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Sample records for seizure therapy mst

  1. Individualized Low-Amplitude Seizure Therapy: Minimizing Current for Electroconvulsive Therapy and Magnetic Seizure Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterchev, Angel V; Krystal, Andrew D; Rosa, Moacyr A; Lisanby, Sarah H

    2015-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) at conventional current amplitudes (800–900 mA) is highly effective but carries the risk of cognitive side effects. Lowering and individualizing the current amplitude may reduce side effects by virtue of a less intense and more focal electric field exposure in the brain, but this aspect of ECT dosing is largely unexplored. Magnetic seizure therapy (MST) induces a weaker and more focal electric field than ECT; however, the pulse amplitude is not individualized and the minimum amplitude required to induce a seizure is unknown. We titrated the amplitude of long stimulus trains (500 pulses) as a means of determining the minimum current amplitude required to induce a seizure with ECT (bilateral, right unilateral, bifrontal, and frontomedial electrode placements) and MST (round coil on vertex) in nonhuman primates. Furthermore, we investigated a novel method of predicting this amplitude-titrated seizure threshold (ST) by a non-convulsive measurement of motor threshold (MT) using single pulses delivered through the ECT electrodes or MST coil. Average STs were substantially lower than conventional pulse amplitudes (112–174 mA for ECT and 37.4% of maximum device amplitude for MST). ST was more variable in ECT than in MST. MT explained 63% of the ST variance and is hence the strongest known predictor of ST. These results indicate that seizures can be induced with less intense electric fields than conventional ECT that may be safer; efficacy and side effects should be evaluated in clinical studies. MT measurement could be a faster and safer alternative to empirical ST titration for ECT and MST. PMID:25920013

  2. Minimum Electric Field Exposure for Seizure Induction with Electroconvulsive Therapy and Magnetic Seizure Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won H; Lisanby, Sarah H; Laine, Andrew F; Peterchev, Angel V

    2017-05-01

    Lowering and individualizing the current amplitude in electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has been proposed as a means to produce stimulation closer to the neural activation threshold and more focal seizure induction, which could potentially reduce cognitive side effects. However, the effect of current amplitude on the electric field (E-field) in the brain has not been previously linked to the current amplitude threshold for seizure induction. We coupled MRI-based E-field models with amplitude titrations of motor threshold (MT) and seizure threshold (ST) in four nonhuman primates (NHPs) to determine the strength, distribution, and focality of stimulation in the brain for four ECT electrode configurations (bilateral, bifrontal, right-unilateral, and frontomedial) and magnetic seizure therapy (MST) with cap coil on vertex. At the amplitude-titrated ST, the stimulated brain subvolume (23-63%) was significantly less than for conventional ECT with high, fixed current (94-99%). The focality of amplitude-titrated right-unilateral ECT (25%) was comparable to cap coil MST (23%), demonstrating that ECT with a low current amplitude and focal electrode placement can induce seizures with E-field as focal as MST, although these electrode and coil configurations affect differently specific brain regions. Individualizing the current amplitude reduced interindividual variation in the stimulation focality by 40-53% for ECT and 26% for MST, supporting amplitude individualization as a means of dosing especially for ECT. There was an overall significant correlation between the measured amplitude-titrated ST and the prediction of the E-field models, supporting a potential role of these models in dosing of ECT and MST. These findings may guide the development of seizure therapy dosing paradigms with improved risk/benefit ratio.

  3. Magnetic Seizure Therapy for Unipolar and Bipolar Depression: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Cretaz, Eric; Brunoni, Andr? R.; Lafer, Beny

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Magnetic seizure therapy (MST) is a novel, experimental therapeutic intervention, which combines therapeutic aspects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and transcranial magnetic stimulation, in order to achieve the efficacy of the former with the safety of the latter. MST might prove to be a valuable tool in the treatment of mood disorders, such as major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder. Our aim is to r...

  4. Electric field strength and focality in electroconvulsive therapy and magnetic seizure therapy: a finite element simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhi-De; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Peterchev, Angel V.

    2011-02-01

    We present the first computational study comparing the electric field induced by various electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and magnetic seizure therapy (MST) paradigms. Four ECT electrode configurations (bilateral, bifrontal, right unilateral, and focal electrically administered seizure therapy) and three MST coil configurations (circular, cap, and double cone) were modeled. The model incorporated a modality-specific neural activation threshold. ECT (0.3 ms pulse width) and MST induced the maximum electric field of 2.1-2.5 V cm-1 and 1.1-2.2 V cm-1 in the brain, corresponding to 6.2-7.2 times and 1.2-2.3 times the neural activation threshold, respectively. The MST electric field is more confined to the superficial cortex compared to ECT. The brain volume stimulated was much larger with ECT (up to 100%) than with MST (up to 8.2%). MST with the double-cone coil was the most focal, and bilateral ECT was the least focal. Our results suggest a possible biophysical explanation of the reduced side effects of MST compared to ECT. Our results also indicate that the conventional ECT pulse amplitude (800-900 mA) is much higher than necessary for seizure induction. Reducing the ECT pulse amplitude should be explored as a potential means of diminishing side effects.

  5. Magnetic Seizure Therapy for Unipolar and Bipolar Depression: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Cretaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Magnetic seizure therapy (MST is a novel, experimental therapeutic intervention, which combines therapeutic aspects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT and transcranial magnetic stimulation, in order to achieve the efficacy of the former with the safety of the latter. MST might prove to be a valuable tool in the treatment of mood disorders, such as major depressive disorder (MDD and bipolar disorder. Our aim is to review current literature on MST. Methods. OVID and MEDLINE databases were used to systematically search for clinical studies on MST. The terms “magnetic seizure therapy,” “depression,” and “bipolar” were employed. Results. Out of 74 studies, 8 met eligibility criteria. There was considerable variability in the methods employed and samples sizes were small, limiting the generalization of the results. All studies focused on depressive episodes, but few included patients with bipolar disorder. The studies found reported significant antidepressant effects, with remission rates ranging from 30% to 40%. No significant cognitive side effects related to MST were found, with a better cognitive profile when compared to ECT. Conclusion. MST was effective in reducing depressive symptoms in mood disorders, with generally less side effects than ECT. No study focused on comparing MST to ECT on bipolar depression specifically.

  6. Unaltered Neuronal and Glial Counts in Animal Models of Magnetic Seizure Therapy and Electroconvulsive Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dwork, A.J.; Christensen, J.R.; Larsen, K.B.

    2009-01-01

    report on its anatomical effects. We discerned no histological lesions in the brains of higher mammals subjected to electroconvulsive shock (ECS) or MST, under conditions that model closely those used in humans. We sought to extend these findings by determining whether these interventions affected...... the number of neurons or glia in the frontal cortex or hippocampus. Twenty-four animals received 6 weeks of ECS, MST, or anesthesia alone, 4 days per week. After perfusion fixation, numbers of neurons and glia in frontal cortex and hippocampus were determined by unbiased stereological methods. We found...... no effect of either intervention on volumes or total number or numerical density of neurons or glia in hippocampus, frontal cortex, or subregions of these structures. Induction of seizures in a rigorous model of human ECT and MST therapy does not cause a change in the number of neurons or glia...

  7. Magnetic seizure therapy in an adolescent with refractory bipolar depression: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noda Y

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Yoshihiro Noda,1,2 Zafiris J Daskalakis,1–3 Jonathan Downar,4 Paul E Croarkin,5 Paul B Fitzgerald,6 Daniel M Blumberger1–3 1Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, 2Temerty Centre for Therapeutic Brain Intervention, 3Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 4MRI-Guided rTMS Clinic, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada; 5Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 6Monash Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre, The Alfred and Monash University Central Clinical School, Melbourne, Australia Abstract: Magnetic seizure therapy (MST has shown efficacy in adult patients with treatment-resistant depression with limited impairment in memory. To date, the use of MST in adolescent depression has not been reported. Here we describe the first successful use of MST in the treatment of an adolescent patient with refractory bipolar depression. This patient received MST in an ongoing open-label study for treatment-resistant major depression. Treatments employed a twin-coil MST apparatus, with the center of each coil placed over the frontal cortex (ie, each coil centered over F3 and F4. MST was applied at 100 Hz and 100% machine output at progressively increasing train durations. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the 24-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and cognitive function was assessed with a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. This adolescent patient achieved full remission of clinical symptoms after an acute course of 18 MST treatments and had no apparent cognitive decline, other than some autobiographical memory impairment that may or may not be related to the MST treatment. This case report suggests that MST may be a safe and well tolerated intervention for adolescents with treatment-resistant bipolar depression. Pilot studies to further evaluate the effectiveness and safety of

  8. Aminophylline increases seizure length during electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L; Dannon, P N; Hirschmann, S; Schriber, S; Amytal, D; Dolberg, O T; Grunhaus, L

    1999-12-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is considered to be one of the most effective treatments for patients with major depression and persistent psychosis. Seizure characteristics probably determine the therapeutic effect of ECT; as a consequence, short seizures are accepted as one of the factors of poor outcome. During most ECT courses seizure threshold increases and seizure duration decreases. Methylxanthine preparations, caffeine, and theophylline have been used to prolong seizure duration. The use of aminophylline, more readily available than caffeine, has not been well documented. The objective of this study was to test the effects of aminophylline on seizure length. Fourteen drug-free patients with diagnoses of affective disorder or psychotic episode receiving ECT participated in this study. Seizure length was assessed clinically and per EEG. Statistical comparisons were done using paired t tests. A significant increase (p < 0.04) in seizure length was achieved and maintained on three subsequent treatments with aminophylline. No adverse events were noted from the addition of aminophylline.

  9. New methods of minimally invasive brain modulation as therapies in psychiatry: TMS, MST, VNS and DBS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Mark S

    2002-08-01

    Over the past 20 years, new methods have been developed that have allowed scientists to visualize the human brain in action. Initially positron emission tomography (PET) and now functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) are causing a paradigm shift in psychiatry and the neurosciences. Psychiatry is abandoning the pharmacological model of 'brain as soup', used for much of the past 20 years. Instead, there is new realization that both normal and abnormal behavior arise from chemical processes that occur within parallel distributed networks in specific brain regions. Many of these pathological circuits are becoming well characterized, in disorders ranging from Parkinson's disease, to obsessive-compulsive disorder, to depression. Most recently, there has been an explosion of new techniques that allow for direct stimulation of these brain circuits, without the need for open craniotomy and neurosurgical ablation. The techniques include transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), magnetic seizure therapy (MST), vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), and deep brain stimulation (DBS). This review will describe these new tools, and overview their current and future potential for research and clinical neuropsychiatric use. The psychiatry of the future will be better grounded in a firm understanding of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology (as well as pharmacology). These brain stimulation tools, or their next iterations, will play an ever-larger role in clinical neuropsychiatric practice.

  10. Magnetic Seizure Therapy in Treatment-Resistant Schizophrenia: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor M. Tang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveElectroconvulsive therapy is effective in treatment-resistant schizophrenia (TRS but use is limited due to stigma and concerns around cognitive adverse effects. Magnetic seizure therapy (MST is a promising new neuromodulation technique that uses transcranial magnetic stimulation to induce therapeutic seizures. Studies of MST in depression have shown clinical improvement with a favorable adverse effect profile. No studies have examined the clinical utility of MST in schizophrenia.MethodsWe conducted an open-label pilot clinical trial of MST in eight TRS patients. Up to 24 MST treatments were delivered depending on treatment response. We assessed clinical outcome through the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS and the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire (Q-LES-Q. Cognitive testing included a neuropsychological test battery, the Autobiographical Memory Inventory (AMI, Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA, and reorientation time.ResultsFour patients completed the trial as per protocol. For all patients and for trial completers alone, there was a significant clinical and quality of life improvement. Three met pre-determined criteria for remission (total score ≤25 on the BPRS and one met criteria for response (i.e., ≥25% BPRS improvement from baseline for two consecutive assessments. Pre and post neurocognitive data showed no significant cognitive adverse effects apart from a decrease in AMI scores.ConclusionIn this pilot study, MST demonstrated evidence for feasibility in patients with TRS, with promise for clinical efficacy and negligible cognitive side effects. Further study in larger clinical populations is needed.Clinical Trial Registrationwww.ClinicalTrials.gov, Identifier NCT01596608.

  11. Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secondary seizures; Reactive seizures; Seizure - secondary; Seizure - reactive; Convulsions ... or kidney failure Very high blood pressure ( malignant hypertension ) Venomous bites and stings ( snake bite ) Withdrawal from ...

  12. The lack of cross-national equivalence of a therapist adherence measure (TAM-R) in multisystemic therapy (MST)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, A.M.C.; Scholte, R.H.J.; Geffen, W. van; Timman, R.; Busschbach, J.J.V. van; Rijken, R.E.A. van der

    2016-01-01

    This two-study report investigates the equivalence of the Dutch Therapist Adherence Measure Revised (TAM-R) to the US original. The TAM-R is a questionnaire measuring therapist adherence to the treatment model of Multisystemic Therapy (MST). Monitoring of therapist adherence is essential for

  13. Seizure Following Topical Gammabenzene Hexachloride Therapy

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    Biswas Animesh

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of short-lived, self-limiting major epileptic seizures following an improper application of gammabenzene hexachloride (GBHC lotion in a 15 month old boy suffering from scabies with secondary bacterial infection is reported here due to its rarity in clinical practice and, more particularly, to stress the need of correct instructions on the use of GBHC application for the prevention of iatrogenic neurotoxicity.

  14. Optimizing therapy of seizures in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelucci, Roberto

    2006-12-26

    The use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in the neurosurgical setting has a number of implications, including their possible role in the prevention of seizures after acute cerebral insults or brain tumors and the potential for toxicity and interactions when these agents are administered in association with radiotherapy or chemotherapy. This review discusses these controversial issues and draws the following conclusions. 1) AEDs should be prescribed on a short-term basis to prevent seizures occurring within the first week after a cerebral insult (trauma, neurosurgical procedure) but are ineffective to avoid true post-traumatic epilepsy or first seizures in patients with primary or secondary cerebral neoplasms. 2) The use of phenytoin and, to a lesser extent, phenobarbital and carbamazepine during cranial irradiation is associated with an increased risk for severe, potentially fatal, mucocutaneous reactions. In this context, new AEDs with a very low potential for allergic cutaneous reactions should be preferred. 3) Enzyme-inducing AEDs, such as phenytoin, phenobarbital, and carbamazepine, may increase the clearance and reduce the clinical efficacy of corticosteroids and anticancer agents that are also metabolized by the cytochrome P450 system. The newly developed AEDs that are devoid of hepatic metabolism, such as levetiracetam and gabapentin, are now recommended because of good results in preliminary studies and because they do not show interactions with anticancer agents.

  15. Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... wake up between them. Seizures can have many causes, including medicines, high fevers, head injuries and certain diseases. People who have recurring seizures due to a brain disorder have epilepsy. NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  16. Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may be diagnosed with epilepsy , also known as seizure disorder. Seizure Basics Usually, electrical activity in the brain involves ... times. Fortunately, fainting rarely is a sign of epilepsy. Most kids recover very quickly (seconds to minutes) ...

  17. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for psychogenic nonepileptic seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, L.H.; Chalder, T.; Chigwedere, C.; Khondoker, M.R.; Moriarty, J.; Toone, B.K.; Mellers, J.D.C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and standard medical care (SMC) as treatments for psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES). Methods: Our randomized controlled trial (RCT) compared CBT with SMC in an outpatient neuropsychiatric setting. Sixty-six PNES patients were randomized to either CBT (plus SMC) or SMC alone, scheduled to occur over 4 months. PNES diagnosis was established by video-EEG telemetry for most patients. Exclusion criteria included comorbid history of epilepsy, <2 PNES/month, and IQ <70. The primary outcome was seizure frequency at end of treatment and at 6-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes included 3 months of seizure freedom at 6-month follow-up, measures of psychosocial functioning, health service use, and employment. Results: In an intention-to-treat analysis, seizure reduction following CBT was superior at treatment end (group × time interaction p < 0.0001; large to medium effect sizes). At follow-up, the CBT group tended to be more likely to have experienced 3 months of seizure freedom (odds ratio 3.125, p = 0.086). Both groups improved in some health service use measures and on the Work and Social Adjustment Scale. Mood and employment status showed no change. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that cognitive-behavioral therapy is more effective than standard medical care alone in reducing seizure frequency in PNES patients. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that CBT in addition to SMC, as compared to SMC alone, significantly reduces seizure frequency in patients with PNES (change in median monthly seizure frequency: baseline to 6 months follow-up, CBT group, 12 to 1.5; SMC alone group, 8 to 5). GLOSSARY AED = antiepileptic drug; CBT = cognitive-behavioral therapy; CI = confidence interval; DSM-IV = Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition; HADS = Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale; IQR = interquartile range; ITT = intention-to-treat; OR = odds ratio; PNES

  18. Gene therapy decreases seizures in a model of Incontinentia pigmenti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogbevia, Godwin K; Töllner, Kathrin; Körbelin, Jakob; Bröer, Sonja; Ridder, Dirk A; Grasshoff, Hanna; Brandt, Claudia; Wenzel, Jan; Straub, Beate K; Trepel, Martin; Löscher, Wolfgang; Schwaninger, Markus

    2017-07-01

    Incontinentia pigmenti (IP) is a genetic disease leading to severe neurological symptoms, such as epileptic seizures, but no specific treatment is available. IP is caused by pathogenic variants that inactivate the Nemo gene. Replacing Nemo through gene therapy might provide therapeutic benefits. In a mouse model of IP, we administered a single intravenous dose of the adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector, AAV-BR1-CAG-NEMO, delivering the Nemo gene to the brain endothelium. Spontaneous epileptic seizures and the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) were monitored. The endothelium-targeted gene therapy improved the integrity of the BBB. In parallel, it reduced the incidence of seizures and delayed their occurrence. Neonate mice intravenously injected with the AAV-BR1-CAG-NEMO vector developed no hepatocellular carcinoma or other major adverse effects 11 months after vector injection, demonstrating that the vector has a favorable safety profile. The data show that the BBB is a target of antiepileptic treatment and, more specifically, provide evidence for the therapeutic benefit of a brain endothelial-targeted gene therapy in IP. Ann Neurol 2017;82:93-104. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  19. Electroconvulsive Therapy In Neuropsychiatry : Relevance Of Seizure Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangadhar BN

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is used to induce therapeutic seizures in various clinical conditions. It is specifically useful in depression, catatonia, patients with high suicidal risk, and those intolerant to drugs. Its beneficial effects surpass its side effects. Memory impairment is benign and transient. Its mechanism of action is unknown, though numerous neurotransmitters and neuroreceptors have been implicated. The standards of ECT practice are well established but still evolving in some particularly in unilateral ECT. Assessment of threshold by formula method may deliver higher stimulus dose compared with titration method. Cerebral seizure during ECT procedure is necessary. Motor (cuff method and EEG seizure monitoring are mandatory. Recent studies have shown some EEG parameters (amplitude, fractal dimension, symmetry, and post ictal suppression to be associated with therapeutic outcome. Besides seizure monitoring, measuring other physiological parameters such as heart rate (HR and blood pressure (BP may be useful indicators of therapeutic response. Use of ECT in neurological conditions as well as its application in psychiatric illnesses associated with neurological disorders has also been reviewed briefly.

  20. BRAVEMIND: Advancing the Virtual Iraq/Afghanistan PTSD Exposure Therapy for MST

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    It has three questions that ask the frequency and amount of alcohol consumed . Psychophysiological Patient Report: This is a brief self-report...to sleep without nightmares waking him, and began challenging some of his fears around going to restaurants , movies, etc. At follow-up, John’s...Jones-Alexander, J., Buckley, T. C., & Forneris, C. A. (1996). Psychometric properties of the PTSD checklist (PCL). Behaviour Research and Therapy, 34

  1. The effect of propofol-remifentanil anesthesia on selected seizure quality indices in electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinwiddie, Stephen H; Glick, David B; Goldman, Morris B

    2012-07-01

    Use of a short-acting opiate to potentiate anesthetic induction agents has been shown to increase seizure duration in electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), but little is known of the effect of this combination on indices of seizure quality. To determine whether anesthetic modality affects commonly provided indices of seizure quality. Twenty-five subjects were given propofol 2 mg/kg body weight for their first ECT session, at which time seizure threshold was titrated. Subjects thereafter alternated between that anesthetic regimen or propofol 0.5 mg/kg plus remifentanil 1 mcg/kg. Linear mixed models with random subject effect, adjusting for electrode placement, electrical charge, and number of treatments, were fit to estimate effect of anesthesia on seizure duration and several standard seizure quality indices (average seizure energy, time to peak electroencephalography (EEG) power, maximum sustained power, interhemispheric coherence, early and midictal EEG amplitude, and maximum sustained interhemispheric EEG coherence). Propofol-remifentanil anesthesia significantly lengthened seizure duration and was associated with longer time to reach maximal EEG power and coherence as well as maximal degree of interhemispheric EEG coherence. No effect was seen on early ictal amplitude or average seizure energy index. Propofol-remifentanil anesthesia prolongs seizure duration and has a significant effect on some, but not all, measures of seizure quality. This effect may be of some benefit in cases where adequate seizures are otherwise difficult to elicit. Varying anesthetic technique may allow more precise investigation of the relationships between and relative impacts of commonly used seizure quality indices on clinical outcomes and ECT-related cognitive side effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Music-supported therapy (MST) in improving post-stroke patients' upper-limb motor function: a randomised controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yanna; Forreider, Brian; Sun, Xinting; Geng, Xiaokun; Zhang, Weidong; Du, Huishan; Zhang, Tong; Ding, Yuchuan

    2015-05-01

    Music-supported therapy (MST) is a new approach for motor rehabilitation of stroke patients. Recently, many studies have demonstrated that MST improved the motor functions of post-stroke patients. However, the underlying mechanism for this effect is still unclear. It may result from repeated practice or repeated practice combined with musical stimulation. Currently, few studies have been designed to clarify this discrepancy. In this study, the application of "mute" musical instruments allowed for the study of music as an independent factor. Thirty-three post-stroke patients with no substantial previous musical training were included. Participants were assigned to either audible music group (MG) or mute music group (CG), permitting observation of music's independent effect. All subjects received the conventional rehabilitation treatments. Patients in MG (n = 15) received 20 extra sessions of audible musical instrument training over 4 weeks. Patients in CG (n = 18) received "mute" musical instrument training of the same protocol as that of MG. Wolf motor function test (WMFT) and Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA) for upper limbs were utilised to evaluate motor functions of patients in both groups before and after the treatment. Three patients in CG dropped out. All participants in both groups showed significant improvements in motor functions of upper limbs after 4  weeks' treatment. However, significant differences in the WMFT were found between the two groups (WMFT-quality: P = 0.025; WMFT-time: P = 0.037), but not in the FMA (P = 0.448). In short, all participants showed significant improvement after 4 weeks' treatment, but subjects in MG demonstrated greater improvement than those in CG. This study supports that MST, when combined with conventional treatment, is effective for the recovery of motor skills in post-stroke patients. Additionally, it suggests that apart from the repetitive practices of MST, music may play a unique role in improving

  3. Lack of effect of naloxone on prolactin and seizures in electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperling, M R; Melmed, S; McAllister, T; Price, T R

    1989-01-01

    Both opiate agonist and antagonist injection have been reported to modulate prolactin secretion, alter brain excitability and produce seizures, and modify the postictal state. We studied the effects of administration of high-dose naloxone, an opiate antagonist, on postictal prolactin levels, seizure duration, and postictal behavior, using patients undergoing electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) as a seizure model. Seven patients had 8 mg naloxone injected prior to one ECT treatment and saline injected prior to another treatment, with the order of injection randomized. Before ECT and 15 min after ECT, prolactin levels were drawn, and no blunting of the expected postictal prolactin elevation by naloxone injection was observed. We found no evidence that endogenous opiates trigger prolactin secretion during seizures. Seizure duration was also similar in saline and naloxone groups, and naloxone did not reverse postictal depression, as has been reported in an animal model.

  4. Population dose-response analysis of daily seizure count following vigabatrin therapy in adult and pediatric patients with refractory complex partial seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jace C; Hutmacher, Matthew M; Wesche, David L; Tolbert, Dwain; Patel, Mahlaqa; Kowalski, Kenneth G

    2015-01-01

    Vigabatrin is an irreversible inhibitor of γ-aminobutyric acid transaminase (GABA-T) and is used as an adjunctive therapy for adult patients with refractory complex partial seizures (rCPS). The purpose of this investigation was to describe the relationship between vigabatrin dosage and daily seizure rate for adults and children with rCPS and identify relevant covariates that might impact seizure frequency. This population dose-response analysis used seizure-count data from three pediatric and two adult randomized controlled studies of rCPS patients. A negative binomial distribution model adequately described daily seizure data. Mean seizure rate decreased with time after first dose and was described using an asymptotic model. Vigabatrin drug effects were best characterized by a quadratic model using normalized dosage as the exposure metric. Normalized dosage was an estimated parameter that allowed for individualized changes in vigabatrin exposure based on body weight. Baseline seizure rate increased with decreasing age, but age had no impact on vigabatrin drug effects after dosage was normalized for body weight differences. Posterior predictive checks indicated the final model was capable of simulating data consistent with observed daily seizure counts. Total normalized vigabatrin dosages of 1, 3, and 6 g/day were predicted to reduce seizure rates 23.2%, 45.6%, and 48.5%, respectively. © 2014, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  5. The chemical induction of seizures in psychiatric therapy: were flurothyl (indoklon) and pentylenetetrazol (metrazol) abandoned prematurely?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Kathryn; Fink, Max

    2014-10-01

    Camphor-induced and pentylenetetrazol-induced brain seizures were first used to relieve psychiatric illnesses in 1934. Electrical inductions (electroconvulsive therapy, ECT) followed in 1938. These were easier and less expensive to administer and quickly became the main treatment method. In 1957, seizure induction with the inhalant anesthetic flurothyl was tested and found to be clinically effective.For many decades, complaints of memory loss have stigmatized and inhibited ECT use. Many variations of electricity in form, electrode placement, dosing, and stimulation method offered some relief, but complaints still limit its use. The experience with chemical inductions of seizures was reviewed based on searches for reports of each agent in Medline and in the archival files of original studies by the early investigators. Camphor injections were inefficient and were rapidly replaced by pentylenetetrazol. These were effective but difficult to administer. Flurothyl inhalation-induced seizures were as clinically effective as electrical inductions with lesser effects on memory functions. Flurothyl inductions were discarded because of the persistence of the ethereal aroma and the fears induced in the professional staff that they might seize. Persistent complaints of memory loss plague electricity induced seizures. Flurothyl induced seizures are clinically as effective without the memory effects associated with electricity. Reexamination of seizure inductions using flurothyl in modern anesthesia facilities is encouraged to relieve medication-resistant patients with mood disorders and catatonia.

  6. Evaluation of Cannabidiol in Animal Seizure Models by the Epilepsy Therapy Screening Program (ETSP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Brian D; Jacobson, Catherine A; Metcalf, Cameron S; Smith, Misty D; Wilcox, Karen S; Hampson, Aidan J; Kehne, John H

    2017-07-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a cannabinoid component of marijuana that has no significant activity at cannabinoid receptors or psychoactive effects. There is considerable interest in CBD as a therapy for epilepsy. Almost a third of epilepsy patients are not adequately controlled by clinically available anti-seizure drugs (ASDs). Initial studies appear to demonstrate that CBD preparations may be a useful treatment for pharmacoresistant epilepsy. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) funded Epilepsy Therapy Screening Program (ETSP) investigated CBD in a battery of seizure models using a refocused screening protocol aimed at identifying pharmacotherapies to address the unmet need in pharmacoresistant epilepsy. Applying this new screening workflow, CBD was investigated in mouse 6 Hz 44 mA, maximal electroshock (MES), corneal kindling models and rat MES and lamotrigine-resistant amygdala kindling models. Following intraperitoneal (i.p.) pretreatment, CBD produced dose-dependent protection in the acute seizure models; mouse 6 Hz 44 mA (ED 50 164 mg/kg), mouse MES (ED 50 83.5 mg/kg) and rat MES (ED 50 88.9 mg/kg). In chronic models, CBD produced dose-dependent protection in the corneal kindled mouse (ED 50 119 mg/kg) but CBD (up to 300 mg/kg) was not protective in the lamotrigine-resistant amygdala kindled rat. Motor impairment assessed in conjunction with the acute seizure models showed that CBD exerted seizure protection at non-impairing doses. The ETSP investigation demonstrates that CBD exhibits anti-seizure properties in acute seizure models and the corneal kindled mouse. However, further preclinical and clinical studies are needed to determine the potential for CBD to address the unmet needs in pharmacoresistant epilepsy.

  7. A feasibility study of a new method for electrically producing seizures in man: focal electrically administered seizure therapy [FEAST].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahas, Ziad; Short, Baron; Burns, Carol; Archer, Melanie; Schmidt, Matthew; Prudic, Joan; Nobler, Mitchell S; Devanand, D P; Fitzsimons, Linda; Lisanby, Sarah H; Payne, Nancy; Perera, Tarique; George, Mark S; Sackeim, Harold A

    2013-05-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) remains the most effective acute treatment for severe major depression, but with significant risk of adverse cognitive effects. Unidirectional electrical stimulation with a novel electrode placement and geometry (Focal Electrically Administered Seizure Therapy (FEAST)) has been proposed as a means to initiate seizures in prefrontal cortex prior to secondary generalization. As such, it may have fewer cognitive side effects than traditional ECT. We report on its first human clinical application. Seventeen unmedicated depressed adults (5 men; 3 bipolar disorder; age 53 ± 16 years) were recruited after being referred for ECT. Open-label FEAST was administered with a modified spECTrum 5000Q device and a traditional ECT dosing regimen until patients clinically responded. Clinical and cognitive assessments were obtained at baseline, and end of course. Time to orientation recovery, a predictor of long-term amnestic effects, was assessed at each treatment. Nonresponders to FEAST were transitioned to conventional ECT. One patient withdrew from the study after a single titration session. After the course of FEAST (median 10 sessions), there was a 46.1 ± 35.5% improvement in Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD24) scores compared to baseline (33.1 ± 6.8, 16.8 ± 10.9; P FEAST produced clinically meaningful antidepressant improvement, with relatively short time to reorientation. Our preliminary work first in primates and now depressed adults demonstrates that FEAST is feasible, safe, well-tolerated and, if efficacy can be optimized, has potential to replace traditional ECT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Regional cerebral blood flow changes associated with focal electrically administered seizure therapy (FEAST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahine, George; Short, Baron; Spicer, Ken; Schmidt, Matthew; Burns, Carol; Atoui, Mia; George, Mark S; Sackeim, Harold A; Nahas, Ziad

    2014-01-01

    Use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is limited by cognitive disturbance. Focal electrically-administered seizure therapy (FEAST) is designed to initiate focal seizures in the prefrontal cortex. To date, no studies have documented the effects of FEAST on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). A 72 year old depressed man underwent three single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scans to capture the onset and resolution of seizures triggered with right unilateral FEAST. We used Bioimage Suite for within-subject statistical analyses of perfusion differences ictally and post-ictally compared with the baseline scan. Early ictal increases in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were limited to the right prefrontal cortex. Post-ictally, perfusion was reduced in bilateral frontal and occipital cortices and increased in left motor and precuneus cortex. FEAST appears to triggers focal onsets of seizure activity in the right prefrontal cortex with subsequent generalization. Future studies are needed on a larger sample. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The influence of the anesthesia-to-stimulation time interval on seizure quality parameters in electroconvulsive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, A; Christensen, S J; Jensen, A E K

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) continues to be the most efficacious treatment for severe depression and other life-threatening acute psychiatric conditions. Treatment efficacy is dependent upon the induced seizure quality, which may be influenced by a range of treatment related factors....... Recently, the time interval from anesthesia to the electrical stimulation (ASTI) has been suggested to be an important determinant of seizure quality. METHODS: We measured ASTI in 73 ECT sessions given to 22 individual patients, and analyzed its influence on five seizure quality parameters (EEG seizure...

  10. Adverse reactions of hyperbaric oxygen therapy - case description of a generalised seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grobelska Kinga

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT is a safe treatment, provided fulfilling certain rules of patient qualifications to treatment, as well as supervision over the course of therapy by qualified medical staff. Side effects reported in the literature are rare, and are usually mild and transient. Professional medical staff allows minimising the adverse events occurrence. The scale of complications is unknown, especially in Polish hyperbaric center. Careful analysis could be used to develop prevention procedures for patients of hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Hyperbaric Oxygen Centre and Wound Treatment in Bydgoszcz during 28 months performed hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT in case of 423 patients. During this period, adverse events occurred occasionally. 17 cases have been reported. Authors described study case 77 year-old patient who was admitted due to non-healing wound-left lower abdomen (state after radiotherapy. During the fourth session, on decompression phase patient have had a generalized seizure (tonic-clonic. The decompression was stopped, the oxygen supply was disconnected but only after the drug administration seizures terminated. The most likely causative agent of the adverse reactions of the patient treated with HBOT was the oxygen toxic effect on the brain tissue. However, analyzing the circumstances of the seizure termination: phase of decompression at the pressure 2ATA and lack of oxygen disconnection response, it cannot be excluded other causes of this complication.

  11. MST Filterability Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, M. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Burket, P. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Duignan, M. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-03-12

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently treating radioactive liquid waste with the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). The low filter flux through the ARP has limited the rate at which radioactive liquid waste can be treated. Recent filter flux has averaged approximately 5 gallons per minute (gpm). Salt Batch 6 has had a lower processing rate and required frequent filter cleaning. Savannah River Remediation (SRR) has a desire to understand the causes of the low filter flux and to increase ARP/MCU throughput. In addition, at the time the testing started, SRR was assessing the impact of replacing the 0.1 micron filter with a 0.5 micron filter. This report describes testing of MST filterability to investigate the impact of filter pore size and MST particle size on filter flux and testing of filter enhancers to attempt to increase filter flux. The authors constructed a laboratory-scale crossflow filter apparatus with two crossflow filters operating in parallel. One filter was a 0.1 micron Mott sintered SS filter and the other was a 0.5 micron Mott sintered SS filter. The authors also constructed a dead-end filtration apparatus to conduct screening tests with potential filter aids and body feeds, referred to as filter enhancers. The original baseline for ARP was 5.6 M sodium salt solution with a free hydroxide concentration of approximately 1.7 M.3 ARP has been operating with a sodium concentration of approximately 6.4 M and a free hydroxide concentration of approximately 2.5 M. SRNL conducted tests varying the concentration of sodium and free hydroxide to determine whether those changes had a significant effect on filter flux. The feed slurries for the MST filterability tests were composed of simple salts (NaOH, NaNO2, and NaNO3) and MST (0.2 – 4.8 g/L). The feed slurry for the filter enhancer tests contained simulated salt batch 6 supernate, MST, and filter enhancers.

  12. Successful switch from bilateral brief pulse to right unilateral ultrabrief pulse electroconvulsive therapy after failure to induce seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawashima H

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Hirotsugu Kawashima,1 Yuko Kobayashi,1 Taro Suwa,2 Toshiya Murai,2 Ryuichi Yoshioka1 1Department of Psychiatry, Toyooka Hospital, Toyooka, Hyogo, Japan; 2Department of Neuropsychiatry, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan Abstract: Inducing adequate therapeutic seizures during electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is sometimes difficult due to a high seizure threshold, even at the maximum stimulus charge. Previous studies have demonstrated that seizure threshold is lower in patients treated with right unilateral ultrabrief pulse (RUL-UBP ECT than in those treated with bilateral or brief pulse (BL-BP ECT. Therefore, switching to RUL-UBP ECT may be beneficial for patients in whom seizure induction is difficult with conventional ECT. In the present report, we discuss the case of a patient suffering from catatonic schizophrenia in whom BL-BP ECT failed to induce seizures at the maximum charge. However, RUL-UBP ECT successfully elicited therapeutic seizures and enabled the patient to achieve complete remission. This case illustrates that, along with other augmentation strategies, RUL-UBP ECT represents an alternative for seizure induction in clinical practice. Keywords: electroconvulsive therapy, augmentation, ultrabrief pulse, electrode placement, seizure threshold

  13. RESULTS OF SUPPLEMENTAL MST STUDIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, T; David Hobbs, D; Samuel Fink, S

    2006-01-01

    The current design of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) includes an auxiliary facility, the Actinide Finishing Facility, which provides a second contact of monosodium titanate (MST) to remove soluble actinides and strontium from waste if needed. This treatment will occur after cesium removal by Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX). Although the process changes and safety basis implications have not yet been analyzed, provisions also exist to recover the MST from this operation and return to the initial actinide removal step in the SWPF for an additional (third) contact with fresh waste. A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) request identified the need to study the following issues involving this application of MST: Determine the effect of organics from the solvent extraction (CSSX) process on radionuclide sorption by MST; Determine the efficiency of re-using MST for multiple contacts; and Examine fissile loading on MST under conditions using a waste containing significantly elevated concentrations of plutonium, uranium, neptunium, and strontium. This report describes the results of three experimental studies conducted to address these needs: (1) Addition of high concentrations of entrained CSSX solvent had no noticeable effect, over a two week period, on the sorption of the actinides and strontium by MST in a direct comparison experiment. (2) Test results show that MST still retains appreciable capacity after being used once. For instance, reused MST--in the presence of entrained solvent--continued to sorb actinides and strontium. (3) A single batch of MST was used to sequentially contact five volumes of a simulant solution containing elevated concentrations of the radionuclides of interest. After the five contacts, we measured the following solution actinide loadings on the MST: plutonium: 0.884 ± 0.00539 wt % or (1.02 ± 0.0112) E+04 (micro)g/g MST, uranium: 12.1 ± 0.786 wt % or (1.40 ± 0.104) E+05 (micro)g/g MST, and neptunium: 0.426 ± 0.00406 wt % or

  14. Nonepileptic seizures under levetiracetam therapy: a case report of forced normalization process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzellotti, Francesca; Franciotti, Raffaella; Zhuzhuni, Holta; D'Amico, Aurelio; Thomas, Astrid; Onofrj, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Nonepileptic seizures (NES) apparently look like epileptic seizures, but are not associated with ictal electrical discharges in the brain. NES constitute one of the most important differential diagnoses of epilepsy. They have been recognized as a distinctive clinical phenomenon for centuries, and video/electroencephalogram monitoring has allowed clinicians to make near-certain diagnoses. NES are supposedly unrelated to organic brain lesions, and despite the preponderance of a psychiatric/psychological context, they may have an iatrogenic origin. We report a patient with NES precipitated by levetiracetam therapy; in this case, NES was observed during the disappearance of epileptiform discharges from the routine video/electroencephalogram. We discuss the possible mechanisms underlying NES with regard to alternative psychoses associated with the phenomenon of the forced normalization process.

  15. Focal Electrically Administered Seizure Therapy (FEAST): A novel form of ECT illustrates the roles of current directionality, polarity, and electrode configuration in seizure induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spellman, Timothy; Peterchev, Angel V.; Lisanby, Sarah H.

    2009-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a mainstay in the treatment of severe, medication resistant depression. The antidepressant efficacy and cognitive side effects of ECT are influenced by the position of the electrodes on the head and by the degree to which the electrical stimulus exceeds the threshold for seizure induction. However, surprisingly little is known about the effects of other key electrical parameters such as current directionality, polarity, and electrode configuration. Understanding these relationships may inform the optimization of therapeutic interventions to improve their risk/benefit ratio. To elucidate these relationships, we evaluated a novel form of ECT (focal electrically administered seizure therapy, FEAST) that combines unidirectional stimulation, control of polarity, and an asymmetrical electrode configuration, and contrasted it with conventional ECT in a nonhuman primate model. Rhesus monkeys had their seizure thresholds determined on separate days with ECT conditions that crossed the factors of current directionality (unidirectional or bidirectional), electrode configuration (standard bilateral or FEAST (small anterior and large posterior electrode)), and polarity (assignment of anode and cathode in unidirectional stimulation). Ictal expression and post-ictal suppression were quantified via scalp EEG. Findings were replicated and extended in a second experiment with the same subjects. Seizures were induced in each of 75 trials, including 42 FEAST procedures. Seizure thresholds were lower with unidirectional than with bidirectional stimulation (pFEAST than in bilateral ECS (p=0.0294). Ictal power was greatest in posterior-anode unidirectional FEAST, and post-ictal suppression was strongest in anterior-anode FEAST (p=0.0008 and p=0.0024, respectively). EEG power was higher in the stimulated hemisphere in posterior-anode FEAST (p=0.0246), consistent with the anode being the site of strongest activation. These findings suggest that current

  16. Nonepileptic seizures under levetiracetam therapy: a case report of forced normalization process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anzellotti F

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Francesca Anzellotti, Raffaella Franciotti, Holta Zhuzhuni, Aurelio D'Amico, Astrid Thomas, Marco Onofrj Department of Neuroscience and Imaging, Aging Research Centre, Gabriele d'Annunzio University Foundation, Gabriele d'Annunzio University, Chieti, Italy Abstract: Nonepileptic seizures (NES apparently look like epileptic seizures, but are not associated with ictal electrical discharges in the brain. NES constitute one of the most important differential diagnoses of epilepsy. They have been recognized as a distinctive clinical phenomenon for centuries, and video/electroencephalogram monitoring has allowed clinicians to make near-certain diagnoses. NES are supposedly unrelated to organic brain lesions, and despite the preponderance of a psychiatric/psychological context, they may have an iatrogenic origin. We report a patient with NES precipitated by levetiracetam therapy; in this case, NES was observed during the disappearance of epileptiform discharges from the routine video/electroencephalogram. We discuss the possible mechanisms underlying NES with regard to alternative psychoses associated with the phenomenon of the forced normalization process. Keywords: nonepileptic seizures, forced normalization, levetiracetam, behavioral side effects

  17. Clobazam as an adjunctive therapy in treating seizures associated with Lennox–Gastaut syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leahy JT

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer T Leahy1, Catherine J Chu-Shore1,2, Janet L Fisher3 1Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Neurology, Programs in Neurophysiology and Epilepsy, Boston, MA, 2Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 3University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, Physiology and Neuroscience, Columbia, SC, USA Abstract: Lennox–Gastaut syndrome (LGS is a devastating childhood epilepsy syndrome characterized by the occurrence of multiple types of seizures and cognitive decline. Most children suffer from frequent seizures that are refractory to current medical management. Recent clinical trials have suggested that addition of clobazam may improve the clinical outcome for some LGS patients. Although clobazam has been available for over five decades, it has only recently been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for this indication. As a 1,5-benzodiazepine, clobazam is structurally related to the widely used 1,4-benzodiazepines, which include diazepam. Clobazam has been shown to modulate GABAergic neurotransmission by positive allosteric modulation of GABAA receptors, and to increase expression of transporters for both GABA and glutamate. The active metabolite n-desmethylclobazam (norclobazam also modulates GABAA receptors, and the relative importance of these two compounds in the clinical effectiveness of clobazam remains an open question. Clinical trials involving clobazam as an addon therapy in a variety of pediatric epilepsy populations have found a significant improvement in seizure control. In patients with LGS, clobazam may have greatest efficacy for drop seizures. Longstanding clinical experience suggests that clobazam is a safe and well tolerated antiepileptic drug with infrequent and mild adverse effects. These results suggest that adjunctive treatment with clobazam may be a reasonable option for LGS patients, particularly those who are treatment-resistant. Keywords: benzodiazepine, epilepsy, gamma

  18. Budget impact analysis of adjunctive therapy with lacosamide for partial-onset epileptic seizures in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoens, Steven

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to compute the budget impact of lacosamide, a new adjunctive therapy for partial-onset seizures in epilepsy patients from 16 years of age who are uncontrolled and having previously used at least three anti-epileptic drugs from a Belgian healthcare payer perspective. The budget impact analysis compared the 'world with lacosamide' to the 'world without lacosamide' and calculated how a change in the mix of anti-epileptic drugs used to treat uncontrolled epilepsy would impact drug spending from 2008 to 2013. Data on the number of patients and on the market shares of anti-epileptic drugs were taken from Belgian sources and from the literature. Unit costs of anti-epileptic drugs originated from Belgian sources. The budget impact was calculated from two scenarios about the market uptake of lacosamide. The Belgian target population is expected to increase from 5333 patients in 2008 to 5522 patients in 2013. Assuming that the market share of lacosamide increases linearly over time and is taken evenly from all other anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs), the budget impact of adopting adjunctive therapy with lacosamide increases from €5249 (0.1% of reference drug budget) in 2008 to €242,700 (4.7% of reference drug budget) in 2013. Assuming that 10% of patients use standard AED therapy plus lacosamide, the budget impact of adopting adjunctive therapy with lacosamide is around €800,000-900,000 per year (or 16.7% of the reference drug budget). Adjunctive therapy with lacosamide would raise drug spending for this patient population by as much as 16.7% per year. However, this budget impact analysis did not consider the fact that lacosamide reduces costs of seizure management and withdrawal. The literature suggests that, if savings in other healthcare costs are taken into account, adjunctive therapy with lacosamide may be cost saving.

  19. Seizure threshold and the half-age method in bilateral electroconvulsive therapy in Japanese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Kazuyuki; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Yamaguchi, Masayasu; Tanaka, Koichi; Fujii, Tomokazu; Kitahara, Yuichi; Tamaoki, Toshio; Matsushita, Yutaka; Nunomura, Akihiko; Motohashi, Nobutaka

    2015-01-01

    Seizure threshold (ST) in electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has not been reported previously in Japanese patients. We investigated ST in bilateral ECT in Japanese patients using the dose-titration method. The associations between demographic and clinical characteristics and ST were analyzed to identify the predictors of ST. Finally, the validity of the half-age method for the stimulus dose was evaluated. Fifty-four Japanese patients with mood disorder, schizophrenia, and other psychotic disorders received an acute course of bilateral ECT using a brief-pulse device. ST was determined at the first session using a fixed titration schedule. ST was correlated with age, sex, body mass index, history of previous ECT, and psychotropic drugs on multiple regression analysis. Furthermore, the rate of accomplished seizures was calculated using the half-age method. Mean ST was 136 mC. ST was influenced by age, sex, history of previous ECT, and medication with benzodiazepines. The accomplished seizure rate using the half-age method was 72%, which was significantly lower in men and subjects on benzodiazepines. ST in Japanese patients was equal to or slightly higher than that previously reported in other ethnic groups, which might be attributable, at least in part, to high prevalence of and large-dose benzodiazepine prescription. Higher age, male gender, no history of ECT, and benzodiazepines were related to higher ST. The half-age method was especially useful in female patients and subjects without benzodiazepine medication. © 2014 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2014 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  20. The clonic phase of seizures in patients treated with electroconvulsive therapy is related to age and stimulus intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chieh eTseng

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is effective in the treatment of major depressive disorder and schizophrenia in patients who are drug-naïve or less-receptive to antipsychotic drugs. Several studies have discussed the correlation between patient characteristics, input current volume and seizure duration. According to the present principle of ECT guidelines, the therapeutic effect of ECT mostly correlates with seizure duration. As the tonic phase is different from the clonic phase with respect to brain function and activity, it is informative to analyse both the tonic and clonic phases. Thus, this study sought to clarify the relationship between the features of the two phases, and to re-examine and refine guidelines regarding ECT treatment.Method: ECT-course data from 44 schizophrenia patients were recollected, including the number of treatments that they had received, their gender, age, and the association of these characteristics with motor seizure duration was analysed. A two-factor correlation was employed to test the relationship between each of the two factors.Result: The meta-analysis results indicate that seizure duration and age are significantly correlated. Older patients had relatively short seizure durations after ECT-treatment. Notably, a negative correlation was only found between age and the clonic phase of the seizure, not between age and the tonic phase. Furthermore, this study also found an inverse relationship between ECT-intensity and the clonic phase, but not between ECT-intensity and the tonic phase.Conclusion: This study demonstrated that age and ECT-intensity are negatively correlated with seizure duration, particularly in the clonic phase. The present observations are not fully consistent with the basic guidelines of the APA-ECT practical manual. Accordingly, the predictions regarding the therapeutic effect of ECT can be based on both the seizure duration and the clonic phase.

  1. Brivaracetam: review of its pharmacology and potential use as adjunctive therapy in patients with partial onset seizures [Corrigendum

    OpenAIRE

    Russo, Emilio; Mumoli,Laura; Palleria,Caterina; Gasparini,Sara; Citraro,Rita; Labate,Angelo; Ferlazzo,Edoardo; Gambardella,Antonio; De Sarro,Giovambattista

    2015-01-01

    Brivaracetam: review of its pharmacology and potential use as adjunctive therapy in patients with partial onset seizures [Corrigendum] Mumoli L, Palleria C, Gasparini S, et al. Drug Des Devel Ther. 2015;9:5719–5725.   The authors advise several errors in the paper that are corrected in Corrigendum. View the original article by Mumoli et al.

  2. Absence seizure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seizure - petit mal; Seizure - absence; Petit mal seizure; Epilepsy - absence seizure ... Elsevier; 2016:chap 101. Marcdante KJ, Kliegman RM. Seizures (paroxysmal disorders). In: Marcdante KJ, Kliegman RM, eds. Nelson Essentials ...

  3. Brivaracetam: review of its pharmacology and potential use as adjunctive therapy in patients with partial onset seizures [Corrigendum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumoli L

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Brivaracetam: review of its pharmacology and potential use as adjunctive therapy in patients with partial onset seizures [Corrigendum] Mumoli L, Palleria C, Gasparini S, et al. Drug Des Devel Ther. 2015;9:5719–5725.   The authors advise several errors in the paper that are corrected in Corrigendum. View the original article by Mumoli et al.

  4. Effects of the addition of remifentanil to propofol anesthesia on seizure length and postictal suppression index in electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Richard; Booth, David; Gray, Hamish; Frampton, Chris

    2008-09-01

    Propofol is a widely used anesthetic agent for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). However, there are concerns that its anticonvulsant effect may interfere with the efficacy of ECT. We aimed to investigate the effects on seizure activity of the addition of the opiate remifentanil to propofol anesthesia for ECT. A retrospective analysis of 633 treatments in 73 patients was conducted. At each treatment, patients had received anesthesia with propofol alone or propofol plus remifentanil, depending on which anesthetist was providing anesthesia. Analysis of variance was performed to examine the effects of the anesthetic used, the electrode placement, the dose of electricity administered, and the stage in the course of treatment. Dependent variables were electroencephalogram seizure length and postictal suppression index (PSI). Addition of remifentanil resulted in a small but significantly lower dose of propofol being used to induce unconsciousness. Addition of remifentanil affected seizure length, mainly related to an effect when placement was right unilateral (F = 5.70; P = 0.017). There was also a significantly increased PSI (F = 4.3; P = 0.039), which was not dependent on dose or on placement. The data suggest that addition of remifentanil to propofol anesthesia significantly alters seizure indices. This may be secondary to a reduction in the amount of propofol required or to an independent effect of remifentanil. The increase in PSI in particular suggests that addition of remifentanil may improve clinical response. However, this can only be examined in a randomized controlled trial.

  5. Changes in maternal depression are associated with MST outcomes for adolescents with co-occurring externalizing and internalizing problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimbos, T.; Granic, I.

    2010-01-01

    he efficacy of Multisystemic therapy (MST) in treating adolescent aggression has been established, however, not all youth and their families benefit from MST. One reason for this treatment variability could be the failure to distinguish between different aggressive Subtypes with different risk

  6. Changes in Maternal Depression Are Associated with MST Outcomes for Adolescents with Co-Occurring Externalizing and Internalizing Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimbos, Teresa; Granic, Isabela

    2009-01-01

    The efficacy of Multisystemic therapy (MST) in treating adolescent aggression has been established, however, not all youth and their families benefit from MST. One reason for this treatment variability could be the failure to distinguish between different aggressive subtypes with different risk factors, developmental prognoses and treatment needs.…

  7. Overcoming the hurdles of multi-step targeting (MST) for effective radioimmunotherapy of solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, Steven M.; Cheung, Nai-Kong

    2009-01-01

    The 4 specific aims of this project are: (1) Optimization of MST to increase tumor uptake; (2) Antigen heterogeneity; (3) Characterization and reduction of renal uptake; and (4) Validation in vivo of optimized MST targeted therapy. This proposal focussed upon optimizing multistep immune targeting strategies for the treatment of cancer. Two multi-step targeting constructs were explored during this funding period: (1) anti-Tag-72 and (2) anti-GD2.

  8. Review of levetiracetam, with a focus on the extended release formulation, as adjuvant therapy in controlling partial-onset seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol M Ulloa

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Carol M Ulloa, Allen Towfigh, Joseph SafdiehDepartment of Neurology and Neuroscience, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Levetiracetam is a second-generation antiepileptic drug (AED with a unique chemical structure and mechanism of action. The extended release formulation of levetiracetam (Keppra XR™; UCB Pharma was recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration for adjunctive therapy in the treatment of partial-onset seizures in patients 16 years of age and older with epilepsy. This approval is based on a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter, multinational trial. Levetiracetam XR allows for once-daily dosing, which may increase compliance and, given the relatively constant plasma concentrations, may minimize concentration-related adverse effects. Levetiracetam’s mode of action is not fully elucidated, but it has been found to target high-voltage, N-type calcium channels as well as the synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A. Levetiracetam has nearly ideal pharmacokinetics. It is rapidly and almost completely absorbed after oral ingestion, is ‹10% protein-bound, demonstrates linear kinetics, is minimally metabolized through a pathway independent of the cytochrome P450 system, has no significant drug–drug interactions, and has a wide therapeutic index. The most common reported adverse events with levetiracetam XR were somnolence, irritability, dizziness, nausea, influenza, and nasopharyngitis. Levetiracetam XR provides an efficacious and well-tolerated treatment option for adjunctive therapy in the treatment of partial-onset seizures.Keywords: levetiracetam, partial-onset seizures, antiepileptic drugs

  9. Brivaracetam: review of its pharmacology and potential use as adjunctive therapy in patients with partial onset seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumoli L

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Laura Mumoli,1 Caterina Palleria,2 Sara Gasparini,1 Rita Citraro,2 Angelo Labate,1 Edoardo Ferlazzo,1 Antonio Gambardella,1 Giovambattista De Sarro,2 Emilio Russo2 1Institute of Neurology, 2Institute of Pharmacology, University Magna Græcia, Catanzaro, Italy Abstract: Brivaracetam (BRV, a high-affinity synaptic vesicle protein 2A ligand, reported to be 10–30-fold more potent than levetiracetam (LEV, is highly effective in a wide range of experimental models of focal and generalized seizures. BRV and LEV similarly bind to synaptic vesicle protein 2A, while differentiating for other pharmacological effects; in fact, BRV does not inhibit high voltage Ca2+ channels and AMPA receptors as LEV. Furthermore, BRV apparently exhibits inhibitory activity on neuronal voltage-gated sodium channels playing a role as a partial antagonist. BRV is currently waiting for approval both in the United States and the European Union as adjunctive therapy for patients with partial seizures. In patients with photosensitive epilepsy, BRV showed a dose-dependent effect in suppressing or attenuating the photoparoxysmal response. In well-controlled trials conducted to date, adjunctive BRV demonstrated efficacy and good tolerability in patients with focal epilepsy. BRV has a linear pharmacokinetic profile. BRV is extensively metabolized and excreted by urine (only 8%–11% unchanged. The metabolites of BRV are inactive, and hydrolysis of the acetamide group is the mainly involved metabolic pathway; hepatic impairment probably requires dose adjustment. BRV does not seem to influence other antiepileptic drug plasma levels. Six clinical trials have so far been completed indicating that BRV is effective in controlling seizures when used at doses between 50 and 200 mg/d. The drug is generally well-tolerated with only mild-to-moderate side effects; this is confirmed by the low discontinuation rate observed in these clinical studies. The most common side effects are related to

  10. Brivaracetam: review of its pharmacology and potential use as adjunctive therapy in patients with partial onset seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumoli, Laura; Palleria, Caterina; Gasparini, Sara; Citraro, Rita; Labate, Angelo; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Gambardella, Antonio; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Russo, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Brivaracetam (BRV), a high-affinity synaptic vesicle protein 2A ligand, reported to be 10-30-fold more potent than levetiracetam (LEV), is highly effective in a wide range of experimental models of focal and generalized seizures. BRV and LEV similarly bind to synaptic vesicle protein 2A, while differentiating for other pharmacological effects; in fact, BRV does not inhibit high voltage Ca(2+) channels and AMPA receptors as LEV. Furthermore, BRV apparently exhibits inhibitory activity on neuronal voltage-gated sodium channels playing a role as a partial antagonist. BRV is currently waiting for approval both in the United States and the European Union as adjunctive therapy for patients with partial seizures. In patients with photosensitive epilepsy, BRV showed a dose-dependent effect in suppressing or attenuating the photoparoxysmal response. In well-controlled trials conducted to date, adjunctive BRV demonstrated efficacy and good tolerability in patients with focal epilepsy. BRV has a linear pharmacokinetic profile. BRV is extensively metabolized and excreted by urine (only 8%-11% unchanged). The metabolites of BRV are inactive, and hydrolysis of the acetamide group is the mainly involved metabolic pathway; hepatic impairment probably requires dose adjustment. BRV does not seem to influence other antiepileptic drug plasma levels. Six clinical trials have so far been completed indicating that BRV is effective in controlling seizures when used at doses between 50 and 200 mg/d. The drug is generally well-tolerated with only mild-to-moderate side effects; this is confirmed by the low discontinuation rate observed in these clinical studies. The most common side effects are related to central nervous system and include fatigue, dizziness, and somnolence; these apparently disappear during treatment. In this review, we analyzed BRV, focusing on the current evidences from experimental animal models to clinical studies with particular interest on potential use in clinical

  11. MST radar data-base management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickwar, V. B.

    1983-01-01

    Data management for Mesospheric-Stratospheric-Tropospheric, (MST) radars is addressed. An incoherent-scatter radar data base is discussed in terms of purpose, centralization, scope, and nature of the data base management system.

  12. [The influence of cognitive-behavioral therapy on the P300 potential in children with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures and tension headache].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolarska-Weryńska, Urszula; Steczkowska, Małgorzata; Kaciński, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Explaining associations between neurophysiological and neuropsychological parameteres in children and improving the measurement methods would lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis and course of psychosomatic disease. Goal: clinical assessment of the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy in the treatment of psychogenic no- nepileptic seizures and tension type headaches in children. Determining the influence of cognitive behavioral therapy on the cognitive P300 potential and whether P300 parameters in children correlate with neuropsychological parameters. 20 children with nonepileptic psychogenic seizures and 30 children with tension type headaches, aged 11.3 - 17.11 years. The final diagnosis was made in the Paediatric Neurology Clinic. The P300 examination was performed before/after therapy, with/without hyperventilation. A fixed structure therapy was implemented (10 sessions, 90 minutes each), during two weeks of hospitalization or in an outpatient clinic (9 children with tension type headache). The psychological assessment comprised of temperament questionnaires, auditory and visual memory trials, executive function and attention trials, and in some cases also intelligence testing. More significant correlations were found in children with psychogenic seizures: attention parameters correlated negatively with reaction time, and this correlation tended to fade in the second examination, after psychotherapy. In children with tension type headache a statistically insignificant tendency was found of a positive correlation between those parameters. Medium P300 parameteres in this group were better. In 17/20 of children with psychogenic seizures a clinical improvement was observed, in 3 children the symptoms persisted in a 6 month follow up, but of a lower frequency. In 11/27 of chil- dren with tension headache the symptoms persisted, also with a lower frequency. cognitive-behavioral therapy is effective in the reduction of symptoms in many cases of

  13. Febrile seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... proper care. Occasionally, a provider will prescribe a medicine called diazepam to prevent or treat febrile seizures that occur more than once. However, no drug is completely effective in preventing febrile seizures. Alternative Names Seizure - fever induced; Febrile convulsions Patient Instructions ...

  14. Risk factor for febrile seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odalović Dragica

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Febrile seizures are the most frequent neurological disorder in the childhood. According to American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP, they have been defined as seizures provoked by high temperature in children aged between 6 months and 5 years, without previous history of afebrile seizures, intracranial infections and other possible causes of seizures. Seizures can be typical and atypical, according to the characteristics. Pathogenesis of this disorder has not been clarified yet, and it is believed to be a combination of genetic factors, high body temperature and brain maturation. The risk factors for recurrence of febrile seizures are: age in which seizures appeared for the first time, epilepsy in the first degree relative, febrile seizures in the first degree relative, frequent diseases with fever and low body temperature on the beginning of seizures. The frequency of recurrent seizures The risk for occurrence of epilepsy in children with simple seizures is about 1-1.5%, which is slightly higher compared to general population, while it increases to 4-15% in patients with complex seizures. However, there is no evidence that therapy prevents occurrence of epilepsy. When the prevention of recurrent seizures is considered, it is necessary to separate simple from complex seizures. The aim of this paper was to analyze the most important risk factors for febrile seizures, and to evaluate their impact on occurrence of recurrent seizures. Our study included 125 children with febrile seizures, aged from 6 months to 5 years. The presence of febrile seizures and epilepsy in the first degree relative has been noted in 22% of children. Typical febrile seizures were observed in 76% of cases, and atypical in 24%. Most patients had only one seizure (73.6%. Children, who had seizure earlier in life, had more frequent recurrences. Both risk factors were present in 25% of patients, while 68% of patients had only one risk factor. For the children with febrile disease

  15. Combined Diazepam and MK-801 Therapy Provides Synergistic Protection from Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine-induced Tonic-Clonic Seizures and Lethality in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakarjian, Michael P.; Ali, Mahil S.; Velíšková, Jana; Stanton, Patric K.; Heck, Diane E.; Velíšek, Libor

    2015-01-01

    The synthetic rodenticide, tetramethylenedisulfotetramine (TMDT), is a persistent and highly lethal GABA-gated Cl− channel blocker. TMDT is clandestinely produced, remains popular in mainland China, and causes numerous unintentional and deliberate poisonings worldwide. TMDT is odorless, tasteless, and easy to manufacture, features that make it a potential weapon of terrorism. There is no effective treatment. We previously characterized the effects of TMDT in C57BL/6 mice and surveyed efficacies of GABAergic and glutamatergic anticonvulsant treatments. At 0.4 mg/kg i.p., TMDT produced neurotoxic symptomatology consisting of twitches, clonic and tonic-clonic seizures, often progressing to status epilepticus and death. If administered immediately after the occurrence of the first clonic seizure, the benzodiazepine diazepam (DZP) effectively prevented all subsequent seizure symptoms, whereas the NMDA receptor antagonist dizocilpine (MK-801) primarily prevented tonic-clonic seizures. The latter agent, however, appeared to be more effective at preventing delayed death. The present study further explored these phenomena, and characterized the therapeutic actions of DZP and MK-801 as combinations. Joint treatment with both DZP and MK-801 displayed synergistic protection against tonic-clonic seizures and 24 hour lethality as determined by isobolographic analysis. Clonic seizures, however, remained poorly controlled. A modification of the treatment regimen, where DZP was followed 10 min later by MK-801, yielded a reduction in both types of seizures and improved overall outcome. Simultaneous monitoring of subjects via EEG and videography confirmed effectiveness of this sequential regimen. We conclude that TMDT blockage at GABAA receptors involves early activation of NMDA receptors, which contribute to persistent ictogenic activity. Our data predict that a sequential combination treatment with DZP followed by MK-801 will be superior to either individual therapy with, or

  16. Prolonged exposure therapy for the treatment of patients diagnosed with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Lorna; Vaidya-Mathur, Urmi; Lancman, Marcelo

    2017-01-01

    Although there is general consensus that psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) are treated with psychotherapy, the effectiveness of most psychotherapeutic modalities remains understudied. In this treatment series of 16 patients dually diagnosed with PNES and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), we evaluated the effect of prolonged exposure therapy (PE) on reduction of PNES. Secondary measures included Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and Post-Traumatic Disorder Diagnostic Scale (PDS). Subjects diagnosed with video EEG-confirmed PNES and PTSD confirmed through neuropsychological testing and clinical interview were treated with traditional PE psychotherapy with certain modifications for the PNES. Treatment was conducted over the course of 12-15 weekly sessions. Seizure frequency was noted in each session by examining the patients' seizure logs, and mood and PTSD symptomatology was assessed at baseline and on the final session. Eighteen subjects enrolled, and 16 (88.8%) completed the course of treatment. Thirteen of the 16 (81.25%) therapy completers reported no seizures by their final PE session, and the other three reported a decline in seizure frequency (Z=-3.233, p=0.001). Mean scores on scales of depression (M=-13.56, SD=12.27; t (15)=-4.420, pPTSD symptoms (M=-17.1875, SD=13.01; t (15)=-5.281, pPTSD reduced the number of PNES and improved mood and post traumatic symptomatology. Follow-up revealed that gains made in seizure control on the last day of treatment were maintained over time. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Predictors of Seizure Threshold in Right Unilateral Ultrabrief Electroconvulsive Therapy: Role of Concomitant Medications and Anaesthesia Used.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez, Verònica; Hadzi-Pavlovic, Dusan; Smith, Deidre; Loo, Colleen K

    2015-01-01

    An individualized approach to maximize electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) efficacy and minimize cognitive side effects is to treat patients relative to their seizure threshold (ST). However, although Right Unilateral-Ultrabrief (0.3 ms) (RUL-UB) ECT is increasingly used in clinical settings as an effective form of ECT with minimal cognitive effects, there is sparse data regarding predictors of ST. To analyze the relationship between ST and clinical and demographic factors in a sample of patients treated with RUL-UB ECT. Clinical, demographic and ECT data from 179 patients in ECT research studies were examined. Seizure threshold was titrated at the first ECT session. ECT was performed with a Thymatron(®) or Mecta(®) device, with thiopentone (2.5-5 mg/kg) or propofol (1-2 mg/kg) anaesthesia. Medications taken at the time of ST titration were documented. The association between ST and candidate predictor variables was examined with regression analysis. Multiple regression analyses showed that 34% of the variance in ST (P < 0.001) could be predicted. Older age (R(2) = 0.194, P < 0.001), propofol (vs thiopentone) (R(2) = 0.029, P ≤ 0.01) and higher anaesthetic dose (mg in propofol equivalents) (R(2) = 0.029, P < 0.05) were found to be predictors of higher initial ST. Treatment with lithium (R(2) = 0.043, P < 0.01) and study site (R(2) = 0.019, P < 0.05) significantly predicted lower initial ST. Empirical titration is recommended for accurate determination of ST in patients receiving RUL-UB ECT. Novel findings of this study are that propofol anaesthesia resulted in higher ST than thiopentone and concomitant treatment with lithium treatment lowered ST. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. MST - CEARÁ, 20 ANOS DE MARCHAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Amaro Gomes de Alencar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo pretende hacer un rescate geográfi co e histórico de los veinte años del "Movimiento de los Trabajadores Rurales Sin Tierra" en Ceará (MST- CE, 1989 a 2009. Durante esos años, varias fueron las formas de luchas para que la espacialización y la territorialización del MST que sucedieron en Ceará. Algunas de esas formas de luchas fueron: los confl ictos; las ocupaciones de tierras, de los edifi cios públicos y de las avenidas; las marchas, la presencia de los militantes, en los asentamientos federal y estaduales, de los varios programas de reforma agraria. Para abordar esas marchas del MST-Ceará, este texto está estructurado en 4 partes. En la primera, la "Introducción", construimos una pequeña línea del tiempo de las luchas agrarias desde las indígenas hasta la primera ocupación de tierras realizada por el Movimiento. En la segunda, "Las acciones del MST-Ceará", describimos sus principales actividades tales como: caminadas, marchas, ocupaciones de inmuebles y edifi cios públicos en el Estado. En la tercera, "Territorialización del MST en Ceará", analizamos los caminos para tornarse presente, reconocido y respetado en Ceará.

  19. The Telomerase Inhibitor MST-312 Interferes with Multiple Steps in the Herpes Simplex Virus Life Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberichter, Jarod; Roberts, Scott; Abbasi, Imran; Dedthanou, Phonphanh; Pradhan, Prajakta; Nguyen, Marie L

    2015-10-01

    The life cycle of herpes simplex virus (HSV) has the potential to be further manipulated to yield novel, more effective therapeutic treatments. Recent research has demonstrated that HSV-1 can increase telomerase activity and that expression of the catalytic component of telomerase, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), alters sensitivity to HSV-dependent apoptosis. Telomerase is a cellular enzyme that synthesizes nucleotide repeats at the ends of chromosomes (telomeres), which prevents shortening of the 3' ends of DNA with each cell division. Once telomeres reach a critical length, cells undergo senescence and apoptosis. Here, we used a cell-permeable, reversible inhibitor of the telomerase enzyme, MST-312, to investigate telomerase activity during HSV infection. Human mammary epithelial cells immortalized through TERT expression and human carcinoma HEp-2 cells were infected with the KOS1.1 strain of HSV-1 in the presence of MST-312. MST-312 treatment reduced the number of cells displaying a cytopathic effect and the accumulation of immediate early and late viral proteins. Moreover, the presence of 20 μM to 100 μM MST-312 during infection led to a 2.5- to 5.5-log10 decrease in viral titers. MST-312 also inhibited the replication of HSV-2 and a recent clinical isolate of HSV-1. Additionally, we determined that MST-312 has the largest impact on viral events that take place prior to 5 h postinfection (hpi). Furthermore, MST-312 treatment inhibited virus replication, as measured by adsorption assays and quantification of genome replication. Together, these findings demonstrate that MST-312 interferes with the HSV life cycle. Further investigation into the mechanism for MST-312 is warranted and may provide novel targets for HSV therapies. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections can lead to cold sores, blindness, and brain damage. Identification of host factors that are important for the virus life cycle may provide novel targets for HSV antivirals. One such factor

  20. Rheology Of MonoSodium Titanate (MST) And Modified Mst (mMST) Mixtures Relevant To The Salt Waste Processing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koopman, D. C.; Martino, C. J.; Shehee, T. C.; Poirier, M. R.

    2013-07-31

    The Savannah River National Laboratory performed measurements of the rheology of suspensions and settled layers of treated material applicable to the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility. Suspended solids mixtures included monosodium titanate (MST) or modified MST (mMST) at various solid concentrations and soluble ion concentrations with and without the inclusion of kaolin clay or simulated sludge. Layers of settled solids were MST/sludge or mMST/sludge mixtures, either with or without sorbed strontium, over a range of initial solids concentrations, soluble ion concentrations, and settling times.

  1. Rheology Of MonoSodium Titanate (MST) And Modified Mst (mMST) Mixtures Relevant To The Salt Waste Processing Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koopman, D. C.; Martino, C. J.; Shehee, T. C.; Poirier, M. R.

    2013-01-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory performed measurements of the rheology of suspensions and settled layers of treated material applicable to the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility. Suspended solids mixtures included monosodium titanate (MST) or modified MST (mMST) at various solid concentrations and soluble ion concentrations with and without the inclusion of kaolin clay or simulated sludge. Layers of settled solids were MST/sludge or mMST/sludge mixtures, either with or without sorbed strontium, over a range of initial solids concentrations, soluble ion concentrations, and settling times

  2. Meteor detection on ST (MST) radars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avery, S.K.

    1987-01-01

    The ability to detect radar echoes from backscatter due to turbulent irregularities of the radio refractive index in the clear atmosphere has lead to an increasing number of established mesosphere - stratosphere - troposphere (MST or ST) radars. Humidity and temperature variations are responsible for the echo in the troposphere and stratosphere and turbulence acting on electron density gradients provides the echo in the mesosphere. The MST radar and its smaller version, the ST radar, are pulsed Doppler radars operating in the VHF - UHF frequency range. These echoes can be used to determine upper atmosphere winds at little extra cost to the ST radar configuration. In addition, the meteor echoes can supplement mesospheric data from an MST radar. The detection techniques required on the ST radar for delineating meteor echo returns are described

  3. The ROME (Retrospective Observational Multicenter study on Eslicarbazepine) study: Efficacy and behavioural effects of Eslicarbazepine acetate as adjunctive therapy for adults with partial onset seizures in real life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assenza, G; Mecarelli, O; Lanzone, J; Assenza, F; Tombini, M; Di Lazzaro, V; Pulitano, P

    2018-05-01

    Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) is a third-generation member of the dibenzazepine family approved in 2009 by the European Medicines Agency with the indication of adjunctive therapy in adult people with partial-onset seizures (PPOS). We aimed at assessing the ESL impact on seizure frequency and quality of life in PPOS with a particular attention to sleepiness and depression. We evaluated 50 adult PPOS (>18 years; 48 ± 14 years-old; 23 males) treated with adjunctive ESL for ≥2months with a retrospective multi-centric design. Clinical files of the last 2 years were reviewed checking for monthly seizure frequency, treatment retention rate, adverse drug reactions (ADRs), concomitant anti-epileptic drugs and behavioural scales for sleepiness (Stanford Sleepiness Scale, SSS, and Epworth Sleepiness Scale, ESS), depression (Beck Depression Inventory-II, BDI) and overall quality of life (QOLIE-31). At the end of 96 ± 28 days of ESL treatment, the mean seizure reduction was 56%; 60% of patients had seizure reduction above 50%, with a 31% of the whole population becoming seizure free. We reported 16 ADRs with 4 hyponatremia. Retention rate was 76%. Patient reported less sleepiness after ESL (SSS, p = 0.031; ESS, p = 0.0000002). Before ESL, 38% of patients had pathologic BDI scores, which normalized in most of them (73%) after ESL (BDI improvement, p = 0.000012). These scores resulted in an amelioration of quality of life (QOLIE-31, p = 0.000002). ESL is a safe and effective anti-epileptic drug in a real life scenario, with an excellent behavioural profile for the overall quality of life and, in particular, for sleepiness and depression. Copyright © 2018 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Hyponatraemia and seizures after ecstasy use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, S.; Banerjee, A.; Alexander, W.

    1999-01-01

    A patient presented to our unit with seizures and profound hyponatraemia after ingestion of a single tablet of ecstasy. The seizures proved resistant to therapy and ventilation on the intensive care unit was required. Resolution of the seizures occurred on correction of the metabolic abnormalities. The pathogenesis of seizures and hyponatraemia after ecstasy use is discussed. Ecstasy use should be considered in any young patient presenting with unexplained seizures and attention should be directed towards electrolyte levels, particularly sodium.


Keywords: ecstasy; seizures; hyponatraemia PMID:10396584

  5. A Digital Signature Scheme Based on MST3 Cryptosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibo Hong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As special types of factorization of finite groups, logarithmic signature and cover have been used as the main components of cryptographic keys for secret key cryptosystems such as PGM and public key cryptosystems like MST1, MST2, and MST3. Recently, Svaba et. al proposed a revised MST3 encryption scheme with greater security. Meanwhile, they put forward an idea of constructing signature schemes on the basis of logarithmic signatures and random covers. In this paper, we firstly design a secure digital signature scheme based on logarithmic signatures and random covers. In order to complete the task, we devise a new encryption scheme based on MST3 cryptosystems.

  6. COgnitive behavioural therapy versus standardised medical care for adults with Dissociative non-Epileptic Seizures (CODES): statistical and economic analysis plan for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Emily J; Goldstein, Laura H; McCrone, Paul; Perdue, Iain; Chalder, Trudie; Mellers, John D C; Richardson, Mark P; Murray, Joanna; Reuber, Markus; Medford, Nick; Stone, Jon; Carson, Alan; Landau, Sabine

    2017-06-06

    Dissociative seizures (DSs), also called psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, are a distressing and disabling problem for many patients in neurological settings with high and often unnecessary economic costs. The COgnitive behavioural therapy versus standardised medical care for adults with Dissociative non-Epileptic Seizures (CODES) trial is an evaluation of a specifically tailored psychological intervention with the aims of reducing seizure frequency and severity and improving psychological well-being in adults with DS. The aim of this paper is to report in detail the quantitative and economic analysis plan for the CODES trial, as agreed by the trial steering committee. The CODES trial is a multicentre, pragmatic, parallel group, randomised controlled trial performed to evaluate the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of 13 sessions of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) plus standardised medical care (SMC) compared with SMC alone for adult outpatients with DS. The objectives and design of the trial are summarised, and the aims and procedures of the planned analyses are illustrated. The proposed analysis plan addresses statistical considerations such as maintaining blinding, monitoring adherence with the protocol, describing aspects of treatment and dealing with missing data. The formal analysis approach for the primary and secondary outcomes is described, as are the descriptive statistics that will be reported. This paper provides transparency to the planned inferential analyses for the CODES trial prior to the extraction of outcome data. It also provides an update to the previously published trial protocol and guidance to those conducting similar trials. ISRCTN registry ISRCTN05681227 (registered on 5 March 2014); ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02325544 (registered on 15 December 2014).

  7. Dopey's seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, B; Christiaens, F

    1999-06-01

    Angelman syndrome is a neurogenetic condition namely characterized by developmental delay, virtual absence of expressive verbal language, peculiar organization of movement, seizures and happy demeanor. This syndrome has been recognized since 1965, but it seems that Walt Disney presented an original depiction of it in his first full-length animated film, including myoclonic jerks and an apparently generalized tonic-clonic seizure. Copyright 1999 BEA Trading Ltd.

  8. Envenomation Seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharal, Ghulam Abbas; Darby, Richard Ryan; Cohen, Adam B

    2018-01-01

    Insect sting-related envenomation rarely produces seizures. We present a patient with confusion and seizures that began 24 hours after a yellow jacket (wasp) sting. Given the rapid onset and resolution of symptoms, as well as accompanying dermatological and orbital features, and the lack of any infectious or structural abnormalities identified, the toxic effect of the wasp venom (and related anaphylaxis reaction) was believed to be the cause of his presentation.

  9. MST e-News June 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kippen, Karen Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-17

    This is Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) June 2016 newsletter of the Materials Science and Technology Division. The following are major topics in this newsletter: MST-8 scientists guide national efforts to overcome nuclear energy technical challenges, first-ever scanning probe microscopy capabilities for plutonium, laboratory metallurgists make thorium targets for production of cancer-fighting isotopes, and a spotlight on Veronica Livescu.

  10. Effect of sludge solids to mono-sodium titanate (MST) ratio on MST-treated sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, H.H.

    1999-01-01

    The Salt Disposition Systems Engineering Team has selected two cesium removal technologies for further development to replace the In-Tank Precipitation process: small tank tetraphenylborate (TPB) precipitation and crystalline silicotitanate (CST) ion exchange. In the CST ion exchange process, incoming salt solution from storage tanks containing entrained sludge solids is pretreated with monosodium titanate (MST) to adsorb strontium and plutonium. The resulting slurry is filtered using a cross-flow filter, with the permeate sent forward to CST ion exchange columns for cesium removal prior to conversion into Class A grout at the Saltstone Facility. The MST and sludge solids are to be sent for vitrification at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The High Level Waste Division (HLWD) requested that the Waste Processing Technology Section (WPTS) study varying the insoluble sludge solids to MST ratio to determine the relative impact of sludge and MST on filter performance. The purpose of this study was not for an exhaustive comprehensive search for an optimized insoluble sludge solids to monosodium titanate (MST) ratio, but as a scoping study to identify any effects of having an excess of either material. This document reports the results obtained

  11. [A modified approach to the diagnosis and therapy of epileptic seizures in the third stage of life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavranović, Muhamed; Delilović, Jasminka; Kurtović, Azra; Alibegović, Sakib; Rajić, Zeljka; Ajanović, Zakira

    2003-01-01

    Incidence of seizures in the elderly is nowadays greater than the one characteristic for children up to 10 years of age. Epileptic seizures are the third most common serious neurological disorder in this age group, after stroke and dementia. Optimal care for those patients, regarding to the seizures, demands some modification in diagnostic and treatment approach. Aim of this report was to point out problems in diagnostics, treatment and most common mistakes in practice. Fifty one patients were assessed, aged 65-83 years, (30 female and 21 male), with diagnosis of epilepsy and established antiepileptic treatment. All patients were re-examined, and following procedures were utilised: auto and heteroanamnesis (especially data provided by eyewitnesses), clinical examination, biochemical status, complete cardiological examination, EEG registration, serum concentrations of antiepileptic drugs, CT and MRI scan. Out of 51 patients 11 were misdiagnosed (syncope, provoked seizures, TIA). The most common form of seizures were partial seizures with or without secondary generalization (31 cases). Etiologic factors: stroke (25 cases), arteriosclerosis (7 cases), tumours (3 cases), trauma (2 cases), unknown (3 cases) cardiovascular diseases (29 casec) diabetes mellitus (20 cases), respiratory disturbance (12 cases) renal disturbances (8 cases). Only 30 patients had monotherapy from the beginning, with either carbamazepine or valproate. Rest were treated from the beginning with 2 antiepileptic drugs (phenobarbital + carbamazepine or pheytoin + phenobarbital). Adverse effects were recorded in 21 patients. I. It is crucial to distingiush unprovoked and provoked seizures during diagnostic procedures, as well as epileptic and non-epileptic attacks; 2. Principle of monotherapy is conditio sine qua non, and in treatment attention should be paid to co-morbidity, multitherapy, drug interactions, intoxication, diminished detoxication and elimination of drugs, as well as increased

  12. Testing and Characterization of Engineered Forms of Monosodium Titanate (MST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Nash, C.; Hobbs, D.

    2012-01-01

    Engineered forms of MST and mMST were prepared at ORNL using an internal gelation process. Samples of these two materials were characterized at SRNL to examine particle size and morphology, peroxide content, tapped densities, and Na, Ti, and C content. Batch contact tests were also performed to examine the performance of the materials. The E mMST material was found to contain less than 10% of the peroxide found in a freshly prepared batch of mMST. This was also evidenced in batch contact testing with both simulated and actual waste, where little difference in performance was seen between the two engineered materials, E MST and E mMST. Based on these results, attempts were made to increase the peroxide content of the materials by post-treatment with hydrogen peroxide. The peroxide treatment resulted in a slight (∼10%) increase in peroxide content; however, the peroxide:Ti molar ratio was still much lower (∼0.1 X) than what is seen in a freshly prepared batch of mMST. Testing with simulated waste showed the performance of the peroxide treated materials was improved. Batch contact tests were also performed with an earlier (2003) prepared lot of E MST to examine the effect of ionic strength on the performance of the material. In general the results showed a decrease in removal performance with increasing ionic strength, which is consistent with previous testing with MST. A Sr loading isotherm was also determined, and the E MST material was found to reach a Sr loading as high as 13.2 wt % after 100 days of contact at a phase ratio of 20000 mL/g. At the typical MST phase ratio of 2500 mL/g (0.4 g/L), a Sr loading of 2.64 wt % was reached after 506 hours of contact. Samples of E MST and the post-peroxide treated E mMST were also tested in a column configuration using simulated waste solution. The breakthrough curves along with analysis of the sorbent beds at the conclusion of the experiments showed that the peroxide treated E mMST has a higher Sr and Np capacity, but

  13. TESTING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ENGINEERED FORMS OF MONOSODIUM TITANATE (MST)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Nash, C.; Hobbs, D.

    2012-05-14

    Engineered forms of MST and mMST were prepared at ORNL using an internal gelation process. Samples of these two materials were characterized at SRNL to examine particle size and morphology, peroxide content, tapped densities, and Na, Ti, and C content. Batch contact tests were also performed to examine the performance of the materials. The {sup E}mMST material was found to contain less than 10% of the peroxide found in a freshly prepared batch of mMST. This was also evidenced in batch contact testing with both simulated and actual waste, where little difference in performance was seen between the two engineered materials, {sup E}MST and {sup E}mMST. Based on these results, attempts were made to increase the peroxide content of the materials by post-treatment with hydrogen peroxide. The peroxide treatment resulted in a slight ({approx}10%) increase in peroxide content; however, the peroxide:Ti molar ratio was still much lower ({approx}0.1 X) than what is seen in a freshly prepared batch of mMST. Testing with simulated waste showed the performance of the peroxide treated materials was improved. Batch contact tests were also performed with an earlier (2003) prepared lot of {sup E}MST to examine the effect of ionic strength on the performance of the material. In general the results showed a decrease in removal performance with increasing ionic strength, which is consistent with previous testing with MST. A Sr loading isotherm was also determined, and the {sup E}MST material was found to reach a Sr loading as high as 13.2 wt % after 100 days of contact at a phase ratio of 20000 mL/g. At the typical MST phase ratio of 2500 mL/g (0.4 g/L), a Sr loading of 2.64 wt % was reached after 506 hours of contact. Samples of {sup E}MST and the post-peroxide treated {sup E}mMST were also tested in a column configuration using simulated waste solution. The breakthrough curves along with analysis of the sorbent beds at the conclusion of the experiments showed that the peroxide treated

  14. COgnitive behavioural therapy vs standardised medical care for adults with Dissociative non-Epileptic Seizures (CODES): a multicentre randomised controlled trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Laura H; Mellers, John D C; Landau, Sabine; Stone, Jon; Carson, Alan; Medford, Nick; Reuber, Markus; Richardson, Mark; McCrone, Paul; Murray, Joanna; Chalder, Trudie

    2015-06-27

    The evidence base for the effectiveness of psychological interventions for patients with dissociative non-epileptic seizures (DS) is currently extremely limited, although data from two small pilot randomised controlled trials (RCTs), including from our group, suggest that Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) may be effective in reducing DS occurrence and may improve aspects of psychological status and psychosocial functioning. The study is a multicentre, pragmatic parallel group RCT to evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of specifically-tailored CBT plus standardised medical care (SMC) vs SMC alone in reducing DS frequency and improving psychological and health-related outcomes. In the initial screening phase, patients with DS will receive their diagnosis from a neurologist/epilepsy specialist. If patients are eligible and interested following the provision of study information and a booklet about DS, they will consent to provide demographic information and fortnightly data about their seizures, and agree to see a psychiatrist three months later. We aim to recruit ~500 patients to this screening stage. After a review three months later by a psychiatrist, those patients who have continued to have DS in the previous eight weeks and who meet further eligibility criteria will be told about the trial comparing CBT + SMC vs SMC alone. If they are interested in participating, they will be given a further booklet on DS and study information. A research worker will see them to obtain their informed consent to take part in the RCT. We aim to randomise 298 people (149 to each arm). In addition to a baseline assessment, data will be collected at 6 and 12 months post randomisation. Our primary outcome is monthly seizure frequency in the preceding month. Secondary outcomes include seizure severity, measures of seizure freedom and reduction, psychological distress and psychosocial functioning, quality of life, health service use, cost effectiveness and adverse

  15. Robust MST-Based Clustering Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qidong; Zhang, Ruisheng; Zhao, Zhili; Wang, Zhenghai; Jiao, Mengyao; Wang, Guangjing

    2018-06-01

    Minimax similarity stresses the connectedness of points via mediating elements rather than favoring high mutual similarity. The grouping principle yields superior clustering results when mining arbitrarily-shaped clusters in data. However, it is not robust against noises and outliers in the data. There are two main problems with the grouping principle: first, a single object that is far away from all other objects defines a separate cluster, and second, two connected clusters would be regarded as two parts of one cluster. In order to solve such problems, we propose robust minimum spanning tree (MST)-based clustering algorithm in this letter. First, we separate the connected objects by applying a density-based coarsening phase, resulting in a low-rank matrix in which the element denotes the supernode by combining a set of nodes. Then a greedy method is presented to partition those supernodes through working on the low-rank matrix. Instead of removing the longest edges from MST, our algorithm groups the data set based on the minimax similarity. Finally, the assignment of all data points can be achieved through their corresponding supernodes. Experimental results on many synthetic and real-world data sets show that our algorithm consistently outperforms compared clustering algorithms.

  16. Seizure prognosis of patients with low-grade tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlenberg, Cynthia A; Fadul, Camilo E; Roberts, David W; Thadani, Vijay M; Bujarski, Krzysztof A; Scott, Rod C; Jobst, Barbara C

    2012-09-01

    Seizures frequently impact the quality of life of patients with low grade tumors. Management is often based on best clinical judgment. We examined factors that correlate with seizure outcome to optimize seizure management. Patients with supratentorial low-grade tumors evaluated at a single institution were retrospectively reviewed. Using multiple regression analysis the patient characteristics and treatments were correlated with seizure outcome using Engel's classification. Of the 73 patients with low grade tumors and median follow up of 3.8 years (range 1-20 years), 54 (74%) patients had a seizure ever and 46 (63%) had at least one seizure before tumor surgery. The only factor significantly associated with pre-surgical seizures was tumor histology. Of the 54 patients with seizures ever, 25 (46.3%) had a class I outcome at last follow up. There was no difference in seizure outcome between grade II gliomas (astrocytoma grade II, oligodendroglioma grade II, mixed oligo-astrocytoma grade II) and other pathologies (pilocytic astrocytoma, ependymomas, DNET, gangliocytoma and ganglioglioma). Once seizures were established seizure prognosis was similar between different pathologies. Chemotherapy (p=0.03) and radiation therapy (p=0.02) had a positive effect on seizure outcome. No other parameter including significant tumor growth during the follow up period predicted seizure outcome. Only three patients developed new-onset seizures after tumor surgery that were non-perioperative. Anticonvulsant medication was tapered in 14 patients with seizures and 10 had no further seizures. Five patients underwent additional epilepsy surgery with a class I outcome in four. Two patients received a vagal nerve stimulator with >50% seizure reduction. Seizures at presentation are the most important factor associated with continued seizures after tumor surgery. Pathology does not influence seizure outcome. Use of long term prophylactic anticonvulsants is unwarranted. Chemotherapy and

  17. "Transit data"-based MST computation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thodoris Karatasos

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present an innovative image recognition technique which is based on the exploitation of transit-data in images or simple photographs of sites of interest. Our objective is to automatically transform real-world images to graphs and, then, compute Minimum Spanning Trees (MST in them.We apply this framework and present an application which automatically computes efficient construction plans (for escalator or low-emission hot spots for connecting all points of interest in cultural sites, i.e., archaeological sites, museums, galleries, etc, aiming to to facilitate global physical access to cultural heritage and artistic work and make it accessible to all groups of population.

  18. Seizures and Teens: Surgery for Seizures--What's It All About?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchowny, Michael S.; Dean, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    Nearly 1 out of 2 children and teens with seizures may need to take medications throughout their lives. At least 25% will develop a condition called refractory epilepsy--meaning that their seizures do not respond to medical therapy. For these children and teens, non-drug therapies such as brain surgery are available that may offer a chance to…

  19. Treating seizures in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Marcus C; Westover, M Brandon; Cole, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Seizures are known to occur in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). In the setting of a rapidly progressive condition with no effective therapy, determining appropriate treatment for seizures can be difficult if clinical morbidity is not obvious yet the electroencephalogram (EEG) demonstrates a worrisome pattern such as status epilepticus. Herein, we present the case of a 39-year-old man with CJD and electrographic seizures, discuss how this case challenges conventional definitions of seizures, and discuss a rational approach toward treatment. Coincidentally, our case is the first report of CJD in a patient with Stickler syndrome.

  20. Veja o MST! - Um frame revelado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Maria Tenuta de Azevedo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Esta é uma análise de duas reportagens jornalísticas publicadas em 3/04/2002, referentes a um único episódio: a invasão, liderada pelo Movimento dos Trabalhadores Sem-Terra (MST, da Fazenda Córrego da Ponte, situada em Buritis, Minas Gerais, de propriedade da família do então presidente Fernando Henrique Cardoso, ocorrida em 23/03/2002. Tal análise revela, no texto da Revista Veja (p. 46 a 50, a construção, principalmente através de recursos lexicais, de um determinado modelo cognitivo idealizado - frame - (Fauconnier, 1997 - subjacente à macro-estrutura do texto, o que não ocorre em relação à reportagem da Revista Isto é (p. 31 a 34. A existência de tal frame, compartilhada culturalmente por escritores e leitores, leva, por parte destes, a interpretações maniqueístas do evento sendo reportado.The present work is an analysis of two magazine reports referring to the episode of the invasion of Córrego da Ponte Farm, situated in Buritis, MG, which happened on March 23rd, 2002, led by the Landless Workers Movement (MST. Córrego da Ponte is property of the family of Fernando Henrique Cardoso (The president of Brazil at that time. The first of those reports (Veja Magazine, April 3rd, 2002, p. 46 to 50 is seen in details, since it presents elements of an idealized cognitive model - frame (Fauconnier, 1997 underlying the superstructure of the text. The existence of such frame, revealed by certain linguistic elements, especially the lexical choice, tends to raise dualistic interpretations of the socio-political event being reported. The second one (Isto é Magazine, edition 1696, April 03rd, 2002, p. 31 to 34 is taken as a differentiated parameter, for comparison to the analysis proposal for the first report.

  1. Effect of Mst1 on Endometriosis Apoptosis and Migration: Role of Drp1-Related Mitochondrial Fission and Parkin-Required Mitophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qingdong; Ye, Mingxia; Yang, Wen; Wang, Min; Li, Mingxia; Gu, Chenglei; Zhao, Luyang; Zhang, Zhe; Han, Weidong; Fan, Wensheng; Meng, Yuanguang

    2018-01-01

    Mitochondrial homeostasis is implicated in the development and progression of endometriosis through poorly defined mechanisms. Mst1 is the major growth suppressor related to cancer migration, apoptosis and proliferation. However, whether Mst1 is involved in endometriosis apoptosis and migration via regulating the mitochondrial function remains to be elucidated. Expression of Mst1 in endometriosis was examined via western blots. Cellular apoptosis was detected via MTT and TUNEL assay. Gain of function assay about Mst1 was conducted via adenovirus over-expression. Mitochondrial functions were evaluated via mitochondrial membrane potential JC-1 staining, ROS flow cytometry analysis, mPTP opening assessment and immunofluorescence of HtrA2/Omi. The mitophagy activity were examined via western blots and immunofluorescence. First, we found that Mst1 was significantly downregulated in the ectopic endometrium of endometriosis compared to the normal endometrium. However, the recovery of Mst1 function was closely associated with the inability of endometrial stromal cells (ESCs) to migrate and survive. A functional study indicated that regaining Mst1 enhanced Drp1 post-transcriptional phosphorylation at Ser616 and repressed Parkin transcription activity via p53, leading to mitochondrial fission activation and mitophagy inhibition. Excessive Drp1-related fission forced the mitochondria to liberate HtrA2/Omi into the cytoplasm. Moreover, Mst1-induced defective mitophagy evoked cellular oxidative stress, energy metabolism and calcium overload. Through excessive mitochondrial fission and aberrant mitophagy, Mst1 launched caspase 9-related mitochondrial apoptosis and abrogated F-actin/lamellipodium-dependent cellular migration. Notably, we also defined NR4A/miR181c as the upstream signal for Mst1 dysfunction in endometriosis. Collectively, our results comprehensively described the important role of the NR4A-miR181c-Mst1 pathway in endometriosis, which handled mitochondrial

  2. Seizures and Teens: Stress, Sleep, & Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Patricia Osborne

    2007-01-01

    Most parents are used to erratic sleep patterns and mood swings in their teenagers. When these occur in an adolescent with seizures, however, the parent may wonder if sleep and mood problems are related to seizures. Sorting out the cause and effects of sleep in an adolescent with seizures can be confusing. Since stress can be a contributor to both…

  3. Improvements to the MST Thomson Scattering Diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, D. T.; Borchardt, M. T.; den Hartog, D. J.; Holly, D. J.; Kile, T.; Kubala, S. Z.; Jacobson, C. M.; Thomas, M. A.; Wallace, J. P.; Young, W. C.; MST Thomson Scattering Team

    2017-10-01

    Multiple upgrades to the MST Thomson Scattering diagnostic have been implemented to expand capabilities of the system. In the past, stray laser light prevented electron density measurements everywhere and temperature measurements for -z/a >0.75. To mitigate stray light, a new laser beamline is being commissioned that includes a longer entrance flight tube, close-fitting apertures, and baffles. A polarizer has been added to the collection optics to further reduce stray light. An absolute density calibration using Rayleigh scattering in argon will be performed. An insertable integrating sphere will provide a full-system spectral calibration as well as maps optical fibers to machine coordinates. Reduced transmission of the collection optics due to coatings from plasma-surface interactions is regularly monitored to inform timely replacements of the first lens. Long-wavelength filters have been installed to better characterize non-Maxwellian electron distribution features. Previous work has identified residual photons not described by a Maxwellian distribution during m =0 magnetic bursts. Further effort to characterize the distribution function will be described. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences program under Award No. DE-FC02-05ER54814.

  4. Controlled-release oxycodone-induced seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Moti; Rudich, Zvia; Gurevich, Boris; Lifshitz, Matityahu; Brill, Silviu; Lottan, Michael; Weksler, Natan

    2005-11-01

    The use of the opioid oxycodone hydrochloride in the management of chronic pain is gaining popularity principally because of its tolerability. However, opioid-related seizure in patients with epilepsy or other conditions that may decrease seizure threshold has been described in the literature; in particular, oxycodone has been associated with seizure in a patient with acute renal failure. The aim of this article was to report a patient with a history of seizures but normal renal and hepatic function who developed seizure on 2 occasions after oxycodone ingestion. A 54-year-old male patient presented with a history of tonic-clonic seizures that developed immediately after intracranial surgery. Long-term treatment with carbamazepine 400 mg QD was started, and the patient was free of convulsions for approximately 7 years. The patient presented to us with severe headache that was nonresponsive to an NSAID and the opiate agonist tramadol. Treatment with controlled-release (CR) oxycodone and tramadol drops (50 mg QID if necessary) was started, and tonic-clonic seizures developed 3 days later. Based on laboratory analysis, the patient had normal renal and hepatic function. On discontinuation of oxycodone treatment, the seizures resolved. However, due to effective pain relief with oxycodone, the patient decided to continue treatment, and seizures recurred. Carbamazepine was then administered 4 hours before oxycodone dosing, which allowed continuation of treatment without seizure. A patient with a history of seizures controlled with long-term carbamazepine therapy developed seizures when he started treatment with oxycodone CR at recommended doses. Oxycodone CR should be used with extreme caution in patients with epilepsy or other conditions that may decrease seizure threshold.

  5. Seizure Disorders in Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... If I have a seizure disorder, can it cause problems during pregnancy? • What risks are associated with having a seizure ... If I have a seizure disorder, can it cause problems during pregnancy? Seizure disorders can affect pregnancy in several ways: • ...

  6. Management Of Post Stroke Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavian Ghandehari

    2017-02-01

    that proved to be more effective than immediate-release carbamazepine in elderly patients, providing level A evidence for their use in this indication. In addition, gabapentin remains the only drug that has been specifically evaluated in stroke patients, demonstrating a high rate of long-term seizure freedom. At present, low-dose lamotrigine or gabapentin appears to represent the optimal first-line therapy for post-stroke seizure and epilepsy in elderly patients or in younger patients requiring anticoagulants. However, low-dose extended-release carbamazepine might be a reasonable and less expensive option in patients with appropriate bone health who do not requiring anticoagulat. Based on the stroke management guidelines antiepileptic drugs should not be administered as preventive management in any type of stroke patients without seizure.

  7. Febrile Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Institutes of Health (NIH), the leading supporter of biomedical research in the world. Researchers are exploring the biological, ... Testimony Legislative Updates Impact NINDS Contributions to Approved Therapies ... Director, Division of Intramural Research

  8. Febrile Seizure Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Cisneros

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This simulation session is appropriate for medical students, community physicians, or residents in emergency medicine, neurology, pediatrics, or family medicine. Introduction: Febrile seizures are the most common form of seizures in childhood; they are thought to occur in 2-5% of all children.1-3 Febrile seizures are defined as a seizure in association with a febrile illness in children without a central nervous system infection, previous afebrile seizure, known brain disorder, or electrolyte abnormalities. 1,2 They typically occur between 6 months and 18 months of age though they can occur up to 5 years of age.3 Febrile seizures are categorized as: simple (generalized seizure lasting less than 15 minutes in a child aged 6 months to 5 years, and less than 1 in a 24 hour period or complex (a focal seizure or generalized seizure lasting greater than 15 minutes, or multiple seizures in a 24 hour period. 1,3 Treatment for febrile seizures is based on treating the underlying cause of the fever and giving reassurance and education to the parents.2 Mortality is extremely rare, and there is no difference in the patient’s cognitive abilities after a febrile seizure, even when the seizure is prolonged.1 Objectives: At the end of this simulation session, the learner will be able to: 1 discuss the management of febrile seizures 2 discuss when placement of an advanced airway is indicated in the management of a febrile seizure 3 list the risk factors for febrile seizures 4 prepare a differential diagnosis for the causes of febrile seizures 5 educate family members on febrile seizures. Methods: This educational session is a high-fidelity simulation.

  9. Caramiphen edisylate as Adjunct to Standard Therapy attenuates soman-induced Seizures and Cognitive Deficits in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-16

    705. Maren S. Pavlovian fear conditioning as a behavioral assay for hippocampus and amygdala function: cautions and caveats. Eur J Neurosci 2008;28... conditioning . Hear Res 2011;274:61–74. Weissman BA, Raveh L. Therapy against organophosphate poisoning: the importance of anticholinergic drugs with...whichmay lead to neuropathological damage and behavioral deficits. Caramiphen edisylate is an anticholinergic drug with antiglutamatergic properties

  10. Assessment of performing an MST strike in Tank 21H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, Michael R.

    2014-09-29

    Previous Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) tank mixing studies performed for the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) project have shown that 3 Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs) installed in Tank 41 are sufficient to support actinide removal by MST sorption as well as subsequent resuspension and removal of settled solids. Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is pursuing MST addition into Tank 21 as part of the Large Tank Strike (LTS) project. The preliminary scope for LTS involves the use of three standard slurry pumps (installed in N, SE, and SW risers) in a Type IV tank. Due to the differences in tank size, internal interferences, and pump design, a separate mixing evaluation is required to determine if the proposed configuration will allow for MST suspension and strontium and actinide sorption. The author performed the analysis by reviewing drawings for Tank 21 [W231023] and determining the required cleaning radius or zone of influence for the pumps. This requirement was compared with previous pilot-scale MST suspension data collected for SCIX that determined the cleaning radius, or zone of influence, as a function of pump operating parameters. The author also reviewed a previous Tank 50 mixing analysis that examined the ability of standard slurry pumps to suspend sludge particles. Based on a review of the pilot-scale SCIX mixing tests and Tank 50 pump operating experience, three standard slurry pumps should be able to suspend sludge and MST to effectively sorb strontium and actinides onto the MST. Using the SCIX data requires an assumption about the impact of cooling coils on slurry pump mixing. The basis for this assumption is described in this report. Using the Tank 50 operating experience shows three standard slurry pumps should be able to suspend solids if the shear strength of the settled solids is less than 160 Pa. Because Tank 21 does not contain cooling coils, the shear strength could be larger.

  11. System aspects of the Indian MST radar facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, G.

    1986-01-01

    One of the major objectives of the Indian Middle Atmosphere Program is to investigate the motions of the middle atmosphere on temporal and spatial scales and the interaction between the three height regions of the middle atmosphere. Realizing the fact that radar technique has proven to be a very powerful tool for the study of Earth atmosphere, the Indian Middle Atmosphere Program has recommended establishing a mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radar as a national facility for atmospheric research. The major landmarks in this attempt to setup the MST radar as a national facility are described.

  12. Grand Mal Seizure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... grand mal seizures include: A family history of seizure disorders Any injury to the brain from trauma, a ... the risk of birth defects. If you have epilepsy and plan to become pregnant, work with your ...

  13. Frontal Lobe Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cause of frontal lobe epilepsy remains unknown. Complications Status epilepticus. Frontal lobe seizures tend to occur in clusters and may provoke a dangerous condition called status epilepticus — in which seizure activity lasts much longer than ...

  14. Overview of results from the MST reversed field pinch experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarff, J.S.; Almagri, A.F.; Anderson, J.K.; Borchardt, M.; Carmody, D.; Caspary, K.; Chapman, B.E.; Den Hartog, D.J.; Duff, J.; Eilerman, S.; Falkowski, A.; Forest, C.B.; Goetz, J.A.; Holly, D.J.; Kim, J.-H.; King, J.; Ko, J.; Koliner, J.; Kumar, S.; Lee, J.D.

    2013-01-01

    An overview of recent results from the MST programme on physics important for the advancement of the reversed field pinch (RFP) as well as for improved understanding of toroidal magnetic confinement more generally is reported. Evidence for the classical confinement of ions in the RFP is provided by analysis of impurity ions and energetic ions created by 1 MW neutral beam injection (NBI). The first appearance of energetic-particle-driven modes by NBI in a RFP plasma is described. MST plasmas robustly access the quasi-single-helicity state that has commonalities to the stellarator and ‘snake’ formation in tokamaks. In MST the dominant mode grows to 8% of the axisymmetric field strength, while the remaining modes are reduced. Predictive capability for tearing mode behaviour has been improved through nonlinear, 3D, resistive magnetohydrodynamic computation using the measured resistivity profile and Lundquist number, which reproduces the sawtooth cycle dynamics. Experimental evidence and computational analysis indicates two-fluid effects, e.g., Hall physics and gyro-viscosity, are needed to understand the coupling of parallel momentum transport and current profile relaxation. Large Reynolds and Maxwell stresses, plus separately measured kinetic stress, indicate an intricate momentum balance and a possible origin for MST's intrinsic plasma rotation. Gyrokinetic analysis indicates that micro-tearing modes can be unstable at high beta, with a critical gradient for the electron temperature that is larger than for tokamak plasmas by roughly the aspect ratio. (paper)

  15. Intravenous Carbamazepine for Adults With Seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickery, P Brittany; Tillery, Erika E; DeFalco, Alicia Potter

    2018-03-01

    To review the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, safety, dosage and administration, potential drug-drug interactions, and place in therapy of the intravenous (IV) formulation of carbamazepine (Carnexiv) for the treatment of seizures in adult patients. A comprehensive PubMed and EBSCOhost search (1945 to August 2017) was performed utilizing the keywords carbamazepine, Carnexiv, carbamazepine intravenous, IV carbamazepine, seizures, epilepsy, and seizure disorder. Additional data were obtained from literature review citations, manufacturer's product labeling, and Lundbeck website as well as Clinicaltrials.gov and governmental sources. All English-language trials evaluating IV carbamazepine were analyzed for this review. IV carbamazepine is FDA approved as temporary replacement therapy for treatment of adult seizures. Based on a phase I trial and pooled data from 2 open-label bioavailability studies comparing oral with IV dosing, there was no noted indication of loss of seizure control in patients switched to short-term replacement antiepileptic drug therapy with IV carbamazepine. The recommended dose of IV carbamazepine is 70% of the patient's oral dose, given every 6 hours via 30-minute infusions. The adverse effect profile of IV carbamazepine is similar to that of the oral formulation, with the exception of added infusion-site reactions. IV carbamazepine is a reasonable option for adults with generalized tonic-clonic or focal seizures, previously stabilized on oral carbamazepine, who are unable to tolerate oral medications for up to 7 days. Unknown acquisition cost and lack of availability in the United States limit its use currently.

  16. Seizure development after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misirli, H; Ozge, A; Somay, G; Erdoğan, N; Erkal, H; Erenoğlu, N Y

    2006-12-01

    Although there have been many studies on seizures following stroke, there is still much we do not know about them. In this study, we evaluated the characteristics of seizures in stroke patients. There were 2267 patients with a first-ever stroke, and after excluding 387 patients, 1880 were available for analysis. Of these 1880 patients, we evaluated 200 patients with seizures and 400 patients without seizures. We investigated the seizures according to age, gender, stroke type, the aetiology of ischaemic stroke and the localisation of the lesion. The seizures were classified as early onset and late onset and the seizure type as partial, generalised or secondarily generalised. Seizures occurred in 200 (10.6%) of 1880 strokes. The number of patients with seizures were 138 (10.6%) in ischaemic stroke group and 62 (10.7%) in haemorrhagic stroke group. Patients with ischaemic strokes had 41 embolic (29.7%) and 97 thrombotic (70.3%) origin, and these were not statistically significant in comparison with controls. Cortical involvement for the development of seizures was the most important risk factor (odds ratios = 4.25, p < 0.01). It was concluded that embolic strokes, being younger than 65 years old, and cortical localisation of stroke were important risks for developing seizures.

  17. Efficacy and safety of extended-release oxcarbazepine (Oxtellar XR™) as adjunctive therapy in patients with refractory partial-onset seizures: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, JA; Baroldi, P; Brittain, ST; Johnson, JK

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy, tolerability, and safety of once-daily 1200 mg and 2400 mg SPN-804 (Oxtellar XR™, Supernus Pharmaceuticals), an extended-release tablet formulation of oxcarbazepine (OXC), added to 1-3 concomitant antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in adults with refractory partial-onset seizures, with or without secondary generalization. Methods The Prospective, Randomized Study of OXC XR in Subjects with Partial Epilepsy Refractory (PROSPER) study was a multinational, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group Phase 3 study. The primary efficacy endpoint was median percent reduction from baseline in monthly (28-day) seizure frequency for the 16-week double-blind treatment period in the intent-to-treat (ITT) population with analyzable seizure data. Other efficacy analyses included proportion of patients with ≥ 50% seizure reduction, proportion of patients seizure free, and the relationship between clinical response and plasma concentration. Results Median percent reduction was -28.7% for placebo, −38.2% (P = 0.08 vs placebo) for once-daily SPN-804 1200 mg, and −42.9% (P = 0.003) for SPN-804 2400 mg. Responder rates were 28.1%, 36.1% (P = 0.08), and 40.7% (P = 0.02); 16-week seizure-free rates in a pragmatic ITT analysis were 3.3%, 4.9% (P = 0.59), and 11.4% (P = 0.008), respectively. When data were analyzed separately for study site clusters, a post hoc analysis demonstrated that both SPN-804 dosages were significantly superior to placebo in median percent seizure reduction (placebo: −13.3%; 1200 mg: −34.5%, P = 0.02; 2400 mg: −52.7%, P = 0.006) in the North American study site cluster. A concentration–response analysis also supported a clinically meaningful effect for 1200 mg. Adverse event types reflected the drug's established profile. Adverse event frequency was consistent with a pharmacokinetic profile in which SPN-804 produces lower peak plasma concentrations vs immediate-release OXC. Once-daily dosing was not

  18. Seizure detection, seizure prediction, and closed-loop warning systems in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramgopal, Sriram; Thome-Souza, Sigride; Jackson, Michele; Kadish, Navah Ester; Sánchez Fernández, Iván; Klehm, Jacquelyn; Bosl, William; Reinsberger, Claus; Schachter, Steven; Loddenkemper, Tobias

    2014-08-01

    Nearly one-third of patients with epilepsy continue to have seizures despite optimal medication management. Systems employed to detect seizures may have the potential to improve outcomes in these patients by allowing more tailored therapies and might, additionally, have a role in accident and SUDEP prevention. Automated seizure detection and prediction require algorithms which employ feature computation and subsequent classification. Over the last few decades, methods have been developed to detect seizures utilizing scalp and intracranial EEG, electrocardiography, accelerometry and motion sensors, electrodermal activity, and audio/video captures. To date, it is unclear which combination of detection technologies yields the best results, and approaches may ultimately need to be individualized. This review presents an overview of seizure detection and related prediction methods and discusses their potential uses in closed-loop warning systems in epilepsy. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Athletes with seizure disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Byron Don; Pleacher, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with seizure disorders have long been restricted from participation in certain sporting activities. Those with seizure disorders are more likely than their peers to have a sedentary lifestyle and to develop obesity. Regular participation in physical activity can improve both physical and psychosocial outcomes for persons with seizure disorders. Seizure activity often is reduced among those patients who regularly engage in aerobic activity. Recent literature indicates that the diagnosis of seizure disorders remains highly stigmatizing in the adolescent population. Persons with seizure disorders may be more accepted by peer groups if they are allowed to participate in sports and recreational activities. Persons with seizure disorders are encouraged to participate in regular aerobic activities. They may participate in team sports and contact or collision activities provided that they utilize appropriate protective equipment. There seems to be no increased risk of injury or increasing seizure activity as the result of such participation. Persons with seizure disorders still are discouraged from participating in scuba diving and skydiving. The benefits of participation in regular sporting activity far outweigh any risk to the athlete with a seizure disorder who chooses to participate in sports.

  20. Hypermethylation of MST1 in IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis and rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuhara, Takataro; Tomiyama, Takashi [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, The Third Department of Internal Medicine, JST CREST, Kansai Medical University, 2-5-1 Shin-machi, Hirakata, Osaka 573-1010 (Japan); Yasuda, Kaneki [Department of Urology and Andrology, Kansai Medical University, 2-5-1 Shin-machi, Hirakata, Osaka 573-1010 (Japan); Ueda, Yoshihiro [Department of Molecular Genetics, Institute of Biomedical Science, and JST CREST, Kansai Medical University, 2-5-1 Shin-machi, Hirakata, Osaka 573-1010 (Japan); Ozaki, Yoshio; Son, Yonsu; Nomura, Shosaku [Department of the First Department of Internal Medicine, Kansai Medical University, 2-5-1 Shin-machi, Hirakata, Osaka 573-1010 (Japan); Uchida, Kazushige; Okazaki, Kazuichi [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, The Third Department of Internal Medicine, JST CREST, Kansai Medical University, 2-5-1 Shin-machi, Hirakata, Osaka 573-1010 (Japan); Kinashi, Tatsuo, E-mail: kinashi@takii.kmu.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Genetics, Institute of Biomedical Science, and JST CREST, Kansai Medical University, 2-5-1 Shin-machi, Hirakata, Osaka 573-1010 (Japan)

    2015-08-07

    The serine/threonine kinase Mst1 plays important roles in the control of immune cell trafficking, proliferation, and differentiation. Previously, we reported that Mst1 was required for thymocyte selection and regulatory T-cell functions, thereby the prevention of autoimmunity in mice. In humans, MST1 null mutations cause T-cell immunodeficiency and hypergammaglobulinemia with autoantibody production. RASSF5C(RAPL) is an activator of MST1 and it is frequently methylated in some tumors. Herein, we investigated methylation of the promoter regions of MST1 and RASSF5C(RAPL) in leukocytes from patients with IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Increased number of CpG methylation in the 5′ region of MST1 was detected in AIP patients with extrapancreatic lesions, whereas AIP patients without extrapancreatic lesions were similar to controls. In RA patients, we detected a slight increased CpG methylation in MST1, although the overall number of methylation sites was lower than that of AIP patients with extrapancreatic lesions. There were no significant changes of the methylation levels of the CpG islands in the 5′ region of RASSF5C(RAPL) in leukocytes from AIP and RA patients. Consistently, we found a significantly down-regulated expression of MST1 in regulatory T cells of AIP patients. Our results suggest that the decreased expression of MST1 in regulatory T cells due to hypermethylation of the promoter contributes to the pathogenesis of IgG4-related AIP. - Highlights: • Mst1 controls immune cells trafficking, cell proliferation and differentiation. • Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is an idiopathic pancreatitis affecting multiple organs. • Decreased MST1 expression and increased CpG methylation of promoter of MST1 in AIP. • Slight increased CpG methylation of MST1 in rheumatoid arthritis patients. • MST1 contributes pathogenesis of IgG4-related AIP.

  1. Hypermethylation of MST1 in IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis and rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuhara, Takataro; Tomiyama, Takashi; Yasuda, Kaneki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Ozaki, Yoshio; Son, Yonsu; Nomura, Shosaku; Uchida, Kazushige; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Kinashi, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase Mst1 plays important roles in the control of immune cell trafficking, proliferation, and differentiation. Previously, we reported that Mst1 was required for thymocyte selection and regulatory T-cell functions, thereby the prevention of autoimmunity in mice. In humans, MST1 null mutations cause T-cell immunodeficiency and hypergammaglobulinemia with autoantibody production. RASSF5C(RAPL) is an activator of MST1 and it is frequently methylated in some tumors. Herein, we investigated methylation of the promoter regions of MST1 and RASSF5C(RAPL) in leukocytes from patients with IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Increased number of CpG methylation in the 5′ region of MST1 was detected in AIP patients with extrapancreatic lesions, whereas AIP patients without extrapancreatic lesions were similar to controls. In RA patients, we detected a slight increased CpG methylation in MST1, although the overall number of methylation sites was lower than that of AIP patients with extrapancreatic lesions. There were no significant changes of the methylation levels of the CpG islands in the 5′ region of RASSF5C(RAPL) in leukocytes from AIP and RA patients. Consistently, we found a significantly down-regulated expression of MST1 in regulatory T cells of AIP patients. Our results suggest that the decreased expression of MST1 in regulatory T cells due to hypermethylation of the promoter contributes to the pathogenesis of IgG4-related AIP. - Highlights: • Mst1 controls immune cells trafficking, cell proliferation and differentiation. • Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is an idiopathic pancreatitis affecting multiple organs. • Decreased MST1 expression and increased CpG methylation of promoter of MST1 in AIP. • Slight increased CpG methylation of MST1 in rheumatoid arthritis patients. • MST1 contributes pathogenesis of IgG4-related AIP

  2. A seizuring alagille syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jomon Mathew John

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Alagille syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant inherited disorder with incidence of one in 100,000 live births. This syndrome with seizure as a presentation has been rarely reported in Indian studies. We present a 3-month-old infant who presented to us with seizures was found to have a dysmorphic face, jaundice, hepatomegaly, and soft systolic murmur. Infant was stabilized and remained seizure free. A detailed clinical evaluation of a common presentation may reveal a rare syndrome.

  3. Effect of age and anticonvulsants on seizure threshold during bilateral electroconvulsive therapy with brief-pulse stimulus: A chart-based analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitturkar, Abhishek R.; Sinha, Preeti; Bagewadi, Virupakshappa I.; Thirthalli, Jagadisha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Efficacy and adverse effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) depend on the extent to which the electrical stimulus exceeds patients' seizure thresholds (STs). Titration method of estimating ST is recommended. Age and co-prescribed anticonvulsants (ACs) are known to affect ST. Literature on ST in bilateral ECT (BLECT) is sparse. Objective: To explore the clinical and demographic determinants of ST in a clinically representative sample of patients prescribed with BLECT. Materials and Methods: ECT records of 640 patients who received BLECT in 2011 in an academic psychiatric setting were studied. Demographic, clinical, pharmacological, and ECT details were analyzed. As per the standard practice, during the 1st ECT session, ST was determined by titration method, starting with 30 milli-Coulombs (mC) and increasing by 30 mC and thence in steps of 60 mC. Increase in ST over up to 6th session of ECT was noted. Receiver operating characteristic curve was used to find age cut-off with high specificity for ST ≥120 mC. The associations of ST and increase in ST with the age cut-off and other clinical factors were assessed using Chi-square test and logistic regression analysis. Results: The mean age was 30.98 years (+11.23 years) and mean ST at 1st ECT session was 130.36 mC (+51.96 mC). There was significantly high positive correlation (r = 0.37, P < 0.001) between age and ST. Cut-off age of 45 years had high specificity: Only 4.6% of those older than 45 years had ST <120 mC. Higher proportion of patients on AC had ST ≥120 mC. These associations were seen even after controlling for potential confounds of each other using logistic regression analysis. The results were similar for increase in ST over the course of ECT. Sex, diagnosis, use of antipsychotics, antidepressants, lithium, and benzodiazepines (BZPs) had no effect on ST or its increase. Conclusions: For BLECT using brief-pulse stimulus, ST depends on age and use of AC. For patients above the age of 45

  4. Epilepsy after Febrile Seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seinfeld, S. A.; Pellock, J M; Kjeldsen, Lone Marianne Juel

    2016-01-01

    to evaluate genetic associations of different febrile seizure subtypes. Results Histories of febrile seizures were validated in 1051 twins in 900 pairs. The febrile seizure type was classified as simple, complex, or febrile status epilepticus. There were 61% simple, 12% complex, and 7% febrile status...... epilepticus. There were 78 twins who developed epilepsy. The highest rate of epilepsy (22.2%) occurred in the febrile status epilepticus group. Concordance was highest in simple group. Conclusion A twin with febrile status epilepticus is at the highest risk of developing epilepsy, but simple febrile seizures...

  5. MST1 activation by curcumin mediates JNK activation, Foxo3a nuclear translocation and apoptosis in melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Teng; Ji, Jiang; Guo, Yong-li

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Curcumin activates MST1 in melanoma cells. •MST1 mediates curcumin-induced apoptosis of melanoma cells. •ROS production is involved in curcumin-induced MST1 activation. •MST1 mediates curcumin-induced JNK activation in melanoma cells. •MST1 mediates curcumin-induced Foxo3a nuclear translocation and Bim expression. -- Abstract: Different groups including ours have shown that curcumin induces melanoma cell apoptosis, here we focused the role of mammalian Sterile 20-like kinase 1 (MST1) in it. We observed that curcumin activated MST1-dependent apoptosis in cultured melanoma cells. MST1 silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) suppressed curcumin-induced cell apoptosis, while MST1 over-expressing increased curcumin sensitivity. Meanwhile, curcumin induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in melanoma cells, and the ROS scavenger, N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), almost blocked MST1 activation to suggest that ROS might be required for MST1 activation by curcumin. c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) activation by curcumin was dependent on MST1, since MST1 inhibition by RNAi or NAC largely inhibited curcumin-induced JNK activation. Further, curcumin induced Foxo3 nuclear translocation and Bim-1 (Foxo3 target gene) expression in melanoma cells, such an effect by curcumin was inhibited by MST1 RNAi. In conclusion, we suggested that MST1 activation by curcumin mediates JNK activation, Foxo3a nuclear translocation and apoptosis in melanoma cells

  6. MST1 activation by curcumin mediates JNK activation, Foxo3a nuclear translocation and apoptosis in melanoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Teng, E-mail: tengyu33@yahoo.com [Department of Dermatology, Shandong Ji-ning No. 1 People’s Hospital, Shandong Province 272011 (China); Ji, Jiang [Department of Dermatology, The Second Hospital Affiliated of Soochow University, SuZhou, Jiangsu Province 215000 (China); Guo, Yong-li [Department of Oncology, Shandong Ji-ning No. 1 People’s Hospital, Shandong Province 272011 (China)

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •Curcumin activates MST1 in melanoma cells. •MST1 mediates curcumin-induced apoptosis of melanoma cells. •ROS production is involved in curcumin-induced MST1 activation. •MST1 mediates curcumin-induced JNK activation in melanoma cells. •MST1 mediates curcumin-induced Foxo3a nuclear translocation and Bim expression. -- Abstract: Different groups including ours have shown that curcumin induces melanoma cell apoptosis, here we focused the role of mammalian Sterile 20-like kinase 1 (MST1) in it. We observed that curcumin activated MST1-dependent apoptosis in cultured melanoma cells. MST1 silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) suppressed curcumin-induced cell apoptosis, while MST1 over-expressing increased curcumin sensitivity. Meanwhile, curcumin induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in melanoma cells, and the ROS scavenger, N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), almost blocked MST1 activation to suggest that ROS might be required for MST1 activation by curcumin. c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) activation by curcumin was dependent on MST1, since MST1 inhibition by RNAi or NAC largely inhibited curcumin-induced JNK activation. Further, curcumin induced Foxo3 nuclear translocation and Bim-1 (Foxo3 target gene) expression in melanoma cells, such an effect by curcumin was inhibited by MST1 RNAi. In conclusion, we suggested that MST1 activation by curcumin mediates JNK activation, Foxo3a nuclear translocation and apoptosis in melanoma cells.

  7. Generalized tonic-clonic seizure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tonic-clonic seizures have vision, taste, smell, or sensory changes, hallucinations, or dizziness before the seizure. This ... longer (called the post-ictal state) Loss of memory (amnesia) about the seizure episode Headache Weakness of ...

  8. Methadone-induced Torsades de Pointes Masquerading as Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C. Traficante

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors herein present the case of a 53-year-old female who was being treated as an outpatient for seizure disorder but was also receiving high-dose methadone therapy. She presented to the emergency department (ED for what appeared to be a seizure and was found to have a prolonged QT interval, as well as runs of paroxysmal polymorphic ventricular tachycardia with seizure-like activity occurring during the arrhythmia. The markedly prolonged QT interval corrected after treatment with intravenous magnesium; subsequent electroencephalogram, neurology and cardiology consultations confirmed the cause of the recurrent seizure-like episodes to be secondary to the cardiotoxic effects of methadone.

  9. Seizures in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, Marcus; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; Polman, Susan; De Keyser, Jacques

    Seizures have long been recognized to be part of the disease spectrum of multiple sclerosis (MS). While they occur in only a minority of patients with MS, epileptic seizures can have serious consequences. The treatment of MS can be epileptogenic, and antiepileptic treatment can conversely worsen the

  10. Treatment Outcome Of Seizures Associated With Intracranial Cavernous Angiomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nievera Conrad C

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Seizures are among the typical presentations of intracranial cavernous angiomas (ICA. Twenty-one patients (age range: 2 to 53 years treated for seizures associated with ICA between 1983 and 1997 were restrospectively studied to evaluate their outcome following medical or surgical intervention. The mean interval between seizure onset and initial presentation at our institution was 7.6 years. Seizures were simple partial in 3 patients, complex partial in 15 and secondarily generalized tonic-clonic in 13. The commonest site of the lesion was the temporal lobe (52%. Multiple angiomas were observed in 5 (24% patients. Seven (32% patients were medically-managed with antiepileptic therapy and 14 (68% underwent either lesionectomy with resection of the epileptogenic zone (9 patients or temporal lobectomy (5 patients. Mean follow-up time was 4 years (range: 3 months to 14 years. Of the medically-managed patients, 3 (43% remained seizure-free whereas 4 (57% continued to have seizures with an average frequency of one per day. Of the surgically-managed patients, 12 (86% became seizure-free and 2 (14% had no more than two seizures per year. Surgery appears to be extremely effective in the management of seizures associated with ICA and should receive a strong and early consideration in patients who fail medical therapy.

  11. Mortality after primary intracerebral hemorrhage in relation to post-stroke seizures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessens, D.; Bekelaar, K.; Schreuder, F.H.B.M.; Greef, B.T.A. de; Vlooswijk, M.C.G.; Staals, J.; Oostenbrugge, R.J. van; Rouhl, R.P.W.

    2017-01-01

    Seizures after intracerebral hemorrhage are repeatedly seen. Whether the development of seizures after intracerebral hemorrhage affects survival in the long term is unknown. This study aims to determine the relation between seizures (i.e., with and without anti-epileptic therapy) and long-term

  12. Computerized adaptive and multistage testing with R using packages catR and mstR

    CERN Document Server

    Magis, David; von Davier, Alina A

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this guide and manual is to provide a practical and brief overview of the theory on computerized adaptive testing (CAT) and multistage testing (MST) and to illustrate the methodologies and applications using R open source language and several data examples.  Implementation relies on the R packages catR and mstR that have been already or are being developed by the first author (with the team) and that include some of the newest research algorithms on the topic. The book covers many topics along with the R-code: the basics of R, theoretical overview of CAT and MST, CAT designs, CAT assembly methodologies, CAT simulations, catR package, CAT applications, MST designs, IRT-based MST methodologies, tree-based MST methodologies, mstR package, and MST applications.  CAT has been used in many large-scale assessments over recent decades, and MST has become very popular in recent years.  R open source language also has become one of the most useful tools for applications in almost all fields, including b...

  13. Proton MR spectroscopy in patients with acute temporal lobe seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, M; Smith, J K; Kwock, L

    2001-01-01

    Decreases in N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) as seen by proton MR spectroscopy are found in hippocampal sclerosis, and elevated levels of lipids/lactate have been observed after electroconvulsive therapy. Our purpose was to determine whether increased levels of lipids/lactate are found in patients with acute seizures of hippocampal origin. Seventeen patients with known temporal lobe epilepsy underwent proton MR spectroscopy of the mesial temporal lobes within 24 hours of their last seizure. Four of them were restudied when they were seizure-free. Five healthy individuals were used as control subjects. All MR spectroscopy studies were obtained using a single-voxel technique with TEs of 135 and 270. The relationship between the presence of lipids/lactate and seizures was tested using Fisher's exact test. Mean and standard deviations for NAA/creatine (Cr) were obtained in the hippocampi in patients with seizures on initial and follow-up studies and these values were compared with those in the control subjects. Seizure lateralization was obtained in 15 patients. Of the 17 seizure locations that involved hippocampi, 16 showed lipids/lactate by proton MR spectroscopy. Of the 13 hippocampi not directly affected by seizures, 10 showed no lipids/lactate and three showed lipids/lactate. The relationship between lipids/lactate and seizure location was confirmed. A comparison of NAA/Cr ratios for the involved hippocampi with those in control subjects showed significant differences on initial MR spectroscopy; however, no significant difference was found between acute and follow-up NAA/Cr ratios in hippocampi affected by seizures. Lipids/lactate were present in the hippocampi of patients with acute seizures and decreased when the patients were seizure-free. Thus, lipids/lactate may be a sensitive marker for acute temporal lobe seizures.

  14. Accelerometry based detection of epileptic seizures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijsen, T.M.E.

    2008-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders. Epileptic seizures are the manifestation of abnormal hypersynchronous discharges of cortical neurons that impair brain function. Most of the people affected can be treated successfully with drug therapy or neurosurgical procedures. But there

  15. Prospective IS-MST radar. Potential and diagnostic capabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potekhin A.P.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the next few years, a new radar is planned to be built near Irkutsk. It should have capabilities of incoherent scatter (IS radars and mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST radars [Zherebtsov et al., 2011]. The IS-MST radar is a phased array of two separated antenna panels with a multichannel digital receiving system, which allows detailed space-time processing of backscattered signal. This paper describes characteristics, configuration, and capabilities of the antenna and transceiver systems of this radar. We estimate its potential in basic operating modes to study the ionosphere by the IS method at heights above 100 km and the atmosphere with the use of signals scattered from refractive index fluctuations, caused by turbulent mixing at heights below 100 km. The modeling shows that the radar will allow us to regularly measure neutral atmosphere parameters at heights up to 26 km as well as to observe mesosphere summer echoes at heights near 85 km in the presence of charged ice particles (an increase in Schmidt number and mesosphere winter echoes at heights near 65 km with increasing background electron density. Evaluation of radar resources at the IS mode in two height ranges 100–600 and 600–2000 km demonstrates that in the daytime and with the accumulation time of 10 min, the upper boundaries of electron density and ionospheric plasma temperature are ~1500 and ~1300 km respectively, with the standard deviation of no more than 10 %. The upper boundary of plasma drift velocity is ~1100 km with the standard deviation of 45 m/s. The estimation of interferometric capabilities of the MST radar shows that it has a high sensitivity to objects of angular size near 7.5 arc min, and its potential accuracy in determining target angles can reach 40 arc sec.

  16. Locked modes and magnetic field errors in MST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almagri, A.F.; Assadi, S.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.; Kerst, D.W.

    1992-06-01

    In the MST reversed field pinch magnetic oscillations become stationary (locked) in the lab frame as a result of a process involving interactions between the modes, sawteeth, and field errors. Several helical modes become phase locked to each other to form a rotating localized disturbance, the disturbance locks to an impulsive field error generated at a sawtooth crash, the error fields grow monotonically after locking (perhaps due to an unstable interaction between the modes and field error), and over the tens of milliseconds of growth confinement degrades and the discharge eventually terminates. Field error control has been partially successful in eliminating locking

  17. What is the standard approach to assessment of an unprovoked seizure in an adult?: HONG KONG

    OpenAIRE

    Kwan, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Since Hong Kong is highly urbanized and acute public hospitals have been established across the city, most patients with unprovoked seizures not already receiving antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy, particularly convulsive seizures, will be admitted as emergency for assessment. A thorough history is taken from the patient and any witnesses to the seizure. This includes the circumstance of the seizures, detailed symptoms and signs experienced by the patient and witnessed by others before, during...

  18. MST4 kinase phosphorylates ACAP4 protein to orchestrate apical membrane remodeling during gastric acid secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiao; Yao, Phil Y; Jiang, Jiying; Zhang, Yin; Su, Zeqi; Yao, Wendy; Wang, Xueying; Gui, Ping; Mullen, McKay; Henry, Calmour; Ward, Tarsha; Wang, Wenwen; Brako, Larry; Tian, Ruijun; Zhao, Xuannv; Wang, Fengsong; Cao, Xinwang; Wang, Dongmei; Liu, Xing; Ding, Xia; Yao, Xuebiao

    2017-09-29

    Digestion in the stomach depends on acidification of the lumen. Histamine-elicited acid secretion is triggered by activation of the PKA cascade, which ultimately results in the insertion of gastric H,K-ATPases into the apical plasma membranes of parietal cells. Our recent study revealed the functional role of PKA-MST4-ezrin signaling axis in histamine-elicited acid secretion. However, it remains uncharacterized how the PKA-MST4-ezrin signaling axis operates the insertion of H,K-ATPases into the apical plasma membranes of gastric parietal cells. Here we show that MST4 phosphorylates ACAP4, an ARF6 GTPase-activating protein, at Thr 545 Histamine stimulation activates MST4 and promotes MST4 interaction with ACAP4. ACAP4 physically interacts with MST4 and is a cognate substrate of MST4 during parietal cell activation. The phosphorylation site of ACAP4 by MST4 was mapped to Thr 545 by mass spectrometric analyses. Importantly, phosphorylation of Thr 545 is essential for acid secretion in parietal cells because either suppression of ACAP4 or overexpression of non-phosphorylatable ACAP4 prevents the apical membrane reorganization and proton pump translocation elicited by histamine stimulation. In addition, persistent overexpression of MST4 phosphorylation-deficient ACAP4 results in inhibition of gastric acid secretion and blockage of tubulovesicle fusion to the apical membranes. Significantly, phosphorylation of Thr 545 enables ACAP4 to interact with ezrin. Given the location of Thr 545 between the GTPase-activating protein domain and the first ankyrin repeat, we reason that MST4 phosphorylation elicits a conformational change that enables ezrin-ACAP4 interaction. Taken together, these results define a novel molecular mechanism linking the PKA-MST4-ACAP4 signaling cascade to polarized acid secretion in gastric parietal cells. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Genetic deletion of Mst1 alters T cell function and protects against autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin V Salojin

    Full Text Available Mammalian sterile 20-like kinase 1 (Mst1 is a MAPK kinase kinase kinase which is involved in a wide range of cellular responses, including apoptosis, lymphocyte adhesion and trafficking. The contribution of Mst1 to Ag-specific immune responses and autoimmunity has not been well defined. In this study, we provide evidence for the essential role of Mst1 in T cell differentiation and autoimmunity, using both genetic and pharmacologic approaches. Absence of Mst1 in mice reduced T cell proliferation and IL-2 production in vitro, blocked cell cycle progression, and elevated activation-induced cell death in Th1 cells. Mst1 deficiency led to a CD4+ T cell development path that was biased toward Th2 and immunoregulatory cytokine production with suppressed Th1 responses. In addition, Mst1-/- B cells showed decreased stimulation to B cell mitogens in vitro and deficient Ag-specific Ig production in vivo. Consistent with altered lymphocyte function, deletion of Mst1 reduced the severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE and protected against collagen-induced arthritis development. Mst1-/- CD4+ T cells displayed an intrinsic defect in their ability to respond to encephalitogenic antigens and deletion of Mst1 in the CD4+ T cell compartment was sufficient to alleviate CNS inflammation during EAE. These findings have prompted the discovery of novel compounds that are potent inhibitors of Mst1 and exhibit desirable pharmacokinetic properties. In conclusion, this report implicates Mst1 as a critical regulator of adaptive immune responses, Th1/Th2-dependent cytokine production, and as a potential therapeutic target for immune disorders.

  20. A novel non-canonical mechanism of regulation of MST3 (mammalian Sterile20-related kinase 3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Stephen J; McGuffin, Liam J; Marshall, Andrew K; Giraldo, Alejandro; Pikkarainen, Sampsa; Clerk, Angela; Sugden, Peter H

    2012-03-15

    The canonical pathway of regulation of the GCK (germinal centre kinase) III subgroup member, MST3 (mammalian Sterile20-related kinase 3), involves a caspase-mediated cleavage between N-terminal catalytic and C-terminal regulatory domains with possible concurrent autophosphorylation of the activation loop MST3(Thr(178)), induction of serine/threonine protein kinase activity and nuclear localization. We identified an alternative 'non-canonical' pathway of MST3 activation (regulated primarily through dephosphorylation) which may also be applicable to other GCKIII (and GCKVI) subgroup members. In the basal state, inactive MST3 co-immunoprecipitated with the Golgi protein GOLGA2/gm130 (golgin A2/Golgi matrix protein 130). Activation of MST3 by calyculin A (a protein serine/threonine phosphatase 1/2A inhibitor) stimulated (auto)phosphorylation of MST3(Thr(178)) in the catalytic domain with essentially simultaneous cis-autophosphorylation of MST3(Thr(328)) in the regulatory domain, an event also requiring the MST3(341-376) sequence which acts as a putative docking domain. MST3(Thr(178)) phosphorylation increased MST3 kinase activity, but this activity was independent of MST3(Thr(328)) phosphorylation. Interestingly, MST3(Thr(328)) lies immediately C-terminal to a STRAD (Sterile20-related adaptor) pseudokinase-like site identified recently as being involved in binding of GCKIII/GCKVI members to MO25 scaffolding proteins. MST3(Thr(178)/Thr(328)) phosphorylation was concurrent with dissociation of MST3 from GOLGA2/gm130 and association of MST3 with MO25, and MST3(Thr(328)) phosphorylation was necessary for formation of the activated MST3-MO25 holocomplex.

  1. Epilepsy or seizures - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and the people you work with about your seizure disorder. Driving your own car is generally safe and ... References Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff RB, Jankovic J, Mazziotta JC, Pomeroy ...

  2. Temporal Lobe Seizure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... functions, including having odd feelings — such as euphoria, deja vu or fear. Temporal lobe seizures are sometimes called ... sudden sense of unprovoked fear or joy A deja vu experience — a feeling that what's happening has happened ...

  3. Fibromyalgia and seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatum, William O; Langston, Michael E; Acton, Emily K

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this case-matched study was to determine how frequently fibromyalgia is associated with different paroxysmal neurological disorders and explore the utility of fibromyalgia as a predictor for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures. The billing diagnosis codes of 1,730 new, non-selected patient encounters were reviewed over a three-year period for an epileptologist in a neurology clinic to identify all patients with historical diagnoses of fibromyalgia. The frequency with which epileptic seizures, psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, and physiological non-epileptic events were comorbid with fibromyalgia was assessed. Age and gender case-matched controls were used for a between-group comparison. Wilcoxon tests were used to analyse interval data, and Chi-square was used to analyse categorical data (pFibromyalgia was retrospectively identified in 95/1,730 (5.5%) patients in this cohort. Females represented 95% of the fibromyalgia sample (age: 53 years; 95% CI: 57, 51). Forty-three percent of those with fibromyalgia had a non-paroxysmal, neurological primary clinical diagnosis, most commonly chronic pain. Paroxysmal events were present in 57% of fibromyalgia patients and 54% of case-matched controls. Among patients with fibromyalgia and paroxysmal disorders, 11% had epileptic seizures, 74% had psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, and 15% had physiological non-epileptic events, compared to case-matched controls with 37% epileptic seizures, 51% psychogenic non-epileptic events, and 12% physiological non-epileptic events (p = 0.009). Fibromyalgia was shown to be a predictor for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures in patients with undifferentiated paroxysmal spells. However, our results suggest that the specificity and sensitivity of fibromyalgia as a marker for psychogenic non-epileptic seizures in a mixed general neurological population of patients is less than previously described.

  4. The Campus take over – the MST under graduate students Ocupando o campus - uma análise sobre os universitários do MST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emerson Dias

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available This is an analysis how the historical and sociological influences that belong to the (Movement of the No Land Rural Workers MST are understood by the under graduate student of the movement. He is a new sociological character who arises as a resistance test to testify the capacity of reorganizing and mobilizing the country. Keywords: Rural social movements. Education. MST. O artigo analisa como as influências históricas e sociológicas que permeiam os ideais das lideranças do Movimento dos Trabalhadores Rurais Sem-Terra (MST são compreendidas pelo universitário sem-terra, este novo personagem sociológico que desponta como prova da resistência e da capacidade de reorganização das mobilizações do campo. Palavras-chave: Movimentos sociais rurais. Educação. MST.

  5. Seizure precipitants (triggering factors) in patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlisi, Monica; Shorvon, Simon

    2014-04-01

    adult epilepsy clinic population: (a) to identify the frequency of seizure precipitants (triggering factors) and their relative frequency in those with psychiatric disorders, and in those in remission or with active epilepsy, differences in frequency with regard to gender, seizure duration, number of drugs taken; (b) to determine which precipitants patients most commonly report; and (c) to identify differences in the distribution of precipitants among generalized, temporal, and extratemporal epilepsies. Consecutive patients attending a tertiary-care epilepsy clinic were prospectively and an open personal interview to identify and characterize seizure precipitants. Information about the epilepsy and clinical characteristics of patients was collected during the interview and from medical records. Of 104 patients, 97% cited at least one precipitant. Stress, sleep deprivation, and fatigue were the most frequently reported precipitants. Patients with psychological comorbidities reported a greater percentage of seizures with seizure precipitants. Patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy seemed to be more sensitive to seizures during awakening and sleep deprivation, patients with extratemporal epilepsy reported more frequent seizures during sleep. There were no differences in frequency or type of seizure precipitants with regard to gender, seizure duration or frequency, and the number of antiepileptic drugs taken. The findings may have implications for the better management of epilepsy by increasing a focus on nonpharmacological therapy. The implications of the findings for nosology and causation of epilepsy are also briefly discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Seizures Induced by Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Ogunyemi

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Musicogenic epilepsy is a rare disorder. Much remains to be learned about the electroclinical features. This report describes a patient who has been followed at our institution for 17 years, and was investigated with long-term telemetered simultaneous video-EEG recordings. She began to have seizures at the age of 10 years. She experienced complex partial seizures, often preceded by elementary auditory hallucination and complex auditory illusion. The seizures occurred in relation to singing, listening to music or thinking about music. She also had occasional generalized tonic clonic seizures during sleep. There was no significant antecedent history. The family history was negative for epilepsy. The physical examination was unremarkable. CT and MRI scans of the brain were normal. During long-term simultaneous video-EEG recordings, clinical and electrographic seizure activities were recorded in association with singing and listening to music. Mathematical calculation, copying or viewing geometric patterns and playing the game of chess failed to evoke seizures.

  7. Paternal Involvement in Multisystemic Therapy: Effects on Adolescent Outcomes and Maternal Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervan, Shannon; Granic, Isabela; Solomon, Tracy; Blokland, Kirsten; Ferguson, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    The association between paternal involvement in therapy, adolescent outcomes and maternal depression was examined within the context of Multisystemic Therapy (MST), an empirically supported, family- and community-based treatment for antisocial adolescents. Ninety-nine families were recruited from five mental health agencies providing MST. We…

  8. Pervanadate induces Mammalian Ste20 Kinase 3 (MST3) tyrosine phosphorylation but not activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Wei-Chih; Lu, Te-Ling; Ling, Pin; Lee, Te-Hsiu; Cho, Chien-Yu; Huang, Chi-Ying F; Jeng, Wen-Yih; Weng, Yui-Ping; Chiang, Chun-Yen; Wu, Jin Bin; Lu, Te-Jung

    2016-07-01

    The yeast Ste20 (sterile) protein kinase, which is a serine/threonine kinase, responds to the stimulation of the G proteincoupled receptor (GPCR) pheromone receptor. Ste20 protein kinase serves as the critical component that links signaling from the GPCR/G proteins to the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade in yeast. The yeast Ste20p functions as a MAP kinase kinase kinase kinase (MAP4K) in the pheromone response. Ste20-like kinases are structurally conserved from yeast to mammals. The mechanism by which MAP4K links GPCR to the MAPK pathway is less clearly defined in vertebrates. In addition to MAP4K, the tyrosine kinase cascade bridges G proteins and the MAPK pathway in vertebrate cells. Mammalian Ste20 Kinase 3 (MST3) has been categorized into the Ste20 family and has been reported to function in the regulation of cell polarity and migration. However, whether MST3 tyrosine phosphorylation regulates diverse signaling pathways is unknown. In this study, the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor pervanadate was found to induce MST3 tyrosine phosphorylation in intact cells, and the activity of tyrosine-phosphorylated MST3 was measured. This tyrosine-directed phosphorylation was independent of MST3 activity. Parameters including protein conformation, Triton concentration and ionic concentration influenced the sensitivity of MST3 activity. Taken together, our data suggests that the serine/threonine kinase MST3 undergoes tyrosinedirected phosphorylation. The tyrosine-phosphorylated MST3 may create a docking site for the structurally conserved SH2/SH3 (Src Homology 2 and 3) domains within the Src oncoprotein. The unusual tyrosinephosphorylated MST3 may recruit MST3 to various signaling components. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. What is the standard approach to assessment of an unprovoked seizure in an adult?: HONG KONG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Patrick

    2012-12-01

    Since Hong Kong is highly urbanized and acute public hospitals have been established across the city, most patients with unprovoked seizures not already receiving antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy, particularly convulsive seizures, will be admitted as emergency for assessment. A thorough history is taken from the patient and any witnesses to the seizure. This includes the circumstance of the seizures, detailed symptoms and signs experienced by the patient and witnessed by others before, during, and after the seizure, any potential precipitating factors, history of previous seizures (that the patient might have overlooked), and history of previous brain insults that might have increased the risk of epilepsy later in life, including gestational and birth history, history of childhood febrile seizure, significant head trauma, any family history of epilepsy or seizures, comorbidities, current medications, drug and alcohol abuse, and social history including employment, driving, and living circumstances. A detailed physical and neurologic examination is performed.

  10. Safety Profile of Eslicarbazepine Acetate as Add-On Therapy in Adults with Refractory Focal-Onset Seizures: From Clinical Studies to 6 Years of Post-Marketing Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, Helena; Vieira, Mariana; Costa, Raquel; Graça, Joana; Magalhães, Luís M; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício

    2017-12-01

    Eslicarbazepine acetate was first approved in the European Union in 2009 as adjunctive therapy in adults with partial-onset seizures with or without secondary generalization. The objective of this study was to review the safety profile of eslicarbazepine acetate analyzing the data from several clinical studies to 6 years of post-marketing surveillance. We used a post-hoc pooled safety analysis of four phase III, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled studies (BIA-2093-301, -302, -303, -304) of eslicarbazepine acetate as add-on therapy in adults. Safety data of eslicarbazepine acetate in special populations of patients aged ≥65 years with partial-onset seizures (BIA-2093-401) and subjects with moderate hepatic impairment (BIA-2093-111) and renal impairment (BIA-2093-112) are also considered. The incidences of treatment-emergent adverse events, treatment-emergent adverse events leading to discontinuation, and serious adverse events were analyzed. The global safety database of eslicarbazepine acetate was analyzed for all cases from post-marketing surveillance from 1 October, 2009 to 21 October, 2015. From a pooled analysis of four phase III studies, it was concluded that the incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events, treatment-emergent adverse events leading to discontinuation, and adverse drug reactions were dose dependent. Dizziness, somnolence, headache, and nausea were the most common treatment-emergent adverse events (≥10% of patients) and the majority were of mild-to-moderate intensity. No dose-dependent trend was observed for serious adverse events and individual serious adverse events were reported in less than 1% of patients. Hyponatremia was classified as a possibly related treatment-emergent adverse event in phase III studies (1.2%); however, after 6 years of post-marketing surveillance it represents the most frequently (10.2%) reported adverse drug reaction, with more than half of these cases occurring with eslicarbazepine acetate at

  11. MST radar and polarization lidar observations of tropical cirrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Bhavani Kumar

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Significant gaps in our understanding of global cirrus effects on the climate system involve the role of frequently occurring tropical cirrus. Much of the cirrus in the atmosphere is largely due to frequent cumulus and convective activity in the tropics. In the Indian sub-tropical region, the deep convective activity is very prominent from April to December, which is a favorable period for the formation of deep cumulus clouds. The fibrous anvils of these clouds, laden with ice crystals, are one of the source mechanisms for much of the cirrus in the atmosphere. In the present study, several passages of tropical cirrus were investigated by simultaneously operating MST radar and a co-located polarization lidar at the National MST Radar Facility (NMRF, Gadanki (13.45° N, 79.18° E, India to understand its structure, the background wind field and the microphysics at the cloud boundaries. The lidar system used is capable of measuring the degree of depolarization in the laser backscatter. It has identified several different cirrus structures with a peak linear depolarization ratio (LDR in the range of 0.1 to 0.32. Simultaneous observations of tropical cirrus by the VHF Doppler radar indicated a clear enhancement of reflectivity detected in the vicinity of the cloud boundaries, as revealed by the lidar and are strongly dependent on observed cloud LDR. An inter-comparison of radar reflectivity observed for vertical and oblique beams reveals that the radar-enhanced reflectivity at the cloud boundaries is also accompanied by significant aspect sensitivity. These observations indicate the presence of anisotropic turbulence at the cloud boundaries. Radar velocity measurements show that boundaries of cirrus are associated with enhanced horizontal winds, significant vertical shear in the horizontal winds and reduced vertical velocity. Therefore, these measurements indicate that a circulation at the cloud boundaries suggest an entrainment taking place close to

  12. MST radar and polarization lidar observations of tropical cirrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Bhavani Kumar

    Full Text Available Significant gaps in our understanding of global cirrus effects on the climate system involve the role of frequently occurring tropical cirrus. Much of the cirrus in the atmosphere is largely due to frequent cumulus and convective activity in the tropics. In the Indian sub-tropical region, the deep convective activity is very prominent from April to December, which is a favorable period for the formation of deep cumulus clouds. The fibrous anvils of these clouds, laden with ice crystals, are one of the source mechanisms for much of the cirrus in the atmosphere. In the present study, several passages of tropical cirrus were investigated by simultaneously operating MST radar and a co-located polarization lidar at the National MST Radar Facility (NMRF, Gadanki (13.45° N, 79.18° E, India to understand its structure, the background wind field and the microphysics at the cloud boundaries. The lidar system used is capable of measuring the degree of depolarization in the laser backscatter. It has identified several different cirrus structures with a peak linear depolarization ratio (LDR in the range of 0.1 to 0.32. Simultaneous observations of tropical cirrus by the VHF Doppler radar indicated a clear enhancement of reflectivity detected in the vicinity of the cloud boundaries, as revealed by the lidar and are strongly dependent on observed cloud LDR. An inter-comparison of radar reflectivity observed for vertical and oblique beams reveals that the radar-enhanced reflectivity at the cloud boundaries is also accompanied by significant aspect sensitivity. These observations indicate the presence of anisotropic turbulence at the cloud boundaries. Radar velocity measurements show that boundaries of cirrus are associated with enhanced horizontal winds, significant vertical shear in the horizontal winds and reduced vertical velocity. Therefore, these measurements indicate that a circulation at the cloud boundaries suggest an entrainment taking place close to

  13. Hypoparathyroidism Causing Seizures: When Epilepsy Does Not Fit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faheem Seedat

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A 24-year-old man presented to the Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital emergency department with recurrent seizures having previously been diagnosed with epilepsy from age 14. The biochemical investigations and brain imaging were suggestive of seizures secondary to hypocalcemia, and a diagnosis of idiopathic hypoparathyroidism was confirmed. After calcium and vitamin D replacement, the patient recovered well and is seizure free, and off antiepileptic therapy. This case highlights the occurrence of brain calcinosis in idiopathic hypoparathyroidism; the occurrence of acute symptomatic seizures due to provoking factors other than epilepsy; and the importance, in the correct clinical setting, of considering alternative, and sometimes treatable, causes of seizures other than epilepsy.

  14. Sex and Hormonal influences on Seizures and Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velíšková, Jana; DeSantis, Kara A.

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy is the third most common chronic neurological disorder. Clinical and experimental evidence supports the role of sex and influence of sex hormones on seizures and epilepsy as well as alterations of the endocrine system and levels of sex hormones by epileptiform activity. Conversely, seizures are sensitive to changes in sex hormone levels, which in turn may affect the seizure-induced neuronal damage. The effects of reproductive hormones on neuronal excitability and seizure-induced damage are complex to contradictory and depend on different mechanisms, which have to be accounted for in data interpretation. Both estradiol and progesterone/allopregnanolone may have beneficial effects for patients with epilepsy. Individualized hormonal therapy should be considered as adjunctive treatment in patients with epilepsy to improve seizure control as well as quality of life. PMID:22504305

  15. Turbulent transport in the MST reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rempel, T.D.; Almagri, A.F.; Assadi, S.; Den Hartog, D.J.; Hokin, S.A.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.; Shen, W.; Sidikman, K.L.; Spragins, C.W.; Sprott, J.C.; Stoneking, M.R.; Zita, E.J.

    1991-11-01

    Measurements of edge turbulence and the associated transport are ongoing in the Madison Symmetric Torus (R = 1.5 m, a = 0.52 m) reversed-field pinch using magnetic and electrostatic probes. Magnetic fluctuations are dominated by m = 1 and n ∼ 2R/a tearing modes. Particle losses induced by magnetic field fluctuations have been found to be ambipolar ( parallel B r > = O). Electrostatic fluctuations are broadband and turbulent, with mode widths δm ∼ 3--7 and δn ∼70--150. Particle, parallel current, and energy transport arising from coherent motion with the fluctuating ExB drift has been measured. Particle transport via this channel is comparable to the total particle loss from MST. Energy transport (from phi >/B o ) due to electrostatic fluctuations is relatively small, and parallel current transport (from parallel E chi >/B o ) may be small as well

  16. 20 ANOS EM MOVIMENTO. 20 ANOS DE EZLN E MST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Ramon Montenegro Gómez

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Ao longo dos meses de abril e maio, aconteceu na FCT/UNESP, campus de Presidente Prudente, uma série de atividades, organizadas pelo Centro de Estudos de Geografia do Trabalho – CEGeT, pelo Centro de Memória e Hemeroteca Sindical “Florestan Fernandes” – CEMOSi e pelo Núcleo de Estudos, Pesquisas e Projetos de Reforma Agrária – NERA, apresentando as lutas e resistências dos dois movimentos sociais com maior visibilidade e reconhecimento na América Latina (e, seguramente, no mundo: O Exército Zapatista de Libertação Nacional – EZLN e o Movimento dos Trabalhadores Rurais Sem Terra – MST.

  17. Photogenic partial seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, M J; Binnie, C D

    2000-01-01

    To establish the incidence and symptoms of partial seizures in a cohort of patients investigated on account of known sensitivity to intermittent photic stimulation and/or precipitation of seizures by environmental visual stimuli such as television (TV) screens or computer monitors. We report 43 consecutive patients with epilepsy, who had exhibited a significant EEG photoparoxysmal response or who had seizures precipitated by environmental visual stimuli and underwent detailed assessment of their photosensitivity in the EEG laboratory, during which all were questioned concerning their ictal symptoms. All patients were considered on clinical grounds to have an idiopathic epilepsy syndrome. Twenty-eight (65%) patients reported visually precipitated attacks occurring initially with maintained consciousness, in some instances evolving to a period of confusion or to a secondarily generalized seizure. Visual symptoms were most commonly reported and included positive symptoms such as coloured circles or spots, but also blindness and subjective symptoms such as "eyes going funny." Other symptoms described included nonspecific cephalic sensations, deja-vu, auditory hallucinations, nausea, and vomiting. No patient reported any clear spontaneous partial seizures, and there were no grounds for supposing that any had partial epilepsy excepting the ictal phenomenology of some or all of the visually induced attacks. These findings provide clinical support for the physiological studies that indicate that the trigger mechanism for human photosensitivity involves binocularly innervated cells located in the visual cortex. Thus the visual cortex is the seat of the primary epileptogenic process, and the photically triggered discharges and seizures may be regarded as partial with secondary generalization.

  18. Seizure recurrence after a first febrile seizure: a multivariate approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offringa, M.; Derksen-Lubsen, G.; Bossuyt, P. M.; Lubsen, J.

    1992-01-01

    The results are presented of a follow-up study of 155 Dutch children after the first febrile seizure. Of these initially untreated children 37 per cent had had at least one, 30 per cent at least two and 17 per cent at least three subsequent seizures. The vulnerable period for recurrent seizures

  19. The debate: Treatment after the first seizure - The CONTRA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhoff, Bernhard J

    2017-07-01

    In many instances antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment of epilepsy patients is sustained for a long time and is even a lifelong therapy. Chronic drug treatment naturally means the potential burden of adverse effects. The prognosis to remain seizure-free is good after a first seizure even without AEDs. Therefore one has to consider the possibility that freedom from seizures when AED treatment has been initiated after the first seizure may not in fact be the result of the AED treatment. On the other hand seizure-free patients without severe side effects most probably will not consider discontinuing AEDs. Therefore in these cases it will not be possible to discover whether AEDs are really necessary to maintain freedom from seizures. Furthermore it has been shown that the long-term prognosis is independent of whether AED treatment started after the first or a following seizure. Therefore in most instances AED treatment after a first seizure should be avoided. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Seizure ending signs in patients with dyscognitive focal seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavvala, Jay R; Gerard, Elizabeth E; Macken, Mícheál; Schuele, Stephan U

    2015-09-01

    Signs indicating the end of a focal seizure with loss of awareness and/or responsiveness but without progression to focal or generalized motor symptoms are poorly defined and can be difficult to determine. Not recognizing the transition from ictal to postictal behaviour can affect seizure reporting accuracy by family members and may lead to delayed or a lack of examination during EEG monitoring, erroneous seizure localization and inadequate medical intervention for prolonged seizure duration. Our epilepsy monitoring unit database was searched for focal seizures without secondary generalization for the period from 2007 to 2011. The first focal seizure in a patient with loss of awareness and/or responsiveness and/or behavioural arrest, with or without automatisms, was included. Seizures without objective symptoms or inadequate video-EEG quality were excluded. A total of 67 patients were included, with an average age of 41.7 years. Thirty-six of the patients had seizures from the left hemisphere and 29 from the right. All patients showed an abrupt change in motor activity and resumed contact with the environment as a sign of clinical seizure ending. Specific ending signs (nose wiping, coughing, sighing, throat clearing, or laughter) were seen in 23 of 47 of temporal lobe seizures and 7 of 20 extra-temporal seizures. Seizure ending signs are often subtle and the most common finding is a sudden change in motor activity and resumption of contact with the environment. More distinct signs, such as nose wiping, coughing or throat clearing, are not specific to temporal lobe onset. A higher proportion of seizures during sleep went unexamined, compared to those during wakefulness. This demonstrates that seizure semiology can be very subtle and arousals from sleep during monitoring should alert staff. Patient accounts of seizure frequency appear to be unreliable and witness reports need to be taken into account. [Published with video sequences].

  1. Urinary urge seizure semiology localization by intracranial monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengarajan, Ronak; Shamim, Sadat

    2018-01-01

    Seizures may present with many different symptom complexes. Seizure semiologies have localization value when contemplating surgical therapies. Epilepsy presenting as a desire to micturate is exceedingly rare, with only a handful of published cases. We present a patient who had initially unexplained childhood urinary urge that progressed into lapses of memory and confusion that was eventually diagnosed as epilepsy in adulthood. Due to refractoriness to medical management, our patient's epileptic focus was localized through both noninvasive and invasive subdural electrode arrays to the nondominant medial temporal lobe and successfully treated with an amygdalohippocampectomy. Only one other case of ictal urinary urgency seizures has been recorded with intracranial electroencephalogram monitoring in the literature.

  2. Biomarkers of epileptic seizures and epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Lorber

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to review biological markers, their importance and usefulness in the diagnosis of epileptic seizure or epilepsy. Assessed are also their prognostic value, their use in the evaluation of antiepileptic therapy effect and some other useful properties. The article reviews prolactin, neuron specific enolase, S–100 protein, creatin kinase, laminin, matrix metalloproteinase, nesfatin–1, ghrelin, obestatin and chromogranin A. The authors stress the need for further research studies in this area.

  3. Precipitating factors and therapeutic outcome in epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, J; Saher, M S; Burr, W; Elger, C E

    2000-10-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of precipitating factors and therapy on the outcome of epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Retrospective analysis of data from 34 patients (mean age at seizure onset 19 years; mean duration of follow-up 9.2 years) suffering from epilepsy of either cryptogenic or remote symptomatic (n = 19), or idiopathic (n = 15) etiology. The total number of seizures in all patients was 146. Without treatment 97 seizures manifested during 90.5 years without treatment (1.07 seizures/year), during treatment with carbamazepine or valproate 49 seizures occurred within 224 years (0.2 seizures/year). The frequency of seizures was significantly lower during treatment. Precipitating factors were found in relation to 31% of seizures in patients with remote symptomatic or cryptogenic epilepsy, and for 51% of seizures in patients with idiopathic epilepsy. There was a low frequency of seizures in patients with generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Precipitating factors are common. Antiepileptic drug treatment is effective.

  4. Modeling Seizure Self-Prediction: An E-Diary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haut, Sheryl R.; Hall, Charles B.; Borkowski, Thomas; Tennen, Howard; Lipton, Richard B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose A subset of patients with epilepsy successfully self-predicted seizures in a paper diary study. We conducted an e-diary study to ensure that prediction precedes seizures, and to characterize the prodromal features and time windows that underlie self-prediction. Methods Subjects 18 or older with LRE and ≥3 seizures/month maintained an e-diary, reporting AM/PM data daily, including mood, premonitory symptoms, and all seizures. Self-prediction was rated by, “How likely are you to experience a seizure [time frame]”? Five choices ranged from almost certain (>95% chance) to very unlikely. Relative odds of seizure (OR) within time frames was examined using Poisson models with log normal random effects to adjust for multiple observations. Key Findings Nineteen subjects reported 244 eligible seizures. OR for prediction choices within 6hrs was as high as 9.31 (1.92,45.23) for “almost certain”. Prediction was most robust within 6hrs of diary entry, and remained significant up to 12hrs. For 9 best predictors, average sensitivity was 50%. Older age contributed to successful self-prediction, and self-prediction appeared to be driven by mood and premonitory symptoms. In multivariate modeling of seizure occurrence, self-prediction (2.84; 1.68,4.81), favorable change in mood (0.82; 0.67,0.99) and number of premonitory symptoms (1,11; 1.00,1.24) were significant. Significance Some persons with epilepsy can self-predict seizures. In these individuals, the odds of a seizure following a positive prediction are high. Predictions were robust, not attributable to recall bias, and were related to self awareness of mood and premonitory features. The 6-hour prediction window is suitable for the development of pre-emptive therapy. PMID:24111898

  5. Epileptic Seizures are Reduced by Autonomic Biofeedback Therapy Through Enhancement of Fronto-limbic Connectivity: A Controlled Trial and Neuroimaging Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Nagai

    2018-01-01

    Interpretation: Our clinical study provides evidence for autonomic biofeedback therapy as an effective and potent behavioral intervention for patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. This approach is non-pharmacological, non-invasive and seemingly side-effect free.

  6. Brain Stimulation Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Magnetic Seizure Therapy Deep Brain Stimulation Additional Resources Brain Stimulation Therapies Overview Brain stimulation therapies can play ... for a shorter recovery time than ECT Deep Brain Stimulation Deep brain stimulation (DBS) was first developed ...

  7. Paternal involvement in Multisystemic Therapy: Effects on adolescent outcomes and maternal depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gervan, S.; Granic, I.; Solomon, T.; Blokland, K.; Ferguson, B.

    2012-01-01

    The association between paternal involvement in therapy, adolescent outcomes and maternal depression was examined within the context of Multisystemic Therapy (MST), an empirically supported, family- and community-based treatment for antisocial adolescents. Ninety-nine families were recruited from

  8. Multisystemic Therapy for Child Non-Externalizing Psychological and Health Problems: A Preliminary Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pane, Heather T.; White, Rachel S.; Nadorff, Michael R.; Grills-Taquechel, Amie; Stanley, Melinda A.

    2013-01-01

    Multisystemic therapy (MST) is effective for decreasing or preventing delinquency and other externalizing behaviors and increasing prosocial or adaptive behaviors. The purpose of this project was to review the literature examining the efficacy of MST for other child psychological and health problems reflecting non-externalizing behaviors,…

  9. EL MST Y LAS DISPUTAS POR LAS ALTERNATIVAS EN BRASIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Pedro Stédile

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available La victoria del presidente Lulaen las últimas elecciones cambió la correlaciónde fuerzas de la lucha por la reforma agraria enBrasil. Por los compromisos históricos del PT,su liderazgo y como partido de izquierda,tenemos ahora un gobierno federal que apoyala reforma agraria, al contrario de lo que fue elgobierno de Fernando Henrique Cardoso. Porlo tanto, la disputa se sitúa en otro nivel. Sinembargo, hay otras fuerzas poderosas que seoponen a la reforma agraria como lo son ellatifundio, el modelo neoliberal del agro-negocio, la clase dominante como un todo, elEstado burgués brasileño y los medios decomunicación que actúan como un espacio delucha ideológica que disputa la hegemonía en lasociedad contra nosotros. En este nuevocontexto, el MST evalúa que ahora sí se puedeavanzar en la reforma agraria, pero que es unmomento de acumulación de fuerzas y no degrandes definiciones que consoliden la reformaagraria de nuevo tipo que nosotrosdefendemos. Es decir, estamos acumulandopara el futuro.

  10. Cerebrovascular Diseases and Early Seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşegül Gündüz

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Cerebrovascular disease is one of the important causes of seizures and epilepsy among the advanced age group. Seziures are found to be associated with lesion localization and size in previous studies. METHODS: Here, we aimed to detect prevelance of seizure, relation of seizure and lesion localization, and observed seizure types. RESULTS: Three hundred seventy eight patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease or intraparenchymal hemorrhage who were followed in Cerrahpasa IVIedical School clinic were studied retrospectively and probability of seizure occurence within 1 month after stroke was evaluated. CONCLUSION: Among 378 patients hospitalized by acute stroke, 339 were diagnosed as ischemic cerebrovascular disease and 39 (10.3% had primary intraparenchymal hematoma. Seizures were observed in 16 patients (4.2%, 2 (%5.1 in intraparenchymal hematoma group and 14 (%4.1 in ischemic cerebrovascular disease. Early seizures were detected in 33% of patients with anterior cerebral artery, in 6.8% of posterior cerebral artery and in 3.3% of middle cerebral artery infarcts and in three patients out of 12 who were known to have epilepsy. Seizure types were secondarily generalised tonic-clonic seizure in nine cases (57%. Among whole group status epilepticus was observed in four patients (1.1%. Conclusion: Early seizure rates are found to be high among patients with anterior cerebral artery infarct and known epilepsy

  11. Evaluation of the pentylenetetrazole seizure threshold test in epileptic mice as surrogate model for drug testing against pharmacoresistant seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töllner, Kathrin; Twele, Friederike; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Resistance to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is a major problem in epilepsy therapy, so that development of more effective AEDs is an unmet clinical need. Several rat and mouse models of epilepsy with spontaneous difficult-to-treat seizures exist, but because testing of antiseizure drug efficacy is extremely laborious in such models, they are only rarely used in the development of novel AEDs. Recently, the use of acute seizure tests in epileptic rats or mice has been proposed as a novel strategy for evaluating novel AEDs for increased antiseizure efficacy. In the present study, we compared the effects of five AEDs (valproate, phenobarbital, diazepam, lamotrigine, levetiracetam) on the pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) seizure threshold in mice that were made epileptic by pilocarpine. Experiments were started 6 weeks after a pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus. At this time, control seizure threshold was significantly lower in epileptic than in nonepileptic animals. Unexpectedly, only one AED (valproate) was less effective to increase seizure threshold in epileptic vs. nonepileptic mice, and this difference was restricted to doses of 200 and 300 mg/kg, whereas the difference disappeared at 400mg/kg. All other AEDs exerted similar seizure threshold increases in epileptic and nonepileptic mice. Thus, induction of acute seizures with PTZ in mice pretreated with pilocarpine does not provide an effective and valuable surrogate method to screen drugs for antiseizure efficacy in a model of difficult-to-treat chronic epilepsy as previously suggested from experiments with this approach in rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Identifying seizure clusters in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Grayson L; Harlow, Lisa L; Machan, Jason T; Thomas, Dave; LaFrance, W C

    2017-08-01

    The present study explored how seizure clusters may be defined for those with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES), a topic for which there is a paucity of literature. The sample was drawn from a multisite randomized clinical trial for PNES; seizure data are from participants' seizure diaries. Three possible cluster definitions were examined: 1) common clinical definition, where ≥3 seizures in a day is considered a cluster, along with two novel statistical definitions, where ≥3 seizures in a day are considered a cluster if the observed number of seizures statistically exceeds what would be expected relative to a patient's: 1) average seizure rate prior to the trial, 2) observed seizure rate for the previous seven days. Prevalence of clusters was 62-68% depending on cluster definition used, and occurrence rate of clusters was 6-19% depending on cluster definition. Based on these data, clusters seem to be common in patients with PNES, and more research is needed to identify if clusters are related to triggers and outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Naloxone fails to prolong seizure length in ECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, K G; Pandurangi, A K

    1999-12-01

    Electroconvulsive shock (ECS) in animals has been shown to enhance endogenous opiate systems. The anticonvulsant effects of ECS are also partially blocked by the opiate receptor antagonist naloxone, leading some investigators to postulate that the anticonvulsant effects of ECS are mediated by activation of endogenous opiates. If such a phenomenon occurs in humans, then naloxone might prolong seizure length in electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). In the present study, nine patients were given 2.0 mg intravenous (i.v.) naloxone 2 minutes prior to one-half of their ECT treatments. Motor seizure length was measured via the cuff technique. EEG tracings were read by an investigator blind to naloxone status. There was no difference between the two groups in either EEG or nonblindly evaluated motor seizure length. It is concluded that a dose of 2 mg naloxone does not effectively increase seizure length in ECT.

  14. Levetiracetam for the Treatment of Refractor Neonatal Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esengül KELEŞ

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Convulsions are observed commonly in newborns and especially in premature babies. The afety and efficiency of conventional antiepileptic drugs have been extensively investigated. But long term side effects like apoptosis are newly recognized even with the the most commonly used antiepilectic drug, phenobarbital. Much research is related to the safety and efficiency of levetiracetam, one of the recent antiepileptic drugs, used in partial onset idiopathic or generalized seizures of adults and children. However, research on newborns, especially premature newborns is limited. In this paper we present two cases involving seven day newborn premature twins treated with refractory seizures. Seizures were controlled only with levetiracetam therapy. We did not observe any long term side effects which can be related to levetiracetam or seizures in a long term follow up of both patients.

  15. Do essencialismo ao não essencialismo? reflexões sobre a identidade cultural do MST From essentialism to non essentialism? reflections about cultural identity of MST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Souza da Cruz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho apresenta um estudo envolvendo um movimento social, o MST (Movimento dos Trabalhadores Rurais Sem-Terra, e as noções de identidade cultural. A investigação desenvolve um breve exercício de contextualização do movimento através de sua história, seu relacionamento com o poder e sua estrutura nos dias atuais. Com relação aos marcos teórico-metodológicos, a pesquisa adota os pressupostos de Kathryn Woodward (2000, Stuart Hall (2002 e Zygmunt Bauman (2005 e os discursos dos integrantes do movimento retirados do estudo de recepção realizado por Cruz (2006. Como discussão central, pretende-se analisar os desafios do MST em tempos de globalização.The work presents a study involving a social movement, the MST (Portuguese acronym for Movement of the Agricultural Landless Workers, and the slight knowledge of cultural identity. The inquiry develops a brief exercise combining the meaning of the movement through its history, its relationship with the power and its structure in the current days. In regard to theoretical-methodological landmarks, the research adopts pressupositions of Kathryn Woodward (2000, Stuart Hall (2002 e Zygmunt Bauman (2005 and speeches of people from the movement, taken from Cruz' study of reception (2006. As central quarrel, it is intended to analyze the challenges of the MST in globalization times.

  16. A novel, non-canonical mechanism of regulation of MST3 (mammalian Sterile20-related kinase 3)

    OpenAIRE

    Fuller, Stephen J; McGuffin, Liam J; Marshall, Andrew K; Giraldo, Alejandro; Pikkarainen, Sampsa; Clerk, Angela; Sugden, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The canonical pathway of regulation of the GCK (germinal centre kinase) III subgroup member, MST3 (mammalian Sterile20-related kinase 3), involves a caspase-mediated cleavage between N-terminal catalytic and C-terminal regulatory domains with possible concurrent autophosphorylation of the activation loop MST3(Thr178), induction of serine/threonine protein kinase activity and nuclear localization. We identified an alternative ‘non-canonical’ pathway of MST3 activation (regulated primarily thro...

  17. MstApp, a rich client control applications framework at DESY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirsten Hinsch, Winfried Schuette

    2012-01-01

    The control systems for PETRA 3 (a dedicated synchrotron machine) and its pre-accelerators extensively use rich clients for the control room and the servers. Most of them are written with the help of a rich client Java framework: MstApp. They totalize 106 different consoles and 158 individual server applications. MstApp takes care of many common control system application aspects beyond communication. MstApp provides a common look and feel: core menu items, a colour scheme for standard states of hardware components and predefined standardized screen sizes/locations. It interfaces our console application manager (CAM) and displays on demand our communication link diagnostics tools. MstApp supplies an accelerator context for each application; it handles printing, logging, re-sizing and unexpected application crashes. Due to our standardized deploy process MstApp applications know their individual developers and can even send them - on button press of the users - E-mails. Further a concept of different operation modes is implemented: view only, operating and expert use. Administration of the corresponding rights is done via web access of a database server. Initialization files on a web server are instantiated as JAVA objects with the help of the Java SE XML-Decoder. Data tables are read with the same mechanism. New MstApp applications can easily be created with in house wizards like the NewProjectWizard or the DeviceServerWizard. MstApp improves the operator experience, application developer productivity and delivered software quality. (authors)

  18. Vagus nerve stimulation magnet activation for seizures: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, R S; Eggleston, K S; Wright, C W

    2015-01-01

    Some patients receiving VNS Therapy report benefit from manually activating the generator with a handheld magnet at the time of a seizure. A review of 20 studies comprising 859 subjects identified patients who reported on-demand magnet mode stimulation to be beneficial. Benefit was reported in a weighted average of 45% of patients (range 0-89%) using the magnet, with seizure cessation claimed in a weighted average of 28% (range 15-67%). In addition to seizure termination, patients sometimes reported decreased intensity or duration of seizures or the post-ictal period. One study reported an isolated instance of worsening with magnet stimulation (Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med, 157, 2003 and 560). All of the reviewed studies assessed adjunctive magnet use. No studies were designed to provide Level I evidence of efficacy of magnet-induced stimulation. Retrospective analysis of one pivotal randomized trial of VNS therapy showed significantly more seizures terminated or improved in the active stimulation group vs the control group. Prospective, controlled studies would be required to isolate the effect and benefit of magnet mode stimulation and to document that the magnet-induced stimulation is the proximate cause of seizure reduction. Manual application of the magnet to initiate stimulation is not always practical because many patients are immobilized or unaware of their seizures, asleep or not in reach of the magnet. Algorithms based on changes in heart rate at or near the onset of the seizure provide a methodology for automated responsive stimulation. Because literature indicates additional benefits from on-demand magnet mode stimulation, a potential role exists for automatic activation of stimulation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Termination of seizure clusters is related to the duration of focal seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferastraoaru, Victor; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Lipton, Richard B; Dümpelmann, Matthias; Legatt, Alan D; Blumberg, Julie; Haut, Sheryl R

    2016-06-01

    Clustered seizures are characterized by shorter than usual interseizure intervals and pose increased morbidity risk. This study examines the characteristics of seizures that cluster, with special attention to the final seizure in a cluster. This is a retrospective analysis of long-term inpatient monitoring data from the EPILEPSIAE project. Patients underwent presurgical evaluation from 2002 to 2009. Seizure clusters were defined by the occurrence of at least two consecutive seizures with interseizure intervals of <4 h. Other definitions of seizure clustering were examined in a sensitivity analysis. Seizures were classified into three contextually defined groups: isolated seizures (not meeting clustering criteria), terminal seizure (last seizure in a cluster), and intracluster seizures (any other seizures within a cluster). Seizure characteristics were compared among the three groups in terms of duration, type (focal seizures remaining restricted to one hemisphere vs. evolving bilaterally), seizure origin, and localization concordance among pairs of consecutive seizures. Among 92 subjects, 77 (83%) had at least one seizure cluster. The intracluster seizures were significantly shorter than the last seizure in a cluster (p = 0.011), whereas the last seizure in a cluster resembled the isolated seizures in terms of duration. Although focal only (unilateral), seizures were shorter than seizures that evolved bilaterally and there was no correlation between the seizure type and the seizure position in relation to a cluster (p = 0.762). Frontal and temporal lobe seizures were more likely to cluster compared with other localizations (p = 0.009). Seizure pairs that are part of a cluster were more likely to have a concordant origin than were isolated seizures. Results were similar for the 2 h definition of clustering, but not for the 8 h definition of clustering. We demonstrated that intracluster seizures are short relative to isolated seizures and terminal seizures. Frontal

  20. Seizure Prediction and its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iasemidis, Leon D.

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy is characterized by intermittent, paroxysmal, hypersynchronous electrical activity, that may remain localized and/or spread and severely disrupt the brain’s normal multi-task and multi-processing function. Epileptic seizures are the hallmarks of such activity and had been considered unpredictable. It is only recently that research on the dynamics of seizure generation by analysis of the brain’s electrographic activity (EEG) has shed ample light on the predictability of seizures, and illuminated the way to automatic, prospective, long-term prediction of seizures. The ability to issue warnings in real time of impending seizures (e.g., tens of minutes prior to seizure occurrence in the case of focal epilepsy), may lead to novel diagnostic tools and treatments for epilepsy. Applications may range from a simple warning to the patient, in order to avert seizure-associated injuries, to intervention by automatic timely administration of an appropriate stimulus, for example of a chemical nature like an anti-epileptic drug (AED), electromagnetic nature like vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), deep brain stimulation (DBS), transcranial direct current (TDC) or transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and/or of another nature (e.g., ultrasonic, cryogenic, biofeedback operant conditioning). It is thus expected that seizure prediction could readily become an integral part of the treatment of epilepsy through neuromodulation, especially in the new generation of closed-loop seizure control systems. PMID:21939848

  1. Aborting Seizures by Painful Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Carasso

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been well established that serious consequences may result from allowing seizures to continue. The opportunities for early interruption of seizures by medication is often restricted to medical personnel, leaving non-trained bystanders unable to intervene. We were able to interrupt seizures (including status epilepticus by application of painful dorsiflexion. The mode of action that enables pain to elevate the seizure threshold remains to be elucidated, although the phenomenon is consistent with earlier laboratory studies in experimental epilepsy. The technique may be recommended as an effective and easily learned procedure that may have wide applicability.

  2. Neuropeptides and seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snead, O C

    1986-11-01

    There are four lines of evidence for or against a role of neuropeptides in epilepsy: Administration of a variety of opiate agonists into the ventricles or brain of animals produces a constellation of electrical and behavioral changes, seemingly receptor-specific, both sensitive to the specific opiate antagonist naloxone as well as certain anticonvulsant drugs. The primary reservation concerning these data in terms of their relevance to epilepsy regards the fact that the peptides are exogenously administered in relatively high doses. Hence, these data may reflect neurotoxic effects of peptides rather than physiologic function. A variety of opiate agonists are anticonvulsant and naloxone shortens the postictal state in some experimental seizure models. One could attempt to reconcile these data with those in No. 1 by hypothesizing that the spikes and behavioral changes examined in the latter experimental parodynes represented a sort of isolated model of the postictal state. Naloxone has little effect in clinical epilepsy. These data are far from conclusive for two reasons. First, few patients have been studied. Second, because of the issue of opiate receptor heterogeneity and the high doses of naloxone needed experimentally to block non-mu opiate effects, the doses of naloxone used clinically to date are too low to rule out possible delta- or epsilon-mediated effects. The negative clinical data are illustrative of the dangers and difficulties of extrapolating data generated in animal models of seizures to the human condition. ACTH, a peptide that is derived from the same precursor molecule as beta-endorphin, is clearly an effective anticonvulsant in certain childhood seizure states. However, whether this is due to a direct or indirect (that is, cortisol) effect on brain is far from clear. Paradoxically, in contradistinction to other data concerning pro- and anticonvulsant properties of various opioid peptides, there is no animal model of infantile spasms to help

  3. Characteristics of the initial seizure in familial febrile seizures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Stuijvenberg (Margriet); E. van Beijeren; N.H. Wils; G. Derksen-Lubsen (Gerarda); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractComplex seizure characteristics in patients with a positive family history were studied to define familial phenotype subgroups of febrile seizures. A total of 51 children with one or more affected first degree relatives and 177 without an affected first degree

  4. Seizure disorders in 43 cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, A; Bellino, C; Bertone, I; Cagnotti, G; Iulini, B; Miniscalco, B; Casalone, C; Gianella, P; Cagnasso, A

    2015-01-01

    Large animals have a relatively high seizure threshold, and in most cases seizures are acquired. No published case series have described this syndrome in cattle. To describe clinical findings and outcomes in cattle referred to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital of the University of Turin (Italy) because of seizures. Client-owned cattle with documented evidence of seizures. Medical records of cattle with episodes of seizures reported between January 2002 and February 2014 were reviewed. Evidence of seizures was identified based on the evaluation of seizure episodes by the referring veterinarian or 1 of the authors. Animals were recruited if physical and neurologic examinations were performed and if diagnostic laboratory test results were available. Forty-three of 49 cases fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The mean age was 8 months. Thirty-one animals were male and 12 were female. Piedmontese breed accounted for 39/43 (91%) animals. Seizures were etiologically classified as reactive in 30 patients (70%) and secondary or structural in 13 (30%). Thirty-six animals survived, 2 died naturally, and 5 were euthanized for reasons of animal welfare. The definitive cause of reactive seizures was diagnosed as hypomagnesemia (n = 2), hypocalcemia (n = 12), and hypomagnesemia-hypocalcemia (n = 16). The cause of structural seizures was diagnosed as cerebrocortical necrosis (n = 8), inflammatory diseases (n = 4), and lead (Pb) intoxication (n = 1). The study results indicate that seizures largely are reported in beef cattle and that the cause can be identified and successfully treated in most cases. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  5. Neurons in cortical area MST remap the memory trace of visual motion across saccadic eye movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Naoko; Kawano, Kenji

    2014-05-27

    Perception of a stable visual world despite eye motion requires integration of visual information across saccadic eye movements. To investigate how the visual system deals with localization of moving visual stimuli across saccades, we observed spatiotemporal changes of receptive fields (RFs) of motion-sensitive neurons across periods of saccades in the middle temporal (MT) and medial superior temporal (MST) areas. We found that the location of the RFs moved with shifts of eye position due to saccades, indicating that motion-sensitive neurons in both areas have retinotopic RFs across saccades. Different characteristic responses emerged when the moving visual stimulus was turned off before the saccades. For MT neurons, virtually no response was observed after the saccade, suggesting that the responses of these neurons simply reflect the reafferent visual information. In contrast, most MST neurons increased their firing rates when a saccade brought the location of the visual stimulus into their RFs, where the visual stimulus itself no longer existed. These findings suggest that the responses of such MST neurons after saccades were evoked by a memory of the stimulus that had preexisted in the postsaccadic RFs ("memory remapping"). A delayed-saccade paradigm further revealed that memory remapping in MST was linked to the saccade itself, rather than to a shift in attention. Thus, the visual motion information across saccades was integrated in spatiotopic coordinates and represented in the activity of MST neurons. This is likely to contribute to the perception of a stable visual world in the presence of eye movements.

  6. Types of Seizures Affecting Individuals with TSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Policy Sitemap Learn Engage Donate About TSC Epilepsy/Seizure Disorders Seizures remain one of the most common neurological ... TSC Brain and Neurological Function Brain Abnormalities Epilepsy/Seizure Disorders Infantile Spasms Epilepsy in Adults with TSC Epilepsy ...

  7. Galanin gene transfer curtails generalized seizures in kindled rats without altering hippocampal synaptic plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanter-Schlifke, I; Toft Sørensen, Andreas; Ledri, M

    2007-01-01

    Gene therapy-based overexpression of endogenous seizure-suppressing molecules represents a promising treatment strategy for epilepsy. Viral vector-based overexpression of the neuropeptide galanin has been shown to effectively suppress generalized seizures in various animal models of epilepsy...

  8. The international implementation of multisystemic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenwald, Sonja K; Heiblum, Naamith; Saldana, Lisa; Henggeler, Scott W

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to consider, through the lenses of theory and research on technology transfer and the adoption and implementation of innovation, the international transport of evidence-based psychosocial treatments for youth, using Multisystemic Therapy (MST) as an example. MST is a well-validated family and community-based approach originally developed in the United States to treat serious juvenile offenders. This article describes challenges to MST transport internationally by virtue of the political, legal, economic, and cultural contexts in different nations. Modifications used to address these challenges and facilitate the international implementation of MST are described and pertain to pre-implementation processes, clinical staff, training materials and procedures, and clinical service delivery.

  9. Seizure clusters: characteristics and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haut, Sheryl R

    2015-04-01

    Many patients with epilepsy experience 'clusters' or flurries of seizures, also termed acute repetitive seizures (ARS). Seizure clustering has a significant impact on health and quality of life. This review summarizes recent advances in the definition and neurophysiologic understanding of clustering, the epidemiology and risk factors for clustering and both inpatient and outpatient clinical implications. New treatments for seizure clustering/ARS are perhaps the area of greatest recent progress. Efforts have focused on creating a uniform definition of a seizure cluster. In neurophysiologic studies of refractory epilepsy, seizures within a cluster appear to be self-triggering. Clinical progress has been achieved towards a more precise prevalence of clustering, and consensus guidelines for epilepsy monitoring unit safety. The greatest recent advances are in the study of nonintravenous route of benzodiazepines as rescue medications for seizure clusters/ARS. Rectal benzodiazepines have been very effective but barriers to use exist. New data on buccal, intramuscular and intranasal preparations are anticipated to lead to a greater number of approved treatments. Progesterone may be effective for women who experience catamenial clusters. Seizure clustering is common, particularly in the setting of medically refractory epilepsy. Clustering worsens health and quality of life, and the field requires greater focus on clarifying of definition and clinical implications. Progress towards the development of nonintravenous routes of benzodiazepines has the potential to improve care in this area.

  10. [Reflex seizures, cinema and television].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares-Romero, Jesús

    2015-12-16

    In movies and television series are few references to seizures or reflex epilepsy even though in real life are an important subgroup of total epileptic syndromes. It has performed a search on the topic, identified 25 films in which they appear reflex seizures. Most seizures observed are tonic-clonic and visual stimuli are the most numerous, corresponding all with flashing lights. The emotions are the main stimuli in higher level processes. In most cases it is not possible to know if a character suffers a reflex epilepsy or suffer reflex seizures in the context of another epileptic syndrome. The main conclusion is that, in the movies, the reflex seizures are merely a visual reinforcing and anecdotal element without significant influence on the plot.

  11. Seizure Associated Takotsubo Syndrome: A Rare Combination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Htay Htay Kyi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC is increasingly recognized in neurocritical care population especially in postmenopausal females. We are presenting a 61-year-old African American female with past medical history of epilepsy, bipolar disorder, and hypertension who presented with multiple episodes of seizures due to noncompliance with antiepileptic medications. She was on telemetry which showed ST alarm. Electrocardiogram (ECG was ordered and showed ST elevation in anterolateral leads and troponins were positive. Subsequently Takotsubo cardiomyopathy was diagnosed by left ventriculography findings and absence of angiographic evidence of obstructive coronary artery disease. Echocardiogram showed apical hypokinesia, ejection fraction of 40%, and systolic anterior motion of mitral valve with hyperdynamic left ventricle, in the absence of intracoronary thrombus formation in the angiogram. Electroencephalography showed evidence of generalized tonic-clonic seizure. She was treated with supportive therapy. This case illustrates importance of ECG in all patients with seizure irrespective of cardiac symptoms as TC could be the cause of Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP and may be underdiagnosed and so undertreated.

  12. Mechanisms of morphine enhancement of spontaneous seizure activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saboory, Ehsan; Derchansky, Miron; Ismaili, Mohammed; Jahromi, Shokrollah S; Brull, Richard; Carlen, Peter L; El Beheiry, Hossam

    2007-12-01

    High-dose opioid therapy can precipitate seizures; however, the mechanism of such a dangerous adverse effect remains poorly understood. The aim of our study was to determine whether the neuroexcitatory activity of high-dose morphine is mediated by selective stimulation of opioid receptors. Mice hippocampi were resected intact and bathed in low magnesium artificial cerebrospinal fluid to induce spontaneous seizure-like events recorded from CA1 neurons. Application of morphine had a biphasic effect on the recorded spontaneous seizure-like events. In a low concentration (10 microM), morphine depressed electrographic seizure activity. Higher morphine concentrations (30 and 100 microM) enhanced seizure activity in an apparent dose-dependent manner. Naloxone, a nonselective opiate antagonist blocked the proconvulsant action of morphine. Selective mu and kappa opiate receptor agonists and antagonists enhanced and suppressed the spontaneous seizure activity, respectively. On the contrary, delta opioid receptor ligands did not have an effect. The proseizure effect of morphine is mediated through selective stimulation of mu and kappa opiate receptors but not the activation of the delta receptor system. The observed dose-dependent mechanism of morphine neuroexcitation underscores careful adjustment and individualized opioid dosing in the clinical setting.

  13. Eye position effects on the remapped memory trace of visual motion in cortical area MST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Naoko; Kawano, Kenji

    2016-02-23

    After a saccade, most MST neurons respond to moving visual stimuli that had existed in their post-saccadic receptive fields and turned off before the saccade ("trans-saccadic memory remapping"). Neuronal responses in higher visual processing areas are known to be modulated in relation to gaze angle to represent image location in spatiotopic coordinates. In the present study, we investigated the eye position effects after saccades and found that the gaze angle modulated the visual sensitivity of MST neurons after saccades both to the actually existing visual stimuli and to the visual memory traces remapped by the saccades. We suggest that two mechanisms, trans-saccadic memory remapping and gaze modulation, work cooperatively in individual MST neurons to represent a continuous visual world.

  14. Predicting epileptic seizures in advance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Moghim

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is the second most common neurological disorder, affecting 0.6-0.8% of the world's population. In this neurological disorder, abnormal activity of the brain causes seizures, the nature of which tend to be sudden. Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs are used as long-term therapeutic solutions that control the condition. Of those treated with AEDs, 35% become resistant to medication. The unpredictable nature of seizures poses risks for the individual with epilepsy. It is clearly desirable to find more effective ways of preventing seizures for such patients. The automatic detection of oncoming seizures, before their actual onset, can facilitate timely intervention and hence minimize these risks. In addition, advance prediction of seizures can enrich our understanding of the epileptic brain. In this study, drawing on the body of work behind automatic seizure detection and prediction from digitised Invasive Electroencephalography (EEG data, a prediction algorithm, ASPPR (Advance Seizure Prediction via Pre-ictal Relabeling, is described. ASPPR facilitates the learning of predictive models targeted at recognizing patterns in EEG activity that are in a specific time window in advance of a seizure. It then exploits advanced machine learning coupled with the design and selection of appropriate features from EEG signals. Results, from evaluating ASPPR independently on 21 different patients, suggest that seizures for many patients can be predicted up to 20 minutes in advance of their onset. Compared to benchmark performance represented by a mean S1-Score (harmonic mean of Sensitivity and Specificity of 90.6% for predicting seizure onset between 0 and 5 minutes in advance, ASPPR achieves mean S1-Scores of: 96.30% for prediction between 1 and 6 minutes in advance, 96.13% for prediction between 8 and 13 minutes in advance, 94.5% for prediction between 14 and 19 minutes in advance, and 94.2% for prediction between 20 and 25 minutes in advance.

  15. Intraoperative seizures and seizures outcome in patients underwent awake craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yang; Peizhi, Zhou; Xiang, Wang; Yanhui, Liu; Ruofei, Liang; Shu, Jiang; Qing, Mao

    2016-11-25

    Awake craniotomies (AC) could reduce neurological deficits compared with patients under general anesthesia, however, intraoperative seizure is a major reason causing awake surgery failure. The purpose of the study was to give a comprehensive overview the published articles focused on seizure incidence in awake craniotomy. Bibliographic searches of the EMBASE, MEDLINE,were performed to identify articles and conference abstracts that investigated the intraoperative seizure frequency of patients underwent AC. Twenty-five studies were included in this meta-analysis. Among the 25 included studies, one was randomized controlled trials and 5 of them were comparable studies. The pooled data suggested the general intraoperative seizure(IOS) rate for patients with AC was 8%(fixed effect model), sub-group analysis identified IOS rate for glioma patients was 8% and low grade patients was 10%. The pooled data showed early seizure rates of AC patients was 11% and late seizure rates was 35%. This systematic review and meta-analysis shows that awake craniotomy is a safe technique with relatively low intraoperative seizure occurrence. However, few RCTs were available, and the acquisition of further evidence through high-quality RCTs is highly recommended.

  16. Treating acute seizures with benzodiazepines: does seizure duration matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, David E

    2014-10-01

    Several clinical trials have shown improved seizure control and outcome by early initiation of treatment with benzodiazepines, before arrival in the emergency department and before intravenous access can be established. Here, evidence is provided and reviewed for rapid treatment of acute seizures in order to avoid the development of benzodiazepine pharmacoresistance and the emergence of self-sustaining status epilepticus. Alterations in the physiology, pharmacology, and postsynaptic level of GABA-A receptors can develop within minutes to an hour and hinder the ability of synaptic inhibition to stop seizures while also impairing the efficacy of GABAergic agents, such as benzodiazepines, to boost impaired inhibition. In addition, heightened excitatory transmission further exacerbates the inhibitory/excitatory balance and makes seizure control even more resistant to treatment. The acute increase in the surface expression of NMDA receptors during prolonged seizures also may cause excitotoxic injury, cell death, and other pathological expressions and re-arrangements of receptor subunits that all contribute to long-term sequelae such as cognitive impairment and chronic epilepsy. In conclusion, a short window of opportunity exists when seizures are maximally controlled by first-line benzodiazepine treatment. After that, multiple pathological mechanisms quickly become engaged that make seizures increasingly more difficult to control with high risk for long-term harm.

  17. Mouse repeated electroconvulsive seizure (ECS) does not reverse social stress effects but does induce behavioral and hippocampal changes relevant to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) side-effects in the treatment of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Buel, Erin M; Sigrist, Hannes; Seifritz, Erich; Fikse, Lianne; Bosker, Fokko J; Schoevers, Robert A; Klein, Hans C; Pryce, Christopher R; Eisel, Ulrich Lm

    2017-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective treatment for depression, but can have negative side effects including amnesia. The mechanisms of action underlying both the antidepressant and side effects of ECT are not well understood. An equivalent manipulation that is conducted in experimental animals is electroconvulsive seizure (ECS). Rodent studies have provided valuable insights into potential mechanisms underlying the antidepressant and side effects of ECT. However, relatively few studies have investigated the effects of ECS in animal models with a depression-relevant manipulation such as chronic stress. In the present study, mice were first exposed to chronic social stress (CSS) or a control procedure for 15 days followed by ECS or a sham procedure for 10 days. Behavioral effects were investigated using an auditory fear conditioning (learning) and expression (memory) test and a treadmill-running fatigue test. Thereafter, immunohistochemistry was conducted on brain material using the microglial marker Iba-1 and the cholinergic fibre marker ChAT. CSS did not increase fear learning and memory in the present experimental design; in both the control and CSS mice ECS reduced fear learning and fear memory expression. CSS induced the expected fatigue-like effect in the treadmill-running test; ECS induced increased fatigue in CSS and control mice. In CSS and control mice ECS induced inflammation in hippocampus in terms of increased expression of Iba-1 in radiatum of CA1 and CA3. CSS and ECS both reduced acetylcholine function in hippocampus as indicated by decreased expression of ChAT in several hippocampal sub-regions. Therefore, CSS increased fatigue and reduced hippocampal ChAT activity and, rather than reversing these effects, a repeated ECS regimen resulted in impaired fear learning-memory, increased fatigue, increased hippocampal Iba-1 expression, and decreased hippocampal ChAT expression. As such, the current model does not provide insights into the

  18. INVESTIGATING SUSPENSION OF MST, CST, AND SIMULATED SLUDGE SLURRIES IN A PILOT-SCALE WASTE TANK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, M.; Qureshi, Z.; Restivo, M.; Steeper, T.; Williams, M.

    2011-05-24

    The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing waste tank (i.e., Tank 41H) to house the process. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is conducting pilot-scale mixing tests to determine the pump requirements for suspending and resuspending monosodium titanate (MST), crystalline silicotitanate (CST), and simulated sludge. The purpose of this pilot scale testing is for the pumps to resuspend the MST, CST, and simulated sludge particles so that they can be removed from the tank, and to suspend the MST so it can contact strontium and actinides. The pilot-scale tank is a 1/10.85 linear scaled model of Tank 41H. The tank diameter, tank liquid level, pump nozzle diameter, pump elevation, and cooling coil diameter are all 1/10.85 of their dimensions in Tank 41H. The pump locations correspond to the proposed locations in Tank 41H by the SCIX program (Risers B5, B3, and B1). Previous testing showed that three Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs) will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank, and to resuspend MST that has settled in a waste tank at nominal 45 C for four weeks. The conclusions from this analysis are: (1) Three SMPs will be able to resuspend more than 99.9% of the MST and CST that has settled for four weeks at nominal 45 C. The testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is 84% of the maximum discharge velocity of the pump. (2) Three SMPs will be able to resuspend more than 99.9% of the MST, CST, and simulated sludge that has settled for four weeks at nominal 45 C. The testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is 82% of the maximum discharge velocity of the pump. (3) A contact time of 6-12 hours is needed for strontium sorption by MST in a jet mixed tank with cooling coils, which is consistent with bench-scale testing and actinide removal process (ARP) operation.

  19. STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE SORPTION BY MST AND MMST UNDER CONDITIONS REVELANT TO THE SMALL COLUMN ION-EXCHANGE PROCESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Hobbs, D.; Poirier, M.

    2011-05-06

    A series of tests were performed to examine the kinetics of Sr and actinide removal by monosodium titanate (MST) and modified monosodium titanate (mMST) under mixing conditions similar to what will be provided in the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) Program. Similar removal kinetics were seen for two different mixing energies, indicating that under these conditions bulk solution transport is not the rate limiting step for Sr and actinide removal. Sr removal was found to be rapid for both MST and mMST, reaching steady-state conditions within six hours. In contrast, at least six weeks is necessary to reach steady-state conditions for Pu with MST. For mMST, steady-state conditions for Pu were achieved within two weeks. The actual contact time required for the SCIX process will depend on starting sorbate concentrations as well as the requirements for the decontaminated salt solution. During testing leaks occurred in both the MST and mMST tests and evidence of potential desorption was observed. The desorption likely occurred as a result of the change in solids to liquid phase ratio that occurred due to the loss of solution. Based on these results, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) recommended additional testing to further study the effect of changing phase ratios on desorption. This testing is currently in progress and results will be documented in a separate report.

  20. Recorrência da Crise Convulsiva após Terapia Anticonvulsivante com Sulfato de Magnésio em Pacientes com Eclâmpsia Recurrence of Seizures after Anticonvulsant Therapy with Magnesium Sulfate in Patients with Eclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melania Maria Ramos de Amorim

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: determinar a freqüência de recorrência das crises convulsivas após tratamento com sulfato de magnésio, avaliando o tratamento adotado e o prognóstico materno. Casuística e Métodos: analisaram-se todos os casos de eclâmpsia atendidos no IMIP entre janeiro de 1995 e junho de 1998. Sulfato de magnésio e oxigenoterapia foram administrados para todas as pacientes, interrompendo-se a gravidez após estabilização do quadro clínico. Determinou-se a freqüência de complicações maternas de acordo com a presença ou não de recorrência da crise convulsiva, utilizando-se o teste chi² de associação, a um nível de significância de 5%. Resultados: doze pacientes apresentaram recorrência da eclâmpsia após sulfato de magnésio (10%, repetindo-se então metade da dose de ataque. Em 4 destas verificou-se nova recorrência, administrando-se então diazepam endovenoso. Depois do diazepam, uma paciente ainda teve crises repetidas, sendo então realizada infusão de fenitoína e, posteriormente, indução do coma barbitúrico (tionembutal. Essa paciente foi submetida a tomografia computadorizada, constatando-se hemorragia intracraniana. As complicações maternas foram significativamente mais freqüentes no grupo com recorrência: coma (16,7% versus 0,9%, acidose (50% versus 2,9%, edema agudo de pulmão (16,7% versus 2,9%, hemorragia cerebral (16,7% versus 0% e insuficiência renal aguda (16,7% versus 1,9%. Ocorreram 3 casos de morte materna no grupo com recorrência (25% e 2 no grupo sem recorrência (1,9%. Conclusões: a recorrência da crise convulsiva é pouco freqüente após uso do sulfato de magnésio (10%, porém associa-se a aumento da morbimortalidade materna, requerendo acompanhamento em UTI e realização de tomografia para exclusão de hemorragia cerebral.Purpose: to determine the frequency of recurrence of seizures after anticonvulsant therapy with magnesium sulfate and to evaluate treatment and maternal prognosis

  1. Clinical and psychosocial characteristics of children with nonepileptic seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinta Sri

    2008-01-01

    (82.4% either recovered completely or had more than 50% reduction in the frequency of their symptoms, after three to six months of initiation of therapy. Conclusions: Psychosocial stress is common among children with nonepileptic seizures. Confirmatory diagnosis by video EEG, along with prompt psychosocial intervention, often results in a favorable outcome for most children with nonepileptic seizures.

  2. Effects of Multisystemic Therapy through Midlife: A 21.9-Year Follow-Up to a Randomized Clinical Trial with Serious and Violent Juvenile Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Aaron M.; Borduin, Charles M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Although current evidence suggests that the positive effects of multisystemic therapy (MST) on serious crime reach as far as young adulthood, the longer term impact of MST on criminal and noncriminal outcomes in midlife has not been evaluated. In the present study, the authors examined a broad range of criminal and civil court outcomes…

  3. Em busca da visibilidade: apropriações e produções de audiovisuais pelo MST * Searching for visibility: appropriations and audiovisual producions by MST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FERNANDO PERLI

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: A formação do Movimento dos Trabalhadores Rurais Sem Terra (MST marcou-se pelo envolvimento de entidades civis e religiosas na produção de diversos meios de comunicação. Dentre a variedade, os audiovisuais tornaram-se instrumentos cada vez mais recorrentes para a capacitação de quadros e a visibilidade social do MST. Na década de 1990, as coberturas dadas pela mídia e a ampliação dos mecanismos de divulgação do movimento social contribuíram para o desenvolvimento de projetos que incentivaram a produção de vídeos-documentários pelos sem-terra. O presente artigo suscita a análise das apropriações e produções de audiovisuais na organização do MST, considerando o sentido político do reconhecimento de audiovisuais para a divulgação do movimento social e o debate sobre o lugar ocupado por diferentes mecanismos de difusão de representações na luta pela reforma agrária.Palavras-chave: Audiovisuais – Movimentos sociais – Movimento dos Trabalhadores Rurais Sem-Terra. Abstract: The formation of the Landless Rural Workers Movement (MST was marked by the participation of civil and religious authorities in the production of various media. Among them, the audiovisual production became an increasingly recurrent instrument to train its cadre and to enable social visibility to the organization. In the 1990s, the media coverage and the expansion of dissemination mechanisms have contributed to the development of projects that stimulated the production of documentaries by the landless rural workers. This paper raises the analysis of appropriations and audiovisual productions within MST, considering the political sense of acknowledging the audiovisual as a means to disseminate the social movement as well as the debate on the place occupied by different diffusion mechanisms of representations in the struggle for agrarian reform.Keywords: Audiovisual – Social movement – Landless Rural Workers Movement.

  4. HMPAO-SPECT in cerebral seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruenwald, F.; Bockisch, A.; Reichmann, K.; Ammari, B.; Hotze, A.; Biersack, H.J.; Durwen, H.; Buelau, P.; Elger, C.E.; Rohde, A.; Penin, H.

    1988-01-01

    In nine patients with suspected psychogenic seizures and in three patients with proven epileptic seizures HMPAO-SPECT was performed prior to and during seizure. In the patients with lateron-proven psychogenic seizures no, or only slight, changes of regional cerebral blood flow were found. Patients with proven epilepsy revealed partly normal findings interictally but during seizure a markedly increased circumscript blood flow was found in all patients. Even though PET is superior to SPECT with respect to spatial resolution, in the diagnosis of seizures HMPAO-SPECT has the advantage of enabling injection of the tracer during the seizure and the performance of the SPECT study subsequently. (orig.) [de

  5. Design and development of a lower-hybrid antenna for the MST reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, M.; Cekic, M.; Lovell, T.W.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.; Uchimoto, E.

    1995-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies strongly motivated the development of a radio-frequency current drive scheme for current density gradient reduction in the outer region of a reversed field pinch. The preliminary experiments using inductive current drive indicate that such current density profile modification reduces the magnetic fluctuation amplitude and related energy and particle losses. To test the theoretical predictions and to further improve confinement in the MST, the authors are planning a series of lower-hybrid wave experiments. The initial phase is the design and optimization of a low-power antenna to study slow wave propagation in a frequency range 2--3 f LH (200--300 MHz) with parallel index of refraction n parallel ∼10. Ray-tracing calculations, for typical MST plasma parameters, indicate that such a wave will spiral radially into a target zone inside the reversal layer. The antenna consists of an array of tunable loops arranged in the poloidal direction. The design is compatible with the existing box-port openings in the MST conductive shell to prevent additional magnetic field errors associated with large portholes. Antenna vacuum characteristics are studied on a test-stand designed to approximate the geometry of the MST shell. For the initial measurements of plasma response and antenna loading, the authors designed a reduced, easily insertable, vacuum antenna structure. The results of plasma impedance measurements will be compared with the numerical modeling results and incorporated in the optimized design of the antenna for wave propagation experiments

  6. The Politics of the MST Autonomous Rural Communities, the State, and Electoral Politics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergara Camus, Leandro

    Examination of the politicization of landless people in the encampments and settlements of the Movimento dos Trabalhadores Rurais Sem-Terra (Landless Rural Workers' Movement-MST) in Brazil suggests that the movement's success rest on the fact that it generates relatively autonomous rural communities

  7. Edge fluctuations in the MST [Madison Symmetric Torus] reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almagri, A.; Assadi, S.; Beckstead, J.; Chartas, G.; Crocker, N.; Den Hartog, D.; Dexter, R.; Hokin, S.; Holly, D.; Nilles, E.; Prager, S.; Rempel, T.; Sarff, J.; Scime, E.; Shen, W.; Spragins, C.; Sprott, J.; Starr, G.; Stoneking, M.; Watts, C.

    1990-10-01

    Edge magnetic and electrostatic fluctuations are measured in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed field pinch. At low frequency ( e > p e /p e where φ and p e are the fluctuating potential and pressure, respectively). From measurements of the fluctuating density, temperature, and potential we infer that the electrostatic fluctuation induced transport of particles and energy can be substantial. 13 refs., 11 figs

  8. PHLPP1 regulates contact inhibition by dephosphorylating Mst1 at the inhibitory site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Sujin; Kang, Jeong Gu; Lee, Ju Hee; Song, Kyoung Jin; Ko, Jeong-Heon; Kim, Yong-Sam

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • PHLPP1 regulates contact inhibition by dephosphorylating Mst1 at Thr 387 . • Overexpression of PHLPP1 sensitizes contact inhibition. • Tumor cells with suppressed PHLPP1 expression are refractory to apoptosis and highly proliferative. • Loss or down-regulation of PHLPP1 may drive tumor development and progression. - Abstract: Contact inhibition has been largely elusive despite that a loss of contact inhibition is a critical event for cancer development and progression. Here, we report that PHLPP1 is a binding protein for Mst1 and it modulates the Hippo pathway by dephosphorylating Mst1 at the inhibitory Thr 387 of Mst1. Yap1 was localized predominantly in the nucleus but marginally in the cytoplasm in HeLa cells under sparse conditions, whereas the functional protein was more directed to sequestration in the cytoplasm under dense environments. Furthermore, loss of PHLPP1 resulted in a failure of the apoptotic control. It is interesting that down-regulated expression of PHLPP1 appears to mimic the loss of contact inhibition, a hallmark of cancer

  9. PHLPP1 regulates contact inhibition by dephosphorylating Mst1 at the inhibitory site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Sujin; Kang, Jeong Gu [Targeted Gene Regulation Research Center, KRIBB, 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ju Hee [Targeted Gene Regulation Research Center, KRIBB, 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomolecular Science, University of Science and Technology, 217 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Kyoung Jin [Targeted Gene Regulation Research Center, KRIBB, 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Jeong-Heon [Targeted Gene Regulation Research Center, KRIBB, 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomolecular Science, University of Science and Technology, 217 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong-Sam, E-mail: omsys1@kribb.re.kr [Targeted Gene Regulation Research Center, KRIBB, 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomolecular Science, University of Science and Technology, 217 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-24

    Highlights: • PHLPP1 regulates contact inhibition by dephosphorylating Mst1 at Thr{sup 387}. • Overexpression of PHLPP1 sensitizes contact inhibition. • Tumor cells with suppressed PHLPP1 expression are refractory to apoptosis and highly proliferative. • Loss or down-regulation of PHLPP1 may drive tumor development and progression. - Abstract: Contact inhibition has been largely elusive despite that a loss of contact inhibition is a critical event for cancer development and progression. Here, we report that PHLPP1 is a binding protein for Mst1 and it modulates the Hippo pathway by dephosphorylating Mst1 at the inhibitory Thr{sup 387} of Mst1. Yap1 was localized predominantly in the nucleus but marginally in the cytoplasm in HeLa cells under sparse conditions, whereas the functional protein was more directed to sequestration in the cytoplasm under dense environments. Furthermore, loss of PHLPP1 resulted in a failure of the apoptotic control. It is interesting that down-regulated expression of PHLPP1 appears to mimic the loss of contact inhibition, a hallmark of cancer.

  10. '"My Land, Your Social Transformation": Conflicts within the Landless People Movement (MST), Rio De Janeiro, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, Rute

    2008-01-01

    The Brazilian "Movimento dos Trabalhadores Rurais Sem-Terra" (MST) is one of the best-known and most prominent rural social movements. The unequal distribution of land in Brazil, and the neglect of this problem by successive Brazilian governments contributed greatly to the organisation of rural movements striving for the implementation…

  11. Reframing the Public in Public Education: The Landless Workers Movement (MST) and Adult Education in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapliyal, Nisha

    2013-01-01

    Education for rural Brazilians has historically been dominated by two imperatives: human capital and political patronage. For the last four decades, the Landless Workers Movement (MST) have maintained a struggle to democratise public education and democracy itself. In this article, I make a situated analysis of the educational politics of the MST…

  12. Management of Reflex Anoxic Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at the Roald Dahl EEG Unit, Alder Hey Children’s NHS Foundation, Liverpool, UK, review the definition, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and management of reflex anoxic seizures (RAS in children.

  13. Evaluation of no-MST operations in the SRS ARP for Hanford LAWPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2016-11-14

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) Actinide Removal Process has been processing salt waste since 2008. This process includes a filtration step in the 512-S facility. Initial operations included the addition, or strike, of monosodium titanate (MST) to remove soluble actinides and strontium. The added MST and any entrained sludge solids were then separated from the supernate by cross flow filtration. During this time, the filter operations have, on many occasions, been the bottleneck process limiting the rate of salt processing. Recently, 512-S- has started operations utilizing “No-MST” where the MST actinide removal strike was not performed and the supernate was simply pre-filtered prior to Cs removal processing. Direct filtration of decanted tank supernate, as demonstrated in 512-S, is the proposed method of operation for the Hanford Low Activity Waste Pretreatment System (LAWPS) facility. Processing decanted supernate without MST solids has been demonstrated for cross flow filtration to provide a significant improvement in production with the SRS Salt Batches 8 and 9 feed chemistries. The average filtration rate for the first 512-S batch processing cycle using No-MST has increased filtrate production by over 35% of the historical average. The increase was sustained for more than double the amount of filtrate batches processed before cleaning of the filter was necessary. While there are differences in the design of the 512-S and Hanford filter systems, the 512-S system should provide a reasonable indication of LAWPS filter performance with similar feed properties. Based on the data from the 512-S facility and with favorable feed properties, the LAWPS filter, as currently sized at over twice the size of the 512-S filter (532 square feet filtration area versus 235 square feet), has the potential to provide sustained filtrate production at the upper range of the planned LAWPS production rate of 17 gpm.

  14. Different ketogenesis strategies lead to disparate seizure outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolce, Alison; Santos, Polan; Chen, Weiran; Hoke, Ahmet; Hartman, Adam L

    2018-07-01

    Despite the introduction of new medicines to treat epilepsy over the last 50 years, the number of patients with poorly-controlled seizures remains unchanged. Metabolism-based therapies are an underutilized treatment option for this population. We hypothesized that two different means of systemic ketosis, the ketogenic diet and intermittent fasting, would differ in their acute seizure test profiles and mitochondrial respiration. Male NIH Swiss mice (aged 3-4 weeks) were fed for 12-13 days using one of four diet regimens: ketogenic diet (KD), control diet matched to KD for protein content and micronutrients (CD), or CD with intermittent fasting (24 h feed/24 h fast) (CD-IF), tested post-feed or post-fast. Mice were subject to the 6 Hz threshold test or, in separate cohorts, after injection of kainic acid in doses based on their weight (Cohort I) or a uniform dose regardless of weight (Cohort II). Mitochondrial respiration was tested in brain tissue isolated from similarly-fed seizure-naïve mice. KD mice were protected against 6 Hz-induced seizures but had more severe seizure scores in the kainic acid test (Cohorts I & II), the opposite of CD-IF mice. No differences were noted in mitochondrial respiration between diet regimens. KD and CD-IF do not share identical antiseizure mechanisms. These differences were not explained by differences in mitochondrial respiration. Nevertheless, both KD and CD-IF regimens protected against different types of seizures, suggesting that mechanisms underlying CD-IF seizure protection should be explored further. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Serotonin neurones have anti-convulsant effects and reduce seizure-induced mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Gordon F; Murray, Nicholas M; Hajek, Michael A; Richerson, George B

    2014-01-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is the leading cause of death in patients with refractory epilepsy. Defects in central control of breathing are important contributors to the pathophysiology of SUDEP, and serotonin (5-HT) system dysfunction may be involved. Here we examined the effect of 5-HT neurone elimination or 5-HT reduction on seizure risk and seizure-induced mortality. Adult Lmx1bf/f/p mice, which lack >99% of 5-HT neurones in the CNS, and littermate controls (Lmx1bf/f) were subjected to acute seizure induction by maximal electroshock (MES) or pilocarpine, variably including electroencephalography, electrocardiography, plethysmography, mechanical ventilation or pharmacological therapy. Lmx1bf/f/p mice had a lower seizure threshold and increased seizure-induced mortality. Breathing ceased during most seizures without recovery, whereas cardiac activity persisted for up to 9 min before terminal arrest. The mortality rate of mice of both genotypes was reduced by mechanical ventilation during the seizure or 5-HT2A receptor agonist pretreatment. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram reduced mortality of Lmx1bf/f but not of Lmx1bf/f/p mice. In C57BL/6N mice, reduction of 5-HT synthesis with para-chlorophenylalanine increased MES-induced seizure severity but not mortality. We conclude that 5-HT neurones raise seizure threshold and decrease seizure-related mortality. Death ensued from respiratory failure, followed by terminal asystole. Given that SUDEP often occurs in association with generalised seizures, some mechanisms causing death in our model might be shared with those leading to SUDEP. This model may help determine the relationship between seizures, 5-HT system dysfunction, breathing and death, which may lead to novel ways to prevent SUDEP. PMID:25107926

  16. Urinary urge seizure semiology localization by intracranial monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengarajan, Ronak; Shamim, Sadat

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Seizures may present with many different symptom complexes. Seizure semiologies have localization value when contemplating surgical therapies. Epilepsy presenting as a desire to micturate is exceedingly rare, with only a handful of published cases. We present a patient who had initially unexplained childhood urinary urge that progressed into lapses of memory and confusion that was eventually diagnosed as epilepsy in adulthood. Due to refractoriness to medical management, our patient's epileptic focus was localized through both noninvasive and invasive subdural electrode arrays to the nondominant medial temporal lobe and successfully treated with an amygdalohippocampectomy. Only one other case of ictal urinary urgency seizures has been recorded with intracranial electroencephalogram monitoring in the literature. PMID:29686574

  17. Mouse repeated electroconvulsive seizure (ECS does not reverse social stress effects but does induce behavioral and hippocampal changes relevant to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT side-effects in the treatment of depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin M van Buel

    Full Text Available Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is an effective treatment for depression, but can have negative side effects including amnesia. The mechanisms of action underlying both the antidepressant and side effects of ECT are not well understood. An equivalent manipulation that is conducted in experimental animals is electroconvulsive seizure (ECS. Rodent studies have provided valuable insights into potential mechanisms underlying the antidepressant and side effects of ECT. However, relatively few studies have investigated the effects of ECS in animal models with a depression-relevant manipulation such as chronic stress. In the present study, mice were first exposed to chronic social stress (CSS or a control procedure for 15 days followed by ECS or a sham procedure for 10 days. Behavioral effects were investigated using an auditory fear conditioning (learning and expression (memory test and a treadmill-running fatigue test. Thereafter, immunohistochemistry was conducted on brain material using the microglial marker Iba-1 and the cholinergic fibre marker ChAT. CSS did not increase fear learning and memory in the present experimental design; in both the control and CSS mice ECS reduced fear learning and fear memory expression. CSS induced the expected fatigue-like effect in the treadmill-running test; ECS induced increased fatigue in CSS and control mice. In CSS and control mice ECS induced inflammation in hippocampus in terms of increased expression of Iba-1 in radiatum of CA1 and CA3. CSS and ECS both reduced acetylcholine function in hippocampus as indicated by decreased expression of ChAT in several hippocampal sub-regions. Therefore, CSS increased fatigue and reduced hippocampal ChAT activity and, rather than reversing these effects, a repeated ECS regimen resulted in impaired fear learning-memory, increased fatigue, increased hippocampal Iba-1 expression, and decreased hippocampal ChAT expression. As such, the current model does not provide insights

  18. Shikonin regulates C-MYC and GLUT1 expression through the MST1-YAP1-TEAD1 axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vališ, Karel, E-mail: karel.valis@biomed.cas.cz [Laboratory of Structural Biology and Cell Signaling, Institute of Microbiology, v.v.i., The Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague (Czech Republic); Faculty of Science, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Talacko, Pavel; Grobárová, Valéria [Laboratory of Structural Biology and Cell Signaling, Institute of Microbiology, v.v.i., The Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague (Czech Republic); Faculty of Science, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Černý, Jan [Faculty of Science, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Novák, Petr, E-mail: pnovak@biomed.cas.cz [Laboratory of Structural Biology and Cell Signaling, Institute of Microbiology, v.v.i., The Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague (Czech Republic); Faculty of Science, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2016-12-10

    The general mechanism underlying the tumor suppressor activity of the Hippo signaling pathway remains unclear. In this study, we explore the molecular mechanisms connecting the Hippo signaling pathway with glucose metabolism. We have found that two key regulators of glycolysis, C-MYC and GLUT1, are targets of the Hippo signaling pathway in human leukemia cells. Our results revealed that activation of MST1 by the natural compound shikonin inhibited the expression of GLUT1 and C-MYC. Furthermore, RNAi experiments confirmed the regulation of GLUT1 and C-MYC expression via the MST1-YAP1-TEAD1 axis. Surprisingly, YAP1 was found to positively regulate C-MYC mRNA levels in complex with TEAD1, while it negatively regulates C-MYC levels in cooperation with MST1. Hence, YAP1 serves as a rheostat for C-MYC, which is regulated by MST1. In addition, depletion of MST1 stimulates lactate production, whereas the specific depletion of TEAD1 has an opposite effect. The inhibition of lactate production and cellular proliferation induced by shikonin also depends on the Hippo pathway activity. Finally, a bioinformatic analysis revealed conserved TEAD-binding motifs in the C-MYC and GLUT1 promoters providing another molecular data supporting our observations. In summary, regulation of glucose metabolism could serve as a new tumor suppressor mechanism orchestrated by the Hippo signaling pathway. - Highlights: • Shikonin inhibits C-MYC and GLUT1 expression in MST1 and YAP1 dependent manner. • YAP1-TEAD1 interaction activates C-MYC and GLUT1 expression. • MST1 in cooperation with YAP1 inhibits C-MYC and GLUT1 expression. • MST1-YAP1-TEAD1 axis regulates lactate production by leukemic cells. • MST1 and YAP1 proteins block proliferation of leukemic cells.

  19. Seizures presenting as incessant laughter: a case of gelastic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Christina M; Goldman, Mitchell J

    2012-12-01

    Gelastic seizures are defined as seizure activity manifesting as laughter inappropriate to the situation, with supporting evidence on electroencephalogram or magnetic resonance imaging. Gelastic seizures are most commonly reported in patients with hypothalamic hamartomas causing precocious puberty. The differential diagnosis of incessant laughter is important to recognize in the Emergency Department, as some conditions warrant immediate treatment and others require further diagnostic work-up with implications for the entire family. The background and pathophysiology of gelastic epilepsy will be discussed. The case of a previously healthy girl with acute onset of incessant laughter is reported. This patient was diagnosed with a clinical case of gelastic seizures. This case illustrates the importance of recognizing this form of seizures for accurate treatment and follow-up. This case report illustrates the importance of a broad differential for a patient presenting emergently with uncontrollable laughter. Gelastic epilepsy is relatively rare but requires further work-up and often may require chronic therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Oral loading dose of phenytoin in the treatment of serial seizures, prevention of seizure recurrence and rapid drug substitution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokić, D; Janković, S M

    1994-01-01

    Over a period of nine months twenty-five epileptic patients were treated with the oral loading dose of phenytoin. The dose ranged from 12 to 23 mg/kg body weight during 1 to 12 hours. In 20 patients with serial seizures or intolerance to other antiepileptic drugs this treatment was effective. Seizures also stopped in 2 of 4 patients with serial partial motor seizures. These 2 patients required both higher loading dose and faster rate of administration than the other patients. A patient with epilepsia partialis continua failed to respond to the treatment. Patients that received phenytoin through the naso-gastric tube, in respect to oral administration, required higher doses to obtain therapeutic plasma levels of phenytoin. One patient had mild nausea, 3 mild dizziness, and 1 tinitus on the first day of the treatment. There was no correlation between a given dose and the achieved phenytoin plasma levels. In our opinion the therapy with oral loading dose of phenytoin is highly effective in the treatment of serial generalized seizures and rapid antiepileptic drug substitution, and partially effective in the prevention of partial motor seizures. It produces only mild and transient side-effects.

  1. Efficacy of multisystemic therapy in youths aged 10-17 with severe antisocial behaviour and emotional disorders: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jia Xuan; Fajardo, Maria Lourdes Restrepo

    2017-11-01

    Antisocial behaviour and conduct disorders are the most common behavioural and mental health problems in children and young people globally. An efficacious intervention is needed to manage these antisocial behaviours that have costly consequences. Multisystemic Therapy (MST), an intensive home-based intervention for youths with psychosocial and behavioural problems, is recommended under National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines for conduct disorder. However, reviews on the efficacy of MST are mixed. To review randomised controlled trials (RCTs) reporting efficacy of MST among youths presenting with antisocial behaviour and emotional disorder respectively. A systematic map term to subject heading search was conducted in PsycINFO, Embase, and Ovid Medline databases for articles up to November 2015. RCTs comparing MST vs.treatment as usual (TAU) in youths presenting with antisocial behaviour and emotional disorder were included. 12 RCTs ( n  = 1425) reported efficacy of MST vs. TAU in youths presenting with antisocial behaviour and emotional disorder. Clinically significant treatment effects of MST showed a reduction of antisocial behaviour which includes delinquency. MST, vs. psychiatric hospitalisation, was associated with a reduction of suicidal attempts in youths presenting with psychiatric emergencies. 4 studies showed that MST was less costly than TAU in the short term, with further analysis required for long-term cost-effectiveness. MST is an efficacious intervention for severe antisocial behaviours in reduction of delinquency and should be included in clinical practices. MST was shown to have a positive effect on emotional disorder but further research is needed to evaluate the efficacy of MST with emotional disorder. Further analysis is required to assess the services utilized for long-term cost effectiveness.

  2. Jornadas de trabalho de mulheres e homens em um assentamento do MST Workdays of men and women in a collective settlement of the landless movement (MST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovana Ilka Jacinto Salvaro

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Este texto busca discutir a divisão do trabalho em um assentamento coletivo do Movimento dos Trabalhadores Rurais Sem Terra (MST, em Santa Catarina, marcado pela proposta de coletivização da terra e dos meios de produção. Nessa forma de organização, busca-se, seguindo as diretrizes estabelecidas pelo MST, a transformação igualitária e solidária da sociedade, incluindo a construção de novas relações de gênero. O que se observou é que, no cotidiano, mulheres e homens, sujeitos históricos e culturais, apropriam-se desses discursos de gênero, ao mesmo tempo que buscam lidar com as contradições que se apresentam. Entre estas, colocam-se as diferentes jornadas de trabalho que, apoiadas em padrões relacionais fixos, determinam oito horas diárias para os homens na produção e quatro para as mulheres, em função do trabalho doméstico e do cuidado das crianças.This text presents a discussion on the division of labor in a collective settlement of the Landless Movement (Movimento dos Trabalhadores Rurais Sem Terra - MST in Santa Catarina, characterized by the collectivization of land and of all means of production. Within this form of organization and according to the directives established by the MST, an equalitarian and solidarious transformation of society, including the construction of new genre relations, is sought for. What has been noted, throughout the daily routine, is that men and women alike, both historical and cultural subjects, appropriate this discourse at the same time in which they try to deal with upcoming contradictions. Within the latter, and based on fixed relational standards, different work hours are thus established. Men are determined to work on a daily eight hour basis in production whereas women, due to domestic work and child rearing, are granted a four hour schedule.

  3. Regulation of emotions in psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanek, Monika; Harvey, Martin; McGowan, John; Agrawal, Niruj

    2014-08-01

    Despite the long history of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES), relatively little is known about the mechanisms that cause and maintain this condition. Emerging research evidence suggests that patients with PNES might have difficulties in regulating their emotions. However, much remains to be learned about the nature of these difficulties and the emotional responses of individuals with PNES. This study aimed to gain a detailed understanding of emotion regulation processes in patients with PNES by examining differences between patients with PNES and a healthy control group with regard to intensity of emotional reactions, understanding of one's emotional experience, beliefs about emotions, and managing emotions by controlling emotional expression. A cross-sectional design was used to compare the group with PNES (n=56) and the healthy control group (n=88) on a range of self-report measures. Participants with a diagnosis of PNES reported significantly poorer understanding of their emotions, more negative beliefs about emotions, and a greater tendency to control emotional expression compared to the control group. While intensity of emotions did not discriminate between the groups, poor understanding and negative beliefs about emotions were found to be significant predictors of PNES, even after controlling for age, education level, and emotional distress. Furthermore, the presence of some emotion regulation difficulties was associated with self-reported seizure severity. The results of this study are largely consistent with previous literature and provide evidence for difficulties in emotion regulation in patients with PNES. However, this research goes further in bringing together different aspects of emotion regulation, including beliefs about emotions, which have not been examined before. As far as it is known, this is the first study to suggest that levels of alexithymia in a population with PNES are positively associated with self-reported seizure severity. The

  4. Automated seizure detection systems and their effectiveness for each type of seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulate-Campos, A; Coughlin, F; Gaínza-Lein, M; Fernández, I Sánchez; Pearl, P L; Loddenkemper, T

    2016-08-01

    Epilepsy affects almost 1% of the population and most of the approximately 20-30% of patients with refractory epilepsy have one or more seizures per month. Seizure detection devices allow an objective assessment of seizure frequency and a treatment tailored to the individual patient. A rapid recognition and treatment of seizures through closed-loop systems could potentially decrease morbidity and mortality in epilepsy. However, no single detection device can detect all seizure types. Therefore, the choice of a seizure detection device should consider the patient-specific seizure semiologies. This review of the literature evaluates seizure detection devices and their effectiveness for different seizure types. Our aim is to summarize current evidence, offer suggestions on how to select the most suitable seizure detection device for each patient and provide guidance to physicians, families and researchers when choosing or designing seizure detection devices. Further, this review will guide future prospective validation studies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Seizure semiology: an important clinical clue to the diagnosis of autoimmune epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Rui-Juan; Ren, Hai-Tao; Guan, Hong-Zhi; Cui, Tao; Shao, Xiao-Qiu

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the seizure semiologic characteristics of patients with autoimmune epilepsy (AE) and describe the investigation characteristics of AE using a larger sample size. This observational retrospective case series study was conducted from a tertiary epilepsy center between May 2014 and March 2017. Cases of new-onset seizures were selected based on laboratory evidence of autoimmunity. At the same time, typical mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) patients with hippocampal sclerosis (HS) were recruited as the control group from the subjects who underwent presurgical evaluation during the same period. A total of 61 patients with AE were identified. Specific autoimmune antibodies were detected in 39 patients (63.93%), including anti-VGKC in 23 patients (37.70%), anti-NMDA-R in 9 patients (14.75%), anti-GABA B -R in 6 patients (9.84%), and anti-amphiphysin in 1 patient (1.64%). Regarding the seizure semiology, no significant differences were noted between AE patients with autoantibody and patients with suspected AE without antibody. Compared to typical MTLE patients with HS, both AE patients with autoantibody and patients with suspected AE without antibody had the same seizure semiologic characteristics, including more frequent SPS or CPS, shorter seizure duration, rare postictal confusion, and common sleeping SGTC seizures. This study highlights important seizure semiologic characteristics of AE. Patients with autoimmune epilepsy had special seizure semiologic characteristics. For patients with autoimmune epilepsy presenting with new-onset seizures in isolation or with a seizure-predominant neurological disorder, the special seizure semiologic characteristics may remind us to test neuronal nuclear/cytoplasmic antibodies early and initiate immunomodulatory therapies as soon as possible. Furthermore, the absence of neural-specific autoantibodies does not rule out AE.

  6. Epileptic seizures due to multiple cerebral cavernomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spasić Mirjana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cavernous angiomas are angiographically occult vascular malformations that are present in 0.4−0.9 % of people, and represent around 5% of all cerebrovascular malformations. They can be single or multiple, and sporadic or familial. The presence of multiple lesions is more frequent in familial cavernomatosis. Ten to 30 % are associated with familial clustering. Case report. We presented the case of a 43-year-old man, admitted to the Emergency Department due to unprovoked seizure during the wide awake and everyday activities. Neurological examination was with no focal signs. A 32-channel standard digital EEG was without any significant changes of normal baseline activity. After sleep deprivation EEG showed multifocal, bilateral and asymmetric polyspikes and sharpwaves activity. Hyperventilation induced generalized epileptiform discharges. MRI scan demonstrated multiple small cavernous angiomas. Neuropsychological testing demonstrated a delayed memory impairment. Neurosurgery treatment was not recommended, and the therapy with valproate 1 250 mg/day had an excellent efficacy with no singnificant adverse effects. Conclusion. This patient considered as a rare case with multiple cavernomatosis highlights the importance of neuroradiological examination in adult patients with the first epileptic seizure but with no focal neurological signs. .

  7. Adeno-Associated Viral Vector-Induced Overexpression of Neuropeptide Y Y2 Receptors in the Hippocampus Suppresses Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woldbye, David P. D.; Angehagen, Mikael; Gotzsche, Casper R.; Elbrond-Bek, Heidi; Sorensen, Andreas T.; Christiansen, Soren H.; Olesen, Mikkel V.; Nikitidou, Litsa; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Kanter-Schlifke, Irene; Kokaia, Merab

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy using recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors overexpressing neuropeptide Y in the hippocampus exerts seizure-suppressant effects in rodent epilepsy models and is currently considered for clinical application in patients with intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Seizure suppression by neuropeptide Y in the hippocampus is…

  8. Development of Ethernet Based Remote Monitoring and Controlling of MST Radar Transmitters using ARM Cortex Microcontroller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Narayana ROSHANNA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The recently emerging Web Services technology has provided a new and excellent solution to Industrial Automation in online control and remote monitoring. In this paper, a Web Service Based Remote Monitoring & Controlling of Radar Transmitters for safety management (WMCT developed for MST Radar is described. It achieved the MST radar transmitters’ remote supervisory, data logging and controlling activities. The system is developed using an ARM Cortex M3 processor to monitor and control the 32 triode-based transmitters of the 53-MHz Radar. The system controls transmitters via the internet using an Ethernet client server and store health status in the Database for radar performance analysis. The system enables scientists to operate and control the radar transmitters from a remote client machine Webpage.

  9. B4C solid target boronization of the MST reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Hartog, D.J.; Cekic, M.; Fiksel, G.; Hokin, S.A.; Kendrick, R.D.; Prager, S.C.; Stoneking, M.R.

    1992-10-01

    A solid rod of hot-pressed boron carbide is being used as the source of boron during boronization of MST. The most striking result of this procedure is the reduction in oxygen contamination of the plasma (O III radiation, characteristic of oxygen at the edge, falls by about a factor of 3 after boronization.). The radiated power fraction drops to about half its initial value. Particle reflux from the wall is also lowered, making density control simpler. The rod (12.7 mm diameter) is inserted into the edge plasma of normal high-power RFP discharges. B 4 C is ablated from the surface of the rod and deposited in a thin film (a-B/C:H) on the walls and limiters. The energy flux carried by ''superthermal'' (not ''runaway'') electrons at the edge of MST appears to enhance the efficient, non-destructive ablation of the boron carbide rod

  10. Sensor integration of multiple tripolar concentric ring electrodes improves pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure onset detection in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makeyev, Oleksandr; Ding, Quan; Kay, Steven M; Besio, Walter G

    2012-01-01

    As epilepsy affects approximately one percent of the world population, electrical stimulation of the brain has recently shown potential for additive seizure control therapy. Previously, we applied noninvasive transcranial focal stimulation via tripolar concentric ring electrodes on the scalp of rats after inducing seizures with pentylenetetrazole. We developed a system to detect seizures and automatically trigger the stimulation and evaluated the system on the electrographic activity from rats. In this preliminary study we propose and validate a novel seizure onset detection algorithm based on exponentially embedded family. Unlike the previously proposed approach it integrates the data from multiple electrodes allowing an improvement of the detector performance.

  11. Experimental febrile seizures are precipitated by a hyperthermia-induced respiratory alkalosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuchmann, Sebastian; Schmitz, Dietmar; Rivera, Claudio; Vanhatalo, Sampsa; Salmen, Benedikt; Mackie, Ken; Sipilä, Sampsa T; Voipio, Juha; Kaila, Kai

    2006-07-01

    Febrile seizures are frequent during early childhood, and prolonged (complex) febrile seizures are associated with an increased susceptibility to temporal lobe epilepsy. The pathophysiological consequences of febrile seizures have been extensively studied in rat pups exposed to hyperthermia. The mechanisms that trigger these seizures are unknown, however. A rise in brain pH is known to enhance neuronal excitability. Here we show that hyperthermia causes respiratory alkalosis in the immature brain, with a threshold of 0.2-0.3 pH units for seizure induction. Suppressing alkalosis with 5% ambient CO2 abolished seizures within 20 s. CO2 also prevented two long-term effects of hyperthermic seizures in the hippocampus: the upregulation of the I(h) current and the upregulation of CB1 receptor expression. The effects of hyperthermia were closely mimicked by intraperitoneal injection of bicarbonate. Our work indicates a mechanism for triggering hyperthermic seizures and suggests new strategies in the research and therapy of fever-related epileptic syndromes.

  12. Increase in MST activity correlates with visual motion learning: A functional MRI study of perceptual learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larcombe, Stephanie J; Kennard, Chris; Bridge, Holly

    2018-01-01

    Repeated practice of a specific task can improve visual performance, but the neural mechanisms underlying this improvement in performance are not yet well understood. Here we trained healthy participants on a visual motion task daily for 5 days in one visual hemifield. Before and after training, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure the change in neural activity. We also imaged a control group of participants on two occasions who did not receive any task training. While in the MRI scanner, all participants completed the motion task in the trained and untrained visual hemifields separately. Following training, participants improved their ability to discriminate motion direction in the trained hemifield and, to a lesser extent, in the untrained hemifield. The amount of task learning correlated positively with the change in activity in the medial superior temporal (MST) area. MST is the anterior portion of the human motion complex (hMT+). MST changes were localized to the hemisphere contralateral to the region of the visual field, where perceptual training was delivered. Visual areas V2 and V3a showed an increase in activity between the first and second scan in the training group, but this was not correlated with performance. The contralateral anterior hippocampus and bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and frontal pole showed changes in neural activity that also correlated with the amount of task learning. These findings emphasize the importance of MST in perceptual learning of a visual motion task. Hum Brain Mapp 39:145-156, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Multiple Sclerosis: Can It Cause Seizures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... multiple sclerosis and epilepsy? Answers from B Mark Keegan, M.D. Epileptic seizures are more common in ... controlled with anti-seizure medication. With B Mark Keegan, M.D. Lund C, et al. Multiple sclerosis ...

  14. Etiology and Outcome of Neonatal Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The prognostic value of seizure etiology, neurologic examination, EEG, and neuroimaging in the neurodevelopmental outcome of 89 term infants with neonatal seizures was determined at the Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

  15. Temperature, age, and recurrence of febrile seizure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Stuijvenberg (Margriet); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); G. Derksen-Lubsen (Gerarda); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: Prediction of a recurrent febrile seizure during subsequent episodes of fever. DESIGN: Study of the data of the temperatures, seizure recurrences, and baseline patient characteristics that were collected at a randomized placebo controlled trial of ibuprofen

  16. Inherited MST1 deficiency underlies susceptibility to EV-HPV infections.

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    Amandine Crequer

    Full Text Available Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV is characterized by persistent cutaneous lesions caused by a specific group of related human papillomavirus genotypes (EV-HPVs in otherwise healthy individuals. Autosomal recessive (AR EVER1 and EVER2 deficiencies account for two thirds of known cases of EV. AR RHOH deficiency has recently been described in two siblings with EV-HPV infections as well as other infectious and tumoral manifestations. We report here the whole-exome based discovery of AR MST1 deficiency in a 19-year-old patient with a T-cell deficiency associated with EV-HPV, bacterial and fungal infections. MST1 deficiency has recently been described in seven patients from three unrelated kindreds with profound T-cell deficiency and various viral and bacterial infections. The patient was also homozygous for a rare ERCC3 variation. Our findings broaden the clinical range of infections seen in MST1 deficiency and provide a new genetic etiology of susceptibility to EV-HPV infections. Together with the recent discovery of RHOH deficiency, they suggest that T cells are involved in the control of EV-HPVs, at least in some individuals.

  17. INVESTIGATING SUSPENSION OF MST SLURRIES IN A PILOT-SCALE WASTE TANK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, M.; Restivo, M.; Steeper, T.; Williams, M.; Qureshi, Z.

    2011-01-24

    The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing waste tank (i.e., Tank 41H) to house the process. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is conducting pilot-scale mixing tests to determine the pump requirements for suspending monosodium titanate (MST), crystalline silicotitanate (CST), and simulated sludge. The purpose of this pilot scale testing is for the pumps to suspend the MST particles so that MST can be removed from the tank. The pilot-scale tank is a 1/10.85 linear scaled model of Tank 41H. The tank diameter, tank liquid level, pump nozzle diameter, pump elevation, and cooling coil diameter are all 1/10.85 of their dimensions in Tank 41H. The pump locations correspond to the proposed locations in Tank 41H by the SCIX program (Risers B5 and B2 for two pump configurations and Risers B5, B3, and B1 for three pump configurations).

  18. Morphine potentiates seizures induced by GABA antagonists and attenuates seizures induced by electroshock in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, F; Gale, K

    1983-11-25

    In a naloxone-reversible, dose-dependent manner, morphine (10-50 mg/kg i.p.) protected against seizures induced by maximal electroshock and increased the incidence and severity of seizures induced by bicuculline, in rats. Morphine also potentiated seizures induced by isoniazid and by picrotoxin. Thus, opiate activity influences the expression of seizures in contrasting ways depending upon the mode of seizure induction. Since morphine consistently potentiated seizures induced by interference with GABA transmission, it appears that GABAergic systems may be of particular significance for the elucidation of the varied effects of morphine on seizure susceptibility.

  19. Multisystemic Therapy and Functional Family Therapy Compared on their Effectiveness Using the Propensity Score Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eeren, Hester V; Goossens, Lucas M A; Scholte, Ron H J; Busschbach, Jan J V; van der Rijken, Rachel E A

    2018-01-09

    Multisystemic Therapy (MST) and Functional Family Therapy (FFT) have overlapping target populations and treatment goals. In this study, these interventions were compared on their effectiveness using a quasi-experimental design. Between October, 2009 and June, 2014, outcome data were collected from 697 adolescents (mean age 15.3 (SD 1.48), 61.9% male) assigned to either MST or FFT (422 MST; 275 FFT). Data were gathered during Routine Outcome Monitoring. The primary outcome was externalizing problem behavior (Child Behavior Checklist and Youth Self Report). Secondary outcomes were the proportion of adolescents living at home, engaged in school or work, and who lacked police contact during treatment. Because of the non-random assignment, a propensity score method was used to control for observed pre-treatment differences. Because the risk-need-responsivity (RNR) model guided treatment assignment, effectiveness was also estimated in youth with and without a court order as an indicator of their risk level. Looking at the whole sample, no difference in effect was found with regard to externalizing problems. For adolescents without a court order, effects on externalizing problems were larger after MST. Because many more adolescents with a court order were assigned to MST compared to FFT, the propensity score method could not balance the treatment groups in this subsample. In conclusion, few differences between MST and FFT were found. In line with the RNR model, higher risk adolescents were assigned to the more intensive treatment, namely MST. In the group with lower risk adolescents, this more intensive treatment was more effective in reducing externalizing problems.

  20. Hippocampal Abnormalities and Seizure Recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal volumetry and T2 relaxometry were performed on 84 consecutive patients (adolescents and adults with partial epilepsy submitted to antiepileptic drug (AED withdrawal after at least 2 years of seizure control, in a study at State University of Campinas-UNICAMP, Brazil.

  1. First mesospheric turbulence study using coordinated rocket and MST radar measurements over Indian low latitude region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Chandra

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A campaign to study turbulence in the mesosphere, over low latitudes in India, using rocket-borne measurements and Indian MST radar, was conducted during July 2004. A rocket-borne Langmuir probe detected a spectrum of electron density irregularities, with scale sizes in the range of about 1 m to 1 km, in 67.5–78.0 km and 84–89 km altitude regions over a low latitude station Sriharikota (13.6° N, 80.2° E. A rocket-borne chaff experiment measured zonal and meridional winds about 30 min after the Langmuir probe flight. The MST radar located at Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E, which is about 100 km west of Sriharikota, also detected the presence of a strong scattering layer in 73.5–77.5 km region from which radar echoes corresponding to 3 m irregularities were received. Based on the region of occurrence of irregularities, which was highly collisional, presence of significant shears in zonal and meridional components of wind measured by the chaff experiment, 10 min periodicity in zonal and meridional winds obtained by the MST radar and the nature of wave number spectra of the irregularities, it is suggested that the observed irregularities were produced through the neutral turbulence mechanism. The percentage amplitude of fluctuations across the entire scale size range showed that the strength of turbulence was stronger in the lower altitude regions and decreased with increasing altitude. It was also found that the amplitude of fluctuations was large in regions of steeper electron density gradients. MST radar observations showed that at smaller scales of turbulence such as 3 m, (a the thickness of the turbulent layer was between 2 and 3 km and (b and fine structures, with layer thicknesses of about a km or less were also embedded in these layers. Rocket also detected 3-m fluctuations, which were very strong (a few percent in lower altitudes (67.5 to 71.0 km and small but clearly well above the noise floor at higher altitudes. Rocket and radar

  2. First mesospheric turbulence study using coordinated rocket and MST radar measurements over Indian low latitude region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, H.; Sinha, H.S.S.; Das, U.; Misra, R.N.; Das, S.R. [Physical Research Lab., Ahmedabad (India); Datta, J.; Chakravarty, S.C. [ISRO Headquarters, Bangalore (India); Patra, A.K.; Vekateswara Rao, N.; Narayana Rao, D. [National Atmospheric Research Lab., Tirupati (India)

    2008-07-01

    A campaign to study turbulence in the mesosphere, over low latitudes in India, using rocket-borne measurements and Indian MST radar, was conducted during July 2004. A rocket-borne Langmuir probe detected a spectrum of electron density irregularities, with scale sizes in the range of about 1 m to 1 km, in 67.5-78.0 km and 84-89 km altitude regions over a low latitude station Sriharikota (13.6 N, 80.2 E). A rocket-borne chaff experiment measured zonal and meridional winds about 30 min after the Langmuir probe flight. The MST radar located at Gadanki (13.5 N, 79.2 E), which is about 100 km west of Sriharikota, also detected the presence of a strong scattering layer in 73.5-77.5 km region from which radar echoes corresponding to 3 m irregularities were received. Based on the region of occurrence of irregularities, which was highly collisional, presence of significant shears in zonal and meridional components of wind measured by the chaff experiment, 10 min periodicity in zonal and meridional winds obtained by the MST radar and the nature of wave number spectra of the irregularities, it is suggested that the observed irregularities were produced through the neutral turbulence mechanism. The percentage amplitude of fluctuations across the entire scale size range showed that the strength of turbulence was stronger in the lower altitude regions and decreased with increasing altitude. It was also found that the amplitude of fluctuations was large in regions of steeper electron density gradients. MST radar observations showed that at smaller scales of turbulence such as 3 m, (a) the thickness of the turbulent layer was between 2 and 3 km and (b) and fine structures, with layer thicknesses of about a km or less were also embedded in these layers. Rocket also detected 3-m fluctuations, which were very strong (a few percent) in lower altitudes (67.5 to 71.0 km) and small but clearly well above the noise floor at higher altitudes. Rocket and radar results also point to the

  3. Seizure outcomes in non-resective epilepsy surgery: An update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englot, Dario J.; Birk, Harjus; Chang, Edward F.

    2016-01-01

    In approximately 30% of patients with epilepsy, seizures are refractory to medical therapy, leading to significant morbidity and increased mortality. Substantial evidence has demonstrated the benefit of surgical resection in patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsy, and in the present journal, we recently reviewed seizure outcomes in resective epilepsy surgery. However, not all patients are candidates for or amenable to open surgical resection for epilepsy. Fortunately, several non-resective surgical options are now available at various epilepsy centers, including novel therapies which have been pioneered in recent years. Ablative procedures such as stereotactic laser ablation and stereotactic radiosurgery offer minimally invasive alternatives to open surgery with relatively favorable seizure outcomes, particularly in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. For certain individuals who are not candidates for ablation or resection, palliative neuromodulation procedures such as vagus nerve stimulation, deep brain stimulation, or responsive neurostimulation may result in a significant decrease in seizure frequency and improved quality of life. Finally, disconnection procedures such as multiple subpial transections and corpus callosotomy continue to play a role in select patients with an eloquent epileptogenic zone or intractable atonic seizures, respectively. Overall, open surgical resection remains the gold standard treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy, although it is significantly under-utilized. While non-resective epilepsy procedures have not replaced the need for resection, there is hope that these additional surgical options will increase the number of patients who receive treatment for this devastating disorder - particularly individuals who are not candidates for or who have failed resection. PMID:27206422

  4. The prevalence of thyrotoxicosis-related seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tae-Jin; Kim, Sun-Jung; Kim, Gyu Sik; Choi, Young-Chul; Kim, Won-Joo

    2010-09-01

    Central nervous system dysfunction, such as hyperexcitation, irritability, and disturbance of consciousness, may occur in patients with thyrotoxicosis. There are also a few case reports of seizures attributed to thyrotoxicosis. The objective of the present study was to determine the prevalence of seizures that appeared to be related to the thyrotoxic state in patients with thyrotoxicosis. We retrospectively determined the prevalence and clinical features of seizures in 3382 patients with hyperthyroidism. Among patients with seizures, we excluded those with other causes of seizures or a history of epilepsy. We did not exclude two patients in whom later work-up showed an abnormal magnetic resonance imaging, as their seizures resolved after they became euthyroid. Among the 3382 patients with hyperthyroidism, there were seven patients (0.2%) with seizures who met our criteria. Primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures occurred in four patients (57%), complex partial seizures with secondary generalized tonic-clonic seizures occurred in two patients (29%), and one patient had a focal seizure (14%). The initial electroencephalography (EEG) was normal in two patients (29%), had generalized slow activity in four patients (57%), and had diffuse generalized beta activity in one patient (14%). On magnetic resonance imaging, one patient had diffuse brain atrophy, and one had an old basal ganglia infarct. After the patients became euthyroid, the EEG was repeated and was normal in all patients. During follow-up periods ranging from 18 to 24 months, none of the patients had seizures. Hyperthyroidism is the precipitating cause of seizures in a small percentage of these patients. In these patients, the prognosis is good if they become euthyroid. The prevalence of thyrotoxicosis-related seizures reported here can be used in conjunction with the prevalence of thyrotoxicosis in the population to estimate the prevalence of thyrotoxicosis-related seizures in populations.

  5. Pretreatment seizure semiology in childhood absence epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Sudha Kilaru; Shinnar, Shlomo; Cnaan, Avital; Dlugos, Dennis; Conry, Joan; Hirtz, Deborah G; Hu, Fengming; Liu, Chunyan; Mizrahi, Eli M; Moshé, Solomon L; Clark, Peggy; Glauser, Tracy A

    2017-08-15

    To determine seizure semiology in children with newly diagnosed childhood absence epilepsy and to evaluate associations with short-term treatment outcomes. For participants enrolled in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, comparative-effectiveness trial, semiologic features of pretreatment seizures were analyzed as predictors of treatment outcome at the week 16 to 20 visit. Video of 1,932 electrographic absence seizures from 416 participants was evaluated. Median seizure duration was 10.2 seconds; median time between electrographic seizure onset and clinical manifestation onset was 1.5 seconds. For individual seizures and by participant, the most common semiology features were pause/stare (seizure 95.5%, participant 99.3%), motor automatisms (60.6%, 86.1%), and eye involvement (54.9%, 76.5%). The interrater agreement for motor automatisms and eye involvement was good (72%-84%). Variability of semiology features between seizures even within participants was high. Clustering analyses revealed 4 patterns (involving the presence/absence of eye involvement and motor automatisms superimposed on the nearly ubiquitous pause/stare). Most participants experienced more than one seizure cluster pattern. No individual semiologic feature was individually predictive of short-term outcome. Seizure freedom was half as likely in participants with one or more seizure having the pattern of eye involvement without motor automatisms than in participants without this pattern. Almost all absence seizures are characterized by a pause in activity or staring, but rarely is this the only feature. Semiologic features tend to cluster, resulting in identifiable absence seizure subtypes with significant intraparticipant seizure phenomenologic heterogeneity. One seizure subtype, pause/stare and eye involvement but no motor automatisms, is specifically associated with a worse treatment outcome. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  6. Electroencephalography after a single unprovoked seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debicki, Derek B

    2017-07-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is an essential diagnostic tool in the evaluation of seizure disorders. In particular, EEG is used as an additional investigation for a single unprovoked seizure. Epileptiform abnormalities are related to seizure disorders and have been shown to predict recurrent unprovoked seizures (i.e., a clinical definition of epilepsy). Thus, the identification of epileptiform abnormalities after a single unprovoked seizure can inform treatment options. The current review addresses the relationship between EEG abnormalities and seizure recurrence. This review also addresses factors that are found to improve the yield of recording epileptiform abnormalities including timing of EEG relative to the new-onset seizure, use of repeat studies, use of sleep deprivation and prolonged recordings. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Frequency of seizures and epilepsy in neurological HIV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellinghaus, C; Engbring, C; Kovac, S; Möddel, G; Boesebeck, F; Fischera, M; Anneken, K; Klönne, K; Reichelt, D; Evers, S; Husstedt, I W

    2008-01-01

    Infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated both with infections of the central nervous system and with neurological deficits due to direct effects of the neurotropic virus. Seizures and epilepsy are not rare among HIV-infected patients. We investigated the frequency of acute seizures and epilepsy of patients in different stages of HIV infection. In addition, we compared the characteristics of patients who experienced provoked seizures only with those of patients who developed epilepsy. The database of the Department of Neurology, University of Münster, was searched for patients with HIV infection admitted between 1992 and 2004. Their charts were reviewed regarding all available sociodemographic, clinical, neurophysiological, imaging and laboratory data, therapy and outcome. Stage of infection according to the CDC classification and the epileptogenic zone were determined. Of 831 HIV-infected patients treated in our department, 51 (6.1%) had seizures or epilepsy. Three of the 51 patients (6%) were diagnosed with epilepsy before the onset of the HIV infection. Fourteen patients (27%) only had single or few provoked seizures in the setting of acute cerebral disorders (eight patients), drug withdrawal or sleep withdrawal (two patients), or of unknown cause (four patients). Thirty-four patients (67%) developed epilepsy in the course of their HIV infection. Toxoplasmosis (seven patients), progressive multifocal leukencephalopathy (seven patients) and other acute or subacute cerebral infections (five patients) were the most frequent causes of seizures. EEG data of 38 patients were available. EEG showed generalized and diffuse slowing only in 9 patients, regional slowing in 14 patients and regional slowing and epileptiform discharges in 1 patient. Only 14 of the patients had normal EEG. At the last contact, the majority of the patients (46 patients=90%) were on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Twenty-seven patients (53%) were on

  8. BRAVEMIND: Advancing the Virtual Iraq/Afghanistan PTSD Exposure Therapy for MST

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    including psychological history, suicidality , and alcohol/substance abuse/dependence, and ability to wear VR headset were briefly reviewed according to a...There were no significant differences between study completers and study non- completers on pre-treatment measures of PTSD and depression . See Table 1...participants in the VRET group would show statistically and clinically meaningful reductions in PTSD and depression (PCL-5, CAPS, PHQ-9 scores and

  9. Seizure characteristics of epilepsy in childhood after acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuji; Natsume, Jun; Kidokoro, Hiroyuki; Ishihara, Naoko; Azuma, Yoshiteru; Tsuji, Takeshi; Okumura, Akihisa; Kubota, Tetsuo; Ando, Naoki; Saitoh, Shinji; Miura, Kiyokuni; Negoro, Tamiko; Watanabe, Kazuyoshi; Kojima, Seiji

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify characteristics of post-encephalopathic epilepsy (PEE) in children after acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD), paying particular attention to precise diagnosis of seizure types. Among 262 children with acute encephalopathy/encephalitis registered in a database of the Tokai Pediatric Neurology Society between 2005 and 2012, 44 were diagnosed with AESD according to the clinical course and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and were included in this study. Medical records were reviewed to investigate clinical data, MRI findings, neurologic outcomes, and presence or absence of PEE. Seizure types of PEE were determined by both clinical observation by pediatric neurologists and ictal video-electroencephalography (EEG) recordings. Of the 44 patients after AESD, 10 (23%) had PEE. The period between the onset of encephalopathy and PEE ranged from 2 to 39 months (median 8.5 months). Cognitive impairment was more severe in patients with PEE than in those without. Biphasic seizures and status epilepticus during the acute phase of encephalopathy did not influence the risk of PEE. The most common seizure type of PEE on clinical observation was focal seizures (n = 5), followed by epileptic spasms (n = 4), myoclonic seizures (n = 3), and tonic seizures (n = 2). In six patients with PEE, seizures were induced by sudden unexpected sounds. Seizure types confirmed by ictal video-EEG recordings were epileptic spasms and focal seizures with frontal onset, and all focal seizures were startle seizures induced by sudden acoustic stimulation. Intractable daily seizures remain in six patients with PEE. We demonstrate seizure characteristics of PEE in children after AESD. Epileptic spasms and startle focal seizures are common seizure types. The specific seizure types may be determined by the pattern of diffuse subcortical white matter injury in AESD and age-dependent reorganization of the brain

  10. Diazepam prophylaxis of contrast media-induced seizures during computed tomography of patients with brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagani, J.J.; Hayman, L.A.; Bigelow, R.H.; Libshitz, H.I.; Lepke, R.A.; Wallace, S.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of 5 mg of intravenous diazepam (Valium) on contrast media-associated seizer incidence was studied in a randomized controlled trial involving 284 patients with known or suspected brain metastases undergoing cerebral computed tomography. Of these patients, 188 were found to have brain metastases, and it is estimated that for this subgroup prophylactic diazepam reduces the risk of contrast-assocated seizure by a factor of 0.26. Seizures occurred in three of 96 patients with metastases on diazepam and in 14 of 92 patients with metastases but without diazepam. Factors related to increased risk of contrast media-associated seizures are: (1) prior seizure history due to brain metatases and/or prior contrast, (2) progressive cerebral metastases, and (3) prior or concurrent brain antineoplastic therapy. Factors not related to an increased risk of these seizures are: (1) contrast media dosage, chemical composition, or osmolarity, (2) computed tomographic appearance of metastases, and (3) type of primary malignancy. Concomitant therapeutic levels of diphenylhydantoin (Dilantin) do not protect completely against contrast media-associated seizures. Pathophysiology of contrast media-associated seizures is discussed in view of the risk factors determined by this study

  11. Respiratory alkalosis in children with febrile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuchmann, Sebastian; Hauck, Sarah; Henning, Stephan; Grüters-Kieslich, Annette; Vanhatalo, Sampsa; Schmitz, Dietmar; Kaila, Kai

    2011-11-01

    Febrile seizures (FS) are the most common type of convulsive events in children. FS are suggested to result from a combination of genetic and environmental factors. However, the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying FS remain unclear. Using an animal model of experimental FS, it was demonstrated that hyperthermia causes respiratory alkalosis with consequent brain alkalosis and seizures. Here we examine the acid-base status of children who were admitted to the hospital for FS. Children who were admitted because of gastroenteritis (GE), a condition known to promote acidosis, were examined to investigate a possible protective effect of acidosis against FS. We enrolled 433 age-matched children with similar levels of fever from two groups presented to the emergency department. One group was admitted for FS (n = 213) and the other for GE (n = 220). In the FS group, the etiology of fever was respiratory tract infection (74.2%), otitis media (7%), GE (7%), tonsillitis (4.2%), scarlet fever (2.3%) chickenpox (1.4%), urinary tract infection (1.4%), postvaccination reaction (0.9%), or unidentified (1.4%). In all patients, capillary pH and blood Pco(2) were measured immediately on admission to the hospital. Respiratory alkalosis was found in children with FS (pH 7.46 ± 0.04, [mean ± standard deviation] Pco(2) 29.5 ± 5.5 mmHg), whereas a metabolic acidosis was seen in all children admitted for GE (pH 7.31 ± 0.03, Pco(2) 37.7 ± 4.3 mmHg; p respiratory alkalosis, irrespective of the severity of the underlying infection as indicated by the level of fever. The lack of FS in GE patients is attributable to low pH, which also explains the fact that children with a susceptibility to FS do not have seizures when they have GE-induced fever that is associated with acidosis. The present demonstration of a close link between FS and respiratory alkalosis may pave the way for further clinical studies and attempts to design novel therapies for the treatment of FS by controlling the

  12. Feasibility of recording high frequency oscillations with tripolar concentric ring electrodes during pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makeyev, Oleksandr; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Liling; Zhu, Zhenghan; Taveras, Aristides; Troiano, Derek; Medvedev, Andrei V; Besio, Walter G

    2012-01-01

    As epilepsy remains a refractory condition in about 30% of patients with complex partial seizures, electrical stimulation of the brain has recently shown potential for additive seizure control therapy. Previously, we applied noninvasive transcranial focal stimulation via novel tripolar concentric ring electrodes (TCREs) on the scalp of rats after inducing seizures with pentylenetetrazole (PTZ). We developed a close-loop system to detect seizures and automatically trigger the stimulation and evaluated its effect on the electrographic activity recorded by TCREs in rats. In our previous work the detectors of seizure onset were based on seizure-induced changes in signal power in the frequency range up to 100 Hz, while in this preliminary study we assess the feasibility of recording high frequency oscillations (HFOs) in the range up to 300 Hz noninvasively with scalp TCREs during PTZ-induced seizures. Grand average power spectral density estimate and generalized likelihood ratio tests were used to compare power of electrographic activity at different stages of seizure development in a group of rats (n= 8). The results suggest that TCREs have the ability to record HFOs from the scalp as well as that scalp-recorded HFOs can potentially be used as features for seizure onset detection.

  13. Occipital lobe seizures and epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adcock, Jane E; Panayiotopoulos, Chrysostomos P

    2012-10-01

    Occipital lobe epilepsies (OLEs) manifest with occipital seizures from an epileptic focus within the occipital lobes. Ictal clinical symptoms are mainly visual and oculomotor. Elementary visual hallucinations are common and characteristic. Postictal headache occurs in more than half of patients (epilepsy-migraine sequence). Electroencephalography (EEG) is of significant diagnostic value, but certain limitations should be recognized. Occipital spikes and/or occipital paroxysms either spontaneous or photically induced are the main interictal EEG abnormalities in idiopathic OLE. However, occipital epileptiform abnormalities may also occur without clinical relationship to seizures particularly in children. In cryptogenic/symptomatic OLE, unilateral posterior EEG slowing is more common than occipital spikes. In neurosurgical series of symptomatic OLE, interictal EEG abnormalities are rarely strictly occipital. The most common localization is in the posterior temporal regions and less than one-fifth show occipital spikes. In photosensitive OLE, intermittent photic stimulation elicits (1) spikes/polyspikes confined in the occipital regions or (2) generalized spikes/polyspikes with posterior emphasis. In ictal EEG, a well-localized unifocal rhythmic ictal discharge during occipital seizures is infrequent. A bioccipital field spread to the temporal regions is common. Frequency, severity, and response to treatment vary considerably from good to intractable and progressive mainly depending on underlying causes.

  14. Smartphone applications for seizure management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandher, Puneet Singh; Bhullar, Karamdeep Kaur

    2016-06-01

    Technological advancements continue to provide innovative ways of enhancing patient care in medicine. In particular, the growing popularity of smartphone technology has seen the recent emergence of a myriad of healthcare applications (or apps) that promise to help shape the way in which health information is delivered to people worldwide. While limited research already exists on a range of such apps, our study is the first to examine the salient features of smartphone applications as they apply to the area of seizure management. For the purposes of this review, we conducted a search of the official online application stores of the five major smartphone platforms: iPhone, Android, Blackberry, Windows Mobile and Nokia-Symbian. Apps were included if they reported to contain some information or tools relating to seizure management and excluded if they were aimed exclusively at health professionals. A total of 28 applications met these criteria. Overall, we found an increasing number of epilepsy apps available on the smartphone market, but with only a minority offering comprehensive educational information alongside tools such as seizure diaries, medication tracking and/or video recording. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Studying small molecule-aptamer interactions using MicroScale Thermophoresis (MST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entzian, Clemens; Schubert, Thomas

    2016-03-15

    Aptamers are potent and versatile binding molecules recognizing various classes of target molecules. Even challenging targets such as small molecules can be identified and bound by aptamers. Studying the interaction between aptamers and drugs, antibiotics or metabolites in detail is however difficult due to the lack of sophisticated analysis methods. Basic binding parameters of these small molecule-aptamer interactions such as binding affinity, stoichiometry and thermodynamics are elaborately to access using the state of the art technologies. The innovative MicroScale Thermophoresis (MST) is a novel, rapid and precise method to characterize these small molecule-aptamer interactions in solution at microliter scale. The technology is based on the movement of molecules through temperature gradients, a physical effect referred to as thermophoresis. The thermophoretic movement of a molecule depends - besides on its size - on charge and hydration shell. Upon the interaction of a small molecule and an aptamer, at least one of these parameters is altered, leading to a change in the movement behavior, which can be used to quantify molecular interactions independent of the size of the target molecule. The MST offers free choice of buffers, even measurements in complex bioliquids are possible. The dynamic affinity range covers the pM to mM range and is therefore perfectly suited to analyze small molecule-aptamer interactions. This section describes a protocol how quantitative binding parameters for aptamer-small molecule interactions can be obtained by MST. This is demonstrated by mapping down the binding site of the well-known ATP aptamer DH25.42 to a specific region at the adenine of the ATP molecule. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Fluctuation reduction and enhanced confinement in the MST reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, B.E.

    1997-10-01

    Plasmas with a factor of ≥3 improvement in energy confinement have been achieved in the MST reversed-field pinch (RFP). These plasmas occur spontaneously, following sawtooth crashes, subject to constraints on, eg, toroidal magnetic field reversal and wall conditioning. Possible contributors to the improved confinement include a reduction of core-resonant, global magnetic fluctuations and a reduction of electrostatic fluctuations over the entire plasma edge. One feature of these plasmas is a region of strong ExB flow shear in the edge. Never before observed in conjunction with enhanced confinement in the RFP, such shear is common in enhanced confinement discharges in tokamaks and stellarators. Another feature of these plasmas is a new type of discrete dynamo event. Like sawtooth crashes, a common form of discrete dynamo, these events correspond to bursts of edge parallel current. The reduction of electrostatic fluctuations in these plasmas occurs within and beyond the region of strong ExB flow shear, similar to what is observed in tokamaks and stellarators. However, the reductions in the MST include fluctuations whose correlation lengths are larger than the width of the shear region. The reduction of the global magnetic fluctuations is most likely due to flattening of the μ=μ 0 rvec J· rvec B/B 2 profile. Flattening can occur, eg, due to the new type of discrete dynamo event and reduced edge resistivity. Enhanced confinement plasmas are also achieved in the MST when auxiliary current is applied to flatten the μ profile and reduce magnetic fluctuations. Unexpectedly, these plasmas also exhibit a region (broader than in the case above) of strong ExB flow shear in the edge, an edge-wide reduction of electrostatic fluctuations, and the new type of discrete dynamo event. Auxiliary current drive has historically been viewed as the principal route to fusion reactor viability for the RFP

  17. Neonatal Seizure Models to Study Epileptogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuka Kasahara

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Current therapeutic strategies for epilepsy include anti-epileptic drugs and surgical treatments that are mainly focused on the suppression of existing seizures rather than the occurrence of the first spontaneous seizure. These symptomatic treatments help a certain proportion of patients, but these strategies are not intended to clarify the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the primary process of epilepsy development, i.e., epileptogenesis. Epileptogenic changes include reorganization of neural and glial circuits, resulting in the formation of an epileptogenic focus. To achieve the goal of developing “anti-epileptogenic” drugs, we need to clarify the step-by-step mechanisms underlying epileptogenesis for patients whose seizures are not controllable with existing “anti-epileptic” drugs. Epileptogenesis has been studied using animal models of neonatal seizures because such models are useful for studying the latent period before the occurrence of spontaneous seizures and the lowering of the seizure threshold. Further, neonatal seizure models are generally easy to handle and can be applied for in vitro studies because cells in the neonatal brain are suitable for culture. Here, we review two animal models of neonatal seizures for studying epileptogenesis and discuss their features, specifically focusing on hypoxia-ischemia (HI-induced seizures and febrile seizures (FSs. Studying these models will contribute to identifying the potential therapeutic targets and biomarkers of epileptogenesis.

  18. An overview of data acquisition, signal coding and data analysis techniques for MST radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, P. K.

    1986-01-01

    An overview is given of the data acquisition, signal processing, and data analysis techniques that are currently in use with high power MST/ST (mesosphere stratosphere troposphere/stratosphere troposphere) radars. This review supplements the works of Rastogi (1983) and Farley (1984) presented at previous MAP workshops. A general description is given of data acquisition and signal processing operations and they are characterized on the basis of their disparate time scales. Then signal coding, a brief description of frequently used codes, and their limitations are discussed, and finally, several aspects of statistical data processing such as signal statistics, power spectrum and autocovariance analysis, outlier removal techniques are discussed.

  19. (Re politicizing the concept of gender: the political participation of the women in the MST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Gonçalves

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article we examine the complex and contradictory construction of the Gender Sector as a part of the organizational structure of the Movement of Landless Rural Workers (MST. The background is formed by the tensions surrounding the political participation of women in the struggle for land, in which the initial emphasis given to the category woman is substituted by the concept of gender. More than a simple alteration in terminology, this change involves the challenge of understanding theoretically and constructing in political practice new gender relations.

  20. Analysis of the water dynamics for the MSE-COIL and theMST-COIL

    CERN Document Server

    Massidda, L; Kadi, Y; Balhan, B

    2005-01-01

    In this report, we present the technical specification for the numerical model and the study of the acoustic wave propagation in the water tubes of the extraction septum magnet (MSE) and the thin magnetic septum (MST) in the event of an asynchronous firing of the extraction kickers (MKE). The deposited energy densities, estimated by the high-energy particle transport code FLUKA, were converted to internal heat generation rates according to the time dependence of the extracted beam. The transient response to this thermal load was obtained by simulating power deposition and acoustic wave propagation by the spectral-element code ELSE.

  1. A brief history of the development of wind-profiling or MST radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Van Zandt

    Full Text Available The history of the development of the wind-profiling or MST radar technique is reviewed from its inception in the late 1960s to the present. Extensions of the technique by the development of boundary-layer radars and the radio-acoustic sounding system (RASS technique to measure temperature are documented. Applications are described briefly, particularly practical applications to weather forecasting, with data from networks of radars, and scientific applications to the study of rapidly varying atmospheric phenomena such as gravity waves and turbulence.

    Key words: Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (instruments and techniques · Radio science (remote sensing; instruments and techniques

  2. A brief history of the development of wind-profiling or MST radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Van Zandt

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available The history of the development of the wind-profiling or MST radar technique is reviewed from its inception in the late 1960s to the present. Extensions of the technique by the development of boundary-layer radars and the radio-acoustic sounding system (RASS technique to measure temperature are documented. Applications are described briefly, particularly practical applications to weather forecasting, with data from networks of radars, and scientific applications to the study of rapidly varying atmospheric phenomena such as gravity waves and turbulence.Key words: Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (instruments and techniques · Radio science (remote sensing; instruments and techniques

  3. Magnetic fluctuation induced transport and edge dynamo measurements in the MST reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hokin, S.; Fiksel, G.; Ji, H.

    1994-09-01

    Probe measurements in MST indicate that RFP particle and energy loss is governed by magnetic fluctuations inside r/a = 0.8, with energy carried out convectively by superthermal electrons. The radial loss rate is lower than the Rechester-Rosenbluth level, presumably due to the establishment of a restraining ambipolar potential. Several aspects of these measurements contradict the Kinetic Dynamo Theory, while the MHD dynamo EMF is measured to be large enough to drive the edge current carried by these superthermal electrons

  4. Stimulation of the nervous system for the management of seizures: current and future developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jerome V; Patil, Arunangelo

    2003-01-01

    Vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) for the treatment of refractory epilepsy appears to have started from the theory that since VNS can alter the EEG, it may influence epilepsy. It proved effective in several models of epilepsy and was then tried in short-term, open-label and double-blind trials, leading to approval in Canada, Europe and the US. Follow-up observations in these patients demonstrated continued improvement in seizure control for up to 2 years. Close to 50% of treated patients have achieved at least a 50% reduction in seizure frequency. This therapy was also useful as rescue therapy for ongoing seizures in some patients; many patients are more alert. The initial trials were completed in patients >/=12 years of age with refractory partial seizures. Subsequently, similar benefits were shown in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, hypothalamic hamartomas and primary generalised seizures. Implanting the generator and leads is technically easy, and complications are few. The method of action is largely unknown, although VNS appears to alter metabolic activity in specific brain nuclei. Considering that improvement in mood is frequently found in patients using VNS, it has undergone trials in patients with depression. Other illnesses deserving exploration with this unusual therapy are Alzheimer's disease and autism. Some aspects of VNS have proven disappointing. Although patients have fewer seizures, the number of antiepileptic drugs they take is not significantly reduced. In addition, there is no way to accurately predict the end of life of the generator. Optimal stimulation parameters, if they exist, are unknown. Deep brain stimulation is a new method for controlling medically refractory seizures. It is based on the observation that thalamic stimulation can influence the EEG over a wide area. Several thalamic nuclei have been the object of stimulation in different groups of patients. Intraoperative brain imaging is essential for

  5. The involvement of audio-motor coupling in the music-supported therapy applied to stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Fornells, Antoni; Rojo, Nuria; Amengual, Julià L; Ripollés, Pablo; Altenmüller, Eckart; Münte, Thomas F

    2012-04-01

    Music-supported therapy (MST) has been developed recently to improve the use of the affected upper extremity after stroke. MST uses musical instruments, an electronic piano and an electronic drum set emitting piano sounds, to retrain fine and gross movements of the paretic upper extremity. In this paper, we first describe the rationale underlying MST, and we review the previous studies conducted on acute and chronic stroke patients using this new neurorehabilitation approach. Second, we address the neural mechanisms involved in the motor movement improvements observed in acute and chronic stroke patients. Third, we provide some recent studies on the involvement of auditory-motor coupling in the MST in chronic stroke patients using functional neuroimaging. Finally, these ideas are discussed and focused on understanding the dynamics involved in the neural circuit underlying audio-motor coupling and how functional connectivity could help to explain the neuroplastic changes observed after therapy in stroke patients. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  6. Channel selection for automatic seizure detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duun-Henriksen, Jonas; Kjaer, Troels Wesenberg; Madsen, Rasmus Elsborg

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the performance of epileptic seizure detection using only a few of the recorded EEG channels and the ability of software to select these channels compared with a neurophysiologist. Methods: Fifty-nine seizures and 1419 h of interictal EEG are used for training and testing...... of an automatic channel selection method. The characteristics of the seizures are extracted by the use of a wavelet analysis and classified by a support vector machine. The best channel selection method is based upon maximum variance during the seizure. Results: Using only three channels, a seizure detection...... sensitivity of 96% and a false detection rate of 0.14/h were obtained. This corresponds to the performance obtained when channels are selected through visual inspection by a clinical neurophysiologist, and constitutes a 4% improvement in sensitivity compared to seizure detection using channels recorded...

  7. Epidemiology of early stages of epilepsy: Risk of seizure recurrence after a first seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Syed; Ladino, Lady Diana; Hernandez-Ronquillo, Lizbeth; Téllez-Zenteno, José F

    2017-07-01

    A single unprovoked seizure is a frequent phenomenon in the general population and the rate of seizure recurrence can vary widely. Individual risk prognostication is crucial in predicting patient outcomes and guiding treatment decisions. In this article, we review the most important risk factors associated with an increased likelihood of seizure recurrence after a single unprovoked seizure. In summary, the presence of focal seizure, nocturnal seizure, history of prior brain injury, family history of epilepsy, abnormal neurological exam, epileptiform discharges on electroencephalography and neuroimaging abnormalities, portend increased risk of seizure recurrence. Elucidation of these risk factors in patient assessment will augment clinical decision-making and may help determine the appropriateness of instituting anti-epilepsy treatment. We also discuss the Canadian model of single seizure clinics and the potential use to assess these patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Seizure Recognition and Observation: A Guide for Allied Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epilepsy Foundation of America, Landover, MD.

    Intended for allied health professionals, this guide provides information on seizure recognition and classification to help them assist the patient, the family, and the treating physician in obtaining control of epileptic seizures. A section on seizure recognition describes epilepsy and seizures, covering seizure classification and the causes of…

  9. 19 CFR 162.22 - Seizure of conveyances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seizure of conveyances. 162.22 Section 162.22... TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Seizures § 162.22 Seizure of conveyances. (a) General applicability. If it shall appear to any officer authorized to board conveyances and make seizures that there...

  10. SEIZURE PREDICTION: THE FOURTH INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaveri, Hitten P.; Frei, Mark G.; Arthurs, Susan; Osorio, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    The recently convened Fourth International Workshop on Seizure Prediction (IWSP4) brought together a diverse international group of investigators, from academia and industry, including epileptologists, neurosurgeons, neuroscientists, computer scientists, engineers, physicists, and mathematicians who are conducting interdisciplinary research on the prediction and control of seizures. IWSP4 allowed the presentation and discussion of results, an exchange of ideas, an assessment of the status of seizure prediction, control and related fields and the fostering of collaborative projects. PMID:20674508

  11. The impact of antidepressants on seizure frequency and depressive and anxiety disorders of patients with epilepsy: Is it worth investigating?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribot, Ramses; Ouyang, Bichun; Kanner, Andres M

    2017-05-01

    Depression and anxiety disorders in patients with epilepsy (PWE) remain under-recognized and under-treated, despite being the most common psychiatric co-morbidities. Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) are considered first-line treatment for primary depression and anxiety disorders. We performed this study to investigate if SSRIs and SNRIs could affect the seizure frequency of PWE and to assess whether such effect is independent of the response of the mood and anxiety disorders to these drugs. This was a retrospective study of 100 consecutive PWE who were started on an SSRI or SNRI for the treatment of a depressive and/or anxiety disorder. Every patient underwent a psychiatric evaluation by one of the investigators using a semi-structured interview who also managed the pharmacologic treatment in all the patients. Patients were excluded if they had a diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures or if they had undergone epilepsy surgery or the implant of the vagal nerve stimulator six months before and after the start of the antidepressant therapy. The final analysis was conducted in 84 patients. For each type of seizure, an average and maximal monthly seizure frequency during the six months preceding and following the start of psychotropic drugs was extracted from the medical records. We identified the number of patients whose seizure frequency during treatment with antidepressants: (i) shifted from a seizure/month and vice-versa, (ii) increased beyond maximal/monthly baseline frequency, and (iii) patients who developed de-novo generalized tonic-clonic (GTC) seizures. None of the patients with a baseline seizure frequency seizure/month went on to have ≥1seizure/month after initiating treatment with antidepressants, had an increase in frequency beyond baseline maximal counts or developed de-novo-GTC seizures. Furthermore, there was no seizure recurrence among patients that had been seizure

  12. Genetics Home Reference: benign familial neonatal seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: Epilepsy Educational Resources (7 links) Boston Children's Hospital: My Child Has...Seizures and Epilepsy Centers ...

  13. Prediction Models for Plutonium, Strontium, Uranium and Neptunium Loading onto Monosodium Titanate (MST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fondeur, F. F.; Hobbs, D. T.; Barnes, M. J.; Peters, T. B.; Fink, S. D.

    2005-01-01

    The DA isotherm parameters for U, Pu, Sr and Np have been updated to include additional data obtained since the original derivation. The DA isotherms were modified to include a kinetic function derived by Rahn to describe sorbate loading from the beginning of sorption up to equilibrium. The final functions describe both kinetic and thermodynamic sorption. We selected the Rahn function to describe radionuclide sorption because it originates from diffusion and absorption controlled sorption. An investigation of the thermal behavior of radionuclide sorption on MST as shown by this data revealed the sorption process is diffusion (or transport) controlled (in solution). Transport in solution can in theory be accelerated by vigorous mixing but the range of available mixing speed in the facility design will probably not be sufficient to markedly increase radionuclide sorption rate on MST from diffusion-controlled sorption. The laboratory studies included mixing energies hydraulically-scaled to match those of the Actinide Removal Process and these likely approximate the range of energies available in the Salt Waste Processing Facility

  14. First Absolutely Calibrated Localized Measurements of Ion Velocity in the MST in Locked and Rotating Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltzer, M.; Craig, D.; den Hartog, D. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Munaretto, S.

    2015-11-01

    An Ion Doppler Spectrometer (IDS) is used on MST for high time-resolution passive and active measurements of impurity ion emission. Absolutely calibrated measurements of flow are difficult because the spectrometer records data within 0.3 nm of the C+5 line of interest, and commercial calibration lamps do not produce lines in this narrow range . A novel optical system was designed to absolutely calibrate the IDS. The device uses an UV LED to produce a broad emission curve in the desired region. A Fabry-Perot etalon filters this light, cutting transmittance peaks into the pattern of the LED emission. An optical train of fused silica lenses focuses the light into the IDS with f/4. A holographic diffuser blurs the light cone to increase homogeneity. Using this light source, the absolute Doppler shift of ion emissions can be measured in MST plasmas. In combination with charge exchange recombination spectroscopy, localized ion velocities can now be measured. Previously, a time-averaged measurement along the chord bisecting the poloidal plane was used to calibrate the IDS; the quality of these central chord calibrations can be characterized with our absolute calibration. Calibration errors may also be quantified and minimized by optimizing the curve-fitting process. Preliminary measurements of toroidal velocity in locked and rotating plasmas will be shown. This work has been supported by the US DOE.

  15. Development of radio acoustic sounding system (RASS with Gadanki MST radar – first results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Tsuda

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A high-power acoustic exciter was designed and developed for the Gadanki MST Radar to facilitate observations in the Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS mode. Sweep range of acoustic signal frequencies was set to 94–125 Hz so as to satisfy Bragg matching condition for temperature range of −90°–40°C between surface and the tropopause (about 17 km. Raytracing of acoustic wave propagation was used to predict the antenna beam directions along which optimum RASS echoes could be obtained. During the RASS observation period of about 18 h on 23–24 July 2006 height profiles of atmospheric virtual temperature were obtained between 1.5 km and 10 km and occasionally up to 14 km. In comparison with the three simultaneous radiosonde launches, RASS derived temperature profiles had the r.m.s. discrepancy of about 1 K, although deviation of the RASS results sometimes appeared when the radial wind velocity was not fully available for the correction of apparent sound speed. This study has successfully demonstrated capability of the RASS application with the Gadanki MST radar, which will be used for continuous monitoring of the temperature profiles in the troposphere and lower stratosphere region in the tropics.

  16. Absolute brightness modeling for improved measurement of electron temperature from soft x-rays on MST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reusch, L. M.; Franz, P.; Goetz, J. A.; den Hartog, D. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; van Meter, P.

    2017-10-01

    The two-color soft x-ray tomography (SXT) diagnostic on MST is now capable of Te measurement down to 500 eV. The previous lower limit was 1 keV, due to the presence of SXR emission lines from Al sputtered from the MST wall. The two-color technique uses two filters of different thickness to form a coarse spectrometer to estimate the slope of the continuum x-ray spectrum, which depends on Te. The 1.6 - 2.0 keV Al emission lines were previously filtered out by using thick Be filters (400 µm and 800 µm), thus restricting the range of the SXT diagnostic to Te >= 1 keV. Absolute brightness modeling explicitly includes several sources of radiation in the analysis model, enabling the use of thinner filters and measurement of much lower Te. Models based on the atomic database and analysis structure (ADAS) agree very well with our experimental SXR measurements. We used ADAS to assess the effect of bremsstrahlung, recombination, dielectronic recombination, and line emission on the inferred Te. This assessment informed the choice of the optimum filter pair to extend the Te range of the SXT diagnostic. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences program under Award Numbers DE-FC02-05ER54814 and DE-SC0015474.

  17. Molecular cloning, functional characterization and expression analysis of a novel monosaccharide transporter gene OsMST6 from rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Y.; Xiao, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Chai, C.; Wei, G.; Wei, X.; Xu, H.; Wang, M.; Ouwerkerk, P.B.F.; Zhu, Z.

    2008-01-01

    Monosaccharides transporters play important roles in assimilate supply for sink tissue development. In this study, a new monosaccharide transporter gene OsMST6 was identified from rice (Oryza sativa L.). The predicted OsMST6 protein shows typical features of sugar transporters and shares 79.6%

  18. Deep Recurrent Neural Networks for seizure detection and early seizure detection systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talathi, S. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-06-05

    Epilepsy is common neurological diseases, affecting about 0.6-0.8 % of world population. Epileptic patients suffer from chronic unprovoked seizures, which can result in broad spectrum of debilitating medical and social consequences. Since seizures, in general, occur infrequently and are unpredictable, automated seizure detection systems are recommended to screen for seizures during long-term electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings. In addition, systems for early seizure detection can lead to the development of new types of intervention systems that are designed to control or shorten the duration of seizure events. In this article, we investigate the utility of recurrent neural networks (RNNs) in designing seizure detection and early seizure detection systems. We propose a deep learning framework via the use of Gated Recurrent Unit (GRU) RNNs for seizure detection. We use publicly available data in order to evaluate our method and demonstrate very promising evaluation results with overall accuracy close to 100 %. We also systematically investigate the application of our method for early seizure warning systems. Our method can detect about 98% of seizure events within the first 5 seconds of the overall epileptic seizure duration.

  19. Multiple sensor integration for seizure onset detection in human patients comparing conventional disc versus novel tripolar concentric ring electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makeyev, Oleksandr; Ding, Quan; Martínez-Juárez, Iris E; Gaitanis, John; Kay, Steven M; Besio, Walter G

    2013-01-01

    As epilepsy affects approximately one percent of the world population, electrical stimulation of the brain has recently shown potential for additive seizure control therapy. Closed-loop systems that apply electrical stimulation when seizure onset is automatically detected require high accuracy of automatic seizure detection based on electrographic brain activity. To improve this accuracy we propose to use noninvasive tripolar concentric ring electrodes that have been shown to have significantly better signal-to-noise ratio, spatial selectivity, and mutual information compared to conventional disc electrodes. The proposed detection methodology is based on integration of multiple sensors using exponentially embedded family (EEF). In this preliminary study it is validated on over 26.3 hours of data collected using both tripolar concentric ring and conventional disc electrodes concurrently each from 7 human patients with epilepsy including five seizures. For a cross-validation based group model EEF correctly detected 100% and 80% of seizures respectively with tripolar concentric ring electrodes.

  20. Adeno-associated viral vector-induced overexpression of neuropeptide Y Y2 receptors in the hippocampus suppresses seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woldbye, David Paul Drucker; Ängehagen, Mikael; Gøtzsche, Casper René

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy using recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors overexpressing neuropeptide Y in the hippocampus exerts seizure-suppressant effects in rodent epilepsy models and is currently considered for clinical application in patients with intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Seizure...... recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors. In two temporal lobe epilepsy models, electrical kindling and kainate-induced seizures, vector-based transduction of Y2 receptor complementary DNA in the hippocampus of adult rats exerted seizure-suppressant effects. Simultaneous overexpression of Y2...... and neuropeptide Y had a more pronounced seizure-suppressant effect. These results demonstrate that overexpression of Y2 receptors (alone or in combination with neuropeptide Y) could be an alternative strategy for epilepsy treatment....

  1. Seizure semiology identifies patients with bilateral temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loesch, Anna Mira; Feddersen, Berend; Tezer, F Irsel; Hartl, Elisabeth; Rémi, Jan; Vollmar, Christian; Noachtar, Soheyl

    2015-01-01

    Laterality in temporal lobe epilepsy is usually defined by EEG and imaging results. We investigated whether the analysis of seizure semiology including lateralizing seizure phenomena identifies bilateral independent temporal lobe seizure onset. We investigated the seizure semiology in 17 patients in whom invasive EEG-video-monitoring documented bilateral temporal seizure onset. The results were compared to 20 left and 20 right consecutive temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients who were seizure free after anterior temporal lobe resection. The seizure semiology was analyzed using the semiological seizure classification with particular emphasis on the sequence of seizure phenomena over time and lateralizing seizure phenomena. Statistical analysis included chi-square test or Fisher's exact test. Bitemporal lobe epilepsy patients had more frequently different seizure semiology (100% vs. 40%; p<0.001) and significantly more often lateralizing seizure phenomena pointing to bilateral seizure onset compared to patients with unilateral TLE (67% vs. 11%; p<0.001). The sensitivity of identical vs. different seizure semiology for the identification of bilateral TLE was high (100%) with a specificity of 60%. Lateralizing seizure phenomena had a low sensitivity (59%) but a high specificity (89%). The combination of lateralizing seizure phenomena and different seizure semiology showed a high specificity (94%) but a low sensitivity (59%). The analysis of seizure semiology including lateralizing seizure phenomena adds important clinical information to identify patients with bilateral TLE. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Anti-Seizure Medications: Relief from Nerve Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anti-seizure medications: Relief from nerve pain Anti-seizure drugs often are used to help control the type of ... by damaged nerves. By Mayo Clinic Staff Anti-seizure medications were originally designed to treat people with ...

  3. Complex partial seizures: cerebellar metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodore, W.H.; Fishbein, D.; Deitz, M.; Baldwin, P.

    1987-07-01

    We used positron emission tomography (PET) with (/sup 18/F)2-deoxyglucose to study cerebellar glucose metabolism (LCMRglu) and the effect of phenytoin (PHT) in 42 patients with complex partial seizures (CPS), and 12 normal controls. Mean +/- SD patient LCMRglu was 6.9 +/- 1.8 mg glucose/100 g/min (left = right), significantly lower than control values of 8.5 +/- 1.8 (left, p less than 0.006), and 8.3 +/- 1.6 (right, p less than 0.02). Only four patients had cerebellar atrophy on CT/MRI; cerebellar LCMRglu in these was 5.5 +/- 1.5 (p = 0.054 vs. total patient sample). Patients with unilateral temporal hypometabolism or EEG foci did not have lateralized cerebellar hypometabolism. Patients receiving phenytoin (PHT) at the time of scan and patients with less than 5 years total PHT exposure had lower LCMRglu, but the differences were not significant. There were weak inverse correlations between PHT level and cerebellar LCMRglu in patients receiving PHT (r = -0.36; 0.05 less than p less than 0.1), as well as between length of illness and LCMRglu (r = -0.22; 0.05 less than p less than 0.1). Patients with complex partial seizures have cerebellar hypometabolism that is bilateral and due only in part to the effect of PHT.

  4. Seizure Disorders: A Review for School Psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Henry T.; Barrett, Rowland P.

    1995-01-01

    Recognizing possible seizure disorders, medication side-effects, behavioral and cognitive effects of seizures, and their treatments are important skills for school psychologists because they affect 500,000 United States school-aged children attending regular education. A knowledgeable school professional serves a critical role in integrating…

  5. A Neonate with persistent hypoglycemia and seizures.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBY

    disorder was diagnosed and managed with limited success as the episodes hydroglycemic seizures persisted. ... the presence of hyperinsulinemia as the cause of the hypoglycemic dependent seizures. Case Presentation. A three day old girl was admitted to the neonatal .... the Prader-Willi syndrome, has been reported.

  6. 43 CFR 3.16 - Seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Seizure. 3.16 Section 3.16 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior PRESERVATION OF AMERICAN ANTIQUITIES § 3.16 Seizure. Any object of antiquity taken, or collection made, on lands owned or controlled by the United States, without...

  7. Effect of Seizure Clustering on Epilepsy Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A prospective, long-term population-based study was performed to determine whether seizure clustering (3 or more afebrile seizures during a 24 hour period is associated with drug resistance and increased mortality in childhood-onset epilepsy, in a study at University of Turku, Finland, and the Epilepsy Research Group, Berlin, Germany.

  8. Orgasm Induced Seizures: A Rare Phenomenon

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    testing of the brain revealed no structural abnormality. His blood examination findings were ... A variety of stimuli can cause reflex seizures, Some triggers include light, music and cognitive phenomenon. There are case reports ... seizures cause great personal distress and significantly affect marital relationships. Though ...

  9. Noninvasive transcranial focal stimulation via tripolar concentric ring electrodes lessens behavioral seizure activity of recurrent pentylenetetrazole administrations in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makeyev, Oleksandr; Luna-Munguía, Hiram; Rogel-Salazar, Gabriela; Liu, Xiang; Besio, Walter G

    2013-05-01

    Epilepsy affects approximately 1% of the world population. Antiepileptic drugs are ineffective in approximately 30% of patients and have side effects. We have been developing a noninvasive transcranial focal electrical stimulation with our novel tripolar concentric ring electrodes as an alternative/complementary therapy for seizure control. In this study we demonstrate the effect of focal stimulation on behavioral seizure activity induced by two successive pentylenetetrazole administrations in rats. Seizure onset latency, time of the first behavioral change, duration of seizure, and maximal seizure severity score were studied and compared for focal stimulation treated (n = 9) and control groups (n = 10). First, we demonstrate that no significant difference was found in behavioral activity for focal stimulation treated and control groups after the first pentylenetetrazole administration. Next, comparing first and second pentylenetetrazole administrations, we demonstrate there was a significant change in behavioral activity (time of the first behavioral change) in both groups that was not related to focal stimulation. Finally, we demonstrate focal stimulation provoking a significant change in seizure onset latency, duration of seizure, and maximal seizure severity score. We believe that these results, combined with our previous reports, suggest that transcranial focal stimulation may have an anticonvulsant effect.

  10. Seizure phenotypes, periodicity, and sleep-wake pattern of seizures in Kcna-1 null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Samantha; Wallace, Eli; Hwang, Youngdeok; Maganti, Rama

    2016-02-01

    This study was undertaken to describe seizure phenotypes, natural progression, sleep-wake patterns, as well as periodicity of seizures in Kcna-1 null mutant mice. These mice were implanted with epidural electroencephalography (EEG) and electromyography (EMG) electrodes, and simultaneous video-EEG recordings were obtained while animals were individually housed under either diurnal (LD) condition or constant darkness (DD) over ten days of recording. The video-EEG data were analyzed to identify electrographic and behavioral phenotypes and natural progression and to examine the periodicity of seizures. Sleep-wake patterns were analyzed to understand the distribution and onset of seizures across the sleep-wake cycle. Four electrographically and behaviorally distinct seizure types were observed. Regardless of lighting condition that animals were housed in, Kcna-1 null mice initially expressed only a few of the most severe seizure types that progressively increased in frequency and decreased in seizure severity. In addition, a circadian periodicity was noted, with seizures peaking in the first 12h of the Zeitgeber time (ZT) cycle, regardless of lighting conditions. Interestingly, seizure onset differed between lighting conditions where more seizures arose out of sleep in LD conditions, whereas under DD conditions, the majority occurred out of the wakeful state. We suggest that this model be used to understand the circadian pattern of seizures as well as the pathophysiological implications of sleep and circadian disturbances in limbic epilepsies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Source and sink nodes in absence seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Abner C; Machado, Birajara S; Caboclo, Luis Otavio S F; Fujita, Andre; Baccala, Luiz A; Sameshima, Koichi

    2016-08-01

    As opposed to focal epilepsy, absence seizures do not exhibit a clear seizure onset zone or focus since its ictal activity rapidly engages both brain hemispheres. Yet recent graph theoretical analysis applied to absence seizures EEG suggests the cortical focal presence, an unexpected feature for this type of epilepsy. In this study, we explore the characteristics of absence seizure by classifying the nodes as to their source/sink natures via weighted directed graph analysis based on connectivity direction and strength estimation using information partial directed coherence (iPDC). By segmenting the EEG signals into relatively short 5-sec-long time windows we studied the evolution of coupling strengths from both sink and source nodes, and the network dynamics of absence seizures in eight patients.

  12. Febrile seizures and risk of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mogens; Pedersen, Carsten Bøcker; Christensen, Jakob

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Febrile seizure is a benign condition for most children, but experiments in animals and neuroimaging studies in humans suggest that some febrile seizures may damage the hippocampus, a brain area of possible importance in schizophrenia. METHODS: A population-based cohort of all children...... with schizophrenia. A history of febrile seizures was associated with a 44% increased risk of schizophrenia [relative risk (RR)=1.44; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.07-1.95] after adjusting for confounding factors. The association between febrile seizures and schizophrenia remained virtually unchanged when...... restricting the analyses to people with no history of epilepsy. A history of both febrile seizures and epilepsy was associated with a 204% increased risk of schizophrenia (RR=3.04; 95% CI, 1.36-6.79) as compared with people with no such history. CONCLUSIONS: We found a slightly increased risk of schizophrenia...

  13. Seizure-Induced Oxidative Stress in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreekanth Puttachary

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An insult to the brain (such as the first seizure causes excitotoxicity, neuroinflammation, and production of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS. ROS and RNS produced during status epilepticus (SE overwhelm the mitochondrial natural antioxidant defense mechanism. This leads to mitochondrial dysfunction and damage to the mitochondrial DNA. This in turn affects synthesis of various enzyme complexes that are involved in electron transport chain. Resultant effects that occur during epileptogenesis include lipid peroxidation, reactive gliosis, hippocampal neurodegeneration, reorganization of neural networks, and hypersynchronicity. These factors predispose the brain to spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS, which ultimately establish into temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. This review discusses some of these issues. Though antiepileptic drugs (AEDs are beneficial to control/suppress seizures, their long term usage has been shown to increase ROS/RNS in animal models and human patients. In established TLE, ROS/RNS are shown to be harmful as they can increase the susceptibility to SRS. Further, in this paper, we review briefly the data from animal models and human TLE patients on the adverse effects of antiepileptic medications and the plausible ameliorating effects of antioxidants as an adjunct therapy.

  14. Audit on first seizure presentation to Taranaki Base Hospital: a secondary centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, Sean; Kumar, Rajesh

    2017-11-10

    Management of first seizure should be based on treating the underlying cause and tailoring investigations to identify those patients at high risk of recurrence. To establish the incidence of first seizure presentation to Taranaki Base Hospital and investigate the management of these patients. A retrospective audit was performed identifying patients presenting to Taranaki Base Hospital from 1 January 2015 to 31 December 2015 with a first seizure. Thirty-seven patients presented with their first seizure with 50% found to have an easily reversible precipitant. Forty-three percent had a history of previous brain insult and 52% had an abnormality identified on neuroimaging. Only 14% received formal neurology follow-up and only 8% had electroencephalography. Forty-three percent received chronic antiepileptic drug therapy and 27% had a recurrent seizure within 12 months. Only 43% had documented driving advice. The incidence of first seizure presentation to Taranaki Base Hospital is similar to worldwide data. In general, patients receive basic investigations in keeping with international guidelines. This audit has helped to identify a number of areas to address with the current service provision, including ways to improve access to important investigations and ways to develop a guideline to standardise care.

  15. MST 1: Proceedings of a conference on the integration of mathematics, science and technology in precollege education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swyler, K. [ed.

    1995-11-01

    Example MST activities examined here show: (1) an inquiry-driven learning stimulus, involving (2) the synthesis of concepts in math, science and technology, through (3) the application of the scientific method and engineering problem solving/test protocols, and provoking (4) a stimulus for further exploration. A semi-exploratory learning approach offered background aimed at enabling participants to take meaningful courses of investigation; this approach must be balanced by maintaining contact with framework content standards. On the whole, the philosophy underlying the MST learning approach--as envisioned in the draft NYS Framework, and embodied in the example activities--is strongly endorsed. This endorsement is broad-based: those represented include teachers of mathematics, science, and technology, and school district administrators--in roughly equal numbers. Discussion centers not on whether the MST approach should be pursued, but on what is involved in doing it. Teams of conference participants were given time to plan or extend MST initiatives in their own districts. Outlines of the initiatives proposed by ten of the teams are disseminated herein.

  16. Gaseous signalling molecule SO2 via Hippo‑MST pathway to improve myocardial fibrosis of diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Maojun; Liu, Shengquan; Tan, Wenting; Tang, Fen; Long, Junrong; Li, Zining; Liang, Biao; Chu, Chun; Yang, Jun

    2017-12-01

    Recent studies have indicated the existence of an endogenous sulfur dioxide (SO2)‑generating system in the cardiovascular system. The present study aimed to discuss the function and regulatory mechanism of gaseous signal molecule SO2 in inhibiting apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) via the Hippo‑MST signaling pathway to improve myocardial fibrosis of diabetic rats. A total of 40 male Sprague‑Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups (10 rats per group): Normal control group (control group), diabetic rats group [streptozotocin (STZ) group], SO2 intervention group (STZ+SO2 group) and diabetes mellitus rats treated with L‑Aspartic acid β‑hydroxamate (HDX) group (HDX group). Diabetic rats models were established by intra‑peritoneal injection of STZ (40 mg/kg) Following model establishment, intra‑peritoneal injection of Na2SO3/NaHSO3 solution (0.54 mmol/kg) was administered in the STZ+SO2 group, and HDX solution (25 mg/kg/week) was administered in the HDX group. A total of 4 weeks later, echocardiography was performed to evaluate rats' cardiac function; Masson staining, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling staining and transmission electron microscopy examinations were performed to observe myocardial morphological changes. ELISA was employed to determine the SO2 content. Western blot analysis was performed to detect the expression of proteins associated with apoptosis, ERS and the Hippo‑MST signalling pathway. Compared with the control group, the STZ group and HDX group had a disordered arrangement of myocardial cells with apparent myocardial fibrosis, and echocardiography indicated that the cardiac function was lowered, there was an obvious increase of apoptosis in myocardial tissue, the expression levels of apoptosis‑associated protein B‑cell lymphoma associated protein X, caspase‑3 and caspase‑9 were upregulated, and Bcl‑2 expression was downregulated. The expression of ERS and Hippo‑MST

  17. Failure of the Nemo trial: bumetanide is a promising agent to treat many brain disorders but not newborn seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yehezkel eBen-Ari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The diuretic bumetanide failed to treat acute seizures due to hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE in newborn babies and was associated with hearing loss (NEMO trial; 1. On the other hand, clinical and experimental observations suggest that the diuretic might provide novel therapy for many brain disorders including autistic spectrum disorder, schizophrenia, Rett syndrome and Parkinson disease. Here, we discuss the differences between the pathophysiology of severe recurrent seizures in the neonates and neurological and psychiatric disorders stressing the uniqueness of severe seizures in newborn in comparison to other disorders.

  18. A STUDY OF THE VARIED AETIOLOGY AND CLINICAL PRESENTATION OF NEW ONSET SEIZURES IN POSTPARTUM PERIOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra Kumar Sudarsi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Seizures in the postpartum period are the major cause of mortality and morbidity. A variety of neurological disorders causing seizures may be encountered during pregnancy and puerperium. These disorders may be unrelated to pregnancy (e.g. Meningitis or peculiar to pregnancy (e.g. Eclampsia or. Pregnancy may affect the course of the pre-existing neurological disorders such as epilepsy. So, keeping in mind the varied aetiology of postpartum seizures and its response to appropriate treatment, our study has been conducted to find out the most common causes in our setup to guide the optimal therapy. AIM OF THE STUDY To study the varied aetiology and clinical presentation of new onset seizures in the postpartum period over a period of two years. MATERIALS AND METHODS 50 patients who developed first episode of seizures in postpartum period (that is after delivery to 6 weeks admitted to Osmania General Hospital on random selection. All women complaining of new onset seizure with in postpartum period up to 6 weeks. All those women who are known epileptics and who had seizures in the antenatal period were excluded from the study. The selected patients were studied in detail with history and physical examination. RESULTS Different causes for first episode of seizures in postpartum period are enlisted here. Cavernous sinus thrombosis in 17 patients, late postpartum eclampsia accounted for 13 patients, intracranial haemorrhage in 6 patients, ischaemic stroke in 5 patients, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in 4 patients, CNS infections in 6 patients, glioma in 1 patient, viral hepatitis in one patient, idiopathic in 3 patients. CONCLUSIONS Cavernous sinus thrombosis and late postpartum eclampsia constitute the major aetiology of first onset of seizes occurring in the postpartum period.

  19. Confinement and fluctuations in the MST [Madison Symmetric Torus] reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprott, J.C.; Almagri, A.F.; Assadi, S.; Beckstead, J.A.; Chartas, G.; Dexter, N.; Den Hartog, D.J.; Hokin, S.A.; Holly, D.J.; Prager, S.C.; Rempel, T.D.; Sarff, J.S.; Scime, E.; Shen, W.; Spragins, C.W.; Watts, C.

    1990-09-01

    MST is a large (R 0 /a = 1.5/0.52 m) RFP which to date has obtained 80 ms discharges at a peak plasma current of 0.6 MA. Low loop voltages (15 volts) and modest temperatures (T e /T i ∼ 350/250 eV) are routinely obtained giving estimated unoptimized energy confinement times of about 1 ms. Loop voltage and ion temperature are anomalous. Magnetic fluctuations are typically 0.5% with most of the power at frequencies below 30 kHz and mode numbers in agreement with MHD prediction for tearing modes. Electrostatic fluctuations are typically 10 to 20% with a spectrum that decreases with frequency. 5 refs., 2 figs

  20. Music-supported therapy in the rehabilitation of subacute stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau-Sánchez, Jennifer; Duarte, Esther; Ramos-Escobar, Neus; Sierpowska, Joanna; Rueda, Nohora; Redón, Susana; Veciana de Las Heras, Misericordia; Pedro, Jordi; Särkämö, Teppo; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2018-04-01

    The effect of music-supported therapy (MST) as a tool to restore hemiparesis of the upper extremity after a stroke has not been appropriately contrasted with conventional therapy. The aim of this trial was to test the effectiveness of adding MST to a standard rehabilitation program in subacute stroke patients. A randomized controlled trial was conducted in which patients were randomized to MST or conventional therapy in addition to the rehabilitation program. The intensity and duration of the interventions were equated in both groups. Before and after 4 weeks of treatment, motor and cognitive functions, mood, and quality of life (QoL) of participants were evaluated. A follow-up at 3 months was conducted to examine the retention of motor gains. Both groups significantly improved their motor function, and no differences between groups were found. The only difference between groups was observed in the language domain for QoL. Importantly, an association was encountered between the capacity to experience pleasure from music activities and the motor improvement in the MST group. MST as an add-on treatment showed no superiority to conventional therapies for motor recovery. Importantly, patient's intrinsic motivation to engage in musical activities was associated with better motor improvement. © 2018 New York Academy of Sciences.

  1. Randomized, controlled trial of ibuprofen syrup administered during febrile illnesses to prevent febrile seizure recurrences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Stuijvenberg (Margriet); G. Derksen-Lubsen (Gerarda); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); J.D.F. Habbema (Dik); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES: Febrile seizures recur frequently. Factors increasing the risk of febrile seizure recurrence include young age at onset, family history of febrile seizures, previous recurrent febrile seizures, time lapse since previous seizure <6 months,

  2. Optimal management of seizures associated with tuberous sclerosis complex: current and emerging options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang S

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Shelly Wang,1 Aria Fallah2,3 1Department of Neurosurgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2Department of Neurosurgery, Miami Children’s Hospital, Miami, FL, USA; 3Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada Abstract: Seizures are clinically significant manifestations associated with 79%–90% of patients with tuberous sclerosis complex. Often occurring within the first year of life in the form of infantile spasms, seizures interfere with neuropsychiatric, social, and cognitive development and carry significant individual and societal consequences. Prompt identification and treatment of seizures is an important focus in the overall management of tuberous sclerosis complex patients. Medical management, either after seizure onset or prophylactically in infants with electroencephalographic abnormalities, is considered first-line therapy. Vigabatrin and adrenocorticotropic hormone have emerged over the past few decades as mainstay pharmacologic modalities. Furthermore, emerging research on mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors demonstrated promise for the management of seizures and subependymal giant cell astrocytoma. For appropriate surgical candidates with an epileptogenic zone associated with one or more glioneuronal hamartomas, ideally in noneloquent cortex, resective surgery can be considered, which provides a cure in 56% of patients. For medically refractory patients who do not meet criteria for curative surgery, palliative surgical approaches focused on reducing seizure burden, in the form of corpus callosotomy and vagus nerve stimulation, are alternative management options. Lastly, the ketogenic diet, a reemerging therapy based on the anticonvulsant effects of ketone bodies, can be utilized independently or in conjunction with other treatment modalities for the management of difficult-to-treat seizures. Keywords: epilepsy, adrenocorticotropic hormone, vigabatrin, mammalian

  3. Do reflex seizures and spontaneous seizures form a continuum? - triggering factors and possible common mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irmen, Friederike; Wehner, Tim; Lemieux, Louis

    2015-02-01

    Recent changes in the understanding and classification of reflex seizures have fuelled a debate on triggering mechanisms of seizures and their conceptual organization. Previous studies and patient reports have listed extrinsic and intrinsic triggers, albeit their multifactorial and dynamic nature is poorly understood. This paper aims to review literature on extrinsic and intrinsic seizure triggers and to discuss common mechanisms among them. Among self-reported seizure triggers, emotional stress is most frequently named. Reflex seizures are typically associated with extrinsic sensory triggers; however, intrinsic cognitive or proprioceptive triggers have also been assessed. The identification of a trigger underlying a seizure may be more difficult if it is intrinsic and complex, and if triggering mechanisms are multifactorial. Therefore, since observability of triggers varies and triggers are also found in non-reflex seizures, the present concept of reflex seizures may be questioned. We suggest the possibility of a conceptual continuum between reflex and spontaneous seizures rather than a dichotomy and discuss evidence to the notion that to some extent most seizures might be triggered. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Neurodevelopmental comorbidities and seizure control 24 months after a first unprovoked seizure in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason, Eva Åndell; Tomson, Torbjörn; Carlsson, Sofia; Tedroff, Kristina; Åmark, Per

    2018-07-01

    To follow children with newly diagnosed unprovoked seizures to determine (1) whether the prevalence of neurodevelopmental comorbidities and cerebral palsy (CP) changed after the initial seizure, and (2) the association between studied comorbidities and seizures 13-24 months after seizure onset or initiation of treatment. Analyses were based on 750 children (28 days-18 years) with a first unprovoked seizure (index) included in a population-based Incidence Registry in Stockholm between 2001 and 2006. The children were followed for two years and their medical records were examined for a priori defined neurodevelopmental/psychiatric comorbidities and CP and seizure frequency. Baseline information was collected from medical records from before, and up to six months after, the index seizure. Odds ratios (OR) of repeated seizures 13-24 months after the first seizure or after initiation of anti-epileptic drug treatment was calculated by logistic regression and adjusted for age and sex. At baseline, 32% of the children had neurodevelopmental/psychiatric comorbidities or CP compared to 35%, 24 months later. Children with such comorbidities more often experienced seizures 13-24 months after the index seizure (OR 2.87, CI 2.07-3.99) with the highest OR in those with CP or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Children diagnosed at age neurodevelopmental comorbidities and CP in children with epilepsy tend to be present already at seizure onset and that such comorbidities are strong indicators of poor outcome regarding seizure control with or without treatment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Improving staff response to seizures on the epilepsy monitoring unit with online EEG seizure detection algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommens, Nicole; Geertsema, Evelien; Jansen Holleboom, Lisanne; Cox, Fieke; Visser, Gerhard

    2018-05-11

    User safety and the quality of diagnostics on the epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU) depend on reaction to seizures. Online seizure detection might improve this. While good sensitivity and specificity is reported, the added value above staff response is unclear. We ascertained the added value of two electroencephalograph (EEG) seizure detection algorithms in terms of additional detected seizures or faster detection time. EEG-video seizure recordings of people admitted to an EMU over one year were included, with a maximum of two seizures per subject. All recordings were retrospectively analyzed using Encevis EpiScan and BESA Epilepsy. Detection sensitivity and latency of the algorithms were compared to staff responses. False positive rates were estimated on 30 uninterrupted recordings (roughly 24 h per subject) of consecutive subjects admitted to the EMU. EEG-video recordings used included 188 seizures. The response rate of staff was 67%, of Encevis 67%, and of BESA Epilepsy 65%. Of the 62 seizures missed by staff, 66% were recognized by Encevis and 39% by BESA Epilepsy. The median latency was 31 s (staff), 10 s (Encevis), and 14 s (BESA Epilepsy). After correcting for walking time from the observation room to the subject, both algorithms detected faster than staff in 65% of detected seizures. The full recordings included 617 h of EEG. Encevis had a median false positive rate of 4.9 per 24 h and BESA Epilepsy of 2.1 per 24 h. EEG-video seizure detection algorithms may improve reaction to seizures by improving the total number of seizures detected and the speed of detection. The false positive rate is feasible for use in a clinical situation. Implementation of these algorithms might result in faster diagnostic testing and better observation during seizures. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Oxaliplatin-Induced Tonic-Clonic Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad K. Rahal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxaliplatin is a common chemotherapy drug used for colon and gastric cancers. Common side effects are peripheral neuropathy, hematological toxicity, and allergic reactions. A rare side effect is seizures which are usually associated with posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome (PRES. A 50-year-old male patient presented with severe abdominal pain. CT scan of the abdomen showed acute appendicitis. Appendectomy was done and pathology showed mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma. Adjuvant chemotherapy was started with Folinic acid, Fluorouracil, and Oxaliplatin (FOLFOX. During the third cycle of FOLFOX, the patient developed tonic-clonic seizures. Laboratory workup was within normal limits. EEG and MRI of the brain showed no acute abnormality. The patient was rechallenged with FOLFOX but he had tonic-clonic seizures for the second time. His chemotherapy regimen was switched to Folinic acid, Fluorouracil, and Irinotecan (FOLFIRI. After 5 cycles of FOLFIRI, the patient did not develop any seizures, making Oxaliplatin the most likely culprit for his seizures. Oxaliplatin-induced seizures rarely occur in the absence of PRES. One case report has been described in the literature. We present a rare case of tonic-clonic seizures in a patient receiving Oxaliplatin in the absence of PRES.

  7. Biotelemetry system for Epilepsy Seizure Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, LaCurtise; Bohnert, George W.

    2009-07-02

    The Biotelemetry System for Epilepsy Seizure Control Project developed and tested an automated telemetry system for use in an epileptic seizure prevention device that precisely controls localized brain temperature. This project was a result of a Department of Energy (DOE) Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (GIPP) grant to the Kansas City Plant (KCP), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to partner with Flint Hills Scientific, LLC, Lawrence, KS and Biophysical Laboratory Ltd (BIOFIL), Sarov, Russia to develop a method to help control epileptic seizures.

  8. On the nature of seizure dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, William C.; Quilichini, Pascale P.; Ivanov, Anton I.

    2014-01-01

    Seizures can occur spontaneously and in a recurrent manner, which defines epilepsy; or they can be induced in a normal brain under a variety of conditions in most neuronal networks and species from flies to humans. Such universality raises the possibility that invariant properties exist that characterize seizures under different physiological and pathological conditions. Here, we analysed seizure dynamics mathematically and established a taxonomy of seizures based on first principles. For the predominant seizure class we developed a generic model called Epileptor. As an experimental model system, we used ictal-like discharges induced in vitro in mouse hippocampi. We show that only five state variables linked by integral-differential equations are sufficient to describe the onset, time course and offset of ictal-like discharges as well as their recurrence. Two state variables are responsible for generating rapid discharges (fast time scale), two for spike and wave events (intermediate time scale) and one for the control of time course, including the alternation between ‘normal’ and ictal periods (slow time scale). We propose that normal and ictal activities coexist: a separatrix acts as a barrier (or seizure threshold) between these states. Seizure onset is reached upon the collision of normal brain trajectories with the separatrix. We show theoretically and experimentally how a system can be pushed toward seizure under a wide variety of conditions. Within our experimental model, the onset and offset of ictal-like discharges are well-defined mathematical events: a saddle-node and homoclinic bifurcation, respectively. These bifurcations necessitate a baseline shift at onset and a logarithmic scaling of interspike intervals at offset. These predictions were not only confirmed in our in vitro experiments, but also for focal seizures recorded in different syndromes, brain regions and species (humans and zebrafish). Finally, we identified several possible biophysical

  9. 27 CFR 478.152 - Seizure and forfeiture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seizure and forfeiture... Exemptions, Seizures, and Forfeitures § 478.152 Seizure and forfeiture. (a) Any firearm or ammunition... demonstrated by clear and convincing evidence, shall be subject to seizure and forfeiture, and all provisions...

  10. 19 CFR 162.92 - Notice of seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Notice of seizure. 162.92 Section 162.92 Customs... (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act § 162.92 Notice of seizure. (a) Generally. Customs will send written notice of seizure as provided in this section to all known interested...

  11. 8 CFR 1280.21 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 1280.21 Section 1280... REGULATIONS IMPOSITION AND COLLECTION OF FINES § 1280.21 Seizure of aircraft. Seizure of an aircraft under the... that its value is less than the amount of the fine which may be imposed. If seizure of an aircraft for...

  12. 8 CFR 280.21 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 280.21 Section 280.21... OF FINES § 280.21 Seizure of aircraft. Seizure of an aircraft under the authority of section 239 of... than the amount of the fine which may be imposed. If seizure of an aircraft for violation of section...

  13. 50 CFR 12.11 - Notification of seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notification of seizure. 12.11 Section 12... SEIZURE AND FORFEITURE PROCEDURES Preliminary Requirements § 12.11 Notification of seizure. Except where the owner or consignee is personally notified or seizure is made pursuant to a search warrant, the...

  14. 50 CFR 12.5 - Seizure by other agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Seizure by other agencies. 12.5 Section 12... SEIZURE AND FORFEITURE PROCEDURES General Provisions § 12.5 Seizure by other agencies. Any authorized... the laws listed in § 12.2 will, if so requested, deliver such seizure to the appropriate Special Agent...

  15. Economic Impact of Multisystemic Therapy for Child Abuse and Neglect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dopp, Alex R; Schaeffer, Cindy M; Swenson, Cynthia Cupit; Powell, Jennifer S

    2018-04-04

    This study evaluated the economics of Multisystemic Therapy for Child Abuse and Neglect (MST-CAN) by applying the Washington State Institute for Public Policy (WSIPP) cost-benefit model to data from a randomized effectiveness trial with 86 families (Swenson et al. in JFP 24:497-507, 2010b). The net benefit of MST-CAN, versus enhanced outpatient treatment, was $26,655 per family at 16 months post-baseline. Stated differently, every dollar spent on MST-CAN recovered $3.31 in savings to participants, taxpayers, and society at large. Policymakers and public service agencies should consider these findings when making investments into interventions for high-need families involved with child protective services.

  16. EEG analysis of seizure patterns using visibility graphs for detection of generalized seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Long, Xi; Arends, Johan B A M; Aarts, Ronald M

    2017-10-01

    The traditional EEG features in the time and frequency domain show limited seizure detection performance in the epileptic population with intellectual disability (ID). In addition, the influence of EEG seizure patterns on detection performance was less studied. A single-channel EEG signal can be mapped into visibility graphs (VGS), including basic visibility graph (VG), horizontal VG (HVG), and difference VG (DVG). These graphs were used to characterize different EEG seizure patterns. To demonstrate its effectiveness in identifying EEG seizure patterns and detecting generalized seizures, EEG recordings of 615h on one EEG channel from 29 epileptic patients with ID were analyzed. A novel feature set with discriminative power for seizure detection was obtained by using the VGS method. The degree distributions (DDs) of DVG can clearly distinguish EEG of each seizure pattern. The degree entropy and power-law degree power in DVG were proposed here for the first time, and they show significant difference between seizure and non-seizure EEG. The connecting structure measured by HVG can better distinguish seizure EEG from background than those by VG and DVG. A traditional EEG feature set based on frequency analysis was used here as a benchmark feature set. With a support vector machine (SVM) classifier, the seizure detection performance of the benchmark feature set (sensitivity of 24%, FD t /h of 1.8s) can be improved by combining our proposed VGS features extracted from one EEG channel (sensitivity of 38%, FD t /h of 1.4s). The proposed VGS-based features can help improve seizure detection for ID patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Osteoporosis-Related Simultaneous Four Joints Fractures and Dislocation after a Seizure: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah S. AlOmran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of steroid-induced osteoporosis-related multiple fractures and dislocations are described after a seizure is reported. Patient had two years history of steroid use with no supplement or antiresorptive therapy. There was a delay in the diagnosis which affected an otherwise good outcome in such situations. It is recommended that patients on steroid should be given calcium, vitamin D, and an antiresorptive. Furthermore, a meticulous clinical examination is required in patients who are on steroids and suffer epileptic seizures to rule out skeletal injury.

  18. Multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis for epileptic patient in seizure and seizure free status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Dipak; Dutta, Srimonti; Chakraborty, Sayantan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We analyze EEG of patients during seizure and in seizure free interval. • Data from different sections of the brain and seizure activity was analyzed. • Assessment of cross-correlation in seizure and seizure free interval using MF-DXA technique. - Abstract: This paper reports a study of EEG data of epileptic patients in terms of multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis (MF-DXA). The EEG clinical data were obtained from the EEG Database available with the Clinic of Epileptology of the University Hospital of Bonn, Germany. The data sets (C, D, and E) were taken from five epileptic patients undergoing presurgical evaluations. The data sets consist of intracranial EEG recordings during seizure-free intervals (interictal periods) from within the epileptogenic zone (D) and from the hippocampal formation of the opposite hemisphere of the epileptic patients’ brain, respectively (C). The data set (E) was recorded during seizure activity (ictal periods). MF-DXA is a very rigorous and robust tool for assessment of cross-correlation among two nonlinear time series. The study reveals the degree of cross-correlation is more among seizure and seizure free interval in epileptogenic zone. These data are very significant for diagnosis, onset and prognosis of epileptic patients

  19. Influence of vigilance state on physiological consequences of seizures and seizure-induced death in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajek, Michael A; Buchanan, Gordon F

    2016-05-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is the leading cause of death in patients with refractory epilepsy. SUDEP occurs more commonly during nighttime sleep. The details of why SUDEP occurs at night are not well understood. Understanding why SUDEP occurs at night during sleep might help to better understand why SUDEP occurs at all and hasten development of preventive strategies. Here we aimed to understand circumstances causing seizures that occur during sleep to result in death. Groups of 12 adult male mice were instrumented for EEG, EMG, and EKG recording and subjected to seizure induction via maximal electroshock (MES) during wakefulness, nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Seizure inductions were performed with concomitant EEG, EMG, and EKG recording and breathing assessment via whole body plethysmography. Seizures induced via MES during sleep were associated with more profound respiratory suppression and were more likely to result in death. Despite REM sleep being a time when seizures do not typically occur spontaneously, when seizures were forced to occur during REM sleep, they were invariably fatal in this model. An examination of baseline breathing revealed that mice that died following a seizure had increased baseline respiratory rate variability compared with those that did not die. These data demonstrate that sleep, especially REM sleep, can be a dangerous time for a seizure to occur. These data also demonstrate that there may be baseline respiratory abnormalities that can predict which individuals have higher risk for seizure-induced death.

  20. Hemorrhagic Retinopathy after Spondylosis Surgery and Seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kord Valeshabad, Ali; Francis, Andrew W; Setlur, Vikram; Chang, Peter; Mieler, William F; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2015-08-01

    To report bilateral hemorrhagic retinopathy in an adult female subject after lumbar spinal surgery and seizure. A 38-year-old woman presented with bilateral blurry vision and spots in the visual field. The patient had lumbar spondylosis surgery that was complicated by a dural tear with persistent cerebrospinal fluid leak. Visual symptoms started immediately after witnessed seizure-like activity. At presentation, visual acuity was 20/100 and 20/25 in the right and left eye, respectively. Dilated fundus examination demonstrated bilateral hemorrhagic retinopathy with subhyaloid, intraretinal, and subretinal involvement. At 4-month follow-up, visual acuity improved to 20/60 and 20/20 in the right and left eye, respectively. Dilated fundus examination and fundus photography showed resolution of retinal hemorrhages in both eyes. The first case of bilateral hemorrhagic retinopathy after lumbar spondylosis surgery and witnessed seizure in an adult was reported. Ophthalmic examination may be warranted after episodes of seizure in adults.

  1. Seizure detection algorithms based on EMG signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa

    Background: the currently used non-invasive seizure detection methods are not reliable. Muscle fibers are directly connected to the nerves, whereby electric signals are generated during activity. Therefore, an alarm system on electromyography (EMG) signals is a theoretical possibility. Objective...... on the amplitude of the signal. The other algorithm was based on information of the signal in the frequency domain, and it focused on synchronisation of the electrical activity in a single muscle during the seizure. Results: The amplitude-based algorithm reliably detected seizures in 2 of the patients, while...... the frequency-based algorithm was efficient for detecting the seizures in the third patient. Conclusion: Our results suggest that EMG signals could be used to develop an automatic seizuredetection system. However, different patients might require different types of algorithms /approaches....

  2. Serum Prolactin in Diagnosis of Epileptic Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The results of studies in databases and references concerning serum prolactin levels (PRL in patients with suspected seizures were rated for quality and analyzed by members of the Therapeutics Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

  3. Aging models of acute seizures and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kevin M

    2010-01-01

    Aged animals have been used by researchers to better understand the differences between the young and the aged brain and how these differences may provide insight into the mechanisms of acute seizures and epilepsy in the elderly. To date, there have been relatively few studies dedicated to the modeling of acute seizures and epilepsy in aged, healthy animals. Inherent challenges to this area of research include the costs associated with the purchase and maintenance of older animals and, at times, the unexpected and potentially confounding comorbidities associated with aging. However, recent studies using a variety of in vivo and in vitro models of acute seizures and epilepsy in mice and rats have built upon early investigations in the field, all of which has provided an expanded vision of seizure generation and epileptogenesis in the aged brain. Results of these studies could potentially translate to new and tailored interventional approaches that limit or prevent the development of epilepsy in the elderly.

  4. Effect of prophylactic phenobarbital on seizures, encephalopathy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cerebral metabolism and re-oxygenation, which lead to cerebral oedema .... their serum electrolytes and glucose, calcium and magnesium levels measured. ..... Dzhala V, Ben-Ari Y, Khazipov R. Seizures accelerate anoxia-induced neuronal.

  5. Counselling adults who experience a first seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, Karen T; Newton, Mark

    2017-07-01

    A first seizure can result in significant uncertainty, fear and apprehension. One of the key roles of the clinician in the setting of first seizure is to provide accurate, timely information and counselling. We review the numerous components to be considered when counselling an adult patient after a first seizure. We provide a framework and manner to provide that counselling. We focus on an individualized approach and provide recommendations and information on issues of diagnosis, etiology, prognosis, the role and importance of medical testing, lifestyle considerations, driving, medication and other key counselling considerations. Accurate, timely counselling can allay fears and anxieties, remove misconceptions and reduce the risk for injury in seizure recurrence. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Epilepsies and Seizures: Hope Through Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... epilepticus and sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) . Status Epilepticus Status epilepticus is a potentially life-threatening condition ... otherwise experience good seizure control with their medication. status epilepticus – a potentially life-threatening condition in which a ...

  7. Mouse repeated electroconvulsive seizure (ECS) does not reverse social stress effects but does induce behavioral and hippocampal changes relevant to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) side-effects in the treatment of depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Buel, Erin M; Sigrist, Hannes; Seifritz, Erich; Fikse, Lianne; Bosker, Fokko J; Schoevers, Robert A; Klein, Hans C; Pryce, Christopher R; Eisel, Ulrich Lm

    2017-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective treatment for depression, but can have negative side effects including amnesia. The mechanisms of action underlying both the antidepressant and side effects of ECT are not well understood. An equivalent manipulation that is conducted in experimental

  8. Predictors of acute symptomatic seizures after intracranial hemorrhage in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Seema; Kebede, Tewodros; Dean, Nathan P; Carpenter, Jessica L

    2014-10-01

    To determine the prevalence of acute symptomatic seizures in infants with supratentorial intracranial hemorrhage, to identify potential risk factors, and to determine the effect of acute seizures on long-term morbidity and mortality. Children less than 24 months with intracranial hemorrhage were identified from a neurocritical care database. All patients who received seizure prophylaxis beginning at admission were included in the study. Risk factors studied were gender, etiology, location of hemorrhage, seizure(s) on presentation, and the presence of parenchymal injury. Acute clinical and electrographic seizures were identified from hospital medical records. Subsequent development of late seizures was determined based on clinical information from patients' latest follow-up. Patients with idiopathic neonatal intracranial hemorrhage, premature infants, and those with prior history of seizures were excluded from analysis. Seventy-two infants met inclusion criteria. None. Forty percent of infants had acute symptomatic seizures. The prevalence was similar regardless of whether etiology of hemorrhage was traumatic or nontraumatic. Seizures on presentation and parenchymal injury were independent risk factors of acute seizures (p = 0.001 and p = 0.006, respectively). Younger children and women were also at higher risk (p Acute seizures were not predictive of mortality, but nearly twice as many patients with acute seizures developed late seizures when compared with those without. Electrographic seizures and parenchymal injury were also predictive of development of late seizures (p hemorrhage are at high risk for acute symptomatic seizures. This is regardless of the etiology of hemorrhage. Younger patients, women, patients with parenchymal injury, and patients presenting with seizure are most likely to develop acute seizures. Although the benefits of seizure prophylaxis have not been studied in this specific population, these results suggest that it is an important component

  9. 15 CFR 904.501 - Notice of seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Notice of seizure. 904.501 Section 904... Seizure and Forfeiture Procedures § 904.501 Notice of seizure. Within 60 days from the date of the seizure, NOAA will serve the Notice of Seizure as provided in § 904.3 to the owner or consignee, if known or...

  10. Seizure characteristics in multiple sclerosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Shaygannejad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To evaluate seizure characteristic among multiple sclerosis patients with coexistent seizure activity compared to control group. Materials and Methods : This study is a cross-sectional study which was conducted by reviewing the clinical records of patients with definite diagnosis of MS according to McDonald′s criteria from March 2007 to June 2011, who referred to the MS clinic of the university. Results : A total of 920 patients with a diagnosis of MS were identified, among whom 29 patients (3.15% with seizure activity (case due to MS with the mean age of 32.6 ± 6.23 years were analyzed. Also, fifty MS patients without any seizure occurrence with the mean age of 33.7 ± 7.4 years were used as our control group. In case group, seizure was general tonic clonic in 23 patients (79.3%, complex partial in four (13.8%, and simple partial in two (5.9%. The 26 available interictal EEGs in MS patients showed abnormal EEG pattern in 22 (84.6% of them, including focal epileptic form discharge or focal slowing in 10 (38.5%, generalized discharge (spike-wave, polyspike, or general paroxysmal fast activity in 10 (38.5%, and general slowing activity in 10 record (38.5%. MRI reviews of the 26 available brain MRIs showed subcortical white mater lesions in 22 (84.6% of patients with seizure. All MRIs were performed within one month after the first seizure episode. Amongst 48 available MRIs in our control group, 91.7% (44 cases showed periventricular lesions and in 8.3% (4 cases subcortical white matter lesions were reported. Conclusion : The result of this study demonstrated the higher rate of subcortical whit matter lesion in MS patients with seizure occurrence compared to control group.

  11. Seizures in dominantly inherited Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarea, Aline; Charbonnier, Camille; Rovelet-Lecrux, Anne; Nicolas, Gaël; Rousseau, Stéphane; Borden, Alaina; Pariente, Jeremie; Le Ber, Isabelle; Pasquier, Florence; Formaglio, Maite; Martinaud, Olivier; Rollin-Sillaire, Adeline; Sarazin, Marie; Croisile, Bernard; Boutoleau-Bretonnière, Claire; Ceccaldi, Mathieu; Gabelle, Audrey; Chamard, Ludivine; Blanc, Frédéric; Sellal, François; Paquet, Claire; Campion, Dominique; Hannequin, Didier; Wallon, David

    2016-08-30

    To assess seizure frequency in a large French cohort of autosomal dominant early-onset Alzheimer disease (ADEOAD) and to determine possible correlations with causative mutations. A national multicentric study was performed in patients with ADEOAD harboring a pathogenic mutation within PSEN1, PSEN2, APP, or a duplication of APP, and a minimal follow-up of 5 years. Clinical, EEG, and imaging data were systematically recorded. We included 132 patients from 77 families: 94 PSEN1 mutation carriers (MCs), 16 APP duplication carriers, 15 APP MCs, and 7 PSEN2 MCs. Seizure frequency was 47.7% after a mean follow-up of 8.4 years (range 5-25). After 5-year follow-up and using a Cox model analysis, the percentages of patients with seizures were respectively 19.1% (10.8%-26.7%) for PSEN1, 28.6% (0%-55.3%) for PSEN2, 31.2% (4.3%-50.6%) for APP duplications, and no patient for APP mutation. APP duplication carriers showed a significantly increased seizure risk compared to both APP MCs (hazard ratio [HR] = 5.55 [95% confidence interval 1.87-16.44]) and PSEN1 MCs (HR = 4.46 [2.11-9.44]). Among all PSEN1 mutations, those within the domains of protein hydrophilic I, transmembrane II (TM-II), TM-III, TM-IV, and TM-VII were associated with a significant increase in seizure frequency compared to other domains (HR = 4.53 [1.93-10.65], p = 0.0005). Seizures are a common feature of ADEOAD. In this population, risk was significantly higher in the APP duplication group than in all other groups. Within PSEN1, 5 specific domains were associated with a higher seizure risk indicating specific correlations between causative mutation and seizures. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  12. Ketogenic diet: Predictors of seizure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Nitin; Arkilo, Dimitrios; Farooq, Osman; Gillogly, Cynthia; Kavak, Katelyn S; Weinstock, Arie

    2017-01-01

    The ketogenic diet is an effective non-pharmacologic treatment for medically resistant epilepsy. The aim of this study was to identify any predictors that may influence the response of ketogenic diet. A retrospective chart review for all patients with medically resistant epilepsy was performed at a tertiary care epilepsy center from 1996 to 2012. Patient- and diet-related variables were evaluated with respect to seizure reduction at 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12-month intervals and divided into four possible outcome classes. Sixty-three patients met inclusion. Thirty-seven (59%) reported >50% seizure reduction at 3 months with 44% and 37% patients benefiting at 6-month and 12-month follow up, respectively. A trend toward significant seizure improvement was noted in 48% patients with seizure onset >1 year at 12-month (p = 0.09) interval and in 62% patients with >10 seizure/day at 6-month interval (p = 0.054). An ordinal logistic regression showed later age of seizure to have higher odds of favorable response at 1-month (p = 0.005) and 3-month (p = 0.013) follow up. Patients with non-fasting diet induction were more likely to have a favorable outcome at 6 months (p = 0.008) as do females (p = 0.037) and those treated with higher fat ratio diet (p = 0.034). Our study reports the effectiveness of ketogenic diet in children with medically resistant epilepsy. Later age of seizure onset, female gender, higher ketogenic diet ratio and non-fasting induction were associated with better odds of improved seizure outcome. A larger cohort is required to confirm these findings.

  13. Acute recurrent seizures in a dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    A detailed account is given, in question and answer format, of the diagnosis of meningioma in the left cerebral cortex of a 9-year-old male Shetland sheepdog with a history of sudden onset of seizures. The seizures were controlled by phenobarbital. Surgery was also performed to debulk the tumour. One year later the dog's neurological condition deteriorated again. Meningioma was confirmed by PM examination

  14. Administrative management of the soldier with seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunderson, C H

    1991-07-01

    Based on improvement in our understanding of the prognosis of young adults with new onset seizures, and cumulative experience with the rules in effect for the last 30 years, a substantial change in the regulations affecting the fitness and profiling of these soldiers has been made. In general, these liberalize retention and profiling, set limits on the duration of trials of duty, provide for fitness determinations in soldiers with pseudo-seizures, and specify when neurologic consultation is required.

  15. Resolving cognitive dissonance by acquisition of self-organizational skills may decrease drug-resistant seizures - A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, Rosa; Andrews, Donna J; Reiter, Joel M; von Schoen-Angerer, Tido

    2014-01-01

    A recent review of psychobehavioral therapy for epilepsy recommends case reports as a research design to explore specific psychological mediators of psychobehavioral interventions for epilepsy that address the bidirectional relationship between psychological states and seizures. The report was prepared according to the consensus-based CARE guidelines for standardized clinical case reporting. This is a case of a 16-year-old male individual with a diagnosed seizure disorder and learning disability who continued to have daytime and nighttime seizures on a regular basis despite exhausting of available conventional treatment options. A psychological assessment led to the working hypothesis that cognitive dissonance between fear of failure and high expectations of self had led to a "broken" self-image and active avoidance of responsibility that resulted in intense emotional distress which correlated with the occurrence of seizures. This working hypothesis resulted in a treatment plan that employed the acquisition of self-organizational skills and relaxation techniques as the main therapeutic strategy. Motivational strategies were employed to facilitate the regulation of lifestyle-related seizure precipitants. In this case, the acquisition of self-organizational skills and the development of seizure interruption techniques correlated with a clinically significant decrease of seizures. Methodological limitations of the interpretation of the presented data are discussed.

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid findings after epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzikonstantinou, Anastasios; Ebert, Anne D; Hennerici, Michael G

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to evaluate ictally-induced CSF parameter changes after seizures in adult patients without acute inflammatory diseases or infectious diseases associated with the central nervous system. In total, 151 patients were included in the study. All patients were admitted to our department of neurology following acute seizures and received an extensive work-up including EEG, cerebral imaging, and CSF examinations. CSF protein elevation was found in most patients (92; 60.9%) and was significantly associated with older age, male sex, and generalized seizures. Abnormal CSF-to-serum glucose ratio was found in only nine patients (5.9%) and did not show any significant associations. CSF lactate was elevated in 34 patients (22.5%) and showed a significant association with focal seizures with impaired consciousness, status epilepticus, the presence of EEG abnormalities in general and epileptiform potentials in particular, as well as epileptogenic lesions on cerebral imaging. Our results indicate that non-inflammatory CSF elevation of protein and lactate after epileptic seizures is relatively common, in contrast to changes in CSF-to-serum glucose ratio, and further suggest that these changes are caused by ictal activity and are related to seizure type and intensity. We found no indication that these changes may have further-reaching pathological implications besides their postictal character.

  17. Hungry Neurons: Metabolic Insights on Seizure Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bazzigaluppi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy afflicts up to 1.6% of the population and the mechanisms underlying the appearance of seizures are still not understood. In past years, many efforts have been spent trying to understand the mechanisms underlying the excessive and synchronous firing of neurons. Traditionally, attention was pointed towards synaptic (dysfunction and extracellular ionic species (dysregulation. Recently, novel clinical and preclinical studies explored the role of brain metabolism (i.e., glucose utilization of seizures pathophysiology revealing (in most cases reduced metabolism in the inter-ictal period and increased metabolism in the seconds preceding and during the appearance of seizures. In the present review, we summarize the clinical and preclinical observations showing metabolic dysregulation during epileptogenesis, seizure initiation, and termination, and in the inter-ictal period. Recent preclinical studies have shown that 2-Deoxyglucose (2-DG, a glycolysis blocker is a novel therapeutic approach to reduce seizures. Furthermore, we present initial evidence for the effectiveness of 2-DG in arresting 4-Aminopyridine induced neocortical seizures in vivo in the mouse.

  18. Monitor for status epilepticus seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark; Simkins, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the sensor technology and associated electronics of a monitor designed to detect the onset of a seizure disorder called status epilepticus. It is a condition that affects approximately 3-5 percent of those individuals suffering from epilepsy. This form of epilepsy does not follow the typical cycle of start-peak-end. The convulsions continue until medically interrupted and are life threatening. The mortality rate is high without prompt medical treatment at a suitable facility. The paper describes the details of a monitor design that provides an inexpensive solution to the needs of those responsible for the care of individuals afflicted with this disorder. The monitor has been designed as a cooperative research and development effort involving the United States Army Armament Research, Development, and Engineering Center's Benet Laboratories (Benet) and the Cerebral Palsy Center for the Disabled (Center), in association with the Department of Neurology at Albany Medical College (AMC). Benet has delivered a working prototype of the device for field testing, in collaboration with Albany Medical College. The Center has identified several children in need of special monitoring and has agreed to pursue commercialization of the device.

  19. Seizure-related factors and non-verbal intelligence in children with epilepsy. A population-based study from Western Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høie, B; Mykletun, A; Sommerfelt, K; Bjørnaes, H; Skeidsvoll, H; Waaler, P E

    2005-06-01

    To study the relationship between seizure-related factors, non-verbal intelligence, and socio-economic status (SES) in a population-based sample of children with epilepsy. The latest ILAE International classifications of epileptic seizures and syndromes were used to classify seizure types and epileptic syndromes in all 6-12 year old children (N=198) with epilepsy in Hordaland County, Norway. The children had neuropediatric and EEG examinations. Of the 198 patients, demographic characteristics were collected on 183 who participated in psychological studies including Raven matrices. 126 healthy controls underwent the same testing. Severe non-verbal problems (SNVP) were defined as a Raven score at or Raven percentile group, whereas controls were highly over-represented in the higher percentile groups. SNVP were present in 43% of children with epilepsy and 3% of controls. These problems were especially common in children with remote symptomatic epilepsy aetiology, undetermined epilepsy syndromes, myoclonic seizures, early seizure debut, high seizure frequency and in children with polytherapy. Seizure-related characteristics that were not usually associated with SNVP were idiopathic epilepsies, localization related (LR) cryptogenic epilepsies, absence and simple partial seizures, and a late debut of epilepsy. Adjusting for socio-economic status factors did not significantly change results. In childhood epilepsy various seizure-related factors, but not SES factors, were associated with the presence or absence of SNVP. Such deficits may be especially common in children with remote symptomatic epilepsy aetiology and in complex and therapy resistant epilepsies. Low frequencies of SNVP may be found in children with idiopathic and LR cryptogenic epilepsy syndromes, simple partial or absence seizures and a late epilepsy debut. Our study contributes to an overall picture of cognitive function and its relation to central seizure characteristics in a childhood epilepsy population

  20. Phenytoin versus Leviteracetam for Seizure Prophylaxis after brain injury – a meta analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafar Syed

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current standard therapy for seizure prophylaxis in Neuro-surgical patients involves the use of Phenytoin (PHY. However, a new drug Levetiracetam (LEV is emerging as an alternate treatment choice. We aimed to conduct a meta-analysis to compare these two drugs in patients with brain injury. Methods An electronic search was performed in using Pubmed, Embase, and CENTRAL. We included studies that compared the use of LEV vs. PHY for seizure prophylaxis for brain injured patients (Traumatic brain injury, intracranial hemorrhage, intracranial neoplasms, and craniotomy. Data of all eligible studies was extracted on to a standardized abstraction sheet. Data about baseline population characteristics, type of intervention, study design and outcome was extracted. Our primary outcome was seizures. Results The literature search identified 2489 unduplicated papers. Of these 2456 papers were excluded by reading the abstracts and titles. Another 25 papers were excluded after reading their complete text. We selected 8 papers which comprised of 2 RCTs and 6 observational studies. The pooled estimate’s Odds Ratio 1.12 (95% CI = 0.34, 3.64 demonstrated no superiority of either drug at preventing the occurrence of early seizures. In a subset analysis of studies in which follow up for seizures lasted either 3 or 7 days, the effect estimate remained insignificant with an odds ratio of 0.96 (95% CI = 0.34, 2.76. Similarly, 2 trials reporting seizure incidence at 6 months also had insignificant pooled results while comparing drug efficacy. The pooled odds ratio was 0.96 (95% CI = 0.24, 3.79. Conclusions Levetiracetam and Phenytoin demonstrate equal efficacy in seizure prevention after brain injury. However, very few randomized controlled trials (RCTs on the subject were found. Further evidence through a high quality RCT is highly recommended.

  1. Epileptic seizures in Neuro-Behcet disease: why some patients develop seizure and others not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlu, Gulnihal; Semercioglu, Sencer; Ucler, Serap; Erdal, Abidin; Inan, Levent E

    2015-03-01

    Behcet disease (BD) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory disorder. Neuro BD (NBD) is seen in approximately 5% of all patients. The aim of this study is to investigate the frequency, type and prognosis of epileptic seizures in different forms of NBD. All files of 42 patients with NBD were evaluated between 2006 and 2012, retrospectively. The demographic data, the presentation of NBD, clinical findings including seizures, EEG and neuroimaging findings were reviewed. The mean age of patients was 35.02±8.43 years. Thirty (71.4%) patients were male; the remaining 12 of them were female. Twenty-four patients had brainstem lesions; 16 patients had cerebral venous thrombosis. Spinal cord involvement was seen in two patients. Seven patients had epileptic seizures (six partial onset seizures with or without secondary generalization). Six of them had cerebral sinus thrombosis (CVT). Four patients had a seizure as the first symptom of the thrombosis. One patient had late onset seizure due to chronic venous infarct. The other patient with seizure had brainstem involvement. The remaining was diagnosed as epilepsy before the determination of NBD. CVT seen in BD seems to be the main risk factor for epileptic seizures in patients with NBD. The prognosis is usually good especially in patients with CVT. Epileptic seizures in patients with brainstem involvement may be an indicator for poor prognosis. Superior sagittal thrombosis or cortical infarct would be predictor of seizures occurrence because of the high ratio in patients with seizures. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Identification and mitigation of stray laser light in the Thomson scattering system on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, C. M.; Borchardt, M. T.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Falkowski, A. F.; Morton, L. A.; Thomas, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    The Thomson scattering diagnostic on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) records excessive levels of stray Nd:YAG laser light. Stray light saturates the 1064 nm spectral channel in all polychromators, which prevents absolute electron density measurements via Rayleigh scattering calibration. Furthermore, stray light contaminates adjacent spectral channels for r/a ≥ 0.75, which renders the diagnostic unable to make electron temperature measurements at these radii. In situ measurements of stray light levels during a vacuum vessel vent are used to identify stray light sources and strategies for reduction of stray light levels. Numerical modeling using Zemax OpticStudio supports these measurements. The model of the vacuum vessel and diagnostic includes synthetic collection optics to enable direct comparison of measured and simulated stray light levels. Modeling produces qualitatively similar stray light distributions to MST measurements, and quantifies the mitigation effects of stray light mitigation strategies prior to implementation.

  3. Identification and mitigation of stray laser light in the Thomson scattering system on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, C. M., E-mail: cjacobson@wisc.edu; Borchardt, M. T.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Falkowski, A. F.; Morton, L. A.; Thomas, M. A. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The Thomson scattering diagnostic on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) records excessive levels of stray Nd:YAG laser light. Stray light saturates the 1064 nm spectral channel in all polychromators, which prevents absolute electron density measurements via Rayleigh scattering calibration. Furthermore, stray light contaminates adjacent spectral channels for r/a ≥ 0.75, which renders the diagnostic unable to make electron temperature measurements at these radii. In situ measurements of stray light levels during a vacuum vessel vent are used to identify stray light sources and strategies for reduction of stray light levels. Numerical modeling using Zemax OpticStudio supports these measurements. The model of the vacuum vessel and diagnostic includes synthetic collection optics to enable direct comparison of measured and simulated stray light levels. Modeling produces qualitatively similar stray light distributions to MST measurements, and quantifies the mitigation effects of stray light mitigation strategies prior to implementation.

  4. PILOT-SCALE TESTING OF THE SUSPENSION OF MST, CST, AND SIMULATED SLUDGE SLURRIES IN A SLUDGE TANK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, M.; Qureshi, Z.; Restivo, M.; Steeper, T.; Williams, M.; Herman, D.

    2011-08-02

    The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing waste tank (i.e., Tank 41H) to house the process. Following strontium, actinide, and cesium removal, the concentrated solids will be transported to a sludge tank (i.e., monosodium titanate (MST)/sludge solids to Tank 42H or Tank 51H and crystalline silicotitanate (CST) to Tank 40H) for eventual transfer to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is conducting pilot-scale mixing tests to determine the pump requirements for mixing MST, CST, and simulated sludge. The purpose of this pilot scale testing is to determine the pump requirements for mixing MST and CST with sludge in a sludge tank and to determine whether segregation of particles occurs during settling. Tank 40H and Tank 51H have four Quad Volute pumps; Tank 42H has four standard pumps. The pilot-scale tank is a 1/10.85 linear scaled model of Tank 40H. The tank diameter, tank liquid level, pump nozzle diameter, pump elevation, and cooling coil diameter are all 1/10.85 of their dimensions in Tank 40H. The pump locations correspond to the current locations in Tank 40H (Risers B2, H, B6, and G). The pumps are pilot-scale Quad Volute pumps. Additional settling tests were conducted in a 30 foot tall, 4 inch inner diameter clear column to investigate segregation of MST, CST, and simulated sludge particles during settling.

  5. The anticholinergic and antiglutamatergic drug caramiphen reduces seizure duration in soman-exposed rats: Synergism with the benzodiazepine diazepam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, M.K.; Wright, L.K.M.; Stone, M.F.; Schwartz, J.E.; Kelley, N.R.; Moffett, M.C.; Lee, R.B.; Lumley, L.A.

    2012-01-01

    Therapy of seizure activity following exposure to the nerve agent soman (GD) includes treatment with the anticonvulsant diazepam (DZP), an allosteric modulator of γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABA A ) receptors. However, seizure activity itself causes the endocytosis of GABA A receptors and diminishes the inhibitory effects of GABA, thereby reducing the efficacy of DZP. Treatment with an N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist prevents this reduction in GABAergic inhibition. We examined the efficacy of the NMDA receptor antagonist caramiphen edisylate (CED; 20 mg/kg, im) and DZP (10 mg/kg, sc), administered both separately and in combination, at 10, 20 or 30 min following seizure onset for attenuation of the deleterious effects associated with GD exposure (1.2 LD 50 ; 132 μg/kg, sc) in rats. Outcomes evaluated were seizure duration, neuropathology, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, body weight, and temperature. We also examined the use of the reversible AChE inhibitor physostigmine (PHY; 0.2 mg/kg, im) as a therapy for GD exposure. We found that the combination of CED and DZP yielded a synergistic effect, shortening seizure durations and reducing neuropathology compared to DZP alone, when treatment was delayed 20–30 min after seizure onset. PHY reduced the number of animals that developed seizures, protected a fraction of AChE from GD inhibition, and attenuated post-exposure body weight and temperature loss independent of CED and/or DZP treatment. We conclude that: 1) CED and DZP treatment offers considerable protection against the effects of GD and 2) PHY is a potential therapeutic option following GD exposure, albeit with a limited window of opportunity. -- Highlights: ► Soman (GD) produced seizure activity resulting in neuropathology in rats. ► Tx: caramiphen (CED) and/or diazepam (DZP) @ 10, 20 or 30 min after seizure onset. ► CED/DZP showed superior anticonvulsant and neuroprotective capacity. ► Physostigmine (PHY) was examined as an

  6. The anticholinergic and antiglutamatergic drug caramiphen reduces seizure duration in soman-exposed rats: Synergism with the benzodiazepine diazepam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, M.K.; Wright, L.K.M.; Stone, M.F.; Schwartz, J.E.; Kelley, N.R.; Moffett, M.C.; Lee, R.B.; Lumley, L.A., E-mail: lucille.a.lange@us.army.mil

    2012-03-15

    Therapy of seizure activity following exposure to the nerve agent soman (GD) includes treatment with the anticonvulsant diazepam (DZP), an allosteric modulator of γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABA{sub A}) receptors. However, seizure activity itself causes the endocytosis of GABA{sub A} receptors and diminishes the inhibitory effects of GABA, thereby reducing the efficacy of DZP. Treatment with an N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist prevents this reduction in GABAergic inhibition. We examined the efficacy of the NMDA receptor antagonist caramiphen edisylate (CED; 20 mg/kg, im) and DZP (10 mg/kg, sc), administered both separately and in combination, at 10, 20 or 30 min following seizure onset for attenuation of the deleterious effects associated with GD exposure (1.2 LD{sub 50}; 132 μg/kg, sc) in rats. Outcomes evaluated were seizure duration, neuropathology, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, body weight, and temperature. We also examined the use of the reversible AChE inhibitor physostigmine (PHY; 0.2 mg/kg, im) as a therapy for GD exposure. We found that the combination of CED and DZP yielded a synergistic effect, shortening seizure durations and reducing neuropathology compared to DZP alone, when treatment was delayed 20–30 min after seizure onset. PHY reduced the number of animals that developed seizures, protected a fraction of AChE from GD inhibition, and attenuated post-exposure body weight and temperature loss independent of CED and/or DZP treatment. We conclude that: 1) CED and DZP treatment offers considerable protection against the effects of GD and 2) PHY is a potential therapeutic option following GD exposure, albeit with a limited window of opportunity. -- Highlights: ► Soman (GD) produced seizure activity resulting in neuropathology in rats. ► Tx: caramiphen (CED) and/or diazepam (DZP) @ 10, 20 or 30 min after seizure onset. ► CED/DZP showed superior anticonvulsant and neuroprotective capacity. ► Physostigmine (PHY) was

  7. An Alternative to Optimize the Indonesian’s Airport Network Design: An Application of Minimum Spanning Tree (MST Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luluk Lusiantoro

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Using minimum spanning tree technique (MST, this exploratory research was done to optimize the interrelation and hierarchical network design of Indonesian’s airports. This research also identifies the position of the Indonesian’s airports regionally based on the ASEAN Open Sky Policy 2015. The secondary data containing distance between airports (both in Indonesia and in ASEAN, flight frequency, and correlation of Gross Domestic Regional Product (GDRP for each region in Indonesia are used as inputs to form MST networks. The result analysis is done by comparing the MST networks with the existing network in Indonesia. This research found that the existing airport network in Indonesia does not depict the optimal network connecting all airports with the shortest distance and maximizing the correlation of regional economic potential in the country. This research then suggests the optimal networks and identifies the airports and regions as hubs and spokes formed by the networks. Lastly, this research indicates that the Indonesian airports have no strategic position in the ASEAN Open Sky network, but they have an opportunity to get strategic positions if 33 airports in 33 regions in Indonesia are included in the network.

  8. Stimulation Induced Electrographic Seizures in Deep Brain Stimulation of the Anterior Nucleus of the Thalamus Do Not Preclude a Subsequent Favorable Treatment Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nora, Tommi; Heinonen, Hanna; Tenhunen, Mirja; Rainesalo, Sirpa; Järvenpää, Soila; Lehtimäki, Kai; Peltola, Jukka

    2018-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the anterior nucleus of the thalamus (ANT) is a method of neuromodulation used for refractory focal epilepsy. We report a patient suffering from drug-resistant epilepsy who developed novel visual symptoms and atypical seizures with the onset of ANT-DBS therapy. Rechallenge under video electroencephalography recording confirmed that lowering the stimulation voltage alleviated these symptoms. Subsequent stimulation with the initial voltage value did not cause the recurrence of either the visual symptoms or the new seizure type, and appeared to alleviate the patient's seizures in long-term follow-up. We therefore hypothesize that the occurrence of stimulation induced seizures at the onset of DBS therapy should not be considered as a failure in the DBS therapy, and the possibility of a subsequent favorable response to the treatment still exists.

  9. Stimulation Induced Electrographic Seizures in Deep Brain Stimulation of the Anterior Nucleus of the Thalamus Do Not Preclude a Subsequent Favorable Treatment Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommi Nora

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Deep brain stimulation (DBS of the anterior nucleus of the thalamus (ANT is a method of neuromodulation used for refractory focal epilepsy. We report a patient suffering from drug-resistant epilepsy who developed novel visual symptoms and atypical seizures with the onset of ANT-DBS therapy. Rechallenge under video electroencephalography recording confirmed that lowering the stimulation voltage alleviated these symptoms. Subsequent stimulation with the initial voltage value did not cause the recurrence of either the visual symptoms or the new seizure type, and appeared to alleviate the patient’s seizures in long-term follow-up. We therefore hypothesize that the occurrence of stimulation induced seizures at the onset of DBS therapy should not be considered as a failure in the DBS therapy, and the possibility of a subsequent favorable response to the treatment still exists.

  10. Morin impedes Yap nuclear translocation and fosters apoptosis through suppression of Wnt/β-catenin and NF-κB signaling in Mst1 overexpressed HepG2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perumal, NaveenKumar [Department of Biochemistry, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600025, Tamil Nadu (India); Perumal, MadanKumar [Department of Biochemistry, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600025, Tamil Nadu (India); Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Kannan, Anbarasu [Department of Cellular and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas Health Science Center, Tyler, Texas (United States); Subramani, Kumar [Centre for Biotechnology, Anna University, Chennai 600025, Tamil Nadu (India); Halagowder, Devaraj [Department of Zoology, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600025, Tamil Nadu (India); Sivasithamparam, NiranjaliDevaraj, E-mail: profniranjali@gmail.com [Department of Biochemistry, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600025, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2017-06-15

    Recent clinical and experimental evidences strongly acclaim Yes-associated protein (Yap), a key oncogenic driver in liver carcinogenesis, as a therapeutic target. Of the known multiple schemes to inhibit Yap activity, activation of Mammalian Sterile 20-like Kinase 1 (Mst1), an upstream regulator of Yap, appears to be a promising one. In this study, we hypothesize that morin, a bioflavonoid, mediates its anti-cancer effect through the activation of Mst1/hippo signaling in liver cancer cells. To test this hypothesis, both full length Mst1 (F-Mst1) and kinase active N-terminal Mst1 (N-Mst1)-overexpressed HepG2 cells were used. Exposure of F-Mst1 overexpressed HepG2 cells to morin activated Mst1 by caspase-3 cleavage and thereby inhibited Yap nuclear translocation and fostered apoptosis. Morin suppressed NF-κB p65 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling through Mst1 activation via cleavage and phosphorylation, leading to cell death. Annexin-V/PI staining further confirmed the induction of apoptosis in morin treated F-Mst1 overexpressed cells. The present study shows that morin targets cell survival molecules such as NF-κB p65 and β-catenin through activation of hippo signaling. Therefore, morin could be considered as a potential anti-cancer agent against liver cancer. - Highlights: • Morin induced cytotoxicity in cultured HepG2 cells. • Morin activated hippo pathway via Mst1 activation in transfected HepG2 cells. • Morin suppressed Wnt/β-catenin signaling and induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. • Morin inhibited NF-κB signaling through Mst1 activation in transfected HepG2 cells. • Morin potentiates apoptosis through Mst1-JNK-caspase mediated mechanism in HepG2 cells.

  11. Morin impedes Yap nuclear translocation and fosters apoptosis through suppression of Wnt/β-catenin and NF-κB signaling in Mst1 overexpressed HepG2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perumal, NaveenKumar; Perumal, MadanKumar; Kannan, Anbarasu; Subramani, Kumar; Halagowder, Devaraj; Sivasithamparam, NiranjaliDevaraj

    2017-01-01

    Recent clinical and experimental evidences strongly acclaim Yes-associated protein (Yap), a key oncogenic driver in liver carcinogenesis, as a therapeutic target. Of the known multiple schemes to inhibit Yap activity, activation of Mammalian Sterile 20-like Kinase 1 (Mst1), an upstream regulator of Yap, appears to be a promising one. In this study, we hypothesize that morin, a bioflavonoid, mediates its anti-cancer effect through the activation of Mst1/hippo signaling in liver cancer cells. To test this hypothesis, both full length Mst1 (F-Mst1) and kinase active N-terminal Mst1 (N-Mst1)-overexpressed HepG2 cells were used. Exposure of F-Mst1 overexpressed HepG2 cells to morin activated Mst1 by caspase-3 cleavage and thereby inhibited Yap nuclear translocation and fostered apoptosis. Morin suppressed NF-κB p65 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling through Mst1 activation via cleavage and phosphorylation, leading to cell death. Annexin-V/PI staining further confirmed the induction of apoptosis in morin treated F-Mst1 overexpressed cells. The present study shows that morin targets cell survival molecules such as NF-κB p65 and β-catenin through activation of hippo signaling. Therefore, morin could be considered as a potential anti-cancer agent against liver cancer. - Highlights: • Morin induced cytotoxicity in cultured HepG2 cells. • Morin activated hippo pathway via Mst1 activation in transfected HepG2 cells. • Morin suppressed Wnt/β-catenin signaling and induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. • Morin inhibited NF-κB signaling through Mst1 activation in transfected HepG2 cells. • Morin potentiates apoptosis through Mst1-JNK-caspase mediated mechanism in HepG2 cells.

  12. Towards an Online Seizure Advisory System—An Adaptive Seizure Prediction Framework Using Active Learning Heuristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karuppiah Ramachandran, Vignesh Raja; Alblas, Huibert J.; Le Viet Duc, Duc Viet; Meratnia, Nirvana

    2018-01-01

    In the last decade, seizure prediction systems have gained a lot of attention because of their enormous potential to largely improve the quality-of-life of the epileptic patients. The accuracy of the prediction algorithms to detect seizure in real-world applications is largely limited because the

  13. EEG analysis of seizure patterns using visibility graphs for detection of generalized seizures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Lei; Long, Xi; Arends, J.B.A.M.; Aarts, R.M.

    2017-01-01

    Background The traditional EEG features in the time and frequency domain show limited seizure detection performance in the epileptic population with intellectual disability (ID). In addition, the influence of EEG seizure patterns on detection performance was less studied. New method A single-channel

  14. Plasticity-modulated seizure dynamics for seizure termination in realistic neuronal models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppert, M.M.J.; Kalitzin, S.; Lopes da Silva, F.H.; Viergever, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    In previous studies we showed that autonomous absence seizure generation and termination can be explained by realistic neuronal models eliciting bi-stable dynamics. In these models epileptic seizures are triggered either by external stimuli (reflex epilepsies) or by internal fluctuations. This

  15. SUT sucrose and MST monosaccharide transporter inventory of the Selaginella genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie eLalonde

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available While most metazoa mainly use hexose transporters to acquire hexoses from their diet and as a transport form for distributing carbon and energy within their bodies, insects use trehalose and plants use sucrose as their major form for translocation. Plant genomes contain at least three families of mono- and disaccharide transporters: monosaccharide/polyol transporters that are evolutionary closely related to the yeast and human glucose transporters, sucrose transporters of the SUT family, which similar to the hexose transporters belong to the major facilitator superfamily (MFS, but share only minimal amino acid sequence homology to the hexose transporters, and the family of SWEET sugar transporters conserved between animals and plants. Recently, the genome sequence of the spikemoss Selaginella has been determined. In order to study the evolution of sugar transport in plants, we carried out a careful annotation of the complement of sugar transporters in Selaginella. We review what is known about sugar transport in spikemoss and provide phylogenetic analyses of the complement of MST and SUT homologs in Selaginella.

  16. Control of the wax moth Galleria mellonella L. (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae by the male sterile technique (MST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafari Reza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we examined the control of wax moth using the male sterile technique (MST with gamma-rays. To determine the safe and effective dosage of gamma-rays capable of sterilizing male pupae of the wax moth, male pupae were exposed to increasing single doses of gamma-rays (250, 300, 350 and 400 Gy. The release ratio of sterile to normal males was also studied in a similar experiment. Treatments included sterile males, normal males and virgin females at the following ratios: 1:1:1, 2:1:1, 3:1:1, 4:1:1 and 5:1:1. Possible parthenogenetic reproduction of this pest was also examined. The results showed that 350 Gy was the most effective dose capable of sterilizing the male pupae of the wax moth. The best release ratio was established at four sterile males, one normal male for each normal female (4:1:1. Also females were incapable of producing offspring without males.

  17. Animal Models of Seizures and Epilepsy: Past, Present, and Future Role for the Discovery of Antiseizure Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löscher, Wolfgang

    2017-07-01

    The identification of potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of epilepsy requires the use of seizure models. Except for some early treatments, including bromides and phenobarbital, the antiseizure activity of all clinically used drugs was, for the most part, defined by acute seizure models in rodents using the maximal electroshock and subcutaneous pentylenetetrazole seizure tests and the electrically kindled rat. Unfortunately, the clinical evidence to date would suggest that none of these models, albeit useful, are likely to identify those therapeutics that will effectively manage patients with drug resistant seizures. Over the last 30 years, a number of animal models have been developed that display varying degrees of pharmacoresistance, such as the phenytoin- or lamotrigine-resistant kindled rat, the 6-Hz mouse model of partial seizures, the intrahippocampal kainate model in mice, or rats in which spontaneous recurrent seizures develops after inducing status epilepticus by chemical or electrical stimulation. As such, these models can be used to study mechanisms of drug resistance and may provide a unique opportunity for identifying a truly novel antiseizure drug (ASD), but thus far clinical evidence for this hope is lacking. Although animal models of drug resistant seizures are now included in ASD discovery approaches such as the ETSP (epilepsy therapy screening program), it is important to note that no single model has been validated for use to identify potential compounds for as yet drug resistant seizures, but rather a battery of such models should be employed, thus enhancing the sensitivity to discover novel, highly effective ASDs. The present review describes the previous and current approaches used in the search for new ASDs and offers some insight into future directions incorporating new and emerging animal models of therapy resistance.

  18. The effects of glycemic control on seizures and seizure-induced excitotoxic cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schauwecker Paula

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epilepsy is the most common neurological disorder after stroke, affecting more than 50 million persons worldwide. Metabolic disturbances are often associated with epileptic seizures, but the pathogenesis of this relationship is poorly understood. It is known that seizures result in altered glucose metabolism, the reduction of intracellular energy metabolites such as ATP, ADP and phosphocreatine and the accumulation of metabolic intermediates, such as lactate and adenosine. In particular, it has been suggested that the duration and extent of glucose dysregulation may be a predictor of the pathological outcome of status. However, little is known about neither the effects of glycemic control on brain metabolism nor the effects of managing systemic glucose concentrations in epilepsy. Results In this study, we examined glycemic modulation of kainate-induced seizure sensitivity and its neuropathological consequences. To investigate the relationship between glycemic modulation, seizure susceptibility and its neuropathological consequences, C57BL/6 mice (excitotoxin cell death resistant were subjected to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia, followed by systemic administration of kainic acid to induce seizures. Glycemic modulation resulted in minimal consequences with regard to seizure severity but increased hippocampal pathology, irrespective of whether mice were hypoglycemic or hyperglycemic prior to kainate administration. Moreover, we found that exogenous administration of glucose following kainic acid seizures significantly reduced the extent of hippocampal pathology in FVB/N mice (excitotoxin cell death susceptible following systemic administration of kainic acid. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that modulation of the glycemic index can modify the outcome of brain injury in the kainate model of seizure induction. Moreover, modulation of the glycemic index through glucose rescue greatly diminishes the extent of seizure

  19. Detection of Epileptic Seizures with Multi-modal Signal Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa

    convulsive seizures tested. Another study was performed, involving quantitative parameters in the time and frequency domain. The study showed, that there are several differences between tonic seizures and the tonic phase of GTC seizures and furthermore revealed differences of the epileptic (tonic and tonic...... phase of GTC) and simulated seizures. This was valuable information concerning a seizure detection algorithm, and the findings from this research provided evidence for a change in the definition of these seizures by the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE). Our final study presents a novel...

  20. Risk of seizures in transcranial magnetic stimulation: a clinical review to inform consent process focused on bupropion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobek CE

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Christine E Dobek,1 Daniel M Blumberger,2 Jonathan Downar,3 Zafiris J Daskalakis,2 Fidel Vila-Rodriguez11Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Non-Invasive Neurostimulation Therapies (NINET Laboratory, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, 2Department of Psychiatry, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 3Department of Psychiatry, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, CanadaObjective: When considering repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS for major depressive disorder, clinicians often face a lack of detailed information on potential interactions between rTMS and pharmacotherapy. This is particularly relevant to patients receiving bupropion, a commonly prescribed antidepressant with lower risk of sexual side effects or weight increase, which has been associated with increased risk of seizure in particular populations. Our aim was to systematically review the information on seizures occurred with rTMS to identify the potential risk factors with attention to concurrent medications, particularly bupropion.Data sources: We conducted a systematic review through the databases PubMed, PsycINFO, and EMBASE between 1980 and June 2015. Additional articles were found using reference lists of relevant articles. Reporting of data follows Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement.Study selection: Two reviewers independently screened articles reporting the occurrence of seizures during rTMS. Articles reporting seizures in epilepsy during rTMS were excluded. A total of 25 rTMS-induced seizures were included in the final review.Data extraction: Data were systematically extracted, and the authors of the applicable studies were contacted when appropriate to provide more detail about the seizure incidents.Results: Twenty-five seizures were identified. Potential risk factors emerged such as sleep deprivation, polypharmacy, and neurological insult. High-frequency-rTMS was

  1. Prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation and subsequent development of seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, K.; Yoshimaru, H.; Otake, M.; Annegers, J.F.; Schull, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    Seizures are a frequent sequela of impaired brain development and can be expected to affect more children with radiation-related brain damage than children without such damage. This report deals with the incidence and type of seizures among survivors prenatally exposed to the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and their association with specific stages of prenatal development at the time of irradiation. Fetal radiation dose was assumed to be equal to the dose to the maternal uterus. Seizures here include all references in the clinical record to seizure, epilepsy, or convulsion. Histories of seizures were obtained at biennial routine clinical examinations starting at about the age of 2 years. These clinical records were used to classify seizures as febrile or unprovoked (without precipitating cause). No seizures were ascertained among subjects exposed 0-7 weeks after fertilization at doses higher than 0.10 Gy. The incidence of seizures was highest with irradiation at the eighth through the 15th week after fertilization among subjects with doses exceeding 0.10 Gy and was linearly related to the level of fetal exposure. This obtains for all seizures without regard to the presence of fever or precipitating causes, and for unprovoked seizures. When the 22 cases of severe mental retardation were excluded, the increase in seizures was only suggestively significant and only for unprovoked seizures. After exposure at later stages of development, there was no increase in recorded seizures

  2. A new model to study sleep deprivation-induced seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucey, Brendan P; Leahy, Averi; Rosas, Regine; Shaw, Paul J

    2015-05-01

    A relationship between sleep and seizures is well-described in both humans and rodent animal models; however, the mechanism underlying this relationship is unknown. Using Drosophila melanogaster mutants with seizure phenotypes, we demonstrate that seizure activity can be modified by sleep deprivation. Seizure activity was evaluated in an adult bang-sensitive seizure mutant, stress sensitive B (sesB(9ed4)), and in an adult temperature sensitive seizure mutant seizure (sei(ts1)) under baseline and following 12 h of sleep deprivation. The long-term effect of sleep deprivation on young, immature sesB(9ed4) flies was also assessed. Laboratory. Drosophila melanogaster. Sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation increased seizure susceptibility in adult sesB(9ed4)/+ and sei(ts1) mutant flies. Sleep deprivation also increased seizure susceptibility when sesB was disrupted using RNAi. The effect of sleep deprivation on seizure activity was reduced when sesB(9ed4)/+ flies were given the anti-seizure drug, valproic acid. In contrast to adult flies, sleep deprivation during early fly development resulted in chronic seizure susceptibility when sesB(9ed4)/+ became adults. These findings show that Drosophila is a model organism for investigating the relationship between sleep and seizure activity. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  3. Pure methotrexate encephalopathy presenting with seizures: CT and MRI features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loevblad, K.O.; Kelkar, P.; Ozdoba, C.; Remonda, L.; Schroth, G. [Department of Neuroradiology, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Inselspital, University of Bern, CH-3010 Bern (Switzerland); Ramelli, G. [Department of Pediatrics, Inselspital, University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland)

    1998-02-01

    With the advent of chemotherapy, mortality rates in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) have decreased, but complications in the central nervous system have appeared. These include direct involvement of the brain itself and the development of chemotherapy-related encephalopathy as a delayed reaction. In most reported cases, this encephalopathy is believed to be due to necrotising angiitis arising from the combination of chemotherapy with adjuvant radiotherapy. We report the cases of four children with ALL who had been treated with high-dose intravenous and intrathecal chemotherapy but no radiation therapy, and who were admitted to hospital because of seizures. CT of the brain revealed the presence of diffuse periventricular white matter hypodensities in all cases and subcortical hyperdense foci in three cases. MRI showed diffuse hyperintense white matter lesions on T2-weighted images in all four patients; hypointense changes were observed on susceptibility-sensitive FLASH sequences in the hyperdense foci seen on CT as well as changes that were hyperintense on T1-weighted images. It was, therefore, concluded that the lesions corresponded to a leukoencephalopathy with calcific deposits. These findings are of a pure form of methotrexate encephalopathy causing seizures. (orig.) With 2 figs., 17 refs.

  4. Pure methotrexate encephalopathy presenting with seizures: CT and MRI features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loevblad, K.O.; Kelkar, P.; Ozdoba, C.; Remonda, L.; Schroth, G.; Ramelli, G.

    1998-01-01

    With the advent of chemotherapy, mortality rates in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) have decreased, but complications in the central nervous system have appeared. These include direct involvement of the brain itself and the development of chemotherapy-related encephalopathy as a delayed reaction. In most reported cases, this encephalopathy is believed to be due to necrotising angiitis arising from the combination of chemotherapy with adjuvant radiotherapy. We report the cases of four children with ALL who had been treated with high-dose intravenous and intrathecal chemotherapy but no radiation therapy, and who were admitted to hospital because of seizures. CT of the brain revealed the presence of diffuse periventricular white matter hypodensities in all cases and subcortical hyperdense foci in three cases. MRI showed diffuse hyperintense white matter lesions on T2-weighted images in all four patients; hypointense changes were observed on susceptibility-sensitive FLASH sequences in the hyperdense foci seen on CT as well as changes that were hyperintense on T1-weighted images. It was, therefore, concluded that the lesions corresponded to a leukoencephalopathy with calcific deposits. These findings are of a pure form of methotrexate encephalopathy causing seizures. (orig.)

  5. Widespread EEG changes precede focal seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Perucca

    Full Text Available The process by which the brain transitions into an epileptic seizure is unknown. In this study, we investigated whether the transition to seizure is associated with changes in brain dynamics detectable in the wideband EEG, and whether differences exist across underlying pathologies. Depth electrode ictal EEG recordings from 40 consecutive patients with pharmacoresistant lesional focal epilepsy were low-pass filtered at 500 Hz and sampled at 2,000 Hz. Predefined EEG sections were selected immediately before (immediate preictal, and 30 seconds before the earliest EEG sign suggestive of seizure activity (baseline. Spectral analysis, visual inspection and discrete wavelet transform were used to detect standard (delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma and high-frequency bands (ripples and fast ripples. At the group level, each EEG frequency band activity increased significantly from baseline to the immediate preictal section, mostly in a progressive manner and independently of any modification in the state of vigilance. Preictal increases in each frequency band activity were widespread, being observed in the seizure-onset zone and lesional tissue, as well as in remote regions. These changes occurred in all the investigated pathologies (mesial temporal atrophy/sclerosis, local/regional cortical atrophy, and malformations of cortical development, but were more pronounced in mesial temporal atrophy/sclerosis. Our findings indicate that a brain state change with distinctive features, in the form of unidirectional changes across the entire EEG bandwidth, occurs immediately prior to seizure onset. We postulate that these changes might reflect a facilitating state of the brain which enables a susceptible region to generate seizures.

  6. Sex dimorphism in seizure-controlling networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, Fillippo Sean; Galanopoulou, Aristea S; Moshé, Solomon L

    2014-12-01

    Males and females show a different predisposition to certain types of seizures in clinical studies. Animal studies have provided growing evidence for sexual dimorphism of certain brain regions, including those that control seizures. Seizures are modulated by networks involving subcortical structures, including thalamus, reticular formation nuclei, and structures belonging to the basal ganglia. In animal models, the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNR) is the best studied of these areas, given its relevant role in the expression and control of seizures throughout development in the rat. Studies with bilateral infusions of the GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol have identified distinct roles of the anterior or posterior rat SNR in flurothyl seizure control, that follow sex-specific maturational patterns during development. These studies indicate that (a) the regional functional compartmentalization of the SNR appears only after the third week of life, (b) only the male SNR exhibits muscimol-sensitive proconvulsant effects which, in older animals, is confined to the posterior SNR, and (c) the expression of the muscimol-sensitive anticonvulsant effects become apparent earlier in females than in males. The first three postnatal days are crucial in determining the expression of the muscimol-sensitive proconvulsant effects of the immature male SNR, depending on the gonadal hormone setting. Activation of the androgen receptors during this early period seems to be important for the formation of this proconvulsant SNR region. We describe molecular/anatomical candidates underlying these age- and sex-related differences, as derived from in vitro and in vivo experiments, as well as by [(14)C]2-deoxyglucose autoradiography. These involve sex-specific patterns in the developmental changes in the structure or physiology or GABA(A) receptors or of other subcortical structures (e.g., locus coeruleus, hippocampus) that may affect the function of seizure-controlling networks

  7. Concurrent Electroconvulsive Therapy and Bupropion Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takala, Christopher R; Leung, Jonathan G; Murphy, Lauren L; Geske, Jennifer R; Palmer, Brian A

    2017-09-01

    Bupropion is associated with a dose-dependent increased risk of seizures. Use of concomitant bupropion and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) remains controversial because of an increased risk of prolonged seizures. This is the first systematic evaluation of the effect of bupropion on ECT. A case group (n = 119), patients treated with concomitant ECT and bupropion, was compared with an age and gender frequency-matched control group (n = 261), treated with only ECT. Electroconvulsive therapy treatment data including seizure length, number of treatments, and concurrent medications were extracted. Longitudinal mixed models examined ECT versus ECT + bupropion group differences over the course of treatments measured by seizure duration (electroencephalogram [EEG] and motor). Multivariable models examined the total number of treatments and first and last seizure duration. All models considered group differences with ECT treatment measures adjusted for age, gender, benzodiazepine treatment, lead placement, and setting. Electroconvulsive therapy treatment with bupropion led to shorter motor seizure duration (0.047) and EEG seizure duration (P = 0.001). The number of ECT treatments (7.3 vs 7.0 treatments; P = 0.23), respectively, or the probability of a prolonged seizure (P = 0.15) was not significantly different. Benzodiazepine use was significantly more common in control subjects (P = 0.01). This is a retrospective analysis limited in part by unavailable variables (seizure threshold, nature of EEG and motor seizure monitoring, type of ECT device, dosing and formulation of bupropion, and duration of the current depressive illness). This study revealed a significantly shorter duration in seizure length with ECT + concomitant bupropion, but not in the number of required treatments in those treated compared with ECT without bupropion. There remains a critical need to reevaluate the efficacy of concomitant use of psychotropic medications + ECT.

  8. Seizures after intravenous tramadol given as premedication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalit Kumar Raiger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 35-year-old, 50-kg female with a history of epilepsy was scheduled for elective breast surgery (fibroadenoma under general anaesthesia. She was given glycopyrrolate 0.2 mg, ondansetron 4 mg and tramadol 100 mg i.v. as premedication. Within 5 min, she had an acute episode of generalised tonic-clonic seizure that was successfully treated with 75 mg thiopentone i.v. and after 30 min, she was given general anaesthesia with endotracheal intubation. Surgery, intra-operative period, extubation and post-operative period were uneventful. We conclude that tramadol may provoke seizures in patients with epilepsy even within the recommended dose range.

  9. Treating seizures and epilepsy with anticoagulants?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola eMaggio

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Thrombin is a serine protease playing an essential role in the blood coagulation cascade. Recent work, however, has identified a novel role for thrombin-mediated signaling pathways in the central nervous system. Binding of thrombin to protease-activated receptors (PARs in the brain appears to have multiple actions affecting both health and disease. Specifically, thrombin has been shown to lead to the onset of seizures via PAR-1 activation. In this perspective article, we review the putative mechanisms by which thrombin causes seizures and epilepsy. We propose a potential role of PAR-1 antagonists and novel thrombin inhibitors as new, possible antiepileptic drugs.

  10. Seizure After Local Anesthesia for Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Jing Tsai

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available We report a young male patient who experienced seizure after local injection of 3 mL 2% lidocaine with epinephrine 1:200,000 around a recurrent nasal angiofibroma. After receiving 100% oxygen via mask and thiamylal sodium, the patient had no residual neurologic sequelae. Seizure immediately following the injection of local anesthetics in the nasal cavity is probably due to injection into venous or arterial circulation with retrograde flow to the brain circulation. Further imaging study or angiography should be done before head and neck surgeries, especially in such highly vascular neoplasm.

  11. Characterization of beam-driven instabilities and current redistribution in MST plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parke, E.

    2015-11-01

    A unique, high-rep-rate (>10 kHz) Thomson scattering diagnostic and a high-bandwidth FIR interferometer-polarimeter on MST have enabled characterization of beam-driven instabilities and magnetic equilibrium changes observed during high power (1 MW) neutral beam injection (NBI). While NBI leads to negligible net current drive, an increase in on-axis current density observed through Faraday rotation is offset by a reduction in mid-radius current. Identification of the phase flip in temperature fluctuations associated with tearing modes provides a sensitive measure of rational surface locations. This technique strongly constrains the safety factor for equilibrium reconstruction and provides a powerful new tool for measuring the equilibrium magnetic field. For example, the n = 6 temperature structure is observed to shift inward 1.1 +/- 0.6 cm, with an estimated reduction of q0 by 5%. This is consistent with a mid-radius reduction in current, and together the Faraday rotation and Thomson scattering measurements corroborate an inductive redistribution of current that compares well with TRANSP/MSTFit predictions. Interpreting tearing mode temperature structures in the RFP remains challenging; the effects of multiple, closely-spaced tearing modes on the mode phase measurement require further verification. In addition to equilibrium changes, previous work has shown that the large fast ion population drives instabilities at higher frequencies near the Alfvén continuum. Recent observations reveal a new instability at much lower frequency (~7 kHz) with strongly chirping behavior. It participates in extensive avalanches of the higher frequency energetic particle and Alfvénic modes to drive enhanced fast ion transport. Internal structures measured from Te and ne fluctuations, their dependence on the safety factor, as well as frequency scaling motivate speculation about mode identity. Work supported by U.S. DOE.

  12. Momentum transport during reconnection events in the MST reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuritsyn, Alexey

    2008-11-01

    During reconnection events in the MST reversed field pinch momentum parallel to the magnetic field is observed to be suddenly transported from the core to the edge. This occurs simultaneous with a surge in multiple resistive tearing instabilities. From measurements of the plasma flow and the forces arising from tearing instability (Maxwell and Reynolds stresses) we have established that tearing instabilities induce strong momentum transport. Comparison with nonlinear MHD computation of tearing fluctuations supports this conclusion, although it also indicates that effects beyond single-fluid MHD are likely to be important. The radial profile of the parallel velocity is reconstructed from a combination of diagnostics: Rutherford scattering of injected neutral atoms (for majority ions), charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (for minority ions), and Mach probes (for edge majority ion flow). Maxwell stress has been measured previously in the core by laser Faraday rotation, and both stresses are measured in the edge with probes. A surprising observation is that both the Maxwell and Reynolds stresses are each ten times larger than needed to account for the observed momentum transport (i.e., larger than the inertial and viscous terms in the momentum balance equation). However, they are oppositely directed such that their difference is approximately equal to the rate of change of plasma momentum. The large magnitude of the individual stresses is not predicted by MHD theory; the Maxwell stress also produces a Hall dynamo effect, implying that a two-fluid theory might be necessary for a complete description of momentum transport. To test further the relation between momentum transport and tearing fluctuations, momentum transport was measured perturbatively, by altering plasma rotation with inserted biased electrodes. Biasing is applied in plasmas with large tearing activity and improved confinement plasmas in which tearing activity is reduced by inductive current profile

  13. Spectroscopic measurement of the MHD dynamo in the MST reversed field pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, James Tharp [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1998-09-01

    The author has directly observed the coupling of ion velocity fluctuations and magnetic field fluctuations to produce an MHD dynamo electric field in the interior of the MST reversed field pinch. Chord averaged ion velocity fluctuations were measured with a fast spectroscopic diagnostic which collects line radiation from intrinsic carbon impurities simultaneously along two lines of sight. The chords employed for the measurements resolved long wavelength velocity fluctuations of several km/s at 8-20 kHz as tiny, fast Doppler shifts in the emitted line profile. During discrete dynamo events the velocity fluctuations, like the magnetic fluctuations, increase dramatically. The toroidal and poloidal chords with impact parameters of 0.3 a and 0.6 a respectively, resolved fluctuation wavenumbers with resonance surfaces near or along the lines of sight indicating a radial velocity fluctuation width for each mode which spans only a fraction of the plasma radius. The phase between the measured toroidal velocity fluctuations and the magnetic fluctuations matches the predictions of resistive MHD while the poloidal velocity fluctuations exhibit a phase consistent with the superposition of MHD effects and the advection of a mean flow gradient past the poloidal line of sight. Radial velocity fluctuations resolved by a chord through the center of the plasma were small compared to the poloidal and toroidal fluctuations and exhibited low coherence with the magnetic fluctuations. The ensembled nonlinear product of the ion velocity fluctuations and fluctuations in the magnetic field indicates a substantial dynamo electric field which peaks during the periods of spontaneous flux generation.

  14. Spectroscopic measurement of the MHD dynamo in the MST reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, J.T.

    1998-09-01

    The author has directly observed the coupling of ion velocity fluctuations and magnetic field fluctuations to produce an MHD dynamo electric field in the interior of the MST reversed field pinch. Chord averaged ion velocity fluctuations were measured with a fast spectroscopic diagnostic which collects line radiation from intrinsic carbon impurities simultaneously along two lines of sight. The chords employed for the measurements resolved long wavelength velocity fluctuations of several km/s at 8--20 kHz as tiny, fast Doppler shifts in the emitted line profile. During discrete dynamo events the velocity fluctuations, like the magnetic fluctuations, increase dramatically. The toroidal and poloidal chords with impact parameters of 0.3 a and 0.6 a respectively, resolved fluctuation wavenumbers with resonance surfaces near or along the lines of sight indicating a radial velocity fluctuation width for each mode which spans only a fraction of the plasma radius. The phase between the measured toroidal velocity fluctuations and the magnetic fluctuations matches the predictions of resistive MHD while the poloidal velocity fluctuations exhibit a phase consistent with the superposition of MHD effects and the advection of a mean flow gradient past the poloidal line of sight. Radial velocity fluctuations resolved by a chord through the center of the plasma were small compared to the poloidal and toroidal fluctuations and exhibited low coherence with the magnetic fluctuations. The ensembled nonlinear product of the ion velocity fluctuations and fluctuations in the magnetic field indicates a substantial dynamo electric field which peaks during the periods of spontaneous flux generation

  15. A systematic review of suggestive seizure induction for the diagnosis of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popkirov, Stoyan; Grönheit, Wenke; Wellmer, Jörg

    2015-09-01

    Suggestive seizure induction is a widely used method for diagnosing psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES). Despite seven decades of multidisciplinary research, however, there is still no unified protocol, no definitive agreement on the ethical framework and no consensus on diagnostic utility. This systematic review surveys the evidence at hand and addresses clinically relevant aspects of suggestive seizure induction. In addition to its use for facilitating the diagnostic process, its mechanism of action and utility in elucidating the psychopathology of PNES will be discussed. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. How does electroconvulsive therapy work?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolwig, Tom G

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews 3 current theories of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). One theory points to generalized seizures as essential for the therapeutic efficacy of ECT. Another theory highlights the normalization of neuroendocrine dysfunction in melancholic depression as a result of ECT. A third...... theory is based on recent findings of increased hippocampal neurogenesis and synaptogenesis in experimental animals given electroconvulsive seizures. Presently, the endocrine theory has the strongest foundation to explain the working mechanism of ECT....

  17. How does electroconvulsive therapy work?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolwig, Tom G

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews 3 current theories of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). One theory points to generalized seizures as essential for the therapeutic efficacy of ECT. Another theory highlights the normalization of neuroendocrine dysfunction in melancholic depression as a result of ECT. A third t...... theory is based on recent findings of increased hippocampal neurogenesis and synaptogenesis in experimental animals given electroconvulsive seizures. Presently, the endocrine theory has the strongest foundation to explain the working mechanism of ECT....

  18. Computed tomography and childhood seizure disorder in Ibadan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Computed tomography and childhood seizure disorder in Ibadan. ... neuroimaging, it offers an opportunity to investigate structural lesions as a cause of seizures ... The presence of neurologic deficit increased the yield of abnormal CT features.

  19. Epileptic seizures in patients with glioma: A single centre- based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    were used for analysis of seizure incidence differences as per WHO Grades, histology, location ... Keywords: Brain tumour, Epilepsy, Glioma, Seizures, Levetiracetam, .... glioma patients. Characteristics. N (%). Gender. Male. Female. Histology.

  20. Puerperal seizures: not the usual suspects | Hayes | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. We present a case of puerperal seizures and neonatal flaccidity due to abuse and abrupt withdrawal from zolpidem, following an elective Caesarean delivery at term. Keywords: zolpidem, puerperal seizures, withdrawal ...

  1. Phenobarbital reduces EEG amplitude and propagation of neonatal seizures but does not alter performance of automated seizure detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieson, Sean R; Livingstone, Vicki; Low, Evonne; Pressler, Ronit; Rennie, Janet M; Boylan, Geraldine B

    2016-10-01

    Phenobarbital increases electroclinical uncoupling and our preliminary observations suggest it may also affect electrographic seizure morphology. This may alter the performance of a novel seizure detection algorithm (SDA) developed by our group. The objectives of this study were to compare the morphology of seizures before and after phenobarbital administration in neonates and to determine the effect of any changes on automated seizure detection rates. The EEGs of 18 term neonates with seizures both pre- and post-phenobarbital (524 seizures) administration were studied. Ten features of seizures were manually quantified and summary measures for each neonate were statistically compared between pre- and post-phenobarbital seizures. SDA seizure detection rates were also compared. Post-phenobarbital seizures showed significantly lower amplitude (pphenobarbital reduces both the amplitude and propagation of seizures which may help to explain electroclinical uncoupling of seizures. The seizure detection rate of the algorithm was unaffected by these changes. The results suggest that users should not need to adjust the SDA sensitivity threshold after phenobarbital administration. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Multicenter clinical assessment of improved wearable multimodal convulsive seizure detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onorati, Francesco; Regalia, Giulia; Caborni, Chiara; Migliorini, Matteo; Bender, Daniel; Poh, Ming-Zher; Frazier, Cherise; Kovitch Thropp, Eliana; Mynatt, Elizabeth D; Bidwell, Jonathan; Mai, Roberto; LaFrance, W Curt; Blum, Andrew S; Friedman, Daniel; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Mohammadpour-Touserkani, Fatemeh; Reinsberger, Claus; Tognetti, Simone; Picard, Rosalind W

    2017-11-01

    New devices are needed for monitoring seizures, especially those associated with sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). They must be unobtrusive and automated, and provide false alarm rates (FARs) bearable in everyday life. This study quantifies the performance of new multimodal wrist-worn convulsive seizure detectors. Hand-annotated video-electroencephalographic seizure events were collected from 69 patients at six clinical sites. Three different wristbands were used to record electrodermal activity (EDA) and accelerometer (ACM) signals, obtaining 5,928 h of data, including 55 convulsive epileptic seizures (six focal tonic-clonic seizures and 49 focal to bilateral tonic-clonic seizures) from 22 patients. Recordings were analyzed offline to train and test two new machine learning classifiers and a published classifier based on EDA and ACM. Moreover, wristband data were analyzed to estimate seizure-motion duration and autonomic responses. The two novel classifiers consistently outperformed the previous detector. The most efficient (Classifier III) yielded sensitivity of 94.55%, and an FAR of 0.2 events/day. No nocturnal seizures were missed. Most patients had seizure frequency. When increasing the sensitivity to 100% (no missed seizures), the FAR is up to 13 times lower than with the previous detector. Furthermore, all detections occurred before the seizure ended, providing reasonable latency (median = 29.3 s, range = 14.8-151 s). Automatically estimated seizure durations were correlated with true durations, enabling reliable annotations. Finally, EDA measurements confirmed the presence of postictal autonomic dysfunction, exhibiting a significant rise in 73% of the convulsive seizures. The proposed multimodal wrist-worn convulsive seizure detectors provide seizure counts that are more accurate than previous automated detectors and typical patient self-reports, while maintaining a tolerable FAR for ambulatory monitoring. Furthermore, the multimodal system

  3. Specific features of early post-stroke seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Valeryevna Danilova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of examining 101 patients (68 men and 33 women aged 48 to 89 years with seizures in the first 7 days of stroke. A control group comprised 97 patients who had experienced ischemic stroke without seizures. Early seizures more frequently occurred in the cardioembolic subtype of stroke as simple partial seizures. The neuroimaging features of ischemic foci were revealed and the cerebrovascular responsiveness was evaluated in different vascular basins in these patients.

  4. pre-hospital management of febrile seizures in children seen

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INTRODUCTION. A febrile seizure refers to a seizure occurring in infancy or childhood usually between three months and five years of age as a result of elevated body temperature in the absence of pathology in the brain.1 Febrile seizures are commonly encountered in emergency paediatric practice and have been ...

  5. Out-of-body experiences associated with seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce eGreyson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Alterations of consciousness are critical factors in the diagnosis of epileptic seizures. With these alterations in consciousness, some persons report sensations of separating from the physical body, experiences that may in rare cases resemble spontaneous out-of-body experiences. This study was designed to identify and characterize these out-of-body-like subjective experiences associated with seizure activity. 55% of the patients in this study recalled some subjective experience in association with their seizures. Among our sample of 100 patients, 7 reported out-of-body experiences associated with their seizures. We found no differentiating traits that were associated with patients’ reports of out-of-body experiences, in terms of either demographics; medical history, including age of onset and duration of seizure disorder, and seizure frequency; seizure characteristics, including localization, lateralization, etiology, and type of seizure, and epilepsy syndrome; or ability to recall any subjective experiences associated with their seizures. Reporting out-of-body experiences in association with seizures did not affect epilepsy-related quality of life. It should be noted that even in those patients who report out-of-body experiences, such sensations are extremely rare events that do not occur routinely with their seizures. Most patients who reported out-of-body experiences described one or two experiences that occurred an indeterminate number of years ago, which precludes the possibility of associating the experience with the particular characteristics of that one seizure or with medications taken or other conditions at the time.

  6. Complex partial seizure, disruptive behaviours and the Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Complex partial seizure is an epileptic seizure which results in impairment of responsiveness or awareness such as altered level of consciousness. Complex partial seizures are often preceded by an aura such as depersonalization, feelings of de javu, jamais vu and fear. The ictal phase of complex partial ...

  7. The determinants of seizure severity in Nigerian epileptics | Imam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This assesses generalisation of seizures, falls, injuries, urinary incontinence, warning interval before loss of consciousness, automatisms and time of recovery on a graded scale. Results: The most frequent indices of seizure severity in Nigerian epileptics is the generalisation of seizures in 85.7% of subjects, incontinence of ...

  8. 19 CFR 162.21 - Responsibility and authority for seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Responsibility and authority for seizures. 162.21 Section 162.21 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... authority for seizures. (a) Seizures by Customs officers. Property may be seized, if available, by any...

  9. Rapidly Learned Identification of Epileptic Seizures from Sonified EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Psyche eLoui

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Sonification refers to a process by which data are converted into sound, providing an auditory alternative to visual display. Currently, the prevalent method for diagnosing seizures in epilepsy is by visually reading a patient’s electroencephalogram (EEG. However, sonification of the EEG data provides certain advantages due to the nature of human auditory perception. We hypothesized that human listeners will be able to identify seizures from EEGs using the auditory modality alone, and that accuracy of seizure identification will increase after a short training session. Here we describe an algorithm we have used to sonify EEGs of both seizure and non-seizure activity, followed by a training study in which subjects listened to short clips of sonified EEGs and determine whether each clip was of seizure or normal activity, both before and after a short training session. Results show that before training subjects performed at chance level in differentiating seizures vs. non-seizures, but there was a significant improvement of accuracy after the training session. After training, subjects successfully distinguished seizures from non-seizures using the auditory modality alone. Further analyses using signal detection theory demonstrated improvement in sensitivity and reduction in response bias as a result of training. This study demonstrates the potential of sonified EEGs to be used for the detection of seizures. Future studies will attempt to increase accuracy using novel training and sonification modifications, with the goals of managing, predicting, and ultimately controlling seizures using sonification as a possible biofeedback-based intervention for epilepsy.

  10. Patterns of antiepileptic drug use and seizure control among people ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Epilepsy is characterized by episodic and unpredictable seizure recurrences which are often amenable to medical treatment. Simple and readily available medications can be used to control seizures in epilepsy. However, in many communities in developing countries seizure control among people living with ...

  11. 26 CFR 403.25 - Personal property subject to seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Personal property subject to seizure. 403.25... AND ADMINISTRATION DISPOSITION OF SEIZED PERSONAL PROPERTY Seizures and Forfeitures § 403.25 Personal property subject to seizure. Personal property may be seized by the Commissioner of Internal Revenue or his...

  12. 28 CFR 0.86 - Seizure of gambling devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Seizure of gambling devices. 0.86 Section... Bureau of Investigation § 0.86 Seizure of gambling devices. The Director, Associate Director, Assistants... General to make seizures of gambling devices (18 U.S.C. 1955(d), 15 U.S.C. 1171 et seq.) and wire or oral...

  13. 27 CFR 447.63 - Seizure and forfeiture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seizure and forfeiture. 447.63 Section 447.63 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS... IMPLEMENTS OF WAR Penalties, Seizures and Forfeitures § 447.63 Seizure and forfeiture. Whoever knowingly...

  14. 77 FR 11437 - Inspection Service Authority; Seizure and Forfeiture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... POSTAL SERVICE 39 CFR Part 233 Inspection Service Authority; Seizure and Forfeiture AGENCY: Postal... Service's rules and regulations regarding the seizure and forfeiture of property into three sections, 39.... The proposed revision consolidates sections 233.8 and 233.9, and treats seizures involving personal...

  15. 14 CFR 13.17 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 13.17 Section 13.17... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Legal Enforcement Actions § 13.17 Seizure of aircraft. (a) Under... officer, or a Federal Aviation Administration safety inspector, authorized in an order of seizure issued...

  16. 9 CFR 118.4 - Seizure and condemnation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seizure and condemnation. 118.4... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS DETENTION; SEIZURE AND CONDEMNATION § 118.4 Seizure and condemnation. Any biological product which is prepared, sold, bartered...

  17. 27 CFR 555.166 - Seizure or forfeiture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seizure or forfeiture. 555... EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE EXPLOSIVES COMMERCE IN EXPLOSIVES Unlawful Acts, Penalties, Seizures and Forfeitures § 555.166 Seizure or forfeiture. Any explosive materials involved or used or intended to be used...

  18. 26 CFR 301.7321-1 - Seizure of property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seizure of property. 301.7321-1 Section 301... ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Other Offenses § 301.7321-1 Seizure of property. Any property subject... director or assistant regional commissioner (alcohol, tobacco, and firearms). Upon seizure of property by...

  19. 19 CFR 12.101 - Seizure of prohibited switchblade knives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seizure of prohibited switchblade knives. 12.101...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Switchblade Knives § 12.101 Seizure of prohibited... accordance with § 12.100(a) shall be seized under 19 U.S.C. 1595a(c). (b) Notice of seizure. Notice of...

  20. 76 FR 26660 - Consolidation of Seizure and Forfeiture Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-09

    ... CFR Parts 8 and 9 [Docket No. OAG 127; AG Order No. 3263-2011] RIN 1105-AA74 Consolidation of Seizure... seizure and forfeiture regulations, to conform those regulations to the Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act..., Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives'' and generally transferred law enforcement functions, and seizure and...

  1. 8 CFR 274.1 - Seizure and forfeiture authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seizure and forfeiture authority. 274.1 Section 274.1 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS SEIZURE AND FORFEITURE OF CONVEYANCES § 274.1 Seizure and forfeiture authority. Any officer of Customs and Border...

  2. 27 CFR 555.186 - Seizure or forfeiture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seizure or forfeiture. 555... Seizure or forfeiture. Any plastic explosive that does not contain a detection agent in violation of 18 U.S.C. 842(l)-(n) is subject to seizure and forfeiture, and all provisions of 19 U.S.C. 1595a...

  3. Neuroimaging observations in a cohort of elderly manifesting with new onset seizures: Experience from a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjib Sinha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The occurrence of epilepsy is higher among elderly patients. The clinical manifestations of seizures, causes of epilepsy, and choice of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs are different in elderly people with epilepsy compared to the young. Aim: To evaluate the imaging (CT/MRI observations in elderly patients manifesting with new-onset seizures. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and one elderly patients with new onset seizures, >60 years (age: 68.0 ± 7.5 years; M:F = 1.8:1 from Jan′ 07 to Jan′ 09, were prospectively recruited. Observations of cranial CT scan (n = 201 and MR imaging (n = 43 were analyzed. Results: The type of seizures included: Simple partial (42%, generalized tonic-clonic (30.3%, and complex partial (27.4%. The pattern of epilepsy syndromes were acute symptomatic (42.3%, remote symptomatic (18.4%, cryptogenic (37.8%, and idiopathic (1.5%. Seizures were controlled with monotherapy in 85%. The CT scan (n = 201 revealed cerebral atrophy (139, mild (79, moderate (43, and severe (18; focal lesions (98, infarcts (45, hemorrhages (18, granuloma (16, tumor (15 and gliosis (4, and hemispheric atrophy (1, white matter changes (75 and diffuse edema (21. An MRI (n = 43 showed variable degree of cerebral atrophy (31; white matter changes (20; focal cerebral lesions (24; - infarct (7; intracranial hemorrhage (6; granuloma (5; tumor (6; gliosis (1; hemispheric atrophy (1; and prominent Virchow-Robin spaces (7; and UBOs (12. Patients with focal lesions in neuroimaging more often had partial seizures, symptomatic epilepsy, past stroke, focal deficit, absence of diffuse atrophy, focal EEG slowing, abnormal CSF, seizure recurrence at follow-up (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Brain imaging observations in elderly patients with new-onset seizures revealed underlying symptomatic nature, hence the etiology and thereby assisted in deciding the specific therapy.

  4. Automatic Seizure Detection in Rats Using Laplacian EEG and Verification with Human Seizure Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltane, Amal; Boudreaux-Bartels, G. Faye; Besio, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Automated detection of seizures is still a challenging problem. This study presents an approach to detect seizure segments in Laplacian electroencephalography (tEEG) recorded from rats using the tripolar concentric ring electrode (TCRE) configuration. Three features, namely, median absolute deviation, approximate entropy, and maximum singular value were calculated and used as inputs into two different classifiers: support vector machines and adaptive boosting. The relative performance of the extracted features on TCRE tEEG was examined. Results are obtained with an overall accuracy between 84.81 and 96.51%. In addition to using TCRE tEEG data, the seizure detection algorithm was also applied to the recorded EEG signals from Andrzejak et al. database to show the efficiency of the proposed method for seizure detection. PMID:23073989

  5. Seizures beget seizures in temporal lobe epilepsies: the boomerang effects of newly formed aberrant kainatergic synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Crepel, Valérie; Represa, Alfonso

    2008-01-01

    Do temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) seizures in adults promote further seizures? Clinical and experimental data suggest that new synapses are formed after an initial episode of status epilepticus, however their contribution to the transformation of a naive network to an epileptogenic one has been debated. Recent experimental data show that newly formed aberrant excitatory synapses on the granule cells of the fascia dentate operate by means of kainate receptor-operated signals that are not present on naive granule cells. Therefore, genuine epileptic networks rely on signaling cascades that differentiate them from naive networks. Recurrent limbic seizures generated by the activation of kainate receptors and synapses in naive animals lead to the formation of novel synapses that facilitate the emergence of further seizures. This negative, vicious cycle illustrates the central role of reactive plasticity in neurological disorders.

  6. Using Dictionary Pair Learning for Seizure Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin; Yu, Nana; Zhou, Weidong

    2018-02-13

    Automatic seizure detection is extremely important in the monitoring and diagnosis of epilepsy. The paper presents a novel method based on dictionary pair learning (DPL) for seizure detection in the long-term intracranial electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings. First, for the EEG data, wavelet filtering and differential filtering are applied, and the kernel function is performed to make the signal linearly separable. In DPL, the synthesis dictionary and analysis dictionary are learned jointly from original training samples with alternating minimization method, and sparse coefficients are obtained by using of linear projection instead of costly [Formula: see text]-norm or [Formula: see text]-norm optimization. At last, the reconstructed residuals associated with seizure and nonseizure sub-dictionary pairs are calculated as the decision values, and the postprocessing is performed for improving the recognition rate and reducing the false detection rate of the system. A total of 530[Formula: see text]h from 20 patients with 81 seizures were used to evaluate the system. Our proposed method has achieved an average segment-based sensitivity of 93.39%, specificity of 98.51%, and event-based sensitivity of 96.36% with false detection rate of 0.236/h.

  7. Protection against generalised seizured by Dalbergia saxatilis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aqueous root decoction of Dalbergia saxatilis (DS) is used to manage convulsive disorders in African herbal medicine practice. We had previously reported the anticonvulsant effects of the aqueous root extract of DS against strychnine and picrotoxin seizures. In this study, DS was tested against pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) ...

  8. Seizures and Teens: Maximizing Health and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundstrom, Diane

    2007-01-01

    As parents and caregivers, their job is to help their children become happy, healthy, and productive members of society. They try to balance the desire to protect their children with their need to become independent young adults. This can be a struggle for parents of teens with seizures, since there are so many challenges they may face. Teenagers…

  9. Treatment Of Seizures In The Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleem MA

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing life expectancy over the preceding decades and trend towards further increase means that the elderly is now a growing section of the population. Seizures are a particularly common disorder in the age group. Considering that above the age of 50 years, one is prone to suffer from atleast one chromic illness, the interplay between associated medical and neurologic diseases and seizures need to be understood. These comorbidities like hypertension, cerebrovascular accidents, diabetes, renal failure and others not only contribute to seizures, they may also interfere with their appropriate treatment. Seizures, on the other hand, may be the cause of added morbidity like fractures, head injury and poor self esteem which may lead to poor quality of life. In addition, the unique pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and side effect profile of the various antieplileptic drugs in the elderly and the multiple drug interactions, require judicious use along with regular monitoring. However, an ideal antiepileptic drug for the elderly is yet to be found.

  10. Photosensitivity and visually induced seizures: review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parra, J.; Kalitzin, S.; Lopes da Silva, F.H.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Interest in visually induced seizures has increased in recent years as a result of the increasing number of precipitants in our modern environment. This review addresses new developments in this field with special attention given to the emergence of new diagnostic, therapeutic and

  11. febrile seizures, Tripoli, Libya, knowledge, attitude

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kim

    the knowledge, attitude and practice of mothers regarding febrile seizures in Tripoli, Libya. ... aim of the audit is to assess the attitude and knowledge of parents of children with .... The following exclusion criteria were used: child who has fever due CNS ... department after giving prior first aid-a similar results was reported.

  12. S100B proteins in febrile seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkonen, Kirsi; Pekkala, Niina; Pokka, Tytti

    2011-01-01

    at the hospital after FS and S100B concentration in serum (r=-0.130, P=0.28) or in cerebrospinal fluid samples (r=-0.091, P=0.52). Our findings indicate that FS does not cause significant blood-brain barrier openings, and increase the evidence that these seizures are relatively harmless for the developing brain....

  13. Reducing and measuring fluctuations in the MST RFP: Enhancement of energy confinement and measurement of the MHD dynamo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Hartog, D.J.; Almagri, A.F.

    1996-09-01

    A three- to five-fold enhancement of the energy confinement time in a reversed-field pinch (RFP) has been achieved in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) by reducing the amplitude of tearing mode fluctuations responsible for anomalous transport in the core of the RFP. By applying a transient poloidal inductive electric field to flatten the current density profile, the fluctuation amplitude b/B decreases from 1.5% to 0.8%, the electron temperature T e0 increases from 250 eV to 370 eV, the ohmic input power decreases from 4.5 MW to approximately 1.5 MW, the poloidal beta β 0 increases from 6% to 9%, and the energy confinement time τ E increases from 1 ms to ∼5 ms in I φ = 340 kA plasmas with density n = 1 x 10 19 m -3 . Current profile control methods are being developed for the RFP in a program to eliminate transport associated with these current-gradient-driven fluctuations. In addition to controlling the amplitude of the tearing modes, we are vigorously pursuing an understanding of the physics of these fluctuations. In particular, plasma flow, both equilibrium and fluctuating, plays a critical role in a diversity of physical phenomena in MST. The key results: 1) Edge probe measurements show that the MHD dynamo is active in low collisionality plasmas, while at high collisionality a new mechanism, the 'electron diamagnetic dynamo,' is observed. 2) Core spectroscopic measurements show that the toroidal velocity fluctuations of the plasma are coherent with the large-scale magnetic tearing modes; the scalar product of these two fluctuating quantities is similar to that expected for the MHD dynamo electromotive force. 3) Toroidal plasma flow in MST exhibits large radial shear and can be actively controlled, including unlocking locked discharges, by modifying E r with a robust biased probe. 24 refs

  14. Curcumin inhibits amygdaloid kindled seizures in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DU, Peng; Li, Xin; Lin, Hao-Jie; Peng, Wei-Feng; Liu, Jian-Ying; Ma, Yu; Fan, Wei; Wang, Xin

    2009-06-20

    Curcumin can reduce the severity of seizures induced by kainate acid (KA), but the role of curcumin in amygdaloid kindled models is still unknown. This study aimed to explore the effect of curcumin on the development of kindling in amygdaloid kindled rats. With an amygdaloid kindled Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat model and an electrophysiological method, different doses of curcumin (10 mgxkg(-1)xd(-1) and 30 mgxkg(-1)xd(-1) as low dose groups, 100 mgxkg(-1)xd(-1) and 300 mgxkg(-1)xd(-1) as high dose groups) were administrated intraperitoneally during the whole kindling days, by comparison with the course of kindling, afterdischarge (AD) thresholds and the number of ADs to reach the stages of class I to V seizures in the rats between control and experimental groups. One-way or two-way ANOVA and Fisher's least significant difference post hoc test were used for statistical analyses. Curcumin (both 100 mgxkg(-1)xd(-1) and 300 mgxkg(-1)xd(-1)) significantly inhibited the behavioral seizure development in the (19.80 +/- 2.25) and (21.70 +/- 2.21) stimulations respectively required to reach the kindled state. Rats treated with 100 mgxkg(-1)xd(-1) curcumin 30 minutes before kindling stimulation showed an obvious increase in the stimulation current intensity required to evoke AD from (703.3 +/- 85.9) microA to (960.0 +/- 116.5) microA during the progression to class V seizures. Rats treated with 300 mgxkg(-1)xd(-1) curcumin showed a significant increase in the stimulation current intensity required to evoke AD from (735.0 +/- 65.2) microA to (867.0 +/- 93.4) microA during the progression to class V seizures. Rats treated with 300 mgxkg(-1)xd(-1) curcumin required much more evoked ADs to reach the stage of class both IV (as (199.83 +/- 12.47) seconds) and V seizures (as (210.66 +/- 10.68) seconds). Rats treated with 100 mgxkg(-1)xd(-1) curcumin required much more evoked ADs to reach the stage of class V seizures (as (219.56 +/- 18.24) seconds). Our study suggests that curcumin has

  15. Characteristics of seizure-induced signal changes on MRI in patients with first seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Si Eun; Lee, Byung In; Shin, Kyong Jin; Ha, Sam Yeol; Park, JinSe; Park, Kang Min; Kim, Hyung Chan; Lee, Joonwon; Bae, Soo-Young; Lee, Dongah; Kim, Sung Eun

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive factors and identify the characteristics of the seizure-induced signal changes on MRI (SCM) in patients with first seizures. We conducted a retrospective study of patients with first seizures from March 2010 to August 2014. The inclusion criteria for this study were patients with 1) first seizures, and 2) MRI and EEG performed within 24h of the first seizures. The definition of SCM was hyper-intensities in the brain not applying to cerebral arterial territories. Multivariate logistic regression was performed with or without SCM as a dependent variable. Of 431 patients with seizures visiting the ER, 69 patients met the inclusion criteria. Of 69 patients, 11 patients (15.9%) had SCM. Epileptiform discharge on EEG (OR 29.7, 95% CI 1.79-493.37, p=0.018) was an independently significant variable predicting the presence of SCM in patients with first seizures. In addition, the topography of SCM was as follows; i) ipsilateral hippocampus, thalamus and cerebral cortex (5/11), ii) unilateral cortex (4/11), iii) ipsilateral thalamus and cerebral cortex (1/11), iv) bilateral hippocampus (1/11). Moreover, 6 out of 7 patients who underwent both perfusion CT and MRI exhibited unilateral cortical hyperperfusion with ipsilateral thalamic involvement reflecting unrestricted vascular territories. There is an association between epileptiform discharges and SCM. Additionally, the involvement of the unilateral cortex and ipsilateral thalamus in SCM and its hyperperfusion state could be helpful in differentiating the consequences of epileptic seizures from other pathologies. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The effects of music-supported therapy on motor, cognitive, and psychosocial functions in chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Takako; Dawson, Deirdre R; Wright, Rebecca; Honjo, Kie; Chen, Joyce L; Chen, J Jean; Black, Sandra E; Stuss, Donald T; Ross, Bernhard

    2018-05-24

    Neuroplasticity accompanying learning is a key mediator of stroke rehabilitation. Training in playing music in healthy populations and patients with movement disorders requires resources within motor, sensory, cognitive, and affective systems, and coordination among these systems. We investigated effects of music-supported therapy (MST) in chronic stroke on motor, cognitive, and psychosocial functions compared to conventional physical training (GRASP). Twenty-eight adults with unilateral arm and hand impairment were randomly assigned to MST (n = 14) and GRASP (n = 14) and received 30 h of training over a 10-week period. The assessment was conducted at four time points: before intervention, after 5 weeks, after 10 weeks, and 3 months after training completion. As for two of our three primary outcome measures concerning motor function, all patients slightly improved in Chedoke-McMaster Stroke Assessment hand score, while the time to complete Action Research Arm Test became shorter in the MST group. The third primary outcome measure for well-being, Stroke Impact Scale, was improved for emotion and social communication earlier in MST and coincided with the improved executive function for task switching and music rhythm perception. The results confirmed previous findings and expanded the potential usage of MST for enhancing quality of life in community-dwelling chronic-stage survivors. © 2018 New York Academy of Sciences.

  17. Coprolalia as a manifestation of epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massot-Tarrús, Andreu; Mousavi, Seyed Reza; Dove, Carin; Hayman-Abello S, Susan; Hayman-Abello, Brent; Derry, Paul A; Diosy, David C; McLachlan, Richard S; Burneo, Jorge G; Steven, David A; Mirsattari, Seyed M

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the lateralizing and localizing value of ictal coprolalia and brain areas involved in its production. A retrospective search for patients manifesting ictal coprolalia was conducted in our EMU database. Continuous video-EEG recordings were reviewed, and EEG activity before and during coprolalia was analyzed using independent component analysis (ICA) technique and was compared to the seizures without coprolalia among the same patients. Nine patients were evaluated (five women), eight with intracranial video-EEG recordings (icVEEG). Four had frontal or temporal lesions, and five had normal MRIs. Six patients showed impairment in the language functions and five in the frontal executive tasks. Two hundred six seizures were reviewed (60.7% from icVEEG). Ictal coprolalia occurred in 46.6% of them, always associated with limbic auras or automatisms. They arose from the nondominant hemisphere in five patients, dominant hemisphere in three, and independently from the right and left hippocampus-parahippocampus in one. Electroencephalographic activity always involved orbitofrontal and/or mesial temporal regions of the nondominant hemisphere when coprolalia occurred. Independent component analysis of 31 seizures in seven patients showed a higher number of independent components in the nondominant hippocampus-parahippocampus before and during coprolalia and in the dominant lateral temporal region in those seizures without coprolalia (p=0.009). Five patients underwent surgery, and all five had an ILAE class 1 outcome. Ictal coprolalia occurs in both males and females with temporal or orbitofrontal epilepsy and has a limited lateralizing value to the nondominant hemisphere but can be triggered by seizures from either hemisphere. It involves activation of the paralimbic temporal-orbitofrontal network. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Melding Infant Mental Health and Multisystemic Therapy Approaches to Community-Based Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Jay C.; Carubia, Beau A.; Murgolo, Marisa A.; Carter, Debbie R.; Frankel, Karen A.

    2013-01-01

    A recent partnership between the Irving Harris Program in Child Development and Infant Mental Health and the Community Based Psychiatry Program at University of Colorado Hospital joined two different approaches to child mental health treatment: infant mental health and multisystemic therapy (MST). This article illustrates the compatibility of…

  19. Early and late postoperative seizure outcome in 97 patients with supratentorial meningioma and preoperative seizures: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhe; Chen, Peng; Fu, Weiming; Zhu, Junming; Zhang, Hong; Shi, Jian; Zhang, Jianmin

    2013-08-01

    We identified factors associated with early and late postoperative seizure control in patients with supratentorial meningioma plus preoperative seizures. In this retrospective study, univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression analysis compared 24 clinical variables according to the occurrence of early (≤1 week) or late (>1 week) postoperative seizures. Sixty-two of 97 patients (63.9 %) were seizure free for the entire postoperative follow-up period (29.5 ± 11.8 months), while 13 patients (13.4 %) still had frequent seizures at the end of follow-up. Fourteen of 97 patients (14.4 %) experienced early postoperative seizures, and emergence of new postoperative neurological deficits was the only significant risk factor (odds ratio = 7.377). Thirty-three patients (34.0 %) experienced late postoperative seizures at some time during follow-up, including 12 of 14 patients with early postoperative seizures. Associated risk factors for late postoperative seizures included tumor progression (odds ratio = 7.012) and new permanent postoperative neurological deficits (odds ratio = 4.327). Occurrence of postoperative seizures in patients with supratentorial meningioma and preoperative seizure was associated with new postoperative neurological deficits. Reduced cerebral or vascular injury during surgery may lead to fewer postoperative neurological deficits and better seizure outcome.

  20. Evaluation of Seizure Attacks in Patients with Cerebrovascular Accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Koochaki

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most common reason for seizure in elderly duration is the stroke. This study was conducted aiming to assess the frequency of seizure attack occurrence in those patients. Materials and Methods: This investigation was carried out through a cross-sectional method for one year on 330 patients admitted to the neurology ward as diagnosed with stroke. The required data was collected through the researcher-made questionnaire from the patients suffering from stoke which was diagnosed based on clinical findings, CT-Scan and MRI as required. Results: Among 330 patient suffering from stroke (162 men and 168 women, 48 cases (14.5% were suffering from seizure. Six percent of the patients had early seizure and another 8.5% had late seizure. Among 162 men suffering from the stroke, 32 ones were without seizures and 30 men were suffering the seizure. A number of 150 women out of total 168 ones suffering from the stroke, had no seizure and 18 others had seizures; frequency of seizure occurrence was more in male samples (p=0.044. In the people under 60 year, there were mostly early types of seizure (45% and in the age range above 60 year, it was mostly late type (89.3%. A 68.5% of the patients suffering from the seizure had experienced ischemic stroke. However, the frequency of seizure occurrence in the patients with hemorrhagic stroke was statistically greater (p=0.003. Conclusion: This examination showed that occurrence of seizure attacks in the people with stroke is 14.5% and it is seen more in the hemorrhagic strokes than ischemic ones. The frontoparietal area is the most common location involved and tonic clonic was the most common seizure in the patients suffering from it who have experienced the stroke

  1. Unilateral Thalamic Infarct Presenting as a Convulsive Seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Brohi, Hazim; Mughul, Afshan

    2017-09-01

    Lesions of the thalamus and those extending into midbrain can cause various types of movement disorders such as dystonia, asterixis and ballism-chorea. Seizures are rare manifestation of thalamic disorder. Occurrence of seizures in bilateral thalamic infarct has been reported; but seizures in unilateral thalamic infarct have been reported very rarely. Literature review showed only single case of perinatal unilateral thalamic infarct presenting with seizures. We are reporting a unique case of convulsive seizure at the onset of unilateral thalamic infarct in an adult male, which has never been reported to the best of our knowledge.

  2. Pediatric intracerebral hemorrhage: acute symptomatic seizures and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beslow, Lauren A; Abend, Nicholas S; Gindville, Melissa C; Bastian, Rachel A; Licht, Daniel J; Smith, Sabrina E; Hillis, Argye E; Ichord, Rebecca N; Jordan, Lori C

    2013-04-01

    Seizures are believed to be common presenting symptoms in neonates and children with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). However, few data are available on the epidemiology of acute symptomatic seizures or the risk for later epilepsy. To define the incidence of and explore risk factors for seizures and epilepsy in children with spontaneous ICH. Our a priori hypotheses were that younger age at presentation, cortical involvement of ICH, acute symptomatic seizures after presentation, ICH due to vascular malformation, and elevated intracranial pressure requiring urgent intervention would predict remote symptomatic seizures and epilepsy. Prospective cohort study conducted between March 1, 2007, and January 1, 2012. Three tertiary care pediatric hospitals. Seventy-three pediatric subjects with spontaneous ICH including 20 perinatal (≥37 weeks' gestation to 28 days) and 53 childhood subjects (>28 days to Acute symptomatic seizures (clinically evident and electrographic-only seizures within 7 days), remote symptomatic seizures, and epilepsy. Acute symptomatic seizures occurred in 35 subjects (48%). Acute symptomatic seizures as a presenting symptom of ICH occurred in 12 perinatal (60%) and 19 childhood (36%) subjects (P = .07). Acute symptomatic seizures after presentation occurred in 7 children. Electrographic-only seizures were present in 9 of 32 subjects (28%) with continuous electroencephalogram monitoring. One-year and 2-year remote symptomatic seizure-free survival rates were 82% (95% CI, 68-90) and 67% (95% CI, 46-82), respectively. One-year and 2-year epilepsy-free survival rates were 96% (95% CI, 83-99) and 87% (95% CI, 65-95), respectively. Elevated intracranial pressure requiring acute intervention was a risk factor for seizures after presentation (P = .01; Fisher exact test), remote symptomatic seizures, and epilepsy (P = .03, and P = .04, respectively; log-rank test). Presenting seizures are common in perinatal and childhood ICH. Continuous

  3. Disparity in regional cerebral blood flow during electrically induced seizure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sestoft, D; Meden, P; Hemmingsen, R

    1993-01-01

    This is a presentation of 2 cases in which the intraictal regional cerebral blood flow distribution was measured with the 99mTc-HMPAO single photon emission computerized tomography technique during an electrically induced seizure. Although the seizure was verified as generalized on electroencepha......This is a presentation of 2 cases in which the intraictal regional cerebral blood flow distribution was measured with the 99mTc-HMPAO single photon emission computerized tomography technique during an electrically induced seizure. Although the seizure was verified as generalized...... electroencephalography-verified generalized seizures....

  4. A biblioteca na página eletrônica do MST: heterogeneidade e memória The library in the electronic site of MST: heterogeneity and memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucília Maria Sousa Romão

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Esse trabalho busca, à luz da teoria do discurso, investigar como a heterogeneidade é manifesta em uma biblioteca virtual, a saber, a Biblioteca inscrita dentro do site do Movimento dos Trabalhadores Rurais Sem Terra (MST. Interessa-nos perceber como há uma memória sustentadora dos atos de linguagem e como há uma inscrição histórica dos sentidos no verbal e no imagético, que possibilitam a construção de vários gestos de leitura. Por fim, julgamos ser produtivo analisar a biblioteca como o espaço polifônico em que várias vozes estão inscritas, marcando o movimento dos sujeitos, dos sentidos, enfim, dos discursos.This work searches, at the light of the theory of speech, to investigate as the heterogeneity is obvious in a virtual library, in this case, the library in the site of the Rural Workers Movement (MST. It is interesting to know that there is a supporting memory of the language actions and a historical registration of verbal and no-verbal senses, that allow the construction of several reading gestures. Finally, we considered important to analyze the library as a polyphonic space where several voices are enrolled, marking the movement of the subjects, of the senses, that is, of the speech.

  5. Glucose uptake and growth of glucose-limited chemostat cultures of Aspergillus niger and a disruptant lacking MstA, a high-affinity glucose transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Thomas R; vanKuyk, Patricia A; Poulsen, Bjarne R

    2007-01-01

    This is a study of high-affinity glucose uptake in Aspergillus niger and the effect of disruption of a high-affinity monosaccharide-transporter gene, mstA. The substrate saturation constant (K(s)) of a reference strain was about 15 microM in glucose-limited chemostat culture. Disruption of mst......-affinity uptake system of A. niger. The mstA disruptant and a reference strain were cultivated in glucose-limited chemostat cultures at low, intermediate and high dilution rate (D=0.07 h(-1), 0.14 h(-1) and 0.20 h(-1)). Mycelium harvested from steady-state cultures was subjected to glucose uptake assays...

  6. Dynamic control of modeled tonic-clonic seizure states with closed-loop stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryce eBeverlin II

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Seizure control using deep brain stimulation (DBS provides an alternative therapy to patients with intractable and drug resistant epilepsy. This paper presents novel DBS stimulus protocols to disrupt seizures. Two protocols are presented: open-loop stimulation and a closed-loop feedback system utilizing measured firing rates to adjust stimulus frequency. Stimulation suppression is demonstrated in a computational model using 3000 excitatory Morris-Lecar model neurons connected with depressing synapses. Cells are connected using second order network topology to simulate network topologies measured in cortical networks. The network spontaneously switches from tonic to clonic as synaptic strengths and tonic input to the neurons decreases. To this model we add periodic stimulation pulses to simulate DBS. Periodic forcing can synchronize or desynchronize an oscillating population of neurons, depending on the stimulus frequency and amplitude. Therefore, it is possible to either extend or truncate the tonic or clonic phases of the seizure. Stimuli applied at the firing rate of the neuron generally synchronize the population while stimuli slightly slower than the firing rate prevent synchronization. We present an adaptive stimulation algorithm that measures the firing rate of a neuron and adjusts the stimulus to maintain a relative stimulus frequency to firing frequency and demonstrate it in a computational model of a tonic-clonic seizure. This adaptive algorithm can affect the duration of the tonic phase using much smaller stimulus amplitudes than the open-loop control.

  7. Music-supported therapy induces plasticity in the sensorimotor cortex in chronic stroke: a single-case study using multimodal imaging (fMRI-TMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo, Nuria; Amengual, Julian; Juncadella, Montserrat; Rubio, Francisco; Camara, Estela; Marco-Pallares, Josep; Schneider, Sabine; Veciana, Misericordia; Montero, Jordi; Mohammadi, Bahram; Altenmüller, Eckart; Grau, Carles; Münte, Thomas F; Rodriguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2011-01-01

    Music-Supported Therapy (MST) has been developed recently in order to improve the use of the affected upper extremity after stroke. This study investigated the neuroplastic mechanisms underlying effectiveness in a patient with chronic stroke. MST uses musical instruments, a midi piano and an electronic drum set emitting piano sounds, to retrain fine and gross movements of the paretic upper extremity. Data are presented from a patient with a chronic stroke (20 months post-stroke) with residual right-sided hemiparesis who took part in 20 MST sessions over the course of 4 weeks. Post-therapy, a marked improvement of movement quality, assessed by 3D movement analysis, was observed. Moreover, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of a sequential hand movement revealed distinct therapy-related changes in the form of a reduction of excess contralateral and ipsilateral activations. This was accompanied by changes in cortical excitability evidenced by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Functional MRI in a music listening task suggests that one of the effects of MST is the task-dependent coupling of auditory and motor cortical areas. The MST appears to be a useful neurorehabilitation tool in patients with chronic stroke and leads to neural reorganization in the sensorimotor cortex.

  8. Probability of detection of clinical seizures using heart rate changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Ivan; Manly, B F J

    2015-08-01

    Heart rate-based seizure detection is a viable complement or alternative to ECoG/EEG. This study investigates the role of various biological factors on the probability of clinical seizure detection using heart rate. Regression models were applied to 266 clinical seizures recorded from 72 subjects to investigate if factors such as age, gender, years with epilepsy, etiology, seizure site origin, seizure class, and data collection centers, among others, shape the probability of EKG-based seizure detection. Clinical seizure detection probability based on heart rate changes, is significantly (pprobability of detecting clinical seizures (>0.8 in the majority of subjects) using heart rate is highest for complex partial seizures, increases with a patient's years with epilepsy, is lower for females than for males and is unrelated to the side of hemisphere origin. Clinical seizure detection probability using heart rate is multi-factorially dependent and sufficiently high (>0.8) in most cases to be clinically useful. Knowledge of the role that these factors play in shaping said probability will enhance its applicability and usefulness. Heart rate is a reliable and practical signal for extra-cerebral detection of clinical seizures originating from or spreading to central autonomic network structures. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Predictability of uncontrollable multifocal seizures - towards new treatment options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnertz, Klaus; Dickten, Henning; Porz, Stephan; Helmstaedter, Christoph; Elger, Christian E.

    2016-04-01

    Drug-resistant, multifocal, non-resectable epilepsies are among the most difficult epileptic disorders to manage. An approach to control previously uncontrollable seizures in epilepsy patients would consist of identifying seizure precursors in critical brain areas combined with delivering a counteracting influence to prevent seizure generation. Predictability of seizures with acceptable levels of sensitivity and specificity, even in an ambulatory setting, has been repeatedly shown, however, in patients with a single seizure focus only. We did a study to assess feasibility of state-of-the-art, electroencephalogram-based seizure-prediction techniques in patients with uncontrollable multifocal seizures. We obtained significant predictive information about upcoming seizures in more than two thirds of patients. Unexpectedly, the emergence of seizure precursors was confined to non-affected brain areas. Our findings clearly indicate that epileptic networks, spanning lobes and hemispheres, underlie generation of seizures. Our proof-of-concept study is an important milestone towards new therapeutic strategies based on seizure-prediction techniques for clinical practice.

  10. Risk Factors for Preoperative Seizures and Loss of Seizure Control in Patients Undergoing Surgery for Metastatic Brain Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Adela; Weingart, Jon D; Gallia, Gary L; Lim, Michael; Brem, Henry; Bettegowda, Chetan; Chaichana, Kaisorn L

    2017-08-01

    Metastatic brain tumors are the most common brain tumors in adults. Patients with metastatic brain tumors have poor prognoses with median survival of 6-12 months. Seizures are a major presenting symptom and cause of morbidity and mortality. In this article, risk factors for the onset of preoperative seizures and postoperative seizure control are examined. Adult patients who underwent resection of one or more brain metastases at a single institution between 1998 and 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. Of 565 patients, 114 (20.2%) patients presented with seizures. Factors independently associated with preoperative seizures were preoperative headaches (P = 0.044), cognitive deficits (P = 0.031), more than 2 intracranial metastatic tumors (P = 0.013), temporal lobe location (P = 0.031), occipital lobe location (P = 0.010), and bone involvement by tumor (P = 0.029). Factors independently associated with loss of seizure control after surgical resection were preoperative seizures (P = 0.001), temporal lobe location (P = 0.037), lack of postoperative chemotherapy (P = 0.010), subtotal resection of tumor (P = 0.022), and local recurrence (P = 0.027). At last follow-up, the majority of patients (93.8%) were seizure-free. Thirty patients (5.30%) in total had loss of seizure control, and only 8 patients (1.41%) who did not have preoperative seizures presented with new-onset seizures after surgical resection of their metastases. The brain is a common site for metastases from numerous primary cancers, such as breast and lung. The identification of factors associated with onset of preoperative seizures as well as seizure control postoperatively could aid management strategies for patients with metastatic brain tumors. Patients with preoperative seizures who underwent resection tended to have good seizure control after surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Computed Tomography Findings in Patients with Seizure Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumnima Acharya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Seizure occurs in up to 10% of the population, whereas epilepsy is a chronic disease characterized by recurrent seizures that may affect up to 2% of the population. Modern neuroimaging is useful in diagnosis of  abnormalities underlying the epilepsies, but the information provided by imaging techniques can also contribute to proper classification of certain epileptic disorders and can delineate the genetics of some underlying syndromes. Neuroimaging is even more important for those patients who have medically intractable seizures. This study was carried out to establish different etiologies of seizures, to correlate the clinical data and radiological findings in cases of seizure, and to identify the common etiologies in different types of seizures. Methods: This was a retrospective hospital-based study conducted in the Department of Radiodiagnosis of Lumbini Medical College Teaching Hospital. Records of patients of past two years, admitted in any department of the hospital with history of seizure disorder and underwent a Computed Tomography  (CT of brain were included. The CT patterns were assessed and the data were tabulated and statistically analyzed. Results: There were a total of 480 cases out of which 263 (55% were male and 217 (45% were female with M:F ratio of 1.2:1. Generalized seizure was more frequent than partial seizure in both gender. In 274 cases of generalized seizures, CT scan findings were abnormal in 151 cases and normal finding observed in 123 cases. In 206 cases of partial seizures, 125 cases were abnormal and 81 having normal CT scan findings. Age wise distribution showed highest number (n=218 of cases in young group (60 yr. The most common cause of seizure  was  calcified granuloma (n=79, 16.5% followed by neurocysticercosis (NCC, n=64, 13%. Diffuse cerebral edema, sub-arachnoid hemorrhage, and hydrocephalus was seen only in lower age group particularly among 1-20 years. Infarct and diffuse cortical

  12. Role of biomarkers in differentiating new-onset seizures from psychogenic nonepileptic seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahendra Javali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Review of literature revealed very limited studies considering a combination of serum prolactin (PRL and serum creatine kinase (CK as markers for differentiating epileptic and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES. Therefore, in the present study, we analyzed the role of serum PRL and serum CK, individually and in combination. Methodology: This prospective study was conducted in a tertiary care medical teaching hospital over a period of 18 months. Patients aged over 15 years suspected to have new-onset seizures presenting within 5 h of ictus were included in this study. CK, serum PRL was measured at 0–1, 1–3, and 3–5 h after seizures. Results: Hundred subjects were studied for the role of serum PRL and serum CK in differentiating epileptic and PNES. The mean age was 42.24 years with a male:female ratio of 1.27:1. All patients of generalized tonic–clonic seizures (GTCS, who presented within 1 h, had elevated PRL, whereas 75% of patients with partial seizures had elevated PRL within 1 h of presentation. Nearly 91.66% of patients with GTCS who presented within 1 h had elevated CPK, whereas 70% of patients with partial seizures had elevated CPK. None of the patients diagnosed with PNES showed rise in either of the markers. Conclusion: In the present study, none of the patients with PNES showed raise in either serum PRL or CK. However, there was no correlation between the types of seizure and PRL or serum CK levels.

  13. Using trend templates in a neonatal seizure algorithm improves detection of short seizures in a foetal ovine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwanenburg, Alex; Andriessen, Peter; Jellema, Reint K; Niemarkt, Hendrik J; Wolfs, Tim G A M; Kramer, Boris W; Delhaas, Tammo

    2015-03-01

    Seizures below one minute in duration are difficult to assess correctly using seizure detection algorithms. We aimed to improve neonatal detection algorithm performance for short seizures through the use of trend templates for seizure onset and end. Bipolar EEG were recorded within a transiently asphyxiated ovine model at 0.7 gestational age, a common experimental model for studying brain development in humans of 30-34 weeks of gestation. Transient asphyxia led to electrographic seizures within 6-8 h. A total of 3159 seizures, 2386 shorter than one minute, were annotated in 1976 h-long EEG recordings from 17 foetal lambs. To capture EEG characteristics, five features, sensitive to seizures, were calculated and used to derive trend information. Feature values and trend information were used as input for support vector machine classification and subsequently post-processed. Performance metrics, calculated after post-processing, were compared between analyses with and without employing trend information. Detector performance was assessed after five-fold cross-validation conducted ten times with random splits. The use of trend templates for seizure onset and end in a neonatal seizure detection algorithm significantly improves the correct detection of short seizures using two-channel EEG recordings from 54.3% (52.6-56.1) to 59.5% (58.5-59.9) at FDR 2.0 (median (range); p seizures by EEG monitoring at the NICU.

  14. Local cerebral metabolism during partial seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, J. Jr.; Kuhl, D.E.; Phelps, M.E.; Rausch, R.; Nuwer, M.

    1983-01-01

    Interictal and ictal fluorodeoxyglucose scans were obtained with positron CT from four patients with spontaneous recurrent partial seizures, one with epilepsia partialis continua, and one with a single partial seizure induced by electrical stimulation of the hippocampus. Ictal metabolic patterns were different for each patient studied. Focal and generalized increased and decreased metabolism were observed. Ictal hypermetabolism may exceed six times the interictal rate and could represent activation of excitatory or inhibitory synapses in the epileptogenic region and its projection fields. Hypometabolism seen on ictal scans most likely reflects postictal depression and may indicate projection fields of inhibited neurons. No quantitative relationship between alterations in metabolism and EEG or behavioral measurements of ictal events could be demonstrated

  15. Tramadol: seizures, serotonin syndrome, and coadministered antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Randy A; Sansone, Lori A

    2009-04-01

    This ongoing column is dedicated to the challenging clinical interface between psychiatry and primary care-two fields that are inexorably linked.Tramadol (Ultram(®)) is a commonly prescribed analgesic because of its relatively lower risk of addiction and better safety profile in comparison with other opiates. However, two significant adverse reactions are known to potentially occur with tramadol-seizures and serotonin syndrome. These two adverse reactions may develop during tramadol monotherapy, but appear much more likely to emerge during misuse/overdose as well as with the coadministration of other drugs, particularly antidepressants. In this article, we review the data relating to tramadol, seizures, and serotonin syndrome. This pharmacologic intersection is of clear relevance to both psychiatrists and primary care clinicians.

  16. Local cerebral metabolism during partial seizures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, J. Jr.; Kuhl, D.E.; Phelps, M.E.; Rausch, R.; Nuwer, M.

    1983-04-01

    Interictal and ictal fluorodeoxyglucose scans were obtained with positron CT from four patients with spontaneous recurrent partial seizures, one with epilepsia partialis continua, and one with a single partial seizure induced by electrical stimulation of the hippocampus. Ictal metabolic patterns were different for each patient studied. Focal and generalized increased and decreased metabolism were observed. Ictal hypermetabolism may exceed six times the interictal rate and could represent activation of excitatory or inhibitory synapses in the epileptogenic region and its projection fields. Hypometabolism seen on ictal scans most likely reflects postictal depression and may indicate projection fields of inhibited neurons. No quantitative relationship between alterations in metabolism and EEG or behavioral measurements of ictal events could be demonstrated.

  17. Acute Pancreatitis Case Presented with Epileptic Seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uygar Utku

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis, defined as the acute non-bacte¬rial inflammatory condition of the pancreas. A 53-year-old woman was admitted to our emergency service after a first episode of generalized tonic-clonic seizure. There was no past medical history. The initial laboratory findings showed a low serum calcium level (5.8 mg/dL normal value 8.8-10.2 mg/dL. High Amylase-802 U/L, Lipase-489 U/L levels. CT abdomen showed pancreatic edema and inflammation suggestive of acute pancreatitis. This case report demonstrates a rare but important differential diagnosis in generalised tonic-clonic seizures of adult onset

  18. Brain imaging during seizure: ictal brain SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kottamasu, Sambasiva Rao

    1997-01-01

    The role of single photon computed tomography (SPECT) in presurgical localization of medically intractable complex partial epilepsy (CPE) in children is reviewed. 99m Technetium neurolite, a newer lipophylic agent with a high first pass brain extraction and little or no redistribution is injected during a seizure, while the child is monitored with a video recording and continuous EEG and SPECT imaging is performed in the next 1-3 hours with the images representing regional cerebral profusion at the time of injection. On SPECT studies performed with radiopharmaceutical injected during a seizure, ictal focus is generally hypervascular. Other findings on ictal brain SPECT include hypoperfusion of adjacent cerebral cortex and white matter, hyperperfusion of contralateral motor cortex, hyperperfusion of ipsilateral basal ganglia and thalamus, brain stem and contralateral cerebellum. Ictal brain SPECT is non-invasive, cost effective and highly sensitive for localization of epileptic focus in patients with intractable CPE. (author)

  19. Hungry Neurons: Metabolic Insights on Seizure Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Paolo Bazzigaluppi; Azin Ebrahim Amini; Iliya Weisspapir; Bojana Stefanovic; Peter L. Carlen

    2017-01-01

    Epilepsy afflicts up to 1.6% of the population and the mechanisms underlying the appearance of seizures are still not understood. In past years, many efforts have been spent trying to understand the mechanisms underlying the excessive and synchronous firing of neurons. Traditionally, attention was pointed towards synaptic (dys)function and extracellular ionic species (dys)regulation. Recently, novel clinical and preclinical studies explored the role of brain metabolism (i.e., glucose utilizat...

  20. Dissociation in patients with dissociative seizures: relationships with trauma and seizure symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pick, S; Mellers, J D C; Goldstein, L H

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to extend the current understanding of dissociative symptoms experienced by patients with dissociative (psychogenic, non-epileptic) seizures (DS), including psychological and somatoform types of symptomatology. An additional aim was to assess possible relationships between dissociation, traumatic experiences, post-traumatic symptoms and seizure manifestations in this group. A total of 40 patients with DS were compared with a healthy control group (n = 43), matched on relevant demographic characteristics. Participants completed several self-report questionnaires, including the Multiscale Dissociation Inventory (MDI), Somatoform Dissociation Questionnaire-20, Traumatic Experiences Checklist and the Post-Traumatic Diagnostic Scale. Measures of seizure symptoms and current emotional distress (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) were also administered. The clinical group reported significantly more psychological and somatoform dissociative symptoms, trauma, perceived impact of trauma, and post-traumatic symptoms than controls. Some dissociative symptoms (i.e. MDI disengagement, MDI depersonalization, MDI derealization, MDI memory disturbance, and somatoform dissociation scores) were elevated even after controlling for emotional distress; MDI depersonalization scores correlated positively with trauma scores while seizure symptoms correlated with MDI depersonalization, derealization and identity dissociation scores. Exploratory analyses indicated that somatoform dissociation specifically mediated the relationship between reported sexual abuse and DS diagnosis, along with depressive symptoms. A range of psychological and somatoform dissociative symptoms, traumatic experiences and post-traumatic symptoms are elevated in patients with DS relative to healthy controls, and seem related to seizure manifestations. Further studies are needed to explore peri-ictal dissociative experiences in more detail.

  1. M Current-Based Therapies for Nerve Agent Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    synaptic transmission. Science 264, 107-111. Wolff, C., Gillard , M., Fuks, B., & Chatelain, P. (2005). [3H]linopirdine binding to rat brain membranes is...supporting hippocampal synaptic transmission. Science 264, 107–111. Wolff C, Gillard M, Fuks B & Chatelain P (2005). [3H]Linopirdine binding to rat

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in complex partial seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furune, Sunao; Negoro, Tamiko; Maehara, Mitsuo; Nomura, Kazushi; Miura, Kiyokuni; Takahashi, Izumi; Watanabe, Kazuyoshi

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) were performed on 45 patients with intractable complex partial seizures. MRI was performed with a superconducting whole-body scanner operating at 0.5 tesla (T) and 1.5 T. In patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, 8 of 24 patients had abnormal CT, but 16 or 24 patients showed abnormal MRI. 1.5 T MRI detected more abnormality than 0.5 T MRI when CT was normal. In patients with frontal lobe epilepsy, 5 of 7 patients had normal CT and MRI. In 2 other patients, MRI demonstrated an arachnoid cyst and increased signal intensity area on the T2-weighted images which were not detected by CT. In patients with occipital lobe epilepsy, 5 of 6 patients show abnormal CT and MRI. In patients with tuberous sclerosis, MRI revealed some increased signal intensity areas on the T2-weighted images in the occipital and temporal lobe, which were not detected by CT. Most surface EEG foci corresponded with the side of MRI abnormality. These data indicate that MRI is more informative than CT in complex partial seizures. MRI is the imaging technique of choice in the diagnosis of complex partial seizures. (author)

  3. Unsupervised EEG analysis for automated epileptic seizure detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birjandtalab, Javad; Pouyan, Maziyar Baran; Nourani, Mehrdad

    2016-07-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder which can, if not controlled, potentially cause unexpected death. It is extremely crucial to have accurate automatic pattern recognition and data mining techniques to detect the onset of seizures and inform care-givers to help the patients. EEG signals are the preferred biosignals for diagnosis of epileptic patients. Most of the existing pattern recognition techniques used in EEG analysis leverage the notion of supervised machine learning algorithms. Since seizure data are heavily under-represented, such techniques are not always practical particularly when the labeled data is not sufficiently available or when disease progression is rapid and the corresponding EEG footprint pattern will not be robust. Furthermore, EEG pattern change is highly individual dependent and requires experienced specialists to annotate the seizure and non-seizure events. In this work, we present an unsupervised technique to discriminate seizures and non-seizures events. We employ power spectral density of EEG signals in different frequency bands that are informative features to accurately cluster seizure and non-seizure events. The experimental results tried so far indicate achieving more than 90% accuracy in clustering seizure and non-seizure events without having any prior knowledge on patient's history.

  4. Epileptic seizures in patients with a posterior circulation infarct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yüksel Kaplan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of seizures and the clinical features of patients with seizures related to a posterior circulation infarct (POCI. METHODS: We reviewed all ischemic stroke patients admitted to our clinic between January 2011 and January 2012. The patients’ database information was retrospectively analyzed. Fifty-five patients with a POCI were included in the study. We reviewed all patients with epileptic seizures related to a POCI. Age, gender, recurrent stroke, risk factors, etiology, radiographic localization, the seizure type and onset time, and the electroencephalographic findings of patients were evaluated. We excluded all patients who had precipitating conditions during seizures such as taking drugs, acid-base disturbances, electrolyte imbalance, and history of epilepsy. RESULTS: Seizures were observed in four patients (3 male, 1 female with a POCI related epileptic seizures (7.2%. The etiology of strokes was cardiac-embolic in 3 patients and vertebral artery dissection in 1 patient. Seizures occurred in 2 patients as presenting finding, in 1 patient within 7 days, and 1 patient within 28 days. Primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures occurred in 3 patients and simple partial seizures with secondary generalization in 1 patient. Three patients had cerebellum infarction at the left hemisphere. One patient had lateral medullary infarction at the right side. The electroencephalographic findings of patients were normal. CONCLUSION: Studies involving patients with seizures related to a POCI are novel and few in number. Three patients with seizure had cerebellum infarction. The cerebellum in these patients may contribute via different mechanisms over seizure activity.

  5. Risk factors associated with postoperative seizures in patients undergoing cardiac surgery who received tranexamic acid: A case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix R Montes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Antifibrinolytic agents are used during cardiac surgery to minimize bleeding and reduce exposure to blood products. Several reports suggest that tranexamic acid (TA can induce seizure activity in the postoperative period. To examine factors associated with postoperative seizures in patients undergoing cardiac surgery who received TA. University-affiliated hospital. Case-control study. Patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB between January 2008 and December 2009 were identified. During this time, all patients undergoing heart surgery with CPB received TA. Cases were defined as patients who developed seizures that required initiation of anticonvulsive therapy within 48 h of surgery. Exclusion criteria included subjects with preexisting epilepsy and patients in whom the convulsive episode was secondary to a new ischemic lesion on brain imaging. Controls who did not develop seizures were randomly selected from the initial cohort. From an initial cohort of 903 patients, we identified 32 patients with postoperative seizures. Four patients were excluded. Twenty-eight cases and 112 controls were analyzed. Cases were more likely to have a history of renal impairment and higher preoperative creatinine values compared with controls (1.39 ± 1.1 vs. 0.98 ± 0.02 mg/dL, P = 0.02. Significant differences in the intensive care unit, postoperative and total lengths of stay were observed. An association between high preoperative creatinine value and postoperative seizure was identified. TA may be associated with the development of postoperative seizures in patients with renal dysfunction. Doses of TA should be reduced or even avoided in this population.

  6. National Audit of Seizure management in Hospitals (NASH): results of the national audit of adult epilepsy in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Peter A; Kirkham, Jamie J; Marson, Anthony G; Pearson, Mike G

    2015-03-31

    About 100,000 people present to hospitals each year in England with an epileptic seizure. How they are managed is unknown; thus, the National Audit of Seizure management in Hospitals (NASH) set out to assess prior care, management of the acute event and follow-up of these patients. This paper describes the data from the second audit conducted in 2013. 154 emergency departments (EDs) across the UK. Data from 4544 attendances (median age of 45 years, 57% men) showed that 61% had a prior diagnosis of epilepsy, 12% other neurological problems and 22% were first seizure cases. Each ED identified 30 consecutive adult cases presenting due to a seizure. Details were recorded of the patient's prior care, management at hospital and onward referral to neurological specialists onto an online database. Descriptive results are reported at national level. Of those with epilepsy, 498 (18%) were on no antiepileptic drug therapy and 1330 (48%) were on monotherapy. Assessments were often incomplete and witness histories were sought in only 759 (75%) of first seizure patients, 58% were seen by a senior doctor and 57% were admitted. For first seizure patients, advice on further seizure management was given to 264 (27%) and only 55% were referred to a neurologist or epilepsy specialist. For each variable, there was wide variability among sites that was not explicable. For the sites who partook in both audits, there was a trend towards better care in 2013, but this was small and dwarfed by the intersite variability. These results have parallels with the Sentinel Audit of Stroke performed a decade earlier. There is wide intersite variability in care covering the entire care pathway, and a need for better organised and accessible care for these patients. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. Uric acid is released in the brain during seizure activity and increases severity of seizures in a mouse model for acute limbic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyrion, Lisa; Raedt, Robrecht; Portelli, Jeanelle; Van Loo, Pieter; Wadman, Wytse J; Glorieux, Griet; Lambrecht, Bart N; Janssens, Sophie; Vonck, Kristl; Boon, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Recent evidence points at an important role of endogenous cell-damage induced pro-inflammatory molecules in the generation of epileptic seizures. Uric acid, under the form of monosodium urate crystals, has shown to have pro-inflammatory properties in the body, but less is known about its role in seizure generation. This study aimed to unravel the contribution of uric acid to seizure generation in a mouse model for acute limbic seizures. We measured extracellular levels of uric acid in the brain and modulated them using complementary pharmacological and genetic tools. Local extracellular uric acid levels increased three to four times during acute limbic seizures and peaked between 50 and 100 min after kainic acid infusion. Manipulating uric acid levels through administration of allopurinol or knock-out of urate oxidase significantly altered the number of generalized seizures, decreasing and increasing them by a twofold respectively. Taken together, our results consistently show that uric acid is released during limbic seizures and suggest that uric acid facilitates seizure generalization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Febrile seizures: a population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane S. Dalbem

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the prevalence of benign febrile seizures of childhood and describe the clinical and epidemiological profile of this population. Methods: This was a population-based, cross-sectional study, carried out in the city of Barra do Bugres, MT, Brazil, from August 2012 to August 2013. Data were collected in two phases. In the first phase, a questionnaire that was previously validated in another Brazilian study was used to identify suspected cases of seizures. In the second phase, a neurological evaluation was performed to confirm diagnosis. Results: The prevalence was 6.4/1000 inhabitants (95% CI: 3.8–10.1. There was no difference between genders. Simple febrile seizures were found in 88.8% of cases. A family history of febrile seizures in first-degree relatives and history of epilepsy was present in 33.3% and 11.1% of patients, respectively. Conclusions: The prevalence of febrile seizures in Midwestern Brazil was lower than that found in other Brazilian regions, probably due to the inclusion only of febrile seizures with motor manifestations and differences in socioeconomic factors among the evaluated areas. Resumo: Objetivos: Estabelecer a prevalência das crises febris e descrever o perfil clínico e epidemiológico dessa população. Métodos: Estudo transversal de base populacional realizado na cidade de Barra do Bugres (MT, no período de agosto de 2012 a agosto de 2013. Os dados foram coletados em duas etapas. Na primeira fase utilizamos um questionário validado previamente em outro estudo brasileiro, para identificação de casos suspeitos de crises epilépticas. Na segunda etapa realizamos a avaliação neuroclínica para confirmação diagnóstica. Resultados: A prevalência de crise febril foi de 6,4/1000 habitantes (IC95% 3,8; 10,1. Não houve diferença entre os sexos. As crises febris simples foram encontradas em 88,8% dos casos. A história familiar de crise febril e epilepsia em parentes de 1° grau esteve

  9. A randomized controlled trial of the effectiveness of multisystemic therapy in the Netherlands: post-treatment changes and moderator effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asscher, J.J.; Dekovic, M.; Manders, W.A.; Prins, P.J.M.; van der Laan, P.H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: In the present randomized controlled trial, the effectiveness of multisystemic therapy (MST) in The Netherlands was examined. Moderator tests were conducted for ethnicity, age and gender. Methods: The sample consisted of N = 256 adolescents, referred because of conduct problems, and

  10. A randomized controlled trial of the effectiveness of multisystemic therapy in the Netherlands: post-treatment changes and moderator effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asscher, J.J.; Deković, M.; Manders, W.A.; van der Laan, P.H.; Prins, P.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: In the present randomized controlled trial, the effectiveness of multisystemic therapy (MST) in The Netherlands was examined. Moderator tests were conducted for ethnicity, age and gender. Methods: The sample consisted of N = 256 adolescents, referred because of conduct problems, and

  11. Tranexamic acid-associated seizures: Causes and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecker, Irene; Wang, Dian-Shi; Whissell, Paul D; Avramescu, Sinziana; Mazer, C David; Orser, Beverley A

    2016-01-01

    Antifibrinolytic drugs are routinely used worldwide to reduce the bleeding that results from a wide range of hemorrhagic conditions. The most commonly used antifibrinolytic drug, tranexamic acid, is associated with an increased incidence of postoperative seizures. The reported increase in the frequency of seizures is alarming, as these events are associated with adverse neurological outcomes, longer hospital stays, and increased in-hospital mortality. However, many clinicians are unaware that tranexamic acid causes seizures. The goal of this review is to summarize the incidence, risk factors, and clinical features of these seizures. This review also highlights several clinical and preclinical studies that offer mechanistic insights into the potential causes of and treatments for tranexamic acid-associated seizures. This review will aid the medical community by increasing awareness about tranexamic acid-associated seizures and by translating scientific findings into therapeutic interventions for patients. © 2015 The Authors Annals of Neurology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Neurological Association.

  12. Tranexamic acid–associated seizures: Causes and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecker, Irene; Wang, Dian‐Shi; Whissell, Paul D.; Avramescu, Sinziana; Mazer, C. David

    2015-01-01

    Antifibrinolytic drugs are routinely used worldwide to reduce the bleeding that results from a wide range of hemorrhagic conditions. The most commonly used antifibrinolytic drug, tranexamic acid, is associated with an increased incidence of postoperative seizures. The reported increase in the frequency of seizures is alarming, as these events are associated with adverse neurological outcomes, longer hospital stays, and increased in‐hospital mortality. However, many clinicians are unaware that tranexamic acid causes seizures. The goal of this review is to summarize the incidence, risk factors, and clinical features of these seizures. This review also highlights several clinical and preclinical studies that offer mechanistic insights into the potential causes of and treatments for tranexamic acid–associated seizures. This review will aid the medical community by increasing awareness about tranexamic acid–associated seizures and by translating scientific findings into therapeutic interventions for patients. ANN NEUROL 2016;79:18–26 PMID:26580862

  13. A NEW MULTI-SPECTRAL THRESHOLD NORMALIZED DIFFERENCE WATER INDEX (MST-NDWI WATER EXTRACTION METHOD – A CASE STUDY IN YANHE WATERSHED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhou

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Accurate remote sensing water extraction is one of the primary tasks of watershed ecological environment study. Since the Yanhe water system has typical characteristics of a small water volume and narrow river channel, which leads to the difficulty for conventional water extraction methods such as Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI. A new Multi-Spectral Threshold segmentation of the NDWI (MST-NDWI water extraction method is proposed to achieve the accurate water extraction in Yanhe watershed. In the MST-NDWI method, the spectral characteristics of water bodies and typical backgrounds on the Landsat/TM images have been evaluated in Yanhe watershed. The multi-spectral thresholds (TM1, TM4, TM5 based on maximum-likelihood have been utilized before NDWI water extraction to realize segmentation for a division of built-up lands and small linear rivers. With the proposed method, a water map is extracted from the Landsat/TM images in 2010 in China. An accuracy assessment is conducted to compare the proposed method with the conventional water indexes such as NDWI, Modified NDWI (MNDWI, Enhanced Water Index (EWI, and Automated Water Extraction Index (AWEI. The result shows that the MST-NDWI method generates better water extraction accuracy in Yanhe watershed and can effectively diminish the confusing background objects compared to the conventional water indexes. The MST-NDWI method integrates NDWI and Multi-Spectral Threshold segmentation algorithms, with richer valuable information and remarkable results in accurate water extraction in Yanhe watershed.

  14. MST e Escola Nacional Florestan Fernandes: formação, comunicação e socialização política

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Nabarrete Bastos

    Full Text Available Resumo Este artigo apresenta resultados de pesquisa sobre a formação política do Movimento dos Trabalhadores Rurais Sem Terra (MST a partir da comunicação e socialização com o trabalhador urbano. Utiliza-se o método dialético e são aplicadas técnicas qualitativas, entrevistas semiestruturadas com lideranças do MST, e pesquisa antropológica na Escola Nacional Florestan Fernandes (ENFF. A ENFF, fundada pelo MST no município de Guararema, Estado de São Paulo, em 2005, é um dos principais espaços de formação política dos movimentos sociais da América Latina. Constitui também espaço estratégico para a formação, comunicação e socialização política entre a classe trabalhadora do campo e da cidade. A ENFF possui potencial para ser espaço de construção da hegemonia popular por meio da sociabilidade entre movimentos sociais do campo e da cidade, por meio da produção simbólica comum e da educação universalizante, contudo, ainda é um espaço em que prevalecem a hegemonia política e a cultura do MST.

  15. Quando o Movimento dos Trabalhadores Rurais Sem Terra - MST - ocupa a escola: A educação da infância em uma escola em movimento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arenhart, Deise

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This text has as an objective to reflect on an educational experience that has grown within the Pedagogy of Brazil’s Landless Rural Workers Movement- MST. The goal is to build an understanding of the social movement as an educational agent and, at the same time, to highlight the experience of a school that is based on the Pedagogy of the MST. Research was conducted in a settlement of the MST, through observations and interviews with adults and children of the settlement and associated sections in the organization of the Movement. The analysis is grounded on critical studies in the fields of Education and Sociology, in particular the Sociology of Childhood. The study indicates that to be in motion is a human formative experience born out of the Pedagogy of a social movement which attempts to become a historical project. Solidarity, class conscience, child participation, cultivating of social memory, collectivism, valuing of rural culture and a recognition of human beings as historical agents are some of the practices observed in the context under study that reflect the presence of MST as educational agent. This article is written in Portugese

  16. 78 FR 24301 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Epilepsy and Seizure Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ...-0106] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Epilepsy and Seizure Disorders AGENCY: Federal... history of epilepsy/ seizures, off anti-seizure medication and seizure-free for 10 years, may be qualified.... Jandreau is a 46 year-old Class A CMV driver in Maine. He has a diagnosis of seizure disorder. He has...

  17. 75 FR 38599 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Epilepsy and Seizure Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-02

    ...-0203] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Epilepsy and Seizure Disorders AGENCY: Federal... individuals with seizure disorders to operate CMVs in interstate commerce. DATES: Comments must be received on... anti-seizure medication. Drivers with a history of epilepsy/seizures off anti-seizure medication and...

  18. 76 FR 18822 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Epilepsy and Seizure Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-05

    ...-0089] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Epilepsy and Seizure Disorders AGENCY: Federal... individuals with seizure disorders to operate CMVs in interstate commerce. DATES: Comments must be received on... anti-seizure medication. Drivers with a history of epilepsy/seizures off anti-seizure medication and...

  19. 78 FR 41988 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Epilepsy and Seizure Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-12

    ...-0107] Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Epilepsy and Seizure Disorders AGENCY: Federal... history of epilepsy/ seizures, off anti-seizure medication and seizure-free for 10 years, may be qualified... Bird Mr. Bird is a 29 year-old driver in Ohio. He has a diagnosis of epilepsy and has remained seizure...

  20. Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: our video-EEG experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nežádal, Tomáš; Hovorka, Jiří; Herman, Erik; Němcová, Iveta; Bajaček, Michal; Stichová, Eva

    2011-09-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the number of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) in our patients with a refractory seizure disorder, to determine the 'typical' PNES semiology using video-EEG monitoring and describe other PNES parameters. We evaluated prospectively 596 patients with pharmacoresistant seizures. All these patients underwent continuous video-EEG monitoring. In consenting patients, we used suggestive seizure provocation. We assessed seizure semiology, interictal EEG, brain MRI, psychiatric co-morbidities, personality profiles, and seizure outcome. In the sample of 596 monitored patients, we detected 111 (19.3%) patients with PNES. Of the 111 patients with PNES, 86.5% had spontaneous and 76.5% had provoked seizures. The five most typical symptoms were: initially closed eyelids (67.6%), rapid tremor (47.7%), asynchronous limb movement (37.8%), preictal pseudosleep (33.3%), and side-to-side head movement (32.4%). Interictal EEG was rated as abnormal in 46.2% and with epileptiform abnormality in 9%. Brain MRI was abnormal in 32 (28.8%) patients. Personality disorders (46.8%), anxiety (39.6%), and depression (12.6%) were the most frequent additional psychiatric co-morbidities. PNES outcome after at least 2 years is reported; 22.5% patients was seizure-free; one-third had markedly reduced seizure frequency. We have not seen any negative impact of the provocative testing on the seizure outcome. Video-EEG monitoring with suggestive seizure provocation supported by clinical psychiatric and psychological evaluation significantly contributes to the correct PNES diagnosis, while interictal EEG and brain MRI are frequently abnormal. Symptoms typical for PNES, as opposed to epileptic seizures, could be distinguished.

  1. Refletindo sobre os vínculos com a carreira dos militantes do MST: Entrincheiramento em análise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denilson Aparecido Leite Freire

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo analisou o entrincheiramento na carreira dos trabalhadores queatuam no Movimento Sem Terra (MST, através de um levantamento quantitativo com99 participantes do movimento. O entrincheiramento é um construto que engloba apercepção de falta de alternativas na carreira, custos emocionais e investimento nacarreira. Foram utilizadas escalas validadas, com um KMO de 0.741. Os resultadosmostraram níveis de entrincheiramento maiores entre: assalariados, com relação aosvoluntários; mulheres, com relação aos homens; e público das regiões Sul e Sudestedevido à questões históricas ligadas à Terra.

  2. Seizures and the Role of Anticonvulsants After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Lara L; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Vespa, Paul M

    2016-10-01

    Posttraumatic seizures are a common complication of traumatic brain injury. Posttraumatic epilepsy accounts for 20% of symptomatic epilepsy in the general population and 5% of all epilepsy. Early posttraumatic seizures occur in more than 20% of patients in the intensive care unit and are associated with secondary brain injury and worse patient outcomes. Most posttraumatic seizures are nonconvulsive and therefore continuous electroencephalography monitoring should be the standard of care for patients with moderate or severe brain injury. The literature shows that posttraumatic seizures result in secondary brain injury caused by increased intracranial pressure, cerebral edema and metabolic crisis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: malignant migrating partial seizures of infancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: Epilepsy Educational Resources (7 links) Boston Children's Hospital: Seizures Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: ...

  4. Daytime encopresis associated with gland mal epileptic seizures: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyatsi, D P

    2005-08-01

    Sphincteric incontinence of stool and urine are not unusual features of generalised epileptic seizures. Isolated secondary encopresis as a manifestation of an epileptic seizure is unusual. This report is of, a four year old boy, with daytime secondary non-retentive encopresis. The onset of encopresis was preceded by several episodes of nocturnal generalised tonic clonic epileptic seizures. An electroencephalogram showed features consistent with complex partial seizures. He was commenced on anti-epileptic treatment with phenytoin sodium, and by the third day of treatment, the patient had achieved stool control.

  5. Abnormal radionuclide cerebral angiograms and scans due to seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, J.S.; Mishkin, F.S.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of recent seizures on the brain scan was determined in a retrospective study of patients who had had seizures. All patients who underwent brain scanning within eight days of seizures and who did not have a specific intracranial lesion were included. The /sup 99m/Tc-pertechnetate cerebral angiogram and/or delayed scan was abnormal in 73 percent of 22 patients. The data suggest that if seizures occur within six days of the brain imaging, the image is likely to be abnormal. (auth)

  6. Retention, dosing, tolerability and patient reported seizure outcome of Zonisamide as only add-on treatment under real-life conditions in adult patients with partial onset seizures: Results of the observational study ZOOM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamer, Hajo; Baulac, Michel; McMurray, Rob; Kockelmann, Edgar

    2016-01-01

    Zonisamide is licensed for adjunctive therapy for partial-onset seizures with or without secondary generalisation in patients 6 years and older and as monotherapy for the treatment of partial seizures in adult patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy, and shows a favourable pharmacokinetic profile with low interaction potential with other drugs. The aim of the present study was to gather real-life data on retention and modalities of zonisamide use when administered as only add-on treatment to a current AED monotherapy in adult patients with partial-onset seizures. This multicenter observational study was performed in 4 European countries and comprised three visits: baseline, and after 3 and 6 months. Data on patients' retention, reported efficacy, tolerability and safety, and quality of life was collected. Of 100 included patients, 93 could be evaluated. After 6 months, the retention rate of zonisamide add-on therapy was 82.8%. At this time, a reduction of seizure frequency of at least 50% was observed in 79.7% of patients, with 43.6% reporting seizure freedom over the last 3 months of the study period. Adverse events were reported by 19.4% of patients, with fatigue, agitation, dizziness, and headache being most frequent. Approximately 25% of patients were older than 60 years, many of whom suffered from late-onset epilepsy. Compared to younger patients, these patients showed considerable differences with regard to their antiepileptic drug regimen at baseline, and slightly higher responder and retention rates at 6 months. Despite limitations due to the non-interventional open-label design and the low sample size, the results show that zonisamide as only add-on therapy is well retained, indicating effectiveness in the majority of patients under real-life conditions. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Benign focal epilepsy of childhood with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS: clinical characteristics of seizures according to age at first seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miziara Carmen Silvia M.G.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available BECTS is characterized by the presence of simple partial motor seizures in the face and/or oropharynx, with or without sensory symptoms and often with secondary generalization. These seizures tend to occur more often during sleep or drowsiness. According to some authors, generalized seizures prevail over other types particularly among children aged five or less. The purpose of this study is to determine the characteristics of the first epileptic episode among children with BECTS, grouped by age as of their first epileptic seizure, as well as to analyze how such seizures change over the course of clinical evolution. A total of 61 children were examined, 16 of whom below the age of 5 and 45 above. With regard to the first and recurrent epileptic episodes, our final assessment showed that partial seizures occurred more frequently than generalized tonic-clonic seizures in both groups. Although no conclusive relation could be established between the type of partial seizure (i.e. simple versus complex and the children's age as of their first epileptic episode, it was possible to correlate the type of epileptic seizure with their clinical evolution, in which case simple partial seizures proved to be more frequent than complex partial seizures. It should be noted that the number of children under the age of five was relatively small, which evinces the need for further studies. It should also be borne in mind that the reported frequency of generalized seizures in these children's first epileptic episode may be due to their parents' lack of attention and familiarity with this pathology and their attendant difficulty in characterizing its clinical symptoms.

  8. Acute postoperative seizures and long-term seizure outcome after surgery for hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Casciato, Sara; Quarato, Pier Paolo; Mascia, Addolorata; D'Aniello, Alfredo; Grammaldo, Liliana G; De Risi, Marco; Meldolesi, Giulio N; Romigi, Andrea; Esposito, Vincenzo; Picardi, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    To assess the incidence and the prognostic value of acute postoperative seizures (APOS) in patients surgically treated for drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy due to hippocampal sclerosis (TLE-HS). We studied 139 consecutive patients with TLE-HS who underwent epilepsy surgery and were followed up for at least 5 years (mean duration of follow-up 9.1 years, range 5-15). Medical charts were reviewed to identify APOS, defined as ictal events with the exception of auras occurring within the first 7 days after surgery. Seizure outcome was determined at annual intervals. Patients who were in Engel Class Ia at the last contact were classified as having a favorable outcome. Seizure outcome was favorable in 99 patients (71%). Six patients (4%) experienced APOS and in all cases their clinical manifestations were similar to the habitual preoperative seizures. All patients with APOS had unfavorable long-term outcome, as compared with 35 (26%) of 133 in whom APOS did not occur (pseizure outcome. Given some study limitations, our findings should be regarded as preliminary and need confirmation from future larger, prospective, multicenter studies. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Intractable Seizures and Rehabilitation in Ciguatera Poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derian, Armen; Khurana, Seema; Rothenberg, Joshua; Plumlee, Charles

    2017-05-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning is the most frequently reported seafood toxin illness associated with the ingestion of contaminated tropical fish. Diagnosis relies on a history of recent tropical fish ingestion and subsequent development of gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and neurological symptoms. Ciguatera poisoning usually has a self-limited time course, and its management involves symptomatic control and supportive care. This case report presents an uncommon case of ciguatera poisoning with prolonged intractable seizures refractory to standard antiseizure medications. The patient also had significant functional decline that responded to rigorous inpatient rehabilitation not previously described in literature.

  10. Detection and Prediction of Epileptic Seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duun-Henriksen, Jonas

    % from 16 cm2. The coherences of different frequency bands below 16 Hz all seem to have similar declines as a function of the Euclidean distance between channels. Frequencies between 16 and 30 Hz have a steeper decline and will only show coherent parts to cortical channels within 60 cm2....... There is no coherence for frequencies above 30 Hz at any distance. A lot of patients with epilepsy still struggle with a dreadful fear of suddenly having a seizure. The current PhD study identified topics where an EEG monitor could provide improvement in the patient’s quality of life. By algorithm development...

  11. S100B proteins in febrile seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkonen, Kirsi; Pekkala, Niina; Pokka, Tytti

    2011-01-01

    S100B protein concentrations correlate with the severity and outcome of brain damage after brain injuries, and have been shown to be markers of blood-brain barrier damage. In children elevated S100B values are seen as a marker of damage to astrocytes even after mild head injuries. S100B proteins...... may also give an indication of an ongoing pathological process in the brain with respect to febrile seizures (FS) and the likelihood of their recurrence. To evaluate this, we measured S100B protein concentrations in serum and cerebrospinal fluid from 103 children after their first FS. 33 children...

  12. Children with new onset seizures: A prospective study of parent variables, child behavior problems, and seizure occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Joan K; Haber, Linda C; Dunn, David W; Shore, Cheryl P; Johnson, Cynthia S; Perkins, Susan M

    2015-12-01

    Parent variables (stigma, mood, unmet needs for information and support, and worry) are associated with behavioral difficulties in children with seizures; however, it is not known how this relationship is influenced by additional seizures. This study followed children (ages 4-14 years) and their parents over a 24-month period (with data collected at baseline and 6, 12, and 24 months) and investigated the effect of an additional seizure on the relationship between parenting variables and child behavior difficulties. The sample was parents of 196 children (104 girls and 92 boys) with a first seizure within the past 6 weeks. Child mean age at baseline was 8 years, 3 months (SD 3 years). Data were analyzed using t-tests, chi-square tests, and repeated measures analyses of covariance. Relationships between parent variables, additional seizures, and child behavior problems were consistent across time. Several associations between parent variables and child behavior problems were stronger in the additional seizure group than in the no additional seizure group. Findings suggest that interventions that assist families to respond constructively to the reactions of others regarding their child's seizure condition and to address their needs for information and support could help families of children with continuing seizures to have an improved quality of life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Anaesthesia for electroconvulsive therapy - new tricks for old drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stripp, Tobias Kvist; Jorgensen, Martin Balslev; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review is to investigate existing literature in order to delineate whether the use of anaesthesia and timing of seizure induction in a new and optimised way may improve the efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). METHODS: PubMed/MEDLINE was searched for exist......OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review is to investigate existing literature in order to delineate whether the use of anaesthesia and timing of seizure induction in a new and optimised way may improve the efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). METHODS: PubMed/MEDLINE was searched...... the shortest seizures, etomidate and ketamine the longest. Etomidate and ketamine+propofol 1 : 1 seems to yield the seizures with best quality. Seizure quality is improved when induction of ECT is delayed until the effect of the anaesthetic has waned - possibly monitored with BIS values. Manual...

  14. Combined sub-threshold dosages of phenobarbital and low-frequency stimulation effectively reduce seizures in amygdala-kindled rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, Azam; Semnanian, Saeed; Atapour, Nafiseh; Shojaei, Amir; Moradi, Homeira; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, Javad

    2014-08-01

    Low-frequency stimulation (LFS) is a potential therapy utilized in patients who do not achieve satisfactory control of seizures with pharmacological treatments. Here, we investigated the interaction between anticonvulsant effects of LFS and phenobarbital (a commonly used medicine) on amygdala-kindled seizures in rats. Animals were kindled by electrical stimulation of basolateral amygdala in a rapid manner (12 stimulations/day). Fully kindled animals randomly received one of the three treatment choices: phenobarbital (1, 2, 3, 4 and 8 mg/kg; i.p.; 30 min before kindling stimulation), LFS (one or 4 packages contained 100 or 200 monophasic square wave pulses, 0.1-ms pulse duration at 1 Hz, immediately before kindling stimulation) or a combination of both (phenobarbital at 3 mg/kg and LFS). Phenobarbital alone at the doses of 1, 2 and 3 mg/kg had no significant effect on the main seizure parameters. LFS application always produced anticonvulsant effects unless applied with the pattern of one package of 100 pulses, which is considered as non-effective. All the seizure parameters were significantly reduced when phenobarbital (3 mg/kg) was administered prior to the application of the non-effective pattern of LFS. Phenobarbital (3 mg/kg) also increased the anticonvulsant actions of the effective LFS pattern. Our results provide an evidence of a positive cumulative anticonvulsant effect of LFS and phenobarbital, suggesting a potential combination therapy at sub-threshold dosages of phenobarbital and LFS to achieve a satisfactory clinical effect.

  15. Diagnosing psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: Video-EEG monitoring, suggestive seizure induction and diagnostic certainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popkirov, Stoyan; Jungilligens, Johannes; Grönheit, Wenke; Wellmer, Jörg

    2017-08-01

    Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) can remain undiagnosed for many years, leading to unnecessary medication and delayed treatment. A recent report by the International League Against Epilepsy Nonepileptic Seizures Task Force recommends a staged approach to the diagnosis of PNES (LaFrance, et al., 2013). We aimed to investigate its practical utility, and to apply the proposed classification to evaluate the role of long-term video-EEG monitoring (VEEG) and suggestive seizure induction (SSI) in PNES workup. Using electronic medical records, 122 inpatients (mean age 36.0±12.9years; 68% women) who received the diagnosis of PNES at our epilepsy center during a 4.3-year time period were included. There was an 82.8% agreement between diagnostic certainty documented at discharge and that assigned retroactively using the Task Force recommendations. In a minority of cases, having used the Task Force criteria could have encouraged the clinicians to give more certain diagnoses, exemplifying the Task Force report's utility. Both VEEG and SSI were effective at supporting high level diagnostic certainty. Interestingly, about one in four patients (26.2%) had a non-diagnostic ("negative") VEEG but a positive SSI. On average, this subgroup did not have significantly shorter mean VEEG recording times than VEEG-positive patients. However, VEEG-negative/SSI-positive patients had a significantly lower habitual seizure frequency than their counterparts. This finding emphasizes the utility of SSI in ascertaining the diagnosis of PNES in patients who do not have a spontaneous habitual event during VEEG due to, for example, low seizure frequency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Serum zinc status of neonates with seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olia Sharmeen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Seizure is a common neurological disorder in neonatal age group!. Primary metabolic derangement is one of the important reason behind this convulsion during this period. Among primary metabolic derangement hypoglycemia, is most common followed by bypocalcaemia, hypomagnesaemia, low zinc status etc. As causes of many cases of convul­sion remain unknown in neonate. Objectives: To see the zinc status in the sera of neonate with convulsion. So that if needed early intervention can be taken up and thereby prevent complications. Method: A total of 50 neonates (1-28 days who had convulsion with no apparent reasons of convulsion were enrolled as cases and 50 healthy age and sex matched neonates were enrolled as controls. After a quick clinical evaluation serum zinc status was estimated from venous blood by atomic absorption method in Chemistry Division, Atomic Energy Centre. Low zinc was considered if serum value was <0.7mg/L. Results: Among a total of 50 cases 6% had low zinc value & 2% of controls also had low zinc level. The mean serwu zinc level of cases and controls were 1.57±0.95 and 2.37±1.06 mmol/1 respectively (p<0.01. Conclusion: From the study it is seen that low zinc value is an important cause of neonatal seizure due to primary metabolic abnormalities. So early recognition and treatment could save these babies from long term neurological sequelies.

  17. Seizures and Sleep in the Thalamus: Focal Limbic Seizures Show Divergent Activity Patterns in Different Thalamic Nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Li; Motelow, Joshua E; Ma, Chanthia; Biche, William; McCafferty, Cian; Smith, Nicholas; Liu, Mengran; Zhan, Qiong; Jia, Ruonan; Xiao, Bo; Duque, Alvaro; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2017-11-22

    The thalamus plays diverse roles in cortical-subcortical brain activity patterns. Recent work suggests that focal temporal lobe seizures depress subcortical arousal systems and convert cortical activity into a pattern resembling slow-wave sleep. The potential simultaneous and paradoxical role of the thalamus in both limbic seizure propagation, and in sleep-like cortical rhythms has not been investigated. We recorded neuronal activity from the central lateral (CL), anterior (ANT), and ventral posteromedial (VPM) nuclei of the thalamus in an established female rat model of focal limbic seizures. We found that population firing of neurons in CL decreased during seizures while the cortex exhibited slow waves. In contrast, ANT showed a trend toward increased neuronal firing compatible with polyspike seizure discharges seen in the hippocampus. Meanwhile, VPM exhibited a remarkable increase in sleep spindles during focal seizures. Single-unit juxtacellular recordings from CL demonstrated reduced overall firing rates, but a switch in firing pattern from single spikes to burst firing during seizures. These findings suggest that different thalamic nuclei play very different roles in focal limbic seizures. While limbic nuclei, such as ANT, appear to participate directly in seizure propagation, arousal nuclei, such as CL, may contribute to depressed cortical function, whereas sleep spindles in relay nuclei, such as VPM, may interrupt thalamocortical information flow. These combined effects could be critical for controlling both seizure severity and impairment of consciousness. Further understanding of differential effects of seizures on different thalamocortical networks may lead to improved treatments directly targeting these modes of impaired function. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Temporal lobe epilepsy has a major negative impact on quality of life. Previous work suggests that the thalamus plays a critical role in thalamocortical network modulation and subcortical arousal

  18. Barriers to Seizure Management in Schools: Perceptions of School Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Debbie; Patel, Anup D; Cohen, Daniel M; Scherzer, Daniel; Kline, Jennifer

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess school nurses' perceptions of barriers to optimal management of seizures in schools. Eighty-three school nurses completed an electronic survey. Most agreed they felt confident they could identify a seizure (97.6%), give rectal diazepam (83.8%), and handle cluster seizures (67.1%), but fewer were confident they could give intranasal midazolam (63.3%), had specific information about a student's seizures (56.6%), or could swipe a vagus nerve stimulator magnet (47.4%). Nurses were more likely to be available at the time of a seizure in rural (17/20) (85%) versus suburban (21/34) (62%) or urban (8/25) (32%) schools (P = .001). School nurses are comfortable managing seizures in the school setting. However, a specific seizure plan for each child and education on intranasal midazolam and vagus nerve stimulator magnet use are needed. A barrier in urban schools is decreased availability of a nurse to identify seizures and administer treatment. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. [Subacute encephalopathy with epileptic seizures in an alcoholic patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozian, R; Otto, F G

    2000-09-01

    We introduce a case of a 66 year-old male with chronic alcoholism who suffered from confusion, Wernicke-aphasia and epileptic seizures. Several EEG revealed periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges. The patient's case resembles the symptoms of a subacute encephalopathy with epileptic seizures which can occur in alcoholics.

  20. Automated differentiation between epileptic and non-epileptic convulsive seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beniczky, Sándor; Conradsen, Isa; Moldovan, Mihai

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was the clinical validation of an automated algorithm based on surface electromyography (EMG) for differentiation between convulsive epileptic and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNESs). Forty-four consecutive episodes with convulsive events were automatically analyzed with the a......%) and 18 PNESs (95%). The overall diagnostic accuracy was 95%. This algorithm is useful for distinguishing between epileptic and psychogenic convulsive seizures....

  1. Neuroimaging findings in pediatric patients with seizure from an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Pediatric seizures in developing countries are often poorly investigated and consequently poorly managed. Sociocultural misconceptions, financial difficulties, and lack of facilities are often blamed. This study studies the structural intracranial abnormalities associated with pediatric seizures and the proportion of ...

  2. Paradoxical Seizure Response to Phenytoin in an Epileptic Heroin Addict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasagar, Brintha; Verma, Beni R; Dewberry, Robert G; Pula, Thaddeus

    2015-06-01

    Phenytoin has a narrow therapeutic window and seizures can occur at both ends of the spectrum. A 41-year-old man with a history of a seizure disorder and heroin addiction presented with dizziness following 2 generalized tonic-clonic seizures that occurred earlier that day. The patient had received a loading dose of phenytoin for seizures associated with a subtherapeutic level 5 days previously. Initial evaluation revealed an elevated phenytoin level of 32.6 mcg/mL and an opiate-positive toxicology screen. Levetiracetam was started on the day of presentation and phenytoin was held until the level returned to the therapeutic range. The patient's dizziness resolved and he had no additional seizures. Evaluation for reversible causes of seizure activity along with anticonvulsant administration is generally the standard of care for breakthrough seizures. Phenytoin blood levels, if supratherapeutic, may be at least partially responsible for breakthrough seizure activity; in this circumstance, holding phenytoin and temporarily adding another anticonvulsant may be indicated.

  3. Picrotoxin-induced seizures modified by morphine and opiate antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J; Nores, W L; Kenigs, V; Olson, G A; Olson, R D

    1993-07-01

    The effects of naloxone, Tyr-MIF-1, and MIF-1 on morphine-mediated changes in susceptibility to picrotoxin-induced seizures were studied. Rats were pretreated with naloxone, MIF-1, Tyr-MIF-1, or saline. At 15-min intervals, they received a second pretreatment of morphine or saline and then were tested for seizures following a convulsant dose of picrotoxin. Several parameters of specific categories of seizures were scored. Morphine increased the number of focal seizure episodes, duration of postseizure akinesis, and incidence of generalized clonic seizures. Naloxone tended to block the morphine-mediated changes in susceptibility. Tyr-MIF-1 had effects similar to naloxone on duration of postseizure immobility but tended to potentiate the effects of morphine on focal seizure episodes. The effects of morphine and the opiate antagonists on focal seizure episodes and postseizure duration suggest the general involvement of several types of opiate receptors in these picrotoxin-induced behaviors. However, the observation of antagonistic effects for Tyr-MIF-1 on immobility but agonistic effects for focal seizures suggests that the type of effect exerted by opiate agents may depend upon other neuronal variables.

  4. Seizure tests distinguish intermittent fasting from the ketogenic diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Adam L.; Zheng, Xiangrong; Bergbower, Emily; Kennedy, Michiko; Hardwick, J. Marie

    2010-01-01

    Summary Purpose Calorie restriction can be anticonvulsant in animal models. The ketogenic diet was designed to mimic calorie restriction and has been assumed to work by the same mechanisms. We challenged this assumption by profiling the effects of these dietary regimens in mice subjected to a battery of acute seizure tests. Methods Juvenile male NIH Swiss mice received ketogenic diet or a normal diet fed in restricted quantities (continuously or intermittently) for ~ 12 days, starting at 3–4 weeks of age. Seizures were induced by the 6 Hz test, kainic acid, maximal electroshock, or pentylenetetrazol. Results The ketogenic and calorie-restricted diets often had opposite effects depending on the seizure test. The ketogenic diet protected from 6 Hz–induced seizures, whereas calorie restriction (daily and intermittent) increased seizure activity. Conversely, calorie restriction protected juvenile mice against seizures induced by kainic acid, whereas the ketogenic diet failed to protect. Intermittent caloric restriction worsened seizures induced by maximal electroshock but had no effect on those induced by pentylenetetrazol. Discussion In contrast to a longstanding hypothesis, calorie restriction and the ketogenic diet differ in their acute seizure test profiles, suggesting that they have different underlying anticonvulsant mechanisms. These findings highlight the importance of the 6 Hz test and its ability to reflect the benefits of ketosis and fat consumption. PMID:20477852

  5. How the environment shapes genetically induced seizure activity in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schridde, U.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Takahashi, T.; Fukuyama, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Underling biology that governs the age-dependent seizure susceptibility is a new, exciting research field for every pediatric epileptologists and developmental nouroscientists. From daily practice, clinicians are well aware about a close correlation between the degree of seizure susceptibility and

  6. Congenital hypoparathyroidism presenting as recurrent seizures in an adult

    OpenAIRE

    Acharya, Sourya; Shukla, Samarth; Singh, Dinesh; Deshpande, Rohit; Mahajan, S. N.

    2012-01-01

    Hypocalcemia due to hypoparathyroidism may manifest as serious neurologic symptoms such as seizures, movement disorders, or raised intracranial pressure. Several patients were observed to have these dangerous neurologic complications even without subtle signs of hypocalcemia like tetany, chvostek's sign or carpopedal spasms. We present a case of recurrent hypocalcemic seizures due to congenital hypoparathyroidism.

  7. Responding to Seizures (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-11-26

    As traumatic as epilepsy can be for the person experiencing seizures, it can be just as troubling for witnesses who want to try and help. In this podcast, Rosemarie Kobau discusses the appropriate way to help someone who is experiencing a seizure.  Created: 11/26/2015 by MMWR.   Date Released: 11/26/2015.

  8. Responding to Seizures (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-11-26

    When helping someone with a seizure, it’s important to remain calm. This podcast discusses what to do if you witness someone having a seizure.  Created: 11/26/2015 by MMWR.   Date Released: 11/26/2015.

  9. 19 CFR 162.63 - Arrests and seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arrests and seizures. 162.63 Section 162.63 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Controlled Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana § 162...

  10. Seizure Disorders: An Alternative Explanation for Students' Inattention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnew, Christina M.; Nystul, Michael S.; Conner, Mary Catherine

    1998-01-01

    Provides an overview of seizure disorders. They are more common than previously thought, and most have their onset in adolescence. Types of seizure disorders common in children, their symptoms, and treatment are described. A case example illustrates behavior in school and a paradoxical medication effect. (EMK)

  11. epilepsy following simple febrile seizure in a rural community in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-12-12

    Dec 12, 2011 ... family history of epilepsy did not significantly influence the development of later epilepsy X2 ... following a single simple febrile seizure. MATERIALS ANd ... If the parent did not witness the seizure, an adult who witnessed the ...

  12. Recognition Memory Is Impaired in Children after Prolonged Febrile Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinos, Marina M.; Yoong, Michael; Patil, Shekhar; Chin, Richard F. M.; Neville, Brian G.; Scott, Rod C.; de Haan, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Children with a history of a prolonged febrile seizure show signs of acute hippocampal injury on magnetic resonance imaging. In addition, animal studies have shown that adult rats who suffered febrile seizures during development reveal memory impairments. Together, these lines of evidence suggest that memory impairments related to hippocampal…

  13. Self‑perceived seizure precipitants among patients with epilepsy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most (80%) patients rightly indicated that antiepileptic drug was the best treatment for their seizure control. Conclusion: The result of this study showed that the leading perceived seizure precipitants among epilepsy patients attending the neurology clinic of UITH were stress, inadequate sleep, head trauma, and demonic ...

  14. Temporal epileptic seizures and occupational exposure to solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, M; Bælum, Jesper; Bonde, J P

    1994-01-01

    Long term exposure to organic solvents is usually not considered as a possible cause of chronic epileptic seizures. A case that shows a remarkable coincidence between exposure to organic solvents and occurrence of epileptic seizures is reported. The man was a 58 year old sign writer with lifelong...

  15. Responding to Seizures (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    As traumatic as epilepsy can be for the person experiencing seizures, it can be just as troubling for witnesses who want to try and help. In this podcast, Rosemarie Kobau discusses the appropriate way to help someone who is experiencing a seizure.

  16. Seizure detection using dynamic warping for patients with intellectual disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, L.; Arends, J.B.A.M.; Long, X.; Wu, Y.; Cluitmans, P.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is paramount for both retrospective analysis and real-time monitoring of epileptic seizures. Studies have shown that EEG-based seizure detection is very difficult for a specific epileptic population with intellectual disability due to the cerebral development disorders.

  17. 19 CFR 12.109 - Seizure and forfeiture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seizure and forfeiture. 12.109 Section 12.109 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE... § 12.109 Seizure and forfeiture. (a) Whenever any pre-Columbian monumental or architectural sculpture...

  18. Validation of an automated seizure detection algorithm for term neonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieson, Sean R.; Stevenson, Nathan J.; Low, Evonne; Marnane, William P.; Rennie, Janet M.; Temko, Andrey; Lightbody, Gordon; Boylan, Geraldine B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to validate the performance of a seizure detection algorithm (SDA) developed by our group, on previously unseen, prolonged, unedited EEG recordings from 70 babies from 2 centres. Methods EEGs of 70 babies (35 seizure, 35 non-seizure) were annotated for seizures by experts as the gold standard. The SDA was tested on the EEGs at a range of sensitivity settings. Annotations from the expert and SDA were compared using event and epoch based metrics. The effect of seizure duration on SDA performance was also analysed. Results Between sensitivity settings of 0.5 and 0.3, the algorithm achieved seizure detection rates of 52.6–75.0%, with false detection (FD) rates of 0.04–0.36 FD/h for event based analysis, which was deemed to be acceptable in a clinical environment. Time based comparison of expert and SDA annotations using Cohen’s Kappa Index revealed a best performing SDA threshold of 0.4 (Kappa 0.630). The SDA showed improved detection performance with longer seizures. Conclusion The SDA achieved promising performance and warrants further testing in a live clinical evaluation. Significance The SDA has the potential to improve seizure detection and provide a robust tool for comparing treatment regimens. PMID:26055336

  19. Increasing Epilepsy Awareness in Schools: A Seizure Smart Schools Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Heather A.; Hiltz, Cynthia M.; Kopplin, Vicki L.; Lindeke, Linda L.

    2015-01-01

    A high prevalence of epilepsy diagnoses and seizure events among students was identified at a large Midwestern school district. In partnership with the Epilepsy Foundation of Minnesota (EFMN), a quality improvement project was conducted to provide education and resources to staff caring for school children with seizures. School nurses (N = 26)…

  20. 32 CFR 935.101 - Seizure of property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Seizure of property. 935.101 Section 935.101 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Criminal Actions § 935.101 Seizure of property. Any property seized in connection...

  1. Frequency of fever episodes related to febrile seizure recurrence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Stuijvenberg (Margriet); N.E. Jansen (Nichon); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); G. Derksen-Lubsen (Gerarda); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of this study was to assess the number of fever episodes as a risk factor for febrile seizure recurrence during the first 6 months after the last previous febrile seizure. In a 6-month follow-up study of 155 children, aged 3 months to 5 y, with a first or a recurrent febrile

  2. 19 CFR 12.104e - Seizure and forfeiture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seizure and forfeiture. 12.104e Section 12.104e Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Cultural Property § 12.104e Seizure and forfeiture. (a) Whenever...

  3. Seizures and Epilepsy and Their Relationship to Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Johnny L.; Neal, Daniene

    2009-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are serious neurodevelopmental disorders which often co-occur with intellectual disabilities. A disorder which is strongly correlated with both of these disabilities are seizures and epilepsy. The purpose of this review was to provide an overview of available research on seizures and epilepsy in the ASD population…

  4. Complex partial seizure with severe depression and conduct ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Complex partial seizure complicated by psychiatric comorbidities like depression and conduct disorder presents management challenges for both the physician and parents. The etiology of such psychiatric comorbidities may be related to the seizure or to several other unrelated risk factors. The psychiatric comorbidities and ...

  5. [Brain lateralization and seizure semiology: ictal clinical lateralizing signs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Réka; Kalmár, Zsuzsanna; Fehér, Nóra; Fogarasi, András; Gyimesi, Csilla; Janszky, József

    2008-07-30

    Clinical lateralizing signs are the phenomena which can unequivocally refer to the hemispheric onset of epileptic seizures. They can improve the localization of epileptogenic zone during presurgical evaluation, moreover, their presence can predict a success of surgical treatment. Primary sensory phenomena such as visual aura in one half of the field of vision or unilateral ictal somatosensory sensation always appear on the contralateral to the focus. Periictal unilateral headache, although it is an infrequent symptom, is usually an ipsilateral sign. Primary motor phenomena like epileptic clonic, tonic movements, the version of head ubiquitously appear contralateral to the epileptogenic zone. Very useful lateralization sign is the ictal hand-dystonia which lateralizes to the contralateral hemisphere in nearly 100%. The last clonus of the secondarily generalized tonic-clonic seizure lateralizes to the ipsilateral hemisphere in 85%. The fast component of ictal nystagmus appears in nearly 100% on the contralateral side of the epileptic focus. Vegetative symptoms during seizures arising from temporal lobe such as spitting, nausea, vomiting, urinary urge are typical for seizures originating from non-dominant (right) hemisphere. Ictal pallor and cold shivers are dominant hemispheric lateralization signs. Postictal unilateral nose wiping refers to the ipsilateral hemispheric focus compared to the wiping hand. Ictal or postictal aphasia refers to seizure arising from dominant hemisphere. Intelligable speech during complex partial seizures appears in non-dominant seizures. Automatism with preserved consciousness refers to the seizures of non-dominant temporal lobe.

  6. Seizures in Fragile X Syndrome: Characteristics and Comorbid Diagnoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Raspa, Melissa; Loggin-Hester, Lisa; Bishop, Ellen; Holiday, David; Bailey, Donald B., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    A national survey of caregivers of individuals with fragile X syndrome addressed characteristics of epilepsy and co-occurring conditions. Of the 1,394 individuals (1,090 males and 304 females) with the full mutation, 14% of males and 6% of females reported seizures. Seizures were more often partial, began between ages 4 and 10 years, and were…

  7. Seizure tests distinguish intermittent fasting from the ketogenic diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Adam L; Zheng, Xiangrong; Bergbower, Emily; Kennedy, Michiko; Hardwick, J Marie

    2010-08-01

    Calorie restriction can be anticonvulsant in animal models. The ketogenic diet was designed to mimic calorie restriction and has been assumed to work by the same mechanisms. We challenged this assumption by profiling the effects of these dietary regimens in mice subjected to a battery of acute seizure tests. Juvenile male NIH Swiss mice received ketogenic diet or a normal diet fed in restricted quantities (continuously or intermittently) for ∼12 days, starting at 3-4 weeks of age. Seizures were induced by the 6 Hz test, kainic acid, maximal electroshock, or pentylenetetrazol. The ketogenic and calorie-restricted diets often had opposite effects depending on the seizure test. The ketogenic diet protected from 6 Hz-induced seizures, whereas calorie restriction (daily and intermittent) increased seizure activity. Conversely, calorie restriction protected juvenile mice against seizures induced by kainic acid, whereas the ketogenic diet failed to protect. Intermittent caloric restriction worsened seizures induced by maximal electroshock but had no effect on those induced by pentylenetetrazol. In contrast to a longstanding hypothesis, calorie restriction and the ketogenic diet differ in their acute seizure test profiles, suggesting that they have different underlying anticonvulsant mechanisms. These findings highlight the importance of the 6 Hz test and its ability to reflect the benefits of ketosis and fat consumption. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2010 International League Against Epilepsy.

  8. Precipitants of seizure among patients with epilepsy: Experience at Kano, Northwestern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L F Owolabi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Common precipitating factors of seizure included stress, febrile illness and non adherence to antiepileptic drugs. Knowledge of these precipitating factors are vital prevention of seizure.

  9. Efficacy and safety of eslicarbazepine acetate monotherapy for partial-onset seizures: Experience from a multicenter, observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledano, Rafael; Jovel, Camilo Espinosa; Jiménez-Huete, Adolfo; Bayarri, Pau Giner; Campos, Dulce; Gomariz, Elena López; Giráldez, Beatriz González; García-Morales, Irene; Falip, Mercé; Agredano, Paula Martínez; Palao, Susana; Prior, María José Aguilar Amat; Pascual, María Rosa Querol; Navacerrada, Francisco José; González, Francisco Javier López; Ojeda, Joaquín; Sáez, Aránzazu Alfaro; Bermejo, Pedro Emilio; Gil-Nagel, Antonio

    2017-08-01

    Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL, Aptiom™) is a once-daily anticonvulsant, approved as adjunctive treatment of partial-onset seizures (POS). Historical-controlled trials investigating the use of ESL as monotherapy have demonstrated a favorable efficacy and tolerability profile in patients with POS. This prospective, non-interventional study recruited POS patients in 17 hospitals in Spain. After a 3-month baseline period, ESL therapy was initiated as 400mg QD and up-titrated to an optimal maintenance dose based on clinical response and tolerance. The incidence of seizures was assessed via seizure calendars and the nature and severity of adverse events (AEs) were also recorded. A total of 117 patients (aged 9-87years) enrolled in the study and were treated with ESL at either 400mg/day (3.4% patients), 800mg/day (61% patients), 1200mg/day (27.1% patients) or 1600mg/day (8.5% patients). At 3months, 82.0% (n=72) of patients achieved a ≥50% reduction in seizure frequency, compared to 79.7% (n=67) of patients at 6months and 83.0% (n=49) at 12months. Patients who suffered secondary generalized tonic-clonic (SGTC) seizures had seizure-free rates of 71% (n=27), 69.6% (n=29), and 72.7% (n=16) at 3, 6, and 12months, respectively. Overall, 18 patients (15.3%) reported AEs of instability and dizziness (n=9), somnolence (n=3), mild hyponatremia (n=3), headache (n=1), hypertriglyceridemia (n=1), and allergic reaction (n=1), which caused ESL discontinuation of ESL treatment. ESL is effective and well tolerated as monotherapy for patients with POS, which supports previous findings. Early use is supported by its frequent use as monotherapy in this study and lack of severe side effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Are we missing non-motor seizures in Parkinson's disease? Two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Andre Y; Cucca, Alberto; Agarwal, Shashank; Liu, Anli; Di Rocco, Alessandro; Biagioni, Milton C

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is predominantly recognized for its motor symptoms, but patients struggle from a morbid and heterogeneous collection of non-motor symptoms (NMS-PD) that can affect their quality of life even more. NMS-PD is a rather generalized term and the heterogeneity and non-specific nature of many symptoms poses a clinical challenge when a PD patient presents with non-motor complaints that may not be NMS-PD. We report two patients with idiopathic PD who presented with acute episodes of cognitive changes. Structural brain images, cardiovascular and laboratory assessment were unremarkable. Both patients experienced a considerable delay before receiving an epilepsy-evaluation, at which point electroencephalogram abnormalities supported the diagnosis of focal non-motor seizures with alteration of awareness. Antiepileptic therapy was implemented and was effective in both cases. Diagnosing non-motor seizures can be challenging. However, PD patients pose an even greater challenge given their eclectic non-motor clinical manifestations and other disease-related complications that could confound and mislead adequate clinical interpretation. Our two cases provide examples of non-motor seizures that may mimic non-motor symptoms of PD. Treating physicians should always consider other possible causes of non-motor symptoms that may coexist in PD patients. Epilepsy work-up should be contemplated in the differential of acute changes in cognition, behavior, or alertness.

  11. Efficacy and tolerability of high-dose phenobarbital in children with focal seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Akihisa; Nakahara, Eri; Ikeno, Mitsuru; Abe, Shinpei; Igarashi, Ayuko; Nakazawa, Mika; Takasu, Michihiko; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2016-04-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of children with focal epilepsy treated with oral high-dose phenobarbital. We reviewed data on children (agedphenobarbital (>5 mg/kg/day to maintain a target serum level >40 μg/mL) for at least 6 months. Seizure frequency was evaluated after phenobarbital titration, and 1 and 2 years after high-dose phenobarbital treatment commenced. Treatment was judged effective when seizure frequencies fell by ⩾75%. Seven boys and eight girls were treated. The median age at commencement of high-dose phenobarbital therapy was 30 months. The maximal serum phenobarbital level ranged from 36.5 to 62.9 μg/mL. High-dose PB was effective in seven. In two patients, treatment was transiently effective, but seizure frequency later returned to the baseline. High-dose PB was ineffective in six. No significant association between effectiveness and any clinical variable was evident. Drowsiness was recorded in nine patients, but no patient developed a behavioral problem or hypersensitivity. Oral high-dose phenobarbital was effective in 7 of 15 patients with focal epilepsy and well tolerated. High-dose PB may be useful when surgical treatment is difficult. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Inter-modality comparisons of seizure focus lateralization in complex partial seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, P.T.; Cortes-Blanco, A.; Pourdehnad, M.; Desiderio, L.; Jang, S.; Alavi, A.; Levy-Reis, I.

    2001-01-01

    Anterior temporal lobectomy offers a high chance of seizure-free outcome in patients suffering from drug-refractory complex partial seizure (CPS) originating from the temporal lobe. Other than EEG, several functional and morphologic imaging methods are used to define the spatial seizure origin. The present study was undertaken to compare the merits of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and single-voxel proton MR spectroscopy (MRS) for the lateralization of temporal lobe seizure foci. The clinical charts and imaging data of 43 consecutive CPS patients were reviewed. Based on surface EEG, 31 patients were classified with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE; 25 lateralized, 6 not lateralized) and 12 with non-temporal lobe epilepsy. All were examined by FDG-PET, MRS and MRI within 6 weeks. FDG-PET and MRI were interpreted visually, while the N-acetyl-aspartate to creatine ratio was used for MRS interpretation. One FDG-PET scan was invalid due to seizure activity post injection. The MR spectra could not be evaluated in five cases bilaterally and three cases unilaterally for technical reasons. A total of 15 patients underwent anterior temporal lobectomy. All showed a beneficial postoperative outcome. When the proportions of agreement between FDG-PET (0.77), MRI (0.58) and MRS (0.56) and surface EEG in TLE cases were compared, there were no significant differences (P>0.10). However, FDG-PET showed a significantly higher agreement (0.93) than MRI (0.60; P=0.03) with the side of successful temporal lobectomy. The concordance of MRS with the side of successful temporal lobectomy was intermediate (0.75). When the results of functional and morphologic imaging were combined, no significant differences were found between the rates of agreement of FDG-PET/MRI and MRS/MRI with EEG (0.80 vs 0.68; P=0.50) and with the side of successful temporal lobectomy (0.87 vs 0.92; P=0.50) in TLE cases. However, MRS/MRI showed

  13. Inter-modality comparisons of seizure focus lateralization in complex partial seizures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, P.T.; Cortes-Blanco, A.; Pourdehnad, M.; Desiderio, L.; Jang, S.; Alavi, A. [Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Levy-Reis, I. [Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Neurology

    2001-10-01

    Anterior temporal lobectomy offers a high chance of seizure-free outcome in patients suffering from drug-refractory complex partial seizure (CPS) originating from the temporal lobe. Other than EEG, several functional and morphologic imaging methods are used to define the spatial seizure origin. The present study was undertaken to compare the merits of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and single-voxel proton MR spectroscopy (MRS) for the lateralization of temporal lobe seizure foci. The clinical charts and imaging data of 43 consecutive CPS patients were reviewed. Based on surface EEG, 31 patients were classified with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE; 25 lateralized, 6 not lateralized) and 12 with non-temporal lobe epilepsy. All were examined by FDG-PET, MRS and MRI within 6 weeks. FDG-PET and MRI were interpreted visually, while the N-acetyl-aspartate to creatine ratio was used for MRS interpretation. One FDG-PET scan was invalid due to seizure activity post injection. The MR spectra could not be evaluated in five cases bilaterally and three cases unilaterally for technical reasons. A total of 15 patients underwent anterior temporal lobectomy. All showed a beneficial postoperative outcome. When the proportions of agreement between FDG-PET (0.77), MRI (0.58) and MRS (0.56) and surface EEG in TLE cases were compared, there were no significant differences (P>0.10). However, FDG-PET showed a significantly higher agreement (0.93) than MRI (0.60; P=0.03) with the side of successful temporal lobectomy. The concordance of MRS with the side of successful temporal lobectomy was intermediate (0.75). When the results of functional and morphologic imaging were combined, no significant differences were found between the rates of agreement of FDG-PET/MRI and MRS/MRI with EEG (0.80 vs 0.68; P=0.50) and with the side of successful temporal lobectomy (0.87 vs 0.92; P=0.50) in TLE cases. However, MRS/MRI showed

  14. Predictors of Recurrent Febrile Seizures in Iranian Children

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    Yousef Veisani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A few factors appear to boost a child's risk of having recurrent febrile seizures, including young age during the first seizure, seizure type, and having immediate family members with a history of febrile seizures. The present study aimed to provide reliable information about recurrent febrile seizure in Iranian children. On the computerized literature valid on valid keyword with search in valid database PubMed, Scientific Information Databases (SID (, Global medical article limberly (Medlib, Iranian Biomedical Journals (Iran Medex, Iranian Journal Database (Magiran, and Google Scholar recruited in different geographic areas. To explore heterogeneity in studies I2 index was used. Meta-analysis used to data analysis with random effects model.Hospital data of 4,599 children with febrile seizure. Overall, 21 studies met our inclusion criteria. Febrile seizure in 2 age groups (<2 and 2-6 years were 55.8% (95% CI: 50.4-61.2 and 44.2% (95% CI: 38.8-61.2 respectively. Pooled recurrent rate of febrile seizure in Iran was 20.9% (95% CI: 12.3-29.5. In 28.8 (95% CI: 19.3-38.4, children there was positive family history. The mean prevalence of simple and complex seizures was 69.3% (95% CI: 59.5-79.0 and 28.3% (95% CI: 19.6-31.0 respectively. The rates in different geographical regions of central, east, and west of Iran, 25, 20.8 and 27.1% were estimated, respectively.According to the data the prevalence febrile seizure is higher in males and children under two years. Recurrence rate in Iran, similar to other studies performed in other regions of the world.

  15. A brief history of typical absence seizures - Petit mal revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigo, Francesco; Trinka, Eugen; Lattanzi, Simona; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Nardone, Raffaele; Martini, Mariano

    2018-03-01

    In this article, we have traced back the history of typical absence seizures, from their initial clinical description to the more recent nosological position. The first description of absence seizures was made by Poupart in 1705 and Tissot in 1770. In 1824, Calmeil introduced the term "absences", and in 1838, Esquirol for the first time used the term petit mal. Reynolds instead used the term "epilepsia mitior" (milder epilepsy) and provided a comprehensive description of absence seizures (1861). In 1854, Delasiauve ranked absences as the seizure type with lower severity and introduced the concept of idiopathic epilepsy. Otto Binswanger (1899) discussed the role of cortex in the pathophysiology of "abortive seizures", whereas William Gowers (1901) emphasized the importance of a detailed clinical history to identify nonmotor seizures or very mild motor phenomena which otherwise may go unnoticed or considered not epileptic. At the beginning of the 20th Century, the term pyknolepsy was introduced, but initially was not universally considered as a type of epilepsy; it was definitely recognized as an epileptic entity only in 1945, based on electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings. Hans Berger, the inventor of the EEG, made also the first EEG recording of an atypical absence (his results were published only in 1933), whereas the characteristic EEG pattern was reported by neurophysiologists of the Harvard Medical School in 1935. The discovery of EEG made it also possible to differentiate absence seizures from so called "psychomotor" seizures occurring in temporal lobe epilepsy. Penfield and Jasper (1938) considered absences as expression of "centrencephalic epilepsy". Typical absences seizures are now classified by the International League Against Epilepsy among generalized nonmotor (absence) seizures. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Spatial memory impairment in Morris water maze after electroconvulsive seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Maria; Hallin, Thord; Broms, Jonas; Ekstrand, Joakim; Tingström, Anders

    2017-02-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is one of the most efficient treatments for severe major depression, but some patients suffer from retrograde memory loss after treatment. Electroconvulsive seizures (ECS), an animal model of ECT, have repeatedly been shown to increase hippocampal neurogenesis, and multiple ECS treatments cause retrograde amnesia in hippocampus-dependent memory tasks. Since recent studies propose that addition of newborn hippocampal neurons might degrade existing memories, we investigated whether the memory impairment after multiple ECS treatments is a cumulative effect of repeated treatments, or if it is the result of a delayed effect after a single ECS. We used the hippocampus-dependent memory task Morris water maze (MWM) to evaluate spatial memory. Rats were exposed to an 8-day training paradigm before receiving either a single ECS or sham treatment and tested in the MWM 24 h, 72 h, or 7 days after this treatment, or multiple (four) ECS or sham treatments and tested 7 days after the first treatment. A single ECS treatment was not sufficient to cause retrograde amnesia whereas multiple ECS treatments strongly disrupted spatial memory in the MWM. The retrograde amnesia after multiple ECS is a cumulative effect of repeated treatments rather than a delayed effect after a single ECS.

  17. Neuroimaging abnormalities and seizure recurrence in a prospective cohort study of Zambians with human immunodeficiency virus and first seizure

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    Michael J. Potchen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In HIV-positive individuals with first seizure, we describe neuroimaging findings, detail clinical and demographic risk factors for imaging abnormalities, and evaluate the relationship between imaging abnormalities and seizure recurrence to determine if imaging abnormalities predict recurrent seizures. Among 43 participants (mean 37.4 years, 56% were male, 16 (37% were on antiretroviral drugs, 32 (79% had advanced HIV disease, and (28 66% had multiple seizures and/or status epilepticus at enrollment. Among those with cerebrospinal fluid studies, 14/31 (44% had opportunistic infections (OIs. During follow-up, 9 (21% died and 15 (35% experienced recurrent seizures. Edema was associated with OIs (odds ratio: 8.79; confidence interval: 1.03-236 and subcortical atrophy with poorer scores on the International HIV Dementia Scale (5.2 vs. 9.3; P=0.002. Imaging abnormalities were not associated with seizure recurrence or death (P>0.05. Seizure recurrence occurred in at least a third and over 20% died during follow-up. Imaging was not predictive of recurrent seizure or death, but imaging abnormalities may offer additional diagnostic insights in terms of OI risk and cognitive impairment.

  18. Seizure, Fit or Attack? The Use of Diagnostic Labels by Patients with Epileptic or Non-Epileptic Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plug, Leendert; Sharrack, Basil; Reuber, Markus

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis of the use of diagnostic labels such as "seizure", "attack", "fit", and "blackout" by patients who experience seizures. While previous research on patients' preferences for diagnostic terminology has relied on questionnaires, we assess patients' own preferences and their responses to a doctor's use of different labels…

  19. Why are seizures rare in rapid eye movement sleep? Review of the frequency of seizures in different sleep stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Marcus; Pavlova, Milena

    2013-01-01

    Since the formal characterization of sleep stages, there have been reports that seizures may preferentially occur in certain phases of sleep. Through ascending cholinergic connections from the brainstem, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is physiologically characterized by low voltage fast activity on the electroencephalogram, REMs, and muscle atonia. Multiple independent studies confirm that, in REM sleep, there is a strikingly low proportion of seizures (~1% or less). We review a total of 42 distinct conventional and intracranial studies in the literature which comprised a net of 1458 patients. Indexed to duration, we found that REM sleep was the most protective stage of sleep against focal seizures, generalized seizures, focal interictal discharges, and two particular epilepsy syndromes. REM sleep had an additional protective effect compared to wakefulness with an average 7.83 times fewer focal seizures, 3.25 times fewer generalized seizures, and 1.11 times fewer focal interictal discharges. In further studies REM sleep has also demonstrated utility in localizing epileptogenic foci with potential translation into postsurgical seizure freedom. Based on emerging connectivity data in sleep, we hypothesize that the influence of REM sleep on seizures is due to a desynchronized EEG pattern which reflects important connectivity differences unique to this sleep stage.

  20. Case report of an infant with severe vitamin D deficiency rickets manifested as hypocalcemic seizures

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    Vuletić Biljana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hypocalcemic seizures are uncommon in the post-neonatal period. We report an infant with hypocalcemic seizures caused by severe deficiency of vitamin D. Case Outline. A five-month-old male infant was admitted to hospital in March 2013 with recurrent generalized afebrile seizures resistant to clonazepam therapy. At the clinical examination, the infant showed characteristic rachitic signs, so that after a blood sample was taken for laboratory testing, the infant was given infusion of 2 ml/kg of 10% of calcium gluconate at a rate of 0.5 ml/min. The treatment resulted in immediate termination of seizures and normalization of the consciousness of the infant. Blood sample analysis showed extremely low levels of free and total calcium (0.36/1.24 mmol/l and 25(OHD (<3 ng/ml, elevated alkaline phosphatase (878 U/l and parathyroid hormone (283 pg/ml, and low calcium/creatinine ratio (mg/mg in a portion of urine (0.03, while the levels of serum phosphorus, pH, total protein, albumin and creatinine were within the reference range. Wrist X-ray showed typical signs of rickets. In order to fully stabilize calcium homeostasis, along with 2,000 IU of vitamin D3 daily and standard cow’s milk formula, calcium gluconate (80 mg/kg daily was given orally over a period of two weeks. The treatment resulted in complete stabilization of the infant’s condition and rapid improvement in laboratory, radiological and clinical findings of rickets. Conclusion. Generalized convulsions in the afebrile infant represent a serious and etiopathogenically very heterogeneous problem. Extremely rare, as in the case of our patient, it may be due to severe hypocalcemia caused by a deficiency of vitamin D.