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Sample records for selective excitation pulses

  1. A novel selective-excitation RF pulse for magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Liu; Jianqi, Li; Gengying, Li

    2008-05-01

    A selective-excitation radiofrequency (RF) pulse that uses hard pulses composed of a sequence of composite pulses with positive and negative phases (P/N pulse) is proposed herein. Because the amplitude of the RF signal is unchanged during the excitation, RF amplification can be accomplished using a nonlinear RF power amplifier (i.e., class C or D type). In this article, Fourier series have been first used to analyze the equivalence between the proposed P/N pulse and the conventional soft pulse on selective excitation. Subsequently, computer simulations based on density-matrix theory are used to compare the excitation profiles of both the soft and the P/N pulses. The excitation profiles of the P/N pulses have been measured experimentally through a home-built 0.3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. In addition, several slices of images have been obtained as proofs by using the multislice two-dimensional spin echo sequence through replacement of the conventional soft pulse by the proposed P/N pulse. Because the perfect selectivity of the proposed P/N pulse, it can be used for imaging studies to improve the efficiency of amplification at the lowest cost.

  2. Single and Multiple-Selective Excitation Combined with Pulsed Field Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalvit, Claudio; Ko, Soo Young; Böhlen, Jean Marc

    1996-02-01

    Applications of selective, multiselective, and semiselective pulses with pulsed field gradients are described. The use of multiple-selective excitation and PFGs for coherence selection in the selective one-dimensional experiments results in spectra devoid of artifacts and with remarkable solvent suppression. Multiple-selective excitation is also employed in an experiment called Multigate, a variant of the well-known WATERGATE experiment, in order to achieve multiple solvent signal suppression. Finally, new pulse sequences are shown for recording pure absorption ω1semiselective PFG NOESY, ROESY, and TOCSY experiments. The merits and limitations of these experiments are discussed.

  3. Acceleration of a ground-state reaction by selective femtosecond-infrared-laser-pulse excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensitzki, Till; Yang, Yang; Kozich, Valeri; Ahmed, Ashour A.; Kössl, Florian; Kühn, Oliver; Heyne, Karsten

    2018-02-01

    Infrared (IR) excitation of vibrations that participate in the reaction coordinate of an otherwise thermally driven chemical reaction are believed to lead to its acceleration. Attempts at the practical realization of this concept have been hampered so far by competing processes leading to sample heating. Here we demonstrate, using femtosecond IR-pump IR-probe experiments, the acceleration of urethane and polyurethane formation due to vibrational excitation of the reactants for 1:1 mixtures of phenylisocyanate and cyclohexanol, and toluene-2,4-diisocyanate and 2,2,2-trichloroethane-1,1-diol, respectively. We measured reaction rate changes upon selective vibrational excitation with negligible heating of the sample and observed an increase of the reaction rate up to 24%. The observation is rationalized using reactant and transition-state structures obtained from quantum chemical calculations. We subsequently used IR-driven reaction acceleration to write a polyurethane square on sample windows using a femtosecond IR pulse.

  4. Renal zoomed EPI-DWI with spatially-selective radiofrequency excitation pulses in two dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yong-Lan, E-mail: ylhe_526@163.com [Department of Radiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Hausmann, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.hausmann@medma.uni-heidelberg.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim – Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Morelli, John N., E-mail: dr.john.morelli@gmail.com [St. John' s Medical Center, Tulsa, OK (United States); Attenberger, Ulrike I., E-mail: ulrike.attenberger@medma.uni-heidelberg.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim – Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Schoenberg, Stefan O., E-mail: stefan.schoenberg@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim – Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Riffel, Philipp, E-mail: philipp.riffel@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim – Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Renal zoomed diffusion-weighted imaging with spatially-selective radiofrequency excitation pulses is feasible. • z-EPI offers considerable potential for mitigating the limitations of conventional EPI techniques. • z-EPI of kidney may lead to substantial image quality improvements with reduced artifacts. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and clinical robustness of zoomed diffusion-weighted echo planar imaging (z-EPI) relative to conventional single-shot EPI (c-EPI) for DWI of the kidneys. Materials and methods: This retrospective study was approved by the institutional research ethics board. 66 patients (median age 58.5 years ± 13.4, range 23–83 years, 45 men, 21 women) undergoing 3T (Magnetom Skyra{sup ®}, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) using a dynamic parallel transmit array (TimTX TrueShape, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) for renal MRI were included in this study. Both c-EPI and z-EPI images were obtained. For z-EPI, a two-dimensional spatially-selective radiofrequency (RF) pulse was applied for echo planar imaging with the FOV reduced by a factor of 3. Two radiologists, blinded to clinical data and scan parameters evaluated the images with respect to their diagnostic confidence, overall preference, overall image quality, delineation of the kidney, spatial distortion, and image blur. Sequences were compared using a paired Wilcoxon test. ADC values for the upper pole, mid-zone, lower pole of the normal kidneys were compared between sequences as well as ADC values for renal lesions, using a paired t-test. Results: With z-EPI, the kidney was significantly better delineated with sharper boundaries, less image blur and distortion, and overall better image quality relative to c-EPI (all p < 0.001). The z-EPI technique led to greater diagnostic confidence than c-EPI (p = 0.020). z-EPI was preferred to c-EPI in 60 cases (90.9%, 60/66). No statistically significant differences in the ADC values of renal parenchyma or

  5. Renal zoomed EPI-DWI with spatially-selective radiofrequency excitation pulses in two dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Yong-Lan; Hausmann, Daniel; Morelli, John N.; Attenberger, Ulrike I.; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Riffel, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Renal zoomed diffusion-weighted imaging with spatially-selective radiofrequency excitation pulses is feasible. • z-EPI offers considerable potential for mitigating the limitations of conventional EPI techniques. • z-EPI of kidney may lead to substantial image quality improvements with reduced artifacts. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and clinical robustness of zoomed diffusion-weighted echo planar imaging (z-EPI) relative to conventional single-shot EPI (c-EPI) for DWI of the kidneys. Materials and methods: This retrospective study was approved by the institutional research ethics board. 66 patients (median age 58.5 years ± 13.4, range 23–83 years, 45 men, 21 women) undergoing 3T (Magnetom Skyra ® , Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) using a dynamic parallel transmit array (TimTX TrueShape, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) for renal MRI were included in this study. Both c-EPI and z-EPI images were obtained. For z-EPI, a two-dimensional spatially-selective radiofrequency (RF) pulse was applied for echo planar imaging with the FOV reduced by a factor of 3. Two radiologists, blinded to clinical data and scan parameters evaluated the images with respect to their diagnostic confidence, overall preference, overall image quality, delineation of the kidney, spatial distortion, and image blur. Sequences were compared using a paired Wilcoxon test. ADC values for the upper pole, mid-zone, lower pole of the normal kidneys were compared between sequences as well as ADC values for renal lesions, using a paired t-test. Results: With z-EPI, the kidney was significantly better delineated with sharper boundaries, less image blur and distortion, and overall better image quality relative to c-EPI (all p < 0.001). The z-EPI technique led to greater diagnostic confidence than c-EPI (p = 0.020). z-EPI was preferred to c-EPI in 60 cases (90.9%, 60/66). No statistically significant differences in the ADC values of renal parenchyma or of

  6. Water-selective excitation of short T2 species with binomial pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deligianni, Xeni; Bär, Peter; Scheffler, Klaus; Trattnig, Siegfried; Bieri, Oliver

    2014-09-01

    For imaging of fibrous musculoskeletal components, ultra-short echo time methods are often combined with fat suppression. Due to the increased chemical shift, spectral excitation of water might become a favorable option at ultra-high fields. Thus, this study aims to compare and explore short binomial excitation schemes for spectrally selective imaging of fibrous tissue components with short transverse relaxation time (T2 ). Water selective 1-1-binomial excitation is compared with nonselective imaging using a sub-millisecond spoiled gradient echo technique for in vivo imaging of fibrous tissue at 3T and 7T. Simulations indicate a maximum signal loss from binomial excitation of approximately 30% in the limit of very short T2 (0.1 ms), as compared to nonselective imaging; decreasing rapidly with increasing field strength and increasing T2 , e.g., to 19% at 3T and 10% at 7T for T2 of 1 ms. In agreement with simulations, a binomial phase close to 90° yielded minimum signal loss: approximately 6% at 3T and close to 0% at 7T for menisci, and for ligaments 9% and 13%, respectively. Overall, for imaging of short-lived T2 components, short 1-1 binomial excitation schemes prove to offer marginal signal loss especially at ultra-high fields with overall improved scanning efficiency. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. New fat suppression method with no pre-saturation pulse. WCHASE (water chemical-shift selective excitation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, Yu; Miyazaki, Mitsue; Machida, Yoshio; Takai, Hiroshi; Kojima, Fumitoshi

    1998-01-01

    A new fat suppression method with no pre-saturation pulse, water chemical-shift selective excitation (WCHASE), was developed. The characteristic feature of WCHASE is as follows. First, narrowing the frequency bandwidth of the 90deg RF pulse to chemical shift between water and fat signals, about 230 Hz in 1.5 T. Next, the ratio of slice gradient amplitudes for 90deg and 180deg. RF pulses are optimized in order to eliminate fat components from all slices. Prior to the experiment, a brief phase map shimming was performed to adjust B 0 field inhomogeneity using first order gradients. The WCHASE technique was compared with CHESS and conventional spin echo without fat suppression on the brain of healthy volunteers. The experimental results showed better fat suppression effect with WCHASE compared to CHESS. (author)

  8. Control of HOD photodissociation dynamics via bond-selective infrared multiphoton excitation and a femtosecond ultraviolet laser pulse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amstrup, Bjarne; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1992-01-01

    moment, excites the molecule to a dissociative electronic state. We consider the HOD molecule which is ideal due to the local mode structure of the vibrational states. It is shown that selective and localized bond stretching can be created in simple laser fields. When such a nonstationary vibrating HOD...... molecule is photodissociated with a short laser pulse (~5 fs) complete selectivity between the channels H+OD and D+OH is observed over the entire absorption band covering these channels. The Journal of Chemical Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  9. Homogeneous non-selective and slice-selective parallel-transmit excitations at 7 Tesla with universal pulses: A validation study on two commercial RF coils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Gras

    Full Text Available Parallel transmission (pTx technology, despite its great potential to mitigate the transmit field inhomogeneity problem in magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-high field (UHF, suffers from a cumbersome calibration procedure, thereby making the approach problematic for routine use. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate on two different 7T systems respectively equipped with 8-transmit-channel RF coils from two different suppliers (Rapid-Biomed and Nova Medical, the benefit of so-called universal pulses (UP, optimized to produce uniform excitations in the brain in a population of adults and making unnecessary the calibration procedures mentioned above. Non-selective and slice-selective UPs were designed to return homogeneous excitation profiles throughout the brain simultaneously on a group of ten subjects, which then were subsequently tested on ten additional volunteers in magnetization prepared rapid gradient echo (MPRAGE and multi-slice gradient echo (2D GRE protocols. The results were additionally compared experimentally with the standard non-pTx circularly-polarized (CP mode, and in simulation with subject-specific tailored excitations. For both pulse types and both coils, the UP mode returned a better signal and contrast homogeneity than the CP mode. Retrospective analysis of the flip angle (FA suggests that the FA deviation from the nominal FA on average over a healthy adult population does not exceed 11% with the calibration-free parallel-transmit pulses whereas it goes beyond 25% with the CP mode. As a result the universal pulses designed in this work confirm their relevance in 3D and 2D protocols with commercially available equipment. Plug-and-play pTx implementations henceforth become accessible to exploit with more flexibility the potential of UHF for brain imaging.

  10. Zoomed EPI-DWI of the pancreas using two-dimensional spatially-selective radiofrequency excitation pulses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Riffel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Implementation of DWI in the abdomen is challenging due to artifacts, particularly those arising from differences in tissue susceptibility. Two-dimensional, spatially-selective radiofrequency (RF excitation pulses for single-shot echo-planar imaging (EPI combined with a reduction in the FOV in the phase-encoding direction (i.e. zooming leads to a decreased number of k-space acquisition lines, significantly shortening the EPI echo train and potentially susceptibility artifacts. PURPOSE: To assess the feasibility and image quality of a zoomed diffusion-weighted EPI (z-EPI sequence in MR imaging of the pancreas. The approach is compared to conventional single-shot EPI (c-EPI. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 23 patients who had undergone an MRI study of the abdomen were included in this retrospective study. Examinations were performed on a 3T whole-body MR system (Magnetom Skyra, Siemens equipped with a two-channel fully dynamic parallel transmit array (TimTX TrueShape, Siemens. The acquired sequences consisted of a conventional EPI DWI of the abdomen and a zoomed EPI DWI of the pancreas. For z-EPI, the standard sinc excitation was replaced with a two-dimensional spatially-selective RF pulse using an echo-planar transmit trajectory. Images were evaluated with regard to image blur, respiratory motion artifacts, diagnostic confidence, delineation of the pancreas, and overall scan preference. Additionally ADC values of the pancreatic head, body, and tail were calculated and compared between sequences. RESULTS: The pancreas was better delineated in every case (23/23 with z-EPI versus c-EPI. In every case (23/23, both readers preferred z-EPI overall to c-EPI. With z-EPI there was statistically significantly less image blur (p<0.0001 and respiratory motion artifact compared to c-EPI (p<0.0001. Diagnostic confidence was statistically significantly better with z-EPI (p<0.0001. No statistically significant differences in calculated ADC values were observed

  11. Zoomed EPI-DWI of the pancreas using two-dimensional spatially-selective radiofrequency excitation pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffel, Philipp; Michaely, Henrik J; Morelli, John N; Pfeuffer, Josef; Attenberger, Ulrike I; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Haneder, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Implementation of DWI in the abdomen is challenging due to artifacts, particularly those arising from differences in tissue susceptibility. Two-dimensional, spatially-selective radiofrequency (RF) excitation pulses for single-shot echo-planar imaging (EPI) combined with a reduction in the FOV in the phase-encoding direction (i.e. zooming) leads to a decreased number of k-space acquisition lines, significantly shortening the EPI echo train and potentially susceptibility artifacts. To assess the feasibility and image quality of a zoomed diffusion-weighted EPI (z-EPI) sequence in MR imaging of the pancreas. The approach is compared to conventional single-shot EPI (c-EPI). 23 patients who had undergone an MRI study of the abdomen were included in this retrospective study. Examinations were performed on a 3T whole-body MR system (Magnetom Skyra, Siemens) equipped with a two-channel fully dynamic parallel transmit array (TimTX TrueShape, Siemens). The acquired sequences consisted of a conventional EPI DWI of the abdomen and a zoomed EPI DWI of the pancreas. For z-EPI, the standard sinc excitation was replaced with a two-dimensional spatially-selective RF pulse using an echo-planar transmit trajectory. Images were evaluated with regard to image blur, respiratory motion artifacts, diagnostic confidence, delineation of the pancreas, and overall scan preference. Additionally ADC values of the pancreatic head, body, and tail were calculated and compared between sequences. The pancreas was better delineated in every case (23/23) with z-EPI versus c-EPI. In every case (23/23), both readers preferred z-EPI overall to c-EPI. With z-EPI there was statistically significantly less image blur (p<0.0001) and respiratory motion artifact compared to c-EPI (p<0.0001). Diagnostic confidence was statistically significantly better with z-EPI (p<0.0001). No statistically significant differences in calculated ADC values were observed between the two sequences. Zoomed diffusion-weighted EPI

  12. Selective excitation of a vibrational level within the electronic ground state of a polyatomic molecule with ultra pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    de Clercq, L

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Coherent control of the upper vibrational level populations in the electronic ground state of a polyatomic molecule was simulated. Results indicate that selective excitation of a specific upper state level is possible...

  13. Selective excitation of a vibrational level within the electronic ground state of a polyatomic molecule with ultra short pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Clercq, L

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Coherent control of the upper vibrational level populations in the electronic ground state of a polyatomic molecule was simulated. Results indicate that selective excitation of a specific upper state level is possible....

  14. Pure-Phase Selective Excitation in Fast-Relaxing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangger, Klaus; Oberer, Monika; Sterk, Heinz

    2001-09-01

    Selective pulses have been used frequently for small molecules. However, their application to proteins and other macromolecules has been limited. The long duration of shaped-selective pulses and the short T2 relaxation times in proteins often prohibited the use of highly selective pulses especially on larger biomolecules. A very selective excitation can be obtained within a short time by using the selective excitation sequence presented in this paper. Instead of using a shaped low-intensity radiofrequency pulse, a cluster of hard 90° pulses, delays of free precession, and pulsed field gradients can be used to selectively excite a narrow chemical shift range within a relatively short time. Thereby, off-resonance magnetization, which is allowed to evolve freely during the free precession intervals, is destroyed by the gradient pulses. Off-resonance excitation artifacts can be removed by random variation of the interpulse delays. This leads to an excitation profile with selectivity as well as phase and relaxation behavior superior to that of commonly used shaped-selective pulses. Since the evolution of scalar coupling is inherently suppressed during the double-selective excitation of two different scalar-coupled nuclei, the presented pulse cluster is especially suited for simultaneous highly selective excitation of N-H and C-H fragments. Experimental examples are demonstrated on hen egg white lysozyme (14 kD) and the bacterial antidote ParD (19 kD).

  15. 1D experiments with multiply selective excitation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    2.1 Shaped pulse modulation. To achieve tri-selective excitation, the transmitter frequency (νT) may be positioned at the average of any two of the three chemical shifts in question, denoted by νA, νB, νC, here, νA corresponds to the lowest frequency signal, the next higher frequency signal being at νB the highest frequency ...

  16. Gradient-based selective excitation schemes in NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adell, P.; Parella, T.; Sanchez-Ferranda, F.; Virgili, A. [Departament de Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, (Spain)

    1996-10-01

    The behaviour of several recently proposed frequency-selective NMR excitation methods was monitored using brucine as a test sample. for each method the results were compared in terms of selectivity, sensitivity, phase properties and J-coupling refocussing. Methods using pulsed field gradients gave better overall results than shaped pulses alone. A slight modification of the WATERGATE method, incorporating the exclusive use of Gaussian pulses and the insertion of a final refocussing delay, gave the most satisfactory results.

  17. Heat pulse excitability of vestibular hair cells and afferent neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brichta, Alan M.; Tabatabaee, Hessam; Boutros, Peter J.; Ahn, JoongHo; Della Santina, Charles C.; Poppi, Lauren A.; Lim, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    In the present study we combined electrophysiology with optical heat pulse stimuli to examine thermodynamics of membrane electrical excitability in mammalian vestibular hair cells and afferent neurons. We recorded whole cell currents in mammalian type II vestibular hair cells using an excised preparation (mouse) and action potentials (APs) in afferent neurons in vivo (chinchilla) in response to optical heat pulses applied to the crista (ΔT ≈ 0.25°C per pulse). Afferent spike trains evoked by heat pulse stimuli were diverse and included asynchronous inhibition, asynchronous excitation, and/or phase-locked APs synchronized to each infrared heat pulse. Thermal responses of membrane currents responsible for APs in ganglion neurons were strictly excitatory, with Q10 ≈ 2. In contrast, hair cells responded with a mix of excitatory and inhibitory currents. Excitatory hair cell membrane currents included a thermoelectric capacitive current proportional to the rate of temperature rise (dT/dt) and an inward conduction current driven by ΔT. An iberiotoxin-sensitive inhibitory conduction current was also evoked by ΔT, rising in heat pulse excitability in vestibular sensory organs and provide quantitative methods for rational application of optical heat pulses to examine protein biophysics and manipulate cellular excitability. PMID:27226448

  18. Analysis on Response of Dynamic Systems to Pulse Sequences Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Lili

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Near-fault ground motions with long-period pulses can place severe demands on structures near an active fault. These pulse-type ground motions can be represented by pulse sequences with simple shapes. Half-sinusoidal pulse sequences are used to approximate recorded ground motions and dynamic responses of SDOF system under the excitation of these pulse sequences are studied. Four cases are considered: (1 variation in duration of successor sub-pulse; (2 variation in duration of predecessor sub-pulse; (3 variation in amplitude of successor sub-pulse; and (4 variation in amplitude of predecessor sub-pulse. The corresponding acceleration, velocity and displacement response spectra of these pulse sequences are studied. The analysis on SDOF system shows that in some cases the responses are strongly affected by the changes of duration and/or amplitude of the sub-pulse. The study can be useful to understand the influences of sub-pulse in the near-fault pulse-type ground motions.

  19. Modeling pulsed excitation for gas-phase laser diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Settersten, Thomas B.; Linne, Mark A.

    2002-01-01

    Excitation dynamics for pulsed optical excitation are described with the density-matrix equations and the rate equations for a two-level system. A critical comparison of the two descriptions is made with complete and consistent formalisms that are amenable to the modeling of applied laser-diagnostic techniques. General solutions, resulting from numerical integration of the differential equations describing the excitation process, are compared for collisional conditions that range from the completely coherent limit to the steady-state limit, for which the two formalisms are identical. This analysis demonstrates the failure of the rate equations to correctly describe the transient details of the excitation process outside the steady-state limit. However, reasonable estimates of the resultant population are obtained for nonsaturating (linear) excitation. This comparison provides the laser diagnostician with the means to evaluate the appropriate model for excitation through a simple picture of the breakdown of the rate-equation validity

  20. Multiple pulse traveling wave excitation of neon-like germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, J. C.; Nilsen, J.; Silva, L. B. da

    1995-01-01

    Traveling wave excitation has been shown to significantly increase the output intensity of the neon-like germanium x-ray laser. The driving laser pulse consisted of three 100 ps Gaussian laser pulses separated by 400 ps. Traveling wave excitation was employed by tilting the wave front of the driving laser by 45 degrees to match the propagation speed of the x-ray laser photons along the length of the target. We show results of experiments with the traveling wave, with no traveling wave, and against the traveling wave and comparisons to a numerical model. Gain was inferred from line intensity measurements at two lengths

  1. [Effect of the pulse shape on electrostimulation of excitable tissues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volobuev, A N; Razumov, A N; Romanchuk, P I; Romanchuk, N P

    2010-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the consideration of the mechanisms of electrostimulation of excitable tissues used in remedial medicine. Community of biophysical principles underlying the Weiss-Lapique and Dubois-Reymond laws is emphasized. The action of stimulating pulses on biological tissues and its consequences are analysed with reference to their shape (rectangular, triangular, and exponential). It is shown that the shape of the accommodation curve depends on the shape of stimulating pulses and physiological conditions of the tissue.

  2. Pulsed laser excitation of phosphate stabilised silver nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pulsed laser excitation; silver nanoparticles; surface plasmon band; sodium polyphosphate stabilizer. 1. ... are one of the most widely studied and well characterised metal systems due to the high stability of the silver ... processes occur by electron–phonon interactions and phonon cooling mechanism via phonon–solvent ...

  3. Heat pulse excitability of vestibular hair cells and afferent neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbitt, Richard D; Brichta, Alan M; Tabatabaee, Hessam; Boutros, Peter J; Ahn, JoongHo; Della Santina, Charles C; Poppi, Lauren A; Lim, Rebecca

    2016-08-01

    In the present study we combined electrophysiology with optical heat pulse stimuli to examine thermodynamics of membrane electrical excitability in mammalian vestibular hair cells and afferent neurons. We recorded whole cell currents in mammalian type II vestibular hair cells using an excised preparation (mouse) and action potentials (APs) in afferent neurons in vivo (chinchilla) in response to optical heat pulses applied to the crista (ΔT ≈ 0.25°C per pulse). Afferent spike trains evoked by heat pulse stimuli were diverse and included asynchronous inhibition, asynchronous excitation, and/or phase-locked APs synchronized to each infrared heat pulse. Thermal responses of membrane currents responsible for APs in ganglion neurons were strictly excitatory, with Q10 ≈ 2. In contrast, hair cells responded with a mix of excitatory and inhibitory currents. Excitatory hair cell membrane currents included a thermoelectric capacitive current proportional to the rate of temperature rise (dT/dt) and an inward conduction current driven by ΔT An iberiotoxin-sensitive inhibitory conduction current was also evoked by ΔT, rising in protein biophysics and manipulate cellular excitability. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Thermal response of nanocomposite materials under pulsed laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashidi-Huyeh, Majid; Palpant, Bruno

    2004-01-01

    The optical properties of nanocomposite materials made of matrix-embedded noble metal nanoparticles strongly depend on thermal effects from different origins. We propose a classical model describing the energy exchanges within the nanoparticles and between the latter and the surrounding dielectric host subsequent to a light pulse absorption. This model, which accounts for the thermal interactions between neighboring particles, allows us to calculate numerically the temperature dynamics of the electrons, metal lattice and matrix as functions of particle size, and metal concentration of the medium, whatever be the pulsed excitation temporal regime. It is illustrated in the case of Au:SiO 2 materials under femtosecond and nanosecond pulse excitation. It is shown that, in the femtosecond regime, the heat transfer to the matrix cannot be neglected beyond a few picosecond delay from which particle size and metal concentration play a significant role in the electron relaxation. In the nanosecond regime, these morphologic parameters influence crucially the material thermal behavior with the possibility of generating a thermal lens effect. The implications in the analysis of experimental results regarding both the electron relaxation dynamics and the nonlinear optical properties are also discussed. Finally, a method to adapt the model to the case of thin nanocomposite film is proposed

  5. Selective photoionization of isotopic atoms with pulsed lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Changjian

    1994-01-01

    The dynamics of isotopically selective interactions between the radiation of three pulsed lasers and atoms with a four-levels scheme has been studied. Starting from the time-dependent Schroedinger equation with the rotating-wave approximation, authors applied Sylvester theorem to the dynamic equations associated with near-and off-resonant excitations, respectively. Authors obtained the explicit expressions for the four-levels occupation probabilities. The analytic treatment explored the properties of coherent oscillations occurred in the atomic excitation processes with intense monochromatic lasers. The conditions under which the population inversion takes place are derived from near-resonant excitations. The criteria to select the basic parameters of pulsed lasers involved in the process are also provided

  6. Selective serotonergic excitation of callosal projection neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eAvesar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin (5-HT acting as a neurotransmitter in the cerebral cortex is critical for cognitive function, yet how 5-HT regulates information processing in cortical circuits is not well understood. We tested the serotonergic responsiveness of layer 5 pyramidal neurons (L5PNs of the mouse medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC, and found 3 distinct response types: long-lasting 5-HT1A (1A receptor-dependent inhibitory responses (84% of L5PNs, 5-HT2A (2A receptor-dependent excitatory responses (9%, and biphasic responses in which 2A-dependent excitation followed brief inhibition (5%. Relative to 5-HT-inhibited neurons, those excited by 5-HT had physiological properties characteristic of callosal/commissural (COM neurons that project to the contralateral cortex. We tested whether serotonergic responses in cortical pyramidal neurons are correlated with their axonal projection pattern using retrograde fluorescent labeling of COM and corticopontine-projecting (CPn neurons. 5-HT generated excitatory or biphasic responses in all 5-HT-responsive layer 5 COM neurons. Conversely, CPn neurons were universally inhibited by 5-HT. Serotonergic excitation of COM neurons was blocked by the 2A antagonist MDL 11939, while serotonergic inhibition of CPn neurons was blocked by the 1A antagonist WAY 100635, confirming a role for these two receptor subtypes in regulating pyramidal neuron activity. Selective serotonergic excitation of COM neurons was not layer-specific, as COM neurons in layer 2/3 were also selectively excited by 5-HT relative to their non-labeled pyramidal neuron neighbors. Because neocortical 2A receptors are implicated in the etiology and pathophysiology of schizophrenia, we propose that COM neurons may represent a novel cellular target for intervention in psychiatric disease.

  7. Lifetime measurement of the cesium 6P3/2 state using ultrafast laser-pulse excitation and ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sell, J. F.; Patterson, B. M.; Ehrenreich, T.; Brooke, G.; Scoville, J.; Knize, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    We report a precision measurement of the cesium 6P 3/2 excited-state lifetime. Two collimated, counterpropagating thermal Cs beams cross perpendicularly to femtosecond pulsed laser beams. High timing accuracy is achieved from having excitation and ionization laser pulses which originate from the same mode-locked laser. Using pulse selection we vary the separation in time between excitation and ionization laser pulses while counting the ions produced. We obtain a Cs 6P 3/2 lifetime of 30.460(38) ns, which is a factor of two improvement from previous measurements and with an uncertainty of 0.12%, is one of the most accurate lifetime measurements on record.

  8. The EMP excitation of radiation by the pulsed relativistic electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakirev, V.A.; Sidelnikov, G.L.

    1996-01-01

    The mechanisms of excitation of ultra-wideband electromagnetic pulses (EMP) by short pulses of high-current relativistic electron beams were proposed and investigated. It is shown that the transformation efficiency of the bunch kinetic energy to the excited energy of the EMP can be very significant. (author). 2 figs., 4 refs

  9. Experimental and theoretical study on characteristics of pulse excitation in T-burners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Mi; Wang, Ningfei; Li, Junwei; Song, Anchen; Ma, Yu

    2017-05-01

    Pulse excitation is the key to measure the pressure-coupling response function of composite propellant. It is also a key trigger factor for nonlinear combustion instability. This paper aims at understanding characteristics of pulse excitation in T-burners. Pulse excitation is provided by black powder (BP). D2 law is used to calculate BP burning properties. Firstly, the experimental pressure history of a pulse excitation is analyzed. Pressure pulse and mean pressure increment are introduced to describe pulse excitation. Secondly, the modified zero-dimension model and one-dimension model of pressure pulse are established based on energy conservation and modification. The results of models indicate that the modified zero-dimensional model can accurately predict the pressure pulse. The modified zero-dimension model demonstrates that the pressure pulse is determined by pulse build-up time threshold, volume coefficient, effective weight fraction of BP, weight of BP et. al. When burning time of BP is larger than the threshold, volume coefficient is equal to 2, and effective weight fraction of BP is less than 1. The pressure pulse is approximately linear correlation with weight and effective weight fraction of BP. Otherwise, volume coefficient is larger than 2, and effective weight fraction of BP is equal to 1. The pressure pulse is approximately linear correlation with volume coefficient and BP weight. Thirdly, a zero-dimensional prediction model of mean pressure is established based on conservations of energy and mass. The prediction models of pressure pulse and mean pressure are validated by T-burner experiments. Finally, effects of BP burning properties on pressure pulse and mean pressure increment are studied. The results show that both pressure pulse and mean pressure increment increase with increasing BP weight, linearly. The pressure pulse is more sensitivity to the variations of burning time of BP. As burning time of BP decreases, the mean pressure increment

  10. Pulse train induced rotational excitation and orientation of a polar molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Ashish; Arya, Urvashi; Vidhani, Bhavna; Prasad, Vinod

    2014-08-14

    We investigate theoretically the rotational excitation and field free molecular orientation of polar HBr molecule, interacting with train of ultrashort laser pulses. By adjusting the number of pulses, pulse period and the intensity of the pulse, one can suppress a population while simultaneously enhancing the desired population in particular rotational state. We have used train of laser pulses of different shaped pulse envelopes. The dynamics and orientation of molecules in the presence of pulse train of different shapes is studied and explained. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Selective Coherent Excitation of Charged Density Waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsvetkov, A.A.; Sagar, D.M.; Loosdrecht, P.H.M. van; Marel, D. van der

    2003-01-01

    Real time femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy is used to study collective and single particle excitations in the charge density wave state of the quasi-1D metal, blue bronze. Along with the previously observed collective amplitudon excitation, the spectra show several additional coherent features.

  12. Quantum resonance, Anderson localisation and selective rotational excitation in periodically kicked molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Averbukh I. Sh.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We show that molecules kicked periodically by laser pulses currently used in molecular alignment experiments allow to observe effects of the periodically kicked quantum rotor in a real rotational system. Among these effects are Anderson localisation in angular momentum and the scaling of the quantum resonance. Based on this, we propose a new scheme for selective molecular rotational excitation.

  13. The influence of the excitation pulse length on ultrafast magnetization dynamics in nickel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fognini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The laser-induced demagnetization of a ferromagnet is caused by the temperature of the electron gas as well as the lattice temperature. For long excitation pulses, the two reservoirs are in thermal equilibrium. In contrast to a picosecond laser pulse, a femtosecond pulse causes a non-equilibrium between the electron gas and the lattice. By pump pulse length dependent optical measurements, we find that the magnetodynamics in Ni caused by a picosecond laser pulse can be reconstructed from the response to a femtosecond pulse. The mechanism responsible for demagnetization on the picosecond time scale is therefore contained in the femtosecond demagnetization experiment.

  14. Process and device for the selective excitation and separation of isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducas, T.W.

    1976-01-01

    Description is given of a method for selectively populating high-lying excited states of atoms or molecules. It comprises: excitation of atoms or molecules with a first circularly polarized pulsed radiation, the coherent frequency components of first pulsed radiation have frequencies corresponding to the energy difference between a lower energy level and the frequency split levels of an intermediate energy level, the duration of pulse being less than 2π/Δω, where Δω is the frequency difference of the split levels; applying a second circularly polarized pulsed radiation to atoms or molecules for a time subsequent to the termination of first radiation, the coherent frequency components of second pulsed radiation have frequencies corresponding to the energy difference between the split levels of intermediate energy level and an upper energy level, the duration of second pulse being less than 2π/Δω. The first and second radiation have the same handedness of circular polarization, whereby upper energy level has a greater population than prior to excitation by first and second radiation pulses [fr

  15. Modeling and phantom studies of ultrasonic wall shear rate measurements using coded pulse excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsou, Jean K; Liu, Jie; Insana, Michael F

    2006-04-01

    Wall shear rate (WSR) is the derivative of blood velocity with respect to vessel radius at the endothelial cell (EC) surface. The product of WSR and blood viscosity is the wall shear stress (WSS) that has been identified as an important factor for atherosclerosis development. High echo signal-to-noise ratio (eSNR) and high spatial resolution are crucial for minimizing the errors in WSR estimates. By transmitting coded pulses with time-bandwidth product greater than one, high eSNR from weak blood scatter can be achieved without increasing instantaneous power or sacrificing spatial resolution. This paper summarizes a series of measurements in a straight tube (5-mm diameter), constant velocity flow phantom using a 10 MHz transducer (60% bandwidth, f/1.5) imaged with a 72 degrees Doppler angle, 125 MHz sampling frequency and 1 kHz pulse repetition frequency. Measurements were made using a frequency-modulated (FM) code, phase-modulated (PM) codes, and uncoded broadband and narrow band pulse transmissions. Both simulation and experimental results show that coded-pulse excitation increases accuracy and precision in WSR estimation for laminar flow over a broad range of peak velocity values when compared to standard pulsing techniques in noise-limited conditions (eSNR < 30 dB). The code sequence and its length are selected to balance range lobe suppression with eSNR and echo coherence enhancements to minimize WSR errors. In our study, the combination of an eight bit Optimal coded pulse with a Wiener compression filter yielded the highest WSR estimation performance.

  16. Study of excited states in liquid organic systems with the use of pulse radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanan, G.

    1979-01-01

    Application of electron pulse radiolysis of liquid organic systems in the investigations of excited singlet and triplet states has been illustrated with ethyl acetate and hexafluorobenzene. The fluorescence spectrum and lifetime of singlet excited hexafluorobenzene ( 1 HFB*) in cyclohexane medium have been obtained using nanosecond electron pulses. The possible formation of excimer in this case has been investigated. Energy transfer reactions from excited benzene singlet to HFB in benzene and cyclohexane media have been studied and their transfer constants were evaluated. Pulse radiolysis of ethyl acetate in presence of different concentrations of anthracene or biphenyl were used in the study of solute triplets. An upper limit for the yield of excited singlet anthracene was estimated to be approximately 0.1. The contribution of ethyl acetate cations in forming the excited singlet states of anthracene has been discussed. (auth.)

  17. Pulse excitation experiment of a superconducting generator; chodendo hatsudenki no parusu reiki shiken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyaike, K.; Iimura, T.; Nishimura, M.; Arata, M.; Takabatake, M. [Toshiba Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Yamada, M.; Kanamori, Y.; Hasegawa, K. [Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan)

    1999-11-10

    Efficiency improvement, improvement in the stability of electric power system it is miniaturization and weight reduction can be expected in comparison with the traditional-model generator superconducting generator. We produce the small superconducting generator for the experiment experimentally, and performance characteristics verification of the generator is carried out experimentally. This time, pulse excitation test of the superconducting generator was carried out, and the ac loss of the conductor by the pulse excitation investigated the effect on the quenching current. (NEDO)

  18. Cardiac imaging at 7 Tesla: Single- and two-spoke radiofrequency pulse design with 16-channel parallel excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitter, Sebastian; DelaBarre, Lance; Wu, Xiaoping; Greiser, Andreas; Wang, Dingxin; Auerbach, Edward J; Vaughan, J Thomas; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Van de Moortele, Pierre-François

    2013-11-01

    Higher signal to noise ratio (SNR) and improved contrast have been demonstrated at ultra-high magnetic fields (≥7 Tesla [T]) in multiple targets, often with multi-channel transmit methods to address the deleterious impact on tissue contrast due to spatial variations in B1 (+) profiles. When imaging the heart at 7T, however, respiratory and cardiac motion, as well as B0 inhomogeneity, greatly increase the methodological challenge. In this study we compare two-spoke parallel transmit (pTX) RF pulses with static B1 (+) shimming in cardiac imaging at 7T. Using a 16-channel pTX system, slice-selective two-spoke pTX pulses and static B1 (+) shimming were applied in cardiac CINE imaging. B1 (+) and B0 mapping required modified cardiac triggered sequences. Excitation homogeneity and RF energy were compared in different imaging orientations. Two-spoke pulses provide higher excitation homogeneity than B1 (+) shimming, especially in the more challenging posterior region of the heart. The peak value of channel-wise RF energy was reduced, allowing for a higher flip angle, hence increased tissue contrast. Image quality with two-spoke excitation proved to be stable throughout the entire cardiac cycle. Two-spoke pTX excitation has been successfully demonstrated in the human heart at 7T, with improved image quality and reduced RF pulse energy when compared with B1 (+) shimming. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Electromagnetic field, excited by monodirected X-radiation pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhemerov, A.V.; Metelkin, E.V.

    1994-01-01

    Parameters of electromagnetic field, generated in the atmosphere by monodirected pulse source of X radiation located at the altitude of approximately several kilometers have been estimated by the method of delayed potentials. The source radiation is directed towards the Earth surface. The conclusion was made that restricted areas of approximately 1 km with considerable pulse electromagnetic fields can be created on the Earth surface

  20. Implications of electron attachment to highly-excited states in pulsed-power discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinnaduwage, L.A.; Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN

    1997-01-01

    The author points out the possible implications of electron attachment to highly-excited states of molecules in two pulsed power technologies. One involves the pulsed H 2 discharges used for the generation of H ion beams for magnetic fusion energy and particle accelerators. The other is the power modulated plasma discharges used for material processing

  1. Synthesis of ultrawideband radiation of combined antenna arrays excited by nanosecond bipolar voltage pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshelev, V I; Plisko, V V; Sevostyanov, E A

    2017-01-01

    To broaden the spectrum of high-power ultrawideband radiation, it is suggested to synthesize an electromagnetic pulse summing the pulses of different length in free space. On the example of model pulses corresponding to radiation of combined antennas excited by bipolar voltage pulses of the length of 2 and 3 ns, the possibility of twofold broadening of the radiation spectrum was demonstrated. Radiation pulses with the spectrum width exceeding three octaves were obtained. Pattern formation by the arrays of different geometry excited by the pulses having different time shifts was considered. Optimum array structure with the pattern maximum in the main direction was demonstrated on the example of a 2×2 array. (paper)

  2. A low power radiofrequency pulse for simultaneous multislice excitation and refocusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichner, Cornelius; Wald, Lawrence L; Setsompop, Kawin

    2014-10-01

    Simultaneous multislice (SMS) acquisition enables increased temporal efficiency of MRI. Nonetheless, MultiBand (MB) radiofrequency (RF) pulses used for SMS can cause large energy deposition. Power independent of number of slices (PINS) pulses reduce RF power at cost of reduced bandwidth and increased off-resonance dependency. This work improves PINS design to further reduce energy deposition, off-resonance dependency and peak power. Modifying the shape of MB RF-pulses allows for mixing with PINS excitation, creating a new pulse type with reduced energy deposition and SMS excitation characteristics. Bloch Simulations were used to evaluate excitation and off-resonance behavior of this "MultiPINS" pulse. In this work, MultiPINS was used for whole-brain MB = 3 acquisition of high angular and spatial resolution diffusion MRI at 7 Tesla in 3 min. By using MultiPINS, energy transmission and peak power for SMS imaging can be significantly reduced compared with PINS and MB pulses. For MB = 3 acquisition in this work, MultiPINS reduces energy transmission by up to ∼50% compared with PINS pulses. The energy reduction was traded off to shorten the MultiPINS pulse, yielding higher signal at off-resonances for spin-echo acquisitions. MB and PINS pulses can be combined to enable low energy and peak power SMS acquisition. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Ab initio design of picosecond infrared laser pulses for controlling vibrational-rotational excitation of CO molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Thomas; Ren, Qinghua; Balint-Kurti, Gabriel G.; Manby, Frederick R.

    2007-06-01

    Optimal control of rovibrational excitations of the CO molecule using picosecond infrared laser pulses is described in the framework of the electric-nuclear Born-Oppenheimer approximation [G. G. Balint-Kurti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 122, 084110 (2005)]. The potential energy surface of the CO molecule in the presence of an electric field is calculated using coupled cluster theory with a large orbital basis set. The quantum dynamics of the process is treated using a full three dimensional treatment of the molecule in the laser field. The detailed mechanisms leading to efficient control of the selected excitation processes are discussed.

  4. Selective mode excitation in hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galea, A. D.; Couny, F.; Coupland, S.; Roberts, P. J.; Sabert, H.; Knight, J. C.; Birks, T. A.; Russell, Philip St. J.

    2005-04-01

    Modes are selectively excited by launching light through the cladding from the side into a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. Measuring the total output power at the end of the fiber as a function of the angle of incidence of the exciting laser beam provides a powerful diagnostic for characterizing the cladding bandgap. Furthermore, various types of modes on either side of the bandgap are excited individually, and their near-field images are obtained.

  5. Electromagnetic excitation of a generic cavity with a variable e-beam pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleetwood, R.; Kerris, K.; Merkel, G.; Roberts, H.; Smith, M.

    1987-01-01

    Relativistic electron-beam nose-erosion techniques have been employed to produce an electron beam with variable pulse shape and bremsstrahlung capability (''dial a pulse''). This capability has been employed to excite a large number of electromagnetic fields inside a canonical cavity. Electron-beam and bremsstrahlung pulse-shape parameters have been varied to produce changes in the electromagnetic cavity response. For example, generic cavity test parameters such as displacement currents or conduction currents can be emphasized or de-emphasized. A theoretical interpretation of these electromagnetic excitations is presented

  6. Anomalous photo-induced response by double-pulse excitation in the organic conductor (EDO-TTF)2PF6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onda, Ken; Ogihara, Sho; Ishikawa, Tadahiko; Okimoto, Yoichi; Shao, Xiangfeng; Nakano, Yoshiaki; Yamochi, Hideki; Saito, Gunzi; Koshihara, Shin-ya

    2009-02-01

    We measured ultrafast reflectivity changes induced by double-pulse excitation in the organic conductor (EDO-TTF)2PF6. Using double-pulse excitation with a relatively high intensity, the sign of reflectivity change became reversed at around 0.8 ps and subsequently the reflectivity change reverted to that of the normal photo-induced state after about 1 ps. Using a optically phase-locked double-pulse with low intensity, we found that the temporal profile excited by an in-phase double-pulse differs from that by an out-of-phase double-pulse despite the time difference between the double-pulses being only 1.31 fs. This was true even when there is almost no overlap between each pulse in the double-pulse. These results indicate that the photo-response in this material to double-pulse excitation differs greatly from the linear sum of the responses to single pulses.

  7. Self-resonant wakefield excitation by intense laser pulse in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, N.E.; Pogosova, A.A.; Gorbunov, L.M.; Ramazashvili, R.R.; Kirsanov, V.I.

    1993-01-01

    It is demonstrated by theoretical analysis and numerical calculations that in an underdense plasma the process of three-dimensional evolution of the short and strong laser pulse (with duration equal to several plasma periods) leads to compression and self-modulation of the pulse, so that during a fairly long period of time beats of pulse amplitude generates resonantly a strong and stable plasma wakefield. The intensity of the wake-field is so high that it can provide a new promising outlook for the plasma based accelerator concept. Linear analysis of dispersion relation predicts that taking into account transverse component of wavenumber considerably increases the growth rate of resonance instability of the pulse. The numerical simulations demonstrate that considered self-focusing and resonant-modulation instability are essentially three dimensional processes. Laser field evolution in each transverse cross section of the pulse is synchronized by the regular structure of plasma wave that is excited by the pulse. The considered effect of resonant modulation has a threshold. For the pulses with the intensity below the threshold the refraction dominates and no modulation appears. The studied phenomenon can be referred to as the Self-Resonant Wakefield (SRWF) excitation that is driven by self-focusing and self-modulation of laser pulse with quite a moderate initial duration. In fact, this method of excitation differs from both suggested in Ref.1 (PBWA) and in Refs.2,3 (LWFA), being even more than the combination of these concepts. Unlike the first scheme it does not require initially the two-frequency laser pulse, since the modulation here appears in the most natural way due to evolution of the pulse. In contrast with the LWFA, the considered SRWF generation scheme gives the possibility to raise the intensity of wake-excitation due to pulse self-focusing ( initial stage) and self modulation (second stage)

  8. Towards 1H-MRSI of the human brain at 7T with slice-selective adiabatic refocusing pulses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheenen, T.W.J.; Heerschap, A.; Klomp, D.W.J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the possibilities of proton spectroscopic imaging (1H-MRSI) of the human brain at 7 Tesla with adiabatic refocusing pulses. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A combination of conventional slice selective excitation and two pairs of slice selective adiabatic refocusing pulses (semi-LASER)

  9. Infrared photodissociation of size selected internally excited ethylene clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, U.; Huisken, F.; Lauenstein, Ch.; Meyer, H.; Sroka, R.

    1987-12-01

    Ethylene clusters (C2H4)n are generated in a supersonic expansion with He and size selected by scattering from a helium beam. The clusters are dissociated upon absorption of a photon from a pulsed CO2 laser by exciting the ν7 mode of the monomer. During the collision about 30 meV of internal energy is transferred to the cluster so that the laser photons interact with internally hot clusters. The frequency and fluence dependences of the photodissociation cross sections are measured for (C2H4)n with n=2,3,4,5, and 6. Nearly all spectra exhibit structure which is most pronounced for the dimer. The overall width (FWHM) decreases from 31.2 cm-1 for the dimer to 12.2 cm-1 for the hexamer, while the maximum position is nearly the same (951.6 cm-1). The structure of the dimer spectrum is attributed to hot bands. The large linewidth corresponds to a short lifetime in the ps range.

  10. A Comparison of AC and Short-Pulse Excitation for Xe Excimer Barrier Discharge Lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mildren, R. P.; Morrow, R.; Carman, R. J.

    1999-10-01

    Dielectric barrier discharge excitation of rare-gas and rare-gas halide excimers provides an efficient scheme for generating intense VUV radiation for applications including lighting, ozonisation, and photochemical surface treatment. Typically, lamps employ AC (sinusoidal) voltage excitation in which case VUV emission is produced from short-livid micro discharges (streamers) distributed stochastically over the dielectric. However, it has been recently demonstrated that significantly increased efficiency (by factor 2-3) can be obtained from Xe lamps when using short excitation pulses separated by idle periods[1]. In this paper, we report an investigation into the mechanisms which bring about improved efficiency by comparing the electrical, spectral and spatial emission characteristics of a small-scale Xe lamp excited by short pulses ( 100ns) with that of conventional AC excitation. The results reveal that pulsed excitation produces a homogenous glow-like discharge in which the electron density and temperature are more favourable for efficient excimer production. [1] RP Mildren et al, IVth Int. Conf. Atom. and Molec. Pulsed Lasers, Tomsk, Siberia Sept. (1999); F Vollkommer and L Hitzschke, Proc. 8th Int. Symp. Sci. Tech. Light Sources, Greifswald, Germany, '98, IL-07, pp51-59 (1998)

  11. Excited delirium: Consideration of selected medical and psychiatric issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Samuel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Edith Samuel1, Robert B Williams1, Richard B Ferrell21Department of Psychology, Atlantic Baptist University, Moncton, New Brunswick Canada; 2Department of Psychiatry, Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, New Hampshire, USAAbstract: Excited delirium, sometimes referred to as agitated or excited delirium, is the label assigned to the state of acute behavioral disinhibition manifested in a cluster of behaviors that may include bizarreness, aggressiveness, agitation, ranting, hyperactivity, paranoia, panic, violence, public disturbance, surprising physical strength, profuse sweating due to hyperthermia, respiratory arrest, and death. Excited delirium is reported to result from substance intoxication, psychiatric illness, alcohol withdrawal, head trauma, or a combination of these. This communication reviews the history of the origins of excited delirium, selected research related to its causes, symptoms, management, and the links noted between it and selected medical and psychiatric conditions. Excited delirium involves behavioral and physical symptoms that are also observed in medical and psychiatric conditions such as rhabdomyolysis, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, and catatonia. A useful contribution of this communication is that it links the state of excited delirium to conditions for which there are known and effective medical and psychiatric interventions.Keywords: excited delirium, excited states, cocaine misuse, restraint or in custody deaths

  12. Photostability of a fluorescent marker under pulsed excited-state depletion through stimulated emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyba, Marcus; Hell, Stefan W

    2003-09-01

    Saturated stimulated-emission depletion (STED) of a fluorescent marker has been shown to break the diffraction barrier in far-field fluorescence microscopy and to facilitate spatial resolution down to a few tens of nanometers. Here we investigate the photostability of a fluorophore that, in this concept, is repeatedly excited and depleted by synchronized laser pulses. Our study of bacteria labeled with RH-414, a membrane marker, reveals that increasing the duration of the STED pulse from approximately 10 to 160 ps fundamentally improves the photostability of the dye. At the same time the STED efficiency is maintained. The observed photobleaching of RH-414 is due primarily to multiphoton absorption from its ground state. One can counteract photobleaching by employing STED pulses that range from 150 ps to approximately half of the lifetime of the excited state. The results also have implications for multiphoton excitation microscopy.

  13. Wave-packet dynamics in alkaline dimers. Investigation and control through coherent excitation with fs-pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, F.N.B.

    2007-01-01

    During my PhD thesis I investigated alkaline dimers with coherent control in a molecular beam as well as with pump-probe spectroscopy in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). The aim of the coherent control experiments were the isotope selective ionization with phase- and amplitude-shaped fs-pulses. Chapter 4 described the gained results of isotope selective ionization of NaK and KRb in a molecular beam by using different pulse formers. For the NaK dimer was the reached optimization factor R Ph and Ampl 770 =R max /R min =25 between maximization and minimization of the isotopomer ratio ( 23 Na 39 K) + /( 23 Na 41 K) + with phase and amplitude modulation of the fs-pulse with a central wavelength of λ=770 nm. From the electronic ground-state X(1) 1 Σ + ;ν''=0 transfers a one-photon-excitation population in the first excited A(2) 1 Σ + state. The coherent control experiment on KRb was used to maximize and minimize the isotopomer ratio ( 124 KRb) + /( 126 KRb) + . It was the first coherent control experiment with a spectral resolution of 1.84 cm -1 /Pixel. For the phase and amplitude optimization was the received optimization factor between minimization and maximization of the isotopomer ratio R Ph and Ampl =R max /R min =7 at a central wavelength of 840 nm. The results showed a stepwise excitation process from the electronic ground-state in the first excited (2) 1 Σ + state with a further excitation, that is possible over three resonant energy potential curves into the ionic ground-state. In the second part of my thesis I realized pump-probe spectroscopy of Rb 2 dimers in a dark SPOT. (orig.)

  14. Modeling the response of mesospheric sodium to pulsed-laser excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellemeier, Joschua A; Hickson, Paul; Labadie, Lucas

    2017-08-01

    A simulation modeling excitation of the sodium D 2 line by nanosecond time scale pulsed lasers is described. By numerically integrating transition rates in the sodium hyperfine structure, the return flux per sodium atom is predicted as a function of laser power. The simulation should be useful for studies of mesospheric sodium and adaptive optics. Applications include the estimation of sodium column density from lidar return flux, and of laser guide star brightness for different pulsed laser formats. The simulation assumes that the pulse repetition frequency is sufficiently low (smaller than a few kilohertz) that atomic collisions restore local thermodynamic equilibrium between pulses. It is also assumed that the pulse length is short compared to the Larmor precession time scale. The numerical results are well-approximated by a simple analytic model for a three-level atom. The number of emitted photons is found to be primarily dependent on the product of the length of the laser pulse and the energy density.

  15. Excitation of random intense single-cycle light-pulse chains in optical fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Y C; Zhang, F L; Gao, J B; Chen, Z Y; Lin, C Y; Yu, M Y

    2014-01-01

    Excitation of intense periodic single-cycle light pulses in a stochastic background arising from continuous wave stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in a long optical fiber with weak optical feedback is found experimentally and modeled theoretically. Such intense light-pulse chains occur randomly and the optical feedback is a requirement for their excitation. The probability of these forms, among the large number of experimental output signals with identifiable waveforms, appearing is only about 3%, with the remainder exhibiting regular SBS characteristics. It is also found that pulses with low period numbers appear more frequently and the probability distribution for their occurrence in terms of the pulse power is roughly L-shaped, like that for rogue waves. The results from a three-wave-coupling model for SBS including feedback phase control agree well qualitatively with the observed phenomena. (paper)

  16. Wave fronts, pulses and wave trains in photoexcited superlattices behaving as excitable or oscillatory media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arana, J I; Bonilla, L L; Grahn, H T

    2011-01-01

    Undoped and strongly photoexcited semiconductor superlattices with field-dependent recombination behave as excitable or oscillatory media with spatially discrete nonlinear convection and diffusion. Infinitely long, dc-current-biased superlattices behaving as excitable media exhibit wave fronts with increasing or decreasing profiles, whose velocities can be calculated by means of asymptotic methods. These superlattices can also support pulses of the electric field. Pulses moving downstream with the flux of electrons can be constructed from their component wave fronts, whereas pulses advancing upstream do so slowly and experience saltatory motion: they change slowly in long intervals of time separated by fast transitions during which the pulses jump to the previous superlattice period. Photoexcited superlattices can also behave as oscillatory media and exhibit wave trains. (paper)

  17. Helmholtz resonance cells for pulsed dye laser-excited high resolution optoacoustic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    The signal waveform observed in optoacoustic measurements is complex and highly dependent on sample for open-cavity cells and pulsed optical excitation. A Helmholtz resonator (HR) cell has been employed to reduce this dependence on sample and thus simplify signal processing. The cell background signal is likewise reduced with the HR cell. An optoacoustic (OA) spectrum of holmium oxide powder is presented to demonstrate the utility of this cell with pulsed dye laser excitation for acquistion of high resolution OA spectra of solids

  18. Thermal Dynamics of Xanthene Dye in Polymer Matrix Excited by Double Pulse Laser Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samusev, Ilia; Borkunov, Rodion; Tsarkov, Maksim; Konstantinova, Elizaveta; Antipov, Yury; Demin, Maksim; Bryukhanov, Valery

    2018-01-01

    Double-pulse laser excitation of the eosin and silver nanoparticles embedded into polymer media is known to be a method of electronic-vibrational energy deactivation kinetic process information obtaining and polymer thermal dynamics investigation. We have studied the vibrational relaxation processes in dye molecules (eosin) and nanoparticles in polyvinyl alcohol after two time-shifted laser pulses with fast and delayed fluorescence kinetics study. In order to simulate thermal and photophysical processes caused by double photon excitation, we solved heat transfer and energy deactivation differential equations numerically. The simulation allowed us to obtain the value of heat conductivity coefficient of polymer matrix.

  19. CO2 laser pulse switching by optically excited semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, V.L. da.

    1986-01-01

    The construction and the study of a semi-conductor optical switch used for generating short infrared pulses and to analyse the semiconductor characteristics, are presented. The switch response time depends on semiconductor and control laser characteristics. The results obtained using a Ge switch controlled by N 2 , NdYag and Dye lasers are presented. The response time was 50 ns limited by Ge recombination time. The reflectivity increased from 7% to 59% using N 2 laser to control the switch. A simple model for semiconductor optical properties that explain very well the experimental results, is also presented. (author) [pt

  20. Wake-Field Wave Resonant Excitation in Magnetized Plasmas by Electromagnetic Pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milant'ev, V.P.; Turikov, V.A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the space charge wave excitation process at electromagnetic pulse propagation along external magnetic field in vicinity of electron cyclotron resonance. In hydrodynamic approach it is obtained an equation for plasma density under ponderomotive force action. With help of this equation we investigated a wake-field wave amplitude dependence from resonance detuning. The numerical simulation using a PIC method electromagnetic pulse propagation process in the resonant conditions was done

  1. Characterizing human activity induced impulse and slip-pulse excitations through structural vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shijia; Mirshekari, Mostafa; Fagert, Jonathon; Ramirez, Ceferino Gabriel; Chung, Albert Jin; Hu, Chih Chi; Shen, John Paul; Zhang, Pei; Noh, Hae Young

    2018-02-01

    Many human activities induce excitations on ambient structures with various objects, causing the structures to vibrate. Accurate vibration excitation source detection and characterization enable human activity information inference, hence allowing human activity monitoring for various smart building applications. By utilizing structural vibrations, we can achieve sparse and non-intrusive sensing, unlike pressure- and vision-based methods. Many approaches have been presented on vibration-based source characterization, and they often either focus on one excitation type or have limited performance due to the dispersion and attenuation effects of the structures. In this paper, we present our method to characterize two main types of excitations induced by human activities (impulse and slip-pulse) on multiple structures. By understanding the physical properties of waves and their propagation, the system can achieve accurate excitation tracking on different structures without large-scale labeled training data. Specifically, our algorithm takes properties of surface waves generated by impulse and of body waves generated by slip-pulse into account to handle the dispersion and attenuation effects when different types of excitations happen on various structures. We then evaluate the algorithm through multiple scenarios. Our method achieves up to a six times improvement in impulse localization accuracy and a three times improvement in slip-pulse trajectory length estimation compared to existing methods that do not take wave properties into account.

  2. Selective excitation in a three-state system using a hybrid adiabatic-nonadiabatic interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yunheung; Lee, Han-gyeol; Jo, Hanlae; Ahn, Jaewook

    2016-08-01

    The chirped-pulse interaction in the adiabatic coupling regime induces cyclic permutations of the energy states of a three-level system in the V -type configuration, which process is known as the three-level chirped rapid adiabatic passage (RAP). Here we show that a spectral hole in a chirped pulse can turn on or off the level mixing at adiabatic crossing points of this process, reducing the system to an effective two-level system. The given hybrid adiabatic-nonadiabatic transition enables selective excitation of the three-level system, controlled by the laser intensity and spectral position of the hole, as well as the sign of the chirp parameter. Experiments performed with shaped femtosecond laser pulses and the three lowest energy levels (5 S1 /2 , 5 P1 /2 , and 5 P3 /2 ) of atomic rubidium (Rb) show good agreement with the theoretically analyzed dynamics. The result indicates that our method, when being combined with the ordinary chirped RAP, implements an adiabatic transition between the Raman-coupled excited states. Furthermore, our laser intensity-dependent control may have applications including selective excitations of atoms or ions arranged in space when being used in conjunction with laser beam profile programming.

  3. Pulsed radiation studies of carotenoid radicals and excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, M.

    2001-04-01

    The one-electron reduction potentials of the radical cations of five dietary carotenoids, in aqueous micellar environments, have been obtained from a pulse radiolysis study of electron transfer between the carotenoids and tryptophan radical cations as a function of pH, and lie in the range 980 to 1060 mV. The decays of the carotenoid radical cations suggest a distribution of exponential lifetimes. The radicals persist for up to about one second, depending on the medium and may re-orientate within a biological environment to react with other biomolecules, such as tyrosine, cysteine or ascorbic acid, which was indeed confirmed. Spectral information of carotenoid pigmented liposomes has been collected, subsequently pulse radiolysis was used to generate the radical cations of β-carotene, zeaxanthin and lutein, in unilamellar vesicles of dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline. The rate constants for the 'repair' of these carotenoid radical cations by water-soluble vitamin C were found to be similar (∼1 x 10 7 M -1 s -1 ) for β-carotene and zeaxanthin and somewhat lower (∼0.5 x 10 7 M -1 s -1 ) for lutein. The results are discussed in terms of the microenvironment of the carotenoids and suggest that for β-carotene, a hydrocarbon carotenoid, the radical cation is able to interact with a water-soluble species even though the parent hydrocarbon carotenoid is probably entirely in the non-polar region of the liposome. Studies investigating the ability of ingested lycopene to protect human lymphoid cells against singlet oxygen and nitrogen dioxide radical mediated cell damage have shown that a high lycopene diet is beneficial in protecting human cells against reactive oxygen species. Triplet states of carotenoids were produced in benzene solvent and their triplet lifetimes were found to depend on the concentration of the parent molecule. The rate constants obtained for ground state quenching correlate with the number of conjugated double bonds, the longer chain systems having

  4. Harmonic pulsed excitation and motion detection of a vibrating reflective target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Matthew W; Greenleaf, James F

    2008-01-01

    Elasticity imaging is an emerging medical imaging modality. Methods involving acoustic radiation force excitation and pulse-echo ultrasound motion detection have been investigated to assess the mechanical response of tissue. In this work new methods for dynamic radiation force excitation and motion detection are presented. The theory and model for harmonic motion detection of a vibrating reflective target are presented. The model incorporates processing of radio frequency data acquired using pulse-echo ultrasound to measure harmonic motion with amplitudes ranging from 100 to 10,000 nm. A numerical study was performed to assess the effects of different parameters on the accuracy and precision of displacement amplitude and phase estimation and showed how estimation errors could be minimized. Harmonic pulsed excitation is introduced as a multifrequency radiation force excitation method that utilizes ultrasound tonebursts repeated at a rate f(r). The radiation force, consisting of frequency components at multiples of f(r), is generated using 3.0 MHz ultrasound, and motion detection is performed simultaneously with 9.0 MHz pulse-echo ultrasound. A parameterized experimental analysis showed that displacement can be measured with small errors for motion with amplitudes as low as 100 nm. The parameterized numerical and experimental analyses provide insight into how to optimize acquisition parameters to minimize measurement errors.

  5. Enhanced Electron Attachment to Highly-Excited Molecules and Its Applications in Pulsed Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, W.X.; Ma, C.Y.; McCorkle, D.L.; Pinnaduwage, L.A.

    1999-01-01

    Studies conducted over the past several years have shown that electron attachment to highly-excited states of molecules have extremely large cross sections. We will discuss the implications of this for pulsed discharges used for H - generation, material processing, and plasma remediation

  6. Pinwheel-like structures resulting from interaction of plane pulses of excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sielewiesiuk, Jakub; Górecki, Jerzy

    2002-12-01

    We demonstrate that complex spatiotemporal structures may appear in an excitable system as the result of interaction between two plane pulses. Such behavior has been obtained for FitzHugh-Nagumo type of dynamics by numerical integration of reaction-diffusion equations.

  7. Volumetric graphics in liquid using holographic femtosecond laser pulse excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Kota; Hayasaki, Yoshio

    2017-06-01

    Much attention has been paid to the development of three-dimensional volumetric displays in the fields of optics and computer graphics, and it is a dream of we display researchers. However, full-color volumetric displays are challenging because many voxels with different colors have to be formed to render volumetric graphics in real three-dimensional space. Here, we show a new volumetric display in which microbubble voxels are three-dimensionally generated in a liquid by focused femtosecond laser pulses. Use of a high-viscosity liquid, which is the key idea of this system, slows down the movement of the microbubbles, and as a result, volumetric graphics can be displayed. This "volumetric bubble display" has a wide viewing angle and simple refresh and requires no addressing wires because it involves optical access to transparent liquid and achieves full-color graphics composed on light-scattering voxels controlled by illumination light sources. In addition, a bursting of bubble graphics system using an ultrasonic vibrator also has been demonstrated. This technology will open up a wide range of applications in three-dimensional displays, augmented reality and computer graphics.

  8. Study of ultra-high gradient wakefield excitation by intense ultrashort laser pulses in plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Kotaki, H

    2002-01-01

    We investigate a mechanism of nonlinear phenomena in laser-plasma interaction, a laser wakefield excited by intense laser pulses, and the possibility of generating an intense bright electron source by an intense laser pulse. We need to understand and further employ some of these phenomena for our purposes. We measure self-focusing, filamentation, and the anomalous blueshift of the laser pulse. The ionization of gas with the self-focusing causes a broad continuous spectrum with blueshift. The normal blueshift depends on the laser intensity and the plasma density. We, however, have found different phenomenon. The laser spectrum shifts to fixed wavelength independent of the laser power and gas pressure above some critical power. We call the phenomenon 'anomalous blueshift'. The results are explained by the formation of filaments. An intense laser pulse can excite a laser wakefield in plasma. The coherent wakefield excited by 2 TW, 50 fs laser pulses in a gas-jet plasma around 10 sup 1 sup 8 cm sup - sup 3 is mea...

  9. Pulsed radiation studies of carotenoid radicals and excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, M

    2001-04-01

    The one-electron reduction potentials of the radical cations of five dietary carotenoids, in aqueous micellar environments, have been obtained from a pulse radiolysis study of electron transfer between the carotenoids and tryptophan radical cations as a function of pH, and lie in the range 980 to 1060 mV. The decays of the carotenoid radical cations suggest a distribution of exponential lifetimes. The radicals persist for up to about one second, depending on the medium and may re-orientate within a biological environment to react with other biomolecules, such as tyrosine, cysteine or ascorbic acid, which was indeed confirmed. Spectral information of carotenoid pigmented liposomes has been collected, subsequently pulse radiolysis was used to generate the radical cations of {beta}-carotene, zeaxanthin and lutein, in unilamellar vesicles of dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline. The rate constants for the 'repair' of these carotenoid radical cations by water-soluble vitamin C were found to be similar ({approx}1 x 10{sup 7} M{sup -1}s{sup -1}) for {beta}-carotene and zeaxanthin and somewhat lower ({approx}0.5 x 10{sup 7} M{sup -1}s{sup -1}) for lutein. The results are discussed in terms of the microenvironment of the carotenoids and suggest that for {beta}-carotene, a hydrocarbon carotenoid, the radical cation is able to interact with a water-soluble species even though the parent hydrocarbon carotenoid is probably entirely in the non-polar region of the liposome. Studies investigating the ability of ingested lycopene to protect human lymphoid cells against singlet oxygen and nitrogen dioxide radical mediated cell damage have shown that a high lycopene diet is beneficial in protecting human cells against reactive oxygen species. Triplet states of carotenoids were produced in benzene solvent and their triplet lifetimes were found to depend on the concentration of the parent molecule. The rate constants obtained for ground state quenching correlate with the number

  10. Study of ultra-high gradient wakefield excitation by intense ultrashort laser pulses in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotaki, Hideyuki

    2002-12-01

    We investigate a mechanism of nonlinear phenomena in laser-plasma interaction, a laser wakefield excited by intense laser pulses, and the possibility of generating an intense bright electron source by an intense laser pulse. We need to understand and further employ some of these phenomena for our purposes. We measure self-focusing, filamentation, and the anomalous blueshift of the laser pulse. The ionization of gas with the self-focusing causes a broad continuous spectrum with blueshift. The normal blueshift depends on the laser intensity and the plasma density. We, however, have found different phenomenon. The laser spectrum shifts to fixed wavelength independent of the laser power and gas pressure above some critical power. We call the phenomenon 'anomalous blueshift'. The results are explained by the formation of filaments. An intense laser pulse can excite a laser wakefield in plasma. The coherent wakefield excited by 2 TW, 50 fs laser pulses in a gas-jet plasma around 10 18 cm -3 is measured with a time-resolved frequency domain interferometer (FDI). The density distribution of the helium gas is measured with a time-resolved Mach-Zehnder interferometer to search for the optimum laser focus position and timing in the gas-jet. The results show an accelerating wakefield excitation of 20 GeV/m with good coherency, which is useful for ultrahigh gradient particle acceleration in a compact system. This is the first time-resolved measurement of laser wakefield excitation in a gas-jet plasma. The experimental results are compared with a Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulation. The pump-probe interferometer system of FDI and the anomalous blueshift will be modified to the optical injection system as a relativistic electron beam injector. In 1D PIC simulation we obtain the results of high quality intense electron beam acceleration. These results illuminate the possibility of a high energy and a high quality electron beam acceleration. (author)

  11. Relaxation and interaction of electronic excitations induced by intense ultra short light pulses in BaF2 scintillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirm, M.; Nagirnyi, V.; Vielhauer, S.; Feldbach, E.

    2011-06-01

    Excitation density effects have a pronounced influence on relaxation processes in solids. They come into play in scintillating and dosimetric materials exposed to ionizing radiation or in laser materials operating in intense ultraviolet light fields. The scientific understanding of the underlying process is poor, mainly because most of the studies of light emitting materials under short wavelength excitation have been performed at weak and moderate excitation intensities due to limited availability of powerful light sources. Disembodied data on excitation density effects have been reported for wide-gap dielectrics studied by luminescence spectroscopy, by using such excitation sources as powerful ion beams,1,2pulsed electron beams,2,3 and wide-band hard X-ray synchrotron radiation.4 It is obvious that such non-selective excitation is a good tool for revealing density-related phenomena in these materials in general, but for investigating specific features of relaxation processes in insulators, light sources with well defined parameters are necessary. Since the shortwavelength free electron laser (FEL) technology has been devised by an international consortium at HASYLAB of DESY, resulting in the development of TESLA Test facility (TTF)5 and later in the construction of a dedicated FEL source FLASH in Hamburg,6 more advanced studies became possible. The range of interests towards this light source covers the fields from material science and various other branches of physics to structural biology. The pioneering luminescence study revealed excitation density effects in the decay of Ce3+ 5d-4f luminescence in Y3Al5O12 crystals and luminescence of BaF2 crystals in UV-visible range.7 These results motivated systematic investigations of excitation density effects in wide gap crystals using FEL8,9 and high-harmonic-generated VUV radiation,10 and, at lower energies, femtosecond laser pulses in the UV.11,12 The main goal of the present work is to analyze the same phenomenon

  12. Multi-pulse orbits and chaotic dynamics in motion of parametrically excited viscoelastic moving belt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wei; Yao Minghui

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the Shilnikov type multi-pulse orbits and chaotic dynamics of parametrically excited viscoelastic moving belt are studied in detail. Using Kelvin-type viscoelastic constitutive law, the equations of motion for viscoelastic moving belt with the external damping and parametric excitation are given. The four-dimensional averaged equation under the case of primary parametric resonance is obtained by directly using the method of multiple scales and Galerkin's approach to the partial differential governing equation of viscoelastic moving belt. From the averaged equations obtained here, the theory of normal form is used to give the explicit expressions of normal form with a double zero and a pair of pure imaginary eigenvalues. Based on normal form, the energy-phrase method is employed to analyze the global bifurcations and chaotic dynamics in parametrically excited viscoelastic moving belt. The global bifurcation analysis indicates that there exist the heteroclinic bifurcations and the Silnikov type multi-pulse homoclinic orbits in the averaged equation. The results obtained above mean the existence of the chaos for the Smale horseshoe sense in parametrically excited viscoelastic moving belt. The chaotic motions of viscoelastic moving belts are also found by using numerical simulation. A new phenomenon on the multi-pulse jumping orbits is observed from three-dimensional phase space

  13. selective excitation of vibrational modes of polyatomic molecule

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Mode-selective dynamics of triatomic molecule in the electronic ground state under continuous wave laser pulse is investigated for the discrete vibrational bound states. A non-perturbative approach has been used to analyse the vibrational couplings and dynamics of the molecule. Keywords. Polyatomic molecule ...

  14. selective excitation of vibrational modes of polyatomic molecule

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    vnautiyal@himalaya.du.ac.in; sneh@del2.vsnl.net.in. MS received 3 September 2003; accepted 12 December 2003. Abstract. Mode-selective dynamics of triatomic molecule in the electronic ground state under continuous wave laser pulse is investigated for the discrete vibrational bound states. A non-perturbative approach ...

  15. Comparative study of two-photon fluorescent bio-markers at nanosecond and femtosecond pulsed excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Burl H.; Sarkisov, Sergey S.; Nesterov, V. N.; Curley, Michael J.; Urbas, Augustine; Patel, Darayas N.; Wang, J.-C.

    2007-02-01

    In this study we investigate visible fluorescence of cytotoxic bio-markers (molecular probes) based on the derivatives of piperidone at femtosecond infrared pulsed laser excitation. The subject of this investigation is the origin of the fluorescence. Does it originate from the excited state absorption, which occurs only at slow, nanosecond excitation, or is it due to intrinsic multi-photon absorption? In the past, it has been shown indirectly, through the laser photolysis study, that the contribution of the excited state absorption is minimal for several compounds of such type. The results of direct experiments with an infrared femtosecond fiber laser as an excitation source described here support this hypothesis. The observed dependence of the fluorescence on the pump power indicated the contribution of not only two-photon, but multi-photon routes of excitation. Additionally, it was shown that the spectral features of the fluorescence correlate with the presence of glycine, an amino acid that is one of the building blocks of proteins in a cell. The implication of this result is, in addition to their anticancer action, the compounds can possibly be used for fluorescent diagnostics of cancer and multi-photon fluorescent microscopy of malignant cell cultures using portable infrared fiber lasers as excitation sources.

  16. Highly selective population of two excited states in nonresonant two-photon absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hui; Zhang Shi-An; Sun Zhen-Rong

    2011-01-01

    A nonresonant two-photon absorption process can be manipulated by tailoring the ultra-short laser pulse. In this paper, we theoretically demonstrate a highly selective population of two excited states in the nonresonant two-photon absorption process by rationally designing a spectral phase distribution. Our results show that one excited state is maximally populated while the other state population is widely tunable from zero to the maximum value. We believe that the theoretical results may play an important role in the selective population of a more complex nonlinear process comprising nonresonant two-photon absorption, such as resonance-mediated (2+1)-three-photon absorption and (2+1)-resonant multiphoton ionization. (atomic and molecular physics)

  17. Laser excitation of SF6: spectroscopy and coherent pulse propagation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantrell, C.D.; Makarov, A.A.; Louisell, W.H.

    1978-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies of coherent propagation effects in SF 6 and other polyatomic molecules are summarized beginning with an account of relevant aspects of the high-resolution spectroscopy of the ν 3 band of SF 6 . A laser pulse propagating in a molecular gas can acquire new frequencies which were not initially present in the pulse, and, in fact, a wave is coherently generated at the frequency of every molecular transition accessible from the initial molecular energy levels. The possible consequences of coherent generation of sidebands for the multiple-photon excitation of SF 6 and other polyatomic molecules are discussed

  18. Selective brain stimulation using conditioning pulses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holsheimer, J.

    2005-01-01

    A system and method is described for preferentially stimulating dorsal column fibers while avoiding stimulation of dorsal root fibers. The invention applies hyperpolarizing (anodic) pre-pulses (HPP) and depolarizing (cathodic) pre-pulses (DPP) to neural tissue, such as spinal cord tissue, through a

  19. Active manipulation of the selective alignment by two laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng-Qiang, Yang; Zhi-Rong, Guo; Gui-Xian, Ge

    2010-01-01

    This paper solves numerically the full time-dependent Schrödinger equation based on the rigid rotor model, and proposes a novel strategy to determine the optimal time delay of the two laser pulses to manipulate the molecular selective alignment. The results illustrate that the molecular alignment generated by the first pulse can be suppressed or enhanced selectively, the relative populations of even and odd rotational states in the final rotational wave packet can be manipulated selectively by precisely inserting the peak of the second laser pulse at the time when the slope for the alignment parameter by the first laser locates a local maximum for the even rotational states and a local minimum for the odds, and vice versa. The selective alignment can be further optimised by selecting the intensity ratio of the two laser pulses on the condition that the total laser intensity and pulse duration are kept constant. (atomic and molecular physics)

  20. Detection of salmonella on globe fruits using pulse excited magnetoelastic biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikle, Howard C.; Du, Songtao; Prorok, Barton C.; Chin, Bryan A.

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes the results of a research project to investigate magnetoelastic (ME) biosensors actuated with a pulse excitation to measure the concentration of Salmonella Typhimurium of globe fruits. The ME biosensors are based on an acoustic wave resonator platform that is a freestanding (free-free) thin ribbon of magnetostrictive material with a lengthto- width ratio of 5:1. A biorecognition probe coated on the surface of the resonator platform binds with a targeted pathogen, i.e. E2 phage that binds with S. Typhimurium. The biosensor was actuated to vibrate longitudinally such that the resonant frequency depended primarily on the length of sensor and its overall mass. A pulsed excitation and measurement system was used to actuate micron scale ME biosensors to vibrate. The biosensor responds in a ring-down manner, a damped decay of the resonance amplitude, from which the resonant frequency was measured. An increase in mass due to the binding of the target pathogen resulted in a decrease in the resonant frequency. The pulsed excitation and measurement system that was developed under this effort and the characterization of its performance on the measurement of Salmonella concentrations on globe fruits is described.

  1. Excitation of an acoustic pulse by an impulsive shear flow in a dusty plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Goree, John; Dusty plasma Team

    2017-10-01

    A dusty plasma is a strongly-coupled plasma that contains micron-sized particles. These particles, also called dust particles, are highly charged by ambient plasma; they interact with each other, sustaining collective wave motion. Both longitudinal and transverse waves can in general be excited. Here we use an electrostatic three-dimensional (3D) simulation to reveal a wave excitation mechanism that is due to viscous heating. In the simulation, an impulsive force was applied to drive a shear flow motion with a sudden onset. After a delay, a longitudinal acoustic pulse wave was observed, propagating outwards from the edge of the flow. We found that the viscous heating due to shear motion can result in a brief localized rarefaction in the dust cloud, leading to the excitation of a longitudinal acoustic wave. The simulation parameters were motivated by the PK-4 instrument on the International Space Station (ISS). Work was supported by NASA.

  2. Introduction to gas lasers with emphasis on selective excitation processes

    CERN Document Server

    Willett, Colin S

    1974-01-01

    Introduction to Gas Lasers: Population Inversion Mechanisms focuses on important processes in gas discharge lasers and basic atomic collision processes that operate in a gas laser. Organized into six chapters, this book first discusses the historical development and basic principles of gas lasers. Subsequent chapters describe the selective excitation processes in gas discharges and the specific neutral, ionized and molecular laser systems. This book will be a valuable reference on the behavior of gas-discharge lasers to anyone already in the field.

  3. Terahertz Emission of Ferromagnetic Ni-Fe Thin Films Excited by Ultrafast Laser Pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Jian; Zhang Huai-Wu; Li Yuan-Xun

    2012-01-01

    It is believed that the ultrafast demagnetization process in ferromagnetic film is intrinsically a thermal effect, which is induced by ultrafast laser pulses. We present experimental evidence that such ultrafast demagnetization of the NiFe thin film can radiate electromagnetic waves in the terahertz range. We also demonstrate that the magnitude of the terahertz electromagnetic pulse emitted from ferromagnetic films after pulsed laser excitation can be tuned by the Gilbert damping factor α, which is conventionally used to describe damping of GHz precession motion of magnetization. Different damping factors are obtained by varying the normal metal film adjacent to the magnetic film via spin pumping. The measured radiated electric field in the far field is found to be proportional to the Gilbert damping factor. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  4. The pulse duration of electrical stimulation influences H-reflexes but not corticospinal excitability for tibialis anterior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Alyssa R; Lou, Jenny W H; Collins, David F

    2014-10-01

    The afferent volley generated by neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) influences corticospinal (CS) excitability and frequent NMES sessions can strengthen CS pathways, resulting in long-term improvements in function. This afferent volley can be altered by manipulating NMES parameters. Presently, we manipulated one such parameter, pulse duration, during NMES over the common peroneal nerve and assessed the influence on H-reflexes and CS excitability. We hypothesized that compared with shorter pulse durations, longer pulses would (i) shift the H-reflex recruitment curve to the left, relative to the M-wave curve; and (ii) increase CS excitability more. Using 3 pulse durations (50, 200, 1000 μs), M-wave and H-reflex recruitment curves were collected and, in separate experiments, CS excitability was assessed by comparing motor evoked potentials elicited before and after 30 min of NMES. Despite finding a leftward shift in the H-reflex recruitment curve when using the 1000 μs pulse duration, consistent with a larger afferent volley for a given efferent volley, the increases in CS excitability were not influenced by pulse duration. Hence, although manipulating pulse duration can alter the relative recruitment of afferents and efferents in the common peroneal nerve, under the present experimental conditions it is ineffective for maximizing CS excitability for rehabilitation.

  5. Spin-State-Selective Excitation. Application for E.COSY-Type Measurement of JHHCoupling Constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Axel; Duus, Jens ø.; Sørensen, Ole Winneche

    1997-09-01

    A new pulse sequence element, spin-state-selective excitation (S3E), is introduced and combined with E.COSY-type techniques for measurement of1H-1HJcoupling constants. S3E edits the two resonances of a doublet prior to an evolution period of a multidimensional experiment and results in a subspectrum for each resonance. Due to this editing the large heteronuclear one-bond coupling constants normally exploited for separation of submultiplets in E.COSY-type experiments can be suppressed in experiments employing S3E. Hence there is a concomitant effective increase in resolution. Apart from pulse imperfections and relaxation during a delay (4J)-1S3E causes no loss of sensitivity in comparison to conventional experiments. Experimental confirmation is done using the protein RAP 17-97 (N-terminal domain of α2-macroglobulin receptor associated protein).

  6. Pulse selection system for the Oslo cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messelt, S.

    1984-09-01

    The beam from a cyclotron usually consists of short beam bursts with a time separation corresponding to the cyclone frequency. The report deals with a system for increasing the time separation in order to avoid ambiguities resulting from time overlap of events due to successive beam pulses. This is done by using a pair of electrostatic deflection plates driven at some integer fraction of the cyclotron frequency. This pulse selectrion system, which is used for the Oslo cyclotron, is described. The pulsing system has been tested by measuring gamma-rays from a thick target in one of the beam lines down-stream from the exit slit of the 90degr. magnet. The resuls of tests with 13 MeV and 23 MeV protons and division factor of 3 and 4, respectively, are shown. (RF)

  7. Enhancement of Lamb Wave Imaging Resolution by Step Pulse Excitation and Prewarping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shangchen Fu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For the purpose of improving the damage localization accuracy, a prewarping technology is combined with step pulse excitation and this method is used in Lamb wave imaging of plate structures with adjacent damages. Based on the step pulse excitation, various narrowband or burst response can be derived by signal processing technology and this method provides flexibility for further prewarping approach. A narrowband signal warped with a preselected distance is then designed, and the dispersion in the response of this prewarping signal will be greatly reduced. However, in order to calculate the distance for prewarping, the first arrival needs to be estimated from the burst response. From the step-pulse response, narrowband responses at different central frequencies can be obtained, and by averaging peak-value time of their first arrivals, a more accurate estimation can be calculated. By using the prewarping method to the damage scattering signals before imaging, the imaging resolution of the delay-and-sum method can be highly enhanced. The experiment carried out in an aluminum plate with adjacent damages proves the efficiency of this method.

  8. Eddy Current Pulsed Thermography with Different Excitation Configurations for Metallic Material and Defect Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui Yun Tian

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews recent developments of eddy current pulsed thermography (ECPT for material characterization and nondestructive evaluation (NDE. Due to the fact that line-coil-based ECPT, with the limitation of non-uniform heating and a restricted view, is not suitable for complex geometry structures evaluation, Helmholtz coils and ferrite-yoke-based excitation configurations of ECPT are proposed and compared. Simulations and experiments of new ECPT configurations considering the multi-physical-phenomenon of hysteresis losses, stray losses, and eddy current heating in conjunction with uniform induction magnetic field have been conducted and implemented for ferromagnetic and non-ferromagnetic materials. These configurations of ECPT for metallic material and defect characterization are discussed and compared with conventional line-coil configuration. The results indicate that the proposed ECPT excitation configurations can be applied for different shapes of samples such as turbine blade edges and rail tracks.

  9. Pulsed laser study of excited states of aromatic molecules absorbed in globular proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, M.; Thomas, J.K.

    1977-01-01

    Pyrene and several derivatives of pyrene such as pyrene sulfonic acid, and pyrene butyric acid were incorporated into bovine serum albumin (BSA) in aqueous solution. The pyrene chromophore was subsequently excited by a pulse of uv light (lambda = 3471 A) from a Q switched frequency doubled ruby laser. The lifetime of the pyrene excited singlet and triplet states were monitored by time resolved spectrophotometry. Various molecules, such as O 2 and I - , dissolved in the aqueous phase, diffused into the protein and quenched pyrene excited states. The rates of these reactions were followed under a variety of conditions such as pH and temperature and in the presence of inert additives. The rates of pyrene excited-state quenching were often considerably smaller than the rates observed in simple solutions. A comparison of the rates in the protein and homogeneous solutions gives information on the factors such as temperature, charge, and pH that control the movement of small molecules in and into BSA

  10. Thermoacoustic and photoacoustic characterizations of few-layer graphene by pulsed excitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Department of Medical Imaging, The University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85724 (United States); School of Information Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University, Shanghai 200031 (China); Witte, Russell S. [Department of Medical Imaging, The University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85724 (United States); Xin, Hao, E-mail: hxin@email.arizona.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)

    2016-04-04

    We characterized the thermoacoustic and photoacoustic properties of large-area, few-layer graphene by pulsed microwave and optical excitations. Due to its high electric conductivity and low heat capacity per unit area, graphene lends itself to excellent microwave and optical energy absorption and acoustic signal emanation due to the thermoacoustic effect. When exposed to pulsed microwave or optical radiation, distinct thermoacoustic and photoacoustic signals generated by the few-layer graphene are obtained due to microwave and laser absorption of the graphene, respectively. Clear thermoacoustic and photoacoustic images of large-area graphene sample are achieved. A numerical model is developed and the simulated results are in good accordance with the measured ones. This characterization work may find applications in ultrasound generator and detectors for microwave and optical radiation. It may also become an alternative characterization approach for graphene and other types of two-dimensional materials.

  11. Sub-nanosecond plastic scintillator time response studies using laser produced x-ray pulsed excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirsell, K.G.; Tripp, G.R.; Lent, E.M.; Lerche, R.A.; Cheng, J.C.; Hocker, L.; Lyons, P.B.

    1976-01-01

    The light emission time response of quenched NElll plastic scintillators has been measured using a streak camera (20 ps resolution) and 100 to 180 ps, 1.06 μm, laser-produced, pulsed, low energy x-ray excitation. Each light output pulse was obtained by deconvolution from the film data using the x-ray temporal response measured with an x-ray sensitive streak camera (10 ps resolution). Time response parameters are presented for benzophenone and acetophenone, quenching agents which most effectively reduce the decay time of the singlet component. Full width-half-maximums less than or equal to 260 ps were observed for NElll samples quenched with greater than or equal to 2 percent benzophenone. Results are given for unquenched samples consisting of different concentrations of butyl-PBD in PVT and for the phosphor ZnO doped with Ga

  12. Sub-nanosecond plastic scintillator time response studies using laser produced x-ray pulsed excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirsell, K.G.; Tripp, G.R.; Lent, E.M.; Lerche, R.A.; Cheng, J.C.; Hocker, L.; Lyons, P.B.

    1977-01-01

    The light emission time response of quenched NE111 plastic scintillators has been measured using a streak camera (20 ps resolution) and 100 to 180 ps, 1.06 μm, laser-produced, pulsed, low energy x-ray excitation. Each light output pulse was obtained by deconvolution from the film data using the x-ray temporal response measured with an x-ray sensitive streak camera (10 ps resolution). Time response parameters are presented for benzophenone and acetophenone, quenching agents which most effectively reduce the decay time of the singlet component. Full width-half-maximums less than or equal to 260 ps were observed for NE111 samples quenched with greater than or equal to 2 percent benzophenone. Results are given for unquenched samples consisting of different concentrations of butyl-PBD in PVT and for the phosphor ZnO doped with Ga

  13. Longitudinally excited CO2 laser with short laser pulse operating at high repetition rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianhui; Uno, Kazuyuki; Akitsu, Tetsuya; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2016-11-01

    A short-pulse longitudinally excited CO2 laser operating at a high repetition rate was developed. The discharge tube was made of a 45 cm-long or 60 cm-long dielectric tube with an inner diameter of 16 mm and two metallic electrodes at the ends of the tube. The optical cavity was formed by a ZnSe output coupler with a reflectivity of 85% and a high-reflection mirror. Mixed gas (CO2:N2:He = 1:1:2) was flowed into the discharge tube. A high voltage of about 33 kV with a rise time of about 200 ns was applied to the discharge tube. At a repetition rate of 300 Hz and a gas pressure of 3.4 kPa, the 45 cm-long discharge tube produced a short laser pulse with a laser pulse energy of 17.5 mJ, a spike pulse energy of 0.2 mJ, a spike width of 153 ns, and a pulse tail length of 90 μs. The output power was 5.3 W. The laser pulse waveform did not depend on the repetition rate, but the laser beam profile did. At a low repetition rate of less than 50 Hz, the laser beam had a doughnut-like shape. However, at a high repetition rate of more than 150 Hz, the discharge concentrated at the center of the discharge tube, and the intensity at the center of the laser beam was higher. The laser beam profile depended on the distribution of the discharge. An output power of 7.0 W was achieved by using the 60 cm-long tube.

  14. Vibrational energy transfer in selectively excited diatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasch, C.J.

    1978-09-01

    Single rovibrational states of HCl(v=2), HBr(v=2), DCl(v=2), and CO(v=2) were excited with a pulsed optical parametric oscillator (OPO). Total vibrational relaxation rates near - resonance quenchers were measured at 295 0 K using time resolved infrared fluorescence. These rates are attributed primarily to V - V energy transfer, and they generally conform to a simple energy gap law. A small deviation was found for the CO(v) + DCl(v') relaxation rates. Upper limits for the self relaxation by V - R,T of HCl(v=2) and HBr(v=2) and for the two quantum exchange between HCl and HBr were determined. The HF dimer was detected at 295 0 K and 30 torr HF pressure with an optoacoustic spectrometer using the OPO. Pulsed and chopped, resonant and non-resonant spectrophones are analyzed in detail. From experiments and first order perturbation theory, these V - V exchange rates appear to behave as a first order perturbation in the vibrational coordinates. The rotational dynamics are known to be complicated however, and the coupled rotational - vibrational dynamics were investigated theoreticaly in infinite order by the Dillon and Stephenson and the first Magnus approximations. Large ΔJ transitions appear to be important, but these calculations differ by orders of magnitude on specific rovibrational transition rates. Integration of the time dependent semiclassical equations by a modified Gordon method and a rotationally distorted wave approximation are discussed as methods which would treat the rotational motion more accurately. 225 references

  15. Comparison of ATLOG and Xyce for Bell Labs Electromagnetic Pulse Excitation of Finite-Long Dissipative Conductors over a Ground Plane.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    campione, Salvatore [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Warne, Larry K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schiek, Richard [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Basilio, Lorena I. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This report details the modeling results for the response of a finite-length dissipative conductor interacting with a conducting ground to the Bell Labs electromagnetic pulse excitation. We use both a frequency-domain and a time-domain method based on transmission line theory through a code we call ATLOG - Analytic Transmission Line Over Ground. Results are compared to the circuit simulator Xyce for selected cases. Intentionally Left Blank

  16. TRACE ANALYSIS BY LASER-EXCITED ATOMIC FLUORESCENCE WITH ATOMIZATION IN A PULSED PLASMA

    OpenAIRE

    Lunyov , O.; Oshemkov , S.; Petrov , A.

    1991-01-01

    The possibilities of plasma atomization for laser fluorescence trace analysis are discussed. Pulsed hot hollow cathode discharge was used for analysis of solutions and powdered samples. The high voltage spark and laser-induced breakdown (laser spark) were used as atomizers of metal-containing atmospheric aerosols. Detection limits were improved by means of temporal background selection.

  17. Effects of phase and coupling between the vibrational modes on selective excitation in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Vishesha; Malinovsky, Vladimir S.; Malinovskaya, Svetlana

    2010-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy has been a major tool of investigation of biological structures as it contains the vibrational signature of molecules. A quantum control method based on chirped pulse adiabatic passage was recently proposed for selective excitation of a predetermined vibrational mode in CARS microscopy [Malinovskaya and Malinovsky, Opt. Lett. 32, 707 (2007)]. The method utilizes the chirp sign variation at the peak pulse amplitude and gives a robust adiabatic excitation of the desired vibrational mode. Using this method, we investigate the impact of coupling between vibrational modes in molecules on controllability of excitation of the CARS signal. We analyze two models of two coupled two-level systems (TLSs) having slightly different transitional frequencies. The first model, featuring degenerate ground states of the TLSs, gives robust adiabatic excitation and maximum coherence in the resonant TLS for positive value of the chirp. In the second model, implying nondegenerate ground states in the TLSs, a population distribution is observed in both TLSs, resulting in a lack of selectivity of excitation and low coherence. It is shown that the relative phase and coupling between the TLSs play an important role in optimizing coherence in the desired vibrational mode and suppressing unwanted transitions in CARS microscopy.

  18. Circular photocurrent in Ag/Pd resistive films upon excitation by femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikheev, G. M.; Saushin, A. S.; Vanyukov, V. V.; Mikheev, K. G.; Svirko, Yu. P.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents the results of the experimental investigation of the generation of nanosecond photocurrent pulses in silver-palladium (Ag/Pd) resistive films under excitation by laser pulses with a duration of 120 fs at a wavelength of 795 nm. The photocurrent was detected in the direction perpendicular to the plane of incidence of the laser beam on the film. The 20-μm-thick films under investigation were a porous polycrystalline material consisting predominantly of nanocrystallites of the palladium oxide PdO and the Ag-Pd solid solution. The direction of the photocurrent observed in the films depends on the sign of the circular polarization of the incident radiation. It was found that the observed photocurrent depends on the angle of incidence in accordance with the odd law and consists of the circular and linear contributions, which are dependent on and independent of the sign of the circular polarization, respectively. It was shown that the circular photocurrent is significantly higher than the linear photocurrent. It was established that, for both the circular and linear polarizations, the photocurrent is directly proportional to the power of the excitation radiation. For the linearly polarized laser radiation, the photocurrent depends on the polarization angle in accordance with the odd law. The regularities revealed are consistent with the mechanism of the generation of transverse photocurrent with the photon drag effect.

  19. Experimental Investigation on Surface Quality Processed by Self-Excited Oscillation Pulsed Waterjet Peening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiaolong; Kang, Yong; Li, Deng; Wang, Xiaochuan; Zeng, Dongping

    2017-08-25

    High-speed waterjet peening technology has attracted a lot of interest and is now being widely studied due to its great ability to strengthen metal surfaces. In order to further improve the mechanical properties of metals, self-excited oscillation pulsed waterjets (SOPWs) were used for surface peening with an experimental investigation focused on the surface topography and properties. By impinging the aluminum alloy (5052) specimens with SOPWs issuing from an organ-pipe oscillation nozzle, the hardness and roughness at various inlet pressures and stand-off distances were measured and analyzed, as well as the residual stress. Under the condition of optimum stand-off distances, the microscopic appearances of peened specimens obtained by SEM were displayed and analyzed. Results show that self-excited oscillation pulsed waterjet peening (SOPWP) is capable of improving the surface quality. More specifically, compared with an untreated surface, the hardness and residual stress of the peened surfaces were increased by 61.69% and 148%, respectively. There exists an optimal stand-off distance and operating pressure for creating the highest surface quality. SOPWP can produce almost the same enhancement effect as shot peening and lead to a lower surface roughness. Although such an approach is empirical and qualitative in nature, this procedure also generated information of value in guiding future theoretical and experimental work on the application of SOPWP in the industry practice.

  20. A total internal reflection-fluorescence correlation spectroscopy setup with pulsed diode laser excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weger, Lukas; Hoffmann-Jacobsen, Kerstin

    2017-09-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) measures fluctuations in a (sub-)femtoliter volume to analyze the diffusive behavior of fluorescent particles. This highly sensitive method has proven to be useful for the analysis of dynamic biological systems as well as in chemistry, physics, and material sciences. It is routinely performed with commercial fluorescence microscopes, which provide a confined observation volume by the confocal technique. The evanescent wave of total internal reflectance (TIR) is used in home-built systems to permit a surface sensitive FCS analysis. We present a combined confocal and TIR-FCS setup which uses economic low-power pulsed diode lasers for excitation. Excitation and detection are coupled to time-correlated photon counting hardware. This allows simultaneous fluorescence lifetime and FCS measurements in a surface-sensitive mode. Moreover, the setup supports fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy at surfaces. The excitation can be easily switched between TIR and epi-illumination to compare the surface properties with those in liquid bulk. The capabilities of the presented setup are demonstrated by measuring the diffusion coefficients of a free dye molecule, a labeled polyethylene glycol, and a fluorescent nanoparticle in confocal as well as in TIR-FCS.

  1. Experimental installation for excitation of semiconductors and dielectrics by picosecond pulsed electron beam and electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasibov, A.S.; Berezhnoj, K.V.; Shapkin, P.V.; Reutova, A.G.; Shunajlov, S.A.; Yalandin, M.I.

    2009-01-01

    The experimental facility for shaping high-voltage pulses with amplitudes of 30-250 kV and durations of 100-500 ps and electron beams with a current density of up to 1000 A/cm -2 is described. The facility was built using the principle of energy compression of a pulse from a nanosecond high-voltage generator accompanied by the subsequent pulse sharpening and cutting. The setup is equipped with two test coaxial chambers for radiation excitation in semiconductor crystals by an electron beam or an electric field in air at atmospheric pressure and T = 300 K. Generation of laser radiation in the visible range under field and electron pumping was attained in ZnSSe, ZnSe, ZnCdS, and CdS (462, 480, 515, and 525 nm, respectively). Under the exposure to an electric field (up to 10 6 V x cm -1 ), the laser generation region is as large as 300-500 μm. The radiation divergence was within 5 Deg C. The maximum integral radiation power (6 kW at λ = 480 nm) was obtained under field pumping of a zinc selenide sample with a single dielectric mirror [ru

  2. Triplet excited states and radical intermediates formed in electron pulse radiolysis of amino-substituted fluorenones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samant, Vaishali; Singh, A.K.; Mukherjee, Tulsi; Palit, D.K. E-mail: dkpalit@apsara.barc.ernet.in

    2005-04-01

    Electron pulse radiolysis of four differently substituted amino derivatives of fluorenone, namely, 1-amino-, 2-amino- 3-amino-, and 4-aminofluorenone, has been carried out to study the effect of structure on the spectroscopic and kinetic characteristics of the triplet excited states as well as the transient free radical intermediates formed under reducing and oxidizing conditions. The triplet states of these compounds have been generated in benzene by pulse radiolysis and in other solvents by flash photolysis technique and their spectral and kinetic properties have been investigated. Hydrated electron (e{sub aq}{sup -}) has been found to react with these fluorenone derivatives to form the anion radical species with a diffusion-controlled rate constant. The spectral and kinetic properties of the transient ketyl and anion radicals have been studied by generating them in aqueous solutions of suitable pH. The pK{sub a} values of ketyl[rlhar2]anion radical equilibria are in the range of 6.8-7.7 for these derivatives. The oxidized species have been generated by reaction with the azide radical. Hydrogen atom adducts as well as the cation radicals of these derivatives have also been generated by pulse radiolysis and characterized.

  3. Enhanced diffusion weighting generated by selective adiabatic pulse trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ziqi; Bartha, Robert

    2007-09-01

    A theoretical description and experimental validation of the enhanced diffusion weighting generated by selective adiabatic full passage (AFP) pulse trains is provided. Six phantoms (Ph-1-Ph-6) were studied on a 4 T Varian/Siemens whole body MRI system. Phantoms consisted of 2.8 cm diameter plastic tubes containing a mixture of 10 μm ORGASOL polymer beads and 2 mM Gd-DTPA dissolved in 5% agar (Ph-1) or nickel(II) ammonium sulphate hexahydrate doped (56.3-0.8 mM) water solutions (Ph-2-Ph-6). A customized localization by adiabatic selective refocusing (LASER) sequence containing slice selective AFP pulse trains and pulsed diffusion gradients applied in the phase encoding direction was used to measure 1H 2O diffusion. The b-value associated with the LASER sequence was derived using the Bloch-Torrey equation. The apparent diffusion coefficients measured by LASER were comparable to those measured by a conventional pulsed gradient spin-echo (PGSE) sequence for all phantoms. Image signal intensity increased in Ph-1 and decreased in Ph-2-Ph-6 as AFP pulse train length increased while maintaining a constant echo-time. These experimental results suggest that such AFP pulse trains can enhance contrast between regions containing microscopic magnetic susceptibility variations and homogeneous regions in which dynamic dephasing relaxation mechanisms are dominant.

  4. Thermometry properties of Er, Yb–Gd2O2S microparticles: dependence on the excitation mode (cw versus pulsed excitation) and excitation wavelength (980 nm versus 1500 nm)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avram, Daniel; Tiseanu, Carmen

    2018-04-01

    Herein, we present a first report on the luminescence thermometry properties of Er, Yb doped Gd2O2S microparticles under near infrared up-conversion excitation at 980 and 1500 nm measured in the 280–800 K interval. The thermometry properties are assessed using both cw and ns pulsed excitation as well as tuning the excitation wavelength across Yb and Er absorption profiles. For low cw (300 mW cm‑1) and pulsed ns (400 ÷ 550 mW cm‑1) excitation modes, no thermal load is observed. At room-temperature (280 K), the maximum relative sensitivity values are comparable under pulsed excitation at 980 and 1500 nm, around ∼0.01 and ∼0.008% K‑1, respectively. In addition, a relative intense up-conversion emission at 980 nm under excitation at 1500 nm is measured. Our findings evidence attractive up-conversion and thermometry properties Er, Yb doped Gd2O2S under near-infrared excitation and highlight the need to explore further these properties in the nanoparticulate regime.

  5. Impulsive excitation of coherent magnons and phonons by subpicosecond laser pulses in the weak ferromagnet FeBO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalashnikova, A. M.; Kimel, A. V.; Pisarev, R. V.; Gridnev, V. N.; Usachev, P. A.; Kirilyuk, A.; Rasing, Th.

    2008-09-01

    Coherent magnons and phonons are excited by subpicosecond laser pulses in the weak ferromagnet FeBO3 . Impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (ISRS) is proven to be the microscopic mechanism of the excitation. It is shown that coherent magnons can be excited by both linearly and circularly polarized laser pulses where the efficiency of the process depends on the mutual orientation of the magnetic and crystallographic axes and the light propagation direction. The strong ellipticity of the ferromagnetic magnon mode is demonstrated, both experimentally and theoretically, to be essential for the excitation and observation of such coherent magnons. Because of this ellipticity, the amplitude of the coherent magnons excited by linearly polarized light may exceed by 2 orders of magnitude the amplitude of those excited by circularly polarized light. The primary difference between the excitation of coherent magnons by linearly polarized pulses via ISRS and via the earlier reported process of photoinduced magnetic anisotropy is discussed. Furthermore, the ISRS process is found to be responsible for the excitation of two optical phonon branches (8.4 and 12.1 THz) observed in our experiments. A coherent excitation, with a temperature-independent frequency of 0.7 THz, has also been observed in the magnetically ordered phase but could not be assigned to any optical phonon modes known in FeBO3 . The well-pronounced dependence of the amplitude of this mode on temperature suggests that this mode of nonmagnetic origin becomes Raman active only in the magnetically ordered phase and, therefore, can be excited and observed only below the Néel temperature.

  6. The interaction with the lower ionosphere of electromagnetic pulses from lightning: Excitation of optical emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taranenko, Y. N.; Inan, U. S.; Bell, T. F.

    1993-01-01

    A self consistent and fully kinetic simulation of the interaction of lightning radiated electromagnetic (EM) pulses with the nighttime lower ionosphere indicates that optical emissions observable with conventional instruments would be excited. For example, emissions of the 1st and 2nd positive bands of N2 occur at rates reaching 7 x 10(exp 7) and 10(exp 7) cu cm/s respectively at 92 km altitude for a lightning discharge with an electric field E(sub 100) = 20 V/m (normalized to a 100 km distance). The maximum height integrated intensities of these emissions are 4 x 10(exp 7) and 6 x 10(exp 6) R respectively, lasting for approx. 50 micrometers.

  7. Confined longitudinal acoustic phonon modes in free-standing Si membranes coherently excited by femtosecond laser pulses

    OpenAIRE

    Hudert, Florian; Bruchhausen, Axel; Issenmann, Daniel; Schecker, Olivier; Waitz, Reimar; Erbe, Artur; Scheer, Elke; Dekorsy, Thomas; Mlayah, Adnen; Huntzinger, Jean-Roch

    2009-01-01

    In this Rapid Communication we report the first time-resolved measurements of confined acoustic phonon modes in free-standing Si membranes excited by fs laser pulses. Pump-probe experiments using asynchronous optical sampling reveal the impulsive excitation of discrete acoustic modes up to the 19th harmonic order for membranes of two different thicknesses. The modulation of the membrane thickness is measured with fm resolution. The experimental results are compared with a theoretical model in...

  8. Curious Consequences of Strong Coupling in NMR Experiments Involving Selective Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huth, Johannes; Fu, Riqiang; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    This study is concerned with the effects of applying selective pulses to systems with strong second-order scalar couplings in isotropic phase, where different transitions ( rs) are associated with different transition matrix elements F+( rs) . Two unusual features can be distinguished: the nutation angle ("flip angle") depends on the matrix element of the irradiated transition ( rs), and, in contrast to the behavior of an isolated spin- {1}/{2} system, the norm of the three single-transition operators [ I( rs) x, I( rs) y, I( rs) z] associated with the fictitious spin- {1}/{2} space of the irradiated transition ( rs) is generally not conserved. It is necessary to consider the single-transition operators [ I( rp) x, I( rp) y, I( rp) z] and [ I( sq) x, I( sq) y, I( sq) z] associated with all connected transitions ( rp) and ( sq) that share a common energy level ror swith the irradiated transition ( rs). If the pulse applied to the ( rs) transition is sufficiently selective, the transverse components I( rp) x, I( rp) y, I( sq) x, and I( sq) y, can be neglected, since their expectation values remain equal to zero after application of a selective pulse to the ( rs) transition, but the longitudinal components I( rp) zand I( sq) zacquire nonvanishing expectation values. When the selective pulse affects several transitions simultaneously, the response varies from one transition to another, depending on the matrix elements and the connectivities. These effects manifest themselves in unusual amplitudes and phases of signals excited by selective pulses, in particular in selective two-dimensional correlation spectra.

  9. Finite element modeling of heating phenomena of cracks excited by high-intensity ultrasonic pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhao-Jiang; Zheng Jiang; Zhang Shu-Yi; Mi Xiao-Bing; Zheng Kai

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional thermo-mechanical coupled finite element model is built up to simulate the phenomena of dynamical contact and frictional heating of crack faces when the plate containing the crack is excited by high-intensity ultrasonic pulses. In the finite element model, the high-power ultrasonic transducer is modeled by using a piezoelectric thermal-analogy method, and the dynamical interaction between both crack faces is modeled using a contact-impact theory. In the simulations, the frictional heating taking place at the crack faces is quantitatively calculated by using finite element thermal-structural coupling analysis, especially, the influences of acoustic chaos to plate vibration and crack heating are calculated and analysed in detail. Meanwhile, the related ultrasonic infrared images are also obtained experimentally, and the theoretical simulation results are in agreement with that of the experiments. The results show that, by using the theoretical method, a good simulation of dynamic interaction and friction heating process of the crack faces under non-chaotic or chaotic sound excitation can be obtained

  10. Electron Emission from Ferroelectric/Antiferroelectric Cathodes Excited by Short High-Voltage Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Benedek, G; Handerek, J; Riege, H

    1997-01-01

    Un-prepoled Lead Zirconate Titanate Lanthanum doped-PLZT ferroelectric cathodes have emitted intense current pulses under the action of a high voltage pulse of typically 8 kV/cm for PLZT of 8/65/35 composition and 25 kV/cm for PLZT of 4/95/5 composition. In the experiments described in this paper, the exciting electric field applied to the sample is directed from the rear surface towards the emitting surface. The resulting emission is due to an initial field emission from the metal of the grid deposited over the emitting surface with the consequent plasma formation and the switching of ferroelectric domains. These electrons may be emitted directly form the crystal or from the plasma. This emission requires the material in ferroelectric phase. In fact, PLZT cathodes of the 8/65/35 type, that is with high Titanium content, showing ferroelectric-paraelectric phase sequence, emit at room temperature, while PLZT cathodes of the 4/95/5 type, that is with low Titanium content, having antiferro-ferro-paraelectric pha...

  11. Selective Two-Photon Absorptive Resonance Femtosecond-Laser Electronic-Excitation Tagging (STARFLEET) Velocimetry in Flow and Combustion Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Naibo; Halls, Benjamin R.; Stauffer, Hans U.; Roy, Sukesh; Danehy, Paul M.; Gord, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Selective Two-Photon Absorptive Resonance Femtosecond-Laser Electronic-Excitation Tagging (STARFLEET), a non-seeded ultrafast-laser-based velocimetry technique, is demonstrated in reactive and non-reactive flows. STARFLEET is pumped via a two-photon resonance in N2 using 202.25-nm 100-fs light. STARFLEET greatly reduces the per-pulse energy required (30 µJ/pulse) to generate the signature FLEET emission compared to the conventional FLEET technique (1.1 mJ/pulse). This reduction in laser energy results in less energy deposited in the flow, which allows for reduced flow perturbations (reactive and non-reactive), increased thermometric accuracy, and less severe damage to materials. Velocity measurements conducted in a free jet of N2 and in a premixed flame show good agreement with theoretical velocities and further demonstrate the significantly less-intrusive nature of STARFLEET.

  12. Impact of ultrafast demagnetization process on magnetization reversal in L10 FePt revealed using double laser pulse excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, J. Y.; Tang, M.; Zhang, Z.; Ma, L.; Sun, L.; Zhou, C.; Hu, X. F.; Zheng, Z.; Shen, L. Q.; Zhou, S. M.; Wu, Y. Z.; Chen, L. Y.; Zhao, H. B.

    2018-02-01

    Ultrafast laser induced magnetization reversal in L10 FePt films with high perpendicular magnetic anisotropy was investigated using single- and double-pulse excitations. Single-pulse excitation beyond 10 mJ cm-2 caused magnetization (M) reversal at the applied fields much smaller than the static coercivity of the films. For double-pulse excitation, both coercivity reduction and reversal percentage showed a rapid and large decrease with the increasing time interval (Δt) of the two pulses in the range of 0-2 ps. In this Δt range, the maximum demagnetization (ΔMp) was also strongly attenuated, whereas the integrated demagnetization signals over more than 10 ps, corresponding to the average lattice heat effect, showed little change. These results indicate that laser induced M reversal in FePt films critically relies on ΔMp. Because ΔMp is determined by spin temperature, which is higher than lattice temperature, utilizing an ultrafast laser instead of a continuous-wave laser in laser-assisted M reversal may reduce the overall deposited energy and increase the speed of recording. The effective control of M reversal by slightly tuning the time delay of two laser pulses may also be useful for ultrafast spin manipulation.

  13. Dependence the Integrated Energy of the Electromagnetic Response from Excitation Pulse Duration for Epoxy Samples With Sand Filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surzhikov, V. P.; Demikhova, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Results of research of influence of the excitation pulse duration on the parameters of the electromagnetic response of epoxy samples with filler the quartz sand presented in the paper. The electric component of a response was registered by the capacitive sensors using a differential amplifier. Measurements were carried out at two frequencies of the master generator of 65 kHz and 74 kHz. The pulse duration was changing from 10 to 100 microseconds. The stepped sort of dependence of the integrated oscillations energy in the response from duration of the excitation pulse was discovered. The conclusion was made about the determining role of the normal oscillations in formation of such dependence.

  14. Energy-selective neutron transmission imaging at a pulsed source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kockelmann, W.; Frei, G.; Lehmann, E. H.; Vontobel, P.; Santisteban, J. R.

    2007-08-01

    Energy-selective neutron radiography experiments were carried out at the ISIS pulsed spallation source. This neutron transmission imaging technique combines the hardware used for conventional neutron radiography with the Bragg edge transmission features of time-of-flight methods. The main component of the energy-selective radiography set-up was a gated image-intensified CCD camera that viewed a neutron sensitive scintillation screen via a mirror. Energy resolution was obtained via synchronization of the light-intensifier with the pulse structure of the neutron source. It is demonstrated that contrast enhancement of materials can be straightforwardly achieved, and that microstructural features in metal samples can be directly visualized with high spatial resolution by taking advantage of the Bragg edges in the energy dependent neutron cross sections.

  15. Ultrafast emission from colloidal nanocrystals under pulsed X-ray excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Turtos, R.M.; Polovitsyn, A.; Christodoulou, S.; Salomoni, M.; Auffray, E.; Moreels, I.; Lecoq, P.; Grim, J.Q.

    2016-01-01

    Fast timing has emerged as a critical requirement for radiation detection in medical and high energy physics, motivating the search for scintillator materials with high light yield and fast time response. However, light emission rates from conventional scintillation mechanisms fundamentally limit the achievable time resolution, which is presently at least one order of magnitude slower than required for next-generation detectors. One solution to this challenge is to generate an intense prompt signal in response to ionizing radiation. In this paper, we present colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) as promising prompt photon sources. We investigate two classes of NCs: two-dimensional CdSe nanoplatelets (NPLs) and spherical CdSe/CdS core/giant shell quantum dots (GS QDs). We demonstrate that the emission rates of these NCs under pulsed X-ray excitation are much faster than traditional mechanisms in bulk scintillators, i.e. 5d-4f transitions. CdSe NPLs have a sub-100 ps effective decay time of 77 ps and CdSe/...

  16. Selective, pulsed CVD of platinum on microfilament gas sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manginell, R.P.; Smith, J.H.; Ricco, A.J.; Moreno, D.J.; Hughes, R.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Huber, R.J. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Senturia, S.D. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    A post-processing, selective micro-chemical vapor deposition (``micro-CVD``) technology for the deposition of catalytic films on surface-micromachined, nitride-passivated polysilicon filaments has been investigated. Atmospheric pressure deposition of Pt on microfilaments was accomplished by thermal decomposition of Pt acetylacetonate; deposition occurs selectively only on those filaments which are electrically heated. Catalyst morphology, characterized by SEM, can be controlled by altering deposition time, filament temperature, and through the use of pulsed heating of the filament during deposition. Morphology plays an important role in determining the sensitivity of these devices when used as combustible gas sensors.

  17. Two-pulse laser control of bond-selective fragmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amstrup, Bjarne; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1996-01-01

    We elaborate on a two-pulse (pump-pump) laser control scheme for selective bond-breaking in molecules [Amstrup and Henriksen, J. Chem. Phys. 97, 8285 (1992)]. We show, in particular, that with this scheme one can overcome the obstacle of intramolecular vibrational relaxation. As an example, we...... consider an ozone molecule with isotopic substitution, that is, (OOO)-O-16-O-16-O-18. It is shown that asymmetric bond stretching can be created in simple (intense) laser fields. We predict that an alternating high selectivity between the channels O-16+(OO)-O-16-O-18 and (OO)-O-16-O-16+ O-18 can...

  18. Higgs amplitude mode in the BCS superconductors Nb1-xTi(x)N induced by terahertz pulse excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Ryusuke; Hamada, Yuki I; Makise, Kazumasa; Uzawa, Yoshinori; Terai, Hirotaka; Wang, Zhen; Shimano, Ryo

    2013-08-02

    Ultrafast responses of BCS superconductor Nb(1-x)Ti(x)N films in a nonadiabatic excitation regime were investigated by using terahertz (THz) pump-THz probe spectroscopy. After an instantaneous excitation with the monocycle THz pump pulse, a transient oscillation emerges in the electromagnetic response in the BCS gap energy region. The oscillation frequency coincides with the asymptotic value of the BCS gap energy, indicating the appearance of the theoretically anticipated collective amplitude mode of the order parameter, namely the Higgs amplitude mode. Our result opens a new pathway to the ultrafast manipulation of the superconducting order parameter by optical means.

  19. Process and system for isotope separation using the selective vibrational excitation of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodroffe, J.A.; Keck, J.C.

    1976-01-01

    This invention concerns the separation of isotopes by using the isotopically selective vibrational excitation and the vibration-translation reactions of the excited particles. UF 6 molecular mixed with a carrier gas, such as argon, are directed through a refrigerated chamber lighted by a laser radiation tuned to excite vibrationally the uranium hexafluoride molecules of a particular uranium isotope. The density of the carrier gas is preferably maintained above the density of the uranium hexafluoride to allow a greater collision probability of the vibrationally excited molecules with a carried molecule. In such a case, the vibrationally excited uranium hexafluoride will collide with a carrier gas molecule provoking the conversion of the excitation energy into a translation of the excited molecule, resulting in thermal energy or greater diffusibility than that of the other uranium hexafluoride molecules [fr

  20. Collective state of interwall excitons on GaAs/AlGaAs double quantum wells under pulse resonant excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Larionov, A V; Hvam, J; Soerensen, K

    2002-01-01

    The time evolution and kinetics of the photoluminescence (PL) spectra of the interwall excitons under the pulse resonant excitation of the interwall excitons are studied in the GaAs/AlGaAs binary quantum well. It is established, that the collective exciton phase originates with the time delay relative to the exciting pulse (several nanoseconds), which is conditioned by the density and temperature relaxation to the equilibrium values.The origination of the collective phase of the interwall excitons is accompanied by the strong narrowing of the corresponding photoluminescence line, the superlinear growth of its intensity and large time of change in the degree of the circular polarization.The collective exciton phase originates at the temperatures < 6 K and the interwall excitons densities 3 x 10 sup 1 sup 0 cm sup - sup 2

  1. Characteristics of Excitable Dog Behavior Based on Owners’ Report from a Self-Selected Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabelansky, Anastasia; Dowling-Guyer, Seana

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary This study provides information about owners’ experiences with their dogs’ excitable behavior. We found that certain daily scenarios tended to prompt excitable behavior. The majority of owners in this self-selected sample were very frustrated with their excitable dog. Many dogs in the sample had other behavior problems. Abstract Past research has found that excitable dog behavior is prevalent among sheltered and owned dogs and many times is a reason for canine relinquishment. In spite of its prevalence in the canine population, excitable behavior is relatively unstudied in the scientific literature. The intent of this research was to understand the experience of owners of excitable dogs through the analysis of self-administered online questionnaires completed by owners as part of another study. We found that certain daily scenarios tended to prompt excitable behavior, with excitability most common when the owner or other people came to the dog’s home. All owners experienced some level of frustration with their dog’s excitable behavior, with the majority being very frustrated. Many dogs in the sample had other behavior problems, with disobedient, destructive, chasing and barking behaviors being the most commonly reported. Other characteristics of excitable dogs also are discussed. Although the ability to generalize from these results is likely limited, due to targeted recruitment and selection of owners of more excitable dogs, this research provides valuable insights into the owner’s experience of excitable behavior. We hope this study prompts more research into canine excitable behavior which would expand our understanding of this behavior and help behaviorists, veterinarians, and shelters develop tools for managing it, as well as provide better education to owners of excitable dogs. PMID:26999222

  2. Luminiscence decay of SZn:Ag and OZn:Ga scintillation detectors excited by a pulsed laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, J.; Romero, L.

    1981-01-01

    A high sensitivity experimental set up for luminiscence decay measurements in the 10 -7 -1 sec range has been developed. As an application, luminiscence light decay in SZn:Ag and OZn:Ga after excitation by a pulsed N 2 laser has been measured. In SZn:Ag, measurements of total light decay was compared with donor acceptor pairs theory. In both substances, spectral evolution in the first 15 sec was investigated. (auth.)

  3. Luminescence decay of S Zn::Ag and O Zn:Ga scintillation detectors excited by a pulsed laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, L.; Campos, J.

    1981-01-01

    In the present work a high sensitivity experimental set up for luminescence decay measurements in the 1 0 - 1 sec range has been developed. As an application, luminescence light decay In S Zn:Ag and 0Zn:Ga after excitation by a pulsed N 2 laser has been measured. In SZnrAg, measurements of total light decay was compared with donor acceptor pairs theory. In both substances, spectral evolution in the first 15 sec was investigated. (Author) 4 refs

  4. Optimising the separation of quartz and feldspar optically stimulated luminescence using pulsed excitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ankjærgaard, Christina; Jain, Mayank; Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov

    2010-01-01

    the LEDs are switched off until just before the LEDs are switched on again, with the pulse on-time equal to the pulse off-time of 50 μs. By using only the initial interval of the pulsed OSL decay curve (equivalent to 0.2 s of CW-OSL using blue light at 50 mW cm−2) we find that the quartz to feldspar pulsed...

  5. Characteristics of Excitable Dog Behavior Based on Owners' Report from a Self-Selected Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabelansky, Anastasia; Dowling-Guyer, Seana

    2016-03-15

    Past research has found that excitable dog behavior is prevalent among sheltered and owned dogs and many times is a reason for canine relinquishment. In spite of its prevalence in the canine population, excitable behavior is relatively unstudied in the scientific literature. The intent of this research was to understand the experience of owners of excitable dogs through the analysis of self-administered online questionnaires completed by owners as part of another study. We found that certain daily scenarios tended to prompt excitable behavior, with excitability most common when the owner or other people came to the dog's home. All owners experienced some level of frustration with their dog's excitable behavior, with the majority being very frustrated. Many dogs in the sample had other behavior problems, with disobedient, destructive, chasing and barking behaviors being the most commonly reported. Other characteristics of excitable dogs also are discussed. Although the ability to generalize from these results is likely limited, due to targeted recruitment and selection of owners of more excitable dogs, this research provides valuable insights into the owner's experience of excitable behavior. We hope this study prompts more research into canine excitable behavior which would expand our understanding of this behavior and help behaviorists, veterinarians, and shelters develop tools for managing it, as well as provide better education to owners of excitable dogs.

  6. Theoretical estimation of nonlinear optical force on dielectric spherical particles of arbitrary size under femtosecond pulsed excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Anita; De, Arijit K.

    2017-08-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that high-repetition-rate ultrafast pulsed excitation is more efficient in optical trapping of dielectric nanoparticles as compared with continuous-wave excitation at the same average power. The physics behind the different nature of force under these two excitation conditions remained deceptive until quite recently when it was theoretically explained, in the dipole limit, as a combined effect of (1) repetitive instantaneous momentum transfer and (2) optical Kerr nonlinearity. The role of optical Kerr effect was theoretically studied for larger dielectric spherical particles, in the ray optics limit, also. However, a theoretical underpinning is yet to be established as to whether the effect of optical nonlinearity is omnipresent across different particle sizes, which we investigate here. Using localized approximation of generalized Lorenz-Mie theory, we theoretically analyze the nature of force (and potential) and provide a detailed comparative discussion between this generalized scattering formulation with dipole scattering formulation for dielectric nanoparticles.

  7. Atmospheric air dielectric barrier discharge excited by nanosecond pulse and AC used for improving the hydrophilicity of aramid fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, YUAN; Wenchun, WANG; Dezheng, YANG; Zilu, ZHAO; Li, ZHANG; Sen, WANG

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, a long line-shape dielectric barrier discharge excited by a nanosecond pulse and AC is generated in atmospheric air for the purpose of discussing the uniformity, stability and ability of aramid fiber treatment. The discharge images, waveforms of current and voltage, optical emission spectra, and gas temperatures of both discharges are compared. It is found that nanosecond pulsed discharge has a more uniform discharge morphology, higher energy efficiency and lower gas temperature, which indicates that nanosecond pulsed discharge is more suitable for surface modification. To reduce the water contact angle from 96° to about 60°, the energy cost is only about 1/7 compared with AC discharge. Scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are employed to understand the mechanisms of hydrophilicity improvement.

  8. Dynamic behavior of superconducting flux qubit excited by a series of electromagnetic pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyko, A.S.; Omelyanchouk, A.N.; Shevchenko, S.N.

    2007-01-01

    We study theoretically the behavior of the superconducting flux qubit subjected to a series of electromagnetic pulses. The possibility of controlling system state via changing the parameters of the pulse is studied. We calculated the phase shift in a tank circuit weakly coupled to the qubit which can be measured by the impedance measurement technique. For the flux qubit we consider the possibility of estimating the relaxation rate from the impedance measurements by varying the delay time between the pulses

  9. Relaxation and excitation electronic processes in dielectrics irradiated by ultrafast IR and VUV pulses; Processus electroniques d'excitation et de relaxation dans les solides dielectriques excites par des impulsions IR et XUV ultracourtes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudin, J

    2005-11-15

    We studied excitation and relaxation of electrons involved during interaction of visible and VUV femtosecond pulses with dielectrics. The generated population of hot electrons, having energy of few eV to few tens of eV above the bottom of the conduction band, is responsible of phenomena ranging to defect creation to optical breakdown. Owing to two techniques: photoemission and transient photoconductivity we improve the understanding of the The first photoemission experiments deal with dielectrics irradiated by 30 fs IR pulses. The photoemission spectra measured show a large population of electrons which energy rise up to 40 eV. We interpret this result in terms of a new absorption process: direct multi-photons inter-branch transitions. The 2. type of photoemission experiments are time resolved 'pump/probe' investigation. We study the relaxation of electrons excited by a VUV pulses. We used the high order harmonics (HOH) as light sources. We found surprisingly long decay time in the range of ps timescale. Last type of experiments is photoconductivity studies of diamond samples. Using HOH as light source we measure the displacement current induced by excited electrons in the conduction band. Those electrons relax mainly by impact ionisation creating secondary electrons. Hence by probing the number of electrons we were able to measure the efficiency of these relaxation processes. We observe a diminution of this efficiency when the energy of exciting photons is above 20 eV. Owing to Monte-Carlo simulation we interpret this result in terms of band structure effect. (author)

  10. THE EXCITED LOADS OF ATTRACTION IN A SYMMETRICAL INDUCTOR SYSTEM FOR THE MAGNETIC PULSE REMOVING OF THE BODY CAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Gnatov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, repair and recovery of vehicle body operations become more and more popular. A special place here is taken by equipment that provides performance of given repair operations. The most interesting are methods for recovery of car body panels that allow the straightening without disassembling of car body panels and damaging of existing protective coating. Now, there are several technologies for repair and recovery of car body panels without their disassembly and dismantling. The most perspective is magnetic-pulse technology of external noncontact straightening. Results. The calculation of excited loads attractions in a symmetrical inductor system in the universal tool of magnetic-pulse straightening is provided. According to the obtained analytical dependence of the numerical evaluation of volumetric construction diagrams, phase and amplitude of the radial dependence of the spatial distribution of the excited efforts of attraction is obtained. The influence of the magnetic properties of the blank screen and manifested in the appearance of powerful magnetic attraction forces is determined. Originality. A new trend of research of magnetic-pulse working of thin-walled metals has been formulated and received further development, which allows to create not only new equipment, but principally new technological processes of external non-contact repair and recovery of vehicle body panels. Scientific basis of electrodynamic and magnetic attraction of thin-walled sheet metals with using the energy of high-power pulsed fields was created for the first time and proved theoretically and experimentally. Scientific and technical solutions in design of effective tools based on single-turn inductor systems of cylindrical geometry for straightening and recovery of car body panels were formulated and proved theoretically, as well as experimentally. Practical value. Using the results of the calculations we can create effective tools for an external magnetic

  11. Simultaneously Excitatory and Inhibitory Effects of Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation Revealed Using Selective Pulse-Train Stimulation in the Rat Motor Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatoun, Ahmad; Asamoah, Boateng; Mc Laughlin, Myles

    2017-09-27

    Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) uses sinusoidal, subthreshold, electric fields to modulate cortical processing. Cortical processing depends on a fine balance between excitation and inhibition and tACS acts on both excitatory and inhibitory cortical neurons. Given this, it is not clear whether tACS should increase or decrease cortical excitability. We investigated this using transcranial current stimulation of the rat (all males) motor cortex consisting of a continuous subthreshold sine wave with short bursts of suprathreshold pulse-trains inserted at different phases to probe cortical excitability. We found that when a low-rate, long-duration, suprathreshold pulse-train was used, subthreshold cathodal tACS decreased cortical excitability and anodal tACS increased excitability. However, when a high-rate, short-duration, suprathreshold pulse-train was used this pattern was inverted. An integrate-and-fire model incorporating biophysical differences between cortical excitatory and inhibitory neurons could predict the experimental data and helped interpret these results. The model indicated that low-rate suprathreshold pulse-trains preferentially stimulate excitatory cortical neurons, whereas high-rate suprathreshold pulse-trains stimulate both excitatory and inhibitory neurons. If correct, this indicates that suprathreshold pulse-train stimulation may be able to selectively control the excitation-inhibition balance within a cortical network. The excitation-inhibition balance then likely plays an important role in determining whether subthreshold tACS will increase or decrease cortical excitability. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) is a noninvasive neuromodulation method that uses weak sinusoidal electric fields to modulate cortical activity. In healthy volunteers tACS can modulate perception, cognition, and motor function but the underlying neural mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, using rat

  12. Computer modelling of a short-pulse excited dielectric barrier discharge xenon excimer lamp (lambda approx 172 nm)

    CERN Document Server

    Carman, R J

    2003-01-01

    A detailed rate-equation analysis has been used to simulate the plasma kinetics in a pulsed-excited dielectric barrier discharge in xenon, under operating conditions where the discharge structure is spatially homogeneous. The one-dimensional model, incorporating 14 species and 70 reaction processes, predicts results that are in good agreement with experimental measurements of the electrical characteristics, and optical (vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) and visible) pulse shapes. The model reveals that electrical breakdown of the discharge gap occurs via a fast-moving ionization/excitation wavefront that starts close to the anode dielectric and propagates towards the cathode at approx 3x10 sup 5 m s sup - sup 1. The wavefront appears as a result of successive avalanches of electrons that propagate across the discharge gap after release from the cathode dielectric. During breakdown, the mean electron energy in the bulk plasma is close to optimum for preferential excitation of the Xe* 1s sub 4 sub , sub 5 states that fe...

  13. SENSORS OFMAGNETIC HEADINGOF THE AIRCRAFT AND THE LOCAL MAGNETIC FIELDS ON THE BASIS OF FERROPROBES WITH PULSE EXCITATION SCHEME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The flux gate for measurement of size and direction of magnetic field of the Earth and for measurement of local magnetic fields, applying the unidirectional pulse scheme in an excitement chain are examined. The article treats the bene- fits of ferroprobes with pulse excitement in comparison with the similar sensors with sinusoidal excitement. According to the original circuit proposed by the authors of the article flux gate sensor for measurement of a local magnetic field with two ferroprobes for the purpose of compensation of the Earth’s magnetic field is designed. The experiment with flux gate sensors which contain various quantities of rounds in an output winding and a permanent magnet is carried out. The factors that influence the output voltage of the sensor are examined during the experiment. The regression equation for the ferro- probe by the experimental data is obtained. The regression is important for development of similar measuring systems. First of all, the results of the research are important for the analysis of technical characteristics of magneto-modulation sensors, and for ferroprobes design in aircraft industry.

  14. Self-Resonant Plasma Wake-Field Excitation by a Laser-Pulse with a Steep Leading-Edge for Particle-Acceleration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goloviznin, V. V.; van Amersfoort, P. W.

    1995-01-01

    The self-modulational instability of a relatively long laser pulse with a power close to or less than the critical power for relativistic self-focusing in plasma is considered. Strong wake-field excitation occurs as the result of a correlated transverse and longitudinal evolution of the pulse. The

  15. Excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorner, B.

    1996-01-01

    A short introduction to instrumental resolution is followed by a discussion of visibilities of phonon modes due to their eigenvectors. High precision phonon dispersion curves in GaAs are presented together with 'ab initio' calculations. Al 2 O 3 is taken as an example of selected visibility due to group theory. By careful determination of phonon intensities eigenvectors can be determined, such as in Silicon and Diamond. The investigation of magnon modes is shown for the garnet Fe 2 Ca 3 (GeO 4 ) 3 , where also a quantum gap due to zero point spin fluctuations was observed. The study of the splitting of excitons in CsFeCl 3 in an applied magnetic field demonstrates the possibilities of neutron polarisation analysis, which made it possible to observe a mode crossing. An outlook to inelastic X-ray scattering with very high energy resolution of synchrotron radiation is given with the examples of phonons in Beryllium and in water. (author) 19 figs., 36 refs

  16. Excitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorner, B. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1996-12-31

    A short introduction to instrumental resolution is followed by a discussion of visibilities of phonon modes due to their eigenvectors. High precision phonon dispersion curves in GaAs are presented together with `ab initio` calculations. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is taken as an example of selected visibility due to group theory. By careful determination of phonon intensities eigenvectors can be determined, such as in Silicon and Diamond. The investigation of magnon modes is shown for the garnet Fe{sub 2}Ca{sub 3}(GeO{sub 4}){sub 3}, where also a quantum gap due to zero point spin fluctuations was observed. The study of the splitting of excitons in CsFeCl{sub 3} in an applied magnetic field demonstrates the possibilities of neutron polarisation analysis, which made it possible to observe a mode crossing. An outlook to inelastic X-ray scattering with very high energy resolution of synchrotron radiation is given with the examples of phonons in Beryllium and in water. (author) 19 figs., 36 refs.

  17. Pulsed magnetic field excitation sensitivity of match-type electric blasting caps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parson, Jonathan; Dickens, James; Walter, John; Neuber, Andreas A.

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents a study on energy deposition and electromagnetic compatibility of match-type electroexplosive devices (EEDs), which recently have found more usage in pulsed power environments with high electromagnetic interference (EMI) background. The sensitivity of these devices makes them dangerous to intended and unintended radiation produced by devices commonly used in pulsed power environments. Match-type EEDs have been found to be susceptible to such low levels of energy (7-8 mJ) that safe operation of these EEDs is vital when in use near devices that produce high levels of pulsed EMI. The scope of this paper is to provide an investigation that incorporates results of similar studies to provide detonation characteristics of these EEDs. The three topics included in this study are sensitivity testing, modeling of the thermodynamic heat propagation, and electromagnetic compatibility from pulsed electromagnetic radiation. The thermodynamic joule heating of the primary explosive has been modeled by a solution to the 1D heat equation. A simple pulsed generator, Marx generator with an inductive load, was used for the electromagnetic compatibility assessment of the coupled field between the pulse generator and shorted EED. The results of the electromagnetic compatibility assessment relate the resistive, inductive, and capacitive components of the pulse generator to the area of the shorted EED.

  18. Coaxial monitoring of temperature field in selective pulsed laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Che; Chen, Zhongyun; Cao, Hongzhong; Zhou, Jianhong

    2017-10-01

    Selective Laser Melting is a rapid manufacturing technology which produces complex parts layer by layer. The presence of thermal stress and thermal strain in the forming process often leads to defects in the formed parts. In order to detect fabricate errors and avoid failure which caused by thermal gradient in time. An infrared thermal imager and a high speed CCD camera were applied to build a coaxial optical system for real-time monitoring the temperature distribution and changing trend of laser affected zone in SLM forming process. Molten tracks were fabricated by SLM under different laser parameters such as frequency, pulse width. And the relationship between the laser parameters and the temperature distribution were all obtained and analyzed.

  19. Comparative investigations of the spontaneous and stimulated emissions from nitrogen molecules in air with femtosecond laser excitation pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ziting; Wang, Zhanshan; Chu, Wei; Zeng, Bin; Yao, Jinping; Li, Guihua; Xie, Hongqiang; Cheng, Ya

    2016-01-01

    We report on experimental investigations on the spontaneous and stimulated emissions from excited nitrogen molecules generated in both linearly and circularly polarized intense laser fields. The spontaneous emission is measured from the side direction of the laser-induced filament whereas the stimulated emission generated by seed amplification is measured in the forward direction of the laser propagation. The comparison between the signal intensities of the spontaneous fluorescence emission and the seed-amplified stimulated emission provides an insight into the population inversion generated in nitrogen molecules with circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulses. (paper)

  20. Detection of leak-defective fuel rods using the circumferential Lamb waves excited by the resonance backscattering of ultrasonic pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, M.S.; Yang, M.S.; Kim, H.C.

    1992-01-01

    A new ultrasonic technique for detecting the infiltrated water in leaked fuel rods is developed. Propagation characteristics of the circumferential Lamb waves in the cladding tubes are estimated by the resonance scattering theory. The Lamb waves are excited by the resonance backscattering of ultrasonic pulses. In sound fuel rods, the existence of the Lamb waves is revealed by a series of periodic echoes. In leaked fuel rods, however, the Lamb waves are perturbed strongly by the scattered waves from the surface of fuel pellets, thus the periodic echoes are not observed. (author)

  1. Analytical model for electromagnetic radiation from a wakefield excited by intense short laser pulses in an unmagnetized plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Ziyu; Chen Shi; Dan Jiakun; Li Jianfeng; Peng Qixian, E-mail: ziyuch@gmail.com [Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2011-10-15

    A simple one-dimensional analytical model for electromagnetic emission from an unmagnetized wakefield excited by an intense short-pulse laser in the nonlinear regime has been developed in this paper. The expressions for the spectral and angular distributions of the radiation have been derived. The model suggests that the origin of the radiation can be attributed to the violent sudden acceleration of plasma electrons experiencing the accelerating potential of the laser wakefield. The radiation process could help to provide a qualitative interpretation of existing experimental results, and offers useful information for future laser wakefield experiments.

  2. Analytical model for electromagnetic radiation from a wakefield excited by intense short laser pulses in an unmagnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Ziyu; Chen Shi; Dan Jiakun; Li Jianfeng; Peng Qixian

    2011-01-01

    A simple one-dimensional analytical model for electromagnetic emission from an unmagnetized wakefield excited by an intense short-pulse laser in the nonlinear regime has been developed in this paper. The expressions for the spectral and angular distributions of the radiation have been derived. The model suggests that the origin of the radiation can be attributed to the violent sudden acceleration of plasma electrons experiencing the accelerating potential of the laser wakefield. The radiation process could help to provide a qualitative interpretation of existing experimental results, and offers useful information for future laser wakefield experiments.

  3. Enhancement of nonlinear optical response of weakly confined excitons in GaAs thin films by spectrally rectangle-shape-pulse-excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, O; Isu, T; Ishi-Hayase, J; Sasaki, M; Tsuchiya, M

    2007-01-01

    We report the enhancement of the nonlinear optical response of the weakly confined excitons with use of spectrally rectangular pulse. The nonlinear optical response was investigated as a function of excitation energy by a degenerate four-wave-mixing (DFWM) technique. In the case that the laser pulse with the controlled spectral shape excites the plural exciton states simultaneously, the DFWM signal intensity is enhanced by a factor of two in comparison with the intensity under the excitation of a single exciton state. This enhancement is caused by the superposition of the nonlinear optical responses from the plural exciton states

  4. Phased laser diode array permits selective excitation of ultrasonic guided waves in coated bone-mimicking tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moilanen, Petro; Salmi, Ari; Kilappa, Vantte; Zhao, Zuomin; Timonen, Jussi; Hæggström, Edward

    2017-10-01

    This paper validates simulation predictions, which state that specific modes could be enhanced in quantitative ultrasonic bone testing. Tunable selection of ultrasonic guided wave excitation is useful in non-destructive testing since it permits the mediation of energy into diagnostically useful modes while reducing the energy mediated into disturbing contributions. For instance, it is often challenging to distinguish and extract the useful modes from ultrasound signals measured in bone covered by a soft tissue. We show that a laser diode array can selectively excite ultrasound in bone mimicking phantoms. A fiber-coupled diode array (4 elements) illuminated two solid tubes (2-3 mm wall thickness) embraced by an opaque soft-tissue mimicking elastomer coating (5 mm thick). A predetermined time delay matching the selected mode and frequency was employed between the outputs of the elements. The generated ultrasound was detected by a 215 kHz piezo receiver. Our results suggest that this array reduces the disturbances caused by the elastomer cover and so pave way to permit non-contacting in vivo guided wave ultrasound assessment of human bones. The implementation is small, inexpensive, and robust in comparison with the conventional pulsed lasers.

  5. State-selective high-energy excitation of nuclei by resonant positron annihilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay A. Belov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the annihilation of a positron with a bound atomic electron, the virtual γ photon created may excite the atomic nucleus. We put forward this effect as a spectroscopic tool for an energy-selective excitation of nuclear transitions. This scheme can efficiently populate nuclear levels of arbitrary multipolarities in the MeV regime, including giant resonances and monopole transitions. In certain cases, it may have higher cross sections than the conventionally used Coulomb excitation and it can even occur with high probability when the latter is energetically forbidden.

  6. Deep tissue optical imaging of upconverting nanoparticles enabled by exploiting higher intrinsic quantum yield through use of millisecond single pulse excitation with high peak power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Haichun; Xu, Can T.; Dumlupinar, Gökhan

    2013-01-01

    the possible thermal side-effects of the excitation light moderate. These key results facilitate means to break through the general shallow depth limit of upconverting-nanoparticle-based fluorescence techniques, necessary for a range of biomedical applications, including diffuse optical imaging, photodynamic......We have accomplished deep tissue optical imaging of upconverting nanoparticles at 800 nm, using millisecond single pulse excitation with high peak power. This is achieved by carefully choosing the pulse parameters, derived from time-resolved rate-equation analysis, which result in higher intrinsic...... quantum yield that is utilized by upconverting nanoparticles for generating this near infrared upconversion emission. The pulsed excitation approach thus promises previously unreachable imaging depths and shorter data acquisition times compared with continuous wave excitation, while simultaneously keeping...

  7. Speckle Reduction for Ultrasonic Imaging Using Frequency Compounding and Despeckling Filters along with Coded Excitation and Pulse Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua S. Ullom

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for improving the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR while maintaining the −6 dB axial resolution of ultrasonic B-mode images is proposed. The technique proposed is known as eREC-FC, which enhances a recently developed REC-FC technique. REC-FC is a combination of the coded excitation technique known as resolution enhancement compression (REC and the speckle-reduction technique frequency compounding (FC. In REC-FC, image CNR is improved but at the expense of a reduction in axial resolution. However, by compounding various REC-FC images made from various subband widths, the tradeoff between axial resolution and CNR enhancement can be extended. Further improvements in CNR can be obtained by applying postprocessing despeckling filters to the eREC-FC B-mode images. The despeckling filters evaluated were the following: median, Lee, homogeneous mask area, geometric, and speckle-reducing anisotropic diffusion (SRAD. Simulations and experimental measurements were conducted with a single-element transducer (f/2.66 having a center frequency of 2.25 MHz and a −3 dB bandwidth of 50%. In simulations and experiments, the eREC-FC technique resulted in the same axial resolution that would be typically observed with conventional excitation with a pulse. Moreover, increases in CNR of 348% were obtained in experiments when comparing eREC-FC with a Lee filter to conventional pulsing methods.

  8. Enhanced Size Selection in Two-Photon Excitation for CsPbBr3 Perovskite Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junsheng; Chábera, Pavel; Pascher, Torbjörn; Messing, Maria E; Schaller, Richard; Canton, Sophie; Zheng, Kaibo; Pullerits, Tõnu

    2017-10-19

    Cesium lead bromide (CsPbBr 3 ) perovskite nanocrystals (NCs), with large two-photon absorption (TPA) cross-section and bright photoluminescence (PL), have been demonstrated as stable two-photon-pumped lasing medium. With two-photon excitation, red-shifted PL spectrum and increased PL lifetime is observed compared with one-photon excitation. We have investigated the origin of such difference using time-resolved laser spectroscopies. We ascribe the difference to the enhanced size selection of NCs by two-photon excitation. Because of inherent nonlinearity, the size dependence of absorption cross-section under TPA is stronger. Consequently, larger size NCs are preferably excited, leading to longer excited-state lifetime and red-shifted PL emission. In a broad view, the enhanced size selection in two-photon excitation of CsPbBr 3 NCs is likely a general feature of the perovskite NCs and can be tuned via NC size distribution to influence their performance within NC-based nonlinear optical materials and devices.

  9. Discrete excitation of mode pulses using a diode-pumped solid-state digital laser

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngcobo, Sandile

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available , with zero radial-order (p = 0) were generated. Pulses of duration 200 ms and intensities as high as 1 mW with repetition speed of 60 Hz were produced at 1 um wavelength. The maximum peak power-conversion efficiency measured was 1.3%....

  10. Hyperpolarized13C urea myocardial first-pass perfusion imaging using velocity-selective excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuetterer, Maximilian; Busch, Julia; Peereboom, Sophie M; von Deuster, Constantin; Wissmann, Lukas; Lipiski, Miriam; Fleischmann, Thea; Cesarovic, Nikola; Stoeck, Christian T; Kozerke, Sebastian

    2017-06-21

    A velocity-selective binomial excitation scheme for myocardial first-pass perfusion measurements with hyperpolarized 13 C substrates, which preserves bolus magnetization inside the blood pool, is presented. The proposed method is evaluated against gadolinium-enhanced 1 H measurements in-vivo. The proposed excitation with an echo-planar imaging readout was implemented on a clinical CMR system. Dynamic myocardial stress perfusion images were acquired in six healthy pigs after bolus injection of hyperpolarized 13 C urea with the velocity-selective vs. conventional excitation, as well as standard 1 H gadolinium-enhanced images. Signal-to-noise, contrast-to-noise (CNR) and homogeneity of semi-quantitative perfusion measures were compared between methods based on first-pass signal-intensity time curves extracted from a mid-ventricular slice. Diagnostic feasibility is demonstrated in a case of septal infarction. Velocity-selective excitation provides over three-fold reduction in blood pool signal with a two-fold increase in myocardial CNR. Extracted first-pass perfusion curves reveal a significantly reduced variability of semi-quantitative first-pass perfusion measures (12-20%) for velocity-selective excitation compared to conventional excitation (28-93%), comparable to that of reference 1 H gadolinium data (9-15%). Overall image quality appears comparable between the velocity-selective hyperpolarized and gadolinium-enhanced imaging. The feasibility of hyperpolarized 13 C first-pass perfusion CMR has been demonstrated in swine. Comparison with reference 1 H gadolinium data revealed sufficient data quality and indicates the potential of hyperpolarized perfusion imaging for human applications.

  11. Electronically driven adsorbate excitation mechanism in femtosecond-pulse laser desorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandbyge, Mads; Hedegård, Per; Heinz, T. F.

    1995-01-01

    a systematic theoretical treatment of this coupling process in the language of an electronic friction, which generates Langevin noise in the adsorbate center-of-mass degrees of freedom, while the electronic degrees of freedom are at a high temperature. Starting from an influence-functional path......-integral description, a simple formula for the electronic friction is defined which is valid at all electronic temperatures. At low temperatures the formalism makes contact with the electronic friction appearing in the theory of adsorbate vibrational damping, whereas at high temperatures comparable with the adsorbate...... electronic excitation energies the friction becomes strongly temperature dependent due to dominance by virtual excitations between different adsorbate potential energy surfaces. The former regime is related to the electronic friction model for the desorption process, and the latter to the desorption induced...

  12. Modeling of collisional excited x-ray lasers using short pulse laser pumping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Akira; Moribayashi, Kengo; Utsumi, Takayuki; Tajima, Toshiki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    A simple atomic kinetics model of electron collisional excited x-ray lasers has been developed. The model consists of a collisional radiative model using the average ion model (AIM) and a detailed term accounting (DTA) model of Ni-like Ta. An estimate of plasma condition to produce gain in Ni-like Ta ({lambda}=44A) is given. Use of the plasma confined in a cylinder is proposed to preform a uniform high density plasma from 1-D hydrodynamics calculations. (author)

  13. Inertial displacement of a domain wall excited by ultra-short circularly polarized laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janda, T.; Roy, P. E.; Otxoa, R. M.; Šobáň, Z.; Ramsay, A.; Irvine, A. C.; Trojanek, F.; Surýnek, M.; Campion, R. P.; Gallagher, B. L.; Němec, P.; Jungwirth, T.; Wunderlich, J.

    2017-05-01

    Domain wall motion driven by ultra-short laser pulses is a pre-requisite for envisaged low-power spintronics combining storage of information in magnetoelectronic devices with high speed and long distance transmission of information encoded in circularly polarized light. Here we demonstrate the conversion of the circular polarization of incident femtosecond laser pulses into inertial displacement of a domain wall in a ferromagnetic semiconductor. In our study, we combine electrical measurements and magneto-optical imaging of the domain wall displacement with micromagnetic simulations. The optical spin-transfer torque acts over a picosecond recombination time of the spin-polarized photo-carriers that only leads to a deformation of the initial domain wall structure. We show that subsequent depinning and micrometre-distance displacement without an applied magnetic field or any other external stimuli can only occur due to the inertia of the domain wall.

  14. Selective dorsal column stimulation in SCS, using conditioning pulses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holsheimer, J.

    2004-01-01

    A system and method is described for preferentially stimulating dorsal column fibers while avoiding stimulation of dorsal root fibers. The invention applies hyperpolarizing (anodic) pre-pulses (HPP) and depolarizing (cathodic) pre-pulses (DPP) to neural tissue, such as spinal cord tissue, through a

  15. Selective dorsal column stimulation in SCS, using conditioning pulses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holsheimer, J.

    2003-01-01

    A system and method is described for preferentially stimulating dorsal column fibers while avoiding stimulation of dorsal root fibers. The invention applies hyperpolarizing pre-pulses and depolarizing pre-pulses to neural tissue, such as spinal cord tissue, through a lead placed over the spinal cord

  16. A New Selective Harmonic Elimination Pulse- Width and Amplitude Modulation (SHEPWAM) for Drive Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghoreishy, Hoda; Varjani, Ali Yazdian; Mohamadian, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Compared to the conventional selective harmonic elimination-pulse width modulation (SHE-PWM), the selective harmonic elimination-pulse width and amplitude modulation (SHE-PWAM) control strategy results in significant improvements in the performance of CHB inverters. This fact is due to considerin...

  17. Automatic vibration mode selection and excitation; combining modal filtering with autoresonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Solomon; Bucher, Izhak

    2018-02-01

    Autoresonance is a well-known nonlinear feedback method used for automatically exciting a system at its natural frequency. Though highly effective in exciting single degree of freedom systems, in its simplest form it lacks a mechanism for choosing the mode of excitation when more than one is present. In this case a single mode will be automatically excited, but this mode cannot be chosen or changed. In this paper a new method for automatically exciting a general second-order system at any desired natural frequency using Autoresonance is proposed. The article begins by deriving a concise expression for the frequency of the limit cycle induced by an Autoresonance feedback loop enclosed on the system. The expression is based on modal decomposition, and provides valuable insight into the behavior of a system controlled in this way. With this expression, a method for selecting and exciting a desired mode naturally follows by combining Autoresonance with Modal Filtering. By taking various linear combinations of the sensor signals, by orthogonality one can "filter out" all the unwanted modes effectively. The desired mode's natural frequency is then automatically reflected in the limit cycle. In experiment the technique has proven extremely robust, even if the amplitude of the desired mode is significantly smaller than the others and the modal filters are greatly inaccurate.

  18. Selective excitation of vortex fibre modes using a spatial light modulator

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bouchal, Z.; Haderka, Ondřej; Čelechovský, R.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 7, - (2005), s. 125 ISSN 1367-2630 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : selective excitation * fibre modes * spatial light modulator Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.585, year: 2005 http://www.iop.org/EJ/mmedia/1367-2630/7/1/125/

  19. PRISMA - a spectrometer for the measurement of coherent excitations on a pulsed spallation neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreani, C.; Cilloco, F.; Petrillo, C.; Sacchetti, F.; Windsor, C.G.

    1986-04-01

    The measurement of nuclear and magnetic excitation spectra from single crystal samples remains central to condensed matter physics. The requirements in terms of the range and resolution of the scattering vector Q and energy transfer h/2πω are reviewed and typical experiments with a well defined cross-section are chosen. The performance and limitations of existing instruments are reviewed. A design for a new spectrometer, PRISMA, to be installed on the UK spallation neutron source, ISIS, is presented. Its performance for chosen experiments is given in terms of the Q and h/2πω range covered in a single scan, the resolution and the count rate. (author)

  20. Development and performance test of picosecond pulse x-ray excited streak camera system for scintillator characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagida, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Yoshikawa, Akira

    2010-01-01

    To observe time and wavelength-resolved scintillation events, picosecond pulse X-ray excited streak camera system is developed. The wavelength range spreads from vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) to near infrared region (110-900 nm) and the instrumental response function is around 80 ps. This work describes the principle of the newly developed instrument and the first performance test using BaF 2 single crystal scintillator. Core valence luminescence of BaF 2 peaking around 190 and 220 nm is clearly detected by our system, and the decay time turned out to be of 0.7 ns. These results are consistent with literature and confirm that our system properly works. (author)

  1. Comparison of laser diode response to pulsed electrical and radiative excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baggio, J.; Rainsant, J.M.; D'hose, C.; Lalande, P.; Musseau, O.; Leray, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    The authors have studied the electrical and optical response of two laser diodes under transient irradiation. Both diodes exhibit a positive photocurrent, which adds to the bias current, and a decrease of the optical power until extinction when dose rate is increased. Direct carrier generation in the laser cavity is a second order phenomena. The diode overall response is driven by both the substrate photocurrent and the transient conduction of current confinement regions, which decrease the net current density in the cavity and switches-off the laser emission. This behavior is in good agreement with pulsed electrical characterizations and 2D simulations

  2. Coherent terahertz emission from ferromagnetic films excited by femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaurepaire, E.; Turner, G.M.; Harrel, S.M.; Beard, M.C.; Bigot, J.-Y.; Schmuttenmaer, C.A.

    2004-01-01

    It is shown that the laser induced ultrafast demagnetization of ferromagnetic films results in the emission of a terahertz electromagnetic pulse. This emission has been detected from Ni films using free-space electro-optic sampling. The radiated electric field E(t) is explained by Maxwell equations (radiation from a time dependent magnetic dipole), and is expected to be proportional to the second time derivative of the magnetization d 2 M/dt 2 , as measured in the far field. This technique opens appealing perspectives in the context of measuring and understanding the ultrafast spin dynamics as well as the interaction of electrons (both charge and spin) with electromagnetic fields

  3. Effects of non-exciton components excited by broadband pulses on quantum beats in a GaAs/AlAs multiple quantum well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Osamu; Iwasaki, Yuki; Kita, Takashi; Akahane, Kouichi

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we report the effect of the excitation of non-exciton components caused by broadband pulses on quantum beat oscillation. Using a spectrally controlled pump pulse, a long-lived oscillation is clearly observed, and the pump-power dependence shows the suppression of the dephasing rate of the oscillation. Our results from incoherent carrier generation using a continuous wave laser demonstrate that the non-exciton components behaving as free carriers increase the oscillation dephasing rate.

  4. Kinetics of plasma formation in sodium vapor excited by nanosecond resonant laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, M. A.; Gamal, Y. E. E.

    2012-07-01

    We have studied theoretically formation of molecular ion Na2 + and the atomic ion Na+ which are created in laser excited sodium vapor at the first resonance transition, 3S1/2-3P1/2. A set of rate equations, which describe the temporal variation of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF), the electron density, the population density of the excited states as well as the atomic Na+ and molecular ion Na2 +, are solved numerically. The calculations are carried out at different laser energy and different sodium atomic vapor densities. The numerical calculations of the EEDF show that a deviation from the Maxwellian distribution due to the superelastic collisions effect. In addition to the competition between associative ionization (3P-3P), associative ionization (3P-3D) and Molnar-Hornbeck ionization processes for producing Na2 +, the calculations have also shown that the atomic ions Na+ are formed through the Penning ionization and photoionization processes. These results are found to be consistent with the experimental observations.

  5. A tunable general purpose Q-band resonator for CW and pulse EPR/ENDOR experiments with large sample access and optical excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reijerse, Edward; Lendzian, Friedhelm; Isaacson, Roger; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    We describe a frequency tunable Q-band cavity (34 GHz) designed for CW and pulse Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) as well as Electron Nuclear Double Resonance (ENDOR) and Electron Electron Double Resonance (ELDOR) experiments. The TE 011 cylindrical resonator is machined either from brass or from graphite (which is subsequently gold plated), to improve the penetration of the 100 kHz field modulation signal. The (self-supporting) ENDOR coil consists of four 0.8 mm silver posts at 2.67 mm distance from the cavity center axis, penetrating through the plunger heads. It is very robust and immune to mechanical vibrations. The coil is electrically shielded to enable CW ENDOR experiments with high RF power (500 W). The top plunger of the cavity is movable and allows a frequency tuning of ±2 GHz. In our setup the standard operation frequency is 34.0 GHz. The microwaves are coupled into the resonator through an iris in the cylinder wall and matching is accomplished by a sliding short in the coupling waveguide. Optical excitation of the sample is enabled through slits in the cavity wall (transmission ˜60%). The resonator accepts 3 mm o.d. sample tubes. This leads to a favorable sensitivity especially for pulse EPR experiments of low concentration biological samples. The probehead dimensions are compatible with that of Bruker flexline Q-band resonators and it fits perfectly into an Oxford CF935 Helium flow cryostat (4-300 K). It is demonstrated that, due to the relatively large active sample volume (20-30 μl), the described resonator has superior concentration sensitivity as compared to commercial pulse Q-band resonators. The quality factor ( Q L) of the resonator can be varied between 2600 (critical coupling) and 1300 (over-coupling). The shortest achieved π/2-pulse durations are 20 ns using a 3 W microwave amplifier. ENDOR (RF) π-pulses of 20 μs ( 1H @ 51 MHz) were obtained for a 300 W amplifier and 7 μs using a 2500 W amplifier. Selected applications of the

  6. Neuronal excitation and permeabilization by 200-ns pulsed electric field: An optical membrane potential study with FluoVolt dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhomov, Andrei G; Semenov, Iurii; Casciola, Maura; Xiao, Shu

    2017-07-01

    Electric field pulses of nano- and picosecond duration are a novel modality for neurostimulation, activation of Ca 2+ signaling, and tissue ablation. However it is not known how such brief pulses activate voltage-gated ion channels. We studied excitation and electroporation of hippocampal neurons by 200-ns pulsed electric field (nsPEF), by means of time-lapse imaging of the optical membrane potential (OMP) with FluoVolt dye. Electroporation abruptly shifted OMP to a more depolarized level, which was reached within 10s), so cells remained above the resting OMP level for at least 20-30s. Activation of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) enhanced the depolarizing effect of electroporation, resulting in an additional tetrodotoxin-sensitive OMP peak in 4-5ms after nsPEF. Omitting Ca 2+ in the extracellular solution did not reduce the depolarization, suggesting no contribution of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC). In 40% of neurons, nsPEF triggered a single action potential (AP), with the median threshold of 3kV/cm (range: 1.9-4kV/cm); no APs could be evoked by stimuli below the electroporation threshold (1.5-1.9kV/cm). VGSC opening could already be detected in 0.5ms after nsPEF, which is too fast to be mediated by the depolarizing effect of electroporation. The overlap of electroporation and AP thresholds does not necessarily reflect the causal relation, but suggests a low potency of nsPEF, as compared to conventional electrostimulation, for VGSC activation and AP induction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Elimination of Second-Harmonics in CMUTs using Square Pulse Excitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lei, Anders; Diederichsen, Søren Elmin; Hansen, Sebastian Molbech

    2016-01-01

    The harmonic imaging mode is today a fundamental part of ultrasound imaging; it is not only used for suppressing the grating lobe artifact, but also to reduce many other acoustical artifacts in the ultrasound image. A vital performance parameter for accepting CMUT probes as a clinical usable...... transducer technology is, that it can support harmonic imaging. The large bandwidth of the CMUT is a clear advantage for harmonic imaging, but the inherent nonlinear behavior of the CMUT poses an issue as it is difficult to dissociate the harmonics generated in the tissue from the harmonic content...... of the transmitted signal. This work presents how proper pulse coding of a bipolar pulser, which is present in most commercial ultrasound scanners, can reduce the intrinsic generated harmonic to fundamental pressure amplitude ratio to below −35 dB, making CMUT probes usable for clinical applications....

  8. Phase selection during pulsed laser annealing of manganese

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Follstaedt, D.M.; Peercy, P.S.; Perepezko, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    Pulsed (25 ns) laser-induced heating of the α phase of Mn is found to be sufficiently rapid to bypass solid-state transformation to the high-temperature β, γ, and delta allotropes and thus produce melts that are calculated to be undercooled by approx. 120 K with respect to the equilibrium melting temperature of the delta phase. Nucleation of the γ phase in this highly undercooled melt is observed for sufficiently long melt durations. The experiments thus demonstrate that pulsed laser-induced melting of metals with allotropes permits the study of nucleation and growth in highly undercooled melts with calculable temperatures

  9. Detection and speciation of transuranium elements in synthetic groundwater via pulsed-laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beitz, J.V.; Bowers, D.L.; Doxtader, M.M.; Maroni, V.A.; Reed, D.T.

    1987-01-01

    High sensitivity methods for detection and speciation of complexed transuranium ions in synthetic basalt groundwater, and simplified analogs, are being developed which exploit advances in pulsed laser technology. The first demonstration of high sensitivity detection of a transuranium ion at temperatures significantly above ambient is reported using laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS). The existence of enhanced LPAS signal amplitudes with increasing temperature in aqueous solution is confirmed in LPAS spectra recorded at 30 C, 60 C and 90 C using micromolar concentrations of /sup 241/Am/sup 3+/. A detection sensitivity of 8.5 parts per trillion (weight basis) of /sup 244/Cm/sup 3+/ in a simplified basalt groundwater at 22 C has been achieved using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIF). This corresponds to 1 x 10/sup 8/ Cm/sup 3+/ ions in the laser beam. The detailed spectroscopic information obtained by this method points to the existence of previously unobserved Cm/sup 3+/ species. A brief assessment of the applicability and sensitivity of LPAS and LIF methods for speciating transuranium ions in near-neutral pH aqueous solution, such as the groundwater expected in a basalt nuclear waste repository, is presented. 27 refs., 3 figs

  10. TDDFT investigation of excitation of water tetramer under femtosecond laser pulse irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiping; Xu, Xuefen; Zhang, Fengshou; Qian, Chaoyi

    2018-04-01

    We study the static properties of water tetramer in ground state, the optical absorption spectra and ultrafast nonadiabatic dynamical response of water tetramer to short and intense laser pulses with different intensities by a real-space, real-time implementation of time-dependent density functional theory coupled to molecular dynamics (TDDFT-MD) nonadiabatically. The calculated results are in good agreement with available values in literature. Four typical irradiated scenarios of water tetramer in laser field, which are “normal vibration,” “break and reorganization,” “fragmentation and new formation” and “pure fragmentation”, are explored by discussing the ionization, the bond lengths of OH bonds and hydrogen bonds and the kinetic energy of ions. The dynamic simulation shows that the reaction channel of water tetramer can really be controlled by choosing appropriate laser parameters referring to the optical absorption spectra and hydrogen ions play an important role in the reaction channel. Furthermore, it is found that the laser intensity affects the kinetic energy of ejected protons more than that of the remaining fragments and all dynamic processes are somehow directly related to the velocity of departing protons.

  11. Development of novel solvent extraction system by utilizing the metal ions excitation with ultraviolet pulse laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeki, Morihisa; Sasaki, Yuji; Yokoyama, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Novel liquid-liquid extraction technique was developed using ultraviolet pulse laser. The liquid-liquid system was composed of pure water and the 1-octanol solution of EuCl 3 and TODGA (TODGA = N,N,N',N'-tetraoctyl-diglycolamide). The Eu 3+ ion, which was formed to be the Eu 3+ (TODGA) n complex in 1-octanol, was reduced to Eu 2+ by irradiation of fourth harmonic of Nd:YAG laser (266 nm). The Eu 2+ ion was stabilized by addition of 15-Crown-5 (15C5). The observation by in-situ emission spectroscopy showed that the Eu 2+ ion reduced by the 266 nm-laser irradiation resulted in back-extraction of Eu from the 1-octanol solution to the water. The emission spectrum observed in 1-octanol suggested the change from the Eu 3+ (TODGA) n to the Eu 2+ (15C5) m complex after the reduction by the 266 nm laser. Time dependence of the concentration of Eu 2+ (15C5) m was investigated at the aqueous phase, the organic one and their interface. The results suggest that (1) rapid formation of Eu 2+ (15C5) m in 1-octanol after the irradiation of the 266 nm laser, (2) slow diffusion of Eu 2+ (15C5) m in 1-octanol, and (3) existence of time-lag between the formation of Eu 2+ (15C5) m in 1-octanol and its back-extraction to the water. (author)

  12. Multi-Pulse Excitation for Underwater Analysis of Copper-Based Alloys Using a Novel Remote Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirado, Salvador; Fortes, Francisco J; Laserna, J Javier

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the use of multi-pulse excitation has been evaluated as an effective solution to mitigate the preferential ablation of the most volatile elements, namely Sn, Pb, and Zn, observed during laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis of copper-based alloys. The novel remote LIBS prototype used in this experiments featured both single-pulse (SP-LIBS) and multi-pulse excitation (MP-LIBS). The remote instrument is capable of performing chemical analysis of submersed materials up to a depth of 50 m. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis was performed at air pressure settings simulating the conditions during a real subsea analysis. A set of five certified bronze standards with variable concentration of Cu, As, Sn, Pb, and Zn were used. In SP-LIBS, signal emission is strongly sensitive to ambient pressure. In this case, fractionation effect was observed. Multi-pulse excitation circumvents the effect of pressure over the quantitative analysis, thus avoiding the fractionation phenomena observed in single pulse LIBS. The use of copper as internal standard minimizes matrix effects and discrepancies due to variation in ablated mass. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Calculation of a CO sub 2 gasdynamic laser with selective thermal excitation and an unstable resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuz' min, A.I.; Lavrov, A.V.; Chernysheva, N.V. (Leningradskii Gosudarstvennyi Universitet, Leningrad (USSR))

    1989-03-01

    The problem of calculating an unstable telescopic resonator for a CO{sub 2} gasdynamic laser with selective thermal excitation is studied. Parabolized Navier-Stokes equations and equations of field propagation in the resonator are used to describe the GDL in the geometric optic approximation. The efficiency is studied as a function of the magnification factor and of the distance between the mirrors. 19 refs.

  14. Site selective excitation spectroscopy of CsCdBr sub 3 :U sup 3 sup +

    CERN Document Server

    Yin Min

    2002-01-01

    The CsCdBr sub 3 :U sup 3 sup + crystal was grown by the Bridgman technique from the starting materials CsBr, CdBr sub 2 and UBr sub 4. X-ray check showed that the sample crystallized in the CsNiBr sub 3 structure. Under selective excitation at low temperature, the emission spectra and the fluorescence decay curve were measured and discussed

  15. On the biphoton excitation of the fluorescence of the bacteriochlorophyll molecules of purple photosynthetic bacteria by powerful near IR femto-picosecond pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borisov, A. Yu., E-mail: borissov@belozersky.msu.ru [Moscow State University, Belozersky Institute of Physicochemical Biology (Russian Federation)

    2011-11-15

    The authors of a number of experimental works detected nonresonance biphoton excitation of bacteriochlorophyll molecules, which represent the main pigment in the light-absorbing natural 'antenna' complexes of photosynthesizing purple bacteria, by femtosecond IR pulses (1250-1500 nm). They believe that IR quanta excite hypothetic forbidden levels of the pigments of these bacteria in the double frequency range 625-750 nm. We propose and ground an alternative triplet mechanism to describe this phenomenon. According to our hypothesis, the mechanism of biphoton excitation of molecules by IR quanta can manifest itself specifically, through high triplet levels of molecules in the high fields induced by femtosecond-picosecond laser pulses.

  16. Modulation of the electroluminescence emission from ZnO/Si NCs/p-Si light-emitting devices via pulsed excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Vidrier, J.; Gutsch, S.; Blázquez, O.; Hiller, D.; Laube, J.; Kaur, R.; Hernández, S.; Garrido, B.; Zacharias, M.

    2017-05-01

    In this work, the electroluminescence (EL) emission of zinc oxide (ZnO)/Si nanocrystals (NCs)-based light-emitting devices was studied under pulsed electrical excitation. Both Si NCs and deep-level ZnO defects were found to contribute to the observed EL. Symmetric square voltage pulses (50-μs period) were found to notably enhance EL emission by about one order of magnitude. In addition, the control of the pulse parameters (accumulation and inversion times) was found to modify the emission lineshape, long inversion times (i.e., short accumulation times) suppressing ZnO defects contribution. The EL results were discussed in terms of the recombination dynamics taking place within the ZnO/Si NCs heterostructure, suggesting the excitation mechanism of the luminescent centers via a combination of electron impact, bipolar injection, and sequential carrier injection within their respective conduction regimes.

  17. Photoluminescence varied by selective excitation in BiGdWO6:Eu3+ phosphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavani, K.; Graça, M. P. F.; Kumar, J. Suresh; Neves, A. J.

    2017-12-01

    Eu3+ doped bismuth gadolinium tungstate (BGW), a simplest member of Aurivillius family of layered perovskites, was synthesized by solid-state reaction method. Structural characterisation has been performed by X-Ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Band gap of the host matrix has been calculated using reflectance and absorption spectra. Three different mechanisms were found to explain the excitation of Eu3+ ions and are described in detail. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of the BGW phosphor doped with Eu3+ ions consist of major emission lines associated with 5D0 → 7FJ (J = 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4) of Eu3+ ion. Site selective PL excitation and emission indicates that Eu3+ ions doped in BiGdWO6 are sensitive to the excitation wavelength without change in the structure. Change in emission spectra were observed when the excitation wavelength was changed. Judd-Ofelt (J-O) parameters were determined from the indirect method to interpret the interactions between the host and dopant ions along with detailed analysis of lifetime measurements.

  18. Assessment of relevant hepatic steatosis in obese adolescents by rapid fat-selective GRE imaging with spatial-spectral excitation: a quantitative comparison with spectroscopic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Springer, Fabian; Schick, Fritz; Ehehalt, Stefan; Binder, Gerhard; Sommer, Julia; Ballweg, Verena; Machann, Juergen; Claussen, Claus D.

    2011-01-01

    To test the feasibility of fat-selective GRE imaging using a spectral-spatial excitation technique for determination of intrahepatic lipid content (IHL) in obese adolescents. Fat-selective MR imaging (1.5 T) was applied to record a single axial slice through a representative liver region within a single breath-hold. The sequence uses six equidistant slice-selective excitation pulses with binomial amplitude ratios to achieve high selectivity for lipid signals after appropriate shimming. IHL MRI content was quantified using signal intensity of adjacent subcutaneous adipose tissue. As the gold standard for IHL quantification, single-voxel stimulated echo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was applied. IHL MRS was quantified using the water peak as a reference. Forty-five MR examinations could be performed, and IHL MRS content ranged from 0.7% to 19.1%. Results from MRS and fat-selective imaging correlated well with Spearman coefficients between r = 0.78 and r = 0.86. There were no relevant regional differences in IHL within the liver parenchyma (p > 0.6359). Fat-selective imaging was able to reliably identify patients with IHL content above 5% with positive/negative likelihood ratio of 11.8 and 0.05, respectively. Fat-selective MR imaging provides both a reliable and a convenient method of rapidly quantifying IHL content in obese adolescents. (orig.)

  19. Evaluation of non-selective refocusing pulses for 7 T MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jay; Jankiewicz, Marcin; Anderson, Adam W.; Gore, John C.

    2012-01-01

    There is a continuing need for improved RF pulses that achieve proper refocusing in the context of ultra-high field (⩾7 T) human MRI. Simple block or sinc pulses are highly susceptible to RF field inhomogeneities, and adiabatic pulses are generally considered too SAR intensive for practical use at 7 T. The performance of the array of pulses falling between these extremes, however, has not been systematically evaluated. The aim of this work was to compare the performances of 21 non-selective refocusing pulses spanning a range of durations and SAR levels. The evaluation was based upon simulations and both phantom and in vivo human brain experiments conducted at 7 T. Tested refocusing designs included block, composite block, BIR-4, hyperbolic secant, and numerically optimized composite waveforms. These pulses were divided into three SAR classes and two duration categories, and, based on signal gain in a 3-D spin echo sequence, practical recommendations on usage are made within each category. All evaluated pulses were found to produce greater volume-averaged signals relative to a 180° block pulse. Although signal gains often come with the price of increased SAR or duration, some pulses were found to result in significant signal enhancement while also adhering to practical constraints. This work demonstrates the signal gains and losses realizable with single-channel refocusing pulse designs and should assist in the selection of suitable refocusing pulses for practical 3-D spin-echo imaging at 7 T. It further establishes a reference against which future pulses and multi-channel designs can be compared.

  20. Unveiling the excited state energy transfer pathways in peridinin-chlorophyll a-protein by ultrafast multi-pulse transient absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redeckas, Kipras; Voiciuk, Vladislava; Zigmantas, Donatas; Hiller, Roger G; Vengris, Mikas

    2017-04-01

    Time-resolved multi-pulse methods were applied to investigate the excited state dynamics, the interstate couplings, and the excited state energy transfer pathways between the light-harvesting pigments in peridinin-chlorophyll a-protein (PCP). The utilized pump-dump-probe techniques are based on perturbation of the regular PCP energy transfer pathway. The PCP complexes were initially excited with an ultrashort pulse, resonant to the S 0 →S 2 transition of the carotenoid peridinin. A portion of the peridinin-based emissive intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state was then depopulated by applying an ultrashort NIR pulse that perturbed the interaction between S 1 and ICT states and the energy flow from the carotenoids to the chlorophylls. The presented data indicate that the peridinin S 1 and ICT states are spectrally distinct and coexist in an excited state equilibrium in the PCP complex. Moreover, numeric analysis of the experimental data asserts ICT→Chl-a as the main energy transfer pathway in the photoexcited PCP systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Photoionization and trans-to-cis isomerization of β-cyclodextrin-encapsulated azobenzene induced by two-color two-laser-pulse excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Tatsuya; Hara, Michihiro

    2018-03-01

    Azobenzene (1) and the complex resulting from the incorporation of 1 with cyclodextrin (1/CD) are attractive for light-driven applications such as micromachining and chemical biology tools. The highly sensitive photoresponse of 1 is crucial for light-driven applications containing both 1 and 1/CD to reach their full potential. In this study, we investigated the photoionization and trans-to-cis isomerization of 1/CD induced by one- and two-color two-laser pulse excitation. Photoionization of 1/CD, which was induced by stepwise two-photon absorption, was observed using laser pulse excitation at 266 nm. Additionally, simultaneous irradiation with 266 and 532 nm laser pulses increased the trans-to-cis isomerization yield (Υt → c) by 27%. It was concluded that the increase in Υt → c was caused by the occurrence of trans-to-cis isomerization in the higher-energy singlet state (Sn), which was reached by S1 → Sn transition induced by laser pulse excitation at 532 nm. The results of this study are potentially applicable in light-driven applications such as micromachining and chemical biology tools.

  2. Frequency-Selective Fat Suppression Radiofrequency Pulse Train to Remove Olefinic Fats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Takayuki

    2013-01-01

    CHESS pulse can suppress the signal originating from aliphatic fat protons but cannot suppress the signal from olefinic fat protons, which is near the resonance frequency of water protons. Adipose tissue contains various fat species; aliphatic fat comprises about 90 % and olefinic fat about 10 % of adipose tissue. Thus, CHESS pulse cannot be used to suppress the signal from adipose tissue completely. The purpose of this study was to find a method to suppress the signal from adipose tissue completely. The Fatsat train pulse, created with an arbitrary flip angle and insensitive to B1 inhomogeneity, was used. Because B1 inhomogeneity is larger on higher field magnetic resonance imaging, the fat suppression radiofrequency pulse needs to be B1-insensitive. To investigate a percentage of olefinic fat in adipose tissues, the excitation frequency of the Fatsat train pulse was varied from -240 to +400 Hz and the images and fat-suppressed images were obtained. The presence of olefinic fat comprising about 10 % of abdominal adipose tissue was identified. The result agreed with some previous papers. Complete fat suppression could be achieved by partial (10 %) inversion of longitudinal aliphatic fat magnetization and by canceling out the two fat magnetizations. The flip angle was identified to about 95°. In conclusion, the cause that the signal from adipose tissues cannot be suppressed completely has been found. Improved images that signals from adipose tissues were suppressed completely have been demonstrated. This technique can also be applied to several pulse sequences.

  3. Predicting the effect of relaxation during frequency-selective adiabatic pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, Annalise R.; McKee, Cailyn E.; Woelk, Klaus

    2017-11-01

    Adiabatic half and full passages are invaluable for achieving uniform, B1-insensitive excitation or inversion of macroscopic magnetization across a well-defined range of NMR frequencies. To accomplish narrow frequency ranges with adiabatic pulses (computer-calculated data with experimental results demonstrates that, in non-viscous, small-molecule fluids, it is possible to model magnetization and relaxation by considering standard T1 and T2 relaxation in the traditional rotating frame. The proposed model is aimed at performance optimizations of applications in which these pulses are employed. It differs from previous reports which focused on short high-power adiabatic pulses and relaxation that is governed by dipole-dipole interactions, cross polarization, or chemical exchange.

  4. Small Field-of-view single-shot EPI-DWI of the prostate: Evaluation of spatially-tailored two-dimensional radiofrequency excitation pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attenberger, Ulrike I; Rathmann, Nils; Sertdemir, Metin; Riffel, Philipp; Weidner, Anja; Kannengiesser, Stefan; Morelli, John N; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Hausmann, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Spatially-tailored (RF) excitation pulses in echo-planar imaging (EPI), combined with a decreased FOV in the phase-encoding direction, enable a reduction of k-space acquisition lines, which shortens the echo train length (ETL) and reduces susceptibility artifacts. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the image quality of a zoomed EPI (z-EPI) sequence in diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of the prostate in comparison to a conventional single-shot EPI using single-channel (c-EPI1) and multi-channel (c-EPI2) RF excitation, with and without use of an endorectal coil. 33 consecutive patients (mean age: 61 +/- 9 years; mean PSA: 8.67±6.23 ng/ml) with examinations between 10/2012 and 02/2014 were analyzed in this retrospective study. In 26 of 33 patients the initial multiparametric (mp)-MRI was performed on a whole-body 3T scanner (Magnetom Trio, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) using an endorectal coil (c (conventional)-EPI1). Zoomed-EPI (Z-EPI) examinations of these patients and a complete mp-MRI protocol including c-EPI2 of 7 additional patients were carried out on another 3T wb MR scanner with two-channel dynamic parallel transmit capability (Magnetom Skyra with TimTX TrueShape, Siemens). For z-EPI, the one-dimensional spatially selective RF excitation pulse was replaced by a two-dimensional RF pulse. Degree of image blur and susceptibility artifacts (0=not present to 3= non-diagnostic), maximum image distortion (mm), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values, as well as overall scan preference were evaluated. SNR maps were generated to compare c-EPI2 and z-EPI. Overall image quality of z-EPI was preferred by both readers in all examinations with a single exception. Susceptibility artifacts were rated significantly lower on z-EPI compared to both other methods (z-EPI vs c-EPI1: p<0.01; z-EPI vs c-EPI2: p<0.01) as well as image blur (z-EPI vs c-EPI1: p<0.01; z-EPI vs c-EPI2: p<0.01). Image distortion was not statistically significantly reduced with z-EPI (z-EPI vs c

  5. Hadamard-encoding combined with two-dimensional-selective radiofrequency excitations for flexible and efficient acquisitions of multiple voxels in MR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Martin G; Finsterbusch, Jürgen

    2012-04-01

    To improve the efficiency and flexibility of acquisitions of multiple voxels in MR spectroscopy by combining two-dimensional-selective radiofrequency (2DRF) excitations and Hadamard encoding. With 2DRF excitations (PROPELLER trajectory, 16 half-Fourier segments, each with five lines) two voxels are defined. By combining the individual 2DRF pulses with Hadamard-like encoded phases, the voxels are acquired simultaneously but the individual contributions can be isolated from the obtained spectra. This is demonstrated on a 3 Tesla whole-body MR system in phantoms and in the human brain in vivo. Compared with sequential single-voxel acquisitions the signal efficiency increases with the number of voxels covered. Furthermore, in comparison to conventional single-voxel MRS based on cross-sectional RF excitations, 2DRF excitations offer a higher flexibility because they allow for arbitrary voxel sizes, orientations, in-plane positions, and shapes. The presented approach improves the flexibility and efficiency of acquisitions of multiple voxels, i.e., can shorten acquisition times accordingly, and can help to reduce partial volume effects. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Analytical applications of selectively excited lanthanide ion luminescence in various inorganic powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, L.C.

    1981-01-01

    Applications of the analytical technique called Selectively Excited Probe Ion Luminescence (SEPIL) have been investigated for a variety of inorganic powders. The probe ions used are lanthanide ions, which are incorporated at low concentrations into an inert inorganic powder. Lanthanide ions at defect sites with different ligand field symmetries have different crystal field splittings of the energy levels, resulting in optical excitation and emission transitions at different energies. One defect site can be selectively excited in the presence of others by using a tunable dye laser. This technique has great potential for the ultra-trace level analysis of inorganic impurity ions, because of the inherent high sensitivity and selectivity. The results have been more complex than anticipated, reflecting the complexity of the solid-state defect chemistry. Due to problems encountered in learning how to control lattice defects and low efficiency of trace ion incorporation, these techniques are now useful for trace ion analysis only in a few specialized cases. The potential of the technique may be excellent for the characterization of important defect-related materials problems. The defect properties of CaO, ThO 2 , scheelites (CaWO 4 ), sulfates (CdSO 4 ), silicates (CaSiO 3 ), and ZrO 2 have been investigated. Changes in the defects are sometimes related to composition, phase, or structural changes, and are sometimes unrelated to macroscopic lattice changes. Assignments for the composition of particular defect sites have been made in CaO and ThO 2 . Interesting energy transfer behavior of Pr in CaO has been studied. No other analytical technique can provide these kinds of information about powder defects at low concentrations

  7. Influence of temperature on the selectivity of dissociation of CF3I molecules by multiphoton vibrational and subsequent electronic excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryavtsev, Y.A.

    1980-01-01

    A report is given of theoretical and experimental studies of the influence of temperature on the selectivity of separating carbon isotopes by multiphoton vibrational and subsequent electronic excitation of CF 3 I molecules. Carbon dioxide laser radiation was used for vibrational excitation and XeC1 and XeF excimer lasers were used for dissociation. A selectivity of 108 was achieved at 223 0 K

  8. Rejecting escape events in large volume Ge detectors by a pulse shape selection procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Zoppo, A. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratorio Nazionale del Sud, Catania (Italy)); Agodi, C. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratorio Nazionale del Sud, Catania (Italy)); Alba, R. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratorio Nazionale del Sud, Catania (Italy)); Bellia, G. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratorio Nazionale del Sud, Catania (Italy) Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Catania (Italy)); Coniglione, R. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratorio Nazionale del Sud, Catania (Italy)); Loukachine, K. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratorio Nazionale del Sud, Catania (Italy)); Maiolino, C. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratorio Nazionale del Sud, Catania (Italy)); Migneco, E. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratorio Nazionale del Sud, Catania (Italy) Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Catania (Italy)); Piattelli, P. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Labora

    1993-10-01

    The dependence of the response to [gamma]-rays of a large volume Ge detector on the interval width of a selected initial rise pulse slope is investigated. The number of escape events associated with a small pulse slope is found to be greater than the corresponding number of full energy events. An escape event rejection procedure based on the observed correlation between energy deposition and pulse shape is discussed. Such a procedure seems particularly suited for the design of highly granular large volume Ge detector arrays. (orig.)

  9. Rejecting escape events in large volume Ge detectors by a pulse shape selection procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Zoppo, A.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Bellia, G.; Coniglione, R.; Loukachine, K.; Maiolino, C.; Migneco, E.; Piattelli, P.; Santonocito, D.; Sapienza, P.

    1993-01-01

    The dependence of the response to γ-rays of a large volume Ge detector on the interval width of a selected initial rise pulse slope is investigated. The number of escape events associated with a small pulse slope is found to be greater than the corresponding number of full energy events. An escape event rejection procedure based on the observed correlation between energy deposition and pulse shape is discussed. Such a procedure seems particularly suited for the design of highly granular large volume Ge detector arrays. (orig.)

  10. Measurements and kinetic modeling of atomic species in fuel-oxidizer mixtures excited by a repetitive nanosecond pulse discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, C.; Eckert, Z.; Yin, Z.; Frederickson, K.; Adamovich, I. V.

    2018-01-01

    This work presents the results of number density measurements of metastable Ar atoms and ground state H atoms in diluted mixtures of H2 and O2 with Ar, as well as ground state O atoms in diluted H2–O2–Ar, CH4–O2–Ar, C3H8–O2–Ar, and C2H4–O2–Ar mixtures excited by a repetitive nanosecond pulse discharge. The measurements have been made in a nanosecond pulse, double dielectric barrier discharge plasma sustained in a flow reactor between two plane electrodes encapsulated within dielectric material, at an initial temperature of 500 K and pressures ranging from 300 Torr to 700 Torr. Metastable Ar atom number density distribution in the afterglow is measured by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy, and used to characterize plasma uniformity. Temperature rise in the reacting flow is measured by Rayleigh scattering. H atom and O atom number densities are measured by two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence. The results are compared with kinetic model predictions, showing good agreement, with the exception of extremely lean mixtures. O atoms and H atoms in the plasma are produced mainly during quenching of electronically excited Ar atoms generated by electron impact. In H2–Ar and O2–Ar mixtures, the atoms decay by three-body recombination. In H2–O2–Ar, CH4–O2–Ar, and C3H8–O2–Ar mixtures, O atoms decay in a reaction with OH, generated during H atom reaction with HO2, with the latter produced by three-body H atom recombination with O2. The net process of O atom decay is O  +  H  →  OH, such that the decay rate is controlled by the amount of H atoms produced in the discharge. In extra lean mixtures of propane and ethylene with O2–Ar the model underpredicts the O atom decay rate. At these conditions, when fuel is completely oxidized by the end of the discharge burst, the net process of O atom decay, O  +  O  →  O2, becomes nearly independent of H atom number density. Lack of agreement with the

  11. Dependence of the Intensity of Components of the Multiplet in Sensitized Phosphorescence of Acenaphthene in N-Hexane on the Exciting Pulse Duration at 77 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanova, N. V.; Deryabin, M. I.; Valyukhov, D. P.

    2017-10-01

    The special features of the multiplet structure in spectra of sensitized acenaphthene phosphorescence caused by triplet-triplet energy transfer from 2,7-dibromodiphenylen sulfide (the energy donor) molecules in n-hexane matrices are investigated at 77 K. It is demonstrated that the distribution of intensities between components of the multiplet in quasi-line spectrum of sensitized acenaphthene phosphorescence depends on the freezing rate of the solution and the exciting pulse duration. The possible reasons for these dependences are discussed.

  12. Natural selection by pulsed predation: survival of the thickest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijleveld, Aller I; Twietmeyer, Sönke; Piechocki, Julia; van Gils, Jan A; Piersma, Theunis

    2015-07-01

    Selective predation can lead to natural selection in prey populations and may alleviate competition among surviving individuals. The processes of selection and competition can have substantial effects on prey population dynamics, but are rarely studied simultaneously. Moreover, field studies of predator-induced short-term selection pressures on prey populations are scarce. Here we report measurements of density dependence in body composition in a bivalve prey (edible cockle, Cerastoderma edule) during bouts of intense predation by an avian predator (Red Knot, Calidris canutus). We measured densities, patchiness, morphology, and body composition (shell and flesh mass) of cockles in a quasi-experimental setting, i.e., before and after predation in three similar plots of 1 ha each, two of which experienced predation, and one of which remained unvisited in the course of the short study period and served as a reference. An individual's shell and flesh mass declined with cockle density (negative density dependence). Before predation, cockles were patchily distributed. After predation, during which densities were reduced by 78% (from 232 to 50 cockles/m2), the patchiness was substantially reduced, i.e., the spatial distribution was homogenized. Red Knots selected juvenile cockles with an average length of 6.9 ± 1.0 mm (mean ± SD). Cockles surviving predation had heavier shells than before predation (an increase of 21.5 percentage points), but similar flesh masses. By contrast, in the reference plot shell mass did not differ statistically between initial and final sampling occasions, while flesh mass was larger (an increase of 13.2 percentage points). In this field study, we show that Red Knots imposed a strong selection pressure on cockles to grow fast with thick shells and little flesh mass, with selection gradients among the highest reported in the literature.

  13. Vibrational energy transfer in selectively excited diatomic molecules. [Relaxation rates, self-relaxation, upper limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasch, C.J.

    1978-09-01

    Single rovibrational states of HCl(v=2), HBr(v=2), DCl(v=2), and CO(v=2) were excited with a pulsed optical parametric oscillator (OPO). Total vibrational relaxation rates near - resonance quenchers were measured at 295/sup 0/K using time resolved infrared fluorescence. These rates are attributed primarily to V - V energy transfer, and they generally conform to a simple energy gap law. A small deviation was found for the CO(v) + DCl(v') relaxation rates. Upper limits for the self relaxation by V - R,T of HCl(v=2) and HBr(v=2) and for the two quantum exchange between HCl and HBr were determined. The HF dimer was detected at 295/sup 0/K and 30 torr HF pressure with an optoacoustic spectrometer using the OPO. Pulsed and chopped, resonant and non-resonant spectrophones are analyzed in detail. From experiments and first order perturbation theory, these V - V exchange rates appear to behave as a first order perturbation in the vibrational coordinates. The rotational dynamics are known to be complicated however, and the coupled rotational - vibrational dynamics were investigated theoreticaly in infinite order by the Dillon and Stephenson and the first Magnus approximations. Large ..delta..J transitions appear to be important, but these calculations differ by orders of magnitude on specific rovibrational transition rates. Integration of the time dependent semiclassical equations by a modified Gordon method and a rotationally distorted wave approximation are discussed as methods which would treat the rotational motion more accurately. 225 references.

  14. Wave-packet dynamics in alkaline dimers. Investigation and control through coherent excitation with fs-pulses; Wellenpaketdynamik in Alkali-Dimeren. Untersuchung und Steuerung durch kohaerente Anregung mit fs-Pulsen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauer, F.N.B.

    2007-07-01

    During my PhD thesis I investigated alkaline dimers with coherent control in a molecular beam as well as with pump-probe spectroscopy in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). The aim of the coherent control experiments were the isotope selective ionization with phase- and amplitude-shaped fs-pulses. Chapter 4 described the gained results of isotope selective ionization of NaK and KRb in a molecular beam by using different pulse formers. For the NaK dimer was the reached optimization factor R{sub Ph} and {sub Ampl}{sup 770}=R{sub max}/R{sub min}=25 between maximization and minimization of the isotopomer ratio ({sup 23}Na{sup 39}K){sup +}/({sup 23}Na{sup 41}K){sup +} with phase and amplitude modulation of the fs-pulse with a central wavelength of {lambda}=770 nm. From the electronic ground-state X(1){sup 1}{sigma}{sup +};{nu}''=0 transfers a one-photon-excitation population in the first excited A(2) {sup 1}{sigma}{sup +} state. The coherent control experiment on KRb was used to maximize and minimize the isotopomer ratio ({sup 124}KRb){sup +}/({sup 126}KRb){sup +}. It was the first coherent control experiment with a spectral resolution of 1.84 cm{sup -1}/Pixel. For the phase and amplitude optimization was the received optimization factor between minimization and maximization of the isotopomer ratio R{sub Ph} and {sub Ampl}=R{sub max}/R{sub min}=7 at a central wavelength of 840 nm. The results showed a stepwise excitation process from the electronic ground-state in the first excited (2){sup 1}{sigma}{sup +} state with a further excitation, that is possible over three resonant energy potential curves into the ionic ground-state. In the second part of my thesis I realized pump-probe spectroscopy of Rb{sub 2} dimers in a dark SPOT. (orig.)

  15. Calculation of isotope selective excitation of uranium isotopes using spectral simulation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Hassanieh, O.

    2009-06-01

    Isotope ratio enhancement factor and isotope selectivity of 235 U in five excitation schemes (I: 0→10069 cm - 1 →IP, II: 0 →10081 cm - 1 →IP, III: 0 →25349 cm - 1→ IP, IV: 0→28650 cm - 1 →IP, V: 0→16900 cm - 1 →34659 cm - 1 →IP), were computed by a spectral simulation approach. The effect of laser bandwidth and Doppler width on the isotope ratio enhancement factor and isotope selectivity of 235 U has been studied. The photoionization scheme V gives the highest isotope ratio enhancement factor. The main factors which effect the separation possibility are the isotope shift and the relative intensity of the transitions between hyperfine levels. The isotope ratio enhancement factor decreases exponentially by increasing the Doppler width and the laser bandwidth, where the effect of Doppler width is much greater than the effect of the laser bandwidth. (author)

  16. Fabrication of selective solar absorbers using pulsed laser deposition

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Yalisi, B

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available infrared region. Minimising thermal emittance implies that the device retains all the solar energy that it absorbs from the sun without releasing it in the form of heat, until it has been collected and delivered to where it is to be utilised. Selective...

  17. Selective arterial spin labeling (SASL): perfusion territory mapping of selected feeding arteries tagged using two-dimensional radiofrequency pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Nigel P; Jezzard, Peter

    2003-06-01

    To date, most perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods using arterial spin labeling (ASL) have employed slab-selective inversion pulses or continuous labeling within a plane in order to obtain maps derived from all major blood vessels entering the brain. However, there is great potential for gaining additional information on the territories perfused by the major vessels if individual feeding arteries could be tagged. This study demonstrates noninvasive arterial perfusion territory maps obtained using two-dimensional (2D) selective inversion pulses. This method is designated "selective ASL" (SASL). The SASL method was used to tag the major arteries below the circle of Willis. A combination of 2D selective tagging and multislice readout allows perfusion territories to be clearly visualized, with likely applications to cerebrovascular disease and stroke. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Selective laser melting of hypereutectic Al-Si40-powder using ultra-short laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullsperger, T.; Matthäus, G.; Kaden, L.; Engelhardt, H.; Rettenmayr, M.; Risse, S.; Tünnermann, A.; Nolte, S.

    2017-12-01

    We investigate the use of ultra-short laser pulses for the selective melting of Al-Si40-powder to fabricate complex light-weight structures with wall sizes below 100 μ {m} combined with higher tensile strength and lower thermal expansion coefficient in comparison to standard Al-Si alloys. During the cooling process using conventional techniques, large primary silicon particles are formed which impairs the mechanical and thermal properties. We demonstrate that these limitations can be overcome using ultra-short laser pulses enabling the rapid heating and cooling in a non-thermal equilibrium process. We analyze the morphology characteristics and micro-structures of single tracks and thin-walled structures depending on pulse energy, repetition rate and scanning velocity utilizing pulses with a duration of 500 {fs} at a wavelength of 1030 {nm}. The possibility to specifically change and optimize the microstructure is shown.

  19. Temporally Diverse Excitation Generates Direction-Selective Responses in ON- and OFF-Type Retinal Starburst Amacrine Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W. Fransen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of sensory receptive fields increases from one synaptic stage to the next. In many cases, increased complexity is achieved through spatiotemporal interactions between convergent excitatory and inhibitory inputs. Here, we present evidence that direction selectivity (DS, a complex emergent receptive field property of retinal starburst amacrine cells (SACs, is generated by spatiotemporal interactions between functionally diverse excitatory inputs. Electrophysiological whole-cell recordings from ON and OFF SACs show distinct temporal differences in excitation following proximal compared with distal stimulation of their receptive fields. Distal excitation is both faster and more transient, ruling out passive filtering by the dendrites and indicating a task-specific specialization. Model simulations demonstrate that this specific organization of excitation generates robust DS responses in SACs, consistent with elementary motion detector models. These results indicate that selective integration of spatiotemporally patterned excitation is a computational mechanism for motion detection in the mammalian retina.

  20. Phase-Modulated Nonresonant Laser Pulses Can Selectively Convert Enantiomers in a Racemic Mixture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, Esben Folger; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2017-01-01

    -modulated, nonresonant, linearly polarized Gaussian laser pulses that can selectively deracemize a racemic mixture of 3D-oriented, 3,5-difluoro-3',5'-dibromobiphenyl (F2H3C6-C6H3Br2) molecules, the laser-induced dynamics of which are well studied experimentally. These results strongly suggest that designing a closed...

  1. FPGA-based photon-counting phase-modulation fluorometer and a brief comparison with that operated in a pulsed-excitation mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Tetsuo; Taga, Takanori; Mizuno, Takahiko

    2018-02-01

    We have constructed a high-efficiency, photon-counting phase-modulation fluorometer (PC-PMF) using a field-programmable gate array, which is a modified version of the photon-counting fluorometer (PCF) that works in a pulsed-excitation mode (Iwata and Mizuno in Meas Sci Technol 28:075501, 2017). The common working principle for both is the simultaneous detection of the photoelectron pulse train, which covers 64 ns with a 1.0-ns resolution time (1.0 ns/channel). The signal-gathering efficiency was improved more than 100 times over that of conventional time-correlated single-photon-counting at the expense of resolution time depending on the number of channels. The system dead time for building a histogram was eliminated, markedly shortening the measurement time for fluorescent samples with moderately high quantum yields. We describe the PC-PMF and make a brief comparison with the pulsed-excitation PCF in precision, demonstrating the potential advantage of PC-PMF.

  2. Numerical investigation of a scalable setup for efficient terahertz generation using a segmented tilted-pulse-front excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pálfalvi, László; Tóth, György; Tokodi, Levente; Márton, Zsuzsanna; Fülöp, József András; Almási, Gábor; Hebling, János

    2017-11-27

    A hybrid-type terahertz pulse source is proposed for high energy terahertz pulse generation. It is the combination of the conventional tilted-pulse-front setup and a transmission stair-step echelon-faced nonlinear crystal with a period falling in the hundred-micrometer range. The most important advantage of the setup is the possibility of using plane parallel nonlinear optical crystal for producing good-quality, symmetric terahertz beam. Another advantage of the proposed setup is the significant reduction of imaging errors, which is important in the case of wide pump beams that are used in high energy experiments. A one dimensional model was developed for determining the terahertz generation efficiency, and it was used for quantitative comparison between the proposed new hybrid setup and previously introduced terahertz sources. With lithium niobate nonlinear material, calculations predict an approximately ten-fold increase in the efficiency of the presently described hybrid terahertz pulse source with respect to that of the earlier proposed setup, which utilizes a reflective stair-step echelon and a prism shaped nonlinear optical crystal. By using pump pulses of 50 mJ pulse energy, 500 fs pulse length and 8 mm beam spot radius, approximately 1% conversion efficiency and 0.5 mJ terahertz pulse energy can be reached with the newly proposed setup.

  3. Direct observation of interaction between plasma ions and grid-excited pulses in a Q-machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S.A.; Jensen, Vagn Orla; Michelsen, Poul

    1970-01-01

    The change in velocity-distribution function caused by interaction between ions and density pulses in a Q-machine is observed experimentally.......The change in velocity-distribution function caused by interaction between ions and density pulses in a Q-machine is observed experimentally....

  4. An uniform DBD plasma excited by bipolar nanosecond pulse using wire-cylinder electrode configuration in atmospheric air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Peng-Chao; Wang, Wen-Chun; Zhang, Shuai; Jia, Li; Yang, De-Zheng; Tang, Kai; Liu, Zhi-Jie

    2014-03-25

    In this study, a bipolar nanosecond pulsed power supply with 15 ns rising time is employed to generate an uniform dielectric barrier discharge using the wire-cylinder electrode configuration in atmospheric air. The images, waveforms of pulse voltage and discharge current, and the optical emission spectra of the discharges are recorded. The rotational and vibrational temperatures of plasma are determined by comparing the simulated spectra with the experimental spectra. The effects of pulse peak voltage, pulse repetition rate and quartz tube diameter on the emission intensities of N2 (C(3)Πu→B(3)Πg, 0-0) and N2(+)B(2)Σu(+)→X(2)Σg(+),0-0 and the rotational and vibrational temperatures have been investigated. It is found that the uniform plasma with low gas temperature can be obtained, and the emission intensities of N2 (C(3)Πu→B(3)Πg, 0-0) and N2(+)B(2)Σu(+)→X(2)Σg(+),0-0 rise with increasing the pulse peak voltage and pulse repetition rate, while decrease as the increase of quartz tube diameter. In addition, under the condition of 28 kV pulse peak voltage, 150 Hz pulse repetition rate and 7 mm quartz tube diameter, the plasma gas temperature is determined to be 330 K. The results also indicate that the plasma gas temperature keep almost constant when increasing the pulse peak voltage and pulse repetition rate but increase with the increase of the quartz tube diameter. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Nonresonant Multiple-Pulse Control of Molecular Motions in Liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikiforov V.G.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose the implementation of the multiple-pulse excitation for manipulation of the molecular contributions to the optically-heterodyne-detected optical-Kerr-effect. The key parameters controlling the specificity of the multiple-pulse excitation scenarios are the pulses durations, the delays between pulses, the relation between the pump pulses amplitudes and the pulses polarizations. We model the high-order optical responses and consider some principles of the scenarios construction. We show that it is possible to adjust the excitation scenario in such a way that the some responses can be removed from detected signal along with the enhancement of the interested response amplitude. The theoretical analysis and first experimental data reveal that the multiple-pulse excitation technique can be useful for the selective spectroscopy of the molecular vibrations and rotations in liquid.

  6. Selective inactivation of human immunodeficiency virus with subpicosecond near-infrared laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsen, K T; Tsen, S-W D; Hung, C-F; Wu, T-C; Kiang, Juliann G

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate for the first time that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can be inactivated by irradiation with subpicosecond near-infrared laser pulses at a moderate laser power density. By comparing the threshold laser power density for the inactivation of HIV with those of human red blood cells and mouse dendritic cells, we conclude that it is plausible to use the ultrashort pulsed laser to selectively inactivate blood-borne pathogens such as HIV while leaving sensitive materials like human red blood cells unharmed. This finding has important implications in the development of a new laser technology for disinfection of viral pathogens in blood products and in the clinic. (fast track communication)

  7. Quadri-Pulse Theta Burst Stimulation using Ultra-High Frequency Bursts - A New Protocol to Induce Changes in Cortico-Spinal Excitability in Human Motor Cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Nikolai H; Gleich, Bernhard; Gattinger, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Patterned transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) such as theta burst stimulation (TBS) or quadri-pulse stimulation (QPS) can induce changes in cortico-spinal excitability, commonly referred to as long-term potentiation (LTP)-like and long-term depression (LTD)-like effects in human motor cortex ...... in cortico-spinal excitability. Induced current direction in the brain appears to be relevant when qTBS targets I-wave periodicity, corroborating that high-fidelity spike timing mechanisms are critical for inducing bi-directional plasticity in human M1....... was set to 666 Hz to mimic the rhythmicity of the descending cortico-spinal volleys that are elicited by TMS (i.e., I-wave periodicity). In a second experiment, burst frequency was set to 200 Hz to maximize postsynaptic Ca2+ influx using a temporal pattern unrelated to I-wave periodicity. The second phase...

  8. Fruit-Enhanced Resistance to Microbial Infection Induced by Selective Laser Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia G. Gonzálvez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Table grapes were irradiated with laser pulses at two different wavelengths: one selected at 302.1 nm, that is, resonant with the transresveratrol biphoton absorption band, and another selected at 300 nm, that is a nonresonant wavelength where trans-resveratrol two-photon absorption is negligible. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopic analyses of the irradiated grapes' skin showed an enhancement of polyphenols' content when the resonant wavelength was employed. Furthermore, microbiological analysis performed with nontreated (control, nonresonant, and resonantly irradiated grapes demonstrated how the last samples developed a significantly lower number of colony forming units. Since the only difference between the two (resonant and nonresonant irradiation conditions was just a couple of nanometres in the employed UV-B laser wavelengths, the germicidal effect should be considered very similar. As a result, the observed difference in the table grape resistance to microbial infection was attributed to a wavelength-dependent-induced photochemistry. Finally, the potentiality of this method to enhance the postharvest health status of table grapes is remarked.

  9. A qualitative and quantitative investigation of the uncracked and cracked condition of concrete beams using impulse excitation, acoustic emission, and ultrasonic pulse velocity techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliopoulos, S.; Iliopoulos, A.; Pyl, L.; Sol, H.; Aggelis, D. G.

    2014-04-01

    The Impulse Excitation Technique (IET) is a useful tool for characterizing the structural condition of concrete. Processing the obtained dynamic parameters (damping ratio, response frequency) as a function of response amplitude, clear and systematic differences appear between intact and cracked specimens, while factors like age and sustained load are also influential. Simultaneously, Acoustic Emission (AE) and Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity (UPV) techniques are used during the three point bending test of the beams in order to supply additional information on the level of damage accumulation which resulted in the specific dynamic behavior revealed by the IET test.

  10. Transient increase of the energy gap of superconducting NbN thin films excited by resonant narrow-band terahertz pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, M; Rousseau, I; Klammer, M; Leiderer, P; Mittendorff, M; Winnerl, S; Helm, M; Gol'tsman, G N; Demsar, J

    2013-06-28

    Observations of radiation-enhanced superconductivity have thus far been limited to a few type-I superconductors (Al, Sn) excited at frequencies between the inelastic scattering rate and the superconducting gap frequency 2Δ/h. Utilizing intense, narrow-band, picosecond, terahertz pulses, tuned to just below and above 2Δ/h of a BCS superconductor NbN, we demonstrate that the superconducting gap can be transiently increased also in a type-II dirty-limit superconductor. The effect is particularly pronounced at higher temperatures and is attributed to radiation induced nonthermal electron distribution persisting on a 100 ps time scale.

  11. LASER EMISSIONS FROM CO2 VIBRATIONAL TRANSITIONS IN A LOW TEMPERATURE SUPERSONIC FLOW EXCITED BY A PULSED ELECTRON BEAM STABILIZED DISCHARGE

    OpenAIRE

    Fontaine, B.; Forestier, B.; Gross, P.; Koudriavtsev, E.

    1980-01-01

    High power long pulse infrared laser emission has been achieved on CO2 molecule with the high density and very low temperature supersonic flow-electron beam-stabilized discharge excitation device developped at I.M.F.M. ([MATH] [MATH] 2 amagats, T [MATH] 70 - 150 K). Laser emission at [MATH] = 10.6 µ has been achieved for a resonant cavity set at the discharge location and also 3 cm downstream of the discharge location. With Ar/CO2, Ar/CO2/H2, He/CO2, and He/CO2/N2 mixtures, lasing energy and ...

  12. Improvement of chemical shift selective saturation (CHESS) pulse for MR angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimori, Yoshiyuki; Sashie, Hiroyuki; Hiraga, Akira; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi

    2000-01-01

    We improved the fat suppression technique based on chemical shift selective saturation (CHESS). To do this, we shortened the duration of the CHESS pulse to achieve a short repetition time (TR) for MR angiography (MRA). A short-duration CHESS pulse causes broad frequency band saturation, creating extensive offset from the resonance frequency of water. In our phantom experiment, the best parameters of the short-duration CHESS pulse were 3.84 ms in duration, -650 Hz in offset frequency from water resonance, and had a 130-degree flip angle. With this technique, MRA will be able to be carried out without a significant increase in TR. Thus, better vessel contrast will be maintained in time-of-flight (TOF) MRA or contrast-enhanced MRA when using the maximum intensity projection (MIP) method. (author)

  13. Optimization schemes for selective molecular cleavage with tailored ultrashort laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieger, Kevin; Castro, Alberto; Gross, E.K.U.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Isosurface plot of the electronic density, and positions of the nuclei, during the irradiation of a formaldiminium ion with an optimized laser pulse, leading to the selective cleavage of a proton. Display Omitted Highlights: ► We use QOCT in combination with mixed quantum-classical molecular models. ► TDDFT models the electrons coupled to the nuclei through Ehrenfest equations. ► Both gradient-free and gradient-based algorithms are explored for the optimization. ► We explore different options for the definition of the target functional. - Abstract: We present some approaches to the computation of ultra-fast laser pulses capable of selectively breaking molecular bonds. The calculations are based on a mixed quantum-classical description: The electrons are treated quantum mechanically (making use of time-dependent density-functional theory), whereas the nuclei are treated classically. The temporal shape of the pulses is tailored to maximize a control target functional which is designed to produce the desired molecular cleavage. The precise definition of this functional is a crucial ingredient: we explore expressions based on the forces, on the momenta and on the velocities of the nuclei. The algorithm used to find the optimum pulse is also relevant; we test both direct gradient-free algorithms, as well as schemes based on formal optimal control theory. The tests are performed both on one dimensional models of atomic chains, and on first-principles descriptions of molecules.

  14. Systems and methods for selective detection and imaging in coherent Raman microscopy by spectral excitation shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Freudiger, Christian; Min, Wei

    2016-03-15

    A microscopy imaging system is disclosed that includes a light source system, a spectral shaper, a modulator system, an optics system, an optical detector and a processor. The light source system is for providing a first train of pulses and a second train of pulses. The spectral shaper is for spectrally modifying an optical property of at least some frequency components of the broadband range of frequency components such that the broadband range of frequency components is shaped producing a shaped first train of pulses to specifically probe a spectral feature of interest from a sample, and to reduce information from features that are not of interest from the sample. The modulator system is for modulating a property of at least one of the shaped first train of pulses and the second train of pulses at a modulation frequency. The optical detector is for detecting an integrated intensity of substantially all optical frequency components of a train of pulses of interest transmitted or reflected through the common focal volume. The processor is for detecting a modulation at the modulation frequency of the integrated intensity of substantially all of the optical frequency components of the train of pulses of interest due to the non-linear interaction of the shaped first train of pulses with the second train of pulses as modulated in the common focal volume, and for providing an output signal for a pixel of an image for the microscopy imaging system.

  15. Site selective excitation of Eu 3+ ions in the lanthanum squarate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piriou, B.; Petit, J.F.; Trombe, J.C.; Gleizes, A.

    1989-01-01

    Microcrystalline powder of La 2 (H 2 0) 11 (C 4 0 4 ) 3 . 2H 2 0 doped with 2.5 % Eu 3+ was studied at 77K. The site selective excitation in the 5 D 2 sub-levels and the time resolved spectroscopy were needed to distinguish very similar sites, in the structure with very closely spaced (2 cm -1 ) 5 D 0 levels. Two sites without symmetry were characterized in agreement with the structure. The presence of a minority third one is supposed to be due to the large concentration of the doping europium. The energy of all the Stark components of 7 F 1 7 F 2 5 D 0 and 5 D 2 are given. The sets of the energy levels of each site are very similar. This corresponds to the accidental identity of the coordination polyedron of inequivalent sites and shows the weak contribution to the crystalline field due to the second and farther neighbours. The spectra are correlated to the sites on the criterion of the 5 D 0 life time, 142 and 130 μs for the sites having respectively five and six water molecules [fr

  16. Momentum distributions of selected rare-gas atoms probed by intense femtosecond laser pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu-Samha, Mahmoud; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2011-01-01

    We provide a direct comparison between numerical and experimental (Rudenko et al 2004 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 37 L407) photoelectron momentum distributions in strong-field ionization of selected rare-gas atoms (He, Ne and Ar), probed by femtosecond linearly polarized laser pulses. The cal......We provide a direct comparison between numerical and experimental (Rudenko et al 2004 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 37 L407) photoelectron momentum distributions in strong-field ionization of selected rare-gas atoms (He, Ne and Ar), probed by femtosecond linearly polarized laser pulses....... The calculations are performed by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation within the single-active-electron approximation, and focal-volume effects are taken into account by appropriately averaging the results. The resulting momentum distributions are in quantitative agreement with the experimental...

  17. Selection of mixed conducting oxides for oxidative dehydrogenation of propane with pulse experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crapanzano, S.D.; Babych, Igor V.; Lefferts, Leonardus

    2010-01-01

    In this study, propane pulse experiments at 550 °C are used as a method to select suitable oxides for further operation of catalytic dense membrane reactor (CDMR) for oxidative dehydrogenation of propane. Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3−δ (BSCF), La2NiO4+δ (LN) and PrBaCo2O5+δ (PBC) powders were used as

  18. Accelerated Time-Domain Modeling of Electromagnetic Pulse Excitation of Finite-Length Dissipative Conductors over a Ground Plane via Function Fitting and Recursive Convolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campione, Salvatore [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Warne, Larry K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sainath, Kamalesh [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Basilio, Lorena I. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-10-01

    In this report we overview the fundamental concepts for a pair of techniques which together greatly hasten computational predictions of electromagnetic pulse (EMP) excitation of finite-length dissipative conductors over a ground plane. In a time- domain, transmission line (TL) model implementation, predictions are computationally bottlenecked time-wise, either for late-time predictions (about 100ns-10000ns range) or predictions concerning EMP excitation of long TLs (order of kilometers or more ). This is because the method requires a temporal convolution to account for the losses in the ground. Addressing this to facilitate practical simulation of EMP excitation of TLs, we first apply a technique to extract an (approximate) complex exponential function basis-fit to the ground/Earth's impedance function, followed by incorporating this into a recursion-based convolution acceleration technique. Because the recursion-based method only requires the evaluation of the most recent voltage history data (versus the entire history in a "brute-force" convolution evaluation), we achieve necessary time speed- ups across a variety of TL/Earth geometry/material scenarios. Intentionally Left Blank

  19. Selective susceptibility to nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) across different human cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianulis, Elena C; Labib, Chantelle; Saulis, Gintautas; Novickij, Vitalij; Pakhomova, Olga N; Pakhomov, Andrei G

    2017-05-01

    Tumor ablation by nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) is an emerging therapeutic modality. We compared nsPEF cytotoxicity for human cell lines of cancerous (IMR-32, Hep G2, HT-1080, and HPAF-II) and non-cancerous origin (BJ and MRC-5) under strictly controlled and identical conditions. Adherent cells were uniformly treated by 300-ns PEF (0-2000 pulses, 1.8 kV/cm, 50 Hz) on indium tin oxide-covered glass coverslips, using the same media and serum. Cell survival plotted against the number of pulses displayed three distinct regions (initial resistivity, logarithmic survival decline, and residual resistivity) for all tested cell types, but with differences in LD 50 spanning as much as nearly 80-fold. The non-cancerous cells were less sensitive than IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells but more vulnerable than the other cancers tested. The cytotoxic efficiency showed no apparent correlation with cell or nuclear size, cell morphology, metabolism level, or the extent of membrane disruption by nsPEF. Increasing pulse duration to 9 µs (0.75 kV/cm, 5 Hz) produced a different selectivity pattern, suggesting that manipulation of PEF parameters can, at least for certain cancers, overcome their resistance to nsPEF ablation. Identifying mechanisms and cell markers of differential nsPEF susceptibility will critically contribute to the proper choice and outcome of nsPEF ablation therapies.

  20. Timeresolved investigation of atomic order in tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ) monocrystals after excitation with ultrashort light pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sager, Christian

    2011-02-01

    This thesis describes time-resolved investigations of the atomic structure of one-dimensional organic molecular crystals after laser excitation of the photo-induced phase transition. There is a neutral to ionic phase transition in tetrathiafulvalene-chloranil-crystals (TTF-CA-crystals). At this phase transition a Peierls distortion occurs. A new model is introduced, that can explain the photo-induced phase transition in TTF-CY-crystals. This model is called charge density wave model of photo induced structural phase transition. There is a structural phase transition in tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanochinodimethane-crystals (TTF-TCNQ-crystals). At this phase transition the one-dimensional metal TTF-TCNQ is transformed to an insulator. The phase transition is driven by the Peierls distortion. The charge density wave model is appropriate for description of the processes in TTF-TCNQ-crystals after laser excitation. The results of time-resolved measurements of the structure of TTF-TCNQ-crystals after excitation of the photo-induced phase transition can be anticipated with the charge density wave model. In the basis of these anticipated results, a time-resolved measurement for investigation of the atomic structure of TTF-TCNQ after excitation of the photo-induced phase transition is proposed. The time-resolved measurement should be performed at a beamline of a third generation synchrotron by the optical pump X-ray probe technique. The time-resolved measurement is prepared by an optical characterization and by static X-ray diffraction measurements. The results of the optical characterization and the static X-ray diffraction measurements are presented and analyzed. (orig.)

  1. Charting the excitability of premotor to motor connections while withholding or initiating a selected movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroeger, Johan; Bäumer, Tobias; Jonas, Melanie

    2010-01-01

    subjects performed a delayed response [symbol 1 (S1) - symbol 2 (S2)] Go-NoGo reaction time task with visual cues. Conditioning TMS pulses were applied to the left premotor or left motor cortex 8 ms before a test pulse was given to the right motor cortex at 300 or 1800 ms after S1 or 150 ms after S2. S1...

  2. Temporally Diverse Excitation Generates Direction-Selective Responses in ON- and OFF-Type Retinal Starburst Amacrine Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransen, James W; Borghuis, Bart G

    2017-02-07

    The complexity of sensory receptive fields increases from one synaptic stage to the next. In many cases, increased complexity is achieved through spatiotemporal interactions between convergent excitatory and inhibitory inputs. Here, we present evidence that direction selectivity (DS), a complex emergent receptive field property of retinal starburst amacrine cells (SACs), is generated by spatiotemporal interactions between functionally diverse excitatory inputs. Electrophysiological whole-cell recordings from ON and OFF SACs show distinct temporal differences in excitation following proximal compared with distal stimulation of their receptive fields. Distal excitation is both faster and more transient, ruling out passive filtering by the dendrites and indicating a task-specific specialization. Model simulations demonstrate that this specific organization of excitation generates robust DS responses in SACs, consistent with elementary motion detector models. These results indicate that selective integration of spatiotemporally patterned excitation is a computational mechanism for motion detection in the mammalian retina. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Plasmon-Assisted Selective and Super-Resolving Excitation of Individual Quantum Emitters on a Metal Nanowire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Pan, Deng; Wei, Hong; Xu, Hongxing

    2018-03-14

    Hybrid systems composed of multiple quantum emitters coupled with plasmonic waveguides are promising building blocks for future integrated quantum nanophotonic circuits. The techniques that can super-resolve and selectively excite contiguous quantum emitters in a diffraction-limited area are of great importance for studying the plasmon-mediated interaction between quantum emitters and manipulating the single plasmon generation and propagation in plasmonic circuits. Here we show that multiple quantum dots coupled with a silver nanowire can be controllably excited by tuning the interference field of surface plasmons on the nanowire. Because of the period of the interference pattern is much smaller than the diffraction limit, we demonstrate the selective excitation of two quantum dots separated by a distance as short as 100 nm. We also numerically demonstrate a new kind of super-resolution imaging method that combines the tunable surface plasmon interference pattern on the NW with the structured illumination microscopy technique. Our work provides a novel high-resolution optical excitation and imaging method for the coupled systems of multiple quantum emitters and plasmonic waveguides, which adds a new tool for studying and manipulating single quantum emitters and single plasmons for quantum plasmonic circuitry applications.

  4. Displacement and emission currents from PLZT 8/65/35 and 4/95/5 excited by a negative voltage pulse at the rear electrode

    CERN Document Server

    Benedek, G; Handerek, J; Marchesini, S; De Martinis, C; Riege, H; Scurati, A

    1997-01-01

    It is shown that non-prepoled PLZT ceramics, both in ferroelectric and antiferroelectric phase, emit intense current bursts when a negative exciting voltage is applied to the rear surface of the cathode. The spontaneous polarization induced in the bulk by applying the field through the cathode disk, creates a sheet of negative charge on the diode boundary of the ferroelectric. This, in turn, induces such a high electric field at the diode dielectric surface that electrons are ejected out from the ceramic surface into the vacuum. The coherent behaviour of the displacement and emitted current shows clearly that the emission is due to a variation of spontaneous polarization. A second effect generated by the application of the high voltage pulse at the rear side is the formation of a surface plasma. Applying a positive voltage to the anode, electrons are readily transferred through the diode gap.

  5. Laser-Bioplasma Interaction: Excitation and Suppression of the Brain Waves by the Multi-photon Pulsed-operated Fiber Lasers in the Ultraviolet Range of Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander; IAPS-team Team

    2017-10-01

    The novel study of the laser excitation-suppression of the brain waves is proposed. It is based on the pulsed-operated multi-photon fiber-laser interaction with the brain parvalbumin (PV) neurons. The repetition frequency matches the low frequency brain waves (5-100 Hz); enabling the resonance-scanning of the wide range of the PV neurons (the generators of the brain wave activity). The tunable fiber laser frequencies are in the ultraviolet frequency range, thus enabling the monitoring of the PV neuron-DNA, within the 10s of milliseconds. In medicine, the method can be used as an ``instantaneous-on-off anesthetic.'' Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs, Stefan University.

  6. Broadband non-selective excitation of plutonium isotopes for isotope ratio measurements in resonance ionization mass spectrometry: a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankari, M

    2012-10-15

    Making isotope ratio measurements with minimum isotope bias has always been a challenging task to mass spectrometrists, especially for the specific case of plutonium, owing to the strategic importance of the element. In order to use resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) as a tool for isotope ratio measurements, optimization of the various laser parameters and other atomic and system parameters is critical to minimize isotopic biases. Broadband simultaneous non-selective excitation of the isotopes of plutonium in the triple resonance excitation scheme with λ(1) = 420.77 nm, λ(2) = 847.28 nm, and λ(3) = 767.53 nm based on density matrix formalism has been theoretically computed for the determination of isotope ratios. The effects of the various laser parameters and other factors such as the atomization temperature and the dimensions of the atomic beam on the estimation of isotope ratios were studied. The effects of Doppler broadening, and time-dependent excitation parameters such as Rabi frequencies, ionization rate and the effect of non-Lorenztian lineshape have all been incorporated. The average laser powers and bandwidths for the three-excitation steps were evaluated for non-selective excitation. The laser intensity required to saturate the three-excitation steps were studied. The two-dimensional lineshape contour and its features were investigated, while the reversal of peak asymmetry of two-step and two-photon excitation peaks under these conditions is discussed. Optimized powers for the non-selective ionization of the three transitions were calculated as 545 mW, 150 mW and 545 mW and the laser bandwidth for all the three steps was ~20 GHz. The isotopic bias between the resonant and off-resonant isotope under the optimized conditions was no more than 9%, which is better than an earlier reported value. These optimized laser power and bandwidth conditions are better than in the earlier experimental work since these comprehensive calculations yield

  7. Selective surface functionalization of poly(butadiene) using inner-shell monochromatic excitation and exposition to a reactive gaseous atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessler, Felipe; Ramanathan, Rajajeyaganthan; Weibel, Daniel E.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies showed that in low power plasma treatments the surface radical species are mainly generated by VUV-UV radiation and not by ions. Synchrotron radiation offers the potential to excite inner-shell electrons in the required power range (1-4 nm), besides the possibility of its extreme monochromaticity. Thin films (∼ 200 nm) of poly(butadiene) (PBU) have been selectively functionalized with the combination of monochromatic synchrotron radiation and exposure to oxygen atmosphere. The experiments were conducted in the SGM line, LNLS (C 1s edge). NEXAFS spectra were obtained before and after irradiation at different times and energies. High and efficient surface functionalization of PBU films by the introduction of oxygenated groups were observed when specific excitation energies of K-shell were selected. Similar results were previously reported for polystyrene showing that the Auger stimulated desorption mechanisms are involved in the process. (author)

  8. Influence of Selected Parameters of XeCl Excimer Laser System on Characteristics of Radiation Pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokora, L.; Iwanejko, L.

    1998-01-01

    We present the dependences of energy and duration of radiation pulses as well as efficiency of XeCl laser on selected parameters of the laser system such as: C 2 capacitance, the separating inductance, L S , the distance between electrodes in laser's chamber, d K and also the supply voltage, U 0 , composition, and pressure of the active-medium mixture of gases. Results of numerical computations relate to a three-component mixture of gases, He-Xe-HCl, of the active medium of the excimer laser. (author)

  9. [High current microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp excited ionic fluorescence spectrometry of alkaline earth elements in inductively coupled plasma with a Fassel-torch].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shao-Yu; Gong, Zhen-Bin; Huang, Ben-Li

    2006-02-01

    High current microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp (HCMP-HCL) excited ionic fluorescence spectrometry (IFS) of alkaline earth elements in inductively coupled plasma (ICP) with a Fassel-torch has been investigated. In wide condition ranges only IFS was observed, whilst atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) was not detectable. More intense ionic fluorescence signal was observed at lower observation heights and at lower incident RF powers. Without introduction of any reduction organic gases into the ICP, the limit of detection (LOD, 3sigma) of Ba was improved by 50-fold over that of a conventional pulsed (CP) HCL with the Baird sleeve-extended torch. For Ca and Sr, the LODs by HCMP-HCL-ICP-IFS and CP-HCL-ICP-AFS show no significant difference. Relative standard deviations were 0.6%-1.4% (0.1-0.2 microg x mL(-1), n = 10) for 5 ionic fluorescence lines. Preliminary studies showed that the intensity of ionic fluorescence could be depressed in the presence of K, Al and P.

  10. Selectivity in Threshold Vibrational Excitation of CO2 by Electron Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanroose, W.; Zhang, Zhijong; McCurdy, C. W.; Rescigno, T. N.

    2003-10-01

    Vibrational excitation of the hydrogen halides by low energy electron impact has been a subject of continued interest ever since pronounced threshold peaks were observed in the vibrationally inelastic cross sections by Rohr and Linder some twenty-five years ago. More recently, similar structures were observed in non-polar triatomic molecules, but only for certain transitions. We present a non-empirical local potential model for studying threshold vibrational excitation by electron impact. This work builds on the zero-range potential virtual state model of Gauyacq and Herzenberg (J. P. Gauyacq and A. Herzenberg, Phys. Rev. A 25, 2959 (1982)), using known analytic properties of the S-matrix to predict the analytic continuation of the negative ion potential curve into the continuum. We derive an equation that determines the nuclear dynamics which can be solved without the need for an expansion in target vibrational states. The model is applied to CO2 vibrational excitation and provides, for the first time, a quantitatively accurate description of the observed excitation cross sections at energies below 1 eV.

  11. Excited States and Photodebromination of Selected Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers: Computational and Quantitative Structure—Property Relationship Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a density functional theory (DFT/time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT study on the lowest lying singlet and triplet excited states of 20 selected polybrominateddiphenyl ether (PBDE congeners, with the solvation effect included in the calculations using the polarized continuum model (PCM. The results obtained showed that for most of the brominated diphenyl ether (BDE congeners, the lowest singlet excited state was initiated by the electron transfer from HOMO to LUMO, involving a π–σ* excitation. In triplet excited states, structure of the BDE congeners differed notably from that of the BDE ground states with one of the specific C–Br bonds bending off the aromatic plane. In addition, the partial least squares regression (PLSR, principal component analysis-multiple linear regression analysis (PCA-MLR, and back propagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN approaches were employed for a quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR study. Based on the previously reported kinetic data for the debromination by ultraviolet (UV and sunlight, obtained QSPR models exhibited a reasonable evaluation of the photodebromination reactivity even when the BDE congeners had same degree of bromination, albeit different patterns of bromination.

  12. Research of the elastic waves generated by a pulse laser. Excitation mechanism of elastic waves and application to nondestructive testing; Pulse laser de reikishita danseiha ni kansuru kenkyu. Danseiha reiki no mechanism to hihakai kensa eno oyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, H.; Takemoto, M. [Aoyama Gakuin University, Tokyo (Japan). College of Science and Engineering

    1994-07-20

    A bulk wave is generated when a pulse laser is irradiated to the material, and the characteristics of a Young`s modulus and Poisson`s ratio can be nondestructively estimated from the bulk wave. The generation mechanism of laser ultrasonic waves must be first clarified for such application. In this paper, fundamental research was conducted to study the generation mechanism of the elastic waves excited by a Q-switched Nd-YAG laser, and the generation method and characteristics of Rayleigh waves. The following result was obtained. A bulk wave is generated by the disk-like adiabatic expansion near the surface if the laser power is small when a spot-shape pulse laser was irradiated. A bulk wave is generated by the thin disk-like adiabatic expansion beneath the surface due to the thermal diffusion in the depth direction of a base material when the laser power becomes large. Moreover, a bulk wave is generated by the impact force due to abrasion and plasma when the power becomes still larger. The information on the bulk wave characteristics and Rayleigh wave was also obtained. 25 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Effect of dye laser pulse duration on selective cutaneous vascular injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garden, J.M.; Tan, O.T.; Kerschmann, R.; Boll, J.; Furumoto, H.; Anderson, R.R.; Parrish, J.A.

    1986-11-01

    The pulsed dye laser at 577 nm, a wavelength well absorbed by oxyhemoglobin, causes highly selective thermal injury to cutaneous blood vessels. Confinement of thermal damage to microvessels is, in theory, related to the laser exposure time (pulsewidth) on selective vascular injury. This study investigates the effect of 577 nm dye laser pulsewidth on selective vascular injury. Nine Caucasian, normal volunteers received 577 nm dye laser exposures at pulsewidths of 1.5-350 microseconds to their skin. Clinical purpura threshold exposure doses were determined in each volunteer, and biopsies of threshold and suprathreshold doses were examined in each volunteer. The laser exposure dose required to produce purpura increased as pulsewidth increased in all 9 subjects (p less than 0.001). This finding corresponds to laser pulsewidths equal to or exceeding the thermal relaxation times for dermal blood vessels. Histologically, vessel damage was selectively, but qualitatively, different for short vs long pulsewidths. Pulsewidths shorter than 20 microseconds caused vessel wall fragmentation and hemorrhage, whereas longer pulsewidths caused no significant hemorrhage. The purpura noted clinically appears to be due to a coagulum of intralumenal denatured erythrocytes. At 24 h, there was marked vessel wall necrosis at all pulsewidths. The short pulsewidths may cause erythrocyte vaporization, rapid thermal expansion, and mechanical vessel rupture with hemorrhage. Long pulsewidths appear to cause thermal denaturation with less mechanical vessel damage. The selective, nonhemorrhagic, vascular necrosis caused by the long-pulsewidth dye laser may lead to a more desirable clinical outcome in the therapy of blood vessel disease processes.

  14. Piezoelectric transducer parameter selection for exciting a single mode from multiple modes of Lamb waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hai-Yan; Yu Jian-Bo

    2011-01-01

    Excitation and propagation of Lamb waves by using rectangular and circular piezoelectric transducers surface-bonded to an isotropic plate are investigated in this work. Analytical stain wave solutions are derived for the two transducer shapes, giving the responses of these transducers in Lamb wave fields. The analytical study is supported by a numerical simulation using the finite element method. Symmetric and antisymmetric components in the wave propagation responses are inspected in detail with respect to test parameters such as the transducer geometry, the length and the excitation frequency. By placing only one piezoelectric transducer on the top or the bottom surface of the plate and weakening the strength of one mode while enhancing the strength of the other modes to find the centre frequency, with which the peak wave amplitude ratio between the S0 and A0 modes is maximum, a single mode excitation from the multiple modes of the Lamb waves can be achieved approximately. Experimental data are presented to show the validity of the analyses. The results are used to optimize the Lamb wave detection system. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  15. Kinetic studies following state-selective laser excitation: Progress report, March 15, 1988--March 14, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keto, J.W.

    1988-11-01

    The objective of this contract is the study of state-to-state, electronic energy transfer reactions following two-photon laser excitation. We have chosen to study reactions of Xe 5p 5 np because of their relevance to the XeCl excimer laser. We are studying deactivation reactions in collisions with heavy atoms such as Ar, Kr, and Xe and reactive collisions with chlorides. The reactants are excited by multiphoton laser absorption. Product channels are observed by their fluorescence, or by laser induced fluorescence using a second color laser. Reaction rates are measured by observing the time dependent decay of signals from reactant and product channels. In addition we measure interaction potentials of the reactants by laser spectroscopy where the laser induced fluorescence or ionization is measured as a function of laser wavelength (excitation spectra) or by measuring fluorescence spectra at fixed laser frequencies with monochromators. The spectra are obtained in the form of either lineshapes or individual lines from rovibrational transitions of bound states. 11 refs. 4 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Impacts of Airborne Lidar Pulse Density on Estimating Biomass Stocks and Changes in a Selectively Logged Tropical Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Silva

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Airborne lidar is a technology well-suited for mapping many forest attributes, including aboveground biomass (AGB stocks and changes in selective logging in tropical forests. However, trade-offs still exist between lidar pulse density and accuracy of AGB estimates. We assessed the impacts of lidar pulse density on the estimation of AGB stocks and changes using airborne lidar and field plot data in a selectively logged tropical forest located near Paragominas, Pará, Brazil. Field-derived AGB was computed at 85 square 50 × 50 m plots in 2014. Lidar data were acquired in 2012 and 2014, and for each dataset the pulse density was subsampled from its original density of 13.8 and 37.5 pulses·m−2 to lower densities of 12, 10, 8, 6, 4, 2, 0.8, 0.6, 0.4 and 0.2 pulses·m−2. For each pulse density dataset, a power-law model was developed to estimate AGB stocks from lidar-derived mean height and corresponding changes between the years 2012 and 2014. We found that AGB change estimates at the plot level were only slightly affected by pulse density. However, at the landscape level we observed differences in estimated AGB change of >20 Mg·ha−1 when pulse density decreased from 12 to 0.2 pulses·m−2. The effects of pulse density were more pronounced in areas of steep slope, especially when the digital terrain models (DTMs used in the lidar derived forest height were created from reduced pulse density data. In particular, when the DTM from high pulse density in 2014 was used to derive the forest height from both years, the effects on forest height and the estimated AGB stock and changes did not exceed 20 Mg·ha−1. The results suggest that AGB change can be monitored in selective logging in tropical forests with reasonable accuracy and low cost with low pulse density lidar surveys if a baseline high-quality DTM is available from at least one lidar survey. We recommend the results of this study to be considered in developing projects and national

  17. Electromagnetic Pulse Excitation of Finite-Long Dissipative Conductors over a Conducting Ground Plane in the Frequency Domain.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    campione, Salvatore [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Warne, Larry K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schiek, Richard [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Basilio, Lorena I. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This report details the modeling results for the response of a finite-length dissipative conductor interacting with a conducting ground to a hypothetical nuclear device with the same output energy spectrum as the Fat Man device. We use a frequency-domain method based on transmission line theory and implemented it in a code we call ATLOG - Analytic Transmission Line Over Ground. Select results are compared to ones computed using the circuit simulator Xyce. Intentionally Left Blank

  18. Substance P selectively decreases paired pulse depression in the rat hippocampal slice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies Stephen N

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although being widespread in the hippocampus, the role tachykinins play in synaptic transmission is unclear. The effect of substance P on field potentials evoked by stimulation of the Schaffer collateral-commissural fibres and recorded from the CA1 region of the rat hippocampal slice were studied. Results Perfusion of substance P (8 μM had no effect on the fEPSP or population spike. Substance P did however cause a selective reduction in the paired pulse depression of population spikes evoked by paired stimulation at interpulse intervals of 20–80 msec. A comparison of the actions of other tachykinin receptor agonists gave an order of potency of substance P > [β-Ala8]-neurokinin A (4–10 > senktide. The effect of substance P was reduced by the neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist SR140333, but not by the neurokinin-2 or neurokinin-3 receptor antagonists, MDL 29,913 or [Trp7, β-Ala8]-neurokinin A (4–10. Conclusion The order of potency of the agonists, and the effects of the antagonists, both indicate that the effect of substance P on paired pulse depression is mediated by neurokinin-1 receptors.

  19. Selective ablation of a titanium nitride film on tungsten carbide substrate using ultrashort laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Eduardo Spinelli

    2017-01-01

    Surface coatings are applied to many cutting tools in the metallurgical industry in order to improve cutting efficiency and extend its useful life. In this work, tests were performed to remove the coating of titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN) on tungsten carbide (WC-Co) pellets, using an ultrashort laser pulses beam. After determination of the damage thresholds of the film and the substrate, were ablated on the surface of the coating lines using two ablation conditions, it was initially operated on the low fluence regime for the film, and later on the low fluence regime of the substrate, far below the threshold of the film, applying high overlapping pulses. A laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system was set up to monitor the materials present in the plasma generated by the laser, but the system did not present sufficient sensitivity to read the low intensity of the plasma generated in the process and was not used. After the analysis of the traces by electron microscopy, optical profilometer and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, it was not possible to determine a safe process to carry out the selective removal of the film in question, however, due to the data obtained and observations of the results in some traces, new possibilities were raised, opening the discussion for future work. (author)

  20. Molecular reorganization of selected quinoline derivatives in the ground and excited states—Investigations via static DFT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Błaziak, Kacper; Panek, Jarosław J.; Jezierska, Aneta, E-mail: aneta.jezierska@chem.uni.wroc.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Wrocław, ul. F. Joliot-Curie 14, 50-383 Wrocław (Poland)

    2015-07-21

    Quinoline derivatives are interesting objects to study internal reorganizations due to the observed excited-state-induced intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). Here, we report on computations for selected 12 quinoline derivatives possessing three kinds of intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Density functional theory was employed for the current investigations. The metric and electronic structure simulations were performed for the ground state and first excited singlet and triplet states. The computed potential energy profiles do not show a spontaneous proton transfer in the ground state, whereas excited states exhibit this phenomenon. Atoms in Molecules (AIM) theory was applied to study the nature of hydrogen bonding, whereas Harmonic Oscillator Model of aromaticity index (HOMA) provided data of aromaticity evolution as a derivative of the bridge proton position. The AIM-based topological analysis confirmed the presence of the intramolecular hydrogen bonding. In addition, using the theory, we were able to provide a quantitative illustration of bonding transformation: from covalent to the hydrogen. On the basis of HOMA analysis, we showed that the aromaticity of both rings is dependent on the location of the bridge proton. Further, the computed results were compared with experimental data available. Finally, ESIPT occurrence was compared for the three investigated kinds of hydrogen bridges, and competition between two bridges in one molecule was studied.

  1. Molecular reorganization of selected quinoline derivatives in the ground and excited states—Investigations via static DFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błaziak, Kacper; Panek, Jarosław J.; Jezierska, Aneta

    2015-07-01

    Quinoline derivatives are interesting objects to study internal reorganizations due to the observed excited-state-induced intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). Here, we report on computations for selected 12 quinoline derivatives possessing three kinds of intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Density functional theory was employed for the current investigations. The metric and electronic structure simulations were performed for the ground state and first excited singlet and triplet states. The computed potential energy profiles do not show a spontaneous proton transfer in the ground state, whereas excited states exhibit this phenomenon. Atoms in Molecules (AIM) theory was applied to study the nature of hydrogen bonding, whereas Harmonic Oscillator Model of aromaticity index (HOMA) provided data of aromaticity evolution as a derivative of the bridge proton position. The AIM-based topological analysis confirmed the presence of the intramolecular hydrogen bonding. In addition, using the theory, we were able to provide a quantitative illustration of bonding transformation: from covalent to the hydrogen. On the basis of HOMA analysis, we showed that the aromaticity of both rings is dependent on the location of the bridge proton. Further, the computed results were compared with experimental data available. Finally, ESIPT occurrence was compared for the three investigated kinds of hydrogen bridges, and competition between two bridges in one molecule was studied.

  2. Molecular reorganization of selected quinoline derivatives in the ground and excited states—Investigations via static DFT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Błaziak, Kacper; Panek, Jarosław J.; Jezierska, Aneta

    2015-01-01

    Quinoline derivatives are interesting objects to study internal reorganizations due to the observed excited-state-induced intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). Here, we report on computations for selected 12 quinoline derivatives possessing three kinds of intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Density functional theory was employed for the current investigations. The metric and electronic structure simulations were performed for the ground state and first excited singlet and triplet states. The computed potential energy profiles do not show a spontaneous proton transfer in the ground state, whereas excited states exhibit this phenomenon. Atoms in Molecules (AIM) theory was applied to study the nature of hydrogen bonding, whereas Harmonic Oscillator Model of aromaticity index (HOMA) provided data of aromaticity evolution as a derivative of the bridge proton position. The AIM-based topological analysis confirmed the presence of the intramolecular hydrogen bonding. In addition, using the theory, we were able to provide a quantitative illustration of bonding transformation: from covalent to the hydrogen. On the basis of HOMA analysis, we showed that the aromaticity of both rings is dependent on the location of the bridge proton. Further, the computed results were compared with experimental data available. Finally, ESIPT occurrence was compared for the three investigated kinds of hydrogen bridges, and competition between two bridges in one molecule was studied

  3. Phase-selective vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) nanostructured thin films by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masina, B. N., E-mail: BMasina@csir.co.za, E-mail: slafane@cdta.dz [CSIR-National Laser Centre, PO BOX 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); School of Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X54001, Durban 4000 (South Africa); Lafane, S., E-mail: BMasina@csir.co.za, E-mail: slafane@cdta.dz; Abdelli-Messaci, S.; Kerdja, T. [Division des Milieux Ionisés et Laser, Centre de Développement des Technologies Avancées, Cité du 20 Août 1956, BP 17, Baba Hassen (Algeria); Wu, L. [CSIR-National Laser Centre, PO BOX 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Akande, A. A.; Mwakikunga, B. [DST/CSIR National Centre for Nano-Structured Materials, PO BOX 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Forbes, A. [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, Wits 2050, Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2015-10-28

    Thin films of monoclinic nanostructured vanadium dioxide are notoriously difficult to produce in a selective manner. To date, post-annealing, after pulsed laser deposition (PLD), has been used to revert the crystal phase or to remove impurities, and non-glass substrates have been employed, thus reducing the efficacy of the transparency switching. Here, we overcome these limitations in PLD by optimizing a laser-ablation and deposition process through optical imaging of the laser-induced plasma. We report high quality monoclinic rutile-type vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) (M1) nanoparticles without post-annealing, and on a glass substrate. Our samples demonstrate a reversible metal-to-insulator transition at ∼43 °C, without any doping, paving the way to switchable transparency in optical materials at room temperature.

  4. Selective Coke Combustion by Oxygen Pulsing During Mo/ZSM‐5‐Catalyzed Methane Dehydroaromatization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coumans, Ferdy J. A. G.; Uslamin, Evgeny; Kapteijn, Freek

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Non‐oxidative methane dehydroaromatization is a promising reaction to directly convert natural gas into aromatic hydrocarbons and hydrogen. Commercialization of this technology is hampered by rapid catalyst deactivation because of coking. A novel approach is presented involving selective oxidation of coke during methane dehydroaromatization at 700 °C. Periodic pulsing of oxygen into the methane feed results in substantially higher cumulative product yield with synthesis gas; a H2/CO ratio close to two is the main side‐product of coke combustion. Using 13C isotope labeling of methane it is demonstrated that oxygen predominantly reacts with molybdenum carbide species. The resulting molybdenum oxides catalyze coke oxidation. Less than one‐fifth of the available oxygen reacts with gaseous methane. Combined with periodic regeneration at 550 °C, this strategy is a significant step forward, towards a process for converting methane into liquid hydrocarbons. PMID:27791321

  5. Photothermal and accompanied phenomena of selective nanophotothermolysis with gold nanoparticles and laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustovalov, V K; Smetannikov, A S; Zharov, V P

    2008-01-01

    In medical applications of laser and nanotechnology to diagnosis and treat cancer or microorganisms, understanding of lased-induced photothermal (PT) and accompanied phenomena around nanoparticles are crucial for optimization and bringing this promising technology to bedside. We analyzed the main PT-based effects in and around gold nanoparticles under action of short (nano-, pico-, and femtosecond) laser pulses with focus on photoacoustic effects due to the thermal expansion of nanoparticles and liquid around them, thermal protein denaturation, explosive liquid vaporization, melting and evaporation of nanoparticle, optical breakdown initiated by nanoparticles and accompanied to shock waves and explosion (fragmentation) of gold nanoparticles. Characteristic parameters for these processes such as the temperature and pressures levels, and laser intensity thresholds among others are summarized to provide basis for comparison of different mechanisms of selective nanophotothermolysis and diagnostics of different targets (e.g., cancer cells, bacteria, viruses)

  6. High-power radio frequency pulse generation and extration based on wakefield excited by an intense charged particle beam in dielectric-loaded waveguides.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, F.; High Energy Physics; Illinois Inst. of Tech

    2009-07-24

    Power extraction using a dielectric-loaded (DL) waveguide is a way to generate high-power radio frequency (RF) waves for future particle accelerators, especially for two-beam-acceleration. In a two-beam-acceleration scheme, a low-energy, high-current particle beam is passed through a deceleration section of waveguide (decelerator), where the power from the beam is partially transferred to trailing electromagnetic waves (wakefields); then with a properly designed RF output coupler, the power generated in the decelerator is extracted to an output waveguide, where finally the power can be transmitted and used to accelerate another usually high-energy low-current beam. The decelerator, together with the RF output coupler, is called a power extractor. At Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA), we designed a 7.8GHz power extractor with a circular DL waveguide and tested it with single electron bunches and bunch trains. The output RF frequency (7.8GHz) is the sixth harmonic of the operational frequency (1.3GHz) of the electron gun and the linac at AWA. In single bunch excitation, a 1.7ns RF pulse with 30MW of power was generated by a single 66nC electron bunch passing through the decelerator. In subsequent experiments, by employing different splitting-recombining optics for the photoinjector laser, electron bunch trains were generated and thus longer RF pulses could be successfully generated and extracted. In 16-bunch experiments, 10ns and 22ns RF pulses have been generated and extracted; and in 4-bunch experiments, the maximum power generated was 44MW with 40MW extracted. A 26GHz DL power extractor has also been designed to test this technique in the millimeter-wave range. A power level of 148MW is expected to be generated by a bunch train with a bunch spacing of 769ps and bunch charges of 20nC each. The arrangement for the experiment is illustrated in a diagram. Higher-order-mode (HOM) power extraction has also been explored in a dual-frequency design. By using a bunch

  7. Anomalous argon excitation in pulse supersonic flows of Ar + CH sub 4 , Ar + SiH sub 4 and Ar + CH sub 4 + SiH sub 4 mixtures, activated with an electron beam

    CERN Document Server

    Madirbaev, V Z; Korobejshchikov, N G; Sharafutdinov, R G

    2001-01-01

    The processes of energy exchange in the supersonic flows of the argon mixtures with methane and silane, activated by the electron beam, are studied. It is shown, that at the initial stage of condensation in the flux there takes place selective excitation of the argon atoms energy levels. The boundary parameters, whereby the effect of the anomalous radiation excitation is observed, are determined

  8. Isotopically selective RIMS of rare radionuclides by double-resonance excitation with cw lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushaw, B.A.; Munley, J.T.

    1990-09-01

    Double-resonance, Resonance Ionization Mass Spectroscopy (RIMS) using two single-frequency dye lasers and a CO 2 laser for photoionization has been shown to be both extremely sensitive and highly selective. Measurements on the radioisotope 210 Pb have demonstrated optical selectivity in excess of 10 9 and detection limits of less than 1 femtogram

  9. Source characterization of selected North Caspian events from the relative excitation of regional phases. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niazi, M.

    1981-11-01

    Seismograms of seven recent events (presumed underground nuclear explosions) which occurred during 1976-1979 in the North Caspian Sea region of the western Soviet Kazakh are compared at regional distances for their relative source excitation characteristics. The body wave magnitude estimates of these events range from 5.1 to 6.0. The data consist of analog and digital records collected at stations ranging in instrumental sophistication from temporary sites with single component smoke drum capability to those of SRO, ASRO and array (ILPA) configurations with digitally recorded down-hole observations. The amplitude and frequency measurements of the analog seismograms for the first arrival and the peak amplitude of P coda as well as for the clear S wave signals recorded for different events at the same station are compared.

  10. Off-resonant vibrational excitation: Orientational dependence and spatial control of photofragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machholm, Mette; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2000-01-01

    Off-resonant and resonant vibrational excitation with short intense infrared (IR) laser pulses creates localized oscillating wave packets, but differs by the efficiency of the excitation and surprisingly by the orientational dependence. Orientational selectivity of the vibrational excitation...... of randomly oriented heteronuclear diatomic molecules can be obtained under simultaneous irradiation by a resonant and an off-resonant intense IR laser pulse: Molecules with one initial orientation will be vibrationally excited, while those with the opposite orientation will be at rest. The orientation...

  11. Spin wave excitation in sub-micrometer thick Y3Fe5O12 films fabricated by pulsed laser deposition on garnet and silicon substrates: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balinskiy, Michael; Ojha, Shuchi; Chiang, Howard; Ranjbar, Mojtaba; Ross, Caroline A.; Khitun, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    The development of yttrium iron garnet nanostructures on a silicon substrate is critically important for the integration of magnonic components with conventional electronic circuits. In this work, we present experimental data on spin wave excitation and propagation in 700 nm thick planar Y3Fe5O12 (YIG) films fabricated on gadolinium gallium garnet Gd3Ga5O12 (GGG) and silicon substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The spin wave spectroscopy measurements were accomplished using a set of micro-antennas placed directly on the film surface. The data were collected in a frequency range of 0.5-7 GHz and a bias magnetic field from 0 to 2000 Oe. We compare and analyze the spectra obtained for YIG/GGG and YIG/Si. Fitting to the Kittel formula yields the effective magnetization of the samples which is compared with the results obtained by magnetometry. Application of spin wave spectroscopy for magnetic film characterization allows us to extract valuable information on the magnetic texture. Understanding the mechanisms leading to the spin wave damping modification is the key to low-loss spin wave devices compatible with conventional silicon-based technology.

  12. Lead extraction by selective operation of a nanosecond-pulsed 355nm laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Amir; Bogdan, Stefan; Glikson, Michael; Ishaaya, Amiel A.; Love, Charles

    2016-03-01

    Lead extraction (LE) is necessary for patients who are suffering from a related infection, or in opening venous occlusions that prevent the insertion of additional lead. In severe cases of fibrous encapsulation of the lead within a vein, laser-based cardiac LE has become one of the foremost methods of removal. In cases where the laser radiation (typically at 308 nm wavelength) interacts with the vein wall rather than with the fibrotic lesion, severe injury and subsequent bleeding may occur. Selective tissue ablation was previously demonstrated by a laser operating in the UV regime; however, it requires the use of sensitizers (e.g.: tetracycline). In this study, we present a preliminary examination of efficacy and safety aspects in the use of a nanosecond-pulsed solid-state laser radiation, at 355 nm wavelength, guided in a catheter consisting of optical fibers, in LE. Specifically, we demonstrate a correlation between the tissue elasticity and the catheter advancement rate, in ex-vivo experiments. Our results indicate a selectivity property for specific parameters of the laser radiation and catheter design. The selectivity is attributed to differences in the mechanical properties of the fibrotic tissue and a normal vein wall, leading to a different photomechanical response of the tissue's extracellular matrix. Furthermore, we performed successful in-vivo animal trials, providing a basic proof of concept for using the suggested scheme in LE. Selective operation using a 355 nm laser may reduce the risk of blood vessel perforation as well as the incidence of major adverse events.

  13. Comparison of selective arterial spin labeling using 1D and 2D tagging RF pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstandin, Simon; Heiler, Patrick M; Scharf, Johann; Schad, Lothar R

    2011-01-01

    Generic arterial spin labeling (ASL) techniques label all brain feeding arteries. In this work, we used two different selective ASL (SASL) methods to show the perfusion of one single artery. A slice selective inversion of an area including the desired vessel was compared to a multidimensional RF pulse with Gaussian profile to label only the artery of interest. Perfusion images with a resolution of 2 x 2 x 5 mm(3) are shown that were acquired after tagging only the internal carotid artery of healthy volunteers. In addition, both techniques were applied to a patient with an extra-intracranial bypass to illustrate its perfusion territory. These perfusion images are consistent with a standard angiography. SASL imaging with a resolution of 2 x 2 x 5 mm(3) is possible in a total scan time of 5 min. The presented MR techniques may in part replace the assessment of revascularization success by conventional angiography. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  14. An FPGA-Based Silicon Neuronal Network with Selectable Excitability Silicon Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Katori, Yuichi; Kohno, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a digital silicon neuronal network which simulates the nerve system in creatures and has the ability to execute intelligent tasks, such as associative memory. Two essential elements, the mathematical-structure-based digital spiking silicon neuron (DSSN) and the transmitter release based silicon synapse, allow us to tune the excitability of silicon neurons and are computationally efficient for hardware implementation. We adopt mixed pipeline and parallel structure and shift operations to design a sufficient large and complex network without excessive hardware resource cost. The network with 256 full-connected neurons is built on a Digilent Atlys board equipped with a Xilinx Spartan-6 LX45 FPGA. Besides, a memory control block and USB control block are designed to accomplish the task of data communication between the network and the host PC. This paper also describes the mechanism of associative memory performed in the silicon neuronal network. The network is capable of retrieving stored patterns if the inputs contain enough information of them. The retrieving probability increases with the similarity between the input and the stored pattern increasing. Synchronization of neurons is observed when the successful stored pattern retrieval occurs.

  15. Tuning excitation laser wavelength for secondary resonance in low-intensity phase-selective laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for in-situ analytical measurement of nanoaerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Gang; Li, Shuiqing; Tse, Stephen D.

    2018-02-01

    In recent years, a novel low-intensity phase-selective laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (PS-LIBS) technique has been developed for unique elemental-composition identification of aerosolized nanoparticles, where only the solid-phase nanoparticles break down, forming nanoplasmas, without any surrounding gas-phase breakdown. Additional work has demonstrated that PS-LIBS emissions can be greatly enhanced with secondary resonant excitation by matching the excitation laser wavelength with an atomic transition line in the formed nanoplasma, thereby achieving low limits of detection. In this work, a tunable dye laser is employed to investigate the effects of excitation wavelength and irradiance on in-situ PS-LIBS measurements of TiO2 nanoaerosols. The enhancement factor by resonant excitation can be 220 times greater than that for non-resonant cases under similar conditions. Moreover, the emitted spectra are unique for the selected resonant transition lines for a given element, suggesting the potential to make precise phase-selective and analyte-selective measurements of nanoparticles in a multicomponent multiphase system. The enhancement factor by resonant excitation is highly sensitive to excitation laser wavelength, with narrow excitation spectral windows, i.e., 0.012 to 0.023 nm (FWHM, full width at half maximum) for Ti (I) neutral atomic lines, and 0.051 to 0.139 nm (FWHM) for Ti (II) single-ionized atomic lines. Boltzmann analysis of the emission intensities, temporal response of emissions, and emission dependence on excitation irradiance are investigated to understand aspects of the generated nanoplasmas such as temperature, local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), and excitation mechanism.

  16. Selective generation of two pulse modes in a single all normal dispersion fiber laser oscillator and analysis of their optical characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S.; Choi, M.; Song, J. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Kim, Y.

    2017-02-01

    Fiber ultrafast pulses such as mode-locked and noise-like pulses have useful optical characteristics for high precision metrology applications. In this study, we develop an ytterbium doped fiber laser with all normal dispersion which can selectively generate two pulse modes, mode-locked and noise-like pulses, by a turn-key system including polarization control and selective detection parts. The spectral and temporal characteristics of two pulses generated from the single oscillator are analyzed and compared with each other through optical spectrum, RF spectrum and autocorrelation. Furthermore, spectral coherence characteristics are verified through interference signals generated by balanced and unbalanced arm interferometers.

  17. Improved volume selective (1) H MR spectroscopic imaging of the prostate with gradient offset independent adiabaticity pulses at 3 tesla

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinseifer, I.K.; Asten, J.J.A. van; Weiland, E.; Scheenen, T.W.J.; Maas, M.C.; Heerschap, A.

    2015-01-01

    Volume selection in (1) H MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) of the prostate is commonly performed with low-bandwidth refocusing pulses. However, their large chemical shift displacement error (CSDE) causes lipid signal contamination in the spectral range of interest. Application of high-bandwidth

  18. On the physics of laser-induced selective photothermolysis of hair follicles: Influence of wavelength, pulse duration, and epidermal cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svaasand, Lars O; Nelson, J Stuart

    2004-01-01

    The physical basis for optimization of wavelength, pulse duration, and cooling for laser-induced selective photothermolysis of hair follicles in human skin is discussed. The results indicate that the most important optimization parameter is the cooling efficiency of the technique utilized for epidermal protection. The optical penetration is approximately the same for lasers at 694, 755, and 800 nm. The penetration of radiation from Nd:yttrium-aluminum-garnet lasers at 1064 nm is, however, somewhat larger. Photothermal damage to the follicle is shown to be almost independent of laser pulse duration up to 100 ms. The results reveal that epidermal cooling by a 30-80-ms-long cryogen spurt immediately before laser exposure is the only efficient technique for laser pulse durations less than 10 ms. For longer pulse durations in the 30-100 ms range, protection can be done efficiently by skin cooling during laser exposure. For laser pulses of 100 ms, an extended precooling period, e.g., by bringing a cold object into good thermal contact with the skin for about 1 s, can be of value. Thermal quenching of laser induced epidermal temperature rise after pulsed exposure can most efficiently be done with a 20 ms cryogen spurt applied immediately after irradiation. (c) 2004 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

  19. Taurine enhances excitability of mouse cochlear neural stem cells by selectively promoting differentiation of glutamatergic neurons over GABAergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin; Zhu, Gang-Hua; Xie, Ding-Hua; Wu, Wei-Jing; Hu, Peng

    2015-05-01

    Taurine is a sulfur-containing amino acid present in high concentrations in mammalian tissues, and has been implicated in several processes involving brain development and neurotransmission. However, the role of taurine in inner ear neural development is still largely unknown. Here we report that taurine enhanced the viability and proliferation of in vitro mouse cochlear neural stem cell culture, as well as improved neurite outgrowth. Moreover, prolonged taurine treatment also increased the neural electrical activity by escalating changes of intracellular calcium concentration, the number of spontaneous Ca(2+) oscillations in cells, and the frequencies of Ca(2+) spikes. Most importantly, we found that this escalated neural excitability by taurine was due to combined effect of increase in the population of excitatory glutamatergic neuron and decrease in inhibitory GABAergic neuron population. This is the first report on the effect of taurine to selectively promote neural stem cell differentiation by altering neuron type commitment. Our study has supported the potential of taurine as treatment against hearing loss caused by neuron degeneration, or even as an agent to improve sensitivity of hearing by increasing overall excitability of auditory nervous system.

  20. Mitigation of B1+ inhomogeneity using spatially selective excitation with jointly designed quadratic spatial encoding magnetic fields and RF shimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yi-Cheng; Lattanzi, Riccardo; Chu, Ying-Hua; Cloos, Martijn A; Sodickson, Daniel K; Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2017-08-01

    The inhomogeneity of flip angle distribution is a major challenge impeding the application of high-field MRI. We report a method combining spatially selective excitation using generalized spatial encoding magnetic fields (SAGS) with radiofrequency (RF) shimming to achieve homogeneous excitation. This method can be an alternative approach to address the challenge of B1+ inhomogeneity using nonlinear gradients. We proposed a two-step algorithm that jointly optimizes the combination of nonlinear spatial encoding magnetic fields and the combination of multiple RF transmitter coils and then optimizes the locations, RF amplitudes, and phases of the spokes. Our results show that jointly designed SAGS and RF shimming can provide a more homogeneous flip angle distribution than using SAGS or RF shimming alone. Compared with RF shimming alone, our approach can reduce the relative standard deviation of flip angle by 56% and 52% using phantom and human head data, respectively. The jointly designed SAGS and RF shimming method can be used to achieve homogeneous flip angle distributions when fully parallel RF transmission is not available. Magn Reson Med 78:577-587, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  1. MR pulse sequences for selective relaxation time measurements: a phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Jensen, K E; Jensen, M

    1990-01-01

    The accuracy of relaxation time measurements of spectroscopic inversion recovery and CPMG multi-echo pulse sequences together with ISIS and stimulated echo-pulse methods have been tested on a reference phantom (test object no. 5, of the EEC Concerted Research Project). For the measurements...... a Siemens Magnetom wholebody magnetic resonance scanner operating at 1.5 Tesla was used. For comparison six imaging pulse sequences for relaxation time measurements were tested on the same phantom. The spectroscopic pulse sequences all had an accuracy better than 10% of the reference values....

  2. Selective Coke Combustion by Oxygen Pulsing During Mo/ZSM-5-Catalyzed Methane Dehydroaromatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosinov, Nikolay; Coumans, Ferdy J A G; Uslamin, Evgeny; Kapteijn, Freek; Hensen, Emiel J M

    2016-11-21

    Non-oxidative methane dehydroaromatization is a promising reaction to directly convert natural gas into aromatic hydrocarbons and hydrogen. Commercialization of this technology is hampered by rapid catalyst deactivation because of coking. A novel approach is presented involving selective oxidation of coke during methane dehydroaromatization at 700 °C. Periodic pulsing of oxygen into the methane feed results in substantially higher cumulative product yield with synthesis gas; a H 2 /CO ratio close to two is the main side-product of coke combustion. Using 13 C isotope labeling of methane it is demonstrated that oxygen predominantly reacts with molybdenum carbide species. The resulting molybdenum oxides catalyze coke oxidation. Less than one-fifth of the available oxygen reacts with gaseous methane. Combined with periodic regeneration at 550 °C, this strategy is a significant step forward, towards a process for converting methane into liquid hydrocarbons. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  3. Selective breaking of bonds in water with intense, 2-cycle, infrared laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathur, D., E-mail: atmol1@tifr.res.in; Dharmadhikari, A. K. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, 1 Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Dota, K. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, 1 Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Centre for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Manipal University, Manipal 576 104 (India); Dey, D.; Tiwari, A. K. [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Kolkata, Mohanpur 741 246 (India); Dharmadhikari, J. A. [Centre for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Manipal University, Manipal 576 104 (India); De, S. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Vasa, P. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400 076 (India)

    2015-12-28

    One of the holy grails of contemporary science has been to establish the possibility of preferentially breaking one of several bonds in a molecule. For instance, the two O–H bonds in water are equivalent: given sufficient energy, either one of them is equally likely to break. We report bond-selective molecular fragmentation upon application of intense, 2-cycle pulses of 800 nm laser light: we demonstrate up to three-fold enhancement for preferential bond breaking in isotopically substituted water (HOD). Our experimental observations are rationalized by means of ab initio computations of the potential energy surfaces of HOD, HOD{sup +}, and HOD{sup 2+} and explorations of the dissociation limits resulting from either O–H or O–D bond rupture. The observations we report present a formidable theoretical challenge that need to be taken up in order to gain insights into molecular dynamics, strong field physics, chemical physics, non-adiabatic processes, mass spectrometry, and time-dependent quantum chemistry.

  4. Quantum control of vibrational excitations in a heteronuclear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Optimal control theory is applied to obtain infrared laser pulses for selective vibrational excitation in a heteronuclear diatomic molecule. The problem of finding the optimized field is phrased as a maximization of a cost functional which depends on the laser field. A time dependent Gaussian factor is introduced in the field ...

  5. Low intensity and frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields selectively impair breast cancer cell viability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Crocetti

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: A common drawback of many anticancer therapies is non-specificity in action of killing. We investigated the potential of ultra-low intensity and frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs to kill breast cancer cells. Our criteria to accept this technology as a potentially valid therapeutic approach were: 1 cytotoxicity to breast cancer cells and; 2 that the designed fields proved innocuous to healthy cell classes that would be exposed to the PEMFs during clinical treatment. METHODS: MCF7 breast cancer cells and their normal counterparts, MCF10 cells, were exposed to PEMFs and cytotoxic indices measured in order to design PEMF paradigms that best kill breast cancer cells. The PEMF parameters tested were: 1 frequencies ranging from 20 to 50 Hz; 2 intensities ranging from 2 mT to 5 mT and; 3 exposure durations ranging from 30 to 90 minutes per day for up to three days to determine the optimum parameters for selective cancer cell killing. RESULTS: We observed a discrete window of vulnerability of MCF7 cells to PEMFs of 20 Hz frequency, 3 mT magnitude and exposure duration of 60 minutes per day. The cell damage accrued in response to PEMFs increased with time and gained significance after three days of consecutive daily exposure. By contrast, the PEMFs parameters determined to be most cytotoxic to breast cancer MCF-7 cells were not damaging to normal MCF-10 cells. CONCLUSION: Based on our data it appears that PEMF-based anticancer strategies may represent a new therapeutic approach to treat breast cancer without affecting normal tissues in a manner that is non-invasive and can be potentially combined with existing anti-cancer treatments.

  6. Low Intensity and Frequency Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields Selectively Impair Breast Cancer Cell Viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocetti, Sara; Beyer, Christian; Schade, Grit; Egli, Marcel; Fröhlich, Jürg; Franco-Obregón, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Introduction A common drawback of many anticancer therapies is non-specificity in action of killing. We investigated the potential of ultra-low intensity and frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) to kill breast cancer cells. Our criteria to accept this technology as a potentially valid therapeutic approach were: 1) cytotoxicity to breast cancer cells and; 2) that the designed fields proved innocuous to healthy cell classes that would be exposed to the PEMFs during clinical treatment. Methods MCF7 breast cancer cells and their normal counterparts, MCF10 cells, were exposed to PEMFs and cytotoxic indices measured in order to design PEMF paradigms that best kill breast cancer cells. The PEMF parameters tested were: 1) frequencies ranging from 20 to 50 Hz; 2) intensities ranging from 2 mT to 5 mT and; 3) exposure durations ranging from 30 to 90 minutes per day for up to three days to determine the optimum parameters for selective cancer cell killing. Results We observed a discrete window of vulnerability of MCF7 cells to PEMFs of 20 Hz frequency, 3 mT magnitude and exposure duration of 60 minutes per day. The cell damage accrued in response to PEMFs increased with time and gained significance after three days of consecutive daily exposure. By contrast, the PEMFs parameters determined to be most cytotoxic to breast cancer MCF-7 cells were not damaging to normal MCF-10 cells. Conclusion Based on our data it appears that PEMF-based anticancer strategies may represent a new therapeutic approach to treat breast cancer without affecting normal tissues in a manner that is non-invasive and can be potentially combined with existing anti-cancer treatments. PMID:24039828

  7. Zoomed EPI-DWI of the head and neck with two-dimensional, spatially-selective radiofrequency excitation pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riffel, Philipp; Michaely, Henrik J.; Attenberger, Ulrike I.; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Haneder, Stefan [University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim - Heidelberg University, Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Mannheim (Germany); Morelli, John N. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Pfeuffer, Josef [Siemens Healthcare Sector, Application Development, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of zoomed diffusion-weighted EPI (z-EPI) in the head and neck in a healthy volunteer population and to compare to conventional single-shot EPI (c-EPI). Nine volunteers were included in this prospective, IRB-approved study. Examinations were performed on a 3 T-MR system equipped with a two-channel, fully-dynamic parallel transmit array. The acquired sequences consisted of a T2w-TSE, a c-EPI, and two z-EPI acquisitions. For quantitative assessment of distortion artefacts, DW images were fused with T2-TSE images. Misregistration of DW images with T2-TSE images was assessed in the cervical spine. For qualitative assessment, two readers ranked c-EPI and z-EPI sequences in terms of susceptibility artefacts, image blur, and overall imaging preference. ADC values of several anatomical regions were calculated and compared between sequences. Mean maximum distortion with the c-EPI was 5.9 mm ± 1.6 mm versus 2.4 mm ± 1 mm (p < 0.05) with z-EPI. Both readers found more blur and susceptibility artefacts in every case with c-EPI. No statistically significant differences in calculated ADC values were observed. z-EPI of the head and neck leads to substantial image quality improvements relative to c-EPI due to a reduction in susceptibility artefacts and image blur. (orig.)

  8. Selective treatment of carious dentin using a mid-infrared tunable pulsed laser at 6 μm wavelength range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Masayuki; Ishii, Katsunori; Yoshikawa, Kazushi; Yasuo, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Kazuyo; Awazu, Kunio

    2011-03-01

    Optical technologies have good potential for caries detection, prevention, excavation, and the realization of minimal intervention dentistry. This study aimed to develop a selective excavation technique of carious tissue using the specific absorption in 6 μm wavelength range. Bovine dentin demineralized with lactic acid solution was used as a carious dentin model. A mid-infrared tunable pulsed laser was obtained by difference-frequency generation technique. The wavelength was tuned to 6.02 and 6.42 μm which correspond to absorption bands called amide I and amide II, respectively. The laser delivers 5 ns pulse width at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The morphological change after irradiation was observed with a scanning electron microscope, and the measurement of ablation depth was performed with a confocal laser microscope. At λ = 6.02 μm and the average power density of 15 W/cm2, demineralized dentin was removed selectively with less-invasive effect on sound dentin. The wavelength of 6.42 μm also showed the possibility of selective removal. High ablation efficiency and low thermal side effect were observed using the nanosecond pulsed laser with λ = 6.02 μm. In the near future, development of compact laser device will open the minimal invasive laser treatment to the dental clinic.

  9. Noninvasive investigation of exocrine pancreatic function: Feasibility of cine dynamic MRCP with a spatially selective inversion-recovery pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasokawa, Kazuya; Ito, Katsuyoshi; Tamada, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Akira; Hayashida, Minoru; Tanimoto, Daigo; Higaki, Atsushi; Noda, Yasufumi; Kido, Ayumu

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the feasibility of noncontrast-enhanced cine dynamic magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) with a spatially selective inversion-recovery (IR) pulse for evaluating exocrine pancreatic function in comparison with the N-benzoyl-L-tyrosyl-p-aminobenzoic acid (BT-PABA) test as a pancreatic exocrine function test. Twenty subjects with or without chronic pancreatitis were included. MRCP with a spatially selective IR pulse was repeated every 15 seconds for 5 minutes to acquire a total of 20 images (cine-dynamic MRCP). The median and mean frequency of the observation (the number of times) and the moving distance (mean secretion grading scores) of pancreatic juice inflow on cine-dynamic MRCP were compared with a BT-PABA test. The urinary PABA excretion rate (%) had significant positive correlations with both the mean secretion grade (r = 0.66, P = 0.002) and frequency of secretory inflow (r = 0.62, P = 0.004) in cine dynamic MRCP. Both the mean frequency of observations of pancreatic secretory inflow (1.4 ± 1.6 times vs. 14.3 ± 4.2 times, P Cine dynamic MRCP with a spatially selective IR pulse may have potential for estimating the pancreatic exocrine function noninvasively as a substitute for the BT-PABA test. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Population Transfer between Two Quantum States by Piecewise Chirping of Femtosecond Pulses: Theory and Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhdanovich, S.; Shapiro, E. A.; Shapiro, M.; Hepburn, J. W.; Milner, V.

    2008-01-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate the method of population transfer by piecewise adiabatic passage between two quantum states. Coherent excitation of a two-level system with a train of ultrashort laser pulses is shown to reproduce the effect of an adiabatic passage, conventionally achieved with a single frequency-chirped pulse. By properly adjusting the amplitudes and phases of the pulses in the excitation pulse train, we achieve complete and robust population transfer to the target state. The piecewise nature of the process suggests a possibility for the selective population transfer in complex quantum systems

  11. Polarization-selective vortex-core switching by tailored orthogonal Gaussian-pulse currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Young-Sang; Lee, Ki-Suk; Jung, Hyunsung; Choi, Youn-Seok; Yoo, Myoung-Woo; Han, Dong-Soo; Im, Mi-Young; Fischer, Peter; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2011-05-01

    We experimentally demonstrate low-power-consumption vortex-core switching in magnetic nanodisks using tailored rotating magnetic fields produced with orthogonal and unipolar Gaussian-pulse currents. The optimal width of the orthogonal pulses and their time delay are found, from analytical and micromagnetic numerical calculations, to be determined only by the angular eigenfrequency ωD for a given vortex-state disk of polarization p, such that σ=1/ωD and Δt=π/2p/ωD. The estimated optimal pulse parameters are in good agreement with the experimental results. Finally, this work lays a foundation for energy-efficient information recording in vortex-core cross-point architecture.

  12. Selective silencing of Na(V)1.7 decreases excitability and conduction in vagal sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muroi, Yukiko; Ru, Fei; Kollarik, Marian; Canning, Brendan J; Hughes, Stephen A; Walsh, Stacey; Sigg, Martin; Carr, Michael J; Undem, Bradley J

    2011-12-01

    There has been much information learned in recent years about voltage gated sodium channel (Na(V)) subtypes in somatosensory pain signalling, but much less is known about the role of specific sodium channel subtypes in the vagal sensory system. In this study, we developed a technique using adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) to directly introduce shRNA against Na(V)1.7 subtype gene into the vagal sensory ganglia of guinea pigs in vivo. Na(V)1.7 gene expression in nodose ganglia was effectively and selectively reduced without influencing the expression of other sodium channel subtype genes including Na(V)1.1, 1.2, 1.3 1.6, 1.8, or 1.9. Using a whole cell patch-clamp technique, this effect on Na(V)1.7 gene expression coincided with a reduction in tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium current, a requirement for much larger depolarizing stimulus to initiate action potentials, and reduction in repetitive action potential discharge. Extracellular recordings in the isolated vagus nerve revealed that the conduction of action potentials in sensory A- and C-fibres in many neurons was effectively abolished after Na(V)1.7 shRNA introduction. Moreover, bilateral Na(V)1.7 shRNA injected animals survived for several months and the vagal reflex behaviour, exemplified by citric acid-induced coughing, was significantly suppressed. These data indicate that selectively silencing Na(V)1.7 ion channel expression leads to a substantial decrease in neural excitability and conduction block in vagal afferent nerves.

  13. Identification and Decay Studies of New, Neutron-Rich Isotopes of Bismuth, Lead and Thallium by means of a Pulsed Release Element Selective Method

    CERN Multimedia

    Mills, A; Kugler, E; Van duppen, P L E; Lettry, J

    2002-01-01

    % IS354 \\\\ \\\\ It is proposed to produce, identify and investigate at ISOLDE new, neutron-rich isotopes of bismuth, lead and thallium at the mass numbers A=215 to A=218. A recently tested operation mode of the PS Booster-ISOLDE complex, taking an advantage of the unique pulsed proton beam structure, will be used together with a ThC target in order to increase the selectivity. The decay properties of new nuclides will be studied by means of $\\beta$-, $\\gamma$- and X- ray spectroscopy methods. The expected information on the $\\beta$-half-lives and excited states will be used for testing and developing the nuclear structure models ``south-east'' of $^{208}$Pb, and will provide input data for the description of the r-process path at very heavy nuclei. The proposed study of the yields and the decay properties of those heavy nuclei produced in the spallation of $^{232}$Th by a 1~GeV proton beam contributes also the data necessary for the simulations of a hybrid accelerator-reactor system.

  14. 2D numerical modelling of gas temperature in a nanosecond pulsed longitudinal He-SrBr2 discharge excited in a high temperature gas-discharge tube for the high-power strontium laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernogorova, T. P.; Temelkov, K. A.; Koleva, N. K.; Vuchkov, N. K.

    2016-05-01

    An active volume scaling in bore and length of a Sr atom laser excited in a nanosecond pulse longitudinal He-SrBr2 discharge is carried out. Considering axial symmetry and uniform power input, a 2D model (r, z) is developed by numerical methods for determination of gas temperature in a new large-volume high-temperature discharge tube with additional incompact ZrO2 insulation in the discharge free zone, in order to find out the optimal thermal mode for achievement of maximal output laser parameters. A 2D model (r, z) of gas temperature is developed by numerical methods for axial symmetry and uniform power input. The model determines gas temperature of nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge in helium with small additives of strontium and bromine.

  15. Selective bond breakage within the HOD molecule using optimized femtosecond ultraviolet laser pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiwari, Ashwani Kumar; Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2008-01-01

    With the HOD molecule initially in its vibrational ground state, we theoretically analyze the laser-induced control of the OD/OH branching ratio D+OH H+OD in the first absorption band. In the weak-field limit, any form of UV-pulse shaping control leads to a branching ratio larger than similar to 2...

  16. Selective Deactivation of M13 Bacteriophage in E. Coli using Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Molukanele, P

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Deactivation of M13 Bacteriophage in E. Coli using Femtosecond Laser Pulses P. Molukanele 1, 3, A. Du Plessis 1, T. Roberts 1, L. Botha 1, M. Khati 2,3, W. Campos 2, 3 1CSIR National Laser Centre, Femtosecond Science group, Pretoria, South Africa 2CSIR...

  17. Selective ablation of dental enamel and dentin using femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lizarelli, R F Z; Costa, M M; Carvalho-Filho, E; Bagnato, V S; Nunes, F D

    2008-01-01

    The study of the interaction of intense laser light with matter, as well as transient response of atoms and molecules is very appropriated because of the laser energy concentration in a femtosecond optical pulses. The fundamental problem to be solved is to find tools and techniques which allow us to observe and manipulate on a femtosecond time scale the photonics events on and into the matter. Six third human extracted molars were exposed to a femtosecond Ti:Sapphire Q-switched and mode locked laser (Libra-S, Coherent, Palo Alto, CA, USA), emitting pulses with 70 fs width, radiation wavelength of 801 nm, at a constant pulse repetition rate of 1 KHz. The laser was operated at different power levels (70 to 400 mW) with constant exposition time of 10 seconds, at focused and defocused mode. Enamel and dentin surfaces were evaluated concerned ablation rate and morphological aspects under scanning electron microscopic. The results in this present experiment suggest that at the focused mode and under higher average power, enamel tissues present microcavities with higher depth and very precise edges, but, while dentin shows a larger melt-flushing, lower depth and melting and solidification aspect. In conclusion, it is possible to choose hard or soft ablation, under lower and higher average power, respectively, revealing different aspects of dental enamel and dentin, depending on the average power, fluence and distance from the focal point of the ultra-short pulse laser on the tooth surface

  18. The energy and temporal characteristics of orthogonal polarized waves generated by a transversely-excited pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertel, I.M.; Churakov, V.V.; Petukhov, V.O.; Prokopov, A.P.; Trushin, S.A.; Voitovich, A.P.

    1980-01-01

    The competition of orthogonally-polarized waves with various differences in the wave Q-factors and active medium pressures is studied. The possibility of controlling the parameters of a pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser by changing the value of the amplitude anisotropy of the cavity is demonstrated. The duration of the emission pulse for one of two orthogonal polarizations was reduced by virtually 50%.

  19. Multi-frequency excitation

    KAUST Repository

    Younis, Mohammad I.

    2016-03-10

    Embodiments of multi-frequency excitation are described. In various embodiments, a natural frequency of a device may be determined. In turn, a first voltage amplitude and first fixed frequency of a first source of excitation can be selected for the device based on the natural frequency. Additionally, a second voltage amplitude of a second source of excitation can be selected for the device, and the first and second sources of excitation can be applied to the device. After applying the first and second sources of excitation, a frequency of the second source of excitation can be swept. Using the methods of multi- frequency excitation described herein, new operating frequencies, operating frequency ranges, resonance frequencies, resonance frequency ranges, and/or resonance responses can be achieved for devices and systems.

  20. Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Lumbar Nerve Roots: Comparison Between Fast Readout-Segmented and Selective-Excitation Acquisitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoliu, Andrei; Ho, Michael; Nanz, Daniel; Piccirelli, Marco; Dappa, Evelyn; Klarhöfer, Markus; Del Grande, Filippo; Kuhn, Felix Pierre

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the quality of recently emerged advanced diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) techniques with conventional single-shot echo-planar imaging (EPI) in a functional assessment of lumbar nerve roots. The institutional review board approved the study including 12 healthy volunteers. Diffusion tensor imaging was performed at 3 T (MAGNETOM Skyra; Siemens Healthcare) with b-values of 0 and 700 s/mm and an isotropic spatial resolution for subsequent multiplanar reformatting. The nerve roots L2 to S1 were imaged in coronal orientation with readout-segmented EPI (rs-DTI) and selective-excitation EPI (sTX-DTI) with an acquisition time of 5 minutes each, and in axial orientation with single-shot EPI (ss-DTI) with an acquisition time of 12 minutes (scan parameters as in recent literature). Two independent readers qualitatively and quantitatively assessed image quality. The interobserver reliability ranged from "substantial" to "almost perfect" for all examined parameter and all 3 sequences (κ = 0.70-0.94). Overall image quality was rated higher, and artifact levels were scored lower for rs-DTI and sTX-DTI than for ss-DTI (P = 0.007-0.027), while fractional anisotropy and signal-to-noise ratio values were similar for all sequences (P ≥ 0.306 and P ≥ 0.100, respectively). Contrast-to-noise ratios were significantly higher for rs-DTI and ss-DTI than for sTX-DTI (P = 0.004-0.013). Despite shorter acquisition times, rs-DTI and sTX-DTI produced images of higher quality with smaller geometrical distortions than the current standard of reference, ss-DTI. Thus, DTI acquisitions in the coronal plane, requiring fewer slices for full coverage of exiting nerve roots, may allow for functional neurography in scan times suitable for routine clinical practice.

  1. Tunable CO2 laser system with subnanosecond-pulse-train output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, W. D.

    2017-02-01

    A CO2 laser system has been demonstrated that generates a train of subnanosecond pulses tunable over the P and R branches of the CO2 laser spectrum at 9-11 μm. It utilizes optical free induction decay to generate a single 100-ps laser pulse from a tunable transverse-excited-atmospheric CO2 laser. This laser pulse is injection-seeded into a high-pressure CO2 oscillator whose output consists of a train of amplified 100-ps pulses with maximum pulse energy of 30 mJ, corresponding to a peak power of 300 MW. The 100-ps, tunable, infrared laser pulses are needed for a new technique to remotely detect atmospheric gaseous molecules, which relies on the train of CO2 laser pulses selectively exciting the target molecules whose presence is then revealed using a separate terahertz probe beam.

  2. Vibrationally selective optimal control of alignment and orientation using infrared laser pulses: Application to carbon monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Shiyang; Balint-Kurti, Gabriel G.; Manby, Frederick R.

    2007-07-01

    Optimal control methods are used to study molecular alignment and orientation using infrared laser pulses. High order molecule-field interactions are taken into account through the use of the electric-nuclear Born-Oppenheimer approximation [G. G. Balint-Kurti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 122, 084110 (2005)]. High degrees of alignment and orientation are achieved by optimized infrared laser pulses of duration on the order of one rotational period of the molecule. It is shown that, through the incorporation of a vibrational projection operator into the optimization procedure, it is possible not only to maximize the alignment and orientation but also to bring the whole system into a single prescribed vibrational manifold. Numerical calculations are performed for carbon monoxide using ab initio potential energies computed in the presence of external electric fields.

  3. Low Intensity and Frequency Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields Selectively Impair Breast Cancer Cell Viability

    OpenAIRE

    Crocetti, Sara; Beyer, Christian; Schade, Grit; Egli, Marcel; Fr?hlich, J?rg; Franco-Obreg?n, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A common drawback of many anticancer therapies is non-specificity in action of killing. We investigated the potential of ultra-low intensity and frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) to kill breast cancer cells. Our criteria to accept this technology as a potentially valid therapeutic approach were: 1) cytotoxicity to breast cancer cells and; 2) that the designed fields proved innocuous to healthy cell classes that would be exposed to the PEMFs during clinical treatmen...

  4. Fat suppression in MR imaging with binomial pulse sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudovin, C.J.; Bryant, D.J.; Bydder, G.M.; Young, I.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on a study to develop pulse sequences allowing suppression of fat signal on MR images without eliminating signal from other tissues with short T1. They have developed such a technique involving selective excitation of protons in water, based on a binomial pulse sequence. Imaging is performed at 0.15 T. Careful shimming is performed to maximize separation of fat and water peaks. A spin-echo 1,500/80 sequence is used, employing 90 degrees pulse with transit frequency optimized for water with null excitation of 20 H offset, followed by a section-selective 180 degrees pulse. With use of the binomial sequence for imagining, reduction in fat signal is seen on images of the pelvis and legs of volunteers. Patient studies show dramatic improvement in visualization of prostatic carcinoma compared with standard sequences

  5. Sampling system for pulsed signals. Study of the radioactive lifetimes of excited 32P1/2 and 32P3/2 states of Na, excited by a tunable dye laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, P.; Campos, J.

    1979-01-01

    A system for sampling and averaging repetitive signals in the order of nanoseconds is discussed. The system uses as storage memory a multichannel analyzer operating in multi scaling mode. This instrument is employed for the measurement of atomic level lifetimes using a dye laser to excite the atoms and is applied to the study of lifetimes of the 3 2 P1/2 and 3 2 P3/2 states of sodium. (Author) 32 refs

  6. Selective removal of carious dentin using a nanosecond pulsed laser with a wavelength of 6.02 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Katsunori; Saiki, Masayuki; Yasuo, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Kazuyo; Yoshikawa, Kazushi; Awazu, Kunio

    2010-04-01

    Conventional laser light sources for the treatment of a hard tissue in dental (Er:YAG laser, Er,Cr:YSGG laser and CO2 laser etc.) are good for removal of caries. However these lasers cannot achieve to give a selective treatment effect for caries without a side effect for normal tissue. The objective of this study is to develop the less-invasive treatment technique of carious dentin by selective absorption effect using the laser with a wavelength of 6.02 μm which corresponds to an absorption peak of organic matters called amide 1 band. Mid-infrared nanosecond pulsed laser by difference-frequency generation was used for the experiment of selective treatment. A tunable wavelength range, pulse width and repetition rate is from 5.5 to 10 μm, 5 ns and Hz, respectively. The laser with a wavelength of 6.02 μm and predetermined energy parameters was irradiated to the plate of carious dentin model which is made by soaking in lactic acid solution. After laser irradiation, the surface and cross-sectional surface of samples were observed by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Average power density about 15 W/cm2 realized to excavate a demineralized region (carious dentin model) selectively in a SEM observation. In the same energy condition, serious side effect was not observed on the surface of normal dentin. A wavelength of 6.02 μm realizes a selective excavation of carious dentin. Using 6.02 μm is a novel and promising technique toward to next-generation dental treatment procedure for realizing MI.

  7. Double half RF pulses for reduced sensitivity to eddy currents in UTE imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josan, Sonal; Pauly, John M; Daniel, Bruce L; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2009-05-01

    Ultrashort echo time imaging with half RF pulse excitation is challenging as eddy currents induced by the slice-select gradient distort the half pulse slice profile. This work presents two pulses with T(2)-dependent slice profiles that are less sensitive to eddy currents. The double half pulse improves the slice selectivity for long T(2) components, while the inverted double half pulse suppresses the unwanted long T(2) signal. Thus, both approaches prevent imperfect cancellation of out-of-slice signal from contaminating the desired slice. Experimental results demonstrate substantially improved slice selectivity and R(2)* quantitation accuracy with these pulses. These pulses are effective in making short T(2) imaging and quantitation less sensitive to eddy currents and provide an alternative to time-consuming gradient characterization. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Site-selective excitation and polarized absorption and emission spectra of trivalent thulium and erbium in strontium fluorapatite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruber, J.B. [Department of Physics, San Jose State University, San Jose, California 95192-0106 (United States); Wright, A.O.; Seltzer, M.D. [Research and Technology Division, Naval Air Warfare Center, Code 474230D, China Lake, California 93555-6001 (United States); Zandi, B.; Merkle, L.D. [IR Optics Technology OFC, Army Research Laboratory, Ft. Belvoir, Virginia 22060-5838 (United States); Hutchinson, J.A. [Night Vision and Electronics Sensors Directorate, The United States Army, Ft. Belvoir, Virginia 22060-5806 (United States); Morrison, C.A. [Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, Maryland 20783-1145 (United States); Allik, T.H. [Science Applications International Corporation, 1710 Goodridge Drive, McLean, Virginia 22102 (United States); Chai, B.H. [Center for Research on Electro-optics and Lasers, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32836 (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Polarized fluorescence spectra produced by site-selective excitation and conventional polarized absorption spectra were obtained for Tm{sup 3+} and Er{sup 3+} ions individually incorporated into single crystals of strontium fluorapatite, Sr{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}F. Substitution of the trivalent rare earth ion for divalent strontium was achieved by passive charge compensation during Czochralski growth of the fluorapatite crystals. Spectra were obtained between 1780 and 345 nm at temperatures from 4 K to room temperature on crystals having the hexagonal structure [P6{sub 3}/m(C{sub 6h}{sup 2})]. The polarized fluorescence spectra due to transitions from multiplet manifolds of Tm{sup 3+}(4f{sup 12}), including {sup 1}D{sub 2}, {sup 1}G{sub 4}, and {sup 3}H{sub 4} to manifolds {sup 3}H{sub 6} (the ground-state manifold), {sup 3}F{sub 4}, {sup 3}H{sub 5}, {sup 3}H{sub 4}, and {sup 3}F{sub 3} were analyzed for the details of the crystal-field splitting of the manifolds. Fluorescence lifetimes were measured for Tm{sup 3+} transitions from {sup 1}D{sub 2}, {sup 1}G{sub 4}, and {sup 3}H{sub 4} at room temperature and from {sup 1}G{sub 4} at 16 K. Results of the analysis indicate that the majority of Tm{sup 3+} ions occupy sites having C{sub s} symmetry. A point-charge lattice-sum calculation was made in which the crystal-field components, A{sub nm}, were determined assuming that trivalent thulium replaces divalent strontium in the metal site having C{sub s} symmetry. Results support the conclusion that the nearest-neighbor fluoride (F{sup {minus}}) is replaced by divalent oxygen (O{sup 2{minus}}), thus preserving overall charge neutrality and local symmetry. Crystal-field splitting calculations predict energy levels in agreement with experimental data. By varying the crystal-field parameters, B{sub nm}, we obtained a rms difference of 7cm{sup {minus}1} between 43 calculated and experimental Stark levels for Tm{sup 3+}(4f{sup 12}) in Tm:SFAP. (Abstract Truncated)

  9. Phase selection during pulsed laser annealing of Fe-V alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perepezko, J.H.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Peercy, P.S.

    1987-01-01

    Pulsed laser melting of the low-temperature σ (tetragonal, D8/sub b/) phase has been used to generate a liquid undercooled with respect to the melting point of the higher-temperature, equilibrium α (bcc) solid solution in equiatomic Fe-V alloys. From calculations based on reported thermodynamic data and equilibrium transformation temperatures, the metastable melting point of the σ phase is about 1720 K for an Fe-50 at.% V alloy, which is 54 K below the melting temperature of the α phase. During rapid heating of well-annealed σ-phase material with a 30 ns laser pulse to above melt threshold, the σ → α reaction is suppressed, so that the melt zone is undercooled by -- 54 K with respect to the equilibrium α phase. The α phase nucleates from the undercooled molten surface layer and is retained during the subsequent rapid cooling (-- 10/sup 10/ K/s) because of the relatively sluggish α → σ transformation. X-ray diffraction (Read camera) and TEM identified the σ phase in the near-surface after melting σ with incident laser energies (1.0-1.41 J/cm/sup 2/) which are well above the melt threshold as determined by changes in reflectivity (-- 0.7 J/cm/sup 2/). The α phase nucleated from the undercooled liquid within -- 20 ns

  10. Effective Strategy for Conformer-Selective Detection of Short-Lived Excited State Species: Application to the IR Spectroscopy of the N1H Keto Tautomer of Guanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asami, Hiroya; Tokugawa, Munefumi; Masaki, Yoshiaki; Ishiuchi, Shun-Ichi; Gloaguen, Eric; Seio, Kohji; Saigusa, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Masaaki; Sekine, Mitsuo; Mons, Michel

    2016-04-14

    The ultrafast deactivation processes in the excited state of biomolecules, such as the most stable tautomers of guanine, forbid any state-of-the-art gas phase spectroscopic studies on these species with nanosecond lasers. This drawback can be overcome by grafting a chromophore having a long-lived excited state to the molecule of interest, allowing thus a mass-selective detection by nanosecond R2PI and therefore double resonance IR/UV conformer-selective spectroscopic studies. The principle is presently demonstrated on the keto form of a modified 9-methylguanine, for which the IR/UV double resonance spectrum in the C═O stretch region, reported for the first time, provides evidence for extensive vibrational couplings within the guanine moiety. Such a successful strategy opens up a route to mass-selective IR/UV spectroscopic investigations on molecules exhibiting natural chromophores having ultrashort-lived excited states, such as DNA bases, their complexes as well as peptides containing short-lived aromatic residues.

  11. Three-dimensional MRI with independent slab excitation and encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissa, Amir; Wilman, Alan H

    2012-02-01

    Three-dimensional MRI is typically performed with the same orientation for radiofrequency slab excitation and slab select phase encoding. We introduce independent slab excitation and encoding to create a new degree of freedom in three-dimensional MRI, which is the angular relationship between the prescribed excitation volume and the voxel encoding grid. By separating the directions of slab excitation and slab phase encoding, the independent slab excitation and encoding method allows choice of optimal voxel orientation, while maintaining volume excitation based on anatomic landmarks. The method requires simple pulse sequence modifications and uses standard image reconstruction followed by removal of aliasing and image reformatting. The independent slab excitation and encoding method enables arbitrary oblique angle imaging using fixed voxel encoding gradients to maintain similar eddy current, concomitant field, or magnetic dipole effects independent of the oblique angle of excitation. We apply independent slab excitation and encoding to phase and susceptibility-weighted imaging using fixed voxel encoding aligned with the main magnetic field to demonstrate its value in both standardizing and improving image contrast, when using arbitrary oblique imaging volumes. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Milk processed by pulsed electric fields: evaluation of microbial quality, physicochemical characteristics, and selected nutrients at different storage conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez-Aguirre, Daniela; Fernández, Sulmer; Esquivel, Heracleo; Dunne, Patrick C; Barbosa-Cánovas, Gustavo V

    2011-01-01

    Pulsed electric fields (PEF) technology was used to pasteurize raw milk under selected treatments. Processing conditions were: temperature 20, 30, and 40 °C, electric field 30.76 to 53.84 kV/cm, and pulse numbers 12, 24, and 30 for skim milk (SM), and 12, 21, and 30 for whole milk (WM) (2 μs pulse width, monopolar). Physicochemical parameters (pH, electrical conductivity, density, color, solids nonfat [SNF]) and composition (protein and fat content) were measured after processing. Shelf life of SM and WM was assessed after processing at 46.15 kV/cm, combined with temperature (20 to 60 °C) and 30 pulses. Mesophilic and psychrophilic loads and pH were evaluated during storage at 4 and 21 °C. Results showed minor variations in physicochemical properties after processing. There was an interesting trend in SM in SNF, which decreased as treatment became stronger; similar behavior was observed for fat and protein, showing a 0.18% and 0.17% decrease, respectively, under the strongest conditions. Protein and fat content decreased in WM samples treated at 40 °C, showing a decrease in protein (0.11%), and an even higher decrease in fat content. During storage, PEF-treated milk samples showed higher stability at 4 °C with minor variations in pH; after 33 d, pH was higher than 6. However samples at 21 °C showed faster spoilage and pH dropped to 4 after 5 d. Growth of mesophilic bacteria was delayed in both milks after PEF processing, showing a 6- and 7-log cycles for SM and WM, respectively, after day 25 (4 °C); however, psychrophilic bacteria grew faster in both cases. Pulsed electric fields (PEF) technology in the pasteurization of liquid food products has shown positive results. Processing times can be reduced considerably, which in turn reduces the loss of nutrients and offers important savings in energy. PEF has been used successfully to pasteurize some liquid foods, but it is still not used commercially in milk pasteurization, although several trials have shown

  13. Design of optimal laser pulses to control molecular rovibrational ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Optimal control theory in combination with time-dependent quantum dynamics is employed to design laser pulses which can perform selective vibrational and rotational excitations in a heteronuclear diatomic system. We have applied the conjugate gradient method for the constrained optimization of a suit-.

  14. Excitation and ionization of hydrogen and helium atoms by femtosecond laser pulses: theoretical approach by Coulomb-Volkov states; Excitation et ionisation des atomes d'hydrogene et d'helium par des impulsions laser femtosecondes: approche theorique par des etats de Coulomb-Volkov

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guichard, R

    2007-12-15

    We present a theoretical approach using Coulomb-Volkov states that appears useful for the study of atomic multi-photonic processes induced by intense XUV femtosecond laser pulses. It predicts hydrogen ionization spectra when it is irradiated by laser pulses in perturbations conditions. Three ways have been investigated. Extension to strong fields when {Dirac_h}{omega} > I{sub p}: it requires to include the hydrogen ground state population, introducing it in standard Coulomb-Volkov amplitude leads to saturated multi-photonic ionization. Extension to multi-photonic transitions with {Dirac_h}{omega} < I{sub p}: new quantum paths are open by the possibility to excite the lower hydrogen bound states. Multiphoton excitation of these states is investigated using a Coulomb-Volkov approach. Extension to helium: two-photon double ionization study shows the influence of electronic correlations in both ground and final state. Huge quantity of information such as angular and energetic distributions as well as total cross sections is available. (author)

  15. Spectrally selective molecular doped solids: spectroscopy, photophysics and their application to ultrafast optical pulse processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galaup, Jean-Pierre

    2005-01-01

    The persistent spectral hole-burning (PSHB) phenomenon observed in molecular doped polymers cooled down to liquid helium temperatures allows the engraving of spectral structures in the inhomogeneous absorption profile of the material. This phenomenon known since 1974 has became a fruitful field for the study of the intimacy of complex molecular systems in the solid state, revealing high-resolution spectroscopy, photophysics, photochemistry and dynamics of molecular doped amorphous media, organic as well as inorganic. A PSHB molecular doped solid can be programmed in spectral domain and therefore, it can be converted in an optical processor capable to achieve user-defined optical functions. Some aspects of this field are illustrated in the present paper. An application is presented where a naphthalocyanine doped polymer film is used in a demonstrative experiment to prove that temporal aberration free re-compression of ultra-short light pulses is feasible. Perspectives for the coherent control of light fields or photochemical processes are also evoked

  16. Spectrally selective molecular doped solids: spectroscopy, photophysics and their application to ultrafast optical pulse processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galaup, Jean-Pierre [Laboratoire Aime Cotton, CNRS UPR 3321, Ba-hat t. 505, 91405 Orsay cedex (France)]. E-mail: jean-pierre.galaup@lac.u-psud.fr

    2005-04-15

    The persistent spectral hole-burning (PSHB) phenomenon observed in molecular doped polymers cooled down to liquid helium temperatures allows the engraving of spectral structures in the inhomogeneous absorption profile of the material. This phenomenon known since 1974 has became a fruitful field for the study of the intimacy of complex molecular systems in the solid state, revealing high-resolution spectroscopy, photophysics, photochemistry and dynamics of molecular doped amorphous media, organic as well as inorganic. A PSHB molecular doped solid can be programmed in spectral domain and therefore, it can be converted in an optical processor capable to achieve user-defined optical functions. Some aspects of this field are illustrated in the present paper. An application is presented where a naphthalocyanine doped polymer film is used in a demonstrative experiment to prove that temporal aberration free re-compression of ultra-short light pulses is feasible. Perspectives for the coherent control of light fields or photochemical processes are also evoked.

  17. Decay of coherent acoustic phonons generated by femtosecond pulsed optical excitation and injected in a Wannier-Stark superlattice (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Anthony J.; Poyser, Caroline L.; Akimov, Andrey V.; York, William; Henini, Mohamed; Campion, Richard P.

    2017-02-01

    In the past decade, sound amplification by the stimulated emission of (acoustic phonon) radiation (saser) devices for generating coherent terahertz (THz) acoustic waves have been demonstrated [1 - 3]. The devices exploit the electron-phonon interactions in periodic semiconductor nanostructures known as superlattices (SLs) to amplify acoustic phonons. In addition, the particular acoustic properties of SLs can be exploited to make mirrors and cavities for THz phonons. Thus SLs can provide the two essential elements of a saser: the acoustic gain medium and the acoustic cavity. In this presentation I will describe experimental studies of the THz phonon dynamics in a weakly-coupled GaAs/AlAs saser SL, which is DC electrically biased into the Wannier-Stark regime. Picoseconds-duration pulses of coherent THz acoustic phonons were generated using pump light pulses from a femtosecond laser and injected into the SL device. These phonon pulses seeded the saser cavity modes at about 220 and 440 GHz, which were amplified within the device. The phonons were detected using two methods: reflection of femtosecond probe light pulses, in a conventional pump-probe arrangement, and through the transient electrical response of the device itself. When the DC bias conditions for saser were achieved in the device, the amplitude and lifetime of the seeded modes were both increased, analogous to the threshold and spectral line narrowing effects seen in laser devices. [1] R P Beardsley et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 085501 (2010). [2] W Maryam et al., Nature Communications 4:2184 (2013). [3] K Shinokita et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 075504 (2016).

  18. Selective deactivation of M13 bacteriophage in E. Coli using femtosecond laser pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Molukanele, P

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Potential for the selective deactivation of viruses while leaving the sensitive material such as the host cell unharmed was studied using a femtosecond laser system, and preliminary results are reported....

  19. Selective Coke Combustion by Oxygen Pulsing During Mo/ZSM-5-Catalyzed Methane Dehydroaromatization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosinov, Nikolay; Coumans, Ferdy J A G; Uslamin, Evgeny; Kapteijn, F.; Hensen, Emiel J M

    2016-01-01

    Non-oxidative methane dehydroaromatization is a promising reaction to directly convert natural gas into aromatic hydrocarbons and hydrogen. Commercialization of this technology is hampered by rapid catalyst deactivation because of coking. A novel approach is presented involving selective

  20. Programmable pulse generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Zhihua; Lou Binqiao; Duan Xiaohui

    2002-01-01

    The author introduces the design of programmable pulse generator that is based on a micro-controller and controlled by RS232 interface of personal computer. The whole system has good stability. The pulse generator can produce TTL pulse and analog pulse. The pulse frequency can be selected by EPLD. The voltage amplitude and pulse width of analog pulse can be adjusted by analog switches and digitally-controlled potentiometers. The software development tools of computer is National Instruments LabView5.1. The front panel of this virtual instrumentation is intuitive and easy-to-use. Parameters can be selected and changed conveniently by knob and slide

  1. Selective excavation of human carious dentin using the nanosecond pulsed laser in 5.8-μm wavelength range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Tetsuya; Ishii, Katsunori; Yoshikawa, Kazushi; Yasuo, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Kazuyo; Awazu, Kunio

    Less-invasive treatment of caries has been needed in laser dentistry. Based on the absorption property of dentin substrates, 6 μm wavelength range shows specific absorptions and promising characteristics for the excavation. In our previous study, 5.8 μm wavelength range was found to be effective for selective excavation of carious dentin and restoration treatment using composite resin from the irradiation experiment with bovine sound and demineralized dentin. In this study, the availability of 5.8 μm wavelength range for selective excavation of human carious dentin was investigated for clinical application. A mid-infrared tunable nanosecond pulsed laser by difference-frequency generation was used for revealing the ablation property of human carious dentin. Irradiation experiments indicated that the wavelength of 5.85 μm and the average power density of 30 W/cm2 realized the selective excavation of human carious dentin, but ablation property was different with respect to each sample because of the different caries progression. In conclusion, 5.8 μm wavelength range was found to be effective for selective excavation of human carious dentin.

  2. Effect of sulfur-containing spices on the bioaccessibility of trace minerals from selected cereals and pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Meena; Platel, Kalpana

    2017-07-01

    Garlic and onion, which are rich in organo-sulfur compounds, are reported to enhance the bioaccessibility of Ca, Mg, Fe and Zn; however, there is a lack of similar information on the bioaccessibility of copper, manganese and chromium. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine the effect of exogenous garlic and onion on the bioaccessibility of these trace minerals from selected food grains. The effect of two levels of garlic (0.25 and 0.5 g/10 g grain -1 ) and onion (1.5 and 3 g/10 g grain -1 ) on the bioaccessibility of these trace minerals from two representative cereals and pulses was determined by employing an in vitro dialysability procedure. Both garlic and onion significantly improved the bioaccessibility of Cu, especially when added at the higher level, in most of the foods examined. The enhancing effect of garlic on Mn bioaccessibility was found in cooked sorghum and chickpea, whereas onion significantly improved Mn bioaccessibility in cooked rice and chickpea. The addition of both spices did not exert any enhancing effect on Cr bioaccessibility from the cereals and pulses. The bioaccessibility of Cu, as well as Mn to a lesser extent, from vegetarian diets can be significantly improved by incorporating garlic and onion in the diet. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Kinetic studies following state-selective laser excitation: Annual performance report for the period March 15, 1987-March 14, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keto, J.W.

    1987-11-01

    The objective of this contract is the study of state-to-state, electronic energy transfer reactions following two-photon laser excitation. We have specifically been studying reactions of Xe 5p 5 6p because of their relevance to the XeCl excimer laser. We are studying deactivation reactions in collisions with heavy atoms such as Ar, Kr, and Xe and reactive collisions with chlorides. The reactants are excited by multiphoton laser absorption. Product channels are observed by their fluorescence, or in experiments in the coming months by laser induced fluorescence using a second color laser. Reaction rates are measured by observing the time dependent decay of signals from reactant and product channels. In addition we measure interaction potentials of the reactants by laser spectroscopy where the laser induced fluorescence or ionization is measured as a function of laser wavelength (excitation spectra) or by measuring fluorescence spectra at fixed laser frequencies with monochromators. The spectra are obtained in the form of either lineshapes or individual lines from rovibrational transitions of bound states. 4 figs

  4. Selective Growth of PZT Nanowires on Si Substrates Using Glancing Angle Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Acevedo, D.; Mateo, D.; Hordagoda, M.; Witanachchi, S.

    Thin films and nanostructures of the ferroelectric material Lead Zirconium Titanium Oxide (PZT) offer a multitude of applications in Piezotronics, and ferroelectric capacitor memories. While the growth of PZT thin films is well established, methodologies for the fabrication of vertically-aligned and spatially ordered PZT columns in nanoscale are not common. In this work an approach that uses a self-assembled nanoparticle template in a glancing angle pulsed laser deposition (GAPLD) process is presented. Lanthanum strontium manganite oxide (LSMO) was grown by laser ablation on a Si substrate masked by a monolayer of commercially available silica nanospheres (SNS) with diameter of 250nm self-assembled in a closed-pack hexagonal configuration (HCP) using Langmuir-Blodgett method. The HCP configuration of the mask will allows for the formation of LSMO islands on the crevices in between spheres, which will serve as seed layers for PZT growth. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the grown PZT's morphology. Due to the ballistic shadowing effect introduced by the GAPLD, PZT columns in the form of hexagonal nanopillars evolved over the spatially ordered nanotemplate. Tunability of growth was achieved for certain PZT growth conditions. Morphological and structural properties of these structures were studied and showed a preferred orientation of growth of the (200) tetragonal/rhombohedral phase.

  5. Quantum control of molecular vibrational and rotational excitations in a homonuclear diatomic molecule: A full three-dimensional treatment with polarization forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Qinghua; Balint-Kurti, Gabriel G.; Manby, Frederick R.; Artamonov, Maxim; Ho, Tak-San; Rabitz, Herschel

    2006-01-01

    The optimal control of the vibrational excitation of the hydrogen molecule [Balint-Kurti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 122, 084110 (2005)] utilizing polarization forces is extended to three dimensions. The polarizability of the molecule, to first and higher orders, is accounted for using explicit ab initio calculations of the molecular electronic energy in the presence of an electric field. Optimal control theory is then used to design infrared laser pulses that selectively excite the molecule to preselected vibrational-rotational states. The amplitude of the electric field of the optimized pulses is restricted so that there is no significant ionization during the process, and a new frequency sifting method is used to simplify the frequency spectrum of the pulse. The frequency spectra of the optimized laser pulses for processes involving rotational excitation are more complex than those relating to processes involving only vibrational excitation.

  6. Plasma response to transient high voltage pulses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The solitary electron holes are reviewed for positive pulsed bias to the electrode. Also the excitation of waves (solitary electron and ion holes) is reviewed for a metallic electrode covered by a dielectric material. The wave excitation during and after the pulse withdrawal, excitation and propagation characteristics of various ...

  7. Comparison of Principal Component Analysis and Linear Discriminant Analysis applied to classification of excitation-emission matrices of the selected biological material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Leśkiewicz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Quality of two linear methods (PCA and LDA applied to reduce dimensionality of feature analysis is compared and efficiency of their algorithms in classification of the selected biological materials according to their excitation-emission fluorescence matrices is examined. It has been found that LDA method reduces the dimensions (or a number of significant variables more effectively than PCA method. A relatively good discrimination within the examined biological material has been obtained with the use of LDA algorithm.[b]Keywords[/b]: Feature Analysis, Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Biological Material Classification

  8. NMR studies of selective population inversion and spin clustering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, J.S.

    1986-02-01

    This work describes the development and application of selective excitation techniques in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. Composite pulses and multiple-quantum methods are used to accomplish various goals, such as broadband and narrowband excitation in liquids, and collective excitation of groups of spins in solids. These methods are applied to a variety of problems, including non-invasive spatial localization, spin cluster size characterization in disordered solids and solid state NMR imaging.

  9. NMR studies of selective population inversion and spin clustering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, J.S.

    1986-02-01

    This work describes the development and application of selective excitation techniques in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. Composite pulses and multiple-quantum methods are used to accomplish various goals, such as broadband and narrowband excitation in liquids, and collective excitation of groups of spins in solids. These methods are applied to a variety of problems, including non-invasive spatial localization, spin cluster size characterization in disordered solids and solid state NMR imaging

  10. Spectral tuning via multi-phonon-assisted stokes and anti-stokes excitations in LaF{sub 3}: Tm{sup 3+} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Dangli, E-mail: gaodangli@163.com [School of Materials & Mineral Resources, Xi' an University of Architecture and Technology, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710055 (China); College of Science, Xi' an University of Architecture and Technology, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710055 (China); Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Nano Materials and Technology, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710055 (China); Tian, Dongping, E-mail: dptian@xauat.edu.cn [School of Materials & Mineral Resources, Xi' an University of Architecture and Technology, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710055 (China); College of Science, Xi' an University of Architecture and Technology, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710055 (China); Chong, Bo; Li, Long [College of Science, Xi' an University of Architecture and Technology, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710055 (China); Zhang, Xiangyu [College of Science, Chang' an University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710064 (China)

    2016-09-05

    We present a facile and highly effective method to tailor upconversion (UC) emission from LaF{sub 3}: Tm{sup 3+} nanoparticles (NPs) by adjusting ambient temperature from 20 K to 400 K accompanied with the pulse laser excitation. Spectral tuning mechanism controlled by ambient temperature at pulse laser excitation is revealed, and a mechanism based on the modification on multi-phonon relaxation rates for the rapid population of intermediate level {sup 3}H{sub 4} and multi-phonon-assisted excited state absorption is proposed. Based on multi-phonon relaxation theory and time-resolved photoluminescence studies, it is reasonable that UC luminescence under short-pulse laser excitation mainly originates from the ions at/near the surface of NPs. These exciting findings in ambient temperature accompanied with the short-pulse excitation dependent UC selectivity offer a general approach to tailoring lanthanide related UC emissions, which will benefit multicolor displays and imaging. - Graphical abstract: An effective method to tailor upconversion from LaF{sub 3}: Tm{sup 3+} nanoparticles by adjusting ambient temperature accompanied with the short-pulse laser excitation is presented and the spectral tuning mechanism based the modification on multi-phonon relaxation rate and multi-phonon-assisted excited state absorption is also revealed. - Highlights: • The luminescence switching is controlled by temperature and pulse duration. • The mechanism based on the multi-phonon-assisted excitations is proposed. • Blue luminescence under short-pulse excitation originates from the surface ions. • Temperature has a big effect on luminescence color output.

  11. Improving the precision of linear optics measurements based on turn-by-turn beam position monitor data after a pulsed excitation in lepton storage rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Malina

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Beam optics control is of critical importance for machine performance and protection. Nowadays, turn-by-turn (TbT beam position monitor (BPM data are increasingly exploited as they allow for fast and simultaneous measurement of various optics quantities. Nevertheless, so far the best documented uncertainty of measured β-functions is of about 10‰ rms. In this paper we compare the β-functions of the ESRF storage ring measured from two different TbT techniques—the N-BPM and the Amplitude methods—with the ones inferred from a measurement of the orbit response matrix (ORM. We show how to improve the precision of TbT techniques by refining the Fourier transform of TbT data with properly chosen excitation amplitude. The precision of the N-BPM method is further improved by refining the phase advance measurement. This represents a step forward compared to standard TbT measurements. First experimental results showing the precision of β-functions pushed down to 4‰ both in TbT and ORM techniques are reported and commented.

  12. Improving the precision of linear optics measurements based on turn-by-turn beam position monitor data after a pulsed excitation in lepton storage rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malina, L.; Coello de Portugal, J.; Persson, T.; Skowroński, P. K.; Tomás, R.; Franchi, A.; Liuzzo, S.

    2017-08-01

    Beam optics control is of critical importance for machine performance and protection. Nowadays, turn-by-turn (TbT) beam position monitor (BPM) data are increasingly exploited as they allow for fast and simultaneous measurement of various optics quantities. Nevertheless, so far the best documented uncertainty of measured β -functions is of about 10‰ rms. In this paper we compare the β -functions of the ESRF storage ring measured from two different TbT techniques—the N-BPM and the Amplitude methods—with the ones inferred from a measurement of the orbit response matrix (ORM). We show how to improve the precision of TbT techniques by refining the Fourier transform of TbT data with properly chosen excitation amplitude. The precision of the N-BPM method is further improved by refining the phase advance measurement. This represents a step forward compared to standard TbT measurements. First experimental results showing the precision of β -functions pushed down to 4‰ both in TbT and ORM techniques are reported and commented.

  13. A Study of Cortical Excitability, Central Motor Conduction, and Cortical Inhibition Using Single Pulse Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Patients with Early Frontotemporal and Alzheimer's Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Issac, Thomas Gregor; Nagaraju, B C; Philip, Mariamma

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative cortical dementias affect several million people worldwide. Early diagnosis and categorization are essential for initiating appropriate pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment so that deterioration can be postponed, and disability adjusted life years can be saved both for the patient and for the caregiver. Therefore, an early, simple, noninvasive biomarker will serve as a boon. Patients who satisfied probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) or frontotemporal dementia (FTD) using international consensus criteria for FTD and National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke-AD and Related Disorders Association criteria for AD were evaluated using single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation with figure of eight coil and motor evoked potential from right first dorsal interossei. Resting threshold (MT), central motor conduction time (CMCT), and silent period (SP) were evaluated. Resting MT and SP are reduced in patients with Alzheimer's disease whereas CMCT is prolonged in patients with FTD and SP is in the lower limit of normal in both conditions. The patterns of central motor conduction and MT are distinctly different in patients with early Alzheimer's disease (AD) and FTD.

  14. Can Measured Synergy Excitations Accurately Construct Unmeasured Muscle Excitations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Nicholas A; Patten, Carolynn; Fregly, Benjamin J

    2018-01-01

    Accurate prediction of muscle and joint contact forces during human movement could improve treatment planning for disorders such as osteoarthritis, stroke, Parkinson's disease, and cerebral palsy. Recent studies suggest that muscle synergies, a low-dimensional representation of a large set of muscle electromyographic (EMG) signals (henceforth called "muscle excitations"), may reduce the redundancy of muscle excitation solutions predicted by optimization methods. This study explores the feasibility of using muscle synergy information extracted from eight muscle EMG signals (henceforth called "included" muscle excitations) to accurately construct muscle excitations from up to 16 additional EMG signals (henceforth called "excluded" muscle excitations). Using treadmill walking data collected at multiple speeds from two subjects (one healthy, one poststroke), we performed muscle synergy analysis on all possible subsets of eight included muscle excitations and evaluated how well the calculated time-varying synergy excitations could construct the remaining excluded muscle excitations (henceforth called "synergy extrapolation"). We found that some, but not all, eight-muscle subsets yielded synergy excitations that achieved >90% extrapolation variance accounted for (VAF). Using the top 10% of subsets, we developed muscle selection heuristics to identify included muscle combinations whose synergy excitations achieved high extrapolation accuracy. For 3, 4, and 5 synergies, these heuristics yielded extrapolation VAF values approximately 5% lower than corresponding reconstruction VAF values for each associated eight-muscle subset. These results suggest that synergy excitations obtained from experimentally measured muscle excitations can accurately construct unmeasured muscle excitations, which could help limit muscle excitations predicted by muscle force optimizations.

  15. High power laser exciter accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, T.H.

    1975-01-01

    Recent developments in untriggered oil and water switching now permit the construction of compact, high energy density pulsed power sources for laser excitation. These accelerators, developed principally for electron beam fusion studies, appear adaptable to laser excitation and will provide electron beams of 10 13 to 10 14 W in the next several years. The accelerators proposed for e-beam fusion essentially concentrate the available power from the outside edge of a disk into the central region where the electron beam is formed. One of the main problem areas, that of power flow at the vacuum diode insulator, is greatly alleviated by the multiplicity of electron beams that are allowable for laser excitation. A proposal is made whereby the disk-shaped pulsed power sections are stacked vertically to form a series of radially flowing electron beams to excite the laser gas volume. (auth)

  16. An area selective and anisotropic etching of Si by synchrotron radiation excitation; Effects of introducing O[sub 2] molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Takashi; Kitamura, Osamu; Terakado, Shingo; Suzuki, Shigeo (Sanyo Electric Co., Ltd., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan). Tsukuba Research Center); Tanaka, Kenichiro

    1992-12-01

    Single crystalline silicon was photochemically etched by synchrotron radiation (SR) in the presence of reactive species produced by microwave discharge. The etching gases were a mixture of SF[sub 6] and Ar. We attempted to introduce O[sub 2] gas in order to increase the area selectivity by protecting the nonirradiated area. It was found that the introduction of O[sub 2] molecules was very effective in depressing the etching of a nonirradiated area resulting in high area selectivity. Also an anisotropic feature of c-Si was obtained by addition of O[sub 2] molecules and submicron patterning was successfully performed using a stencil mask. The effect of O[sub 2] molecules was investigated by the measurement of the spectra of total electron yield and Auger electrons. It seems that the formation of an oxide layer on c-Si surface played an important role in the area-selective etching. (author).

  17. Time- and energy resolved photoemission electron microscopy-imaging of photoelectron time-of-flight analysis by means of pulsed excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oelsner, Andreas; Rohmer, Martin; Schneider, Christian; Bayer, Daniela; Schoenhense, Gerd; Aeschlimann, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The present work enlightens the developments in time- and energy resolved photoemission electron microscopy over the past few years. We describe basic principles of the technique and demonstrate different applications. An energy- and time-filtering photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) for real-time spectroscopic imaging can be realized either by a retarding field or hemispherical energy analyzer or by using time-of-flight optics with a delay line detector. The latter method has the advantage of no data loss at all as all randomly incoming particles are measured not only by position but also by time. This is of particular interest for pump-probe experiments in the femtosecond and attosecond time scale where space charge processes drastically limit the maximum number of photoemitted electrons per laser pulse. This work focuses particularly on time-of-flight analysis using a novel delay line detector. Time and energy resolved PEEM instruments with delay line detectors enable 4D imaging (x, y, Δt, E Kin ) on a true counting basis. This allows a broad range of applications from real-time observation of dynamic phenomena at surfaces to fs time-of-flight spectro-microscopy and even aberration correction. By now, these time-of-flight analysis instruments achieve intrinsic time resolutions of 108 ps absolute and 13.5 ps relative. Very high permanent measurement speeds of more than 4 million events per second in random detection regimes have been realized using a standard USB2.0 interface. By means of this performance, the time-resolved PEEM technique enables to display evolutions of spatially resolved (<25 nm) and temporal sliced images life on any modern computer. The method allows dynamics investigations of variable electrical, magnetic, and optical near fields at surfaces and great prospects in dynamical adaptive photoelectron optics. For dynamical processes in the ps time scale such as magnetic domain wall movements, the time resolution of the delay line detectors

  18. Bio-effects of repetitively pulsed ultra-fast distributed feedback dye lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, N.; Ahmad, M.I.; Sheikh, A.

    1999-01-01

    Results of experimental study showing an unexpected rise in pulses of distributed feedback dye laser (DFDL) output due to temperature accumulation in dye cell during passively Q-Switched, a Mode-locked operation is reported. This unintended increase in number of pulse duration, per pulse energy may cause side-effects when used for selective photo thermolysis. To probe this phenomenon most commonly dye was excited with 10 to 20 pulses of second harmonic of a passively Q-Switched and Mode-locked Nd-YaG laser. The outputs of DFDL and Nd:YaG laser were recorded by Imacon 675-streak camera. The peak of DFDL output pulses was found delayed proportionally from the peak of the NYAG pulses by more than one inter-pulse period of excitation laser. A computer program was used to simulate the experimentally measured delay to estimate thermal decay constants and energy retained by the medium to determine the amount of incremental fluctuations in output. The delay between peaks of Nd:YAG (input) and DFDL(output) pulses was found to vary from 10 to 14 nanoseconds for various cavity lengths. It was found that for smaller inter-pulse periods the effect of gradual build-up satisfies the threshold conditions for some of the pulses that otherwise can not. This may lead to unintended increase in energy fluence causing overexposure-induced side-effects. (author)

  19. Voiced Excitations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holzricher, John

    2004-01-01

    To more easily obtain a voiced excitation function for speech characterization, measurements of skin motion, tracheal tube, and vocal fold, motions were made and compared to EM sensor-glottal derived...

  20. Excited states

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Edward C

    1974-01-01

    Excited States, Volume I reviews radiationless transitions, phosphorescence microwave double resonance through optical spectra in molecular solids, dipole moments in excited states, luminescence of polar molecules, and the problem of interstate interaction in aromatic carbonyl compounds. The book discusses the molecular electronic radiationless transitions; the double resonance techniques and the relaxation mechanisms involving the lowest triplet state of aromatic compounds; as well as the optical spectra and relaxation in molecular solids. The text also describes dipole moments and polarizab

  1. Wave propagation in heterogeneous excitable media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schebesch, I.; Engel, H.

    1998-04-01

    Heterogeneities deeply affect pulse dynamics in excitable media. In one dimension, spatially periodic variation of the excitation threshold leads to a characteristic dependence of the propagation speed on the modulation period d with a maximum at a certain optimal value dopt. The maximum speed may be larger than the pulse velocity in an effective homogeneous medium. In two dimensions, the geometry and size of heterogeneities determine the wave dynamics. For example, an excitability distribution made of oblique stripes with different angles of inclination can result in a speedup or a slowdown of the pulse. The calculations are carried out with a modified Oregonator model for light-sensitive Belouzov-Zhabotinskii media where a heterogeneous distribution of excitability can be achieved by inhomogeneous illumination. Nevertheless, the results do not depend on the details of the local kinetics, but apply to the general case of excitable media.

  2. Synaptic excitation mediated by AMPA receptors in rat cerebellar slices is selectively enhanced by aniracetam and cyclothiazide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxall, A R; Garthwaite, J

    1995-05-01

    AMPA receptors mediate fast, glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the central nervous system. The time-course of the associated postsynaptic current has been suggested to be determined principally by the kinetics of glutamate binding and receptor desensitization. Aniracetam and cyclothiazide are drugs capable of selectively preventing desensitization of the AMPA receptor. To investigate the relevance of desensitization to fast synaptic transmission in the cerebellum we have tested these compounds against AMPA-induced depolarizations and postsynaptic potentials using the grease-gap recording technique. Aniracetam (1 microM-5 mM) and cyclothiazide (1 microM-500 microM) both enhanced the depolarising action of AMPA (1 microM) on Purkinje cells in a concentration-dependent manner. At the highest concentrations tested, the increases over controls were approximately 600% and 800% respectively. Aniracetam also increased, in a concentration-dependent manner, the amplitude of the evoked synaptic potentials of both parallel fibre-Purkinje cell and mossy fibre-granule cell pathways, with the highest concentrations tested enhancing the potentials by approximately 60% and 75% respectively. These data suggest that, at two different synapses in the cerebellum, AMPA receptor desensitization occurs physiologically and is likely to contribute to the shape of fast synaptic currents.

  3. Bulk plasma properties in the pulsed glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, Glen P.; King, Fred L.

    2003-01-01

    This work focuses on the spatial and temporal characteristics of a glow discharge plasma operated with power pulses of 5 ms in duration at 25% duty cycle. Interpretation of emission data provides insight into the nature of the plasma at each instant of a typical pulse cycle and at each position in space. Because the bulk plasma properties affect the distribution of excited energy levels of the sputtered atoms, an improved understanding of the plasma affords the ability to select conditions that enhance analytically important emission lines. Optical emission spectroscopy was used to determine the relative populations of excited states for atoms and ions during the initial breakdown, the steady state and the recombining periods of the discharge pulse cycle. The plasma is highly ionizing in nature at the time of breakdown--with lower excited states being overpopulated--before reaching the steady state, or plateau, period, also ionizing in nature. These behaviors arise from a loss of charged particles and photons to the surroundings that shifts the plasma away from Saha and Boltzmann balances during these periods. The post-pulse period typically displays recombining behavior, characterized by population inversion for selected species--except for regions close to the cathode, where electrons and ions are lost by diffusion and are not available for recombination. The sputtered analyte atom emissions closely mimic those of the plasma bath gas, except that their emissions persevere for longer in the recombining after-peak period than do the discharge gas species

  4. Postprandial changes in secretory flow of pancreatic juice in the main pancreatic duct: evaluation with cine-dynamic MRCP with a spatially selective inversion-recovery (IR) pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasokawa, Kazuya; Ito, Katsuyoshi; Tamada, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Akira; Hayashida, Minoru; Torigoe, Teruyuki; Tanimoto, Daigo; Higaki, Atsushi; Noda, Yasufumi; Kido, Ayumu [Kawasaki Medical School, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    To evaluate the influence of oral ingestion on the secretory flow dynamics of physiological pancreatic juice within the main pancreatic duct in healthy subjects by using cine-dynamic MRCP with spatially-selective inversion-recovery (IR) pulse non-invasively. Thirty-eight healthy subjects were investigated. MRCP with spatially-selective IR pulse was repeated every 15 s for 5 min to acquire a total of 20 images (cine-dynamic MRCP). A set of 20 MRCP images was repeatedly obtained before and after liquid oral ingestion every 7 min (including 2-min interval) for 40 min (a total of seven sets). Secretion grade of pancreatic juice on cine-dynamic MRCP was compared before and after oral ingestion using the nonparametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Median secretion grades of pancreatic juice at 5 min (score = 2.15), 12 min (score = 1.95) and 19 min (score = 2.05) after ingestion were significantly higher than that before ingestion (score = 1.40) (P = 0.004, P = 0.032, P = 0.045, respectively). Secretion grade of pancreatic juice showed a maximum peak of 2.15 at 5 min after ingestion. Thereafter, the secretion grade of pancreatic juice tended to gradually decline. Non-invasive cine-dynamic MRCP using spatially-selective IR pulse showed potential for evaluating postprandial changes in the secretory flow dynamics of pancreatic juice as a physiological reaction. (orig.)

  5. Picosecond pulses of coherent MM-wave radiation in a photoinjector-driven waveguide free-selected laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fochs, S.N.; Le Sage, G.P.; Feng, L. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    A 5 MeV, high repetition rate (2.142 GHz in burst mode), high brightness, tabletop photoinjector is currently under construction at the UC Davis Department of Applied Science, on the LLNL site. Ultrashort pulses of coherent synchrotron radiation can be generated by transversally accelerating the electron beam with a wiggler in either metallic or dielectric-loaded waveguide FEL structures. This interaction is investigated theoretically and experimentally. Subpicosecond photoelectron bunches will be produced in the photoinjector by irradiating a high quantum efficiency Cs{sub 2}Te (Cesium Telluride) photocathode with a train of 100 UV (210 nm), ultra-short (250 fs) laser pulses. These bunches will be accelerated in a 1-1/2 cell {pi}-mode X-band RF gun e energized by a 20 MW, 8,568 GHz SLAC klystron. The peak current is 0.25 kA (0.25 nC, 1 ps), with a normalized beam emittance {epsilon}{sub n}<2.5 {pi} mm-mrad. This prebunched electron beam is then transversally accelerated in a cylindrical waveguide by a 30-mm period, 10 period long helical wiggler. The peak wiggler field is adjusted to 8.5 kG, so that the group velocity of the radiated electromagnetic waves matches the axial velocity of the electron bunch (grazing condition, zero slippage). Chirped output pulses in excess of 2 MW power are predicted, with an instantaneous bandwidth extending from 125 GHz to 225 GHz and a pulse duration of 15 ps (HWHM). To produce even shorter pulses, a dielectric-loaded waveguide can be used. The dispersion relation of this waveguide structure has an inflection point (zero group velocity dispersion). If the grazing condition is satisfied at this point, the final output pulse duration is no longer determined by slippage, or by group velocity dispersion and bandwidth, but by higher-order dispersive effects yielding transform-limited pulses.

  6. Error Analysis and Selection of Optimal Excitation Parameters for the Sensing of CO2 and O2 from Space for ASCENDS Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliutau, Denis; Prasad, Narasimha S.

    2012-01-01

    Simulation studies to optimize sensing of CO2 and O2 from space are described. Uncertainties in line-by-line calculations unaccounted for in previous studies identified. Multivariate methods are employed for measurement wavelengths selection. The Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) recommended by NRC Decadal Survey has a stringent accuracy requirements of 0.5% or better in XCO2 retrievals. NASA LaRC and its partners are investigating the use of the 1.57 m band of CO2 and the 1.26-1.27 m band of oxygen for XCO2 measurements. As part of these efforts, we are carrying out simulation studies using a lidar modeling framework being developed at NASA LaRC to predict the performance of our proposed ASCENDS mission implementation [1]. Our study is aimed at predicting the sources and magnitudes of errors anticipated in XCO2 retrievals for further error minimization through the selection of optimum excitation parameters and development of better retrieval methods.

  7. Gradient-tailored excitation for single-quantum NMR spectroscopy of aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotto, M; Saudek, V; Sklenár, V

    1992-11-01

    A novel approach to tailored selective excitation for the measurement of NMR spectra in non-deuterated aqueous solutions (WATERGATE, WATER suppression by GrAdient-Tailored Excitation) is described. The gradient echo sequence, which effectively combines one selective 180 degrees radiofrequency pulse and two field gradient pulses, achieves highly selective and effective water suppression. This technique is ideally suited for the rapid collection of multi-dimensional data since a single-scan acquisition produces a pure phase NMR spectrum with a perfectly flat baseline, at the highest possible sensitivity. Application to the fast measurement of 2D NOE data of a 2.2 mM solution of a double-stranded DNA fragment in 90% H2O at 5 degrees C is presented.

  8. Clinical Comparison of Pulse and Chirp Excitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Høgholm; Misaridis, T.; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2002-01-01

    ) in which image quality decreased and (2) in which the image would be insufficient for clinical diagnosis. Furthermore they compared image quality in matching pairs of conventional and CE images. The average increase in penetration depth were almost 2 cm. Side-by-side comparison showed that coded image...

  9. Heavy ion beam excitation of rare gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribitzki, G.; Ulrich, A.; Busch, B.; Kroetz, W.; Miller, R.; Wieser, J.

    1991-01-01

    The emission of light from rare gas targets at pressures of more than 100 Pa excited by a pulsed heavy ion beam has been studied. The absolute intensity of several spectral lines has been measured as a function of time at different target gas pressures. Population densities, excitation cross sections, and rate constants for collisional quenching were determined from the line intensities and the lifetimes of the excited states. (orig.)

  10. Root-flipped multiband refocusing pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anuj; Lustig, Michael; Grissom, William A

    2016-01-01

    To design low peak power multiband refocusing radiofrequency pulses, with application to simultaneous multislice spin echo MRI. Multiband Shinnar-Le Roux β polynomials were designed using convex optimization. A Monte Carlo algorithm was used to determine patterns of β polynomial root flips that minimized the peak power of the resulting refocusing pulses. Phase-matched multiband excitation pulses were also designed to obtain linear-phase spin echoes. Simulations compared the performance of the root-flipped pulses with time-shifted and phase-optimized pulses. Phantom and in vivo experiments at 7T validated the function of the root-flipped pulses and compared them to time-shifted spin echo signal profiles. Averaged across number of slices, time-bandwidth product, and slice separation, the root-flipped pulses have 46% shorter durations than time-shifted pulses with the same peak radiofrequency amplitude. Unlike time-shifted and phase-optimized pulses, the root-flipped pulses' excitation errors do not increase with decreasing band separation. Experiments showed that the root-flipped pulses excited the desired slices at the target locations, and that for equivalent slice characteristics, the shorter root-flipped pulses allowed shorter echo times, resulting in higher signal than time-shifted pulses. The proposed root-flipped multiband radiofrequency pulse design method produces low peak power pulses for simultaneous multislice spin echo MRI. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Selective removal of carious human dentin using a nanosecond pulsed laser operating at a wavelength of 5.85 μ m

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Katsunori; Kita, Tetsuya; Yoshikawa, Kazushi; Yasuo, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Kazuyo; Awazu, Kunio

    2015-05-01

    Less invasive methods for treating dental caries are strongly desired. However, conventional dental lasers do not always selectively remove caries or ensure good bonding to the composite resin. According to our previous study, demineralized dentin might be removed by a nanosecond pulsed laser operating at wavelengths of around 5.8 μm. The present study investigated the irradiation effect of the light on carious human dentin classified into "remove," "not remove," and "unclear" categories. Under 5.85-μm laser pulses, at average power densities of 30 W/cm2 and irradiation time of 2 s, the ablation depth of "remove" and "not remove," and also the ablation depth of "unclear" and "not remove," were significantly different (pcaries treatment.

  12. Isotope separation using vibrationally excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to isotope separation employing isotopically selective vibrational excitation and vibration-translation reactions of the excited particles. Uranium enrichment, using uranium hexafluoride, is a particular embodiment. (U.K.)

  13. Excited baryons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    The status of the theory of the low-energy approach to hadron structure is reviewed briefly by surveying a few relevant models. A few examples of tests needed to sort out the predictions of different models pertaining to the quark-gluon structure of hadrons are discussed, and given the resulting physics objectives, a few experimental options for excited baryon research at CFBAF are suggested. (LEW)

  14. Excited baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    The status of the theory of the low-energy approach to hadron structure is reviewed briefly by surveying a few relevant models. A few examples of tests needed to sort out the predictions of different models pertaining to the quark-gluon structure of hadrons are discussed, and given the resulting physics objectives, a few experimental options for excited baryon research at CFBAF are suggested

  15. Differential Pulse Voltammetric Determination of Selected Nitro-Compounds on Silver, Solid Silver Composite, and Solid Graphite Composite Electrodes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Navrátil, Tomáš; Barek, J.; Fašinová-Šebková, S.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 21, 3-5 (2009), s. 309-315 ISSN 1040-0397 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/07/1195; GA AV ČR IAA400400806 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : silver electrode * silver composite electrode * graphite composite electrode * differential pulse voltammetry Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.630, year: 2009

  16. Postprandial changes in secretory flow of pancreatic juice in the main pancreatic duct: evaluation with cine-dynamic MRCP with a spatially selective inversion-recovery (IR) pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasokawa, Kazuya; Ito, Katsuyoshi; Tamada, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Akira; Hayashida, Minoru; Torigoe, Teruyuki; Tanimoto, Daigo; Higaki, Atsushi; Noda, Yasufumi; Kido, Ayumu

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the influence of oral ingestion on the secretory flow dynamics of physiological pancreatic juice within the main pancreatic duct in healthy subjects by using cine-dynamic MRCP with spatially-selective inversion-recovery (IR) pulse non-invasively. Thirty-eight healthy subjects were investigated. MRCP with spatially-selective IR pulse was repeated every 15 s for 5 min to acquire a total of 20 images (cine-dynamic MRCP). A set of 20 MRCP images was repeatedly obtained before and after liquid oral ingestion every 7 min (including 2-min interval) for 40 min (a total of seven sets). Secretion grade of pancreatic juice on cine-dynamic MRCP was compared before and after oral ingestion using the nonparametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Median secretion grades of pancreatic juice at 5 min (score = 2.15), 12 min (score = 1.95) and 19 min (score = 2.05) after ingestion were significantly higher than that before ingestion (score = 1.40) (P = 0.004, P = 0.032, P = 0.045, respectively). Secretion grade of pancreatic juice showed a maximum peak of 2.15 at 5 min after ingestion. Thereafter, the secretion grade of pancreatic juice tended to gradually decline. Non-invasive cine-dynamic MRCP using spatially-selective IR pulse showed potential for evaluating postprandial changes in the secretory flow dynamics of pancreatic juice as a physiological reaction. • Secretion grade of pancreatic juice at cine-dynamic MRCP after ingestion was evaluated. • Secretion grade was significantly increased within 19 min after liquid meal ingestion. • Secretion grade showed maximum peak of 2.15 at 5 min after ingestion. • Postprandial changes in pancreatic juice flow can be assessed by cine-dynamic MRCP.

  17. Diffusion-weighted MRI of the Prostate: Advantages of Zoomed EPI with Parallel-transmit-accelerated 2D-selective Excitation Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thierfelder, Kolja M.; Scherr, Michael K.; Weiss, Jakob; Mueller-Lisse, Ullrich G.; Theisen, Daniel [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Notohamiprodjo, Mike; Nikolaou, Konstantin [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); University Hospital Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Dietrich, Olaf [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Josef Lissner Laboratory for Biomedical Imaging, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Pfeuffer, Josef [Siemens Healthcare, Application Development, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the use of 2D-selective, parallel-transmit excitation magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for diffusion-weighted echo-planar imaging (pTX-EPI) of the prostate, and to compare it to conventional, single-shot EPI (c-EPI). The MRI examinations of 35 patients were evaluated in this prospective study. PTX-EPI was performed with a TX-acceleration factor of 1.7 and a field of view (FOV) of 150 x 90 mm{sup 2}, whereas c-EPI used a full FOV of 380 x 297 mm{sup 2}. Two readers evaluated three different aspects of image quality on 5-point Likert scales. To quantify distortion artefacts, maximum diameters and prostate volume were determined for both techniques and compared to T2-weighted imaging. The zoomed pTX-EPI was superior to c-EPI with respect to overall image quality (3.39 ± 0.62 vs 2.45 ± 0.67) and anatomic differentiability (3.29 ± 0.65 vs 2.41 ± 0.65), each with p < 0.0001. Artefacts were significantly less severe in pTX-EPI (0.93 ± 0.73 vs 1.49 ± 1.08), p < 0.001. The quantitative analysis yielded a higher agreement of pTX-EPI with T2-weighted imaging than c-EPI with respect to coronal (ICCs: 0.95 vs 0.93) and sagittal (0.86 vs 0.73) diameters as well as prostate volume (0.94 vs 0.92). Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values did not differ significantly between the two techniques (p > 0.05). Zoomed pTX-EPI leads to substantial improvements in diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of the prostate with respect to different aspects of image quality and severity of artefacts. (orig.)

  18. Nonresonant interaction of ultrashort electromagnetic pulses with multilevel quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belenov, E.; Isakov, V.; Nazarkin, A.

    1994-01-01

    Some features of the excitation of multilevel quantum systems under the action of electromagnetic pulses which are shorter than the inverse frequency of interlevel transitions are considered. It is shown that the interaction is characterized by a specific type of selectivity which is not connected with the resonant absorption of radiation. The simplest three-level model displays the inverse population of upper levels. The effect of an ultrashort laser pulse on a multilevel molecule was regarded as an instant reception of the oscillation velocity by the oscillator and this approach showed an effective excitation and dissociation of the molecule. The estimations testify to the fact that these effects can be observed using modern femtosecond lasers.

  19. Laser amplification in excited dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Thomas; Haahr-Lillevang, Lasse; Sarpe, Cristian; Zielinski, Bastian; Götte, Nadine; Senftleben, Arne; Balling, Peter; Baumert, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Wide-bandgap dielectrics such as glasses or water are transparent at visible and infrared wavelengths. This changes when they are exposed to ultrashort and highly intense laser pulses. Different interaction mechanisms lead to the appearance of various transient nonlinear optical phenomena. Using these, the optical properties of dielectrics can be controlled from the transparent to the metal-like state. Here we expand this range by a yet unexplored mechanism in excited dielectrics: amplification. In a two-colour pump-probe experiment, we show that a 400 nm femtosecond laser pulse is coherently amplified inside an excited sapphire sample on a scale of a few micrometres. Simulations strongly support the proposed two-photon stimulated emission process, which is temporally and spatially controllable. Consequently, we expect applications in all fields that demand strongly localized amplification.

  20. Laser amplification in excited dielectrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, Thomas; Haahr-Lillevang, Lasse; Sarpe, Cristian

    2018-01-01

    Wide-bandgap dielectrics such as glasses or water are transparent at visible and infrared wavelengths. This changes when they are exposed to ultrashort and highly intense laser pulses. Different interaction mechanisms lead to the appearance of various transient nonlinear optical phenomena. Using...... these, the optical properties of dielectrics can be controlled from the transparent to the metal-like state. Here we expand this range by a yet unexplored mechanism in excited dielectrics: amplification. In a two-colour pump-probe experiment, we show that a 400nm femtosecond laser pulse is coherently...... amplified inside an excited sapphire sample on a scale of a few micrometres. Simulations strongly support the proposed two-photon stimulated emission process, which is temporally and spatially controllable. Consequently, we expect applications in all fields that demand strongly localized amplification....

  1. Selective excavation of decalcified dentin using a mid-infrared tunable nanosecond pulsed laser: wavelength dependency in the 6 μm wavelength range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Katsunori; Saiki, Masayuki; Yoshikawa, Kazushi; Yasuo, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Kazuyo; Awazu, Kunio

    2011-07-01

    Selective caries treatment has been anticipated as an essential application of dentistry. In clinic, some lasers have already realized the optical drilling of dental hard tissue. However, conventional lasers lack the selectivity, and still depend on the dentist's ability. Based on the absorption property of carious dentin, 6 μm wavelength range shows specific absorptions and promising characteristics for excavation. The objective of this study is to develop a selective excavation of carious dentin by using the laser ablation with 6 μm wavelength range. A mid-infrared tunable pulsed laser was obtained by difference-frequency generation technique. The wavelength was tuned around the absorption bands called amide 1 and amide 2. In the wavelength range from 5.75 to 6.60 μm, the difference of ablation depth between demineralized and normal dentin was observed. The wavelength at 6.02 μm and the average power density of 15 W/cm2, demineralized dentin was removed selectively with less-invasive effect on normal dentin. The wavelength at 6.42 μm required the increase of average power density, but also showed the possibility of selective ablation. This study provided a valuable insight into a wavelength choice for a novel dental laser device under development for minimal intervention dentistry.

  2. Anomalous pulse interaction in dissipative media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordyugov, Grigory; Engel, Harald

    2008-06-01

    We review a number of phenomena occurring in one-dimensional excitable media due to modified decay behind propagating pulses. Those phenomena can be grouped in two categories depending on whether the wake of a solitary pulse is oscillatory or not. Oscillatory decay leads to nonannihilative head-on collision of pulses and oscillatory dispersion relation of periodic pulse trains. Stronger wake oscillations can even result in a bistable dispersion relation. Those effects are illustrated with the help of the Oregonator and FitzHugh-Nagumo models for excitable media. For a monotonic wake, we show that it is possible to induce bound states of solitary pulses and anomalous dispersion of periodic pulse trains by introducing nonlocal spatial coupling to the excitable medium.

  3. Intramolecular Vibrational Energy Transfer and Bond-Selected Photochemistry in Liquids

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Crim, F

    2001-01-01

    .... In the gas phase experiments, one pulse excited the first overtone of the O-H stretching vibration in nitric acid and the second pulse probed the excited molecule by excitation to a dissociative...

  4. Selective extraction of intracellular components from the microalga Chlorella vulgaris by combined pulsed electric field-temperature treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, P R; Pataro, G; Capitoli, M; Barbosa, M J; Wijffels, R H; Eppink, M H M; Olivieri, G; Ferrari, G

    2016-03-01

    The synergistic effect of temperature (25-65 °C) and total specific energy input (0.55-1.11 kWh kgDW(-1)) by pulsed electric field (PEF) on the release of intracellular components from the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris was studied. The combination of PEF with temperatures from 25 to 55 °C resulted in a conductivity increase of 75% as a result of cell membrane permeabilization. In this range of temperatures, 25-39% carbohydrates and 3-5% proteins release occurred and only for carbohydrate release a synergistic effect was observed at 55 °C. Above 55 °C spontaneous cell lysis occurred without PEF. Combined PEF-temperature treatment does not sufficiently disintegrate the algal cells to release both carbohydrates and proteins at yields comparable to the benchmark bead milling (40-45% protein, 48-58% carbohydrates). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Pulse Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Lawrence (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An apparatus and a computer-implemented method for generating pulses synchronized to a rising edge of a tachometer signal from rotating machinery are disclosed. For example, in one embodiment, a pulse state machine may be configured to generate a plurality of pulses, and a period state machine may be configured to determine a period for each of the plurality of pulses.

  6. Combined two-photon excitation and d → f energy-transfer in Ir/lanthanide dyads with time-gated selection from a two-component emission spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edkins, Robert M; Sykes, Daniel; Beeby, Andrew; Ward, Michael D

    2012-10-14

    In a pair of Ir/Eu and Ir/Tb dyads, two-photon excitation of the Ir-phenylpyridine chromophore at 780 nm is followed by partial d → f energy-transfer to give a combination of short-lived Ir-based (blue) and long-lived lanthanide-based (red or green) emission; these components can be selected separately by time-gated detection.

  7. Selective excavation of human carious dentin using a nanosecond pulsed laser with a wavelength of 5.85 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Tetsuya; Ishii, Katsunori; Yoshikawa, Kazushi; Yasuo, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Kazuyo; Awazu, Kunio

    2013-06-01

    Less-invasive treatment of caries has been needed in laser dentistry. Based on the absorption property of dentin substrates, 6 μm wavelength range shows specific absorptions and promising characteristics for the excavation. In our previous study, 5.8 μm wavelength range was found to be effective for selective excavation of carious dentin and restoration treatment using composite resin from the irradiation experiment with bovine sound and demineralized dentin. In this study, the availability of 5.8 μm wavelength range for selective excavation of human carious dentin was investigated for clinical application. A mid-infrared tunable nanosecond pulsed laser by difference-frequency generation was used for revealing the ablation property of human carious dentin. Irradiation experiments indicated that the wavelength of 5.85 μm and the average power density of 30 W/cm2 realized the selective excavation of human carious dentin, but ablation property was different with respect to each sample because of the different caries progression. In conclusion, the wavelength of 5.85 μm could realize the selective excavation of human carious dentin, but it was necessary to evaluate the stage of caries progression in order to control the ablation property.

  8. The influence of pulsed electric fields and microwave pretreatments on some selected physicochemical properties of oil extracted from black cumin seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshabadi, Hamid; Mirzaei, HabibOllah; Ghodsvali, Alireza; Jafari, Seid Mahdi; Ziaiifar, Aman Mohammad

    2018-01-01

    Application of novel technologies such as microwave and pulsed electric fields (PEF) might increase the speed and efficiency of oil extraction. In the present research, PEF (3.25 kV/cm electric field intensity and 30 pulse number) and microwave (540 W for 180 s) pretreatments were used to study the process of oil extraction from black cumin ( Nigella sativa ) seeds. After applying the selected pretreatments, the oil of seeds was extracted with the use of a screw press and the extraction efficiency, refractive index, oil density, color index, oxidative stability, and chemical components of oil and protein of meal were evaluated. The achieved results expressed that PEF and microwave pretreatments increased the oil extraction efficiency and its oxidative stability. Different pretreatments didn't have any significant influence on the refractive index of black cumin seed oil ( p >.05). When microwave and PEF were used, the oil density showed an enhancement as the following: 1.51% and 0.96%, respectively in comparison with the samples with no pretreatments. Evaluation of the extracted oils, using GC/MS analysis indicated that thymoquinone was the dominant phenolic component in the black cumin oil. Finally, the SEM analysis revealed that microwave and PEF can be useful in the extraction of oil from black cumin seeds since these treatments damaged cell walls and facilitated the oil extraction process.

  9. RF Pulsed Heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pritzkau, David P.

    2002-01-03

    RF pulsed heating is a process by which a metal is heated from magnetic fields on its surface due to high-power pulsed RF. When the thermal stresses induced are larger than the elastic limit, microcracks and surface roughening will occur due to cyclic fatigue. Pulsed heating limits the maximum magnetic field on the surface and through it the maximum achievable accelerating gradient in a normal conducting accelerator structure. An experiment using circularly cylindrical cavities operating in the TE{sub 011} mode at a resonant frequency of 11.424 GHz is designed to study pulsed heating on OFE copper, a material commonly used in normal conducting accelerator structures. The high-power pulsed RF is supplied by an X-band klystron capable of outputting 50 MW, 1.5 {micro}s pulses. The test pieces of the cavity are designed to be removable to allow testing of different materials with different surface preparations. A diagnostic tool is developed to measure the temperature rise in the cavity utilizing the dynamic Q change of the resonant mode due to heating. The diagnostic consists of simultaneously exciting a TE{sub 012} mode to steady-state in the cavity at 18 GHz and measuring the change in reflected power as the cavity is heated from high-power pulsed RF. Two experimental runs were completed. One run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 120 K for 56 x 10{sup 6} pulses. The second run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 82 K for 86 x 10{sup 6} pulses. Scanning electron microscope pictures show extensive damage occurring in the region of maximum temperature rise on the surface of the test pieces.

  10. State-selective electron transfer and ionization in collisions of highly charged ions with ground-state Na(3s) and laser-excited Na*(3p)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blank, I.; Otranto, S.; Meinema, C.; Olson, R. E.; Hoekstra, R.

    2012-01-01

    Single electron transfer and ionization in collisions of N5+ and Ne8+ with ground state Na(3s) and laser excited Na*(3p) are investigated both experimentally and theoretically at collision energies from 1 to 10 keV/amu, which includes the classical orbital velocity of the valence electron.

  11. A Randomized Comparative Study of Pulsed Radiofrequency Treatment With or Without Selective Nerve Root Block for Chronic Cervical Radicular Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Zhou, Qian; Xiao, Lizu; Yang, Juan; Xong, Donglin; Li, Disen; Liu, LiPing; Ancha, Sigdha; Cheng, Jianguo

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrated a combination of pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) and cervical nerve root block (CNRB) via a posterior approach was superior to a transforaminal epidural steroid injection through the anterolateral approach for cervical radicular pain in a previous study. This randomized trial was conducted to determine the comparative efficacy between CNRB, PRF, and CNRB + PRF for cervical radicular pain. A prospective and randomized design was used in this study. Sixty-two patients were randomized into three parallel groups: CNRB, PRF, or CNRB + PRF. Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) was used to measure pain intensity, and global perceived effect (GPE) was scored by the patient on a 7-point scale, ranging from much worse (-3), no change (0), to total improvement (+3). The outcomes were evaluated at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months. Side effects and complications were noted. The NRS was significantly reduced in all three groups 1 week after the treatments (P 0.05). No serious complications were observed in any of the patients. Combining CNRB and PRF appeared to be a safe and efficacious technique for cervical radicular pain. The combination therapy yielded better outcomes than either CNRB or PRF alone. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  12. Selection rules for angular momentum transfer via impulsive stimulated Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Takuya; Tamaru, Hiroharu; Kuwata-Gonokami, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    Impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (ISRS) plays a key role in coherent control of low-energy rotational resonances. Femtosecond laser pulses are widely employed to utilize ISRS because they are broadband and can cover the needed frequencies in a single pulse. Here, we show theoretically that the ISRS process is expressed as a linear response to the instantaneous Stokes parameters (ISPs) of the laser pulse. These IPSs expressed in rotational coordinates are then shown to be responsible for the angular momentum transfer from light to matter. These relationships have led to the designs of spectral profiles and polarization states of light pulses that should selectively excite particular rotational modes.

  13. Correlation of the ionisation response at selected points of IC sensitive regions with SEE sensitivity parameters under pulsed laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordienko, A V; Mavritskii, O B; Egorov, A N; Pechenkin, A A; Savchenkov, D V [National Research Nuclear University ' ' MEPhI' ' (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-31

    The statistics of the ionisation response amplitude measured at selected points and their surroundings within sensitive regions of integrated circuits (ICs) under focused femtosecond laser irradiation is obtained for samples chosen from large batches of two types of ICs. A correlation between these data and the results of full-chip scanning is found for each type. The criteria for express validation of IC single-event effect (SEE) hardness based on ionisation response measurements at selected points are discussed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  14. Technological characteristics and selected bioactive compounds of Opuntia dillenii cactus fruit juice following the impact of pulsed electric field pre-treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa-Ayoub, Tamer E; Jaeger, Henry; Youssef, Khaled; Knorr, Dietrich; El-Samahy, Salah; Kroh, Lothar W; Rohn, Sascha

    2016-11-01

    Selected technological characteristics and bioactive compounds of juice pressed directly from the mash of whole Opuntia dillenii cactus fruits have been investigated. The impact of pulsed electric fields (PEF) for a non-thermal disintegration on the important juice characteristics has been evaluated in comparison to microwave heating and use of pectinases. Results showed that the cactus juice exhibited desirable technological characteristics. Besides, it also contained a high amount of phenolic compounds being the major contributors to the overall antioxidant activity of juice. HPLC-DAD/ESI-MS(n) measurements in the fruits' peel and pulp showed that isorhamnetin 3-O-rutinoside was determined as the single flavonol found only in the fruit's peel. Treating fruit mash with a moderate electric field strength increased juice yield and improved juice characteristics. Promisingly, the highest release of isorhamnetin 3-O-rutinoside from fruit's peel into juice was maximally achieved by PEF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Optical trapping with femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Anita; Dhamija, Shaina; De, Arijit K.

    2017-08-01

    Laser trapping of 100nm diameter polystyrene bead under high repetition rate ultrafast pulsed excitation is studied theoretically as well as experimentally. In our theoretical analysis, we explore the role of optical Kerr effect at 50mW average power under pulsed excitation. In our experiment, we use a CMOS camera to record two-photon fluorescence signal from the trapped particle which decays with time due to photo-bleaching.

  16. Laser ablation comparison by picosecond pulses train and nanosecond pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednev, V. N.; Filippov, M. N.; Bunkin, A. F.; Pershin, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    A comparison of laser ablation by a train of picosecond pulses and nanosecond pulses revealed a difference in laser craters, ablation thresholds, plasma sizes and spectral line intensities. Laser ablation with a train of picosecond pulses resulted in improved crater quality while ablated mass decreased up to 30%. A reduction in laser plasma dimensions for picosecond train ablation was observed while the intensity of atomic/ionic lines in the plasma spectra was greater by a factor of 2-4 indicating an improved excitation and atomization in the plasma.

  17. Collisional excitation transfer between Rb(5P) states in 50–3000 Torr of 4He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sell, J F; Gearba, M A; Patterson, B M; Byrne, D; Jemo, G; Meeter, R; Knize, R J; Lilly, T C

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of the mixing rates and cross sections for collisional excitation transfer between the 5P 1/2 and 5P 3/2 states of rubidium (Rb) in the presence of 4 He buffer gas are presented. Selected pulses from a high repetition rate, mode-locked femtosecond laser are used to excite either Rb state with the fluorescence due to collisional excitation transfer observed by time-correlated single-photon counting. The time dependence of this fluorescence is fitted to the solution of rate equations which include the mixing rate, atomic lifetimes and any quenching processes. The variation in the mixing rate over a large range of buffer gas densities allows the determination of both the binary collisional transfer cross section and a three-body collisional transfer rate. We do not observe any collisional quenching effects at 4 He pressures up to 6 atm and discuss in detail other systematic effects considered in the experiment. (paper)

  18. Excitation methods for energy dispersive analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaklevic, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    The rapid development in recent years of energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis has been based primarily on improvements in semiconductor detector x-ray spectrometers. However, the whole analysis system performance is critically dependent on the availability of optimum methods of excitation for the characteristic x rays in specimens. A number of analysis facilities based on various methods of excitation have been developed over the past few years. A discussion is given of the features of various excitation methods including charged particles, monochromatic photons, and broad-energy band photons. The effects of the excitation method on background and sensitivity are discussed from both theoretical and experimental viewpoints. Recent developments such as pulsed excitation and polarized photons are also discussed

  19. Selective fabrication of p-type and n-type thermoelectric micropatterns by the reduction of CuO/NiO mixed nanoparticles using femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoshiri, Mizue; Hata, Seiichi

    2018-01-01

    p-type and n-type thermoelectric micropatterns were selectively fabricated via the reduction and reoxidation of CuO/NiO mixed nanoparticles using femtosecond laser pulses. The micropatterns were formed by raster scanning focused femtosecond laser pulses on a solution film containing CuO and NiO nanoparticles, ethylene glycol, and polyvinylpyrrolidone, followed by the removal of the non-irradiated nanoparticles. Cu-Ni was generated by reductive sintering of the CuO/NiO mixed nanoparticles at laser scanning speeds ranging from 5 to 20 mm/s and a laser fluence of 0.055 J/cm2. In contrast, intense peaks corresponding to Cu2O and NiO were observed in the X-ray diffraction spectrum of the micropattern formed at a scanning speed of 1 mm/s, indicating that Cu2O and NiO were generated via the reoxidation of the reduced metals. The Seebeck coefficients of the micropatterns formed at a fluence of 0.055 J/cm2 and scanning speeds of 5-20 mm/s were between - 32 and - 16 µV/K, whereas that of the micropattern formed at a fluence of 0.055 J/cm2 and scanning speed of 1 mm/s was 250 µV/K. These results suggest that the Seebeck coefficient depends on the generated n-type Cu-Ni and p-type Cu2O and NiO phases. A thermoelectric couple was fabricated by selectively fabricating p-type and n-type thermoelectric elements. The thermoelectric couple exhibited a thermoelectric voltage of 0.25 mV/K when a temperature gradient was applied between its hot and cold sides. The generated voltage was nearly consistent with the estimated voltage based on the Seebeck coefficient. The developed process for selective fabrication is expected to be useful for the direct writing of thermoelectric-type sensors.

  20. PULSE GENERATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeschke, C.W.

    1957-09-24

    An improvement in pulse generators is described by which there are produced pulses of a duration from about 1 to 10 microseconds with a truly flat top and extremely rapid rise and fall. The pulses are produced by triggering from a separate input or by modifying the current to operate as a free-running pulse generator. In its broad aspect, the disclosed pulse generator comprises a first tube with an anode capacitor and grid circuit which controls the firing; a second tube series connected in the cathode circuit of the first tube such that discharge of the first tube places a voltage across it as the leading edge of the desired pulse; and an integrator circuit from the plate across the grid of the second tube to control the discharge time of the second tube, determining the pulse length.

  1. Metal nanoparticle ensembles: tunable laser pulses distinguish monomer from dimer vibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jais, Pablo M; Murray, Daniel B; Merlin, Roberto; Bragas, Andrea V

    2011-09-14

    Resonant interaction of laser pulses with plasmons is used to identify vibrations associated with isolated spheres and pairs of contacting spheres in a system of gold nanoparticles. The optical pulses generate coherent mechanical oscillations of both monomers and dimers in the 5-150 GHz range, the amplitudes of which exhibit a strong enhancement when the laser central wavelength is tuned to resonate with the corresponding plasmon. Because of the resonant selection in the excitation process, the widths of the acoustic modes are significantly smaller than broadening caused by the spread in radii in the ensemble.

  2. Impact parameter selected nuclear temperatures of hot nuclei from excited state populations for 40Ar+197Au reactions at E/A=25MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zuyu; He Zhiyong; Duan Limin; Jin Genming; Wu Heyu; Zhang Baoguo; Wen Wanxin; Qi Yujin; Luo Qingzheng; Dai Guangxi; Wang Hongwei

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear temperatures extracted from excited state populations were measured as a function of linear momentum transfer (LMT) for 40 Ar+ 197 Au reactions at 25MeV/nucleon. The emission temperatures increased slightly with increasing linear momentum transfer or decreasing impact parameter. Taking into account the corrections of detection efficiency and sequential feeding from higher-lying states, a temperature of T∼4MeV was deduced for central collisions. For peripheral collisions the extracted temperatures increased with the energy of the particles. (orig.)

  3. The impact of pulse duration on composite WATERGATE pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingjing; Zhang, Xu; Sun, Peng; Jiang, Xianwang; Jiang, Bin; Cao, Chunyang; Liu, Maili

    2010-10-01

    As an effective method for solvent suppression, WATERGATE is widely used in high resolution NMR spectroscopy. It is usually composed of a number of pulses separated by constant intervals. However, theoretical and experimental analyses indicate that narrower bandwidth and lower intensities around the secondary suppression points occur in the excitation profile of the composite WATERGATE. The excitation profile distortion is caused by the chemical shift evolution during the RF pulses. The higher the ratio of pulse duration to the inter-pulse delay is, the severer the profile distorts. Therefore, in high magnetic fields, the effect will be serious when WATERGATE is applied to some biological samples whose resonances distribute over a wide range. As can be seen obviously by applying WATERGATE to detect a RNA-protein mixture sample in an 800 MHz spectrometer, the resonances of the imino protons were partially suppressed by showing decreased intensities, though the intended secondary suppression points were set far away from them. In this article, we proposed an optimized WATERGATE that could effectively compensate the chemical shift evolution during the RF pulses, and relieve the excitation profile distortion. The optimized experiment will be a good way to retain the imino signal intensities when WATERGATE is applied to detect the RNA samples in high magnetic field.

  4. Inactivation of viruses by coherent excitations with a low power visible femtosecond laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu T-C

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Resonant microwave absorption has been proposed in the literature to excite the vibrational states of microorganisms in an attempt to destroy them. But it is extremely difficult to transfer microwave excitation energy to the vibrational energy of microorganisms due to severe absorption of water in this spectral range. We demonstrate for the first time that, by using a visible femtosecond laser, it is effective to inactivate viruses such as bacteriophage M13 through impulsive stimulated Raman scattering. Results and discussion By using a very low power (as low as 0.5 nj/pulse visible femtosecond laser having a wavelength of 425 nm and a pulse width of 100 fs, we show that M13 phages were inactivated when the laser power density was greater than or equal to 50 MW/cm2. The inactivation of M13 phages was determined by plaque counts and had been found to depend on the pulse width as well as power density of the excitation laser. Conclusion Our experimental findings lay down the foundation for an innovative new strategy of using a very low power visible femtosecond laser to selectively inactivate viruses and other microorganisms while leaving sensitive materials unharmed by manipulating and controlling with the femtosecond laser system.

  5. Four-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation using multiple conditioning inputs. Normative MEP responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calancie, Blair; Wang, Dongliang; Young, Eufrosina; Alexeeva, Natalia

    2018-04-01

    A four-pulse pattern of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was compared to traditional dual-pulse TMS for its ability to modulate motor cortical excitability. This novel pattern consisted of a three-pulse train of subthreshold conditioning pulses followed by a suprathreshold test pulse (i.e., SC-T). The intervals between these superconditioning (SC) pulses (1, 3, or 6 ms) and the follow-on test pulse (1, 3, 10, or 25 ms) were varied, and the resultant MEPs were compared to those elicited by: (1) single-pulse TMS; and (2) dual-pulse conditioning-test (C-T) TMS with either short (3 ms) or long (10 ms) intervals to elicit short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) or intracortical facilitation (ICF), respectively. Testing included abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and tibialis anterior (TA) in 15 neurologically normal adults. For superconditioning inputs, 10 ms test intervals caused especially strong facilitation of the test MEP, while 1 ms test intervals were particularly effective at causing inhibition of the test response. For both muscles and across all subjects, the most effective of the 12 SC-T inputs tested for causing either facilitation or inhibition was-with rare exception-superior to the dual-pulse TMS input for causing facilitation (i.e., ICF) or inhibition (i.e., SICI), while the overall magnitude of effect was more pronounced in APB compared to TA. Nevertheless, after normalization, the impact of a superconditioning input train on the test MEP was similar in APB and TA muscles, suggesting similar mechanisms of action. Limited findings from a single subject with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are included to further illustrate the potential advantages of using a train of conditioning pulses preceding a TMS test pulse to selectively investigate abnormal motor cortical excitatory and inhibitory circuitry.

  6. Timeresolved investigation of atomic order in tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ) monocrystals after excitation with ultrashort light pulses; Zeitaufgeloeste Untersuchung atomarer Ordnung in Tetrathiafulvalen-Tetracyanochinodimethan (TTF-TCNQ)-Einkristallen nach Anregung mit ultrakurzen Lichtpulsen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sager, Christian

    2011-02-15

    This thesis describes time-resolved investigations of the atomic structure of one-dimensional organic molecular crystals after laser excitation of the photo-induced phase transition. There is a neutral to ionic phase transition in tetrathiafulvalene-chloranil-crystals (TTF-CA-crystals). At this phase transition a Peierls distortion occurs. A new model is introduced, that can explain the photo-induced phase transition in TTF-CY-crystals. This model is called charge density wave model of photo induced structural phase transition. There is a structural phase transition in tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanochinodimethane-crystals (TTF-TCNQ-crystals). At this phase transition the one-dimensional metal TTF-TCNQ is transformed to an insulator. The phase transition is driven by the Peierls distortion. The charge density wave model is appropriate for description of the processes in TTF-TCNQ-crystals after laser excitation. The results of time-resolved measurements of the structure of TTF-TCNQ-crystals after excitation of the photo-induced phase transition can be anticipated with the charge density wave model. In the basis of these anticipated results, a time-resolved measurement for investigation of the atomic structure of TTF-TCNQ after excitation of the photo-induced phase transition is proposed. The time-resolved measurement should be performed at a beamline of a third generation synchrotron by the optical pump X-ray probe technique. The time-resolved measurement is prepared by an optical characterization and by static X-ray diffraction measurements. The results of the optical characterization and the static X-ray diffraction measurements are presented and analyzed. (orig.)

  7. Selective Stabilization of the Spin States of a Magnetically Anisotropic Dysprosium Ion Induced by Photo-Excitation of the Associated Cyclic π-Conjugated System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Takamitsu; Ozawa, Hideaki; Sakaguchi, Yutaro; Kizaki, Kazuro; Kobayashi, Toshiya; Fuyuhiro, Akira; Ishikawa, Naoto

    2017-11-16

    The presence of a new electronic interaction, which couples a 4 f-electronic system with a total angular momentum J and a photoexcited cyclic π-conjugated system with an orbital angular momentum L, in the bis(phthalocyaninato)dysprosium single-molecule magnet ([DyPc 2 ] - ) is reported. Two π-π* excited states in the visible spectral region of the [DyPc 2 ] - complex, which are denoted here as Q L and Q H , showed significantly different temperature and field dependences of the magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) A-term intensity. This phenomenon not only indicates the presence of a "J-L" interaction, but also that the interaction generates two different preferred orientations of the J-L pair, either parallel (for the Q H band) or antiparallel (for the Q L band), depending on the excitation energy. We have constructed a theoretical model that reproduces the temperature and field dependences, and quantitatively evaluated the J-L interaction. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. A Study of the Effects of High Power Pulsed 2450 MHz Microwaves, ELF modulated Microwaves, and ELF Fields on Human Lymphocytes and Selected Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-27

    either 60 Hz continuous waveform at 1 gauss or pulsed electromagnetic fields ( PEMF ) generated by a Biosteogcn Model CU-204 generator (Electro-Biology, Inc...fields at 1 gauss and pulsed electroamgnctic fields ( PEMF ) generated by a Biostcogen Model CU-204 generator (Electro-Biology, Inc.). Inmediately post...at 1 gauss and 15 Hz pulse train (Fig. 1). PEMF induced larger shifts of RNA fluorcscencc tha1 60 Hz fields. IlL-60 (Fig. 2), peripheral human

  9. Comparison of diffusion-weighted images using short inversion time inversion recovery or chemical shift selective pulse as fat suppression in patients with breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazama, Toshiki; Nasu, Katsuhiro; Kuroki, Yoshifumi; Nawano, Shigeru; Ito, Hisao

    2009-01-01

    Fat suppression is essential for diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the body. However, the chemical shift selective (CHESS) pulse often fails to suppress fat signals in the breast. The purpose of this study was to compare DWI using CHESS and DWI using short inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) in terms of fat suppression and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value. DWI using STIR, DWI using CHESS, and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images were obtained in 32 patients with breast carcinoma. Uniformity of fat suppression, ADC, signal intensity, and visualization of the breast tumors were evaluated. In 44% (14/32) of patients there was insufficient fat suppression in the breasts on DWI using CHESS, whereas 0% was observed on DWI using STIR (P<0.0001). The ADCs obtained for DWI using STIR were 4.3% lower than those obtained for DWI using CHESS (P<0.02); there was a strong correlation of the ADC measurement (r=0.93, P<0.001). DWI using STIR may be excellent for fat suppression; and the ADC obtained in this sequence was well correlated with that obtained with DWI using CHESS. DWI using STIR may be useful when the fat suppression technique in DWI using CHESS does not work well. (author)

  10. Pulsed irradiation improves target selectivity of infrared laser-evoked gene operator for single-cell gene induction in the nematode C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Motoshi; Toyoda, Naoya; Takagi, Shin

    2014-01-01

    Methods for turning on/off gene expression at the experimenter's discretion would be useful for various biological studies. Recently, we reported on a novel microscope system utilizing an infrared laser-evoked gene operator (IR-LEGO) designed for inducing heat shock response efficiently in targeted single cells in living organisms without cell damage, thereby driving expression of a transgene under the control of a heat shock promoter. Although the original IR-LEGO can be successfully used for gene induction, several limitations hinder its wider application. Here, using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) as a subject, we have made improvements in IR-LEGO. For better spatial control of heating, a pulsed irradiation method using an optical chopper was introduced. As a result, single cells of C. elegans embryos as early as the 2-cell stage and single neurons in ganglia can be induced to express genes selectively. In addition, the introduction of site-specific recombination systems to IR-LEGO enables the induction of gene expression controlled by constitutive and cell type-specific promoters. The strategies adopted here will be useful for future applications of IR-LEGO to other organisms.

  11. Rapidly tuning miniature transversely excited atmospheric-pressure CO2 laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yanchen; Ren, Deming; Hu, Xiaoyong; Liu, Fengmei; Zhao, Jingshan

    2002-08-20

    An experimental study of a rapidly tuning miniature transversely excited atmospheric-pressure CO2 laser is reported. To rapidly shift laser wavelengths over selected transitions in the 9-11 microm wavelength region, we have utilized a high-frequency stepping motor and a diffraction grating. The laser is highly automated with a monolithic microprocessor controlled laser line selection. For the achievement of stable laser output, a system of laser excitation with a voltage of 10 kV, providing effective surface corona preionization and allowing one to work at various gas pressures, is utilized. Laser operation at 59 emission lines of the CO2 molecule rotational transition is obtained and at 51 lines, the pulse energy of laser radiation exceeds 30 mJ. The system can be tuned between two different rotational lines spanning the wavelength range from 9.2 to 10.8 microm within 10 ms.

  12. Phasic excitation of ventral tegmental dopamine neurons potentiates the initiation of conditioned approach behavior: parametric and reinforcement-schedule analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilango, Anton; Kesner, Andrew J; Broker, Carl J; Wang, Dong V; Ikemoto, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Midbrain dopamine neurons are implicated in motivation and learning. However, it is unclear how phasic excitation of dopamine neurons, which is implicated in learning, is involved in motivation. Here we used a self-stimulation procedure to examine how mice seek for optogenetically-induced phasic excitation of dopamine neurons, with an emphasis on the temporal dimension. TH-Cre transgenic mice received adeno-associated viral vectors encoding channelrhodopsin-2 into the ventral tegmental area, resulting in selective expression of the opsin in dopamine neurons. These mice were trained to press on a lever for photo-pulse trains that phasically excited dopamine neurons. They learned to self-stimulate in a fast, constant manner, and rapidly reduced pressing during extinction. We first determined effective parameters of photo-pulse trains in self-stimulation. Lever-press rates changed as a function of the manipulation of pulse number, duration, intensity, and frequency. We then examined effects of interval and ratio schedules of reinforcement on photo-pulse train reinforcement, which was contrasted with food reinforcement. Reinforcement with food inhibited lever pressing for a few seconds, after which pressing was robustly regulated in a goal-directed manner. In contrast, phasic excitation of dopamine neurons robustly potentiated the initiation of lever pressing; however, this effect did not last more than 1 s and quickly diminished. Indeed, response rates markedly decreased when lever pressing was reinforced with inter-reinforcement interval schedules of 3 or 10 s or ratio schedules requiring multiple responses per reinforcement. Thus, phasic excitation of dopamine neurons briefly potentiates the initiation of approach behavior with apparent lack of long-term motivational regulation.

  13. Phasic excitation of ventral tegmental dopamine neurons potentiates the initiation of conditioned approach behavior: parametric and reinforcement-schedule analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilango, Anton; Kesner, Andrew J.; Broker, Carl J.; Wang, Dong V.; Ikemoto, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Midbrain dopamine neurons are implicated in motivation and learning. However, it is unclear how phasic excitation of dopamine neurons, which is implicated in learning, is involved in motivation. Here we used a self-stimulation procedure to examine how mice seek for optogenetically-induced phasic excitation of dopamine neurons, with an emphasis on the temporal dimension. TH-Cre transgenic mice received adeno-associated viral vectors encoding channelrhodopsin-2 into the ventral tegmental area, resulting in selective expression of the opsin in dopamine neurons. These mice were trained to press on a lever for photo-pulse trains that phasically excited dopamine neurons. They learned to self-stimulate in a fast, constant manner, and rapidly reduced pressing during extinction. We first determined effective parameters of photo-pulse trains in self-stimulation. Lever-press rates changed as a function of the manipulation of pulse number, duration, intensity, and frequency. We then examined effects of interval and ratio schedules of reinforcement on photo-pulse train reinforcement, which was contrasted with food reinforcement. Reinforcement with food inhibited lever pressing for a few seconds, after which pressing was robustly regulated in a goal-directed manner. In contrast, phasic excitation of dopamine neurons robustly potentiated the initiation of lever pressing; however, this effect did not last more than 1 s and quickly diminished. Indeed, response rates markedly decreased when lever pressing was reinforced with inter-reinforcement interval schedules of 3 or 10 s or ratio schedules requiring multiple responses per reinforcement. Thus, phasic excitation of dopamine neurons briefly potentiates the initiation of approach behavior with apparent lack of long-term motivational regulation. PMID:24834037

  14. Phasic excitation of ventral tegmental dopamine neurons potentiates the initiation of conditioned approach behavior: Parametric and reinforcement-schedule analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton eIlango

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Midbrain dopamine neurons are implicated in motivation and learning. However, it is unclear how phasic excitation of dopamine neurons, which is implicated in learning, is involved in motivation. Here we used a self-stimulation procedure to examine how mice seek for optogenetically-induced phasic excitation of dopamine neurons, with an emphasis on the temporal dimension. TH-Cre transgenic mice received adeno-associated viral vectors encoding channelrhodopsin-2 into the ventral tegmental area, resulting in selective expression of the opsin in dopamine neurons. These mice were trained to press on a lever for photo-pulse trains that phasically excited dopamine neurons. They learned to self-stimulate in a fast, constant manner, and rapidly reduced pressing during extinction. We first determined effective parameters of photo-pulse trains in self-stimulation. Lever-press rates changed as a function of the manipulation of pulse number, duration, intensity and frequency. We then examined effects of interval and ratio schedules of reinforcement on photo-pulse train reinforcement, which was contrasted with food reinforcement. Reinforcement with food inhibited lever pressing for a few seconds, after which pressing was robustly regulated in a goal-directed manner. In contrast, phasic excitation of dopamine neurons robustly potentiated the initiation of lever pressing; however, this effect did not last more than 1 s and quickly diminished. Indeed, response rates markedly decreased when lever pressing was reinforced with inter-reinforcement interval schedules of 3 or 10 s or ratio schedules requiring multiple responses per reinforcement. Thus, phasic excitation of dopamine neurons briefly potentiates the initiation of approach behavior with apparent lack of long-term motivational regulation.

  15. Diffusion-weighted imaging of the rat pelvis using 3D water-excitation MP-RAGE MR sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numano, Tomokazu; Homma, Kazuhiro; Hyodo, Koji; Nitta, Naotaka; Iwasaki, Nobuaki

    2008-01-01

    We developed a novel technique for fat-saturated, 3-dimensional (3D) diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging sequencing based upon the 3D magnetization-prepared, rapid gradient-echo (3D-MP-RAGE) method. We saturated fat using 2 techniques, chemical shift selective (CHESS; FatSat)-3D-DWI sequence versus water excitation (WE)-3D-DWI method, then compared the 2 sequences in terms of degree of fat suppression. In preparing the FatSat-3D-DWI sequence, we used a ''CHESS-90deg radiofrequency (RF)-motion probing gradient (MPG)-180deg RFMPG-90deg RF'' pulse-train, to sensitize the magnetization to fat-saturated diffusion. In contrast, in the WE-3D-DWI sequence, we selected a RAGE-excitation pulse with a binominal-pulse 1-1 or 1-2-1 for water-excited (fat-saturated) diffusion imaging. Experimental results in a phantom confirmed the effects of diffusion weighting and of fat saturation. Fat saturation was much better in the WE-3D-DWI sequence than the CHESS-3D-DWI sequence. From results from animal (rat pelvis) experiments using WE-3D-DWI, we obtained fat-saturated DWI. This sequence was useful for in vivo imaging. (author)

  16. Pulse Oximetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... American Thoracic Society www. thoracic. org American Thoracic Society PATIENT EDUCATION | INFORMATION SERIES How accurate is the pulse oximeter? The ... patient. co. uk/ doctor/ Pulse- Oximetry. htm This ... service of the American Thoracic Society. The content is for educational purposes only. It ...

  17. MO-FG-CAMPUS-JeP2-01: 4D-MRI with 3D Radial Sampling and Self-Gating-Based K-Space Sorting: Image Quality Improvement by Slab-Selective Excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Z; Pang, J; Tuli, R; Fraass, B; Fan, Z; Yang, W; Bi, X; Hakimian, B; Li, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A recent 4D MRI technique based on 3D radial sampling and self-gating-based K-space sorting has shown promising results in characterizing respiratory motion. However due to continuous acquisition and potentially drastic k-space undersampling resultant images could suffer from low blood-to-tissue contrast and streaking artifacts. In this study 3D radial sampling with slab-selective excitation (SS) was proposed in attempt to enhance blood-to-tissue contrast by exploiting the in-flow effect and to suppress the excess signal from the peripheral structures particularly in the superior-inferior direction. The feasibility of improving image quality by using this approach was investigated through a comparison with the previously developed non-selective excitation (NS) approach. Methods: Two excitation approaches SS and NS were compared in 5 cancer patients (1 lung 1 liver 2 pancreas and 1 esophagus) at 3Tesla. Image artifact was assessed in all patients on a 4-point scale (0: poor; 3: excellent). Signal-tonoise ratio (SNR) of the blood vessel (aorta) at the center of field-of-view and its nearby tissue were measured in 3 of the 5 patients (1 liver 2 pancreas) and blood-to-tissue contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were then determined. Results: Compared with NS the image quality of SS was visually improved with overall higher signal in all patients (2.6±0.55 vs. 3.4±0.55). SS showed an approximately 2-fold increase of SNR in the blood (aorta: 16.39±1.95 vs. 32.19±7.93) and slight increase in the surrounding tissue (liver/pancreas: 16.91±1.82 vs. 22.31±3.03). As a result the blood-totissue CNR was dramatically higher in the SS method (1.20±1.20 vs. 9.87±6.67). Conclusion: The proposed 3D radial sampling with slabselective excitation allows for reduced image artifact and improved blood SNR and blood-to-tissue CNR. The success of this technique could potentially benefit patients with cancerous tumors that have invaded the surrounding blood vessels where radiation

  18. Improving the time efficiency of the Fourier synthesis method for slice selection in magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahayori, B; Khaneja, N; Johnston, L A; Farrell, P M; Mareels, I M Y

    2016-01-01

    The design of slice selective pulses for magnetic resonance imaging can be cast as an optimal control problem. The Fourier synthesis method is an existing approach to solve these optimal control problems. In this method the gradient field as well as the excitation field are switched rapidly and their amplitudes are calculated based on a Fourier series expansion. Here, we provide a novel insight into the Fourier synthesis method via representing the Bloch equation in spherical coordinates. Based on the spherical Bloch equation, we propose an alternative sequence of pulses that can be used for slice selection which is more time efficient compared to the original method. Simulation results demonstrate that while the performance of both methods is approximately the same, the required time for the proposed sequence of pulses is half of the original sequence of pulses. Furthermore, the slice selectivity of both sequences of pulses changes with radio frequency field inhomogeneities in a similar way. We also introduce a measure, referred to as gradient complexity, to compare the performance of both sequences of pulses. This measure indicates that for a desired level of uniformity in the excited slice, the gradient complexity for the proposed sequence of pulses is less than the original sequence. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. In vitro study on selective removal of bovine demineralized dentin using nanosecond pulsed laser at wavelengths around 5.8 μm for realizing less invasive treatment of dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Tetsuya; Ishii, Katsunori; Yoshikawa, Kazushi; Yasuo, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Kazuyo; Awazu, Kunio

    2015-04-01

    In the treatment of dental caries, less invasive methods are strongly required. However, conventional dental lasers cannot always achieve selective removal of caries or good bonding with a composite resin. Based on the optical absorption characteristics of dentin, wavelengths around 6 μm are promising in this regard. Our previous study indicated the possibility of selective removal of demineralized dentin using a nanosecond pulsed laser at wavelengths around 6 μm. In the present study, the optimal laser irradiation conditions were investigated for achieving selective removal of demineralized dentin. Bovine dentin was used, and its laser ablation characteristics were evaluated. The results indicated that demineralized dentin could be selectively removed, without causing cracking or damage to sound dentin, at laser wavelengths of 5.75 and 5.80 μm and average power densities of 30-40 W/cm(2). These optimal laser irradiation conditions also realized higher bonding strength with a composite resin than was possible using an Er:YAG laser. The use of nanosecond pulses allowed the thermal confinement condition to be satisfied, leading to a reduction in tissue damage, including degradation of dental pulp vitality. Thus, a nanosecond pulsed laser at 5.8 μm was found to be effective for less invasive caries treatment.

  20. Excited charmed mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, J.N.; Shukla, S.

    1995-05-01

    The experimental status of excited charmed mesons is reviewed and is compared to theoretical expectations. Six states have been observed and their properties are consistent with those predicted for excited charmed states with orbital angular momentum equal to one

  1. Non-enhanced 3D MR angiography of the lower extremity using ECG-gated TSE imaging with non-selective refocusing pulses. Initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanzman, R.S.; Blondin, D.; Orzechowski, D.; Scherer, A.; Moedder, U.; Kroepil, P.; Godehardt, E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate non-enhanced 3D MR angiography using turbo spin echo (TSE) imaging with non-selective refocusing pulses (NATIVE SPACE MRA) for the visualization of the arteries of the lower extremity. Materials and Methods: Three-station imaging (iliac arteries, femoral arteries, arteries of the lower leg) was performed in 8 healthy volunteers and 3 patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) using a 1.5 T MR scanner. In 8 healthy volunteers, 4 different acquisition schemes were performed with the following imaging parameters: S 1: acquisition with every heartbeat (RR = 1), spoiler gradient of 25 % (SG = 25 %); S 2: RR = 1, SG = 0 %; S 3: RR = 2, SG = 25 %; S 4: RR = 2, SG = 0 %. The subjective image quality on a 4-point-scale (4 = excellent to 1 = not diagnostic) and relative SNR were assessed. In 3 patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD), SPACE MRA was performed for assessment of stenosis. Results: The mean subjective image quality was significantly lower for the iliac arteries compared to the femoral arteries and arteries of the lower leg (p < 0.0001). The subjective image quality for acquisition scheme S 1 was significantly lower than the image quality for S 3 and S 4 for the iliac arteries (p < 0.01), while the subjective image quality for acquisition scheme S 2 was significantly lower than S 3 and S 4 for the femoral arteries and the arteries of the lower leg (p < 0.01). The relative SNR was significantly higher for acquisition schemes S 3 and S 4 as compared to S 1 and S 2 (p < 0.0001) for all regions. SPACE MRA disclosed 7 significant stenoses in 3 PAD patients. Conclusion: ECG-gated SPACE MRA is a promising imaging technique for non-enhanced assessment of the arteries of the lower extremity. (orig.)

  2. The Trichel pulse corona in N2 + CCl2F2 mixtures: the shape of pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vagnerova, L.; Dindosova, D.; Skalny, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    The formation of regular Trichel pulses in electronegative gaseous mixtures is studied experimentally, with emphasis on the consequences of different electron attachment mechanisms in the used gas mixtures on the behavior of the discharge. Negative ions are believed to be responsible for excitation of the Trichel pulses. The experimental data presented in the paper give evidence that the origin of the negative ions does not play any substantial role in the formation of the initial part of the Trichel pulses. (J.U.)

  3. Pulsed Out of Awareness: EEG Alpha oscillations represent a pulsed inhibition of ongoing cortical processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Elliott Mathewson

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Alpha oscillations are ubiquitous in the brain, but their role in cortical processing remains a matter of debate. Recently, evidence has begun to accumulate in support of a role for alpha oscillations in attention selection and control. Here we first review evidence that 8-12 Hz oscillations in the brain have a general inhibitory role in cognitive processing, with an emphasis on their role in visual processing. Then, we summarize the evidence in support of our recent proposal that alpha represents a pulsed inhibition of ongoing neural activity. The phase of the ongoing EEG can influence evoked activity and subsequent processing, and we propose that alpha exerts its inhibitory role through alternating microstates of inhibition and excitation. Finally, we discuss evidence that this pulsed inhibition can be entrained to rhythmic stimuli in the environment, such that preferential processing occurs for stimuli at predictable moments. The entrainment of preferential phase may provide a mechanism for temporal attention in the brain. This pulsed inhibitory account of alpha has important implications for many common cognitive phenomena, such as the attentional blink, and seems to indicate that our visual experience may at least some times be coming through in waves.

  4. Optimal control of peridinin excited-state dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietzek, Benjamin; Chábera, Pavel; Hanf, Robert; Tschierlei, Stefanie; Popp, Jürgen; Pascher, Torbjörn; Yartsev, Arkady; Polívka, Tomáš

    2010-07-01

    Optimal control is applied to study the excited-state relaxation of the carbonyl-carotenoid peridinin in solution. Phase-shaping of the excitation pulses is employed to influence the photoinduced reaction dynamics of peridinin. The outcome of various control experiments using different experimentally imposed fitness parameters is discussed. Furthermore, the effects of pump-wavelength and different solvents on the control efficiency are presented. The data show that excited-state population within either the S 1 or the ICT state can be reduced significantly by applying optimal control, while the efficiency of control decreases upon excitation into the low-energy side of the absorption band. However, we are unable to alter the ratio of S 1 and ICT population or increase the population of either state compared to excitation with a transform-limited pulse. We compare the results to various control mechanisms and argue that characteristic low-wavenumber modes are relevant for the photochemistry of peridinin.

  5. Predictive modeling, simulation, and optimization of laser processing techniques: UV nanosecond-pulsed laser micromachining of polymers and selective laser melting of powder metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criales Escobar, Luis Ernesto

    One of the most frequently evolving areas of research is the utilization of lasers for micro-manufacturing and additive manufacturing purposes. The use of laser beam as a tool for manufacturing arises from the need for flexible and rapid manufacturing at a low-to-mid cost. Laser micro-machining provides an advantage over mechanical micro-machining due to the faster production times of large batch sizes and the high costs associated with specific tools. Laser based additive manufacturing enables processing of powder metals for direct and rapid fabrication of products. Therefore, laser processing can be viewed as a fast, flexible, and cost-effective approach compared to traditional manufacturing processes. Two types of laser processing techniques are studied: laser ablation of polymers for micro-channel fabrication and selective laser melting of metal powders. Initially, a feasibility study for laser-based micro-channel fabrication of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) via experimentation is presented. In particular, the effectiveness of utilizing a nanosecond-pulsed laser as the energy source for laser ablation is studied. The results are analyzed statistically and a relationship between process parameters and micro-channel dimensions is established. Additionally, a process model is introduced for predicting channel depth. Model outputs are compared and analyzed to experimental results. The second part of this research focuses on a physics-based FEM approach for predicting the temperature profile and melt pool geometry in selective laser melting (SLM) of metal powders. Temperature profiles are calculated for a moving laser heat source to understand the temperature rise due to heating during SLM. Based on the predicted temperature distributions, melt pool geometry, i.e. the locations at which melting of the powder material occurs, is determined. Simulation results are compared against data obtained from experimental Inconel 625 test coupons fabricated at the National

  6. Two-photon excitation STED microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moneron, Gael; Hell, Stefan W

    2009-08-17

    We report sub-diffraction resolution in two-photon excitation (TPE) fluorescence microscopy achieved by merging this technique with stimulated-emission depletion (STED). We demonstrate an easy-to-implement and promising laser combination based on a short-pulse laser source for two-photon excitation and a continuous-wave (CW) laser source for resolution enhancement. Images of fluorescent nanoparticles and the immunostained transcription regulator NF kappaB in mammalian cell nuclei exhibit resolutions of barrier. (c) 2009 Optical Society of America

  7. A Ku band pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer using an arbitrary waveform generator for quantum control experiments at millikelvin temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, Yung Szen, E-mail: yungszen@utm.my [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka-shi, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Tabuchi, Yutaka [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology (RCAST), The University of Tokyo, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan); Negoro, Makoto; Kagawa, Akinori; Kitagawa, Masahiro, E-mail: kitagawa@ee.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka-shi, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    We present a 17 GHz (Ku band) arbitrary waveform pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer for experiments down to millikelvin temperatures. The spectrometer is located at room temperature, while the resonator is placed either in a room temperature magnet or inside a cryogen-free dilution refrigerator; the operating temperature range of the dilution unit is from ca. 10 mK to 8 K. This combination provides the opportunity to perform quantum control experiments on electron spins in the pure-state regime. At 0.6 T, spin echo experiments were carried out using γ-irradiated quartz glass from 1 K to 12.3 mK. With decreasing temperatures, we observed an increase in spin echo signal intensities due to increasing spin polarizations, in accordance with theoretical predictions. Through experimental data fitting, thermal spin polarization at 100 mK was estimated to be at least 99%, which was almost pure state. Next, to demonstrate the ability to create arbitrary waveform pulses, we generate a shaped pulse by superposing three Gaussian pulses of different frequencies. The resulting pulse was able to selectively and coherently excite three different spin packets simultaneously—a useful ability for analyzing multi-spin system and for controlling a multi-qubit quantum computer. By applying this pulse to the inhomogeneously broadened sample, we obtain three well-resolved excitations at 8 K, 1 K, and 14 mK.

  8. Formation of plasmon pulses in the cooperative decay of excitons of quantum dots near a metal surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shesterikov, A. B.; Gubin, M. Yu. [Vladimir State University (Russian Federation); Gladush, M. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Spectroscopy (Russian Federation); Prokhorov, A. V., E-mail: avprokhorov33@mail.ru [Vladimir State University (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    The formation of pulses of surface electromagnetic waves at a metal–dielectric boundary is considered in the process of cooperative decay of excitons of quantum dots distributed near a metal surface in a dielectric layer. It is shown that the efficiency of exciton energy transfer to excited plasmons can, in principle, be increased by selecting the dielectric material with specified values of the complex permittivity. It is found that in the mean field approximation, the semiclassical model of formation of plasmon pulses in the system under study is reduced to the pendulum equation with the additional term of nonlinear losses.

  9. WaterControl: self-diffusion based solvent signal suppression enhanced by selective inversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Gang; Torres, Allan M; Price, William S

    2017-05-01

    Selective inversion/excitation based solvent signal suppression techniques are widely used in various NMR experiments because of their high efficiency and general applicability. However, these techniques generate a 'null'/suppression region containing (non-quantitatively) degraded solvent and desired resonances because of their reliance on the rejection of the coherence transfer pathway corresponding to all the resonances within the suppression region. To address this issue, the WaterControl technique was developed by inserting a (pulsed gradient - selective inversion pulse - pulsed gradient) unit into each 'transverse' period of a standard stimulated echo pulse sequence so that the coherence transfer pathways corresponding to both the suppression and non-suppression regions can be selected in one transient. The new sequence affords a diffusion based and quantifiable solvent signal suppression with no or minimal loss of features of interest. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. a simple a simple excitation control excitation control excitation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    produce the primary dc fluxes are usually placed on the rotor because it has to (in most cases) sustain only a small fraction of the armature current. In situations ... concentrated on the var control of a synchronous motor and the study was extended to over-excitation schemes for power factor control of power lines to save.

  11. Isotope separation using vibrationally excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodroffe, J.A.; Keck, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    Vibrational excitation of molecules having components of a selected isotope type is used to produce a conversion from vibrational to translational excitation of the molecules by collision with the molecules of a heavy carrier gas. The resulting difference in translaton between the molecules of the selected isotope type and all other molecules of the same compound permits their separate collection. When applied to uranium enrichment, a subsonic cryogenic flow of molecules of uranium hexafluoride in combination with an argon carrier gas is directed through a cooled chamber that is illuminated by laser radiaton tuned to vibrationally excite the uranium hexafluoride molecules of a specific uranium isotope. The excited molecules collide with carrier gas molecules, causing a conversion of the excitation energy into a translation of the excited molecule, which results in a higher thermal energy or diffusivity than that of the other uranium hexafluoride molecules. The flowing molecules including the excited molecules directly enter a set of cryogenically cooled channels. The higher thermal velocity of the excited molecules increases the probability of their striking a collector surface. The molecules which strike this surface immediately condense. After a predetermined thickness of molecules is collected on the surface, the flow of uranium hexafluoride is interrupted and the chamber heated to the point of vaporization of the collected hexafluoride, permitting its removal. (LL)

  12. Chemometrics-assisted excitation-emission fluorescence analytical data for rapid and selective determination of optical brighteners in the presence of uncalibrated interferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Ali; Masoum, Saeed; Mohsenikia, Atefeh; Abbasi, Saleheh

    2016-01-01

    This study describes a novel approach for the simultaneous determination of CBS-X and CXT as widely used optical brighteners in household detergent, by combining the advantage of the high sensitivity of molecular fluorescence, and the selectivity of second-order chemometric methods. The proposed method is assisted by second-order chemometric analyses employing the PARAFAC, SWATLD and APTLD that help us to determine CBS-X and CXT in laundry powders and environmental samples, through the unique decomposition of the three-way data array. Proposed method can provide the extraction of relative concentrations of the analytes, as well as the spectral profiles. This approach achieves the second-order advantage and in principle could be able to overcome the spectral uncalibrated interference problems in the determination of CBS-X and CXT at the ng g- 1 level. By spiking the known concentrations of these compounds to the real samples, the accuracy of the proposed methods was validated and recoveries of the spiked values were calculated. High recoveries (90.00%-113.33%) for the spiked laundry powders and real environmental samples indicate the present method successfully faces this complex challenge without the necessity of applying separation and preconcentration steps in environmental contaminations.

  13. High voltage pulse generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasching, George E.

    1977-03-08

    An improved high-voltage pulse generator has been provided which is especially useful in ultrasonic testing of rock core samples. An N number of capacitors are charged in parallel to V volts and at the proper instance are coupled in series to produce a high-voltage pulse of N times V volts. Rapid switching of the capacitors from the paralleled charging configuration to the series discharging configuration is accomplished by using silicon-controlled rectifiers which are chain self-triggered following the initial triggering of a first one of the rectifiers connected between the first and second of the plurality of charging capacitors. A timing and triggering circuit is provided to properly synchronize triggering pulses to the first SCR at a time when the charging voltage is not being applied to the parallel-connected charging capacitors. Alternate circuits are provided for controlling the application of the charging voltage from a charging circuit to be applied to the parallel capacitors which provides a selection of at least two different intervals in which the charging voltage is turned "off" to allow the SCR's connecting the capacitors in series to turn "off" before recharging begins. The high-voltage pulse-generating circuit including the N capacitors and corresponding SCR's which connect the capacitors in series when triggered "on" further includes diodes and series-connected inductors between the parallel-connected charging capacitors which allow sufficiently fast charging of the capacitors for a high pulse repetition rate and yet allow considerable control of the decay time of the high-voltage pulses from the pulse-generating circuit.

  14. Pulse plating

    CERN Document Server

    Hansal, Wolfgang E G; Green, Todd; Leisner, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The electrodeposition of metals using pulsed current has achieved practical importance in recent years. Although it has long been known that changes in potential, with or without polarity reversal, can significantly affect the deposition process, the practical application of this has been slow to be adopted. This can largely be explained in terms of the complex relationship between the current regime and its effect on the electrodeposition process. In order to harness these effects, an understanding of the anodic and cathodic electrochemical processes is necessary, together with the effects of polarity reversal and the rate of such reversals. In this new monograph, the basics of metal electrodeposition from solution are laid out in great detail in seven distinct chapters. With this knowledge, the reader is able to predict how a given pulse train profile can be adopted to achieve a desired outcome. Equally important is the choice of a suitable rectifier and the ancillary control circuits to enable pulse platin...

  15. Wave equations for pulse propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shore, B.W.

    1987-06-24

    Theoretical discussions of the propagation of pulses of laser radiation through atomic or molecular vapor rely on a number of traditional approximations for idealizing the radiation and the molecules, and for quantifying their mutual interaction by various equations of propagation (for the radiation) and excitation (for the molecules). In treating short-pulse phenomena it is essential to consider coherent excitation phenomena of the sort that is manifest in Rabi oscillations of atomic or molecular populations. Such processes are not adequately treated by rate equations for excitation nor by rate equations for radiation. As part of a more comprehensive treatment of the coupled equations that describe propagation of short pulses, this memo presents background discussion of the equations that describe the field. This memo discusses the origin, in Maxwell's equations, of the wave equation used in the description of pulse propagation. It notes the separation into lamellar and solenoidal (or longitudinal and transverse) and positive and negative frequency parts. It mentions the possibility of separating the polarization field into linear and nonlinear parts, in order to define a susceptibility or index of refraction and, from these, a phase and group velocity. The memo discusses various ways of characterizing the polarization characteristics of plane waves, that is, of parameterizing a transverse unit vector, such as the Jones vector, the Stokes vector, and the Poincare sphere. It discusses the connection between macroscopically defined quantities, such as the intensity or, more generally, the Stokes parameters, and microscopic field amplitudes. The material presented here is a portion of a more extensive treatment of propagation to be presented separately. The equations presented here have been described in various books and articles. They are collected here as a summary and review of theory needed when treating pulse propagation.

  16. Analysis of Indium Tin Oxide Film Using Argon Fluroide (ArF) Laser-Excited Atomic Fluorescence of Ablated Plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Sut Kam; Garcia, Dario Machado

    2017-04-01

    A two-pulse laser-excited atomic fluorescence (LEAF) technique at 193 nm wavelength was applied to the analysis of indium tin oxide (ITO) layer on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film. Fluorescence emissions from analytes were induced from plumes generated by first laser pulse. Using this approach, non-selective LEAF can be accomplished for simultaneous multi-element analysis and it overcomes the handicap of strict requirement for laser excitation wavelength. In this study, experimental conditions including laser fluences, times for gating and time delay between pulses were optimized to reveal high sensitivity with minimal sample destruction and penetration. With weak laser fluences of 100 and 125 mJ/cm 2 for 355 and 193 nm pulses, detection limits were estimated to be 0.10% and 0.43% for Sn and In, respectively. In addition, the relation between fluorescence emissions and number of laser shots was investigated; reproducible results were obtained for Sn and In. It shows the feasibility of depth profiling by this technique. Morphologies of samples were characterized at various laser fluences and number of shots to examine the accurate penetration. Images of craters were also investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results demonstrate the imperceptible destructiveness of film after laser shot. With such weak laser fluences and minimal destructiveness, this LEAF technique is suitable for thin-film analysis.

  17. Numerical study on the selective excitation of Helmholtz-Gauss beams in end-pumped solid-state digital lasers with the control of the laser gain transverse position provided by off-axis end pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ko-Fan; Chu, Shu-Chun

    2018-03-01

    This study proposes a complete and unified method for selective excitation of any specified nearly nondiffracting Helmholtz-Gauss (HzG) beam in end-pumped solid-state digital lasers. Four types of the HzG beams: cosine-Gauss beams, Bessel-Gauss beams, Mathieu-Gauss beams, and, in particular, parabolic-Gauss beams are successfully demonstrated to be generated with the proposed methods. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, parabolic-Gauss beams have not yet been directly generated from any kind of laser system. The numerical results of this study show that one can successfully achieve any lasing HzG beams directly from the solid-state digital lasers with only added control of the laser gain transverse position provided by off-axis end pumping. This study also presents a practical digital laser set-up for easily manipulating off-axis pumping in order to achieve the control of the laser gain transverse gain position in digital lasers. The reported results in this study provide advancement of digital lasers in dynamically generating nondiffracting beams. The control of the digital laser cavity gain position creates the possibility of achieving real-time selection of more laser modes in digital lasers, and it is worth further investigation in the future.

  18. Excited states v.6

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Edward C

    1982-01-01

    Excited States, Volume 6 is a collection of papers that discusses the excited states of molecules. The first paper discusses the linear polyene electronic structure and potential surfaces, considering both the theoretical and experimental approaches in such electronic states. This paper also reviews the theory of electronic structure and cites some experimental techniques on polyene excitations, polyene spectroscopic phenomenology, and those involving higher states of polyenes and their triplet states. Examples of these experimental studies of excited states involve the high-resolution one-pho

  19. Excited states 2

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Edward C

    2013-01-01

    Excited States, Volume 2 is a collection of papers that deals with molecules in the excited states. The book describes the geometries of molecules in the excited electronic states. One paper describes the geometries of a diatomic molecule and of polyatomic molecules; it also discusses the determination of the many excited state geometries of molecules with two, three, or four atoms by techniques similar to diatomic spectroscopy. Another paper introduces an ordered theory related to excitons in pure and mixed molecular crystals. This paper also presents some experimental data such as those invo

  20. Selection of surrogate bacteria in place of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium for pulsed electric field treatment of orange juice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulsed electric field (PEF) technology has been used as an innovative treatment for the reduction of microorganisms in liquid foods and beverages by the electroporation of bacterial membranes. PEF may be used to pasteurize orange juice at lower temperatures than traditional thermal processes, prese...

  1. Femtosecond laser pulses principles and experiments

    CERN Document Server

    1998-01-01

    This smooth introduction for advanced undergraduate students starts with the fundamentals of lasers and pulsed optics Thus prepared, the student learns how to generate short and ultrashort laser pulses, how to manipulate them, and how to measure them Finally, spectroscopic implications are discussed This rounded text gives the student an up-to-date introduction to one of the most exciting fields in laser physics

  2. Single shot three-dimensional pulse sequence for hyperpolarized13C MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiazheng; Wright, Alan J; Hu, De-En; Hesketh, Richard; Brindle, Kevin M

    2017-02-01

    Metabolic imaging with hyperpolarized 13 C-labeled cell substrates is a promising technique for imaging tissue metabolism in vivo. However, the transient nature of the hyperpolarization, and its depletion following excitation, limits the imaging time and the number of excitation pulses that can be used. We describe here a single-shot three-dimensional (3D) imaging sequence and demonstrate its capability to generate 13 C MR images in tumor-bearing mice injected with hyperpolarized [1- 13 C]pyruvate. The pulse sequence acquires a stack-of-spirals at two spin echoes after a single excitation pulse and encodes the kz-dimension in an interleaved manner to enhance robustness to B 0 inhomogeneity. Spectral-spatial pulses are used to acquire dynamic 3D images from selected hyperpolarized 13 C-labeled metabolites. A nominal spatial/temporal resolution of 1.25 × 1.25 × 2.5 mm 3  × 2 s was achieved in tumor images of hyperpolarized [1- 13 C]pyruvate and [1- 13 C]lactate acquired in vivo. Higher resolution in the z-direction, with a different k-space trajectory, was demonstrated in measurements on a thermally polarized [1- 13 C]lactate phantom. The pulse sequence is capable of imaging hyperpolarized 13 C-labeled substrates at relatively high spatial and temporal resolutions and is robust to moderate system imperfections. Magn Reson Med 77:740-752, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  3. LIBS using dual- and ultra-short laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, S M; Stratis, D N; Eland, K L; Lai, T; Berg, M A; Gold, D M

    2001-02-01

    Pre-ablation dual-pulse LIBS enhancement data for copper, brass and steel using ns laser excitation are reported. Although large enhancements are observed for all samples, the magnitude of the enhancement is matrix dependent. Whereas all of the dual-pulse studies used ns laser excitation we see interesting effects when using ps and fs laser excitation for single-pulse LIBS. LIBS spectra of copper using 1.3 ps and 140 fs laser pulses show much lower background signals compared to ns pulse excitation. Also, the atomic emission decays much more rapidly with time. Because of relatively low backgrounds when using ps and fs pulses, non-gated detection of LIBS is shown to be very effective. The plasma dissipates quickly enough using ps and fs laser pulses, that high pulse rates, up to 1,000 Hz, are effective for increasing the LIBS signal, for a given measurement time. Finally, a simple near-collinear dual-pulse fiber-optic LIBS probe is shown to be useful for enhanced LIBS measurements.

  4. Laser excitation of the n=3 level of positronium for antihydrogen production

    CERN Document Server

    Aghion, S; Ariga, A; Ariga, T; Bonomi, G; Braunig, P; Bremer, J; Brusa, R S; Cabaret, L; Caccia, M; Caravita, R; Castelli, F; Cerchiari, G; Chlouba, K; Cialdi, S; Comparat, D; Consolati, G; Demetrio, A; Di Noto, L; Doser, M; Dudarev, A; Ereditato, A; Evans, C; Ferragut, R; Fesel, J; Fontana, A; Forslund, O K; Gerber, S; Giammarchi, M; Gligorova, A; Gninenko, S N; Guatieri, F; Haider, S; Holmestad, H; Huse, T; Jernelv, I L; Jordan, E; Kellerbauer, A; Kimura, M; Koetting, T; Krasnicky, D; Lagomarsino, V; Lansonneur, P; Lebrun, P; Lehner, S; Liberadzka, J; Malbrunot, C; Mariazzi, S; Marx, L; Matveev, V A; Mazzotta, Z; Nebbia, G; Nedelec, P; Oberthaler, M K; Pacifico, N; Pagano, D; Penasa, L; Petracek, V; Pistillo, C; Prelz, F; Prevedelli, M; Ravelli, L; Resch, L; Rienacker, B; Røhne, O M; Rotondi, A; Sacerdoti, M; Sandaker, H; Santoro, R; Scampoli, P; Smestad, L; Sorrentino, F; Spacek, M; Storey, J; Strojek, I M; Testera, G; Tietje, I; Vamosi, S; Widmann, E; Yzombard, P; Zmeskal, J; Zurlo, N.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate laser excitation of the n=3 state of positronium (Ps) in vacuum. A specially designed high-efficiency pulsed slow positron beam and single shot positronium annihilation lifetime spectroscopy were used to produce and detect Ps. Pulsed laser excitation of n=3 level at 205 nm was monitored via Ps photoionization induced by a second intense laser pulse at 1064 nm. About 15% of the overall positronium emitted in vacuum was excited to n=3 and photoionized. Saturation of both the n=3 excitation and the following photoionization was observed and is explained by a simple rate equation model. Scanning the laser frequency allowed us to extract the positronium transverse temperature related to the width of the Doppler-broadened line. Moreover, preliminary observation of excitation to Rydberg states (n = 15...17) using n=3 as intermediate level was observed, giving an independent confirmation of efficient excitation to the 33P state.

  5. Higher-order power harmonics of pulsed electrical stimulation modulates corticospinal contribution of peripheral nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chiun-Fan; Bikson, Marom; Chou, Li-Wei; Shan, Chunlei; Khadka, Niranjan; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Fregni, Felipe

    2017-03-03

    It is well established that electrical-stimulation frequency is crucial to determining the scale of induced neuromodulation, particularly when attempting to modulate corticospinal excitability. However, the modulatory effects of stimulation frequency are not only determined by its absolute value but also by other parameters such as power at harmonics. The stimulus pulse shape further influences parameters such as excitation threshold and fiber selectivity. The explicit role of the power in these harmonics in determining the outcome of stimulation has not previously been analyzed. In this study, we adopted an animal model of peripheral electrical stimulation that includes an amplitude-adapted pulse train which induces force enhancements with a corticospinal contribution. We report that the electrical-stimulation-induced force enhancements were correlated with the amplitude of stimulation power harmonics during the amplitude-adapted pulse train. In an exploratory analysis, different levels of correlation were observed between force enhancement and power harmonics of 20-80 Hz (r = 0.4247, p = 0.0243), 100-180 Hz (r = 0.5894, p = 0.0001), 200-280 Hz (r = 0.7002, p harmonics. This is a pilot, but important first demonstration that power at high order harmonics in the frequency spectrum of electrical stimulation pulses may contribute to neuromodulation, thus warrant explicit attention in therapy design and analysis.

  6. Selectivity in multiple quantum nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Warren Sloan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division

    1980-11-01

    The observation of multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance transitions in isotropic or anisotropic liquids is shown to give readily interpretable information on molecular configurations, rates of motional processes, and intramolecular interactions. However, the observed intensity of high multiple-quantum transitions falls off dramatically as the number of coupled spins increases. The theory of multiple-quantum NMR is developed through the density matrix formalism, and exact intensities are derived for several cases (isotropic first-order systems and anisotropic systems with high symmetry) to shown that this intensity decrease is expected if standard multiple-quantum pulse sequences are used. New pulse sequences are developed which excite coherences and produce population inversions only between selected states, even though other transitions are simultaneously resonant. One type of selective excitation presented only allows molecules to absorb and emit photons in groups of n. Coherent averaging theory is extended to describe these selective sequences, and to design sequences which are selective to arbitrarily high order in the Magnus expansion. This theory and computer calculations both show that extremely good selectivity and large signal enhancements are possible.

  7. Part I. Application of pulse polarography and pulse anodic stripping to the determination of selected heavy metals in natural waters. Part II. Application of controlled potential coulometric techniques to the determination of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosmun, S.T.

    1977-06-01

    The use of a thin mercury film wax-impregnated graphite electrode for the simultaneous determination of cadmium, lead and zinc in an acetate buffer by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry is described. Optimal instrumental parameters for maximum resolution and sensitivity for simultaneous analysis of these three elements in natural waters are discussed. The interference of copper with the determination of zinc is investigated in detail. An optimal mercury film thickness for this electrode is suggested. A method utilizing differential pulse polarography for the determination of chromium (VI) in natural water is described. Additions of 0.62 μg Cu(II) ml -1 and 0.55 μg Fe(III) ml -1 did not interfere with the determination of 0.050 μg Cr(VI) ml -1 . The natural water samples containing Cr(VI) were buffered to approximately pH 7 with 0.1 M ammonium acetate and 0.005 M ethylenediamine and analyzed. Natural water samples of chromium from 0.035 μg to 2.0 μg.ml -1 may be analyzed directly without further preparation. The detection limit is 0.010 μg.ml -1 . A novel, highly efficient cell with integral stirrer for controlled potential coulometry is described. This cell was used to demonstrate the feasibility of determining uranium (VI) by predictive coulometry. A PDP 8/I minicomputer was used to predict the coulometric endpoint with high accuracy within 2.5 minutes in a titration which normally takes about 10 minutes. This technique was shown to yield acceptable results even in the presence of an interfering phosphate matrix

  8. New MR pulse sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, S.E.; Flamig, D.P.; Griffey, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a method for fat suppression for three-dimensional MR imaging. The FATS (fat-suppressed acquisition with echo time shortened) sequence employs a pair of opposing adiabatic half-passage RF pulses tuned on fat resonance. The imaging parameters are as follows: TR, 20 msec; TE, 21.7-3.2 msec; 1,024 x 128 x 128 acquired matrix; imaging time, approximately 11 minutes. A series of 54 examinations were performed. Excellent fat suppression with water excitation is achieved in all cases. The orbital images demonstrate superior resolution of small orbital lesions. The high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in cranial studies demonstrates excellent petrous bone and internal auditory canal anatomy

  9. Multiplexed two-photon microscopy of dynamic biological samples with shaped broadband pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Rajesh S; Boudoux, Caroline; Labroille, Guillaume; Olivier, Nicolas; Veilleux, Israel; Farge, Emmanuel; Joffre, Manuel; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel

    2009-07-20

    Coherent control can be used to selectively enhance or cancel concurrent multiphoton processes, and has been suggested as a means to achieve nonlinear microscopy of multiple signals. Here we report multiplexed two-photon imaging in vivo with fast pixel rates and micrometer resolution. We control broadband laser pulses with a shaping scheme combining diffraction on an optically-addressed spatial light modulator and a scanning mirror allowing to switch between programmable shapes at kiloHertz rates. Using coherent control of the two-photon excited fluorescence, it was possible to perform selective microscopy of GFP and endogenous fluorescence in developing Drosophila embryos. This study establishes that broadband pulse shaping is a viable means for achieving multiplexed nonlinear imaging of biological tissues.

  10. A new phase modulated binomial-like selective-inversion sequence for solvent signal suppression in NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Johnny; Zheng, Gang; Price, William S

    2017-02-01

    A new 8-pulse Phase Modulated binomial-like selective inversion pulse sequence, dubbed '8PM', was developed by optimizing the nutation and phase angles of the constituent radio-frequency pulses so that the inversion profile resembled a target profile. Suppression profiles were obtained for both the 8PM and W5 based excitation sculpting sequences with equal inter-pulse delays. Significant distortions were observed in both profiles because of the offset effect of the radio frequency pulses. These distortions were successfully reduced by adjusting the inter-pulse delays. With adjusted inter-pulse delays, the 8PM and W5 based excitation sculpting sequences were tested on an aqueous lysozyme solution. The 8 PM based sequence provided higher suppression selectivity than the W5 based sequence. Two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy experiments were also performed on the lysozyme sample with 8PM and W5 based water signal suppression. The 8PM based suppression provided a spectrum with significantly increased (~ doubled) cross-peak intensity around the suppressed water resonance compared to the W5 based suppression. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Pulsed power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The key element of our pulsed power program is concentration of power in time and space by suppression of breakdown in dielectrics and in vacuum. Magnetically insulated vacuum transmission lines and magnetic suppression of insulator flashover have continued as the main reserch directions. Vacuum insulated line studies at Physics International have been expanded and a test bed at Sandia, called MITE (Magnetically Insulated Transmission Experiment), is under development. The choice for the baseline EBFA design will depend on the outcome of these studies and should be made in July 1977. The slow and intermediate speed pulsed power approaches to EBFA will be based on Proto I and Proto II results and several of the projected EBFA subsystems are presently being tested in Proto II. A further stage of power concentration, within the vacuum diode itself, would considerably ease the burden on dielectrics; methods of power multiplication involving magnetically imploded plasmas are being considered and tests have begun using the Ripple III apparatus

  12. Nuclear transitions induced by atomic excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyer, P.L.; Bounds, J.A.; Haight, R.C.; Luk, T.S.

    1988-01-01

    In the two-step pumping scheme for a gamma-ray laser, an essential step is that of exciting the nucleus from a long-lived storage isomer to a nearby short-lived state that then decays to the upper lasing level. An experiment is in progress to induce this transfer by first exciting the atomic electrons with uv photons. The incident photons couple well to the electrons, which then couple via a virtual photon to the nucleus. As a test case, excitation of the 235 U nucleus is being sought, using a high-brightness uv laser. The excited nuclear state, having a 26-minute half-life, decays by internal converison, resulting in emission of an atomic electron. A pulsed infrared laser produces an atomic beam of 235 U which is then bombarded by the uv laser beam. Ions are collected, and conversion electrons are detected by a channel elctron multiplier. In preliminary experiments, an upper limit of 7 x 10 -5 has been obtained for the probability of exciting a 235 U atom in the uv beam for one picosecond at an intensity of about 10 15 W/cm 2 . Experiments with higher sensitivities and at higher uv beam intensities are underway. 6 refs., 1 fig

  13. Instrumentation of kinetic spectroscopy-15. Injector pulse generators for electron accelerators, part 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janata, E.; Gutsch, W.

    1998-01-01

    The injector pulse generator for a K400 van de Graaff accelerator provides pulses with selecteable pulse duration and amplitude. The pulse amplitude can be varied from zero to 220 V, and the duration from 3 to 999 ns in 1 ns increments. The time uncertainty of the pulses is negligible compared with the smallest pulse duration obtainable. Selection of the pulse parameters can be done either manually or via a computer using a standard interface bus.

  14. Instrumentation of kinetic spectroscopy-15 Injector pulse generators for electron accelerators, part 3

    CERN Document Server

    Janata, E

    1998-01-01

    The injector pulse generator for a K400 van de Graaff accelerator provides pulses with selecteable pulse duration and amplitude. The pulse amplitude can be varied from zero to 220 V, and the duration from 3 to 999 ns in 1 ns increments. The time uncertainty of the pulses is negligible compared with the smallest pulse duration obtainable. Selection of the pulse parameters can be done either manually or via a computer using a standard interface bus.

  15. Age-related change in renal corticomedullary differentiation: evaluation with noncontrast-enhanced steady-state free precession (SSFP) MRI with spatially selective inversion pulse using variable inversion time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Yasufumi; Kanki, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Akira; Higashi, Hiroki; Tanimoto, Daigo; Sato, Tomohiro; Higaki, Atsushi; Tamada, Tsutomu; Ito, Katsuyoshi

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate age-related change in renal corticomedullary differentiation and renal cortical thickness by means of noncontrast-enhanced steady-state free precession (SSFP) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with spatially selective inversion recovery (IR) pulse. The Institutional Review Board of our hospital approved this retrospective study and patient informed consent was waived. This study included 48 patients without renal diseases who underwent noncontrast-enhanced SSFP MRI with spatially selective IR pulse using variable inversion times (TIs) (700-1500 msec). The signal intensity of renal cortex and medulla were measured to calculate renal corticomedullary contrast ratio. Additionally, renal cortical thickness was measured. The renal corticomedullary junction was clearly depicted in all patients. The mean cortical thickness was 3.9 ± 0.83 mm. The mean corticomedullary contrast ratio was 4.7 ± 1.4. There was a negative correlation between optimal TI for the best visualization of renal corticomedullary differentiation and age (r = -0.378; P = 0.001). However, there was no significant correlation between renal corticomedullary contrast ratio and age (r = 0.187; P = 0.20). Similarly, no significant correlation was observed between renal cortical thickness and age (r = 0.054; P = 0.712). In the normal kidney, noncontrast-enhanced SSFP MRI with spatially selective IR pulse can be used to assess renal corticomedullary differentiation and cortical thickness without the influence of aging, although optimal TI values for the best visualization of renal corticomedullary junction were shortened with aging. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Reduction of B1 sensitivity in selective single-slab 3D turbo spin echo imaging with very long echo trains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaeseok; Mugler, John P; Hughes, Timothy

    2009-10-01

    Single-slab 3D turbo/fast spin echo (SE) imaging with very long echo trains was recently introduced with slab selection using a highly selective excitation pulse and short, nonselective refocusing pulses with variable flip angles for high imaging efficiency. This technique, however, is vulnerable to image degradation in the presence of spatially varying B(1) amplitudes. In this work we develop a B(1) inhomogeneity-reduced version of single-slab 3D turbo/fast SE imaging based on the hypothesis that it is critical to achieve spatially uniform excitation. Slab selection was performed using composite adiabatic selective excitation wherein magnetization is tipped into the transverse plane by a nonselective adiabatic-half-passage pulse and then slab is selected by a pair of selective adiabatic-full-passage pulses. Simulations and experiments were performed to evaluate the proposed technique and demonstrated that this approach is a simple and efficient way to reduce B(1) sensitivity in single-slab 3D turbo/fast SE imaging with very long echo trains. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Multiple excitation regenerative amplifier inertial confinement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, V.E.; Haas, R.A.; Krupke, W.F.; Schlitt, L.G.

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to apparatus and methods for producing high intensity laser radiation generation which is achieved through an optical amplifier-storage ring design. One or two synchronized, counterpropagating laser pulses are injected into a regenerative amplifier cavity and amplified by gain media which are pumped repetitively by electrical or optical means. The gain media excitation pulses are tailored to efficiently amplify the laser pulses during each transit. After the laser pulses have been amplified to the desired intensity level, they are either switched out of the cavity by some switch means, as for example an electro-optical device, for any well known laser end uses, or a target means may be injected into the regenerative amplifier cavity in such a way as to intercept simultaneously the counterpropagating laser pulses. One such well known end uses to which this invention is intended is for production of high density and temperature plasmas suitable for generating neutrons, ions and x-rays and for studying matter heated by high intensity laser radiation

  18. Superharmonic imaging with chirp coded excitation: filtering spectrally overlapped harmonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harput, Sevan; McLaughlan, James; Cowell, David M J; Freear, Steven

    2014-11-01

    Superharmonic imaging improves the spatial resolution by using the higher order harmonics generated in tissue. The superharmonic component is formed by combining the third, fourth, and fifth harmonics, which have low energy content and therefore poor SNR. This study uses coded excitation to increase the excitation energy. The SNR improvement is achieved on the receiver side by performing pulse compression with harmonic matched filters. The use of coded signals also introduces new filtering capabilities that are not possible with pulsed excitation. This is especially important when using wideband signals. For narrowband signals, the spectral boundaries of the harmonics are clearly separated and thus easy to filter; however, the available imaging bandwidth is underused. Wideband excitation is preferable for harmonic imaging applications to preserve axial resolution, but it generates spectrally overlapping harmonics that are not possible to filter in time and frequency domains. After pulse compression, this overlap increases the range side lobes, which appear as imaging artifacts and reduce the Bmode image quality. In this study, the isolation of higher order harmonics was achieved in another domain by using the fan chirp transform (FChT). To show the effect of excitation bandwidth in superharmonic imaging, measurements were performed by using linear frequency modulated chirp excitation with varying bandwidths of 10% to 50%. Superharmonic imaging was performed on a wire phantom using a wideband chirp excitation. Results were presented with and without applying the FChT filtering technique by comparing the spatial resolution and side lobe levels. Wideband excitation signals achieved a better resolution as expected, however range side lobes as high as -23 dB were observed for the superharmonic component of chirp excitation with 50% fractional bandwidth. The proposed filtering technique achieved >50 dB range side lobe suppression and improved the image quality without

  19. Excited states 4

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Edward C

    2013-01-01

    Excited States, Volume 4 is a collection of papers that deals with the excited states of molecular activity. One paper investigates the resonance Raman spectroscopy as the key to vibrational-electronic coupling. This paper reviews the basic theory of Raman scattering; it also explains the derivation of the Raman spectra, excitation profiles, and depolarization ratios for simple resonance systems. Another paper reviews the magnetic properties of triplet states, including the zero-field resonance techniques, the high-field experiments, and the spin Hamiltonian. This paper focuses on the magnetic

  20. Development of optoelectronic-based pulsed current sensor to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anil S Nayak

    2017-08-03

    Aug 3, 2017 ... Copper vapour laser (CVL) is a pulsed electric discharge pumped laser. The electrical excitation of the CVL takes place at a pulsed voltage of 10–15 kV at ... drive the optical transmitter on considering proper polarity of the signal. When the voltage developed across R1 reaches to the on-state voltage of the ...

  1. Temperature dependence of pulse-induced mechanoluminescence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Mechanoluminescence; dislocations; pulse-induced excitation; alkali halides; radiative recombination. ... B P Chandra2. Department of Post Graduate Studies and Research in Physics and Electronics, Rani Durgawati University, Jabalpur 482 001, India; Pt. Ravi Shanker Shukla University, Raipur 492 010, India ...

  2. Excimer Lasers With Capacitively Excited Tubular Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, Hans J.; Herweg, Helmut; de la Rosa, Jose

    1989-04-01

    The excitation of excimer lasers in tubular discharges results in simple and compact devices needing no preionization. Optical output energies are in the millijoule range. We investigated XeF, KrF and ArF lasers for various operating conditions. The lasers consist of capillary glass tubes with two internal electrodes at the ends and an aluminium-foil wrapped around the tube as capacitive electrode. A maximum output energy of 0.3 mJ has been achieved for the XeF laser. The good quality of the discharge is indicated by the observation of spontaneous mode locking. The detailed study of the discharge for different polarities of the electrodes has shown that efficient operation with a high gas lifetime can be obtained by a purely capacitively excited discharge. A gas lifetime of about 10,000 pulses for 3 litres gas mixture has been observed. Using a two stage Marx generator to generate 100 kV excitation voltage a maximum output energy of 0.7 mJ was obtained for a gas mixture of Kr, F2 and He with an efficiency of 0.17%. The KrF laser operates also without the buffer gas. Laser action in ArF has been achieved with 15 μJ pulse energy and 10 ns duration.

  3. Dynamical excitation in fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledergerber, T.; Paltiel, Z.; Fraenkel, Z.; Pauli, H.C.

    1976-01-01

    The excitation mechanism of the fission process is studied in terms of a model of particles moving in a deformed time-dependent potential. A residual interaction of the pairing type is incoporated by means of the BCS approximation. Only 2-quasi-particle excitations up to some cutoff energy are included. The separation of the total excitation energy into intrinsic and translational parts is made at the scission point. The present calculations for 240 Pu show that, in the framework of this model, most of the available energy at scission is transformed into intrinsic excitation energy. However the convergence of the calculated value for the cutoff energy is unsatisfactory and hence a description in terms of a better model space is needed. The fact that very many channels are involved suggests that a statistical treatment may be useful. (author)

  4. Tailored spiral in-out spectral-spatial water suppression pulses for magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Wismans, Carrie; Cao, Zhipeng; Klomp, Dennis W J; Wijnen, Jannie P; Grissom, William A

    2018-01-01

    To develop short water suppression sequences for 7 T magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging, with mitigation of subject-specific transmit RF field ( B1+) inhomogeneity. Patient-tailored spiral in-out spectral-spatial saturation pulses were designed for a three-pulse WET water suppression sequence. The pulses' identical spatial subpulses were designed using patient-specific B1+ maps and a spiral in-out excitation k-space trajectory. The subpulse train was weighted by a spectral envelope that was root-flipped to minimize peak RF demand. The pulses were validated in in vivo experiments that acquired high resolution magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging data, using a crusher coil for fast lipid suppression. Residual water signals and MR spectra were compared between the proposed tailored sequence and a conventional WET sequence. Replacing conventional spectrally-selective pulses with tailored spiral in-out spectral-spatial pulses reduced mean water residual from 5.88 to 2.52% (57% improvement). Pulse design time was less then 0.4 s. The pulses' specific absorption rate were compatible with magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging TRs under 300 ms, which enabled spectra of fine in plane spatial resolution (5 mm) with good quality to be measured in 7.5 min. Tailored spiral in-out spectral-spatial water suppression enables efficient high resolution magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in the brain. Magn Reson Med 79:31-40, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  5. Long-pulse high-power VUV molecular F2 laser pumped by a beam of relativistic electrons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, P.J.M.; Lankhorst, Frank T.; Lankhorst, F.T.J.L.; Bastiaens, Hubertus M.J.; Botma, H.; Botma, Hako; Witteman, W.J.

    1995-01-01

    A long pulse molecular F2 laser ((lambda) equals 157 nm) with an optical pulse width of 160 ns and an output energy of 1.7 J (4.6 MW/cm2) pumped by an electron beam has been realized. The only restriction for the optical pulse width of the laser seems to be the duration of the excitation pulse. No

  6. Broadband CPMG sequence with short composite refocusing pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroleva, Van D. M.; Mandal, Soumyajit; Song, Yi-Qiao; Hürlimann, Martin D.

    2013-05-01

    We demonstrate that CPMG sequences with phase-modulated refocusing pulses of the same duration as the standard 180° pulses can generate echo trains with significantly increased amplitudes compared to the standard CPMG sequence in the case when there is a large range of Larmor frequencies across the sample. The best performance is achieved with symmetric phase-alternating (SPA) composite refocusing pulses of the form α-yβ+yα-y. In comparison to standard 180° pulses, we show that with SPA refocusing pulses with α ≈ 27° and β ≈ 126°, it is possible to double the signal-to-noise ratio without increasing the total pulse duration or power consumption of the refocusing pulses. The increased bandwidth of these pulses more than compensates for the decrease in performance in the vicinity of resonance. To achieve the full benefit of the broadband nature of the SPA pulses in a CPMG sequence, it is necessary to combine these refocusing pulses with a broadband excitation pulse. When it is not possible to use a short, high amplitude excitation pulse, we show that phase-alternating (PA) excitation pulses are suitable for this purpose. We present a detailed analysis of the underlying spin dynamics of these new pulse sequences and confirm the simulations with experiments. We show that for samples with T1/T2 > 1, the new sequences in grossly inhomogeneous fields do not only generate echoes with an increased amplitude, but also with an increased decay time. Finally, we analyze the diffusion properties and show quantitatively that the broadband sequences have a substantially higher diffusion sensitivity compared with the standard CPMG sequence.

  7. Localizations in cellular automata with mutualistic excitation rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Every cell of two-dimensional cellular automaton with eight-cell neighborhood takes three states: resting, excited and refractory, and updates excited to refractory and refractory to resting states unconditionally. A resting cell excites depending on number of excited and refractory neighbors. We made exhaustive study of spatio-temporal excitation dynamics for all rules of this type and selected several classes of rules. The classes supporting self-localizations are studied in details. We uncover basic types of mobile (gliders) and stationary localizations, and characterize their morphology and dynamics.

  8. Tightly localized stationary pulses in a multilevel atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xiong-Jun; Oh, C. H.; Liu, Xin; Liu, Zheng-Xin; Kwek, L. C.

    2007-01-01

    We show that the pulse matching phenomenon can be obtained in the general multilevel system with electromagnetically induced transparency. For this we find a different way to create tightly localized stationary pulses by using counterpropagating pump fields. The present process is a spatial compression of excitation so that it allows us to shape and further intensify the localized stationary pulses, without using standing waves of pump fields or spatially modulated pump fields

  9. Bow Wave from Ultraintense Electromagnetic Pulses in Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Bulanov, S. V.; Kato, Y.

    2008-01-01

    We show a new effect of the bow-wave excitation by an intense short laser pulse propagating in underdense plasma. Because of spreading of the laser pulse energy in transverse direction, the bow wave causes a large-scale transverse modulation of the electron density. This can significantly increase the electric potential of the wake wave since the wake wave is generated in the region much wider than the laser pulse waist

  10. Highly excited atom in the electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delone, N.B.; Krajnov, V.P.; Shepelyanskij, D.L.; AN SSSR, Novosibirsk. Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki)

    1983-01-01

    Properties of highly excited atom placed in electromagnetic field are reviewed. Probabilities of bound-boUnd and bound-free transition between quasi-classical atomic states, as well approximate rules of selection for such transitions, are considered. Properties of dynamic polarization of highly excited atomic states are investigated. Quantum mechanisms of ionization (multiphoton and tunnel) of highly excited states are discussed. A considerable part of the review is devoted to the consideration of the stochastic dynamics of the classic atomic electron in the variable monochromatic electromagnetic field. Threshold values of field intensity for the appearance of stochastic electron motion and atom ionization depending on field frequency, its polarization and the main quantum number of the atomic state considered are presented. The effect of the orbital moment of the ionized state on the process of stochasticity appearance is discussed. In the framework of classical mechanics and quasiclassical approximation of quantum mechanics the classical diffusion ionization of highly excited atom in electromagnetic field is considered. The problem on the application of classical mechanics in the investigation of properties of highly excited atom in electromagnetic field is discussed. Conditions for the realization of quantum and quasiclassic ionization of highly excited atoms are considered. In the last part of the review experimental data on the behaviour of highly excited atoms in the field of radiofrequency range are analyzed. The comparison of the data of experiments and those of the theory given in the revieW deronstrate their good agreement

  11. Pulse radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenshields, H.; Seddon, W.A.

    1982-03-01

    This supplement to two bibliographies published in 1970 and 1972 lists 734 references to the literature of pulse radiolysis, arranged under eight broad subject headings. The references were compiled by searching Biological Abstracts, Chemical Abstracts, Nuclear Science Abstracts and the Weekly List of Papers in Radiation Chemistry issued by the Radiation Chemistry Data Center of Notre Dame University. Full bibliographic data is given for papers published in the period 1971 to 1974. A personal author index listing more than 600 authors and a similar number of co-authors is included

  12. PULSE COLUMN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimmett, E.S.

    1964-01-01

    This patent covers a continuous countercurrent liquidsolids contactor column having a number of contactor states each comprising a perforated plate, a layer of balls, and a downcomer tube; a liquid-pulsing piston; and a solids discharger formed of a conical section at the bottom of the column, and a tubular extension on the lowest downcomer terminating in the conical section. Between the conical section and the downcomer extension is formed a small annular opening, through which solids fall coming through the perforated plate of the lowest contactor stage. This annular opening is small enough that the pressure drop thereacross is greater than the pressure drop upward through the lowest contactor stage. (AEC)

  13. Evaluation of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency by cine-dynamic MRCP using spatially selective inversion-recovery (IR) pulse: Correlation with severity of chronic pancreatitis based on morphological changes of pancreatic duct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasokawa, Kazuya; Ito, Katsuyoshi; Kanki, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Akira; Torigoe, Teruyuki; Sato, Tomohiro; Tamada, Tsutomu

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the correlation between the pancreatic exocrine insufficiency estimated by cine-dynamic MRCP using spatially selective IR pulse and the severity stages (modified Cambridge classification) based on morphological changes of the pancreatic duct in patients with suspected chronic pancreatitis. Thirty-nine patients with suspected chronic pancreatitis underwent cine-dynamic MRCP with a spatially selective IR pulse. The secretion grading score (5-point scale) based on the moving distance of pancreatic juice inflow on cine-dynamic MRCP was assessed, and compared with the stage of the severity of chronic pancreatitis based on morphological changes of pancreatic duct. The stage of the severity of chronic pancreatitis based on morphological changes had significant negative correlations with the secretion grade (r=-0.698, P0.70 in 2 (33%) of 6 patients showing normal pancreatic exocrine function. It should be noted that the degree of morphological changes of pancreatic duct does not necessarily reflect the severity of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency at cine-dynamic MRCP in stage 2-3 chronic pancreatitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Impact of Electron Collision Mixing on the delay times of an electron beam excited Atomic Xe laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, P.J.M.; Lan, Y.F.; Lan, Yun Fu; Ohwa, Mieko; Kushner, Mark J.

    1990-01-01

    The atomic xenon (5d¿6p) infrared laser has been experimentally and theoretically investigated using a short-pulse (30-ns), high-power (1-10-MW/cm3) coaxial electron beam excitation source. In most cases, laser oscillation is not observed during the e-beam current pulse. Laser pulses of hundreds of

  15. X-ray excited optical luminescence of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oestreich, G.J.

    1979-05-01

    X-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL) coupled with time resolved spectroscopy was employed to analyze polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in n-alkane solvents at 10 K. A pulsed XEOL system which was designed around minicomputer control of a medical x-ray unit was developed. Computer software which generated variable width x-ray pulses, monitored timing reference pulses, controlled data acquisition, and analyzed data was written. Phosphorescence decay constants of several PAHs were determined. Synthetic mixtures of zone refined PAHs were prepared and time resolved with the pulsed XEOL technique. Analytical results obtained from the five component mixtures of PAHs at the part per million level were tabulated. Systematic improvements and further development of the pulsed XEOL method were considered.

  16. Pulsed laser excitation of phosphate stabilised silver nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Laser flash photolysis studies were carried out on two types of silver nanoparticles prepared by -radiolysis of Ag+ solutions in the presence of polyphosphate as the stabiliser. Type I silver nanoparticles displayed a surface plasmon band at 390 nm. Type II silver nanoparticles showed a 390 nm surface plasmon band with a ...

  17. Pulsed laser excitation of phosphate stabilised silver nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Radiation Chemistry and Chemical Dynamics Division, Bhabha Atomic. Research Centre, Trombay ... with rise in the absorption in the red region which was attributed to the photoejection of electrons 10. They interpret their ... metallic clusters of silver, showing the normal SPB absorption, it could also generate under certain ...

  18. Coherent excitation of vibrational levels using ultra short pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Clercq, LE

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available population in a specific vibrational level. We used two approaches to do this, in the one model we used Von Neumann’s equations and the other the Optical Bloch equations (OBE’s). In this poster presentation the Optical Bloch model was used to do...

  19. Ultrafast electron diffraction studies of optically excited thin bismuth films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajkovic, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    This thesis contains work on the design and the realization of an experimental setup capable of providing sub-picosecond electron pulses for ultrafast electron diffraction experiments, and performing the study of ultrafast dynamics in bismuth after optical excitation using this setup. (orig.)

  20. Ultrafast electron diffraction studies of optically excited thin bismuth films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajkovic, Ivan

    2008-10-21

    This thesis contains work on the design and the realization of an experimental setup capable of providing sub-picosecond electron pulses for ultrafast electron diffraction experiments, and performing the study of ultrafast dynamics in bismuth after optical excitation using this setup. (orig.)

  1. Visualizing rotational wave functions of electronically excited nitric oxide molecules by using an ion imaging technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuse, Kenta; Chizuwa, Nao; Ikeda, Dai; Imajo, Takashi; Ohshima, Yasuhiro

    2018-01-31

    Here we report the dissociative ionization imaging of electronically excited nitric oxide (NO) molecules to visualize rotational wave functions in the electronic excited state (A 2 Σ + ). The NO molecules were excited to a single rotational energy eigenstate in the first electronic excited state by a resonant nanosecond ultraviolet pulse. The molecules were then irradiated by a strong, circularly polarized femtosecond imaging pulse. Spatial distribution of the ejected N + and O + fragment ions from the dissociative NO 2+ was recorded as a direct measure of the molecular axis distribution using a high-resolution slice ion imaging apparatus. The circularly polarized probe pulse realizes the isotropic ionization and thus undistorted shapes of the functions can be visualized. Due to the higher ionization efficiency of the excited molecules relative to the ground state ones, signals from the excited NO were enhanced. We can, therefore, extract shapes of the square of rotational wave functions in the electronic excited state although the unexcited ground state molecules are the majority in an ensemble. The observed images show s-function-like and p-function-like shapes depending on the excitation wavelengths. These shapes well reflect the rotational (angular momentum) character of the prepared states. The present approach directly leads to the evaluation method of the molecular axis alignment in photo-excited ensembles, and it could also lead to a visualization method for excited state molecular dynamics.

  2. Does intrinsic motivation enhance motor cortex excitability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radel, Rémi; Pjevac, Dusan; Davranche, Karen; d'Arripe-Longueville, Fabienne; Colson, Serge S; Lapole, Thomas; Gruet, Mathieu

    2016-11-01

    Intrinsic motivation (IM) is often viewed as a spontaneous tendency for action. Recent behavioral and neuroimaging evidence indicate that IM, in comparison to extrinsic motivation (EM), solicits the motor system. Accordingly, we tested whether IM leads to greater excitability of the motor cortex than EM. To test this hypothesis, we used two different tasks to induce the motivational orientation using either words representing each motivational orientation or pictures previously linked to each motivational orientation through associative learning. Single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation over the motor cortex was applied when viewing the stimuli. Electromyographic activity was recorded on the contracted first dorsal interosseous muscle. Two indexes of corticospinal excitability (the amplitude of motor-evoked potential and the length of cortical silent period) were obtained through unbiased automatic detection and analyzed using a mixed model that provided both statistical power and a high level of control over all important individual, task, and stimuli characteristics. Across the two tasks and the two indices of corticospinal excitability, the exposure to IM-related stimuli did not lead to a greater corticospinal excitability than EM-related stimuli or than stimuli with no motivational valence (ps > .20). While these results tend to dismiss the advantage of IM at activating the motor cortex, we suggest alternative hypotheses to explain this lack of effect, which deserves further research. © 2016 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  3. Macroscopic dynamics of thermal nuclear excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastrukov, S.I.; Deak, F.; Kiss, A.; Seres, Z.

    1989-11-01

    The concept of kinetic temperature as a local dynamical variable of thermal nuclear collective motion is formulated using long-mean-free-path approach based on the Landau-Vlasov kinetic equation. In the Fermi drop model the thermal fluid dynamics of the spherical nucleus is analyzed. It is shown that in a compressible Fermi liquid the temperature pulses propagate in the form of spherical wave in phase with the acoustic wave. The thermal and compressional excitations are caused by the isotropic harmonic oscillations of the Fermi sphere in momentum space. (author) 25 refs.; 2 figs

  4. Magnetic resonance described in the excitation dependent rotating frame of reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahayori, Bahman; Johnston, Leigh A; Mareels, Iven M Y; Farrell, Peter M

    2008-01-01

    An excitation dependent rotating frame of reference to observe the magnetic resonance phenomenon is introduced in this paper that, to the best of our knowledge, has not been used previously in the nuclear magnetic resonance context. The mathematical framework for this new rotating frame of reference is presented based on time scaling the Bloch equation after transformation to the classical rotating frame of reference whose transverse plane is rotating at the Larmor frequency. To this end, the Bloch equation is rewritten in terms of a magnetisation vector observed from the excitation dependent rotating frame of reference. The resultant Bloch equation is referred to as the time scaled Bloch equation. In the excitation dependent rotating frame of reference whose coordinates are rotating at the instantaneous Rabi frequency the observed magnetisation vector is a much slower signal than the true magnetisation in the rotating frame of reference. As a result the ordinary differential equation solvers have the ability to solve the time scaled version of the Bloch equation with a larger step size resulting in a smaller number of samples for solving the equation to a desired level of accuracy. The simulation results for different types of excitation are presented in this paper. This method may be used in true Bloch simulators in order to reduce the simulation time or increase the accuracy of the numerical solution. Moreover, the time scaled Bloch equation may be employed to determine the optimal excitation pattern in magnetic resonance imaging as well as designing pulses with better slice selectivity which is an active area of research in this field.

  5. l- and n-changing collisions during interaction of a pulsed beam of Li Rydberg atoms with CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubreuil, B.; Harnafi, M.

    1989-07-01

    The pulsed Li atomic beam produced in our experiment is based on controlled transversely-excited-atmospheric CO2 laser-induced ablation of a Li metal target. The atomic beam is propagated in vacuum or in CO2 gas at low pressure. Atoms in the beam are probed by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. This allows the determination of time-of-flight and velocity distributions. Li Rydberg states (n=5-13) are populated in the beam by two-step pulsed-laser excitation. The excited atoms interact with CO2 molecules. l- and n-changing cross sections are deduced from the time evolution of the resonant or collision-induced fluorescence following this selective excitation. l-changing cross sections of the order of 104 AṦ are measured; they increase with n as opposed to the plateau observed for Li* colliding with a diatomic molecule. This behavior is qualitatively well explained in the framework of the free-electron model. n-->n' changing processes with large cross sections (10-100 AṦ) are also observed even in the case of large electronic energy change (ΔEnn'>103 cm-1). These results can be interpreted in terms of resonant-electronic to vibrational energy transfers between Li Rydberg states and CO2 vibrational modes.

  6. Giant resonances on excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besold, W.; Reinhard, P.G.; Toepffer, C.

    1984-01-01

    We derive modified RPA equations for small vibrations about excited states. The temperature dependence of collective excitations is examined. The formalism is applied to the ground state and the first excited state of 90 Zr in order to confirm a hypothesis which states that not only the ground state but every excited state of a nucleus has a giant resonance built upon it. (orig.)

  7. Effects of pulse width and repetition rate of pulsed laser on kinetics and production of singlet oxygen luminescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Defu Chen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed and continuous-wave (CW lasers have been widely used as the light sources for photodynamic therapy (PDT treatment. Singlet oxygen (1O2 is known to be a major cytotoxic agent in type-II PDT and can be directly detected by its near-infrared luminescence at 1270nm. As compared to CW laser excitation, the effects of pulse width and repetition rate of pulsed laser on the kinetics and production of 1O2 luminescence were quantitatively studied during photosensitization of Rose Bengal. Significant difference in kinetics of 1O2 luminescence was found under the excitation with various pulse widths of nanosecond, microsecond and CW irradiation with power of 20mW. The peak intensity and duration of 1O2 production varied with the pulse widths for pulsed laser excitation, while the 1O2 was generated continuously and its production reached a steady state with CW excitation. However, no significant difference (P>0.05 in integral 1O2 production was observed. The results suggest that the PDT efficacy using pulsed laser may be identical to the CW laser with the same wavelength and the same average fluence rate below a threshold in solution.

  8. Experimental evaluation of a non-linear coded excitation method for contrast imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borsboom, Jerome; Chin, Chien Ting; de Jong, N.

    2004-01-01

    Previously, we have shown that for a single bubble, using chirps as the excitation signal improves both the linear and the non-linear response. Computer simulations of randomly distributed contrast agent bubbles show an increase of 10–13 dB in response when comparing pulse excitations with chirp

  9. Terahertz Solitons in Biomolecular Systems and their Excitation by External Electromagnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bugay А.N.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear dynamics of charge and acoustic excitations in cellular microtubules is considered. Different types of nonlinear solitary waves were studied taking account for dissipation. The mechanism of electro-acoustic pulse excitation by external electromagnetic field of terahertz frequency is recognized.

  10. A quantum dynamics study of the benzopyran ring opening guided by laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saab, Mohamad, E-mail: mohamad.saab@univ-montp2.fr [CTMM, Institut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier (UMR5253), CC 15001, Université Montpellier 2, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Doriol, Loïc Joubert, E-mail: Loic.Joubert-Doriol@univ-montp2.fr [CTMM, Institut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier (UMR5253), CC 15001, Université Montpellier 2, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Lasorne, Benjamin, E-mail: lasorne@univ-montp2.fr [CTMM, Institut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier (UMR5253), CC 15001, Université Montpellier 2, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Guérin, Stéphane, E-mail: sguerin@u-bourgogne.fr [Département Optique, Interaction Matière-Rayonnement (OMR) (UMR 6303), Université de Bourgogne, F-21078 Dijon (France); Gatti, Fabien, E-mail: gatti@univ-montp2.fr [CTMM, Institut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier (UMR5253), CC 15001, Université Montpellier 2, F-34095 Montpellier (France)

    2014-10-17

    Highlights: • We perform quantum mechanical simulations for the ring-opening of benzopyran. • We develop strategies of control with laser pulses. • We focus on the physics involving the conical intersection. - Abstract: The ring-opening photoisomerization of benzopyran, which occurs via a photochemical route involving a conical intersection, has been studied with quantum dynamics calculations using the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method (MCTDH). We introduce a mechanistic strategy to control the conversion of benzopyran to merocyanine with laser pulses. We use a six-dimensional model developed in a previous work for the potential energy surfaces (PES) based on an extension of the vibronic-coupling Hamiltonian model (diabatization method by ansatz), which depends on the most active degrees of freedom. The main objective of these quantum dynamics simulations is to provide a set of strategies that could help experimentalists to control the photoreactivity vs. photostability ratio (selectivity). In this work we present: (i) a pump–dump technique used to control the photostability, (ii) a two-step strategy to enhance the reactivity of the system: first, a pure vibrational excitation in the electronic ground state that prepares the system and, second, an ultraviolet excitation that brings the system to the first adiabatic electronic state; (iii) finally the effect of a non-resonant pulse (Stark effect) on the dynamics.

  11. Seven-tesla time-of-flight angiography using a 16-channel parallel transmit system with power-constrained 3-dimensional spoke radiofrequency pulse design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitter, Sebastian; Wu, Xiaoping; Auerbach, Edward J; Adriany, Gregor; Pfeuffer, Josef; Hamm, Michael; Uğurbil, Kâmil; van de Moortele, Pierre-François

    2014-05-01

    strong improvement in flip angle homogeneity particularly impacted the junction between adjacent TOF slabs, where significant residual artifacts observed with 1-spoke excitation could be efficiently mitigated using a 2-spoke excitation with same RF power and same average flip angle. Although the total RF power is maintained at the same level than that in CP mode excitation, the energy distribution is fairly heterogeneous through the 16 transmit channels for 1- and 2-spoke excitations, with the highest energy for 1 channel being a factor of 2.4 (1 spoke) and 2.2 (2 spokes) higher than that in CP mode. In vivo experiments demonstrated the necessity for including ΔB0 spatial variations during 2-spoke RF pulse design, particularly in areas with strong local susceptibility variations such as the lower frontal lobe. Significant improvement in excitation fidelity leading to improved TOF contrast, particularly in the brain periphery, as well as smooth slab transitions can be achieved with 2-spoke excitation while maintaining the same excitation energy as that in CP mode. These results suggest that expanding parallel transmit methods, including the use of multidimensional spatially selective excitation, will also be very beneficial for other techniques, such as perfusion imaging.

  12. Excitation Methods for Bridge Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrar, C.R.; Duffy, T.A.; Cornwell, P.J.; Doebling, S.W.

    1999-02-08

    This paper summarizes the various methods that have been used to excited bridge structures during dynamic testing. The excitation methods fall into the general categories of ambient excitation methods and measured-input excitation methods. During ambient excitation the input to the bridge is not directly measured. In contrast, as the category label implies, measured-input excitations are usually applied at a single location where the force input to the structure can be monitored. Issues associated with using these various types of measurements are discussed along with a general description of the various excitation methods.

  13. Measurement and Control of Attosecond Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-25

    To use the quantum path interference, present in any attosecond pulse, to resolve the strongly-driven attosecond time-scale electron dynamics in...color pulse is then incident on a gas target placed some distance away where it creates an isolated attosecond pulse in Xenon , Krypton and probably...scale electron dynamics in selected ions. Figure 5: Beamlets as measured in the far field plotted with their angle of propagation shown for

  14. Nuclear photonics at ultra-high counting rates and higher multipole excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirolf, P. G.; Habs, D.; Filipescu, D.; Gernhäuser, R.; Günther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Marginean, N.; Pietralla, N.

    2012-01-01

    Next-generation γ beams from laser Compton-backscattering facilities like ELI-NP (Bucharest)] or MEGa-Ray (Livermore) will drastically exceed the photon flux presently available at existing facilities, reaching or even exceeding 10 13 γ/sec. The beam structure as presently foreseen for MEGa-Ray and ELI-NP builds upon a structure of macro-pulses (∼120 Hz) for the electron beam, accelerated with X-band technology at 11.5 GHz, resulting in a micro structure of 87 ps distance between the electron pulses acting as mirrors for a counterpropagating intense laser. In total each 8.3 ms a γ pulse series with a duration of about 100 ns will impinge on the target, resulting in an instantaneous photon flux of about 10 18 γ/s, thus introducing major challenges in view of pile-up. Novel γ optics will be applied to monochromatize the γ beam to ultimately ΔE/E∼10 −6 . Thus level-selective spectroscopy of higher multipole excitations will become accessible with good contrast for the first time. Fast responding γ detectors, e.g. based on advanced scintillator technology (e.g. LaBr 3 (Ce)) allow for measurements with count rates as high as 10 6 -10 7 γ/s without significant drop of performance. Data handling adapted to the beam conditions could be performed by fast digitizing electronics, able to sample data traces during the micro-pulse duration, while the subsequent macro-pulse gap of ca. 8 ms leaves ample time for data readout. A ball of LaBr 3 detectors with digital readout appears to best suited for this novel type of nuclear photonics at ultra-high counting rates.

  15. Solving the Bloch equation with periodic excitation using harmonic balancing: application to Rabi modulated excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahayori, Bahman; Johnston, Leigh A; Layton, Kelvin J; Farrell, Peter M; Mareels, Iven M Y

    2015-10-01

    In waveform design for magnetic resonance applications, periodic continuous-wave excitation offers potential advantages that remain largely unexplored because of a lack of understanding of the Bloch equation with periodic continuous-wave excitations. Using harmonic balancing techniques the steady state solutions of the Bloch equation with periodic excitation can be effectively solved. Moreover, the convergence speed of the proposed series approximation is such that a few terms in the series expansion suffice to obtain a very accurate description of the steady state solution. The accuracy of the proposed analytic approximate series solution is verified using both a simulation study as well as experimental data derived from a spherical phantom with doped water under continuous-wave excitation. Typically a five term series suffices to achieve a relative error of less than one percent, allowing for a very effective and efficient analytical design process. The opportunities for Rabi frequency modulated continuous-wave form excitation are then explored, based on a comparison with steady state free precession pulse sequences.

  16. Angular Spectrum Simulation of Pulsed Ultrasound Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Yigang; Jensen, Henrik; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2009-01-01

    The optimization of non-linear ultrasound imaging should in a first step be based on simulation, as this makes parameter studies considerably easier than making transducer prototypes. Such a simulation program should be capable of simulating non-linear pulsed fields for arbitrary transducer...... frequencies must be performed. Combining it with Field II, the generation of non-linear simulation for any geometry with any excitation array transducer becomes feasible. The purpose of this paper is to make a general pulsed simulation software using the modified ASA. Linear and phased array transducers...... are used to create the source plane, which is 2 mm from the transducer surface. Field II generates pulses for all the points in the source plane, and the 3D matrix data (1D time, 2D space) are obtained. The pulses in the simulated plane are calculated by the modified ASA, which is the 3D inverse Fourier...

  17. Tailoring Atomic Wavefunctions with Designer Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhold, Carlos O.

    1998-05-01

    Manipulation and control of the electronic states of atoms provides an exciting new area of research in atomic physics with important potential applications. Such control can be achieved using ``designer'' electromagnetic pulses whose strengths are comparable to the Coulomb electric field and whose durations are of the order of the classical orbital period of the atom. Coherent control of the electron dynamics requires complete knowledge of the initial state as well as of the pulses whose shapes can be carefully tailored at will. In this presentation we report on experimental and theoretical control of atomic wavefunctions using very high-n Rydberg atoms and designer half-cycle pulses. We discuss new possibilities in producing and probing coherent atomic wavepackets and the first realization of the periodically kicked atom, a paradigmatic system of non-linear dynamics using a superposition of half-cycle pulses.

  18. Excitation of Stellar Pulsations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houdek, G.

    2012-01-01

    In this review I present an overview of our current understanding of the physical mechanisms that are responsible for the excitation of pulsations in stars with surface convection zones. These are typically cooler stars such as the δ Scuti stars, and stars supporting solar-like oscillations....

  19. Excitations and spin waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindgaard, P.-A.

    1978-01-01

    When neutron scattering data became available for the light rare earths (REs) and the RE compounds, a need was felt for a systematic theory for excitations in crystal-field dominated systems. The crystal field mixes the wavefunctions and provides a coupling between the ground state and the excited states for many operators, whereas for the Heisenberg system only J - has a nonzero matrix element to the first excited state. A review is given of successful applications of the theory in the interpretation of several experiments. The excitation spectrum for neutron scattering is simply given by the poles of the imaginary part of the enhanced wave-vector-dependent susceptibility tensor calculated in the random-phase approximation. A discussion of the effect of two-ion anisotropy is given. The formalism reduces to the conventional spin wave theory for the Heisenberg system when the crystal field is negligible compared to the exchange interaction. However, this theory has the drawback that it is necessary to know the crystal field in advance and each value of J must then be treated separately. A review of the results in the RE Laves-phase compounds and in the heavy rare earths is given, and the status of the current understanding of the interactions is rare earths and their compounds is discussed. (author)

  20. Hardness and excitation energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is shown that the first excitation energy can be given by the Kohn-Sham hardness (i.e. the energy difference of the ground-state lowest unoccupied and highest occupied levels) plus an extra term coming from the partial derivative of the ensemble exchange-correlation energy with respect to the weighting factor in the ...

  1. Excitations in exotic superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayden, S.

    1999-01-01

    Neutron scattering has played an important role in unravelling the mysteries of superconductivity. Studies of ordinary or conventional superconductors - materials such as aluminium and lead that lose their electrical resistance when cooled below a certain temperature - have focused on vibrations in the lattice structure of the crystal. In these cases magnetic excitations due to the collective motion of electron spins in the crystal are not particularly important and, moreover, are difficult to see. In contrast, magnetic excitations are thought to be important in the newer, exotic or unconventional superconductors such as heavy fermions and cuprates. Two independent groups working at the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble, France, and at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) in Tokai have recently observed a new magnetic excitation in the superconducting state of the heavy fermion compound uranium-palladium-aluminium, UPd 2 Al 3 , (Phys. Rev. Lett.1998 81 4244; 1998 80 5417). A similar excitation has been observed in yttrium barium copper oxide (YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6.93 ), a high-temperature superconductor. The results may hold clues about the nature of certain types of unconventional superconductivity. In this article the author describes these latest results. (UK)

  2. Relativistic Coulomb excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winther, A.; Alder, K.

    1979-01-01

    Coulomb excitation of both target and projectile in relativistic heavy ion collisions is evaluated including the lowest order correction for the deviation from a straight line trajectory. Explicit results for differential and total cross sections are given in the form of tables and figures. (Auth.)

  3. Hardness and excitation energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... the ground-state lowest unoccupied and highest occupied levels) plus an extra term coming from the partial derivative of the ensemble exchange-correlation energy with respect to the weighting factor in the limit → 0. It is proposed that the first excitation energy can be used as a reactivity index instead of the hardness.

  4. Pulse pile-up. II: Tailed pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, D.H.

    1990-07-01

    The considerations of the preceding paper are extended to the case of pulses having infinite (exponential) tails. Exact solutions are presented for pure exponential pulses all of the same height; ruin theory is applied for pulses of more realistic form. (Author) (2 refs., 9 figs.)

  5. Influence of pulse width and detuning on coherent phonon generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kazutaka G.; Shikano, Yutaka; Kayanuma, Yosuke

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the coherent phonon generation mechanism by irradiation of an ultrashort pulse with a simple two-level model. Our derived formulation shows that both impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (ISRS) and impulsive absorption (IA) simultaneously occur, and phonon wave packets are generated in the electronic ground and excited states by ISRS and IA, respectively. We identify the dominant process from the amplitude of the phonon oscillation. For short pulse widths, ISRS is very small and becomes larger as the pulse width increases. We also show that the initial phase is dependent on the pulse width and the detuning.

  6. Neuropeptide FF and prolactin-releasing peptide decrease cortical excitability through activation of NPFF receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffel, Ine; Meurs, Alfred; Portelli, Jeanelle; Raedt, Robrecht; De Herdt, Veerle; Sioncke, Lynn; Wadman, Wytse; Bihel, Frederic; Schmitt, Martine; Vonck, Kristl; Bourguignon, Jean-Jacques; Simonin, Frederic; Smolders, Ilse; Boon, Paul

    2015-03-01

    Drugs with a novel mechanism of action are needed to reduce the number of people with epilepsy that are refractory to treatment. Increasing attention is paid to neuropeptide systems and several anticonvulsant neuropeptides have already been described, such as galanin, ghrelin, and neuropeptide Y (NPY). Many others, however, have not been investigated for their ability to affect epileptic seizures. In this study, the potential anticonvulsant activities of three members of the RF-amide neuropeptide family, neuropeptide FF (NPFF), prolactin-releasing peptide (PrRP), and kisspeptin (Kp) and other receptor ligands (NPFF1/2 R, GPR10, and GRP54, respectively) were tested in the motor cortex stimulation model. A train of pulses with increasing intensity (0-10 mA over 150 s, 50 Hz, pulse width 2 msec) was delivered to the motor cortex of rats. The threshold intensity for eliciting a motor response (i.e., motor threshold) was determined through behavioral observation and used as a measure for cortical excitability. The threshold was determined before, during, and after the intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of various NPFF1/2 R, GPR10, and GPR54 receptor ligands. NPFF and PrRP significantly increased the motor threshold by a maximum of 143 ± 27 and 83 ± 13 μA, respectively, for the doses of 1 nmol/h (p < 0.05). The increase of motor threshold by NPFF and PrRP was prevented by pretreatment and co-treatment with the NPFF1/2 R antagonist RF9. Pretreatment with a selective NPFF1 R antagonist also prevented the threshold increase induced by NPFF. Kp did not increase motor threshold. Intracerebroventricular infusion of NPFF or PrRP decreases cortical excitability in rats through activation of NPFFRs. Furthermore, the NPFF1 R is required for the NPFF-induced decrease in cortical excitability. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  7. Control over the Dissociation of Highly Excited Oxygen in Attosecond XUV Pump- IR Probe experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmers, Henry; Shivaram, Niranjan; Sandhu, Arvinder

    2013-05-01

    We present results on the phase and amplitude control over the photodissociation yield of O2+ in a pump-probe experiment. Using an attosecond pulse train, we create excited state wavepackets along both the B and c state pathways of O2+. We use a two-IR pulse probe to steer the wavepacket. By tuning the excitation spectrum and phase between the two IR pulses, we find we can modulate the dissociated O+ yield with the frequency of IR intensity modulation and control the phase difference between the two dissociation pathways. This work was supported by NSF grant PHY-0955274.

  8. Laser techniques for spectroscopy of core-excited atomic levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, S. E.; Young, J. F.; Falcone, R. W.; Rothenberg, J. E.; Willison, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    We discuss three techniques which allow the use of tunable lasers for high resolution and picosecond time scale spectroscopy of core-excited atomic levels. These are: anti-Stokes absorption spectroscopy, laser induced emission from metastable levels, and laser designation of selected core-excited levels.

  9. Influence of collision energy and vibrational excitation on the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    For atom-diatom reactions (i.e., A+BC), reagent vibrational excitation has been of longstanding inter- est in reaction dynamics, thus, a focus of present work has been on whether significant influence of vibrational excitation on this reaction can be observed. Initial vibra- tional state (v=0-3, j =0) selected ICS is depicted.

  10. Producing coherent excitations in pumped Mott antiferromagnetic insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao; Claassen, Martin; Moritz, B.; Devereaux, T. P.

    2017-12-01

    Nonequilibrium dynamics in correlated materials has attracted attention due to the possibility of characterizing, tuning, and creating complex ordered states. To understand the photoinduced microscopic dynamics, especially the linkage under realistic pump conditions between transient states and remnant elementary excitations, we performed nonperturbative simulations of various time-resolved spectroscopies. We used the Mott antiferromagnetic insulator as a model platform. The transient dynamics of multiparticle excitations can be attributed to the interplay between Floquet virtual states and a modification of the density of states, in which interactions induce a spectral weight transfer. Using an autocorrelation of the time-dependent spectral function, we show that resonance of the virtual states with the upper Hubbard band in the Mott insulator provides the route towards manipulating the electronic distribution and modifying charge and spin excitations. Our results link transient dynamics to the nature of many-body excitations and provide an opportunity to design nonequilibrium states of matter via tuned laser pulses.

  11. Photodamage of mesotetraphenylporphyrin under one- and two-photon excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Yanan; Liu Yuqiang; Yang Zhenling; Yang Yanqiang; Guo Ximing

    2010-01-01

    Photoinduced damage behavior of mesotetraphenylporphyrin (TPP) under one- and two-photon excitation with femtosecond laser pulses is investigated in the present work. Quenching in the luminescent intensity is observed. Results suggest that laser irradiation on TPP mainly causes two simultaneously occurring photoprocesses: photodamage and formation of a porphine-type photoproduct. The damage rate exhibits a linear dependence on the incident light power in one-photon excitation, whereas in two-photon excitation, the power dependence of the damage rate turns out to be exponential. The photoproduct formed in one- and two-photon excitation is identical. This product, which is observed to possess superior photostability and two-photon absorbing ability compared with the original TPP sensitizer, is likely to be treated as a secondary photosensitizer in the activation process of photodynamic therapy (PDT). This work might be helpful for the drug evaluation in the practical application of PDT.

  12. Subwavelength Localization of Atomic Excitation Using Electromagnetically Induced Transparency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Miles

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We report an experiment in which an atomic excitation is localized to a spatial width that is a factor of 8 smaller than the wavelength of the incident light. The experiment utilizes the sensitivity of the dark state of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT to the intensity of the coupling laser beam. A standing-wave coupling laser with a sinusoidally varying intensity yields tightly confined Raman excitations during the EIT process. The excitations, located near the nodes of the intensity profile, have a width of 100 nm. The experiment is performed using ultracold ^{87}Rb atoms trapped in an optical dipole trap, and atomic localization is achieved with EIT pulses that are approximately 100 ns long. To probe subwavelength atom localization, we have developed a technique that can measure the width of the atomic excitations with nanometer spatial resolution.

  13. Laser-excitation-source development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    A number of schemes can be used to excite a gas laser, which introduces complexity in the search for the new laser because it requires the development of a host of advanced excitation sources. There are three demonstrated schemes for the excitation of a gas laser: (1) electron beam, (2) electric discharge, and (3) photolytic pumping. The photons for photypic pumping may be obtained with the other two excitation mechanisms in an external gas cell. Thus, from a power conditioning point of view, there are only two important excitation schemes, but each scheme has many different options. Research progress is reported on direct electric-discharge excitation development

  14. Attosecond dynamics of electron correlation in doubly excited atomic states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolaides, Cleanthes A. [Theoretical and Physical Chemistry Institute, National Hellenic Research Foundation, Athens (Greece) and Physics Department, National Technical University, Athens (Greece)). E-mail: can@eie.gr] Mercouris, Theodoros; Komninos, Yanis [Theoretical and Physical Chemistry Institute, National Hellenic Research Foundation, Athens (Greece)]. E-mails: thmerc@eie.gr; ykomn@eie.gr

    2002-06-28

    We have solved the time-dependent Schroedinger equation describing the simultaneous interaction of the He 1s2s {sup 1}S state with two laser-generated pulses of trapezoidal or Gaussian shape, of duration 86 fs and of frequencies {omega}{sub 1}=1.453 au and {omega}{sub 2}=1.781 au. The system is excited to the energy region of two strongly correlated doubly excited states, chosen for this study according to specific criteria. It is demonstrated quantitatively that, provided one focuses on the dynamics occurring within the attosecond timescale, the corresponding orbital configurations, 2s2p and 2p3d {sup 1}P{sup 0}, exist as nonstationary states, with occupation probabilities that are oscillating as the states decay exponentially into the 1s{epsilon}p continuum, during and after the laser-atom interaction. It follows that it is feasible to probe by attosecond pulses the motion of configurations of electrons as they correlate via the total Hamiltonian. For the particular system studied here, the probe pulses could register the oscillating doubly excited configurations by de-exciting to the He 1s3d {sup 1}D state, which emits at 6680 A. (author). Letter-to-the-editor.

  15. Superluminous laser pulse in an active medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D.L.; Tajima, T.

    1993-12-01

    Physical conditions are obtained to make the propagation velocity of a laser pulse and thus the phase velocity of the excited wake be at any desired value, including that equal to or greater than the speed of light. The provision of an active-plasma laser medium with an appropriately shaped pulse allows not only replenishment of laser energy loss to the wakefield but also acceleration of the group velocity of photons. A stationary solitary solution in the accelerated frame is obtained from the model equations and simulations thereof for the laser, plasma and atoms. This approach has applications in photonics and telecommunications as well as wakefield accelerators

  16. Associative ionization of two laser excited Na atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meijer, H.A.J.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation into the associative ionization of two sodium atoms excited by polarized laser beams is described. It was possible to excite the Na atoms in a velocity-selective way by exploiting the Doppler effect. The excitation of Na to the 3 2 P 3/2 , F=3 level is discussed on the basis of so-called saturation curves. Experiments with seven different combinations of polarization of the two exciting laser beams are described and the results discussed. 86 refs.; 53 figs.; 6 tabs

  17. Isotope separation using vibrationally excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodroffe, J.A.; Keck, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    A system for isotope separation or enrichment wherein molecules of a selected isotope type in a flow of molecules of plural isotope types are vibrationally excited and collided with a background gas to provide enhanced diffusivity for the molecules of the selected isotope type permitting their separate collection. The system typically is for the enrichment of uranium using a uranium hexafluoride gas in combination with a noble gas such as argon. The uranium hexafluoride molecules having a specific isotope of uranium are vibrationally excited by laser radiation. The vibrational energy is converted to a translation energy upon collision with a particle of the background gas and the added translation energy enhances the diffusivity of the selected hexafluoride molecules facilitating its condensation on collection surfaces provided for that purpose. This process is periodically interrupted and the cryogenic flow halted to permit evaporation of the collected molecules to provide a distinct, enriched flow

  18. Time resolved 2-D optical imaging of a pulsed unbalanced magnetron plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, J W; Clarke, G C B; Braithwaite, N St J; Bryant, P M; Kelly, P J

    2006-01-01

    Using wavelength filtered two dimensional (2-D) optical imaging, the temporal and spatial evolution of selected excited species in a pulsed magnetron discharge has been studied. A titanium target was sputtered at a pulse frequency of 100 kHz, in an argon atmosphere, at an operating pressure of 0.27 Pa. The radial information of the emissivity was determined using the Abel inversion technique. The results show strong excitation of the observed species above the racetrack in the on-time, and the possible development of an ion-acoustic wave, initiated after the off-on transition. The on-off transition is accompanied by a burst of light from the plasma bulk consistent with the transient plasma potential reaching about +200 V. During this phase, we argue that there is a release of secondary electrons from the grounded substrate and walls due to ion bombardment, as well as an increased confinement of energetic plasma electrons. The characteristic decay times of the selected transitions at 750.4, 751.5, 810.4 and 811.5 nm (ArI), present within the bandpass width of our filters, is briefly discussed in terms of the production of fast electrons in the system

  19. Coherent pump pulses in Double Electron Electron Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Claudia E.; Stoll, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The recent introduction of shaped pulses to Double Electron Electron Resonance (DEER) spectroscopy has led to significant enhancements in sensitivity through increased excitation bandwidths and improved control over spin dynamics. The application of DEER has so far relied on the presence of an incoherent pump channel to average out most undesired coherent effects of the pump pulse(s) on the observer spins. However, in fully coherent EPR spectrometers that are increasingly used to generate shaped pulses, the presence of coherent pump pulses means that these effects need to be explicitly considered. In this paper, we examine the effects of coherent rectangular and sech/tanh pump pulses in DEER experiments with up to three pump pulses. We show that, even in the absence of significant overlap of the observer and pump pulse excitation bandwidths, coherence transfer pathways involving both types of pulses generate spin echoes of considerable intensity. These echoes introduce artefacts, which, if not identified and removed, can easily lead to misinterpretation. We demonstrate that the observed echoes can be quantitatively modelled using a simple spin quantum dynamics approach that includes instrumental transfer functions. Based on an analysis of the echo crossing artefacts, we propose efficient phase cycling schemes for their suppression. This enables the use of advanced DEER experiments, characterized by high sensitivity and increased accuracy for long-distance measurements, on novel fully coherent EPR spectrometers. PMID:27339858

  20. Harmonically excited orbital variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, T.

    1985-01-01

    Rephrasing the equations of motion for orbital maneuvers in terms of Lagrangian generalized coordinates instead of Newtonian rectangular cartesian coordinates can make certain harmonic terms in the orbital angular momentum vector more readily apparent. In this formulation the equations of motion adopt the form of a damped harmonic oscillator when torques are applied to the orbit in a variationally prescribed manner. The frequencies of the oscillator equation are in some ways unexpected but can nonetheless be exploited through resonant forcing functions to achieve large secular variations in the orbital elements. Two cases are discussed using a circular orbit as the control case: (1) large changes in orbital inclination achieved by harmonic excitation rather than one impulsive velocity change, and (2) periodic and secular changes to the longitude of the ascending node using both stable and unstable excitation strategies. The implications of these equations are also discussed for both artificial satellites and natural satellites. For the former, two utilitarian orbits are suggested, each exploiting a form of harmonic excitation. 5 refs

  1. Random pulse generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Ya'nan; Jin Dapeng; Zhao Dixin; Liu Zhen'an; Qiao Qiao; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing

    2007-01-01

    Due to the randomness of radioactive decay and nuclear reaction, the signals from detectors are random in time. But normal pulse generator generates periodical pulses. To measure the performances of nuclear electronic devices under random inputs, a random generator is necessary. Types of random pulse generator are reviewed, 2 digital random pulse generators are introduced. (authors)

  2. Seismic excitation by space shuttles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, H.; Mori, J.; Sturtevant, B.; Anderson, D.L.; Heaton, T.

    1992-01-01

    Shock waves generated by the space shuttles Columbia (August 13, 1989), Atlantis (April 11, 1991) and Discovery (September 18, 1991) on their return to Edwards Air Force Base, California, were recorded by TERRAscope (Caltech's broadband seismic network), the Caltech-U.S.G.S Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN), and the University of Southern California (USC) Los Angeles Basin Seismic Network. The spatial pattern of the arrival times exhibits hyperbolic shock fronts from which the path, velocity and altitude of the space shuttle could be determined. The shock wave was acoustically coupled to the ground, converted to a seismic wave, and recorded clearly at the broadband TERRAscope stations. The acoustic coupling occurred very differently depending on the conditions of the Earth's surface surrounding the station. For a seismic station located on hard bedrock, the shock wave (N wave) was clearly recorded with little distortion. Aside from the N wave, very little acoustic coupling of the shock wave energy to the ground occurred at these sites. The observed N wave record was used to estimate the overpressure of the shock wave accurately; a pressure change of 0.5 to 2.2 mbars was obtained. For a seismic station located close to the ocean or soft sedimentary basins, a significant amount of shock wave energy was transferred to the ground through acoustic coupling of the shock wave and the oceanic Rayleigh wave. A distinct topography such as a mountain range was found effective to couple the shock wave energy to the ground. Shock wave energy was also coupled to the ground very effectively through large man made structures such as high rise buildings and offshore oil drilling platforms. For the space shuttle Columbia, in particular, a distinct pulse having a period of about 2 to 3 seconds was observed, 12.5 s before the shock wave, with a broadband seismograph in Pasadena. This pulse was probably excited by the high rise buildings in downtown Los Angeles which were

  3. Increased excitability of somatosensory cortex in aged humans is associated with impaired tactile acuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Melanie; Tegenthoff, Martin; Kohlhaas, Karsten; Stude, Philipp; Höffken, Oliver; Gatica Tossi, Mario A; Kalisch, Tobias; Kowalewski, Rebecca; Dinse, Hubert R

    2012-02-01

    Aging affects all levels of neural processing, including changes of intracortical inhibition and cortical excitability. Paired-pulse stimulation, the application of two stimuli in close succession, is a useful tool to investigate cortical excitability in humans. The paired-pulse behavior is characterized by the second response being significantly suppressed at short stimulus onset asynchronies. While in rat somatosensory cortex, intracortical inhibition has been demonstrated to decline with increasing age, data from human motor cortex of elderly subjects are controversial and there are no data for the human somatosensory cortex (SI). Moreover, behavioral implications of age-related changes of cortical excitability remain elusive. We therefore assessed SI excitability by combining paired-pulse median nerve stimulation with recording somatosensory evoked potentials in 138 healthy subjects aged 17-86 years. We found that paired-pulse suppression was characterized by substantial interindividual variability, but declined significantly with age, confirming reduced intracortical inhibition in elderly subjects. To link the age-related increase of cortical excitability to perceptual changes, we measured tactile two-point discrimination in a subsample of 26 aged participants who showed either low or high paired-pulse suppression. We found that tactile performance was particularly impaired in subjects showing markedly enhanced cortical excitability. Our data demonstrate that paired-pulse suppression of human SI is significantly reduced in older adults, and that age-related enhancement of cortical excitability correlates with degradation of tactile perception. These findings indicate that cortical excitability constitutes an important mechanism that links age-related neurophysiological changes to behavioral alterations in humans.

  4. Multiple-photon excitation and dissociation of polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantrell, C.D.

    1986-01-01

    This book is Volume 35 in Springer's Topics in Current Physics series designed to provide the interested reader perspective on a rapidly developing research field by gathering together review articles by major players. The editor has accurately highlighted the major results of the multiple-photon excitation (MPE) shock wave of research activity that propagated through the gas-phase chemical physics community during the 1970's. Throughout this period three questions intrigued the photochemists: (1) how is it possible that virtually any polyatomic molecule can efficiently absorb scores of infrared photons from a pulsed CO 2 TEA laser to achieve bond fission? (2) can insight into the dissociation dynamic be gained from this process, and in particular can bonds be made to break selectively? (3) could MPE be used to separate heavy isotopes? The answers to the first two questions are thoroughly examined and answered in the excellent review by Y.T. Lee et al., which itself is worth the price of the book. The question of isotope separation is discussed in two articles, one by Ambartzumian and the other by Cantrell. However, the recent glut of cheap uranium on world energy markets and the decision of DOE to develop atomic multiphoton ionization as the process of choice have resulted in a rapid deflation of interest in MPE separation schemes

  5. Penning ionization cross sections of excited rare gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukai, Masatoshi; Hatano, Yoshihiko.

    1988-01-01

    Electronic energy transfer processes involving excited rare gas atoms play one of the most important roles in ionized gas phenomena. Penning ionization is one of the well known electronic energy transfer processes and has been studied extensively both experimentally and theoretically. The present paper reports the deexcitation (Penning ionization) cross sections of metastable state helium He(2 3 S) and radiative He(2 1 P) atoms in collision with atoms and molecules, which have recently been obtained by the authors' group by using a pulse radiolysis method. Investigation is made of the selected deexcitation cross sections of He(2 3 S) by atoms and molecules in the thermal collisional energy region. Results indicate that the cross sections are strongly dependent on the target molecule. The deexcitation probability of He(2 3 S) per collision increases with the excess electronic energy of He(2 3 S) above the ionization potential of the target atom or molecule. Another investigation, made on the deexcitation of He(2 1 P), suggests that the deexcitation cross section for He(2 1 P) by Ar is determined mainly by the Penning ionization cross section due to a dipole-dipole interaction. Penning ionization due to the dipole-dipole interaction is also important for deexcitation of He(2 1 P) by the target molecules examined. (N.K.)

  6. Collisional and radiative relaxation of the first excited states of rare gases. Energy transfer from argon excited atoms to different molecules and fluorescence of molecular xenon excited by synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutuit-Fleischmann, Odile

    1978-01-01

    In the first section, the measurement of total deexcitation cross sections of the 3P 2,1,0 and 1 P 1 argon states by N 2 , H 2 , CO and SF 6 using a pulsed gas radiolysis technique and 600 keV electrons is discussed. The energy transfer from the resonant states 3 P 1 and 1 P 1 of argon (as excited selectively by synchrotron radiation) to the C 3 π u state of nitrogen has been studied in more detail. On the basis of these results, the different theoretical models for these reactions have been discussed. In the second section, the fluorescence of the second continuum of molecular xenon at around 1700 A, as excited by synchrotron radiation in the region of the 3P 1 1 S 0 resonance line at 1470 A, is considered. A short lived component of the fluorescence decay has been observed; this is attributed to emission at short interatomic distances from the high vibrational levels of Xe 2 + (O u + ). The emissions at the left turning point of the potential curve of the O u + state has been observed at λ > 2000 A. From these results, the potential curves for the states Xe 2 (O g + ) and Xe 2 * (O u + ) have been estimated and the Franck-Condon factors have also been calculated as a function of the wavelength of the fluorescence. (author) [fr

  7. Kinetics of excited levels in copper-vapor laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smilanski, I.

    1981-10-01

    A full and representative description of the excited copper level kinetics in a copper-vapor laser is presented. The research was carried out in three stages. The first stage was the development of a representative and reliable measurement cell. A laser tube constructed of refractory materials and an excitation circuit which provides short pulses at a high repetition rate to heat the tube and excite the copper atoms were developed. This stage was also dedicated to characterizing the laser and studying its scaling laws. In the second stage a rapid neasuring system which avoids the problem of spectral line shape was developed. The system is based on the 'hook' method, which utilizes the anomalous dispersion in the vicinity of an atomic line. The light source, a wide band nitrogen-laser-pumped dye laser, ensures a short sampling time, and the recording system, with a television camera face as the recording medium, allows precise data reduction. In the third stage the excited copper level kinetics in a copper vapor laser is measured. The principal conclusions, that only a small part of the energy in the discharge is utilized to populate the upper laser levels and that the lower laser level population is very large at the end of the excitation pulse and cannot be attributed to relaxation of the upper levels, necessitate a new kinetic description of the copper-vapor laser. The laser is not self-terminating; it is activated and terminated by the electrical discharge

  8. State selective extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photoemission cross sections for excitation and ionization-excitation of helium in fast electron and positive ion collisions: Helg-bullet (1snp) 1Plg-bullet (n=2 to 10) and He+ (np) (n=2 to 10) Rydberg states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigue, M.; Colegrove, T.; Bailey, M.

    1993-01-01

    We have analyzed high resolution (EUV) spectra of HeI and HeII originating from e - , H + , H 2 + and H 3 + bombardment of He gas. From these data excitation and ionization-excitation cross sections have been obtained by the HeI (1snp) 1 P o → (1s2) 1 S + hν and HeII (np) 2 P o -(1s) 2 S + hν Rydberg series with main quantum numbers from n=2 to 10, respectively. The determination of the individual line intensities has been accomplished using the IRAF one dimensional spectroscopy package installed on the Physics Department's HP9000 system. The cross sections for n≥4 presented here are reported for the first time. The up manifolds have been studied as a function of the projectile charge and velocity and number of scattering centers. Theoretically we have parametrized the cross sections in terms of first order, second order and interference contributions. We have also tested sum rules, by integrating over all np states. The dynamical Stark mixing among HeII ns and np states has also been investigated. A detailed discussion of the intensity distribution at high np states is presented for different means of excitation

  9. Sampling system for pulsed signals. Study of the radioactive lifetimes of excited 3{sup 2}P1/2 and 3{sup 2}P3/2 states of Na, excited by a tunable dye laser; Sistema de muestreo para senales pulsadas. Estudio de vidas medias de niveles 3{sup 2} P1/2 y 3{sup 2}P3/2 excitados por un laser de colorantes pulsado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, P.; Campos, J.

    1979-07-01

    A system for sampling and averaging repetitive signals in the order of nanoseconds is discussed. The system uses as storage memory a multichannel analyzer operating in multi scaling mode. This instrument is employed for the measurement of atomic level lifetimes using a dye laser to excite the atoms and is applied to the study of lifetimes of the 3{sup 2}P1/2 and 3{sup 2}P3/2 states of sodium. (Author) 32 refs.

  10. A pulsed, mono-energetic and angular-selective UV photo-electron source for the commissioning of the KATRIN experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, J.; Ranitzsch, P. C.-O.; Beck, M.; Beglarian, A.; Erhard, M.; Groh, S.; Hannen, V.; Kraus, M.; Ortjohann, H.-W.; Rest, O.; Schlösser, K.; Thümmler, T.; Valerius, K.; Wierman, K.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Winzen, D.; Zacher, M.; Weinheimer, C.

    2017-06-01

    The KATRIN experiment aims to determine the neutrino mass scale with a sensitivity of 200 {meV/c^2} (90% C. L.) by a precision measurement of the shape of the tritium β -spectrum in the endpoint region. The energy analysis of the decay electrons is achieved by a MAC-E filter spectrometer. To determine the transmission properties of the KATRIN main spectrometer, a mono-energetic and angular-selective electron source has been developed. In preparation for the second commissioning phase of the main spectrometer, a measurement phase was carried out at the KATRIN monitor spectrometer where the device was operated in a MAC-E filter setup for testing. The results of these measurements are compared with simulations using the particle-tracking software "Kassiopeia", which was developed in the KATRIN collaboration over recent years.

  11. Coherence resonance in an excitable system with time delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethia, Gautam C.; Kurths, Juergen; Sen, Abhijit

    2007-01-01

    We study the noise activated dynamics of a model excitable system that consists of a subcritical Hopf oscillator with a time delayed nonlinear feedback. The coherence of the noise driven pulses of the system exhibits a novel double peaked structure as a function of the noise amplitude. The two peaks correspond to separate optimal noise levels for excitation of single spikes and multiple spikes (bursts) respectively. The relative magnitudes of these peaks are found to be a sensitive function of time delay. The physical significance of our results and its practical implications in various real life systems are discussed

  12. Signatures of Anderson localization excited by an optical frequency comb

    KAUST Repository

    Gentilini, S.

    2010-01-25

    We investigate Anderson localization of light as occurring in ultrashort excitations. A theory based on time dependent coupled-mode equations predicts universal features in the spectrum of the transmitted pulse. In particular, the process of strong localization of light is shown to correspond to the formation of peaks in both the amplitude and in the group delay of the transmitted pulse. Parallel ab initio simulations made with finite-difference time-domain codes and molecular dynamics confirm theoretical predictions, while showing that there exists an optimal degree of disorder for the strong localization. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  13. Pulsed water jet generated by pulse multiplication

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dvorský, R.; Sitek, Libor; Sochor, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 4 (2016), s. 959-967 ISSN 1330-3651 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : high-pressure pulses * pulse intensifier * pulsed water jet * water hammer effect Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 0.723, year: 2016 http://hrcak.srce.hr/163752?lang=en

  14. Vector pulsing soliton of self-induced transparency in waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamashvili, G.T.

    2015-01-01

    A theory of an optical resonance vector pulsing soliton in waveguide is developed. A thin transition layer containing semiconductor quantum dots forms the boundary between the waveguide and one of the connected media. Analytical and numerical solutions for the optical vector pulsing soliton in waveguide are obtained. The vector pulsing soliton in the presence of excitonic and bi-excitonic excitations is compared with the soliton for waveguide TM-modes with parameters that can be used in modern optical experiments. It is shown that these nonlinear waves have significantly different parameters and shapes. - Highlights: • An optical vector pulsing soliton in a planar waveguide is presented. • Explicit form of the optical vector pulsing soliton are obtained. • The vector pulsing soliton and the soliton have different parameters and profiles

  15. Highly excited atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleppner, D.; Littman, M.G.; Zimmerman, M.L.

    1981-01-01

    Highly excited atoms are often called Rydberg atoms. These atoms have a wealth of exotic properties which are discussed. Of special interest, are the effects of electric and magnetic fields on Rydberg atoms. Ordinary atoms are scarcely affected by an applied electric or magnetic field; Rydberg atoms can be strongly distorted and even pulled apart by a relatively weak electric field, and they can be squeezed into unexpected shapes by a magnetic field. Studies of the structure of Rydberg atoms in electric and magnetic fields have revealed dramatic atomic phenomena that had not been observed before

  16. Excited QCD 2017

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This edition is the ninth in a series of workshops that had been previously organised in Poland (2009), Slovakia (2010 and 2015), France (2011), Portugal (2012 and 2016) and Bosnia and Herzegovina (2013 and 2014). In the year 2017 the workshop goes to the beautiful Sintra near Lisbon, Portugal. The workshop covers diverse aspects of QCD: (i) QCD at low energies: excited hadrons, new resonances, glueballs, multiquarks. (ii) QCD at high temperatures and large densities: heavy-ion collisions, jets, diffraction, hadronisation, quark-gluon plasma, holography, colour-glass condensate, compact stars, applications to astrophysics.

  17. Interference through the resonant Auger process via multiple core-excited states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Souvik; Nakajima, Takashi

    2017-12-01

    We theoretically investigate the resonant Auger process via multiple core-excited states. The presence of multiple core-excited states sets off interference into the common final continuum, and we show that the degree of interference depends on the various parameters such as the intensity of the employed x-ray pulse and the lifetimes of the core-excited states. For the specific examples we employ the double (1 s-13 p and 1 s-14 p ) core-excited states of Ne atom and numerically solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation to demonstrate that the energy-resolved electron spectra clearly exhibit the signature of interference.

  18. Effects of pulse-to-pulse residual species on discharges in repetitively pulsed discharges through packed bed reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruszelnicki, Juliusz; Engeling, Kenneth W.; Foster, John E.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) sustained in packed bed reactors (PBRs) are being investigated for conversion of toxic and waste gases, and CO2 removal. These discharges are repetitively pulsed having varying flow rates and internal geometries, which results in species from the prior pulse still being in the discharge zone at the time the following discharge pulse occurs. A non-negligible residual plasma density remains, which effectively acts as preionization. This residual charge changes the discharge properties of subsequent pulses, and may impact important PBR properties such as chemical selectivity. Similarly, the residual neutral reactive species produced during earlier pulses will impact the reaction rates on subsequent pulses. We report on results of a computational investigation of a 2D PBR using the plasma hydrodynamics simulator nonPDPSIM. Results will be discussed for air flowing though an array of dielectric rods at atmospheric pressure. The effects of inter-pulse residual species on PBR discharges will be quantified. Means of controlling the presence of residual species in the reactor through gas flow rate, pulse repetition, pulse width and geometry will be described. Comparisons will be made to experiments. Work supported by US DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science and the National Science Foundation.

  19. Coherent Control of Multiphoton Transitions in the Gas and Condensed Phases with Shaped Ultrashort Pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcos Dantus

    2008-09-23

    Controlling laser-molecule interactions has become an integral part of developing devices and applications in spectroscopy, microscopy, optical switching, micromachining and photochemistry. Coherent control of multiphoton transitions could bring a significant improvement of these methods. In microscopy, multi-photon transitions are used to activate different contrast agents and suppress background fluorescence; coherent control could generate selective probe excitation. In photochemistry, different dissociative states are accessed through two, three, or more photon transitions; coherent control could be used to select the reaction pathway and therefore the yield-specific products. For micromachining and processing a wide variety of materials, femtosecond lasers are now used routinely. Understanding the interactions between the intense femtosecond pulse and the material could lead to technologically important advances. Pulse shaping could then be used to optimize the desired outcome. The scope of our research program is to develop robust and efficient strategies to control nonlinear laser-matter interactions using ultrashort shaped pulses in gas and condensed phases. Our systematic research has led to significant developments in a number of areas relevant to the AMO Physics group at DOE, among them: generation of ultrashort phase shaped pulses, coherent control and manipulation of quantum mechanical states in gas and condensed phases, behavior of isolated molecules under intense laser fields, behavior of condensed phase matter under intense laser field and implications on micromachining with ultrashort pulses, coherent control of nanoparticles their surface plasmon waves and their nonlinear optical behavior, and observation of coherent Coulomb explosion processes at 10^16 W/cm^2. In all, the research has resulted in 36 publications (five journal covers) and nine invention disclosures, five of which have continued on to patenting

  20. EDITORIAL: Nanotechnological selection Nanotechnological selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna

    2013-01-01

    At the nanoscale measures can move from a mass-scale analogue calibration to counters of discrete units. The shift redefines the possible levels of control that can be achieved in a system if adequate selectivity can be imposed. As an example as ionic substances pass through nanoscale pores, the quantity of ions is low enough that the pore can contain either negative or positive ions. Yet precise control over this selectivity still raises difficulties. In this issue researchers address the challenge of how to regulate the ionic selectivity of negative and positive charges with the use of an external charge. The approach may be useful for controlling the behaviour, properties and chemical composition of liquids and has possible technical applications for nanofluidic field effect transistors [1]. Selectivity is a critical advantage in the administration of drugs. Nanoparticles functionalized with targeting moieties can allow delivery of anti-cancer drugs to tumour cells, whilst avoiding healthy cells and hence reducing some of the debilitating side effects of cancer treatments [2]. Researchers in Belarus and the US developed a new theranostic approach—combining therapy and diagnosis—to support the evident benefits of cellular selectivity that can be achieved when nanoparticles are applied in medicine [3]. Their process uses nanobubbles of photothermal vapour, referred to as plasmonic nanobubbles, generated by plasmonic excitations in gold nanoparticles conjugated to diagnosis-specific antibodies. The intracellular plasmonic nanobubbles are controlled by laser fluence so that the response can be tuned in individual living cells. Lower fluence allows non-invasive high-sensitive imaging for diagnosis and higher fluence can disrupt the cellular membrane for treatments. The selective response of carbon nanotubes to different gases has leant them to be used within various different types of sensors, as summarized in a review by researchers at the University of