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Sample records for sedation clinical utility

  1. Terminal sedation and euthanasia: A comparison of clinical practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A.C. Rietjens (Judith); J.J.M. van Delden (Hans); A. van der Heide (Agnes); A.M. Vrakking (Astrid); B.D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen (Bregje); P.J. van der Maas (Paul); G. van der Wal (Gerrit)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBackground: An important issue in the debate about terminal sedation is the extent to which it differs from euthanasia. We studied clinical differences and similarities between both practices in the Netherlands. Methods: Personal interviews were held with a nationwide stratified sample

  2. Quality of care in palliative sedation: audit and compliance monitoring of a clinical protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez-Rosario, Miguel Angel; Castillo-Padrós, Manuel; Garrido-Bernet, Belén; Ascanio-León, Belen

    2012-10-01

    The European Association for Palliative Care and the U.S. National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization have published statements that recommend an audit of palliative sedation practices. The aim was to assess the feasibility of a quality care project in palliative sedation. We carried out an audit of adherence to a guideline regarding palliative sedation, undertaken as a yearly assessment during two years, of a sample of patient charts. With an audit tool, the charts were evaluated as to the presence of the ethical sedation checklist, information that justified palliative sedation, patient and/or family agreement, and the appropriateness of treatment in concordance with the clinical protocol. An educational program and result feedback meetings were used as the implementation strategy. Roughly 25% of the medical charts of patients who died in the palliative care unit were evaluated, 94 in 2007 and 110 in 2008. In 2007 and 2008, 63% and 57% of the patients, respectively, whose median age was 65 years, were sedated, with a median length of two days. The main reason for sedation was agitation concomitant with respiratory failure in roughly 60% and 75% of the cases in 2007 and 2008, respectively. Agreement of the patient/family about sedation was collected from 100% of the cases. The concordance of procedures with the sedation guideline was 100% in both years. Our quality-of-care strategy was shown to obtain a higher level of compliance with the palliative sedation guideline for at least two years. Copyright © 2012 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Randomised clinical trial: a 'nudge' strategy to modify endoscopic sedation practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harewood, G C; Clancy, K; Engela, J; Abdulrahim, M; Lohan, K; O'Reilly, C

    2011-07-01

    In behavioural economics, a 'nudge' describes configuration of a choice to encourage a certain action without taking away freedom of choice. To determine the impact of a 'nudge' strategy - prefilling either 3mL or 5mL syringes with midazolam - on endoscopic sedation practice. Consecutive patients undergoing sedation for EGD or colonoscopy were enrolled. On alternate weeks, midazolam was prefilled in either 3mL or 5mL syringes. Preprocedure sedation was administered by the endoscopist to achieve moderate conscious sedation; dosages were at the discretion of the endoscopist. Meperidine was not prefilled. Overall, 120 patients received sedation for EGD [59 (5mL), 61 (3mL)] and 86 patients were sedated for colonoscopy [38 (5mL), 48 (3mL)]. For EGDs, average midazolam dose was significantly higher in the 5-mL group (5.2mg) vs. 3-mL group (3.3mg), (Pnudge' strategies may hold promise in modifying endoscopic sedation practice. Further research is required to explore the utility of 'nudges' in impacting other aspects of endoscopic practice. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Randomised clinical trial: a 'nudge' strategy to modify endoscopic sedation practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harewood, G C

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: In behavioural economics, a \\'nudge\\' describes configuration of a choice to encourage a certain action without taking away freedom of choice. AIM: To determine the impact of a \\'nudge\\' strategy - prefilling either 3mL or 5mL syringes with midazolam - on endoscopic sedation practice. METHODS: Consecutive patients undergoing sedation for EGD or colonoscopy were enrolled. On alternate weeks, midazolam was prefilled in either 3mL or 5mL syringes. Preprocedure sedation was administered by the endoscopist to achieve moderate conscious sedation; dosages were at the discretion of the endoscopist. Meperidine was not prefilled. RESULTS: Overall, 120 patients received sedation for EGD [59 (5mL), 61 (3mL)] and 86 patients were sedated for colonoscopy [38 (5mL), 48 (3mL)]. For EGDs, average midazolam dose was significantly higher in the 5-mL group (5.2mg) vs. 3-mL group (3.3mg), (P<0.0001); for colonoscopies, average midazolam dose was also significantly higher in the 5-mL group (5.1mg) vs. 3-mL group (3.3mg), (P<0.0001). There was no significant difference in mean meperidine dose (42.1mg vs. 42.8mg, P=0.9) administered to both colonoscopy groups. No adverse sedation-related events occurred; no patient required reversal of sedation. CONCLUSIONS: These findings demonstrate that \\'nudge\\' strategies may hold promise in modifying endoscopic sedation practice. Further research is required to explore the utility of \\'nudges\\' in impacting other aspects of endoscopic practice.

  5. Randomised clinical trial: a 'nudge' strategy to modify endoscopic sedation practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harewood, G C

    2011-05-17

    Background  In behavioural economics, a \\'nudge\\' describes configuration of a choice to encourage a certain action without taking away freedom of choice. Aim  To determine the impact of a \\'nudge\\' strategy - prefilling either 3 mL or 5 mL syringes with midazolam - on endoscopic sedation practice. Methods  Consecutive patients undergoing sedation for EGD or colonoscopy were enrolled. On alternate weeks, midazolam was prefilled in either 3 mL or 5 mL syringes. Preprocedure sedation was administered by the endoscopist to achieve moderate conscious sedation; dosages were at the discretion of the endoscopist. Meperidine was not prefilled. Results  Overall, 120 patients received sedation for EGD [59 (5 mL), 61 (3 mL)] and 86 patients were sedated for colonoscopy [38 (5 mL), 48 (3 mL)]. For EGDs, average midazolam dose was significantly higher in the 5-mL group (5.2 mg) vs. 3-mL group (3.3 mg), (P < 0.0001); for colonoscopies, average midazolam dose was also significantly higher in the 5-mL group (5.1 mg) vs. 3-mL group (3.3 mg), (P < 0.0001). There was no significant difference in mean meperidine dose (42.1 mg vs. 42.8 mg, P = 0.9) administered to both colonoscopy groups. No adverse sedation-related events occurred; no patient required reversal of sedation. Conclusions  These findings demonstrate that \\'nudge\\' strategies may hold promise in modifying endoscopic sedation practice. Further research is required to explore the utility of \\'nudges\\' in impacting other aspects of endoscopic practice.

  6. "Suffering" in palliative sedation: Conceptual Analysis and Implications for Decision-Making in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzaro, Claudia; Schildmann, Jan

    2018-04-21

    Palliative sedation is an increasingly used and, simultaneously, challenging practice at the end of life. Many controversies associated with this therapy are rooted in implicit differences regarding the understanding of "suffering" as prerequisite for palliative sedation. The aim of this paper is to inform the current debates by a conceptual analysis of two different philosophical accounts of suffering, (1) the subjective and holistic concept and (2) the objective and gradual concept and by a clinical-ethical analysis of the implications of each account for decisions about palliative sedation. We will show that while the subjective and holistic account of suffering fits well with the holistic approach of palliative care, there are considerable challenges to justify limits to requests for palliative sedation. By contrast, the objective and gradual account fits well with the need for an objective basis for clinical decisions in the context of palliative sedation, but runs the risk of falling short when considering the individual and subjective experience of suffering at the end of life. We will conclude with a plea for the necessity of further combined conceptual and empirical research to develop a sound and feasible understanding of suffering which can contribute to consistent decision-making about palliative sedation. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Survey of the sevoflurane sedation status in one provincial dental clinic center for the disabled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chang-hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background Sevoflurane sedation in pediatric and disabled patients has the advantage of faster induction and recovery compared to general anesthesia, as well as minimum influence on the respiratory and cardiovascular functions, and airway protective reflexes. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of sevoflurane sedation used in dental treatment at one provincial dental clinic center for the disabled. Methods We investigated patients' gender, age, reasons for undergoing sedation, medication history prior to treatment, duration of anesthesia, treatment length, type of treatment, and yearly patterns, for 387 cases of dental treatment performed using sevoflurane sedation from January 2013 to October 2016. Results We analyzed 387 cases (215 male patients, 172 female patients). Male patients aged 20 year or older accounted for 39.0% of all patients, marking the highest proportion. Patient's lack of cooperation was the most common reason for performing dental sedation. Prosthetic treatment was the most frequently practiced, accounting for 174 treatment cases. The mean lengths of the entire treatment and of the dental procedure were 55.2 min and 39.8 min, respectively. Conclusions Sevoflurane sedation has the advantage of fast anesthesia induction and recovery compared to general anesthesia; therefore, it can be used efficiently to induce anesthesia in pediatric and disabled patients during short dental procedures, enabling stable treatment of these patients. PMID:28879316

  8. Evaluation of sedation for standing clinical procedures in horses using detomidine combined with buprenorphine.

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    Taylor, Polly; Coumbe, Karen; Henson, Frances; Scott, David; Taylor, Alan

    2014-01-01

    To examine the effect of including buprenorphine with detomidine for sedation of horses undergoing clinical procedures. Partially blinded, randomised, prospective clinical field trial. Eighty four client-owned horses scheduled for minor surgery or diagnostic investigation under standing sedation. The effects of buprenorphine (5 μg kg(-1) ) (Group B, n = 46) or placebo (5% glucose solution) (Group C, n = 38) in combination with detomidine (10 μg kg(-1) ) were compared in standing horses undergoing minor clinical procedures. The primary outcome measure was successful completion of the procedure. The degree of sedation and ataxia were scored using simple descriptive scales. Heart and respiratory rates were recorded at 15-30 minute intervals. Parametric data from each group were compared using anova or t-test and non parametric data using the Mann-Whitney U test. The procedure was carried out successfully in 91% of Group B and 63% of Group C (p detomidine, increased after buprenorphine but not glucose administration, was more profound in group B and lasted longer (60 versus 30 minutes) p detomidine 10 and 20 μg kg(-1) with minor side effects similar to other alpha2 agonist/opioid combinations. Detomidine-buprenorphine sedation is suitable for standing procedures in horses. © 2013 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  9. Use of analgesic and sedative drugs in the NICU: integrating clinical trials and laboratory data.

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    Durrmeyer, Xavier; Vutskits, Laszlo; Anand, Kanwaljeet J S; Rimensberger, Peter C

    2010-02-01

    Recent advances in neonatal intensive care include and are partly attributable to growing attention for comfort and pain control in the term and preterm infant requiring intensive care.Limitation of painful procedures is certainly possible, but most critically ill infants require unavoidable painful or stressful procedures such as intubation, mechanical ventilation, or catheterization.Many analgesics (opioids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs)and sedatives (benzodiazepines and other anesthetic agents) are available but their use varies considerably among units. This review summarizes current experimental knowledge on the effects of sedative and analgesic drugs on brain development and reviews clinical evidence that speaks for or against the use of common analgesic and sedative drugs in the NICU but avoids any discussion of anesthesia during surgery. Risk/benefit ratios of intermittent boluses or continuous infusions for the commonly used sedative and analgesic agents are discussed in the light of clinical and experimental studies. The limitations of extrapolating experimental results from animals to humans must be considered while making practical recommendations based on the currently available evidence.

  10. Immediate interruption of sedation compared with usual sedation care in critically ill postoperative patients (SOS-Ventilation): a randomised, parallel-group clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanques, Gerald; Conseil, Matthieu; Roger, Claire; Constantin, Jean-Michel; Prades, Albert; Carr, Julie; Muller, Laurent; Jung, Boris; Belafia, Fouad; Cissé, Moussa; Delay, Jean-Marc; de Jong, Audrey; Lefrant, Jean-Yves; Futier, Emmanuel; Mercier, Grégoire; Molinari, Nicolas; Jaber, Samir

    2017-10-01

    Avoidance of excessive sedation and subsequent prolonged mechanical ventilation in intensive care units (ICUs) is recommended, but no data are available for critically ill postoperative patients. We hypothesised that in such patients stopping sedation immediately after admission to the ICU could reduce unnecessary sedation and improve patient outcomes. We did a randomised, parallel-group, clinical trial at three ICUs in France. Stratified randomisation with minimisation (1:1 via a restricted web platform) was used to assign eligible patients (aged ≥18 years, admitted to an ICU after abdominal surgery, and expected to require at least 12 h of mechanical ventilation because of a critical illness defined by a Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score >1 for any organ, but without severe acute respiratory distress syndrome or brain injury) to usual sedation care provided according to recommended practices (control group) or to immediate interruption of sedation (intervention group). The primary outcome was the time to successful extubation (defined as the time from randomisation to the time of extubation [or tracheotomy mask] for at least 48 h). All patients who underwent randomisation (except for those who were excluded after randomisation) were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01486121. Between Dec 2, 2011, and Feb 27, 2014, 137 patients were randomly assigned to the control (n=68) or intervention groups (n=69). In the intention-to-treat analysis, time to successful extubation was significantly lower in the intervention group than in the control group (median 8 h [IQR 4-36] vs 50 h [29-93], group difference -33·6 h [95% CI -44·9 to -22·4]; p<0·0001). The adjusted hazard ratio was 5·2 (95% CI 3·1-8·8, p<0·0001). Immediate interruption of sedation in critically ill postoperative patients with organ dysfunction who were admitted to the ICU after abdominal surgery improved outcomes compared

  11. Utilizing bi-spectral index (BIS) for the monitoring of sedated adult ICU patients: a systematic review.

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    Bilgili, Beliz; Montoya, Juan C; Layon, A J; Berger, Andrea L; Kirchner, H L; Gupta, Leena K; Gloss, David S

    2017-03-01

    The ideal level of sedation in the ICU is an ongoing source of scrutiny. At higher levels of sedation, the current scoring systems are not ideal. BIS may be able to improve both. We evaluated literature on effectiveness of BIS monitoring in sedated mechanically ventilated (MV) ICU patients compared to clinical sedation scores (CSS). For this systematic review, full text articles were searched in OVID, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases from 1986 - 2014. Additional studies were identified searching bibliographies/abstracts from national/international Critical Care Medicine conferences and references from searched articles retrieved. Search terms were: 'Clinical sedation scale, Bi-spectral Index, Mechanical ventilation, Intensive care Unit'. Included were prospective, randomized and non-randomized studies comparing BIS monitoring with any CSS in MV adult (>18 yr old) ICU patients. Studies were graded for quality of evidence based on bias as established by the GRADE guidelines. Additional sources of bias were examined. There were five studies which met inclusion criteria. All five studies were either unclear or high risk for blinding of participants and blinding of outcome assessment. All papers had at least one source of additional high risk, or unclear/unstated. BIS monitoring in the mechanically ventilated ICU patient may decrease sedative drug dose, recall, and time to wake-up. The studies suggesting this are severely limited methodologically. BIS, when compared to subjective CSSs, is not, at this time, clearly indicated. An appropriately powered randomized, controlled study is needed to determine if this monitoring modality is of use on the ICU.

  12. International variations in clinical practice guidelines for palliative sedation: a systematic review.

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    Abarshi, Ebun; Rietjens, Judith; Robijn, Lenzo; Caraceni, Augusto; Payne, Sheila; Deliens, Luc; Van den Block, Lieve

    2017-09-01

    Palliative sedation is a highly debated medical practice, particularly regarding its proper use in end-of-life care. Worldwide, guidelines are used to standardise care and regulate this practice. In this review, we identify and compare national/regional clinical practice guidelines on palliative sedation against the European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC) palliative sedation Framework and assess the developmental quality of these guidelines using the Appraisal Guideline Research and Evaluation (AGREE II) instrument. Using the PRISMA criteria, we searched multiple databases (PubMed, CancerLit, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, NHS Evidence and Google Scholar) for relevant guidelines, and selected those written in English, Dutch and Italian; published between January 2000 and March 2016. Of 264 hits, 13 guidelines-Belgium, Canada (3), Ireland, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Europe, and USA (2) were selected. 8 contained at least 9/10 recommendations published in the EAPC Framework; 9 recommended 'pre-emptive discussion of the potential role of sedation in end-of-life care'; 9 recommended 'nutrition/hydration while performing sedation' and 8 acknowledged the need to 'care for the medical team'. There were striking differences in terminologies used and in life expectancy preceding the practice. Selected guidelines were conceptually similar, comparing closely to the EAPC Framework recommendations, albeit with notable variations. Based on AGREE II, 3 guidelines achieved top scores and could therefore be recommended for use in this context. Also, domains 'scope and purpose' and 'editorial independence' ranked highest and lowest, respectively-underscoring the importance of good reportage at the developmental stage. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. Rectal Thiopental versus Intramuscular Ketamine in Pediatric Procedural Sedation and Analgesia; a Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Azizkhani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Physicians frequently deal with procedures which require sedation of pediatric patients. Laceration repair is one of them. No study has been performed regarding the comparison between induction of sedation with sodium thiopental and ketamine in laceration repair. Therefore, the present study was aimed to comparison of induced sedation by rectal sodium thiopental and muscular injection of hydrochloride ketamine in pediatric patients need laceration repair. Methods: The presented study is a single-blinded clinical trial performed through 2013 to 2014 in Ayatollah Kashani and Alzahra Hospitals, Isfahan, Iran. Patients from 3 months to 14 years, needed sedation for laceration repair, were entered. Patients were sequentially evaluated and randomly categorized in two groups of hydrochloride ketamine with dose of 2-4 milligram per kilogram and sodium thiopental with dose of 25 milligram per kilogram. Demographic data and vital signs before drug administration and after induction of sedation, Ramsey score, time to onset of action, and sedation recovery time were evaluated. Chi-squared, Mann-Whitney, and Non-parametric analysis of covariance tests were used. P<0.05 was considered as a significant level. Results: In this study 60 pediatric patients were entered. 30 patients with mean age of 42.8±18.82 months were received sodium thiopental and the rest with mean age of 30.08±16.88 months given ketamine. Mann-Whitney test was showed that time to onset of action in sodium thiopental group (28.23±5.18 minutes was significantly higher than ketamine (7.77±4.13 minutes, (p<0.001. The sedation recovery time in ketamine group (29.83±7.70 was higher than sodium thiopental. Depth of sedation had no significant difference between two groups based on Ramsey score (p=0.87. No significant difference was seen between two groups in the respiratory rate (df=1, 58; F=0.002; P=0.96 and heart rate (df=1, 58; F=0.98; P=0.33. However, arterial oxygen

  14. Effect of sedation with detomidine on intraocular pressure with and without topical anesthesia in clinically normal horses.

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    Holve, Dana L

    2012-02-01

    To determine the effect of sedation with detomidine on intraocular pressure (IOP) in standing horses and whether topical ocular application of anesthetic alters this effect. Clinical trial. 15 clinically normal horses. Horses were assigned to group 1 (n = 7) or 2 (8). Intraocular pressure measurements were obtained at baseline (before sedation) and 10 minutes after IV administration of detomidine (0.02 mg/kg [0.009 mg/lb]). Group 1 horses had an additional IOP measurement at 20 minutes after sedation. For group 2 horses, topical ocular anesthetic was administered 10 minutes prior to baseline IOP measurements. Mean ± SD baseline IOP for horses without topical anesthesia (group 1 horses; IOP, 24.30 ± 3.09 mm Hg) was significantly lower, compared with that of horses with topical anesthesia (group 2 horses; IOP, 30.40 ± 3.25 mm Hg). Compared with baseline values, IOP at 10 minutes after sedation decreased significantly in all horses (by 3.61 ± 1.48 mm Hg and 5.78 ± 4.32 mm Hg in groups 1 and 2, respectively). In group 1 horses, IOP at 10 (20.69 ± 3.45 mm Hg) and 20 (19.96 ± 2.13 mm Hg) minutes after sedation was significantly decreased, compared with baseline values; however, the difference between IOP at 10 versus 20 minutes was not significant. The difference in IOP between group 1 and 2 horses at 10 minutes after sedation was not significant. IV administration of detomidine caused a decrease in IOP in clinically normal horses and may be a safe sedative when performing ocular procedures.

  15. Procedural sedation analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheta Saad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of noninvasive and minimally invasive procedures performed outside of the operating room has grown exponentially over the last several decades. Sedation, analgesia, or both may be needed for many of these interventional or diagnostic procedures. Individualized care is important when determining if a patient requires procedural sedation analgesia (PSA. The patient might need an anti-anxiety drug, pain medicine, immobilization, simple reassurance, or a combination of these interventions. The goals of PSA in four different multidisciplinary practices namely; emergency, dentistry, radiology and gastrointestinal endoscopy are discussed in this review article. Some procedures are painful, others painless. Therefore, goals of PSA vary widely. Sedation management can range from minimal sedation, to the extent of minimal anesthesia. Procedural sedation in emergency department (ED usually requires combinations of multiple agents to reach desired effects of analgesia plus anxiolysis. However, in dental practice, moderate sedation analgesia (known to the dentists as conscious sedation is usually what is required. It is usually most effective with the combined use of local anesthesia. The mainstay of success for painless imaging is absolute immobility. Immobility can be achieved by deep sedation or minimal anesthesia. On the other hand, moderate sedation, deep sedation, minimal anesthesia and conventional general anesthesia can be all utilized for management of gastrointestinal endoscopy.

  16. The PediSedate device, a novel approach to pediatric sedation that provides distraction and inhaled nitrous oxide: clinical evaluation in a large case series.

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    Denman, William T; Tuason, Pacifico M; Ahmed, Mohammed I; Brennen, Loralie M; Cepeda, M Soledad; Carr, Daniel B

    2007-02-01

    Pediatric sedation is of paramount importance but can be challenging. Fear and anticipatory anxiety before invasive procedures often lead to uncooperativeness. A novel device (PediSedate) provides sedation through a combination of inhaled nitrous oxide and distraction (video game). We evaluated the acceptability and safety of the PediSedate device in children. We enrolled children between 3 and 9 years old who were scheduled to undergo surgical procedures that required general inhalational anesthesia. After the device was applied, he/she played a video game while listening to the audio portion of the game through the earphones. Nitrous oxide in oxygen was administered via the nasal piece of the headset starting at 50% and increasing to 70%, in 10% increments every 8 min. Treatment failures, vital signs, arterial oxygen saturation, depth of sedation, airway patency, side effects, acceptance of the device and parental satisfaction were all evaluated. Of 100 children included, treatment failure occurred in 18% mainly because of poor tolerance of the device. At least 96% of the children who completed the study exhibited an excellent degree of sedation, 22% had side effects, and none experienced serious airway obstruction. Nausea and vomiting were the most common side effects and no patients had hemodynamic instability. The PediSedate device combines nonpharmacologic with pharmacologic methods of sedation. Most of the children we evaluated were able to tolerate the PediSedate device and achieved an adequate degree of sedation.

  17. Plasma drug concentrations and clinical effects of a peripheral alpha-2-adrenoceptor antagonist, MK-467, in horses sedated with detomidine.

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    Vainionpää, Mari H; Raekallio, Marja R; Pakkanen, Soile A E; Ranta-Panula, Ville; Rinne, Valtteri M; Scheinin, Mika; Vainio, Outi M

    2013-05-01

    To investigate plasma drug concentrations and the effect of MK-467 (L-659'066) on sedation, heart rate and gut motility in horses sedated with intravenous (IV) detomidine. Experimental randomized blinded crossover study. Six healthy horses. Detomidine (10 μg kg(-1) IV) was administered alone (DET) and in combination with MK-467 (250 μg kg(-1) IV; DET + MK). The level of sedation and intestinal sounds were scored. Heart rate (HR) and central venous pressure (CVP) were measured. Blood was collected to determine plasma drug concentrations. Repeated measures anova was used for HR, CVP and intestinal sounds, and the Student's t-test for pairwise comparisons between treatments for the area under the time-sedation curve (AUCsed ) and pharmacokinetic parameters. Significance was set at p Detomidine-induced intestinal hypomotility was prevented by MK-467. AUCsed was significantly higher with DET than DET + MK, but maximal sedations scores did not differ significantly between treatments. MK-467 lowered the AUC of the plasma concentration of detomidine, and increased its volume of distribution and clearance. MK-467 prevented detomidine induced bradycardia and intestinal hypomotility. MK-467 did not affect the clinical quality of detomidine-induced sedation, but the duration of the effect was reduced, which may have been caused by the effects of MK-467 on the plasma concentration of detomidine. MK-467 may be useful clinically in the prevention of certain peripheral side effects of detomidine in horses. © 2013 The Authors. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia © 2013 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  18. Developmental procedures for the clinical practice guidelines for conscious sedation in dentistry for the Korean Academy of Dental Sciences.

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    An, So-Youn; Seo, Kwang-Suk; Kim, Seungoh; Kim, Jongbin; Lee, Deok-Won; Hwang, Kyung-Gyun; Kim, Hyun Jeong

    2016-12-01

    Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are defined as "statements that are scientifically reviewed about evidence and systematically developed to assist in the doctors' and patients' decision making in certain clinical situations." This recommendation aims to promote good clinical practice for the provision of safe and effective practices of conscious sedation in dentistry. The development of this clinical practice guideline was conducted by performing a systematic search of the literature for evidence-based CPGs. Existing guidelines, relevant systematic reviews, policy documents, legislation, or other recommendations were reviewed and appraised. To supplement this information, key questions were formulated by the Guideline Development Group and used as the basis for designing systematic literature search strategies to identify literature that may address these questions. Guideline documents were evaluated through a review of domestic and international databases for the development of a renewing of existing conscious sedation guidelines for dentistry. Clinical practice guidelines were critically appraised for their methodologies using Appraisal of guidelines for research and evaluation (AGREE) II. A total of 12 existing CPGs were included and 13 recommendations were made in a range of general, adult, and pediatric areas. The clinical practice guidelines for conscious sedation will be reviewed in 5 years' time for further updates to reflect significant changes in the field.

  19. 75 FR 73104 - Clinical Development Programs for Sedation Products; Request for Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ... assessments of memory, recall, anxiety, agitation, delirium, among others, appropriate as efficacy endpoints... adverse effects. What should the size and duration of exposure of the safety database be for sedation...

  20. Palliative sedation in nursing anesthesia.

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    Wolf, Michael T

    2013-04-01

    Palliative sedation is a technique of providing a sedative for end-of-life care to patients with intractable pain. The literature discusses the techniques and use of palliative sedation. Numerous articles have been written regarding the issues surrounding its use, but no literature has discussed the prescription or administration of palliative sedation by a nurse anesthetist. By understanding the concept and ethics involved in its use and providing nursing care that is theory based, the author argues that the involvement of nursing anesthesia is appropriate and within the scope of practice. Few other healthcare disciplines can provide the patient care and empirical knowledge that is imperative in the care of the dying patient. This article discusses the concept and ethics of palliative sedation and presents a case of providing palliative sedation to a terminally ill patient by an experienced nurse anesthetist. Palliative sedation should be understood, embraced, and utilized as an area of expertise suited for nursing anesthesia.

  1. The clinical utility of posturography.

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    Visser, Jasper E; Carpenter, Mark G; van der Kooij, Herman; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2008-11-01

    Postural instability and falls are common and devastating features of ageing and many neurological, visual, vestibular or orthopedic disorders. Current management of these problems is hampered by the subjective and variable nature of the available clinical balance measures. In this narrative review, we discuss the clinical utility of posturography as a more objective and quantitative measure of balance and postural instability, focusing on several areas where clinicians presently experience the greatest difficulties in managing their patients: (a) to make an appropriate differential diagnosis in patients presenting with falls or balance impairment; (b) to reliably identify those subjects who are at risk of falling; (c) to objectively and quantitatively document the outcome of therapeutic interventions; and (d) to gain a better pathophysiological understanding of postural instability and falls, as a basis for the development of improved treatment strategies to prevent falling. In each of these fields, posturography offers several theoretical advantages and, when applied correctly, provides a useful tool to gain a better understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms in patients with balance disorders, at the group level. However, based on the available evidence, none of the existing techniques is currently able to significantly influence the clinical decision making in individual patients. We critically review the shortcomings of posturography as it is presently used, and conclude with several recommendations for future research.

  2. Accounting for the sedative and analgesic effects of medication changes during patient participation in clinical research studies: measurement development and application to a sample of institutionalized geriatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloane, Philip; Ivey, Jena; Roth, Mary; Roederer, Mary; Williams, Christianna S

    2008-03-01

    To date, no system has been published that allows investigators to adjust for the overall sedative and/or analgesic effects of medications, or changes in medications, in clinical trial participants for whom medication use cannot be controlled. This is common in clinical trials of behavioral and complementary/alternative therapies, and in research involving elderly or chronically ill patients for whom ongoing medical care continues during the trial. This paper describes the development, and illustrates the use, of a method we developed to address this issue, in which we generate single continuous variables to represent the daily sedative and analgesic loads of multiple medications. Medications for 90 study participants in a clinical trial of a nonpharmacological intervention were abstracted from medication administration records across multiple treatment periods. An expert panel of three academic clinical pharmacists and a geriatrician met to develop a system by which each study medication could be assigned a sedative and analgesic effect rating. The two measures, when applied to data on 90 institutionalized persons with Alzheimer's disease, resulted in variables with moderately skewed distributions that are consistent with the clinical profile of analgesia and sedation use in long-term care populations. The average study participant received 1.89 analgesic medications per day and had a daily analgesic load of 2.96; the corresponding figures for sedation were 2.07 daily medications and an average daily load of 11.41. A system of classifying the sedative and analgesic effects of non-study medications was created that divides drugs into categories based on the strength of their effects and assigns a rating to express overall sedative and analgesic effects. These variables may be useful in comparing patients and populations, and to control for drug effects in future studies.

  3. [Clinical trail on the effect of nitrous oxide/oxygen inhalation sedation on the treatment of acute pulpitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin-wen; Wang, Li-xin; Liu, Xi-yun

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of nitrous oxide/oxygen inhalation sedation in the treatment of acute pulpitis. The study population comprised 72 patients of acute pulpitis treated from September 2012 to March 2013. They were randomly divided into 2 groups, which included experimental group (37 cases) and control group (35 cases). Venham clinical anxiety, cooperative behavior level and WHO clinical pain level evaluation were conducted for the patients. Wilcoxon and Chi-square test were used respectively for statistical analysis with SPSS 14.0 software package. In the experimental group, 86.5% cases behaved comfortable, while in the control group the rate was only 42.9%. 94.6% of the patients in the experimental group felt painless after therapy. The proportion of that in the control group was 68.6%. There was significant difference between the 2 groups (Ppulpitis, while the long-term clinical result still needs further investigation.

  4. Bispectral Index Monitoring: validity and utility in pediatric dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Ashima; Mittal, Neeti; Mittal, Parteek; Gauba, K

    2014-01-01

    Reliable and safe provision of sedation and general anesthesia is dependent on continuous vigilance of patient's sedation depth. Failure to do so may result in unintended oversedation or undersedation. It is a common practice to observe sedation depth by applying subjective sedation scales and in case of general anesthesia, practitioner is dependent on vital sign assessment. The Bispectral Index System (BIS) is a recently introduced objective, quantitative, easy to use, and free from observer bias, and clinically useful tool to assess sedation depth and it precludes the need to stimulate the patient to assess his sedation level. The present article is an attempt to orient the readers towards utility and validity of BIS for sedation and general anesthesia in pediatric dentistry. In this article, we attempt to make the readers understand the principle of BIS, its variation across sedation continuum, its validity across different age groups and for a variety of sedative drugs.

  5. Randomized Clinical Trial of Sedation With Oral Midazolam For Voiding Cystourethrography in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haji Ghorbann Nooreddini

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Background:Voiding Cystourethrography (VCUG is a distressing procedure for children.Conscious sedation with any drug that its dose would not influences the procedure is preferred. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of conscious sedation using oral midazolam in children undergoing VCUG.Methods: From November 2008 to October 2009 period, 93 Patients (68 girls and 25 boys, age ranging from 24 months to 11 years old (mean, 5.8 yearswere double blindly randomized to receive a placebo (water or oral midazolam before the examination. The primary outcome measures were patients' cooperation, facility of the procedure, 48 hours post procedure memory of children, bladder urine residue and detection of Vesocoureteral reflex. The data were analysed by SPSS and categorical variables compared using t-test and continuous variables compared using Chi. Square and Fisher’s exact tests.Results: 93 children were randomizly divided in two groups. In midazolam   group, 44(93.6% patients had good cooperation but in the control group 26(56.5%had bad cooperation and 19 patients (41.3% very bad cooperation (P=0.000. In midazolam group, 36 children (76.6% had easy separation from their parents but in   control group 20 children (43.5% had moderate resistant and 21(45.7% severe resistant. (P=0.000. Eighteen (38 % patients of the study group and twenty patients(43 % of control group had VUR respectively (P=0.65.   Conclusion:According to this study, midazolam is a useful sedation in children undergoing VCUG.  

  6. Oral Chloral Hydrate Compare with Rectal Thiopental in Pediatric Procedural Sedation and Analgesia; a Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Azizkhani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The increasing use of diagnostic imaging in pediatric medicine has resulted in growing need for procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA to minimize motion artifacts during procedures. The drug of choice in pediatric PSA was not introduced till now. The aim of the present study was comparison of oral chloral hydrate (OCH and rectal sodium thiopental (RST in pediatric PSA.Methods: In the present randomized clinical trial, 2-6 years old pediatrics who referred for performing brain computed tomography scan was enrolled and were randomly divided in to two groups. OCH (50mg/kg and RST (25mg/kg were prescribed and a trained nurse recorded the time from drug prescription to receiving the conscious sedation (onset of action, the total time period which the patient has the Ramsay score≥4 (duration of action, and adverse effect of agents. Mann-Whitney U test and chi-squared test, and Non-parametric analysis of covariance (ANCOVA were used for comparisons. Results: One hundred and forty children were entered to two groups of OCH and RST, randomly. The patients of two groups had similar age, sex, weight, and baseline vital signs except for diastolic blood pressure (p<0.001. The onset of action in OCH and RST groups were 24.5±6.1and 28.7±5.2 minutes, respectively (p<0.001. Duration of action in OCH and RST groups were 12.9±2.8 minutes and 13.7±2.6 minutes, respectively (p=0.085. Non parametric ANCOVA revealed that only diastolic blood pressure was affected by drug prescription (p=0.001. In 11(15.7% patients in RST group, diarrhea was observed during 24 hours (p=0.001. Oxygen desaturation was observed only in two patients, both in OCH group. Conclusion: Each of the sedative has advantages and disadvantages that should be considered when selecting one for inducing short-term sedation. It seems that rectal sodium thiopental and oral chloral hydrate are equally effective in pediatric PSA and based on patient’s condition we can administrate

  7. Clinical Utility and "DSM-V"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins-Sweatt, Stephanie N.; Widiger, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    The construction of the American Psychiatric Association's diagnostic manual has been guided primarily by concerns of construct validity rather than of clinical utility, despite claims by its authors that the highest priority has in fact been clinical utility. The purpose of this article was to further articulate the concept and importance of…

  8. Clinical utility of curcumin extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Gary N; Spelman, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Turmeric root has been used medicinally in China and India for thousands of years. The active components are thought to be the curcuminoids, primarily curcumin, which is commonly available worldwide as a standardized extract. This article reviews the pharmacology of curcuminoids, their use and efficacy, potential adverse effects, and dosage and standardization. Preclinical studies point to mechanisms of action that are predominantly anti-inflammatory and antineoplastic, while early human clinical trials suggest beneficial effects for dyspepsia, peptic ulcer, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, uveitis, orbital pseudotumor, and pancreatic cancer. Curcumin is well-tolerated; the most common side effects are nausea and diarrhea. Theoretical interactions exist due to purported effects on metabolic enzymes and transport proteins, but clinical reports do not support any meaningful interactions. Nonetheless, caution, especially with chemotherapy agents, is advised. Late-phase clinical trials are still needed to confirm most beneficial effects.

  9. The clinical utility of posturography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Jasper E.; Carpenter, Mark G.; van der Kooij, Herman; Bloem, Bastiaan R.

    2008-01-01

    Postural instability and falls are common and devastating features of ageing and many neurological, visual, vestibular or orthopedic disorders. Current management of these problems is hampered by the subjective and variable nature of the available clinical balance measures. In this narrative review,

  10. Palliative sedation for intolerable suffering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltoni, Marco; Scarpi, Emanuela; Nanni, Oriana

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide an update on palliative sedation in palliative and end-of-life care. Palliative sedation is the medical procedure used to deal with refractory symptoms in advanced cancer patients when all other specific approaches have failed. Palliative sedation, in the strictest sense of the term, is a proportionate (proportionate palliative sedation, PPS) and intrinsically variable procedure used on an individual basis to relieve refractory symptoms in terminally ill patients, without the intention of hastening death. Completely separate from any other end-of-life decision and not intended to hasten death, palliative sedation has been shown not to have a detrimental impact on survival. To maintain palliative sedation as a legitimate clinical procedure from any ethical or clinical point of view, it must be limited to the restricted area for which it was conceived, that is, relief from refractory suffering as deemed necessary by a patient and by an experienced palliative care team. In this way, there is no risk of associating palliative sedation with other end-of-life decisions. Close collaboration is needed between oncologists and palliative care physicians for this clinical procedure.

  11. Comparison of propofol deep sedation versus moderate sedation during endosonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayar, D S; Guthrie, W G; Goodman, A; Lee, Y; Feuerman, M; Scheinberg, L; Gress, F G

    2010-09-01

    The purposes of this study are: (1) to prospectively evaluate clinically relevant outcomes including sedation-related complications for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) procedures performed with the use of propofol deep sedation administered by monitored anesthesia care (MAC), and (2) to compare these results with a historical case-control cohort of EUS procedures performed using moderate sedation provided by the gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopist. Patients referred for EUS between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2002 were enrolled. Complication rates for EUS using MAC sedation were observed and also compared with a historical case-control cohort of EUS patients who received meperidine/midazolam for moderate sedation, administered by the GI endoscopist. Logistic regression analysis was used to isolate possible predictors of complications. A total of 1,000 patients underwent EUS with propofol sedation during the period from January 1, 2001 through December 31, 2002 (mean age 64 years, 53% female). The distribution of EUS indications based on the primary area of interest was: 170 gastroduodenal, 92 anorectal, 508 pancreaticohepatobiliary, 183 esophageal, and 47 mediastinal. The primary endpoint of the study was development of sedation-related complications occurring during a performed procedure. A total of six patients experienced complications: duodenal perforation (one), hypotension (one), aspiration pneumonia (one), and apnea requiring endotracheal intubation (three). The complication rate with propofol was 0.60%, compared with 1% for the historical case-control (meperidine/midazolam moderate sedation) group. There does not appear to be a significant difference between complication rates for propofol deep sedation with MAC and meperidine/midazolam administered for moderate sedation.

  12. Circulating tumor cells: clinical validity and utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabel, Luc; Proudhon, Charlotte; Gortais, Hugo; Loirat, Delphine; Coussy, Florence; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Bidard, François-Clément

    2017-06-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are rare tumor cells and have been investigated as diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers in many types of cancer. Although CTCs are not currently used in clinical practice, CTC studies have accumulated a high level of clinical validity, especially in breast, lung, prostate and colorectal cancers. In this review, we present an overview of the current clinical validity of CTCs in metastatic and non-metastatic disease, and the main concepts and studies investigating the clinical utility of CTCs. In particular, this review will focus on breast, lung, colorectal and prostate cancer. Three major topics concerning the clinical utility of CTC are discussed-(1) treatment based on CTCs used as liquid biopsy, (2) treatment based on CTC count or CTC variations, and (3) treatment based on CTC biomarker expression. A summary of published or ongoing phase II and III trials is also presented.

  13. Clinical utility of measures of breathlessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Deborah L; Rodak, Bernadette

    2002-09-01

    The clinical utility of measures of dyspnea has been debated in the health care community. Although breathlessness can be evaluated with various instruments, the most effective dyspnea measurement tool for patients with chronic lung disease or for measuring treatment effectiveness remains uncertain. Understanding the evidence for the validity and reliability of these instruments may provide a basis for appropriate clinical application. Evaluate instruments designed to measure breathlessness, either as single-symptom or multidimensional instruments, based on psychometrics foundations such as validity, reliability, and discriminative and evaluative properties. Classification of each dyspnea measurement instrument will recommend clinical application in terms of exercise, benchmarking patients, activities of daily living, patient outcomes, clinical trials, and responsiveness to treatment. Eleven dyspnea measurement instruments were selected. Each instrument was assessed as discriminative or evaluative and then analyzed as to its psychometric properties and purpose of design. Descriptive data from all studies were described according to their primary patient application (ie, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, or other patient populations). The Borg Scale and the Visual Analogue Scale are applicable to exertion and thus can be applied to any cardiopulmonary patient to determine dyspnea. All other measures were determined appropriate for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, whereas the Shortness of Breath Questionnaire can be applied to cystic fibrosis and lung transplant patients. The most appropriate utility for all instruments was measuring the effects on activities of daily living and for benchmarking patient progress. Instruments that quantify function and health-related quality of life have great utility for documenting outcomes but may be limited as to documenting treatment responsiveness in terms of clinically important changes. The dyspnea

  14. Effects of patient-directed music intervention on anxiety and sedative exposure in critically ill patients receiving mechanical ventilatory support: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlan, Linda L; Weinert, Craig R; Heiderscheit, Annie; Tracy, Mary Fran; Skaar, Debra J; Guttormson, Jill L; Savik, Kay

    2013-06-12

    Alternatives to sedative medications, such as music, may alleviate the anxiety associated with ventilatory support. To test whether listening to self-initiated patient-directed music (PDM) can reduce anxiety and sedative exposure during ventilatory support in critically ill patients. Randomized clinical trial that enrolled 373 patients from 12 intensive care units (ICUs) at 5 hospitals in the Minneapolis-St Paul, Minnesota, area receiving acute mechanical ventilatory support for respiratory failure between September 2006 and March 2011. Of the patients included in the study, 86% were white, 52% were female, and the mean (SD) age was 59 (14) years. The patients had a mean (SD) Acute Physiology, Age and Chronic Health Evaluation III score of 63 (21.6) and a mean (SD) of 5.7 (6.4) study days. Self-initiated PDM (n = 126) with preferred selections tailored by a music therapist whenever desired while receiving ventilatory support, self-initiated use of noise-canceling headphones (NCH; n = 122), or usual care (n = 125). Daily assessments of anxiety (on 100-mm visual analog scale) and 2 aggregate measures of sedative exposure (intensity and frequency). Patients in the PDM group listened to music for a mean (SD) of 79.8 (126) (median [range], 12 [0-796]) minutes/day. Patients in the NCH group wore the noise-abating headphones for a mean (SD) of 34.0 (89.6) (median [range], 0 [0-916]) minutes/day. The mixed-models analysis showed that at any time point, patients in the PDM group had an anxiety score that was 19.5 points lower (95% CI, -32.2 to -6.8) than patients in the usual care group (P = .003). By the fifth study day, anxiety was reduced by 36.5% in PDM patients. The treatment × time interaction showed that PDM significantly reduced both measures of sedative exposure. Compared with usual care, the PDM group had reduced sedation intensity by -0.18 (95% CI, -0.36 to -0.004) points/day (P = .05) and had reduced frequency by -0.21 (95% CI, -0.37 to -0.05) points/day (P

  15. Assessment of hemispheric dominance for receptive language in pediatric patients under sedation using magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaie, Roozbeh; Narayana, Shalini; Schiller, Katherine; Birg, Liliya; Wheless, James W; Boop, Frederick A; Papanicolaou, Andrew C

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive assessment of hemispheric dominance for receptive language using magnetoencephalography (MEG) is now a well-established procedure used across several epilepsy centers in the context of pre-surgical evaluation of children and adults while awake, alert and attentive. However, the utility of MEG for the same purpose, in cases of sedated patients, is contested. Establishment of the efficiency of MEG is especially important in the case of children who, for a number of reasons, must be assessed under sedation. Here we explored the efficacy of MEG language mapping under sedation through retrospective review of 95 consecutive pediatric patients, who underwent our receptive language test as part of routine clinical evaluation. Localization of receptive language cortex and subsequent determination of laterality was successfully completed in 78% (n = 36) and 55% (n = 27) of non-sedated and sedated patients, respectively. Moreover, the proportion of patients deemed left hemisphere dominant for receptive language did not differ between non-sedated and sedated patients, exceeding 90% in both groups. Considering the challenges associated with assessing brain function in pediatric patients, the success of passive MEG in the context of the cases reviewed in this study support the utility of this method in pre-surgical receptive language mapping.

  16. Assessment of hemispheric dominance for receptive language in pediatric patients under sedation using magnetoencephalography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roozbeh eRezaie

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive assessment of hemispheric dominance for receptive language using Magnetoencephalography (MEG is now a well-established procedure used across several epilepsy centers in the context of pre-surgical evaluation of children and adults while awake, alert and attentive. However, the utility of MEG for the same purpose, in cases of sedated patients, is contested. Establishment of the efficiency of MEG is especially important in the case of children who, for a number of reasons, must be assessed under sedation. Here we explored the efficacy of MEG language mapping under sedation through retrospective review of 95 consecutive pediatric patients, who underwent our receptive language test as part of routine clinical evaluation. Localization of receptive language cortex and subsequent determination of laterality was successfully completed in 78% (n=36 and 55% (n=27 of non-sedated and sedated patients, respectively. Moreover, the proportion of patients deemed left hemisphere dominant for receptive language did not differ between non-sedated and sedated patients, exceeding 90% in both groups. Considering the challenges associated with assessing brain function in pediatric patients, the success of passive MEG in the context of the cases reviewed in this study support the utility of this method in pre-surgical receptive language mapping.

  17. Clinically unrecognized pulmonary aspiration during gastrointestinal endoscopy with sedation: A potential pitfall interfering the performance of 18F-FDG PET for cancer screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, Te-Chun; Wu, Yu-Chin; Ding, Hueisch-Jy; Wang, Chih-Hsiu; Yen, Kuo-Yang; Sun, Shung-Shung; Yeh, Jun-Jun; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We found several cases with unexpected pulmonary abnormalities on the 18 F-FDG PET scan after the gastrointestinal endoscopy with sedation during a compact health check-up course, interfering the interpretations of 18 F-FDG PET scan for cancer screening. The current studies aimed to analyze the incidence and the clinical relevance of this pulmonary finding. Materials and methods: From June to December 2009, 127 subjects undergoing the sequential gastrointestinal endoscopy with sedation and 18 F-FDG PET scan within 48 h as part of routine health check-up were retrospectively enrolled in this study. The incidence of abnormal pulmonary findings and their SUV max of FDG were calculated and correlated with the clinical manifestations. Results: Five subjects had abnormal 18 F-FDG PET findings but pulmonary symptoms were only found in 2. The SUV max did not seem to reflect the severity of pulmonary symptoms or the need of intervention. Although the incidence of unrecognized pulmonary aspiration featuring inflammation detected by the 18 F-FDG PET scan was high (3.94%, 5/127), the incidence of events needed intervention remained low (0.79%, 1/127), similar to those previously reported literatures. Conclusions: Although higher incidence of pulmonary aspiration in this study, it probably reflects the better sensitivity of 18 F-FDG PET for inflammation. The low incidence of clinical events needed intervention may still reflect the safety of sedation used for gastrointestinal endoscopy. Proper arrangement of the sequential examinations if subjects need both gastrointestinal endoscopy with sedation and 18 F-FDG PET is important to reduce the interference degrading the performance of 18 F-FDG PET in cancer screening, diagnosis or staging.

  18. Intra-operative Patient-Controlled Sedation (PCS:Propofol versus Midazolam Supplementation During Epidural Analgesia (Clinical and Hormonal Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan S Al-khayat

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was done on sixty adult males scheduled to have an epidural analgesia for elective inguinal hernia repair. The study was designed to compare propofol and midazolam with regard to their suitability for the patient-controlled sedation (PCS technique during epidural analgesia. Patients were divided into three equal groups and premedicated with 0.2mg.kg -1 oral midazolam. Group I (G1 served as control. Using PCS technique, the pump was programmed to deliver on demand a bolus dose of 0.5 mg.kg- 1 of propofol in Group II (G2 or 0.1mg.kg -1 midazolam in Group III(G3. Patient′s sedation status was assessed by sedation score, comfort scale and by psychometric testing. The total delivered dose of each tested drug was calculated. Serum concentrations of propfol and midazolam, plasma cortisol and free fatty acids were measured. Propofol and midazolam PCS technique produced excellent and easily controllable sedation. The dose needed to produce steady state sedation was 2.8±1.42 and 0.11±0.6 mg.kg -1 .h- 1 for propofol and midazolam respectively. Propofol was more suitable than midazolam for PCS because of its rapid onset, favorable recovery profile and low side effects. PCS proved to be a stress-free and acceptable technique.

  19. The perspectives of clinical staff and bereaved informal care-givers on the use of continuous sedation until death for cancer patients: The study protocol of the UNBIASED study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background A significant minority of dying people experience refractory symptoms or extreme distress unresponsive to conventional therapies. In such circumstances, sedation may be used to decrease or remove consciousness until death occurs. This practice is described in a variety of ways, including: 'palliative sedation', 'terminal sedation', 'continuous deep sedation until death', 'proportionate sedation' or 'palliative sedation to unconsciousness'. Surveys show large unexplained variation in incidence of sedation at the end of life across countries and care settings and there are ethical concerns about the use, intentions, risks and significance of the practice in palliative care. There are also questions about how to explain international variation in the use of the practice. This protocol relates to the UNBIASED study (UK Netherlands Belgium International Sedation Study), which comprises three linked studies with separate funding sources in the UK, Belgium and the Netherlands. The aims of the study are to explore decision-making surrounding the application of continuous sedation until death in contemporary clinical practice, and to understand the experiences of clinical staff and decedents' informal care-givers of the use of continuous sedation until death and their perceptions of its contribution to the dying process. The UNBIASED study is part of the European Association for Palliative Care Research Network. Methods/Design To realize the study aims, a two-phase study has been designed. The study settings include: the domestic home, hospital and expert palliative care sites. Phase 1 consists of: a) focus groups with health care staff and bereaved informal care-givers; and b) a preliminary case notes review to study the range of sedation therapy provided at the end of life to cancer patients who died within a 12 week period. Phase 2 employs qualitative methods to develop 30 patient-centred case studies in each country. These involve interviews with staff and

  20. The perspectives of clinical staff and bereaved informal care-givers on the use of continuous sedation until death for cancer patients: The study protocol of the UNBIASED study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Heide Agnes

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A significant minority of dying people experience refractory symptoms or extreme distress unresponsive to conventional therapies. In such circumstances, sedation may be used to decrease or remove consciousness until death occurs. This practice is described in a variety of ways, including: 'palliative sedation', 'terminal sedation', 'continuous deep sedation until death', 'proportionate sedation' or 'palliative sedation to unconsciousness'. Surveys show large unexplained variation in incidence of sedation at the end of life across countries and care settings and there are ethical concerns about the use, intentions, risks and significance of the practice in palliative care. There are also questions about how to explain international variation in the use of the practice. This protocol relates to the UNBIASED study (UK Netherlands Belgium International Sedation Study, which comprises three linked studies with separate funding sources in the UK, Belgium and the Netherlands. The aims of the study are to explore decision-making surrounding the application of continuous sedation until death in contemporary clinical practice, and to understand the experiences of clinical staff and decedents' informal care-givers of the use of continuous sedation until death and their perceptions of its contribution to the dying process. The UNBIASED study is part of the European Association for Palliative Care Research Network. Methods/Design To realize the study aims, a two-phase study has been designed. The study settings include: the domestic home, hospital and expert palliative care sites. Phase 1 consists of: a focus groups with health care staff and bereaved informal care-givers; and b a preliminary case notes review to study the range of sedation therapy provided at the end of life to cancer patients who died within a 12 week period. Phase 2 employs qualitative methods to develop 30 patient-centred case studies in each country. These involve

  1. Cost-effectiveness analysis of clinic-based chloral hydrate sedation versus general anaesthesia for paediatric ophthalmological procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Heather F; Lambley, Rosemary; West, Stephanie K; Ungar, Wendy J; Mireskandari, Kamiar

    2015-11-01

    The inability of some children to tolerate detailed eye examinations often necessitates general anaesthesia (GA). The objective was to assess the incremental cost effectiveness of paediatric eye examinations carried out in an outpatient sedation unit compared with GA. An episode of care cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted from a societal perspective. Model inputs were based on a retrospective cross-over cohort of Canadian children aged Costs ($CAN), adverse events and number of successful procedures were modelled in a decision analysis with one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analysis. The mean cost per patient was $406 (95% CI $401 to $411) for EUS and $1135 (95% CI $1125 to $1145) for EUA. The mean number of successful procedures per patient was 1.39 (95% CI 1.34 to 1.42) for EUS and 2.06 (95% CI 2.02 to 2.11) for EUA. EUA was $729 more costly on average than EUS (95% CI $719 to $738) but resulted in an additional 0.68 successful procedures per child. The result was robust to varying the cost assumptions. Cross-over designs offer a powerful way to assess costs and effectiveness of two interventions because patients serve as their own control. This study demonstrated significant savings when ophthalmological exams were carried out in a hospital outpatient clinic, although with slightly fewer procedures completed. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  2. Effect of Intranasal Sedation Using Ketamine and Midazolam on Behavior of 3-6 Year-Old Uncooperative Children in Dental Office: A Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Mehran

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of intranasal ketamine and midazolam on behavior of 3-6 year-old children during dental treatments.  Materials and Methods: In this randomized cross-over clinical trial, 17 uncooperative children requiring at least two dental treatments were selected and randomly received ketamine (0.5mg/kg or midazolam (0.2mg/kg prior to treatment. The other medication was used in the next visit. The children’s behavioral pattern was determined according to the Houpt's scale regarding sleep, movement, crying and overall behavior. Physiological parameters were also measured at different time intervals. The data were subjected to Wilcoxon Signed Rank test and two-way repeated measures ANOVA.Results: The frequency of crying decreased significantly following ketamine administration compared to midazolam (P=0.002; movement of children decreased with fewer incidence of treatment interruption (P=0.001 while their sleepiness increased (P=0.003. Despite higher success of sedation with ketamine compared to midazolam, no significant differences were found between the two regarding patients’ overall behavior (P>0.05. The patients had higher heart rate and blood pressure with ketamine; however, no significant difference was found regarding respiratory rate and oxygen saturation (P>0.05.  Conclusions: Ketamine (0.5mg/kg led to fewer movements, less crying and more sleepiness compared to midazolam (0.2mg/kg. No significant differences were found between the two drugs regarding children’s overall behavior and sedation efficiency. Both drugs demonstrated positive efficacy for sedation of children during dental treatments.Keywords: Conscious Sedation; Ketamine; Midazolam; Administration, Intranasal

  3. Palliative Sedation in Patients With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltoni, Marco; Setola, Elisabetta

    2015-10-01

    Palliative sedation involves the use of sedative medication to relieve refractory symptoms in patients by reducing their level of consciousness. Although it is considered an acceptable clinical practice from most ethical points of view, palliative sedation is still a widely debated procedure and merits better understanding. The relevant medical literature pertaining to palliative sedation was analyzed and reviewed from various technical, relational, and bioethical perspectives. Proportionate palliative sedation is considered to be the most clinically appropriate modality for performing palliative sedation. However, guidelines must be followed to ensure that it is performed correctly. Benzodiazepines represent the first therapeutic option and careful monitoring of dosages is essential to avoid oversedation or undersedation. Proportionate palliative sedation is used to manage and relieve refractory symptoms in patients with cancer during their last days or hours of life. Evidence suggests that its use has no detrimental effect on survival. A different decision-making process is used to manage the withdrawal of hydration than the process used to determine whether proportionate palliative sedation is appropriate. Communication between patients, their relatives, and the health care staff is important during this medical intervention.

  4. [Sedation with nitrous oxide in daily practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Luc C; Marks, Luc A

    2003-01-01

    Conscious sedation is recommended, together with behaviour management techniques, to facilitate treatment of dental fear or dental phobia patients. In this article the authors focus on inhalation sedation by means of nitrous oxide. The procedures and indications are explained and illustrated with clinical cases. On the strength of the literature and their own experience the authors reach the conclusion that Inhalation sedation is a kind of pharmacological behaviour management and an important additional tool to increase patient cooperation. Inhalation sedation can only be performed by trained practitioners under internationally accepted safety conditions. Inhalation sedation has a future in Belgium providing the appropriate law is adapted. This technique deserves a place in the dental curriculum.

  5. Pharmacologic Considerations for Pediatric Sedation and Anesthesia Outside the Operating Room: A Review for Anesthesia and Non-Anesthesia Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurmi, Narjeet; Patel, Perene; Kraus, Molly; Trentman, Terrence

    2017-10-01

    Understanding the pharmacologic options for pediatric sedation outside the operating room will allow practitioners to formulate an ideal anesthetic plan, allaying anxiety and achieving optimal immobilization while ensuring rapid and efficient recovery. The authors identified relevant medical literature by searching PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, Scopus, Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases for English language publications covering a period from 1984 to 2017. Search terms included pediatric anesthesia, pediatric sedation, non-operating room sedation, sedation safety, and pharmacology. As a narrative review of common sedation/anesthesia options, the authors elected to focus on studies, reviews, and case reports that show clinical relevance to modern day sedation/anesthesia practice. A variety of pharmacologic agents are available for sedation/anesthesia in pediatrics, including midazolam, fentanyl, ketamine, dexmedetomidine, etomidate, and propofol. Dosing ranges reported are a combination of what is discussed in the reviewed literature and text books along with personal recommendations based on our own practice. Several reports reveal that ketofol (a combination of ketamine and propofol) is quite popular for short, painful procedures. Fospropofol is a newer-generation propofol that may confer advantages over regular propofol. Remimazolam combines the pharmacologic effects of remifentanil and midazolam. A variety of etomidate derivatives such as methoxycarbonyl-etomidate, carboetomidate, methoxycarbonyl-carboetomidate, and cyclopropyl-methoxycarbonyl metomidate are in development stages. The use of nitrous oxide as a mild sedative, analgesic, and amnestic agent is gaining popularity, especially in the ambulatory setting. Utilizing a dedicated and experienced team to provide sedation enhances safety. Furthermore, limiting sedation plans to single-agent pharmacy appears to be safer than using multi-agent plans.

  6. Propofol sedation in children: sleep trumps amnesia☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselis, Robert; Kelhoffer, Eric; Mehta, Meghana; Root, James C.; Robinson, Fay; Mason, Keira P.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Detailed assessments of the effects of propofol on memory in children are lacking. We assessed the feasibility of measuring memory during propofol infusion, as commonly performed in sedation for MRI scanning. In addition, we determined the onset of memory loss in relation to the onset of sedation measured by verbal responsiveness. Materials and methods Children scheduled for sedation for MRI received a 10-min infusion of propofol (3 mg/kg) as they viewed and named 100 simple line drawings, one shown every five seconds, until they were no longer responsive (encoding). A control group receiving no sedation for MRI underwent similar tasks. Sedation was measured as any verbal response, regardless of correctness. After recovery from sedation, recognition memory was tested, with correct yes/no recognitions matched to sedation responses during encoding (subsequent memory paradigm). Results Of the 48 children who received propofol, 30 could complete all study tasks (6.2 ± 1.6 years, 16 males). Individual responses could be modeled in all 30 children. On average, there was a 50% probability of no verbal response 3.1 min after the start of infusion, with 50% memory loss at 2.7 min. Children receiving propofol recognized 65 ± 16% of the pictures seen, whereas the control group recognized 93 ± 5%. Conclusion Measurement of memory and sedation is possible in verbal children receiving propofol by infusion in a clinical setting. Despite propofol being an amnestic agent, there was little or no amnestic effect of propofol while the child was verbally responsive. It is important for sedation providers to realize that propofol sedation does not always produce amnesia while the child is responsive. ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT02278003. PMID:27938911

  7. Propofol sedation in children: sleep trumps amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselis, Robert; Kelhoffer, Eric; Mehta, Meghana; Root, James C; Robinson, Fay; Mason, Keira P

    Detailed assessments of the effects of propofol on memory in children are lacking. We assessed the feasibility of measuring memory during propofol infusion, as commonly performed in sedation for MRI scanning. In addition, we determined the onset of memory loss in relation to the onset of sedation measured by verbal responsiveness. Children scheduled for sedation for MRI received a 10-min infusion of propofol (3 mg/kg) as they viewed and named 100 simple line drawings, one shown every five seconds, until they were no longer responsive (encoding). A control group receiving no sedation for MRI underwent similar tasks. Sedation was measured as any verbal response, regardless of correctness. After recovery from sedation, recognition memory was tested, with correct yes/no recognitions matched to sedation responses during encoding (subsequent memory paradigm). Of the 48 children who received propofol, 30 could complete all study tasks (6.2 ± 1.6 years, 16 males). Individual responses could be modeled in all 30 children. On average, there was a 50% probability of no verbal response 3.1 min after the start of infusion, with 50% memory loss at 2.7 min. Children receiving propofol recognized 65 ± 16% of the pictures seen, whereas the control group recognized 93 ± 5%. Measurement of memory and sedation is possible in verbal children receiving propofol by infusion in a clinical setting. Despite propofol being an amnestic agent, there was little or no amnestic effect of propofol while the child was verbally responsive. It is important for sedation providers to realize that propofol sedation does not always produce amnesia while the child is responsive. CLINICALTRIALS. NCT02278003. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Risks of propofol sedation/anesthesia for imaging studies in pediatric research: eight years of experience in a clinical research center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiringoda, Ruwan; Thurm, Audrey E; Hirschtritt, Matthew E; Koziol, Deloris; Wesley, Robert; Swedo, Susan E; O'Grady, Naomi P; Quezado, Zenaide M N

    2010-06-01

    To quantify the incidence of adverse events associated with anesthesia given for research-driven imaging studies and to identify risk factors for those events in pediatric research subjects. Retrospective cohort study. National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. Children and adolescents enrolled in clinical research protocols who required anesthesia for research-related imaging studies from January 2000 to September 2008. Propofol sedation/anesthesia. The occurrence of respiratory, cardiovascular, and all anesthesia-related adverse events that required intervention while receiving anesthetics for research-driven imaging studies and other noninvasive procedures. We identified 607 children who received 1480 propofol anesthetic procedures for imaging studies. Seventy percent of anesthetics were given to subjects with severe diseases and significant disabilities (American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status [ASA] III). Anesthesia had a mean (SD) duration of 115 (55) minutes, and in 12.5% of procedures, an airway device was necessary. There were 98 notable respiratory, cardiovascular, and other events in 79 anesthetic procedures, a rate of 534 per 10 000 anesthetic procedures with 1 or more adverse events. There was no long-lasting morbidity or mortality. The ASA classification (odds ratio [OR], 2.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.24-6.88), anesthetic effect duration (OR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.25-1.70), and presence of airway abnormalities (OR, 4.41; 95% CI, 1.60-12.12) were independently associated with adverse events during anesthetic use. In our clinical research sample of high-risk children who received sedation/anesthesia by an anesthesiologist, we observed a low incidence of adverse events and no long-term complications. Risk factors for adverse events included higher ASA classification, increasing anesthetic duration, and presence of airway abnormalities.

  9. Bispectral Index Monitoring Reduces the Dosage of Propofol and Adverse Events in Sedation for Endobronchial Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada, Natividad; Júdez, Diego; Martínez Ubieto, Javier; Pascual, Ana; Chacón, Enrique; De Pablo, Francisco; Mincholé, Elisa; Bello, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Current guidelines recommend monitoring the anesthetic depth of sedation during respiratory endoscopy by using clinical scales despite their subjective nature and the potential change in the level of sedation caused by frequent stimulation. Monitoring by means of the bispectral index (BIS) has shown its utility in reducing the use of drugs and their adverse events in general anesthesia, but evidence in prolonged sedation is insufficient. Our objective was to evaluate BIS in patients undergoing endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS). A randomized cohort study of 90 patients with mediastinal lymph node involvement and/or lung or mediastinal lesions for whom EBUS was indicated, comparing the modified observer's assessment of alertness/sedation scale clinical evaluation (n = 45) versus the BIS evaluation (n = 45) of sedation with propofol-remifentanil, was conducted in order to evaluate the clinical parameters, doses used, adverse events, and tolerance of the procedure. We found a shorter waking time and a significantly lower dose of total propofol in the BIS group. Significantly fewer overall adverse events were recorded in the BIS group and included desaturation, hypotension, and bradypnea. Tolerance was better in the BIS group. No significant differences were found in terms of cough, memory of the procedure, or the level of difficulty of EBUS on the part of the pulmonologists. BIS monitoring of sedation in EBUS makes it possible to reduce the dosage of propofol, thereby shortening the waking time and reducing adverse events. This form of monitoring should be taken into consideration in the future for systematic use in prolonged sedation, as in the case of EBUS. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Molecular diagnostics clinical utility strategy: a six-part framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frueh, Felix W; Quinn, Bruce

    2014-09-01

    The clinical utility of a molecular test rises proportional to a favorable regulatory risk/benefit assessment, and clinical utility is the driver of payer coverage decisions. Although a great deal has been written about clinical utility, debates still center on its 'definition.' We argue that the definition (an impact on clinical outcomes) is self-evident, and improved communications should focus on sequential steps in building and proving an adequate level of confidence for the diagnostic test's clinical value proposition. We propose a six-part framework to facilitate communications between test developers and health technology evaluators, relevant to both regulatory and payer decisions.

  11. The indicator of sedation need (IOSN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulthard, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Conscious sedation in dentistry is usually indicated because a patient's anxiety can prohibit the necessary dental treatment being undertaken. It may also be indicated because of unpleasant or lengthy treatment or to prevent exacerbation of a patient's medical or behavioural condition by anxiety. The indicator of sedation need (IOSN) tool has been developed to help support dentists in their clinical decision-making and uses information about a patient's anxiety, medical and behavioural status and treatment complexity. The IOSN has been used to measure sedation need and has shown that 5.1% of patients attending general dental practices have a high need of conscious sedation. IOSN has also been used to investigate the need for conscious sedation in the general population among dental practice attenders and those who don't attend. The proportion was found to be 6.7%. Some patients require conscious sedation in order to access dental care. The indicator of sedation need (IOSN) tool helps in the decision-making process.

  12. Orthokeratology: clinical utility and patient perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charm J

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Jessie Charm Sight Enhancement Center, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Abstract: Orthokeratology (ortho-k is a special rigid contact lens worn at night to achieve myopic reduction and control. This review provides an overview on prescribing ortho-k, including clinical consideration on patient aspect and lens design; its clinical outcomes; and clinical efficacy and safety. Patient satisfaction was summarized. In order to achieve long-term healthy ortho-k treatment, it requires both patient and practitioners’ care and rapport to maintain good ocular health and lens conditions. Keywords: orthokeratology, efficacy, patient satisfaction, myopic reduction, myopic control

  13. Ketamine versus Ketamine / magnesium Sulfate for Procedural Sedation and Analgesia in the Emergency Department: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizkhani, Reza; Bahadori, Azadeh; Shariati, Mohammadreza; Golshani, Keyhan; Ahmadi, Omid; Masoumi, Babak

    2018-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of magnesium sulfate (MgSO 4 ) in procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA) when combined with ketamine in patients with fractures in emergency departments and required short and painful emergency procedures. In this study, 100 patients with fractures and dislocations who were presented to the emergency departments and required PSA for short and painful emergency procedures were randomly allocated to groups of ketamine plus MgSO 4 or ketamine alone. Train of four (TOF) stimulation pattern was assessed using nerve stimulator machine and compared between groups. The mean age of studied patients was 46.9 ± 9.3 years old. 48% were male and 52% were female. No significant differences were noted between groups in demographic variables. The status of TOF, 2 min after the injection of ketamine (1.5 mg/kg), in both groups was similar. After the injection of the second dose of ketamine (1 mg/kg) the status of TOF in four patients in ketamine plus MgSO 4 (0.45 mg/kg) group changed, it was three quarters but in ketamine group, the status of TOF in all patients was four quarters. The difference between groups was not statistically significant ( P = 0.12). The findings revealed that for muscle relaxation during medical procedures in the emergency department, ketamine in combination with MgSO 4 with this dose was not effective for muscle relaxation during procedures.

  14. Conscious Sedation Efficacy of 0.3 and 0.5 mg/kg Oral Midazolam for Three to Six Year-Old Uncooperative Children Undergoing Dental Treatment: A Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Fallahinejad Ghajari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Midazolam with variable dosages has been used to induce sedation in pediatric dentistry. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of two dosages of oral midazolam for conscious sedation of children undergoing dental treatment.Materials and Methods: In this randomized crossover double blind clinical trial, 20 healthy children (ASA I aged three to six years with negative or definitely negative Frankl behavioral rating scale were evaluated. Half of the children received 0.5mg/kg oral midazolam plus 1mg/kg hydroxyzine (A orally in the first session and 0.3mg/kg oral midazolam plus 1mg/kg hydroxyzine (B in the next session. The other half received the drugs on a reverse order. Sedation degree by Houpt sedation rating scale, heart rate and level of SpO2 were assessed at the beginning and after 15 and 30 minutes. The data were analyzed using SPSS 19 and Wilcoxon Signed Rank and McNemar’s tests.Results: The results showed that although administration of 0.5mg/kg oral midazolam was slightly superior to 0.3mg/kg oral midazolam in terms of sedation efficacy, the differences were not significant (P>0.05. The difference in treatment success was not significant either (P>0.05. Heart rate, oxygen saturation (SpO2 and respiratory rate were within the normal range and did not show a significant change (P>0.05.Conclusions: The overall success rate of the two drug combinations namely 0.5mg/kg oral midazolam plus hydroxyzine and 0.3mg/kg oral midazolam plus hydroxyzine was not significantly different for management of pediatric patients.Keywords: Conscious Sedation; Pediatric Dentistry; Midazolam; Hydroxyzine

  15. Sedation in Pediatric Esophagogastroduodenoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seak Hee Oh

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD has become an established diagnostic and therapeutic modality in pediatric gastroenterology. Effective sedation strategies have been adopted to improve patient tolerance during pediatric EGD. For children, safety is a fundamental consideration during this procedure as they are at a higher risk of severe adverse events from procedural sedation compared to adults. Therefore, a detailed risk evaluation is required prior to the procedure, and practitioners should be aware of the benefits and risks associated with sedation regimens during pediatric EGD. In addition, pediatric advanced life support by endoscopists or immediate intervention by anesthesiologists should be available in the event that severe adverse events occur during pediatric EGD.

  16. Intranasal dexmedetomidine for sedation for pediatric computed tomography imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekitarian Filho, Eduardo; Robinson, Fay; de Carvalho, Werther Brunow; Gilio, Alfredo Elias; Mason, Keira P

    2015-05-01

    This prospective observational pilot study evaluated the aerosolized intranasal route for dexmedetomidine as a safe, effective, and efficient option for infant and pediatric sedation for computed tomography imaging. The mean time to sedation was 13.4 minutes, with excellent image quality, no failed sedations, or significant adverse events. Registered with ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01900405. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Diagnostic utility of clinical and biochemical parameters in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diagnostic utility of clinical and biochemical parameters in pancreatic head malignancy ... Department of Surgery, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, ..... technical review on the epidemiology, diagnosis, and.

  18. Analgesia, sedation, and memory of intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuzzo, M; Pinamonti, A; Cingolani, E; Grassi, L; Bianconi, M; Contu, P; Gritti, G; Alvisi, R

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this article was to investigate the relationship between analgesia, sedation, and memory of intensive care. One hundred fifty-two adult, cooperative intensive care unit (ICU) patients were interviewed 6 months after hospital discharge about their memory of intensive care. The patient was considered to be cooperative when he/she was aware of self and environment at the interview. The patients were grouped as follows: A (45 patients) substantially no sedation, B (85) morphine, and C (22) morphine and other sedatives. The patients having no memory of intensive care were 38%, 34%, and 23% respectively, in the three groups. They were less ill, according to SAPS II (P memories was not different among the three groups. Females reported at least one emotional memory more frequently than males (odds ratio 4.17; 95% CI 10.97-1.59). The patients receiving sedatives in the ICU are not comparable with those receiving only opiates or nothing, due to the different clinical condition. The lack of memory of intensive care is present in one third of patients and is influenced more by length of stay in ICU than by the sedation received. Sedation does not influence the incidence of factual, sensation, and emotional memories of ICU admitted patients. Females have higher incidences of emotional memories than males. Copyright 2001 by W.B. Saunders Company

  19. Clonidine Sedation Effects in Children During Electroencephalography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Barzegar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available It is very important to have proper management in children with Seizure. Electroencephalography (EEG as a diagnostic instrument has a key role in determining the management method of seizure in children. Because of poor cooperation of some children (especially children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorders and developmental disorders in performing EEG, it is the best choice to sedate children before EEG. The aim of present study is to evaluate the sedation efficacy of clonidine in children before EEG. In a randomized clinical trial, 45 children age 2 to 12 with seizure, who referred to Children Hospital of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences and candidate for EEG, were studied. Sedation before EEG induced by 0.5 to 2.0 mg clonidine orally. Sedation score (0 to 5 measured by using eyes condition, response to voice, and response to touch. Successful sedation, EEG performing, and hemodynamic stability were evaluated during sedation. Of all patients, 40 patients (88.88% were sedated successfully, and EEG was performed for all of the children. Mean onset time of clonidine effect was 35.47±13.56 minutes and mean time of that the patients’ level of consciousness back to the level before administrating of clonidine was 77.55±26.87 minutes. Hemodynamic states of all patients were stable during the study, and there were no significant changes in vital sign of patients. In conclusion, clonidine can be considered as a safe alternative medication for sedation for EEG, which is fortunately associated with no significant change in vital signs, which may complicate overall status of patients.

  20. Procedural sedation analgesia

    OpenAIRE

    Sheta, Saad A

    2010-01-01

    The number of noninvasive and minimally invasive procedures performed outside of the operating room has grown exponentially over the last several decades. Sedation, analgesia, or both may be needed for many of these interventional or diagnostic procedures. Individualized care is important when determining if a patient requires procedural sedation analgesia (PSA). The patient might need an anti-anxiety drug, pain medicine, immobilization, simple reassurance, or a combination of these interve...

  1. Comparison of sedation strategies for critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutton, Brian; Burry, Lisa D.; Kanji, Salmaan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sedatives and analgesics are administered to provide sedation and manage agitation and pain in most critically ill mechanically ventilated patients. Various sedation administration strategies including protocolized sedation and daily sedation interruption are used to mitigate drug...... their efficacy and safety for mechanically ventilated patients. Methods: We will search the following from 1980 to March 2016: Ovid MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, PsycINFO, and Web of Science. We will also search the Cochrane Library, gray literature, and the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. We...... of interest include duration of mechanical ventilation, time to first extubation, ICU and hospital length of stay, re-intubation, tracheostomy, mortality, total sedative and opioid exposure, health-related quality of life, and adverse events. To inform our NMA, we will first conduct conventional pair...

  2. The Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale modified for palliative care inpatients (RASS-PAL): a pilot study exploring validity and feasibility in clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Bush, Shirley H; Grassau, Pamela A; Yarmo, Michelle N; Zhang, Tinghua; Zinkie, Samantha J; Pereira, José L

    2014-01-01

    Background The Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale (RASS), which assesses level of sedation and agitation, is a simple observational instrument which was developed and validated for the intensive care setting. Although used and recommended in palliative care settings, further validation is required in this patient population. The aim of this study was to explore the validity and feasibility of a version of the RASS modified for palliative care populations (RASS-PAL). Methods A prospective study...

  3. Clinical validation of free breathing respiratory triggered retrospectively cardiac gated cine balanced steady-state free precession cardiovascular magnetic resonance in sedated children

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnamurthy, Rajesh; Pednekar, Amol; Atweh, Lamya A; Vogelius, Esben; Chu, Zili David; Zhang, Wei; Maskatia, Shiraz; Masand, Prakash; Morris, Shaine A; Krishnamurthy, Ramkumar; Muthupillai, Raja

    2015-01-01

    Background Cine balanced steady-state free precession (SSFP), the preferred sequence for ventricular function, demands uninterrupted radio frequency (RF) excitation to maintain the steady-state during suspended respiration. This is difficult to accomplish in sedated children. In this work, we validate a respiratory triggered (RT) SSFP sequence that drives the magnetization to steady-state before commencing retrospectively cardiac gated cine acquisition in a sedated pediatric population. Metho...

  4. The proportionate value of proportionality in palliative sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Jeffrey T

    2014-01-01

    Proportionality, as it pertains to palliative sedation, is the notion that sedation should be induced at the lowest degree effective for symptom control, so that the patient's consciousness may be preserved. The pursuit of proportionality in palliative sedation is a widely accepted imperative advocated in position statements and guidelines on this treatment. The priority assigned to the pursuit of proportionality, and the extent to which it is relevant for patients who qualify for palliative sedation, have been overstated. Copyright 2014 The Journal of Clinical Ethics. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical Utility of Cancellation on the WISC-IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianjun; Chen, Hsinyi

    2013-01-01

    This study examined empirical evidence for clinical utility of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, fourth edition (WISC-IV) cancellation subtest by comparing data from 597 clinical and 597 matched control children. The results of dependent t and sequential logistic regression analyses demonstrated that (a) children with intellectual…

  6. The effect of moderate sedation on exocrine pancreas function in normal healthy subjects: a prospective, randomized, cross-over trial using the synthetic porcine secretin stimulated Endoscopic Pancreatic Function Test (ePFT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conwell, Darwin L; Zuccaro, Gregory; Purich, Edward; Fein, Seymor; Vanlente, Frederick; Vargo, John; Dumot, John; O'laughlin, Cathy; Trolli, Patricia

    2005-05-01

    ,323-6563) respectively (p= 0.0656). The mean peak bicarbonate concentrations for sedated (n = 8) versus non-sedated (n = 8) groups were 103 +/- 11 meq/L (range 78-125) and 106 +/- 11 meq/L (range 87-138), respectively (p= 0.1346). There was excellent correlation of peak bicarbonate concentrations when sedation and no sedation groups were compared (r= 0.744, p < 0.05; Spearman rank correlation). There were no episodes of pancreatitis. (a) Moderate sedation used for upper endoscopy does not effect the clinical diagnostic parameters (peak bicarbonate concentration or total bicarbonate output) utilized to diagnose pancreatic insufficiency. (b) Analysis of duodenal drainage fluid collected endoscopically after synthetic secretin stimulation produces an identical pancreatic secretory curve described with traditional gastroduodenal tube collection methods.

  7. Reducing sedation for pediatric body MRI using accelerated and abbreviated imaging protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Rizwan; Hu, Houchun Harry; Krishnamurthy, Ramkumar; Krishnamurthy, Rajesh

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an established diagnostic imaging tool for investigating pediatric disease. MRI allows assessment of structure, function, and morphology in cardiovascular imaging, as well as tissue characterization in body imaging, without the use of ionizing radiation. For MRI in children, sedation and general anesthesia (GA) are often utilized to suppress patient motion, which can otherwise compromise image quality and diagnostic efficacy. However, evidence is emerging that use of sedation and GA in children might have long-term neurocognitive side effects, in addition to the short-term procedure-related risks. These concerns make risk-benefit assessment of sedation and GA more challenging. Therefore, reducing or eliminating the need for sedation and GA is an important goal of imaging innovation and research in pediatric MRI. In this review, the authors focus on technical and clinical approaches to reducing and eliminating the use of sedation in the pediatric population based on image acquisition acceleration and imaging protocols abbreviation. This paper covers important physiological and technical considerations for pediatric body MR imaging and discusses MRI techniques that offer the potential of recovering diagnostic-quality images from accelerated scans. In this review, the authors also introduce the concept of reporting elements for important indications for pediatric body MRI and use this as a basis for abbreviating the MR protocols. By employing appropriate accelerated and abbreviated approaches based on an understanding of the imaging needs and reporting elements for a given clinical indication, it is possible to reduce sedation and GA for pediatric chest, cardiovascular and abdominal MRI. (orig.)

  8. Reducing sedation for pediatric body MRI using accelerated and abbreviated imaging protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Rizwan [The Ohio State University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Columbus, OH (United States); Hu, Houchun Harry; Krishnamurthy, Ramkumar; Krishnamurthy, Rajesh [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2018-01-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an established diagnostic imaging tool for investigating pediatric disease. MRI allows assessment of structure, function, and morphology in cardiovascular imaging, as well as tissue characterization in body imaging, without the use of ionizing radiation. For MRI in children, sedation and general anesthesia (GA) are often utilized to suppress patient motion, which can otherwise compromise image quality and diagnostic efficacy. However, evidence is emerging that use of sedation and GA in children might have long-term neurocognitive side effects, in addition to the short-term procedure-related risks. These concerns make risk-benefit assessment of sedation and GA more challenging. Therefore, reducing or eliminating the need for sedation and GA is an important goal of imaging innovation and research in pediatric MRI. In this review, the authors focus on technical and clinical approaches to reducing and eliminating the use of sedation in the pediatric population based on image acquisition acceleration and imaging protocols abbreviation. This paper covers important physiological and technical considerations for pediatric body MR imaging and discusses MRI techniques that offer the potential of recovering diagnostic-quality images from accelerated scans. In this review, the authors also introduce the concept of reporting elements for important indications for pediatric body MRI and use this as a basis for abbreviating the MR protocols. By employing appropriate accelerated and abbreviated approaches based on an understanding of the imaging needs and reporting elements for a given clinical indication, it is possible to reduce sedation and GA for pediatric chest, cardiovascular and abdominal MRI. (orig.)

  9. Non-sedation versus sedation with a daily wake-up trial in critically ill patients receiving mechanical ventilation (NONSEDA Trial)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Palle; Olsen, Hanne Tanghus; Jørgensen, Helene Korvenius

    2014-01-01

    comparing sedation with no sedation, a priori powered to have all-cause mortality as primary outcome.The objective is to assess the benefits and harms of non-sedation versus sedation with a daily wake-up trial in critically ill patients. METHODS: The non-sedation (NONSEDA) trial is an investigator......-sedation supplemented with pain management during mechanical ventilation.Control intervention is sedation with a daily wake-up trial.The primary outcome will be all cause mortality at 90 days after randomization. Secondary outcomes will be: days until death throughout the total observation period; coma- and delirium...... in mortality with a type I error risk of 5% and a type II error risk of 20% (power at 80%). DISCUSSION: The trial investigates potential benefits of non-sedation. This might have large impact on the future treatment of mechanically ventilated critically ill patients.Trial register: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT...

  10. An ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants with narcotic, sedative and analgesic effects in west of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saki, K; Bahmani, M; Rafieianb-Kopaei, M D; Asadollahi, K; Emaneini, M; Taherikalani, M

    2016-01-01

    The first step for identification of medicinal plants and their therapeutic effects is to determine their use by local people, traditional medicine books and personal experiences. The aim of this study was to document the medicinal plants used as analgesic, sedative or narcotic agents by local residents of Dehloran, Iran. Interviews conducted with 53 informants (38 male and 15 female) revealed that a total of 32 medicinal plants belonging to 22 families are used in Dehloran as narcotic, sedative and analgesic agents. The most utilized plant families were Asteraceae, Rosaceae and Fabaceae. Approximately 74% of the utilized plants was attributed to herbs, followed by trees (13%) and shrubs (13%). Sixty-six percent of the medicinal plants used in the study area were perennial and the rest were annual or biannual. The most widely used plant parts were flowers (34%) followed by leaves (24%) and fruits (14%). Thirty-nine percent of the medicinal plants were used as sedatives, 39% as analgesics, and 24% as narcotics. Recommended plants in this study can be good candidates for further clinical and laboratory trials on diseases that are associated with pain, suffering, stress and depression. They also can be used to develop new sedative, narcotic and analgesic drugs.

  11. Variation in diurnal sedation in mechanically ventilated patients who are managed with a sedation protocol alone or a sedation protocol and daily interruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sangeeta; Meade, Maureen; Burry, Lisa; Mallick, Ranjeeta; Katsios, Christina; Fergusson, Dean; Dodek, Peter; Burns, Karen; Herridge, Margaret; Devlin, John W; Tanios, Maged; Fowler, Robert; Jacka, Michael; Skrobik, Yoanna; Olafson, Kendiss; Cook, Deborah

    2016-08-01

    Mechanically ventilated patients may receive more sedation during the night than during the day, potentially delaying extubation. We compared nighttime and daytime benzodiazepine and opioid administration in adult patients enrolled in a multicenter sedation trial comparing protocolized sedation alone or protocolized sedation combined with daily sedation interruption; and we evaluated whether nighttime and daytime doses were associated with liberation from mechanical ventilation. This is a secondary analysis of a randomized trial which was conducted in 16 North American medical-surgical ICUs. In all 423 patients, nurses applied a validated sedation scale hourly to titrate benzodiazepine and opioid infusions to achieve a light level of sedation. Using fentanyl equivalents and midazolam equivalents, we compared dosages administered during night (19:00 to 07:00) and day (07:00 to 19:00) shifts. Using multivariable logistic regression we evaluated the association between nighttime and daytime opioid and sedative doses, and spontaneous breathing trial (SBT) conduct, SBT success, and extubation. Nighttime benzodiazepine and opioid doses were significantly higher than daytime doses (mean difference midazolam equivalents 23.3 mg, 95 % CI 12.9, 33.8, p Patients were more often restrained during day shifts (76.3 % vs 73.7 %, p patient despite successful SBT. Patients received higher doses of opioids and benzodiazepines at night. Higher nighttime doses were associated with SBT failure and delayed extubation. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00675363 . Registered 7 May 2008.

  12. "Sedation is tricky": A qualitative content analysis of nurses' perceptions of sedation administration in mechanically ventilated intensive care unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetland, Breanna; Guttormson, Jill; Tracy, Mary Fran; Chlan, Linda

    2018-03-20

    Critical care nurses are responsible for administering sedative medications to mechanically ventilated patients. With significant advancements in the understanding of the impact of sedative exposure on physiological and psychological outcomes of ventilated patients, updated practice guidelines for assessment and management of pain, agitation, and delirium in the intensive care unit were released in 2013. The primary aim of this qualitative study was to identify and describe themes derived from critical care nurses' comments regarding sedation administration practices with mechanically ventilated patients. This is a qualitative content analysis of secondary text data captured through a national electronic survey of members of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses. A subsample (n = 67) of nurses responded to a single, open-ended item at the end of a survey that evaluated nurses' perceptions of current sedation administration practices. Multiple factors guided sedation administration practices, including individual patient needs, nurses' synthesis of clinical evidence, application of best practices, and various personal and professional practice perspectives. Our results also indicated nurses desire additional resources to improve their sedation administration practices including more training, better communication tools, and adequate staffing. Critical care nurses endorse recommendations to minimise sedation administration when possible, but a variety of factors, including personal perspectives, impact sedation administration in the intensive care unit and need to be considered. Critical care nurses continue to encounter numerous challenges when assessing and managing sedation of mechanically ventilated patients. Copyright © 2018 Australian College of Critical Care Nurses Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale modified for palliative care inpatients (RASS-PAL): a pilot study exploring validity and feasibility in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Shirley H; Grassau, Pamela A; Yarmo, Michelle N; Zhang, Tinghua; Zinkie, Samantha J; Pereira, José L

    2014-03-31

    The Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale (RASS), which assesses level of sedation and agitation, is a simple observational instrument which was developed and validated for the intensive care setting. Although used and recommended in palliative care settings, further validation is required in this patient population. The aim of this study was to explore the validity and feasibility of a version of the RASS modified for palliative care populations (RASS-PAL). A prospective study, using a mixed methods approach, was conducted. Thirteen health care professionals (physicians and nurses) working in an acute palliative care unit assessed ten consecutive patients with an agitated delirium or receiving palliative sedation. Patients were assessed at five designated time points using the RASS-PAL. Health care professionals completed a short survey and data from semi-structured interviews was analyzed using thematic analysis. The inter-rater intraclass correlation coefficient range of the RASS-PAL was 0.84 to 0.98 for the five time points. Professionals agreed that the tool was useful for assessing sedation and was easy to use. Its role in monitoring delirium however was deemed problematic. Professionals felt that it may assist interprofessional communication. The need for formal education on why and how to use the instrument was highlighted. This study provides preliminary validity evidence for the use of the RASS-PAL by physicians and nurses working in a palliative care unit, specifically for assessing sedation and agitation levels in the management of palliative sedation. Further validity evidence should be sought, particularly in the context of assessing delirium.

  14. The Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale modified for palliative care inpatients (RASS-PAL): a pilot study exploring validity and feasibility in clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale (RASS), which assesses level of sedation and agitation, is a simple observational instrument which was developed and validated for the intensive care setting. Although used and recommended in palliative care settings, further validation is required in this patient population. The aim of this study was to explore the validity and feasibility of a version of the RASS modified for palliative care populations (RASS-PAL). Methods A prospective study, using a mixed methods approach, was conducted. Thirteen health care professionals (physicians and nurses) working in an acute palliative care unit assessed ten consecutive patients with an agitated delirium or receiving palliative sedation. Patients were assessed at five designated time points using the RASS-PAL. Health care professionals completed a short survey and data from semi-structured interviews was analyzed using thematic analysis. Results The inter-rater intraclass correlation coefficient range of the RASS-PAL was 0.84 to 0.98 for the five time points. Professionals agreed that the tool was useful for assessing sedation and was easy to use. Its role in monitoring delirium however was deemed problematic. Professionals felt that it may assist interprofessional communication. The need for formal education on why and how to use the instrument was highlighted. Conclusion This study provides preliminary validity evidence for the use of the RASS-PAL by physicians and nurses working in a palliative care unit, specifically for assessing sedation and agitation levels in the management of palliative sedation. Further validity evidence should be sought, particularly in the context of assessing delirium. PMID:24684942

  15. Comparison of the changes in blood glucose level during sedation with midazolam and propofol in implant surgery: a prospective randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaviani, Nasser; Koosha, Farzad; Shahtusi, Mina

    2014-09-01

    Reducing the patients' stress can prevent, or at least, limit the increase in blood glucose level. The study compares the effect of propofol and midazolam on blood glucose level in the patients undergoing dental implant surgery. The effect of pre-operational stress on blood glucose level during the surgery is also evaluated. This prospective randomized clinical trial recruited 33 patients undergoing dental implant surgery and divided into two groups. Conscious sedation was performed by midazolam in one group and with propofol in another group. The pre-operational stress was scored and the blood glucose level was measured in 4 different stages; before the operation, two minutes after the local anesthetic injection; thirty minutes after the onset of operation and at the end of the operation. The results were analyzed by employing ANOVA and Pearson test. The p Value was adopted 0.05 and the confidence coefficient was assumed 95%. The average levels of the blood glucose in midazolam and propofol group were 93.82 mg/dl and 94 mg/dl before the operation which displayed a meaningful increase of blood glucose level in both groups as the operation went on. The values were 103.76 mg/dl for midazolam and 108.56 mg/dl for the propofol group (pblood glucose level between two groups in the different stages of the operation (p= 0.466). The Pearson correlation coefficient test revealed a higher increase in the blood glucose level in the patients with a higher pre-operational stress score (r= 0.756, pblood glucose level while undergoing an operation. No statistically significant difference was detected between midazolam and propofol.

  16. A Prospective Cohort Study on the Clinical Utility of Second ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-06-28

    Jun 28, 2017 ... the clinical utility of second trimester MABP in the prediction of preeclampsia. Methods: This ..... the convenience of a single cutoff value for decision making, a systematic review and meta‑analysis[17] showed that MABP was a ...

  17. Socio-demographic determinants of antenatal clinic utilization in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Socio-demographic determinants of antenatal clinic utilization in a Nigerian university teaching hospital. ... CONCLUSION:Among other social factors female education improved women's ability to take decisions on reproductive matters. Poor education and low socioeconomic status not only increase women's vulnerability ...

  18. Diagnostic utility of clinical and biochemical parameters in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diagnostic utility of clinical and biochemical parameters in pancreatic head malignancy patients with normal carbohydrate antigen 19-9 levels. Xiaoli Jin1, Yulian Wu2. 1. Department of Surgery, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, 3 Qingchun. Road East, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province ...

  19. [Sedation and analgesia practices among Spanish neonatal intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Alvarez, A; Carbajal, R; Courtois, E; Pertega-Diaz, S; Muñiz-Garcia, J; Anand, K J S

    2015-08-01

    Pain management and sedation is a priority in neonatal intensive care units. A study was designed with the aim of determining current clinical practice as regards sedation and analgesia in neonatal intensive care units in Spain, as well as to identify factors associated with the use of sedative and analgesic drugs. A multicenter, observational, longitudinal and prospective study. Thirty neonatal units participated and included 468 neonates. Of these, 198 (42,3%) received sedatives or analgesics. A total of 19 different drugs were used during the study period, and the most used was fentanyl. Only fentanyl, midazolam, morphine and paracetamol were used in at least 20% of the neonates who received sedatives and/or analgesics. In infusions, 14 different drug prescriptions were used, with the most frequent being fentanyl and the combination of fentanyl and midazolam. The variables associated with receiving sedation and/or analgesia were, to have required invasive ventilation (P3 (P=.023; OR=2.26), the existence of pain evaluation guides in the unit (Pneonates admitted to intensive care units receive sedatives or analgesics. There is significant variation between Spanish neonatal units as regards sedation and analgesia prescribing. Our results provide evidence on the "state of the art", and could serve as the basis of preparing clinical practice guidelines at a national level. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. The validity and clinical utility of purging disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keel, Pamela K; Striegel-Moore, Ruth H

    2009-12-01

    To review evidence of the validity and clinical utility of Purging Disorder and examine options for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders fifth edition (DSM-V). Articles were identified by computerized and manual searches and reviewed to address five questions about Purging Disorder: Is there "ample" literature? Is the syndrome clearly defined? Can it be measured and diagnosed reliably? Can it be differentiated from other eating disorders? Is there evidence of syndrome validity? Although empirical classification and concurrent validity studies provide emerging support for the distinctiveness of Purging Disorder, questions remain about definition, diagnostic reliability in clinical settings, and clinical utility (i.e., prognostic validity). We discuss strengths and weaknesses associated with various options for the status of Purging Disorder in the DSM-V ranging from making no changes from DSM-IV to designating Purging Disorder a diagnosis on equal footing with Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa.

  1. Moderate sedation for MRI in young children with autism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Allison Kinder [Duke University Medical Center, Division of Pediatric Anesthesia, Durham (United States); Hazlett, Heather Cody; Garrett, Nancy T [University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Wilkerson, Christy [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Durham, NC (United States); Piven, Joseph [University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Departments of Psychiatry and Pediatrics, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2005-09-01

    Autism is a pervasive neurodevelopmental disorder. Because of the deficits associated with the condition, sedation of children with autism has been considered more challenging than sedation of other children. To test this hypothesis, we compared children with autism against clinical controls to determine differences in requirements for moderate sedation for MRI. Children ages 18-36 months with autism (group 1, n = 41) and children with no autistic behavior (group 2, n = 42) were sedated with a combination of pentobarbital and fentanyl per sedation service protocol. The sedation nurse was consistent for all patients, and all were sedated to achieve a Modified Ramsay Score of 4. Demographics and doses of sedatives were recorded and compared. There were no sedation failures in either group. Children in group 1 (autism) were significantly older than group 2 (32.02{+-}3.6 months vs 28.16{+-}6.7 months) and weighed significantly more (14.87{+-}2.1 kg vs 13.42{+-}2.2 kg). When compared on a per-kilogram basis, however, group 1 had a significantly lower fentanyl requirement than group 2 (1.25{+-}0.55 mcg/kg vs 1.57{+-}0.81 mcg/kg), but no significant difference was found in pentobarbital dosing between groups 1 and 2, respectively (4.92{+-}0.92 mg/kg vs 5.21{+-}1.6 mg/kg). Autistic children in this age range are not more difficult to sedate and do not require higher doses of sedative agents for noninvasive imaging studies. (orig.)

  2. Moderate sedation for MRI in young children with autism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, Allison Kinder; Hazlett, Heather Cody; Garrett, Nancy T.; Wilkerson, Christy; Piven, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    Autism is a pervasive neurodevelopmental disorder. Because of the deficits associated with the condition, sedation of children with autism has been considered more challenging than sedation of other children. To test this hypothesis, we compared children with autism against clinical controls to determine differences in requirements for moderate sedation for MRI. Children ages 18-36 months with autism (group 1, n = 41) and children with no autistic behavior (group 2, n = 42) were sedated with a combination of pentobarbital and fentanyl per sedation service protocol. The sedation nurse was consistent for all patients, and all were sedated to achieve a Modified Ramsay Score of 4. Demographics and doses of sedatives were recorded and compared. There were no sedation failures in either group. Children in group 1 (autism) were significantly older than group 2 (32.02±3.6 months vs 28.16±6.7 months) and weighed significantly more (14.87±2.1 kg vs 13.42±2.2 kg). When compared on a per-kilogram basis, however, group 1 had a significantly lower fentanyl requirement than group 2 (1.25±0.55 mcg/kg vs 1.57±0.81 mcg/kg), but no significant difference was found in pentobarbital dosing between groups 1 and 2, respectively (4.92±0.92 mg/kg vs 5.21±1.6 mg/kg). Autistic children in this age range are not more difficult to sedate and do not require higher doses of sedative agents for noninvasive imaging studies. (orig.)

  3. [General practitioner and palliative sedation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Recent publications in Dutch national newspapers on palliative sedation have raised concerns about its use in general practice. There is now evidence that there is no significant increase in the incidence of palliative sedation. Euthanasia requests were pending in 20.8% of the cases in which palliative sedation was performed, but the general practitioners could clearly justify why they made this choice. This is important because it indicates that they are aware of a sharp distinction between euthanasia and palliative sedation. Although the decision to perform palliative sedation was discussed with almost all cancer patients, patient involvement was less present in non-cancer conditions. This may be related to different disease trajectories, but it also indicates that attention should be devoted to earlier identification of patients in need of palliative care. The findings confirm that the practice of palliative sedation by general practitioners largely reflects the recommendations of the Dutch National Guideline on Palliative Sedation.

  4. Implications of utility and deontology for the clinical nurse specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, L

    1989-01-01

    Faced with prospective payment plans and personnel shortages nurses in advanced clinical practice are under pressure to find practical solutions. These solutions may reflect the institutional philosophy of utility rather than the traditional nursing ethic of deontology, illustrating the need to examine the differences between utilitarian and deontological principles as they affect nursing practice. This paper discusses deontology and utility as they apply to nursing practice, considers how these different philosophical positions may affect advanced practitioners, and describes the current status of ethics in nursing.

  5. Comfort and patient-centred care without excessive sedation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vincent, Jean-Louis; Shehabi, Yahya; Walsh, Timothy S

    2016-01-01

    We propose an integrated and adaptable approach to improve patient care and clinical outcomes through analgesia and light sedation, initiated early during an episode of critical illness and as a priority of care. This strategy, which may be regarded as an evolution of the Pain, Agitation...... and Delirium guidelines, is conveyed in the mnemonic eCASH-early Comfort using Analgesia, minimal Sedatives and maximal Humane care. eCASH aims to establish optimal patient comfort with minimal sedation as the default presumption for intensive care unit (ICU) patients in the absence of recognised medical...... requirements for deeper sedation. Effective pain relief is the first priority for implementation of eCASH: we advocate flexible multimodal analgesia designed to minimise use of opioids. Sedation is secondary to pain relief and where possible should be based on agents that can be titrated to a prespecified...

  6. The rate of adverse events during IV conscious sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwamburger, Nathan T; Hancock, Raymond H; Chong, Chol H; Hartup, Grant R; Vandewalle, Kraig S

    2012-01-01

    Conscious sedation has become an integral part of dentistry; it is often used to reduce anxiety or fear in some patients during oral surgery, periodontal surgery, implant placement, and general dentistry procedures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the frequency of adverse events during IV conscious sedation provided by credentialed general dentists and periodontists in the United States Air Force (USAF). Sedation clinical records (Air Force Form 1417) from calendar year 2009 were requested from all USAF bases. A total of 1,468 records were reviewed and 19 adverse events were noted in 17 patients. IV complication (infiltration) was the most common adverse event. The overall adverse event rate was 1.3 per 100 patients treated. The results of this study show that moderate sedation provided by general dentists and periodontists in the USAF has a low incidence of adverse events, and conscious sedation remains a viable option for providers for the reduction of anxiety in select patients.

  7. Retail clinic utilization associated with lower total cost of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Andrew; Dunham, Lisette; Snower, Kristen; Hu, Min; Matlin, Olga S; Shrank, William H; Choudhry, Niteesh K; Brennan, Troyen

    2013-04-01

    To better understand the impact of retail clinic use on a patient's annual total cost of care. A propensity score matched-pair, cohort design was used to analyze healthcare spending patterns among CVS Caremark employees in the year following a visit to a MinuteClinic, the retail clinics inside CVS pharmacies. De-identified medical and pharmacy claims for CVS Caremark employees and their dependents who received care at a retail clinic between June 1, 2009, and May 31, 2010, were matched to those of subjects who received care elsewhere. High-dimensional propensity score and greedy matching techniques were used to create a 1-to-1 matched cohort that was analyzed using generalized linear regression models. Individuals using a retail clinic had a lower total cost of care (-$262; 95% confidence interval, -$510 to -$31; P = .025) in the year following their clinic visit than individuals who received care in other settings. This savings was primarily due to lower medical expenses at physicians' offices ($77 savings, P = .008) and hospital inpatient care ($121 savings, P = .049). The 6022 retail clinic users also had 142 (12%) fewer emergency department visits (P = .01), though this was not related to significant cost savings. This study found that retail clinic use was associated with lower overall total cost of care compared with that at alternative sites. Savings may extend beyond the retail clinic visit itself to other types of medical utilization.

  8. [Psychomotor agitation, pharmaceutical sedation and psychiatric emergency in psychotic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passamar, M; Tellier, O; Vilamot, B

    2011-12-01

    Psychomotor agitation, very common among psychiatric emergencies, raises the question of pharmaceutical sedation, its indications, and its issues, notably with regard to the observance in postemergency. A new approach to sedation places it within its therapeutic aim and also takes into account the sometimes harmful impact on the course of the patient's care. A pretherapeutical, analysis both clinical and environmental is crucial. The time spent on the initial meeting and assessment is essential. The evolution of professional practices in mental health allows us to distinguish three kinds of sedation (vigilance, behaviour and psychical) that guide the choice and the mode of psychotropic drug use. The harmful effects of an ever-increasing use of sedation is debated. The use of atypical antipsychotics and injectable forms is argued. Early psychical sedation is preferable to the obsolete practice of vigilance sedation and to behavioural sedation with its limited indications. The use of excessive or prolonged sedation might have a detrimental effect on the care offered after psychiatric emergency treatment. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  9. Palliative sedation in end-of-life care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltoni, Marco; Scarpi, Emanuela; Nanni, Oriana

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this review was to present and comment on recent data published on palliative sedation in palliative and end-of-life care. Palliative sedation is a medical procedure used to deal with the refractory symptoms occurring in the advanced stages of cancer. It has clinical, nursing, relational and ethical implications, making it a highly sensitive issue. Over the last 12 months, a number of authors have published interesting new findings on different areas of palliative sedation, that is prevalence, indications, monitoring, duration and choice of drugs. In particular, a clear definition of palliative sedation and of its more pronounced form, deep continuous sedation (DCS), has emerged. It has been confirmed that, when performed in the correct way and with the right aims, palliative sedation does not have a detrimental impact on survival. Recent findings confirm that palliative sedation is an integral part of a medical palliative care approach and is needed in certain clinical situations. It is a legitimate clinical practice from any ethical point of view. While oncologists should have a basic knowledge of the procedure, its in depth study is a core competency for palliative care physicians.

  10. Beyond clinical utility: The multiple values of DTC genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Turrini

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available One point of consensus in the otherwise very controversial discussion about the benefits and dangers of DTC genetics in the health domain is the lack of substantial clinical utility. At the same time, both the empirical and conceptual literature indicate that health-related DTC tests can have value and utility outside of the clinic. We argue that a broader and multi-faceted conceptualization of utility and value would enrich the ethical and social discussion of DTC testing in several ways: First, looking at ways in which DTC testing can have personal and social value for users – in the form of entertainment, learning, or a way to relate to others – can help to explain why people still take DTC tests, and will, further down the line, foster a more nuanced understanding of secondary and tertiary uses of DTC test results (which could very well unearth new ethical and regulatory challenges. Second, considering the economic value and broader utility of DTC testing foregrounds wider social and political aspects than have been dominant in the ethical and regulatory debates surrounding DTC genetics so far. These wider political aspects include the profound power asymmetries that characterize the collection and use of personal genetic data in many contexts.

  11. Palliative Sedation at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barathi, B

    2012-01-01

    Patients with advanced cancer often suffer from multiple intractable physical symptoms. Though majority of the symptoms can be controlled, in some of the patients these symptoms remain refractory and uncontrolled till the end. Palliative sedation (PS) is one of the ways to relieve intractable suffering of the dying cancer patients. The main concern while using PS is its life-shortening effect. This case report describes the feasibility of administering PS in Indian home settings. PMID:22837615

  12. Palliative sedation at home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Barathi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Patients with advanced cancer often suffer from multiple intractable physical symptoms. Though majority of the symptoms can be controlled, in some of the patients these symptoms remain refractory and uncontrolled till the end. Palliative sedation (PS is one of the ways to relieve intractable suffering of the dying cancer patients. The main concern while using PS is its life-shortening effect. This case report describes the feasibility of administering PS in Indian home settings.

  13. Comparison of dexmedetomidine and sufentanil for conscious sedation in patients undergoing awake fibreoptic nasotracheal intubation: a prospective, randomised and controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, She-Liang; Xie, Yi-hong; Wang, Wen-Yuan; Hu, Shuang-Fei; Zhang, Yun-Long

    2014-01-01

    Fibreoptic intubation is a valuable technique for difficult airway management in which conscious sedation is paramount. To investigate the efficacy and safety of dexmedetomidine (DEX) and sufentanil (SUF) for conscious sedation during awake nasotracheal intubation under vision by a fibreoptic bronchoscope. Forty patients with anticipated difficult airways of American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II scheduled for awake fibreoptic nasotracheal intubation were randomised into two groups each containing 20 subjects. DEX group received DEX at a dose of 1.0 μg/kg over 10 min followed by a continuous infusion of 0.5 μg/kg per hour, while SUF group received SUF target controlled infusion in which the target plasma concentration was 0.3 ng/mL. The nasotracheal intubation conditions and the tolerance to nasotracheal intubation were observed; the occurrence of adverse events including hypertension, bradycardia and respiratory depression during nasotracheal intubation and post-surgical throat pain and hoarseness, and post-surgical memory score were recorded. Better nasotracheal intubation conditions and higher tolerance to intubation were observed in DEX group than those in SUF group (P memory score for sedation during awake fibreoptic nasotracheal intubation. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Platelet function testing: methods of assessment and clinical utility.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mylotte, Darren

    2012-02-01

    Platelets play a central role in the regulation of both thrombosis and haemostasis yet tests of platelet function have, until recently, been exclusively used in the diagnosis and management of bleeding disorders. Recent advances have demonstrated the clinical utility of platelet function testing in patients with cardiovascular disease. The ex vivo measurement of response to antiplatelet therapies (aspirin and clopidogrel), by an ever-increasing array of platelet function tests, is with some assays, predictive of adverse clinical events and thus, represents an emerging area of interest for both the clinician and basic scientist. This review article will describe the advantages and disadvantages of the currently available methods of measuring platelet function and discuss both the limitations and emerging data supporting the role of platelet function studies in clinical practice.

  15. Platelet function testing: methods of assessment and clinical utility.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mylotte, Darren

    2011-01-01

    Platelets play a central role in the regulation of both thrombosis and haemostasis yet tests of platelet function have, until recently, been exclusively used in the diagnosis and management of bleeding disorders. Recent advances have demonstrated the clinical utility of platelet function testing in patients with cardiovascular disease. The ex vivo measurement of response to antiplatelet therapies (aspirin and clopidogrel), by an ever-increasing array of platelet function tests, is with some assays, predictive of adverse clinical events and thus, represents an emerging area of interest for both the clinician and basic scientist. This review article will describe the advantages and disadvantages of the currently available methods of measuring platelet function and discuss both the limitations and emerging data supporting the role of platelet function studies in clinical practice.

  16. A Review of Palliative Sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobb, Barton

    2016-09-01

    Palliative sedation has become a standard practice to treat refractory symptoms at end-of-life. Dyspnea and delirium are the two most commonly treated symptoms. The medications used in palliative sedation are usually benzodiazepines, barbiturates, antipsychotics, and/or anesthetics. Some ethical considerations remain, especially surrounding the use of palliative sedation in psychological distress and existential suffering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Therapeutics and Sedation in Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Earle R.

    1988-01-01

    Sedation can help to overcome the fear that prevents many Canadians from accepting dental treatment. This article discusses the indications and contraindications for oral, intramuscular, and inhalation sedation as used by the general dental practitioner for both adult and child patients, with a note on the growing number of specialist dental anesthetists who provide intravenous out-patient sedation. Local anesthesia is discussed with reference to allergic reactions, malignant hyperthermia, an...

  18. Risk and safety of pediatric sedation/anesthesia for procedures outside the operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravero, Joseph P

    2009-08-01

    Sedation and anesthesia outside the operating room represents a rapidly growing field of practice that involves a number of different specialty providers including anesthesiology. The literature surrounding this work is found in a variety of journals - many outside anesthesiology. This review is intended to inform readers about the current status of risk and safety involving sedation/anesthesia for tests and minor procedures utilizing a wide range of sources. Two large database studies have helped to define the frequency and nature of adverse events in pediatric sedation/anesthesia practice from a multispecialty perspective. A number of papers describing respiratory and hemodynamic aspects of dexmedetomidine sedation have also been published. Finally, a number of studies relating to training sedation providers, reporting of sedation adverse events, sedation for vulnerable populations, and (in particular) ketamine sedation adverse respiratory events have also come to light. The latest publications continue to document a relatively low risk to pediatric sedation yet also warn us about the potential adverse events in this field. The results help to define competencies required to deliver pediatric sedation and make this practice even safer. Particularly interesting are new jargon and methodologies for defining adverse events and the use of new methods for training sedation providers.

  19. Palliative Sedation: Reliability and Validity of Sedation Scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arevalo Romero, J.; Brinkkemper, T.; van der Heide, A.; Rietjens, J.A.; Ribbe, M.W.; Deliens, L.; Loer, S.A.; Zuurmond, W.W.A.; Perez, R.S.G.M.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Observer-based sedation scales have been used to provide a measurable estimate of the comfort of nonalert patients in palliative sedation. However, their usefulness and appropriateness in this setting has not been demonstrated. Objectives: To study the reliability and validity of

  20. Optimizing value utilizing Toyota Kata methodology in a multidisciplinary clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merguerian, Paul A; Grady, Richard; Waldhausen, John; Libby, Arlene; Murphy, Whitney; Melzer, Lilah; Avansino, Jeffrey

    2015-08-01

    Value in healthcare is measured in terms of patient outcomes achieved per dollar expended. Outcomes and cost must be measured at the patient level to optimize value. Multidisciplinary clinics have been shown to be effective in providing coordinated and comprehensive care with improved outcomes, yet tend to have higher cost than typical clinics. We sought to lower individual patient cost and optimize value in a pediatric multidisciplinary reconstructive pelvic medicine (RPM) clinic. The RPM clinic is a multidisciplinary clinic that takes care of patients with anomalies of the pelvic organs. The specialties involved include Urology, General Surgery, Gynecology, and Gastroenterology/Motility. From May 2012 to November 2014 we performed time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) analysis by measuring provider time for each step in the patient flow. Using observed time and the estimated hourly cost of each of the providers we calculated the final cost at the individual patient level, targeting clinic preparation. We utilized Toyota Kata methodology to enhance operational efficiency in an effort to optimize value. Variables measured included cost, time to perform a task, number of patients seen in clinic, percent value-added time (VAT) to patients (face to face time) and family experience scores (FES). At the beginning of the study period, clinic costs were $619 per patient. We reduced conference time from 6 min/patient to 1 min per patient, physician preparation time from 8 min to 6 min and increased Medical Assistant (MA) preparation time from 9.5 min to 20 min, achieving a cost reduction of 41% to $366 per patient. Continued improvements further reduced the MA preparation time to 14 min and the MD preparation time to 5 min with a further cost reduction to $194 (69%) (Figure). During this study period, we increased the number of appointments per clinic. We demonstrated sustained improvement in FES with regards to the families overall experience with their providers

  1. Palliative Sedation: An Analysis of International Guidelines and Position Statements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurschick, Lauren; Mayer, Deborah K; Hanson, Laura C

    2015-09-01

    To describe the suggested clinical practice of palliative sedation as it is presented in the literature and discuss available guidelines for its use. CINAHL, PubMed, and Web of Science were searched for publications since 1997 for recommended guidelines and position statements on palliative sedation as well as data on its provision. Keywords included palliative sedation, terminal sedation, guidelines, United States, and end of life. Inclusion criteria were palliative sedation policies, frameworks, guidelines, or discussion of its practice, general or oncology patient population, performance of the intervention in an inpatient unit, for humans, and in English. Exclusion criteria were palliative sedation in children, acute illness, procedural, or burns, and predominantly ethical discussions. Guidelines were published by American College of Physicians-American Society of Internal Medicine (2000), Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association (2003), American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine (2006), American Medical Association (2008), Royal Dutch Medical Association (2009), European Association for Palliative Care (2009), National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (2010), and National Comprehensive Cancer Network (2012). Variances throughout guidelines include definitions of the practice, indications for its use, continuation of life-prolonging therapies, medications used, and timing/prognosis. The development and implementation of institutional-based guidelines with clear stance on the discussed variances is necessary for consistency in practice. Data on provision of palliative sedation after implementation of guidelines needs to be collected and disseminated for a better understanding of the current practice in the United States. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Palliative sedation: reliability and validity of sedation scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arevalo, Jimmy J; Brinkkemper, Tijn; van der Heide, Agnes; Rietjens, Judith A; Ribbe, Miel; Deliens, Luc; Loer, Stephan A; Zuurmond, Wouter W A; Perez, Roberto S G M

    2012-11-01

    Observer-based sedation scales have been used to provide a measurable estimate of the comfort of nonalert patients in palliative sedation. However, their usefulness and appropriateness in this setting has not been demonstrated. To study the reliability and validity of observer-based sedation scales in palliative sedation. A prospective evaluation of 54 patients under intermittent or continuous sedation with four sedation scales was performed by 52 nurses. Included scales were the Minnesota Sedation Assessment Tool (MSAT), Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale (RASS), Vancouver Interaction and Calmness Scale (VICS), and a sedation score proposed in the Guideline for Palliative Sedation of the Royal Dutch Medical Association (KNMG). Inter-rater reliability was tested with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Cohen's kappa coefficient. Correlations between the scales using Spearman's rho tested concurrent validity. We also examined construct, discriminative, and evaluative validity. In addition, nurses completed a user-friendliness survey. Overall moderate to high inter-rater reliability was found for the VICS interaction subscale (ICC = 0.85), RASS (ICC = 0.73), and KNMG (ICC = 0.71). The largest correlation between scales was found for the RASS and KNMG (rho = 0.836). All scales showed discriminative and evaluative validity, except for the MSAT motor subscale and VICS calmness subscale. Finally, the RASS was less time consuming, clearer, and easier to use than the MSAT and VICS. The RASS and KNMG scales stand as the most reliable and valid among the evaluated scales. In addition, the RASS was less time consuming, clearer, and easier to use than the MSAT and VICS. Further research is needed to evaluate the impact of the scales on better symptom control and patient comfort. Copyright © 2012 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of dexmedetomidine and propofol for conscious sedation in awake craniotomy: a prospective, double-blind, randomized, and controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, She-liang; Zheng, Jia-yin; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Wen-yuan; Jin, Tao; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Qi

    2013-11-01

    It has been reported that dexmedetomidine (DEX) can be used for conscious sedation in awake craniotomy, but few data exist to compare DEX versus propofol (PRO). To compare the efficacy and safety of DEX versus PRO for conscious sedation in awake craniotomy. Thirty patients of American Society of Anesthesiologists grade I-II scheduled for awake craniotomy, were randomized into 2 groups each containing 15 subjects. Group D received DEX and group P received PRO. Two minutes after tracheal intubation (T1), PRO (target plasma concentration) was titrated down to 1 to 4 µg/mL in group P. In group D, PRO was discontinued and DEX was administered 1.0 µg/kg followed by a maintenance dose of 0.2 to 0.7 µg/kg/h. The surgeon preset the anticipated awake point-in-time (T0) preoperatively. Ten minutes before T0 (T3), DEX was titrated down to 0.2 µg/kg/h in group D, PRO was discontinued and normal saline (placebo) 5 mL/h was infused in group P. Arousal time, quality of revival and adverse events during the awake period, degree of satisfaction from surgeons and patients were recorded. Arousal time was significantly shorter in group D than in group P (P awake period in group D was similar to that of group P (P = .68). The degree of satisfaction of surgeons was significantly higher in group D than in group P (P awake period (P > .05). Either DEX or PRO can be effectively and safely used for conscious sedation in awake craniotomy. Comparing the two, DEX produced a shorter arousal time and a higher degree of surgeon satisfaction.

  4. Safe sedation in general practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    anxiolysis, amnesia, sedation or pain control? ∙ What will the effect of the drugs be on the airway, spontaneous breathing and cardiovascular system? The patient. As more procedures are performed OOR, the operator has retained the opportunity to evaluate patients pre-operatively. However, the sedation provider usually ...

  5. Pediatric procedural sedation and analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith James

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA is an evolving field in pediatric emergency medicine. As new drugs breach the boundaries of anesthesia in the Pediatric Emergency Department, parents, patients, and physicians are finding new and more satisfactory methods of sedation. Short acting, rapid onset agents with little or no lingering effects and improved safety profiles are replacing archaic regimens. This article discusses the warning signs and areas of a patient′s medical history that are particularly pertinent to procedural sedation and the drugs used. The necessary equipment is detailed to provide the groundwork for implementing safe sedation in children. It is important for practitioners to familiarize themselves with a select few of the PSA drugs, rather than the entire list of sedatives. Those agents most relevant to PSA in the pediatric emergency department are presented.

  6. Staging in bipolar disorder: from theoretical framework to clinical utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Michael; Post, Robert; Ratheesh, Aswin; Gliddon, Emma; Singh, Ajeet; Vieta, Eduard; Carvalho, Andre F; Ashton, Melanie M; Berk, Lesley; Cotton, Susan M; McGorry, Patrick D; Fernandes, Brisa S; Yatham, Lakshmi N; Dodd, Seetal

    2017-10-01

    Illness staging is widely utilized in several medical disciplines to help predict course or prognosis, and optimize treatment. Staging models in psychiatry in general, and bipolar disorder in particular, depend on the premise that psychopathology moves along a predictable path: an at-risk or latency stage, a prodrome progressing to a first clinical threshold episode, and one or more recurrences with the potential to revert or progress to late or end-stage manifestations. The utility and validity of a staging model for bipolar disorder depend on its linking to clinical outcome, treatment response and neurobiological measures. These include progressive biochemical, neuroimaging and cognitive changes, and potentially stage-specific differences in response to pharmacological and psychosocial treatments. Mechanistically, staging models imply the presence of an active disease process that, if not remediated, can lead to neuroprogression, a more malignant disease course and functional deterioration. Biological elements thought to be operative in bipolar disorder include a genetic diathesis, physical and psychic trauma, epigenetic changes, altered neurogenesis and apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammation, and oxidative stress. Many available agents, such as lithium, have effects on these targets. Staging models also suggest the utility of stage-specific treatment approaches that may not only target symptom reduction, but also impede illness neuroprogression. These treatment approaches range from prevention for at-risk individuals, to early intervention strategies for prodromal and newly diagnosed individuals, complex combination therapy for rapidly recurrent illness, and palliative-type approaches for those at chronic, late stages of illness. There is hope that prompt initiation of potentially disease modifying therapies may preclude or attenuate the cognitive and structural changes seen in the later stages of bipolar disorder. The aims of this paper are to: a

  7. Experiences of Family Members of Dying Patients Receiving Palliative Sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tursunov, Olga; Cherny, Nathan I; Ganz, Freda DeKeyser

    2016-11-01

    part of the core nursing curriculum. Nursing administrators in areas that use palliative sedation should enforce good nursing clinical practice as recommended by international practice guidelines, such as those of the European Association for Palliative Care.

  8. Clinical utility of the Taylor spatial frame for limb deformities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshet D

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Doron Keshet, Mark Eidelman Pediatric Orthopedics Unit, Rambam Health Care Center, Haifa, Israel Abstract: The Taylor spatial frame (TSF is a hexapod external fixator that can correct six-axis deformities. The mathematical base of all hexapod systems is projective geometry, which describes complex repositioning of an object in space. The Taylor brothers developed one of the first six-axis correction systems, which is known today as TSF. Over the years, this system has become the most used six-axis deformity correction device. In this review, we describe the history behind TSF development, and describe the principles and clinical utility for application of the TSF in different settings, such as acute trauma, malunions, and various deformities of the lower and upper limb. Keywords: external fixator, deformity correction, hexapod

  9. Analyzing Clinical Presentation, Service Utilization, and Clinical Outcome of Female Sexual Minority College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Heather C.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers examining clinically-relevant trends for sexual minority women have found evidence of psychological distress and greater utilization of mental health services compared to heterosexually-identified women. However, the results of many research studies with this population have methodological limitations surrounding recruitment of…

  10. Electroencephalography signatures of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: clinical utility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba G

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Guzmán Alba,1 Ernesto Pereda,2 Soledad Mañas,3 Leopoldo D Méndez,3 Almudena González,1 Julián J González1 1Physiology Unit, Health Sciences Faculty (S Medicine, 2Department of Industrial Engineering, School of Engineering and Technology, University of La Laguna, 3Clinical Neurophysiology Unit, University Hospital La Candelaria, Tenerife, Spain Abstract: The techniques and the most important results on the use of electroencephalography (EEG to extract different measures are reviewed in this work, which can be clinically useful to study subjects with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. First, we discuss briefly and in simple terms the EEG analysis and processing techniques most used in the context of ADHD. We review techniques that both analyze individual EEG channels (univariate measures and study the statistical interdependence between different EEG channels (multivariate measures, the so-called functional brain connectivity. Among the former ones, we review the classical indices of absolute and relative spectral power and estimations of the complexity of the channels, such as the approximate entropy and the Lempel-Ziv complexity. Among the latter ones, we focus on the magnitude square coherence and on different measures based on the concept of generalized synchronization and its estimation in the state space. Second, from a historical point of view, we present the most important results achieved with these techniques and their clinical utility (sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy to diagnose ADHD. Finally, we propose future research lines based on these results. Keywords: EEG, ADHD, power spectrum, functional connectivity, clinical assessment

  11. Clinical utility of the X-chromosome array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarate, Yuri A; Dwivedi, Alka; Bartel, Frank O; Bellomo, M Allison; Cathey, Sara S; Champaigne, Neena L; Clarkson, L Kate; Dupont, Barbara R; Everman, David B; Geer, Joseph S; Gordon, Barbara C; Lichty, Angie W; Lyons, Michael J; Rogers, R Curtis; Saul, Robert A; Schroer, Richard J; Skinner, Steven A; Stevenson, Roger E

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have limited the use of specific X-chromosome array designed platforms to the evaluation of patients with intellectual disability. In this retrospective analysis, we reviewed the clinical utility of an X-chromosome array in a variety of scenarios. We divided patients according to the indication for the test into four defined categories: (1) autism spectrum disorders and/or developmental delay and/or intellectual disability (ASDs/DD/ID) with known family history of neurocognitive disorders; (2) ASDs/DD/ID without known family history of neurocognitive disorders; (3) breakpoint definition of an abnormality detected by a different cytogenetic test; and (4) evaluation of suspected or known X-linked conditions. A total of 59 studies were ordered with 27 copy number variants detected in 25 patients (25/59 = 42%). The findings were deemed pathogenic/likely pathogenic (16/59 = 27%), benign (4/59 = 7%) or uncertain (7/59 = 12%). We place particular emphasis on the utility of this test for the diagnostic evaluation of families affected with X-linked conditions and how it compares to whole genome arrays in this setting. In conclusion, the X-chromosome array frequently detects genomic alterations of the X chromosome and it has advantages when evaluating some specific X-linked conditions. However, careful interpretation and correlation with clinical findings is needed to determine the significance of such changes. When the X-chromosome array was used to confirm a suspected X-linked condition, it had a yield of 63% (12/19) and was useful in the evaluation and risk assessment of patients and families. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Clinical utility of ramucirumab in advanced gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan MMK

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Matthew MK Chan,1,2 Katrin M Sjoquist,1,3 John R Zalcberg4 1NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2Department of Medical Oncology, Central Coast Cancer Centre, Gosford Hospital, Gosford, NSW, Australia; 3Cancer Care Centre, St George Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 4School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: Gastric cancer is currently the third most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Prognosis remains poor with most patients presenting with advanced or metastatic disease. A better understanding of angiogenesis has led to the investigation of drugs that inhibit the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF pathway including anti-VEGF antibody therapy (eg, bevacizumab, inhibitors of angiogenic receptor tyrosine kinases (eg, sunitinib, sorafenib, apatinib, regorafenib, and inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFRs (eg, ramucirumab. Ramucirumab, a VEGFR-2 inhibitor, is the first anti-angiogenic agent approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in the treatment of advanced gastric cancers. This review will focus on the clinical utility and potential use of ramucirumab in advanced gastric cancer. Keywords: ramucirumab, IMC-1121B, gastric cancer, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, angiogenesis, targeted therapy

  13. Electroencephalography signatures of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: clinical utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, Guzmán; Pereda, Ernesto; Mañas, Soledad; Méndez, Leopoldo D; González, Almudena; González, Julián J

    2015-01-01

    The techniques and the most important results on the use of electroencephalography (EEG) to extract different measures are reviewed in this work, which can be clinically useful to study subjects with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). First, we discuss briefly and in simple terms the EEG analysis and processing techniques most used in the context of ADHD. We review techniques that both analyze individual EEG channels (univariate measures) and study the statistical interdependence between different EEG channels (multivariate measures), the so-called functional brain connectivity. Among the former ones, we review the classical indices of absolute and relative spectral power and estimations of the complexity of the channels, such as the approximate entropy and the Lempel-Ziv complexity. Among the latter ones, we focus on the magnitude square coherence and on different measures based on the concept of generalized synchronization and its estimation in the state space. Second, from a historical point of view, we present the most important results achieved with these techniques and their clinical utility (sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy) to diagnose ADHD. Finally, we propose future research lines based on these results.

  14. Utilization of lean management principles in the ambulatory clinic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Jessica T; Brinton, Thomas S; Gonzalez, Chris M

    2009-03-01

    The principles of 'lean management' have permeated many sectors of today's business world, secondary to the success of the Toyota Production System. This management method enables workers to eliminate mistakes, reduce delays, lower costs, and improve the overall quality of the product or service they deliver. These lean management principles can be applied to health care. Their implementation within the ambulatory care setting is predicated on the continuous identification and elimination of waste within the process. The key concepts of flow time, inventory and throughput are utilized to improve the flow of patients through the clinic, and to identify points that slow this process -- so-called bottlenecks. Nonessential activities are shifted away from bottlenecks (i.e. the physician), and extra work capacity is generated from existing resources, rather than being added. The additional work capacity facilitates a more efficient response to variability, which in turn results in cost savings, more time for the physician to interact with patients, and faster completion of patient visits. Finally, application of the lean management principle of 'just-in-time' management can eliminate excess clinic inventory, better synchronize office supply with patient demand, and reduce costs.

  15. Assessment of patients' awareness and factors influencing patients' demands for sedation in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Yoo Kyeom; Montagnese, Thomas A; Harding, Jarrod; Aminoshariae, Anita; Mickel, Andre

    2015-02-01

    Endodontic therapy is perceived by many as a procedure to be feared. Many studies have reported that fear and anxiety are major deterrents to seeking dental care in general, but only a few deal with the use of sedation in endodontic therapies. The purpose of this study was to assess patients' awareness of and factors influencing the potential demand for sedation in endodontics. We hypothesized that there is an association between demographic factors and the demand for sedation in endodontics. A survey consisting of 24 questions was given to patients 18 years and older who presented to the graduate endodontic clinic. Results were collected and statistically analyzed. Thirty-six percent of patients reported that their perception of sedation was being put to sleep, and 27% perceived it as related to or reducing pain. Concerns associated with endodontic therapy were the fear of pain (35%), fear of needles (16%), difficulty getting numb (10%), and anxiety (7%). The 2 major demographic factors that influenced the demand for sedation were cost and the level of anxiety (P endodontic therapy if the option of sedation was available. The demand for sedation in endodontics is high. Patients' understanding of sedation varies. More patients would consider having endodontic procedures if sedation was available. The provision of sedation by endodontists could result in more patients accepting endodontic therapies. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical utility of dabigatran in United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehab, Abdulla; Elnour, Asim A.; Sadik, Adel; Mandil, Mahmoud Abu; AlShamsi, Ali; Suwaidi, Aesha Al; Bhagavathula, AkshayaSrikanth; Erkekoglu, Pinar; Hamad, Farah; Nuaimi, Saif K. Al

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To provide early data regarding clinical utility of dabigatran in Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates (UAE). Methods: This was an ethics approved retrospective cross sectional study. We retrieved a total of 76 patients who were using dabigatran from September to December 2014 in the Cardiology Clinic at Al-Ain Hospital, Al-Ain, UAE. The primary analysis was designed to test the frequency of bleeding events (rate) with dabigatran 75, 110, and 150 mg. Results: The mean age ± standard deviation of cohort was 67.9 ± 1.5 years (range; 29-98 years), composed of males (52.6%) with mean age of 66.3 ± 1.7 years, and females (47.4%) with mean age of 69.6 ± 1.1 years. The highest age group was those between 61-80 years (60.5%). Most comprised the age strata of ≤75 years (73.7%). The main indication for dabigatran use was atrial fibrillation. The rate of bleeding with dabigatran was 18/76 (23.7%), and melena was the leading cause of bleeding 8/76 (10.7%). The hospitalization rate was 67.1%, dabigatran withdrawal rate was 0.01%, and mortality rate was 6.5%. The cohort had exhibited incidences of minor bleeding with one fatal major bleeding, high co-morbidities, admission, and readmission, which was not directly linked to dabigatran. We did not identify any relation of death due to dabigatran. Conclusion: Dabigatran is a suitable alternative to warfarin obviating the need for repetitive international normalized ratio monitoring, however, it may need plasma drug monitoring. PMID:26593161

  17. Translation, reliability, and clinical utility of the Melbourne Assessment 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Corinna N; Plebani, Anael; Labruyère, Rob

    2017-10-12

    The aims were to (i) provide a German translation of the Melbourne Assessment 2 (MA2), a quantitative test to measure unilateral upper limb function in children with neurological disabilities and (ii) to evaluate its reliability and aspects of clinical utility. After its translation into German and approval of the back translation by the original authors, the MA2 was performed and videotaped twice with 30 children with neuromotor disorders. For each participant, two raters scored the video of the first test for inter-rater reliability. To determine test-retest reliability, one rater additionally scored the video of the second test while the other rater repeated the scoring of the first video to evaluate intra-rater reliability. Time needed for rater training, test administration, and scoring was recorded. The four subscale scores showed excellent intra-, inter-rater, and test-retest reliability with intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.90-1.00 (95%-confidence intervals 0.78-1.00). Score items revealed substantial to almost perfect intra-rater reliability (weighted kappa k w  = 0.66-1.00) for the more affected side. Score item inter-rater and test-retest reliability of the same extremity were, with one exception, moderate to almost perfect (k w  = 0.42-0.97; k w  = 0.40-0.89). Furthermore, the MA2 was feasible and acceptable for patients and clinicians. The MA2 showed excellent subscale and moderate to almost perfect score item reliability. Implications for Rehabilitation There is a lack of high-quality studies about psychometric properties of upper limb measurement tools in the neuropediatric population. The Melbourne Assessment 2 is a promising tool for reliable measurement of unilateral upper limb movement quality in the neuropediatric population. The Melbourne Assessment 2 is acceptable and practicable to therapists and patients for routine use in clinical care.

  18. Palliative sedation in end-of-life care and survival: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltoni, Marco; Scarpi, Emanuela; Rosati, Marta; Derni, Stefania; Fabbri, Laura; Martini, Francesca; Amadori, Dino; Nanni, Oriana

    2012-04-20

    Palliative sedation is a clinical procedure aimed at relieving refractory symptoms in patients with advanced cancer. It has been suggested that sedative drugs may shorten life, but few studies exist comparing the survival of sedated and nonsedated patients. We present a systematic review of literature on the clinical practice of palliative sedation to assess the effect, if any, on survival. A systematic review of literature published between January 1980 and December 2010 was performed using MEDLINE and EMBASE databases. Search terms included palliative sedation, terminal sedation, refractory symptoms, cancer, neoplasm, palliative care, terminally ill, end-of-life care, and survival. A manual search of the bibliographies of electronically identified articles was also performed. Eleven published articles were identified describing 1,807 consecutive patients in 10 retrospective or prospective nonrandomized studies, 621 (34.4%) of whom were sedated. One case-control study was excluded from prevalence analysis. The most frequent reason for sedation was delirium in the terminal stages of illness (median, 57.1%; range, 13.8% to 91.3%). Benzodiazepines were the most common drug category prescribed. Comparing survival of sedated and nonsedated patients, the sedation approach was not shown to be associated with worse survival. Even if there is no direct evidence from randomized clinical trials, palliative sedation, when appropriately indicated and correctly used to relieve unbearable suffering, does not seem to have any detrimental effect on survival of patients with terminal cancer. In this setting, palliative sedation is a medical intervention that must be considered as part of a continuum of palliative care.

  19. Intranasal sedatives in pediatric dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSarheed, Maha A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To identify the intranasal (IN) sedatives used to achieve conscious sedation during dental procedures amongst children. Methods: A literature review was conducted by identifying relevant studies through searches on Medline. Search included IN of midazolam, ketamine, sufentanil, dexmedetomidine, clonidine, haloperidol and loranzepam. Studies included were conducted amongst individuals below 18 years, published in English, and were not restricted by year. Exclusion criteria were articles that did not focus on pediatric dentistry. Results: Twenty studies were included. The most commonly used sedatives were midazolam, followed by ketamine and sufentanil. Onset of action for IN midazolam was 5-15 minutes (min), however, IN ketamine was faster (mean 5.74 min), while both IN sufentanil (mean 20 min) and IN dexmedetomidine (mean 25 min) were slow in comparison. Midazolam was effective for modifying behavior in mild to moderately anxious children, however, for more invasive or prolonged procedures, stronger sedatives, such as IN ketamine, IN sufentanil were recommended. In addition, ketamine fared better in overall success rate (89%) when compared with IN midazolam (69%). Intranasal dexmedetomidine was only used as pre-medication amongst children. While its’ onset of action is longer when compared with IN midazolam, it produced deeper sedation at the time of separation from the parent and at the time of anesthesia induction. Conclusion: Intranasal midazolam, ketamine and sufentanil are effective and safe for conscious sedation, while intranasal midazolam, dexmedetomidine and sufentanil have proven to be effective premedications. PMID:27570849

  20. Idioms of distress among trauma survivors: subtypes and clinical utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Devon E; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto

    2010-06-01

    In this introduction to the Special Issue on Trauma and Idioms of Distress, we provide an overview of the concept and typology of "idioms of distress," focusing particularly on their clinical utility. This includes the role of idioms as indicators of trauma exposure, of various types of psychopathology and of levels of distress, risk and functioning. It likewise includes the fact that idioms of distress may profoundly influence the personal meaning of having a trauma-related disorder, may shape the interpersonal course of the disorder and may pattern help-seeking and self-treatment. Finally, it illustrates the fact that idioms may also help clinicians understand sufferers' views of the causes of their distress, constitute key therapeutic targets and help increase therapeutic empathy and treatment adherence. This special issue focuses on the role played by idioms of distress in the local trauma ontology, the associations between the idioms and psychiatric disorders occurring in the context of trauma and the mechanisms by which the idioms profoundly influence the personal and interpersonal course of trauma-related disorders.

  1. Platelet Function Tests: Preanalytical Variables, Clinical Utility, Advantages, and Disadvantages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvas, Anne-Mette; Grove, Erik Lerkevang

    2017-01-01

    Platelet function tests are mainly used in the diagnostic work-up of platelet disorders. During the last decade, the additional use of platelet function tests to evaluate the effect of antiplatelet therapy has also emerged in an attempt to identify patients with an increased risk of arterial thrombosis. Furthermore, platelet function tests are increasingly used to measure residual effect of antiplatelet therapy prior to surgery with the aim of reducing the risk of bleeding. To a limited extend, platelet function tests are also used to evaluate hyperaggregability as a potential marker of a prothrombotic state outside the setting of antiplatelet therapy. This multifaceted use of platelet function tests and the development of simpler point-of-care tests with narrower application have increased the use of platelet function testing and also facilitated the use of platelet function tests outside the highly specialized laboratories. The present chapter describes the preanalytical variables, which should be taken into account when planning platelet function testing. Also, the most widely used platelet function tests are introduced, and their clinical utility and their relative advantages and disadvantages are discussed.

  2. Clinical utility of imaging for evaluation of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murakami T

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Takamichi Murakami,1 Masakatsu Tsurusaki,1 Tomoko Hyodo,1 Yasuharu Imai2 1Department of Radiology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 2Department of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Ikeda Municipal Hospital, Osaka, Japan Abstract: The hemodynamics of a hepatocellular nodule is the most important imaging parameter used to characterize various hepatocellular nodules in liver cirrhosis, because sequential changes occur in the feeding vessels and hemodynamic status during hepatocarcinogenesis. Therefore, the imaging criteria for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC are also usually based on vascular findings, eg, early arterial uptake followed by washout in the portal venous and equilibrium phases. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, dynamic multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT, and dynamic magnetic resonance (MR imaging with gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA are useful for detecting hypervascular HCC on the basis of vascular criteria but are not as useful for hypovascular HCC. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging with gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA, a hepatocyte-specific MR contrast agent, is superior to dynamic MDCT and dynamic MR imaging with Gd-DTPA in detecting both hypervascular and hypovascular HCC. Moreover, Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MR imaging can display each histologically differentiated HCC as hypointense relative to the liver parenchyma. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography imaging might not be suitable for the screening and detection of HCC, given its lower diagnostic performance. However, this technique plays an important role in determining whether HCC has spread beyond the liver. Keywords: hepatocellular carcinoma, evaluation, imaging, clinical utility

  3. Efficacy of Ketamine in Pediatric Sedation Dentistry: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Samuel; Kingsley, Karl

    2018-05-01

    Ketamine has been used as a safe and effective sedative to treat adults and children exhibiting high levels of anxiety or fear during dental treatment. Pediatric dentistry often involves patients with high levels of anxiety and fear and possibly few positive dental experiences. Patient management can involve behavioral approaches, as well as the use of sedation or general anesthesia with a variety of agents, including midazolam, diazepam, hydroxyzine, meperidine, and ketamine. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical efficacy of ketamine use in pediatric sedation dentistry through systematic review and analysis. A systematic review of publications between 1990 and 2015 was conducted using PubMed and MEDLINE databases maintained by the US National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health. The keywords used were (ketamine) AND (dental OR dentistry) AND (sedation). The abstract and title of all potential publications were then screened for clinical trials and to remove non-English articles, non-human or animal trials, and other non-dental or non-relevant studies. A total of 1,657 citations were initially identified, reviewed, and screened, eventually resulting in inclusion of 25 clinical trials in this systematic review. Nineteen studies evaluated ketamine effects in pediatric dental sedation using oral (non-invasive) administration, three involved subcutaneous or intramuscular injection, and three were completed intravenously. Evidence analysis of these trials revealed the majority (n = 22/25) provided strong, positive evidence for the use of ketamine (alone or in combination) to reduce dental anxiety and behavioral non-compliance with the remainder suggesting equivocal results. Additional endpoints evaluated in some studies involved dosage, as well as time to achieve sedation effect. The use of ketamine (alone or in combination) can provide safe, effective, and timely sedation in pediatric patients regardless of the route of

  4. Clinical utility of carotid duplex ultrasound prior to cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Judith C; Kabbani, Loay S; Peterson, Edward L; Masabni, Khalil; Morgan, Jeffrey A; Brooks, Sara; Wertella, Kathleen P; Paone, Gaetano

    2016-03-01

    Clinical utility and cost-effectiveness of carotid duplex examination prior to cardiac surgery have been questioned by the multidisciplinary committee creating the 2012 Appropriate Use Criteria for Peripheral Vascular Laboratory Testing. We report the clinical outcomes and postoperative neurologic symptoms in patients who underwent carotid duplex ultrasound prior to open heart surgery at a tertiary institution. Using the combined databases from our clinical vascular laboratory and the Society of Thoracic Surgery, a retrospective analysis of all patients who underwent carotid duplex ultrasound within 13 months prior to open heart surgery from March 2005 to March 2013 was performed. The outcomes between those who underwent carotid duplex scanning (group A) and those who did not (group B) were compared. Among 3233 patients in the cohort who underwent cardiac surgery, 515 (15.9%) patients underwent a carotid duplex ultrasound preoperatively, and 2718 patients did not (84.1%). Among the patients who underwent carotid screening vs no screening, there was no statistically significant difference in the risk factors of cerebrovascular disease (10.9% vs 12.7%; P = .26), prior stroke (8.2% vs 7.2%; P = .41), and prior transient ischemic attack (2.9% vs 3.3%; P = .24). For those undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), 306 (17.8%) of 1723 patients underwent preoperative carotid duplex ultrasound. Among patients who had carotid screening prior to CABG, the incidence of carotid disease was low: 249 (81.4%) had minimal or mild stenosis (duplex scanning and those who did not. Primary outcomes of patients who underwent open heart surgery also showed no difference in the perioperative mortality (5.1% vs 6.9%; P = .14) and stroke (2.6% vs 2.4%; P = .85) between patients undergoing preoperative duplex scanning and those who did not. Operative intervention of severe carotid stenosis prior to isolated CABG occurred in 2 of the 17 patients (11.8%) identified who

  5. Clinical utility of FDG-PET for the clinical diagnosis in MCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbizu, Javier; Festari, Cristina; Altomare, Daniele; Walker, Zuzana; Bouwman, Femke; Rivolta, Jasmine; Orini, Stefania; Barthel, Henryk; Agosta, Federica; Drzezga, Alexander; Nestor, Peter; Boccardi, Marina; Frisoni, Giovanni Battista; Nobili, Flavio

    2018-04-27

    We aim to report the quality of accuracy studies investigating the utility of [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET in supporting the diagnosis of prodromal Alzheimer's Disease (AD), frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and prodromal dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects, and the corresponding recommendations made by a panel of experts. Seven panellist, four from the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, and three from the European Academy of Neurology, produced recommendations taking into consideration the incremental value of FDG-PET, as added on clinical-neuropsychological examination, to ascertain the aetiology of MCI (AD, FTLD or DLB). A literature search using harmonized population, intervention, comparison, and outcome (PICO) strings was performed, and an evidence assessment consistent with the European Federation of Neurological Societies guidance was provided. The consensual recommendation was achieved based on Delphi rounds. Fifty-four papers reported the comparison of interest. The selected papers allowed the identification of FDG patterns that characterized MCI due to AD, FTLD and DLB. While clinical outcome studies supporting the diagnosis of MCI due to AD showed varying accuracies (ranging from 58 to 100%) and varying areas under the receiver-operator characteristic curves (0.66 to 0.97), no respective data were identified for MCI due to FTLD or for MCI due to DLB. However, the high negative predictive value of FDG-PET and the existence of different disease-specific patterns of hypometabolism support the consensus recommendations for the clinical use of this imaging technique in MCI subjects. FDG-PET has clinical utility on a fair level of evidence in detecting MCI due to AD. Although promising also in detecting MCI due to FTLD and MCI due to DLB, more research is needed to ultimately judge the clinical utility of FDG-PET in these entities.

  6. Evaluating the MEDLINE Core Clinical Journals filter: data-driven evidence assessing clinical utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Fedyshin, Michele; Ketchum, Andrea M; Arnold, Robert M; Fedyshin, Peter J

    2014-12-01

    MEDLINE offers the Core Clinical Journals filter to limit to clinically useful journals. To determine its effectiveness for searching and patient-centric decision making, this study compared literature used for Morning Report in Internal Medicine with journals in the filter. An EndNote library with references answering 327 patient-related questions during Morning Report from 2007 to 2012 was exported to a file listing variables including designated Core Clinical Journal, Impact Factor, date used and medical subject. Bradford's law of scattering was applied ranking the journals and reflecting their clinical utility. Recall (sensitivity) and precision of the Core Morning Report journals and non-Core set was calculated. This study applied bibliometrics to compare the 628 articles used against these criteria to determine journals impacting decision making. Analysis shows 30% of clinically used articles are from the Core Clinical Journals filter and 16% of the journals represented are Core titles. When Bradford-ranked, 55% of the top 20 journals are Core. Articles sources used. Among the 63 Morning Report subjects, 55 have <50% precision and 41 have <50% recall including 37 subjects with 0% precision and 0% recall. Low usage of publications within the Core Clinical Journals filter indicates less relevance for hospital-based care. The divergence from high-impact medicine titles suggests clinically valuable journals differ from academically important titles. With few subjects demonstrating high recall or precision, the MEDLINE Core Clinical Journals filter may require a review and update to better align with current clinical needs. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Anxiety in Children Undergoing VCUG: Sedation or No Sedation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Herd

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Voiding cystourethrograms are distressing for children and parents. Nonpharmacological methods reduce distress. Pharmacological interventions for VCUG focus on sedation as well as analgesia, anxiolysis, and amnesia. Sedation has cost, time, and safety issues. Which agents and route should we use? Are we sure that sedation does not influence the ability to diagnose vesicoureteric reflux? Methods. Literature search of Medline, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Database. Review of comparative studies found. Results. Seven comparative studies including two randomised controlled trials were reviewed. Midazolam given orally (0.5-0.6 mg/kg or intranasally (0.2 mg/kg is effective with no apparent effect on voiding dynamics. Insufficient evidence to recommend other sedating agents was found. Deeper sedating agents may interfere with voiding dynamics. Conclusion. Midazolam reduces the VCUG distress, causes amnesia, and does not appear to interfere with voiding dynamics. Midazolam combined with simple analgesia is an effective method to reduce distress to children undergoing VCUG.

  8. Nebivolol: impact on cardiac and endothelial function and clinical utility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toblli JE

    2012-03-01

    heart failure compared with standard care. Thus, nebivolol is an effective and well tolerated agent with benefits above those of traditional β-blockers due to its influence on nitric oxide release, which give it singular hemodynamic effects, cardioprotective activity, and a good tolerability profile. This paper reviews the pharmacology structure and properties of nebivolol, focusing on endothelial dysfunction, clinical utility, comparative efficacy, side effects, and quality of life in general with respect to the other antihypertensive agents.Keywords: beta-blockers, nebivolol, oxidative stress, endothelial function, cardiovascular protection, nitric oxide

  9. Clinical utility and development of biomarkers in invasive aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Thomas F

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis remains very difficult, and there are limited treatment options for the disease. Pre-clinical models have been used to evaluate the diagnosis and treatment of Aspergillus infection and to assess the pathogenicity and virulence of the organism. Extensive efforts in Aspergillus research have significantly expanded the genomic information about this microorganism. The standardization of animal models of invasive aspergillosis can be used to enhance the evaluation of genomic information about the organism to improve the diagnosis and treatment of invasive aspergillosis. One approach to this process has been the award of a contract by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health to establish and standardize animal models of invasive aspergillosis for the development of new diagnostic technologies for both pulmonary and disseminated Aspergillus infection. This work utilizes molecular approaches for the genetic manipulation of Aspergillus strains that can be tested in animal-model systems to establish new diagnostic targets and tools. Studies have evaluated the performance characteristics of assays for cell-wall antigens of Aspergillus including galactomannan and beta-D-glucan, as well as for DNA targets in the organism, through PCR. New targets, such as proteomic and genomic approaches, and novel detection methods, such as point-of-care lateral-flow devices, have also been evaluated. The goal of this paper is to provide a framework for evaluating genomic targets in animal models to improve the diagnosis and treatment of invasive aspergillosis toward ultimately improving the outcomes for patients with this frequently fatal infection.

  10. Clinical utility of carotid and transcranial ultrasound in cerebrovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figueiredo L

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Lívia Figueiredo, Viviane F Zétola, Marcos C Lange Neurology Division, Hospital de Clínicas, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil Abstract: Carotid and transcranial (CTU ultrasound is a useful tool in a number of clinical settings, particularly in cerebrovascular diseases. CTU is the only method that provides real-time determination of velocity and the spectral waveform of blood flow in the extracranial and basal intracranial arteries, and is effective in the detection of stenosis and occlusion. When transcranial ultrasound is considered, CTU is the only method that allows visualization of microembolic signals in the intracranial arteries. CTU makes a rapid differential diagnosis possible, improving therapeutic decision-making in acute stroke and determining the risk of recurrence and prognosis based on its findings. It is also the standard of care in children with sickle cell disease, when selecting patients for chronic blood transfusion, and for reducing the risk of ischemic stroke in these patients. CTU has some advantages, ie, relative simplicity in terms of interpretation and performance, and affordability, noninvasiveness, and portability. The main concern with ultrasound is that it is an operator-dependent tool and requires a high level of expertise and knowledge of three-dimensional cerebrovascular anatomy for correct interpretation of sonograms. The most significant limitation of intracranial evaluation by transcranial ultrasound is the absence of a suitable bone window in approximately 10% of patients. This paper gives an overview of the current utility and importance of CTU in the prevention and evaluation of ischemic cerebrovascular disease. Keywords: transcranial Doppler ultrasonography, Doppler ultrasonography duplex, cerebrovascular disorders, stroke

  11. The effect of acupressure at spleen 6 acupuncture point on the anxiety level and sedative and analgesics consumption of women during labor: A randomized, single-blind clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Samadi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Labor pain is the most severe pain women would experience, which could lead to loss of emotional control that plays a key role in creating a traumatic delivery experience and psychological disorders. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of acupressure on anxiety level and sedative and analgesics consumption in women during labor. Materials and Methods: This study was a randomized, single-blind clinical trial performed at Maryam Hospital in Tehran, Iran. One hundred and thirty-one pregnant women in Labor Ward were selected by convenience sampling. Subjects were randomly allocated to three groups, namely experimental group (pressure group, control group 1(touh group and, control group 2 (routine care group. The study data were gathered using demographic information form, and assessed with Faces Anxiety Scale (FAS. For participants belonging to the experimental group, pressure was applied to the Spleen 6 acupoint for 30 min, and for those with only light touch was applied to the Spleen 6 acupoint for 30 min. The collected data were analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences 16 and descriptive statistics. Results: There was a significant difference between the three groups in terms of the mean of anxiety after 30 min of starting the intervention and 30 min after termination of the intervention; the anxiety of the experimental group was significantly decreased (p = 0.03. Sedative and analgesics consumption was significantly lower in the experimental group compared to the other groups (p = 0.006. Conclusions: This study showed that compression of the Spleen 6 acupoint was an effective complementary method to decrease maternal anxiety and analgesic consumption, especially pethidine.

  12. Cognitive Effects and Sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhingra, Lara; Ahmed, Ebtesam; Shin, Jae; Scharaga, Elyssa; Magun, Maximilian

    2015-10-01

    Cognitive effects and sedation (CES) are prevalent in chronic nonmalignant pain populations receiving long-term opioid therapy and are among the most common reasons patients discontinue opioid use. In this narrative review, we describe the phenomenology, epidemiology, mechanisms, assessment, and management of opioid-related CES. We reviewed the empirical and theoretical literature on CES in opioid-treated populations with chronic pain. Data on long-term opioid therapy (≥ 3 months in duration) in chronic nonmalignant pain patients were sought. The phenomenology of CES includes: inattention, concentration difficulties, memory deficits, psychomotor dysfunction, perceptual distortions, and executive dysfunction and somnolence, sleep disorders, and lethargy. Deficits may be caused by unrelieved pain or opioid therapy alone, or from a combination of these and other factors. Mechanisms include central nervous system effects, for example, direct toxic effects on neurons resulting in decreased consciousness; direct effects on processing and reaction resulting in cognitive or psychomotor impairment, and inhibitory effects on cholinergic activity. Pharmacological management approaches may include opioid dose reduction and rotation or psychostimulant use. Nonpharmacological approaches may include cognitive-behavioral therapy, mindfulness-based stress reduction, acupuncture, exercise, and yoga. The most prevalent CES include: memory deficits (73-81%), sleep disturbance (35-57%), and fatigue (10%). At its most severe, extreme cognitive dysfunction can result in frank delirium and decreased alertness can result in coma. Emotional distress, sleep disorders, and other comorbidities and treatments can worsen CES, particularly among the elderly. Conclusions about the neuropsychological domains affected by opioids are limited due to the heterogeneity of studies and methodological issues. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. No-sedation during mechanical ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laerkner, Eva; Stroem, Thomas; Toft, Palle

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence is growing that less or no-sedation is possible and beneficial for patients during mechanical ventilation. AIM: To investigate if there was a difference in patient consciousness and nursing workload comparing a group of patients receiving no-sedation with a group of sedated...... patients with daily wake up, and also to estimate economic consequences of a no-sedation strategy. DESIGN AND METHODS: Data were collected during a prospective trial of 140 mechanically ventilated patients randomized to either no-sedation or to sedation with daily wake up. From day 1 to 7 in the intensive...

  14. [Clinical study of the influence of daily sedation interruption on fluctuation of blood glucose level and mortality of critical patients with multiple trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Jin, Zhaochen; Cai, Yan; Ji, Musen; Kong, Xianru; Liu, Jing; Yang, Hongfeng; Wang, Chenglong

    2014-04-01

    To assess the influence of a protocol of routine daily interruption of sedation on fluctuation of blood glucose level and mortality of critical patients with multiple trauma. A prospective study involving 68 critical patients with multiple trauma admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) was performed. Finger blood glucose level was measured after the implementation of daily interruption of sedation, and the results were recorded every 2 hours during the first 24 hours. Mean (MEAN), standard deviation (SD) and coefficient of variability (CV) of blood glucose level, glycemic liability index (GLI), mean amplitude of glycemic excursion (MAGE) and largest amplitude of glycemic excursions (LAGE) were calculated respectively, and 30-day mortality was recorded. The patients under study were divided into four groups according to the median values of MEAN and GLI, group A with patients of low MEAN+low GLI (n=34), group B with patients of low MEAN+high GLI (n=14), group C with patients of high MEAN+low GLI (n=12), and group D with patients of high MEAN+high GLI (n=8). Glucose levels, their range of fluctuation, and the prognosis were compared among groups. Five of the 68 patients died, with a gross mortality rate of 7.4%. Group analysis demonstrated that the patients in group A had the best prognosis with the 30-day mortality rate of 0 (0/34), while that of the group D was worst with the 30-day mortality rate of 37.5% (3/8). The MEAN levels of glucose were relatively lower in groups A and B (6.7±1.3 mmol/L, 7.6±0.8 mmol/L) and higher in groups C and D (9.3±1.4 mmol/L, 10.7±1.3 mmol/L). Indicators of glucose level fluctuation, including SD, CV, GLI, LAGE, and MAGE, were lower in groups A and C (SD: 1.6±0.4 mmol/L, 1.7±0.6 mmol/L; CV: 0.2±0.1, 0.2±0.1; GLI: 26.5±19.5, 40.1±17.6; LAGE: 4.6±2.3 mmol/L, 6.5±1.9 mmol/L; MAGE: 2.7±0.8 mmol/L, 3.1±0.80 mmol/L), and higher in groups B and D (SD: 2.9±0.7 mmol/L, 3.9±0.8 mmol/L; CV: 0.4±0.1, 0.4±0.1; GLI: 120.5±33.2, 184

  15. Sedative-hypnotic drug use among community-dwelling elderly in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Han-Yun; Yu, Shu-Han; Lee, Chun-Yi; Huang, Wen-Hao; Huang, Seng-Loong; Wu, Chi-Shin; Chiu, Yen-Feng; Hsiung, Chao A

    2018-03-21

    Sedative-hypnotic medication use has been related to severe adverse events and risks. This study investigated the prevalence of and characteristics associated with the use of sedatives and hypnotics among community-dwelling elderly persons aged 65 years and over in Taiwan. A representative sample of community-dwelling adults was recruited. Clinical and sociodemographic data were collected for assessing physical, mental, and cognitive functioning and disorders. Sedatives and hypnotics use was determined via both self-reporting and prescription records. Logistic regression modeling was used to evaluate associations between sedative-hypnotic use and demographic and health status. Among the 3,978 participants aged 65 years and over, the rate of sedative-hypnotic use was 19.7% (n = 785). 4.5% (n = 35) of users reported sedative-hypnotic use without a doctor's prescription. Several sociodemographic characteristics were positively associated with sedative and hypnotic use, including older age, female gender, higher education level, married status, unemployment, and current alcohol consumption. Comorbid chronic and cardiovascular diseases, mental illness, depression, pain, and sleep problems also increased the likelihood of sedative-hypnotic use. This study is one of the largest pioneer studies to date to survey sedatives-hypnotics use among community-dwelling elderly. One in five community-dwelling older adults reported sedative-hypnotic drugs use in Taiwan, and about 5% of sedative and/or hypnotics usage was without a doctor's prescription. Findings could be helpful for drug-use safety interventions to identify target geriatric patients who are in general at higher risk of downstream harm associated with sedative-hypnotic use in geriatric patients.

  16. Relieving existential suffering through palliative sedation: discussion of an uneasy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Anne; Boston, Patricia

    2011-12-01

    This article presents a discussion of the use of palliative sedation in response to intractable (not responsive to treatment) existential suffering. Patients suffering from a terminal illness are often faced with severe symptoms at the end of life. Although palliative sedation is sometimes used when no other options are effective in relieving unbearable pain or suffering, its use in response to intractable existential suffering in terminal illness remains controversial. A literature search was conducted for published articles addressing the use of palliative sedation between 1996 and 2009 using established databases. Palliative sedation remains an uneasy practice. The debates have centred on ethical issues surrounding decisions to use sedation and on separating the intent of palliative sedation (relief of intolerable symptoms) from the intent of euthanasia (hastening death). There is lack of consensus in defining existential suffering. Consequently, there is limited understanding of how decisions are being made when using palliative sedation to treat intractable existential suffering. Given the confusion and uncertainty about ethical and clinical justifications for palliative sedation in treating existential suffering, we argue that a better understanding of the controversies and decision-making process is needed. Greater understanding is required to prevent palliative sedation from becoming a substitute for intensive treatment of this kind of suffering. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Sedative load and salivary secretion and xerostomia in community-dwelling older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiisanoja, Antti; Syrjälä, Anna-Maija; Komulainen, Kaija; Hartikainen, Sirpa; Taipale, Heidi; Knuuttila, Matti; Ylöstalo, Pekka

    2016-06-01

    The aim was to investigate how sedative load and the total number of drugs used are related to hyposalivation and xerostomia among 75-year-old or older dentate, non-smoking, community-dwelling people. The study population consisted of 152 older people from the Oral Health GeMS study. The data were collected by interviews and clinical examinations during 2004-2005. Sedative load, which measures the cumulative effect of taking multiple drugs with sedative properties, was calculated using the Sedative Load Model. The results showed that participants with a sedative load of either 1-2 or ≥3 had an increased likelihood of having low stimulated salivary flow (xerostomia (OR: 2.5, CI: 0.5-12) compared with participants without a sedative load. The results showed that the association between the total number of drugs and hyposalivation was weaker than the association between sedative load and hyposalivation. Sedative load is strongly related to hyposalivation and to a lesser extent with xerostomia. The adverse effects of drugs on saliva secretion are specifically related to drugs with sedative properties. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Palliative sedation and moral distress: A qualitative study of nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokker, M E; Swart, S J; Rietjens, J A C; van Zuylen, L; Perez, R S G M; van der Heide, A

    2018-04-01

    Clinical nursing practice may involve moral distress, which has been reported to occur frequently when nurses care for dying patients. Palliative sedation is a practice that is used to alleviate unbearable and refractory suffering in the last phase of life and has been linked to distress in nurses. The aim of this study was to explore nurses' reports on the practice of palliative sedation focusing on their experiences with pressure, dilemmas and morally distressing situations. In-depth interviews with 36 nurses working in hospital, nursing home or primary care. Several nurses described situations in which they felt that administration of palliative sedation was in the patient's best interest, but where they were constrained from taking action. Nurses also reported on situations where they experienced pressure to be actively involved in the provision of palliative sedation, while they felt this was not in the patient's best interest. The latter situation related to (1) starting palliative sedation when the nurse felt not all options to relieve suffering had been explored yet; (2) family requesting an increase of the sedation level where the nurse felt that this may involve unjustified hastening of death; (3) a decision by the physician to start palliative sedation where the patient had previously expressed an explicit wish for euthanasia. Nurses experienced moral distress in situations where they were not able to act in what they believed is the patient's best interest. Situations involving moral distress require nurses to be well informed and able to adequately communicate with suffering patients, distressed family and physicians. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Clinical Telemedicine Utilization in Ontario over the Ontario Telemedicine Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, Laurel D; Hogenbirk, John C; Warry, Wayne

    2016-06-01

    Northern Ontario is a region in Canada with approximately 775,000 people in communities scattered across 803,000 km(2). The Ontario Telemedicine Network (OTN) facilitates access to medical care in areas that are often underserved. We assessed how OTN utilization differed throughout the province. We used OTN medical service utilization data collected through the Ontario Health Insurance Plan and provided by the Ministry of Health and Long Term Care. Using census subdivisions grouped by Northern and Southern Ontario as well as urban and rural areas, we calculated utilization rates per fiscal year and total from 2008/2009 to 2013/2014. We also used billing codes to calculate utilization by therapeutic area of care. There were 652,337 OTN patient visits in Ontario from 2008/2009 to 2013/2014. Median annual utilization rates per 1,000 people were higher in northern areas (rural, 52.0; urban, 32.1) than in southern areas (rural, 6.1; urban, 3.1). The majority of usage in Ontario was in mental health and addictions (61.8%). Utilization in other areas of care such as surgery, oncology, and internal medicine was highest in the rural north, whereas primary care use was highest in the urban south. Utilization was higher and therapeutic areas of care were more diverse in rural Northern Ontario than in other parts of the province. Utilization was also higher in urban Northern Ontario than in Southern Ontario. This suggests that telemedicine is being used to improve access to medical care services, especially in sparsely populated regions of the province.

  20. A Survey of Hospice and Palliative Care Clinicians' Experiences and Attitudes Regarding the Use of Palliative Sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiser, Samuel; Estrada-Stephen, Karen; Sahr, Natasha; Gully, Jonathan; Marks, Sean

    2017-09-01

    A variety of terms and attitudes surround palliative sedation (PS) with little research devoted to hospice and palliative care (HPC) clinicians' perceptions and experiences with PS. These factors may contribute to the wide variability in the reported prevalence of PS. This study was designed to better identify hospice and palliative care (HPC) clinician attitudes toward, and clinical experiences with palliative sedation (PS). A 32-question survey was distributed to members of the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine (n = 4678). The questions explored the language clinicians use for PS, and their experiences with PS. Nine hundred thirty-six (20% response rate) responded to the survey. About 83.21% preferred the terminology of PS compared with other terms. A majority felt that PS is a bioethically appropriate treatment for refractory physical and nonphysical symptoms in dying patients. Most felt PS was not an appropriate term in clinical scenarios when sedation occurred as an unintended side effect from standard treatments. Hospice clinicians use PS more consistently and with less distress than nonhospice clinician respondents. Benzodiazepines (63.1%) and barbiturates (18.9%) are most commonly prescribed for PS. PS is the preferred term among HPC clinicians for the proportionate use of pharmacotherapies to intentionally lower awareness for refractory symptoms in dying patients. PS is a bioethically appropriate treatment for refractory symptoms in dying patients. However, there is a lack of clear agreement about what is included in PS and how the practice of PS should be best delivered in different clinical scenarios. Future efforts to investigate PS should focus on describing the clinical scenarios in which PS is utilized and on the level of intended sedation necessary, in an effort to better unify the practice of PS.

  1. Sedation with alfentanil and propofol for rhizotomies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    M Jansen van Rensburg

    Deep sedation can be avoided by maximising analgesia, and keeping patients ..... sedation and memory effects of propofol, midazolam, isoflurane, and alfentanil in healthy ... electroencephalogram predicts conscious processing of information.

  2. Pressure ulcers in critically ill patients - Preventable by non-sedation? A substudy of the NONSEDA-trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedergaard, Helene K; Haberlandt, Trine; Toft, Palle; Jensen, Hanne Irene

    2018-02-01

    Pressure ulcers still pose a significant clinical challenge to critically ill patients. This study is a substudy of the multicenter NONSEDA-trial, where critically ill patients were randomised to sedation or non-sedation during mechanical ventilation. The objective of this substudy was to assess if non-sedation affected the occurrence of pressure ulcers. Retrospective assessment of data from a single NONSEDA-trial site. Mixed intensive care unit. The occurrence of pressure ulcers, described by grade and location. 205 patients were included. Patients with pressure ulcers in the two groups were comparable with regards to baseline data. There were 44 ulcers in 32 patients in the sedated group and 31 ulcers in 25 patients in the non-sedated group (p=0.08). 64% of the ulcers in sedated patients were located on sacrum and heels, whereas 68% of the ulcers in non-sedated patients were related to equipment (p=0.03). Non-sedation did not significantly reduce the number of pressure ulcers. Non-sedation significantly affected the location of ulcers: non-sedated patients mainly had ulcers related to equipment, whereas sedated patients mainly had ulcers on the sacrum and heels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. When there are no good choices: illuminating the borderland between proportionate palliative sedation and palliative sedation to unconsciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Thomas T; Demme, Richard A; Quill, Timothy E

    2011-01-01

    Despite state-of-the-art palliative care, some patients will require proportionate palliative sedation as a last-resort option to relieve intolerable suffering at the end of life. In this practice, progressively increasing amounts of sedation are provided until the target suffering is sufficiently relieved. Uncertainty and debate arise when this practice approaches palliative sedation to unconsciousness (PSU), especially when unconsciousness is specifically intended or when the target symptoms are more existential than physical. We constructed a case series designed to highlight some of the common approaches and challenges associated with PSU and the more aggressive end of the spectrum of proportionate palliative sedation as retrospectively identified by palliative care consultants over the past 5 years from a busy inpatient palliative care service at a tertiary medical center in Rochester (NY, USA). Ten cases were identified as challenging by the palliative care attendings, of which four were selected for presentation for illustrative purposes because they touched on central issues including loss of capacity, the role of existential suffering, the complexity of clinical intention, the role of an institutional policy and use of anesthetics as sedative agents. Two other cases were selected focusing on responses to two special situations: a request for PSU that was rejected; and anticipatory planning for total sedation in the future. Although relatively rare, PSU and more aggressive end-of-the-spectrum proportionate palliative sedation represent responses to some of the most challenging cases faced by palliative care clinicians. These complex cases clearly require open communication and collaboration among caregivers, patients and family. Knowing how to identify these circumstances, and how to approach these interventions of last resort are critical skills for practitioners who take care of patients at the end of life.

  4. The use of dexmedetomidine in intensive care sedation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Antonelli

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The goals and recommendations for ICU (Intensive Care Unit patients’ sedation and analgesia should be to have adequately sedated patients who are calm and arousal, so that they can guarantee a proper evaluation and an adequate control of pain. This way, it is also possible to perform their neurological evaluation, preserving intellectual faculties and helping them in actively participating to their care. Dexmedetomidine is a selective alpha-2 receptor agonist, member of theraputical cathegory: “other hypnotics and sedatives” (ATC: N05CM18. Dexmedetomidine is recommended for the sedation of adult ICU patients who need a sedation level not deeper than arousal in response to verbal stimulation (corresponding to Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale 0 to -3. After the EMA approval, some European government authorities have elaborated HTA on dexmedetomidine, based on clinical evidence derived from Prodex and Midex trials. Dexmedetomidine resulted to be as effective as propofol and midazolam in maintaining the target depth of sedation in ICU patients. The mean duration of mechanical ventilation with dexmedetomidine was numerically shorter than with propofol and significantly shorter than with midazolam. The resulting favourable economic profile of dexmedetomidine supported the clinical use in ICU. Dexmedetomidine seems to provide clinical benefits due to the reduction of mechanical ventilation and ventilator weaning duration. Within the present review, an economic analysis of costs associated to the use of dexmedetomidine was therefore performed also in the Italian care setting. Thus, four different analyses were carried out based on the quantification of the total number of days in ICU, the time spent on mechanical ventilation, the weighted average number of days with mechanical ventilation or not and TISS points (Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System. Despite the incremental cost for drug therapy associated with dexmedetomidine, a reduction of

  5. Palliative sedation: the position statement of the Italian National Committee for Bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsi, Luciano; Gristina, Giuseppe R

    2017-05-01

    In January 2016 the Italian National Bioethics Committee (NBC) published a position statement entitled Deep and continuous palliative sedation in the imminence of death, related to the use of sedation and analgesia for relief from pain and psychological distress in dying patients. In this statement the Committee points out the clinical and ethical appropriateness of palliative sedation as a therapeutic procedure. As a result, today palliative sedation has to be considered useful, scientifically safe and reliable, and acknowledged as an integral part of good clinical practice. At the same time, the position statement, once and for all, makes clear that palliative sedation cannot and must not be equated with the practice of euthanasia. Thus, this document should be known by health professionals caring for dying patients not only in palliative as well as in intensive care settings, but it should be also considered as a milestone aimed to encourage and ease a widespread implementation of this procedure in all health care settings.

  6. Clinical utility of a 377 gene custom next-generation sequencing ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    JEN BEVILACQUA

    2017-07-26

    Jul 26, 2017 ... Clinical utility of a 377 gene custom next-generation sequencing epilepsy panel ... number of genes, making it a very attractive option for a condition as .... clinical value of various test offerings to guide decision making.

  7. A Conscious Sedation Protocol for Videolaryngostroboscopy in Pediatric Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Anne

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine best sedation protocol for videolaryngostroboscopy in children unable to tolerate non-sedated evaluation. Materials and Methods. Consecutive case series of 10 children with voice disturbances, unable to tolerate nonsedated videolaryngostroboscopy at an academic tertiary care children’s hospital. Flexible fiberoptic videolaryngostroboscopy was performed and interpreted by pediatric otolaryngologist and speech and language pathologist. Sedation was administered with newly described protocol that allowed functional portion of evaluation. Main Outcome Measures: ability to follow commands and tolerate flexible fiberoptic videolaryngostroboscopy. Secondary Outcome Measures: total phonation time, complications, need for subsequent videolaryngostroboscopic attempts, clinical outcomes, and follow-up. Results. 10 children underwent procedure under conscious sedation. 9/10 children were able to perform simple tasks and maintain adequate phonation time to complete stroboscopic exam. 1/10 patients failed to complete exam because of crying during entire exam. Mean exam time was 2 minutes 52 seconds (SD 86 seconds, phonation time is 1 minute 44 seconds (SD 60 seconds, and number of tasks completed was 10.5 (SD 8.6. Conclusions. Conscious sedation for videolaryngostroboscopy can be safely and effectively performed in children unable to comply with nonsedated examination. Such studies provide valuable diagnostic information to make a diagnosis and to devise a treatment plan.

  8. Intentions of Registered Antenatal Clinic Patients About Utilizing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nigeria bears a sizeable proportion of the global HIV burden; mother to child transmission as a major contributor and prevention of mother to child transmission the hope for a HIV-free generation. Objective: To find evaluate how booked antenatal attendees intend to utilize the labour and delivery services of the ...

  9. Sedating children in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bRed Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa. cSedation and Pain ... As the authors indicate, there is increasing pressure from practitioners, funders and patients or parents for procedures to take place outside the ...

  10. The Utility of the Frailty Index in Clinical Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatry, K; Peel, N M; Gray, L C; Hubbard, R E

    2018-01-01

    Using clinical vignettes, this study aimed to determine if a measure of patient frailty would impact management decisions made by geriatricians regarding commonly encountered clinical situations. Electronic surveys consisting of three vignettes derived from cases commonly seen in an acute inpatient ward were distributed to geriatricians. Vignettes included patients being considered for intensive care treatment, rehabilitation, or coronary artery bypass surgery. A frailty index was generated through Comprehensive electronic Geriatric Assessment. For each vignette, respondents were asked to make a recommendation for management, based on either a brief or detailed amount of clinical information and to reconsider their decision after the addition of the frailty index. The study suggests that quantification of frailty might aid the clinical judgment now employed daily to proceed with usual care, or to modify it based on the vulnerability of the person to whom it is aimed.

  11. Utility of an Equine Clinical Skills Course: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Bruce W; Danielson, Jared A

    Recent publications have revealed inadequacies in the veterinary training of future equine practitioners. To help address this problem, a 2-week Equine Clinical Skills course was designed and implemented to provide fourth-year veterinary students with opportunities to have hands-on experience with common equine clinical skills using live animals and cadavers. Alumni and employers of alumni were surveyed to determine whether or not students participating in the course were more competent performing clinical skills during their first year post-graduation than those who had not participated in the course. Students who participated in the course were also surveyed before and after completing the course to determine whether or not their self-assessed skills improved during the course. Alumni who had taken the course rated their ability to perform the clinical skills more highly than alumni who had not taken the course. Similarly, students participating in the course indicated that they were significantly more able to perform the clinical skills after the course than when it began. Employers did not indicate a difference between the clinical skills of those who had taken the course and those who had not. Because this study involved a limited number of respondents from one institution, further studies should be conducted to replicate these findings and determine their generalizability.

  12. Clinical outcomes, not clinical utility, should be the major consideration for saxagliptin with or without metformin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doggrell SA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sheila A DoggrellDepartment of Pharmacology, School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, AustraliaA recent review by Panagoulias and Doupis, published in Patient Preference and Adherence, concerned the saxagliptin/metformin fixed combination (SAXA/MET FDC, and was titled "Clinical utility in the treatment of type 2 diabetes with the saxagliptin/metformin fixed combination."1 This review concluded that "The SAXA/MET FDC is a patient-friendly, dosage-flexible, and hypoglycemia-safe regimen with very few adverse events and a neutral or even favorable effect on body weight. It achieves significant glycosylated hemoglobin A1c reduction helping the patient to achieve his/her individual glycemic goals."1View original paper by Panagoulias and Doupis.

  13. Update on dexmedetomidine: use in nonintubated patients requiring sedation for surgical procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohanad Shukry

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Mohanad Shukry, Jeffrey A MillerUniversity of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Department of Anesthesiology, Children’s Hospital of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, OK, USAAbstract: Dexmedetomidine was introduced two decades ago as a sedative and supplement to sedation in the intensive care unit for patients whose trachea was intubated. However, since that time dexmedetomidine has been commonly used as a sedative and hypnotic for patients undergoing procedures without the need for tracheal intubation. This review focuses on the application of dexmedetomidine as a sedative and/or total anesthetic in patients undergoing procedures without the need for tracheal intubation. Dexmedetomidine was used for sedation in monitored anesthesia care (MAC, airway procedures including fiberoptic bronchoscopy, dental procedures, ophthalmological procedures, head and neck procedures, neurosurgery, and vascular surgery. Additionally, dexmedetomidine was used for the sedation of pediatric patients undergoing different type of procedures such as cardiac catheterization and magnetic resonance imaging. Dexmedetomidine loading dose ranged from 0.5 to 5 μg kg-1, and infusion dose ranged from 0.2 to 10 μg kg-1 h-1. Dexmedetomidine was administered in conjunction with local anesthesia and/or other sedatives. Ketamine was administered with dexmedetomidine and opposed its bradycardiac effects. Dexmedetomidine may by useful in patients needing sedation without tracheal intubation. The literature suggests potential use of dexmedetomidine solely or as an adjunctive agent to other sedation agents. Dexmedetomidine was especially useful when spontaneous breathing was essential such as in procedures on the airway, or when sudden awakening from sedation was required such as for cooperative clinical examination during craniotomies.Keywords: dexmedetomidine, sedation, nonintubated patients

  14. Pharmacological therapy for analgesia and sedation in the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, K J S; Hall, R W

    2006-11-01

    Rapid advances have been made in the use of pharmacological analgesia and sedation for newborns requiring neonatal intensive care. Practical considerations for the use of systemic analgesics (opioids, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, other drugs), local and topical anaesthetics, and sedative or anaesthetic agents (benzodiazepines, barbiturates, other drugs) are summarised using an evidence-based medicine approach, while avoiding mention of the underlying basic physiology or pharmacology. These developments have inspired more humane approaches to neonatal intensive care. Despite these advances, little is known about the clinical effectiveness, immediate toxicity, effects on special patient populations, or long-term effects after neonatal exposure to analgesics or sedatives. The desired or adverse effects of drug combinations, interactions with non-pharmacological interventions or use for specific conditions also remain unknown. Despite the huge gaps in our knowledge, preliminary evidence for the use of neonatal analgesia and sedation is available, but must be combined with a clear definition of clinical goals, continuous physiological monitoring, evaluation of side effects or tolerance, and consideration of long-term clinical outcomes.

  15. Clinical utility of asthma biomarkers: from bench to bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijverberg SJH

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Susanne JH Vijverberg,1,2,* Bart Hilvering,2,* Jan AM Raaijmakers,1 Jan-Willem J Lammers,2 Anke-Hilse Maitland-van der Zee,1,* Leo Koenderman2,* 1Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Clinical Pharmacology, Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Science, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands; 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Asthma is a chronic disease characterized by airway inflammation, bronchial hyperresponsiveness, and recurrent episodes of reversible airway obstruction. The disease is very heterogeneous in onset, course, and response to treatment, and seems to encompass a broad collection of heterogeneous disease subtypes with different underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. There is a strong need for easily interpreted clinical biomarkers to assess the nature and severity of the disease. Currently available biomarkers for clinical practice – for example markers in bronchial lavage, bronchial biopsies, sputum, or fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO – are limited due to invasiveness or lack of specificity. The assessment of markers in peripheral blood might be a good alternative to study airway inflammation more specifically, compared to FeNO, and in a less invasive manner, compared to bronchoalveolar lavage, biopsies, or sputum induction. In addition, promising novel biomarkers are discovered in the field of breath metabolomics (eg, volatile organic compounds and (pharmacogenomics. Biomarker research in asthma is increasingly shifting from the assessment of the value of single biomarkers to multidimensional approaches in which the clinical value of a combination of various markers is studied. This could eventually lead to the development of a clinically applicable algorithm composed of various markers and clinical features to phenotype asthma and improve diagnosis and asthma management

  16. Ketamine sedation for patients with acute agitation and psychiatric illness requiring aeromedical retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Cong, Minh; Gynther, Bruce; Hunter, Ernest; Schuller, Peter

    2012-04-01

    Aeromedical retrieval services face the difficult problem of appropriate levels of sedation for transport of acutely agitated patients to definitive care. This paper describes a technique using ketamine, which is titratable and avoids problems associated with airway management. A 3-year review of a new technique of ketamine sedation by aeromedical retrieval teams from the Cairns base of the Queensland section of the Royal Flying Doctor Service of Australia. Clinical records were systematically reviewed for ketamine administration and signs of adverse events during transport and in the subsequent 72 h. 18 patients were sedated during retrieval with intravenous ketamine. Effective sedation was achieved in all cases, with no significant adverse events noted during retrieval or 72 h afterwards. Ketamine sedation is effective and safe in agitated patients with a psychiatric illness in the aeromedical setting and does not lead to worsening agitation in the subsequent 72-h period.

  17. Utilizing Motivational Interviewing to Address Resistant Behaviors in Clinical Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahesh, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Motivational interviewing is presented as an approach to address resistant behaviors in clinical supervision. A case example is used to illustrate the process in which the relational and technical elements of motivational interviewing can be applied to supervisee resistance. Implications for supervisors and researchers are discussed.

  18. Clinical utility of RapidArc™ radiotherapy technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infusino, Erminia

    2015-01-01

    RapidArc™ is a radiation technique that delivers highly conformal dose distributions through the complete rotation (360°) and speed variation of the linear accelerator gantry. This technique, called volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), compared with conventional radiotherapy techniques, can achieve high-target volume coverage and sparing damage to normal tissues. RapidArc delivers precise dose distribution and conformity similar to or greater than intensity-modulated radiation therapy in a short time, generally a few minutes, to which image-guided radiation therapy is added. RapidArc has become a currently used technology in many centers, which use RapidArc technology to treat a large number of patients. Large and small hospitals use it to treat the most challenging cases, but more and more frequently for the most common cancers. The clinical use of RapidArc and VMAT technology is constantly growing. At present, a limited number of clinical data are published, mostly concerning planning and feasibility studies. Clinical outcome data are increasing for a few tumor sites, even if only a little. The purpose of this work is to discuss the current status of VMAT techniques in clinical use through a review of the published data of planning systems and clinical outcomes in several tumor sites. The study consisted of a systematic review based on analysis of manuscripts retrieved from the PubMed, BioMed Central, and Scopus databases by searching for the keywords “RapidArc”, “Volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy”, and “Intensity-modulated radiotherapy”

  19. Effects of sedation on echocardiographic variables of left atrial and left ventricular function in healthy cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jessica L; Schober, Karsten E; Fuentes, Virginia Luis; Bonagura, John D

    2012-10-01

    Although sedation is frequently used to facilitate patient compliance in feline echocardiography, the effects of sedative drugs on echocardiographic variables have been poorly documented. This study investigated the effects of two sedation protocols on echocardiographic indices in healthy cats, with special emphasis on the assessment of left atrial size and function, as well as left ventricular diastolic performance. Seven cats underwent echocardiography (transthoracic two-dimensional, spectral Doppler, color flow Doppler and tissue Doppler imaging) before and after sedation with both acepromazine (0.1 mg/kg IM) and butorphanol (0.25 mg/kg IM), or acepromazine (0.1 mg/kg IM), butorphanol (0.25 mg/kg IM) and ketamine (1.5 mg/kg IV). Heart rate increased significantly following acepromazine/butorphanol/ketamine (mean±SD of increase, 40±26 beats/min) and non-invasive systolic blood pressure decreased significantly following acepromazine/butorphanol (mean±SD of decrease, 12±19 mmHg). The majority of echocardiographic variables were not significantly different after sedation compared with baseline values. Both sedation protocols resulted in mildly decreased left ventricular end-diastolic dimension and mildly increased left ventricular end-diastolic wall thickness. This study therefore failed to demonstrate clinically meaningful effects of these sedation protocols on echocardiographic measurements, suggesting that sedation with acepromazine, butorphanol and/or ketamine can be used to facilitate echocardiography in healthy cats.

  20. Clinical utility of the Rorschach with African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presley, G; Smith, C; Hilsenroth, M; Exner, J

    2001-12-01

    In this study we sought to identify Rorschach differences between African Americans and White Americans and to understand these differences within a social and cultural framework. Data from the Exner (1993) Comprehensive System normative sample (N = 700) was used to form a group of 44 African Americans and 44 White Americans matched for age, sex, education, and socioeconomic status. Twenty-three Rorschach variables were chosen a priori and group differences were analyzed. The only clinically significant difference found was that African Americans offered significantly less cooperative movement. This lower frequency of cooperative movement may suggest African Americans do not anticipate cooperative interactions with others as a routine event. This may reflect a shared feeling among African Americans that most members of our society are less likely to be sensitive to or responsive to their needs relative to others. However, the study demonstrates a striking similarity between the groups, supporting the clinical use of the Rorschach with African Americans.

  1. Update on the clinical utility and optimal use of cefditoren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barberán J

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available José Barberán,1 Lorenzo Aguilar,2 María-José Giménez21Infectious Diseases Department, Hospital Central de la Defensa Gomez Ulla, 2Microbiology Department, School of Medicine, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, SpainAbstract: This article reviews and updates published data on cefditoren. The in vitro activity of cefditoren and its potential pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic adequacy to cover emerging resistance phenotypes in the present decade is reviewed. Cefditoren's in vitro activity against most prevalent bacterial respiratory pathogens in the community and its pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile suggests a significant role for cefditoren in the treatment of respiratory tract infections. Clinical trials (in acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, community-acquired pneumonia, pharyngotonsillitis, and sinusitis performed during clinical development outside Japan, mainly in adults, are reviewed, together with new clinical studies in the treatment of pharyngotonsillitis, sinusitis, and otitis media in children, mainly in Japan, for efficacy and safety assessment. The results of these studies support the adequacy of cefditoren for the treatment of community-acquired respiratory tract infections with a safety profile similar to previous oral antibiotics. From the data reviewed, it is concluded that cefditoren is an adequate option for the treatment of mild-to-moderate community-acquired respiratory infections, especially in geographical areas with a reported prevalence of phenotypes exhibiting nonsusceptibility to common oral antibiotics.Keywords: acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, community-acquired pneumonia, pharyngotonsillitis, sinusitis, otitis media

  2. Biomarkers in Scleroderma: Progressing from Association to Clinical Utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligon, Colin; Hummers, Laura K

    2016-03-01

    Scleroderma is a heterogenous disease characterized by autoimmunity, a characteristic vasculopathy, and often widely varying extents of deep organ fibrosis. Recent advances in the understanding of scleroderma's evolution have improved the ability to identify subgroups of patients with similar prognosis in order to improve risk stratification, enrich clinical trials for patients likely to benefit from specific therapies, and identify promising therapeutic targets for intervention. High-throughput technologies have recently identified fibrotic and inflammatory effectors in scleroderma that exhibit strong prognostic ability and may be tied to disease evolution. Increasingly, the use of collections of assayed circulating proteins and patterns of gene expression in tissue has replaced single-marker investigations in understanding the evolution of scleroderma and in objectively characterizing disease extent. Lastly, identification of shared patterns of disease evolution has allowed classification of patients into latent disease subtypes, which may allow rapid clinical prognostication and targeted management in both clinical and research settings. The concept of biomarkers in scleroderma is expanding to include nontraditional measures of aggregate protein signatures and disease evolution. This review examines the recent advances in biomarkers with a focus on those approaches poised to guide prospective management or themselves serve as quantitative surrogate disease outcomes.

  3. Biomarkers in prostate cancer - Current clinical utility and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretschmer, Alexander; Tilki, Derya

    2017-12-01

    Current tendencies in the treatment course of prostate cancer patients increase the need for reliable biomarkers that help in decision-making in a challenging clinical setting. Within the last decade, several novel biomarkers have been introduced. In the following comprehensive review article, we focus on diagnostic (PHI ® , 4K score, SelectMDx ® , ConfirmMDx ® , PCA3, MiPS, ExoDX ® , mpMRI) and prognostic (OncotypeDX GPS ® , Prolaris ® , ProMark ® , DNA-ploidy, Decipher ® ) biomarkers that are in widespread clinical use and are supported by evidence. Hereby, we focus on multiple clinical situations in which innovative biomarkers may guide decision-making in prostate cancer therapy. In addition, we describe novel liquid biopsy approaches (circulating tumor cells, cell-free DNA) that have been described as predictive biomarkers in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and might support an individual patient-centred oncological approach in the nearer future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Nutritive utilization of protein and digestive utilization of fat in two commercial diets designed for clinical enteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alférez, M J; Campos, M S; Barrionuevo, M; López-Aliaga, I

    1990-01-01

    The digestive and metabolic utilization of protein (50% lactoalbumin + 50% casein) and fat (43.0% butter, 29.5% olive oil, 14.7% soy oil, 9.8% MCT and 3.0% lecithin) provided by two commercial diets used in clinical enteral nutrition (normoproteic, 16.1% protein and 20.8% fat, and hyperproteic, 23.1% protein and 14.9% fat), was studied in adult rats (mean body weight 180 g). The diet containing the greater amount of protein improved the digestive utilization of nitrogen, and although nitrogen retention was optimal, it failed to rise further when the dietary protein supply was increased. The digestive utilization of fat in both diets was excellent.

  5. Clinical utility of breath ammonia for evaluation of ammonia physiology in healthy and cirrhotic adults

    OpenAIRE

    Spacek, Lisa A; Mudalel, Matthew; Tittel, Frank; Risby, Terence H; Solga, Steven F

    2015-01-01

    Blood ammonia is routinely used in clinical settings to assess systemic ammonia in hepatic encephalopathy and urea cycle disorders. Despite its drawbacks, blood measurement is often used as a comparator in breath studies because it is a standard clinical test. We sought to evaluate sources of measurement error and potential clinical utility of breath ammonia compared to blood ammonia.

  6. Who is referred for sedation for dentistry and why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, C A; Newton, T; Milgrom, P

    2009-03-28

    To assess referrals to sedation, examining dental anxiety and background of patients, and compare these characteristics to those referred to a restorative dentistry clinic. Descriptive, cross sectional survey. Subjects were 100 consecutive new patients in sedation and special care and 50 new patients in restorative dentistry at Guy's and St Thomas NHS Foundation Trust. A questionnaire included demographics, self-reported oral health and dental attendance, and dental fear. Information from the patients records was taken: ASA classification, previous sedation or general anaesthesia, alcohol and tobacco use, and medications. The best predictors of referral were dental anxiety level and an irregular attendance. The most important fears were seeing, hearing and feeling the vibrations of the dental drill, and the perception of an accelerated heart rate. Other factors such as general, mental and dental health and alcohol use were related to referral but less important. Referral is consistent with the goal of the sedation clinic to see anxious patients. Referring general practitioners are able to identify these patients.

  7. Clinical utility of ustekinumab in Crohn’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotze PG

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Paulo Gustavo Kotze,1,2 Christopher Ma,1 Abdulelah Almutairdi,1,3 Remo Panaccione1 1Inflammatory Bowel Disease Unit, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 2Inflammatory Bowel Disease Outpatient Clinics, Colorectal Surgery Unit, Catholic University of Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil; 3Department of Medicine, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Abstract: The introduction of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF therapy marked an important milestone in the management of moderate-to-severe Crohn’s disease (CD. However, there remains a pressing demand for alternative therapeutic options for patients with primary nonresponse, secondary loss of response, or intolerable side effects to conventional treatment and TNF antagonists. Ustekinumab (UST is a fully human IgG1κ monoclonal antibody that inhibits the p40 subunit shared by the proinflammatory cytokines, the interleukin (IL-12 and -23. This blockade leads to dampening of the inflammatory cascade and differentiation of inflammatory T cells. The clinical development program for UST in CD includes dose finding Phase II (Crohn’s Evaluation of Response to Ustekinumab Anti-Interleukin-12/23 for Induction [CERTIFI] and the pivotal Phase III (UNITI trials that demonstrated both the clinical efficacy and safety in anti-TNF-naive and anti-TNF-exposed patients. Real-world evidence has further defined the role of UST in CD management. In this review, we discuss the mechanism of action of UST, describe the results of the randomized controlled trials with this agent, and review the real-world efficacy and safety data from observational cohorts. Finally, we identify areas of future research in the IL-12/23 inflammatory pathway and discuss the positioning of this novel therapeutic option in CD treatment algorithms. Keywords: ustekinumab, Crohn’s disease, interleukin

  8. Sedation and monitoring for gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amornyotin, Somchai

    2013-02-16

    The safe sedation of patients for diagnostic or therapeutic procedures requires a combination of properly trained physicians and suitable facilities. Additionally, appropriate selection and preparation of patients, suitable sedative technique, application of drugs, adequate monitoring, and proper recovery of patients is essential. The goal of procedural sedation is the safe and effective control of pain and anxiety as well as to provide an appropriate degree of memory loss or decreased awareness. Sedation practices for gastrointestinal endoscopy (GIE) vary widely. The majority of GIE patients are ambulatory cases. Most of this procedure requires a short time. So, short acting, rapid onset drugs with little adverse effects and improved safety profiles are commonly used. The present review focuses on commonly used regimens and monitoring practices in GIE sedation. This article is to discuss the decision making process used to determine appropriate pre-sedation assessment, monitoring, drug selection, dose of sedative agents, sedation endpoint and post-sedation care. It also reviews the current status of sedation and monitoring for GIE procedures in Thailand.

  9. Palliative sedation and ethical dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juri Salamah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Palliative sedation is a unique concern for the patient as well as the family. It is a difficult serious ethical dilemma for the physicians to handle. The conflicting ethical principles of autonomy, beneficence and nonmaleficence in continuing versus discontinuing all supportive devices raise concerns among health professionals whether this is euthanasia (physician-assisted suicide or is just prolonging the patient's unnecessary suffering.

  10. Capnography monitoring during procedural sedation and analgesia: a systematic review protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Conway, Aaron; Douglas, Clint; Sutherland, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Background An important potential clinical benefit of using capnography monitoring during procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA) is that this technology could improve patient safety by reducing serious sedation-related adverse events, such as death or permanent neurological disability, which are caused by inadequate oxygenation. The hypothesis is that earlier identification of respiratory depression using capnography leads to a change in clinical management that prevents hypoxaemia. As inade...

  11. Clinical utility of foam dressings in wound management: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen J

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Jakob Nielsen, Karsten Fogh Department of Dermatology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark Background: The management of chronic wounds is a significant medical burden associated with large health care expenditures. Since the establishment of moist wound healing in the 1960s, several types of wound dressings have been developed. However, the evidence for effectiveness when comparing various types of wound dressings is limited. Objectives: The purpose of this review is 1 to provide a general description of the role of foam in wound therapy and 2 to evaluate the evidence for effectiveness of foam dressings compared to other frequently used products. Summary and conclusion: Foam has a significant role in the clinical management of chronic wounds and in moist wound healing. There are only a few randomized controlled trials, which in general, show no significant difference in the healing effect of different dressing types. The choice of wound dressing should therefore be based on clinical evaluation of the wound and the periwound skin. Keywords: foam dressing, chronic wounds, comparative effectiveness, healing, periwound skin, ulcers 

  12. Clinical utility of MR FLAIR imaging for head injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashikaga, Ryuichiro [Kinki Univ., Osaka-Sayama, Osaka (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-12-01

    To study the utility of fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR images in the evaluation of traumatic head injury, 56 patients with traumatic head injuries were examined with long TR/TE spin-echo (SE) sequences and FLAIR sequences. In 40 of them, long TR/short TE images were added to those sequences. Careful readings of MR images were done by two well-trained neuroradiologists. The chi-square test was used for statistical evaluation of our results. The relative sensitivities of FLAIR images were significantly better than those of long TR/TE, long TR/short TE images for the detection of diffuse axonal injury (p<0.01), cortical contusion (p<0.01), and subdural hematoma (p<0.01 for long TR/TE, p<0.05 for long TR/short TE). The number of cases of epidural hematoma and brainstem injury was too small for statistical significance to be determined. In 9 patients with corpus callosum injuries. FLAIR images demonstrated the lesions as abnormally high signal intensity in the septum pellucidum and fornix. Only sagittal FLAIR images could definitely discriminate the traumatic lesions of the fornix from the surrounding CSF. In addition, FLAIR images could easily discriminate DAI of the corpus callosum from CSF of the cavum velli interpositi. MR FLAIR images were found to be useful for detecting traumatic head injuries. (author)

  13. Clinical Utility of Iopamidol (Pamiray 370) for Cardiac CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mok Hee; Seon, Hyun Ju; Choi, Song; Kim, Yun Hyeon; Kim, Jae Kyu; Park, Jin Gyoon; Kang, Heong Keun

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the utility of iopamidol-based nonionic contrast media (Pamiray 370) for cardiac CT, with assessment of its image quality and safety. The study included 100 patients who underwent cardiac CT with Pamiray 370 (experimental group), and 100 patients who underwent cardiac CT with Ultravist 370 (control group). A comparison of the image qualities and degree of vascular contrast enhancement was made between the two groups and evaluated statistically by an independent t-test. Changes in vital signs and adverse events during cardiac CT were evaluated in the experimental group. There were no statistically significant differences in the image quality (image quality score in experimental group vs. control group: 4.26 ± 0.63 vs. 4.24 ± 0.62), and mean attenuation values at the coronary arteries(p > 0.05) between two groups. For the experimental group, 12% experienced adverse events, including mild and transient reactions such as dizziness (7%), nausea (4%), and fatigue (1%). Further, 94% of patients complained of mild to moderate febrile sense just after contrast agent administration, which spontaneously disappeared within 3 minutes without any specific management. For cardiac CT, Pamiray 370 was comparable to the widely-used contrast agent (Ultravist 370) in terms of image quality and safety without any severe adverse reaction.

  14. Clinical utility and limitation of MRI in neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Shigeki; Machida, Tohru; Shirouzu, Ichirou; Ohkubo, Toshiyuki; Sasaki, Yasushi.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has several advantages over computed tomography in the neuroradiological field: it provids biochemical information, images in any plane without bone artifacts, and superior contrast between gray matter and white matter. It is, however, of limited availability because of longer imaging time, poor spatial resolution, and poor visualization of calcification and the bone. In this review, pathophysiology that shows relatively characteristic signal intensity is described, including hemorrhage, fat, protein-rich cyst, calcification, iron, and posterior pituitary gland. The utility and limitation of MRI are discussed in terms of the following diseases and lesion sites: small tumors in the skull base; demyelination of white matter or degenerative disease; cerebral infarction or cerebral ischemic disease; intramedullary lesion; meningeal lesion; and pediatric diseases such as medullary sheath formation and malformation. Finally, recent advance and future perspectives of MRI are presented, focusing on 3-dimensional imaging, MR angiography, fat-suppression MR imaging, MR spectroscopy, intravoxel incoherent motion imaging, imaging time, and spatial resolution. (N.K.) 82 refs

  15. NICE recommendations for psychotherapy in depression: Of limited clinical utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen, D; Smith, P St John

    2015-01-01

    In 2009/10 NICE partially updated its guidelines on the treatment and management of depression in adults. Due to methodological shortcomings the recommendations for psychotherapy must be treated with caution. Despite recognising the heterogeneous and comorbid nature of depression, and the limitations of depression as a unitary diagnostic category, NICE treats depression as if it were a unitary entity differentiated only by severity. The guidance ignores important aetiological factors such as trauma, loss and maltreatment, personality and interpersonal difficulties. It excludes the largest naturalistic studies on clinical populations treated in the National Health Service on the grounds that they are observational studies conducted in heterogeneous groups with mixed neurotic disorders. It unquestioningly accepts that the "brand" of psychotherapy has construct validity, and ignores psychotherapy process research indicating significant commonalities, and overlap, between treatment modalities and evidence that individual practitioner effects are larger than the differences between treatment modalities. It fails to consider patient differences and preferences, which are known to influence uptake, completion and response. It takes an exclusively short-term perspective on a chronic relapsing disorder. It does not consider the evidence for longer-term treatments. It is of special concern that NICE misrepresents the findings of its own systematic review by implying that CBT and IPT are superior treatments. NICE's systematic review actually found no evidence of superiority between CBT, IPT, psychodynamic psychotherapy, or counselling. Based on the exclusion of much clinically relevant research demonstrating the effectiveness of psychodynamic psychotherapy and counselling many commentators have alleged a bias towards CBT in the guidance. With regard to service delivery NICE proposes the replacement of psychiatric assessment and individualised treatment plans, with an unproven

  16. Clinical applications of a high quantum utilization scanner. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crandall, P.H.; Cassen, B.

    1973-04-01

    The clinical usefulness of a tomographic imaging process employing a fast rectilinear scanner consisted of a spherical-cap nest of seven individual detectors (3'' x 1 / 2 '' activated sodium iodide) collimated to a common focal point at 10 cm. Hydraulic drives permitted a fast rectilinear scan to be made and, when raised or lowered, at different planes. Patients with well-defined brain lesions were studied using /sup 99m/Tc-pertechnetate or 203 Hg-chlormerodrin as tracers by measuring three dimensions of their lesions and anatomical location at the time of operation. Brain maps were used to identify this location at operation and also the location of images traced from film density displays of a conventional radioisotopic scan, the tomographic scan, and cerebral angiograms. (U.S.)

  17. Amniotic membrane allografts: development and clinical utility in ophthalmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizzuti A

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Allison Rizzuti,1,2 Adam Goldenberg,1 Douglas R Lazzaro1,2 1SUNY Downstate Medical Center, 2Kings County Hospital Center, Brooklyn, NY, USA Abstract: Amniotic membrane, the innermost layer of the placenta, is a tissue that promotes epithelialization, while decreasing inflammation, neovascularization, and scarring. It is used in the surgical management of a wide variety of ophthalmic conditions where it functions as a graft or patch in ocular surface reconstruction. The development of new preservation techniques, as well as a sutureless amniotic membrane, has allowed for easier, in-office placement, without the disadvantages of an operating room procedure. The purpose of this review is to describe the historical development of amniotic membrane in ophthalmology and to describe its current clinical applications, particularly focusing on recent advances. Keywords: ocular surface, cornea, stem cells, prokera, allograft, patch, transplantation

  18. Clinical utility of MR imaging in chronic progressive radiation myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melki, P.S.; Halimi, P.; Wibault, P.; Doyon, D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper defines the diagnostic and prognostic value of MR imaging in chronic progressive radiation myelopathy 9CPRM). In this series, MR imaging showed excellent sensitivity (199%) for the demonstration of radiation-induced lesions of the spinal cord. Fifty percent of the cases showed spinal cord hypertrophy (pseudotumoral, 33%; cystic, 17%) occurring within 8 months of the clinical onset of myelopathy. The remaining 50% showed spinal cord atrophy, which occurred more than 8 months following the onset of myelopathy. These medullary lesions were located at least partially in the radiation field but extended beyond its boundaries in 73% of the cases. MR imaging helped to establish disease prognosis: spinal cord hypertrophy was usually associated with neurologic deterioration and fatal outcome within a mean of 11.5 months; in spinal atrophy, neurologic deficit was often static and survival rates were better

  19. Achieving low anastomotic leak rates utilizing clinical perfusion assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kream, Jacob; Ludwig, Kirk A; Ridolfi, Timothy J; Peterson, Carrie Y

    2016-10-01

    Anastomotic leak after colorectal resection increases morbidity, mortality, and in the setting of cancer, increases recurrences rates and reduces survival odds. Recent reports suggest that fluorescence evaluation of perfusion after colorectal anastomosis creation is associated with low anastomotic leak rates (1.4%). The purpose of this work was to evaluate whether a similar low anastomotic leak rate after left-sided colorectal resections could be achieved using standard assessment of blood flow to the bowel ends. We performed a retrospective chart review at an academic tertiary referral center, evaluating 317 consecutive patients who underwent a pelvic anastomosis after sigmoid colectomy, left colectomy, or low anterior resection. All operations were performed by a single surgeon from March 2008 to January 2015 with only standard clinical measures used to assess perfusion to the bowel ends. The primary outcome measure was the anastomotic leak rate as diagnosed by clinical symptoms, exam, or routine imaging. The average patient age was 59.7 years with an average body mass index of 28.8 kg/m(2). Rectal cancer (128, 40.4%) was the most common indication for operation while hypertension (134, 42.3%) was the most common comorbidity. In total, 177 operations were laparoscopic (55.8%), 13 were reoperative resections (4.1%), and 108 were protected with a loop ileostomy (34.1%). Preoperative chemotherapy was administered to 25 patients (7.9%) while preoperative chemo/radiation was administered to 64 patients (20.2%). The anastomotic leak rate was 1.6% (5/317). Our data suggests that standard, careful evaluation of adequate blood flow via inspection and confirmation of pulsatile blood flow to the bowel ends and meticulous construction of the colorectal or coloanal anastomoses can result in very low leak rates, similar to the rate reported when intraoperative imaging is used to assess perfusion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Utilization of the American Telemedicine Association's Clinical Practice Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniotti, Nina; Bernard, Jordana

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: The American Telemedicine Association (ATA) Standards and Guidelines Committee develops practice standards and guidelines. Key to the Committee's mission is dissemination so the standards can be used in the practice of telemedicine. Over a 2-year period, when a standards document was accessed from the ATA Web site, a short survey was completed, but it did not assess how the documents were used once downloaded. A more formal survey was conducted to determine the impact ATA standards and guidelines are having on healthcare delivery via telemedicine. Materials and Methods: A survey was developed and distributed via SurveyMonkey to 13,177 ATA members and nonmembers in November 2011. Results were compiled and analyzed after a 90-day open period for responses to be submitted. Results: The majority of respondents (96%) believe the practice of telemedicine/telehealth should have standards and guidelines and that the ATA and other professional societies/associations should be responsible for developing them. The top uses of guidelines include guidance for clinical practice, training, gaining reimbursement, and research. Respondents indicating a need for standards and guidelines said the ATA (78.7%) and other professional societies/associations (74.5%) should be responsible for development. When asked to list specific practice guidelines or standards they are using for telehealth, the majority (21.5%) are using in-house (e.g., hospital, company)-developed guidelines, followed by those from professional associations/societies (20.4%) and those developed by the ATA (18.2%). Conclusions: Overall, the survey results indicate guidelines documents developed by the ATA and other professional societies and those developed in-house are being regularly accessed and used in both public and private sectors. Practitioners of telemedicine believe that standards and guidelines are needed for guidance for clinical practice, training, gaining reimbursement, and research

  1. Clinical utility of metabolic syndrome severity scores: considerations for practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeBoer MD

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mark D DeBoer,1,2 Matthew J Gurka2 11Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, 2Department of Health Outcomes and Policy, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA Abstract: The metabolic syndrome (MetS is marked by abnormalities in central obesity, high blood pressure, high triglycerides, low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and high fasting glucose and appears to be produced by underlying processes of inflammation, oxidative stress, and adipocyte dysfunction. MetS has traditionally been classified based on dichotomous criteria that deny that MetS-related risk likely exists as a spectrum. Continuous MetS scores provide a way to track MetS-related risk over time. We generated MetS severity scores that are sex- and race/ethnicity-specific, acknowledging that the way MetS is manifested may be different by sex and racial/ethnic subgroup. These scores are correlated with long-term risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Clinical use of scores like these provide a potential opportunity to identify patients at highest risk, motivate patients toward lifestyle change, and follow treatment progress over time. Keywords: metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, risk prediction

  2. Potential and clinical utility of stem cells in cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korff Krause

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Korff Krause, Carsten Schneider, Kai Jaquet, Karl-Heinz KuckHanseatic Heart Center Hamburg, Department of Cardiology, Asklepios Hospital St. Georg, Hamburg, GermanyAbstract: The recent identification of bone marrow-derived adult stem cells and other types of stem cells that could improve heart function after transplantation have raised high expectations. The basic mechanisms have been studied mostly in murine models. However, these experiments revealed controversial results on transdifferentiation vs transfusion of adult stem cells vs paracrine effects of these cells, which is still being debated. Moreover, the reproducibility of these results in precisely translated large animal models is still less well investigated. Despite these weaknesses results of several clinical trials including several hundreds of patients with ischemic heart disease have been published. However, there are no solid data showing that any of these approaches can regenerate human myocardium. Even the effectiveness of cell therapy in these approaches is doubtful. In future we need in this important field of regenerative medicine: i more experimental data in large animals that are closer to the anatomy and physiology of humans, including data on dose effects, comparison of different cell types and different delivery routes; ii a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the fate of transplanted cells; iii more intensive research on genuine regenerative medicine, applying genetic regulation and cell engineering.Keywords: stem cells, cardiovascular disease

  3. Psychometric analysis of subjective sedation scales used for critically ill paediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xiaohua; Zhang, Tingting; Zhou, Lingling

    2018-01-01

    This study evaluated the psychometric properties of subjective sedation scales using one psychometric scoring system to identify the appropriate scale that is most suitable for clinical care practice. A number of published sedation assessment scales for paediatric patients are currently used to attempt to achieve a moderate depth of sedation to avoid the undesirable effects caused by over- or undersedation. However, there has been no systematic review of these scales. We searched the Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, etc., to obtain relevant articles. The quality of the selected studies was evaluated according to the Consensus-based Standards for the Selection of Health Measurement Instruments checklist. Articles that had been published or were in press and discussed the psychometric properties of sedation scales were included. The population comprised critically ill infants and non-verbal children ranging in age from 0 to 18 years who underwent sedation in an intensive care unit. Data were independently extracted by two investigators using a standard data extraction checklist: 43 articles were included in this review, and 13 sedation scales were examined. The quality of the psychometric evidence for the Comfort Scale and Comfort Behaviour Scale was 'very good', with the Comfort Scale having a higher quality (total weighted scores, Comfort Scale = 17·3 and Comfort Behaviour Scale = 15·5). We suggest that the scales be systematically and comprehensively tested in terms of development method, reliability, validation, feasibility and correlation with clinical outcome. The Comfort Scale and Comfort Behaviour Scale are useful tools for measuring sedation in paediatric patients. Nursing staff should choose one subjective sedation scale that is suitable for assessing paediatric patients' depth of sedation. We recommend the Comfort Scale and Comfort Behaviour Scale as optimal choices if the clinical

  4. Sedation-related complications in gastrointestinal endoscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Amornyotin, Somchai

    2013-01-01

    Sedation practices for gastrointestinal endoscopic (GIE) procedures vary widely in different countries depending on health system regulations and local circumstances. The goal of procedural sedation is the safe and effective control of pain and anxiety, as well as to provide an appropriate degree of memory loss or decreased awareness. Sedation-related complications in gastrointestinal endoscopy, once occurred, can lead to significant morbidity and occasional mortality in patients. The risk fa...

  5. Sedation and monitoring for gastrointestinal endoscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Amornyotin, Somchai

    2013-01-01

    The safe sedation of patients for diagnostic or therapeutic procedures requires a combination of properly trained physicians and suitable facilities. Additionally, appropriate selection and preparation of patients, suitable sedative technique, application of drugs, adequate monitoring, and proper recovery of patients is essential. The goal of procedural sedation is the safe and effective control of pain and anxiety as well as to provide an appropriate degree of memory loss or decreased awaren...

  6. Pediatric dental sedation: challenges and opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Travis; Xu,Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Travis M Nelson, Zheng Xu Department of Pediatric Dentistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: High levels of dental caries, challenging child behavior, and parent expectations support a need for sedation in pediatric dentistry. This paper reviews modern developments in pediatric sedation with a focus on implementing techniques to enhance success and patient safety. In recent years, sedation for dental procedures has been implicated in a disproportionate number of cases th...

  7. Pediatric dental sedation: challenges and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson TM

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Travis M Nelson, Zheng Xu Department of Pediatric Dentistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: High levels of dental caries, challenging child behavior, and parent expectations support a need for sedation in pediatric dentistry. This paper reviews modern developments in pediatric sedation with a focus on implementing techniques to enhance success and patient safety. In recent years, sedation for dental procedures has been implicated in a disproportionate number of cases that resulted in death or permanent neurologic damage. The youngest children and those with more complicated medical backgrounds appear to be at greatest risk. To reduce complications, practitioners and regulatory bodies have supported a renewed focus on health care quality and safety. Implementation of high fidelity simulation training and improvements in patient monitoring, including end-tidal carbon dioxide, are becoming recognized as a new standard for sedated patients in dental offices and health care facilities. Safe and appropriate case selection and appropriate dosing for overweight children is also paramount. Oral sedation has been the mainstay of pediatric dental sedation; however, today practitioners are administering modern drugs in new ways with high levels of success. Employing contemporary transmucosal administration devices increases patient acceptance and sedation predictability. While recently there have been many positive developments in sedation technology, it is now thought that medications used in sedation and anesthesia may have adverse effects on the developing brain. The evidence for this is not definitive, but we suggest that practitioners recognize this developing area and counsel patients accordingly. Finally, there is a clear trend of increased use of ambulatory anesthesia services for pediatric dentistry. Today, parents and practitioners have become accustomed to children receiving general anesthesia in the outpatient setting. As a

  8. Photoaging and the clinical utility of fractional laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borges J

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Juliano Borges,1,2 Mônica Manela-Azulay,1,2 Tullia Cuzzi1,2 1Instituto de Dermatologia Professor Rubem David Azulay, Santa Casa de Misericórdia do Rio de Janeiro, 2Serviço de Anatomia Patológica da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Abstract: The description of atomic structure by Niels Bohr set the basis for the emergence of quantum physics. Based on these fundamentals, Einstein published in 1917 a paper on the amplification of energy by Stimulated Emission of Radiation as part of his quantum theories. In 1955, Townes and Gordon turned Einstein's theories into practice, creating a coherent and amplified microwave device using ammonia gas in an optical medium. But it was at the beginning of the 1980s, that Anderson and Parrish published an article about the selective photothermolysis model which revolutionized clinical practice. The use of laser in photoaging began with CO2 (10,600 nm. In 1989, it was first used for resurfacing of a face with prominent photoaging. Ablative lasers have therefore had great popularity in the 1980s and 1990s, but prolonged postoperative time and significant risk of side effects have lowered the acceptance by patients. In 2004, the description of the fractionated radiation for the treatment of photoaging, by Mainstein, represented a great event. The stimulation of collagen occurred through fractional laser beams, which would reach the selected area while saving islands of sound skin. These islands accelerated the process of cicatrization of the treated tissue and shortened the postprocedure time. Furthermore, the fractionated radiation presented a smaller range of side effects, increasing the safety of the procedure. As mentioned earlier, as fractional lasers incise on the skin, they leave islands of healthy skin that accelerate recovery, while generating necrosis columns. Such necrosis columns remove damaged extracellular matrix material, allowing resettlement

  9. Treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism: the clinical utility of etelcalcetide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cozzolino M

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mario Cozzolino,1 Andrea Galassi,1 Ferruccio Conte,1 Michela Mangano,1 Luca Di Lullo,2 Antonio Bellasi1,3 1Department of Health Sciences, Renal Division, University of Milan, ASST Santi Paolo e Carlo, San Paolo Hospital, Milan, 2U.O.C. Nefrologia e Dialisi, Ospedale L. Parodi Delfino, Colleferro, Roma, 3Sant’Anna Hospital, ASST-Lariana, Como, Italy Abstract: Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT, a very frequent, severe, and worsening complication of chronic kidney disease, is characterized by high serum parathyroid hormone (PTH, parathyroid gland hyperplasia, and disturbances in mineral metabolism. Clinically, SHPT shows renal osteodystrophy, vascular calcification, cardiovascular damage, and fatal outcome. Calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR is the main physiological regulator of PTH secretion; its activation by calcium rapidly inhibits PTH. Another important player in regulating mineral metabolism is vitamin D receptor (VDR, which is under the influence of vitamin D and influences the intestinal absorption of calcium and phosphate, PTH gene expression, and bone calcium mobilization. Serum phosphate levels influence fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23 production, a phosphatonin that modulates serum phosphate reabsorption, PTH synthesis, and vitamin D production. Current therapeutic approaches consist of 1 phosphate intake control by diet or phosphate binders, 2 vitamin D by VDR activation, and 3 calcimimetic agents that activate CaSR. Recently, a new long-acting peptide (etelcalcetide belonging to the calcimimetics class was approved for intravenous use in hemodialysis patients with SHPT. Etelcalcetide binds directly to CaSR, by a sulfide bond, inhibiting the production and secretion of PTH by parathyroid glands. After intravenous administration in rats, etelcalcetide is quickly distributed to the tissues and eliminated by kidneys, while in uremic animals the nonrenal excretion is only 1.2%. In hemodialysis patients, the treatment itself is the

  10. Administration order of midazolam/fentanyl for moderate dental sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobb, Douglas; Clarke, Alix; Lai, Hollis

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of administration order when a sedative drug (midazolam) and an opioid analgesic drug (fentanyl) is applied for moderate intravenous (IV) sedation in dentistry. A retrospective chart review was conducted in one dental clinic during its transition from a midazolam-first to a fentanyl-first protocol for dental procedures requiring moderate IV sedation. Physiological parameters, drug administration times, patient recovery times, drug dosages, and patient recall and satisfaction were investigated for differences. A total of 76 charts (40 midazolam-first and 36 fentanyl-first administrations), were used in the analysis. Administering midazolam first resulted in an average 4.38 min (52%) decrease in administration times (P 0.05). Oxygen saturation levels did not drop below 90% for either group; however, 5 cases in the fentanyl-first group fell to between 90% and 92%, compared with 0 cases in the midazolam-first group. The administration order of fentanyl and midazolam may have different effects on patients and the sedation procedure. Findings from this study should be used to facilitate discussion among dental practitioners and to guide additional research investigating this topic.

  11. Sedation-related complications in gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amornyotin, Somchai

    2013-11-16

    Sedation practices for gastrointestinal endoscopic (GIE) procedures vary widely in different countries depending on health system regulations and local circumstances. The goal of procedural sedation is the safe and effective control of pain and anxiety, as well as to provide an appropriate degree of memory loss or decreased awareness. Sedation-related complications in gastrointestinal endoscopy, once occurred, can lead to significant morbidity and occasional mortality in patients. The risk factors of these complications include the type, dose and mode of administration of sedative agents, as well as the patient's age and underlying medical diseases. Complications attributed to moderate and deep sedation levels are more often associated with cardiovascular and respiratory systems. However, sedation-related complications during GIE procedures are commonly transient and of a mild degree. The risk for these complications while providing any level of sedation is greatest when caring for patients already medically compromised. Significant unwanted complications can generally be prevented by careful pre-procedure assessment and preparation, appropriate monitoring and support, as well as post-procedure management. Additionally, physicians must be prepared to manage these complications. This article will review sedation-related complications during moderate and deep sedation for GIE procedures and also address their appropriate management.

  12. Pediatric neuro MRI. Tricks to minimize sedation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkovich, Matthew J.; Desikan, Rahul S. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Xu, Duan; Barkovich, A.J. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); UCSF-Benioff Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Williams, Cassandra [UCSF-Benioff Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2018-01-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the workhorse modality in pediatric neuroimaging because it provides excellent soft-tissue contrast without ionizing radiation. Until recently, studies were uninterpretable without sedation; however, given development of shorter sequences, sequences that correct for motion, and studies showing the potentially deleterious effects of sedation on immature laboratory animals, it is prudent to minimize sedation when possible. This manuscript provides basic guidelines for performing pediatric neuro MRI without sedation by both modifying technical factors to reduce scan time and noise, and using a multi-disciplinary team to coordinate imaging with the patient's biorhythms. (orig.)

  13. Sleep and Sedative States Induced by Targeting the Histamine and Noradrenergic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Yu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sedatives target just a handful of receptors and ion channels. But we have no satisfying explanation for how activating these receptors produces sedation. In particular, do sedatives act at restricted brain locations and circuitries or more widely? Two prominent sedative drugs in clinical use are zolpidem, a GABAA receptor positive allosteric modulator, and dexmedetomidine (DEX, a selective α2 adrenergic receptor agonist. By targeting hypothalamic neuromodulatory systems both drugs induce a sleep-like state, but in different ways: zolpidem primarily reduces the latency to NREM sleep, and is a controlled substance taken by many people to help them sleep; DEX produces prominent slow wave activity in the electroencephalogram (EEG resembling stage 2 NREM sleep, but with complications of hypothermia and lowered blood pressure—it is used for long term sedation in hospital intensive care units—under DEX-induced sedation patients are arousable and responsive, and this drug reduces the risk of delirium. DEX, and another α2 adrenergic agonist xylazine, are also widely used in veterinary clinics to sedate animals. Here we review how these two different classes of sedatives, zolpidem and dexmedetomideine, can selectively interact with some nodal points of the circuitry that promote wakefulness allowing the transition to NREM sleep. Zolpidem enhances GABAergic transmission onto histamine neurons in the hypothalamic tuberomammillary nucleus (TMN to hasten the transition to NREM sleep, and DEX interacts with neurons in the preoptic hypothalamic area that induce sleep and body cooling. This knowledge may aid the design of more precise acting sedatives, and at the same time, reveal more about the natural sleep-wake circuitry.

  14. Staff education, regular sedation and analgesia quality feedback, and a sedation monitoring technology for improving sedation and analgesia quality for critically ill, mechanically ventilated patients: a cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Timothy S; Kydonaki, Kalliopi; Antonelli, Jean; Stephen, Jacqueline; Lee, Robert J; Everingham, Kirsty; Hanley, Janet; Phillips, Emma C; Uutela, Kimmo; Peltola, Petra; Cole, Stephen; Quasim, Tara; Ruddy, James; McDougall, Marcia; Davidson, Alan; Rutherford, John; Richards, Jonathan; Weir, Christopher J

    2016-10-01

    Optimal sedation of patients in intensive care units (ICUs) requires the avoidance of pain, agitation, and unnecessary deep sedation, but these outcomes are challenging to achieve. Excessive sedation can prolong ICU stay, whereas light sedation can increase pain and frightening memories, which are commonly recalled by ICU survivors. We aimed to assess the effectiveness of three interventions to improve sedation and analgesia quality: an online education programme; regular feedback of sedation-analgesia quality data; and use of a novel sedation-monitoring technology (the Responsiveness Index [RI]). We did a cluster randomised trial in eight ICUs, which were randomly allocated to receive education alone (two ICUs), education plus sedation-analgesia quality feedback (two ICUs), education plus RI monitoring technology (two ICUs), or all three interventions (two ICUs). Randomisation was done with computer-generated random permuted blocks, stratified according to recruitment start date. A 45 week baseline period was followed by a 45 week intervention period, separated by an 8 week implementation period in which the interventions were introduced. ICU and research staff were not masked to study group assignment during the intervention period. All mechanically ventilated patients were potentially eligible. We assessed patients' sedation-analgesia quality for each 12 h period of nursing care, and sedation-related adverse events daily. Our primary outcome was the proportion of care periods with optimal sedation-analgesia, defined as being free from excessive sedation, agitation, poor limb relaxation, and poor ventilator synchronisation. Analysis used multilevel generalised linear mixed modelling to explore intervention effects in a single model taking clustering and patient-level factors into account. A concurrent mixed-methods process evaluation was undertaken to help understand the trial findings. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01634451. Between

  15. Sedation practice in Nordic and non-Nordic ICUs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid; Albarran, John W; Ring, Mette

    2013-01-01

    A trend towards lighter sedation has been evident in many intensive care units (ICUs). The aims of the survey were to describe sedation practice in European ICUs and to compare sedation practice in Nordic and non-Nordic countries....

  16. Spectral entropy as a monitor of depth of propofol induced sedation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mahon, Padraig

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this prospective, observational study was to evaluate State and Response entropy (Entropy(TM) Monitor, GE Healthcare, Finland), indices as measures of moderate ("conscious") sedation in healthy adult patients receiving a low dose propofol infusion. Sedation was evaluated using: (I) the responsiveness component of the OAA\\/S scale (Observer\\'s Assessment of Alertness\\/Sedation scale) and (II) multi-channel electroencephalogram (EEG) interpretation by a clinical expert. METHODS: 12 ASA I patients were recruited. A target-controlled infusion of propofol was administered (using Schnider\\'s pharmacokinetic model) with an initial effect site concentration set to 0.5 microg ml(-1). A 4 minute equilibrium period was allowed. This concentration was increased at 4 minute intervals by 0.5 microg ml(-1) to a maximum of 2.0 microg ml(-1). State (SE) and Response (RE), entropy values were recorded for each 4 minute epoch together with clinical sedation scores (OAA\\/S) and continuous multi-channel EEG. The multi-channel EEG recorded during the final minute of each 4 minute epoch or "patient\\/time unit" was presented to a neurophysiologist who assigned a label "sedated\\/not sedated". SE\\/RE values were compared in patient\\/time units with clinical or EEG evidence of sedation versus those without. RESULTS: Mean SE and RE values were less in patient\\/time units when clinical evidence of sedation was present, [mean = 86.8 (95% CI, 84.0-88.3) and 94.3 (95%CI, 92-96.1)], P = 0.002 and P = 0.001, respectively. In patient\\/time units assigned the label "sedated" by the clinical neurophysiologist assessing the multi-channel EEG, SE and RE values were less [mean = 87.5 (95% CI, 86.3-88.4) and 95.0 (95% CI, 93.8-96.1)] P = 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: A statistically significant decrease in SE and RE values was demonstrated in patient\\/time units in which clinical or EEG evidence of sedation was present. We conclude that spectral entropy

  17. Efficacy of two types of palliative sedation therapy defined using intervention protocols: proportional vs. deep sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Kengo; Morita, Tatsuya; Yokomichi, Naosuke; Mori, Masanori; Naito, Akemi Shirado; Tsukuura, Hiroaki; Yamauchi, Toshihiro; Kawaguchi, Takashi; Fukuta, Kaori; Inoue, Satoshi

    2018-06-01

    This study investigated the effect of two types of palliative sedation defined using intervention protocols: proportional and deep sedation. We retrospectively analyzed prospectively recorded data of consecutive cancer patients who received the continuous infusion of midazolam in a palliative care unit. Attending physicians chose the sedation protocol based on each patient's wish, symptom severity, prognosis, and refractoriness of suffering. The primary endpoint was a treatment goal achievement at 4 h: in proportional sedation, the achievement of symptom relief (Support Team Assessment Schedule (STAS) ≤ 1) and absence of agitation (modified Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale (RASS) ≤ 0) and in deep sedation, the achievement of deep sedation (RASS ≤ - 4). Secondary endpoints included mean scores of STAS and RASS, deep sedation as a result, and adverse events. Among 398 patients who died during the period, 32 received proportional and 18 received deep sedation. The treatment goal achievement rate was 68.8% (22/32, 95% confidence interval 52.7-84.9) in the proportional sedation group vs. 83.3% (15/18, 66.1-100) in the deep sedation group. STAS decreased from 3.8 to 0.8 with proportional sedation at 4 h vs. 3.7 to 0.3 with deep sedation; RASS decreased from + 1.2 to - 1.7 vs. + 1.4 to - 3.7, respectively. Deep sedation was needed as a result in 31.3% (10/32) of the proportional sedation group. No fatal events that were considered as probably or definitely related to the intervention occurred. The two types of intervention protocol well reflected the treatment intention and expected outcomes. Further, large-scale cohort studies are promising.

  18. Pediatric dental sedation: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Travis M; Xu, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    High levels of dental caries, challenging child behavior, and parent expectations support a need for sedation in pediatric dentistry. This paper reviews modern developments in pediatric sedation with a focus on implementing techniques to enhance success and patient safety. In recent years, sedation for dental procedures has been implicated in a disproportionate number of cases that resulted in death or permanent neurologic damage. The youngest children and those with more complicated medical backgrounds appear to be at greatest risk. To reduce complications, practitioners and regulatory bodies have supported a renewed focus on health care quality and safety. Implementation of high fidelity simulation training and improvements in patient monitoring, including end-tidal carbon dioxide, are becoming recognized as a new standard for sedated patients in dental offices and health care facilities. Safe and appropriate case selection and appropriate dosing for overweight children is also paramount. Oral sedation has been the mainstay of pediatric dental sedation; however, today practitioners are administering modern drugs in new ways with high levels of success. Employing contemporary transmucosal administration devices increases patient acceptance and sedation predictability. While recently there have been many positive developments in sedation technology, it is now thought that medications used in sedation and anesthesia may have adverse effects on the developing brain. The evidence for this is not definitive, but we suggest that practitioners recognize this developing area and counsel patients accordingly. Finally, there is a clear trend of increased use of ambulatory anesthesia services for pediatric dentistry. Today, parents and practitioners have become accustomed to children receiving general anesthesia in the outpatient setting. As a result of these changes, it is possible that dental providers will abandon the practice of personally administering large amounts of

  19. The perspectives of clinical staff and bereaved informal care-givers on the use of continuous sedation until death for cancer patients: The study protocol of the UNBIASED study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Seymour (Jane); J.A.C. Rietjens (Judith); J. Brown (Jayne); A. van der Heide (Agnes); S. Sterckx (Sigrid); L. Deliens (Luc)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: A significant minority of dying people experience refractory symptoms or extreme distress unresponsive to conventional therapies. In such circumstances, sedation may be used to decrease or remove consciousness until death occurs. This practice is described in a variety of

  20. A systematic literature review on the ethics of palliative sedation: an update (2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Blair

    2016-09-01

    Palliative sedation has been the subject of intensive debate since its first appearance in 1990. In a 2010 review of palliative sedation, the following areas were identified as lacking in consensus: inconsistent terminology, its use in nonphysical suffering, the ongoing experience of distress, and concern that the practice of palliative sedation may hasten death. This review looks at the literature over the past 6 years and provides an update on these outstanding concerns. Good clinical guidelines and policies are still required to address issues of emotional distress and waylay concerns that palliative sedation hastens death. The empirical evidence suggests some movement toward consensus on the practice of palliative sedation. However, a continued need exists for evidence-informed practice guidelines, education, and research to support the ethical practice of palliative sedation at the end of life. Until that time, clinicians are advised to adopt a framework or guideline that has been expert driven to ensure consistent and ethical use of palliative sedation at the end of life.

  1. Midazolam conscious sedation in a large Danish municipal dental service for children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uldum, Birgitte; Hallonsten, Anna-Lena; Poulsen, Sven

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the introduction and the first six years use of midazolam for conscious sedation in a municipal dental service in Denmark. In 1998, all dentists were introduced to midazolam conscious sedation. A sedation chart was filled in for each session, and parents' assessment was obtained. In 2004, all clinical materials were collected. Six hundred and eighty sessions were performed; 63.7% of the children were between 2 and 6 years of age; 88.5% belonged to American Society of Anesthesiologists grade 1; 74.8% of the sedations performed used the oral route of administration. Restorations were performed during 60.3% of the sessions, and extractions during 38.4%. Complications during the sessions were rare, the most frequent being double vision (6.1%), hiccups (2.7%), and paradoxical reaction (2.0%). Using Wilton's sedation scale, 42.9% were calm and 27.7% were agitated during treatment, whereas after treatment 61.7% were calm; 80.4% of the parents were very positive towards this sedation method. Sedation with midazolam for dental treatment of children with dental fear and anxiety is a feasible and an efficient method with a low rate of complications. It can probably reduce the need for dental treatment under general anaesthesia.

  2. [Terminal sedation: consultation with a second physician as is the case in euthanasia and assisted suicide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsioen, B P; Schuurman, W H A Elink; van den Hurk, A J P M; van der Poel, B N M; Runia, E H

    2005-02-26

    In terminally-ill patients in the Netherlands deep sedation by means of a continuous subcutaneous infusion with midazolam occurs more frequently than euthanasia and assisted suicide. Deep terminal sedation is applied to relieve symptoms during the phase of dying, but in contrast to euthanasia and assisted suicide, does not hasten death. In three terminally-ill patients, a 65-year-old man suffering from pulmonary carcinoma, a 94-year-old woman with general malaise, nausea and anorexia, and a 79-year-old woman in the final stage of ovarian carcinoma, a general-practitioner advisor was consulted about an end-of-life decision--deep terminal sedation versus euthanasia or assisted suicide. The first two patients were given deep sedation until death, in both cases a day and a half later. The third patient's request for euthanasia was considered to meet the legal criteria for euthanasia. Compliance with the Dutch statutory criteria for due care in euthanasia and assisted suicide might also be helpful when deciding about terminal deep sedation, but the role and responsibility of the attending physician may differ. However, the radical effects of sedation on the terminally-ill patient and the rapid changes in the clinical situation of the patient when the decision to sedate is taken, both emphasize the need for consultation with another physician.

  3. Clinical utility and validity of minoxidil response testing in androgenetic alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goren, Andy; Shapiro, Jerry; Roberts, Janet; McCoy, John; Desai, Nisha; Zarrab, Zoulikha; Pietrzak, Aldona; Lotti, Torello

    2015-01-01

    Clinical response to 5% topical minoxidil for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is typically observed after 3-6 months. Approximately 40% of patients will regrow hair. Given the prolonged treatment time required to elicit a response, a diagnostic test for ruling out nonresponders would have significant clinical utility. Two studies have previously reported that sulfotransferase enzyme activity in plucked hair follicles predicts a patient's response to topical minoxidil therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical utility and validity of minoxidil response testing. In this communication, the present authors conducted an analysis of completed and ongoing studies of minoxidil response testing. The analysis confirmed the clinical utility of a sulfotransferase enzyme test in successfully ruling out 95.9% of nonresponders to topical minoxidil for the treatment of AGA. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. New pricing approaches for bundled payments: Leveraging clinical standards and regional variations to target avoidable utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellsten, Erik; Chu, Scally; Crump, R Trafford; Yu, Kevin; Sutherland, Jason M

    2016-03-01

    Develop pricing models for bundled payments that draw inputs from clinician-defined best practice standards and benchmarks set from regional variations in utilization. Health care utilization and claims data for a cohort of incident Ontario ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke episodes. Episodes of care are created by linking incident stroke hospitalizations with subsequent health service utilization across multiple datasets. Costs are estimated for episodes of care and constituent service components using setting-specific case mix methodologies and provincial fee schedules. Costs are estimated for five areas of potentially avoidable utilization, derived from best practice standards set by an expert panel of stroke clinicians. Alternative approaches for setting normative prices for stroke episodes are developed using measures of potentially avoidable utilization and benchmarks established by the best performing regions. There are wide regional variations in the utilization of different health services within episodes of stroke care. Reconciling the best practice standards with regional utilization identifies significant amounts of potentially avoidable utilization. Normative pricing models for stroke episodes result in increasingly aggressive redistributions of funding. Bundled payment pilots to date have been based on the costs of historical service patterns, which effectively 'bake in' unwarranted and inefficient variations in utilization. This study demonstrates the feasibility of novel clinically informed episode pricing approaches that leverage these variations to target reductions in potentially avoidable utilization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The sedative and analgesic potentials of dexmedtomidine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Venous access was secured thirty minutes later, the fluid was connected to the cannula and was set to flow at daily fluid maintenance rate of 90mlkgday-1. Neither sedation nor analgesia was achieved with 20μgkg-1. Slight to moderate sedative effect was achieved at 40μg/kg with significant reduction in heart, pulse and ...

  6. Sedation in the ICU Less is more

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strom, T.

    2012-01-01

    . The intervention group received only bolus doses of morphine or haloperidol if delirium was suspected. The control group received standard infusion of sedatives to RAMSAY 3-4 and sedatives were interrupted on a daily basis. Both groups received morphine as intravenous bolus doses (2.5 to 5 mg). The primary outcome...

  7. Nurse-administered propofol sedation for endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J T; Vilmann, P; Horsted, T

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to perform a risk analysis during the implementation phase of nurse-administered propofol sedation (NAPS) and to validate our structured training program.......The aim of the present study was to perform a risk analysis during the implementation phase of nurse-administered propofol sedation (NAPS) and to validate our structured training program....

  8. Sedation practice among Nigerian radiology residents

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Providing safe and effective sedation to patients, especially those with multiple medical problems, can be ... This study aimed to determine knowledge, attitude and practice of Nigerian radiology ..... works. Conclusion. Sedation and resuscitation are an integral part of radiology .... An evaluation of a virtual reality.

  9. The safety and efficacy of using a concentrated intranasal midazolam formulation for paediatric dental sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Michael

    2011-01-01

    To add to the evidence base for safe and effective paediatric conscious sedation techniques in primary dental care. To consider the safety and effectiveness of an alternative sedation technique for facilitating dental treatment in anxious children, thereby avoiding dental general anaesthetic. Leagrave Dental Sedation Clinic. A primary care-based general and referral clinic for anxious patients, special care dentistry and oral surgery. This is a prospective service evaluation of 114 selected anxious children requiring invasive dental treatment. Each child was administered 0.25 mg/kg intranasal midazolam using a concentrated 40 mg/ml midazolam (INM) in 2% lignocaine solution. Successful completion of intended dental treatment with a child who is co-operative and who meets the UK accepted definition of conscious sedation. 57% of the children found the administration of the new formulation acceptable. Of the 114 patients who received INM, 104 completed the treatment (91%). The 10 children who could not complete the treatment with INM were converted to intravenous sedation and treatment was completed successfully at the same appointment. During treatment there was no desaturation and only one patient desaturated briefly in the recovery area. Parents rated the technique acceptable in 76% of cases and would have the procedure repeated in 83% of cases. Parents rated this technique as having 8.3 out of 10 with only 5 parents awarding a score of less than 7 out of 10. Side effects included blurred vision, sneezing, headaches, restlessness with one patient having post-operative nausea and vomiting. In selected cases intranasal sedation provides a safe and effective alternative for dental GA in short invasive procedures limited to one or two quadrants in children. Other techniques, e.g., oral and intravenous sedation, appear to have a much higher acceptability of administration. This technique may be useful if inhalation sedation, oral sedation or intravenous sedation is

  10. Cultural changes in ICU sedation management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Ingrid

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore physicians' views and perceptions of sedation, and offer a new approach to the understanding of issues of sedation. I used a qualitative, descriptive, and explorative multicenter design. Data were generated by seven key-informant interviews using...... a semistructured interview guide. One experienced doctor was selected at each of the seven largest intensive care units in Denmark. Interpretational analysis was performed by comprehensive overview, individual case analysis, cross-case analysis, and integrated thematic analysis and identification of emerging...... provide an understanding of contextual issues of sedation, safety, and comfort, and suggest that a cultural change in sedation strategies might reduce the duration of sedation and mechanical ventilation while containing cost and improving the well-being of the patients....

  11. A Survey of Hospice and Palliative Care Physicians Regarding Palliative Sedation Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, Michael R; Protus, Bridget McCrate; Kimbrel, Jason; Grauer, Phyllis

    2017-04-01

    Patients nearing the end of life may experience symptoms that are refractory to standard therapeutic options. Physicians may consider palliative sedation to relieve intolerable suffering. There is limited clinical literature regarding preferred medications for palliative sedation. To determine the preferred medications physicians use when implementing palliative sedation. An Internet-based, cross-sectional survey of hospice and palliative care physicians in the United States. A link to the survey was e-mailed to 3130 physician members of the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine, of which 381 physicians completed the survey. Physicians were not required to answer all questions. Nearly all (n = 335, 99%) respondents indicated that palliative sedation may be used (acceptable by 73% [n = 248] for refractory symptoms and acceptable by 26% [n = 87] only for imminently dying patients). Seventy-nine percent (n = 252) believed that opioids should not be used to induce palliative sedation but should be continued to provide pain control. Midazolam was the most commonly selected first-line choice for palliative sedation (n = 155, 42%). The most commonly reported second-line agents for the induction of palliative sedation were lorazepam, midazolam (for those who did not select midazolam as first-line agent), and phenobarbital with a reported preference of 20% (n = 49), 19% (n = 46), and 17% (n = 40), respectively. Of the physicians surveyed, 99% (n = 335) felt that palliative sedation is a reasonable treatment modality. Midazolam was considered a drug of choice for inducing and maintaining sedation, and opioids were continued for pain control.

  12. Sedation/general anesthesia for magnetic resonance imaging in paediatrics patients - special considerations and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzoneva, D.; Hinev, S.; Guergueltcheva, V.; Chamova, T.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study requires the patient to remain motionless for extended periods of time, which can not be achieved in children without special care or drug-induced sleep. There are various methods for sedation / general anaesthesia (GA) in children with their different advantages and disadvantages. The aim of this study was to report our experience with sedation/GA in children who require MRI/computed-tomography (CT) studies. We performed a retrospective review of the sedation/GA records in 34 children aged from 6 months to 12 years; class ASA I-III, undergoing diagnostic MR/CT study. Demographic data, information regarding diagnosis, type of sedation/GA, use of premedication, time to readiness for the procedure after premedication administration, duration of procedure, and the recovery time were obtained. Any adverse events were noted. Imaging study in most of the patients (61.8%) was performed for neurological diseases (delayed neuropsychological development, epilepsy, and cerebral palsy). Sedation/GA with Propofol was administered in 50% (n=17) of patients, in 26.5% (n=9) - Ketamine plus Midazolam; in 20.6% (n=7) - Midazolam alone, and in 9% (n=1) - Thiopental. The time to readiness for the procedure and the recovery time were statistically significantly shorter for patients receiving Propofol, and the observed adverse respiratory events were mild in severity, when compared with patients receiving sedation/GA with another hypnotic agent (p<0.05).The evaluation of the respiratory system before sedation/GA should be carefully performed, as the respiratory diseases could increase the patients' risk of adverse events occurrence. Sedation/GA with Propofol is a method of choice in children with neurological disorders with seizures, increased intracranial pressure and myopathies, undergoing MR/CT study. Crucial for patients' safety and good clinical results is the medical professionals, delivering sedation/GA, to have the knowledge and practical

  13. Palliative sedation versus euthanasia: an ethical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Have, Henk; Welie, Jos V M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article was to review the ethical debate concerning palliative sedation. Although recent guidelines articulate the differences between palliative sedation and euthanasia, the ethical controversies remain. The dominant view is that euthanasia and palliative sedation are morally distinct practices. However, ambiguous moral experiences and considerable practice variation call this view into question. When heterogeneous sedative practices are all labeled as palliative sedation, there is the risk that palliative sedation is expanded to include practices that are actually intended to bring about the patients' death. This troublesome expansion is fostered by an expansive use of the concept of intention such that this decisive ethical concept is no longer restricted to signify the aim in guiding the action. In this article, it is argued that intention should be used in a restricted way. The significance of intention is related to other ethical parameters to demarcate the practice of palliative sedation: terminality, refractory symptoms, proportionality, and separation from other end-of-life decisions. These additional parameters, although not without ethical and practical problems, together formulate a framework to ethically distinguish a more narrowly defined practice of palliative sedation from practices that are tantamount to euthanasia. Finally, the article raises the question as to what impact palliative sedation might have on the practice of palliative care itself. The increasing interest in palliative sedation may reemphasize characteristics of health care that initially encouraged the emergence of palliative care in the first place: the focus on therapy rather than care, the physical dimension rather than the whole person, the individual rather than the community, and the primacy of intervention rather than receptiveness and presence. Copyright © 2014 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical librarian support for rapid review of clinical utility of cancer molecular biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Yimin; Fowler, Clara S; Fulton, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    The clinical librarian used a restricted literature searching and quality-filtering approach to provide relevant clinical evidence for the use of cancer molecular biomarkers by institutional policy makers and clinicians in the rapid review process. The librarian-provided evidence was compared with the cited references in the institutional molecular biomarker algorithm. The overall incorporation rate of the librarian-provided references into the algorithm was above 80%. This study suggests the usefulness of clinical librarian expertise for clinical practice. The searching and filtering methods for high-level evidence can be adopted by information professionals who are involved in the rapid literature review.

  15. The clinical utility of the Maslach Burnout Inventory in a clinical population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijweg, J.H.M.; Verbraak, M.J.P.M.; Dijk, M.K. van

    2013-01-01

    This replication study examines the use of the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI-GS), a self-report questionnaire on burnout, as a clinical diagnostic instrument for measuring clinical burnout. The MBI and Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI), a semistructured interview based on

  16. Sedation for pediatric radiological procedures: analysis of potential causes of sedation failure and paradoxical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karian, V.E.; Burrows, P.E.; Connor, L. [Dept. of Radiology, Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Zurakowski, D. [Dept. of Biostatistics, Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Mason, K.P. [Dept. of Anesthesiology, Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    1999-11-01

    Background. Sedation for diagnostic imaging and interventional radiologic procedures in pediatrics has greatly increased over the past decade. With appropriate patient selection and monitoring, serious adverse effects are infrequent, but failure to sedate and paradoxical reactions do occur. Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine, among patients undergoing sedation for radiologic procedures, the incidence of sedation failure and paradoxical reaction to pentobarbital and to identify potentially correctable causes. Materials and methods. Records of 1665 patients who were sedated in the radiology department from 1 November 1997 to 1 July 1998 were reviewed. Patients failing sedation or experiencing paradoxical reaction were compared with respect to sex, age group, diagnosis, scan type, time of day, NPO status, use of IV contrast and type of sedation agent using the Fisher exact test, Pearson chi-square, analysis of variance (ANOVA), the Student t-test, and logistic regression. Results. Data analysis revealed a sedation failure rate of 1 % and paradoxical reaction rate of 1.2 %. Stepwise multiple logistic regression revealed that the only significant independent multivariate predictor of failure was the need for the administration of a combination of pentobarbital, fentanyl, and midazolam IV. Conclusion. The low rate of sedation failure and paradoxical reactions to pentobarbital was near optimal and probably cannot be improved with the currently available sedatives. (orig.)

  17. Sedation for pediatric radiological procedures: analysis of potential causes of sedation failure and paradoxical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karian, V.E.; Burrows, P.E.; Connor, L.; Zurakowski, D.; Mason, K.P.

    1999-01-01

    Background. Sedation for diagnostic imaging and interventional radiologic procedures in pediatrics has greatly increased over the past decade. With appropriate patient selection and monitoring, serious adverse effects are infrequent, but failure to sedate and paradoxical reactions do occur. Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine, among patients undergoing sedation for radiologic procedures, the incidence of sedation failure and paradoxical reaction to pentobarbital and to identify potentially correctable causes. Materials and methods. Records of 1665 patients who were sedated in the radiology department from 1 November 1997 to 1 July 1998 were reviewed. Patients failing sedation or experiencing paradoxical reaction were compared with respect to sex, age group, diagnosis, scan type, time of day, NPO status, use of IV contrast and type of sedation agent using the Fisher exact test, Pearson chi-square, analysis of variance (ANOVA), the Student t-test, and logistic regression. Results. Data analysis revealed a sedation failure rate of 1 % and paradoxical reaction rate of 1.2 %. Stepwise multiple logistic regression revealed that the only significant independent multivariate predictor of failure was the need for the administration of a combination of pentobarbital, fentanyl, and midazolam IV. Conclusion. The low rate of sedation failure and paradoxical reactions to pentobarbital was near optimal and probably cannot be improved with the currently available sedatives. (orig.)

  18. Drug-induced sleep endoscopy with target-controlled infusion using propofol and monitored depth of sedation to determine treatment strategies in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiser, Clemens; Fthenakis, Phillippe; Hapfelmeier, Alexander; Berger, Sebastian; Hofauer, Benedikt; Hohenhorst, Winfried; Kochs, Eberhard F; Wagner, Klaus J; Edenharter, Guenther M

    2017-09-01

    Drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) has become an important diagnostic examination tool in the treatment decision process for surgical therapies in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Currently, there is a variety of regimes for the performance of DISE, which renders comparison and assessment across results difficult. It remains unclear how the different regimes influence the findings of the examination and the resulting conclusions and treatment recommendations. This study aimed to investigate the correlation between increasing levels of sedation (i.e., light, medium, and deep) induced by propofol using a target-controlled infusion (TCI) pump, with the obstruction patterns at the levels of the velum, oropharynx, tongue base, and epiglottis (i.e., VOTE classification). A second goal was the establishment of a sufficient sedation level to enable a reliable decision regarding treatment recommendations. Forty-three patients with OSA underwent a DISE procedure using propofol TCI. Three levels of sedation were defined, depending on entropy levels and assessment of sedation: light sedation, medium sedation, and deep sedation. The evaluation of the upper airway at each level, with increasing sedation, was documented using the VOTE classification. The elapsed time at which each assessment was performed was recorded. Upper airway changes occurred and were measured throughout the DISE procedure. Clinically useful determinations of airway closure occurred at medium sedation; this level of sedation was most probably achieved with a blood propofol concentration of 3.2 μg/ml. In all 43 patients, definite treatment decisions could be made at medium sedation level. Increasing sedation did not result in changes in the treatment decision. Changes in upper airway collapse during DISE with propofol TCI occur at levels of medium sedation. Decisions regarding surgical treatment could be made at this level of sedation. Upper Airway Collapse in Patients with Obstructive

  19. Sedation and memories of patients subjected to mechanical ventilation in an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Jaquilene Barreto da; Marcon, Sonia Silva; Macedo, Claudia Rejane Lima de; Jorge, Amaury Cesar; Duarte, Péricles Almeida Delfino

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between sedation and the memories reported by patients subjected to mechanical ventilation following discharge from the intensive care unit. This prospective, observational, cohort study was conducted with individuals subjected to mechanical ventilation who remained in the intensive care unit for more than 24 hours. Clinical statistics and sedation records were extracted from the participants' clinical records; the data relative to the participants' memories were collected using a specific validated instrument. Assessment was performed three months after discharge from the intensive care unit. A total of 128 individuals were assessed, most of whom (84.4%) reported recollections from their stay in the intensive care unit as predominantly a combination of real and illusory events. The participants subjected to sedation (67.2%) at deep levels (Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale [RASS] -4 and -5) for more than two days and those with psychomotor agitation (33.6%) exhibited greater susceptibility to occurrence of illusory memories (p>0.001). The probability of the occurrence of illusory memories was greater among the participants who were subjected to deep sedation. Sedation seems to be an additional factor that contributed to the occurrence of illusory memories in severely ill individuals subjected to mechanical ventilation.

  20. Antagonism of detomidine sedation in the horse using intravenous tolazoline or atipamezole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbell, J A E; Muir, W W

    2006-05-01

    The ability to shorten the duration of sedation would potentially improve safety and utility of detomidine. To determine the effects of tolazoline and atipamezole after detomidine sedation. Administration of tolazoline or atipamezole would not affect detomidine sedation. In a randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, descriptive study, detomidine (0.02 mg/kg bwt i.v.) was administered to 6 mature horses on 4 separate occasions. Twenty-five mins later, each horse received one of 4 treatments: Group 1 saline (0.9% i.v.) as a placebo control; Group 2 atipamezole (0.05 mg/kg bwt i.v.); Group 3 atipamezole (0.1 mg/kg bwt i.v.); and Group 4 tolazoline (4.0 mg/kg bwt i.v.). Sedation, muscle relaxation and ataxia were scored by 3 independent observers at 9 time points. Horses were led through an obstacle course at 7 time points. Course completion time was recorded and the ability of the horse to traverse the course was scored by 3 independent observers. Horses were videotaped before, during and after each trip through the obstacle course. Atipamezole and tolazoline administration incompletely antagonised the effects of detomidine, but the time course to recovery was shortened. Single bolus administration of atipamezole or tolazoline produced partial reversal of detomidine sedation and may be useful for minimising detomidine sedation.

  1. Palliative pharmacological sedation for terminally ill adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beller, Elaine M; van Driel, Mieke L; McGregor, Leanne; Truong, Shani; Mitchell, Geoffrey

    2015-01-02

    Terminally ill people experience a variety of symptoms in the last hours and days of life, including delirium, agitation, anxiety, terminal restlessness, dyspnoea, pain, vomiting, and psychological and physical distress. In the terminal phase of life, these symptoms may become refractory, and unable to be controlled by supportive and palliative therapies specifically targeted to these symptoms. Palliative sedation therapy is one potential solution to providing relief from these refractory symptoms. Sedation in terminally ill people is intended to provide relief from refractory symptoms that are not controlled by other methods. Sedative drugs such as benzodiazepines are titrated to achieve the desired level of sedation; the level of sedation can be easily maintained and the effect is reversible. To assess the evidence for the benefit of palliative pharmacological sedation on quality of life, survival, and specific refractory symptoms in terminally ill adults during their last few days of life. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 11), MEDLINE (1946 to November 2014), and EMBASE (1974 to December 2014), using search terms representing the sedative drug names and classes, disease stage, and study designs. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-RCTs, non-RCTs, and observational studies (e.g. before-and-after, interrupted-time-series) with quantitative outcomes. We excluded studies with only qualitative outcomes or that had no comparison (i.e. no control group or no within-group comparison) (e.g. single arm case series). Two review authors independently screened titles and abstracts of citations, and full text of potentially eligible studies. Two review authors independently carried out data extraction using standard data extraction forms. A third review author acted as arbiter for both stages. We carried out no meta-analyses due to insufficient data for pooling on any outcome; therefore, we reported

  2. Deep sedation during pneumatic reduction of intussusception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilivitzki, Anat; Shtark, Luda Glozman; Arish, Karin; Engel, Ahuva

    2012-05-01

    Pneumatic reduction of intussusception under fluoroscopic guidance is a routine procedure. The unsedated child may resist the procedure, which may lengthen its duration and increase the radiation dose. We use deep sedation during the procedure to overcome these difficulties. The purpose of this study was to summarize our experience with deep sedation during fluoroscopic reduction of intussusception and assess the added value and complication rate of deep sedation. All children with intussusception who underwent pneumatic reduction in our hospital between January 2004 and June 2011 were included in this retrospective study. Anesthetists sedated the children using propofol. The fluoroscopic studies, ultrasound (US) studies and the childrens' charts were reviewed. One hundred thirty-one attempted reductions were performed in 119 children, of which 121 (92%) were successful and 10 (8%) failed. Two perforations (1.5%) occurred during attempted reduction. Average fluoroscopic time was 1.5 minutes. No complication to sedation was recorded. Deep sedation with propofol did not add any complication to the pneumatic reduction. The fluoroscopic time was short. The success rate of reduction was high,raising the possibility that sedation is beneficial, possibly by smooth muscle relaxation.

  3. Euthanasia and palliative sedation in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Almagor, Raphael; Ely, E Wesley

    2018-01-04

    The aim of this article is to use data from Belgium to analyse distinctions between palliative sedation and euthanasia. There is a need to reduce confusion and improve communication related to patient management at the end of life specifically regarding the rapidly expanding area of patient care that incorporates a spectrum of nuanced yet overlapping terms such as palliative care, sedation, palliative sedation, continued sedation, continued sedation until death, terminal sedation, voluntary euthanasia and involuntary euthanasia. Some physicians and nurses mistakenly think that relieving suffering at the end of life by heavily sedating patients is a form of euthanasia, when indeed it is merely responding to the ordinary and proportionate needs of the patient. Concerns are raised about abuse in the form of deliberate involuntary euthanasia, obfuscation and disregard for the processes sustaining the management of refractory suffering at the end of life. Some suggestions designed to improve patient management and prevent potential abuse are offered. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. [Sedation with midazolam for ambulatory pediatric dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavlokhova, E A; Ostreĭkov, I F; Korolenkova, M V

    2014-01-01

    To improve the quality of dental treatment in children by using combined anaesthesia technique including local anaesthesia and conscious sedation, and to assess the effectiveness of conscious sedation for younger children undergoing dental treatment. The study included 208 children aged 14-88 months who received dental treatment for tooth decay and its complication under combined anaesthesia. Midazolam was used as sedative medication. Sedation level was assessed by visual scale and BIS-monitoring. ANI-monitoring was also used for pain sensitiveness evaluation. Results All 208 children were successfully treated under combined anaesthesia which showed satisfactory sedation rates both by visual scale and and BIS-monitoring values. While mean patient age was 39 months 20.6% were younger than 24 months. These data are extremely valuable as according to literature review conscious sedation in early infancy remains controversial. Our results proved conscious sedation to be effective in younger children undergoing dental treatment thus representing important alternative for general anaesthesia and providing a basis for later behavior management.

  5. Resource utilization after introduction of a standardized clinical assessment and management plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Kevin G; Rathod, Rahul H; Farias, Michael; Graham, Dionne; Powell, Andrew J; Fulton, David R; Newburger, Jane W; Colan, Steven D; Jenkins, Kathy J; Lock, James E

    2010-01-01

    A Standardized Clinical Assessment and Management Plan (SCAMP) is a novel quality improvement initiative that standardizes the assessment and management of all patients who carry a predefined diagnosis. Based on periodic review of systemically collected data the SCAMP is designed to be modified to improve its own algorithm. One of the objectives of a SCAMP is to identify and reduce resource utilization and patient care costs. We retrospectively reviewed resource utilization in the first 93 arterial switch operation (ASO) SCAMP patients and 186 age-matched control ASO patients. We compared diagnostic and laboratory testing obtained at the initial SCAMP clinic visit and control patient visits. To evaluate the effect of the SCAMP over time, the number of clinic visits per patient year and echocardiograms per patient year in historical control ASO patients were compared to the projected rates for ASO SCAMP participants. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), stress echocardiogram, and lipid profile utilization were higher in the initial SCAMP clinic visit group than in age-matched control patients. Total echocardiogram and lung scan usage were similar. Chest X-ray and exercise stress testing were obtained less in SCAMP patients. ASO SCAMP patients are projected to have 0.5 clinic visits and 0.5 echocardiograms per year. Historical control patients had more clinic visits (1.2 vs. 0.5 visits/patient year, P<.01) and a higher echocardiogram rate (0.92 vs. 0.5 echocardiograms/patient year, P<.01) Implementation of a SCAMP may initially lead to increased resource utilization, but over time resource utilization is projected to decrease.

  6. A multidisciplinary three-phase approach to improve the clinical utility of patient safety indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najjar, Peter; Kachalia, Allen; Sutherland, Tori; Beloff, Jennifer; David-Kasdan, Jo Ann; Bates, David W; Urman, Richard D

    2015-01-01

    The AHRQ Patient Safety Indicators (PSIs) are used for calculation of risk-adjusted postoperative rates for adverse events. The payers and quality consortiums are increasingly requiring public reporting of hospital performance on these metrics. We discuss processes designed to improve the accuracy and clinical utility of PSI reporting in practice. The study was conducted at a 793-bed tertiary care academic medical center where PSI processes have been aggressively implemented to track patient safety events at discharge. A three-phased approach to improving administrative data quality was implemented. The initiative consisted of clinical review of all PSIs, documentation improvement, and provider outreach including active querying for patient safety events. This multidisciplinary effort to develop a streamlined process for PSI calculation reduced the reporting of miscoded PSIs and increased the clinical utility of PSI monitoring. Over 4 quarters, 4 of 41 (10%) PSI-11 and 9 of 138 (7%) PSI-15 errors were identified on review of clinical documentation and appropriate adjustments were made. A multidisciplinary, phased approach leveraging existing billing infrastructure for robust metric coding, ongoing clinical review, and frontline provider outreach is a novel and effective way to reduce the reporting of false-positive outcomes and improve the clinical utility of PSIs.

  7. Evidence of clinical utility: an unmet need in molecular diagnostics for patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, David R; McCormack, Robert T; Keating, Susan M; Gutman, Steven I; Hamilton, Stanley R; Mansfield, Elizabeth A; Piper, Margaret A; Deverka, Patricia; Frueh, Felix W; Jessup, J Milburn; McShane, Lisa M; Tunis, Sean R; Sigman, Caroline C; Kelloff, Gary J

    2014-03-15

    This article defines and describes best practices for the academic and business community to generate evidence of clinical utility for cancer molecular diagnostic assays. Beyond analytical and clinical validation, successful demonstration of clinical utility involves developing sufficient evidence to demonstrate that a diagnostic test results in an improvement in patient outcomes. This discussion is complementary to theoretical frameworks described in previously published guidance and literature reports by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Institute of Medicine, and Center for Medical Technology Policy, among others. These reports are comprehensive and specifically clarify appropriate clinical use, adoption, and payer reimbursement for assay manufacturers, as well as Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-certified laboratories, including those that develop assays (laboratory developed tests). Practical criteria and steps for establishing clinical utility are crucial to subsequent decisions for reimbursement without which high-performing molecular diagnostics will have limited availability to patients with cancer and fail to translate scientific advances into high-quality and cost-effective cancer care. See all articles in this CCR Focus section, "The Precision Medicine Conundrum: Approaches to Companion Diagnostic Co-development." ©2014 AACR.

  8. Oral Sedation in the Dental Office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastiani, Francesco R; Dym, Harry; Wolf, Joshua

    2016-04-01

    This article highlights the commonly used medications used in dentistry and oral surgery. General dentists and specialists must be knowledgeable about the pharmacology of the drugs currently available along with their risks and benefits. Enteral sedation is a useful adjunct for the treatment of anxious adult and pediatric patients. When enteral sedation is used within the standards of care, the interests of the public and the dental profession are served through a cost-effective, effective service that can be widely available. Oral sedation enables dentists to provide dental care to millions of individuals who otherwise would have unmet dental needs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Evidence for the Criterion Validity and Clinical Utility of the Pathological Narcissism Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Katherine M.; Wright, Aidan G. C.; Lukowitsky, Mark R.; Donnellan, M. Brent; Hopwood, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the authors evaluated aspects of criterion validity and clinical utility of the grandiosity and vulnerability components of the Pathological Narcissism Inventory (PNI) using two undergraduate samples (N = 299 and 500). Criterion validity was assessed by evaluating the correlations of narcissistic grandiosity and narcissistic…

  10. Clinical utility of the PCA3 urine assay in European men scheduled for repeat biopsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haese, A.; Taille, A. De La; Poppel, H. van; Marberger, M.; Stenzl, A.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Huland, H.; Abbou, C.C.; Remzi, M.; Tinzl, M.; Feyerabend, S.; Stillebroer, A.B.; Gils, M.P.M.Q.; Schalken, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Prostate CAncer gene 3 (PCA3) assay has shown promise as an aid in prostate cancer (pCA) diagnosis in identifying men with a high probability of a positive (repeat) biopsy. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the clinical utility of the PROGENSA PCA3 assay. DESIGN, SETTING, AND

  11. Resource utilization implications of treatment were able to be assessed from appropriately reported clinical trial data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poole-Wilson, Philip A.; Kirwan, Bridget-Anne; Voko, Zoltan; de Brouwer, Sophie; Dunselman, Peter H. J. M.; van Dalen, Frederik J.; Lubsen, Jacobus

    Background and Objective: Published clinical trial data rarely allow assessment of the health care resource utilization implications of treatment. We give an example of how these can be assessed given appropriate tabulation of data. Methods: Data from a trial comparing long-acting nifedipine

  12. Music Therapy with Children: A Review of Clinical Utility and Application to Special Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeaw, John David Andrew

    This paper reviews the effectiveness of music therapy in treating children with psychiatric and developmental problems. The clinical utility of music therapy is first evaluated by examining the foundational effects of music on affect and behavior. Next, the two broad approaches to music therapy, active and passive music therapy, are discussed.…

  13. Palliative sedation in Germany: factors and treatment practices associated with different sedation rate estimates in palliative and hospice care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiel, Stephanie; Nurnus, Mareike; Ostgathe, Christoph; Klein, Carsten

    2018-03-13

    Clinical practice of Palliative Sedation (PS) varies between institutions worldwide and sometimes includes problematic practices. Little available research points at different definitions and frameworks which may contribute to uncertainty of healthcare professionals in the application of PS. This analysis investigates what demographic factors and characteristics of treatment practices differ between institutions with high versus low sedation rates estimates in Palliative and Hospice Care in Germany. Data sets from 221 organisations from a prior online survey were separated into two sub-groups divided by their estimated sedation rate A) lower/equal to 16% (n = 187; 90.8%) and B) higher than 16% (n = 19; 9.2%) for secondary analysis. Demographic factors and characteristics of PS treatment practices between the two groups were compared using T-Tests and Chi 2 / Fisher Exact Tests and considered significant (*) at two-sided p palliative and hospice care representatives show divergence, which may be influenced one by another. A comprehensive framework considering conceptual, clinical, ethical, and legal aspects of different definitions of PS could help to better distinguish between different types and nuances of PS.

  14. Sedation for procedures outside the operating room in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina Rodriguez, Ericka

    2014-01-01

    Sedation is defined in the pediatric population. An adequate preoperative assessment is established in patients subjected to a sedation. Fundamental characteristics of drugs used during a sedation are determined. Recommendations about surveillance and monitoring are established in a patient sedated. Principal characteristics of sedation are defined in patients exposed to radiological diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Considerations in sedation are identified for procedures in the laboratory of digestive endoscopy. Alternatives of sedation are mentioned for oncological patients subjected to invasive procedures. Working conditions and specifications of anesthesia are determined in the cardiac catheterization room [es

  15. Sedation with nitrous oxide compared with no sedation during catheterization for urologic imaging in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zier, Judith L.; Kvam, Kathryn A.; Kurachek, Stephen C.; Finkelstein, Marsha

    2007-01-01

    Various strategies to mitigate children's distress during voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) have been described. Sedation with nitrous oxide is comparable to that with oral midazolam for VCUG, but a side-by-side comparison of nitrous oxide sedation and routine care is lacking. The effects of sedation/analgesia using 70% nitrous oxide and routine care for VCUG and radionuclide cystography (RNC) were compared. A sample of 204 children 4-18 years of age scheduled for VCUG or RNC with sedation or routine care were enrolled in this prospective study. Nitrous oxide/oxygen (70%/30%) was administered during urethral catheterization to children in the sedated group. The outcomes recorded included observed distress using the Brief Behavioral Distress Score, self-reported pain, and time in department. The study included 204 patients (99 nonsedated, 105 sedated) with a median age of 6.3 years (range 4.0-15.2 years). Distress and pain scores were greater in nonsedated than in sedated patients (P < 0.001). Time in department was longer in the sedated group (90 min vs. 30 min); however, time from entry to catheterization in a non-imaging area accounted for most of the difference. There was no difference in radiologic imaging time. Sedation with nitrous oxide is effective in reducing distress and pain during catheterization for VCUG or RNC in children. (orig.)

  16. The effect of neuromuscular blockade on oxygen consumption in sedated and mechanically ventilated pediatric patients after cardiac surgery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemson, J.; Driessen, J.J.; Hoeven, J.G. van der

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To measure the effect of intense neuromuscular blockade (NMB) on oxygen consumption (VO(2)) in deeply sedated and mechanically ventilated children on the first day after complex congenital cardiac surgery. DESIGN: Prospective clinical interventional study. SETTING: Pediatric intensive

  17. Downbeat Nystagmus Induced by Sedation in Lasik

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Paciuc-Beja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nystagmus was elicited during lasik under sedation in two patients that were treated for depression. Nystagmus was not present before or after surgery. Nystagmus can be pharmacologically induced and can be a hazard to refractive surgery.

  18. Trends in Continuous Deep Sedation until Death between 2007 and 2013: A Repeated Nationwide Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joachim; Rietjens, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Background Continuous deep sedation until death is a highly debated medical practice, particularly regarding its potential to hasten death and its proper use in end-of-life care. A thorough analysis of important trends in this practice is needed to identify potentially problematic developments. This study aims to examine trends in the prevalence and practice characteristics of continuous deep sedation until death in Flanders, Belgium between 2007 and 2013, and to study variation on physicians’ degree of palliative training. Methods Population-based death certificate study in 2007 and 2013 in Flanders, Belgium. Reporting physicians received questionnaires about medical practices preceding the patient’s death. Patient characteristics, clinical characteristics (drugs used, duration, artificial nutrition/hydration, intention and consent), and palliative care training of attending physician were recorded. We posed the following question regarding continuous deep sedation: ‘Was the patient continuously and deeply sedated or kept in a coma until death by the use of one or more drugs’. Results After the initial rise of continuous deep sedation to 14.5% in 2007 (95%CI 13.1%-15.9%), its use decreased to 12.0% in 2013 (95%CI 10.9%-13.2%). Compared with 2007, in 2013 opioids were less often used as sole drug and the decision to use continuous deep sedation was more often preceded by patient request. Compared to non-experts, palliative care experts more often used benzodiazepines and less often opioids, withheld artificial nutrition/hydration more often and performed sedation more often after a request from or with the consent of the patient or family. Conclusion Worldwide, this study is the first to show a decrease in the prevalence of continuous deep sedation. Despite positive changes in performance and decision-making towards more compliance with due care requirements, there is still room for improvement in the use of recommended drugs and in the involvement of

  19. Trends in Continuous Deep Sedation until Death between 2007 and 2013: A Repeated Nationwide Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenzo Robijn

    Full Text Available Continuous deep sedation until death is a highly debated medical practice, particularly regarding its potential to hasten death and its proper use in end-of-life care. A thorough analysis of important trends in this practice is needed to identify potentially problematic developments. This study aims to examine trends in the prevalence and practice characteristics of continuous deep sedation until death in Flanders, Belgium between 2007 and 2013, and to study variation on physicians' degree of palliative training.Population-based death certificate study in 2007 and 2013 in Flanders, Belgium. Reporting physicians received questionnaires about medical practices preceding the patient's death. Patient characteristics, clinical characteristics (drugs used, duration, artificial nutrition/hydration, intention and consent, and palliative care training of attending physician were recorded. We posed the following question regarding continuous deep sedation: 'Was the patient continuously and deeply sedated or kept in a coma until death by the use of one or more drugs'.After the initial rise of continuous deep sedation to 14.5% in 2007 (95%CI 13.1%-15.9%, its use decreased to 12.0% in 2013 (95%CI 10.9%-13.2%. Compared with 2007, in 2013 opioids were less often used as sole drug and the decision to use continuous deep sedation was more often preceded by patient request. Compared to non-experts, palliative care experts more often used benzodiazepines and less often opioids, withheld artificial nutrition/hydration more often and performed sedation more often after a request from or with the consent of the patient or family.Worldwide, this study is the first to show a decrease in the prevalence of continuous deep sedation. Despite positive changes in performance and decision-making towards more compliance with due care requirements, there is still room for improvement in the use of recommended drugs and in the involvement of patients and relatives in the

  20. Evaluation of nitrous oxide-oxygen and triclofos sodium as conscious sedative agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Subramaniam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Conscious sedation is used in the pediatric dentistry to reduce fear and anxiety in children and promote favorable treatment outcomes. To achieve them, the primary clinical need is for a well-tolerated, effective, and expedient analgesic and sedative agent that is safe to use. Aim: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of nitrous oxide-oxygen and triclofos sodium as conscious sedative agents in 5–10-year-old children. Methodology: Sixty children aged 5–10 years showing anxious, uncooperative, and apprehensive behavior were randomly divided and assigned into two groups (Groups A and B such that Group A received 40% nitrous oxide-60% oxygen and Group B received triclofos sodium in the dose of 70 mg/kg body weight, given 30 min before the treatment procedure. During the whole course of sedation procedure, the response of the child was assessed using Houpt's behavior rating scale. The acceptance of route of drug administration by the patient and parent was also assessed. Data obtained were statistically evaluated using the Mann–Whitney U-test and Chi-square test. Results: Children sedated with triclofos sodium were significantly more drowsy and disoriented compared to those sedated with nitrous oxide. The overall behavior of children in both the groups was similar. Good parental acceptance was observed for both the routes of administration. Patients accepted the oral route significantly better than inhalation route. Conclusion: Both nitrous oxide-oxygen and triclofos sodium were observed to be effective sedative agents, for successful and safe use in 5–10-year-old dental patients. Patients showed a good acceptance of the oral route compared to the inhalation route for sedation.

  1. Memory effects of sedative drugs in children and adolescents--protocol for a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Karolline A; Daher, Anelise; Maia, Lucianne C; Costa, Paulo S; Martins, Carolina C; Paiva, Saul M; Costa, Luciane R

    2016-02-18

    Some sedatives used in children and adolescents can affect memory function. Memory impairment of traumatic experience can minimize the chance of future psychological trauma. Knowledge about the potential of different sedatives to produce amnesia can help in the decision-making process of choosing a sedative regimen. The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the effect of different sedatives on memory of perioperative events in children and adolescents. Electronic databases and other sources, such as trial registers, gray literature, and conference abstracts will be searched. Randomized controlled trials will be included that assess memory of perioperative events in children and adolescents 2-19 years old receiving sedative drugs as premedication or as agents for procedural sedation in a medical or dental settings. The outcomes will be loss of memory after and before sedative administration (anterograde and retrograde amnesia). Two independent reviewers will perform screening, study selection, and data extraction. Disagreement at all levels will be resolved by consensus or by involving a third reviewer. Assessment of the risk of bias of included studies will be performed according to "Cochrane Collaboration's Tool for Assessing Risk of Bias in Randomized Trials." Clinical and methodological heterogeneity across studies will be evaluated to determine if it is possible to combine or not combine study results in a meta-analysis. To the best of our knowledge, there is no systematic review that specifically addresses this question. Findings from the review will be useful in the decision-making process about the best sedative for minimizing recall of the medical/dental event and possible psychological trauma. PROSPERO CRD42015017559.

  2. Clonidine for sedation and analgesia for neonates receiving mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romantsik, Olga; Calevo, Maria Grazia; Norman, Elisabeth; Bruschettini, Matteo

    2017-05-10

    Although routine administration of pharmacologic sedation or analgesia during mechanical ventilation in preterm neonates is not recommended, its use in clinical practice remains common. Alpha-2 agonists, mainly clonidine and dexmedetomidine, are used as adjunctive (or alternative) sedative agents alongside opioids and benzodiazepines. Clonidine has not been systematically assessed for use in neonatal sedation during ventilation. To assess whether clonidine administered to term and preterm newborn infants receiving mechanical ventilation reduces morbidity and mortality rates. To compare the intervention versus placebo, no treatment, and dexmedetomidine; and to assess the safety of clonidine infusion for potential harms.To perform subgroup analyses according to gestational age; birth weight; administration method (infusion or bolus therapy); dose, duration, and route of clonidine administration; and pharmacologic sedation as a co-intervention. We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 12) in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE via PubMed (1966 to January 10, 2017), Embase (1980 to January 10, 2017), and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL; 1982 to January 10, 2017). We also searched clinical trials databases, conference proceedings, and the reference lists of retrieved articles for randomized controlled trials and quasi-randomized trials. We searched for randomized controlled trials, quasi-randomized controlled trials, and cluster trials comparing clonidine versus placebo, no treatment, or dexmedetomidine administered to term and preterm newborns receiving mechanical ventilation via an endotracheal tube. For the included trial, two review authors independently extracted data (e.g. number of participants, birth weight, gestational age, all-cause death during initial hospitalization, duration of respiratory support, sedation

  3. Factors shaping effective utilization of health information technology in urban safety-net clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Sheba; Garth, Belinda; Fish, Allison; Baker, Richard

    2013-09-01

    Urban safety-net clinics are considered prime targets for the adoption of health information technology innovations; however, little is known about their utilization in such safety-net settings. Current scholarship provides limited guidance on the implementation of health information technology into safety-net settings as it typically assumes that adopting institutions have sufficient basic resources. This study addresses this gap by exploring the unique challenges urban resource-poor safety-net clinics must consider when adopting and utilizing health information technology. In-depth interviews (N = 15) were used with key stakeholders (clinic chief executive officers, medical directors, nursing directors, chief financial officers, and information technology directors) from staff at four clinics to explore (a) nonhealth information technology-related clinic needs, (b) how health information technology may provide solutions, and (c) perceptions of and experiences with health information technology. Participants identified several challenges, some of which appear amenable to health information technology solutions. Also identified were requirements for effective utilization of health information technology including physical infrastructural improvements, funding for equipment/training, creation of user groups to share health information technology knowledge/experiences, and specially tailored electronic billing guidelines. We found that despite the potential benefit that can be derived from health information technologies, the unplanned and uninformed introduction of these tools into these settings might actually create more problems than are solved. From these data, we were able to identify a set of factors that should be considered when integrating health information technology into the existing workflows of low-resourced urban safety-net clinics in order to maximize their utilization and enhance the quality of health care in such settings.

  4. Framework for continuous palliative sedation therapy in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Mervyn M; Cellarius, Victor; Henry, Blair; Oneschuk, Doreen; Librach Canadian Society Of Palliative Care Physicians Taskforce, S Lawrence

    2012-08-01

    Canada does not have a standardized ethical and practice framework for continuous palliative sedation therapy (CPST). Although a number of institutional and regional guidelines exist, Canadian practice varies. Given the lack of international and national consensus on CPST, the Canadian Society for Palliative Care Physicians (CSPCP) formed a special task force to develop a consensus-based framework for CPST. Through a preliminary review of sedation practices nationally and internationally, it was determined that although considerable consensus was emerging on this topic, there remained both areas of contention and a lack of credible scientific evidence to support a definitive clinical practice guideline. This led to the creation of a framework to help guide policy, practice, and research. This framework was developed through the following steps: 1) literature review; 2) identification of issues; 3) preparation of a draft framework; 4) expert consultation and revision; 5) presentation at conferences and further revision; and 6) further revision and national consensus building. A thorough literature review, including gray literature, of sedation therapy at the end of life was conducted from which an initial framework was drafted. This document was reviewed by 30 multidisciplinary experts in Canada and internationally, revised several times, and then submitted to CSPCP members for review. Consensus was high on most parts of the framework. The framework for CPST will provide a basis for the development of safe, effective, and ethical use of CPST for patients in palliative care and at the end of life.

  5. [Application of bispectral index monitoring in sedation and analgesia for flexible bronchoscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, S R; Liu, Y J; Su, N J; Shu, Y; Gu, W

    2017-12-12

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of using bispectral index monitoring in sedation and analgesia for bronchoscopy. Methods: Totally 285 patients admitted to the Respiratory Medicine Department of Nanjing First Hospital for bronchoscopy between June 2016 and December 2016 were assigned, according to their own wishes, into a conscious sedation group (171 cases receiving local anesthesia and conscious sedation, 89 males, 82 females, mean age 59±10 years) and a control group (114 cases undergoing local anesthesia, 59 males, 55 females, average age 61±12 years). The 2 groups were compared in terms of operation time, blood pressure, heart rate and other indicators during bronchoscopy including incidence of adverse events, memory of the procedure, willingness to be re-examined, safety of sedation and analgesia for bronchoscopy under bispectral index monitoring, and patient satisfaction in the postoperative follow-up. Results: The conscious sedation group and the control group had no difference in age and sex ratio( P >0.05). Compared with the patients in the control group(operation time 16±5 min and systolic blood pressure 153±21 mmHg, 1 mmHg=0.133 kPa), those in the conscious sedation group had a shorter operation time(14±5 min) and a lower systolic blood pressure(144±22 mmHg), with statistically significant difference ( P sedation group and 92±12 mmHg and 87±14 times/min in the control group, P >0.05). Adverse events, overall intraoperative cough and bleeding were found to be significantly reduced in the conscious sedation group (27%, 4% and 13% and 60%, 13% and 35% in the control group, P sedation group, and 14% in the control group, P =0.72). Patient satisfaction and willingness to be re-examined were markedly higher in the conscious sedation group (97%) than in the controls (4%, P sedation and analgesia for bronchoscopy and has higher patient satisfaction, suggesting that it is a potential tool for use in clinical practice.

  6. The safety and efficacy of intranasal midazolam sedation combined with inhalation sedation with nitrous oxide and oxygen in paediatric dental patients as an alternative to general anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Conscious Decision' was published in 2000 by the Department of Health, effectively ending the provision of dental general anaesthesia (DGA) outside the hospital environment. Other aspects of dental anxiety and behavioural management and sedation techniques were encouraged before the decision to refer for a DGA was reached. Although some anxious children may be managed with relative analgesia (RA), some may require different sedation techniques for dentists to accomplish dental treatment. Little evidence has been published in the UK to support the use of alternative sedation techniques in children. This paper presents another option using an alternative conscious sedation technique. to determine whether a combination of intranasal midazolam (IN) and inhalation sedation with nitrous oxide and oxygen is a safe and practical alternative to DGA. A prospective clinical audit of 100 cases was carried out on children referred to a centre for DGA. 100 children between 3 and 13 years of age who were referred for DGA were treated using this technique. Sedation was performed by intranasal midazolam followed by titrating a mixture of nitrous oxide and oxygen. A range of dental procedures was carried out while the children were sedated. Parents were present during the dental treatment. Data related to the patient, dentistry and treatment as well as sedation variables were collected at the treatment visit and a telephonic post-operative assessment from the parents was completed a week later. It was found that 96% of the required dental treatment was completed successfully using this technique, with parents finding this technique acceptable in 93% of cases. 50% of children found the intranasal administration of the midazolam acceptable. There was no clinically relevant oxygen desaturation during the procedure. Patients were haemodynamically stable and verbal contact was maintained throughout the procedure. In selected cases this technique provides a safe and effective alternative

  7. Safety of Conscious Sedation In Interventional Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arepally, Aravind; Oechsle, Denise; Kirkwood, Sharon; Savader, Scott J.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To identify rates of adverse events associated with the use of conscious sedation in interventional radiology.Methods: In a 5-month period, prospective data were collected on patients undergoing conscious sedation for interventional radiology procedures (n = 594). Adverse events were categorized as respiratory, sedative, or major adverse events. Respiratory adverse events were those that required oral airway placement, ambu bag, or jaw thrust. Sedation adverse events were unresponsiveness, oxygen saturation less than 90%, use of flumazenil/naloxone, or agitation. Major adverse events were hypotension, intubation, CPR, or cardiac arrest. The frequency of adverse events for the five most common radiology procedures were determined.Results: The five most common procedures (total n = 541) were biliary tube placement/exchange (n = 182), tunneled catheter placement (n 135), diagnostic arteriography (n = 125), vascular interventions (n = 52), and other catheter insertions (n = 46). Rates for respiratory, sedation, and major adverse events were 4.7%, 4.2%, and 2.0%, respectively. The most frequent major adverse event was hypotension (2.0%). Biliary procedures had the highest rate of total adverse events (p < .05) and respiratory adverse events (p < .05).Conclusion: The frequency of adverse events is low with the use of conscious sedation during interventional procedures. The highest rates occurred during biliary interventions

  8. Nurse-administered propofol sedation for endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J T; Vilmann, P; Horsted, T

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS: The aim of the present study was to perform a risk analysis during the implementation phase of nurse-administered propofol sedation (NAPS) and to validate our structured training program. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A structured training program was developed both for endosco......BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS: The aim of the present study was to perform a risk analysis during the implementation phase of nurse-administered propofol sedation (NAPS) and to validate our structured training program. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A structured training program was developed both...... pressure was recorded in 451 patients (26%). Independent risk factors were type of intervention and level of experience of the staff performing the sedation. CONCLUSION: These results were obtained after development of a structured training program both for endoscopists and nurses using propofol...... for sedation, and can be used as basis for further comparison. NAPS for endoscopic procedures is safe when performed by personnel properly trained in airway handling and sedation with propofol, and has considerable advantages compared with conventional sedation for endoscopy....

  9. Danish research-active clinical nurses overcome barriers in research utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamsen, Lis; Larsen, Kristian; Bjerregaard, Lene; Madsen, Jan K

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether there was a difference between clinical nurses who were research-active, and clinical nurses who were nonresearch-active in utilization of research. A further aim was to identify the most significant barriers faced by a group of Danish clinical nurses in their use of research. Discrepancy between the improved quality of research results and the lack of implementing them was the starting point for a series of studies which showed the types of barriers clinical nurses found especially cumbersome when applying the research results of other researchers. This study investigates whether the clinical nurses' own engagement in research had any impact on their perception of research utilization. The study had an exploratory and descriptive design. Seventy-nine Danish clinical nurses participated and semi-structured interviewing was used as the research method. There was a statistically significant difference between the research-active and nonresearch-active nurses on various variables. The study showed that, to a larger extent, research-active nurses used evidence-based knowledge and were generally more internationally orientated. Furthermore, two important barriers for research utilization were identified by all 79 clinical nurses included in the study, i.e. 90% of the nurses explained that the quantity of research results was overwhelming, and 75% of them found that they were unable to evaluate the quality of the research. Clinical nurses, who were research-active themselves, experienced more success in overcoming some of the barriers, which existed in applying research to practice. The research potential found amongst clinical nurses in Denmark needed to be further supported through training and guidance in research methodology, establishing introductory stipends and part-time research positions. By doing so, some of the barriers affecting research utilization and the so-called theory-practice gap might be reduced. Further

  10. Determining utility values in patients with anterior cruciate ligament tears using clinical scoring systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szucs Thomas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several instruments and clinical scoring systems have been established to evaluate patients with ligamentous knee injuries. A comparison of individual articles in the literature is challenging, not only because of heterogeneity in methodology, but also due to the variety of the scoring systems used to document clinical outcomes. There is limited information about the correlation between used scores and quality of life with no information being available on the impact of each score on the utility values. The aim of this study was to compare the most commonly used scores for evaluating patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injuries, and to establish corresponding utility values. These values will be used for the interpretation and comparison of outcome results in the currently available literature for different treatment options. Methods Four hypothetical vignettes were defined, based on different levels of activities after rupture of the ACL to simulate typical situations seen in daily practice. A questionnaire, including the Health Utility Index (HUI for utility values, the IKDC subjective score, the Lysholm and the Tegner score, was created and 25 orthopedic surgeons were asked to fill the questionnaire for each hypothetical patient as proxies for all patients they had treated and who would fit in that hypothetical vignette. Results The utility value as an indicator for quality of life increased with the level of activity. Having discomforts already during normal activities of daily living was rated with a mean utility value of 0.37 ± 0.19, half of that of a situation where mild sport activity was possible without discomfort (0.78 ± 0.11. All investigated scores were able to distinguish clearly (p Conclusions Here we report the correlation between the most commonly used scores for the assessment of patients with a ruptured ACL and utility values as an indicator of quality of life. Assumptions were based on expert

  11. Patterns of health service utilization at a medical school clinic in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yawson, A E; Malm, K L; Adu, A A; Wontumi, G-M; Biritwum, R B

    2012-09-01

    The University of Ghana Medical School (UGMS) Clinic provides healthcare service which is free at point of service to students, staff, retired staff and dependents of staff of the College of Health Sciences. However, since 1983, no in-depth review of health service provision or utilization has been undertaken. This study reviewed client characteristics, utilization and disease patterns at the clinic and also compared the disease patterns to that of other primary health facilities nationwide. This was an analytical cross-sectional study undertaken at the UGMS clinic in Korle-Bu. It was a retrospective review of records of all clients attending the facility from January 2002 to December, 2004. More males than females attended the clinic and majority (63.9%) of clients were between 15-44 years (median age was 26 years). Dependents of staff constituted the highest attendants (41%) to the clinic. Among staff, junior staffs were in the majority. Malaria, respiratory tract infection and musculoskeletal pain were the most common conditions seen. Overall, 83% of clients were treated and discharged per visit without the need for review visits. Dependents of staff used the facility the most and they live in many different part of the city of Accra, and to ask them to attend the clinic for care is not efficient. It will be better to provide or supplement their securing of insurance so that they could access health care close to their homes and save time and attention to students and staff.

  12. Palliative sedation, not slow euthanasia: a prospective, longitudinal study of sedation in Flemish palliative care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claessens, Patricia; Menten, Johan; Schotsmans, Paul; Broeckaert, Bert

    2011-01-01

    Palliative sedation remains a much debated and controversial issue. The limited literature on the topic often fails to answer ethical questions concerning this practice. The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of patients who are being sedated for refractory symptoms in palliative care units (PCUs) from the time of admission until the day of death. A prospective, longitudinal, descriptive design was used to assess data in eight PCUs. The total sample consisted of 266 patients. Information on demographics, medication, food and fluid intake, decision making, level of consciousness, and symptom experience were gathered by nurses and researchers three times a week. If patients received palliative sedation, extra information was gathered. Of all included patients (n=266), 7.5% received palliative sedation. Sedation started, on average, 2.5 days before death and for half of these patients, the form of sedation changed over time. At the start of sedation, patients were in the end stage of their illness and needed total care. Patients were fully conscious and had very limited oral food or fluid intake. Only three patients received artificial fluids at the start of sedation. Patients reported, on average, two refractory symptoms, the most important ones being pain, fatigue, depression, drowsiness, and loss of feeling of well-being. In all cases, the patient gave consent to start palliative sedation because of increased suffering. This study revealed that palliative sedation is only administered in exceptional cases where refractory suffering is evident and for those patients who are close to the ends of their lives. Moreover, this study supports the argument that palliative sedation has no life-shortening effect. Copyright © 2011 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Sedation and Analgesia in Burn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özkan Akıncı

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Burn injury is one of the most serious injuries that mankind may face. In addition to serious inflammation, excessive fluid loss, presence of hemodynamic instability due to intercurrent factors such as debridements, infections and organ failure, very different levels and intensities of pain, psychological problems such as traumatic stress disorder, depression, delirium at different levels that occur in patient with severe burn are the factors which make it difficult to provide the patient comfort. In addition to a mild to moderate level of baseline permanent pain in burn patients, which is due to tissue damage, there is procedural pain as well, which occurs by treatments such as grafting and dressings, that are severe, short-term burst style 'breakthrough' pain. Movement and tactile stimuli are also seen in burn injury as an effect to sensitize the peripheral and central nervous system. Even though many burn centers have established protocols to struggle with the pain, studies show that pain relief still inadequate in burn patients. Therefore, the treatment of burn pain and the prevention of possible emergence of future psychiatric problems suc as post-traumatic stress disorder, the sedative and anxiolytic agents should be used as a recommendation according to the needs and hemodynamic status of individual patient. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9 Suppl: 26-30

  14. Safe Driving After Propofol Sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerlin-Grady, Lee; Austin, Paul N; Gabaldon, Dion A

    2017-10-01

    Propofol is a short-acting medication with fast cognitive and psychomotor recovery. However, patients are usually instructed not to drive a motor vehicle for 24 hours after receiving propofol. The purpose of this article was to review the evidence examining when it is safe to drive after receiving propofol for sedation for diagnostic and surgical procedures. This is a systematic review of the literature. A search of the literature was conducted using Google Scholar, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library for the time period 1990 to 2015. Two randomized controlled trials and two observational studies met the inclusion criteria. Using a simulator, investigators examined driving ability of subjects who received modest doses (about 100 mg) of propofol for endoscopic procedures and surveyed subjects who drove immediately after discharge. There were methodological concerns with the studies such as small sample sizes, modest doses of propofol, and three of the four studies were done in Japan by the same group of investigators limiting generalizability. This limited research suggests that it may be safe for patients to drive sooner than 24 hours after receiving propofol. However, large multicenter trials using heterogenous samples using a range of propofol doses are needed to support an evidence-based revision to the current discharge guidelines for patients receiving propofol. Copyright © 2016 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The utility of observational studies in clinical decision making: lessons learned from statin trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foody, JoAnne M; Mendys, Phillip M; Liu, Larry Z; Simpson, Ross J

    2010-05-01

    Contemporary clinical decision making is well supported by a wide variety of information sources, including clinical practice guidelines, position papers, and insights from randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Much of our fundamental understanding of cardiovascular risk factors is based on multiple observations from major epidemiologic studies, such as The Seven Country Studies and the US-based Framingham Heart Study. These studies provided the framework for the development of clinical practice guidelines, including the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel series. The objective of this article is to highlight the value of observational studies as a complement to clinical trial data for clinical decision making in real-world practice. Although RCTs are still the benchmark for assessing clinical efficacy and safety of a specific therapeutic approach, they may be of limited utility to practitioners who must then adapt the lessons learned from the trial into the patient care environment. The use of well-structured observational studies can improve our understanding of the translation of clinical trials into clinical practice, as demonstrated here with the example of statins. Although such studies have their own limitations, improved techniques for design and analysis have reduced the impact of bias and confounders. The introduction of the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) guidelines has provided more uniformity for such studies. When used together with RCTs, observational studies can enhance our understanding of effectiveness and utility in real-world clinical practice. In the examples of statin observational studies, the results suggest that relative effectiveness of different statins and potential impact of switching statins should be carefully considered in treating individual patients by practicing physicians.

  16. Utilization of a Clinical Trial Management System for the Whole Clinical Trial Process as an Integrated Database: System Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yu Rang; Yoon, Young Jo; Koo, HaYeong; Yoo, Soyoung; Choi, Chang-Min; Beck, Sung-Ho; Kim, Tae Won

    2018-04-24

    Clinical trials pose potential risks in both communications and management due to the various stakeholders involved when performing clinical trials. The academic medical center has a responsibility and obligation to conduct and manage clinical trials while maintaining a sufficiently high level of quality, therefore it is necessary to build an information technology system to support standardized clinical trial processes and comply with relevant regulations. The objective of the study was to address the challenges identified while performing clinical trials at an academic medical center, Asan Medical Center (AMC) in Korea, by developing and utilizing a clinical trial management system (CTMS) that complies with standardized processes from multiple departments or units, controlled vocabularies, security, and privacy regulations. This study describes the methods, considerations, and recommendations for the development and utilization of the CTMS as a consolidated research database in an academic medical center. A task force was formed to define and standardize the clinical trial performance process at the site level. On the basis of the agreed standardized process, the CTMS was designed and developed as an all-in-one system complying with privacy and security regulations. In this study, the processes and standard mapped vocabularies of a clinical trial were established at the academic medical center. On the basis of these processes and vocabularies, a CTMS was built which interfaces with the existing trial systems such as the electronic institutional review board health information system, enterprise resource planning, and the barcode system. To protect patient data, the CTMS implements data governance and access rules, and excludes 21 personal health identifiers according to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) privacy rule and Korean privacy laws. Since December 2014, the CTMS has been successfully implemented and used by 881 internal and

  17. Comparison of Dexmedetomidine and Midazolam in Sedation for Percutaneous Drainage of Hepatic Hydatid Cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavullu, Emine Nilgün; Aksoy, Esra; Abdullayev, Ruslan; Göğüş, Nermin; Dede, Doğan

    2013-12-01

    Hydatid cyst still continues to be a public health problem. The basic treatment for the disease is surgery, but ultrasound-guided percutaneous drainage has become an important treatment alternative. Agents preferred for sedation during drainage performed under local anaesthesia must also preserve respiration and hemodynamic stability while providing adequate sedation. We compared the sedative properties of midazolam, which has a short duration of action, and a selective α2 adrenergic receptor agonist, dexmedetomidine, and the intraoperative complications. After approval by the clinical trials ethics committee, 40 patients with similar demographic data were randomized into two groups. All patients received 10 mg metoclopramide and 45.5 mg pheniramine before the procedure. Then, midazolam (0.07 mg kg(-1) IV bolus followed by 0.01 mg kg(-1) h(-1) infusion) was administered to Group 1, and dexmedetomidine (1 μg kg(-1) loading dose in 10 minutes, followed by 0.2 μg kg(-1) h(-1) continuous infusion) was administered to Group 2 for sedation. Just before the surgical procedure, all patients received IV propofol in a subhypnotic dose of 0.5 mg kg(-1); the dose was repeated if adequate sedation could not be achieved. Observer's assessment of alertness/sedation (OAA/S) scale and Bispectral index (BIS) were used to evaluate the sedation level during the procedure. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), respiratory rate (RR), peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) and end-tidal carbon dioxide pressure (ETCO2) were monitored before and after induction and every 5 minutes thereafter. Propofol requirement was noted for each group. Sedation in the dexmedetomidine group was as effective and adequate as that observed in the midazolam group. BIS values were significantly lower in the dexmedetomidine group, especially after 10 minutes and thereafter. RR, SpO2, and ETCO2 were similar in both groups, whereas clinically insignificant decreases in HR and MAP were observed in the

  18. Homeless Veterans' Use of Peer Mentors and Effects on Costs and Utilization in VA Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jean; Lo, Jeanie; Gehlert, Elizabeth; Johnson, Erin E; O'Toole, Thomas P

    2017-06-01

    The study compared health care utilization and costs among homeless veterans randomly assigned to peer mentors or usual care and described contacts with peer mentors. Homeless patients at four Department of Veterans Affairs clinics were randomly assigned to a peer mentor (N=195) or to usual care (N=180). Administrative data on utilization and costs over a six-month follow-up were combined with peer mentors' reports of patient contacts. Most patients (87%) in the peer mentor group had at least one peer contact. Patients in this group spent the largest proportions of time discussing housing and health issues with peer mentors and had more outpatient encounters than those in usual care, although differences were not significant. No other between-group differences were found in utilization or costs. Although significant impacts of peer mentors on health care patterns or costs were not detected, some patients had frequent contact with peer mentors.

  19. Importance of the use of protocols for the management of analgesia and sedation in pediatric intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliana Motta

    Full Text Available Summary Introduction: Analgesia and sedation are essential elements in patient care in the intensive care unit (ICU, in order to promote the control of pain, anxiety and agitation, prevent the loss of devices, accidental extubation, and improve the synchrony of the patient with mechanical ventilation. However, excess of these medications leads to rise in morbidity and mortality. The ideal management will depend on the adoption of clinical and pharmacological measures, guided by scales and protocols. Objective: Literature review on the main aspects of analgesia and sedation, abstinence syndrome, and delirium in the pediatric intensive care unit, in order to show the importance of the use of protocols on the management of critically ill patients. Method: Articles published in the past 16 years on PubMed, Lilacs, and the Cochrane Library, with the terms analgesia, sedation, abstinence syndrome, mild sedation, daily interruption, and intensive care unit. Results: Seventy-six articles considered relevant were selected to describe the importance of using a protocol of sedation and analgesia. They recommended mild sedation and the use of assessment scales, daily interruptions, and spontaneous breathing test. These measures shorten the time of mechanical ventilation, as well as length of hospital stay, and help to control abstinence and delirium, without increasing the risk of morbidity and morbidity. Conclusion: Despite the lack of controlled and randomized clinical trials in the pediatric setting, the use of protocols, optimizing mild sedation, leads to decreased morbidity.

  20. Clinical utility of EEG in diagnosing and monitoring epilepsy in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatum, W O; Rubboli, G; Kaplan, P W; Mirsatari, S M; Radhakrishnan, K; Gloss, D; Caboclo, L O; Drislane, F W; Koutroumanidis, M; Schomer, D L; Kasteleijn-Nolst Trenite, D; Cook, Mark; Beniczky, S

    2018-05-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) remains an essential diagnostic tool for people with epilepsy (PWE). The International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology produces new guidelines as an educational service for clinicians to address gaps in knowledge in clinical neurophysiology. The current guideline was prepared in response to gaps present in epilepsy-related neurophysiological assessment and is not intended to replace sound clinical judgement in the care of PWE. Furthermore, addressing specific pathophysiological conditions of the brain that produce epilepsy is of primary importance though is beyond the scope of this guideline. Instead, our goal is to summarize the scientific evidence for the utility of EEG when diagnosing and monitoring PWE. Copyright © 2018 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A critical appraisal of the clinical utility of proton therapy in oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongxu

    2015-01-01

    Proton therapy is an emerging technology for providing radiation therapy to cancer patients. The depth dose distribution of a proton beam makes it a preferable radiation modality as it reduces radiation to the healthy tissue outside the tumor, compared with conventional photon therapy. While theoretically beneficial, its clinical values are still being demonstrated from the increasing number of patients treated with proton therapy, from several dozen proton therapy centers around the world. High equipment and facility costs are often the major obstacle for its wider adoption. Because of the high cost and lack of definite clinical evidence of its superiority, proton therapy treatment faces criticism on its cost-effectiveness. Technological development is causing a gradual lowering of costs, and research and clinical studies are providing further evidence on its clinical utility. PMID:26604838

  2. Microdose clinical trial by use of radioisotope and perspective of its possible utilization in drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Tsuneo; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2009-01-01

    Many promising PET tracers have been developed by the progress of molecular imaging research, and new era could be opened by clinical trials using investigational products labeled by RI. Guidance for microdose clinical trial issued by MHLW in June, 2008, is the regulatory basis to develop PET tracer under clinical trial by the pharmaceutical affairs law. In this review, the discussion from the aspect of regulatory science is highlighted, particularly, on the topics of guidance for microdose and exploratory IND study including sub-therapeutic dose (type II) and therapeutic dose (type III), the revised GMP for investigational product including RI-labeled product, and to ward guidance for microdose clinical trial for biological product. Finally, the US FDA guidance developing medical imaging drug including biological product is introduced, and then perspective of possible utilization of in vivo radiopharmaceutical agents in drug development is discussed. (author)

  3. Proposed Guideline Revisions for Dental Sedation and General Anesthesia: Why Target the Safest Level of Sedation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionne, Raymond A

    2016-09-01

    Recently proposed revisions to the American Dental Association's Guidelines for the Use of Sedation and General Anesthesia by Dentists, aimed at improving safety in dental offices, differentiate between levels of sedation based on drug-induced changes in physiologic and behavioral states. However, the author of this op-ed is concerned the proposed revisions may have far-reaching and unintended consequences.

  4. Clinical Utility of the DSM-5 Alternative Model of Personality Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Bo; Markon, Kristian; Simonsen, Erik

    2015-01-01

    In Section III, Emerging Measures and Models, DSM-5 presents an Alternative Model of Personality Disorders, which is an empirically based model of personality pathology measured with the Level of Personality Functioning Scale (LPFS) and the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5). These novel...... instruments assess level of personality impairment and pathological traits. Objective. A number of studies have supported the psychometric qualities of the LPFS and the PID-5, but the utility of these instruments in clinical assessment and treatment has not been extensively evaluated. The goal of this study...... was to evaluate the clinical utility of this alternative model of personality disorders. Method. We administered the LPFS and the PID-5 to psychiatric outpatients diagnosed with personality disorders and other nonpsychotic disorders. The personality profiles of six characteristic patients were inspected...

  5. Utilizing data grid architecture for the backup and recovery of clinical image data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Brent J; Zhou, M Z; Documet, J

    2005-01-01

    Grid Computing represents the latest and most exciting technology to evolve from the familiar realm of parallel, peer-to-peer and client-server models. However, there has been limited investigation into the impact of this emerging technology in medical imaging and informatics. In particular, PACS technology, an established clinical image repository system, while having matured significantly during the past ten years, still remains weak in the area of clinical image data backup. Current solutions are expensive or time consuming and the technology is far from foolproof. Many large-scale PACS archive systems still encounter downtime for hours or days, which has the critical effect of crippling daily clinical operations. In this paper, a review of current backup solutions will be presented along with a brief introduction to grid technology. Finally, research and development utilizing the grid architecture for the recovery of clinical image data, in particular, PACS image data, will be presented. The focus of this paper is centered on applying a grid computing architecture to a DICOM environment since DICOM has become the standard for clinical image data and PACS utilizes this standard. A federation of PACS can be created allowing a failed PACS archive to recover its image data from others in the federation in a seamless fashion. The design reflects the five-layer architecture of grid computing: Fabric, Resource, Connectivity, Collective, and Application Layers. The testbed Data Grid is composed of one research laboratory and two clinical sites. The Globus 3.0 Toolkit (Co-developed by the Argonne National Laboratory and Information Sciences Institute, USC) for developing the core and user level middleware is utilized to achieve grid connectivity. The successful implementation and evaluation of utilizing data grid architecture for clinical PACS data backup and recovery will provide an understanding of the methodology for using Data Grid in clinical image data backup for

  6. Does the concept of borderline personality features have clinical utility in childhood?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawes, David J

    2014-01-01

    Phenotypic features of borderline personality disorder may first emerge during childhood, alongside symptoms of common externalizing and internalizing disorders. Children with these borderline personality features (BPF) are, therefore, likely to come into contact with clinical services prior to adolescence. This raises the question of whether BPF may be clinically informative with respect to the formulation and treatment of childhood psychopathology. BPF in late childhood appear to be highly heritable, while also predicted by environmental risk factors that overlap with those related to both externalizing and internalizing disorders. These risk factors include hostile parenting, maternal insensitivity to infant attachment cues, and early peer victimization, thereby implicating both family and peer processes that play out across early development. Children with BPF appear to be further characterized by social-cognitive factors including social perspective coordination deficits, a shame-prone self-concept, and hypermentalizing, which may represent potential therapeutic targets. Clinical research into the implications of BPF for the treatment of childhood psychopathology is a current priority. It is proposed that the research designs that have contributed to recent evidence for the clinical utility of childhood psychopathic traits may likewise aid in understanding the potential clinical utility of BPF in children.

  7. Integrating utilization-focused evaluation with business process modeling for clinical research improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Jonathan M; Rosas, Scott; Trochim, William M K

    2010-10-01

    New discoveries in basic science are creating extraordinary opportunities to design novel biomedical preventions and therapeutics for human disease. But the clinical evaluation of these new interventions is, in many instances, being hindered by a variety of legal, regulatory, policy and operational factors, few of which enhance research quality, the safety of study participants or research ethics. With the goal of helping increase the efficiency and effectiveness of clinical research, we have examined how the integration of utilization-focused evaluation with elements of business process modeling can reveal opportunities for systematic improvements in clinical research. Using data from the NIH global HIV/AIDS clinical trials networks, we analyzed the absolute and relative times required to traverse defined phases associated with specific activities within the clinical protocol lifecycle. Using simple median duration and Kaplan-Meyer survival analysis, we show how such time-based analyses can provide a rationale for the prioritization of research process analysis and re-engineering, as well as a means for statistically assessing the impact of policy modifications, resource utilization, re-engineered processes and best practices. Successfully applied, this approach can help researchers be more efficient in capitalizing on new science to speed the development of improved interventions for human disease.

  8. The role of sedation tests in identifying sedative drug effects in healthy volunteers and their power to dissociate sedative-related impairments from memory dysfunctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wezenberg, E.; Sabbe, B.G.C.; Hulstijn, W.; Ruigt, G.S.F.; Verkes, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    The study investigated whether four specified drugs would show similar patterns on tests considered to measure sedation. In addition, their drug-effect patterns on sedation and memory performance were compared to determine whether the sedative effects could be differentiated from the memory effects.

  9. The role of sedation tests in identifying sedative drug effects in healthy volunteers and their power to dissociate sedative-related impairments from memory dysfunctions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wezenberg, E.; Sabbe, B.G.C.; Hulstijn, W.; Ruigt, G.S.F.; Verkes, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    The study investigated whether four specified drugs would show similar patterns on tests considered to measure sedation. In addition, their drug-effect patterns on sedation and memory performance were compared to determine whether the sedative effects could be differentiated from the memory

  10. A review of the clinical utility of duloxetine in the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King JB

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Jordan B King, Marisa B Schauerhamer, Brandon K Bellows Pharmacotherapy Outcomes Research Center, University of Utah College of Pharmacy, Salt Lake City, UT, USA Abstract: Diabetes mellitus is a world-wide epidemic with many long-term complications, with neuropathy being the most common. In particular, diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain (DPNP, can be one of the most distressing complications associated with diabetes, leading to decreases in physical and mental quality of life. Despite the availability of many efficient medications, DPNP remains a challenge to treat, and the optimal sequencing of pharmacotherapy remains unknown. Currently, there are only three medications approved by the US Food and Drug Administration specifically for the management of DPNP. Duloxetine (DUL, a selective serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, is one of these. With the goal of optimizing pharmacotherapy use in DPNP population, a review of current literature was conducted, and the clinical utility of DUL described. Along with early clinical trials, recently published observational studies and pharmacoeconomic models may be useful in guiding decision making by clinicians and managed care organizations. In real-world practice settings, DUL is associated with decreased or similar opioid utilization, increased medication adherence, and similar health care costs compared with current standard of care. DUL has consistently been found to be a cost-effective option over short time-horizons. Currently, the long-term cost-effectiveness of DUL is unknown. Evidence derived from randomized clinical trials, real-world observations, and economic models support the use of DUL as a first-line treatment option from the perspective of the patient, clinician, and managed care payer. Keywords: clinical trials, pharmacoeconomic studies, opioid-utilization, health care utilization, pregabalin, tricyclic antidepressants, gabapentin

  11. Nitric oxide nanoparticles: Pre-clinical utility as a therapeutic for intramuscular abscesses

    OpenAIRE

    Schairer, David O.; Martinez, Luis R.; Blecher, Karin; Chouake, Jason S.; Nacharaju, Parimala; Gialanella, Philip; Friedman, Joel M.; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Friedman, Adam J.

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a critical component of host defense against invading pathogens; however, its therapeutic utility is limited due to a lack of practical delivery systems. Recently, a NO-releasing nanoparticulate platform (NO-np) was shown to have in vitro broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and in vivo pre-clinical efficacy in a dermal abscess model. To extend these findings, both topical (TP) and intralesional (IL) NO-np administration was evaluated in a MRSA intramuscular murine absce...

  12. Population pharmacodynamic modelling of midazolam induced sedation in terminally ill adult patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Winter, Brenda C. M.; Masman, Anniek D.; van Dijk, Monique; Baar, Frans P. M.; Tibboel, Dick; Koch, Birgit C. P.; van Gelder, Teun; Mathot, Ron A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Aims Midazolam is the drug of choice for palliative sedation and is titrated to achieve the desired level of sedation. A previous pharmacokinetic (PK) study showed that variability between patients could be partly explained by renal function and inflammatory status. The goal of this study was to combine this PK information with pharmacodynamic (PD) data, to evaluate the variability in response to midazolam and to find clinically relevant covariates that may predict PD response. Method A population PD analysis using nonlinear mixed effect models was performed with data from 43 terminally ill patients. PK profiles were predicted by a previously described PK model and depth of sedation was measured using the Ramsay sedation score. Patient and disease characteristics were evaluated as possible covariates. The final model was evaluated using a visual predictive check. Results The effect of midazolam on the sedation level was best described by a differential odds model including a baseline probability, Emax model and interindividual variability on the overall effect. The EC50 value was 68.7 μg l–1 for a Ramsay score of 3–5 and 117.1 μg l–1 for a Ramsay score of 6. Comedication with haloperidol was the only significant covariate. The visual predictive check of the final model showed good model predictability. Conclusion We were able to describe the clinical response to midazolam accurately. As expected, there was large variability in response to midazolam. The use of haloperidol was associated with a lower probability of sedation. This may be a result of confounding by indication, as haloperidol was used to treat delirium, and deliria has been linked to a more difficult sedation procedure. PMID:28960387

  13. An open-access endoscopy screen correctly and safely identifies patients for conscious sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Darshan; Feuerstein, Joseph D; Moss, Laureen; D'Souza, Julie; Montanaro, Kerri; Leffler, Daniel A; Sheth, Sunil G

    2016-11-01

    Open-access scheduling is highly utilized for facilitating generally low-risk endoscopies. Preprocedural screening addresses sedation requirements; however, procedural safety may be compromised if screening is inaccurate. We sought to determine the reliability of our open-access scheduling system for appropriate use of conscious sedation. We prospectively and consecutively enrolled outpatient procedures booked at an academic center by open-access using screening after in-office gastroenterology (GI) consultation. We collected the cases inappropriately booked for conscious sedation and compared the characteristics for significant differences. A total of 8063 outpatients were scheduled for procedures with conscious sedation, and 5959 were booked with open-access. Only 78 patients (0.97%, 78/8063) were identified as subsequently needing anesthesiologist-assisted sedation; 44 (56.4%, 44/78) were booked through open-access, of which chronic opioid (47.7%, 21/44) or benzodiazepine use (34.1%, 15/44) were the most common reasons for needing anesthesiologist-assisted sedation. Patients on chronic benzodiazepines required more midazolam than those not on chronic benzodiazepines (P = .03) of those patients who underwent conscious sedation. Similarly, patients with chronic opioid use required more fentanyl than those without chronic opioid use (P = .04). Advanced liver disease and alcohol use were common reasons for patients being booked after in-office consultation and were significantly higher than those booked with open-access (both P open-access scheduling. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press and Sixth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University.

  14. Deep Brain Stimulation Utilizing Dexmedetomidine: A Clinical Report from theUniversity of Miami Miller School of Medicine

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    Derek B Covington

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Deep brain stimulation (DBS is an increasingly utilized technique to treat symptoms of neurological movement disorders, most commonly, Parkinson′s Disease. Patients and surgeons alike appreciate the minimally invasive nature of this procedure, as well as its reversibility. As these surgeries are being performed more often, it is becoming increasingly important to optimize our anesthetic management during these cases. Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of the DBS procedures that have been performed at our institution utilizing monitored anaesthesia care (MAC via dexmedetomidine infusion to report on the frequency and type of perioperative complications as well as to assess the effectiveness of this technique. Results: A total of 150 patients and 174 lead placements were included in this study. Dexmedetomidine was the sole anaesthetic used in 85.6% of cases. The remaining cases used a combination of dexmedetomidine and adjuvant agents. A total of one perioperative complication was found in our series, resulting in a total complication rate percentage per patient of 0.6%. Conclusions: We found very few perioperative complications associated with the use of dexmedetomidine during these challenging cases. With its anxiolytic, sedative, and analgesic properties coupled with preservation of respiration and a short half-life, dexmedetomidine has ideal properties for DBS procedures.

  15. Sedation and Monitoring in the Pediatric Patient during Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hyun Kee; Lightdale, Jenifer R

    2016-07-01

    Sedation is a fundamental component of pediatric gastrointestinal procedures. The 2 main types of sedation for pediatric endoscopy remain general anesthesia and procedural sedation. Although anesthesiologist-administered sedation protocols are more common, there is no ideal regimen for endoscopy in children. This article discusses specific levels of sedation for endoscopy as well as various regimens that can be used to achieve each. Risks and considerations that may be specific to performing gastrointestinal procedures in children are reviewed. Finally, potential future directions for sedation and monitoring that may change the practice of pediatric gastroenterology and ultimately patient outcomes are examined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Sedation for pediatric diagnostic imaging: use of pediatric and nursing resources as an alternative to a radiology department sedation team

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruess, Lynne; O'Connor, Stephen C.; Mikita, Cecilia P.; Creamer, Kevin M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective. To develop a pathway to provide safe, effective, and efficient sedation for pediatric diagnostic imaging studies using non-radiology personnel. Materials and methods. A multidisciplinary team considered manpower and training requirements and national sedation standards before designing a sedation pathway, which included scheduling, pre-sedation history and physical, medication protocols, and monitoring. Oral and IV medication protocols were developed based on patient age and weight. Sedation delays were defined as >15 min (IV) or >30 min (PO) from start of sedation to start of imaging. A sedation failure resulted in an incomplete diagnostic imaging study. Failure rates of 124 sedations before and 388 sedations after the pathway were compared.Results. The sedation failure rate for 7 months prior to pathway initiation was 15% (19/124). In the first 25 months after pathway initiation, failures were significantly reduced to 1.5% (6/388) (P 55 min). Deviation from the recommended medication protocol accounted for most of the 115 delays. Only minor adverse events were seen (12/388, 3.1%).Conclusion. Implementing a pediatric sedation pathway significantly decreases the sedation failure rate. Pediatric residents and nurses can safely, effectively and efficiently sedate pediatric patients for routine diagnostic imaging procedures without the need for a radiology department sedation team in a department with a small-to-moderate volume of pediatric patients. (orig.)

  17. Endoscopy and sedation: an inseparable binomial for the gastroenterologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Javier; Terán, Álvaro

    2018-04-01

    The development of endoscopy and its increasing demand among the population have led to a growing need for propofol-based sedation techniques. Benefit is indisputable for both patients and endoscopists, but some aspects require considering the "who" and "how" of sedation as related to safety and health care costs. Propofol is first-choice in endoscopy for the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy because of its fast onset of action and short half-life, and many reports exist on its safety when used by gastroenterologists rather than anesthesiologists. In this issue of REED several originals support the efficiency and safety of propofol even for complex, high-risk, or protracted procedures such as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and enteroscopy. Propofol may be safely and effectively administered by a team with specific skills acquired through education and using a specific procedure. However, difficulties arise in real-world clinical practice that preclude such training, which in Spain should be included in the MIR (médico interno residente) specialization program curriculum. The Comisión Nacional de Digestivo (Spanish National Commission on Digestive Diseases), sensitive to this training gap, has included in their latest version of the MIR program (under assessment) four additional competences, with number 145 (training in deep sedation) being most relevant here. In addition, the Spanish Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (SEED) has invested significant efforts in sedation training, with over 50 courses on sedation for endoscopists and nurses. Continuing education and training in this field (for instance, refresher courses on advanced cardiopulmonary resuscitation) should be a goal for all endoscopy units. Because of the diversity found among hospitals, with single or multiple endoscopy rooms, efforts should be made to persuade those in charge of gastroenterology and anesthesiology departments to establish the necessary care

  18. [AWAKE CRANIOTOMY: IN SEARCH FOR OPTIMAL SEDATION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikova, A S; Sel'kov, D A; Kobyakov, G L; Shmigel'skiy, A V; Lubnin, A Yu

    2015-01-01

    Awake craniotomy is a "gold standard"for intraoperative brain language mapping. One of the main anesthetic challenge of awake craniotomy is providing of optimal sedation for initial stages of intervention. The goal of this study was comparison of different technics of anesthesia for awake craniotomy. Materials and methods: 162 operations were divided in 4 groups: 76 cases with propofol sedation (2-4mg/kg/h) without airway protection; 11 cases with propofol sedation (4-5 mg/kg/h) with MV via LMA; 36 cases of xenon anesthesia; and 39 cases with dexmedetomidine sedation without airway protection. Results and discussion: brain language mapping was successful in 90% of cases. There was no difference between groups in successfulness of brain mapping. However in the first group respiratory complications were more frequent. Three other technics were more safer Xenon anesthesia was associated with ultrafast awakening for mapping (5±1 min). Dexmedetomidine sedation provided high hemodynamic and respiratory stability during the procedure.

  19. Rectal Sedation with Thiopental in Children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granados, Ana Maria; Levy, Wilma; Badiel, Marisol; Cruz Libreros, Alejandro; Toro Gutierrez, Juan Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Objective: to determine the effectiveness of a rectal sedation protocol with sodium thiopental in children undergoing diagnostic imaging studies in a level-four-complexity health care facility. Materials and Methods: this case series observational study was developed between the months of January and March 2004 in the Fundacion clinica Valle del Lili. All pediatric patients between the ages of three months and eight years of age who underwent an imaging study were included. A dose of 25-40 mg/kg of sodium thiopental was administered rectally. Successful sedation was defined as one that allowed the successful completion of the study with the least number of motion artifacts. The features of the sedation and the adverse effects were evaluated. Results: the study population included 103 children with a median age of two years. The imaging studies were successfully concluded in 97% of the patients. The average total time until complete awakening was 2.9 hours. With respect to the interruption of sedation, we found statistically significant differences between the children who were kept awake the night before the procedure and those who were not. The most common adverse effect was diarrhea, which was recorded in 13 patients. Five of the patients required a supplemental dose of the sedative. There were two cases of increased salivation and one of vomiting, yet they resolved spontaneously. Conclusions: this rectal sodium thiopental protocol is a safe and effective procedure for the completion of diagnostic imaging studies in the pediatric population at our health care center.

  20. Anaesthesia and Sedation for the Autistic Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacoor, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Autism is a disability that affects how a person communicates and relates to the world around them. Patients on the autistic spectrum may be referred to a Special Care Dentistry service to be managed under sedation or general anaesthetic, as their visit to the dentist can be stressful and disruptive to their routine. As it is a spectrum disorder, each patient needs to be assessed individually in order to determine whether sedation or general anaesthetic would be appropriate for them. Some autistic patients may have good verbal communication and mild learning difficulties, and may be able to tolerate treatment under local anaesthetic with behavioural management alone. On the other end of the spectrum, patients with severe autism and learning difficulties may not permit the dentist to even examine them and will require a general anaesthetic. There will also be patients on the autistic spectrum who are suitable for conscious sedation depending on their level of learning difficulty and cooperation. Oral and transmucosal sedation can also be useful for providing presedation to a patient to facilitate venous access. In order to minimise distress to the patient, it is important that adequate sedation, anaesthesia and analgesia are achieved both perioperatively and post-operatively.

  1. Ketamine-propofol sedation in circumcision

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    Handan Gulec

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTBACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To compare the therapeutic effects of ketamine alone or ketamine plus propofol on analgesia, sedation, recovery time, side effects in premedicated children with midazolam-ketamine-atropin who are prepared circumcision operation.METHODS: 60 American Society of Anaesthesiologists physical status I-II children, aged between 3 and 9 years, undergoing circumcision operations under sedation were recruited according to a randomize and double-blind institutional review board-approved protocol. Patients were randomized into two groups via sealed envelope assignment. Both groups were administered a mixture of midazolam 0.05 mg/kg + ketamine 3 mg/kg + atropine 0.02 mg/kg intramuscularly in the presence of parents in the pre-operative holding area. Patients were induced with propofol-ketamine in Group I or ketamine alone in Group II.RESULTS: In the between-group comparisons, age, weight, initial systolic blood pressure, a difference in terms of the initial pulse rate was observed (p > 0.050. Initial diastolic blood pressure and subsequent serial measurements of 5, 10, 15, 20th min, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and pulse rate in ketamine group were significantly higher (p < 0.050.CONCLUSION: Propofol-ketamine (Ketofol provided better sedation quality and hemodynamy than ketamine alone in pediatric circumcision operations. We did not observe significant complications during sedation in these two groups. Therefore, ketofol appears to be an effective and safe sedation method for circumcision operation.

  2. The factor structure and clinical utility of formal thought disorder in first episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Eric; Lyne, John Paul; O'Donoghue, Brian; Segurado, Ricardo; Kinsella, Anthony; Hannigan, Ailish; Kelly, Brendan D; Malone, Kevin; Clarke, Mary

    2015-10-01

    Formal thought disorder (FTD) is a core feature of psychosis, however there are gaps in our knowledge about its prevalence and factor structure. We had two aims: first, to establish the factor structure of FTD; second, to explore the clinical utility of dimensions of FTD in order to further the understanding of its nosology. A cross-validation study was undertaken to establish the factor structure of FTD in first episode psychosis (FEP). The relative utility of FTD categories vs. dimensions across diagnostic categories was investigated. The prevalence of clinically significant FTD in this FEP sample was 21%, although 41% showed evidence of disorganised speech, 20% displayed verbosity and 24% displayed impoverished speech. A 3-factor model was identified as the best fit for FTD, with disorganisation, poverty and verbosity dimensions (GFI=0.99, RMR=0.07). These dimensions of FTD accurately distinguished affective from non-affective diagnostic categories. A categorical approach to FTD assessment was useful in identifying markers of clinical acuteness, as identified by short duration of untreated psychosis (OR=2.94, P<0.01) and inpatient treatment status (OR=3.98, P<0.01). FTD is moderately prevalent and multi-dimensional in FEP. Employing both a dimensional and categorical assessment of FTD gives valuable clinical information, however there may be a need to revise our conceptualisation of the nosology of FTD. The prognostic value of FTD, as well as its neural basis, requires elucidation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. [Sedation with stimulative circadian rhythm in mechanically ventilation patients in intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jian-ying; Deng, Qun; Guo, Xu-sheng; Liu, Shuang-qing; Zhang, Yu-hong; He, Zhong-jie; Yao, Yong-ming; Lin, Hong-yuan

    2012-07-01

    To sedate the mechanically ventilation patients in intensive care unit (ICU) with stimulative circadian rhythm, and evaluate whether the protocol has advantages in recovering natural circadian rhythm, duration of mechanical ventilation, and length of ICU stay after weaning of sedation. A prospective random control trial was conducted. One hundred and twenty ventilated patients in ICU were randomly assigned to four groups: circadian rhythm (CR), daily interruption (DI), continuous sedation (CS) or demand sedation (DS) group, each n = 30. Given more complications, DS group was deleted after recruiting 10 cases and 90 patients were admitted ultimately. Patients' age, gender, body weight, acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) scores, sedatives dosages, daily arousal time, duration of mechanical ventilation, length of ICU stay, complications (ventilator-associated pneumonia, barotrauma with intrathoracic drain tube) and untoward reactions (accidental extubation, reintubation, tracheotomy, death) were recorded, the biochemical indicators were determined, as well as number of nurses on duty at 10:00 and 22:00. The patients' sex ratio, age, body weight, APACHEII scores, duration of mechanical ventilation, length of ICU stay showed no difference among CR, DI and CS groups. The total sedatives dosages (mg: 5466.7 ± 620.4) and average sedatives dosages [mg×h(-1) ×kg(-1): 2.19 ± 0.61] in CS group were significantly higher than those in CR group (4344.5 ± 816.0, 1.00 ± 0.51) and DI group (4154.3 ± 649.4, 1.23 ± 0.62, all P nurses on duty in the daytime (1.65, 1.41, 1.14, all P biochemistry index showed no difference in each group. It demonstrated that sedation with stimulative circadian rhythm be helpful to create circadian rhythm after weaning of sedation. While complications and untoward reactions did not increase, as well as duration of mechanical ventilation and length of ICU stay. Therefore, the clinical applicability of this sedative

  4. How safe is deep sedation or general anesthesia while providing dental care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Jeffrey D; Kramer, Kyle J; Bosack, Robert C

    2015-09-01

    Deep sedation and general anesthesia are administered daily in dental offices, most commonly by oral and maxillofacial surgeons and dentist anesthesiologists. The goal of deep sedation or general anesthesia is to establish a safe environment in which the patient is comfortable and cooperative. This requires meticulous care in which the practitioner balances the patient's depth of sedation and level of responsiveness while maintaining airway integrity, ventilation, and cardiovascular hemodynamics. Using the available data and informational reports, the authors estimate that the incidence of death and brain injury associated with deep sedation or general anesthesia administered by all dentists most likely exceeds 1 per month. Airway compromise is a significant contributing factor to anesthetic complications. The American Society of Anesthesiology closed claim analysis also concluded that human error contributed highly to anesthetic mishaps. The establishment of a patient safety database for anesthetic management in dentistry would allow for a more complete assessment of morbidity and mortality that could direct efforts to further increase safe anesthetic care. Deep sedation and general anesthesia can be safely administered in the dental office. Optimization of patient care requires appropriate patient selection, selection of appropriate anesthetic agents, utilization of appropriate monitoring, and a highly trained anesthetic team. Achieving a highly trained anesthetic team requires emergency management preparation that can foster decision making, leadership, communication, and task management. Copyright © 2015 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Utilization of the Nursing Process to Foster Clinical Reasoning During a Simulation Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Lambie

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nursing practice includes complex reasoning and multifaceted decision making with minimal standardized guidance in how to evaluate this phenomenon among nursing students. Learning outcomes related to the clinical reasoning process among novice baccalaureate nursing students during a simulation experience were evaluated. Nursing process records were utilized to evaluate and foster the development of clinical reasoning in a high-fidelity medical-surgical simulation experience. Students were unable to describe and process pertinent patient information appropriately prior to the simulation experience. Students’ ability to identify pertinent patient cues and plan appropriate patient care improved following the simulation. The learning activity afforded a structured opportunity to identify cues, prioritize the proper course of nursing interventions, and engage in collaboration among peers. The simulation experience provides faculty insight into the students’ clinical reasoning processes, while providing students with a clear framework for successfully accomplishing learning outcomes.

  6. The influence of immigrant background on the choice of sedation method in paediatric dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlander, Andreas; Jansson, Leif; Carlstedt, Kerstin; Grindefjord, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    The effects of immigration on the demographics of the Swedish population have changed the situation for many dental care providers, placing increased demand on cultural competence. The aim of this investigation was to study the choice of sedation method among children with immigrant background, referred to paediatric dentistry specialists, because of behaviour management problems or dental fear in combination with treatment needs. The material consisted of dental records from children referred to two clinics for paediatric dentistry: 117 records from children with an immigrant background and 106 from children with a non-immigrant background. Information about choice of sedation method (conventional treatment, conscious sedation with midazolam, nitrous oxide, or general anaesthesia) and dental status was collected from the records. The number of missed appointments (defaults) was also registered. Binary logistic regression analyses were used to calculate the influence of potential predictors on choice of sedation method. The mean age of the patients in the immigrant group was 4.9 yrs, making them significantly younger than the patients in the non-immigrant group (mean 5.7 yrs). In the immigrant group, 26% of the patients defaulted from treatments, while the corresponding frequency was significantly lower for the reference group (7%). The numbers of primary teeth with caries and permanent teeth with caries were positively and significantly correlated with the choice of treatment under general anaesthesia. Conscious sedation was used significantly more often in younger children and in the non-immigrant group, while nitrous oxide was preferred in the older children. In conclusion, conscious sedation was more frequently used in the non-immigrant group. The choice of sedation was influenced by caries frequency and the age of the child.

  7. Palliative sedation: from the family perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayne-Bossert, Petra; Zulian, Gilbert B

    2013-12-01

    Palliative sedation (PS) is a treatment option in case of refractory symptoms at the end of life. The emotional impact on nurses and doctors has been widely studied. We explore the experience of family members during a PS procedure. An anonymous questionnaire was sent to the closest family members (n = 17) of patients who died while receiving palliative sedation. The response rate was 59% (10 of 17). Nine relatives were sufficiently informed about PS. In all, 70% evaluated the chosen moment for initiation of PS as adequate. All the relatives noticed a significant improvement in the refractory symptom with a mean reduction in the estimated suffering of 6.25 points on a visual analog scale. Palliative sedation should be performed in the best possible way for the patient and his family in order to efficiently reduce a refractory symptom.

  8. Office-based deep sedation for pediatric ophthalmologic procedures using a sedation service model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalwani, Kirk; Tomlinson, Matthew; Koh, Jeffrey; Wheeler, David

    2012-01-01

    Aims. (1) To assess the efficacy and safety of pediatric office-based sedation for ophthalmologic procedures using a pediatric sedation service model. (2) To assess the reduction in hospital charges of this model of care delivery compared to the operating room (OR) setting for similar procedures. Background. Sedation is used to facilitate pediatric procedures and to immobilize patients for imaging and examination. We believe that the pediatric sedation service model can be used to facilitate office-based deep sedation for brief ophthalmologic procedures and examinations. Methods. After IRB approval, all children who underwent office-based ophthalmologic procedures at our institution between January 1, 2000 and July 31, 2008 were identified using the sedation service database and the electronic health record. A comparison of hospital charges between similar procedures in the operating room was performed. Results. A total of 855 procedures were reviewed. Procedure completion rate was 100% (C.I. 99.62-100). There were no serious complications or unanticipated admissions. Our analysis showed a significant reduction in hospital charges (average of $1287 per patient) as a result of absent OR and recovery unit charges. Conclusions. Pediatric ophthalmologic minor procedures can be performed using a sedation service model with significant reductions in hospital charges.

  9. Office-Based Deep Sedation for Pediatric Ophthalmologic Procedures Using a Sedation Service Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirk Lalwani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. (1 To assess the efficacy and safety of pediatric office-based sedation for ophthalmologic procedures using a pediatric sedation service model. (2 To assess the reduction in hospital charges of this model of care delivery compared to the operating room (OR setting for similar procedures. Background. Sedation is used to facilitate pediatric procedures and to immobilize patients for imaging and examination. We believe that the pediatric sedation service model can be used to facilitate office-based deep sedation for brief ophthalmologic procedures and examinations. Methods. After IRB approval, all children who underwent office-based ophthalmologic procedures at our institution between January 1, 2000 and July 31, 2008 were identified using the sedation service database and the electronic health record. A comparison of hospital charges between similar procedures in the operating room was performed. Results. A total of 855 procedures were reviewed. Procedure completion rate was 100% (C.I. 99.62–100. There were no serious complications or unanticipated admissions. Our analysis showed a significant reduction in hospital charges (average of $1287 per patient as a result of absent OR and recovery unit charges. Conclusions. Pediatric ophthalmologic minor procedures can be performed using a sedation service model with significant reductions in hospital charges.

  10. An evaluation of instruments for scoring physiological and behavioral cues of pain, non-pain related distress, and adequacy of analgesia and sedation in pediatric mechanically ventilated patients: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Tamara L; Sumamo Schellenberg, Elizabeth; Rempel, Gwen R; Scott, Shannon D; Hartling, Lisa

    2014-04-01

    Advancing technology allows for successful treatment of children with life-threatening illnesses. Effectively assessing and optimally treating a child's distress during their stay in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) is paramount. Objective measures of distress in mechanically ventilated pediatric patients are increasingly available but few have been evaluated. The objectives of this systematic review were to identify available instruments appropriate for measuring physiological and behavioral cues of pain, non-pain related distress, and adequacy of analgesia and sedation in mechanically ventilated pediatric patients, and evaluate these instruments in terms of their psychometric properties. A systematic review of original and validation reports of objective instruments to measure pain and non-pain related distress, and adequacy of analgesia and sedation in mechanically ventilated PICU patients was undertaken. A comprehensive search was conducted in 10 databases from January 1970 to June 2011. Reference lists of relevant articles were reviewed to identify additional articles. Studies were included in the review if they met pre-established eligibility criteria. Two independent reviewers reviewed studies for inclusion, assessed quality, and extracted data. Twenty-five articles were included, identifying 15 instruments. The instruments had different foci including: assessing pain, non-pain related distress, and sedation (n=2); assessing pain exclusively (n=4); assessing sedation exclusively (n=7), assessing sedation in mechanically ventilated muscle relaxed PICU patients (n=1); and assessing delirium in mechanically ventilated PICU patients (n=1). The Comfort Scale demonstrated the greatest clinical utility in the assessment of pain, non-pain related distress, and sedation in mechanically ventilated pediatric patients. Modified FLACC and the MAPS are more appropriate, however, for the assessment of procedural pain and other brief painful events. More work is

  11. Hepatitis C Virus Resistance Testing in Genotype 1: The Changing Role in Clinical Utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molino, Suzanne; Martin, Michelle T

    2017-09-01

    To review the role and utility of baseline resistance testing with currently available and pipeline genotype 1 hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment. Authors reviewed liver meeting abstracts for data on currently-available and pipeline genotype 1 retreatment regimens from January 1, 2015, to March 23, 2017. Additional trials were identified from a review of clinicaltrials.gov using the pipeline medication names. Authors identified reports of current and pipeline genotype 1 retreatment regimens. Seven references were clinical study results presented at the meetings of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the European Association for the Study of the Liver, and 2 studies were from clinicaltrials.gov . Retreatment trial data of currently available salvage regimens indicate that baseline NS5A resistance-associated substitutions (RASs) may decrease sustained virological response (SVR) rates when retreating with ledipasvir/sofosbuvir but are not affected when using elbasvir/grazoprevir + sofosbuvir + ribavirin, paritaprevir/ritonavir/ombitasvir + dasabuvir + sofosbuvir, or sofosbuvir/velpatasvir + ribavirin. Pipeline data indicate that baseline NS5A RASs do not affect SVR rates when retreating with sofosbuvir/velpatasvir/voxilaprevir or glecaprevir/pibrentasvir. Baseline resistance testing was used for decisional support for 3 clinical scenarios in patients with HCV genotype 1 infection at the time of manuscript submission. Pending the approval of 2 new direct-acting antiviral regimens in the third quarter of 2017, the rapidly evolving HCV treatment guidelines will likely reflect a decreased clinical utility for resistance testing.

  12. Clinical utility of marketing terms used for over-the-counter dermatologic products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boozalis, Emily; Patel, Shivani

    2018-05-08

    Cosmetic products are commonly marketed using dermatologic terms such as 'hypoallergenic', 'non-comedogenic', 'fragrance-free', etc. The clinical relevance of these claims can be confusing to both patients and clinicians. A systematic review was performed via a PubMed search of published articles from January 1985 to October 2017 to further describe and elucidate the clinical utility of a predefined list of common dermatologic terms used by pharmaceutical companies to market over-the-counter products. The terms 'fragrance-free', 'hypoallergenic', 'non-comedogenic', and 'oil-free' on cosmetic product labels are not regulated by any governing body and provide varied clinical utility. Products labeled as having 'natural ingredients' are not necessarily safer or less irritating to patients with atopy or a history of allergic contact dermatitis. Despite the increasing popularity of 'paraben-free' cosmetics, parabens are safe for patients in the quantities used in cosmetic products and can be safely used in patients who do not exhibit contact dermatitis to this preservative. A working knowledge of common cosmetic ingredients may help dermatologists to counsel patients on which products to avoid for their specific dermatologic conditions.

  13. [Sedation in the terminal phase of life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhagen, E H; Eliel, M R; de Graeff, A; Teunissen, S C

    1999-12-25

    In 2 patients, a woman aged 38 years and a man aged 48 years, in the terminal phase of life due to metastasized+ malignancy, palliative care failed. They suffered seriously from pain, delirium, restlessness, nausea, and fear. Deep sedation was given to induce almost continuous sleep without the intention of causing death. After one and five quiet days respectively the patients died. Deep sedation is an option when palliative care fails to diminish serious suffering. Midazolam, given by continuous subcutaneous infusion is the drug of choice.

  14. Clinical utility of circulating cell-free DNA in advanced colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan A Lima Pereira

    Full Text Available Circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA isolated from the plasma of cancer patients (pts has been shown to reflect the genomic mutation profile of the tumor. However, physician and patient assessment of clinical utility of these assays in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC has not been previously described.Patients were prospectively consented to a prospective genomic matching protocol (Assessment of Targeted Therapies Against Colorectal Cancer [ATTACC], with collection of blood for cfDNA extraction and sequencing of a 54-gene panel in a CLIA-certified lab. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissue from prior resections or biopsies underwent 50-gene sequencing. Results from both assays were returned to the treating physicians for patient care and clinical trial selection. Follow-up surveys of treating physicians and chart reviews assessed clinical utility.128 mCRC pts were enrolled between 6/2014 and 1/2015. Results were returned in median of 13 and 26 days for cfDNA and FFPE sequencing, respectively. With cfDNA sequencing, 78% (100/128 of samples had a detectable somatic genomic alteration. 50% of cfDNA cases had potentially actionable alterations, and 60% of these could be genomically matched to at least one clinical trial in our institution. 50% (15/30 of these pts enrolled onto an identified matched trial. Physicians reported that the cfDNA testing improved the quality of care they could provide in 73% of the cases, and that 89% of pts reported greater satisfaction with the efforts to personalize experimental therapeutic agents.cfDNA sequencing can provide timely information on potentially actionable mutations and amplifications, thereby facilitating clinical trial enrollment and improving the perceived quality of care.

  15. Changes to the bispectral index and regional cerebral blood flow in a sedative state, caused by midazolam administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Junko

    2006-01-01

    Psychosedation, as used in the field of dentistry, is intended to provide trouble-free dental care while maintaining a proper level of sedation. One drug used in psychosedation is midazolam, which is known to have a strong amnestic effect. In the current research, I sought to clarify whether the bispectral index (BIS) using electroencephalogram (EEG) analysis can be used for assessment of optimal sedation in psychosedation, and what effects midazolam has on the cerebrum's mechanism of memory. The subjects were 17 healthy adult volunteers. Intravenous sedation involved a single administration of 0.06 mg/kg midazolam, or 6 mg/kg/h propofol, administered for 5 minutes and then continuously administered for 25 minutes at 3 mg/kg/h. For nitrous oxide inhalation sedation, 10-30% nitrous oxide was used. Clinical sedation and the BIS were measured in a variety of circumstances. To examine the effects of midazolam on the central nervous system, changes in brain oxygen consumption in visual memory tasks were assessed through observing changes in areas of brain activation using 3T fMRI. With intravenous sedation using midazolam or propofol, the BIS decreased immediately after drug administration, and the BIS at which optimal sedation was clinically determined was about 65. In contrast, no decrease in the BIS was noted with nitrous oxide inhalation sedation. In observing areas of brain activation by fMRI, the oxygen consumption mainly of visual cortices in the occipital lobe increased as a result of stimulation by visual memory tasks. Regardless of the amnestic effect midazolam produced in subjects, it did not suppress activation of the visual cortices in the occipital lobe. In intravenous sedation using midazolam or propofol, the BIS is effective in determining optimal sedation, and appropriate perioperative management can be performed using the BIS. However, in nitrous oxide inhalation sedation it appears that the BIS cannot be used to monitor levels of sedation. Amnestic

  16. Emerging Utility of Virtual Reality as a Multidisciplinary Tool in Clinical Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmand, Ali; Davis, Steven; Lee, Danny; Barber, Scott; Sikka, Neal

    2017-10-01

    Among the more recent products borne of the evolution of digital technology, virtual reality (VR) is gaining a foothold in clinical medicine as an adjunct to traditional therapies. Early studies suggest a growing role for VR applications in pain management, clinical skills training, cognitive assessment and cognitive therapy, and physical rehabilitation. To complete a review of the literature, we searched PubMed and MEDLINE databases with the following search terms: "virtual reality," "procedural medicine," "oncology," "physical therapy," and "burn." We further limited our search to publications in the English language. Boolean operators were used to combine search terms. The included search terms yielded 97 potential articles, of which 45 were identified as meeting study criteria, and are included in this review. These articles provide data, which strongly support the hypothesis that VR simulations can enhance pain management (by reducing patient perception of pain and anxiety), can augment clinical training curricula and physical rehabilitation protocols (through immersive audiovisual environments), and can improve clinical assessment of cognitive function (through improved ecological validity). Through computer-generated, life-like digital landscapes, VR stands to change the current approach to pain management, medical training, neurocognitive diagnosis, and physical rehabilitation. Additional studies are needed to help define best practices in VR utilization, and to explore new therapeutic uses for VR in clinical practice.

  17. Auditory processing during deep propofol sedation and recovery from unconsciousness

    OpenAIRE

    Koelsch, Stefan; Heinke, Wolfgang; Sammler, Daniela; Olthoff, Derk

    2006-01-01

    Objective Using evoked potentials, this study investigated effects of deep propofol sedation, and effects of recovery from unconsciousness, on the processing of auditory information with stimuli suited to elicit a physical MMN, and a (music-syntactic) ERAN. Methods Levels of sedation were assessed using the Bispectral Index (BIS) and the Modified Observer's Assessment of Alertness and Sedation Scale (MOAAS). EEG-measurements were performed during wakefulness, deep propofol sedation (MOAAS 2–3...

  18. The robustness of DLP hyperspectral imaging for clinical and surgical utility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuzak, Karel J.; Wehner, Eleanor; Rao, Shekar; Litorja, Maritoni; Allen, David W.; Singer, Mike; Purdue, Gary; Ufret-Vincenty, Rafael; White, Jonathan; Cadeddu, Jeffrey; Livingston, Edward

    2010-02-01

    Utilizing seed funding from Texas Instruments, a DLP (R)Hyperspectral Imaging system was developed by integrating a focal-plane array, FPA, detector with a DLP based spectrally tunable illumination source. Software is used to synchronize FPA with DLP hardware for collecting spectroscopic images as well as running novel illumination schemes and chemometric deconvolution methods for producing gray scale or color encoded images visualizing molecular constituents at video rate. Optical spectra and spectroscopic image data of a variety of live human organs and diseased tissue collected from patients during surgical procedures and clinical visits being cataloged for a database will be presented.

  19. Vascular perfusion of reproductive organs in pony mares and heifers during sedation with detomidine or xylazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Reno R; Ginther, O J

    2009-01-01

    To assess the vascular effects of detomidine and xylazine in pony mares and heifers, respectively, as determined in a major artery and by extent of vascular perfusion of reproductive organs. 10 pony mares and 10 Holstein heifers. Pony mares were assigned to receive physiologic saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (n = 5) or detomidine (3.0 mg/mare, IV; 5). Heifers were assigned to receive saline solution (5) or xylazine (14 mg/heifer, IM; 5). Color Doppler ultrasonographic examinations were performed immediately before and 10 minutes after administration of saline solution or sedative. In spectral Doppler mode, a spectral graph of blood flow velocities during a cardiac cycle was obtained at the internal iliac artery and at the ovarian pedicle. In color-flow mode, color signals of blood flow in vessels of the corpus luteum and endometrium were assessed. Systemic effects of sedation in the 2 species were evident as a decrease in heart rate; increase in duration of systole, diastole, or both; decrease in volume of blood flow; and decrease in velocity of blood flow within the internal iliac artery. However, an effect of sedatives on local vascular perfusion in the ovaries and endometrium was not detected. Sedation with detomidine in pony mares and xylazine in heifers did not affect vascular perfusion in reproductive organs. These sedatives can be used in experimental and clinical color Doppler evaluations of vascular perfusion of the corpus luteum and endometrium.

  20. [The use of conscious sedation versus general anesthesia in modern dentistry: rising ethical dilemmas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayalon, S; Gozal, Y; Kaufman, E

    2004-10-01

    Conscious sedation and general anesthesia have been in the use of the dental profession since the first half of the 19th century. Although seemingly appealing to use due to alleviation of pain and anxiety induced by the dental treatment, the alteration of consciousness level of dental patients is not without risk. Morbidity and mortality due to dental treatment performed under general anesthesia were investigated at the last decades of the 20th century. The mortality rates found in these investigations were surprisingly high comparing to researches of morbidity and mortality due to other medical procedures, performed under general anesthesia. Therefore, although general anesthesia is sometimes the only way to treat certain patients, maintaining strict indications for dental treatment under general anesthesia is necessary. Conscious sedation was found as a safer alternative for achieving a level of consciousness enabling dental treatment in those patients who are unable to receive treatment in normal dental clinic settings. We therefore believe that conscious sedation should be the golden standard for the treatment of those patients. The practicing of dentistry in patients who have need of dental treatment under special settings such as general anesthesia and sedation raises ethical dilemmas to the caregiver. The following review will summarize the available data on morbidity and mortality due to dental treatment given under general anesthesia and conscious sedation. The ethical questions arising from their practicing will be discussed and some answers shall be proposed.

  1. Færre indikationer for sedation ved respiratorbehandling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm, Thomas; Rian, Omar; Toft, Palle

    2012-01-01

    Critically ill patients undergoing mechanical ventilation have traditionally been deeply sedated. In the latest decade growing evidence supports less sedation as being beneficial for the patients. A daily interruption of sedation has been shown to reduce the length of mechanical ventilation and t...

  2. Neural correlates of successful semantic processing during propofol sedation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adapa, Ram M.; Davis, Matthew H.; Stamatakis, Emmanuel A.; Absalom, Anthony R.; Menon, David K.

    Sedation has a graded effect on brain responses to auditory stimuli: perceptual processing persists at sedation levels that attenuate more complex processing. We used fMRI in healthy volunteers sedated with propofol to assess changes in neural responses to spoken stimuli. Volunteers were scanned

  3. Moderate and deep nurse-administered propofol sedation is safe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jeppe Thue; Møller, Ann; Hornslet, Pernille

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Non-anaesthesiologist-administered propofol sedation (NAPS/NAAP) is increasingly used in many countries. Most regimens aim for light or moderate sedation. Little evidence on safety of deep NAPS sedation is available. The aim of this study was to explore the safety of intermittent deep...

  4. Pediatric Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Sedation: A 2010 Nationwide Survey in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Hon Chen

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: A majority of pediatric EGD in Taiwan was performed under sedation and applied more often to younger children. Endoscopists were more satisfied during EGD when practicing sedation. This survey should help formulate updated practice guidelines and policies regarding endoscopic sedation.

  5. Closed-loop control for cardiopulmonary management and intensive care unit sedation using digital imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Behnood

    assessed by expert and non-expert human examiners. Next, we consider facial expression recognition using an unsupervised learning framework. We show that different facial expressions reside on distinct subspaces if the manifold is unfolded. In particular, semi-definite embedding is used to reduce the dimensionality and unfold the manifold of facial images. Next, generalized principal component analysis is used to fit a series of subspaces to the data points and associate each data point to a subspace. Data points that belong to the same subspace are shown to belong to the same facial expression. In clinical intensive care unit practice sedative/analgesic agents are titrated to achieve a specific level of sedation. The level of sedation is currently based on clinical scoring systems. Examples include the motor activity assessment scale (MAAS), the Richmond agitation-sedation scale (RASS), and the modified Ramsay sedation scale (MRSS). In general, the goal of the clinician is to find the drug dose that maintains the patient at a sedation score corresponding to a moderately sedated state. In this research, we use pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling to find an optimal drug dosing control policy to drive the patient to a desired MRSS score. Atrial fibrillation, a cardiac arrhythmia characterized by unsynchronized electrical activity in the atrial chambers of the heart, is a rapidly growing problem in modern societies. One treatment, referred to as catheter ablation, targets specific parts of the left atrium for radio frequency ablation using an intracardiac catheter. As a first step towards the general solution to the computer-assisted segmentation of the left atrial wall, we use shape learning and shape-based image segmentation to identify the endocardial wall of the left atrium in the delayed-enhancement magnetic resonance images. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  6. Clinical utility of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donders, Jacobus; Strong, Carrie-Ann H

    2015-02-01

    The performance of 100 patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) was compared with that of 100 demographically matched neurologically healthy controls. Processing Speed was the only WAIS-IV factor index that was able to discriminate between persons with moderate-severe TBI on the one hand and persons with either less severe TBI or neurologically healthy controls on the other hand. The Processing Speed index also had acceptable sensitivity and specificity when differentiating between patients with TBI who either did or did not have scores in the clinically significant range on the Trail Making Test. It is concluded that WAIS-IV Processing Speed has acceptable clinical utility in the evaluation of patients with moderate-severe TBI but that it should be supplemented with other measures to assure sufficient accuracy in the diagnostic process. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Dressing-related trauma: clinical sequelae and resource utilization in a UK setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlesworth B

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Bruce Charlesworth,1 Claire Pilling,1 Paul Chadwick,2 Martyn Butcher31Adelphi Values, Macclesfield, 2Salford Royal Foundation Trust, Salford, 3Northern Devon Healthcare Trust, Devon, UKBackground: Dressings are the mainstay of wound care management; however, adherence of the dressing to the wound or periwound skin is common and can lead to dressing-related pain and trauma. Dressing-related trauma is recognized as a clinical and economic burden to patients and health care providers. This study was conducted to garner expert opinion on clinical sequelae and resource use associated with dressing-related trauma in a UK setting.Methods: This was an exploratory study with two phases: qualitative pilot interviews with six wound care specialists to explore dressing-related trauma concepts, sequelae, and resource utilization; and online quantitative research with 30 wound care specialists to validate and quantify the concepts, sequelae, and resource utilization explored in the first phase of the study. Data were collected on mean health care professional time, material costs, pharmaceutical costs, and inpatient management per sequela occurrence until resolution. Data were analyzed to give total costs per sequela and concept occurrence.Results: The results demonstrate that dressing-related trauma is a clinically relevant concept. The main types of dressing-related trauma concepts included skin reactions, adherence to the wound, skin stripping, maceration, drying, and plugging of the wound. These were the foundation for a number of clinical sequelae, including wound enlargement, increased exudate, bleeding, infection, pain, itching/excoriation, edema, dermatitis, inflammation, and anxiety. Mean total costs range from £56 to £175 for the complete onward management of each occurrence of the six main concepts.Conclusion: These results provide insight into the hidden costs of dressing-related trauma in a UK setting. This research successfully conceptualized

  8. Clinical Utility of Preoperative Computed Tomography in Patients With Endometrial Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogani, Giorgio; Gostout, Bobbie S; Dowdy, Sean C; Multinu, Francesco; Casarin, Jvan; Cliby, William A; Frigerio, Luigi; Kim, Bohyun; Weaver, Amy L; Glaser, Gretchen E; Mariani, Andrea

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the clinical utility of routine preoperative pelvic and abdominal computed tomography (CT) examinations in patients with endometrial cancer (EC). We retrospectively reviewed records from patients with EC who underwent a preoperative endometrial biopsy and had surgery at our institution from January 1999 through December 2008. In the subset with an abdominal CT scan obtained within 3 months before surgery, we evaluated the clinical utility of the CT scan. Overall, 224 patients (18%) had a preoperative endometrial biopsy and an available CT scan. Gross intra-abdominal disease was observed in 10% and 20% of patients with preoperative diagnosis of endometrioid G3 and type II EC, respectively, whereas less than 5% of patients had a preoperative diagnosis of hyperplasia or low-grade EC. When examining retroperitoneal findings, we observed that a negative CT scan of the pelvis did not exclude the presence of pelvic node metastasis. Alternately, a negative CT scan in the para-aortic area generally reduced the probability of finding para-aortic dissemination but with an overall low sensitivity (42%). However, the sensitivity for para-aortic dissemination was as high as 67% in patients with G3 endometrioid cancer. In the case of negative para-aortic nodes in the CT scan, the risk of para-aortic node metastases decreased from 18.8% to 7.5% in patients with endometrioid G3 EC. Up to 15% of patients with endometrioid G3 cancer had clinically relevant incidental findings that necessitated medical or surgical intervention. In patients with endometrioid G3 and type II EC diagnosed by the preoperative biopsy, CT scans may help guide the operative plan by facilitating preoperative identification of gross intra-abdominal disease and enlarged positive para-aortic nodes that are not detectable during physical examinations. In addition, CT may reveal other clinically relevant incidental findings.

  9. Palliative Sedation and What Constitutes Active Dying: A Case of Severe Progressive Dystonia and Intractable Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Jacob J; Feely, Molly A; Kramer, Neha M; Moeschler, Susan M; Swetz, Keith M

    2016-05-01

    We present the case of a 34-year-old woman with Klippel-Feil syndrome who developed progressive generalized dystonia of unclear etiology, resulting in intractable pain despite aggressive medical and surgical interventions. Ultimately, palliative sedation was required to relieve suffering. Herein, we describe ethical considerations including defining sedation, determining prognosis in the setting of an undefined neurodegenerative condition, and use of treatments that concurrently might prolong or alter end-of-life trajectory. We highlight pertinent literature and how it may be applied in challenging and unique clinical situations. Finally, we discuss the need for expert multidisciplinary involvement when implementing palliative sedation and illustrate that procedures and rules need to be interpreted to deliver optimal patient-centered plan of care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Clinical utility of fetal autopsy and its impact on genetic counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Shalini S; Shukla, Anju; Lewis, Leslie; Kadavigere, Rajagopal; Mathew, Mary; Adiga, Prashanth K; Vasudeva, Akhila; Kumar, Pratap; Shetty, Jyothi; Shah, Hitesh; Girisha, Katta M

    2015-07-01

    We aimed to analyze the utility of fetal autopsy in terms of its contribution to establishing a definitive diagnosis and its impact on genetic counseling. Detailed fetal autopsy was carried out in fetuses referred for examination. Clinical utility of fetal autopsy and its impact on counseling were measured by adapting previously published parameters. We performed autopsy in 230 fetuses. There were 106 cases with single system and 92 cases with multisystem involvement. We confirmed prenatal findings in 23% of cases and observed additional findings in 37% of cases. In 23% of cases, autopsy findings differed enough to change the diagnosis. However, in 17% of fetuses, no cause of fetal loss was determined. Risk of recurrence became clear in 30.3% of the fetuses, and risk remained the same, but the diagnosis was different in 4.8% of cases after autopsy. Hence, autopsy led to refinement of the risk of recurrence in 36% of cases. Autopsy aided prenatal counseling of couples in 77% of cases by either confirming the prenatal findings (35%) or providing new information/ruling out a diagnosis (42%). The present study quantifies the utility of fetal autopsy in reproductive genetic counseling in a large cohort. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Clinical Utility of a Precision Medicine Test Evaluating Outpatients with Suspected Obstructive Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladapo, Joseph A; Budoff, Matt; Sharp, David; Zapien, Michael; Huang, Lin; Maniet, Bruce; Herman, Lee; Monane, Mark

    2017-04-01

    Identifying patients with obstructive coronary artery disease can be challenging for primary care physicians. Advances in precision medicine may help augment clinical tools and redefine the paradigm for evaluating coronary artery disease in the outpatient setting. A blood-based age/sex/gene expression score (ASGES) incorporating key features of precision medicine has shown clinical validity with a 96% negative predictive value and 89% sensitivity in estimating a symptomatic patient's current likelihood of obstructive coronary artery disease. To better characterize the clinical utility of the ASGES and measure its impact on clinician decision-making, a community-based registry was established. The prospective PRESET Registry (NCT01677156) enrolled stable, nonacute adult patients presenting with typical or atypical symptoms suggestive of obstructive coronary artery disease from 21 US primary care practices from August 2012 to August 2014. Demographics, clinical characteristics, and ASGES results (predefined as low [ASGES ≤15] or elevated [ASGES >15]) were collected, as were referrals to Cardiology or further functional/anatomic cardiac testing after ASGES testing. Patients were followed for 1 year post ASGES testing. Among the 566-patient cohort (median age 56 years), clinicians referred 26/252 (10%) of patients with low scores vs 137/314 (44%) of patients with elevated scores to Cardiology or advanced cardiac testing for further evaluation (unadjusted odds ratio 0.15, P precision medicine in the delivery of cardiovascular care. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Reduction in Unnecessary Clinical Laboratory Testing Through Utilization Management at a US Government Veterans Affairs Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konger, Raymond L; Ndekwe, Paul; Jones, Genea; Schmidt, Ronald P; Trey, Marty; Baty, Eric J; Wilhite, Denise; Munshi, Imtiaz A; Sutter, Bradley M; Rao, Maddamsetti; Bashir, Chowdry M

    2016-03-01

    To implement an electronic laboratory utilization management system (laboratory expert system [LES]) to provide safe and effective reductions in unnecessary clinical laboratory testing. The LES is a set of frequency filter subroutines within the Veterans Affairs hospital and laboratory information system that was formulated by an interdisciplinary medical team. Since implementing the LES, total test volume has decreased by a mean of 11.18% per year compared with our pre-LES test volume. This change was not attributable to fluctuations in outpatient visits or inpatient days of care. Laboratory cost savings were estimated at $151,184 and $163,751 for 2012 and 2013, respectively. A significant portion of these cost savings was attributable to reductions in high-volume, large panel testing. No adverse effects on patient care were reported, and mean length of stay for patients remained unchanged. Electronic laboratory utilization systems can effectively reduce unnecessary laboratory testing without compromising patient care. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  13. Efficacy of clinical diagnostic procedures utilized in nuclear medicine. Nine month progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-01-01

    This study is designed to determine the efficacy of nuclear medicine procedures in clinical practice. Several methods of determining efficacy will be evaluated to determine those most suitable. Nuclear medicine methods will be confined to the study of lung diseases by pulmonary perfusion and ventilation. In addition to evaluating the above methods data will be obtained to determine the sensitivity, specificity, predictive value and efficiency of the test under consideration. These values, corrected for prevalence of the disease processes under consideration will then be compared to the values obtained by the MACRO and MICRO methods and will help to bound the clinical reliability of the diagnostic method depending on the degree to which the several methods trend together. Depending on the practicality of these two methods, in addition to the determination of efficacy, cost effectiveness factors and benefit-risk estimates which are used to apply to radiation effects will be determined for nuclear medicine studies of the brain, bone, heart, liver and thyroid subsequently. The measurement techniques will then be utilized to establish guidelines for the most useful applications of the given procedure so that clinicians will be able to obtain a pretest estimate of the utility of the nuclear medicine test.

  14. Echo-planar MR cerebral blood volume mapping of glomas. Clinical utility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronen, H.J.; Univ. Central Hospital, Helsinki; Glass, J.; Pardo, F.S.; Belliveau, J.W.; Gruber, M.L.; Buchbinder, B.R.; Gazit, I.E.; Linggood, R.M.; Fischman, A.J.; Rosen, F.S.; Hochberg, F.H.

    1995-01-01

    Neovascularization is a common phenomenon in gliomas. MR imaging cerebral blood volume (CBV) mapping utilizes ultrafast echo-planar imaging and simultaneous use of gadolinium-based contrast material. To determine the utility of MR CBV mapping in the clinical evaluation of gliomas, we followed 15 patients with serial studies. This technique provided functional information that was not evident with conventional CT or MR imaging. Low-grade tumors demonstrated homogeneously low CBV, while high-grade tumors often showed areas of both high and low CBV. The maximum tumor CBV/white matter ratio was compared between low- (n=3) and high-grade gliomas (n=5) in patients without previous treatment and with histologic verification (n=8) and was significantly higher in high-grade gliomas (p<0.01), High CBV foci in nonenhancing tumor areas were present in 2 cases. The distinction between radiation necrosis and active tumor could be made correctly in 3 of 4 cases. The information provided by MR CBV mapping has the potential to be an adjunct in the clinical care of glioma patients. (orig.)

  15. Effects of music on sedation depth and sedative use during pediatric dental procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkalayci, Ozlem; Araz, Coskun; Cehreli, Sevi Burcak; Tirali, Resmiye Ebru; Kayhan, Zeynep

    2016-11-01

    The study aimed to investigate the effects of listening to music or providing sound isolation on the depth of sedation and need for sedatives in pediatric dental patients. Prospective, randomized, and controlled study. Tertiary, university hospital. In total, 180 pediatric patients, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I and II, who were scheduled for dental procedures of tooth extraction, filling, amputation, and root treatment. Patients were categorized into 3 groups: music, isolation, and control. During the procedures, the patients in the music group listened to Vivaldi's The Four Seasons violin concertos by sound-isolating headphones, whereas the patients in the isolation group wore the headphones but did not listen to music. All patients were sedated by 0.1 mg/kg midazolam and 1 mg/kg propofol. During the procedure, an additional 0.5 mg/kg propofol was administered as required. Bispectral index was used for quantifying the depth of sedation, and total dosage of the propofol was used for sedative requirements. The patients' heart rates, oxygen saturations, and Observer's Assessment of Alertness and Sedation Scale and bispectral index scores, which were monitored during the operation, were similar among the groups. In terms of the amount of propofol used, the groups were similar. Prolonged postoperative recovery cases were found to be significantly frequent in the control group, according to the recovery duration measurements (P = .004). Listening to music or providing sound isolation during pediatric dental interventions did not alter the sedation level, amount of medication, and hemodynamic variables significantly. This result might be due to the deep sedation levels reached during the procedures. However, listening to music and providing sound isolation might have contributed in shortening the postoperative recovery duration of the patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Sedatives for opiate withdrawal in newborn infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, David A; Jeffery, Heather E; Cole, Michael J

    2010-10-06

    Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) due to opiate withdrawal may result in disruption of the mother-infant relationship, sleep-wake abnormalities, feeding difficulties, weight loss and seizures. Treatments used to ameliorate symptoms and reduce morbidity include opiates, sedatives and non-pharmacological treatments. To assess the effectiveness and safety of using a sedative compared to a non-opiate control for NAS due to withdrawal from opiates, and to determine which type of sedative is most effective and safe. This update included searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Issue 1, 2010), MEDLINE 1966 to April 2010 and abstracts of conference proceedings. Trials enrolling infants with NAS born to mothers with an opiate dependence with > 80% follow-up and using random or quasi-random allocation to sedative or control. Control could include another sedative or non-pharmacological treatment. Each author assessed study quality and extracted data independently. Seven studies enrolling 385 patients were included. There were substantial methodological concerns for most studies including the use of quasi-random allocation methods and sizeable, largely unexplained differences in reported numbers allocated to each group.One study reported phenobarbitone compared to supportive care alone did not reduce treatment failure or time to regain birthweight, but resulted in a significant reduction in duration of supportive care (MD -162.1 min/day, 95% CI -249.2, -75.1). Comparing phenobarbitone to diazepam, meta-analysis of two studies found phenobarbitone resulted in a significant reduction in treatment failure (typical RR 0.39, 95% CI 0.24, 0.62). Comparing phenobarbitone with chlorpromazine, one study reported no significant difference in treatment failure.In infants treated with an opiate, one study reported addition of clonidine resulted in no significant difference in treatment failure, seizures or mortality. In infants treated with an opiate, one study

  17. Patient profiles and clinical utility of mepolizumab in severe eosinophilic asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haldar P

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Pranabashis Haldar Respiratory Biomedical Research Unit, Glenfield Hospital, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK Abstract: Mepolizumab (Nucala® is an effective and specific anti-eosinophil molecular therapy that has recently been approved as add-on therapy for the management of severe eosinophilic asthma by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA, European Medicines Agency (EMA; European Union and more recently National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE; UK. It is one of several molecular therapies in development for this indication and is illustrative of the strategic trajectory for pharmaceutical drug development taken over the past decade in several disease areas. Molecular therapies offer the prospect of improved specificity and effectiveness of biological effect. However, this necessitates a clear understanding of the underlying mechanistic pathways underpinning pathological processes, to inform drug development that yields novel more efficacious treatment options with a better clinical profile than existing agents. For the first time, utilization of molecular therapies in clinical trials is providing a novel in vivo model to characterize the association between specific pathways and clinical disease expression. It is increasingly recognized that asthma exhibits both clinical and pathological heterogeneity. It follows that a one-size-fits-all approach will not be appropriate and cost-effectiveness may only be achieved by identifying responder subgroups. This so-called personalized approach to therapy is being supported by the parallel development of companion biomarkers for clinical application. In this review, the author summarizes the clinical studies, their interpretation and the lessons learnt with mepolizumab that have informed our understanding of the approach to personalized molecular therapy in asthma. Keywords: IL-5, Nucala, exacerbations 

  18. Review of the Reported Measures of Clinical Validity and Clinical Utility as Arguments for the Implementation of Pharmacogenetic Testing: A Case Study of Statin-Induced Muscle Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleen E. Jansen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Advances from pharmacogenetics (PGx have not been implemented into health care to the expected extent. One gap that will be addressed in this study is a lack of reporting on clinical validity and clinical utility of PGx-tests. A systematic review of current reporting in scientific literature was conducted on publications addressing PGx in the context of statins and muscle toxicity. Eighty-nine publications were included and information was selected on reported measures of effect, arguments, and accompanying conclusions. Most authors report associations to quantify the relationship between a genetic variation an outcome, such as adverse drug responses. Conclusions on the implementation of a PGx-test are generally based on these associations, without explicit mention of other measures relevant to evaluate the test's clinical validity and clinical utility. To gain insight in the clinical impact and select useful tests, additional outcomes are needed to estimate the clinical validity and utility, such as cost-effectiveness.

  19. Bispectral Index monitoring in cancer patients undergoing palliative sedation: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monreal-Carrillo, Edith; Allende-Pérez, Silvia; Hui, David; García-Salamanca, Maria-Fernanda; Bruera, Eduardo; Verástegui, Emma

    2017-10-01

    Continuous palliative sedation (PS) is currently titrated based on clinical observation; however, it is often unclear if patients are still aware of their suffering. The aim of this prospective study is to characterize the level of consciousness in patients undergoing PS using Bispectral Index (BIS) monitoring. We enrolled consecutive patients with refractory symptoms requiring PS. We documented the level of sedation using Ramsay Sedation Scale (RSS) and BIS at 0, 2, 4, 6, 12, and 24 h during the first day of PS and examined their degree of association. Intravenous midazolam or propofol was titrated according to the sedation level. Twenty patients on PS were recruited and had BIS continuous monitoring. Delirium was the most frequent reason for PS (n = 15, 75%). The median time of sedation was 24.5 h (interquartile range 6-46). The average time to achieve the desired sedation level was 6 h, and dose titration was required in 80% of the cases. At baseline, 14 (70%) patients were considered to be awake according to RSS (i.e., 1-3) and 19 (95%) were awake according to BIS (i.e., >60%). This proportion decreased to 31 and 56% at 4 h, 27% and 53 at 6 h, and 22 and 33% at 24 h. RS and BIS had moderate correlation (rho = -0.58 to -0.65); however, a small proportion of patients were found to be awake by BIS (i.e., ≥60%) despite clinical observation (i.e., RSS 4-6) indicating otherwise. The BIS is a noninvasive, bedside, real-time continuous monitoring method that may facilitate the objective assessment of level of consciousness and dose titration in patients undergoing PS.

  20. Developing a clinical utility framework to evaluate prediction models in radiogenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yirong; Liu, Jie; Munoz del Rio, Alejandro; Page, David C.; Alagoz, Oguzhan; Peissig, Peggy; Onitilo, Adedayo A.; Burnside, Elizabeth S.

    2015-03-01

    Combining imaging and genetic information to predict disease presence and behavior is being codified into an emerging discipline called "radiogenomics." Optimal evaluation methodologies for radiogenomics techniques have not been established. We aim to develop a clinical decision framework based on utility analysis to assess prediction models for breast cancer. Our data comes from a retrospective case-control study, collecting Gail model risk factors, genetic variants (single nucleotide polymorphisms-SNPs), and mammographic features in Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon. We first constructed three logistic regression models built on different sets of predictive features: (1) Gail, (2) Gail+SNP, and (3) Gail+SNP+BI-RADS. Then, we generated ROC curves for three models. After we assigned utility values for each category of findings (true negative, false positive, false negative and true positive), we pursued optimal operating points on ROC curves to achieve maximum expected utility (MEU) of breast cancer diagnosis. We used McNemar's test to compare the predictive performance of the three models. We found that SNPs and BI-RADS features augmented the baseline Gail model in terms of the area under ROC curve (AUC) and MEU. SNPs improved sensitivity of the Gail model (0.276 vs. 0.147) and reduced specificity (0.855 vs. 0.912). When additional mammographic features were added, sensitivity increased to 0.457 and specificity to 0.872. SNPs and mammographic features played a significant role in breast cancer risk estimation (p-value < 0.001). Our decision framework comprising utility analysis and McNemar's test provides a novel framework to evaluate prediction models in the realm of radiogenomics.

  1. SEDATIVE AND ANALGESIC EFFECTS OF DETOMIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE IN GOATS

    OpenAIRE

    A. N. Tunio., A. B. Kalhoro and I.H. Kathio1

    2003-01-01

    The sedative and analgesic effects of three dose rates of detomidine (40, 50 and 60µg/kg body weight) were studied in six goats. Moderate to deep sedation occurred after administration of 40µg/kg of detomidine as compared to deep sedation produced by 50 and 60µg/kg of detomidine. The degree, onset and duration of sedation and onset and duration of maximum sedation were all dose dependent. Skin analgesia and recumbency were produced in all animals with higher doses (50 and 60µg/kg) and in thre...

  2. Spatio-temporal dynamics of multimodal EEG-fNIRS signals in the loss and recovery of consciousness under sedation using midazolam and propofol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seul-Ki Yeom

    Full Text Available On sedation motivated by the clinical needs for safety and reliability, recent studies have attempted to identify brain-specific signatures for tracking patient transition into and out of consciousness, but the differences in neurophysiological effects between 1 the sedative types and 2 the presence/absence of surgical stimulations still remain unclear. Here we used multimodal electroencephalography-functional near-infrared spectroscopy (EEG-fNIRS measurements to observe electrical and hemodynamic responses during sedation simultaneously. Forty healthy volunteers were instructed to push the button to administer sedatives in response to auditory stimuli every 9-11 s. To generally illustrate brain activity at repetitive transition points at the loss of consciousness (LOC and the recovery of consciousness (ROC, patient-controlled sedation was performed using two different sedatives (midazolam (MDZ and propofol (PPF under two surgical conditions. Once consciousness was lost via sedatives, we observed gradually increasing EEG power at lower frequencies (15 Hz, as well as spatially increased EEG powers in the delta and lower alpha bands, and particularly also in the upper alpha rhythm, at the frontal and parieto-occipital areas over time. During ROC from unconsciousness, these spatio-temporal changes were reversed. Interestingly, the level of consciousness was switched on/off at significantly higher effect-site concentrations of sedatives in the brain according to the use of surgical stimuli, but the spatio-temporal EEG patterns were similar, regardless of the sedative used. We also observed sudden phase shifts in fronto-parietal connectivity at the LOC and the ROC as critical points. fNIRS measurement also revealed mild hemodynamic fluctuations. Compared with general anesthesia, our results provide insights into critical hallmarks of sedative-induced (unconsciousness, which have similar spatio-temporal EEG-fNIRS patterns regardless of the stage and

  3. Clinical utility of the Structured Observation of Motor Performance in Infants within the child health services.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kine Johansen

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the clinical utility of the Structured Observation of Motor Performance in Infants (SOMP-I when used by nurses in routine child healthcare by analyzing the nurses' SOMP-I assessments and the actions taken when motor problems were suspected.Infants from three child health centers in Uppsala County, Sweden, were consecutively enrolled in a longitudinal study. The 242 infants were assessed using SOMP-I by the nurse responsible for the infant as part of the regular well-child visits at as close to 2, 4, 6 and 10 months of age as possible. The nurses noted actions taken such as giving advice, scheduling an extra follow-up or referring the infant to specialized care. The infants' motor development was reassessed at 18 months of age through review of medical records or parental report.The assessments of level of motor development at 2 and 10 months showed a distribution corresponding to the percentile distribution of the SOMP-I method. Fewer infants than expected were assessed as delayed at 4 and 6 months or deficient in quality at all assessment ages. When an infant was assessed as delayed in level or deficient in quality, the likelihood of the nurse taking actions increased. This increased further if both delay and quality deficit were found at the same assessment or if one or both were found at repeated assessments. The reassessment of the motor development at 18 months did not reveal any missed infants with major motor impairments.The use of SOMP-I appears to demonstrate favorable clinical utility in routine child healthcare as tested here. Child health nurses can assess early motor performance using this standardized assessment method, and using the method appears to support them the clinical decision-making.

  4. A favorable course of palliative sedation: searching for indicators using caregivers' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkkemper, Tijn; Rietjens, Judith A C; Deliens, Luc; Ribbe, Miel W; Swart, Siebe J; Loer, Stephan A; Zuurmond, Wouter W A; Perez, Roberto S G M

    2015-03-01

    Comparing characteristics of a favorable sedation course during palliative sedation to a less favorable course based on the reports Dutch physicians and nurses. Cases identified as having a favorable sedation course less often concerned a male patient (P = .019 nurses' cases), reached the intended sedation depth significantly quicker (P sedation (P = .015 physicians' cases), and had a shorter total duration of sedation compared (P sedation course. A favorable course during palliative sedation seems more probable when health care professionals report on a (relatively) shorter time to reach the required depth of sedation and when a deeper level of sedation can be obtained. © The Author(s) 2013.

  5. Clinical utility of FDG PET in Parkinson's disease and atypical parkinsonism associated with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Zuzana; Gandolfo, Federica; Orini, Stefania; Garibotto, Valentina; Agosta, Federica; Arbizu, Javier; Bouwman, Femke; Drzezga, Alexander; Nestor, Peter; Boccardi, Marina; Altomare, Daniele; Festari, Cristina; Nobili, Flavio

    2018-05-19

    There are no comprehensive guidelines for the use of FDG PET in the following three clinical scenarios: (1) diagnostic work-up of patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) at risk of future cognitive decline, (2) discriminating idiopathic PD from progressive supranuclear palsy, and (3) identifying the underlying neuropathology in corticobasal syndrome. We therefore performed three literature searches and evaluated the selected studies for quality of design, risk of bias, inconsistency, imprecision, indirectness and effect size. Critical outcomes were the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive/negative predictive value, area under the receiving operating characteristic curve, and positive/negative likelihood ratio of FDG PET in detecting the target condition. Using the Delphi method, a panel of seven experts voted for or against the use of FDG PET based on published evidence and expert opinion. Of 91 studies selected from the three literature searches, only four included an adequate quantitative assessment of the performance of FDG PET. The majority of studies lacked robust methodology due to lack of critical outcomes, inadequate gold standard and no head-to-head comparison with an appropriate reference standard. The panel recommended the use of FDG PET for all three clinical scenarios based on nonquantitative evidence of clinical utility. Despite widespread use of FDG PET in clinical practice and extensive research, there is still very limited good quality evidence for the use of FDG PET. However, in the opinion of the majority of the panellists, FDG PET is a clinically useful imaging biomarker for idiopathic PD and atypical parkinsonism associated with dementia.

  6. A versatilidade clínica do arco utilidade The clinical versatility of the utility archwire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Antonio de Figueiredo

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: dentro da ciência Bioprogressiva, o arco utilidade, juntamente com o quadri-hélice, é o dispositivo mais conhecido e utilizado para o tratamento de inúmeras más oclusões. Com um desenho ao mesmo tempo simples e original, o arco utilidade tornou-se parte integrante do arsenal ortodôntico utilizado nos períodos das dentaduras mista e permanente. O nome do arco é uma referência à grande versatilidade que este dispositivo oferece, e devido aos vários efeitos que o mesmo pode promover durante o tratamento. OBJETIVO: este artigo destina-se a discutir a fabricação, a ativação e o uso clínico do arco utilidade de Ricketts no tratamento ortodôntico, além de descrever alguns dos princípios da técnica ortodôntica Bioprogressiva. CONCLUSÃO: pode-se concluir que o arco utilidade é um aparelho extremamente versátil, com inúmeras possibilidades clínicas, sendo capaz de intruir, extruir, avançar ou retrair os incisivos superiores e inferiores; manter, diminuir ou aumentar o espaço no arco inferior; além de ancorar os molares inferiores. Entretanto, uma das maiores vantagens de seu uso consiste na correção de más oclusões do tipo Classe II, com mordida profunda.INTRODUCTION: The utility archwire, along with the quad-helix, is the most widely known and used device within the Bioprogressive technique for the treatment of several malocclusions. Featuring a simple yet original design, the utility archwire has become an integral part of the orthodontic arsenal, with applications in the periods of mixed and permanent dentition. The name of this archwire refers to its great versatility, and to the multiple effects it can have during treatment. OBJECTIVE: This article aims to discuss the production, application and clinical use of the Ricketts utility archwire in orthodontic treatments, as well as to describe some of the basics aspects of the Bioprogressive orthodontic technique. CONCLUSION: It can be concluded that the

  7. Short Report. Audit of Conscious Sedation Provision in a Salaried Dental Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephen G

    2016-01-01

    Clinical audit is a tool that may be used to improve the quality of care and outcomes for patients in a health care setting as well as a mechanism for clinicians to reflect on their performance. The audit described in this short report involved the collection and analysis of data related to the administration of 1,756 conscious sedations, categorised as standard techniques, by clinicians employed by an NHS Trust-based dental service during the year 2014. Data collected included gender, age and medical status of subject, the type of care delivered, the dose of drug administered and the quality of the achieved sedation and any sedation-related complications. This was the first time that a service-wide clinical audit had been undertaken with the objective of determining the safety and effectiveness of this aspect of care provision. Evaluation of the analysed data supported the perceived view that such care was being delivered satisfactorily. This on-going audit will collect data during year 2016 on the abandonment of clinical sessions, in which successful sedation had been achieved, due to the failure to obtain adequate local anaesthesia.

  8. Development of Process Control Methodology for Tracking the Quality and Safety of Pain, Agitation, and Sedation Management in Critical Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Timothy S; Kydonaki, Kalliopi; Lee, Robert J; Everingham, Kirsty; Antonelli, Jean; Harkness, Ronald T; Cole, Stephen; Quasim, Tara; Ruddy, James; McDougall, Marcia; Davidson, Alan; Rutherford, John; Richards, Jonathan; Weir, Christopher J

    2016-03-01

    To develop sedation, pain, and agitation quality measures using process control methodology and evaluate their properties in clinical practice. A Sedation Quality Assessment Tool was developed and validated to capture data for 12-hour periods of nursing care. Domains included pain/discomfort and sedation-agitation behaviors; sedative, analgesic, and neuromuscular blocking drug administration; ventilation status; and conditions potentially justifying deep sedation. Predefined sedation-related adverse events were recorded daily. Using an iterative process, algorithms were developed to describe the proportion of care periods with poor limb relaxation, poor ventilator synchronization, unnecessary deep sedation, agitation, and an overall optimum sedation metric. Proportion charts described processes over time (2 monthly intervals) for each ICU. The numbers of patients treated between sedation-related adverse events were described with G charts. Automated algorithms generated charts for 12 months of sequential data. Mean values for each process were calculated, and variation within and between ICUs explored qualitatively. Eight Scottish ICUs over a 12-month period. Mechanically ventilated patients. None. The Sedation Quality Assessment Tool agitation-sedation domains correlated with the Richmond Sedation Agitation Scale score (Spearman ρ = 0.75) and were reliable in clinician-clinician (weighted kappa; κ = 0.66) and clinician-researcher (κ = 0.82) comparisons. The limb movement domain had fair correlation with Behavioral Pain Scale (ρ = 0.24) and was reliable in clinician-clinician (κ = 0.58) and clinician-researcher (κ = 0.45) comparisons. Ventilator synchronization correlated with Behavioral Pain Scale (ρ = 0.54), and reliability in clinician-clinician (κ = 0.29) and clinician-researcher (κ = 0.42) comparisons was fair-moderate. Eight hundred twenty-five patients were enrolled (range, 59-235 across ICUs), providing 12,385 care periods for evaluation (range 655

  9. The presence, predictive utility, and clinical significance of body dysmorphic symptoms in women with eating disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Both eating disorders (EDs) and body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) are disorders of body image. This study aimed to assess the presence, predictive utility, and impact of clinical features commonly associated with BDD in women with EDs. Methods Participants recruited from two non-clinical cohorts of women, symptomatic and asymptomatic of EDs, completed a survey on ED (EDE-Q) and BDD (BDDE-SR) psychopathology, psychological distress (K-10), and quality of life (SF-12). Results A strong correlation was observed between the total BDDE-SR and the global EDE-Q scores (r = 0.79, p 0.05) measured appearance checking, reassurance-seeking, camouflaging, comparison-making, and social avoidance. In addition to these behaviors, inspection of sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) revealed that BDDE-SR items measuring preoccupation and dissatisfaction with appearance were most predictive of ED cases (Se and Sp > 0.60). Higher total BDDE-SR scores were associated with greater distress on the K-10 and poorer quality of life on the SF-12 (all p < 0.01). Conclusions Clinical features central to the model of BDD are common in, predictive of, and associated with impairment in women with EDs. Practice implications are that these features be included in the assessment and treatment of EDs. PMID:24999401

  10. Clinical utility of 3% diquafosol ophthalmic solution in the treatment of dry eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Shizuka

    2015-01-01

    Diquafosol is a drug used for dry eye treatment with a novel mechanism of action. It stimulates the secretion of tear fluid and mucin on the ocular surface, thus enabling us to selectively treat the tear film layer, playing an important role in the establishment of the concept of “Tear Film Oriented Therapy (TFOT)”, an effective therapeutic approach to dry eye in Japan. The 3% diquafosol ophthalmic solution has been widely used for the treatment of dry eye in clinical practice, and it is currently available in Japan and South Korea. This review provides an overview of the clinical utility of 3% diquafosol ophthalmic solution, focusing on the results of clinical studies on various types of dry eye, including aqueous-deficient dry eye, short tear film breakup time-type dry eye, and post dry eye after laser in situ keratomileusis. It also introduces the additive effect of diquafosol on sodium hyaluronate monotherapy for dry eye, and the effect of 3% diquafosol ophthalmic solution for dry eye-related conditions. Additionally, it summarizes the ocular effects of diquafosol in healthy human eyes. Lastly, the importance of improving tear film stability in dry eye treatment, as well as general advances in dry eye treatments, are described. PMID:26028958

  11. Clinical utility of 3% diquafosol ophthalmic solution in the treatment of dry eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koh S

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Shizuka Koh Department of Ophthalmology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka, Japan Abstract: Diquafosol is a drug used for dry eye treatment with a novel mechanism of action. It stimulates the secretion of tear fluid and mucin on the ocular surface, thus enabling us to selectively treat the tear film layer, playing an important role in the establishment of the concept of “Tear Film Oriented Therapy (TFOT”, an effective therapeutic approach to dry eye in Japan. The 3% diquafosol ophthalmic solution has been widely used for the treatment of dry eye in clinical practice, and it is currently available in Japan and South Korea. This review provides an overview of the clinical utility of 3% diquafosol ophthalmic solution, focusing on the results of clinical studies on various types of dry eye, including aqueous-deficient dry eye, short tear film breakup time-type dry eye, and post dry eye after laser in situ keratomileusis. It also introduces the additive effect of diquafosol on sodium hyaluronate monotherapy for dry eye, and the effect of 3% diquafosol ophthalmic solution for dry eye-related conditions. Additionally, it summarizes the ocular effects of diquafosol in healthy human eyes. Lastly, the importance of improving tear film stability in dry eye treatment, as well as general advances in dry eye treatments, are described. Keywords: diquafosol, dry eye, mucin secretion, fluid secretion, ocular surface, vision

  12. Clinical utility of 3% diquafosol ophthalmic solution in the treatment of dry eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Shizuka

    2015-01-01

    Diquafosol is a drug used for dry eye treatment with a novel mechanism of action. It stimulates the secretion of tear fluid and mucin on the ocular surface, thus enabling us to selectively treat the tear film layer, playing an important role in the establishment of the concept of "Tear Film Oriented Therapy (TFOT)", an effective therapeutic approach to dry eye in Japan. The 3% diquafosol ophthalmic solution has been widely used for the treatment of dry eye in clinical practice, and it is currently available in Japan and South Korea. This review provides an overview of the clinical utility of 3% diquafosol ophthalmic solution, focusing on the results of clinical studies on various types of dry eye, including aqueous-deficient dry eye, short tear film breakup time-type dry eye, and post dry eye after laser in situ keratomileusis. It also introduces the additive effect of diquafosol on sodium hyaluronate monotherapy for dry eye, and the effect of 3% diquafosol ophthalmic solution for dry eye-related conditions. Additionally, it summarizes the ocular effects of diquafosol in healthy human eyes. Lastly, the importance of improving tear film stability in dry eye treatment, as well as general advances in dry eye treatments, are described.

  13. Clinical utility of FDG-PET in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosta, Federica; Altomare, Daniele; Festari, Cristina; Orini, Stefania; Gandolfo, Federica; Boccardi, Marina; Arbizu, Javier; Bouwman, Femke; Drzezga, Alexander; Nestor, Peter; Nobili, Flavio; Walker, Zuzana; Pagani, Marco

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the incremental value of FDG-PET over clinical tests in: (i) diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS); (ii) picking early signs of neurodegeneration in patients with a genetic risk of Huntington's disease (HD); and detecting metabolic changes related to cognitive impairment in (iii) ALS and (iv) HD patients. Four comprehensive literature searches were conducted using the PICO model to extract evidence from relevant studies. An expert panel then voted using the Delphi method on these four diagnostic scenarios. The availability of evidence was good for FDG-PET utility to support the diagnosis of ALS, poor for identifying presymptomatic subjects carrying HD mutation who will convert to HD, and lacking for identifying cognitive-related metabolic changes in both ALS and HD. After the Delphi consensual procedure, the panel did not support the clinical use of FDG-PET for any of the four scenarios. Relative to other neurodegenerative diseases, the clinical use of FDG-PET in ALS and HD is still in its infancy. Once validated by disease-control studies, FDG-PET might represent a potentially useful biomarker for ALS diagnosis. FDG-PET is presently not justified as a routine investigation to predict conversion to HD, nor to detect evidence of brain dysfunction justifying cognitive decline in ALS and HD.

  14. Use of amyloid PET across the spectrum of Alzheimer's disease: clinical utility and associated ethical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuzy, Antoine; Zimmer, Eduardo Rigon; Heurling, Kerstin; Rosa-Neto, Pedro; Gauthier, Serge

    2014-09-01

    Abstract Recent advances have made possible the in vivo detection of beta-amyloid (Aβ) pathology using positron emission tomography. While the gold standard for amyloid imaging, carbon-11 labeled Pittsburgh compound B is increasingly being replaced by fluorine-18 labeled radiopharmaceuticals, with three already approved for clinical use by US and European regulatory bodies. Appropriate use criteria proposed by an amyloid imaging taskforce convened by the Alzheimer's Association and the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging recommend restricting use of this technology to the evaluation of patients with mild cognitive impairment or atypical dementia syndromes. While use among asymptomatic individuals is currently viewed as inappropriate due prognostic uncertainty, elevated levels of brain Aβ among asymptomatic individuals may represent preclinical Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid imaging is likewise expected to play a role in the design of clinical trials. Though preliminary results suggest amyloid imaging to possess clinical utility and cost-effectiveness, both domains have yet to be assessed systematically. As the field moves toward adoption of a pro-disclosure stance for amyloid imaging findings, it is imperative that a broad range of stakeholders be involved to ensure the appropriateness of emerging policies and protocols.

  15. Implementation of an acute venous thromboembolism clinical pathway reduces healthcare utilization and mitigates health disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misky, Gregory J; Carlson, Todd; Thompson, Elaina; Trujillo, Toby; Nordenholz, Kristen

    2014-07-01

    Acute venous thromboembolism (VTE) is prevalent, expensive, and deadly. Published data at our institution identified significant VTE care variation based on payer source. We developed a VTE clinical pathway to standardize care, decrease hospital utilization, provide education, and mitigate disparities. Target population for our interdisciplinary pathway was acute medical VTE patients. The intervention included order sets, system-wide education, follow-up phone calls, and coordinated posthospital care. Study data (n = 241) were compared to historical data (n = 234), evaluating outcomes of hospital admission, length of stay (LOS), and reutilization, stratified by payer source. A total of 241 patients entered the VTE clinical care pathway: 107 with deep venous thrombosis (44.4%) and 134 with a pulmonary embolism (55.6%). Within the pathway, uninsured VTE patients were admitted at a lower rate than insured patients (65.9 vs 79.1%; P = 0.032). LOS decreased from 4.4 to 3.1 days (P historical patients (9.4%, P = 0.254). Individual cost of care decreased from $7610 to $5295 (P cost, particularly among uninsured patients. Results of this novel study demonstrate a model for improving transitional care coordination with local community health clinics and delivering care to vulnerable populations. Other disease populations may benefit from the development of a similar model. © 2014 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  16. Clinical utility of dronabinol in the treatment of weight loss associated with HIV and AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badowski, Melissa E; Perez, Sarah E

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, weight loss has been a common complaint for patients. The use of various definitions defining HIV wasting syndrome has made it difficult to determine its actual prevalence. Despite the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy, it is estimated that the prevalence of HIV wasting syndrome is between 14% and 38%. HIV wasting syndrome may stem from conditions affecting chewing, swallowing, or gastrointestinal motility, neurologic disease affecting food intake or the perception of hunger or ability to eat, psychiatric illness, food insecurity generated from psychosocial or economic concerns, or anorexia due to medications, malabsorption, infections, or tumors. Treatment of HIV wasting syndrome may be managed with appetite stimulants (megestrol acetate or dronabinol), anabolic agents (testosterone, testosterone analogs, or recombinant human growth hormone), or, rarely, cytokine production modulators (thalidomide). The goal of this review is to provide an in-depth evaluation based on existing clinical trials on the clinical utility of dronabinol in the treatment of weight loss associated with HIV/AIDS. Although total body weight gain varies with dronabinol use (-2.0 to 3.2 kg), dronabinol is a well-tolerated option to promote appetite stimulation. Further studies are needed with standardized definitions of HIV-associated weight loss and clinical outcomes, robust sample sizes, safety and efficacy data on chronic use of dronabinol beyond 52 weeks, and associated virologic and immunologic outcomes.

  17. Upper airway morphology in Down Syndrome patients under dexmedetomidine sedation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Subramanyam

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: Children with Down Syndrome are vulnerable to significant upper airway obstruction due to relative macroglossia and dynamic airway collapse. The objective of this study was to compare the upper airway dimensions of children with Down Syndrome and obstructive sleep apnea with normal airway under dexmedetomidine sedation. Methods: IRB approval was obtained. In this retrospective study, clinically indicated dynamic sagittal midline magnetic resonance images of the upper airway were obtained under low (1 mcg/kg/h and high (3 mcg/kg/h dose dexmedetomidine. Airway anteroposterior diameters and sectional areas were measured as minimum and maximum dimensions by two independent observers at soft palate (nasopharyngeal airway and at base of the tongue (retroglossal airway. Results and conclusions: Minimum anteroposterior diameter and minimum sectional area at nasopharynx and retroglossal airway were significantly reduced in Down Syndrome compared to normal airway at both low and high dose dexmedetomidine. However, there were no significant differences between low and high dose dexmedetomidine in both Down Syndrome and normal airway. The mean apnea hypopnea index in Down Syndrome was 16 ± 11. Under dexmedetomidine sedation, children with Down Syndrome and obstructive sleep apnea when compared to normal airway children show significant reductions in airway dimensions most pronounced at the narrowest points in the nasopharyngeal and retroglossal airways.

  18. Upper airway morphology in Down Syndrome patients under dexmedetomidine sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanyam, Rajeev; Fleck, Robert; McAuliffe, John; Radhakrishnan, Rupa; Jung, Dorothy; Patino, Mario; Mahmoud, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Children with Down Syndrome are vulnerable to significant upper airway obstruction due to relative macroglossia and dynamic airway collapse. The objective of this study was to compare the upper airway dimensions of children with Down Syndrome and obstructive sleep apnea with normal airway under dexmedetomidine sedation. IRB approval was obtained. In this retrospective study, clinically indicated dynamic sagittal midline magnetic resonance images of the upper airway were obtained under low (1mcg/kg/h) and high (3mcg/kg/h) dose dexmedetomidine. Airway anteroposterior diameters and sectional areas were measured as minimum and maximum dimensions by two independent observers at soft palate (nasopharyngeal airway) and at base of the tongue (retroglossal airway). Minimum anteroposterior diameter and minimum sectional area at nasopharynx and retroglossal airway were significantly reduced in Down Syndrome compared to normal airway at both low and high dose dexmedetomidine. However, there were no significant differences between low and high dose dexmedetomidine in both Down Syndrome and normal airway. The mean apnea hypopnea index in Down Syndrome was 16±11. Under dexmedetomidine sedation, children with Down Syndrome and obstructive sleep apnea when compared to normal airway children show significant reductions in airway dimensions most pronounced at the narrowest points in the nasopharyngeal and retroglossal airways. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. [Upper airway morphology in Down Syndrome patients under dexmedetomidine sedation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanyam, Rajeev; Fleck, Robert; McAuliffe, John; Radhakrishnan, Rupa; Jung, Dorothy; Patino, Mario; Mahmoud, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Children with Down Syndrome are vulnerable to significant upper airway obstruction due to relative macroglossia and dynamic airway collapse. The objective of this study was to compare the upper airway dimensions of children with Down Syndrome and obstructive sleep apnea with normal airway under dexmedetomidine sedation. IRB approval was obtained. In this retrospective study, clinically indicated dynamic sagittal midline magnetic resonance images of the upper airway were obtained under low (1mcg/kg/h) and high (3mcg/kg/h) dose dexmedetomidine. Airway anteroposterior diameters and sectional areas were measured as minimum and maximum dimensions by two independent observers at soft palate (nasopharyngeal airway) and at base of the tongue (retroglossal airway). Minimum anteroposterior diameter and minimum sectional area at nasopharynx and retroglossal airway were significantly reduced in Down Syndrome compared to normal airway at both low and high dose dexmedetomidine. However, there were no significant differences between low and high dose dexmedetomidine in both Down Syndrome and normal airway. The mean apnea hypopnea index in Down Syndrome was 16±11. Under dexmedetomidine sedation, children with Down Syndrome and obstructive sleep apnea when compared to normal airway children show significant reductions in airway dimensions most pronounced at the narrowest points in the nasopharyngeal and retroglossal airways. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical utility of Standardised Assessment of Personality - Abbreviated Scale (SAPAS) among patients with first episode depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, Jens Drachmann; Bock, Camilla; Vinberg, Maj

    2010-01-01

    for comorbid personality disorder among patients suffering from depression would be of clinical use. METHOD: The present study aimed to assess the utility of the Standardised Assessment of Personality - Abbreviated Scale (SAPAS) as a screen for personality disorder in a population of patients recently......BACKGROUND: Personality disorder frequently co-occurs with depression and seems to be associated with a poorer outcome of treatment and increased risk for recurrences. However, the diagnosing of personality disorder can be lengthy and requires some training. Therefore, a brief screening interview...... diagnosed with first episode depression. A total number of 394 patients with an ICD-10 diagnosis of a single depressive episode were sampled consecutively via the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register during a 2years inclusion period and assessed by the screening interview and, subsequently...

  1. Assessment of the Utility of Cytology and Flow Cytometry of Cerebrospinal Fluid Samples in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Anna S; Giorgadze, Tamara; Tam, Wayne; Chadburn, Amy

    2018-01-01

    We sought to assess the utility and limitations of both flow cytometry (FC) and cytology for the analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in a practical clinical setting. A total of 393 consecutive CSF samples from 171 patients submitted for both cytomorphologic and FC assessments were analyzed. Both FC and cytology findings were negative for malignancy in 315/393 samples (80%), and either positive (POS) or suspicious/atypical (SUSP/AT) in 7% of samples. This resulted in high agreement between FC and cytology (87%). Minor discrepancies were present in 4% of the cases. In 28 samples, an abnormal population was detected by FC but not by cytology. FC and cytology are important complementary methods for analyzing CSF samples. In cases where cytology is SUSP/AT and FC is inconclusive or negative, additional specimens should be submitted for immunostaining, cytogenetics, and/or molecular studies. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Precision diagnostics: moving towards protein biomarker signatures of clinical utility in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrebaeck, Carl A K

    2017-03-01

    Interest in precision diagnostics has been fuelled by the concept that early detection of cancer would benefit patients; that is, if detected early, more tumours should be resectable and treatment more efficacious. Serum contains massive amounts of potentially diagnostic information, and affinity proteomics has risen as an accurate approach to decipher this, to generate actionable information that should result in more precise and evidence-based options to manage cancer. To achieve this, we need to move from single to multiplex biomarkers, a so-called signature, that can provide significantly increased diagnostic accuracy. This Opinion article focuses on the progress being made in identifying protein biomarker signatures of clinical utility, using blood-based proteomics.

  3. Diffusion and Perfusion MR Imaging in Acute Stroke: Clinical Utility and Potential Limitations for Treatment Selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bateman, Mathew; Slater, Lee-Anne; Leslie-Mazwi, Thabele M

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) offer unique insight into acute ischemic stroke pathophysiology. These techniques may offer the ability to apply pathophysiology to accurately individualize acute stroke reperfusion treatment, including ...... to be investigated in ongoing randomized controlled trials, and continued research into these techniques will help achieve the goal of tissue-based decision making and individualized acute stroke treatment....... extending the opportunity of reperfusion treatment to well beyond the current time-based treatment windows. This review examines the use of DWI and PWI in the major stroke trials, their current clinical utility, and potential limitations for reperfusion treatment selection. DWI and PWI continue...

  4. French Swiss physicians' attitude toward palliative sedation: Influence of prognosis and type of suffering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauverd, M; Bernard, M; Currat, T; Ducret, S; Foley, R A; Borasio, G D; Blondeau, D; Dumont, S

    2014-10-01

    Palliative sedation is a last resort medical act aimed at relieving intolerable suffering induced by intractable symptoms in patients at the end-of-life. This act is generally accepted as being medically indicated under certain circumstances. A controversy remains in the literature as to its ethical validity. There is a certain vagueness in the literature regarding the legitimacy of palliative sedation in cases of non-physical refractory symptoms, especially "existential suffering." This pilot study aims to measure the influence of two independent variables (short/long prognosis and physical/existential suffering) on the physicians' attitudes toward palliative sedation (dependent variable). We used a 2 × 2 experimental design as described by Blondeau et al. Four clinical vignettes were developed (vignette 1: short prognosis/existential suffering; vignette 2: long prognosis/existential suffering; vignette 3: short prognosis/physical suffering; vignette 4: long prognosis/physical suffering). Each vignette presented a terminally ill patient with a summary description of his physical and psychological condition, medication, and family situation. The respondents' attitude towards sedation was assessed with a six-point Likert scale. A total of 240 vignettes were sent to selected Swiss physicians. 74 vignettes were completed (36%). The means scores for attitudes were 2.62 ± 2.06 (v1), 1.88 ± 1.54 (v2), 4.54 ± 1.67 (v3), and 4.75 ± 1.71 (v4). General linear model analyses indicated that only the type of suffering had a significant impact on the attitude towards sedation (F = 33.92, df = 1, p = 0.000). Significance of the results: The French Swiss physicians' attitude toward palliative sedation is more favorable in case of physical suffering than in existential suffering. These results are in line with those found in the study of Blondeau et al. with Canadian physicians and will be discussed in light of the arguments given by physicians to explain their decisions.

  5. Intramuscular injection of alfaxalone in combination with butorphanol for sedation in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Julia; Jolliffe, Colette; Archer, Emma; Leece, Elizabeth A

    2017-07-01

    To assess quality of sedation following intramuscular (IM) injection of two doses of alfaxalone in combination with butorphanol in cats. Prospective, randomized, 'blinded' clinical study. A total of 38 cats undergoing diagnostic imaging or noninvasive procedures. Cats were allocated randomly to be administered butorphanol 0.2 mg kg -1 combined with alfaxalone 2 mg kg -1 (group AB2) or 5 mg kg -1 (group AB5) IM. If sedation was inadequate, alfaxalone 2 mg kg -1 IM was administered and cats were excluded from further analysis. Temperament [1 (friendly) to 5 (aggressive)], response to injection, sedation score at 2, 6, 8, 15, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 minutes, overall sedation quality scored after data collection [1 (excellent) to 4 (inadequate)] and recovery quality were assessed. Heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (f R ) and arterial haemoglobin saturation (SpO 2 ) were recorded every 5 minutes. Groups were compared using t tests and Mann-Whitney U tests. Sedation was analysed using two-way anova, and additional alfaxalone using Fisher's exact test (p cats in AB2 and two in AB5 (p = 0.005). Recovery quality, HR, f R and SpO 2 were similar. Seven cats required oxygen supplementation. Complete recovery times were shorter in AB2 (81.8 ± 24.3 versus 126.6 ± 33.3 minutes; p = 0.009). Twitching was the most common adverse event. In combination with butorphanol, IM alfaxalone at 5 mg kg -1 provided better quality sedation than 2 mg kg -1 . Monitoring of SpO 2 is recommended. Copyright © 2017 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Can bispectral index or auditory evoked potential index predict implicit memory during propofol-induced sedation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; Yue, Yun; Sun, Yong-hai; Wu, An-shi

    2006-06-05

    Some patients still suffer from implicit memory of intraoperative events under adequate depth of anaesthesia. The elimination of implicit memory should be a necessary aim of clinical general anaesthesia. However, implicit memory cannot be tested during anaesthesia yet. We propose bispectral index (BIS) and auditory evoked potential index (AEPI), as predictors of implicit memory during anaesthesia. Thirty-six patients were equally divided into 3 groups according to the Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation Score: A, level 3; B, level 2; and C, level 1. Every patient was given the first auditory stimulus before sedation. Then every patient received the second auditory stimulus after the target level of sedation had been reached. BIS and AEPI were monitored before and after the second auditory stimulus presentation. Four hours later, the inclusion test and exclusion test were performed on the ward using process dissociation procedure and the scores of implicit memory estimated. In groups A and B but not C, implicit memory estimates were statistically greater than zero (P memory scores in group A did not differ significantly from those in group B (P > 0.05). Implicit memory scores correlated with BIS and AEPI (P AEPI. The 95% cutoff points of BIS and AEPI for predicting implicit memory are 47 and 28, respectively. Implicit memory does not disappear until the depth of sedation increases to level 1 of OAA/S score. Implicit memory scores correlate well with BIS and AEPI during sedation. BIS is a better index for predicting implicit memory than AEPI during propofol induced sedation.

  7. Efficacy and safety of flumazenil injection for the reversal of midazolam sedation after elective outpatient endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Pyo; Sung, In-Kyung; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Lee, Sun-Young; Park, Hyung Seok; Shim, Chan Sup

    2018-02-01

    Midazolam sedation during elective endoscopy is widely performed and flumazenil is frequently administered after endoscopy to reverse sedation in clinical practice. This study aimed to investigate the safety and efficacy of flumazenil injections after elective endoscopy under midazolam sedation. Participants who underwent an upper endoscopy under midazolam sedation were randomly divided into two groups. In group I, flumazenil was administered i.v. 10 min after the patient's transfer to the recovery room, and no antidote was injected in group II. The time of stay in the recovery room and adverse events were reviewed through the nursing records. We asked the patients about their pain and degree of satisfaction according to a visual analogue scale (VAS), their memory of the procedure, mental status and the presence of uncomfortable symptoms on the day of the procedure and the day afterwards. The length of stay in recovery was significantly shorter in group I than in group II. No significant differences were found in the number of patients with pain (VAS ≥1), adverse events and discomfort between the two groups. Additionally, there were no differences in the patients' memory of the procedure, satisfaction with sedation, willingness to repeat the endoscopy and mental status. The time in the recovery room after flumazenil administration was significantly shortened, and the use of the drug did not increase the risk of adverse events or discomfort. The use of flumazenil for reversing midazolam sedation seems to be safe and effective. © 2018 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Use and perception of nitrous oxide sedation by French dentists in private practice: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilanova-Saingery, C; Bailleul-Forestier, I; Vaysse, F; Vergnes, J-N; Marty, M

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this national survey was to record the use of nitrous oxide and the perceptions of French dental practitioners to this form of sedation. The use of nitrous oxide sedation (NOS) has been authorised in private dental practice in France since December 2009 but, to date, no study implementing both quantitative and qualitative methods has explored such use. The data were collected using a Google Forms questionnaire. A mixed methodology was used for data analysis: a quantitative approach to explore the use of conscious sedation and a qualitative thematic approach (using Nvivo software) to determine the practitioner's perception of it. Responses were collected from 225 practitioners (19% of the target population of 1185). Most of the responders were trained in NOS use in private dental clinics. Seventy-three percent of those who trained privately actually used NOS, compared to 53% of those trained at university (p-value = 0.0052). Above all, NOS was used for children requiring restorative dentistry. The average price of the sedation was 50 Euros and it lasted, on average, for 37 min. The qualitative and thematic analysis revealed the financial and technical difficulties of implementing NOS in private practice. However, it also showed the benefits and pleasure associated with NOS use. This statistical survey of French dental practitioners offers an insight of the current state of the use of conscious sedation with nitrous oxide in private general dental practice in France. It also includes the first report of dental practitioners' perceptions of NOS use and may lead to a better understanding of the reasons why sedation is sometimes not used in private practice.

  9. Palliative sedation: not just normal medical practice. Ethical reflections on the Royal Dutch Medical Association's guideline on palliative sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, Rien; van Delden, Johannes J M; Widdershoven, Guy A M

    2012-11-01

    The main premise of the Royal Dutch Medical Association's (RDMA) guideline on palliative sedation is that palliative sedation, contrary to euthanasia, is normal medical practice. Although we do not deny the ethical distinctions between euthanasia and palliative sedation, we will critically analyse the guideline's argumentation strategy with which euthanasia is demarcated from palliative sedation. First, we will analyse the guideline's main premise, which entails that palliative sedation is normal medical treatment. After this, we will critically discuss three crucial propositions of the guideline that are used to support this premise: (1) the patient's life expectancy should not exceed 2 weeks; (2) the aim of the physician should be to relieve suffering and (3) expert consultation is optional. We will conclude that, if inherent problematic aspects of palliative sedation are taken seriously, palliative sedation is less normal than it is now depicted in the guideline.

  10. Occupational therapists' perceptions about the clinical utility of the 3D interior design software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwa, Anita; Money, Arthur G; Spiliotopoulou, Georgia; Mcintyre, Anne

    2013-07-01

    The 3D interior design software (3DIDS) is a technology, which primarily allows users to simulate their homes and visualize any changes prior to implementing them. This feasibility study aimed to examine occupational therapists' perceptions about the clinical utility of the 3DIDS. A secondary aim was to explore the attitudes of occupational therapists towards technology in general. Three focus groups were conducted with 25 occupational therapists working with older people in the UK. The qualitative data were analysed using inductive thematic analysis. The three main themes that were identified were usage and attitudes of technology, opportunities for realistic application of the 3DIDS and related threats and benefits for the occupational therapy profession. Occupational therapists had a positive attitude towards technology. They suggested that the 3DIDS could be used in discharge planning and in rehabilitation. They viewed it as a tool that could enhance their status within the health care profession and improve communication, but not as a tool that should replace the role of the occupational therapist. This research offers new and important findings about the utilization of the 3DIDS by occupational therapists and provides information as to where this technology should be trialled.

  11. Clinical utility and patient consideration in the use of lenalidomide for multiple myeloma in Chinese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang J

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Jing Wang, Hongfeng Guo, Xin Zhou Department of Hematology, Wuxi People’s Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Wuxi, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Multiple myeloma (MM is an incurable hematologic malignancy caused by the autonomous growth of malignant plasma cells. In the last decade, the introduction of novel targeted agents such as thalidomide, bortezomib, and lenalidomide has dramatically improved the clinical outcome of MM patients in both the frontline and recurrent settings. Lenalidomide is a synthetic derivative of thalidomide, which has been shown to significantly improve overall survival, time to progression, and overall response rates in patients with MM. The China Food and Drug Administration approved the use of lenalidomide in patients with MM in 2013. In a Phase II trial, lenalidomide plus low-dose dexamethasone was associated with a high response rate and acceptable safety profile in heavily pretreated Chinese patients with relapsed/refractory MM, including those with renal impairment and IgD subtype. However, lenalidomide will remain as a second-line antimyeloma drug in the near future because of its high price and the policy of health insurance reimbursement in People’s Republic of China. In this review, we summarize the clinical utility and patient considerations in the use of lenalidomide for MM in Chinese patients. Further studies with larger sample sizes are required to investigate the better quality, longer duration, and more clinically meaningful outcomes of lenalidomide in the treatment of MM in Chinese patients. Keywords: lenalidomide, multiple myeloma, clinical efficacy, Chinese patients

  12. Clinical utility of dronabinol in the treatment of weight loss associated with HIV and AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badowski ME

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Melissa E Badowski,1 Sarah E Perez2 1Department of Pharmacy Practice, Section of Infectious Diseases Pharmacotherapy, College of Pharmacy, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA; 2Infectious Diseases Clinic, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Since the beginning of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, weight loss has been a common complaint for patients. The use of various definitions defining HIV wasting syndrome has made it difficult to determine its actual prevalence. Despite the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy, it is estimated that the prevalence of HIV wasting syndrome is between 14% and 38%. HIV wasting syndrome may stem from conditions affecting chewing, swallowing, or gastrointestinal motility, neurologic disease affecting food intake or the perception of hunger or ability to eat, psychiatric illness, food insecurity generated from psychosocial or economic concerns, or anorexia due to medications, malabsorption, infections, or tumors. Treatment of HIV wasting syndrome may be managed with appetite stimulants (megestrol acetate or dronabinol, anabolic agents (testosterone, testosterone analogs, or recombinant human growth hormone, or, rarely, cytokine production modulators (thalidomide. The goal of this review is to provide an in-depth evaluation based on existing clinical trials on the clinical utility of dronabinol in the treatment of weight loss associated with HIV/AIDS. Although total body weight gain varies with dronabinol use (–2.0 to 3.2 kg, dronabinol is a well-tolerated option to promote appetite stimulation. Further studies are needed with standardized definitions of HIV-associated weight loss and clinical outcomes, robust sample sizes, safety and efficacy data on chronic use of dronabinol beyond 52 weeks, and associated virologic and immunologic outcomes. Keywords: dronabinol, weight loss, HIV/AIDS, HIV wasting syndrome, cachexia

  13. Clinical utility of breath ammonia for evaluation of ammonia physiology in healthy and cirrhotic adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spacek, Lisa A; Mudalel, Matthew; Tittel, Frank; Risby, Terence H; Solga, Steven F

    2016-01-01

    Blood ammonia is routinely used in clinical settings to assess systemic ammonia in hepatic encephalopathy and urea cycle disorders. Despite its drawbacks, blood measurement is often used as a comparator in breath studies because it is a standard clinical test. We sought to evaluate sources of measurement error and potential clinical utility of breath ammonia compared to blood ammonia. We measured breath ammonia in real time by quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectrometry and blood ammonia in 10 healthy and 10 cirrhotic participants. Each participant contributed 5 breath samples and blood for ammonia measurement within 1 h. We calculated the coefficient of variation (CV) for 5 breath ammonia values, reported medians of healthy and cirrhotic participants, and used scatterplots to display breath and blood ammonia. For healthy participants, mean age was 22 years (±4), 70% were men, and body mass index (BMI) was 27 (±5). For cirrhotic participants, mean age was 61 years (±8), 60% were men, and BMI was 31 (±7). Median blood ammonia for healthy participants was within normal range, 10 μmol L−1 (interquartile range (IQR), 3–18) versus 46 μmol L−1 (IQR, 23–66) for cirrhotic participants. Median breath ammonia was 379 pmol mL−1 CO2 (IQR, 265–765) for healthy versus 350 pmol mL−1 CO2 (IQR, 180–1013) for cirrhotic participants. CV was 17 ± 6%. There remains an important unmet need in the evaluation of systemic ammonia, and breath measurement continues to demonstrate promise to fulfill this need. Given the many differences between breath and blood ammonia measurement, we examined biological explanations for our findings in healthy and cirrhotic participants. We conclude that based upon these preliminary data breath may offer clinically important information this is not provided by blood ammonia. PMID:26658550

  14. Drug utilization pattern in a pain clinic of a tertiary care teaching hospital in Eastern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debjyoti Dutta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients attend the Pain Clinic with varieties of complains of pain, like low back pain, knee pain, shoulder pain, headache, facial pain, different neuralgias and other neuropathic pain states. They receive a multimodal treatment for their pain, Multimodal pain therapy is an integrated multidisciplinary treatment in small groups with a closely coordinated therapeutic approach. Drugs that are prescribed for treatment are not only NSAIDS or Opioids, but also various groups of adjuvant pain medications like anti-epileptics, antidepressants etc. Aim: To find out the drug utilization pattern in the Pain Clinic of a tertiary care medical college hospital in Eastern India. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional; unicentric study was conducted in the Pain Clinic during April 2013 to June 2013. New patients who were willing to participate in the study were enrolled as per selection criteria. A copy of prescriptions were collected from the patients. The drugs prescription patterns were analyzed. Result: 319 patients were included in this study in three months period and their prescriptions were analyzed. Female patients (222 were more in number than male (97. As single prescription and also as combination therapy, paracetamol was found to be the most frequently prescribed drug. Frequently used adjuvant pain medications were found to be pregabalin (21.63% and amitriptyline (16.92%.. Antacid was commonly prescribed as gastroprotective agent. Among drug combinations paracetamol (325 mg + tramadol (37.5 mg combination was used most frequently. (55.17%. Conclusion: In this uncentric study we found that patacetamol, tramadol, pregabalin and amitriptyline are the commonly used medications in a pain clinic. We need more multi-centric and comparative Indian studies.

  15. The clinical utilization of radiation therapy in Korea between 2009 and 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jin Kyu; Kim, Mi Sook; Jang, Won Il; Seo, Young Seok; Kim, Hee Jin; Cho, Chul Koo; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Paik, Eun Kyung; Cha, Yu Jin [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Hyun Jin [College of Pharmacy and Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the clinical utilization of radiation therapy (RT) in Korea between 2009 and 2013. We analyzed open claims data from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service. The subjects were patients who had diagnostic codes C00-C97 or D00-D48 according to the 10th revision of the International Classification of Diseases, with procedure codes indicating RT treatment. The total number of patients who received RT in 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, and 2013 were 45,571, 49,593, 54,671, 59,172, and 61,485, respectively. Among them, the total numbers of male and female patients were 20,780/24,791 in 2009, 22,711/26,882 in 2010, 24,872/29,799 in 2011, 27,101/32,071 in 2012, and 27,941/33,544 in 2013. The five cancers that were most frequently treated with RT between 2009 and 2012 were breast, lung, colorectal, liver, and uterine cervical cancers. However, the fifth most common cancer treated with RT that replaced uterine cervical cancer in 2013 was prostate cancer. The three leading types of cancer among the male patients were lung, colorectal, and liver cancers, whereas in female patients, they were breast, uterine cervical, and lung cancers. The type of cancer most commonly treated by RT was cancer of the central nervous system in patients aged 20 years or less, breast cancer in patients aged 30–50 years, and lung cancer in patients aged 60 years or more. Data from this study provided the clinical utilization of RT in Korea between 2009 and 2013.

  16. Clinical utility of computed tomographic lung volumes in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Seung; Lee, Sang-Min; Seo, Joon Beom; Lee, Sei Won; Huh, Jin Won; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lee, Sang-Do

    2014-01-01

    Published data concerning the utility of computed tomography (CT)-based lung volumes are limited to correlation with lung function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of the CT expiratory-to-inspiratory lung volume ratio (CT Vratio) by assessing the relationship with clinically relevant outcomes. A total of 75 stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients having pulmonary function testing and volumetric CT at full inspiration and expiration were retrospectively evaluated. Inspiratory and expiratory CT lung volumes were measured using in-house software. Correlation of the CT Vratio with patient-centered outcomes, including the modified Medical Research Council (MMRC) dyspnea score, the 6-min walk distance (6MWD), the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) score, and multidimensional COPD severity indices, such as the BMI, airflow obstruction, dyspnea, and exercise capacity index (BODE) and age, dyspnea, and airflow obstruction (ADO), were analyzed. The CT Vratio correlated significantly with BMI (r = -0.528, p < 0.001). The CT Vratio was also significantly associated with MMRC dyspnea (r = 0.387, p = 0.001), 6MWD (r = -0.459, p < 0.001), and SGRQ (r = 0.369, p = 0.001) scores. Finally, the CT Vratio had significant correlations with the BODE and ADO multidimensional COPD severity indices (r = 0.605, p < 0.001; r = 0.411, p < 0.001). The CT Vratio had significant correlations with patient-centered outcomes and multidimensional COPD severity indices. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. The effect of daily sedation interruption protocol on early incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia among patients hospitalized in critical care units receiving mechanical ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Shahabi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP is a common side effect in patients who receive intravenous sedation infusion. In routine care, after starting sedation infusion for patients who receive mechanical ventilation, interruption of sedation starts without protocol. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of daily sedation vacation protocol on the incidence of VAP in mechanically ventilated patients. Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial study, 80 patients with intravenous sedation infusion were selected and randomly allocated to intervention and control groups. In the intervention group, daily sedation vacation protocol and in the control group, routine sedation vacation was followed. Modified clinical pulmonary infection score questionnaire was completed before intervention and on the third, fourth, and fifth days after intervention. Data were analyzed by using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA, Chi-square, and independent t-test. Results: The results of this study showed that the incidence rate of VAP in the intervention and control groups was 0% versus 15% on the third day of intervention, 12.5% versus 50% on the fourth day, and 27.5% versus 55.3% on the fifth day of intervention in the intervention and control groups, respectively. The incidence of VAP in the intervention group was significantly lower than in the control group (P < 0.05. Conclusions: The results of this study showed that in patients with intravenous sedation, infusion of a daily sedation vacation protocol may reduce the incidence of VAP. Therefore, in order to prevent VAP, nurses are recommended to use this daily sedation vacation protocol.

  18. Comparison of butorphanol-detomidine versus butorphanol-azaperone for the standing sedation of captive greater one-horned rhinoceroses (Rhinoceros unicornis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bapodra, Priya; Cracknell, Jonathan; Wolfe, Barbara A

    2014-03-01

    Three adult and two subadult greater one-horned rhinoceroses (Rhinoceros unicornis) were sedated a total of nine times using two different intramuscular sedative combinations in order to compare the effectiveness of these combinations in inducing consistent standing sedation in this species. The sedation protocols compared were butorphanol tartrate (50-60 mg) and detomidine hydrochloride (20-30 mg; BD) versus butorphanol tartrate (80-120 mg) and azaperone (80-120 mg; BA). Specific doses were adjusted according to age and sex class, and based on previous experience. Parameters compared included time to achieve defined levels of sedation, time to recovery following antagonism, physiological parameters including heart rate, respiratory rate, indirect arterial blood pressure, and venous blood gas values. A hydraulic restraint chute was utilized to mechanically restrain animals during the procedures, and blood collection and ophthalmic examinations were conducted on all animals. Both protocols resulted in standing sedation for > or = 22.3 +/- 2.9 min or until antagonists were administered. The BD protocol resulted in deeper and more consistent sedation, compared to the BA protocol. Naltrexone hydrochloride (250-300 mg) and tolazoline hydrochloride (1,500-2,000 mg) were administered intramuscularly to antagonize protocol BD, whereas naltrexone alone (200-500 mg) was used to antagonize BA. Time to full antagonism, defined as normal mentation and ambulation following administration of antagonists, was prolonged in the BD protocol (132.3 +/- 17.2 min) compared with the BA protocol (7.5 +/- 2.5 min). Venous blood gas analysis did not reveal any significant blood gas deviations during sedation when compared with either conscious equine or white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum) venous reference ranges. In summary, both combinations resulted in adequate standing sedation for minimally invasive procedures, although BD resulted in more profound and consistent sedation.

  19. Cardiovascular, respiratory and sedative effects of intramuscular alfaxalone, butorphanol and dexmedetomidine compared with ketamine, butorphanol and dexmedetomidine in healthy cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Jeannette; Riccó, Carolina H

    2017-11-01

    Objectives The aim of the study was to evaluate the cardiorespiratory effects, quality of sedation and recovery of intramuscular alfaxalone-dexmedetomidine-butorphanol (ADB) and ketamine-dexmedetomidine-butorphanol (KDB), in cats. Methods Nine adult, healthy cats (6.63 ± 1.42 kg) were enrolled in a blinded, randomized, crossover experimental design. Cats were sedated twice intramuscularly, once with ADB (alfaxalone 1 mg/kg, dexmedetomidine 0.005 mg/kg, butorphanol 0.2 mg/kg), and once with KDB (ketamine 5 mg/kg, dexmedetomidine 0.005 mg/kg, butorphanol 0.2 mg/kg), in random order. Data collected included heart rate (HR), arterial blood pressure and blood gas analysis, respiratory rate, and sedation score. Analysis of variance with Bonferroni post-hoc correction was used for parametric data, and a Wilcoxon signed rank test was used for non-parametric data. Significance was set at P <0.05. Results Total sedation time was shorter for ADB (90.71 ± 15.12 mins vs 147.00 ± 47.75 mins). Peak sedation was observed within 15 mins in both groups. Quality of recovery was excellent in both groups. HR decreased over time in both groups. Diastolic and mean arterial pressure decreased over time for ADB, becoming significant after 30 mins. All cardiovascular variables were within the clinically acceptable range in both groups. Arterial partial pressure of oxygen was significantly decreased from baseline for KDB at all time points (73 ± 2.5 mmHg [9.7 ± 0.3 kPa] vs ADB 83 ± 2.6 mmHg [11 ± 0.3 kPa]). Hypoventilation was not observed. Conclusions and relevance Both protocols produced acceptable cardiovascular stability. Sedation and recovery quality were good, albeit sedation was shorter with ADB. Although oxygenation was better maintained in the ADB group, all sedated cats should receive oxygen supplementation.

  20. Computerized tests to evaluate recovery of cognitive function after deep sedation with propofol and remifentanil for colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrat, Xavier; Ubre, Marta; Risco, Raquel; Gambús, Pedro L; Pedroso, Angela; Iglesias, Aina; Fernandez-Esparrach, Gloria; Ginés, Àngels; Balust, Jaume; Martínez-Palli, Graciela

    2018-03-27

    The use of sedation for diagnostic procedures including gastrointestinal endoscopy is rapidly growing. Recovery of cognitive function after sedation is important because it would be important for most patients to resume safe, normal life soon after the procedure. Computerized tests have shown being accurate descriptors of cognitive function. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the time course of cognitive function recovery after sedation with propofol and remifentanil. A prospective observational double blind clinical study conducted in 34 young healthy adults undergoing elective outpatient colonoscopy under sedation with the combination of propofol and remifentanil using a target controlled infusion system. Cognitive function was measured using a validated battery of computerized cognitive tests (Cogstate™, Melbourne, Australia) at different predefined times: prior to starting sedation (Tbaseline), and then 10 min (T10), 40 min (T40) and 120 min (T120) after the end of colonoscopy. Tests included the assessment of psychomotor function, attention, visual memory and working memory. All colonoscopies were completed (median time: 26 min) without significant adverse events. Patients received a median total dose of propofol and remifentanil of 149 mg and 98 µg, respectively. Psychomotor function and attention declined at T10 but were back to baseline values at T40 for all patients. The magnitude of psychomotor task reduction was large (d = 0.81) however 100% of patients were recovered at T40. Memory related tasks were not affected 10 min after ending sedation. Cognitive impairment in attention and psychomotor function after propofol and remifentanil sedation was significant and large and could be easily detected by computerized cognitive tests. Even though, patients were fully recovered 40 min after ending the procedure. From a cognitive recovery point of view, larger studies should be undertaken to propose adequate criteria for discharge

  1. Increased precuneus connectivity during propofol sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaolin; Li, Shi-Jiang; Hudetz, Anthony G

    2014-02-21

    Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in human participants, we show that sedation by propofol to the point of lost overt responsiveness during the performance of an auditory verbal memory task unexpectedly increases functional connectivity of the precuneus with cortical regions, particularly the dorsal prefrontal and visual cortices. After recovery of consciousness, functional connectivity returns to a pattern similar to that observed during the wakeful baseline. In the context of a recent proposal that highlights the uncoupling of consciousness, connectedness, and responsiveness in general anesthesia, the increased precuneus functional connectivity under propofol sedation may reflect disconnected endogenous mentation or dreaming that continues at a reduced level of metabolic activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Pediatric Palliative Sedation Therapy with Propofol: Recommendations Based on Experience in Children with Terminal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Hunter; Faughnan, Lane G.; Johnson, Liza-Marie; Baker, Justin N.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The use of propofol for palliative sedation of children is not well documented. Objective Here we describe our experience with the use of propofol palliative sedation therapy (PST) to alleviate intractable end-of-life suffering in three pediatric oncology patients, and propose an algorithm for the selection of such candidates for PST. Patients and Methods We identified inpatients who had received propofol PST within 20 days of death at our institution between 2003 and 2010. Their medical records were reviewed for indicators of pain, suffering, and sedation from 48 hours before PST to the time of death. We also tabulated consumption of opioids and other symptom management medications, pain scores, and adverse events of propofol, and reviewed clinical notes for descriptors of suffering and/or palliation. Results Three of 192 (1.6%) inpatients (aged 6–15 years) received propofol PST at the end of life. Consumption of opioids and other supportive medications decreased during PST in two cases. In the third case, pain scores remained high and sedation was the only effective comfort measure. Clinical notes suggested improved comfort and rest in all patients. Propofol infusions were continued until the time of death. Conclusions Our experience demonstrates that propofol PST is a useful palliative option for pediatric patients experiencing intractable suffering at the end of life. We describe an algorithm that can be used to identify such children who are candidates for PST. PMID:22731512

  3. The validity and clinical utility of structured diagnoses of antisocial personality disorder with forensic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Avellan, Luisa E; McGauley, Gillian A; Campbell, Colin D; Fonagy, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Current DSM-based instruments for personality disorders (PDs) limit the investigation of the course and outcome of treatment of these disorders. This study examined the validity of the Shedler-Westen Assessment Procedure-200 (SWAP-200) and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II PD (SCID-II) in a sample of forensic PD patients. Results based on 66 participants indicated that the SWAP-200 Q-factors reduced the frequency of diagnostic comorbidity of PD categories by half compared with the SCID-II. Only the SWAP-200's Antisocial PD category showed good convergent and discriminant validity with respect to other instruments describing aspects of PD. The validity of the cutoff score for severe antisocial PD was confirmed, and this category predicted severe incidents in the hospital at 1 year of follow-up. A violence risk scale was constructed, which differentiated violent and nonviolent offenders. The results support the validity of the SWAP-200 and its potential clinical utility with forensic PD patients.

  4. Clinical utility of 5-aminolevulinic acid HCl to better visualize and more completely remove gliomas

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    Halani SH

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sameer H Halani,1 D Cory Adamson1,2 1Department of Neurosurgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2Neurosurgery Section, Atlanta VA Medical Center, Decatur, GA, USA Abstract: Surgical resection is typically the first line of treatment for gliomas. However, the neurosurgeon faces a major challenge in achieving maximal resection in high-grade gliomas as these infiltrative tumors make it difficult to discern tumor margins from normal brain with conventional white-light microscopy alone. To aid in resection of these infiltrative tumors, fluorescence-guided surgery has gained much popularity in intraoperative visualization of malignant gliomas, with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA leading the way. First introduced in an article in Neurosurgery, 5-ALA has since become a safe, effective, and inexpensive method to visualize and improve resection of gliomas. This has undoubtedly led to improvements in the clinical course of patients as demonstrated by the increased overall and progression-free survival in patients with such devastating disease. This literature review aims to discuss the major studies and trials demonstrating the clinical utility of 5-ALA and its ability to aid in complete resection of malignant gliomas. Keywords: aminolevulinic acid, 5-ALA, fluorescence, glioblastoma multiforme, high-grade glioma, resection

  5. A clinical utility study of exome sequencing versus conventional genetic testing in pediatric neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vissers, Lisenka E L M; van Nimwegen, Kirsten J M; Schieving, Jolanda H; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Yntema, Helger G; Pfundt, Rolph; van der Wilt, Gert Jan; Krabbenborg, Lotte; Brunner, Han G; van der Burg, Simone; Grutters, Janneke; Veltman, Joris A; Willemsen, Michèl A A P

    2017-09-01

    Implementation of novel genetic diagnostic tests is generally driven by technological advances because they promise shorter turnaround times and/or higher diagnostic yields. Other aspects, including impact on clinical management or cost-effectiveness, are often not assessed in detail prior to implementation. We studied the clinical utility of whole-exome sequencing (WES) in complex pediatric neurology in terms of diagnostic yield and costs. We analyzed 150 patients (and their parents) presenting with complex neurological disorders of suspected genetic origin. In a parallel study, all patients received both the standard diagnostic workup (e.g., cerebral imaging, muscle biopsies or lumbar punctures, and sequential gene-by-gene-based testing) and WES simultaneously. Our unique study design allowed direct comparison of diagnostic yield of both trajectories and provided insight into the economic implications of implementing WES in this diagnostic trajectory. We showed that WES identified significantly more conclusive diagnoses (29.3%) than the standard care pathway (7.3%) without incurring higher costs. Exploratory analysis of WES as a first-tier diagnostic test indicates that WES may even be cost-saving, depending on the extent of other tests being omitted. Our data support such a use of WES in pediatric neurology for disorders of presumed genetic origin.Genet Med advance online publication 23 March 2017.

  6. The clinical determination of absolute density in bone utilizing single and dual energy compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huddleston, A.L.; Weaver, J.

    1980-01-01

    Several methods important in the clinical diagnosis of skeletal diseases have been proposed for the determination of bone mass, such as photon absorptiometry, computed tomography, and neutron activation. None of these present methods provides for the determination of the physical density of bone. In the Radiological Physics Research Laboratory at the University of Virginia, the principles of Compton scattering are being investigated with the intent of determining the electron density and the physical density of human bone. A Compton-scatter densitometer has been constructed for the in vivo density determination of the femoral head. This technique utilizes of collimated low energy gamma source and detector system. The method has been tested in cadavers and in known density samples and has an accuracy of 2 %. A second densitometer has been designed for the in vivo determination of electron density of the vertebrae based upon a new technique which employs dual energy Compton scattering in the spinal column. These systems will be discussed; and the principles of dual energy Compton scatter densitometry will be presented. The importance of these isotope techniques and the feasibility of in vivo density determination in the vertebrae and femoral head will be discussed as they relate to clinical diagnosis and research. (author)

  7. Nitric oxide nanoparticles: pre-clinical utility as a therapeutic for intramuscular abscesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schairer, David; Martinez, Luis R; Blecher, Karin; Chouake, Jason; Nacharaju, Parimala; Gialanella, Philip; Friedman, Joel M; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Friedman, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a critical component of host defense against invading pathogens; however, its therapeutic utility is limited due to a lack of practical delivery systems. Recently, a NO-releasing nanoparticulate platform (NO-np) was shown to have in vitro broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and in vivo pre-clinical efficacy in a dermal abscess model. To extend these findings, both topical (TP) and intralesional (IL) NO-np administration was evaluated in a MRSA intramuscular murine abscess model and compared with vancomycin. All treatment arms accelerated abscess clearance clinically, histologically, and by microbiological assays on both days 4 and 7 following infection. However, abscesses treated with NO-np via either route demonstrated a more substantial, statistically significant decrease in bacterial survival based on colony forming unit assays and histologically revealed less inflammatory cell infiltration and preserved muscular architecture. These data suggest that the NO-np may be an effective addition to our armament for deep soft tissue infections.

  8. Antidiabetic Effects of Resveratrol: The Way Forward in Its Clinical Utility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omolola R. Oyenihi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in the understanding and management of diabetes mellitus, the prevalence of the disease is increasing unabatedly with resulting disabling and life-reducing consequences to the global human population. The limitations and side effects associated with current antidiabetic therapies have necessitated the search for novel therapeutic agents. Due to the multipathogenicity of diabetes mellitus, plant-derived compounds with proven multiple pharmacological actions have been postulated to “hold the key” in the search for an affordable, efficacious, and safer therapeutic agent in the treatment of the disease and associated complications. Resveratrol, a phytoalexin present in few plant species, has demonstrated beneficial antidiabetic effects in animals and humans through diverse mechanisms and multiple molecular targets. However, despite the enthusiasm and widespread successes achieved with the use of resveratrol in animal models of diabetes mellitus, there are extremely limited clinical data to confirm the antidiabetic qualities of resveratrol. This review presents an update on the mechanisms of action and protection of resveratrol in diabetes mellitus, highlights challenges in its clinical utility, and suggests the way forward in translating the promising preclinical data to a possible antidiabetic drug in the near future.

  9. Clinical utility of pretreatment prediction of chemoradiotherapy response in rectal cancer: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Byong Chul; Yeo, Seung-Gu

    2017-03-01

    Approximately 20% of all patients with locally advanced rectal cancer experience pathologically complete responses following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and standard surgery. The utility of radical surgery for patients exhibiting good CRT responses has been challenged. Organ-sparing strategies for selected patients exhibiting complete clinical responses include local excision or no immediate surgery. The subjects of this tailored management are patients whose presenting disease corresponds to current indications of neoadjuvant CRT, and their post-CRT tumor response is assessed by clinical and radiological examinations. However, a model predictive of the CRT response, applied before any treatment commenced, would be valuable to facilitate such a personalized approach. This would increase organ preservation, particularly in patients for whom upfront CRT is not generally prescribed. Molecular biomarkers hold the greatest promise for development of a pretreatment predictive model of CRT response. A combination of clinicopathological, radiological, and molecular markers will be necessary to render the model robust. Molecular research will also contribute to the development of drugs that can overcome the radioresistance of rectal tumors. Current treatments for rectal cancer are based on the expected prognosis given the presenting disease extent. In the future, treatment schemes may be modified by including the predicted CRT response evaluated at presentation.

  10. Clinical Utilization of Repeated Open Application Test Among American Contact Dermatitis Society Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gabrielle E; Botto, Nina; Butler, Daniel C; Murase, Jenny E

    2015-01-01

    The repeated open application test (ROAT) provides useful information regarding allergens in suspected cases of allergic contact dermatitis; however, standardized methodology has not been established. The aim of this study was to assess how ROAT is used in clinical and research settings. We distributed a survey regarding ROAT practice to the American Contact Dermatitis Society and conducted a literature review of ROAT utilization in research. A total of 67 American Contact Dermatitis Society members participated in the survey. Respondents most frequently recommend application of leave-on products twice daily (46.0%) and rinse-off products once daily (43.5%). The most commonly used anatomical sites include the forearm (38.7%) and antecubital fossa (32.3%). Most respondents continue ROAT for 1 (49.2%) or 2 weeks (31.7%). Literature review of 32 studies (26 leave-on, 6 rinse-off) revealed that application frequency is most common at twice daily for both leave-on (96.2%) and rinse-off (50.0%) products. The most common anatomical site is the forearm (62.5%), with an overall study duration of 3 to 4 weeks (65.6%). When comparing ROAT clinical and research practice, the majority trend was consistent for leave-on product application frequency and anatomical site, but not for rinse-off product application frequency, or overall duration. Further research is needed to determine best practice recommendations.

  11. The clinical utility of new combination phenylephrine/ketorolac injection in cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawuyi LE

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lola Elizabeth Lawuyi, Avinash Gurbaxani Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai, Dubai, UAE Abstract: The maintenance of mydriasis throughout cataract extraction surgery and the control of ocular inflammation are crucial for successful surgical outcomes. The development of miosis during cataract surgery compromises the visualization of the surgical field and working space for surgeons. This may lead to complications that include posterior capsular tear and associated vitreous loss, longer surgical time, and postoperative inflammation. Postoperative inflammation is often uncomfortable and frustrating for patients. It causes pain, redness, and photophobia. This compromises the best-uncorrected vision following surgery and often leads to multiple clinic visits. This article examines the literature published on the current treatments used to manage mydriasis, pain, and inflammation in cataract extraction surgery. Combination phenylephrine/ketorolac injection offers an exciting new class of medication for use in cataract surgery. With the recent approval of Omidria™ (combination of phenylephrine 1% and ketorolac 0.3% by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA for intraocular use, we review the clinical utility of this new combination injection in cataract surgery. PubMed, MEDLINE, and conference proceedings were searched for the relevant literature using a combination of the following search terms: cataract extraction surgery, pupil dilation (mydriasis, miosis, phenylephrine, ketorolac, Omidria™, intracameral mydriatic. Relevant articles were reviewed and their references checked for further relevant literature. All abstracts were reviewed and full texts retrieved where available. Keywords: cataract extraction surgery, ketorolac, mydriasis, miosis, Omidria™, phenylephrine

  12. Analgesics and sedatives in vascular interventionist radiologic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregorio, M.A. de; Opta, J.M.; Pulido, J.M.; Encarnacion, C.E.; Arino, I., Fernandez, J.A.; Alfonso, E.R.

    1993-01-01

    Interventionist radiology routinely requires the use of different drugs (analgesics and sedatives) in the course of a procedure. Aside from their therapeutic action, these drugs can produce secondary or undesirable effects, making necessary an in-depth knowledge of them to assure their safe and efficient management. The aim of this work is to provide the vascular interventionist radiologist with additional information on the management of those drugs that contribute to minimizing patient discomfort and pain in interventionist procedures. Author

  13. Dreaming and recall during sedation for colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stait, M L; Leslie, K; Bailey, R

    2008-09-01

    Dreaming is reported by one in five patients who are interviewed on emergence from general anaesthesia, but the incidence, predictors and consequences of dreaming during procedural sedation are not known. In this prospective observational study, 200 patients presenting for elective colonoscopy under intravenous sedation were interviewed on emergence to determine the incidences of dreaming and recall. Sedation technique was left to the discretion of the anaesthetist. The incidence of dreaming was 25.5%. Patients reporting dreaming were younger than those who did not report dreaming. Doses of midazolam and fentanyl were similar between dreamers and non-dreamers, however propofol doses were higher in patients who reported dreams than those who did not. Patients reported short, simple dreams about everyday life--no dream suggested near-miss recall of the procedure. Frank recall of the procedure was reported by 4% of the patients, which was consistent with propofol doses commensurate with light general anaesthesia. The only significant predictor of recall was lower propofol dose. Satisfaction with care was generally high, however dreamers were more satisfied with their care than non-dreamers.

  14. An Evaluation of Intranasal Sufentanil and Dexmedetomidine for Pediatric Dental Sedation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M. Hitt

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Conscious or moderate sedation is routinely used to facilitate the dental care of the pre- or un-cooperative child. Dexmedetomidine (DEX has little respiratory depressant effect, possibly making it a safer option when used as an adjunct to either opioids or benzodiazepines. Unlike intranasal (IN midazolam, IN application of DEX and sufentanil (SUF does not appear to cause much discomfort. Further, although DEX lacks respiratory depressive effects, it is an α2-agonist that can cause hypotension and bradycardia when given in high doses or during prolonged periods of administration. The aim of this feasibility study was to prospectively assess IN DEX/SUF as a potential sedation regimen for pediatric dental procedures. After IRB approval and informed consent, children (aged 3–7 years; n = 20 from our dental clinic were recruited. All patients received 2 μg/kg (max 40 μg of IN DEX 45 min before the procedure, followed 30 min later by 1 μg/kg (max 20 μg of IN SUF. An independent observer rated the effects of sedation using the Ohio State University Behavior Rating Scale (OSUBRS and University of Michigan Sedation Scale (UMSS. The dentist and the parent also assessed the efficacy of sedation. Dental procedures were well tolerated and none were aborted. The mean OSUBRS procedure score was 2.1, the UMSS procedure score was 1.6, and all scores returned to baseline after the procedure. The average dentist rated quality of sedation was 7.6 across the 20 subjects. After discharge, parents reported one child with prolonged drowsiness and one child who vomited at home. The use of IN DEX supplemented with IN SUF provided both an effective and tolerable form of moderate sedation. Although onset and recovery are slower than with oral (PO midazolam and transmucosal fentanyl, the quality of the sedation may be better with less risk of respiratory depression. Results from this preliminary study showed no major complications from IN delivery of these agents.

  15. Clinical utility, safety, and efficacy of pregabalin in the treatment of fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhusal S

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Santosh Bhusal,1 Sherilyn Diomampo,1 Marina N Magrey2 1Division of Rheumatology, Metrohealth Medical Center, 2Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine at Metrohealth Medical Center, Cleveland OH, USA Abstract: Fibromyalgia is a chronic debilitating medical syndrome with limited therapeutic options. Pregabalin, an anticonvulsant and α-2-Δ subunit receptor ligand, is one of the anchor drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of fibromyalgia. The drug has shown clinically meaningful benefits across multiple symptom domains of fibromyalgia. Efficacy of pregabalin in fibromyalgia pain has been evaluated in at least five high-quality randomized trials, two long-term extension studies, a meta-analysis, a Cochrane database systematic review, and several post hoc analyses. These studies also hint towards a meaningful benefit on sleep, functioning, quality of life, and work productivity. Side effects of pregabalin, although common, are mild to moderate in intensity. They are noted early during therapy, improve or disappear with dose reduction, and are not usually life- or organ threatening. In most patients, tolerance develops to the most common side effects, dizziness, and somnolence, with time. With close clinical monitoring at initiation or dose titration, pregabalin can be effectively used in primary care setting. Pregabalin is cost saving with long-term use and its cost-effectiveness profile is comparable, if not better, to that of other drugs used in fibromyalgia. In the present era of limited therapeutic options, pregabalin undoubtedly retains its role as one of cardinal drugs used in the treatment of fibromyalgia. This review intends to discuss the clinical utility of pregabalin in the management of fibromyalgia with a focus on efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness. Keywords: fibrositis, myofascial pain, diffuse pain syndrome, lyrica

  16. Clinical Utility of Noninvasive Method to Measure Specific Gravity in the Pediatric Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jeanine E; Huynh, Pauline P; Mody, Ameer P; Wang, Vincent J

    2018-04-01

    Clinicians rely on any combination of signs and symptoms, clinical scores, or invasive procedures to assess the hydration status in children. Noninvasive tests to evaluate for dehydration in the pediatric population are appealing. The objective of our study is to assess the utility of measuring specific gravity of tears compared to specific gravity of urine and the clinical assessment of dehydration. We conducted a prospective cohort convenience sample study, in a pediatric emergency department at a tertiary care children's hospital. We approached parents/guardians of children aged 6 months to 4 years undergoing transurethral catheterization for evaluation of urinary tract infection for enrollment. We collected tears and urine for measurement of tear specific gravity (TSG) and urine specific gravity (USG), respectively. Treating physicians completed dehydration assessment forms to assess for hydration status. Among the 60 participants included, the mean TSG was 1.0183 (SD = 0.007); the mean USG was 1.0186 (SD = 0.0083). TSG and USG were positively correlated with each other (Pearson Correlation = 0.423, p = 0.001). Clinical dehydration scores ranged from 0 to 3, with 87% assigned a score of 0, by physician assessment. Mean number of episodes of vomiting and diarrhea in a 24-hour period were 2.2 (SD = 3.9) and 1.5 (SD = 3.2), respectively. Sixty-two percent of parents reported decreased oral intake. TSG measurements yielded similar results compared with USG. Further studies are needed to determine if TSG can be used as a noninvasive method of dehydration assessment in children. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Utility of the AAOS Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) for Pediatric Supracondylar Humerus Fractures in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Talal; Hegazy, Abdelsalam; Abulhail, Safa I S; Ghomrawi, Hassan M K

    2017-01-01

    The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) recently developed an Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) for pediatric supracondylar humerus fractures (PSHF). The AUC is intended to improve quality of care by informing surgeon decision making. The aim of our study was to cross-reference the management of operatively treated PSHF with the AAOS-published AUC. The AUC for PSHF include 220 patient scenarios, based on different combinations of 6 factors. For each patient scenario, 8 treatment options are evaluated as "appropriate," "maybe appropriate," and "rarely appropriate." We retrospectively reviewed the medical charts and radiographs of all operatively treated PSHF at our hospital from January 2013 to December 2014 and determined the appropriateness of the treatment. Over the study period, 94 children (mean age: 5.2 y; 51 male, 43 female) were admitted with PSHF and underwent a surgical procedure (type IIA: 7, type IIB: 14, type III: 70, flexion type: 3). Only 8 of the 220 scenarios were observed in our patient cohort. The most frequent scenario was represented by a type III fracture, palpable distal pulse, no nerve injury, closed soft-tissue envelope, no radius/ulna fracture, and typical swelling. Of the 94 fractures, the AUC was "appropriate" for 84 cases and "maybe appropriate" for 9 cases. There was only 1 case of "rarely appropriate" management. Closed reduction with lateral pinning and immobilization was the most prevalent treatment option (58.5%). The rate of appropriateness was not affected by the operating surgeon. However, the definition of a case as emergent had a significant impact on the rate of appropriateness. Application of the AUC to actual clinical data was relatively simple. The majority of operatively treated PSHF (89.4%) were managed appropriately. With the introduction of electronic medical charts, an AUC application becomes attractive and easy for orthopaedic surgeons to utilize in clinical practice. However, validity studies of the AUC in

  18. Clinical utility of early amplitude integrated EEG in monitoring term newborns at risk of neurological injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina A. Toso

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to test the clinical utility of an early amplitude-integrated electroencephalography (aEEG to predict short-term neurological outcome in term newborns at risk of neurology injury. METHODS: this was a prospective, descriptive study. The inclusion criteria were neonatal encephalopathy, neurologic disturbances, and severe respiratory distress syndrome. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and likelihood ratio (LR were calculated. Clinical and demographic data were analyzed. Neurological outcome was defined as the sum of clinical, electroimaging, and neuroimaging findings. RESULTS: ten of the 21 monitored infants (48% presented altered short-term neurologic outcome. The aEEG had 90% sensitivity, 82% specificity, 82% positive predictive value, and 90% negative predictive value. The positive LR was 4.95, and the negative LR was 0.12. In three of 12 (25% encephalopathic infants, the aEEG allowed for a better definition of the severity of their condition. Seizures were detected in eight infants (38%, all subclinical at baseline, and none had a normal aEEG background pattern. The status of three infants (43% evolved and required two or more drugs for treatment. CONCLUSIONS: in infants with encephalopathy or other severe illness, aEEG disturbances occur frequently. aEEG provided a better classification of the severity of encephalopathy, detected early subclinical seizures, and allowed for monitoring of the response to treatment. aEEG was a useful tool at the neonatal intensive care unit for predicting poor short-term neurological outcomes for all sick newborn.

  19. 'Palliative sedation'? A retrospective cohort study on the use and labelling of continuously administered sedatives on a palliative care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildmann, Eva; Pörnbacher, Sebastian; Kalies, Helen; Bausewein, Claudia

    2018-03-01

    Sedatives are frequently used towards the end of life. However, there is scarce information when their use is labelled as 'palliative sedation'. To assess the use and labelling of 'continuous administration of sedatives within the last 7 days of life', based on objective operational criteria, on a palliative care unit. Retrospective cohort study, using medical records. Explorative statistical analysis (SPSS 23). Patients who died on a palliative care unit from August 2014 to July 2015. Sedatives recorded were benzodiazepines, levomepromazine, haloperidol ⩾5 mg/day and propofol. Of the 192 patients, 149 (78%) patients received continuous sedatives within the last week of life. The prevalence of delirium/agitation was significantly higher in patients with continuous sedatives compared to those without continuous sedatives at admission to the unit (35% vs 16%, p = 0.02) and on the day before death (58% vs 40%, p = 0.04). The term '(palliative) sedation' was used in the records for 22 of 149 (15%) patients with continuous sedatives. These patients had significantly higher total daily midazolam doses 2 days before death (median (range), 15.0 (6.0-185.0) mg vs 11.5 (1.0-70.0) mg, p = 0.04) and on the day of death (median (range), 19.5 (7.5-240.0) mg vs 12.5 (2.0-65.0) mg, p = 0.01). The dose range was large in both groups. The prevalence of delirium/agitation was associated with the administration of continuous sedatives. There was no consistent pattern regarding labelling the use of continuous sedatives as '(palliative) sedation'. Multicentre mixed-methods research is needed for a better characterization of sedation practices in palliative care.

  20. Assessing the Impact of Peer Educator Outreach on the Likelihood and Acceleration of Clinic Utilization among Sex Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Parthasarathy; Hui, Sam K; Shivkumar, Narayanan; Gowda, Chandrasekhar; Pushpalatha, R

    2016-01-01

    Peer-led outreach is a critical element of HIV and STI-reduction interventions aimed at sex workers. We study the association between peer-led outreach to sex workers and the time to utilize health facilities for timely STI syndromic-detection and treatment. Using data on the timing of peer-outreach interventions and clinic visits, we utilize an Extended Cox model to assess whether peer educator outreach intensity is associated with accelerated clinic utilization among sex workers. Our data comes from 2705 female sex workers registered into Pragati, a women-in-sex-work outreach program, and followed from 2008 through 2012. We analyze this data using an Extended Cox model with the density of peer educator visits in a 30-day rolling window as the key predictor, while controlling for the sex workers' age, client volume, location of sex work, and education level. The principal outcome of interest is the timing of the first voluntary clinic utilization. More frequent peer visit is associated with earlier first clinic visit (HR: 1.83, 95% CI, 1.75-1.91, p educator outreach. Peer outreach density is associated with increased likelihood of-and shortened duration to-clinic utilization among female sex workers, suggesting potential staff resourcing implications. Given the observational nature of our study, however, these findings should be interpreted as an association rather than as a causal relationship.

  1. Routine clinical application of the FRAXA Pfu PCR assay: limits and utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condorelli, D F; Milana, G; Dell'Albani, P; Roccazzello, A M; Insirello, E; Pavone, L; Mollica, F

    1996-11-01

    Fragile X genotype is characterized by the excessive amplification of an unstable region of DNA: a trinucleotide repeat CGG of variable copy number present in the FRAXA locus. Methods based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the CGG repeat region could facilitate the development of a rapid screening assay. Unfortunately, amplification across CGG repeats can be inefficient and unreliable due to their 100% G + C base composition. The utility of the exonuclease-deficient Pfu polymerase for amplification and detection of the CGG repeats at the FRAXA locus has been reported. In the present study we analysed the utility of a Pfu PCR assay as a rapid initial screening method to rule out a diagnosis of fragile X syndrome in males with mental retardation. Affected males did not show any amplification products or a smear of amplification products between 350 and 550 bp. Only 10% of affected male samples did not show any amplification products, while the vast majority showed the amplification smear. The amplification smears represent a serious drawback of the method, since they cannot be distinguished from the amplification products of normal samples after separation in 1% agarose gel. Several modifications of the PCR conditions were attempted to eliminate this problem, but none was appropriate for clinical applications. However, the problem was easily solved by using a higher resolution electrophoretic system that allows a clear distinction of normal bands from pathological smears. We tested the specificity of the Pfu PCR assay, followed by an improved MetaPhor gel electrophoretic separation of PCR products, on 50 samples from normal males and 24 samples form affected males. The results showed that this method is a rapid, sensitive and specific assay for the exclusion of fragile X syndrome diagnosis in mentally retarded males.

  2. Lack of clinical utility of urine gram stain for suspected urinary tract infection in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantey, Joseph B; Gaviria-Agudelo, Claudia; McElvania TeKippe, Erin; Doern, Christopher D

    2015-04-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common infections in children. Urine culture remains the gold standard for diagnosis, but the utility of urine Gram stain relative to urinalysis (UA) is unclear. We reviewed 312 pediatric patients with suspected UTI who had urine culture, UA, and urine Gram stain performed from a single urine specimen. UA was considered positive if ≥10 leukocytes per oil immersion field were seen or if either nitrates or leukocyte esterase testing was positive. Urine Gram stain was considered positive if any organisms were seen. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated using urine culture as the gold standard. Thirty-seven (12%) patients had a culture-proven UTI. Compared to urine Gram stain, UA had equal sensitivity (97.3% versus 97.5%) and higher specificity (85% versus 74%). Empirical therapy was prescribed before the Gram stain result was known in 40 (49%) patients and after in 42 (51%) patients. The antibiotics chosen did not differ between the two groups (P=0.81), nor did they differ for patients with Gram-negative rods on urine Gram stain compared to those with Gram-positive cocci (P=0.67). From these data, we conclude that UA has excellent negative predictive value that is not enhanced by urine Gram stain and that antibiotic selection did not vary based on the urine Gram stain result. In conclusion, the clinical utility of urine Gram stain does not warrant the time or cost it requires. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Impact of ranolazine on clinical outcomes and healthcare resource utilization in patients with refractory angina pectoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Hua; Packard, Kathleen A; Burns, Tammy L; Hilleman, Daniel E

    2013-12-01

    Ranolazine is a novel antianginal medication approved for the treatment of chronic angina. There are only limited data concerning the efficacy of ranolazine in reducing healthcare resource utilization in patients with refractory angina pectoris. The primary objective of this analysis was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ranolazine in refractory angina pectoris. In addition, the impact of ranolazine on healthcare resource utilization was assessed. Consecutive patients with refractory angina pectoris treated with ranolazine at two cardiology practices in the state of Nebraska were included in this analysis. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) angina class and frequency and type of healthcare resource consumption were determined during the 12 months prior to and the 12 months after initiation of ranolazine. A total of 150 pts (64 % men) with a mean age of 66 ± 12 years were included in this analysis. All patients had previously undergone coronary revascularization. Nitrates, β-adrenoceptor antagonists (β-blockers), and calcium antagonists (calcium channel blockers) were being used in 83, 97, and 75 % of patients, respectively. During ranolazine treatment, a significant improvement in CCS angina class was observed, with 23 patients improving by one class and no patient experiencing a deterioration in functional class (p = 0.025). A total of 53 side effects occurred in 28 (19 %) patients receiving ranolazine. Of those patients with side effects, four required dose reduction and seven required drug discontinuation. The frequency of clinic visits and emergency room visits was lower during ranolazine treatment, but the differences in frequency were not significant. The number of patients hospitalized and the number of hospitalizations were significantly lower during ranolazine therapy than in the pre-ranolazine study period (p = 0.002). Ranolazine improved the CCS angina class and reduced hospitalizations over a 12-month follow-up period in a group

  4. Sedative effects of oral pregabalin premedication on intravenous sedation using propofol target-controlled infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karube, Noriko; Ito, Shinichi; Sako, Saori; Hirokawa, Jun; Yokoyama, Takeshi

    2017-08-01

    The sedative effects of pregabalin during perioperative period have not been sufficiently characterized. The aim of this study was to verify the sedative effects of premedication with pregabalin on intravenous sedation (IVS) using propofol and also to assess the influences of this agent on circulation, respiration, and postanesthetic complications. Ten healthy young volunteers underwent 1 h of IVS using propofol, three times per subject, on separate days (first time, no pregabalin; second time, pregabalin 100 mg; third time, pregabalin 200 mg). The target blood concentration (C T ) of propofol was increased in a stepwise fashion based on the bispectral index (BIS) value. Ramsay's sedation score (RSS) was determined at each propofol C T . Propofol C T was analyzed at each sedation level. Circulation and respiration during IVS and complications were also verified. Propofol C T was reduced at BIS values of 60 and 70 in both premedicated groups (100 mg: p = 0.043 and 0.041; 200 mg: p = 0.004 and 0.016, respectively) and at a BIS value of 80 in the pregabalin 200 mg group (p < 0.001). Propofol C T was decreased at RSS 4-6 in the pregabalin 100 mg group (RSS 4: p = 0.047; RSS 5: p = 0.007; RSS 6: p = 0.014), and at RSS 3-6 in the pregabalin 200 mg group (RSS 3-5: p < 0.001; RSS 6: p = 0.002). We conclude that oral premedication with pregabalin reduces the amount of propofol required to obtain an acceptable and adequate sedation level.

  5. Intention, procedure, outcome and personhood in palliative sedation and euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materstvedt, Lars Johan

    2012-03-01

    Palliative sedation at the end of life has become an important last-resort treatment strategy for managing refractory symptoms as well as a topic of controversy within palliative care. Furthermore, palliative sedation is prominent in the public debate about the possible legalisation of voluntary assisted dying (physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia). This article attempts to demonstrate that palliative sedation is fundamentally different from euthanasia when it comes to intention, procedure, outcome and the status of the person. Nonetheless, palliative sedation in its most radical form of terminal deep sedation parallels euthanasia in one respect: both end the experience of suffering. However, only the latter intentionally ends life and also has this as its goal. There is the danger that deep sedation could bring death forward in time due to particular side effects of the treatment. Still that would, if it happens, not be intended, and accordingly is defensible in view of the doctrine of double effect.

  6. Techniques to administer oral, inhalational, and IV sedation in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Krystyna Harbuz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Sedation in dentistry is a controversial topic given the variety of opinions regarding its safe practice. Aims This article evaluates the various techniques used to administer sedation in dentistry and specific methods practiced to form a recommendation for clinicians. Methods An extensive literature search was performed using PubMed, Medline, Google Scholar, Google, and local library resources. Results Most of the literature revealed a consensus that light sedation on low-risk American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA groups, that is ASA I, and possibly II, is the safest method for sedation in a dental outpatient setting. Conclusion Formal training is essential to achieve the safe practice of sedation in dentistry or medicine. The appropriate setting for sedation should be determined as there is an increased risk outside the hospital setting. Patients should be adequately assessed and medication titrated appropriately, based on individual requirements.

  7. No clinical utility of KRAS variant rs61764370 for ovarian or breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollestelle, Antoinette; van der Baan, Frederieke H.; Berchuck, Andrew; Johnatty, Sharon E.; Aben, Katja K.; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Alducci, Elisa; Andrulis, Irene L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Apicella, Carmel; Arndt, Volker; Arnold, Norbert; Arun, Banu K.; Arver, Brita; Ashworth, Alan; Baglietto, Laura; Balleine, Rosemary; Bandera, Elisa V.; Barrowdale, Daniel; Bean, Yukie T.; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Andreas; Berger, Raanan; Beuselinck, Benoit; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Anders; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brand, Judith S.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Brinton, Louise; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bruinsma, Fiona; Brunet, Joan; Brüning, Thomas; Budzilowska, Agnieszka; Bunker, Clareann H.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Butzow, Ralf; Buys, Saundra S.; Caligo, Maria A.; Campbell, Ian; Carter, Jonathan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J.; Claes, Kathleen B.M.; Collée, J. Margriet; Cook, Linda S.; Couch, Fergus J.; Cox, Angela; Cramer, Daniel; Cross, Simon S.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Cybulski, Cezary; Czene, Kamila; Damiola, Francesca; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; deFazio, Anna; Dennis, Joseph; Devilee, Peter; Dicks, Ed M.; Diez, Orland; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Domchek, Susan M.; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; Dörk, Thilo; Santos Silva, Isabel Dos; du Bois, Andreas; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M.; Duran, Mercedes; Easton, Douglas F.; Eccles, Diana; Edwards, Robert P.; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ekici, Arif B.; Ellis, Steve D.; Engel, Christoph; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A.; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Fontaine, Annette; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Fostira, Florentia; Fridley, Brooke L.; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Friel, Grace; Frost, Debra; Garber, Judy; García-Closas, Montserrat; Gayther, Simon A.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Giles, Graham G.; Glasspool, Rosalind; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K.; Goodman, Marc T.; Gore, Martin; Greene, Mark H.; Grip, Mervi; Gronwald, Jacek; Kaulich, Daphne Gschwantler; Guénel, Pascal; Guzman, Starr R.; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hall, Per; Halverson, Sandra L.; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V.O.; Harter, Philipp; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Healey, Sue; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Henderson, Brian E.; Herzog, Josef; Hildebrandt, Michelle A. T.; Høgdall, Claus K.; Høgdall, Estrid; Hogervorst, Frans B.L.; Hopper, John L.; Humphreys, Keith; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Jensen, Allan; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Johnson, Nichola; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kabisch, Maria; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kataja, Vesa; Kauff, Noah; Kelemen, Linda E.; Kerin, Michael J.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Knight, Julia A.; Knol-Bout, Jacoba P.; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Krakstad, Camilla; Kristensen, Vessela; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Larson, Melissa C.; Lasa, Aadriana; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Lazaro, Conxi; Le, Nhu D.; Le Marchand, Loic; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A.; Li, Jingmei; Liang, Dong; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lissowska, Jolanta; Long, Jirong; Lu, Karen H.; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Lurie, Galina; Mai, Phuong L.; Mannermaa, Arto; Margolin, Sara; Mariette, Frederique; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W.M.; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Maugard, Christine; Mazoyer, Sylvie; McGuffog, Lesley; McGuire, Valerie; McLean, Catriona; McNeish, Iain; Meindl, Alfons; Menegaux, Florence; Menéndez, Primitiva; Menkiszak, Janusz; Menon, Usha; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Miller, Nicola; Milne, Roger L.; Modugno, Francesmary; Montagna, Marco; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Müller, Heiko; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Muranen, Taru A.; Narod, Steven A.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Ness, Roberta B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Nielsen, Finn C.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Odunsi, Kunle; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Olson, Janet E.; Olson, Sara H.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Orlow, Irene; Orr, Nick; Orsulic, Sandra; Osorio, Ana; Ottini, Laura; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peissel, Bernard; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Perkins, Jo; Permuth-Wey, Jenny; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M.; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Piedmonte, Marion; Pike, Malcolm C.; Platte, Radka; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Ramus, Susan J.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Rennert, Gad; Risch, Harvey A.; Robson, Mark; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Romero, Atocha; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo; Salani, Ritu; Salvesen, Helga B.; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Schrauder, Michael G.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Schwaab, Ira; Scuvera, Giulietta; Sellers, Thomas A.; Severi, Gianluca; Seynaeve, Caroline M.; Shah, Mitul; Shrubsole, Martha; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Smeets, Dominiek; Sohn, Christof; Soller, Maria; Song, Honglin; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa C.; Stegmaier, Christa; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sucheston, Lara; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Madas; Thompson, Pamela J.; Tihomirova, Laima; Tischkowitz, Marc; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Tsimiklis, Helen; Tung, Nadine; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Vachon, Celine M.; Van 't Veer, Laura J.; van Altena, Anne M.; Van Asperen, C.J.; van den Berg, David; van den Ouweland, Ans M.W.; van Doorn, Helena C.; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Vergote, Ignace; Verhoef, Senno; Vierkant, Robert A.; Vijai, Joseph; Vitonis, Allison F.; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Walsh, Christine; Wang, Qin; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weischer, Maren; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Weltens, Caroline; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Winqvist, Robert; Wu, Anna H.; Wu, Xifeng; Yang, Hannah P.; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Zamora, M. Pilar; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Rookus, Matti A.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Goode, Ellen L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Clinical genetic testing is commercially available for rs61764370, an inherited variant residing in a KRAS 3′ UTR microRNA binding site, based on suggested associations with increased ovarian and breast cancer risk as well as with survival time. However, prior studies, emphasizing particular subgroups, were relatively small. Therefore, we comprehensively evaluated ovarian and breast cancer risks as well as clinical outcome associated with rs61764370. Methods Centralized genotyping and analysis were performed for 140,012 women enrolled in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (15,357 ovarian cancer patients; 30,816 controls), the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (33,530 breast cancer patients; 37,640 controls), and the Consortium of Modifiers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 (14,765 BRCA1 and 7904 BRCA2 mutation carriers). Results We found no association with risk of ovarian cancer (OR= 0.99, 95% CI 0.94–1.04,p = 0.74) or breast cancer (OR = 0.98, 95% CI 0.94–1.01, p = 0.19) and results were consistent among mutation carriers (BRCA1, ovarian cancer HR = 1.09, 95% CI 0.97–1.23, p = 0.14, breast cancer HR = 1.04, 95% CI 0.97–1.12, p = 0.27; BRCA2, ovarian cancer HR = 0.89, 95% CI 0.71–1.13, p = 0.34, breast cancer HR = 1.06, 95% CI 0.94–1.19, p = 0.35). Null results were also obtained for associations with overall survival following ovarian cancer (HR = 0.94, 95% CI 0.83–1.07, p = 0.38), breast cancer (HR = 0.96, 95% CI 0.87–1.06, p = 0.38), and all other previously-reported associations. Conclusions rs61764370 is not associated with risk of ovarian or breast cancer nor with clinical outcome for patients with these cancers. Therefore, genotyping this variant has no clinical utility related to the prediction or management of these cancers. PMID:25940428

  8. No clinical utility of KRAS variant rs61764370 for ovarian or breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollestelle, Antoinette; van der Baan, Frederieke H; Berchuck, Andrew; Johnatty, Sharon E; Aben, Katja K; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Alducci, Elisa; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Antoniou, Antonis C; Apicella, Carmel; Arndt, Volker; Arnold, Norbert; Arun, Banu K; Arver, Brita; Ashworth, Alan; Baglietto, Laura; Balleine, Rosemary; Bandera, Elisa V; Barrowdale, Daniel; Bean, Yukie T; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Andreas; Berger, Raanan; Beuselinck, Benoit; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Anders; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brand, Judith S; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Brinton, Louise; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bruinsma, Fiona; Brunet, Joan; Brüning, Thomas; Budzilowska, Agnieszka; Bunker, Clareann H; Burwinkel, Barbara; Butzow, Ralf; Buys, Saundra S; Caligo, Maria A; Campbell, Ian; Carter, Jonathan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Claes, Kathleen B M; Collée, J Margriet; Cook, Linda S; Couch, Fergus J; Cox, Angela; Cramer, Daniel; Cross, Simon S; Cunningham, Julie M; Cybulski, Cezary; Czene, Kamila; Damiola, Francesca; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; deFazio, Anna; Dennis, Joseph; Devilee, Peter; Dicks, Ed M; Diez, Orland; Doherty, Jennifer A; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Dörk, Thilo; Silva, Isabel Dos Santos; du Bois, Andreas; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M; Duran, Mercedes; Easton, Douglas F; Eccles, Diana; Edwards, Robert P; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ekici, Arif B; Ellis, Steve D; Engel, Christoph; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Fontaine, Annette; Fortuzzi, Stefano; Fostira, Florentia; Fridley, Brooke L; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Friel, Grace; Frost, Debra; Garber, Judy; García-Closas, Montserrat; Gayther, Simon A; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Giles, Graham G; Glasspool, Rosalind; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Goodman, Marc T; Gore, Martin; Greene, Mark H; Grip, Mervi; Gronwald, Jacek; Gschwantler Kaulich, Daphne; Guénel, Pascal; Guzman, Starr R; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hall, Per; Halverson, Sandra L; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Harter, Philipp; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Healey, Sue; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Henderson, Brian E; Herzog, Josef; T Hildebrandt, Michelle A; Høgdall, Claus K; Høgdall, Estrid; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hopper, John L; Humphreys, Keith; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Jensen, Allan; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Johnson, Nichola; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kabisch, Maria; Karlan, Beth Y; Kataja, Vesa; Kauff, Noah; Kelemen, Linda E; Kerin, Michael J; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Kjaer, Susanne K; Knight, Julia A; Knol-Bout, Jacoba P; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Krakstad, Camilla; Kristensen, Vessela; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Larson, Melissa C; Lasa, Adriana; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Lazaro, Conxi; Le, Nhu D; Le Marchand, Loic; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A; Li, Jingmei; Liang, Dong; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lissowska, Jolanta; Long, Jirong; Lu, Karen H; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Lurie, Galina; Mai, Phuong L; Mannermaa, Arto; Margolin, Sara; Mariette, Frederique; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W M; Massuger, Leon F A G; Maugard, Christine; Mazoyer, Sylvie; McGuffog, Lesley; McGuire, Valerie; McLean, Catriona; McNeish, Iain; Meindl, Alfons; Menegaux, Florence; Menéndez, Primitiva; Menkiszak, Janusz; Menon, Usha; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Miller, Nicola; Milne, Roger L; Modugno, Francesmary; Montagna, Marco; Moysich, Kirsten B; Müller, Heiko; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Muranen, Taru A; Narod, Steven A; Nathanson, Katherine L; Ness, Roberta B; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Nielsen, Finn C; Nielsen, Sune F; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nussbaum, Robert L; Odunsi, Kunle; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olson, Janet E; Olson, Sara H; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Orlow, Irene; Orr, Nick; Orsulic, Sandra; Osorio, Ana; Ottini, Laura; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste L; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peissel, Bernard; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M; Perkins, Jo; Permuth-Wey, Jenny; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Piedmonte, Marion; Pike, Malcolm C; Platte, Radka; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Poole, Elizabeth M; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Ramus, Susan J; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Reed, Malcolm W R; Rennert, Gad; Risch, Harvey A; Robson, Mark; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Romero, Atocha; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo; Salani, Ritu; Salvesen, Helga B; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Schrauder, Michael G; Schumacher, Fredrick; Schwaab, Ira; Scuvera, Giulietta; Sellers, Thomas A; Severi, Gianluca; Seynaeve, Caroline M; Shah, Mitul; Shrubsole, Martha; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Smeets, Dominiek; Sohn, Christof; Soller, Maria; Song, Honglin; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa C; Stegmaier, Christa; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sucheston, Lara; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tangen, Ingvild L; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Teixeira, Manuel R; Terry, Kathryn L; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Thompson, Pamela J; Tihomirova, Laima; Tischkowitz, Marc; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Tsimiklis, Helen; Tung, Nadine; Tworoger, Shelley S; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Vachon, Celine M; Van 't Veer, Laura J; van Altena, Anne M; Van Asperen, C J; van den Berg, David; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van Doorn, Helena C; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Vergote, Ignace; Verhoef, Senno; Vierkant, Robert A; Vijai, Joseph; Vitonis, Allison F; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Walsh, Christine; Wang, Qin; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weischer, Maren; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Weltens, Caroline; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S; Wilkens, Lynne R; Winqvist, Robert; Wu, Anna H; Wu, Xifeng; Yang, Hannah P; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Pilar Zamora, M; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D P; Rookus, Matti A; Hooning, Maartje J; Goode, Ellen L

    2016-05-01

    Clinical genetic testing is commercially available for rs61764370, an inherited variant residing in a KRAS 3' UTR microRNA binding site, based on suggested associations with increased ovarian and breast cancer risk as well as with survival time. However, prior studies, emphasizing particular subgroups, were relatively small. Therefore, we comprehensively evaluated ovarian and breast cancer risks as well as clinical outcome associated with rs61764370. Centralized genotyping and analysis were performed for 140,012 women enrolled in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (15,357 ovarian cancer patients; 30,816 controls), the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (33,530 breast cancer patients; 37,640 controls), and the Consortium of Modifiers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 (14,765 BRCA1 and 7904 BRCA2 mutation carriers). We found no association with risk of ovarian cancer (OR=0.99, 95% CI 0.94-1.04, p=0.74) or breast cancer (OR=0.98, 95% CI 0.94-1.01, p=0.19) and results were consistent among mutation carriers (BRCA1, ovarian cancer HR=1.09, 95% CI 0.97-1.23, p=0.14, breast cancer HR=1.04, 95% CI 0.97-1.12, p=0.27; BRCA2, ovarian cancer HR=0.89, 95% CI 0.71-1.13, p=0.34, breast cancer HR=1.06, 95% CI 0.94-1.19, p=0.35). Null results were also obtained for associations with overall survival following ovarian cancer (HR=0.94, 95% CI 0.83-1.07, p=0.38), breast cancer (HR=0.96, 95% CI 0.87-1.06, p=0.38), and all other previously-reported associations. rs61764370 is not associated with risk of ovarian or breast cancer nor with clinical outcome for patients with these cancers. Therefore, genotyping this variant has no clinical utility related to the prediction or management of these cancers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The role of sedation tests in identifying sedative drug effects in healthy volunteers and their power to dissociate sedative-related impairments from memory dysfunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wezenberg, E; Sabbe, B G C; Hulstijn, W; Ruigt, G S F; Verkes, R J

    2007-08-01

    The study investigated whether four specified drugs would show similar patterns on tests considered to measure sedation. In addition, their drug-effect patterns on sedation and memory performance were compared to determine whether the sedative effects could be differentiated from the memory effects. Two double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover studies, each with 16 healthy volunteers, were performed, one testing lorazepam (2.5 mg) and mirtazapine (15 mg) and the other olanzapine (10 mg) and haloperidol (2.5 mg). Subjective sedation was assessed by means of visual analogue scales (VAS) and objective sedation using a simple-reaction-time (SRT) task and a choice-reaction-time (CRT) task, code substitution (symbol digit substitution test (SDST)) and the peak velocity of saccadic eye movements (SEM). A verbal memory test (VMT) was administered to evaluate memory capacity. Apart from haloperidol, all drugs proved to impair performance on all five sedation indices. Contrary to the VAS, the objective measures yielded different response profiles. Two types of drug-effect patterns emerged: one for greater impairments in response speed (SRT, SEM) and one for greater impairments in information processing (CRT, SDST). Lorazepam and olanzapine impeded memory performance, whereas mirtazapine did not. With the use of standardized scores it proved possible to differentiate between the size of the effects of the drugs on the sedation and memory tests. To accurately assess the level and nature of sedation and to differentiate sedation from memory impairments different types of sedation measures are required. Besides studying the subjective effects, it is recommended to also test psychomotor responses and information processing speed.

  10. Propofol for procedural sedation and analgesia reduced dedicated emergency nursing time while maintaining safety in a community emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Joshua C; Abraham, Michael K; Barrueto, Fermin F; Lemkin, Daniel L; Hirshon, Jon M

    2013-09-01

    Procedural sedation and analgesia is a core competency in emergency medicine. Propofol is replacing midazolam in many emergency departments. Barriers to performing procedural sedation include resource utilization. We hypothesized that emergency nursing time is shorter with propofol than midazolam, without increasing complications. Retrospective analysis of a procedural sedation registry for two community emergency departments with combined census of 100,000 patients/year. Demographics, procedure, and ASA physical classification status of adult patients receiving procedural sedation between 2007-2010 with midazolam or propofol were analyzed. Primary outcome was dedicated emergency nursing time. Secondary outcomes were procedural success, ED length of stay, and complication rate. Comparative statistics were performed with Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis, chi-square, or Fisher's exact test. Linear regression was performed with log-transformed procedural sedation time to define predictors. Of 328 procedural sedation and analgesia, 316 met inclusion criteria, of which 60 received midazolam and 256 propofol. Sex distribution varied between groups (midazolam 3% male; propofol 55% male; P = 0.04). Age, procedure, and ASA status were not significantly different. Propofol had shorter procedural sedation time (propofol 32.5 ± 24.2 minutes; midazolam 78.7 ± 51.5 minutes; P differences between complication rates (propofol 14%; midazolam 13%; P = 0.88) or emergency department length of stay (propofol 262.5 ± 132.8 minutes; midazolam 288.6 ± 130.6 minutes; P = 0.09). Use of propofol resulted in shorter emergency nursing time and higher procedural success rate than midazolam with a comparable safety profile. Copyright © 2013 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The clinical utility of the MMPI-2-RF Suicidal/Death Ideation Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfried, Emily; Bodell, Lindsay; Carbonell, Joyce; Joiner, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    Suicide is a major public health concern, with over 100 individuals dying by suicide per day in the United States alone. Therefore, suicide risk assessment is an essential aspect of mental health care. The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF; Ben-Porath & Tellegen, 2008-2011; Tellegen & Ben-Porath, 2008) has a Suicidal/Death Ideation (SUI) scale consisting of 5 items that describe recent suicidal ideation or behaviors. Although this scale has clear face validity, few studies have examined the clinical utility of this scale. The purpose of the current study was to examine associations between the SUI scale and other established measures of suicidal ideation and behavior, including the Depressive Symptom Inventory Suicidality Subscale (DSI-SS; Metalsky & Joiner, 1997), Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation (BSS; Beck & Steer, 1991; Beck, Steer, & Ranieri, 1988), self-report of lifetime suicide attempts, and clinician ratings of suicide risk. Participants were 998 therapy- and assessment-seeking outpatients. Analyses indicated that the SUI scale was positively associated with other self-reported measures of suicidal ideation and behavior. Significant differences in SUI scale scores also emerged among the clinician rating categories of suicide risk. The SUI scale was able to predict previous suicide attempts over and above age, gender, and other MMPI-2-RF scales related to depression. Finally, relative risk ratios for suicide attempts indicate increased risk of suicidality, with higher T scores on the SUI scale. Overall, findings suggest that the MMPI-2-RF SUI scale may be a useful tool for identifying individuals at risk for suicidal ideation and behavior in clinical settings. (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. Clinical utility of scintimammography: From the Anger-camera to new dedicated devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schillaci, Orazio [Department of Biopathology and Diagnostic Imaging, University ' Tor Vergata' , Viale G. Mazzini 121, 00195 Rome (Italy)]. E-mail: oschil@tiscali.it; Danieli, Roberta [Department of Biopathology and Diagnostic Imaging, University ' Tor Vergata' , Viale G. Mazzini 121, 00195 Rome (Italy); Romano, Pasquale [Department of Biopathology and Diagnostic Imaging, University ' Tor Vergata' , Viale G. Mazzini 121, 00195 Rome (Italy); Cossu, Elsa [Department of Biopathology and Diagnostic Imaging, University ' Tor Vergata' , Viale G. Mazzini 121, 00195 Rome (Italy); Simonetti, Giovanni [Department of Biopathology and Diagnostic Imaging, University ' Tor Vergata' , Viale G. Mazzini 121, 00195 Rome (Italy)

    2006-12-20

    Scintimammography is a functional imaging technique which uses a radiation detection camera to detect radionuclide tracers in the patient's breasts. Tracers are designed to accumulate in tumours more than in healthy tissue: the most used are Tc-99 m sestamibi and Tc-99 m tetrofosmin. Scintimammography is useful in some clinical indications as an adjunct to mammography: it is recommended for those lesions where additional information is required to reach a definitive diagnosis. Patients with dubious mammograms may benefit from this test, as well as women with dense breasts or with implants. Scintimammography is a valuable diagnostic tool also in patients with locally advanced breast cancer for monitoring and predicting response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Nevertheless, using an Anger-camera this technique shows a high sensitivity only for cancers >1 cm. Since other modalities are increasingly employed for the early identification of small abnormalities, the issue of detecting small cancers is critical for the future development and clinical utility of breast imaging with radiopharmaceuticals. The use of high-resolution cameras dedicated for breast imaging is the best option to improve the detection of small cancers: they allow higher flexibility in patient positioning, and the availability of mammography-like projections. Moreover, the detector can be placed directly in contact with the breast allowing a mild compression with reduction of the breast's thickness, thus increasing the target-to-background ratio and the sensitivity. These new devices have the potential of increasing the total number of breast scintigraphies performed thereby enhancing the role of nuclear medicine in breast cancer imaging.

  13. Monitoring Hospitalized Adult Patients for Opioid-Induced Sedation and Respiratory Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungquist, Carla R; Smith, Kirsten; Nicely, Kelly L Wiltse; Polomano, Rosemary C

    2017-03-01

    : Opioid analgesics are commonly administered to hospitalized patients to treat acute pain, but these drugs put patients at risk for serious adverse events, such as unintended advancing sedation, respiratory depression, and death. Nurses play an important role in keeping patients safe by making clinical decisions about the frequency and intensity with which patients receiving IV and epidural opioids should be monitored. To make sound clinical judgments, nurses must be aware of the factors that place patients at elevated risk for adverse opioid-related effects and know how to screen and assess patients for these risks. The authors review the literature on unintended advancing sedation and respiratory depression associated with opioid administration and present evidence-based recommendations for clinical decision making and patient monitoring, using both nursing assessments and electronic technologies.

  14. Sedative and mechanical antinociceptive effects of four dosages of romifidine administered intravenously to donkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizarraga, Ignacio; Castillo-Alcala, Fernanda; Robinson, Lauren S

    2017-06-01

    Although romifidine is commonly used to provide sedation and analgesia for the facilitation of clinical procedures in donkeys, limited scientific information is available for this drug in this species. This randomized, controlled, crossover, Latin-square, blinded study compared the sedative and antinociceptive effects of four dosages of romifidine (40, 60, 80, and 100μg/kg IV; R40, R60, R80, and R100, respectively), acepromazine (0.1mg/kg IV; ACE) and saline (0.9%, 5mL IV) by assigning sedation scores (SS) and measuring head heights above ground (HHAG) and mechanical nociceptive thresholds (MNT) in donkeys. Areas under the curve (AUC) from 0 to 30, 30-60, 60-120, and 120-180min after administration were computed for SS, HHAG, and MNT and compared among treatments. Romifidine and ACE, but not saline, induced clinical signs of sedation. SS-AUC 0-30 for R60, R80 and R100, and SS-AUC 30-60 for R100 were higher than corresponding values for saline. HHAG-AUC 30-60 for R40 and R80, and HHAG-AUC 60-120 for R40, R60, R80 and R100 were smaller than for saline. HHAG-AUC 60-120 for R100 were also smaller than those for ACE. Romifidine, but not saline or ACE, increased MNT. MNT-AUC 0-30 and MNT-AUC 30-60 for R40, R60, R80 and R100, and MNT-AUC 60-120 for R80 and R100 were higher than corresponding values for saline and ACE. MNT-AUC 60-120 for R100 were higher than for all other romifidine treatments. In donkeys, the degree of sedation was similar for the four dosages of romifidine, but antinociception was dose-dependent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Teaching pain recognition through art: the Ramsay-Caravaggio sedation scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poropat, Federico; Cozzi, Giorgio; Magnolato, Andrea; Monasta, Lorenzo; Borrometi, Fabio; Krauss, Baruch; Ventura, Alessandro; Barbi, Egidio

    2018-01-31

    Clinical observation is a key component of medical ability, enabling immediate evaluation of the patient's emotional state and contributing to a clinical clue that leads to final decision making. In medical schools, the art of learning to look can be taught using medical humanities and especially visual arts. By presenting a Ramsay sedation score (RSS) integrated with Caravaggio's paintings during a procedural sedation conference for pediatric residents, we want to test the effectiveness of this approach to improve the quality of learning. In this preliminary study, we presented videos showing sedated pediatric patients in the setting of a procedural sedation lesson to two randomized groups of residents, one attending a lesson on RSS explained through the masterpieces of Caravaggio, the other without artistic support. A week later we tested their learning with ten multi-choice questions focused on theoretical questions about sedation monitoring and ten more questions focused on recognizing the appropriate RSS viewing the videos. The primary outcome was the comparison of the total number of RSS layers properly recognized in both groups. We also evaluated the appreciation of the residents of the use of works of art integrated with the lesson. Eleven students were randomized to each group. Two residents in the standard lesson did not attend the test. The percentage of correct answers on the theoretical part was similar, 82% in the art group and 89% in the other (p > 0.05). No difference was found in the video recognition part of the RSS recognition test. Residents exposed to paintings shown great appreciation for the integration of the lesson with the Caravaggio's masterpieces. Adding artwork to a standard medical conference does not improve the performance of student tests, although this approach has been greatly appreciated by residents.

  16. Advanced paediatric conscious sedation: an alternative to dental general anaesthetic in the U.K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Darren; Averley, Paul; Lyne, John; Girdler, Nick

    2011-01-01

    Child dental anxiety is widespread, and it is not always possible to treat children using traditional methods such as behavioural management, local anaesthesia and even relative analgesia. In such cases a dental general anaesthetic (DGA) is the only option available to facilitate dental treatment in anxious children. This study describes an advanced conscious sedation protocol which allows invasive treatment to be carried out in anxious children. It incorporates the use of titrated intravenous midazolam and fentanyl and inhalation agents, sevoflurane and nitrous oxide/oxygen, which is administered by a Consultant Anaesthetist. The aim is to produce an evidence- based study which can offer a sedation technique as a safe and effective alternative to a DGA. Retrospective audit. 267 clinical records were audited retrospectively from a specialist sedation-based clinic, for children aged 5-15 years old. The subjects all underwent invasive dental procedures with this technique between August and November 2008 as an alternative to a DGA. 262/267 (98%) of the subjects were treated safely and successfully and without the loss of verbal communication using this technique. This included many treatments requiring four quadrant dentistry, with both restorations and extractions as necessary being carried out in one visit. 5 subjects (2%) did not tolerate treatment and had to be referred for a DGA. No medical emergencies occurred. Based on the evidence for this group of patients, this advanced conscious sedation technique, offers a safe and effective alternative to DGA. This technique must be carried out in an appropriate environment by an appropriately trained and experienced team who are able to comply with the recommendations for "alternative" sedation techniques.

  17. Outcomes of Propofol Sedation During Emergency Endoscopy Performed for Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan Hyuk; Han, Dong Soo; Jeong, Jae Yoon; Eun, Chang Soo; Yoo, Kyo-Sang; Jeon, Yong Cheol; Sohn, Joo Hyun

    2016-03-01

    Although propofol-based sedation can be used during emergency endoscopy for upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), there is a potential risk of sedation-related adverse events, especially in patients with variceal bleeding. We compared adverse events related to propofol-based sedation during emergency endoscopy between patients with non-variceal and variceal bleeding. Clinical records of patients who underwent emergency endoscopy for UGIB under sedation were reviewed. Adverse events, including shock, hypoxia, and paradoxical reaction, were compared between the non-variceal and variceal bleeding groups. Of 703 endoscopies, 539 and 164 were performed for non-variceal and variceal bleeding, respectively. Shock was more common in patients with variceal bleeding compared to those with non-variceal bleeding (12.2 vs. 3.5%, P bleeding (non-variceal bleeding vs. variceal bleeding: hypoxia, 3.5 vs. 1.8%, P = 0.275; paradoxical reaction interfering with the procedure, 4.1 vs. 5.5%, P = 0.442). Although shock was more common in patients with variceal bleeding compared to those with non-variceal bleeding, most cases could be controlled without procedure interruption. Paradoxical reaction, rather than shock or hypoxia, was the most common cause of procedure interruption in patients with variceal bleeding, but the rate did not differ between patients with non-variceal and variceal bleeding.

  18. Complications of three deep sedation methods for magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solina Tith

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: DS with a pentobarbital technique was associated with decreased odds for complications when compared to a propofol-based technique or a pentobarbital technique requiring supplemental sedation.

  19. Alpha-2 agonists for sedation of mechanically ventilated adults in intensive care units: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruickshank, Moira; Henderson, Lorna; MacLennan, Graeme; Fraser, Cynthia; Campbell, Marion; Blackwood, Bronagh; Gordon, Anthony; Brazzelli, Miriam

    2016-03-01

    -analyses were used for data synthesis. Eighteen RCTs (2489 adult patients) were included. One trial at unclear risk of bias compared dexmedetomidine with clonidine and found that target sedation was achieved in a higher number of patients treated with dexmedetomidine with lesser need for additional sedation. The remaining 17 trials compared dexmedetomidine with propofol or benzodiazepines (midazolam or lorazepam). Trials varied considerably with regard to clinical population, type of comparators, dose of sedative agents, outcome measures and length of follow-up. Overall, risk of bias was generally high or unclear. In particular, few trials blinded outcome assessors. Compared with propofol or benzodiazepines (midazolam or lorazepam), dexmedetomidine had no significant effects on mortality [risk ratio (RR) 1.03, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.85 to 1.24, I (2) = 0%; p = 0.78]. Length of ICU stay (mean difference -1.26 days, 95% CI -1.96 to -0.55 days, I (2) = 31%; p = 0.0004) and time to extubation (mean difference -1.85 days, 95% CI -2.61 to -1.09 days, I (2) = 0%; p comparators, dose of sedative agents, outcome measures and length of follow-up. Overall, risk of bias was generally high or unclear. In particular, few trials blinded assessors. Evidence on the use of clonidine in ICUs is very limited. Dexmedetomidine may be effective in reducing ICU length of stay and time to extubation in critically ill ICU patients. Risk of bradycardia but not of overall mortality is higher among patients treated with dexmedetomidine. Well-designed RCTs are needed to assess the use of clonidine in ICUs and identify subgroups of patients that are more likely to benefit from the use of dexmedetomidine. This study is registered as PROSPERO CRD42014014101. The National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment programme. The Health Services Research Unit is core funded by the Chief Scientist Office of the Scottish Government Health and Social Care Directorates.

  20. Exertional dyspnoea in interstitial lung diseases: the clinical utility of cardiopulmonary exercise testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Bonini

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs represent a heterogeneous group of pathologies characterised by alveolar and interstitial damage, pulmonary inflammation (usually associated with fibrosis, decreased lung function and impaired gas exchange, which can be attributed to either a known or an unknown aetiology. Dyspnoea is one of the most common and disabling symptoms in patients with ILD, significantly impacting quality of life. The mechanisms causing dyspnoea are complex and not yet fully understood. However, it is recognised that dyspnoea occurs when there is an imbalance between the central respiratory efferent drive and the response of the respiratory musculature. The respiratory derangement observed in ILD patients at rest is even more evident during exercise. Pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for exertional dyspnoea and reduced exercise tolerance include altered respiratory mechanics, impaired gas exchange, cardiovascular abnormalities and peripheral muscle dysfunction. This review describes the respiratory physiology of ILD, both at rest and during exercise, and aims to provide comprehensive and updated evidence on the clinical utility of the cardiopulmonary exercise test in the assessment and management of these pathological entities. In addition, the role of exercise training and pulmonary rehabilitation programmes in the ILD population is addressed.

  1. Bayesian probability analysis: a prospective demonstration of its clinical utility in diagnosing coronary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detrano, R.; Yiannikas, J.; Salcedo, E.E.; Rincon, G.; Go, R.T.; Williams, G.; Leatherman, J.

    1984-01-01

    One hundred fifty-four patients referred for coronary arteriography were prospectively studied with stress electrocardiography, stress thallium scintigraphy, cine fluoroscopy (for coronary calcifications), and coronary angiography. Pretest probabilities of coronary disease were determined based on age, sex, and type of chest pain. These and pooled literature values for the conditional probabilities of test results based on disease state were used in Bayes theorem to calculate posttest probabilities of disease. The results of the three noninvasive tests were compared for statistical independence, a necessary condition for their simultaneous use in Bayes theorem. The test results were found to demonstrate pairwise independence in patients with and those without disease. Some dependencies that were observed between the test results and the clinical variables of age and sex were not sufficient to invalidate application of the theorem. Sixty-eight of the study patients had at least one major coronary artery obstruction of greater than 50%. When these patients were divided into low-, intermediate-, and high-probability subgroups according to their pretest probabilities, noninvasive test results analyzed by Bayesian probability analysis appropriately advanced 17 of them by at least one probability subgroup while only seven were moved backward. Of the 76 patients without disease, 34 were appropriately moved into a lower probability subgroup while 10 were incorrectly moved up. We conclude that posttest probabilities calculated from Bayes theorem more accurately classified patients with and without disease than did pretest probabilities, thus demonstrating the utility of the theorem in this application

  2. Clinical utility of self-disclosure for adults who stutter: Apologetic versus informative statements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Courtney T; Croft, Robyn; Gkalitsiou, Zoi; Hampton, Elizabeth

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore the clinical utility of self-disclosure, particularly, whether disclosing in an informative manner would result in more positive observer ratings of the speaker who stutters than either disclosing in an apologetic manner or choosing not to self-disclose at all. Observers (N=338) were randomly assigned to view one of six possible videos (i.e., adult male informative self-disclosure, adult male apologetic self-disclosure, adult male no self-disclosure, adult female informative self-disclosure, adult female apologetic self-disclosure, adult female no self-disclosure). Observers completed a survey assessing their perceptions of the speaker they viewed immediately after watching the video. Results suggest that self-disclosing in an informative manner leads to significantly more positive observer ratings than choosing not to self-disclose. In contrast, use of an apologetic statement, for the most part, does not yield significantly more positive ratings than choosing not to self-disclose. Clinicians should recommend their clients self-disclose in an informative manner to facilitate more positive observer perceptions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Clinical utility of FDG-PET for the differential diagnosis among the main forms of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestor, Peter J; Altomare, Daniele; Festari, Cristina; Drzezga, Alexander; Rivolta, Jasmine; Walker, Zuzana; Bouwman, Femke; Orini, Stefania; Law, Ian; Agosta, Federica; Arbizu, Javier; Boccardi, Marina; Nobili, Flavio; Frisoni, Giovanni Battista

    2018-05-07

    To assess the clinical utility of FDG-PET as a diagnostic aid for differentiating Alzheimer's disease (AD; both typical and atypical forms), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), vascular dementia (VaD) and non-degenerative pseudodementia. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using the PICO model to extract evidence from relevant studies. An expert panel then voted on six different diagnostic scenarios using the Delphi method. The level of empirical study evidence for the use of FDG-PET was considered good for the discrimination of DLB and AD; fair for discriminating FTLD from AD; poor for atypical AD; and lacking for discriminating DLB from FTLD, AD from VaD, and for pseudodementia. Delphi voting led to consensus in all scenarios within two iterations. Panellists supported the use of FDG-PET for all PICOs-including those where study evidence was poor or lacking-based on its negative predictive value and on the assistance it provides when typical patterns of hypometabolism for a given diagnosis are observed. Although there is an overall lack of evidence on which to base strong recommendations, it was generally concluded that FDG-PET has a diagnostic role in all scenarios. Prospective studies targeting diagnostically uncertain patients for assessing the added value of FDG-PET would be highly desirable.

  4. Comparison of clinical utility between diaphragm excursion and thickening change using ultrasonography to predict extubation success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jung-Wan; Lee, Seung Jun; Lee, Jong Deog; Kim, Ho Cheol

    2018-01-01

    Background/Aims Both diaphragmatic excursion and change in muscle thickening are measured using ultrasonography (US) to assess diaphragm function and mechanical ventilation weaning outcomes. However, which parameter can better predict successful extubation remains to be determined. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical utility of these two diaphragmatic parameters to predict extubation success. Methods This study included patients subjected to extubation trial in the medical or surgical intensive care unit of a university-affiliated hospital from May 2015 through February 2016. Diaphragm excursion and percent of thickening change (Δtdi%) were measured using US within 24 hours before extubation. Results Sixty patients were included, and 78.3% (47/60) of these patients were successfully extubated, whereas 21.7% (13/60) were not. The median degree of excursion was greater in patients with extubation success than in those with extubation failure (1.65 cm vs. 0.8 cm, p success had a greater Δtdi% than those with extubation failure (42.1% vs. 22.5%, p = 0.03). The areas under the receiver operating curve for excursion and Δtdi% were 0.836 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.717 to 0.919) and 0.698 (95% CI, 0.566 to 0.810), respectively (p = 0.017). Conclusions Diaphragm excursion seems more accurate than a change in the diaphragm thickness to predict extubation success. PMID:29050461

  5. Clinical Utility of Circulating Tumor Cells in ALK-Positive Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faugeroux, Vincent; Pailler, Emma; Auger, Nathalie; Taylor, Melissa; Farace, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    The advent of rationally targeted therapies such as small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has considerably transformed the therapeutic management of a subset of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring defined molecular abnormalities. When such genetic molecular alterations are detected the use of specific TKI has demonstrated better results (overall response rate, progression free survival) compared to systemic therapy. However, the detection of such molecular abnormalities is complicated by the difficulty in obtaining sufficient tumor material, in terms of quantity and quality, from a biopsy. Here, we described how circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can have a clinical utility in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive NSCLC patients to diagnose ALK-EML4 gene rearrangement and to guide therapeutic management of these patients. The ability to detect genetic abnormalities such ALK rearrangement in CTCs shows that these cells could offer new perspectives both for the diagnosis and the monitoring of ALK-positive patients eligible for treatment with ALK inhibitors.

  6. Pretreatment prostate-specific antigen doubling times: clinical utility of this predictor of prostate cancer behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanks, Gerald E.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Lee, W. Robert; Slivjak, Anne; Schultheiss, Timothy E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The distribution of pretreatment and posttreatment prostate specific antigen (PSA) doubling times (PSADT) varies widely. This report examines the pretreatment PSADT as an independent predictor of biochemical freedom from disease (bNED) and describes the clinical utility of PSADT. Methods and Materials: Ninety-nine patients with T1-3 NX, M-0 prostate cancer treated between February 1989 and November 1993 have pretreatment PSADTs calculated from three or more PSA levels. Biochemical disease-free (bNED) survival (failure is PSA ≥ 1.5 ngm/ml and rising) is evaluated by multivariate analysis of common prognostic indicators and PSADT. Results: Prostate-specific antigen doubling time (PSADT) is a significant predictor of survival along with radiation dose. Patients with a pretreatment PSADT of < 12 months show 50% failure by 18 months, while those with a PSADT that is not increasing show only 3% failure at 3 years. Conclusions: Prostate-specific antigen doubling time (PSADT) is a predictor of bNED outcome in prostate cancer. Patients with PSADT < 12 months have aggressive disease and should be considered for multimodal therapy. Slow PSADT (≥ 5 years) is observed in 57% of patients, and this end point may be considered in the decision to observe rather than to treat. After treatment failure, the PSADT may be used to determine which patients do not need immediate androgen deprivation

  7. Differential pharmacology and clinical utility of rolapitant in chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapoport BL

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Bernardo Leon Rapoport The Medical Oncology Centre of Rosebank, Johannesburg, South Africa Abstract: Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV is a debilitating side effect of many cytotoxic chemotherapy regimens. CINV typically manifests during two well-defined time periods (acute and delayed phases. The acute phase is the first 24 hours after chemotherapy and is largely managed with 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor antagonists. The delayed phase, a 5-day at-risk period during which patients are not often in direct contact with their health care provider, remains a significant unmet medical need. Neurokinin-1 (NK-1 receptor antagonists have demonstrated protection against acute and delayed CINV in patients treated with highly emetogenic chemotherapy and moderately emetogenic chemotherapy when used in combination with a 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor antagonist and dexamethasone. Furthermore, recent data indicate that this protection is maintained over multiple treatment cycles. Rolapitant, a selective and long-acting NK-1 receptor antagonist, is approved as oral formulation for the prevention of delayed CINV in adults. This review discusses the differential pharmacology and clinical utility of rolapitant in preventing CINV compared with other NK-1 receptor antagonists. Keywords: antiemetics, highly emetogenic chemotherapy, moderately emetogenic chemotherapy, delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, emesis, neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists

  8. Clinicians' Judgments of the Clinical Utility of Personality Disorder Trait Descriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crego, Cristina; Sleep, Chelsea E; Widiger, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    Proposed for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition (DSM-5) was a five-domain, 25-dimensional trait model that would have constituted a significant part of the diagnostic criteria for each personality disorder. A primary concern with respect to the proposal was that clinicians might find such an approach to be unacceptable. This study provides results from three independent data collections that compared clinicians' clinical utility ratings for each iteration of the DSM-5 dimensional trait assignments, along with an alternative list of traits derived from the Five Factor Form (FFF). The clinicians considered the final trait assignments that were posted for the avoidant, narcissistic, obsessive-compulsive, and schizoid personality disorders to be significantly less acceptable than the original assignments. They also considered the FFF trait assignments to be preferable to the DSM-5 final postings with respect to the avoidant, narcissistic, obsessive-compulsive, dependent, and histrionic personality disorders. The implications of these results for future editions of the diagnostic manual are discussed.

  9. Expression analysis and clinical utility of L-Dopa decarboxylase (DDC) in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avgeris, Margaritis; Koutalellis, Georgios; Fragoulis, Emmanuel G; Scorilas, Andreas

    2008-10-01

    L-Dopa decarboxylase (DDC) is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzyme that was found to be involved in many malignancies. The aim of this study was to investigate the mRNA expression levels of DDC in prostate tissues and to evaluate its clinical utility in prostate cancer (CaP). Total RNA was isolated from 118 tissue specimens from benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and CaP patients and a highly sensitive quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) method for DDC mRNA quantification has been developed using the SYBR Green chemistry. LNCaP prostate cancer cell line was used as a calibrator and GAPDH as a housekeeping gene. DDC was found to be overexpressed, at the mRNA level, in the specimens from prostate cancer patients, in comparison to those from benign prostate hyperplasia patients (pDDC expression has significant discriminatory value between CaP and BPH (pDDC expression status was compared with other established prognostic factors, in prostate cancer. High expression levels of DDC were found more frequently in high Gleason's score tumors (p=0.022) as well as in advanced stage patients (p=0.032). Our data reveal the potential of DDC expression, at the mRNA level, as a novel biomarker in prostate cancer.

  10. Avanafil for erectile dysfunction in elderly and younger adults: differential pharmacology and clinical utility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katz EG

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Eric G Katz,1 Ronny BW Tan,2 Daniel Rittenberg,1 Wayne J Hellstrom3 1Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA; 2Department of Urology, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore; 3Section of Andrology, Department of Urology, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA Abstract: The treatment modalities of erectile dysfunction range from oral pharmacotherapy to intracavernosal injections, intraurethral pellets, vacuum erectile devices, and the surgical option of penile prosthesis insertion. Oral phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors still remain the preferred treatment for patients since they are the least invasive, not to mention that they can be prescribed by non-urologists. Due to these factors, there has been development of newer drugs with fewer side effects. This is a review of the second generation phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor, avanafil, looking into its pharmacology as well as its clinical utility. Avanafil's faster onset and shorter duration of action has made it preferred as compared to other PDE5 inhibitors for patients with multiple comorbidities. Keywords: phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, impotence, sildenafil, sexual dysfunction, nitric oxide

  11. Assessing the Clinical Utility of SNP Microarray for Prader-Willi Syndrome due to Uniparental Disomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Stephanie L; Hashimoto, Sayaka; McKinney, Aimee; Mihalic Mosher, Theresa; Pyatt, Robert; Reshmi, Shalini C; Astbury, Caroline; Hickey, Scott E

    2017-01-01

    Maternal uniparental disomy (UPD) 15 is one of the molecular causes of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), a multisystem disorder which presents with neonatal hypotonia and feeding difficulty. Current diagnostic algorithms differ regarding the use of SNP microarray to detect PWS. We retrospectively examined the frequency with which SNP microarray could identify regions of homozygosity (ROH) in patients with PWS. We determined that 7/12 (58%) patients with previously confirmed PWS by methylation analysis and microsatellite-positive UPD studies had ROH (>10 Mb) by SNP microarray. Additional assessment of 5,000 clinical microarrays, performed from 2013 to present, determined that only a single case of ROH for chromosome 15 was not caused by an imprinting disorder or identity by descent. We observed that ROH for chromosome 15 is rarely incidental and strongly associated with hypotonic infants having features of PWS. Although UPD microsatellite studies remain essential to definitively establish the presence of UPD, SNP microarray has important utility in the timely diagnostic algorithm for PWS. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Clinical Utility of Serologic Testing for Celiac Disease in Asymptomatic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this evidence-based analysis was to evaluate the clinical utility of serologic testing for celiac disease in asymptomatic individuals presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated in this report. The clinical utility was based on the effects of a gluten-free diet (GFD) on outcomes specific to each of these conditions. The prevalence of celiac disease in asymptomatic individuals and one of these non-gastrointestinal conditions was also evaluated. Clinical Need and Target Population Celiac Disease Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease characterized by a chronic inflammatory state of the proximal small bowel mucosa accompanied by structural and functional changes. Technology Under Evaluation Serologic Tests for Celiac Disease There are a number of serologic tests for celiac disease available. Serologic tests are automated with the exception of the anti-endomysial antibody test, which is more time-consuming and operator-dependent than the other tests. Research Questions What is the prevalence of asymptomatic celiac disease in patients presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated? What is the effect of the gluten-free diet on condition-specific outcomes in patients with asymptomatic celiac disease presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated? What is the clinical utility of serologic testing for celiac disease in asymptomatic patients presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated? The clinical utility was defined as the impact of the GFD on disease specific outcomes. What is the risk of all-cause mortality and lymphoma in individuals with asymptomatic celiac disease? What is the budget impact of serologic testing for celiac disease in asymptomatic subjects presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated? Research Methods Study Population The study population consisted of individuals with newly diagnosed celiac

  13. Assessing the Impact of Peer Educator Outreach on the Likelihood and Acceleration of Clinic Utilization among Sex Workers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parthasarathy Krishnamurthy

    Full Text Available Peer-led outreach is a critical element of HIV and STI-reduction interventions aimed at sex workers. We study the association between peer-led outreach to sex workers and the time to utilize health facilities for timely STI syndromic-detection and treatment. Using data on the timing of peer-outreach interventions and clinic visits, we utilize an Extended Cox model to assess whether peer educator outreach intensity is associated with accelerated clinic utilization among sex workers.Our data comes from 2705 female sex workers registered into Pragati, a women-in-sex-work outreach program, and followed from 2008 through 2012. We analyze this data using an Extended Cox model with the density of peer educator visits in a 30-day rolling window as the key predictor, while controlling for the sex workers' age, client volume, location of sex work, and education level. The principal outcome of interest is the timing of the first voluntary clinic utilization.More frequent peer visit is associated with earlier first clinic visit (HR: 1.83, 95% CI, 1.75-1.91, p < .001. In addition, 18% of all syndrome-based STI detected come from clinic visits in which the sex worker reports no symptoms, underscoring the importance of inducing clinic visits in the detection of STI. Additional models to test the robustness of these findings indicate consistent beneficial effect of peer educator outreach.Peer outreach density is associated with increased likelihood of-and shortened duration to-clinic utilization among female sex workers, suggesting potential staff resourcing implications. Given the observational nature of our study, however, these findings should be interpreted as an association rather than as a causal relationship.

  14. Sedación paliativa (parte I: Controversias sobre términos, definiciones y aplicaciones clínicas Sedação paliativa (parte I: Controvérsias sobre termos, definições e aplicações clínicas Palliative sedation (part I: Controversies about terms, definitions and clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Taboada R.

    ão da hidratação e a nutrição medicamente assistida, e os fundamentos éticos e sua diferença com a eutanásia e/ou suicídio medicamente assistido. São revisados alguns aspectos do debate atual sobre o conceito de “sedação paliativa” e suas diferentes definições, assim como também certas controvérsias relacionadas com as suas aplicações clínicas. Ainda que sejam mencionadas brevemente algumas questões éticas relacionadas com esta prática clínica, estas não são abordadas diretamente neste artigo, mas são deixadas deliberadamente para uma análise mais profunda numa segunda parte.This article analyzes the use of palliative sedation, as a potentially useful therapeutic tool in Palliative Medicine. It suggests that, in spite of the improvement of medical knowledge related to palliative sedation during the last decade, available empirical evidence is still limited and controversy persists. The current debate includes aspects such us: 1. The definition and terminology (palliative vs. terminal sedation; 2. The types of sedation that are included under these expressions (intermittent vs. continuous; superficial vs. profound; 3. The clinical indications (physical symptoms vs. existential suffering; 4. The concomitant administration vs. withdrawal of medically assisted nutrition and hydration; 5. The ethical foundations and its difference with euthanasia and/or physician-assisted-suicide. This article analyzes aspects related to the concept of “palliative sedation” and its different definitions, as well as some controversies related to its clinical applications. Although ethical issues related to palliative sedation are briefly mentioned, they are not dealt with in this article, but intentionally left for a deeper analysis in a part II.

  15. A Review of Agents for Palliative Sedation/Continuous Deep Sedation: Pharmacology and Practical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnar, John

    2017-03-01

    Continuous deep sedation at the end of life is a specific form of palliative sedation requiring a care plan that essentially places and maintains the patient in an unresponsive state because their symptoms are refractory to any other interventions. Because this application is uncommon, many providers may lack practical experience in this specialized area and resources they can access are outdated, nonspecific, and/or not comprehensive. The purpose of this review is to provide an evidence- and experience-based reference that specifically addresses those medications and regimens and their practical applications for this very narrow, but vital, aspect of hospice care. Patient goals in a hospital and hospice environments are different, so the manner in which widely used sedatives are dosed and applied can differ greatly as well. Parameters applied in end-of-life care that are based on experience and a thorough understanding of the pharmacology of those medications will differ from those applied in an intensive care unit or other medical environments. By recognizing these different goals and applying well-founded regimens geared specifically for end-of-life sedation, we can address our patients' symptoms in a more timely and efficacious manner.

  16. Sedative medications outside the operating room and the pharmacology of sedatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tom G

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: There is a growing medical demand for suitable sedatives and analgesics to support the ongoing progress in diagnostic procedures and imaging techniques. This review provides an update of the pharmacology of the most commonly used drugs used for these procedures and shortly...

  17. Clinical characteristics, healthcare costs, and resource utilization in hepatitis C vary by genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goolsby Hunter, Alyssa; Rosenblatt, Lisa; Patel, Chad; Blauer-Peterson, Cori; Anduze-Faris, Beatrice

    2017-05-01

    In the United States, approximately 3 million people are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Genotypes of HCV variably affect disease progression and treatment response. However, the relationships between HCV genotypes and liver disease progression, healthcare resource utilization, and healthcare costs have not been fully explored. In this retrospective study of patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC), healthcare claims from a large US health plan were used to collect data on patient demographic and clinical characteristics. Main outcome measures include healthcare resource utilization (HCRU) and healthcare costs. Linked laboratory data provided genotype and select measures to determine liver disease severity. The sample (mean age 50.6 years, 63.5% male) included 10,331 patients, of whom 79.1% had genotype (GT)1, 12.8% had GT2, and 8.1% had GT3. Descriptive analyses demonstrated variation by HCV genotype in liver and non-liver related comorbidities, liver disease severity, and healthcare costs. The highest percentage of patients with liver-related comorbidities and advanced liver disease was found among those with GT3. Meanwhile, patients with GT2 had lower HCRU and the lowest costs, and patients with GT1 had the highest total all-cause costs. These differences may reflect differing rates of non-liver-related comorbidities and all-cause care. Multivariable analyses showed that genotype was a significant predictor of costs and liver disease severity: compared with patients having GT1, those with GT3 were significantly more likely to have advanced liver disease. Patients with GT2 were significantly less likely to have advanced disease and more likely to have lower all-cause costs. Results may not be generalizable to patients outside the represented commercial insurance plans, and analysis of a prevalent population may underestimate HCRU and costs relative to a sample of treated patients. These results suggest that liver disease progression varies by genotype and

  18. Recall of intensive care unit stay in patients managed with a sedation protocol or a sedation protocol with daily sedative interruption: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, Cheryl; Burry, Lisa; Martinez-Motta, Carlos; Tirgari, Sam; Jiang, Depeng; McDonald, Ellen; Granton, John; Cook, Deborah; Mehta, Sangeeta

    2011-04-01

    Analgesics and sedatives are integral for the relief of pain and anxiety in critically ill patients. However, these agents may contribute to amnesia for intensive care unit (ICU) events; which has been associated with development of posttraumatic stress disorder. Drug administration strategies that minimize sedative use have been associated with less amnesia. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate recall of ICU stay in patients managed with 2 sedation strategies: a sedation protocol or a combination of sedation protocol and daily sedative/analgesic interruption. A questionnaire was administered on day 3 following ICU discharge to evaluate patients' recollections of pain, anxiety, fear, and sleep, as well as memories for specific ICU procedures. Participants were ICU survivors who had been enrolled in SLEAP - a randomized pilot trial comparing two sedation strategies, at 3 university-affiliated medical/surgical ICUs. Twenty-one patients who regained orientation within 72 hours of ICU discharge completed the questionnaire. More than 50% of patients recalled experiencing pain, anxiety, and fear to a moderate or extreme extent; and 57% reported inadequate sleep while in the ICU. Of the 21 patients, 48%, 33%, and 29% had no memories of endotracheal tube suctioning, being on a "breathing machine," and being bathed, respectively. A notable percentage of patients discharged from the ICU report moderate to extreme pain, anxiety, and fear, and inability to sleep during their ICU stay; and 29% to 48% have no recall of specific ICU events. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of the utility of temporal subtraction images in successive whole-body bone scans: a prospective clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraishi, J.; Appelbaum, D.; Pu, Y.; Engelmann, R.; Li Qiang; Doi, K.

    2007-01-01

    We have begun a prospective clinical study for evaluating the clinical utility of temporal subtraction images in successive whole-body bone scans. The computerized temporal subtraction technique has been developed in order to highlight interval changes of abnormal lesions due to skeletal metastases, primary bone tumors, osteomyelitis, and fractures. In our initial preliminary results of the prospective study which was started on November 22, 2006 in our hospital, radiologists reported some interval changes which were not recognized in the initial standard readings, but were obvious when temporal subtraction images were viewed. The usefulness of the temporal subtraction images will be investigated in terms of its clinical utility by the prospective clinical study. (orig.)

  20. Utilizing Clinical Pharmacy Specialists to Address Access to Care Barriers in the Veteran Population for the Management of Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Krystal L; Hadley, Ryan L; Baby, Nidhu; Yeary, Julianne C; Chastain, Lisa M; Brown, Crystal D

    2017-08-01

    To show that clinical pharmacy specialists (CPSs) can be utilized in remote facilities to provide appropriate diabetes outcomes along with potential cost savings. A retrospective cohort chart review conducted at the Veterans Affairs North Texas Healthcare System (VANTHCS) evaluated outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus referred to CPSs at Fort Worth Outpatient Clinic (FWOPC) or the endocrinologist-managed specialty clinic at the Dallas VA Medical Center (DVAMC). The primary outcome was percentage of patients reaching hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) goal of facility if patients continued to be referred to CPS. CPSs can be utilized in diabetes management to provide similar health outcomes as the endocrinologist-managed clinic and to potentially allow for facility cost savings.

  1. A randomized controlled trial of daily sedation interruption in critically ill children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vet, N.J.; Wildt, S.N. de; Verlaat, C.W.; Knibbe, C.A.; Mooij, M.G.; Woensel, J.B. van; Rosmalen, J. van; Tibboel, D.; Hoog, M. de

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare daily sedation interruption plus protocolized sedation (DSI + PS) to protocolized sedation only (PS) in critically ill children. METHODS: In this multicenter randomized controlled trial in three pediatric intensive care units in the Netherlands, mechanically ventilated critically

  2. A randomized controlled trial of daily sedation interruption in critically ill children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vet, Nienke J.; de Wildt, Saskia N.; Verlaat, Carin W. M.; Knibbe, Catherijne A. J.; Mooij, Miriam G.; van Woensel, Job B. M.; van Rosmalen, Joost; Tibboel, Dick; de Hoog, Matthijs

    2016-01-01

    To compare daily sedation interruption plus protocolized sedation (DSI + PS) to protocolized sedation only (PS) in critically ill children. In this multicenter randomized controlled trial in three pediatric intensive care units in the Netherlands, mechanically ventilated critically ill children with

  3. Evaluation of adult outpatient magnetic resonance imaging sedation practices: are patients being sedated optimally?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middelkamp, J.E.; Forster, B.B; Keogh, C.; Lennox, P.; Mayson, K.

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the use of anxiolytics in adult outpatient magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) centres and to determine whether utilisation is optimal based on the pharmacology of the drugs used, who prescribes these drugs, and how patients are managed after administration. Identical paper and Web-based surveys were used to anonymously collect data about radiologists' use of anxiolytic agents for adult outpatient MRI examinations. The survey questions were about the type of facility, percentage of studies that require sedation, the drug used and route of administration, who orders the drug, timing of administration, patient monitoring during and observation after the study, use of a dedicated nurse for monitoring, and use of standard sedation and discharge protocols. The χ2 analysis for statistical association among variables was used. Eighty-five of 263 surveys were returned (32% response rate). The radiologist ordered the medication (53%) in slightly more facilities than the referring physician (44%) or the nurse. Forty percent of patients received medication 15-30 minutes before MRI, which is too early for peak effect of oral or sublingual drugs. Lorazepam was most commonly used (64% first choice). Facilities with standard sedation protocols (56%) were more likely to use midazolam than those without standard sedation protocols (17% vs 10%), to have a nurse for monitoring (P = .032), to have standard discharge criteria (P = .001), and to provide written information regarding adverse effects (P = .002). Many outpatients in MRI centres may be scanned before the peak effect of anxiolytics prescribed. A standard sedation protocol in such centres is associated with a more appropriate drug choice, as well as optimized monitoring and postprocedure care. (author)

  4. Clinical utility of an endoscopic ultrasound-guided rendezvous technique via various approach routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakubo, Kazumichi; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Sasahira, Naoki; Nakai, Yousuke; Kogure, Hirofumi; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Miyabayashi, Koji; Mizuno, Suguru; Sasaki, Takashi; Ito, Yukiko; Yamamoto, Natsuyo; Hirano, Kenji; Tada, Minoru; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2013-09-01

    The endoscopic ultrasound-guided rendezvous techniques (EUS-rendezvous) provide reliable biliary access after failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) cannulation. We evaluated the clinical utility of an EUS-rendezvous technique using various approach routes. Patients undergoing EUS-rendezvous for biliary access after failed bile duct cannulation in ERCP were included. EUS-rendezvous was performed via three approach routes depending on the patient's condition: transgastric, transduodenal in a short endoscopic position, or transduodenal in a long endoscopic position. The main outcomes were the technical success rates. Secondary outcomes were procedure time and complications. Fourteen patients (median age, 77 years) underwent EUS-rendezvous for biliary access resulting from failed biliary cannulation. The reasons for biliary drainage were malignant biliary obstruction in five patients and choledocholithiasis in nine. Transgastric, transduodenal in a short position, and transduodenal in a long position EUS-rendezvous was performed in five, five, and four patients, respectively. Bile duct puncture occurred in the left intrahepatic duct in four patients, right hepatic duct in one, middle common bile duct in four, and lower common bile duct in five. The technical success rate was 100 %. In four patients, the approach route was modified from transduodenal in a short position to transduodenal in a long position or transgastric route. The median procedure time was 81 min. One case each of biliary peritonitis and pancreatitis occurred and were managed conservatively. EUS-rendezvous provided safe and reliable transpapillary bile duct access after failed ERCP cannulation. The selection of the appropriate approach routes, depending on patient condition, is critical.

  5. Chest CT using spectral filtration: radiation dose, image quality, and spectrum of clinical utility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Franziska M.; Johnson, Thorsten R.C.; Sommer, Wieland H.; Thierfelder, Kolja M.; Meinel, Felix G. [University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2015-06-01

    To determine the radiation dose, image quality, and clinical utility of non-enhanced chest CT with spectral filtration. We retrospectively analysed 25 non-contrast chest CT examinations acquired with spectral filtration (tin-filtered Sn100 kVp spectrum) compared to 25 examinations acquired without spectral filtration (120 kV). Radiation metrics were compared. Image noise was measured. Contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) and figure-of-merit (FOM) were calculated. Diagnostic confidence for the assessment of various thoracic pathologies was rated by two independent readers. Effective chest diameters were comparable between groups (P = 0.613). In spectral filtration CT, median CTDI{sub vol}, DLP, and size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) were reduced (0.46 vs. 4.3 mGy, 16 vs. 141 mGy*cm, and 0.65 vs. 5.9 mGy, all P < 0.001). Spectral filtration CT had higher image noise (21.3 vs. 13.2 HU, P < 0.001) and lower CNR (47.2 vs. 75.3, P < 0.001), but was more dose-efficient (FOM 10,659 vs. 2,231/mSv, P < 0.001). Diagnostic confidence for parenchymal lung disease and osseous pathologies was lower with spectral filtration CT, but no significant difference was found for pleural pathologies, pulmonary nodules, or pneumonia. Non-contrast chest CT using spectral filtration appears to be sufficient for the assessment of a considerable spectrum of thoracic pathologies, while providing superior dose efficiency, allowing for substantial radiation dose reduction. (orig.)

  6. Update on the clinical utility of once-daily tacrolimus in the management of transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revollo J

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Jane Revollo Department of Pharmacy, Jackson Memorial Hospital, University of Miami Leonard M Miller School of Medicine Miami, FL, USAThe review by Posadas Salas and Srinivas of the clinical utility of once-daily tacrolimus formulations in the management of transplant patients1 was timely and relevant. It is worth noting, however, the data were presented in a way that overlooked several key differences between two distinct once-daily tacrolimus formulations. These formulations differ in bioavailability, Cmax, Tmax, dose required to achieve target trough levels, and time to reach target trough. The specific formulation and dosing information of one product was detailed in this review (described as modified release 4 [MR-4]; Astagraf®, Astellas Pharma Inc., Tokyo, Japan, but no formulation or dosing details were provided for a very different once-daily tacrolimus formulation (LCP-Tacro™; Veloxis Pharmaceuticals A/S, Hørsholm, Denmark for which a thorough review was recently published.2 The latter product is currently approved in Europe and under review by the US Food and Drug Administration in the US. In presenting data in this review, the authors did not identify which product was investigated in each of the studies discussed. This could easily lead to misinterpretation of results or erroneous conclusions, ie, that both once-daily formulations are the same. In fact, a careful parsing of the data clearly demonstrates that they are not equivalent. Misunderstanding of this point could have a potentially serious impact on appropriate dosing, safety, and patient management in the post-transplant setting. Differentiation between the two products is needed to clarify what appear to be conflicting results of the studies presented in this review.View original paper by Posadas Salas and Srinivas

  7. Sedation and mechanical hypoalgesia after sublingual administration of detomidine hydrochloride gel to donkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizarraga, Ignacio; Castillo-Alcala, Fernanda; Varner, Kelley M; Robinson, Lauren S

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare sedative and mechanical hypoalgesic effects of sublingual administration of 2 doses of detomidine gel to donkeys. DESIGN Randomized blinded controlled trial. ANIMALS 6 healthy castrated male donkeys. PROCEDURES In a crossover study design, donkeys received each of the following sublingual treatments 1 week apart in a randomly assigned order: 1 mL of molasses (D0) or detomidine hydrochloride gel at 20 μg/kg (9 μg/lb; D20) or 40 μg/kg (18 μg/lb; D40). Sedation score (SS), head height above the ground (HHAG), and mechanical nociceptive threshold (MNT) were assessed before and for 180 minutes after treatment. Areas under the effect change-versus-time curves (AUCs) from 0 to 30, 30 to 60, 60 to 120, and 120 to 180 minutes after administration were computed for SS, HHAG, and MNT and compared among treatments. RESULTS D20 and D40 resulted in greater SS AUCs from 60 to 120 minutes and smaller HHAG AUCs from 30 through 180 minutes than did D0. The D40 resulted in smaller HHAG AUCs from 60 to 120 minutes than did D20. Compared with D0 values, MNT AUCs from 60 to 120 minutes were higher for D20, whereas MNT AUCs from 30 through 180 minutes were higher for D40. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE D20 and D40 induced sedation and mechanical hypoalgesia in donkeys by > 30 minutes after administration, but only sedation was dose dependent. Sublingual administration of detomidine gel at 40 μg/kg may be useful for sedation of standing donkeys prior to potentially painful minor procedures.

  8. Identifying role of perceived quality and satisfaction on the utilization status of the community clinic services; Bangladesh context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Rizwanul M; Abdullah, Mamun S; Rahman, Anisur M; Alam, Ashraful M

    2016-06-24

    Bangladesh is one among the few countries of the world that provides free medical services at the community level through various public health facilities. It is now evident that, clients' perceived quality of services and their expectations of service standards affect health service utilization to a great extent. The aim of the study was to develop and validate the measures for perception and satisfaction of primary health care quality in Bangladesh context and to identify their aspects on the utilization status of the Community Clinic services. This mixed method cross sectional survey was conducted from January to June 2012, in the catchment area of 12 community clinics. Since most of the outcome indicators focus mainly on women and children, women having children less than 2 years of age were randomly assigned and interviewed for the study purpose. Data were collected through FGD, Key informants interview and a pretested semi- structured questionnaire. About 95 % of the respondents were Muslims and 5 % were Hindus. The average age of the respondents was 23.38 (SD 4.15) and almost all of them are home makers. The average monthly expenditure of their family was 95US $ (SD 32US$). At the beginning of the study, two psychometric research instruments; 24 items perceived quality of primary care services PQPCS scale (chronbach's α = .89) and 22 items community clinic service satisfaction CCSS scale (chronbach's α = .97), were constructed and validated. This study showed less educated, poor, landless mothers utilized the community clinic services more than their educated and wealthier counterpart. Women who lived in their own residence used the community clinic services more frequently than those who lived in a rental house. Perceptions concerning skill and competence of the health care provider and satisfaction indicating interpersonal communication and attitude of the care provider were important predictors for community clinic service utilization

  9. An Internet treatment with weekly e-mail contacts used in a tobacco unit: clinical utility and predictors of outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallego, M.J.; Modesto, M.; Muñoz, M.A.; Almajano, M.J.; Modolell, E.; Peris, C.P.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents preliminary data on the clinical utility and outcome predictors of The San Francisco Stop Smoking Internet Site (SFSSIS) (Lenert et al., 2003) used with weekly e-mail contacts and the usual pharmacological treatment. Fifty smokers participated in the current series of cases, 24

  10. Practice and documentation of palliative sedation: a quality improvement initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, M.; Azevedo, C.; Bush, S.H.; Lawlor, P.; Pereira, J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Palliative sedation (ps), the continuous use of sedating doses of medication to intentionally reduce consciousness and relieve refractory symptoms at end of life, is ethically acceptable if administered according to standards of best practice. Procedural guidelines outlining the appropriate use of ps and the need for rigorous documentation have been developed. As a quality improvement strategy, we audited the practice and documentation of ps on our palliative care unit (pcu). Methods A pharmacy database search of admissions in 2008 identified, for a subsequent chart review, patients who had received either a continuous infusion of midazolam (≥10 mg/24 h), regular parenteral dosing of methotrimeprazine (≥75 mg daily), or regular phenobarbital. Documentation of the decision-making process, consent, and medication use was collected using a data extraction form based on current international ps standards. Results Interpretation and comparison of data were difficult because of an apparent lack of a consistent operational definition of ps. Patient records had no specific documentation in relation to ps initiation, to clearly identified refractory symptoms, and to informed consent in 60 (64.5%), 43 (46.2%), and 38 (40.9%) charts respectively. Variation in the medications used was marked: 54 patients (58%) were started on a single agent and 39 (42%), on multiple agents. The 40 patients (43%) started on midazolam alone received a mean daily dose of 21.4 mg (standard deviation: 24.6 mg). Conclusions The lack of documentation and standardized practice of ps on our pcu has resulted in a quality improvement program to address those gaps. They also highlight the importance of conducting research and developing clinical guidelines in this area. PMID:24764700

  11. People with insomnia: experiences with sedative hypnotics and risk perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Janet M Y; Bartlett, Delwyn J; Armour, Carol L; Ellis, Jason G; Saini, Bandana

    2016-08-01

    Sedative hypnotics form an important part of managing insomnia and are recommended for short-term use. It is standard practice for clinicians to inform the patient to use medications only 'when required', but the use of these medications is often chronic. Little is known about the impact of standard labelling/instructions on promoting appropriate medication use for managing insomnia. To explore patient medication-taking beliefs, experiences and behavioural practices relating to the use of pharmacological/complementary sleep aids for insomnia. Specialist sleep/psychology clinics and the general community in Sydney, Australia. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 51 people with insomnia using a schedule of questions to gauge their experiences, beliefs and current practices relating to insomnia medication use. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and subjected to Framework Analysis to identify emergent themes. Participants held distinctive views about the safety and efficacy of complementary and pharmacological agents but do not intuitively turn to medications to resolve their sleep complaint. Medication use was affirmed through tangible medication-taking cues due to the ambivalence in current instructions and labelling. Practices such as dosage modification, medication substitution and delaying medication use might be important drivers for psychological dependence. Current labelling and instructions do not necessarily promote the quality use of sedative hypnotics due to the variability in patient interpretations. Clarifying the timing, quantity and frequency of medication administration as well as insomnia symptom recognition would play a significant role in optimizing the role of pharmacotherapy in the management of insomnia. © 2015 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Continuous Palliative Sedation for Cancer and Noncancer Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, S.J.; Rietjens, J.A.C.; van Zuylen, L.; Zuurmond, W.W.A.; Perez, R.S.G.M.; van der Maas, P.J.; van Delden, J.J.M.; van der Heide, A.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Palliative care is often focused on cancer patients. Palliative sedation at the end of life is an intervention to address severe suffering in the last stage of life. Objectives: To study the practice of continuous palliative sedation for both cancer and noncancer patients. Methods: In 2008,

  13. Atelectasis on pediatric chest CT: comparison of sedation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargent, M.A.; McEachern, A.M.; Jamieson, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    Background. A change in practice at our institution resulted in increased use of anesthesia for CT scan of the chest in children who required sedation. Objective. To determine whether there is a difference in the frequency or severity of pulmonary atelectasis on CT scan in children sedated by anesthesiologists compared with children sedated by radiologists using intravenous pentobarbital. Materials and methods. Retrospective blinded review of 60 CT scans of the chest performed in 41 children. Forty-one studies in children sedated by radiologists (median age 29 months) were compared with 19 studies in children sedated by anesthesiologists (median age 25 months). Results. Atelectasis sufficient to obscure pulmonary metastases was shown in 5 of 41 (12 %) radiology sedations and 13 of 19 (68 %) anesthesiology sedations (P < 0.01). Higher grades of atelectasis were recorded in children under anesthesia (P < 0.01). Conclusion. Atelectasis is more frequent and more severe in children undergoing general anesthesia compared with intravenous pentobarbital sedation. Consideration should be given to the use of forced inspiration in children anesthetized for CT scan of the chest. (orig.)

  14. Sedative properties of Mitracarpus villosus leaves in mice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    anxiolytics increase the head-dip counts. The reduction in the number of head dips shown by the extract is therefore an indication of the presence of psychoactive constituents that are sedative in nature. The sedative property of the plant was confirmed by its ability to potentiate the duration of diazepam induced sleep.

  15. Recording EEG In Young Children Without Sedation | Curuneaux ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Although it has been considered that sedation in children undergoing EEG tests is effective and safe and complications are infrequent, occasionally adverse sedation-related events are presented. Objective The aim of this work was to determine if it is possible to carry out EEG in children up to 4 years old ...

  16. Propofol dose and incidence of dreaming during sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eer, Audrey Singyi; Padmanabhan, Usha; Leslie, Kate

    2009-10-01

    Dreaming is commonly reported after propofol-based sedation. We measured the incidence of dreaming and bispectral index (BIS) values in colonoscopy patients sedated with combinations of propofol, midazolam and fentanyl. Two hundred patients presenting for elective outpatient colonoscopy were sedated with combinations of propofol, midazolam and fentanyl. BIS was monitored throughout the procedure. Patients were interviewed immediately after they emerged from sedation. The primary end point was a report of dreaming during sedation. Ninety-seven patients were administered propofol alone, 44 were administered propofol and fentanyl, 16 were administered propofol and midazolam and 43 were administered propofol, midazolam and fentanyl. Dreaming was reported by 19% of patients. Dreamers received higher doses of propofol and had lower BIS values during sedation. Age of 50 years or less, preoperative quality of recovery score of less than 14, higher home dream recall, propofol dose of more than 300 mg and time to Observers' Assessment of Alertness/Sedation score equalling 5 of 8 min or less were independent predictors of dreaming. Dreaming during sedation is associated with higher propofol dose and lower BIS values.

  17. Use of sedation to relieve refractory symptoms in dying patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indications. Agitated delirium was the most common reason (45%) for using sedation, followed by intractable vomiting due to inoperable malignant intestinal obstruction in 25% of patients. Three patients with persistent convulsions or myoclonic jerking and 2 patients with severe refractory dyspnoea required some sedation.

  18. Experience with Conscious sedation for Oocyte Retrieval in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    elearning

    The aim of this study was to assess clients' pain experience, acceptance of conscious sedation and correlates of pain during oocyte retrieval ... Conscious sedation and analgesia are one of several methods used to relieve pain during oocyte retrieval in. IVF procedures. .... relieves anxiety and reduces the patient's memory.

  19. Translating state-of-the-art spinal cord MRI techniques to clinical use: A systematic review of clinical studies utilizing DTI, MT, MWF, MRS, and fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan R. Martin

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: State-of-the-art spinal cord MRI techniques are emerging with great potential to improve the diagnosis and management of various spinal pathologies, but the current body of evidence has only showed limited clinical utility to date. Among these imaging tools DTI is the most mature, but further work is necessary to standardize and validate its use before it will be adopted in the clinical realm. Large, well-designed studies with a priori hypotheses, standardized acquisition methods, detailed clinical data collection, and robust automated analysis techniques are needed to fully demonstrate the potential of these rapidly evolving techniques.

  20. Conscious sedation vs general anesthesia in pediatric dentistry – a review

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Cátia Carvalho; Lavado, Carla; Areias, Cristina; Mourão, Joana; Andrade, David de

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Performing dental treatments on pediatric patients who present behavioral problems is usually a great clinical challenge. Depending on the patients’ emotional maturity and their physical, psychological and mental skills, the usual behavior control techniques may not offer adequate efficacy and safety when dental procedures are being carried out. In these circumstances, alternative and more invasive methods such as conscious sedation and general anesthesia may become necessary. ...

  1. Laryngospasm With Apparent Aspiration During Sedation With Nitrous Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babl, Franz E; Grindlay, Joanne; Barrett, Michael Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Nitrous oxide and oxygen mixture has become increasingly popular for the procedural sedation and analgesia of children in the emergency department. In general, nitrous oxide is regarded as a very safe agent according to large case series. We report a case of single-agent nitrous oxide sedation of a child, complicated by laryngospasm and radiographically confirmed bilateral upper lobe pulmonary opacities. Although rarely reported with parenteral sedative agents, laryngospasm and apparent aspiration has not been previously reported in isolated nitrous oxide sedation. This case highlights that, similar to other sedative agents, nitrous oxide administration also needs to be conducted by staff and in settings in which airway emergencies can be appropriately managed. Copyright © 2015 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. SEDATIVE AND ANALGESIC EFFECTS OF DETOMIDINE HYDROCHLORIDE IN GOATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Tunio., A. B. Kalhoro and I.H. Kathio1

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The sedative and analgesic effects of three dose rates of detomidine (40, 50 and 60µg/kg body weight were studied in six goats. Moderate to deep sedation occurred after administration of 40µg/kg of detomidine as compared to deep sedation produced by 50 and 60µg/kg of detomidine. The degree, onset and duration of sedation and onset and duration of maximum sedation were all dose dependent. Skin analgesia and recumbency were produced in all animals with higher doses (50 and 60µg/kg and in three animals with lower dose (40µg/kg. Duration of recumbency was 22.66 ± 1.45, 35.16 ± 1.68 and 55.66 ± 1.64 minutes after administration of 40, 50 and 60µg/kg of detomidine, respectively.

  3. Safety and risk factors for difficult endoscopist-directed ERCP sedation in daily practice: a hospital-based case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Pérez-Cuadrado-Robles

    Full Text Available Background: There are limited data concerning endoscopist-directed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography deep sedation. The aim of this study was to establish the safety and risk factors for difficult sedation in daily practice. Patients and methods: Hospital-based, frequency matched case-control study. All patients were identified from a database of 1,008 patients between 2014 and 2015. The cases were those with difficult sedations. This concept was defined based on the combination of the receipt of high-doses of midazolam or propofol, poor tolerance, use of reversal agents or sedation-related adverse events. The presence of different factors was evaluated to determine whether they predicted difficult sedation. Results: One-hundred and eighty-nine patients (63 cases, 126 controls were included. Cases were classified in terms of high-dose requirements (n = 35, 55.56%, sedation-related adverse events (n = 14, 22.22%, the use of reversal agents (n = 13, 20.63% and agitation/discomfort (n = 8, 12.7%. Concerning adverse events, the total rate was 1.39%, including clinically relevant hypoxemia (n = 11, severe hypotension (n = 2 and paradoxical reactions to midazolam (n = 1. The rate of hypoxemia was higher in patients under propofol combined with midazolam than in patients with propofol alone (2.56% vs. 0.8%, p < 0.001. Alcohol consumption (OR: 2.674 [CI 95%: 1.098-6.515], p = 0.030, opioid consumption (OR: 2.713 [CI 95%: 1.096-6.716], p = 0.031 and the consumption of other psychoactive drugs (OR: 2.015 [CI 95%: 1.017-3.991], p = 0.045 were confirmed to be independent risk factors for difficult sedation. Conclusions: Endoscopist-directed deep sedation during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is safe. The presence of certain factors should be assessed before the procedure to identify patients who are high-risk for difficult sedation.

  4. Clinical utility of vitamin d testing: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    This report from the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) was intended to evaluate the clinical utility of vitamin D testing in average risk Canadians and in those with kidney disease. As a separate analysis, this report also includes a systematic literature review of the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in these two subgroups.This evaluation did not set out to determine the serum vitamin D thresholds that might apply to non-bone health outcomes. For bone health outcomes, no high or moderate quality evidence could be found to support a target serum level above 50 nmol/L. Similarly, no high or moderate quality evidence could be found to support vitamin D's effects in non-bone health outcomes, other than falls. VITAMIN D: Vitamin D is a lipid soluble vitamin that acts as a hormone. It stimulates intestinal calcium absorption and is important in maintaining adequate phosphate levels for bone mineralization, bone growth, and remodelling. It's also believed to be involved in the regulation of cell growth proliferation and apoptosis (programmed cell death), as well as modulation of the immune system and other functions. Alone or in combination with calcium, Vitamin D has also been shown to reduce the risk of fractures in elderly men (≥ 65 years), postmenopausal women, and the risk of falls in community-dwelling seniors. However, in a comprehensive systematic review, inconsistent results were found concerning the effects of vitamin D in conditions such as cancer, all-cause mortality, and cardiovascular disease. In fact, no high or moderate quality evidence could be found concerning the effects of vitamin D in such non-bone health outcomes. Given the uncertainties surrounding the effects of vitamin D in non-bone health related outcomes, it was decided that this evaluation should focus on falls and the effects of vitamin D in bone health and exclusively within average-risk individuals and patients with kidney disease. Synthesis of vitamin D occurs naturally in the skin

  5. Auditory processing during deep propofol sedation and recovery from unconsciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelsch, Stefan; Heinke, Wolfgang; Sammler, Daniela; Olthoff, Derk

    2006-08-01

    Using evoked potentials, this study investigated effects of deep propofol sedation, and effects of recovery from unconsciousness, on the processing of auditory information with stimuli suited to elicit a physical MMN, and a (music-syntactic) ERAN. Levels of sedation were assessed using the Bispectral Index (BIS) and the Modified Observer's Assessment of Alertness and Sedation Scale (MOAAS). EEG-measurements were performed during wakefulness, deep propofol sedation (MOAAS 2-3, mean BIS=68), and a recovery period. Between deep sedation and recovery period, the infusion rate of propofol was increased to achieve unconsciousness (MOAAS 0-1, mean BIS=35); EEG measurements of recovery period were performed after subjects regained consciousness. During deep sedation, the physical MMN was markedly reduced, but still significant. No ERAN was observed in this level. A clear P3a was elicited during deep sedation by those deviants, which were task-relevant during the awake state. As soon as subjects regained consciousness during the recovery period, a normal MMN was elicited. By contrast, the P3a was absent in the recovery period, and the P3b was markedly reduced. Results indicate that the auditory sensory memory (as indexed by the physical MMN) is still active, although strongly reduced, during deep sedation (MOAAS 2-3). The presence of the P3a indicates that attention-related processes are still operating during this level. Processes of syntactic analysis appear to be abolished during deep sedation. After propofol-induced anesthesia, the auditory sensory memory appears to operate normal as soon as subjects regain consciousness, whereas the attention-related processes indexed by P3a and P3b are markedly impaired. Results inform about effects of sedative drugs on auditory and attention-related mechanisms. The findings are important because these mechanisms are prerequisites for auditory awareness, auditory learning and memory, as well as language perception during anesthesia.

  6. A prospective, longitudinal study to evaluate the clinical utility of a predictive algorithm that detects risk of opioid use disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenton, Ashley; Lee, Chee; Lewis, Katrina; Sharma, Maneesh; Kantorovich, Svetlana; Smith, Gregory A; Meshkin, Brian

    2018-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical utility of an algorithm-based decision tool designed to assess risk associated with opioid use. Specifically, we sought to assess how physicians were using the profile in patient care and how its use affected patient outcomes. Patients and methods A prospective, longitudinal study was conducted to assess the utility of precision medicine testing in 5,397 patients across 100 clinics in the USA. Using a patent-protected, validated algorithm combining specific genetic risk factors with phenotypic traits, patients were categorized into low-, moderate-, and high-risk patients for opioid abuse. Physicians who ordered precision medicine testing were asked to complete patient evaluations and document their actions, decisions, and perceptions regarding the utility of the precision medicine tests. The patient outcomes associated with each treatment action were carefully documented. Results Physicians used the profile to guide treatment decisions for over half of the patients. Of those, guided treatment decisions for 24.5% of the patients were opioid related, including changing the opioid prescribed, starting an opioid, or titrating a patient off the opioid. Treatment guidance was strongly influenced by profile-predicted opioid use disorder (OUD) risk. Most importantly, patients whose physicians used the profile to guide opioid-related treatment decisions had improved clinical outcomes, including better pain management by medication adjustments, with an average pain decrease of 3.4 points on a scale of 1–10. Conclusion Patients whose physicians used the profile to guide opioid-related treatment decisions had improved clinical outcomes, as measured by decreased pain levels resulting from better pain management with prescribed medications. The clinical utility of the profile is twofold. It provides clinically actionable recommendations that can be used to 1) prevent OUD through limiting initial opioid

  7. Is "really conscious" sedation with solely an opioid an alternative to every day used sedation regimes for colonoscopies in a teaching hospital? Midazolam/fentanyl, propofol/alfentanil, or alfentanil only for colonoscopy: a randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eberl, S.; Polderman, J. A. W.; Preckel, B.; Kalkman, C. J.; Fockens, P.; Hollmann, M. W.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the satisfaction of patients and endoscopists and concurrently safety aspects of an "alfentanil only" and two clinically routinely used sedation regimes in patients undergoing colonoscopy in a teaching hospital. One hundred and eighty patients were prospectively randomized in three

  8. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging of physeal injury: reliability and clinical utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurie, Brett; Koff, Matthew F; Shah, Parina; Feldmann, Eric James; Amacker, Nadja; Downey-Zayas, Timothy; Green, Daniel; Potter, Hollis G

    2014-01-01

    Injuries to the physis are common in children with a subset resulting in an osseous bar and potential growth disturbance. Magnetic resonance imaging allows for detailed assessment of the physis with the ability to generate 3-dimensional physeal models from volumetric data. The purpose of this study was to assess the interrater reliability of physeal bar area measurements generated using a validated semiautomated segmentation technique and to highlight the clinical utility of quantitative 3-dimensional (3D) physeal mapping in pediatric orthopaedic practice. The Radiology Information System/Picture Archiving Communication System (PACS) at our institution was searched to find consecutive patients who were imaged for the purpose of assessing a physeal bar or growth disturbance between December 2006 and October 2011. Physeal segmentation was retrospectively performed by 2 independent operators using semiautomated software to generate physeal maps and bar area measurements from 3-dimensional spoiled gradient recalled echo sequences. Inter-reliability was statistically analyzed. Subsequent surgical management for each patient was recorded from the patient notes and surgical records. We analyzed 24 patients (12M/12F) with a mean age of 11.4 years (range, 5-year to 15-year olds) and 25 physeal bars. Of the physeal bars: 9 (36%) were located in the distal tibia; 8 (32%) in the proximal tibia; 5 (20%) in the distal femur; 1 (4%) in the proximal femur; 1 (4%) in the proximal humerus; and 1 (4%) in the distal radius. The independent operator measurements of physeal bar area were highly correlated with a Pearson correlation coefficient (r) of 0.96 and an intraclass correlation coefficient for average measures of 0.99 (95% confidence interval, 0.97-0.99). Four patients underwent resection of the identified physeal bars, 9 patients were treated with epiphysiodesis, and 1 patient underwent bilateral tibial osteotomies. Semiautomated segmentation of the physis is a reproducible

  9. Basic Evaluation of Analytical Performance and Clinical Utility of Immunoradiometric TSH Assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhy, Il Kyo; Cho, Bo Youn; Lee, Hong Kyu; Koh, Chang Soon; Min, Hun Ki; Lee, Mun Ho

    1987-01-01

    To assess the analytic performance of immunoradiometric TSH assay (IRMA TSH), assay precision determined by intra and interassay variance, assay accuracy determined by dilution and recovery study, were evaluated by using two commercial kit (Abott and Daichi). Normal range of basal serum TSH and TRH stimulated TSH increment were also determined in 234 healthy subjects (male 110, female 124; age 20-70) and 30 volunteers (male 10, female 20; age 21-26). In addition, basal TSH levels of 70 patients with untreated hyperthyroidism, 50 untreated hypothyroidism, and 60 euthyroidism were measured to assess the clinical utility of IRMA TSH. The detection limit of IRMA TSH was 0.04 mU/l and 0.08 mU/l by Abott Kit and Daichi kit respectively. Using Abott kit, intraassay variance were 2.0, 3.1 and 1.4% in mean TSH concentration 2.4, 31.6 and 98.2 mU/l repectively and interassay variance were 2.0 and 3.2% in mean TSH concentration 2.3 and 31.3 mU/l. Mean recovery rate was 92.5% and dilution study showed nearly straight line. When Daichi kit was used, intrasssay variance were 5.6, 5.2 and 6.2% in mean TSH concentration of 2.4, 31.6 and 98.2 mU/1 respectively and interassay variance were 7.1 and 7.4% in mean TSH of 2.3 and 31.3 mU,/l. Mean recovery rate was 89.9%. Normal range of basal TSH and TRH stimulated peak TSH were 0.38-4.02 mU/1 and 2.85-30.8 mU/1 repectively (95% confidence interval, Abott kit used). Sensitivity and specificity of basal TSH levels for diagnosing hypothyroidism as well as specificity for diagnosing hyperthyroidism were 100% by using both kit. Sensitivity of basal TSH level for diagnosing hyperthyroidism was 100% when TSH levels were measured by Abott kit while that was 80.9% when measured by Daichi kit. These results suggest that IRMA TSH was very precise and accurate method and might be used as a first line test in the evaluation of thyroid function

  10. MO-FG-207-03: Maximizing the Utility of Integrated PET/MRI in Clinical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behr, S. [University of California (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The use of integrated PET/MRI systems in clinical applications can best benefit from understanding their technological advances and limitations. The currently available clinical PET/MRI systems have their own characteristics. Thorough analyses of existing technical data and evaluation of necessary performance metrics for quality assurances could be conducted to optimize application-specific PET/MRI protocols. This Symposium will focus on technical advances and limitations of clinical PET/MRI systems, and how this exciting imaging modality can be utilized in applications that can benefit from both PET and MRI. Learning Objectives: To understand the technological advances of clinical PET/MRI systems To correctly identify clinical applications that can benefit from PET/MRI To understand ongoing work to further improve the current PET/MRI technology Floris Jansen is a GE Healthcare employee.

  11. MO-FG-207-03: Maximizing the Utility of Integrated PET/MRI in Clinical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behr, S.

    2015-01-01

    The use of integrated PET/MRI systems in clinical applications can best benefit from understanding their technological advances and limitations. The currently available clinical PET/MRI systems have their own characteristics. Thorough analyses of existing technical data and evaluation of necessary performance metrics for quality assurances could be conducted to optimize application-specific PET/MRI protocols. This Symposium will focus on technical advances and limitations of clinical PET/MRI systems, and how this exciting imaging modality can be utilized in applications that can benefit from both PET and MRI. Learning Objectives: To understand the technological advances of clinical PET/MRI systems To correctly identify clinical applications that can benefit from PET/MRI To understand ongoing work to further improve the current PET/MRI technology Floris Jansen is a GE Healthcare employee

  12. Development and validation of a theoretical test in non-anaesthesiologist-administered propofol sedation for gastrointestinal endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jeppe Thue; Savran, Mona Meral; Møller, Ann Merete

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Safety with non-anaesthesiologist-administered propofol sedation (NAAP) during gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy is related to theoretical knowledge. A summative testing of knowledge before attempting supervised nurse-administered propofol sedation (NAPS) in the clinic is advised. The aims...... of this study were to develop a theoretical test about propofol sedation, to gather validity evidence for the test and to measure the effect of a NAPS-specific training course. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A three-phased psychometric study on multiple choice questionnaire (MCQ) test development, gathering of validity......% increase; p = 0.001 and 0.001, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Data supported the validity of the developed MCQ test. The NAPS-specific course with pre-course testing adds theoretical knowledge to already well-prepared participants....

  13. Impact of early in-hospital medication review by clinical pharmacists on health services utilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne M Hohl

    Full Text Available Adverse drug events are a leading cause of emergency department visits and unplanned admissions, and prolong hospital stays. Medication review interventions aim to identify adverse drug events and optimize medication use. Previous evaluations of in-hospital medication reviews have focused on interventions at discharge, with an unclear effect on health outcomes. We assessed the effect of early in-hospital pharmacist-led medication review on the health outcomes of high-risk patients.We used a quasi-randomized design to evaluate a quality improvement project in three hospitals in British Columbia, Canada. We incorporated a clinical decision rule into emergency department triage pathways, allowing nurses to identify patients at high-risk for adverse drug events. After randomly selecting the first eligible patient for participation, clinical pharmacists systematically allocated subsequent high-risk patients to medication review or usual care. Medication review included obtaining a best possible medication history and reviewing the patient's medications for appropriateness and adverse drug events. The primary outcome was the number of days spent in-hospital over 30 days, and was ascertained using administrative data. We used median and inverse propensity score weighted logistic regression modeling to determine the effect of pharmacist-led medication review on downstream health services use.Of 10,807 high-risk patients, 6,416 received early pharmacist-led medication review and 4,391 usual care. Their baseline characteristics were balanced. The median number of hospital days was reduced by 0.48 days (95% confidence intervals [CI] = 0.00 to 0.96; p = 0.058 in the medication review group compared to usual care, representing an 8% reduction in the median length of stay. Among patients under 80 years of age, the median number of hospital days was reduced by 0.60 days (95% CI = 0.06 to 1.17; p = 0.03, representing 11% reduction in the median length of stay

  14. Utility of two methodologies in the clinical assessment of oral dryness in postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachita Kodandera Chengappa

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: A good correlation of CODS with sialometry scores indicates that CODS can be utilized for semiquantitative assessment of oral dryness. It appears that UWS has poor correlation with duration of menopause. Xerostomia and UWS were not significantly related.

  15. Trends in the utilization of medical imaging from 2003 to 2011: clinical encounters offer a complementary patient-centered focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodoo, Martey S; Duszak, Richard; Hughes, Danny R

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate trends in utilization and spending for medical imaging, using medical visits resulting in imaging as a novel metric of utilization. Utilization and spending for medical imaging were examined using (1) Medicare Part B claims data from 2003 to 2011 to measure per-enrollee spending and (2) household component events data on the elderly Medicare-age population from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey from 2003 to 2010 to measure utilization as a function of clinical encounters. Annual health spending and Medicare payments for imaging for the elderly population grew from $294 per enrollee in 2003 to $418 in 2006 and had declined to $390 by 2011. Over this entire time, however, annual medical visits by a similar Medicare-age (≥ 65 years old) population resulting in imaging trended consistently downward, from 12.8% in 2003 to 10.6% in 2011. Despite early growth and then more recent declines in average Medicare spending per enrollee since 2003, the percentage of patient encounters resulting in medical imaging has significantly and consistently declined nationwide. Spending alone is thus an incomplete measure of changes in the role and utilization of medical imaging in overall patient care. As policymakers focus on medical imaging, a thoughtful analysis of payment policy influencing imaging utilization, and its role in concurrent and downstream patient care, will be critical to ensure appropriate patient access. Copyright © 2013 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Chloral hydrate in pediatric magnetic resonance imaging: evaluation of a 10-year sedation experience administered by radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, Jorge; Toro, Rodrigo; Rascovsky, Simon; Arango, Andres; Angel, Gabriel J.; Calvo, Victor; Delgado, Jorge A.

    2015-01-01

    Chloral hydrate is a sedative that has been used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To evaluate the use, effectiveness and safety of chloral hydrate administered by radiologists for the sedation of children who require MRI procedures. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical charts for all patients ages 0 - 10 years old who underwent sedation