WorldWideScience

Sample records for selected methodological mineralogical

  1. Thermal conductivity of sedimentary rocks - selected methodological, mineralogical and textural studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Midttoemme, Kirsti

    1997-12-31

    The thermal conductivity of sedimentary rocks is an important parameter in basin modelling as the main parameter controlling the temperature within a sedimentary basin. This thesis presents measured thermal conductivities, mainly on clay- and mudstone. The measured values are compared with values obtained by using thermal conductivity models. Some new thermal conductivity models are developed based on the measured values. The values obtained are less than most previously published values. In a study of unconsolidated sediments a constant deviation was found between thermal conductivities measured with a needle probe and a divided bas apparatus. Accepted thermal conductivity models based on the geometric mean model fail to predict the thermal conductivity of clay- and mudstone. Despite this, models based on the geometric mean model, where the effect of porosity is taken account of by the geometric mean equation, seem to be the best. Existing models underestimate the textural influence on the thermal conductivity of clay- and mudstone. The grain size was found to influence the thermal conductivity of artificial quartz samples. The clay mineral content seems to be a point of uncertainty in both measuring and modelling thermal conductivity. A good universal thermal conductivity model must include many mineralogical and textural factors. Since this is difficult, different models restricted to specific sediment types and textures are suggested to be the best solution to obtain realistic estimates applicable in basin modelling. 243 refs., 64 figs., 31 tabs.

  2. Mineralogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, C.

    2006-01-01

    The classic in the field since 1848, this extraordinary reference offers readers unsurpassed coverage of mineralogy and crystallography. The book is known for integrating complete coverage of concepts and principles with a more systematic and descriptive treatment of mineralogy. The revised edition now includes a CD-ROM to let readers see the minerals and crystals, while also viewing chemical composition, symmetry, and morphological crystallography.

  3. A new and improved methodology for qualitative and quantitative mineralogical analysis of Boom Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeelmaekers, E.; Vandenberghe, N.; Honty, M.; De Craen, M.; Derkowski, A.; Van Geet, M.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. A good knowledge of the mineralogy of any host formation studied for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste, is a prerequisite for understanding the geochemical environment which will determine the migration and retention behaviour of radionuclides. In this respect, the Boom Clay mineralogical composition has been extensively studied last decades as reference host formation (e.g. ARCHIMEDEARGILE project, OECD-NEA clay catalogue report) with the aim to provide reliable data for a safety assessment. However, a comparison of the available literature data clearly showed a serious discrepancy among studies, not only in the quantitative, but also in the qualitative mineralogical composition of the Boom Clay (SAFIR II). The reason for such a huge disagreement could be related, among others, to variable grain size distributions of the studied samples (sample heterogeneity) and differences in the methodological approaches. In particular, the unambiguous characterisation of clay minerals and the quantification of mixed-layer phases appeared as an everlasting problem. This study is aimed at achieving a consensus on the qualitative and quantitative mineralogical data of the Boom Clay using the most advanced techniques currently available in the clay science. A new sampling campaign was performed in such a way that samples are (20 in total) more or less regularly distributed over Boom Clay Formation, ensuring that variations in the grain size distributions due to silty clay-clayey silt layers alternations are accounted for. The novel concept based on an analysis at two levels was applied: (1) bulk rock and (2) clay fraction analysis. (1) A bulk rock analysis consists of conventional XRD analysis with the identification of the principal mineral phases. As a next step, the bulk rock was mixed with a ZnO internal standard and experimental diffraction patterns of randomly oriented powders were analyzed using &apos

  4. Microstructural and mineralogical characterization of selected shales in support of nuclear waste repository studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Hyder, L.K.; Alley, P.D.

    1988-01-01

    Five shales were examined as part of the Sedimentary Rock Program evaluation of this medium as a potential host for a US civilian nuclear waste repository. The units selected for characterization were the Chattanooga Shale from Fentress County, Tennessee; the Pierre Shale from Gregory County, South Dakota; the Green River Formation from Garfield County, Colorado; and the Nolichucky Shale and Pumpkin Valley Shale from Roane County, Tennessee. The micromorphology and structure of the shales were examined by petrographic, scanning electron, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Chemical and mineralogical compositions were studied through the use of energy-dispersive x-ray, neutron activation, atomic absorption, thermal, and x-ray diffraction analysis techniques. 18 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Mineralogical correlation of surficial sediment from area drainages with selected sedimentary interbeds at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholomay, R.C.

    1990-08-01

    Ongoing research by the US Geological Survey at the INEL involves investigation of the migration of radioactive elements contained in low-level radioactive waste, hydrologic and geologic factors affecting waste movement, and geochemical factors that influence the chemical composition of the waste. Identification of the mineralogy of the Snake River Plain is needed to aid in the study of the hydrology and geochemistry of subsurface waste disposal. The US Geological Surveys project office at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, used mineralogical data to correlate surficial sediment samples from the Big Lost River, Little Lost River, and Birch Greek drainages with selected sedimentary interbed core samples taken from test holes at the RWMC (Radioactive Waste Management Complex), TRA (Test Reactors Area), ICPP (Idaho Chemical Processing Plant), and TAN (Test Area North). Correlating the mineralogy of a particular present-day drainage area with a particular sedimentary interbed provides information on historical source of sediment for interbeds in and near the INEL. Mineralogical data indicate that surficial sediment samples from the Big Lost River drainage contained a larger amount of feldspar and pyroxene and a smaller amount of calcite and dolomite than samples from the Little Lost River and Birch Creek drainages. Mineralogical data from sedimentary interbeds at the RWMC, TRA, and ICPP correlate with surficial sediment of the present-day big Lost River drainage. Mineralogical data from a sedimentary interbed at TAN correlate with surficial sediment of the present-day Birch Creek drainage. 13 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Mineralogical correlation of surficial sediment from area drainages with selected sedimentary interbeds at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartholomay, R.C.

    1990-08-01

    Ongoing research by the US Geological Survey at the INEL involves investigation of the migration of radioactive elements contained in low-level radioactive waste, hydrologic and geologic factors affecting waste movement, and geochemical factors that influence the chemical composition of the waste. Identification of the mineralogy of the Snake River Plain is needed to aid in the study of the hydrology and geochemistry of subsurface waste disposal. The US Geological Surveys project office at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, used mineralogical data to correlate surficial sediment samples from the Big Lost River, Little Lost River, and Birch Greek drainages with selected sedimentary interbed core samples taken from test holes at the RWMC (Radioactive Waste Management Complex), TRA (Test Reactors Area), ICPP (Idaho Chemical Processing Plant), and TAN (Test Area North). Correlating the mineralogy of a particular present-day drainage area with a particular sedimentary interbed provides information on historical source of sediment for interbeds in and near the INEL. Mineralogical data indicate that surficial sediment samples from the Big Lost River drainage contained a larger amount of feldspar and pyroxene and a smaller amount of calcite and dolomite than samples from the Little Lost River and Birch Creek drainages. Mineralogical data from sedimentary interbeds at the RWMC, TRA, and ICPP correlate with surficial sediment of the present-day big Lost River drainage. Mineralogical data from a sedimentary interbed at TAN correlate with surficial sediment of the present-day Birch Creek drainage. 13 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Airfoil selection methodology for Small Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salgado Fuentes, Valentin; Troya, Cesar; Moreno, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    On wind turbine technology, the aerodynamic performance is fundamental to increase efficiency. Nowadays there are several databases with airfoils designed and simulated for different applications; that is why it is necessary to select those suitable for a specific application. This work presents...... a new methodology for airfoil selection used in feasibility and optimization of small wind turbines with low cut-in speed. On the first stage, airfoils data is tested on XFOIL software to check its compatibility with the simulator; then, arithmetic mean criteria is recursively used to discard...... underperformed airfoils; the best airfoil data was exported to Matlab for a deeper analysis. In the second part, data points were interpolated using "splines" to calculate glide ratio and stability across multiple angles of attack, those who present a bigger steadiness were conserved. As a result, 3 airfoils...

  8. Mineralogy of selected sedimentary interbeds at or near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, M.F.; Bartholomay, R.C.

    1994-08-01

    The US Geological Survey's (USGS) Project Office at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) analyzed 66 samples from sedimentary interbed cores during a 38-month period beginning in October 1990 to determine bulk and clay mineralogy. These cores had been collected from 19 sites in the Big Lost River Basin, 2 sites in the Birch Creek Basin, and 1 site in the Mud Lake Basin, and were archived at the USGS lithologic core library at the INEL. Mineralogy data indicate that core samples from the Big Lost River Basin have larger mean and median percentages of quartz, total feldspar, and total clay minerals, but smaller mean and median percentages of calcite than the core samples from the Birch Creek Basin. Core samples from the Mud Lake Basin have abundant quartz, total feldspar, calcite, and total clay minerals. Identification of the mineralogy of the Snake River Plain is needed to aid in the study of the hydrology and geochemistry of subsurface waste disposal

  9. A Selection Methodology for the RTOS Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, P.; Tafazoli, S.

    In past years, the market of Operating Systems (OS) has been quite active. One of those key markets is to support embedded real-time applications in which the OS must guarantee the timeliness as well as the correctness of the processing. Many OS claim to be Real-Time Operating Systems (RTOS), but often, it is only by reviewing the OS specifications or detailed information that one can truly identify the OS that enables real- time applications. Designers are faced with and impressive task when selecting an RTOS for their space mission. Whether for historical reasons or due to the rapid evolution of the RTOS market, it appears that RTOS are not evaluated for each mission but rather imposed. Although reasons for imposing this choice can be well justified, other times one is left to wonder if the lack of evaluation to mission requirements can lead to increased risks down the road. How does one select the proper RTOS for space missions, which will a) meet the requirements, b) correspond with the knowledge and expertise of the staff and c) continue to be a strategic choice for the future? The purpose of this paper is to compare commercially available RTOS that are suitable for space missions requiring hard real-time capabilities. It is our belief that this research identifies the important products for space missions and presents a methodology to select the appropriate RTOS that will meet design requirements and other relevant criteria. Lastly, the paper will present the volatility of the market in the past two years and determine the implications for embedded systems used in space missions. 1

  10. Mineralogical characterization of selected shales in support of nuclear waste repository studies: Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.Y.; Hyder, L.K.; Alley, P.D.

    1987-12-01

    Because baseline characterization of shale mineralogy is critical to the interpretation of results from experiments on radionuclide retardation, groundwater-shale interactions, and physicochemical characteristics, a protocol for quantitative mineralogical analyses has been developed by integrating geochemical and instrumental techniques for the investigation of properties related to repository performance. Thermal analyses were used to estimate total organic matter and carbonate mineral contents. Scanning electron microscope backscattering and elemental mapping of polished sectors and particle-size distribution data were used to estimate the amounts of quartz plus feldspar and pyrite in the shales. X-ray diffraction, neutron activation, and size-distribution data were utilized to estimate phyllosilicate mineral contents. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy was used to identify clay mineral components.

  11. Mineralogical characterization of selected shales in support of nuclear waste repository studies: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Hyder, L.K.; Alley, P.D.

    1987-12-01

    Because baseline characterization of shale mineralogy is critical to the interpretation of results from experiments on radionuclide retardation, groundwater-shale interactions, and physicochemical characteristics, a protocol for quantitative mineralogical analyses has been developed by integrating geochemical and instrumental techniques for the investigation of properties related to repository performance. Thermal analyses were used to estimate total organic matter and carbonate mineral contents. Scanning electron microscope backscattering and elemental mapping of polished sectors and particle-size distribution data were used to estimate the amounts of quartz plus feldspar and pyrite in the shales. X-ray diffraction, neutron activation, and size-distribution data were utilized to estimate phyllosilicate mineral contents. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy was used to identify clay mineral components

  12. Mineralogy, petrology and whole-rock chemistry data compilation for selected samples of Yucca Mountain tuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connolly, J.R.

    1991-12-01

    Petrologic, bulk chemical, and mineralogic data are presented for 49 samples of tuffaceous rocks from core holes USW G-1 and UE-25a number-sign 1 at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Included, in descending stratigraphic order, are 11 samples from the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff, 12 samples from the Tuffaceous Beds of Calico Hills, 3 samples from the Prow Pass Member of the Crater Flat Tuff, 20 samples from the Bullfrog Member of the Crater Flat Tuff and 3 samples from the Tram Member of the Crater Flat Tuff. The suite of samples contains a wide variety of petrologic types, including zeolitized, glassy, and devitrified tuffs. Data vary considerably between groups of samples, and include thin section descriptions (some with modal analyses for which uncertainties are estimated), electron microprobe analyses of mineral phases and matrix, mineral identifications by X-ray diffraction, and major element analyses with uncertainty estimates

  13. Physical, chemical and mineralogical characteristics of some selected gardud soils of kordofan region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elgubshawi, Abdelmoneim Ahmed Ismail

    1995-05-01

    Recently much of the attention is given to gardud soil as the main alternative for the depleted marginal sandy soils. A lack of exact knowledge regarding these soils are evident. For studying gardud soil four sites were chosen according to the annual rainfall. Two pits were excavated in each site to represent the concaved and convexed locations plus composite samples to cover the area between two pits. Morphological, physical, chemical and mineralogical investigations were made. The results showed that the gardud soils were relatively differed within and between sites due to the climate and the topography. The dominant clay minerals are kaolinite, montmorillonite and illte. The chemical and physical characteristics were poor. Some of the restrictions limiting the use of these soils such as erosion, hardness, fertility, stoniness, drought and acidity. According to the American system of soil classification, the soils studied were given the following classification: (1) Bardab soil: (A) Kanhablic rhodustalf-fine clay, kaolinite, isohyperthermic (concaved). (B) Kandic paleustalf-very fine clay, kaolinite, isohyperthermic (convexed). (2) Sodari: (A) Typic comborthid-coarse loamy, mixed hyperthermic (concave). (B) Typic comborthid-coarse loamy, mixed hyperthermic (convexed). (3) Nihud (Rahad Elsilk): (A) Rhodic paleustalf-fine loamy, kaolinite isohyperthermic (concaved). (B) Aridic paleustalf-fine loamy kaolinite isohyperthermic (convexed). (4) Umgamalla: (A) Ustic hapustalf-fine loamy kaolinite isohyperthermic (concaved). (B)Ustic hapustalf-fine loamy kaolinite isohyperthermic (convexed). (Author)

  14. Physical, chemical and mineralogical characteristics of some selected gardud soils of kordofan region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elgubshawi, Abdelmoneim Ahmed Ismail [Department of Biochemistry and Soil Science, Faculty of agriculture, University of Khartoum, Khartoum (Sudan)

    1995-05-01

    Recently much of the attention is given to gardud soil as the main alternative for the depleted marginal sandy soils. A lack of exact knowledge regarding these soils are evident. For studying gardud soil four sites were chosen according to the annual rainfall. Two pits were excavated in each site to represent the concaved and convexed locations plus composite samples to cover the area between two pits. Morphological, physical, chemical and mineralogical investigations were made. The results showed that the gardud soils were relatively differed within and between sites due to the climate and the topography. The dominant clay minerals are kaolinite, montmorillonite and illte. The chemical and physical characteristics were poor. Some of the restrictions limiting the use of these soils such as erosion, hardness, fertility, stoniness, drought and acidity. According to the American system of soil classification, the soils studied were given the following classification: (1) Bardab soil: (A) Kanhablic rhodustalf-fine clay, kaolinite, isohyperthermic (concaved). (B) Kandic paleustalf-very fine clay, kaolinite, isohyperthermic (convexed). (2) Sodari: (A) Typic comborthid-coarse loamy, mixed hyperthermic (concave). (B) Typic comborthid-coarse loamy, mixed hyperthermic (convexed). (3) Nihud (Rahad Elsilk): (A) Rhodic paleustalf-fine loamy, kaolinite isohyperthermic (concaved). (B) Aridic paleustalf-fine loamy kaolinite isohyperthermic (convexed). (4) Umgamalla: (A) Ustic hapustalf-fine loamy kaolinite isohyperthermic (concaved). (B)Ustic hapustalf-fine loamy kaolinite isohyperthermic (convexed). (Author) 39 refs. , 8 tabs. , 35 figs.

  15. Selection of skin dose calculation methodologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrell, W.E.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports that good health physics practice dictates that a dose assessment be performed for any significant skin contamination incident. There are, however, several methodologies that could be used, and while there is probably o single methodology that is proper for all cases of skin contamination, some are clearly more appropriate than others. This can be demonstrated by examining two of the more distinctly different options available for estimating skin dose the calculational methods. The methods compiled by Healy require separate beta and gamma calculations. The beta calculational method is the derived by Loevinger, while the gamma dose is calculated from the equation for dose rate from an infinite plane source with an absorber between the source and the detector. Healy has provided these formulas in graphical form to facilitate rapid dose rate determinations at density thicknesses of 7 and 20 mg/cm 2 . These density thicknesses equate to the regulatory definition of the sensitive layer of the skin and a more arbitrary value to account of beta absorption in contaminated clothing

  16. Accident selection methodology for TA-55 FSAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letellier, B.C.; Pan, P.Y.; Sasser, M.K.

    1995-01-01

    In the past, the selection of representative accidents for refined analysis from the numerous scenarios identified in hazards analyses (HAs) has involved significant judgment and has been difficult to defend. As part of upgrading the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) for the TA-55 plutonium facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, an accident selection process was developed that is mostly mechanical and reproducible in nature and fulfills the requirements of the Department of Energy (DOE) Standard 3009 and DOE Order 5480.23. Among the objectives specified by this guidance are the requirements that accident screening (1) consider accidents during normal and abnormal operating conditions, (2) consider both design basis and beyond design basis accidents, (3) characterize accidents by category (operational, natural phenomena, etc.) and by type (spill, explosion, fire, etc.), and (4) identify accidents that bound all foreseeable accident types. The accident selection process described here in the context of the TA-55 FSAR is applicable to all types of DOE facilities

  17. Methodology for Mode Selection in Corridor Analysis of Freight Transportation

    OpenAIRE

    Kanafani, Adib

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of tins report is to outline a methodology for the analysis of mode selection in freight transportation. This methodology is intended to partake of transportation corridor analysts, a component of demand analysis that is part of a national transportation process. The methodological framework presented here provides a basis on which specific models and calculation procedures might be developed. It also provides a basis for the development of a data management system suitable for co...

  18. Systems selection methodology for civil nuclear power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarborough, J.

    1988-01-01

    A methodology for evaluation and selection of a preferred Advanced Small or Medium Power Reactor (SMPR) for commercial electric power generation is discussed, and an illustrative example is presented with five US Advanced SMPR power plants. The evaluation procedure was developed from a methodology for ranking small, advanced nuclear power plant designs under development by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Defense (DOD). The methodology involves establishing numerical probability distributions for each of fifteen evaluation criteria for each Advanced SMPR plant. A resultant single probability distribution with its associated numerical mean value is then developed for each Advanced SMPR plant by Monte Carlo sampling techniques in order that each plant may be ranked with an associated statement of certainty. The selection methodology is intended as a screening procedure for commercial offerings to preclude detailed technical and commercial assessments from being conducted for those offerings which do not meet the initial screening criteria

  19. Systems selection methodology for civil nuclear power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarborough, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    A methodology for evaluation and selection of a preferred Advanced Small or Medium Power Reactor (SMPR) for commercial electric power generation is discussed, and an illustrative example is presented with five U.S. Advanced SMPR power plants. The evaluation procedure was developed from a methodology for ranking small. advenced nuclear power plant designs under development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Defense (DOD). The methodology involves establishing numerical probability distributions for each of fifteen evaluation criteria for each Advanced SMPR plant. A resultant single probability distribution with its associated numerical mean value is then developed for each Advanced SMPR plant by Monte Carlo sampling techniques in order that each plant may be ranked with an associated statement of certainty. The selection methodology is intended as a screening procedure for commercial offerings to preclude detailed technical and commercial assessments from being conducted for those offerings which do not meet the initial screening criteria. (auhtor)

  20. Selection methodology for LWR safety programs and proposals. Volume 2. Methodology application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritzman, R.L.; Husseiny, A.A.

    1980-08-01

    The results of work done to update and apply a methodology for selecting (prioritizing) LWR safety technology R and D programs are described. The methodology is based on multiattribute utility (MAU) theory. Application of the methodology to rank-order a group of specific R and D programs included development of a complete set of attribute utility functions, specification of individual attribute scaling constants, and refinement and use of an interactive computer program (MAUP) to process decision-maker inputs and generate overall (multiattribute) program utility values. The output results from several decision-makers are examined for consistency and conclusions and recommendations regarding general use of the methodology are presented. 3 figures, 18 tables

  1. A case on vendor selection methodology: An integrated approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil C. Shil

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Vendor selection methodology is a highly researched area in supply chain management l terature and a very significant decision taken by supply chain managers due to technological advances in the manufacturing process. Such research has two basic dimensions: one is related to the identification of variables affecting the performance of the vendors and the other deals with the methodology to be applied. Most of the research conducted in this area deal with the upfront selection of vendors. However, it is very common to have a list of dedicated vendors due to the development of sophisticated production technologies like just in time (JIT, a lean or agile manufacturing process where continuous flow of materials is a requirement. This paper addresses the issue of selecting the optimal vendor from the internal database of a company. Factor analysis, analytical hierarchy process and regression analysis is used in an integrated way to supplement the vendor selection process. The methodology presented here is simply a proposal where every possible room for adjustment is available.

  2. Sedimentological and mineralogical characteristics of recent sediments at selected sites in the southern basin of Lake Michigan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tisue, G.T.; Merk, G.

    1976-01-01

    During the 1976 field season, sediment traps and current meters were set out in the southern basin of Lake Michigan to study the relationship between suspended material and currents. The gross mineralogical and chemical characteristics of the bottom sediments at the locations of these experiments were determined

  3. IT OUTSOURCING: METHODOLOGY FOR SUPPLIER SELECTION CRITERIA FOR COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Alexandre Simões

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Two criteria are usually adopted to select the provider of IT: lower prices or better service qualification of the supplier. This article proposes a strategic approach: the company should hire the provider that best leverage their competitive advantages. This approach implied the need to develop a methodology. To support it, the authors analyzed four models, Porter, RBV (Resource-Based View, Balanced Scorecard and the Weapons and Field Competition. Preferred the latter to be the most complete, qualiquantitative technique and able to accurately align the goals of the IT service firm's to competitive contracting strategy. The methodology was developed and applied to an insurance company and in face of the excellent results, decided to write this article to disclose it.

  4. A methodology for selecting optimum organizations for space communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragusa, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    This paper suggests that a methodology exists for selecting optimum organizations for future space communities of various sizes and purposes. Results of an exploratory study to identify an optimum hypothetical organizational structure for a large earth-orbiting multidisciplinary research and applications (R&A) Space Base manned by a mixed crew of technologists are presented. Since such a facility does not presently exist, in situ empirical testing was not possible. Study activity was, therefore, concerned with the identification of a desired organizational structural model rather than the empirical testing of it. The principal finding of this research was that a four-level project type 'total matrix' model will optimize the effectiveness of Space Base technologists. An overall conclusion which can be reached from the research is that application of this methodology, or portions of it, may provide planning insights for the formal organizations which will be needed during the Space Industrialization Age.

  5. Survey and selection of assessment methodologies for GAVE options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weterings, R.

    1999-05-01

    The Dutch government is interested in the possibilities for a market introduction of new gaseous and liquid energy carriers. To this purpose the GAVE-programme was recently set up. This study is carried out within the framework of the GAVE-programme and aims at the selection of methodologies for assessing the technological, economic, ecological and social perspectives of these new energy options (so-called GAVE-options). Based on the results of these assessments the Dutch ministries of Housing, Planning and Environment (VROM) and Economic Affairs (EZ) will decide at the end of 1999 about starting demonstration projects of promising energy carriers

  6. Methodology for Selecting Best Management Practices Integrating Multiple Stakeholders and Criteria. Part 1: Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Carvallo Aceves

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of stormwater Best Management Practices (BMPs could help re-establish the natural hydrological cycle of watersheds after urbanization, with each BMP presenting a different performance across a range of criteria (flood prevention, pollutant removal, etc.. Additionally, conflicting views from the relevant stakeholders may arise, resulting in a complex selection process. This paper proposes a methodology for BMP selection based on the application of multi-criteria decision aid (MCDA methods, integrating multiple stakeholder priorities and BMP combinations. First, in the problem definition, the MCDA methods, relevant criteria and design guidelines are selected. Next, information from the preliminary analysis of the watershed is used to obtain a list of relevant BMPs. The third step comprises the watershed modeling and analysis of the BMP alternatives to obtain performance values across purely objective criteria. Afterwards, a stakeholder analysis based on survey applications is carried out to obtain social performance values and criteria priorities. Then, the MCDA methods are applied to obtain the final BMP rankings. The last step considers the sensitivity analysis and rank comparisons in order to draw the final conclusions and recommendations. Future improvements to the methodology could explore inclusion of multiple objective analysis, and alternative means for obtaining social performance values.

  7. Resource selection for an interdisciplinary field: a methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, Beth E; Murray, Jane; Alterman, Ina; Welbourne, Penny

    2002-10-01

    The Health Sciences and Human Services Library of the University of Maryland developed and implemented a methodology to evaluate print and digital resources for social work. Although this methodology was devised for the interdisciplinary field of social work, the authors believe it may lend itself to resource selection in other interdisciplinary fields. The methodology was developed in response to the results of two separate surveys conducted in late 1999, which indicated improvement was needed in the library's graduate-level social work collections. Library liaisons evaluated the print collection by identifying forty-five locally relevant Library of Congress subject headings and then using these subjects or synonymous terms to compare the library's titles to collections of peer institutions, publisher catalogs, and Amazon.com. The collection also was compared to social work association bibliographies, ISI Journal Citation Reports, and major social work citation databases. An approval plan for social work books was set up to assist in identifying newly published titles. The library acquired new print and digital social work resources as a result of the evaluation, thus improving both print and digital collections for its social work constituents. Visibility of digital resources was increased by cataloging individual titles in aggregated electronic journal packages and listing each title on the library Web page.

  8. Spectral zone selection methodology for pebble bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mphahlele, Ramatsemela; Ougouag, Abderrafi M.; Ivanov, Kostadin N.; Gougar, Hans D.

    2011-01-01

    A methodology is developed for determining boundaries of spectral zones for pebble bed reactors. A spectral zone is defined as a region made up of a number of nodes whose characteristics are collectively similar and that are assigned the same few-group diffusion constants. The spectral zones are selected in such a manner that the difference (error) between the reference transport solution and the diffusion code solution takes a minimum value. This is achieved by choosing spectral zones through optimally minimizing this error. The objective function for the optimization algorithm is the total reaction rate error, which is defined as the sum of the leakage, absorption and fission reaction rates errors in each zone. The selection of these spectral zones is such that the core calculation results based on diffusion theory are within an acceptable tolerance as compared to a proper transport reference solution. Through this work, a consistent approach for identifying spectral zones that yield more accurate diffusion results is introduced.

  9. Methodology proposal for matrices selection for hazardous wastes stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Eliane Magalhaes Pereira da; Vasconcelos, Vanderley de; Jordao, Elizabete

    2002-01-01

    The issues of environmental pollution by solid waste arised with the onset of the industrial era. Coping with these issues has been even worsen due to the lack of consciousness and planning for a sound waste management. In addition, most of the companies have found it difficult to keep themselves competitive in a global economy due to the lack of information and by not having access to waste management new technologies. On the other hand, solidification/stabilization technologies are usual practices in the nuclear industry. The aim of this paper is to present a proposal to the development of a methodology, for selection of immobilization binders for hazardous waste, based on the available technologies in the nuclear industry. (author)

  10. Clay mineralogy of selected borehole sediments from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.K.; Peifer, D.W.; Rood, C.K.

    1992-04-01

    Smectite, 90 to 100% interstratified illite-smectite, chlorate, and kaolinite are identified in boreholes drilled in fluvial and alluvial fan deposits of the Plio-Pleistocene Livermore Formation in the vicinity of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Livermore. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and electron microprobe studies indicate the clays persist through 150 ft of gravels, sands, silts, and mudstones of the vadose zone to total drilling depths of 200 ft in the saturated zone. Scanning electron microscopy indicates that true clays (layer silicate only) comprise between 2 and 15 modal percent of the Livermore Formation. Authigenic and detrital smectite, 90% interlayered illite-smectite, and chlorate persist throughout the stratigraphic section; kaolinite occurs only in the upper 100 ft of the section and is absent below. Smectite comprises between 60 to 90% of the true (layer silicate only) clay fraction. Illite and kaolinite±chlorite abundances fluctuate between 10 to 30% and 10 to 20% of this fraction, respectively. Authigenic smectite, illite, and chlorate crystallize together with detrital phases; the authigenic component increases with depth. The relative percentages of clay minerals define unique mineralogical intervals, which can be correlated between boreholes. Pervasive microfractures and interconnected porosity are inherent in the finer sediments; the microfractures typically are 1 mm or less in width and are variably spaced. Voids and microfractures are conspicuously lined by clays. Porosity for the argillaceous sediments ranges between 23 and 40%; Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) specific surface area decreases variably from 40 m 2 /g near the surface to 15 m 2 /g at the 115-ft depth. Within the pelitic matrix, iron, iron-titanium, chromium, and manganese oxides are pervasive

  11. Agile methodology selection criteria: IT start-up case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micic, Lj

    2017-05-01

    Project management in modern IT companies is often based on agile methodologies which have several advantages compared to traditional methodologies such is waterfall. Having in mind that clients sometimes change project during development it is crucial for an IT company to choose carefully which methodology is going to implement and is it going to be mostly based on one or is it going got be combination of several. There are several modern and often used methodologies but among those Scrum, Kanban and XP programming are usually the most common. Sometimes companies use mostly tools and procedures from one but quite often they use some of the combination of those methodologies. Having in mind that those methodologies are just a framework they allow companies to adapt it for their specific projects as well as for other limitations. These methodologies are in limited usage Bosnia but more and more IT companies are starting to use agile methodologies because it is practice and common not just for their clients abroad but also starting to be the only option in order to deliver quality product on time. However it is always challenging which methodology or combination of several companies should implement and how to connect it to its own project, organizational framework and HR management. This paper presents one case study based on local IT start up and delivers solution based on theoretical framework and practical limitations that case company has.

  12. Draft report: a selection methodology for LWR safety R and D programs and proposals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husseiny, A. A.; Ritzman, R. L.

    1980-03-01

    The results of work done to develop a methodology for selecting LWR safety R and D programs and proposals is described. A critical survey of relevant decision analysis methods is provided including the specifics of multiattribute utility theory. This latter method forms the basis of the developed selection methodology. Details of the methodology and its use are provided along with a sample illustration of its application.

  13. Draft report: a selection methodology for LWR safety R and D programs and proposals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husseiny, A.A.; Ritzman, R.L.

    1980-03-01

    The results of work done to develop a methodology for selecting LWR safety R and D programs and proposals is described. A critical survey of relevant decision analysis methods is provided including the specifics of multiattribute utility theory. This latter method forms the basis of the developed selection methodology. Details of the methodology and its use are provided along with a sample illustration of its application

  14. Selecting a software development methodology. [of digital flight control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    The state of the art analytical techniques for the development and verification of digital flight control software is studied and a practical designer oriented development and verification methodology is produced. The effectiveness of the analytic techniques chosen for the development and verification methodology are assessed both technically and financially. Technical assessments analyze the error preventing and detecting capabilities of the chosen technique in all of the pertinent software development phases. Financial assessments describe the cost impact of using the techniques, specifically, the cost of implementing and applying the techniques as well as the relizable cost savings. Both the technical and financial assessment are quantitative where possible. In the case of techniques which cannot be quantitatively assessed, qualitative judgements are expressed about the effectiveness and cost of the techniques. The reasons why quantitative assessments are not possible will be documented.

  15. Solvent selection methodology for pharmaceutical processes: Solvent swap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadakis, Emmanouil; Kumar Tula, Anjan; Gani, Rafiqul

    2016-01-01

    A method for the selection of appropriate solvents for the solvent swap task in pharmaceutical processes has been developed. This solvent swap method is based on the solvent selection method of Gani et al. (2006) and considers additional selection criteria such as boiling point difference...... in pharmaceutical processes as well as new solvent swap alternatives. The method takes into account process considerations such as batch distillation and crystallization to achieve the swap task. Rigorous model based simulations of the swap operation are performed to evaluate and compare the performance...

  16. Tracking and sensor data fusion methodological framework and selected applications

    CERN Document Server

    Koch, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Sensor Data Fusion is the process of combining incomplete and imperfect pieces of mutually complementary sensor information in such a way that a better understanding of an underlying real-world phenomenon is achieved. Typically, this insight is either unobtainable otherwise or a fusion result exceeds what can be produced from a single sensor output in accuracy, reliability, or cost. This book provides an introduction Sensor Data Fusion, as an information technology as well as a branch of engineering science and informatics. Part I presents a coherent methodological framework, thus providing th

  17. Notes on the evolution of feature selection methodology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Somol, Petr; Novovičová, Jana; Pudil, Pavel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 5 (2007), s. 713-730 ISSN 0023-5954 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/07/1594; GA MŠk 1M0572; GA AV ČR IAA2075302 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 507752 - MUSCLE Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) 2C06019 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : feature selection * branch and bound * sequential search * mixture model Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 0.552, year: 2007

  18. Contracting Selection for the Development of the Range Rule Risk Methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1997-01-01

    ...-Effectiveness Risk Tool and contractor selection for the development of the Range Rule Risk Methodology. The audit objective was to determine whether the Government appropriately used the Ordnance and Explosives Cost-Effectiveness Risk Tool...

  19. Selective methodology of population dynamics for optimizing a multiobjective environment of job shop production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Ruiz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a methodology based on population genetics to improve the performance of two or more variables in job shop production systems. The methodology applies a genetic algorithm with special features in the individual selection when they pass from generation to generation. In comparison with the FIFO method, the proposed methodology showed better results in the variables makespan, idle time and energy cost. When compared with NSGA II, the methodology did not showed relevant differences in makespan and idle time; however better performance was obtained in energy cost and, especially, in the number of required iterations to get the optimal makespan.

  20. Methodology For The Selection Of Compensation Trade Tools In SMEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milichovský František

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this paper is to determine which factors of business tools are important in Czech companies. To find these factors, theoretical information from the area of trade tools and data from primary research (obtained via questionnaire were used. These data are applied by a statistical evaluation of selected indicators which could help determine the significance of the indicators in the area being monitored. Activities concerning the management of company finances are also partially incorporated, as due to their close cohesion with business, they cannot be excluded from the field of turnaround management. The business tools described in the paper see excellent usage not only during times of crisis but also in periods of prosperity, when their application provides companies with unique competitive advantages as a way of increasing GDP. The results of the paper confirm the necessity for compensation tools in the business environment and provide the significance level of the compensation tools used. Accurate usage could create an advantage in a global market characterised by high competition.

  1. Multicriteria decision methodology for selecting technical alternatives in the Mixed Waste Integrated Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrada, J.J.; Berry, J.B.

    1993-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) has as one of its tasks the identification of a decision methodology and key decision criteria for the selection methodology. The aim of a multicriteria analysis is to provide an instrument for a systematic evaluation of distinct alternative projects. Determination of this methodology will clarify (1) the factors used to evaluate these alternatives, (2) the evaluator's view of the importance of the factors, and (3) the relative value of each alternative. The selected methodology must consider the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) decision-making criteria for application to the analysis technology subsystems developed by the DOE Office of Technology Development. This report contains a compilation of several decision methodologies developed in various national laboratories, institutions, and universities. The purpose of these methodologies may vary, but the core of the decision attributes are very similar. Six approaches were briefly analyzed; from these six, in addition to recommendations made by the MWIP technical support group leaders and CERCLA, the final decision methodology was extracted. Slight variations are observed in the many methodologies developed by different groups, but most of the analyzed methodologies address similar aspects for the most part. These common aspects were the core of the methodology suggested in this report for use within MWIP for the selection of technologies. The set of criteria compiled and developed for this report have been grouped in five categories: (1) process effectiveness, (2) developmental status, (3) life-cycle cost, (4) implementability, and (5) regulatory compliance

  2. Methodology of simultaneous analysis of Uranium and Thorium by nuclear and atomic techniques. Application to the Uranium and Thorium dosing in mineralogic samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakhi, S.

    1988-01-01

    This work concerns essentially the potential applications of 100 kW nuclear reactor of Strasbourg Nuclear Research Centre to neutron activation analysis of Uranium and Thorium. The Uranium dosing has been made using: 239-U, 239-Np, fission products or delayed neutrons. Thorium has been showed up by means of 233-Th or 233-Pa. The 239-U and 233-Th detection leads to a rapid and non-destructive analysis of Uranium and Thorium. The maximum sensitivity is of 78 ng for Uranium and of 160 ng for Thorium. The Uranium and Thorium dosing based on 239-Np and 233-Pa detection needs chemical selective separations for each of these radionuclides. The liquid-liquid extraction has permitted to elaborate rapid and quantitative separation methods. The sensitivities of the analysis after extraction reach 30 ng for Uranium and 50 ng for Thorium. The fission products separation study has allowed to elaborate the La, Ce and Nd extractions and its application to the Uranium dosing gives satisfying results. A rapid dosing method with a sensitivity of 0.35 microgramme has been elaborated with the help of delayed neutrons measurement. These different methods have been applied to the Uranium and Thorium dosing in samples coming from Oklo mine in Gabon. The analyses of these samples by atomic absorption spectroscopy and by the proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) method confirm that the neutron activation analysis methods are reliable. 37 figs., 14 tabs., 50 refs

  3. SELECTING WORKING TEAMS FOR INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY OUTSOURCING PROJECTS THROUGH A COMBINATION OF METHODOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Alejandra Castellini

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This paper deals with a problem that Information Technology outsourcing suppliers generally face when selecting a working team technically capable for specific roles in software development projects. A combination of methodologies, interactively integrated, is proposed. They are Soft System Methodology to structure the problem, Repertory Grid for individual interviews and elicitation of the selection criteria, DRV Processes to assess the candidates and to generate knowledge and consensus on the selection process and Linear Programming to assign people to each position. This multimethodology allowed finding a more comprehensive solution than that initially requested by the company, since it helped to establish the necessary transformations for the selection model to operate in the right way, set the competencies to be considered as selection criteria, develop a consensus estimate of the weighted criteria, and award global values to candidates, optimizing the assignment of roles in the group for the project.

  4. Methodologie, Eclectisme...et Bricolage Pedagogique (Methodology, Selective Teaching Methods... and Pedagogical Odds and Ends).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Salins, Genevieve-Dominique

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on the contents of foreign language texts and the types of foreigners who learn French. The article notes the tone of didactic discussions in these manuals and questions the usage of two terms appearing there--"methodology" and "selection." (Author/CK)

  5. Attribute Based Selection of Thermoplastic Resin for Vacuum Infusion Process: A Decision Making Methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raghavalu Thirumalai, Durai Prabhakaran; Lystrup, Aage; Løgstrup Andersen, Tom

    2012-01-01

    The composite industry looks toward a new material system (resins) based on thermoplastic polymers for the vacuum infusion process, similar to the infusion process using thermosetting polymers. A large number of thermoplastics are available in the market with a variety of properties suitable...... be beneficial. In this paper, the authors introduce a new decision making tool for resin selection based on significant attributes. This article provides a broad overview of suitable thermoplastic material systems for vacuum infusion process available in today’s market. An illustrative example—resin selection...... for vacuum infused of a wind turbine blade—is shown to demonstrate the intricacies involved in the proposed methodology for resin selection....

  6. A Methodology for Collective Evaluation and Selection of Industrial R&D Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Muhittin Oral; Ossama Kettani; Pascal Lang

    1991-01-01

    This paper proposes a methodology for evaluating and selecting R&D projects in a collective decision setting, especially useful at sectorial and national levels. It consists of two major phases: Evaluation and Selection. The evaluation process repeatedly uses mathematical programming models to determine the "relative values" of a given R&D project from the viewpoint of the other R&D projects. The selection process of R&D projects is based on these "relative values" and is done through a model...

  7. The teacher's role in selecting a methodological approach to the interpretation of a literary work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stakić Mirjana M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper looks at the teacher's role in selecting a methodological approach to the interpretation of a literary work. The choice of methodological approach is dependent on: 1 the semiotic structure of the literary text; 2 the specific educational goals of interpretation; 3 the students' age, psychophysical abilities and knowledge, and 4 the planned circumstances of instruction. In selecting a method of interpretation, the teacher should take into consideration not only these factors, but also contemporary literary theory and its methodological apparatus. This can be a challenging task whose fulfillment does not guarantee that the interpretation will be successful, since the validity and functionality of the methodological approach cannot be established in theory but rather through teaching practice. It is up to the teacher to be creative, because a literary work cannot be interpreted by means of a single method but always through a combination of methods, certain of which have their origins in literary theory. There is a widespread belief among teachers that these methods, which have the status of technical/special methods in literary methodology, cannot be used in the first four grades of elementary school. This paper offers an example illustrating that the interpretive model can be used as early as first grade. A teacher's knowledge, as well as their creativity in selecting a method and their openness to creative methodological combinations and skill in applying them, directly affect the effectiveness of interpretation, either succeeding in developing a fondness for books and reading, or, failing that, resulting in a permanent loss of interest in the world of literature.

  8. How to Select the most Relevant Roughness Parameters of a Surface: Methodology Research Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrovskij, I. N.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, the foundations for new methodology creation which provides solving problem of surfaces structure new standards parameters huge amount conflicted with necessary actual floors quantity of surfaces structure parameters which is related to measurement complexity decreasing are considered. At the moment, there is no single assessment of the importance of a parameters. The approval of presented methodology for aerospace cluster components surfaces allows to create necessary foundation, to develop scientific estimation of surfaces texture parameters, to obtain material for investigators of chosen technological procedure. The methods necessary for further work, the creation of a fundamental reserve and development as a scientific direction for assessing the significance of microgeometry parameters are selected.

  9. Methodological development for selection of significant predictors explaining fatal road accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadashova, Bahar; Arenas-Ramírez, Blanca; Mira-McWilliams, José; Aparicio-Izquierdo, Francisco

    2016-05-01

    Identification of the most relevant factors for explaining road accident occurrence is an important issue in road safety research, particularly for future decision-making processes in transport policy. However model selection for this particular purpose is still an ongoing research. In this paper we propose a methodological development for model selection which addresses both explanatory variable and adequate model selection issues. A variable selection procedure, TIM (two-input model) method is carried out by combining neural network design and statistical approaches. The error structure of the fitted model is assumed to follow an autoregressive process. All models are estimated using Markov Chain Monte Carlo method where the model parameters are assigned non-informative prior distributions. The final model is built using the results of the variable selection. For the application of the proposed methodology the number of fatal accidents in Spain during 2000-2011 was used. This indicator has experienced the maximum reduction internationally during the indicated years thus making it an interesting time series from a road safety policy perspective. Hence the identification of the variables that have affected this reduction is of particular interest for future decision making. The results of the variable selection process show that the selected variables are main subjects of road safety policy measures. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Methodological proposal for evaluating and selecting environment al indicators, Case: Chachafruto Stream Basin, Rionegro, Antioquia, Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osorio Velez, Luis Fernando; Pineda Correa, Marcelena

    2000-01-01

    The investigation mainly responds to the necessity of developing a methodology that allows getting indicators to make easier the process of making decisions in the environmental administration field. The elaboration was relied on the support of the Corporacion Autonoma Regional Rionegro - Nare CORNARE in Antioquia - Colombia, through a subscribed agreement between this entity and the authors. The development of the investigation was carried out in two parts: the first involves the search of methodological paths for the evaluation and selection of applicable indicators to basins, Through the creation of parameters that allow qualifying these indicators in direct form; this is followed by a statistical treatment that allows selecting indicators in a rational way. For application purposes, some criterions are defined in a such way that the selected indicators can be evaluated; with these criterions the matrix is constructed; this allows to view and qualify the indicators, starting from ranges and scales previously defined; once the evaluation and qualification matrix are carried out, the selection process is begun from multivariate analysis. The second part consists in the methodology application expounded to a pattern of indicators previously defined and a determined territory (Basin of the Chachafruto Stream, Rionegro - Antioquia - Colombia); starting from the listing of the whole reported indicators in the consulted literature, the ability of themselves to reflex the basin problems is analyzed, based on parameters such as local contextualization and focuses of the topic. Once the first selection is done, the indicators are submitted to the qualification and evaluation matrix and its results are analyzed by multivariate analysis, in order to condense the environmental indicators to be used. Subsequently, for the evaluation of selected indicators, it is necessary to compile diverse thematic information and to identify the existent databases for the select territory

  11. Materials selection as an interdisciplinary technical activity: basic methodology and case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ferrante

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available The technical activity known as Materials Selection is reviewed in its concepts and methodologies. Objectives and strategies are briefly presented and two important features are introduced and discussed; (i Merit Indices: a combination of materials properties, which maximises the objectives chosen by the designer and (ii Materials Properties Maps: a bi-dimensional space whose coordinates are pairs of properties in which materials can be plotted and compared directly in terms of their merit indices. A general strategy for the deduction of these indices is explained and a formal methodology to establish a ranking of candidate materials when multiple constraints intervene is presented. Finally, two case studies are discussed in depth, one related to materials substitution in the context of mechanical design and a less conventional case linking material selection to physical comfort in the home furniture industry.

  12. Search and selection methodology of systematic reviews in orthodontics (2000-2004).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Mir, Carlos; Major, Michael P; Major, Paul W

    2006-08-01

    More systematic reviews related to orthodontic topics are published each year, although little has been done to evaluate their search and selection methodologies. Systematic reviews related to orthodontics published between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2004, were searched for their use of multiple electronic databases and secondary searches. The search and selection methods of identified systematic reviews were evaluated against the Cochrane Handbook's guidelines. Sixteen orthodontic systematic reviews were identified in this period. The percentage of reviews documenting and using each criterion of article searching has changed over the last 5 years, with no recognizable directional trend. On average, most systematic reviews documented their electronic search terms (88%) and inclusion-exclusion criteria (100%), and used secondary searching (75%). Many still failed to search more than MEDLINE (56%), failed to document the database names and search dates (37%), failed to document the search strategy (62%), did not use several reviewers for selecting studies (75%), and did not include all languages (81%). The methodology of systematic reviews in orthodontics is still limited, with key methodological components frequently absent or not appropriately described.

  13. A methodology for selection of wind energy system locations using multicriterial analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sansevic, M.; Rabadan, Lj. Pilic [Croatia Univ., Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture, Split (Croatia)

    1996-12-31

    The effectiveness of a wind turbine generator depends not only on its performance but also on the site`s wind resource. Thus the problem of location selection should be approached systematically, by considering a set of relevant parameters particularly those having a significant economical and ecological impact. This paper presents the methodology used in location selection for the operation of wind energy system. It is based on a multicriterial analysis which enables comparison and ranking of locations according to a set of different parameters. Principal objectives (criteria) in location selection are: energy-economical, technical-technological, physical planning and environment and life protection objectives. For the mathematical modeling of this multicriterial problem the PROMETHEE method is chosen which is developed especially for the solution of rather ``poorly`` structured problems, thus justifying its application in the preliminary stage of site selection for the wind energy systems. The developed methodology is applied in selecting the locations in the island of Rhodes using the available database of the Geographic Information System and the wind potential data obtained by means of the AIOLOS program. (Author)

  14. Selection of phage-displayed accessible recombinant targeted antibodies (SPARTA): methodology and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Sara; Staquicini, Fernanda I; Ferrara, Fortunato; Staquicini, Daniela I; Sharma, Geetanjali; Tarleton, Christy A; Nguyen, Huynh; Naranjo, Leslie A; Sidman, Richard L; Arap, Wadih; Bradbury, Andrew Rm; Pasqualini, Renata

    2018-05-03

    We developed a potentially novel and robust antibody discovery methodology, termed selection of phage-displayed accessible recombinant targeted antibodies (SPARTA). This combines an in vitro screening step of a naive human antibody library against known tumor targets, with in vivo selections based on tumor-homing capabilities of a preenriched antibody pool. This unique approach overcomes several rate-limiting challenges to generate human antibodies amenable to rapid translation into medical applications. As a proof of concept, we evaluated SPARTA on 2 well-established tumor cell surface targets, EphA5 and GRP78. We evaluated antibodies that showed tumor-targeting selectivity as a representative panel of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) and were highly efficacious. Our results validate a discovery platform to identify and validate monoclonal antibodies with favorable tumor-targeting attributes. This approach may also extend to other diseases with known cell surface targets and affected tissues easily isolated for in vivo selection.

  15. Methodology for the selection of alternatives to the waterfall division of hydro graphical basin, considering environmental impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, S.H.F. da; Pires, S.H.; Rovere, E.L. La; Pereira, M.V.F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the many stages of a new methodology propose to selection of alternatives of waterfall division of hydro graphical basin considering environmental impacts. The methodology uses the techniques of hierarchical analysis in evaluation of environmental impacts, simulation the individualized power plants in energy evaluation and multi-objective analysis in selection of better alternative of division of basin waterfall. The methodology still foresee moments and mechanisms to take into account the opinion of different social sectors. (C.M.)

  16. Selection Methodology Approach to Preferable and Alternative Sites for the First NPP Project in Yemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassim, Moath [Kyunghe Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kessel, David S. [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The purpose of this paper is to briefly present the methodology and results of the first siting study for the first nuclear power plant (NPP) in Yemen. In this study it has been demonstrated that there are suitable sites for specific unit/units power of 1000 MWt (about 300 MWe) nuclear power plant. To perform the site selection, a systematic selection method was developed. The method uses site-specific data gathered by literature review and expert judgement to identify the most important site selection criteria. A two-step site selection process was used. Candidate sites were chosen that meet a subset of the selection criteria that form the most important system constraints. These candidate sites were then evaluated against the full set of selection criteria using the Analytical Hierarchy Process Method (AHP). Candidate sites underwent a set of more specific siting criteria weighted by expert judgment to select preferable sites and alternatives using AHP method again. Expert Judgment method was used to rank and weight the importance of each criteria, then AHP method used to evaluate and weight the relation between criterion to criterion and between all criteria against the global weight. Then logical decision software was used to rank sites upon their weighting value.

  17. Selection Methodology Approach to Preferable and Alternative Sites for the First NPP Project in Yemen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassim, Moath; Kessel, David S.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to briefly present the methodology and results of the first siting study for the first nuclear power plant (NPP) in Yemen. In this study it has been demonstrated that there are suitable sites for specific unit/units power of 1000 MWt (about 300 MWe) nuclear power plant. To perform the site selection, a systematic selection method was developed. The method uses site-specific data gathered by literature review and expert judgement to identify the most important site selection criteria. A two-step site selection process was used. Candidate sites were chosen that meet a subset of the selection criteria that form the most important system constraints. These candidate sites were then evaluated against the full set of selection criteria using the Analytical Hierarchy Process Method (AHP). Candidate sites underwent a set of more specific siting criteria weighted by expert judgment to select preferable sites and alternatives using AHP method again. Expert Judgment method was used to rank and weight the importance of each criteria, then AHP method used to evaluate and weight the relation between criterion to criterion and between all criteria against the global weight. Then logical decision software was used to rank sites upon their weighting value

  18. Development of a novel set of criteria to select methodology for designing product service systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuananh Tran

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes eight groups of twenty nine scoring criteria that can help designers and practitioners to compare and select an appropriate methodology for a certain problem in designing product service system (PSS. PSS has been researched for more than a decade and is now becoming more and more popular in academia as well as industry. Despite that fact, the adoption of PSS is still limited for its potential. One of the main reasons is that designing PSS itself is a challenge. Designers and developers face difficulties in choosing appropriate PSS design methodologies for their projects so that they can design effective PSS offerings. By proposing eight groups of twenty nine scoring criteria, this paper enables a “step by step” process to identify the most appropriate design methodology for a company’s PSS problem. An example is also introduced to illustrate the use of the proposed scoring criteria and provide a clear picture of how different design methodologies can be utilized at their best in terms of application.

  19. An Innovative Structural Mode Selection Methodology: Application for the X-33 Launch Vehicle Finite Element Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Homero, Jr.

    2000-01-01

    An innovative methodology for determining structural target mode selection and mode selection based on a specific criterion is presented. An effective approach to single out modes which interact with specific locations on a structure has been developed for the X-33 Launch Vehicle Finite Element Model (FEM). We presented Root-Sum-Square (RSS) displacement method computes resultant modal displacement for each mode at selected degrees of freedom (DOF) and sorts to locate modes with highest values. This method was used to determine modes, which most influenced specific locations/points on the X-33 flight vehicle such as avionics control components, aero-surface control actuators, propellant valve and engine points for use in flight control stability analysis and for flight POGO stability analysis. Additionally, the modal RSS method allows for primary or global target vehicle modes to also be identified in an accurate and efficient manner.

  20. A New Integrated Threshold Selection Methodology for Spatial Forecast Verification of Extreme Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholodovsky, V.

    2017-12-01

    Extreme weather and climate events such as heavy precipitation, heat waves and strong winds can cause extensive damage to the society in terms of human lives and financial losses. As climate changes, it is important to understand how extreme weather events may change as a result. Climate and statistical models are often independently used to model those phenomena. To better assess performance of the climate models, a variety of spatial forecast verification methods have been developed. However, spatial verification metrics that are widely used in comparing mean states, in most cases, do not have an adequate theoretical justification to benchmark extreme weather events. We proposed a new integrated threshold selection methodology for spatial forecast verification of extreme events that couples existing pattern recognition indices with high threshold choices. This integrated approach has three main steps: 1) dimension reduction; 2) geometric domain mapping; and 3) thresholds clustering. We apply this approach to an observed precipitation dataset over CONUS. The results are evaluated by displaying threshold distribution seasonally, monthly and annually. The method offers user the flexibility of selecting a high threshold that is linked to desired geometrical properties. The proposed high threshold methodology could either complement existing spatial verification methods, where threshold selection is arbitrary, or be directly applicable in extreme value theory.

  1. A hierarchical modeling methodology for the definition and selection of requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufresne, Stephane

    This dissertation describes the development of a requirements analysis methodology that takes into account the concept of operations and the hierarchical decomposition of aerospace systems. At the core of the methodology, the Analytic Network Process (ANP) is used to ensure the traceability between the qualitative and quantitative information present in the hierarchical model. The proposed methodology is implemented to the requirements definition of a hurricane tracker Unmanned Aerial Vehicle. Three research objectives are identified in this work; (1) improve the requirements mapping process by matching the stakeholder expectations with the concept of operations, systems and available resources; (2) reduce the epistemic uncertainty surrounding the requirements and requirements mapping; and (3) improve the requirements down-selection process by taking into account the level of importance of the criteria and the available resources. Several challenges are associated with the identification and definition of requirements. The complexity of the system implies that a large number of requirements are needed to define the systems. These requirements are defined early in the conceptual design, where the level of knowledge is relatively low and the level of uncertainty is large. The proposed methodology intends to increase the level of knowledge and reduce the level of uncertainty by guiding the design team through a structured process. To address these challenges, a new methodology is created to flow-down the requirements from the stakeholder expectations to the systems alternatives. A taxonomy of requirements is created to classify the information gathered during the problem definition. Subsequently, the operational and systems functions and measures of effectiveness are integrated to a hierarchical model to allow the traceability of the information. Monte Carlo methods are used to evaluate the variations of the hierarchical model elements and consequently reduce the

  2. The Methodology of Selecting the Transport Mode for Companies on the Slovak Transport Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Černá, Lenka; Zitrický, Vladislav; Daniš, Jozef

    2017-03-01

    Transport volume in the Slovak Republic is growing continuously every year. This rising trend is influenced by the development of car industry and its suppliers. Slovak republic has also a geographic strategy position in middle Europe from the side of transport corridors (east-west and north-south). The development of transport volume in freight transport depends on the transport and business processes between the European Union and China and it is an opportunity for Slovak republic to obtain transit transport flows. In the Slovak Republic, road transport has a dominant position in the transport market. The volume of road transport has gradually increased over the past years. The increase of road transport is reflected on the highways and speed roads in regions which have higher economic potential. The increase of rail transport as seen on the main rail corridors is not as significant as in road transport. Trade globalization also has an influence on the increase of transport volume in intermodal transport. Predicted increase in transport volume for this transport mode is from 2,3 mil ton per year at present to 8 mil ton in the year 2020. Selection of transport mode and carrier is an important aspect for logistic management, because companies (customers) want to reduce the number of carriers which they trade and they create the system of several key carriers. Bigger transport volume and more qualitative transport service give a possibility to reduce transport costs. This trend is positive for carriers too, because the carriers can focus only on the selected customers and provide more qualitative services. The paper is focused on the selection of transport mode based on the proposed methodology. The aims of the paper are, definition of criteria which directly influence the selection of transport modes, determination of criteria based on the subjectively methods, creation of process for the selection of transport modes and practical application of proposed

  3. SITE-94. Mineralogy of the Aespoe site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Karin

    1996-12-01

    The water composition has several impacts on the repository. It will influence the behaviour of the engineered materials (e.g. corrosion). It may also determine the possible solubility and speciation of released radionuclides. It also acts as a transport medium for the released elements. The groundwater composition and the potential development of the composition due to the presence of the repository as well as due to external variations is thus an important issue in a safety analysis. The development of the groundwater composition is strongly dependent on reactions with the minerals present in water bearing fractures. Here equilibrium chemistry may be of importance, but also reaction kinetics is important to the long-term behaviour. Within the SITE-94 project, a safety analysis is performed for the conditions at the Aespoe site. The mineralogy of the area has been evaluated from drill cores at various places at the site. In this report a recommendation for selection of mineralogy to be used in geochemical modelling of the repository is given. Calcite and iron containing minerals dominate the fracture filling mineralogy at the Aespoe site. Some typical fracture filling mineralogies may be identified in the fractures: epidote, chlorite, calcite, hematite, some illite/smectite + quartz, fluorite, pyrite and goethite. In addition to these a number of minor minerals are found in the fractures. Uncertainties in the fracture filling data may be due to problems when taking out the drill cores. Drilling water may remove important clay minerals and sealed fractures may be reopened mechanically and treated as water conducting fractures. The problem of determining the variability of the mineralogy along the flow paths also remains. This problem will never be solved when the investigation is performed by drilling investigation holes

  4. Methodology for Selecting Initiating Events and Hazards for Consideration in an Extended PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wielenberg, A.; Hage, M.; Loeffler, H.; Alzbutas, R.; Apostol, M.; Bareith, A.; Siklossy, T.; Brac, P.; Burgazzi, L.; Cazzoli, E.; Vitazkova, J.; Cizelj, L.; Prosek, A.; Volkanovski, A.; Hashimoto, K.; Godefroy, F.; Gonzalez, M.; Groudev, P.; Kolar, L.; Kumar, M.; Nitoi, M.; Raimond, E.

    2016-01-01

    An extended PSA applies to a site of one or several Nuclear Power Plant unit(s) and its environment. It intends to calculate the risk induced by the main sources of radioactivity (reactor core and spent fuel storages) on the site, taking into account all operating states for each main source and all possible relevant accident initiating events (both internal and external) affecting one unit or the whole site. The combination between hazards or initiating events and their impact on a unit or the whole site is a crucial issue for an extended PSA. The report tries to discuss relevant methodologies for this purpose. The report proposes a methodology to select initiating events and hazards for the development of an extended PSA. The proposed methodology for initiating events identification, screening and bounding analysis for an extended PSA consists of four major steps: 1. A comprehensive identification of events and hazards and their respective combinations applicable to the plant and site. Qualitative screening criteria will be applied, 2. The calculation of initial (possibly conservative) frequency claims for events and hazards and their respective combinations applicable to the plant and the site. Quantitative screening criteria will be applied, 3. An impact analysis and bounding assessment for all applicable events and scenarios. Events are either screened out from further more detailed analysis, or are assigned to a bounding event (group), or are retained for detailed analysis, 4. The probabilistic analysis of all retained (bounding) events at the appropriate level of detail. (authors)

  5. Methodology for Selecting Best Management Practices Integrating Multiple Stakeholders and Criteria. Part 2: Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Carvallo Aceves

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The selection of stormwater Best Management Practices (BMPs for mitigating the effects of urbanization on the hydrological cycle could be a complex process due to conflicting stakeholder views, and varying levels of performance of BMPs across a range of criteria (runoff reduction, erosion control, etc.. Part 1 of this article proposed a methodology based on the application of multi-criteria decision aid (MCDA methods, which was tested here on a residential stormwater network in the Montreal area. The case study considered green roofs, rain gardens, rain barrels and pervious pavement over a range of economic, social, and water quality and quantity criteria by applying 4 MCDA methods under three different stakeholder views. The results indicated Elimination et Choix Traduisant la Réalité (ELECTRE III to be the most appropriate method for the methodology, presenting flexibility concerning threshold values, criteria weights, and showing shared top choices across stakeholders (rain gardens, and rain gardens in combination with pervious pavement. The methodology shows potential for more formal applications and research opportunities. Future work may lie in the inclusion of multiple objective optimization, better stakeholder engagement, estimation of economic benefits, water quality modeling, long-term hydrological simulations, and estimating real BMP pollutant removal rates.

  6. Journal of Mineralogical and Petrological Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Official journal of Japan Association of Mineralogical Sciences (JAMS), focusing on mineralogical and petrological sciences and their related fields. Journal of Mineralogical and Petrological Sciences (JMPS) is the successor journal to both “Journal of Mineralogy, Petrology and Economic Geology” and “Mineralogical Journal”. Journal of Mineralogical and Petrological Sciences (JMPS) is indexed in the ISI database (Thomson Reuters), the Science Citation Index-Expanded, Current Contents/Physical, Chemical & Earth Sciences, and ISI Alerting Services.

  7. Geochemistry and mineralogy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plecas, I.; Dimovic, S.; Orta, M.M.; Alba, M.D.; Alvero, R.; Becerro, A.I.; Castro, M.A.; Chain, P.; Escudero, A.; Naranjo, M.; Pavon, E.; Trillo, J.M.; Vejsada, J.; Vokal, A.; Zadvernyuk, H.P.; Fedorenko, Y.G.; Zlobenko, B.P.; Koromyslichenko, T.I.; Battaglia, S.; Cervelli, M.; Millot, R.; Girard, J.P.; Missana, T.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Alonso, U.; Muurinen, A.; Carlsson, T.; Chain, P.; Alba, M.D.; Becerro, A.I.; Castro, M.A.; Escudero, A.; Gonzalez-Carrascosa, T.; Hurtado, S.; Pavon, E.; Villa, M.; Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.; Bourg, A.C.M.; Marques Fernandes, M.; Rabung, Th.; Dahn, R.; Baeyens, B.; Bradbury, M.H.; Breynaert, E.; Maes, A.; Bruggeman, C.; Maes, I.A.; Vancluysen, J.; Credoz, A.; Bildstein, O.; Jullien, M.; Raynal, J.; Petronin, J.C.; Trotignon, L.; Pokrovsky, O.; Jacquier, P.; Beaucaire, C.; Vuillaume, A.L.; Wittebroodt, Ch.; Ly, J.; Page, J.; Savoye, S.; Pitsch, H.; Jacques, D.; Wang, L.; Galunin, E.; Chain, P.; Alba, M.D.; Vidal, M.; Grandia, F.; Domenech, C.; Arcos, D.; Duro, L.; Bruno, J.; Andre, L.; Pauwels, H.; Azaroual, M.; Albrecht, A.; Romero, M.A.; Aerts, S.; Boven, P.; Van Geet, M.; Boever, P. de; Alonso, U.; Albarran, N.; Missana, T.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Truche, L.; Berger, G.; Guillaume, D.; Jacquot, E.; Tournassat, Ch.; Lerouge, C.; Brendle, J.; Greneche, J.M.; Touzelet, St.; Blanc, Ph.; Gaucher, E.C.; Thoenen, T.; Klinkenberg, M.; Kaufhold, S.; Dohrmann, R.; Siegesmund, S.; Liu, D.J.; Bruggeman, C.; Maes, N.; Weber, T.; Trotignon, L.; Pozo, C.; Bildstein, O.; Combarieu, G. de; Frugier, P.; Menut, D

    2007-07-01

    This session gathers 52 articles (posters) dealing with: the influence of natural sorbents immobilization of spent ion exchange resins in cement; the chemical stability of rare-earth silicate; the mineralogical heterogeneity of Rokle bentonite and radionuclide adsorption: A case study for cesium; the rheological and sorption properties of clay-polymer composites; the clay mineral interactions with leachate solutions in landfills; the lithium isotope fractionation during adsorption onto mineral surfaces; the sorption of Sr{sup 2+} onto mixed smectite / illite clays; Eh and pH in the pore water of compacted bentonite; the chemical interaction of {sup 152}Eu with the clay barrier; the modeling of the acid-base surface chemistry of Montmorillonite; a time resolved laser fluorescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of lanthanide/actinide sorption on clay minerals: influence of carbonate complexation; the structure elucidation and occurrence of Tc(IV) pyrogallol complexes; the geochemistry of Se(0) under boom clay conditions; an experimental and modelling study of pure secondary silicate minerals reactivity in geological CO{sub 2} sequestration conditions; an experimental evaluation of a retention model for major groundwater elements on the Tournemire argillite; modelling the long term interaction of cementitious pore water with Boom clay; the sorption-desorption of radionuclides and analogues in clays suitable for barriers; the modelling of the Redox evolution in the tunnel backfill of a high level nuclear waste repository; the reactivity of nitrates in the different storage compartments of type-b wastes; an investigation into the biodiversity of sulphate reducing bacteria in Boom clay; the colloid generation mechanisms from compacted bentonite under different geochemical conditions; the experimental reduction of aqueous sulphate by hydrogen in the context of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite; cation exchanged Fe(II) and Sr as compared to other divalent cations

  8. A Negative Selection Immune System Inspired Methodology for Fault Diagnosis of Wind Turbines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Esmaeil; Meskin, Nader; Khorasani, Khashayar

    2017-11-01

    High operational and maintenance costs represent as major economic constraints in the wind turbine (WT) industry. These concerns have made investigation into fault diagnosis of WT systems an extremely important and active area of research. In this paper, an immune system (IS) inspired methodology for performing fault detection and isolation (FDI) of a WT system is proposed and developed. The proposed scheme is based on a self nonself discrimination paradigm of a biological IS. Specifically, the negative selection mechanism [negative selection algorithm (NSA)] of the human body is utilized. In this paper, a hierarchical bank of NSAs are designed to detect and isolate both individual as well as simultaneously occurring faults common to the WTs. A smoothing moving window filter is then utilized to further improve the reliability and performance of the FDI scheme. Moreover, the performance of our proposed scheme is compared with another state-of-the-art data-driven technique, namely the support vector machines (SVMs) to demonstrate and illustrate the superiority and advantages of our proposed NSA-based FDI scheme. Finally, a nonparametric statistical comparison test is implemented to evaluate our proposed methodology with that of the SVM under various fault severities.

  9. Structured methodology review identified seven (RETREAT) criteria for selecting qualitative evidence synthesis approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Andrew; Noyes, Jane; Flemming, Kate; Gerhardus, Ansgar; Wahlster, Philip; van der Wilt, Gert Jan; Mozygemba, Kati; Refolo, Pietro; Sacchini, Dario; Tummers, Marcia; Rehfuess, Eva

    2018-07-01

    To compare and contrast different methods of qualitative evidence synthesis (QES) against criteria identified from the literature and to map their attributes to inform selection of the most appropriate QES method to answer research questions addressed by qualitative research. Electronic databases, citation searching, and a study register were used to identify studies reporting QES methods. Attributes compiled from 26 methodological papers (2001-2014) were used as a framework for data extraction. Data were extracted into summary tables by one reviewer and then considered within the author team. We identified seven considerations determining choice of methods from the methodological literature, encapsulated within the mnemonic Review question-Epistemology-Time/Timescale-Resources-Expertise-Audience and purpose-Type of data. We mapped 15 different published QES methods against these seven criteria. The final framework focuses on stand-alone QES methods but may also hold potential when integrating quantitative and qualitative data. These findings offer a contemporary perspective as a conceptual basis for future empirical investigation of the advantages and disadvantages of different methods of QES. It is hoped that this will inform appropriate selection of QES approaches. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Methodology for the integral comparison of nuclear reactors: selecting a reactor for Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes R, R.; Martin del Campo M, C.

    2006-01-01

    In this work it was built a methodology to compare nuclear reactors of third generation that can be contemplated for future electric planning in Mexico. This methodology understands the selection of the reactors to evaluate eliminating the reactors that still are not sufficiently mature at this time of the study. A general description of each reactor together with their main ones characteristic is made. It was carried out a study for to select the group of parameters that can serve as evaluation indicators, which are the characteristics of the reactors with specific values for each considered technology, and it was elaborated an evaluation matrix indicators including the reactors in the columns and those indicators in the lines. Since that none reactor is the best in all the indicators were necessary to use a methodology for multi criteria taking decisions that we are presented. It was used the 'Fuzzy Logic' technique, the which is based in those denominated diffuse groups and in a system of diffuse inference based on heuristic rules in the way 'If Then consequence> ', where the linguistic values of the condition and of the consequence is defined by diffuse groups, it is as well as the rules always they transform a diffuse group into another. Later on they combine all the diffuse outputs to create a single output and an inverse transformation is made that it transfers the output from the diffuse domain to the real one. They were carried out two studies one with the entirety of the indicators and another in which the indicators were classified in three approaches: the first one refers to indicators related with the planning of the plants inside the context of the general electric sector, the second approach includes indicators related with the characteristics of the fuel and the third it considers indicators related with the acting of the plant in safety and environmental impact. This second study allowed us to know the qualities of each reactor in each one of the

  11. Methodological Adaptations for Investigating the Perceptions of Language-Impaired Adolescents Regarding the Relative Importance of Selected Communication Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Vicki A.; Brammall, Helen

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the systematic and detailed processes undertaken to modify a research methodology for use with language-impaired adolescents. The original methodology had been used previously with normally achieving adolescents and speech pathologists to obtain their opinions about the relative importance of selected communication skills…

  12. Non-coplanar automatic beam orientation selection in cranial IMRT: a practical methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llacer, Jorge [EC Engineering Consultants LLC, 130 Forest Hill Drive, Los Gatos, CA 95032 (United States); Li Sicong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198 (United States); Agazaryan, Nzhde; Solberg, Timothy D [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Promberger, Claus [BrainLAB AG, Kapellenstrasse 12, 85622 Feldkirchen (Germany)], E-mail: escalivat@jllacer.com, E-mail: sl1@unmc.edu, E-mail: NAgazaryan@mednet.ucla.edu, E-mail: claus.promberger@brainlab.com, E-mail: Timothy.Solberg@utsouthwestern.edu

    2009-03-07

    This paper proposes a method for automatic selection of beam orientations in non-coplanar cranial IMRT. Methods of computer vision, beam's eye view techniques and neural networks are used to define a new geometry-based methodology that leads to treatment plans for cranial lesions that are comparable in quality to those generated by experienced radiation physicists. The automatic beam selection (ABS) process can be carried out in clinically useful computation times, in 1 min or less for most cases. In the process of describing the ABS process, it is shown that the cranial beam orientation optimization problem is mathematically ill posed, with the expectation that a large number of solutions will lead to similar results. Nevertheless, there are better and worse solutions and we show that the proposed ABS process, by its design, has to lead to one of the better ones. We have carried out extensive tests with 14 patients with beam selection tasks ranging from the rather simple to quite complex. The ABS process has always yielded optimizations with results that are considered good for clinic use. Seven-beam coplanar optimizations for some of the patients have also been investigated. Comparisons with non-coplanar optimizations indicate in which cases the simpler coplanar plans can be used to advantage. Parameters used in the comparisons are dose-volume histograms, minimum and maximum PTV doses, equivalent uniform doses for the PTV and OARs, and treatment volume, conformity and normal tissue indices. It is felt that the current ABS methodology is ready for extensive clinical tests.

  13. Mineralogical characterization of West Chestnut Ridge soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Kopp, O.C.; Lietzke, D.A.

    1984-12-01

    The morphological, physicochemical, and mineralogical properties of the soils and residua from the proposed site of the Central Waste Disposal Facility were characterized. The proposed site is underlain by cherty dolostones, limestones, and shales of the Knox Group covered by a thick residuum. Three diagnostic horizons from four soil profiles and six samples from residuum cores were selected for mineralogical analysis. The coarse fractions (gravel and sand) of the samples included different types of chert, iron-manganese oxide nodules, and quartz. The samples were high in clay content (except those from the A and E horizons) and low in pH and base saturation. The clay fractions were composed of varying amounts of kaolinite, mica, vermiculite, aluminum hydroxy-interlayered vermiculite, amorphous iron and aluminum oxides, gibbsite, and quartz. Aluminum hydroxy-interlayered vermiculite is the major component in surface horizons, but kaolinite becomes dominant in subsurface horizons of the soils. Degradation of kaolinite and formation of aluminum hydroxy-interlayered vermiculite and iron and aluminum oxides are pronounced chemical weathering processes in the surface soils. The aluminum hydroxy interlayering of vermiculite reduces cation exchange and selective sorption capacities of soils. In the residua, micaceous minerals free of aluminum hydroxy interlayering, kaolinite, and amorphous iron and aluminum oxides are major components in the clay fraction. The sorption ratios of 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 60 Co, and the uranium isotopes expected to be in the radioactive wastes should be very high for the clays having such mineralogical composition. The low acid-buffering capacity (base saturation) of the residua suggest that the fragile chemical and mineralogical equilibria can be easily broken if an extreme chemical condition is imposed on the residua

  14. A Methodology for the Analysis and Selection of Alternative for the Disposition of Surplus Plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) - Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) has announced a Record of Decision (ROD) selecting alternatives for disposition of surplus plutonium. A major objective of this decision was to further U.S. efforts to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons. Other concerns that were addressed include economic, technical, institutional, schedule, environmental, and health and safety issues. The technical, environmental, and nonproliferation analyses supporting the ROD are documented in three DOE reports (DOE-TSR 96, DOE-PEIS 96, and DOE-NN 97, respectively). At the request of OFMD, a team of analysts from the Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium (ANRCP) provided an independent evaluation of the alternatives for plutonium that were considered during the evaluation effort. This report outlines the methodology used by the ANRCP team. This methodology, referred to as multiattribute utility theory (MAU), provides a structure for assembling results of detailed technical, economic, schedule, environment, and nonproliferation analyses for OFMD, DOE policy makers, other stakeholders, and the general public in a systematic way. The MAU methodology has been supported for use in similar situations by the National Research Council, an agency of the National Academy of Sciences.1 It is important to emphasize that the MAU process does not lead to a computerized model that actually determines the decision for a complex problem. MAU is a management tool that is one component, albeit a key component, of a decision process. We subscribe to the philosophy that the result of using models should be insights, not numbers. The MAU approach consists of four steps: (1) identification of alternatives, objectives, and performance measures, (2) estimation of the performance of the alternatives with respect to the objectives, (3) development of value functions and weights for the objectives, and (4) evaluation of the alternatives and sensitivity

  15. Defense nuclear energy systems selection methodology for civil nuclear power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarborough, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    A methodology developed to select a preferred nuclear power system for a US Department of Defense (DOD) application has been used to evaluate preferred nuclear power systems for a remote island community in Southeast Asia. The plant would provide ∼10 MW of electric power, possibly low-temperature process heat for the local community, and would supplement existing island diesel electric capacity. The nuclear power system evaluation procedure was evolved from a disciplined methodology for ranking ten nuclear power designs under joint development by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOD. These included six designs proposed by industry for the Secure Military Power Plant Program (now termed Multimegawatt Terrestrial Reactor Program), the SP-100 Program, the North Warning System Program, and the Modular Advanced High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) and Liquid-Metal Reactor (LMR) programs. The 15 evaluation criteria established for the civil application were generally similar to those developed and used for the defense energy systems evaluation, except that the weighting factor applied to each individual criterion differed. The criteria and their weighting (importance) functions for the civil application are described

  16. Projected large flood event sensitivity to projection selection and temporal downscaling methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raff, D. [U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, Denver, Colorado (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Large flood events, that influence regulatory guidelines as well as safety of dams decisions, are likely to be affected by climate change. This talk will evaluate the use of climate projections downscaled and run through a rainfall - runoff model and its influence on large flood events. The climate spatial downscaling is performed statistically and a re-sampling and scaling methodology is used to temporally downscale from monthly to daily signals. The signals are run through a National Weather Service operational rainfall-runoff model to produce 6-hour flows. The flows will be evaluated for changes in large events at look-ahead horizons from 2011 - 2040, 2041 - 2070, and 2071 - 2099. The sensitivity of results will be evaluated with respect to projection selection criteria and re-sampling and scaling criteria for the Boise River in Idaho near Lucky Peak Dam. (author)

  17. Projected large flood event sensitivity to projection selection and temporal downscaling methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raff, D.

    2008-01-01

    Large flood events, that influence regulatory guidelines as well as safety of dams decisions, are likely to be affected by climate change. This talk will evaluate the use of climate projections downscaled and run through a rainfall - runoff model and its influence on large flood events. The climate spatial downscaling is performed statistically and a re-sampling and scaling methodology is used to temporally downscale from monthly to daily signals. The signals are run through a National Weather Service operational rainfall-runoff model to produce 6-hour flows. The flows will be evaluated for changes in large events at look-ahead horizons from 2011 - 2040, 2041 - 2070, and 2071 - 2099. The sensitivity of results will be evaluated with respect to projection selection criteria and re-sampling and scaling criteria for the Boise River in Idaho near Lucky Peak Dam. (author)

  18. Elucidation of Mechanisms and Selectivities of Metal-Catalyzed Reactions using Quantum Chemical Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Stefano; Kalek, Marcin; Huang, Genping; Himo, Fahmi

    2016-05-17

    Quantum chemical techniques today are indispensable for the detailed mechanistic understanding of catalytic reactions. The development of modern density functional theory approaches combined with the enormous growth in computer power have made it possible to treat quite large systems at a reasonable level of accuracy. Accordingly, quantum chemistry has been applied extensively to a wide variety of catalytic systems. A huge number of problems have been solved successfully, and vast amounts of chemical insights have been gained. In this Account, we summarize some of our recent work in this field. A number of examples concerned with transition metal-catalyzed reactions are selected, with emphasis on reactions with various kinds of selectivities. The discussed cases are (1) copper-catalyzed C-H bond amidation of indoles, (2) iridium-catalyzed C(sp(3))-H borylation of chlorosilanes, (3) vanadium-catalyzed Meyer-Schuster rearrangement and its combination with aldol- and Mannich-type additions, (4) palladium-catalyzed propargylic substitution with phosphorus nucleophiles, (5) rhodium-catalyzed 1:2 coupling of aldehydes and allenes, and finally (6) copper-catalyzed coupling of nitrones and alkynes to produce β-lactams (Kinugasa reaction). First, the methodology adopted in these studies is presented briefly. The electronic structure method in the great majority of these kinds of mechanistic investigations has for the last two decades been based on density functional theory. In the cases discussed here, mainly the B3LYP functional has been employed in conjunction with Grimme's empirical dispersion correction, which has been shown to improve the calculated energies significantly. The effect of the surrounding solvent is described by implicit solvation techniques, and the thermochemical corrections are included using the rigid-rotor harmonic oscillator approximation. The reviewed examples are chosen to illustrate the usefulness and versatility of the adopted methodology in

  19. Mineralogy. 2. rev., enlarged ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthes, S.

    1987-01-01

    The textbook is intended for students with a basic knowledge of descriptive mineralogy and crystallography who wish to enhance their knowledge in the fields of determinative mineralogy, petrology, and the geology and genesis of mineral deposits. The material presented concentrates on the essential aspects of the subject fields and is completed by up-to-date information concerning the technical and economic significance of the minerals, rocks and ores as raw materials. With 165 figs., 2 tabs [de

  20. Methodology on sizing and selecting thermoelectric cooler from different TEC manufacturers in cooling system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, F.L.; Fok, S.C.

    2008-01-01

    The search and selection for a suitable thermoelectric cooler (TEC) to optimize a cooling system design can be a tedious task as there are many product ranges from several TEC manufacturers. Although the manufacturers do provide proprietary manuals or electronic search facilities for their products, the process is still cumbersome as these facilities are incompatible. The electronic facilities often have different user interfaces and functionalities, while the manual facilities have different presentations of the performance characteristics. This paper presents a methodology to assist the designer to size and select the TECs from different manufacturers. The approach will allow designers to find quickly and to evaluate the devices from different TEC manufacturers. Based on the approach, the article introduces a new operational framework for an Internet based thermoelectric cooling system design process that would promote the interaction and collaboration between the designers and TEC manufacturers. It is hoped that this work would be useful for the advancement of future tools to assist designers to develop, analyze and optimize thermoelectric cooling system design in minimal time using the latest TECs available on the market

  1. Methodology for selection of attributes and operating conditions for SVM-Based fault locator's

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie Johan Arredondo Arteaga

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Energy distribution companies must employ strategies to meet their timely and high quality service, and fault-locating techniques represent and agile alternative for restoring the electric service in the power distribution due to the size of distribution services (generally large and the usual interruptions in the service. However, these techniques are not robust enough and present some limitations in both computational cost and the mathematical description of the models they use. Method: This paper performs an analysis based on a Support Vector Machine for the evaluation of the proper conditions to adjust and validate a fault locator for distribution systems; so that it is possible to determine the minimum number of operating conditions that allow to achieve a good performance with a low computational effort. Results: We tested the proposed methodology in a prototypical distribution circuit, located in a rural area of Colombia. This circuit has a voltage of 34.5 KV and is subdivided in 20 zones. Additionally, the characteristics of the circuit allowed us to obtain a database of 630.000 records of single-phase faults and different operating conditions. As a result, we could determine that the locator showed a performance above 98% with 200 suitable selected operating conditions. Conclusions: It is possible to improve the performance of fault locators based on Support Vector Machine. Specifically, these improvements are achieved by properly selecting optimal operating conditions and attributes, since they directly affect the performance in terms of efficiency and the computational cost.

  2. Analysis Methodology for Optimal Selection of Ground Station Site in Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieves-Chinchilla, J.; Farjas, M.; Martínez, R.

    2013-12-01

    Optimization of ground station sites is especially important in complex missions that include several small satellites (clusters or constellations) such as the QB50 project, where one ground station would be able to track several spatial vehicles, even simultaneously. In this regard the design of the communication system has to carefully take into account the ground station site and relevant signal phenomena, depending on the frequency band. To propose the optimal location of the ground station, these aspects become even more relevant to establish a trusted communication link due to the ground segment site in urban areas and/or selection of low orbits for the space segment. In addition, updated cartography with high resolution data of the location and its surroundings help to develop recommendations in the design of its location for spatial vehicles tracking and hence to improve effectiveness. The objectives of this analysis methodology are: completion of cartographic information, modelling the obstacles that hinder communication between the ground and space segment and representation in the generated 3D scene of the degree of impairment in the signal/noise of the phenomena that interferes with communication. The integration of new technologies of geographic data capture, such as 3D Laser Scan, determine that increased optimization of the antenna elevation mask, in its AOS and LOS azimuths along the horizon visible, maximizes visibility time with spatial vehicles. Furthermore, from the three-dimensional cloud of points captured, specific information is selected and, using 3D modeling techniques, the 3D scene of the antenna location site and surroundings is generated. The resulting 3D model evidences nearby obstacles related to the cartographic conditions such as mountain formations and buildings, and any additional obstacles that interfere with the operational quality of the antenna (other antennas and electronic devices that emit or receive in the same bandwidth

  3. A note on “An alternative multiple attribute decision making methodology for solving optimal facility layout design selection problems”

    OpenAIRE

    R. Venkata Rao

    2012-01-01

    A paper published by Maniya and Bhatt (2011) (An alternative multiple attribute decision making methodology for solving optimal facility layout design selection problems, Computers & Industrial Engineering, 61, 542-549) proposed an alternative multiple attribute decision making method named as “Preference Selection Index (PSI) method” for selection of an optimal facility layout design. The authors had claimed that the method was logical and more appropriate and the method gives directly the o...

  4. A methodology framework for weighting genetic traits that impact greenhouse gas emission intensities in selection indexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, P R; Hely, F S; Quinton, C D; Cromie, A R

    2018-01-01

    A methodological framework was presented for deriving weightings to be applied in selection indexes to account for the impact genetic change in traits will have on greenhouse gas emissions intensities (EIs). Although the emission component of the breeding goal was defined as the ratio of total emissions relative to a weighted combination of farm outputs, the resulting trait-weighting factors can be applied as linear weightings in a way that augments any existing breeding objective before consideration of EI. Calculus was used to define the parameters and assumptions required to link each trait change to the expected changes in EI for an animal production system. Four key components were identified. The potential impact of the trait on relative numbers of emitting animals per breeding female first has a direct effect on emission output but, second, also has a dilution effect from the extra output associated with the extra animals. Third, each genetic trait can potentially change the amount of emissions generated per animal and, finally, the potential impact of the trait on product output is accounted for. Emission intensity weightings derived from this equation require further modifications to integrate them into an existing breeding objective. These include accounting for different timing and frequency of trait expressions as well as a weighting factor to determine the degree of selection emphasis that is diverted away from improving farm profitability in order to achieve gains in EI. The methodology was demonstrated using a simple application to dairy cattle breeding in Ireland to quantify gains in EI reduction from existing genetic trends in milk production as well as in fertility and survival traits. Most gains were identified as coming through the dilution effect of genetic increases in milk protein per cow, although gains from genetic improvements in survival by reducing emissions from herd replacements were also significant. Emission intensities in the Irish

  5. Application of methodological approach to selection of sportswomen to calisthenics teams for group exercises, considering compatibility factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.S. Kozhanova

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: motivation of methodological approach to selection of sportswomen to calisthenics teams for group exercises considering compatibility factor. Material: in the research 40 high qualification sportswomen of 17-23 yrs age with sport experience of 11-16 years participated. With cluster analysis 10 gymnasts with morphological indicators, meeting modern standards of group exercises were selected. Results: we found 5 generalized factors, which characterize structure of selection to teams and determines 72% of dispersion. Influence of kinds and connected with them criteria of compatibility on efficiency of gymnasts’ competition functioning were also determined. The authors substantiated methodological approach to selection of sportswomen to calisthenics teams for group exercises, considering compatibility factor. Conclusions: in selection to calisthenics teams for group exercises it is purposeful to realize complex registration of compatibility kinds, considering gymnasts’ similar features by recommended indicators.

  6. Development of a systematic methodology to select hazard analysis techniques for nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasconcelos, Vanderley de; Reis, Sergio Carneiro dos; Costa, Antonio Carlos Lopes da [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mails: vasconv@cdtn.br; reissc@cdtn.br; aclc@cdtn.br; Jordao, Elizabete [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Quimica]. E-mail: bete@feq.unicamp.br

    2008-07-01

    In order to comply with licensing requirements of regulatory bodies risk assessments of nuclear facilities should be carried out. In Brazil, such assessments are part of the Safety Analysis Reports, required by CNEN (Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission), and of the Risk Analysis Studies, required by the competent environmental bodies. A risk assessment generally includes the identification of the hazards and accident sequences that can occur, as well as the estimation of the frequencies and effects of these unwanted events on the plant, people, and environment. The hazard identification and analysis are also particularly important when implementing an Integrated Safety, Health, and Environment Management System following ISO 14001, BS 8800 and OHSAS 18001 standards. Among the myriad of tools that help the process of hazard analysis can be highlighted: CCA (Cause- Consequence Analysis); CL (Checklist Analysis); ETA (Event Tree Analysis); FMEA (Failure Mode and Effects Analysis); FMECA (Failure Mode, Effects and Criticality Analysis); FTA (Fault Tree Analysis); HAZOP (Hazard and Operability Study); HRA (Human Reliability Analysis); Pareto Analysis; PHA (Preliminary Hazard Analysis); RR (Relative Ranking); SR (Safety Review); WI (What-If); and WI/CL (What-If/Checklist Analysis). The choice of a particular technique or a combination of techniques depends on many factors like motivation of the analysis, available data, complexity of the process being analyzed, expertise available on hazard analysis, and initial perception of the involved risks. This paper presents a systematic methodology to select the most suitable set of tools to conduct the hazard analysis, taking into account the mentioned involved factors. Considering that non-reactor nuclear facilities are, to a large extent, chemical processing plants, the developed approach can also be applied to analysis of chemical and petrochemical plants. The selected hazard analysis techniques can support cost

  7. Development of a systematic methodology to select hazard analysis techniques for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos, Vanderley de; Reis, Sergio Carneiro dos; Costa, Antonio Carlos Lopes da; Jordao, Elizabete

    2008-01-01

    In order to comply with licensing requirements of regulatory bodies risk assessments of nuclear facilities should be carried out. In Brazil, such assessments are part of the Safety Analysis Reports, required by CNEN (Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission), and of the Risk Analysis Studies, required by the competent environmental bodies. A risk assessment generally includes the identification of the hazards and accident sequences that can occur, as well as the estimation of the frequencies and effects of these unwanted events on the plant, people, and environment. The hazard identification and analysis are also particularly important when implementing an Integrated Safety, Health, and Environment Management System following ISO 14001, BS 8800 and OHSAS 18001 standards. Among the myriad of tools that help the process of hazard analysis can be highlighted: CCA (Cause- Consequence Analysis); CL (Checklist Analysis); ETA (Event Tree Analysis); FMEA (Failure Mode and Effects Analysis); FMECA (Failure Mode, Effects and Criticality Analysis); FTA (Fault Tree Analysis); HAZOP (Hazard and Operability Study); HRA (Human Reliability Analysis); Pareto Analysis; PHA (Preliminary Hazard Analysis); RR (Relative Ranking); SR (Safety Review); WI (What-If); and WI/CL (What-If/Checklist Analysis). The choice of a particular technique or a combination of techniques depends on many factors like motivation of the analysis, available data, complexity of the process being analyzed, expertise available on hazard analysis, and initial perception of the involved risks. This paper presents a systematic methodology to select the most suitable set of tools to conduct the hazard analysis, taking into account the mentioned involved factors. Considering that non-reactor nuclear facilities are, to a large extent, chemical processing plants, the developed approach can also be applied to analysis of chemical and petrochemical plants. The selected hazard analysis techniques can support cost

  8. Climate Change Modeling Methodology Selected Entries from the Encyclopedia of Sustainability Science and Technology

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The Earth's average temperature has risen by 1.4°F over the past century, and computer models project that it will rise much more over the next hundred years, with significant impacts on weather, climate, and human society. Many climate scientists attribute these increases to the buildup of greenhouse gases produced by the burning of fossil fuels and to the anthropogenic production of short-lived climate pollutants. Climate Change Modeling Methodologies: Selected Entries from the Encyclopedia of Sustainability Science and Technology provides readers with an introduction to the tools and analysis techniques used by climate change scientists to interpret the role of these forcing agents on climate.  Readers will also gain a deeper understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of these models and how to test and assess them.  The contributions include a glossary of key terms and a concise definition of the subject for each topic, as well as recommendations for sources of more detailed information. Features au...

  9. Evaluation and selection of indicators for land degradation and desertification monitoring: methodological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmas, C; Kairis, Or; Karavitis, Ch; Ritsema, C; Salvati, L; Acikalin, S; Alcala, M; Alfama, P; Atlhopheng, J; Barrera, J; Belgacem, A; Solé-Benet, A; Brito, J; Chaker, M; Chanda, R; Coelho, C; Darkoh, M; Diamantis, I; Ermolaeva, O; Fassouli, V; Fei, W; Feng, J; Fernandez, F; Ferreira, A; Gokceoglu, C; Gonzalez, D; Gungor, H; Hessel, R; Juying, J; Khatteli, H; Khitrov, N; Kounalaki, A; Laouina, A; Lollino, P; Lopes, M; Magole, L; Medina, L; Mendoza, M; Morais, P; Mulale, K; Ocakoglu, F; Ouessar, M; Ovalle, C; Perez, C; Perkins, J; Pliakas, F; Polemio, M; Pozo, A; Prat, C; Qinke, Y; Ramos, A; Ramos, J; Riquelme, J; Romanenkov, V; Rui, L; Santaloia, F; Sebego, R; Sghaier, M; Silva, N; Sizemskaya, M; Soares, J; Sonmez, H; Taamallah, H; Tezcan, L; Torri, D; Ungaro, F; Valente, S; de Vente, J; Zagal, E; Zeiliguer, A; Zhonging, W; Ziogas, A

    2014-11-01

    An approach to derive relationships for defining land degradation and desertification risk and developing appropriate tools for assessing the effectiveness of the various land management practices using indicators is presented in the present paper. In order to investigate which indicators are most effective in assessing the level of desertification risk, a total of 70 candidate indicators was selected providing information for the biophysical environment, socio-economic conditions, and land management characteristics. The indicators were defined in 1,672 field sites located in 17 study areas in the Mediterranean region, Eastern Europe, Latin America, Africa, and Asia. Based on an existing geo-referenced database, classes were designated for each indicator and a sensitivity score to desertification was assigned to each class based on existing research. The obtained data were analyzed for the various processes of land degradation at farm level. The derived methodology was assessed using independent indicators, such as the measured soil erosion rate, and the organic matter content of the soil. Based on regression analyses, the collected indicator set can be reduced to a number of effective indicators ranging from 8 to 17 in the various processes of land degradation. Among the most important indicators identified as affecting land degradation and desertification risk were rain seasonality, slope gradient, plant cover, rate of land abandonment, land-use intensity, and the level of policy implementation.

  10. New screening methodology for selection of polymeric materials for transdermal drug delivery devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, Roberto P.

    As medical advances extend the human lifespan, the level of chronic illnesses will increase and thus straining the needs of the health care system that, as a result, governments will need to balance expenses without upsetting national budgets. Therefore, the selection of a precise and affordable drug delivery technology is seen as the most practical solution for governments, health care professionals, and consumers. Transdermal drug delivery patches (TDDP) are one of the best economical technologies that are favored by pharmaceutical companies and physicians alike because it offers fewer complications when compared to other delivery technologies. TDDP provides increased efficiency, safety and convenience for the patient. The TDDP segment within the US and Global drug delivery markets were valued at 5.6 and 12.7 billion respectively in 2009. TDDP is forecasted to reach $31.5 billion in 2015. The present TDDP technology involves the fabrication of a patch that consists of a drug embedded in a polymeric matrix. The diffusion coefficient is determined from the slope of the cumulative drug release versus time. It is a trial and error method that is time and labor consuming. With all the advantages that TDDPs can offer, the methodology used to achieve the so-called optimum design has resulted in several incidents where the safety and design have been put to question in recent times (e.g. Fentanyl). A more logical screening methodology is needed. This work shows the use of a modified Duda Zielinsky equation (DZE). Experimental release curves from commercial are evaluated. The experimental and theoretical Diffusion Coefficient values are found to be within the limits specified in the patent literature. One interesting finding is that the accuracy of the DZE is closer to experimental values when the type of Molecular Shape and Radius are used. This work shows that the modified DZE could be used as an excellent screening tool to determine the optimal polymeric matrices that

  11. Advances and Opportunities in Ore Mineralogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel J. Cook

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The study of ore minerals is rapidly transforming due to an explosion of new micro- and nano-analytical technologies. These advanced microbeam techniques can expose the physical and chemical character of ore minerals at ever-better spatial resolution and analytical precision. The insights that can be obtained from ten of today’s most important, or emerging, techniques and methodologies are reviewed: laser-ablation inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry; focussed ion beam-scanning electron microscopy; high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy; electron back-scatter diffraction; synchrotron X-ray fluorescence mapping; automated mineral analysis (Quantitative Evaluation of Mineralogy via Scanning Electron Microscopy and Mineral Liberation Analysis; nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry; atom probe tomography; radioisotope geochronology using ore minerals; and, non-traditional stable isotopes. Many of these technical advances cut across conceptual boundaries between mineralogy and geochemistry and require an in-depth knowledge of the material that is being analysed. These technological advances are accompanied by changing approaches to ore mineralogy: the increased focus on trace element distributions; the challenges offered by nanoscale characterisation; and the recognition of the critical petrogenetic information in gangue minerals, and, thus the need to for a holistic approach to the characterization of mineral assemblages. Using original examples, with an emphasis on iron oxide-copper-gold deposits, we show how increased analytical capabilities, particularly imaging and chemical mapping at the nanoscale, offer the potential to resolve outstanding questions in ore mineralogy. Broad regional or deposit-scale genetic models can be validated or refuted by careful analysis at the smallest scales of observation. As the volume of information at different scales of observation expands, the level of complexity

  12. Inhibitor selection for internal corrosion control of pipelines. 1: Laboratory methodologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papavinasam, S.; Revie, R.W.; Attard, M. [CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). Materials Technology Lab.; Demoz, A.; Sun, H.; Donini, J.C.; Michaelian, K. [CANMET, Devon, Alberta (Canada). Western Research Centre

    1999-11-01

    Various laboratory methodologies to evaluate corrosion inhibitors are reviewed. Two new methodologies, high-temperature, high-pressure jet impingement (HTHPJI) and high-temperature, high-pressure rotating electrode (HTHPRE), are presented. Flow patterns and hydrodynamic parameters of rotating cage are presented.

  13. Selecting aesthetic gynecologic procedures for plastic surgeons: a review of target methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrzenski, Adam

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this article was to assist cosmetic-plastic surgeons in selecting aesthetic cosmetic gynecologic-plastic surgical interventions. Target methodological analyses of pertinent evidence-based scientific papers and anecdotal information linked to surgical techniques for cosmetic-plastic female external genitalia were examined. A search of the existing literature from 1900 through June 2011 was performed by utilizing electronic and manual databases. A total of 87 articles related to cosmetic-plastic gynecologic surgeries were identified in peer-review journals. Anecdotal information was identified in three sources (Barwijuk, Obstet Gynecol J 9(3):2178-2179, 2011; Benson, 5th annual congress on aesthetic vaginal surgery, Tucson, AZ, USA, November 14-15, 2010; Scheinberg, Obstet Gynecol J 9(3):2191, 2011). Among those articles on cosmetic-plastic gynecologic surgical technique that were reviewed, three articles met the criteria for evidence-based medicine level II, one article was level II-1 and two papers were level II-2. The remaining papers were classified as level III. The pertinent 25 papers met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. There was no documentation on the safety and effectiveness of cosmetic-plastic gynecologic procedures in the scientific literature. All published surgical interventions are not suitable for a cosmetic-plastic practice. The absence of documentation on safety and effectiveness related to cosmetic-plastic gynecologic procedures prevents the establishment of a standard of practice. Traditional gynecologic surgical procedures cannot be labeled and used as cosmetic-plastic procedures, it is a deceptive practice. Obtaining legal trademarks on traditional gynecologic procedures and creating a business model that tries to control clinical-scientific knowledge dissemination is unethical. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings

  14. Screening methodology for site selection of a nuclear waste repository in shale formations in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoth, P.; Krull, P.; Wirth, H.

    2004-01-01

    The radioactive waste disposal policy in the Federal Republic of Germany is based on the principle that all types of radioactive waste must be disposed of in deep geological formations. Because of the favourable properties of rock salt and the existence of thick rock salt formations in Germany, so far most of the research in the field of radioactive waste disposal sites was focused on the study of the use of rock salt. In addition, German research organisations have also conducted generic research and development projects in alternative geological formations (Wanner and Brauer, 2001), but a comprehensive evaluation of their utilisation has been only done for parts of the crystalline rocks in Germany. Research projects on argillaceous rocks started relatively late, so that German experience is mainly connected to German research work with the corresponding European Underground Research Laboratories and the exploration of the former Konrad iron mine as a potential repository site for radioactive waste with negligible heat generation. The German Federal Government has signed in 2001 an agreement with national utility companies to end electricity generation by nuclear power. This decision affected the entire German radioactive waste isolation strategy and especially the repository projects. The utility companies agreed upon standstill of exploration at the Gorleben site and the Federal Ministry for the Environment tries to establish a new comprehensive procedure for the selection of a repository site, built upon well-founded criteria incorporating public participation. Step 3 of the planning includes the examination of further sites in Germany and the comparison with existing sites and concepts. Under these circumstances, argillaceous rock (clay and shale) formations are now a special area of interest in Germany and the development of a screening methodology was required for the evaluation of shales as host and barrier rocks for nuclear waste repositories. (author)

  15. Mineralogical applications of Mossbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fysh, S.A.; Clark, P.E.

    1981-01-01

    The Mossbauer effect has been used to study a variety of bauxites, and has been shown to be capable of accurately characterizing the iron mineralogy of bauxite. Such studies may prove to be of great use in determining the suitability of bauxite for aluminium extraction, and in optimizing extraction conditions

  16. Selecting Health Care Improvement Projects: A Methodology Integrating Cause-and-Effect Diagram and Analytical Hierarchy Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testik, Özlem Müge; Shaygan, Amir; Dasdemir, Erdi; Soydan, Guray

    It is often vital to identify, prioritize, and select quality improvement projects in a hospital. Yet, a methodology, which utilizes experts' opinions with different points of view, is needed for better decision making. The proposed methodology utilizes the cause-and-effect diagram to identify improvement projects and construct a project hierarchy for a problem. The right improvement projects are then prioritized and selected using a weighting scheme of analytical hierarchy process by aggregating experts' opinions. An approach for collecting data from experts and a graphical display for summarizing the obtained information are also provided. The methodology is implemented for improving a hospital appointment system. The top-ranked 2 major project categories for improvements were identified to be system- and accessibility-related causes (45%) and capacity-related causes (28%), respectively. For each of the major project category, subprojects were then ranked for selecting the improvement needs. The methodology is useful in cases where an aggregate decision based on experts' opinions is expected. Some suggestions for practical implementations are provided.

  17. Selection of low-level radioactive waste disposal sites using screening models versus more complex methodologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uslu, I.; Fields, D.E.

    1993-01-01

    The task of choosing a waste-disposal site from a set of candidate sites requires an approach capable of objectively handling many environmental variables for each site. Several computer methodologies have been developed to assist in the process of choosing a site for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste; however, most of these models are costly to apply, in terms of computer resources and the time and effort required by professional modelers, geologists, and waste-disposal experts. The authors describe how the relatively simple DRASTIC methodology (a standardized system for evaluating groundwater pollution potential using hydrogeologic settings) may be used for open-quotes pre-screeningclose quotes of sites to determine which subset of candidate sites is worthy of more detailed screening. Results of site comparisons made with DRASTIC are compared with results obtained using PRESTO-II methodology, which is representative of the more complex release-transport-human exposure methodologies. 6 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  18. A data-driven multi-model methodology with deep feature selection for short-term wind forecasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Cong; Cui, Mingjian; Hodge, Bri-Mathias; Zhang, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • An ensemble model is developed to produce both deterministic and probabilistic wind forecasts. • A deep feature selection framework is developed to optimally determine the inputs to the forecasting methodology. • The developed ensemble methodology has improved the forecasting accuracy by up to 30%. - Abstract: With the growing wind penetration into the power system worldwide, improving wind power forecasting accuracy is becoming increasingly important to ensure continued economic and reliable power system operations. In this paper, a data-driven multi-model wind forecasting methodology is developed with a two-layer ensemble machine learning technique. The first layer is composed of multiple machine learning models that generate individual forecasts. A deep feature selection framework is developed to determine the most suitable inputs to the first layer machine learning models. Then, a blending algorithm is applied in the second layer to create an ensemble of the forecasts produced by first layer models and generate both deterministic and probabilistic forecasts. This two-layer model seeks to utilize the statistically different characteristics of each machine learning algorithm. A number of machine learning algorithms are selected and compared in both layers. This developed multi-model wind forecasting methodology is compared to several benchmarks. The effectiveness of the proposed methodology is evaluated to provide 1-hour-ahead wind speed forecasting at seven locations of the Surface Radiation network. Numerical results show that comparing to the single-algorithm models, the developed multi-model framework with deep feature selection procedure has improved the forecasting accuracy by up to 30%.

  19. Effect of methodological and ecological approaches on heterogeneity of nest-site selection of a long-lived vulture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Moreno-Opo

    Full Text Available The application of scientific-based conservation measures requires that sampling methodologies in studies modelling similar ecological aspects produce comparable results making easier their interpretation. We aimed to show how the choice of different methodological and ecological approaches can affect conclusions in nest-site selection studies along different Palearctic meta-populations of an indicator species. First, a multivariate analysis of the variables affecting nest-site selection in a breeding colony of cinereous vulture (Aegypius monachus in central Spain was performed. Then, a meta-analysis was applied to establish how methodological and habitat-type factors determine differences and similarities in the results obtained by previous studies that have modelled the forest breeding habitat of the species. Our results revealed patterns in nesting-habitat modelling by the cinereous vulture throughout its whole range: steep and south-facing slopes, great cover of large trees and distance to human activities were generally selected. The ratio and situation of the studied plots (nests/random, the use of plots vs. polygons as sampling units and the number of years of data set determined the variability explained by the model. Moreover, a greater size of the breeding colony implied that ecological and geomorphological variables at landscape level were more influential. Additionally, human activities affected in greater proportion to colonies situated in Mediterranean forests. For the first time, a meta-analysis regarding the factors determining nest-site selection heterogeneity for a single species at broad scale was achieved. It is essential to homogenize and coordinate experimental design in modelling the selection of species' ecological requirements in order to avoid that differences in results among studies would be due to methodological heterogeneity. This would optimize best conservation and management practices for habitats and species in

  20. Methodology for selecting low-level radioactive waste disposal sites with application to the Oak Ridge Reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.W.; Ketelle, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    A methodology was developed to select an environmentally acceptable site for low-level radioactive waste disposal for a predetermined region of interest using prescribed site suitability requirements. The methodology provides a defensible means for identifying candidate areas within the region, candidate sites within the areas, and an environmentally preferred site from the candidate sites. This is accomplished in site screening and site characterization stages. The site screening stage relies on reconnaissance data to identify a preferred site. The site characterization stage relies on a detailed site investigation to determine site acceptability. The methodology was applied to the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation through the site screening stage. 6 references, 3 figures, 7 tables

  1. A grey-based group decision-making methodology for the selection of hydrogen technologiess in Life Cycle Sustainability perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manzardo, Alessandro; Ren, Jingzheng; Mazzi, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a grey-based group decision-making methodology for the selection of the best renewable energy technology (including hydrogen) using a life cycle sustainability perspective. The traditional grey relational analysis has been modified to better address...... the issue of uncertainty. The proposed methodology allows multi-person to participate in the decision-making process and to give linguistic evaluation on the weights of the criteria and the performance of the alternative technologies. In this paper, twelve hydrogen production technologies have been assessed...... using the proposed methodology, electrolysis of water technology by hydropower has been considered to be the best technology for hydrogen production according to the decision-making group....

  2. 75 FR 78678 - Proposed Methodology for Respondent Selection in Antidumping Proceedings; Request for Comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... evidence of shipment from a non-selected company before making its respondent-selection decision. However... administering authority at the time of selection, or (2) exporters and producers accounting for the largest... accompanying Issues and Decision Memorandum at Comment 1A. Therefore, to ensure the statistical validity of the...

  3. GEOCHEMISTRY AND MINERALOGICAL EVALUATION OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Osondu

    2011-11-05

    Nov 5, 2011 ... mica-schist. AAS and XRD techniques were employed in the determination of chemical and mineralogical composition of ten .... Sample %. British Standard. Institution (BSI). %. American standard. (ASTM) %. SiO2. Al2O3. Fe2O3. TiO2. CaO. MgO. Na2O. K2O. P2O5. LO I. 46.65. 47.67. 1.02. 1.28. 0.10. 0.02.

  4. Application Development Methodology Appropriateness: An Exploratory Case Study Bridging the Gap between Framework Characteristics and Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lawrence H., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study analyzed experiences of twenty software developers. The research showed that all software development methodologies are distinct from each other. While some, such as waterfall, focus on traditional, plan-driven approaches that allow software requirements and design to evolve; others facilitate ambiguity and uncertainty by…

  5. Prediction of selectivity from morphological conditions: Methodology and a case study on cod (Gadus morhua)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Bent; Krag, Ludvig Ahm; Frandsen, Rikke

    2009-01-01

    The FISHSELECT methodology. tools, and software were developed and used to measure the morphological parameters that determine the ability of cod to penetrate different mesh types, sizes, and openings. The shape of one cross-section at the cod's head was found to explain 97.6% of the mesh...

  6. Integrated acoustic, mineralogy, and geomechanics characterization of the Huron shale southern West Virginia, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franquet, J.A.; Mitra, Arijit; Warrington, D.S.; Moos, Daniel; Lacazette, Alfred [Society of Petroleum Engineers (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Successful hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling are the key to exploiting unconventional shale gas reservoirs. Acoustic anisotropy, in-situ stress, mineralogy and organic matter content are important factors in well completion design. This paper explores an integrated acoustic, mineralogy and geomechanics characterization of the Huron shale, located in south west Virginia, USA. The study consisted of acquiring the borehole acoustic and mineralogy logging data, in addition to conventional logs, from a vertical well prior to hydraulic fracturing and microseismic monitoring. The acoustic data were processed for borehole Stoneley reflective indicators and radial velocity variations. Substantial transverse acoustic anisotropy was noticed and used to acquire vertical and horizontal dynamic elastic properties. A micromechanical constitutive model, arrived at through mineralogy and petrophysical analysis, was used to produce the stress-strain behavior of the rock. This stress profile, with accurate mineralogy and petrophysical analysis, provides important information for best selection of lateral wells and helps in the identification of natural fracture barriers.

  7. [Selection of medical graduates for residency posts. A comparative study of the methodologies used in different countries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, Ramiro D; Lagares, Alfonso; Villena, Victoria; García Seoane, Jorge; Jiménez-Roldán, Luis; Munarriz, Pablo M; Castaño-Leon, Ana M; Alén, José F

    2015-01-01

    The design of an appropriate method for the selection of medical graduates for residency posts is extremely important, not only for the efficiency of the method itself (accurate identification of most competent candidates), but also for its influence on the study and teaching methodologies operating in medical schools. Currently, there is a great variation in the criteria used in different countries and there is no definitively appropriate method. The use of isolated or combined criteria, such as the marks obtained by students in medical schools, their performance in tests of theoretical knowledge and evaluations of clinical competence, or personal interviews, have a limited value for identifying those candidates who will perform better during the residency and later on during independent practice. To analyse the variability in the methodologies used for the selection of residents employed in different countries, in particular those used in the United Kingdom and USA, where external agencies and medical schools make systematic analyses of curriculum development. The advantages and disadvantages of national or transnational licensing examinations on the process of convergence and harmonization of medical degrees and residency programmes through Europe are discussed. The present analysis is used to design a new and more efficient multi-criteria methodology for resident selection in Spain, which will be published in the next issue of this journal. Since the multi-criteria methods used in UK and USA appear to be most consistent, these have been employed for designing the new methodology that could be applied in Spain. Although many experts in medical education reject national examinations for awarding medical degrees or ranking candidates for residency posts, it seems that, when appropriately designed, they can be used to verify the level of competence of graduating students without necessarily distorting curriculum implementation or improvement. Copyright © 2014

  8. Advances in ranking and selection, multiple comparisons, and reliability methodology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Balakrishnan, N; Nagaraja, HN

    2007-01-01

    S. Panchapakesan has made significant contributions to ranking and selection and has published in many other areas of statistics, including order statistics, reliability theory, stochastic inequalities, and inference. Written in his honor, the twenty invited articles in this volume reflect recent advances in these areas and form a tribute to Panchapakesan's influence and impact on these areas. Thematically organized, the chapters cover a broad range of topics from: Inference; Ranking and Selection; Multiple Comparisons and Tests; Agreement Assessment; Reliability; and Biostatistics. Featuring

  9. Automated spectral zones selection methodology for diffusion theory data preparation for pebble bed reactor analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mphahlele, Ramatsemela

    A methodology is developed for the determination of the optimum spectral zones in Pebble Bed Reactors (PBR). In this work a spectral zone is defined as a zone made up of a number of nodes whose characteristics are collectively similar and that are assigned the same few-group diffusion constants. In other words the spectral zones are the regions over which the few-group diffusion parameters are generated. The identification of spectral boundaries is treated as an optimization problem. It is solved by systematically and simultaneously repositioning all zone boundaries to achieve the global minimum error between the reference transport solution (MCNP) and the diffusion code solution (NEM). The objective function for the optimization algorithm is the total reaction rate error, which is defined as the sum of the leakage, absorption and fission reaction rates error in each zone. An iterative determination of group-dependent bucklings is incorporated into the methodology to properly account for spectral effects of neighboring zones. A preferred energy group structure has also been chosen. This optimization approach with the reference transport solution has proved to be accurate and consistent, however the computational effort required to complete the optimization process is significant. Thus a more practical methodology is also developed for the determination of the spectral zones in PBRs. The reactor physics characteristics of the spectral zones have been studied to understand the nature of the spectral zone boundaries. The practical tool involves the use of spectral indices based on few-group diffusion theory whole core calculations. With this methodology, there is no need to first have a reference transport solution. It is shown that the diffusion-theory coarse group fluxes and the effective multiplication factor computed using zones based on the practical index agrees within a narrow tolerance with those of the reference approach. Therefore the "practical" index

  10. Developing "Personality" Taxonomies: Metatheoretical and Methodological Rationales Underlying Selection Approaches, Methods of Data Generation and Reduction Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uher, Jana

    2015-12-01

    Taxonomic "personality" models are widely used in research and applied fields. This article applies the Transdisciplinary Philosophy-of-Science Paradigm for Research on Individuals (TPS-Paradigm) to scrutinise the three methodological steps that are required for developing comprehensive "personality" taxonomies: 1) the approaches used to select the phenomena and events to be studied, 2) the methods used to generate data about the selected phenomena and events and 3) the reduction principles used to extract the "most important" individual-specific variations for constructing "personality" taxonomies. Analyses of some currently popular taxonomies reveal frequent mismatches between the researchers' explicit and implicit metatheories about "personality" and the abilities of previous methodologies to capture the particular kinds of phenomena toward which they are targeted. Serious deficiencies that preclude scientific quantifications are identified in standardised questionnaires, psychology's established standard method of investigation. These mismatches and deficiencies derive from the lack of an explicit formulation and critical reflection on the philosophical and metatheoretical assumptions being made by scientists and from the established practice of radically matching the methodological tools to researchers' preconceived ideas and to pre-existing statistical theories rather than to the particular phenomena and individuals under study. These findings raise serious doubts about the ability of previous taxonomies to appropriately and comprehensively reflect the phenomena towards which they are targeted and the structures of individual-specificity occurring in them. The article elaborates and illustrates with empirical examples methodological principles that allow researchers to appropriately meet the metatheoretical requirements and that are suitable for comprehensively exploring individuals' "personality".

  11. Application of an integrated multi-criteria decision making AHP-TOPSIS methodology for ETL software selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanine, Mohamed; Boutkhoum, Omar; Tikniouine, Abdessadek; Agouti, Tarik

    2016-01-01

    Actually, a set of ETL software (Extract, Transform and Load) is available to constitute a major investment market. Each ETL uses its own techniques for extracting, transforming and loading data into data warehouse, which makes the task of evaluating ETL software very difficult. However, choosing the right software of ETL is critical to the success or failure of any Business Intelligence project. As there are many impacting factors in the selection of ETL software, the same process is considered as a complex multi-criteria decision making (MCDM) problem. In this study, an application of decision-making methodology that employs the two well-known MCDM techniques, namely Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) and Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) methods is designed. In this respect, the aim of using AHP is to analyze the structure of the ETL software selection problem and obtain weights of the selected criteria. Then, TOPSIS technique is used to calculate the alternatives' ratings. An example is given to illustrate the proposed methodology. Finally, a software prototype for demonstrating both methods is implemented.

  12. Methodology for identifying and representing knowledge in the scope of CMM inspection resource selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, S.; Barreiro, J.; Cuesta, E.; Álvarez, B. J.; González, D.

    2012-04-01

    This paper is focused on the task of elicitation and structuring of knowledge related to selection of inspection resources. The final goal is to obtain an informal model of knowledge oriented to the inspection planning in coordinate measuring machines. In the first tasks, where knowledge is captured, it is necessary to use tools that make easier the analysis and structuring of knowledge, so that rules of selection can be easily stated to configure the inspection resources. In order to store the knowledge a so-called Onto-Process ontology has been developed. This ontology may be of application to diverse processes in manufacturing engineering. This paper describes the decomposition of the ontology in terms of general units of knowledge and others more specific for selection of sensor assemblies in inspection planning with touch sensors.

  13. A methodological framework of preparing economic evidence for selection of medicines in the Chinese setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xin; Faunce, Thomas Alured

    2010-08-01

    Medicines are becoming a major component of health expenditure in China. Selection of effective and cost-effective medicines represents an important effort to improve medicines use. A guideline on cost-effectiveness studies has been available in China. This guideline, however, fails to be a practical tool to prepare and critically appraise economic evidence. This article discusses, in the Chinese context, the approach to integrating economic component into the medicines selection, and elaborates the methods of producing economic evidence, including conducing economic reviews and primary economic studies. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd and Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University.

  14. Methodology for Outdoor Water Savings Model and Spreadsheet Tool for U.S. and Selected States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Alison A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Chen, Yuting [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dunham, Camilla [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Fuchs, Heidi [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Price, Sarah [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Stratton, Hannah [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-07-31

    Green lawns and landscaping are archetypical of the populated American landscape, and typically require irrigation, which corresponds to a significant fraction of residential, commercial, and institutional water use. In North American cities, the estimated portion of residential water used for outdoor purposes ranges from 22-38% in cooler climates up to 59-67% in dry and hot environments, while turfgrass coverage within the United States spans 11.1-20.2 million hectares (Milesi et al. 2009). One national estimate uses satellite and aerial photography data to develop a relationship between impervious surface and lawn surface area, yielding a conservative estimate of 16.4 (± 3.6) million hectares of lawn surface area in the United States—an area three times larger than that devoted to any irrigated crop (Milesi et al. 2005). One approach that holds promise for cutting unnecessary outdoor water use is the increased deployment of “smart” irrigation controllers to increase the water efficiency of irrigation systems. This report describes the methodology and inputs employed in a mathematical model that quantifies the effects of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s WaterSense labeling program for one such type of controller, weather-based irrigation controllers (WBIC). This model builds off that described in “Methodology for National Water Savings Model and Spreadsheet Tool–Outdoor Water Use” and uses a two-tiered approach to quantify outdoor water savings attributable to the WaterSense program for WBIC, as well as net present value (NPV) of that savings. While the first iteration of the model assessed national impacts using averaged national values, this version begins by evaluating impacts in three key large states that make up a sizable portion of the irrigation market: California, Florida, and Texas. These states are considered to be the principal market of “smart” irrigation controllers that may result in the bulk of national savings. Modeled

  15. The distribution of selected CORINE land cover classes in different natural landscapes in Slovakia: Methodological framework and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pazúr Róbert

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of selected CORINE land cover classes in different physical conditions was subject to modelling, analysis and evaluation in this article. In three regions with different geo-relief, the occurrence of land cover classes was analysed by using determinants commonly used in land-use models. Using three different modelling frameworks, the importance of methodological design in land-cover modelling was demonstrated. High levels of explanatory power for the factors defined here were found in landscapes of high heterogeneity. Findings derived from the statistical models highlight the importance of landscape disaggregation by natural conditions in complex land-cover or land-use models.

  16. Survey and selection of assessment methodologies for GAVE options; Inventarisatie en selectie van beoordelingsmethodieken voor GAVE-opties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weterings, R. [ed.] [TNO Milieu, Energie en Procesinnovatie TNO-MEP, Apeldoorn (Netherlands)

    1999-05-01

    The Dutch government is interested in the possibilities for a market introduction of new gaseous and liquid energy carriers. To this purpose the GAVE-programme was recently set up. This study is carried out within the framework of the GAVE-programme and aims at the selection of methodologies for assessing the technological, economic, ecological and social perspectives of these new energy options (so-called GAVE-options). Based on the results of these assessments the Dutch ministries of Housing, Planning and Environment (VROM) and Economic Affairs (EZ) will decide at the end of 1999 about starting demonstration projects of promising energy carriers.

  17. Fukushima Daiichi unit 1 uncertainty analysis--Preliminary selection of uncertain parameters and analysis methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoni, Jeffrey N.; Kalinich, Donald A.

    2014-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) plans to conduct uncertainty analyses (UA) on the Fukushima Daiichi unit (1F1) plant with the MELCOR code. The model to be used was developed for a previous accident reconstruction investigation jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). However, that study only examined a handful of various model inputs and boundary conditions, and the predictions yielded only fair agreement with plant data and current release estimates. The goal of this uncertainty study is to perform a focused evaluation of uncertainty in core melt progression behavior and its effect on key figures-of-merit (e.g., hydrogen production, vessel lower head failure, etc.). In preparation for the SNL Fukushima UA work, a scoping study has been completed to identify important core melt progression parameters for the uncertainty analysis. The study also lays out a preliminary UA methodology.

  18. An optimal baseline selection methodology for data-driven damage detection and temperature compensation in acousto-ultrasonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres-Arredondo, M-A; Sierra-Pérez, Julián; Cabanes, Guénaël

    2016-01-01

    The process of measuring and analysing the data from a distributed sensor network all over a structural system in order to quantify its condition is known as structural health monitoring (SHM). For the design of a trustworthy health monitoring system, a vast amount of information regarding the inherent physical characteristics of the sources and their propagation and interaction across the structure is crucial. Moreover, any SHM system which is expected to transition to field operation must take into account the influence of environmental and operational changes which cause modifications in the stiffness and damping of the structure and consequently modify its dynamic behaviour. On that account, special attention is paid in this paper to the development of an efficient SHM methodology where robust signal processing and pattern recognition techniques are integrated for the correct interpretation of complex ultrasonic waves within the context of damage detection and identification. The methodology is based on an acousto-ultrasonics technique where the discrete wavelet transform is evaluated for feature extraction and selection, linear principal component analysis for data-driven modelling and self-organising maps for a two-level clustering under the principle of local density. At the end, the methodology is experimentally demonstrated and results show that all the damages were detectable and identifiable. (paper)

  19. An optimal baseline selection methodology for data-driven damage detection and temperature compensation in acousto-ultrasonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Arredondo, M.-A.; Sierra-Pérez, Julián; Cabanes, Guénaël

    2016-05-01

    The process of measuring and analysing the data from a distributed sensor network all over a structural system in order to quantify its condition is known as structural health monitoring (SHM). For the design of a trustworthy health monitoring system, a vast amount of information regarding the inherent physical characteristics of the sources and their propagation and interaction across the structure is crucial. Moreover, any SHM system which is expected to transition to field operation must take into account the influence of environmental and operational changes which cause modifications in the stiffness and damping of the structure and consequently modify its dynamic behaviour. On that account, special attention is paid in this paper to the development of an efficient SHM methodology where robust signal processing and pattern recognition techniques are integrated for the correct interpretation of complex ultrasonic waves within the context of damage detection and identification. The methodology is based on an acousto-ultrasonics technique where the discrete wavelet transform is evaluated for feature extraction and selection, linear principal component analysis for data-driven modelling and self-organising maps for a two-level clustering under the principle of local density. At the end, the methodology is experimentally demonstrated and results show that all the damages were detectable and identifiable.

  20. A Combined Fuzzy-AHP and Fuzzy-GRA Methodology for Hydrogen Energy Storage Method Selection in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aytac Yildiz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we aim to select the most appropriate Hydrogen Energy Storage (HES method for Turkey from among the alternatives of tank, metal hydride and chemical storage, which are determined based on expert opinions and literature review. Thus, we propose a Buckley extension based fuzzy Analytical Hierarchical Process (Fuzzy-AHP and linear normalization based fuzzy Grey Relational Analysis (Fuzzy-GRA combined Multi Criteria Decision Making (MCDM methodology. This combined approach can be applied to a complex decision process, which often makes sense with subjective data or vague information; and used to solve to solve HES selection problem with different defuzzification methods. The proposed approach is unique both in the HES literature and the MCDM literature.

  1. An integrated multi-criteria decision-making methodology for conveyor system selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pairat Jiamruangjarus

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Material handling equipment (MHE is important for every industry because it has an effect on the productivity of manufacturing. Conveyor systems are presently one popular type of MHE. This paper presents an integration of the analytic network process (ANP with the benefits, opportunities, costs and risk (BOCR model in order to select the best conveyor system. The proposed model established a network with four merits, six strategies criteria, and twenty six sub-criteria with four alternatives (present, roller conveyor, chain conveyor, and monorail. The ANP is to determine the relative weights of an evaluative criteria and decision alternatives. Therefore, the final ranking of the alternatives are calculated by synthesizing the score of each alternative under BOCR. The results showed that the best alternative under all five methods is the chain conveyor. These research results can be easily applied, adapted and used to improve performance of selecting the conveyer system in small and medium enterprises through large industries.

  2. Species selection methodology for an ecological assessment of the Columbia River at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, J.M.; Brandt, C.A.; Dauble, D.D.; Maughan, A.D.; O'Neil, T.K.

    1995-01-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is conducting an ecological risk assessment of the Columbia River to evaluate the current hazards posed by residual contamination from past nuclear production operations at Hanford. Due to the complexity of the aquatic and riparian ecological communities, a three-step species selection process was developed. In step 1, a comprehensive species list was developed using natural resource agency databases that identified plant and animal species known to occur in the Columbia River study area. In step 2, a panel of regional biologists from federal and state resource additional criteria to derive a list of 181 species of concern. In step 3, the species of concern were qualitatively ranked based on a scoring of their potential exposure and sensitivity to contaminants using a conceptual exposure model for the study area. In this model, species were scored based on (1) potential dietary exposure to biomagnifying and non-biomagnifying contaminants, (2) potential dermal and inhalation exposure to contaminants, (3) exposure duration, and (4) sensitivity to contaminants. From this ranking the stakeholders selected 65 tentative species for further evaluation. By excluding species that seldom use the river and riparian areas, and selecting within the same foraging guild, this list was further reduced to 43 species for evaluation in the screening-level risk assessment

  3. Optimal Corridor Selection for a Road Space Management Strategy: Methodology and Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushant Sharma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nationwide, there is a growing realization that there are valuable benefits to using the existing roadway facilities to their full potential rather than expanding capacity in a traditional way. Currently, state DOTs are looking for cost-effective transportation solutions to mitigate the growing congestion and increasing funding gaps. Innovative road space management strategies like narrowing of multiple lanes (three or more and shoulder width to add a lane enhance the utilization while eliminating the costs associated with constructing new lanes. Although this strategy (among many generally leads to better mobility, identifying optimal corridors is a challenge and may affect the benefits. Further, there is a likelihood that added capacity may provide localized benefits, at the expense of system level performance measures (travel time and crashes because of the relocation of traffic operational bottlenecks. This paper develops a novel transportation programming and investment decision method to identify optimal corridors for adding capacity in the network by leveraging lane widths. The methodology explicitly takes into consideration the system level benefits and safety. The programming compares two conflicting objectives of system travel time and safety benefits to find an optimal solution.

  4. Reflectance spectroscopy and asteroid surface mineralogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaffey, M.J.; Bell, J.F.; Cruikshank, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    Information available from reflectance spectroscopy on the surface mineralogy of asteroids is discussed. Current spectral interpretive procedures used in the investigations of asteroid mineralogy are described. Present understanding of the nature and history of asteroids is discussed together with some still unresolved issues such as the source of ordinary chondrites. 100 refs

  5. Quartzites beneath pyroclastic flows – mineralogical aspects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malý, Karel; Cajz, Vladimír

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 3 (2005), s. 370-371 ISSN 0369-2086 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA3013302 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : quartzite * ignimbrite * mineralogy Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  6. A New Methodology to Select the Preferred Solutions from the Pareto-optimal Set: Application to Polymer Extrusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Jose C.; Gaspar-Cunha, Antonio; Fonseca, Carlos M.

    2007-01-01

    Most of the real world optimization problems involve multiple, usually conflicting, optimization criteria. Generating Pareto optimal solutions plays an important role in multi-objective optimization, and the problem is considered to be solved when the Pareto optimal set is found, i.e., the set of non-dominated solutions. Multi-Objective Evolutionary Algorithms based on the principle of Pareto optimality are designed to produce the complete set of non-dominated solutions. However, this is not allays enough since the aim is not only to know the Pareto set but, also, to obtain one solution from this Pareto set. Thus, the definition of a methodology able to select a single solution from the set of non-dominated solutions (or a region of the Pareto frontier), and taking into account the preferences of a Decision Maker (DM), is necessary. A different method, based on a weighted stress function, is proposed. It is able to integrate the user's preferences in order to find the best region of the Pareto frontier accordingly with these preferences. This method was tested on some benchmark test problems, with two and three criteria, and on a polymer extrusion problem. This methodology is able to select efficiently the best Pareto-frontier region for the specified relative importance of the criteria

  7. Enamel surface topography analysis for diet discrimination. A methodology to enhance and select discriminative parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Arthur; Blondel, Cécile; Brunetière, Noël; Ramdarshan, Anusha; Merceron, Gildas

    2018-03-01

    Tooth wear and, more specifically, dental microwear texture is a dietary proxy that has been used for years in vertebrate paleoecology and ecology. DMTA, dental microwear texture analysis, relies on a few parameters related to the surface complexity, anisotropy and heterogeneity of the enamel facets at the micrometric scale. Working with few but physically meaningful parameters helps in comparing published results and in defining levels for classification purposes. Other dental microwear approaches are based on ISO parameters and coupled with statistical tests to find the more relevant ones. The present study roughly utilizes most of the aforementioned parameters in their more or less modified form. But more than parameters, we here propose a new approach: instead of a single parameter characterizing the whole surface, we sample the surface and thus generate 9 derived parameters in order to broaden the parameter set. The identification of the most discriminative parameters is performed with an automated procedure which is an extended and refined version of the workflows encountered in some studies. The procedure in its initial form includes the most common tools, like the ANOVA and the correlation analysis, along with the required mathematical tests. The discrimination results show that a simplified form of the procedure is able to more efficiently identify the desired number of discriminative parameters. Also highlighted are some trends like the relevance of working with both height and spatial parameters, as well as the potential benefits of dimensionless surfaces. On a set of 45 surfaces issued from 45 specimens of three modern ruminants with differences in feeding preferences (grazing, leaf-browsing and fruit-eating), it is clearly shown that the level of wear discrimination is improved with the new methodology compared to the other ones.

  8. Assessment of public acceptability in site selection process. The methodology and the results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeleznik, N.; Kralj, M.; Polic, M.; Kos, D.; Pek Drapal, D.

    2005-01-01

    The site selection process for the low and intermediate radioactive waste (LILW) repository in Slovenia follows the mixed mode approach according to the model proposed by IAEA. After finishing the conceptual and planning stage in 1999, and after identification of the potentially suitable areas in the area survey stage in 2001, ARAO (Agency for radwaste management) invited all municipalities to volunteer in the procedure of placing the LILW repository in the physical environment. A positive response was received from eight municipalities, though three municipalities later resigned from it. A selection between twelve locations in these five municipalities had to be done because Slovenian procedure provides for only three locations to be further evaluated in the stage of identification of potentially suitable sites. A pre-feasibility study of the public acceptability, together with the technical aspects (safety, technical functionality, economic, environmental and spatial aspects) was performed. The aspect of public acceptability included objective and subjective evaluation criteria. The former included information obtained from studies of demography, data on local economy, infrastructure and eventual environmental problems, media analysis, and earlier public opinion polls. The latter included data obtained from topical workshops, free phone line, telephone interviews with the general public and personal interviews with representatives of decision makers and public opinion leaders, as well as a public opinion poll in all included communities. Evaluated municipalities were ranked regarding their social suitability for the radioactive waste site. (author)

  9. A study of risk evaluation methodology selection for the external hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuramoto, Takahiro; Yamaguchi, Akira; Narumiya, Yosiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Since the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake in March 2011, there has been growing demands for assessing the effects of external hazards, including natural events, such as earthquake and tsunami, and external human behaviors, and taking actions to address those external hazards. The newly established Japanese regulatory requirements claim design considerations associated with external hazards. The primary objective of the risk assessment for external hazards is to establish countermeasures against such hazards rather than grasping the risk figures. Therefore, applying detailed risk assessment methods, such as probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), to all the external hazards is not always the most appropriate. Risk assessment methods can vary in types including qualitative evaluation, hazard analysis (analyzing hazard frequencies or their influence), and margin assessment. To resolve these issues, a process has been established that enables us to identify the external hazards in a comprehensive and systematic manner, which have potential risks leading to core damage and to select an appropriate evaluation method according to the risks associated with each of the external hazards. This paper discusses the comprehensive and systematic identification process for the external hazards which have potential risks leading to core damage, and the approaches of selecting an appropriate evaluation method for each external hazard. This paper also describes some applications of specific risk evaluation methods. (author)

  10. Methodology for the selection of the regime of flow in lagoons of stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz T, Luis Eduardo; Alayon Torres, Walter E; Monsegny S, Carlos Emilio

    2000-01-01

    To model biological processes, information is needed on the stoichiometry and kinetics of the reactions and about the hydraulic regime of the system. The stoichiometry of a reaction refers to the quantity of consumed reactants (such as substrates) and to the quantity of formed products (such as microorganisms). The hydraulic regime makes reference to the configuration of the flow inside of and outside of the process and to the mixture and distribution of the solids of the fluid inside the reactor. The present article it is centered in studying the different mixture regimens and its kinetic models of degradation of organic matter applied to the case specify of the lagoon of stabilization of residual waters of the Municipality of Tocancipa; also it the methodology discusses to determine the type of flow that is presented in a stabilization lagoon. The kinetic models of degradation of organic matter in stabilization lagoons are classified according with the presence or absence of oxygen in the lagoon and with the mixture regime that it is presented in this. The regimens of flow that are presented in the stabilization lagoons are those of complete mixture and the piston flow, one completely opposed to the other one. Between these two is the denominated regime of dispersed or arbitrary flow. The determination of the mixture regime is of great importance, since with this it is possible to have an idea of the behavior of the rates of removal of the nutrients that arrive to the system, of the consumption of oxygen and the kinetic pattern of removal of organic matter among others. The regime of mixture complete ideal this characterized because the mass of water that enters to the system is dispersed instantly, making that the characteristics of the water are the same ones in any point, that is to say that the reaction rates are constant in the reactor and the demand of oxygen it is identical in any sampling point, likewise it happens with the removal rate; this has big

  11. Selection of meteorological parameters affecting rainfall estimation using neuro-fuzzy computing methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Roslan; Roy, Chandrabhushan; Motamedi, Shervin; Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Petković, Dalibor; Gocic, Milan; Lee, Siew Cheng

    2016-05-01

    Rainfall is a complex atmospheric process that varies over time and space. Researchers have used various empirical and numerical methods to enhance estimation of rainfall intensity. We developed a novel prediction model in this study, with the emphasis on accuracy to identify the most significant meteorological parameters having effect on rainfall. For this, we used five input parameters: wet day frequency (dwet), vapor pressure (e̅a), and maximum and minimum air temperatures (Tmax and Tmin) as well as cloud cover (cc). The data were obtained from the Indian Meteorological Department for the Patna city, Bihar, India. Further, a type of soft-computing method, known as the adaptive-neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS), was applied to the available data. In this respect, the observation data from 1901 to 2000 were employed for testing, validating, and estimating monthly rainfall via the simulated model. In addition, the ANFIS process for variable selection was implemented to detect the predominant variables affecting the rainfall prediction. Finally, the performance of the model was compared to other soft-computing approaches, including the artificial neural network (ANN), support vector machine (SVM), extreme learning machine (ELM), and genetic programming (GP). The results revealed that ANN, ELM, ANFIS, SVM, and GP had R2 of 0.9531, 0.9572, 0.9764, 0.9525, and 0.9526, respectively. Therefore, we conclude that the ANFIS is the best method among all to predict monthly rainfall. Moreover, dwet was found to be the most influential parameter for rainfall prediction, and the best predictor of accuracy. This study also identified sets of two and three meteorological parameters that show the best predictions.

  12. Selection of Grounded Theory as an Appropriate Research Methodology for a Dissertation: One Student’s Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W. Jones, Ed.D.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Doctoral students wanting to use grounded theory as a methodological approach for their dissertation often face multiple challenges gaining acceptance of their approach by their committee. This paper presents the case that the author used to overcome these challenges through the process of eliminating other methodologies, leaving grounded theory as the preferred method for the desired research issue. Through examining the approach used successfully by the author, other doctoral students will be able to frame similar arguments justifying the use of grounded theory in their dissertations and seeing the use of the method continue to spread into new fields and applications. This paper examines the case built for selecting grounded theory as a defensible dissertation approach. The basic research issue that I wanted to investigate was how practitioners in an applied field sought information in their work; in other words, how they researched. I further narrowed the investigation down to a more specific field, but the paper presented here is left in broader form so that other students can see the approach in more general terms.

  13. Principle and methodology of nuclear power plant site selection. Application to radiocobalt cycle in the Rhone river

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georges, J.

    1987-01-01

    In a first bibliographic part, after some generalities on radioactivity and nuclear power, general principles of radiation protection and national and international regulations are presented. The methodology of the radioecological study involved in site selection is developed. In a second more experimental part, the processing of radiocobalt gamma radioactivity measurement in water, fishes, plants and Rhone river sediments demonstrates the influence of age and geographical situation of the nuclear power stations located along the river. A laboratory experiment of cobalt 60 transfer from chironomes larvae to carp is carried out. Comparison with the results of other laboratory experiments makes it possible to propose an experimental model of cobalt transfer within a fresh water ecosystem; radioactivity levels calculated for various compartments seem to be consistent with the Rhone river levels [fr

  14. Energy conservation in coal conversion. Final report, September 15, 1977--September 1, 1978. Selected case studies and conservation methodologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purcupile, J.C.

    1978-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to apply the methodologies developed in the Energy Conservation in Coal Conversion August, 1977 Progress Report - Contract No. EY77S024196 - to an energy efficient, near-term coal conversion process design, and to develop additional, general techniques for studying energy conservation and utilization in coal conversion processes. The process selected for study was the Ralph M. Parsons Company of Pasadena, California ''Oil/Gas Complex, Conceptual Design/Economic Analysis'' as described in R and D Report No. 114 - Interim Report No. 4, published March, 1977, ERDA Contract No. E(49-18)-1975. Thirteen papers representing possible alternative methods of energy conservation or waste heat utilization have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  15. GIS-based site selection methodology for hybrid renewable energy systems: A case study from western Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydin, Nazli Yonca; Kentel, Elcin; Sebnem Duzgun, H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We proposed a site selection methodology for renewable energy systems. ► Fuzzy logic and geographic information system tools are used. ► Alternative locations are evaluated in terms of economic and environmental criteria. - Abstract: Renewable energy sources are presently being considered as alternatives to fossil fuels, because they are perpetual, environmentally friendly, and release negligible amounts of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere while producing energy. A disadvantage of renewable energy systems, however, is that continuous energy generation is not possible by using only one type of renewable energy system, since renewable energy resources depend on climate and weather conditions. Two or more renewable energy systems can be integrated into a hybrid system to overcome this problem so that when one resource is not available, the other can continue producing energy. Another disadvantage of renewable energy sources is that they are not available at every geographic location. Their use is mostly advantageous at remote locations that often are of high ecological value. Thus, identification of preferable locations for renewable energy systems is a decision-making problem that requires evaluation of the potential of the resource together with economic and environmental limitations. This paper introduces a methodology for site selection of hybrid wind solar–PV renewable energy systems. First, environmental acceptability and economic feasibility objectives are identified through a comprehensive review of the literature, current Turkish laws and legislations, and interviews with the General Directorate of Electrical Power Resources Survey and Development Administration of Turkey. Second, viable locations in terms of environmental acceptability and economic feasibility are determined through a fuzzy decision-making procedure that uses ordered weighted averaging algorithm for aggregating multiple objectives. Then, priority sites are identified

  16. Evaluation of the efficacy of tradizional recovery interventions in historical buildings. A new selection methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinale, Tiziana; Colapietro, Domenico

    2013-04-01

    construction characters, both these tufa and stone block, present in Puglia and Basilicata regions. You are assessed consequently energy and static vulnerability of the pre-consolidation state and identified qualitatively and verified quantitatively traditional recovery solutions, exportable on constructive units morphologically similar present in other environments. Specific simulations experimental energy, based on traditional techniques of passive cooling systems have been activated in particular environments, in the Basilicata Region, in particular in the Sassi of Matera, just for the purposes of exploitation and the adaptation plant engineering and technology for a living comfort and environmental "sustainable". The non-linear dynamic analysis, carried out in the historical centers of Trani and Molfetta in Puglia, have finally shown that a combination of traditional interventions, based on their own solutions of the rules of the local art, they are able to ensure improvements in terms of static vulnerability of 31.65 % in the state ex-post if compared to techniques of modern recovery and strong invasiveness, for which there is a value of 3.70 %. It's interventions selected qualitatively in order to ensure reversibility, reduced invasiveness and the integrity of the construction, respecting its structural design and the transformations that took place in the course of history.

  17. Geochemical and mineralogical characteristics of Lithomargic clay

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Geochemical and mineralogical characteristics of Lithomargic clay. GEOCHEMICAL AND .... tries, as filling material in the pulp and paper, toothpaste and paint industries as well ..... tions very vital to human health and other ac- tivities of man.

  18. A methodology for the valuation and selection of adaptable technology portfolios and its application to small and medium airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinon, Olivia J.

    The increase in the types of airspace users (large aircraft, small and regional jets, very light jets, unmanned aerial vehicles, etc.), as well as the very limited number of future new airport development projects are some of the factors that will characterize the next decades in air transportation. These factors, associated with a persistent growth in air traffic will worsen the current gridlock situation experienced at some major airports. As airports are becoming the major capacity bottleneck to continued growth in air traffic, it is therefore primordial to make the most efficient use of the current, and very often, underutilized airport infrastructure. This research thus proposes to address the increase in air traffic demand and resulting capacity issues by considering the implementation of operational concepts and technologies at underutilized airports. However, there are many challenges associated with sustaining the development of this type of airports. First, the need to synchronize evolving technologies with airports’ needs and investment capabilities is paramount. Additionally, it was observed that the evolution of secondary airports, and their needs, is tightly linked to the environment in which they operate. In particular, sensitivity of airports to changes in the dynamics of their environment is important, therefore requiring that the factors that drive the need for technology acquisition be identified and characterized. Finally, the difficulty to evaluate risk and make financially viable decisions, particularly when investing in new technologies, cannot be ignored. This research provides a methodology that addresses these challenges and ensures the sustainability of airport capacity-enhancement investments in a continuously changing environment. In particular, it is articulated around the need to provide decision makers with the capability to valuate and select adaptable technology portfolios to ensure airport financial viability. Hence, the four

  19. Mineralogy of the rare earth elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    This paper contains mineralogic properties of the rare earth elements (REE). Notes are given on total REE abundances, distribution patterns, and modes of occurrence. References are confined as far as possible to papers containing usable REE data. The minerals are grouped alphabetically within each major cationic group. The paper includes an alphabetic table of mineral names, chemical formulas, crystal system and section number. It functions as a handy entrance to the mineralogic and bibliographic paper. (G.J.P.)

  20. Mineralogical conversion of asbestos containing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsford, S.K.; Foltz, A.D.; Ek, R.B.

    1996-01-01

    The principal objective of the Technical Task Plan (TTP) is to demonstrate a thermal-chemical mineralogical asbestos conversion unit at the Hanford Site, which converts non-radiological asbestos containing materials (ACMs) into an asbestos-free material. The permanent thermal-chemical mineralogical conversion of ACMs to a non-toxic, non-hazardous, potentially marketable end product should not only significantly reduce the waste stream volumes but terminate the open-quotes cradle to graveclose quotes ownership liabilities

  1. A methodological protocol for selecting and quantifying low-value prescribing practices in routinely collected data: an Australian case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Jonathan; Elshaug, Adam G; Bhatia, R Sacha; Chalmers, Kelsey; Badgery-Parker, Tim; Pearson, Sallie-Anne

    2017-05-03

    Growing imperatives for safety, quality and responsible resource allocation have prompted renewed efforts to identify and quantify harmful or wasteful (low-value) medical practices such as test ordering, procedures and prescribing. Quantifying these practices at a population level using routinely collected health data allows us to understand the scale of low-value medical practices, measure practice change following specific interventions and prioritise policy decisions. To date, almost all research examining health care through the low-value lens has focused on medical services (tests and procedures) rather than on prescribing. The protocol described herein outlines a program of research funded by Australia's National Health and Medical Research Council to select and quantify low-value prescribing practices within Australian routinely collected health data. We start by describing our process for identifying and cataloguing international low-value prescribing practices. We then outline our approach to translate these prescribing practices into indicators that can be applied to Australian routinely collected health data. Next, we detail methods of using Australian health data to quantify these prescribing practices (e.g. prevalence of low-value prescribing and related costs) and their downstream health consequences. We have approval from the necessary Australian state and commonwealth human research ethics and data access committees to undertake this work. The lack of systematic and transparent approaches to quantification of low-value practices in routinely collected data has been noted in recent reviews. Here, we present a methodology applied in the Australian context with the aim of demonstrating principles that can be applied across jurisdictions in order to harmonise international efforts to measure low-value prescribing. The outcomes of this research will be submitted to international peer-reviewed journals. Results will also be presented at national and

  2. Formulation and development of a methodology for selecting desulfurization processes, applicable to diluted sulfurous emissions from copper. Preparation of the engineering for a draft project using electron beam process, selected with this methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aros M, Patricia.

    1997-01-01

    A comparative study of clean desulfurization technologies was prepared. Sulfur abatement processes from S O 2 gas streams were analyzed in 21 processes grouped into 8 different types. Since there are a large number of potentially applicable processes, this thesis presents a process selection methodology based on a technical/economic analysis series, which produces a ranking by scores. Visual Basic 3.0 software was used to develop the program, which can be installed in any computer and uses Windows 95. Based on these results in Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission decided to present a draft project for electron beam technology. The full design and calculation for the humidifying and cooling tower was prepared together with the design of the remaining equipment for size, in order to estimate probable costs. The pre-feasibility evaluation determined that the process would generate profits, when the selling price of ammonium sulfate - which is a byproduct of the process that is used as fertilizer - is above US$ 110/ton. The process cost is heavily influenced by the capital cost of storage facilities, since a long term supply for ammonia reagent is needed. This product is imported in Chile and it is currently an expensive reagent. (author). 33 app., 7 tabs

  3. Mineralogical diversity and geology of Humboldt crater derived using Moon Mineralogy Mapper data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinot, M.; Besse, S.; Flahaut, J.; Quantin-Nataf, C.; Lozac'h, L.; van Westrenen, W.

    2018-01-01

    Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) spectroscopic data and high-resolution imagery data sets were used to study the mineralogy and geology of the 207 km diameter Humboldt crater. Analyses of M3 data, using a custom-made method for M3 spectra continuum removal and spectral parameters calculation, reveal

  4. A Methodology for the Selection of Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis Methods in Real Estate and Land Management Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rosaria Guarini

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Real estate and land management are characterised by a complex, elaborate combination of technical, regulatory and governmental factors. In Europe, Public Administrators must address the complex decision-making problems that need to be resolved, while also acting in consideration of the expectations of the different stakeholders involved in settlement transformation. In complex situations (e.g., with different aspects to be considered and multilevel actors involved, decision-making processes are often used to solve multidisciplinary and multidimensional analyses, which support the choices of those who are making the decision. Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA methods are included among the examination and evaluation techniques considered useful by the European Community. Such analyses and techniques are performed using methods, which aim to reach a synthesis of the various forms of input data needed to define decision-making problems of a similar complexity. Thus, one or more of the conclusions reached allow for informed, well thought-out, strategic decisions. According to the technical literature on MCDA, numerous methods are applicable in different decision-making situations, however, advice for selecting the most appropriate for the specific field of application and problem have not been thoroughly investigated. In land and real estate management, numerous queries regarding evaluations often arise. In brief, the objective of this paper is to outline a procedure with which to select the method best suited to the specific queries of evaluation, which commonly arise while addressing decision-making problems. In particular issues of land and real estate management, representing the so-called “settlement sector”. The procedure will follow a theoretical-methodological approach by formulating a taxonomy of the endogenous and exogenous variables of the multi-criteria analysis methods.

  5. A methodology to guide the selection of composite materials in a wind turbine rotor blade design process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolotti, P.; Adolphs, G.; Bottasso, C. L.

    2016-09-01

    This work is concerned with the development of an optimization methodology for the composite materials used in wind turbine blades. Goal of the approach is to guide designers in the selection of the different materials of the blade, while providing indications to composite manufacturers on optimal trade-offs between mechanical properties and material costs. The method works by using a parametric material model, and including its free parameters amongst the design variables of a multi-disciplinary wind turbine optimization procedure. The proposed method is tested on the structural redesign of a conceptual 10 MW wind turbine blade, its spar caps and shell skin laminates being subjected to optimization. The procedure identifies a blade optimum for a new spar cap laminate characterized by a higher longitudinal Young's modulus and higher cost than the initial one, which however in turn induce both cost and mass savings in the blade. In terms of shell skin, the adoption of a laminate with intermediate properties between a bi-axial one and a tri-axial one also leads to slight structural improvements.

  6. Landslide: Mineralogical and Physical Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor, Viluș; Grozav, Adia; Rogobete, Gheorghe

    2017-10-01

    In order to construct a road bed foundation, if land has moved, on an area with old landslides, there is a high chance of it moving again. The investigation was made in a region with hilly relief, in which the parent materials of soils are argillaceous marls of Pliocene age. Because the slope is scarped and the versant has been cut, the soil mass slide favoured of the particle-size distribution dominated by heavy clay. With a reiteratedly percolative moisture regime, the soil material is saturated in water fora long period (700-800 mm precipitation/year), and that can increase the slope mass, thereby increasing the driving forces. In a soil profile situated on the top of the hill, with landslide for about 40 m length of the road, disturbed and undisturbed soil samples were analysed physic-chemical and mineralogical. For the heavy and light minerals from the sand fraction a polarized light analyser is used, and for clay minerals X-ray, differential thermal and infrared absorption method are used. The particle-size distribution in the soil profile is dominated by the clay fraction, which reached 53.2% in the ABt horizon and 63.0% in the Bt horizon (67-93 cm depth). The structure of the light minerals, consists of quartz (41-58%); feldspar (10.16-18.10%); muscovite (14.10-26.04). The heavy minerals are oxides (2.61-15.26%), hornblende (0.58-2.87%) and biotite (0.51-2.68%). It must be mentioned the presence of the metamorphic minerals, with the source of the Poiana Rusca mountains. These minerals are epidote (1.01-1.86%), disthene (0.70-1.86%), staurolite (0.73-2.46%) and sillimanite (0.35-0.45%). The clay minerals, inherited from the parent material or formed during the soil-forming process are dominated by smectite, which represent (71-85%) from the total clay minerals, illite 10-21%, and Kaolinite, 4-12%. Rheological properties, like plastic index (53.8%), activity index (1.01%) and consistency index (0.99-1.00%) show that the shrinkage - swelling processes are

  7. Mineralogical and chemical characterization of various bentonite and smectite-rich clay materials Part A: Comparison and development of mineralogical characterization methods Part B: Mineralogical and chemical characterization of clay materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumpulainen, S.; Kiviranta, L.

    2010-06-01

    Mineralogy is an essential issue in understanding thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC) behavior of bentonite materials. Mineralogy affects, among others, chemical composition of pore water, susceptibility for erosion, and transport of radionuclides. Consequently, mineralogy affects the designs of the buffer and backfill components. The objective of this work was to implement and develop mineralogical and chemical methods for characterization of reference clays considered for use as buffer and backfill materials in nuclear waste disposal. In this work, different methods were tested, compared, developed, and best available techniques selected. An additional aim was to characterize reference materials that are used in various nuclear waste disposal supporting studies, e.g., the SKB's alternative buffer material (ABM) experiment. Materials studied included three Wyoming-bentonites, two bentonites from Milos, four bentonites from Kutch district, and two Friedland clays. Minerals were identified using x-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and polarizing microscopy. Mineralogical composition was estimated using Rietveld-analysis. Chemical methods were used to support and validate mineralogical interpretation. Total chemical composition was determined from decomposed samples using spectrometry (ICP-AES) and combustion (Leco-S, Leco-C). Ferric and ferrous iron species were distinguished titrimetrically and the amount of soluble sulphate was determined using ion chromatography. In addition, cation exchange capacity and original exchangeable cations were determined. Chemical composition of fine (<2 μ m) fractions and poorly crystalline Fe-, Al- and Si-phases determined by selective extractions were used in structural calculations of smectite. XRD is a basic method for all mineralogical characterization, but it is insensitive for detecting trace minerals and variations in the structural chemical composition of clay minerals. Polarizing

  8. Criteria for the development and use of the methodology for environmentally-acceptable fossil energy site evaluation and selection. Volume 2. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckstein, L.; Northrop, G.; Scott, R.

    1980-02-01

    This report serves as a companion document to the report, Volume 1: Environmentally-Acceptable Fossil Energy Site Evaluation and Selection: Methodology and Users Guide, in which a methodology was developed which allows the siting of fossil fuel conversion facilities in areas with the least environmental impact. The methodology, known as SELECS (Site Evaluation for Energy Conversion Systems) does not replace a site specific environmental assessment, or an environmental impact statement (EIS), but does enhance the value of an EIS by thinning down the number of options to a manageable level, by doing this in an objective, open and selective manner, and by providing preliminary assessment and procedures which can be utilized during the research and writing of the actual impact statement.

  9. Skeletal carbonate mineralogy of Scottish bryozoans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer Jones, Mary; Najorka, Jens; Smith, Abigail M.

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes the skeletal carbonate mineralogy of 156 bryozoan species collected from Scotland (sourced both from museum collections and from waters around Scotland) and collated from literature. This collection represents 79% of the species which inhabit Scottish waters and is a greater number and proportion of extant species than any previous regional study. The study is also of significance globally where the data augment the growing database of mineralogical analyses and offers first analyses for 26 genera and four families. Specimens were collated through a combination of field sampling and existing collections and were analysed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and micro-XRD to determine wt% MgCO3 in calcite and wt% aragonite. Species distribution data and phylogenetic organisation were applied to understand distributional, taxonomic and phylo-mineralogical patterns. Analysis of the skeletal composition of Scottish bryozoans shows that the group is statistically different from neighbouring Arctic fauna but features a range of mineralogy comparable to other temperate regions. As has been previously reported, cyclostomes feature low Mg in calcite and very little aragonite, whereas cheilostomes show much more variability, including bimineralic species. Scotland is a highly variable region, open to biological and environmental influx from all directions, and bryozoans exhibit this in the wide range of within-species mineralogical variability they present. This plasticity in skeletal composition may be driven by a combination of environmentally-induced phenotypic variation, or physiological factors. A flexible response to environment, as manifested in a wide range of skeletal mineralogy within a species, may be one characteristic of successful invasive bryozoans. PMID:29897916

  10. Geochemistry and mineralogy of recent sediments of Guanabara Bay (NE sector) and its major rivers - Rio de Janeiro State - Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    FARIA, MARCIA DE MELO; SANCHEZ, BRAZ A.

    2001-01-01

    Geochemical and clay mineralogical studies of bottom sediments collected along the Macacu and Caceribu rivers and Guanabara Bay were carried out in order to investigate the relationship between major source areas and recent sediments of the bay. Clay mineralogy includes different groups with selective distribution conditioned by geomorphic features and depositional settings. Micaceous clay minerals are abundant near parent rock in the upper course, whereas kaolinite derived from varied source...

  11. Mineralogical and particulate morphological characterization of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Six representative geophagic clayey soils from Botswana were mineralogically characterized using X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD), optical microscopy, and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Results of identified mineral phases revealed quartz (SiO2) as the most dominant in all samples constituting ...

  12. Chemical and mineralogical characterization and ceramic suitability ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The chemical and mineralogical characterization of raw feldspathic materials from Dschang (Cameroon) was realized by means of X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analyses, optical and scanning electron microscopies, and analytical techniques. It was found that these materials consist of albite (43 ± 3 wt.%), microcline ...

  13. Geomicrobiology; inseparable from low temperature geochemistry & mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southam, G.

    2009-05-01

    Bacteria play an important role in catalyzing a wide array of biogeochemical processes that affect the dissolution of minerals, the aqueous geochemistry of their surroundings and secondary mineral formation. Processes occurring at the bacteria-mineral interface can occur on the scale of nanoenvironments and will normally extend to microenvironments or even, to macroscopic features where extensive growth of bacteria is supported. The action of bacteria in these systems can produce a wide range of biomarkers that can be preserved over geologic time periods. Possible biomarkers include dissolution features in mineral substrates, fossil structures of individual cells to complex cell-cell associations, and chemical (isotopic and organic) signatures. In any system, we need to focus at the scale of the bacteria themselves to appreciate the actual chemistry of their surroundings and the kinds of reactions that they can catalyse. For example, photosynthetic microbial mats in an Atlin, BC wetland create ideal conditions for biologically induced precipitation of magnesium carbonates, specifically dypingite Mg5(CO3)4(OH)25H2O, which we were unable to reproduce abiotically. The preservation of biosignatures over geologic time presents obvious challenges, and the effect of diagenesis on fossils and their mineralogical assemblages deserves attention, especially with respect to the preservation and analysis of materials on (or from) Mars. For this, we need to rely on our Earth analogue sites as a way to triage the wide range of samples that are available for collection and analysis. The preservation of organic materials and cells in salts is particularly interesting. Conversely, the hematite nodules on Mars may not be good samples to target in the search for a Martian biosphere. The possibility of finding an extant biosphere increases with depth; however, evidence from Earth's deep subsurface demonstrates that it does not contain an abundant biosphere. Bacteria thrive in

  14. Selection methodology for LWR safety R and D programs and proposals. Volume III. User's manual for the multi-attribute utility package (MAUP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hale, M.; Turnage, J.J.; Husseiny, A.A.; Ritzman, R.L.

    1981-02-01

    The computer program which was developed to apply the multi-attribute utility (MAU) methodology to the selection of LWR safety R and D programs and proposals is described. An overview of the MAU method is presented, followed by a description of the steps incorporated in developing individual modules for use in the multi-attribute utility package (MAUP). Each module is described complete with usage information and an example of computer output

  15. A methodology of selection of exercises for operator training on a control room simulator and its application to the data bank of exercises at the Dukovany NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holy, J.

    2005-07-01

    The report describes the preparation of methodology for the selection of scenarios to be used during operator training on a full-scope simulator. The scenarios are selected from a data bank of scenarios, which is under preparation based on feedback from the operational history and theoretical analyses. The new methodology takes into account 3 basic attributes defining the priority for use within the training programme: frequency of occurrence, safety-related significance, and difficulty. The attributes are scored and based on a joint score, the importance of inclusion of the scenario in the training programme is also scored. The methodology was applied to the data bank of scenarios for simulation of abnormal states and incidents trained on the up-to-date simulator of the Dukovany NPP, and the results of this pilot application were made available to Dukovany operator training staff as a tool for the preparation of training plans for the years to come. The results of a PSA study are used for a non-trivial selection of the scenarios

  16. Mineralogical characterization of uranium yellow cake concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausen, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    Uranium yellow cake concentrates have been analyzed and characterized mineralogically by means of differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectra and wet chemical methods. On the basis of mineralogical methods of characterization, the following four major structural types of yellow cake may be classified: Uranyl Hydroxide Hydrate, UO 2 (OH) 2 nH 2 O; Basic Uranyl Sulfate Hydrate, (UO 2 ) x (SO 4 ) y (OH) s(x-y ).nH 2 O; Sodium Para-Uranate, Na 5 U 7 O 24 and Uranyl Peroxide Hydrate, UO 4 .nH 2 O. In this paper conditions of yellow cake preparation and characterization are described, along with discussion of significance of structural types to the physical and chemical properties of yellow cake production

  17. Mineralogical Diversity and Geology of Humboldt Crater Derived Using Moon Mineralogy Mapper Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinot, M.; Besse, S.; Flahaut, J.; Quantin-Nataf, C.; Lozac'h, L.; van Westrenen, W.

    2018-02-01

    Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) spectroscopic data and high-resolution imagery data sets were used to study the mineralogy and geology of the 207 km diameter Humboldt crater. Analyses of M3 data, using a custom-made method for M3 spectra continuum removal and spectral parameters calculation, reveal multiple pure crystalline plagioclase detections within the Humboldt crater central peak complex, hinting at its crustal origin. However, olivine, spinel, and glass are observed in the crater walls and rims, suggesting these minerals derive from shallower levels than the plagioclase of the central peak complex. High-calcium pyroxenes are detected in association with volcanic deposits emplaced on the crater's floor. Geologic mapping was performed, and the age of Humboldt crater's units was estimated from crater counts. Results suggest that volcanic activity within this floor-fractured crater spanned over a billion years. The felsic mineralogy of the central peak complex region, which presumably excavated deeper material, and the shallow mafic minerals (olivine and spinel) detected in Humboldt crater walls and rim are not in accordance with the general view of the structure of the lunar crust. Our observations can be explained by the presence of a mafic pluton emplaced in the anorthositic crust prior to the Humboldt-forming impact event. Alternatively, the excavation of Australe basin ejecta could explain the observed mineralogical detections. This highlights the importance of detailed combined mineralogical and geological remote sensing studies to assess the heterogeneity of the lunar crust.

  18. Mineralogical Diversity and Geology of Humboldt Crater Derived Using Moon Mineralogy Mapper Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinot, M; Besse, S; Flahaut, J; Quantin-Nataf, C; Lozac'h, L; van Westrenen, W

    2018-02-01

    Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M 3 ) spectroscopic data and high-resolution imagery data sets were used to study the mineralogy and geology of the 207 km diameter Humboldt crater. Analyses of M 3 data, using a custom-made method for M 3 spectra continuum removal and spectral parameters calculation, reveal multiple pure crystalline plagioclase detections within the Humboldt crater central peak complex, hinting at its crustal origin. However, olivine, spinel, and glass are observed in the crater walls and rims, suggesting these minerals derive from shallower levels than the plagioclase of the central peak complex. High-calcium pyroxenes are detected in association with volcanic deposits emplaced on the crater's floor. Geologic mapping was performed, and the age of Humboldt crater's units was estimated from crater counts. Results suggest that volcanic activity within this floor-fractured crater spanned over a billion years. The felsic mineralogy of the central peak complex region, which presumably excavated deeper material, and the shallow mafic minerals (olivine and spinel) detected in Humboldt crater walls and rim are not in accordance with the general view of the structure of the lunar crust. Our observations can be explained by the presence of a mafic pluton emplaced in the anorthositic crust prior to the Humboldt-forming impact event. Alternatively, the excavation of Australe basin ejecta could explain the observed mineralogical detections. This highlights the importance of detailed combined mineralogical and geological remote sensing studies to assess the heterogeneity of the lunar crust.

  19. Environmentally-acceptable fossil energy site evaluation and selection: methodology and user's guide. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Northrop, G.M.

    1980-02-01

    This report is designed to facilitate assessments of environmental and socioeconomic impacts of fossil energy conversion facilities which might be implemented at potential sites. The discussion of methodology and the User's Guide contained herein are presented in a format that assumes the reader is not an energy technologist. Indeed, this methodology is meant for application by almost anyone with an interest in a potential fossil energy development - planners, citizen groups, government officials, and members of industry. It may also be of instructional value. The methodology is called: Site Evaluation for Energy Conversion Systems (SELECS) and is organized in three levels of increasing sophistication. Only the least complicated version - the Level 1 SELECS - is presented in this document. As stated above, it has been expressly designed to enable just about anyone to participate in evaluating the potential impacts of a proposed energy conversion facility. To accomplish this objective, the Level 1 calculations have been restricted to ones which can be performed by hand in about one working day. Data collection and report preparation may bring the total effort required for a first or one-time application to two to three weeks. If repeated applications are made in the same general region, the assembling of data for a different site or energy conversion technology will probably take much less time.

  20. Chemical characterization, nano-particle mineralogy and particle size distribution of basalt dust wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalmora, Adilson C. [Laboratory of Environmental Researches and Nanotechnology Development, Centro Universitário La Salle, Mestrado em Avaliação de Impactos Ambientais em Mineração. Victor Barreto, 2288 Centro 92010-000, Canoas, RS (Brazil); Institute for Environmental Assessment and Water Studies (IDÆA), Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), C/Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Ramos, Claudete G.; Oliveira, Marcos L.S. [Laboratory of Environmental Researches and Nanotechnology Development, Centro Universitário La Salle, Mestrado em Avaliação de Impactos Ambientais em Mineração. Victor Barreto, 2288 Centro 92010-000, Canoas, RS (Brazil); Teixeira, Elba C. [Fundação Estadual de Proteção Ambiental Henrique Luis Roessler, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Kautzmann, Rubens M.; Taffarel, Silvio R. [Laboratory of Environmental Researches and Nanotechnology Development, Centro Universitário La Salle, Mestrado em Avaliação de Impactos Ambientais em Mineração. Victor Barreto, 2288 Centro 92010-000, Canoas, RS (Brazil); Brum, Irineu A.S. de [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Escola de Engenharia, Departamento de Metalurgia, Centro de Tecnologia, Av. Bento Gonçalves, 9500. Bairro Agronomia. CEP: 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); and others

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the geochemistry of basalt alteration is central to the study of agriculture systems. Various nano-minerals play an important role in the mobilization of contaminants and their subsequent uptake by plants. We present a new analytical experimental approach in combination with an integrated analytical protocol designed to study basalt alteration processes. Recently, throughout the world, ultra-fine and nano-particles derived from basalt dust wastes (BDW) during “stonemeal” soil fertilizer application have been of great concern for their possible adverse effects on human health and environmental pollution. Samples of BDW utilized were obtained from companies in the Nova Prata mining district in southern Brazil for chemical characterization and nano-mineralogy investigation, using an integrated application of advanced characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), High Resolution-Transmission Electron microscopy (HR-TEM)/Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS)/(selected-area diffraction pattern) SAED, Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM/EDS), and granulometric distribution analysis. The investigation has revealed that BDW materials are dominated by SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3,} with a complex micromineralogy including alkali feldspar, augite, barite, labradorite, hematite, heulandrite, gypsum, kaolinite, quartz, and smectite. In addition, we have identified a number of trace metals such as Cd, Cu, Cr, and Zn, that are preferentially concentrated into the finer, inhalable, dust fraction and, thus, could present a health hazard in the urban areas around the basalt mining zone. The implication of this observation is that use of these nanometric-sized particulates as soil fertilizer may present different health challenges to those of conventional fertilizers, inviting future work regarding the relative toxicities of these materials. Our investigation on the particle size distribution, nano

  1. Chemical characterization, nano-particle mineralogy and particle size distribution of basalt dust wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalmora, Adilson C.; Ramos, Claudete G.; Oliveira, Marcos L.S.; Teixeira, Elba C.; Kautzmann, Rubens M.; Taffarel, Silvio R.; Brum, Irineu A.S. de

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the geochemistry of basalt alteration is central to the study of agriculture systems. Various nano-minerals play an important role in the mobilization of contaminants and their subsequent uptake by plants. We present a new analytical experimental approach in combination with an integrated analytical protocol designed to study basalt alteration processes. Recently, throughout the world, ultra-fine and nano-particles derived from basalt dust wastes (BDW) during “stonemeal” soil fertilizer application have been of great concern for their possible adverse effects on human health and environmental pollution. Samples of BDW utilized were obtained from companies in the Nova Prata mining district in southern Brazil for chemical characterization and nano-mineralogy investigation, using an integrated application of advanced characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), High Resolution-Transmission Electron microscopy (HR-TEM)/Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS)/(selected-area diffraction pattern) SAED, Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM/EDS), and granulometric distribution analysis. The investigation has revealed that BDW materials are dominated by SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , and Fe 2 O 3, with a complex micromineralogy including alkali feldspar, augite, barite, labradorite, hematite, heulandrite, gypsum, kaolinite, quartz, and smectite. In addition, we have identified a number of trace metals such as Cd, Cu, Cr, and Zn, that are preferentially concentrated into the finer, inhalable, dust fraction and, thus, could present a health hazard in the urban areas around the basalt mining zone. The implication of this observation is that use of these nanometric-sized particulates as soil fertilizer may present different health challenges to those of conventional fertilizers, inviting future work regarding the relative toxicities of these materials. Our investigation on the particle size distribution, nano-particle mineralogy and chemical

  2. Handbook of soil analysis. Mineralogical, organic and inorganic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pansu, M. [Centre IRD, 34 - Montpellier (France); Gautheyrou, J.

    2006-07-01

    This handbook is a reference guide for selecting and carrying out numerous methods of soil analysis. It is written in accordance with analytical standards and quality control approaches.It covers a large body of technical information including protocols, tables, formulae, spectrum models, chromatograms and additional analytical diagrams. The approaches are diverse, from the simplest tests to the most sophisticated determination methods in the physical chemistry of mineralogical and organic structures, available and total elements, soil exchange complex, pesticides and contaminants, trace elements and isotopes.As a basic reference, it will be particularly useful to scientists, engineers, technicians, professors and students, in the areas of soil science, agronomy, earth and environmental sciences as well as in related fields such as analytical chemistry, geology, hydrology, ecology, climatology, civil engineering and industrial activities associated with soil. (orig.)

  3. Mineralogical composition changes of postagrogenic soils under different plant communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churilin, Nikita; Chizhikova, Natalia; Varlamov, Evgheni; Churilina, Alexandra

    2017-04-01

    Plant communities play the leading role in transformation of soil. The need of studying former arable lands increases due to large number of abandoned lands in Russia. It is necessary to study mineralogical composition of soils involved into natural processes to understand the trends of their development after agricultural activities in the past. The aim of the study is to identify changes in mineralogical composition of soils under the influence of different plant communities. Soils were sampled in the south of Arkhangelsk region, Ustyansky district, near Akichkin Pochinok village. Soils are formed on clay moraine of Moscow glaciation. Soil profiles were dug on interfluve. We selected 4 plant communities on different stages of succession: upland meadow with domination of sod grasses (Phleum pratense, Agrostis tenuis), 16-year-old birch forest where dominants are herbaceous plants such as Poa sp., Chamerion angustiflium, Agrostis tenuis, 16-year-old spruce forest with no herbaceous vegetation and 70-year-old bilberry spruce forest with domination of Vaccinium myrtillus and Vaccinium vitis-idaea. To separate soil fractions mineral content. We noticed a clear differentiation of studied soils both in the content of fraction and composition of minerals. Mineralogical composition and major mineral phases correlation of profiles under 70 years and 16 years of spruce forests are different. Mineralogical content in upper part of profile under the young spruce is more differentiated than in old spruce forest: the amount of quartz and kaolinite increases in upper horizon, although in this case the overall pattern of profile formation of clay material during podzolization remains unchanged. There is more substantial desilting under the birch forest, compared with profile under the spruce of same age within top 50 cm. Under the meadow vegetation we've discovered differentiation in mineral composition. Upper horizons contain smectite phase and differ from the underlying

  4. A methodology for spatial data selection for statistical downscaling purposes. A case study of precipitation in southwestern Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woth, K. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Kuestenforschung

    2001-07-01

    In this study, the sensitivity of the estimation of small-scale climate variables using the technique of statistical downscaling is investigated and one method to select the most suitable input data is presented. For the example of precipitation in southwest Europe, the input data are selected systematically by extracting those stations that show a strong statistical relation in time with North Atlantic sea level pressure (SLP). From these stations the sector of North Atlantic SLP is selected that best explains the dominant spatial pattern of regional precipitation. For comparison, one alternative, slightly different geographical box is used. For both sectors a statistical model for the estimation of future rainfall in the southwest of Europe is constructed. It is shown that the method of statistical downscaling is sensitive to small changes of the input data and that the estimations of future precipitation show remarkable differences for the two different Atlantic SLP sectors considered. Possible reasons are discussed. (orig.)

  5. Preliminary analysis in a clayey mass aimed at ceramic blocks production: physical and mineralogical characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, L.J.M.D. da; Apolonio, T.G.; Salviano, A.F.; Taveira, S.K.A.; Garcia, T.G.C.; Silva, J; Luna, P.A.; Macedo, R.S.

    2016-01-01

    The physical, chemical and mineralogical characterization of the clayey mass are important in determining its properties, allowing a better knowledge of the raw material used in the manufacture of ceramic products. This work aims to characterize the raw material used in the manufacture of ceramic sealing blocks in a ceramic industry. Thus, it was evaluated by laboratory tests the raw material used in the production of ceramic blocks in a ceramics industry in the region of Carnauba dos Dantas, RN. The methodology used in the tests is the same as the IPT, which consists in carrying out the plasticity testing, particle size, chemical analysis and X-ray diffraction. Results indicate that the sample studied by the physical and mineralogical characteristics, has the potential to be applied in the manufacture of red ceramic products for use in construction. (author)

  6. Characterisation of some Clays Used for Whiteware Ceramics I. Mineralogical composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Benea

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to obtain a semiquantitative mineralogical composition of raw materials used for whiteware ceramics, four different clay types were analysed by X-ray diffraction. Studies were carried out by using a combination of analyses of the bulk sample, and of the fine fraction. Using a well-established pre-treatment methodology (use of chemicals, ultrasonic treatment, dispersion procedures, clay mineral concentration by centrifugation and sedimentation, oriented and random powder preparation, cation saturation, expansion/dehydration methods, 12 X-ray diffractometer traces were obtained from each sample. Based on these informations it was possible to establish the qualitative mineralogical composition, and also a semiquantitative one using peak intensities and peak area corrected by various factors. Scanning electron microscopy was also used in order to illustrate the identified mineral phases.

  7. Uranium geochemistry, mineralogy, geology, exploration and resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Vivo, B.

    1984-01-01

    This book comprises papers on the following topics: history of radioactivity; uranium in mantle processes; transport and deposition of uranium in hydrothermal systems at temperatures up to 300 0 C: Geological implications; geochemical behaviour of uranium in the supergene environment; uranium exploration techniques; uranium mineralogy; time, crustal evolution and generation of uranium deposits; uranium exploration; geochemistry of uranium in the hydrographic network; uranium deposits of the world, excluding Europe; uranium deposits in Europe; uranium in the economics of energy; role of high heat production granites in uranium province formation; and uranium deposits

  8. Mineralogic Model (MM3.0) Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, A.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a three-dimensional (3-D) representation of the mineral abundance within the geologic framework model domain. The mineralogic model enables project personnel to estimate mineral abundances at any position, within the model region, and within any stratigraphic unit in the model area. The model provides the abundance and distribution of 10 minerals and mineral groups within 22 stratigraphic sequences or model layers in the Yucca Mountain area. The uncertainties and limitations associated with this model are discussed in Section 6.4. Model validation accomplished by corroboration with data not cited as direct input is discussed in Section 7

  9. Comparison between dispersed nuclear power plants and a nuclear energy center at a hypothetical site on Kentucky Lake, Tennessee. Vol. IV. A site selection methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosemarin, C.S.; Yaffee, S.L.

    1976-09-01

    A methodology has been developed for selecting suitable sites for development as nuclear energy centers. First, the forty-eight contiguous states were screened on the basis of four variables: (1) seismic stability; (2) distance from projected population centers; (3) adequate water supply; and (4) noninterference with scenic and reserved lands. After location of a surrogate area in north central Tennessee, further screening was performed using 22 variables to find a suitable 75-sq-mile surrogate site within this 1500-sq-mile area. A computer method for screening the surrogate area is presented, and the use of the data for the 22 variables is illustrated

  10. Integrated technology selection for energy conservation and PAHs control in iron and steel industry: Methodology and case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Li; Lu, Yonglong; Shi, Yajuan; Wang, Tieyu; Luo, Wei; Gosens, Jorrit; Chen, Peng; Li, Haiqian

    2013-01-01

    Energy conservation and PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) control are two challenges for the iron and steel industry, especially where the industry has developed at high speed. How to select appropriate technologies to improve energy efficiency and control pollution from PAHs simultaneously is encountered by both the researchers and the decision makers. This study sets up a framework on technology selection and combination which integrates technology assessment, multiple objective programming and scenario analysis. It can predict proper technology combination for different emission controls, energy conservation targets and desired levels of production. An iron and steel factory in Southwestern China is cited as a case. It is shown that stricter PAHs control will drive the transformation from process control technology to alternative smelting technology. In low PAHs limit, 25% energy reduction is a threshold. Before inclusion of a restraint on energy consumption at 25% reduction, PAHs emission is the key limiting factor for the technology selection; while after inclusion of this restraint, energy consumption becomes the key limiting factor. The desired level of production will also influence the technology selection. This study can help decision makers to select appropriate technologies to meet the PAHs control objectives and energy conservation strategies in energy-intensive industries. - Highlights: ► We predict technical strategy for energy and PAHs reduction in iron and steel mill. ► With low PAHs control objectives, process control technologies are preferable. ► With medium and high PAHs control goals, alternative smelting technology is dominate. ► In low PAHs control objective, 25% energy reduction is a threshold

  11. Mineralogical Approaches to Sourcing Pipes and Figurines from the Eastern Woodlands, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisseman, S.U.; Moore, D.M.; Hughes, R.E.; Hynes, M.R.; Emerson, T.E.

    2002-01-01

    Provenance studies of stone artifacts often rely heavily upon chemical techniques such as neutron activation analysis. However, stone specimens with very similar chemical composition can have different mineralogies (distinctive crystalline structures as well as variations within the same mineral) that are not revealed by multielemental techniques. Because mineralogical techniques are often cheap and usually nondestructive, beginning with mineralogy allows the researcher to gain valuable information and then to be selective about how many samples are submitted for expensive and somewhat destructive chemical analysis, thus conserving both valuable samples and funds. Our University of Illinois team of archaeologists and geologists employs Portable Infrared Mineral Analyzer (PIMA) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Sequential acid dissolution/XRD/Inductively coupled plasma (SAD-XRD-ICP) analyses. Two case studies of Hopewellian pipes and Mississippian figurines illustrate this mineralogical approach. The results for both studies identify sources relatively close to the sites where the artifacts were recovered: Sterling, Illinois (rather than Ohio) for the (Hopewell) pipes and Missouri (rather than Arkansas or Oklahoma) for the Cahokia figurines. ?? 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Mineralogical, chemical, and petrographic analysis of selected rock samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, D.M.

    1976-01-01

    I. The majority of rocks examined from the NTS were found to be siltstones, varying from coarse into the very fine siltstone range, and containing > 60% quartz, usually much higher. Samples of the UEIL series of cores, in contrast, had a large clay mineral fraction, as well as some carbonate present. A few were intermediate silty claystones or argillites. Microphotographs are included to illustrate the variations in texture observed, while most of the data obtained are summarized in tabular form. II. Seven Michigan Salina evaporite specimens were analyzed

  13. Characterization of rock samples and mineralogical controls on leachates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Cravotta, Charles A.; Galeone, Daniel G.; Jackson, John C.; Dulong, Frank T.; Hornberger, Roger J.; Brady, Keith B.C.

    2009-01-01

    post-weathering rock samples, report trace-element content in leachate, and discuss mineralogical controls on leachate quality based on data from one of the participating laboratories. Table 5.1 lists the samples described in this chapter, the sample numbers, and comments on the characteristics of each lithology. Sample locations are plotted in Figure 5.1. Chapters 2 and 3 describe the sample locations, sample preparation protocols, ABA characteristics, and rationale for selection of rock samples for testing. Microprobe data for pyrite and carbonate minerals are tabulated in Appendix 5.1. Leachate data, along with a series of graphs showing concentration and cumulative transport trends, for the laboratory data discussed in this chapter are included as Excel spreadsheets in Appendices 5.2 and 5.3. Leach column data for the interlaboratory study are evaluated and interpreted in Chapters 7 -11.

  14. Methodology for the selection of routes for international cross-border line projects involving multiple objectives and decision-makers in the analyses of restrictions and environmental possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angel S, Enrique; Cadena, Luis Fernando

    2005-01-01

    A scheme was developed and applied to select the optimum environmental route for international cross-border line projects, in a decision making context involving multiple objectives and multiple decision-makers, the project studied was the electricity interconnection for central America (SIEPAC) for which a prospective assessment was carried out regarding the restrictions and possibilities in the light of the Colombian environmental dimensions management model. The methodology proposed followed these stages: Definition and approval of the structure of environmental restriction and criticality variables, sectorization and selection of complex sections, definition of decision-makers for multi-objective analysis; design and application of consultation tool; definition and modeling of options applying SIG; sensitivity analysis of alternative routes and project's environment management. Different options were identified for insertion and permanence of the project according to the criteria of various interest groups and actors consulted: environmental authorities, electricity companies, scientific community and civil society

  15. Preparation of methodology for reliability analysis of selected digital segments of the instrumentation and control systems of NPPs. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hustak, S.; Patrik, M.; Babic, P.

    2000-12-01

    The report is structured as follows: (i) Introduction; (ii) Important notions relating to the safety and dependability of software systems for nuclear power plants (selected notions from IAEA Technical Report No. 397; safety aspects of software application; reliability/dependability aspects of digital systems); (iii) Peculiarities of digital systems and ways to a dependable performance of the required function (failures in the system and principles of defence against them; ensuring resistance of digital systems against failures at various hardware and software levels); (iv) The issue of analytical procedures to assess the safety and reliability of safety-related digital systems (safety and reliability assessment at an early stage of the project; general framework of reliability analysis of complex systems; choice of an appropriate quantitative measure of software reliability); (v) Selected qualitative and quantitative information about the reliability of digital systems; the use of relations between the incidence of various types of faults); and (vi) Conclusions and recommendations. (P.A.)

  16. Fine particle magnetic mineralogy of archaeological ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, D; King, J A

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the magnetic mineralogy of a worldwide collection of archaeological pottery. The mineral types, the mass fractions and the domain states of the constituent magnetic fine particles were elucidated from a range of measurements including magnetic hysteresis behaviour, the acquisition of isothermal remanence, low field susceptibility and thermomagnetic curves. The magnetic mineralogy of most samples was dominated by magnetite. Titanomagnetites with limited titanium substitution and cation deficient magnetites (indicative of low temperature oxidation) were dominant in some samples. Haematite was detected in 53% of the samples, but seldom contributed much to the saturation magnetization. Magnetic particle sizes are skewed to smaller sizes, with sherds mostly having a large superparamagnetic or a stable single domain fraction. Low temperature susceptibility data suggest that 30% of samples had some multidomain component. The percentage by mass of magnetic material in the ancient pottery studied was less than 0.8% for all but one of the samples and the majority of samples contain less than 0.3% by weight of magnetic fine particles. The presence of low temperature oxidation in many samples and the occurrence of a multidomain component in a third of the collection suggest that ancient pottery may not always be suitable for determining the intensity of the ancient geomagnetic field

  17. Methodology of site selection for solid municipal waste disposal plants; Metodologia per la localizzazione sul territorio di aree ambientalmente compatibili con impianti di smaltimento rifiuti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tassoni, E; Cautilli, F; Polizzano, C; Andriola, L [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente

    1997-09-01

    The selection of suitable areas for solid municipal waste disposal plants has a notable importance in relation to the problems linked to the solid municipal waste management. The knowledge of the territory constitutes the fundamental base for the selection of compatible areas, from an environmental point of view. The method developed by ENEA (1995) and applied to the Latina territory (Central Italy) preliminary considers an accurate bibliographic and cartographic search, relative to the geological, presently, hydrogeological characteristics and the use constraints of the territory. The selection of suitable areas has been carried out on the ground of the following criteria: - selection of potentially suitable large areas, carried out overlaying thematic maps (geological, geomorphological, etc.) elaborated for all the examined territory; - selection of ``exclusion`` areas on the ground of use constraints, such as residential areas, water protection zones and so on. At the end of the proceeding phases other main points with territorial and socioeconomic significance have been examined and represented on thematic maps. Because the selected areas have resulted too numerous, it has been necessary to utilize methods to get environmental comparative evaluations of the areas in relation to the solid municipal waste disposal plants. A method, developed by ENEA (1994) and based on the calculus of the ``impacts matrix`` has been used. The application of the described method has allowed to find out the areas with the best degree of compatibility, which could be defined ``first priority`` areas for the final choice of the plants site. The aforesaid classification allows the Local Administrators to select the site in a scientifically correct way, on the ground of the evaluation of environmental characteristics above indicated and of a cost-benefit balance; this latter is presently not included among the objectives of the methodology.

  18. Adaptation of methodology to select structural alternatives of one-way slab in residential building to the guidelines of the European Committee for Standardization (CEN/TC 350)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraile-Garcia, Esteban, E-mail: esteban.fraile@unirioja.es [University of La Rioja, Department of Mechanical Engineering (Spain); Ferreiro-Cabello, Javier, E-mail: javier.ferreiro@unirioja.es [University of La Rioja, Department of Mechanical Engineering (Spain); Qualiberica S.L. (Spain); Martinez-Camara, Eduardo, E-mail: eduardo.martinezc@unirioja.es [University of La Rioja, Department of Mechanical Engineering (Spain); Jimenez-Macias, Emilio, E-mail: emilio.jimenez@unirioja.es [University of La Rioja, Department of Electrical Engineering (Spain)

    2015-11-15

    The European Committee for Standardization (CEN) through its Technical Committee CEN/TC-350 is developing a series of standards for assessing the building sustainability, at both product and building levels. The practical application of the selection (decision making) of structural alternatives made by one-way slabs leads to an intermediate level between the product and the building. Thus the present study addresses this problem of decision making, following the CEN guidelines and incorporating relevant aspects of architectural design into residential construction. A life cycle assessment (LCA) is developed in order to obtain valid information for the decision making process (the LCA was developed applying CML methodology although Ecoindicator99 was used in order to facilitate the comparison of the values); this information (the carbon footprint values) is contrasted with other databases and with the information from the Environmental Product Declaration (EPD) of one of the lightening materials (expanded polystyrene), in order to validate the results. Solutions of different column disposition and geometries are evaluated in the three pillars of sustainable construction on residential construction: social, economic and environmental. The quantitative analysis of the variables used in this study enables and facilitates an objective comparison in the design stage by a responsible technician; the application of the proposed methodology reduces the possible solutions to be evaluated by the expert to 12.22% of the options in the case of low values of the column index and to 26.67% for the highest values. - Highlights: • Methodology for selection of structural alternatives in buildings with one-way slabs • Adapted to CEN guidelines (CEN/TC-350) for assessing the building sustainability • LCA is developed in order to obtain valid information for the decision making process. • Results validated comparing carbon footprint, databases and Env. Product Declarations

  19. THE METHODOLOGY OF CASES SELECTION FOR TEACHING FOREGN SPEECH TO THE STUDENTS OF NON-LIGUISTIC SPECIALITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Lozovskaya

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the advantages of case-study and its potential in forming the motivation for studying the English language for students of non-linguistic specialities, psychology students in particular. Training future psychologists foreign language communication should involve cases, published in foreign periodicals, and numerous exercises and communicative tasks according to the requirements of the case-technology which is used during their learning process. The studies enable to single out the main criteria of cases selection for the successful formation of foreign speech with the students of psychological faculty.

  20. An Integrated Methodology for Supplier Selection under the Presence of Vagueness: A Case in Banking Sector, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semih Onut

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A supplier selection process mainly involves evaluation of different alternative suppliers based on different criteria. This process can be handled as a combination of the customer needs and the technical requirements. Also customers can be considered as the companies to purchase the suppliers’ technical expertise. Hence, this kind of relationship can be analyzed as a house of quality model typical of quality function deployment (QFD. This paper develops a supplier evaluation approach based on the analytic network process (ANP, QFD, and the technique for order performance by similarity to ideal solution (TOPSIS methods to help an investment bank in Turkey as a real world application. Fuzzy logic is used to capture the vagueness in people’s verbal assessments. In the first phase, matrices used to define the importance of the supplier selection criteria and the technical requirements are calculated with the fuzzy ANP method. The technical requirements and the criteria are combined in the house of quality to evaluate the relationship between them. In the second phase, fuzzy TOPSIS is used to rank the suppliers based on the weighted criteria obtained from the first phase. The study was followed by the sensitivity analysis of the results.

  1. Contribution to chemical-mineralogical study of carbonatites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, M.Q. da; Lima, W.N. de; Correa, S.L.A.

    1982-01-01

    A preliminary chemical-mineralogical study of carbonatites from Jacupiranga (SP,Brazil) and Alto Pinheiros (SC,Brazil) enabled not only to ratify hypotheses previously described by Brazilian researchers but also made clear certain aspects related to the geochemistry of carbonatites concerning their occurrence, the probable genesis of these species and their chemical and mineralogical characteristics.(Author) [pt

  2. Mineralogical composition and functionality of clays used for pottery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mineralogical composition and functionality of clays used for pottery education by physically challenged learners at the Ikwezi-Lokusa Educational Centre, Eastern Cape, South Africa. ... The clays were mineralogically characterised using Munsell Soil Color Chart, X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD) and optical microscopy.

  3. Analysis of environmental contamination resulting from catastrophic incidents: part 2. Building laboratory capability by selecting and developing analytical methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, Matthew; Campisano, Romy; Griggs, John; Fitz-James, Schatzi; Hall, Kathy; Mapp, Latisha; Mullins, Marissa; Nichols, Tonya; Shah, Sanjiv; Silvestri, Erin; Smith, Terry; Willison, Stuart; Ernst, Hiba

    2014-11-01

    Catastrophic incidents can generate a large number of samples of analytically diverse types, including forensic, clinical, environmental, food, and others. Environmental samples include water, wastewater, soil, air, urban building and infrastructure materials, and surface residue. Such samples may arise not only from contamination from the incident but also from the multitude of activities surrounding the response to the incident, including decontamination. This document summarizes a range of activities to help build laboratory capability in preparation for sample analysis following a catastrophic incident, including selection and development of fit-for-purpose analytical methods for chemical, biological, and radiological contaminants. Fit-for-purpose methods are those which have been selected to meet project specific data quality objectives. For example, methods could be fit for screening contamination in the early phases of investigation of contamination incidents because they are rapid and easily implemented, but those same methods may not be fit for the purpose of remediating the environment to acceptable levels when a more sensitive method is required. While the exact data quality objectives defining fitness-for-purpose can vary with each incident, a governing principle of the method selection and development process for environmental remediation and recovery is based on achieving high throughput while maintaining high quality analytical results. This paper illustrates the result of applying this principle, in the form of a compendium of analytical methods for contaminants of interest. The compendium is based on experience with actual incidents, where appropriate and available. This paper also discusses efforts aimed at adaptation of existing methods to increase fitness-for-purpose and development of innovative methods when necessary. The contaminants of interest are primarily those potentially released through catastrophes resulting from malicious activity

  4. Environmental mineralogy - Understanding element behavior in ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown Jr, G.E.; Calas, G.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental Mineralogy has developed over the past decade in response to the recognition that minerals are linked in many important ways with the global ecosystem. Minerals are the main repositories of the chemical elements in Earth's crust and thus are the main sources of elements needed for the development of civilization, contaminant and pollutant elements that impact global and local ecosystems, and elements that are essential plant nutrients. These elements are released from minerals through natural processes, such as chemical weathering, and anthropogenic activities, such as mining and energy production, agriculture and industrial activities, and careless waste disposal. Minerals also play key roles in the biogeochemical cycling of the elements, sequestering elements and releasing them as the primary minerals in crustal rocks undergo various structural and compositional transformations in response to physical, chemical, and biological processes that produce secondary minerals and soils. These processes have resulted in the release of toxic elements such as arsenic in groundwater aquifers, which is having a major impact on the health of millions of people in South and Southeast Asia. The interfaces between mineral surfaces and aqueous solutions are the locations of most chemical reactions that control the composition of the natural environment, including the composition of natural waters. The nuclear fuel cycle, from uranium mining to the disposition of high-level nuclear waste, is also intimately related to minerals. A fundamental understanding of these processes requires molecular-scale information about minerals, their bulk structures and properties such as solubility, their surfaces, and their interactions with aqueous solutions, atmospheric and soil gases, natural organic matter, and biological organisms. Gaining this understanding is further complicated by the presence of natural, incidental, and manufactured nano-particles in the environment, which

  5. Nano-mineralogy of suspended sediment during the beginning of coal rejects spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civeira, Matheus S; Ramos, Claudete G; Oliveira, Marcos L S; Kautzmann, Rubens M; Taffarel, Silvio R; Teixeira, Elba C; Silva, Luis F O

    2016-02-01

    Ultrafine and nanometric sediment inputs into river systems can be a major source of nutrients and hazardous elements and have a strong impact on water quality and ecosystem functions of rivers and lakes regions. However, little is known to date about the spatial distribution of sediment sources in most large scale river basins in South America. The objective of this work was to study the coal cleaning rejects (CCRs) spill that occurred from a CCRs impoundment pond into the Tubarão River, South Brazil, provided a unique occasion to study the importance and role of incidental nanoparticles associated with pollutant dispersal from a large-scale, acute aquatic pollution event. Multifaceted geochemical research by X-ray diffraction (XRD), High Resolution-Transmission Electron microscopy (HR-TEM)/(Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy) EDS/(selected-area diffraction pattern) SAED, Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM)/EDS, and Raman spectroscopy, provided an in-depth understanding of importance of a nano-mineralogy approach of Aqueous Pollution Scenarios. The electron beam studies showed the presence of a number of potentially hazardous elements (PHEs) in nanoparticles (amorphous and minerals). Some of the neoformed ultrafine/nanoparticles found in the contaminated sediments are the same as those commonly associated with oxidation/transformation of oxides, silicates, sulfides, and sulfates. These data of the secondary ultra/nanoparticles, puts in evidence their ability to control the mobility of PHEs, suggesting possible presentations in environmental technology, including recuperation of sensitive coal mine. The developed methodology facilitated the sediment transport of the catchment providing consistent results and suggesting its usefulness as a tool for temporary rivers management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cómo elevar la eficiencia en la selección de vehículos. // Methodology for an effective vehicle selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. del A. Raña González

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Enfocar sobre nuevas bases el perfeccionamiento de la gestión de operaciones, es un objetivo principal, para poder alcanzarnuevos niveles competitivos en la esfera del transporte. Los medios de transporte son los activos mas importantes dentro deeste tipo de empresa, seleccionarlos adecuadamente garantizará una explotación eficiente.El presente trabajo propone una metodología que permite evaluar diferentes alternativas de inversión a través de un enfoquetécnico – económico. Desde el punto de vista técnico es necesario utilizar un índice ponderado que permita evaluarintegralmente las características técnicas de cada uno de los vehículos objeto de análisis.Gran importancia se da a una primera evaluación que permita discriminar en dependencia del segmento de mercado dondetrabajará el vehículo y escoger las alternativas que reúnan un grupo de características que las haga comparables para poderseleccionar la mejor opción dentro de todas las posibles.Palabras claves: Criterios de selección, transporte, vehículo, renta de autos.___________________________________________________________________________Abstract.One of the principal proposes in the field of transportation is the improvement of the manager of operations and to reachnew competitive levels. In this sense, a good selection of vehicles is the guarantee of an efficient performance. The presentwork proposes a methodology with the use of pondered index to evaluate integrally the technical characteristics of eachanalyzed vehicles. Great importance is given to a first evaluation that allows to discriminate a group of parameters andmakes possible to select the best option of vehicle in dependence of the market segment where it will be used.Passwords: Vehicle selection, methodology for taking of decision, rent of car.

  7. Mineralogy of Non-Silicified Fossil Wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George E. Mustoe

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The best-known and most-studied petrified wood specimens are those that are mineralized with polymorphs of silica: opal-A, opal-C, chalcedony, and quartz. Less familiar are fossil woods preserved with non-silica minerals. This report reviews discoveries of woods mineralized with calcium carbonate, calcium phosphate, various iron and copper minerals, manganese oxide, fluorite, barite, natrolite, and smectite clay. Regardless of composition, the processes of mineralization involve the same factors: availability of dissolved elements, pH, Eh, and burial temperature. Permeability of the wood and anatomical features also plays important roles in determining mineralization. When precipitation occurs in several episodes, fossil wood may have complex mineralogy.

  8. Mineralogical aspects of the laterites of Maicuru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemos, V.P.; Costa, M.C. da

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the prelimary mineralogical data of the weathering materials derived from the alkaline-ultramafic-carbonatitic Maicuru complex, State of Para. These material include several minerals species: iron, titanium and aluminium oxides/hydroxides as aluminous goethite, geothite, hematite, maghemite, lepidocrocite, anatase; and gibbsite; clay minerals of the smectite, chlorite, vermiculite and kaolinite groups and interstratified chlorite-smectite, mica-vermiculite, vermiculite-chlorite and Kaolinite-smectite; and aluminous phosphates of the crandalite group, wardite, augelite, senegalite, wavelite and variscite. The principal characteristics of these minerals were obtained by X-ray diffraction, optical methods, electron probe microanalysis, energy dispersive scanning electron microscope, X-ray fluorescence, atomic absorption, inductively coupled plasma-ICP source spectrometry and colorimetric methods. (author) [pt

  9. Multiscale characteristics of mechanical and mineralogical heterogeneity using nanoindentation and Maps Mineralogy in Mancos Shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, H.; Mook, W. M.; Dewers, T. A.

    2017-12-01

    Multiscale characteristics of textural and compositional (e.g., clay, cement, organics, etc.) heterogeneity profoundly influence the mechanical properties of shale. In particular, strongly anisotropic (i.e., laminated) heterogeneities are often observed to have a significant influence on hydrological and mechanical properties. In this work, we investigate a sample of the Cretaceous Mancos Shale to explore the importance of lamination, cements, organic content, and the spatial distribution of these characteristics. For compositional and structural characterization, the mineralogical distribution of thin core sample polished by ion-milling is analyzed using QEMSCAN® with MAPS MineralogyTM (developed by FEI Corporoation). Based on mineralogy and organic matter distribution, multi-scale nanoindentation testing was performed to directly link compositional heterogeneity to mechanical properties. With FIB-SEM (3D) and high-magnitude SEM (2D) images, key nanoindentation patterns are analyzed to evaluate elastic and plastic responses. Combined with MAPs Mineralogy data and fine-resolution BSE images, nanoindentation results are explained as a function of compositional and structural heterogeneity. Finite element modeling is used to quantitatively evaluate the link between the heterogeneity and mechanical behavior during nanoindentation. In addition, the spatial distribution of compositional heterogeneity, anisotropic bedding patterns, and mechanical anisotropy are employed as inputs for multiscale brittle fracture simulations using a phase field model. Comparison of experimental and numerical simulations reveal that proper incorporation of additional material information, such as bedding layer thickness and other geometrical attributes of the microstructures, may yield improvements on the numerical predictions of the mesoscale fracture patterns and hence the macroscopic effective toughness. Sandia National Laboratories is a multimission laboratory managed and operated by

  10. Development of a Novel, Sensitive, Selective, and Fast Methodology to Determine Malondialdehyde in Leaves of Melon Plants by Ultra-High-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melisa E. Yonny

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Early production of melon plant (Cucumis melo is carried out using tunnels structures, where extreme temperatures lead to high reactive oxygen species production and, hence, oxidative stress. Malondialdehyde (MDA is a recognized biomarker of the advanced oxidative status in a biological system. Thus a reliable, sensitive, simple, selective, and rapid separative strategy based on ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to positive electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-(+ESI-MS/MS was developed for the first time to measure MDA, without derivatization, in leaves of melon plants exposed to stress conditions. The detection and quantitation limits were 0.02 μg·L−1 and 0.08 μg·L−1, respectively, which was demonstrated to be better than the methodologies currently reported in the literature. The accuracy values were between 96% and 104%. The precision intraday and interday values were 2.7% and 3.8%, respectively. The optimized methodology was applied to monitoring of changes in MDA levels between control and exposed to thermal stress conditions melon leaves samples. Important preliminary conclusions were obtained. Besides, a comparison between MDA levels in melon leaves quantified by the proposed method and the traditional thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS approach was undertaken. The MDA determination by TBARS could lead to unrealistic conclusions regarding the oxidative stress status in plants.

  11. Methodology for the integral comparison of nuclear reactors: selecting a reactor for Mexico; Metodologia para la comparacion integral de reactores nucleares: seleccion de un reactor para Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes R, R.; Martin del Campo M, C. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Laboratorio de Analisis de Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: ricarera@yahoo.com.mx

    2006-07-01

    In this work it was built a methodology to compare nuclear reactors of third generation that can be contemplated for future electric planning in Mexico. This methodology understands the selection of the reactors to evaluate eliminating the reactors that still are not sufficiently mature at this time of the study. A general description of each reactor together with their main ones characteristic is made. It was carried out a study for to select the group of parameters that can serve as evaluation indicators, which are the characteristics of the reactors with specific values for each considered technology, and it was elaborated an evaluation matrix indicators including the reactors in the columns and those indicators in the lines. Since that none reactor is the best in all the indicators were necessary to use a methodology for multi criteria taking decisions that we are presented. It was used the 'Fuzzy Logic' technique, the which is based in those denominated diffuse groups and in a system of diffuse inference based on heuristic rules in the way 'If Then consequence> ', where the linguistic values of the condition and of the consequence is defined by diffuse groups, it is as well as the rules always they transform a diffuse group into another. Later on they combine all the diffuse outputs to create a single output and an inverse transformation is made that it transfers the output from the diffuse domain to the real one. They were carried out two studies one with the entirety of the indicators and another in which the indicators were classified in three approaches: the first one refers to indicators related with the planning of the plants inside the context of the general electric sector, the second approach includes indicators related with the characteristics of the fuel and the third it considers indicators related with the acting of the plant in safety and environmental impact. This second study allowed us to know the qualities of

  12. Automated Quantitative Rare Earth Elements Mineralogy by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindern, Sven; Meyer, F. Michael

    2016-09-01

    Increasing industrial demand of rare earth elements (REEs) stems from the central role they play for advanced technologies and the accelerating move away from carbon-based fuels. However, REE production is often hampered by the chemical, mineralogical as well as textural complexity of the ores with a need for better understanding of their salient properties. This is not only essential for in-depth genetic interpretations but also for a robust assessment of ore quality and economic viability. The design of energy and cost-efficient processing of REE ores depends heavily on information about REE element deportment that can be made available employing automated quantitative process mineralogy. Quantitative mineralogy assigns numeric values to compositional and textural properties of mineral matter. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with a suitable software package for acquisition of backscatter electron and X-ray signals, phase assignment and image analysis is one of the most efficient tools for quantitative mineralogy. The four different SEM-based automated quantitative mineralogy systems, i.e. FEI QEMSCAN and MLA, Tescan TIMA and Zeiss Mineralogic Mining, which are commercially available, are briefly characterized. Using examples of quantitative REE mineralogy, this chapter illustrates capabilities and limitations of automated SEM-based systems. Chemical variability of REE minerals and analytical uncertainty can reduce performance of phase assignment. This is shown for the REE phases parisite and synchysite. In another example from a monazite REE deposit, the quantitative mineralogical parameters surface roughness and mineral association derived from image analysis are applied for automated discrimination of apatite formed in a breakdown reaction of monazite and apatite formed by metamorphism prior to monazite breakdown. SEM-based automated mineralogy fulfils all requirements for characterization of complex unconventional REE ores that will become

  13. Mineralogy of the Hydrous Lower Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, S. H.; Chen, H.; Leinenweber, K. D.; Kunz, M.; Prakapenka, V.; Bechtel, H.; Liu, Z.

    2017-12-01

    The hydrous ringwoodite inclusions found in diamonds suggest water storage in the mantle transition zone. However, water storage in the lower mantle remains unclear. Bridgmanite and magnesiowustite appear to have very little storage capacity for water. Here, we report experimental results indicating significant changes in the lower-mantle mineralogy under the presence of water. We have synthesized Mg2SiO4 ringwoodite with 2 wt% water in multi-anvil press at 20 GPa and 1573 K at ASU. The hydrous ringwoodite sample was then loaded to diamond anvil cells with Ar or Ne as a pressure medium. We heated the pure hydrous ringwoodite samples at lower-mantle pressure using a CO2 laser heating system at ASU. We measured X-ray diffraction patterns at the GSECARS sector of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) and 12.2.2 sector of the Advanced Light Source (ALS). For the separate Pt-mixed samples, we have conducted in situ heating at the beamlines using near IR laser heating systems. We measured the infrared spectra of the heated samples at high pressure and after pressure quench at 1.4.4 sector of ALS. In the in situ experiments with hydrous ringwoodite + Pt mixture as a starting material, we found formation of stishovite together with bridgmanite and periclase during heating with a near IR laser beams at 1300-2500 K and 35-66 GPa. However, some hydrous ringwoodite still remains even after a total of 45 min of heating. In contrast, the hydrous ringwoodite samples heated without Pt by CO2 laser beams are transformed completely to bridgmanite, periclase and stishovite at 31-55 GPa and 1600-1900 K. We have detected IR active OH mode of stishovite from the samples heated at lower-mantle pressures. The unit-cell volume of stishovite measured after pressure quench is greater than that of dry stishovite by 0.3-0.6%, supporting 0.5-1 wt% of H2O in stishovite in these samples. Stishovite is a thermodynamically forbidden phase in the dry lower mantle because of the existence of periclase and

  14. Mineralogical microanalysis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monso, E.; Tura, J.M.; Marsal, M.; Morell, F.; Pujadas, J.; Morera, J.

    1990-01-01

    A mineralogical analysis of lung tissue was conducted on 25 samples from patients who had been diagnosed as having idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at low magnification and energy-dispersive x-ray analysis (EDXA) was used. In all samples, the surface silicon/sulfur (Si/S) ratio was calculated. The Si/S ratio for 25 samples of normal lung and 6 samples of pneumoconiotic lung was also determined (upper limit of normal Si/S ratio = 0.3). The difference between the Si/S ratio in the group with IPF and group with normal lung tissue was significantly significant (p less than .007, Wilcoxon test). Six of 12 patients with a previous diagnosis of IPF and a Si/S ratio greater than 0.3 had an exposure history that could imply inhalation of silica/silicates, and the correct diagnosis for these patients is most probably pneumoconiosis. The silica/silicate deposits detected in patients with IPF, and who had a ratio and no past exposure to dusts, could be either a cause or an effect of the disease

  15. Mineralogical microanalysis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monso, E.; Tura, J.M.; Marsal, M.; Morell, F.; Pujadas, J.; Morera, J. (Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona (Spain))

    1990-05-01

    A mineralogical analysis of lung tissue was conducted on 25 samples from patients who had been diagnosed as having idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at low magnification and energy-dispersive x-ray analysis (EDXA) was used. In all samples, the surface silicon/sulfur (Si/S) ratio was calculated. The Si/S ratio for 25 samples of normal lung and 6 samples of pneumoconiotic lung was also determined (upper limit of normal Si/S ratio = 0.3). The difference between the Si/S ratio in the group with IPF and group with normal lung tissue was significantly significant (p less than .007, Wilcoxon test). Six of 12 patients with a previous diagnosis of IPF and a Si/S ratio greater than 0.3 had an exposure history that could imply inhalation of silica/silicates, and the correct diagnosis for these patients is most probably pneumoconiosis. The silica/silicate deposits detected in patients with IPF, and who had a ratio and no past exposure to dusts, could be either a cause or an effect of the disease.

  16. chemical and mineralogical characterization of lateritic iron ore

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DJFLEX

    2010-04-22

    Apr 22, 2010 ... The laterite iron ore deposit at Auchi, Edo State, Nigeria was studied chemically and mineralogically. The results of the chemical ... SAMPLE PREPARATION. The samples .... 2µm) and were subjected to X-ray diffraction using.

  17. Mineralogy of halloysites and their interaction with porphyrine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vašutová, V.; Bezdička, Petr; Lang, Kamil; Hradil, David

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 3 (2013), s. 243-250 ISSN 0862-5468 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : organoclays * mineralogy * porphyrine * CEC Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.434, year: 2013

  18. Kinetics of Cs adsorption on soils with different mineralogical composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Atsushi; Funakawa, Shinya; Kosaki, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    137 Cs is one of the main radioisotopes released into the environment by nuclear powerstation accidents (e.g. Chernobyl) and nuclear weapons tests. Many studies have shown that Cs tends to remain at surface soils due to the high adsorption selectivity of clay minerals for this element. This behavior of the Cs + ion is, however, assumed to vary significantly depending on the mineralogical composition of the soil. The main objective of this study is to analyze the kinetics of Cs adsorption on soils with different mineralogical composition. Soil samples used in this study were Mollisols (Um) and Alfisols (Ua) from Ukraine, Ultisols (Tu) from Thailand and Spodosols (Js) from Japan. The dominant clay species of these soils are montmorillonite (Um, Ua), kaolinite and mica (Tu) and beidellite (Js). The rates of Cs adsorption and Ca or K desorption were measured using a continuous flow method. Soil samples that were previously saturated with Ca 2+ were leached with a 0.75 mmol/l Cs + solution at a constant rate of 2.0 ml/min. The leachate was collected every 10 minutes and the concentrations of Cs + , Ca 2+ and K + of each aliquot were measured by atomic adsorption spectrophotometry (Cs + , Ca 2+ ) and flame spectrophotometry (K + ). The datasets obtained were simulated using the first order kinetic model: y = a(1 - exp(-kt)), where a is the adsorption (desorption) maximum and k the rate constant. It is here assumed that Ca 2+ is desorbed from cation exchange sites and K + desorbed from the frayed edges of micaceous minerals. The values of a obtained for both Cs adsorption and Ca desorption was in the order Js>Um>Tu>Ua, whereas the values of k were in the order Tu>Ua>Um>Js. This result reflects the values of permanent negative charge of clays which are originated from the substitution of cations in the structure of 2:1 clay minerals. The value of a for K + desorption was, however, highest in Tu, suggesting that the values of Cs + -exchangeable K + correspond to the amount

  19. The mineralogy of ordinary chondrites and implications for asteroid spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcsween, Harry Y., Jr.; Bennett, Marvin E., III; Jarosewich, Eugene

    1991-01-01

    Published data from bulk chemical analyses of 94 ordinary chondrites are compiled in a table of normative mineralogy and discussed in detail. Significant variations in olivine, pyroxene, and metal abundance ratios are found within each chondrite class and attributed to redox processes superimposed on initial differences in metal/silicate ratios. The use of the diagrams constructed here to predict the mineralogic characteristics of asteroids on the basis of spectrophotometric observations is suggested.

  20. On the role of clay and its mineralogic components in low- and intermediary-level radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craciun, C.; Balan, V.

    2001-01-01

    In site selection for radioactive waste disposal a special attention is paid to clay and its mineralogic components as it has an important potential of retarding for both the radionuclides in radioactive wastes and fluid dynamics in the disposal site. The most frequent reaction implied in the radioisotope migration from liquid to solid phase is the cationic exchange. This work aimed at finding the relationship of clay and its mineralogic components, on one hand, and the exchange properties of the deposits, on the other hand. These relationships are based on the data obtained from about 50 cores sampled in 5 drillings performed in Saligny site, selected for radioactive waste disposal. Four levels different from physical, chemical and mineralogical properties were evidenced. The ionic exchange rate, with values within 5 to 30 me/100 g, has a trend of reflecting the clay contents. The relations between the cationic exchange rate and the clay contents appears to be linear with correlation coefficients varying within 0.81 - 0.97. The mineralogical composition of clay includes smectite (predominantly), illite and kaolin. Close, linear relations between the cationic exchange rate and the smectite fraction in clay and deposits were established with correlation coefficients within 0.74-0.76 and 0.85-0.95, respectively. These results show that the potential of the investigated deposits of acting as natural barriers with retarding effects on both radionuclides and the fluids in the disposal zone is strongly correlated to the amount and the content of the clay in these deposits

  1. Mineralogical Study of Zard Koh and Kulli Koh Iron Ore Deposits of Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SULTAN AHMED KHOSO

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Zard Koh and Kulli Koh are two recently discovered iron ore deposits, existing in the Chagai district, Balochistan, Pakistan. PSM (Pakistan Steel Mill Limited is interested to utilize these ore deposits at priority. Purpose of the present study was to assess the mineralogy of the Zard Koh and Kulli Koh iron ore deposits, as it plays a vital role in the selection of an appropriate processing method. The mineralogical study of ore deposits was carried out by XRD (X-Ray Diffraction, XRF (X-Ray Fluorescence, SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope attached with EDS (Energy Dispersive Spectroscope and SM (Stereomicroscope techniques. Results indicated that the Zard Koh ore is mainly composed of 60.15% maghemite, 23.57% pyrite, 4.07% chlorite, 10.30% grossular and 1.65% admontite minerals. The chemical analysis revealed that Zard Koh iron ore contains an average of 54.27% Fe, 12.73% S, 8.70% Si, 3.07% Al, 4.07% Ca, and 2.16% Mg. Similarly, the mineralogical study of the Kulli Koh iron ore indicated that, ore is containing 51.16% hematite, 29.24% quartz, 8.89% dravite, and 8.76% kaolinite minerals. Elemental analysis of different samples indicated that Kulli Koh iron ore contains an average composition of 40.23% Fe, 20.67% Si, 3.44% Ca, 3.81% Al and 3.25% Mg. Mineralogical study of the Zard Koh and Kulli Koh iron ore deposits suggested that these ore deposits can be beneficiated costeffectively by using magnetic separation techniques.

  2. Mineralogical study of zard koh and kulli koh iron ore deposits of pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoso, S.A.; Abro, M.I.

    2017-01-01

    Zard Koh and Kulli Koh are two recently discovered iron ore deposits, existing in the Chagai district, Balochistan, Pakistan. PSM (Pakistan Steel Mill Limited) is interested to utilize these ore deposits at priority. Purpose of the present study was to assess the mineralogy of the Zard Koh and Kulli Koh iron ore deposits, as it plays a vital role in the selection of an appropriate processing method. The mineralogical study of ore deposits was carried out by XRD (X-Ray Diffraction), XRF (X-Ray Fluorescence), SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope) attached with EDS (Energy Dispersive Spectroscope) and SM (Stereomicroscope) techniques. Results indicated that the Zard Koh ore is mainly composed of 60.15% maghemite, 23.57% pyrite, 4.07% chlorite, 10.30% grossular and 1.65% admontite minerals. The chemical analysis revealed that Zard Koh iron ore contains an average of 54.27% Fe, 12.73% S, 8.70% Si, 3.07% Al, 4.07% Ca, and 2.16% Mg. Similarly, the mineralogical study of the Kulli Koh iron ore indicated that, ore is containing 51.16% hematite, 29.24% quartz, 8.89% dravite, and 8.76% kaolinite minerals. Elemental analysis of different samples indicated that Kulli Koh iron ore contains an average composition of 40.23% Fe, 20.67% Si, 3.44% Ca, 3.81% Al and 3.25% Mg. Mineralogical study of the Zard Koh and Kulli Koh iron ore deposits suggested that these ore deposits can be beneficiated costeffectively by using magnetic separation techniques. (author)

  3. Mineralogical, chemical and physical study of potential buffer and backfill materials from ABM. Test Package 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumpulainen, S.; Kiviranta, L.

    2011-07-01

    In the ABM experiment, three test packages with centre steel heaters surrounded by stacks of compacted bentonite rings of various clay materials were placed in boreholes in Aespoe tunnel. The first parcel was saturated with Aespoe groundwater and the heater was turned on simultaneously with the start of saturation. This parcel was excavated 30 months after its installation. Chemical, mineralogical and physical properties of the MX-80, Dep-CaN, Asha and Friedland clay samples from the ABM parcel 1 were analysed and compared to reference samples. Chemical analyses (ICP-AES, C, CO 3 , S, water soluble SO 4 , Fe 2+ /Fe 3+ ), exchangeable cation analyses, mineralogical analyses (XRD, FTIR) and selective extractions were used to determine changes in the chemistry and mineralogy of ABM materials. Swelling pressure and hydraulic conductivity measurements were performed both for extracted samples and for ground and recompacted samples. Major changes in exchangeable cation composition were observed in all samples originating from equilibration with Aespoe groundwater and interactions with equilibrated waters from neighbouring block materials. Some minor changes in chemical composition were observed as well. Increases in soluble sulphate content in the vicinity of the heater were thought to result from precipitation of sulphate salts. Decreases in sodium content and increases in calcium content were ascribed to changes in exchangeable cations. Interaction with iron was observed to occur only in the close vicinity (first few mm) of the heater. No significantly measureable change in mineralogical composition was seen in any of the studied materials. Extracted Dep-CaN samples showed a slight decrease in swelling pressure. However, when the material was ground, compacted and measured again the swelling pressure was fully recovered. No related change in hydraulic conductivities was observed. (orig.)

  4. Contents and composition of organic matter in subsurface soils affected by land use and soil mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerbrock, Ruth H.; Kaiser, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Land use and mineralogy affect the ability of surface as well as subsurface soils to sequester organic carbon and their contribution to mitigate the greenhouse effect. This study aimed to investigate the long-term impact of land use (i.e., arable and forest) and soil mineralogy on contents and composition of soil organic matter (SOM) from subsurface soils. Seven soils different in mineralogy (Albic and Haplic Luvisol, Colluvic and Haplic Regosol, Haplic and Vertic Cambisol, Haplic Stagnosol) were selected within Germany. Soil samples were taken from forest and adjacent arable sites. First, particulate and water soluble organic matter were separated from the subsurface soil samples. From the remaining solid residues the OM(PY) fractions were separated, analyzed for its OC content (OCPY) and characterized by FTIR spectroscopy. For the arable subsurface soils multiple regression analyses indicate significant positive relationships between the soil organic carbon contents and the contents of i) exchangeable Ca and oxalate soluble Fe, and Alox contents. Further for the neutral arable subsurface soils the contents OCPY weighted by its C=O contents were found to be related to the contents of Ca indicating interactions between OM(PY) and Ca cations. For the forest subsurface soils (pH <5) the OCPY contents were positively related with the contents of Na-pyrophosphate soluble Fe and Al. For the acidic forest subsurface soils such findings indicate interactions between OM(PY) and Fe3+ and Al3+ cations. The effects of land use and soil mineralogy on contents and composition of SOM and OM(PY) will be discussed.

  5. An integrated methodological approach to the computer-assisted gas chromatographic screening of basic drugs in biological fluids using nitrogen selective detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugal, R; Massé, R; Sanchez, G; Bertrand, M J

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents the methodological aspects of a computerized system for the gas-chromatographic screening and primary identification of central nervous system stimulants and narcotic analgesics (including some of their respective metabolites) extracted from urine. The operating conditions of a selective nitrogen detector for optimized analytical functions are discussed, particularly the effect of carrier and fuel gas on the detector's sensitivity to nitrogen-containing molecules and discriminating performance toward biological matrix interferences. Application of simple extraction techniques, combined with rapid derivatization procedures, computer data acquisition, and reduction of chromatographic data are presented. Results show that this system approach allows for the screening of several drugs and their metabolites in a short amount of time. The reliability and stability of the system have been tested by analyzing several thousand samples for doping control at major international sporting events and for monitoring drug intake in addicts participating in a rehabilitation program. Results indicate that these techniques can be used and adapted to many different analytical toxicology situations.

  6. In Situ Planetary Mineralogy Using Simultaneous Time Resolved Fluorescence and Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacksberg, J.; Rossman , G.R.

    2011-01-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy is one of the primary methods of mineralogical analysis in the laboratory, and more recently in the field. Because of its versatility and ability to interrogate rocks in their natural form it is one of the front runners for the next generation of in situ instruments designed to explore adverse set of solar system bodies (e.g. Mars, Venus, the Moon, and other primitive bodies such as asteroids and the Martian moons Phobos and Deimos), as well as for pre-selection of rock and soil samples for potential cache and return missions.

  7. Automated quantitative micro-mineralogical characterization for environmental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kathleen S.; Hoal, K.O.; Walton-Day, Katherine; Stammer, J.G.; Pietersen, K.

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of ore and waste-rock material using automated quantitative micro-mineralogical techniques (e.g., QEMSCAN® and MLA) has the potential to complement traditional acid-base accounting and humidity cell techniques when predicting acid generation and metal release. These characterization techniques, which most commonly are used for metallurgical, mineral-processing, and geometallurgical applications, can be broadly applied throughout the mine-life cycle to include numerous environmental applications. Critical insights into mineral liberation, mineral associations, particle size, particle texture, and mineralogical residence phase(s) of environmentally important elements can be used to anticipate potential environmental challenges. Resources spent on initial characterization result in lower uncertainties of potential environmental impacts and possible cost savings associated with remediation and closure. Examples illustrate mineralogical and textural characterization of fluvial tailings material from the upper Arkansas River in Colorado.

  8. X-ray Spectroscopy and Magnetism in Mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainctavit, Philippe; Brice-Profeta, Sandrine; Gaudry, Emilie; Letard, Isabelle; Arrio, Marie-Anne

    The objective of this paper is to present the kind of information that can be gained in the field of mineralogy from the use of x-ray magnetic spectroscopies. We review some of the questions that are unsettled and that could benefit from an interdisciplinary approach where magnetism, spectroscopy and mineralogy could be mixed. Most of the attention is focused on iron and some other 3d transition elements. The mineralogy of planetary cores and its relation with known meteorites are exemplified. The various oxide phases in the mantle and the nature of iron in these phases is also underlined. The presence of transition elements in insulating minerals and its relation with macroscopic properties such as the color of gemstones are reviewed. Finally an introduction to paleomagnetism is given with a special attention to nanomaghemites.

  9. The Effect of Land Use Change on Soil Type and Clay Mineralogy in Safashahr Area, Fars Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Karimi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, changing the rangelands to agriculture and garden is common. To investigate the impact of land use change on the soils type and clay mineralogy, four land uses including rangeland with poor vegetation, agricultural land, new and old apple orchards were selected in Safashahr area, Fars province. In each land use, three soil profiles were excavated and described and one profile was considered as representative. After required physical and chemical analyses, they were classified according to Soil Taxonomy (ST and the World Reference Base for Soil Resources (WRB. Selected surface and subsurface samples were also collected for clay mineralogy studies. Results showed that changing land use did not have significant effect on soil type and clay minerals and all soils consist of mica, chlorite, smectite, kaolinite and mixed layer minerals. Results demonstrated that ST is more efficient compared to WRB to classify the studied soils.

  10. Mineralogical and geological study of fault rocks and associated strata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeon Jin; Jeong, Gyo Cheol; Bae, Doo Won; Park, Seong Min; Kim, Jun Yeong

    2007-01-01

    Mineralogical characterizations of fault clay and associated strata in fault zone with field study and analytical methods. Mineral composition and color of fault clay and rock occur in fracture zone different from bed rocks. Fault clay mainly composed of smectite with minor zeolite such as laumontite and stilbite, and halloysite, illite, Illite and halloysite grow on the surface of smectite, and laumontite and stilbite result from precipitation or alteration of Ca rich bed rock. The result of mineralogical study at Ipsil, Wangsan, Gaegok, Yugyeori, Gacheon in Gyeongju area, the detail research of microstructure in the fault clay making it possible for prediction to age of fault activity

  11. Mineralogical and geological study of fault rocks and associated strata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeon Jin; Jeong, Gyo Cheol; Bae, Doo Won; Park, Seong Min; Kim, Jun Yeong [Andong Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-01-15

    Mineralogical characterizations of fault clay and associated strata in fault zone with field study and analytical methods. Mineral composition and color of fault clay and rock occur in fracture zone different from bed rocks. Fault clay mainly composed of smectite with minor zeolite such as laumontite and stilbite, and halloysite, illite, Illite and halloysite grow on the surface of smectite, and laumontite and stilbite result from precipitation or alteration of Ca rich bed rock. The result of mineralogical study at Ipsil, Wangsan, Gaegok, Yugyeori, Gacheon in Gyeongju area, the detail research of microstructure in the fault clay making it possible for prediction to age of fault activity.

  12. Mineralogy of Rocks and Sediments at Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilles, Cherie; Downs, Robert; Blake, David; Vaniman, David; Ming, Doug; Rampe, Elizabeth; Morris, Dick; Morrison, Shaunna; Treiman, Allan; Chipera, Steve; Yen, Albert; Bristow, Thomas; Craig, Patricia; Hazen, Robert; Crisp, Joy; Grotzinger, John; Des Marias, David; Farmer, Jack; Sarrazin, Philippe; Morookian, John Michael

    2017-04-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity, is providing in situ mineralogical, geochemical, and sedimentological assessments of rocks and soils in Gale crater. Since landing in 2012, Curiosity has traveled over 15 km, providing analyses of mudstones and sandstones to build a stratigraphic history of the region. The CheMin X-ray diffraction (XRD) instrument is the first instrument on Mars to provide quantitative mineralogical analyses of drilled powders and scooped sediment based on X-ray crystallography. CheMin identifies and determines mineral abundances and unit-cell parameters of major crystalline phases, and identifies minor phases at abundances >1 wt%. In conjunction with elemental analyses, CheMin-derived crystal chemistry allows for the first calculations of crystalline and amorphous material compositions. These mineralogy, crystal chemistry, and amorphous chemistry datasets are playing central roles in the characterization of Gale crater paleoenvironments. CheMin has analyzed 17 rock and sediment samples. In the first phase of the mission, Curiosity explored the sedimentary units of Aeolis Palus (Bradbury group), including two mudstones from Yellowknife Bay. CheMin analyses of the Yellowknife Bay mudstones identified clay minerals among an overall basaltic mineral assemblage. These mineralogical results, along with imaging and geochemical analyses, were used to characterize an ancient lacustrine setting that is thought to have once been a habitable environment. Following the investigations of the Bradbury group, Curiosity arrived at the lower reaches of Aeolis Mons, commonly called Mt. Sharp. A strategic sample campaign was initiated, drilling bedrock at X-ray amorphous phases. Adjacent to fractures, light-toned, halo-like zones are thought to result from significant aqueous alteration of the primary sandstone and show decreased abundances of feldspar and pyroxene, and an increase in the amorphous component, specifically high-silica phases. The Murray

  13. Mineralogy and origin of atmospheric particles in the industrial area of Huelva (SW Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabé, J. M.; Carretero, M. I.; Galán, E.

    The mineralogy of atmospheric particles at the confluence of the Tinto and Odiel rivers, south of Huelva (a highly industrialized city in the SW Spain), was characterized in view to identify source origins. In spite of the small amount of sample collected, mineralogical characterization was performed by X-ray diffraction, polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy with EDS analysis system, using an adequate sample preparation methodology. Sedimentable (SP) and aerosols particles were sampled an one-week basis every two months for one year. Quartz, calcite and feldspars were found to be the major minerals in both fractions, and phyllosilicates, dolomite and gypsum were also identified in lower content. Minor mineral particles included barite, apatite, sphalerite and pyrite. SEM studies revealed the additional presence of chalcopyrite in both SP and aerosols, and of chalcocite-covellite, halite and sylvite in the latter. Siderite, hematite and ankerite were only detected in the SP fraction. The concentrations of the previous minerals increased in summer by effect of the limited rain and the resulting scarcity of atmosphere washing. Non-mineral particles detected by SEM in SP and aerosol fractions included spherical, biological and compositionally complex particles. The main source of mineral particles was found to be the soil suspension in addition to the metallurgical and fertilizer production industries in the area.

  14. Mineralogy: a modern approach to teaching a traditional discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, G. W.

    2011-12-01

    Mineralogy has traditionally been a primary component in undergraduate geoscience curriculum. In recent years, there has been a trend in which mineralogy and petrology have been combined into Earth Materials courses. This is unfortunate as these disciplines each have much to offer students, and content once considered essential is eliminated out of necessity. Mineralogy is still fundamental to students' understanding of the Earth and Earth processes. Using a modern approach to time-honored concepts, I teach a quarter-long Introductory Mineralogy class offered through the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego. Student evaluations of this course unequivocally indicate a high degree of learning and interest in the material, confirming that mineralogy continues to be a valuable class into the 21st century. While much of the content remains similar to what has been taught over the last century, my strategy involves a well-balanced approach to old and new. The first third of the course is background including the relevance of mineralogy, crystal chemistry, and crystallography; the second third of the course is systematic mineralogy using the Dana system; the last third of the course is devoted to understanding optical mineralogy, using modern analytical equipment such as XRD and SEM, and learning to use the petrographic microscope. Throughout the quarter, a strong emphasis is placed on the importance of hand-sample identification. Field work, traditionally not emphasized in mineralogy courses, has been re-introduced to the curriculum. I use modern technology to facilitate and support student learning. A lecture-based approach is employed with carefully crafted and organized PowerPoint presentations. PowerPoint lectures can be effective and highly engaging. The key is to ensure that the lectures are not overly reliant on text, instead relying on diagrams, charts, photos, and embedded media such as 3-D animations (ex. to teach

  15. The Relationship Between the Learning Style Perceptual Preferences of Urban Fourth Grade Children and the Acquisition of Selected Physical Science Concepts Through Learning Cycle Instructional Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Kenneth Mark

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the relationship between the learning style perceptual preferences of fourth grade urban students and the attainment of selected physical science concepts for three simple machines as taught using learning cycle methodology. The sample included all fourth grade children from one urban elementary school (N = 91). The research design followed a quasi-experimental format with a single group, equivalent teacher demonstration and student investigation materials, and identical learning cycle instructional treatment. All subjects completed the Understanding Simple Machines Test (USMT) prior to instructional treatment, and at the conclusion of treatment to measure student concept attainment related to the pendulum, the lever and fulcrum, and the inclined plane. USMT pre and post-test scores, California Achievement Test (CAT-5) percentile scores, and Learning Style Inventory (LSI) standard scores for four perceptual elements for each subject were held in a double blind until completion of the USMT post-test. The hypothesis tested in this study was: Learning style perceptual preferences of fourth grade students as measured by the Dunn, Dunn, and Price Learning Style Inventory (LSI) are significant predictors of success in the acquisition of physical science concepts taught through use of the learning cycle. Analysis of pre and post USMT scores, 18.18 and 30.20 respectively, yielded a significant mean gain of +12.02. A controlled stepwise regression was employed to identify significant predictors of success on the USMT post-test from among USMT pre-test, four CAT-5 percentile scores, and four LSI perceptual standard scores. The CAT -5 Total Math and Total Reading accounted for 64.06% of the variance in the USMT post-test score. The only perceptual element to act as a significant predictor was the Kinesthetic standard score, accounting for 1.72% of the variance. The study revealed that learning cycle instruction does not appear

  16. Current status of application of Moessbauer effect in geology and mineralogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Binfu

    1995-01-01

    The paper briefly introduces the current status of the application of Moessbauer effect in geology and mineralogy. It shows that geology and mineralogy are very active fields in the application of Moessbauer effect

  17. Methods of stoichiography in geochemistry and mineralogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malakhov, V.V.; Petrov, L.L.; Vlasov, A.A.; Dovlitova, L.S.

    2003-01-01

    Reported is a novel reference-free technique, based on stoichiography, for the molecular and phase analysis of complex mixtures with unknown compositions. The concept of stoichiography is based on the stoichiometry of mass transfer of the constituents in transient, homogeneous and heterogeneous phase transformation processes. The technique utilizes both the separation of components according to their differential dissolution characteristics as well as the dynamics of the changes in stoichiometry. The detailed study of the dissolution processes has been made possible by the use of a specially designed instrumental system, termed a Stoichiograph, which consists of a high sensitive inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer as the detector-analyzer. Fundamentals, methodology, and instrumentation of the technique are discussed and its application for the phase analysis of multielement-multiphase samples such as minerals, aerosols, and archaeological materials is demonstrated

  18. Mineralogical Results from the Mars Science Laboratory Rover Curiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, David Frederick.

    2017-01-01

    NASA's CheMin instrument, the first X-ray Diffractometer flown in space, has been operating on Mars for nearly five years. CheMin was first to establish the quantitative mineralogy of the Mars global soil (1). The instrument was next used to determine the mineralogy of a 3.7 billion year old lacustrine mudstone, a result that, together with findings from other instruments on the MSL Curiosity rover, documented the first habitable environment found on another planet (2). The mineralogy of this mudstone from an ancient playa lake was also used to derive the maximum concentration of CO2 in the early Mars atmosphere, a surprisingly low value that calls into question the current theory that CO2 greenhouse warming was responsible for the warm and wet environment of early Mars. CheMin later identified the mineral tridymite, indicative of silica-rich volcanism, in mudstones of the Murray formation on Mt. Sharp. This discovery challenges the paradigm of Mars as a basaltic planet and ushers in a new chapter of comparative terrestrial planetology (3). CheMin is now being used to systematically sample the sedimentary layers that comprise the lower strata of Mt. Sharp, a 5,000 meter sequence of sedimentary rock laid down in what was once a crater lake, characterizing isochemical sediments that through their changing mineralogy, document the oxidation and drying out of the Mars in early Hesperian time.

  19. Mineralogy and geochemistry of bauxite and bentonite deposits from Mozambique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dos Muchangos, A.C.

    2000-01-01

    Results of mineralogical and geochemical studies of bauxites, kaolinitic clays and bentoniteS from Mozambique are presented in this thesis. The bauxite and kaolinitic clay deposits in Penhalonga area (in the central western part of Mozambique) are associated with Precambrian magmatic rocks and

  20. Moessbauer mineralogy on the Moon: The lunar regolith

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, Richard V.; Klingelhoefer, Goestar; Korotev, Randy L.; Shelfer, Tad D.

    1998-01-01

    A first-order requirement for spacecraft missions that land on solid planetary objects is instrumentation for mineralogical analyses. For purposes of providing diagnostic information about naturally-occurring materials, the element iron is particularly important because it is abundant and multivalent. Knowledge of the oxidation state of iron and its distribution among iron-bearing mineralogies tightly constrains the types of materials present and provides information about formation and modification (weathering) processes. Because Moessbauer spectroscopy is sensitive to both the valence of iron and its local chemical environment, the technique is unique in providing information about both the relative abundance of iron-bearing phases and oxidation state of the iron. The Moessbauer mineralogy of lunar regolith samples (primarily soils from the Apollo 16 and 17 missions to the Moon) were measured in the laboratory to demonstrate the strength of the technique for in-situ mineralogical exploration of the Moon. The regolith samples were modeled as mixtures of five iron-bearing phases: olivine, pyroxene, glass, ilmenite, and metal. Based on differences in relative proportions of iron associated with these phases, volcanic-ash regolith can be distinguished from impact-derived regolith, impact-derived soils of different geologic affinity (e.g., highlands and maria) can be distinguished on the basis of their constituent minerals, and soil maturity can be estimated. The total resonant absorption area of the Moessbauer spectrum can be used to estimate total FeO concentrations

  1. Mineralogy and geochemistry of density-separated Greek lignite fractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iordanidis, A.; Doesburg, van J.D.J.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, lignite samples were collected from the Ptolemais region, northern Greece, homogenized, crushed to less than I nun, and separated in three density fractions using heavy media. The mineralogical investigation of the density fractions showed a predominance of pyrite in the light

  2. Mineralogy of Tailings Dump around Selebi Phikwe Nickel-Copper ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed at mineralogically characterizing the tailings dump emanating from the mining and smelting of nickel-copper (Ni-Cu) at Selebi Phikwe, Botswana, Southern Africa. Samples of tailings dump around the Selebi Phikwe Ni-Cu plant were studied using petrographic microscopy and X-ray Powder Diffraction ...

  3. Mineralogical and geochemical studies of phosphorite nodules in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mineralogical and geochemical studies of phosphorite nodules in the Dange Formation Sokoto Basin, Northwestern Niveria. OA Adekeye, SO Akande. Abstract. No Abstract Available Journal of Mining and Geology Vol.40(2) 2004: 101-106. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ...

  4. Mineralogy and pedogenesis in a soil chronosequence on a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies on soils of the floodplain of lower Niger river are scanty although this floodplain forms a very important agricultural resource base in Nigeria. The objective of this study is to provide comprehensive information on the characteristics of the soils with respect to their mineralogy and the effect of seasonal flooding on their ...

  5. Clay mineralogy of the mud banks of Cochin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, R.R.; Murty, P.S.N.

    The mineralogy of the sediments constituting the mud banks formed off Cochin, Kerala, India was studied. The clay mineral composition was used as a means of understanding the nature and source of origin of the muds. Fine fraction of the mud samples...

  6. Mineralogy and trace element chemistry of the Siliceous Earth of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    We report the presence of a 3–5 cm thick loose fragmental layer in the Siliceous Earth at Matti ka. Gol in the Barmer basin of Rajasthan. Petrographic, chemical and mineralogical study reveals the presence of abundant volcanic debris such as glass shards, agglutinates, hollow spheroids, kinked biotites, feldspars showing ...

  7. Physico-chemical and Mineralogical Characterisation of Subsurface ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies were carried out on subsurface sediments obtained around the Gaborone landfill area Botswana, in order to characterize their mineralogy and physico-chemistry, appraise any contaminant inputs from the landfill and assess their ability to attenuate contaminants from the landfill. Physico-chemical properties ...

  8. Characterization of North American lignite fly ashes. II. XRD Mineralogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, G.J.; Johansen, D.M.; Thedchanamoorthy, A.; Steinwand, S.J.; Swanson, K.D.

    1988-01-01

    X-ray powder diffraction has been used to determine the crystalline phase mineralogy in samples of fly ash from each of the lignite mining areas of North America. The characteristic phases of North Dakota lignite fly ashes were periclase, lime, merwinite and the sulfate phases anhydrite, thenardite and a sodalite-structure phase. Mullite was absent in these low-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ ashes. Montana lignite ash mineralogy had characteristics of ND lignite and MT subbituminous coal fly ashes; mullite and C/sub 3/A were present and the alkali sulfates were absent. Texas and Louisiana lignite fly ashes had the characteristic mineralogy of bituminous coal fly ash: quartz, mullite, ferrite-spinel (magnetite) and minor hematite. Even though their analytical CaO contents were 7-14%, all but one lacked crystalline CaO-containing phases. Lignite fly ashes from Saskatchewan were generally the least crystalline of those studied and had a mineralogy consisting of quartz, mullite, ferrite spinel and periclase. Quantitative XRD data were obtained. The position of the diffuse scattering maximum in the x-ray diffractograms was indicative of the glass composition of the lignite fly ash

  9. Proposal for structure of the national system for support of sustainable tourism and a methodology of rating of selected tourist services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Burian

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This thesis is focused on preparation of basic elements of the National System for Support of Sustainable Tourism in the Czech Republic and on development of a methodology for ranking of selected tourist services from the sustainable point of view. Its result is planned to be used as a basis for real decisions potentially taken by the Czech government in near future.The first part analyses and summarises existing approaches worldwide to sustainable tourism, potential benefits and different impacts of tourism in order to specify possible measures avoiding unwanted impacts later on. The need to change towards sutainability in tourism is based on analysis of different policies and documents and a summary of duties of the Czech government (national ones and international ones. There is also a list of the best experiences available how to promote, support and encourage development of sustainable tourism based on analysis of the World Tourism Organisation studies and recommendations, existing EMS systems like ISO, EU ecolabel or methods, approaches, criteria and indicators used by different labels.Next part defines neccessary elements for successful system functioning in the Czech Republic, based on existing and working governmental and non-governmental structures not forgetting such important activities like information, education, marketing and motivation and sets expected responsibilities and roles of different potential partners participating on the system implementation.Unfortunately, there is no one certified tourist business in Czechia according to ISO, EMAS or EU flower before end of October 2004. Main reasons are price, missing benefits and motivations for businesses. Therefore an self-assesment questionnaire for a small-scale accommodation is developed. This fits with the „easy to understand, easy to answer“. This option is missing in the country and it is understood as a prestep to more sophisticated methods of measurment. The main

  10. Mineralogy in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility stratigraphic horizon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, C.L.

    1985-09-01

    Forty-six samples were selected for this study from two cores, one extending 50 ft up through the roof of the WIPP facility and the other penetrating 50 ft below the facility floor. These samples, selected from approximately every other foot of core length, represent the major lithologies present in the immediate vicinity of the WIPP facility horizon: ''clean'' halite, polyhalitic halite, argillaceous halite, and mixed polyhalitic-argillaceous halite. Samples were analyzed for non-NaCl mineralogy by determining weight percents of water- and EDTA-insoluble residues, which were then identified by x-ray diffraction. In general, WIPP halite contains at most 5 wt % non-NaCl residue. The major mineral constituents are quartz, magnesite, anhydrite, gypsum, polyhalite, and clays. Results of this study confirm that, in previous descriptions of WIPP core, trace mineral quantities have been visually overestimated by approximately an order of magnitude. 9 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs

  11. Comparison of the Mineralogy of Comet Wild 2 Coma Grains to Other Astromaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, David; Zolensky, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We propose that Kuiper Belt samples (in this case comet coma grains from the Jupiter family comet Wild 2) are recognizably different from the bulk of materials in outer belt asteroids, because of their different formation positions and times in the early solar system. We believe this despite similarities found between some Wild 2 grains and components of carbonaceous chondrites (i.e. some CAI and chondrules). Kuiper Belt samples must preserve measurable mineralogical and compositional evidence of formation at unique positions and times in the early solar nebula, and these formational differences must have imparted recognizable special characteristics. We hypothesize that these characteristics include: (1) Unique major element compositional ranges of common astromaterial minerals, especially olivine and pyroxene; (2) Unique minor element compositions of major silicate phases, especially olivine and low-Ca pyroxene; (3) Degree and effects of radiation processing -- including amorphous rims, metal coatings, and Glass with Embedded Metal and Sulfides (GEMS); (4) Presence of abundant presolar silicate grains as recognized by anomalous oxygen in silicates; (5) Oxidation state of the mineral assemblage. We are working our way through all available Wild 2 samples, selecting 1-2 non-consecutive viable TEM grids from each possible extracted Wild 2 grain. We especially prefer TEM grids from grains for which complete mineralogical details have not been published (which is to say the majority of the extracted grains). We are performing a basic mineralogic survey by E-beam techniques, to establish the essential features of the extracted Wild 2 grains. We are making a particular effort to carefully and accurately measure minor elements of olivine and pyroxene, as these minerals are widespread in astromaterials, and comparisons of their compositions will serve to place the Wild 2 silicates in contact with asteroids, meteorites and chondritic interplanetary dust particles

  12. Characterization of structures of the Nankai Trough accretionary prism from integrated analyses of LWD log response, resistivity images and clay mineralogy of cuttings: Expedition 338 Site C0002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado, Maria Jose; Schleicher, Anja

    2014-05-01

    The objective of our research is a detailed characterization of structures on the basis of LWD oriented images and logs,and clay mineralogy of cuttings from Hole C0002F of the Nankai Trough accretionary prism. Our results show an integrated interpretation of structures derived from borehole images, petrophysical characterization on LWD logs and cuttings mineralogy. The geometry of the structure intersected at Hole C0002F has been characterized by the interpretation of oriented borehole resistivity images acquired during IODP Expedition 338. The characterization of structural features, faults and fracture zones is based on a detailed post-cruise interpretation of bedding and fractures on borehole images and also on the analysis of Logging While Drilling (LWD) log response (gamma radioactivity, resistivity and sonic logs). The interpretation and complete characterization of structures (fractures, fracture zones, fault zones, folds) was achieved after detailed shorebased reprocessing of resistivity images, which allowed to enhance bedding and fracture's imaging for geometry and orientation interpretation. In order to characterize distinctive petrophysical properties based on LWD log response, it could be compared with compositional changes derived from cuttings analyses. Cuttings analyses were used to calibrate and to characterize log response and to verify interpretations in terms of changes in composition and texture at fractures and fault zones defined on borehole images. Cuttings were taken routinely every 5 m during Expedition 338, indicating a clay-dominated lithology of silty claystone with interbeds of weakly consolidated, fine sandstones. The main mineralogical components are clay minerals, quartz, feldspar and calcite. Selected cuttings were taken from areas of interest as defined on LWD logs and images. The clay mineralogy was investigated on the LWD) data allowed us to characterize structural, petrophysical and mineralogical properties at fracture and

  13. Chemical, mineralogical and ceramic properties of clays from Northern Santa Catarina, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correia, S.L.; Bloot, E.L.; Folgueras, M.V.; Hotza, D.

    2009-01-01

    Clay materials crop out in the northern Santa Catarina mining district were investigated in order to assess their potential in the ceramic industry. Four different clays (A, B, C and D) were selected. Their chemical composition was obtained by Xray fluorescence and their mineralogy by X-ray diffraction, coupled with numerical rational analysis. Their thermal behaviour was studied by differential thermal analysis. Technological testing consisted in a simulation of the industrial processing performed at a laboratory scale. The test pieces were obtained by pressing and fired in the range of 850-1200 deg C. In each case their technological properties were studied. The main mineralogical phases detected were kaolinite, quartz and mica. Hematite and feldspars may be present in the clays. The clays show two groups of particle sizes almost equally frequent in the range of 1 to 60 μm. The northern Santa Catarina clays are suitable for the production of bricks and earthenware in the 900- 1100 deg C range. (author)

  14. A Functional HAZOP Methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liin, Netta; Lind, Morten; Jensen, Niels

    2010-01-01

    A HAZOP methodology is presented where a functional plant model assists in a goal oriented decomposition of the plant purpose into the means of achieving the purpose. This approach leads to nodes with simple functions from which the selection of process and deviation variables follow directly...

  15. Analytical methodologies based on LC–MS/MS for monitoring selected emerging compounds in liquid and solid phases of the sewage sludge

    OpenAIRE

    Boix Sales, Clara; Ibáñez Martínez, María; Fabregat-Safont, David; Morales, E.; Pastor, L.; Sancho Llopis, Juan Vicente; Sánchez-Ramírez, J. E.; Hernández Hernández, Félix

    2016-01-01

    In this work, two analytical methodologies based on liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS) were developed for quantification of emerging pollutants identified in sewage sludge after a previous wide-scope screening. The target list included 13 emerging contaminants (EC): thiabendazole, acesulfame, fenofibric acid, valsartan, irbesartan, salicylic acid, diclofenac, carbamazepine, 4-aminoantipyrine (4- AA), 4-acetyl aminoantipyrine (4-AAA), 4-formyl amin...

  16. Analytical methodologies based on LC?MS/MS for monitoring selected emerging compounds in liquid and solid phases of the sewage sludge

    OpenAIRE

    Boix, C.; Ib??ez, M.; Fabregat-Safont, D.; Morales, E.; Pastor, L.; Sancho, J.V.; S?nchez-Ram?rez, J.E.; Hern?ndez, F.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, two analytical methodologies based on liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC?MS/MS) were developed for quantification of emerging pollutants identified in sewage sludge after a previous wide-scope screening. The target list included 13 emerging contaminants (EC): thiabendazole, acesulfame, fenofibric acid, valsartan, irbesartan, salicylic acid, diclofenac, carbamazepine, 4-aminoantipyrine (4-AA), 4-acetyl aminoantipyrine (4-AAA), 4-formyl aminoantipyrine (...

  17. Mineralogy of the Martian Surface: Crustal Composition to Surface Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustard, John F.

    1999-01-01

    Over the course of this award we have: 1) Completed and published the results of a study of the effects of hyperfine particles on reflectance spectra of olivine and quartz, which included the development of scattering codes. Research has also progressed in the analysis of the effects of fine particle sizes on clay spectra. 2) Completed the analysis of the mineralogy of dark regions, showed the insitu compositions are highly correlated to the SNC meteorites, and determined that the martian mantle was depleted in aluminum prior to 2-3 GA ago; Studies of the mineralogic heterogeneity of surficial materials on Mars have also been conducted. and 3) Performed initial work on the study of the physical and chemical processes likely to form and modify duricrust. This includes assessments of erosion rates, solubility and transport of iron in soil environments, and models of pedogenic crust formation.

  18. On the ranking of chemicals based on their PBT characteristics: comparison of different ranking methodologies using selected POPs as an illustrative example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailaukhanuly, Yerbolat; Zhakupbekova, Arai; Amutova, Farida; Carlsen, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of the environmental behavior of chemicals is a fundamental part of the risk assessment process. The present paper discusses various methods of ranking of a series of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) according to the persistence, bioaccumulation and toxicity (PBT) characteristics. Traditionally ranking has been done as an absolute (total) ranking applying various multicriteria data analysis methods like simple additive ranking (SAR) or various utility functions (UFs) based rankings. An attractive alternative to these ranking methodologies appears to be partial order ranking (POR). The present paper compares different ranking methods like SAR, UF and POR. Significant discrepancies between the rankings are noted and it is concluded that partial order ranking, as a method without any pre-assumptions concerning possible relation between the single parameters, appears as the most attractive ranking methodology. In addition to the initial ranking partial order methodology offers a wide variety of analytical tools to elucidate the interplay between the objects to be ranked and the ranking parameters. In the present study is included an analysis of the relative importance of the single P, B and T parameters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Fracture mineralogy of the Forsmark site. SDM-Site Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstroem, Bjoern (Dept. of Earth Sciences, Univ. of Goeteborg (Sweden)); Tullborg, Eva-Lena (Terralogica AB, Graabo (Sweden)); Smellie, John (Conterra AB, Luleaa (Sweden)); MacKenzie, Angus B. (SUERC, Scottish Enterprise Technology Park, East Kilbride (United Kingdom)); Suksi, Juhani (Dept. of Chemistry, Univ. of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland))

    2008-08-15

    Detailed investigations of the fracture mineralogy and altered wall rock have been carried out as part of the site characterisation programme between 2003 and 2007 at Forsmark. The results have been published in a number of P-reports and in contributions to scientific journals. This report summarises and evaluates the data obtained during the detailed fracture mineralogical studies. The report includes descriptions of the identified fracture minerals and their chemical composition. A sequence of fracture mineralisations has been distinguished and provides information of the low to moderate temperature (brittle) geological and hydrogeological evolution at the site. Special focus has been paid to the chemical and stable isotopic composition of calcite to obtain palaeohydrogeological information. Chemical analyses of bulk fracture filling material have been carried out to identify possible sinks for certain elements and also to reveal the presence of minor phases rich in certain elements which have not been possible to detect by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Statistical analysis of the mineralogy in fractures outside deformation zones (i.e. within fracture domains FFM01, FFM02, FFM03 and FFM06) have been carried out concerning variation of fracture mineral distribution at depth and in different fracture domains. Uranium contents and uranium-series isotopes have been analysed on fracture coating material from hydraulically conductive fractures. Such analyses are also available from the groundwaters and the results are combined in order to reveal recent (< 1 Ma) removal/deposition of uranium in the fracture system. The redox conditions in the fracture system have been evaluated based on mineralogical and chemical indicators as well as Moessbauer analyses

  20. Clay Mineralogy of Brazilian Oxisols with Shrinkage Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samara Alves Testoni

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Shrinkage capacity (caráter retrátil in Portuguese is a new diagnostic characteristic recently introduced in the Brazilian System of Soil Classification (SiBCS to indicate shrink and swell properties observed in subtropical soils from highland plateaus in southern Brazil, specifically in Oxisols with brown colors. In soils located in road cuts exposed to drying for some weeks, strong shrinkage of soil volume is observed in these soils, resulting in the formation of pronounced vertical cracks and large and very large prismatic structures, which crumble in blocks when handled. We hypothesize that such properties are related to their clay mineralogy, although there are no conclusive studies about this, the motive for the present study. Samples of the A and B horizons from six Oxisols with expansive capacity from the states of Santa Catarina and Rio Grande do Sul were analyzed. One Rhodic Hapludox, from the state of Paraná, without expansive capacity, was used for comparison. All the soils are very clayey, originated from basalt, and have similar iron oxide content. For identification of clay mineralogy, X-ray diffraction techniques were employed, together with the use of NEWMOD® software to investigate and describe the interstratified minerals. The results showed that most expansive soils have a similar mineralogical composition, with kaolinite, interstratified kaolinite-smectite (K-S, and hydroxy-Al interlayered smectites (HIS, unlike the non-expansive Rhodic Hapludox, which exhibited kaolinite with significant amounts of gibbsite and low amount of interstratified K-S. According to the mineralogical assemblage identified in the expansive soils, we can affirm that the mechanism of smectite expansion and contraction is related to the shrinkage capacity of the soil, considering that the level of hydroxy-Al intercalation is low. In addition, these mechanisms also are related to the presence of quasicrystals and domains that control the

  1. On methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheesman, Robin; Faraone, Roque

    2002-01-01

    This is an English version of the methodology chapter in the authors' book "El caso Berríos: Estudio sobre información errónea, desinformación y manipulación de la opinión pública".......This is an English version of the methodology chapter in the authors' book "El caso Berríos: Estudio sobre información errónea, desinformación y manipulación de la opinión pública"....

  2. Mineralogy affects geoavailability, bioaccessibility and bioavailability of zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina, Ramon M.; Schaider, Laurel A.; Donaghey, Thomas C.; Shine, James P.; Brain, Joseph D.

    2013-01-01

    We correlated mineralogical and particle characteristics of Zn-containing particles with Zn geoavailability, bioaccessibility, and bioavailability following gavage and intranasal (IN) administration in rats. We compared samples of Zn/Pb mine waste and five pulverized pure-phase Zn minerals ( 65 Zn. We assessed geoavailability using sequential extractions and bioaccessibility using in vitro extraction tests simulating various pH and biological conditions. Zn in vivo bioavailability and in vitro bioaccessibility decreased as follows: mine waste > hydrozincite > hemimorphite > zincite ≈ smithsonite >> sphalerite. We found significant correlations among geoavailability, bioaccessibility and bioavailability. In particular, Zn bioavailability post-gavage and post-IN was significantly correlated with bioaccessibility in simulated phagolysosomal fluid and gastric fluid. These data indicate that solid phase speciation influences biological uptake of Zn and that in vitro tests can be used to predict Zn bioavailability in exposure assessment and effective remediation design. Highlights: •Zinc particle mineralogy influences bioaccessibility and bioavailability. •Zn bioavailability via gavage was 1.2–1.6 times higher than via intranasal route. •Zn particle geoavailability correlates with bioaccessibility. •In vitro bioaccessibility tests can predict in vivo Zn bioavailability. •Metal speciation and geochemical alterations can impact Zn bioavailability. -- Zinc mineralogy influences in vitro bioaccessibility and in vivo bioavailability and in vitro extraction tests can be used to predict Zn bioavailability from particles

  3. Mineralogical and geological study of quaternary deposits and weathering profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Gi Young; Lee, Bong Ho [Andong National Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-01-15

    Movement history of a quaternary reverse fault cutting marine terrace deposit and tertiary bentonite in the Yangnammyon, Gyoungju city was studied by the mineralogical and microtextural analysis of the fault clays and weathered terrace deposits. Two types of fault clays were identified as greenish gray before the deposition of the marine terrace deposits and reddish brown after deposition. Greenish gray fault clay is composed mostly of smectite probably powdered from bentonite showing at least two events of movement from microtextures. After the bentonite was covered by quaternary marine gravel deposits, the reverse fault was reactivated cutting marine gravel deposits to form open spaces along the fault plane which allowed the hydrological infiltration of soil particles and deposition of clays in deep subsurface. The reddish brown 'fault' clays enclosed the fragments of dark brown ultrafine varved clay, proving two events of faulting, and slicken sides bisecting reddish brown clays suggest another faulting event in the final stage. Mineralogical and microtextural analysis of the fault clay show total five events of faulting, which had not been recognized even by thorough conventional paleoseismological investigation using trench, highlighting the importance of microtextural and mineralogical analysis in paleoseismology.

  4. Martian Surface Mineralogy from Rovers with Spirit, Opportunity, and Curiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Richard V.

    2016-01-01

    Beginning in 2004, NASA has landed three well-instrumented rovers on the equatorial martian surface. The Spirit rover landed in Gusev crater in early January, 2004, and the Opportunity rover landed on the opposite side of Mars at Meridian Planum 21 days later. The Curiosity rover landed in Gale crater to the west of Gusev crater in August, 2012. Both Opportunity and Curiosity are currently operational. The twin rovers Spirit and Opportunity carried Mossbauer spectrometers to determine the oxidation state of iron and its mineralogical composition. The Curiosity rover has an X-ray diffraction instrument for identification and quantification of crystalline materials including clay minerals. Instrument suites on all three rovers are capable of distinguishing primary rock-forming minerals like olivine, pyroxene and magnetite and products of aqueous alteration in including amorphous iron oxides, hematite, goethite, sulfates, and clay minerals. The oxidation state of iron ranges from that typical for unweathered rocks and soils to nearly completely oxidized (weathered) rocks and soils as products of aqueous and acid-sulfate alteration. The in situ rover mineralogy also serves as ground-truth for orbital observations, and orbital mineralogical inferences are used for evaluating and planning rover exploration.

  5. An unpublished text of Jovellanos about mineralogy Notas inéditas de Jovellanos sobre mineralogía

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge ORDAZ GARGALLO

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An unpublished manuscript of Gaspar Melchor de Jovellanos about the history of mineralogy, written during his captivity in Bellver Castle (Palma de Mallorca is presented and analyzed. In this writing the importance of the chemical knowledge as a source of other branches of science and its applications in different fields of agriculture, mining and industry is considered. The author made a historical synthesis reviewing the men of science that contributed in a great extent to the advance of the chemistry and mineralogy. The text clearly supports the new contributions of Lavoisier and other supporters of experimentation as a scientific method, which agrees with Jovellanos’ ideas about the development of the «useful» sciences for the progress of the countries.Se presenta y analiza un manuscrito inédito de Gaspar Melchor de Jovellanos sobre la historia de la mineralogía, que redactó durante su cautiverio en el Castillo de Bellver (Palma de Mallorca. En el escrito considera de gran importancia los conocimientos químicos como fuente de otras ramas del saber científico y sus aplicaciones en distintos ámbitos de la agricultura, minería e industria. El autor hace una síntesis histórica repasando los hombres de ciencia que en mayor medida contribuyeron al avance de la química y la mineralogía. El texto apoya claramente las nuevas aportaciones de Lavoisier y otros químicos partidarios de la experimentación como método científico, y es acorde con las ideas de Jovellanos acerca del cultivo de las ciencias «útiles» para el progreso de los pueblos.

  6. Steeply dipping heaving bedrock, Colorado: Part 2 - Mineralogical and engineering properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noe, D.C.; Higgins, J.D.; Olsen, H.W.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the mineralogical and engineering properties of steeply dipping, differentially heaving bedrock, which has caused severe damage near the Denver area. Several field sites in heave-prone areas have been characterized using high sample densities, numerous testing methodologies, and thousands of sample tests. Hydrometer testing shows that the strata range from siltstone to claystone (33 to 66 percent clay) with occasional bentonite seams (53 to 98 percent clay mixed with calcite). From X-ray diffraction analyses, the claystone contains varying proportions of illite-smectite and discrete (pure) smectite, and the bentonite contains discrete smectite. Accessory minerals include pyrite, gypsum, calcite, and oxidized iron compounds. The dominant exchangeable cation is Ca2+, except where gypsum is prevalent, and Mg2+ and Na1+ are elevated. Scanning electron microscope analyses show that the clay fabric is deformed and porous and that pyrite is absent within the weathered zone. Unified Soil Classification for the claystone varies from CL to CH, and the bentonite is CH to MH. Average moisture content values are 17 percent for claystone and 32 percent for bentonite, and these are typically 0 to 5 percent lower than the plastic limit. Swell-consolidation and suction testing shows a full range of swelling potentials from low to very high. These findings confirm that type I (bed-parallel, symmetrical to asymmetrical) heave features are strongly associated with changes in bedrock composition and mineralogy. Composition changes are not necessarily a factor for type II (bed-parallel to bed-oblique, strongly asymmetrical) heave features, which are associated with movements along subsurface shear zones.

  7. Petrological mineralogical and geochemical characterization of the granitoids and fracture fillings developed in Ratones Mines (Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buil Gutierrez, B.

    2002-01-01

    The petrological, mineralogical and geochemical characterisation of the granitoids and fracture fillings developed in the Ratones Mine (Caceres, Spain) has been done in order to understand rock-water interaction processes which control water geochemical parameters. Special interest has been devoted to the analysis and interpretation of REE patterns in the solid phase (granitoids and fracture fillings) because they constitute geochemical tracers in water-rock interaction process. Moreover, REE are considered as actinide analogues. In order to characterise the solid phase (granitoids and fracture fillings) several investigation scales (system, outcrop, whole rock, mineral and geochemical components) have been considered and different types of samples have been analysed. These factors control the methodological approach used in this investigation. The analytical methods we have used in this investigation are microscope, qualitative and semi-quantitative methods (XRD, SEM,EDAX) and quantitative methods (ICP-MS, XRF, EM, LAM-IC-MS). The bulk of the granitoids located around the Ratones Mine Belongs to the alkaline feldspar granite-sienogranite lihotype and they show a peraluminous and subalkaline pattern. From the mineralogical point of view, they are composed by quartz, K-feldspar (Or>90%), showing sericitation, moscovitization and turmolinization altherations, alkaline plagioclase (An-=-3%), usually altered to sericite, saussirite and less frequently affected by moscovitization processes, Fe-Al biotite, frequently affected by chloritization processes and sometimes replaced by muscovite, and finally muscovite (>2% celadonite and <4% paragonite) both of primary and secondary origin. The differences observed between the different lithotypes are related with the modal proportion of the principal minerals,with the presence or absence of certain accessory minerals ( turmaline, cordierite), with specific textural patterns, grain size and also with the richness in specific

  8. Impact of chemical oxidation and water acidification on the mineralogical and physico-chemical properties of the Tournemire argillaceous formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpentier, D.

    2001-11-01

    The French Institute for Protection and Nuclear Safety (IPSN) has selected a site near Tournemire (France) for research programmes on deep geological waste disposal in clay-rich rock formation. A railway tunnel was built about 100 years ago through the thick indurated Toarcian argillite of the Tournemire Massif and two galleries were constructed five years ago. They are used to study the evolution of rock mineralogical composition, texture, water content and water-rock interactions in the excavated disturbed zone. Multi-scale and multi-technique investigations were carried out on the evolution of physical and mineralogical rock properties. Experiments and numerical modelling were used to predict changes due to water-rock interactions and subsequent rock mineralogy and water chemistry modifications. The argillite consists of detrital clay-rich layers and carbonate layers. Pyrites are always present in significant amounts (2 to 2.5 %). The rock presents very low porosity and very low water content (around 3 %). Leaching experiments show that the interstitial water is Na and SO 4 -rich and Cl-poor. The tunnel and galleries digging induces fracture formation. In the altered samples, the clay particles show a better orientation in the stratification plan, which increases the porosity. The oxidation effect yields to mineralogical transformation on the surfaces of the argillite: oxidation of pyrite, dissolution of calcite, dissolution of illite layers in interstratified I/S and formation of gypsum, Fe-oxi/hydroxides, celestite and jarosite. During cycles of hydration/dehydration, condensation water interacts with the argillite and quickly becomes Ca and SO 4 -rich. The local dissolution of clay particles leads to an increase of the chloride and potassium water content. These phenomena are important for the consideration of the underground work stability, especially the evolution of the water-rock equilibria during the re-hydration of the excavated disturbed zones. (author)

  9. Methodological guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halsnaes, K.; Callaway, J.M.; Meyer, H.J.

    1999-01-01

    The guideline document establishes a general overview of the main components of climate change mitigation assessment. This includes an outline of key economic concepts, scenario structure, common assumptions, modelling tools and country study assumptions. The guidelines are supported by Handbook Reports that contain more detailed specifications of calculation standards, input assumptions and available tools. The major objectives of the project have been provided a methodology, an implementing framework and a reporting system which countries can follow in meeting their future reporting obligations under the FCCC and for GEF enabling activities. The project builds upon the methodology development and application in the UNEP National Abatement Coasting Studies (UNEP, 1994a). The various elements provide countries with a road map for conducting climate change mitigation studies and submitting national reports as required by the FCCC. (au) 121 refs

  10. Methodological guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halsnaes, K.; Callaway, J.M.; Meyer, H.J.

    1999-04-01

    The guideline document establishes a general overview of the main components of climate change mitigation assessment. This includes an outline of key economic concepts, scenario structure, common assumptions, modelling tools and country study assumptions. The guidelines are supported by Handbook Reports that contain more detailed specifications of calculation standards, input assumptions and available tools. The major objectives of the project have been provided a methodology, an implementing framework and a reporting system which countries can follow in meeting their future reporting obligations under the FCCC and for GEF enabling activities. The project builds upon the methodology development and application in the UNEP National Abatement Coasting Studies (UNEP, 1994a). The various elements provide countries with a road map for conducting climate change mitigation studies and submitting national reports as required by the FCCC. (au) 121 refs.

  11. The mineralogy and geochemistry of some of the iron-formations of Bushmanland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, T.Q.

    1986-01-01

    A great diversity of metasedimentary and metavolcanic rock types form inselbergs on the sandcovered plains of Bushmanland in the north-western Cape Province. Algoma-type iron-formation occurs as isolated units in the Proterozoic metasediments of Namaqualand and Bushmanland, varying in size and stratigraphical position. In many cases, the iron-formations are closely associated with base metal mineralization. Examples are the huge base metal deposits at Black Mountain, Gamsberg and Broken Hill in the Aggeneys area. The oxidation zones are expressed as black magnetite-rich outcrops which can in some cases be traced for as much as a kilometre. This study was undertaken to investigate the mineralogy and geochemistry of a selection of the iron-formations of Bushmanland. Some of the iron-formations, associated ferriferous metasediments and gossans contain a wide variety of secondary minerals. These minerals were examined by X-ray diffraction and analyses were obtained by means of an electron microprobe

  12. Applications of Siroquant in mineralogical analysis at BHP Billiton minerals technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, J.; England, B.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Newcastle Technology Centre is currently investigating ways of improving the accuracy and efficiency of quantitative mineralogical analysis of iron ores and environmental dusts using Siroquant. The only readily available technique for the quantification of iron oxide and gangue species in iron ores has been the time-consuming modal analysis (point counting) of specially prepared polished sections in reflected light using a petrological microscope. However there are uncertainties associated with bulk sampling and the true reprensensitivity of material mounted in these sections. In addition, the quality of the data depends largely on the training, skill and mineralogical experience of the operator as well as on the quality of the polished section. The data obtained from modal analysis is volumetric and must be converted to weight percent using calculations involving theoretical rather than actual densities. Previous X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) techniques using internal standards (such as corundum) have proved inaccurate and unreliable. To test the validity of using Siroquant to obtain quantitative mineralogical data for iron ores, a series of validation samples was made up to simulate a selection of BHP Billiton iron ores. The results show that reliable and reproducible data can be obtained for hematite/goethite ratios in a wide variety of ore types. However the technique was not without its problems and it was found that particle size, both actual and entered, had a significant effect on the results. It was also found that optimum particle size for samples containing such a wide range of absorption coefficients is smaller than that indicated by standard milling curves, but that longer milling times resulted in overgrinding and non-detection of softer species. Hence the quantification of minor species, especially kaolinite, still presents some problems and these will be investigated through the use of further validation samples. The quantitative

  13. Coupled X-ray computed tomography and grey level co-occurrence matrices as a method for quantification of mineralogy and texture in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, M. A.; Miller, J. A.; Becker, M.

    2018-02-01

    Texture is one of the most basic descriptors used in the geological sciences. The value derived from textural characterisation extends into engineering applications associated with mining, mineral processing and metal extraction where quantitative textural information is required for models predicting the response of the ore through a particular process. This study extends the well-known 2D grey level co-occurrence matrices methodology into 3D as a method for image analysis of 3D x-ray computed tomography grey scale volumes of drill core. Subsequent interrogation of the information embedded within the grey level occurrence matrices (GLCM) indicates they are sensitive to changes in mineralogy and texture of samples derived from a magmatic nickel sulfide ore. The position of the peaks in the GLCM is an indication of the relative density (specific gravity, SG) of the minerals and when interpreted using a working knowledge of the mineralogy of the ore presented a means to determine the relative abundance of the sulfide minerals (SG > 4), dense silicate minerals (SG > 3), and lighter silicate minerals (SG < 3). The spread of the peaks in the GLCM away from the diagonal is an indication of the degree of grain boundary interaction with wide peaks representing fine grain sizes and narrow peaks representing coarse grain sizes. The method lends itself to application as part of a generic methodology for routine use on large XCT volumes providing quantitative, timely, meaningful and automated information on mineralogy and texture in 3D.

  14. A methodological approach to study the stability of selected watercolours for painting reintegration, through reflectance spectrophotometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelosi, Claudia; Capobianco, Giuseppe; Agresti, Giorgia; Bonifazi, Giuseppe; Morresi, Fabio; Rossi, Sara; Santamaria, Ulderico; Serranti, Silvia

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the stability to simulated solar radiation of some paintings samples through a new methodological approach adopting non-invasive spectroscopic techniques. In particular, commercial watercolours and iron oxide based pigments were used, these last ones being prepared for the experimental by gum Arabic in order to propose a possible substitute for traditional reintegration materials. Reflectance spectrophotometry in the visible range and Hyperspectral Imaging in the short wave infrared were chosen as non-invasive techniques for evaluation the stability to irradiation of the chosen pigments. These were studied before and after artificial ageing procedure performed in Solar Box chamber under controlled conditions. Data were treated and elaborated in order to evaluate the sensitivity of the chosen techniques in identifying the variations on paint layers, induced by photo-degradation, before they could be observed by eye. Furthermore a supervised classification method for monitoring the painted surface changes adopting a multivariate approach was successfully applied.

  15. Lessons learned from the application of a participatory evaluation methodology to healthy municipalities, cities and communities initiatives in selected countries of the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Marilyn; Franceschini, Maria Cristina

    2007-01-01

    Health promotion has made significant strides in the past few decades in the Americas. Creating a healthy and supportive setting, also known as the settings approach, continues to be one of the most widely used health promotion strategies. Interest in evaluating the effectiveness of these strategies has been increasing greatly in the past few years. Participatory evaluation holds great promise for helping to generate this evidence and promote understanding of the factors that affect, positively or negatively, the advances of health promotion in the Region. During 2004-2006, a Participatory Evaluation methodology was introduced into several countries in the Americas through formal trainings conducted by the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) in collaboration with country partners. This article summarizes the main lessons learned from the application of the participatory evaluation methodology in various countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. Factors affecting the evaluation of the initiatives were identified at multiple levels (individual, community, organizational, political, economic, etc.). Specific issues that were addressed included the political context, turnover of personnel in key institutions, concerns related to the effectiveness of participatory processes, and the existence of strong and sustained leadership at the country level. These factors are intertwined and affect each other in very complex ways, a fact that was reflected in the municipalities' experiences with participatory evaluation. Challenges included the ability to secure resources for the evaluation, the time needed to conclude the process, and working in an intersectoral manner. However, participating municipalities reported that the process of implementing a participatory evaluation and working with various stakeholders had an empowering effect: communities and stakeholders were more willing and interested in participating in health promotion initiatives in a sustained manner

  16. Sensitivity analysis of alkaline plume modelling: influence of mineralogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaboreau, S.; Claret, F.; Marty, N.; Burnol, A.; Tournassat, C.; Gaucher, E.C.; Munier, I.; Michau, N.; Cochepin, B.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the context of a disposal facility for radioactive waste in clayey geological formation, an important modelling effort has been carried out in order to predict the time evolution of interacting cement based (concrete or cement) and clay (argillites and bentonite) materials. The high number of modelling input parameters associated with non negligible uncertainties makes often difficult the interpretation of modelling results. As a consequence, it is necessary to carry out sensitivity analysis on main modelling parameters. In a recent study, Marty et al. (2009) could demonstrate that numerical mesh refinement and consideration of dissolution/precipitation kinetics have a marked effect on (i) the time necessary to numerically clog the initial porosity and (ii) on the final mineral assemblage at the interface. On the contrary, these input parameters have little effect on the extension of the alkaline pH plume. In the present study, we propose to investigate the effects of the considered initial mineralogy on the principal simulation outputs: (1) the extension of the high pH plume, (2) the time to clog the porosity and (3) the alteration front in the clay barrier (extension and nature of mineralogy changes). This was done through sensitivity analysis on both concrete composition and clay mineralogical assemblies since in most published studies, authors considered either only one composition per materials or simplified mineralogy in order to facilitate or to reduce their calculation times. 1D Cartesian reactive transport models were run in order to point out the importance of (1) the crystallinity of concrete phases, (2) the type of clayey materials and (3) the choice of secondary phases that are allowed to precipitate during calculations. Two concrete materials with either nanocrystalline or crystalline phases were simulated in contact with two clayey materials (smectite MX80 or Callovo- Oxfordian argillites). Both

  17. Automated mineralogy and petrology - applications of TESCAN Integrated Mineral Analyzer (TIMA)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrstka, Tomáš; Gottlieb, P.; Skála, Roman; Breiter, Karel; Motl, D.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 1 (2018), s. 47-63 ISSN 1802-6222 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) StrategieAV21/4 Program:StrategieAV Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : TIMA * Automated SEM/EDS * applied mineralogy * modal analysis * artificial intelligence * neural networks Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy OBOR OECD: Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.609, year: 2016

  18. Influence of clay mineralogy on clay based ceramic products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radzali Othman; Tuan Besar Tuan Sarif; Zainal Arifin Ahmad; Ahmad Fauzi Mohd Noor; Abu Bakar Aramjat

    1996-01-01

    Clay-based ceramic products can either be produced directly from a suitable clay source without the need further addition or such products can be produced from a ceramic body formulated by additions of other raw materials such as feldspar and silica sand. In either case, the mineralogical make-up of the clay component plays a dominating role in the fabrication and properties of the ceramic product. This study was sparked off by a peculiar result observed in one of five local ball clay samples that were used to reformulate a ceramic body. Initial characterisation tests conducted on the clays indicated that these clays can be classified as kaolinitic. However, one of these clays produced a ceramic body that is distinctively different in terms of whiteness, smoothness and density as compared to the other four clays. Careful re-examination of other characterisation data, such as particle size distribution and chemical analysis, failed to offer any plausible explanation. Consequently, the mineralogical analysis by x-ray diffraction was repeated by paying meticulous attention to specimen preparation. Diffraction data for the clay with anomalous behaviour indicated the presence of a ∼ 10A peak that diminished when the same specimen was re-tested after heating in an oven at 12O degree C whilst the other four clays only exhibit the characteristic kaolinite (Al sub 2 O sub 3. 2SiO sub 2. 2H sub 2 0) and muscovite peaks at ∼ 7A and ∼ 10A before and after heat treatment. This suggests the presence of the mineral halloysite (A1 sub 2 0 sub 3. 2SiO sub 2.4H sub 2 0) in that particular clay. This difference in mineralogy can be attributed to account for the variations in physical properties of the final product. Consequently, this paper reviews in general the precautionary measures that must be adhered to during any mineralogical investigation of clay minerals or clay-based materials. The common pitfalls during specimen preparation, machine settings and interpretation of

  19. Temperature buffer test. Hydro-mechanical and chemical/ mineralogical characterizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aakesson, Mattias; Olsson, Siv; Dueck, Ann; Nilsson, Ulf; Karnland, Ola; Kiviranta, Leena; Kumpulainen, Sirpa; Linden, Johan

    2012-01-01

    The Temperature Buffer Test (TBT) is a joint project between SKB/ANDRA and supported by ENRESA (modeling) and DBE (instrumentation), which aims at improving the understanding and to model the thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of buffers made of swelling clay submitted to high temperatures (over 100 deg C) during the water saturation process. The test has been carried out in a KBS-3 deposition hole at Aspo HRL. It was installed during the spring of 2003. Two steel heaters (3 m long, 0.6 m diameter) and two buffer arrangements have been investigated: the lower heater was surrounded by rings of compacted Wyoming bentonite only, whereas the upper heater was surrounded by a composite barrier, with a sand shield between the heater and the bentonite. The test was dismantled and sampled during the winter of 2009/2010. This report presents the hydro-mechanical and chemical/mineralogical characterization program which was launched subsequent to the dismantling operation. The main goal has been to investigate if any significant differences could be observed between material from the field experiment and the reference material. The field samples were mainly taken from Ring 4 (located at the mid-section around the lower heater), in which the temperature in the innermost part reached 155 deg C. The following hydro-mechanical properties have been determined for the material (test technique within brackets): hydraulic conductivity (swelling pressure device), swelling pressure (swelling pressure device), unconfined compression strength (mechanical press), shear strength (triaxial cell) and retention properties (jar method). The following chemical/mineralogical properties (methods within brackets) were determined: anion analysis of water leachates (IC), chemical composition (ICP/AES+MS, EGA), cation exchange capacity (CEC, Cu-trien method) and exchangeable cations (exchange with NH4, ICPAES), mineralogical composition (XRD and FTIR), element distribution and microstructure (SEM and

  20. Application of Moessbauer spectrum to geological and mineralogical problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korovushkin, V.V.

    1985-01-01

    Main parameters of γ-resonance spectra (resonance effect value, chemical isomer shift, quadrupole splitting, nuclear Zeeman splitting) are considered. Methods of the sample preparation and technique for geological sample analysis using nuclear gamma-resonance (NGR) spectroscopy are described in brief. Possibility of direct application of the above method to determine the iron valence in minerals, their diagnosis and determination of quantitative distribution of iron between the mineral forms in rocks in the process of uranium ore formation and destruction, are discussed. Prospects for NGR-spectroscopy application to geology and mineralogy are pointed out

  1. Petrology, mineralogy and geochemistry of surficial uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagel, M.

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the petrology, mineralogy, and geochemistry of surficial uranium ore deposits is important for developing prospecting and evaluation strategies. Carnotite is the main uranium mineral and is found in those deposits that have the greatest potential uranium resources. The following uranium-bearing minerals have been reported to occur in surficial deposits: carnotite, tyuyamunite, soddyite, weeksite, haiweeite, uranophane, betauranophane, metaankoleite, torbernite, autunite, phosphuranylite, schroeckingerite, Pb-V-U hydroxide (unnamed mineral), uraninite and organourano complexes. The interrelationships between some of the minerals of the host rocks (especially the clays) are not well understood. (author)

  2. MIRD methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojo, Ana M.; Gomez Parada, Ines

    2004-01-01

    The MIRD (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) system was established by the Society of Nuclear Medicine of USA in 1960 to assist the medical community in the estimation of the dose in organs and tissues due to the incorporation of radioactive materials. Since then, 'MIRD Dose Estimate Report' (from the 1 to 12) and 'Pamphlets', of great utility for the dose calculations, were published. The MIRD system was planned essentially for the calculation of doses received by the patients during nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures. The MIRD methodology for the absorbed doses calculations in different tissues is explained

  3. PSA methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magne, L

    1997-12-31

    The purpose of this text is first to ask a certain number of questions on the methods related to PSAs. Notably we will explore the positioning of the French methodological approach - as applied in the EPS 1300{sup 1} and EPS 900{sup 2} PSAs - compared to other approaches (Part One). This reflection leads to more general reflection: what contents, for what PSA? This is why, in Part Two, we will try to offer a framework for definition of the criteria a PSA should satisfy to meet the clearly identified needs. Finally, Part Three will quickly summarize the questions approached in the first two parts, as an introduction to the debate. 15 refs.

  4. PSA methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magne, L.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this text is first to ask a certain number of questions on the methods related to PSAs. Notably we will explore the positioning of the French methodological approach - as applied in the EPS 1300 1 and EPS 900 2 PSAs - compared to other approaches (Part One). This reflection leads to more general reflection: what contents, for what PSA? This is why, in Part Two, we will try to offer a framework for definition of the criteria a PSA should satisfy to meet the clearly identified needs. Finally, Part Three will quickly summarize the questions approached in the first two parts, as an introduction to the debate. 15 refs

  5. A preliminary assessment of mineralogical criteria on the utility of argillaceous rocks and minerals for high-level radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopp, O.C.

    1986-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to review available data concerning the properties reported for shales and clay-rich rocks and clay minerals to determine whether such information could be instrumental in selecting the more favorable assemblages of clays for high-level waste repository purposes. Literature searches were conducted for reports dealing with the properties of these argillaceous materials. The properties that were obtained from appropriate references were recorded in an Appleworks Database. The data are divided into five major goups: chemical properties, general physical properties, hydrologic properties, mechanical properties, and thermal properties. The Database includes such information as the type of material, formation name, geological age, location, depth, test conditions, results, and reference(s). In general, noticeable correlations were not apparent when mineralogical information was compared with various properties using plots of the data for each individual property. The best correlations were obtained for chemical and certain mechanical and hydrologic properties. Thermal properties appear to be least influenced by clay mineral composition. An important reason for the inability to correlate mineralogical compositions with most properties was the lack of uniformity of test methods, test conditions, and even the units used for reporting the final data. There was very limited information concerning the mineralogical compositions of most of the shales tested. The potential exists for identifying the more suitable formations (or specific horizons within formations) using mineralogical data; however, in order to make such selections, it will be necessary to collect future data using standardized test methods and conditions. The mineralogical compositions of the samples tested need to be determined quantitatively rather than qualitatively

  6. Analytical methodologies based on LC-MS/MS for monitoring selected emerging compounds in liquid and solid phases of the sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boix, C; Ibáñez, M; Fabregat-Safont, D; Morales, E; Pastor, L; Sancho, J V; Sánchez-Ramírez, J E; Hernández, F

    2016-01-01

    In this work, two analytical methodologies based on liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) were developed for quantification of emerging pollutants identified in sewage sludge after a previous wide-scope screening. The target list included 13 emerging contaminants (EC): thiabendazole, acesulfame, fenofibric acid, valsartan, irbesartan, salicylic acid, diclofenac, carbamazepine, 4-aminoantipyrine (4-AA), 4-acetyl aminoantipyrine (4-AAA), 4-formyl aminoantipyrine (4-FAA), venlafaxine and benzoylecgonine. The aqueous and solid phases of the sewage sludge were analyzed making use of Solid-Phase Extraction (SPE) and UltraSonic Extraction (USE) for sample treatment, respectively. The methods were validated at three concentration levels: 0.2, 2 and 20 μg L(-1) for the aqueous phase, and 50, 500 and 2000 μg kg(-1) for the solid phase of the sludge. In general, the method was satisfactorily validated, showing good recoveries (70-120%) and precision (RSD metabolites of dipyrone had not been studied before in sewage sludge.

  7. A methodology to design heuristics for model selection based on the characteristics of data: Application to investigate when the Negative Binomial Lindley (NB-L) is preferred over the Negative Binomial (NB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Mohammadali; Dhavala, Soma Sekhar; Lord, Dominique; Geedipally, Srinivas Reddy

    2017-10-01

    Safety analysts usually use post-modeling methods, such as the Goodness-of-Fit statistics or the Likelihood Ratio Test, to decide between two or more competitive distributions or models. Such metrics require all competitive distributions to be fitted to the data before any comparisons can be accomplished. Given the continuous growth in introducing new statistical distributions, choosing the best one using such post-modeling methods is not a trivial task, in addition to all theoretical or numerical issues the analyst may face during the analysis. Furthermore, and most importantly, these measures or tests do not provide any intuitions into why a specific distribution (or model) is preferred over another (Goodness-of-Logic). This paper ponders into these issues by proposing a methodology to design heuristics for Model Selection based on the characteristics of data, in terms of descriptive summary statistics, before fitting the models. The proposed methodology employs two analytic tools: (1) Monte-Carlo Simulations and (2) Machine Learning Classifiers, to design easy heuristics to predict the label of the 'most-likely-true' distribution for analyzing data. The proposed methodology was applied to investigate when the recently introduced Negative Binomial Lindley (NB-L) distribution is preferred over the Negative Binomial (NB) distribution. Heuristics were designed to select the 'most-likely-true' distribution between these two distributions, given a set of prescribed summary statistics of data. The proposed heuristics were successfully compared against classical tests for several real or observed datasets. Not only they are easy to use and do not need any post-modeling inputs, but also, using these heuristics, the analyst can attain useful information about why the NB-L is preferred over the NB - or vice versa- when modeling data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Infrared detection of the mineralogical aspects that influence the processing of calcined kaolin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenheide, Stefan; Guatame-Garcia, Adriana; Buxton, Mike; van der Werff, Harald

    2017-04-01

    identification of tourmaline, biotite and hematite as the Fe-bearing mineralogy. Tourmaline was found mainly in veins and sometimes as phenocrysts; biotite was rather scarce, which suggest the advanced alteration degree of the deposit; hematite was present as coating and concentrated along quartz veins. Most of the mineral associations were represented by kaolinite, halloysite, muscovite, illite and montmorillonite. The ground mass was mostly kaolinite, although transition zones from kaolinite to halloysite and kaolinite to mica and montmorillonite were detected. Regarding the kaolinite crystallinity, the pure kaolinite graded from high to very high crystallinity. For the mineral mixtures of kaolinite with montmorillonite or halloysite, the crystallinity could not be determined with confidence. These findings raise the possibility of using hyperspectral imaging as a tool for assisting selective mining, by identifying the areas in the deposit with the highest kaolin quality, thus reducing the amount of waste. In scenarios where selective mining is not possible, the spectral characterisation might provide robust mineralogical information about the content of the ore that can support the decision-making process in higher levels of the kaolin value chain.

  9. Solvent selection and optimization of α-chymotrypsin-catalyzed synthesis of N-Ac-Phe-Tyr-NH2 using mixture design and response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shih-Hao; Kuo, Chia-Hung; Chang, Chieh-Ming J; Liu, Yung-Chuan; Chiang, Wen-Dee; Shieh, Chwen-Jen

    2012-01-01

    A peptide, N-Ac-Phe-Tyr-NH(2) , with angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor activity was synthesized by an α-chymotrypsin-catalyzed condensation reaction of N-acetyl phenylalanine ethyl ester (N-Ac-Phe-OEt) and tyrosinamide (Tyr-NH(2) ). Three kinds of solvents: a Tris-HCl buffer (80 mM, pH 9.0), dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), and acetonitrile were employed in this study. The optimum reaction solvent component was determined by simplex centroid mixture design. The synthesis efficiency was enhanced in an organic-aqueous solvent (Tris-HCl buffer: DMSO: acetonitrile = 2:1:1) in which 73.55% of the yield of N-Ac-Phe-Tyr-NH(2) could be achieved. Furthermore, the effect of reaction parameters on the yield was evaluated by response surface methodology (RSM) using a central composite rotatable design (CCRD). Based on a ridge max analysis, the optimum condition for this peptide synthesis included a reaction time of 7.4 min, a reaction temperature of 28.1°C, an enzyme activity of 98.9 U, and a substrate molar ratio (Phe:Tyr) of 1:2.8. The predicted and the actual (experimental) yields were 87.6 and 85.5%, respectively. The experimental design and RSM performed well in the optimization of synthesis of N-Ac-Phe-Tyr-NH(2) , so it is expected to be an effective method for obtaining a good yield of enzymatic peptide. © 2012 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2012. Copyright © 2012 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  10. Adverse selection and supply-side factors in the enrollment in community-based health insurance in Northwest Ethiopia: A mixed methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atafu, Asmamaw; Kwon, Soonman

    2018-05-20

    Since 2010, the Ethiopian government introduced different measures to implement community-based health insurance (CBHI) schemes to improve access to health service and reduce the catastrophic effect of health care costs. The aim of this study was to examine the determinants of enrollment in CBHI in Northwest Ethiopia. In this study, we utilized a mix of quantitative (multivariate logistic regression applied to population survey linked with health facility survey) and qualitative (focus group discussion and in-depth interview) methods to better understand the factors that affect CBHI enrollment. The study revealed important factors, such as household, informal association, and health facility, as barriers to CBHI enrollment. Age and educational status, self-rated health status, perceived quality of health services, knowledge, and information (awareness) about CBHI were among the characteristics of individual household head, affecting enrollment. Household size and participation in an informal association, such as local credit associations, were also positively associated with CBHI enrollment. Additionally, health facility factors like unavailability of laboratory tests were the main factor that hinders CBHI enrollment. This study showed a possibility of adverse selection in CBHI enrollment. Additionally, perceived quality of health services, knowledge, and information (awareness) are positively associated with CBHI enrollment. Therefore, policy interventions to mitigate adverse selection as well as provision of social marketing activities are crucial to increase enrollment in CBHI. Furthermore, policy interventions that enhance the capacity of health facilities and schemes to provide the promised services are necessary. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Thermodynamic modeling of mineralogical phases formed by continuous casting powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romo-Castaneda, Julio; Cruz-Ramirez, Alejandro; Romero-Serrano, Antonio; Vargas-Ramirez, Marissa; Hallen-Lopez, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    A great amount of mineralogical phases were predicted and represented in stability phase diagrams, which were obtained by the use of the thermodynamic software FACTSage considering both the chemical composition and the melting temperature of the mould flux. Melting-solidification tests on commercial mould flux glasses for thin slab casting of steel revealed the existence of cuspidine (Ca 4 Si 2 O 7 F 2 ) as the main mineralogical phase formed during the flux solidification by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). This phase directly influences the heat transfer phenomena from the strand to the mould and it is obtained with higher fluorite content (22% CaF 2 ). Cuspidine is desirable only in fluxes to produce medium carbon (included peritectic grade) steels, because it reduces the heat flux from the strand to the mould, thus controlling the shrinkage rate during the flux solidification. The experimental results are in agreement with those obtained by the thermodynamic software. The stability phase diagrams could be used as an important tool in the flux design for continuous casting process.

  12. Thermodynamic modeling of mineralogical phases formed by continuous casting powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romo-Castaneda, Julio [Metallurgy and Materials Department, Instituto Politecnico Nacional-ESIQIE, Apdo. P. 118-431, 07051 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Cruz-Ramirez, Alejandro, E-mail: alcruzr@ipn.mx [Metallurgy and Materials Department, Instituto Politecnico Nacional-ESIQIE, Apdo. P. 118-431, 07051 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Romero-Serrano, Antonio; Vargas-Ramirez, Marissa; Hallen-Lopez, Manuel [Metallurgy and Materials Department, Instituto Politecnico Nacional-ESIQIE, Apdo. P. 118-431, 07051 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2011-01-10

    A great amount of mineralogical phases were predicted and represented in stability phase diagrams, which were obtained by the use of the thermodynamic software FACTSage considering both the chemical composition and the melting temperature of the mould flux. Melting-solidification tests on commercial mould flux glasses for thin slab casting of steel revealed the existence of cuspidine (Ca{sub 4}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7}F{sub 2}) as the main mineralogical phase formed during the flux solidification by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). This phase directly influences the heat transfer phenomena from the strand to the mould and it is obtained with higher fluorite content (22% CaF{sub 2}). Cuspidine is desirable only in fluxes to produce medium carbon (included peritectic grade) steels, because it reduces the heat flux from the strand to the mould, thus controlling the shrinkage rate during the flux solidification. The experimental results are in agreement with those obtained by the thermodynamic software. The stability phase diagrams could be used as an important tool in the flux design for continuous casting process.

  13. Automated mineralogical logging of coal and coal measure core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Fraser; Joan Esterle; Colin Ward; Ruth Henwood; Peter Mason; Jon Huntington; Phil Connor; Reneta Sliwa; Dave Coward; Lew Whitbourn [CSIRO Exploration & Mining (Australia)

    2006-06-15

    A mineralogical core logging system based on spectral reflectance (HyLogger{trademark}) has been used to detect and quantify mineralogies in coal and coal measure sediments. The HyLogger{trademark} system, as tested, operates in the visible-to-shortwave infrared spectral region, where iron oxides, sulphates, hydroxyl-bearing and carbonate minerals have characteristic spectral responses. Specialized software assists with mineral identification and data display. Three Phases of activity were undertaken. In Phase I, carbonates (siderite, ankerite, calcite) and clays (halloysite, dickite) were successfully detected and mapped in coal. Repeat measurements taken from one of the cores after three months demonstrated the reproducibility of the spectral approach, with some spectral differences being attributed to variations in moisture content and oxidation. Also, investigated was HyLogger{trademark} ability to create a 'brightness-profile' on coal materials, and these results were encouraging. In Phase II, geotechnically significant smectitic clays (montmorillonite) were detected and mapped in cores of clastic roof and floor materials. Such knowledge would be useful for mine planning and design purposes. In Phase III, our attempts at determining whether phosphorus-bearing minerals such as apatite could be spectrally detected were less than conclusive. A spectral index could only be created for apatite, and the relationships between the spectrally-derived apatite-index, the XRD results and the analytically-derived phosphorus measurements were ambiguous.

  14. Mineralogical behaviour of bentonites in open and closed systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbert, H.J.; Kasbohm, J.

    2004-01-01

    Mineralogical and chemical changes of bentonites were investigated in a natural analogue study and in laboratory experiments. As a working hypothesis we assumed that in geological, i.e. open systems, bentonites may be penetrated over geological time scales by larger water volumes than high compacted bentonites used as technical barriers in repositories in salt formations. Under this assumption open geological systems are characterised by low solid/liquid ratios and closed repository systems by high solid/liquid ratios. Consequently in laboratory experiments the mineralogical changes were investigated under different solid/liquid ratios and compared with results of a natural analogue study. In the natural analogue study in deep boreholes in the East Slovakian Basin the expandability of montmorillonite and the degree of transformation in illite-smectite (IS) mixed layer structures was found to be dependent not only on depth and temperature but also on the salinity of the pore waters. In this open geological system with a comparatively low solid/liquid ratio the observed changes in the montmorillonite were significantly different than those observed in the laboratory study on compacted MX-80 bentonite. (authors)

  15. Iron concretions in Brazilian Soils. 2. Mineralogical characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontes, M.R.; Silva, E.G. da

    1985-01-01

    The mineralogy of six concretionary material from several pedological domains in Brazil were examined by x-ray diffratometry analysis and room temperature (RT) 57 Fe Moessbauer Spectroscopy. In two samples (from 'Quadrilatero Ferrifero' and Itaituba, in the state of Para) hematite was the predominant mineralogical phase, while in the other samples, from Chapada do Apodi (State of Rio Grande do Norte), Calciolandia (State of Minas Gerais), and Vicosa (State of Minas Gerais), goethite appeared as the main occurring mineral, in the (hydr) oxide crystallized fraction. The goethitic character was related to the manganese content in the concretions. The Moessbauer patterns exhibited superparamagnetic relaxation effects, although a six line hyperfine magnetic splitting, and a central doublet appeared at least in three cases. Exceptionally, in the two samples from Chapada do Apodi the six line pattern collapsed completely, and only a central doublet remained. The hyperfine magnetic field was drastically reduced both by particle size and isomorphically substituted aluminum in the iron oxide structure, probably, of Al-hematites. From the Moessbauer parameters, Al-goethite seemed to be present only in the sample from Vicosa, although it should be emphasized that the RT measurements do not always permit access to the hyperfine strucutre in this kind of material, as a result of small size particle effects. (Author) [pt

  16. Mineralogical and chemical characteristics of marble of Bela Pola deposite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shijakova-Ivanova, Tena; Boev, Blazho; Panov, Zoran; Pavlov, Dejan

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents mineralogical characteristics of marbles from the Bela Pola deposit. We have made mineralogical-chemical analyses of marbles and associated minerals in them. The investigation was carried out at the Faculty of natural and technical sciences - Shtip. Marbles from Bela Pola are dolomite and dolomite-calcite types. Microscope investigations have shown that marbles from Bela Pola have granoblastic structure but at some places it can be found with porphyroblastic structures. Percentage on calcite and dolomite is: 94.08% dolomite, 6.25% is calcite in white marbles. On the other hand calcite is present with 93% in gray marbles. Except dolomite and calcite also appear the following accessoring minerals: quartz, fluorite, corundum and paragonite. In general, after summarizing all the facts, which have resulted from this research we could say that, the Bela Pola marbles are massive, compact and white with high quality. In accordance to all formerly mentioned features, this marbles can be classified in the commercial group of marbles suitable for external application or internal design

  17. Mineralogic studies of tuff for high-level waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaniman, D.; Bish, D.; Broxton, D.; Byers, F.; Carlos, B.; Levy, S.

    1986-01-01

    The volcanic rocks at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, consist predominantly of tuff that originated 12 to 14 million years ago as flows and airfalls of hot volcanic particulates. On cooling these units formed two major rock types: crystallized zones formed mostly of feldspar and silica minerals, and zones of glass. Alteration of glass to zeolite minerals occurred largely during structural tilting of Yucca Mountain in the ∼1-3 million years following the major eruptions. The compositions of zeolites formed from glasses strongly indicate open-system chemical exchange. Superimposed on this general alteration of glasses are areas of local high-temperature alteration. High-temperature alteration ended by 11 million years ago. Zeolites such as clinoptilolite persisted during high-temperature alteration at temperatures up to 100 degree C, suggesting that clinoptilolite at Yucca Mountain close to the thermally disturbed zone around a repository may also survive heating to temperatures at least this high. The mineralogic data from tuff at Yucca Mountain will ultimately be used by the Department of Energy Nevada Nuclear Waste storage Investigations for (1) defining the mineralogic component in estimating waste element travel times away from the repository and (2) determining the past history of alteration and the anticipated stability of minerals near the repository

  18. Mineralogic Model (MM3.0) Analysis Model Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Lum

    2002-02-12

    The purpose of this report is to document the Mineralogic Model (MM), Version 3.0 (MM3.0) with regard to data input, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations and validation of the model results, qualification status of the model, and the differences between Version 3.0 and previous versions. A three-dimensional (3-D) Mineralogic Model was developed for Yucca Mountain to support the analyses of hydrologic properties, radionuclide transport, mineral health hazards, repository performance, and repository design. Version 3.0 of the MM was developed from mineralogic data obtained from borehole samples. It consists of matrix mineral abundances as a function of x (easting), y (northing), and z (elevation), referenced to the stratigraphic framework defined in Version 3.1 of the Geologic Framework Model (GFM). The MM was developed specifically for incorporation into the 3-D Integrated Site Model (ISM). The MM enables project personnel to obtain calculated mineral abundances at any position, within any region, or within any stratigraphic unit in the model area. The significance of the MM for key aspects of site characterization and performance assessment is explained in the following subsections. This work was conducted in accordance with the Development Plan for the MM (CRWMS M&O 2000). The planning document for this Rev. 00, ICN 02 of this AMR is Technical Work Plan, TWP-NBS-GS-000003, Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model, Process Model Report, Revision 01 (CRWMS M&O 2000). The purpose of this ICN is to record changes in the classification of input status by the resolution of the use of TBV software and data in this report. Constraints and limitations of the MM are discussed in the appropriate sections that follow. The MM is one component of the ISM, which has been developed to provide a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site. The ISM consists of three components: (1

  19. Mineralogic Model (MM3.0) Analysis Model Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lum, C.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the Mineralogic Model (MM), Version 3.0 (MM3.0) with regard to data input, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations and validation of the model results, qualification status of the model, and the differences between Version 3.0 and previous versions. A three-dimensional (3-D) Mineralogic Model was developed for Yucca Mountain to support the analyses of hydrologic properties, radionuclide transport, mineral health hazards, repository performance, and repository design. Version 3.0 of the MM was developed from mineralogic data obtained from borehole samples. It consists of matrix mineral abundances as a function of x (easting), y (northing), and z (elevation), referenced to the stratigraphic framework defined in Version 3.1 of the Geologic Framework Model (GFM). The MM was developed specifically for incorporation into the 3-D Integrated Site Model (ISM). The MM enables project personnel to obtain calculated mineral abundances at any position, within any region, or within any stratigraphic unit in the model area. The significance of the MM for key aspects of site characterization and performance assessment is explained in the following subsections. This work was conducted in accordance with the Development Plan for the MM (CRWMS M and O 2000). The planning document for this Rev. 00, ICN 02 of this AMR is Technical Work Plan, TWP-NBS-GS-000003, Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model, Process Model Report, Revision 01 (CRWMS M and O 2000). The purpose of this ICN is to record changes in the classification of input status by the resolution of the use of TBV software and data in this report. Constraints and limitations of the MM are discussed in the appropriate sections that follow. The MM is one component of the ISM, which has been developed to provide a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site. The ISM consists of three components

  20. Magnetic mineralogy and rock magnetic properties of silicate and carbonatite rocks from Oldoinyo Lengai volcano (Tanzania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, H. B.; Balashova, A.; Almqvist, B. S. G.; Bosshard-Stadlin, S. A.; Weidendorfer, D.

    2018-06-01

    Oldoinyo Lengai, a stratovolcano in northern Tanzania, is most famous for being the only currently active carbonatite volcano on Earth. The bulk of the volcanic edifice is dominated by eruptive products produced by silica-undersaturated, peralkaline, silicate magmas (effusive, explosive and/or as cumulates at depth). The recent (2007-2008) explosive eruption produced the first ever recorded pyroclastic flows at this volcano and the accidental lithics incorporated into the pyroclastic flows represent a broad variety of different rock types, comprising both extrusive and intrusive varieties, in addition to various types of cumulates. This mix of different accidental lithics provides a unique insight into the inner workings of the world's only active carbonatite volcano. Here, we focus on the magnetic mineralogy and the rock magnetic properties of a wide selection of samples spanning the spectrum of Oldoinyo Lengai rock types compositionally, as well from a textural point of view. Here we show that the magnetic properties of most extrusive silicate rocks are dominated by magnetite-ulvöspinel solid solutions, and that pyrrhotite plays a larger role in the magnetic properties of the intrusive silicate rocks. The natrocarbonatitic lavas, for which the volcano is best known for, show distinctly different magnetic properties in comparison with the silicate rocks. This discrepancy may be explained by abundant alabandite crystals/blebs in the groundmass of the natrocarbonatitic lavas. A detailed combination of petrological/mineralogical studies with geophysical investigations is an absolute necessity in order to understand, and to better constrain, the overall architecture and inner workings of the subvolcanic plumbing system. The results presented here may also have implications for the quest in order to explain the genesis of the uniquely natrocarbonatitic magmas characteristic of Oldoinyo Lengai.

  1. Erratum to: Psammoma bodies in two types of human ovarian tumours: a mineralogical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanlu; Wang, Changqiu; Li, Yan; Lu, Anhuai; Mei, Fang; Liu, Jianying; Du, Jingyun; Zhang, Yan

    2015-06-01

    Psammoma body (PB) is a common form of calcification in pathological diagnosis and closely relevant to tumours. This paper focuses on the mineralogical characteristics of PBs in ovarian serous cancer and teratoma by using polarization microscope (POM), environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM), micro-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (micro-FT-IR), transmission electron microscope (TEM), micro-area synchrotron radiation X-ray powder diffraction (μ-SRXRD) and fluorescence (μ-SRXRF). Both the PBs in tissues and separated from eight typical cases were investigated. POM and ESEM observation revealed the inside-out growth pattern of PBs. μ-SRXRD and micro-FT-IR results demonstrated the dominant mineral phase of PBs in ovarian serous cancer and teratoma was AB-type carbonate hydroxyapatite (Ca10[(PO4)6-x-y(CO3)x(HPO4)y][(OH)2-u(CO3)u] with 0 ≤ x,y,u ≤ 2). As observed by ESEM and TEM, the layer-rich PBs in teratoma were up to 70 μm and mainly consisted of 5 nm-wide, 5-12 nm-long columnar crystals; the PBs in ovarian serous cancer with a maximum diameter of 35 μm were composed of slightly longer columnar crystals and granulates with 20-100 nm in diameter. The selected area electron diffraction patterns showed dispersed polycrystalline diffraction rings with arching behavior of (002) diffraction, indicating the aggregated nanocrystals grew in the preferred orientation of (002) face. The EDX and μ-SRXRF results together indicated the existence of Na, Mg, Zn and Sr in PBs. These detailed mineralogical characteristics may help uncover the nature of the pathological PBs in ovary.

  2. Psammoma bodies in two types of human ovarian tumours: a mineralogical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanlu, Meng; Changqiu, Wang; Yan, Li; Anhuai, Lu; Fang, Mei; Jianying, Liu; Jingyun, Du; Yan, Zhang

    2015-06-01

    Psammoma body (PB) is a common form of calcification in pathological diagnosis and closely relevant to tumours. This paper focuses on the mineralogical characteristics of PBs in ovarian serous cancer and teratoma by using polarization microscope (POM), environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM), micro-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (micro-FT-IR), transmission electron microscope (TEM), micro-area synchrotron radiation X-ray powder diffraction (μ-SRXRD) and fluorescence (μ-SRXRF). Both the PBs in tissues and separated from eight typical cases were investigated. POM and ESEM observation revealed the inside-out growth pattern of PBs. μ-SRXRD and micro-FT-IR results demonstrated the dominant mineral phase of PBs in ovarian serous cancer and teratoma was AB-type carbonate hydroxyapatite (Ca10[(PO4)6-x-y(CO3)x(HPO4 2-)y][(OH)2-u(CO3)u] with 0 ≤ x,y,u ≤ 2). As observed by ESEM and TEM, the layer-rich PBs in teratoma were up to 70 μm and mainly consisted of 5 nm-wide, 5-12 nm-long columnar crystals; the PBs in ovarian serous cancer with a maximum diameter of 35 μm were composed of slightly longer columnar crystals and granulates with 20-100 nm in diameter. The selected area electron diffraction patterns showed dispersed polycrystalline diffraction rings with arching behavior of (002) diffraction, indicating the aggregated nanocrystals grew in the preferred orientation of (002) face. The EDX and μ-SRXRF results together indicated the existence of Na, Mg, Zn and Sr in PBs. These detailed mineralogical characteristics may help uncover the nature of the pathological PBs in ovary.

  3. A methodology for the analysis and selection of alternatives for the disposition of surplus plutonium. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulder, R.

    1995-01-01

    The Office of Fissile Materials Disposition is currently involved in the development of a comprehensive approach to the long-term storage and disposition of fissile materials. A major objective of this effort is to provide a framework for US efforts to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons. This will entail both the elimination of excess highly enriched uranium and plutonium, and the insurance of the highest standards of safety, security, and international accountability. The Office of Fissile Materials Disposition is supporting an Interagency Working Group that has initiated a comprehensive review of alternatives for plutonium disposition which takes into account non-proliferation, economic, technical, institutional, schedule, environmental, and health and safety issues. These alternatives were identified by the development of screening criteria as a guide to the selection of alternatives that best achieve the fissile nuclear material long-term storage and disposition goals of the US Government

  4. Assessment of a sequential extraction protocol by examining solution chemistry and mineralogical evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maubec, Nicolas; Pauwels, Hélène; Noël, Hervé; Bourrat, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge of the behavior of heavy metals, such as copper and zinc in sediments, is a key factor to improve the management of rivers. The mobility of these metals, which may be harmful to the environment, depends directly on their concentration and speciation , which in turn depend on physico-chemical parameters such as mineralogy of the sediment fraction, pH, redox potential, salinity etc ... (Anderson et al., 2000; Sterckeman et al., 2004; Van Oort et al., 2008). Several methods based on chemical extractions are currently applied to assess the behavior of heavy metals in soils and sediments. Among them, sequential extraction procedure is widely used in soil and sediment science and provides details about the origin, biological and physicochemical availability, mobilization and transports of trace metals elements. It is based on the use of a series of extracting reagents to extract selectively heavy metals according to their association within the solid phase (Cornu and Clozel, 2000) including the following different fraction : exchangeable, bound to carbonates, associated to oxides (reducible fraction), linked to organic matter and sulfides (oxidizable fraction) as well as silicate minerals so called residual fraction (Hickey and Kittrick, 1984; Tessier et al., 1979). Consequently sequential extraction method is expected to simulate a lot of potential natural and anthropogenic modifications of environmental conditions (Arey et al., 1999; Brannon and Patrick, 1987; Hickey and Kittrick, 1984; La Force et al., 1999; Tessier et al., 1979). For three decades, a large number of protocols has been proposed, characterized by specific reagents and experimental conditions (concentrations, number of steps, extraction orders and solid/solution ratio) (Das et al., 1995; Gomez Ariza et al., 2000; Quevauviller et al., 1994; Rauret, 1998; Tack and Verloo, 1995), but it appeared that several of them suffer from a lack of selectivity of applied reagents: besides target ones, some

  5. Methodology for Check Valve Selection to Maintain the Integrity of Pipeline against the Check Valve Slam for the KIJANG Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dayong; Yoon, Hyungi; Seo, Kyoungwoo; Kim, Seonhoon [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The check valve slam results in a water hammer and unexpected system pressure rise in the pipeline. Sometimes, the pressure rise by check valve slam in the pipeline exceeds the design pressure and then it causes the rupture of pipeline. Therefore, check valve slam significantly influences on the integrity of pipe. Especially, this it is most likely to occur by check valve installed in the discharge of pump when one pump trips among the two or more running in parallel pump system. This study focuses on the check valve selection to maintain the integrity of PCS pipeline against the check valve slam. If design head for KJRR PCS pipeline is higher than the sum of static head and 11 m, any type check valves can be installed at the discharge of pump. However, if design head for KJRR PCS pipeline is lower than the sum of static head and 11 m, installation of swing and ball check on the discharge of pump must be avoid to prevent the rupture of PCS pipeline.

  6. A facile and selective approach for enrichment of l-cysteine in human plasma sample based on zinc organic polymer: Optimization by response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrani, Sonia; Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Ostovan, Abbas; Javadian, Hamedreza; Mansoorkhani, Mohammad Javad Khoshnood; Taghipour, Tahere

    2018-02-05

    In this research, a facile and selective method was described to extract l-cysteine (l-Cys), an essential α-amino acid for anti-ageing playing an important role in human health, from human blood plasma sample. The importance of this research was the mild and time-consuming synthesis of zinc organic polymer (Zn-MOP) as an adsorbent and evaluation of its ability for efficient enrichment of l-Cys by ultrasound-assisted dispersive micro solid-phase extraction (UA-DMSPE) method. The structure of Zn-MOP was investigated by FT-IR, XRD and SEM. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied for the experimental data to reach the best optimum conditions. The quantification of l-Cys was carried out by high performance liquid chromatography with UV detection set at λ=230nm. The calibration graph showed reasonable linear responses towards l-Cys concentrations in the range of 4.0-1000μg/L (r 2 =0.999) with low limit of detection (0.76μg/L, S/N=3) and RSD≤2.18 (n=3). The results revealed the applicability and high performance of this novel strategy in detecting trace l-Cys by Zn-MOP in complicated matrices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Methodology for Check Valve Selection to Maintain the Integrity of Pipeline against the Check Valve Slam for the KIJANG Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dayong; Yoon, Hyungi; Seo, Kyoungwoo; Kim, Seonhoon

    2016-01-01

    The check valve slam results in a water hammer and unexpected system pressure rise in the pipeline. Sometimes, the pressure rise by check valve slam in the pipeline exceeds the design pressure and then it causes the rupture of pipeline. Therefore, check valve slam significantly influences on the integrity of pipe. Especially, this it is most likely to occur by check valve installed in the discharge of pump when one pump trips among the two or more running in parallel pump system. This study focuses on the check valve selection to maintain the integrity of PCS pipeline against the check valve slam. If design head for KJRR PCS pipeline is higher than the sum of static head and 11 m, any type check valves can be installed at the discharge of pump. However, if design head for KJRR PCS pipeline is lower than the sum of static head and 11 m, installation of swing and ball check on the discharge of pump must be avoid to prevent the rupture of PCS pipeline

  8. Mineralogy of an Active Eolian Sediment from the Namib Dune, Gale Crater, Mars

    OpenAIRE

    Achilles, C. N.; Downs, R. T.; Ming, D. W.; Rampe, E. B.; Morris, R. V.; Treiman, A. H.; Morrison, S. M.; Blake, D. F.; Vaniman, D. T.; Ewing, R. C.; Chipera, S. J.; Yen, A. S.; Bristow, T. F.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Gellert, R.

    2017-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity, is using a comprehensive scientific payload to explore rocks and soils in Gale crater, Mars. Recent investigations of the Bagnold Dune Field provided the first in situ assessment of an active dune on Mars. The Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) X-ray diffraction instrument on Curiosity performed quantitative mineralogical analyses of the

  9. Chemical and mineralogical characterization of iron concretions of some Brazilian soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, M.F.

    1980-01-01

    Chemical and physical analyses of concretionary materials were carried out, with the purpose of getting chemical and mineralogical characteristics of concretions found in some Brazilian soils in different ecosystems spectrophotometry was used for the chemical characterization, and x-ray diffraction and Moessbauer spectroscopy for the mineralogical characterization of the materials studied. (A.R.H.) [pt

  10. Mineral Supertrumps: A New Card Game to Assist Learning of Mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spandler, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Mineralogy is an essential component of Earth Science education, yet many students struggle to obtain adequate comprehension and knowledge of mineralogy during tertiary (postsecondary) degree programs. The use of educational games can be an effective strategy for science teaching as games provide an active learning environment that enhances…

  11. Comparative mineralogical characteristics of red soils from South Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlena Yaneva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to compare mineralogical composition of red soils, formed on marbles in South Bulgaria. We used mineralogical analysis of heavy and light mineral fraction in immersion under polarizing microscope and X-ray diffraction analysis of bulk sample and clay fraction. Three test polygons, located in South Bulgaria were examined: Petrovo, Nova Lovcha and Dobrostan, which are characterized with different latitude, altitude, and exposition. Three or more sites from each polygon were sampled and analyzed. The red soils are formed on white and gray calcite and calcite-dolomite marbles, impure silicate-rich marbles and only in one site – on marble breccias. We determined the following mineral phases in red soils: calcite, dolomite, quarts, and feldspars, mica, illite-type mica, illite, smectite, vermiculite-smectite, and kaolinite. Heavy minerals are represented by amphibole, titanite and epidote, and minor amounts of zircon, garnet, tourmaline, rutile, pyroxene, andalusite, kyanite, sillimanite and apatite. Opaque minerals are predominantly goethite and hematite. Plant tissue is abundant in light fraction from the uppermost soil horizons. Analyses of heavy mineral fraction show presence of metamorphic and igneous minerals which indicate participation of weathering products from other rock types in the nearby area. The types of heavy minerals in soils depend more on composition of parent rocks and geomorphic position than on climate type. Soils from Nova Lovcha show similar composition, but the quantity of goethite and hematite significantly increase in soil from plain. Typical high-metamorphic minerals as andalusite, kyanite and sillimanite present only in Nova Lovcha, while garnet dominates in Petrovo and opaque minerals - in Dobrostan. Red soils, formed on slopes, where erosion prevails over accumulation, contain more illite, smectite and vermiculite-smectite, and very few or no kaolinite, whereas the kaolinite is dominant in soils

  12. Testing methodologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    Several methodologies are available for screening human populations for exposure to ionizing radiation. Of these, aberration frequency determined in peripheral blood lymphocytes is the best developed. Individual exposures to large doses can easily be quantitated, and population exposures to occupational levels can be detected. However, determination of exposures to the very low doses anticipated from a low-level radioactive waste disposal site is more problematical. Aberrations occur spontaneously, without known cause. Exposure to radiation induces no new or novel types, but only increases their frequency. The limitations of chromosomal aberration dosimetry for detecting low level radiation exposures lie mainly in the statistical signal to noise'' problem, the distribution of aberrations among cells and among individuals, and the possible induction of aberrations by other environmental occupational or medical exposures. However, certain features of the human peripheral lymphocyte-chromosomal aberration system make it useful in screening for certain types of exposures. Future technical developments may make chromosomal aberration dosimetry more useful for low-level radiation exposures. Other methods, measuring gene mutations or even minute changes on the DNA level, while presently less will developed techniques, may eventually become even more practical and sensitive assays for human radiation exposure. 15 refs.

  13. Testing methodologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    Several methodologies are available for screening human populations for exposure to ionizing radiation. Of these, aberration frequency determined in peripheral blood lymphocytes is the best developed. Individual exposures to large doses can easily be quantitated, and population exposures to occupational levels can be detected. However, determination of exposures to the very low doses anticipated from a low-level radioactive waste disposal site is more problematical. Aberrations occur spontaneously, without known cause. Exposure to radiation induces no new or novel types, but only increases their frequency. The limitations of chromosomal aberration dosimetry for detecting low level radiation exposures lie mainly in the statistical ''signal to noise'' problem, the distribution of aberrations among cells and among individuals, and the possible induction of aberrations by other environmental occupational or medical exposures. However, certain features of the human peripheral lymphocyte-chromosomal aberration system make it useful in screening for certain types of exposures. Future technical developments may make chromosomal aberration dosimetry more useful for low-level radiation exposures. Other methods, measuring gene mutations or even minute changes on the DNA level, while presently less will developed techniques, may eventually become even more practical and sensitive assays for human radiation exposure. 15 refs

  14. Simulation of radionuclide retardation at Yucca Mountain using a stochastic mineralogical/geochemical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birdsell, K.H.; Campbell, K.; Eggert, K.; Travis, B.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary transport calculations for radionuclide movement at Yucca Mountain. Several different realizations of spatially distributed sorption coefficients are used to study the sensitivity of radionuclide migration. These sorption coefficients are assumed to be functions of the mineralogic assemblages of the underlying rock. The simulations were run with TRACRN 1 , a finite-difference porous flow and radionuclide transport code developed for the Yucca Mountain Project. Approximately 30,000 nodes are used to represent the unsaturated and saturated zones underlying the repository in three dimensions. Transport calculations for a representative radionuclide cation, 135 Cs, and anion, 99 Tc, are presented. Calculations such as these will be used to study the effectiveness of the site's geochemical barriers at a mechanistic level and to help guide the geochemical site characterization program. The preliminary calculations should be viewed as a demonstration of the modeling methodology rather than as a study of the effectiveness of the geochemical barriers. The model provides a method for examining the integration of flow scenarios with transport and retardation processes as currently understood for the site. The effects on transport of many of the processes thought to be active at Yucca Mountain may be examined using this approach. 11 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab

  15. Monitoring selective components of primary health care: methodology and community assessment of vaccination, diarrhoea, and malaria practices in Conakry, Guinea. ACSI-CCCD team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabis, F; Breman, J G; Roisin, A J; Haba, F

    1989-01-01

    The Africa Child Survival Initiative-Combatting Childhood Communicable Diseases (ACSI-CCCD) Project is a primary health care activity that focuses on antenatal care, immunization, diarrhoeal disease control, and malaria control in children under 5 years of age. In order to gauge progress made in the project, a community-based health interview survey to measure simultaneously several prevention and treatment indicators was carried out in 1986 in Conakry, Guinea. A sample of 1415 caretakers and their 2048 children aged under 5 years was visited using a cluster sampling technique. The survey documented the levels of literacy and health education awareness of the caretakers, measured the vaccination coverage levels for children and women of childbearing age, and determined treatment practices for diarrhoea and malaria. Of the 637 women who reported having given birth in the previous 12 months, 96% had visited an antenatal clinic, but only 49% had had two or more doses of tetanus toxoid, and 13% took weekly chemoprophylaxis against malaria. The vaccination coverage for measles was 16% for children aged 12-23 months. Oral rehydration therapy (ORT) was given to 16% of children with diarrhoea; however, only 43% of those who were administered ORT at home were treated according to standard guidelines. Of children with diarrhoea, 51% were given antidiarrhoeal or antimicrobial drugs by caretakers. Fever was treated at home for 79% of the febrile children, and 43% of those with fever also visited health units. The use of injectable antimalarials and prolonged treatments with chloroquine were common. Combining findings from a population-based community study with an assessment of practices in health facilities can provide reliable information for the implementation and monitoring of selective components of primary health care.

  16. Metodologias para seleção de fornecedores: uma revisão da literatura Supplier selection methodologies: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Coelho Viana

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A crescente participação do fornecedor na perfomance geral da contratante tem tornado as organizações mais exigentes na escolha de seus contratados, o que ocasionou a incorporação de uma diversidade de critérios de avaliação ao processo decisório. A relevância e complexidade da decisão de contratação, por sua vez, têm incentivado a busca por novas ferramentas e técnicas de seleção de fornecedores. Nesse sentido, a presente pesquisa realizou uma revisão literária dos trabalhos desenvolvidos relacionados ao tema, na qual foram analisados artigos publicados entre os anos de 1998 e 2011. A partir dessa revisão foi possível identificar as tendências e lacunas da literatura recente, oferecendo aos interessados direcionamento para futuras aplicações e/ou aperfeiçoamentos.Driven by the increasing supplier's involvement in the overall performance of the purchaser, companies have become more demanding in their choices, which led to the incorporation of a variety of evaluation criteria in the decision making process. The importance and complexity of the hiring decision, in turn, have encouraged the search for new tools and techniques for vendor selection. The present study conducted a literature review of works related to the topic, where articles published between 1998 and 2011 were analyzed. This review has identified trends and gaps of the recent literature, offering insights to interested parties for further application and/or improvements.

  17. Mineralogy of dust deposited during the Harmattan season in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Changling; Breuning-Madsen, Henrik; Awadzi, Theodore W.

    2007-01-01

    Ocean. In this project, we studied samples of dust and topsoils in various agroecological zones, from the north to the south of Ghana, focussing mainly on the mineralogy of these materials. Some data about grain sizes and morphology of the samples are also presented. Feldspars, together with quartz......In Ghana, a dust-laden Harmattan wind blows from the Sahara in the period November to March. Some of the dust is trapped in the vegetation, in lakes and other inland waters, and a little on the bare land, whereas the rest of the dust is blown further away to the Ivory Coast or out into the Atlantic......, are the common minerals found in Harmattan dust, but the relative contents of K-feldspars and plagioclase vary markedly in the different zones. This variation is consistent with changes in the relative content of the feldspars in the topsoil, indicating a substantial local contribution to the Harmattan dust...

  18. Soil chemistry and mineralogy of the Santa Cruz coastal terraces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinney, Colin; Aniku, Jacob; Burke, Raymond; Harden, Jennifer; Singer, Michael; Munster, Jennie

    2002-01-01

    Marine terraces in the central coast of California provide an opportunity to study a soil chronosequence in which similar materials (beach deposits) have been weathered under similar slope, climatic, and vegetation conditions during the Quaternary. The terraces between Santa Cruz and Año Nuevo, California, have been studied for decades and are thought to be one of the best example of marine terraces in California {Lawson (1893), Wilson (1907); Branner and others (1909), Rode (1930) Page and Holmes (1945), Alexander (1953), Bradley (1956, 1957, 1958, and 1965), Bradley and Addicott (1968), Clark (1966 and 1970), Jahns and Hamilton (1971), Lajoie and others (1972), Bradley and Griggs (1976). Hanks and others (1986), Aniku (1986), Fine and others (1988), Anderson (1990 and 1994), and Rosenbloom and Anderson (1994).} Here we report morphological, chemical, physical, and mineralogical data for the soils that were formed in deposits on the Santa Cruz marine terraces in order to examine soil characteristics as a function of increasing terrace age.

  19. Mineralogy and geochemistry of soils from glass houses and solariums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgariu, Dumitru; Filipov, Feodor; Rusu, Constantin; Bulgariu, Laura

    2010-05-01

    The experimental studies have been performed on soil samples from Copou-Iaşi, Bacău and Bârlad (România) glass houses. We have specially follow the aspects concerning to the distribution of occurrence forms, composition and structure of mineral and organic components, and the genetic correlations between these in conditions of soils from glass houses, respectively. The results regarding the distribution tendencies on profile and the correlations between mineral and organic components of studied soils have been correlated with the results of microscopic, spectral (IR and Raman) and X-ray diffraction studies, and with the results of thermodynamic modelling of mineral equilibriums and dynamics of pedogenesis processes, in conditions of soils from glass houses. The utilization of intensive cultivation technologies of vegetables in glass houses determined the degradation of morphological, physical and chemical characteristics of soils, by fast evolution of salted processes (salinization and / or sodization), compaction, carbonatation, eluviation-illuviation, frangipane formation, stagnogleization, gleization, etc. Under these conditions, at depth of 30-40 cm is formed a compact and impenetrable horizon with frangipane characteristics, expresses more or less. The aspects about the formation of frangipane horizon in soils from glasshouses are not yet sufficiently know. Whatever of the formation processes, the frangipane horizons determined a sever segregation in pedo-geochemical evolution of soils from glasshouses, with very important consequences on the agrochemical quality of these soils. The soils from glass houses are characterized by a very large variability of mineralogy and chemistry, which are traduced by intense modifications of superior horizons, in many cases there are conditions for the apparition of new pedogenetic horizons through new-pedogenesis processes. Under these conditions the definition of some general characteristics of soils from glasshouses is

  20. Minerals cave, Volcan Irazu, Costa Rica: description, mineralogy and origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulloa, Andres; Campos-Fernandez, Cristian S.; Rojas, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Two caves are found in the NW sector of the main crater of the Volcan Irazu at the base of the crown of a glide. The caves are located in an area of structural weakness of the massif developed in sequences of pyroclasts with hydrothermal alteration. Several explorations are organized for the recognition of the caves. The purpose has been of collecting samples and photographs for mineralogical and topographic analyses, through X-ray diffractometry. The minerals present in the samples are compared and identified by means of PDF-2 power x-ray diffraction database of the 2007 ICDD, International Center for Diffraction Data. The origin of the caves has been studied, and it is suggested to carry out other of complement studies [es

  1. Raman spectroscopic analysis of real samples: Brazilian bauxite mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulstich, Fabiano Richard Leite; Castro, Harlem V.; de Oliveira, Luiz Fernando Cappa; Neumann, Reiner

    2011-10-01

    In this investigation, Raman spectroscopy with 1064 and 632.8 nm excitation was used to investigate real mineral samples of bauxite ore from mines of Northern Brazil, together with Raman mapping and X-rays diffraction. The obtained results show clearly that the use of microRaman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the identification of all the minerals usually found in bauxites: gibbsite, kaolinite, goethite, hematite, anatase and quartz. Bulk samples can also be analysed, and FT-Raman is more adequate due to better signal-to-noise ratio and representativity, although not efficient for kaolinite. The identification of fingerprinting vibrations for all the minerals allows the acquisition of Raman-based chemical maps, potentially powerful tools for process mineralogy applied to bauxite ores.

  2. The mineralogy of bauxite for producing smelter-grade alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Authier-Martin, M.; Forte, G.; Ostap, S.; See, J.

    2001-12-01

    Aluminum-producing companies rely on low-cost, high-purity, smelter-grade alumina (aluminum oxide), and alumina production utilizes the bulk of bauxites mined world-wide. The mineralogy of the bauxites has a significant impact on the operation of the Bayer process for alumina production. Typically, the Bayer process produces smelter-grade alumina of 99.5% Al2O3, starting from bauxite containing 30% to 60% Al2O3. The main objective of the Bayer process is to extract the maximum amount of aluminum from the bauxite at as high an aluminate concentration in solution as possible, while limiting any troublesome side reactions. Only with a better understanding of the chemistry of the mineral species and a strict control of the operating/processing conditions can the Bayer process produce efficiently, a low cost, high-quality alumina with minimum detrimental environmental impact.

  3. Mineralogical and paragenetical problems of the Mecsek uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincze, J.; Fazekas, V.

    1979-01-01

    The latest results of the ore-mineralogical examination of the uranium ore of a deposit included in Permian sandstones in the Mecsek Mountains, southern Hungary, are presented. The phases of the minerals belonging to the uranium oxide series and their types of development, the post-coffinite nasturan pseudomorphs and the relationship between nasturan and coffinite are dealt with. Of the sulphide ore minerals associated with uranium ore mineralization the type determinant mineral is pyrite, i.e. the mineral forming their bulk and partly represented by characteristically finely aggregated ''bacteriopyrite'' and/or spherical pyrite and ''framboidal pyrite. The textural pattern of the ore mineralization is of typically matrix type. The matrix of sandstone is constituted by carbonate minerals, ''hydromicas'' and ore minerals. The matrix and, consequently, the ore minerals will corrode and consume the allothigenic detrital rockforming minerals, the feldspar, quartz-porphyry and quartz. (A.L.)

  4. AEGIS methodology and a perspective from AEGIS methodology demonstrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dove, F.H.

    1981-03-01

    Objectives of AEGIS (Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems) are to develop the capabilities needed to assess the post-closure safety of waste isolation in geologic formation; demonstrate these capabilities on reference sites; apply the assessment methodology to assist the NWTS program in site selection, waste package and repository design; and perform repository site analyses for the licensing needs of NWTS. This paper summarizes the AEGIS methodology, the experience gained from methodology demonstrations, and provides an overview in the following areas: estimation of the response of a repository to perturbing geologic and hydrologic events; estimation of the transport of radionuclides from a repository to man; and assessment of uncertainties

  5. Comet Mineralogy as Inferred from Infrared Spectra of Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, Diane H.

    2006-01-01

    For most comets, infrared (IR) spectroscopy (remote sensing) is the method through which we diagnose the mineralogy and size distribution of dust in their comae. The shape and contrast of the IR spectral features depend on the particle size: optically active minerals (absorbing of visible and near-IR solar photons) and submicron solid grains or highly porous (> 90% vacuum) grains primarily contribute to the shapes of the observed resonances. Comet mineralogies typically are determined by fitting thermal emission models of ensembles of discrete mineral grains to observed IR spectral energy distributions. The absorptivities (Q-abs) and scattering efficiencies (Q-scat) of the discrete mineral grains are computed using Mie scattering, Maxwell-Garnet mixing, Discrete Dipole Approximation, and Multi-Layered Sphere codes. These techniques when applied to crystalline minerals, specifically olivine (Mg_x, Fe_1-x)2 Si04, x>0.9, require the use of ellipsoidal shaped particles with elongated axial ratios or hollow spheres to produce the shapes of the resonances observed both from comet comae and laboratory samples. The wavelength positions of the distinct resonances from submicron-radii crystalline silicates, as well as their thermal equilibrium temperatures, constrain the crystalline olivine to have a relatively high Mg-content (x>0.9, or Fo>90). Only resonances computed for submicron Mg-rich crystalline olivine and crystalline orthopyroxene match the observed IR spectral features. However, this has led to the interpretation that micron-radii and larger crystals are absent from comet comae. Furthermore, the mass fraction of silicate crystals is dependent upon whether just the submicron portion of the size distribution is being compared or the submicron crystals compare to the aggregates of porous amorphous silicates that are computationally tractable as porous spheres. We will discuss the Deep Impact results as examples of these challenges to interpreting mid-IR spectra of

  6. Semantic Interoperability for Computational Mineralogy: Experiences of the eMinerals Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, A. M.; White, T. O.; Dove, M. T.; Bruin, R. P.; Couch, P. A.; Tyer, R. P.

    2006-12-01

    The use of atomic scale computer simulation of minerals to obtain information for geophysics and environmental science has grown enormously over the past couple of decades. It is now routine to probe mineral behavior in the Earth's deep interior and in the surface environment by borrowing methods and simulation codes from computational chemistry and physics. It is becoming increasingly important to use methods embodied in more than one of these codes to solve any single scientific problem. However, scientific codes are rarely designed for easy interoperability and data exchange; data formats are often code-specific, poorly documented and fragile, liable to frequent change between software versions, and even compiler versions. This means that the scientist's simple desire to use the methodological approaches offered by multiple codes is frustrated, and even the sharing of data between collaborators becomes fraught with difficulties. The eMinerals consortium was formed in the early stages of the UK eScience program with the aim of developing the tools needed to apply atomic scale simulation to environmental problems in a grid-enabled world, and to harness the computational power offered by grid technologies to address some outstanding mineralogical problems. One example of the kind of problem we can tackle is the origin of the compressibility anomaly in silica glass. By passing data directly between simulation and analysis tools we were able to probe this effect in more detail than has previously been possible and have shown how the anomaly is related to the details of the amorphous structure. In order to approach this kind of problem we have constructed a mini-grid, a small scale and extensible combined compute- and data-grid that allows the execution of many calculations in parallel, and the transparent storage of semantically-rich marked-up result data. Importantly, we automatically capture multiple kinds of metadata and key results from each calculation. We

  7. Quick, Easy, and Economic Mineralogical Studies of Flooded Chalk for EOR Experiments Using Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Borromeo

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the chalk-fluid interactions and the associated mineralogical and mechanical alterations on a sub-micron scale are major goals in Enhanced Oil Recovery. Mechanical strength, porosity, and permeability of chalk are linked to mineral dissolution that occurs during brine injections, and affect the reservoir potential. This paper presents a novel “single grain” methodology to recognize the varieties of carbonates in rocks and loose sediments: Raman spectroscopy is a non-destructive, quick, and user-friendly technique representing a powerful tool to identify minerals down to 1 µm. An innovative working technique for oil exploration is proposed, as the mineralogy of micron-sized crystals grown in two flooded chalk samples (Liége, Belgium was successfully investigated by Raman spectroscopy. The drilled chalk cores were flooded with MgCl2 for ca. 1.5 (Long Term Test and 3 years (Ultra Long Term Test under North Sea reservoir conditions (Long Term Test: 130 °C, 1 PV/day, 9.3 MPa effective stress; Ultra Long Term Test: 130 °C, varying between 1–3 PV/day, 10.4 MPa effective stress. Raman spectroscopy was able to identify the presence of recrystallized magnesite along the core of the Long Term Test up to 4 cm from the injection surface, down to the crystal size of 1–2 µm. In the Ultra Long Term Test core, the growth of MgCO3 affected nearly the entire core (7 cm. In both samples, no dolomite or high-magnesium calcite secondary growth could be detected when analysing 557 and 90 Raman spectra on the Long and Ultra Long Term Test, respectively. This study can offer Raman spectroscopy as a breakthrough tool in petroleum exploration of unconventional reservoirs, due to its quickness, spatial resolution, and non-destructive acquisition of data. These characteristics would encourage its use coupled with electron microscopes and energy dispersive systems or even electron microprobe studies.

  8. Methodology for ranking restoration options

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Hedemann

    1999-01-01

    techniques as a function of contamination and site characteristics. The project includes analyses of existing remediation methodologies and contaminated sites, and is structured in the following steps:-characterisation of relevant contaminated sites -identication and characterisation of relevant restoration...... techniques -assessment of the radiological impact -development and application of a selection methodology for restoration options -formulation ofgeneric conclusions and development of a manual The project is intended to apply to situations in which sites with nuclear installations have been contaminated...

  9. Elemental and mineralogical study of earth-based pigments using particle induced X-ray emission and X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nel, P.; Lynch, P.A.; Laird, J.S.; Casey, H.M.; Goodall, L.J.; Ryan, C.G.; Sloggett, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    Artwork and precious artefacts demand non-destructive analytical methodologies for art authentication, attribution and provenance assessment. However, structural and chemical characterisation represents a challenging problem with existing analytical techniques. A recent authentication case based on an Australian Aboriginal artwork, indicate there is substantial benefit in the ability of particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), coupled with dynamic analysis (DA) to characterise pigments through trace element analysis. However, this information alone is insufficient for characterising the mineralogical residence of trace elements. For this reason a combined methodology based on PIXE and X-ray diffraction (XRD) has been performed to explore the benefits of a more comprehensive data set. Many Aboriginal paintings and artefacts are predominantly earth pigment based. This makes these cultural heritage materials an ideal case study for testing the above combined methodological approach on earth-based pigments. Samples of synthetic and naturally occurring earth-based pigments were obtained from a range of sources, which include Indigenous communities within Australia's Kimberley region. PIXE analyses using a 3 MeV focussed proton beam at the CSIRO nuclear microprobe, as well as laboratory-based XRD was carried out on the above samples. Elemental signature spectra as well as mineralogical data were used to assess issues regarding synthetic and naturally occurring earth pigments with the ultimate aim of establishing provenance.

  10. Detailed mineralogical characterization of the Bullfrog and Tram members USW-G1, with emphasis on clay mineralogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bish, D.L.

    1981-10-01

    The detailed mineralogy of the Bullfrog and Tram Members of the Crater Flat Tuff from drill hole USW-G1 has been examined, primarily to characterize fully the amounts and types of clay minerals in the tuffs and the possible effects clay minerals have on rock properties. Results of bulk sample x-ray diffraction analyses agree closely with previous determinations, although slightly higher clay mineral contents were found in this study. X-ray diffraction analysis of fine fractions revealed that the clay minerals in the tuffs are sodium-saturated montmorillonite-beidellites with typical layer charges and no high-charge layers. These smectites are found in virtually all samples of the Bullfrog and Tram, and there is no correlation between the amounts of smectites and the amounts of zeolite, quartz, and feldspar. Smectites are present in both welded and nonwelded horizons and are scarce in some zones with slight-to-absent welding

  11. The Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) imaging spectrometerfor lunar science: Instrument description, calibration, on‐orbit measurements, science data calibration and on‐orbit validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Pieters,; P. Mouroulis,; M. Eastwood,; J. Boardman,; Green, R.O.; Glavich, T.; Isaacson, P.; Annadurai, M.; Besse, S.; Cate, D.; Chatterjee, A.; Clark, R.; Barr, D.; Cheek, L.; Combe, J.; Dhingra, D.; Essandoh, V.; Geier, S.; Goswami, J.N.; Green, R.; Haemmerle, V.; Head, J.; Hovland, L.; Hyman, S.; Klima, R.; Koch, T.; Kramer, G.; Kumar, A.S.K.; Lee, K.; Lundeen, S.; Malaret, E.; McCord, T.; McLaughlin, S.; Mustard, J.; Nettles, J.; Petro, N.; Plourde, K.; Racho, C.; Rodriguez, J.; Runyon, C.; Sellar, G.; Smith, C.; Sobel, H.; Staid, M.; Sunshine, J.; Taylor, L.; Thaisen, K.; Tompkins, S.; Tseng, H.; Vane, G.; Varanasi, P.; White, M.; Wilson, D.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Discovery Moon Mineralogy Mapper imaging spectrometer was selected to pursue a wide range of science objectives requiring measurement of composition at fine spatial scales over the full lunar surface. To pursue these objectives, a broad spectral range imaging spectrometer with high uniformity and high signal-to-noise ratio capable of measuring compositionally diagnostic spectral absorption features from a wide variety of known and possible lunar materials was required. For this purpose the Moon Mineralogy Mapper imaging spectrometer was designed and developed that measures the spectral range from 430 to 3000 nm with 10 nm spectral sampling through a 24 degree field of view with 0.7 milliradian spatial sampling. The instrument has a signal-to-noise ratio of greater than 400 for the specified equatorial reference radiance and greater than 100 for the polar reference radiance. The spectral cross-track uniformity is >90% and spectral instantaneous field-of-view uniformity is >90%. The Moon Mineralogy Mapper was launched on Chandrayaan-1 on the 22nd of October. On the 18th of November 2008 the Moon Mineralogy Mapper was turned on and collected a first light data set within 24 h. During this early checkout period and throughout the mission the spacecraft thermal environment and orbital parameters varied more than expected and placed operational and data quality constraints on the measurements. On the 29th of August 2009, spacecraft communication was lost. Over the course of the flight mission 1542 downlinked data sets were acquired that provide coverage of more than 95% of the lunar surface. An end-to-end science data calibration system was developed and all measurements have been passed through this system and delivered to the Planetary Data System (PDS.NASA.GOV). An extensive effort has been undertaken by the science team to validate the Moon Mineralogy Mapper science measurements in the context of the mission objectives. A focused spectral, radiometric

  12. The Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) imaging spectrometer for lunar science: Instrument description, calibration, on-orbit measurements, science data calibration and on-orbit validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, R.O.; Pieters, C.; Mouroulis, P.; Eastwood, M.; Boardman, J.; Glavich, T.; Isaacson, P.; Annadurai, M.; Besse, S.; Barr, D.; Buratti, B.; Cate, D.; Chatterjee, A.; Clark, R.; Cheek, L.; Combe, J.; Dhingra, D.; Essandoh, V.; Geier, S.; Goswami, J.N.; Green, R.; Haemmerle, V.; Head, J.; Hovland, L.; Hyman, S.; Klima, R.; Koch, T.; Kramer, G.; Kumar, A.S.K.; Lee, Kenneth; Lundeen, S.; Malaret, E.; McCord, T.; McLaughlin, S.; Mustard, J.; Nettles, J.; Petro, N.; Plourde, K.; Racho, C.; Rodriquez, J.; Runyon, C.; Sellar, G.; Smith, C.; Sobel, H.; Staid, M.; Sunshine, J.; Taylor, L.; Thaisen, K.; Tompkins, S.; Tseng, H.; Vane, G.; Varanasi, P.; White, M.; Wilson, D.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Discovery Moon Mineralogy Mapper imaging spectrometer was selected to pursue a wide range of science objectives requiring measurement of composition at fine spatial scales over the full lunar surface. To pursue these objectives, a broad spectral range imaging spectrometer with high uniformity and high signal-to-noise ratio capable of measuring compositionally diagnostic spectral absorption features from a wide variety of known and possible lunar materials was required. For this purpose the Moon Mineralogy Mapper imaging spectrometer was designed and developed that measures the spectral range from 430 to 3000 nm with 10 nm spectral sampling through a 24 degree field of view with 0.7 milliradian spatial sampling. The instrument has a signal-to-noise ratio of greater than 400 for the specified equatorial reference radiance and greater than 100 for the polar reference radiance. The spectral cross-track uniformity is >90% and spectral instantaneous field-of-view uniformity is >90%. The Moon Mineralogy Mapper was launched on Chandrayaan-1 on the 22nd of October. On the 18th of November 2008 the Moon Mineralogy Mapper was turned on and collected a first light data set within 24 h. During this early checkout period and throughout the mission the spacecraft thermal environment and orbital parameters varied more than expected and placed operational and data quality constraints on the measurements. On the 29th of August 2009, spacecraft communication was lost. Over the course of the flight mission 1542 downlinked data sets were acquired that provide coverage of more than 95% of the lunar surface. An end-to-end science data calibration system was developed and all measurements have been passed through this system and delivered to the Planetary Data System (PDS.NASA.GOV). An extensive effort has been undertaken by the science team to validate the Moon Mineralogy Mapper science measurements in the context of the mission objectives. A focused spectral, radiometric

  13. Methodological proposal for defining mining vocation in Venezuelan land-use planning; Propuesta metodologica para definir la vocacion minera en el contexto del ordenamiento territorial venezolano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valladares Salinas, R. Y.; Dall Pozzo, F.; Castillo Padron, A. J.

    2015-07-01

    Mining is an economic activity which is necessary to provide raw materials for the different socio-productive networks of the country. Its application depends on the mineralogical occurrence offered by the geological conditions of an area and requires planning due to the fact that it needs to be located in a geographical space and the environment fragility of this space and the socio-economic and political-institutional legislation at a given moment all have to be taken into account. Therefore, the objective of this research consists of a proposal for a methodological model to define areas with mining adapted to the Venezuelan context of land-use planning, in order to assign mining uses to the most appropriate areas for that goal, considering the selection, assessment and integration of a series of variables and indicators adjusted to the thematic information available. (Author)

  14. Sample size methodology

    CERN Document Server

    Desu, M M

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important problems in designing an experiment or a survey is sample size determination and this book presents the currently available methodology. It includes both random sampling from standard probability distributions and from finite populations. Also discussed is sample size determination for estimating parameters in a Bayesian setting by considering the posterior distribution of the parameter and specifying the necessary requirements. The determination of the sample size is considered for ranking and selection problems as well as for the design of clinical trials. Appropria

  15. Methodology of site studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caries, J.C.; Hugon, J.; Grauby, A.

    1980-01-01

    This methodology consists in an essentially dynamic, estimated and follow-up analysis of the impact of discharges on all the environment compartments, whether natural or not, that play a part in the protection of man and his environment. It applies at two levels, to wit: the choice of site, or the detailed study of the site selected. Two examples of its application will be developed, namely: at the choice of site level in the case of marine sites, and of the detailed study level of the chosen site in that of a riverside site [fr

  16. Temperature buffer test. Hydro-mechanical and chemical/ mineralogical characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aakesson, Mattias; Olsson, Siv; Dueck, Ann; Nilsson, Ulf; Karnland, Ola [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden); Kiviranta, Leena; Kumpulainen, Sirpa [BandTech Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Linden, Johan [Aabo Akademi, Aabo (Finland)

    2012-01-15

    The Temperature Buffer Test (TBT) is a joint project between SKB/ANDRA and supported by ENRESA (modeling) and DBE (instrumentation), which aims at improving the understanding and to model the thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of buffers made of swelling clay submitted to high temperatures (over 100 deg C) during the water saturation process. The test has been carried out in a KBS-3 deposition hole at Aspo HRL. It was installed during the spring of 2003. Two steel heaters (3 m long, 0.6 m diameter) and two buffer arrangements have been investigated: the lower heater was surrounded by rings of compacted Wyoming bentonite only, whereas the upper heater was surrounded by a composite barrier, with a sand shield between the heater and the bentonite. The test was dismantled and sampled during the winter of 2009/2010. This report presents the hydro-mechanical and chemical/mineralogical characterization program which was launched subsequent to the dismantling operation. The main goal has been to investigate if any significant differences could be observed between material from the field experiment and the reference material. The field samples were mainly taken from Ring 4 (located at the mid-section around the lower heater), in which the temperature in the innermost part reached 155 deg C. The following hydro-mechanical properties have been determined for the material (test technique within brackets): hydraulic conductivity (swelling pressure device), swelling pressure (swelling pressure device), unconfined compression strength (mechanical press), shear strength (triaxial cell) and retention properties (jar method). The following chemical/mineralogical properties (methods within brackets) were determined: anion analysis of water leachates (IC), chemical composition (ICP/AES+MS, EGA), cation exchange capacity (CEC, Cu-trien method) and exchangeable cations (exchange with NH4, ICPAES), mineralogical composition (XRD and FTIR), element distribution and microstructure (SEM and

  17. The global influence of dust mineralogical composition on heterogeneous ice nucleation in mixed-phase clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoose, C; Lohmann, U; Erdin, R; Tegen, I

    2008-01-01

    Mineral dust is the dominant natural ice nucleating aerosol. Its ice nucleation efficiency depends on the mineralogical composition. We show the first sensitivity studies with a global climate model and a three-dimensional dust mineralogy. Results show that, depending on the dust mineralogical composition, coating with soluble material from anthropogenic sources can lead to quasi-deactivation of natural dust ice nuclei. This effect counteracts the increased cloud glaciation by anthropogenic black carbon particles. The resulting aerosol indirect effect through the glaciation of mixed-phase clouds by black carbon particles is small (+0.1 W m -2 in the shortwave top-of-the-atmosphere radiation in the northern hemisphere)

  18. Kaolin clays from Patagonia - Argentina. Relationship between the mineralogy and ceramic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Factorovich, J.C.; Badino, D.; Cravero, F.; Dominguez, E.

    1997-01-01

    The mineralogy, grain size distribution, chemical composition, S and C contents, plasticity, and cationic exchange capacity are determined in the sedimentary kaolinitic clays from the clay pits Puma Negra, Puma Gris, Tincar Super; and Chenque and Cardenal located in Santa Cruz and Chubut Provinces. Mineralogy and Particle size distribution of > 5, 5-2 and <2μ fractions are determined. Modulus of rupture, 1100 and 1250 deg C shrinkage and water absorption and whiteness are found. It is accomplished a statistics correlation between the characteristics of grain size distribution, mineralogy, and other physical properties with the main ceramic properties to understand its influence in the ceramic process. (author)

  19. Mineralogy of an active eolian sediment from the Namib dune, Gale crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilles, C. N.; Downs, R. T.; Ming, D. W.; Rampe, E. B.; Morris, R. V.; Treiman, A. H.; Morrison, S. M.; Blake, D. F.; Vaniman, D. T.; Ewing, R. C.; Chipera, S. J.; Yen, A. S.; Bristow, T. F.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Gellert, R.; Hazen, R. M.; Fendrich, K. V.; Craig, P. I.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Des Marais, D. J.; Farmer, J. D.; Sarrazin, P. C.; Morookian, J. M.

    2017-11-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity, is using a comprehensive scientific payload to explore rocks and soils in Gale crater, Mars. Recent investigations of the Bagnold Dune Field provided the first in situ assessment of an active dune on Mars. The Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) X-ray diffraction instrument on Curiosity performed quantitative mineralogical analyses of the history of the dune material and offers an important opportunity for ground truth of orbital observations. CheMin's analysis of the mineralogy and phase chemistry of modern and ancient Gale crater dune fields, together with other measurements by Curiosity's science payload, provides new insights into present and past eolian processes on Mars.

  20. Selection of methodology to assess food intake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biró, G.; Hulshof, K.F.A.M.; Ovesen, L.; Amorim Cruz, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the EFCOSUM project was to develop a method to estimate both acute and usual consumption levels in European countries and for the sake of comparison, a common basic method for dietary assessment was needed. The method should allow a reliable comparison of the intake of relevant

  1. Mineralogy of the Chaparra IOCG deposit, southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yáñez, Juan; Alfonso, Pura

    2014-05-01

    The Chaparra IOCG, located in southern Peru, near Chala, is mined and exploited by small-scale miners for gold, however, it has not been studied until now. Here we present a preliminary geological and mineralogic study of this deposit. Powder X ray diffraction, electron microscopy and electron microprobe were used to characterize the mineralization. This deposit is hosted in magmatic rocks from the Coastal Batholith. Host rocks belong to the Linga Super-unit, of Upper Cretaceous age and are mainly constituted by monzonites, monzogabbros and diorites. Major alterations are the propylitic (chlorite - albite - quartz), advanced argillic (jarosite - natrojarosite) and sericitic (muscovite-sericite-quartz). Gypsum and other alteration minerals such as potassium feldspar and phlogopite, vermiculite and natrolite are widespread. Mineralization occurs mainly in quartz veins up to 1 m thick, emplaced filling fractures. Ore mineralogy is mainly composed of hematite, goethite, and sulphides (mainly pyrite, chalcopyrite and covellite). Gold and REE-rich minerals also occur. Native gold can reach up to 1 mm in size, but usually is few μm in size. Its composition is 82-92 wt% Au, up to 12 wt% of Ag and Fe can reach up to 4 wt%. The paragenetic sequence in the Chaparra deposit was divided into three stages: (I) primary mineralization, (II) Fracture filling, and (III) supergene alteration. The sequence begins with the crystallization of magnetite, quartz, pyrrhotite and pyrite. Subsequently, native gold, native Bismuth and uraninite crystallices together with the former minerals, in which are enclosed. Later, monacite is formed, being enclosed in quartz. Pyrite also presents small grains of chalcopyrite inside. Galena, sphalerite and arsenopyrite also are formed, whether included in pyrite or outside. Scarce grains of sakuraiite also occur in this stage. Structural formula of sakuraiie from this deposit is Cu 01.78-1.90 Zn 0.07-12Fe 1.16-124In 0.22-0.26Sn 0.79-082S4). Indium

  2. Ancient mortars from Cape Verde: mineralogical and physical characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Fernando; Costa, Cristiana; Velosa, Ana; Quintela, Ana; Terroso, Denise; Marques, Vera

    2014-05-01

    Times and locations of different building constructions means different knowledge, habits, different construction methods and materials. The study and safeguarding of the architectural heritage takes nowadays a progressive importance as a vehicle for transmission of cultures and history of nations. The coatings are of great importance in the durability of a building due to the protective role of the masonry. The compatibility between the materials with which they are executed (masonry, mortar and grout settlement) promotes the proper functioning of the wall and a consequent increase in durability. Therefore, it becomes important to study and characterize the mortar coating of buildings to know its characteristics and to use compatible materials in the rehabilitation and maintenance of buildings. This study aims to characterize the chemical, physical, mechanical and mineralogical mortar samples collected in buildings in three islands of Cape Verde, for the conservation, rehabilitation and preservation of them. The collected samples belong to buildings constructed in the end of XIX century and in the beginning of XX century. In order to characterize the mortar samples some tests was made, such as X-Ray Diffraction, X- Ray Fluorescence, acid attack and mechanical strength. The samples were divided into three groups depending on origin; so we have a first group collected on the island of Santiago, the second on the island of Saint Vincent and the third on the island of Santo Antao. The samples are all carbonated, but Santiago samples have a lower carbonates content. In terms of insoluble residue (from the acid attack) it was concluded that the samples have similar value ranging from 9 to 26%. The compressive strength of the mortars have a range between 1.36 and 4.55 MPa, which is related to the presence of more binder in samples with higher resistance. The chemical and mineralogical analyzes showed that these consist of lime mortars (binder), natural pozzolan and

  3. A preliminary assessment of the relationship between the mineralogy and diagenetic history of four argillaceous rocks and their thermomechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopp, O.C.; Mulligan, P.J.; Reeves, D.K.

    1988-11-01

    A primary purpose of this study was to develop reproducible, quantitative methods to determine the bulk mineral composition and diagenetic history of argillaceous rocks and to attempt, in a preliminary way, to explain the thermomechanical behavior of several formations that were being measured by others. This report presents the results of several methods of analysis [specific-gravity determinations, water contents, chemical analyses by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis, quantitative mineralogical analyses by x-ray diffraction (QXRD), preferred orientation analyses by x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of fractured samples] that were used to study selected samples from the Conasauga Group, the Rhinestreet Shale, the Pierre Shale, and the Green River Formation to determine their mineralogical character and the effects of diagenesis on these materials. The results were then related to thermochemical test data that were obtained on samples from the same cores. Specific-gravity determinations on ''as-received'' samples ranged from 2.00 for the Green River Formation to 2.75 for the Rhinestreet Shale. Exposure to the atmosphere resulted in a small net gain (+0.5) in specific gravity for the Conasauga Group samples and a net loss (-0.11) for the Pierre Shale samples. Water contents, determined by heating to 105/degree/C for 1 h, averaged 0.8% by weight for the Conasauga Shale, Rhinestreet Shale, and Green River Formation samples. The water content determined for the Pierre Shale samples was 12.1 wt %

  4. A protocol for a three-arm cluster randomized controlled superiority trial investigating the effects of two pedagogical methodologies in Swedish preschool settings on language and communication, executive functions, auditive selective attention, socioemotional skills and early maths skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerholm, Tove; Hörberg, Thomas; Tonér, Signe; Kallioinen, Petter; Frankenberg, Sofia; Kjällander, Susanne; Palmer, Anna; Taguchi, Hillevi Lenz

    2018-06-19

    During the preschool years, children develop abilities and skills in areas crucial for later success in life. These abilities include language, executive functions, attention, and socioemotional skills. The pedagogical methods used in preschools hold the potential to enhance these abilities, but our knowledge of which pedagogical practices aid which abilities, and for which children, is limited. The aim of this paper is to describe an intervention study designed to evaluate and compare two pedagogical methodologies in terms of their effect on the above-mentioned skills in Swedish preschool children. The study is a randomized control trial (RCT) where two pedagogical methodologies were tested to evaluate how they enhanced children's language, executive functions and attention, socioemotional skills, and early maths skills during an intensive 6-week intervention. Eighteen preschools including 28 units and 432 children were enrolled in a municipality close to Stockholm, Sweden. The children were between 4;0 and 6;0 years old and each preschool unit was randomly assigned to either of the interventions or to the control group. Background information on all children was collected via questionnaires completed by parents and preschools. Pre- and post-intervention testing consisted of a test battery including tests on language, executive functions, selective auditive attention, socioemotional skills and early maths skills. The interventions consisted of 6 weeks of intensive practice of either a socioemotional and material learning paradigm (SEMLA), for which group-based activities and interactional structures were the main focus, or an individual, digitally implemented attention and math training paradigm, which also included a set of self-regulation practices (DIL). All preschools were evaluated with the ECERS-3. If this intervention study shows evidence of a difference between group-based learning paradigms and individual training of specific skills in terms of

  5. Mineralogy and microstructure of sintered lignite coal fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marina Ilic; Christopher Cheeseman; Christopher Sollars; Jonathan Knight [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    2003-02-01

    Lignite coal fly ash from the 'Nikola Tesla' power plant in Yugoslavia has been characterised, milled, compacted and sintered to form monolithic ceramic materials. The effect of firing at temperatures between 1130 and 1190{sup o}C on the density, water accessible porosity, mineralogy and microstructure of sintered samples is reported. This class C fly ash has an initial average particle size of 82 {mu}m and contains siliceous glass together with the crystalline phases quartz, anorthite, gehlenite, hematite and mullite. Milling the ash to an average particle size of 5.6 m, compacting and firing at 1170{sup o}C for 1 h produces materials with densities similar to clay-based ceramics that exhibit low water absorption. Sintering reduces the amount of glass, quartz, gehlenite and anhydrite, but increases formation of anorthite, mullite, hematite and cristobalite. SEM confirms the formation of a dense ceramic at 1170{sup o}C and indicates that pyroplastic effects cause pore formation and bloating at 1190{sup o}C. 23 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Surface Mineralogy Mapping of Ceres from the Dawn Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, T. B.; Zambon, F.

    2017-12-01

    Ceres' surface composition is of special interest because it is a window into the interior state and the past evolution of this dwarf planet. Disk-integrated telescopic spectral observations indicated that Ceres' surface is hydroxylated, similar to but not exactly the same as some of the carbonaceous chondrite classes of meteorites. Furthermore, Ceres' bulk density is low, indicating significant water content. The Dawn mission in orbit around Ceres, provided a new and larger set of observations on the mineralogy, molecular and elemental composition, and their distributions in association with surface features and geology. A set of articles was prepared, from which this presentation is derived, that is the first treatment of the entire surface composition of Ceres using the complete High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) Dawn Ceres data set and the calibrations from all the Dawn instruments. This report provides a current and comprehensive view of Ceres' surface composition and integrates them into general conclusions. Ceres' surface composition shows a fairly uniform distribution of NH4- and Mg-phyllosilicates, carbonates, mixed with a dark component. The widespread presence of phyllosilicates, and salts on Ceres' surface is indicative of the presence of aqueous alteration processes, which involved the whole dwarf planet. There is also likely some contamination by low velocity infall, as seen on Vesta, but it is more difficult to distinguish this infall from native Ceres material, unlike for the Vesta case.

  7. MMA-EoS: A Computational Framework for Mineralogical Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chust, T. C.; Steinle-Neumann, G.; Dolejš, D.; Schuberth, B. S. A.; Bunge, H.-P.

    2017-12-01

    We present a newly developed software framework, MMA-EoS, that evaluates phase equilibria and thermodynamic properties of multicomponent systems by Gibbs energy minimization, with application to mantle petrology. The code is versatile in terms of the equation-of-state and mixing properties and allows for the computation of properties of single phases, solution phases, and multiphase aggregates. Currently, the open program distribution contains equation-of-state formulations widely used, that is, Caloric-Murnaghan, Caloric-Modified-Tait, and Birch-Murnaghan-Mie-Grüneisen-Debye models, with published databases included. Through its modular design and easily scripted database, MMA-EoS can readily be extended with new formulations of equations-of-state and changes or extensions to thermodynamic data sets. We demonstrate the application of the program by reproducing and comparing physical properties of mantle phases and assemblages with previously published work and experimental data, successively increasing complexity, up to computing phase equilibria of six-component compositions. Chemically complex systems allow us to trace the budget of minor chemical components in order to explore whether they lead to the formation of new phases or extend stability fields of existing ones. Self-consistently computed thermophysical properties for a homogeneous mantle and a mechanical mixture of slab lithologies show no discernible differences that require a heterogeneous mantle structure as has been suggested previously. Such examples illustrate how thermodynamics of mantle mineralogy can advance the study of Earth's interior.

  8. Iron Mineralogy and Uranium-Binding Environment in the ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetlands mitigate the migration of groundwater contaminants through a series of biogeochemical gradients that enhance multiple contaminant-binding processes. The hypothesis of this study was that wetland plant roots contribute organic carbon and release O2 within the rhizosphere (plant-impact soil zone) that promote the formation of Fe(III)-(oxyhydr)oxides. In turn, these Fe(III)-(oxyhydr)oxides stabilize organic matter that together contribute to contaminant immobilization. Mineralogy and U binding environments of the rhizosphere were evaluated in samples collected from contaminated and non-contaminated areas of a wetland on the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Based on Mössbauer spectroscopy, rhizosphere soil was greatly enriched with nanogoethite, ferrihydrite-like nanoparticulates, and hematite, with negligible Fe(II) present. X-ray computed tomography and various microscopy techniques showed that root plaques were tens-of-microns thick and consisted of highly oriented Fe-nanoparticles, suggesting that the roots were involved in creating the biogeochemical conditions conducive to the nanoparticle formation. XAS showed that a majority of the U in the bulk wetland soil was in the +6 oxidation state and was not well correlated spatially to Fe concentrations. SEM/EDS confirm that U was enriched on root plaques, where it was always found in association with P. Together these findings support our hypothesis and suggest that plants can alter mineralo

  9. The Morro do Resende orthogneiss: mineralogy, petrography, geochemistry and geochronology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos, Fabiana Franco de; Avila, Ciro Alexandre; Bongiolo, Everton Marques; Camara, Beatriz de Oliveira; Menezes, Victor Hugo Riboura; Cunha, Fernanda Caetano de Mattos; Neumann, Reiner; Teixeira, Wilson; Barbosa, Natali

    2017-01-01

    The Morro do Resende orthogneiss is a hololeucocratic to leucocratic, fine-grained body with monzogranitic to granodioritic composition, cropping out near the Volta Grande mine in Nazareno County, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. It bears xenoliths of metamafic rocks of the Rio das Mortes metavolcano-sedimentary sequence and yields a U-Pb SHRIMP crystallization age of 2174 ± 4 Ma, relating it to one of the magmatic pulses of the Mineiro Belt. The primary mineralogy includes quartz, albite, microcline, biotite, allanite, zircon, magnetite, titanite and apatite, while sericite, epidote, zoisite, clinozoisite, carbonate and chlorite are metamorphic minerals. Maghemite, barite, fluorite, monazite, xenotime, garnet and REE fluorides (possibly gagarinite) are hydrothermal, as they fill the fractures, intergrow or replace the primary and metamorphic minerals. Fluid interaction was not homogeneous throughout the body. Metamorphic paragenesis points to greenschist facies conditions, which could be related to the Paleoproterozoic II event of the Mineiro Belt, which lasted from 2131 to 2101 Ma. The Morro do Resende orthogneiss is distinguished by significant REE enrichment, as well as a negative Eu anomaly linked to the magmatic crystallization and a negative Ce anomaly related to oxidizing hydrothermal fluids circulation. (author)

  10. The mineralogical characterization of tellurium in copper anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, T. T.; Dutrizac, J. E.

    1993-12-01

    A mineralogical study of a «normal» commercial copper anode and six tellurium-rich copper anodes from the CCR Refinery of the Noranda Copper Smelting and Refining Company was carried out to identify the tellurium carriers and their relative abundances. In all the anodes, the major tellurium carrier is the Cu2Se-Cu2Te phase which occurs as a constituent of complex inclusions at the copper grain boundaries. In tellurium-rich anodes, the molar tellurium content of the Cu2Se-Cu2Te phase can exceed that of selenium. Although >85 pct of the tellurium occurs as the Cu2Se-Cu2Te phase, minor amounts are present in Cu-Pb-As-Bi-Sb oxide, Cu-Bi-As oxide, and Cu-Te-As oxide phases which form part of the grain-boundary inclusions. About 1 pct of the tellurium content of silver-rich anodes occurs in various silver alloys, but gold tellurides were never detected. Surprising is the fact that 2 to 8 pct of the total tellurium content of the anodes occurs in solid solution in the copper-metal matrix, and presumably, this form of tellurium dissolves at the anode interface during electrorefining.

  11. Mineralogical and geochemical characterization of the Jurassic coal from Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baioumy, H.M. [Central Metallurgical Research and Development Institute, Cairo (Egypt)

    2009-06-15

    The Jurassic coal deposit in the Maghara area, Sinai, Egypt contains at least 11 coal seams of lenticular shape. The thickness of the main coal seams ranges from 130 cm to 2 m and are underlain and overlain by thin black shale beds. Mineralogical analysis indicated that this coal is characterized by low mineral matter with traces of quartz in some samples. However, coal ash is made up of quartz with traces of calcite, anhydrite, and hematite. Analysis of coal rank parameters indicated that the Maghara coal can be classified as medium volatile bituminous coal. The high sulfur contents and the relatively high proportion of pyritic sulfur suggest a possible marine transgression after the deposition of precursor peat. This interpretation is supported by the relatively high B contents. The relatively high Ge in the Maghara coal could be attributed to an infiltration of Ge enriched water from the surrounding siliceous sediments probably during diagenesis. The high Au contents were contributed to an Au-rich provenance of the ash contents of this coal. Rare earth elements geochemistry indicated low concentrations of these elements with slight enrichment of light rare earth elements (LREEs), slight negative Eu anomaly, and relatively flat heavy rare earth elements (HREEs) patterns. The low contents of trace and rare earth elements, particularly those with environmental relevance, compared to the usual concentration ranges in worldwide coal gives an advantage for this coal.

  12. Mineralogical Composition of the Mexican Ordinary Chondrite Type Meteorite: A Raman, Infrared and XRD Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrooumov, M.

    2016-08-01

    The Raman microprobe (RMP), infrared (IR) and XRD analysis have been applied to the examination of mineralogical composition of seven mexican meteorites: Aldama, Cosina, El Pozo, Escalon, Nuevo Mercurio,Pacula, Zapotitlan Salinas.

  13. X-Ray Diffraction and Fluorescence Instrument for Mineralogical Analysis at the Lunar Surface, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop LUNA, a compact and lightweight X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) / X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) instrument for mineralogical analysis of regolith, rock...

  14. X-Ray Diffraction and Fluorescence Instrument for Mineralogical Analysis at the Lunar Surface, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a compact and lightweight X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) / X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) instrument for analysis of mineralogical composition of regolith,...

  15. Influence of substrate mineralogy on bacterial mineralization of calcium carbonate: implications for stone conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos; Jroundi, Fadwa; Schiro, Mara; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnación; González-Muñoz, María Teresa

    2012-06-01

    The influence of mineral substrate composition and structure on bacterial calcium carbonate productivity and polymorph selection was studied. Bacterial calcium carbonate precipitation occurred on calcitic (Iceland spar single crystals, marble, and porous limestone) and silicate (glass coverslips, porous sintered glass, and quartz sandstone) substrates following culturing in liquid medium (M-3P) inoculated with different types of bacteria (Myxococcus xanthus, Brevundimonas diminuta, and a carbonatogenic bacterial community isolated from porous calcarenite stone in a historical building) and direct application of sterile M-3P medium to limestone and sandstone with their own bacterial communities. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and 2-dimensional XRD (2D-XRD) analyses revealed that abundant highly oriented calcite crystals formed homoepitaxially on the calcitic substrates, irrespective of the bacterial type. Conversely, scattered spheroidal vaterite entombing bacterial cells formed on the silicate substrates. These results show that carbonate phase selection is not strain specific and that under equal culture conditions, the substrate type is the overruling factor for calcium carbonate polymorph selection. Furthermore, carbonate productivity is strongly dependent on the mineralogy of the substrate. Calcitic substrates offer a higher affinity for bacterial attachment than silicate substrates, thereby fostering bacterial growth and metabolic activity, resulting in higher production of calcium carbonate cement. Bacterial calcite grows coherently over the calcitic substrate and is therefore more chemically and mechanically stable than metastable vaterite, which formed incoherently on the silicate substrates. The implications of these results for technological applications of bacterial carbonatogenesis, including building stone conservation, are discussed.

  16. Optical maturity variation in lunar spectra as measured by Moon Mineralogy Mapper data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, J.W.; Staid, M.; Besse, S.; Boardman, J.; Clark, R.N.; Dhingra, D.; Isaacson, P.; Klima, R.; Kramer, G.; Pieters, C.M.; Taylor, L.A.

    2011-01-01

    High spectral and spatial resolution data from the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) instrument on Chandrayaan-1 are used to investigate in detail changes in the optical properties of lunar materials accompanying space weathering. Three spectral parameters were developed and used to quantify spectral effects commonly thought to be associated with increasing optical maturity: an increase in spectral slope ("reddening"), a decrease in albedo ("darkening"), and loss of spectral contrast (decrease in absorption band depth). Small regions of study were defined that sample the ejecta deposits of small fresh craters that contain relatively crystalline (immature) material that grade into local background (mature) soils. Selected craters are small enough that they can be assumed to be of constant composition and thus are useful for evaluating trends in optical maturity. Color composites were also used to identify the most immature material in a region and show that maturity trends can also be identified using regional soil trends. The high resolution M3 data are well suited to quantifying the spectral changes that accompany space weathering and are able to capture subtle spectral variations in maturity trends. However, the spectral changes that occur as a function of maturity were observed to be dependent on local composition. Given the complexity of space weathering processes, this was not unexpected but poses challenges for absolute measures of optical maturity across diverse lunar terrains. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Mineralogy and petrography of samples of Permo-Triassic sedimentary strata from Cumbria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemp, S.J.; Milodowski, A.E.; Bloodworth, A.J.

    1989-03-01

    The mineralogy and petrography of Permo-Triassic sediments from Cumbria are described. The samples are duplicates of those selected for sorption experiments by Harwell Laboratory and are considered representative of Permo-Triassic strata underlying the BNFL Sellafield site. The regional geological context of the samples is briefly discussed. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that the St Bees Sandstone and Eden Shales samples are predominantly composed of quartz with minor feldspar, gypsum and hematite. The clay assemblage is formed of dioctahedral mica and trioctahedral chloride with minor kaolinite. Diagnostic testing also reveals the presence of corrensite, a regularly interstratified chlorite-smectite, in one of the samples. Possible diagenetic processes responsible for corrensite formation, including the alteration of originally deposited smectite by magnesium-rich pore waters, are discussed. Modelling of the diffraction profile indicates that the chlorite and corrensite are iron-rich species. Back scattered electron microscopy shows the samples to be typical red bed sediments exhibiting framework grain dissolution, the breakdown and replacement of unstable ferromagnesian minerals being accompanied by the precipitation of hematite and anatase. Particle-size analysis shows similar distributions for the St Bees Sandstone samples but a greater proportion of clay material in the Eden Shales. (author)

  18. Magnetic separation as a method to assist mineralogical characterization of rocks by X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Amanda Luzia da; Oliveira, Arno Heeren de; Fernandes, Maria Lourdes Souza

    2013-01-01

    The X-ray diffraction (XRD) corresponds to one of the main techniques for characterization of structures in crystalline materials widely used in the identification of minerals in samples of geological materials such as rocks. However, the large number of mineral phases present in a rock sample can generate excess peaks in the diffractogram, and it can promote overlapping peaks and induce erroneous identification. The purpose of this study was to perform magnetic separation of minerals from rock samples in order to enable the identification of the minerals by XRD. For this magnetic separation, two samples of rock were selected: a sample of high silica content and a sample with low silica content. The magnetic separation of minerals from each sample was performed using the magnetic separator isodynamic Frantz. Posteriorly, the fractions obtained in magnetic separations were analyzed by XRD. In the sample with high silica content, it was obtained a fraction where was identified the accessory mineral epidote, which had not been identified in the total sample diffractogram. In the sample with low silica content, the magnetic separation into several mineral fractions made possible to obtain diffraction patterns with fewer peaks and peaks with higher relative intensities, which allowed its mineralogical characterization. The results showed that the mineral separation by the magnetic separator Frantz made the identification of accessory minerals by XRD and the characterization of samples which have many mineral phases possible, which proves that magnetic separation by Frantz is a method which can assist analyses by XRD. (author)

  19. Magnetic separation as a method to assist mineralogical characterization of rocks by X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Amanda Luzia da; Oliveira, Arno Heeren de; Fernandes, Maria Lourdes Souza, E-mail: amanda@igc.ufmg.br, E-mail: heeren@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: amanda@igc.ufmg.br, E-mail: lurdesfernandes@ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horionte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The X-ray diffraction (XRD) corresponds to one of the main techniques for characterization of structures in crystalline materials widely used in the identification of minerals in samples of geological materials such as rocks. However, the large number of mineral phases present in a rock sample can generate excess peaks in the diffractogram, and it can promote overlapping peaks and induce erroneous identification. The purpose of this study was to perform magnetic separation of minerals from rock samples in order to enable the identification of the minerals by XRD. For this magnetic separation, two samples of rock were selected: a sample of high silica content and a sample with low silica content. The magnetic separation of minerals from each sample was performed using the magnetic separator isodynamic Frantz. Posteriorly, the fractions obtained in magnetic separations were analyzed by XRD. In the sample with high silica content, it was obtained a fraction where was identified the accessory mineral epidote, which had not been identified in the total sample diffractogram. In the sample with low silica content, the magnetic separation into several mineral fractions made possible to obtain diffraction patterns with fewer peaks and peaks with higher relative intensities, which allowed its mineralogical characterization. The results showed that the mineral separation by the magnetic separator Frantz made the identification of accessory minerals by XRD and the characterization of samples which have many mineral phases possible, which proves that magnetic separation by Frantz is a method which can assist analyses by XRD. (author)

  20. Chemical and mineralogical aspects of water-bentonite interaction in nuclear fuel disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melamed, A.; Pitkaenen, P.

    1996-01-01

    In the field of nuclear fuel disposal, bentonite has been selected as the principal sealing and buffer material for placement around waste canisters, forming both a mechanical and chemical barrier between the radioactive waste and the surrounding ground water. Ion exchange and mineral alteration processes were investigated in a laboratory study of the long-term interaction between compacted Na-bentonite (Volclay MX-80) and ground water solutions, conducted under simulated nuclear fuel disposal conditions. The possible alteration of montmorillonite into illite has been a major object of the mineralogical study. However, no analytical evidence was found, that would indicate the formation of this non-expandable clay type. Apparently, the change of montmorillonite from Na- to Ca-rich was found to be the major alteration process in bentonite. In the water, a concentration decrease in Ca, Mg, and K, and an increase in Na, HCO 3 and SO 4 were recorded. The amount of calcium ions available in the water was considered insufficient to account for the recorded formation of Ca-montmorillonite. It is therefore assumed that the accessory Ca-bearing minerals in bentonite provide the fundamental source of these cations, which exchange with sodium during the alteration process. (38 refs.)

  1. Detection Capability Evaluation on Chang'e-5 Lunar Mineralogical Spectrometer (LMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Ren, Xin; Yan, Wei; Xu, Xuesen; Cai, Tingni; Liu, Dawei; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Chunlai

    2016-04-01

    The Chang'e-5 (CE-5) lunar sample return mission is scheduled to launch in 2017 to bring back lunar regolith and drill samples. The Chang'e-5 Lunar Mineralogical Spectrometer (LMS), as one of the three sets of scientific payload installed on the lander, is used to collect in-situ spectrum and analyze the mineralogical composition of the sampling site. It can also help to select the sampling site , and to compare the measured laboratory spectrum of returned sample with in-situ data. LMS employs acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTFs) and is composed of a VIS/NIR module (0.48μm-1.45μm) and an IR module (1.4μm -3.2μm). It has spectral resolution ranging from 3 to 25 nm, with a field of view (FOV) of 4.24°×4.24°. Unlike Chang'e-3 VIS/NIR Imaging Spectrometer (VNIS), the spectral coverage of LMS is extended from 2.4μm to 3.2μm, which has capability to identify H2O/OH absorption features around 2.7μm. An aluminum plate and an Infragold plate are fixed in the dust cover, being used as calibration targets in the VIS/NIR and IR spectral range respectively when the dust cover is open. Before launch, a ground verification test of LMS needs to be conducted in order to: 1) test and verify the detection capability of LMS through evaluation on the quality of image and spectral data collected for the simulated lunar samples; and 2) evaluate the accuracy of data processing methods by the simulation of instrument working on the moon. The ground verification test will be conducted both in the lab and field. The spectra of simulated lunar regolith/mineral samples will be collected simultaneously by the LMS and two calibrated spectrometers: a FTIR spectrometer (Model 102F) and an ASD FieldSpec 4 Hi-Res spectrometer. In this study, the results of the LMS ground verification test will be reported including the evaluation on the LMS spectral and image data quality, mineral identification and inversion ability, accuracy of calibration and geometric positioning .

  2. The influence of natural pozzolana mineralogical composition in the properties of blended cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gener Rizo, M.

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The pozzolana activity is the main property of the active additions but, in order to select them, we have to consider - between other factors- its mineralogical composition with a great influence, not only in the active component, but also in other cement properties. In the present work we have studied 4 different Cuban natural pozzolanes, characterized with the help of X ray diffraction and with thermic and chemical analysis. The pozzolanic activity was also evaluated through a chemical and physicomechanic method. Some cements were prepared with different contents of each one of the pozzolanics, and analysed their physicomechanic and chemical properties. Finally, we found that the pozzolanics mineralogical composition has a great influence in the pozzolanic activity and in the properties of mixed cements. Also we found that it 5 possible to obtain the best resistances in the time and the smaller needs of water when the vitreous phase prevail in the additions.

    La actividad puzolánica es la propiedad fundamental de las adiciones activas, pero para la selección de la misma se debe considerar, entre otros factores, su composición mineralógica, que influye no sólo en los constituyentes activos, sino también en muchas propiedades de los cementos. En el presente trabajo, como material puzolánico se estudiaron 4 puzolanas naturales cubanas, las cuales fueron caracterizadas mediante difracción de Rayos X, análisis térmico y análisis químico; se evaluó, además, la actividad puzolánica mediante un método químico y otro físico-mecánico. Se prepararon cementos con diferentes contenidos de cada una de las puzolanas y se analizaron sus propiedades químicas y físico-mecánicas. Se concluye que la composición mineralógica de las puzolanas influye de forma determinante en la actividad puzolánica y en las propiedades de los cementos mezclados; que los mejores desarrollos de resistencias en el tiempo y los menores requerimientos

  3. Preliminary Results on Mineralogy and Geochemistry of Loki's Castle Arctic Vents and Host Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriga, Fernando; Carvalho, Carlos; Inês Cruz, M.; Dias, Ágata; Fonseca, Rita; Relvas, Jorge; Pedersen, Rolf

    2010-05-01

    The Loki's Castle hydrothermal vent field was discovered in the summer of 2008, during a cruise led by the Centre of Geobiology of the University of Bergen, integrated in the H2Deep Project (Eurocores, ESF). Loki's Castle is the northernmost hydrothermal vent field discovered to date. It is located at the junction between the Mohns Ridge and the South Knipovich Ridge, in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea, at almost 74°N. This junction shows unique features and apparently there is no transform fault to accommodate the deformation generated by the bending of the rift valley from WSW-ENE to almost N-S. The Knipovich Rigde, being a complex structure, is an ultra-slow spreading ridge, with an effective spreading rate of only ~ 6 mm/y. It is partly masked by a substantial cover of glacial and post-glacial sediments, estimated to be between 12 and 20 ky old, derived from the nearby Bear Island fan, to the East of the ridge. The Loki's Castle vent site is composed of several active, over 10 m tall chimneys, producing up to 320°C fluid, at the top of a very large sulphide mound, which is estimated to be around 200 m in diameter. About a dozen gravity cores were obtained in the overall area. From these we collected nearly 200 subsamples. Eh and pH were measured in all subsamples. The Portuguese component of the H2Deep project is aimed at characterizing, chemically and mineralogically, the sulphide chimneys and the collected sediments around the vents (up to 5 meters long gravity cores). These studies are aimed at understanding the ore-forming system, and its implications for submarine mineral exploration, as well as the relation of the microbial population with the hydrothermal component of sediments. Here we present an overview of preliminary data on the mineralogical assemblage found in the analyzed sediments and chimneys. The identification of the different mineral phases was obtained through petrographic observations of polished thin sections under the microscope (with both

  4. Detection and context of hydrated mineralogy in the Tyrrhena Terra region, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Haan, J.; Zegers, T. E.; van Ruitenbeek, F. J. A.; van der Werff, H. M. A.; Rossi, A.

    2008-09-01

    two spectra taken at base and summit of Olympus Mons provides the atmospheric spectrum. To quickly assess the mineralogy of a large region, CRISM multispectral summary products [5] are applied to OMEGA datasets. Hydrated mineral deposits are located on the basis of the absorption feature centered at ~1.9um. This feature is the result of a combination of v2 bend and v3 (asymmetrical) stretch mode overtones. Noise reduction is performed by applying a principal component transform to the OMEGA data. Principal components which are dominated by noise are manually selected and discarded, after which the data are transformed back to the wavelength domain. Using this approach, a large degree of system noise can be effectively eliminated without significantly affecting signal quality [6]. Results The methods described have led to positive identification of large deposits of hydrated mineralogy in Tyrrhena Terra. Whilst several deposits are evidently associated with cratering processes (e.g. [7]), one major deposit in particular draws attention (figure 1). In this deposit, the light-colored hydrated minerals are generally associated with very rough morphology. In addition, they seem to be located underneath a dark, crater-saturated unit. Given the limited quality of local OMEGA-derived spectra, it is impossible to unambiguously determine the exact mineralogy of the deposit. The hydrated signature is correlated with high night-time temperatures as observed in THEMIS IRnight observations (figure 2). This indicates the hydrated material is present as a solid bedrock mass (e.g. mudstone) instead of a loose concretion. The deposit is situated in a topographic low, bounded by a channel-rich unit in the north and a sharp unit contact in the south. Discussion The sharp unit contact south of the hydrated deposit coincides with a sharp contrast in topographic elevation. It strikes parallel to the contours of Isidis Planitia, a trend which is continued on larger scale. Given the strike

  5. Geology, mineralogy and geochemistry of Ferezneh ferromanganese anomaly, east of Sangan mines complex, NE Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazi Mazhari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The Ferezneh prospect area is one of the eastern anomalies of Khaf’s Sangan iron mine. The Sangan mines complex is located within the Khaf-Kashmar-Bardeskan volcano-plutonic and metallogenic belt in northeastern Iran. The Sangan mine is the largest Fe skarn in western Asia, having a proven reserve of over 1000 Mt iron ore @ 53% Fe (Golmohammadi et al., 2015 and consisting of three parts; western, central and eastern Sangan, each part including several anomalies. In this study, Ferezneh (North and West prospect area which is an eastern anomaly of the Sangan iron ore is discussed. Ferezneh anomaly is located in 60°36'7" - 60°34'27"E and 34°30'47" - 34°29'46"N, 35 km south of the city of Taybad, 10 km southeast of Karat and 1.5 km southwest of Ferezneh village. The purpose of this study was to prepare a geologic map for separation and identification of the intrusions, determining their relationships with mineralization, distinguishing the type of mineralization, mineralogy, petrology and geochemistry of the mineral deposits, and finally their relationship with other major Sangan’s deposits. Materials and methods In order to achieve the objectives of the study: 1- 140 thin sections of the intrusive rocks, marble limestone and dolomite, as well as 40 polished sections of ore were taken in an area of 9.5 km2. Mineralogy and mineralization studies were performed in the Economic Geology Laboratory of Ferdowsi University of Mashhad. 2- A few samples were selected for X-ray diffraction analysis in order to ensure accuracy of mineralogical studies and were sent to Binalood Laboratory in Tehran. 3- In addition to major and minor elements geochemistry study of the ores, 10 samples were sent to East Amitis Laboratory in Mashhad for XRF analysis and also to Canada S.G.S Laboratory for ICP-MS analysis. Discussion and results Mineralization in the Ferezneh prospect area was limited to iron and manganese oxides in the form of massive and

  6. Processing of copper converter slag for metals reclamation: Part II: mineralogical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Tong; Ling, Yunhan

    2004-10-01

    Chemical and mineralogical characterizations of a copper converter slag, and its products obtained by curing with strong sulphuric acid and leaching with hot water, were carried out using ore microscopy, scanning electronic microscopy with energy dispersive spectrometry, wave-length dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, X-ray diffractometry and chemical phase analysis, which provided necessary information to develop a new process for treating such slag and further understanding of the chemical and mineralogical changes in the process.

  7. Skeletal mineralogy of coral recruits under high temperature and pCO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Foster

    2016-03-01

    Our results show that elevated pCO2 alone is unlikely to drive changes in the skeletal mineralogy of young corals. Not having an ability to switch from aragonite to calcite precipitation may leave corals and ultimately coral reef ecosystems more susceptible to predicted ocean acidification. An important area for prospective research would be the investigation of the combined impact of high pCO2 and reduced Mg ∕ Ca ratio on coral skeletal mineralogy.

  8. Kaolin from Acoculco (Puebla, Mexico) as a raw material: mineralogical and thermal characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia Vallès, Maite; Pi, T.; Alfonso, P.; Canet, C.; Martínez Manent, Salvador; Jiménez-Franco, A.; Tarragó Aymerich, Mariona; Hernández-Cruz, B.

    2015-01-01

    The present study determined the mineralogy and thermal properties of kaolin from Acoculco (Puebla), at the eastern Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt and compared it with the nearby deposits of Agua Blanca (Hidalgo) and Huayacocotla (Veracruz). The mineralogy of the kaolins was determined by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Thermal behaviour was studied by differential thermal analysis, dilatometry and hot-stage microscopy. The Acoculco deposit is composed ...

  9. Mineralogy and Oxygen Isotope Compositions of an Unusual Hibonite-Perovskite Refractory Inclusion from Allende

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, L. P.; Snead, C.; Rahman, Z.; McKeegan, K. D.

    2012-01-01

    Hibonite-rich Ca- and Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) are among the earliest formed solids that condensed in the early nebula. We discovered an unusual refractory inclusion from the Allende CV3 chondrite (SHAL) containing an approx 500 micron long single crystal of hibonite and co-existing coarse-grained perovskite. The mineralogy and petrography of SHAL show strong similarities to some FUN inclusions, especially HAL. Here we report on the mineralogy, petrography, mineral chemistry and oxygen isotopic compositions in SHAL.

  10. Qualitative characterization by x-ray diffraction from soils: mineralogy conditions to benefit the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiyama, Bruna Sayuri; Tavares, Mauricio de Moraes

    2010-01-01

    Four samples were collected from four soil profiles located in the Rural Federal University of Amazonia. These, were analyzed parameters such as color, texture, consistency, granulometry, porosity and water absorption. We identified the following soil types: Distrofic Yellow Latosoil; Lateritic Concretionary; distrofic Low Humic Gley. The work was to continue the qualitative analysis by X-rays diffraction, identifying the mineralogical composition of each sample. Explaining the mineralogical conditions that affect or benefit the environment. (author)

  11. Mini-review: The Morphology, Mineralogy and Microbiology of Accumulated Iron Corrosion Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-11

    including the morphology, mineralogy , microbiology and the mecha- nisms for formation. Use of descriptive terms to denote specific iron corrosion product...RESPONSIBLE PERSON 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) 11-03-2014 Journal Article Mini-review: the morphology, mineralogy and microbiology of...oxides/ hydroxides with a preponderance of α-FeOOH (goethite) and accumulation of metals. Bacteria, particularly iron-oxidizing and sulfatereducing

  12. Technical characterization by image analysis: an automatic method of mineralogical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, J.F. de

    1988-01-01

    The application of a modern method of image analysis fully automated for the study of grain size distribution modal assays, degree of liberation and mineralogical associations is discussed. The image analyser is interfaced with a scanning electron microscope and an energy dispersive X-rays analyser. The image generated by backscattered electrons is analysed automatically and the system has been used in accessment studies of applied mineralogy as well as in process control in the mining industry. (author) [pt

  13. Methodology for the case studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M.J.W.; Woltjer, G.B.

    2017-01-01

    This document is about the methodology and selection of the case studies. It is meant as a guideline for the case studies, and together with the other reports in this work package can be a source of inform ation for policy officers, interest groups and researchers evaluating or performing impact

  14. The Star–Planet Connection. I. Using Stellar Composition to Observationally Constrain Planetary Mineralogy for the 10 Closest Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkel, Natalie R.; Unterborn, Cayman T.

    2018-01-01

    The compositions of stars and planets are connected, but the definition of “habitability” and the “habitable zone” only take into account the physical relationship between the star and planet. Planets, however, are made truly habitable by both chemical and physical processes that regulate climatic and geochemical cycling between atmosphere, surface, and interior reservoirs. Despite this, an “Earth-like” planet is often defined as a planet made of a mixture of rock and Fe that is roughly 1 Earth-density. To understand the interior of a terrestrial planet, the stellar abundances of planet-building elements (e.g., Mg, Si, and Fe) can be used as a proxy for the planet’s composition. We explore the planetary mineralogy and structure for fictive planets around the 10 stars closest to the Sun using stellar abundances from the Hypatia Catalog. Although our sample contains stars that are both sub- and super-solar in their abundances, we find that the mineralogies are very similar for all 10 planets—since the error or spread in the stellar abundances create significant degeneracy in the models. We show that abundance uncertainties need to be on the order of [Fe/H] < 0.02 dex, [Si/H] < 0.01 dex, [Al/H] < 0.002 dex, while [Mg/H] and [Ca/H] < 0.001 dex in order to distinguish two unique planetary populations in our sample of 10 stars. While these precisions are high, we believe that they are possible given certain abundance techniques, in addition to methodological transparency, that have recently been demonstrated in the literature. However, without these precisions, the uncertainty in planetary structures will be so high that we will be unable to confidently state that a planet is like the Earth, or unlike anything we have ever seen. We made some cuts and ruled out a number of stars, but these 10 are still rather nearby.

  15. Clinical trial methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peace, Karl E; Chen, Ding-Geng

    2011-01-01

    ... in the pharmaceutical industry, Clinical trial methodology emphasizes the importance of statistical thinking in clinical research and presents the methodology as a key component of clinical research...

  16. Timescales of carbon turnover in soils with mixed crystalline mineralogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomo, Lesego; Trumbore, Susan E.; Bern, Carleton R.; Chadwick, Oliver A.

    2017-01-01

    Organic matter–mineral associations stabilize much of the carbon (C) stored globally in soils. Metastable short-range-order (SRO) minerals such as allophane and ferrihydrite provide one mechanism for long-term stabilization of organic matter in young soil. However, in soils with few SRO minerals and a predominance of crystalline aluminosilicate or Fe (and Al) oxyhydroxide, C turnover should be governed by chemisorption with those minerals. Here, we correlate mineral composition from soils containing small amounts of SRO minerals with mean turnover time (TT) of C estimated from radiocarbon (14C) in bulk soil, free light fraction and mineral-associated organic matter. We varied the mineral amount and composition by sampling ancient soils formed on different lithologies in arid to subhumid climates in Kruger National Park (KNP), South Africa. Mineral contents in bulk soils were assessed using chemical extractions to quantify Fe oxyhydroxides and SRO minerals. Because of our interest in the role of silicate clay mineralogy, particularly smectite (2 : 1) and kaolinite (1 : 1), we separately quantified the mineralogy of the clay-sized fraction using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and measured 14C on the same fraction. Density separation demonstrated that mineral associated C accounted for 40–70 % of bulk soil organic C in A and B1 horizons for granite, nephelinite and arid-zone gabbro soils, and > 80 % in other soils. Organic matter strongly associated with the isolated clay-sized fraction represented only 9–47 % of the bulk soil C. The mean TT of C strongly associated with the clay-sized fraction increased with the amount of smectite (2 : 1 clays); in samples with > 40 % smectite it averaged 1020 ± 460 years. The C not strongly associated with clay-sized minerals, including a combination of low-density C, the C associated with minerals of sizes between 2 µm and 2 cm (including Fe oxyhydroxides as coatings), and C removed from clay

  17. Clay mineralogy in different geomorphic surfaces in sugarcane areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, L.; Marques, J., Jr.

    2012-04-01

    The crystallization of the oxides and hydroxides of iron and aluminum and kaolinite of clay fraction is the result of pedogenetic processes controlled by the relief. These minerals have influence on the physical and chemical attributes of soil and exhibit spatial dependence. The pattern of spatial distribution is influenced by forms of relief as the geomorphic surfaces. In this sense, the studies aimed at understanding the relationship between relief and the distribution pattern of the clay fraction attributes contribute to the delineation of specific areas of management in the field. The objective of this study was to evaluate the spatial distribution of oxides and hydroxides of iron and aluminum and kaolinite of clay fraction and its relationship with the physical and chemical attributes in different geomorphic surfaces. Soil samples were collected in a transect each 25 m (100 samples) and in the sides of the same (200 samples) as well as an area of 500 ha (1 sample each six hectare). Geomorphic surfaces (GS) in the transect were mapped in detail to support mapping the entire area. The soil samples were taken to the laboratory for chemical, physical, and mineralogical analysis, and the pattern of spatial distribution of soil attributes was obtained by statistics and geostatistics. The GS I is considered the oldest surface of the study area, with depositional character, and a slope ranging from 0 to 4%. GS II and III are considered to be eroded, and the surface II plan a gentle slope that extends from the edge of the surface until the beginning of I and III. The crystallographic characteristics of the oxides and hydroxides of iron and aluminum and kaolinite showed spatial dependence and the distribution pattern corresponding to the limits present of the GS in the field. Surfaces I and II showed the best environments to the degree of crystallinity of hematite and the surface III to the greatest degree of crystallinity of goethite agreeing to the pedoenvironment

  18. Timescales of carbon turnover in soils with mixed crystalline mineralogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomo, Lesego; Trumbore, Susan; Bern, Carleton R.; Chadwick, Oliver A.

    2017-01-01

    Organic matter-mineral associations stabilize much of the carbon (C) stored globally in soils. Metastable short-range-order (SRO) minerals such as allophane and ferrihydrite provide one mechanism for long-term stabilization of organic matter in young soil. However, in soils with few SRO minerals and a predominance of crystalline aluminosilicate or Fe (and Al) oxyhydroxide, C turnover should be governed by chemisorption with those minerals. Here, we correlate mineral composition from soils containing small amounts of SRO minerals with mean turnover time (TT) of C estimated from radiocarbon (14C) in bulk soil, free light fraction and mineral-associated organic matter. We varied the mineral amount and composition by sampling ancient soils formed on different lithologies in arid to subhumid climates in Kruger National Park (KNP), South Africa. Mineral contents in bulk soils were assessed using chemical extractions to quantify Fe oxyhydroxides and SRO minerals. Because of our interest in the role of silicate clay mineralogy, particularly smectite (2 : 1) and kaolinite (1 : 1), we separately quantified the mineralogy of the clay-sized fraction using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and measured 14C on the same fraction. Density separation demonstrated that mineral associated C accounted for 40-70 % of bulk soil organic C in A and B1 horizons for granite, nephelinite and arid-zone gabbro soils, and > 80 % in other soils. Organic matter strongly associated with the isolated clay-sized fraction represented only 9-47 % of the bulk soil C. The mean TT of C strongly associated with the clay-sized fraction increased with the amount of smectite (2 : 1 clays); in samples with > 40 % smectite it averaged 1020 ± 460 years. The C not strongly associated with clay-sized minerals, including a combination of low-density C, the C associated with minerals of sizes between 2 µm and 2 cm (including Fe oxyhydroxides as coatings), and C removed from clay-sized material by 2 % hydrogen peroxide had

  19. Clay mineralogy and magnetic susceptibility of Oxisols in geomorphic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Arantes Camargo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies analyzing the variability of clay minerals and magnetic susceptibility provide data for the delineation of site-specific management areas since many of their attributes are important to agronomy and the environment. This study aimed to evaluate the spatial variability of clay minerals, magnetic susceptibility, adsorbed phosphorus and physical attributes in Oxisols of sandstones in different geomorphic surfaces. For that purpose, soil samples were collected every 25 m along a transect located within the area where the geomorphic surfaces were identified and mapped. The transect occupied the central portion of 500 ha, where it was also sampled for density purposes with one sample per six hectares. Soil samples were collected at a depth of 0.0-0.2 m. The results of the physical, chemical, mineralogical and magnetic susceptibility analyses were subjected to statistical and geostatistical analyses. The nature of the clay minerals and magnetic susceptibility was dependent on the variation of the soil parent material. High values of magnetic susceptibility were associated with the presence of maghemite and magnetite of coarse size. The spatial variability of crystallinity and the content of Fe oxides, as well as magnetic susceptibility, were dependent on the age of the geomorphic surfaces. The youngest surface had greater spatial variability of these attributes. The iron (goethite and hematite and aluminum (gibbsite oxides in the youngest geomorphic surface influenced the low values of soil density and high values of total pore volume, micropores and P adsorption. The characterization of the spatial variability of Fe oxides and susceptibility allowed for the delineation of homogeneous areas.

  20. Chemical-mineralogical characterisation of coarse recycled concrete aggregate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limbachiya, M.C.; Marrocchino, E.; Koulouris, A.

    2007-01-01

    The construction industry is now putting greater emphasis than ever before on increasing recycling and promoting more sustainable waste management practices. In keeping with this approach, many sectors of the industry have actively sought to encourage the use of recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) as an alternative to primary aggregates in concrete production. The results of a laboratory experimental programme aimed at establishing chemical and mineralogical characteristics of coarse RCA and its likely influence on concrete performance are reported in this paper. Commercially produced coarse RCA and natural aggregates (16-4 mm size fraction) were tested. Results of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyses showed that original source of RCA had a negligible effect on the major elements and a comparable chemical composition between recycled and natural aggregates. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses results indicated the presence of calcite, portlandite and minor peaks of muscovite/illite in recycled aggregates, although they were directly proportioned to their original composition. The influence of 30%, 50%, and 100% coarse RCA on the chemical composition of equal design strength concrete has been established, and its suitability for use in a concrete application has been assessed. In this work, coarse RCA was used as a direct replacement for natural gravel in concrete production. Test results indicated that up to 30% coarse RCA had no effect on the main three oxides (SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 and CaO) of concrete, but thereafter there was a marginal decrease in SiO 2 and increase in Al 2 O 3 and CaO contents with increase in RCA content in the mix, reflecting the original constituent's composition

  1. Chemical-mineralogical characterisation of coarse recycled concrete aggregate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbachiya, M C; Marrocchino, E; Koulouris, A

    2007-01-01

    The construction industry is now putting greater emphasis than ever before on increasing recycling and promoting more sustainable waste management practices. In keeping with this approach, many sectors of the industry have actively sought to encourage the use of recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) as an alternative to primary aggregates in concrete production. The results of a laboratory experimental programme aimed at establishing chemical and mineralogical characteristics of coarse RCA and its likely influence on concrete performance are reported in this paper. Commercially produced coarse RCA and natural aggregates (16-4 mm size fraction) were tested. Results of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyses showed that original source of RCA had a negligible effect on the major elements and a comparable chemical composition between recycled and natural aggregates. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses results indicated the presence of calcite, portlandite and minor peaks of muscovite/illite in recycled aggregates, although they were directly proportioned to their original composition. The influence of 30%, 50%, and 100% coarse RCA on the chemical composition of equal design strength concrete has been established, and its suitability for use in a concrete application has been assessed. In this work, coarse RCA was used as a direct replacement for natural gravel in concrete production. Test results indicated that up to 30% coarse RCA had no effect on the main three oxides (SiO2, Al2O3 and CaO) of concrete, but thereafter there was a marginal decrease in SiO2 and increase in Al2O3 and CaO contents with increase in RCA content in the mix, reflecting the original constituent's composition.

  2. Rare Mineralogy in Alkaline Ultramafic Rocks, Western Kentucky Fluorspar District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, W.

    2017-12-01

    The alkaline ultramafic intrusive dike complex in the Western Kentucky Fluorspar District contains unusual mineralogy that was derived from mantle magma sources. Lamprophyre and peridotite petrologic types occur in the district where altered fractionated peridotites are enriched in Rare Earth Elements (REE) and some lamprophyre facies are depleted in incompatible elements. Unusual minerals in dikes, determined by petrography and X-ray diffraction, include schorlomite and andradite titanium garnets, astrophyllite, spodumene, niobium rutile, wüstite, fluoro-tetraferriphlogopite, villiaumite, molybdenite, and fluocerite, a REE-bearing fluoride fluorescent mineral. Mixing of MVT sphalerite ore fluids accompanies a mid-stage igneous alteration and intrusion event consistent with paragenetic studies. The presence of lithium in the spodumene and fluoro-tetraferriphlogopite suggests a lithium phase in the mineral fluids, and the presence of enriched REE in dikes and fluorite mineralization suggest a metasomatic event. Several of these rare minerals have never been described in the fluorspar district, and their occurrence suggests deep mantle metasomatism. Several REE-bearing fluoride minerals occur in the dikes and in other worldwide occurrences, they are usually associated with nepheline syenite and carbonatite differentiates. There is an early and late stage fluoride mineralization, which accompanied dike intrusion and was also analyzed for REE content. One fluorite group is enriched in LREE and another in MREE, which suggests a bimodal or periodic fluorite emplacement. Whole-rock elemental analysis was chondrite normalized and indicates that some of the dikes are slightly enriched in light REE and show a classic fractionation enrichment. Variations in major-element content; high titanium, niobium, and zirconium values; and high La/Yb, Zr/Y, Zr/Hf, and Nb/Ta ratios suggest metasomatized lithospheric-asthenospheric mantle-sourced intrusions. The high La/Yb ratios in some

  3. Supplement to a Methodology for Succession Planning for Technical Experts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, Bernadette Lugue [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cain, Ronald A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Agreda, Carla L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-11-01

    This report complements A Methodology for Succession Planning for Technical Experts (Ron Cain, Shaheen Dewji, Carla Agreda, Bernadette Kirk, July 2017), which describes a draft methodology for identifying and evaluating the loss of key technical skills at nuclear operations facilities. This report targets the methodology for identifying critical skills, and the methodology is tested through interviews with selected subject matter experts.

  4. Southern complex: geology, geochemistry, mineralogy, and mineral chemistry of selected uranium- and thorium-rich granites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Four major rock groups are defined in the Southern Complex: the Bell Creek Granite (BCG), the Clotted Granitoids (CGR), the Albite Granite (AGR), and the Migmatite Complex. Metatexites of the Migmatite Complex are the oldest rocks and include paleosome of a metasedimentary and metavolcanic protolith represented by Banded Iron Formation, Banded Amphibolite, and Banded Gneisses, and interlayered or crosscutting leucogranites. The CGR span the range from metatexite to diatexite and represent in-situ partial melting of metapelitic layers in the protolith during intrusion of the BCG. The BCG cuts the migmatites, is locally cut by the CGR, and was derived by partial melting of a dominantly metasedimentary protolith at some depth below the presently exposed migmatites during a regional tectonothermal event. The Albite Granite is a 2km diameter, muscovite-fluorite-columbite-bearing intrusive stock that cuts all other major units. The thorium history of the BCG is a function of the history of monazite. The thorium history of the CGR is also dominated by monazite but the thorium content of this unit cannot be entirely accounted for by original restite monazite. The uranium history of the BCG and CGR was dominated by magmatic differentiation and post magmatic, metamorphic and supergene redistributions and is largely independent of the thorium history. The thorium and uranium history of the AGR was dominated by magmatic/deuteric processes unlike the BCG and CGR

  5. Geochemical and mineralogical study of selected weathered samples from Olkiluoto site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindberg, A.

    2009-02-01

    Optical microscopy, chemical analyses and X-ray diffraction method were used to study the influence of weathering from 11 drill core samples from shallow depths (< 25 m). The samples, 4 to 22 cm in length were drilled from Olkiluoto study site, Eurajoki, and they represent the common rock types of local bedrock: mica gneiss, tonalitic and granodioritic gneiss. Two of the samples were macroscopically unweathered and 9 of them were remarkably altered. The alteration was shown as porosity, the abundance of chlorite instead of biotite and pink, unclear feldspars. Many samples also contained red-brown hematite and fractures, some of them coated with secondary minerals, even clay. Microscopically the most visible feature of weathering was the total alteration of plagioclase and cordierite to sericite. In many samples also biotite was richly altered to chlorite and opaque minerals. Microfractures were common and they were filled by hematite, kaolinite and fine-grained muscovite (sericite). Hematite was, in some cases, also largely replacing the weathered minerals, feldspars and cordierite. Chemical alteration was not clear, because the alteration of main minerals have produced secondary minerals with almost the same chemical composition without any reasonable depleting or enrichment of certain elements. X-ray diffraction determination of samples proved, that often plagioclase was replaced by mica and biotite by chlorite. In some cases the samples contained products of chemical weathering, kaolinite and smectite. (orig.)

  6. Mineralogical investigations into ash deposits of selected brown coals; Mineralogische Untersuchungen an Ascheansaetzen ausgewaehlter Braunkohlen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szilagyi, J.; Ullrich, B. [Technische Univ. Dresden, Inst. fuer Geotechnik (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Within the framework of the research project financed by the Arbeitsgemeinschaft industrieller Forschungsvereinigungen (AIF) ''Experimental investigations into the formation of ash deposits from stack gases during the combustion of pulverised lignite'' and supervised by the chair of power station technology (Institute of Energy Technology) of the Dresden Technical University, the mineral composition of ash deposits of six different coals were investigated: two coal blends (different countries worldwide), two lignites from east from the River Elbe (types WM and JAe), one from west of the River Elbe and one Rhenish lignite. (orig.)

  7. Physicochemical and mineralogical characterization of uranium-contaminated soils from the Fernald Integrated Demonstration Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elless, M.P.; Lee, S.Y.; Timpson, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    An integrated approach that utilizes various characterization technologies has been developed for the Uranium Soil Integrated Demonstration program. The Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation site near Cincinnati, Ohio, was selected as the host facility for this demonstration. Characterization of background, untreated contaminated, and treated contaminated soils was performed to assess the contamination and the effect of treatment efforts to remove uranium from these soils. Carbonate minerals were present in the contaminated soils (added for erosion control) but were absent in the nearby background soils. Because of the importance of the carbonate anion to uranium solubility, the occurrence of carbonate minerals in these soils will be an important factor in the development of a successful remediation technology. Uranium partitioning data among several particle-size fractions indicate that conventional soil washing will be ineffective for remediation of these soils and that chemical extraction will be necessary to lower the uranium concentration to the target level (52 mg/kg). Carbonate-based (sodium carbonate/bicarbonate) and acid-based (sulfuric and citric acids) lixiviants were employed for the selective removal of uranium from these soils. Characterization results have identified uranium phosphate minerals as the predominant uranium mineral form in both the untreated and treated soils. The low solubility associated with phosphate minerals is primarily responsible for their occurrence in the posttreated soils. Artificial weathering of the treated soils caused by the treatments, particularly acid-based lixiviants, was documented by their detrimental effects on several physicochemical characteristics of these soils (e.g., soil pH, particle-size distribution, and mineralogy)

  8. Ma_MISS on ExoMars: Mineralogical Characterization of the Martian Subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Altieri, Francesca; Ammannito, Eleonora; Biondi, David; De Angelis, Simone; Meini, Marco; Mondello, Giuseppe; Novi, Samuele; Paolinetti, Riccardo; Soldani, Massimo; Mugnuolo, Raffaele; Pirrotta, Simone; Vago, Jorge L.; Ma_MISS Team

    2017-07-01

    The Ma_MISS (Mars Multispectral Imager for Subsurface Studies) experiment is the visible and near infrared (VNIR) miniaturized spectrometer hosted by the drill system of the ExoMars 2020 rover. Ma_MISS will perform IR spectral reflectance investigations in the 0.4-2.2 μm range to characterize the mineralogy of excavated borehole walls at different depths (between 0 and 2 m). The spectral sampling is about 20 nm, whereas the spatial resolution over the target is 120 μm. Making use of the drill's movement, the instrument slit can scan a ring and build up hyperspectral images of a borehole. The main goal of the Ma_MISS instrument is to study the martian subsurface environment. Access to the martian subsurface is crucial to our ability to constrain the nature, timing, and duration of alteration and sedimentation processes on Mars, as well as habitability conditions. Subsurface deposits likely host and preserve H2O ice and hydrated materials that will contribute to our understanding of the H2O geochemical environment (both in the liquid and in the solid state) at the ExoMars 2020 landing site. The Ma_MISS spectral range and sampling capabilities have been carefully selected to allow the study of minerals and ices in situ before the collection of samples. Ma_MISS will be implemented to accomplish the following scientific objectives: (1) determine the composition of subsurface materials, (2) map the distribution of subsurface H2O and volatiles, (3) characterize important optical and physical properties of materials (e.g., grain size), and (4) produce a stratigraphic column that will inform with regard to subsurface geological processes. The Ma_MISS findings will help to refine essential criteria that will aid in our selection of the most interesting subsurface formations from which to collect samples.

  9. Geochemical and mineralogical characterization of a neutral, low-sulfide/high-carbonate tailings impoundment, Markušovce, eastern Slovakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Edgar; Petrák, Marián; Tóth, Roman; Lalinská-Voleková, Bronislava; Jurkovič, L'ubomír; Kučerová, Gabriela; Radková, Anežka; Sottník, Peter; Vozár, Jaroslav

    2013-11-01

    Tailings deposits generated from mining activities represent a potential risk for the aquatic environment through the release of potentially toxic metals and metalloids occurring in a variety of minerals present in the tailings. Physicochemical and mineralogical characteristics of tailings such as total concentrations of chemical elements, pH, ratio of acid-producing to acid-neutralizing minerals, and primary and secondary mineral phases are very important factors that control the actual release of potentially toxic metals and metalloids from the tailings to the environment. The aims of this study are the determination of geochemical and mineralogical characteristics of tailings deposited in voluminous impoundment situated near the village of Markušovce (eastern Slovakia) and identification of the processes controlling the mobility of selected toxic metals (Cu, Hg) and metalloids (As, Sb). The studied tailings have unique features in comparison with the other tailings investigated previously because of the specific mineral assemblage primarily consisting of barite, siderite, quartz, and minor sulfides. To meet the aims, samples of the tailings were collected from 3 boreholes and 15 excavated pits and subjected to bulk geochemical analyses (i.e., determination of chemical composition, pH, Eh, acid generation, and neutralization potentials) combined with detailed mineralogical characterization using optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microprobe analysis (EMPA), and micro-X-ray diffraction (μ-XRD). Additionally, the geochemical and mineralogical factors controlling the transfer of potentially toxic elements from tailings to waters were also determined using short-term batch test (European norm EN 12457), sampling of drainage waters and speciation-equilibrium calculations performed with PHREEQC. The tailings mineral assemblage consists of siderite, barite, quartz, and dolomite. Sulfide minerals constitute only a minor proportion of the tailings

  10. UNCOMMON SENSORY METHODOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimír Vietoris

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sensory science is the young but the rapidly developing field of the food industry. Actually, the great emphasis is given to the production of rapid techniques of data collection, the difference between consumers and trained panel is obscured and the role of sensory methodologists is to prepare the ways for evaluation, by which a lay panel (consumers can achieve identical results as a trained panel. Currently, there are several conventional methods of sensory evaluation of food (ISO standards, but more sensory laboratories are developing methodologies that are not strict enough in the selection of evaluators, their mechanism is easily understandable and the results are easily interpretable. This paper deals with mapping of marginal methods used in sensory evaluation of food (new types of profiles, CATA, TDS, napping.

  11. Safety class methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donner, E.B.; Low, J.M.; Lux, C.R.

    1992-01-01

    DOE Order 6430.1A, General Design Criteria (GDC), requires that DOE facilities be evaluated with respect to ''safety class items.'' Although the GDC defines safety class items, it does not provide a methodology for selecting safety class items. The methodology described in this paper was developed to assure that Safety Class Items at the Savannah River Site (SRS) are selected in a consistent and technically defensible manner. Safety class items are those in the highest of four categories determined to be of special importance to nuclear safety and, merit appropriately higher-quality design, fabrication, and industrial test standards and codes. The identification of safety class items is approached using a cascading strategy that begins at the 'safety function' level (i.e., a cooling function, ventilation function, etc.) and proceeds down to the system, component, or structure level. Thus, the items that are required to support a safety function are SCls. The basic steps in this procedure apply to the determination of SCls for both new project activities, and for operating facilities. The GDC lists six characteristics of SCls to be considered as a starting point for safety item classification. They are as follows: 1. Those items whose failure would produce exposure consequences that would exceed the guidelines in Section 1300-1.4, ''Guidance on Limiting Exposure of the Public,'' at the site boundary or nearest point of public access 2. Those items required to maintain operating parameters within the safety limits specified in the Operational Safety Requirements during normal operations and anticipated operational occurrences. 3. Those items required for nuclear criticality safety. 4. Those items required to monitor the release of radioactive material to the environment during and after a Design Basis Accident. Those items required to achieve, and maintain the facility in a safe shutdown condition 6. Those items that control Safety Class Item listed above

  12. Acoustic emission methodology and application

    CERN Document Server

    Nazarchuk, Zinoviy; Serhiyenko, Oleh

    2017-01-01

    This monograph analyses in detail the physical aspects of the elastic waves radiation during deformation or fracture of materials. I presents the  methodological bases for the practical use of acoustic emission device, and describes the results of theoretical and experimental researches of evaluation of the crack growth resistance of materials, selection of the useful AE signals. The efficiency of this methodology is shown through the diagnostics of various-purpose industrial objects. The authors obtain results of experimental researches with the help of the new methods and facilities.

  13. Preliminary analysis in a clayey mass aimed at ceramic blocks production: physical and mineralogical characteristics; Analise preliminar em uma massa argilosa visando a producao de blocos ceramicos: caracteristicas fisicas e mineralogicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, L.J.M.D. da; Apolonio, T.G.; Salviano, A.F.; Taveira, S.K.A.; Garcia, T.G.C.; Silva, J; Luna, P.A.; Macedo, R.S., E-mail: reginaldo.severo@ufcg.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    The physical, chemical and mineralogical characterization of the clayey mass are important in determining its properties, allowing a better knowledge of the raw material used in the manufacture of ceramic products. This work aims to characterize the raw material used in the manufacture of ceramic sealing blocks in a ceramic industry. Thus, it was evaluated by laboratory tests the raw material used in the production of ceramic blocks in a ceramics industry in the region of Carnauba dos Dantas, RN. The methodology used in the tests is the same as the IPT, which consists in carrying out the plasticity testing, particle size, chemical analysis and X-ray diffraction. Results indicate that the sample studied by the physical and mineralogical characteristics, has the potential to be applied in the manufacture of red ceramic products for use in construction. (author)

  14. Investigationof Clay Mineralogy, Micromorphology and Evolution of Soils in Bajestan Playa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ghasemzadeh Ganjehie

    2017-03-01

    , pediment and clay flat. Considering the diversity of geomorphic units, 11 soil profiles were described and diffrenet soil layers and horizons were sampled. Undisturbed soil samples were taken micromorphological studies. Some horizons were selected for clay mineralogy analysis. The mineralogy of clay fraction was determined using X-ray diffraction method. Results and discution: All studied soils except the profiles in the pediment were classified in the Aridisols order. There were two geomorphic surfaces in alluvial fans. In the first geomorphic surface a soil with the Bk horizon buried a soil with red Btk horizon. In the second geomorphic surface, it seems that the erosion has been removed the overlying soil. The Bk horizon showed the maximum soil development in the clay flat and intermediate alluvial fan-clay flat landforms. Clay coating on sand in thin section was the evidence of clay illuviation in Btk horizon. Carbonate nodules associated with clay coating are the compound pedofeature in Btk horizon. These evidences reflect polygenetic nature of the soils and different period of climate change and soil formation. Smectite, mica, chlorite and palygorskite are the clay minerals in the studied soils. Similar to soils in arid regions of Iran, palygorskite was found in Bk, Bt and Bz horizons. The existence of Bk horizon in overlying soils, buried Btk horizon, removal of surface horizon in alluvial fan are the evidences of regressive and progressive of pedogenic processes in the study area. Btk horizon represents a warm and wetter and Bk horizon indicates a relatively wetter period in comparison to present time. Conclusion: Btk was the most developed horizon in the study area that occurred as buried paleosol in alluvial fan. Bk, Bw, By and Bz were the common horizon in other landforms. Clay coating and red color of Btk horizon might seem as indicators of hot and humid conditions in the past, during the argillic horizon formation. Covered carbonate nodules with clay coating

  15. Mineralogic Zonation Within the Tuff Confining Unit, Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lance Prothro

    2005-01-01

    Recently acquired mineralogic data from drill hole samples in Yucca Flat show that the tuff confining unit (TCU) can be subdivided into three mineralogic zones based on the relative abundances of primary and secondary mineral assemblages. These zones are (1) an upper zone characterized by the abundance of the zeolite mineral clinoptilolite with lesser amounts of felsic and clay minerals; (2) a middle zone with felsic minerals dominant over clinoptilolite and clay minerals; and (3) a basal argillic zone where clay minerals are dominant over felsic minerals and clinoptilolite. Interpretation of the mineralogic data, along with lithologic, stratigraphic, and geophysical data from approximately 500 drill holes, reveals a three-layer mineralogic model for the TCU that shows all three zones are extensive beneath Yucca Flat. The mineralogic model will be used to subdivide the TCU in the Yucca Flat hydrostratigraphic framework model, resulting in a more accurate and versatile framework model. In addition, the identification of the type, quantity, and distribution of minerals within each TCU layer will permit modelers to better predict the spatial distribution and extent of contaminant transport from underground tests in Yucca Flat, at both the level of the hydrologic source term and the corrective action unit

  16. CCD-Based XRD/XRF for Determining Environmental Mineralogy on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaniman, D. T.; Bish, D. L.; Blake, D. F.; Chipera, S. J.

    2000-01-01

    Health effects from Martian dusts will be a concern for any manned Mars missions. Nuisance dusts plagued the Apollo astronauts, but dusts of more hazardous mineralogy, in habitats occupied by Mars astronauts weakened by a long-duration mission, may be more than a nuisance. Chemical hazards in Martian regolith attributable to S, Cl, Br, Cd, and Pb are known or strongly suspected to be present, but terrestrial studies of the health effects of dusts indicate that accurate determination of mineralogy is a critical factor in evaluating inhalation hazards. Mineral inhalation hazards such as the Group-I carcinogenic zeolite erionite, which is demonstrated to cause mesothelioma, cannot be identified by chemical analysis alone. Studies of palagonite analogs raise the possibility that erionite may occur on Mars. In addition to health effects concerns, environmental mineralogy has significant importance in resource extraction, groundwater use, and sustained agriculture. The high sulfur and chlorine content of Martian regolith will affect all of these uses, but the nature of mineralogic reservoirs for S and Cl will determine their uptake and concentration in extracted groundwater and in agricultural applications of regolith. Wet chemistry experiments planned for the Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) will define some of the consequences of water/soil interaction, but an understanding of the mineralogic basis for water-rock reactions is needed to understand the mechanisms of reaction and to apply the results of a few experiments to larger scales and different conditions.

  17. A national-scale geochemical and mineralogical survey of soils of the conterminous United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, David B.; Cannon, William F.; Woodruff, Laurel G.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Sampling for national-scale soil geochemical and mineralogical survey completed for conterminous USA. → Natural variation for most elements is approximately three orders of magnitude. → Composition of soil parent material is the major controlling factor. → Climate (average annual precipitation) is also an important controlling factor for some elements. → Sample archive (4800 sites) available for future investigations. - Abstract: In 2007, the US Geological Survey initiated a low-density (1 site per 1600 km 2 , c. 4800 sites) geochemical and mineralogical survey of soils of the conterminous USA. The ideal sampling protocol at each site includes a sample from 0-5 cm depth, a composite of the soil A horizon, and a sample from the soil C horizon. The 3 , HClO 4 and HF. Separate methods are used for As, Hg, Se and total C on this same size fraction. The major mineralogical components are determined by a quantitative X-ray diffraction method. Sampling was completed in 2010 with chemical and mineralogical analysis currently underway. Preliminary results for a swath from the central USA to Florida clearly show the effects of soil parent material and climate on the chemical and mineralogical composition of soils. A sample archive will be established and made available for future investigations.

  18. Blanket safety by GEMSAFE methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Tetsuo; Saito, Masaki

    2001-01-01

    General Methodology of Safety Analysis and Evaluation for Fusion Energy Systems (GEMSAFE) has been applied to a number of fusion system designs, such as R-tokamak, Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER), and the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) designs in the both stages of Conceptual Design Activities (CDA) and Engineering Design Activities (EDA). Though the major objective of GEMSAFE is to reasonably select design basis events (DBEs) it is also useful to elucidate related safety functions as well as requirements to ensure its safety. In this paper, we apply the methodology to fusion systems with future tritium breeding blankets and make clear which points of the system should be of concern from safety ensuring point of view. In this context, we have obtained five DBEs that are related to the blanket system. We have also clarified the safety functions required to prevent accident propagations initiated by those blanket-specific DBEs. The outline of the methodology is also reviewed. (author)

  19. Mineralogical and lithochemical studies of strata beneath the Harwell research site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmot, R.D.; Morgan, D.J.

    1982-11-01

    Determinations have been made of the mineralogy and lithochemistry of the principal lithological units of the Mesozoic and Palaeozoic rocks penetrated by boreholes at the Harwell Research Site. Samples were taken at approximately 9m intervals from the Upper Greensand to the Coal Measures, together with a number from the Chalk. Mineralogical analyses were carried out using X-ray diffraction, with thermal analysis and surface area measurements aiding quantification. Major and trace element determinations were made using direct electron excitation X-ray spectrometry and X-ray fluorescence respectively. Other chemical determinations included organic carbon, sulphate and 'exchangeable' cations. The mineralogical and lithochemical variations within and between the major litho-stratigraphic units are discussed and compared with published data for other localities. (author)

  20. Mineralogic and petrologic investigation of post-test core samples from the Spent Fuel Test - Climax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryerson, F.J.; Beiriger, J.

    1985-02-01

    We have characterized a suite of samples taken subsequent to the end of the Spent Fuel Test - Climax by petrographic and microanalytical techniques and determined their mineral assemblage, modal properties, and mineral chemistry. The samples were obtained immediately adjacent to the canister borehole at a variety of depths and positions within the canister drift, as well as radially outward from each canister hole. This method of sampling allows variations in post-test mineralogic properties to be evaluated on the basis of (1) depth along a particular canister hole and (2) position within the canister drift, with respect to the heat and radiation sources, and with respect to the pre - test samples. In no case did we find any significant correlation between the mineralogical properties and variables listed above. In short, the Spent Fuel Test - Climax has produced no identifiable mineralogical response in the Climax quartz monzonite. 12 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs

  1. Influence of mineralogical and heavy metal composition on natural radionuclide concentrations in the river sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suresh, G., E-mail: gsureshphy_1983@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics Thiruvalluvar College of Engg and Tech, Ponnur hills, Vandavasi, Tamilnadu 604 505 (India); Ramasamy, V. [Department of Physics, Annamalai University, Tamilnadu (India); Meenakshisundaram, V. [Health and Safety Division, IGCAR, Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu (India); Venkatachalapathy, R. [CAS in Marine Biology, Faculty of Marine Sciences, Annamalai University, Tamilnadu (India); Ponnusamy, V. [Department of Physics, MIT Campus, Anna University Chennai, Tamilnadu (India)

    2011-10-15

    The natural radiation level has been determined for the sediment samples of the Ponnaiyar River with an aim of evaluating the radiation hazard. The mineralogical characterizations of the sediments have been carried out using the Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic technique. The relative distribution of major minerals is determined by calculating extinction coefficient. The concentration and spatial distribution of heavy metals (Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn and Ni) have been studied to understand the heavy metal contamination and its level of toxicity. To evaluate the potential toxicity, heavy metal concentrations are compared with different toxicological and geological reference values. The comparison results suggest that the present metals create an adverse effect on the aquatic ecosystems associated with this river. To assess the sediment contamination due to the studied heavy metals, the Pollution Load Index (PLI) is calculated. Multivariate Statistical analyses (Pearson Correlation, Cluster and Factor analysis) were carried out between the parameters obtained from radioactivity, mineralogical and geochemical analysis to know the existing relations. Obtained results showed that the effect of mineralogy on level of radioactivity should be significant. However, mineralogy effect on heavy metal composition in the sediments should be limited, indicating that other factors such as vicinity of the pollution sources are more important. Also, the influence of mineralogical characterization on level of radioactivity is significant, whereas the influence of the heavy metal composition on level of radioactivity should be limited. - Highlights: >Sediments radioactivity, mineralogical and heavy metal characterization have been analyzed. > Absorbed dose rate, PLI and kaolinite increase towards the river mouth. > Influence of minerals and heavy metals on level of radioactivity is assessed.

  2. Influence of mineralogical and heavy metal composition on natural radionuclide concentrations in the river sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suresh, G.; Ramasamy, V.; Meenakshisundaram, V.; Venkatachalapathy, R.; Ponnusamy, V.

    2011-01-01

    The natural radiation level has been determined for the sediment samples of the Ponnaiyar River with an aim of evaluating the radiation hazard. The mineralogical characterizations of the sediments have been carried out using the Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic technique. The relative distribution of major minerals is determined by calculating extinction coefficient. The concentration and spatial distribution of heavy metals (Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn and Ni) have been studied to understand the heavy metal contamination and its level of toxicity. To evaluate the potential toxicity, heavy metal concentrations are compared with different toxicological and geological reference values. The comparison results suggest that the present metals create an adverse effect on the aquatic ecosystems associated with this river. To assess the sediment contamination due to the studied heavy metals, the Pollution Load Index (PLI) is calculated. Multivariate Statistical analyses (Pearson Correlation, Cluster and Factor analysis) were carried out between the parameters obtained from radioactivity, mineralogical and geochemical analysis to know the existing relations. Obtained results showed that the effect of mineralogy on level of radioactivity should be significant. However, mineralogy effect on heavy metal composition in the sediments should be limited, indicating that other factors such as vicinity of the pollution sources are more important. Also, the influence of mineralogical characterization on level of radioactivity is significant, whereas the influence of the heavy metal composition on level of radioactivity should be limited. - Highlights: →Sediments radioactivity, mineralogical and heavy metal characterization have been analyzed. → Absorbed dose rate, PLI and kaolinite increase towards the river mouth. → Influence of minerals and heavy metals on level of radioactivity is assessed.

  3. Mineralogy of Interplanetary Dust Particles from the Comet Giacobini-Zinner Dust Stream Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, S.; Westphal, A. J.; Palma, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    The Draconoid meteor shower, originating from comet 21P/Giacobini-Zinner, is a low-velocity Earth-crossing dust stream that had a peak anticipated flux on Oct. 8, 2012. In response to this prediction, NASA performed dedicated stratospheric dust collections to target interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) from this comet stream on Oct 15-17, 2012 [3]. Twelve dust particles from this targeted collection were allocated to our coordinated analysis team for studies of noble gas (Univ. Minnesota, Minnesota State Univ.), SXRF and Fe-XANES (SSL Berkeley) and mineralogy/isotopes (JSC). Here we report a mineralogical study of 3 IDPs from the Draconoid collection..

  4. Vertical evolution of the Cínovec granite cupola – chemical and mineralogical record

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Breiter, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 46 (2016), s. 4-6 E-ISSN 1434-7512. [Late Paleozoic magmatism in the Erzgebirge / Krušné hory: Magma genesis, tectonics, geophysics, and mineral deposits : abstracts. 11.11.2016-12.11.2016, Freiberg] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-13600S Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : granite * Cínovec * geology * mineralogy * geochemistry Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy http://tu-freiberg.de/sites/default/files/media/institut-fuer-geologie-718/pdf/fog_volume_46.pdf

  5. Mineralogical investigations of the area to the North-West of Qattara Depression, Western Desert, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosson, S.; Roshdy, H.M.K.

    2000-01-01

    Petrophysical and mineralogical investigations are given for subsurface samples from this area. The paper deals with mineralogical investigations of Middle Jurassic, Lower Cretaceous and Upper Cretaceous sedimentary rocks. It includes thin section examinations for 14 samples of sandstone, siltstone and carbonates, and x-ray powder diffraction analyses of some argillaceous samples, untreated and glycolated. It was found that the kaolinite group is the main clay mineral recorded in the argillaceous sandstone and siltstone samples. Illite and montmorillonite are identified in the shale sample representing the Kharita Formation. Siderite was also recorded in the sample. Illite and montmorillonite were recorded as well as kaolinite in two siltstone samples. (Author)

  6. Chemical and Mineralogical Characterization of a Hematite-bearing Ridge on Mauna Kea, Hawaii: A Potential Mineralogical Process Analog for the Mount Sharp Hematite Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, T. G.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Hamilton, J. C.; Adams, M.; Fraeman, A. A.; Arvidson, R. E.; Catalano, J. G.; Mertzman, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity landed in Gale Crater in August 2012 and is currently roving towards the layered central mound known as Mount Sharp [1]. Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) hyperspectral data indicate Mount Sharp contains an 5 km stratigraphic sequence including Fe-Mg smectites, hematite, and hydrated sulfates in the lower layers separated by an unconformity from the overlying anhydrous strata [1,2,3]. Hematite was initially detected in CRISM data to occur in the lower sulfate layers on the north side of the mound [2]. [3] further mapped a distinct hematite detection occurring as part of a 200 m wide ridge that extends 6.5 km NE-SW, approximately parallel with the base of Mount Sharp. It is likely a target for in-situ analyses by Curiosity. We document here the occurrence of a stratum of hematite-bearing breccia that is exposed on the Puu Poliahu cinder cone near the summit of Mauna Kea volcano (Hawaii) (Fig.1). The stratum is more resistant to weathering than surrounding material, giving it the appearance of a ridge. The Mauna Kea hematite ridge is thus arguably a potential terrestrial mineralogical and process analog for the Gale Crater hematite ridge. We are acquiring a variety of chemical and mineralogical data on the Mauna Kea samples, with a focus on the chemical and mineralogical information already available or planned for the Gale hematite ridge.

  7. Site investigation SFR. Fracture mineralogy and geochemistry of borehole sections sampled for groundwater chemistry and Eh. Results from boreholes KFR01, KFR08, KFR10, KFR19, KFR7A and KFR105

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstroem, Bjoern (WSP Sverige AB (Sweden)); Tullborg, Eva-Lena (Terralogica AB, Grabo (Sweden))

    2011-01-15

    This report is part of the complementary site investigations for the future expansion of SFR. The report presents the results obtained during a detailed mineralogical and geochemical study of fracture minerals in drill cores from borehole section sampled for groundwater chemistry and where downhole Eh measurements have been performed. The groundwater redox system comprises not only the water, but also the bedrock/fracture mineral system in contact with this water. It is thus important to gain knowledge of the solid phases in contact with the groundwater, i.e. the fracture minerals. The samples studied for mineralogy and geochemistry, here reported, were selected to represent the fracture surfaces in contact with the groundwater in the sampled borehole sections and will give input to the hydrogeochemical model (SFR SDM). The mineralogy was determined using SEM-EDS and XRD and the geochemistry of fracture filling material was analysed by ICP-AES and ICP-QMS. The most common fracture minerals in the samples are mixed layer clay (smectite-illite), illite, chlorite, calcite, quartz, adularia and albite. Other minerals identified in the borehole sections include laumontite, pyrite, barite, chalcopyrite, hematite, Fe-oxyhydroxide, muscovite, REE-carbonate, allanite, biotite, asphaltite, galena, sphalerite, arsenopyrite, uranium phosphate, uranium silicate, Y-Ca silicate, monazite, xenotime, harmotome and fluorite. There are no major differences between the fracture mineralogy of the investigated borehole sections from SFR and the fracture mineralogy of the Forsmark site investigation area. The four fracture mineral generations distinguished within the Forsmark site investigation are also found at SFR. However, some differences have been observed: 1) Barite and uranium minerals are more common in the SFR fractures, 2) clay minerals like mixed layer illite-smectite and illite dominates in contrast to Forsmark where corrensite is by far the most common clay mineral and, 3

  8. Site investigation SFR. Fracture mineralogy and geochemistry of borehole sections sampled for groundwater chemistry and Eh. Results from boreholes KFR01, KFR08, KFR10, KFR19, KFR7A and KFR105

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandstroem, Bjoern; Tullborg, Eva-Lena

    2011-01-01

    This report is part of the complementary site investigations for the future expansion of SFR. The report presents the results obtained during a detailed mineralogical and geochemical study of fracture minerals in drill cores from borehole section sampled for groundwater chemistry and where downhole Eh measurements have been performed. The groundwater redox system comprises not only the water, but also the bedrock/fracture mineral system in contact with this water. It is thus important to gain knowledge of the solid phases in contact with the groundwater, i.e. the fracture minerals. The samples studied for mineralogy and geochemistry, here reported, were selected to represent the fracture surfaces in contact with the groundwater in the sampled borehole sections and will give input to the hydrogeochemical model (SFR SDM). The mineralogy was determined using SEM-EDS and XRD and the geochemistry of fracture filling material was analysed by ICP-AES and ICP-QMS. The most common fracture minerals in the samples are mixed layer clay (smectite-illite), illite, chlorite, calcite, quartz, adularia and albite. Other minerals identified in the borehole sections include laumontite, pyrite, barite, chalcopyrite, hematite, Fe-oxyhydroxide, muscovite, REE-carbonate, allanite, biotite, asphaltite, galena, sphalerite, arsenopyrite, uranium phosphate, uranium silicate, Y-Ca silicate, monazite, xenotime, harmotome and fluorite. There are no major differences between the fracture mineralogy of the investigated borehole sections from SFR and the fracture mineralogy of the Forsmark site investigation area. The four fracture mineral generations distinguished within the Forsmark site investigation are also found at SFR. However, some differences have been observed: 1) Barite and uranium minerals are more common in the SFR fractures, 2) clay minerals like mixed layer illite-smectite and illite dominates in contrast to Forsmark where corrensite is by far the most common clay mineral and, 3

  9. Mineralogy of Nicobar Fan turbidites (IODP Leg 362): Himalayan provenance and diagenetic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limonta, M.; Garzanti, E.; Ando, S.; Carter, A.; Milliken, K. L.; Pickering, K. T.

    2017-12-01

    In this study we use quantitative petrographic and heavy-mineral data on silt-sized and sand-sized sediments from the Nicobar Fan turbiditic depositional system to unravel their provenance and discriminate between pre-depositional and post-depositional processes controlling sediment mineralogy. Eighteen samples from the two drill sites U1480 e U1481, collected down to a depth of 1400 m during International Ocean Discovery Expedition 362, were selected for analysis. A complete section of the sedimentary section overlying oceanic basaltic basement was recovered at the U1480 drill site, whereas the U1481 drill site, located 35 km to the southeast, focused on the deeper interval of the sedimentary section overlying oceanic basement. Here we illustrate the compositional trends observed throughout the recovered succession, and compare heavy-mineral suites characterizing sediments drilled at the two U1480 and U1481 sites to check for potential differences in sediment provenance over a relatively short distance in trench settings. Diagenetic control with increasing burial depth was also specifically investigated. In Pleistocene sediments at depths of a few tens of meters only, rich heavy-mineral assemblages include mainly hornblende, epidote, and garnet, associated with apatite, clinopyroxene, tourmaline, sillimanite, kyanite, zircon, titanite, and rare staurolite and rutile, testifying to long-distance provenance from the Himalayan range via the Ganga-Brahmaputra fluvio-deltaic-turbiditic system. Heavy-mineral concentration shows a progressive decrease with burial depth, pointing to selective diagenetic dissolution of less durable detrital minerals. Clinopyroxene becomes rare below 400 m depth and was not recorded below 500 m depth, where amphibole decreases notably in relative abundance. More durable heavy minerals, including zircon, tourmaline, apatite, garnet and epidote, consequently tend to be relatively enriched with increasing age and burial depth. Petrographic and

  10. Corrigendum to "Arsenic mineralogy and mobility in the arsenic-rich historical mine waste dump" [Sci. Total Environ. 536 (2015) 713-728

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Filippi, Michal; Drahota, P.; Machovič, V.; Böhmová, Vlasta; Mihaljevič, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 541, January 15 (2016), s. 1639 ISSN 0048-9697 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : corrigendum * erratum * arsenic mineralogy Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 4.900, year: 2016

  11. Arsenic mineralogy of near-neutral soils and mining waste at the Smolotely-Líšnice historical gold district, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drahota, P.; Kulakowski, O.; Culka, A.; Knappová, M.; Rohovec, Jan; Veselovský, F.; Racek, M.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 89, February (2018), s. 243-254 ISSN 0883-2927 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : soil * mining waste * pharmacosiderite * yukonite * arseniosiderite Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy OBOR OECD: Mineralogy Impact factor: 2.581, year: 2016

  12. Mineralogical association in the zone of argillic advanced alteration in a kaolin deposit of Patagonia Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rainoldi, A; Oviedo, P.; Maiza, P.; Marfil, S.

    2010-01-01

    This work is about the mineralogical and petrological relations of the para genetic association of advanced argillic zone in the kaolin deposit in Patagonia.This study allowed to establish the sequence of events that took place in the deposit as well as the conditions under which they were generated

  13. Mineralogy and pore water chemistry of a boiler ash from a MSW fluidized-bed incinerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodénan, F; Guyonnet, D; Piantone, P; Blanc, P

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the mineralogy and pore water chemistry of a boiler ash sampled from a municipal solid waste fluidized-bed incinerator, subject to 18 months of dynamic leaching in a large percolation column experiment. A particular focus is on the redox behaviour of Cr(VI) in relation to metal aluminium Al(0), as chromium may represent an environmental or health hazard. The leaching behaviour and interaction between Cr(VI) and Al(0) are interpreted on the basis of mineralogical evolutions observed over the 18-month period and of saturation indices calculated with the geochemical code PhreeqC and reviewed thermodynamic data. Results of mineralogical analyses show in particular the alteration of mineral phases during leaching (e.g. quartz and metal aluminium grains), while geochemical calculations suggest equilibria of percolating fluids with respect to specific mineral phases (e.g. monohydrocalcite and aluminium hydroxide). The combination of leaching data on a large scale and mineralogical analyses document the coupled leaching behaviour of aluminium and chromium, with chromium appearing in the pore fluids in its hexavalent and mobile state once metal aluminium is no longer available for chromium reduction. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Pedogennyje i litogennyje osobennosti mineralogičeskogo sostava černozema na krasnocvetnych porodach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lesovaja, S. N.; Kapička, Aleš; Petrovský, Eduard; Aparin, B. F.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 12 (2003), s. 1482-1490 ISSN 0032-180X Grant - others:RFFI(RU) 01-04-48815 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3012916 Keywords : mineralogical composition * chernozem * magnetic minerals Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography

  15. Pedogenic and lithogenic features in the mineralogical composition of chernozem developed from red-earth deposits

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lesovaya, S. N.; Kapička, Aleš; Petrovský, Eduard; Aparin, B. F.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 12 (2003), s. 1325-1333 ISSN 1064-2293 Grant - others:RFFI(RU) 01-04-48815 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3012916 Keywords : mineralogical composition * chernozem * magnetic minerals Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 0.136, year: 2003

  16. Remote In-Situ Quantitative Mineralogical Analysis Using XRD/XRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, D. F.; Bish, D.; Vaniman, D.; Chipera, S.; Sarrazin, P.; Collins, S. A.; Elliott, S. T.

    2001-01-01

    X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) is the most direct and accurate method for determining mineralogy. The CHEMIN XRD/XRF instrument has shown promising results on a variety of mineral and rock samples. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  17. Sand and clay mineralogy of sal forest soils of the Doon Siwalik ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    3Forest Soil & Land Reclamation Division, Forest Research Institute, Dehradun 248 006, India. .... also helps in characterizing the soil mineralogical make-up in relation to the growth and develop- ment of the species essential for sustainable forest management. ...... and Weed S B (Madison: Soil Science Society of America).

  18. Textural and mineralogical study of the San Gregorio de Polanco mesozoic basic dams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaglia, S.; Muzio, R.; Masquelin, H.

    2010-01-01

    This work is about the preliminary results of petrographic study in Mesozoic basic dikes located around San Gregorio de Polanco (Tacuarembo department. Uruguay). The textural mineralogical study conducted by scanning electron microscopy confirms the presence of significant late hydrothermal activity which are represented by the conspicuous presence of interstitial barite mineralization level

  19. Size, surface texture, chemical composition and mineralogy interrelations in ferromanganese nodules of central Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banakar, V.K; Pattan, J.N.; Jauhari, P.

    Fiftyseven ferromanganese nodules, classified into 3 size class (4,4-6 and 6-8 cm diam.), from the siliceous sediments of central Indian Ocean were analysed for transition metals and representative sample from each size class for mineralogy. Smaller...

  20. Lithological and mineralogical changes observed in a core from the western Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Reddy, N.P.C.; Rao, K.M.; Putra, S.V.S; Rao, Ch.M.

    Lithological and mineralogical studies were carried out on sediments from a 650 cm long core from the north western Bay of Bengal at a depth of 2700 m. These studies demarcate a boundary at 380 cm designated as unit 1 from 0-380 cm and unit 2 from...

  1. Prediction of potential compressive strength of Portland clinker from its mineralogy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svinning, K.; Høskuldsson, Agnar; Justnes, H.

    2010-01-01

    Based on a statistical model first applied for prediction of compressive strength up to 28 d from the microstructure of Portland cement, potential compressive strength of clinker has been predicted from its mineralogy. The prediction model was evaluated by partial least squares regression...

  2. Mineralogical characteristics of andradite and grossular of te Sasa Ore Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shijakova-Ivanova, Tena; Zajkova-Paneva, Vesna

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents the mineralogical characteristics of garnets (andradite and grossular) of the Sasa ore field, Investigations were carried out in the Institute for Crystallography and Petrography in Zurich, Switzerland and in the laboratory of the Faculty of Mining and Geology, Shtip. (Original)

  3. Mineralogical Composition of Urinary Stones and Their Frequency in Patients: Relationship to Gender and Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Keshavarzi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This investigation reports the mineralogy and possible pathological significance of urinary stones removed from patients in Fars province, Iran. X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and polarizing microscope (PM techniques were used to investigate the mineralogical compositions of urinary stones. The identified mineral components include whewellite, weddellite, hydroxyapatite, uricite and cystine. These techniques revealed that the whewellite and uricite were the most common mineral phases. Platy-like/monoclinic whewellite, prismatic/monoclinic uric acid and hexagonal cystine crystals were revealed by SEM. Biominerals (calcium carbonate and quartz were also identified in PM images. Of the variables determining the type of precipitated minerals, the effects of pH on depositional conditions proved to be the most apparent parameter, as shown by occurrences and relationships among the studied minerals. Our results revealed the importance of detailed knowledge of mineralogical composition in assessing the effects of age and sex. The highest incidence of urinary stones was observed in the 40–60 age group. Calcium oxalate and uric acid stones are more frequent in men than women. Finally, the study concluded that knowledge of the mineralogical composition of urinary stones is important as it helps the scientific community to explain the chemistry and the etiology of the calculi in the urinary system.

  4. Arsenic-rich acid mine water with extreme arsenic concentration: mineralogy, geochemistry, microbiology, and environmental implications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Majzlan, J.; Plášil, Jakub; Škoda, R.; Gescher, J.; Kögler, F.; Rusznyak, A.; Küsel, K.; Neu, T.R.; Mangold, S.; Rothe, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 23 (2014), s. 13685-13693 ISSN 0013-936X R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-31276P Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : extreme arsenic concentration Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 5.330, year: 2014

  5. Detailed description of oil shale organic and mineralogical heterogeneity via fourier transform infrared mircoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Kathryn E.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Foster, Michael; Gutierrez, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Mineralogical and geochemical information on reservoir and source rocks is necessary to assess and produce from petroleum systems. The standard methods in the petroleum industry for obtaining these properties are bulk measurements on homogenized, generally crushed, and pulverized rock samples and can take from hours to days to perform. New methods using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy have been developed to more rapidly obtain information on mineralogy and geochemistry. However, these methods are also typically performed on bulk, homogenized samples. We present a new approach to rock sample characterization incorporating multivariate analysis and FTIR microscopy to provide non-destructive, spatially resolved mineralogy and geochemistry on whole rock samples. We are able to predict bulk mineralogy and organic carbon content within the same margin of error as standard characterization techniques, including X-ray diffraction (XRD) and total organic carbon (TOC) analysis. Validation of the method was performed using two oil shale samples from the Green River Formation in the Piceance Basin with differing sedimentary structures. One sample represents laminated Green River oil shales, and the other is representative of oil shale breccia. The FTIR microscopy results on the oil shales agree with XRD and LECO TOC data from the homogenized samples but also give additional detail regarding sample heterogeneity by providing information on the distribution of mineral phases and organic content. While measurements for this study were performed on oil shales, the method could also be applied to other geological samples, such as other mudrocks, complex carbonates, and soils.

  6. Mineralogy and pore water chemistry of a boiler ash from a MSW fluidized-bed incinerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodenan, F.; Guyonnet, D.; Piantone, P.; Blanc, P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the mineralogy and pore water chemistry of a boiler ash sampled from a municipal solid waste fluidized-bed incinerator, subject to 18 months of dynamic leaching in a large percolation column experiment. A particular focus is on the redox behaviour of Cr(VI) in relation to metal aluminium Al 0 , as chromium may represent an environmental or health hazard. The leaching behaviour and interaction between Cr(VI) and Al 0 are interpreted on the basis of mineralogical evolutions observed over the 18-month period and of saturation indices calculated with the geochemical code PhreeqC and reviewed thermodynamic data. Results of mineralogical analyses show in particular the alteration of mineral phases during leaching (e.g. quartz and metal aluminium grains), while geochemical calculations suggest equilibria of percolating fluids with respect to specific mineral phases (e.g. monohydrocalcite and aluminium hydroxide). The combination of leaching data on a large scale and mineralogical analyses document the coupled leaching behaviour of aluminium and chromium, with chromium appearing in the pore fluids in its hexavalent and mobile state once metal aluminium is no longer available for chromium reduction.

  7. Mineralogy of Air-Pollution-Control Residues from a Secondary Lead Smellter: Environmental Implications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ettler, V.; Johan, Z.; Baronnet, A.; Jankovský, F.; Gilles, C.; Mihaljevič, M.; Šebek, O.; Strnad, L.; Bezdička, Petr

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 23 (2005), s. 9309-9316 ISSN 0013-936X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP205/01/D132 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : mineralogy * environmental aplications Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.054, year: 2005

  8. Unattended Monitoring System Design Methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drayer, D.D.; DeLand, S.M.; Harmon, C.D.; Matter, J.C.; Martinez, R.L.; Smith, J.D.

    1999-01-01

    A methodology for designing Unattended Monitoring Systems starting at a systems level has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories. This proven methodology provides a template that describes the process for selecting and applying appropriate technologies to meet unattended system requirements, as well as providing a framework for development of both training courses and workshops associated with unattended monitoring. The design and implementation of unattended monitoring systems is generally intended to respond to some form of policy based requirements resulting from international agreements or domestic regulations. Once the monitoring requirements are established, a review of the associated process and its related facilities enables identification of strategic monitoring locations and development of a conceptual system design. The detailed design effort results in the definition of detection components as well as the supporting communications network and data management scheme. The data analyses then enables a coherent display of the knowledge generated during the monitoring effort. The resultant knowledge is then compared to the original system objectives to ensure that the design adequately addresses the fundamental principles stated in the policy agreements. Implementation of this design methodology will ensure that comprehensive unattended monitoring system designs provide appropriate answers to those critical questions imposed by specific agreements or regulations. This paper describes the main features of the methodology and discusses how it can be applied in real world situations

  9. Skeletal mineralogy of coral recruits under high temperature and pCO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, T.; Clode, P. L.

    2016-03-01

    Aragonite, which is the polymorph of CaCO3 precipitated by modern corals during skeletal formation, has a higher solubility than the more stable polymorph calcite. This higher solubility may leave animals that produce aragonitic skeletons more vulnerable to anthropogenic ocean acidification. It is therefore important to determine whether scleractinian corals have the plasticity to adapt and produce calcite in their skeletons in response to changing environmental conditions. Both high pCO2 and lower Mg / Ca ratios in seawater are thought to have driven changes in the skeletal mineralogy of major marine calcifiers in the past ˜ 540 Ma. Experimentally reduced Mg / Ca ratios in ambient seawater have been shown to induce some calcite precipitation in both adult and newly settled modern corals; however, the impact of high pCO2 on the mineralogy of recruits is unknown. Here we determined the skeletal mineralogy of 1-month-old Acropora spicifera coral recruits grown under high temperature (+3 °C) and pCO2 (˜ 900 µatm) conditions, using X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. We found that newly settled coral recruits produced entirely aragonitic skeletons regardless of the treatment. Our results show that elevated pCO2 alone is unlikely to drive changes in the skeletal mineralogy of young corals. Not having an ability to switch from aragonite to calcite precipitation may leave corals and ultimately coral reef ecosystems more susceptible to predicted ocean acidification. An important area for prospective research would be the investigation of the combined impact of high pCO2 and reduced Mg / Ca ratio on coral skeletal mineralogy.

  10. Scenario development methodologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eng, T.; Hudson, J.; Stephansson, O.

    1994-11-01

    In the period 1981-1994, SKB has studied several methodologies to systematize and visualize all the features, events and processes (FEPs) that can influence a repository for radioactive waste in the future. All the work performed is based on the terminology and basic findings in the joint SKI/SKB work on scenario development presented in the SKB Technical Report 89-35. The methodologies studied are a) Event tree analysis, b) Influence diagrams and c) Rock Engineering Systems (RES) matrices. Each one of the methodologies is explained in this report as well as examples of applications. One chapter is devoted to a comparison between the two most promising methodologies, namely: Influence diagrams and the RES methodology. In conclusion a combination of parts of the Influence diagram and the RES methodology is likely to be a promising approach. 26 refs

  11. Reliability Centered Maintenance - Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammerer, Catherine C.

    2009-01-01

    Journal article about Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) methodologies used by United Space Alliance, LLC (USA) in support of the Space Shuttle Program at Kennedy Space Center. The USA Reliability Centered Maintenance program differs from traditional RCM programs because various methodologies are utilized to take advantage of their respective strengths for each application. Based on operational experience, USA has customized the traditional RCM methodology into a streamlined lean logic path and has implemented the use of statistical tools to drive the process. USA RCM has integrated many of the L6S tools into both RCM methodologies. The tools utilized in the Measure, Analyze, and Improve phases of a Lean Six Sigma project lend themselves to application in the RCM process. All USA RCM methodologies meet the requirements defined in SAE JA 1011, Evaluation Criteria for Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM) Processes. The proposed article explores these methodologies.

  12. Mineralogical characterization of beach sand minerals: traditional and modern approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurthy, P.

    2016-01-01

    Precise identification of beach sand minerals is an essential prerequisite for the reserve estimation of a given deposit and also in the subsequent evaluation of the process flow sheet for its optimal recovery. Traditional methods that are used for the identification of the beach sand minerals such as magnetite, hematite, ilmenite, rutile, anatase, zircon, garnet, sillimanite, monazite, quartz and others include heavy liquid separation (bromoform and methylene iodide) and studying the optical properties of the grains from different fractions so as to identify the specific phases in a sample. Grain counting of specific minerals from a given sievefraction under a petrological microscope to estimate the mode and their subsequent conversion in to weight percent fractions forms the critical second stage that is followed by the reserve estimates. These methodologies are tedious and time consuming often involving a few days for a single sample. The paper introduces the numerous instrumental methods (XRF, XRD - Rietveld and CCSEM) of mineral speciation and their qualification in with case studies from the west coast deposits in India

  13. Design methodology of Dutch banknotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heij, Hans A. M.

    2000-04-01

    Since the introduction of a design methodology for Dutch banknotes, the quality of Dutch paper currency has improved in more than one way. The methodology is question provides for (i) a design policy, which helps fix clear objectives; (ii) design management, to ensure a smooth cooperation between the graphic designer, printer, papermaker an central bank, (iii) a program of requirements, a banknote development guideline for all parties involved. This systematic approach enables an objective selection of design proposals, including security features. Furthermore, the project manager obtains regular feedback from the public by conducting market surveys. Each new design of a Netherlands Guilder banknote issued by the Nederlandsche Bank of the past 50 years has been an improvement on its predecessor in terms of value recognition, security and durability.

  14. Synthesis, Properties and Mineralogy of Important Inorganic Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Warner, Terence E

    2010-01-01

    Intended as a textbook for courses involving preparative solid-state chemistry, this book offers clear and detailed descriptions on how to prepare a selection of inorganic materials that exhibit important optical, magnetic and electrical properties, on a laboratory scale. The text covers a wide range of preparative methods and can be read as separate, independent chapters or as a unified coherent body of work. Discussions of various chemical systems reveal how the properties of a material can often be influenced by modifications to the preparative procedure, and vice versa. References to miner

  15. Relationship between soil oxidizable carbon and physical, chemical and mineralogical properties of umbric ferralsols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Adriano Marques

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of Umbric Ferralsols with thick umbric epipedons (> 100 cm thickness in humid Tropical and Subtropical areas is a paradox since the processes of organic matter decomposition in these environments are very efficient. Nevertheless, this soil type has been reported in areas in the Southeast and South of Brazil, and at some places in the Northeast. Aspects of the genesis and paleoenvironmental significance of these Ferralsols still need a better understanding. The processes that made the umbric horizons so thick and dark and contributed to the preservation of organic carbon (OC at considerable depths in these soils are of special interest. In this study, eight Ferralsols with a thick umbric horizon (UF under different vegetation types were sampled (tropical rain forest, tropical seasonal forest and savanna woodland and their macromorphological, physical, chemical and mineralogical properties studied to detect soil characteristics that could explain the preservation of high carbon amounts at considerable depths. The studied UF are clayey to very clayey, strongly acidic, dystrophic, and Al-saturated and charcoal fragments are often scattered in the soil matrix. Kaolinites are the main clay minerals in the A and B horizons, followed by abundant gibbsite and hydroxyl-interlayered vermiculite. The latter was only found in UFs derived from basalt rock in the South of the country. Total carbon (TC ranged from 5 to 101 g kg-1 in the umbric epipedon. Dichromate-oxidizable organic carbon represented nearly 75 % of TC in the thick A horizons, while non-oxidizable C, which includes recalcitrant C (e.g., charcoal, contributed to the remaining 25 % of TC. Carbon contents were not related to most of the inorganic soil variables studied, except for oxalate-extractable Al, which individually explained 69 % (P < 0.001 of the variability of TC in the umbric epipedon. Clay content was not suited as predictor of TC or of the other studied C forms. Bulk

  16. Introduction to LCA Methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauschild, Michael Z.

    2018-01-01

    In order to offer the reader an overview of the LCA methodology in the preparation of the more detailed description of its different phases, a brief introduction is given to the methodological framework according to the ISO 14040 standard and the main elements of each of its phases. Emphasis...

  17. Methodologies, languages and tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amako, Katsuya

    1994-01-01

    This is a summary of the open-quotes Methodologies, Languages and Toolsclose quotes session in the CHEP'94 conference. All the contributions to methodologies and languages are relevant to the object-oriented approach. Other topics presented are related to various software tools in the down-sized computing environment

  18. Archetype modeling methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moner, David; Maldonado, José Alberto; Robles, Montserrat

    2018-03-01

    Clinical Information Models (CIMs) expressed as archetypes play an essential role in the design and development of current Electronic Health Record (EHR) information structures. Although there exist many experiences about using archetypes in the literature, a comprehensive and formal methodology for archetype modeling does not exist. Having a modeling methodology is essential to develop quality archetypes, in order to guide the development of EHR systems and to allow the semantic interoperability of health data. In this work, an archetype modeling methodology is proposed. This paper describes its phases, the inputs and outputs of each phase, and the involved participants and tools. It also includes the description of the possible strategies to organize the modeling process. The proposed methodology is inspired by existing best practices of CIMs, software and ontology development. The methodology has been applied and evaluated in regional and national EHR projects. The application of the methodology provided useful feedback and improvements, and confirmed its advantages. The conclusion of this work is that having a formal methodology for archetype development facilitates the definition and adoption of interoperable archetypes, improves their quality, and facilitates their reuse among different information systems and EHR projects. Moreover, the proposed methodology can be also a reference for CIMs development using any other formalism. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Menopause and Methodological Doubt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Sheila

    2005-01-01

    Menopause and methodological doubt begins by making a tongue-in-cheek comparison between Descartes' methodological doubt and the self-doubt that can arise around menopause. A hermeneutic approach is taken in which Cartesian dualism and its implications for the way women are viewed in society are examined, both through the experiences of women…

  20. VEM: Virtual Enterprise Methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tølle, Martin; Vesterager, Johan

    2003-01-01

    This chapter presents a virtual enterprise methodology (VEM) that outlines activities to consider when setting up and managing virtual enterprises (VEs). As a methodology the VEM helps companies to ask the right questions when preparing for and setting up an enterprise network, which works...

  1. Data Centric Development Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Fadi E.

    2012-01-01

    Data centric applications, an important effort of software development in large organizations, have been mostly adopting a software methodology, such as a waterfall or Rational Unified Process, as the framework for its development. These methodologies could work on structural, procedural, or object oriented based applications, but fails to capture…

  2. The Methodology of Magpies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Arts/Humanities researchers frequently do not explain methodology overtly; instead, they "perform" it through their use of language, textual and historic cross-reference, and theory. Here, methodologies from literary studies are shown to add to Higher Education (HE) an exegetical and critically pluralist approach. This includes…

  3. MINERALOGY OF HALLOYSITES AND THEIR INTERACTION WITH PORPHYRINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vašutová V.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Samples representing two modifications of halloysites, dehydrated (7 Å and hydrated (10 Å forms, respectively, were examined with the aim to select suitable candidates for to be used as carriers of porphyrine photoactive molecules. The samples were analysed by powder X-ray diffraction (pXRD, infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM. Chemical composition was also determined. For the determination of cationic exchange capacity (CEC the silver thiourea method (AgTU was used. Silver cations concentrations in the solution before and after the interaction were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS. By the interaction of two pure hydrated halloysites with porphyrine it was found that porphyrine does not intercalate the interlayer space, but it is adsorbed on the outer surface of halloysite. This interaction changed the colour of clay sample from white to green. The changes were also clearly visible on diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS.

  4. Mineralogical study on agricultural soils using mossbauer spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceron L, M.L.; Fabian S, J.; Bravo C, J.

    1999-01-01

    Iron (Fe) compounds are very common in nature. In the case of soils, they occur in the form of Fe sesquioxides, such as oxides, hydroxides and oxyhydroxides, as well as substitution cations in clay minerals. These minerals occur in crystalline and amorphous states. The isotopic selective nature of mossbauer spectroscopy (nuclear gamma resonance) allows the indentification of minerals containing Fe even when they are present in low concentrations and in amorphous state. In this work we report the preliminary results of a current study of soil samples collected from the area of Chinchero, Cusco. The experimental data were obtained by mossbauer spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction; these data were complemented with data reported by other workers. Standard procedures were used for sample preparation and the mossbauer spectra were taken at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures

  5. Chemical, mineralogical and ceramic properties of clays from Northern Santa Catarina, Brazil; Caracterizaco fisico-quimica de argilas da regiao norte de Santa Catarina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correia, S L; Bloot, E L; Folgueras, M.V., E-mail: sivaldo@joinville.udesc.b [Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina (UDESC/CCT), Joinville, SC (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Tecnologicas; Hotza, D [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC/EQA), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica

    2009-07-01

    Clay materials crop out in the northern Santa Catarina mining district were investigated in order to assess their potential in the ceramic industry. Four different clays (A, B, C and D) were selected. Their chemical composition was obtained by Xray fluorescence and their mineralogy by X-ray diffraction, coupled with numerical rational analysis. Their thermal behaviour was studied by differential thermal analysis. Technological testing consisted in a simulation of the industrial processing performed at a laboratory scale. The test pieces were obtained by pressing and fired in the range of 850-1200 deg C. In each case their technological properties were studied. The main mineralogical phases detected were kaolinite, quartz and mica. Hematite and feldspars may be present in the clays. The clays show two groups of particle sizes almost equally frequent in the range of 1 to 60 {mu}m. The northern Santa Catarina clays are suitable for the production of bricks and earthenware in the 900- 1100 deg C range. (author)

  6. Comparison of the mineralogy of the Boss-Bixby, Missouri copper-iron deposit, and the Olympic Dam copper-uranium-gold deposit, South Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandom, R.T.; Hagni, R.D.; Allen, C.R.

    1985-01-01

    An ore microscopic examination of 80 polished sections prepared from selected drill core specimens from the Boss-Bixby, Missouri copper-iron deposit has shown that its mineral assemblage is similar to that of the Olympic Dam (Roxby Downs) copper-uranium-gold deposit in South Australia. A comparison with the mineralogy reported for Olympic Dam shows that both deposits contain: 1) the principal minerals, magnetite, hematite, chalcopyrite, and bornite, 2) the cobalt-bearing phases, carrollite and cobaltian pyrite, 3) the titanium oxides, rutile and anatase, 4) smaller amounts of martite, covellite, and electrum, 5) fluorite and carbonates, and 6) some alteration minerals. The deposits also are similar with regard to the sequence of mineral deposition: 1) early oxides, 2) then sulfide minerals, and 3) a final oxide generation. The deposits, however, are dissimilar with regard to their host rock lithologies and structural settings. The Boss-Bixby ores occupy breccia zones within a hydrothermally altered basic intrusive and intruded silicic volcanics, whereas the Olympic Dam ores are contained in sedimentary breccias in a graben or trough. Also, some minerals have been found thus far to occur at only one of the deposits. The similarity of mineralogy in these deposits suggests that they were formed from ore fluids that had some similarities in character and that the St. Francois terrane of Missouri is an important region for further exploration for deposits with this mineral assemblage

  7. An integrated view of the chemistry and mineralogy of martian soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, A. S.; Gellert, Ralf; Schroder, C.; Morris, R.V.; Bell, J.F.; Knudson, A.T.; Clark, B. C.; Ming, D. W.; Crisp, J.A.; Arvidson, R. E.; Blaney, D.; Brückner, J.; Christensen, P.R.; DesMarais, D.J.; De Souza, P.A.; Economou, T.E.; Ghosh, A.; Hahn, B.C.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Haskin, L.A.; Hurowitz, J.A.; Joliff, B.L.; Johnson, J. R.; Klingelhofer, G.; Madsen, M.B.; McLennan, S.M.; McSween, H.Y.; Richter, L.; Rieder, R.; Rodionov, D.; Soderblom, L.; Squyres, S. W.; Tosca, N.J.; Wang, A.; Wyatt, M.; Zipfel, J.

    2005-01-01

    The mineralogical and elemental compositions of the martian soil are indicators of chemical and physical weathering processes. Using data from the Mars Exploration Rovers, we show that bright dust deposits on opposite sides of the planet are part of a global unit and not dominated by the composition of local rocks. Dark soil deposits at both sites have similar basaltic mineralogies, and could reflect either a global component or the general similarity in the compositions of the rocks from which they were derived. Increased levels of bromine are consistent with mobilization of soluble salts by thin films of liquid water, but the presence of olivine in analysed soil samples indicates that the extent of aqueous alteration of soils has been limited. Nickel abundances are enhanced at the immediate surface and indicate that the upper few millimetres of soil could contain up to one per cent meteoritic material.

  8. X-ray Diffraction Results from Mars Science Laboratory: Mineralogy of Rocknest at Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bish, D. L.; Blake, D. F.; Vaniman, D. T.; Chipera, S. J.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Treiman, A. H.; Sarrazin, P.; Morrison, S. M.; Downs, R. T.; Achilles, C. N.; Yen, A. S.; Bristow, T. F.; Crisp, J. A.; Morookian, J. M.; Farmer, J. D.; Rampe, E. B.; Stolper, E. M.; Spanovich, N.; Achilles, Cherie; Agard, Christophe; Verdasca, José Alexandre Alves; Anderson, Robert; Anderson, Ryan; Archer, Doug; Armiens-Aparicio, Carlos; Arvidson, Ray; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Atreya, Sushil; Aubrey, Andrew; Baker, Burt; Baker, Michael; Balic-Zunic, Tonci; Baratoux, David; Baroukh, Julien; Barraclough, Bruce; Bean, Keri; Beegle, Luther; Behar, Alberto; Bell, James; Bender, Steve; Benna, Mehdi; Bentz, Jennifer; Berger, Gilles; Berger, Jeff; Berman, Daniel; Bish, David; Blake, David F.; Avalos, Juan J. Blanco; Blaney, Diana; Blank, Jen; Blau, Hannah; Bleacher, Lora; Boehm, Eckart; Botta, Oliver; Böttcher, Stephan; Boucher, Thomas; Bower, Hannah; Boyd, Nick; Boynton, Bill; Breves, Elly; Bridges, John; Bridges, Nathan; Brinckerhoff, William; Brinza, David; Bristow, Thomas; Brunet, Claude; Brunner, Anna; Brunner, Will; Buch, Arnaud; Bullock, Mark; Burmeister, Sönke; Cabane, Michel; Calef, Fred; Cameron, James; Campbell, John "Iain"; Cantor, Bruce; Caplinger, Michael; Rodríguez, Javier Caride; Carmosino, Marco; Blázquez, Isaías Carrasco; Charpentier, Antoine; Chipera, Steve; Choi, David; Clark, Benton; Clegg, Sam; Cleghorn, Timothy; Cloutis, Ed; Cody, George; Coll, Patrice; Conrad, Pamela; Coscia, David; Cousin, Agnès; Cremers, David; Crisp, Joy; Cros, Alain; Cucinotta, Frank; d'Uston, Claude; Davis, Scott; Day, Mackenzie "Kenzie"; Juarez, Manuel de la Torre; DeFlores, Lauren; DeLapp, Dorothea; DeMarines, Julia; DesMarais, David; Dietrich, William; Dingler, Robert; Donny, Christophe; Downs, Bob; Drake, Darrell; Dromart, Gilles; Dupont, Audrey; Duston, Brian; Dworkin, Jason; Dyar, M. Darby; Edgar, Lauren; Edgett, Kenneth; Edwards, Christopher; Edwards, Laurence; Ehlmann, Bethany; Ehresmann, Bent; Eigenbrode, Jen; Elliott, Beverley; Elliott, Harvey; Ewing, Ryan; Fabre, Cécile; Fairén, Alberto; Farley, Ken; Farmer, Jack; Fassett, Caleb; Favot, Laurent; Fay, Donald; Fedosov, Fedor; Feldman, Jason; Feldman, Sabrina; Fisk, Marty; Fitzgibbon, Mike; Flesch, Greg; Floyd, Melissa; Flückiger, Lorenzo; Forni, Olivier; Fraeman, Abby; Francis, Raymond; François, Pascaline; Franz, Heather; Freissinet, Caroline; French, Katherine Louise; Frydenvang, Jens; Gaboriaud, Alain; Gailhanou, Marc; Garvin, James; Gasnault, Olivier; Geffroy, Claude; Gellert, Ralf; Genzer, Maria; Glavin, Daniel; Godber, Austin; Goesmann, Fred; Goetz, Walter; Golovin, Dmitry; Gómez, Felipe Gómez; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Gondet, Brigitte; Gordon, Suzanne; Gorevan, Stephen; Grant, John; Griffes, Jennifer; Grinspoon, David; Grotzinger, John; Guillemot, Philippe; Guo, Jingnan; Gupta, Sanjeev; Guzewich, Scott; Haberle, Robert; Halleaux, Douglas; Hallet, Bernard; Hamilton, Vicky; Hardgrove, Craig; Harker, David; Harpold, Daniel; Harri, Ari-Matti; Harshman, Karl; Hassler, Donald; Haukka, Harri; Hayes, Alex; Herkenhoff, Ken; Herrera, Paul; Hettrich, Sebastian; Heydari, Ezat; Hipkin, Victoria; Hoehler, Tori; Hollingsworth, Jeff; Hudgins, Judy; Huntress, Wesley; Hurowitz, Joel; Hviid, Stubbe; Iagnemma, Karl; Indyk, Steve; Israël, Guy; Jackson, Ryan; Jacob, Samantha; Jakosky, Bruce; Jensen, Elsa; Jensen, Jaqueline Kløvgaard; Johnson, Jeffrey; Johnson, Micah; Johnstone, Steve; Jones, Andrea; Jones, John; Joseph, Jonathan; Jun, Insoo; Kah, Linda; Kahanpää, Henrik; Kahre, Melinda; Karpushkina, Natalya; Kasprzak, Wayne; Kauhanen, Janne; Keely, Leslie; Kemppinen, Osku; Keymeulen, Didier; Kim, Myung-Hee; Kinch, Kjartan; King, Penny; Kirkland, Laurel; Kocurek, Gary; Koefoed, Asmus; Köhler, Jan; Kortmann, Onno; Kozyrev, Alexander; Krezoski, Jill; Krysak, Daniel; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Lacour, Jean Luc; Lafaille, Vivian; Langevin, Yves; Lanza, Nina; Lasue, Jeremie; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Lee, Ella Mae; Lee, Qiu-Mei; Lees, David; Lefavor, Matthew; Lemmon, Mark; Malvitte, Alain Lepinette; Leshin, Laurie; Léveillé, Richard; Lewin-Carpintier, Éric; Lewis, Kevin; Li, Shuai; Lipkaman, Leslie; Little, Cynthia; Litvak, Maxim; Lorigny, Eric; Lugmair, Guenter; Lundberg, Angela; Lyness, Eric; Madsen, Morten; Mahaffy, Paul; Maki, Justin; Malakhov, Alexey; Malespin, Charles; Malin, Michael; Mangold, Nicolas; Manhes, Gérard; Manning, Heidi; Marchand, Geneviève; Jiménez, Mercedes Marín; García, César Martín; Martin, Dave; Martin, Mildred; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Martín-Soler, Javier; Martín-Torres, F. Javier; Mauchien, Patrick; Maurice, Sylvestre; McAdam, Amy; McCartney, Elaina; McConnochie, Timothy; McCullough, Emily; McEwan, Ian; McKay, Christopher; McLennan, Scott; McNair, Sean; Melikechi, Noureddine; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Meyer, Michael; Mezzacappa, Alissa; Miller, Hayden; Miller, Kristen; Milliken, Ralph; Ming, Douglas; Minitti, Michelle; Mischna, Michael; Mitrofanov, Igor; Moersch, Jeff; Mokrousov, Maxim; Jurado, Antonio Molina; Moores, John; Mora-Sotomayor, Luis; Morookian, John Michael; Morris, Richard; Morrison, Shaunna; Mueller-Mellin, Reinhold; Muller, Jan-Peter; Caro, Guillermo Muñoz; Nachon, Marion; López, Sara Navarro; Navarro-González, Rafael; Nealson, Kenneth; Nefian, Ara; Nelson, Tony; Newcombe, Megan; Newman, Claire; Newsom, Horton; Nikiforov, Sergey; Niles, Paul; Nixon, Brian; Dobrea, Eldar Noe; Nolan, Thomas; Oehler, Dorothy; Ollila, Ann; Olson, Timothy; Owen, Tobias; Hernández, Miguel Ángel de Pablo; Paillet, Alexis; Pallier, Etienne; Palucis, Marisa; Parker, Timothy; Parot, Yann; Patel, Kiran; Paton, Mark; Paulsen, Gale; Pavlov, Alex; Pavri, Betina; Peinado-González, Verónica; Pepin, Robert; Peret, Laurent; Perez, Rene; Perrett, Glynis; Peterson, Joe; Pilorget, Cedric; Pinet, Patrick; Pla-García, Jorge; Plante, Ianik; Poitrasson, Franck; Polkko, Jouni; Popa, Radu; Posiolova, Liliya; Posner, Arik; Pradler, Irina; Prats, Benito; Prokhorov, Vasily; Purdy, Sharon Wilson; Raaen, Eric; Radziemski, Leon; Rafkin, Scot; Ramos, Miguel; Rampe, Elizabeth; Raulin, François; Ravine, Michael; Reitz, Günther; Rennó, Nilton; Rice, Melissa; Richardson, Mark; Robert, François; Robertson, Kevin; Manfredi, José Antonio Rodriguez; Romeral-Planelló, Julio J.; Rowland, Scott; Rubin, David; Saccoccio, Muriel; Salamon, Andrew; Sandoval, Jennifer; Sanin, Anton; Fuentes, Sara Alejandra Sans; Saper, Lee; Sarrazin, Philippe; Sautter, Violaine; Savijärvi, Hannu; Schieber, Juergen; Schmidt, Mariek; Schmidt, Walter; Scholes, Daniel "Dan"; Schoppers, Marcel; Schröder, Susanne; Schwenzer, Susanne; Martinez, Eduardo Sebastian; Sengstacken, Aaron; Shterts, Ruslan; Siebach, Kirsten; Siili, Tero; Simmonds, Jeff; Sirven, Jean-Baptiste; Slavney, Susie; Sletten, Ronald; Smith, Michael; Sánchez, Pablo Sobrón; Spanovich, Nicole; Spray, John; Squyres, Steven; Stack, Katie; Stalport, Fabien; Steele, Andrew; Stein, Thomas; Stern, Jennifer; Stewart, Noel; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane; Stoiber, Kevin; Stolper, Ed; Sucharski, Bob; Sullivan, Rob; Summons, Roger; Sumner, Dawn; Sun, Vivian; Supulver, Kimberley; Sutter, Brad; Szopa, Cyril; Tan, Florence; Tate, Christopher; Teinturier, Samuel; ten Kate, Inge; Thomas, Peter; Thompson, Lucy; Tokar, Robert; Toplis, Mike; Redondo, Josefina Torres; Trainer, Melissa; Treiman, Allan; Tretyakov, Vladislav; Urqui-O'Callaghan, Roser; Van Beek, Jason; Van Beek, Tessa; VanBommel, Scott; Vaniman, David; Varenikov, Alexey; Vasavada, Ashwin; Vasconcelos, Paulo; Vicenzi, Edward; Vostrukhin, Andrey; Voytek, Mary; Wadhwa, Meenakshi; Ward, Jennifer; Webster, Chris; Weigle, Eddie; Wellington, Danika; Westall, Frances; Wiens, Roger Craig; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Williams, Amy; Williams, Joshua; Williams, Rebecca; Williams, Richard B. "Mouser"; Wilson, Mike; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Wolff, Mike; Wong, Mike; Wray, James; Wu, Megan; Yana, Charles; Yen, Albert; Yingst, Aileen; Zeitlin, Cary; Zimdar, Robert; Mier, María-Paz Zorzano

    2013-09-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity scooped samples of soil from the Rocknest aeolian bedform in Gale crater. Analysis of the soil with the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) x-ray diffraction (XRD) instrument revealed plagioclase (~An57), forsteritic olivine (~Fo62), augite, and pigeonite, with minor K-feldspar, magnetite, quartz, anhydrite, hematite, and ilmenite. The minor phases are present at, or near, detection limits. The soil also contains 27 ± 14 weight percent x-ray amorphous material, likely containing multiple Fe3+- and volatile-bearing phases, including possibly a substance resembling hisingerite. The crystalline component is similar to the normative mineralogy of certain basaltic rocks from Gusev crater on Mars and of martian basaltic meteorites. The amorphous component is similar to that found on Earth in places such as soils on the Mauna Kea volcano, Hawaii.

  9. Mechanical properties of cohesive soils in dependence on the water quantity and mineralogical composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludvik Trauner

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available This article explains the relationships between the water content, mineralogical properties and mechanical properties of saturated clays. The findings are based on theoretical analysis and were confirmed experimentally on monomineral clay samples. It was foundthat the quantity of intergrain water, which determines the undrained shear strength and compressibility of clays, consists of free pore water, and the firmly adsorbed water on the external surfaces of the clay grains. The free water quantity is the same for differentsaturated clays, at the same undrained shear strength, and same effective stress after consolidation and, likewise, the thickness of the water film around the clay grains. The total quantity of firmly adsorbed water depends on the specific surfaces of the clays. Theresult of this work is a new analytical formulation that gives the relationship between the water content and the mechanical properties of clays, taking into account their mineralogical characteristics.

  10. Expected Geochemical and Mineralogical Properties of Meteorites from Mercury: Inferences from Messenger Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCubbin, F. M.; McCoy, T. J.

    2016-01-01

    Meteorites from the Moon, Mars, and many types of asteroid bodies have been identified among our global inventory of meteorites, however samples of Mercury and Venus have not been identified. The absence of mercurian and venusian meteorites could be attributed to an inability to recognize them in our collections due to a paucity of geochemical information for Venus and Mercury. In the case of mercurian meteorites, this possibility is further supported by dynamical calculations that suggest mercurian meteorites should be present on Earth at a factor of 2-3 less than meteorites from Mars [1]. In the present study, we focus on the putative mineralogy of mercurian meteorites using data obtained from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, which has provided us with our first quantitative constraints on the geochemistry of planet Mercury. We have used the MESSENGER data to compile a list of mineralogical and geochemical characteristics that a meteorite from Mercury is likely to exhibit.

  11. Thermal and mineralogical characterization of drill cuttings from north capixaba: initial studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fialho, P.F.; Goncalves, G. dos R.; Calmon, J.L.; Tristao, F.A.; Nunes, E.; Cunha, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    The drilling of oil wells generates various wastes among which are the cuttings and drilling fluids. The management of these wastes have been a problem for the oil and gas industry because of the amount generated and its contaminants, which can be organic and inorganic. This paper presents initial studies of thermal and mineralogical characterization of the drill cuttings from oil wells and gas in Southeast Brazilian, state of Espirito Santo with aim of reuse them as raw material in building materials. Characterizations were performed physical, thermal and mineralogical by particle size distribution, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. The results indicate that there are potential replacements of natural raw materials or drill cuttings in the production of building materials. (author)

  12. Mineralogical characterization of quarry fines from Tracuateua city, state of Para, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, J.H.B. da; Negrao, R.C.; Angelica, R.S.; Universidade Federal do Para

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the mineralogy quarry fines samples for its reuse and thus contributing to mitigate the environmental impact caused by this waste. In order to achieve the results, samples were collected and prepared for assays and identification of the mineralogical phases present in the quarry fines from the samples. X-ray diffraction and optical microscopy techniques were used. The quarry of fines characterization was based on qualitatively identification the minerals present in the samples. It was detected the presence of quartz, muscovite and feldspar (albite and microclinite) by x-ray diffraction technique and microscopic and macroscopic observations. Moreover, the size distribution was determined, and the samples presented a medium to fine size (ranging from 9,5 mm to 0,075 mm) and the grains presented an irregular and angular shapes. (author)

  13. Mineralogical test as a preliminary step for metallurgical proses of Kalan ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Affandi, K.

    1998-01-01

    Mineralogical tests as a preliminary step for hydrometallurgy of Kalan ores, including Eko Remaja and Rirang have been carried out to identify the elements and minerals content which affect the metallurgical process, especially the leaching and purification of uranium. Mineralogical tests have been done by means of radioactive and radioluxugraph tests to identify radioactive minerals; thin specimen analysis, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to identify elements and morphology, EPMA to analyse qualitatively the elements, X-ray Diffractometer (XRD) to identify of minerals content; and X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) and chemical analyses to determine total elements qualitatively and quantitatively. The experimental results show that the Eko Remaja ores contain uraninite and brannerite, iron and titan oxides, sulfides, phosphates and silicates minerals, while the Rirang ores contain uraninite, monazite and molybdenite

  14. Confidence Hills Mineralogy and Chemin Results from Base of Mt. Sharp, Pahrump Hills, Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, P. D.; Bish, D. L.; Blake, D. F.; Vaniman, D. T.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Rampe, E. B.; Achilles, C. N.; Chipera, S. J.; Treiman, A. H.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity recently completed its fourth drill sampling of sediments on Mars. The Confidence Hills (CH) sample was drilled from a rock located in the Pahrump Hills region at the base of Mt. Sharp in Gale Crater. The CheMin X-ray diffractometer completed five nights of analysis on the sample, more than previously executed for a drill sample, and the data have been analyzed using Rietveld refinement and full-pattern fitting to determine quantitative mineralogy. Confidence Hills mineralogy has several important characteristics: 1) abundant hematite and lesser magnetite; 2) a 10 angstrom phyllosilicate; 3) multiple feldspars including plagioclase and alkali feldspar; 4) mafic silicates including forsterite, orthopyroxene, and two types of clinopyroxene (Ca-rich and Ca-poor), consistent with a basaltic source; and 5) minor contributions from sulfur-bearing species including jarosite.

  15. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy in Mineralogy: A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottana, Annibale

    2003-01-01

    The number of mineral species known to date rapidly approaches 4000, and yet they represent but a small fraction of all the known inorganic and organic compounds. Nevertheless, minerals represent an ideal field of activity for X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), because the investigation of their crystal-chemical peculiarities takes an enormous advantage of the property of this method of being atom-selective, even in the presence of a wide range of competing atoms located in similar structural environments. As a matter of fact, XAS on minerals proved to be a useful probing method as early as for W. Kossel's pioneer studies of in the 1930's, just after the fine structures occurring at and near the absorption edge had been first detected. However, XAS did not really become consolidated in mineral studies until the 1980's, when synchrotron sources became available to users. A concise, but complete review of the historical and recent applications of XAS to minerals and to their analogues synthesized for geological/geophysical purposes i.e., to better understand the mechanisms by which the Earth evolves, is here given. Special reference will be made to transition metals (Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni) which absorb in the hard X-ray spectral region (> 4 KeV) and to the geologically-significant elements (O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S and K) which absorb in the soft X-ray region (500-4000 eV)

  16. Methodology for ranking restoration options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedemann Jensen, Per

    1999-04-01

    The work described in this report has been performed as a part of the RESTRAT Project FI4P-CT95-0021a (PL 950128) co-funded by the Nuclear Fission Safety Programme of the European Commission. The RESTRAT project has the overall objective of developing generic methodologies for ranking restoration techniques as a function of contamination and site characteristics. The project includes analyses of existing remediation methodologies and contaminated sites, and is structured in the following steps: characterisation of relevant contaminated sites; identification and characterisation of relevant restoration techniques; assessment of the radiological impact; development and application of a selection methodology for restoration options; formulation of generic conclusions and development of a manual. The project is intended to apply to situations in which sites with nuclear installations have been contaminated with radioactive materials as a result of the operation of these installations. The areas considered for remedial measures include contaminated land areas, rivers and sediments in rivers, lakes, and sea areas. Five contaminated European sites have been studied. Various remedial measures have been envisaged with respect to the optimisation of the protection of the populations being exposed to the radionuclides at the sites. Cost-benefit analysis and multi-attribute utility analysis have been applied for optimisation. Health, economic and social attributes have been included and weighting factors for the different attributes have been determined by the use of scaling constants. (au)

  17. Mineralogical characterization of the argillaceous material from the Municipality of Santa Barbara, Para, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrando, E.A.; Sheller, T.; Angelica, R.S.; Neves, R.S.

    2009-01-01

    In the present work were investigated mineralogical phases in a material with argillaceous characteristic of the region of Genipauba, Santa Barbara, State of Para. Characterization of the collected sample was performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermogravimetric analysis (TG) and infrared spectroscopy (IR). The results of the assays indicate the presence of the clay minerals like kaolinite and muscovite, as well as minerals as quartz and anatase. (author)

  18. Mineralogy of Fluvio-Lacustrine Sediments Investigated by Curiosity During the Prime Mission: Implications for Diagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampe, Elizabeth B.; Morris, R. V.; Bish, D. L.; Vaniman, D. T.; Bristow, T. F.; Chipera, S. J.; Blake, D. F.; Ming, D. W.; Farmer, J. D.; Morrison, S. M.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity investigated sedimentary rocks that were deposited in a diversity of fluvio-lacustrine settings. The entire science payload was employed to characterize the mineralogy and chemistry of the Sheepbed mudstone at Yellowknife Bay and the Windjana sandstone at the Kimberley. Data from the CheMin instrument, a transmission Xray diffractometer, were used to determine the quantitative mineralogy of both samples. The Sheepbed mudstone contains detrital basaltic minerals, calcium sulfates, iron oxides or hydroxides, iron sulfides, trioctahedral smectite, and amorphous material. The mineral assemblage and chemical data from APXS suggest that the trioctahedral smectite and magnetite formed authigenically as a result of alteration of olivine. The apparent lack of higher-grade phyllosilicates (e.g., illite and chlorite) and the presence of anhydrite indicate diagenesis at 50- 80 ºC. The mineralogy of the Windjana sandstone is different than the Sheepbed mudstone. Windjana contains significant abundances of K-feldspar, low- and high-Ca pyroxenes, magnetite, phyllosilicates, and amorphous material. At least two distinct phyllosilicate phases exist: a 10 Å phase and a component that is expanded with a peak at 11.8 Å. The identity of the expanded phase is currently unknown, but could be a smectite with interlayer H2O, and the 10 Å phase could be illite or collapsed smectite. Further work is necessary to characterize the phyllosilicates, but the presence of illite could suggest that Windjana experienced burial diagenesis. Candidates for the cementing agents include fine-grained phyllosilicates, Fe-oxides, and/or amorphous material. Interpretations of CheMin data from the Windjana sandstone are ongoing at the time of writing, but we will present an estimate of the composition of the amorphous material from mass balance calculations using the APXS bulk chemistry and quantitative mineralogy from CheMin.

  19. A Mineralogical Assessment on Residues after Acidic Leaching of Bauxite Residue (Red Mud) for Titanium Recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Gözde Alkan; Claudia Schier; Lars Gronen; Srecko Stopic; Bernd Friedrich

    2017-01-01

    Due to its alkalinity, red mud produced by the Bayer process may affect both the environment and human health. For this reason, its further utilization instead of disposal is of great importance. Numerous methods have already been studied for hydrometallurgical treatment of red mud, especially for the recovery of various metallic components such as iron, aluminum, titanium or rare earth elements. This study focuses on the extraction of titanium from red mud and in particular the mineralogical...

  20. Study of bismuth minerals belonging to the mineralogical collection from the National Museum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baptista, A.; Baptista, N.R.

    1991-09-01

    With the purpose of searching the presence of Tellurium minerals in the Ouro Preto-Mariana country, Minas Gerais State, and considering the existence of a great number of minerals in which this element come across allied with Bismuth, samples of the mineralogical collection of the Museu Nacional, proceeding that region and classified as Bismuth minerals were studied by X-ray fluorescence analysis and diffractometric analysis. In this report the results of this research are presented. (Author)

  1. Using mineralogy as a guide to understanding slagging: a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creelman, R.A. [R.A. Creelman & Associates (Australia)

    1994-12-31

    This paper details the mineralogy that accompanied the Callide B Power station slagging investigations. Investigations were made of coal mineral matter, particles collected from the furnace, flyash and the slag deposits. Objectives were to characterise the particles formed from burning Callide coal, to relate them to the slag deposits and flyash, and by applying thermodynamics gain an understanding of the underlying mechanisms that lead to attachment and accumulation of particles in the furnace. 9 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. Mineralogical impact on long-term patterns of soil nitrogen and phosphorus enzyme activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikutta, Robert; Turner, Stephanie; Meyer-Stüve, Sandra; Guggenberger, Georg; Dohrmann, Reiner; Schippers, Axel

    2014-05-01

    Soil chronosequences provide a unique opportunity to study microbial activity over time in mineralogical diverse soils of different ages. The main objective of this study was to test the effect of mineralogical properties, nutrient and organic matter availability over whole soil pro-files on the abundance and activity of the microbial communities. We focused on microbio-logical processes involved in nitrogen and phosphorus cycling at the 120,000-year Franz Josef soil chronosequence. Microbial abundances (microbial biomass and total cell counts) and enzyme activities (protease, urease, aminopeptidase, and phosphatase) were determined and related to nutrient contents and mineralogical soil properties. Both, microbial abundances and enzyme activities decreased with soil depth at all sites. In the organic layers, microbial biomass and the activities of N-hydrolyzing enzymes showed their maximum at the intermediate-aged sites, corresponding to a high aboveground biomass. In contrast, the phosphatase activity increased with site age. The activities of N-hydrolyzing enzymes were positively correlated with total carbon and nitrogen contents, whereas the phosphatase activity was negatively correlated with the phosphorus content. In the mineral soil, the enzyme activities were generally low, thus reflecting the presence of strongly sorbing minerals. Sub-strate-normalized enzyme activities correlated negatively to clay content as well as poorly crystalline Al and Fe oxyhydroxides, supporting the view that the evolution of reactive sec-ondary mineral phases alters the activity of the microbial communities by constraining sub-strate availability. Our data suggest a strong mineralogical influence on nutrient cycling par-ticularly in subsoil environments.

  3. Qualitative mineralogical characterization of the sinter by X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greca, M.C.; Pietroluongo, L.R.V.; Baliza, S.V.; Costa Pereira, E.A. da

    1987-01-01

    This paper aims the qualitative mineralogical characterization of sinters and raw materials employed on its fabrication, via X-ray diffraction technique. Thus, sample with constant coke breeze content and variable contents of sand, limestone, dunite and dolomite were prepared to obtain current sinter compositions, with variable basicity. The tests were performed at the research of the following institutions: Companhia Siderurgica Nacional, Centro de Tecnologia Mineral and Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia. (author) [pt

  4. Mineralogical Study of Workable Material Coming from Mina Fe Ciudad Rodrigo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mingarro Martin, E.

    1962-01-01

    A mineralogical analysis is made to ascertain the effects of acid bleaching on normalized conditions. Uranium is mainly found under uranotile, pitchblende and autunite form with an average assay of 0.4 p. ct. The loss of uranium in tailings under current conditions of attach, mainly is due to pitchblende resistance, being practically no leachable, and to uranium absorption by hydrated iron oxides and colloidal ores. This last problem will be discussed in a next paper. (Author) 5 refs

  5. Mineralogy, Petrology, Chronology, and Exposure History of the Chelyabinsk Meteorite and Parent Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.; Abell, P.; Agresti, D.; Berger, E. L.; Burton, A. S.; Delaney, J. S.; Fries, M. D.; Gibson, E. K.; Harrington, R.; Herzog, G. F.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The Chelyabinsk meteorite fall on February 15, 2013 attracted much more attention worldwide than do most falls. A consortium led by JSC received 3 masses of Chelyabinsk (Chel-101, -102, -103) that were collected shortly after the fall and handled with care to minimize contamination. Initial studies were reported in 2013; we have studied these samples with a wide range of analytical techniques to better understand the mineralogy, petrology, chronology and exposure history of the Chelyabinsk parent body.

  6. Influence of the chemical, physical and mineralogical characteristics on the three latosoils compacting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Rafael Braganca Alves; Fontes, Luiz Eduardo Ferreira; Costa, Liovando Marciano da

    1997-01-01

    This work studies the behavior of three brazilian latosoils (Purple, Una and yellow latosoils) concerning to the tendency of compacting, by using the trail analysis for evaluation of the physical, chemical, mineralogical and other compacting estimation effects on this process. Two conditions of soil use were considered: intensive cultivation, with field evaluation which indicates the compacting and not worked area, with natural forest or old and abandoned reforesting

  7. Mineralogical Studies Related to Endemic Diseases in Rural P. R. China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkin, H. E.; Zheng, B.; Finkelman, R. B.

    2003-12-01

    Domestic combustion of coal for heating and cooking is mostly confined to the world's developing countries and probably involves about 1 billion persons in China, India, Indonesia, and Africa. Various endemic diseases affecting millions of people involving arsenic, selenium, and fluorine poisoning have been associated with domestic coal combustion in rural China. We have investigated the relationship between mineralized coals (and stone coals) and disease occurrences in Guizhou and Hubei Provinces. The mineralogy of the coals has been studied by a wide variety of techniques, including optical petrography, scanning electron microscopy, electron microprobe analysis, ion probe, Synchrotron XANES-EXAFS, and Raman spectroscopy. Arsenic enrichment (up to 3 weight percent) in Upper Permian Longtan Formation coals, southwestern Guizhou Province, occurs in both 3+ and 5+ valence states. Arsenic occurs in arsenopyrite, pyrite, Al-phosphate, scorodite, Fe-oxides, and as an organically-bound species. Fluorine poisoning, much more widespread than arsenic-poisoning, is related to burning F-rich coals and F-rich clays as admixtures. Mineralogical and chemical analysis suggests that the clays contain the fluorine probably substituting for the hydroxyl group. Localized selenium poisoning in Hubei Province is related to Se-rich stone coals. The selenium occurs as a native element and in rare mandarinoite. In these three cases, knowledge of the paragenesis and mineralogy of the element enrichment in coal was vital to help understand and mitigate the endemic diseases. For the situation concerning arsenic and selenium poisoning, suspect coals have been identified and mining from these deposits has been curtailed. Fluorine has been a much more difficult problem for the local public health officials as both the coal and clay in the burning admixture can contain high fluorine. Regional geochemical and mineralogical studies will help to define coal and clay with low fluorine, suitable for

  8. Iron mineralogy and uranium-binding environment in the rhizosphere of a wetland soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, Daniel I., E-mail: daniel.kaplan@srnl.doe.gov [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Kukkadapu, Ravi [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Seaman, John C. [Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, Aiken, SC 29802 (United States); Arey, Bruce W.; Dohnalkova, Alice C. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Buettner, Shea [Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, Aiken, SC 29802 (United States); Li, Dien [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Varga, Tamas [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Scheckel, Kirk G. [US Environmental Protection Agency, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH 45224 (United States); Jaffé, Peter R. [Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Wetlands mitigate the migration of groundwater contaminants through a series of biogeochemical gradients that enhance multiple contaminant-binding processes. The hypothesis of this study was that wetland plant roots contribute organic carbon and release O{sub 2} within the rhizosphere (plant-impact soil zone) that promote the formation of Fe(III)-(oxyhydr)oxides. In turn, these Fe(III)-(oxyhydr)oxides stabilize organic matter that together contribute to contaminant immobilization. Mineralogy and U binding environments of the rhizosphere were evaluated in samples collected from contaminated and non-contaminated areas of a wetland on the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Based on Mössbauer spectroscopy, rhizosphere soil was greatly enriched with nanogoethite, ferrihydrite-like nanoparticulates, and hematite, with negligible Fe(II) present. X-ray computed tomography and various microscopy techniques showed that root plaques were tens-of-microns thick and consisted of highly oriented Fe-nanoparticles, suggesting that the roots were involved in creating the biogeochemical conditions conducive to the nanoparticle formation. XAS showed that a majority of the U in the bulk wetland soil was in the + 6 oxidation state and was not well correlated spatially to Fe concentrations. SEM/EDS confirm that U was enriched on root plaques, where it was always found in association with P. Together these findings support our hypothesis and suggest that plants can alter mineralogical conditions that may be conducive to contaminant immobilization in wetlands. - Highlights: • Uranium concentrated in wetland environments • Hypothesized that plant roots change mineralogy and contaminant binding environment, promoting contaminant immobilization • Field study showed sharp dissolved U concentration profiles over the centimeter scale. • Spectroscopy identified unique mineralogy in rhizosphere compared to non-rhizosphere soil. • Uranium concentrated in root plaques in the + 6

  9. Mineralogical characteristics of the silica polymorphs in relation to their biological activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guthrie, G.D. Jr. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Heaney, P.J. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Geological and Geophysical Sciences

    1993-10-01

    Numerous aspects of minerals (including the silica polymorphs) can effect their biological activities. These include periodic structures, compositional variations, dissolution characteristics, surface properties, and particle size/shape. In order to understand mineral-induced pathogenesis in a mechanistic way, the links between these properties and biochemical processes must be elucidated. This paper presents some of the basic properties of the silica polymorphs that may relate to pathogenicity and mineralogical strategies for designing biological assays to evaluate these properties.

  10. Iron mineralogy and uranium-binding environment in the rhizosphere of a wetland soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, Daniel I.; Kukkadapu, Ravi; Seaman, John C.; Arey, Bruce W.; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Buettner, Shea; Li, Dien; Varga, Tamas; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Jaffé, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Wetlands mitigate the migration of groundwater contaminants through a series of biogeochemical gradients that enhance multiple contaminant-binding processes. The hypothesis of this study was that wetland plant roots contribute organic carbon and release O_2 within the rhizosphere (plant-impact soil zone) that promote the formation of Fe(III)-(oxyhydr)oxides. In turn, these Fe(III)-(oxyhydr)oxides stabilize organic matter that together contribute to contaminant immobilization. Mineralogy and U binding environments of the rhizosphere were evaluated in samples collected from contaminated and non-contaminated areas of a wetland on the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Based on Mössbauer spectroscopy, rhizosphere soil was greatly enriched with nanogoethite, ferrihydrite-like nanoparticulates, and hematite, with negligible Fe(II) present. X-ray computed tomography and various microscopy techniques showed that root plaques were tens-of-microns thick and consisted of highly oriented Fe-nanoparticles, suggesting that the roots were involved in creating the biogeochemical conditions conducive to the nanoparticle formation. XAS showed that a majority of the U in the bulk wetland soil was in the + 6 oxidation state and was not well correlated spatially to Fe concentrations. SEM/EDS confirm that U was enriched on root plaques, where it was always found in association with P. Together these findings support our hypothesis and suggest that plants can alter mineralogical conditions that may be conducive to contaminant immobilization in wetlands. - Highlights: • Uranium concentrated in wetland environments • Hypothesized that plant roots change mineralogy and contaminant binding environment, promoting contaminant immobilization • Field study showed sharp dissolved U concentration profiles over the centimeter scale. • Spectroscopy identified unique mineralogy in rhizosphere compared to non-rhizosphere soil. • Uranium concentrated in root plaques in the + 6 oxidation

  11. Test and Delivery of the Chemin Mineralogical Instrument for Mars Science Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, D. F.; Vaniman, D.; Anderson, R.; Bish, D.; Chipera, S.; Chemtob, S.; Crisp, J.; DesMarais, D. J.; Downs, R.; Feldman, S.; hide

    2010-01-01

    The CheMin mineralogical instrument on MSL will return quantitative powder X-ray diffraction data (XRD) and qualitative X-ray fluorescence data (XRF; 14

  12. Clay Mineralogy of AN Alluvial Aquifer in a Mountainous, Semiarid Terrain, AN Example from Rifle, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, W. C.; Lim, D.; Zaunbrecher, L. K.; Pickering, R. A.; Williams, K. H.; Navarre-Sitchler, A.; Long, P. E.; Noel, V.; Bargar, J.; Qafoku, N. P.

    2015-12-01

    Alluvial sediments deposited along the Colorado River corridor in the semi-arid regions of central to western Colorado can be important hosts for legacy contamination including U, V, As and Se. These alluvial sediments host aquifers which are thought to provide important "hot spots" and "hot moments" for microbiological activity controlling organic carbon processing and fluxes in the subsurface. Relatively little is known about the clay mineralogy of these alluvial aquifers and the parent alluvial sediments in spite of the fact that they commonly include lenses of silt-clay materials. These lenses are typically more reduced than coarser grained materials, but zones of reduced and more oxidized materials are present in these alluvial aquifer sediments. The clay mineralogy of the non-reduced parent alluvial sediments of the alluvial aquifer located in Rifle, CO (USA) is composed of chlorite, smectite, illite, kaolinite and quartz. The clay mineralogy of non-reduced fine-grained materials at Rifle are composed of the same suite of minerals found in the sediments plus a vermiculite-smectite intergrade that occurs near the bottom of the aquifer near the top of the Wasatch Formation. The clay mineral assemblages of the system reflect the mineralogically immature character of the source sediments. These assemblages are consistent with sediments and soils that formed in a moderately low rainfall climate and suggestive of minimal transport of the alluvial sediments from their source areas. Chlorite, smectite, smectite-vermiculite intergrade, and illite are the likely phases involved in the sorption of organic carbon and related microbial redox transformations of metals in these sediments. Both the occurrence and abundance of chlorite, smectite-vermiculite, illite and smectite can therefore exert an important control on the contaminant fluxes and are important determinants of biogeofacies in mountainous, semiarid terrains.

  13. Bulanık Analitik Hiyerarşi Süreci ile Uygun Altı Sigma Metodolojisinin Seçimi(The Selection of Appropriate Six Sigma Methodology by Using Fuzzy Analytical Hierarchy Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çiğdem SOFYALIOĞLU

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Six sigma is considered as a business strategy that depends on the continuous improvement approach that tries to eliminate the process variability and aims to decrease the scrap in business processes by using statistical tools and techniques. In this study, first the differences between Six Sigma Improvement Model and Design for Six Sigma will be given and then the proper methodology for the business in order to achieve its goals will be determined by using fuzzy AHP which is one of the multicriteria decision making techniques.

  14. Potential effects of ocean acidification on Alaskan corals based on calcium carbonate mineralogy composition analysis (NCEI Accession 0157223)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains potential effects of ocean acidification on Alaskan corals based on calcium carbonate mineralogy composition analysis. Effects of...

  15. Nano-FTIR Spectroscopy to Investigate the Silicate Mineralogy of Mercury Analogues: Supporting MERTIS Onboard BepiColombo Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varatharajan, I.; Maturilli, A.; Helbert, J.; Ulrich, G.; Born, K.; Namur, O.; Kästner, B.; Hecht, L.; Charlier, B.; Hiesinger, H.

    2018-05-01

    Nano-FTIR Spectroscopy is used to investigate the silicate mineralogy of synthetic Mercury analogues produced under reduced conditions representing different Mercury terrains. The study will support MERTIS payload onboard BepiColombo mission.

  16. Lack of cross-shelf transport of sediments on the western margin of India: Evidence from clay mineralogy

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaswamy, V.; Nair, R.R.

    transported long distances along the shelf, cross-shelf transport appears to be minimal. Confirmatory evidence of qualitative differences in outer and inner shelf clays is provided by sediment trap clay mineralogy on the outer shelf. Clay bound pollutant...

  17. Characterization of water reservoirs affected by acid mine drainage: geochemical, mineralogical, and biological (diatoms) properties of the water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, T; Rivera, M J; Almeida, S F P; Delgado, C; Gomes, P; Grande, J A; de la Torre, M L; Santisteban, M

    2016-04-01

    This work presents a combination of geochemical, mineralogical, and biological data obtained in water reservoirs located in one of the most paradigmatic mining regions, suffering from acid mine drainage (AMD) problems: the Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB). Four water reservoirs located in the Spanish sector of the IBP, storing water for different purposes, were selected to achieve an environmental classification based on the effects of AMD: two mining dams (Gossan and Águas Ácidas), a reservoir for industrial use (Sancho), and one with water used for human supply (Andévalo). The results indicated that the four reservoirs are subject to the effect of metallic loads from polluted rivers, although with different levels: Águas Ácidas > Gossan > Sancho ≥ Andévalo. In accordance, epipsammic diatom communities have differences in the respective composition and dominant taxa. The dominant diatoms in each reservoir indicated acid water: Pinnularia acidophila and Pinnularia aljustrelica were found in the most acidic dams (Gossan and Águas Ácidas, with pH <3), Pinnularia subcapitata in Sancho (pH 2.48-5.82), and Eunotia exigua in Andévalo (pH 2.34-6.15).

  18. Effects of vegetation on chemical and mineralogical characteristics of soils developed on a decantation bank from a copper mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, Beatriz; Vega, Flora A; Silva, Luis F O; Andrade, Luisa

    2012-04-01

    Open cast mining has a strong impact on the environment, the intensity depending on the morphology of the deposit and on the nature of the minerals. At Touro mine (NW Spain) there is a large area covered by tailings, one of which, called the "sedimentation bank", was used to deposit sludge resulting from the extraction of copper in the flotation plant. Three zones were selected and the soils were sampled to analyse the changes brought about by vegetation on the chemical and mineralogical properties of the soils developed over the sedimentation bank and its development over time. The vegetation increased the pH, contents of organic material, nitrogen, clay and free oxides of Fe and Al, and the cationic exchange capacity of the soils. The decrease in the sulphide content, benefited by the vegetation process, led to a reduction in the total content of Cr and Cu. The vegetation also contributed towards the alteration of the primary minerals. The transformation of jarosite, the formation of nanocrystals of hematite, goethite, hydroxypolymers, and amorphous minerals that contained Cu, Cr and Pb were observed. Nevertheless the high Cu and Cr contents indicate that it is advisable to change the restoration process. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. OH/H2O Detection Capability Evaluation on Chang'e-5 Lunar Mineralogical Spectrometer (LMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Ren, Xin; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Chunlai; Mu, Lingli; Deng, Liyan

    2016-10-01

    The Chang'e-5 (CE-5) lunar sample return mission is scheduled to launch in 2017 to bring back lunar regolith and drill samples. The Chang'e-5 Lunar Mineralogical Spectrometer (LMS), as one of the three sets of scientific payload installed on the lander, is used to collect in-situ spectrum and analyze the mineralogical composition of the samplingsite. It can also help to select the sampling site, and to compare the measured laboratory spectrum of returned sample with in-situ data. LMS employs acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTFs) and is composed of a VIS/NIR module (0.48μm-1.45μm) and an IR module (1.4μm -3.2μm). It has spectral resolution ranging from 3 to 25 nm, with a field of view (FOV) of 4.24°×4.24°. Unlike Chang'e-3 VIS/NIR Imaging Spectrometer (VNIS), the spectral coverage of LMS is extended from 2.4μm to 3.2μm, which has capability to identify H2O/OH absorption features around 2.7μm. An aluminum plate and an Infragold plate are fixed in the dust cover, being used as calibration targets in the VIS/NIR and IR spectral range respectively when the dust cover is open. Before launch, a ground verification test of LMS needs to be conducted in order to: 1) test and verify the detection capability of LMS through evaluation on the quality of image and spectral data collected for the simulated lunar samples; and 2) evaluate the accuracy of data processing methods by the simulation of instrument working on the moon. The ground verification test will be conducted both in the lab and field. The spectra of simulated lunar regolith/mineral samples will be collected simultaneously by the LMS and two calibrated spectrometers: a FTIR spectrometer (Model 102F) and an ASD FieldSpec 4 Hi-Res spectrometer. In this study, the results of the LMS ground verification test will be reported, and OH/H2O Detection Capability will be evaluated especially.

  20. Geochemical and mineralogical characteristics of percolates and its evaporates from Technosols before and after limestone filler stabilisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Sirvent, Carmen; Martinez-Sanchez, Maria Jose; Garcia-Lorenzo, Maria Luz; Hernandez-Cordoba, Manuel

    2017-04-01

    The chemistry of waters is recognized as a relevant monitoring tool when assessing the adverse effects of acid mine drainage. The weathering of sulphide minerals produces a great variety of efflorescences of soluble sulphate salts. These minerals play an important role for environmental pollution, since they can be either a sink or a source for acidity and trace elements. This communication deals with the leachability of potentially toxic elements (PTE) eluting from technosols formed from soils affected by mining activities and limestone filler. A total of three contaminated soils affected by opencast mining were selected and mixed with limestone filler at three percentages: 10 %, 20 % and 30 %, providing nine stabilised samples. These samples were stored in containers and moistened simulating rainfall. The percolates obtained were collected, and the PTEs content (As, Cd, Cu, Fe, Pb and Zn) was determined. Evaporation-precipitation experiments were carried out in these waters, and the mineralogical composition of efflorescences was evaluated. The study area is heavily polluted as a result of historical mining and processing activities, producing large amount of wastes, characterised by high trace elements content and acidic pH. The results obtained for the percolates after the rain episode showed that, before the stabilization approach, waters had an acidic pH, high electrical conductivity and high PTEs content. When these soils were mixed with 10, 20 and 30 % of limestone filler, the pH was neutral and the soluble trace element content strongly decreased, being under the detection limit when limestone percentage was 20 % and 30 %. The mineralogical composition of efflorescences before the stabilisation approach showed that predominant minerals were copiapite, followed by gypsum and bilinite. Other soluble sulphates were determined in lower percentage, such as hexahydrite, halotriquite or pickeringite. After the mixing with 10 % of limestone filler, the evaporates

  1. Bioleaching of two different genetic types of chalcopyrite and their comparative mineralogical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Sha; Gu, Guohua; Ji, Jing; Xu, Baoke

    2018-02-01

    The bioleaching of two different genetic types of chalcopyrite by the moderate thermophile Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans was investigated by leaching behaviors elucidation and their comparative mineralogical assessment. The leaching experiment showed that the skarn-type chalcopyrite (STC) revealed a much faster leaching rate with 33.34% copper extracted finally, while only 23.53% copper was bioleached for the porphyry-type chalcopyrite (PTC). The mineralogical properties were analyzed by XRD, SEM, XPS, and Fermi energy calculation. XRD indicated that the unit cell volume of STC was a little larger than that of PTC. SEM indicated that the surface of STC had more steps and ridges. XPS spectra showed that Cu(I) was the dominant species of copper on the surfaces of the two chalcopyrite samples, and STC had much more copper with lower Cu 2p 3/2 binding energy. Additionally, the Fermi energy of STC was much higher than that of PTC. These mineralogical differences were in good agreement with the bioleaching behaviors of chalcopyrite. This study will provide some new information for evaluating the oxidation kinetics of chalcopyrite.

  2. Mineralogical Plasticity Acts as a Compensatory Mechanism to the Impacts of Ocean Acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Jonathan Y S; Russell, Bayden D; Connell, Sean D

    2017-03-07

    Calcifying organisms are considered particularly susceptible to the future impacts of ocean acidification (OA), but recent evidence suggests that they may be able to maintain calcification and overall fitness. The underlying mechanism remains unclear but may be attributed to mineralogical plasticity, which modifies the energetic cost of calcification. To test the hypothesis that mineralogical plasticity enables the maintenance of shell growth and functionality under OA conditions, we assessed the biological performance of a gastropod (respiration rate, feeding rate, somatic growth, and shell growth of Austrocochlea constricta) and analyzed its shell mechanical and geochemical properties (shell hardness, elastic modulus, amorphous calcium carbonate, calcite to aragonite ratio, and magnesium to calcium ratio). Despite minor metabolic depression and no increase in feeding rate, shell growth was faster under OA conditions, probably due to increased precipitation of calcite and trade-offs against inner shell density. In addition, the resulting shell was functionally suitable for increasingly "corrosive" oceans, i.e., harder and less soluble shells. We conclude that mineralogical plasticity may act as a compensatory mechanism to maintain overall performance of calcifying organisms under OA conditions and could be a cornerstone of calcifying organisms to acclimate to and maintain their ecological functions in acidifying oceans.

  3. Impact of pulp and paper mill effluents and solid wastes on soil mineralogical and physicochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Gopi; Bhattacharyya, Krishna G

    2015-03-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the impact of the effluents and the solid wastes generated by a giant pulp and paper mill in the northeastern part of India on soil mineralogy of the area. The impacts were monitored by analysis of soil samples from seven sites located in the potential impact zone and a control site where any kind of effluent discharge or solid waste dumping was absent. The soil belonged to medium texture type (sandy clay loam, sandy loam, loamy sand, and silt loam), and the soil aggregate analysis indicated higher levels of organic carbon, pH, electrical conductivity, effective cation exchange capacity, and mean weight diameter at sites receiving effluents and solid wastes from the pulp and paper mill. Depletion in soil silica level and in feldspar and quartz contents and rise in iron and calcium contents at the sites receiving effluents from the pulp and paper mill indicated significant influence on soil mineralogy. The soil contained a mixture of minerals consisting of tectosilicates (with silicate frameworks as in quartz or feldspar), phylosilicates (layered clays like kaolinite, smectite, chlorite, illite, etc.), and carbonates. Absence of pure clay minerals indicated a state of heterogeneous intermediate soil clay transformation. The significance of the mixed mineralogy in relation to the disposal of effluents and dumping of solid wastes is discussed in details.

  4. Chemistry and Mineralogy of Antarctica Dry Valley Soils: Implications for Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, J. E.; Golden, D. C.; Graff, T. G.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Douglas, S.; Kounaves, S. P.; McKay, C. P.; Tamppari, L, K.; Smith, P. H.; hide

    2011-01-01

    The Antarctic Dry Valleys (ADV) comprise the largest ice-free region of Antarctica. Precipitation almost always occurs as snow, relative humidity is frequently low, and mean annual temperatures are about -20 C. The ADV soils have previously been categorized into three soil moisture regimes: subxerous, xerous and ultraxerous, based on elevation and climate influences. The subxerous regime is predominately a coastal zone soil, and has the highest average temperature and precipitation, while the ultraxerous regime occurs at high elevation (>1000 m) and have very low temperature and precipitation. The amounts and types of salts present in the soils vary between regions. The nature, origin and significance of salts in the ADV have been previously investigated. Substantial work has focused on soil formation in the ADVs, however, little work has focused on the mineralogy of secondary alteration phases. The dominant weathering process in the ADV region is physical weathering, however, chemical weathering has been well documented. The objective of this study was to characterize the chemistry and mineralogy, including the alteration mineralogy, of soils from two sites, a subxerous soil in Taylor Valley, and an ultraxerous soil in University Valley. The style of aqueous alteration in the ADVs may have implications for pedogenic processes on Mars.

  5. Effect of Aggregate Mineralogy and Concrete Microstructure on Thermal Expansion and Strength Properties of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinwoo An

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aggregate type and mineralogy are critical factors that influence the engineering properties of concrete. Temperature variations result in internal volume changes could potentially cause a network of micro-cracks leading to a reduction in the concrete’s compressive strength. The study specifically studied the effect of the type and mineralogy of fine and coarse aggregates in the normal strength concrete properties. As performance measures, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE and compressive strength were tested with concrete specimens containing different types of fine aggregates (manufactured and natural sands and coarse aggregates (dolomite and granite. Petrographic examinations were then performed to determine the mineralogical characteristics of the aggregate and to examine the aggregate and concrete microstructure. The test results indicate the concrete CTE increases with the silicon (Si volume content in the aggregate. For the concrete specimens with higher CTE, the micro-crack density in the interfacial transition zone (ITZ tended to be higher. The width of ITZ in one of the concrete specimens with a high CTE displayed the widest core ITZ (approx. 11 µm while the concrete specimens with a low CTE showed the narrowest core ITZ (approx. 3.5 µm. This was attributed to early-age thermal cracking. Specimens with higher CTE are more susceptible to thermal stress.

  6. Hydrothermally-induced changes in mineralogy and magnetic properties of oxidized A-type granites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nédélec, Anne; Trindade, Ricardo; Peschler, Anne; Archanjo, Carlos; Macouin, Mélina; Poitrasson, Franck; Bouchez, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    The changes in magnetic mineralogy due to the hydrothermal alteration of A-type granitic rocks have been thoroughly investigated in samples from the granite of Tana (Corsica, France), and compared with other A-type granites: Meruoca (NE Brazil), Bushveld (South Africa), Mount Scott (Wichita Mountains, Oklahoma, USA) and the stratoid hypersolvus granites of Madagascar. The altered red-colored samples and their non-altered equivalents were magnetically characterized by means of magnetic susceptibility measurements, hysteresis loops, remanent coercivity spectra, and Lowrie test. It is shown that hydrothermalization in magnetite-bearing granites is related to the formation of fine-grained magnetite and hematite, and to coeval depletion in the content of primary low-coercive coarse-grained magnetite. These mineralogical changes give typical rock magnetic signatures, namely lower susceptibility magnitudes and anisotropy degrees, prolate AMS (anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility) fabrics and increased coercivities. Optical microscopy and SEM (scanning electronic microscopy) images suggest that the orientation of the secondary magnetic minerals is related to fluid-pathways and micro-fractures formed during the hydrothermal event and therefore may be unrelated to magma emplacement and crystallization fabrics. Changes in magnetic mineralogy and grain-size distribution have also to be considered for any paleomagnetic and iron isotope studies in granites.

  7. Mineralogical controls on aluminum and magnesium in uranium mill tailings: Key Lake, Saskatchewan, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, M A; Hendry, M J; Koshinsky, J; Essilfie-Dughan, J; Paikaray, S; Chen, J

    2013-07-16

    The mineralogy and evolution of Al and Mg in U mill tailings are poorly understood. Elemental analyses (ICP-MS) of both solid and aqueous phases show that precipitation of large masses of secondary Al and Mg mineral phases occurs throughout the raffinate neutralization process (pH 1-11) at the Key Lake U mill, Saskatchewan, Canada. Data from a suite of analytical methods (ICP-MS, EMPA, laboratory- and synchrotron-based XRD, ATR-IR, Raman, TEM, EDX, ED) and equilibrium thermodynamic modeling showed that nanoparticle-sized, spongy, porous, Mg-Al hydrotalcite is the dominant mineralogical control on Al and Mg in the neutralized raffinate (pH ≥ 6.7). The presence of this secondary Mg-Al hydrotalcite in mineral samples of both fresh and 15-year-old tailings indicates that the Mg-Al hydrotalcite is geochemically stable, even after >16 years in the oxic tailings body. Data shows an association between the Mg-Al hydrotalcite and both As and Ni and point to this Mg-Al hydrotalcite exerting a mineralogical control on the solubility of these contaminants.

  8. A regional mineralogical study of the manganese-bearing Voelwater subgroup in the northern Cape Province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleyenstueber, A.S.E.

    1985-11-01

    The Voelwater Subgroup, of the Proterozoic Transvaal Sequence, in the Hotazel area, is preserved in five structurally controlled basins, on the eastern side of the Dimoten syncline. The Subgroup represents a relatively undisturbed unit of mixed volcanogenic - chemical sedimentary rocks. The Hotazel Formation within the Voelwater Subgroup, consists of a finely banded carbonate - silicate - hematite - manganese lutite sequence of banded iron-formation and must be unique in that it contains the world's largest land-based repository of manganese. Twenty-one drill cores, sampled lithologically at intervals of approximately one metre through the total sedimentary sequence, were studied by microscopic, X-ray diffraction and electron microprobe methods. The mineralogy of the Voelwater Subgroup was studied on a regional scale, with the emphasis on the minerals within the manganese beds of the Hotazel Formation. The objective of the study was: a. To study the variation and distrubution of minerals in the various manganese ores on a regional scale. b. To compare the mineralogical differences of the different ores mined, in order to gain a better understanding of their metallurgical behaviour. c. To try to locate high-grade manganese ore target areas for future exploration, with the aid of mineralogical information. d. To try to establish the origin of the manganese in the Voelwater Formation. e. To study the relationship of the manganese units with the adjacent chemical sediments of the Hotazel Formation

  9. Characterization of raw and burnt oil shale from Dotternhausen: Petrographical and mineralogical evolution with temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiéry, Vincent; Bourdot, Alexandra; Bulteel, David

    2015-01-01

    The Toarcian Posidonia shale from Dotternhausen, Germany, is quarried and burnt in a fluidized bed reactor to produce electricity. The combustion residue, namely burnt oil shale (BOS), is used in the adjacent cement work as an additive in blended cements. The starting material is a typical laminated oil shale with an organic matter content ranging from 6 to 18%. Mineral matter consists principally of quartz, feldspar, pyrite and clays. After calcination in the range, the resulting product, burnt oil shale, keeps the macroscopic layered texture however with different mineralogy (anhydrite, lime, iron oxides) and the formation of an amorphous phase. This one, studied under STEM, reveals a typical texture of incipient partial melting due to a long retention time (ca. 30 min) and quenching. An in-situ high temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD) allowed studying precisely the mineralogical changes associated with the temperature increase. - Highlights: • We present oil shale/burnt oil shale characterization. • The Posidonia Shale is burnt in a fluidized bed. • Mineralogical evolution with temperature is complex. • The burnt oil shale is used in composite cements

  10. Design Methodology - Design Synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Mogens Myrup

    2003-01-01

    Design Methodology is part of our practice and our knowledge about designing, and it has been strongly supported by the establishing and work of a design research community. The aim of this article is to broaden the reader¿s view of designing and Design Methodology. This is done by sketching...... the development of Design Methodology through time and sketching some important approaches and methods. The development is mainly forced by changing industrial condition, by the growth of IT support for designing, but also by the growth of insight into designing created by design researchers.......ABSTRACT Design Methodology shall be seen as our understanding of how to design; it is an early (emerging late 60ies) and original articulation of teachable and learnable methodics. The insight is based upon two sources: the nature of the designed artefacts and the nature of human designing. Today...

  11. GPS system simulation methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Thomas F.

    1993-01-01

    The following topics are presented: background; Global Positioning System (GPS) methodology overview; the graphical user interface (GUI); current models; application to space nuclear power/propulsion; and interfacing requirements. The discussion is presented in vugraph form.

  12. Hazard classification methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brereton, S.J.

    1996-01-01

    This document outlines the hazard classification methodology used to determine the hazard classification of the NIF LTAB, OAB, and the support facilities on the basis of radionuclides and chemicals. The hazard classification determines the safety analysis requirements for a facility

  13. Nonlinear Image Denoising Methodologies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yufang, Bao

    2002-01-01

    In this thesis, we propose a theoretical as well as practical framework to combine geometric prior information to a statistical/probabilistic methodology in the investigation of a denoising problem...

  14. Clinical trial methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peace, Karl E; Chen, Ding-Geng

    2011-01-01

    "Now viewed as its own scientific discipline, clinical trial methodology encompasses the methods required for the protection of participants in a clinical trial and the methods necessary to provide...

  15. Methodology of sustainability accounting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.H. Sokil

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Modern challenges of the theory and methodology of accounting are realized through the formation and implementation of new concepts, the purpose of which is to meet the needs of users in standard and unique information. The development of a methodology for sustainability accounting is a key aspect of the management of an economic entity. The purpose of the article is to form the methodological bases of accounting for sustainable development and determine its goals, objectives, object, subject, methods, functions and key aspects. The author analyzes the theoretical bases of the definition and considers the components of the traditional accounting methodology. Generalized structural diagram of the methodology for accounting for sustainable development is offered in the article. The complex of methods and principles of sustainable development accounting for systematized and non-standard provisions has been systematized. The new system of theoretical and methodological provisions of accounting for sustainable development is justified in the context of determining its purpose, objective, subject, object, methods, functions and key aspects.

  16. Reconstructing the Holocene depositional environments along the northern coast of Sfax (Tunisia): Mineralogical and sedimentological approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamourou, Ali; Touir, Jamel; Fagel, Nathalie

    2017-05-01

    A sedimentological and mineralogical study of sedimentary cores allowed reconstructing the evolution of depositional environments along the Northern coast of Sfax (Tunisia). The aim of this research work is to identify the factors controlling the sedimentation from the Holocene to the Present time. Three 30-m sediment cores collected by drilling at 30 m water depth were analyzed for their color, magnetic susceptibility signal, grain size by laser diffraction, organic matter content by loss of ignition, carbonate content by calcimetry and mineralogy by X-ray diffraction on bulk powder and clay <2 μm. They broadly present the same sedimentological and mineralogical features. Microscopical observations of petrographic slides allowed identifying six main sedimentary facies. Bulk mineralogical assemblages comprised clay minerals, quartz, calcite, gypsum and K-feldspars were examined. Considerable change was observed in the carbonate content that mimicked the bioclaste abundance and diluted the detrital minerals (clay minerals, quartz and feldspars). The gypsum mainly occurred in the lower sedimentary columns (SC12 and SC9) and in the upper/middle of core SC6. The clay fraction was made of a mixture of kaolinite, illite, smectite and palygorskite with no clear variation through core depth. Both grain-size parameters and magnetic susceptibility profile showed a sharp transition in the upper 2-5 m of the sedimentological columns. Coarse, sandy to gravely sediments characterized by a low magnetic susceptibility signal were replaced by fine bioclastic-rich clayey sediments. The analysis of vertical succession of depositional facies revealed a fluvial depositional environment (coastal plain) basically marked by fluvial channels and inundation plains at the bottom of all cores. However, core-top sediments recorded a littoral marine environment with sand depositions rich in gastropods, lamellibranches and algæ. Depositional facies, sedimentological and mineralogical

  17. Field Characterization of the Mineralogy and Organic Chemistry of Carbonates from the 2010 Arctic Mars Analog Svalbard Expedition by Evolved Gas Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdam, A. C.; Ten Kate, I. L.; Stern, J. C.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Blake, D. F.; Morris, R. V.; Steele, A.; Amundson, H. E. F.

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 Arctic Mars Analog Svalbard Expedition (AMASE) investigated two geologic settings using methodologies and techniques being developed or considered for future Mars missions, such as the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), ExoMars, and Mars Sample Return. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) [1] instrument suite, which will be on MSL, consists of a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), a gas chromatograph (GC), and a tunable laser mass spectrometer (TLS); all will be applied to analyze gases created by pyrolysis of samples. During AMASE, a Hiden Evolved Gas Analysis-Mass Spectrometer (EGA-MS) system represented the EGA-MS capability of SAM. Another MSL instrument, CheMin, will use x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) to perform quantitative mineralogical characterization of samples [e.g., 2]. Field-portable versions of CheMin were used during AMASE. AMASE 2010 focused on two sites that represented biotic and abiotic analogs. The abiotic site was the basaltic Sigurdfjell vent complex, which contains Mars-analog carbonate cements including carbonate globules which are excellent analogs for the globules in the ALH84001 martian meteorite [e.g., 3, 4]. The biotic site was the Knorringfjell fossil methane seep, which featured carbonates precipitated in a methane-supported chemosynthetic community [5]. This contribution focuses on EGA-MS analyses of samples from each site, with mineralogy comparisons to CheMin team results. The results give insight into organic content and organic-mineral associations, as well as some constraints on the minerals present.

  18. The fractional scaling methodology (FSM) Part 1. methodology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak Zuber; Ivan Catton; Upendra S Rohatgi; Wolfgang Wulff

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: a quantitative methodology is developed, based on the concepts of hierarchy and synthesis, to integrate and organize information and data. The methodology uses scaling to synthesize experimental data and analytical results, and to provide quantitative criteria for evaluating the effects of various design and operating parameters that influence processes in a complex system such as a nuclear power plant or a related test facility. Synthesis and scaling are performed on three hierarchical levels: the process, component and system levels. Scaling on the process level determines the effect of a selected process on a particular state variable during a selected scenario. At the component level this scaling determines the effects various processes have on a state variable, and it ranks the processes according to their importance by the magnitude of the fractional change they cause on that state variable. At the system level the scaling determines the governing processes and corresponding components, ranking these in the order of importance according to their effect on the fractional change of system-wide state variables. The scaling methodology reveals on all levels the fractional change of state variables and is called therefore the Fractional Scaling Methodology (FSM). FSM synthesizes process parameters and assigns to each thermohydraulic process a dimensionless effect metric Ω = ωt, that is the product of the specific rate of fractional change ω and the characteristic time t. The rate of fractional change ω is the ratio of process transport rate over content of a preserved quantity in a component. The effect metric Ω quantifies the contribution of the process to the fractional change of a state variable in a given component. Ordering of a component effect metrics provides the hierarchy of processes in a component, then in all components and the system. FSM separates quantitatively dominant from minor processes and components and

  19. Regional Shelter Analysis Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, Michael B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dennison, Deborah [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kane, Jave [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Walker, Hoyt [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Miller, Paul [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The fallout from a nuclear explosion has the potential to injure or kill 100,000 or more people through exposure to external gamma (fallout) radiation. Existing buildings can reduce radiation exposure by placing material between fallout particles and exposed people. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was tasked with developing an operationally feasible methodology that could improve fallout casualty estimates. The methodology, called a Regional Shelter Analysis, combines the fallout protection that existing buildings provide civilian populations with the distribution of people in various locations. The Regional Shelter Analysis method allows the consideration of (a) multiple building types and locations within buildings, (b) country specific estimates, (c) population posture (e.g., unwarned vs. minimally warned), and (d) the time of day (e.g., night vs. day). The protection estimates can be combined with fallout predictions (or measurements) to (a) provide a more accurate assessment of exposure and injury and (b) evaluate the effectiveness of various casualty mitigation strategies. This report describes the Regional Shelter Analysis methodology, highlights key operational aspects (including demonstrating that the methodology is compatible with current tools), illustrates how to implement the methodology, and provides suggestions for future work.

  20. System Anthropological Psychology: Methodological Foundations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaliy Y. Klochko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers methodological foundations of the system anthropologicalpsychology (SAP as a scientific branch developed by a well-represented groupof Siberian scientists. SAP is a theory based on axiomatics of cultural-historicalpsychology of L.S. Vygotsky and transspective analysis as a specially developedmeans to define the tendencies of science developing as a self-organizing system.Transspective analysis has revealed regularities in a constantly growing complexityof professional-psychological thinking along the course of emergence ofscientific cognition. It has proved that the field of modern psychology is shapedby theories constructed with ideation of different grades of complexity. The concept“dynamics of the paradigm of science” is introduced; it allows transitions tobe acknowledged from ordinary-binary logic characteristics of the classical scienceto a binary-ternary logic, adequate to non-classical science and then to aternary-multidimensional logic, which is now at the stage of emergence. The latteris employed in SAP construction. It involves the following basic methodologicalprinciples: the principle of directed (selective interaction and the principle ofgenerative effect of selective interaction. The concept of “complimentary interaction”applied in natural as well as humanitarian sciences is reconsidered in thecontext of psychology. The conclusion is made that the principle of selectivity anddirectedness of interaction is relevant to the whole Universe embracing all kindsof systems including the living ones. Different levels of matter organization representingsemantic structures of various complexity use one and the same principleof meaning making through which the Universe ensures its sustainability asa self-developing phenomenon. This methodology provides an explanation fornature and stages of emergence of multidimensional life space of an individual,which comes as a foundation for generation of such features of

  1. Petrographic, mineralogical, geochemical and paleo environmental characterization of radioactive anomaly associated to carbonate rocks from Jandaira formation of high cretaceous from Potiguar basin - Rio Grande do Norte - Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, N.S.

    1988-01-01

    The Jandaira Formation (Turonian/Maastrichtian - Potiguar Basin, Brazil) presents an anomalous radioactive marker in the upper part of its carbonatic section. This marker of 3-20 m in thickness, comprises an area of about 3500 Km 2 and shows a radioactivity of 470 UAPI, against a background of 20 UAPI on the Gamma Ray Log. In the effort of characterizing this marker, petrological, mineralogical, geological and paleontological, analyses were made in ditch samples of selected 23 wells. This marker is composed by bioclastics packstones to mudstones, mainly constituted of planktonic and bentonic forams, deposited in relatively deep water. Chemical analysis of the P 205 richest samples, the ones show that they are also enriched on U, F, As, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, S, Se, V, Y, Yb and on all rare-earth elements. The origin of the radioactive anomaly is due to the presence of sedimentary phosphates (phosphorite) made-up of uraniferous coloform apatite. (author)

  2. The policy trail methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holford, John; Larson, Anne; Melo, Susana

    of ‘policy trail’, arguing that it can overcome ‘methodological nationalism’ and link structure and agency in research on the ‘European educational space’. The ‘trail’ metaphor, she suggests, captures the intentionality and the erratic character of policy. The trail connects sites and brings about change......, but – although policy may be intended to be linear, with specific outcomes – policy often has to bend, and sometimes meets insurmountable obstacles. This symposium outlines and develops the methodology, but also reports on research undertaken within a major FP7 project (LLLIght’in’Europe, 2012-15) which made use......In recent years, the “policy trail” has been proposed as a methodology appropriate to the shifting and fluid governance of lifelong learning in the late modern world (Holford et al. 2013, Holford et al. 2013, Cort 2014). The contemporary environment is marked by multi-level governance (global...

  3. Methodology for attainment of density and effective atomic number through dual energy technique using microtomographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, H.; Lima, I.; Lopes, R.T.

    2014-01-01

    Dual energy technique for computerized microtomography shows itself as a promising method for identification of mineralogy on geological samples of heterogeneous composition. It can also assist with differentiating very similar objects regarding the attenuation coefficient, which are usually not separable during image processing and analysis of microtomographic data. Therefore, the development of a feasible and applicable methodology of dual energy in the analysis of microtomographic images was sought. - Highlights: • Dual energy technique is promising for identification of distribution of minerals. • A feasible methodology of dual energy in analysis of tomographic images was sought. • The dual energy technique is efficient for density and atomic number identification. • Simulation showed that the proposed methodology agrees with theoretical data. • Nondestructive characterization of distribution of density and chemical composition

  4. Changing methodologies in TESOL

    CERN Document Server

    Spiro, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Covering core topics from vocabulary and grammar to teaching, writing speaking and listening, this textbook shows you how to link research to practice in TESOL methodology. It emphasises how current understandings have impacted on the language classroom worldwide and investigates the meaning of 'methods' and 'methodology' and the importance of these for the teacher: as well as the underlying assumptions and beliefs teachers bring to bear in their practice. By introducing you to language teaching approaches, you will explore the way these are influenced by developments in our understanding of l

  5. Creativity in phenomenological methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyer, Pia; Martinsen, Bente; Norlyk, Annelise

    2014-01-01

    on the methodologies of van Manen, Dahlberg, Lindseth & Norberg, the aim of this paper is to argue that the increased focus on creativity and arts in research methodology is valuable to gain a deeper insight into lived experiences. We illustrate this point through examples from empirical nursing studies, and discuss......Nursing research is often concerned with lived experiences in human life using phenomenological and hermeneutic approaches. These empirical studies may use different creative expressions and art-forms to describe and enhance an embodied and personalised understanding of lived experiences. Drawing...... may support a respectful renewal of phenomenological research traditions in nursing research....

  6. IT Project Selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Keld

    2016-01-01

    for initiation. Most of the research on project selection is normative, suggesting new methods, but available empirical studies indicate that many methods are seldom used in practice. This paper addresses the issue by providing increased understanding of IT project selection practice, thereby facilitating...... the development of methods that better fit current practice. The study is based on naturalistic decision-making theory and interviews with experienced project portfolio managers who, when selecting projects, primarily rely on political skills, experience and personal networks rather than on formal IT project......-selection methods, and these findings point to new areas for developing new methodological support for IT project selection....

  7. New lithogeochemical and mineralogical exploration of Li-Sn greisen mineralisation in old mining adits of the Zinnwald deposit, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neßler, Jörg; Seifert, Thomas; Gutzmer, Jens; Müller, Armin; Henker, Jan; Kühn, Kersten

    2014-05-01

    The polymetallic Zinnwald-Cínovec deposit is represented by greisen-type mineralisation hosted within the apical portion of a small granite intrusion. Similar to other granitic stocks with Sn-W mineralisation in the Erzgebirge, the Zinnwald granite intruded during the post-collisional stage of the late-Variscan (Permo-Carboniferous) magmatic evolution. These intrusions are characterised by the prominent enrichment of incompatible elements (F, Li, Rb, Cs, Sn, Nb and Ta) and the depletion of P2O5. The deposit is located in the eastern part of the Erzgebirge region, Germany and straddles the border between Germany and the Czech Republic. It is characterised by flat dipping, sheet-like greisen ore bodies (up to 40 m in thickness) and veins (up to 1 m in thickness) located in the apical part and along the quaquaversal dipping edges of the granite stock. The greisen bodies predominantly consist of quartz, Li-Rb-Cs-bearing mica (named zinnwaldite), topaz, fluorite and accessory kaolinite and cassiterite. Historically mined for its cassiterite and wolframite ores since the 16th and 19th century, respectively, the deposit still provides access to a wide spread system of drifts and adits. Selected parts of the underground mine are now presented by the visitor's mine "Vereinigt Zwitterfeld zu Zinnwald". These local conditions are favourable for the re-examination of the exhibited greisen mineralisation. Within the framework of the ongoing Li and Sn exploration project of the SolarWorld Solicium GmbH in the German part of the deposit, an underground sampling campaign has been conducted, incorporating a series of 88 channel samples gained at two different levels (Tiefer Bünau adit = 750 m a.s.l.; Tiefe Hilfe Gottes adit = 720 m a.s.l.). Equally spaced channels of 2 m intervals and approximate dimensions of 180 x 5 x 2.5 cm have been created on pre-selected and detailed mapped walls of two different adits within the mine. The sample material has been gained for mineralogical

  8. Computer Network Operations Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-01

    means of their computer information systems. Disrupt - This type of attack focuses on disrupting as “attackers might surreptitiously reprogram enemy...by reprogramming the computers that control distribution within the power grid. A disruption attack introduces disorder and inhibits the effective...between commanders. The use of methodologies is widespread and done subconsciously to assist individuals in decision making. The processes that

  9. SCI Hazard Report Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the methodology in creating a Source Control Item (SCI) Hazard Report (HR). The SCI HR provides a system safety risk assessment for the following Ares I Upper Stage Production Contract (USPC) components (1) Pyro Separation Systems (2) Main Propulsion System (3) Reaction and Roll Control Systems (4) Thrust Vector Control System and (5) Ullage Settling Motor System components.

  10. Complicating Methodological Transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges-Rhoads, Sarah; Van Cleave, Jessica; Hughes, Hilary E.

    2016-01-01

    A historical indicator of the quality, validity, and rigor of qualitative research has been the documentation and disclosure of the behind-the-scenes work of the researcher. In this paper, we use what we call "methodological data" as a tool to complicate the possibility and desirability of such transparency. Specifically, we draw on our…

  11. Methodological Advances in Dea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Cherchye (Laurens); G.T. Post (Thierry)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractWe survey the methodological advances in DEA over the last 25 years and discuss the necessary conditions for a sound empirical application. We hope this survey will contribute to the further dissemination of DEA, the knowledge of its relative strengths and weaknesses, and the tools

  12. NUSAM Methodology for Assessment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leach, Janice [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Snell, Mark K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This document provides a methodology for the performance-based assessment of security systems designed for the protection of nuclear and radiological materials and the processes that produce and/or involve them. It is intended for use with both relatively simple installations and with highly regulated complex sites with demanding security requirements.

  13. MIRD methodology. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojo, Ana M.

    2004-01-01

    This lecture develops the MIRD (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) methodology for the evaluation of the internal dose due to the administration of radiopharmaceuticals. In this first part, the basic concepts and the main equations are presented. The ICRP Dosimetric System is also explained. (author)

  14. Response Surface Methodology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijnen, Jack P.C.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: This chapter first summarizes Response Surface Methodology (RSM), which started with Box and Wilson’s article in 1951 on RSM for real, non-simulated systems. RSM is a stepwise heuristic that uses first-order polynomials to approximate the response surface locally. An estimated polynomial

  15. MIRD methodology. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Parada, Ines

    2004-01-01

    This paper develops the MIRD (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) methodology for the evaluation of the internal dose due to the administration of radiopharmaceuticals. In this second part, different methods for the calculation of the accumulated activity are presented, together with the effective half life definition. Different forms of Retention Activity curves are also shown. (author)

  16. Mineralogical and geochemical patterns of urban surface soils, the example of Pforzheim, Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norra, Stefan; Lanka-Panditha, Mahesh; Kramar, Utz; Stueben, Doris

    2006-01-01

    This study presents a combined geochemical and mineralogical survey of urban surface soils. Many studies on urban soils are restricted to purely chemical surveys in order to investigate soil pollution caused by anthropogenic activities such as traffic, heating, industrial processing, waste disposal and many more. In environmental studies, chemical elements are often distinguished as lithogenic and anthropogenic elements. As a novel contribution to those studies, the authors combined the analysis of a broad set of chemical elements with the analysis of the main mineralogical phases. The semi-quantification of mineralogical phases supported the assignment of groups of chemical elements to lithogenic or anthropogenic origin. Minerals are important sinks for toxic elements. Thus, knowledge about their distribution in soils is crucial for the assessment of the environmental hazards due to pollution of urban soils. In Pforzheim, surface soils (0-5 cm depth) from various land use types (forest, agriculture, urban green space, settlement areas of various site densities) overlying different geological units (clastic and chemical sediments) were investigated. Urban surface soils of Pforzheim reflect to a considerable degree the mineral and chemical composition of parent rocks. Irrespective of the parent rocks, elevated concentrations of heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Pb, Sn, Ag) were found in soils throughout the whole inner urban settlement area of Pforzheim indicating pollution. These pollutants will tend to accumulate in inner urban surface soils according to the available adsorption capacity, which is normally higher in soils overlying limestone than in soils overlying sandstone. However, inner urban surface soils overlying sandstone show elevated concentrations of carbonates, phyllo-silicates and Fe and elevated pH values compared with forest soils overlying sandstone. Thus, in comparison to forest soils overlying sandstones, inner urban soils overlying sandstone affected by

  17. Metodologia de seleção de cepas para produção etodologia da ciclodextrina glicosiltransferase e para purificação da enzima = Strains selection methodology for cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase production and enzyme purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glauciane de Lara Costa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available As ciclodextrinas (CDs são maltooligossacarídeos, produzidas a partir do amido, pela enzima ciclodextrina glicosiltransferase (CGTase. Esta pesquisa teve por objetivo estabelecer metodologias de seleção de cepas para produção de CGTase e para purificação da enzima. Os microrganismos foram selecionados a partir de 53 análises de solos de cultura de amido, em placas contendo meio de cultivo específico, para seleção de cepas produtoras de CGTase. As enzimas foram obtidas com cultivo destes microrganismos em meio líquido. As atividades enzimáticas das CGTases foram determinadas pelos métodos espectrofotométricos e precipitação com tricloroetileno. A cepa isolada do solo de aveia foi a que apresentou maior atividade [0,1864 mmol de b-CD (min mL-1]. Esta cepa foi utilizada para a produção da enzima em escala laboratorial e purificação em cromatografia deafinidade bioespecífica. A cepa selecionada nesta pesquisa abre novas perspectivas para produção de enzima e CDs em escala industrial.Cyclodextrins (CDs are maltooligosaccharides produced from starch by cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase (CGTase enzyme. This researchaimed at establishing method for strains selection for CGTase production and enzyme purification. The microorganisms were selected from 53 analyses of starch cultures soils on plates containing specific culture medium for strains selection that produce CGTase. Theenzymes were obtained by culturing these microorganisms in liquid medium. The enzyme activity was determined with photospectrometric methods and precipitation with trichloroethylene. The strain isolated from oat soil was the one that showed the highest activity [0.1864 mmol of b-CD (min mL-1]. This strain was used for enzyme production in laboratory scale and purification by biospecific affinity chromatography. The strain selected in this research opens new perspectives for enzymes production and CDs in industrial scale.

  18. Mineralogical characterization of historical portuguese wall tiles of Sao Luis, Maranhao, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivas Mercury, J.M.; Vasconcelos, N.S.L.S.; Cabral, A.A.; Pereira, D.J. Costa; Angelica, R.S.

    2010-01-01

    Portuguese wall tiles from centuries, XVII, XVIII and XIX, found in Sao Luis Maranhao has been studied by X-ray diffraction, in order to interpret the possible raw material and burning temperature. The mineral phases, Quartz, Wollastonite, Calcite and Gehlenite were identified in all samples. Based on the results it is possible to affirm that the main raw materials used to manufacture this materials was probably mixtures of kaolinite clay and calcite. Based on the mineralogical information it was also possible to state that burning temperature of this wall tiles was lower than 1000 deg C. (author)

  19. Mineralogical and textural characteristics of Kakul (Hazara) phosphate rock, NWFP, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehmood, R.; Bhatti, M.A.; Kazmi, K.R.; Mehmood, A.; Sheikh, S.T.; Aleem Shah, S.A.

    2010-01-01

    Various types of minerals, present in phosphate rock of Hazara area of Khyber Pukhtoonkhwa Province of Pakistan, were identified and their concentration was determined using a suitable method. The characteristics of the rock were defined by petrography, X-ray diffraction, and chemical analysis and the textural characteristics such as grain size, grain shape and their arrangement in the rock body were also investigated. The degree of liberation of phosphate-bearing mineral was studied by the particle-counting method. Mineralogical and textural observations indicated that fine-grained rock may be suitable for beneficiation by the froth flotation separation technique. (author)

  20. Soil mineralogy and microbes determine forest life history strategy and carbon cycling in humid tropical forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soong, J.; Verbruggen, E.; Peñuelas, J.; Janssens, I. A.; Grau, O.

    2017-12-01

    Tropical forests account for over one third of global terrestrial gross primary productivity and cycle more C than any other ecosystem on Earth. However, we still lack a mechanistic understanding of how such high productivity is maintained on the old, highly weathered and phosphorus depleted soils in the tropics. We hypothesized that heterogeneity in soil texture, mineralogy and microbial community composition may be the major drivers of differences in soil C storage and P limitation across tropical forests. We sampled 12 forest sites across a 200 km transect in the humid neo-tropics of French Guiana that varied in soil texture, precipitation and mineralogy. We found that soil texture was a major driver of soil carbon stocks and forest life history strategy, where sandy forests have lower soil C stocks, slower turnover and decomposition and a more closed nutrient cycle while clayey forests have higher soil C stocks, faster turnover and a more leaky nutrient cycle (using natural abundance stable isotope evidence). We found that although the presence of Al and Fe oxides in the clayey soils occludes soil organic matter and P, a greater abundance of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi help forests to access occluded P in clayey soils fueling higher turnover and faster decomposition rates. Evidence from a laboratory incubation of tropical soils with nutrient additions further demonstrates the de-coupling of microbial P demands from C:N limitations providing further evidence for the need to examine microbial stoichiometry to explain C cycling in the P-limited tropics. We argue that microbial community composition and physiological demands, constrained within the limitations of soil mineralogical reactivity, largely controls nutrient and C cycling in tropical forest soils. Together our observational field study and laboratory incubation provide a unique dataset to shed light on the mineralogical and microbial controls on C and nutrient cycling in tropical soils. By integrating