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Sample records for select microsatellite markers

  1. Selection of microsatellite markers for bladder cancer diagnosis without the need for corresponding blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Tilborg, Angela A G; Kompier, Lucie C; Lurkin, Irene

    2012-01-01

    . Moreover, stutter peaks may complicate the analysis. To use microsatellite markers for diagnosis of recurrent bladder cancer, we aimed to select markers without stutter peaks and a constant ratio between alleles, thereby avoiding the need for a control DNA sample. We investigated 49 microsatellite markers...... with tri- and tetranucleotide repeats in regions commonly lost in bladder cancer. Based on analysis of 50 blood DNAs the 12 best performing markers were selected with few stutter peaks and a constant ratio between peaks heights. Per marker upper and lower cut off values for allele ratios were determined...

  2. Selection of microsatellite markers for bladder cancer diagnosis without the need for corresponding blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela A G van Tilborg

    Full Text Available Microsatellite markers are used for loss-of-heterozygosity, allelic imbalance and clonality analyses in cancers. Usually, tumor DNA is compared to corresponding normal DNA. However, normal DNA is not always available and can display aberrant allele ratios due to copy number variations in the genome. Moreover, stutter peaks may complicate the analysis. To use microsatellite markers for diagnosis of recurrent bladder cancer, we aimed to select markers without stutter peaks and a constant ratio between alleles, thereby avoiding the need for a control DNA sample. We investigated 49 microsatellite markers with tri- and tetranucleotide repeats in regions commonly lost in bladder cancer. Based on analysis of 50 blood DNAs the 12 best performing markers were selected with few stutter peaks and a constant ratio between peaks heights. Per marker upper and lower cut off values for allele ratios were determined. LOH of the markers was observed in 59/104 tumor DNAs. We then determined the sensitivity of the marker panel for detection of recurrent bladder cancer by assaying 102 urine samples of these patients. Sensitivity was 63% when patients were stratified for LOH in their primary tumors. We demonstrate that up-front selection of microsatellite markers obliterates the need for a corresponding blood sample. For diagnosis of bladder cancer recurrences in urine this significantly reduces costs. Moreover, this approach facilitates retrospective analysis of archival tumor samples for allelic imbalance.

  3. Bulk development and stringent selection of microsatellite markers in the western flower thrips Frankliniella occidentalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Li-Jun; Li, Ze-Min; Wang, Ze-Hua; Zhu, Liang; Gong, Ya-Jun; Chen, Min; Wei, Shu-Jun

    2016-05-20

    Recent improvements in next-generation sequencing technologies have enabled investigation of microsatellites on a genome-wide scale. Faced with a huge amount of candidates, the use of appropriate marker selection criteria is crucial. Here, we used the western flower thrips Frankliniella occidentalis for an empirical microsatellite survey and validation; 132,251 candidate microsatellites were identified, 92,102 of which were perfect. Dinucleotides were the most abundant category, while (AG)n was the most abundant motif. Sixty primer pairs were designed and validated in two natural populations, of which 30 loci were polymorphic, stable, and repeatable, but not all in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) and linkage equilibrium. Four marker panels were constructed to understand effect of marker selection on population genetic analyses: (i) only accept loci with single nucleotide insertions (SNI); (ii) only accept the most polymorphic loci (MP); (iii) only accept loci that did not deviate from HWE, did not show SNIs, and had unambiguous peaks (SS) and (iv) all developed markers (ALL). Although the MP panel resulted in microsatellites of highest genetic diversity followed by the SNI, the SS performed best in individual assignment. Our study proposes stringent criteria for selection of microsatellites from a large-scale number of genomic candidates for population genetic studies.

  4. Selection of microsatellite markers for bladder cancer diagnosis without the need for corresponding blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A.G. van Tilborg (Angela); L.C. Kompier (Lucie); I. Lurkin (Irene); R. Poort (Ricardo); S. El Bouazzaoui (Samira); K.A. van der Keur (Kirstin); T.C.M. Zuiverloon (Tahlita); L. Dyrskjot (Lars); T.F. Orntoft (Torben); M.J. Roobol-Bouts (Monique); E.C. Zwarthoff (Ellen)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractMicrosatellite markers are used for loss-of-heterozygosity, allelic imbalance and clonality analyses in cancers. Usually, tumor DNA is compared to corresponding normal DNA. However, normal DNA is not always available and can display aberrant allele ratios due to copy number variations in

  5. Empirical Selection of Informative Microsatellite Markers within Co-ancestry Pig Populations Is Required for Improving the Individual Assignment Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y H; Chu, H P; Jiang, Y N; Lin, C Y; Li, S H; Li, K T; Weng, G J; Cheng, C C; Lu, D J; Ju, Y T

    2014-05-01

    The Lanyu is a miniature pig breed indigenous to Lanyu Island, Taiwan. It is distantly related to Asian and European pig breeds. It has been inbred to generate two breeds and crossed with Landrace and Duroc to produce two hybrids for laboratory use. Selecting sets of informative genetic markers to track the genetic qualities of laboratory animals and stud stock is an important function of genetic databases. For more than two decades, Lanyu derived breeds of common ancestry and crossbreeds have been used to examine the effectiveness of genetic marker selection and optimal approaches for individual assignment. In this paper, these pigs and the following breeds: Berkshire, Duroc, Landrace and Yorkshire, Meishan and Taoyuan, TLRI Black Pig No. 1, and Kaohsiung Animal Propagation Station Black pig are studied to build a genetic reference database. Nineteen microsatellite markers (loci) provide information on genetic variation and differentiation among studied breeds. High differentiation index (FST) and Cavalli-Sforza chord distances give genetic differentiation among breeds, including Lanyu's inbred populations. Inbreeding values (FIS) show that Lanyu and its derived inbred breeds have significant loss of heterozygosity. Individual assignment testing of 352 animals was done with different numbers of microsatellite markers in this study. The testing assigned 99% of the animals successfully into their correct reference populations based on 9 to 14 markers ranking D-scores, allelic number, expected heterozygosity (HE) or FST, respectively. All miss-assigned individuals came from close lineage Lanyu breeds. To improve individual assignment among close lineage breeds, microsatellite markers selected from Lanyu populations with high polymorphic, heterozygosity, FST and D-scores were used. Only 6 to 8 markers ranking HE, FST or allelic number were required to obtain 99% assignment accuracy. This result suggests empirical examination of assignment-error rates is required if

  6. Empirical Selection of Informative Microsatellite Markers within Co-ancestry Pig Populations Is Required for Improving the Individual Assignment Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. H. Li

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Lanyu is a miniature pig breed indigenous to Lanyu Island, Taiwan. It is distantly related to Asian and European pig breeds. It has been inbred to generate two breeds and crossed with Landrace and Duroc to produce two hybrids for laboratory use. Selecting sets of informative genetic markers to track the genetic qualities of laboratory animals and stud stock is an important function of genetic databases. For more than two decades, Lanyu derived breeds of common ancestry and crossbreeds have been used to examine the effectiveness of genetic marker selection and optimal approaches for individual assignment. In this paper, these pigs and the following breeds: Berkshire, Duroc, Landrace and Yorkshire, Meishan and Taoyuan, TLRI Black Pig No. 1, and Kaohsiung Animal Propagation Station Black pig are studied to build a genetic reference database. Nineteen microsatellite markers (loci provide information on genetic variation and differentiation among studied breeds. High differentiation index (FST and Cavalli-Sforza chord distances give genetic differentiation among breeds, including Lanyu’s inbred populations. Inbreeding values (FIS show that Lanyu and its derived inbred breeds have significant loss of heterozygosity. Individual assignment testing of 352 animals was done with different numbers of microsatellite markers in this study. The testing assigned 99% of the animals successfully into their correct reference populations based on 9 to 14 markers ranking D-scores, allelic number, expected heterozygosity (HE or FST, respectively. All miss-assigned individuals came from close lineage Lanyu breeds. To improve individual assignment among close lineage breeds, microsatellite markers selected from Lanyu populations with high polymorphic, heterozygosity, FST and D-scores were used. Only 6 to 8 markers ranking HE, FST or allelic number were required to obtain 99% assignment accuracy. This result suggests empirical examination of assignment-error rates

  7. Isolation and characterization of polymorphic microsatellite markers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) is the third largest natural fiber crop and one of the five major oil crops in the world. ... These novel polymorphic microsatellite loci will be useful in genetic linkage map construction, germplasm classification and identification, gene identification and QTL mapping, and marker-assisted selection ...

  8. Characterization of novel polymorphic microsatellite markers from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    polymorphic microsatellite markers from the cDNA library of Japanese scallop Mizuhopecten yessoensis and cross-species amplification in bay scallop ... Keywords. microsatellite markers; cDNA library; Mizuhopecten yessoensis; Argopecten irradians. .... EST databases as a source for molecular markers: lessons from.

  9. Genetic diversity and parentage in farmer selections of cacao from Southern Sulawesi, Indonesia revealed by microsatellite markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinarti, Diny; Susilo, Agung W.; Meinhardt, Lyndel W.; Ji, Kun; Motilal, Lambert A.; Mischke, Sue; Zhang, Dapeng

    2015-01-01

    Indonesia is the third largest cocoa-producing country in the world. Knowledge of genetic diversity and parentage of farmer selections is important for effective selection and rational deployment of superior cacao clones in farmers’ fields. We assessed genetic diversity and parentage of 53 farmer selections of cacao in Sulawesi, Indonesia, using 152 international clones as references. Cluster analysis, based on 15 microsatellite markers, showed that these Sulawesi farmer selections are mainly comprised of hybrids derived from Trinitario and two Upper Amazon Forastero groups. Bayesian assignment and likelihood-based parentage analysis further demonstrated that only a small number of germplasm groups, dominantly Trinitario and Parinari, contributed to these farmer selections, in spite of diverse parental clones having been used in the breeding program and seed gardens in Indonesia since the 1950s. The narrow parentage predicts a less durable host resistance to cacao diseases. Limited access of the farmers to diverse planting materials or the strong preference for large pods and large bean size by local farmers, may have affected the selection outcome. Diverse sources of resistance, harbored in different cacao germplasm groups, need to be effectively incorporated to broaden the on-farm diversity and ensure sustainable cacao production in Sulawesi. PMID:26719747

  10. Selection and use of microsatellite markers for individual identification and meat traceability of six swine breeds in the Chinese market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jie; Li, Tingting; Zhu, Chao; Jiang, Xiaoling; Zhao, Yan; Xu, Zhenzhen; Yang, Shuming; Chen, Ailiang

    2017-01-01

    Meat traceability based on molecular markers is exerting a great influence on food safety and will enhance its key role in the future. This study aimed to investigate and verify the polymorphism of 23 microsatellite markers and select the most suitable markers for individual identification and meat traceability of six swine breeds in the Chinese market. The mean polymorphism information content value of these 23 loci was 0.7851, and each locus exhibited high polymorphism in the pooled population. There were 10 loci showing good polymorphism in each breed, namely, Sw632, S0155, Sw2406, Sw830, Sw2525, Sw72, Sw2448, Sw911, Sw122 and CGA. When six highly polymorphic loci were combined, the match probability value for two random individual genotypes among the pig breeds (Beijing Black, Sanyuan and Taihu) was lower than 1.151 E-06. An increasing number of loci indicated a gradually decreasing match probability value and therefore enhanced traceability accuracy. The validation results of tracing 18 blood and corresponding meat samples based on five highly polymorphic loci (Sw2525, S0005, Sw0107, Sw911 and Sw857) were successful, with 100% conformation probability, which provided a foundation for establishing a traceability system for pork in the Chinese market.

  11. Selection of an effective microsatellite marker system for genetic control and analysis of gerbil populations in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, X Y; Li, W; Sa, X Y; Li, C L; Lu, J; Wang, Y Z; Chen, Z W

    2015-09-21

    Although gerbils have been widely used in many areas of biological research over many years, there is currently no effective genetic quality control system available. In the present study, we sought to establish a microsatellite marker system for quality control and conducted an optimized analysis of 137 microsatellite loci in two laboratory gerbil populations and one wild population. Independent sample t-tests on the mean effective allele number, mean of Shannon's information index, and mean HE suggested that 28 of the 137 microsatellite markers were informative for gerbil genetic control. Analysis of 4 laboratory gerbil populations and 1 wild population using the 28 microsatellite loci indicated that allele numbers varied from 1.9639 (Guangzhou, GZ) to 6.6071 (North-West wild, NW). The average of HO versus HE was 0.6236/0.3802, 0.6671/0.4159, 0.4185/0.3464, 0.4592/0.3821, and 0.3972/0.4167 for the Beijing, NW, Hangzhou, Dalian, and GZ populations, respectively. The GZ population showed the greatest differentiation, having higher RST and Nei's standard genetic distances. An AMO-VA revealed high genetic differentiation among the five populations (FST = 0.296). The microsatellite system established here is effective and will be important in future studies for genetic quality control and monitoring of gerbil breeds.

  12. Retrospective selection of elite parent trees using paternity testing with microsatellite markers: an alternative short term breeding tactic for Eucalyptus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grattapaglia, D; Ribeiro, V J; Rezende, G D S P

    2004-06-01

    The conventional way to drive modifications in old forest tree seed orchards is to establish progeny trials involving each parent tree and then evaluate its contribution to the performance of the progeny by estimating its general and specific combining ability (GCA and SCA). In this work, we successfully applied an alternative parent selection tactic based on paternity testing of superior offspring derived from a hybrid seed orchard established with a single Eucalyptus grandis seed parents and six E. urophylla pollen parents. A battery of 14 microsatellite markers was used to carry out parentage tests of 256 progeny individuals including two independent samples of selected trees and one control unselected sample, all derived from 6-year-old forest stands in eastern Brazil. Paternity determination was carried out for all progeny individuals by a sequential paternity exclusion procedure. Exclusion was declared only when the obligatory paternal allele in the progeny tree was not present in the alleged parent tree for at least four independent markers to avoid false exclusions due to mutation or null alleles. After maternity checks to identify seed mixtures and selfed individuals, the paternity tests revealed that approximately 29% of the offspring was sired by pollen parents outside the orchard. No selfed progeny were found in the selected samples. Three pollen parents were found to have sired essentially all of the offspring in the samples of selected and non-selected progeny individuals. One of these three parents sired significantly more selected progeny than unselected ones ( P< or =0.0002 in a Fisher exact test). Based on these results, low-reproductive-successful parents were culled from the orchard, and management procedures were adopted to minimize external pollen contamination. A significant difference ( P<0.01) in mean annual increment was observed between forest stands produced with seed from the orchard before and after selection of parents and

  13. Ten polymorphic microsatellite markers characterized for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MING MING BAO

    2Freshwater Aquaculture Collaborative Innovation Center of Hubei Province, Hubei 430070, People's Republic of China. 3Xinjiang Fisheries ... Keywords. microsatellite markers; cross-species amplification; genetic diversity; Schizothorax pseudaksaiensis. Journal of ..... University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. Zane L.

  14. Screening and identification of a microsatellite marker associated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, primer pairs of 15 microsatellite markers associated with sex determination of tilapia were selected and amplified in Wami tilapia, Oreochromis urolepis hornorum. While one marker, UNH168, on linkage group 3 (LG3) was associated((P<0.001) with the phenotypic sex in the experimental population, nine ...

  15. Microsatellites as DNA markers in cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Guoqing

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic research of cultivated peanut has lagged behind other crop species because of the paucity of polymorphic DNA markers found in this crop. It is necessary to identify additional DNA markers for further genetic research in peanut. Results Microsatellite markers in cultivated peanut were developed using the SSR enrichment procedure. The results showed that the GA/CT repeat was the most frequently dispersed microsatellite in peanut. The primer pairs were designed for fifty-six different microsatellites, 19 of which showed a polymorphism among the genotypes studied. The average number of alleles per locus was 4.25, and up to 14 alleles were found at one locus. This suggests that microsatellite DNA markers produce a higher level of DNA polymorphism than other DNA markers in cultivated peanut. Conclusions It is desirable to isolate and characterize more DNA markers in cultivated peanut for more productive genomic studies, such as genetic mapping, marker-assisted selection, and gene discovery. The development of microsatellite markers holds a promise for such studies.

  16. Multilocus microsatellite markers for molecular typing of Candida tropicalis isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuan; Zhou, Hai-jian; Che, Jie; Li, Wen-ge; Bian, Fu-ning; Yu, Shuan-bao; Zhang, Li-juan; Lu, Jinxing

    2014-11-20

    Candida tropicalis is considered to be the leading pathogen causing nosocomial fungemia and hepatosplenic fungal infections in patients with cancer, particularly those with leukemia. Microsatellite-based typing methods using sets of genetic markers have been developed and reported for population structure analysis of C. albicans, C. glabrata, and C. parapsilosis, but no studies have been published for genetic analysis of C. tropicalis. The objective of this study was to develop new microsatellite loci that have the ability to distinguish among C. tropicalis isolates. DNA sequences containing over 10 bi- or tri-nucleotide repeats were selected from the C. tropicalis genome database. Thirty PCR primers sets specific for the microsatellite loci were designed and tested using eight clinically independent isolates. According to the amplification efficiency, specificity, and observed polymorphisms, eight markers were selected for further population structure analysis and molecular typing. Sixty-five independent C. tropicalis isolates were genotyped using these 8 markers. Based on these analyses, six microsatellite loci were confirmed, although two loci were found to be with unstable flanking areas. The six polymorphic loci displayed 4-22 alleles and 7-27 genotypes. The discriminatory power of the six loci ranged from 0.70 to 0.95. Genotyping results obtained by microsatellite analysis were compared to PCR-fingerprinting and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). The comparisons showed that microsatellite analysis and MLST had the similar discriminatory power for C. tropicalis, which were more powerful than PCR-fingerprinting. This is the first attempt to develop new microsatellite loci for C. tropicalis. These newly developed markers will be a valuable resource for the differentiation of C. tropicalis isolates. More C. tropicalis isolates will need to be sequenced and analyzed in order to fully show the potential of these newly developed microsatellite markers.

  17. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This species is threatened throughout its range in West- ern Ghats as a result of overexploitation and habitat destruc- tion, which have reduced local population sizes and has led many populations to local extinction. In this study, we report the development of microsatellite markers and discuss the utility of these markers in ...

  18. Microsatellite markers associated with body and carcass weights in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microsatellite markers are presently used in selection to facilitate the genetic improvement of growth and carcass traits in chickens. The genetic improvement of six weeks live body and carcass weights of Cairo B-2 line, after six generation of selection, was compared with the control line (C line). Cairo B-2 line had higher ...

  19. Genome-wide mining, characterization, and development of microsatellite markers in gossypium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiong; Fang, Lei; Chen, Jiedan; Hu, Yan; Si, Zhanfeng; Wang, Sen; Chang, Lijing; Guo, Wangzhen; Zhang, Tianzhen

    2015-06-01

    Although much research has been conducted to characterize microsatellites and develop markers, the distribution of microsatellites remains ambiguous and the use of microsatellite markers in genomic studies and marker-assisted selection is limited. To identify microsatellites for cotton research, we mined 100,290, 83,160, and 56,937 microsatellites with frequencies of 41.2, 49.1, and 74.8 microsatellites per Mb in the recently sequenced Gossypium species: G. hirsutum, G. arboreum, and G. raimondii, respectively. The distributions of microsatellites in their genomes were non-random and were positively and negatively correlated with genes and transposable elements, respectively. Of the 77,996 developed microsatellite markers, 65,498 were physically anchored to the 26 chromosomes of G. hirsutum with an average marker density of 34 markers per Mb. We confirmed 67,880 (87%) universal and 7,705 (9.9%) new genic microsatellite markers. The polymorphism was estimated in above three species by in silico PCR and validated with 505 markers in G. hirsutum. We further predicted 8,825 polymorphic microsatellite markers within G. hirsutum acc. TM-1 and G. barbadense cv. Hai7124. In our study, genome-wide mining and characterization of microsatellites, and marker development were very useful for the saturation of the allotetraploid genetic linkage map, genome evolution studies and comparative genome mapping.

  20. QDD: a user-friendly program to select microsatellite markers and design primers from large sequencing projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meglécz, Emese; Costedoat, Caroline; Dubut, Vincent; Gilles, André; Malausa, Thibaut; Pech, Nicolas; Martin, Jean-François

    2010-02-01

    QDD is an open access program providing a user-friendly tool for microsatellite detection and primer design from large sets of DNA sequences. The program is designed to deal with all steps of treatment of raw sequences obtained from pyrosequencing of enriched DNA libraries, but it is also applicable to data obtained through other sequencing methods, using FASTA files as input. The following tasks are completed by QDD: tag sorting, adapter/vector removal, elimination of redundant sequences, detection of possible genomic multicopies (duplicated loci or transposable elements), stringent selection of target microsatellites and customizable primer design. It can treat up to one million sequences of a few hundred base pairs in the tag-sorting step, and up to 50,000 sequences in a single input file for the steps involving estimation of sequence similarity. QDD is freely available under the GPL licence for Windows and Linux from the following web site: http://www.univ-provence.fr/gsite/Local/egee/dir/meglecz/QDD.html. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  1. Microsatellite markers: An important fingerprinting tool for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-08-01

    Aug 1, 2011 ... further chromosome rearrangements or variations in seq- uences between wheat grass genomes (Mullan et al.,. 2005), and SSR variations have been identified in 60 durum wheat accessions (Wang et al., 2007). UTILIZATION OF MICROSATELLITE MARKERS IN. BREEDING PROGRAMS. The efficiency of ...

  2. DNA marker mining of ILSTS035 microsatellite locus on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    We describe tests for detecting and locating quantitative trait loci (QTL) for traits in Hanwoo cattle. From results of a permutation test to detect QTL for marbling, we selected the microsatellite locus ILSTS035 on chromosome 6 for further analysis. K-means clustering analysis applied to five traits and nine DNA markers in ...

  3. DNA marker mining of ILSTS035 microsatellite locus on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We describe tests for detecting and locating quantitative trait loci (QTL) for traits in Hanwoo cattle. From results of a permutation test to detect QTL for marbling, we selected the microsatellite locus ILSTS035 on chromosome 6 for further analysis. -means clustering analysis applied to five traits and nine DNA markers in ...

  4. Screening and identification of a microsatellite marker associated with sex in Wami tilapia, Oreochromis urolepis hornorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Huaping; Liu, Zhigang; Lu, Maixin; Gao, Fengying; Ke, Xiaoli; Ma, Dongmei; Huang, Zhanghan; Cao, Jianmeng; Wang, Miao

    2016-06-01

    In this study, primer pairs of 15 microsatellite markers associated with sex determination of tilapia were selected and amplified in Wami tilapia, Oreochromis urolepis hornorum. While one marker, UNH168, on linkage group 3 (LG3) was associated (P tilapia chromosome pair (chromosome 1, equivalent to LG3). This sex-linked microsatellite marker could potentially be used for marker-assisted selection in tilapia breeding programmes to produce monosex male tilapia.

  5. The impact of selection on population genetic structure in the clam Meretrix petechialis revealed by microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xia; Wang, Hongxia; Li, Yan; Liu, Baozhong

    2016-02-01

    The aim of our work is to evaluate the impact of mass selection on genetic structure in artificially closed populations of the clam Meretrix petechialis. In the present study, we performed mass selection over four generations (from 2004 to 2010) on two clam populations [shell features of purple lines (SP) and black dots (SB)] and analyzed their temporal genetic variation and structure using microsatellite makers. The two closed populations originated from the natural Shandong population (SD); thus, a natural SD population (10SD) was used to detect the current genetic structure after 6 years of natural selection. The results showed that the genetic diversity of the four generations of SB and SP was gradually reduced but remained at relatively high levels (SB, A = 18.9.4-16.8, Ho = 0.7389-0.6971, and He = 0.8897-0.8591; SP, A = 20.0-17.8, Ho = 0.7512-0.7043, and He = 0.8938-0.8625), which has not been reduced compared with that of the 10SD population (A = 17.8, Ho = 0.6803, and He = 0.8302). The Ne estimates for the two populations were almost at the same levels as the actual numbers of parental individuals. In addition, a low inbreeding coefficient was detected in the two populations (SB, 0.00201-0.00639; SP, 0.00176-0.00541). Based on the results, the present mass selection has not made a large impact on the population genetic structure of the closed populations. The present investigation provides important information for the development of management strategies for genetic breeding of the clam.

  6. Novel Polymorphic Multilocus Microsatellite Markers to Distinguish Candida tropicalis Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xin; Xiao, Meng; Liu, Ping; Chen, Sharon; Kong, Fanrong; Wang, He; Zhang, Li; Hou, Xin; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Candida tropicalis is an important pathogen. Here we developed and evaluated a polymorphic multilocus microsatellite scheme employing novel genetic markers for genotyping of C. tropicalis. Using 10 isolates from 10 unique (separate) patients to screen over 4000 tandem repeats from the C. tropicalis genome (strain MYA-3404), six new candidate microsatellite loci (ctm1, ctm3, ctm8, ctm18, ctm24 and ctm26) were selected according to amplification success, observed polymorphisms and stability of flanking regions by preliminary testing. Two known microsatellite loci CT14 and URA3 were also studied. The 6-locus scheme was then tested against a set of 82 different isolates from 32 patients. Microsatellite genotypes of isolates from the same patient (two to five isolates per patient) were identical. The six loci produced eight to 17 allele types and identified 11 to 24 genotypes amongst 32 patients' isolates, achieving a discriminatory power (DP) of 0.76 to 0.97 (versus 0.78 for both CT14 and URA3 loci, respectively). Testing of a combination of only three loci, ctm1, ctm3 and ctm24, also achieved maximum typing efficiency (DP = 0.99, 29 genotypes). The microsatellite typing scheme had good correlation compared with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, although was slightly less discriminatory. The new six-locus microsatellite typing scheme is a potentially valuable tool for genotyping and investigating microevolution of C. tropicalis.

  7. Analysis of new microsatellite markers developed from reported sequences of Japanese flounder Paralichthys olivaceus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haiyang; Jiang, Liming; Chen, Wei; Wang, Xubo; Wang, Zhigang; Zhang, Quanqi

    2010-12-01

    The expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus, were selected from GenBank to identify simple sequence repeats (SSRs) or microsatellites. A bioinformatic analysis of 11111 ESTs identified 751 SSR-containing ESTs, including 440 dinucleotide, 254 trinucleotide, 53 tetranucleotide, 95 pentanucleotide and 40 hexanucleotide microsatellites respectively. The CA/TG and GA/TC repeats were the most abundant microsatellites. AT-rich types were predominant among trinucleotide and tetranucleotide microsatellites. PCR primers were designed to amplify 10 identified microsatellites loci. The PCR results from eight pairs of primers showed polymorphisms in wild populations. In 30 wild individuals, the mean observed and expected heterozygosities of these 8 polymorphic SSRs were 0.71 and 0.83 respectively and the average PIC value was 0.8. These microsatellite markers should prove to be a useful addition to the microsatellite markers that are now available for this species.

  8. PMDBase: a database for studying microsatellite DNA and marker development in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Jingyin; Dossa, Komivi; Wang, Linhai; Zhang, Yanxin; Wei, Xin; Liao, Boshou; Zhang, Xiurong

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellite DNAs (or SSRs) are important genomic components involved in many important biological functions. SSRs have been extensively exploited as molecular markers for diverse applications including genetic diversity, linkage/association mapping of gene/QTL, marker-assisted selection, variety identification and evolution analysis. However, a comprehensive database or web service for studying microsatellite DNAs and marker development in plants is lacking. Here, we developed a database, ...

  9. Applications of Redwood Genotyping by Using Microsatellite Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris Brinegar; Dan Bruno; Ryan Kirkbride; Steven Glavas; Ingrid Udranszky

    2007-01-01

    A panel of polymorphic microsatellite markers have been developed in coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens). Two loci in particular (Seq18D7-3 and Seq21E5) demonstrate the potential of microsatellite genotyping in the assessment of genetic diversity and inheritance in redwoods. The highly polymorphic Seq18D7-3 marker provided evidence for the planting...

  10. PMDBase: a database for studying microsatellite DNA and marker development in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jingyin; Dossa, Komivi; Wang, Linhai; Zhang, Yanxin; Wei, Xin; Liao, Boshou; Zhang, Xiurong

    2017-01-04

    Microsatellite DNAs (or SSRs) are important genomic components involved in many important biological functions. SSRs have been extensively exploited as molecular markers for diverse applications including genetic diversity, linkage/association mapping of gene/QTL, marker-assisted selection, variety identification and evolution analysis. However, a comprehensive database or web service for studying microsatellite DNAs and marker development in plants is lacking. Here, we developed a database, PMDBase, which integrates large amounts of microsatellite DNAs from genome sequenced plant species and includes a web service for microsatellite DNAs identification. In PMDBase, 26 230 099 microsatellite DNAs were identified spanning 110 plant species. Up to three pairs of primers were supplied for every microsatellite DNA. For 81 species, genomic features of the microsatellite DNAs (genic or non-genic) were supplied with the corresponding genes or transcripts from public databases. Microsatellite DNAs can be explored through browsing and searching modules with a user-friendly web interface and customized software. Furthermore, we developed MISAweb and embedded Primer3web to help users to identify microsatellite DNAs and design corresponding primers in their own genomic sequences online. All datasets of microsatellite DNAs can be downloaded conveniently. PMDBase will be updated regularly with new available genome data and can be accessed freely via the address http://www.sesame-bioinfo.org/PMDBase. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Survey of genetic structure of geese using novel microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang-Yu Lai

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective The aim of this study was to create a set of microsatellite markers with high polymorphism for the genetic monitoring and genetic structure analysis of local goose populations. Methods Novel microsatellite markers were isolated from the genomic DNA of white Roman geese using short tandem repeated probes. The DNA segments, including short tandem repeats, were tested for their variability among four populations of geese from the Changhua Animal Propagation Station (CAPS. The selected microsatellite markers could then be used to monitor genetic variability and study the genetic structures of geese from local geese farms. Results 14 novel microsatellite loci were isolated. In addition to seven known loci, two multiplex sets were constructed for the detection of genetic variations in geese populations. The average of allele number, the effective number of alleles, the observed heterozygosity, the expected heterozygosity, and the polymorphism information content were 11.09, 5.145, 0.499, 0.745, and 0.705, respectively. The results of analysis of molecular variance and principal component analysis indicated a contracting white Roman cluster and a spreading Chinese cluster. In white Roman populations, the CAPS populations were depleted to roughly two clusters when K was set equal to 6 in the Bayesian cluster analysis. The founders of private farm populations had a similar genetic structure. Among the Chinese geese populations, the CAPS populations and private populations represented different clads of the phylogenetic tree and individuals from the private populations had uneven genetic characteristics according to various analyses. Conclusion Based on this study’s analyses, we suggest that the CAPS should institute a proper breeding strategy for white Roman geese to avoid further clustering. In addition, for preservation and stable quality, the Chinese geese in the CAPS and the aforementioned proper breeding scheme should be introduced to

  12. Evaluation of the genetic variability of 13 microsatellite markers in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Evaluation of the genetic variability of 13 microsatellite markers in native Indian pigs. Rajeev Kaul Atar ... The evaluated microsatellites exhibited a very high heterozygosity and polymorphism information content. ... Animal Genetics Division, National Bureau of Animal Genetic Resources, P.O. Box 129, Karnal 132 001, India ...

  13. Trinucleotide repeat microsatellite markers for Black Poplar (Populus nigra L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smulders, M.J.M.; Schoot, van der J.; Arens, P.; Vosman, B.

    2001-01-01

    Using an enrichment procedure, we have cloned microsatellite repeats from black poplar (Populus nigra L.) and developed primers for microsatellite marker analysis. Ten primer pairs, mostly for trinucleotide repeats, produced polymorphic fragments in P. nigra. Some of them also showed amplification

  14. Sinai and Norfa chicken diversity revealed by microsatellite markers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study aimed to outline the population differentiation of Sinai and Norfa chicken, native to Egypt, with microsatellite markers. Twenty microsatellite loci recommended by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) were used. Fifty eight birds were sampled (29 for each strain: 12 males + 17 females). Data were ...

  15. Development of microsatellite markers from an enriched genomic library of pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuchjaree Watcharawongpaiboon

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Development of microsatellite markers in Pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata L. was performed using the biotin-streptavidin enrichment procedure. One hundred and thirty three clones were randomly selected. After sequence analysis of 31 randomly picked positive colonies, 100% of the colonies were found to contain microsatellite sequences, and 9 primer pairs were designed. Five of the primers tested could amplify pumpkins DNA and can be used for genetic purity testing of the commercial hybrids. This paper reports the first isolation and utilization of microsatellite markers in pumpkin.

  16. Genetic variability in Brazilian wheat cultivars assessed by microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Ivan; Vieira, Elisa Serra Negra; da Silva, Glacy Jaqueline; de Assis Franco, Francisco; Marchioro, Volmir Sérgio

    2009-07-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum) is one of the most important food staples in the south of Brazil. Understanding genetic variability among the assortment of Brazilian wheat is important for breeding. The aim of this work was to molecularly characterize the thirty-six wheat cultivars recommended for various regions of Brazil, and to assess mutual genetic distances, through the use of microsatellite markers. Twenty three polymorphic microsatellite markers (PMM) delineated all 36 of the samples, revealing a total of 74 simple sequence repeat (SSR) alleles, i.e. an average of 3.2 alleles per locus. Polymorphic information content (PIC value) calculated to assess the informativeness of each marker ranged from 0.20 to 0.79, with a mean of 0.49. Genetic distances among the 36 cultivars ranged from 0.10 (between cultivars Ocepar 18 and BRS 207) to 0.88 (between cultivars CD 101 and Fudancep 46), the mean distance being 0.48. Twelve groups were obtained by using the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic means analysis (UPGMA), and thirteen through the Tocher method. Both methods produced similar clusters, with one to thirteen cultivars per group. The results indicate that these tools may be used to protect intellectual property and for breeding and selection programs.

  17. Genetic variability in Brazilian wheat cultivars assessed by microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Schuster

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Wheat (Triticum aestivum is one of the most important food staples in the south of Brazil. Understanding genetic variability among the assortment of Brazilian wheat is important for breeding. The aim of this work was to molecularly characterize the thirty-six wheat cultivars recommended for various regions of Brazil, and to assess mutual genetic distances, through the use of microsatellite markers. Twenty three polymorphic microsatellite markers (PMM delineated all 36 of the samples, revealing a total of 74 simple sequence repeat (SSR alleles, i.e. an average of 3.2 alleles per locus. Polymorphic information content (PIC value calculated to assess the informativeness of each marker ranged from 0.20 to 0.79, with a mean of 0.49. Genetic distances among the 36 cultivars ranged from 0.10 (between cultivars Ocepar 18 and BRS 207 to 0.88 (between cultivars CD 101 and Fudancep 46, the mean distance being 0.48. Twelve groups were obtained by using the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic means analysis (UPGMA, and thirteen through the Tocher method. Both methods produced similar clusters, with one to thirteen cultivars per group. The results indicate that these tools may be used to protect intellectual property and for breeding and selection programs.

  18. New microsatellite markers classifying nontoxic and toxic Jatropha ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 90; Online resources. New microsatellite markers classifying nontoxic and toxic Jatropha curcas. Patcharin Tanya Sujinna Dachapak Maung Maung Tar Peerasak Srinives. Volume 90 Online resources 2011 pp e76-e78 ...

  19. Microsatellite markers: An important fingerprinting tool for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microsatellites are simple sequence repeats (SSR) of 1-6 nucleotides. They appear to be ubiquitous in higher organisms, both in animal and plant genomes and involving repetitive as well as unique sequences, although the frequency of microsatellites varies between species. They are abundant, dispersed throughout the ...

  20. New microsatellite markers classifying nontoxic and toxic Jatropha ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sions of jatropha from India and a nontoxic accession from. Mexico. Basha and Sujatha (2009) reported genetic vari- ation and interspecific hybrids of Jatropha species using. RAPD and ISSR as nuclear specific markers, and chloro- plast microsatellite markers as organelle specific markers. Ganesh et al. (2008) studied ...

  1. Structural assessment of backcrossing using microsatellite markers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Backcrossing, coupled with marker or gene assisted selection, can be used to introgress a specific gene or chromosomal region from one population into another. The objective of this study was to assess the genomic structure of cattle produced by backcrossing for loci that are unlinked to a locus that was being introgressed ...

  2. Sequence tagged microsatellites for the Xgwm533 locus provide new diagnostic markers to select for the presence of stem rust resistance gene Sr2 in bread wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, M J; Kuchel, H; Chalmers, K J

    2004-11-01

    The stem rust resistance gene Sr2 has provided durable broad-spectrum, adult-plant resistance to the fungal pathogen Puccinia graminis Pers. f. sp. tritici throughout wheat-growing regions of the world for more than 50 years. The ability to select for Sr2 in wheat breeding programs was recently improved by the identification of a tightly linked microsatellite marker gwm533. This marker typically amplifies a 120-bp polymerase chain reaction fragment from wheat lines carrying Sr2. In instances where the 120-bp fragment is not associated with the presence of Sr2, DNA sequence analysis has shown that a second allele was amplified, differing in the structure of the microsatellite repeat. To discriminate this allelic homoplasy (alleles identical in size, but not identical by descent), sequence-tagged microsatellites (STM) markers were developed for the Xgwm533 locus. These markers were shown to be diagnostic for the presence of Sr2 in a wide range of germplasm, representative of all major wheat varieties historically grown in Australia. The STMs will be particularly useful for marker-assisted selection in Southern Australian breeding programs, where the use of the marker gwm533 is often precluded by the presence of the non- Sr2-associated 120-bp allele in the pedigree of current breeding germplasm. The STMs also revealed a high incidence of previously undetected allelic homoplasy at the Xgwm533 locus and may have broader utility in genetic research and breeding, as this locus is also reported to be strongly associated with a major gene conferring resistance to Fusarium head blight.

  3. Parentage Reconstruction in Eucalyptus nitens Using SNPs and Microsatellite Markers: A Comparative Analysis of Marker Data Power and Robustness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telfer, Emily J; Stovold, Grahame T; Li, Yongjun; Silva-Junior, Orzenil B; Grattapaglia, Dario G; Dungey, Heidi S

    2015-01-01

    Pedigree reconstruction using molecular markers enables efficient management of inbreeding in open-pollinated breeding strategies, replacing expensive and time-consuming controlled pollination. This is particularly useful in preferentially outcrossed, insect pollinated Eucalypts known to suffer considerable inbreeding depression from related matings. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker panel consisting of 106 markers was selected for pedigree reconstruction from the recently developed high-density Eucalyptus Infinium SNP chip (EuCHIP60K). The performance of this SNP panel for pedigree reconstruction in open-pollinated progenies of two Eucalyptus nitens seed orchards was compared with that of two microsatellite panels with 13 and 16 markers respectively. The SNP marker panel out-performed one of the microsatellite panels in the resolution power to reconstruct pedigrees and out-performed both panels with respect to data quality. Parentage of all but one offspring in each clonal seed orchard was correctly matched to the expected seed parent using the SNP marker panel, whereas parentage assignment to less than a third of the expected seed parents were supported using the 13-microsatellite panel. The 16-microsatellite panel supported all but one of the recorded seed parents, one better than the SNP panel, although there was still a considerable level of missing and inconsistent data. SNP marker data was considerably superior to microsatellite data in accuracy, reproducibility and robustness. Although microsatellites and SNPs data provide equivalent resolution for pedigree reconstruction, microsatellite analysis requires more time and experience to deal with the uncertainties of allele calling and faces challenges for data transferability across labs and over time. While microsatellite analysis will continue to be useful for some breeding tasks due to the high information content, existing infrastructure and low operating costs, the multi-species SNP resource

  4. Parentage Reconstruction in Eucalyptus nitens Using SNPs and Microsatellite Markers: A Comparative Analysis of Marker Data Power and Robustness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily J Telfer

    Full Text Available Pedigree reconstruction using molecular markers enables efficient management of inbreeding in open-pollinated breeding strategies, replacing expensive and time-consuming controlled pollination. This is particularly useful in preferentially outcrossed, insect pollinated Eucalypts known to suffer considerable inbreeding depression from related matings. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP marker panel consisting of 106 markers was selected for pedigree reconstruction from the recently developed high-density Eucalyptus Infinium SNP chip (EuCHIP60K. The performance of this SNP panel for pedigree reconstruction in open-pollinated progenies of two Eucalyptus nitens seed orchards was compared with that of two microsatellite panels with 13 and 16 markers respectively. The SNP marker panel out-performed one of the microsatellite panels in the resolution power to reconstruct pedigrees and out-performed both panels with respect to data quality. Parentage of all but one offspring in each clonal seed orchard was correctly matched to the expected seed parent using the SNP marker panel, whereas parentage assignment to less than a third of the expected seed parents were supported using the 13-microsatellite panel. The 16-microsatellite panel supported all but one of the recorded seed parents, one better than the SNP panel, although there was still a considerable level of missing and inconsistent data. SNP marker data was considerably superior to microsatellite data in accuracy, reproducibility and robustness. Although microsatellites and SNPs data provide equivalent resolution for pedigree reconstruction, microsatellite analysis requires more time and experience to deal with the uncertainties of allele calling and faces challenges for data transferability across labs and over time. While microsatellite analysis will continue to be useful for some breeding tasks due to the high information content, existing infrastructure and low operating costs, the multi

  5. DNA Fingerprinting of Olive Varieties by Microsatellite Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunja Bandelj

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Microsatellites combine several features of an ultimate molecular marker and they are used increasingly in various plant genetic studies and applications. In this work we report on the utilisation of fourteen previously developed olive microsatellite markers for the identification and differentiation of a set of nineteen olive varieties. All analysed microsatellite markers revealed a high level of polymorphism that allowed unique genotyping of the examined varieties. Ninety-six alleles were detected at all 14 loci, which multiplied into a large number of observed genotypes, giving high discrimination value for varietal identification. A minimum number of three microsatellite markers was chosen for the rapid and unambiguous varietal identification of nineteen olive varieties and only two markers were sufficient for differentiation of five local varieties. DNA fingerprints of olive cultivars by means of microsatellites provided meaningful data, which can be extended by additional olive varieties or new microsatellites and used for accurate inter-laboratory comparison. The data obtained can be used for the varietal survey and construction of a database of all olive varieties grown in Slovenia providing also additional genetic information on the agronomic and quality characteristics of the olive varieties.

  6. Screening transferable microsatellite markers across genus Phalaenopsis (Orchidaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ya-Zhu; Shih, Huei-Chuan; Tsai, Chi-Chu; Ho, Hsing-Hua; Liao, Pei-Chun; Chiang, Yu-Chung

    2017-11-15

    Molecular identification based on microsatellite loci is an important technology to improve the commercial breeding of the moth orchid. There are more than 30,000 cultivars have been enrolled at the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS). In this study, genomic microsatellite primer sets were developed from Phalaenopsis aphrodite subsp. formosana to further examine the transferability of across 21 Phalaenopsis species. Twenty-eight polymorphic microsatellite markers were obtained using the magnetic bead enrichment method, with high transferability of the 21 species of the genus Phalaenopsis, especially in the subgenus Phalaenopsis. The 28 newly developed polymorphic microsatellite markers with high polymorphism information content values. The best and second fit grouping (K) are inferred as two and four by the ΔK evaluation in the assignment test. This result indicates that these microsatellite markers are discernible to subgenus Phalaenopsis. Our results indicate that these new microsatellite markers are useful for delimiting species within genus Phalaenopsis. As expected, the genetic relationships between species of subgenus Phalaenopsis can be well distinguished based on the assignment test. These molecular markers could apply to assess the paternity of Phalaenopsis as well as investigating hybridization among species of genus Phalaenopsis.

  7. Using MiddRAD-seq data to develop polymorphic microsatellite markers for an endangered yew species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hantao Qin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Microsatellites are highly polymorphic markers which have been used in a wide range of genetic studies. In recent years, various sources of next-generation sequencing data have been used to develop new microsatellite loci, but compared with the more common shotgun genomic sequencing or transcriptome data, the potential utility of RAD-seq data for microsatellite ascertainment is comparatively under-used. In this study, we employed MiddRAD-seq data to develop polymorphic microsatellite loci for the endangered yew species Taxus florinii. Of 8,823,053 clean reads generated for ten individuals of a population, 94,851 (∼1% contained microsatellite motifs. These corresponded to 2993 unique loci, of which 526 (∼18% exhibited polymorphism. Of which, 237 were suitable for designing microsatellite primer pairs, and 128 loci were randomly selected for PCR validation and microsatellite screening. Out of the 128 primer pairs, 16 loci gave clear, reproducible patterns, and were then screened and characterized in 24 individuals from two populations. The total number of alleles per locus ranged from two to ten (mean = 4.875, and within-population expected heterozygosity from zero to 0.789 (mean = 0.530, indicating that these microsatellite loci will be useful for population genetics and speciation studies of T. florinii. This study represents one of few examples to mine polymorphic microsatellite loci from ddRAD data.

  8. Developing genome-wide microsatellite markers of bamboo and their applications on molecular marker assisted taxonomy for accessions in the genus Phyllostachys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hansheng; Yang, Li; Peng, Zhenhua; Sun, Huayu; Yue, Xianghua; Lou, Yongfeng; Dong, Lili; Wang, Lili; Gao, Zhimin

    2015-01-26

    Morphology-based taxonomy via exiguously reproductive organ has severely limitation on bamboo taxonomy, mainly owing to infrequent and unpredictable flowering events of bamboo. Here, we present the first genome-wide analysis and application of microsatellites based on the genome of moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) to assist bamboo taxonomy. Of identified 127,593 microsatellite repeat-motifs, the primers of 1,451 microsatellites were designed and 1,098 markers were physically mapped on the genome of moso bamboo. A total of 917 markers were successfully validated in 9 accessions with ~39.8% polymorphic potential. Retrieved from validated microsatellite markers, 23 markers were selected for polymorphic analysis among 78 accessions and 64 alleles were detected with an average of 2.78 alleles per primers. The cluster result indicated the majority of the accessions were consistent with their current taxonomic classification, confirming the suitability and effectiveness of the developed microsatellite markers. The variations of microsatellite marker in different species were confirmed by sequencing and in silico comparative genome mapping were investigated. Lastly, a bamboo microsatellites database (http://www.bamboogdb.org/ssr) was implemented to browse and search large information of bamboo microsatellites. Consequently, our results of microsatellite marker development are valuable for assisting bamboo taxonomy and investigating genomic studies in bamboo and related grass species.

  9. Polymorphic microsatellite markers in Euryale ferox Salisb. (Nymphaeaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Zhiwu; Pan, Lei; Ke, Weidong; Ding, Yi

    2009-01-01

    Eleven polymorphic microsatellite markers were isolated and identified in the aquatic plant Euryale ferox Salisb. (Nymphaeaceae). This species, which belongs to basal Magnoliophyta, reproduces sexually. All of these 11 microsatellite markers yielded 25 alleles in a survey of a wild population of 34 individuals. Two or three alleles per locus were detected, with expected heterozygosity ranging from 0.056 to 0.634 and observed heterozygosity from 0.000 to 0.088. These simple sequence repeat markers will be useful for evaluating the genetic structure of the E. ferox population in the future. © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Transferability of Rubus Microsatellite Markers for use in Black Raspberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are valuable as co-dominant genetic markers with a variety of applications such as DNA fingerprinting, linkage mapping, and population structure analysis. To date, SSR marker development in Rubus has focused on red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L., subgenu...

  11. The use of microsatellite markers for genetic diversity assessment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, gene diversity and genetic relationships among 30 genotypes of genus Hordeum from Kerman province (Iran) were assessed using 10 simple sequence repeat (SSR) primers. Seven of these markers were highly polymorphic. A total of 96 alleles were detected. The number of alleles per microsatellite marker ...

  12. Development of microsatellite markers for identifying Brazilian coffee arabica varieties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vieira, E.S.N.; Pinho, Von E.V.R.; Carvalho, M.G.G.; Esselink, G.; Vosman, B.

    2010-01-01

    Microsatellite markers, also known as SSRs (Simple Sequence Repeats), have proved to be excellent tools for identifying variety and determining genetic relationships. A set of 127 SSR markers was used to analyze genetic similarity in twenty five Coffea arabica varieties. These were composed of

  13. Polymorphic microsatellite markers for genetic studies of African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many wild animal species lack informative genetic markers for analysing genetic variation and structure, which is essential for effective long term conservation and management. We present heterologous microsatellite markers in six Tanzanian antelope species including: grant's gazelle, hartebeest, eland, roan, impala and ...

  14. Use of microsatellite markers in management of conifer forest species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig S. Echt

    1999-01-01

    Within the past ten years a new class of genetic marker1 has risen to prominence as the tool of choice for many geneticists. Microsatellite DNAs, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs), were first characterized as highly informative genetic markers in humans (Weber and May, 1990; Litt and Luty, 1990), and have since been found in practically all...

  15. Ten polymorphic microsatellite markers characterized for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MING MING BAO

    Estonba A. 2009 Microsatellite variability in European anchovy. (Engraulis encrasicolus) calls for further investigation of its genetic structure and biogeography. ICES J. Mar. Sci. 66, 2176–. 2182. Received 23 November 2015, in revised form 29 December 2015; accepted 4 January 2016. Unedited version published online: ...

  16. Development of microsatellite markers for Helopeltis theivora ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-07-12

    Jul 12, 2010 ... are highly polymorphic, neutral and show Mendelian inheritance, they therefore represent one of the most powerful tools for population genetic studies (Bruford and. Wayne, 1993). Microsatellites have also been analysed extensively in Drosophila melanogaster (Bachtrog et al.,. 1999), Drosophila simulans ...

  17. Genetic variability in local Brazilian horse lines using microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, A C M; Paiva, S R; Albuquerque, M S M; Egito, A A; Santos, S A; Lima, F C; Castro, S T; Mariante, A S; Correa, P S; McManus, C M

    2012-04-10

    Genetic variability at 11 microsatellite markers was analyzed in five naturalized/local Brazilian horse breeds or genetic groups. Blood samples were collected from 328 animals of the breeds Campeira (Santa Catarina State), Lavradeira (Roraima State), Pantaneira (Pantanal Mato-Grossense), Mangalarga Marchador (Minas Gerais State), as well as the genetic group Baixadeiro (Maranhão State), and the exotic breeds English Thoroughbred and Arab. We found significant genetic variability within evaluated microsatellite loci, with observed heterozygosis varying between 0.426 and 0.768 and polymorphism information content values of 0.751 to 0.914. All breeds showed high inbreeding coefficients and were not in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The smallest genetic distance was seen between the Pantaneira and Arab breeds. The principal component analyzes and Bayesian approach demonstrated that the exotic breeds have had a significant influence on the genetic formation of the local breeds, with introgression of English Throroughbred in Pantaneira and Lavradeira, as well as genetic proximity between the Arab, Pantaneira and Mangalarga Marchador populations. This study shows the need to conserve traits acquired by naturalized horse breeds over centuries of natural selection in Brazil due to the genetic uniqueness of each group, suggesting a reduced gene flow between them. These results reinforce the need to include these herds in animal genetic resource conservation programs to maximize the genetic variability and conserve useful allele combinations.

  18. Genome-wide survey and analysis of microsatellites in giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), with a focus on the applications of a novel microsatellite marker system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jie; Li, Yu-Zhi; Du, Lian-Ming; Yang, Bo; Shen, Fu-Jun; Zhang, He-Min; Zhang, Zhi-He; Zhang, Xiu-Yue; Yue, Bi-Song

    2015-02-07

    The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is a critically endangered species endemic to China. Microsatellites have been preferred as the most popular molecular markers and proven effective in estimating population size, paternity test, genetic diversity for the critically endangered species. The availability of the giant panda complete genome sequences provided the opportunity to carry out genome-wide scans for all types of microsatellites markers, which now opens the way for the analysis and development of microsatellites in giant panda. By screening the whole genome sequence of giant panda in silico mining, we identified microsatellites in the genome of giant panda and analyzed their frequency and distribution in different genomic regions. Based on our search criteria, a repertoire of 855,058 SSRs was detected, with mono-nucleotides being the most abundant. SSRs were found in all genomic regions and were more abundant in non-coding regions than coding regions. A total of 160 primer pairs were designed to screen for polymorphic microsatellites using the selected tetranucleotide microsatellite sequences. The 51 novel polymorphic tetranucleotide microsatellite loci were discovered based on genotyping blood DNA from 22 captive giant pandas in this study. Finally, a total of 15 markers, which showed good polymorphism, stability, and repetition in faecal samples, were used to establish the novel microsatellite marker system for giant panda. Meanwhile, a genotyping database for Chengdu captive giant pandas (n = 57) were set up using this standardized system. What's more, a universal individual identification method was established and the genetic diversity were analysed in this study as the applications of this marker system. The microsatellite abundance and diversity were characterized in giant panda genomes. A total of 154,677 tetranucleotide microsatellites were identified and 15 of them were discovered as the polymorphic and stable loci. The individual

  19. Distribution, function and evolution characterization of microsatellite in Sargassum thunbergii (Fucales, Phaeophyta) transcriptome and their application in marker development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fuli; Hu, Zimin; Liu, Wenhui; Li, Jingjing; Wang, Wenjun; Liang, Zhourui; Wang, Feijiu; Sun, Xiutao

    2016-01-06

    Using transcriptome data to mine microsatellite and develop markers has growingly become prevalent. However, characterizing the possible function of microsatellite is relatively rare. In this study, we explored microsatellites in the transcriptome of the brown alga Sargassum thunbergii and characterized the frequencies, distribution, function and evolution, and developed primers to validate these microsatellites. Our results showed that Tri-nucleotide is the most abundant, followed by di- and mono-nucleotide. The length of microsatellite was significantly affected by the repeat motif size. The density of microsatellite in the CDS region is significantly lower than that in the UTR region. The annotation of the transcripts containing microsatellite showed that 573 transcripts have GO terms and can be categorized into 42 groups. Pathways enrichment showed that microsatellites were significantly overrepresented in the genes involved in pathways such as Ubiquitin mediated proteolysis, RNA degradation, Spliceosome, etc. Primers flanking 961 microsatellite loci were designed, and among the 30 pairs of primer selected randomly for availability test, 23 were proved to be efficient. These findings provided new insight into the function and evolution of microsatellite in transcriptome, and the identified microsatellite loci within the annotated gene will be useful for developing functional markers in S. thunbergii.

  20. Genetic diversity in some local chicken breeds using microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cassandro

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Genetic relationships among Veneto native breeds of chickens were studied on the basis of microsatellites polymorphisms. A total of 100 DNA samples from 2 local chicken breeds (45 Robusta Lionata and 43 Robusta Maculata and a commercial broiler line (12 Golden Comet were analyzed using 19 microsatellite markers. The average number of alleles per locus was 4.05 and the expected heterozigosity resulted lower for the local breeds than the broiler line. The Robusta Lionata breed and the broiler line showed a significant deficit and excess of heterozygotes, respectively, deviating from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Nei’s standard genetic distances corrected for bias due to sampling of individuals (Da, based on allele frequencies, were calculated among breeds. The local breeds resulted very similar confirming the same genetic origin. The results suggested that microsatellite markers are a useful tool for studying the genetic diversity among local chicken breeds.

  1. Detection of Sequence Polymorphism in Rubus Occidentalis L. Monomorphic Microsatellite Markers by High Resolution Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microsatellite, or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, are valuable as co-dominant genetic markers with a variety of applications such as DNA fingerprinting, linkage mapping, and population structure analysis. Development of microsatellite primers through the identification of appropriate repeate...

  2. Mining microsatellite markers from public expressed sequence tag ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hasnaoui N., Buonamici A., Sebastiani F., Mars M., Zhang D. and. Vendramin G. G. 2012 Molecular genetic diversity of Punica granatum L. (pomegranate) as revealed by microsatellite DNA markers (SSR). Gene 493, 105–112. Huang X. and Madan A. 1999 CAP 3: a DNA sequence assembly program. Genome Res.

  3. Segregation analysis of microsatellite (SSR) markers in sugarcane polyploids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although the microsatellite (SSR) DNA markers have been extensively used in sugarcane breeding research, little is known about its inheritance mechanism. To address this problem, a high throughput molecular genotyping experiment was conducted on 964 single pollen grains and a 288-self progeny S1 map...

  4. Screening and identification of a microsatellite marker associated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1991), and importance to tropical and subtropical aquacul- ture, tilapia has received ... specific duplication of amh (denoted as amhy) lacking the TGF- β domain was identified ..... mixed sex culture. The sex-linked microsatellite marker identified in this study could be used to assist breeding for production of monosex tilapia.

  5. Screening and identification of a microsatellite marker associated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    UNH168 was localized by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on the long arm of the largest tilapia chromosome pair. (chromosome 1, equivalent to LG3). ... 1991), and importance to tropical and subtropical aquacul- ture, tilapia has received much ... In Nile tilapia, 10 microsatellite markers belonging to linkage group 1 ...

  6. Mining microsatellite markers from public expressed sequence tag ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [Jian Z.-H., Liu X.-S., Hu J.-B., Chen Y.-H. and Feng J.-C. 2012 Mining microsatellite markers from public expressed sequence tag sequences for genetic diversity .... gram (Premier Biosoft International, Palo Alto, CA) was used to design ..... relationships among pomegranate genotypes studied by fruit characteristics and ...

  7. Microsatellite markers for the diploid Basidiomycete fungus, Armillaria mellea

    Science.gov (United States)

    We isolated and characterized 13 microsatellite markers for two North American populations (California and Pennsylvania) of Armillaria mellea, a fungal root pathogen responsible for Armillaria root disease of numerous horticultural crops and forest trees. The frequency of alleles ranged from two to...

  8. Mining microsatellite markers from public expressed sequence tag ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 91; Issue 3. Mining microsatellite markers from public expressed sequence tag sequences for genetic diversity analysis in pomegranate. Zai-Hai Jian Xin-She Liu Jian-Bin Hu Yan-Hui Chen Jian-Can Feng. Research Note Volume 91 Issue 3 December 2012 pp 353-358 ...

  9. Cross-species amplification of human microsatellite markers in pig ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (Macaca arctoides) and pig-tailed macaque (Macaca nemestrina) are biomedically important species but are becoming endangered fast. In the present study, 20 human tetranucleotide microsatellite markers were used to test their cross-species amplification in captive stump-tailed macaques and pig-tailed macaques.

  10. Microsatellite markers and polymorphism in cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alisa P. Ramakrishnan; Craig E. Coleman; Susan E. Meyer; Daniel J. Fairbanks

    2001-01-01

    Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) individuals were genetically characterized using polymorphic microsatellite markers. Through analysis of alleles of five polymorphic loci, genotypes were constructed of individuals from four populations in Utah and Nevada. There were 15 different genotypes: Whiterocks, UT, had nine genotypes, Hobble Creek, UT, had seven genotypes,...

  11. Characterization of microsatellite markers in eastern white pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. S. Echt; P. May-Marquardt; M. Hseih; R. Zahorchak

    1996-01-01

    An enrichment cloning method was evaluated for the isolation of microsatellite loci from eastern white pine and the resulting markers were examined for polymorphisms. A 200-fold enrichment was achieved for highly abundant (AC)n repeats, but for much less abundant (ACAG)n repeats an enrichment of only 20-fold was obtained....

  12. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers in Garcinia ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K. V.

    (table 3) indicating successful cross amplification of SSR markers in Garcinia. The present study describes the isolation and characterization of microsatellites isolated from whole-genome sequence data of G. gummi-gutta. The NGS and mining of the G. gummi- gutta genome helped in identification of thousands of SSR.

  13. Cross-species applicability of chicken microsatellite markers for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We obtained blood samples of 57 Indian ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) belonging to three indigenous duck populations of geographically distinct locations of the country and genotyped them using chicken microsatellite markers. Twenty three of the 30 loci were amplified and 17 loci yielded high success rate (> 91%).

  14. Mining microsatellite markers from public expressed sequence tag

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 91; Issue 3. Mining microsatellite markers from public expressed sequence tag sequences for genetic diversity analysis in pomegranate. Zai-Hai Jian Xin-She Liu Jian-Bin Hu Yan-Hui Chen Jian-Can Feng. Research Note Volume 91 Issue 3 December 2012 pp 353-358 ...

  15. Thirty novel microsatellite markers for the coastal pelagic fish ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Scomber japonicus (Scombridae: Scomber) is a wide-spread pelagic fish in the warm and temperate transition coastal areas and adjacent seas of Atlantic, Pacific and northwest. Indian oceans (Collette and Nauen 1983). Although there are few studies on development of microsatellite markers that provide useful tool to ...

  16. Characterization of microsatellite markers for Broussonetia papyrifera (Moraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñailillo, Johany; Kuo, Wenhsi; Olivares, Gabriela; Silva-Poblete, Gerardo; Peña-Ahumada, Barbara; Muñoz, Sofía; Moncada, Ximena; Chung, Kuo-Fang; Seelenfreund, Daniela; Seelenfreund, Andrea

    2017-08-01

    Broussonetia papyrifera (Moraceae) is native to Asia and is used as a medicinal plant and as a source of fiber for making paper. It was dispersed into the Pacific region as a fiber source for making nonwoven textiles (barkcloth). Microsatellites were developed to trace the human-mediated dispersal of this species into the Pacific region. A set of 36 microsatellites was isolated and initially assayed on 10 accessions to assess polymorphism. We found that 20 markers were polymorphic, with the number of alleles per marker ranging from four to 35 in 70 accessions genotyped from three Asian populations. Observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.04 to 0.85 and from 0.19 to 0.94, respectively. These markers were tested in four Moraceae species and one Rosaceae species. These markers will be useful for the assessment of genetic diversity in B. papyrifera . They show low transferability to other species tested.

  17. Microsatellite Markers for the Invasive Species Bidens alba (Asteraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Bin Lu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed in the invasive species Bidens alba (Asteraceae to assess its population structure and to facilitate tracking its expansion in China. Methods and Results: Using 454 pyrosequencing, 20 microsatellite primer sets were developed for B. alba. The markers were tested on one population of B. alba (30 individuals and one population of the closely related B. pilosa (30 individuals in China. For B. alba, all of the markers were polymorphic, and the number of alleles per locus ranged from three to 32. The expected heterozygosity values were from 0.3787 to 0.9284, and the Shannon–Wiener index was from 0.6796 to 2.8401. Conclusions: These markers will be useful for investigating the genetic structure, genetic diversity, and invasion dynamics of B. alba and will also be useful in studies of B. pilosa.

  18. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers in Fraser fir (Abies fraseri)

    Science.gov (United States)

    S.A. Josserand; K.M. Potter; G. Johnson; J.A. Bowen; J. Frampton; C.D. Nelson

    2006-01-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of 14 microsatellite loci from Fraser fir (Abies fraseri). These markers originated from cloned inserts enriched for DNA sequences containing tandem di- and tri-nucleotide repeats. In total, 36 clones were selected, sequenced and evaluated. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers for 14 of these...

  19. Isolation of microsatellite markers in the Calliptamus genus (Orthoptera, Acrididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet, E; Pages, C; Blondin, L; Billot, C; Rivallan, R; Vassal, Jm; Lecoq, M; Risterucci, Am

    2010-01-01

    The Calliptamus genus (Orthoptera: Acrididae) includes locust and grasshopper species, some of which have a high economic impact. Using an enriched methodology, 10 microsatellite markers have been developed from two species, Calliptamus italicus and Calliptamus barbarus. These polymorphic markers were tested on different populations of three Calliptamus species: C. italicus, C. barbarus, C. wattenwylianus. Two markers were amplified on the three species, as well as four on C. barbarus and two on C. italicus. In each species, 9 to 23 alleles per locus were observed. These molecular markers might prove to be a new and interesting tool for Calliptamus population genetics and dispersion studies.

  20. Cultivar identification and genetic relatedness among 25 black walnut (Juglans nigra) clones based on microsatellite markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kejia Pang; Keith Woeste; Charles. Michler

    2017-01-01

    A set of eight microsatellite markers was used to genotype 25 black walnut (Juglans nigra L.) clones within the Purdue University germplasm repository. The identities of 212 ramets were verified using the same eight microsatellite markers. Some trees were mislabeled and corrected as to clone using analysis of microsatellite markers. A genetic...

  1. Genome-Wide Identification and Transferability of Microsatellite Markers between Palmae Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yong; Xia, Wei; Ma, Jianwei; Mason, Annaliese S.; Fan, Haikuo; Shi, Peng; Lei, Xintao; Ma, Zilong; Peng, Ming

    2016-01-01

    The Palmae family contains 202 genera and approximately 2800 species. Except for Elaeis guineensis and Phoenix dactylifera, almost no genetic and genomic information is available for Palmae species. Therefore, this is an obstacle to the conservation and genetic assessment of Palmae species, especially those that are currently endangered. The study was performed to develop a large number of microsatellite markers which can be used for genetic analysis in different Palmae species. Based on the assembled genome of E. guineensis and P. dactylifera, a total of 814 383 and 371 629 microsatellites were identified. Among these microsatellites identified in E. guineensis, 734 509 primer pairs could be designed from the flanking sequences of these microsatellites. The majority (618 762) of these designed primer pairs had in silico products in the genome of E. guineensis. These 618 762 primer pairs were subsequently used to in silico amplify the genome of P. dactylifera. A total of 7 265 conserved microsatellites were identified between E. guineensis and P. dactylifera. One hundred and thirty-five primer pairs flanking the conserved SSRs were stochastically selected and validated to have high cross-genera transferability, varying from 16.7 to 93.3% with an average of 73.7%. These genome-wide conserved microsatellite markers will provide a useful tool for genetic assessment and conservation of different Palmae species in the future. PMID:27826307

  2. Genome-wide identification and transferability of microsatellite markers between Palmae species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Xiao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The Palmae family contains 202 genera and approximately 2800 species. Except for Elaeis guineensis and Phoenix dactylifera, almost no genetic and genomic information is available for Palmae species. Therefore, this is an obstacle to the conservation and genetic assessment of Palmae species, especially those that are currently endangered. The study was performed to develop a large number of microsatellite markers which can be used for genetic analysis in different Palmae species. Based on the assembled genome of Elaeis guineensis and Phoenix dactylifera, a total of 814 383 and 371 629 microsatellites were identified. Among these microsatellites identified in Elaeis guineensis, 734 509 primer pairs could be designed from the flanking sequences of these microsatellites. The majority (618 762 of these designed primer pairs had in silico products in the genome of Elaeis guineensis. These 618 762 primer pairs were subsequently used to in silico amplify the genome of Phoenix dactylifera. A total of 7 265 conserved microsatellites were identified between Elaeis guineensis and Phoenix dactylifera. One hundred and thirty-five primer pairs flanking the conserved SSRs were stochastically selected and validated to have high cross-genera transferability, varying from 16.7% to 93.3% with an average of 73.7%. These genome-wide conserved microsatellite markers will provide a useful tool for genetic assessment and conservation of different Palmae species in the future.

  3. Polymorphic microsatellite markers in the invasive shrub Buddleja davidii (Scrophulariaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiter, Susanne; Ebeling, Susan K; Durka, Walter

    2011-02-01

    Microsatellite primers were developed for the invasive plant Buddleja davidii, a Chinese shrub that is an invader in most other continents. An invasive population was analyzed using eight di- and tetranucleotide microsatellite loci. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 5 to 14. Due to polyploidy, exact genotypes could not be determined. Progeny arrays were used to study the outcrossing rate using presence/absence data of alleles resulting in an estimate of multilocus outcrossing rate of 93%. The markers were successfully tested in five congeneric species. The results indicate the utility of these loci in future studies of population genetics and breeding systems in B. davidii and in congeneric species.

  4. Isolation and characterization of novel microsatellite markers from the sika deer (Cervus nippon) genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y M; Bai, C Y; Niu, W P; Yu, H; Yang, R J; Yan, S Q; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, M J; Zhao, Z H

    2015-09-28

    Microsatellite markers are widely and evenly distributed, and are highly polymorphic. Rapid and convenient detection through automated analysis means that microsatellite markers are widely used in the construction of plant and animal genetic maps, in quantitative trait loci localization, marker-assisted selection, identification of genetic relationships, and genetic diversity and phylogenetic tree construction. However, few microsatellite markers remain to be isolated. We used streptavidin magnetic beads to affinity-capture and construct a (CA)n microsatellite DNA-enriched library from sika deer. We selected sequences containing more than six repeats to design primers. Clear bands were selected, which were amplified using non-specific primers following PCR amplification to screen polymorphisms in a group of 65 unrelated sika deer. The positive clone rate reached 82.9% by constructing the enriched library, and we then selected positive clones for sequencing. There were 395 sequences with CA repeats, and the CA repeat number was 4-105. We selected sequences containing more than six repeats to design primers, of which 297 pairs were designed. We next selected clear bands and used non-specific primers to amplify following PCR amplification. In total, 245 pairs of primers were screened. We then selected 50 pairs of primers to randomly screen for polymorphisms. We detected 47 polymorphic and 3 monomorphic loci in 65 unrelated sika deer. These newly isolated and characterized microsatellite loci can be used to construct genetic maps and for lineage testing in deer. In addition, they can be used for comparative genomics between Cervidae species.

  5. Transcriptome-derived microsatellite markers for Dioon (Zamiaceae) cycad species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Alberto; Cervantes-Díaz, Fret; Perez-Zavala, Francisco G; González-Astorga, Jorge; Bede, Jacqueline C; Cibrián-Jaramillo, Angélica

    2016-02-01

    Dioon (Zamiaceae) is an endangered North American cycad genus of evolutionary and ornamental value. We designed and validated a set of microsatellite markers from D. edule that can be used for population-level and conservation studies, and that transferred successfully to D. angustifolium, D. spinulosum, and D. holmgrenii. We tested 50 primers from 80 microsatellite candidate loci in the OneKP D. edule transcriptome. Genotypes from 21 loci in 20 D. edule individuals revealed up to 14 alleles per locus and observed heterozygosity from 0.15 to 0.92; one locus was monomorphic. Seven of those 21 loci were polymorphic in D. angustifolium, D. spinulosum, and D. holmgrenii, with up to seven alleles, and an observed heterozygosity up to 0.89. The transcriptome-derived microsatellites generated here will serve as tools to advance population genetic studies and inform conservation strategies of Dioon, including the identification and origin of illegal plants in the cycad trade.

  6. Development and characterization of polymorphic microsatellite markers for the sweet orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck)

    OpenAIRE

    Novelli,Valdenice M.; Cristofani,Mariangela; Souza,Alessandra A.; Machado,Marcos A.

    2006-01-01

    The aims of this study were to develop simple sequence repeat markers (SSRs or microsatellite markers) in citrus and to evaluate the efficiency of these markers for characterization of sweet orange. We developed SSRs from a genomic library of 'Pêra IAC' sweet orange enriched for AG/TC, GT/CA, TCA/AGT and AAC/TTG sequence repeats. We selected 279 sequences from which 171 primer pairs were designed of which 113 with the best banding patterns were selected. Characterization of sweet orange micro...

  7. Development of Microsatellite Markers for Isodon longitubus (Lamiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Yamashiro

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed for Isodon longitubus to study the natural hybridization of the species and its congeners. Methods and Results: A total of 10 primer sets were developed for I. longitubus. From the initial screening, all of 10 loci were polymorphic with five to 19 alleles per locus in the Mt. Ishizuchi population, whereas nine loci were polymorphic with two to 12 alleles per loci in the Toon population. Although one locus was monomorphic at one population, the observed and expected heterozygosity values estimated from 34 I. longitubus samples ranged from 0.273 to 1.000 and from 0.483 to 0.918, respectively. Six primer sets could amplify all three species examined in this study (I. inflexus, I. japonicus, and I. shikokianus. Conclusions: The 10 microsatellite markers developed here will be useful in analyzing the population genetic structure of I. longitubus and in studying the natural hybridization between Isodon species.

  8. Pooled Genotyping of Microsatellite Markers in Parent–Offspring Trios

    OpenAIRE

    Kirov, George; Williams, Nigel; Sham, Pak; Craddock, Nick; Owen, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    We studied the extent to which genotyping of simple sequence repeat polymorphisms (SSRs) in pooled DNA samples can be used to predict differences in allele frequencies between parents and their affected offspring. We also developed a simple method of correction for the effects of stutter and differential amplification on the analysis of SSRs in pooled DNA samples based on widely available software. We genotyped individually eight polymorphic microsatellite markers in 110 parent–offspring trio...

  9. Population Structure in Naegleria fowleri as Revealed by Microsatellite Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupat-Goutaland, Bénédicte; Régoudis, Estelle; Besseyrias, Matthieu; Mularoni, Angélique; Binet, Marie; Herbelin, Pascaline; Pélandakis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Naegleria sp. is a free living amoeba belonging to the Heterolobosea class. Over 40 species of Naegleria were identified and recovered worldwide in different habitats such as swimming pools, freshwater lakes, soil or dust. Among them, N. fowleri, is a human pathogen responsible for primary amoeboic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Around 300 cases were reported in 40 years worldwide but PAM is a fatal disease of the central nervous system with only 5% survival of infected patients. Since both pathogenic and non pathogenic species were encountered in the environment, detection and dispersal mode are crucial points in the fight against this pathogenic agent. Previous studies on identification and genotyping of N. fowleri strains were focused on RAPD analysis and on ITS sequencing and identified 5 variants: euro-american, south pacific, widespread, cattenom and chooz. Microsatellites are powerful markers in population genetics with broad spectrum of applications (such as paternity test, fingerprinting, genetic mapping or genetic structure analysis). They are characterized by a high degree of length polymorphism. The aim of this study was to genotype N. fowleri strains using microsatellites markers in order to track this population and to better understand its evolution. Six microsatellite loci and 47 strains from different geographical origins were used for this analysis. The microsatellite markers revealed a level of discrimination higher than any other marker used until now, enabling the identification of seven genetic groups, included in the five main genetic groups based on the previous RAPD and ITS analyses. This analysis also allowed us to go further in identifying private alleles highlighting intra-group variability. A better identification of the N. fowleri isolates could be done with this type of analysis and could allow a better tracking of the clinical and environmental N. fowleri strains.

  10. Population Structure in Naegleria fowleri as Revealed by Microsatellite Markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bénédicte Coupat-Goutaland

    Full Text Available Naegleria sp. is a free living amoeba belonging to the Heterolobosea class. Over 40 species of Naegleria were identified and recovered worldwide in different habitats such as swimming pools, freshwater lakes, soil or dust. Among them, N. fowleri, is a human pathogen responsible for primary amoeboic meningoencephalitis (PAM. Around 300 cases were reported in 40 years worldwide but PAM is a fatal disease of the central nervous system with only 5% survival of infected patients. Since both pathogenic and non pathogenic species were encountered in the environment, detection and dispersal mode are crucial points in the fight against this pathogenic agent. Previous studies on identification and genotyping of N. fowleri strains were focused on RAPD analysis and on ITS sequencing and identified 5 variants: euro-american, south pacific, widespread, cattenom and chooz. Microsatellites are powerful markers in population genetics with broad spectrum of applications (such as paternity test, fingerprinting, genetic mapping or genetic structure analysis. They are characterized by a high degree of length polymorphism. The aim of this study was to genotype N. fowleri strains using microsatellites markers in order to track this population and to better understand its evolution. Six microsatellite loci and 47 strains from different geographical origins were used for this analysis. The microsatellite markers revealed a level of discrimination higher than any other marker used until now, enabling the identification of seven genetic groups, included in the five main genetic groups based on the previous RAPD and ITS analyses. This analysis also allowed us to go further in identifying private alleles highlighting intra-group variability. A better identification of the N. fowleri isolates could be done with this type of analysis and could allow a better tracking of the clinical and environmental N. fowleri strains.

  11. Microsatellite markers for Urochloa humidicola (Poaceae) and their transferability to other Urochloa species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Jean C S; Barreto, Mariana A; Oliveira, Fernanda A; Vigna, Bianca B Z; Souza, Anete P

    2015-03-15

    Urochloa humidicola is a warm-season grass commonly used as forage in the tropics and is recognized for its tolerance to seasonal flooding. This grass is an important forage species for the Cerrado and Amazon regions of Brazil. U. humidicola is a polyploid species with variable ploidy (6X-9X) and facultative apomixis with high phenotypic plasticity. However, this apomixis and ploidy, as well as the limited knowledge of the genetic basis of the germplasm collection, have constrained genetic breeding activities, yet microsatellite markers may enable a better understanding of the species' genetic composition. This study aimed to develop and characterize new polymorphic microsatellite molecular markers in U. humidicola and to evaluate their transferability to other Urochloa species. A set of microsatellite markers for U. humidicola was identified from two new enriched genomic DNA libraries: the first library was constructed from a single sexual genotype and the second from a pool of eight apomictic genotypes selected on the basis of previous results. Of the 114 loci developed, 72 primer pairs presented a good amplification product, and 64 were polymorphic among the 34 genotypes tested. The number of bands per simple sequence repeat (SSR) locus ranged from 1 to 29, with a mean of 9.6 bands per locus. The mean polymorphism information content (PIC) of all loci was 0.77, and the mean discrimination power (DP) was 0.87. STRUCTURE analysis revealed differences among U. humidicola accessions, hybrids, and other Urochloa accessions. The transferability of these microsatellites was evaluated in four species of the genus, U. brizantha, U. decumbens, U. ruziziensis, and U. dictyoneura, and the percentage of transferability ranged from 58.33% to 69.44% depending on the species. This work reports new polymorphic microsatellite markers for U. humidicola that can be used for breeding programs of this and other Urochloa species, including genetic linkage mapping, quantitative trait

  12. Microsatellite markers of water buffalo, Bubalus bubalis - development, characterisation and linkage disequilibrium studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaidhegi R

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microsatellite markers are highly polymorphic and widely used in genome mapping and population genetic studies in livestock species. River buffalo, Bubalus bubalis is an economically important livestock species, though only a limited number of microsatellite markers have been reported thus far in this species. Results In the present study, using two different approaches 571 microsatellite markers have been characterized for water buffalo. Of the 571 microsatellite markers, 498 were polymorphic with average heterozygosity of 0.51 on a panel of 24 unrelated buffalo. Fisher exact test was used to detect LD between the marker pairs. Among the 137550 pairs of marker combination, 14.58% pairs showed significant LD (P Conclusion The high conservation of cattle microsatellite loci in water buffalo promises the usefulness of the cattle microsatellites markers on buffalo. The polymorphic markers characterised in this study will contribute to genetic linkage and radiation hybrid mapping of water buffalo and population genetic studies.

  13. Discovery of Genome-Wide Microsatellite Markers in Scombridae: A Pilot Study on Albacore Tuna.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natacha Nikolic

    Full Text Available Recent developments in sequencing technologies and bioinformatics analysis provide a greater amount of DNA sequencing reads at a low cost. Microsatellites are the markers of choice for a variety of population genetic studies, and high quality markers can be discovered in non-model organisms, such as tuna, with these recent developments. Here, we use a high-throughput method to isolate microsatellite markers in albacore tuna, Thunnus alalunga, based on coupling multiplex enrichment and next-generation sequencing on 454 GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing. The crucial minimum number of polymorphic markers to infer evolutionary and ecological processes for this species has been described for the first time. We provide 1670 microsatellite design primer pairs, and technical and molecular genetics selection resulting in 43 polymorphic microsatellite markers. On this panel, we characterized 34 random and selectively neutral markers («neutral» and 9 «non-neutral» markers. The variability of «neutral» markers was screened with 136 individuals of albacore tuna from southwest Indian Ocean (42, northwest Indian Ocean (31, South Africa (31, and southeast Atlantic Ocean (32. Power analysis demonstrated that the panel of genetic markers can be applied in diversity and population genetics studies. Global genetic diversity for albacore was high with a mean number of alleles at 16.94; observed heterozygosity 66% and expected heterozygosity 77%. The number of individuals was insufficient to provide accurate results on differentiation. Of the 9 «non-neutral» markers, 3 were linked to a sequence of known function. The one is located to a sequence having an immunity function (ThuAla-Tcell-01 and the other to a sequence having energy allocation function (ThuAla-Hki-01. These two markers were genotyped on the 136 individuals and presented different diversity levels. ThuAla-Tcell-01 has a high number of alleles (20, heterozygosity (87-90%, and assignment index. Thu

  14. Discovery of Genome-Wide Microsatellite Markers in Scombridae: A Pilot Study on Albacore Tuna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolic, Natacha; Duthoy, Stéphanie; Destombes, Antoine; Bodin, Nathalie; West, Wendy; Puech, Alexis; Bourjea, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in sequencing technologies and bioinformatics analysis provide a greater amount of DNA sequencing reads at a low cost. Microsatellites are the markers of choice for a variety of population genetic studies, and high quality markers can be discovered in non-model organisms, such as tuna, with these recent developments. Here, we use a high-throughput method to isolate microsatellite markers in albacore tuna, Thunnus alalunga, based on coupling multiplex enrichment and next-generation sequencing on 454 GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing. The crucial minimum number of polymorphic markers to infer evolutionary and ecological processes for this species has been described for the first time. We provide 1670 microsatellite design primer pairs, and technical and molecular genetics selection resulting in 43 polymorphic microsatellite markers. On this panel, we characterized 34 random and selectively neutral markers («neutral») and 9 «non-neutral» markers. The variability of «neutral» markers was screened with 136 individuals of albacore tuna from southwest Indian Ocean (42), northwest Indian Ocean (31), South Africa (31), and southeast Atlantic Ocean (32). Power analysis demonstrated that the panel of genetic markers can be applied in diversity and population genetics studies. Global genetic diversity for albacore was high with a mean number of alleles at 16.94; observed heterozygosity 66% and expected heterozygosity 77%. The number of individuals was insufficient to provide accurate results on differentiation. Of the 9 «non-neutral» markers, 3 were linked to a sequence of known function. The one is located to a sequence having an immunity function (ThuAla-Tcell-01) and the other to a sequence having energy allocation function (ThuAla-Hki-01). These two markers were genotyped on the 136 individuals and presented different diversity levels. ThuAla-Tcell-01 has a high number of alleles (20), heterozygosity (87-90%), and assignment index. ThuAla-Hki-01

  15. Molecular marker analysis to differentiate a clonal selection of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lalit Kumar

    2013-04-03

    Apr 3, 2013 ... Microsatellite and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers were used to differentiate. Manjari Naveen, a clonal selection of Centennial Seedless variety of grape. Twenty one (21) microsatellite primers could not detect variation between parent variety and its clone. AFLP analysis.

  16. Microsatellite marker development by partial sequencing of the sour passion fruit genome (Passiflora edulis Sims).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Susan; Martins, Alexandre M; Junqueira, Nilton T V; Costa, Ana Maria; Faleiro, Fábio G; Ferreira, Márcio E

    2017-07-21

    The Passiflora genus comprises hundreds of wild and cultivated species of passion fruit used for food, industrial, ornamental and medicinal purposes. Efforts to develop genomic tools for genetic analysis of P. edulis, the most important commercial Passiflora species, are still incipient. In spite of many recognized applications of microsatellite markers in genetics and breeding, their availability for passion fruit research remains restricted. Microsatellite markers in P. edulis are usually limited in number, show reduced polymorphism, and are mostly based on compound or imperfect repeats. Furthermore, they are confined to only a few Passiflora species. We describe the use of NGS technology to partially assemble the P. edulis genome in order to develop hundreds of new microsatellite markers. A total of 14.11 Gbp of Illumina paired-end sequence reads were analyzed to detect simple sequence repeat sites in the sour passion fruit genome. A sample of 1300 contigs containing perfect repeat microsatellite sequences was selected for PCR primer development. Panels of di- and tri-nucleotide repeat markers were then tested in P. edulis germplasm accessions for validation. DNA polymorphism was detected in 74% of the markers (PIC = 0.16 to 0.77; number of alleles/locus = 2 to 7). A core panel of highly polymorphic markers (PIC = 0.46 to 0.77) was used to cross-amplify PCR products in 79 species of Passiflora (including P. edulis), belonging to four subgenera (Astrophea, Decaloba, Distephana and Passiflora). Approximately 71% of the marker/species combinations resulted in positive amplicons in all species tested. DNA polymorphism was detected in germplasm accessions of six closely related Passiflora species (P. edulis, P. alata, P. maliformis, P. nitida, P. quadrangularis and P. setacea) and the data used for accession discrimination and species assignment. A database of P. edulis DNA sequences obtained by NGS technology was examined to identify microsatellite repeats in

  17. Genetic diversity of bovine Neospora caninum determined by microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, N; Gottstein, B; Haddadzadeh, H R

    2015-10-01

    Neospora caninum is one of the most significant parasitic organisms causing bovine abortion worldwide. Despite the economic impact of this infection, relatively little is known about the genetic diversity of this parasite. In this study, using Nc5 and ITS1 nested PCR, N. caninum has been detected in 12 brain samples of aborted fetuses from 298 seropositive dairy cattle collected from four different regions in Tehran, Iran. These specimen (Nc-Iran) were genotyped in multilocus using 9 different microsatellite markers previously described (MS4, MS5, MS6A, MS6B, MS7, MS8, MS10, MS12 and MS21). Microsatellite amplification was completely feasible in 2 samples, semi-completely in 8 samples, and failed in 2 samples. Within the two completely performed allelic profiles of Nc-Iran strains, unique multilocus profiles were obtained for both and novel allelic patterns were found in the MS8 and MS10 microsatellite markers. The Jaccard's similarity index showed significant difference between these two strains and from other standard isolates derived from GenBank such as Nc-Liv, Nc-SweB1, Nc-GER1, KBA1, and KBA2. All samples originating from the same area showed identical allelic numbers and a correlation between the number of repeats and geographic districts was observed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers for Passiflora contracta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazé, Ana Luíza R; Kriedt, Raquel A; Beheregaray, Luciano B; Bonatto, Sandro L; Freitas, Loreta B

    2012-01-01

    Passiflora contracta Vitta (Passifloraceae) is an endemic species of the Atlantic Rainforest, one of the most species-rich ecoregions in the world, although extremely endangered. We have developed an enriched microsatellite library in order to fine-scale studies of the genetic structure of P. contracta. Twelve pairs of microsatellite primers were designed, and seven loci were successfully amplified and characterized by genotyping two wild populations of P. contracta. All seven loci were polymorphic, with an average number of alleles found being 4.8 and 5 per population. The cross-species transferability was tested using sister species Passiflora ovalis Vell. Ex Roemer. The development of these markers will contribute to the studies of population genetics in P. contracta as well as future studies concerning diversity patterns in the Atlantic Rainforest, and may also help to establish strategies for the conservation of this species.

  19. Isolation and Characterization of Microsatellite Markers for Passiflora contracta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luíza R. Cazé

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Passiflora contracta Vitta (Passifloraceae is an endemic species of the Atlantic Rainforest, one of the most species-rich ecoregions in the world, although extremely endangered. We have developed an enriched microsatellite library in order to fine-scale studies of the genetic structure of P. contracta. Twelve pairs of microsatellite primers were designed, and seven loci were successfully amplified and characterized by genotyping two wild populations of P. contracta. All seven loci were polymorphic, with an average number of alleles found being 4.8 and 5 per population. The cross-species transferability was tested using sister species Passiflora ovalis Vell. Ex Roemer. The development of these markers will contribute to the studies of population genetics in P. contracta as well as future studies concerning diversity patterns in the Atlantic Rainforest, and may also help to establish strategies for the conservation of this species.

  20. Development of microsatellite markers in Byrsonima crassifolia (Malpighiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Genevieve K; Schaal, Barbara A

    2012-03-01

    We developed and characterized microsatellite markers for Byrsonima crassifolia (Malpighiaceae), a widely distributed neotropical fruit tree. Eight polymorphic and two monomorphic microsatellite loci were identified and screened in 60 samples from four geographically disparate populations (Bolivia, Brazil, Mexico, and Panama). Each locus exhibited between two and 11 alleles. Expected heterozygosity ranged from 0 to 0.839. All loci amplify in the congeners B. variabilis and B. basiloba, four amplify in B. bucidaefolia, and seven amplify in B. variabilis, although levels of polymorphism have not been assessed. These loci will provide novel tools for comparing genetic diversity present in cultivated and noncultivated populations of B. crassifolia throughout its range, and may prove valuable in related species.

  1. Characterization of microsatellite markers for Broussonetia papyrifera (Moraceae)1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñailillo, Johany; Kuo, Wenhsi; Olivares, Gabriela; Silva-Poblete, Gerardo; Peña-Ahumada, Barbara; Muñoz, Sofía; Moncada, Ximena; Chung, Kuo-Fang; Seelenfreund, Daniela; Seelenfreund, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Premise of the study: Broussonetia papyrifera (Moraceae) is native to Asia and is used as a medicinal plant and as a source of fiber for making paper. It was dispersed into the Pacific region as a fiber source for making nonwoven textiles (barkcloth). Microsatellites were developed to trace the human-mediated dispersal of this species into the Pacific region. Methods and Results: A set of 36 microsatellites was isolated and initially assayed on 10 accessions to assess polymorphism. We found that 20 markers were polymorphic, with the number of alleles per marker ranging from four to 35 in 70 accessions genotyped from three Asian populations. Observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.04 to 0.85 and from 0.19 to 0.94, respectively. These markers were tested in four Moraceae species and one Rosaceae species. Conclusions: These markers will be useful for the assessment of genetic diversity in B. papyrifera. They show low transferability to other species tested. PMID:28924515

  2. Development and characterization of highly polymorphic long TC repeat microsatellite markers for genetic analysis of peanut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macedo Selma E

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. is a crop of economic and social importance, mainly in tropical areas, and developing countries. Its molecular breeding has been hindered by a shortage of polymorphic genetic markers due to a very narrow genetic base. Microsatellites (SSRs are markers of choice in peanut because they are co-dominant, highly transferrable between species and easily applicable in the allotetraploid genome. In spite of substantial effort over the last few years by a number of research groups, the number of SSRs that are polymorphic for A. hypogaea is still limiting for routine application, creating the demand for the discovery of more markers polymorphic within cultivated germplasm. Findings A plasmid genomic library enriched for TC/AG repeats was constructed and 1401 clones sequenced. From the sequences obtained 146 primer pairs flanking mostly TC microsatellites were developed. The average number of repeat motifs amplified was 23. These 146 markers were characterized on 22 genotypes of cultivated peanut. In total 78 of the markers were polymorphic within cultivated germplasm. Most of those 78 markers were highly informative with an average of 5.4 alleles per locus being amplified. Average gene diversity index (GD was 0.6, and 66 markers showed a GD of more than 0.5. Genetic relationship analysis was performed and corroborated the current taxonomical classification of A. hypogaea subspecies and varieties. Conclusions The microsatellite markers described here are a useful resource for genetics and genomics in Arachis. In particular, the 66 markers that are highly polymorphic in cultivated peanut are a significant step towards routine genetic mapping and marker-assisted selection for the crop.

  3. Microsatellite markers linked to the locus of the watermelon fruit stripe pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, R N C S; Santos, C A F; Dias, R C S; Alves, J C S F; Nogueira, T O

    2015-01-16

    Agronomic performance and external and internal appearance of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) fruit are important traits that should be taken into consideration during the development of a new cultivar, as well as being the principal identification elements used by the consumer, which are based on the external appearance and quality of the fruit. Externally, the fruit can be characterized in terms of the shape, the color of the lower rind, and the presence of grooves and stripes, the stripes can be classified as clearly defined or diffuse. The objective of this study was to identify microsatellite markers linked to the stripe pattern of watermelon fruit to support watermelon improvement programs, with the selection of this characteristic in the plantlet stage. F1 and F2 populations, result of a cross between the cultivars BRS Opara (clearly defined stripes) and Pérola (diffuse stripes), were phenotyped for their fruit stripe pattern. The CTAB 2X protocol was used for DNA extraction and 116 microsatellite markers were examined in a group of F2 plants that had fruit with well-defined stripes and fruit with diffuse stripes. The microsatellite loci MCPI_05 and MCPI_16 exhibited a linkage to the stripe pattern at a distance of 1.5 and 1.8 cM, respectively, with LOD scores of 39.28 and 38.11, respectively, which were located on chromosome six of the watermelon genome. These markers can be used in marker-assisted selection in watermelon improvement programs, by various research institutions.

  4. Chloroplast microsatellite markers for Artocarpus (Moraceae) developed from transcriptome sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Elliot M; Laricchia, Kristen M; Murphy, Matthew; Ragone, Diane; Scheffler, Brian E; Simpson, Sheron; Williams, Evelyn W; Zerega, Nyree J C

    2015-09-01

    Chloroplast microsatellite loci were characterized from transcriptomes of Artocarpus altilis (breadfruit) and A. camansi (breadnut). They were tested in A. odoratissimus (terap) and A. altilis and evaluated in silico for two congeners. Fifteen simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were identified in chloroplast sequences from four Artocarpus transcriptome assemblies. The markers were evaluated using capillary electrophoresis in A. odoratissimus (105 accessions) and A. altilis (73). They were also evaluated in silico in A. altilis (10), A. camansi (6), and A. altilis × A. mariannensis (7) transcriptomes. All loci were polymorphic in at least one species, with all 15 polymorphic in A. camansi. Per species, average alleles per locus ranged between 2.2 and 2.5. Three loci had evidence of fragment-length homoplasy. These markers will complement existing nuclear markers by enabling confident identification of maternal and clone lines, which are often important in vegetatively propagated crops such as breadfruit.

  5. A microsatellite marker linkage map of the housefly, Musca domestica : Evidence for male recombination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feldmeyer, B.; Pen, I.; Beukeboom, L. W.

    We present the first molecular marker linkage map for Musca domestica containing 35 microsatellite plus six visible markers. We report the development of 33 new microsatellite markers of which 19 are included in the linkage map. Two hundred and thirty-six F2 individuals were genotyped from three

  6. Toward fully automated genotyping: Genotyping microsatellite markers by deconvolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlin, M.W.; Lancia, G.; See-Kiong, Ng [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Dense genetic linkage maps have been constructed for the human and mouse genomes, with average densities of 2.9 cM and 0.35 cM, respectively. These genetic maps are crucial for mapping both Mendelian and complex traits and are useful in clinical genetic diagnosis. Current maps are largely comprised of abundant, easily assayed, and highly polymorphic PCR-based microsatellite markers, primarily dinucleotide (CA){sub n} repeats. One key limitation of these length polymorphisms is the PCR stutter (or slippage) artifact that introduces additional stutter bands. With two (or more) closely spaced alleles, the stutter bands overlap, and it is difficult to accurately determine the correct alleles; this stutter phenomenon has all but precluded full automation, since a human must visually inspect the allele data. We describe here novel deconvolution methods for accurate genotyping that mathematically remove PCR stutter artifact from microsatellite markers. These methods overcome the manual interpretation bottleneck and thereby enable full automation of genetic map construction and use. New functionalities, including the pooling of DNAs and the pooling of markers, are described that may greatly reduce the associated experimentation requirements. 32 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. CmMDb: a versatile database for Cucumis melo microsatellite markers and other horticulture crop research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhawna; Chaduvula, Pavan K; Bonthala, Venkata S; Manjusha, Verma; Siddiq, Ebrahimali A; Polumetla, Ananda K; Prasad, Gajula M N V

    2015-01-01

    Cucumis melo L. that belongs to Cucurbitaceae family ranks among one of the highest valued horticulture crops being cultivated across the globe. Besides its economical and medicinal importance, Cucumis melo L. is a valuable resource and model system for the evolutionary studies of cucurbit family. However, very limited numbers of molecular markers were reported for Cucumis melo L. so far that limits the pace of functional genomic research in melon and other similar horticulture crops. We developed the first whole genome based microsatellite DNA marker database of Cucumis melo L. and comprehensive web resource that aids in variety identification and physical mapping of Cucurbitaceae family. The Cucumis melo L. microsatellite database (CmMDb: http://65.181.125.102/cmmdb2/index.html) encompasses 39,072 SSR markers along with its motif repeat, motif length, motif sequence, marker ID, motif type and chromosomal locations. The database is featured with novel automated primer designing facility to meet the needs of wet lab researchers. CmMDb is a freely available web resource that facilitates the researchers to select the most appropriate markers for marker-assisted selection in melons and to improve breeding strategies.

  8. Identification and Characterization of Microsatellite Markers Derived from the Whole Genome Analysis of Taenia solium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica J Pajuelo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Infections with Taenia solium are the most common cause of adult acquired seizures worldwide, and are the leading cause of epilepsy in developing countries. A better understanding of the genetic diversity of T. solium will improve parasite diagnostics and transmission pathways in endemic areas thereby facilitating the design of future control measures and interventions. Microsatellite markers are useful genome features, which enable strain typing and identification in complex pathogen genomes. Here we describe microsatellite identification and characterization in T. solium, providing information that will assist in global efforts to control this important pathogen.For genome sequencing, T. solium cysts and proglottids were collected from Huancayo and Puno in Peru, respectively. Using next generation sequencing (NGS and de novo assembly, we assembled two draft genomes and one hybrid genome. Microsatellite sequences were identified and 36 of them were selected for further analysis. Twenty T. solium isolates were collected from Tumbes in the northern region, and twenty from Puno in the southern region of Peru. The size-polymorphism of the selected microsatellites was determined with multi-capillary electrophoresis. We analyzed the association between microsatellite polymorphism and the geographic origin of the samples.The predicted size of the hybrid (proglottid genome combined with cyst genome T. solium genome was 111 MB with a GC content of 42.54%. A total of 7,979 contigs (>1,000 nt were obtained. We identified 9,129 microsatellites in the Puno-proglottid genome and 9,936 in the Huancayo-cyst genome, with 5 or more repeats, ranging from mono- to hexa-nucleotide. Seven microsatellites were polymorphic and 29 were monomorphic within the analyzed isolates. T. solium tapeworms were classified into two genetic groups that correlated with the North/South geographic origin of the parasites.The availability of draft genomes for T. solium represents a

  9. Characterization of novel microsatellite markers in Musa acuminata subsp. burmannicoides, var. Calcutta 4

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    Amorim Edson P

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Banana is a nutritionally important crop across tropical and sub-tropical countries in sub-Saharan Africa, Central and South America and Asia. Although cultivars have evolved from diploid, triploid and tetraploid wild Asian species of Musa acuminata (A genome and Musa balbisiana (B genome, many of today's commercial cultivars are sterile triploids or diploids, with fruit developing via parthenocarpy. As a result of restricted genetic variation, improvement has been limited, resulting in a crop frequently lacking resistance to pests and disease. Considering the importance of molecular tools to facilitate development of disease resistant genotypes, the objectives of this study were to develop polymorphic microsatellite markers from BAC clone sequences for M. acuminata subsp. burmannicoides, var. Calcutta 4. This wild diploid species is used as a donor cultivar in breeding programs as a source of resistance to diverse biotic stresses. Findings Microsatellite sequences were identified from five Calcutta 4 BAC consensi datasets. Specific primers were designed for 41 loci. Isolated di-nucleotide repeat motifs were the most abundant, followed by tri-nucleotides. From 33 tested loci, 20 displayed polymorphism when screened across 21 diploid M. acuminata accessions, contrasting in resistance to Sigatoka diseases. The number of alleles per SSR locus ranged from two to four, with a total of 56. Six repeat classes were identified, with di-nucleotides the most abundant. Expected heterozygosity values for polymorphic markers ranged from 0.31 to 0.75. Conclusions This is the first report identifying polymorphic microsatellite markers from M. acuminata subsp. burmannicoides, var. Calcutta 4 across accessions contrasting in resistance to Sigatoka diseases. These BAC-derived polymorphic microsatellite markers are a useful resource for banana, applicable for genetic map development, germplasm characterization, evolutionary studies and marker

  10. Characterization of novel microsatellite markers in Musa acuminata subsp. burmannicoides, var. Calcutta 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert Ng; Passos, Marco An; Menezes, Natalia Np; Souza, Manoel T; do Carmo Costa, Marcos M; Rennó Azevedo, Vânia C; Amorim, Edson P; Pappas, Georgios J; Ciampi, Ana Y

    2010-05-27

    Banana is a nutritionally important crop across tropical and sub-tropical countries in sub-Saharan Africa, Central and South America and Asia. Although cultivars have evolved from diploid, triploid and tetraploid wild Asian species of Musa acuminata (A genome) and Musa balbisiana (B genome), many of today's commercial cultivars are sterile triploids or diploids, with fruit developing via parthenocarpy. As a result of restricted genetic variation, improvement has been limited, resulting in a crop frequently lacking resistance to pests and disease. Considering the importance of molecular tools to facilitate development of disease resistant genotypes, the objectives of this study were to develop polymorphic microsatellite markers from BAC clone sequences for M. acuminata subsp. burmannicoides, var. Calcutta 4. This wild diploid species is used as a donor cultivar in breeding programs as a source of resistance to diverse biotic stresses. Microsatellite sequences were identified from five Calcutta 4 BAC consensi datasets. Specific primers were designed for 41 loci. Isolated di-nucleotide repeat motifs were the most abundant, followed by tri-nucleotides. From 33 tested loci, 20 displayed polymorphism when screened across 21 diploid M. acuminata accessions, contrasting in resistance to Sigatoka diseases. The number of alleles per SSR locus ranged from two to four, with a total of 56. Six repeat classes were identified, with di-nucleotides the most abundant. Expected heterozygosity values for polymorphic markers ranged from 0.31 to 0.75. This is the first report identifying polymorphic microsatellite markers from M. acuminata subsp. burmannicoides, var. Calcutta 4 across accessions contrasting in resistance to Sigatoka diseases. These BAC-derived polymorphic microsatellite markers are a useful resource for banana, applicable for genetic map development, germplasm characterization, evolutionary studies and marker assisted selection for traits.

  11. Development of 15 polymorphic microsatellite markers for Ficus virens (Moraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Rong-Hua; Li, Yun-Xiang; Liu, Mei; Quan, Qiu-Mei

    2017-01-01

    Ficus virens (Moraceae) is distributed widely in South and Southeast Asia, Melanesia, and northern Australia, and it is also cultivated outside its original northern range limit in southwestern China. Therefore, the species is well suited to explore the mechanism of range limits of Ficus species. However, little is known about its genetic background. Fifteen polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed using the biotin-streptavidin capture method. Polymorphism was tested in 85 F. virens individuals sampled from three populations. The number of alleles ranged from three to 17. The observed and expected heterozygosity of each population varied from 0.0667 to 0.9286 and 0.0650 to 0.8890, respectively. Cross-species amplification was also carried out in eight other Ficus species. These 15 markers will be valuable for studying the genetic variation and population structure of F. virens and related Ficus species.

  12. Use of microsatellite markers in an American beech (Fagus grandifolia) population and paternity testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer Koch; Dave Carey; M.E. Mason

    2010-01-01

    Cross-species amplification of six microsatellite markers from European beech (Fagus sylvatica Linn) and nine markers from Japanese beech (Fagus crenata Blume) was tested in American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.). Three microsatellites from each species were successfully adapted for use in American beech...

  13. Eighteen polymorphic microsatellite markers for the highly endangered Spanish imperial eagle (Aquila adalberti) and related species

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Cruz, Begoña; Godoy, José A.; Negro, Juan J.; O'Brien, Stephen J.; Johnson, Warren E.

    2002-01-01

    Here we describe the development of 18 polymorphic microsatellite markers for the endangered Spanish imperial eagle (Aquila adalberti). Microsatellites were tested in five other raptor species. These markers were revealed as good molecular tools for genetic population studies, individual identification and parentage assessment in Spanish imperial eagle and closely related species.

  14. Eighteen polymorphic microsatellite markers for the highly endangered Spanish imperial eagle ( Aquila adalberti ) and related species

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Cruz, Begoña; David, Victor A.; Godoy, José A.; Negro, Juan J.; O'Brien, Stephen J.; Johnson, Warren E.

    2002-01-01

    Here we describe the development of 18 polymorphic microsatellite markers for the endangered Spanish imperial eagle ( Aquila adalberti ). Microsatellites were tested in five other raptor species. These markers were revealed as good molecular tools for genetic population studies, individual identification and parentage assessment in Spanish imperial eagle and closely related species.

  15. Application of Microsatellite Markers in Conservation Genetics and Fisheries Management: Recent Advances in Population Structure Analysis and Conservation Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Muneer, P. M.

    2014-01-01

    Microsatellites are the most popular and versatile genetic marker with myriads of applications in population genetics, conservation biology, and evolutionary biology. These are the arrays of DNA sequences, consisting of tandemly repeating mono-, di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide units, which are distributed throughout the genomes of most eukaryotic species. Microsatellites are codominant in nature, highly polymorphic, easily typed, and Mendelian inherited, all properties which make them very suitable for the study of population structure and pedigree analysis and capable of detecting differences among closely related species. PCR for microsatellites can be automated for identifying simple sequence repeat polymorphism. Small amount of blood samples or alcohol preserved tissue is adequate for analyzing them. Most of the microsatellites are noncoding, and therefore variations are independent of natural selection. These properties make microsatellites ideal genetic markers for conservation genetics and fisheries management. This review addresses the applications of microsatellite markers in conservation genetics and recent advances in population structure analysis in the context of fisheries management. PMID:24808959

  16. The characterisation of microsatellite markers reveals tetraploidy in the Greater Water Parsnip, Sium latifolium (Apiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Naomi J; Horsburgh, Gavin J; Dawson, Deborah A

    2017-06-12

    The Greater Water Parsnip, Sium latifolium (Apiaceae), is a marginal aquatic perennial currently endangered in England and consequently the focus of a number of conservation translocation projects. Microsatellite markers were developed for S. latifolium to facilitate comparison of genetic diversity and composition between natural and introduced populations. We selected 65 S. latifolium microsatellite (MiSeq) sequences and designed primer pairs for these. Primer sets were tested in 32 individuals. We found 15 polymorphic loci that amplified consistently. For the selected 15 loci, the number of alleles per locus ranged from 8 to 17. For all loci, S. latifolium individuals displayed up to four alleles indicating polyploidy in this species. These are the first microsatellite loci developed for S. latifolium and each individual displayed 1-4 alleles per locus, suggesting polyploidy in this species. These markers provide a valuable resource in evaluating the population genetic composition of this endangered species and thus will be useful for guiding conservation and future translocations of the species.

  17. Genetic variability of watermelon accessions based on microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de S Gama, R N C; Santos, C A F; de C S Dias, R

    2013-03-13

    We analyzed the genetic variability of 40 watermelon accessions collected from 8 regions of Northeastern Brazil using microsatellite markers, in order to suggest strategies of conservation and utilization of genetic variability in this species. These accessions are not commercial cultivars. They were sampled in areas of traditional farmers that usually keep their own seeds for future plantings year after year. An UPGMA dendrogram was generated from a distance matrix of the Jaccard coefficient, based on 41 alleles of 13 microsatellite loci. Analysis of molecular variance was made by partitioning between and within geographical regions. The similarity coefficient between accessions ranged from 37 to 96%; the dendrogram gave a co-phenetic value of 0.80. The among population genetic variability was high ( (^)ϕST = 0.319). Specific clusters of accessions sampled in 3 regions of Maranhão were observed while the other 5 regions did not presented specific clusters by regions. We conclude that watermelon genetic variability is not uniformly dispersed in the regions analyzed, indicating that geographical barriers or edaphoclimatic conditions have limited open mating. We suggest sampling a greater number of populations, so regional species diversity will be better represented and preserved in the germplasm bank.

  18. Development of microsatellite markers for the genetic analysis of Magnaporthe grisea

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    Brondani Claudio

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available An AG microsatellite-enriched genomic DNA library was constructed for Magnaporthe grisea (anamorph Pyricularia grisea, the causal agent of rice blast. Seventy-two DNA clones containing microsatellite repeats were isolated and sequenced in order to develop a series of new PCR-based molecular markers to be used in genetic studies of the fungus. Twenty-four of these clones were selected to design primer pairs for the PCR amplification of microsatellite alleles. Single spore cultures of M. grisea isolated from rice and wheat in Brazil, Colombia and China were genotyped at three microsatellite loci. Isolates from southern Brazil were predominantly monomorphic at the tested SSR loci, indicating a low level of genetic variability in these samples. However, seven alleles were observed at the MGM-1 locus in isolates from Central Brazil and at least nine alleles were detected at the same locus in a sample of Colombian isolates. Polymorphism analysis at SSR loci is a simple and direct approach for estimating the genetic diversity of M. grisea isolates and a powerful tool for studying M. grisea genetics.

  19. Genetic diversity of Halla horses using microsatellite markers

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    Joo-Hee Seo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently about 26,000 horses are breeding in Korea and 57.2% (14,776 horses of them are breeding in Jeju island. According to the statistics published in 2010, the horses breeding in Jeju island are subdivided into Jeju horse (6.1%, Thoroughbred (18.8% and Halla horse (75.1%. Halla horses are defined as a crossbreed between Jeju and Thoroughbred horses and are used for horse racing, horse riding and horse meat production. However, little research has been conducted on Halla horses because of the perception of crossbreed and people’s weighted interest toward Jeju horses. Method Using 17 Microsatellite (MS Markers recommended by International Society for Animal Genetics (ISAG, genomic DNAs were extracted from the hair roots of 3,880 Halla horses breeding in Korea and genetic diversity was identified by genotyping after PCR was performed. Results and conclusion In average, 10.41 alleles (from 6 alleles in HTG7 to 17 alleles in ASB17 were identified after the analysis using 17 MS Markers. The mean value of Hobs was 0.749 with a range from 0.612(HMS1 to 0.857(ASB2. Also, it was found that Hexp and PIC values were lowest in HMS1 (0.607 and 0.548, respectively, and highest in LEX3(0.859 and 0.843, respectively, and the mean value of Hexp was 0.760 and that of PIC was 0.728. 17 MS markers used in this studies were considered as appropriate markers for the polymorphism analysis of Halla horses. The frequency for the appearance of identical individuals was 5.90 × 10−20 when assumed as random mating population and when assumed as half-sib and full-sib population, frequencies were 4.08 × 10−15 and 3.56 × 10−8, respectively. Based on these results, the 17 MS markers can be used adequately for the Individual Identification and Parentage Verification of Halla horses. Remarkably, allele M and Q of ASB23 marker, G of HMS2 marker, H and L of HTG6 marker, L of HTG7 marker, E of LEX3 marker were the specific alleles

  20. Screening and identification of microsatellite markers associated with cold tolerance in Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, H P; Liu, Z G; Lu, M X; Gao, F Y; Ke, X L; Huang, Z H

    2015-08-28

    Tilapia is an important fish cultured in tropical and subtropical areas. Cold sensitivity limits the expansion of tilapia culture into colder regions of the world, and mass mortalities of cultured tilapia have been reported due to severe cold currents in winter. Since the late 1990s, several strains of Nile tilapia have been domesticated to improve the ability to adapt to low temperatures. Previous studies revealed that these varieties were more cold-tolerant than the founder population and overwintered naturally well in ponds in the west-south area of Guangdong Province. In this study, to develop tilapia strains with improved cold tolerance for breeding programs through marker-assisted selection, two microsatellite markers, UNH916 and UNH999, showed complete co-segregation with cold tolerance among the polymorphic microsatellite primers. Our results provide a foundation for identifying resistant gene(s) linked with these markers, as well as identifying simple sequence repeat markers associated with cold tolerance that can be used for maker-assisted selection programs in tilapia breeding to increase the growing range and productivity of tilapia aquaculture.

  1. Comparing single-nucleotide polymorphism marker-based and microsatellite marker-based linkage analyses.

    OpenAIRE

    Ulgen, Ayse; Li, Wentian

    2005-01-01

    Abstract We compared linkage analysis results for an alcoholism trait, ALDX1 (DSM-III-R and Feigner criteria) using a nonparametric linkage analysis method, which takes into account allele sharing among several affected persons, for both microsatellite and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers (Affymetrix and Illumina) in the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA) dataset provided to participants at the Genetic Analysis Workshop 14 (GAW14). The two sets of linkage res...

  2. New evidence for habitat-specific selection in Wadden Sea Zostera marina populations revealed by genome scanning using SNP and microsatellite markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oetjen, Katharina; Ferber, Steven; Dankert, Ilka; Reusch, Thorsten B. H.

    Eelgrass Zostera marina is an ecosystem-engineering species of outstanding importance for coastal soft sediment habitats that lives in widely diverging habitats. Our first goal was to detect divergent selection and habitat adaptation at the molecular genetic level; hence, we compared three pairs of

  3. Enhanced cross-species utility of conserved microsatellite markers in shorebirds

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    Székely Tamás

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microsatellite markers are popular genetic markers frequently used in forensic biology. Despite their popularity, the characterisation of polymorphic microsatellite loci and development of suitable markers takes considerable effort. Newly-available genomic databases make it feasible to identify conserved genetic markers. We examined the utility and characteristics of conserved microsatellite markers in Charadriiformes (plovers, sandpipers, gulls and auks. This order harbours many species with diverse breeding systems, life histories and extraordinary migration biology whose genetics warrant investigation. However, research has been largely restrained by the limited availability of genetic markers. To examine the utility of conserved microsatellite loci as genetic markers we collated a database of Charadriiformes microsatellites, searched for homologues in the chicken genome and tested conserved markers for amplification and polymorphism in a range of charadriiform species. Results Sixty-eight (42% of 161 charadriiform microsatellite loci were assigned to a single location in the chicken genome based on their E-value. Fifty-five primers designed from conserved microsatellite loci with an E-value of E-10 or lower amplified across a wider range of charadriiform species than a control group of primers from ten anonymous microsatellite loci. Twenty-three of 24 examined conserved markers were polymorphic, each in on average 3 of 12 species tested. Conclusion Genomic sequence databases are useful tools to identify conserved genetic markers including those located in non-coding regions. By maximising primer sequence similarity between source species and database species, markers can be further improved and provide additional markers to study the molecular ecology of populations of non-model organisms.

  4. Pooled genotyping of microsatellite markers in parent-offspring trios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirov, G; Williams, N; Sham, P; Craddock, N; Owen, M J

    2000-01-01

    We studied the extent to which genotyping of simple sequence repeat polymorphisms (SSRs) in pooled DNA samples can be used to predict differences in allele frequencies between parents and their affected offspring. We also developed a simple method of correction for the effects of stutter and differential amplification on the analysis of SSRs in pooled DNA samples based on widely available software. We genotyped individually eight polymorphic microsatellite markers in 110 parent-offspring trios affected with bipolar affective disorder (BP). Analysis of pooled DNA samples predicted very accurately the differences in individual allele frequency distributions between children and their parents. The mean error was stutter and differential amplification were performed. We show that if an individual allele is significantly preferentially transmitted from parents to affected offspring, the difference in the frequency of that allele would be sufficiently large to be detected with pooling in most situations. We propose recommendations for disequilibrium mapping with pooling in which both case-control samples and trios are used in an initial screen and markers are genotyped individually only if they satisfy very relaxed criteria for statistical significance. The use of case-control samples should reduce the false-negative rate as the differences in allele frequencies between cases and controls are twice as high in the presence of the same genetic effect. The use of trios will confirm or reject any suggested differences, thus reducing the false-positive rate that can be created by hidden population stratification.

  5. Development of Sequence-Based Microsatellite Marker for Phalaenopsis Orchid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FATIMAH

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Phalaenopsis is one of the most interesting genera of orchids due to the members are often used as parents to produce hybrids. The establishment and development of highly reliable and discriminatory methods for identifying species and cultivars has become increasingly more important to plant breeders and members of the nursery industry. The aim of this research was to develop sequence-based microsatellite (eSSR markers for the Phalaenopsis orchid designed from the sequence of GenBank NCBI. Seventeen primers were designed and thirteen primers pairs could amplify the DNA giving the expected PCR product with polymorphism. A total of 51 alleles, with an average of 3 alleles per locus and polymorphism information content (PIC values at 0.674, were detected at the 16 SSR loci. Therefore, these markers could be used for identification of the Phalaenopsis orchid used in this study. Genetic similarity and principle coordinate analysis identified five major groups of Phalaenopsis sp. the first group consisted of P. amabilis, P. fuscata, P. javanica, and P. zebrine. The second group consisted of P. amabilis, P. amboinensis, P. bellina, P. floresens, and P. mannii. The third group consisted of P. bellina, P. cornucervi, P. cornucervi, P. violaceae sumatra, P. modesta. The forth group consisted of P. cornucervi and P. lueddemanniana, and the fifth group was P. amboinensis.

  6. Genetic Diversity of Acacia mangium Seed Orchard in Wonogiri Indonesia Using Microsatellite Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VIVI YUSKIANTI

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity is important in tree improvement programs. To evaluate levels of genetic diversity of first generation Acacia mangium seedling seed orchard in Wonogiri, Central Java, Indonesia, three populations from each region of Papua New Guinea (PNG and Queensland, Australia (QLD were selected and analyzed using 25 microsatellite markers. Statistical analysis showed that PNG populations have higher number of detected alleles and level of genetic diversity than QLD populations. This study provides a basic information about the genetic background of the populations used in the development of an A. mangium seed orchard in Indonesia.

  7. Development and characterization of polymorphic microsatellite markers in taro (Colocasia esculenta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, Emma S; Godwin, Ian D

    2002-10-01

    Microsatellite-containing sequences were isolated from enriched genomic libraries of taro (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott). The sequencing of 269 clones yielded 77 inserts containing repeat motifs. The majority of these (81.7%) were dinucleotide or trinucleotide repeats. The GT/CA repeat motif was the most common, accounting for 42% of all repeat types. From a total of 43 primer pairs designed, 41 produced markers within the expected size range. Sixteen (39%) were polymorphic when screened against a restricted set of taro genotypes from Southeast Asia and Oceania, with an average of 3.2 alleles detected on each locus. These markers represent a useful resource for taro germplasm management, genome mapping, and marker-assisted selection.

  8. Development of Microsatellite Markers for Lagerstroemia indica (Lythraceae and Related Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed and characterized to analyze genetic diversity within Lagerstroemia cultivars and related species. Methods and Results: Using simple sequence repeat (SSR-enriched libraries, 11 species-specific polymorphic genomic SSRs were developed from L. indica ‘Hong Die Fei Wu’. All primers were tested on 48 L. indica individuals from China, the United States, and France. The primers amplified four to 12 alleles per locus, including di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide repeats. Observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.1875 to 0.7609 and 0.2836 to 0.8385, respectively. The primers were also highly cross-transferrable to L. subcostata, L. limii, L. fauriei, L. caudata, and L. speciosa. Conclusions: The new primers will enlarge the bank of SSRs available to genetic research of Lagerstroemia. These SSR markers will facilitate population genetics and molecular marker-assisted selection of L. indica.

  9. Identification, characterization and utilization of unigene derived microsatellite markers in tea (Camellia sinensis L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohapatra Trilochan

    2009-05-01

    for IAM and SMM models for the UGMS loci showed excess heterozygosity and did not show any bottleneck operating in the tea population. Conclusion UGMS markers identified and characterized in this study provided insight about the abundance and distribution of SSR in the expressed genome of C. sinensis. The identification and validation of 61 new UGMS markers will not only help in intra and inter specific genetic diversity assessment but also be enriching limited microsatellite markers resource in tea. Further, the use of these markers would reduce the cost and facilitate the gene mapping and marker-aided selection in tea. Since, 36 of these UGMS markers correspond to the Arabidopsis protein sequence data with known functions will offer the opportunity to investigate the consequences of SSR polymorphism on gene functions.

  10. Development of microsatellite markers for Euryale ferox (Nymphaeaceae), an endangered aquatic plant species in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanishi, Ayumi; Kaneko, Shingo; Isagi, Yuji; Imanishi, Junichi; Natuhara, Yosihiro; Morimoto, Yukihiro

    2011-08-01

    Microsatellite markers were developed to investigate genetic diversity and genetic structure of Euryale ferox, a vulnerable aquatic plant. Ten microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized for this species. Eight loci showed polymorphisms with two or three alleles per locus. As for the polymorphic markers, the expected and observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.00 to 0.08 and 0.17 to 0.64, respectively. The 10 microsatellite markers described here will be useful for investigating genetic diversity, genetic structure, and gene flow between populations of E. ferox.

  11. Microsatellite markers isolated from the wild medicinal plant Centella asiatica (Apiaceae) from an enriched genomic library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakotondralambo, Soaharin'ny Ony Raoseta; Lussert, Alexandra; Rivallan, Ronan; Danthu, Pascal; Noyer, Jean-Louis; Baurens, Franc-Christophe

    2012-04-01

    Microsatellite markers for Centella asiatica, an important medicinal herb, were developed and characterized to promote genetic and molecular studies. A GA/GT-enriched genomic library was constructed from an accession from Madagascar. Roughly 75% of the 768 clones of the enriched library contained microsatellites. Eighty sequences containing microsatellites were obtained from 96 positive clones. Specific primers were designed for 20 loci, and 17 of them displayed polymorphism when screened across 17 C. asiatica accessions, with an average of 4.3 alleles per locus. The observed and expected heterozygosity values averaged 0.114 and 0.379, respectively. This is the first report constructing an enriched genomic library and identifying microsatellite markers from C. asiatica. These 17 polymorphic microsatellite markers are a useful resource for this plant, applicable for diversity studies, pedigree analyses, and genetic mapping.

  12. Genetic Traceability of Black Pig Meats Using Microsatellite Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Don Oh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Pork from Jeju black pig (population J and Berkshire (population B has a unique market share in Korea because of their high meat quality. Due to the high demand of this pork, traceability of the pork to its origin is becoming an important part of the consumer demand. To examine the feasibility of such a system, we aim to provide basic genetic information of the two black pig populations and assess the possibility of genetically distinguishing between the two breeds. Muscle samples were collected from slaughter houses in Jeju Island and Namwon, Chonbuk province, Korea, for populations J and B, respectively. In total 800 Jeju black pigs and 351 Berkshires were genotyped at thirteen microsatellite (MS markers. Analyses on the genetic diversity of the two populations were carried out in the programs MS toolkit and FSTAT. The population structure of the two breeds was determined by a Bayesian clustering method implemented in structure and by a phylogenetic analysis in Phylip. Population J exhibited higher mean number of alleles, expected heterozygosity and observed heterozygosity value, and polymorphism information content, compared to population B. The FIS values of population J and population B were 0.03 and −0.005, respectively, indicating that little or no inbreeding has occurred. In addition, genetic structure analysis revealed the possibility of gene flow from population B to population J. The expected probability of identify value of the 13 MS markers was 9.87×10−14 in population J, 3.17×10−9 in population B, and 1.03×10−12 in the two populations. The results of this study are useful in distinguishing between the two black pig breeds and can be used as a foundation for further development of DNA markers.

  13. Genome-Wide Microsatellite Characterization and Marker Development in the Sequenced Brassica Crop Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiaqin; Huang, Shunmou; Zhan, Jiepeng; Yu, Jingyin; Wang, Xinfa; Hua, Wei; Liu, Shengyi; Liu, Guihua; Wang, Hanzhong

    2014-01-01

    Although much research has been conducted, the pattern of microsatellite distribution has remained ambiguous, and the development/utilization of microsatellite markers has still been limited/inefficient in Brassica, due to the lack of genome sequences. In view of this, we conducted genome-wide microsatellite characterization and marker development in three recently sequenced Brassica crops: Brassica rapa, Brassica oleracea and Brassica napus. The analysed microsatellite characteristics of these Brassica species were highly similar or almost identical, which suggests that the pattern of microsatellite distribution is likely conservative in Brassica. The genomic distribution of microsatellites was highly non-uniform and positively or negatively correlated with genes or transposable elements, respectively. Of the total of 115 869, 185 662 and 356 522 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers developed with high frequencies (408.2, 343.8 and 356.2 per Mb or one every 2.45, 2.91 and 2.81 kb, respectively), most represented new SSR markers, the majority had determined physical positions, and a large number were genic or putative single-locus SSR markers. We also constructed a comprehensive database for the newly developed SSR markers, which was integrated with public Brassica SSR markers and annotated genome components. The genome-wide SSR markers developed in this study provide a useful tool to extend the annotated genome resources of sequenced Brassica species to genetic study/breeding in different Brassica species. PMID:24130371

  14. Genome-wide microsatellite characterization and marker development in the sequenced Brassica crop species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiaqin; Huang, Shunmou; Zhan, Jiepeng; Yu, Jingyin; Wang, Xinfa; Hua, Wei; Liu, Shengyi; Liu, Guihua; Wang, Hanzhong

    2014-02-01

    Although much research has been conducted, the pattern of microsatellite distribution has remained ambiguous, and the development/utilization of microsatellite markers has still been limited/inefficient in Brassica, due to the lack of genome sequences. In view of this, we conducted genome-wide microsatellite characterization and marker development in three recently sequenced Brassica crops: Brassica rapa, Brassica oleracea and Brassica napus. The analysed microsatellite characteristics of these Brassica species were highly similar or almost identical, which suggests that the pattern of microsatellite distribution is likely conservative in Brassica. The genomic distribution of microsatellites was highly non-uniform and positively or negatively correlated with genes or transposable elements, respectively. Of the total of 115 869, 185 662 and 356 522 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers developed with high frequencies (408.2, 343.8 and 356.2 per Mb or one every 2.45, 2.91 and 2.81 kb, respectively), most represented new SSR markers, the majority had determined physical positions, and a large number were genic or putative single-locus SSR markers. We also constructed a comprehensive database for the newly developed SSR markers, which was integrated with public Brassica SSR markers and annotated genome components. The genome-wide SSR markers developed in this study provide a useful tool to extend the annotated genome resources of sequenced Brassica species to genetic study/breeding in different Brassica species.

  15. Microsatellite markers for Grosmannia alacris (Ophiostomataceae, Ascomycota) and other species in the G. serpens complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Tuan A; de Beer, Z Wilhelm; Zanzot, James W; Wingfield, Michael J; Wingfield, Brenda D

    2012-05-01

    Polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for the pine-infecting fungus, Grosmannia alacris. Sixteen microsatellite markers were developed by using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR)-PCRs and 454 sequencing methods. Seven of these markers showed polymorphisms for a South African population of G. alacris, and 13 markers showed polymorphism when European isolates were included. Most of the primer pairs also amplified four closely related species: G. serpens, Leptographium gibbsii, L. castellanum, and L. yamaokae. These new markers will be useful for population studies of G. alacris and other species in the G. serpens complex.

  16. Genetic characterisation of four strains of Nile tilapia (Oreochromie Niloticus L.) using microsatellite markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, M.J.M.; Komen, J.; Deerenberg, R.M.; Siwek-Gapinska, M.Z.; Bovenhuis, H.

    2004-01-01

    Four domesticated strains of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus L.) were genetically characterized using 14 microsatellite markers and 64 animals per strain. Two strains, Chitralada (AIT) and International Development Research Centers (IDRC) were obtained from the AIT institute, Bangkok, Thailand.

  17. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers for the wild South American Passiflora cincinnata (Passifloraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira-Silva, Carlos B M; Santos, Elisa S L; Souza, Alisson M; Mori, Gustavo M; Oliveira, Eder J; Corrêa, Ronan X; Souza, Anete P

    2012-04-01

    We developed the first set of microsatellite markers for the passion fruit, Passiflora cincinnata, to provide tools for further study of its genetic diversity and to support current conservation and genetic studies. We used a microsatellite-enriched library approach to isolate and characterize 25 new molecular markers. Seven primer pairs successfully amplified polymorphic microsatellite regions, with an average of five alleles per locus. The mean values of expected and observed levels of heterozygosity were 0.516 and 0.525, respectively. The microsatellite markers identified in this study may be valuable tools for population genetic studies, and this set of markers also may be useful in the design of a genetic conservation strategy, mating system, and hybridization studies.

  18. Population genetic structure of Orchesella cincta (Collembola; Hexapoda) in NW Europe, as revealed by microsatellite markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wurff, van der A.W.G.; Gols, R.; Ernsting, G.; Straalen, van N.M.

    2005-01-01

    We studied genetic variation and population differentiation in the springtail Orchesella cincta L. An earlier approach, using allozymes, revealed extremely low variation among and within populations from NW Europe. Microsatellite marker analysis showed higher genetic variation than allozymes, and

  19. Genetic characterization of the Bardigiano horse using microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed at investigating the genetic structure of the Bardigiano horse and its relationships with the Haflinger, Maremmano and Arabian breeds using 11 microsatellite markers. A total of 94 alleles were detected across the breeds, with a mean of 8.5 alleles per locus and a mean observed heterozygosity of 0.69. Compared to the other breeds, the Bardigiano horse showed quite a high genetic variability, as indicated by the mean number of alleles (7.0 vs 6.1÷7.6 and by the observed heterozygosity (0.72 vs 0.66÷0.71. Moreover, the genotype distributions in the Bardigiano groups of different sex and age were not significantly different. The overall FST value showed that the genetic differences among breeds accounted for 7.8% (P=0.001 of the total variation, and the pairwise FST values were all significant. The assignment test allocated between 96.8 and 98.9% of the individuals to the population they were collected from, with a mean probability of assignment of about 97% for all breeds, except for the Arabian, where it approached 100%. The results have highlighted that the Bardigiano breed has a high within and between breed variability, which is considerably more than could be expected by looking at its evolution history. This justifies the need for the development of additional breeding strategies to preserve the existing genetic variability.

  20. Development and characterization of genomic microsatellite markers in Prosopis cineraria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashi Shekhar Anand

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of genetic diversity is a must for exploring the genetic resources for plant development and improvement. Prosopis cineraria is ecologically imperative species known for its innumerable biological benefits. Since there is a lack of genetic resources for the species, so it is crucial to unravel the population dynamics which will be very effective in plant improvement and conservation strategies. Of the 41 genomic microsatellite markers designed from (AGn enriched library, 24 were subsequently employed for characterization on 30 genotypes of Indian arid region. A total of 93 alleles with an average 3.875 could be amplified by tested primer pairs. The average observed and expected heterozygosity was 0.5139 and 0.5786, respectively with 23 primer pairs showing significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Polymorphic information content average to 0.5102 and the overall polymorphism level was found to be 93.27%. STRUCTURE analysis and DARwin exhibited the presence of 4 clusters among 30 genotypes.

  1. Screening of seven microsatellite markers for litter size in Xinong ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-08

    Aug 8, 2011 ... microsatellite loci. The number of effective alleles (Ne), polymorphism information content (PIC) and average heterozygosity (He) were the highest at OarFCB11 and the lowest at OarAE129 in Xinong. Saanen dairy goat. The analysis of the effect of the six polymorphisms microsatellite loci on the litter size of ...

  2. Amplification of North American Red Oak Microsatellite Markers in European White Oaks and Chinese Chestnut

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. R. Aldrich; M. Jagtap; C. H. Michler; J. Romero-Severson

    2003-01-01

    We examined the cross-species amplification success of thirty microsatellite markers developed from North American northern red oak (Quercus rubra) in other members of the family Fagaceae. Sixteen of these markers are newly developed and we report primer sequences and amplification conditions here. Twelve of the thirty (40.0%) red oak markers...

  3. Development of novel microsatellite markers for strain-specific identification of Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Beom-Ho; Lee, Chang Soo; Song, Hae-Ryong; Lee, Hyung-Gwan; Oh, Hee-Mock

    2014-09-01

    A strain-specific identification method is required to secure Chlorella strains with useful genetic traits, such as a fast growth rate or high lipid productivity, for application in biofuels, functional foods, and pharmaceuticals. Microsatellite markers based on simple sequence repeats can be a useful tool for this purpose. Therefore, this study developed five novel microsatellite markers (mChl-001, mChl-002, mChl-005, mChl-011, and mChl-012) using specific loci along the chloroplast genome of Chlorella vulgaris. The microsatellite markers were characterized based on their allelic diversities among nine strains of C. vulgaris with the same 18S rRNA sequence similarity. Each microsatellite marker exhibited 2~5 polymorphic allele types, and their combinations allowed discrimination between seven of the C. vulgaris strains. The two remaining strains were distinguished using one specific interspace region between the mChl-001 and mChl-005 loci, which was composed of about 27 single nucleotide polymorphisms, 13~15 specific sequence sites, and (T)n repeat sites. Thus, the polymorphic combination of the five microsatellite markers and one specific locus facilitated a clear distinction of C. vulgaris at the strain level, suggesting that the proposed microsatellite marker system can be useful for the accurate identification and classification of C. vulgaris.

  4. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers for Casearia sylvestris Sw. (Salicaceae), a neotropical medicinal tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallari, M M; Billot, C; Bouvet, J-M; Favreau, B; Zucchi, M I; Palmieri, D A; Gimenes, M A

    2008-07-01

    Casearia sylvestris Sw. is a widespread neotropical tree utilized in popular medicine. Recent research ranked Casearia as one of the most promising genus in the search of drugs against cancer. Despite its wide distribution and pharmacological importance, no microsatellite markers have yet been developed for this genus. In this study, we provide 10 polymorphic microsatellite loci specifically designed for C. sylvestris, used to analyse 90 individuals distributed in two populations from São Paulo state, Brazil. On average, 12.3 alleles per locus were identified, showing the ability of the markers to detect microsatellite polymorphism in this species. © 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. A review of microsatellite markers and their applications in rice breeding programs to improve blast disease resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Gous; Rafii, Mohd Y; Ismail, Mohd R; Puteh, Adam B; Rahim, Harun A; Islam, Kh Nurul; Latif, Mohammad Abdul

    2013-11-14

    Over the last few decades, the use of molecular markers has played an increasing role in rice breeding and genetics. Of the different types of molecular markers, microsatellites have been utilized most extensively, because they can be readily amplified by PCR and the large amount of allelic variation at each locus. Microsatellites are also known as simple sequence repeats (SSR), and they are typically composed of 1-6 nucleotide repeats. These markers are abundant, distributed throughout the genome and are highly polymorphic compared with other genetic markers, as well as being species-specific and co-dominant. For these reasons, they have become increasingly important genetic markers in rice breeding programs. The evolution of new biotypes of pests and diseases as well as the pressures of climate change pose serious challenges to rice breeders, who would like to increase rice production by introducing resistance to multiple biotic and abiotic stresses. Recent advances in rice genomics have now made it possible to identify and map a number of genes through linkage to existing DNA markers. Among the more noteworthy examples of genes that have been tightly linked to molecular markers in rice are those that confer resistance or tolerance to blast. Therefore, in combination with conventional breeding approaches, marker-assisted selection (MAS) can be used to monitor the presence or lack of these genes in breeding populations. For example, marker-assisted backcross breeding has been used to integrate important genes with significant biological effects into a number of commonly grown rice varieties. The use of cost-effective, finely mapped microsatellite markers and MAS strategies should provide opportunities for breeders to develop high-yield, blast resistance rice cultivars. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge concerning the linkage of microsatellite markers to rice blast resistance genes, as well as to explore the use of MAS in rice breeding

  6. A Review of Microsatellite Markers and Their Applications in Rice Breeding Programs to Improve Blast Disease Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Abdul Latif

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few decades, the use of molecular markers has played an increasing role in rice breeding and genetics. Of the different types of molecular markers, microsatellites have been utilized most extensively, because they can be readily amplified by PCR and the large amount of allelic variation at each locus. Microsatellites are also known as simple sequence repeats (SSR, and they are typically composed of 1–6 nucleotide repeats. These markers are abundant, distributed throughout the genome and are highly polymorphic compared with other genetic markers, as well as being species-specific and co-dominant. For these reasons, they have become increasingly important genetic markers in rice breeding programs. The evolution of new biotypes of pests and diseases as well as the pressures of climate change pose serious challenges to rice breeders, who would like to increase rice production by introducing resistance to multiple biotic and abiotic stresses. Recent advances in rice genomics have now made it possible to identify and map a number of genes through linkage to existing DNA markers. Among the more noteworthy examples of genes that have been tightly linked to molecular markers in rice are those that confer resistance or tolerance to blast. Therefore, in combination with conventional breeding approaches, marker-assisted selection (MAS can be used to monitor the presence or lack of these genes in breeding populations. For example, marker-assisted backcross breeding has been used to integrate important genes with significant biological effects into a number of commonly grown rice varieties. The use of cost-effective, finely mapped microsatellite markers and MAS strategies should provide opportunities for breeders to develop high-yield, blast resistance rice cultivars. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge concerning the linkage of microsatellite markers to rice blast resistance genes, as well as to explore the use of MAS

  7. A Review of Microsatellite Markers and Their Applications in Rice Breeding Programs to Improve Blast Disease Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Gous; Rafii, Mohd Y.; Ismail, Mohd R.; Puteh, Adam B.; Rahim, Harun A.; Islam, Kh. Nurul; Latif, Mohammad Abdul

    2013-01-01

    Over the last few decades, the use of molecular markers has played an increasing role in rice breeding and genetics. Of the different types of molecular markers, microsatellites have been utilized most extensively, because they can be readily amplified by PCR and the large amount of allelic variation at each locus. Microsatellites are also known as simple sequence repeats (SSR), and they are typically composed of 1–6 nucleotide repeats. These markers are abundant, distributed throughout the genome and are highly polymorphic compared with other genetic markers, as well as being species-specific and co-dominant. For these reasons, they have become increasingly important genetic markers in rice breeding programs. The evolution of new biotypes of pests and diseases as well as the pressures of climate change pose serious challenges to rice breeders, who would like to increase rice production by introducing resistance to multiple biotic and abiotic stresses. Recent advances in rice genomics have now made it possible to identify and map a number of genes through linkage to existing DNA markers. Among the more noteworthy examples of genes that have been tightly linked to molecular markers in rice are those that confer resistance or tolerance to blast. Therefore, in combination with conventional breeding approaches, marker-assisted selection (MAS) can be used to monitor the presence or lack of these genes in breeding populations. For example, marker-assisted backcross breeding has been used to integrate important genes with significant biological effects into a number of commonly grown rice varieties. The use of cost-effective, finely mapped microsatellite markers and MAS strategies should provide opportunities for breeders to develop high-yield, blast resistance rice cultivars. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge concerning the linkage of microsatellite markers to rice blast resistance genes, as well as to explore the use of MAS in rice breeding

  8. Characterization and transferability of microsatellite markers of the cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmieri Dario A

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Arachis includes Arachis hypogaea (cultivated peanut and wild species that are used in peanut breeding or as forage. Molecular markers have been employed in several studies of this genus, but microsatellite markers have only been used in few investigations. Microsatellites are very informative and are useful to assess genetic variability, analyze mating systems and in genetic mapping. The objectives of this study were to develop A. hypogaea microsatellite loci and to evaluate the transferability of these markers to other Arachis species. Results Thirteen loci were isolated and characterized using 16 accessions of A. hypogaea. The level of variation found in A. hypogaea using microsatellites was higher than with other markers. Cross-transferability of the markers was also high. Sequencing of the fragments amplified using the primer pair Ah11 from 17 wild Arachis species showed that almost all wild species had similar repeated sequence to the one observed in A. hypogaea. Sequence data suggested that there is no correlation between taxonomic relationship of a wild species to A. hypogaea and the number of repeats found in its microsatellite loci. Conclusion These results show that microsatellite primer pairs from A. hypogaea have multiple uses. A higher level of variation among A. hypogaea accessions can be detected using microsatellite markers in comparison to other markers, such as RFLP, RAPD and AFLP. The microsatellite primers of A. hypogaea showed a very high rate of transferability to other species of the genus. These primer pairs provide important tools to evaluate the genetic variability and to assess the mating system in Arachis species.

  9. A standardized microsatellite marker panel for parentage and kinship analyses in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldbieser, G C; Bosworth, B G

    2013-08-01

    This research was designed to produce a standardized set of microsatellite loci for parentage and kinship analyses in channel catfish, the leading species of US aquaculture. Three panels of five to six markers each were developed that contained a total of two dinucleotide-, eight trinucleotide- and seven tetranucleotide-microsatellite loci respectively. The loci had a range of nine to 31 alleles per locus in an outbred population. Based on the allele frequencies measured in commercial randomly bred broodstock, the combined probability of non-exclusion of an unrelated candidate parent pair was 5.36e-18. The combined probability of non-exclusion of unrelated identical genotypes was 2.58e-08. The microsatellite panels were validated by parentage and kinship evaluation in three populations. A total of 697 spawns were collected from matings of outbred broodstock over three spawning seasons, and parents were determined unambiguously for all but three spawns. Genotype analysis also enabled the identification of half-sibling and full-sibling families produced by pond spawning. In a second experiment, parentage was unambiguously determined in nine spawns from a population consisting of broodstock derived from only four families. A third experiment demonstrated that all but one of 374 individuals from 10 full-sibling families could be assigned to a family after coculture in an earthen pond for 1 year. The standardized microsatellite panels enable the development of pedigreed catfish populations and large-scale performance evaluations in common environments to support the genetic improvement of cultured catfish through selective breeding. Published 2012. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  10. New microsatellite markers for wild and commercial species of Passiflora (Passifloraceae) and cross-amplification1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira-Silva, Carlos B. M.; Santos, Elisa S. L.; Vieira, João G. P.; Mori, Gustavo M.; Jesus, Onildo N.; Corrêa, Ronan X.; Souza, Anete P.

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: We developed the first microsatellites for Passiflora setacea and characterized new sets of markers for P. edulis and P. cincinnata, enabling further genetic diversity studies to support the conservation and breeding of passion fruit species. • Methods and Results: We developed 69 microsatellite markers and, in conjunction with assessments of cross-amplification using primers available from the literature, present 43 new polymorphic microsatellite loci for three species of Passiflora. The mean number of alleles per locus was 3.1, and the mean values of the expected and observed levels of heterozygosity were 0.406 and 0.322, respectively. • Conclusions: These microsatellite markers will be valuable tools for investigating the genetic diversity and population structure of wild and commercial species of passion fruit (Passiflora spp.) and may be useful for developing conservation and improvement strategies by contributing to the understanding of the mating system and hybridization within the genus. PMID:25202599

  11. New microsatellite markers for wild and commercial species of Passiflora (Passifloraceae) and cross-amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira-Silva, Carlos B M; Santos, Elisa S L; Vieira, João G P; Mori, Gustavo M; Jesus, Onildo N; Corrêa, Ronan X; Souza, Anete P

    2014-02-01

    We developed the first microsatellites for Passiflora setacea and characterized new sets of markers for P. edulis and P. cincinnata, enabling further genetic diversity studies to support the conservation and breeding of passion fruit species. • We developed 69 microsatellite markers and, in conjunction with assessments of cross-amplification using primers available from the literature, present 43 new polymorphic microsatellite loci for three species of Passiflora. The mean number of alleles per locus was 3.1, and the mean values of the expected and observed levels of heterozygosity were 0.406 and 0.322, respectively. • These microsatellite markers will be valuable tools for investigating the genetic diversity and population structure of wild and commercial species of passion fruit (Passiflora spp.) and may be useful for developing conservation and improvement strategies by contributing to the understanding of the mating system and hybridization within the genus.

  12. New Microsatellite Markers for Wild and Commercial Species of Passiflora (Passifloraceae and Cross-Amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos B. M. Cerqueira-Silva

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: We developed the first microsatellites for Passiflora setacea and characterized new sets of markers for P. edulis and P. cincinnata, enabling further genetic diversity studies to support the conservation and breeding of passion fruit species. Methods and Results: We developed 69 microsatellite markers and, in conjunction with assessments of cross-amplification using primers available from the literature, present 43 new polymorphic microsatellite loci for three species of Passiflora. The mean number of alleles per locus was 3.1, and the mean values of the expected and observed levels of heterozygosity were 0.406 and 0.322, respectively. Conclusions: These microsatellite markers will be valuable tools for investigating the genetic diversity and population structure of wild and commercial species of passion fruit (Passiflora spp. and may be useful for developing conservation and improvement strategies by contributing to the understanding of the mating system and hybridization within the genus.

  13. Microsatellite markers reveal the below ground distribution of genets in two species of Rhizopogon forming tuberculate ectomycorrhizas on Douglas-fir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annette M. Kretzer; Susie Dunham; Randy Molina; Joseph W. Spatafora

    2003-01-01

    We have developed microsatellite markers for two sister species of Rhizopogon, R. vesiculosus and R. vinicolor (Boletales, Basidiomycota), and used selected markers to investigate genet size and distribution from ectomycorrhizal samples. Both species form ectomycorrhizas with tuberculate morphology on Douglas-fir (...

  14. Genetic diversity assessed by microsatellite markers in sweet corn cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Daniela Lopes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Information on genetic diversity is essential to the characterization and utilization of germplasm. The genetic diversity of twenty-two sweet corn cultivars (seventeen open-pollinated varieties, OPV, and five hybrids, H was investigated by applying simple sequence repeat markers. A total of 257 primers were tested, of which 160 were found to be usable in terms of high reproducibility for all the samples tested; 45 were polymorphic loci, of which 30 were used to assess the genetic diversity of sweet corn cultivars. We detected a total of 86 alleles using 30 microsatellite primers. The mean polymorphism was 82 %. The highest heterozygosity values (Ho = 0.20 were found in the PR030-Doce Flor da Serra and BR427 III OPVs, whereas the lowest values (0.14 were recorded in the MG161-Branco Doce and Doce Cubano OPVs. The polymorphism information content ranged from 0.19 (Umc2319 to 0.71 (Umc2205. The analysis of molecular variance revealed that most of the genetic variability was concentrated within the cultivars of sweet corn (75 %, with less variability between them (25 %. The consensus tree derived from the neighbor-joining (NJ algorithm using 1,000 bootstrapping replicates revealed seven genetically different groups. Nei’s diversity values varied between 0.103 (Doce do Hawai × CNPH-1 cultivars and 0.645 (Amarelo Doce × Lili cultivars, indicating a narrow genetic basis. The Lili hybrid was the most distant cultivar, as revealed by Principal Coordinates Analysis and the NJ tree. This study on genetic diversity will be useful for planning future studies on sweet corn genetic resources and can complement the breeding programs for this crop.

  15. Comparative genome-wide polymorphic microsatellite markers in Antarctic penguins through next generation sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianna, Juliana A.; Noll, Daly; Mura-Jornet, Isidora; Valenzuela-Guerra, Paulina; González-Acuña, Daniel; Navarro, Cristell; Loyola, David E.; Dantas, Gisele P. M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Microsatellites are valuable molecular markers for evolutionary and ecological studies. Next generation sequencing is responsible for the increasing number of microsatellites for non-model species. Penguins of the Pygoscelis genus are comprised of three species: Adélie (P. adeliae), Chinstrap (P. antarcticus) and Gentoo penguin (P. papua), all distributed around Antarctica and the sub-Antarctic. The species have been affected differently by climate change, and the use of microsatellite markers will be crucial to monitor population dynamics. We characterized a large set of genome-wide microsatellites and evaluated polymorphisms in all three species. SOLiD reads were generated from the libraries of each species, identifying a large amount of microsatellite loci: 33,677, 35,265 and 42,057 for P. adeliae, P. antarcticus and P. papua, respectively. A large number of dinucleotide (66,139), trinucleotide (29,490) and tetranucleotide (11,849) microsatellites are described. Microsatellite abundance, diversity and orthology were characterized in penguin genomes. We evaluated polymorphisms in 170 tetranucleotide loci, obtaining 34 polymorphic loci in at least one species and 15 polymorphic loci in all three species, which allow to perform comparative studies. Polymorphic markers presented here enable a number of ecological, population, individual identification, parentage and evolutionary studies of Pygoscelis, with potential use in other penguin species. PMID:28898354

  16. Characterization of nine polymorphic microsatellite markers in sprat ( Sprattus sprattus L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dailianis, T.; Limborg, Morten; Hanel, R.

    2008-01-01

    Nine polymorphic microsatellites were isolated from sprat (Sprattus sprattus) using a microsatellite enrichment protocol and selective hybridization with a biotinylated (AC)(12) probe. The loci showed different variation patterns in a Baltic Sea population (44 individuals) with mean number of all...... of alleles at 12.7 and mean observed heterozygosity at 0.78. These microsatellite loci are expected to be used for taxonomic considerations in sprat, stock differentiation and population genetic analysis....

  17. Microsatellite markers for population genetic studies of the rock ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lagonosticta sanguinodorsalis). First, we tested existing passerine microsatellite loci for cross-species amplification success in a small sample of rock firefinches and identified 10 loci that were seemingly polymorphic and easy to score. Secondly, we ...

  18. Genetic identity of Thamnophis sp. using microsatellite genetic markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloss, Brian L.

    2011-01-01

    Butler’s gartersnake (Thamnophis butleri) was previously listed by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources as a state threatened species. Several key questions associated with species identity, integrity, and hybridization with other gartersnake species needed to be addressed to further refi ne the management plan for this species. The objectives of this research were: 1) to determine if genetic markers developed in the initial phase of research could identify discrete genetic groups of Wisconsin gartersnakes, 2) to determine if any or all genetic groups delineated in objective one were consistent with Butler’s gartersnake, plains gartersnake (T. radix), and/or common gartersnake (T. sirtalis), and 3) to determine if any of the genetic data were consistent with hybridization occurring between gartersnakes in Wisconsin. Snakes were sampled from various Midwestern locations with a focus on sites in Wisconsin. All snakes were photo-vouchered, morphological landmarks were taken, and a tail snip was collected for genetic analysis. Genetic data from previously developed microsatellite markers discriminated three genetic groups from a composite 13-locus dataset (N=815) using the Bayesian admixture analysis in STRUCTURE v2.3.3. These units were highly consistent with species-groups based on the membership of a small number of known snakes from areas where the species are not thought to co-occur. Using a threshold q-value (proportional genotype) of ≥80%, 498 Butler’s gartersnakes, 93 plains gartersnakes, and 107 common gartersnakes were identifi ed in Wisconsin samples; putative hybrid snakes of Butler’s gartersnake x plain gartersnake (34), Butler’s gartersnake x common gartersnake (8), and a single ambiguous snake were also identifi ed in Wisconsin samples. Levels of divergence among the species groups from Wisconsin were lower than between species groups from other states consistent with either larger than expected Wisconsin population sizes or signifi

  19. Development of microsatellite markers for Hancornia speciosa Gomes (Apocynaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, A J L; Yamaguishi, A T; Chaves, L J; Coelho, A S G; Lima, J S; Telles, M P C

    2015-07-03

    Herein, we describe 34 microsatellite loci developed using an enrichment genomic library for the tree species Hancornia speciosa Gomes (Apocynaceae). Thirty-five individuals were genotyped using 34 primers to analyze the polymorphisms at each locus. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 4 to 20. The average number of alleles was 8.11, and the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.62 to 0.94. These microsatellite primers will be useful in population genetics studies for this species.

  20. Development and application of sequence-tagged microsatellite site (STMS) markers in chickpea (Cicer arietinum), banana (Musa spp.) and their major pathogens, Ascochyta rabiei and Mycosphaerella fijiensis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, P.; Kaemmer, D.; Paff, T.; Geistlinger, J.; Neu, C.; Kahl, G.

    2001-01-01

    DNA markers of various kinds have found widespread application in many facets of plant breeding and plant pathogen control. Yet another marker type, sequence-tagged microsatellite (STMS) markers, provides the markers of choice for nearly every crop because of their co-dominant nature, reliability, ease of application and high polymorphic information content. We report here on the development of a whole set of STMS markers and the respective, selected primer sequences for two important crops, chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) and banana (Musa acuminata), and for their most devastating fungal pathogens, Ascochyta rabiei and Mycosphaerella fijiensis, respectively. These markers were generated either by direct screening of size-selected genomic libraries with microsatellite-complementary oligonucleotides, or by enrichment of DNA fragments containing microsatellite sequences. A total of 69 markers for chickpea, 15 markers for M. acuminata, 19 markers for A rabiei and 11 markers for M. fijiensis, selected on the basis of their high information content and ease of use are presented here. These can be applied for mapping of the respective genomes, for various population studies, and cultivar and isolate identification. We further demonstrate that several of these markers can potentially be applied across species boundaries and thus could increase the marker repertoire also for other species of the genus Cicer, Musa and for Ascochyta-type pathogens of bean, and potentially also of lentil and pea. (author)

  1. Transferability of microsatellite markers located in candidate genes for wood properties between Eucalyptus species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia V. Acuña

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study:  To analyze the feasibility of extrapolating conclusions on wood quality genetic control between different Eucalyptus species, particularly from species with better genomic information, to those less characterized. For this purpose, the first step is to analyze the conservation and cross-transferability of microsatellites markers (SSRs located in candidate genes.Area of study: Eucalyptus species implanted in Argentina coming from different Australian origins.Materials and methods: Twelve validated and polymorphic SSRs in candidate genes (SSR-CGs for wood quality in E. globulus were selected for cross species amplification in six species: E. grandis, E. saligna, E. dunnii, E. viminalis, E. camaldulensis and E. tereticornis.Main results: High cross-species transferability (92% to 100% was found for the 12 polymorphic SSRs detected in E. globulus. These markers revealed allelic diversity in nine important candidate genes: cinnamoyl CoA reductase (CCR, cellulose synthase 3 (CesA3, the transcription factor LIM1, homocysteine S-methyltransferase (HMT, shikimate kinase (SK, xyloglucan endotransglycosylase 2 (XTH2, glutathione S-transferase (GST, glutamate decarboxylase (GAD and peroxidase (PER.Research highlights: The markers described are potentially suitable for comparative QTL mapping, molecular marker assisted breeding (MAB and for population genetic studies across different species within the subgenus Symphyomyrtus.Keywords: validation; cross-transferability; SSR; functional markers; eucalypts; Symphyomyrtus.

  2. Development of Pedigree Classification Using Microsatellite and Mitochondrial Markers for Giant Grouper Broodstock (Epinephelus lanceolatus Management in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Che Kuo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Most giant groupers in the market are derived from inbred stock. Inbreeding can cause trait depression, compromising the animals’ fitness and disease resistance, obligating farmers to apply increased amounts of drugs. In order to solve this problem, a pedigree classification method is needed. Here, microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA were used as genetic markers to analyze the genetic relationships among giant grouper broodstocks. The 776-bp fragment of high polymorphic mitochondrial D-loop sequence was selected for measuring sibling relatedness. In a sample of 118 giant groupers, 42 haplotypes were categorized, with nucleotide diversity (π of 0.00773 and haplotype diversity (HD of 0.983. Furthermore, microsatellites were used for investigation of parentage. Six out of 33 microsatellite loci were selected as markers based on having a high number of alleles and compliance with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Microsatellite profiles based on these loci provide high variability with low combined non-exclusion probability, permitting practical use in aquaculture. The method described here could be used to improve grouper broodstock management and lower the chances of inbreeding. This approach is expected to lead to production of higher quality groupers with higher disease resistance, thereby reducing the need for drug application.

  3. Development of pedigree classification using microsatellite and mitochondrial markers for Giant grouper broodstock (Epinephelus lanceolatus) management in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Hsiao-Che; Hsu, Hao-Hsuan; Chua, Chee Shin; Wang, Ting-Yu; Chen, Young-Mao; Chen, Tzong-Yueh

    2014-04-30

    Most giant groupers in the market are derived from inbred stock. Inbreeding can cause trait depression, compromising the animals' fitness and disease resistance, obligating farmers to apply increased amounts of drugs. In order to solve this problem, a pedigree classification method is needed. Here, microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA were used as genetic markers to analyze the genetic relationships among giant grouper broodstocks. The 776-bp fragment of high polymorphic mitochondrial D-loop sequence was selected for measuring sibling relatedness. In a sample of 118 giant groupers, 42 haplotypes were categorized, with nucleotide diversity (π) of 0.00773 and haplotype diversity (HD) of 0.983. Furthermore, microsatellites were used for investigation of parentage. Six out of 33 microsatellite loci were selected as markers based on having a high number of alleles and compliance with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Microsatellite profiles based on these loci provide high variability with low combined non-exclusion probability, permitting practical use in aquaculture. The method described here could be used to improve grouper broodstock management and lower the chances of inbreeding. This approach is expected to lead to production of higher quality groupers with higher disease resistance, thereby reducing the need for drug application.

  4. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers in the African forest elephant (Loxodonta cyclotis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugala, Natalie A; Ishida, Yasuko; Georgiadis, Nicholas J; Roca, Alfred L

    2016-07-26

    African elephants comprise two species, the savanna elephant (Loxodonta africana) and the forest elephant (L. cyclotis), which are distinct morphologically and genetically. Forest elephants are seriously threatened by poaching for meat and ivory, and by habitat destruction. However, microsatellite markers have thus far been developed only in African savanna elephants and Asian elephants, Elephas maximus. The application of microsatellite markers across deeply divergent lineages may produce irregular patterns such as large indels or null alleles. Thus we developed novel microsatellite markers using DNA from two African forest elephants. One hundred microsatellite loci were identified in next generation shotgun sequences from two African forest elephants, of which 53 were considered suitable for testing. Twenty-three microsatellite markers successfully amplified elephant DNA without amplifying human DNA; these were further characterized in 15 individuals from Lope National Park, Gabon. Three of the markers were monomorphic and four of them carried only two alleles. The remaining sixteen polymorphic loci carried from 3 to 8 alleles, with observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.27 to 0.87, expected heterozygosity from 0.40 to 0.86, and the Shannon diversity index from 0.73 to 1.86. Linkage disequilibrium was not detected between loci, and no locus deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The markers developed in this study will be useful for genetic analyses of the African forest elephant and contribute to their conservation and management.

  5. Application of microsatellite markers as potential tools for traceability of Girgentana goat breed dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardina, Maria Teresa; Tortorici, Lina; Mastrangelo, Salvatore; Di Gerlando, Rosalia; Tolone, Marco; Portolano, Baldassare

    2015-08-01

    In livestock, breed assignment may play a key role in the certification of products linked to specific breeds. Traceability of farm animals and authentication of their products can contribute to improve breed profitability and sustainability of animal productions with significant impact on the rural economy of particular geographic areas and on breed and biodiversity conservation. With the goal of developing a breed genetic traceability system for Girgentana dairy products, the aim of this study was to identify specific microsatellite markers able to discriminate among the most important Sicilian dairy goat breeds, in order to detect possible adulteration in Girgentana dairy products. A total of 20 microsatellite markers were analyzed on 338 individual samples from Girgentana, Maltese, and Derivata di Siria goat breeds. Specific microsatellite markers useful for traceability of dairy products were identified. Eight microsatellite markers showed alleles present at the same time in Maltese and Derivata di Siria and absent in Girgentana and, therefore, they were tested on DNA pools of the three breeds. Considering the electropherograms' results, only FCB20, SRCRSP5, and TGLA122 markers were tested on DNA samples extracted from cheeses of Girgentana goat breed. These three microsatellite markers could be applied in a breed genetic traceability system of Girgentana dairy products in order to detect adulteration due to Maltese and Derivata di Siria goat breeds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Evolution of the polymorphism at molecular markers in QTL and non-QTL regions in selected chicken lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loywyck, V.; Bed'hom, B.; Pinard-van der Laan, M.H.; Pitel, F.; Verrier, E.; Bijma, P.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the joint evolution of neutral and selected genomic regions in three chicken lines selected for immune response and in one control line. We compared the evolution of polymorphism of 21 supposedly neutral microsatellite markers versus 30 microsatellite markers located in seven

  7. Characterisation of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. ssp. vulgaris) varieties using microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smulders, Marinus J M; Esselink, G Danny; Everaert, Isabelle; De Riek, Jan; Vosman, Ben

    2010-05-18

    Sugar beet is an obligate outcrossing species. Varieties consist of mixtures of plants from various parental combinations. As the number of informative morphological characteristics is limited, this leads to some problems in variety registration research. We have developed 25 new microsatellite markers for sugar beet. A selection of 12 markers with high quality patterns was used to characterise 40 diploid and triploid varieties. For each variety 30 individual plants were genotyped. The markers amplified 3-21 different alleles. Varieties had up to 7 different alleles at one marker locus. All varieties could be distinguished. For the diploid varieties, the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.458 to 0.744. The average inbreeding coefficient F(is) was 0.282 +/- 0.124, but it varied widely among marker loci, from F(is) = +0.876 (heterozygote deficiency) to F(is) = -0.350 (excess of heterozygotes). The genetic differentiation among diploid varieties was relatively constant among markers (F(st) = 0.232 +/- 0.027). Among triploid varieties the genetic differentiation was much lower (F(st) = 0.100 +/- 0.010). The overall genetic differentiation between diploid and triploid varieties was F(st) = 0.133 across all loci. Part of this differentiation may coincide with the differentiation among breeders' gene pools, which was Fst = 0.063. Based on a combination of scores for individual plants all varieties can be distinguished using the 12 markers developed here. The markers may also be used for mapping and in molecular breeding. In addition, they may be employed in studying gene flow from crop to wild populations.

  8. Characterisation of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. ssp. vulgaris varieties using microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Riek Jan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sugar beet is an obligate outcrossing species. Varieties consist of mixtures of plants from various parental combinations. As the number of informative morphological characteristics is limited, this leads to some problems in variety registration research. Results We have developed 25 new microsatellite markers for sugar beet. A selection of 12 markers with high quality patterns was used to characterise 40 diploid and triploid varieties. For each variety 30 individual plants were genotyped. The markers amplified 3-21 different alleles. Varieties had up to 7 different alleles at one marker locus. All varieties could be distinguished. For the diploid varieties, the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.458 to 0.744. The average inbreeding coefficient Fis was 0.282 ± 0.124, but it varied widely among marker loci, from Fis = +0.876 (heterozygote deficiency to Fis = -0.350 (excess of heterozygotes. The genetic differentiation among diploid varieties was relatively constant among markers (Fst = 0.232 ± 0.027. Among triploid varieties the genetic differentiation was much lower (Fst = 0.100 ± 0.010. The overall genetic differentiation between diploid and triploid varieties was Fst = 0.133 across all loci. Part of this differentiation may coincide with the differentiation among breeders' gene pools, which was Fst = 0.063. Conclusions Based on a combination of scores for individual plants all varieties can be distinguished using the 12 markers developed here. The markers may also be used for mapping and in molecular breeding. In addition, they may be employed in studying gene flow from crop to wild populations.

  9. New Microsatellite Markers for Tricyrtis macrantha (Convallariaceae and Cross-Amplification in Closely Related Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriko Ohki

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were characterized in Tricyrtis macrantha (sect. Brachycyrtis, Convallariaceae, a vulnerable species endemic to Japan, to investigate its genetic diversity and population structure. Methods and Results: Eleven microsatellite markers were developed. The number of alleles per locus ranged from one to seven, and genetic diversity per locus ranged from 0.142 to 0.812. Four markers were successfully amplified in other species of sect. Brachycyrtis (T. ishiiana, T. ishiiana var. surugensis, and T. macranthopsis. Conclusions: The microsatellite markers can be used to investigate the genetic diversity and population structure of the vulnerable and endangered species of Tricyrtis sect. Brachycyrtis, to aid in the development of conservation strategies for each species.

  10. Isolation of microsatellite markers for the red mangrove, Rhizophora mangle (Rhizophoraceae)1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Diana O.; Vinson, Christina C.; Nascimento, Dulcivania S. S.; Mehlig, Ulf; Menezes, Moirah P. M.; Sampaio, Iracilda; Silva, Marivana B.

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Three species of the mangrove tree genus Rhizophora are found in the New World and along the west coast of Africa. Of these, R. mangle is the most abundant and has a complex interbreeding relationship with the sympatric R. racemosa and R. harrisonii. The development of additional microsatellite markers would permit paternity analyses and investigation of the hybrid origin of these species. • Methods and Results: Using an enriched library method, via hybridization with biotinylated oligonucleotides complementary to repetitive poly AG/TC, primers for 11 microsatellite markers of R. mangle were developed and characterized in populations in Pará and São Paulo (Brazil) and Florida (USA). Ten of these markers were transferable to R. racemosa and R. harrisonii. • Conclusions: The microsatellite markers presented here will be useful in studies of contemporary and historical gene flow between American and West African Rhizophora species. PMID:25202582

  11. Isolation of Microsatellite Markers for the Red Mangrove, Rhizophora mangle (Rhizophoraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana O. Ribeiro

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Three species of the mangrove tree genus Rhizophora are found in the New World and along the west coast of Africa. Of these, R. mangle is the most abundant and has a complex interbreeding relationship with the sympatric R. racemosa and R. harrisonii. The development of additional microsatellite markers would permit paternity analyses and investigation of the hybrid origin of these species. Methods and Results: Using an enriched library method, via hybridization with biotinylated oligonucleotides complementary to repetitive poly AG/TC, primers for 11 microsatellite markers of R. mangle were developed and characterized in populations in Pará and São Paulo (Brazil and Florida (USA. Ten of these markers were transferable to R. racemosa and R. harrisonii. Conclusions: The microsatellite markers presented here will be useful in studies of contemporary and historical gene flow between American and West African Rhizophora species.

  12. Development of 12 chloroplast microsatellite markers in Vigna unguiculata (Fabaceae) and amplification in Phaseolus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lei; Li, Yi; Guo, Rui; Wu, Hua; Hu, Zhihui; Chen, Chanyou

    2014-03-01

    Vigna unguiculata is an economically important legume, and the complexity of its variability and evolution needs to be further understood. Based on publicly available databases, we developed chloroplast microsatellite primers to investigate genetic diversity within V. unguiculata and its related species Phaseolus vulgaris. • Twelve polymorphic chloroplast microsatellite markers were developed and characterized in 62 V. unguiculata individuals. The number of alleles per locus varied between two and four, the unbiased haploid diversity per locus ranged from 0.123 to 0.497, and the polymorphism information content varied from 0.114 to 0.369. In cross-species amplifications, nine of these markers showed polymorphism in 29 P. vulgaris individuals. • The newly developed chloroplast microsatellite markers exhibit variation in V. unguiculata as well as their transferability in P. vulgaris. These markers can be used to investigate genetic diversity and evolution in V. unguiculata and P. vulgaris.

  13. Development of 12 chloroplast microsatellite markers in Vigna unguiculata (Fabaceae) and amplification in Phaseolus vulgaris1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lei; Li, Yi; Guo, Rui; Wu, Hua; Hu, Zhihui; Chen, Chanyou

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Vigna unguiculata is an economically important legume, and the complexity of its variability and evolution needs to be further understood. Based on publicly available databases, we developed chloroplast microsatellite primers to investigate genetic diversity within V. unguiculata and its related species Phaseolus vulgaris. • Methods and Results: Twelve polymorphic chloroplast microsatellite markers were developed and characterized in 62 V. unguiculata individuals. The number of alleles per locus varied between two and four, the unbiased haploid diversity per locus ranged from 0.123 to 0.497, and the polymorphism information content varied from 0.114 to 0.369. In cross-species amplifications, nine of these markers showed polymorphism in 29 P. vulgaris individuals. • Conclusions: The newly developed chloroplast microsatellite markers exhibit variation in V. unguiculata as well as their transferability in P. vulgaris. These markers can be used to investigate genetic diversity and evolution in V. unguiculata and P. vulgaris. PMID:25202608

  14. Development of 12 Chloroplast Microsatellite Markers in Vigna unguiculata (Fabaceae and Amplification in Phaseolus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Pan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Vigna unguiculata is an economically important legume, and the complexity of its variability and evolution needs to be further understood. Based on publicly available databases, we developed chloroplast microsatellite primers to investigate genetic diversity within V. unguiculata and its related species Phaseolus vulgaris. Methods and Results: Twelve polymorphic chloroplast microsatellite markers were developed and characterized in 62 V. unguiculata individuals. The number of alleles per locus varied between two and four, the unbiased haploid diversity per locus ranged from 0.123 to 0.497, and the polymorphism information content varied from 0.114 to 0.369. In cross-species amplifications, nine of these markers showed polymorphism in 29 P. vulgaris individuals. Conclusions: The newly developed chloroplast microsatellite markers exhibit variation in V. unguiculata as well as their transferability in P. vulgaris. These markers can be used to investigate genetic diversity and evolution in V. unguiculata and P. vulgaris.

  15. Development of microsatellite markers for Suriana maritima (Surianaceae) using next-generation sequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W S; Zhao, G; Jian, S G; Wang, Z F

    2015-10-30

    Our objective was to develop microsatellite markers for use in assessing genetic variation in the small shrub or tree species Suriana maritima (Surianaceae). In China, this species is found only as a few fragmented populations and individuals on the Paracel Islands. Using next-generation genome sequencing methodology, we developed 17 novel microsatellite markers for S. maritima. Fifty-four individuals from six populations of S. maritima were examined for polymorphisms; only one allele was detected for each of the markers. Microsatellite loci developed indicate a complete absence of genetic diversity for S. maritima on the Paracel Islands in China. These markers will be useful for examining genetic variation among S. maritima populations in other areas of the world.

  16. Development of 18 polymorphic microsatellite markers for Vinca minor (Apocynaceae) via 454 pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Sina; Wöhrmann, Tina; Huettel, Bruno; Weising, Kurt

    2015-05-01

    Polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed in Vinca minor (Apocynaceae) to evaluate the level of clonality, population structure, and genetic diversity of the species within its native and introduced range. A total of 1371 microsatellites were found in 43,565 reads from 454 pyrosequencing of genomic V. minor DNA. Additional microsatellite loci were mined from publicly available cDNA sequences. After several rounds of screening, 18 primer pairs flanking di-, tri-, or tetranucleotide repeats were identified that revealed high levels of genetic diversity in two native Italian populations, with two to 11 alleles per locus. Clonal growth predominated in two populations from the introduced range in Germany. Five loci successfully cross-amplified in three additional Vinca species. The novel polymorphic microsatellite markers are promising tools for studying clonality and population genetics of V. minor and for assessing the historical origin of Central European populations.

  17. High resolution melting detects sequence polymorphism in rubus occidentalis L. monomorphic microsatellite markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microsatellite, or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, are valuable as co-dominant genetic markers with a variety of applications such as DNA fingerprinting, linkage mapping, and population structure analysis. However, primer pairs designed from the regions that flank SSRs often generate fragment...

  18. Characterization of microsatellite DNA markers for the alligator snapping turtle, Macrochelys temminckii: Primer note

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackler, J.C.; Van Den Bussche, Ronald A.; Leslie, David M.

    2007-01-01

    Two trinucleotide and seven tetranucleotide microsatellite loci were isolated from an alligator snapping turtle Macrochelys temminckii. To assess the degree of variability in these nine microsatellite loci, we genotyped 174 individuals collected from eight river drainage basins in the southeastern USA. These markers revealed a moderate degree of allelic diversity (six to 16 alleles per locus) and observed heterozygosity (0.166-0.686). These polymorphic microsatellite loci provide powerful tools for population genetic studies for a species that is afforded some level of conservation protection in every state in which it occurs. ?? 2006 The Authors.

  19. A complex microsatellite at chromosome 7q33 as a new prognostic marker of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xu; Deng, Hongyu; Su, Min; Liao, Qianjin; Huang, Dan; Liao, Duan-Fang; Xiao, Zhi-Qiang; Cao, Deliang

    2017-10-24

    Disease-specific markers are critical for early diagnosis, targeted therapy and prognostic prediction of diseases. Current study reports a complex microsatellite as a new prognostic marker of sporadic colorectal cancer. This microsatellite located at Chromosome 7q33 is composed of three tetranucleotide tandem repeats, (TTCC) 2 (TCCC) 5 (TCCT) 7 , flanked by a CT-rich sequence. We analyzed polymorphisms of this microsatellite in 158 sporadic colorectal cancer, 143 matched normal adjacent tissues (NAT) and 150 health donors. Our results showed that this complex microsatellite was instable with polymorphic frequency of 77.2% in colorectal cancer, 52.4% in NAT and 54.7% in health donors (pmicrosatellite, followed by (TTCC) 2 site for approximately 20%. Polymorphisms in (TCCC) 5 was rare. Polymorphisms at the (TCCT) 7 site were mainly insertions of 1 to 4 copies of TCCT (88.6%), and deletions occurred in about 6.4% of cases. The (TTCC) 2 site was featured with one copy TTCC insertions. Pair-wise analyses between colorectal tumors and NAT revealed that 88 of 121 (72.7%) tumors displayed expansion, contraction or both in these tetranucleotide tandem repeats when compared to NAT. A cross-analysis with clinicopathological data of 158 colorectal cancers revealed that polymorphic alterations of the microsatellite associated with less lymphatic metastasis (pmicrosatellite demonstrated better survival (n=112, p=0.0058). Together these data suggest that this complex microsatellite is a potential prognostic marker of sporadic colorectal cancer.

  20. Development of microsatellite markers in Cannabis sativa for DNA typing and genetic relatedness analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghanim, H J; Almirall, J R

    2003-08-01

    Microsatellite markers were developed for Cannabis sativa L. (marijuana) to be used for DNA typing (genotype identification) and to measure the genetic relationships between the different plants. Twelve different oligonucleotide probes were used to screen an enriched microsatellite library of Cannabis sativa in which 49% of the clones contained microsatellite sequences. Characterization of microsatellite loci in Cannabis revealed that GA/CT was the most abundant class of the isolated microsatellites representing 50% overall followed by GTT/CAA, AAG/TTC, and GAT/CTA representing 16%, 15%, and 10%, respectively. Eleven polymorphic STR markers were developed, three derived from dinucleotide motifs and eight from trinucleotide motifs. A total of 52 alleles were detected averaging 4.7 alleles/locus. The expected heterozygosity of the eleven loci ranged between 0.368 and 0.710 and the common probability of identical genotypes was 1.8 x 10(-7). The loci identified 27 unique profiles of the 41 Cannabis samples. The 11 microsatellite markers developed in this study were found to be useful for DNA typing and for assessing genetic relatedness in Cannabis.

  1. Identification of novel microsatellite markers for Saraca asoca, a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [Sumangala R. C., Shaanker R. U., Dayanandan S., Vasudeva R. and Ravikanth G. 2013 Identification of novel microsatellite mark- ers for Saraca ..... Biometrics 48, 361–. 372. Hattori M., Nakabayashi T., Lim Y. A., Miyashio H., Kurokawa M.,. Gupta M. P. et al. 1995 Inhibitory effects of various Ayurvedic and Panamanian ...

  2. Screening of seven microsatellite markers for litter size in Xinong ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The number of effective alleles (Ne), polymorphism information content (PIC) and average heterozygosity (He) were the highest at OarFCB11 and the lowest at OarAE129 in Xinong Saanen dairy goat. The analysis of the effect of the six polymorphisms microsatellite loci on the litter size of Xinong Saanen dairy goat indicated ...

  3. Molecular characterization of Doom pigs using microsatellite markers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The polymorphic information content (PIC) was 0.63±0.143. Microsatellite analysis revealed moderate to less genetic diversity in the Doom pig population. The overall mean of within-population inbreeding estimate (FIS) was 0.089. The Shannon's information index (I) was sufficiently high with a mean of 1.36. The bottleneck ...

  4. Isolation and screening of microsatellite markers from the pearl ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and decrease of cultured pearl quality. Thus, it is desirable to investigate the genetic variability of this species to pro- vide background information for its ... tity test, population genetics and gene mapping (Evans et al. 2006; Herbinger et al. 2006). Here, we report nine polymor- phic microsatellite loci that would be useful in ...

  5. Development of microsatellite markers for use in breeding catfish ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A group of 12 loci microsatellite (including di- and tetranucleotides) has been sequenced, using Sanger's method, to obtain complete sequences for fragments between 140 and 200 pb and are currently being used to study the genetic diversity of catfish populations. The populations showed genetic variation with average ...

  6. Development and use of microsatellite markers in Marama bean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Etant donné la valeur nutritionnelle des ses graines, carottes, sa richesse en protein, en huiles et amidon, le haricot Marama est considéré comme une culture potentielle pour des milieux arides où peu de cultures conventionnelles peuvent survivre. Dans ces conditions, les microsatellites deviennent de plus en plus un ...

  7. Isolation of microsatellite markers for Bletilla striata and cross ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bletilla is a temperate, terrestrial genus of orchids containing 6 species. For the species whose whole genome is unknown, we used magnetic bead hybridization method to develop microsatellite Simple Repeat Polymorphoresis (SSR) for Bletilla striata and 9 primer sets were characterized in two wild populations of B.

  8. Microsatellite marker data of Boswellia papyrifera populations in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Addisalem, A.B.; Duminil, J.; Wouters, A.P.; Bongers, F.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The file "Data fine-scale structure of Boswellia papyrifera TGGE paper.xlsx" contains the microsatellite data used in the study " Fine-scale spatial genetic structure in the frankincense tree Boswellia papyrifera (Del.) Hochst. and implications for conservation", by A. B. Addisalem, J. Duminil, D.

  9. Microsatellite markers for northern red oak (Fagaceae: Quercus rubra)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston R. Aldrich; Charles H. Michler; Weilin Sun; Jeanne Romero-Severson

    2002-01-01

    We provide primer sequences for 14 (GA)n microsatellite loci developed from northern red oak, an important timber species. We screened loci using two sets of samples. A parent-offspring set included DNA from seven acorns collected from one mother tree along with maternal DNA, to determine that all progeny carried a maternal allele at each locus....

  10. Microsatellite markers associated with body and carcass weights in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    enoh

    2012-02-21

    Feb 21, 2012 ... 87:143-151. Kaiser MG, Yonash N, Cahaner A, Lamont SJ (2000). Microsatellite polymorphism between and within broiler populations. Poult. Sic. 79: 626-628. Kestin SC, Su G, Sørensen P (1999). Different commercial broiler crosses have different susceptibilities to leg weakness. Poult. Sci. 78: 1085-1090.

  11. Genetic divergence of rubber tree estimated by multivariate techniques and microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lígia Regina Lima Gouvêa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity of 60 Hevea genotypes, consisting of Asiatic, Amazonian, African and IAC clones, and pertaining to the genetic breeding program of the Agronomic Institute (IAC, Brazil, was estimated. Analyses were based on phenotypic multivariate parameters and microsatellites. Five agronomic descriptors were employed in multivariate procedures, such as Standard Euclidian Distance, Tocher clustering and principal component analysis. Genetic variability among the genotypes was estimated with 68 selected polymorphic SSRs, by way of Modified Rogers Genetic Distance and UPGMA clustering. Structure software in a Bayesian approach was used in discriminating among groups. Genetic diversity was estimated through Nei's statistics. The genotypes were clustered into 12 groups according to the Tocher method, while the molecular analysis identified six groups. In the phenotypic and microsatellite analyses, the Amazonian and IAC genotypes were distributed in several groups, whereas the Asiatic were in only a few. Observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.05 to 0.96. Both high total diversity (H T' = 0.58 and high gene differentiation (Gst' = 0.61 were observed, and indicated high genetic variation among the 60 genotypes, which may be useful for breeding programs. The analyzed agronomic parameters and SSRs markers were effective in assessing genetic diversity among Hevea genotypes, besides proving to be useful for characterizing genetic variability.

  12. Microsatellite markers for identification and parentage analysis in the European wild boar (Sus scrofa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa Vânia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The wild boar (Sus scrofa is among the most widespread mammal species throughout the old world. Presently, studies concerning microsatellites in domestic pigs and wild boars have been carried out in order to investigate domestication, social behavior and general diversity patterns among either populations or breeds. The purpose of the current study is to develop a robust set of microsatellites markers for parentage analyses and individual identification. Findings A set of 14 previously reported microsatellites markers have been optimized and tested in three populations from Hungary, Portugal and Spain, in a total of 167 samples. The results indicate high probabilities of exclusion (0.99999, low probability of identity (2.0E-13 – 2.5E-9 and a parentage assignment of 100%. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that this set of markers is a useful and efficient tool for the individual identification and parentage assignment in wild boars.

  13. Isolation and Characterization of Microsatellite Markers for Canavalia cathartica and C. lineata (Fabaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asuka Yamashiro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed for the sea-dispersed legume Canavalia cathartica to investigate its genetic diversity and population structure. We also applied these microsatellite markers to the closely related species C. lineata. Methods and Results: Ten primer sets were developed for C. cathartica, and all of the primers were amplified in C. lineata. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to 13 and one to 10 for C. cathartica and C. lineata, respectively. The expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.375 to 0.870 and from 0.071 to 0.877 for C. cathartica and C. lineata, respectively. Conclusions: The 10 microsatellite markers developed in this study can be used to analyze the population genetic structure of C. cathartica and other related taxa.

  14. Isolation and Characterization of Microsatellite Markers for the Cleistogamous Species Lamium amplexicaule (Lamiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojana Stojanova

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Lamium amplexicaule is a cleistogamous plant that produces both closed flowers (obligately self-pollinated and open flowers (potentially outcrossed. The conditions for the maintenance of such a mating system depend on the outcrossing rate of the open flowers, which can be estimated using neutral microsatellite markers. Methods and Results: Forty primer pairs corresponding to microsatellite motifs obtained by coupling multiplex microsatellite enrichment and next-generation sequencing were tested. Thirteen primers amplified with satisfying results. The polymorphism of these markers was studied in four French populations. Allele number varied from one to eight per locus and per population. Heterozygosity levels were significantly lower than those expected under Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Conclusions: Our results are consistent with a partial self-fertilization pattern. These markers will be used to estimate the outcrossing rate as well as population differentiation in L. amplexicaule.

  15. High-utility conserved avian microsatellite markers enable parentage and population studies across a wide range of species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Microsatellites are widely used for many genetic studies. In contrast to single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and genotyping-by-sequencing methods, they are readily typed in samples of low DNA quality/concentration (e.g. museum/non-invasive samples), and enable the quick, cheap identification of species, hybrids, clones and ploidy. Microsatellites also have the highest cross-species utility of all types of markers used for genotyping, but, despite this, when isolated from a single species, only a relatively small proportion will be of utility. Marker development of any type requires skill and time. The availability of sufficient “off-the-shelf” markers that are suitable for genotyping a wide range of species would not only save resources but also uniquely enable new comparisons of diversity among taxa at the same set of loci. No other marker types are capable of enabling this. We therefore developed a set of avian microsatellite markers with enhanced cross-species utility. Results We selected highly-conserved sequences with a high number of repeat units in both of two genetically distant species. Twenty-four primer sets were designed from homologous sequences that possessed at least eight repeat units in both the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) and chicken (Gallus gallus). Each primer sequence was a complete match to zebra finch and, after accounting for degenerate bases, at least 86% similar to chicken. We assessed primer-set utility by genotyping individuals belonging to eight passerine and four non-passerine species. The majority of the new Conserved Avian Microsatellite (CAM) markers amplified in all 12 species tested (on average, 94% in passerines and 95% in non-passerines). This new marker set is of especially high utility in passerines, with a mean 68% of loci polymorphic per species, compared with 42% in non-passerine species. Conclusions When combined with previously described conserved loci, this new set of conserved markers will not only

  16. Association Mapping for Important Agronomic Traits in Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) Core Collection Using Microsatellite Markers

    OpenAIRE

    Heena Ambreen; Shivendra Kumar; Amar Kumar; Manu Agarwal; Arun Jagannath; Shailendra Goel

    2018-01-01

    Carthamus tinctorius L. (safflower) is an important oilseed crop producing seed oil rich in unsaturated fatty acids. Scarcity of identified marker-trait associations is a major limitation toward development of successful marker-assisted breeding programs in safflower. In the present study, a safflower panel (CartAP) comprising 124 accessions derived from two core collections was assayed for its suitability for association mapping. Genotyping of CartAP using microsatellite markers revealed sig...

  17. Development of microsatellite markers for six Tetranychus species by transfer from Tetranychus urticae genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia; Sun, Jing-Tao; Jin, Peng-Yu; Hong, Xiao-Yue

    2016-09-01

    Microsatellite markers are frequently used to explore the population genetic structure of organisms. Spider mites (genus Tetranychus) are important agricultural pests. Several markers have been developed for T. urticae, but for other spider mites, few such markers are available, hampering studies of their population genetics. In this study, we developed and characterized microsatellite markers for six non-model spider mite species (T. truncatus, T. kanzawai, T. ludeni, T. piercei, T. phaselus and T. pueraricola) by cross-species amplification of markers in the T. urticae genome, in order to better understand the population structure of Tetranychus species. Among 228 screened loci, many were polymorphic, including 13 loci in T. urticae, 11 loci in T. truncatus, 15 loci in T. pueraricola, 23 loci in T. kanzawai, 19 loci in T. piercei, 11 loci in T. phaselus and 9 loci in T. ludeni. Sequence analysis determined that the fragment length variations of the transferred microsatellites were mainly due to the variations of the numbers of repeats. These new microsatellite markers should be useful for studying the population genetics of the seven Tetranychus species.

  18. PCR-mediated recombination in development of microsatellite markers: mechanism and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula A. Roratto

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Protocols for microsatellite-enrichment libraries have been widely applied to several species in order to supply the most informative molecular markers for population and inbreeding studies. One drawback of these protocols is the ratio of designed primer pairs that fail to amplify the expected fragment, even after exhaustive optimization attempts. A possible cause of unsuccessful microsatellite primers may be that such loci are artifacts resulting from chimeric PCR products, instead of real genomic sequences. The microsatellite-enriched library constructed for Aegla longirostri (Crustacea, Decapoda, Anomura showed that 29% of sequenced clones were chimeric products because these sequences shared one of the flanking regions around the same repeat motif but not the other. PCR-mediated recombination is a well-known event described for several procedures in which related sequences are used as a template. We have associated this phenomenon with microsatellite marker development. This study explained the high ratio of recombinant sequences generated in the A. longirostri microsatellite-enriched library. We discuss the mechanism and implications of PCR chimeric-product formation during microsatellite isolation.

  19. Characterization of 11 novel microsatellite markers for the vagabond butterflyfish, Chaetodon vagabundus

    KAUST Repository

    Saenz Agudelo, Pablo

    2015-02-21

    Microsatellite markers were developed for the coral reef fish Chaetodon vagabundus using shotgun pyrosequencing. As threats to coral reefs intensify, information on larval connectivity is of increasing value for efficient conservation planning. Here, 11 novel microsatellites were characterized for 192 individuals from Papua New Guinea. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 7 to 32, while observed and expected heterozygosity values varied from 0.214 to 0.903. These markers will be used to study population structure and larval connectivity of this iconic coral reef fish in coral reefs across the Indo-Pacific.

  20. Nine novel, polymorphic microsatellite markers for the study of threatened Caribbean acroporid corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baums, I B; Devlin-Durante, M K; Brown, L; Pinzón, J H

    2009-07-01

    Caribbean reef-building corals in the genus Acropora have been declining dramatically since the 1980s and are now listed as threatened. The study of their complex reproductive system (mixed asexual and sexual) and their population structure requires highly polymorphic nuclear genetic markers. Of eight previously developed microsatellite loci for A. palmata, only five behaved in a Mendelian fashion and only four reliably amplified the sister species, A. cervicornis. Here, nine novel microsatellite markers are presented that dramatically increase the power to distinguish between asexual and sexual reproductive events and may help to refine population boundaries and gene flow across their ranges. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Microsatellite markers from tea green leafhopper Empoasca (Matsumurasca) onukii: a powerful tool for studying genetic structure in tea plantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Dietrich, Christopher H; Qin, Daozheng

    2016-07-29

    Tea green leafhopper is one of the most dominant pests in Chinese tea plantations. Recent evidence, including morphological and molecular data, revealed that tea green leafhopper in China is the same species as in Japan, Empoasca (Matsumurasca) onukii Matsuda. Previous morphological study that revealed variation in the structure of the male genitalia within and among populations of this species suggested that there may be significant population-level genetic variation. To provide powerful molecular markers to explore the population genetic diversity and population genetic structure of this pest in China, microsatellite markers were obtained by AFLP of sequences containing repeats (FIASCO). Eighteen polymorphic markers were evaluated for five populations of E. (M.) onukii, Two related empoascine leafhopper species were selected to test the transferability of the markers. Population genetic structure of E. (M.) onukii was detected using Structure analysis, principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and variance analysis. The identified markers were polymorphic with total number of alleles ranging from 6 to 24 per locus, observed and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.133 to 0.9 and 0.183 to 0.926, respectively, and the polymorphic information content value over all populations varied from 0.429 to 0.911. This is the first study to demonstrate that microsatellite markers provide valuable information for genetic structure of E. (M.) onukii in Chinese tea plantations. There is obvious genetic differentiation between the two populations in the Southwest tea area. These microsatellite markers will be the powerful tools for genetic studies of E. (M.) onukii and improve understanding of the microevolution of this species.

  2. Development of 12 Microsatellite Markers in Dorcus titanus castanicolor (Motschulsky, 1861) (Lucanidae, Coleoptera) from Korea Using Next-Generation Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Tae Hwa; Han, Sang Hoon; Park, Sun Jae

    2016-09-23

    In the present study, we used next-generation sequencing to develop 12 novel microsatellite markers for genetic structural analysis of Dorcus titanus castanicolor (Lucanidae; Coleoptera), a popular pet insect in China, Korea, and Japan. We identified 52,357 microsatellite loci in 339,287,381 bp of genomic sequence and selected 19 of the loci based on their PCR amplification efficiency and polymorphism. The 19 selected markers were then tested for the presence of null alleles and linkage disequilibrium. We did not detect any evidence of null alleles; however, four pairs of loci (DT03 and DT11, DT05 and DT26, DT08 and DT26, DT26 and DT35) exhibited linkage disequilibrium. Thus, we assessed the genetic diversity of a D. titanus castanicolor population from the Daejeon region of Korea (n = 22) using 13 markers. Among them, one marker (DT17) deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Therefore, 12 markers may be useful for further analyzing the genetic diversity of D. titanus castanicolor.

  3. Molecular characterization of Doom pigs using microsatellite markers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-07-23

    Jul 23, 2014 ... 3020. Afr. J. Biotechnol. Table 1. Microsatellite analysis in Doom pig population. Panel. Locus. Size range. (bp). Parameter. Na. Ne. PIC. Ho. He. I. FIS. HWE ... 145-161. 4. 2.5641. 0.6422. 0.7000. 0.6100. 1.1097. -0.1475. 3.3NS. Panel 3. SO218. 193-201. 5. 2.0769. 0.4850. 0.5556. 0.5185. 1.0507. -0.0714.

  4. Microsatellite markers for hoop-petticoat daffodils (Narcissus sect. Bulbocodii; Amaryllidaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Könyves, Kálmán; David, John C; Culham, Alastair

    2016-04-01

    Microsatellite markers were developed using hoop-petticoat daffodils (Narcissus sect. Bulbocodii; Amaryllidaceae) to aid in the taxonomic revision of the section, and to further evaluate their broad applicability for daffodil cultivar identification. Three hundred fifty-one primer pairs were developed using a commercial service. Nineteen polymorphic and repeatable markers were developed by screening 67 of these primer pairs. Of these, 11 chosen markers were used to screen 317 samples; the number of alleles per locus ranged from four to 21, and the observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.101 to 0.297. There were null genotypes in some samples for six of the markers. All the microsatellites were transferable to other Narcissus sections. The results indicate that these new markers have sufficient potential variation to be used for taxonomic revision of the genus and to distinguish many commercial daffodil cultivars.

  5. Development of microsatellite markers of vandaceous orchids for species and variety identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyachoknagul, S; Nettuwakul, C; Phuekvilai, P; Wannapinpong, S; Srikulnath, K

    2014-07-24

    Vandaceous orchids are a group of orchid genera in the subfamily Vandoideae. Among this group, Mokara, Phalaenopsis, and Vanda are the most popular and commercially important orchids in Thailand. Novel microsatellite markers were developed from Mokara, the intergeneric hybrid from 3 genera Vanda, Ascocentrum, and Arachnis by using enriched method. Six primers from this study plus one primer previously developed from Vanda genome, a total of 7 markers, were selected to characterize 4 orchid genera (Mokara, Vanda, Rhynchostylis, and Ascocenda). The observed and expected heterozygosities varied in the 4 genera from 0.0000-1.0000 and 0.0000-0.8765, respectively. The transferability of these primers was also investigated in 76 vandaceous orchids from 12 genera. Three primer pairs, MOK26, MOK29, and MOK62, could successfully amplify the DNA of all samples, while MOK103 could be used with most of the samples. The total number of alleles from 76 samples ranged from 3 to 19 alleles per locus, with an average of 8.5714. Therefore, these markers could be used for variety/ species identification, certification and protection, genetic diversity, and evolutionary studies.

  6. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers and analysis of genetic variability in Curculigo latifolia Dryand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaei, Nahid; Abdullah, Nur Ashikin Psyquay; Saleh, Ghizan; Abdullah, Thohirah Lee

    2012-11-01

    Curculin, a sweet protein found in Curculigo latifolia fruit has great potential for the pharmaceutical industry. This protein interestingly has been found to have both sweet taste and taste-modifying capacities comparable with other natural sweeteners. According to our knowledge this is the first reported case on the isolation of microsatellite loci in this genus. Hence, the current development of microsatellite markers for C. latifolia will facilitate future population genetic studies and breeding programs for this valuable plant. In this study 11 microsatellite markers were developed using 3' and 5' ISSR markers. The primers were tested on 27 accessions from all states of Peninsular Malaysia. The number of alleles per locus ranged from three to seven, with allele size ranging from 141 to 306 bp. The observed and expected heterozygosity ranged between 0.00-0.65 and 0.38-0.79, respectively. The polymorphic information content ranged from 0.35 to 0.74 and the Shannon's information index ranged from 0.82 to 1.57. These developed polymorphic microsatellites were used for constructing a dendrogram by unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean cluster analysis using the Dice's similarity coefficient. Accessions association according to their geographical origin was observed. Based on characteristics of isolated microsatellites for C. latifolia accessions all genotype can be distinguished using these 11 microsatellite markers. These polymorphic markers could also be applied to studies on uniformity determination and somaclonal variation of tissue culture plantlets, varieties identification, genetic diversity, analysis of phylogenetic relationship, genetic linkage maps and quantitative trait loci in C. latifolia.

  7. Characterization and cross-amplification of microsatellite markers in four species of anemonefish (Pomacentridae, Amphiprion spp.)

    KAUST Repository

    Bonin, Mary C.

    2015-04-09

    Anemonefish are iconic symbols of coral reefs and have become model systems for research on larval dispersal and population connectivity in coral reef fishes. Here we present 24 novel microsatellite markers across four species of anemonefish and also test 35 previously published markers for cross-amplification on two anemonefish species in order to facilitate further research on their population genetics and phylogenetics. Novel loci were isolated from sequences derived from microsatellite-enriched or 454 GS-FLX shotgun sequence libraries developed using congeneric DNA. Primer testing successfully identified 15 new microsatellite loci for A. percula, 4 for A. melanopus, 3 for A. akindynos, and 2 for A. omanensis. These novel microsatellite loci were polymorphic with a mean of 10 ± 1.6 SE (standard error) alleles per locus and an average observed heterozygosity of 0.647 ± 0.032 SE. Reliable cross-amplification of 12 and 26 of the 35 previously published Amphiprion markers was achieved for A. melanopus and A. akindynos, respectively, suggesting that the use of markers developed from the DNA of congeners can provide a quick and cost-effective alternative to the isolation of new loci. Together, the markers presented here provide an important resource for ecological, evolutionary, and conservation genetic research on anemonefishes that will inform broader conservation and management actions for coral reef fishes. © 2015 Senckenberg Gesellschaft für Naturforschung and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

  8. No microsatellite instability using Bethesda panel and revised markers in uterine leiomyomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ja-Min; Lee, Jae-Ho; Gwon, Gi-Jeong; Kim, Dae-Kwang

    2014-01-01

    Uterine leiomyomas are benign tumors of the uterus that arise clonally from smooth muscle cells of the myometrium and are very common reason for hysterectomy. The aim of this study was to evaluate microsatellite instability (MSI) in uterine leiomyomas using a set of MSI markers by Promega Corporation (Madison, WI, USA) and the Bethesda guideline. DNA was isolated from paired normal and tumoral tissues in 50 patients with uterine leiomyomas and MSI was analyzed by using seven microsatellite markers. Our result showed that microsatellite stability was found in all uterine leiomyomas. These data confirm the genetic status of uterine leiomyomas for the first time in Korean populations, and suggest that uterine leiomyomas have genetic stability in Korean. © 2013 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Improved testing for microsatellite instability in colorectal cancer using a simplified 3-marker assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esemuede, Iyare; Forslund, Ann; Khan, Sajid A; Qin, Li-Xuan; Gimbel, Mark I; Nash, Garrett M; Zeng, Zhaoshi; Rosenberg, Shoshana; Shia, Jinru; Barany, Francis; Paty, Philip B

    2010-12-01

    In colorectal cancer (CRC), microsatellite instability (MSI) is a valuable marker of defective DNA mismatch repair that identifies cancers with distinct phenotypic properties, including favorable survival. However, the optimal assay for MSI status is unknown. We have evaluated a simplified 3-marker assay for MSI and compared it with the 5-marker (NCI) assay to see if technical variations in MSI testing are important. DNA samples from 357 CRCs were evaluated for MSI using the 5 microsatellite markers recommended for the NCI assay (BAT 25, BAT26, D2S123, D5S346, and D17S250). Results were compared with a simplified 3-marker assay (BAT25, BAT26, and D2S123). CRCs identified as MSI were evaluated for their clinical, pathological, and genetic characteristics. The 5-marker assay identified 96 cancers as MSI. Only 56 of these were MSI by the 3-marker assay (3-marker+ group), leaving 40 cases identified as MSI only by NCI criteria (3-marker- group). The remaining 261 cancers were microsatellite stable (MSS). The 3-marker+ MSI tumors had features characteristic of MSI tumors: more proximal, poorly differentiated, associated with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), more BRAF mutations, fewer KRAS mutations, better 5-year disease-specific survival, more frequent mismatch repair (MMR) protein loss, and less likely to be metastatic on presentation (P marker- MSI and MSS cancers (P marker MSI assay outperforms the traditional 5-marker assay for identifying patients with favorable prognosis and homogeneous clinical and genetic features. More accurate MSI testing should improve prognostic and predictive scoring systems for colorectal cancer.

  10. Rapid detection of autosomal aneuploidy using microsatellite markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, P.N.; Teshima, I.E. [Hospital for Sick Children, Ontario (Canada); Winsor, E.J.T. [Toronto Hospital, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Trisomy occurs in at least 4% of all clinically recognized pregnancies, making it the most common type of chromosome abnormality in humans. The most commonly occurring trisomies are those of chromosomes 13, 18, 21 and aneuploidy of X and Y, accounting for about 0.3% of all newborns and a much higher percentage of conceptuses. In Canada, prenatal chromosome analysis by amniocentesis is offered to those women {ge} 35 years of age at the time of delivery or equivalent risk by maternal serum screen. We are developing a rapid molecular diagnostic test to detect the most common autosomal aneuploidies in prenatal and neonatal samples. The tests makes use of highly polymorphic short tandem repeat markers labeled with fluorescent tags which allow analysis on a GENESCANNER automated fragment analyzer (ABI). Multiple polymorphic markers have been selected on each of chromosomes 13, 18 and 21. At a given locus, trisomic fetuses/neonates will have either three alleles or two alleles with one allele having twice the intensity of the other. Unaffected individuals have two equal intensity alleles. We are conducting a blind study that will compare the detection efficiencies of FISH analysis on uncultured cells and the molecular method on confirmation amniotic fluid samples collected at the time of termination of affected fetuses. Results on cultured amniocytes from one such patient confirmed that trisomy 21 can be detected. FISH was not done on this sample. In addition, detection efficiency of the molecular method in whole blood samples from affected neonates is also being studied. To date, two such samples have been tested, one with trisomy 13 and one with trisomy 18, and both samples were diagnosed correctly. Preliminary results suggest that this method may provide a valuable tool for the rapid diagnosis of aneuploidy.

  11. Genic Microsatellite Markers in Brassica rapa: Development, Characterization, Mapping, and Their Utility in Other Cultivated and Wild Brassica Relatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramchiary, Nirala; Nguyen, Van Dan; Li, Xiaonan; Hong, Chang Pyo; Dhandapani, Vignesh; Choi, Su Ryun; Yu, Ge; Piao, Zhong Yun; Lim, Yong Pyo

    2011-01-01

    Genic microsatellite markers, also known as functional markers, are preferred over anonymous markers as they reveal the variation in transcribed genes among individuals. In this study, we developed a total of 707 expressed sequence tag-derived simple sequence repeat markers (EST-SSRs) and used for development of a high-density integrated map using four individual mapping populations of B. rapa. This map contains a total of 1426 markers, consisting of 306 EST-SSRs, 153 intron polymorphic markers, 395 bacterial artificial chromosome-derived SSRs (BAC-SSRs), and 572 public SSRs and other markers covering a total distance of 1245.9 cM of the B. rapa genome. Analysis of allelic diversity in 24 B. rapa germplasm using 234 mapped EST-SSR markers showed amplification of 2 alleles by majority of EST-SSRs, although amplification of alleles ranging from 2 to 8 was found. Transferability analysis of 167 EST-SSRs in 35 species belonging to cultivated and wild brassica relatives showed 42.51% (Sysimprium leteum) to 100% (B. carinata, B. juncea, and B. napus) amplification. Our newly developed EST-SSRs and high-density linkage map based on highly transferable genic markers would facilitate the molecular mapping of quantitative trait loci and the positional cloning of specific genes, in addition to marker-assisted selection and comparative genomic studies of B. rapa with other related species. PMID:21768136

  12. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers in the sexual-apomictic complex Taraxacum officinale (dandelion)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falque, M.; Keurentjes, J.J.B.; Bakx-Schotman, J.M.T.; Van Dijk, P.J.

    1998-01-01

    Microsatellite markers were developed in Taraxacum officinale to study gene flow between sexual and apomictic plants and to identify clones. Twenty five thousand genomic DNA clones were hybridized with a (CT)(12)D probe. The density of (GA/CT)(n) repeats was estimated at one every 61 kb in the T.

  13. Development and characterization of nine new microsatellite markers in Taraxacum (Asteraceae).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasut, R.; Dijk, P.J.; Falque, M.; Trávnicek, B.; Jong, de J.H.S.G.M.

    2004-01-01

    This study aims at developing and characterizing new microsatellite primer pairs in Taraxacum officinale auct. to produce polymorphic markers for genetical and evolutionary studies on apomixis in this sexual-apomictic complex. A total of 24 diploid plants were tested for allelic polymorphism and

  14. Molecular characterization of peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] germplasm in the United States using microsatellite markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] is an important medicinal fruit with immense health benefits and antioxidant activity. In this study, microsatellite markers were used as DNA fingerprinting tools for the identification and characterization of peach germplasm in the United States. Eleven microsatel...

  15. Integrating microsatellite DNA markers and otolith geochemistry to assess population structure of European hake (Merluccius merluccius)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Susanne E.; Pérez, Montse; Presa, Pablo; Thorrold, Simon R.; Cabral, Henrique N.

    2014-04-01

    Population structure and natal origins of European hake were investigated using microsatellite DNA markers and otolith geochemistry data. Five microsatellites were sequenced and otolith core geochemical composition was determined from age-1 hake collected in the northeast Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea. Microsatellites provided evidence of a major genetic split in the vicinity of the Strait of Gibraltar, separating the Atlantic and the Mediterranean populations, with the exception of the Gulf of Cádiz. Based on classification models using otolith core geochemical values, individual natal origins were identified, although with an increased error rate. Coupling genotype and otolith data increased the classification accuracy of individuals to their potential natal origins while providing evidence of movement between the northern and southern stock units in the Atlantic Ocean. Information obtained by the two natural markers on population structure of European hake was complementary as the two markers act at different spatio-temporal scales. Otolith geochemistry provides information over an ecological time frame and on a fine spatial scale, while microsatellite DNA markers report on gene flow over evolutionary time scales and therefore act on a broader spatio-temporal resolution. Thus, this study confirmed the value of otolith geochemistry to complement the assessment of early life stage dispersal in populations with high gene flow and low genetic divergence.

  16. Evolutionary history of two endemic Appalachian conifers revealed using microsatellite markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin M. Potter; John Frampton; Sedley A. Josserand; C. Dana Nelson

    2010-01-01

    Fraser fir (Abies fraseri [Pursh] Poir.) and intermediate fir (Abies balsamea [L.] Mill. var. phanerolepis Fern.) exist in small populations in the Appalachian highlands of the southeastern United States. We used ten nuclear microsatellite markers to quantify genetic variation within Fraser fir and intermediate...

  17. Characterization of the 17p amplicon in human sarcomas: microsatellite marker analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, M.; Tarkkanen, M.; Hulsebos, T.; Larramendy, M. L.; Forus, A.; Myklebost, O.; Aaltonen, L. A.; Elomaa, I.; Knuutila, S.

    1999-01-01

    The structure of the 17p amplicon from 9 human sarcoma specimens evaluated by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) has been studied by analyzing 28 microsatellite markers by PCR. Eleven sarcoma specimens showing no DNA copy number increases at 17p by CGH were analyzed as control samples. Five

  18. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers for carolina hemlock (Tsuga caroliniana)

    Science.gov (United States)

    S.A. Josserand; K.M. Potter; C.S. Echt; C.D. Nelson

    2008-01-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of 31 polymorphic di- and trinucleotide microsatellite marker loci for Carolina hemlock (Tsuga caroliniana Englem.). In addition, primer pairs for 16 loci amplified scoreable alleles in six other Euga species. In eastern North America, both Carolina hemlock and eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis...

  19. A set of novel microsatellite markers developed for an economically important tree, Dracontomelon duperreanum, in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z F; Cao, H L; Wu, L F; Guo, Y; Mei, Q M; Li, M; Wang, Y; Wang, Z M

    2017-05-10

    Dracontomelon duperreanum, the most representative species of the family Anacardiaceae, is an important multipurpose tree in China and Vietnam. However, no genetic diversity studies have been reported on this species. In this study, we identified 11 microsatellite markers for D. duperreanum by using the restriction-site-associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq) method and examined their polymorphisms in 22 samples obtained from the South China Botanical Garden, South China. We could detect only two or three alleles for each microsatellite marker. The mean observed and expected heterozygosities were 0.41 and 0.39, respectively, which were lower than those reported for the species with similar life history forms. These relatively low genetic diversities in this common plant species are unexpected and might have resulted from its extensive cultivation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of microsatellite markers in the genus Dracontomelon. These microsatellite markers will be valuable for studying the genetic diversities and structures in D. duperreanum and other Dracontomelon species.

  20. An annotated genetic map of loblolly pine based on microsatellite and cDNA markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig S. Echt; Surya Saha; Konstantin V. Krutovsky; Kokulapalan Wimalanathan; John E. Erpelding; Chun Liang; C Dana Nelson

    2011-01-01

    Previous loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) genetic linkage maps have been based on a variety of DNA polymorphisms, such as AFLPs, RAPDs, RFLPs, and ESTPs, but only a few SSRs (simple sequence repeats), also known as simple tandem repeats or microsatellites, have been mapped in P. taeda. The objective of this study was to integrate a large set of SSR markers from a variety...

  1. Development and characterization of twelve microsatellite markers for Porphyra linearis Greville.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela-Álvarez, Elena; Paulino, Cristina; Serrão, Ester A

    2017-02-01

    The genus Porphyra (and its sister genus Pyropia) contains important red algal species that are cultivated and/or harvested for human consumption, sustaining a billion-dollar aquaculture industry. A vast amount of research has been focused on species of this genus, including studies on genetics and genomics among other areas. Twelve novel microsatellite markers were developed here for Porphyra linearis. Markers were characterized using 32 individuals collected from four natural populations of P. linearis with total heterozygosity varying from 0.098 to 0.916. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 18. All markers showed cross amplification with Porphyra umbilicalis and/or Porphyra dioica. These polymorphic microsatellite markers are useful for investigating population genetic diversity and differentiation in P. linearis and may become useful for other genetic research on the reproductive biology of this important species.

  2. Characterization of Fungus-Specific Microsatellite Markers in the Lichen Fungus Usnea subfloridana (Parmeliaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiiu Tõrra

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Microsatellite loci were developed for the haploid lichenized fungal species Usnea subfloridana to study its population subdivision and the species' response to forest disturbance, fragmentation, and environmental pollution. Methods and Results: We developed 14 polymorphic microsatellite markers using 454 pyrosequencing data of U. subfloridana. The number of alleles per locus ranged from three to 15, and Nei's unbiased gene diversity averaged over nine markers without null alleles ranged from 0.64 to 0.67. Evaluation of the cross-species amplification in U. glabrescens and U. wasmuthii indicates that these markers are also informative in other Usnea species. Conclusions: These markers will allow us to investigate the effects of forest management and environmental pollution on genetic population structure of U. subfloridana and closely related species. Moreover, they will help facilitate phylogeographic studies of U. subfloridana across the species' distribution area in Europe.

  3. Development of microsatellite loci exhibiting reverse ascertainment bias and a sexing marker for use in Emperor Geese (Chen canagica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravley, Meg C.; Sage, George K.; Schmutz, Joel A.; Talbot, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    The Alaskan population of Emperor Geese (Chen canagica) nests on the Yukon–Kuskokwim Delta in western Alaska. Numbers of Emperor Geese in Alaska declined from the 1960s to the mid-1980s and since then, their numbers have slowly increased. Low statistical power of microsatellite loci developed in other waterfowl species and used in previous studies of Emperor Geese are unable to confidently assign individual identity. Microsatellite loci for Emperor Goose were therefore developed using shotgun amplification and next-generation sequencing technology. Forty-one microsatellite loci were screened and 14 were found to be polymorphic in Emperor Geese. Only six markers – a combination of four novel loci and two loci developed in other waterfowl species – are needed to identify an individual from among the Alaskan Emperor Goose population. Genetic markers for identifying sex in Emperor Geese were also developed. The 14 novel variable loci and 15 monomorphic loci were screened for polymorphism in four other Arctic-nesting goose species, Black Brant (Branta bernicla nigricans), Greater White-fronted (Anser albifrons), Canada (B. canadensis) and Cackling (B. hutchinsii) Goose. Emperor Goose exhibited the smallest average number of alleles (3.3) and the lowest expected heterozygosity (0.467). Greater White-fronted Geese exhibited the highest average number of alleles (4.7) and Cackling Geese the highest expected heterozygosity (0.599). Six of the monomorphic loci were variable and able to be characterised in the other goose species assayed, a predicted outcome of reverse ascertainment bias. These findings fail to support the hypothesis of ascertainment bias due to selection of microsatellite markers.

  4. Genetic Variation of 28 microsatellite markers in Australian merino ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ratiyat

    2016-02-26

    Feb 26, 2016 ... The extracted DNA samples were quantified using a NanoDrop spectrophotometer and then made into aliquot DNA samples of 10 ng/μL. The DNA samples were then genotyped for 28 MS markers on different chromosomes (Tables 1a and 1b). A panel of MS markers was designed, developed and used as.

  5. Prediction of maize single-cross performance by mixed linear models with microsatellite marker information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestre, M; Von Pinho, R G; Souza, J C

    2010-06-11

    We evaluated the potential of the best linear unbiased predictor (BLUP) along with the relationship coefficient for predicting the performance of untested maize single-cross hybrids. Ninety S(0:2) progenies arising from three single-cross hybrids were used. The 90 progenies were genotyped with 25 microsatellite markers, with nine markers linked to quantitative trait loci for grain yield. Based on genetic similarities, 17 partial inbred lines were selected and crossed in a partial diallel design. Similarity and relationship coefficients were used to construct the additive and dominance genetic matrices; along with BLUP, they provided predictions for untested single-crosses. Five degrees of imbalance were simulated (5, 10, 20, 30, and 40 hybrids). The correlation values between the predicted genotypic values and the observed phenotypic means varied from 0.55 to 0.70, depending on the degree of imbalance. A similar result was observed for the specific combining ability predictions; they varied from 0.61 to 0.70. It was also found that the relationship coefficient based on BLUP provided more accurate predictions than similarity-in-state predictions. We conclude that BLUP methodology is a viable alternative for the prediction of untested crosses in early progenies.

  6. De novo assembly and characterization of foot transcriptome and microsatellite marker development for Paphia textile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoming; Li, Jiakai; Xiao, Shijun; Liu, Xiande

    2016-01-15

    Paphia textile is an important, aquaculture bivalve clam species distributed mainly in China, Philippines, and Malaysia. Recent studies of P. textile have focused mainly on artificial breeding and nutrition analysis, and the transcriptome and genome of P. textile have rarely been reported. In this work, the transcriptome of P. textile foot tissue was sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq™ 2000 platform. A total of 20,219,795 reads were generated, resulting in 4.08 Gb of raw data. The raw reads were cleaned and assembled into 54,852 unigenes with an N50 length of 829 bp. Of these unigenes, 38.92% were successfully annotated based on their matches to sequences in seven public databases. Among the annotated unigenes, 14,571 were assigned Gene Ontology terms, 5448 were classified to Clusters of Orthologous Groups categories, and 6738 were mapped to 228 pathways in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database. For functional marker development, 5605 candidate simple sequence repeats were identified in the transcriptome and 80 primer pairs were selected randomly and amplified in a wild population of P. textile. A total of 36 loci that exhibited obvious repeat length polymorphisms were detected. The transcriptomic data and microsatellite markers will provide valuable resources for future functional gene analyses, genetic map construction, and quantitative trait loci mapping in P. textile. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of microsatellite markers for the bracken fern, Pteridium aquilinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoqing; Wang, Jianxiu; Tian, Hongli; Zhang, Xianchun; Wen, Jun; Zhou, Shiliang

    2008-11-01

    We isolated eight novel polymorphic microsatellite loci from Pteridium aquilinum. These loci were characterized in 30 individuals, one from Bolivia, two from Peru, one from the USA, one from Japan, and 25 from Northeast China to Southwest China. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to seven. The observed heterozygosity (H(O) ) ranged from 0.000 to 0.600 with an average of 0.3051, and the expected heterozygosity (H(E) ) ranged from 0.0966 to 0.7780 with an average of 0.4267. One locus deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and four pairs of loci were found to be in linkage disequilibrium. These polymorphic loci will be useful in the study of the population genetic structure of Pteridium. © 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Polymorphic microsatellite markers for population analysis of a tephritid pest species, Bactrocera tryoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnear, M W; Bariana, H S; Sved, J A; Frommer, M

    1998-11-01

    To obtain a set of microsatellite markers for the Queensland fruit fly Bactrocera tryoni, a genomic library was screened with a number of simple repeat oligonucleotide probes. Sequencing recovered 22 repeat loci. The microsatellite sequences were short, with repeat numbers ranging from five to 11. Of these, 16 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer sets yielded amplifiable products, which were tested on 53 flies from five widely separated sites. All loci showed polymorphism in the population sample, with the number of alleles ranging from two to 16. Several dinucleotide repeats showed alleles separated by single-base differences and multiple steps, suggesting a mutation process more complex than the stepwise mutation model.

  9. Microsatellite marker isolation and development for the giant Pacific Octopus (Enteroctopus dofleini)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, Rebecca K.; Sage, G. Kevin; Talbot, Sandra L.; Scheel, David

    2012-01-01

    We isolated and developed 18 novel microsatellite markers for the giant Pacific octopus (Enteroctopus dofleini) and examined them for 31 individuals from Prince William Sound (PWS), Alaska. These loci displayed moderate levels of allelic diversity (averaging 11 alleles per locus) and heterozygosity (averaging 65%). Seven loci deviated from Hardy–Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE) due to heterozygote deficiency for the PWS population, although deviations were not observed for all these loci in other populations, suggesting the PWS population is not in mutation-drift equilibrium. These novel microsatellite loci yielded sufficient genetic diversity for potential use in population genetics, individual identification, and parentage studies.

  10. Determination of ancestral proportions in synthetic bovine breeds using commonly employed microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicalho, H M S; Pimenta, C G; Mendes, I K P; Pena, H B; Queiroz, E M; Pena, S D J

    2006-07-31

    The International Society of Animal Genetics (ISAG) has chosen nine microsatellites (international marker set) as a standard that should be included in all cattle parentage studies. They are BM1824, BM2113, INRA023, SPS115, TGLA122, TGLA126, TGLA227, ETH10, and ETH225. We decided to ascertain whether this microsatellite set could be used to determine ancestral proportions in individual animals of synthetic breeds produced by crossing zebu and taurine cattle. Since the genotypes of these markers are routinely available, this would constitute a practical and cost-free method to estimate the ancestry of synthetic breed animals. Genotypes of 100 Gir and 100 Holstein animals were examined for this ISAG marker set. As expected, there were very significant allele frequency differences between the two breeds at most loci. We also typed 20 Girolando animals for which there was complete genealogical information. "Structure" software easily distinguished Holstein and Gir animals based on their microsatellite genotypes; it also attributed the genomic proportion of zebu and taurine of each of the 20 Girolando animals. The proportion of Holstein ancestry was then regressed on the genealogical data; there was a highly significant correlation (r = 0.84, P Girolando animals within narrow confidence limits. This microsatellite set might also be useful for estimating the proportions of taurine and zebu origins in commercial meat products.

  11. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers (SSR) in Sesamum (Sesamum indicum L.) species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spandana, B; Reddy, V Prathap; Prasanna, G John; Anuradha, G; Sivaramakrishnan, S

    2012-11-01

    Microsatellites, also known as simple sequence repeats (SSRs), are the class of repetitive DNA sequences present throughout the genome of many plant and animal species. Recent advances in molecular genetics had been the introduction of microsatellite markers to investigate the genetic structuring of natural plant populations. We have employed an enrichment strategy for microsatellite isolation by using multi-enzymes digestion, microsatellite oligoprobes, and streptavidin magnetic beads in Sesamum (Sesamum indicum L.). More than 200 SSR motifs were detected (SSR motifs ≥2 repeat units or 6 bp); 80 % of the clones contained SSR motifs. When regarding SSRs with four or more repeat units and a minimum length of 10 bp, 132 of them showed repeats. Eighteen SSR markers were initially characterized for optimum annealing temperature using a gradient PCR technique. Among the 18 SSR markers characterized, five were found to be polymorphic and used to analyze 60 Sesamum germplasm accessions. The maximum number of alleles detected was four with a single primer and the least number of two alleles with three primers with an average PIC value of 0.77. SSRs are a valuable tool for estimating genetic diversity and analyzing the evolutionary and historical development of cultivars at the genomic level in sesame breeding programs.

  12. Isolation and Characterization of Novel Microsatellite Markers in Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mostafa Pirseyedi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Pomegranate (Punica granatum L. has been cultivated from ancient times for its economic, ornamental and medicinal properties globally. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of 12 polymorphic microsatellite markers from a repeat-enriched genomic library of Punica granatum L. The genetic diversity of these loci was assessed in 60 genotypes of Punica granatum L. All loci were variable: the number of polymorphic alleles per locus ranged from two to five (average 2.9. The observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.15 to 0.87 and 0.29 to 0.65, respectively. The polymorphic information content ranged from 0.26 to 0.61 (average: 0.43. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that polymorphic microsatellite markers have been reported for P. granatum L. These new markers should allow studies of the population structure and genetic diversity of pomegranate to be performed in the future.

  13. Isolation and Characterization of Novel Microsatellite Markers in Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirseyedi, Seyed Mostafa; Valizadehghan, Sahar; Mardi, Mohsen; Ghaffari, Mohammad Reza; Mahmoodi, Parvaneh; Zahravi, Mehdi; Zeinalabedini, Mehrshad; Nekoui, Seyed Mojtaba Khayam

    2010-01-01

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) has been cultivated from ancient times for its economic, ornamental and medicinal properties globally. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of 12 polymorphic microsatellite markers from a repeat-enriched genomic library of Punica granatum L. The genetic diversity of these loci was assessed in 60 genotypes of Punica granatum L. All loci were variable: the number of polymorphic alleles per locus ranged from two to five (average 2.9). The observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.15 to 0.87 and 0.29 to 0.65, respectively. The polymorphic information content ranged from 0.26 to 0.61 (average: 0.43). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that polymorphic microsatellite markers have been reported for P. granatum L. These new markers should allow studies of the population structure and genetic diversity of pomegranate to be performed in the future. PMID:20559498

  14. Microsatellite markers for the critically endangered elm species Ulmus gaussenii (Ulmaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Qi-Fang; Yang, Jie; He, Jia; Wang, Dan-Bi; Shi, En; Xu, Wei-Xiang; Jeelani, Nasreen; Wang, Zhong-Sheng; Liu, Hong

    2016-07-20

    The Anhui elm Ulmus gaussenii is listed as a critically endangered species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and is endemic to China, where its only population is restricted to Langya Mountain in Chuzhou, Anhui Province. To better understand the population genetics of U. gaussenii, we developed 12 microsatellite markers using an improved technique. The 12 markers were polymorphic, with the number of alleles per locus ranging from two to nine. Observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.021 to 0.750 and 0.225 to 0.744, respectively. The inbreeding coefficient ranged from -0.157 to 0.960. Significant linkage disequilibrium was detected for two pairs of loci, and significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were found in nine loci. These microsatellite markers will contribute to the studies of population genetics in U. gaussenii, which in turn will contribute to species conservation and protection.

  15. Isolation and characterization of novel microsatellite markers for Avena sativa (Poaceae) (oat).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bin; Zhang, Zongwen; Chen, Lingyun; He, Minggao

    2012-02-01

    A new set of microsatellite primers was developed for Avena sativa and characterized to assess the level of genetic diversity among cultivars and wild genotypes. Using an enrichment genomic library, 14 simple sequence repeat markers were identified. The loci of these markers were characterized and found to be polymorphic in size among 48 genotypes of oat from diverse geographical locations. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to eight, while the observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.031 to 0.75. These newly identified microsatellite markers will facilitate genetic diversity studies, fingerprinting, and genetic mapping of oat. Moreover, these new primers for A. sativa will aid future studies of polyploidy and hybridization in other species in this genus.

  16. Phylogenetic and microsatellite markers for Tulasnella (Tulasnellaceae) mycorrhizal fungi associated with Australian orchids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruibal, Monica P; Peakall, Rod; Smith, Leon M; Linde, Celeste C

    2013-03-01

    Phylogenetic and microsatellite markers were developed for Tulasnella mycorrhizal fungi to investigate fungal species identity and diversity. These markers will be useful in future studies investigating the phylogenetic relationship of the fungal symbionts, specificity of orchid-mycorrhizal associations, and the role of mycorrhizae in orchid speciation within several orchid genera. • We generated partial genome sequences of two Tulasnella symbionts originating from Chiloglottis and Drakaea orchid species with 454 genome sequencing. Cross-genus transferability across mycorrhizal symbionts associated with multiple genera of Australian orchids (Arthrochilus, Chiloglottis, Drakaea, and Paracaleana) was found for seven phylogenetic loci. Five loci showed cross-transferability to Tulasnella from other orchid genera, and two to Sebacina. Furthermore, 11 polymorphic microsatellite loci were developed for Tulasnella from Chiloglottis. • Highly informative markers were obtained, allowing investigation of mycorrhizal diversity of Tulasnellaceae associated with a wide variety of terrestrial orchids in Australia and potentially worldwide.

  17. Fourteen polymorphic microsatellite markers for the fungal banana pathogen Mycosphaerella fijiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bao Jun; Zhong, Shao Bin

    2008-07-01

    Fourteen polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for Mycosphaerella fijiensis, a fungus causing the black sigatoka disease in banana. The sequenced genome of M. fijiensis was screened for sequences with single sequence repeats (SSRs) using a Perl script. Fourteen SSR loci, evaluated on 48 M. fijiensis isolates from Hawaii, were identified to be highly polymorphic. These markers revealed two to 19 alleles, with an average of 6.43 alleles per locus. The estimated gene diversity ranged from 0.091 to 0.930 across the 14 microsatellite loci. The SSR markers developed would be useful for population genetics studies of M. fijiensis. © 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Isolation and characterization of novel microsatellite markers in pomegranate (Punica granatum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirseyedi, Seyed Mostafa; Valizadehghan, Sahar; Mardi, Mohsen; Ghaffari, Mohammad Reza; Mahmoodi, Parvaneh; Zahravi, Mehdi; Zeinalabedini, Mehrshad; Nekoui, Seyed Mojtaba Khayam

    2010-05-03

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) has been cultivated from ancient times for its economic, ornamental and medicinal properties globally. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of 12 polymorphic microsatellite markers from a repeat-enriched genomic library of Punica granatum L. The genetic diversity of these loci was assessed in 60 genotypes of Punica granatum L. All loci were variable: the number of polymorphic alleles per locus ranged from two to five (average 2.9). The observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.15 to 0.87 and 0.29 to 0.65, respectively. The polymorphic information content ranged from 0.26 to 0.61 (average: 0.43). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that polymorphic microsatellite markers have been reported for P. granatum L. These new markers should allow studies of the population structure and genetic diversity of pomegranate to be performed in the future.

  19. Development of new microsatellite markers from Mango (Mangifera indica) and cross-species amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravishankar, Kundapura Venkataramana; Mani, Bellam Hanumantha-Reddy; Anand, Lalitha; Dinesh, Makki Ramachandra

    2011-04-01

    Microsatellite markers were developed and characterized to assess the genetic diversity among mango (Mangifera indica) cultivars and to test their amplification in closely related species. Thirty-six microsatellite (simple sequence repeats; SSR) loci were isolated by a microsatellite-enriched partial genomic library method. Primers designed for these loci were characterized using 30 diverse mango cultivars. The number of alleles ranged from 3 to 19 with an average of 9.2 alleles per locus. Polymorphic information content values ranged from 0.185 to 0.920 with a mean of 0.687. The total value for the probability of identity was 2.42 × 10(-31). The newly identified SSRs would be useful in genetic diversity studies, finger-printing, and mapping. Loci from five related species, M. odorata, M. anadamanica, M. zeylanica, M. camptosperma, and M. griffithii, were successfully amplified using these SSR primers, showing their potential utility across species.

  20. Development of polymorphic microsatellite markers in barfin flounder (Verasper moseri) and spotted halibut (Verasper variegatus) by the cross-species amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongyu; Chen, Songlin

    2011-10-01

    Barfin flounder (Verasper moseri) and spotted halibut (Verasper variegatus) are two commercially important flatfish species in the Northeast Asia. In the present study, we reported polymorphic microsatellite markers in V. moseri and V. variegatus by the cross-species amplification of microsatellite primers developed previously in two other related marine fish species. A total of 244 polymorphic microsatellite markers were selected for cross-species amplification in V. moseri and V. variegatus, of which 182 markers deriving from Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) and 62 markers deriving from Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus). A sample of 10 individuals were detected. As a result, a total of 67 loci showed polymorphisms in V. moseri, and 62 loci showed polymorphisms in V. variegatus, with the observed number of alleles per locus ranging from two to five in V. moseri, and from two to seven in V. variegatus, respectively. This paper provided more candidate microsatellite markers which could be useful for construction of genetic linkage maps, evaluation of population genetic structure and stock management of V. moseri and V. variegatus.

  1. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers for Sturnira parvidens and cross-species amplification in Sturnira species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar G. Gutiérrez

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Sturnira is one of the most species-rich genera in the Neotropics, and it is found from Mexico and the Lesser Antilles to Argentina. This genus forms a well-supported monophyletic clade with at least twenty-one recognized species, as well as several others under taxonomic review. Sturnira parvidens is a widespread frugivorous bat of the deciduous forests of the Neotropics, is highly abundant, and is a major component in fruit dispersal to regenerate ecosystems. Methods We used a technique based on Illumina paired-end sequencing of a library highly enriched for microsatellite repeats to develop loci for S. parvidens. We analyzed millions of resulting reads with specialized software to extract those reads that contained di-, tri-, tetra-, penta-, and hexanucleotide microsatellites. Results We selected and tested 14 polymorphic (di, tri, and tetra microsatellites. All markers were genotyped on 26 different individuals from distinct locations of the distributional area of S. parvidens. We observed medium—high genetic variation across most loci, but only 12 were functionally polymorphic. Levels of expected heterozygosity across all markers were high to medium (mean HE = 0.79, mean HO = 0.72. We examined ascertainment bias in twelve bats of the genus, obtaining null/monomorphic/polymorphic amplifications. Discussion The Illumina paired-end sequencing system is capable of identifying massive numbers of microsatellite loci, while expending little time, reducing costs, and providing a large amount of data. The described polymorphic loci for S. parvidens in particular, and for the genus in general, could be suitable for further genetic analysis, including taxonomic inconsistencies, parentage/relatedness analysis, and population genetics assessments.

  2. Microsatellite marker-based assessment of the biodiversity of native bioethanol yeast strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonangelo, Ana Teresa B F; Alonso, Diego P; Ribolla, Paulo E M; Colombi, Débora

    2013-08-01

    Although many Brazilian sugar mills initiate the fermentation process by inoculating selected commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, the unsterile conditions of the industrial sugar cane ethanol fermentation process permit the constant entry of native yeast strains. Certain of those native strains are better adapted and tend to predominate over the initial strain, which may cause problems during fermentation. In the industrial fermentation process, yeast cells are often exposed to stressful environmental conditions, including prolonged cell recycling, ethanol toxicity and osmotic, oxidative or temperature stress. Little is known about these S. cerevisiae strains, although recent studies have demonstrated that heterogeneous genome architecture is exhibited by some selected well-adapted Brazilian indigenous yeast strains that display high performance in bioethanol fermentation. In this study, 11 microsatellite markers were used to assess the genetic diversity and population structure of the native autochthonous S. cerevisiae strains in various Brazilian sugar mills. The resulting multilocus data were used to build a similarity-based phenetic tree and to perform a Bayesian population structure analysis. The tree revealed the presence of great genetic diversity among the strains, which were arranged according to the place of origin and the collection year. The population structure analysis revealed genotypic differences among populations; in certain populations, these genotypic differences are combined to yield notably genotypically diverse individuals. The high yeast diversity observed among native S. cerevisiae strains provides new insights on the use of autochthonous high-fitness strains with industrial characteristics as starter cultures at bioethanol plants. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Towards a genus-wide reference linkage map for Eucalyptus based exclusively on highly informative microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondani, Rosana P V; Brondani, C; Grattapaglia, D

    2002-05-01

    A novel set of 50 highly polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed and mapped on existing RAPD framework maps of Eucalyptus grandis and E. urophylla. Together with the twenty previously developed microsatellite markers, these were used to align the existing maps for the two most commercially important Eucalyptus species in the tropics. Sixty-three microsatellite markers were placed on the E. grandis map in 11 linkage groups, and 53 on the E. urophylla map distributed in 10 linkage groups. Approximately 66% of the microsatellite markers segregated in a fully informative fashion, allowing the establishment of colinear syntenic linkage groups between the two maps. The 50 new microsatellite markers were highly informative, with an average of 14 alleles per locus, and average expected heterozygosity between 0.82 and 0.87. Furthermore, within the subgenus Symphyomyrtus, to which the vast majority of commercially important Eucalyptus species belong, these markers display on average 90% transportability. This set of 70 mapped microsatellite markers represents a significant step toward the development of a genus-wide reference linkage map for Eucalyptus. These highly multiallelic and transportable markers constitute a powerful tool for QTL discovery and validation, and can be used in directed searches for QTL allele variation across Eucalyptus pedigrees.

  4. Tagging microsatellite marker to a blast resistance gene in the irrigated rice cultivar Cica-8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Martins Pinheiro

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The rice cultivar Cica-8 exhibit differential reaction to several pathotypes of Magnaporthe oryzae. The objective of the present investigation was to determine the number of alleles involved in the expression of resistance to leaf blast and identify microsatellite markers linked to these alleles. A cross between cultivar Metica-1 and Cica-8 susceptible and resistant, respectively, to pathotype IB-1 (Py1049 was made to obtain F1, F2, BC1:1 and BC1:2 progenies. Greenhouse tests for leaf blast reaction showed that resistance is controlled by a monogenic dominant gene. For testing microsatellite markers, DNA of both resistant and susceptible parents and F1 and F2 populations was extracted. As expected for single dominant gene the F2 populations segregated at a ratio of 3:1. Of the 11 microsatellite markers tested, one marker RM 7102 was found to be closely linked to the resistant allele at a distance of 2.7 cM, in the cultivar Cica-8 to pathotype IB-1.

  5. Novel microsatellite markers suggest the mechanism of parthenogenesis in Extatosoma tiaratum is automixis with terminal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Yasaman; van Rooyen, Anthony; Elgar, Mark Adrian; Jones, Therésa Melanie; Weeks, Andrew Raymond

    2018-02-01

    Parthenogenetic reproduction is taxonomically widespread and occurs through various cytological mechanisms, which have different impact on the genetic variation of the offspring. Extatosoma tiaratum is a facultatively parthenogenetic Australian insect (Phasmatodea), in which females oviposit continuously throughout their adult lifespan irrespective of mating. Fertilized eggs produce sons and daughters through sexual reproduction and unfertilized eggs produce female offspring via parthenogenesis. Here, we developed novel microsatellite markers for E. tiaratum and characterized them by genotyping individuals from a natural population. We then used the microsatellite markers to infer the cytological mechanism of parthenogenesis in this species. We found evidence suggesting parthenogenesis in E. tiaratum occurs through automixis with terminal fusion, resulting in substantial loss of microsatellite heterozygosity in the offspring. Loss of microsatellite heterozygosity may be associated with loss of heterozygosity in fitness related loci. The mechanism of parthenogenetic reproduction can therefore affect fitness outcomes and needs to be considered when comparing costs and benefits of sex versus parthenogenesis. © 2016 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  6. Evaluation of the genetic variability of 13 microsatellite markers in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    tification methods such as typing of blood groups and biochemical polymorphism have proved their usefulness, but the discriminating power of these techniques is less than that of DNA markers. Moreover, the number of different tissues on which the typing can be done is very limited and represents a significant limitation of ...

  7. Microsatellite DNA as shared genetic markers among conifer species

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.S. Echt; G.G. Vendramin; C. D. Nelson; Paula E. Marquardt

    1999-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer pairs for 21 simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci in Pinus strobus L, and 6 in Pinus radiata D. Don were evaluated to determine whether SSR marker amplification could be achieved in 1O other conifer species. Eighty percent of SSR primer pairs for (AC) loci that were polymorphic in P. ...

  8. Polymorphic microsatellite markers in Taxus chinensis var. mairei ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Qin L. P. 2012 Geographic and tissue influences on endophytic fungal communities of Taxus chinensis var. mairei in China. Curr. Microbiol. 66, 40–48. Wu Y., Li Z. H. and Wu J. J. 2009 Polymorphic microsatel- lite markers in the Melon Fruit Fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae. (Coquillett) (Diptera: Tephritidae). Mol. Ecol. Res.

  9. A test of mink microsatellite markers in the ferret

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anistoroaei, Razvan Marian; Christensen, Knud

    2006-01-01

    markers from American mink were tested in the ferret, under the same conditions as for the mink. Of the 59, 43 off them (73.5 %) amplified a ferret sequence; 5 amplification products differed in size from the respective mink sequences. Ten amplified fragments from ferret were sequenced. The sequences...

  10. Development of single locus DNA microsatellite markers in Oryctes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1Department of Plant Protection, Faculty of Agriculture, 2Department of Biology, Faculty of Science and 3Department of. Cell and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Biotechnology and Biomolecular ... promising genetic marker, suitable for precise discrimination of closely related individuals (Smouse and Chevillon 1998).

  11. DNA marker mining of ILSTS035 microsatellite locus on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    analyse quantitative-trait data (Weller 1986, Lander and. Botstein 1989, Churchill and Doerge 1994). Many research groups (Hirano et al. 1998; Kim et al. 2000, 2003a,b) have intensively analysed linkage between markers and traits to identify chromosomal regions responsible for economi- cally important traits such as ...

  12. Using microsatellite (SSR) and morphological markers to assess the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Falcata (Medicago sativa spp. falcata L.), with its high resistance to cold weather, drought and disease, plays an important role in alfalfa breeding. The aim of this study was to assess the genetic diversity of the 12 falcata populations in Eurasia using SSR markers and morphological traits. Regressions for genetic distance, ...

  13. Isolation and characterization of novel microsatellite markers and their application for diversity assessment in cultivated groundnut (Arachis hypogaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crouch Jonathan H

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cultivated peanut or groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L. is the fourth most important oilseed crop in the world, grown mainly in tropical, subtropical and warm temperate climates. Due to its origin through a single and recent polyploidization event, followed by successive selection during breeding efforts, cultivated groundnut has a limited genetic background. In such species, microsatellite or simple sequence repeat (SSR markers are very informative and useful for breeding applications. The low level of polymorphism in cultivated germplasm, however, warrants a need of larger number of polymorphic microsatellite markers for cultivated groundnut. Results A microsatellite-enriched library was constructed from the genotype TMV2. Sequencing of 720 putative SSR-positive clones from a total of 3,072 provided 490 SSRs. 71.2% of these SSRs were perfect type, 13.1% were imperfect and 15.7% were compound. Among these SSRs, the GT/CA repeat motifs were the most common (37.6% followed by GA/CT repeat motifs (25.9%. The primer pairs could be designed for a total of 170 SSRs and were optimized initially on two genotypes. 104 (61.2% primer pairs yielded scorable amplicon and 46 (44.2% primers showed polymorphism among 32 cultivated groundnut genotypes. The polymorphic SSR markers detected 2 to 5 alleles with an average of 2.44 per locus. The polymorphic information content (PIC value for these markers varied from 0.12 to 0.75 with an average of 0.46. Based on 112 alleles obtained by 46 markers, a phenogram was constructed to understand the relationships among the 32 genotypes. Majority of the genotypes representing subspecies hypogaea were grouped together in one cluster, while the genotypes belonging to subspecies fastigiata were grouped mainly under two clusters. Conclusion Newly developed set of 104 markers extends the repertoire of SSR markers for cultivated groundnut. These markers showed a good level of PIC value in cultivated germplasm

  14. Genetic diversity analysis in the section Caulorrhizae (genus Arachis) using microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Darío A; Bechara, Marcelo D; Curi, Rogério A; Monteiro, Jomar P; Valente, Sérgio E S; Gimenes, Marcos A; Lopes, Catalina R

    2010-01-01

    Diversity in 26 microsatellite loci from section Caulorrhizae germplasm was evaluated by using 33 accessions of A. pintoi Krapov. & W.C. Gregory and ten accessions of Arachis repens Handro. Twenty loci proved to be polymorphic and a total of 196 alleles were detected with an average of 9.8 alleles per locus. The variability found in those loci was greater than the variability found using morphological characters, seed storage proteins and RAPD markers previously used in this germplasm. The high potential of these markers to detect species-specific alleles and discriminate among accessions was demonstrated. The set of microsatellite primer pairs developed by our group for A. pintoi are useful molecular tools for evaluating Section Caulorrhizae germplasm, as well as that of species belonging to other Arachis sections.

  15. Genetic diversity analysis in the section Caulorrhizae (genus Arachis using microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darío A. Palmieri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Diversity in 26 microsatellite loci from section Caulorrhizae germplasm was evaluated by using 33 accessions of A. pintoi Krapov. & W.C. Gregory and ten accessions of Arachis repens Handro. Twenty loci proved to be polymorphic and a total of 196 alleles were detected with an average of 9.8 alleles per locus. The variability found in those loci was greater than the variability found using morphological characters, seed storage proteins and RAPD markers previously used in this germplasm. The high potential of these markers to detect species-specific alleles and discriminate among accessions was demonstrated. The set of microsatellite primer pairs developed by our group for A. pintoi are useful molecular tools for evaluating Section Caulorrhizae germplasm, as well as that of species belonging to other Arachis sections.

  16. An evaluation of sequence tagged microsatellite site markers for genetic analysis within Citrus and related species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijas, J M; Fowler, J C; Thomas, M R

    1995-04-01

    Microsatellites, also called sequence tagged microsatellite sites (STMSs), have become important markers for genome analysis but are currently little studied in plants. To assess the value of STMSs for analysis within the Citrus plant species, two example STMSs were isolated from an intergeneric cross between rangpur lime (Citrus x limonia Osbeck) and trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf.). Unique flanking primers were constructed for polymerase chain reaction amplification both within the test cross and across a broad range of citrus and related species. Both loci showed length variation between test cross parents with alleles segregating in a Mendelian fashion to progeny. Amplification across species showed the STMS flanking primers to be conserved in every genome tested. The traits of polymorphism, inheritance, and conservation across species mean that STMS markers are ideal for genome mapping within Citrus, which contains high levels of genetic variability.

  17. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers for Central American Begonia sect. Gireoudia (Begoniaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twyford, Alex D; Ennos, Richard A; Kidner, Catherine A

    2013-05-01

    Transcriptome sequence data were used to design microsatellite primers for two widespread Central American Begonia species, B. heracleifolia and B. nelumbiifolia, to investigate population structure and hybridization. • The transcriptome from vegetative meristem tissue from the related B. plebeja was mined for microsatellite loci, and 31 primer pairs amplified in the target species. Fifteen primer pairs were combined in two multiplex PCR reactions, which amplified an average of four alleles per locus. • The markers developed will be a valuable genetic resource for medium-throughput genotyping of Central American species of Begonia sect. Gireoudia. A subset of these markers have perfect sequence matches to Asian B. venusta, and are promising for studies in other Begonia sections.

  18. Transferability and characterization of microsatellite markers in two Neotropical Ficus species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Gonçalves Nazareno

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Microsatellite markers were transferred and characterized for two Neotropical fig tree species, Ficus citrifolia and Ficus eximia. Our study demonstrated that microsatellite markers developed from different subgenera of Ficus can be transferred to related species. In the present case, 12 of the 15 primer pairs tested (80% were successfully transferred to both of the above species. Eleven loci were polymorphic when tested across 60 F. citrifolia and 60 F. eximia individuals. For F. citrifolia, there were 4 to 15 alleles per locus, whereas expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.31 to 0.91. In the case of F. eximia, this was 2 to 12 alleles per locus and expected heterozygosities from 0.42 to 0.87.

  19. Microsatellite markers for Nuphar japonica (Nymphaeaceae), an aquatic plant in the agricultural ecosystem of Japan1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Sonoko; Shiga, Takashi; Isagi, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Nuphar species (Nymphaeaceae) are representative aquatic plants in irrigation ponds in Japanese agricultural ecosystems. We developed 15 polymorphic microsatellite markers for N. japonica and confirmed their utility for its close relatives N. oguraensis var. akiensis and N. ×saijoensis, which originated from natural hybridization between N. japonica and N. oguraensis. Methods and Results: Genetic variation was characterized in 15 polymorphic loci in three populations of N. japonica. The average number of alleles per locus was 3.47 (range = 2−9; n = 32), and the average expected heterozygosity per locus was 0.84 (range = 0.5–1.0); 11 loci were amplified in N. oguraensis var. akiensis and 15 in N. ×saijoensis. Conclusions: The polymorphic microsatellite markers developed in this study will be useful for investigating the levels of genetic diversity within remnant populations of Nuphar taxa and could provide a valuable tool for conservation genetics of these taxa. PMID:28101435

  20. Development and Characterization of Microsatellite Markers for Central American Begonia sect. Gireoudia (Begoniaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex D. Twyford

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Transcriptome sequence data were used to design microsatellite primers for two widespread Central American Begonia species, B. heracleifolia and B. nelumbiifolia, to investigate population structure and hybridization. Methods and Results: The transcriptome from vegetative meristem tissue from the related B. plebeja was mined for microsatellite loci, and 31 primer pairs amplified in the target species. Fifteen primer pairs were combined in two multiplex PCR reactions, which amplified an average of four alleles per locus. Conclusions: The markers developed will be a valuable genetic resource for medium-throughput genotyping of Central American species of Begonia sect. Gireoudia. A subset of these markers have perfect sequence matches to Asian B. venusta, and are promising for studies in other Begonia sections.

  1. Preliminary studies of the genetic structure of “Cimarron uruguayo” dog using microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Gagliardi B.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetive. To analyze the population structure, using microsatellite markers in a sample of “Cimarron Uruguayo” dogs. Materials and methods. Thirty dogs were analyzed in different areas of Uruguay with a set of nine molecular microsatellite markers using PCR. The population structure was analyzed using the free distribution software “Structure’’. Results. According to our data, the preliminary results show that it is not possible to establish a subdivision among the animals in the sample. Conclusions. The study supports the hypothesis that the currently existing canines derive from a founding nucleus that took refuge in the Northeastern region of the country. The distribution of the breed among the different areas of Uruguay continues nowadays, so there is no isolation among the different groups of animals, and the exchange is constant

  2. Isolation of Microsatellite Markers in a Chaparral Species Endemic to Southern California, Ceanothus megacarpus (Rhamnaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin D. A. Ishibashi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Microsatellite (simple sequence repeat [SSR] markers were developed for Ceanothus megacarpus, a chaparral species endemic to coastal southern California, to investigate potential processes (e.g., fragmentation, genetic drift, and interspecific hybridization responsible for the genetic structure within and among populations distributed throughout mainland and island populations. Methods and Results: Four SSR-enriched libraries were used to develop and optimize 10 primer sets of microsatellite loci containing either di-, tri-, or tetranucleotide repeats. Levels of variation at these loci were assessed for two populations of C. megacarpus. Observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.250 to 0.885, and number of alleles ranged between four and 21 per locus. Eight to nine loci also successfully amplified in three other species of Ceanothus. Conclusions: These markers should prove useful for evaluating the influence of recent and historical processes on genetic variation in C. megacarpus and related species.

  3. SNPs selected by information content outperform randomly selected microsatellite loci for delineating genetic identification and introgression in the endangered dark European honeybee (Apis mellifera mellifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Irene; Henriques, Dora; Jara, Laura; Johnston, J Spencer; Chávez-Galarza, Julio; De La Rúa, Pilar; Pinto, M Alice

    2017-07-01

    The honeybee (Apis mellifera) has been threatened by multiple factors including pests and pathogens, pesticides and loss of locally adapted gene complexes due to replacement and introgression. In western Europe, the genetic integrity of the native A. m. mellifera (M-lineage) is endangered due to trading and intensive queen breeding with commercial subspecies of eastern European ancestry (C-lineage). Effective conservation actions require reliable molecular tools to identify pure-bred A. m. mellifera colonies. Microsatellites have been preferred for identification of A. m. mellifera stocks across conservation centres. However, owing to high throughput, easy transferability between laboratories and low genotyping error, SNPs promise to become popular. Here, we compared the resolving power of a widely utilized microsatellite set to detect structure and introgression with that of different sets that combine a variable number of SNPs selected for their information content and genomic proximity to the microsatellite loci. Contrary to every SNP data set, microsatellites did not discriminate between the two lineages in the PCA space. Mean introgression proportions were identical across the two marker types, although at the individual level, microsatellites' performance was relatively poor at the upper range of Q-values, a result reflected by their lower precision. Our results suggest that SNPs are more accurate and powerful than microsatellites for identification of A. m. mellifera colonies, especially when they are selected by information content. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Analysis of the genetic relationships and diversity among 11 populations of Xanthoceras sorbifolia using phenotypic and microsatellite marker data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Shen

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: Microsatellite markers can be used to efficiently distinguish X. sorbifolia populations and assess their genetic diversity. The information we have provided will contribute to the conservation and management of this important plant genetic resource.

  5. Siberian tiger’s recent population bottleneck in the Russian Far East revealed by microsatellite markers

    OpenAIRE

    Alasaad, Samer; Soriguer, Ramón C.; Chelominab, Galina; Sushitsky, Yury Petrovich; Fickel, Joerns

    2011-01-01

    Because size reduced, or bottlenecked, populations are more prone to adverse events, the detection of genetic bottleneck signatures in wildlife species is highly relevant for conservation. Here we applied 11 microsatellite markers to the endangered Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) using tissue and blood samples of animals from the Primorsky region of the Russian Far East. Excess heterozygosity and mode shift in allele frequencies tests were positive, while the M-ratio test was nega...

  6. Development and characterization of 47 novel microsatellite markers for Vellozia squamata (Velloziaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte-Barbosa, Marcia; Bajay, Miklos M; Zucchi, Maria I; Pivello, Vânia R

    2015-02-01

    • We developed and validated microsatellite primers for Vellozia squamata (Velloziaceae), an endemic species of the cerrado (Brazilian savannas), to investigate the influence of different fire regimes on its genetic diversity and population structure. • Using a selective hybridization method, we tested 51 SSR loci using a natural population of V. squamata and obtained 47 amplifiable loci. Among these, 26 loci were polymorphic and the average values of genetic diversity were: average number of alleles per locus ([Formula: see text]) = 6.54, average number of alleles per polymorphic locus ([Formula: see text]) = 7.13, average observed heterozygosity [Formula: see text] = 0.22, average expected heterozygosity [Formula: see text] = 0.49, and average fixation index [Formula: see text] = 0.55. • These 26 loci allowed us to assess the effects of distinct fire regimes on the genetic structure of V. squamata populations with the aim of establishing strategies for the conservation of this endemic species. The markers can also be useful for future pharmaceutical studies, as the species has great potential for medicinal and cosmetic applications.

  7. Genetic variability in spotted seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus), determined with microsatellite DNA markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, R.; Bowers, K.; Hensley, R.; Mobley, B.; Belouski, E.

    2007-01-01

    Variation in the allele frequencies of five microsatellite loci was surveyed in 1256 individual spotted seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus) obtained from 12 bays and estuaries from Laguna Madre, Texas, to Charlotte Harbor, Florida, to St. John's River on the Florida Atlantic Coast. Texas and Louisiana collection sites were resampled each year for two to four years (1998-2001). Genetic differentiation was observed. Spotted seatrout from Florida waters were strongly differentiated from spotted seatrout collected in Louisiana and Texas. The greatest genetic discontinuity was observed between Tampa Bay and Charlotte Harbor, and Charlotte Harbor seatrout were most similar to Atlantic Coast spotted seatrout. Texas and Louisiana samples were not strongly structured within the northwestern Gulf of Mexico and there was little evidence of temporal differentiation within bays. These findings are contrary to those of earlier analyses with allozymes and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) where evidence of spatial differentiation was found for spotted seatrout resident on the Texas coast. The differences in genetic structure observed among these markers may reflect differences in response to selective pressure, or may be due to differences in underlying genetic processes.

  8. Inbreeding and genetic diversity analysis in a hatchery release population and clones of Rhopilema esculentum based on microsatellite markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tao; Chen, Zaizhong; Wang, Mosang; Hu, Yulong; Wang, Weiji

    2017-05-01

    Ten microsatellite markers were used to analyze the levels of genetic diversity and inbreeding in a hatchery release population of Rhopilema esculentum Kishinouye (Scyphozoa: Rhizostomatidae). A total of 85 alleles were detected in 600 individuals. Within-population levels of observed ( H o) and expected ( H e) heterozygosity ranged from 0.152 to 0.839 (mean=0.464) and from 0.235 to 0.821 (mean=0.618), respectively. The polymorphism information content (PIC) of each marker ranged from 0.207 to 0.795 with an average of 0.580, indicating that the hatchery population maintained a high level of genetic diversity. Inbreeding levels were estimated in the hatchery population and the inbreeding coefficient was 0.203. This result revealed that a certain level of inbreeding occurred within the population. Meanwhile, we also determined genetic diversity at the clone level. Several polyps from the same scyphistomae were genotyped at the ten microsatellite loci and there was virtually no difference in their genotypes. Furthermore, we calculated the probabilities of exclusion. When both parents were known, the average exclusion probability of ten loci was 99.99%. Our data suggest that the ten microsatellite markers can not only be used to analyze the identity of individuals but they can also be applied to parentage identification. Our research provides a theoretical basis and technical support for genetic diversity detection and reasonable selection of R. esculentum hatchery populations. These findings support the use of releasing studies and conservation of R. esculentum germplasm resources.

  9. Study of Genetic Diversity in Iranian Turkmen Horse by Four Microsatellite Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Samoozad

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the genetic diversity of Iranian Turkmen Horse using microsatellite markers (HMS02, HMS03, HMS07 and AHT04. Blood samples were collected from 51 Turkmen horses in Khorasan Shomali province, Iran. Genomic DNA was extracted and then standard Polymerase Chain Reaction performed to amplify the microsatellite markers using specific primers. The PCR products were electrophoresed on 8% polyacrylamide gel. The results have demonstrated that the number of alleles in these loci varied from 9 to 12 with mean value of 10.5. HMS02 and HMS07 had the highest (12 and the lowest (9 number of alleles, respectively. HMS02 had the highest (0.8847 and HMS03 had the lowest (0.8039 heterozygosity rates. Also, polymorphic information content (PIC was the highest (0.86 in HMS07and the lowest (0.77 in HMS03. Finally, the highest and the lowest value of Shannon index were estimated in HMS07 and AHT04, respectively. Results have shown that these four microsatellite loci have high polymorphism and can be used as suitable molecular markers in genetic studies.

  10. Microsatellite marker discovery using single molecule real-time circular consensus sequencing on the Pacific Biosciences RS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grohme, Markus A; Soler, Roberto Frias; Wink, Michael; Frohme, Marcus

    2013-11-01

    Microsatellite sequences are important markers for population genetics studies. In the past, the development of adequate microsatellite primers has been cumbersome. However with the advent of next-generation sequencing technologies, marker identification in genomes of non-model species has been greatly simplified. Here we describe microsatellite discovery on a Pacific Biosciences single molecule real-time sequencer. For the Greater White-fronted Goose (Anser albifrons), we identified 316 microsatellite loci in a single genome shotgun sequencing experiment. We found that the capability of handling large insert sizes and high quality circular consensus sequences provides an advantage over short read technologies for primer design. Combined with a straightforward amplification-free library preparation, PacBio sequencing is an economically viable alternative for microsatellite discovery and subsequent PCR primer design.

  11. Development of microsatellite markers in Gonystylus bancanus (Ramin) useful for tracing and tracking of wood of this protected species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smulders, M.J.M.; Westende, van 't W.P.C.; Diway, B.; Esselink, G.D.; Meer, van der P.J.; Koopman, W.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Ten polymorphic microsatellite markers have been developed for Gonystylus bancanus (Ramin), a protected tree species of peat swamp forests in Malaysia and Indonesia. Eight markers were also shown to be polymorphic in other Gonystylus species. The markers will enable assessing the amount of genetic

  12. Genomic sequencing and microsatellite marker development for Boswellia papyrifera, an economically important but threatened tree native to dry tropical forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Addisalem, A.B.; Esselink, G.; Bongers, F.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Microsatellite (or simple sequence repeat, SSR) markers are highly informative DNA markers often used in conservation genetic research. Next-generation sequencing enables efficient development of large numbers of SSR markers at lower costs. Boswellia papyrifera is an economically important tree

  13. Isolation of 21 polymorphic microsatellite markers for the Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fike, Jennifer A; Beasley, James C; Rhodes, Olin E

    2009-07-01

    Twenty-one polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for the Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana). The number of alleles ranged from two to 13 and observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.464 to 0.964. Significant heterozygote deficiencies were observed at three loci and null alleles were detected at five loci. Evidence for gametic disequilibrium was observed between three sets of paired loci after a sequential Bonferroni correction was applied. These markers will enable us to investigate the mating tactics, movement behaviour and social structure of Virginia opossum populations inhabiting fragmented agricultural landscapes. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Development of polymorphic microsatellite markers for the human botfly, Dermatobia hominis (Diptera: Oestridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitarello, Bárbara Domingues; Torres, Tatiana Teixeira; Lyra, Mariana Lúcio; DE Azeredo-Espin, Ana Maria Lima

    2009-01-01

    In this report, we describe the development of 17 polymorphic microsatellite markers for the human botfly, Dermatobia hominis, an obligatory parasite of mammals of great veterinary importance in Latin America. The number of alleles ranged from 5 to 21 per locus, with a mean of 12.2 alleles per locus. The expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.2571 to 0.9206 and from 0.2984 to 0.9291 in two populations from Brazil. These markers should provide a high resolution tool for assessment of the fine-scale genetic structure of natural populations of the human botfly. © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Development of Microsatellite Markers for Two Australian Persoonia (Proteaceae Species Using Two Different Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A. Stingemore

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed and cross-species transferability assessed for two Persoonia species to evaluate genetic diversity and population genetic structure of these broadly distributed southwest Australian tree species. Methods and Results: Microsatellite-enriched libraries and 454 GS-FLX shotgun sequencing were used to identity nine microsatellite loci for P. elliptica (one 454; eight cloning and six for P. longifolia (three 454; three cloning. These loci were screened for variation in individuals from populations in southwestern Australia. In P. elliptica, observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.46 to 0.93 and 0.42 to 0.88, respectively. For P. longifolia, observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.04 to 0.88 and 0.04 to 0.84, respectively. Conclusions: The microsatellites identified in this study will enable the examination of population and spatial structuring of genetic diversity in P. elliptica and P. longifolia, two priority species for mine site restoration in southwestern Australia.

  16. A novel method for automatic genotyping of microsatellite markers based on parametric pattern recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Asa; Karlsson, Patrik; Gyllensten, Ulf

    2003-09-01

    Genetic mapping of loci affecting complex phenotypes in human and other organisms is presently being conducted on a very large scale, using either microsatellite or single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers and by partly automated methods. A critical step in this process is the conversion of the instrument output into genotypes, both a time-consuming and error prone procedure. Errors made during this calling of genotypes will dramatically reduce the ability to map the location of loci underlying a phenotype. Accurate methods for automatic genotype calling are therefore important. Here, we describe novel algorithms for automatic calling of microsatellite genotypes using parametric pattern recognition. The analysis of microsatellite data is complicated both by the occurrence of stutter bands, which arise from Taq polymerase misreading the number of repeats, and additional bands derived form the non-template dependent addition of a nucleotide to the 3' end of the PCR products. These problems, together with the fact that the lengths of two alleles in a heterozygous individual may differ by only two nucleotides, complicate the development of an automated process. The novel algorithms markedly reduce the need for manual editing and the frequency of miscalls, and compares very favourably with commercially available software for automatic microsatellite genotyping.

  17. Novel microsatellite marker development from the unassembled genome sequence data of the marbled flounder Pseudopleuronectes yokohamae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minegishi, Yuki; Ikeda, Minoru; Kijima, Akihiro

    2015-12-01

    Various genome-scale data have been increasingly published in diverged species, but they can be reused for other purposes by re-analyzing in other ways. As a case study to utilize the published genome data, we developed microsatellite markers from the genome sequence data (assembled contigs and unassembled reads) of the marbled flounder Pseudopleuronectes yokohamae. No microsatellites were identified in the contig sequences, whereas the computer software found 781,773 sequences containing microsatellites with di- to hexa-nucleotide motif in the unassembled reads. For 86,732 unique sequences among them, a total of 331,368 primer pairs were designed. Screening based on PCR amplification, polymorphisms and accurate genotyping resulted in sixteen primer sets, which were later characterized using 45 samples collected in Onagawa Bay, Miyagi, Japan. The presence of null alleles was suggested at four loci in the studied population but no evidence of allelic dropout was found. The observed number of alleles and heterozygosity was 2-20 and 0-0.88889, respectively, indicating polymorphisms and usefulness for population genetic analyses of this species. In addition, a large number of the microsatellite primers developed in this study are potentially applicable also for kinship estimation, individual fingerprint and linkage map construction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of a model webserver for breed identification using microsatellite DNA marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iquebal, Mir Asif; Sarika; Dhanda, Sandeep Kumar; Arora, Vasu; Dixit, Sat Pal; Raghava, Gajendra P S; Rai, Anil; Kumar, Dinesh

    2013-12-09

    Identification of true to breed type animal for conservation purpose is imperative. Breed dilution is one of the major problems in sustainability except cases of commercial crossbreeding under controlled condition. Breed descriptor has been developed to identify breed but such descriptors cover only "pure breed" or true to the breed type animals excluding undefined or admixture population. Moreover, in case of semen, ova, embryo and breed product, the breed cannot be identified due to lack of visible phenotypic descriptors. Advent of molecular markers like microsatellite and SNP have revolutionized breed identification from even small biological tissue or germplasm. Microsatellite DNA marker based breed assignments has been reported in various domestic animals. Such methods have limitations viz. non availability of allele data in public domain, thus each time all reference breed has to be genotyped which is neither logical nor economical. Even if such data is available but computational methods needs expertise of data analysis and interpretation. We found Bayesian Networks as best classifier with highest accuracy of 98.7% using 51850 reference allele data generated by 25 microsatellite loci on 22 goat breed population of India. The FST values in the study were seen to be low ranging from 0.051 to 0.297 and overall genetic differentiation of 13.8%, suggesting more number of loci needed for higher accuracy. We report here world's first model webserver for breed identification using microsatellite DNA markers freely accessible at http://cabin.iasri.res.in/gomi/. Higher number of loci is required due to less differentiable population and large number of breeds taken in this study. This server will reduce the cost with computational ease. This methodology can be a model for various other domestic animal species as a valuable tool for conservation and breed improvement programmes.

  19. Assessment of genetic purity in rice (Oryza sativa L.) hybrids using microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, Anjana; Choudhury, Partha Ray; Pande, Veena; Mandal, Asit B

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the present study is to detect genetic impurity in the seed lots of CMS lines, restorers and hybrids and to identify signature markers to differentiate parents and hybrids through DNA-based assays. Furthermore, attempts have been made to find out an alternative to Grow-Out-Test, which is very tedious, time consuming and used conventionally for seed genetic purity testing since beginning of quality seed multiplication chain. Fifty-one rice-specific sequence tagged microsatellite (STMS) primer pairs distributed throughout the rice genome were employed for fingerprinting of eight rice hybrids and their parental lines with a view to assess variation within parental lines and to test the genetic purity of the commercial seed lots. Among those, 51 markers, 28 microsatellite markers showed polymorphism (54.90 %). A total of 98 alleles were obtained with an average of 1.92 alleles per primer pair and number of alleles amplified for each primer pair ranged from 1 to 4. A set of markers were identified to differentiate parental lines of the hybrids and which emphasizes the immense scope of those molecular markers for their use in the unambiguous identification of hybrid, which would be of great benefit to farmers that depend on the hybrids.

  20. Validation of microsatellite markers for assisted selection of soybean resistance to cyst nematode races 3 and 14 Validação de marcadores microssatélites para a seleção assistida de resistência de soja ao nematóide-de-cisto raças 3 e 14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Flores da Silva

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to validate microsatellite markers associated with resistance to soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines Ichinohe races 3 and 14, in soybean (Glycine max L. genotypes, for use in marker-assisted selection (MAS programs. Microsatellites of soybean linkage groups A2, D2 and G were tested in two populations, and their selection efficiencies were determined. The populations were 65 F2:3 families from Msoy8001 (resistant x Conquista (susceptible cross, and 66 F2:3 families of S5995 (resistant x Renascença (susceptible cross, evaluated for resistance to races 3 and 14, respectively. Families with female index up to 30% were considered moderately resistant. Markers of A2 and G linkage groups were associated with resistance to race 3. Markers Satt309 and GMENOD2B explained the greatest proportion of phenotypic variance in the different groups. The combinations Satt309+GMENOD2B and Satt309+Satt187 presented 100% selection efficiency. Resistance to race 14 was associated with markers of G linkage group, and selection efficiency in the Satt309+Satt356 combination was 100%. The selection differential obtained by phenotypic and marker assisted selection showed that both can result in similar gains.O objetivo deste trabalho foi validar marcadores microssatélites associados à resistência às raças 3 e 14 do nematóide-de-cisto (Heterodera glycines Ichinohe da soja (Glycine max L., para serem utilizados em programas de seleção assistida por marcadores moleculares (SAM. Microssatélites dos grupos de ligação A2, D2 e G da soja foram testados em duas populações, e suas eficiências de seleção foram determinadas. As populações foram 65 famílias F2:3, do cruzamento Msoy8001 (resistente x Conquista (suscetível, e 66 famílias F2:3, do cruzamento S5995 (resistente x Renascença (suscetível, avaliadas para a resistência às raças 3 e 14, respectivamente. Famílias com índice de fêmeas de até 30% foram

  1. Paternity testing using microsatellite DNA markers in captive Adélie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaoka, Ken; Suzuki, Isao; Kasugai, Naeko; Fukumoto, Yohei

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the paternity of 39 Adélie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae) hatched at the Port of Nagoya Public Aquarium between 1995 and 2005 breeding seasons using microsatellite DNA markers. Among the 13 microsatellite marker loci tested in this study, eight markers amplified and were found to be polymorphic in the colony's founders of the captive population (n = 26). Multiple marker analysis confirmed that all the hatchlings shared alleles with their social fathers and that none of them were sired by any male (all males ≥4 years old in the exhibit tank during each reproductive season; n = 9-15) other than the one carrying out parental duties, except in the case of two inbred hatchlings whose half-sibling parents shared the same father. These results demonstrated that extra-pair paternity (EPP) did not occur in this captive population and that even if EPP has been detected among them, the probability of excluding all other possible fathers in the exhibit tank is extremely high based on paternity exclusion probabilities across the investigated loci. The paternity exclusion probabilities were almost the same between 1994 and 2005. The probability of identity across the investigated loci declined between the two time points, but was still high. These results are reflected in a very short history of breeding in this captive population. In other words, the parentage analyses using a suite of microsatellite markers will be less effective as generations change in small closed populations, such as zoo and aquarium populations. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Marker-assisted selection using ridge regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, J C; Thompson, R; Denham, M C

    2000-04-01

    In cross between inbred lines, linear regression can be used to estimate the correlation of markers with a trait of interest; these marker effects then allow marker assisted selection (MAS) for quantitative traits. Usually a subset of markers to include in the model must be selected: no completely satisfactory method of doing this exists. We show that replacing this selection of markers by ridge regression can improve the mean response to selection and reduce the variability of selection response.

  3. Detection of allelic variability at wheat loci associated with resistance to Fusarium ssp. using molecular markers - microsatellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kačavenda Dragana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium head blight (FHB, caused primarily by Fusarium graminearum, is one of the most important fungal diseases of wheat. It may cause severe yield and quality losses in humid and warm conditions. However, the most important concern is the mycotoxin contamination of grain. Breeding of cultivars resistant to FHB is the best way to control the disease. In order to examine possibilities for application molecular markers - microsatellites in selecting for resistance to FHB, allelic variability at wheat loci associated with resistance to Fusarium ssp. was saidied using two microsatellite markers: GWM533 (chromosome 3B and GWM156 (chromosome 5A. Detection of the allelic polymorphism was conducted compared to the cultivars Sumai 3, Frontana and Amigo which are widely used as FHB resistance sources. In 23 French genotypes and 25 genotypes developed at the Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops in Novi Sad, 5 alleles (GWM533 and 6 alleles (GWM156 were detected. In 15 genotypes at loci GWM533 and 10 genotypes at loci GWM156 same allele was detected as in some of standard cultivars. Obtained results should be evaluated at field experiments in order to confirm corelation between presence of specific allele and resistance to fusarium head blight and in order to examine importance of alleles that are not detected in standard cultivars.

  4. Loss of heterozygosity and microsatellite instability as predictive markers among Iranian esophageal cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mahdi Forghanifard

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Variation in microsatellite sequences that are dispersed in the genome has been linked to a deficiency in cellular mismatch repair system and defects in several genes of this system are involved in carcinogenesis. Our aim in this study was to illustrate microsatellite DNA alteration in esophageal cancer. Materials and Methods: DNA was extracted from formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE tissues from surgical and matched margin-normal samples. Microsatellite instability (MSI and loss of heterozygosity (LOH were studied in 50 cases of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC by amplifying six microsatellite markers: D13S260 (13q12.3, D13S267 (13q12.3, D9S171 (9p21, D2S123 (2p, D5S2501 (5q21 and TP53 (17p13.1 analyzed on 6% denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results: Statistical analysis indicated a near significant reverse correlation between grade and LOH (P= 0.068, correlation coefficient= -0.272. Specifically, increased LOH in tumor DNA has a significant correlation with increased differentiation from poorly differentiated to well differentiated tumors (P= 0.002 and P= 0.016 respectively. In addition, higher number of chromosomal loci with LOH showed a reverse correlation with lymph node metastasis (P= 0.026, correlation coefficient= -0.485. Furthermore, there was a positive correlation between addiction and MSI (P= 0.026, correlation coefficient= 0.465. Conclusion: Microsatellite DNA alterations may be a prognostic tool for detection and the evolution of prognosis in patients with SCC of esophagus. It can be concluded that regional lymph node metastasis would be less likely with increased heterozygote loci and addiction with any of opium, cigarette, water pipe or alcohol can be a susceptibility factor(s for MSI.

  5. Genetic characterization of 12 heterologous microsatellite markers for the giant tropical tree Cariniana legalis (Lecythidaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Corbo Guidugli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Twelve microsatellite loci previously developed in the tropical tree Cariniana estrellensis were genetically characterized in Cariniana legalis. Polymorphisms were assessed in 28 C. legalis individuals found between the Pardo and Mogi-Guaçu River basins in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. Of the 12 loci, 10 were polymorphic and exhibited Mendelian inheritance. The allelic richness at each locus ranged from 2-11, with an average of 7 alleles per locus, and the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.07-0.88. These loci showed a high probability of paternity exclusion. The characteristics of these heterologous microsatellite markers indicate that they are suitable tools for investigating questions concerning population genetics in C. legalis.

  6. Molecular characterization and differentiation of five horse breeds raised in Algeria using polymorphic microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berber, N; Gaouar, S; Leroy, G; Kdidi, S; Tabet Aouel, N; Saïdi Mehtar, N

    2014-10-01

    In this study, genetic analyses of diversity and differentiation were performed on five horse breeds raised in Algeria (Barb, Arab-Barb, Arabian, Thoroughbred and French Trotter). All microsatellite markers were highly polymorphic in all the breeds. A total of 123 alleles from 14 microsatellite loci were detected in 201 horses. The average number of alleles per locus was the highest in the Arab-Barb horses (7.86) and lowest in the thoroughbred breed (5.71), whereas the observed and expected heterozygosities per breed ranged from 0.71 (Thoroughbred) to 0.752 (Barb) and 0.71 (Thoroughbred) to 0.77 (Arab-Barb), respectively. The genetic differentiation between the breeds was significant (p horse populations and the other breeds. The Barb and Arab-Barb breeds seem to be the most genetically related and support the decision to consider the breeds as same population. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. Brown trout ( Salmo trutta ) stocking impact assessment using microsatellite DNA markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Møller; Ruzzante, D.E.; Eg Nielsen, Einar

    2001-01-01

    trout had occurred for only two of the five populations potentially influenced by stocking. In one of these two rivers, microsatellite data obtained from a limited number of old scale samples indicated that individuals from the original population were genetically divergent from these of the present......The genetic integrity of many salmonid fish populations is threatened by stocking of domesticated conspecifics. The purpose of this study was to assess the utility of microsatellite DNA markers for detecting loss of genetic diversity in hatchery strains, for estimating their genetic relationships......, and for monitoring the genetic impact of stocking activity on wild populations of salmonid fishes. Brown trout from ten hatchery strains, one supportive breeding "strain," and five wild populations were screened for variation at eight loci. In most hatchery strains, genetic variation was comparable to that of wild...

  8. Development of Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers for Indian Tobacco, Lobelia inflata (Campanulaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. William Hughes

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Nuclear microsatellite markers were developed for Lobelia inflata (Campanulaceae, an obligately self-fertilizing plant species, for use in the study of temporal fluctuation in allele frequency and of the genetic structure within and among populations. Methods and Results: We developed 28 primer pairs for L. inflata, all of which amplify CT dinucleotide repeats. We evaluated amplification of these loci in 53 L. inflata individuals at three sites in eastern North America and found that 24 loci showed microsatellite polymorphism. We also found that 16 loci amplified successfully in L. cardinalis, and 11 amplified successfully in L. siphilitica. Conclusions: These primers will be useful for assessing allelic diversity within and among populations of L. inflata, and show potential for use in congeneric species.

  9. Microsatellite markers to determine population genetic structure in the golden anchovy, Coilia dussumieri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathirvelpandian, A; Gopalakrishnan, A; Lakra, W S; Krishna, Gopal; Sharma, Rupam; Musammilu, K K; Basheer, V S; Jena, J K

    2014-06-01

    Coilia dussumieri (Valenciennes, 1848) commonly called as golden anchovy, constitutes a considerable fishery in the northern part of both the west and east coasts of India. Despite its clear-cut geographic isolation, the species is treated as a unit stock for fishery management purposes. We evaluated 32 microsatellite primer pairs from three closely related species (resource species) belonging to the family Engraulidae through cross-species amplification in C. dussumieri. Successful cross-priming was obtained with 10 loci, which were sequenced for confirmation of repeats. Loci were tested for delineating the genetic stock structure of four populations of C. dussumieri from both the coasts of India. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 8 to 18, with a mean of 12.3. Results of pairwise F ST indicated genetic stock structuring between the east and west coast populations of India and also validated the utilization of identified microsatellite markers in population genetic structure analysis.

  10. Development of 35 novel microsatellite markers for the two-band anemonefish Amphiprion bicinctus

    KAUST Repository

    Nanninga, Gerrit B.

    2012-12-18

    To investigate population genetic patterns of the anemonefish Amphiprion bicinctus in the Red Sea, we isolated and characterized 35 microsatellite loci using 454-sequencing. Microsatellite sequences were identified using the Tandem Repeats Finder program. The 35 loci were tested on 80 individuals sampled from two spatially separated populations along the Saudi Arabian Red Sea coast. We found a mean of 10. 9 alleles per locus and observed levels of heterozygosity ranged from 0. 4 to 0. 98. All loci were polymorphic, none deviated significantly from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, no linkage disequilibrium was observed and there was no evidence for -alleles in both populations. The markers reported here constitute the first specific set for this species, and they are expected to contribute to future studies of connectivity in the Red Sea region. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  11. Novel Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers Reveal Genetic Differentiation between Two Sympatric Types of Galaxea fascicularis.

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    Yuichi Nakajima

    Full Text Available The reef-building, scleractinian coral, Galaxea fascicularis, is classified into soft and hard types, based on nematocyst morphology. This character is correlated with the length of the mitochondrial non-coding region (mt-Long: soft colony type, and nematocysts with wide capsules and long shafts; mt-Short: hard colony type, and nematocysts with thin capsules and short shafts. We isolated and characterized novel polymorphic microsatellite markers for G. fascicularis using next-generation sequencing. Based upon the mitochondrial non-coding region, 53 of the 97 colonies collected were mt-Long (mt-L and 44 were mt-Short (mt-S. Among the 53 mt-L colonies, 27 loci were identified as amplifiable, polymorphic microsatellite loci, devoid of somatic mutations and free of scoring errors. Eleven of those 27 loci were also amplifiable and polymorphic in the 44 mt-S colonies; these 11 are cross-type microsatellite loci. The other 16 loci were considered useful only for mt-L colonies. These 27 loci identified 10 multilocus lineages (MLLs among the 53 mt-L colonies (NMLL/N = 0.189, and the 11 cross-type loci identified 7 MLLs in 44 mt-S colonies (NMLL/N = 0.159. Significant genetic differentiation between the two types was detected based on the genetic differentiation index (FST = 0.080, P = 0.001. Bayesian clustering also indicated that these two types are genetically isolated. While nuclear microsatellite genotypes also showed genetic differentiation between mitochondrial types, the mechanism of divergence is not yet clear. These markers will be useful to estimate genetic diversity, differentiation, and connectivity among populations, and to understand evolutionary processes, including divergence of types in G. fascicularis.

  12. In silico mining of putative microsatellite markers from whole genome sequence of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis and development of first BuffSatDB

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    Sarika

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Though India has sequenced water buffalo genome but its draft assembly is based on cattle genome BTau 4.0, thus de novo chromosome wise assembly is a major pending issue for global community. The existing radiation hybrid of buffalo and these reported STR can be used further in final gap plugging and “finishing” expected in de novo genome assembly. QTL and gene mapping needs mining of putative STR from buffalo genome at equal interval on each and every chromosome. Such markers have potential role in improvement of desirable characteristics, such as high milk yields, resistance to diseases, high growth rate. The STR mining from whole genome and development of user friendly database is yet to be done to reap the benefit of whole genome sequence. Description By in silico microsatellite mining of whole genome, we have developed first STR database of water buffalo, BuffSatDb (Buffalo MicroSatellite Database (http://cabindb.iasri.res.in/buffsatdb/ which is a web based relational database of 910529 microsatellite markers, developed using PHP and MySQL database. Microsatellite markers have been generated using MIcroSAtellite tool. It is simple and systematic web based search for customised retrieval of chromosome wise and genome-wide microsatellites. Search has been enabled based on chromosomes, motif type (mono-hexa, repeat motif and repeat kind (simple and composite. The search may be customised by limiting location of STR on chromosome as well as number of markers in that range. This is a novel approach and not been implemented in any of the existing marker database. This database has been further appended with Primer3 for primer designing of the selected markers enabling researcher to select markers of choice at desired interval over the chromosome. The unique add-on of degenerate bases further helps in resolving presence of degenerate bases in current buffalo assembly. Conclusion Being first buffalo STR database in the world

  13. A microsatellite-based consensus linkage map for species of Eucalyptus and a novel set of 230 microsatellite markers for the genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Emlyn R

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eucalypts are the most widely planted hardwood trees in the world occupying globally more than 18 million hectares as an important source of carbon neutral renewable energy and raw material for pulp, paper and solid wood. Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs in Eucalyptus have been localized on pedigree-specific RAPD or AFLP maps seriously limiting the value of such QTL mapping efforts for molecular breeding. The availability of a genus-wide genetic map with transferable microsatellite markers has become a must for the effective advancement of genomic undertakings. This report describes the development of a novel set of 230 EMBRA microsatellites, the construction of the first comprehensive microsatellite-based consensus linkage map for Eucalyptus and the consolidation of existing linkage information for other microsatellites and candidate genes mapped in other species of the genus. Results The consensus map covers ~90% of the recombining genome of Eucalyptus, involves 234 mapped EMBRA loci on 11 linkage groups, an observed length of 1,568 cM and a mean distance between markers of 8.4 cM. A compilation of all microsatellite linkage information published in Eucalyptus allowed us to establish the homology among linkage groups between this consensus map and other maps published for E. globulus. Comparative mapping analyses also resulted in the linkage group assignment of other 41 microsatellites derived from other Eucalyptus species as well as candidate genes and QTLs for wood and flowering traits published in the literature. This report significantly increases the availability of microsatellite markers and mapping information for species of Eucalyptus and corroborates the high conservation of microsatellite flanking sequences and locus ordering between species of the genus. Conclusion This work represents an important step forward for Eucalyptus comparative genomics, opening stimulating perspectives for evolutionary studies and

  14. Mining microsatellites in the peach genome: development of new long-core SSR markers for genetic analyses in five Prunus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettori, Maria Teresa; Micali, Sabrina; Giovinazzi, Jessica; Scalabrin, Simone; Verde, Ignazio; Cipriani, Guido

    2015-01-01

    A wide inventory of molecular markers is nowadays available for individual fingerprinting. Microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs), play a relevant role due to their relatively ease of use, their abundance in the plant genomes, and their co-dominant nature, together with the availability of primer sequences in many important agricultural crops. Microsatellites with long-core motifs are more easily scored and were adopted long ago in human genetics but they were developed only in few crops, and Prunus species are not among them. In the present work the peach whole-genome sequence was used to select 216 SSRs containing long-core motifs with tri-, tetra- and penta-nucleotide repeats. Microsatellite primer pairs were designed and tested for polymorphism in the five diploid Prunus species of economic relevance (almond, apricot, Japanese plum, peach and sweet cherry). A set of 26 microsatellite markers covering all the eight chromosomes, was also selected and used in the molecular characterization, population genetics and structure analyses of a representative sample of the five diploid Prunus species, assessing their transportability and effectiveness. The combined probability of identity between two random individuals for the whole set of 26 SSRs was quite low, ranging from 2.30 × 10(-7) in peach to 9.48 × 10(-10) in almond, confirming the usefulness of the proposed set for fingerprinting analyses in Prunus species.

  15. Isolation and characterization of novel microsatellite markers for the northern mauxia shrimp, Acetes chinensis, using pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jung-Ha; Kang, Hyun-Sook; Noh, Eun-Soo; Park, Jung-Youn; An, Chel-Min

    2014-12-01

    Among the 14 species in the Acetes genus, Acetes japonicus and Acetes chinensis, are the only and also abundant two species around the Korean Peninsula, and are used in traditional recipes. These species are of great economic importance, but little is known about their population genetics, despite the fact that information of this kind is important for stock assessment, fisheries management and identification of origin. A total of 9 microsatellite (MS) markers for A. chinensis were developed using pyrosequencing techniques. Polymorphisms of these markers were evaluated in 96 wild individuals collected from the Yellow Sea off the coast of Korea. A total of 133 alleles were detected at nine loci, with a cross-species transferability of 56% with A. japonicus. These markers will facilitate assessment of population genetic diversity in the genus Acetes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of microsatellite markers in Fosterella rusbyi (Bromeliaceae) using 454 pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wöhrmann, Tina; Wagner, Natascha; Krapp, Florian; Huettel, Bruno; Weising, Kurt

    2012-04-01

    Polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for Fosterella rusbyi (Bromeliaceae) to evaluate the population genetic structure and genetic diversity of natural populations of F. rusbyi and other Fosterella species in Bolivia. 454 pyrosequencing technology was used to generate 73027 sequence reads from F. rusbyi DNA, which together contained 2796 perfect simple sequence repeats (SSRs). Primer pairs were designed for 30 loci, of which 15 were used to genotype 30 F. rusbyi plants from two geographical areas in Bolivia. All markers were polymorphic, with two to nine alleles in the overall sample. Cross-species amplification was tested in 10 additional Fosterella species. Seven loci showed consistent amplification in six or more species. The 15 SSR markers developed for F. rusbyi are promising candidates for population genetic analyses within F. rusbyi and other species of Fosterella.

  17. Cross-species transferability of microsatellite markers in the genus Lippia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, C P; Rocha, D S; Bajay, M M; Santos, F R C; Campos, J B; Pinheiro, J B; Zucchi, M I; Silva-Mann, R; Arrigoni-Blank, M F; Blank, A F

    2014-11-27

    The cross-species transferability of 20 microsatellite markers was tested in the genus Lippia. Eleven markers were polymorphic after screening 19 accessions of Lippia sidoides and Lippia gracilis maintained in the Active Germplasm Bank (AGB) from Universidade Federal de Sergipe. Additionally, 40 accessions of Lippia spp were collected in Sergipe to increase the germplasm bank. A total of 23, 22, and 36 alleles were identified, with an average of 2.3, 2.2, and 3.27 alleles per locus, respectively, for each group. The markers that were used were efficient tools to access genetic diversity in the germplasm bank and will be useful for further research aiming at the conservation and management of these important aromatic species.

  18. POPULATION GENETIC STRUCTURE OF AN ENDANGERED KALIBAUS, Labeo calbasu (HAMILTON, 1822 REVEALED BY MICROSATELLITE DNA MARKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Robiul Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The population genetic structure of Labeo calbasu collected from four wild and a hatchery population was studied using microsatellite DNA marker analysis. Five heterologous microsatellite markers (Lr10, Lr21, Lr24, Lr26 and CcatG1 developed from rohu and catla were analyzed to test the genetic variability of L. calbasu stocks. The number of alleles observed in the loci ranged from 2-10. The loci were found to be polymorphic (microsatellite markers may assist the proper management of L. calbasu populations in the wild.

  19. Isolation and Characterization of Novel Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers for Cimex hemipterus F. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seri Masran, Siti Nor Ain; Ab Majid, Abdul Hafiz

    2018-02-10

    Due to the growing public health and tourism awareness, Cimex hemipterus Fabricius (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) has gained a great interest in increasing reported infestation cases in tropical regions of the world, including Malaysia. Since the information on the molecular ecology and population biology of this species are tremendously lacking, the isolation and development of molecular markers can be used to determine its genetic structure. In this study, novel microsatellite primers isolated from enriched genomic libraries of C. hemipterus were developed using 454 Roche shotgun sequencing. Seven validated polymorphic microsatellite primers were consistently amplified and characterized from 70 tropical bed bugs collected from seven locations throughout Malaysia. The number of alleles per locus identified ranged from 6 to 14. Comparison of loci for overall and between population were done with mean observed and expected heterozygosity were determined at 0.320 and 0.814, 0.320 and 0.727, respectively. Polymorphic information criteria (PIC) valued the markers as highly informative as PIC >0.5. Overall population, they are possibly in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium with loci Ch_09ttn, Ch_01dn, and Ch_13dn showing signs of a null allele. There were no scoring errors caused by stutter peaks, no large allele dropout was detected for all loci and showed no evidence of linkage disequilibrium. In conclusion, all seven molecular microsatellite markers identified can be beneficially used to gain more information on the population genetic structure and breeding patterns of C. hemipterus as well as the relationship of dispersal and infestation. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Microsatellite DNA markers for delineating population structure and kinship among the endangered Kirtland’s warbler (Dendroica kirtlandii)

    Science.gov (United States)

    TIM L. KING; MICHAEL S. EACKLES; ANNE P. HENDERSON; CAROL I. BOCETTI; DAVE CURRIE; JR WUNDERLE

    2005-01-01

    We document the isolation and characterization of 23 microsatellite DNA markers for the endangered Kirtland’s warbler (Dendroica kirtlandii), a Nearctic/Neotropical migrant passerine. This suite of markers revealed moderate to high levels of allelic diversity (averaging 7.7 alleles per locus) and heterozygosity (averaging 72%). Genotypic frequencies at 22 of 23 (95%)...

  1. Transcriptome-derived microsatellite markers for Dioon (Zamiaceae) cycad species1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Alberto; Cervantes-Díaz, Fret; Perez-Zavala, Francisco G.; González-Astorga, Jorge; Bede, Jacqueline C.; Cibrián-Jaramillo, Angélica

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Dioon (Zamiaceae) is an endangered North American cycad genus of evolutionary and ornamental value. We designed and validated a set of microsatellite markers from D. edule that can be used for population-level and conservation studies, and that transferred successfully to D. angustifolium, D. spinulosum, and D. holmgrenii. Methods and Results: We tested 50 primers from 80 microsatellite candidate loci in the OneKP D. edule transcriptome. Genotypes from 21 loci in 20 D. edule individuals revealed up to 14 alleles per locus and observed heterozygosity from 0.15 to 0.92; one locus was monomorphic. Seven of those 21 loci were polymorphic in D. angustifolium, D. spinulosum, and D. holmgrenii, with up to seven alleles, and an observed heterozygosity up to 0.89. Conclusions: The transcriptome-derived microsatellites generated here will serve as tools to advance population genetic studies and inform conservation strategies of Dioon, including the identification and origin of illegal plants in the cycad trade. PMID:26949574

  2. Molecular characterization of twenty polymorphic microsatellite markers in the polyploid fruit tree species Syzygium samarangense (Myrtaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, J M; Tsai, C C; Yen, C R; Ko, Y Z; Chen, S R; Weng, I S; Lin, Y S; Chiang, Y C

    2015-10-21

    Syzygium samarangense (Blume) Merr. & Perry (wax apple) is an important commercial fruit tree in Southeast Asia. Here, microsatellite markers were developed to evaluate genetic diversity and distinguish cultivars in this species. In total, 161 microsatellite loci with sufficient flanking sequences to design primer sets were isolated from wax apple using a magnetic bead-enrichment method. Fifty-eight primer sets were designed based on the flanking sequences of each single sequence repeat (SSR) locus and were tested using 14 wax apple cultivars/lines. Twenty SSR loci were found to be polymorphic and transferable across the 14 wax apple cultivars/lines. The number of alleles and effective number of alleles detected per locus ranged from 4 to 12 and from 1.697 to 9.800, respectively. The expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.150 to 0.595 (mean = 0.414). Polymorphism information content values ranged from 0.502 to 0.866 (mean = 0.763). These new microsatellite loci will be of value for characterization of genetic diversity in wax apples and for the identification of cultivars.

  3. Novel polymorphic microsatellite markers developed for a common reef sponge, Stylissa carteri

    KAUST Repository

    Giles, E.C.

    2013-04-04

    Despite the ubiquitous role sponges play in reef ecosystem dynamics, little is known about population-level connectivity in these organisms. The general field of population genetics in sponges remains in its infancy. To date, microsatellite markers have only been developed for few sponge species and no sponge population genetics studies using microsatellites have been conducted in the Red Sea. Here, with the use of next-generation sequencing, we characterize 12 novel polymorphic loci for the common reef sponge, Stylissa carteri. The number of alleles per loci ranged between three and eight. Observed heterozygosity frequencies (Ho) ranged from 0.125 to 0.870, whereas expected (He) heterozygosity frequencies ranged from 0.119 to 0.812. Only one locus showed consistent deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) in both populations and two loci consistently showed the possible presence of null alleles. No significant linkage disequilibrium was detected for any pairs of loci. These microsatellites will be of use for numerous ecological studies focused on this common and abundant sponge. 2013 The Author(s).

  4. Microsatellite markers for an endemic Atlantic Forest tree, Manilkara multifida (Sapotaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Ramiris C S; Vivas, Caio V; Oliveira, Fernanda A; Menezes, Ivandilson P P; van den Berg, Cassio; Gaiotto, Fernanda A

    2013-01-01

    Manilkara multifida is a tropical tree that is endemic to the Atlantic forests of southern Bahia, Brazil. Currently, populations of this species are restricted to fragmented landscapes that are susceptible to anthropogenic disturbances. Considering this issue, and that there is no genetic information available for this endangered species, we developed microsatellite markers for M. multifida to provide resources for future conservation genetics studies. Using an enriched genomic library, we isolated eight polymorphic microsatellite loci and optimized the amplification conditions for M. multifida. For each locus, we estimated the number of alleles, H E and H O, paternity exclusion Q, individual identity I and fixation index F, and examined the presence of null alleles. The mean number of alleles was 11.9, and the heterozygosity was high at all loci (average H E = 0.809 and H O = 0.777). The combined values for both paternity exclusion and individual identity were Q = 0.9959 and I = 5.45 × 10(-11), respectively. No evidence of null alleles was detected. The results of our analysis indicated that all eight microsatellites are promising for assessing questions involving inbreeding, gene flow, co-ancestry and mating patterns in M. multifida.

  5. Microsatellites as markers for comparison among different populations of Sarcoptes scabiei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Maione

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present investigation was to analyse genetic variation and relationships of epizootic mange mites from sympatric Alpine chamois and red fox populations. The results of multi-locus genotyping using microsatellite marker loci support the hypothesis that gene flow between mite varieties on sympatric Alpine chamois and red fox is absent or extremely rare. Although the number of samples analysed until now is very small, the transmission of parasites seem to be more frequent when phylogenetically related host species are involved.

  6. Microsatellite markers for the palaeo-temperature indicator Pentapharsodinium dalei (Dinophyceae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundholm, Nina; Nielsen, Lene Rostgaard; Ribeiro, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    Pentapharsodinium dalei is a widely distributed cold-water dinoflagellate, which is used in palaeoecology as an indicator of relatively warmer conditions in polar and subpolar regions. This species has been proposed to be one of the first indicators of global warming at high latitudes.We developed...... dinucleotide polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed as multiplex polymerase chain reactions and were genotyped in 32 strains. The number of alleles per locus varied between 4 and 12, and the estimated gene diversity varied from 0.588 to 0.891. The haploid state of the vegetative cells was confirmed...

  7. Genetic characterization of Gaddi goat breed of Western Himalayas using microsatellite markers

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    Gurdeep Singh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In the present study, genetic characterization of Gaddi goat breed, a native to north temperate western Himalayan region of India, was carried out for the purpose of breed characterization and assessing existing intra-population genetic diversity. Materials and Methods: Totally, 75 blood samples procured at random from genetically unrelated animals of two sexes and different age groups and true to breed type were collected from different locations in the breeding tract of these goats in Himachal Pradesh, of which only 51 samples with desired quantity and quality were subjected to further processing for DNA isolation. The multi-locus genotype data were generated on 51 Gaddi goats sampled across different regions of the breeding tract in Himachal Pradesh using 15 FAO recommended goat specific microsatellite markers, which gave amplification and observed and effective number of alleles, gene frequency, observed and expected heterozygosity were estimated through PopGene software (1.3.1. Results: A total of 135 distinct alleles were observed with mean observed and effective number of alleles as 9.0000±0.82 and 6.5874±0.56 respectively across all 15 studied loci. The maximum (15 alleles were contributed by loci DRBP1 and P19/DYA and the least (5 by SRCRSP5. The mean heterozygosity was observed to be 0.8347±0.01 ranging from 0.7584 (SRCRSP5 to 0.9156 (P19-DYA across all loci. The mean observed (HO and expected (HE heterozygosities across all loci were 0.7484±0.02 and 0.8431±0.01 respectively. The polymorphism information content (PIC value ranged from 0.7148 (SRCPS5 to 0.909 (P19-DYA with mean PIC of 0.8105±0.01 in the present study. The average heterozygosity was observed to be 0.8347±0.01 ranging from 0.7584 (SRCRSP5 to 0.9156 P19 (DYA across all loci. Conclusion: Microsatellite analysis revealed high level of polymorphism across studied microsatellite markers and informativeness of the markers for genetic diversity analysis studies in

  8. Microsatellite markers for population genetic studies of the blowfly Chrysomya putoria (Diptera: Calliphoridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosangela Aparecida Rodrigues

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of the genetic variation and population structure of Chrysomya species is of great interest for both basic and applied research. However, very limited genetic information is available for this genus across its geographical distribution. Here, we describe 12 polymorphic microsatellite loci isolated from Chrysomya putoria with expected heterozygosities ranging from 0.1402-0.8312. These markers are of potential applied interest for forensic entomologists and for the characterisation of the genetic structure of C. putoria from recently colonised regions, with great promise for understanding the colonisation dynamics and spread of the genus Chrysomya in the New World.

  9. Genetic variability among the wild boars (Sus scrofa scrofa), crossbred animals and pigs using microsatellite markers (STRs)

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Paula Viana Correa da; Lui, Jeffrey Frederico; Band, Guilherme de Oliveira; Regitano, Luciana Correia de Almeida; Grossi, Selma de Fátima; Sollero, Bruna Pena; Nunes, Cleujosí da Silva

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the genetic variability among the wild boars, crossbred animals and pigs using microsatellite markers. Five genetic groups were studied. The fragments of three microsatellites developed for Sus scrofa domestica - IGF1, ACTG2 and TNFB - were amplified through PCR technique to evaluate the expected intra populacion variability (He) and observed (Ho) heterozygosity, and endogamy coefficient (F IS ) within each population and inter population variability F IS , t...

  10. Identification of microsatellite DNA markers for the giant anteater Myrmecophaga tridactyla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, J E; Vilas Boas, L A; Lemos, M V F; de Macedo Lemos, E G; Contel, E P B

    2005-01-01

    The giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla) is found from Belize and Guatemala to Paraguay and Argentina. Its conservation status is considered vulnerable by IUCN. Here we report the isolation and characterization of six microsatellite loci. Positive loci for (GT)(n) were isolated using a magnetic bead hybridization selection protocol. The number of alleles per locus as well as the heterozygosity and PCR conditions are described. These loci will be useful for studying population structure, genetic diversity, and paternity in M. tridactyla wild populations.

  11. 1p36 deletion is a marker for tumour dissemination in microsatellite stable stage II-III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayrhofer, Markus; Kultima, Hanna Göransson; Birgisson, Helgi; Sundström, Magnus; Mathot, Lucy; Edlund, Karolina; Viklund, Björn; Sjöblom, Tobias; Botling, Johan; Micke, Patrick; Påhlman, Lars; Glimelius, Bengt; Isaksson, Anders

    2014-11-24

    The clinical behaviour of colon cancer is heterogeneous. Five-year overall survival is 50-65% with all stages included. Recurring somatic chromosomal alterations have been identified and some have shown potential as markers for dissemination of the tumour, which is responsible for most colon cancer deaths. We investigated 115 selected stage II-IV primary colon cancers for associations between chromosomal alterations and tumour dissemination. Follow-up was at least 5 years for stage II-III patients without distant recurrence. Affymetrix SNP 6.0 microarrays and allele-specific copy number analysis were used to identify chromosomal alterations. Fisher's exact test was used to associate alterations with tumour dissemination, detected at diagnosis (stage IV) or later as recurrent disease (stage II-III). Loss of 1p36.11-21 was associated with tumour dissemination in microsatellite stable tumours of stage II-IV (odds ratio = 5.5). It was enriched to a similar extent in tumours with distant recurrence within stage II and stage III subgroups, and may therefore be used as a prognostic marker at diagnosis. Loss of 1p36.11-21 relative to average copy number of the genome showed similar prognostic value compared to absolute loss of copies. Therefore, the use of relative loss as a prognostic marker would benefit more patients by applying also to hyperploid cancer genomes. The association with tumour dissemination was supported by independent data from the The Cancer Genome Atlas. Deletions on 1p36 may be used to guide adjuvant treatment decisions in microsatellite stable colon cancer of stages II and III.

  12. Development and Characterization of Transcription Factor Gene-Derived Microsatellite (TFGM) Markers in Medicago truncatula and Their Transferability in Leguminous and Non-Leguminous Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenxian; Jia, Xitao; Liu, Zhimin; Zhang, Zhengshe; Wang, Yanrong; Liu, Zhipeng; Xie, Wengang

    2015-05-15

    Transcription factors (TFs) are critical adaptor molecules that regulate many plant processes by controlling gene expression. The recent increase in the availability of TF data has made TFs a valuable resource for genic functional microsatellite marker development. In the present study, we developed TF gene-derived microsatellite (TFGM) markers for Medicago truncatula and assessed their cross-species transferability. A total of 203 SSRs were identified from 1467 M. truncatula TF coding sequences, 87.68% of which were trinucleotide repeats, followed by mono- (4.93%) and hexanucleotide repeats (1.48%). Further, 142 TFGM markers showed a high level of transferability to the leguminous (55.63%-85.21%) and non-leguminous (28.17%-50.00%) species. Polymorphisms of 27 TFGM markers were evaluated in 44 alfalfa accessions. The allele number per marker ranged from two to eight with an average of 4.41, and the PIC values ranged from 0.08 to 0.84 with an average of 0.60. Considering the high polymorphism, these TFGM markers developed in our study will be valuable for genetic relationship assessments, marker-assisted selection and comparative genomic studies in leguminous and non-leguminous species.

  13. Microsatellite markers for evaluating the diversity of the natural killer complex and major histocompatibility complex genomic regions in domestic horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horecky, C; Horecka, E; Futas, J; Janova, E; Horin, P; Knoll, A

    2018-04-01

    Genotyping microsatellite markers represents a standard, relatively easy, and inexpensive method of assessing genetic diversity of complex genomic regions in various animal species, such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and/or natural killer cell receptor (NKR) genes. MHC-linked microsatellite markers have been identified and some of them were used for characterizing MHC polymorphism in various species, including horses. However, most of those were MHC class II markers, while MHC class I and III sub-regions were less well covered. No tools for studying genetic diversity of NKR complex genomic regions are available in horses. Therefore, the aims of this work were to establish a panel of markers suitable for analyzing genetic diversity of the natural killer complex (NKC), and to develop additional microsatellite markers of the MHC class I and class III genomic sub-regions in horses. Nine polymorphic microsatellite loci were newly identified in the equine NKC. Along with two previously reported microsatellites flanking this region, they constituted a panel of 11 loci allowing to characterize genetic variation in this functionally important part of the horse genome. Four newly described MHC class I/III-linked markers were added to 11 known microsatellites to establish a panel of 15 MHC markers with a better coverage of the class I and class III sub-regions. Major characteristics of the two panels produced on a group of 65 horses of 13 breeds and on five Przewalski's horses showed that they do reflect genetic variation within the horse species. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Inheritance patterns and identification of microsatellite markers linked to the rice blast resistance in BC2F1 population of rice breeding

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    Gous Miah

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The BC2F1 population was derived from a cross between rice variety, MR219 (susceptible to blast and Pongsu Seribu 1 (resistant to blast. The objectives of this research were to know the inheritance pattern of blast resistance and to identify the linked markers associated with blast resistance in BC2F1 population. Sixteen microsatellite markers were found as polymorphic between the parents related to blast resistant genes (Pi-genes. Among the selected blast resistant linked markers, two markers RM6836 and RM8225 showed expected testcross ratio (1:1 for single-gene model in the BC2F1 population with the association between resistant and susceptible progeny. A total of 333-BC2F1 plants were challenged with the most virulent pathotype P7.2 of Magnaporthe oryzae. Chi-square (χ2 analysis for phenotypic segregation in single-gene model showed goodness of fit (P = 0.4463 to the expected segregation ratio (1:1. In marker segregation analysis, two polymorphic markers (RM6836 and RM8225 clearly showed goodness of fit to the expected segregation testcross ratio (1:1 for the single-gene model. The marker RM8225 and RM6836 showed significant R2 values higher than 10 for the trait of the blast lesions degree (BLD. The positions of RM6836 and RM8225 markers on rice chromosome 6 and the distance between these two markers is 0.2 cM. We conclude that single dominant gene control the blast resistance in Pongsu Seribu 1 located on chromosome 6, which is linked to RM8225 and RM6836 microsatellite markers. This information could be useful in marker-assisted selection for blast resistance in rice breeding involving Pongsu Seribu 1.

  15. Microsatellite alterations at selected tetranucleotide repeats are associated with morphologies of colorectal neoplasias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Young; Chung, Heekyung; Devaraj, Bikash; Iwaizumi, Moriya; Han, Hye Seung; Hwang, Dae-Yong; Seong, Moo Kyung; Jung, Barbara H.; Carethers, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Elevated microsatellite alterations at selected tetranucleotide repeats (EMAST) occurs during microsatellite instability (MSI) that is not associated with major defects in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) but rather the reduced (heterogenous) expression of the MMR protein hMSH3; it occurs in sporadic colorectal tumors. We examined the timing of development of EMAST during progression of colorectal neoplasias and looked for correlations between EMAST and clinical and pathology features of tumors. Methods We evaluated tumor samples from a cohort of patients that had 24 adenomas and 84 colorectal cancers. EMAST were analyzed after DNA microdissection of matched normal and tumor samples using the polymorphic tetranucleotide microsatellite markers MYCL1, D9S242, D20S85, D8S321, and D20S82; data were compared with clinical and pathology findings. Traditional MSI analysis was performed and hMSH3 expression was measured. Results Moderately-differentiated adenocarcinomas and poorly-differentiated adenocarcinomas had higher frequencies of EMAST (56.9% and 40.0%, respectively) than well-differentiated adenocarcinomas (12.5%) or adenomas (33.3%) (P=0.040). In endoscopic analysis, ulcerated tumors had a higher frequency of EMAST (52.3%) than flat (44.0%) or protruded tumors (20.0%) (P=0.049). In quantification, all tumors with >3 tetranucleotide defects lost MSH3 (>75% of cells); nuclear heterogeneity of hMSH3 occurred more frequently in EMAST-positive (40.0%) than in EMAST-negative tumors (13.2%) (P=0.010). Conclusions EMAST is acquired during progression of adenoma and well-differentiated carcinomas to moderately and poorly differentiated carcinomas; it correlates with nuclear heterogeneity for hMSH3. Loss of hMSH3 corresponds with multiple tetranucleotide frameshifts. The association between EMAST and ulcerated tumors might result from increased inflammation. PMID:20708618

  16. Development of novel DNA markers for genetic analysis of grey hamsters by cross-species amplification of microsatellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C; Zhang, S J; Du, X Y; Xu, Y M; Huo, X Y; Liao, L F; Chen, Z W

    2015-11-13

    The grey hamster has been used in biomedical research for decades. However, effective molecular methods for evaluating the genetic structure of this species are lacking, which hinders its wider usage. In this study, we employed cross-amplification of microsatellite loci of species within the same genus by polymerase chain reaction. Loci screened included 107 from the Mongolian gerbil (MG) and 60 from the Chinese hamster (CH); of these, 15 polymorphic loci were identified for the grey hamster. Of the 167 loci screened, 95 (56.9%) with clear bands on agarose gel were initially identified. After sequencing, 74 (77.9%) of these matched the criteria for microsatellite characteristics, including 41 from MG and 33 from CH. Lastly, 15 (20.3%) loci with more than two alleles for each locus were identified through capillary electrophoresis scanning. To justify the applicability of the 15 grey hamster loci, genetic indexes of grey hamsters were evaluated using 46 generations of outbred stock, established 20 years ago, from Xinjiang, China. Mean effective allele numbers and expected heterozygosity of stock were as low as, respectively, 1.2 and 0.14; these were 2.8 and 4.0 times inferior, respectively, to wild grey hamsters. This finding suggests that the genetic structure of the stock-bred population is too weak to resist artificial and natural selection, mutation and genetic drifting. In conclusion, we have developed de novo microsatellite markers for genetic analysis of the grey hamster, providing data and methodology for the enrichment of a genetic library for this species.

  17. Rapid Microsatellite Marker Development Using Next Generation Pyrosequencing to Inform Invasive Burmese Python—Python molurus bivittatus—Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen M. Hart

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Invasive species represent an increasing threat to native ecosystems, harming indigenous taxa through predation, habitat modification, cross-species hybridization and alteration of ecosystem processes. Additionally, high economic costs are associated with environmental damage, restoration and control measures. The Burmese python, Python molurus bivittatus, is one of the most notable invasive species in the US, due to the threat it poses to imperiled species and the Greater Everglades ecosystem. To address population structure and relatedness, next generation sequencing was used to rapidly produce species-specific microsatellite loci. The Roche 454 GS-FLX Titanium platform provided 6616 di-, tri- and tetra-nucleotide repeats in 117,516 sequences. Using stringent criteria, 24 of 26 selected tri- and tetra-nucleotide loci were polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplified and 18 were polymorphic. An additional six cross-species loci were amplified, and the resulting 24 loci were incorporated into eight PCR multiplexes. Multi-locus genotypes yielded an average of 61% (39%–77% heterozygosity and 3.7 (2–6 alleles per locus. Population-level studies using the developed microsatellites will track the invasion front and monitor population-suppression dynamics. Additionally, cross-species amplification was detected in the invasive Ball, P. regius, and Northern African python, P. sebae. These markers can be used to address the hybridization potential of Burmese pythons and the larger, more aggressive P. sebae.

  18. Rapid microsatellite marker development using next generation pyrosequencing to inform invasive Burmese python -- Python molurus bivittatus -- management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Margaret E.; Hart, Kristen M.

    2013-01-01

    Invasive species represent an increasing threat to native ecosystems, harming indigenous taxa through predation, habitat modification, cross-species hybridization and alteration of ecosystem processes. Additionally, high economic costs are associated with environmental damage, restoration and control measures. The Burmese python, Python molurus bivittatus, is one of the most notable invasive species in the US, due to the threat it poses to imperiled species and the Greater Everglades ecosystem. To address population structure and relatedness, next generation sequencing was used to rapidly produce species-specific microsatellite loci. The Roche 454 GS-FLX Titanium platform provided 6616 di-, tri- and tetra-nucleotide repeats in 117,516 sequences. Using stringent criteria, 24 of 26 selected tri- and tetra-nucleotide loci were polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified and 18 were polymorphic. An additional six cross-species loci were amplified, and the resulting 24 loci were incorporated into eight PCR multiplexes. Multi-locus genotypes yielded an average of 61% (39%–77%) heterozygosity and 3.7 (2–6) alleles per locus. Population-level studies using the developed microsatellites will track the invasion front and monitor population-suppression dynamics. Additionally, cross-species amplification was detected in the invasive Ball, P. regius, and Northern African python, P. sebae. These markers can be used to address the hybridization potential of Burmese pythons and the larger, more aggressive P. sebae.

  19. Genetic differentiation of red and gray tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus using microsatellites and SCAR markers as indicators of genetic sex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Arqueros

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this work was to develop a standardized molecular protocols, to differentiate red and gray tilapia lineages using DNA microsatellites and to evaluate SCAR-5F-X/5R and SCAR-5F/5R-Y markers associated with the phenotypic sex of O. niloticus. The UNH106 microsatellite allowed differentiating genetically the lineages of red tilapia from gray. The markers UNH136, UNH115 and UNH995 presented monomorphic loci in both the red and gray tilapia in the population stock of the Centro Experimental de Genética of the Universidad Nacional de Trujillo. Fragment sizes for microsatellites and the reference gene β actin are described. The effectiveness of SCAR markers as informative in the determination of the genetic sex in XX and YY females and XY y YY males of red tilapia and XX females and XY males of gray tilapia was also confirmed.

  20. Genomic Integrity Detection of In Vitro Irradiated Banana Using Microsatellite Marker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Ratna Djuita

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Genomic Integrity Detection of In Vitro Irradiated Banana Using Microsatellite Marker. The research aims todetect genomic integrity of in vitro irradiated banana using microsatellite marker. These studies were done on bananacv. Pisang Mas irradiated by 15 Gy of gamma ray. The DNA was isolated from each accesion following Dixie.Amplification of DNA products were done by Perkin Elmer Gene Amp PCR 2400 using ten primers, and thenelectroforesis in agarose 1%. Finally a vertical polyacrylamide gel electroforesis was run and the products werevisualized by silver staining. The result shown that among the primers tested, eight primers produced clear, discrete,and reproducible bands. Number of DNA band exhibited ranging from one to two, following the ploidy level of pisangMas which is a diploid banana cultivar (AA. One band suggest homozygote allele while two bands showedheterozygote allele. Out of eight primers, six primers produced different allele among irradiated, in vitro, and in vivocontrol plant. Meanwhile, for the other two primers the allele were monomorph for all the accessions examined.Genomic modification was observed at all irradiated plants. The modification can happened at zygosity of certain allelethat may change from heterozygote to homozygote or vice versa. While modification in allele size that underlyinggenomic instability could be caused by several genetic events such as deletion, insertion, and amplification ofnucleotides.

  1. Validation of EST-derived microsatellite markers for two Cerrado-endemic Campomanesia (Myrtaceae) species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, E A G C; Boaventura-Novaes, C R D; Braga, R S; Reis, E F; Pinto, J F N; Telles, M P C

    2016-03-04

    We assessed the transferability of 120 EST-derived Eucalyptus microsatellite primers to Campomanesia adamantium and C. pubescens. Both species are berry trees native to the Brazilian Cerrado, and population genetic information is poor. Twelve markers were used to analyze the genetic variability of four sampled populations. Regarding DNA extraction, we sampled leaf tissues from two populations of each species (80 individuals). Of the 120 primers evaluated, 87 did not amplify any PCR products, and 21 rendered nonspecific amplification. Twelve primers were successfully transferred, providing a low combined probability of genetic identity for both species (5.718 x 10(-10) for C. adamantium; 1.182 x 10(-11) for C. pubescens) and a high probability of paternity exclusion (0.99939 for C. adamantium; 0.99982 for C. pubescens). The average number of alleles in the polymorphic loci was 6.8 for C. adamantium and 7.8 for C. pubescens, ranging from 2 to 16 alleles per locus. The observed heterozygosity values for C. adamantium and C. pubescens were 0.504 and 0.503, respectively, and the expected heterozygosity values for C. adamantium and C. pubescens were 0.517 and 0.579, respectively. The populations exhibited structured genetic variability with qP values of 0.105 for C. adamantium and 0.249 for C. pubescens. Thus, we concluded that these 12 microsatellite markers, transferred from Eucalyptus, were efficient for population genetic studies of C. adamantium and C. pubescens.

  2. Genetic similarity among commercial oil palm materials based on microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Arias

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Microsatellite markers are used to determine genetic similarities among individuals and might be used in various applications in breeding programs. For example, knowing the genetic similarity relationships of commercial planting materials helps to better understand their responses to environmental, agronomic and plant health factors. This study assessed 17 microsatellite markers in 9 crosses (D x P of Elaeis guineensis Jacq. from various commercial companies in Malaysia, France, Costa Rica and Colombia, in order to find possible genetic differences and/or similarities. Seventy-seven alleles were obtained, with an average of 4.5 alleles per primer and a range of 2-8 amplified alleles. The results show a significant reduction of alleles, compared to the number of alleles reported for wild oil palm populations. The obtained dendrogram shows the formation of two groups based on their genetic similarity. Group A, with ~76% similarity, contains the commercial material of 3 codes of Deli x La Mé crosses produced in France and Colombia, and group B, with ~66% genetic similarity, includes all the materials produced by commercial companies in Malaysia, France, Costa Rica and Colombia

  3. Genetic diversity of resin yielder Pinus merkusii from West Java - Indonesia revealed by microsatellites marker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susilowati, A.; Rachmat, H. H.; Siregar, I. Z.; Supriyanto

    2018-02-01

    Phenotypic observation of resin yielder Pinus merkusii showed higher value of genetic variation and narrow sense heritability values for resin production trait. This result indicated that genetic factor played as dominant aspect. However, further observation using molecular marker would still be needed to overcome the weakness of phenotypic observation. This study was carried out in order to characterize the genetic diversity and genetic differentiation of resin yielder genotype candidate P.merkusii using microsatellite markers and to characterize the genetic structure in the resin yielder populations. Seventy needle and inner bark samples were collected from resin yielder in Cijambu Seedling Seed Orchard (SSO) Sumedang, West Java and further divided into two genotype candidates (lower and high resin yielder). Seven microsatellites loci (pm01, pm04, pm05, pm07, pm08, pm09a, pm12, pde5 and SPAC 11.6) were used for detection of genetic diversity. Results showed that genetic diversity in higher resin candidates was (0.551), slightly different compared lower candidates (0.545). However, cluster analysis determined that higher resin yielder grouped with lower one. Molecular variation was found to be low among populations (21%) and high among individuals within the populations (79%). Private alleles were detected both in higher yielder and also normal population.

  4. Microsatellite DNA markers detects 95% of chromosome 22q11 deletions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnet, D.; Cormier-Daire, V.; Munnich, A.; Lyonnet, S. [INSERM, Paris (France)] [and others

    1997-01-20

    Cono-truncal cardiac malformations account for some 50% of congenital heart defects in newborn infants. Recently, hemizygosity for chromosome 22q11.2 was reported in patients with the DiGeorge/Velo-cardio-facial syndromes (DGS/VCFS) and causally related disorders. We have explored the potential use of microsatellite DNA markers for rapid detection of 22q11 deletions in 19 newborn infants referred for cono-truncal heart malformations with associated DGS/VCFS anomalies. A failure of parental inheritance was documented in 84.2% of cases (16/19). PCR-based genotyping using microsatellite DNA markers located within the commonly deleted region allowed us either to confirm or reject a 22q11 microdeletion in 94.3% of cases (18/19) within 24 hours. This test is now currently performed in the infants referred to us for a cono-truncal heart malformation as a first intention screening for 22q11 microdeletion. 10 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. Development of 15 polymorphic microsatellite markers for Ficus virens (Moraceae)1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Rong-Hua; Li, Yun-Xiang; Liu, Mei; Quan, Qiu-Mei

    2017-01-01

    Premise of the study: Ficus virens (Moraceae) is distributed widely in South and Southeast Asia, Melanesia, and northern Australia, and it is also cultivated outside its original northern range limit in southwestern China. Therefore, the species is well suited to explore the mechanism of range limits of Ficus species. However, little is known about its genetic background. Methods and Results: Fifteen polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed using the biotin-streptavidin capture method. Polymorphism was tested in 85 F. virens individuals sampled from three populations. The number of alleles ranged from three to 17. The observed and expected heterozygosity of each population varied from 0.0667 to 0.9286 and 0.0650 to 0.8890, respectively. Cross-species amplification was also carried out in eight other Ficus species. Conclusions: These 15 markers will be valuable for studying the genetic variation and population structure of F. virens and related Ficus species. PMID:28090407

  6. Genetic diversity among Juglans regia L. genotypes assessed by morphological traits and microsatellite markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoodi, R.; Rahmani, F.; Rezaee, R.

    2013-06-01

    In this study, genetic diversity was assayed among 16 accessions and five cultivars of Persian walnut (Juglans regia L.) using morphological traits and nine simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Samples were collected from Agriculture Research Center of Urmia city (North West Iran). Study on important morphological traits revealed genetic similarity of -0.6 to 0.99 based on CORR coefficient. The microsatellite marker system produced 34 alleles in range of 160-290 bp. The minimum (2) and maximum (7) number of alleles were obtained from WGA71 and WGA202 genetic loci, respectively. The mean number of alleles per locus was 4.25. Jaccards similarity coefficient ranged from 0.13 to 0.76. The results of this paper indicate high diversity among these genotypes which could be used for breeding management. (Author) 28 refs.

  7. Resolving genealogical relationships in the Pyjama cardinalfish, Sphaeramia nematoptera (Apogonidae) with 23 novel microsatellite markers

    KAUST Repository

    Rueger, Theresa

    2015-03-21

    Many coral reef fishes exhibit unique reproductive strategies that can play a central role in conservation programs. Cardinalfishes (f. Apogonidae) are all paternal mouthbrooders, where the male holds the fertilised eggs in his mouth until they hatch. Males may fertilise the eggs of multiple females resulting in polygyny and skewed reproductive success. Here we present 23 tetranucleotide microsatellite loci in four multiplexes to identify breeding strategies in the Pyjama cardinalfish, Sphaeramia nematoptera (Bleeker, 1856). All markers were polymorphic with a mean of 14.39 ± 1.61 SE alleles per locus and an average observed heterozygosity of 0.624 ± 0.054 SE across 384 genotyped individuals. This marker set provides a rare opportunity to investigate mating behaviour, reproductive success, kin group structure and larval dispersal in natural populations of a coral reef fish targeted by the aquarium trade.

  8. Database derived microsatellite markers (SSRs) for cultivar differentiation in Brassica oleracea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Louarn, Sébastien Jean Yves; Torp, Anna Maria; Holme, I.B.

    2007-01-01

     Fifty-nine Brassica oleracea cultivars, belonging to five botanical varieties, were evaluated for microsatellite (SSR) polymorphisms using 11 database sequence derived primer pairs. The cultivars represented 12 broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica), ten Brussels sprouts (B. o. var. gemmifera......), 21 cabbage (B. o. var. capitata, including the groups white and red cabbage), six savoy cabbage (B. o. var. sabauda), and ten cauliflower (B. o. var. botrytis) cultivars from 13 seed suppliers. The 11 primer pairs amplified in total 47 fragments, and differentiated 51 of the cultivars, whereas...... the remaining eight cultivars were differentiated from the rest in four inseparable pairs. All SSR markers, except one, produced a polymorphic information content (PIC value) of 0.5 or above. The average diversity for all markers within the tested material was 0.64. There was no major difference...

  9. Development of Microsatellite Markers for a Tropical Seagrass, Syringodium filiforme (Cymodoceaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra L. Bijak

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: A total of 17 polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for the tropical Atlantic seagrass Syringodium filiforme (Cymodoceaceae, enabling analysis of population genetic structure in this species for the first time. Methods and Results: The 17 primers amplified di- and trinucleotide repeats revealing two to eight alleles per locus among the South Florida populations tested. In the analysis of two populations from the Florida Keys (Florida, USA, observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.063 to 0.905, although sampling was from relatively closely located populations so heterozygosity is expected to be higher across larger spatial scales. Multiplex PCRs consisting of two 6-plex and one 5-plex reactions were developed to maximize genotyping efficiency. Conclusions: We present here 17 polymorphic markers that will be useful for the study of clonality and population structure of S. filiforme, a marine plant that forms extensive habitat throughout the tropical Atlantic and Caribbean.

  10. Identification and characterization of microsatellite markers in Pinus kesiya var. langbianensis (Pinaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Nian-Hui; Xu, Yu-Lan; Wang, Da-Wei; Chen, Shi; Li, Gen-Qian

    2017-02-01

    Microsatellite primers were developed in Pinus kesiya var. langbianensis (Pinaceae), a species native to southwestern China, to investigate its genetic diversity and population structure in order to provide information for the conservation and management of this species. Using next-generation sequencing, a total of 2349 putative simple sequence repeat primer pairs were designed. Eighteen polymorphic markers in 60 individuals belonging to four populations of P. kesiya var. langbianensis were identified and characterized with two to 11 alleles per locus. The observed and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.000 to 0.800 and 0.000 to 0.840, respectively. Each of these loci cross-amplified in the closely related species P. massoniana , P. densata , P. tabuliformis , and P. yunnanensis , with one to seven alleles per locus. The new markers are promising tools to study the population genetics of P. kesiya var. langbianensis and related species.

  11. Chicken microsatellite markers isolated from libraries enriched for simple tandem repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, M; Dawson, D A; McCamley, C; Wardle, A F; Armour, J A; Burke, T

    1997-12-01

    The total number of microsatellite loci is considered to be at least 10-fold lower in avian species than in mammalian species. Therefore, efficient large-scale cloning of chicken microsatellites, as required for the construction of a high-resolution linkage map, is facilitated by the construction of libraries using an enrichment strategy. In this study, a plasmid library enriched for tandem repeats was constructed from chicken genomic DNA by hybridization selection. Using this technique the proportion of recombinant clones that cross-hybridized to probes containing simple tandem repeats was raised to 16%, compared with < 0.1% in a non-enriched library. Primers were designed from 121 different sequences. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of two chicken reference pedigrees enabled 72 loci to be localized within the collaborative chicken genetic map, and at least 30 of the remaining loci have been shown to be informative in these or other crosses.

  12. Selecting representative microsatellite loci for genetic monitoring and analyzing genetic structure of an outbred population of orange tabby cats in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, X Y; Yi, S; Huo, X Y; Wang, C; Liu, D F; Ren, W Z; Chen, Z W

    2015-03-13

    We optimized a panel of microsatellite markers from cat and tiger genetic data for efficient genetic monitoring and used it to analyze the genetic structure of an outbred cat stock in China. We selected a set of rich polymorphic microsatellite loci from 131 cat microsatellite loci and 3 Sumatran tiger microsatellite loci using agarose gel electrophoresis. Next, the set of optimized genetic markers was used to analyze the genetic variation in an outbred population of orange tabby cats in China by simple-tandem repeat scanning. Thirty-one loci rich in polymorphisms were selected and the highest allele number in a single locus was 8. Analysis of the orange tabby cat population illustrated that the average observed number of alleles, mean effective allele number, mean Shannon's information index, mean expected heterozygosity, and observed heterozygosity were 3.8387, 2.4027, 0.9787, 0.5565, and 0.5528, respectively. The 31 microsatellite markers used were polymorphic and suitable for analyzing the genetic structure of cats. The population of orange tabby cats was confirmed to be a well-outbred stock.

  13. New microsatellite markers for population studies of Phytophthora cinnamomi, an important global pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbrecht, J; Duong, T A; Berg, N V D

    2017-12-15

    Phytophthora cinnamomi is the causal agent of root rot, canker and dieback of thousands of plant species around the globe. This oomycete not only causes severe economic losses but also threatens natural ecosystems. In South Africa, P. cinnamomi affects eucalyptus, avocado, macadamia and indigenous fynbos. Despite being one of the most important plant pathogens with a global distribution, little information is available regarding origin, invasion history and population biology. This is partly due to the limited number of molecular markers available for studying P. cinnamomi. Using available genome sequences for three isolates of P. cinnamomi, sixteen polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed as a set of multiplexable markers for both PCR and Gene Scan assays. The application of these markers on P. cinnamomi populations from avocado production areas in South Africa revealed that they were all polymorphic in these populations. The markers developed in this study represent a valuable resource for studying the population biology and movement of P. cinnamomi and will aid in the understanding of the origin and invasion history of this important species.

  14. Development of microsatellite markers using next-generation sequencing for the fish Colossoma macropomum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariede, Raquel B; Freitas, Milena V; Hata, Milene E; Matrochirico-Filho, Vito A; Utsunomia, Ricardo; Mendonça, Fernando F; Foresti, Fausto; Porto-Foresti, Fábio; Hashimoto, Diogo T

    2018-02-01

    Tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum) is a fish species from the Amazon and Orinoco Rivers, with favorable characteristics to the cultivation system and great market acceptance in South America. However, the construction of a genetic map for the genetic improvement of this species is limited by the low number of molecular markers currently described. Thus, this study aimed to validate gene-associated and anonymous (non-genic) microsatellites obtained by next generation sequencing (RNA-seq and whole genome shotgun-WGS, respectively), for future construction of a genetic map and search for quantitative trait loci (QTL) in this species. In the RNA-seq data, the observed and expected heterozygosity (H o and H e ) ranged from 0.09 to 0.73, and 0.09 to 0.85, respectively. In the WGS data, H o and H e ranged from 0.33 to 0.95, and 0.28 to 0.92, respectively. In general, the evaluation of 200 markers resulted in 45 polymorphic loci, of which 14 were gene-associated (RNA-Seq) and 31 were anonymous (WGS). Moreover, some markers were related to genes of the immune system, biological regulation/control and biogenesis. This study contributes to increase the number of molecular markers available for genetic studies in C. macropomum, which will allow the development of breeding programs assisted by molecular markers.

  15. Development of MHC-Linked Microsatellite Markers in the Domestic Cat and Their Use to Evaluate MHC Diversity in Domestic Cats, Cheetahs, and Gir Lions

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, Katrina M.; Kirby, Katherine; Beatty, Julia A.; Barrs, Vanessa R.; Cattley, Sonia; David, Victor; O’Brien, Stephen J.; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn; Belov, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Diversity within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) reflects the immunological fitness of a population. MHC-linked microsatellite markers provide a simple and an inexpensive method for studying MHC diversity in large-scale studies. We have developed 6 MHC-linked microsatellite markers in the domestic cat and used these, in conjunction with 5 neutral microsatellites, to assess MHC diversity in domestic mixed breed (n = 129) and purebred Burmese (n = 61) cat populations in Australia. Th...

  16. An insight into the genetic variation of Schistosoma japonicum in mainland China using DNA microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Jaya; Qian, Bao Zhen; Mcvean, Gilean; Webster, Joanne P

    2005-03-01

    This study presents the first microsatellite investigation into the level of genetic variation among Schistosoma japonicum from different geographical origins. S. japonicum isolates were obtained from seven endemic provinces across mainland China: Zhejiang (Jiashan County), Anhui (Guichi County), Jiangxi (Yongxiu County), Hubei (Wuhan County), Hunan (Yueyang area), Sichuan 1 (Maoshan County), Sichuan 2 (Tianquan County), Yunnan (Dali County), and also one province in the Philippines (Sorsogon). DNA from 20 individuals from each origin were screened against 11 recently isolated and characterized S. japonicum microsatellites, and a set of nine loci were selected based on their polymorphic information content. High levels of polymorphism were obtained between and within population samples, with Chinese and Philippine strains appearing to follow different lineages, and with distinct branching between provinces. Moreover, across mainland China, genotype clustering appeared to be related to habitat type and/or intermediate host morph. These results highlight the suitability of microsatellites for population genetic studies of S. japonicum and suggest that there may be different strains of S. japonicum circulating in mainland China.

  17. Anonymous and EST-based microsatellite DNA markers that transfer broadly across the fig tree genus (Ficus, Moraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heer, Katrin; Machado, Carlos A; Himler, Anna G; Herre, Edward Allen; Kalko, Elisabeth K V; Dick, Christopher W

    2012-08-01

    We developed a set of microsatellite markers for broad utility across the species-rich pantropical tree genus Ficus (fig trees). The markers were developed to study population structure, hybridization, and gene flow in neotropical species. We developed seven novel primer sets from expressed sequence tag (EST) libraries of F. citrifolia and F. popenoei (subgen. Urostigma sect. Americana) and optimized five previously developed anonymous loci for cross-species amplification. The markers were successfully tested on four species from the basal subgenus Pharmacosycea sect. Pharmacosycea (F. insipida, F. maxima, F. tonduzii, and F. yoponensis) and seven species of the derived subgenus Urostigma (F. citrifolia, F. colubrinae, F. costaricana, F. nymphaeifolia, F. obtusifolia, F. pertusa, and F. popenoei). The 12 markers amplified consistently and displayed polymorphism in all the species. This set of microsatellite markers is transferable across the phylogenetic breadth of Ficus, and should therefore be useful for studies of population structure and gene flow in approximately 750 fig species worldwide.

  18. Use of microsatellite markers for the assessment of bambara groundnut breeding system and varietal purity before genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Wai Kuan; Muchugi, Alice; Muthemba, Samuel; Kariba, Robert; Mavenkeni, Busiso Olga; Hendre, Prasad; Song, Bo; Van Deynze, Allen; Massawe, Festo; Mayes, Sean

    2016-06-01

    Maximizing the research output from a limited investment is often the major challenge for minor and underutilized crops. However, such crops may be tolerant to biotic and abiotic stresses and are adapted to local, marginal, and low-input environments. Their development through breeding will provide an important resource for future agricultural system resilience and diversification in the context of changing climates and the need to achieve food security. The African Orphan Crops Consortium recognizes the values of genomic resources in facilitating the improvement of such crops. Prior to beginning genome sequencing there is a need for an assessment of line varietal purity and to estimate any residual heterozygosity. Here we present an example from bambara groundnut (Vigna subterranea (L.) Verdc.), an underutilized drought tolerant African legume. Two released varieties from Zimbabwe, identified as potential genotypes for whole genome sequencing (WGS), were genotyped with 20 species-specific SSR markers. The results indicate that the cultivars are actually a mix of related inbred genotypes, and the analysis allowed a strategy of single plant selection to be used to generate non-heterogeneous DNA for WGS. The markers also confirmed very low levels of heterozygosity within individual plants. The application of a pre-screen using co-dominant microsatellite markers is expected to substantially improve the genome assembly, compared to a cultivar bulking approach that could have been adopted.

  19. Development of microsatellite markers for Hyacinth macaw (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus) and their cross-amplification in other parrot species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Helder E; Presti, Flavia T; Wasko, Adriane P; Pinhal, Danillo

    2015-12-01

    Hyacinth macaw Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus is the largest parrot of the world and is considered vulnerable to extinction due to its habitat loss and illegal trade associated to the international pet market demand. Genetic studies on this species are still incipient to generate a consistent characterization of the population dynamics and to develop appropriate conservation strategies. In this sense, microsatellite markers may support the detection of a population genetic structure for this bird species. However, at this time, none Hyacinth macaw species-specific primers for microsatellite loci have been so far established. This study aimed to develop and characterize polymorphic microsatellite markers for A. hyacinthinus and to check for their cross-amplification in other parrot species. Sequences containing repeated dinucleotide motifs were prospected and optimized from a genomic library that was enriched for microsatellites using magnetic beads. The analyses of 43-57 samples from wild individuals of three distinct Brazilian subpopulations led to the characterization of five polymorphic microsatellite loci. Allele richness per locus ranged from two to 12. Three loci exhibited observed heterozygosity values higher than 50%, but the overall average value among all loci was close to 45%. In addition, successful primer cross-amplification was verified in seven other investigated species of Neotropical parrots. The newly developed markers have shown to be potentially useful for in situ and ex situ population studies to support future conservation actions of Hyacinth macaw and other parrots.

  20. High-throughput microsatellite marker development in two sparid species and verification of their transferability in the family Sparidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Kerry; Hoareau, Thierry B; Bloomer, Paulette

    2012-07-01

    Recently, 454 sequencing has emerged as a popular method for isolating microsatellites owing to cost-effectiveness and time saving. In this study, repeat-enriched libraries from two southern African endemic sparids (Pachymetopon blochii and Lithognathus lithognathus) were 454 GS-FLX sequenced. From these, 7370 sequences containing repeats (SCRs) were identified. A brief survey of 23 studies showed a significant difference between the number of SCRs when enrichment was performed first before 454 sequencing. We designed primers for 302 unique fragments containing more than five repeat units and suitable flanking regions. A fraction (microsatellite loci (nine in each of the focal species) being described. Sanger sequencing of alleles confirmed that size variation was because of differences in the number of tandem repeats. However, a case of homoplasy and sequencing errors in the 454 sequencing were identified. These newly developed and four previously isolated loci were successfully used to identify polymorphic markers in nine other economically important species, representative of sparid diversity. The combination of newly developed markers with data from previous sparid cross-species studies showed a significant negative correlation between genetic divergence to focal species and microsatellite transferability. The high level of transferability we described (48% amplification success and 32% polymorphism) suggests that the 302 microsatellite loci identified represent an excellent resource for future studies on sparids. Microsatellite marker development should commonly include tests of transferability to reduce costs and increase feasibility of population genetics studies in nonmodel organisms. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Genetic Diversity Analysis of South and East Asian Duck Populations Using Highly Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongwon Seo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Native duck populations have lower productivity, and have not been developed as much as commercials duck breeds. However, native ducks have more importance in terms of genetic diversity and potentially valuable economic traits. For this reason, population discriminable genetic markers are needed for conservation and development of native ducks. In this study, 24 highly polymorphic microsatellite (MS markers were investigated using commercial ducks and native East and South Asian ducks. The average polymorphic information content (PIC value for all MS markers was 0.584, indicating high discrimination power. All populations were discriminated using 14 highly polymorphic MS markers by genetic distance and phylogenetic analysis. The results indicated that there were close genetic relationships among populations. In the structure analysis, East Asian ducks shared more haplotypes with commercial ducks than South Asian ducks, and they had more independent haplotypes than others did. These results will provide useful information for genetic diversity studies in ducks and for the development of duck traceability systems in the market.

  2. Parentage determination in three breeds of Indian goat using heterologous microsatellite markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganai, N.A.; Yadav, B.R.

    2005-01-01

    Parentage verification in Indian goat breeds addresses dubious parentage of three types: 1, exclusion of a putative parent when the genotype of one parent and offspring are known; 2, exclusion of a putative parent when the genotype of the other parent is not available; and 3, exclusion of both the parents of an offspring if falsely recorded. The investigation used 116 unrelated goats and six pedigreed families of three breeds of goat (Jamnapari, Barbari and Sirohi). A set of 12 bovine microsatellite markers was analysed for parentage determination in goats for different types of misidentifications. For Type 1 dubious parentage, the exclusion probability for each marker varied widely, from as low as 13.4% (locus BM-5004 in Jamnapari) to as high as 67% (locus BMS-1237 in Sirohi). For type 2, the values of probability of exclusion ranged from 5% (locus BMS-1237 in Barbari) to 50.1% (locus BMS-1237 in Sirohi). For Type 3, exclusion values ranged from 21.6% to 84%. The exclusion probabilities of falsely recorded parents were estimated for different combinations of 5 markers sets with 12, 8, 6, 5 and 4 markers, respectively. (author)

  3. Identification and characterization of microsatellite from Alternaria brassicicola to assess cross-species transferability and utility as a diagnostic marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ruchi; Kumar, Sudheer; Kashyap, Prem Lal; Srivastava, Alok Kumar; Mishra, Sanjay; Sharma, Arun Kumar

    2014-11-01

    Alternaria blight caused by Alternaria brassicicola (Schwein.) Wiltshire and A. brassicae (Berk.) Sacc., is one of the most important disease of rapeseed-mustard, characterized by the formation of spots on leaves, stem, and siliquae with premature defoliation and stunting of growth. These two species are very difficult to differentiate based on disease symptoms or spore morphology. Therefore, the aim of present investigation was to identify and characterize transferable microsatellite loci from A. brassicicola to A. brassicae for the development of diagnostic marker. A total of 8,457 microsatellites were identified from transcript sequences of A. brassicicola. The average density of microsatellites was one microsatellite per 1.94 kb of transcript sequence screened. The most frequent repeat was tri-nucleotide (74.03 %), whereas penta-nucleotide (1.14 %) was least frequent. Among amino acids, arginine (13.11 %) showed maximum abundance followed by lysine (10.11 %). A total of 32 alleles were obtained across the 31 microsatellite loci for the ten isolates of A. brassicicola. In cross-species amplifications, 5 of the 31 markers amplified the corresponding microsatellite regions in twenty isolates of A. brassicae and showed monomorphic banding pattern. Microsatellite locus ABS28 was highly specific for A. brassicicola, as no amplification was observed from twenty-nine other closely related taxa. Primer set, ABS28F/ABS28R, amplified a specific amplicon of 380 bp from all A. brassicicola isolates. Standard curves were generated for A. brassicicola isolate using SYBR Green I fluorescent dye for detection of amplification in real-time PCR assay. The lowest detection limit of assay was 0.01 ng. Thus, the primer set can be used as diagnostic marker to discriminate and diagnose A. brassicicola from synchronously occurring fungus, A. brassicae associated with rapeseed and mustard.

  4. An annotated genetic map of loblolly pine based on microsatellite and cDNA markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wimalanathan Kokulapalan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L. genetic linkage maps have been based on a variety of DNA polymorphisms, such as AFLPs, RAPDs, RFLPs, and ESTPs, but only a few SSRs (simple sequence repeats, also known as simple tandem repeats or microsatellites, have been mapped in P. taeda. The objective of this study was to integrate a large set of SSR markers from a variety of sources and published cDNA markers into a composite P. taeda genetic map constructed from two reference mapping pedigrees. A dense genetic map that incorporates SSR loci will benefit complete pine genome sequencing, pine population genetics studies, and pine breeding programs. Careful marker annotation using a variety of references further enhances the utility of the integrated SSR map. Results The updated P. taeda genetic map, with an estimated genome coverage of 1,515 cM(Kosambi across 12 linkage groups, incorporated 170 new SSR markers and 290 previously reported SSR, RFLP, and ESTP markers. The average marker interval was 3.1 cM. Of 233 mapped SSR loci, 84 were from cDNA-derived sequences (EST-SSRs and 149 were from non-transcribed genomic sequences (genomic-SSRs. Of all 311 mapped cDNA-derived markers, 77% were associated with NCBI Pta UniGene clusters, 67% with RefSeq proteins, and 62% with functional Gene Ontology (GO terms. Duplicate (i.e., redundant accessory and paralogous markers were tentatively identified by evaluating marker sequences by their UniGene cluster IDs, clone IDs, and relative map positions. The average gene diversity, He, among polymorphic SSR loci, including those that were not mapped, was 0.43 for 94 EST-SSRs and 0.72 for 83 genomic-SSRs. The genetic map can be viewed and queried at http://www.conifergdb.org/pinemap. Conclusions Many polymorphic and genetically mapped SSR markers are now available for use in P. taeda population genetics, studies of adaptive traits, and various germplasm management applications. Annotating mapped

  5. Isolation of 16 Microsatellite Markers for Spiraea alpina and S. mongolica (Rosaceae of the Qinghai–Tibet Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulzar Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: A set of microsatellite markers were developed to characterize the level of genetic diversity and gene flow in two plant species endemic to the Qinghai–Tibet Plateau, Spiraea alpina and S. mongolica. Methods and Results: Using the Fast Isolation by AFLP of Sequences Containing repeats (FIASCO method, 16 microsatellite loci showed polymorphisms in both species. In two populations of each species, the number of alleles per locus ranged from three to 18 in S. alpina and from four to 30 in S. mongolica. Conclusions: These microsatellite markers provide an efficient tool for population genetic studies and will be used to assess the genetic diversity and spatial genetic structure of S. alpina and S. mongolica.

  6. Development, characterization and cross species amplification of polymorphic microsatellite markers from expressed sequence tags of turmeric (Curcuma longa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siju, S; Dhanya, K; Syamkumar, S; Sasikumar, B; Sheeja, T E; Bhat, A I; Parthasarathy, V A

    2010-02-01

    Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) were used for the screening of type and frequency of Class I (hypervariable) simple sequence repeats (SSRs). A total of 231 microsatellite repeats were detected from 12,593 EST sequences of turmeric after redundancy elimination. The average density of Class I SSRs accounts to one SSR per 17.96 kb of EST. Mononucleotides were the most abundant class of microsatellite repeat in turmeric ESTs followed by trinucleotides. A robust set of 17 polymorphic EST-SSRs were developed and used for evaluating 20 turmeric accessions. The number of alleles detected ranged from 3 to 8 per loci. The developed markers were also evaluated in 13 related species of C. longa confirming high rate (100%) of cross species transferability. The polymorphic microsatellite markers generated from this study could be used for genetic diversity analysis and resolving the taxonomic confusion prevailing in the genus.

  7. Characterization of a canine tetranucleotide microsatellite marker located in the first intron of the tumor necrosis factor alpha gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masashi; Tanaka, Kazuaki; Takizawa, Tatsuya; Segawa, Kazuhito; Neo, Sakurako; Tsuchiya, Ryo; Murata, Michiko; Murakami, Masaru; Hisasue, Masaharu

    2014-01-01

    A polymorphic tetranucleotide (GAAT)n microsatellite in the first intron of the canine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFA) gene was characterized in this study; 139 dogs were analyzed: 22 Beagles, 26 Chihuahuas, 20 Miniature Dachshunds, 24 Miniature Poodles, 22 Pembroke Welsh Corgis and 25 Shiba Inus. We detected the presence of the 4 alleles (GAAT)5, (GAAT)6, (GAAT)7 and (GAAT)8, including 9 of the 10 expected genotypes. The expected heterozygosity (He) and the polymorphic information content (PIC) value of this microsatellite locus varied from 0.389 to 0.749 and from 0.333 to 0.682, respectively, among the 6 breeds. The allelic frequency differed greatly among breeds, but this microsatellite marker was highly polymorphic and could be a useful marker for the canine TNFA gene.

  8. Analysis of genetic diversity and differentiation of seven stocks of Litopenaeus vannamei using microsatellite markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Wang, Weiji; Li, Weiya; Zhang, Quanqi; Kong, Jie

    2014-08-01

    Seven microsatellite markers were used to evaluate the genetic diversity and differentiation of seven stocks of Litopenaeus vannamei, which were introduced from Central and South America to China. All seven microsatellite loci were polymorphic, with polymorphism information content ( PIC) values ranging from 0.593 to 0.952. Totally 92 alleles were identified, and the number of alleles ( Na) and effective alleles ( Ne) varied between 4 and 21 and 2.7 and 14.6, respectively. Observed heterozygosity ( H o) values were lower than the expected heterozygosity ( H e) values (0.526-0.754), which indicated that the seven stocks possessed a rich genetic diversity. Thirty-seven tests were detected for reasonable significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. F is values were positive at five loci, suggesting that there was a relatively high degree of inbreeding within stocks. Pairwise F st values ranged from 0.0225 to 0.151, and most of the stock pairs were moderately differentiated. Genetic distance and cluster analysis using UPGMA revealed a close genetic relationship of L. vannamei between Pop2 and Pop3. AMOVA indicated that the genetic variation among stocks (11.3%) was much lower than that within stocks (88.7%). Although the seven stocks had a certain degree of genetic differentiation and a rich genetic diversity, there is an increasing risk of decreased performance due to inbreeding in subsequent generations.

  9. Mating system in a natural population of Theobroma grandiflorum (Willd. ex Spreng. Schum., by microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves Rafael M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to study the mating system of a natural population of Theobroma grandiflorum (cupuassu from Nova Ipixuna, Pará state, using microsatellite markers. Eight polymorphic microsatellite loci were analyzed in eight families, each represented by 10 six-month old seedlings derived from open-pollinated pods. The estimation for the multilocus outcrossing rate (m = 1.0 and individual outcrossing rate ( = 1.0 for this population suggests that T. grandiflorum may be a perfect outbreeding (allogamous species. Likewise, for the studied population the estimate for single locus outcrossing rate (S was elevated (0.946, but lower than m, confirming the likely outcrossing character of the species and suggesting the occurrence of 5.4% biparental inbreeding rate (m - S. The estimation of genetic divergence (st between allelic frequencies in ovules and pollen revealed a deviation from random mating in 75% of the evaluated loci. Likewise, the estimate of correlation of paternity (P = 0.930 and the mean coefficient of co-ancestrality within families (XY = 0.501 indicated that the outcrossings were predominantly correlated, and the offspring were full-sibs. These results suggested that for this particular population of T. grandiflorum, the sampling strategy for genetic conservation and breeding should adopt specific models for families derived from correlated outcrossing (full-sibs and not the ones usually adopted in classic outcrossing species breeding programs (half-sibs.

  10. Development and characterization of novel microsatellite markers for Ginkgo biloba using 454 pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Q; Wang, X X; Xu, M; Cao, F L; Yu, F X; Xu, L A

    2016-03-28

    As a "living fossil" that is used to understand the evolutionary history of seed plants, Ginkgo biloba is a well-known multipurpose tree with edible seeds, medicinal properties, and ornamental value, but little is known about its genetic diversity. Microsatellite, or simple sequence repeat (SSR), markers have proven to be powerful tools for genetic studies of plants. In this study, we isolated 30 novel polymorphic microsatellite loci in G. biloba using 454 pyrosequencing. The characteristics of these loci were tested with 48 cultivars. The number of alleles (NA) per locus ranged from two to seven. The observed (HO) and expected (HE) heterozygosities ranged from 0.000 to 0.750 and from 0.021 to 0.792, with an average of 0.326 and 0.443, respectively. In terms of genetic diversity in the Ginkgo population, NA was 3.300, NE was 2.090, I was 0.782, HO was 0.326, and HE was 0.443. These polymorphic SSRs will be useful for the assessment of population genetic diversity and resource conservation of G. biloba.

  11. Genetic diversity and population structure ofPolistes nimphabased on DNA microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyra, K B; Melosik, I; Baraniak, E

    The Eurasiatic Polistes nimpha belongs to primitively eusocial wasps for which no data are available on its population's genetic structure and relatedness/relationships of individuals. The purpose of this research is to determine the amplification efficiency in P. nimpha of microsatellite primers developed for P. dominula and using these primers, to explore genetic diversity, population structure and relatedness/relationship of P. nimpha in the context of its reproductive options. Eight out of twelve microsatellite markers analyzed on 59 individuals (pupae and larvae) were polymorphic (mean PIC = 0.545) and mutated following the stepwise mutation model. The Bayesian clustering method gave the probability of >0.898 of there being 10 clusters within the pooled sample of 15 nests. In two or three nest clusters, full- and/or half-siblings and unrelated individuals occurred. A significant correlation between genetic and geographic distances was detected. There are three main possibilities that come into play to explain our genetic results and direct field observations: cooperative nest foundation, visitations, and/or usurpation events. So far there is no conclusive evidence to exclude or support any of these possibilities.

  12. Genetic diversity of the Northern Morocco goat population assessed with microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najat El Moutchou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this work was to study the genetic diversity of the Northern Morocco goat population through the analysis of 19 microsatellites in 144 animals from 61 herds. To detect a possible population structure, three distinct geographic subpopulations were characterized as a function of climate and environmental influences. Most of the markers were highly polymorphic, and the results revealed considerable genetic variation across the studied loci. A total of 204 alleles were detected, with an average number of 10.7 per locus. The PIC average was 0.728, and four microsatellites showed a significant deviation (p< 0.05 from Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA indicated that only 0.5% of the variation corresponded to differences among subpopulations, and 99.5% corresponded to differences among individuals. Factorial correspondence analysis showed intense admixtures across the putative subpopulations, and the subdivision related to geographical or environmental adaptation was undetectable. The Northern Morocco goat population presented high genetic diversity and a lack of population structure. The main reason for these findings is the absence of the breed concept (reproductively closed population, resulting in uncontrolled crossbreeding with exotic breeds and other local goats.

  13. Repetitive flanking sequences challenge microsatellite marker development: a case study in the lepidopteran Melanargia galathea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Max; Csencsics, Daniela; Gugerli, Felix

    2016-11-01

    Microsatellite DNA families (MDF) are stretches of DNA that share similar or identical sequences beside nuclear simple-sequence repeat (nSSR) motifs, potentially causing problems during nSSR marker development. Primers positioned within MDFs can bind several times within the genome and might result in multiple banding patterns. It is therefore common practice to exclude MDF loci in the course of marker development. Here, we propose an approach to deal with multiple primer-binding sites by purposefully positioning primers within the detected repetitive element. We developed a new protocol to determine the family type and the primer position in relation to MDFs using the software packages repark and repeatmasker together with an in-house R script. We re-evaluated newly developed nSSR markers for the lepidopteran Marbled White (Melanargia galathea) and explored the implications of our results with regard to published data sets of the butterfly Euphydryas aurinia, the grasshopper Stethophyma grossum, the conifer Pinus cembra and the crucifer Arabis alpina. For M. galathea, we show that it is not only possible to develop reliable nSSR markers for MDF loci, but even to benefit from their presence in some cases: We used one unlabelled primer, successfully binding within an MDF, for two different loci in a multiplex PCR, combining this family primer with uniquely binding and fluorescently labelled primers outside of MDFs, respectively. As MDFs are abundant in many taxa, we propose to consider these during nSSR marker development in taxa concerned. Our new approach might help in reducing the number of tested primers during nSSR marker development. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Functionally Relevant Microsatellite Markers From Chickpea Transcription Factor Genes for Efficient Genotyping Applications and Trait Association Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujur, Alice; Bajaj, Deepak; Saxena, Maneesha S.; Tripathi, Shailesh; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; Gowda, C.L.L.; Singh, Sube; Jain, Mukesh; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.; Parida, Swarup K.

    2013-01-01

    We developed 1108 transcription factor gene-derived microsatellite (TFGMS) and 161 transcription factor functional domain-associated microsatellite (TFFDMS) markers from 707 TFs of chickpea. The robust amplification efficiency (96.5%) and high intra-specific polymorphic potential (34%) detected by markers suggest their immense utilities in efficient large-scale genotyping applications, including construction of both physical and functional transcript maps and understanding population structure. Candidate gene-based association analysis revealed strong genetic association of TFFDMS markers with three major seed and pod traits. Further, TFGMS markers in the 5′ untranslated regions of TF genes showing differential expression during seed development had higher trait association potential. The significance of TFFDMS markers was demonstrated by correlating their allelic variation with amino acid sequence expansion/contraction in the functional domain and alteration of secondary protein structure encoded by genes. The seed weight-associated markers were validated through traditional bi-parental genetic mapping. The determination of gene-specific linkage disequilibrium (LD) patterns in desi and kabuli based on single nucleotide polymorphism-microsatellite marker haplotypes revealed extended LD decay, enhanced LD resolution and trait association potential of genes. The evolutionary history of a strong seed-size/weight-associated TF based on natural variation and haplotype sharing among desi, kabuli and wild unravelled useful information having implication for seed-size trait evolution during chickpea domestication. PMID:23633531

  15. Characterization of microsatellite markers isolated from the American Mink (Mustela vison) genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansari, S.; Anistoroaei, Razvan Marian; Farid, A.

    2007-01-01

    Two size-selected mink genomic libraries were constructed and recombinant colonies (n=6,144) were screened with a pool of probes, containing (AAAG)8, (AAGG)8, (AGGG)8, (ATAG)8 and (AG)15 oligonucleotides in equal amounts. A total of 44 colonies were hybridized and confirmed upon replating. Sequen....... Sequencing of the clones revealed 35 microsatellites with unique sequences. There were 19 di- and 6 tetra nucleotides, and the remaining 10 had complex repeats. Twenty eight (80%) were polymorphic in a panel of 20 mink from two Danish Farms....

  16. Genetic diversity of different indigenous chicken ecotypes using highly polymorphic MHC-linked and non-MHC microsatellite markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ngeno, K.; Waaij, van der E.H.; Megens, H.J.W.C.; Kahi, A.K.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated the genetic make-up of different ecotypes of indigenous chickens (ICs) in Kenya based on major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-linked and non-MHC microsatellite markers. Blood samples were collected from eight regions (48 birds per region) of Kenya: Kakamega (KK), Siaya (BN),

  17. Development of novel chloroplast microsatellite markers to identify species in the Agrostis complex (Poaceae) and related genera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria L. Zapiola; Richard C. Cronn; Carol A. Mallory-Smith

    2010-01-01

    We needed a reliable way to identify species and confirm potential interspecific and intergeneric hybrids in a landscape-level study of gene flow from transgenic gylphosate-resistant Agrostis stolonifera (Poaceae) to compatible relatives. We developed 12 new polymorphic chloroplast microsatellite markers to aid in identifying species recipient of...

  18. Brown trout ( Salmo trutta ) stocking impact assessment using microsatellite DNA markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Møller; Ruzzante, D.E.; Eg Nielsen, Einar

    2001-01-01

    The genetic integrity of many salmonid fish populations is threatened by stocking of domesticated conspecifics. The purpose of this study was to assess the utility of microsatellite DNA markers for detecting loss of genetic diversity in hatchery strains, for estimating their genetic relationships......, and for monitoring the genetic impact of stocking activity on wild populations of salmonid fishes. Brown trout from ten hatchery strains, one supportive breeding "strain," and five wild populations were screened for variation at eight loci. In most hatchery strains, genetic variation was comparable to that of wild...... between the wild and hatchery populations. We assessed whether wild populations were introgressed by stocked hatchery trout by performing assignment tests to determine population of origin and estimating maximum potential introgression rates. The results suggested that genetic introgression by hatchery...

  19. Genetic characterization of five hatchery populations of the Pacific Abalone (Haliotis discus hannai) using microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hye Suck; Lee, Jang Wook; Kim, Hyun Chul; Myeong, Jeong-In

    2011-01-01

    The Pacific abalone, Haliotis discus hannai, is a popular food in Eastern Asia. Aquacultural production of this species has increased because of recent resource declines, the growing consumption, and ongoing government-operated stock release programs. Therefore, the genetic characterization of hatchery populations is necessary to maintain the genetic diversity of this species and to develop more effective aquaculture practices. We analyzed the genetic structures of five cultured populations in Korea using six microsatellite markers. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 15 to 64, with an average of 23.5. The mean observed and expected heterozygosities were 0.797 and 0.904, respectively. The inbreeding coefficient F(IS) ranged from 0.054 to 0.184 (mean F(IS) = 0.121 ± 0.056). The genetic differentiation across all populations was low but significant (overall F(ST) = 0.009, P discus hannai fisheries and the aquaculture industry.

  20. Molecular diversity of Pakistani mango (Mangifera indica L.) varieties based on microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazish, T; Shabbir, G; Ali, A; Sami-Ul-Allah, S; Naeem, M; Javed, M; Batool, S; Arshad, H; Hussain, S B; Aslam, K; Seher, R; Tahir, M; Baber, M

    2017-04-05

    Understanding the genetic diversity of different Pakistani mango varieties is important for germplasm management and varietal characterization. Microsatellites are efficient and highly polymorphic markers for comparative genome mapping, and were used in the present study to determine the genetic relatedness and variability among 15 indigenous mango cultivars (Mangifera indica L.). Overall, 181 bands were produced using 12 simple sequence repeat (SSR) primers. Out of the 12 primers used, 10 were polymorphic and two were monomorphic. Genetic relatedness among cultivars was assessed by constructing a dendrogram using the unweighted pair group method of arithmetic means. The accessions exhibited coefficients of similarity ranging from 75 to 100%, indicating the frequent use of only a few parent cultivars and the presence of inbreeding. The primers used in the present study were found to be valuable for identifying genetic relationships among mango cultivars.

  1. Common ancestral origin of pemphigus vulgaris in Jews and Spaniards: a study using microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewenthal, R; Slomov, Y; Gonzalez-Escribano, M F; Goldberg, I; Korostishevsky, M; Brenner, S; Nunez-Roldan, A; Conejo-Mir, J S; Gazit, E

    2004-04-01

    Pemphigus is a group of autoimmune blistering diseases of the skin and mucous membranes. The association of pemphigus with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) is widely accepted. It was described in many ethnic groups and in most countries of the world. Studies showed that the associated HLA haplotype in Jewish pemphigus vulgaris (PV) patients is HLA-B38, DRB1*0402, and DQB1*0302; or HLA-B35, DRB1*0402, and DQB1*0302. Similar associations with class II genes were found in Spanish non-Jewish PV patients. As Jews lived in Spain for hundreds of years and many converted to Christianity, the presence of the same HLA haplotype in the Jewish and Spanish PV suggests that they may share the same founder. Microsatellite markers which span the entire major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus were used as genetic probes. They were utilized to dissect the MHC region in the search for possible common haplotypes, besides HLA, which may provide an answer to this question. It was found that in both cohorts, in addition to HLA class II genes, there are probably genes in the class I region which are associated with PV. Alleles belonging to the associated markers were used to construct haplotypes and to estimate genetic distances. The distance between the two PV cohorts is relatively short, but the distance between the Jewish patients and the Jewish controls is greater compared to the distance between Spanish patients and Spanish controls. In both PV populations, the same microsatellite haplotypes in addition to a common class II haplotype were found, suggesting that both patient populations originated from the same genetic stock and, therefore, share the same ancestral disease gene.

  2. Possibilities for marker-assisted selection in aquaculture breeding schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonesson, A.K.

    2007-01-01

    FAO estimates that there are around 200 species in aquaculture. However, only a few species have ongoing selective breeding programmes. Marker-assisted selection (MAS) is not used in any aquaculture breeding scheme today. The aim of this chapter, therefore, is to review briefly the current status of aquaculture breeding schemes and to evaluate the possibilities for MAS of aquaculture species. Genetic marker maps have been published for some species in culture. The marker density of these maps is, in general, rather low and the maps are composed of many amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers anchored to few microsatellites. Some quantitative trait loci (QTL) have been identified for economically important traits, but they are not yet mapped at a high density. Computer simulations of within-family MAS schemes show a very high increase in genetic gain compared with conventional family-based breeding schemes, mainly due to the large family sizes that are typical for aquaculture breeding schemes. The use of genetic markers to identify individuals and their implications for breeding schemes with control of inbreeding are discussed. (author)

  3. Nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate: Evidence of linkage to a microsatellite marker on 6p23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carinci, F.; Pezzetti, F.; Scapoli, L.; Padula, E.; Baciliero, U.; Curioni, C.; Tognon, M.

    1995-01-01

    Nonsydromic cleft lip with or without secondary clefting of the palate (CL+/{minus}P) is one of the most common birth defects. A previous linkage study concerning CL+/{minus}P and cleft palate (CP) families indicated chromosome 6p, near F13A locus, as a possible region for the presence of a clefting gene. More recently, another linkage study performed on a sample of 12 families with nonsyndromic CL+/{minus}P seemed to exclude this association. To test the hypothesis on the possible presence of a major gene on chromosome 6p, we carried out a study on a large sample (21) of CL+/{minus}P families from northeastern Italy. In conclusion, our investigation can be summarized as follows: (i) CL+/{minus}P disease appears to be heterogeneous; (ii) {approximately}66% of the pedigrees showed an autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance; and (iii) CL+/{minus}P locus maps on 6p23 very close to or at the microsatellite marker D6S89. To verify whether the D6S89 is the closest marker to the CL+/{minus}P locus, additional examinations with new markers are underway. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Molecular characterization of soybean cultivars by microsatellite markers with universal tail sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alexandre Gomes Ribeiro

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to standardize a semiautomated method for genotyping soybean, based on universal tail sequence primers (UTSP, and to compare it with the conventional genotyping method that uses electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels. Thirty soybean cultivars were genotypically characterized by both methods, using 13 microsatellite loci. For the UTSP method, the number of alleles (NA was 50 (2-7 per marker and the polymorphic information content (PIC ranged from 0.40 to 0.74. For the conventional method, the NA was 38 (2-5 per marker and the PIC varied from 0.39 to 0.67. The genetic dissimilarity matrices obtained by the two methods were highly correlated with each other (0.8026, and the formed groups were coherent with the phenotypic data used for varietal registration. The 13 markers allowed the distinction of all analyzed cultivars. The low cost of the UTSP method, associated with its high accuracy, makes it ideal for the characterization of soybean cultivars and for the determination of genetic purity.

  5. Microsatellite markers for the endangered Roanoke logperch, Percina rex (Percidae) and their potential utility for other darter species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, D.J.; Roberts, J.H.; Angermeier, P.L.; Hallerman, E.M.

    2008-01-01

    The Roanoke logperch (Percina rex Jordan and Evermann), an endangered fish, occurs in only six watersheds in the Roanoke and Chowan river drainages of Virginia, USA. The species' population genetic structure is poorly known. We developed 16 microsatellite markers that were reliably scorable and polymorphic P. rex. Markers were also screened in seven other darter species of the genus Percina. Most markers exhibited successful amplification and polymorphism in several species. These markers may therefore prove useful for population genetic studies in other darters, a diverse but highly imperiled group. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  6. Characterization of 35 novel microsatellite DNA markers from the duck (Anas platyrhynchos genome and cross-amplification in other birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Ke

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In order to study duck microsatellites, we constructed a library enriched for (CAn, (CAGn, (GCCn and (TTTCn. A total of 35 pairs of primers from these microsatellites were developed and used to detect polymorphisms in 31 unrelated Peking ducks. Twenty-eight loci were polymorphic and seven loci were monomorphic. A total of 117 alleles were observed from these polymorphic microsatellite markers, which ranged from 2 to 14 with an average of 4.18 per locus. The frequencies of the 117 alleles ranged from 0.02 to 0.98. The highest heterozygosity (0.97 was observed at the CAUD019 microsatellite locus and the lowest heterozygosity (0.04 at the CAUD008 locus, and 11 loci had heterozygosities greater than 0.50 (46.43%. The polymorphism information content (PIC of 28 loci ranged from 0.04 to 0.88 with an average of 0.42. All the above markers were used to screen the polymorphism in other bird species. Two markers produced specific monomorphic products with the chicken DNA. Fourteen markers generated specific fragments with the goose DNA: 5 were polymorphic and 9 were monomorphic. But no specific product was detected with the peacock DNA. Based on sequence comparisons of the flanking sequence and repeat, we conclude that 2 chicken loci and 14 goose loci were true homologous loci of the duck loci. The microsatellite markers identified and characterized in the present study will contribute to the genetic map, quantitative traits mapping, and phylogenetic analysis in the duck and goose.

  7. Development of Genomic Microsatellite Markers in Carthamus tinctorius L. (Safflower) Using Next Generation Sequencing and Assessment of Their Cross-Species Transferability and Utility for Diversity Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambreen, Heena; Kumar, Shivendra; Variath, Murali Tottekkad; Joshi, Gopal; Bali, Sapinder; Agarwal, Manu; Kumar, Amar; Jagannath, Arun; Goel, Shailendra

    2015-01-01

    distinct cluster. The cluster analysis also distinguished diploid and tetraploid wild species of safflower. Next generation sequencing of safflower genome generated a large set of microsatellite markers. The novel markers developed in this study will add to the existing repertoire of markers and can be used for diversity analysis, synteny studies, construction of linkage maps and marker-assisted selection.

  8. Identification of cut-rose (Rosa hybrida) and rootstock varieties using robust Sequence Tagged Microsatellite markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esselink, D.; Smulders, M.J.M.; Vosman, B.

    2003-01-01

    In this study a DNA fingerprinting protocol was developed for the identification of rose varieties based on the variability of microsatellites. Microsatellites were isolated from Rosa hybrida L. using enriched small insert libraries. In total 24 polymorphic sequenced tagged microsatellite site

  9. Development of microsatellite markers by transcriptome sequencing in two species of Amorphophallus (Araceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xingfei; Pan, Cheng; Diao, Ying; You, Yongning; Yang, Chaozhu; Hu, Zhongli

    2013-07-19

    Amorphophallus is a genus of perennial plants widely distributed in the tropics or subtropics of West Africa and South Asia. Its corms contain a high level of water-soluble glucomannan; therefore, it has long been used as a medicinal herb and food source. Genetic studies of Amorphophallus have been hindered by a lack of genetic markers. A large number of molecular markers are required for genetic diversity study and improving disease resistance in Amorphophallus. Here, we report large scale of transcriptome sequencing of two species: Amorphophallus konjac and Amorphophallus bulbifer using deep sequencing technology, and microsatellite (SSR) markers were identified based on these transcriptome sequences. cDNAs of A. konjac and A. bulbifer were sequenced using Illumina HiSeq™ 2000 sequencing technology. A total of 135,822 non-redundant unigenes were assembled from about 9.66 gigabases, and 19,596 SSRs were identified in 16,027 non-redundant unigenes. Di-nucleotide SSRs were the most abundant motif (61.6%), followed by tri- (30.3%), tetra- (5.6%), penta- (1.5%), and hexa-nucleotides (1%) repeats. The top di- and tri-nucleotide repeat motifs included AG/CT (45.2%) and AGG/CCT (7.1%), respectively. A total of 10,754 primer pairs were designed for marker development. Of these, 320 primers were synthesized and used for validation of amplification and assessment of polymorphisms in 25 individual plants. The total of 275 primer pairs yielded PCR amplification products, of which 205 were polymorphic. The number of alleles ranged from 2 to 14 and the polymorphism information content valued ranged from 0.10 to 0.90. Genetic diversity analysis was done using 177 highly polymorphic SSR markers. A phenogram based on Jaccard's similarity coefficients was constructed, which showed a distinct cluster of 25 Amorphophallus individuals. A total of 10,754 SSR markers have been identified in Amorphophallus using transcriptome sequencing. One hundred and seventy-seven polymorphic

  10. Mining online genomic resources in Anolis carolinensis facilitates rapid and inexpensive development of cross-species microsatellite markers for the Anolis lizard genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wordley, Claire; Slate, Jon; Stapley, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    Online sequence databases can provide valuable resources for the development of cross-species genetic markers. In particular, mining expressed tag sequences (EST) for microsatellites and developing conserved cross-species microsatellite markers can provide a rapid and relatively inexpensive method to develop new markers for a range of species. Here, we adopt this approach to develop cross-species microsatellite markers in Anolis lizards, which is a model genus in evolutionary biology and ecology. Using EST sequences from Anolis carolinensis, we identified 127 microsatellites that satisfied our criteria, and tested 49 of these in five species of Anolis (carolinensis, distichus, apletophallus, porcatus and sagrei). We identified between 8 and 25 new variable genetic markers for five Anolis species. These markers will be a valuable resource for studies of population genetics, comparative mapping, mating systems, behavioural ecology and adaptive radiations in this diverse lineage. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Microsatellite markers for the tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum, Serrasalmidae, Characiformes), an economically important keystone species of the Amazon River floodplain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Maria D Conceição F; Hrbek, Tomas; Farias, Izeni P

    2009-05-01

    Colossoma macropomum is a keystone species of the Amazon floodplain, and is an important but severely overexploited commercial species. To provide tools for addressing ecological and conservation questions, we developed 14 highly polymorphic microsatellite markers that had between four and 21 alleles per locus in the 25 tested individuals. With the exception of comparisons involving the locus Cm1F5 that also showed heterozygosity deficiency, no pairs of loci were at linkage disequilibrium. Many of the microsatellite loci were also variable in three other serrasalmid species which span the phylogenetic depth of the Serrasalmidae. © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Polymorphism of Microsatellite markers and ‎Their Association with Egg Production Traits in ‎Iraqi Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israa Luay AL-jaryan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted on local Iraqi chickens and two strains of commercial laying hens (ISA Brawn and Ross Hen as control. To estimate genetic Diversity using microsatellites and their association with egg production traits, three microsatellites markers, located on 1, 5 and E5C10 chromosomes were used in pesent study. A total of 100 varieties of three chicken populations were genotyped for three microsatellite markers by polymerase chain reaction (PCR to evaluate the genetic Diversity (GD among populations using Nei Index similarity mean.  The present study show that local chicken populations were more diverse than control populations. Genetic Diversity among populations was obtained using Nei Index similarity mean. The present results indicate that the Highest GD among local chickens (0.82 and the lowest GD (0.4 and when comper local chickens with control strains found that the highest GD was (0.76 when comper with ISA Brawn, and (0.702 when comper the study population with Ross Hen strain and the lowest GD was (0.673 when comper with ISA Brawn strain, (0.661 when comper the study population with Ross Hen  strain, that’s mean the Three microsatellite genetic markers applied in the present study success to reveal high degree of similarity among the three population used here. The genetic distance revealed that local chickens are mostly related to ISA Brawn strain more than Ross Hen strain

  13. Microsatellite marker development by multiplex ion torrent PGM sequencing: a case study of the endangered Odorrana narina complex of frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igawa, Takeshi; Nozawa, Masafumi; Nagaoka, Mai; Komaki, Shohei; Oumi, Shohei; Fujii, Tamotsu; Sumida, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    The endangered Ryukyu tip-nosed frog Odorrana narina and its related species, Odorrana amamiensis, Odorrana supranarina, and Odorrana utsunomiyaorum, belong to the family Ranidae and are endemically distributed in Okinawa (O. narina), Amami and Tokunoshima (O. amamiensis), and Ishigaki and Iriomote (O. supranarina and O. utsunomiyaorum) Islands. Because of varying distribution patterns, this species complex is an intrinsic model for speciation and adaptation. For effective conservation and molecular ecological studies, further genetic information is needed. For rapid, cost-effective development of several microsatellite markers for these and 2 other species, we used next-generation sequencing technology of Ion Torrent PGM™. Distribution patterns of repeat motifs of microsatellite loci in these modern frog species (Neobatrachia) were similarly skewed. We isolated and characterized 20 new microsatellite loci of O. narina and validated cross-amplification in the three-related species. Seventeen, 16, and 13 loci were cross-amplified in O. amamiensis, O. supranarina, and O. utsunomiyaorum, respectively, reflecting close genetic relationships between them. Mean number of alleles and expected heterozygosity of newly isolated loci varied depending on the size of each inhabited island. Our findings suggested the suitability of Ion Torrent PGM™ for microsatellite marker development. The new markers developed for the O. narina complex will be applicable in conservation genetics and molecular ecological studies. © The American Genetic Association 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Genomic sequencing and microsatellite marker development for Boswellia papyrifera, an economically important but threatened tree native to dry tropical forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addisalem, A B; Esselink, G Danny; Bongers, F; Smulders, M J M

    2015-01-07

    Microsatellite (or simple sequence repeat, SSR) markers are highly informative DNA markers often used in conservation genetic research. Next-generation sequencing enables efficient development of large numbers of SSR markers at lower costs. Boswellia papyrifera is an economically important tree species used for frankincense production, an aromatic resinous gum exudate from bark. It grows in dry tropical forests in Africa and is threatened by a lack of rejuvenation. To help guide conservation efforts for this endangered species, we conducted an analysis of its genomic DNA sequences using Illumina paired-end sequencing. The genome size was estimated at 705 Mb per haploid genome. The reads contained one microsatellite repeat per 5.7 kb. Based on a subset of these repeats, we developed 46 polymorphic SSR markers that amplified 2-12 alleles in 10 genotypes. This set included 30 trinucleotide repeat markers, four tetranucleotide repeat markers, six pentanucleotide markers and six hexanucleotide repeat markers. Several markers were cross-transferable to Boswellia pirrotae and B. popoviana. In addition, retrotransposons were identified, the reads were assembled and several contigs were identified with similarity to genes of the terpene and terpenoid backbone synthesis pathways, which form the major constituents of the bark resin. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company.

  15. Microsatellite markers for the large blue butterflies Maculinea nausithous and Maculinea alcon (Lepidoptera : Lycaenidae) and their amplification in other Maculinea species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeisset, I; Als, Thomas Damm; Settele, J

    2005-01-01

    We developed microsatellite markers for Maculinea nausithous and Maculinea alcon, two of five species of endangered large blue butterflies found in Europe. Two separate microsatellite libraries were constructed. Eleven markers were developed for M. nausithous and one for M. alcon. The primers were...... tested on both species as well as on the three other European Maculinea species. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to 14. These markers will be useful tools for population genetic studies of Maculinea species....

  16. Microsatellite markers for the large blue butterflies Maculinea nausithous and Maculinea alcon (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae) and their amplification in other Maculinea species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeisset, Inga; Damm Als, Thomas; Settele, Josef

    2005-01-01

    We developed microsatellite markers for Maculinea nausithous and Maculinea alcon, two of five species of endangered large blue butterflies found in Europe. Two separate microsatellite libraries were constructed. Eleven markers were developed for M. nausithous and one for M. alcon. The primers were...... tested on both species as well as on the three other European Maculinea species. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to 14. These markers will be useful tools for population genetic studies of Maculinea species....

  17. Use of microsatellite markers in molecular analysis of segregating populations of papaya (Carica papaya L.) derived from backcrossing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, F O; Pereira, M G; Luz, L N; Cardozo, D L; Ramos, H C C; Macedo, C M P

    2013-07-08

    Brazil is the world leader in papaya production. However, only a small number of cultivars are registered for commercial planting, mainly owing to delays in obtaining cultivars and the high costs of the field phase of breeding programs. These costs can be reduced when molecular tools are combined with conventional breeding methods. In the present study, we conducted a molecular analysis of a self-fertilized population of a first backcrossing generation of BC1S1 papaya plants via microsatellite markers both to monitor the level of homozygosity and the gene/allele transfer that confers the Golden trait (fruit color) and to assess the parental genomic proportion in the genotypes studied. Based on the analysis of 20 polymorphic microsatellite loci, 19 genotypes with the Golden trait belonging to BC1S1 were evaluated in addition to the parental genotypes. Genetic distance was estimated through weighted index. The genotypes were then grouped using the hierarchical nearest neighbor method, and the analysis of principal coordinates was used to measure the proportion of parental genomes in the segregating genotypes. The mean value of the inbreeding coefficient was 0.36. The analysis of the principal coordinates revealed that on average, 64% of the recurrent parent genome was present in the population. Together, the analyses allowed the selection of 3 individuals for the next backcross cycle (33BC1S1-18, 34BC1S1-16, and 37BC1S1-10). These individuals had a higher proportion of the recurrent parent and were grouped close to the recurrent parent in the cluster analysis.

  18. [Genetic diversity and kin relationships among wild and cultivated populations of the pejibaye palm (Bactris gasipaes, Palmae) using microsatellite markers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugalde, José Alfredo Hernández; Urpí, Jorge Mora; Nuñez, Oscar Rocha

    2008-03-01

    Genetic diversity and kin relationships among wild and cultivated populations of the pejibaye palm (Bactris gasipaes, Palmae) using microsatellite markers. The genetic diversity of the peach palm (Pejibaye, Bactris gasipaes Kunth) was evaluated using four nuclear DNA microsatellites in an effort to elucidate the evolution and domestication of this crop. A total of 258 samples from seven wild populations and eleven races were analyzed. All loci were polymorphic and a total of 50 alleles were identified. Average genetic diversity (0.67) and genetic differentiation among populations (Fst=0.16) were high when all populations were considered. Genetic differentiation was lower when the populations were grouped according to their origin into Western and Eastern populations (Fst=0.13 for both). Gene flow was slightly higher among Western populations (Nm=1.71) than among Eastern populations (Nm=1.62). The Putumayo, Yurimaguas, Vaupés, Tucurrique and Guatuso races seem to have been subjected to intense human selection. Hybrid populations exist in Azuero, Tuira, Cauca, Vaupés, Puerto Ayacucho and Solimões, probably resulting from exchange and introgressions among sympatric wild and cultivated populations. Genetic distance (Dm) was estimated to determine the degree of relationship among populations using the neighbor-joining method; the wild populations from Maracaibo were used as the outgroup. The populations were divided into three general groups: Maracaibo (B. caribaea, B. macana var veragua and B. macana var arapuey), Eastern Amazon (Tembe, Pará and Acre) and a third group with two subgroups, Western (Azuero, Chontilla, Tuira, Cauca, Tucurrique and Guatuso) and Upper Amazon (B. dahlgreniana, Puerto Ayacucho, Solimões, Vaupés and Putumayo). The genetic relationships strongly support the hypothesis that peach palm was brought into cultivation independently in no less than three areas: the Western Andes (extending into lower Central America); Upper Amazon (extending

  19. Characterization and application of newly developed polymorphic microsatellite markers in the Ezo red fox (Vulpes vulpes schrencki).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, T; Seki, Y; Kameyama, Y; Kikkawa, Y; Wada, K

    2016-12-19

    The Ezo red fox (Vulpes vulpes schrencki), a subspecies endemic to Hokkaido island, Japan, is a known host species for the tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis. To develop tools for molecular ecological studies, we isolated 28 microsatellite regions from the genome of Ezo red fox, and developed 18 polymorphic microsatellite markers. These markers were characterized using 7 individuals and 22 fecal samples of the Ezo red fox. The number of alleles for these markers ranged from 1 to 7, and the observed heterozygosity, estimated on the basis of the genotypes of 7 individuals, ranged from 0.29 to 1.00. All markers, except DvNok5, were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P > 0.05), and no linkage disequilibrium was detected among these loci, except between DvNok14 and DvNok28 (P = 0.01). Moreover, six microsatellite loci were successfully genotyped using feces-derived DNA from the Ezo red fox. The markers developed in our study might serve as a useful tool for molecular ecological studies of the Ezo red fox.

  20. Development and characterization of novel microsatellite markers in Trillium govanianum: a threatened plant species from North-Western Himalaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vikas; Wani, Mohammad Saleem; Singh, Vijay; Kaur, Kuljit; Gupta, Raghbir Chand

    2017-07-01

    Trillium govanianum is a temperate forest understory plant species of high value belonging to the family Melanthiaceae. It is endemic to Himalayan region and facing a bottleneck situation due to reckless extractions from its natural strands. In the present study, 21 microsatellite markers were developed and characterized in 20 accessions of T. govanianum. Collectively, the polymorphic markers amplified 31 alleles in a range of 2-4 with an average of 2.6 alleles per marker. The mean observed heterozygosity (H o ), expected heterozygosity (H e ), and Shannon information index (I) were 0.46, 0.48, and 0.73, respectively. Average polymorphism information content (PIC) was 0.385. The cross-transferability in a related species, namely, Polygonatum verticillatum, showed amplification of ten markers. The newly developed microsatellite markers efficiently distinguished the different accessions on the basis of their geographic origin. Thus, these microsatellites can be useful in exploring genetic diversity in various existing populations of T. govanianum in north-western Himalaya, which may be useful for their conservation, management, and improvement in future.

  1. Origin and genome evolution of polyploid green toads in Central Asia: evidence from microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betto-Colliard, C; Sermier, R; Litvinchuk, S; Perrin, N; Stöck, M

    2015-03-01

    Polyploidization, which is expected to trigger major genomic reorganizations, occurs much less commonly in animals than in plants, possibly because of constraints imposed by sex-determination systems. We investigated the origins and consequences of allopolyploidization in Palearctic green toads (Bufo viridis subgroup) from Central Asia, with three ploidy levels and different modes of genome transmission (sexual versus clonal), to (i) establish a topology for the reticulate phylogeny in a species-rich radiation involving several closely related lineages and (ii) explore processes of genomic reorganization that may follow polyploidization. Sibship analyses based on 30 cross-amplifying microsatellite markers substantiated the maternal origins and revealed the paternal origins and relationships of subgenomes in allopolyploids. Analyses of the synteny of linkage groups identified three markers affected by translocation events, which occurred only within the paternally inherited subgenomes of allopolyploid toads and exclusively affected the linkage group that determines sex in several diploid species of the green toad radiation. Recombination rates did not differ between diploid and polyploid toad species, and were overall much reduced in males, independent of linkage group and ploidy levels. Clonally transmitted subgenomes in allotriploid toads provided support for strong genetic drift, presumably resulting from recombination arrest. The Palearctic green toad radiation seems to offer unique opportunities to investigate the consequences of polyploidization and clonal transmission on the dynamics of genomes in vertebrates.

  2. Demarcation of informative chromosomes in tropical sweet corn inbred lines using microsatellite DNA markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedram Kashiani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of genetic variation among 10 pairs of chromosomes extracted from 13 tropical sweet corn inbred lines, using 99 microsatellite markers, revealed a wide range of genetic diversity. Allelic richness and the number of effective alleles per chromosome ranged from 2.78 to 4.33 and 1.96 to 3.47, respectively, with respective mean values of 3.62 and 2.73. According to the Shannon's information index (I and Nei's gene diversity coefficient (Nei, Chromosome 10 was the most informative chromosome (I = 1.311 and Nei = 0.703, while Chromosome 2 possessed the least (I = 0.762 and Nei = 0.456. Based on linkage disequilibrium (LD measurements for loci less than 50 cM apart on the same chromosome, all loci on Chromosomes 1, 6 and 7 were in equilibrium. Even so, there was a high proportion of genetic variation in Chromosomes 4, 5, 8, 9 and 10, thereby revealing their appropriateness for use in the genetic diversity investigations among tropical sweet corn lines. Chromosome 4, with the highest number of loci in linkage disequilibrium, was considered the best for marker-phenotype association and QTL mapping, followed by Chromosomes 5, 8, 9 and 10.

  3. DNA fingerprinting and diversity analysis in Aus genotypes using microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MD. MONIRUL ISLAM

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available DNA fingerprinting and genetic diversity of 94 Aus (6 BRRI released Aus variety and 88 local Aus landraces genotypes were carried out to protect the Aus landraces from biopiracy. A total of 91 microsatellite markers were tested for screening the genotypes. Among 91 amplified products, 56% have polymorphic bands giving 195 alleles. The number of alleles per locus ranged from four (RM25 and RM147 to twenty seven (RM519, where average allele number was 9.76. The Polymorphism Information Contents (PIC lied between 0.455 (RM5 to 0.934 (RM519. Most robust marker was found RM519 since it provided the highest PIC value (0.934. Pair-wise genetic dissimilarity co-efficient showed the lowest genetic dissimilarity was found BRRI dhan42 and BRRI dhan43 and the highest genetic dissimilarity was found local landraces each other. Here it is shown that most Aus landraces is recognized to have broad genetic base. Thus it is recommended to use these landraces for future breeding program or include new and untouched local landraces to incorporate new genes and broaden genetic base.

  4. Using microsatellite markers to analyze genetic diversity in 14 sheep types in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Vajed Ebrahimi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of genetic relationship among populations has been traditionally based on the analysis of allele frequencies at different loci. The prime objective of this research was to measure the genetic polymorphism of five microsatellite markers (McMA2, BM6444, McMA26, HSC, and OarHH35 and study genetic diversity of 14 sheep types in Iran. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood samples of 565 individuals using an optimized salting-out DNA extraction procedure. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR was successfully performed with the specific primers. Some locus–population combinations were not at Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium (P < 0. 05. The microsatellite analysis revealed high allelic and gene diversity in all 14 breeds. Pakistani and Arabi breeds showed the highest mean number of alleles (11.8 and 11 respectively, while the highest value for polymorphic information content was observed for the Arabi breed (0.88. A UPGMA (unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean dendrogram based on the Nei's standard genetic distance among studied breeds showed a separate cluster for Arabi and Pakistani breeds and another cluster for other breeds. The Shannon index (H0 for McMA2, BM6444, McMA26, HSC, and OarHH35 was 2.31, 2.17, 2.27, 2.04 and 2.18, respectively, and polymorphic information content (PIC values were 0.88, 0.92, 0.87, 0.84, and 0.86 for McMA2, BM6444, McMA26, HSC, and OarHH35, respectively. The high degree of variability demonstrated within the studied sheep types implies that these populations are rich reservoirs of genetic diversity that must be preserved.

  5. Genetic structure of Lutzomyia longipalpis populations in Mato Grosso Do Sul, Brazil, based on microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Mirella F C; Ribolla, Paulo E M; Alonso, Diego P; Andrade-Filho, José D; Casaril, Aline E; Ferreira, Alda M T; Fernandes, Carlos E S; Brazil, Reginaldo P; Oliveira, Alessandra G

    2013-01-01

    Lutzomyialongipalpis (Diptera: Psychodidae) is the major vector of Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum and thus plays a crucial role in the epidemiology of American visceral leishmaniasis (AVL). This vector is the best studied species of sand fly in the Neotropical region. Many studies claim that this vector is in fact a species complex; however there is still no consensus regarding the number of species that belong into this complex or the geographical distribution of sibling species. The aim of the present study was to analyze the genetic relationships within Lu. longipalpis populations in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul (MS), Brazil. We collected 30 Lu. longipalpis (15 females and 15 males) from five localities (Campo Grande, Três Lagoas, Aquidauana, Miranda and Bonito) and 30 Lu. Cruzi from Corumbá, totaling 180 sandflies from MS, and 30 Lu. longipalpis from Estrela de Alagoas, state of Alagoas (AL), Northeast Brazil. We show that eight previously described microsatellite loci were sufficient in distinguishing Lu. longipalpis from Lu. Cruzi, which is a closely related species, and in differentiating between Lu. longipalpis collected in MS versus Estrela de Alagoas. Analyses of the genotypes revealed introgression between sympatric Lu. longipalpis and Lu. Cruzi. Our findings support the hypothesis of cryptic species within the Lu. longipalpis complex. Furthermore, our data revealed introgression between Lu. longipalpis and Lu. cruzi. This phenomenon should be further investigated to determine the level and incidence of hybridization between these two species. We also demonstrated that microsatellite markers are a powerful tool for differentiating sand fly populations and species. The present study has elucidated the population structure of Lu. longipalpis in MS and, by extension, the Neotropical Lu. longipalpis complex itself.

  6. Molecular markers for identifying a new selected variety of Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Zhang, Xiaojun; Liu, Jingwen; Li, Fuhua; Huang, Hao; Li, Yijun; Liu, Xiaolin; Xiang, Jianhai

    2015-01-01

    Selective breeding of the Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei during the last decade has produced new varieties exhibiting high growth rates and disease resistance. However, the identification of new varieties of shrimps from their phenotypic characters is difficult. This study introduces a new approach for identifying varieties of shrimps using molecular markers of microsatellites and mitochondrial control region sequences. The method was employed to identify a new selected variety, Kehai No. 1 (KH-1), from three representative stocks (control group): Zhengda; Tongwei; and a stock collected from Fujian Province, which is now cultured in mainland China. By pooled genotyping of KH-1 and the control group, five microsatellites showing differences between KH-1 and the control group were screened out. Individual genotyping data confirmed the results from pooled genotyping. The genotyping data for the five microsatellites were applied to the assignment analysis of the KH-1 group and the control group using the partial Bayesian assignment method in GENECLASS2. By sequencing the mitochondrial control regions of individuals from the KH-1 and control group, four haplotypes were observed in the KH-1 group, whereas 14 haplotypes were obtained in the control group. By combining the microsatellite assignment analysis with mitochondrial control region analysis, the average accuracy of identification of individuals in the KH-1 group and control group reached 89%. The five selected microsatellite loci and mitochondrial control region sequences were highly polymorphic and could be used to distinguish new selected varieties of L. vannamei from other populations cultured in China.

  7. Development of Seven Microsatellite Markers Using Next Generation Sequencing for the Conservation on the Korean Population of Dorcus hopei (E. Saunders, 1854) (Coleoptera, Lucanidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Tae Hwa; Han, Sang Hoon; Park, Sun Jae

    2015-09-07

    We developed microsatellite markers for genetic structural analyses of Dorcus hopei, a stag beetle species, using next generation sequencing and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based genotyping for regional populations. A total of 407,070,351 base pairs of genomic DNA containing >4000 microsatellite loci except AT repeats were sequenced. From 76 loci selected for primer design, 27 were polymorphic. Of these 27 markers, 10 were tested on three regional populations: two Chinese (Shichuan and Guangxi) and one Korean (Wanju). Three markers were excluded due to inconsistent amplification, genotyping errors, and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE). By multi-locus genotyping, the allele number, observed heterozygosity and polymorphism information content of seven microsatellite loci were ranged 2-10, 0.1333-1.0000, and 0.1228-0.8509, respectively. In an analysis on the genetic differentiation among regional populations including one Japanese population and one cross-breeding population, the individual colored bar-plots showed that both Chinese populations were closer to each other than to the Far East Asian populations. In Far East Asian populations, Wanju and Nirasaki populations could not be distinguished from each other because the frequency of genetic contents was very similar in some individuals of two populations. Moreover, the cross-breeding population contained all patterns of genetic contents shown in Chinese, Korean, and Japanese populations, compared with the genetic content frequency of each regional population. As a result, we examined whether the cross-breeding population might be a hybrid population, and might contain a possibility of interbreeding with Chinese populations in parental generations. Therefore, these markers will be useful for analyses of genetic diversity in populations, genetic relationships between regional populations, genetic structure analyses, and origin tests.

  8. SBMDb: first whole genome putative microsatellite DNA marker database of sugarbeet for bioenergy and industrial applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iquebal, Mir Asif; Jaiswal, Sarika; Angadi, U B; Sablok, Gaurav; Arora, Vasu; Kumar, Sunil; Rai, Anil; Kumar, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    DNA marker plays important role as valuable tools to increase crop productivity by finding plausible answers to genetic variations and linking the Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) of beneficial trait. Prior approaches in development of Short Tandem Repeats (STR) markers were time consuming and inefficient. Recent methods invoking the development of STR markers using whole genomic or transcriptomics data has gained wide importance with immense potential in developing breeding and cultivator improvement approaches. Availability of whole genome sequences and in silico approaches has revolutionized bulk marker discovery. We report world's first sugarbeet whole genome marker discovery having 145 K markers along with 5 K functional domain markers unified in common platform using MySQL, Apache and PHP in SBMDb. Embedded markers and corresponding location information can be selected for desired chromosome, location/interval and primers can be generated using Primer3 core, integrated at backend. Our analyses revealed abundance of 'mono' repeat (76.82%) over 'di' repeats (13.68%). Highest density (671.05 markers/Mb) was found in chromosome 1 and lowest density (341.27 markers/Mb) in chromosome 6. Current investigation of sugarbeet genome marker density has direct implications in increasing mapping marker density. This will enable present linkage map having marker distance of ∼2 cM, i.e. from 200 to 2.6 Kb, thus facilitating QTL/gene mapping. We also report e-PCR-based detection of 2027 polymorphic markers in panel of five genotypes. These markers can be used for DUS test of variety identification and MAS/GAS in variety improvement program. The present database presents wide source of potential markers for developing and implementing new approaches for molecular breeding required to accelerate industrious use of this crop, especially for sugar, health care products, medicines and color dye. Identified markers will also help in improvement of bioenergy trait of

  9. Transferability and utility of white oat (Avena sativa) microsatellite markers for genetic studies in black oat (Avena strigosa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da-Silva, P R; Milach, S C K; Tisian, L M

    2011-11-29

    Preservation and use of wild oat species germplasm are essential for further improvement of cultivated oats. We analyzed the transferability and utility of cultivated (white) oat Avena sativa (AACCDD genome) microsatellite markers for genetic studies of black oat A. strigosa (A(s)A(s) genome) genotypes. The DNA of each black oat genotype was extracted from young leaves and amplified by PCR using 24 microsatellite primers developed from white oat. The PCR products were separated on 3% agarose gel. Eighteen microsatellite primer pairs amplified consistent products and 15 of these were polymorphic in A. strigosa, demonstrating a high degree of transferability. Microsatellite primer pairs AM3, AM4, AM21, AM23, AM30, and AM35 consistently amplified alleles only in A. sativa, which indicates that they are putative loci for either the C or D genomes of Avena. Using the data generated by the 15 polymorphic primer pairs, it was possible to separate 40 genotypes of the 44 that we studied. The four genotypes that could not be separated are probably replicates. We conclude that A. sativa microsatellites have a high transferability index and are a valuable resource for genetic studies and characterization of A. strigosa genotypes.

  10. Association Mapping for Important Agronomic Traits in Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L. Core Collection Using Microsatellite Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heena Ambreen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Carthamus tinctorius L. (safflower is an important oilseed crop producing seed oil rich in unsaturated fatty acids. Scarcity of identified marker-trait associations is a major limitation toward development of successful marker-assisted breeding programs in safflower. In the present study, a safflower panel (CartAP comprising 124 accessions derived from two core collections was assayed for its suitability for association mapping. Genotyping of CartAP using microsatellite markers revealed significant genetic diversity indicated by Shannon information index (H = 0.7537 and Nei's expected heterozygosity (I = 0.4432. In Principal Coordinate Analysis, the CartAP accessions were distributed homogeneously in all quadrants indicating their diverse nature. Distance-based Neighbor Joining analysis did not delineate the CartAP accessions in consonance with their geographical origin. Bayesian analysis of population structure of CartAP demonstrated the unstructured nature of the association panel. Kinship analysis at population (Gij and individual level (Fij revealed absence of or weak relatedness between the CartAP accessions. The above parameters established the suitability of CartAP for association mapping. We performed association mapping using phenotypic data for eight traits of agronomic value (viz., seed oil content, oleic acid, linoleic acid, plant height, number of primary branches, number of capitula per plant, 100-seed weight and days to 50% flowering available for two growing seasons (2011–2012 and 2012–2013 through General Linear Model and Mixed Linear Model. Our study identified ninety-six significant marker-trait associations (MTAs; P < 0.05 of which, several MTAs with correlation coefficient (R2 > 10% were consistently represented in both models and in both seasons for traits viz., oil content, oleic acid content, linoleic acid content and number of primary branches. Several MTAs with high R2-values were detected either in a majority or in

  11. Association Mapping for Important Agronomic Traits in Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) Core Collection Using Microsatellite Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambreen, Heena; Kumar, Shivendra; Kumar, Amar; Agarwal, Manu; Jagannath, Arun; Goel, Shailendra

    2018-01-01

    Carthamus tinctorius L. (safflower) is an important oilseed crop producing seed oil rich in unsaturated fatty acids. Scarcity of identified marker-trait associations is a major limitation toward development of successful marker-assisted breeding programs in safflower. In the present study, a safflower panel (CartAP) comprising 124 accessions derived from two core collections was assayed for its suitability for association mapping. Genotyping of CartAP using microsatellite markers revealed significant genetic diversity indicated by Shannon information index ( H = 0.7537) and Nei's expected heterozygosity ( I = 0.4432). In Principal Coordinate Analysis, the CartAP accessions were distributed homogeneously in all quadrants indicating their diverse nature. Distance-based Neighbor Joining analysis did not delineate the CartAP accessions in consonance with their geographical origin. Bayesian analysis of population structure of CartAP demonstrated the unstructured nature of the association panel. Kinship analysis at population ( G ij ) and individual level ( F ij ) revealed absence of or weak relatedness between the CartAP accessions. The above parameters established the suitability of CartAP for association mapping. We performed association mapping using phenotypic data for eight traits of agronomic value ( viz ., seed oil content, oleic acid, linoleic acid, plant height, number of primary branches, number of capitula per plant, 100-seed weight and days to 50% flowering) available for two growing seasons (2011-2012 and 2012-2013) through General Linear Model and Mixed Linear Model. Our study identified ninety-six significant marker-trait associations (MTAs; P 10% were consistently represented in both models and in both seasons for traits viz ., oil content, oleic acid content, linoleic acid content and number of primary branches. Several MTAs with high R 2 -values were detected either in a majority or in some environments (models and/or seasons). Many MTAs were also

  12. Development of microsatellite markers and their correlation with morphological and chemical markers in Withania somnifera (L. Dunal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Punit Kumar Khanna

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The genetic variation and relationships among 14 Withania accessions were evaluated using morphological, chemical and Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR markers. Wild accessions are more robust and better performing in morphological and chemical metabolite accumulation than cultivated one. The results revealed that out of fourteen, four primers showed distinct polymorphism, indicating the robust nature of microsatellites in revealing polymorphism. The banding pattern was recorded in the form of 0-1 data sheet which was analyzed using unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA based on Jaccard's similarity coefficient. The cluster analysis showed higher level of genetic variation among the accessions. Similarity coefficients ranged from 0.125 to 1. The dendrogram revealed 3 major distinct clusters. Higher range of similarity values for related genotypes using simple sequence repeats (SSR provides greater confidence for the assessment of genetic diversity and relationships. The polymorphism information content (PIC value for the SSR loci ranged from 0.0 to 0.40. Higher PIC values were associated with higher level of polymorphism. Results of this study showed a high degree of variation among analyzed accessions, indicating an important source of genetic diversity that can be used in future breeding programs.

  13. Selection theory for marker-assisted backcrossing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, Matthias; Melchinger, Albrecht E

    2005-06-01

    Marker-assisted backcrossing is routinely applied in breeding programs for gene introgression. While selection theory is the most important tool for the design of breeding programs for improvement of quantitative characters, no general selection theory is available for marker-assisted backcrossing. In this treatise, we develop a theory for marker-assisted selection for the proportion of the genome originating from the recurrent parent in a backcross program, carried out after preselection for the target gene(s). Our objectives were to (i) predict response to selection and (ii) give criteria for selecting the most promising backcross individuals for further backcrossing or selfing. Prediction of response to selection is based on the marker linkage map and the marker genotype of the parent(s) of the backcross population. In comparison to standard normal distribution selection theory, the main advantage of our approach is that it considers the reduction of the variance in the donor genome proportion due to selection. The developed selection criteria take into account the marker genotype of the candidates and consider whether these will be used for selfing or backcrossing. Prediction of response to selection is illustrated for model genomes of maize and sugar beet. Selection of promising individuals is illustrated with experimental data from sugar beet. The presented approach can assist geneticists and breeders in the efficient design of gene introgression programs.

  14. Assessment of genetic diversity among Indian potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) collection using microsatellite and retrotransposon based marker systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vishakha; Nandineni, Madhusudan R

    2014-04-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum) is an important non-cereal crop throughout the world and is highly recommended for ensuring global food security. Owing to the complexities in genetics and inheritance pattern of potato, the conventional method of cross breeding for developing improved varieties has been difficult. Identification and tagging of desirable traits with informative molecular markers would aid in the development of improved varieties. Insertional polymorphism of copia-like and gypsy-like long terminal repeat retrotransposons (RTN) were investigated among 47 potato varieties from India using Inter-Retrotransposon Amplified Polymorphism (IRAP) and Retrotransposon Microsatellite Amplified Polymorphism (REMAP) marker techniques and were compared with the DNA profiles obtained with simple sequence repeats (SSRs). The genetic polymorphism, efficiency of polymorphism and effectiveness of marker systems were evaluated to assess the extent of genetic diversity among Indian potato varieties. A total of 139 polymorphic SSR alleles, 270 IRAP and 98 REMAP polymorphic bands, showing polymorphism of 100%, 87.9% and 68.5%, respectively, were used for detailed characterization of the genetic relationships among potato varieties by using cluster analysis and principal coordinate analysis (PCoA). IRAP analysis resulted in the highest number of polymorphic bands with an average of 15 polymorphic bands per assay unit when compared to the other two marker systems. Based on pair-wise comparison, the genetic similarity was calculated using Dice similarity coefficient. The SSRs showed a wide range in genetic similarity values (0.485-0.971) as compared to IRAP (0.69-0.911) and REMAP (0.713-0.947). A Mantel's matrix correspondence test showed a high positive correlation (r=0.6) between IRAP and REMAP, an intermediate value (r=0.58) for IRAP and SSR and the lowest value (r=0.17) for SSR and REMAP. Statistically significant cophenetic correlation coefficient values, of 0.961, 0.941 and 0

  15. A method for genotyping elite breeding stocks of leaf chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) by assaying mapped microsatellite marker loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghedina, Andrea; Galla, Giulio; Cadalen, Thierry; Hilbert, Jean-Louis; Caenazzo, Silvano Tiozzo; Barcaccia, Gianni

    2015-12-30

    Leaf chicory (Cichorium intybus subsp. intybus var. foliosum L.) is a diploid plant species (2n = 18) of the Asteraceae family. The term "chicory" specifies at least two types of cultivated plants: a leafy vegetable, which is highly differentiated with respect to several cultural types, and a root crop, whose current industrial utilization primarily addresses the extraction of inulin or the production of a coffee substitute. The populations grown are generally represented by local varieties (i.e., landraces) with high variation and adaptation to the natural and anthropological environment where they originated, and have been yearly selected and multiplied by farmers. Currently, molecular genetics and biotechnology are widely utilized in marker-assisted breeding programs in this species. In particular, molecular markers are becoming essential tools for developing parental lines with traits of interest and for assessing the specific combining ability of these lines to breed F1 hybrids. The present research deals with the implementation of an efficient method for genotyping elite breeding stocks developed from old landraces of leaf chicory, Radicchio of Chioggia, which are locally dominant in the Veneto region, using 27 microsatellite (SSR) marker loci scattered throughout the linkage groups. Information on the genetic diversity across molecular markers and plant accessions was successfully assessed along with descriptive statistics over all marker loci and inbred lines. Our overall data support an efficient method for assessing a multi-locus genotype of plant individuals and lineages that is useful for the selection of new varieties and the certification of local products derived from Radicchio of Chioggia. This method proved to be useful for assessing the observed degree of homozygosity of the inbred lines as a measure of their genetic stability; plus it allowed an estimate of the specific combining ability (SCA) between maternal and paternal inbred lines on the

  16. Characterization of 12 Novel Microsatellite Markers of Sogatella furcifera (Hemiptera: Delphacidae) Identified From Next-Generation Sequence Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Hwa Yeun; Coates, Brad; Kim, Kyung Seok; Park, Marana; Lee, Joon-Ho

    2015-01-01

    The white-backed planthopper, Sogatella furcifera (Horváth) (Hemiptera: Delphacidae), is a major pest of rice and has long-range migratory behavior in Asia. Microsatellite markers (simple sequence repeats) have been widely used to determine the origins and genetic diversity of insect pests. We identified novel microsatellite loci for S. furcifera samples collected from Laos, Vietnam, and three localities in Bangladesh from next-generation Roche 454 pyrosequencing data. Size polymorphism at 12 microsatellite loci was verified for 40 adult individuals collected from Shinan, South Korea. The average number of alleles per locus was 7.92. The mean values of observed (H(o)) and expected heterozygosities (H(E)) were 0.615 and 0.757, respectively. These new microsatellite markers will be a resource for future ecological genetic studies of S. furcifera samples across more broad geographic regions in Asia and may assist in estimations of genetic differentiation and gene flow among populations for implementation of more effective management strategies to control this serious rice pest. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  17. Genetic architecture and bottleneck analyses of Salem Black goat breed based on microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Thiruvenkadan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was undertaken in Salem Black goat population for genetic analysis at molecular level to exploit the breed for planning sustainable improvement, conservation and utilization, which subsequently can improve the livelihood of its stakeholders. Materials and Methods: Genomic DNA was isolated from blood samples of 50 unrelated Salem Black goats with typical phenotypic features in several villages in the breeding tract and the genetic characterization and bottleneck analysis in Salem Black goat was done using 25 microsatellite markers as recommended by the Food and Agricultural Organization, Rome, Italy. The basic measures of genetic variation were computed using bioinformatic software. To evaluate the Salem Black goats for mutation drift equilibrium, three tests were performed under three different mutation models, viz., infinite allele model (IAM, stepwise mutation model (SMM and two-phase model (TPM and the observed gene diversity (He and expected equilibrium gene diversity (Heq were estimated under different models of microsatellite evolution. Results: The study revealed that the observed number of alleles ranged from 4 (ETH10, ILSTS008 to 17 (BM64444 with a total of 213 alleles and mean of 10.14±0.83 alleles across loci. The overall observed heterozygosity, expected heterozygosity, inbreeding estimate and polymorphism information content values were 0.631±0.041, 0.820±0.024, 0.233±0.044 and 0.786±0.023 respectively indicating high genetic diversity. The average observed gene diversities (He pooled over different markers was 0.829±0.024 and the average expected gene diversities under IAM, TPM and SMM models were 0.769±0.026, 0.808±0.024 and 0.837±0.020 respectively. The number of loci found to exhibit gene diversity excess under IAM, TPM and SMM models were 18, 17 and 12 respectively. Conclusion: All the three statistical tests, viz., sign test, standardized differences test and Wilcoxon sign rank test, revealed

  18. Genetic Divergence in Domestic Japanese Quail Inferred from Mitochondrial DNA D-Loop and Microsatellite Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunome, Mitsuo; Nakano, Mikiharu; Tadano, Ryo; Kawahara-Miki, Ryoka; Kono, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Shinji; Kawashima, Takaharu; Fujiwara, Akira; Nirasawa, Keijiro; Mizutani, Makoto; Matsuda, Yoichi

    2017-01-01

    To assess the genetic diversity of domestic Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) populations, and their genetic relationships, we examined mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D-loop sequences and microsatellite markers for 19 Japanese quail populations. The populations included nine laboratory lines established in Japan (LWC, Quv, RWN, WE, AWE, AMRP, rb-TKP, NIES-L, and W), six meat-type quail lines reimported from Western countries (JD, JW, Estonia, NIES-Br, NIES-Fr, and NIES-Hn), one commercial population in Japan, and three wild quail populations collected from three Asian areas. The phylogenetic tree of mtDNA D-loop sequences revealed two distinct haplotype groups, Dloop-Group1 and Dloop-Group2. Dloop-Group1 included a dominant haplotype representing most of the quail populations, including wild quail. Dloop-Group2 was composed of minor haplotypes found in several laboratory lines, two meat-type lines, and a few individuals in commercial and wild quail populations. Taking the breeding histories of domestic populations into consideration, these results suggest that domestic quail populations may have derived from two sources, i.e., domestic populations established before and after World War II in Japan. A discriminant analysis of principal components and a Bayesian clustering analysis with microsatellite markers indicated that the domestic populations are clustered into four genetic groups. The two major groups were Microsat-Group1, which contained WE, and four WE-derived laboratory lines (LWC, Quv, RWN, and AWE), and Microsat-Group2 consisting of NIES-L, JD, JW, Estonia, NIES-Br, NIES-Fr, NIES-Hn, W, and commercial and wild populations. The remaining two lines (AMRP and rb-TKP) were each clustered into a separate clade. This hierarchical genetic difference between domestic quail populations is attributed to the genetic background derived from two different genetic sources-the pre-war and post-war populations-which is well supported by their breeding histories.

  19. Paternity assignment in the polyploid Acipenser dabryanus based on a novel microsatellite marker system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya Liu

    Full Text Available Acipenser dabryanus is listed as a Critical Endangered species in the IUCN Red List and the first class protected animals in China. Fortunately, A. dabryanus specimens are being successfully bred in captivity for conservation. However, for effective ex situ conservation, we should be aware of the genetic diversity and the degree of relatedness of the individuals selected for breeding. In this study, we aimed at the development of novel and reliable microsatellites used for the genetic study of A. dabryanus. A total of 14,321 simple sequence repeats (SSRs were detected by transcriptome sequencing and screening. We selected 20 novel and polymorphic microsatellites (non-dinucleotide with good repeatability from the 100 tested loci for a subsequent genetic and paternity study. A set of captive broodstock (F1 stock, n = 43 and their offspring (F2 stock, n = 96 were used to examine the efficiency of the 20 SSRs for assigning parentage to offspring, with an allocation success of 91.7%. We also found that only a few families predominantly contributed to the progeny produced by the 43 breeders. In addition, mitochondrial DNA data showed that the captive broodstock (F1 individuals had an excellent probability of the same lineage, implying that a high level of inbreeding may have occurred in these individuals. Our research provides useful information on genetic diversity and reproductive pattern of A. dabryanus, and the 20 SSRs developed in this study can be applied to the future breeding program to avoid inbreeding for this stock or other related species of Acipenseriformes.

  20. Paternity assignment in the polyploid Acipenser dabryanus based on a novel microsatellite marker system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ya; Chen, Yeyu; Gong, Quan; Lai, Jiansheng; Du, Jun; Deng, Xiaochuan

    2017-01-01

    Acipenser dabryanus is listed as a Critical Endangered species in the IUCN Red List and the first class protected animals in China. Fortunately, A. dabryanus specimens are being successfully bred in captivity for conservation. However, for effective ex situ conservation, we should be aware of the genetic diversity and the degree of relatedness of the individuals selected for breeding. In this study, we aimed at the development of novel and reliable microsatellites used for the genetic study of A. dabryanus. A total of 14,321 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were detected by transcriptome sequencing and screening. We selected 20 novel and polymorphic microsatellites (non-dinucleotide) with good repeatability from the 100 tested loci for a subsequent genetic and paternity study. A set of captive broodstock (F1 stock, n = 43) and their offspring (F2 stock, n = 96) were used to examine the efficiency of the 20 SSRs for assigning parentage to offspring, with an allocation success of 91.7%. We also found that only a few families predominantly contributed to the progeny produced by the 43 breeders. In addition, mitochondrial DNA data showed that the captive broodstock (F1 individuals) had an excellent probability of the same lineage, implying that a high level of inbreeding may have occurred in these individuals. Our research provides useful information on genetic diversity and reproductive pattern of A. dabryanus, and the 20 SSRs developed in this study can be applied to the future breeding program to avoid inbreeding for this stock or other related species of Acipenseriformes.

  1. Microsatellite markers forNuphar japonica(Nymphaeaceae), an aquatic plant in the agricultural ecosystem of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Sonoko; Shiga, Takashi; Isagi, Yuji

    2016-12-01

    Nuphar species (Nymphaeaceae) are representative aquatic plants in irrigation ponds in Japanese agricultural ecosystems. We developed 15 polymorphic microsatellite markers for N. japonica and confirmed their utility for its close relatives N. oguraensis var. akiensis and N . × saijoensis , which originated from natural hybridization between N. japonica and N. oguraensis . Genetic variation was characterized in 15 polymorphic loci in three populations of N. japonica . The average number of alleles per locus was 3.47 (range = 2-9; n = 32), and the average expected heterozygosity per locus was 0.84 (range = 0.5-1.0); 11 loci were amplified in N. oguraensis var. akiensis and 15 in N . × saijoensis . The polymorphic microsatellite markers developed in this study will be useful for investigating the levels of genetic diversity within remnant populations of Nuphar taxa and could provide a valuable tool for conservation genetics of these taxa.

  2. Prediction of maize double-cross hybrids using the best linear unbiased prediction with microsatellite marker information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestre, M; Von Pinho, R G; Souza, J C

    2011-01-11

    We examined the usefulness of the best linear unbiased prediction associated with molecular markers for prediction of untested maize double-cross hybrids. Ten single-cross hybrids from different commercial backgrounds were crossed using a complete diallel design. These 10 single-cross hybrids were genotyped with 20 microsatellite markers. The best linear unbiased prediction associated with microsatellite information gave relatively good prediction ability of the double-cross hybrid performance, with correlations between observed phenotypic values and genotypic prediction values varying from 0.27 to 0.54. Taking into account the predictions of specific combing ability, the correlation between observed and predicted specific combining ability varied from 0.50 to 0.88. Based on these results, we infer that it is feasible to predict maize double-cross hybrids with different unbalance degrees without including any prior information about parental inbreed lines or single-cross hybrid performance.

  3. Efficient development of highly polymorphic microsatellite markers based on polymorphic repeats in transcriptome sequences of multiple individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukosavljev, M; Esselink, G D; van 't Westende, W P C; Cox, P; Visser, R G F; Arens, P; Smulders, M J M

    2015-01-01

    The first hurdle in developing microsatellite markers, cloning, has been overcome by next-generation sequencing. The second hurdle is testing to differentiate polymorphic from nonpolymorphic loci. The third hurdle, somewhat hidden, is that only polymorphic markers with a large effective number of alleles are sufficiently informative to be deployed in multiple studies. Both steps are laborious and still performed manually. We have developed a strategy in which we first screen reads from multiple genotypes for repeats that show the most length variants, and only these are subsequently developed into markers. We validated our strategy in tetraploid garden rose using Illumina paired-end transcriptome sequences of 11 roses. Of 48 tested two markers failed to amplify, but all others were polymorphic. Ten loci amplified more than one locus, indicating duplicated genes or gene families. Completely avoiding duplicated loci will be difficult because the range of numbers of predicted alleles of highly polymorphic single- and multilocus markers largely overlapped. Of the remainder, half were replicate markers (i.e. multiple primer pairs for one locus), indicating the difficulty of correctly filtering short reads containing repeat sequences. We subsequently refined the approach to eliminate multiple primer sets to the same loci. The remaining 18 markers were all highly polymorphic, amplifying on average 11.7 alleles per marker (range = 6-20) in 11 tetraploid roses, exceeding the 8.2 alleles per marker of the 24 most polymorphic markers genotyped previously. This strategy therefore represents a major step forward in the development of highly polymorphic microsatellite markers. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Development of microsatellite markers for Hyacinth macaw (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus) and their cross-amplification in other parrot species

    OpenAIRE

    da Silva, Helder E.; Presti, Flavia T.; Wasko, Adriane P.; Pinhal, Danillo

    2015-01-01

    Background Hyacinth macaw Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus is the largest parrot of the world and is considered vulnerable to extinction due to its habitat loss and illegal trade associated to the international pet market demand. Genetic studies on this species are still incipient to generate a consistent characterization of the population dynamics and to develop appropriate conservation strategies. In this sense, microsatellite markers may support the detection of a population genetic structure fo...

  5. Comparative genomic analysis reveals species-dependent complexities that explain difficulties with microsatellite marker development in molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, C E; Allcock, A L; Johnson, M P; Bailie, D A; Prodöhl, P A

    2011-01-01

    Reliable population DNA molecular markers are difficult to develop for molluscs, the reasons for which are largely unknown. Identical protocols for microsatellite marker development were implemented in three gastropods. Success rates were lower for Gibbula cineraria compared to Littorina littorea and L. saxatilis. Comparative genomic analysis of 47.2 kb of microsatellite containing sequences (MCS) revealed a high incidence of cryptic repetitive DNA in their flanking regions. The majority of these were novel, and could be grouped into DNA families based upon sequence similarities. Significant inter-specific variation in abundance of cryptic repetitive DNA and DNA families was observed. Repbase scans show that a large proportion of cryptic repetitive DNA was identified as transposable elements (TEs). We argue that a large number of TEs and their transpositional activity may be linked to differential rates of DNA multiplication and recombination. This is likely to be an important factor explaining inter-specific variation in genome stability and hence microsatellite marker development success rates. Gastropods also differed significantly in the type of TEs classes (autonomous vs non-autonomous) observed. We propose that dissimilar transpositional mechanisms differentiate the TE classes in terms of their propensity for transposition, fixation and/or silencing. Consequently, the phylogenetic conservation of non-autonomous TEs, such as CvA, suggests that dispersal of these elements may have behaved as microsatellite-inducing elements. Results seem to indicate that, compared to autonomous, non-autonomous TEs maybe have a more active role in genome rearrangement processes. The implications of the findings for genomic rearrangement, stability and marker development are discussed.

  6. Evaluation of Pulasan (Nephelium ramboutan-ake Genetic Diversity in Bogor, West Java, Using Microsatellite Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Luisyane Puhili

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Pulasan (Nephelium ramboutan-ake (Labill. Leenh fruit is highly similar to rambutan rapiah (Nephelium lappaceum fruit with ovate shape, sweet and sour fresh taste, but it has a thick rind. The diversity of pulasan is little informed including in Bogor. The objective of this study was to analyze the genetic diversity of pulasan from Bogor revealed by microsatellite marker. The DNA of 63 individuals from 10 populations of pulasan were extracted using CTAB method and amplified using two primer sets, LMLY6 (GA9(CA2(GA4 dan LMLY12 (CT11. DNA amplification product was visualized and arranged in a matrix of binary data then analyzed the value of the number of different alleles (Na, the number of effective alleles (Ne, Shannon information index (I, heterozygosity (He, and the percentage of polymorphism (PLP. The results of the analysis showed the highest genetic diversity was found in North Bogor (He=0.313. The genetic diversity within a population (61% was higher than that among populations (39%. A dendrogram was constructed using the Unweighted Pair Group Method with arithmetic Mean (UPGMA. The similarity index ranged from 52 to 100% that means there are close relationships among individuals. Cluster analyses grouped some individuals originated from different locations in the same group. The levels of heterozygosity within a population was determined by the history of each individual in a population.

  7. Genetic diversity of turmeric germplasm (Curcuma longa; Zingiberaceae) identified by microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigrist, M S; Pinheiro, J B; Filho, J A Azevedo; Zucchi, M I

    2011-03-09

    Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is a triploid, vegetatively propagated crop introduced early during the colonization of Brazil. Turmeric rhizomes are ground into a powder used as a natural dye in the food industry, although recent research suggests a greater potential for the development of drugs and cosmetics. In Brazil, little is known about the genetic variability available for crop improvement. We examined the genetic diversity among turmeric accessions from a Brazilian germplasm collection comprising 39 accessions collected from the States of Goiás, Mato Grosso do Sul, Minas Gerais, São Paulo, and Pará. For comparison, 18 additional genotypes were analyzed, including samples from India and Puerto Rico. Total DNA was extracted from lyophilized leaf tissue and genetic analysis was performed using 17 microsatellite markers (single-sequence repeats). Shannon-Weiner indexes ranged from 0.017 (Minas Gerais) to 0.316 (São Paulo). Analyses of molecular variance (AMOVA) demonstrated major differences between countries (63.4%) and that most of the genetic diversity in Brazil is found within states (75.3%). Genotypes from São Paulo State were the most divergent and potentially useful for crop improvement. Structure analysis indicated two main groups of accessions. These results can help target future collecting efforts for introduction of new materials needed to develop more productive and better adapted cultivars.

  8. High genetic diversity and connectivity in Colossoma macropomum in the Amazon basin revealed by microsatellite markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazzi-Gomes, Paola; Guerreiro, Sávio; Palheta, Glauber David Almeida; de Melo, Nuno Filipe Alves Correa; Santos, Sidney; Hamoy, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Colossoma macropomum is the second largest scaled fish of the Amazon. It is economically important for commercial fisheries and for aquaculture, but few studies have examined the diversity and genetic structure of natural populations of this species. The aim of this study was to investigate the levels of genetic variability and connectivity that exist between three natural populations of C. macropomum from the Amazon basin. In total, 247 samples were collected from the municipalities of Tefé, Manaus, and Santarém. The populations were genotyped using a panel of 12 multiplex microsatellite markers. The genetic diversity found in these populations was high and similar to other populations described in the literature. These populations showed a pattern of high gene flow associated with the lack of a genetic structure pattern, indicating that the number of migrants per generation and recent migration rates are high. The values of the FST, RST, and exact test of differentiation were not significant for pairwise comparisons between populations. The Bayesian population clustering analysis indicated a single population. Thus, the data provide evidence for high genetic diversity and high gene flow among C. macropomum populations in the investigated region of the Amazon basin. This information is important for programs aiming at the conservation of natural populations. PMID:28170026

  9. Retrotransposon Microsatellite Amplified Polymorphism Strain Fingerprinting Markers Applicable to Various Mushroom Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Quy Vang; Won, Hyo-Kyung; Lee, Tae-Soo; Lee, Chang-Yun; Lee, Hyun-Sook

    2008-01-01

    The retrotransposon marY1 is a gypsy family retroelement, which is detected ubiquitously within the fungal taxonomic groups in which mushrooms are included. To utilize marY1 as a molecular marker for the DNA fingerprinting of mushrooms, oligonucleotides marY1-LTR-L and marY1-LTR-R were designed on the basis of highly conserved regions from the multiple sequence alignment of 30 marY1 sequences retrieved from a nucleotide sequence database. In accordance with Retrotransposon Microsatellite Amplified Polymorphism (REMAP) fingerprinting methodology, the two oligonucleotides were utilized together with the short sequence repeat primers UBC807 and UBC818 for polymerase chain reaction using templates from different mushroom genomic DNAs. Among the tested oligonucleotides, the marY1-LTR-L and UBC807 primer set yielded the greatest amount of abundance and variation in terms of DNA band numbers and patterns. This method was successfully applied to 10 mushroom species, and the primer set successfully discriminated between different commercial mushroom cultivars of the same strains of 14 Pleurotus ostreatus and 16 P. eryngii. REMAP reproducibility was superior to other popular DNA fingerprinting methodologies including the random amplified polymorphic DNA method. PMID:23997618

  10. Understanding the genetic diversity and population structure of yam (Dioscorea alata L.) using microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnau, Gemma; Bhattacharjee, Ranjana; Mn, Sheela; Chair, Hana; Malapa, Roger; Lebot, Vincent; K, Abraham; Perrier, Xavier; Petro, Dalila; Penet, Laurent; Pavis, Claudie

    2017-01-01

    Yams (Dioscorea sp.) are staple food crops for millions of people in tropical and subtropical regions. Dioscorea alata, also known as greater yam, is one of the major cultivated species and most widely distributed throughout the tropics. Despite its economic and cultural importance, very little is known about its origin, diversity and genetics. As a consequence, breeding efforts for resistance to its main disease, anthracnose, have been fairly limited. The objective of this study was to contribute to the understanding of D. alata genetic diversity by genotyping 384 accessions from different geographical regions (South Pacific, Asia, Africa and the Caribbean), using 24 microsatellite markers. Diversity structuration was assessed via Principal Coordinate Analysis, UPGMA analysis and the Bayesian approach implemented in STRUCTURE. Our results revealed the existence of a wide genetic diversity and a significant structuring associated with geographic origin, ploidy levels and morpho-agronomic characteristics. Seventeen major groups of genetically close cultivars have been identified, including eleven groups of diploid cultivars, four groups of triploids and two groups of tetraploids. STRUCTURE revealed the existence of six populations in the diploid genetic pool and a few admixed cultivars. These results will be very useful for rationalizing D. alata genetic resources in breeding programs across different regions and for improving germplasm conservation methods.

  11. High genetic diversity and connectivity in Colossoma macropomum in the Amazon basin revealed by microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazzi-Gomes, Paola; Guerreiro, Sávio; Palheta, Glauber David Almeida; Melo, Nuno Filipe Alves Correa de; Santos, Sidney; Hamoy, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Colossoma macropomum is the second largest scaled fish of the Amazon. It is economically important for commercial fisheries and for aquaculture, but few studies have examined the diversity and genetic structure of natural populations of this species. The aim of this study was to investigate the levels of genetic variability and connectivity that exist between three natural populations of C. macropomum from the Amazon basin. In total, 247 samples were collected from the municipalities of Tefé, Manaus, and Santarém. The populations were genotyped using a panel of 12 multiplex microsatellite markers. The genetic diversity found in these populations was high and similar to other populations described in the literature. These populations showed a pattern of high gene flow associated with the lack of a genetic structure pattern, indicating that the number of migrants per generation and recent migration rates are high. The values of the FST, RST, and exact test of differentiation were not significant for pairwise comparisons between populations. The Bayesian population clustering analysis indicated a single population. Thus, the data provide evidence for high genetic diversity and high gene flow among C. macropomum populations in the investigated region of the Amazon basin. This information is important for programs aiming at the conservation of natural populations.

  12. New microsatellite markers for multi-scale genetic studies on Phlebotomus ariasi Tonnoir, vector of Leishmania infantum in the Mediterranean area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudhomme, Jorian; Toty, Céline; Kasap, Ozge Erisoz; Rahola, Nil; Vergnes, Baptiste; Maia, Carla; Campino, Lenea; Antoniou, Maria; Jimenez, Maribel; Molina, Ricardo; Cannet, Arnaud; Alten, Bulent; Sereno, Denis; Bañuls, Anne-Laure

    2015-02-01

    The population structure of Phlebotomus ariasi, a proven vector of Leishmania infantum in the Mediterranean area, is still poorly understood. Previously, only two microsatellite loci had been developed to study the population genetics of this species. Herein we use these loci and determined fourteen novel microsatellite loci, useful for the characterization of P. ariasi populations. These loci were tested on three populations of P. ariasi, two from France and one from Portugal. In addition, the usefulness of these markers was also evaluated on seven other sandfly species. We show, that for P. ariasi, 15 of the 16 loci selected were polymorphic, with a mean of 4.25 alleles and an observed heterozygosity of 0.299. Within the P. ariasi population of France, 11 loci were polymorphic, with an average of 2.44 alleles and an observed heterozygosity of 0.2177. The fixation index was moderate among the French populations but high between French and Portuguese populations. In addition, eight loci were also found to be amplifiable in six other Phlebotomus species. These results demonstrate the usefulness of this new set of microsatellite loci for population structure and molecular ecology studies of P. ariasi at various spatial scales, but also of other sandfly species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Genetic Evaluation of Natural Populations of the Endangered Conifer Thuja koraiensis Using Microsatellite Markers by Restriction-Associated DNA Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Hou

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Thuja koraiensis Nakai is an endangered conifer of high economic and ecological value in Jilin Province, China. However, studies on its population structure and conservation genetics have been limited by the lack of genomic data. Here, 37,761 microsatellites (simple sequence repeat, SSR were detected based on 875,792 de novo-assembled contigs using a restriction-associated DNA (RAD approach. Among these SSRs, 300 were randomly selected to test for polymorphisms and 96 obtained loci were able to amplify a fragment of expected size. Twelve polymorphic SSR markers were developed to analyze the genetic diversity and population structure of three natural populations. High genetic diversity (mean NA = 5.481, HE = 0.548 and moderate population differentiation (pairwise Fst = 0.048–0.078, Nm = 2.940–4.958 were found in this species. Molecular variance analysis suggested that most of the variation (83% existed within populations. Combining the results of STRUCTURE, principal coordinate, and neighbor-joining analysis, the 232 individuals were divided into three genetic clusters that generally correlated with their geographical distributions. Finally, appropriate conservation strategies were proposed to protect this species. This study provides genetic information for the natural resource conservation and utilization of T. koraiensis and will facilitate further studies of the evolution and phylogeography of the species.

  14. GENETIC DIVERSITY OF SOME IRANIAN SWEET CHERRY (PRUNUS AVIUM) CULTIVARS USING MICROSATELLITE MARKERS AND MORPHOLOGICAL TRAITS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsad, A; Esna-Ashari, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize 23 important Iranian sweet cherry (Prunus avium) cultivars collected from different provinces of Iran and 1 foreign cultivar, which was used as control, considered for breeding programs by using 21 microsatellite markers and 27 morphological traits. In sweet cherry (Prunus avium) accessions, leaf, fruit, and stone morphological characters were evaluated during two consecutive years. The study revealed a high variability in the set of evaluated sweet cherry accessions. The majority of important correlations were determined among variables representing fruit and leaf size and variables related to color. Cluster analysis distinguished sweet cherry accessions into two distinct groups. Principal component analysis (PCA) of qualitative and quantitative morphological parameters explained over 86.59% of total variability in the first seven axes. In PCA, leaf traits such as leaf length and width, and fruit traits such as length, width, and weight, and fruit flesh and juice color were predominant in the first two components, indicating that they were useful for the assessment of sweet cherry germplasm characterization. Out of 21 SSR markers, 16 were polymorphic, producing 177 alleles that varied from 4 to 16 alleles (9.35 on average) with a mean heterozygosity value of 0.82 that produced successful amplifications and revealed DNA polymorphisms. Allele size varied from 95 to 290 bp. Cluster analyses showed that the studied sweet cherry genotypes were classified intofive main groups based mainly on their species characteristics and SSR data. In general, our results did not show a clear structuring of genetic variability within the Iranian diffusion area of sweet cherry, so it was not possible to draw any indications on regions of provenance delimitation. The results of this study contribute to a better understanding of sweet cherry genetic variations in Iran, thus making for more efficient programs aimed at preserving biodiversity and

  15. Development of microsatellite markers to genetically differentiate populations of Octopus minor from Korea and China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jung-Ha; Kim, Yi-Kyung; Park, Jung-Youn; An, Chel-Min; Jun, Je-Chun

    2012-08-01

    Of the more than 300 octopus species, Octopus minor is one of the most popular and economically important species in Eastern Asia, including Korea, along with O. vulgaris, O. ocellatus, and O. aegina. We developed 19 microsatellite markers from Octopus minor and eight polymorphic markers were developed to analyze the genetic diversity and relationships among four octopus populations from Korea and three from China. The number of alleles per locus varied from 10 to 49, and allelic richness per locus ranged from 2 to 16.4 across all populations. The average allele number among the populations was 11.1, with a minimum of 8.3 and a maximum of 13.6. The mean allelic richness was 8.7 in all populations. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) test revealed significant deviation in 19 of the 56 single-locus sites, and null alleles were presumed in five of eight loci. The pairwise F ( ST ) values between populations from Korea and China differed significantly in all pairwise comparisons. The genetic distances between the China and Korea samples ranged from 0.161 to 0.454. The genetic distances among the populations from Korea ranged from 0.033 to 0.090, with an average of 0.062; those among populations from China ranged from 0.191 to 0.316, with an average of 0.254. The populations from Korea and China formed clearly separated into clusters via an unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean dendrogram. Furthermore, a population from muddy flats on the western coast of the Korean Peninsula and one from a rocky area on Jeju Island formed clearly separated subclusters. An assignment test based on the allele distribution discriminated between the Korean and Chinese origins with 96.9 % accuracy.

  16. Genetic variation of silver fir progeny from Tisovik Reserve population determined via microsatellite and isozyme markers

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    Pawlaczyk Ewa Maria

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Progeny from 19 family lines of silver fir (Abies alba Mill. from a small, native and isolated population from the Tisovik Reserve (Belarusian part of Białowieża Primeval Forest growing in an experimental plot near Hajnówka (Polish part of Białowieża Primeval Forest were analysed in terms of 4 nuclear microsatellite DNA loci and 9 isozyme systems with 14 loci. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic variation within and between progeny lines. Analysis of isozyme loci showed that all progeny lines, except the progeny lines T6 and T16, were characterised by an excess of heterozygotes and 20% of the detected variation occurred between progeny. Progeny formed two groups. Microsatellite loci showed that 6 progeny lines demonstrated an excess of heterozygotes and 12 an excess of homozygotes. On an average, the population was in the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA showed that 14% of the detected variation occurred between offspring and the remaining 86% within progeny lines. The most distinct progeny line was Tl, where the highest number of alleles per locus was detected. Generally, progeny of Tisovik is characterised by high level of differentiation as the offspring of isolated population that have limited number of individuals to crossing (only 20. In some progeny line, the private alleles that are detected may be the result of pollination from Polish part of Białowieża Forest where in 1920s and 1930s of XX century had planted the seedling of silver fir of unknown origin. The substructuring of population is observed, and the detected deficiency of heterozygotes may be ostensible as a result of the Wahlund effect. Such pattern of genetic structure could also be an effect of harsh environmental conditions exerting selection pressure and modifying the genetic composition of this population.

  17. Towards the Development of a Molecular Map in Switchgrass: I. Microsatellite Marker Development; ANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunter, L.E.

    2001-01-01

    The long-term goal of the switchgrass breeding program is to improve regionally adapted varieties and increase biomass yield and feedstock quality. Although, to some extent, biomass yields are dependent on environmental constraints, increased yield can be achieved through the development of genotypes with improved seasonal adaptation, tolerance to unfavorable environmental conditions, and improved resistance to pest and disease. To date, improvement in switchgrass has relied on recurrent breeding strategies based on phenotypic or genotypic selection. Yield improvements have been modest by this method. If we expect to make significant increase in yields, we need tools that will allow us to map complex traits and uncover the genes that influence them. A genetic linkage map could be a powerful tool for accelerating switchgrass development through marker-assisted selection, breeding and recombination. This type of mapping requires the development of markers that can be associated with phenotypic traits in a population of known pedigree. The most commonly used markers for mapping include restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) and simple sequence repeats (SSR). At ORNL, we have been concentrating on the development of SSR markers, while our colleagues at the University of Georgia are developing RFLP markers in order to select parents to produce a mapping population and from there to create a framework map from(approx)100 F1 progeny

  18. Polymorphic DNA microsatellite markers for forensic individual identification and parentage analyses of seven threatened species of parrots (family Psittacidae

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    Catherine Jan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The parrot family represents one of the bird group with the largest number of endangered species, as a result of habitat destruction and illegal trade. This illicit traffic involves the smuggling of eggs and animals, and the laundering through captive breeding facilities of wild-caught animals. Despite the huge potential of wildlife DNA forensics to determine with conclusive evidence illegal trade, current usage of DNA profiling approaches in parrots has been limited by the lack of suitable molecular markers specifically developed for the focal species and by low cross-species polymorphism. In this study, we isolated DNA microsatellite markers in seven parrot species threatened with extinction (Amazona brasiliensis, A. oratrix, A. pretrei, A. rhodocorytha, Anodorhynchus leari, Ara rubrogenys and Primolius couloni. From an enriched genomic library followed by 454 pyrosequencing, we characterized a total of 106 polymorphic microsatellite markers (mostly tetranucleotides in the seven species and tested them across an average number of 19 individuals per species. The mean number of alleles per species and across loci varied from 6.4 to 8.3, with the mean observed heterozygosities ranging from 0.65 to 0.84. Identity and parentage exclusion probabilities were highly discriminatory. The high variability displayed by these microsatellite loci demonstrates their potential utility to perform individual genotyping and parentage analyses, in order to develop a DNA testing framework to determine illegal traffic in these threatened species.

  19. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers for Ulmus chenmoui (Ulmaceae), an endangered tree endemic to eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Q F; He, J; Yang, J; Shi, E; Wang, D B; Xu, W X; Jeelani, N; Wang, Z S; Liu, H

    2016-05-13

    Ulmus chenmoui (Ulmaceae) is an endangered tree found on Langya Mountain, eastern China. To better understand the population genetics of U. chenmoui and conserve the species, we developed microsatellite markers. Using a suppression-polymerase chain reaction technique, 74 compound microsatellite primer pairs were designed. Twelve microsatellite markers were polymorphic in 39 individuals, and the number of alleles per locus ranged from 3 to 9. The observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.051 to 0.769 and from 0.533 to 0.768, respectively. Significant linkage disequilibrium was detected for three pairs of loci (P < 0.01), which may be due to a recent population bottleneck and the small population size. Nine of the 12 loci deviated from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P < 0.01), which could be explained by significant inbreeding rather than the presence of null alleles. These markers will provide a solid basis for future efforts in population genetic studies of U. chenmoui, which in turn will contribute to species conservation.

  20. A microsatellite genetic linkage map of black rockfish ( Sebastes schlegeli)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Guannan; Jiang, Liming; He, Yan; Yu, Haiyang; Wang, Zhigang; Jiang, Haibin; Zhang, Quanqi

    2014-12-01

    Ovoviviparous black rockfish ( Sebastes schlegeli) is an important marine fish species for aquaculture and fisheries in China. Genetic information of this species is scarce because of the lack of microsatellite markers. In this study, a large number of microsatellite markers of black rockfish were isolated by constructing microsatellite-enriched libraries. Female- and male-specific genetic linkage maps were constructed using 435 microsatellite markers genotyped in a full-sib family of the fish species. The female linkage map contained 140 microsatellite markers, in which 23 linkage groups had a total genetic length of 1334.1 cM and average inter-marker space of 13.3 cM. The male linkage map contained 156 microsatellite markers, in which 25 linkage groups had a total genetic length of 1359.6 cM and average inter-marker distance of 12.4 cM. The genome coverage of the female and male linkage maps was 68.6% and 69.3%, respectively. The female-to-male ratio of the recombination rate was approximately 1.07:1 in adjacent microsatellite markers. This paper presents the first genetic linkage map of microsatellites in black rockfish. The collection of polymorphic markers and sex-specific linkage maps of black rockfish could be useful for further investigations on parental assignment, population genetics, quantitative trait loci mapping, and marker-assisted selection in related breeding programs.

  1. Analysis of simple sequence repeats in the Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici genome and the development of microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Feng, Yanxia; Sun, Haiyan; Deng, Yuanyu; Yu, Hanshou; Chen, Huaigu

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the genetic structure of Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici is essential for the establishment of efficient disease control strategies. It is becoming clear that microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs), play an important role in genome organization and phenotypic diversity, and are a large source of genetic markers for population genetics and meiotic maps. In this study, we examined the G. graminis var. tritici genome (1) to analyze its pattern of SSRs, (2) to compare it with other plant pathogenic filamentous fungi, such as Magnaporthe oryzae and M. poae, and (3) to identify new polymorphic SSR markers for genetic diversity. The G. graminis var. tritici genome was rich in SSRs; a total 13,650 SSRs have been identified with mononucleotides being the most common motifs. In coding regions, the densities of tri- and hexanucleotides were significantly higher than in noncoding regions. The di-, tri-, tetra, penta, and hexanucleotide repeats in the G. graminis var. tritici genome were more abundant than the same repeats in M. oryzae and M. poae. From 115 devised primers, 39 SSRs are polymorphic with G. graminis var. tritici isolates, and 8 primers were randomly selected to analyze 116 isolates from China. The number of alleles varied from 2 to 7 and the expected heterozygosity (He) from 0.499 to 0.837. In conclusion, SSRs developed in this study were highly polymorphic, and our analysis indicated that G. graminis var. tritici is a species with high genetic diversity. The results provide a pioneering report for several applications, such as the assessment of population structure and genetic diversity of G. graminis var. tritici.

  2. [Identification of European (Capreolus capreolus L.) and Siberian (C. pygargus Pall.) roe deer hybrids by microsatellite marker analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakhina, D A; Zvychanaya, E Yu; Kholodova, M V; Danilkin, A A

    2014-07-01

    An analysis of 130 tissue specimens of the European (Capreolus capreolus) and the Siberian (C. pygargus) roe deer from nine regions of Russia and Ukraine using microsatellite loci analysis was conducted, aimed at the identification of hybrid animals. An optimized complex of 21 microsatellite loci was selected for the determination of species specificity and the search for interspecies hybrids. Hybrid animals were revealed in the Moscow and Volgograd regions. Their ratio in the total sample obtained in the European part of Russia was 11.9%.

  3. [Genotyping of Vaginal Candida glabrata Isolates Using Microsatellite Marker Analysis and DNA Sequencing to Identify Mutations Associated with Antifungal Resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döğen, Aylin; Durukan, Hüseyin; Güzel, Ahmet Barış; Oksüz, Zehra; Kaplan, Engin; Serin, Mehmet Sami; Serin, Ayşe; Emekdaş, Gürol; Aslan, Gönül; Tezcan, Seda; Kalkancı, Ayşe; Ilkit, Macit

    2013-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidosis is the second most common cause of vaginitis (17-39%) after bacterial vaginosis (22-50%). Since the diagnosis of vulvovaginal candidosis mainly depends on clinical findings without mycologic confirmatory tests and treated empirically, the actual incidence rate of vulvovaginal candidosis is unknown. Approximately 70-90% of vulvovaginal candidosis cases are caused by Candida albicans, however the increasing incidence of C.glabrata infections and its reduced susceptibility to azole drug therapy have generated increasing attention. The epidemiology and population structure of vulvovaginal candidosis due to C.glabrata are poorly characterized. This study was aimed to genotype the C.glabrata strains isolated from vaginal samples in Cukurova region, Turkey by microsatellite markers, to investigate the antifungal susceptibility profiles of the strains and to determine the molecular mechanisms leading to phenotypical azole resistance. A total of 34 unrelated vaginal C.glabrata strains isolated from patients with acute (n= 11) and recurrent (n= 14) vulvovaginal candidosis, control group (n= 9) without vaginitis symptoms, and a reference strain of C.glabrata CBS 138 (ATCC 2001) were included in the study. These isolates were genotyped using multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis of three microsatellite markers (RPM2, MTI, and Cg6). Analysis of microsatellite markers was performed by fragment size determination of RPM2, MTI, and Cg6 PCR products through capillary electrophoresis. For each of the evaluated strains, DNA sequence analysis was performed for one gene (CgERG11) and four loci (CgPDR1, NTM1, TRP1, and URA3) to detect mutations possibly associated with antifungal resistance in each strain. In vitro susceptibility profiles of the strains to 13 antifungals and boric acid were determined according to CLSI document M27-A3 to investigate possible relationships between detected mutations and phenotypic resistance. C.glabrata CBS 138

  4. Development of MHC-Linked Microsatellite Markers in the Domestic Cat and Their Use to Evaluate MHC Diversity in Domestic Cats, Cheetahs, and Gir Lions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Katrina M; Kirby, Katherine; Beatty, Julia A; Barrs, Vanessa R; Cattley, Sonia; David, Victor; O'Brien, Stephen J; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn; Belov, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Diversity within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) reflects the immunological fitness of a population. MHC-linked microsatellite markers provide a simple and an inexpensive method for studying MHC diversity in large-scale studies. We have developed 6 MHC-linked microsatellite markers in the domestic cat and used these, in conjunction with 5 neutral microsatellites, to assess MHC diversity in domestic mixed breed (n = 129) and purebred Burmese (n = 61) cat populations in Australia. The MHC of outbred Australian cats is polymorphic (average allelic richness = 8.52), whereas the Burmese population has significantly lower MHC diversity (average allelic richness = 6.81; P lions (n = 13). Our MHC-linked microsatellite markers have potential future use in diversity and disease studies in other populations and breeds of cats as well as in wild felid species. © The American Genetic Association 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Development and characterization of 96 microsatellite markers suitable for QTL mapping and accession control in an Arabidopsis core collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosson, Patrick; Decroocq, Véronique; Revers, Frédéric

    2014-01-22

    To identify plant genes involved in various key traits, QTL mapping is a powerful approach. This approach is based on the use of mapped molecular markers to identify genomic regions controlling quantitative traits followed by a fine mapping and eventually positional cloning of candidate genes. Mapping technologies using SNP markers are still rather expensive and not feasible in every laboratory. In contrast, microsatellite (also called SSR for Simple Sequence Repeat) markers are technologically less demanding and less costly for any laboratory interested in genetic mapping. In this study, we present the development and the characterization of a panel of 96 highly polymorphic SSR markers along the Arabidopsis thaliana genome allowing QTL mapping among accessions of the Versailles 24 core collection that covers a high percentage of the A. thaliana genetic diversity. These markers can be used for any QTL mapping analysis involving any of these accessions. We optimized the use of these markers in order to reveal polymorphism using standard PCR conditions and agarose gel electrophoresis. In addition, we showed that the use of only three of these markers allows differentiating all 24 accessions which makes this set of markers a powerful tool to control accession identity or any cross between any of these accessions. The set of SSR markers developed in this study provides a simple and efficient tool for any laboratory focusing on QTL mapping in A. thaliana and a simple means to control seed stock or crosses between accessions.

  6. Construction of a normalized full-length cDNA library of cephalopod Amphioctopus fangsiao and development of microsatellite markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yanwei; Liu, Wenfen; Xu, Xin; Yang, Jianmin; Wang, Weijun; Wei, Xiumei; Liu, Xiangquan; Sun, Guohua

    2017-10-01

    Amphioctopus fangsiao is one of the most economically important species and has been considered to be a candidate for aquaculture. In order to facilitate its fine-scale genetic analyses, we constructed a normalized full-length library successfully and developed a set of microsatellite markers in this study. The normalized full-length library had a storage capacity of 6.9×105 independent clones. The recombination efficiency was 95% and the average size of inserted fragments was longer than 1000 bp. A total of 3440 high quality ESTs were obtained, which were assembled into 1803 unigenes. Of these unigenes, 450 (25%) were assigned into 33 Gene Ontology terms, 576 (31.9%) into 153 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways, and 275 (15.3%) into 22 Clusters of Orthologous Groups. Seventy-six polymorphic microsatellite markers were identified. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 4 to 17, and the observed and expected heterozygosities varied between 0.167 and 0.967 and between 0.326 and 0.944, respectively. Twelve loci were significantly deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium after Bonferroni correction and no linkage disequilibrium was found between different loci. This study provided not only a useful resource for the isolation of the functional genes, but also a set of informative microsatellites for the assessment of population structure and conservation genetics of A. fangsiao.

  7. Microsatellite instability analysis in hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer using the Bethesda consensus panel of microsatellite markers in the absence of proband normal tissue

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    Dourisboure Ricardo J

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer (HNPCC is an autosomal dominant syndrome predisposing to the early development of various cancers including those of colon, rectum, endometrium, ovarium, small bowel, stomach and urinary tract. HNPCC is caused by germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes, mostly hMSH2 or hMLH1. In this study, we report the analysis for genetic counseling of three first-degree relatives (the mother and two sisters of a male who died of colorectal adenocarcinoma at the age of 23. The family fulfilled strict Amsterdam-I criteria (AC-I with the presence of extracolonic tumors in the extended pedigree. We overcame the difficulty of having a proband post-mortem non-tumor tissue sample for MSI testing by studying the alleles carried by his progenitors. Methods Tumor MSI testing is described as initial screening in both primary and metastasis tumor tissue blocks, using the reference panel of 5 microsatellite markers standardized by the National Cancer Institute (NCI for the screening of HNPCC (BAT-25, BAT-26, D2S123, D5S346 and D17S250. Subsequent mutation analysis of the hMLH1 and hMSH2 genes was performed. Results Three of five microsatellite markers (BAT-25, BAT-26 and D5S346 presented different alleles in the proband's tumor as compared to those inherited from his parents. The tumor was classified as high frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H. We identified in the HNPCC family a novel germline missense (c.1864C>A mutation in exon 12 of hMSH2 gene, leading to a proline 622 to threonine (p.Pro622Thr amino acid substitution. Conclusion This approach allowed us to establish the tumor MSI status using the NCI recommended panel in the absence of proband's non-tumor tissue and before sequencing the obligate carrier. According to the Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD and the International Society for Gastrointestinal Hereditary Tumors (InSiGHT Database this is the first report of this mutation.

  8. Unraveling the genetic structure of Brazilian commercial sugarcane cultivars through microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manechini, João Ricardo Vieira; da Costa, Juliana Borges; Pereira, Bruna Turcatto; Carlini-Garcia, Luciana Aparecida; Xavier, Mauro Alexandre; Landell, Marcos Guimarães de Andrade; Pinto, Luciana Rossini

    2018-01-01

    The Brazilian sugarcane industry plays an important role in the worldwide supply of sugar and ethanol. Investigation into the genetic structure of current commercial cultivars and comparisons to the main ancestor species allow sugarcane breeding programs to better manage crosses and germplasm banks as well as to promote its rational use. In the present study, the genetic structure of a group of Brazilian cultivars currently grown by commercial producers was assessed through microsatellite markers and contrasted with a group of basic germplasm mainly composed of Saccharum officinarum and S. spontaneum accessions. A total of 285 alleles was obtained by a set of 12 SSRs primer pairs that taken together were able to efficiently distinguish and capture the genetic variability of sugarcane commercial cultivars and basic germplasm accessions allowing its application in a fast and cost-effective way for routine cultivar identification and management of sugarcane germplasm banks. Allelic distribution revealed that 97.6% of the cultivar alleles were found in the basic germplasm while 42% of the basic germplasm alleles were absent in cultivars. Of the absent alleles, 3% was exclusive to S. officinarum, 33% to S. spontaneum and 19% to other species/exotic hybrids. We found strong genetic differentiation between the Brazilian commercial cultivars and the two main species (S. officinarum: [Formula: see text] = 0.211 and S. spontaneum: [Formula: see text] = 0.216, Pcommercial cultivars. Average dissimilarity within cultivars was 1.2 and 1.4 times lower than that within S. officinarum and S. spontaneum. Genetic divergence found between cultivars and S. spontaneum accessions has practical applications for energy cane breeding programs as the choice of more divergent parents will maximize the frequency of transgressive individuals in the progeny.

  9. Microsatellite marker analysis reveals the complex phylogeographic history of Rhododendron ferrugineum (Ericaceae in the Pyrenees.

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    Olivia Charrier

    Full Text Available Genetic variation within plant species is determined by a number of factors such as reproductive mode, breeding system, life history traits and climatic events. In alpine regions, plants experience heterogenic abiotic conditions that influence the population's genetic structure. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic structure and phylogeographic history of the subalpine shrub Rhododendron ferrugineum across the Pyrenees and the links between the populations in the Pyrenees, the Alps and Jura Mountains. We used 27 microsatellite markers to genotype 645 samples from 29 Pyrenean populations, three from the Alps and one from the Jura Mountains. These data were used to estimate population genetics statistics such as allelic richness, observed heterozygosity, expected heterozygosity, fixation index, inbreeding coefficient and number of migrants. Genetic diversity was found to be higher in the Alps than in the Pyrenees suggesting colonization waves from the Alps to the Pyrenees. Two separate genetic lineages were found in both the Alps and Pyrenees, with a substructure of five genetic clusters in the Pyrenees where a loss of genetic diversity was noted. The strong differentiation among clusters is maintained by low gene flow across populations. Moreover, some populations showed higher genetic diversity than others and presented rare alleles that may indicate the presence of alpine refugia. Two lineages of R. ferrugineum have colonized the Pyrenees from the Alps. Then, during glaciation events R. ferrugineum survived in the Pyrenees in different refugia such as lowland refugia at the eastern part of the chain and nunataks at high elevations leading to a clustered genetic pattern.

  10. Genetic Diversity of Plasmodium falciparum in Haiti: Insights from Microsatellite Markers.

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    Tamar E Carter

    Full Text Available Hispaniola, comprising Haiti and the Dominican Republic, has been identified as a candidate for malaria elimination. However, incomplete surveillance data in Haiti hamper efforts to assess the impact of ongoing malaria control interventions. Characteristics of the genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum populations can be used to assess parasite transmission, which is information vital to evaluating malaria elimination efforts. Here we characterize the genetic diversity of P. falciparum samples collected from patients at seven sites in Haiti using 12 microsatellite markers previously employed in population genetic analyses of global P. falciparum populations. We measured multiplicity of infections, level of genetic diversity, degree of population geographic substructure, and linkage disequilibrium (defined as non-random association of alleles from different loci. For low transmission populations like Haiti, we expect to see few multiple infections, low levels of genetic diversity, high degree of population structure, and high linkage disequilibrium. In Haiti, we found low levels of multiple infections (12.9%, moderate to high levels of genetic diversity (mean number of alleles per locus = 4.9, heterozygosity = 0.61, low levels of population structure (highest pairwise Fst = 0.09 and no clustering in principal components analysis, and moderate linkage disequilibrium (ISA = 0.05, P<0.0001. In addition, population bottleneck analysis revealed no evidence for a reduction in the P. falciparum population size in Haiti. We conclude that the high level of genetic diversity and lack of evidence for a population bottleneck may suggest that Haiti's P. falciparum population has been stable and discuss the implications of our results for understanding the impact of malaria control interventions. We also discuss the relevance of parasite population history and other host and vector factors when assessing transmission intensity from genetic diversity data.

  11. Genetic Diversity of Plasmodium falciparum in Haiti: Insights from Microsatellite Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Tamar E; Malloy, Halley; Existe, Alexandre; Memnon, Gladys; St Victor, Yves; Okech, Bernard A; Mulligan, Connie J

    2015-01-01

    Hispaniola, comprising Haiti and the Dominican Republic, has been identified as a candidate for malaria elimination. However, incomplete surveillance data in Haiti hamper efforts to assess the impact of ongoing malaria control interventions. Characteristics of the genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum populations can be used to assess parasite transmission, which is information vital to evaluating malaria elimination efforts. Here we characterize the genetic diversity of P. falciparum samples collected from patients at seven sites in Haiti using 12 microsatellite markers previously employed in population genetic analyses of global P. falciparum populations. We measured multiplicity of infections, level of genetic diversity, degree of population geographic substructure, and linkage disequilibrium (defined as non-random association of alleles from different loci). For low transmission populations like Haiti, we expect to see few multiple infections, low levels of genetic diversity, high degree of population structure, and high linkage disequilibrium. In Haiti, we found low levels of multiple infections (12.9%), moderate to high levels of genetic diversity (mean number of alleles per locus = 4.9, heterozygosity = 0.61), low levels of population structure (highest pairwise Fst = 0.09 and no clustering in principal components analysis), and moderate linkage disequilibrium (ISA = 0.05, PHaiti. We conclude that the high level of genetic diversity and lack of evidence for a population bottleneck may suggest that Haiti's P. falciparum population has been stable and discuss the implications of our results for understanding the impact of malaria control interventions. We also discuss the relevance of parasite population history and other host and vector factors when assessing transmission intensity from genetic diversity data.

  12. LOH detected by microsatellite markers reveals the clonal origin of recurrent laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

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    Zhaoyang Cui

    Full Text Available The question of whether "recurrent" laryngeal carcinoma is truly a new tumour with a clonal origin that differs from that of the primary tumour has remained unanswered. The objective of this study was to determine whether recurrent tumours have the same genetic basis as primary tumours, as the answer to this question is important for the development of treatment strategies.Matched samples consisting of primary tumour, recurrent tumour and normal tissue were obtained from the same patient. A total of 37 patients with laryngeal cancer were examined for loss of heterozygosity (LOH on the 3p, 5p, 7q, 8p, 9p, 13p, 17p and 18q chromosomal arms using PCR to amplify microsatellite markers. All patients were routinely followed up and 5-year survival rates were calculated using directly calculating method and Kaplan-Meier's method.A total of 28 out of 37 (75.6% patients showed LOH at a minimum of one locus, and 19 out of 37 (51.3% patients showed LOH at two loci. Primary and recurrent tumours in each patient showed identical allelic loss patterns and incidence rates. Patients without LOH had a longer average time to recurrence than patients with LOH (P<0.05. Additionally, patients with LOH had a longer average smoking duration prior to surgery than patients without LOH (P<0.05. The 5-year survival rates were 32.14%in patients with LOH versus 44.4% in patients without LOH.The data indicate that primary and recurrent tumours have the same clonal origin. This result implies that we failed to radically resect the primary tumours and/or micrometastases in these patients. Consequently, some form of adjunctive therapy may be necessary. Additionally, the data indicate that the recurrence of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma is closely related to chromosomal aberrations (specifically LOH.

  13. Genetic diversity of six populations of red hybrid tilapia, using microsatellites genetic markers

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    Boris Briñez R.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine and evaluate the genetic diversity of six populations of red hybrid tilapia, with the purpose to assess the potential benefit of a future breeding program conducted at the Research Center for Aquaculture (Ceniacua, Colombia. Material and methods. A total of 300 individuals, representing a wide genetic variability, were genotyped using a fluorescent microsatellite marker set of 5 gene-based SSRs in 6 different farms belonging to 4 States of Colombia. Results. The result showed that the mean number of alleles per locus per population was 8.367. The population 5 had the highest mean number of alleles with 9.6 alleles, followed by population 4 with 9.4 alleles, population 2 with 9.2, population 3 with 8.0, population 1 with 7.2 and population 6 with 6.8 alleles. The analysis of the distribution of genetic variation was (17.32% among population, while among individuals within populations was (28.55% and within individuals was high (54.12%. The standard diversity indices showed that population 4 was the more variable (mean He=0.837 followed by population 1 (mean He=0.728, population 3 (mean He=0.721, population 5 (mean He=0.705, population 2 (mean He=0.690, population 6 (mean He=0.586. Highly significant deviations from Hardy–Weinberg, exhibited all of the populations, mostly due to deficits of heterozygotes. Genotype frequencies at loci UNH 106 of population 5 and loci UNH 172 of population 6 were Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE. Conclusions. The results of this study, contribute to the genetic breeding program of Tilapia, conduced by the Research Center for Aquaculture. The Fst distance showed that the samples are differentiated genetically and it is possible to use at the beginning of the genetic program. However, it is recommended to introduce others individuals to the crossbreeding program.

  14. Genetic diversity and relationship of Indian cattle inferred from microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rekha; Kishore, Amit; Mukesh, Manishi; Ahlawat, Sonika; Maitra, Avishek; Pandey, Ashwni Kumar; Tantia, Madhu Sudan

    2015-06-30

    Indian agriculture is an economic symbiosis of crop and livestock production with cattle as the foundation. Sadly, the population of indigenous cattle (Bos indicus) is declining (8.94% in last decade) and needs immediate scientific management. Genetic characterization is the first step in the development of proper management strategies for preserving genetic diversity and preventing undesirable loss of alleles. Thus, in this study we investigated genetic diversity and relationship among eleven Indian cattle breeds using 21 microsatellite markers and mitochondrial D loop sequence. The analysis of autosomal DNA was performed on 508 cattle which exhibited sufficient genetic diversity across all the breeds. Estimates of mean allele number and observed heterozygosity across all loci and population were 8.784 ± 0.25 and 0.653 ± 0.014, respectively. Differences among breeds accounted for 13.3% of total genetic variability. Despite high genetic diversity, significant inbreeding was also observed within eight populations. Genetic distances and cluster analysis showed a close relationship between breeds according to proximity in geographic distribution. The genetic distance, STRUCTURE and Principal Coordinate Analysis concluded that the Southern Indian Ongole cattle are the most distinct among the investigated cattle populations. Sequencing of hypervariable mitochondrial DNA region on a subset of 170 cattle revealed sixty haplotypes with haplotypic diversity of 0.90240, nucleotide diversity of 0.02688 and average number of nucleotide differences as 6.07407. Two major star clusters for haplotypes indicated population expansion for Indian cattle. Nuclear and mitochondrial genomes show a similar pattern of genetic variability and genetic differentiation. Various analyses concluded that the Southern breed 'Ongole' was distinct from breeds of Northern/ Central India. Overall these results provide basic information about genetic diversity and structure of Indian cattle which

  15. Single-Tube Dodecaplex PCR Panel of Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers Closely Linked to theDMPKCTG Repeat for Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis of Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Mulias; Zhao, Mingjue; Lee, Caroline G; Chong, Samuel S

    2017-06-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) currently uses conventional PCR to detect nonexpanded dystrophia myotonica protein kinase ( DMPK ) alleles or triplet-primed PCR to detect the CTG-expanded alleles, coupled with analysis of linked microsatellite markers to increase diagnostic accuracy. We aimed to simplify the process of identification and selection of informative linked markers for application to DM1 PGD. An in silico search was performed to identify all markers within 1-1.5 Mb flanking the DMPK gene. Five previously known (D19S559, APOC2, D19S543, D19S112, and BV209569) and 7 novel (DM45050, DM45178, DM45209, DM45958, DM46513, DM46892, and DM47004.1) markers with potentially high heterozygosity values and polymorphism information content were selected and optimized in a single-tube multiplex PCR panel. Analysis of 184 DNA samples of Chinese and Caucasian individuals (91 from unrelated, anonymized cord blood of Chinese babies born at the National University Hospital, Singapore, and 93 Caucasian DNA samples from the Human Variation Panel HD100CAU) confirmed the high polymorphism indices of all markers (polymorphism information content >0.5), with observed heterozygosity values ranging from 0.62-0.93. All individuals were heterozygous for at least 6 markers, with 99.5% of individuals heterozygous for at least 2 markers on either side of the DMPK CTG repeat. The dodecaplex marker assay was successfully validated on 42 single cells and 12 whole genome amplified single cells. The DM1 multiplex PCR panel is suitable for use in DM1 PGD either as a standalone linkage-based assay or as a complement to DMPK CTG repeat expansion-mutation detection. © 2017 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  16. Development of Microsatellite Markers in Pungtungia herzi Using Next-Generation Sequencing and Cross-Species Amplification in the Genus Pseudopungtungia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Young-Eun; Yu, Jeong-Nam; Kim, Sang Ki; Hwang, Ui Wook; Kwak, Myounghai

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear microsatellite markers for Pungtungia herzi were developed using a combination of next-generation sequencing and Sanger sequencing. One hundred primer sets in the flanking region of dinucleotide and trinucleotide repeat motifs were designed and tested for efficiency in polymerase chain reaction amplification. Of these primer sets, 16 new markers (16%) were successfully amplified with unambiguous polymorphic alleles in 16 individuals of Pungtungia herzi. Cross-species amplification with these markers was then examined in two related species, Pseudopungtungia nigra and Pseudopungtungia tenuicorpa. Fifteen and 11 primer pairs resulted in successful amplification in Pseudopungtungia nigra and Pseudopungtungia tenuicorpa, respectively, with various polymorphisms, ranging from one allele (monomorphic) to 11 alleles per marker. These results indicated that developing microsatellite markers for cross-amplification from a species that is abundant and phylogenetically close to the species of interest is a good alternative when tissue samples of an endangered species are insufficient to develop microsatellites. PMID:24084733

  17. De novo transcriptome analysis and microsatellite marker development for population genetic study of a serious insect pest, Rhopalosiphum padi (L.) (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xinle; Wang, Kang; Su, Sha; Tian, Ruizheng; Li, Yuting; Chen, Maohua

    2017-01-01

    The bird cherry-oat aphid, Rhopalosiphum padi (L.), is one of the most abundant aphid pests of cereals and has a global distribution. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is a rapid and efficient method for developing molecular markers. However, transcriptomic and genomic resources of R. padi have not been investigated. In this study, we used transcriptome information obtained by RNA-Seq to develop polymorphic microsatellites for investigating population genetics in this species. The transcriptome of R. padi was sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. A total of 114.4 million raw reads with a GC content of 40.03% was generated. The raw reads were cleaned and assembled into 29,467 unigenes with an N50 length of 1,580 bp. Using several public databases, 82.47% of these unigenes were annotated. Of the annotated unigenes, 8,022 were assigned to COG pathways, 9,895 were assigned to GO pathways, and 14,586 were mapped to 257 KEGG pathways. A total of 7,936 potential microsatellites were identified in 5,564 unigenes, 60 of which were selected randomly and amplified using specific primer pairs. Fourteen loci were found to be polymorphic in the four R. padi populations. The transcriptomic data presented herein will facilitate gene discovery, gene analyses, and development of molecular markers for future studies of R. padi and other closely related aphid species.

  18. Genetic variability among the wild boars (Sus scrofa scrofa, crossbred animals and pigs using microsatellite markers (STRs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Viana Correa da Silva

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the genetic variability among the wild boars, crossbred animals and pigs using microsatellite markers. Five genetic groups were studied. The fragments of three microsatellites developed for Sus scrofa domestica - IGF1, ACTG2 and TNFB - were amplified through PCR technique to evaluate the expected intra populacion variability (He and observed (Ho heterozygosity, and endogamy coefficient (F IS within each population and inter population variability F IS , testing relationship among five genetic groups to establish the genetic distance among them. The high level of observed heterozygosity values varied between 0.537 and 0.7871. Generally, F IS was low, suggesting that the endogamy did not exist between the tested animals.

  19. Restricted Gene Flow for Gadus macrocephalus from Yellow Sea Based on Microsatellite Markers: Geographic Block of Tsushima Current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Song

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Pacific cod Gadus macrocephalus is a demersal, economically important fish in the family Gadidae. Population genetic differentiation of Pacific cod was examined across its northwestern Pacific range by screening variation of eight microsatellite loci in the present study. All four populations exhibited high genetic diversity. Pairwise fixation index (Fst suggested a moderate to high level of genetic differentiation among populations. Population of the Yellow Sea (YS showed higher genetic difference compared to the other three populations based on the results of pairwise Fst, three-dimensional factorial correspondence analysis (3D-FCA and STRUCTURE, which implied restricted gene flow among them. Wilcoxon signed rank tests suggested no significant heterozygosity excess and no recent genetic bottleneck events were detected. Microsatellite DNA is an effective molecular marker for detecting the phylogeographic pattern of Pacific cod, and these Pacific cod populations should be three management units.

  20. Isolation and Characterization of the First Microsatellite Markers for the Endangered Relict Mussel Hypanis colorata (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Cardiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Ovidiu Popa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypanis colorata (Eichwald, 1829 (Cardiidae: Lymnocardiinae is a bivalve relict species with a Ponto-Caspian distribution and is under strict protection in Romania, according to national regulations. While the species is depressed in the western Black Sea lagoons from Romania and Ukraine, it is also a successful invader in the middle Dniepr and Volga regions. Establishing a conservation strategy for this species or studying its invasion process requires knowledge about the genetic structure of the species populations. We have isolated and characterized nine polymorphic microsatellite markers in H. colorata. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 4 to 28 and the observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.613 to 1.000. The microsatellites developed in the present study are highly polymorphic and they should be useful for the assessment of genetic variation within this species.

  1. Development and Evaluation of Microsatellite Markers for a Native Prairie Perennial, Echinacea angustifolia (Asteraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Ison

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Microsatellite loci for the native prairie perennial Echinacea angustifolia were developed and evaluated for future use in population structure and paternity studies. Methods and Results: A total of 50 trinucleotide microsatellite regions were identified though an enrichment protocol that prescreens for microsatellite repeats before ligating into a vector. Of these, 11 loci were polymorphic and in Hardy—Weinberg equilibrium in three populations with varying numbers of plants. The loci had between three and 14 alleles and collectively provided high paternity exclusion probabilities. Conclusions: These sets of microsatellite primers will provide researchers and land managers with valuable information on the population genetic structure and gene flow between fragmented prairie populations.

  2. Development of eight polymorphic microsatellite markers in the Black and Rufous sengi, Rhynchocyon petersi

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sabuni, C. A.; Van Houtte, N.; Maganga, S. L. S.; Makundi, R. H.; Leirs, H.; Goüy de Bellocq, Joëlle

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2015), s. 193-195 ISSN 1877-7252 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Rhynchocyon petersi * Vulnerable afrotherian * Microsatellites * 454 Sequencing Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.446, year: 2015

  3. Development and validation of 89 novel expressed sequence tag-derived microsatellite markers in blood clam, Tegillarca granosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Shuangshuang; Fang, Jun; Cai, Yilong; Chai, Xueliang; Xiao, Guoqiang

    2017-06-01

    Blood clam, Tegillarca granosa, is an important shellfish in Chinese mariculture industry. Investigative research in this species, such as genetic linkage mapping, requires a large panel of molecular markers. In present study, a total of 89 polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed in T. granosa using the sequence database of Life Sciences Technology 454 next generation sequencing technology. All 89 loci were characterized in 20 individual clams from a natural population inhabiting Yueqing Gulf, Zhejiang Province, China. The number of alleles per polymorphic locus varied between 2 and 15, while the observed heterozygosity, expected heterozygosity and polymorphic information content varied between 0.000 and 1.000, 0.102 and 0.921, and 0.048 and 0.886, respectively. Of the 89 loci identified, 32 loci deviated significantly from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium following Bonferroni correction. Thirty nine markers, which were shown to be polymorphic in a full-sibling family, were tested in Mendelian segregations. As expected, 32 loci were co-dominantly segregated in a Mendelian fashion. These novel developed microsatellite markers represent useful research tools for investigation of population genetic structure and genetic diversity in this species.

  4. Development of novel microsatellite markers for the Northern Goshawk (Accipiter gentilis) and their utility in cross-species amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haughey, Christy; Sage, George K.; Degange, Gabriel; Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Talbot, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    The Northern Goshawk (Accipiter gentilis) is a large forest raptor with a Holarctic distribution and, in some portions of its range, a species of conservation concern. To augment previously reported genetic markers, 13 novel polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed to establish individual identification and familial relationships, to assess levels of genetic diversity, and to identify diagnostic markers. Of the 22 loci tested, 13 were polymorphic, seven were monomorphic, and two failed to amplify. This suite of microsatellite loci yielded a combined probability of parental exclusion of 98%; a single individual sampled from a North American population can be reliably identified using a combination of seven of the 13 polymorphic loci. Cross-species screening in Cooper's Hawks (A. cooperii) and Sharp-shinned Hawks (A. striatus) of the 20 loci that successfully amplified in Northern Goshawks identified 13 loci as polymorphic in each species. Six of these loci (Age1303, Age1308, Age1309, Age1312, and Age1314) appeared to be useful in distinguishing between Accipiter species. These markers will be useful to researchers investigating populations of North American accipiters.

  5. Assessment of genetic diversity in Indian rice germplasm (Oryza sativa L.): use of random versus trait-linked microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Sheel; Singh, Ashutosh; Singh, M R; Goel, Nitika; Vinod, K K; Mohapatra, T; Singh, A K

    2013-12-01

    Assessment of genetic diversity in a crop germplasm is a vital part of plant breeding. DNA markers such as microsatellite or simple sequence repeat markers have been widely used to estimate the genetic diversity in rice. The present study was carried out to decipher the pattern of genetic diversity in terms of both phenotypic and genotypic variability, and to assess the efficiency of random vis-á-vis QTL linked/gene based simple sequence repeat markers in diversity estimation. A set of 88 rice accessions that included landraces, farmer's varieties and popular Basmati lines were evaluated for agronomic traits and molecular diversity. The random set of SSR markers included 50 diversity panel markers developed under IRRI's Generation Challenge Programme (GCP) and the trait-linked/gene based markers comprised of 50 SSR markers reportedly linked to yield and related components. For agronomic traits, significant variability was observed, ranging between the maximum for grains/panicle and the minimum for panicle length. The molecular diversity based grouping indicated that varieties from a common centre were genetically similar, with few exceptions. The trait-linked markers gave an average genetic dissimilarity of 0.45 as against that of 0.37 by random markers, along with an average polymorphic information constant value of 0.48 and 0.41 respectively. The correlation between the kinship matrix generated by trait-linked markers and the phenotype based distance matrix (0.29) was higher than that of random markers (0.19). This establishes the robustness of trait-linked markers over random markers in estimating genetic diversity of rice germplasm.

  6. Marker-assisted selection in forestry species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butcher, P.; Southerton, S.

    2007-01-01

    The primary goal of tree breeding is to increase the quantity and quality of wood products from plantations. Major gains have been achieved using recurrent selection in genetically diverse breeding populations to capture additive variation. However, the long generation times of trees, together with poor juvenile-mature trait correlations, have promoted interest in marker-assisted selection (MAS) to accelerate breeding through early selection. MAS relies on identifying DNA markers, which explain a high proportion of variation in phenotypic traits. Genetic linkage maps have been developed for most commercial tree species and these can be used to locate chromosomal regions where DNA markers co-segregate with quantitative traits (quantitative trait loci, QTL). MAS based on QTL is most likely to be used for within-family selection in a limited number of elite families that can be clonally propagated. Limitations of the approach include the low resolution of marker-trait associations, the small proportion of phenotypic variation explained by QTL and the low success rate in validating QTL in different genetic backgrounds and environments. This has led to a change in research focus towards association mapping to identify variation in the DNA sequence of genes directly controlling phenotypic variation (gene-assisted selection, GAS). The main advantages of GAS are the high resolution of marker-trait associations and the ability to transfer markers across families and even species. Association studies are being used to examine the adaptive significance of variation in genes controlling wood formation and quality, pathogen resistance, cold tolerance and drought tolerance. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in these gene sequences that are significantly associated with trait variation can then be used for early selection. Markers for SNPs can be transferred among individuals regardless of pedigree or family relationship, increasing opportunities for their application in

  7. Development and Integration of Genome-Wide Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers onto a Reference Linkage Map for Constructing a High-Density Genetic Map of Chickpea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yash Paul Khajuria

    Full Text Available The identification of informative in silico polymorphic genomic and genic microsatellite markers by comparing the genome and transcriptome sequences of crop genotypes is a rapid, cost-effective and non-laborious approach for large-scale marker validation and genotyping applications, including construction of high-density genetic maps. We designed 1494 markers, including 1016 genomic and 478 transcript-derived microsatellite markers showing in-silico fragment length polymorphism between two parental genotypes (Cicer arietinum ICC4958 and C. reticulatum PI489777 of an inter-specific reference mapping population. High amplification efficiency (87%, experimental validation success rate (81% and polymorphic potential (55% of these microsatellite markers suggest their effective use in various applications of chickpea genetics and breeding. Intra-specific polymorphic potential (48% detected by microsatellite markers in 22 desi and kabuli chickpea genotypes was lower than inter-specific polymorphic potential (59%. An advanced, high-density, integrated and inter-specific chickpea genetic map (ICC4958 x PI489777 having 1697 map positions spanning 1061.16 cM with an average inter-marker distance of 0.625 cM was constructed by assigning 634 novel informative transcript-derived and genomic microsatellite markers on eight linkage groups (LGs of our prior documented, 1063 marker-based genetic map. The constructed genome map identified 88, including four major (7-23 cM longest high-resolution genomic regions on LGs 3, 5 and 8, where the maximum number of novel genomic and genic microsatellite markers were specifically clustered within 1 cM genetic distance. It was for the first time in chickpea that in silico FLP analysis at genome-wide level was carried out and such a large number of microsatellite markers were identified, experimentally validated and further used in genetic mapping. To best of our knowledge, in the presently constructed genetic map, we mapped

  8. Development and Integration of Genome-Wide Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers onto a Reference Linkage Map for Constructing a High-Density Genetic Map of Chickpea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajuria, Yash Paul; Saxena, Maneesha S; Gaur, Rashmi; Chattopadhyay, Debasis; Jain, Mukesh; Parida, Swarup K; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2015-01-01

    The identification of informative in silico polymorphic genomic and genic microsatellite markers by comparing the genome and transcriptome sequences of crop genotypes is a rapid, cost-effective and non-laborious approach for large-scale marker validation and genotyping applications, including construction of high-density genetic maps. We designed 1494 markers, including 1016 genomic and 478 transcript-derived microsatellite markers showing in-silico fragment length polymorphism between two parental genotypes (Cicer arietinum ICC4958 and C. reticulatum PI489777) of an inter-specific reference mapping population. High amplification efficiency (87%), experimental validation success rate (81%) and polymorphic potential (55%) of these microsatellite markers suggest their effective use in various applications of chickpea genetics and breeding. Intra-specific polymorphic potential (48%) detected by microsatellite markers in 22 desi and kabuli chickpea genotypes was lower than inter-specific polymorphic potential (59%). An advanced, high-density, integrated and inter-specific chickpea genetic map (ICC4958 x PI489777) having 1697 map positions spanning 1061.16 cM with an average inter-marker distance of 0.625 cM was constructed by assigning 634 novel informative transcript-derived and genomic microsatellite markers on eight linkage groups (LGs) of our prior documented, 1063 marker-based genetic map. The constructed genome map identified 88, including four major (7-23 cM) longest high-resolution genomic regions on LGs 3, 5 and 8, where the maximum number of novel genomic and genic microsatellite markers were specifically clustered within 1 cM genetic distance. It was for the first time in chickpea that in silico FLP analysis at genome-wide level was carried out and such a large number of microsatellite markers were identified, experimentally validated and further used in genetic mapping. To best of our knowledge, in the presently constructed genetic map, we mapped highest

  9. Identification and characterisation of microsatellite DNA markers in order to recognise the WSSV susceptible populations of marine giant black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, Usri; Dutta, Sourav; Mallik, Ajoy; Mondal, Debabrata; Mandal, Nripendranath

    2015-09-25

    White spot disease (WSD) which is caused by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) creates severe epizootics in captured and cultured black tiger shrimp, resulting a huge loss in the economic output of the aquaculture industry worldwide. Performing selective breeding using DNA markers would prove to be a potential cost effective strategy for long term disease control in shrimps. In the present investigation, microsatellite DNA fingerprints were compared between naturally occurring WSSV resistant and susceptible populations of Penaeus monodon. After PCR with a set of shrimp specific primers three reproducible DNA fragments of varying sizes were found, among which 442 bp and 236 bp fragments were present in considerably higher frequencies in the WSSV susceptible shrimp population (p ≤ 0.0001). After WSSV challenge experiment the copy no. of WSSV was determined using real-time PCR, where it was found to be almost 4 × 10(3) fold higher in WSSV susceptible shrimps than in the resistant ones. Thus, these microsatellite DNA markers will be useful to distinguish between WSSV susceptible and resistant brood stocks of P. monodon. Sequencing studies revealed that these DNA markers were novel in P. monodon. Highest WSSV resistance using these DNA markers, was observed in the shrimp populations of Andaman Island and Chennai among the different coastal areas of India, suggesting these places as safe for specific pathogen resistant brood stock shrimp collection. This study will be a very effective platform towards understanding the molecular pathogenesis of WSD for generation of disease free shrimp aquaculture industry.

  10. Marker-assisted selection in fish and shellfish breeding schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, V.

    2007-01-01

    The main goals of breeding programmes for fish and shellfish are to increase the profitability and sustainability of aquaculture. Traditionally, these have been carried out successfully using pedigree information by selecting individuals based on breeding values predicted for traits measured on candidates using an 'animal model'. This methodology assumes that phenotypes are explained by a large number of genes with small effects and random environmental deviations. However, information on individual genes with medium or large effects cannot be used in this manner. In selective breeding programmes using pedigree information, molecular markers have been used primarily for parentage assignment when tagging individual fish is difficult and to avoid causing common environmental effects from rearing families in separate tanks. The use of these techniques in such conventional breeding programmes is discussed in detail. Exploiting the great biological diversity of many fish and shellfish species, different experimental designs may use either chromosomal manipulations or large family sizes to increase the likelihood of finding the loci affecting quantitative traits, the so-called QTL, by screening the segregation of molecular markers. Using information on identified loci in breeding schemes in aquaculture is expected to be cost-effective compared with traditional breeding methods only when the accuracy of predicting breeding values is rather low, e.g. for traits with low heritability such as disease resistance or carcass quality. One of the problems facing aquaculture is that some of the resources required to locate QTL accurately, such as dense linkage maps, are not yet available for the many species. Recently, however, information from expressed sequence tag (EST) databases has been used for developing molecular markers such as microsatellites and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Marker-assisted selection (MAS) or genome-wide marker-assisted selection (G-MAS) using

  11. Molecular genetic diversity of Punica granatum L. (pomegranate) as revealed by microsatellite DNA markers (SSR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasnaoui, Nejib; Buonamici, Anna; Sebastiani, Federico; Mars, Messaoud; Zhang, Dapeng; Vendramin, Giovanni G

    2012-02-01

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) is one of the oldest known edible fruits and more and more it arouse interest of scientific community given its numerous biological activities. However, information about its genetic resources and characterization using reliable molecular markers are still scarce. In the present study, we report the development of 4 new polymorphic SSR markers. They have been used in addition to 11 SSRs previously published to investigate molecular diversity of 33 P. granatum ecotypes. Based on the multi-locus profiles, twenty-two distinctive genotypes were identified. Globally, quite low genetic diversity has been revealed, as measured by allele richness (2.83 per locus) and heterozygosity (He=0.245; Ho=0.243), reflecting the narrow genetic background of the plant material. Four synonymous groups could be detected involving 15 accessions. Results of ordination and cluster analysis suggested that almost all the Tunisian cultivars share similar genetic background, and are likely derived from a small number of introductions in ancient times. Results issued from this study provide essential information to project a pomegranate core-collection without plant material duplication and for sustainable management of pomegranate landraces at national and international level. Furthermore, these SSR markers are powerful tool for marker assisted selection (MAS) program and for QTL studies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Thermal tolerance evaluation and related microsatellite marker screening and identification in the large yellow croaker Larimichthys crocea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoming; Li, Jiakai; Wang, Zhiyong; Cai, Mingyi; Liu, Xiande

    2017-05-01

    Thermal tolerance to high temperature was evaluated in the large yellow croaker Larimichthys crocea. The survival thermal maximum for L. crocea was 33.0°C, the 50% critical thermal maximum (50% CTMax) was 35.5°C, and the critical thermal maximum (CTMax) was 36.0°C. Three microsatellite markers (LYC0148, LYC0200 and LYC0435), associated with thermal tolerance were screened and identified using a Bulked Segregation Analysis (BSA) method. These markers have six amplified fragments in which four are related to thermal tolerance. These fragments were cloned and sequenced, and the results showed the core motif were all "AC" repeats. For LYC0148 and LYC0200, the lengths of fragments are 181 bp and 197 bp, respectively. For LYC0435, which has two fragments, the fragment lengths are 112 bp and 100 bp. The results provide useful molecular markers for thermal-tolerance breeding of large yellow croaker in the near future.

  13. Development of novel microsatellite markers for Holothurian scabra (Holothuriidae), Apostichopus japonicas (Stichopodidae) and cross-species testing in other sea cucumbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shangguan, Jingbo; Li, Zhongbao

    2017-06-01

    Thirty-five new microsatellite loci from the sea cucumbers Holothurian scabra (Jaeger, 1833) and Apostichopus japonicas (Selenka, 1867) were screened and characterized using the method of magnetic bead enrichment. Of the twenty-four polymorphic loci tested, eighteen were consistent with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium after a modified false discovery rate (B-Y FDR) correction, whereas six showed statistically significant deviations (CHS2 and CHS11: P microsatellite loci. Although transferability and universality of all loci were generally low, the results of the cross-species study showed that the markers can be applied to identify individuals to species according to the presence or absence of specific microsatellite alleles. The microsatellite markers reported here will contribute to the study of genetic diversity, assisted breeding, and population conservation in sea cucumbers, as well as allow for the identification of individuals to closely related species.

  14. Genetic diversity and population structure analysis between Indian red jungle fowl and domestic chicken using microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinay; Shukla, Sanjeev K; Mathew, Jose; Sharma, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to assess the genetic diversity, population structure, and relatedness in Indian red jungle fowl (RJF, Gallus gallus murgi) from northern India and three domestic chicken populations (gallus gallus domesticus), maintained at the institute farms, namely White Leghorn (WL), Aseel (AS) and Red Cornish (RC) using 25 microsatellite markers. All the markers were polymorphic, the number of alleles at each locus ranged from five (MCW0111) to forty-three (LEI0212) with an average number of 19 alleles per locus. Across all loci, the mean expected heterozygosity and polymorphic information content were 0.883 and 0.872, respectively. Population-specific alleles were found in each population. A UPGMA dendrogram based on shared allele distances clearly revealed two major clusters among the four populations; cluster I had genotypes from RJF and WL whereas cluster II had AS and RC genotypes. Furthermore, the estimation of population structure was performed to understand how genetic variation is partitioned within and among populations. The maximum ▵K value was observed for K = 4 with four identified clusters. Furthermore, factorial analysis clearly showed four clustering; each cluster represented the four types of population used in the study. These results clearly, demonstrate the potential of microsatellite markers in elucidating the genetic diversity, relationships, and population structure analysis in RJF and domestic chicken populations.

  15. Isolation and Characterization of Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers from the Malaria Vector Anopheles fluviatilis Species T (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lather, Manila; Sharma, Divya; Dang, Amita S; Adak, Tridibes; Singh, Om P

    2015-05-01

    Anopheles fluviatilis James is an important malaria vector in India, Pakistan, Nepal, and Iran. It has now been recognized as a complex of at least four sibling species-S, T, U, and V, among which species T is the most widely distributed species throughout India. The taxonomic status of these species is confusing owing to controversies prevailing in the literature. In addition, chromosomal inversion genotypes, which were considered species-diagnostic for An. fluviatilis species T, are unreliable due to the existence of polymorphism in some populations. To study the genetic diversity at population level, we isolated and characterized 20 microsatellite markers from microsatellite-enriched genomic DNA library of An. fluviatilis T, of which 18 were polymorphic while two were monomorphic. The number of alleles per locus among polymorphic markers ranged from 4 to 19, and values for observed and expected heterozygosities varied from 0.352 to 0.857 and from 0.575 to 0.933, respectively. Thirteen markers had cross-cryptic species transferability to species S and U of the Fluviatilis Complex. This study provides a promising genetic tool for the population genetic analyses of An. fluviatilis. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Linkage of morbid obesity with polymorphic microsatellite markers on chromosome 1q31 in a three-generation Canadian kindred

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, J.D.; Bulman, D.E.; Ebers, G.C. [University Hospital, London (Canada)]|[INSERM, Paris (France)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Obesity is the most common nutritional disorder affecting Western societies. An estimated 3.7 million Canadians are considered to be overweight, a condition associated with hypertension, accelerated atherosclerosis, diabetes and a host of other medical problems. We have identified a 3 generation kindred in which morbid obesity appears to segregate in an autosomal dominant manner. All individuals were examined. Mass (kg) and heights (m) were measured in order to determine a body mass index (BMI) for each individual. Those individuals with BMI of greater than or equal to 30.0 were designated as affected. In the pedigree studied 25 individuals met this criteria and 12 of these were morbidly obese (BMI greater or equal to 40.0). A search of candidate genes proved unfruitful. A linkage study was initiated. All individuals in the pedigree were genotyped for microsatellite markers which were spaced every 20 centimorgans (cM). Positive evidence of linkage was detected with markers which map to 1q31-32 (lod score of 3.6 at {theta} = 0.05). Notably, strong effects for fatness in pigs have been found on pig chromosome 4 which has synteny with human chromosome 1q21-32. We are currently attempting to refine the position of this gene using linkage analysis with other microsatellite markers from this region of the genome. In addition we are screening other families in which obesity segregates for linkage to 1q31.

  17. A SUBLOCUS OF THE MULTICOPY MICROSATELLITE MARKER CMS1 MAPS PROXIMAL TO SPINAL MUSCULAR-ATROPHY (SMA) AS SHOWN BY RECOMBINANT ANALYSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERSTEEGE, G; COBBEN, JM; OSINGA, J; SCHEFFER, H; VANOMMEN, GJB; BUYS, CHCM

    1995-01-01

    The critical region containing the spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) gene is flanked by the 5q11-q13 markers, D5S435 and D5S557, as determined by linkage analysis. Here we present the results of an analysis of a Dutch SMA family with the multicopy microsatellite marker CMS1. A crossover is revealed in

  18. Highly Informative Single-Copy Nuclear Microsatellite DNA Markers Developed Using an AFLP-SSR Approach in Black Spruce (Picea mariana) and Red Spruce (P. rubens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yong-Zhong; Forneris, Natascha; Rajora, Om P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are highly informative molecular markers for various biological studies in plants. In spruce (Picea) and other conifers, the development of single-copy polymorphic genomic microsatellite markers is quite difficult, owing primarily to the large genome size and predominance of repetitive DNA sequences throughout the genome. We have developed highly informative single-locus genomic microsatellite markers in black spruce (Picea mariana) and red spruce (Picea rubens) using a simple but efficient method based on a combination of AFLP and microsatellite technologies. Principal Findings A microsatellite-enriched library was constructed from genomic AFLP DNA fragments of black spruce. Sequencing of the 108 putative SSR-containing clones provided 94 unique sequences with microsatellites. Twenty-two of the designed 34 primer pairs yielded scorable amplicons, with single-locus patterns. Fourteen of these microsatellite markers were characterized in 30 black spruce and 30 red spruce individuals drawn from many populations. The number of alleles at a polymorphic locus ranged from 2 to 18, with a mean of 9.3 in black spruce, and from 3 to 15, with a mean of 6.2 alleles in red spruce. The polymorphic information content or expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.340 to 0.909 (mean = 0.67) in black spruce and from 0.161 to 0.851 (mean = 0.62) in red spruce. Ten SSR markers showing inter-parental polymorphism inherited in a single-locus Mendelian mode, with two cases of distorted segregation. Primer pairs for almost all polymorphic SSR loci resolved microsatellites of comparable size in Picea glauca, P. engelmannii, P. sitchensis, and P. abies. Significance The AFLP-based microsatellite-enriched library appears to be a rapid, cost-effective approach for isolating and developing single-locus informative genomic microsatellite markers in black spruce. The markers developed should be useful in black spruce, red spruce

  19. Admixture analysis of stocked brown trout populations using mapped microsatellite DNA markers: indigenous trout persist in introgressed populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Møller; Mensberg, Karen-Lise Dons

    2009-01-01

    , but resolution is low if genetic differentiation is weak. Here, we analyse stocked brown trout populations represented by historical (1943-1956) and contemporary (2000s) samples, where genetic differentiation between wild populations and stocked trout is weak (pair-wise F-ST of 0.047 and 0.053). By analysing...... a high number of microsatellite DNA markers (50) and making use of linkage map information, we achieve clear identification of admixed and non-admixed trout. Moreover, despite strong population-level admixture by hatchery strain trout in one of the populations (70.8%), non-admixed individuals...

  20. Expressed sequence tag-derived microsatellite markers of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Studer, Bruno; Asp, Torben; Frei, Ursula

    2008-01-01

    An expressed sequence tag (EST) library of the key grassland species perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) has been exploited as a resource for microsatellite marker development. Out of 955 simple sequence repeat (SSR) containing ESTs, 744 were used for primer design. Primer amplification...... was tested in eight genotypes of L. perenne and L. multiflorum representing (grand-) parents of four mapping populations and resulted in 464 successfully amplified EST-SSRs. Three hundred and six primer pairs successfully amplified products in the mapping population VrnA derived from two of the eight...

  1. Microsatellite Markers for the Chameleon Grasshopper (Kosciuscola tristis (Orthoptera: Acrididae, an Australian Alpine Specialist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ange-Marie Risterucci

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A set of polymorphic loci was characterised using an enrichment library for the Australian alpine specialist, the chameleon grasshopper (Kosciuscola tristis, an atypical grasshopper known for its remarkable temperature-controlled colour change. The number of alleles per locus ranged from three to 20 and observed heterozygosity from 0.16 to 0.76. These are the first microsatellite markers for a non-endangered Australian alpine animal and will inform questions of gene flow across the sky islands of this unique and threatened region.

  2. Genome-Wide Development and Use of Microsatellite Markers for Large-Scale Genotyping Applications in Foxtail Millet [Setaria italica (L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Garima; Misra, Gopal; Kumari, Kajal; Gupta, Sarika; Parida, Swarup Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Debasis; Prasad, Manoj

    2013-01-01

    The availability of well-validated informative co-dominant microsatellite markers and saturated genetic linkage map has been limited in foxtail millet (Setaria italica L.). In view of this, we conducted a genome-wide analysis and identified 28 342 microsatellite repeat-motifs spanning 405.3 Mb of foxtail millet genome. The trinucleotide repeats (∼48%) was prevalent when compared with dinucleotide repeats (∼46%). Of the 28 342 microsatellites, 21 294 (∼75%) primer pairs were successfully designed, and a total of 15 573 markers were physically mapped on 9 chromosomes of foxtail millet. About 159 markers were validated successfully in 8 accessions of Setaria sp. with ∼67% polymorphic potential. The high percentage (89.3%) of cross-genera transferability across millet and non-millet species with higher transferability percentage in bioenergy grasses (∼79%, Switchgrass and ∼93%, Pearl millet) signifies their importance in studying the bioenergy grasses. In silico comparative mapping of 15 573 foxtail millet microsatellite markers against the mapping data of sorghum (16.9%), maize (14.5%) and rice (6.4%) indicated syntenic relationships among the chromosomes of foxtail millet and target species. The results, thus, demonstrate the immense applicability of developed microsatellite markers in germplasm characterization, phylogenetics, construction of genetic linkage map for gene/quantitative trait loci discovery, comparative mapping in foxtail millet, including other millets and bioenergy grass species. PMID:23382459

  3. Marker-assisted selection for quantitative traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Schuster

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although thousands of scientific articles have been published on the subject of marker-assisted selection (MAS andquantitative trait loci (QTL, the application of MAS for QTL in plant breeding has been restricted. Among the main causes for thislimited use are the low accuracy of QTL mapping and the high costs of genotyping thousands of plants with tens or hundreds ofmolecular markers in routine breeding programs. Recently, new large-scale genotyping technologies have resulted in a costreduction. Nevertheless, the MAS for QTL has so far been limited to selection programs using several generations per year, wherephenotypic selection cannot be performed in all generations, mainly in recurrent selection programs. Methods of MAS for QTL inbreeding programs using self-pollination have been developed.

  4. Population structure and genetic diversity of Brazilian popcorn germplasm inferred by microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereza Aparecida da Silva

    2015-05-01

    Conclusions: The analysis allowed to identify microsatellite loci with high levels of heterozygosity (UMC1549 and UMC1072. These loci can be indicated as promising for detecting polymorphisms in popcorn accessions and in the monitoring of genetic improvement programs. Moreover, allowed to identify heterozygous accessions (BOZM 260, this accession showed allelic variation at all analyzed microsatellite loci and can be recommended for crosses with plants that have desirable agronomic characteristics, with a view to the broadening of the genetic base of popcorn accessions and developing new cultivars.

  5. Microsatellite Markers in the Western Prairie Fringed Orchid, Platanthera praeclara (Orchidaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew A. Ross

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Primers for 31 microsatellite-containing loci were developed for the threatened orchid Platanthera praeclara to enable characterization of the population genetics of this tallgrass prairie native. Methods and Results: Sixteen polymorphic microsatellite loci were identified from four populations. Six of these loci were not in linkage disequilibrium. The average number of alleles per locus per population ranged from 6.4 to 8.9. Conclusions: The results indicate that six of the polymorphic loci will be useful in future studies of population structure, gene flow, and genetic diversity.

  6. Genome-wide conserved non-coding microsatellite (CNMS) marker-based integrative genetical genomics for quantitative dissection of seed weight in chickpea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Deepak; Saxena, Maneesha S; Kujur, Alice; Das, Shouvik; Badoni, Saurabh; Tripathi, Shailesh; Upadhyaya, Hari D; Gowda, C L L; Sharma, Shivali; Singh, Sube; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Parida, Swarup K

    2015-03-01

    Phylogenetic footprinting identified 666 genome-wide paralogous and orthologous CNMS (conserved non-coding microsatellite) markers from 5'-untranslated and regulatory regions (URRs) of 603 protein-coding chickpea genes. The (CT)n and (GA)n CNMS carrying CTRMCAMV35S and GAGA8BKN3 regulatory elements, respectively, are abundant in the chickpea genome. The mapped genic CNMS markers with robust amplification efficiencies (94.7%) detected higher intraspecific polymorphic potential (37.6%) among genotypes, implying their immense utility in chickpea breeding and genetic analyses. Seventeen differentially expressed CNMS marker-associated genes showing strong preferential and seed tissue/developmental stage-specific expression in contrasting genotypes were selected to narrow down the gene targets underlying seed weight quantitative trait loci (QTLs)/eQTLs (expression QTLs) through integrative genetical genomics. The integration of transcript profiling with seed weight QTL/eQTL mapping, molecular haplotyping, and association analyses identified potential molecular tags (GAGA8BKN3 and RAV1AAT regulatory elements and alleles/haplotypes) in the LOB-domain-containing protein- and KANADI protein-encoding transcription factor genes controlling the cis-regulated expression for seed weight in the chickpea. This emphasizes the potential of CNMS marker-based integrative genetical genomics for the quantitative genetic dissection of complex seed weight in chickpea. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  7. PineElm_SSRdb: a microsatellite marker database identified from genomic, chloroplast, mitochondrial and EST sequences of pineapple (Ananas comosus(L.) Merrill).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Sakshi; Mishra, Bharat Kumar; Vivek, Thiruvettai; Magadum, Santoshkumar; Yasin, Jeshima Khan

    2016-01-01

    Simple Sequence Repeats or microsatellites are resourceful molecular genetic markers. There are only few reports of SSR identification and development in pineapple. Complete genome sequence of pineapple available in the public domain can be used to develop numerous novel SSRs. Therefore, an attempt was made to identify SSRs from genomic, chloroplast, mitochondrial and EST sequences of pineapple which will help in deciphering genetic makeup of its germplasm resources. A total of 359511 SSRs were identified in pineapple (356385 from genome sequence, 45 from chloroplast sequence, 249 in mitochondrial sequence and 2832 from EST sequences). The list of EST-SSR markers and their details are available in the database. PineElm_SSRdb is an open source database available for non-commercial academic purpose at http://app.bioelm.com/ with a mapping tool which can develop circular maps of selected marker set. This database will be of immense use to breeders, researchers and graduates working on Ananas spp. and to others working on cross-species transferability of markers, investigating diversity, mapping and DNA fingerprinting.

  8. [Isolation and characterization of 27 polymorphic microsatellite markers in Armillaria luteo-virens ( Physalacriaceae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Rui; Gao, Qingbo; Zhang, Faqi; Li, Yinhu; Ful, Pengcheng; Zhang, Jinhua; Wang, Jiuli; Chen, Shilong

    2014-09-04

    [OBJECTIVE] The objectives of this study were to use Roche 454 GS FLX system to develop SSR markers for Armillaria luteo-virens. These datasets will be valuable for detecting genetic diversity and population structure of this species. [METHODS] We collected Armillaria luteo-virens samples from Yushu in Qinghai province, China. Total RNA was isolated by using the TRIzol reagent, after that we constructed cDNA library and performed one quarter plate of the whole run 454 pyrosequencing. We selected 98 primer pairs randomly from the 321 SSRs to evaluate their application and the polymorphism across 66 individuals (Armillaria luteo-virens) representing 3 wild populations. [RESULTS] Roche 454 sequencing yielded 197,121 reads with a total nucleotide size of 88,585,965bp. 27 of 98 SSRs loci were polymorphic. Numbers of alleles (Na) ranged from 2 to 8. Expected heterozygosity (HE) ranged from less than 0. 001 to 0. 810 at locus ALV65, while observed heterozygosity (Ho) from 0 at loci AIV64 and AIV92 to 0. 900 at loci ALV8. We found no evidence of linkage disequiliburium, however 10 of 27 SSR markers showed significant deviation from Hardy-weinberg equilibrium. [CONCLUSION] These remaining 17 pairs of Armillaria luteo-virens SSR markers will be valuable for future research on detecting population structure and conservation of this species.

  9. Genetic Background and Population Genetics of Hungarian Brown Trout Populations Using PCR-RFLP and Microsatellite Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ágnes Ősz

    2015-12-01

    4 University of West Hungary, Mosonmagyaróvár Vár 2., 9200 Mosonmagyaróvár, Hungary Based on the analyses of the mitochondrial DNA of several European brown trout populations, five evolutionary lineages of brown trout were indentified (Atlantic, Danubian, Mediterranean, Adriatic, Marble. The species is bred primarily for stock enhancement of natural waters, however the most hatchery-maintained broodstocks originate from the Atlantic lineage. Due to the hydrogeography of Hungary our stocks should theoretically belong to the Danubian lineage; however, this has not been investigated earlier by genetic studies. For our genetic analysis, 702 fin clips were collected from two brown trout broodstocks (Lillafüred and Szilvásvárad as well as populations of natural streams (Bán, Jósva, Kemence, Apátkút, Bittva and Kölöntés in Hungary. Sequencing of the control region in mitochondrial DNA, three PCR-RFLP (mitochondrial DNA control region, lactate dehydrogenase and somatolactin genes and five microsatellite markers were used to distinguish between Danubian and Atlantic lineages of brown trout. The proportion of the mitochondrial haplotype of the Danubian lineage was low, with the exception of the Apátkúti, Kölöntés streams and Szilvásvárad broodstock. Analyses of nuclear PCR-RFLP and microsatellites markers showed various distributions of alleles characteristic of the Atlantic or Danubian lineages, although the Atlantic genotype has dominated in all population. In case of the analyses of microsatellites the polymorphism varied greatly at all locations. In addition we found several alleles that were not described earlier in other populations. Those alleles probably would be typical of Hungarian brown trout populations. Overall the populations were effectively in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for both PCR-RFLP and microsatellite markers. The remarkably high proportion of allochthonous Atlantic alleles in the analyzed sites is a clear indicator of the import

  10. Genetic monitoring of supportive breeding in brown trout ( Salmo trutta L.), using microsatellite DNA markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Møller; Eg Nielsen, Einar; Ruzzante, D.E.

    2000-01-01

    Stocking with offspring of local wild fish, so-called supportive breeding, is often advocated as an alternative to stocking domesticated fish. However, it is important to ensure that supportive breeding does not result in inbreeding and loss of genetic variability. We analysed eight microsatellite...

  11. Microsatellite Markers in and around Rice Genes: Applications in Variety Identification and DUS Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonow, S.; Pinho, Von E.V.R.; Vieira, M.G.C.; Vosman, B.

    2009-01-01

    In Brazil, rice (Oryza sativa L.) varieties adapted to different ecological regions are available on the market. However, these varieties exhibit highly similar morphologies, which makes their identification difficult. In this study we identified microsatellites in and around genes that are useful

  12. A multiplex set of microsatellite markers for the scarlet rosefinch (Carpodacus erythrinus)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Poláková, Radka; Vyskočilová, Martina; Martin, J.-F.; Mays Jr., H. L.; Hill, G. E.; Bryja, Josef; Albrecht, Tomáš

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 6 (2007), s. 1375-1378 ISSN 1471-8278 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/06/0851 Grant - others:NSF(US) DEB-0077804 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : Carpodacus * cross-amplification * heterozygosity * microsatellites Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.257, year: 2007

  13. New polymorphic microsatellite markers in the greater false vampire bat Megaderma lyra (Chiroptera: Megadermatidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tereba, A.; Čížková, Dagmar; Sundari, A. A.; Rajan, K. E.; Bogdanowicz, W.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 4 (2011), s. 749-751 ISSN 1877-7252 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : Chiroptera * Megaderma lyra * Microsatellites * Polymorphism Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.485, year: 2011

  14. An annotated genetic map of loblolly pine based on microsatellite and cDNA markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) genetic linkage maps have been based on a variety of DNA polymorphisms, such as AFLPs, RAPDs, RFLPs, and ESTPs, but only a few SSRs (simple sequence repeats), also known as simple tandem repeats or microsatellites, have been mapped in P. taeda. The objective o...

  15. Analysis of genetic variability in the Czech Dachshund population using microsatellite markers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Přibáňová, M.; Horák, Pavel; Schröffelová, D.; Urban, T.; Bechyňová, Renata; Musilová, L.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 126, - (2009), s. 311-318 ISSN 0931-2668 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS500450578; GA ČR GD523/03/H076 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : dachshund * dog * genetic variability * microsatellite Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.706, year: 2009

  16. Genetic Diversity of Bali Cattle Based on Microsatellite Marker in Indonesian Breeding Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Septian

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Genetics characterization in livestock based on microsatellite has been widely implemented including for Bali cattle in three different breeding centres in Indonesia. This study aimed to determine diversity of Bali cattle microsatellites in three breeding centers namely BPTU Bali cattle in Bali, BPT-HMT Serading Sumbawa in West Nusa Tenggara, and Village Breeding Center in South Sulawesi. The number of animals used in this study was 95 head of cattle consisted of 32 heads from BPTU Bali Province, 32 heads from BPT-HMT Serading Sumbawa, and 31 heads from Village Barru Breeding Center Barru distric. Microsatellite loci used to determine the diversity was the locus SPS115, INRA037, MM12, and ETH185 based on flourescently labeled fragment method. Data analysis of microsatellite in Bali cattle at three different locations was performed by using POPGEN 1.2, Cervus, and POPTREE2 programs. The results showed that microsatellite diversity in Bali cattle detected 32 alleles from three different locations, and there were specific alleles at each location. Average values of observed heterozygosity (Ho and expected heterozygosity (He were 0.418 and 0.604 respectively, while the average value of polymorphism informative content (PIC was 0.579. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in general suggested that the loci used in the Bali cattle in three populations were in equilibrium, except INRA037 and ETH185. The genetic diversity between populations of Bali cattle was 0.033 (3%, while the inbreeding coefficient index in all populations was 0.296 (29.6 %. Bali cattle phylogeny tree with three populations showed that the populations of Bali cattle in BPTU Bali and VBC Barru had close genetic distance compared to the population of Bali cattle in BPT-HMT Serading Sumbawa. The results of this study provide information that the characteristics of Bali cattle breeding centers in three locations are different, so we need a directed breeding program in each population.

  17. Rapid development of microsatellite markers with 454 pyrosequencing in a vulnerable fish, the mottled skate, Raja pulchra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jung-Ha; Park, Jung-Youn; Jo, Hyun-Su

    2012-01-01

    The mottled skate, Raja pulchra, is an economically valuable fish. However, due to a severe population decline, it is listed as a vulnerable species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. To analyze its genetic structure and diversity, microsatellite markers were developed using 454 pyrosequencing. A total of 17,033 reads containing dinucleotide microsatellite repeat units (mean, 487 base pairs) were identified from 453,549 reads. Among 32 loci containing more than nine repeat units, 20 primer sets (62%) produced strong PCR products, of which 14 were polymorphic. In an analysis of 60 individuals from two R. pulchra populations, the number of alleles per locus ranged from 1-10, and the mean allelic richness was 4.7. No linkage disequilibrium was found between any pair of loci, indicating that the markers were independent. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test showed significant deviation in two of the 28 single-loci after sequential Bonferroni's correction. Using 11 primer sets, cross-species amplification was demonstrated in nine related species from four families within two classes. Among the 11 loci amplified from three other Rajidae family species; three loci were polymorphic. A monomorphic locus was amplified in all three Rajidae family species and the Dasyatidae family. Two Rajidae polymorphic loci amplified monomorphic target DNAs in four species belonging to the Carcharhiniformes class, and another was polymorphic in two Carcharhiniformes species.

  18. Putative Microsatellite DNA Marker-Based Wheat Genomic Resource for Varietal Improvement and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarika Jaiswal

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Wheat fulfills 20% of global caloric requirement. World needs 60% more wheat for 9 billion population by 2050 but climate change with increasing temperature is projected to affect wheat productivity adversely. Trait improvement and management of wheat germplasm requires genomic resource. Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs being highly polymorphic and ubiquitously distributed in the genome, can be a marker of choice but there is no structured marker database with options to generate primer pairs for genotyping on desired chromosome/physical location. Previously associated markers with different wheat trait are also not available in any database. Limitations of in vitro SSR discovery can be overcome by genome-wide in silico mining of SSR. Triticum aestivum SSR database (TaSSRDb is an integrated online database with three-tier architecture, developed using PHP and MySQL and accessible at http://webtom.cabgrid.res.in/wheatssr/. For genotyping, Primer3 standalone code computes primers on user request. Chromosome-wise SSR calling for all the three sub genomes along with choice of motif types is provided in addition to the primer generation for desired marker. We report here a database of highest number of SSRs (476,169 from complex, hexaploid wheat genome (~17 GB along with previously reported 268 SSR markers associated with 11 traits. Highest (116.93 SSRs/Mb and lowest (74.57 SSRs/Mb SSR densities were found on 2D and 3A chromosome, respectively. To obtain homozygous locus, e-PCR was done. Such 30 loci were randomly selected for PCR validation in panel of 18 wheat Advance Varietal Trial (AVT lines. TaSSRDb can be a valuable genomic resource tool for linkage mapping, gene/QTL (Quantitative trait locus discovery, diversity analysis, traceability and variety identification. Varietal specific profiling and differentiation can supplement DUS (Distinctiveness, Uniformity, and Stability testing, EDV (Essentially Derived Variety/IV (Initial Variety disputes, seed

  19. Genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships in local cattle breeds of Senegal based on autosomal microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiaye, Ndèye Penda; Sow, Adama; Dayo, Guiguigbaza-Kossigan; Ndiaye, Saliou; Sawadogo, Germain Jerôme; Sembène, Mbacké

    2015-08-01

    In Senegal, uncontrolled cross-breeding of cattle breeds and changes in production systems are assumed to lead to an increase of gene flow between populations. This might constitute a relevant threat to livestock improvement. Therewith, this study was carried out to assess the current genetic diversity and the phylogenetic relationships of the four native Senegalese cattle breeds (Gobra zebu, Maure zebu, Djakoré, and N'Dama). Genomic DNA was isolated from blood samples of 120 unrelated animals collected from three agro-ecological areas of Senegal according to their phenotypic traits. Genotyping was done using 11 specific highly polymorphic microsatellite makers recommended by Food and Agriculture Organization. The basic measures of genetic variation and phylogenetic trees were computed using bioinformatics' software. A total of 115 alleles were identified with a number of alleles (Na) at one locus ranging from 6 to 16. All loci were polymorphic with a mean polymorphic information content of 0.76. The mean allelic richness (Rs) lay within the narrow range of 5.14 in N'Dama taurine to 6.10 in Gobra zebu. While, the expected heterozygosity (HE) per breed was high in general with an overall mean of 0.76±0.04. Generally, the heterozygote deficiency (FIS) of 0.073±0.026 was relatively due to inbreeding among these cattle breeds or the occurrence of population substructure. The high values of allelic and gene diversity showed that Senegalese native cattle breeds represented an important reservoir of genetic variation. The genetic distances and clustering trees concluded that the N'Dama cattle were most distinct among the investigated cattle populations. So, the principal component analyses showed qualitatively that there was an intensive genetic admixture between the Gobra zebu and Maure zebu breeds. The broad genetic diversity in Senegalese cattle breeds will allow for greater opportunities for improvement of productivity and adaptation relative to global changes. For

  20. Genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships in local cattle breeds of Senegal based on autosomal microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndèye Penda Ndiaye

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In Senegal, uncontrolled cross-breeding of cattle breeds and changes in production systems are assumed to lead to an increase of gene flow between populations. This might constitute a relevant threat to livestock improvement. Therewith, this study was carried out to assess the current genetic diversity and the phylogenetic relationships of the four native Senegalese cattle breeds (Gobra zebu, Maure zebu, Djakoré, and N’Dama. Methods: Genomic DNA was isolated from blood samples of 120 unrelated animals collected from three agro-ecological areas of Senegal according to their phenotypic traits. Genotyping was done using 11 specific highly polymorphic microsatellite makers recommended by Food and Agriculture Organization. The basic measures of genetic variation and phylogenetic trees were computed using bioinformatics’ software. Results: A total of 115 alleles were identified with a number of alleles (Na at one locus ranging from 6 to 16. All loci were polymorphic with a mean polymorphic information content of 0.76. The mean allelic richness (Rs lay within the narrow range of 5.14 in N’Dama taurine to 6.10 in Gobra zebu. While, the expected heterozygosity (HE per breed was high in general with an overall mean of 0.76±0.04. Generally, the heterozygote deficiency (FIS of 0.073±0.026 was relatively due to inbreeding among these cattle breeds or the occurrence of population substructure. The high values of allelic and gene diversity showed that Senegalese native cattle breeds represented an important reservoir of genetic variation. The genetic distances and clustering trees concluded that the N’Dama cattle were most distinct among the investigated cattle populations. So, the principal component analyses showed qualitatively that there was an intensive genetic admixture between the Gobra zebu and Maure zebu breeds. Conclusions: The broad genetic diversity in Senegalese cattle breeds will allow for greater opportunities for improvement of

  1. Evaluation of MT1XT20 Single Quasi-Monomorphic Mononucleotide Marker for Characterizing Microsatellite Instability in Persian Lynch Syndrome Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahani, Najmeh; Nikpou, Parvaneh; Emami, Mohammad Hassan; Hashemzadeh, Morteza; Zeinalian, Mehrdad; Shariatpanahi, Seyed Shervin; Salehi, Rasoul

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal malignancies with high microsatellite instability (MSI-H), either hereditary (Lynch syndrome) or sporadic, demonstrate better prognosis and altered response to 5FU chemotherapy. It is now recommended to perform MSI testing for all new cases of colorectal cancer regardless of being categorized as hereditary or sporadic. For MSI detection, immunohistochemistry or PCR-based protocols using a cohort of various sets of STR markers are recommended. Here we aimed to evaluate a simplified protocol using just a single STR marker, MT1XT20 mononucleotide repeat, for detection of MSI in Lynch syndrome patients. A Promega five-marker MSI testing panel and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were used as the gold standard in conjunction with MT1XT20. Colorectal patients with a positive history of familial cancers were selected by evaluating medical records. Based on Amsterdam II criteria for Lynch syndrome 20 families were short listed. DNA was extracted from formalin fixed paraffin embedded tumour and adjacent normal tissues resected from the index case in each family. Extracted DNA was subjected to MT1XT20 mononucleotide marker analysis and assessment with a commercially available five marker MSI testing kit (Promega, USA). IHC also was performed on tissue sections and the results were compared with PCR based data. Eight (40%), seven (35%) and five (25%) cases were MSI positive using with the Promega kit, IHC and MT1XT20, respectively. Among the markers included in Promega kit, BAT26 marker showed instability in all 8 samples. NR24 and NR21 markers showed instability in 7 (87.5%), and BAT25 and MONO 27 in 6 (75%) and 5 (62.5%). Although MT1XT20 was earlier reported as a valid standalone marker for MSI testing in CRC patients, we could not verify this in our Iranian patients. Instead BAT26 among the markers included in Promega MSI testing kit showed instability in all 8 MSI-H CRC samples. Therefore, it seems BAT26 could act well as a single marker for MSI testing in Iranian

  2. A microsatellite linkage map for the cultivated strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) suggests extensive regions of homozygosity in the genome that may have resulted from breeding and selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, D J; Passey, T; Surbanovski, N; Lopez Girona, E; Kuchta, P; Davik, J; Harrison, R; Passey, A; Whitehouse, A B; Simpson, D W

    2012-05-01

    The linkage maps of the cultivated strawberry, Fragaria × ananassa (2n = 8x = 56) that have been reported to date have been developed predominantly from AFLPs, along with supplementation with transferrable microsatellite (SSR) markers. For the investigation of the inheritance of morphological characters in the cultivated strawberry and for the development of tools for marker-assisted breeding and selection, it is desirable to populate maps of the genome with an abundance of transferrable molecular markers such as microsatellites (SSRs) and gene-specific markers. Exploiting the recent release of the genome sequence of the diploid F. vesca, and the publication of an extensive number of polymorphic SSR markers for the genus Fragaria, we have extended the linkage map of the 'Redgauntlet' × 'Hapil' (RG × H) mapping population to include a further 330 loci, generated from 160 primer pairs, to create a linkage map for F. × ananassa containing 549 loci, 490 of which are transferrable SSR or gene-specific markers. The map covers 2140.3 cM in the expected 28 linkage groups for an integrated map (where one group is composed of two separate male and female maps), which represents an estimated 91% of the cultivated strawberry genome. Despite the relative saturation of the linkage map on the majority of linkage groups, regions of apparent extensive homozygosity were identified in the genomes of 'Redgauntlet' and 'Hapil' which may be indicative of allele fixation during the breeding and selection of modern F. × ananassa cultivars. The genomes of the octoploid and diploid Fragaria are largely collinear, but through comparison of mapped markers on the RG × H linkage map to their positions on the genome sequence of F. vesca, a number of inversions were identified that may have occurred before the polyploidisation event that led to the evolution of the modern octoploid strawberry species.

  3. Genetic diversity and variability in two Italian autochthonous donkey genetic types assessed by microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donato Matassino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 13rd century, Italian domestic autochthonous donkey population has been characterised by Mediterranean grey mousy cruciate ancestral phenotype, currently typical of Amiata donkey (AD genetic type. This phenotype persisted up to the 16th century when a marked introduction of Hispanic and French big sized and dark bay or darkish coloured sires occurred. In the context of a safeguard programme of Latial Equide resources, the aim of this research was to evaluate the genetic diversity and similarity between the AD breed and an autochthonous donkey population native from Lazio, the Viterbese donkey (VD, using molecular markers. A total of 135 animals (50 AD and 85 VD were genetically characterised by using 16 short tandem repeat markers. A high genetic differentiation between populations (FST=0.158; P<0.01 and a low betweenbreeds genetic similarity (0.233±0.085 were observed. Correspondence analysis, the result of STRUCTURE software analysis and analysis of molecular variance would seem to indicate genetically different entities as well. It would be desirable to increase the number of comparison with other breeds to better understand the origin of VD. Moreover, results obtained in this study suggest that the loss of genetic variation observed in VD could mainly derive from unnoticed sub-population structuring (Wahlund effect, rather than to other factors such as inbreeding, null alleles or selection influence.

  4. Microsatellite DNA polymorphism in selectively controlled Apis mellifera carnica and Apis mellifera caucasica populations from Poland

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    Nikolova Stanimila R.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic polymorphism in selectively controlled honeybee populations of A. m. carnica and A. m. caucasica in Poland, was characterized by microsatellite DNA analysis. All honeybee samples were analyzed for nine microsatellite loci: Ac011; A024; A043; A088; Ap226; Ap238; Ap243; Ap249 and Ap256, which were found to be polymorphic in both populations. The mean number of alleles per locus was 6.222 for A. m. carnica and 4.556 for A. m. caucasica. Average observed and expected heterozygosity values were calculated as 0.976 and 0.734 in A. m. carnica and as 0.933 and 0.603 in A. m. caucasica, respectively. For the nine microsatellite loci, a total of 76 alleles were found in both populations. Thirty-five private alleles were observed in A. m. carnica and 20 in A. m. caucasica. Information about allele frequencies, FST values and genotypic differentiation is given. Nei’s genetic distance between studied populations of A. m. carnica and A. m. caucasica was calculated as 0.384.

  5. Genetic monitoring of supportive breeding in brown trout ( Salmo trutta L.), using microsatellite DNA markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Møller; Eg Nielsen, Einar; Ruzzante, D.E.

    2000-01-01

    Stocking with offspring of local wild fish, so-called supportive breeding, is often advocated as an alternative to stocking domesticated fish. However, it is important to ensure that supportive breeding does not result in inbreeding and loss of genetic variability. We analysed eight microsatellit....... In two populations subject to supportive breeding, there were strong indications of reduced effective population sizes, and significant genetic differentiation was observed between different samples from the same population.......Stocking with offspring of local wild fish, so-called supportive breeding, is often advocated as an alternative to stocking domesticated fish. However, it is important to ensure that supportive breeding does not result in inbreeding and loss of genetic variability. We analysed eight microsatellite...

  6. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers for the Cape gooseberry Physalis peruviana.

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    Jaime Simbaqueba

    Full Text Available Physalis peruviana, commonly known as Cape gooseberry, is an Andean Solanaceae fruit with high nutritional value and interesting medicinal properties. In the present study we report the development and characterization of microsatellite loci from a P. peruviana commercial Colombian genotype. We identified 932 imperfect and 201 perfect Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR loci in untranslated regions (UTRs and 304 imperfect and 83 perfect SSR loci in coding regions from the assembled Physalis peruviana leaf transcriptome. The UTR SSR loci were used for the development of 162 primers for amplification. The efficiency of these primers was tested via PCR in a panel of seven P. peruviana accessions including Colombia, Kenya and Ecuador ecotypes and one closely related species Physalis floridana. We obtained an amplification rate of 83% and a polymorphic rate of 22%. Here we report the first P. peruviana specific microsatellite set, a valuable tool for a wide variety of applications, including functional diversity, conservation and improvement of the species.

  7. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers for the Cape gooseberry Physalis peruviana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simbaqueba, Jaime; Sánchez, Pilar; Sanchez, Erika; Núñez Zarantes, Victor Manuel; Chacon, Maria Isabel; Barrero, Luz Stella; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

    2011-01-01

    Physalis peruviana, commonly known as Cape gooseberry, is an Andean Solanaceae fruit with high nutritional value and interesting medicinal properties. In the present study we report the development and characterization of microsatellite loci from a P. peruviana commercial Colombian genotype. We identified 932 imperfect and 201 perfect Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR) loci in untranslated regions (UTRs) and 304 imperfect and 83 perfect SSR loci in coding regions from the assembled Physalis peruviana leaf transcriptome. The UTR SSR loci were used for the development of 162 primers for amplification. The efficiency of these primers was tested via PCR in a panel of seven P. peruviana accessions including Colombia, Kenya and Ecuador ecotypes and one closely related species Physalis floridana. We obtained an amplification rate of 83% and a polymorphic rate of 22%. Here we report the first P. peruviana specific microsatellite set, a valuable tool for a wide variety of applications, including functional diversity, conservation and improvement of the species.

  8. Marker-assisted selection in poultry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koning, D.-J. de; Hocking, P.M.

    2007-01-01

    Among livestock species, chicken has the most extensive genomics toolbox available for detection of quantitative trait loci (QTL) and marker-assisted selection (MAS). The uptake of MAS is therefore not limited by technical resources but mostly by the priorities and financial constraints of the few remaining poultry breeding companies. With the cost of genotyping decreasing rapidly, an increase in the use of direct trait- single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-associations in MAS can be predicted. (author)

  9. Characterization of genetic diversity of native 'Ancho' chili populations of Mexico using microsatellite markers

    OpenAIRE

    Rocío Toledo-Aguilar; Higinio López-Sánchez; Amalio Santacruz-Varela; Ernestina Valadez-Moctezuma; Pedro A López; Víctor H Aguilar-Rincón; Víctor A González-Hernández; Humberto Vaquera-Huerta

    2016-01-01

    'Ancho' type chilis (Capsicum annuum L. var. annuum) are an important ingredient in the traditional cuisine of Mexico and so are in high demand. It includes six native sub-types with morphological and fruit color differences. However, the genetic diversity of the set of these sub­types has not been determined. The objective of this study was to characterize the genetic diversity of native Mexican ancho chili populations using microsatellites and to determine the relationship among these popul...

  10. Identification and Evaluation of 21 Novel Microsatellite Markers from the Autumnal Moth (Epirrita autumnata (Lepidoptera: Geometridae

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    Siv Grethe Aarnes

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The autumnal moth (Epirrita autumnata is a cyclically outbreaking forest Lepidoptera with circumpolar distribution and substantial impact on Northern ecosystems. We have isolated 21 microsatellites from the species to facilitate population genetic studies of population cycles, outbreaks, and crashes. First, PCR primers and PCR conditions were developed to amplify 19 trinucleotide loci and two tetranucleotide loci in six multiplex PCR approaches and then analyzed for species specificity, sensitivity and precision. Twelve of the loci showed simple tandem repeat array structures while nine loci showed imperfect repeat structures, and repeat numbers varied in our material between six and 15. The application in population genetics for all the 21 microsatellites were further validated in 48 autumnal moths sampled from Northern Norway, and allelic variation was detected in 19 loci. The detected numbers of alleles per locus ranged from two to 13, and the observed and expected heterozygosities varied from 0.04 to 0.69 and 0.04 to 0.79, respectively. Evidence for linkage disequilibrium was found for six loci as well as indication of one null allele. We find that these novel microsatellites and their multiplex-PCR assays are suitable for further research on fine- and large-scale population-genetic studies of Epirrita autumnata.

  11. Identification and Evaluation of 21 Novel Microsatellite Markers from the Autumnal Moth (Epirrita autumnata) (Lepidoptera: Geometridae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarnes, Siv Grethe; Fløystad, Ida; Schregel, Julia; Vindstad, Ole Petter Laksforsmo; Jepsen, Jane Uhd; Eiken, Hans Geir; Ims, Rolf A.; Hagen, Snorre B.

    2015-01-01

    The autumnal moth (Epirrita autumnata) is a cyclically outbreaking forest Lepidoptera with circumpolar distribution and substantial impact on Northern ecosystems. We have isolated 21 microsatellites from the species to facilitate population genetic studies of population cycles, outbreaks, and crashes. First, PCR primers and PCR conditions were developed to amplify 19 trinucleotide loci and two tetranucleotide loci in six multiplex PCR approaches and then analyzed for species specificity, sensitivity and precision. Twelve of the loci showed simple tandem repeat array structures while nine loci showed imperfect repeat structures, and repeat numbers varied in our material between six and 15. The application in population genetics for all the 21 microsatellites were further validated in 48 autumnal moths sampled from Northern Norway, and allelic variation was detected in 19 loci. The detected numbers of alleles per locus ranged from two to 13, and the observed and expected heterozygosities varied from 0.04 to 0.69 and 0.04 to 0.79, respectively. Evidence for linkage disequilibrium was found for six loci as well as indication of one null allele. We find that these novel microsatellites and their multiplex-PCR assays are suitable for further research on fine- and large-scale population-genetic studies of Epirrita autumnata. PMID:26393576

  12. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers for Morus spp. and assessment of their transferability to other closely related species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Adoption of genomics based breeding has emerged as a promising approach for achieving comprehensive crop improvement. Such an approach is more relevant in the case of perennial species like mulberry. However, unavailability of genomic resources of co-dominant marker systems has been the major constraint for adopting molecular breeding to achieve genetic enhancement of Mulberry. The goal of this study was to develop and characterize a large number of locus specific genic and genomic SSR markers which can be effectively used for molecular characterization of mulberry species/genotypes. Result We analyzed a total of 3485 DNA sequences including genomic and expressed sequences (ESTs) of mulberry (Morus alba L.) genome. We identified 358 sequences to develop appropriate microsatellite primer pairs representing 222 genomic and 136 EST regions. Primers amplifying locus specific regions of Dudia white (a genotype of Morus alba L), were identified and 137 genomic and 51 genic SSR markers were standardized. A two pronged strategy was adopted to assess the applicability of these SSR markers using mulberry species and genotypes along with a few closely related species belonging to the family Moraceae viz., Ficus, Fig and Jackfruit. While 100% of these markers amplified specific loci on the mulberry genome, 79% were transferable to other related species indicating the robustness of these markers and the potential they hold in analyzing the molecular and genetic diversity among mulberry germplasm as well as other related species. The inherent ability of these markers in detecting heterozygosity combined with a high average polymorphic information content (PIC) of 0.559 ranging between 0.076 and 0.943 clearly demonstrates their potential as genomic resources in diversity analysis. The dissimilarity coefficient determined based on Neighbor joining method, revealed that the markers were successful in segregating the mulberry species, genotypes and other related species

  13. Genic non-coding microsatellites in the rice genome: characterization, marker design and use in assessing genetic and evolutionary relationships among domesticated groups

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    Singh Nagendra

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Completely sequenced plant genomes provide scope for designing a large number of microsatellite markers, which are useful in various aspects of crop breeding and genetic analysis. With the objective of developing genic but non-coding microsatellite (GNMS markers for the rice (Oryza sativa L. genome, we characterized the frequency and relative distribution of microsatellite repeat-motifs in 18,935 predicted protein coding genes including 14,308 putative promoter sequences. Results We identified 19,555 perfect GNMS repeats with densities ranging from 306.7/Mb in chromosome 1 to 450/Mb in chromosome 12 with an average of 357.5 GNMS per Mb. The average microsatellite density was maximum in the 5' untranslated regions (UTRs followed by those in introns, promoters, 3'UTRs and minimum in the coding sequences (CDS. Primers were designed for 17,966 (92% GNMS repeats, including 4,288 (94% hypervariable class I types, which were bin-mapped on the rice genome. The GNMS markers were most polymorphic in the intronic region (73.3% followed by markers in the promoter region (53.3% and least in the CDS (26.6%. The robust polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification efficiency and high polymorphic potential of GNMS markers over genic coding and random genomic microsatellite markers suggest their immediate use in efficient genotyping applications in rice. A set of these markers could assess genetic diversity and establish phylogenetic relationships among domesticated rice cultivar groups. We also demonstrated the usefulness of orthologous and paralogous conserved non-coding microsatellite (CNMS markers, identified in the putative rice promoter sequences, for comparative physical mapping and understanding of evolutionary and gene regulatory complexities among rice and other members of the grass family. The divergence between long-grained aromatics and subspecies japonica was estimated to be more recent (0.004 Mya compared to short

  14. Genetic Variability and Geographic Diversity of the Common Bed Bug (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) Populations from the Midwest Using Microsatellite Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narain, Ralph B; Lalithambika, Sreedevi; Kamble, Shripat T

    2015-07-01

    With the recent global resurgence of the bed bugs (Cimex lectularius L.), there is a need to better understand its biology, ecology, and ability to establish populations. Bed bugs are domestic pests that feed mainly on mammalian blood. Although bed bugs have not been implicated as vectors of pathogens, their biting activity inflicts severe insomnia and allergic reactions. Moreover, they have recently developed resistance to various insecticides, which requires further molecular research to determine genetic variation and appropriate interventions. Population dynamics, including genetic differentiation and genetic distance of 10 populations from the Midwest were analyzed in this study. The bed bug samples collected by pest control companies were genotyped using eight species-specific microsatellite markers. Results showed all eight markers were polymorphic, with 8-16 alleles per locus, suggesting high genetic diversity. The FST values were >0.25, signifying pronounced genetic differentiation. The G-test results also indicated high genetic differentiation among populations. The frequency of the most common allele across all eight loci was 0.42. The coefficient of relatedness between each of the populations was >0.5, indicative of sibling or parent-offspring relationships, while the FIS and its confidence interval values were statistically insignificant within the populations tested. The populations departed from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, possibly because of high heterozygosity. The genetic distance analysis using a neighbor-joining tree showed that the populations from Kansas City, MO, were genetically separate from most of those from Nebraska, indicating a geographic pattern of genetic structure. Our study demonstrated the effectiveness of using microsatellite markers to study bed bugs population structure, thereby improving our understanding of bed bug population dynamics in the Midwest. Overall, this study showed a high genetic diversity and identified several

  15. Molecular mapping of the hybrid necrosis gene NetJingY176 in Aegilops tauschii using microsatellite markers

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    Fengbo Xue

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The rich genetic variation preserved in collections of Aegilops tauschii can be readily exploited to improve common wheat using synthetic hexaploid wheat lines. However, hybrid necrosis, which is characterized by progressive death of leaves or plants, has been observed in certain interspecific crosses between tetraploid wheat and Ae. tauschii. The aim of this study was to construct a fine genetic map of a gene (temporarily named NetJingY176 conferring hybrid necrosis in Ae. tauschii accession Jing Y176. A triploid F1 population derived from distant hybridization between Ae. tauschii and tetraploid wheat was used to map the gene with microsatellite markers. The newly developed markers XsdauK539 and XsdauK561 co-segregated with NetJingY176 on chromosome arm 2DS. The tightly linked markers developed in this study were used to genotype 91 Ae. tauschii accessions. The marker genotype analysis suggested that 49.45% of the Ae. tauschii accessions carry NetJingY176. Interestingly, hybrid necrosis genotypes tended to appear more commonly in Ae. tauschii ssp. tauschii than in Ae. tauschii ssp. strangulata.

  16. Isolation and Characterization of 13 New Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers in the Phaseolus vulgaris L. (Common Bean Genome

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    Aihua Wang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 13 polymorphic microsatellite markers were isolated from the Phaseolus vulgaris L. (common bean by using the Fast Isolation by AFLP of Sequence COntaining Repeats (FIASCO protocol. These markers revealed two to seven alleles, with an average of 3.64 alleles per locus. The polymorphic information content (PIC values ranged from 0.055 to 0.721 over 13 loci, with a mean value of 0.492, and 7 loci having PIC greater than 0.5. The expected heterozygosity (HE and observed heterozygosity (HO levels ranged from 0.057 to 0.814 and from 0.026 to 0.531, respectively. Cross-species amplification of the 13 prime pairs was performed in its related specie of Vigna unguiculata L. Seven out of all these markers showed cross-species transferability. These markers will be useful for future genetic diversity and population genetics studies for this agricultural specie and its related species.

  17. Development of Microsatellite Markers for the Korean Mussel, Mytilus coruscus (Mytilidae Using Next-Generation Sequencing

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    Hye Suck An

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Mytilus coruscus (family Mytilidae is one of the most important marine shellfish species in Korea. During the past few decades, this species has become endangered due to the loss of habitats and overfishing. Despite this species’ importance, information on its genetic background is scarce. In this study, we developed microsatellite markers for M. coruscus using next-generation sequencing. A total of 263,900 raw reads were obtained from a quarter-plate run on the 454 GS-FLX titanium platform, and 176,327 unique sequences were generated with an average length of 381 bp; 2569 (1.45% sequences contained a minimum of five di- to tetra-nucleotide repeat motifs. Of the 51 loci screened, 46 were amplified successfully, and 22 were polymorphic among 30 individuals, with seven of trinucleotide repeats and three of tetranucleotide repeats. All loci exhibited high genetic variability, with an average of 17.32 alleles per locus, and the mean observed and expected heterozygosities were 0.67 and 0.90, respectively. In addition, cross-amplification was tested for all 22 loci in another congener species, M. galloprovincialis. None of the primer pairs resulted in effective amplification, which might be due to their high mutation rates. Our work demonstrated the utility of next-generation 454 sequencing as a method for the rapid and cost-effective identification of microsatellites. The high degree of polymorphism exhibited by the 22 newly developed microsatellites will be useful in future conservation genetic studies of this species.

  18. Contrasted patterns of selection on MHC-linked microsatellites in natural populations of the Malagasy plague reservoir.

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    Charlotte Tollenaere

    Full Text Available Plague (Yersinia pestis infection is a highly virulent rodent disease that persists in many natural ecosystems. The black rat (Rattus rattus is the main host involved in the plague focus of the central highlands of Madagascar. Black rat populations from this area are highly resistant to plague, whereas those from areas in which the disease is absent (low altitude zones of Madagascar are susceptible. Various lines of evidence suggest a role for the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC in plague resistance. We therefore used the MHC region as a candidate for detecting signatures of plague-mediated selection in Malagasy black rats, by comparing population genetic structures for five MHC-linked microsatellites and neutral markers in two sampling designs. We first compared four pairs of populations, each pair including one population from the plague focus and one from the disease-free zone. Plague-mediated selection was expected to result in greater genetic differentiation between the two zones than expected under neutrality and this was observed for one MHC-class I-linked locus (D20Img2. For this marker as well as for four other MHC-linked loci, a geographic pattern of genetic structure was found at local scale within the plague focus. This pattern would be expected if plague selection pressures were spatially variable. Finally, another MHC-class I-linked locus (D20Rat21 showed evidences of balancing selection, but it seems more likely that this selection would be related to unknown pathogens more widely distributed in Madagascar than plague.

  19. Contrasted patterns of selection on MHC-linked microsatellites in natural populations of the Malagasy plague reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollenaere, Charlotte; Ivanova, Svilena; Duplantier, Jean-Marc; Loiseau, Anne; Rahalison, Lila; Rahelinirina, Soanandrasana; Brouat, Carine

    2012-01-01

    Plague (Yersinia pestis infection) is a highly virulent rodent disease that persists in many natural ecosystems. The black rat (Rattus rattus) is the main host involved in the plague focus of the central highlands of Madagascar. Black rat populations from this area are highly resistant to plague, whereas those from areas in which the disease is absent (low altitude zones of Madagascar) are susceptible. Various lines of evidence suggest a role for the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) in plague resistance. We therefore used the MHC region as a candidate for detecting signatures of plague-mediated selection in Malagasy black rats, by comparing population genetic structures for five MHC-linked microsatellites and neutral markers in two sampling designs. We first compared four pairs of populations, each pair including one population from the plague focus and one from the disease-free zone. Plague-mediated selection was expected to result in greater genetic differentiation between the two zones than expected under neutrality and this was observed for one MHC-class I-linked locus (D20Img2). For this marker as well as for four other MHC-linked loci, a geographic pattern of genetic structure was found at local scale within the plague focus. This pattern would be expected if plague selection pressures were spatially variable. Finally, another MHC-class I-linked locus (D20Rat21) showed evidences of balancing selection, but it seems more likely that this selection would be related to unknown pathogens more widely distributed in Madagascar than plague.

  20. Construction of High Density Sweet Cherry (Prunus avium L.) Linkage Maps Using Microsatellite Markers and SNPs Detected by Genotyping-by-Sequencing (GBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guajardo, Verónica; Solís, Simón; Sagredo, Boris; Gainza, Felipe; Muñoz, Carlos; Gasic, Ksenija; Hinrichsen, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    Linkage maps are valuable tools in genetic and genomic studies. For sweet cherry, linkage maps have been constructed using mainly microsatellite markers (SSRs) and, recently, using single nucleotide polymorphism markers (SNPs) from a cherry 6K SNP array. Genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS), a new methodology based on high-throughput sequencing, holds great promise for identification of high number of SNPs and construction of high density linkage maps. In this study, GBS was used to identify SNPs from an intra-specific sweet cherry cross. A total of 8,476 high quality SNPs were selected for mapping. The physical position for each SNP was determined using the peach genome, Peach v1.0, as reference, and a homogeneous distribution of markers along the eight peach scaffolds was obtained. On average, 65.6% of the SNPs were present in genic regions and 49.8% were located in exonic regions. In addition to the SNPs, a group of SSRs was also used for construction of linkage maps. Parental and consensus high density maps were constructed by genotyping 166 siblings from a 'Rainier' x 'Rivedel' (Ra x Ri) cross. Using Ra x Ri population, 462, 489 and 985 markers were mapped into eight linkage groups in 'Rainier', 'Rivedel' and the Ra x Ri map, respectively, with 80% of mapped SNPs located in genic regions. Obtained maps spanned 549.5, 582.6 and 731.3 cM for 'Rainier', 'Rivedel' and consensus maps, respectively, with an average distance of 1.2 cM between adjacent markers for both 'Rainier' and 'Rivedel' maps and of 0.7 cM for Ra x Ri map. High synteny and co-linearity was observed between obtained maps and with Peach v1.0. These new high density linkage maps provide valuable information on the sweet cherry genome, and serve as the basis for identification of QTLs and genes relevant for the breeding of the species.