctions are an integral part of neuropsychiatric disorders as well as in healthy ageing. Cognitive Enhancers are molecules that help improve aspects of cognition like memory, intelligence, motivation, attention and concentration. Recently, Non Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancers have gained popularity as effective and safe alternative to various established drugs. Many of these Non Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancers seem to be more efficacious compared to currently available Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancers. This review describes and summarizes evidence on various Non Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancers such as physical exercise, sleep, meditation and yoga, spirituality, nutrients, computer training, brain stimulation, and music. We also discuss their role in ageing and different neuro-psychiatric disorders, and current status of Cochrane database recommendations. We searched the Pubmed database for the articles and reviews having the terms 'non pharmacological and cognitive' in the title, published from 2000 till 2014. A total of 11 results displayed, out of which 10 were relevant to the review. These were selected and reviewed. Appropriate cross-references within the articles along with Cochrane reviews were also considered and studied.

  8. Pharmacological screening technologies for venom peptide discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashanth, Jutty Rajan; Hasaballah, Nojod; Vetter, Irina

    2017-12-01

    Venomous animals occupy one of the most successful evolutionary niches and occur on nearly every continent. They deliver venoms via biting and stinging apparatuses with the aim to rapidly incapacitate prey and deter predators. This has led to the evolution of venom components that act at a number of biological targets - including ion channels, G-protein coupled receptors, transporters and enzymes - with exquisite selectivity and potency, making venom-derived components attractive pharmacological tool compounds and drug leads. In recent years, plate-based pharmacological screening approaches have been introduced to accelerate venom-derived drug discovery. A range of assays are amenable to this purpose, including high-throughput electrophysiology, fluorescence-based functional and binding assays. However, despite these technological advances, the traditional activity-guided fractionation approach is time-consuming and resource-intensive. The combination of screening techniques suitable for miniaturization with sequence-based discovery approaches - supported by advanced proteomics, mass spectrometry, chromatography as well as synthesis and expression techniques - promises to further improve venom peptide discovery. Here, we discuss practical aspects of establishing a pipeline for venom peptide drug discovery with a particular emphasis on pharmacology and pharmacological screening approaches. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Venom-derived Peptides as Pharmacological Tools.' Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Pharmacological interactions of vasoconstrictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Moreno, Gerardo; Guardia, Javier; Cutando, Antonio; Calvo-Guirado, José Luis

    2009-01-01

    This article is the first of a series on pharmacological interactions involving medicaments commonly prescribed and/or used in odontology: vasoconstrictors in local anaesthetics and anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial analgesics. The necessity for the odontologist to be aware of adverse reactions as a result of the pharmacological interactions is due to the increase in medicament consumption by the general population. There is a demographic change with greater life expectancy and patients have increased chronic health problems and therefore have increased medicament intake. The presence of adrenaline (epinephrine) and other vasoconstrictors in local odontological anaesthetics is beneficial in relation to the duration and depth of anaesthesia and reduces bleeding and systemic toxicity of the local anaesthetic. However, it might produce pharmacological interactions between the injected vasoconstrictors and the local anaesthetic and adrenergic medicament administered exogenically which the odontologist should be aware of, especially because of the risk of consequent adverse reactions. Therefore the importance of conducting a detailed clinical history of the general state of health and include all medicaments, legal as well as illegal, taken by the patient.

  10. Pharmacological effects of biotin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Mejia, Cristina

    2005-07-01

    In the last few decades, more vitamin-mediated effects have been discovered at the level of gene expression. Increasing knowledge on the molecular mechanisms of these vitamins has opened new perspectives that form a connection between nutritional signals and the development of new therapeutic agents. Besides its role as a carboxylase prosthetic group, biotin regulates gene expression and has a wide repertoire of effects on systemic processes. The vitamin regulates genes that are critical in the regulation of intermediary metabolism: Biotin has stimulatory effects on genes whose action favors hypoglycemia (insulin, insulin receptor, pancreatic and hepatic glucokinase); on the contrary, biotin decreases the expression of hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, a key gluconeogenic enzyme that stimulates glucose production by the liver. The findings that biotin regulates the expression of genes that are critical in the regulation of intermediary metabolism are in agreement with several observations that indicate that biotin supply is involved in glucose and lipid homeostasis. Biotin deficiency has been linked to impaired glucose tolerance and decreased utilization of glucose. On the other hand, the diabetic state appears to be ameliorated by pharmacological doses of biotin. Likewise, pharmacological doses of biotin appear to decrease plasma lipid concentrations and modify lipid metabolism. The effects of biotin on carbohydrate metabolism and the lack of toxic effects of the vitamin at pharmacological doses suggest that biotin could be used in the development of new therapeutics in the treatment of hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, an area that we are actively investigating.

  11. Nicotinic cholinergic antagonists: a novel approach for the treatment of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippiello, P M

    2006-01-01

    Evidence supports the hypothesis that normalization of cholinergic tone by selective antagonism of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (NNRs) may ameliorate the core symptoms of autism. As often is the case, epidemiology has provided the first important clues. It is well recognized that psychiatric patients are significantly more often smokers than the general population. The only known exceptions are obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), catatonic schizophrenia and interestingly, autism. In this regard, clinical studies with nicotine have demonstrated amelioration of symptoms of a number of diseases and disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, ADHD and Tourette's syndrome. Nicotine's agonist properties at CNS NNRs have been implicated in these effects and support the concept of self-medication as a strong motivation for smoking in cognitively compromised individuals. On the other hand, the inverse correlation between autism and smoking suggests that smoking does not provide symptomatic relief and may actually be indicative of an active avoidance of nicotine's agonist effects in this disorder. Neuroanatomical evidence is consistent with this idea based on the presence of hypercholinergic architecture in the autistic brain, particularly during the first few years of development, making the avoidance of further stimulation of an already hyperactive cholinergic system plausible. This may also explain why stimulants (known to increase dopamine levels as do NNR agonists) appear to aggravate autistic symptoms and why studies with cholinesterase inhibitors that increase acetylcholine levels in the brain have yielded variable effects in autism. Taken together, the evidence suggests the possibility that nicotinic cholinergic antagonism may in fact be palliative. Pharmacological evidence supports this hypothesis. For example, antidepressants, many of which are now known to be non-competitive NNR antagonists, have been used successfully to treat a

  12. Single dose silodosin prior to voiding cystourethrogram: a pharmacological adjunct to enhance visualization of posterior urethra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagathan, Deepak Sharanappa; Dalela, Divakar; Sankhwar, Satyanarayan; Goel, Apul; Dwivedi, Amod Kumar; Yadav, Rahul

    2014-03-04

    Voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) is needed to ascertain the upper end of urethral stricture. Occasionally, a patient is unable to open the bladder neck with resultant failure of the test. Realizing the strong and prompt alpha antagonistic action of silodosin, we evaluated single 8 mg dose as a pharmacological adjunct prior to VCUG to overcome this problem.

  13. Design, synthesis and biological activity of 6-substituted carbamoyl benzimidazoles as new nonpeptidic angiotensin II AT₁ receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Wang, Jin-Liang; Zhou, Zhi-Ming; Li, Zhi-Huai; Xue, Wei-Zhe; Xu, Di; Hao, Li-Ping; Han, Xiao-Feng; Fei, Fan; Liu, Ting; Liang, Ai-Hua

    2012-07-15

    A series of 6-substituted carbamoyl benzimidazoles were designed and synthesised as new nonpeptidic angiotensin II AT(1) receptor antagonists. The preliminary pharmacological evaluation revealed a nanomolar AT(1) receptor binding affinity for all compounds in the series, and a potent antagonistic activity in an isolated rabbit aortic strip functional assay for compounds 6f, 6g, 6h and 6k was also demonstrated. Furthermore, evaluation in spontaneous hypertensive rats and a preliminary toxicity evaluation showed that compound 6g is an orally active AT(1) receptor antagonist with low toxicity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Pharmacological management of acute myocardial infarction in the municipal district of Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Caminha Escosteguy

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: International studies have shown a large variation in the utilization patterns of interventions, in acute myocardial infarction. OBJECTIVE: To analyze utilization patterns of pharmacological interventions in acute myocardial infarction and their corresponding effects on hospital mortality. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. LOCAL: Hospitals of the Brazilian National Health System (SUS in the municipal district of Rio de Janeiro. SAMPLE: A stratified hospital sample of 391 medical records selected from the 1,936 admissions registered in the SUS Hospital Information System (SIH/SUS with a main diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction, in the studied district in 1997. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: Sex, age, time to treatment, risk factors, severity factors, diagnosis confirmation, use of pharmacological interventions, hospital death, contraindication of the use of thrombolytic therapy, contraindication of aspirin use. RESULTS: We reviewed 98.2% of the sampled medical records. Acute myocardial infarction diagnosis was confirmed in 91.7% (95% CI 88.3 to 94.2. 61.5% were men and 38.5% women, with an average age of 60.2 years (SD 2.4. The median time interval between symptom onset and hospital admission was 11 hours. Hospital mortality was 20.6% (95% CI 16.7 to 25.0. Intravenous thrombolytic therapy was used in 19.5% (95% CI 15.8 to 23.9 of the cases; aspirin in 86.5% (95% CI 82.5 to 89.6; beta-blockers in 49.0% (95% CI 43.8 to 54.1; angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors in 63.3% (95% CI 58.2 to 68.1; nitrates in 82.0% (95% CI 82.4 to 89.6; heparin in 81.3% (95% CI 76.9 to 85.0; calcium antagonists in 30.5% (95% CI 26.0 to 35.4. There was a significant variation in the use of thrombolytic therapy, beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors, calcium antagonists and heparin among hospitals of different juridical nature. CONCLUSIONS: There was underutilization of some interventions with well-established efficacy (thrombolytic therapy, aspirin, beta-blockers and

  15. Pharmacological Profile of Quinoxalinone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef Ramli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Quinoxalinone and its derivatives are used in organic synthesis for building natural and designed synthetic compounds and they have been frequently utilized as suitable skeletons for the design of biologically active compound. This review covers updated information on the most active quinoxalinone derivatives that have been reported to show considerable pharmacological actions such as antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, antiviral, antitumor, and antitubercular activity. It can act as an important tool for chemists to develop newer quinoxalinone derivatives that may prove to be better agents in terms of efficacy and safety.

  16. Pharmacological Profile of Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ Receptors Interacting with G-Proteins and β-Arrestins 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Malfacini

    Full Text Available Nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ controls several biological functions by selectively activating an opioid like receptor named N/OFQ peptide receptor (NOP. Biased agonism is emerging as an important and therapeutically relevant pharmacological concept in the field of G protein coupled receptors including opioids. To evaluate the relevance of this phenomenon in the NOP receptor, we used a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technology to measure the interactions of the NOP receptor with either G proteins or β-arrestin 2 in the absence and in presence of increasing concentration of ligands. A large panel of receptor ligands was investigated by comparing their ability to promote or block NOP/G protein and NOP/arrestin interactions. In this study we report a systematic analysis of the functional selectivity of NOP receptor ligands. NOP/G protein interactions (investigated in cell membranes allowed a precise estimation of both ligand potency and efficacy yielding data highly consistent with the known pharmacological profile of this receptor. The same panel of ligands displayed marked differences in the ability to promote NOP/β-arrestin 2 interactions (evaluated in whole cells. In particular, full agonists displayed a general lower potency and for some ligands an inverted rank order of potency was noted. Most partial agonists behaved as pure competitive antagonists of receptor/arrestin interaction. Antagonists displayed similar values of potency for NOP/Gβ1 or NOP/β-arrestin 2 interaction. Using N/OFQ as reference ligand we computed the bias factors of NOP ligands and a number of agonists with greater efficacy at G protein coupling were identified.

  17. The pharmacology of neurokinin receptors in addiction: prospects for therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandweiss AJ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Alexander J Sandweiss, Todd W VanderahDepartment of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USAAbstract: Addiction is a chronic disorder in which consumption of a substance or a habitual behavior becomes compulsive and often recurrent, despite adverse consequences. Substance p (SP is an undecapeptide and was the first neuropeptide of the neurokinin family to be discovered. The subsequent decades of research after its discovery implicated SP and its neurokinin relatives as neurotransmitters involved in the modulation of the reward pathway. Here, we review the neurokinin literature, giving a brief historical perspective of neurokinin pharmacology, localization in various brain regions involved in addictive behaviors, and the functional aspects of neurokinin pharmacology in relation to reward in preclinical models of addiction that have shaped the rational drug design of neurokinin antagonists that could translate into human research. Finally, we will cover the clinical investigations using neurokinin antagonists and discuss their potential as a therapy for drug abuse.Keywords: reward, substance p, alcohol, morphine, cocaine, dopamine

  18. Benzimidazoles as benzamide replacements within cyclohexane-based CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherney, Robert J; Mo, Ruowei; Meyer, Dayton T; Pechulis, Anthony D; Guaciaro, Michael A; Lo, Yvonne C; Yang, Gengjie; Miller, Persymphonie B; Scherle, Peggy A; Zhao, Qihong; Cvijic, Mary Ellen; Barrish, Joel C; Decicco, Carl P; Carter, Percy H

    2012-10-01

    We describe the design, synthesis, and evaluation of benzimidazoles as benzamide replacements within a series of trisubstituted cyclohexane CCR2 antagonists. 7-Trifluoromethylbenzimidazoles displayed potent binding and functional antagonism of CCR2 while being selective over CCR3. These benzimidazoles were also incorporated into lactam-containing antagonists, thus completely eliminating the customary bis-amide. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Maraviroc (UK-427,857), a Potent, Orally Bioavailable, and Selective Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Chemokine Receptor CCR5 with Broad-Spectrum Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Dorr, Patrick; Westby, Mike; Dobbs, Susan; Griffin, Paul; Irvine, Becky; Macartney, Malcolm; Mori, Julie; Rickett, Graham; Smith-Burchnell, Caroline; Napier, Carolyn; Webster, Rob; Armour, Duncan; Price, David; Stammen, Blanda; Wood, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    Maraviroc (UK-427,857) is a selective CCR5 antagonist with potent anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) activity and favorable pharmacological properties. Maraviroc is the product of a medicinal chemistry effort initiated following identification of an imidazopyridine CCR5 ligand from a high-throughput screen of the Pfizer compound file. Maraviroc demonstrated potent antiviral activity against all CCR5-tropic HIV-1 viruses tested, including 43 primary isolates from various clades a...

  20. The reversible P2Y12 antagonist ACT-246475 causes significantly less blood loss than ticagrelor at equivalent antithrombotic efficacy in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Markus; Kramberg, Markus; Hess, Patrick; Morrison, Keith; Ernst, Roland; Haag, Franck; Weber, Edgar; Clozel, Martine; Baumann, Martine; Caroff, Eva; Hubler, Francis; Riederer, Markus A; Steiner, Beat

    2017-10-01

    The P2Y 12 receptor is a validated target for prevention of major adverse cardiovascular events in patients with acute coronary syndrome. The aim of this study was to compare two direct-acting, reversible P2Y 12 antagonists, ACT-246475 and ticagrelor, in a rat thrombosis model by simultaneous quantification of their antithrombotic efficacy and surgery-induced blood loss. Blood flow velocity was assessed in the carotid artery after FeCl 3 -induced thrombus formation using a Doppler flow probe. At the same time, blood loss after surgical wounding of the spleen was quantified. Continuous infusions of ACT-246475 and ticagrelor prevented the injury-induced reduction of blood flow in a dose-dependent manner. High doses of both antagonists normalized blood flow and completely abolished thrombus formation as confirmed by histology. Intermediate doses restored baseline blood flow to ≥65%. However, ACT-246475 caused significantly less increase of blood loss than ticagrelor; the difference in blood loss was 2.6-fold (P ACT-246475 and ticagrelor on vascular tone. At concentrations needed to achieve maximal antithrombotic efficacy, ticagrelor compared with ACT-246475 significantly increased carotid blood flow velocity in vivo (P = 0.003), induced vasorelaxation of precontracted rat femoral arteries, and inhibited contraction of femoral artery induced by electrical field stimulation or by phenylephrine. Overall, ACT-246475 showed a significantly wider therapeutic window than ticagrelor. The absence of vasodilatory effects due to high selectivity of ACT-246475 for P2Y 12 provides potential arguments for the observed safety advantage of ACT-246475 over ticagrelor. © 2017 The Authors. Pharmacology Research & Perspectives published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd, British Pharmacological Society and American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  1. PARTIAL AGONISTS, FULL AGONISTS, ANTAGONISTS - DILEMMAS OF DEFINITION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HOYER, D; BODDEKE, HWGM

    The absence of selective antagonists makes receptor characterization difficult, and largely dependent on the use of agonists. However, there has been considerable debate as to whether certain drugs acting at G protein-coupled receptors are better described as agonists, partial agonists or

  2. Excitatory amino acid receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, T N; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Ebert, B

    1997-01-01

    We have previously shown that (RS)-2-amino-2-(5-tert-butyl-3-hydroxyisoxazol-4-yl)acetic acid (ATAA) is an antagonist at N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) and (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptors. We have now resolved ATAA via diastereomeric salt formation......)-phenylethylamine salt of N-BOC-(R)-ATAA. Like ATAA, neither (R)- nor (S)-ATAA significantly affected (IC50 > 100 microM) the receptor binding of tritiated AMPA, kainic acid, or (RS)-3-(2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)propyl-1-phosphonic acid, the latter being a competitive NMDA antagonist. Electrophysiological experiments......, using the rat cortical wedge preparation, showed the NMDA antagonist effect as well as the AMPA antagonist effect of ATAA to reside exclusively in the (R)-enantiomer (Ki = 75 +/- 5 microM and 57 +/- 1 microM, respectively). Neither (R)- nor (S)-ATAA significantly reduced kainic acid-induced excitation...

  3. Synthesis and evaluation of radioiodinated NPC 22009, a putative CRF receptor antagonist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, V.; Hiner, R.N.; Mavunkel, B.J.; Elliott, R.L.; Abreu, M.E.

    1992-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) plays a role in stress-related disorders such as anxiety, depression, anorexia nervosa and stress-induced immune suppression. Hence CRF antagonists have potential therapeutic utility. Recently the authors discovered that pyrazolones such as NPC 22009 and the corresponding disulfide behave as CRF antagonists in vitro with micromolar potency. To probe the nature of this CRF antagonism they developed a convenient synthesis of radioiodinated NPC 22009. Details of the synthesis and preliminary pharmacological studies are presented

  4. Nematode cholinergic pharmacology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segerberg, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Nematode acetylcholine (ACh) receptors were characterized using both biochemical and electrophysiological techniques, including: (1) receptor binding studies in crude homogenates of the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the parasitic nematode Ascaris lumbricoides with the high-affinity probe [ 3 H]N-methylscopolamine ([ 3 H]NMS) which binds to muscarinic receptors in many vertebrate and invertebrate tissues (2) measurement of depolarization and contraction induced by a variety of cholinergic agents, including N-methylscopolamine (NMS), in an innervated dorsal muscle strip preparation of Ascaris; (3) examination of the antagonistic actions of d-tubocurarine (dTC) and NMS at dorsal neuromuscular junction; (4) measurement of input resistance changes in Ascaris commissural motorneurons induced by ACh, dTC, NMS, pilocarpine and other cholinergic drugs

  5. Progress in the development of histamine H3 receptor antagonists/inverse agonists: a patent review (2013-2017).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łażewska, Dorota; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2018-03-01

    Since years, ligands blocking histamine H 3 receptor (H 3 R) activity (antagonists/inverse agonists) are interesting targets in the search for new cures for CNS disorders. Intensive works done by academic and pharmaceutical company researchers have led to many potent and selective H 3 R antagonists/inverse agonists. Some of them have reached to clinical trials. Areas covered: Patent applications from January 2013 to September 2017 and the most important topics connected with H 3 R field are analysed. Espacenet, Patentscope, Pubmed, GoogleScholar or Cochrane Library online databases were principially used to collect all the materials. Expert opinion: The research interest in histamine H 3 R field is still high although the number of patent applications has decreased during the past 4 years (around 20 publications). Complexity of histamine H 3 R biology e.g. many isoforms, constitutive activity, heteromerization with other receptors (dopamine D 2 , D 1 , adenosine A 2A ) and pharmacology make not easy realization and evaluation of therapeutic potential of anti-H 3 R ligands. First results from clinical trials have verified potential utility of histamine H 3 R antagonist/inverse agonists in some diseases. However, more studies are necessary for better understanding of an involvement of the histaminergic system in CNS-related disorders and helping more ligands approach to clinical trials and the market. Lists of abbreviations: hAChEI - human acetylcholinesterase inhibitor; hBuChEI - human butyrylcholinesterase inhibitor; hMAO - human monoamine oxidase; MAO - monoamine oxidase.

  6. Antiallergic effects of H1-receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroody, F M; Naclerio, R M

    2000-01-01

    The primary mechanism of antihistamine action in the treatment of allergic diseases is believed to be competitive antagonism of histamine binding to cellular receptors (specifically, the H1-receptors), which are present on nerve endings, smooth muscles, and glandular cells. This notion is supported by the fact that structurally unrelated drugs antagonize the H1-receptor and provide clinical benefit. However, H1-receptor antagonism may not be their sole mechanism of action in treating allergic rhinitis. On the basis of in vitro and animal experiments, drugs classified as H1-receptor antagonists have long been recognized to have additional pharmacological properties. Most first-generation H1-antihistamines have anticholinergic, sedative, local anaesthetic, and anti-5-HT effects, which might favourably affect the symptoms of the allergic response but also contribute to side-effects. These additional properties are not uniformly distributed among drugs classified as H1-receptor antagonists. Azatadine, for example, inhibits in vitro IgE-mediated histamine and leukotriene (LT) release from mast cells and basophils. In human challenge models, terfenadine, azatadine, and loratadine reduce IgE-mediated histamine release. Cetirizine reduces eosinophilic infiltration at the site of antigen challenge in the skin, but not the nose. In a nasal antigen challenge model, cetirizine pretreatment did not affect the levels of histamine and prostaglandin D2 recovered in postchallenge lavages, whereas the levels of albumin, N-tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester (TAME) esterase activity, and LTs were reduced. Terfenadine, cetirizine, and loratadine blocked allergen-induced hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. In view of the complexity of the pathophysiology of allergy, a number of H1 antagonists with additional properties are currently under development for allergic diseases. Mizolastine, a new H1-receptor antagonist, has been shown to have additional actions that should help reduce the

  7. Potential Activity of Fevicordin-A from Phaleria macrocarpa (Scheff Boerl. Seeds as Estrogen Receptor Antagonist Based on Cytotoxicity and Molecular Modelling Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muchtaridi Muchtaridi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Fevicordin-A (FevA isolated from Phaleria macrocarpa (Scheff Boerl. seeds was evaluated for its potential anticancer activity by in vitro and in silico approaches. Cytotoxicity studies indicated that FevA was selective against cell lines of human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7 with an IC50 value of 6.4 µM. At 11.2 µM, FevA resulted in 76.8% cell death of T-47D human breast cancer cell lines. Critical pharmacophore features amongst human Estrogen Receptor-α (hERα antagonists were conserved in FevA with regard to a hypothesis that they could make notable contributions to its pharmacological activity. The binding stability as well as the dynamic behavior of FevA towards the hERα receptor in agonist and antagonist binding sites were probed using molecular dynamics (MD simulation approach. Analysis of MD simulation suggested that the tail of FevA was accountable for the repulsion of the C-terminal of Helix-11 (H11 in both agonist and antagonist receptor forms. The flexibility of loop-534 indicated the ability to disrupt the hydrogen bond zipper network between H3 and H11 in hERα. In addition, MM/GBSA calculation from the molecular dynamic simulations also revealed a stronger binding affinity of FevA in antagonistic action as compared to that of agonistic action. Collectively, both the experimental and computational results indicated that FevA has potential as a candidate for an anticancer agent, which is worth promoting for further preclinical evaluation.

  8. Importance of the pharmacological profile of the bound ligand in enrichment on nuclear receptors: toward the use of experimentally validated decoy ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagarde, Nathalie; Zagury, Jean-François; Montes, Matthieu

    2014-10-27

    The evaluation of virtual ligand screening methods is of major importance to ensure their reliability. Taking into account the agonist/antagonist pharmacological profile should improve the quality of the benchmarking data sets since ligand binding can induce conformational changes in the nuclear receptor structure and such changes may vary according to the agonist/antagonist ligand profile. We indeed found that splitting the agonist and antagonist ligands into two separate data sets for a given nuclear receptor target significantly enhances the quality of the evaluation. The pharmacological profile of the ligand bound in the binding site of the target structure was also found to be an additional critical parameter. We also illustrate that active compound data sets for a given pharmacological activity can be used as a set of experimentally validated decoy ligands for another pharmacological activity to ensure a reliable and challenging evaluation of virtual screening methods.

  9. Antagonist-agonist combinations as therapies for heroin addiction: back to the future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, David J

    2010-02-01

    Psychopharmacology is a powerful approach to the treatment of many psychiatric disorders. In this article I discuss the conceptual and practical issues in relation to the use of mu opioid receptor agonist, antagonist and partial agonist drugs in the treatment of opioid addiction, as this is one therapeutic area where all three types of agents are currently available. The choice of pharmacological agent is largely determined by patient profile, existence of ongoing drug misuse, and the kinetics of the drugs available. These principles, however, can be applied to other disorders as and when other pharmacological approaches become refined in these areas.

  10. Human microdose evaluation of the novel EP1 receptor antagonist GSK269984A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostenfeld, Thor; Beaumont, Claire; Bullman, Jonathan; Beaumont, Maria; Jeffrey, Phillip

    2012-12-01

    The primary objective was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics (PK) of the novel EP(1) antagonist GSK269984A in human volunteers after a single oral and intravenous (i.v.) microdose (100 µg). GSK269984A was administered to two groups of healthy human volunteers as a single oral (n= 5) or i.v. (n= 5) microdose (100 µg). Blood samples were collected for up to 24 h and the parent drug concentrations were measured in separated plasma using a validated high pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method following solid phase extraction. Following the i.v. microdose, the geometric mean values for clearance (CL), steady-state volume of distribution (V(ss) ) and terminal elimination half-life (t(1/2) ) of GSK269984A were 9.8 l h(-1) , 62.8 l and 8.2 h. C(max) and AUC(0,∞) were 3.2 ng ml(-1) and 10.2 ng ml(-1)  h, respectively; the corresponding oral parameters were 1.8 ng ml(-1) and 9.8 ng ml(-1)  h, respectively. Absolute oral bioavailability was estimated to be 95%. These data were inconsistent with predictions of human PK based on allometric scaling of in vivo PK data from three pre-clinical species (rat, dog and monkey). For drug development programmes characterized by inconsistencies between pre-clinical in vitro metabolic and in vivo PK data, and where uncertainty exists with respect to allometric predictions of the human PK profile, these data support the early application of a human microdose study to facilitate the selection of compounds for further clinical development. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  11. Pharmacological therapy for amblyopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Amblyopia is the most common cause of preventable blindness in children and young adults. Most of the amblyopic visual loss is reversible if detected and treated at appropriate time. It affects 1.0 to 5.0% of the general population. Various treatment modalities have been tried like refractive correction, patching (both full time and part time, penalization and pharmacological therapy. Refractive correction alone improves visual acuity in one third of patients with anisometropic amblyopia. Various drugs have also been tried of which carbidopa & levodopa have been popular. Most of these agents are still in experimental stage, though levodopa-carbidopa combination therapy has been widely studied in human amblyopes with good outcomes. Levodopa therapy may be considered in cases with residual amblyopia, although occlusion therapy remains the initial treatment choice. Regression of effect after stoppage of therapy remains a concern. Further studies are therefore needed to evaluate the full efficacy and side effect profile of these agents.

  12. Pharmacological therapy for amblyopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anupam; Nagpal, Ritu; Mittal, Sanjeev Kumar; Bahuguna, Chirag; Kumar, Prashant

    2017-01-01

    Amblyopia is the most common cause of preventable blindness in children and young adults. Most of the amblyopic visual loss is reversible if detected and treated at appropriate time. It affects 1.0 to 5.0% of the general population. Various treatment modalities have been tried like refractive correction, patching (both full time and part time), penalization and pharmacological therapy. Refractive correction alone improves visual acuity in one third of patients with anisometropic amblyopia. Various drugs have also been tried of which carbidopa & levodopa have been popular. Most of these agents are still in experimental stage, though levodopa-carbidopa combination therapy has been widely studied in human amblyopes with good outcomes. Levodopa therapy may be considered in cases with residual amblyopia, although occlusion therapy remains the initial treatment choice. Regression of effect after stoppage of therapy remains a concern. Further studies are therefore needed to evaluate the full efficacy and side effect profile of these agents. PMID:29018759

  13. Ac-Trp-DPhe(p-I)-Arg-Trp-NH2, a 250-Fold Selective Melanocortin-4 Receptor (MC4R) Antagonist over the Melanocortin-3 Receptor (MC3R), Affects Energy Homeostasis in Male and Female Mice Differently.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lensing, Cody J; Adank, Danielle N; Doering, Skye R; Wilber, Stacey L; Andreasen, Amy; Schaub, Jay W; Xiang, Zhimin; Haskell-Luevano, Carrie

    2016-09-21

    The melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) has been indicated as a therapeutic target for metabolic disorders such as anorexia, cachexia, and obesity. The current study investigates the in vivo effects on energy homeostasis of a 15 nM MC4R antagonist SKY2-23-7, Ac-Trp-DPhe(p-I)-Arg-Trp-NH2, that is a 3700 nM melanocortin-3 receptor (MC3R) antagonist with minimal MC3R and MC4R agonist activity. When monitoring both male and female mice in TSE metabolic cages, sex-specific responses were observed in food intake, respiratory exchange ratio (RER), and energy expenditure. A 7.5 nmol dose of SKY2-23-7 increased food intake, increased RER, and trended toward decreasing energy expenditure in male mice. However, this compound had minimal effect on female mice's food intake and RER at the 7.5 nmol dose. A 2.5 nmol dose of SKY2-23-7 significantly increased female food intake, RER, and energy expenditure while having a minimal effect on male mice at this dose. The observed sex differences of SKY2-23-7 administration result in the discovery of a novel chemical probe for elucidating the molecular mechanisms of the sexual dimorphism present within the melanocortin pathway. To further explore the melanocortin sexual dimorphism, hypothalamic gene expression was examined. The mRNA expression of the MC3R and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) were not significantly different between sexes. However, the expression of agouti-related peptide (AGRP) was significantly higher in female mice which may be a possible mechanism for the sex-specific effects observed with SKY2-23-7.

  14. In vivo binding, pharmacokinetics and metabolism of the selective M2 muscarinic antagonists [3H]AF-DX 116 and [3H]AF-DX 384 in the anesthetized rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mickala, Patrick; Boutin, Herve; Bellanger, Cecile; Chevalier, Cyril; MacKenzie, Eric T.; Dauphin, Francois

    1996-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics, in vivo binding and metabolism of two M 2 muscarinic receptor antagonists, [ 3 H]AF-DX 116 and [ 3 H]AF-DX 384, were studied in anesthetized rats, which received either the tracer alone or following a saturating injection of atropine. Both radioligands were cleared from the circulation with distribution half-lives of 17 and 14 sec and elimination half-lives of 17 and 40 min for [ 3 H]AF-DX 116 and [ 3 H]AF-DX 384, respectively. A radioactive distribution, predominant in peripheral organs when compared to brain, was found at each time studied after tracer injection. Atropine-displaceable tracer uptake was evidenced at 20-40 min in brain (31%), submandibular glands (26%), spleen (37%) and notably heart (55%) for [ 3 H]AF-DX 116 but only in heart (50%) for [ 3 H]AF-DX 384 at 10-20 min. Regional brain sampling revealed a relatively uniform distribution of [ 3 H]AF-DX 384 and a -45% atropine saturation effect (i.e., specific binding) in the thalamus 20 min after injection. Sequential thin-layer chromatographic studies performed on tissue extracts demonstrated the rapid appearance of labeled metabolites of both radiotracers in brain (but less so in liver) and especially in cardiac tissues, where almost 70% of total radioactivity still corresponded to authentic tracer 40 min after injection. Thus, based on their low blood-brain barrier permeability and the high presence of labeled metabolites in the central nervous system, AF-DX 116 and AF-DX 384 might be more helpful in the study of M 2 muscarinic receptors present in heart rather than brain. Labeled with positron emittors, these M 2 antagonists might be applicable to the pathophysiological study of disease states, such as cardiomyopathies

  15. Endothelin receptor antagonists influence cardiovascular morphology in uremic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabokov, A V; Amann, K; Wessels, S; Münter, K; Wagner, J; Ritz, E

    1999-02-01

    In is generally held that renal failure results in blood pressure (BP)-independent structural changes of the myocardium and the vasculature. The contribution, if any, of endothelin (ET) to these changes has been unknown. We morphometrically studied random samples of the left ventricle myocardium and small intramyocardial arteries in subtotally (5/6) nephrectomized (SNx) male Sprague-Dawley rats treated with either the selective ETA receptor antagonist BMS182874 (30 mg/kg/day) or the nonselective ETA/ETB receptor antagonist Ro46-2005 (30 mg/kg/day) in comparison with either sham-operated rats, untreated SNx, or SNx rats treated with the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor trandolapril (0.1 mg/kg/day). Eight weeks later, systolic BP was lower in trandolapril-treated SNx compared with untreated SNx animals. No decrease in BP was seen following either ET receptor antagonist at the dose used. A significantly increased volume density of the myocardial interstitium was found in untreated SNx rats as compared with sham-operated controls. Such interstitial expansion was prevented by trandolapril and either ET receptor antagonist. SNx caused a substantial increase in the wall thickness of small intramyocardial arteries. The increase was prevented by trandolapril or BMS182874 treatment. The arteriolar wall:lumen ratio was significantly lower in all treated groups when compared with untreated SNx. In contrast, only trandolapril, but not the ET receptor antagonists, attenuated thickening of the aortic media in SNx animals. The ETA-selective and ETA/ETB-nonselective receptor antagonists appear to prevent development of myocardial fibrosis and structural changes of small intramyocardial arteries in experimental chronic renal failure. This effect is independent of systemic BP.

  16. CC12, a high-affinity ligand for [3H]cimetidine binding, is an improgan antagonist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hough, L.H.; Nalwalk, J.B.; Phillips, J.R.; Kern, B.; Shan, Z.; Wentland, M.; de Esch, I.J.P.; Janssen, EA; Barr, T.; Stadel, R.

    2007-01-01

    Improgan, a chemical congener of cimetidine, is a highly effective non-opioid analgesic when injected into the CNS. Despite extensive characterization, neither the improgan receptor, nor a pharmacological antagonist of improgan has been previously described. Presently, the specific binding of [

  17. Orexin receptor antagonists as therapeutic agents for insomnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Clementina Equihua

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Insomnia is a common clinical condition characterized by difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep, or non-restorative sleep with impairment of daytime functioning.Currently, treatment for insomnia involves a combination of cognitive behavioral therapy and pharmacological therapy. Among pharmacological interventions, the most evidence exists for benzodiazepine receptor agonist drugs (GABAA receptor, although concerns persist regarding their safety and their limited efficacy. The use of these hypnotic medications must be carefully monitored for adverse effects.Orexin (hypocretin neuropeptides have been shown to regulate transitions between wakefulness and sleep by promoting cholinergic/monoaminergic neural pathways. This has led to the development of a new class of pharmacological agents that antagonize the physiological effects of orexin. The development of these agents may lead to novel therapies for insomnia without the side effect profile of hypnotics (e.g. impaired cognition, disturbed arousal, and motor balance difficulties. However, antagonizing a system that regulates the sleep-wake cycle may create an entirely different side effect profile. In this review, we discuss the role of orexin and its receptors on the sleep-wake cycle and that of orexin antagonists in the treatment of insomnia.

  18. Physiological and Pharmacological Aspects of the Vas Deferens - an Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Stewart Koslov

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The vas deferens, a muscular conduit conveying spermatozoa from the epididymis to the urethra, has been used as a model tissue for smooth muscle pharmacological and physiological advancements. Many drugs, notably α-adrenergic antagonists, have effects on contractility and thus normal ejaculation, incurring significant side effects for patients that may interfere with compliance. A more thorough understanding of the innervation and neurotransmitter pharmacology of the vas has indicated that this is a highly complex structure and a model for co-transmission at the synapse. Recent models have shown clinical scenarios that alter the vas contraction. This review covers structure, receptors, neurotransmitters, smooth muscle physiology, and clinical implications of the vas deferens.

  19. Process Pharmacology: A Pharmacological Data Science Approach to Drug Development and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lötsch, Jörn; Ultsch, Alfred

    2016-04-01

    A novel functional-genomics based concept of pharmacology that uses artificial intelligence techniques for mining and knowledge discovery in "big data" providing comprehensive information about the drugs' targets and their functional genomics is proposed. In "process pharmacology", drugs are associated with biological processes. This puts the disease, regarded as alterations in the activity in one or several cellular processes, in the focus of drug therapy. In this setting, the molecular drug targets are merely intermediates. The identification of drugs for therapeutic or repurposing is based on similarities in the high-dimensional space of the biological processes that a drug influences. Applying this principle to data associated with lymphoblastic leukemia identified a short list of candidate drugs, including one that was recently proposed as novel rescue medication for lymphocytic leukemia. The pharmacological data science approach provides successful selections of drug candidates within development and repurposing tasks. © 2016 The Authors CPT: Pharmacometrics & Systems Pharmacology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  20. Pharmacology of antihistamines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin K Church

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available H 1- antihistamines, the mainstay of treatment for urticaria, were developed from anticholinergic drugs more than 70 years ago. They act as inverse agonists rather than antagonists of histamine H 1 -receptors which are members of the G-protein family. The older first generation H 1- antihistamines penetrate readily into the brain to cause sedation, drowsiness, fatigue and impaired concentration and memory causing detrimental effects on learning and examination performance in children and on impairment of the ability of adults to work and drive. Their use should be discouraged. The newer second-generation H 1 -antihistamines are safer, cause less sedation and are more efficacious. Three drugs widely used for symptomatic relief in urticaria, desloratadine, levocetirizine and fexofenadine are highlighted in this review. Of these levocetirizine and fexofenadine are the most potent in humans in vivo. However, levocetirizine may cause somnolence in susceptible individuals, whereas fexofenadine has a relatively short duration of action and may be required to be given twice daily for all round daily protection. Although desloratadine is less potent, it has the advantages of rarely causing somnolence and having a long duration of action.

  1. Striatal pre- and postsynaptic profile of adenosine A(2A receptor antagonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Orru

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Striatal adenosine A(2A receptors (A(2ARs are highly expressed in medium spiny neurons (MSNs of the indirect efferent pathway, where they heteromerize with dopamine D(2 receptors (D(2Rs. A(2ARs are also localized presynaptically in cortico-striatal glutamatergic terminals contacting MSNs of the direct efferent pathway, where they heteromerize with adenosine A(1 receptors (A(1Rs. It has been hypothesized that postsynaptic A(2AR antagonists should be useful in Parkinson's disease, while presynaptic A(2AR antagonists could be beneficial in dyskinetic disorders, such as Huntington's disease, obsessive-compulsive disorders and drug addiction. The aim or this work was to determine whether selective A(2AR antagonists may be subdivided according to a preferential pre- versus postsynaptic mechanism of action. The potency at blocking the motor output and striatal glutamate release induced by cortical electrical stimulation and the potency at inducing locomotor activation were used as in vivo measures of pre- and postsynaptic activities, respectively. SCH-442416 and KW-6002 showed a significant preferential pre- and postsynaptic profile, respectively, while the other tested compounds (MSX-2, SCH-420814, ZM-241385 and SCH-58261 showed no clear preference. Radioligand-binding experiments were performed in cells expressing A(2AR-D(2R and A(1R-A(2AR heteromers to determine possible differences in the affinity of these compounds for different A(2AR heteromers. Heteromerization played a key role in the presynaptic profile of SCH-442416, since it bound with much less affinity to A(2AR when co-expressed with D(2R than with A(1R. KW-6002 showed the best relative affinity for A(2AR co-expressed with D(2R than co-expressed with A(1R, which can at least partially explain the postsynaptic profile of this compound. Also, the in vitro pharmacological profile of MSX-2, SCH-420814, ZM-241385 and SCH-58261 was is in accordance with their mixed pre- and postsynaptic profile

  2. 5-HT6 receptor antagonist attenuates the memory deficits associated with neuropathic pain and improves the efficacy of gabapentinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayarajan, Pradeep; Nirogi, Ramakrishna; Shinde, Anil; Goura, Venkatesh; Babu, Vuyyuru Arun; Yathavakilla, Sumanth; Bhyrapuneni, Gopinadh

    2015-10-01

    Memory deficit is a co-morbid disorder in patients suffering from neuropathic pain. Gabapentin and pregabalin (gabapentinoids) are among the widely prescribed medications for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Memory loss and sedation are the commonly reported side effects with gabapentinoids. Improving the cognitive functions and attenuating drug-induced side effects may play a crucial role in the management of pain. We evaluated the effects of 5-HT6 receptor antagonists on the memory deficits associated with neuropathy. We also studied the effects of 5-HT6 receptor antagonists on the side effects, and the analgesic effects of gabapentinoids. 5-HT6 receptor antagonists attenuated the cognitive deficits in neuropathic rats. Neuropathic rats co-treated with 5-HT6 receptor antagonist and gabapentinoids showed improvement in memory. 5-HT6 receptor antagonists enhanced the analgesic effects of gabapentinoids but had no effect on the motor side effects. The observed effects may not be due to pharmacokinetic interactions. 5-HT6 receptor antagonist attenuate the cognitive deficits associated with neuropathy, and this effect is also seen when co-treated with gabapentinoids. Since, 5-HT6 antagonists improved the effectiveness of gabapentinoids, reduction in the dosage and frequency of gabapentinoids treatment may reduce the side effects. Combining 5-HT6 receptor antagonist with gabapentinoids may offer a novel treatment strategy for neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  3. Sympatholytic properties of several AT(1)-receptor antagonists in the isolated rabbit thoracic aorta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nap, Alexander; Balt, Jippe C.; Pfaffendorf, Martin; van Zwieten, Pieter A.

    2002-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the facilitating effect of angiotensin II on sympathetic neurotransmission to quantitatively compare the sympatho-inhibitory potencies of the selective AT(1)-receptor antagonists losartan, irbesartan and telmisartan in the isolated rabbit thoracic aorta. Design To investigate

  4. The Role of Pharmacology in Ureteral Physiology and Expulsive Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerde, Travis J.; Nakada, Stephen Y.

    2007-04-01

    Research in the field of ureteral physiology and pharmacology has traditionally been directed toward relaxation of ureteral spasm as a mechanism of analgesia during painful ureteral obstruction, most often stone-induced episodes. However, interest in this field has expanded greatly in recent years with the expanded use of alpha-blocker therapy for inducing stone passage, a usage now termed "medical expulsive therapy". While most clinical reports involving expulsive therapy have focused on alpha receptor or calcium channel blockade, there are diverse studies investigating pharmacological ureteral relaxation with novel agents including cyclooxygenase inhibitors, small molecule beta receptor agonists, neurokinin antagonists, and phosphodiesterase inhibitors. In addition, cutting edge molecular biology research is revealing promising potential therapeutic targets aimed at specific molecular changes that occur during the acute obstruction that accompanies stone disease. The purpose of this report is to review the use of pharmacological agents as ureteral smooth muscle relaxants clinically, and to look into the future of expulsive therapy by reviewing the available literature of ureteral physiology and pharmacology research.

  5. 99mTc-labeling of Peptidomimetic Antagonist to Selectively Target αvβ3 Receptor-Positive Tumor: Comparison of PDA and EDDA as co-Ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, In Soo; Maeng, Jin Soo; Jang, Beom-Su; You, Eric; Cheng, Kenneth; Li, King C.P; Wood, Bradford; Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Danthi, S. Narasimhan; Paik, Chang H.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this research was to synthesize radiolabeled peptidomimetic integrin αvβ3 antagonist with 99mTc for rapid targeting of integrin αvβ3 receptors in tumor to produce a high tumor to background ratio. Methods The amino terminus of 4-[2-(3,4,5,6-tetra-hydropyrimidin-2-ylamino)-ethyloxy]benzoyl-2-(S)-[N-(3-amino-neopenta-1-carbamyl)]-aminoethylsulfonyl-amino-β-alanine hydrochloride (IAC) was conjugated with N-hydroxysuccinimide ester of HYNIC and labeled with 99mTc using tricine with either 1,5-pyridinedicarboxylic acid (PDA) or ethylenediamine-N,N′-diacetic acid (EDDA) as the co-ligand. The products, 99mTc EDDA2/HYNIC-IAC (P1) and 99mTc PDA (tricin)/HYNIC-IAC (P2) were subjected to in vitro serum stability, receptor-binding, biodistribution and imaging studies. Results P1 and P2 were synthesized with an overall yield of >80%. P1 was slightly more stable than P2 when incubated in serum at 37 °C for 18 hrs (84 vs 77% intact). The In vitro receptor-binding of P1 was higher than that of P2 (78.02 ± 13.48 vs 51.05 ± 14.05%) when incubated with αvβ3 at a molar excess (0.8 μM). This receptor binding was completely blocked by a molar excess of an unlabeled peptidomimetic antagonist. Their differences shown in serum stability and the receptor-binding appeared to be related to their biological behaviors in tumor uptake and retention; the 1 h tumor uptakes of P1 and P2 were 3.17±0.52 and 2.13±0.17 % ID/g, respectively. P1 was retained in the tumor longer than P2. P1 was excreted primarily through the renal system whereas P2 complex was excreted equally via both renal and hepatobiliary systems. Thus, P1 was retained in the whole-body with 27.25 ± 3.67% ID at 4 h whereas 54.04 ± 3.57% ID of P2 remained in the whole-body at 4 h. This higher whole-body retention of P2 appeared to be resulted from a higher amount of radioactivity retained in liver and intestine. These findings were supported by imaging studies showing higher tumor

  6. Characterisation of endogenous A2A and A2B receptor-mediated cyclic AMP responses in HEK 293 cells using the GloSensor™ biosensor: Evidence for an allosteric mechanism of action for the A2B-selective antagonist PSB 603.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulding, Joelle; May, Lauren T; Hill, Stephen J

    2018-01-01

    Endogenous adenosine A 2B receptors (A 2B AR) mediate cAMP accumulation in HEK 293 cells. Here we have used a biosensor to investigate the mechanism of action of the A 2B AR antagonist PSB 603 in HEK 293 cells. The A 2A agonist CGS 21680 elicited a small response in these cells (circa 20% of that obtained with NECA), suggesting that they also contain a small population of A 2A receptors. The responses to NECA and adenosine were antagonised by PSB 603, but not by the selective A 2A AR antagonist SCH 58261. In contrast, CGS 21680 responses were not antagonised by high concentrations of PSB 603, but were sensitive to inhibition by SCH 58261. Analysis of the effect of increasing concentrations of PSB 603 on the response to NECA indicated a non-competitive mode of action yielding a marked reduction in the NECA E MAX with no significant effect on EC 50 values. Kinetics analysis of the effect of PSB 603 on the A 2B AR-mediated NECA responses confirmed a saturable effect that was consistent with an allosteric mode of antagonism. The possibility that PSB 603 acts as a negative allosteric modulator of A 2B AR suggests new approaches to the development of therapeutic agents to treat conditions where adenosine levels are high. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Strains of Rodents and the Pharmacology of Learning and Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Ammassari-Teule, Martine; Castellano, Claudio

    2004-01-01

    Mendelian genetic tools have extensively been used to improve the description of the pharmacological mechanisms involved in learning and memory. The first part of this short review describes experiments involving the bidirectional selection of rats or mice for extreme behavioral characteristics or for sensitivity to pharmacological treatments. The second part focuses specifically on inbreeding. In conclusion, the advantages and the limits of a Mendelian pharmacog...

  8. Pharmacological treatment of the benign prostatic hyperplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Guerra, Yohani; Molina Cuevas, Vivian; Oyarzabal Yera, Ambar; Mas Ferreiro, Rosa

    2011-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia is a common disease in over 50 years-old men consisting in uncontrolled and benign growth of prostatic gland that leads to lower urinary tract symptoms. The etiology of benign prostatic hyperplasia is multifactoral involving the increased conversion of testosterone in dihydrotestosterone by the prostatic 5α-reductase action, which brought about events that encourage the prostate growth (static component) and the increase of the bladder and prostate smooth muscle tone (dynamic component) regulated by the aα 1 -adrenoceptors (ADR). The pharmacological treatment of the benign prostatic hyperplasia includes the prostatic 5aα-reductase inhibitors, the aα 1 -adrenoreceptor blockers, their combined therapy and the phytotherapy. This paper was aimed at presenting the most relevant aspects of the pharmacology of drugs used for treating the benign prostatic hyperplasia, and providing elements to analyze their efficacy, safety and tolerability. To this end, a review was made of the different drugs for the treatment of this pathology and they were grouped according to their mechanism of action. Natural products were included as lipid extracts from Serenoa repens and Pygeum africanum as well as D-004, a lipid extract from Roystonea regia fruits, with proved beneficial effects on the main etiological factors of benign prostatic hyperplasia. D-004 is a prostatic 5a-reductase inhibitor, an aα 1 -adrenoceptor antagonist, aα 5-lipooxygenase inhibitor and has antioxidant action, all of which reveals a multifactoral mechanism. The results achieved till now indicate that D-004 is a safe and well-tolerated product

  9. [Pharmacological treatment of obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomis Barbará, R

    2004-01-01

    The pharmacological treatment of obesity should be considered when cannot be achieved a 10% weight loss with diet therapy and physical activity. The drugs effective in obesity treatment may act by different mechanisms such as reduction in food intake, inhibition of fat absorption, increase of thermogenesis and stimulation of adipocyte apoptosis. At present, we only have two marketed drugs for obesity treatment. Sibutramine is an inhibitor of norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonina reuptake which inhibits food intake and increases thermogenesis. Sibutramine administration for a year can induce a weight loss of 4-7%. Its main side effects are hypertension, headache, insomnia and constipation. Orlistat is an inhibitor of pancreatic lipase which is able to block the absorption of 30% of ingested fat. Its administration induces weight loss and reduction of ulterior weight regain. Also, this drug improves hypertension dyslipdaemia and helps to prevent diabetes in 52% of cases when administered over four years. The increase in frequency of stools and interference with vitamin absorption are its main side effects. Glucagon-like peptide 1, which increases insulin sensitivity and satiety, adiponectin and PPAR-gamma agonists which reduce insulin resistance and modulates adipocyte generation are the basis for future therapeutic approaches of obesity. Phosphatase inhibitors induce PPAR-gamma phosphorylation and UCP-1 expression leading to an increase in thermogenesis and reduction in appetite.

  10. Pharmacological therapy of spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzi, Carlo; D'Angelo, Salvatore; Gilio, Michele; Leccese, Pietro; Padula, Angela; Olivieri, Ignazio

    2015-01-01

    The current pharmacological therapy of spondyloarthritis (SpA) includes several drugs: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids, traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biologic drugs. A systematic literature search was completed using the largest electronic databases (Medline, Embase and Cochrane), starting from 1995, with the aim to review data on traditional and biologic agents commercialised for SpA treatment. Randomised controlled trials and large observational studies were considered. In addition, studies performed in SpA patients treated with other, still unapproved, drugs (rituximab, anti-IL6 agents, apremilast, IL17 inhibitors and anakinra) were also taken into account. Biologic agents, especially anti-TNF drugs, have resulted in significant progress in improving clinical symptoms and signs, reducing inflammatory features in laboratory tests and imaging findings, and recovering all functional indexes. Anti-TNF drugs have radically changed the evolution of radiographic progression in peripheral joints; the first disappointing data concerning their efficacy on new bone formation of axial SpA has been recently challenged by studies enrolling patients who have been earlier diagnosed and treated. The opportunity to extend the interval of administration or to reduce the doses of anti-TNF agents can favourably influence the costs. Ustekinumab, the first non-anti-TNF biologic drug commercialised for psoriatic arthritis, offers new chances to patients that are unresponsive to anti-TNF.

  11. Pharmacology of midazolam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieri, L; Schaffner, R; Scherschlicht, R; Polc, P; Sepinwall, J; Davidson, A; Möhler, H; Cumin, R; Da Prada, M; Burkard, W P; Keller, H H; Müller, R K; Gerold, M; Pieri, M; Cook, L; Haefely, W

    1981-01-01

    8-Chloro-6-(2-fluorophenyl)-1-methyl-4H-imidazo[1,5-a][1,4]benzodiazepine (midazolam, Ro 21-3981, Dormicum) is an imidazobenzodiazepine whose salts are soluble and stable in aqueous solution. It has a quick onset and, due to rapid metabolic inactivation, a rather short duration of action in all species studied. Midazolam has a similar pharmacologic potency and broad therapeutic range as diazepam. It produces all the characteristic effects of the benzodiazepine class, i.e., anticonvulsant, anxiolytic, sleep-inducing, muscle relaxant, and "sedative" effects. The magnitude of the anticonflict effect of midazolam is smaller than that of diazepam in rats and squirrel monkeys, probably because a more pronounced sedative component interferes with the increase of punished responses. In rodents, surgical anaesthesia is not attained with midazolam alone even in high i.v. doses, whereas this state is obtained in monkeys. The drug potentiates the effect of various central depressant agents. Midazolam is virtually free of effects on the cardiovascular system in conscious animals and produces only slight decreases in cardiac performance in dogs anaesthetized with barbiturates. No direct effects of the drugs on autonomic functions were found, however, stress-induced autonomic disturbances are prevented, probably by an effect on central regulatory systems. All animal data suggest the usefulness of midazolam as a sleep-inducer and i.v. anaesthetic of rapid onset and short duration.

  12. Pharmacology of pediatric resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushay, H M; Notterman, D A

    1997-02-01

    The resuscitation of children from cardiac arrest and shock remains a challenging goal. The pharmacologic principles underlying current recommendations for intervention in pediatric cardiac arrest have been reviewed. Current research efforts, points of controversy, and accepted practices that may not be most efficacious have been described. Epinephrine remains the most effective resuscitation adjunct. High-dose epinephrine is tolerated better in children than in adults, but its efficacy has not received full analysis. The preponderance of data continues to point toward the ineffectiveness and possible deleterious effects of overzealous sodium bicarbonate use. Calcium chloride is useful in the treatment of ionized hypocalcemia but may harm cells that have experienced asphyxial damage. Atropine is an effective agent for alleviating bradycardia induced by increased vagal tone, but because most bradycardia in children is caused by hypoxia, improved oxygenation is the intervention of choice. Adenosine is an effective and generally well-tolerated agent for the treatment of supraventricular tachycardia. Lidocaine is the drug of choice for ventricular dysrhythmias, and bretylium, still relatively unexplored, is in reserve. Many pediatricians use dopamine for shock in the postresuscitative period, but epinephrine is superior. Most animal research on cardiac arrest is based on models with ventricular fibrillation that probably are not reflective of cardiac arrest situations most often seen in pediatrics.

  13. Pharmacological Fingerprints of Contextual Uncertainty.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Marshall

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Successful interaction with the environment requires flexible updating of our beliefs about the world. By estimating the likelihood of future events, it is possible to prepare appropriate actions in advance and execute fast, accurate motor responses. According to theoretical proposals, agents track the variability arising from changing environments by computing various forms of uncertainty. Several neuromodulators have been linked to uncertainty signalling, but comprehensive empirical characterisation of their relative contributions to perceptual belief updating, and to the selection of motor responses, is lacking. Here we assess the roles of noradrenaline, acetylcholine, and dopamine within a single, unified computational framework of uncertainty. Using pharmacological interventions in a sample of 128 healthy human volunteers and a hierarchical Bayesian learning model, we characterise the influences of noradrenergic, cholinergic, and dopaminergic receptor antagonism on individual computations of uncertainty during a probabilistic serial reaction time task. We propose that noradrenaline influences learning of uncertain events arising from unexpected changes in the environment. In contrast, acetylcholine balances attribution of uncertainty to chance fluctuations within an environmental context, defined by a stable set of probabilistic associations, or to gross environmental violations following a contextual switch. Dopamine supports the use of uncertainty representations to engender fast, adaptive responses.

  14. Occurrence and fate of the angiotensin II receptor antagonist transformation product valsartan acid in the water cycle--a comparative study with selected β-blockers and the persistent anthropogenic wastewater indicators carbamazepine and acesulfame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nödler, Karsten; Hillebrand, Olav; Idzik, Krzysztof; Strathmann, Martin; Schiperski, Ferry; Zirlewagen, Johannes; Licha, Tobias

    2013-11-01

    The substantial transformation of the angiotensin II receptor antagonist valsartan to the transformation product 2'-(2H-tetrazol-5-yl)-[1,1'-biphenyl]-4-carboxylic acid (referred to as valsartan acid) during the activated sludge process was demonstrated in the literature and confirmed in the here presented study. However, there was a severe lack of knowledge regarding the occurrence and fate of this compound in surface water and its behavior during drinking water treatment. In this work a comparative study on the occurrence and persistency of valsartan acid, three frequently used β-blockers (metoprolol, atenolol, and sotalol), atenolol acid (one significant transformation product of atenolol and metoprolol), and the two widely distributed persistent anthropogenic wastewater indicators carbamazepine and acesulfame in raw sewage, treated wastewater, surface water, groundwater, and tap water is presented. Median concentrations of valsartan acid in the analyzed matrices were 101, 1,310, 69, waters valsartan acid was found just as relevant as the analyzed β-blockers and the anticonvulsant carbamazepine. Regarding its persistency in surface waters it was comparable to carbamazepine and acesulfame. Furthermore, removal of valsartan acid during bank filtration was poor, which demonstrated the relevance of this compound for drinking water suppliers. Regarding drinking water treatment (Muelheim Process) the compound was resistant to ozonation but effectively eliminated (≥90%) by subsequent activated carbon filtration. However, without applying activated carbon filtration the compound may enter the drinking water distribution system as it was demonstrated for Berlin tap water. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Pharmacological characterization of the dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase in cockroach brain: evidence for a distinct dopamine receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orr, G.L.; Gole, J.W.D.; Notman, H.J.; Downer, R.G.H.

    1987-01-01

    Dopamine increases cyclic AMP production in crude membrane preparations of cockroach brain with plateaus in cyclic AMP production occurring between 1-10 μM and 10 mM. Maximal production of cyclic AMP is 2.25 fold greater than that of control values. Octopamine also increases cyclic AMP production with a Ka of 1.4 μM and maximal production 3.5 fold greater than that of control. 5-Hydroxytryptamine does not increase cyclic AMP production. The effects of octopamine and dopamine are fully additive. The vertebrate dopamine agonists ADTN and epinine stimulate the dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase (AC) with Ka values of 4.5 and 0.6 μM respectively and with maximal effectiveness 1.7 fold greater than that of control. The selective D 2 -dopamine agonist LY-171555 stimulates cyclic AMP production to a similar extent with a Ka of 50 μM. Other dopamine agonists have no stimulatory effects. With the exception of mianserin, 3 H-piflutixol is displaced from brain membranes by dopamine antagonists with an order of potency similar to that observed for the inhibition of dopamine-sensitive AC. The results indicate that the octopamine- and dopamine-sensitive AC in cockroach brain can be distinguished pharmacologically and the dopamine receptors coupled to AC have pharmacological characteristics distinct from vertebrate D 1 - and D 2 -dopamine receptors. 33 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  16. Management of Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Novel Approaches to the Pharmacology of Gut Motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmelo Scarpignato

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Although it is unclear to what extent irritable bowel syndrome (IBS symptoms represent a normal perception of abnormal function or an abnormal perception of normal function, many believe that IBS constitutes the clinical expression of an underlying motility disorder, affecting primarily the mid- and lower gut. Indeed, transit and contractile abnormalities have been demonstrated with sophisticated techniques in a subset of patients with IBS. As a consequence, drugs affecting gastrointestinal (GI motility have been widely employed with the aim of correcting the major IBS manifestations, ie, pain and altered bowel function. Unfortunately, no single drug has proven to be effective in treating IBS symptom complex. In addition, the use of some medications has often been associated with unpleasant side effects. Therefore, the search for a truly effective and safe drug to control motility disturbances in IBS continues. Several classes of drugs look promising and are under evaluation. Among the motor- inhibiting drugs, gut selective muscarinic antagonists (such as zamifenacin and darifenacin, neurokinin2 antagonists (such as MEN-10627 and MEN-11420, beta3-adrenoreceptor agonists (eg, SR-58611A and GI-selective calcium channel blockers (eg, pinaverium bromide and octylonium are able to decrease painful contractile activity in the gut (antispasmodic effect, without significantly affecting other body functions. Novel mechanisms to stimulate GI motility and transit include blockade of cholecystokinin (CCKA receptors and stimulation of motilin receptors. Loxiglumide (and its dextroisomer, dexloxiglumide is the only CCKA receptor antagonist that is being evaluated clinically. This drug accelerates gastric emptying and colonic transit, thereby increasing the number of bowel movements in patients with chronic constipation. It is also able to reduce visceral perception. Erythromycin and related 14-member macrolide compounds inhibit the binding of motilin to its

  17. The pharmacology of regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, George J; Saul, Justin M; Furth, Mark E; Andersson, Karl-Erik

    2013-07-01

    Regenerative medicine is a rapidly evolving multidisciplinary, translational research enterprise whose explicit purpose is to advance technologies for the repair and replacement of damaged cells, tissues, and organs. Scientific progress in the field has been steady and expectations for its robust clinical application continue to rise. The major thesis of this review is that the pharmacological sciences will contribute critically to the accelerated translational progress and clinical utility of regenerative medicine technologies. In 2007, we coined the phrase "regenerative pharmacology" to describe the enormous possibilities that could occur at the interface between pharmacology, regenerative medicine, and tissue engineering. The operational definition of regenerative pharmacology is "the application of pharmacological sciences to accelerate, optimize, and characterize (either in vitro or in vivo) the development, maturation, and function of bioengineered and regenerating tissues." As such, regenerative pharmacology seeks to cure disease through restoration of tissue/organ function. This strategy is distinct from standard pharmacotherapy, which is often limited to the amelioration of symptoms. Our goal here is to get pharmacologists more involved in this field of research by exposing them to the tools, opportunities, challenges, and interdisciplinary expertise that will be required to ensure awareness and galvanize involvement. To this end, we illustrate ways in which the pharmacological sciences can drive future innovations in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering and thus help to revolutionize the discovery of curative therapeutics. Hopefully, the broad foundational knowledge provided herein will spark sustained conversations among experts in diverse fields of scientific research to the benefit of all.

  18. Species-specific action of (Pro3)GIP - an efficacious agonist on human GIP receptor, but partial agonist and competitive antagonist on rat and mouse GIP receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparre-Ulrich, A H; Hansen, Lærke Smidt; Svendsen, B

    2016-01-01

    effect in murine studies. We conducted a pharmacological analysis of this ligand including interspecies differences between the rodent and human GIP system. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH: Transiently transfected COS-7 cells were assessed for cAMP accumulation upon ligand stimulation and assayed in competition...... level. Thus, in rodent models human GIP is a comparatively weak partial agonist. Human (Pro3)GIP is not an effective antagonist, so there is still a need for an effective antagonist for the elucidation of GIP's physiology....

  19. Pharmacology Portal: An Open Database for Clinical Pharmacologic Laboratory Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen Bjånes, Tormod; Mjåset Hjertø, Espen; Lønne, Lars; Aronsen, Lena; Andsnes Berg, Jon; Bergan, Stein; Otto Berg-Hansen, Grim; Bernard, Jean-Paul; Larsen Burns, Margrete; Toralf Fosen, Jan; Frost, Joachim; Hilberg, Thor; Krabseth, Hege-Merete; Kvan, Elena; Narum, Sigrid; Austgulen Westin, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    More than 50 Norwegian public and private laboratories provide one or more analyses for therapeutic drug monitoring or testing for drugs of abuse. Practices differ among laboratories, and analytical repertoires can change rapidly as new substances become available for analysis. The Pharmacology Portal was developed to provide an overview of these activities and to standardize the practices and terminology among laboratories. The Pharmacology Portal is a modern dynamic web database comprising all available analyses within therapeutic drug monitoring and testing for drugs of abuse in Norway. Content can be retrieved by using the search engine or by scrolling through substance lists. The core content is a substance registry updated by a national editorial board of experts within the field of clinical pharmacology. This ensures quality and consistency regarding substance terminologies and classification. All laboratories publish their own repertoires in a user-friendly workflow, adding laboratory-specific details to the core information in the substance registry. The user management system ensures that laboratories are restricted from editing content in the database core or in repertoires within other laboratory subpages. The portal is for nonprofit use, and has been fully funded by the Norwegian Medical Association, the Norwegian Society of Clinical Pharmacology, and the 8 largest pharmacologic institutions in Norway. The database server runs an open-source content management system that ensures flexibility with respect to further development projects, including the potential expansion of the Pharmacology Portal to other countries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Inverse agonist and neutral antagonist actions of synthetic compounds at an insect 5-HT1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troppmann, B; Balfanz, S; Baumann, A; Blenau, W

    2010-04-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) has been shown to control and modulate many physiological and behavioural functions in insects. In this study, we report the cloning and pharmacological properties of a 5-HT(1) receptor of an insect model for neurobiology, physiology and pharmacology. A cDNA encoding for the Periplaneta americana 5-HT(1) receptor was amplified from brain cDNA. The receptor was stably expressed in HEK 293 cells, and the functional and pharmacological properties were determined in cAMP assays. Receptor distribution was investigated by RT-PCR and by immunocytochemistry using an affinity-purified polyclonal antiserum. The P. americana 5-HT(1) receptor (Pea5-HT(1)) shares pronounced sequence and functional similarity with mammalian 5-HT(1) receptors. Activation with 5-HT reduced adenylyl cyclase activity in a dose-dependent manner. Pea5-HT(1) was expressed as a constitutively active receptor with methiothepin acting as a neutral antagonist, and WAY 100635 as an inverse agonist. Receptor mRNA was present in various tissues including brain, salivary glands and midgut. Receptor-specific antibodies showed that the native protein was expressed in a glycosylated form in membrane samples of brain and salivary glands. This study marks the first pharmacological identification of an inverse agonist and a neutral antagonist at an insect 5-HT(1) receptor. The results presented here should facilitate further analyses of 5-HT(1) receptors in mediating central and peripheral effects of 5-HT in insects.

  1. Identification of Bexarotene as a PPARγ Antagonist with HDX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P. Marciano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The retinoid x receptors (RXRs are the pharmacological target of Bexarotene, an antineoplastic agent indicated for the treatment of cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL. The RXRs form heterodimers with several nuclear receptors (NRs, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ, to regulate target gene expression through cooperative recruitment of transcriptional machinery. Here we have applied hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX mass spectrometry to characterize the effects of Bexarotene on the conformational plasticity of the intact RXRα:PPARγ heterodimer. Interestingly, addition of Bexarotene to PPARγ in the absence of RXRα induced protection from solvent exchange, suggesting direct receptor binding. This observation was confirmed using a competitive binding assay. Furthermore, Bexarotene functioned as a PPARγ antagonist able to alter rosiglitazone induced transactivation in a cell based promoter:reporter transactivation assay. Together these results highlight the complex polypharmacology of lipophilic NR targeted small molecules and the utility of HDX for identifying and characterizing these interactions.

  2. Fuzzy pharmacology: theory and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproule, Beth A; Naranjo, Claudio A; Türksen, I Burhan

    2002-09-01

    Fuzzy pharmacology is a term coined to represent the application of fuzzy logic and fuzzy set theory to pharmacological problems. Fuzzy logic is the science of reasoning, thinking and inference that recognizes and uses the real world phenomenon that everything is a matter of degree. It is an extension of binary logic that is able to deal with complex systems because it does not require crisp definitions and distinctions for the system components. In pharmacology, fuzzy modeling has been used for the mechanical control of drug delivery in surgical settings, and work has begun evaluating its use in other pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic applications. Fuzzy pharmacology is an emerging field that, based on these initial explorations, warrants further investigation.

  3. Antagonistic activity of marine sponges associated Actinobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvakumar Dharmaraj

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To focus on the isolation and preliminary characterization of marine sponges associated Actinobacteria particularly Streptomyces species and also their antagonistic activities against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Methods: The sponges were collected from Kovalam and Vizhinjam port of south-west coast of Kerala, India. Isolation of strains was carried out from sponge extracts using international Streptomyces project media. For preliminary identification of the strains, morphological (mycelial colouration, soluble pigments, melanoid pigmentation, spore morphology, nutritional uptake (carbon utilisation, amonoacids influence, sodium chloride tolerance, physiological (pH, temperature and chemotaxonomical characterization were done. Antimicrobial studies were also carried out for the selected strains. Results: With the help of the spicule structures, the collected marine sponges were identified as Callyspongia diffusa, Mycale mytilorum, Tedania anhelans and Dysidea fragilis. Nearly 94 strains were primarily isolated from these sponges and further they were sub-cultured using international Streptomyces project media. The strains exhibited different mycelial colouration (aerial and substrate, soluble and melanoid pigmentations. The strains possessed three types of sporophore morphology namely rectus flexibilis, spiral and retinaculiaperti. Among the 94 isolates, seven exhibited antibacterial and antifungal activities with maximal zone of inhibition of 30 mm. The nutritional, physiological and chemotaxonomical characteristic study helped in the conventional identification of the seven strains and they all suggest that the strains to be grouped under the genus Streptomyces. Conclusions: The present study clearly helps in the preliminary identification of the isolates associated with marine sponges. Antagonistic activities prove the production of antimicrobial metabolites against the pathogens. Marine sponges associated Streptomyces are

  4. Pharmacology and Structural Analysis of Ligand Binding to the Orthosteric Site of Glutamate-Like GluD2 Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders S; Hansen, Kasper B; Naur, Peter

    2016-01-01

    -term depression. Here, we investigate the pharmacology of the orthosteric binding site in GluD2 by examining the activity of analogs of D-Ser and GluN1 glycine site competitive antagonists at GluD2 receptors containing the lurcher mutation (GluD2(LC)), which promotes spontaneous channel activation. We identify...

  5. The pharmacology of gynaecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tothill, A

    1980-09-01

    Focus in this discussion of the pharmacology of gynecology is on the following: vaginal infections; genital herpes; genital warts; pelvic inflammatory disease; urinary infections; pruritus vulvae; menstrual problems; infertility; oral contraception; and hormone replacement therapy. Doctors in England working in Local Authority Family Planning Clinics are debarred from prescribing, and any patient with a vaginal infection has to be referred either to a special clinic or to her general practitioner which is often preferable as her medical history will be known. Vaginal discharge is a frequent complaint, and it is necessary to obtain full details. 1 of the most common infections is vaginal candidosis. Nystatin pessaries have always been a useful 1st-line treatment and are specific for this type of infection. Trichomonas infection also occurs frequently and responds well to metronidazole in a 200 mg dosage, 3 times daily for 7 days. It is necessary to treat the consort at the same time. Venereal diseases such as syphilis and gonorrhea always require vigorous treatment. Patients are now presenting with herpes genitalis far more often. The only treatment which is currently available, and is as good as any, is the application of warm saline to the vaginal area. Genital warts may be discovered on routine gynecological examination or may be reported to the doctor by the patient. 1 application of a 20% solution of podophyllum, applied carefully to each wart, usually effects a cure. Pelvic inflammatory disease seems to be on the increase. Provided any serious disease is ruled out a course of systemic antibiotics is often effective. Urinary infections are often seen in the gynecologic clinic, and many of these will respond well to 2 tablets of co-trimoxazole, 2 times daily for 14 days. In pruritus vulvae it is important to determine whether the cause is general or local. Menstrual problems regularly occur and have been increased by the IUD and the low-dose progesterone pill

  6. In vitro and in vivo pharmacological characterization of a neuropeptide S tetrabranched derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzza, Chiara; Rizzi, Anna; Malfacini, Davide; Pulga, Alice; Pacifico, Salvatore; Salvadori, Severo; Trapella, Claudio; Reinscheid, Rainer K; Calo, Girolamo; Guerrini, Remo

    2015-02-01

    The peptide welding technology (PWT) is a novel chemical strategy that allows the synthesis of multibranched peptides with high yield, purity, and reproducibility. With this approach, a tetrabranched derivative of neuropeptide S (NPS) has been synthesized and pharmacologically characterized. The in vitro activity of PWT1-NPS has been studied in a calcium mobilization assay. In vivo, PWT1-NPS has been investigated in the locomotor activity (LA) and recovery of the righting reflex (RR) tests. In calcium mobilization studies, PWT1-NPS behaved as full agonist at the mouse NPS receptor (NPSR) being threefold more potent than NPS. The selective NPSR antagonists [ (t) Bu-D-Gly(5)]NPS and SHA 68 displayed similar potency values against NPS and PWT1-NPS. In vivo, both NPS (1-100 pmol, i.c.v.) and PWT1-NPS (0.1-100 pmol, i.c.v.) stimulated mouse LA, with PWT1-NPS showing higher potency than NPS. In the RR assay, NPS (100 pmol, i.c.v.) was able to reduce the percentage of mice losing the RR after diazepam administration and their sleep time 5 min after the i.c.v. injection, but it was totally inactive 2 h after the injection. On the contrary, PWT1-NPS (30 pmol, i.c.v.), injected 2 h before diazepam, displayed wake-promoting effects. This PWT1-NPS stimulant effect was no longer evident in mice lacking the NPSR receptor. The PWT1 technology can be successfully applied to the NPS sequence. PWT1-NPS displayed in vitro a pharmacological profile similar to NPS. In vivo PWT1-NPS mimicked NPS effects showing higher potency and long-lasting action.

  7. Differential clinical pharmacology of rolapitant in delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashad N

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Noha Rashad,1 Omar Abdel-Rahman2 1Medical Oncology Department, Maadi Armed Forces Hospital, 2Clinical Oncology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt Abstract: Rolapitant is a highly selective neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist, orally administered for a single dose of 180 mg before chemotherapy with granisetron D1, dexamethasone 8 mg BID on day 2–4. It has a unique pharmacological characteristic of a long plasma half-life (between 163 and 183 hours; this long half-life makes a single use sufficient to cover the delayed emesis risk period. No major drug–drug interactions between rolapitant and dexamethasone or other cytochrome P450 inducers or inhibitors were observed. The clinical efficacy of rolapitant was studied in two phase III trials in highly emetogenic chemotherapy and in one clinical trial in moderately emetogenic chemotherapy. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients achieving a complete response (defined as no emesis or use of rescue medication in the delayed phase (>24–120 hours after chemotherapy. In comparison to granisetron (10 µg/kg intravenously and dexamethasone (20 mg orally on day 1, and dexamethasone (8 mg orally twice daily on days 2–4 and placebo, rolapitant showed superior efficacy in the control of delayed and overall emesis. This review aims at revising the pharmacological characteristics of rolapitant, offering an updated review of the available clinical efficacy and safety data of rolapitant in different clinical settings, highlighting the place of rolapitant in the management of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV among currently available guidelines, and exploring the future directions of CINV management. Keywords: nausea, vomiting, chemotherapy, rolapitant, CINV

  8. Characterization of a novel non-steroidal glucocorticoid receptor antagonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qun-Yi; Zhang, Meng [The National Center for Drug Screening, Shanghai (China); State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Hallis, Tina M.; DeRosier, Therese A. [Cell Systems Division, Invitrogen, Madison, WI (United States); Yue, Jian-Min; Ye, Yang [State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Mais, Dale E. [The National Center for Drug Screening, Shanghai (China); MPI Research, Mattawan, MI (United States); Wang, Ming-Wei, E-mail: wangmw@mail.shcnc.ac.cn [The National Center for Drug Screening, Shanghai (China); State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China)

    2010-01-15

    Selective antagonists of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) are desirable for the treatment of hypercortisolemia associated with Cushing's syndrome, psychic depression, obesity, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, and glaucoma. NC3327, a non-steroidal small molecule with potent binding affinity to GR (K{sub i} = 13.2 nM), was identified in a high-throughput screening effort. As a full GR antagonist, NC3327 greatly inhibits the dexamethasone (Dex) induction of marker genes involved in hepatic gluconeogenesis, but has a minimal effect on matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), a GR responsive pro-inflammatory gene. Interestingly, the compound recruits neither coactivators nor corepressors to the GR complex but competes with glucocorticoids for the interaction between GR and a coactivator peptide. Moreover, NC3327 does not trigger GR nuclear translocation, but significantly blocks Dex-induced GR transportation to the nucleus, and thus appears to be a 'competitive' GR antagonist. Therefore, the non-steroidal compound, NC3327, may represent a new class of GR antagonists as potential therapeutics for a variety of cortisol-related endocrine disorders.

  9. Characterization of a novel non-steroidal glucocorticoid receptor antagonist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Qun-Yi; Zhang, Meng; Hallis, Tina M.; DeRosier, Therese A.; Yue, Jian-Min; Ye, Yang; Mais, Dale E.; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Selective antagonists of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) are desirable for the treatment of hypercortisolemia associated with Cushing's syndrome, psychic depression, obesity, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, and glaucoma. NC3327, a non-steroidal small molecule with potent binding affinity to GR (K i = 13.2 nM), was identified in a high-throughput screening effort. As a full GR antagonist, NC3327 greatly inhibits the dexamethasone (Dex) induction of marker genes involved in hepatic gluconeogenesis, but has a minimal effect on matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), a GR responsive pro-inflammatory gene. Interestingly, the compound recruits neither coactivators nor corepressors to the GR complex but competes with glucocorticoids for the interaction between GR and a coactivator peptide. Moreover, NC3327 does not trigger GR nuclear translocation, but significantly blocks Dex-induced GR transportation to the nucleus, and thus appears to be a 'competitive' GR antagonist. Therefore, the non-steroidal compound, NC3327, may represent a new class of GR antagonists as potential therapeutics for a variety of cortisol-related endocrine disorders.

  10. A Pharmacological Analysis of an Associative Learning Task: 5-HT1 to 5-HT7 Receptor Subtypes Function on a Pavlovian/Instrumental Autoshaped Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, Alfredo

    2003-01-01

    Recent studies using both invertebrates and mammals have revealed that endogenous serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) modulates plasticity processes, including learning and memory. However, little is currently known about the mechanisms, loci, or time window of the actions of 5-HT. The aim of this review is to discuss some recent results on the effects of systemic administration of selective agonists and antagonists of 5-HT on associative learning in a Pavlovian/instrumental autoshaping (P/I-A) task in rats. The results indicate that pharmacological manipulation of 5-HT1-7 receptors or 5-HT reuptake sites might modulate memory consolidation, which is consistent with the emerging notion that 5-HT plays a key role in memory formation. PMID:14557609

  11. [Selective mutism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ytzhak, A; Doron, Y; Lahat, E; Livne, A

    2012-10-01

    Selective mutism is an uncommon disorder in young children, in which they selectively don't speak in certain social situations, while being capable of speaking easily in other social situations. Many etiologies were proposed for selective mutism including psychodynamic, behavioral and familial etc. A developmental etiology that includes insights from all the above is gaining support. Accordingly, mild language impairment in a child with an anxiety trait may be at the root of developing selective mutism. The behavior will be reinforced by an avoidant pattern in the family. Early treatment and followup for children with selective mutism is important. The treatment includes non-pharmacological therapy (psychodynamic, behavioral and familial) and pharmacologic therapy--mainly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI).

  12. Contributions of different modes of TRPV1 activation to TRPV1 antagonist-induced hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garami, Andras; Shimansky, Yury P; Pakai, Eszter; Oliveira, Daniela L; Gavva, Narender R; Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2010-01-27

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) antagonists are widely viewed as next-generation pain therapeutics. However, these compounds cause hyperthermia, a serious side effect. TRPV1 antagonists differentially block three modes of TRPV1 activation: by heat, protons, and chemical ligands (e.g., capsaicin). We asked what combination of potencies in these three modes of TRPV1 activation corresponds to the lowest potency of a TRPV1 antagonist to cause hyperthermia. We studied hyperthermic responses of rats, mice, and guinea pigs to eight TRPV1 antagonists with different pharmacological profiles and used mathematical modeling to find a relative contribution of the blockade of each activation mode to the development of hyperthermia. We found that the hyperthermic effect has the highest sensitivity to the extent of TRPV1 blockade in the proton mode (0.43 to 0.65) with no to moderate sensitivity in the capsaicin mode (-0.01 to 0.34) and no sensitivity in the heat mode (0.00 to 0.01). We conclude that hyperthermia-free TRPV1 antagonists do not block TRPV1 activation by protons, even if they are potent blockers of the heat mode, and that decreasing the potency to block the capsaicin mode may further decrease the potency to cause hyperthermia.

  13. Pharmacological Aspects of Vipera xantina palestinae Venom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momic, Tatjana; Arlinghaus, Franziska T.; Arien-Zakay, Hadar; Katzhendler, Jeoshua; Eble, Johannes A.; Marcinkiewicz, Cezary; Lazarovici, Philip

    2011-01-01

    In Israel, Vipera xantina palestinae (V.x.p.) is the most common venomous snake, accounting for several hundred cases of envenomation in humans and domestic animals every year, with a mortality rate of 0.5 to 2%. In this review we will briefly address the research developments relevant to our present understanding of the structure and function of V.x.p. venom with emphasis on venom disintegrins. Venom proteomics indicated the presence of four families of pharmacologically active compounds: (i) neurotoxins; (ii) hemorrhagins; (iii) angioneurin growth factors; and (iv) different types of integrin inhibitors. Viperistatin, a α1β1selective KTS disintegrin and VP12, a α2β1 selective C-type lectin were discovered. These snake venom proteins represent promising tools for research and development of novel collagen receptor selective drugs. These discoveries are also relevant for future improvement of antivenom therapy towards V.x.p. envenomation. PMID:22174978

  14. Interleukin-1 antagonists for diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    pathways. The testing of specific anti-inflammatory biologics targeting single pro-inflammatory cytokines has provided clinical proof-of-concept. EXPERT OPINION: IL-1 antagonists have so far failed to meet primary end points in recent-onset type 1 diabetes in Phase IIa, and promising Phase I and IIa trials......INTRODUCTION: Diabetes is a currently incurable, epidemically growing global health concern. Contemporary symptomatic treatment targets acute and chronic metabolic consequences of relative or absolute insulin deficiency. Intensive multifactorial therapy is required to attenuate morbidity...... and mortality from late micro- and macrovascular complications, and despite current best clinical practice diabetes is still associated with shortened lifespan. There is an unmet need for interventions targeting pathogenetic mechanisms in diabetes, and the market for such therapies is huge. AREAS COVERED...

  15. Selectivity and specificity of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor ligands: caveats and critical thinking in characterizing receptor-mediated effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomone, Salvatore; Waeber, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Receptors for sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) have been identified only recently. Their medicinal chemistry is therefore still in its infancy, and few selective agonists or antagonists are available. Furthermore, the selectivity of S1P receptor agonists or antagonists is not well established. JTE-013 and BML-241 (also known as CAY10444), used extensively as specific S1P(2) and S1P(3) receptors antagonists respectively, are cases in point. When analyzing S1P-induced vasoconstriction in mouse basilar artery, we observed that JTE-013 inhibited not only the effect of S1P, but also the effect of U46619, endothelin-1 or high KCl; JTE-013 strongly inhibited responses to S1P in S1P(2) receptor knockout mice. Similarly, BML-241 has been shown to inhibit increases in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration via P(2) receptor or α(1A)-adrenoceptor stimulation and α(1A)-adrenoceptor-mediated contraction of rat mesenteric artery, while it did not affect S1P(3)-mediated decrease of forskolin-induced cyclic AMP accumulation. Another putative S1P(1/3) receptor antagonist, VPC23019, does not inhibit S1P(3)-mediated vasoconstriction. With these examples in mind, we discuss caveats about relying on available pharmacological tools to characterize receptor subtypes.

  16. Selectivity and specificity of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor ligands: caveats and critical thinking in characterizing receptor-mediated effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eWaeber

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Receptors for sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P have been identified only recently. Their medicinal chemistry is therefore still in its infancy, and few selective agonists or antagonists are available. Furthermore, the selectivity of S1P receptor agonists or antagonists is not well established. JTE-013 and BML-241 (also known as CAY10444, used extensively as specific S1P2 and S1P3 receptors antagonists respectively, are cases in point. When analyzing S1P-induced vasoconstriction in mouse basilar artery, we observed that JTE-013 inhibited not only the effect of S1P, but also the effect of U46619, endothelin-1 or high KCl; JTE-013 strongly inhibited responses to S1P in S1P2 receptor knockout mice. Similarly, BML-241 has been shown to inhibit increases in intracellular Ca2+ concentration via P2 receptor or α1A-adrenoceptor stimulation and α1A-adrenoceptor-mediated contraction of rat mesenteric artery, while it did not affect S1P3-mediated decrease of forskolin-induced cyclic AMP accumulation. Another putative S1P1/3 receptor antagonist, VPC23019, does not inhibit S1P3-mediated vasoconstriction. With these examples in mind, we discuss caveats about relying on available pharmacological tools to characterize receptor subtypes.

  17. Pharmacologic treatment for the core deficits and associated symptoms of autism in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Lis; Waldrop, Julee; Brunssen, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental condition affecting 1 out of 160 children in the United States today. Only risperidone has Food and Drug Administration approval for the pharmacologic management of autism in children. However, health care providers may prescribe other drugs used off-label to assist autistic children and their families with the core deficits and associated behaviors of this condition. Evidence for the use of these medications will be discussed in this continuing education offering. Meta analyses, randomized clinical trials, and other prospective experimental studies of pharmacotherapy conducted in the United States in the past 10 years in children between the ages of 5 and 15 years were reviewed. The results support moderate success in treating the associated behaviors of autism and minimal success in treating core deficits across all drug classes. Preliminary evidence demonstrates possible uses for atypical antipsychotic agents, selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitors, stimulants, and N-methyl-D-aspirate receptor antagonists in decreasing the core behaviors and associated symptoms of autism. More studies and longer periods of follow-up are needed before definitive guidelines can be suggested.

  18. Quality management of pharmacology and safety pharmacology studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Per; Seiler, Jürg P

    2002-01-01

    to safety pharmacology studies, and, when indicated, to secondary pharmacodynamic studies, does not influence the scientific standards of studies. However, applying formal GLP standards will ensure the quality, reliability and integrity of studies, which reflect sound study management. It is important...... to encourage a positive attitude among researchers and academics towards these lines, whenever possible. GLP principles applied to the management of non-clinical safety studies are appropriate quality standards when studies are used in the context of protecting public health, and these quality standards...... of pharmacology studies (ICH S7A): primary pharmacodynamic, secondary pharmacodynamic and safety pharmacology studies, and guidance on the quality standards (expectations for GLP conformity) for these study types have been provided. Primary pharmacodynamic studies are the only study types that are fully exempt...

  19. Preemptive analgesia I: physiological pathways and pharmacological modalities.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, D J

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: This two-part review summarizes the current knowledge of physiological mechanisms, pharmacological modalities and controversial issues surrounding preemptive analgesia. SOURCE: Articles from 1966 to present were obtained from the MEDLINE databases. Search terms included: analgesia, preemptive; neurotransmitters; pain, postoperative; hyperalgesia; sensitization, central nervous system; pathways, nociception; anesthetic techniques; analgesics, agents. Principal findings: The physiological basis of preemptive analgesia is complex and involves modification of the pain pathways. The pharmacological modalities available may modify the physiological responses at various levels. Effective preemptive analgesic techniques require multi-modal interception of nociceptive input, increasing threshold for nociception, and blocking or decreasing nociceptor receptor activation. Although the literature is controversial regarding the effectiveness of preemptive analgesia, some general recommendations can be helpful in guiding clinical care. Regional anesthesia induced prior to surgical trauma and continued well into the postoperative period is effective in attenuating peripheral and central sensitization. Pharmacologic agents such as NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) opioids, and NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) - and alpha-2-receptor antagonists, especially when used in combination, act synergistically to decrease postoperative pain. CONCLUSION: The variable patient characteristics and timing of preemptive analgesia in relation to surgical noxious input requires individualization of the technique(s) chosen. Multi-modal analgesic techniques appear most effective.

  20. Pharmacological activities of Vitex agnus-castus extracts in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, B; Berger, D; Hoberg, E; Sticher, O; Schaffner, W

    2000-10-01

    The pharmacological effects of ethanolic Vitex agnus-castus fruit-extracts (especially Ze 440) and various extract fractions of different polarities were evaluated both by radioligand binding studies and by superfusion experiments. A relative potent binding inhibition was observed for dopamine D2 and opioid (micro and kappa subtype) receptors with IC50 values of the native extract between 20 and 70 mg/mL. Binding, neither to the histamine H1, benzodiazepine and OFQ receptor, nor to the binding-site of the serotonin (5-HT) transporter, was significantly inhibited. The lipophilic fractions contained the diterpenes rotun-difuran and 6beta,7beta-diacetoxy-13-hydroxy-labda-8,14-dien . They exhibited inhibitory actions on dopamine D2 receptor binding. While binding inhibition to mu and kappa opioid receptors was most pronounced in lipophilic fractions, binding to delta opioid receptors was inhibited mainly by a aqueous fraction. Standardised Ze 440 extracts of different batches were of constant pharmacological quality according to their potential to inhibit the binding to D2 receptors. In superfusion experiments, the aqueous fraction of a methanolic extract inhibited the release of acetylcholine in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, the potent D2 receptor antagonist spiperone antagonised the effect of the extract suggesting a dopaminergic action mediated by D2 receptor activation. Our results indicate a dopaminergic effect of Vitex agnus-castus extracts and suggest additional pharmacological actions via opioid receptors.

  1. Translational pharmacology of dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists : prolactin and oxytocin as biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, Jasper

    2011-01-01

    For mechanism-based investigations on PK-PD relationships following intranasal administration, the use of advanced animal models and analytical techniques are crucial. As described in this thesis, quantitative information on distinction between extent as well as rate of absorption between

  2. Investigation of CGRP receptors and peptide pharmacology in human coronary arteries. Characterization with a nonpeptide antagonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasbak, Philip; Saetrum Opgaard, Ole; Eskesen, Karen

    2003-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), adrenomedullin (AM), and amylin are structurally related peptides mediating vasorelaxation in the coronary circulation possibly via CGRP receptors (subtypes 1 or 2). Functional CGRP1 receptors appear to consist of at least three different kinds of proteins:...

  3. Design, synthesis, and pharmacological characterization of novel, potent NMDA receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conti, Paola; De Amici, Marco; Grazioso, Giovanni

    2004-01-01

    The two diastereomeric pairs of acidic amino acids 5-(2-amino-2-carboxyethyl)-4,5-dihydroisoxazole-3-carboxylic acid (8A/8B) and 4-(2-amino-2-carboxyethyl)-5,5-dimethyl-4,5-dihydroisoxazole-3-carboxylic acid (10A/10B) were prepared via a strategy based on a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. The four ami...

  4. Binding and functional pharmacological characteristics of gepant-type antagonists in rat brain and mesenteric arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheykhzade, Majid; Amandi, Nilofar; Pla, Monica Vidal

    2017-01-01

    AIM: The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is found in afferent sensory nerve fibers innervating the resistance arteries and plays a pivotal role in a number of neurovascular diseases such as migraine and subarachnoid bleedings. The present study investigates the binding and ant...

  5. The novel adenosine A(2A) antagonist prodrug MSX-4 is effective in animal models related to motivational and motor functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santerre, Jessica L; Nunes, Eric J; Kovner, Rotem; Leser, Chelsea E; Randall, Patrick A; Collins-Praino, Lyndsey E; Lopez Cruz, Laura; Correa, Merce; Baqi, Younis; Müller, Christa E; Salamone, John D

    2012-10-01

    Adenosine A(2A) and dopamine D2 receptors interact to regulate diverse aspects of ventral and dorsal striatal functions related to motivational and motor processes, and it has been suggested that adenosine A(2A) antagonists could be useful for the treatment of depression, parkinsonism and other disorders. The present experiments were performed to characterize the effects of MSX-4, which is an amino acid ester prodrug of the potent and selective adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist MSX-2, by assessing its ability to reverse pharmacologically induced motivational and motor impairments. In the first group of studies, MSX-4 reversed the effects of the D2 antagonist eticlopride on a concurrent lever pressing/chow feeding task that is used as a measure of effort-related choice behavior. MSX-4 was less potent after intraperitoneal administration than the comparison compound, MSX-3, though both were equally efficacious. With this task, MSX-4 was orally active in the same dose range as MSX-3. MSX-4 also reversed the locomotor suppression induced by eticlopride in the open field, but did not induce anxiogenic effects as measured by the relative amount of interior activity. Behaviorally active doses of MSX-4 also attenuated the increase in c-Fos and pDARPP-32(Thr34) expression in nucleus accumbens core that was induced by injections of eticlopride. In addition, MSX-4 suppressed the oral tremor induced by the anticholinesterase galantamine, which is consistent with an antiparkinsonian profile. These actions of MSX-4 indicate that this compound could have potential utility as a treatment for parkinsonism, as well as some of the motivational symptoms of depression and other disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Design and synthesis of novel sulfonamide-containing bradykinin hB2 receptor antagonists. 1. Synthesis and SAR of alpha,alpha-dimethylglycine sulfonamides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattori, Daniela; Rossi, Cristina; Fincham, Christopher I; Berettoni, Marco; Calvani, Federico; Catrambone, Fernando; Felicetti, Patrizia; Gensini, Martina; Terracciano, Rosa; Altamura, Maria; Bressan, Alessandro; Giuliani, Sandro; Maggi, Carlo A; Meini, Stefania; Valenti, Claudio; Quartara, Laura

    2006-06-15

    We recently published the extensive in vivo pharmacological characterization of MEN 16132 (J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther. 2005, 616-623; Eur. J. Pharmacol. 2005, 528, 7), a member of the sulfonamide-containing human B(2) receptor (hB(2)R) antagonists. Here we report, in detail, how this family of compounds was designed, synthesized, and optimized to provide a group of products with subnanomolar affinity for the hB(2)R and high in vivo potency after topical administration to the respiratory tract. The series was designed on the basis of indications from the X-ray structures of the key structural motifs A and B present in known antagonists and is characterized by the presence of an alpha,alpha-dialkyl amino acid. The first lead (17) of the series was submitted to extensive chemical work to elucidate the structural requirements to increase hB(2) receptor affinity and antagonist potency in bioassays expressing the human B(2) receptor (hB(2)R). The following structural features were selected: a 2,4-dimethylquinoline moiety and a piperazine linker acylated with a basic amino acid. The representative lead compound 68 inhibited the specific binding of [(3)H]BK to hB(2)R with a pKi of 9.4 and antagonized the BK-induced inositolphosphate (IP) accumulation in recombinant cell systems expressing the hB(2)R with a pA(2) of 9.1. Moreover, compound 68 when administered (300 nmol/kg) intratracheally in the anesthetized guinea pig, was able to significantly inhibit BK-induced bronchoconstriction for up to 120 min after its administration, while having a lower and shorter lasting effect on hypotension.

  7. Serotonin 2A receptor antagonists for treatment of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebdrup, Bjørn Hylsebeck; Rasmussen, Hans; Arnt, Jørn

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: All approved antipsychotic drugs share an affinity for the dopamine 2 (D2) receptor; however, these drugs only partially ameliorate the symptoms of schizophrenia. It is, therefore, of paramount importance to identify new treatment strategies for schizophrenia. Areas covered......: Preclinical, clinical and post-mortem studies of the serotonin 5-HT2A system in schizophrenia are reviewed. The implications of a combined D2 and 5-HT2A receptor blockade, which is obtained by several current antipsychotic drugs, are discussed, and the rationale for the development of more selective 5-HT2A...... receptor antagonists is evaluated. Moreover, the investigational pipeline of major pharmaceutical companies is examined and an Internet search conducted to identify other pharmaceutical companies investigating 5-HT2A receptor antagonists for the treatment of schizophrenia. Expert opinion: 5-HT2A receptor...

  8. In-silico guided discovery of novel CCR9 antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Cross, Jason B.; Romero, Jan; Heifetz, Alexander; Humphries, Eric; Hall, Katie; Wu, Yuchuan; Stucka, Sabrina; Zhang, Jing; Chandonnet, Haoqun; Lippa, Blaise; Ryan, M. Dominic; Baber, J. Christian

    2018-03-01

    Antagonism of CCR9 is a promising mechanism for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease, including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. There is limited experimental data on CCR9 and its ligands, complicating efforts to identify new small molecule antagonists. We present here results of a successful virtual screening and rational hit-to-lead campaign that led to the discovery and initial optimization of novel CCR9 antagonists. This work uses a novel data fusion strategy to integrate the output of multiple computational tools, such as 2D similarity search, shape similarity, pharmacophore searching, and molecular docking, as well as the identification and incorporation of privileged chemokine fragments. The application of various ranking strategies, which combined consensus and parallel selection methods to achieve a balance of enrichment and novelty, resulted in 198 virtual screening hits in total, with an overall hit rate of 18%. Several hits were developed into early leads through targeted synthesis and purchase of analogs.

  9. Biotransformation of the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists spironolactone and canrenone by human CYP11B1 and CYP11B2: Characterization of the products and their influence on mineralocorticoid receptor transactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Lina; Müller, Anne-Rose; Hobler, Anna; Brixius-Anderko, Simone; Zapp, Josef; Hannemann, Frank; Bernhardt, Rita

    2016-10-01

    Spironolactone and its major metabolite canrenone are potent mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and are, therefore, applied as drugs for the treatment of primary aldosteronism and essential hypertension. We report that both compounds can be converted by the purified adrenocortical cytochromes P450 CYP11B1 and CYP11B2, while no conversion of the selective mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist eplerenone was observed. As their natural function, CYP11B1 and CYP11B2 carry out the final steps in the biosynthesis of gluco- and mineralocorticoids. Dissociation constants for the new exogenous substrates were determined by a spectroscopic binding assay and demonstrated to be comparable to those of the natural substrates, 11-deoxycortisol and 11-deoxycorticosterone. Metabolites were produced at preparative scale with a CYP11B2-dependent Escherichia coli whole-cell system and purified by HPLC. Using NMR spectroscopy, the metabolites of spironolactone were identified as 11β-OH-spironolactone, 18-OH-spironolactone and 19-OH-spironolactone. Canrenone was converted to 11β-OH-canrenone, 18-OH-canrenone as well as to the CYP11B2-specific product 11β,18-diOH-canrenone. Therefore, a contribution of CYP11B1 and CYP11B2 to the biotransformation of drugs should be taken into account and the metabolites should be tested for their potential toxic and pharmacological effects. A mineralocorticoid receptor transactivation assay in antagonist mode revealed 11β-OH-spironolactone as pharmaceutically active metabolite, whereas all other hydroxylation products negate the antagonist properties of spironolactone and canrenone. Thus, human CYP11B1 and CYP11B2 turned out to metabolize steroid-based drugs additionally to the liver-dependent biotransformation of drugs. Compared with the action of the parental drug, changed properties of the metabolites at the target site have been observed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. New pharmacological approaches to the cholinergic system: an overview on muscarinic receptor ligands and cholinesterase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greig, Nigel H; Reale, Marcella; Tata, Ada M

    2013-08-01

    The cholinergic system is expressed in neuronal and in non-neuronal tissues. Acetylcholine (ACh), synthesized in and out of the nervous system can locally contribute to modulation of various cell functions (e.g. survival, proliferation). Considering that the cholinergic system and its functions are impaired in a number of disorders, the identification of new pharmacological approaches to regulate cholinergic system components appears of great relevance. The present review focuses on recent pharmacological drugs able to modulate the activity of cholinergic receptors and thereby, cholinergic function, with an emphasis on the muscarinic receptor subtype, and additionally covers the cholinesterases, the main enzymes involved in ACh hydrolysis. The presence and function of muscarinic receptor subtypes both in neuronal and non-neuronal cells has been demonstrated using extensive pharmacological data emerging from studies on transgenic mice. The possible involvement of ACh in different pathologies has been proposed in recent years and is becoming an important area of study. Although the lack of selective muscarinic receptor ligands has for a long time limited the definition of therapeutic treatment based on muscarinic receptors as targets, some muscarinic ligands such as cevimeline (patents US4855290; US5571918) or xanomeline (patent, US5980933) have been developed and used in pre-clinical or in clinical studies for the treatment of nervous system diseases (Alzheimer' and Sjogren's diseases). The present review focuses on the potential implications of muscarinic receptors in different pathologies, including tumors. Moreover, the future use of muscarinic ligands in therapeutic protocols in cancer therapy will be discussed, considering that some muscarinic antagonists currently used in the treatment of genitourinary disease (e.g. darifenacin, patent, US5096890; US6106864) have also been demonstrated to arrest tumor progression in nude mice. The involvement of muscarinic

  11. A 660-Kb Deletion with Antagonistic Effects on Fertility and Milk Production Segregates at High Frequency in Nordic Red Cattle: Additional Evidence for the Common Occurrence of Balancing Selection in Livestock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadri, Naveen Kumar; Sahana, Goutam; Charlier, Carole; Iso-Touru, Terhi; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Karim, Latifa; Nielsen, Ulrik Sander; Panitz, Frank; Aamand, Gert Pedersen; Schulman, Nina; Georges, Michel; Vilkki, Johanna; Lund, Mogens Sandø; Druet, Tom

    2014-01-01

    In dairy cattle, the widespread use of artificial insemination has resulted in increased selection intensity, which has led to spectacular increase in productivity. However, cow fertility has concomitantly severely declined. It is generally assumed that this reduction is primarily due to the negative energy balance of high-producing cows at the peak of lactation. We herein describe the fine-mapping of a major fertility QTL in Nordic Red cattle, and identify a 660-kb deletion encompassing four genes as the causative variant. We show that the deletion is a recessive embryonically lethal mutation. This probably results from the loss of RNASEH2B, which is known to cause embryonic death in mice. Despite its dramatic effect on fertility, 13%, 23% and 32% of the animals carry the deletion in Danish, Swedish and Finnish Red Cattle, respectively. To explain this, we searched for favorable effects on other traits and found that the deletion has strong positive effects on milk yield. This study demonstrates that embryonic lethal mutations account for a non-negligible fraction of the decline in fertility of domestic cattle, and that associated positive effects on milk yield may account for part of the negative genetic correlation. Our study adds to the evidence that structural variants contribute to animal phenotypic variation, and that balancing selection might be more common in livestock species than previously appreciated. PMID:24391517

  12. A 660-Kb deletion with antagonistic effects on fertility and milk production segregates at high frequency in Nordic Red cattle: additional evidence for the common occurrence of balancing selection in livestock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Kumar Kadri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In dairy cattle, the widespread use of artificial insemination has resulted in increased selection intensity, which has led to spectacular increase in productivity. However, cow fertility has concomitantly severely declined. It is generally assumed that this reduction is primarily due to the negative energy balance of high-producing cows at the peak of lactation. We herein describe the fine-mapping of a major fertility QTL in Nordic Red cattle, and identify a 660-kb deletion encompassing four genes as the causative variant. We show that the deletion is a recessive embryonically lethal mutation. This probably results from the loss of RNASEH2B, which is known to cause embryonic death in mice. Despite its dramatic effect on fertility, 13%, 23% and 32% of the animals carry the deletion in Danish, Swedish and Finnish Red Cattle, respectively. To explain this, we searched for favorable effects on other traits and found that the deletion has strong positive effects on milk yield. This study demonstrates that embryonic lethal mutations account for a non-negligible fraction of the decline in fertility of domestic cattle, and that associated positive effects on milk yield may account for part of the negative genetic correlation. Our study adds to the evidence that structural variants contribute to animal phenotypic variation, and that balancing selection might be more common in livestock species than previously appreciated.

  13. Pharmacological Characterisation of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Expressed in Human iPSC-Derived Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Chatzidaki

    Full Text Available Neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs represent a potentially valuable tool for the characterisation of neuronal receptors and ion channels. Previous studies on iPSC-derived neuronal cells have reported the functional characterisation of a variety of receptors and ion channels, including glutamate receptors, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA receptors and several voltage-gated ion channels. In the present study we have examined the expression and functional properties of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs in human iPSC-derived neurons. Gene expression analysis indicated the presence of transcripts encoding several nAChR subunits, with highest levels detected for α3-α7, β1, β2 and β4 subunits (encoded by CHRNA3-CHRNA7, CHRNB1, CHRNB2 and CHRNB4 genes. In addition, similarly high transcript levels were detected for the truncated dupα7 subunit transcript, encoded by the partially duplicated gene CHRFAM7A, which has been associated with psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. The functional properties of these nAChRs have been examined by calcium fluorescence and by patch-clamp recordings. The data obtained suggest that the majority of functional nAChRs expressed in these cells have pharmacological properties typical of α7 receptors. Large responses were induced by a selective α7 agonist (compound B, in the presence of the α7-selective positive allosteric modulator (PAM PNU-120596, which were blocked by the α7-selective antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA. In addition, a small proportion of the neurons express nAChRs with properties typical of heteromeric (non-α7 containing nAChR subtypes. These cells therefore represent a great tool to advance our understanding of the properties of native human nAChRs, α7 in particular.

  14. FGFR antagonist induces protective autophagy in FGFR1-amplified breast cancer cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yi; Xie, Xiaoyan; Li, Xinyi; Wang, Peiqi; Jing, Qian; Yue, Jiaqi; Liu, Yang; Cheng, Zhong; Li, Jingyi; Song, Haixing; Li, Guoyu; Liu, Rui; Wang, Jinhui

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer, representing approximately 30% of all gynecological cancer cases diagnosed yearly, is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality for women. Amplification of FGFR1 is frequently observed in breast cancers and is associated with poor prognosis. Though FGFRs have long been considered as anti-cancer drug targets, and a cluster of FGFR antagonists are currently under clinical trials, the precise cellular responses under the treatment of FGFR antagonists remains unclear. Here, we show that PD166866, an FGFR1-selective inhibitor, inhibits proliferation and triggers anoikis in FGFR1-amplified breast cancer cell lines. Notably, we demonstrate that PD166866 induces autophagy in FGFR1-amplified breast cancer cell lines, while blockage of autophagy by Atg5 knockdown further enhances the anti-proliferative activities of PD166866. Moreover, mechanistic study reveals that PD166866 induces autophagy through repressing Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. Together, the present study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-tumor activities of FGFR antagonists, and may further assist the FGFRs-based drug discovery. -- Highlights: •FGFR1 antagonist inhibits cell viability in FGFR1-amplified breast cancer cells. •FGFR1 antagonist induces autophagy in FGFR1-amplified breast cancer cells. •FGFR1 antagonist-induced autophagy is protective. •FGFR1 antagonist induces autophagy by inhibiting Akt/mTOR pathway.

  15. FGFR antagonist induces protective autophagy in FGFR1-amplified breast cancer cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yi [The School of Biomedical Sciences, Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu 610083 (China); Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Xie, Xiaoyan; Li, Xinyi; Wang, Peiqi [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China College of Stomatology, Sichuan University (China); Jing, Qian; Yue, Jiaqi; Liu, Yang [The School of Biomedical Sciences, Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu 610083 (China); Cheng, Zhong [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Li, Jingyi, E-mail: li--jingyi@hotmail.com [The School of Biomedical Sciences, Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu 610083 (China); Song, Haixing [The School of Biomedical Sciences, Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu 610083 (China); Li, Guoyu, E-mail: liguoyulisa@163.com [School of Pharmacy, Shihezi University, Shihezi 832003 (China); Liu, Rui, E-mail: liurui_scu@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China College of Stomatology, Sichuan University (China); Wang, Jinhui [School of Pharmacy, Shihezi University, Shihezi 832003 (China)

    2016-05-20

    Breast cancer, representing approximately 30% of all gynecological cancer cases diagnosed yearly, is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality for women. Amplification of FGFR1 is frequently observed in breast cancers and is associated with poor prognosis. Though FGFRs have long been considered as anti-cancer drug targets, and a cluster of FGFR antagonists are currently under clinical trials, the precise cellular responses under the treatment of FGFR antagonists remains unclear. Here, we show that PD166866, an FGFR1-selective inhibitor, inhibits proliferation and triggers anoikis in FGFR1-amplified breast cancer cell lines. Notably, we demonstrate that PD166866 induces autophagy in FGFR1-amplified breast cancer cell lines, while blockage of autophagy by Atg5 knockdown further enhances the anti-proliferative activities of PD166866. Moreover, mechanistic study reveals that PD166866 induces autophagy through repressing Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. Together, the present study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-tumor activities of FGFR antagonists, and may further assist the FGFRs-based drug discovery. -- Highlights: •FGFR1 antagonist inhibits cell viability in FGFR1-amplified breast cancer cells. •FGFR1 antagonist induces autophagy in FGFR1-amplified breast cancer cells. •FGFR1 antagonist-induced autophagy is protective. •FGFR1 antagonist induces autophagy by inhibiting Akt/mTOR pathway.

  16. Safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of the histamine H3 receptor antagonist, ABT-288, in healthy young adults and elderly volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Ahmed A; Haig, George; Florian, Hana; Locke, Charles; Zhang, Jun; Dutta, Sandeep

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this work was to characterize the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of ABT-288, a highly selective histamine H3 receptor antagonist, in healthy young adults and elderly subjects following single and multiple dosing in a phase 1 setting. Single doses (0.1, 0.3, 1, 3, 10, 20 and 40 mg ABT-288) and multiple doses (0.5, 1.5, 3 and 6 mg ABT-288 once-daily for 14 days) were evaluated in young adults and multiple doses (0.5, 1.5, 3 and 5 mg ABT-288 once-daily for 12 days) were evaluated in elderly subjects using randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalating study designs. The effect of food on ABT-288 pharmacokinetics (5 mg single dose) was evaluated using an open label, randomized, crossover design. ABT-288 safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics were comparable in young and elderly subjects. Single doses up to 40 mg and multiple doses up to 3 mg once-daily were generally safe and well tolerated. The most frequently reported adverse events were hot flush, headache, abnormal dreams, insomnia, nausea and dizziness. ABT-288 exposure (AUC) was dose-proportional over the evaluated dose ranges. The mean elimination half-life ranged from 40 to 61 h across dose groups. Steady state was achieved by day 10 of once-daily dosing with 3.4- to 4.2-fold accumulation. Food did not have a clinically meaningful effect on ABT-288 exposure. Based on the above results, 1 and 3 mg once-daily doses of ABT-288 were advanced to phase 2 evaluation in Alzheimer's patients. © 2012 Abbott Laboratories. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  17. Antagonistic Phenomena in Network Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motter, Adilson E.; Timme, Marc

    2018-03-01

    Recent research on the network modeling of complex systems has led to a convenient representation of numerous natural, social, and engineered systems that are now recognized as networks of interacting parts. Such systems can exhibit a wealth of phenomena that not only cannot be anticipated from merely examining their parts, as per the textbook definition of complexity, but also challenge intuition even when considered in the context of what is now known in network science. Here, we review the recent literature on two major classes of such phenomena that have far-reaching implications: (a) antagonistic responses to changes of states or parameters and (b) coexistence of seemingly incongruous behaviors or properties - both deriving from the collective and inherently decentralized nature of the dynamics. They include effects as diverse as negative compressibility in engineered materials, rescue interactions in biological networks, negative resistance in fluid networks, and the Braess paradox occurring across transport and supply networks. They also include remote synchronization, chimera states, and the converse of symmetry breaking in brain, power-grid, and oscillator networks as well as remote control in biological and bioinspired systems. By offering a unified view of these various scenarios, we suggest that they are representative of a yet broader class of unprecedented network phenomena that ought to be revealed and explained by future research.

  18. PHARMACOLOGY OF CANNABINOIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilonka Ferjan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of cannabinoid receptors and endocannabinoid system has led to the potential therapeutic use of cannabis derivatives. Cannabinoids acting through the CB1 receptors modulate the release of other neurotransmitters in central nervous system, whereas the activation of peripheral CB2 receptors results in decreased inflammatory response and increased apoptosis of some tumor cells populations. The cannabinoids have been authorized for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting; stimulation of appetite; to alleviate neuropathic pain and spasticity in multiple sclerosis, and to reduce pain in cancer patients. Efficacy in other diseases and clinical conditions should be proven in ongoing or future clinical trials. Isolation and identification of different cannabinoids from cannabis and synthesis of novel, more selective, derivatives widens their therapeutic potential. However, there are numerous adverse effects reported, especially when cannabinoids formulations with unknown quantitative and qualitative composition are used. Addiction, tolerance, withdrawal symptoms, increased risk of acute myocardial re-infarction, and increased risk of psychosis or worsening of psychosis are the most common adverse effects of cannabinoids. Acute adverse effects e. g. severe central nervous system depression, are more pronounced in children than in adults. Potential cannabinoid medicines should be subject to the same regulations as other potential drugs. Safety and efficacy of any potential drug candidate, regardless whether it is plant-derived or synthesized, should be proven in non-clinical studies and clinical trials, as well as the marketing authorization must be issued by the appropriate drug authority. Patients deserve a quality manufactured product, which always contains the specified amount of "Remedium cardinale."

  19. Precision pharmacology for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, Harald; Vergallo, Andrea; Aguilar, Lisi Flores; Benda, Norbert; Broich, Karl; Cuello, A Claudio; Cummings, Jeffrey; Dubois, Bruno; Federoff, Howard J; Fiandaca, Massimo; Genthon, Remy; Haberkamp, Marion; Karran, Eric; Mapstone, Mark; Perry, George; Schneider, Lon S; Welikovitch, Lindsay A; Woodcock, Janet; Baldacci, Filippo; Lista, Simone

    2018-04-01

    The complex multifactorial nature of polygenic Alzheimer's disease (AD) presents significant challenges for drug development. AD pathophysiology is progressing in a non-linear dynamic fashion across multiple systems levels - from molecules to organ systems - and through adaptation, to compensation, and decompensation to systems failure. Adaptation and compensation maintain homeostasis: a dynamic equilibrium resulting from the dynamic non-linear interaction between genome, epigenome, and environment. An individual vulnerability to stressors exists on the basis of individual triggers, drivers, and thresholds accounting for the initiation and failure of adaptive and compensatory responses. Consequently, the distinct pattern of AD pathophysiology in space and time must be investigated on the basis of the individual biological makeup. This requires the implementation of systems biology and neurophysiology to facilitate Precision Medicine (PM) and Precision Pharmacology (PP). The regulation of several processes at multiple levels of complexity from gene expression to cellular cycle to tissue repair and system-wide network activation has different time delays (temporal scale) according to the affected systems (spatial scale). The initial failure might originate and occur at every level potentially affecting the whole dynamic interrelated systems within an organism. Unraveling the spatial and temporal dynamics of non-linear pathophysiological mechanisms across the continuum of hierarchical self-organized systems levels and from systems homeostasis to systems failure is key to understand AD. Measuring and, possibly, controlling space- and time-scaled adaptive and compensatory responses occurring during AD will represent a crucial step to achieve the capacity to substantially modify the disease course and progression at the best suitable timepoints, thus counteracting disrupting critical pathophysiological inputs. This approach will provide the conceptual basis for effective

  20. Pharmacologic treatment of pain in polyneuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sindrup, Søren H.; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2000-01-01

    Tricyclic antidepressants and anticonvulsants have become the mainstay in the treatment of pain in polyneuropathy. Within the last decade, controlled trials have shown that numerous other drugs relieve such pain. To estimate the efficacy of the different treatments, the authors identified all...... placebo-controlled trials and calculated numbers needed to treat (NNT) to obtain one patient with more than 50% pain relief. The NNT was 2.6 for tricyclic antidepressants, 6.7 for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, 2.5 for anticonvulsant sodium channel blockers, 4.1 for the anticonvulsant calcium...... channel blocker gabapentin, and 3.4 for the mixed opioid and monoaminergic drug tramadol, as calculated from a sufficiently large number of patients. Favorable point estimates of NNT of 1.9 for the NMDA-antagonist dextromethorphan and 3.4 for L-dopa were determined from a limited number of data...

  1. Pharmacology Experiments on the Computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    A computer program that replaces a set of pharmacology and physiology laboratory experiments on live animals or isolated organs is described and illustrated. Five experiments are simulated: dose-effect relationships on smooth muscle, blood pressure and catecholamines, neuromuscular signal transmission, acetylcholine and the circulation, and…

  2. Pharmacology of Marihuana (Cannabis sativa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maickel, Roger P.

    1973-01-01

    A detailed discussion of marihuana (Cannabis sativa) providing the modes of use, history, chemistry, and physiologic properties of the drug. Cites research results relating to the pharmacologic effects of marihuana. These effects are categorized into five areas: behavioral, cardiovascular-respiratory, central nervous system, toxicity-toxicology,…

  3. Chemotaxonomy and pharmacology of Gentianaceae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren Rosendal; Schripsema, Jan

    2002-01-01

    the remaining six are members of the Gentianeae. Based on the above results, a tentative list of chemical characteristics for the tribes of the Gentianaceae is presented. Finally, some pharmacologically interesting properties of plant extracts or compounds from taxa within Gentianaceae are listed....

  4. Differential effects of cathinone compounds and MDMA on body temperature in the rat, and pharmacological characterization of mephedrone-induced hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortall, S E; Green, A R; Swift, K M; Fone, K C F; King, M V

    2013-02-01

    Recreational users report that mephedrone has similar psychoactive effects to 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). MDMA induces well-characterized changes in body temperature due to complex monoaminergic effects on central thermoregulation, peripheral blood flow and thermogenesis, but there are little preclinical data on the acute effects of mephedrone or other synthetic cathinones. The acute effects of cathinone, methcathinone and mephedrone on rectal and tail temperature were examined in individually housed rats, with MDMA included for comparison. Rats were killed 2 h post-injection and brain regions were collected for quantification of 5-HT, dopamine and major metabolites. Further studies examined the impact of selected α-adrenoceptor and dopamine receptor antagonists on mephedrone-induced changes in rectal temperature and plasma catecholamines. At normal room temperature, MDMA caused sustained decreases in rectal and tail temperature. Mephedrone caused a transient decrease in rectal temperature, which was enhanced by α(1) -adrenoceptor and dopamine D(1) receptor blockade, and a prolonged decrease in tail temperature. Cathinone and methcathinone caused sustained increases in rectal temperature. MDMA decreased 5-HT and/or 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) content in several brain regions and reduced striatal homovanillic acid (HVA) levels, whereas cathinone and methcathinone increased striatal HVA and 5-HIAA. Cathinone elevated striatal and hypothalamic 5-HT. Mephedrone elevated plasma noradrenaline levels, an effect prevented by α-adrenoceptor and dopamine receptor antagonists. MDMA and cathinones have different effects on thermoregulation, and their acute effects on brain monoamines also differ. These findings suggest that the adverse effects of cathinones in humans cannot be extrapolated from previous observations on MDMA. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  5. Pharmacological treatment of children with gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tighe, Mark; Afzal, Nadeem A; Bevan, Amanda; Hayen, Andrew; Munro, Alasdair; Beattie, R Mark

    2014-11-24

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) is a common disorder, characterised by regurgitation of gastric contents into the oesophagus. GOR is a very common presentation in infancy in both primary and secondary care settings. GOR can affect approximately 50% of infants younger than three months old (Nelson 1997). The natural history of GOR in infancy is generally that of a functional, self-limiting condition that improves with age; gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) and its precise distinction from GOR are debated, but consensus guidelines from the North American Society of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN-ESPGHAN guidelines 2009) define GORD as 'troublesome symptoms or complications of GOR.' This Cochrane review aims to provide a robust analysis of currently available pharmacological interventions used to treat children with GOR by assessing all outcomes indicating benefit or harm. We sought to identify relevant published trials by searching the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2014, Issue 5), MEDLINE and EMBASE (1966 to 2014), the Centralised Information Service for Complementary Medicine (CISCOM), the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Science Citation Index (on BIDS-UK General Science Index) and the ISI Web of Science. We also searched for ongoing trials in the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com).Reference lists from trials selected by electronic searching were handsearched for relevant paediatric studies on medical treatment of children with gastro-oesophageal reflux, as were published abstracts from conference proceedings (published in Gut and Gastroenterology) and reviews published over the past five years.No language restrictions were applied. Abstracts were reviewed by two review authors, and relevant RCTs on study participants (birth to 16 years) with GOR receiving a pharmacological treatment were selected. Subgroup analysis was considered for children up to 12 months of age

  6. Prophylactic treatment of migraine in children. Part 1. A systematic review of non-pharmacological trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damen, L; Bruijn, J; Koes, BW; Berger, MY; Passchier, J; Verhagen, AP

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of non-pharmacological prophylactic treatments of migraine in children. Databases were searched from inception to June 2004 and references were checked. We selected controlled trials reporting the effects of non-pharmacological prophylactic treatments

  7. An avian homologue of the human β3-adrenoceptor that demonstrates unique pharmacology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broxton, N.M.; Papaioannou, M.; Evans, B.A.; Summers, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: A novel β-adrenoceptor (AR) in the turkey (Tβ 4 -AR; Chen et al 1994) displays low homology with otherβ-AR subtypes thus appearing to represent a novel subtype. It has intermediate affinity for [ 125 I]-cyanopindolol (CYP), lower than that for β|- or β 2 -ARs but higher than for the hβ 3 -AR. However, the gene structure of the tβ 4 -AR closely resembles that of the rodent β 3 -AR gene. cDNAs containing the coding region of tβ 4 - and hβ 3 -ARs were cloned into the mammalian expression vector pCDNA3.1 and transiently expressed in CHO KI cells. The pharmacological properties of the tβ 4 -AR were investigated with binding ([ 125 I] CYP) and cAMP accumulation assays and compared to that of the human β 3 ,-AR. Both the tβ 4 - and hβ 3 -ARs displayed low affinities for CGP20712A (CGP;β 1 -AR selective; pK i , tβ 4 6.13±0.62; hβ 3 6.10±0.15) and ICI118551 (ICI; β 2 -AR selective; pK i tβ 4 7.12±0.54; hβ 3 6.62±0.33). Theβ 3 -AR selective antagonist SR59230 (pK i tβ 4 7.45±0.07; hβ 3 .0010.50) as well as a non-selective antagonist (-) propranolol (Prop; pK i tβ 4 8.90±0.15; hβ 3 7.40±0.74) had higher affinities for both receptors but showed different rank orders of potency. β-AR agonists isoprenaline (Iso; pK i , tβ 4 6.5810.19; hβ 3 5.95±0.10) and noradrenaline (NA; pK i , tβ 4 6.65±0.29; hβ 3 5.66±10.32) had higher affinity for the tβ 4 -AR. In cAMP accumulation assays, the rank orders of potency of agonists was Iso > NA > BRL37344 >>CL316243 for the tβ 4 -AR and BRL37344, Iso > NA > CL316243 for the hβ 3 -AR. The antagonists had rank orders of affinity similar to those determined from binding experiments; for tβ 4 -AR (-) Prop > SR > ICI > (+) Prop > CGP, and hβ 3 -AR, SR > (-)Prop > ICI> (+) Prop > CGP. Therefore the tβ 4 -AR, although resembling the hβ 3 -AR in gene structure, displays high affinity for (-) propranolol and relatively low affinity for β 3 -AR selective agonists. Copyright (2001) Australasian

  8. Non-imidazole-based histamine H3 receptor antagonists with anticonvulsant activity in different seizure models in male adult rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadek B

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Bassem Sadek,1 Ali Saad,1 Gniewomir Latacz,2 Kamil Kuder,2 Agnieszka Olejarz,2 Tadeusz Karcz,2 Holger Stark,3 Katarzyna Kieć-Kononowicz2 1Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates; 2Department of Technology and Biotechnology of Drugs, Faculty of Pharmacy, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Kraków, Poland; 3Department of Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Chemistry, Institute of Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Chemistry, Heinrich Heine University, Düsseldorf, Germany Abstract: A series of twelve novel non-imidazole-based ligands (3–14 was developed and evaluated for its in vitro binding properties at the human histamine H3 receptor (hH3R. The novel ligands were investigated for their in vivo protective effects in different seizure models in male adult rats. Among the H3R ligands (3–14 tested, ligand 14 showed significant and dose-dependent reduction in the duration of tonic hind limb extension in maximal electroshock (MES-induced seizure model subsequent to acute systemic administration (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg, intraperitoneally, whereas ligands 4, 6, and 7 without appreciable protection in MES model were most promising in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ model. Moreover, the protective effect observed for ligand 14 in MES model was lower than that observed for the reference drug phenytoin and was entirely abrogated when rats were co-administered with the brain-penetrant H1R antagonist pyrilamine (PYR but not the brain-penetrant H2R antagonist zolantidine (ZOL, demonstrating that histaminergic neurotransmission by activation of postsynaptically located H1Rs seems to be involved in the protective action. On the contrary, PYR and ZOL failed to abrogate the full protection provided by 4 in PTZ model and the moderate protective effect by 14 in strychnine (STR model. Moreover, the experimental and in silico estimation of properties such as metabolism was

  9. Calcium antagonists for aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorhout Mees, S. M.; Rinkel, G. J. E.; Feigin, V. L.; Algra, A.; van den Bergh, W. M.; Vermeulen, M.; van Gijn, J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Secondary ischaemia is a frequent cause of poor outcome in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Its pathogenesis has been incompletely elucidated, but vasospasm probably is a contributing factor. Experimental studies have suggested that calcium antagonists can prevent or reverse

  10. New approaches in analyzing the pharmacological properties of herbal extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamburger, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    Herbal extracts are widely used and accepted in the population. The pharmacological characterization of such products meets some specific challenges, given the chemical complexity of the active ingredient. An overview is given on modern methods and approaches that can be used for that purpose. In particular, HPLC-based activity profiling is discussed as a means to identify pharmacologically active compounds in an extract, and expression profiling is described as a means for global assessment of effects exerted by multi-component mixtures such as extracts. These methods are illustrated with selected axamples from our labs, including woad (Isatis tinctoria), the traditional Chinese herb Danshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza) and black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa).

  11. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Gluud, L L; Gluud, C

    2004-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy.......Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy....

  12. The Effect of Sympathetic Antagonists on the Antidepressant Action of Alprazolam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorash ZM

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Alprazolam is an anti-anxiety drug shown to be effective in the treatment of depression. In this study, the effect of sympathetic receptor antagonists on alprazolam–induced antidepressant action was studied using a mouse model of forced swimming behavioral despair. The interaction of three sympathetic receptor antagonists with benzodiazepines, which may impact the clinical use of alprazolam, was also studied. Behavioral despair was examined in six groups of albino mice. Drugs were administered intraperitoneally. The control group received only a single dose of 1% Tween 80. The second group received a single dose of alprazolam, and the third group received an antagonist followed by alprazolam. The fourth group was treated with imipramine, and the fifth group received an antagonist followed by imipramine. The sixth group was treated with a single dose of an antagonist alone (atenolol, a β1-selective adrenoceptor antagonist; propranolol, a non selective β-adrenoceptor antagonist; and prazocin, an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist. Results confirmed the antidepressant action of alprazolam and imipramine. Prazocin treatment alone produced depression, but it significantly potentiated the antidepressant actions of imipramine and alprazolam. Atenolol alone produced an antidepressant effect and potentiated the antidepressant action of alprazolam. Propranolol treatment alone produced depression, and antagonized the effects of alprazolam and imipramine, even producing depression in combined treatments. In conclusion, our results reveal that alprazolam may produce antidepressant effects through the release of noradrenaline, which stimulates β2 receptors to produce an antidepressant action. Imipramine may act by activating β2 receptors by blocking or down-regulating β1 receptors.

  13. 5-HT2A receptor antagonists improve motor impairments in the MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ferguson, Marcus C.; Nayyar, Tultul; Deutch, Ariel Y.; Ansah, Twum A.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical observations have suggested that ritanserin, a 5-HT2A/C receptor antagonist may reduce motor deficits in persons with Parkinson's Disease (PD). To better understand the potential antiparkinsonian actions of ritanserin, we compared the effects of ritanserin with the selective 5-HT2A receptor antagonist M100907 and the selective 5-HT2C receptor antagonist SB 206553 on motor impairments in mice treated with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). MPTP-treated mice exhibited...

  14. Pharmacological modulation of mitochondrial calcium homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduino, Daniela M; Perocchi, Fabiana

    2018-01-10

    Mitochondria are pivotal organelles in calcium (Ca 2+ ) handling and signalling, constituting intracellular checkpoints for numerous processes that are vital for cell life. Alterations in mitochondrial Ca 2+ homeostasis have been linked to a variety of pathological conditions and are critical in the aetiology of several human diseases. Efforts have been taken to harness mitochondrial Ca 2+ transport mechanisms for therapeutic intervention, but pharmacological compounds that direct and selectively modulate mitochondrial Ca 2+ homeostasis are currently lacking. New avenues have, however, emerged with the breakthrough discoveries on the genetic identification of the main players involved in mitochondrial Ca 2+ influx and efflux pathways and with recent hints towards a deep understanding of the function of these molecular systems. Here, we review the current advances in the understanding of the mechanisms and regulation of mitochondrial Ca 2+ homeostasis and its contribution to physiology and human disease. We also introduce and comment on the recent progress towards a systems-level pharmacological targeting of mitochondrial Ca 2+ homeostasis. © 2018 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2018 The Physiological Society.

  15. Detailed characterization of the in vitro pharmacological and pharmacokinetic properties of N-(2-hydroxybenzyl)-2,5-dimethoxy-4-cyanophenylethylamine (25CN-NBOH), a highly selective and brain-penetrant 5-HT2A receptor agonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A; McCorvy, John D; Petersen, Sebastian Leth

    2017-01-01

    ]ketanserin/[3H]mesulergine, [3H]LSD and [3H]Cimbi-36 binding assays (Ki 2C/Ki 2A ratio range 52-81, Ki 2B/Ki 2A ratio 37). Moreover, in inositol phosphate and intracellular Ca2+ mobilization assays 25CN-NBOH exhibited 30- to 180-fold 5-HT2A/5-HT2C selectivities and 54-fold 5-HT2A/5-HT2B selectivity as measured...

  16. Pharmacological challenges in chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Olesen, Anne Estrup; Brokjaer, Anne; Fisher, Iben Wendelboe; Larsen, Isabelle Myriam

    2013-01-01

    Drug absorption in patients with chronic pancreatitis might be affected by the pathophysiology of the disease. The exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is associated with changes in gastrointestinal intraluminal pH, motility disorder, bacterial overgrowth and changed pancreatic gland secretion. Together these factors can result in malabsorption and may also affect the efficacy of pharmacological intervention. The lifestyle of chronic pancreatitis patients may also contribute to gastrointestinal ...

  17. Pharmacological treatment of sexual offenders in German outpatient treatment centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Daniel; Gregório Hertz, Priscilla; Sauter, Julia; Briken, Peer; Rettenberger, Martin

    2018-05-04

    In Germany, depending on a sexual offender's culpability and the severity of the offence, he/she can be placed either in the forensic-psychiatric or the correctional system. Numbers related to the pharmacological treatment of sexual offenders for the correctional system are missing so far. In sexual offenders, the pharmacological treatment of paraphilic disorders is of special importance. The present study aimed at assessing the prevalence of pharmacological sexual offender treatment in German outpatient treatment centers supervising mainly clients from the correctional sector. An online questionnaire was sent to 112 outpatient treatment centers and 21 provided data relevant for the present study. The included institutions reported about a total of 813 sexual offenders, of whom 200 (24.6%) were treated with pharmacological agents, most frequently antipsychotics (14.8%) and selective-serotonin-reuptake-inhibitors (7.1%). Of the total sample, 26.7% of sexual offenders were diagnosed with a paraphilic - mainly with a pedophilic - disorder. Only 2% were treated with androgen-deprivation therapy. Compared with forensic-psychiatric institutions, only a minority of sexual offenders are treated with medication specifically addressing paraphilic symptomatology. However, the prevalence of paraphilic disorders found in the present study suggests that pharmacological treatment of paraphilic fantasies and behaviors could be of great importance in the correctional sector as well.

  18. Pharmacological and protein profiling suggest venetoclax (ABT-199) as optimal partner with ibrutinib in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-Gomez, Fabiola; Lamothe, Betty; Woyach, Jennifer A.; Wierda, William G.; Keating, Michael J.; Balakrishnan, Kumudha; Gandhi, Varsha

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) is a critical enzyme in the B-cell receptor pathway and is inhibited by ibrutinib due to covalent binding to the kinase domain. Though ibrutinib results in impressive clinical activity in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), most patients achieve only partial remission due to residual disease. We performed a pharmacologic profiling of residual circulating CLL cells from patients receiving ibrutinib to identify optimal agents that could induce cell death of these lymphocytes. Experimental design Ex vivo serial samples of CLL cells from patients on ibrutinib were obtained prior and after (weeks 2, 4, and 12) the start of treatment. These cells were incubated with PI3K inhibitors (idelalisib or IPI-145), bendamustine, additional ibrutinib, or BCL-2 antagonists (ABT-737 or ABT-199) and cell death was measured. In vitro investigations complemented ex vivo studies. Immunoblots for BTK signaling pathway and antiapoptotic proteins were performed. Results The BCL-2 antagonists, especially ABT-199, induced high cell death during ex vivo incubations. In concert with the ex vivo data, in vitro combinations also resulted highly cytotoxicity. Serial samples of CLL cells obtained before and 2, 4, 12, or 36 weeks after the start of ibrutinib showed inhibition of BTK activity and sensitivity to ABTs. Among the three BCL-2 family anti-apoptotic proteins that are overexpressed in CLL, levels of MCL-1 and BCL-XL were decreased after ibrutinib while ABT-199 selectively antagonizes BCL-2. Conclusions Our biological and molecular results suggest that ibrutinib and ABT-199 combination should be tested clinically against CLL. PMID:25829398

  19. Pharmacological and Protein Profiling Suggests Venetoclax (ABT-199) as Optimal Partner with Ibrutinib in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-Gomez, Fabiola; Lamothe, Betty; Woyach, Jennifer A; Wierda, William G; Keating, Michael J; Balakrishnan, Kumudha; Gandhi, Varsha

    2015-08-15

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) is a critical enzyme in the B-cell receptor pathway and is inhibited by ibrutinib due to covalent binding to the kinase domain. Though ibrutinib results in impressive clinical activity in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), most patients achieve only partial remission due to residual disease. We performed a pharmacologic profiling of residual circulating CLL cells from patients receiving ibrutinib to identify optimal agents that could induce cell death of these lymphocytes. Ex vivo serial samples of CLL cells from patients on ibrutinib were obtained prior and after (weeks 2, 4, and 12) the start of treatment. These cells were incubated with PI3K inhibitors (idelalisib or IPI-145), bendamustine, additional ibrutinib, or BCL-2 antagonists (ABT-737 or ABT-199), and cell death was measured. In vitro investigations complemented ex vivo studies. Immunoblots for BTK signaling pathway and antiapoptotic proteins were performed. The BCL-2 antagonists, especially ABT-199, induced high cell death during ex vivo incubations. In concert with the ex vivo data, in vitro combinations also resulted in high cytotoxicity. Serial samples of CLL cells obtained before and 2, 4, 12, or 36 weeks after the start of ibrutinib showed inhibition of BTK activity and sensitivity to ABTs. Among the three BCL-2 family antiapoptotic proteins that are overexpressed in CLL, levels of MCL-1 and BCL-XL were decreased after ibrutinib while ABT-199 selectively antagonizes BCL-2. Our biologic and molecular results suggest that ibrutinib and ABT-199 combination should be tested clinically against CLL. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Neonatal irradiation: neurotoxicity and modulation of pharmacological response; Irradiacion prenatal: neurotoxicidad y modulacion farmacologica de la respuesta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zieher, Luis M; Guelman, Laura R [Bueno Aires Univ. (Argentina). Facultad de Medicina

    2001-07-01

    Neuronal loss may be responsible of many acute and chronic diseases. For this reason, is very important to understand the mechanisms that contribute to neuronal cell death in order to develop pharmacological strategies for the treatment of these disorders. Developing CNS is very sensitive to ionizing radiations. In particular, irradiation of immature cerebellum induce motor (impaired gait), morphological (disarrangement of cytoarchitecture) and biochemical (increase in noradrenaline levels) alterations, mainly related to cerebellar granule cell death induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated after radiation exposure. Cellular changes triggered by ROS include increased intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels, activation of NMDA glutamatergic receptors and apoptosis. With an excitatory neurotransmitter as glutamate and a multifacetic ion as calcium, their regulation in synapses and cytoplasm, respectively, is very vulnerable. Moreover, the highly aerobic condition of neuronal metabolism determines that an oxidative injury lead to ROS accumulation. The neuro protection therapy attempts to interfere with these few processes by using antioxidants, metal chelators, calcium antagonists or glutamatergic antagonists. In the protocol used in our laboratory, neonatal rats were irradiated with 5 Gy gamma radiations in their cephalic ends, and pre or post-treated with selected putative neuro protective agents. After 30-90 days, motor, morphological and biochemical parameters were measured and compared with irradiated and sham-irradiated (control) animals. Drugs as GM1 ganglioside or amifostine were able to restore abnormal parameters. Cerebellar granule cell irradiated 'in vitro' were treated with neuro protective agents prior or after irradiation. Cell viability and several biochemical parameters were analysed after 48 hours. GM1 ganglioside and amifostine were effective in preventing cell death and increase in ROS induced by ionizing radiation exposure. (author)

  1. Applications of stable isotopes in clinical pharmacology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, Reinout C A; Stellaard, Frans; Woerdenbag, Herman J; Frijlink, Henderik W; Kosterink, Jos G W

    2011-01-01

    This review aims to present an overview of the application of stable isotope technology in clinical pharmacology. Three main categories of stable isotope technology can be distinguished in clinical pharmacology. Firstly, it is applied in the assessment of drug pharmacology to determine the

  2. Role of transglutaminase 2 in A1 adenosine receptor- and β2-adrenoceptor-mediated pharmacological pre- and post-conditioning against hypoxia-reoxygenation-induced cell death in H9c2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Falguni S; Nelson, Carl P; Dickenson, John M

    2018-01-15

    Pharmacologically-induced pre- and post-conditioning represent attractive therapeutic strategies to reduce ischaemia/reperfusion injury during cardiac surgery and following myocardial infarction. We have previously reported that transglutaminase 2 (TG2) activity is modulated by the A 1 adenosine receptor and β 2 -adrenoceptor in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts. The primary aim of this study was to determine the role of TG2 in A 1 adenosine receptor and β 2 -adrenoceptor-induced pharmacological pre- and post-conditioning in the H9c2 cells. H9c2 cells were exposed to 8h hypoxia (1% O 2 ) followed by 18h reoxygenation, after which cell viability was assessed by monitoring mitochondrial reduction of MTT, lactate dehydrogenase release and caspase-3 activation. N 6 -cyclopentyladenosine (CPA; A 1 adenosine receptor agonist), formoterol (β 2 -adrenoceptor agonist) or isoprenaline (non-selective β-adrenoceptor agonist) were added before hypoxia/reoxygenation (pre-conditioning) or at the start of reoxygenation following hypoxia (post-conditioning). Pharmacological pre- and post-conditioning with CPA and isoprenaline significantly reduced hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced cell death. In contrast, formoterol did not elicit protection. Pre-treatment with pertussis toxin (G i/o -protein inhibitor), DPCPX (A 1 adenosine receptor antagonist) or TG2 inhibitors (Z-DON and R283) attenuated the A 1 adenosine receptor-induced pharmacological pre- and post-conditioning. Similarly, pertussis toxin, ICI 118,551 (β 2 -adrenoceptor antagonist) or TG2 inhibition attenuated the isoprenaline-induced cell survival. Knockdown of TG2 using small interfering RNA (siRNA) attenuated CPA and isoprenaline-induced pharmacological pre- and post-conditioning. Finally, proteomic analysis following isoprenaline treatment identified known (e.g. protein S100-A6) and novel (e.g. adenine phosphoribosyltransferase) protein substrates for TG2. These results have shown that A 1 adenosine receptor and β 2 -adrenoceptor

  3. Development of a human vasopressin V1a-receptor antagonist from an evolutionary-related insect neuropeptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Giglio, Maria Giulia; Muttenthaler, Markus; Harpsøe, Kasper; Liutkeviciute, Zita; Keov, Peter; Eder, Thomas; Rattei, Thomas; Arrowsmith, Sarah; Wray, Susan; Marek, Ales; Elbert, Tomas; Alewood, Paul F.; Gloriam, David E.; Gruber, Christian W.

    2017-02-01

    Characterisation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) relies on the availability of a toolbox of ligands that selectively modulate different functional states of the receptors. To uncover such molecules, we explored a unique strategy for ligand discovery that takes advantage of the evolutionary conservation of the 600-million-year-old oxytocin/vasopressin signalling system. We isolated the insect oxytocin/vasopressin orthologue inotocin from the black garden ant (Lasius niger), identified and cloned its cognate receptor and determined its pharmacological properties on the insect and human oxytocin/vasopressin receptors. Subsequently, we identified a functional dichotomy: inotocin activated the insect inotocin and the human vasopressin V1b receptors, but inhibited the human V1aR. Replacement of Arg8 of inotocin by D-Arg8 led to a potent, stable and competitive V1aR-antagonist ([D-Arg8]-inotocin) with a 3,000-fold binding selectivity for the human V1aR over the other three subtypes, OTR, V1bR and V2R. The Arg8/D-Arg8 ligand-pair was further investigated to gain novel insights into the oxytocin/vasopressin peptide-receptor interaction, which led to the identification of key residues of the receptors that are important for ligand functionality and selectivity. These observations could play an important role for development of oxytocin/vasopressin receptor modulators that would enable clear distinction of the physiological and pathological responses of the individual receptor subtypes.

  4. NR2B antagonist CP-101,606 abolishes pitch-mediated deviance detection in awake rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siva eDigavalli

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia patients exhibit a decreased ability to detect change in their auditory environment as measured by auditory event related potentials such as mismatch negativity. This deficit has been linked to abnormal NMDA neurotransmission since, among other observations, non-selective channel blockers of NMDA reliably diminish deviance detection in human subjects as well as in animal models. Recent molecular and functional evidence link NR2B receptor subtype to aberrant NMDA transmission in schizophrenia. However, it is unknown if NR2B receptors participate in pre-attentive deviance detection. We recorded event related potentials from the vertex of freely behaving rats in response to frequency mismatch protocols. We saw a robust increase in N1 response to deviants compared to standard as well as control stimuli indicating true deviance detection. Moreover, the increased negativity was highly sensitive to deviant probability. Next, we tested the effect of a non-selective NMDA channel blocker (ketamine, 30 mg/kg and a highly selective NR2B antagonist, CP-101,606 (10 or 30 mg/kg on deviance detection. Ketamine attenuated deviance mainly by increasing the amplitude of the standard ERP. Amplitude and/or latency of several ERP components were also markedly affected. In contrast, CP-101,606 robustly and dose-dependently inhibited the deviant’s N1 amplitude and as a consequence, completely abolished deviance detection. No other ERPs or components were affected. Thus, we report first evidence that NR2B receptors robustly participate in processes of automatic deviance detection in a rodent model. Lastly, our model demonstrates a path forward to test specific pharmacological hypotheses using translational endpoints relevant to aberrant sensory processing in schizophrenia.

  5. Design, synthesis, and pharmacology of a highly subtype-selective GluR1/2 agonist, (RS)-2-amino-3-(4-chloro-3-hydroxy-5-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (Cl-HIBO)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Esben J; Kristensen, Anders S; Pickering, Darryl S

    2003-01-01

    On the basis of structural studies, chloro-homoibotenic acid (Cl-HIBO) was designed and synthesized. Cl-HIBO was characterized in binding and electrophysiology experiments on native and cloned subtypes of GluRs. Electrophysiological selectivities ranged from 275 to 1600 for GluR1/2 over GluR3/4. ...

  6. Angiotensin receptors in Dupuytren's disease: a target for pharmacological treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Christopher; Touil, Leila; Vaiude, Partha; Singh, Jaipaul; McKirdy, Stuart

    2018-02-01

    Attempts at the pharmacological treatment of Dupuytren's disease have so far been unsuccessful, and the disease is not yet fully understood on a cellular level. The Renin-Angiotensin System has long been understood to play a circulating hormonal role. However, there is much evidence showing Angiotensin II to play a local role in wound healing and fibrosis, with ACE inhibitors being widely used as an anti-fibrotic agent in renal and cardiac disease. This study was designed to investigate the presence of Angiotensin II receptors 1 (AT1) and 2 (AT2) in Dupuytren's tissue to form a basis for further study into the pharmacological treatment of this condition. Tissue was harvested from 11 patients undergoing surgery for Dupuytren's disease. Each specimen was processed into frozen sections and immunostaining was employed to identify AT1 and AT2 receptors. Immunostaining for AT1 receptors was mildly positive in one patient and negative in all the remaining patients. However, all specimens stained extensively for AT2 receptors. This suggests that the expression of AT2 receptors is more prominent than AT1 receptors in Dupuytren's disease. These findings have opened a new avenue for future research involving ACE inhibitors, AT2 agonists, and AT2 antagonists in Dupuytren's disease.

  7. Medicinal Cannabis: History, Pharmacology, And Implications for the Acute Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgeman, Mary Barna; Abazia, Daniel T

    2017-03-01

    The authors review the historical use of medicinal cannabis and discuss the agent's pharmacology and pharmacokinetics, select evidence on medicinal uses, and the implications of evolving regulations on the acute care hospital setting.

  8. Medicinal Cannabis: History, Pharmacology, And Implications for the Acute Care Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Bridgeman, Mary Barna; Abazia, Daniel T.

    2017-01-01

    The authors review the historical use of medicinal cannabis and discuss the agent?s pharmacology and pharmacokinetics, select evidence on medicinal uses, and the implications of evolving regulations on the acute care hospital setting.

  9. Pseudomonas orientalis F9: A Potent Antagonist against Phytopathogens with Phytotoxic Effect in the Apple Flower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Zengerer

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In light of public concerns over the use of pesticides and antibiotics in plant protection and the subsequent selection for spread of resistant bacteria in the environment, it is inevitable to broaden our knowledge about viable alternatives, such as natural antagonists and their mode of action. The genus Pseudomonas is known for its metabolic versatility and genetic plasticity, encompassing pathogens as well as antagonists. We characterized strain Pseudomonas orientalis F9, an isolate from apple flowers in a Swiss orchard, and determined its antagonistic activity against several phytopathogenic bacteria, in particular Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight. P. orientalis F9 displayed antagonistic activity against a broad suite of phytopathogenic bacteria in the in vitro tests. The promising results from this analysis led to an ex vivo assay with E. amylovora CFBP1430Rif and P. orientalis F9 infected detached apple flowers. F9 diminished the fire blight pathogen in the flowers but also revealed phytotoxic traits. The experimental results were discussed in light of the complete genome sequence of F9, which revealed the strain to carry phenazine genes. Phenazines are known to contribute to antagonistic activity of bacterial strains against soil pathogens. When tested in the cress assay with Pythium ultimum as pathogen, F9 showed results comparable to the known antagonist P. protegens CHA0.

  10. Pseudomonas orientalis F9: A Potent Antagonist against Phytopathogens with Phytotoxic Effect in the Apple Flower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengerer, Veronika; Schmid, Michael; Bieri, Marco; Müller, Denise C; Remus-Emsermann, Mitja N P; Ahrens, Christian H; Pelludat, Cosima

    2018-01-01

    In light of public concerns over the use of pesticides and antibiotics in plant protection and the subsequent selection for spread of resistant bacteria in the environment, it is inevitable to broaden our knowledge about viable alternatives, such as natural antagonists and their mode of action. The genus Pseudomonas is known for its metabolic versatility and genetic plasticity, encompassing pathogens as well as antagonists. We characterized strain Pseudomonas orientalis F9, an isolate from apple flowers in a Swiss orchard, and determined its antagonistic activity against several phytopathogenic bacteria, in particular Erwinia amylovora , the causal agent of fire blight. P. orientalis F9 displayed antagonistic activity against a broad suite of phytopathogenic bacteria in the in vitro tests. The promising results from this analysis led to an ex vivo assay with E. amylovora CFBP1430 Rif and P. orientalis F9 infected detached apple flowers. F9 diminished the fire blight pathogen in the flowers but also revealed phytotoxic traits. The experimental results were discussed in light of the complete genome sequence of F9, which revealed the strain to carry phenazine genes. Phenazines are known to contribute to antagonistic activity of bacterial strains against soil pathogens. When tested in the cress assay with Pythium ultimum as pathogen, F9 showed results comparable to the known antagonist P. protegens CHA0.

  11. Antagonistic activity of selected strains of Bacillus thuringiensis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-02

    May 2, 2008 ... taining 100 ml of liquid culture of dextrose potato medium, and incubating in darkness ... later autoclaved for 20 min to a temperature of 120°C. The suspension was ... R. solani growth with a percentage of inhibition of 76.88 and 74.66 .... growth may have been inactivated (Dhingra and Sinclair, 1987).

  12. Antagonistic activity of selected strains of Bacillus thuringiensis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    121, were effective in the reduction of R. solani infection. In addition, GM-23 increased the length of pepper seedlings. These results suggest that the B. thuringiensis strains studied have an excellent potential to be used as bio-control agents of R.

  13. Microbial Herd Protection Mediated by Antagonistic Interaction in Polymicrobial Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Megan J. Q.; Liang, Xiaoye; Smart, Matt; Tang, Le; Moore, Richard; Ingalls, Brian

    2016-01-01

    determining community structures and the exchange of genetic materials. This simplified model elucidates a mechanism of microbial herd protection by which competing antagonistic species can coexist in the same niche, despite their diverse mutually destructive activities. Our results also suggest that antagonistic interactions impose strong selection that could promote multicellular organism-like social behaviors and contribute to the transition to multicellularity during evolution. PMID:27637882

  14. Microbial herd protection mediated by antagonistic interaction in polymicrobial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Megan; Liang, Xiaoye; Smart, Matt; Tang, Le; Moore, Richard; Ingalls, Brian; Dong, Tao G

    2016-09-16

    . This simplified model elucidates a mechanism of microbial herd protection by which competing antagonistic species coexist in the same niche despite their diverse mutually destructive activities. Our results also suggest that antagonistic interaction imposes a strong selection that could promote multicellular like social behaviors and contribute to the transition to multicellularity during evolution. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Evidence that diclofenac and celecoxib are thyroid hormone receptor beta antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zloh, Mire; Perez-Diaz, Noelia; Tang, Leslie; Patel, Pryank; Mackenzie, Louise S

    2016-02-01

    Long term use of NSAIDs is linked to side effects such as gastric bleeding and myocardial infarction. Use of in silico methods and pharmacology to investigate the potential for NSAIDs diclofenac, celecoxib and naproxen to bind to nuclear receptors. In silico screening predicted that both diclofenac and celecoxib has the potential to bind to a number of different nuclear receptors; docking analysis confirmed a theoretical ability for diclofenac and celecoxib but not naproxen to bind to TRβ. Results from TRβ luciferase reporter assays confirmed that both diclofenac and celecoxib display TRβ antagonistic properties; celecoxib, IC50 3.6 × 10(-6)M, and diclofenac IC50 5.3 × 10(-6)M, comparable to the TRβ antagonist MLS (IC50 3.1 × 10(-6)M). In contrast naproxen, a cardio-sparing NSAID, lacked TRβ antagonist effects. In order to determine the effects of NSAIDs in whole organ in vitro, we used isometric wire myography to measure the changes to Triiodothyronine (T3) induced vasodilation of rat mesenteric arteries. Incubation of arteries in the presence of the TRβ antagonist MLS000389544 (10(-5)M), as well as diclofenac (10(-5)M) and celecoxib (10(-5)M) but not naproxen significantly inhibited T3 induced vasodilation compared to controls. These results highlight the benefits of computational chemistry methods used to retrospectively analyse well known drugs for side effects. Using in silico and in vitro methods we have shown that both celecoxib and diclofenac but not naproxen exhibit off-target TRβ antagonist behaviour, which may be linked to their detrimental side effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Iomazenil: pharmacological and animal data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beer, H.F.; Blaeuenstein, P.A.; Hasler, P.H.; Schubiger, P.A.; Hunkeler, W.; Bibettu, E.P.; Pieri, L.; Grayson Richards, J.

    1990-01-01

    The flumazenil analogue Ro 16-0154 (Iomazenil), a benzodiazepine partial inverse agonist, has been labelled by halogen exchange to enable SPECT investigations of central benzodiazepine receptors in human brain. The purified 123 I-Ro 16-0154 was found to be stable in rat brain preparations and to be metabolized in rat liver preparations. Its pharmacological properties were comparable to those of flumazenil with the exception of the antagonism of diazepam versus pentylenetetrazol. Biodistribution in rats (1 h p.i.) resulted in a high brain to blood ratio of 16. Clinical studies revealed images of the bezodiazepine receptor density in the brain. (author) 9 figs., 3 tabs., 27 refs

  17. Pharmacological approach to acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, U.C.; Semb, S.; Nøjgaard, Camilla

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge regarding pharmacological prevention and treatment of acute pancreatitis (AP) based on experimental animal models and clinical trials. Somatostatin (SS) and octreotide inhibit the exocrine production of pancreatic enzymes and may...... be useful as prophylaxis against post endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis (PEP). The protease inhibitor gabexate mesilate (GM) is used routinely as treatment to AP in some countries, but randomized clinical trials and a meta-analysis do not support this practice. Nitroglycerin (NGL...

  18. Pharmacological approach to acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Ulrich-Christian; Semb, Synne; Nojgaard, Camilla

    2008-01-01

    -steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) indomethacin and diclofenac have in randomized studies showed potential as prophylaxis against PEP. Interleukin 10 (IL-10) is a cytokine with anti-inflammatory properties but two trials testing IL-10 as prophylaxis to PEP have returned conflicting results. Antibodies...... pharmacological treatment of AP is limited and studies on the effect of potent anti-inflammatory drugs are warranted....... against tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) have a potential as rescue therapy but no clinical trials are currently being conducted. The antibiotics beta-lactams and quinolones reduce mortality when necrosis is present in pancreas and may also reduce incidence of infected necrosis. Evidence based...

  19. Gaultheria: Phytochemical and Pharmacological Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren-Bing Shi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The genus Gaultheria, comprised of approximately 134 species, is mostly used in ethnic drugs to cure rheumatism and relieve pain. Phytochemical investigations of the genus Gaultheria have revealed the presence of methyl salicylate derivatives, C6-C3 constituents, organic acids, terpenoids, steroids, and other compounds. Methyl salicylate glycoside is considered as a characteristic ingredient in this genus, whose anti-rheumatic effects may have a new mechanism of action. In this review, comprehensive information on the phytochemistry, volatile components and the pharmacology of the genus Gaultheria is provided to explore its potential and advance research.

  20. Pharmacological effects of saw palmetto extract in the lower urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Mayumi; Ito, Yoshihiko; Fujino, Tomomi; Abe, Masayuki; Umegaki, Keizo; Onoue, Satomi; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Yamada, Shizuo

    2009-03-01

    Saw palmetto extract (SPE), an extract from the ripe berries of the American dwarf palm, has been widely used as a therapeutic remedy for urinary dysfunction due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in Europe. Numerous mechanisms of action have been proposed for SPE, including the inhibition of 5alpha-reductase. Today, alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonists and muscarinic cholinoceptor antagonists are commonly used in the treatment of men with voiding symptoms secondary to BPH. The improvement of voiding symptoms in patients taking SPE may arise from its binding to pharmacologically relevant receptors in the lower urinary tract, such as alpha(1)-adrenoceptors, muscarinic cholinoceptors, 1,4-dihyropyridine receptors and vanilloid receptors. Furthermore, oral administration of SPE has been shown to attenuate the up-regulation of alpha(1)-adrenoceptors in the rat prostate induced by testosterone. Thus, SPE at clinically relevant doses may exert a direct effect on the pharmacological receptors in the lower urinary tract, thereby improving urinary dysfunction in patients with BPH and an overactive bladder. SPE does not have interactions with co-administered drugs or serious adverse events in blood biochemical parameters, suggestive of its relative safety, even with long-term intake. Clinical trials (placebo-controlled and active-controlled trials) of SPE conducted in men with BPH were also reviewed. This review should contribute to the understanding of the pharmacological effects of SPE in the treatment of patients with BPH and associated lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS).

  1. A "genome-to-lead" approach for insecticide discovery: pharmacological characterization and screening of Aedes aegypti D(1-like dopamine receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M Meyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many neglected tropical infectious diseases affecting humans are transmitted by arthropods such as mosquitoes and ticks. New mode-of-action chemistries are urgently sought to enhance vector management practices in countries where arthropod-borne diseases are endemic, especially where vector populations have acquired widespread resistance to insecticides. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We describe a "genome-to-lead" approach for insecticide discovery that incorporates the first reported chemical screen of a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR mined from a mosquito genome. A combination of molecular and pharmacological studies was used to functionally characterize two dopamine receptors (AaDOP1 and AaDOP2 from the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti. Sequence analyses indicated that these receptors are orthologous to arthropod D(1-like (Gα(s-coupled receptors, but share less than 55% amino acid identity in conserved domains with mammalian dopamine receptors. Heterologous expression of AaDOP1 and AaDOP2 in HEK293 cells revealed dose-dependent responses to dopamine (EC(50: AaDOP1 = 3.1±1.1 nM; AaDOP2 = 240±16 nM. Interestingly, only AaDOP1 exhibited sensitivity to epinephrine (EC(50 = 5.8±1.5 nM and norepinephrine (EC(50 = 760±180 nM, while neither receptor was activated by other biogenic amines tested. Differential responses were observed between these receptors regarding their sensitivity to dopamine agonists and antagonists, level of maximal stimulation, and constitutive activity. Subsequently, a chemical library screen was implemented to discover lead chemistries active at AaDOP2. Fifty-one compounds were identified as "hits," and follow-up validation assays confirmed the antagonistic effect of selected compounds at AaDOP2. In vitro comparison studies between AaDOP2 and the human D(1 dopamine receptor (hD(1 revealed markedly different pharmacological profiles and identified amitriptyline and doxepin as AaDOP2

  2. Receptor residence time trumps drug-likeness and oral bioavailability in determining efficacy of complement C5a antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seow, Vernon; Lim, Junxian; Cotterell, Adam J.; Yau, Mei-Kwan; Xu, Weijun; Lohman, Rink-Jan; Kok, W. Mei; Stoermer, Martin J.; Sweet, Matthew J.; Reid, Robert C.; Suen, Jacky Y.; Fairlie, David P.

    2016-04-01

    Drug discovery and translation are normally based on optimizing efficacy by increasing receptor affinity, functional potency, drug-likeness (rule-of-five compliance) and oral bioavailability. Here we demonstrate that residence time of a compound on its receptor has an overriding influence on efficacy, exemplified for antagonists of inflammatory protein complement C5a that activates immune cells and promotes disease. Three equipotent antagonists (3D53, W54011, JJ47) of inflammatory responses to C5a (3nM) were compared for drug-likeness, receptor affinity and antagonist potency in human macrophages, and anti-inflammatory efficacy in rats. Only the least drug-like antagonist (3D53) maintained potency in cells against higher C5a concentrations and had a much longer duration of action (t1/2 ~ 20 h) than W54011 or JJ47 (t1/2 ~ 1-3 h) in inhibiting macrophage responses. The unusually long residence time of 3D53 on its receptor was mechanistically probed by molecular dynamics simulations, which revealed long-lasting interactions that trap the antagonist within the receptor. Despite negligible oral bioavailability, 3D53 was much more orally efficacious than W54011 or JJ47 in preventing repeated agonist insults to induce rat paw oedema over 24 h. Thus, residence time on a receptor can trump drug-likeness in determining efficacy, even oral efficacy, of pharmacological agents.

  3. Dopamine D2 receptors in the cerebral cortex: Distribution and pharmacological characterization with [3H]raclopride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidow, M.S.; Goldman-Rakic, P.S.; Rakic, P.; Innis, R.B.

    1989-01-01

    An apparent involvement of dopamine in the regulation of cognitive functions and the recognition of a widespread dopaminergic innervation of the cortex have focused attention on the identity of cortical dopamine receptors. However, only the presence and distribution of dopamine D 1 receptors in the cortex have been well documented. Comparable information on cortical D 2 sites is lacking. The authors report here the results of binding studied in the cortex and neostriatum of rat and monkey using the D 2 selective antagonist [ 3 H]raclopride. In both structures [ 3 H]raclopride bound in a sodium-dependent and saturable manner to a single population of sites with pharmacological profiles of dopamine D 2 receptors. D 2 sites were present in all regions of the cortex, although their density was much lower than in the neostriatum. The density of these sites in both monkey and, to a lesser extent, rat cortex displayed a rostral-caudal gradient with highest concentrations in the prefrontal and lowest concentrations in the occipital cortex, corresponding to dopamine levels in these areas. Thus, the present study established the presence and widespread distribution of dopamine D 2 receptors in the cortex

  4. Pharmacological evaluation of sedative and hypnotic effects of schizandrin through the modification of pentobarbital-induced sleep behaviors in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chenning; Zhao, Xu; Mao, Xin; Liu, Aijing; Liu, Zhi; Li, Xiaolong; Bi, Kaishun; Jia, Ying

    2014-12-05

    The fruits of Schisandra chinensis have been recorded as an effective somnificant for the treatment of insomnia in some oriental countries pharmacopoeias. However, the mechanism of sedative and hypnotic effects of this kind of herb is still unclear. In the present study, schizandrin, which is the main component of Schisandra chinensis, was selected as a target compound to investigate possible mechanisms through behavioral pharmacology methods. The results showed that schizandrin possessed dose-dependent (5-45 mg/kg, i.p.) sedative effects on locomotion activity in normal mice, and produced a dose-dependent decrease in sleep latency and an increase in sleep duration in pentobarbital-treated mice; thus, itself did not induce sleep at higher dose which was used in this experiment (45 mg/kg, i.p.). It also can reverse the rodent models of insomnia induced by p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) and caffeine, which could exhibit a syne with 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) as well; therefore, the hypnotic effects of schizandrin were not inhibited by flumazenil (a specific gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA)-A-BZD receptor antagonist). Altogether, these results indicated that schizandrin produces beneficial sedative and hypnotic bioactivity, which might be mediated by the modification of the serotonergic system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Selective agonists at group II metabotropic glutamate receptors: synthesis, stereochemistry, and molecular pharmacology of (S)- and (R)-2-amino-4-(4-hydroxy[1,2,5]thiadiazol-3-yl)butyric acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Rasmus P; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Greenwood, Jeremy R

    2002-01-01

    Homologation of analogues of the central excitatory neurotransmitter glutamic acid (Glu), in which the distal carboxy group has been bioisosterically replaced by acidic heterocyclic units, has previously provided subtype selective ligands for metabotropic Glu receptors (mGluRs). The (S......)-form of the 1,2,5-thiadiazol-3-ol Glu analogue, 2-amino-3-(4-hydroxy[1,2,5]thiadiazol-3-yl)propionic acid (TDPA, 6), is an 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptor agonist, which in addition stereospecifically activates group I mGluRs. We have now synthesized the (S)- and (R......)-forms of 2-amino-4-(4-hydroxy[1,2,5]thiadiazol-3-yl)butyric acid (homo-TDPA, 7) and shown that whereas neither enantiomer interacts with AMPA receptors, (S)- and (R)-7 appear to be selective and equipotent agonists at group II mGluRs as represented by the mGluR2 subtype. The activities of (S)- and (R)-7...

  6. Modification of kindled amygdaloid seizures by opiate agonists and antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertson, T E; Joy, R M; Stark, L G

    1984-03-01

    The effects of 19 opiate agonists and antagonists on kindled amygdaloid seizures in the rat were studied. The mu agonists tended to reduce the length of elicited afterdischarges and behavioral ranks, while markedly increasing postictal electroencephalogram spikes and behavioral arrest time. These effects were reversed by naloxone. The kappa agonists reduced behavioral rank and variably reduced afterdischarge length with a concomitant lengthening of postictal behavioral arrest time and number of electroencephalogram spikes. The putative sigma agonist, SKF 10,047, reduced afterdischarge durations only at the higher doses tested. The decreases found after the sigma agonists in postictal electroencephalogram spiking and time of behavioral arrest were not reversed by naloxone. Only the lower doses of normeperidine were found to decrease seizure thresholds. The mixed agonist/antagonists (MAA) cyclazocine and cyclorphan markedly increased seizure threshold and reduced afterdischarge duration and behavioral rank. Only the MAA pentazocine tended to increase threshold but not suprathreshold afterdischarge durations. The order of ability to modify the ictal events was MAA (selected) greater than kappa agonists greater than mu agonists greater than sigma agonists. The increase in postictal events (behavior arrest and spikes) was caused most effectively by pretreatment with mu agonist greater than kappa agonist greater than selected MAA greater than sigma agonists.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Pharmacological Treatments in Pathological Gambling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grant, Jon E; Odlaug, Brian Lawrence; Schreiber, Liana R N

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: Pathological gambling (PG) is a relatively common and often disabling psychiatric condition characterized by intrusive urges to engage in deleterious gambling behavior. Although common and financially devastating to individuals and families, there currently exist no formally approved...... pharmacotherapeutic interventions for this disorder. This review seeks to examine the history of medication treatments for PG. METHODS: A systematic review of the 18 double-blind, placebo-controlled pharmacotherapy studies conducted for the treatment of pathological gambling was conducted. Study outcome and the mean...... demonstrated mixed results in controlled clinical trials. Although limited information is available, opioid antagonists and glutamatergic agents have demonstrated efficacious outcomes, especially for individuals with PG suffering from intense urges to engage in the behavior. CONCLUSIONS: Given that several...

  8. Pharmacologic therapy for acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambhampati, Swetha; Park, Walter; Habtezion, Aida

    2014-01-01

    While conservative management such as fluid, bowel rest, and antibiotics is the mainstay of current acute pancreatitis management, there is a lot of promise in pharmacologic therapies that target various aspects of the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Extensive review of preclinical studies, which include assessment of therapies such as anti-secretory agents, protease inhibitors, anti-inflammatory agents, and anti-oxidants are discussed. Many of these studies have shown therapeutic benefit and improved survival in experimental models. Based on available preclinical studies, we discuss potential novel targeted pharmacologic approaches that may offer promise in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. To date a variety of clinical studies have assessed the translational potential of animal model effective experimental therapies and have shown either failure or mixed results in human studies. Despite these discouraging clinical studies, there is a great clinical need and there exist several preclinical effective therapies that await investigation in patients. Better understanding of acute pancreatitis pathophysiology and lessons learned from past clinical studies are likely to offer a great foundation upon which to expand future therapies in acute pancreatitis. PMID:25493000

  9. Pharmacological management of panic disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Marchesi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Carlo MarchesiPsychiatric Section, Department of Neuroscience, University of Parma, Parma, ItalyAbstract: Panic disorder (PD is a disabling condition which appears in late adolescence or early adulthood and affects more frequently women than men. PD is frequently characterized by recurrences and sometimes by a chronic course and, therefore, most patients require longterm treatments to achieve remission, to prevent relapse and to reduce the risks associated with comorbidity. Pharmacotherapy is one of the most effective treatments of PD. In this paper, the pharmacological management of PD is reviewed. Many questions about this effective treatment need to be answered by the clinician and discussed with the patients to improve her/his collaboration to the treatment plan: which is the drug of choice; when does the drug become active; which is the effective dose; how to manage the side effects; how to manage nonresponse; and how long does the treatment last. Moreover, the clinical use of medication in women during pregnancy and breastfeeding or in children and adolescents was reviewed and its risk-benefit balance discussed.Keywords: panic disorder, pharmacological treatment, treatment guidelines

  10. Inducible nitric oxide inhibitors block NMDA antagonist-stimulated motoric behaviors and medial prefrontal cortical glutamate efflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadley C Bergstrom

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO plays a critical role in the motoric and glutamate releasing action of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA-antagonist stimulants. Earlier studies utilized neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors (nNOS for studying the neurobehavioral effects of noncompetitive NMDA-antagonist stimulants such as dizocilpine (MK-801 and phencyclidine (PCP. This study explores the role of the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors (iNOS aminoguanidine (AG and (--epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG in NMDA-antagonist induced motoric behavior and prefrontal cortical glutamate efflux. Adult male rats were administered a dose range of AG, EGCG or vehicle prior to receiving NMDA antagonists MK-801, PCP or a conventional psychostimulant (cocaine and tested for motoric behavior in an open arena. Glutamate in the medial prefrontal cortex was measured using in vivo microdialysis after a combination of AG or EGCG prior to MK-801. Acute administration of AG or EGCG dose-dependently attenuated the locomotor and ataxic properties of MK-801 and PCP. Both AG and EGCG were unable to block the motoric effects of cocaine, indicating the acute pharmacologic action of AG and EGCG is specific to NMDA antagonism and not generalizable to all stimulant class drugs. AG and EGCG normalized MK-801-stimulated medial prefrontal cortical glutamate efflux. These data demonstrate that AG and EGCG attenuates NMDA antagonist-stimulated motoric behavior and cortical glutamate efflux. Our results suggest that EGCG-like polyphenol nutraceuticals (contained in green tea and chocolate may be clinically useful in protecting against the adverse behavioral dissociative and cortical glutamate stimulating effects of NMDA antagonists. Medications that interfere with NMDA antagonists such as MK-801 and PCP have been proposed as treatments for schizophrenia.

  11. Structural and energetic effects of A2A adenosine receptor mutations on agonist and antagonist binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Keränen

    Full Text Available To predict structural and energetic effects of point mutations on ligand binding is of considerable interest in biochemistry and pharmacology. This is not only useful in connection with site-directed mutagenesis experiments, but could also allow interpretation and prediction of individual responses to drug treatment. For G-protein coupled receptors systematic mutagenesis has provided the major part of functional data as structural information until recently has been very limited. For the pharmacologically important A(2A adenosine receptor, extensive site-directed mutagenesis data on agonist and antagonist binding is available and crystal structures of both types of complexes have been determined. Here, we employ a computational strategy, based on molecular dynamics free energy simulations, to rationalize and interpret available alanine-scanning experiments for both agonist and antagonist binding to this receptor. These computer simulations show excellent agreement with the experimental data and, most importantly, reveal the molecular details behind the observed effects which are often not immediately evident from the crystal structures. The work further provides a distinct validation of the computational strategy used to assess effects of point-mutations on ligand binding. It also highlights the importance of considering not only protein-ligand interactions but also those mediated by solvent water molecules, in ligand design projects.

  12. Aldosterone and aldosterone receptor antagonists in patients with chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nappi J

    2011-06-01

    associated with systolic heart failure will benefit from the addition of an aldosterone receptor antagonist to the standard therapies of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers. This review will address the pharmacologic basis of aldosterone receptor antagonists in patients with heart failure and the clinical impact of this therapy.Keywords: aldosterone receptor antagonists, eplerenone, spironolactone, systolic heart failure

  13. Antagonistic properties of microogranisms associated with cassava ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antagonistic properties of indigenous microflora from cassava starch, flour and grated cassava were investigated using the conventional streak, novel ring and well diffusion methods. Antagonism was measured by zone of inhibition between the fungal plug and bacterial streak/ring. Bacillus species were more effective ...

  14. Carbon adaptation influence the antagonistic ability of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influences of carbon adaptation on antagonistic activities of three Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains V4, V7 and V10 against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis were determined in this study. Results from this study showed that the P. aeruginosa strains and their adapted strains significantly inhibited the growth of mycelium ...

  15. Sexually antagonistic "zygotic drive" of the sex chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R Rice

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Genomic conflict is perplexing because it causes the fitness of a species to decline rather than improve. Many diverse forms of genomic conflict have been identified, but this extant tally may be incomplete. Here, we show that the unusual characteristics of the sex chromosomes can, in principle, lead to a previously unappreciated form of sexual genomic conflict. The phenomenon occurs because there is selection in the heterogametic sex for sex-linked mutations that harm the sex of offspring that does not carry them, whenever there is competition among siblings. This harmful phenotype can be expressed as an antagonistic green-beard effect that is mediated by epigenetic parental effects, parental investment, and/or interactions among siblings. We call this form of genomic conflict sexually antagonistic "zygotic drive", because it is functionally equivalent to meiotic drive, except that it operates during the zygotic and postzygotic stages of the life cycle rather than the meiotic and gametic stages. A combination of mathematical modeling and a survey of empirical studies is used to show that sexually antagonistic zygotic drive is feasible, likely to be widespread in nature, and that it can promote a genetic "arms race" between the homo- and heteromorphic sex chromosomes. This new category of genomic conflict has the potential to strongly influence other fundamental evolutionary processes, such as speciation and the degeneration of the Y and W sex chromosomes. It also fosters a new genetic hypothesis for the evolution of enigmatic fitness-reducing traits like the high frequency of spontaneous abortion, sterility, and homosexuality observed in humans.

  16. Pharmacological challenges in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anne Estrup; Brokjaer, Anne; Fischer, Iben Wendelboe Deleuran

    2014-01-01

    food intake is more or less substituted with alcohol, tobacco and coffee. Alcohol and drug interaction are known to influence the pharmacokinetics by altering either drug absorption or by affecting liver metabolism. Since patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis experience severe pain, opioids......Drug absorption in patients with chronic pancreatitis might be affected by the pathophysiology of the disease. The exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is associated with changes in gastrointestinal intraluminal pH, motility disorder, bacterial overgrowth and changed pancreatic gland secretion....... Together these factors can result in malabsorption and may also affect the efficacy of pharmacological intervention. The lifestyle of chronic pancreatitis patients may also contribute to gastrointestinal changes. Many patients limit their food intake because of the pain caused by eating and in some cases...

  17. Pharmacological challenges in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anne Estrup; Brokjaer, Anne; Fischer, Iben Wendelboe Deleuran

    2014-01-01

    food intake is more or less substituted with alcohol, tobacco and coffee. Alcohol and drug interaction are known to influence the pharmacokinetics by altering either drug absorption or by affecting liver metabolism. Since patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis experience severe pain, opioids....... Together these factors can result in malabsorption and may also affect the efficacy of pharmacological intervention. The lifestyle of chronic pancreatitis patients may also contribute to gastrointestinal changes. Many patients limit their food intake because of the pain caused by eating and in some cases......Drug absorption in patients with chronic pancreatitis might be affected by the pathophysiology of the disease. The exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is associated with changes in gastrointestinal intraluminal pH, motility disorder, bacterial overgrowth and changed pancreatic gland secretion...

  18. Pharmacology of human experimental anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.G. Graeff

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available This review covers the effect of drugs affecting anxiety using four psychological procedures for inducing experimental anxiety applied to healthy volunteers and patients with anxiety disorders. The first is aversive conditioning of the skin conductance responses to tones. The second is simulated public speaking, which consists of speaking in front of a video camera, with anxiety being measured with psychometric scales. The third is the Stroop Color-Word test, in which words naming colors are painted in the same or in a different shade, the incongruence generating a cognitive conflict. The last test is a human version of a thoroughly studied animal model of anxiety, fear-potentiated startle, in which the eye-blink reflex to a loud noise is recorded. The evidence reviewed led to the conclusion that the aversive conditioning and potentiated startle tests are based on classical conditioning of anticipatory anxiety. Their sensitivity to benzodiazepine anxiolytics suggests that these models generate an emotional state related to generalized anxiety disorder. On the other hand, the increase in anxiety determined by simulated public speaking is resistant to benzodiazepines and sensitive to drugs affecting serotonergic neurotransmission. This pharmacological profile, together with epidemiological evidence indicating its widespread prevalence, suggests that the emotional state generated by public speaking represents a species-specific response that may be related to social phobia and panic disorder. Because of scant pharmacological data, the status of the Stroop Color-Word test remains uncertain. In spite of ethical and economic constraints, human experimental anxiety constitutes a valuable tool for the study of the pathophysiology of anxiety disorders.

  19. Carotenoids: biochemistry, pharmacology and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Alireza; Basirnejad, Marzieh; Shahbazi, Sepideh; Bolhassani, Azam

    2017-06-01

    Carotenoids and retinoids have several similar biological activities such as antioxidant properties, the inhibition of malignant tumour growth and the induction of apoptosis. Supplementation with carotenoids can affect cell growth and modulate gene expression and immune responses. Epidemiological studies have shown a correlation between a high carotenoid intake in the diet with a reduced risk of breast, cervical, ovarian, colorectal cancers, and cardiovascular and eye diseases. Cancer chemoprevention by dietary carotenoids involves several mechanisms, including effects on gap junctional intercellular communication, growth factor signalling, cell cycle progression, differentiation-related proteins, retinoid-like receptors, antioxidant response element, nuclear receptors, AP-1 transcriptional complex, the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, carotenoids can stimulate the proliferation of B- and T-lymphocytes, the activity of macrophages and cytotoxic T-cells, effector T-cell function and the production of cytokines. Recently, the beneficial effects of carotenoid-rich vegetables and fruits in health and in decreasing the risk of certain diseases has been attributed to the major carotenoids, β-carotene, lycopene, lutein, zeaxanthin, crocin (/crocetin) and curcumin, due to their antioxidant effects. It is thought that carotenoids act in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In this review, we briefly describe the biological and immunological activities of the main carotenoids used for the treatment of various diseases and their possible mechanisms of action. This article is part of a themed section on Principles of Pharmacological Research of Nutraceuticals. To view the other articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.v174.11/issuetoc. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  20. 5-HT2A receptor antagonists improve motor impairments in the MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Marcus C; Nayyar, Tultul; Deutch, Ariel Y; Ansah, Twum A

    2010-01-01

    Clinical observations have suggested that ritanserin, a 5-HT(2A/C) receptor antagonist may reduce motor deficits in persons with Parkinson's Disease (PD). To better understand the potential antiparkinsonian actions of ritanserin, we compared the effects of ritanserin with the selective 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist M100907 and the selective 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonist SB 206553 on motor impairments in mice treated with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). MPTP-treated mice exhibited decreased performance on the beam-walking apparatus. These motor deficits were reversed by acute treatment with L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (levodopa). Both the mixed 5-HT(2A/C) antagonist ritanserin and the selective 5-HT(2A) antagonist M100907 improved motor performance on the beam-walking apparatus. In contrast, SB 206553 was ineffective in improving the motor deficits in MPTP-treated mice. These data suggest that 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonists may represent a novel approach to ameliorate motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. New advances in pharmacological approaches to the cholinergic system: an overview on muscarinic receptor ligands and cholinesterase inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greig, Nigel H.; Reale, Marcella; Tata, Ada Maria

    2016-01-01

    The cholinergic system is expressed in neuronal and in non-neuronal tissues. Acetylcholine (ACh), synthesized in and out of the nervous system can locally contribute to modulation of various cell functions (e.g. survival, proliferation). Considering that the cholinergic system and its functions are impaired in a number of disorders, the identification of new pharmacological approaches to regulate cholinergic system components appears of great relevance. The present review focuses on recent pharmacological drugs able to modulate the activity of cholinergic receptors and thereby, cholinergic function, with an emphasis on the muscarinic receptor subtype, and additionally covers the cholinesterases, the main enzymes involved in ACh hydrolysis. The presence and function of muscarinic receptor subtypes both in neuronal and non-neuronal cells has been demonstrated using extensive pharmacological data emerging from studies on transgenic mice. The possible involvement of ACh in different pathologies has been proposed in recent years and is becoming an important area of study. Although the lack of selective muscarinic receptor ligands has for a long time limited the definition of therapeutic treatment based on muscarinic receptors as targets, some muscarinic ligands such as cevimeline (patents US4855290; US5571918) or xanomeline (patent, US5980933) have been developed and used in pre-clinical or in clinical studies for the treatment of nervous system diseases (Alzheimer’ and Sjogren’s diseases). The present review focuses on the potential implications of muscarinic receptors in different pathologies, including tumors. Moreover, the future use of muscarinic ligands in therapeutic protocols in cancer therapy will be discussed, considering that some muscarinic antagonists currently used in the treatment of genitourinary disease (e.g. darifenacin, patent, US5096890; US6106864) have also been demonstrated to arrest tumor progression in nude mice. The involvement of muscarinic

  2. Pharmacologic Therapy in Men's Health: Hypogonadism, Erectile Dysfunction, and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkseth, Kathryn E; Thirumalai, Arthi; Amory, John K

    2016-07-01

    This article reviews current pharmacologic treatment options for 3 common men's health concerns: hypogonadism, erectile dysfunction (ED), and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Specific topics addressed include: management of male hypogonadism using testosterone replacement therapy, use of oral phosphodiesterase inhibitors as first-line therapy for men with ED and the utility of intraurethral and intrapenile alprostadil injections for patients who do not respond to oral medications, and the role of alpha1-adrenergic antagonists, 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors, anticholinergic agents, and herbal therapies in the management of BPH. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. antagonistic effect of native bacillus isolates against black root rot

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    A number of fungi and bacteria are known to be very effective .... Round. Convex. Smooth. Wrinkled. Slow. BS024. Irregular and spreading. Flat. Wavy .... Antibiotic effect of bacterial antagonist ..... antagonistic Bacillus and Trichoderma isolates ...

  4. Structural refinement and prediction of potential CCR2 antagonists through validated multi-QSAR modeling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Sk Abdul; Adhikari, Nilanjan; Baidya, Sandip Kumar; Gayen, Shovanlal; Jha, Tarun

    2018-01-03

    Chemokines trigger numerous inflammatory responses and modulate the immune system. The interaction between monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) may be the cause of atherosclerosis, obesity, and insulin resistance. However, CCR2 is also implicated in other inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, asthma, and neuropathic pain. Therefore, there is a paramount importance of designing potent and selective CCR2 antagonists despite a number of drug candidates failed in clinical trials. In this article, 83 CCR2 antagonists by Jhonson and Jhonson Pharmaceuticals have been considered for robust validated multi-QSAR modeling studies to get an idea about the structural and pharmacophoric requirements for designing more potent CCR2 antagonists. All these QSAR models were validated and statistically reliable. Observations resulted from different modeling studies correlated and validated results of other ones. Finally, depending on these QSAR observations, some new molecules were proposed that may exhibit higher activity against CCR2.

  5. Effects of sigma(1) receptor ligand MS-377 on D(2) antagonists-induced behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasawa, Jun-ichi; Takahashi, Shinji; Takagi, Kaori; Horikomi, Kazutoshi

    2002-10-01

    (R)-(+)-1-(4-Chlorophenyl)-3-[4-(2-methoxyethyl)piperazin-1-yl]methyl-2-pyrrolidinone L-tartrate (MS-377) is a novel antipsychotic agent with selective and high affinity for sigma(1) receptor. The present study was carried out to clarify the interaction of MS-377 with dopamine D(2) receptor antagonists (D(2) antagonists) in concurrent administration, and then the involvement of sigma receptors in the interaction. The effects of MS-377 on haloperidol- or sultopride-induced inhibition of apomorphine-induced climbing behavior and catalepsy were investigated in mice and rats, respectively. In addition, the effects of (+)-SKF-10,047 and SA4503, both of which are sigma receptor agonists, and WAY-100,635, which is a 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist, on the interaction due to the concurrent use were also investigated. MS-377 potentiated the inhibitory effects of haloperidol or sultopride on apomorphine-induced climbing behavior in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, MS-377 did not affect the catalepsy induction by these drugs. The potentiation of the inhibitory effects of haloperidol or sultopride on apomorphine-induced climbing behavior by MS-377 was not inhibited by WAY-100,635, but was inhibited by (+)-SKF-10,047 and SA4503. These findings showed that MS-377 potentiates the efficacy of D(2) antagonists, but it does not deteriorate the adverse effect. Moreover, sigma(1) receptors are involved in this potentiation of the efficacy of D(2) antagonists by MS-377.

  6. Combination cancer chemotherapy with one compound: pluripotent bradykinin antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, John M; Gera, Lajos; Chan, Daniel C; York, Eunice J; Simkeviciene, Vitalija; Bunn, Paul A; Taraseviciene-Stewart, Laimute

    2005-08-01

    Lung and prostate cancers are major health problems worldwide. Treatments with standard chemotherapy agents are relatively ineffective. Combination chemotherapy gives better treatment than a single agent because the drugs can inhibit the cancer in different pathways, but new therapeutic agents are needed for the treatment of both tumor types. Bradykinin (BK) antagonists offer advantages of combination therapy in one compound. These promising multitargeted anti-cancer compounds selectively stimulate apoptosis in cancers and also inhibit both angiogenesis and matrix metalloprotease (MMP) action in treated lung and prostate tumors in nude mice. The highly potent, metabolism-resistant bradykinin antagonist peptide dimer, B-9870 [SUIM-(DArg-Arg-Pro-Hyp-Gly-Igl-Ser-DIgl-Oic-Arg)2] (SUIM=suberimidyl; Hyp=4-hydroxyproline; Igl=alpha-(2-indanyl)glycine; Oic=octahydroindole-2-carboxylic acid) and its non-peptide mimetic, BKM-570 [2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorocinnamoyl-(o-2,6-dichlorobenzyl)-L-tyrosine-N-(4-amino-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidyl)amide] are superior to the widely used but toxic chemotherapeutic drugs cisplatin and taxotere. In certain combinations, they act synergistically with standard anti-cancer drugs. Due to its structure and biological activity, BKM-570 is an attractive lead compound for derivatization and evaluation for lung and prostate cancer drugs.

  7. Dm5-HT2B: Pharmacological Characterization of the Fifth Serotonin Receptor Subtype of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Blenau

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT is an important regulator of physiological and behavioral processes in both protostomes (e.g., insects and deuterostomes (e.g., mammals. In insects, serotonin has been found to modulate the heart rate and to control secretory processes, development, circadian rhythms, aggressive behavior, as well as to contribute to learning and memory. Serotonin exerts its activity by binding to and activating specific membrane receptors. The clear majority of these receptors belong to the superfamily of G-protein-coupled receptors. In Drosophila melanogaster, a total of five genes have been identified coding for 5-HT receptors. From this family of proteins, four have been pharmacologically examined in greater detail, so far. While Dm5-HT1A, Dm5-HT1B, and Dm5-HT7 couple to cAMP signaling cascades, the Dm5-HT2A receptor leads to Ca2+ signaling in an inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate-dependent manner. Based on sequence similarity to homologous genes in other insects, a fifth D. melanogaster gene was uncovered coding for a Dm5-HT2B receptor. Knowledge about this receptor’s pharmacological properties is very limited. This is quite surprising because Dm5-HT2B has been attributed to distinct physiological functions based on genetic interference with its gene expression. Mutations were described reducing the response of the larval heart to 5-HT, and specific knockdown of Dm5-HT2B mRNA in hemocytes resulted in a higher susceptibility of the flies to bacterial infection. To gain deeper understanding of Dm5-HT2B’s pharmacology, we evaluated the receptor’s response to a series of established 5-HT receptor agonists and antagonists in a functional cell-based assay. Metoclopramide and mianserin were identified as two potent antagonists that may allow pharmacological interference with Dm5-HT2B signaling in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Dm5-HT2B: Pharmacological Characterization of the Fifth Serotonin Receptor Subtype of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blenau, Wolfgang; Daniel, Stöppler; Balfanz, Sabine; Thamm, Markus; Baumann, Arnd

    2017-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is an important regulator of physiological and behavioral processes in both protostomes (e.g., insects) and deuterostomes (e.g., mammals). In insects, serotonin has been found to modulate the heart rate and to control secretory processes, development, circadian rhythms, aggressive behavior, as well as to contribute to learning and memory. Serotonin exerts its activity by binding to and activating specific membrane receptors. The clear majority of these receptors belong to the superfamily of G-protein-coupled receptors. In Drosophila melanogaster , a total of five genes have been identified coding for 5-HT receptors. From this family of proteins, four have been pharmacologically examined in greater detail, so far. While Dm5-HT 1A , Dm5-HT 1B , and Dm5-HT 7 couple to cAMP signaling cascades, the Dm5-HT 2A receptor leads to Ca 2+ signaling in an inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate-dependent manner. Based on sequence similarity to homologous genes in other insects, a fifth D. melanogaster gene was uncovered coding for a Dm5-HT 2B receptor. Knowledge about this receptor's pharmacological properties is very limited. This is quite surprising because Dm5-HT 2B has been attributed to distinct physiological functions based on genetic interference with its gene expression. Mutations were described reducing the response of the larval heart to 5-HT, and specific knockdown of Dm5-HT 2B mRNA in hemocytes resulted in a higher susceptibility of the flies to bacterial infection. To gain deeper understanding of Dm5-HT 2B 's pharmacology, we evaluated the receptor's response to a series of established 5-HT receptor agonists and antagonists in a functional cell-based assay. Metoclopramide and mianserin were identified as two potent antagonists that may allow pharmacological interference with Dm5-HT 2B signaling in vitro and in vivo .

  9. Antidepressant activity of the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist, istradefylline (KW-6002) on learned helplessness in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Koji; Kobayashi, Minoru; Shiozaki, Shizuo; Ohta, Teruko; Mori, Akihisa; Jenner, Peter; Kanda, Tomoyuki

    2014-07-01

    Istradefylline, an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist, improves motor function in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD) and in patients with PD. In addition, some A2A antagonists exert antidepressant-like activity in rodent models of depression, such as the forced swim and the tail suspension tests. We have investigated the effect of istradefylline on depression-like behaviors using the rat learned helplessness (LH) model. Acute, as well as chronic, oral administration of istradefylline significantly improved the inescapable shock (IES)-induced escape deficit with a degree of efficacy comparable to chronic treatment with the tricyclic antidepressant desipramine and the selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine. Both the A1/A2A receptor nonspecific antagonist theophylline and the moderately selective antagonist CGS15943, but not the A1 selective antagonist DPCPX, ameliorated the IES-induced escape deficit. The enhancement of escape response by istradefylline was reversed by a local injection of the A2A specific agonist CGS21680 either into the nucleus accumbens, the caudate-putamen, or the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, but not by the A1 specific agonist R-PIA into the nucleus accumbens. Moreover, neither the 5-HT2A/2C receptor antagonist methysergide or the adrenergic α 2 antagonist yohimbine, nor the β-adrenergic antagonist propranolol, affected the improvement of escape response induced by istradefylline. Istradefylline exerts antidepressant-like effects via modulation of A2A receptor activity which is independent of monoaminergic transmission in the brain. Istradefylline may represent a novel treatment option for depression in PD as well as for the motor symptoms.

  10. Phosphodiesterase 2A Inhibitor TAK-915 Ameliorates Cognitive Impairments and Social Withdrawal in N-Methyl-d-Aspartate Receptor Antagonist-Induced Rat Models of Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Masato; Imada, Haruka; Shiraishi, Eri; Ito, Yuki; Suzuki, Noriko; Miyamoto, Maki; Taniguchi, Takahiko; Iwashita, Hiroki

    2018-04-01

    The pathophysiology of schizophrenia has been associated with glutamatergic dysfunction. Modulation of the glutamatergic signaling pathway, including N -methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, can provide a new therapeutic target for schizophrenia. Phosphodiesterase 2A (PDE2A) is highly expressed in the forebrain, and is a dual substrate enzyme that hydrolyzes both cAMP and cGMP, which play pivotal roles as intracellular second messengers downstream of NMDA receptors. Here we characterize the in vivo pharmacological profile of a selective and brain-penetrant PDE2A inhibitor, ( N -{(1 S )-1-[3-fluoro-4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenyl]-2-methoxyethyl}-7-methoxy-2-oxo-2,3-dihydropyrido[2,3- b ]pyrazine-4(1 H )-carboxamide) (TAK-915) as a novel treatment of schizophrenia. Oral administration of TAK-915 at 3 and 10 mg/kg significantly increased cGMP levels in the frontal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum of rats. TAK-915 at 10 mg/kg significantly upregulated the phosphorylation of α -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-proprionic acid receptor subunit GluR1 in the rat hippocampus. TAK-915 at 3 and 10 mg/kg significantly attenuated episodic memory deficits induced by the NMDA receptor antagonist (+)-MK-801 hydrogen maleate (MK-801) in the rat passive avoidance test. TAK-915 at 10 mg/kg significantly attenuated working memory deficits induced by MK-801 in the rat radial arm maze test. Additionally, TAK-915 at 10 mg/kg prevented subchronic phencyclidine-induced social withdrawal in social interaction in rats. In contrast, TAK-915 did not produce antipsychotic-like activity; TAK-915 had little effect on MK-801- or methamphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion in rats. These results suggest that TAK-915 has a potential to ameliorate cognitive impairments and social withdrawal in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2018 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  11. Pharmacologic treatment of depression in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, Marcus W.; Glazenborg, Arjon; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Mostert, Jop; De Keyser, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Background Depression is a common problem in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). It is unclear which pharmacologic treatment is the most effective and the least harmful. Objectives To investigate the efficacy and tolerability of pharmacologic treatments for depression in patients with MS. Search

  12. Complex Pharmacology of Free Fatty Acid Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milligan, Graeme; Shimpukade, Bharat; Ulven, Trond

    2017-01-01

    pharmacology have shaped understanding of the complex pharmacology of receptors that recognize and are activated by nonesterified or "free" fatty acids (FFAs). The FFA family of receptors is a recently deorphanized set of GPCRs, the members of which are now receiving substantial interest as novel targets...

  13. The Dutch vision of clinical pharmacology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellens, J H M; Grouls, R; Guchelaar, H J; Touw, D J; Rongen, G A; de Boer, A; Van Bortel, L M

    Recent position papers addressing the profession of clinical pharmacology have expressed concerns about the decline of interest in the field among clinicians and medical educators in the United Kingdom and other Western countries, whether clinical pharmacology is actually therapeutics, and whether

  14. David J. Triggle: Medicinal chemistry, to pharmacology, calcium channels, and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Michael J A

    2015-11-15

    David Triggle's scientific career began as a chemist, went through medicinal chemistry into pharmacology, and finally on to somewhat more philosophical interests in later years. It was a career marked by many contributions to all of those aspects of science. Chief amongst his many contributions, in addition to those in medicinal chemistry, was his work on the drugs known as calcium ion channel blockers or (calcium antagonists). In the calcium ion channel field he was a particularly instrumental figure in sorting out the mechanisms, actions and roles of the class of calcium channel blockers, known chemical and pharmacologically as the dihydropyridines (DHPs) in particular, as well as other calcium blockers of diverse structures. During the course of a long career, and extensive journeys into medicinal chemistry and pharmacology, he published voluminously in terms of papers, reviews, conference proceedings and books. Notably, many of his papers often had limited authorship where, as senior author it reflected his deep involvement in all aspects of the reported work. His work always helped clarify the field while his incisive reviews, together with his role in coordinating and running scientific meetings, were a great help in clarifying and organizing various fields of study. He has had a long and illustrious career, and is wellknown in the world of biomedical science; his contributions are appreciated, and well recognized everywhere. The following article attempts to chart a path through his work and contributions to medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, science, academia and students. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Pharmacology of sexually compulsive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codispoti, Victoria L

    2008-12-01

    In a meta-analysis on controlled outcomes evaluations of 22,000 sex offenders, Losel and Schmucker found 80 comparisons between treatment and control groups. The recidivism rate averaged 19% in treated groups, and 27% in controls. Most other reviews reported a lower rate of sexual recidivism in treated sexual offenders. Of 2039 citations in this study (including literature in five languages), 60 studies held independent comparisons. Problematic issues included the control groups; various hormonal, surgical, cognitive behavioral, and psychotherapeutic treatments; and sample sizes. In the 80 studies compared after the year 2000, 32% were reported after 2000, 45% originated in the United States, 45% were reported in journals, and 36% were unpublished. Treatment characteristics showed a significant lack of pharmacologic treatment (7.5%), whereas use cognitive and classical behavioral therapy was 64%. In 68% of the studies, no information was available on the integrity of the treatment implementation; 36% of the treatment settings were outpatient only, 31% were prison settings, and 12% were mixed settings (prison, hospital, and outpatient). Integrating research interpretations is complicated by the heterogeneity of sex offenders, with only 56% being adult men and 17.5% adolescents. Offense types reported included 74% child molestation, 48% incest, and 30% exhibitionism. Pedophilia was not singled out. Follow-up periods varied from 12 months to greater than 84 months. The definition of recidivism ran the gamut from arrest (24%), conviction (30%), charges (19%), and no indication (16%). Results were difficult to interpret because of the methodological problems with this type of study. Overall, a positive outcome was noted with sex offender treatment. Cognitive-behavioral and hormonal treatment were the most promising. Voluntary treatment led to a slightly better outcome than mandatory participation. When accounting for a low base rate of sexual recidivism, the reduction

  16. Antidepressant activity of nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptor antagonists in the mouse learned helplessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda, Victor A D; Medeiros, Iris U; Asth, Laila; Guerrini, Remo; Calo', Girolamo; Gavioli, Elaine C

    2016-07-01

    Pharmacological and genetic evidence support antidepressant-like effects elicited by the blockade of the NOP receptor. The learned helplessness (LH) model employs uncontrollable and unpredictable electric footshocks as a stressor stimulus to induce a depressive-like phenotype that can be reversed by classical antidepressants. The present study aimed to evaluate the action of NOP receptor antagonists in helpless mice. Male Swiss mice were subjected to the three steps of the LH paradigm (i.e., (1) induction, (2) screening, and (3) test). Only helpless animals were subjected to the test session. During the test session, animals were placed in the electrified chamber and the latency to escape after the footshock and the frequency of escape failures were recorded. The effect of the following treatments administered before the test session were evaluated: nortriptyline (30 mg/kg, ip, 60 min), fluoxetine (30 mg/kg, ip, four consecutive days of treatment), and NOP antagonists SB-612111 (1-10 mg/kg, ip, 30 min) and UFP-101 (1-10 nmol, icv, 5 min). To rule out possible biases, the effects of treatments on controllable stressful and non stressful situations were assessed. In helpless mice, nortriptyline, fluoxetine, UFP-101 (3-10 nmol), and SB-612111 (3-10 mg/kg) significantly reduced escape latencies and escape failures. No effects of drug treatments were observed in mice subjected to the controllable electric footshocks and non stressful situations. Acute treatment with NOP antagonists reversed helplessness similarly to the classical antidepressants. These findings support the proposal that NOP receptor antagonists are worthy of development as innovative antidepressant drugs.

  17. Slow receptor dissociation kinetics differentiate macitentan from other endothelin receptor antagonists in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Gatfield

    Full Text Available Two endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs, bosentan and ambrisentan, are currently approved for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH, a devastating disease involving an activated endothelin system and aberrant contraction and proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC. The novel ERA macitentan has recently concluded testing in a Phase III morbidity/mortality clinical trial in PAH patients. Since the association and dissociation rates of G protein-coupled receptor antagonists can influence their pharmacological activity in vivo, we used human PASMC to characterize inhibitory potency and receptor inhibition kinetics of macitentan, ambrisentan and bosentan using calcium release and inositol-1-phosphate (IP(1 assays. In calcium release assays macitentan, ambrisentan and bosentan were highly potent ERAs with K(b values of 0.14 nM, 0.12 nM and 1.1 nM, respectively. Macitentan, but not ambrisentan and bosentan, displayed slow apparent receptor association kinetics as evidenced by increased antagonistic potency upon prolongation of antagonist pre-incubation times. In compound washout experiments, macitentan displayed a significantly lower receptor dissociation rate and longer receptor occupancy half-life (ROt(1/2 compared to bosentan and ambrisentan (ROt(1/2:17 minutes versus 70 seconds and 40 seconds, respectively. Because of its lower dissociation rate macitentan behaved as an insurmountable antagonist in calcium release and IP(1 assays, and unlike bosentan and ambrisentan it blocked endothelin receptor activation across a wide range of endothelin-1 (ET-1 concentrations. However, prolongation of the ET-1 stimulation time beyond ROt(1/2 rendered macitentan a surmountable antagonist, revealing its competitive binding mode. Bosentan and ambrisentan behaved as surmountable antagonists irrespective of the assay duration and they lacked inhibitory activity at high ET-1 concentrations. Thus, macitentan is a competitive

  18. Pharmacology of the hypothermic response to 5-HT1A receptor activation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesch, K P; Poten, B; Söhnle, K; Schulte, H M

    1990-01-01

    The selective 5-HT1A receptor ligand ipsapirone (IPS) caused dose-related hypothermia in humans. The response was attenuated by the nonselective 5-HT1/2 receptor antagonist metergoline and was completely antagonized by the nonselective beta-adrenoceptor antagonist pindolol, which interacts stereoselectively with the 5-HT1A receptor. The selective beta 1-adrenergic antagonist betaxolol had no effect. The findings indicate that IPS-induced hypothermia specifically involves activation of (presynaptic) 5-HT1A receptors. Therefore, the hypothermic response to IPS may provide a convenient in vivo paradigma to assess the function of the presynaptic 5-HT receptor in affective disorders and its involvement in the effects of psychotropic drugs.

  19. Pharmacology of Bradykinin-Evoked Coughing in Guinea Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Matthew M; Adams, Gregory; Mazzone, Stuart B; Mori, Nanako; Yu, Li; Canning, Brendan J

    2016-06-01

    Bradykinin has been implicated as a mediator of the acute pathophysiological and inflammatory consequences of respiratory tract infections and in exacerbations of chronic diseases such as asthma. Bradykinin may also be a trigger for the coughing associated with these and other conditions. We have thus set out to evaluate the pharmacology of bradykinin-evoked coughing in guinea pigs. When inhaled, bradykinin induced paroxysmal coughing that was abolished by the bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist HOE 140. These cough responses rapidly desensitized, consistent with reports of B2 receptor desensitization. Bradykinin-evoked cough was potentiated by inhibition of both neutral endopeptidase and angiotensin-converting enzyme (with thiorphan and captopril, respectively), but was largely unaffected by muscarinic or thromboxane receptor blockade (atropine and ICI 192605), cyclooxygenase, or nitric oxide synthase inhibition (meclofenamic acid and N(G)-nitro-L-arginine). Calcium influx studies in bronchopulmonary vagal afferent neurons dissociated from vagal sensory ganglia indicated that the tachykinin-containing C-fibers arising from the jugular ganglia mediate bradykinin-evoked coughing. Also implicating the jugular C-fibers was the observation that simultaneous blockade of neurokinin2 (NK2; SR48968) and NK3 (SR142801 or SB223412) receptors nearly abolished the bradykinin-evoked cough responses. The data suggest that bradykinin induces coughing in guinea pigs by activating B2 receptors on bronchopulmonary C-fibers. We speculate that therapeutics targeting the actions of bradykinin may prove useful in the treatment of cough. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  20. Pharmacological preconditioning with GYKI 52466: a prophylactic approach to neuroprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea S Goulton

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Some toxins and drugs can trigger lasting neuroprotective mechanisms that enable neurons to resist a subsequent severe insult. This ‘pharmacological preconditioning’ has far-reaching implications for conditions in which blood flow to the brain is interrupted. We have previously shown that in vitro preconditioning with the AMPA receptor antagonist GYKI 52466 induces tolerance to kainic acid (KA toxicity in hippocampus. This effect persists well after washout of the drug and may be mediated via inverse agonism of G protein linked receptors. Given the amplifying nature of metabotropic modulation, we hypothesised that GYKI 52466 may be effective in reducing seizure severity at doses well below those normally associated with adverse side effects. Here we report that pharmacological preconditioning with low-dose GYKI imparts a significant protection against KA-induced seizures in vivo. GYKI (3 mg/kg, s.c., 90