WorldWideScience

Sample records for security test center

  1. Control Systems Security Test Center - FY 2004 Program Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert E. Polk; Alen M. Snyder

    2005-04-01

    In May 2004, the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) was established at Idaho National Laboratory to execute assessment activities to reduce the vulnerability of the nation’s critical infrastructure control systems to terrorist attack. The CSSC implements a program to accomplish the five goals presented in the US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security. This report summarizes the first year funding of startup activities and program achievements that took place in FY 2004 and early FY 2005. This document was prepared for the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center of the National Cyber Security Division of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). DHS has been tasked under the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to coordinate the overall national effort to enhance the protection of the national critical infrastructure. Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-7 directs federal departments to identify and prioritize the critical infrastructure and protect it from terrorist attack. The US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security was prepared by the National Cyber Security Division to address the control system security component addressed in the National Strategy to Secure Cyberspace and the National Strategy for the Physical Protection of Critical Infrastructures and Key Assets. The US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security identified five high-level strategic goals for improving cyber security of control systems.

  2. Chemical Security Analysis Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — In 2006, by Presidential Directive, DHS established the Chemical Security Analysis Center (CSAC) to identify and assess chemical threats and vulnerabilities in the...

  3. Web Security Testing Cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Hope, Paco

    2008-01-01

    Among the tests you perform on web applications, security testing is perhaps the most important, yet it's often the most neglected. The recipes in the Web Security Testing Cookbook demonstrate how developers and testers can check for the most common web security issues, while conducting unit tests, regression tests, or exploratory tests. Unlike ad hoc security assessments, these recipes are repeatable, concise, and systematic-perfect for integrating into your regular test suite.

  4. CENTER FOR CYBER SECURITY STUDIES

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The mission of the Center for Cyber Security Studies is to enhance the education of midshipmen in all areas of cyber warfare, to facilitate the sharing of expertise...

  5. Classification of Security Operation Centers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jacobs, P

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Security Operation Centers (SOCs) are a necessary service for organisations that want to address compliance and threat management. While there are frameworks in existence that addresses the technology aspects of these services, a holistic framework...

  6. Center for Homeland Defense and Security Homeland Security Affairs Journal

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Homeland Security Affairs is the peer-reviewed online journal of the Center for Homeland Defense and Security (CHDS). The journal provides a forum to propose and debate strategies, policies and organizational arrangements to strengthen U.S. homeland security.

  7. The National Homeland Security Research Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The National Homeland Security Research Center advances our nation's security by providing scientific products and expertise to improve the ability to respond to and...

  8. Center for computer security: Computer Security Group conference. Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-06-01

    Topics covered include: computer security management; detection and prevention of computer misuse; certification and accreditation; protection of computer security, perspective from a program office; risk analysis; secure accreditation systems; data base security; implementing R and D; key notarization system; DOD computer security center; the Sandia experience; inspector general's report; and backup and contingency planning. (GHT)

  9. Trainer module for security control center operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    An operator trainer module has been developed to be used with the security control center equipment to be installed as part of a safeguards physical protection system. The module is designed to provide improved training and testing capabilities for control center operators through the use of simulations for perimeter equipment operations. Operators, through the trainer module, can be challenged with a variety of realistic situations which require responsive action identical to that needed in an actual system. This permits a consistent evaluation and confirmation of operator capabilities prior to assignment as an operator and allows for periodic retesting to verify that adequate performance levels are maintained.

  10. Test Control Center (TCC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Test Control Center (TCC) provides a consolidated facility for planning, coordinating, controlling, monitoring, and analyzing distributed test events. ,The TCC...

  11. Model-Based Security Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Schieferdecker

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Security testing aims at validating software system requirements related to security properties like confidentiality, integrity, authentication, authorization, availability, and non-repudiation. Although security testing techniques are available for many years, there has been little approaches that allow for specification of test cases at a higher level of abstraction, for enabling guidance on test identification and specification as well as for automated test generation. Model-based security testing (MBST is a relatively new field and especially dedicated to the systematic and efficient specification and documentation of security test objectives, security test cases and test suites, as well as to their automated or semi-automated generation. In particular, the combination of security modelling and test generation approaches is still a challenge in research and of high interest for industrial applications. MBST includes e.g. security functional testing, model-based fuzzing, risk- and threat-oriented testing, and the usage of security test patterns. This paper provides a survey on MBST techniques and the related models as well as samples of new methods and tools that are under development in the European ITEA2-project DIAMONDS.

  12. Anatomy of a Security Operations Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, John

    2010-01-01

    Many agencies and corporations are either contemplating or in the process of building a cyber Security Operations Center (SOC). Those Agencies that have established SOCs are most likely working on major revisions or enhancements to existing capabilities. As principle developers of the NASA SOC; this Presenters' goals are to provide the GFIRST community with examples of some of the key building blocks of an Agency scale cyber Security Operations Center. This presentation viII include the inputs and outputs, the facilities or shell, as well as the internal components and the processes necessary to maintain the SOC's subsistence - in other words, the anatomy of a SOC. Details to be presented include the SOC architecture and its key components: Tier 1 Call Center, data entry, and incident triage; Tier 2 monitoring, incident handling and tracking; Tier 3 computer forensics, malware analysis, and reverse engineering; Incident Management System; Threat Management System; SOC Portal; Log Aggregation and Security Incident Management (SIM) systems; flow monitoring; IDS; etc. Specific processes and methodologies discussed include Incident States and associated Work Elements; the Incident Management Workflow Process; Cyber Threat Risk Assessment methodology; and Incident Taxonomy. The Evolution of the Cyber Security Operations Center viII be discussed; starting from reactive, to proactive, and finally to proactive. Finally, the resources necessary to establish an Agency scale SOC as well as the lessons learned in the process of standing up a SOC viII be presented.

  13. A layered approach to user-centered security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne

    2008-01-01

    The workshop will explore the possibilities of a user-centered perspective on security. With exceptions, existing research may be criticized for being highly system-centered, focusing on how one may change user behavior to deal with the requirements of security, or on how security aspects can be ......, transparency, participation and democracy. We invite participants to bring forth contributions in this direction....

  14. The Johnson Space Center Management Information Systems (JSCMIS). 1: Requirements Definition and Design Specifications for Versions 2.1 and 2.1.1. 2: Documented Test Scenario Environments. 3: Security Design and Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center Management Information System (JSCMIS) is an interface to computer data bases at NASA Johnson which allows an authorized user to browse and retrieve information from a variety of sources with minimum effort. This issue gives requirements definition and design specifications for versions 2.1 and 2.1.1, along with documented test scenario environments, and security object design and specifications.

  15. Secure Remote Access Issues in a Control Center Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Lee; McNair, Ann R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The ISS finally reached an operational state and exists for local and remote users. Onboard payload systems are managed by the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC). Users access HOSC systems by internet protocols in support of daily operations, preflight simulation, and test. In support of this diverse user community, a modem security architecture has been implemented. The architecture has evolved over time from an isolated but open system to a system which supports local and remote access to the ISS over broad geographic regions. This has been accomplished through the use of an evolved security strategy, PKI, and custom design. Through this paper, descriptions of the migration process and the lessons learned are presented. This will include product decision criteria, rationale, and the use of commodity products in the end architecture. This paper will also stress the need for interoperability of various products and the effects of seemingly insignificant details.

  16. Engineer Research and Development Center's Materials Testing Center (MTC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Engineer Research and Development Center's Materials Testing Center (MTC) is committed to quality testing and inspection services that are delivered on time and...

  17. A Design Methodology for Computer Security Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Ramilli, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The field of "computer security" is often considered something in between Art and Science. This is partly due to the lack of widely agreed and standardized methodologies to evaluate the degree of the security of a system. This dissertation intends to contribute to this area by investigating the most common security testing strategies applied nowadays and by proposing an enhanced methodology that may be effectively applied to different threat scenarios with the same degree of effectiveness. ...

  18. Situated Usability Testing for Security Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greitzer, Frank L.

    2011-03-02

    While usability testing is well established, assessing the usability of security software, tools, or methods deserves more careful consideration. It has been argued that dealing with security has become too difficult for individuals or organizations to manage effectively or to use conveniently. As difficult as it is for system administrators and developers to deal with, security is even more challenging for casual users. Indeed, it is much too easy for casual/home users to configure the security of their systems in non-optimal ways that leave their systems inadvertently insecure. This is exacerbated by the fact that casual users are focused on matters other than security, and likely would prefer not even to think about security. This brief report argues that when security and/or privacy are part of the equation, traditional methods for usability testing should be re-considered. The purpose of this brief report is to argue for and outline a method associated with a new approach to usability testing for examining usable security issues.

  19. IMIRSEL: a secure music retrieval testing environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downie, John S.

    2004-10-01

    The Music Information Retrieval (MIR) and Music Digital Library (MDL) research communities have long noted the need for formal evaluation mechanisms. Issues concerning the unavailability of freely-available music materials have greatly hindered the creation of standardized test collections with which these communities could scientifically assess the strengths and weaknesses of their various music retrieval techniques. The International Music Information Retrieval Systems Evaluation Laboratory (IMIRSEL) is being developed at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) specifically to overcome this hindrance to the scientific evaluation of MIR/MDL systems. Together with its subsidiary Human Use of Music Information Retrieval Systems (HUMIRS) project, IMIRSEL will allow MIR/MDL researchers access to the standardized large-scale collection of copyright-sensitive music materials and standardized test queries being housed at UIUC's National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA). Virtual Research Labs (VRL), based upon NCSA's Data-to-Knowledge (D2K) tool set, are being developed through which MIR/MDL researchers will interact with the music materials under a "trusted code" security model.

  20. Center for Coastline Security Technology, Year-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    aircraft carrier has been arranged. The two remaining field tests were conducted last spring , one in New York City during Fleet Week and the other...definitive field test of the camera was conducted last spring at Port Hueneme, California. The camera, along with four other video cameras brought together...Furthermore, the free viewpoint TV (FTV) based on multi-view video coding ( MVC ) is gaining momentum and this makes DBIR approaches unnecessary as the MVC

  1. BackTrack testing wireless network security

    CERN Document Server

    Cardwell, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Written in an easy-to-follow step-by-step format, you will be able to get started in next to no time with minimal effort and zero fuss.BackTrack: Testing Wireless Network Security is for anyone who has an interest in security and who wants to know more about wireless networks.All you need is some experience with networks and computers and you will be ready to go.

  2. Nuclear Testing and National Security,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    national pledges to an eventual total test ban have provided a subliminal rationale for agreeing to numerous interim restrictions. Thus, nuclear budget cuts... advertised to be a "comprehen- sive" prohibition of all nuclear explosions "whatever their claimed justification," in order to "freeze" progress in

  3. Nursing Students' Access to Test Banks: Are Your Tests Secure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madara, Bernadette; Resha, Cheryl; Krol, Maria D; Lacey, Kimberly; Martin, Elaine F; O'Sullivan, Cynthia; Smith, Jan Weingrad

    2017-05-01

    Schools of nursing have moved to multiple choice test questions to help prepare students for licensure and practice. However, students can buy test banks to help them "get through" nursing school. Accurate assessment of nursing students' knowledge and judgment comprises access to test banks. The purpose of this exploratory study was to gain an understanding about nursing faculty's knowledge concerning test bank security issues, to assess whether publishers were aware of this issue, and vendor's reasons for supplying test banks to students. Overall, the results indicated that the majority of faculty were unaware of student access to test banks, and although most do not use test banks verbatim, general consensus existed that test bank security is a concern. Implications include increasing faculty awareness of test bank access by students, supporting educators to develop their own test bank items, and promoting security of all examinations. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(5):292-294.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Wireless Network Penetration Testing and Security Auditing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Shao-Long

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available IEEE802.11 wireless wireless networks have security issues that are vulnerable to a variety of attacks. Due to using radio to transport data, attackers can bypass firewalls, sniff sensitive information, intercept packets and send malicious packets. Security auditing and penetration testing is expected to ensure wireless networks security. The contributions of this work are analyzed the vulnerability and types of attacks pertaining to IEEE 802.11 WLAN, performed well known attacks in a laboratory environment to conduct penetration tests to confirm whether our wireless network is hackable or not. WAIDPS is configured as auditing tool to view wireless attacks, such as WEP/WPA/WPA2 cracking, rouge access points, denial of service attack. WAIDPS is designed to detect wireless intrusion with additional features. Penetration testing and auditing will mitigate the risk and threatening to protect WALN.

  5. Cyber Security Testing and Training Programs for Industrial Control Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel Noyes

    2012-03-01

    Service providers rely on industrial control systems (ICS) to manage the flow of water at dams, open breakers on power grids, control ventilation and cooling in nuclear power plants, and more. In today's interconnected environment, this can present a serious cyber security challenge. To combat this growing challenge, government, private industry, and academia are working together to reduce cyber risks. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a key contributor to the Department of Energy National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Control Systems Security Program (CSSP), both of which focus on improving the overall security posture of ICS in the national critical infrastructure. In support of the NSTB, INL hosts a dedicated SCADA testing facility which consists of multiple control systems supplied by leading national and international manufacturers. Within the test bed, INL researchers systematically examine control system components and work to identify vulnerabilities. In support of the CSSP, INL develops and conducts training courses which are designed to increase awareness and defensive capabilities for IT/Control System professionals. These trainings vary from web-based cyber security trainings for control systems engineers to more advanced hands-on training that culminates with a Red Team/ Blue Team exercise that is conducted within an actual control systems environment. INL also provides staffing and operational support to the DHS Industrial Control Systems Cyber Emergency Response Team (ICS-CERT) Security Operations Center which responds to and analyzes control systems cyber incidents across the 18 US critical infrastructure sectors.

  6. Kali Linux assuring security by penetration testing

    CERN Document Server

    Ali, Shakeel; Allen, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Written as an interactive tutorial, this book covers the core of Kali Linux with real-world examples and step-by-step instructions to provide professional guidelines and recommendations for you. The book is designed in a simple and intuitive manner that allows you to explore the whole Kali Linux testing process or study parts of it individually.If you are an IT security professional who has a basic knowledge of Unix/Linux operating systems, including an awareness of information security factors, and want to use Kali Linux for penetration testing, then this book is for you.

  7. Automated Security Testing of Web Widget Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezemer, C.P.; Mesbah, A.; Van Deursen, A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is a pre-print of: Cor-Paul Bezemer, Ali Mesbah, and Arie van Deursen. Automated Security Testing of Web Widget Interactions. In Proceedings of the 7th joint meeting of the European Software Engineering Conference and the ACM SIGSOFT Symposium on the Foundations of Software Engineering

  8. Regional Test Center Operations Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, Joshua [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Burnham, Laurie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, Christian Birk [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-07-01

    The U.S. DOE Regional Test Center for Solar Technologies program was established to validate photovoltaic (PV) technologies installed in a range of different climates. The program is funded by the Energy Department's SunShot Initiative. The initiative seeks to make solar energy cost competitive with other forms of electricity by the end of the decade. Sandia National Laboratory currently manages four different sites across the country. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory manages a fifth site in Colorado. The entire PV portfolio currently includes 20 industry partners and almost 500 kW of installed systems. The program follows a defined process that outlines tasks, milestones, agreements, and deliverables. The process is broken out into four main parts: 1) planning and design, 2) installation, 3) operations, and 4) decommissioning. This operations manual defines the various elements of each part.

  9. Electrolysis activities at FCH Test Center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn Nielsen, Eva; Nygaard, Frederik Berg

    FCH Test Center for fuel cell and hydrogen technologies was established in 2010 at Risø DTU in Denmark. Today, the test center is part of DTU Energy Conversion. The center gives industry access to advanced testing and demonstration of components and systems. A number of national projects and EU p...... projects regarding water electrolysis involve FCH Test Center as a partner. This presentation gives an overview of the activities....

  10. Nuclear Weapon Testing Limitations and International Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corden, Pierce S.

    2017-01-01

    For over 50 years stopping nuclear weapon tests has been sought to support achieving international security without nuclear weapons. Testing is the critical path beyond primitive fission devices, e.g. to develop thermonuclear weapons, reduce weight and volume and increase yield. The 1958 Geneva Conference of Experts considered ways to verify a test ban. With then-limitations on seismology, and lack of in-country monitoring and on-site inspections, the 1963 Limited Test Ban Treaty prohibits testing only in the atmosphere, outer space and under water, and is verified by National Technical Means. The US and USSR agreed to a limit of 150 kilotons on underground explosions in the 1970s-80s. The 1996 Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty bans all nuclear explosions. Its International Monitoring System - seismic, hydroacoustic, infrasound and radionuclide sensors - is being used, and has easily detected testing by the DPRK. On-site inspections will be available under an in-force Treaty. A 2012 National Academy report concludes that cheating attempts would not undermine U.S. security, and the program for monitoring and extending the life of US weapons has succeeded since US testing ceased in 1992.

  11. Secure data exchange between intelligent devices and computing centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Syed; Riguidel, Michel

    2005-03-01

    The advent of reliable spontaneous networking technologies (commonly known as wireless ad-hoc networks) has ostensibly raised stakes for the conception of computing intensive environments using intelligent devices as their interface with the external world. These smart devices are used as data gateways for the computing units. These devices are employed in highly volatile environments where the secure exchange of data between these devices and their computing centers is of paramount importance. Moreover, their mission critical applications require dependable measures against the attacks like denial of service (DoS), eavesdropping, masquerading, etc. In this paper, we propose a mechanism to assure reliable data exchange between an intelligent environment composed of smart devices and distributed computing units collectively called 'computational grid'. The notion of infosphere is used to define a digital space made up of a persistent and a volatile asset in an often indefinite geographical space. We study different infospheres and present general evolutions and issues in the security of such technology-rich and intelligent environments. It is beyond any doubt that these environments will likely face a proliferation of users, applications, networked devices, and their interactions on a scale never experienced before. It would be better to build in the ability to uniformly deal with these systems. As a solution, we propose a concept of virtualization of security services. We try to solve the difficult problems of implementation and maintenance of trust on the one hand, and those of security management in heterogeneous infrastructure on the other hand.

  12. 12 CFR 615.5141 - Stress tests for mortgage securities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stress tests for mortgage securities. 615.5141... tests for mortgage securities. Mortgage securities are not eligible investments unless they pass a... cashflow and price of each mortgage security that you purchase and hold, except for adjustable rate...

  13. Carboy Security Testing and Training Programs for Industrial Control Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noyes, Daniel [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Service providers rely on industrial control systems (ICS) to manage the flow of water at dams, open breakers on power grids, control ventilation and cooling in nuclear power plants, and more. In today's interconnected environment, this can present a serious cyber security challenge. To combat this growing challenge, government, private industry, and academia are working together to reduce cyber risks. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a key contributor to the Department of Energy National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Control Systems Security Program (CSSP), both of which focus on improving the overall security posture of ICS in the national critical infrastructure. In support of the NSTB, INL hosts a dedicated SCADA testing facility which consists of multiple control systems supplied by leading national and international manufacturers. Within the test bed, INL researchers systematically examine control system components and work to identify vulnerabilities. In support of the CSSP, INL develops and conducts training courses which are designed to increase awareness and defensive capabilities for IT/Control System professionals. These training vary from web-based cyber security training for control systems engineers to more advanced hands-on training that culminates with a Red Team/Blue Team exercise that is conducted within an actual control systems environment. INL also provides staffing and operational support to the DHS Industrial Control Systems Cyber Emergency Response Team (ICS-CERT) Security Operations Center which responds to and analyzes control systems cyber incidents across the 18 US critical infrastructure sectors.

  14. Security Regression Testing Framework For Web Application Development

    OpenAIRE

    Waheed, Usman

    2014-01-01

    A framework and process that explains how to perform security regression testing for web applications. This paper discusses and proposes a framework based on open source tools that can be used to perform automated security regression testing of web applications.

  15. Mastering wireless penetration testing for highly secured environments

    CERN Document Server

    Johns, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    This book is intended for security professionals who want to enhance their wireless penetration testing skills and knowledge. Since this book covers advanced techniques, you will need some previous experience in computer security and networking.

  16. A Model Based Security Testing Method for Protocol Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Long Fu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The security of protocol implementation is important and hard to be verified. Since the penetration testing is usually based on the experience of the security tester and the specific protocol specifications, a formal and automatic verification method is always required. In this paper, we propose an extended model of IOLTS to describe the legal roles and intruders of security protocol implementations, and then combine them together to generate the suitable test cases to verify the security of protocol implementation.

  17. Terrestrial imaging of military test centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Steven D.

    2010-04-01

    Military test centers require detailed site descriptions. Test agencies demand significant written and visual information of test sites in order to facilitate successful test preparation and execution. New terrestrial imaging techniques (360 degree FOV collection) have recently become feasible to collect in the field. Combined with GIS and mapping applications, image and video data is now provided to test agencies for their use. Test sites for this study include locations in Alaska and Panama with planned image data collection in Arizona and Maryland.

  18. A Tree Locality-Sensitive Hash for Secure Software Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-14

    A TREE LOCALITY-SENSITIVE HASH FOR SECURE SOFTWARE TESTING DISSERTATION Camdon R Cady, Capt, USAF AFIT-ENG-DS-17-S-005 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE...subject to copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENG-DS-17-S-005 A TREE LOCALITY-SENSITIVE HASH FOR SECURE SOFTWARE TESTING DISSERTATION...STATEMENT A APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. AFIT-ENG-DS-17-S-005 A TREE LOCALITY-SENSITIVE HASH FOR SECURE SOFTWARE TESTING DISSERTATION

  19. Establishing a Secure Data Center with Remote Access: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonder, J.; Burton, E.; Murakami, E.

    2012-04-01

    Access to existing travel data is critical for many analysis efforts that lack the time or resources to support detailed data collection. High-resolution data sets provide particular value, but also present a challenge for preserving the anonymity of the original survey participants. To address this dilemma of providing data access while preserving privacy, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the U.S. Department of Transportation have launched the Transportation Secure Data Center (TSDC). TSDC data sets include those from regional travel surveys and studies that increasingly use global positioning system devices. Data provided by different collecting agencies varies with respect to formatting, elements included and level of processing conducted in support of the original purpose. The TSDC relies on a number of geospatial and other analysis tools to ensure data quality and to generate useful information outputs. TSDC users can access the processed data in two different ways. The first is by downloading summary results and second-by-second vehicle speed profiles (with latitude/longitude information removed) from a publicly-accessible website. The second method involves applying for a remote connection account to a controlled-access environment where spatial analysis can be conducted, but raw data cannot be removed.

  20. Unlocking User-Centered Design Methods for Building Cyber Security Visualizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-07

    on Visualization for Cyber Security, 2007. [35] A. Strauss and J. Corbin. Basics of Qualitative Research: Grounded Theory Procedures and Techniques...Centered Design H.5.2 [Information Inter- faces and Presentation]: User Interfaces— Theory and methods 1 INTRODUCTION The practice of user-centered design...for designing visualizations of cyber security data. We ground these discussions in the use of these methods in two dif- ferent cyber security

  1. 12 CFR 652.40 - Stress tests for mortgage securities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stress tests for mortgage securities. 652.40... MORTGAGE CORPORATION FUNDING AND FISCAL AFFAIRS Investment Management § 652.40 Stress tests for mortgage... and price of each mortgage security that you purchase and hold, except for adjustable rate mortgage...

  2. Security Policy and Infrastructure in the Context of a Multi-Centeric Information System Dedicated to Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Said, Mohamed; Robel, Laurence; Golse, Bernard; Jais, Jean Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are complex neuro-developmental disorders affecting children in their early age. The diagnosis of ASD relies on multidisciplinary investigations, in psychiatry, neurology, genetics, electrophysiology, neuro-imagery, audiology and ophthalmology. In order to support clinicians, researchers and public health decision makers, we designed an information system dedicated to ASD, called TEDIS. TEDIS was designed to manage systematic, exhaustive and continuous multi-centric patient data collection via secured Internet connections. In this paper, we present the security policy and security infrastructure we developed to protect ASD' patients' clinical data and patients' privacy. We tested our system on 359 ASD patient records in a local secured intranet environment and showed that the security system is functional, with a consistent, transparent and safe encrypting-decrypting behavior. It is ready for deployment in the nine ASD expert assessment centers in the Ile de France district.

  3. Video calls from lay bystanders to dispatch centers - risk assessment of information security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolle, Stein R; Hasvold, Per; Henriksen, Eva

    2011-09-30

    Video calls from mobile phones can improve communication during medical emergencies. Lay bystanders can be instructed and supervised by health professionals at Emergency Medical Communication Centers. Before implementation of video mobile calls in emergencies, issues of information security should be addressed. Information security was assessed for risk, based on the information security standard ISO/IEC 27005:2008. A multi-professional team used structured brainstorming to find threats to the information security aspects confidentiality, quality, integrity, and availability. Twenty security threats of different risk levels were identified and analyzed. Solutions were proposed to reduce the risk level. Given proper implementation, we found no risks to information security that would advocate against the use of video calls between lay bystanders and Emergency Medical Communication Centers. The identified threats should be used as input to formal requirements when planning and implementing video calls from mobile phones for these call centers.

  4. Video calls from lay bystanders to dispatch centers - risk assessment of information security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasvold Per

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Video calls from mobile phones can improve communication during medical emergencies. Lay bystanders can be instructed and supervised by health professionals at Emergency Medical Communication Centers. Before implementation of video mobile calls in emergencies, issues of information security should be addressed. Methods Information security was assessed for risk, based on the information security standard ISO/IEC 27005:2008. A multi-professional team used structured brainstorming to find threats to the information security aspects confidentiality, quality, integrity, and availability. Results Twenty security threats of different risk levels were identified and analyzed. Solutions were proposed to reduce the risk level. Conclusions Given proper implementation, we found no risks to information security that would advocate against the use of video calls between lay bystanders and Emergency Medical Communication Centers. The identified threats should be used as input to formal requirements when planning and implementing video calls from mobile phones for these call centers.

  5. Security Considerations and Recommendations in Computer-Based Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh M. Al-Saleem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many organizations and institutions around the globe are moving or planning to move their paper-and-pencil based testing to computer-based testing (CBT. However, this conversion will not be the best option for all kinds of exams and it will require significant resources. These resources may include the preparation of item banks, methods for test delivery, procedures for test administration, and last but not least test security. Security aspects may include but are not limited to the identification and authentication of examinee, the risks that are associated with cheating on the exam, and the procedures related to test delivery to the examinee. This paper will mainly investigate the security considerations associated with CBT and will provide some recommendations for the security of these kinds of tests. We will also propose a palm-based biometric authentication system incorporated with basic authentication system (username/password in order to check the identity and authenticity of the examinee.

  6. Control and Non-Payload Communications (CNPC) Prototype Radio - Generation 2 Security Architecture Lab Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannicca, Dennis C.; McKim, James H.; Stewart, David H.; Thadhani, Suresh K.; Young, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center, in cooperation with Rockwell Collins, is working to develop a prototype Control and Non-Payload Communications (CNPC) radio platform as part of NASA Integrated Systems Research Program's (ISRP) Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) project. A primary focus of the project is to work with the FAA and industry standards bodies to build and demonstrate a safe, secure, and efficient CNPC architecture that can be used by industry to evaluate the feasibility of deploying a system using these technologies in an operational capacity. GRC has been working in conjunction with these groups to assess threats, identify security requirements, and to develop a system of standards-based security controls that can be applied to the current GRC prototype CNPC architecture as a demonstration platform. The security controls were integrated into a lab test bed mock-up of the Mobile IPv6 architecture currently being used for NASA flight testing, and a series of network tests were conducted to evaluate the security overhead of the controls compared to the baseline CNPC link without any security. The aim of testing was to evaluate the performance impact of the additional security control overhead when added to the Mobile IPv6 architecture in various modes of operation. The statistics collected included packet captures at points along the path to gauge packet size as the sample data traversed the CNPC network, round trip latency, jitter, and throughput. The effort involved a series of tests of the baseline link, a link with Robust Header Compression (ROHC) and without security controls, a link with security controls and without ROHC, and finally a link with both ROHC and security controls enabled. The effort demonstrated that ROHC is both desirable and necessary to offset the additional expected overhead of applying security controls to the CNPC link.

  7. Transportation Secure Data Center: Real-world Data for Planning, Modeling, and Analysis (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-01-01

    The Transportation Secure Data Center (TSDC) at www.nrel.gov/tsdc provides free, web-based access to detailed transportation data from a variety of travel surveys conducted across the nation. While preserving the privacy of survey participants, this online repository makes vital transportation data broadly available to users from the comfort of their own desks via a secure online connection.

  8. VIRTUAL COGNITIVE CENTERS AS INTELLIGENT SYSTEMS FOR MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SUPPORT OF REGIONAL SECURITY

    OpenAIRE

    A. V. Masloboev

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with engineering problems and application perspectives of virtual cognitive centers as intelligent systems for information support of interagency activities in the field of complex security management of regional development. A research prototype of virtual cognitive center for regional security management in crisis situations, implemented as hybrid cloud service based on IaaS architectural framework with the usage of multi-agent and web-service technologies has been developed...

  9. (Congressional Interest) Network Information and Space Security Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    Terror Management Theory and Human Factors research to support HLS psychology of terrorism studies.  Began collaborations with the Economic...continued to fund Human Factors research (Department of Homeland Security Directorate of Science and Technology priority area) in Terror Management Theory . The...Unpublished manuscript. University of Colorado Colorado Springs, CO. Pyszczynski, T. (2005) What are we so afraid of? A terror management theory perspective

  10. Center for Computer Security newsletter. Volume 2, Number 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1983-05-01

    The Fifth Computer Security Group Conference was held November 16 to 18, 1982, at the Knoxville Hilton in Knoxville, Tennessee. Attending were 183 people, representing the Department of Energy, DOE contractors, other government agencies, and vendor organizations. In these papers are abridgements of most of the papers presented in Knoxville. Less than half-a-dozen speakers failed to furnish either abstracts or full-text papers of their Knoxville presentations.

  11. Wave Energy Research, Testing and Demonstration Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batten, Belinda [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to build upon the research, development and testing experience of the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (NNMREC) to establish a non-grid connected open-ocean testing facility for wave energy converters (WECs) off the coast of Newport, Oregon. The test facility would serve as the first facility of its kind in the continental US with a fully energetic wave resource where WEC technologies could be proven for west coast US markets. The test facility would provide the opportunity for self-contained WEC testing or WEC testing connected via an umbilical cable to a mobile ocean test berth (MOTB). The MOTB would act as a “grid surrogate” measuring energy produced by the WEC and the environmental conditions under which the energy was produced. In order to realize this vision, the ocean site would need to be identified through outreach to community stakeholders, and then regulatory and permitting processes would be undertaken. Part of those processes would require environmental baseline studies and site analysis, including benthic, acoustic and wave resource characterization. The MOTB and its myriad systems would need to be designed and constructed.The first WEC test at the facility with the MOTB was completed within this project with the WET-NZ device in summer 2012. In summer 2013, the MOTB was deployed with load cells on its mooring lines to characterize forces on mooring systems in a variety of sea states. Throughout both testing seasons, studies were done to analyze environmental effects during testing operations. Test protocols and best management practices for open ocean operations were developed. As a result of this project, the non-grid connected fully energetic WEC test facility is operational, and the MOTB system developed provides a portable concept for WEC testing. The permitting process used provides a model for other wave energy projects, especially those in the Pacific Northwest that have similar

  12. Testing and securing Android Studio applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zapata, Belén Cruz

    2014-01-01

    If you are a developer with some Android knowledge, but you do not know how to test your applications using Android Studio, this book will guide you. It is recommended that you are familiar with Android Studio IDE.

  13. Watermark: The Alumni Magazine of the Center for Homeland Defense and Security Center for Information Systems. Spring 2012

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Watermark is published semiannually for the alumni of Center for Homeland Defense and Security (CHDS). Topics in this issue: CHDS Alum Invited to Conference at the White House; Tracy Frazzano Advances Active Shooter Strategies; APEX Conference 2012 : Terrorism, Budgets and Disasters...

  14. Pratical data security testing on virtual learning environment

    OpenAIRE

    Sapkota, Arun

    2015-01-01

    Data breaches in networks are a common issue in Internet Technology. Virtual environments are hidden most of the time, but academic working spaces need more security and encrypted space. This thesis focuses on issues arising at a virtual space created for a teacher for educational purposes. The purpose of the thesis was to explore the vulnerabilities in virtual space in order to implement security patches in the future. Various hacking tools and penetration testing tools were used to disco...

  15. 78 FR 16471 - National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence (NCCoE) Secure Exchange of Electronic Health...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-15

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence (NCCoE) Secure... Institute of Standards and Technology's (NIST) National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence (NCCoE) invited... 64314), inviting U.S. companies to enter into ``National Cybersecurity Excellence Partnerships'' (NCEPs...

  16. 78 FR 2953 - National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence (NCCoE) Secure Exchange of Electronic Health...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence (NCCoE) Secure.... This notice is the initial step for the National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence (NCCoE) in the... collaboration for accelerating the widespread adoption of integrated cybersecurity tools and technologies. The...

  17. The National Criticality Experiments Research Center at the Device Assembly Facility, Nevada National Security Site: Status and Capabilities, Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bragg-Sitton; J. Bess; J. Werner

    2011-09-01

    The National Criticality Experiments Research Center (NCERC) was officially opened on August 29, 2011. Located within the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), the NCERC has become a consolidation facility within the United States for critical configuration testing, particularly those involving highly enriched uranium (HEU). The DAF is a Department of Energy (DOE) owned facility that is operated by the National Nuclear Security Agency/Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). User laboratories include the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Personnel bring their home lab qualifications and procedures with them to the DAF, such that non-site specific training need not be repeated to conduct work at DAF. The NNSS Management and Operating contractor is National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) and the NNSS Safeguards and Security contractor is Wackenhut Services. The complete report provides an overview and status of the available laboratories and test bays at NCERC, available test materials and test support configurations, and test requirements and limitations for performing sub-critical and critical tests. The current summary provides a brief summary of the facility status and the method by which experiments may be introduced to NCERC.

  18. Unlocking User-Centered Design Methods for Building Cyber Security Visualizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-03

    Strauss and J. Corbin. Basics of Qualitative Research: Grounded Theory Procedures and Techniques. 1990. [36] T. Taylor, D. Paterson, J. Glanfield, C...security data from a user-centered perspective. We ground the discussions of these methods in two dif- ferent cyber security visualization design projects...design goals. While the focus of this paper is on three specific design methods, we ground these methods within the design activity framework to provide

  19. VIRTUAL COGNITIVE CENTERS AS INTELLIGENT SYSTEMS FOR MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SUPPORT OF REGIONAL SECURITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Masloboev

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with engineering problems and application perspectives of virtual cognitive centers as intelligent systems for information support of interagency activities in the field of complex security management of regional development. A research prototype of virtual cognitive center for regional security management in crisis situations, implemented as hybrid cloud service based on IaaS architectural framework with the usage of multi-agent and web-service technologies has been developed. Virtual cognitive center is a training simulator software system and is intended for solving on the basis of distributed simulation such problems as: strategic planning and forecasting of risk-sustainable development of regional socioeconomic systems, agents of management interaction specification synthesis for regional components security in different crisis situations within the planning stage of joint anti-crisis actions.

  20. National Computer Security Conference (16th) held at Baltimore Convention Center, Baltimore, Maryland on September 20-23, 1993. Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-23

    NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY/ NATIONAL COMPUTER SECURITY CENTER 16th NATIONAL COMPUTER SECURITY CONFERENCE September 20-23, 1993...Controlling Office is (insert controlling DoD office). Welcome! The National Computer Security Center (NCSC) and the Computer Systems Laboratory (CSL...are pleased to welcome you to the Sixteenth Annual National Computer Security Conference. We believe that the Conference will stimulate a vital and

  1. National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) Capabilities for Homeland Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, G; Nasstrom, J; Baskett, R; Simpson, M

    2010-03-08

    The Department of Energy's National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) provides critical information during hazardous airborne releases as part of an integrated national preparedness and response strategy. Located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, NARAC provides 24/7 tools and expert services to map the spread of hazardous material accidentally or intentionally released into the atmosphere. NARAC graphical products show affected areas and populations, potential casualties, and health effect or protective action guideline levels. LLNL experts produce quality-assured analyses based on field data to assist decision makers and responders. NARAC staff and collaborators conduct research and development into new science, tools, capabilities, and technologies in strategically important areas related to airborne transport and fate modeling and emergency response. This paper provides a brief overview of some of NARAC's activities, capabilities, and research and development.

  2. Comprehensive test ban treaty international monitoring system security threats and proposed security attributes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draelos, T.J.; Craft, R.L.

    1996-03-01

    To monitor compliance with a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), a sensing network, referred to as the International Monitoring System (IMS), is being deployed. Success of the IMS depends on both its ability to preform its function and the international community`s confidence in the system. To ensure these goals, steps must be taken to secure the system against attacks that would undermine it; however, it is not clear that consensus exists with respect to the security requirements that should be levied on the IMS design. In addition, CTBT has not clearly articulated what threats it wishes to address. This paper proposes four system-level threats that should drive IMS design considerations, identifies potential threat agents, and collects into one place the security requirements that have been suggested by various elements of the IMS community. For each such requirement, issues associated with the requirement are identified and rationale for the requirement is discussed.

  3. Health information security: a case study of three selected medical centers in iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajrahimi, Nafiseh; Dehaghani, Sayed Mehdi Hejazi; Sheikhtaheri, Abbas

    2013-03-01

    Health Information System (HIS) is considered a unique factor in improving the quality of health care activities and cost reduction, but today with the development of information technology and use of internet and computer networks, patients' electronic records and health information systems have become a source for hackers. This study aims at checking health information security of three selected medical centers in Iran using AHP fuzzy and TOPSIS compound model. To achieve that security measures were identified, based on the research literature and decision making matrix using experts' points of view. Among the 27 indicators, seven indicators were selected as effective indicators and Fuzzy AHP technique was used to determine the importance of security indicators. Based on the comparisons made between the three selected medical centers to assess the security of health information, it is concluded that Chamran hospital has the most acceptable level of security and attention in three indicators of "verification and system design, user access management, access control system", Al Zahra Hospital in two indicators of "access management and network access control" and Amin Hospital in "equipment safety and system design". In terms of information security, Chamran Hospital ranked first, Al-Zahra Hospital ranked second and Al- Zahra hospital has the third place.

  4. NOTICE OF ELECTRICAL CUT - TEST OF THE SECURED NETWORK

    CERN Multimedia

    Electrical Service ST/EL

    2001-01-01

    The electrical service ST/EL will test the switching sequence between the secured network and the diesel generators on January 8, 2002. The normal network, general services of the sites Meyrin, Prevessin, SPS, Zone Nord, LHC1 and LHC18 will be cut between 6:00am and 6:10am. The secured network will be resupplied by the diesel generators after approximately 1 minute. The UPS network will not be affected. To facilitate the restart of the electrical network and to minimize the impact of the tests on critical equipment, we would like to ask you to stop any equipment that might suffer major inconveniences during the tests (e.g. computers). For any further information, please do not hesitate to contact the Technical Control Room TCR (72201) or G. Cumer (160592).

  5. Center for Technology, Security, and Policy research faculty conduct study of New Madrid Seismic Zone

    OpenAIRE

    Micale, Barbara L.

    2010-01-01

    Theresa Jefferson and John Harrald, research faculty at the Virginia Tech Center for Technology, Security, and Policy in the National Capital Region recently completed a Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)-funded research project to model the social impacts and disaster response requirements of a 7.7 magnitude catastrophic earthquake on the three segments of the New Madrid Seismic Zone.

  6. Vehicle Test Facilities at Aberdeen Test Center and Yuma Test Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    dynamometers rated at 350 hp and 600 hp NA NA Wheeled Vehicle Roller Brake Dynamometer 70 Brake forces up to 45 kN (10,000 lb) at axle weights up to 2000...2.11.9 Wheeled Vehicle Roller Brake Dynamometer. The roller brake dynamometer is capable of dynamically testing brakes and anti-lock brake systems...used for closely controlled engineering tests such as drawbar pull (Figure 12), tractive resistance measurements, coast-down, braking , and fuel

  7. The Exon-Florio National Security Test for Foreign Investment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-04

    Asia, Latin America, the Carribean , and North America. 24 Peninsular and Oriental Steam Company is a leading ports operator and transport company...CRS Report for Congress Prepared for Members and Committees of Congress The Exon-Florio National Security Test for Foreign Investment...c11173008 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour

  8. Cyber Security Test Strategy for Non-safety Display System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Han Seong [Joongbu University, Geumsan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee Eun [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Cyber security has been a big issue since the instrumentation and control (I and C) system of nuclear power plant (NPP) is digitalized. A cyber-attack on NPP should be dealt with seriously because it might cause not only economic loss but also the radioactive material release. Researches on the consequences of cyber-attack onto NPP from a safety point of view have been conducted. A previous study shows the risk effect brought by initiation of event and deterioration of mitigation function by cyber terror. Although this study made conservative assumptions and simplifications, it gives an insight on the effect of cyber-attack. Another study shows that the error on a non-safety display system could cause wrong actions of operators. According to this previous study, the failure of the operator action caused by a cyber-attack on a display system might threaten the safety of the NPP by limiting appropriate mitigation actions. This study suggests a test strategy focusing on the cyber-attack on the information and display system, which might cause the failure of operator. The test strategy can be suggested to evaluate and complement security measures. Identifying whether a cyber-attack on the information and display system can affect the mitigation actions of operator, the strategy to obtain test scenarios is suggested. The failure of mitigation scenario is identified first. Then, for the test target in the scenario, software failure modes are applied to identify realistic failure scenarios. Testing should be performed for those scenarios to confirm the integrity of data and to assure effectiveness of security measures.

  9. On-line performance calculations for the Los Alamos National Security and Resources Study Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, H.S.; Hedstrom, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    The National Security and Resources Study Center at Los Alamos, New Mexico, has been heavily instrumented to permit monitoring of the performance of the solar heating and cooling system. The monitoring system includes a computer, which provides the capability for doing real-time engineering calculations. This capability permits data compression and allows the researcher to interact with the system and to see immediately the results of changing the system parameters.

  10. An Improved String-Searching Algorithm and Its Application in Component Security Testing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jinfu Chen Saihua Cai Lili Zhu Yuchi Guo Rubing Huang Xiaolei Zhao Yunqi Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Mass monitor logs are produced during the process of component security testing. In order to mine the explicit and implicit security exception information of the tested component, the log should be searched for keyword strings...

  11. Small UAS Test Area at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Jeffrey T.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the areas that Dryden Flight Research Center has set up for testing small Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS). It also reviews the requirements and process to use an area for UAS test.

  12. B Complex Test Control Center (TCC) #4210

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The TCC is a dual control room facility for the B-1 and B-2 Test Positions on the B-Stand. The TCC houses continually-updated, state-of-the-art Data Acquisition and...

  13. Test of radiation detectors used in homeland security applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pibida, L; Minniti, R; O'Brien, M; Unterweger, M

    2005-05-01

    This work was performed as part of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) program to support the development of the new American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standards N42.32-2003 and N42.33-2003 for hand-held detectors, and personal electronic dosimeters, as well as to support the Office of Law Enforcement Standards (OLES) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in testing these types of detectors for their use by first responders. These instruments are required to operate over a photon energy range of 60 keV to 1.33 MeV and over a wide range of air-kerma rates. The performance and response of various radiation detectors, purchased by the NIST, was recorded when placed in 60Co, 137Cs, and x-ray beams at different air-kerma rates. The measurements described in this report were performed at the NIST x-ray and gamma-ray radiation calibration facilities. The instruments' response (exposure or dose rate readings) shows strong energy dependence but almost no dependence to different air-kerma rates. The data here reported provide a benchmark in support of current protocols that are being developed for radiation detection instrumentation used in homeland security applications. A future plan is to test these devices, plus other commercially available detectors, against ANSI standards N42.32-2003 and N42.33-2003.

  14. Using secure web services to visualize poison center data for nationwide biosurveillance: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savel, Thomas G; Bronstein, Alvin; Duck, William; Rhodes, M Barry; Lee, Brian; Stinn, John; Worthen, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    Real-time surveillance systems are valuable for timely response to public health emergencies. It has been challenging to leverage existing surveillance systems in state and local communities, and, using a centralized architecture, add new data sources and analytical capacity. Because this centralized model has proven to be difficult to maintain and enhance, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been examining the ability to use a federated model based on secure web services architecture, with data stewardship remaining with the data provider. As a case study for this approach, the American Association of Poison Control Centers and the CDC extended an existing data warehouse via a secure web service, and shared aggregate clinical effects and case counts data by geographic region and time period. To visualize these data, CDC developed a web browser-based interface, Quicksilver, which leveraged the Google Maps API and Flot, a javascript plotting library. Two iterations of the NPDS web service were completed in 12 weeks. The visualization client, Quicksilver, was developed in four months. This implementation of web services combined with a visualization client represents incremental positive progress in transitioning national data sources like BioSense and NPDS to a federated data exchange model. Quicksilver effectively demonstrates how the use of secure web services in conjunction with a lightweight, rapidly deployed visualization client can easily integrate isolated data sources for biosurveillance.

  15. Stochastic optimization of laboratory test workflow at metallurgical testing centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Tošenovský

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the paper is to present a way to shorten the time required to perform laboratory tests of materials in metallurgy. The paper finds a relation between the time to perform a test of materials and the number of technicians carrying out the test. The relation can be used to optimize the number of technicians. The approach is based on probability theory, as the amount of material to be tested is unknown in advance, and uses powerful modelling techniques involving the generalized estimating equations.

  16. National Center for Nuclear Security: The Nuclear Forensics Project (F2012)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klingensmith, A. L.

    2012-03-21

    These presentation visuals introduce the National Center for Nuclear Security. Its chartered mission is to enhance the Nation’s verification and detection capabilities in support of nuclear arms control and nonproliferation through R&D activities at the NNSS. It has three focus areas: Treaty Verification Technologies, Nonproliferation Technologies, and Technical Nuclear Forensics. The objectives of nuclear forensics are to reduce uncertainty in the nuclear forensics process & improve the scientific defensibility of nuclear forensics conclusions when applied to nearsurface nuclear detonations. Research is in four key areas: Nuclear Physics, Debris collection and analysis, Prompt diagnostics, and Radiochemistry.

  17. On Security Management: Improving Energy Efficiency, Decreasing Negative Environmental Impact, and Reducing Financial Costs for Data Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Mazur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Security management is one of the most significant issues in nowadays data centers. Selection of appropriate security mechanisms and effective energy consumption management together with caring for the environment enforces a profound analysis of the considered system. In this paper, we propose a specialized decision support system with a multilevel, comprehensive analysis scheme. As a result of the extensive use of mathematical methods and statistics, guidelines and indicators returned by the proposed approach facilitate the decision-making process and conserve decision-maker’s time and attention. In the paper we utilized proposed multilevel analysis scheme to manage security-based data flow in the example data center. Determining the most secure, energy-efficient, environmental friendly security mechanisms, we implemented the role-based access control method in Quality of Protection Modeling Language (QoP-ML and evaluated its performance in terms of mentioned factors.

  18. Assessment of Information Security Management System based on ISO/IEC 27001:2013 On Subdirectorate of Data Center and Data Recovery Center in Ministry of Internal Affairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurnianto Ari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Information security is a problem effected business process of an organization, so it needs special concern. Information security assessment which is good and has international standard is done using Information Security Management System (ISMS ISO/IEC 27001:2013. In this research, the high level assessment has been done using ISO/IEC 27001:2013 to observe the strength of information secuity in Ministry of Internal Affairs. The research explains about the assessment of information security management which is built using PHP. The input data use primary and secondary data which passed observation. The process gets maturity using the assessment of ISO/IEC 27001:2013. GAP Analysis observes the condition now a days and then to get recommendation and road map. The result of this research gets all of the information security process which has not been already good enough in Ministry of Internal Affairs, gives recommendation and road map to improve part of all information system being running. It indicates that ISO/IEC 27001:2013 is good used to rate maturity of information security management. As the next analyzation, this research use Clause and Annex in ISO/IEC 27001:2013 which is suitable with condition of Data Center and Data Recovery Center, so it gets optimum result and solving problem of the weakness information security.

  19. Good practices in provision of nuclear safeguards and security training courses at the Integrated Support Center for Nuclear Nonproliferation and Nuclear Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Naoki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available More than five years have passed since the Integrated Support Center for Nuclear Nonproliferation and Nuclear Security (ISCN was established under the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA in December 2010 and started its activities, in response to the commitment of Japan at the Nuclear Security Summit in Washington D.C.. The ISCN has been vigorously involved in capacity building assistance on nuclear nonproliferation (safeguards and nuclear security, mainly in the Asian region. It has provided 105 training courses to 2901 participants in total as of August 2016. The ISCN plays a major role in strengthening nuclear nonproliferation and nuclear security in the region, and this can be considered one of the great results of the Nuclear Security Summit process. The ISCN has cooperated with the US Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL to establish a base of instructors, particularly for the Center's flagship two-week courses, the Regional Training Course on Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Facilities (RTC on PP and the Regional Training Course on State Systems of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Material (RTC on SSAC. Furthermore, the ISCN has provided training courses for experts in Japan, making the best use of the Center's knowledge and experience of organizing international courses. The ISCN has also started joint synchronized training with the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission (EC JRC on nuclear safeguards. This paper describes the good practices at the ISCN through its five years of activities, focusing on its progress in nuclear safeguards and nuclear security training.

  20. Black-Box Security Testing of Browser-Based Security Protocols

    OpenAIRE

    Sudhodanan, Avinash

    2017-01-01

    Millions of computer users worldwide use the Internet every day for consuming web-based services (e.g., for purchasing products from online stores, for storing sensitive files in cloud-based file storage web sites, etc.). Browser-based security protocols (i.e. security protocols that run over the Hypertext Transfer Protocol and are executable by commercial web-browsers) are used to ensure the security of these services. Multiple parties are often involved in these protocols. For instance, a b...

  1. Safety and Environment- Masterplan 2020 of DLR's Rocket Test Center Lampoldhausen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberzettl, Andreas; Dommers, Michael

    2013-09-01

    The German Aerospace Center DLR is the German research institute with approximately 7000 employees in 16 domestic locations. Among the research priorities of the German Aerospace Center DLR includes aerospace, energy and transport. DLR is institutionally supported by federal and state governments.Next funding sources arise in the context of third-party funds business (contract research and public contracts and subsidiaries). Main activities of the test center Lampoldshausen are testing of ARIANE's main and upper stage engines in the frame of ESA contracts.In the last years the test center of the DLR in Lampoldshausen has grown strongly, so that the number of employees is actually of about 230. The testing department is mainly responsible for rocket combustion testing according to customer requirements.Two kinds of test facilities are operated, sea level test benches and the altitude simulation test facilities.In addition to the DLR's growth also the activities of the industrial partner ASTRIUM has been elevated so that actually nearly 600 employees are present on site Lampoldshausen.The management of the site in relation to safety and security requires special measures with special respect to the presence of more people inside the testing area in order to guarantee trouble-free and safe experimental operation onsite the DLR's test plants. In order to meet with the future needs of continuing growth, the security and safety requirements have to be adopted.This report gives comprehensive outlook information about future possible scenarios of our coming tasks.Main driving force for future requests is the evolution of the rocket ARIANE. The testing of the new upper stage test facility for ARIANE 5 midlife evolution has been started. A new test position P5.2 is foreseen to perform the qualification of the new upper stage with the VINCI engine. This project will be very complex, in parallel running operation processes will require special procedures related to the overall

  2. Transportation Secure Data Center: Real-World Data for Planning, Modeling, and Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-01-01

    The Transportation Secure Data Center (TSDC) provides free, web-based access to detailed transportation data from a variety of travel surveys conducted across the nation. Maintained by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in partnership with the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), the TSDC houses data from travel surveys and studies conducted using GPS devices. It features millions of data points -- second-by-second GPS readings, vehicle characteristics (if applicable), and demographics -- for all modes of travel. NREL screens the initial data for quality control, translates each data set into a consistent format, and interprets the data for spatial analysis. NREL's processing routines add information on vehicle fuel economy and road grades and join data points to the road network.

  3. Transportation Secure Data Center: Real-World Data for Planning, Modeling, and Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2018-01-19

    The Transportation Secure Data Center (TSDC) at www.nrel.gov/tsdc provides free, web-based access to detailed transportation data from a variety of travel surveys conducted across the nation. While preserving the privacy of survey participants, this online repository makes vital transportation data broadly available to users from the comfort of their own desks via a secure online connection. Data Available through the TSDC: Maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in partnership with the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), the TSDC houses data from travel surveys and studies conducted using global positioning system (GPS) devices. It features millions of data points - second-by-second GPS readings, vehicle characteristics (if applicable), and demographics - for all modes of travel. NREL screens the initial data for quality control, translates each data set into a consistent format, and interprets the data for spatial analysis. NREL's processing routines add information on vehicle fuel economy and road grades and join data points to the road network.

  4. BrowserAudit: Automated testing of browser security features

    OpenAIRE

    Hothersall-Thomas, C; Maffeis, S; Novakovic, C

    2015-01-01

    The security of the client side of a web application relies on browser features such as cookies, the same-origin policy and HTTPS. As the client side grows increasingly powerful and sophisticated, browser vendors have stepped up their offering of security mechanisms which can be leveraged to protect it. These are often introduced experimentally and informally and, as adoption increases, gradually become standardised (e.g., CSP, CORS and HSTS). Considering the diverse landscape of browser vend...

  5. New Cryogenic Optical Test Capability at Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegley, Jeff; Burdine, Robert V. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A new cryogenic optical testing capability exists at Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center (SOMTC). SOMTC has been performing optical wavefront testing at cryogenic temperatures since 1999 in the X-ray Cryogenic Test Facility's (XRCF's) large vacuum chamber. Recently the cryogenic optical testing capability has been extended to a smaller vacuum chamber. This smaller horizontal cylindrical vacuum chamber has been outfitted with a helium-cooled liner that can be connected to the facility's helium refrigeration system bringing the existing kilowatt of refrigeration capacity to bear on a 1 meter diameter x 2 meter long test envelope. Cryogenic environments to less than 20 Kelvin are now possible in only a few hours. SOMTC's existing instruments (the Instantaneous Phase-shifting Interferometer (IPI) from ADE Phase-Shift Technologies and the PhaseCam from 4D Vision Technologies) view the optic under test through a 150 mm clear aperture BK-7 window. Since activation and chamber characterization tests in September 2001, the new chamber has been used to perform a cryogenic (less than 30 Kelvin) optical test of a 22.5 cm diameter x 127 cm radius of curvature Si02 mirror, a cryogenic survival (less than 30 Kelvin) test of an adhesive, and a cryogenic cycle (less than 20 Kelvin) test of a ULE mirror. A vibration survey has also been performed on the test chamber. Chamber specifications and performance data, vibration environment data, and limited test results will be presented.

  6. PTC test bed upgrades to provide ACSES testing support capabilities at transportation technology center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    FRA Task Order 314 upgraded the Positive Train Control (PTC) Test Bed at the Transportation Technology Center to support : testing of PTC systems, components, and related equipment associated with the Advanced Civil Speed Enforcement System : (ACSES)...

  7. A Test-Bed of Secure Mobile Cloud Computing for Military Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-13

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Many military applications have the following characteristics: they start from a mobile device (e.g., a night vision...Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Test-bed, Mobile Cloud Computing, Security , Military Applications REPORT...journals: Final Report: A Test-bed of Secure Mobile Cloud Computing for Military Applications Report Title Many military applications have the

  8. Efficiency in the transmission of information through digital imaging and communications in medicine using security mechanisms: tests with DISCUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Juan L; Servia, Francisco; Mato, Virginia; Vázquez, José Manuel; Pereira, Javier; Dorado, Julian; Díaz, Juan; Novoa, Francisco J; Pazos, Alejandro

    2010-06-01

    This article describes our experience in using a Picture Archiving and Communications System, known as Secure Medical Image Information System, based on the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine standard that supports the use of secure transmissions, from the point of view of how the use of secure sending methods has an effect on the efficiency in the transmission according to the network employed, to quantify productivity loss due to the encryption, the secure transmission, and the subsequent decryption. To test the Secure Medical Image Information System, a series of medical data transmission were conducted from A Coruña (Spain) to the Virgen de las Nieves Hospital, situated 1,000 km away, in Granada (Spain). Once we studied the networking infrastructure of the hospital and its available image generation devices, we subsequently carried out a series of measurements during the transmissions, which allowed us to analyze the behavior of the system with different network schemes and connection speeds. The results obtained from these investigations demonstrate that the impact of secure data-sending methods on the productivity of the system is higher in networks whose capacities are higher and it is not affected by sending data during different periods in the day. In this regard, the presented approach may serve as a model for other small, and possibly mid-sized, medical centers.

  9. Space Chemical Propulsion Test Facilities at NASA Lewis Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urasek, Donald C.; Calfo, Frederick D.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center, located in Cleveland, Ohio, has a number of space chemical propulsion test facilities which constitute a significant national space testing resource. The purpose of this paper is to make more users aware of these test facilities and to encourage their use through cooperative agreements between the government, industry, and universities. Research which is of interest to the government is especially encouraged and often can be done in a cooperative manner that best uses the resources of all parties. An overview of the Lewis test facilities is presented.

  10. Groin Exploration for the Nonpalpable Testes: A Single Center ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Management of non-palpable testes in Nigeria can be difficult due to late presentation and poor resources. Surgical exploration is often required for diagnosis and treatment. Aim: This study reviews the management outcome of clinically non-palpable testeis in a tertiary center in Nigeria. Materials and Methods: ...

  11. Vibro-Acoustics Modal Testing at NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Buehrle, Ralph D.

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarizes on-going modal testing activities at the NASA Langley Research Center for two aircraft fuselage structures: a generic "aluminum testbed cylinder" (ATC) and a Beechcraft Starship fuselage (BSF). Subsequent acoustic tests will measure the interior noise field created by exterior mechanical and acoustic sources. These test results will provide validation databases for interior noise prediction codes on realistic aircraft fuselage structures. The ATC is a 12-ft-long, all-aluminum, scale model assembly. The BSF is a 40-ft-long, all-composite, complete aircraft fuselage. To date, two of seven test configurations of the ATC and all three test configurations of the BSF have been completed. The paper briefly describes the various test configurations, testing procedure, and typical results for frequencies up to 250 Hz.

  12. Implementing secure laptop-based testing in an undergraduate nursing program: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jinyuan; Lorentz, B Chris; Hawes, Stacey; Rugless, Fely; Preston, Janice

    2012-07-01

    This article presents the implementation of secure laptop-based testing in an undergraduate nursing program. Details on how to design, develop, implement, and secure tests are discussed. Laptop-based testing mode is also compared with the computer-laboratory-based testing model. Five elements of the laptop-based testing model are illustrated: (1) it simulates the national board examination, (2) security is achievable, (3) it is convenient for both instructors and students, (4) it provides students hands-on practice, (5) continuous technical support is the key.

  13. UN Security Council decision-making: testing the bribery hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Pacelli Lazzarotti Diniz Costa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Liberal-Institutionalism and Structural Realism expectations about international organizations are confronted by looking at if and how US-controlled international aid is granted, and particularly if it is related or not to political affinity and to United Nations Security Council (UNSC non-permanent membership. A preliminary assessment suggests that these relations only hold for the period of the Cold War, and, even then, only when UNSC non-permanent membership is in years in which the Security Council was deemed very important.

  14. Analysis of a Hybrid Wing Body Center Section Test Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsi-Yung T.; Shaw, Peter; Przekop, Adam

    2013-01-01

    The hybrid wing body center section test article is an all-composite structure made of crown, floor, keel, bulkhead, and rib panels utilizing the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) design concept. The primary goal of this test article is to prove that PRSEUS components are capable of carrying combined loads that are representative of a hybrid wing body pressure cabin design regime. This paper summarizes the analytical approach, analysis results, and failure predictions of the test article. A global finite element model of composite panels, metallic fittings, mechanical fasteners, and the Combined Loads Test System (COLTS) test fixture was used to conduct linear structural strength and stability analyses to validate the specimen under the most critical combination of bending and pressure loading conditions found in the hybrid wing body pressure cabin. Local detail analyses were also performed at locations with high stress concentrations, at Tee-cap noodle interfaces with surrounding laminates, and at fastener locations with high bearing/bypass loads. Failure predictions for different composite and metallic failure modes were made, and nonlinear analyses were also performed to study the structural response of the test article under combined bending and pressure loading. This large-scale specimen test will be conducted at the COLTS facility at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  15. Managing forest resources to secure wood energy supply for urban centers: the case of Kinshasa, Dermocratic Republic of Congo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubiez, E.; Vermeulen, C.; Peltier, R.; Ingram, V.; Schure, J.M.; Marien, J.N.

    2012-01-01

    The management of wood energy has become
    a major concern for the international
    community and is the focus of debates in
    Central Africa. The Makala Project, funded by
    the EU, fits within this context with the
    objective of securing the supply of wood
    energy to urban centers.

  16. Environmental Security Training Workshop (Center for Strategic Leadership. Issue Paper Volume 03-05, January 2005)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Butts, Kent H; Sonski, Alex; Reynolds, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    The United States Southern Command (USSOUTHCOM) Theater Security Cooperation Program for Central America reached a new level of success with the completion of the Environmental Security Training Workshop in Alajuela, Costa Rica...

  17. Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/7: A Generic Model for Cooperative Border Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Netzer, Colonel Gideon

    1999-03-01

    This paper presents a generic model for dealing with security problems along borders between countries. It presents descriptions and characteristics of various borders and identifies the threats to border security, while emphasizing cooperative monitoring solutions.

  18. Space technology test facilities at the NASA Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Anthony R.; Rodrigues, Annette T.

    1990-01-01

    The major space research and technology test facilities at the NASA Ames Research Center are divided into five categories: General Purpose, Life Support, Computer-Based Simulation, High Energy, and the Space Exploraton Test Facilities. The paper discusses selected facilities within each of the five categories and discusses some of the major programs in which these facilities have been involved. Special attention is given to the 20-G Man-Rated Centrifuge, the Human Research Facility, the Plant Crop Growth Facility, the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility, the Arc-Jet Complex and Hypersonic Test Facility, the Infrared Detector and Cryogenic Test Facility, and the Mars Wind Tunnel. Each facility is described along with its objectives, test parameter ranges, and major current programs and applications.

  19. Data Center Governance Information Security Compliance Assessment Based on the Cobit Framewok

    OpenAIRE

    Andrey Ferriyan; Jazi Eko Istiyanto

    2015-01-01

    One of control domain of Cobit describes information security lies in Deliver and Support (DS) on DS5 Ensure Systems Security. This domain describes what things should be done by an organization to preserve and maintain the integrity of the information assets of IT where this all requires a security management process. One of the process is to perform security monitoring by conducting periodic vulnerability assessment to identify weaknesses. Because Cobit is not explained technically so it ne...

  20. Identifying Personality Disorders that are Security Risks: Field Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    pervasive and inflexible, has an onset in adolescence or early adulthood, is stable over time, and leads to distress and impairment.” Personality...of other risky behaviors in the domains of personnel security and safety, such as pathological gambling , failure to honor financial obligations, and...experiences and adolescence in addition to adulthood; (2) the CDI allowed the clinicians to establish a positive rapport and feelings of mutual trust

  1. Testing for lead in toys at day care centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Martha; Stolz, Julie; Chacon-Baker, Ashley

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to lead-based paint or material has been found to impact children's cognitive and behavioral development at blood lead levels far below current standards. The purpose of the project was to screen for lead in toy items in daycare centers in order to raise awareness of inside environmental lead exposures and minimize lead-based exposures for children. Occupational therapy students in a service learning class tested for lead in ten daycare or public centers using the XRF Thermo Scientific Niton XL3t, a method accepted by the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC). A total of 460 items were tested over a two-month period for an average of 66 toys per setting. Fifty six (56) items tested > 100 ppm, which represented 12% of the entire sample. Items with high lead levels included selected toys constructed with lead-based paint, lead metals, plastics using lead as a color enhancer, and decorative objects. While the actual number of lead-based products is small, the cumulative exposure or habitual use may pose an unnecessary risk to children. Indoor exposures occurred for all day care centers regardless of socio-economic levels. Recommendations to minimize exposures are provided.

  2. Secure architecture for extensible mobile internet transport services (SAFEMITS) design and testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgibbons, Patrick W.; Das, Digen K.; Hash, Larry J.

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this research was to design and implement the functional requirements of three important distributed services in a secure mobile ad-hoc network. The three distributed services are described: lookup services, adaptation services and composition services. Further, research was required to implement security at various layers to enhance the overall security of the SAFEMITS network. This required an extensive analysis of the security features of lookup server which functions as the controller of the mobile ad hoc network. Finally a technique was designed to select a super node, and a performance test was performed using both the Windows and Linux operating systems.

  3. Risk-driven security testing using risk analysis with threat modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanivel, Maragathavalli; Selvadurai, Kanmani

    2014-01-01

    Security testing is a process of determining risks present in the system states and protects them from vulnerabilities. But security testing does not provide due importance to threat modeling and risk analysis simultaneously that affects confidentiality and integrity of the system. Risk analysis includes identification, evaluation and assessment of risks. Threat modeling approach is identifying threats associated with the system. Risk-driven security testing uses risk analysis results in test case identification, selection and assessment to prioritize and optimize the testing process. Threat modeling approach, STRIDE is generally used to identify both technical and non-technical threats present in the system. Thus, a security testing mechanism based on risk analysis results using STRIDE approach has been proposed for identifying highly risk states. Risk metrics considered for testing includes risk impact, risk possibility and risk threshold. Risk threshold value is directly proportional to risk impact and risk possibility. Risk-driven security testing results in reduced test suite which in turn reduces test case selection time. Risk analysis optimizes the test case selection and execution process. For experimentation, the system models namely LMS, ATM, OBS, OSS and MTRS are considered. The performance of proposed system is analyzed using Test Suite Reduction Rate (TSRR) and FSM coverage. TSRR varies from 13.16 to 21.43% whereas FSM coverage is achieved up to 91.49%. The results show that the proposed method combining risk analysis with threat modeling identifies states with high risks to improve the testing efficiency.

  4. Test and approval center for fuel cell and hydrogen technologies: Phase I. Initiation. Final report; Test- og godkendelsescenter for braendselscelle- og brintteknologier. Fase 1. Opstart. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, A. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. DTU Energy Conversion, DTU Risoe Campus, Roskilde (Denmark)

    2012-09-15

    The aim of the present project was to initialize a Test and Approval Center for Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies at the sites of the project partners Risoe DTU (Fuel Cells and Solid State Chemistry Division), and DGC (work package 1). The project furthermore included start-up of first activities with focus on the development of accelerated life-time tests of fuel cell systems, preparations for standardization of these methods, and advising in relation to certification and approval of fuel cell systems (work package 2). The main achievements of the project were: Work package 1: 1) A large national and international network was established comprising of important commercial players, research institutions, and other test centers; 2) The test center is known in large part of the international Fuel Cell and Hydrogen community due to substantial efforts in 'marketing'; 3) New national and international projects have been successfully applied for, with significant roles of the test center, which secure the further establishment and development of the center. Work package 2: 1) Testing equipment was installed and commissioned at DTU (Risoe Campus); 2) A comprehensive survey among international players regarding activities on accelerated SOFC testing was carried out; 3) A test procedure for 'compressed' testing of SOFC in relation to {mu} CHP application was developed and used for one-cell stack and 50-cell-stack testing; 4) Guidelines for Danish authority handling were formulated. (Author)

  5. Finite Element Analysis and Test Results Comparison for the Hybrid Wing Body Center Section Test Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przekop, Adam; Jegley, Dawn C.; Rouse, Marshall; Lovejoy, Andrew E.

    2016-01-01

    This report documents the comparison of test measurements and predictive finite element analysis results for a hybrid wing body center section test article. The testing and analysis efforts were part of the Airframe Technology subproject within the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation project. Test results include full field displacement measurements obtained from digital image correlation systems and discrete strain measurements obtained using both unidirectional and rosette resistive gauges. Most significant results are presented for the critical five load cases exercised during the test. Final test to failure after inflicting severe damage to the test article is also documented. Overall, good comparison between predicted and actual behavior of the test article is found.

  6. Authentication Test-Based the RFID Authentication Protocol with Security Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghui Wang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available To the problem of many recently proposed RFID authentication protocol was soon find security holes, we analyzed the main reason, which is that protocol design is not rigorous, and the correctness of the protocol cannot be guaranteed. To this end, authentication test method was adopted in the process of the formal analysis and strict proof to the proposed RFID protocol in this paper. Authentication Test is a new type of analysis and design method of security protocols based on Strand space model, and it can be used for most types of the security protocols. After analysis the security, the proposed protocol can meet the RFID security demand: information confidentiality, data integrity and identity authentication.

  7. Small Radioisotope Power System Testing at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugala, Gina; Bell, Mark; Oriti, Salvatore; Fraeman, Martin; Frankford, David; Duven, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    In April 2009, NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) formed an integrated product team (IPT) to develop a Small Radioisotope Power System (SRPS) utilizing a single Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) with passive balancer. A single ASC produces approximately 80 We making this system advantageous for small distributed lunar science stations. The IPT consists of Sunpower, Inc., to provide the single ASC with a passive balancer, The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHUAPL) to design an engineering model Single Convertor Controller (SCC) for an ASC with a passive balancer, and NASA GRC to provide technical support to these tasks and to develop a simulated lunar lander test stand. The single ASC with a passive balancer, simulated lunar lander test stand, and SCC were delivered to GRC and were tested as a system. The testing sequence at GRC included SCC fault tolerance, integration, electromagnetic interference (EMI), vibration, and extended operation testing. The SCC fault tolerance test characterized the SCCs ability to handle various fault conditions, including high or low bus power consumption, total open load or short circuit, and replacing a failed SCC card while the backup maintains control of the ASC. The integrated test characterized the behavior of the system across a range of operating conditions, including variations in cold-end temperature and piston amplitude, including the emitted vibration to both the sensors on the lunar lander and the lunar surface. The EMI test characterized the AC and DC magnetic and electric fields emitted by the SCC and single ASC. The vibration test confirms the SCCs ability to control the single ASC during launch. The extended operation test allows data to be collected over a period of thousands of hours to obtain long term performance data of the ASC with a passive balancer and the SCC. This paper will discuss the results of each of these tests.

  8. Evaluation of a Secure Laptop-Based Testing Program in an Undergraduate Nursing Program: Students' Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jinyuan; Gunter, Glenda; Tsai, Ming-Hsiu; Lim, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the many robust learning management systems, and the availability of affordable laptops, have made secure laptop-based testing a reality on many campuses. The undergraduate nursing program at the authors' university began to implement a secure laptop-based testing program in 2009, which allowed students to use their newly purchased laptops to take quizzes and tests securely in classrooms. After nearly 5 years' secure laptop-based testing program implementation, a formative evaluation, using a mixed method that has both descriptive and correlational data elements, was conducted to seek constructive feedback from students to improve the program. Evaluation data show that, overall, students (n = 166) believed the secure laptop-based testing program helps them get hands-on experience of taking examinations on the computer and gets them prepared for their computerized NCLEX-RN. Students, however, had a lot of concerns about laptop glitches and campus wireless network glitches they experienced during testing. At the same time, NCLEX-RN first-time passing rate data were analyzed using the χ2 test, and revealed no significant association between the two testing methods (paper-and-pencil testing and the secure laptop-based testing) and students' first-time NCLEX-RN passing rate. Based on the odds ratio, however, the odds of students passing NCLEX-RN the first time was 1.37 times higher if they were taught with the secure laptop-based testing method than if taught with the traditional paper-and-pencil testing method in nursing school. It was recommended to the institution that better quality of laptops needs to be provided to future students, measures needed to be taken to further stabilize the campus wireless Internet network, and there was a need to reevaluate the Laptop Initiative Program.

  9. Natural Environment Corrosion Testing at the Kennedy Space Center Beachside Atmospheric Corrosion Test Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M.

    2017-01-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of how NASA has been conducting corrosion testing in the Natural Marine Environment at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, U.S. The following questions will be addressed: What factors should be considered when selecting and constructing a test site? What are the attributes of a good test site? Is more severe always better? What environmental parameters should be monitored? How frequently? What factors should be considered when designing test specimens? Are current test standards sufficient? How do diurnal, annual and other fluctuations in corrosivity influence tests? How are test results interpreted? Can they be quantified?

  10. Secure equality and greater-than tests with sublinear online complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lipmaa, Helger; Toft, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Secure multiparty computation (MPC) allows multiple parties to evaluate functions without disclosing the private inputs. Secure comparisons (testing equality and greater-than) are important primitives required by many MPC applications. We propose two equality tests for ℓ-bit values with O(1) onli......)); these require two mutually incorruptible parties, but are highly competitive with respect to online complexity when compared to existing protocols....

  11. Development and Testing of the Glenn Research Center Visitor's Center Grid-Tied Photovoltaic Power System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has developed, installed, and tested a 12 kW DC grid-tied photovoltaic (PV) power system at the GRC Visitor s Center. This system utilizes a unique ballast type roof mount for installing the photovoltaic panels on the roof of the Visitor s Center with no alterations or penetrations to the roof. The PV system has generated in excess of 15000 kWh since operation commenced in August 2008. The PV system is providing power to the GRC grid for use by all. Operation of the GRC Visitor s Center PV system has been completely trouble free. A grid-tied PV power system is connected directly to the utility distribution grid. Facility power can be obtained from the utility system as normal. The PV system is synchronized with the utility system to provide power for the facility, and excess power is provided to the utility. The project transfers space technology to terrestrial use via nontraditional partners. GRC personnel glean valuable experience with PV power systems that are directly applicable to various space power systems, and provides valuable space program test data. PV power systems help to reduce harmful emissions and reduce the Nation s dependence on fossil fuels. Power generated by the PV system reduces the GRC utility demand, and the surplus power aids the community. Present global energy concerns reinforce the need for the development of alternative energy systems. Modern PV panels are readily available, reliable, efficient, and economical with a life expectancy of at least 25 years. Modern electronics has been the enabling technology behind grid-tied power systems, making them safe, reliable, efficient, and economical with a life expectancy of at least 25 years. Based upon the success of the GRC Visitor s Center PV system, additional PV power system expansion at GRC is under consideration. The GRC Visitor s Center grid-tied PV power system was successfully designed and developed which served to validate the basic principles

  12. FY15 Final Annual Report for the Regional Test Centers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, Joshua [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) manages four of the five PV Regional Test Centers (RTCs). This report reviews accomplishments made by the four Sandia-managed RTCs during FY2015 (October 1, 2014 to September 30, 2015) as well as some programmatic improvements that apply to all five sites. The report is structured by Site first then by Partner within each site followed by the Current and Potential Partner summary table, the New Business Process, and finally the Plan for FY16 and beyond. Since no official SOPO was ever agreed to for FY15, this report does not include reporting on specific milestones and go/no-go decisions.

  13. Safe and secure South Africa. Vehicle landmine protection validation testing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Reinecke, JD

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to provide an overview of vehicle landmine protection validation testing in South Africa. A short history of validation test standards is given, followed by a summary of current open test standards in general use...

  14. Control Systems Security Center Comparison Study of Industrial Control System Standards against the Control Systems Protection Framework Cyber-Security Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert P. Evans

    2005-09-01

    Cyber security standards, guidelines, and best practices for control systems are critical requirements that have been delineated and formally recognized by industry and government entities. Cyber security standards provide a common language within the industrial control system community, both national and international, to facilitate understanding of security awareness issues but, ultimately, they are intended to strengthen cyber security for control systems. This study and the preliminary findings outlined in this report are an initial attempt by the Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) Standard Awareness Team to better understand how existing and emerging industry standards, guidelines, and best practices address cyber security for industrial control systems. The Standard Awareness Team comprised subject matter experts in control systems and cyber security technologies and standards from several Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories, including Argonne National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories. This study was conducted in two parts: a standard identification effort and a comparison analysis effort. During the standard identification effort, the Standard Awareness Team conducted a comprehensive open-source survey of existing control systems security standards, regulations, and guidelines in several of the critical infrastructure (CI) sectors, including the telecommunication, water, chemical, energy (electric power, petroleum and oil, natural gas), and transportation--rail sectors and sub-sectors. During the comparison analysis effort, the team compared the requirements contained in selected, identified, industry standards with the cyber security requirements in ''Cyber Security Protection Framework'', Version 0.9 (hereafter referred to as the ''Framework''). For each of the seven sector/sub-sectors listed above, one standard was

  15. Assessment And Testing of Industrial Devices Robustness Against Cyber Security Attacks

    CERN Document Server

    Tilaro, F

    2011-01-01

    CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research),like any organization, needs to achieve the conflicting objectives of connecting its operational network to Internet while at the same time keeping its industrial control systems secure from external and internal cyber attacks. With this in mind, the ISA-99[0F1] international cyber security standard has been adopted at CERN as a reference model to define a set of guidelines and security robustness criteria applicable to any network device. Devices robustness represents a key link in the defense-in-depth concept as some attacks will inevitably penetrate security boundaries and thus require further protection measures. When assessing the cyber security robustness of devices we have singled out control system-relevant attack patterns derived from the well-known CAPEC[1F2] classification. Once a vulnerability is identified, it needs to be documented, prioritized and reproduced at will in a dedicated test environment for debugging purposes. CERN - in collaboration ...

  16. PETA: Methodology of Information Systems Security Penetration Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Klíma

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Current methodologies of information systems penetration testing focuses mainly on a high level and technical description of the testing process. Unfortunately, there is no methodology focused primarily on the management of these tests. It often results in a situation when the tests are badly planned, managed and the vulnerabilities found are unsystematically remediated. The goal of this article is to present new methodology called PETA which is focused mainly on the management of penetration tests. Development of this methodology was based on the comparative analysis of current methodologies. New methodology incorporates current best practices of IT governance and project management represented by COBIT and PRINCE2 principles. Presented methodology has been quantitatively evaluated.

  17. Toward Security Test Automation for Event Driven GUI Web Contents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Izzat Alsmadi; Ahmed AlEroud

    2012-01-01

      The web is taking recently a large percentage of software products. The evolving nature of web applications put a serious challenge on testing, if we consider the dynamic nature of the current web...

  18. Autonomous Micro-Modular Mobile Data Center Cloud Computing Study for Modeling, Simulation, Information Processing and Cyber-Security Viability Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cloud computing security penetration testing and anomaly detection defense studies were conducted to assess the adequacy of cloud computing security.  Since...

  19. US DOE Regional Test Centers Program - 2016 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, Joshua [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The US Department of Energy’s Regional Test Center (RTC) program provides outdoor validation and bankability data for innovative solar technologies at five sites across the US representing a range of climate conditions. Data helps get new technologies to market faster and improves US industry competitiveness. Managed by Sandia National Laboratories and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the RTC program partners with US manufacturers of photovoltaic (PV) technologies, including modules, inverters, and balance-of-system equipment. The study is collaborative, with manufacturers (also known as RTC industry partners) and the national labs working together on a system design and validation strategy that meets a clearly defined set of performance and reliability objectives.

  20. Implantable cardiac pacemaker electromagnetic compatibility testing in a novel security system simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainz, Wolfgang; Casamento, Jon P; Ruggera, Paul S; Chan, Dulciana D; Witters, Donald M

    2005-03-01

    This paper describes a novel simulator to perform electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) tests for active implantable medical devices (AIMDs) with electromagnetic fields emitted by security systems. The security system simulator was developed in response to over 100 incident reports over 17 years related to the interference of AIMD's with security systems and the lack of a standardized test method. The simulator was evaluated regarding field homogeneity, signal distortion, and maximum magnetic field strength levels. Small three-axis probes and a three-axis scanning system were designed to determine the spatial and temporal characteristics of the fields emitted by 12 different types of walk through metal detectors (WTMDs). Tests were performed on four implanted pacemakers with a saline phantom and correlated to a newly developed test method performed "in air" (without the phantom). Comparison of the simulator thresholds with tests performed in real WTMDs showed that the simulator is able to mimic the pacemaker interference. The interference thresholds found in the simulator indicate that pulsed magnetic fields are more likely to cause interference in pacemakers than sinusoidal fields. The security system simulator will help biomedical engineers, manufacturers of medical devices, and manufacturers of security systems to identify incompatible combinations of WTMDs and AIMDs early in the development stage.

  1. Coverage of the Test of Memory Malingering, Victoria Symptom Validity Test, and Word Memory Test on the Internet: is test security threatened?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Lyndsey; McCaffrey, Robert J

    2006-01-01

    In forensic neuropsychological settings, maintaining test security has become critically important, especially in regard to symptom validity tests (SVTs). Coaching, which can entail providing patients or litigants with information about the cognitive sequelae of head injury, or teaching them test-taking strategies to avoid detection of symptom dissimulation has been examined experimentally in many research studies. Emerging evidence supports that coaching strategies affect psychological and neuropsychological test performance to differing degrees depending on the coaching paradigm and the tests administered. The present study sought to examine Internet coverage of SVTs because it is potentially another source of coaching, or information that is readily available. Google searches were performed on the Test of Memory Malingering, the Victoria Symptom Validity Test, and the Word Memory Test. Results indicated that there is a variable amount of information available about each test that could threaten test security and validity should inappropriately interested parties find it. Steps that could be taken to improve this situation and limitations to this exploration are discussed.

  2. Evaluating the Impact of the Department of Defense Regional Centers for Security Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    United States, one that it runs jointly with the Africa Center ( Madagascar ), and two that it runs jointly with the Marshall Center and the Africa Center...Pacific region are yet ready to engage in even informal discussions on the controversy regarding disputed islands in the South China Sea, one of the... island states of the Caribbean16 and Oceania) or because their relative wealth would require them to pay to participate and, like some of the Persian

  3. Reviews of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty and U.S. security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanloz, Raymond

    2017-11-01

    Reviews of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) by the National Academy of Sciences concluded that the United States has the technical expertise and physical means to i) maintain a safe, secure and reliable nuclear-weapons stockpile without nuclear-explosion testing, and ii) effectively monitor global compliance once the Treaty enters into force. Moreover, the CTBT is judged to help constrain proliferation of nuclear-weapons technology, so it is considered favorable to U.S. security. Review of developments since the studies were published, in 2002 and 2012, show that the study conclusions remain valid and that technical capabilities are better than anticipated.

  4. The Savannah River Technology Center environmental monitoring field test platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossabi, J.

    1993-03-05

    Nearly all industrial facilities have been responsible for introducing synthetic chemicals into the environment. The Savannah River Site is no exception. Several areas at the site have been contaminated by chlorinated volatile organic chemicals. Because of the persistence and refractory nature of these contaminants, a complete clean up of the site will take many years. A major focus of the mission of the Environmental Sciences Section of the Savannah River Technology Center is to develop better, faster, and less expensive methods for characterizing, monitoring, and remediating the subsurface. These new methods can then be applied directly at the Savannah River Site and at other contaminated areas in the United States and throughout the world. The Environmental Sciences Section has hosted field testing of many different monitoring technologies over the past two years primarily as a result of the Integrated Demonstration Program sponsored by the Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development. This paper provides an overview of some of the technologies that have been demonstrated at the site and briefly discusses the applicability of these techniques.

  5. Nonlinear Analysis and Preliminary Testing Results of a Hybrid Wing Body Center Section Test Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przekop, Adam; Jegley, Dawn C.; Rouse, Marshall; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Wu, Hsi-Yung T.

    2015-01-01

    A large test article was recently designed, analyzed, fabricated, and successfully tested up to the representative design ultimate loads to demonstrate that stiffened composite panels with through-the-thickness reinforcement are a viable option for the next generation large transport category aircraft, including non-conventional configurations such as the hybrid wing body. This paper focuses on finite element analysis and test data correlation of the hybrid wing body center section test article under mechanical, pressure and combined load conditions. Good agreement between predictive nonlinear finite element analysis and test data is found. Results indicate that a geometrically nonlinear analysis is needed to accurately capture the behavior of the non-circular pressurized and highly-stressed structure when the design approach permits local buckling.

  6. Thermal Testing of Ablators in the NASA Johnson Space Center Radiant Heat Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Papa, Steven; Milhoan, Jim; Remark, Brian; Suess, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    A spacecraft's thermal protection system (TPS) is required to survive the harsh environment experienced during reentry. Accurate thermal modeling of the TPS is required to since uncertainties in the thermal response result in higher design margins and an increase in mass. The Radiant Heat Test Facility (RHTF) located at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) replicates the reentry temperatures and pressures on system level full scale TPS test models for the validation of thermal math models. Reusable TPS, i.e. tile or reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC), have been the primary materials tested in the past. However, current capsule designs for MPCV and commercial programs have required the use of an ablator TPS. The RHTF has successfully completed a pathfinder program on avcoat ablator material to demonstrate the feasibility of ablator testing. The test results and corresponding ablation analysis results are presented in this paper.

  7. Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/8: Cooperative Border Security for Jordan: Assessment and Options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qojas, M.

    1999-03-01

    This document is an analysis of options for unilateral and cooperative action to improve the security of Jordan's borders. Sections describe the current political, economic, and social interactions along Jordan's borders. Next, the document discusses border security strategy for cooperation among neighboring countries and the adoption of confidence-building measures. A practical cooperative monitoring system would consist of hardware for early warning, command and control, communications, and transportation. Technical solutions can expand opportunities for the detection and identification of intruders. Sensors (such as seismic, break-wire, pressure-sensing, etc.) can warn border security forces of intrusion and contribute to the identification of the intrusion and help formulate the response. This document describes conceptual options for cooperation, offering three scenarios that relate to three hypothetical levels (low, medium, and high) of cooperation. Potential cooperative efforts under a low cooperation scenario could include information exchanges on military equipment and schedules to prevent misunderstandings and the establishment of protocols for handling emergency situations or unusual circumstances. Measures under a medium cooperation scenario could include establishing joint monitoring groups for better communications, with hot lines and scheduled meetings. The high cooperation scenario describes coordinated responses, joint border patrols, and sharing border intrusion information. Finally, the document lists recommendations for organizational, technical, and operational initiatives that could be applicable to the current situation.

  8. CSEP Testing Center and the first results of the earthquake forecast testing experiment in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruoka, H.; Hirata, N.; Schorlemmer, D.; Euchner, F.; Nanjo, K. Z.; Jordan, T. H.

    2012-08-01

    Major objectives of the Japanese earthquake prediction research program for the period 2009-2013 are to create earthquake forecasting models and begin the prospective testing of these models against recorded seismicity. For this purpose, the Earthquake Research Institute of the University of Tokyo has joined an international partnership to create a Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability (CSEP). Here, we describe a new infrastructure for developing and evaluating forecasting models—the CSEP Japan Testing Center—as well as some preliminary testing results. On 1 November 2009, the Testing Center started a prospective and competitive earthquake predictability experiment using the seismically active and well-instrumented region of Japan as a natural laboratory.

  9. Airborne Dust Cloud Measurements at the INL National Security Test Range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael L. Abbott; Norm Stanley; Larry Radke; Charles Smeltzer

    2007-09-01

    On July 11, 2007, a surface, high-explosive test (<20,000 lb TNT-equivalent) was carried out at the National Security Test Range (NSTR) on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site. Aircraft-mounted rapid response (1-sec) particulate monitors were used to measure airborne PM-10 concentrations directly in the dust cloud and to develop a PM-10 emission factor that could be used for subsequent tests at the NSTR. The blast produced a mushroom-like dust cloud that rose approximately 2,500–3,000 ft above ground level, which quickly dissipated (within 5 miles of the source). In general, the cloud was smaller and less persistence than expected, or that might occur in other areas, likely due to the coarse sand and subsurface conditions that characterize the immediate NSTR area. Maximum short time-averaged (1-sec) PM-10 concentrations at the center of the cloud immediately after the event reached 421 µg m-3 but were rapidly reduced (by atmospheric dispersion and fallout) to near background levels (~10 µg m-3) after about 15 minutes. This occurred well within the INL Site boundary, about 8 km (5 miles) from the NSTR source. These findings demonstrate that maximum concentrations in ambient air beyond the INL Site boundary (closest is 11.2 km from NSTR) from these types of tests would be well within the 150 µg m-3 24-hour National Ambient Air Quality Standards for PM-10. Aircraft measurements and geostatistical techniques were used to successfully quantify the initial volume (1.64E+9 m3 or 1.64 km3) and mass (250 kg) of the PM-10 dust cloud, and a PM-10 emission factor (20 kg m-3 crater soil volume) was developed for this specific type of event at NSTR. The 250 kg of PM-10 mass estimated from this experiment is almost seven-times higher than the 36 kg estimated for the environmental assessment (DOE-ID 2007) using available Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1995) emission factors. This experiment demonstrated that advanced aircraft-mounted instruments operated by

  10. ALMA North American Integration Center Front-End Test System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediss, Geoffrey A.; Crabtree, Joshua; Crady, Kirk; Gaines, Erik; McLeod, Morgan; Morris, Greg; Williams, Rick; Perfetto, Antonio; Webber, John

    2010-10-01

    The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter (ALMA) Array Front End (FE) system is the first element in a complex chain of signal receiving, conversion, processing and recording. 70 Front Ends will be required for the project. The Front End is designed to receive signals in ten different frequency bands. In the initial phase of operations, the antennas will be fully equipped with six bands. These are Band 3 (84-116 GHz), Band 4 (125-163 GHz), Band 6 (211-275 GHz), Band 7 (275-373 GHz), Band 8 (385-500 GHz) and Band 9 (602-720 GHz). It is planned to equip the antennas with the missing bands at a later stage of ALMA operations, with a few Band 5 (163-211 GHz) and Band 10 (787-950 GHz) receivers in use before the end of the construction project. The ALMA Front End is far superior to any existing receiver systems; spin-offs of the ALMA prototypes are leading to improved sensitivities in existing millimeter and submillimeter observatories. The Front End units are comprised of numerous elements, produced at different locations in Europe, North America and East Asia and are integrated at several Front End integration centers (FEIC) to insure timely delivery of all the units to Chile. The North American FEIC (NA FEIC) is at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory facility in Charlottesville, Virginia, USA. This paper describes the design and performance of the test set used at the NA FEIC to check the performance of the Front Ends, following integration and prior to shipment to Chile.

  11. System for Centering a Turbofan in a Nacelle During Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Cameron C.; Thompson, William K.; Hughes, Christopher E.; Shook, Tony D.

    2003-01-01

    A feedback position-control system has been developed for maintaining the concentricity of a turbofan with respect to a nacelle during acoustic and flow tests in a wind tunnel. The system is needed for the following reasons: Thermal and thrust loads can displace the fan relative to the nacelle; In the particular test apparatus (see Figure 1), denoted as a rotor-only nacelle (RAN), the struts, vanes, and other stator components of a turbofan engine that ordinarily maintain the required concentricity in the face of thermal and thrust loads are not present; and The struts and stator components are not present because it is necessary to provide a flow path that is acoustically clean in the sense that the measured noise can be attributed to the fan alone. The system is depicted schematically in Figure 2. The nacelle is supported by two struts attached to a two-axis traverse table located outside the wind-tunnel wall. Two servomotors acting through 100:1 gearboxes drive the table along the Y and Z axes, which are perpendicular to the axis of rotation. The Y and Z components of the deviation from concentricity are measured by four laser displacement sensors mounted on the nacelle and aimed at reflective targets on the center body, which is part of the fan assembly. The outputs of the laser displacement sensors are digitized and processed through a personal computer programmed with control software. The control output of the computer commands the servomotors to move the table as needed to restore concentricity. Numerous software and hardware travel limits and alarms are provided to maximize safety. A highly ablative rub strip in the nacelle minimizes the probability of damage in the event that a deviation from concentricity exceeds the radial clearance [nacelle and the tips of the fan blades. To be able to prevent an excursion in excess of the tip clearance, the system must be accurate enough to control X and Y displacements to within 0.001 in. (.0.025 mm). One

  12. Containing Ebola: A Test for Post-Conflict Security Sector Reform in Sierra Leone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy Haenlein

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ebola has provided the greatest test of the Sierra Leonean security sector – and, in turn, of the UK-led reforms of the past ten-to-fifteen years. The performance of the country's security forces at the height of the crisis suggests that there are sound structures in place; however, Ebola has shown that the Government of Sierra Leone's national security architecture still lacks maturity in responding to such a scenario. Drawing on first-hand interviews with advisers on the ground, this article explores the Sierra Leone government’s response to the Ebola crisis and the performance of the security sector so far, within the wider context of UK-led security-sector reform (SSR since the end of the civil war. In doing so, it highlights a number of lessons to have emerged from the crisis, exploring what these reveal about the nature of the reforms implemented since the end of the country's civil war. In turn, it explores what these suggest for future SSR, which continues to be a core component of the UK’s approach to development and overseas capacity-building.

  13. Measuring the Effect of Using Simulated Security Awareness Training and Testing on Members of Virtual Communities of Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig L. Tidwell

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Information security (Infosec has become a major challenge for all private and public organizations. The protecting of proprietary and secret data and the proper awareness of what is entailed in protecting this data is necessary in all organizations. How does simulation and training influence virtual communities of practice information security awareness over time and with a variety of security scenarios. Can members of a virtual community be significantly changed in how they respond to routine security processes and attempts to breach security or violate the security policy of their organization? How does deterrence play a role in this prevention and education? A study is planned that will train and test users of a virtual community of practice over a 3 month period of time, via a web interface, and using simulated events, to see if the planned security awareness training will be effective in changing their responses to the events and further testing.

  14. An analysis of patient-provider secure messaging at two Veterans Health Administration medical centers: message content and resolution through secure messaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Stephanie L; Petrakis, Beth Ann; Rothendler, James A; Zirkle, Maryan; Zhao, Shibei; Feng, Hua; Fix, Gemmae M; Ozkaynak, Mustafa; Martin, Tracey; Johnson, Sharon A; Tulu, Bengisu; Gordon, Howard S; Simon, Steven R; Woods, Susan S

    2017-09-01

    We sought to understand how patients and primary care teams use secure messaging (SM) to communicate with one another by analyzing secure message threads from 2 Department of Veterans Affairs facilities. We coded 1000 threads of SM communication sampled from 40 primary care teams. Most threads (94.5%) were initiated by patients (90.4%) or caregivers (4.1%); only 5.5% were initiated by primary care team members proactively reaching out to patients. Medication renewals and refills (47.2%), scheduling requests (17.6%), medication issues (12.9%), and health issues (12.7%) were the most common patient-initiated requests, followed by referrals (7.0%), administrative issues (6.5%), test results (5.4%), test issues (5.2%), informing messages (4.9%), comments about the patient portal or SM (4.1%), appreciation (3.9%), self-reported data (2.8%), life issues (1.5%), and complaints (1.5%). Very few messages were clinically urgent (0.7%) or contained other potentially challenging content. Message threads were mostly short (2.7 messages), comprising an average of 1.35 discrete content types. A substantial proportion of issues (24.2%) did not show any evidence of being resolved through SM. Time to response and extent of resolution via SM varied by message content. Proactive SM use by teams varied, but was most often for test results (32.7%), medication-related issues (21.8%), medication renewals (16.4%), or scheduling issues (18.2%). The majority of messages were transactional and initiated by patients or caregivers. Not all content categories were fully addressed over SM. Further education and training for both patients and clinical teams could improve the quality and efficiency of SM communication.

  15. Underground Test Area Activity Communication/Interface Plan, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farnham, Irene [Navarro, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Rehfeldt, Kenneth [Navarro, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this plan is to provide guidelines for effective communication and interfacing between Underground Test Area (UGTA) Activity participants, including the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) and its contractors. This plan specifically establishes the following: • UGTA mission, vision, and core values • Roles and responsibilities for key personnel • Communication with stakeholders • Guidance in key interface areas • Communication matrix

  16. Multi-Center Traffic Management Advisor Operational Field Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Todd; Landry, Steven J.; Hoang, Ty; Nickelson, Monicarol; Levin, Kerry M.; Rowe, Dennis W.

    2005-01-01

    The Multi-Center Traffic Management Advisor (McTMA) is a research prototype system which seeks to bring time-based metering into the mainstream of air traffic control (ATC) operations. Time-based metering is an efficient alternative to traditional air traffic management techniques such as distance-based spacing (miles-in-trail spacing) and managed arrival reservoirs (airborne holding). While time-based metering has demonstrated significant benefit in terms of arrival throughput and arrival delay, its use to date has been limited to arrival operations at just nine airports nationally. Wide-scale adoption of time-based metering has been hampered, in part, by the limited scalability of metering automation. In order to realize the full spectrum of efficiency benefits possible with time-based metering, a much more modular, scalable time-based metering capability is required. With its distributed metering architecture, multi-center TMA offers such a capability.

  17. Autonomy-Enabled Fuel Savings for Military Vehicles: Report on 2016 Aberdeen Test Center Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragatz, Adam [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Prohaska, Robert [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gonder, Jeff [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-05-26

    Fuel savings have never been the primary focus for autonomy-enabled military vehicles. However, studies have estimated that autonomy in passenger and commercial vehicles could improve fuel economy by as much as 22%-33% over various drive cycles. If even a fraction of this saving could be realized in military vehicles, significant cost savings could be realized each year through reduced fuel transport missions, reduced fuel purchases, less maintenance, fewer required personnel, and increased vehicle range. Researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory installed advanced data logging equipment and instrumentation on two autonomy-enabled convoy vehicles configured with Lockheed Martin's Autonomous Mobility Applique System to determine system performance and improve on the overall vehicle control strategies of the vehicles. Initial test results from testing conducted at the U.S. Army Aberdeen Test Center at the Aberdeen Proving Grounds are included in this report. Lessons learned from in-use testing and performance results have been provided to the project partners for continued system refinement.

  18. Foreign and Security Policy of the Newly Independent States: Balancing between Two Power Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergiy G. Fedunyak

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is focusing on the interplay between foreign policy agenda of the post-Soviet states at the one hand and internal policy developments in these countries at the other hand. One of the main explanations why the post-Soviet elites in non-Russian republics are pursuing the so-called multi-vectorialism in the foreign policy is that it serves as a strategy to maximize the most from having good relations both with East and West, and thus trying to perpetuate the monopoly of the power. Uzbekistan is a country in case, as Ukraine (and Moldova is (or was indeed also. At the same time, the special relations between the elites of post-Soviet countries and Moscow are very important in shaping the foreign policy agenda of these countries as a result of the Soviet legacy, i.e. the ties of the former Communist nomenklatura with Moscow are still playing a very important role in the most of the former Soviet republics. Another relevant variable in explaining the current state of affairs in the foreign and security issues of the post-Soviet states and the still dominant role of Russia is the fact that the West (NATO and EU especially are not very successful in trying to limit Moscow’s ambitions in the “near abroad”. This is making the leaders of most NIS to be obedient to Russia’s pretensions in lack of real support from the West in order to counteract these neo-imperial claims from the part of the former metropolis.

  19. Using cyber vulnerability testing techniques to expose undocumented security vulnerabilities in DCS and SCADA equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollet, J. [PlantData Technologies, Inc., 1201 Louisiana Street, Houston, TX 77002 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    This session starts by providing an overview of typical DCS (Distributed Control Systems) and SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) architectures, and exposes cyber security vulnerabilities that vendors never admit, but are found through a comprehensive cyber testing process. A complete assessment process involves testing all of the layers and components of a SCADA or DCS environment, from the perimeter firewall all the way down to the end devices controlling the process, including what to look for when conducting a vulnerability assessment of real-time control systems. The following systems are discussed: 1. Perimeter (isolation from corporate IT or other non-critical networks) 2. Remote Access (third Party access into SCADA or DCS networks) 3. Network Architecture (switch, router, firewalls, access controls, network design) 4. Network Traffic Analysis (what is running on the network) 5. Host Operating Systems Hardening 6. Applications (how they communicate with other applications and end devices) 7. End Device Testing (PLCs, RTUs, DCS Controllers, Smart Transmitters) a. System Discovery b. Functional Discovery c. Attack Methodology i. DoS Tests (at what point does the device fail) ii. Malformed Packet Tests (packets that can cause equipment failure) iii. Session Hijacking (do anything that the operator can do) iv. Packet Injection (code and inject your own SCADA commands) v. Protocol Exploitation (Protocol Reverse Engineering / Fuzzing) This paper will provide information compiled from over five years of conducting cyber security testing on control systems hardware, software, and systems. (authors)

  20. Thallium-201 for cardiac stress tests: residual radioactivity worries patients and security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraci, Matthew J; Brown, Norman; Murray, David

    2012-12-01

    A 47-year-old man presented to the Emergency Department (ED) in duress and stated he was "highly radioactive." There were no reports of nuclear disasters, spills, or mishaps in the local area. This report discusses the potential for thallium-201 (Tl-201) patients to activate passive radiation alarms days to weeks after nuclear stress tests, even while shielded inside industrial vehicles away from sensors. Characteristics of Tl-201, as used for medical imaging, are described. This patient was twice detained by Homeland Security Agents and searched after he activated radiation detectors at a seaport security checkpoint. Security agents deemed him not to be a threat, but they expressed concern regarding his health and level of personal radioactivity. The patient was subsequently barred from his job and sent to the hospital. Tl-201 is a widely used radioisotope for medical imaging. The radioactive half-life of Tl-201 is 73.1h, however, reported periods of extended personal radiation have been seen as far out as 61 days post-administration. This case describes an anxious, but otherwise asymptomatic patient presenting to the ED with detection of low-level personal radiation. Documentation should be provided to and carried by individuals receiving radionuclides for a minimum of five to six half-lives of the longest-lasting isotope provided. Patients receiving Tl-201 should understand the potential for security issues; reducing probable tense moments, confusion, and anxiety to themselves, their employers, security officials, and ED staff. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. OPNET Modeler Simulation Testing of the New Model Used to Cooperation Between QoS and Security Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Papaj

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the performance analysis of the new model, used to integration between QoS and Security, is introduced. OPNET modeler simulation testing of the new model with comparation with the standard model is presented. This new model enables the process of cooperation between QoS and Security in MANET. The introduction how the model is implemented to the simulation OPNET modeler is also showed. Model provides possibilities to integration and cooperation of QoS and security by the cross layer design (CLD with modified security service vector (SSV. An overview of the simulation tested of the new model, comparative study in mobile ad-hoc networks, describe requirements and directions for adapted solutions are presented. Main idea of the testing is to show how QoS and Security related services could be provided simultaneously with using minimal interfering with each service.

  2. Generic System for Remote Testing and Calibration of Measuring Instruments: Security Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurčević, M.; Hegeduš, H.; Golub, M.

    2010-01-01

    Testing and calibration of laboratory instruments and reference standards is a routine activity and is a resource and time consuming process. Since many of the modern instruments include some communication interfaces, it is possible to create a remote calibration system. This approach addresses a wide range of possible applications and permits to drive a number of different devices. On the other hand, remote calibration process involves a number of security issues due to recommendations specified in standard ISO/IEC 17025, since it is not under total control of the calibration laboratory personnel who will sign the calibration certificate. This approach implies that the traceability and integrity of the calibration process directly depends on the collected measurement data. The reliable and secure remote control and monitoring of instruments is a crucial aspect of internet-enabled calibration procedure.

  3. Data Science at the Defense Personnel and Security Research Center. Mission: Improve the Effectiveness, Efficiency, and Fairness of DoD Personnel Security and Suitability Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-14

    Mission: Improve the Effectiveness, Efficiency, and Fairness of DoD Personnel Security and Suitability Programs Report Documentation Page Form... fairness of personnel security in the DoD In the wake of events like 9-11, Ft. Hood, and the Washington Navy Yard shootings, we expanded our

  4. The Multimodal Assessment of Adult Attachment Security: Developing the Biometric Attachment Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Federico; Miljkovitch, Raphaële; Persiaux, Gwenaelle; Morales, Michelle; Scherer, Stefan

    2017-04-06

    Attachment theory has been proven essential for mental health, including psychopathology, development, and interpersonal relationships. Validated psychometric instruments to measure attachment abound but suffer from shortcomings common to traditional psychometrics. Recent developments in multimodal fusion and machine learning pave the way for new automated and objective psychometric instruments for adult attachment that combine psychophysiological, linguistic, and behavioral analyses in the assessment of the construct. The aim of this study was to present a new exposure-based, automatic, and objective adult-attachment assessment, the Biometric Attachment Test (BAT), which exposes participants to a short standardized set of visual and music stimuli, whereas their immediate reactions and verbal responses, captured by several computer sense modalities, are automatically analyzed for scoring and classification. We also aimed to empirically validate two of its assumptions: its capacity to measure attachment security and the viability of using themes as placeholders for rotating stimuli. A total of 59 French participants from the general population were assessed using the Adult Attachment Questionnaire (AAQ), the Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP), and the Attachment Multiple Model Interview (AMMI) as ground truth for attachment security. They were then exposed to three different BAT stimuli sets, whereas their faces, voices, heart rate (HR), and electrodermal activity (EDA) were recorded. Psychophysiological features, such as skin-conductance response (SCR) and Bayevsky stress index; behavioral features, such as gaze and facial expressions; as well as linguistic and paralinguistic features, were automatically extracted. An exploratory analysis was conducted using correlation matrices to uncover the features that are most associated with attachment security. A confirmatory analysis was conducted by creating a single composite effects index and by testing it

  5. Groin Exploration for the Nonpalpable Testes: A Single Center ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in preterm infants approaching 30–45%.[2,3] All UDT should be brought to the scrotum as soon as possible preferably before the age of 2 years so as to reduce ... Laparoscopy enables the evaluation of the position, size, and the structural normality of intra‑abdominal testes. Other investigations such as magnetic resonance ...

  6. A Model of Managerial Effectiveness in Information Security: From Grounded Theory to Empirical Test

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Knapp, Kenneth J

    2005-01-01

    ...: user training, security culture, policy relevance, and policy enforcement. Prior research has not yet examined the mediation factors between management support and information security effectiveness...

  7. Lithium Ion Testing at NSWC Crane in Support of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Harry; Jung, David; Lee, Leonine

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews Lithium Ion Cell testing at the Naval Surface Warfare Center in Crane, India. The contents include: 1) Quallion 15 Ahr Lithium-Ion Cells, LEO Life Cycle Test; 2) Lithion 50 Ahr Lithium-Ion Cells, LEO Life Cycle Test; 3) ABSL 5 Ahr Lithium-Ion Battery, LRO-LLO Life Cycle Test, SDO-GEO Life Cycle Test; and 4) A123 40 Ahr Lithium-Ion Battery, GPM Life Cycle Test, MMS Life Cycle Test.

  8. The distinctive sequelae of children's coping with interparental conflict: Testing the reformulated emotional security theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Patrick T; Martin, Meredith J; Sturge-Apple, Melissa L; Ripple, Michael T; Cicchetti, Dante

    2016-10-01

    Two studies tested hypotheses about the distinctive psychological consequences of children's patterns of responding to interparental conflict. In Study 1, 174 preschool children (M = 4.0 years) and their mothers participated in a cross-sectional design. In Study 2, 243 preschool children (M = 4.6 years) and their parents participated in 2 annual measurement occasions. Across both studies, multiple informants assessed children's psychological functioning. Guided by the reformulated version of emotional security theory, behavioral observations of children's coping with interparental conflict assessed their tendencies to exhibit 4 patterns based on their function in defusing threat: secure (i.e., efficiently address direct instances of threat), mobilizing (i.e., react to potential threat and social opportunities), dominant (i.e., directly defeat threat), and demobilizing (i.e., reduce salience as a target of hostility). As hypothesized, each profile predicted unique patterns of adjustment. Greater security was associated with lower levels of internalizing and externalizing symptoms and greater social competence, whereas higher dominance was associated with externalizing problems and extraversion. In contrast, mobilizing patterns of reactivity predicted more problems with self-regulation, internalizing symptoms, externalizing difficulties, but also greater extraversion. Finally, higher levels of demobilizing reactivity were linked with greater internalizing problems and lower extraversion but also better self-regulation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Computer-aided dispatch--traffic management center field operational test final test plans : state of Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to expand upon the evaluation components presented in "Computer-aided dispatch--traffic management center field operational test final evaluation plan : state of Utah". This document defines the objective, approach, an...

  10. Computer-aided dispatch--traffic management center field operational test final detailed test plan : WSDOT deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to expand upon the evaluation components presented in "Computer-aided dispatch--traffic management center field operational test final evaluation plan : WSDOT deployment". This document defines the objective, approach,...

  11. Underground Test Area Quality Assurance Project Plan Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irene Farnham

    2011-05-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) provides the overall quality assurance (QA) program requirements and general quality practices to be applied to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) Sub-Project (hereafter the Sub-Project) activities. The requirements in this QAPP are consistent with DOE Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance (DOE, 2005); U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance for Quality Assurance Project Plans for Modeling (EPA, 2002); and EPA Guidance on the Development, Evaluation, and Application of Environmental Models (EPA, 2009). The QAPP Revision 0 supersedes DOE--341, Underground Test Area Quality Assurance Project Plan, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 4.

  12. Using K-12 Lessons Learned about How to Balance Accessibility and Test Security to Inform Licensure, Credentialing, and Certification Exam Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Sheryl S.; van den Heuvel, Jill R.; Thurlow, Martha L.

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores how to balance test security and accessibility on licensure, credentialing, and certification exams. It examines K-12 test security policies related to educational assessments across states to discover lessons learned about how to meet accessibility needs of individuals with disabilities while minimizing test security risks. It…

  13. The Academic Computing, Tutoring, and Testing (ACTT) Center Survey--Spring 1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, John

    As part of an effort to evaluate the Academic Computing, Tutoring, and Testing Center, Gainesville College, in Georgia, surveyed 672 students in morning classes, 424 students in evening classes, and all faculty and staff to determine their use of and satisfaction with the Center. Faculty and staff responses were received from 79 individuals,…

  14. Test bed control center design concept for Tank Waste Retrieval Manipulator Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundstrom, E. [Human Machine Interfaces, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Draper, J.V. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Fausz, A. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Psychology

    1995-02-01

    This paper describes the design concept for the control center for the Single Shell Tank Waste Retrieval Manipulator System test bed and the design process behind the concept. The design concept supports all phases of the test bed mission, including technology demonstration, comprehensive system testing, and comparative evaluation for further development and refinement of the TWRMS for field operations.

  15. Development of automated electromagnetic compatibility test facilities at Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Cecil A.

    1986-01-01

    The efforts to automate the electromagentic compatibility (EMC) test facilites at Marshall Flight Center were examined. A battery of nine standard tests is to be integrated by means of a desktop computer-controller in order to provide near real-time data assessment, store the data acquired during testing on flexible disk, and provide computer production of the certification report.

  16. Computer-aided dispatch--traffic management center field operational test : state of Utah final report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    This document provides the final report for the evaluation of the USDOT-sponsored Computer-Aided Dispatch Traffic Management Center Integration Field Operations Test in the State of Utah. The document discusses evaluation findings in the followin...

  17. Computer-aided dispatch--traffic management center field operational test : Washington State final report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    This document provides the final report for the evaluation of the USDOT-sponsored Computer-Aided Dispatch - Traffic Management Center Integration Field Operations Test in the State of Washington. The document discusses evaluation findings in the foll...

  18. An evaluation of software testing metrics for NASA's mission control center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, George E.; Durst, Robert C.; Pelnik, Tammy M.

    1991-01-01

    Software metrics are used to evaluate the software development process and the quality of the resulting product. Five metrics were used during the testing phase of the Shuttle Mission Control Center Upgrade at the NASA Johnson Space Center. All but one metric provided useful information. Based on the experience, it is recommended that metrics be used during the test phase of software development and additional candidate metrics are proposed for further study.

  19. Center not liable for defamation from false-positive hepatitis test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-04-18

    The Nebraska Court of Appeals ruled that [name removed] does not have a cause of action against the Lincoln Plasma Center in Lincoln, NE. The center blacklisted him as a carrier of hepatitis B virus; subsequent tests proved [name removed] was uninfected. [Name removed], a paid plasma donator, was placed on an ineligible list after he tested positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen. [Name removed] sued, alleging that Lincoln defamed him by publishing false information to blood banks about his eligibility to donate. The Court of Appeals upheld a trial court's directed verdict because there was no evidence that the plasma center acted in malice.

  20. Development of Non-hazardous Explosives for Security Training and Testing (NESTT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kury, J.W.; Simpson, R.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Energetic Materials Center; Hallowell, S.F. [Federal Aviation Administration, Atlantic City International Airport, NJ (United States). FAA Technical Center

    1996-01-01

    The security force at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) routinely used canines to search for explosives and other contraband substances. The use of threat quantities of explosive for realistic training in populated or sensitive Laboratory areas has not been permitted because of the hazard. To overcome this limitation a series of non-hazardous materials with authentic signatures have been prepared and evaluated. A series of materials has been prepared that have authentic properties of explosives but are non-hazardous. These NESTT materials are prepared by coating a few micron thick layer of an explosive on a non-reactive substrate. This produces a formulation with an authentic vapor and molecular signature. Authentic x-ray and oxygen/nitrogen density signatures are obtained through the appropriate choice of a substrate. The signatures of NESTT TNT and NESTT Comp. C-4 have been verified by instrument and canine (K-9) detection in a Beta Test Program.

  1. The Effect of the Social Security Earnings Test on Male Labor Supply: New Evidence from Survey and Administrative Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Steven J.; Loughran, David S.

    2008-01-01

    Despite numerous empirical studies, there is surprisingly little agreement about whether the Social Security earnings test affects male labor supply. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the labor supply effects of the earnings test using longitudinal administrative earnings data and more commonly used survey data. We find that…

  2. Using resources of public health centers for education and professional societies to incorporate homeland security topics into public teacher continuing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Margaret E

    2003-08-01

    The Department of Education, the Association of Schools of Public Health, and national professional societies dedicated to teaching and dissemination of information for health and education in the public sector can form a clearinghouse on information and manpower on Homeland Security by affiliation with Centers for Public Health Preparedness (CPHP). The state licensed or regional societies can contribute further information and guidelines. In the HPS the Science Teacher Workshop (STW) and Public Education (PEC) Committees can assist a CPHP on radiation issues.

  3. User-Centered Design and Usability Testing of a Web Site: An Illustrative Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corry, Michael D.; Frick, Theodore W.; Hansen, Lisa

    1997-01-01

    Presents an overview of user-centered design and usability testing. Describes a Web site evaluation project at a university, the iterative process of rapid prototyping and usability testing, and how the findings helped to improve the design. Discusses recommendations for university Web site design and reflects on problems faced in usability…

  4. Propulsion Airframe Integration Test Techniques for Hypersonic Airbreathing Configurations at NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, David W.; Huebner, Lawrence D.; Trexler, Carl A.; Cabell, Karen F.; Andrews, Earl H., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The scope and significance of propulsion airframe integration (PAI) for hypersonic airbreathing vehicles is presented through a discussion of the PAI test techniques utilized at NASA Langley Research Center. Four primary types of PAI model tests utilized at NASA Langley for hypersonic airbreathing vehicles are discussed. The four types of PAI test models examined are the forebody/inlet test model, the partial-width/truncated propulsion flowpath test model, the powered exhaust simulation test model, and the full-length/width propulsion flowpath test model. The test technique for each of these four types of PAI test models is described, and the relevant PAI issues addressed by each test technique are illustrated through the presentation of recent PAI test data.

  5. Infrasound Observations from the Source Physics Experiment (Tests 1, 2, and 3) at the Nevada National Security Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, K. R.; Arrowsmith, S.; Whitaker, R. W.

    2012-12-01

    The overall mission of the National Center for Nuclear Security (NCNS) Source Physics Experiment (SPE-N) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) near Las Vegas, Nevada is to improve upon and develop new physics-based models for underground nuclear explosions using scaled, underground chemical explosions as proxies. Infrasound has been used for many years to study explosive sources both above and below ground. For most of these studies, the explosions were single shot events located in different areas. With the SPE-N series of explosions, we have the rare opportunity to study infrasound generated by a well-characterized source from the same borehole. This reduces the number of variables that must be accounted for when generating models using the acoustic data. At the time of submission, the first three explosive tests (SPE-N-1, SPE-N-2, and SPE-N-3) were successfully conducted on May 3, 2011, October 25, 2011, and July 24, 2012, respectively. SPE-N-1 had a yield of 0.1 ton at a depth of 60 m with a scaled depth of burial of 1,026 m. This explosion was used as a calibration shot as it was the first in the series. SPE-N-2 and SPE-N-3 both had a yield of 1 ton at a depth of 45 m, corresponding to a scaled depth of burial of 357 m. The acoustic amplitudes ranged from ~0.5 Pa at 225 m, to not being detected after 1 km for the SPE-N-1; and ~14 Pa at 225 m, to ~0.1 Pa at 5 km for SPE-N-2 and ~10 Pa to ~0.1 Pa for SPE-N-3. We will focus on detailed acoustic observations from all three tests as well as our efforts to model the infrasound generation at the surface in the area above the explosion.lt;img border=0 src="images/S21C-04_B.jpg">

  6. Real-Time Data Management, IP Telemetry, Data Integration, and Data Center Operations for the Source Physics Experiment (SPE), Nevada National Security Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, G.; Slater, D.; Torrisi, J.; Presser, R.; Williams, M.; Smith, K. D.

    2012-12-01

    The Nevada Seismological Laboratory (NSL) manages time-series data and high-throughput IP telemetry for the National Center for Nuclear Security (NCNS) Source Physics Experiment (SPE), underway on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). During active-source experiments, SPE's heterogeneous systems record over 350 channels of a variety of data types including seismic, infrasound, acoustic, and electro-magnetic. During the interim periods, broadband and short period instruments record approximately 200 channels of continuous, high-sample-rate seismic data. Frequent changes in sensor and station configurations create a challenging meta-data environment. Meta-data account for complete operational histories, including sensor types, serial numbers, gains, sample rates, orientations, instrument responses, data-logger types etc. To date, these catalogue 217 stations, over 40 different sensor types, and over 1000 unique recording configurations (epochs). Facilities for processing, backup, and distribution of time-series data currently span four Linux servers, 60Tb of disk capacity, and two data centers. Bandwidth, physical security, and redundant power and cooling systems for acquisition, processing, and backup servers are provided by NSL's Reno data center. The Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) System Computer Services (SCS) in Las Vegas provides similar facilities for the distribution server. NSL staff handle setup, maintenance, and security of all data management systems. SPE PIs have remote access to meta-data, raw data, and CSS3.0 compilations, via SSL-based transfers such as rsync or secure-copy, as well as shell access for data browsing and limited processing. Meta-data are continuously updated and posted on the Las Vegas distribution server as station histories are better understood and errors are corrected. Raw time series and refined CSS3.0 data compilations with standardized formats are transferred to the Las Vegas data server as available. For better

  7. Ice Crystal Icing Engine Testing in the NASA Glenn Research Center's Propulsion Systems Laboratory: Altitude Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) conducted a full scale ice crystal icing turbofan engine test using an obsolete Allied Signal ALF502-R5 engine in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) at NASA Glenn Research Center. The test article used was the exact engine that experienced a loss of power event after the ingestion of ice crystals while operating at high altitude during a 1997 Honeywell flight test campaign investigating the turbofan engine ice crystal icing phenomena. The test plan included test points conducted at the known flight test campaign field event pressure altitude and at various pressure altitudes ranging from low to high throughout the engine operating envelope. The test article experienced a loss of power event at each of the altitudes tested. For each pressure altitude test point conducted the ambient static temperature was predicted using a NASA engine icing risk computer model for the given ambient static pressure while maintaining the engine speed.

  8. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis at an HIV testing center in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Patrice; Severe, Patrice; Ferdinand, Severine; Goh, Kye Seng; Sola, Christophe; Haas, David W; Johnson, Warren D; Rastogi, Nalin; Pape, Jean W; Fitzgerald, Daniel W

    2006-02-14

    Tuberculosis is the major opportunistic infection of HIV/AIDS in developing countries. We investigated the prevalence rate of multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis at an HIV voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) center in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. A cross-sectional prevalence study of MDR-tuberculosis was conducted at a VCT Center. All patients reporting at least 5 days of cough were screened for tuberculosis, including sputum culture. All Mycobacteria tuberculosis isolates underwent drug susceptibility testing. Between January 2000 and December 2002, isolates from 330 patients underwent drug susceptibility testing. MDR-tuberculosis was documented in 16 (6%) of 281 patients with primary tuberculosis and 10 (20%) of 49 patients with recurrent tuberculosis. In patients with primary disease, 11 (10%) of 115 HIV-infected patients had MDR-tuberculosis compared with five (3%) of 166 HIV-negative patients, (risk ratio 3.2; 95% confidence interval 1.1-8.9; P = 0.0331). Multidrug resistance was prevalent among patients found to have pulmonary tuberculosis at an HIV testing center in Port-au-Prince. Patients with primary pulmonary tuberculosis who were HIV-co-infected were more likely to have multidrug resistance than HIV-negative patients. Assiduous attention to tuberculosis infection control measures at HIV testing centers in developing countries is critical to prevent nosocomial MDR-tuberculosis transmission. Measures may include appropriate ventilation, outdoor seating, ultra-violet lights, and rapid on-site screening for tuberculosis.

  9. Social influence in child care centers: a test of the theory of normative social behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapinski, Maria Knight; Anderson, Jenn; Shugart, Alicia; Todd, Ewen

    2014-01-01

    Child care centers are a unique context for studying communication about the social and personal expectations about health behaviors. The theory of normative social behavior (TNSB; Rimal & Real, 2005 ) provides a framework for testing the role of social and psychological influences on handwashing behaviors among child care workers. A cross-sectional survey of child care workers in 21 centers indicates that outcome expectations and group identity increase the strength of the relationship between descriptive norms and handwashing behavior. Injunctive norms also moderate the effect of descriptive norms on handwashing behavior such that when strong injunctive norms are reported, descriptive norms are positively related to handwashing, but when weak injunctive norms are reported, descriptive norms are negatively related to handwashing. The findings suggest that communication interventions in child care centers can focus on strengthening injunctive norms in order to increase handwashing behaviors in child care centers. The findings also suggest that the theory of normative social behavior can be useful in organizational contexts.

  10. Dispelling the myths behind pediatric patch testing-experience from our tertiary care patch testing centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Sharon E; Steele, Tace; Brod, Bruce; Crawford, Glen H

    2008-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is now known to be a common problem in pediatric populations, accounting for up to 20% of all dermatitis seen in children. Seminal studies conducted over the past decade have demonstrated a prevalence rate in the range of 25% to 60% of children referred for epicutaneous patch testing. This patch test procedure is generally accepted as the gold standardin vivo technique to diagnose allergic contact dermatitis. However, the overwhelming majority of research studies to date have been conducted on adult populations. Increasingly, pediatric patients are undergoing patch test procedures with techniques that have been standardized and optimized almost exclusively in adults. With this article, we hope to emphasize common misconceptions and pitfalls encountered with this approach. In addition, we hope to stimulate research interest in this field so as to determine the optimum patch test conditions and techniques for children.

  11. A novel off-center paddle impeller (OPI) dissolution testing system for reproducible dissolution testing of solid dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yimin; Armenante, Piero M

    2012-02-01

    Dissolution testing is routinely conducted in the pharmaceutical industry to provide in vitro drug release information for quality control purposes. The most common dissolution testing system for solid dosage forms is the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) Dissolution Testing Apparatus 2. This apparatus is very sensitive to the initial location of the tablet, which cannot be controlled because the tablet is dropped into the vessel at the beginning of the test and it may rest at random locations at the vessel's bottom. In this work, a modified Apparatus 2 in which the impeller was placed 8 mm off center in the vessel was designed and tested. This new design was termed "OPI" for "off-center paddle impeller." Dissolution tests were conducted with the OPI apparatus for nine different tablet locations using both disintegrating tablets (prednisone) and nondisintegrating tablets (salicylic acid). The dissolution profiles in the OPI apparatus were largely independent of the tablet location at the vessel's bottom, whereas those obtained in the Standard System generated statistically different profiles depending on the tablet location. The newly proposed OPI system can effectively eliminate artifacts generated by random settling of the tablet at the vessel's bottom, thus making the test more robust. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Underground Test Area Activity Quality Assurance Plan Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farnham, Irene [Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Krenzien, Susan [Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2012-10-01

    This Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) provides the overall quality assurance (QA) requirements and general quality practices to be applied to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) activities. The requirements in this QAP are consistent with DOE Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance (DOE, 2005); U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance for Quality Assurance Project Plans for Modeling (EPA, 2002); and EPA Guidance on the Development, Evaluation, and Application of Environmental Models (EPA, 2009). NNSA/NSO, or designee, must review this QAP every two years. Changes that do not affect the overall scope or requirements will not require an immediate QAP revision but will be incorporated into the next revision cycle after identification. Section 1.0 describes UGTA objectives, participant responsibilities, and administrative and management quality requirements (i.e., training, records, procurement). Section 1.0 also details data management and computer software requirements. Section 2.0 establishes the requirements to ensure newly collected data are valid, existing data uses are appropriate, and environmental-modeling methods are reliable. Section 3.0 provides feedback loops through assessments and reports to management. Section 4.0 provides the framework for corrective actions. Section 5.0 provides references for this document.

  13. Underground Test Area Activity Quality Assurance Plan Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krenzien, Susan [Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Farnham, Irene [Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2015-06-01

    This Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) provides the overall quality assurance (QA) requirements and general quality practices to be applied to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) activities. The requirements in this QAP are consistent with DOE Order 414.1D, Change 1, Quality Assurance (DOE, 2013a); U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance for Quality Assurance Project Plans for Modeling (EPA, 2002); and EPA Guidance on the Development, Evaluation, and Application of Environmental Models (EPA, 2009). If a participant’s requirement document differs from this QAP, the stricter requirement will take precedence. NNSA/NFO, or designee, must review this QAP every two years. Changes that do not affect the overall scope or requirements will not require an immediate QAP revision but will be incorporated into the next revision cycle after identification. Section 1.0 describes UGTA objectives, participant responsibilities, and administrative and management quality requirements (i.e., training, records, procurement). Section 1.0 also details data management and computer software requirements. Section 2.0 establishes the requirements to ensure newly collected data are valid, existing data uses are appropriate, and environmental-modeling methods are reliable. Section 3.0 provides feedback loops through assessments and reports to management. Section 4.0 provides the framework for corrective actions. Section 5.0 provides references for this document.

  14. Underground Test Area Activity Preemptive Review Guidance Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farnham, Irene [Navarro, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Rehfeldt, Kenneth [Navarro, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Preemptive reviews (PERs) of Underground Test Area (UGTA) Activity corrective action unit (CAU) studies are an important and long-maintained quality improvement process. The CAU-specific PER committees provide internal technical review of ongoing work throughout the CAU lifecycle. The reviews, identified in the UGTA Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) (Sections 1.3.5.1 and 3.2), assure work is comprehensive, accurate, in keeping with the state of the art, and consistent with CAU goals. PER committees review various products, including data, documents, software/codes, analyses, and models. PER committees may also review technical briefings including Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO)-required presentations to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and presentations supporting key technical decisions (e.g., investigation plans and approaches). PER committees provide technical recommendations to support regulatory decisions that are the responsibility of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) and NDEP.

  15. NASA Glenn Research Center's Fuel Cell Stack, Ancillary and System Test and Development Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyselle, Patricia L.; Prokopius, Kevin P.; Becks, Larry A.; Burger, Thomas H.; Dick, Joseph F.; Rodriguez, George; Bremenour, Frank; Long, Zedock

    2011-01-01

    At the NASA Glenn Research Center, a fully operational fuel cell test and evaluation laboratory is available which is capable of evaluating fuel cell components and systems for future NASA missions. Components and subsystems of various types can be operated and monitored under a variety of conditions utilizing different reactants. This fuel cell facility can test the effectiveness of various component and system designs to meet NASA's needs.

  16. The Pacific Marine Energy Center - South Energy Test Site (PMEC-SETS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellin, Dan; Batten, Belinda

    2018-02-07

    The overall goal of this project was to build on existing progress to establish the Pacific Marine Energy Center South Energy Test Site (PMEC-SETS) as the nation's first fully permitted test site for wave energy converter arrays. Specifically, it plays an essential role in reducing levelized cost of energy for the wave energy industry by providing both the facility and resources to addres the challenges of cost reduction.

  17. A Comparative Analysis of MEXT English Reading Textbooks and Japan's National Center Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Despite the influence of changing demographics in Japan, the National Center Test for University Entrance Exams continues to assert an ever increasing role in the process of university admissions. In preparation for this examination, the majority of senior high school students learn from textbooks approved by the Japanese Ministry of Education,…

  18. Background-Oriented Schlieren Applications in NASA Glenn Research Center's Ground Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clem, Michelle M.; Woike, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    This is a presentation for an invited session at the 2015 SciTech Conference 53rd AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting. The presentation covers the recent applications of Background-Oriented Schlieren in NASA Glenn Research Center's ground test facilities, such as the 8x6 SWT, open jet rig, and AAPL.

  19. Usability Testing, User-Centered Design, and LibGuides Subject Guides: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonsteby, Alec; DeJonghe, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Usability testing has become a routine way for many libraries to ensure that their Web presence is user-friendly and accessible. At the same time, popular subject guide creation systems, such as LibGuides, decentralize Web content creation and put authorship into the hands of librarians who may not be trained in user-centered design principles. At…

  20. Gerald L. Epstein, PhD: director, center for science, technology, and security policy, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Interview by Madeline Drexler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Gerald L

    2009-12-01

    Over his entire career, Gerald Epstein has toiled at the nexus of science, technology, and security. From 2003 to 2009, he was Senior Fellow for Science and Security at the Center for Strategic and International Studies Homeland Security Program, where he worked on reducing biological weapons threats, improving national preparedness, and easing potential tensions between the scientific research and national security communities. Epstein came to CSIS from the Institute for Defense Analyses. From 1996 to 2001, he served in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. And from 1983 to 1989, and again from 1991 until its demise in 1995, Epstein worked at the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment, where he directed a study on the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, alongside research on other global security topics. A recognized expert in biological risk reduction, Epstein was actually trained as a physicist, having received SB degrees in physics and electrical engineering from MIT, and a PhD in physics from the University of California at Berkeley. How, then, did he come to study the evolving threat from bioterrorism? "What compelled me about bioterrorism was that it was a stellar example of a topic that would lead to a train wreck between the scientific community and the security community unless they figured out how to work together," he said. "The distance between a laboratory and a very large consequence event is a lot shorter in biology than in any other field. I got into bioterrorism to help make sure that the security community doesn't get so scared of the science that it shuts it down, and that the science community isn't so oblivious of security concerns that it pays no attention to them." Epstein spoke on November 6, 2009, with contributing writer Madeline Drexler, author of Emerging Epidemics: The Menace of New Infections (Penguin, 2009), an updated version of an earlier volume. Drexler holds a visiting appointment at the

  1. The environmental dimension of national security: A test of systems analysis methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porfiriev, Boris N.

    1992-11-01

    The systems approach permits us to analyze national security as a cluster of interconnected elements, in which the environmental dimension appears to be the most important one. The environmental problem is divided into two main aspects: environmental security per se and the impact of environment on the overall status of a nation's security. It is argued here that the quality of life and health serve as both the main objective and the principal criterion of environmental security in a social system. Indices of these two factors are used in this article as indicators of the state of this type of security. They confirm that vast areas of Russia, the Ukraine, and Central Asia (especially the Aral Sea region) should be considered as presenting a substantial risk to local people and even producing global impacts on both natural and man-made systems. Environmental factors that destabilize national security are also divided into two groups: those that impact social systems directly and negatively (mainly natural disasters) and technological and sociopolitical agents that cause indirect impacts, in both war and peace time, as well as in the civil and military sectors of the economy. Developments in the former Soviet Union (the Commonwealth of Independent States) are used as an illustration of the consequences that such impacts may have on the status of national security.

  2. Psychiatric patients' return for HIV/STI test results in mental health centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Souto Melo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess individual and/or health service factors associated with patients returning for results of HIV or sexually transmitted infection (STI tests in mental health centers. METHODS: Cross-sectional national multicenter study among 2,080 patients randomly selected from 26 Brazilian mental health centers in 2007. Multilevel logistic regression was used to assess the effect of individual (level 1 and mental health service characteristics (level 2 on receipt of test results. RESULTS: The rate of returning HIV/STI test results was 79.6%. Among health service characteristics examined, only condom distribution was associated with receiving HIV/STI test results, whereas several individual characteristics were independently associated including living in the same city where treatment centers are; being single; not having heard of AIDS; and not having been previously HIV tested. CONCLUSIONS: It is urgent to expand HIV/STI testing in health services which provide care for patients with potentially increased vulnerability to these conditions, and to promote better integration between mental health and health services.

  3. The Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Mark A.; Zak, Bernard Daniel; Backus, George A.; Ivey, Mark D.; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick

    2008-11-01

    The Arctic region is rapidly changing in a way that will affect the rest of the world. Parts of Alaska, western Canada, and Siberia are currently warming at twice the global rate. This warming trend is accelerating permafrost deterioration, coastal erosion, snow and ice loss, and other changes that are a direct consequence of climate change. Climatologists have long understood that changes in the Arctic would be faster and more intense than elsewhere on the planet, but the degree and speed of the changes were underestimated compared to recent observations. Policy makers have not yet had time to examine the latest evidence or appreciate the nature of the consequences. Thus, the abruptness and severity of an unfolding Arctic climate crisis has not been incorporated into long-range planning. The purpose of this report is to briefly review the physical basis for global climate change and Arctic amplification, summarize the ongoing observations, discuss the potential consequences, explain the need for an objective risk assessment, develop scenarios for future change, review existing modeling capabilities and the need for better regional models, and finally to make recommendations for Sandia's future role in preparing our leaders to deal with impacts of Arctic climate change on national security. Accurate and credible regional-scale climate models are still several years in the future, and those models are essential for estimating climate impacts around the globe. This study demonstrates how a scenario-based method may be used to give insights into climate impacts on a regional scale and possible mitigation. Because of our experience in the Arctic and widespread recognition of the Arctic's importance in the Earth climate system we chose the Arctic as a test case for an assessment of climate impacts on national security. Sandia can make a swift and significant contribution by applying modeling and simulation tools with internal collaborations as well as with

  4. Overview of the Orion Vibroacoustic Test Capability at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, William O.; Hozman, Aron D.; McNelis, Mark E.; Otten, Kim D.

    2008-01-01

    In order to support the environmental test needs for our new Orion and Constellation program, NASA is developing unique world-class test facilities. To optimize this testing of spaceflight hardware while minimizing transportation issues, a one-stop, under one roof test capability is being developed at the Space Power Facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center's Plum Brook Station. This facility will provide the capability to perform the following environmental testing: (1) reverberation acoustic testing, (2) mechanical base-shake sine testing, (3) modal testing, (4) thermal-vacuum testing, and (5) EMI/EMC (electromagnetic interference and compatibility) testing. An overview of this test capability will be provided in this presentation, with special focus on the two new vibroacoustic test facilities currently being designed and built, the Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) and the Mechanical Vibration Facility (MVF). Testing of the engineering developmental hardware and qualification hardware of the Orion (Crew Exploration Vehicle) will commence shortly after the facilities are commissioned.

  5. The Development of the Acoustic Design of NASA Glenn Research Center's New Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; Hozman, Aron D.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA s space exploration program. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 ft3 in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world s known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada s acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic design and subsequent on-going construction.

  6. Co-infection of HIV and HBV in voluntary counseling and testing center in Abidjan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouassi-M ’Bengue A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the co-infection of hepatitis B virus (HBV and immune deficiency virus (HIV among clients consulting at the Voluntary Counseling and Testing Center (VCT Center of the Institut Pasteur de C ôte d ’Ivoire (IPCI. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted from April to June 2010 at the VCT of IPCI. All clients attending the VCT of IPCI for HIV test after having signed the informed consent form were included in the study. Venous blood samples were collected from the clients after an interview. Then the rapid tests for screening of HIV infection (Determine HIV 1/2 of Abbott and Genie II HIV-1/HIV-2, Bio-Rad were performed. As for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg test, it was performed using ELISA test system using Monolisa HBsAg Ultra-Bio-Rad. Results: Of 278 samples analyzed, 30 were positive to antibody against HIV-1, giving a seroprevalence of about 10.8%, and 35 were positive to HBsAg, giving a seroprevalence of 12.6%. As for co-infection of HIV and HBV, it was 7/278 cases about 2.5%. Conclusions: It can be concluded that co-infection of HBV and HIV is relatively low among clients consulting at the VCT of the IPCI. Serological surveillance should be systematic in various HIV testing centers in the country. The use of rapid tests for detection of HBsAg allows a lot of tests to be realized. However, the choice of these tests depends on the evaluation results in reference laboratories and situation on ground.

  7. The Brothers Were Wright - An Abridged History of Wind Tunnel Testing at Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, Steve

    2017-01-01

    The Wright Brothers used wind tunnel data to refine their design for the first successful airplane back in 1903. Today, wind tunnels are still in use all over the world gathering data to improve the design of cars, trucks, airplanes, missiles and spacecraft. Ames Research Center is home to many wind tunnels, including the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel complex. Built in the early 1950s, it is one of the premiere transonic and supersonic testing facilities in the country. Every manned spacecraft has been tested in the wind tunnels at Ames. This is a testing history from past to present.

  8. Virtual test: A student-centered software to measure student's critical thinking on human disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusyati, Lilit; Firman, Harry

    2016-02-01

    The study "Virtual Test: A Student-Centered Software to Measure Student's Critical Thinking on Human Disease" is descriptive research. The background is importance of computer-based test that use element and sub element of critical thinking. Aim of this study is development of multiple choices to measure critical thinking that made by student-centered software. Instruments to collect data are (1) construct validity sheet by expert judge (lecturer and medical doctor) and professional judge (science teacher); and (2) test legibility sheet by science teacher and junior high school student. Participants consisted of science teacher, lecturer, and medical doctor as validator; and the students as respondent. Result of this study are describe about characteristic of virtual test that use to measure student's critical thinking on human disease, analyze result of legibility test by students and science teachers, analyze result of expert judgment by science teachers and medical doctor, and analyze result of trial test of virtual test at junior high school. Generally, result analysis shown characteristic of multiple choices to measure critical thinking was made by eight elements and 26 sub elements that developed by Inch et al.; complete by relevant information; and have validity and reliability more than "enough". Furthermore, specific characteristic of multiple choices to measure critical thinking are information in form science comic, table, figure, article, and video; correct structure of language; add source of citation; and question can guide student to critical thinking logically.

  9. The Analysis of North Korea's Nuclear Tests by Turkish National Data Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semin, K.; Meral Ozel, N.; Destici, T. C.; Necmioglu, O.; Kocak, S.

    2013-12-01

    The Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) announced the conduct of a third underground nuclear test on 12 February 2013 in the northeastern part of the country as the previous tests that were conducted in 2009 and 2006. The latest nuclear test is the best detected nuclear event by the global seismic networks. The magnitude estimates show that each new test increased in size when compared with the previous one. As Turkish NDC (National Data Center), we have analyzed the 2013 and 2009 nuclear tests using seismic data from International Monitoring System (IMS) stations through the International Data Center (IDC) located in Vienna. Discrimination analysis was performed based on mb:Ms magnitude ratio and spectral analysis. We have also applied array based waveform cross-correlation to show the similarity of the nuclear tests and precise arrival time measurements for relative location estimates and basic infrasound analysis using two IMS infrasound stations for the 2013 event. Seismic analysis were performed using softwares such as Geotool, EP (Event processor from Norsar) and Seismic Analysis Code (SAC) and the infrasound data were analyzed by using PMCC from CEA-France. The IMS network is operating under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO). The CTBTO verification system is under continuous development, also making use of the state of the art technologies and methodologies.

  10. Ares Launch Vehicles Development Awakens Historic Test Stands at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumbacher, Daniel L.; Burt, Richard K.

    2008-01-01

    This paper chronicles the rebirth of two national rocket testing assets located at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center: the Dynamic Test Stand (also known as the Ground Vibration Test Stand) and the Static Test Stand (also known as the Main Propulsion Test Stand). It will touch on the historical significance of these special facilities, while introducing the requirements driving modifications for testing a new generation space transportation system, which is set to come on line after the Space Shuttle is retired in 2010. In many ways, America's journey to explore the Moon begins at the Marshall Center, which is developing the Ares I crew launch vehicle and the Ares V cargo launch vehicle, along with managing the Lunar Precursor Robotic Program and leading the Lunar Lander descent stage work, among other Constellation Program assignments. An important component of this work is housed in Marshall's Engineering Directorate, which manages more than 40 facilities capable of a full spectrum of rocket and space transportation technology testing - from small components to full-up engine systems. The engineers and technicians who operate these test facilities have more than a thousand years of combined experience in this highly specialized field. Marshall has one of the few government test groups in the United States with responsibility for the overall performance of a test program from conception to completion. The Test Laboratory has facilities dating back to the early 1960s, when the test stands needed for the Apollo Program and other scientific endeavors were commissioned and built along the Marshall Center's southern boundary, with logistics access by air, railroad, and barge or boat on the Tennessee River. NASA and its industry partners are designing and developing a new human-rated system based on the requirements for safe, reliable, and cost-effective transportation solutions. Given below are summaries of the Dynamic Test Stand and the Static Test Stand capabilities

  11. Asset Analysis and Operational Concepts for Separation Assurance Flight Testing at Dryden Flight Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Guillermo J.; Arteaga, Ricardo A.

    2011-01-01

    A preliminary survey of existing separation assurance and collision avoidance advancements, technologies, and efforts has been conducted in order to develop a concept of operations for flight testing autonomous separation assurance at Dryden Flight Research Center. This effort was part of the Unmanned Aerial Systems in the National Airspace System project. The survey focused primarily on separation assurance projects validated through flight testing (including lessons learned), however current forays into the field were also examined. Comparisons between current Dryden flight and range assets were conducted using House of Quality matrices in order to allow project management to make determinations regarding asset utilization for future flight tests. This was conducted in order to establish a body of knowledge of the current collision avoidance landscape, and thus focus Dryden s efforts more effectively towards the providing of assets and test ranges for future flight testing within this research field.

  12. A High Temperature Cyclic Oxidation Data Base for Selected Materials Tested at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Charles A.

    2003-01-01

    The cyclic oxidation test results for some 1000 high temperature commercial and experimental alloys have been collected in an EXCEL database. This database represents over thirty years of research at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The data is in the form of a series of runs of specific weight change versus time values for a set of samples tested at a given temperature, cycle time, and exposure time. Included on each run is a set of embedded plots of the critical data. The nature of the data is discussed along with analysis of the cyclic oxidation process. In addition examples are given as to how a set of results can be analyzed. The data is assembled on a read-only compact disk which is available on request from Materials Durability Branch, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio.

  13. Analysis of the Aircraft Flying Hour Program at the Pacific Missile Test Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    David R. Whipple, hai artment of Adinst<t’e c2e ABSTRACT "Yhis thesis is an analysis of the flight hour cost program at the Pacific Missile Test Center...LEVEL 2 TRAIN COSTS TO BE COSTS COSTS COSTS COSTS NOIA LIZED A-3 A-6 CIVILIANS 87 306,000 A-7 CONTRCTOR F-4 STSI 81 620,325 F-14 SAC 33 568,750 F-18 HIC 5

  14. The Author’s Guide to Writing Air Force Flight Test Center Technical Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    etc., was not accomplished, recommend IOT &E NOT evaluate the system until it has been qualified, or state limitations for IOT &E. The idea is that IOT ...report must be entered in all capital letters. Figure C3 shows an example of the SF 298 with appropriate portion marking for a classified report. PREFACE...paragraph. Edwards Air Force Base Air Force Flight Test Center AUGUST 2009 AUTHOR’S GUIDE C-5 Figure C3 Example SF 298 in Classified

  15. Economic analysis of requests for laboratory tests in primary health care centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunic, Lejla

    2012-03-01

    Operation of the Primary health care center and Medical-biochemical laboratories depends on the number of performed laboratory tests. The number of unnecessary tests significantly affect the operation of health institutions. We analyzed the 1000 requests for laboratory tests at the Primary Health Care Centre in Gracanica from primary care units. Based on the requests for laboratory diagnostics advisable diagnoses from primary health care unit in the Primary Health Care Center (PHC) we made an economic analysis of the total required laboratory tests in the requests for laboratory diagnosis. Incorporating the economic analysis of laboratory tests in requests for laboratory diagnosis by doctors in primary health care (PHC) and the economic analysis of laboratory tests by the disease in primary health care. The economic value of 5333 laboratory tests was 84 312 points (1 point is 0.80 KM). Of the total value of the index score requirements of GPs are 44, 1%, the requirement of family doctors account for 40% and requirements of other specialists make up 15, 9%.. In the requests of the PHC units for laboratory tests are required all levels of services: urine, CBC, SE, glucose, bilirubine, ALT, AST, AF, CK, cholesterol, HDL chol., triglicerdes, creatinine, urea, uric acid, CRP, fibrinogen, calcium and phosphorus. The following requests are the most common laboratory tests: urine, CBC, blood glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, aminotransferases, creatinine, urea. The doctors in family practice most often requested: blood glucose, urine, CBC, SE, TGL. , Chol., ALT, AST, creatinine and urea. General practitioners were demanding more cholesterol and triglycerides, and family medicine doctors were demanding less cholesterol and triglycerides and more often CRP, fibrinogen, ALT, AST, what from the level of economic cost analysis rises the issue whether this was justified?

  16. Field test of a fully distributed fiber optic intrusion detection system for long-distance security monitoring of national borderline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huijuan; Wang, Zinan; Peng, Fei; Peng, Zhengpu; Li, Xiaoyu; Wu, Yu; Rao, Yunjiang

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we presented a successful field test of a fully distributed fiber-optical intrusion detection system for security monitoring of 220km long national borderline in China. Such a fiber fence shows its outstanding ability to operate at extreme weather conditions, like strong wind, heavy snow and storm, wide temperature range from -55° to +50°, et al, which may be the most difficult and complicated environment for practical applications of fiber fences.

  17. The Testing Behind The Test Facility: The Acoustic Design of the NASA Glenn Research Center's World-Class Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hozman, Aron D.; Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, USA. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA's space exploration program. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 cu ft in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world's known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada's acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama, USA. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic design and subsequent on-going construction.

  18. Liquid-propellant rocket engine testing at Arnold Engineering Development Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehoff, Bryan; Tucker, Edgar K.; McAmis, Rob W.

    A continuing need exists for facilities to test both storable and cryogenic liquid-propellant rocket engines and stages at simulated altitude as part of a resposible acquisition risk reduction program. Storable propellant Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) Post Boost Vehicles (PBV) require simulated altitude testing as part of the Aging and Surveillance programs designed to ensure an effective and reliable missile system. Likewise, simulated altitude testing is necessary acquisition risk reduction for advanced cryogenic rocket engines and stages that are being upgraded or developed to satisfy a variety of defense and commercial payload requirements. A review of liquid rocket test facilities at Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) is presented. The facility capabilities used in support of acquisition risk reduction are described, as are new facility capabilities recently completed or funded. Furthermore, a description of the technology applications available at AEDC in support of liquid rocket diagnostics, analysis, and evaluation techniques is presented.

  19. Recommended Strain Gage Application Procedures for Various Langley Research Center Balances and Test Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Thomas C., Sr.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center uses more than 10000 strain gages per year in supporting its various research programs. The character of the testing at LaRC is such that the types of strain gage installations, the materials they are applied to, and the test environments encountered, require many varied approaches for installing strain gages. These installations must be accomplished in the most technically discerning and appropriate manner. This technical memorandum is offered as an assisting guide in helping the strain gage user to determine the appropriate approach for a given strain gage application requirement. Specifically, this document offers detailed recommendations for strain gaging the following: LaRC-Designed balances, LARC custom transducers, certain composite materials and alloys, high-temperature test articles, and selected non-typical or unique materials or test conditions.

  20. Experimental Platform for Usability Testing of Secure Medical Sensor Network Protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jacob; Lo, Benny P.; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2008-01-01

    Implementing security mechanisms such as access control for clinical use is a challenging research issue in BSN due to its required heterogeneous operating responses ranging from chronic diseases management to emergency care. To ensure the clinical uptake of the BSN technology, appropriately desi...

  1. 26 CFR 1.141-4 - Private security or payment test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...; (ii) The amount and timing of the payments are not structured or designed to reflect the payment of.... Generally applicable tax. (i) Authority N issues bonds to finance the construction of a stadium. Under a... stadium. X will not, however, make any payments for this private business use. The security for the bonds...

  2. The DETER Project: Advancing the Science of Cyber Security Experimentation and Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    such use. DETER is currently setting up a Moodle [5] server, slated to be made public in Fall 2010, that will host educational content and facilitate...Security Research,” in Proceedings of Tridentcom, March 2006. [4] Emulab Testbed Web page, http://www.emulab.net [5] Moodle Course Management Tool

  3. Final Report Feasibility Study for the California Wave Energy Test Center (CalWavesm)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blakeslee, Samuel Norman [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States). Inst. for Advanced Technology and Public Policy; Toman, William I. [Protean Wave Energy Ltd., Los Osos, CA (United States); Williams, Richard B. [Leidos Maritime Solutions, Reston, VA (United States); Davy, Douglas M. [CH2M, Sacramento, CA (United States); West, Anna [Kearns and West, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Connet, Randy M. [Omega Power Engineers, LLC, Anaheim, CA (United States); Thompson, Janet [Kearns and West, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Dolan, Dale [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States); Baltimore, Craig [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States); Jacobson, Paul [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Knoxville, TN (United States); Hagerman, George [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Potter, Chris [California Natural Resources Agency, Sacramento, CA (United States); Dooher, Brendan [Pacific Gas and Electric Company, San Francisco, CA (United States); Wendt, Dean [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States); Sheppard, Colin [Humboldt State Univ., Arcata, CA (United States); Harris, Andrew [Humboldt State Univ., Arcata, CA (United States); Lawson, W. Graham [Power Delivery Consultants, Inc., Albany, NY (United States)

    2017-07-31

    The California Wave Energy Test Center (CalWave) Feasibility Study project was funded over multiple phases by the Department of Energy to perform an interdisciplinary feasibility assessment to analyze the engineering, permitting, and stakeholder requirements to establish an open water, fully energetic, grid connected, wave energy test center off the coast of California for the purposes of advancing U.S. wave energy research, development, and testing capabilities. Work under this grant included wave energy resource characterization, grid impact and interconnection requirements, port infrastructure and maritime industry capability/suitability to accommodate the industry at research, demonstration and commercial scale, and macro and micro siting considerations. CalWave Phase I performed a macro-siting and down-selection process focusing on two potential test sites in California: Humboldt Bay and Vandenberg Air Force Base. This work resulted in the Vandenberg Air Force Base site being chosen as the most favorable site based on a peer reviewed criteria matrix. CalWave Phase II focused on four siting location alternatives along the Vandenberg Air Force Base coastline and culminated with a final siting down-selection. Key outcomes from this work include completion of preliminary engineering and systems integration work, a robust turnkey cost estimate, shoreside and subsea hazards assessment, storm wave analysis, lessons learned reports from several maritime disciplines, test center benchmarking as compared to existing international test sites, analysis of existing applicable environmental literature, the completion of a preliminary regulatory, permitting and licensing roadmap, robust interaction and engagement with state and federal regulatory agency personnel and local stakeholders, and the population of a Draft Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Preliminary Application Document (PAD). Analysis of existing offshore oil and gas infrastructure was also performed

  4. Performance of the Primary Mirror Center-of-Curvature Optical Metrology System during Cryogenic Testing of the JWST Pathfinder Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadaway, James B.; Wells, Conrad; Olczak, Gene; Waldman, Mark; Whitman, Tony; Cosentino, Joseph; Connolly, Mark; Chaney, David; Telfer, Randal

    2016-01-01

    The JWST primary mirror consists of 18 1.5 m hexagonal segments, each with 6-DoF and RoC adjustment. The telescope will be tested at its cryogenic operating temperature at Johnson Space Center. The testing will include center-of-curvature measurements of the PM, using the Center-of-Curvature Optical Assembly (COCOA) and the Absolute Distance Meter Assembly (ADMA). The performance of these metrology systems, including hardware, software, procedures, was assessed during two cryogenic tests at JSC, using the JWST Pathfinder telescope. This paper describes the test setup, the testing performed, and the resulting metrology system performance.

  5. Customer Satisfaction: A Comparison of Community College and Employment Security Commission Joblink Career Centers in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deese, Stephanie

    The Workforce Investment Act of 1998 provided states with a great amount of flexibility in the implementation of a system-wide approach to job training and workforce development. The legislation consolidated employment and training services into a one-stop system that is known as JobLink Career Centers in North Carolina. This document presents…

  6. The effect of alternative work schedules (AWS) on performance during acquisition based testing at the U.S. Army Aberdeen Test Center

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Alicia J.

    2014-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This project analyzed the effects of an alternate work schedule (AWS) on the performance of acquisition based testing conducted at the U.S. Army Aberdeen Test Center (ATC), a subordinate test center to the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command. The literature review uncovered how an AWS improved employee work and life balance and performance at three separate external companies. Other potential AWS success factors such as employee abse...

  7. Test Program for Stirling Radioisotope Generator Hardware at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Edward J.; Bolotin, Gary S.; Oriti, Salvatore M.

    2015-01-01

    Stirling-based energy conversion technology has demonstrated the potential of high efficiency and low mass power systems for future space missions. This capability is beneficial, if not essential, to making certain deep space missions possible. Significant progress was made developing the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), a 140-W radioisotope power system. A variety of flight-like hardware, including Stirling convertors, controllers, and housings, was designed and built under the ASRG flight development project. To support future Stirling-based power system development NASA has proposals that, if funded, will allow this hardware to go on test at the NASA Glenn Research Center. While future flight hardware may not be identical to the hardware developed under the ASRG flight development project, many components will likely be similar, and system architectures may have heritage to ASRG. Thus, the importance of testing the ASRG hardware to the development of future Stirling-based power systems cannot be understated. This proposed testing will include performance testing, extended operation to establish an extensive reliability database, and characterization testing to quantify subsystem and system performance and better understand system interfaces. This paper details this proposed test program for Stirling radioisotope generator hardware at NASA Glenn. It explains the rationale behind the proposed tests and how these tests will meet the stated objectives.

  8. 33 CFR 334.180 - Patuxent River, Md.; restricted areas, U.S. Naval Air Test Center, Patuxent River, Md.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... areas, U.S. Naval Air Test Center, Patuxent River, Md. 334.180 Section 334.180 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.180 Patuxent River, Md.; restricted areas, U.S. Naval Air Test Center, Patuxent River, Md...

  9. Testing General Relativity with Stellar Orbits around the Supermassive Black Hole in Our Galactic Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hees, A.; Do, T.; Ghez, A. M.; Martinez, G. D.; Naoz, S.; Becklin, E. E.; Boehle, A.; Chappell, S.; Chu, D.; Dehghanfar, A.; Kosmo, K.; Lu, J. R.; Matthews, K.; Morris, M. R.; Sakai, S.; Schödel, R.; Witzel, G.

    2017-05-01

    We demonstrate that short-period stars orbiting around the supermassive black hole in our Galactic center can successfully be used to probe the gravitational theory in a strong regime. We use 19 years of observations of the two best measured short-period stars orbiting our Galactic center to constrain a hypothetical fifth force that arises in various scenarios motivated by the development of a unification theory or in some models of dark matter and dark energy. No deviation from general relativity is reported and the fifth force strength is restricted to an upper 95% confidence limit of |α | confidence upper limit on a linear drift of the argument of periastron of the short-period star S0-2 of |ω˙ S0-2| self-consistent test of the gravitational theory using orbital dynamic in a strong gravitational regime, that of a supermassive black hole. A sensitivity analysis for future measurements is also presented.

  10. Control System Applicable Use Assessment of the Secure Computing Corporation - Secure Firewall (Sidewinder)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadley, Mark D.; Clements, Samuel L.

    2009-01-01

    Battelle’s National Security & Defense objective is, “applying unmatched expertise and unique facilities to deliver homeland security solutions. From detection and protection against weapons of mass destruction to emergency preparedness/response and protection of critical infrastructure, we are working with industry and government to integrate policy, operational, technological, and logistical parameters that will secure a safe future”. In an ongoing effort to meet this mission, engagements with industry that are intended to improve operational and technical attributes of commercial solutions that are related to national security initiatives are necessary. This necessity will ensure that capabilities for protecting critical infrastructure assets are considered by commercial entities in their development, design, and deployment lifecycles thus addressing the alignment of identified deficiencies and improvements needed to support national cyber security initiatives. The Secure Firewall (Sidewinder) appliance by Secure Computing was assessed for applicable use in critical infrastructure control system environments, such as electric power, nuclear and other facilities containing critical systems that require augmented protection from cyber threat. The testing was performed in the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL) Electric Infrastructure Operations Center (EIOC). The Secure Firewall was tested in a network configuration that emulates a typical control center network and then evaluated. A number of observations and recommendations are included in this report relating to features currently included in the Secure Firewall that support critical infrastructure security needs.

  11. Test of Hydrogen-Oxygen PEM Fuel Cell Stack at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bents, David J.; Scullin, Vincent J.; Chang, Bei-Jiann; Johnson, Donald W.; Garcia, Christopher P.; Jakupca, Ian J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes performance characterization tests of a 64 cell hydrogen oxygen PEM fuel cell stack at NASA Glenn Research Center in February 2003. The tests were part of NASA's ongoing effort to develop a regenerative fuel cell for aerospace energy storage applications. The purpose of the tests was to verify capability of this stack to operate within a regenerative fuel cell, and to compare performance with earlier test results recorded by the stack developer. Test results obtained include polarization performance of the stack at 50 and 100 psig system pressure, and a steady state endurance run at 100 psig. A maximum power output of 4.8 kWe was observed during polarization runs, and the stack sustained a steady power output of 4.0 kWe during the endurance run. The performance data obtained from these tests compare reasonably close to the stack developer's results although some additional spread between best to worst performing cell voltages was observed. Throughout the tests, the stack demonstrated the consistent performance and repeatable behavior required for regenerative fuel cell operation.

  12. Allergic contact dermatitis: patch testing results at Mount Sinai Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jane Y; Al Naami, Munera; Markowitz, Orit; Hadi, Suhail M

    2010-01-01

    Patch testing is an important diagnostic tool commonly used to identify allergens responsible for allergic contact dermatitis, especially in cases where the diagnosis is not clearly apparent. The authors report the patch test results from 2004-2008 and compare the results with the North American Contact Dermatitis Group and Mayo Clinic. Four hundred thirty-four patients with suspected allergic contact dermatitis underwent standardized patch testing with a tray consisting of 50 allergens at Mount Sinai Medical Center. Two hundred ninety patients (66.8%) had positive reactions to at least one allergen. The most frequent contact allergens included nickel sulfate (13%), fragrance mix (9.6%), propylene glycol (7.8%), neomycin sulfate (6.6%), thimerosal (6.4%), bacitracin (6.2%), and sodium gold thiosulfate (5.8%).

  13. Future aerospace ground test facility requirements for the Arnold Engineering Development Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, Mark E.; Baron, Judson R.; Bogdonoff, Seymour M.; Carter, Donald I.; Couch, Lana M.; Fanning, Arthur E.; Heiser, William H.; Koff, Bernard L.; Melnik, Robert E.; Mercer, Stephen C.

    1992-01-01

    Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) was conceived at the close of World War II, when major new developments in flight technology were presaged by new aerodynamic and propulsion concepts. During the past 40 years, AEDC has played a significant part in the development of many aerospace systems. The original plans were extended through the years by some additional facilities, particularly in the area of propulsion testing. AEDC now has undertaken development of a master plan in an attempt to project requirements and to plan for ground test and computational facilities over the coming 20 to 30 years. This report was prepared in response to an AEDC request that the National Research Council (NRC) assemble a committee to prepare guidance for planning and modernizing AEDC facilities for the development and testing of future classes of aerospace systems as envisaged by the U.S. Air Force.

  14. A dynamic mathematical test of international property securities bubbles and crashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Eddie C. M.; Zheng, Xian; Wang, Hui

    2010-04-01

    This study investigates property securities bubbles and crashes by using a dynamic mathematical methodology developed from the previous research (Watanabe et al. 2007a, b [31,32]). The improved model is used to detect the bubble and crash periods in five international countries/cities (namely, United States, United Kingdom, Japan, Hong Kong and Singapore) from Jan, 2000 to Oct, 2008. By this model definition, we are able to detect the beginning of each bubble period even before it bursts. Meanwhile, the empirical results show that most of property securities markets experienced bubble periods between 2003 and 2007, and crashes happened in Apr 2008 triggered by the Subprime Mortgage Crisis of US. In contrast, Japan suffered the shortest bubble period and no evidence has documented the existence of crash there.

  15. National Security Cutter: Enhanced Oversight Needed to Ensure Problems Discovered during Testing and Operations Are Addressed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    2013 to 2014, the NSC interdicted nearly 60 percent more pounds of drugs (cocaine and marijuana ) per day compared to the HECs operating during the...and Evaluation 8 Figure 4: National Security Cutter Combat Weapon Systems 15 Figure 5: Wave Height of Different Sea States Compared to the National...is intended to be capable of extended deployments, increased endurance, and enhanced communication and surveillance systems compared to the High

  16. Space Environment Testing of Photovoltaic Array Systems at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Brandon S.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    To successfully operate a photovoltaic (PV) array system in space requires planning and testing to account for the effects of the space environment. It is critical to understand space environment interactions not only on the PV components, but also the array substrate materials, wiring harnesses, connectors, and protection circuitry (e.g. blocking diodes). Key elements of the space environment which must be accounted for in a PV system design include: Solar Photon Radiation, Charged Particle Radiation, Plasma, and Thermal Cycling. While solar photon radiation is central to generating power in PV systems, the complete spectrum includes short wavelength ultraviolet components, which photo-ionize materials, as well as long wavelength infrared which heat materials. High energy electron radiation has been demonstrated to significantly reduce the output power of III-V type PV cells; and proton radiation damages material surfaces - often impacting coverglasses and antireflective coatings. Plasma environments influence electrostatic charging of PV array materials, and must be understood to ensure that long duration arcs do not form and potentially destroy PV cells. Thermal cycling impacts all components on a PV array by inducing stresses due to thermal expansion and contraction. Given such demanding environments, and the complexity of structures and materials that form a PV array system, mission success can only be ensured through realistic testing in the laboratory. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a broad space environment test capability to allow PV array designers and manufacturers to verify their system's integrity and avoid costly on-orbit failures. The Marshall Space Flight Center test capabilities are available to government, commercial, and university customers. Test solutions are tailored to meet the customer's needs, and can include performance assessments, such as flash testing in the case of PV cells.

  17. Underground Test Area Fiscal Year 2012 Annual Quality Assurance Report Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farnham, Irene [Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Marutzky, Sam [Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This report is mandated by the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) and identifies the UGTA quality assurance (QA) activities for fiscal year (FY) 2012. All UGTA organizations—U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO); Desert Research Institute (DRI); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I); National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec); and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)—conducted QA activities in FY 2012. The activities included conducting assessments, identifying findings and completing corrective actions, evaluating laboratory performance, revising the QAPP, and publishing documents. In addition, processes and procedures were developed to address deficiencies identified in the FY 2011 QAPP gap analysis.

  18. Underground Test Area Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Quality Assurance Report Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krenzien, Susan [Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Marutzky, Sam [Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2014-01-01

    This report is required by the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) and identifies the UGTA quality assurance (QA) activities for fiscal year (FY) 2013. All UGTA organizations—U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO); Desert Research Institute (DRI); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I); National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec); and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)—conducted QA activities in FY 2013. The activities included conducting assessments, identifying findings and completing corrective actions, evaluating laboratory performance, and publishing documents. In addition, integrated UGTA required reading and corrective action tracking was instituted.

  19. A framework for evaluating electronic health record vendor user-centered design and usability testing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratwani, Raj M; Zachary Hettinger, A; Kosydar, Allison; Fairbanks, Rollin J; Hodgkins, Michael L

    2017-04-01

    Currently, there are few resources for electronic health record (EHR) purchasers and end users to understand the usability processes employed by EHR vendors during product design and development. We developed a framework, based on human factors literature and industry standards, to systematically evaluate the user-centered design processes and usability testing methods used by EHR vendors. We reviewed current usability certification requirements and the human factors literature to develop a 15-point framework for evaluating EHR products. The framework is based on 3 dimensions: user-centered design process, summative testing methodology, and summative testing results. Two vendor usability reports were retrieved from the Office of the National Coordinator's Certified Health IT Product List and were evaluated using the framework. One vendor scored low on the framework (5 pts) while the other vendor scored high on the framework (15 pts). The 2 scored vendor reports demonstrate the framework's ability to discriminate between the variabilities in vendor processes and to determine which vendors are meeting best practices. The framework provides a method to more easily comprehend EHR vendors' usability processes and serves to highlight where EHR vendors may be falling short in terms of best practices. The framework provides a greater level of transparency for both purchasers and end users of EHRs. The framework highlights the need for clearer certification requirements and suggests that the authorized certification bodies that examine vendor usability reports may need to be provided with clearer guidance.

  20. Secure, Network-Centric Operations of a Space-Based Asset: Cisco Router in Low Earth Orbit (CLEO) and Virtual Mission Operations Center (VMOC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, William; Stewart, Dave; Shell, Dan; Wood, Lloyd; Paulsen, Phil; Jackson, Chris; Hodgson, Dave; Notham, James; Bean, Neville; Miller, Eric

    2005-01-01

    This report documents the design of network infrastructure to support operations demonstrating the concept of network-centric operations and command and control of space-based assets. These demonstrations showcase major elements of the Transformal Communication Architecture (TCA), using Internet Protocol (IP) technology. These demonstrations also rely on IP technology to perform the functions outlined in the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) Space Link Extension (SLE) document. A key element of these demonstrations was the ability to securely use networks and infrastructure owned and/or controlled by various parties. This is a sanitized technical report for public release. There is a companion report available to a limited audience. The companion report contains detailed networking addresses and other sensitive material and is available directly from William Ivancic at Glenn Research Center.

  1. Early Air Force Flight Test Center (AFFTC) experience with Peripheral Vision Horizon Displays (PVHD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, B. L.

    1984-01-01

    Three separate Air Force Flight Test Center (AFFTC) tests were conducted in 1980 and 1981 on two models of the peripheral vision horizon displays (PVHD) (Malcolm Horizon). A fixed base simulator test was conducted with twenty test pilot subjects using the Flight Simulator Demonstration Model which incorporated a Helium Neon laser as the light bar medium. Two separate flight tests were conducted by the Test Pilot School classes 80A and 80B in a Twin Otter commuter aircraft using the Stage A Model PVHD. The Xenon lighted A Model was tested in its original configuration by class 80A. Class 80B used a modified configuration which incorporated an AFFTC designed and manufactured hood. With the hood, the PVHD projected a thinner, distinct light bar. Only a few general remarks concerning the tests and unrestricted, overall conclusions reached by the author are presented. The conclusions of all three AFFTC evaluations of the PVHD concept were that it has not yet been adequately evaluated. There seems to be a significant learning curve associated with the PVHD and the project pilots for Test Pilot School Class 80B only got a good start on the learning curve. A lengthy learning curve for the PVHD should be anticipated in view of the training period required for the attitude display indicator (ADI). This does seem to point out that the PVHD, in its present form, is simply not as compelling as the natural horizon. It can also be concluded that any attempt at a valid evaluation of the PVHD concept can be done only under instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) or validly simulated IMC conditions. The knee in the learning curve, however, may be reached without full IMC, although it may take much longer to reach.

  2. Premier Homeland Security Educator Awards 32 Master's Degrees

    OpenAIRE

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security

    2012-01-01

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security, PRESS RELEASES MONTEREY, Calif. – Thirty-two homeland security professionals earned a Master of Arts in Security Studies March 30 from the Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Defense and Security (CHDS). The...

  3. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-27

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 104, Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, and provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and confirmation that closure objectives for CAU 104 were met. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; the U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. CAU 104 consists of the following 15 Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Area 7 of the Nevada National Security Site: · CAS 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C · CAS 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1 · CAS 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site · CAS 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a · CAS 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S) · CAS 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S) · CAS 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S) · CAS 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie · CAS 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie · CAS 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus) · CAS 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster) · CAS 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth · CAS 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4 · CAS 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b · CAS 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax Closure activities began in October 2012 and were completed in April 2013. Activities were conducted according to the Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for CAU 104. The corrective actions included No Further Action and Clean Closure. Closure activities generated sanitary waste, mixed waste, and recyclable material. Some wastes exceeded land disposal limits and required treatment prior to disposal. Other wastes met land disposal restrictions and were disposed in appropriate onsite landfills. The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office

  4. Testing the Expectation Theory of the Term Structure of Interest Rates in Turkish Fixed-Income Securities Market.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet ARSLAN

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study empirically tests the expectations hypothesis of term structure of interest rates, in Turkish fixed-income securities market. In the study Johansen and Juselius (JJ test co-integration test has been applied to determine the existence of at least one common trend between short and long term bond interest rates, and it has determined. Therefore both r =0 and also r≤1 co-integration vector hypothesis have been rejected. In other words, based on the data covering January 3, 2003 through June 2010, and consist of 89 observation on each of the 8 different maturity ranging from 3 months to 5 years, it was determined that there were more than 1 co-integration ( r>1 vector in the series. The results indicate that in Turkish fixed-income securities market shorter-term interest rates effects longer-term interest rates. In fact, granger causality test applied and its results also confirm the findings cited above. Besides, the study is bearing some very important implications for Turkish monetary authorities that they could predict and observe behavior of the longer-term interest rates, and also inflation rates, based on the given change in short-term interest rates. In this aspect, this study is unique.

  5. Background Radiation Survey of the Radiological/Nuclear Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colin Okada

    2010-09-16

    In preparation for operations at the Radiological/Nuclear Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Complex (Rad/NucCTEC), the Department of Homeland Security Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DHS/DNDO) requested that personnel from the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) conduct a survey of the present radiological conditions at the facility. The measurements consist of the exposure rate from a high-pressure ion chamber (HPIC), high-resolution spectra from a high-purity germanium (HPGe) system in an in situ configuration, and low-resolution spectra from a sodium iodide (NaI) detector in a radiation detection backpack. Measurements with these systems were collected at discrete locations within the facility. Measurements were also collected by carrying the VECTOR backpack throughout the complex to generate a map of the entire area. The area was also to be surveyed with the Kiwi (an array of eight-2-inch x 4-inch x 16-inch NaI detectors) from the Aerial Measuring Systems; however, conflicts with test preparation activities at the site prevented this from being accomplished.

  6. Field test of a practical secure communication network with decoy-state quantum cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Teng-Yun; Liang, Hao; Liu, Yang; Cai, Wen-Qi; Ju, Lei; Liu, Wei-Yue; Wang, Jian; Yin, Hao; Chen, Kai; Chen, Zeng-Bing; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2009-04-13

    We present a secure network communication system that operated with decoy-state quantum cryptography in a real-world application scenario. The full key exchange and application protocols were performed in real time among three nodes, in which two adjacent nodes were connected by approximate 20 km of commercial telecom optical fiber. The generated quantum keys were immediately employed and demonstrated for communication applications, including unbreakable real-time voice telephone between any two of the three communication nodes, or a broadcast from one node to the other two nodes by using one-time pad encryption.

  7. Results of the analysis of the blood lymphocyte proliferation test data from the National Jewish Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    From, E.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Mathematical Sciences Section; Newman, L.S.; Mroz, M.M. [National Jewish Center for Immunology and Respiratory Medicine, Denver, CO (United States)

    1997-03-01

    A new approach to the analysis of the blood beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (LPT) was presented to the Committee to Accredit Beryllium Sensitization Testing-Beryllium Industry Scientific Advisory Committee in April, 1994. Two new outlier resistant methods were proposed for the analysis of the blood LPT and compared with the approach then in use by most labs. The National Jewish Center (NJC) agreed to provide data from a study that was underway at that time. Three groups of LPT data are considered: (1) a sample of 168 beryllium exposed (BE) workers and 20 nonexposed (NE) persons; (2) 25 unacceptable LPTs, and (3) 32 abnormal LPTs for individuals known to have chronic beryllium disease (CBD). The LAV method described in ORNL-6818 was applied to each LPT. Graphical and numerical summaries similar to those presented for the ORISE data are given. Three methods were used to identify abnormal LPTs. All three methods correctly identified the 32 known CBD cases as abnormal.

  8. Green Propellant Test Capabilities of the Altitude Combustion Stand at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiak, Jonathan M.; Arnett, Lori A.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is committed to providing simulated altitude rocket test capabilities to NASA programs, other government agencies, private industry partners, and academic partners. A primary facility to support those needs is the Altitude Combustion Stand (ACS). ACS provides the capability to test combustion components at a simulated altitude up to 100,000 ft. (approx.0.2 psia/10 Torr) through a nitrogen-driven ejector system. The facility is equipped with an axial thrust stand, gaseous and cryogenic liquid propellant feed systems, data acquisition system with up to 1000 Hz recording, and automated facility control system. Propellant capabilities include gaseous and liquid hydrogen, gaseous and liquid oxygen, and liquid methane. A water-cooled diffuser, exhaust spray cooling chamber, and multi-stage ejector systems can enable run times up to 180 seconds to 16 minutes. The system can accommodate engines up to 2000-lbf thrust, liquid propellant supply pressures up to 1800 psia, and test at the component level. Engines can also be fired at sea level if needed. The NASA GRC is in the process of modifying ACS capabilities to enable the testing of green propellant (GP) thrusters and components. Green propellants are actively being explored throughout government and industry as a non-toxic replacement to hydrazine monopropellants for applications such as reaction control systems or small spacecraft main propulsion systems. These propellants offer increased performance and cost savings over hydrazine. The modification of ACS is intended to enable testing of a wide range of green propellant engines for research and qualification-like testing applications. Once complete, ACS will have the capability to test green propellant engines up to 880 N in thrust, thermally condition the green propellants, provide test durations up to 60 minutes depending on thrust class, provide high speed control and data acquisition, as well as provide advanced imaging and

  9. J-2X Gas Generator Development Testing at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, D. C.; Hormonzian, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    NASA is developing a liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen rocket engine for upper stage and trans-lunar applications of the Ares vehicles for the Constellation program. This engine, designated the J-2X, is a higher pressure, higher thrust variant of the Apollo-era J-2 engine. Development was contracted to Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne in 2006. Over the past several years, two phases of testing have been completed on the development of the gas generator for the J-2X engine. The hardware has progressed through a variety of workhorse injector, chamber, and feed system configurations. Several of these configurations have resulted in combustion instability of the gas generator assembly. Development of the final configuration of workhorse hardware (which will ultimately be used to verify critical requirements on a component level) has required a balance between changes in the injector and chamber hardware in order to successfully mitigate the combustion instability without sacrificing other engine system requirements. This paper provides an overview of the two completed test series, performed at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center. The requirements, facility setup, hardware configurations, and test series progression are detailed. Significant levels of analysis have been performed in order to provide design solutions to mitigate the combustion stability issues, and these are briefly covered. Also discussed are the results of analyses related to either anomalous readings or off-nominal testing throughout the two test series.

  10. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 541: Small Boy Nevada National Security Site and Nevada Test and Training Range, Nevada with ROTC 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Patrick [Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 541 is co-located on the boundary of Area 5 of the Nevada National Security Site and Range 65C of the Nevada Test and Training Range, approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 541 is a grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 541, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): 05-23-04, Atmospheric Tests (6) - BFa Site; 05-45-03, Atmospheric Test Site - Small Boy. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the investigation report. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 1, 2014, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Air Force; and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 541. The site investigation process also will be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The potential contamination sources associated with CASs 05-23-04 and 05-45-03 are from nuclear testing activities conducted at the Atmospheric Tests (6) - BFa Site and Atmospheric Test Site - Small Boy sites. The presence and nature of

  11. Results of the NASA Kennedy Space Center 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Operational Acceptance Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbre', Robert E., Jr.; Decker, Ryan K.; Leahy, Frank B.; Huddleston, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents results of the new Kennedy Space Center (KSC) 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) Operational Acceptance Test (OAT). The goal of the OAT was to verify the data quality of the new DRWP against the performance of the previous DRWP in order to use wind data derived by the new DRWP for space launch vehicle operations support at the Eastern Range. The previous DRWP was used as a situational awareness asset for mission operations to identify rapid changes in the wind environment that weather balloons cannot depict. The Marshall Space Flight Center's Natural Environments Branch assessed data from the new DRWP collected during Jan-Feb 2015 against a specified set of test criteria. Data examination verified that the DRWP provides complete profiles every five minutes from 1.8-19.5 km in vertical increments of 150 m. Analysis of 49 concurrent DRWP and balloon profiles presented root mean square wind component differences around 2.0 m/s. Evaluation of the DRWP's coherence between five-minute wind pairs found the effective vertical resolution to be Nyquist-limited at 300 m for both wind components. In addition, the sensitivity to rejecting data that do not have adequate signal was quantified. This paper documents the data, quality control procedures, methodology, and results of each analysis.

  12. A Study of Mars Dust Environment Simulation at NASA Johnson Space Center Energy Systems Test Area Resource Conversion Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan-Liang Albert

    1999-01-01

    The dust environment on Mars is planned to be simulated in a 20 foot thermal-vacuum chamber at the Johnson Space Center, Energy Systems Test Area Resource Conversion Test Facility in Houston, Texas. This vacuum chamber will be used to perform tests and study the interactions between the dust in Martian air and ISPP hardware. This project is to research, theorize, quantify, and document the Mars dust/wind environment needed for the 20 foot simulation chamber. This simulation work is to support the safety, endurance, and cost reduction of the hardware for the future missions. The Martian dust environment conditions is discussed. Two issues of Martian dust, (1) Dust Contamination related hazards, and (2) Dust Charging caused electrical hazards, are of our interest. The different methods of dust particles measurement are given. The design trade off and feasibility were studied. A glass bell jar system is used to evaluate various concepts for the Mars dust/wind environment simulation. It was observed that the external dust source injection is the best method to introduce the dust into the simulation system. The dust concentration of 30 Mg/M3 should be employed for preparing for the worst possible Martian atmosphere condition in the future. Two approaches thermal-panel shroud for the hardware conditioning are discussed. It is suggested the wind tunnel approach be used to study the dust charging characteristics then to be apply to the close-system cyclone approach. For the operation cost reduction purpose, a dehumidified ambient air could be used to replace the expensive CO2 mixture for some tests.

  13. International Network Performance and Security Testing Based on Distributed Abyss Storage Cluster and Draft of Data Lake Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ByungRae Cha

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The megatrends and Industry 4.0 in ICT (Information Communication & Technology are concentrated in IoT (Internet of Things, BigData, CPS (Cyber Physical System, and AI (Artificial Intelligence. These megatrends do not operate independently, and mass storage technology is essential as large computing technology is needed in the background to support them. In order to evaluate the performance of high-capacity storage based on open source Ceph, we carry out the network performance test of Abyss storage with domestic and overseas sites using KOREN (Korea Advanced Research Network. And storage media and network bonding are tested to evaluate the performance of the storage itself. Additionally, the security test is demonstrated by Cuckoo sandbox and Yara malware detection among Abyss storage cluster and oversea sites. Lastly, we have proposed the draft design of Data Lake framework in order to solve garbage dump problem.

  14. An Evaluation of North Korea’s Nuclear Test by Belbasi Nuclear Tests Monitoring Center-KOERI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necmioglu, O.; Meral Ozel, N.; Semin, K.

    2009-12-01

    Bogazici University and Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute (KOERI) is acting as the Turkish National Data Center (NDC) and responsible for the operation of the International Monitoring System (IMS) Primary Seismic Station (PS-43) under Belbasi Nuclear Tests Monitoring Center for the verification of compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) since February 2000. The NDC is responsible for operating two arrays which are part of the IMS, as well as for transmitting data from these stations to the International Data Centre (IDC) in Vienna. The Belbasi array was established in 1951, as a four-element (Benioff 1051) seismic array as part of the United States Atomic Energy Detection System (USAEDS). Turkish General Staff (TGS) and U.S. Air Force Technical Application Center (AFTAC) under the Defense and Economic Cooperation Agreement (DECA) jointly operated this short period array. The station was upgraded and several seismometers were added to array during 1951 and 1994 and the station code was changed from BSRS (Belbasi Seismic Research Station) to BRTR-PS43 later on. PS-43 is composed of two sub-arrays (Ankara and Keskin): the medium-period array with a ~40 km radius located in Ankara and the short-period array with a ~3 km radius located in Keskin. Each array has a broadband element located at the middle of the circular geometry. Short period instruments are installed at depth 30 meters from the surface while medium and broadband instruments are installed at depth 60 meters from surface. On 25 May 2009, The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) claimed that it had conducted a nuclear test. Corresponding seismic event was recorded by IMS and IDC released first automatic estimation of time (00:54:43 GMT), location (41.2896°N and 129.0480°E) and the magnitude (4.52 mb) of the event in less than two hours time (USGS: 00:54:43 GMT; 41.306°N, 129.029°E; 4.7 mb) During our preliminary analysis of the 25th May 2009 DPRK

  15. Transmissivity and storage coefficient estimates from slug tests, Naval Air Warfare Center, West Trenton, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Alex R.

    2014-01-01

    Slug tests were conducted on 56 observation wells open to bedrock at the former Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) in West Trenton, New Jersey. Aquifer transmissivity (T) and storage coefficient (S) values for most wells were estimated from slug-test data using the Cooper-Bredehoeft-Papadopulos method. Test data from three wells exhibited fast, underdamped water-level responses and were analyzed with the Butler high-K method. The range of T at NAWC was approximately 0.07 to 10,000 square feet per day. At 11 wells, water levels did not change measurably after 20 minutes following slug insertion; transmissivity at these 11 wells was estimated to be less than 0.07 square feet per day. The range of S was approximately 10-10 to 0.01, the mode being 10-10. Water-level responses for tests at three wells fit poorly to the type curves of both methods, indicating that these methods were not appropriate for adequately estimating T and S from those data.

  16. An Overview of Advanced Elastomeric Seal Development and Testing Capabilities at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Patrick H.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is developing advanced space-rated elastomeric seals to support future space exploration missions to low Earth orbit, the Moon, near Earth asteroids, and other destinations. This includes seals for a new docking system and vehicle hatches. These seals must exhibit extremely low leak rates to ensure that astronauts have sufficient breathable air for extended missions. Seal compression loads must be below prescribed limits so as not to overload the mechanisms that compress them, and seal adhesion forces must be low to allow the sealed interface to be separated when required (e.g., during undocking or hatch opening). NASA Glenn Research Center has developed a number of unique test fixtures to measure the leak rates and compression and adhesion loads of candidate seal designs under simulated thermal, vacuum, and engagement conditions. Tests can be performed on full-scale seals with diameters on the order of 50 in., subscale seals that are about 12 in. in diameter, and smaller specimens such as O-rings. Test conditions include temperatures ranging from -238 to 662 F (-150 to 350 C), operational pressure gradients, and seal-on-seal or seal-on-flange mating configurations. Nominal and off-nominal conditions (e.g., incomplete seal compression) can also be simulated. This paper describes the main design features and capabilities of each type of test apparatus and provides an overview of advanced seal development activities at NASA Glenn.

  17. Results of Small-scale Solid Rocket Combustion Simulator testing at Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Benjamin E.; Cook, Jerry

    1993-01-01

    The Small-scale Solid Rocket Combustion Simulator (SSRCS) program was established at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and used a government/industry team consisting of Hercules Aerospace Corporation, Aerotherm Corporation, United Technology Chemical Systems Division, Thiokol Corporation and MSFC personnel to study the feasibility of simulating the combustion species, temperatures and flow fields of a conventional solid rocket motor (SRM) with a versatile simulator system. The SSRCS design is based on hybrid rocket motor principles. The simulator uses a solid fuel and a gaseous oxidizer. Verification of the feasibility of a SSRCS system as a test bed was completed using flow field and system analyses, as well as empirical test data. A total of 27 hot firings of a subscale SSRCS motor were conducted at MSFC. Testing of the Small-scale SSRCS program was completed in October 1992. This paper, a compilation of reports from the above team members and additional analysis of the instrumentation results, will discuss the final results of the analyses and test programs.

  18. The Changing Landscape of Molecular Diagnostic Testing: Implications for Academic Medical Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi L. Rehm

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, the field of molecular diagnostics has undergone tremendous transformation, catalyzed by the clinical implementation of next generation sequencing (NGS. As technical capabilities are enhanced and current limitations are addressed, NGS is increasingly capable of detecting most variant types and will therefore continue to consolidate and simplify diagnostic testing. It is likely that genome sequencing will eventually serve as a universal first line test for disorders with a suspected genetic origin. Academic Medical Centers (AMCs, which have been at the forefront of this paradigm shift are now presented with challenges to keep up with increasing technical, bioinformatic and interpretive complexity of NGS-based tests in a highly competitive market. Additional complexity may arise from altered regulatory oversight, also triggered by the unprecedented scope of NGS-based testing, which requires new approaches. However, these challenges are balanced by unique opportunities, particularly at the interface between clinical and research operations, where AMCs can capitalize on access to cutting edge research environments and establish collaborations to facilitate rapid diagnostic innovation. This article reviews present and future challenges and opportunities for AMC associated molecular diagnostic laboratories from the perspective of the Partners HealthCare Laboratory for Molecular Medicine (LMM.

  19. DICER1 syndrome: Approach to testing and management at a large pediatric tertiary care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Engelen, Kalene; Villani, Anita; Wasserman, Jonathan D; Aronoff, Laura; Greer, Mary-Louise C; Tijerin Bueno, Marta; Gallinger, Bailey; Kim, Raymond H; Grant, Ronald; Meyn, M Stephen; Malkin, David; Druker, Harriet

    2018-01-01

    To expand the current knowledge of DICER1 syndrome and to propose criteria for genetic testing based on experience at a pediatric tertiary care center. This study involved a retrospective chart review of the 78 patients (47 probands and 31 family members) seen in the Cancer Genetics Program at The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) who were offered genetic testing for DICER1. Of 47 probands offered genetic testing for DICER1, 46 pursued testing: 11 (23.9%) carried a pathogenic variant and one proband (2.1%) carried a missense variant of uncertain significance with evidence for pathogenicity. Thirty-one family members of variant-positive probands were offered testing: eight of the 25 who agreed to testing carried their familial variant (32.0%). Overall, 20 patients were identified to have a variant in DICER1 (eight males, 12 females). Of these, 13 (65.0%) presented with clinical manifestations associated with the syndrome. The most common lesions were pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB) (five of 20 patients, 25.0%) and pineoblastoma (three of 20 patients, 15.0%). The average age at which individuals were diagnosed with a primary neoplasm was 5.2 years (range 0.8-20 years, median 3.0). Surveillance at our institution, with a median follow-up time of 23 months, has identified PPB in two asymptomatic individuals. These lesions were identified at early stages, thus potentially reducing treatment-related morbidity and mortality. This study further delineates the DICER1 syndrome phenotype and demonstrates the feasibility of a DICER1 syndrome surveillance protocol for the early detection of tumors. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Increases in Recent HIV Testing Among Men Who Have Sex With Men Coincide With the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Expanded Testing Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Laura A.; Wejnert, Cyprian; Rose, Charles E.; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela; Taussig, Jennifer; Gern, Robert; Hoyte, Tamika; Salazar, Laura; White, Jianglan; Todd, Jeff; Bautista, Greg; Flynn, Colin; Sifakis, Frangiscos; German, Danielle; Isenberg, Debbie; Driscoll, Maura; Hurwitz, Elizabeth; Doherty, Rose; Wittke, Chris; Prachand, Nikhil; Benbow, Nanette; Melville, Sharon; Pannala, Praveen; Yeager, Richard; Sayegh, Aaron; Dyer, Jim; Sheu, Shane; Novoa, Alicia; Thrun, Mark; Al-Tayyib, Alia; Wilmoth, Ralph; Higgins, Emily; Griffin, Vivian; Mokotoff, Eve; MacMaster, Karen; Wolverton, Marcia; Risser, Jan; Rehman, Hafeez; Padgett, Paige; Bingham, Trista; Sey, Ekow Kwa; LaLota, Marlene; Metsch, Lisa; Forrest, David; Beck, Dano; Cardenas, Gabriel; Nemeth, Chris; Anderson, Bridget J.; Watson, Carol-Ann; Smith, Lou; Robinson, William T.; Gruber, DeAnn; Barak, Narquis; Murrill, Chris; Neaigus, Alan; Jenness, Samuel; Hagan, Holly; Reilly, Kathleen H.; Wendel, Travis; Cross, Helene; Bolden, Barbara; D'Errico, Sally; Wogayehu, Afework; Godette, Henry; Brady, Kathleen A.; Kirkland, Althea; Sifferman, Andrea; Miguelino-Keasling, Vanessa; Velasco, Al; Tovar, Veronica; Raymond, H. Fisher; De León, Sandra Miranda; Rolón-Colón, Yadira; Marzan, Melissa; Courogen, Maria; Jaenicke, Tom; Thiede, Hanne; Burt, Richard; Jia, Yujiang; Opoku, Jenevieve; Sansone, Marie; West, Tiffany; Magnus, Manya; Kuo, Irene

    2015-01-01

    According to National HIV Behavioral Surveillance system data, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing increased among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men from 2008 to 2011 in cities funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Expanded Testing Initiative, suggesting that focused HIV testing initiatives might have positive effects. PMID:25352589

  1. Increases in Recent HIV Testing Among Men Who Have Sex With Men Coincide With the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Expanded Testing Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    Cooley, Laura A.; Wejnert, Cyprian; Rose, Charles E.; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela; Taussig, Jennifer; Gern, Robert; Hoyte, Tamika; Salazar, Laura; White, Jianglan; Todd, Jeff; Bautista, Greg; Flynn, Colin; Sifakis, Frangiscos; German, Danielle; Isenberg, Debbie

    2014-01-01

    According to National HIV Behavioral Surveillance system data, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing increased among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men from 2008 to 2011 in cities funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Expanded Testing Initiative, suggesting that focused HIV testing initiatives might have positive effects.

  2. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Proficiency Testing on Small-Scale Safety and Thermal Testing of Improvised Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, John; Sandstrom, Mary; Brown, Geoffrey; Warner, Kirstin; Phillips, Jason; Shelley, Timothy; Reyes, Jose; Hsu, Peter

    2013-06-01

    One of the first steps in establishing safe handling procedures for explosives is small-scale safety and thermal (SSST) testing. To better understand the response of improvised materials or HMEs to SSST testing, 18 HME materials were compared to 3 standard military explosives in a proficiency-type round robin study among five laboratories--2 DoD and 3 DOE--sponsored by DHS. The testing matrix has been designed to address problems encountered with improvised materials--powder mixtures, liquid suspensions, partially wetted solids, immiscible liquids, and reactive materials. Over 30 issues have been identified that indicate standard test methods may require modification when applied to HMEs to derive accurate sensitivity assessments needed for development safe handling and storage practices. This presentation will discuss experimental difficulties encountered when testing these problematic samples, show inter-laboratory testing results, show some statistical interpretation of the results, and highlight some of the testing issues. Some of the work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-617519 (721812).

  3. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 116: Area 25 Test Cell C Facility, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2011-09-29

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 116, Area 25 Test Cell C Facility. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; the U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996 [as amended March 2010]). CAU 116 consists of the following two Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Area 25 of the Nevada National Security Site: (1) CAS 25-23-20, Nuclear Furnace Piping and (2) CAS 25-41-05, Test Cell C Facility. CAS 25-41-05 consisted of Building 3210 and the attached concrete shield wall. CAS 25-23-20 consisted of the nuclear furnace piping and tanks. Closure activities began in January 2007 and were completed in August 2011. Activities were conducted according to Revision 1 of the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 116 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2008). This CR provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and provides data confirming that closure objectives for CAU 116 were met. Site characterization data and process knowledge indicated that surface areas were radiologically contaminated above release limits and that regulated and/or hazardous wastes were present in the facility.

  4. An Overview of High Temperature Seal Development and Testing Capabilities at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demange, Jeffrey J.; Taylor, Shawn C.; Dunlap, Patrick H.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Finkbeiner, Joshua R.; Proctor, Margaret P.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), partnering with the University of Toledo, has a long history of developing and testing seal technologies for high-temperature applications. The GRC Seals Team has conducted research and development on high-temperature seal technologies for applications including advanced propulsion systems, thermal protection systems (airframe and control surface thermal seals), high-temperature preloading technologies, and other extreme-environment seal applications. The team has supported several high-profile projects over the past 30 years and has partnered with numerous organizations, including other government entities, academic institutions, and private organizations. Some of these projects have included the National Aerospace Space Plane (NASP), Space Shuttle Space Transport System (STS), the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV), and the Dream Chaser Space Transportation System, as well as several high-speed vehicle programs for other government organizations. As part of the support for these programs, NASA GRC has developed unique seal-specific test facilities that permit evaluations and screening exercises in relevant environments. The team has also embarked on developing high-temperature preloaders to help maintain seal functionality in extreme environments. This paper highlights several propulsion-related projects that the NASA GRC Seals Team has supported over the past several years and will provide an overview of existing testing capabilities

  5. Stirling Convertor Extended Operation Testing and Data Analysis at Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Peggy A.; Lewandowski, Edward J.; Oriti, Salvatore M.; Wilson, Scott D.

    2010-01-01

    Extended operation of Stirling convertors is essential to the development of radioisotope power systems and their potential use for longduration missions. To document the reliability of the convertors, regular monitoring and analysis of the extended operation data is particularly valuable, allowing us to better understand and quantify long-life characteristics of the convertors. Furthermore, investigation and comparison of the extended operation data to baseline performance data provides an opportunity to understand system behavior should any off-nominal performance occur. Glenn Research Center (GRC) has tested 16 Stirling convertors under 24-hr unattended extended operation, including four that have operated in a thermal vacuum environment and two that are operating in the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Engineering Unit. Ten of the sixteen convertors are the Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASC) developed by Sunpower, Inc. with GRC. These are highly efficient (conversion efficiency of up to 38 percent for the ASC-1), low-mass convertors that have evolved through technologically progressive convertor builds. Six convertors at GRC are Technology Demonstration Convertors from Infinia Corporation. They have achieved greater than 27 percent conversion efficiency and have accumulated over 185,000 of the total 265,000 hr of extended operation at GRC. This paper presents the extended operation testing and data analysis of free-piston Stirling convertors at NASA GRC as well as how these tests have contributed to the Stirling convertor s progression toward flight.

  6. Pulmonary tuberculosis among patients visiting a voluntary confidential counseling and testing center, Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chheng, P; Tamhane, A; Natpratan, C; Tan, V; Lay, V; Sar, B; Kimerling, M E

    2008-03-01

    Voluntary counseling and confidential testing center (VCCT), Battambang District, Cambodia. To determine newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) prevalence and predicting factors, and assess the utility of TB-related symptoms and yield of sputum microscopy and culture. Cross-sectional survey using interview, sputum smears and cultures and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing. Of 496 participants, 29 (5.8%) had culture-confirmed PTB while 19 (65.5%) were acid-fast bacilli (AFB) smear-positive. PTB prevalence was higher (P or =35 years were predictors of PTB. Fever (93%) and hemoptysis (86%) had the highest sensitivity and specificity, respectively. The symptom complex of rapid weight loss, fever and hemoptysis detected all PTB cases (sensitivity 100%). Examination of three sputum smears with culture of the first sample detected 95% (19/20) of the HIV-associated PTB cases and 90% (26/29) overall. TB is common in the VCCT setting, regardless of HIV status. The high prevalence of HIV and PTB among the participants warrants consideration of TB screening for all HIV suspects. Such screening through VCCT is feasible. Adding a single culture test to the evaluation of an initial sputum sample set will substantially increase case detection.

  7. Crane Cell Testing Support of NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawn, Mike; David, Jerry; Rao, Gopalakrishna M.

    2001-01-01

    The objectives presented in this viewgraph presentation include: 1) Verify the quality and reliability of aerospace battery cells and batteries for NASA flight programs; 2) Disseminate the data to develop a plan for in-orbit battery management and to design a cell/battery for future NASA spacecraft; and 3) Establish a cell test data base for rechargeable cell/batteries. In summary: quality EPT Ni-H2, EPT Super NiCd and SAFT NiCd cells have been demonstrated for aerospace applications; the data has been provided to NASA Centers and other agencies for their use and application; developed plan and used in NASA in-orbit battery management. Database on rechargeable cell/batteries is now available for customer use.

  8. The Language Research Center's Computerized Test System for environmental enrichment and psychological assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, D. A.; Rumbaugh, D. M.; Richardson, W. K.

    1992-01-01

    In the spring of 1987, we undertook to provide environmental enrichment to nonhuman primate subjects in ways that would complement and even contribute to the bio-behaviorial science that justified the monkeys' captivity. Of course, the psychological well-being of captive primates--and indeed all research species-- has been an area of intense research activity since the 1985 amendment of the Animal Welfare Act. This mandate for researchers to ensure the psychological, as well as physical, fitness of experimental animals catalyzed the humane and scientific interests of the research community. The contemporary literature is replete with proposed means both of assaying and of providing enrichment and well-being. Notwithstanding, consensus on either assessment or intervention has yet to be reached. The paradigm we employed was modelled after successful efforts with chimpanzees. An automated test system was constructed in which subjects responded to computer tasks by manipulating a joystick. The tasks, interactive game-like versions of many of the classic testing paradigms of cognitive and comparative psychology, permitted the controlled presentation of stimuli and demands without the required presence of a human experimenter. Despite significant barriers to the success, rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and a variety of other primate species (including, of course, humans) have mastered the skills necessary for testing in this paradigm. Previous experiments have illustrated the utility of the test system for addressing questions of learning, memory, attention, perception, and motivation. Additional data have been reported to support the contention that the Language Research Center's Computerized Test System (LRC-CTS) serves its other raison d'etre--providing environmental enrichment and assessing psychological well-being. This paper is designed to augment previous descriptions of the technology and the paradigm for scientists and caretakers interested in environmental

  9. History of Space Shuttle Main Engine Turbopump Bearing Testing at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Howard; Thom, Robert; Moore, Chip; Haluck, Dave

    2010-01-01

    The Space Shuttle is propelled into orbit by two solid rocket motors and three liquid fed main engines. After the solid motors fall away, the shuttle engines continue to run for a total time of 8 minutes. These engines are fed propellants by low and high pressure turbopumps. A critical part of the turbopump is the main shaft that supports the drive turbine and the pump inducer and impeller. Rolling element bearings hold the shaft in place during rotation. If the bearings were to fail, the shaft would move, allowing components to rub in a liquid oxygen or hydrogen environment, which could have catastrophic results. These bearings are required to spin at very high speeds, support radial and axial loads, and have high wear resistance without the benefit of a conventional means of lubrication. The Rocketdyne built Shuttle turbopumps demonstrated their capability to perform during launches; however, the seven hour life requirement was not being met. One of the limiting factors was the bearings. In the late 1970's, an engineering team was formed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), to develop a test rig and plan for testing the Shuttle s main engine high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) bearings. The goals of the program were to better understand the operation of bearings in a cryogenic environment and to further develop and refine existing computer models used to predict the operational limits of these bearings. In 1982, testing began in a rig named the Bearing and Seal Material Tester or BSMT as it was commonly called. The first testing investigated the thermal margin and thermal runaway limits of the HPOTP bearings. The test rig was later used to explore potential bearing improvements in the area of increased race curvatures, new cage materials for better lubrication, new wear resistant rolling element materials, and other ideas to improve wear life. The most notable improvements during this tester s time was the incorporation of silicon nitride balls and

  10. Validation Ice Crystal Icing Engine Test in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) is an existing altitude simulation jet engine test facility located at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, OH. It was modified in 2012 with the integration of an ice crystal cloud generation system. This paper documents the inaugural ice crystal cloud test in PSL--the first ever full scale, high altitude ice crystal cloud turbofan engine test to be conducted in a ground based facility. The test article was a Lycoming ALF502-R5 high bypass turbofan engine, serial number LF01. The objectives of the test were to validate the PSL ice crystal cloud calibration and engine testing methodologies by demonstrating the capability to calibrate and duplicate known flight test events that occurred on the same LF01 engine and to generate engine data to support fundamental and computational research to investigate and better understand the physics of ice crystal icing in a turbofan engine environment while duplicating known revenue service events and conducting test points while varying facility and engine parameters. During PSL calibration testing it was discovered than heated probes installed through tunnel sidewalls experienced ice buildup aft of their location due to ice crystals impinging upon them, melting and running back. Filtered city water was used in the cloud generation nozzle system to provide ice crystal nucleation sites. This resulted in mineralization forming on flow path hardware that led to a chronic degradation of performance during the month long test. Lacking internal flow path cameras, the response of thermocouples along the flow path was interpreted as ice building up. Using this interpretation, a strong correlation between total water content (TWC) and a weaker correlation between median volumetric diameter (MVD) of the ice crystal cloud and the rate of ice buildup along the instrumented flow path was identified. For this test article the engine anti-ice system was required to be turned on before ice crystal

  11. Ames Research Center Shear Tests of SLA-561V Heat Shield Material for Mars-Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauber, Michael; Tran, Huy; Henline, William; Cartledge, Alan; Hui, Frank; Tran, Duoc; Zimmerman, Norm

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the results of arc-jet testing at Ames Research Center on behalf of Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the development of the Mars-Pathfinder heat shield. The current test series evaluated the performance of the ablating SLA-561V heat shield material under shear conditions. In addition, the effectiveness of several methods of repairing damage to the heat shield were evaluated. A total of 26 tests were performed in March 1994 in the 2 in. X 9 in. arc-heated turbulent Duct Facility, including runs to calibrate the facility to obtain the desired shear stress conditions. A total of eleven models were tested. Three different conditions of shear and heating were used. The non-ablating surface shear stresses and the corresponding, approximate, non-ablating surface heating rates were as follows: Condition 1, 170 N/m(exp 2) and 22 W/cm(exp 2); Condition 2, 240 N/m(exp 2) and 40 W/cm(exp 2); Condition 3, 390 N/m(exp 2) and 51 W/cm(exp 2). The peak shear stress encountered in flight is represented approximately by Condition 1; however, the heating rate was much less than the peak flight value. The peak heating rate that was available in the facility (at Condition 3) was about 30 percent less than the maximum value encountered during flight. Seven standard ablation models were tested, of which three models were instrumented with thermocouples to obtain in-depth temperature profiles and temperature contours. An additional four models contained a variety of repair plugs, gaps, and seams. These models were used to evaluated different repair materials and techniques, and the effect of gaps and construction seams. Mass loss and surface recession measurements were made on all models. The models were visually inspected and photographed before and after each test. The SLA-561 V performed well; even at test Condition 3, the char remained intact. Most of the resins used for repairs and gap fillers performed poorly. However, repair plugs made of SLA-561V performed

  12. Profile of clients tested HIV positive in a voluntary counseling and testing center of a district hospital, Udupi, South Kannada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The growing menace created by the HIV/AIDS (human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome has alarmed not only the public health officials but also the general community. The Voluntary Counseling and Testing Centre (VCTC services have begun as a cost-effective intervention in reversing this epidemic. Objectives: 1. To study the sociodemographic characteristics of HIV-positive clients and their risk behaviors. 2. To elucidate the reasons for their visit to the VCTC and know the problems anticipated by the clients after revealing their HIV-positive status. Study Design: A cross-sectional record-based study. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in August 2007 among clients who tested positive for HIV in the VCTC of a district hospital in Karnataka from January to July 2007. Results: Study included 249 individuals, of whom 64.7% were males, 88.7% (age, 15-49 years, married (72.7% males and 84.0% females and literate (females 71.5% and males 85.7%. A high percentage of nonresponse regarding the pattern of risk behavior was noted among the subjects (males: 42.8% and females: 90.9%. Of the individuals who responded, 91 males (98.9% and 6 females (75.0% had multiple heterosexual sex partners, while 1 male had homosexual partner. The figures in females show that two (25% of them had a history of blood transfusion. The reason for visiting the VCTC were cited as some form of illness (33.3%, confirmation of test results (32.9%, family members diagnosed as HIV positive (12.9% and 11.6% were referred from Directly Observed Treatment Scheme (DOTS center. More than three quarter of the sample population anticipated discrimination at the time of medical treatment. Conclusion: People have begun using VCTC services, which reflects a change in their attitude toward HIV. The study provides us a clue to formulate an effective approach to educate people as well as the health personnel who are thought of as one of the important

  13. Homeland Security Master's Degrees Awarded

    OpenAIRE

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security

    2011-01-01

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security, PRESS RELEASES MONTEREY, Calif. – Twenty-nine professionals who work in the homeland security field were awarded master’s degrees March 25 at the Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Defense and Security. The...

  14. Test Platform for Advanced Digital Control of Brushless DC Motors (MSFC Center Director's Discretionary Fund)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwaltney, D. A.

    2002-01-01

    A FY 2001 Center Director's Discretionary Fund task to develop a test platform for the development, implementation. and evaluation of adaptive and other advanced control techniques for brushless DC (BLDC) motor-driven mechanisms is described. Important applications for BLDC motor-driven mechanisms are the translation of specimens in microgravity experiments and electromechanical actuation of nozzle and fuel valves in propulsion systems. Motor-driven aerocontrol surfaces are also being utilized in developmental X vehicles. The experimental test platform employs a linear translation stage that is mounted vertically and driven by a BLDC motor. Control approaches are implemented on a digital signal processor-based controller for real-time, closed-loop control of the stage carriage position. The goal of the effort is to explore the application of advanced control approaches that can enhance the performance of a motor-driven actuator over the performance obtained using linear control approaches with fixed gains. Adaptive controllers utilizing an exact model knowledge controller and a self-tuning controller are implemented and the control system performance is illustrated through the presentation of experimental results.

  15. Home medication support for childhood cancer: family-centered design and testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kathleen E; Biggins, Colleen; Blasko, Deb; Christiansen, Steven M; Fischer, Shira H; Keuker, Christopher; Klugman, Robert; Mazor, Kathleen M

    2014-11-01

    Errors in the use of medications at home by children with cancer are common, and interventions to support correct use are needed. We sought to (1) engage stakeholders in the design and development of an intervention to prevent errors in home medication use, and (2) evaluate the acceptability and usefulness of the intervention. We convened a multidisciplinary team of parents, clinicians, technology experts, and researchers to develop an intervention using a two-step user-centered design process. First, parents and oncologists provided input on the design. Second, a parent panel and two oncology nurses refined draft materials. In a feasibility study, we used questionnaires to assess usefulness and acceptability. Medication error rates were assessed via monthly telephone interviews with parents. We successfully partnered with parents, clinicians, and IT experts to develop Home Medication Support (HoMeS), a family-centered Web-based intervention. HoMeS includes a medication calendar with decision support, a communication tool, adverse effect information, a metric conversion chart, and other information. The 15 families in the feasibility study gave HoMeS high ratings for acceptability and usefulness. Half recorded information on the calendar to indicate to other caregivers that doses were given; 34% brought it to the clinic to communicate with their clinician about home medication use. There was no change in the rate of medication errors in this feasibility study. We created and tested a stakeholder-designed, Web-based intervention to support home chemotherapy use, which parents rated highly. This tool may prevent serious medication errors in a larger study. Copyright © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  16. Identifying the HIV Testing Beliefs of Healthcare Provider Staff at a University Student Health Center: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Cornelia A.

    2012-01-01

    This research project examined the views and perceptions of healthcare provider staff regarding HIV testing and the implementation of HIV testing as a routine part of medical practice in a university student health center at a Historically Black College or University (HBCU). This study further explored whether healthcare provider staff promoted…

  17. Armstrong Flight Research Center Flight Test Capabilities and Opportunities for the Applications of Wireless Data Acquisition Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The presentation will overview NASA Armstrong Flight Research Centers flight test capabilities, which can provide various means for flight testing of passive and active wireless sensor systems, also, it will address the needs of the wireless data acquisition solutions for the centers flight instrumentation issues such as additional weight caused by added instrumentation wire bundles, connectors, wire cables routing, moving components, etc., that the Passive Wireless Sensor Technology Workshop may help. The presentation shows the constraints and requirements that the wireless sensor systems will face in the flight test applications.

  18. Money Buys Financial Security and Psychological Need Satisfaction: Testing Need Theory in Affluence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Ryan T.; Kurai, Mark; Tam, Leona

    2013-01-01

    The most prominent theory to explain the curvilinear relationship between income and subjective well-being (SWB) is need theory, which proposes that increased income and wealth can lead to increased well-being in poverty because money is used to satisfy basic physiological needs. The present study tests the tenets of need theory by proposing that…

  19. Underground Test Area (UGTA) Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 1 ROTC-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farnham, Irene [Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This Closure Report (CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 98, Frenchman Flat, Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), Nevada. The Frenchman Flat CAU was the site of 10 underground nuclear tests, some of which have impacted groundwater near the tests. This work was performed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) Activity in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). This CR describes the selected corrective action to be implemented during closure to protect human health and the environment from the impacted groundwater

  20. Design of High-Fidelity Testing Framework for Secure Electric Grid Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoginath, Srikanth B [ORNL; Perumalla, Kalyan S [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    A solution methodology and implementation components are presented that can uncover unwanted, unintentional or unanticipated effects on electric grids from changes to actual electric grid control software. A new design is presented to leapfrog over the limitations of current modeling and testing techniques for cyber technologies in electric grids. We design a fully virtualized approach in which actual, unmodified operational software under test is enabled to interact with simulated surrogates of electric grids. It enables the software to influence the (simulated) grid operation and vice versa in a controlled, high fidelity environment. Challenges in achieving such capability include achieving low-overhead time control mechanisms in hypervisor schedulers, network capture and time-stamping, translation of network packets emanating from grid software into discrete events of virtual grid models, translation back from virtual sensors/actuators into data packets to control software, and transplanting the entire system onto an accurately and efficiently maintained virtual-time plane.

  1. The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty and Its Relevance for the Global Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dáša ADAŠKOVÁ

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT is one of important international nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament measures. One of its pillars is the verification mechanism that has been built as an international system of nuclear testing detection to enable the control of observance of the obligations anchored in the CTBT. Despite the great relevance to the global non-proliferation and disarmament efforts, the CTBT is still not in force. The main aim of the article is to summarize the importance of the CTBT and its entry into force not only from the international relations perspective but also from the perspective of the technical implementation of the monitoring system.

  2. A ground-based magnetic survey of Frenchman Flat, Nevada National Security Site and Nevada Test and Training Range, Nevada: data release and preliminary interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jeffrey D.; Burton, Bethany L.; Curry-Elrod, Erika; Drellack, Sigmund

    2014-01-01

    The Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly the Nevada Test Site) is located in southern Nevada approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas. Frenchman Flat is a sedimentary basin located on the eastern edge of NNSS and extending eastward into the adjacent Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR).

  3. Lecture 2: Software Security

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    Computer security has been an increasing concern for IT professionals for a number of years, yet despite all the efforts, computer systems and networks remain highly vulnerable to attacks of different kinds. Design flaws and security bugs in the underlying software are among the main reasons for this. This lecture addresses the following question: how to create secure software? The lecture starts with a definition of computer security and an explanation of why it is so difficult to achieve. It then introduces the main security principles (like least-privilege, or defense-in-depth) and discusses security in different phases of the software development cycle. The emphasis is put on the implementation part: most common pitfalls and security bugs are listed, followed by advice on best practice for security development, testing and deployment. Sebastian Lopienski is CERN’s deputy Computer Security Officer. He works on security strategy and policies; offers internal consultancy and audit services; develops and ...

  4. Assessment centers versus cognitive ability tests: Challenging the conventional wisdom on criterion-related validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackett, Paul R; Shewach, Oren R; Keiser, Heidi N

    2017-10-01

    Separate meta-analyses of the cognitive ability and assessment center (AC) literatures report higher criterion-related validity for cognitive ability tests in predicting job performance. We instead focus on 17 samples in which both AC and ability scores are obtained for the same examinees and used to predict the same criterion. Thus, we control for differences in job type and in criteria that may have affected prior conclusions. In contrast to Schmidt and Hunter's (1998) meta-analysis, reporting mean validity of .51 for ability and .37 for ACs, we found using random-effects models mean validity of .22 for ability and .44 for ACs using comparable corrections for range restriction and measurement error in the criterion. We posit that 2 factors contribute to the differences in findings: (a) ACs being used on populations already restricted on cognitive ability and (b) the use of less cognitively loaded criteria in AC validation research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Evaluation of Maxim Module-Integrated Electronics at the DOE Regional Test Centers: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deline, C.; Sekulic, B.; Stein, J.; Barkaszi, S.; Yang, J.; Kahn, S.

    2014-07-01

    Module-embedded power electronics developed by Maxim Integrated are under evaluation through a partnership with the Department of Energy's Regional Test Center (RTC) program. Field deployments of both conventional modules and electronics-enhanced modules are designed to quantify the performance advantage of Maxim's products under different amounts of inter-row shading, and their ability to be deployed at a greater ground-coverage-ratio than conventional modules. Simulations in PVSYST have quantified the predicted performance difference between conventional modules and Maxim's modules from inter-row shading. Initial performance results have identified diffuse irradiance losses at tighter row spacing for both the Maxim and conventional modules. Comparisons with published models show good agreement with models predicting the greatest diffuse irradiance losses. At tighter row spacing, all of the strings equipped with embedded power electronics outperformed their conventional peers. An even greater performance advantage is predicted to occur in the winter months when the amount of inter-row shading mismatch is at a maximum.

  6. Ice Crystal Icing Engine Testing in the NASA Glenn Research Center's Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL): Altitude Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration conducted a full scale ice crystal icing turbofan engine test in the NASA Glenn Research Centers Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) Facility in February 2013. Honeywell Engines supplied the test article, an obsolete, unmodified Lycoming ALF502-R5 turbofan engine serial number LF01 that experienced an un-commanded loss of thrust event while operating at certain high altitude ice crystal icing conditions. These known conditions were duplicated in the PSL for this testing.

  7. An assessment of technology-based service encounters & network security on the e-health care systems of medical centers in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Ching

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enhancing service efficiency and quality has always been one of the most important factors to heighten competitiveness in the health care service industry. Thus, how to utilize information technology to reduce work load for staff and expeditiously improve work efficiency and healthcare service quality is presently the top priority for every healthcare institution. In this fast changing modern society, e-health care systems are currently the best possible way to achieve enhanced service efficiency and quality under the restraint of healthcare cost control. The electronic medical record system and the online appointment system are the core features in employing e-health care systems in the technology-based service encounters. Methods This study implemented the Service Encounters Evaluation Model, the European Customer Satisfaction Index, the Attribute Model and the Overall Affect Model for model inference. A total of 700 copies of questionnaires from two authoritative southern Taiwan medical centers providing the electronic medical record system and the online appointment system service were distributed, among which 590 valid copies were retrieved with a response rate of 84.3%. We then used SPSS 11.0 and the Linear Structural Relationship Model (LISREL 8.54 to analyze and evaluate the data. Results The findings are as follows: (1 Technology-based service encounters have a positive impact on service quality, but not patient satisfaction; (2 After experiencing technology-based service encounters, the cognition of the service quality has a positive effect on patient satisfaction; and (3 Network security contributes a positive moderating effect on service quality and patient satisfaction. Conclusion It revealed that the impact of electronic workflow (online appointment system service on service quality was greater than electronic facilities (electronic medical record systems in technology-based service encounters. Convenience and

  8. An assessment of technology-based service encounters & network security on the e-health care systems of medical centers in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsin Hsin; Chang, Ching Sheng

    2008-04-17

    Enhancing service efficiency and quality has always been one of the most important factors to heighten competitiveness in the health care service industry. Thus, how to utilize information technology to reduce work load for staff and expeditiously improve work efficiency and healthcare service quality is presently the top priority for every healthcare institution. In this fast changing modern society, e-health care systems are currently the best possible way to achieve enhanced service efficiency and quality under the restraint of healthcare cost control. The electronic medical record system and the online appointment system are the core features in employing e-health care systems in the technology-based service encounters. This study implemented the Service Encounters Evaluation Model, the European Customer Satisfaction Index, the Attribute Model and the Overall Affect Model for model inference. A total of 700 copies of questionnaires from two authoritative southern Taiwan medical centers providing the electronic medical record system and the online appointment system service were distributed, among which 590 valid copies were retrieved with a response rate of 84.3%. We then used SPSS 11.0 and the Linear Structural Relationship Model (LISREL 8.54) to analyze and evaluate the data. The findings are as follows: (1) Technology-based service encounters have a positive impact on service quality, but not patient satisfaction; (2) After experiencing technology-based service encounters, the cognition of the service quality has a positive effect on patient satisfaction; and (3) Network security contributes a positive moderating effect on service quality and patient satisfaction. It revealed that the impact of electronic workflow (online appointment system service) on service quality was greater than electronic facilities (electronic medical record systems) in technology-based service encounters. Convenience and credibility are the most important factors of service quality

  9. Non-destructive testing. increasingly important tool in the control of security; Los ensayos no destructivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza Gomez, C.

    2015-07-01

    The importance of the non-destructive testing in society is considered of great importance, given the contribution in aspects of quality and safety in a multitude of industries, which include nuclear, the aeronautics, the petrochemical, shipbuilding, etc. Its main contribution is to have allowed guarantee the quality of any manufactured product or check your status in service, it is techniques that do not impair or destroy the component analyzed, determining its dimensions, characteristics and status of the properties of the material, and of course the presence or absence of defects that may affect their integrity and therefore to the fulfillment of the functions assigned. (Author)

  10. [Formula: see text]Determination of the smoking gun of intent: significance testing of forced choice results in social security claimants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Laurence M; Chafetz, Michael D

    2018-01-01

    Significantly below-chance findings on forced choice tests have been described as revealing "the smoking gun of intent" that proved malingering. The issues of probability levels, one-tailed vs. two-tailed tests, and the combining of PVT scores on significantly below-chance findings were addressed in a previous study, with a recommendation of a probability level of .20 to test the significance of below-chance results. The purpose of the present study was to determine the rate of below-chance findings in a Social Security Disability claimant sample using the previous recommendations. We compared the frequency of below-chance results on forced choice performance validity tests (PVTs) at two levels of significance, .05 and .20, and when using significance testing on individual subtests of the PVTs compared with total scores in claimants for Social Security Disability in order to determine the rate of the expected increase. The frequency of significant results increased with the higher level of significance for each subtest of the PVT and when combining individual test sections to increase the number of test items, with up to 20% of claimants showing significantly below-chance results at the higher p-value. These findings are discussed in light of Social Security Administration policy, showing an impact on policy issues concerning child abuse and neglect, and the importance of using these techniques in evaluations for Social Security Disability.

  11. The Economics of Information Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-04-09

    organizations was $260,000.6 The amount spent on security software alone is significant. Internet Security Software: 1999 Worldwide Markets and Trends...Computer Emergency Response Team (CERT®") Coordination Center, operated by Carnegie Mellon University to track Internet security statistics, recorded 171...becoming available to assist in this process. "The Center for Internet Security (CIS) members are developing and propagating the widespread application

  12. Process Control Systems in the Chemical Industry: Safety vs. Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey Hahn; Thomas Anderson

    2005-04-01

    Traditionally, the primary focus of the chemical industry has been safety and productivity. However, recent threats to our nation’s critical infrastructure have prompted a tightening of security measures across many different industry sectors. Reducing vulnerabilities of control systems against physical and cyber attack is necessary to ensure the safety, security and effective functioning of these systems. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has developed a strategy to secure these vulnerabilities. Crucial to this strategy is the Control Systems Security and Test Center (CSSTC) established to test and analyze control systems equipment. In addition, the CSSTC promotes a proactive, collaborative approach to increase industry's awareness of standards, products and processes that can enhance the security of control systems. This paper outlines measures that can be taken to enhance the cybersecurity of process control systems in the chemical sector.

  13. Underground Test Area Fiscal Year 2014 Annual Quality Assurance Report Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krenzien, Susan

    2015-01-01

    This report is required by the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) and identifies the UGTA quality assurance (QA) activities from October 1, 2013, through September 30, 2014 (fiscal year [FY] 2014). All UGTA organizations—U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO); Desert Research Institute (DRI); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec); Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I); and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)—conducted QA activities in FY 2014. The activities included conducting oversight assessments for QAP compliance, identifying findings and completing corrective actions, evaluating laboratory performance, and publishing documents. UGTA Activity participants conducted 25 assessments on topics including safe operations, QAP compliance, activity planning, and sampling. These assessments are summarized in Section 2.0. Corrective actions tracked in FY 2014 are presented in Appendix A. Laboratory performance was evaluated based on three approaches: (1) established performance evaluation programs (PEPs), (2) interlaboratory comparisons, or (3) data review. The results of the laboratory performance evaluations, and interlaboratory comparison results are summarized in Section 4.0. The UGTA Activity published three public documents and a variety of other publications in FY 2014. The titles, dates, and main authors are identified in Section 5.0. The Contract Managers, Corrective Action Unit (CAU) Leads, Preemptive Review (PER) Committee members, and Topical Committee members are listed by name and organization in Section 6.0. Other activities that affected UGTA quality are discussed in Section 7.0. Section 8.0 provides the FY 2014 UGTA QA program conclusions, and Section 9.0 lists the references not identified in Section 5.0.

  14. Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides an overview of EPA's homeland security roles and responsibilities, and links to specific homeland security issues: water security, research, emergency response, recovery, and waste management.

  15. [Perinatal mortality at the Medical Care Units of the IMSS (Mexico Social Security Institute), National Medical Center of Torreón].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez y Enríquez de Rivera, F C; Velázquez Trejo, M L; Roís Hernández, J

    1998-07-01

    To describe the situation of perinatal mortality during 1994 year in General Hospitals with Family Medicine number 16 and 18 of IMSS (Social Security Mexican Institut) National Medical Center in Torreón Coah. It was realized a retrospective study, were included 199 files of perinatal deaths occurred from January 1st to December 31 of 1994. The variables obtained were number of death for step, period, age, sex, weight and the cause of the cause of the death. Were eliminated the files without data of interest. For the analysis our utilized descriptive statistics. The rate of perinatal mortality was 20.17 per 1000 live birth, fetal death rate 9.58 by 1000 and the rate of neonatal death 12.97 per 1,000 live birth, fetal death rate 8.68 and neonatal death rate 12.30. The majority were in the perinatal period one with a rate of 16.71 by 1,000 live birth. Were most common in a male sex (53%) in pregnancies from 28 to 32 weeks (33.91%) and in babies with less of 1000 gr of weight (33.86%). The causes more frequents of deaths were the respiratory difficult syndrome (41.77%), the anomalies (19.62%) and hypoxia (9.49%). The perinatal mortality in our study was similar that in the rest of the country and is acorde with the literature. The perinatal mortality were in the perinatal period one. Is important to conduce a prospective studies.

  16. Wormuth: Work on Security, Defense 'Holistically'

    OpenAIRE

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security

    2010-01-01

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security, PRESS RELEASES Concepts spawned at the Center for Homeland Defense and Security could be very valuable to government entities such as the Department of Defense as that agency expands its focus in...

  17. Towards client-centered counseling: development and testing of the WHO Decision-Making Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sarah L; Kim, Young Mi; Church, Kathryn

    2010-12-01

    To describe development and testing of a counseling tool intended to inform family planning clients while helping the family planning provider facilitate the client's decision-making process; and to discuss challenges and requisites for shifting to shared decision-making from the extremes of decision-making dominated by the provider, on one hand, or unaided by the provider, on the other. DEVELOPMENT OF THE TOOL: The WHO Decision-Making Tool for Family Planning Clients and Providers is derived from evidence-based principles of client-centered care and counseling. This article discusses how these principles are manifested in the Tool and how the Tool aids both provider and client in improving counseling. Development of the Tool involved formative workshops with providers in Indonesia, Mexico, South Africa and Trinidad and Tobago and observational evaluation research in Indonesia, Mexico, and Nicaragua. Analysis of videotaped counseling sessions quantitatively assessed client-provider communication and decision-making. Also, focus-group discussions, interviews, and a questionnaire collected qualitative data from providers and clients. In general, use of the Tool improved providers' counseling performance: they engaged clients more and gave more and better tailored information. For clients, the Tool increased their communication and involvement. Both the Nicaraguan and Mexican studies found marked shifts toward the client in the locus of decision-making after introduction of the Tool. Use of the tool improves the performance of both providers and clients in family planning counseling and decision-making. There are challenges, however, at the levels of both the provider and the organization in sustaining these changes and scaling up such initiatives in quality of care. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick Matthews

    2012-09-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 105 is located in Area 2 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 105 is a geographical grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with atmospheric nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 105, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 02-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site - Whitney • 02-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site T-2A • 02-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T-2B • 02-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site T-2 • 02-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Turk These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2012, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 105. The site investigation process will also be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The potential contamination sources associated with all CAU 105 CASs are from atmospheric nuclear testing activities. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU

  19. Intercorporate Security Event Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Kovalev

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Security controls are prone to false positives and false negatives which can lead to unwanted reputation losses for the bank. The reputational database within the security operations center (SOC and intercorporate correlation of security events are offered as a solution to increase attack detection fidelity. The theses introduce the definition and structure of the reputation, architectures of reputational exchange and the place of intercorporate correlation in overall SOC correlation analysis.

  20. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 570: Area 9 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick Matthews

    2012-08-01

    CAU 570 comprises the following six corrective action sites (CASs): • 02-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Tesla • 09-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site T-9 • 09-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site S-9G • 09-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Rushmore • 09-23-15, Eagle Contamination Area • 09-99-01, Atmospheric Test Site B-9A These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2012, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 570. The site investigation process will also be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 570 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose at sample locations to the dose-based final action level. The total effective dose will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological

  1. Security Dilemma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wivel, Anders

    2011-01-01

    What is a security dilemma? What are the consequences of security dilemmas in international politics?......What is a security dilemma? What are the consequences of security dilemmas in international politics?...

  2. Impact of add-on laboratory testing at an academic medical center: a five year retrospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Louis S.; Scott R Davis; Humble, Robert M.; Kulhavy, Jeff; Aman, Dean R.; Krasowski, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical laboratories frequently receive orders to perform additional tests on existing specimens (?add-ons?). Previous studies have examined add-on ordering patterns over short periods of time. The objective of this study was to analyze add-on ordering patterns over an extended time period. We also analyzed the impact of a robotic specimen archival/retrieval system on add-on testing procedure and manual effort. Methods In this retrospective study at an academic medical center, ele...

  3. Point-of-Care Testing and Cardiac Biomarkers: The Standard of Care and Vision for Chest Pain Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kost, Gerald J; Tran, Nam K

    2005-11-01

    Point-of-care testing (POCT) is defined as testing at or near the site of patient care. POCTdecreases therapeutic turnaround time (TTAT), increases clinical efficiency, and improves medical and economic outcomes. TTAT represents the time from test ordering to patient treatment. POC technologies have become ubiquitous in the United States, and, therefore,so has the potential for speed, convenience, and satisfaction, strong advantages for physicians, nurses, and patients in chest pain centers. POCT is applied most beneficially through the collaborative teamwork of clinicians and laboratorians who use integrative strategies, performance maps, clinical algorithms, and care paths (critical pathways). For example, clinical investigators have shown that on-site integration of testing for cardiac injury markers (myoglobin, creatinine kinase myocardial band [CKMB],and cardiac troponin I [cTnI]) in accelerated diagnostic algorithms produces effective screening, less hospitalization, and substantial savings. Chest pain centers, which now total over 150 accredited in the United States, incorporate similar types of protocol-driven performance enhancements. This optimization allows chest pain centers to improve patient evaluation, treatment, survival, and discharge. This article focuses on cardiac biomarker POCT for chest pain centers and emergency medicine.

  4. 97 Medical Apparatuses tested at the Academic Medical Center (AMC) Amsterdam for interference by WLAN/WiFi signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hensbroek, R.

    2009-01-01

    This research describes the influence of WLAN 1 signals on medical apparatuses in the Academic Medical Center (AMC) Amsterdam. The results in this report were obtained by testing medical equipment with WLAN signals. A comparable research was reported earlier. See TNO report KvL/P&Z 2007.117 dated

  5. Development of the Nordic Bioeconomy: NCM reporting: Test centers for green energy solutions - Biorefineries and business needs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Lene; Björnsdóttir, Bryndís; Brandt, Asbjørn

    In 2014 the Nordic Council of Ministers initiated a new bioeconomy project: “Test centers for green energy solutions – Biorefineries and Busi-ness needs”. The purpose was to strengthen green growth in the area of the bioeconomy by analyzing and mapping the current status of the bio...

  6. Day Care Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of day care centers for 50 states and Washington D.C. and Puerto Rico. The dataset only includes center based day care locations...

  7. DLA TEST Defense Infrastructure: Improvement Needed in Energy Reporting and Security Funding at Installations with Limited Connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    resilience in the event of an outage.9 For example, renewable energy may be used to power a microgrid , in which the installation can disconnect...DEFENSE INFRASTRUCTURE Improvement Needed in Energy Reporting and Security Funding at Installations with Limited...Improvement Needed in Energy Reporting and Security Funding at Installations with Limited Connectivity Why GAO Did This Study DOD is the largest energy

  8. Social Security: Theoretical Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Kashnik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper looks at the phenomena of security and social security from the philosophical, sociological and psychological perspective. The undertaken analysis of domestic and foreign scientific materials demonstrates the need for interdisciplinary studies, including pedagogy and education, aimed at developing the guidelines for protecting the social system from destruction. The paper defines the indicators, security level indices and their assessment methods singled out from the analytical reports and security studies by the leading Russian sociological centers and international expert organizations, including the United Nations.The research is aimed at finding out the adequate models of personal and social security control systems at various social levels. The theoretical concepts can be applied by the teachers of the Bases of Life Safety course, the managers and researches developing the assessment criteria and security indices of educational environment evaluation, as well as the methods of diagnostics and expertise of educational establishments from the security standpoint. 

  9. Analysis of Thrombophilia Test Ordering Practices at an Academic Center: A Proposal for Appropriate Testing to Reduce Harm and Cost.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Min Shen

    Full Text Available Ideally, thrombophilia testing should be tailored to the type of thrombotic event without the influence of anticoagulation therapy or acute phase effects which can give false positive results that may result in long term anticoagulation. However, thrombophilia testing is often performed routinely in unselected patients. We analyzed all consecutive thrombophilia testing orders during the months of October and November 2009 at an academic teaching institution. Information was extracted from electronic medical records for the following: indication, timing, comprehensiveness of tests, anticoagulation therapy at the time of testing, and confirmatory repeat testing, if any. Based on the findings of this analysis, we established local guidelines in May 2013 for appropriate thrombophilia testing, primarily to prevent testing during the acute thrombotic event or while the patient is on anticoagulation. We then evaluated ordering practices 22 months after guideline implementation. One hundred seventy-three patients were included in the study. Only 34% (58/173 had appropriate indications (unprovoked venous or arterial thrombosis or pregnancy losses. 51% (61/119 with an index clinical event were tested within one week of the event. Although 46% (79/173 were found to have abnormal results, only 46% of these had the abnormal tests repeated for confirmation with 54% potentially carrying a wrong diagnosis with long term anticoagulation. Twenty-two months after guideline implementation, there was an 84% reduction in ordered tests. Thus, this study revealed that a significant proportion of thrombophilia testing was inappropriately performed. We implemented local guidelines for thrombophilia testing for clinicians, resulting in a reduction in healthcare costs and improved patient care.

  10. A Unique Outside Neutron and Gamma Ray Instrumentation Development Test Facility at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnarik, J.; Evans, L.; Floyd, S.; Lim, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Parsons, A.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2010-01-01

    An outside neutron and gamma ray instrumentation test facility has been constructed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to evaluate conceptual designs of gamma ray and neutron systems that we intend to propose for future planetary lander and rover missions. We will describe this test facility and its current capabilities for operation of planetary in situ instrumentation, utilizing a l4 MeV pulsed neutron generator as the gamma ray excitation source with gamma ray and neutron detectors, in an open field with the ability to remotely monitor and operate experiments from a safe distance at an on-site building. The advantage of a permanent test facility with the ability to operate a neutron generator outside and the flexibility to modify testing configurations is essential for efficient testing of this type of technology. Until now, there have been no outdoor test facilities for realistically testing neutron and gamma ray instruments planned for solar system exploration

  11. Electronic healthcare information security

    CERN Document Server

    Dube, Kudakwashe; Shoniregun, Charles A

    2010-01-01

    The ever-increasing healthcare expenditure and pressing demand for improved quality and efficiency of patient care services are driving innovation in healthcare information management. The domain of healthcare has become a challenging testing ground for information security due to the complex nature of healthcare information and individual privacy. ""Electronic Healthcare Information Security"" explores the challenges of e-healthcare information and security policy technologies. It evaluates the effectiveness of security and privacy implementation systems for anonymization methods and techniqu

  12. CORBASec Used to Secure Distributed Aerospace Propulsion Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaser, Tammy M.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center and its industry partners are developing a Common Object Request Broker (CORBA) Security (CORBASec) test bed to secure their distributed aerospace propulsion simulations. Glenn has been working with its aerospace propulsion industry partners to deploy the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) object-based technology. NPSS is a program focused on reducing the cost and time in developing aerospace propulsion engines. It was developed by Glenn and is being managed by the NASA Ames Research Center as the lead center reporting directly to NASA Headquarters' Aerospace Technology Enterprise. Glenn is an active domain member of the Object Management Group: an open membership, not-for-profit consortium that produces and manages computer industry specifications (i.e., CORBA) for interoperable enterprise applications. When NPSS is deployed, it will assemble a distributed aerospace propulsion simulation scenario from proprietary analytical CORBA servers and execute them with security afforded by the CORBASec implementation. The NPSS CORBASec test bed was initially developed with the TPBroker Security Service product (Hitachi Computer Products (America), Inc., Waltham, MA) using the Object Request Broker (ORB), which is based on the TPBroker Basic Object Adaptor, and using NPSS software across different firewall products. The test bed has been migrated to the Portable Object Adaptor architecture using the Hitachi Security Service product based on the VisiBroker 4.x ORB (Borland, Scotts Valley, CA) and on the Orbix 2000 ORB (Dublin, Ireland, with U.S. headquarters in Waltham, MA). Glenn, GE Aircraft Engines, and Pratt & Whitney Aircraft are the initial industry partners contributing to the NPSS CORBASec test bed. The test bed uses Security SecurID (RSA Security Inc., Bedford, MA) two-factor token-based authentication together with Hitachi Security Service digital-certificate-based authentication to validate the various NPSS users. The test

  13. The Expanding Context of European and Mediterranean Security: A Joint Project Between the Center for Naval Analyses (CNA) and Centro Militare di Studi Strategici (CeMiSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    some media program took a bull to visit a china shop to see what he would do-now there’s the threat of hard power for you! In actuality, the bull was... China Russian security issues, based on ten years of strategic dialogue with Russian institutes " Maritime strategy " Future national security...Mediterranean, US-Europe Cooperation, Law of the Sea, Multilateral Organizations 16-. SECURTY CLASSIFICATMO OF: 17. UUEITATION OF 18. NUMBER 19.. NAME OF

  14. The Space Operations Simulation Center (SOSC) and Closed-loop Hardware Testing for Orion Rendezvous System Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Christopher; Milenkovich, Zoran; Wilson, Zachary; Huich, David; Bendle, John; Kibler, Angela

    2011-01-01

    The Space Operations Simulation Center (SOSC) at the Lockheed Martin (LM) Waterton Campus in Littleton, Colorado is a dynamic test environment focused on Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D) development testing and risk reduction activities. The SOSC supports multiple program pursuits and accommodates testing Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) algorithms for relative navigation, hardware testing and characterization, as well as software and test process development. The SOSC consists of a high bay (60 meters long by 15.2 meters wide by 15.2 meters tall) with dual six degree-of-freedom (6DOF) motion simulators and a single fixed base 6DOF robot. The large testing area (maximum sensor-to-target effective range of 60 meters) allows for large-scale, flight-like simulations of proximity maneuvers and docking events. The facility also has two apertures for access to external extended-range outdoor target test operations. In addition, the facility contains four Mission Operations Centers (MOCs) with connectivity to dual high bay control rooms and a data/video interface room. The high bay is rated at Class 300,000 (. 0.5 m maximum particles/m3) cleanliness and includes orbital lighting simulation capabilities.

  15. Do better–informed workers make better retirement choices? A test based on the Social Security Statement

    OpenAIRE

    Giovanni Mastrobuoni

    2007-01-01

    In 1995, the Social Security Administration started sending out the annual Social Security Statement. It contains information about the worker’s estimated benefits at the ages 62, 65, and 70. We use this unique natural experiment to analyze the retirement and claiming decision making. First, we find that, despite the previ- ous availability of information, the Statement has a significant impact on workers’ knowledge about their benefits. These findings are consistent with a model where worker...

  16. Web-CAT: A Web-based Center for Automated Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Anuj Ramesh

    2003-01-01

    The fundamentals of software testing and related activities are often elusive in undergraduate curricula. A direct consequence of the lack of software testing efforts during education is the huge losses suffered by the software industry when applications are not sufficiently tested. Software practitioners have exhorted faculty members and institutions to teach more software testing in universities. The purpose of this research is to provide answers to the needs of such practitioners and in...

  17. Lemnos interoperable security project.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halbgewachs, Ronald D.

    2010-03-01

    With the Lemnos framework, interoperability of control security equipment is straightforward. To obtain interoperability between proprietary security appliance units, one or both vendors must now write cumbersome 'translation code.' If one party changes something, the translation code 'breaks.' The Lemnos project is developing and testing a framework that uses widely available security functions and protocols like IPsec - to form a secure communications channel - and Syslog, to exchange security log messages. Using this model, security appliances from two or more different vendors can clearly and securely exchange information, helping to better protect the total system. Simplify regulatory compliance in a complicated security environment by leveraging the Lemnos framework. As an electric utility, are you struggling to implement the NERC CIP standards and other regulations? Are you weighing the misery of multiple management interfaces against committing to a ubiquitous single-vendor solution? When vendors build their security appliances to interoperate using the Lemnos framework, it becomes practical to match best-of-breed offerings from an assortment of vendors to your specific control systems needs. The Lemnos project is developing and testing a framework that uses widely available open-source security functions and protocols like IPsec and Syslog to create a secure communications channel between appliances in order to exchange security data.

  18. Testing General Relativity with Stellar Orbits around the Supermassive Black Hole in Our Galactic Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hees, A; Do, T; Ghez, A M; Martinez, G D; Naoz, S; Becklin, E E; Boehle, A; Chappell, S; Chu, D; Dehghanfar, A; Kosmo, K; Lu, J R; Matthews, K; Morris, M R; Sakai, S; Schödel, R; Witzel, G

    2017-05-26

    We demonstrate that short-period stars orbiting around the supermassive black hole in our Galactic center can successfully be used to probe the gravitational theory in a strong regime. We use 19 years of observations of the two best measured short-period stars orbiting our Galactic center to constrain a hypothetical fifth force that arises in various scenarios motivated by the development of a unification theory or in some models of dark matter and dark energy. No deviation from general relativity is reported and the fifth force strength is restricted to an upper 95% confidence limit of |α|black hole. A sensitivity analysis for future measurements is also presented.

  19. How the center for Medicare and Medicaid innovation should test accountable care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortell, Stephen M; Casalino, Lawrence P; Fisher, Elliott S

    2010-07-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act establishes a national voluntary program for accountable care organizations (ACOs) by January 2012 under the auspices of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). The act also creates a Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation in the CMS. We propose that the CMS allow flexibility and tiers in ACOs based on their specific circumstances, such as the degree to which they are or are not fully integrated systems. Further, we propose that the CMS assume responsibility for ACO provisions and develop an ordered system for learning how to create and sustain ACOs. Key steps would include setting specific performance goals, developing skills and tools that facilitate change, establishing measurement and accountability mechanisms, and supporting leadership development.

  20. An Examination of an Information Security Framework Implementation Based on Agile Values to Achieve Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act Security Rule Compliance in an Academic Medical Center: The Thomas Jefferson University Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Agile project management is most often examined in relation to software development, while information security frameworks are often examined with respect to certain risk management capabilities rather than in terms of successful implementation approaches. This dissertation extended the study of both Agile project management and information…

  1. Global Health Security

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-09-21

    Dr. Jordan Tappero, a CDC senior advisor on global health, discusses the state of global health security.  Created: 9/21/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID), Center for Global Health (CGH).   Date Released: 9/21/2017.

  2. SU-F-J-177: A Novel Image Analysis Technique (center Pixel Method) to Quantify End-To-End Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, N; Chetty, I [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Snyder, K [Henry Ford Hospital System, Detroit, MI (United States); Scheib, S [Varian Medical System, Barton (Switzerland); Qin, Y; Li, H [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To implement a novel image analysis technique, “center pixel method”, to quantify end-to-end tests accuracy of a frameless, image guided stereotactic radiosurgery system. Methods: The localization accuracy was determined by delivering radiation to an end-to-end prototype phantom. The phantom was scanned with 0.8 mm slice thickness. The treatment isocenter was placed at the center of the phantom. In the treatment room, CBCT images of the phantom (kVp=77, mAs=1022, slice thickness 1 mm) were acquired to register to the reference CT images. 6D couch correction were applied based on the registration results. Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID)-based Winston Lutz (WL) tests were performed to quantify the errors of the targeting accuracy of the system at 15 combinations of gantry, collimator and couch positions. The images were analyzed using two different methods. a) The classic method. The deviation was calculated by measuring the radial distance between the center of the central BB and the full width at half maximum of the radiation field. b) The center pixel method. Since the imager projection offset from the treatment isocenter was known from the IsoCal calibration, the deviation was determined between the center of the BB and the central pixel of the imager panel. Results: Using the automatic registration method to localize the phantom and the classic method of measuring the deviation of the BB center, the mean and standard deviation of the radial distance was 0.44 ± 0.25, 0.47 ± 0.26, and 0.43 ± 0.13 mm for the jaw, MLC and cone defined field sizes respectively. When the center pixel method was used, the mean and standard deviation was 0.32 ± 0.18, 0.32 ± 0.17, and 0.32 ± 0.19 mm respectively. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that the center pixel method accurately analyzes the WL images to evaluate the targeting accuracy of the radiosurgery system. The work was supported by a Research Scholar Grant, RSG-15-137-01-CCE from the American

  3. User-centered design and usability testing of an innovative health-related quality of life module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagykaldi, Z J; Jordan, M; Quitoriano, J; Ciro, C A; Mold, J W

    2014-01-01

    Various computerized health risk appraisals (HRAs) are available, but few of them assess health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in a goal-directed framework. This study describes the user-centered development and usability testing of an innovative HRQoL module that extends a validated HRA tool in primary care settings. Systematic user-centered design, usability testing, and qualitative methods were used to develop the HRQoL module in primary care practices. Twenty two patients and 5 clinicians participated in two rounds of interactive technology think-out-loud sessions (TOLs) and semi-structured interviews (SSIs) to iteratively develop a four-step, computerized process that collects information on patient goals for meaningful life activities and current level of disability and presents a personalized and prioritized list of preventive recommendations linked to online resources. Analysis of TOLs and SSIs generated 5 categories and 11 sub-categories related to facilitators and barriers to usability and human-technology interaction. The categories included: Understanding the Purpose, Usability, Perceived Value, Literacy, and Participant Motivation. Some categories were inter-connected. The technology was continually and iteratively improved between sessions until saturation of positive feedback was achieved in 4 categories (addressing motivation will require more research). Usability of all screen units of the module was improved substantially. Clinician feedback emphasized the importance of the module's ability to translate the patient-centered HRQoL Report into actionable items for clinicians to facilitate shared decision-making. Complete integration of the HRQoL module into the existing HRA will require further development and testing. Systematic application of user-centered design and human factors principles in technology development and testing may significantly improve the usability and clinical value of health information systems. This more sophisticated

  4. Network systems security analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ä.°smail

    2015-05-01

    Network Systems Security Analysis has utmost importance in today's world. Many companies, like banks which give priority to data management, test their own data security systems with "Penetration Tests" by time to time. In this context, companies must also test their own network/server systems and take precautions, as the data security draws attention. Based on this idea, the study cyber-attacks are researched throughoutly and Penetration Test technics are examined. With these information on, classification is made for the cyber-attacks and later network systems' security is tested systematically. After the testing period, all data is reported and filed for future reference. Consequently, it is found out that human beings are the weakest circle of the chain and simple mistakes may unintentionally cause huge problems. Thus, it is clear that some precautions must be taken to avoid such threats like updating the security software.

  5. Space and Missile Systems Center Standard: Test Requirements for Launch, Upper-Stage and Space Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-05

    certain items the specified acceptance test environments could result in physical deterioration of materials or other damage. In those cases, less...parts mounting, board sizes and thickness, number of layers , thermal coefficients of expansion, or installation method, development tests should be...salt fog, and explosive atmosphere. Tests shall conform to the methods given in Reference 1 when applicable. Degradation due to fungus, ozone , and

  6. Recent Improvements to the Acoustical Testing Laboratory at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podboy, Devin M.; Mirecki, Julius H.; Walker, Bruce E.; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    The Acoustical Testing Laboratory (ATL) consists of a 27- by 23- by 20-ft (height) convertible hemi/anechoic chamber and separate sound-attenuating test support enclosure. Absorptive fiberglass wedges in the test chamber provide an anechoic environment down to 100 Hz. A spring-isolated floor system affords vibration isolation above 3 Hz. These specifications, along with very low design background levels, enable the acquisition of accurate and repeatable acoustical measurements on test articles that produce very low sound pressures. Removable floor wedges allow the test chamber to operate in either a hemi-anechoic or anechoic configuration, depending on the size of the test article and the specific test being conducted. The test support enclosure functions as a control room during normal operations. Recently improvements were accomplished in support of continued usage of the ATL by NASA programs including an analysis of the ultra-sonic characteristics. A 3-D traverse system inside the chamber was utilized for acquiring acoustic data for these tests. The traverse system drives a linear array of 13, 1/4 in.-microphones spaced 3 in. apart (36 in. span). An updated data acquisition system was also incorporated into the facility.

  7. Official Position of the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology Social Security Administration Policy on Validity Testing: Guidance and Recommendations for Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chafetz, M D; Williams, M A; Ben-Porath, Y S; Bianchini, K J; Boone, K B; Kirkwood, M W; Larrabee, G J; Ord, J S

    2015-01-01

    The milestone publication by Slick, Sherman, and Iverson (1999) of criteria for determining malingered neurocognitive dysfunction led to extensive research on validity testing. Position statements by the National Academy of Neuropsychology and the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology (AACN) recommended routine validity testing in neuropsychological evaluations. Despite this widespread scientific and professional support, the Social Security Administration (SSA) continued to discourage validity testing, a stance that led to a congressional initiative for SSA to reevaluate their position. In response, SSA commissioned the Institute of Medicine (IOM) to evaluate the science concerning the validation of psychological testing. The IOM concluded that validity assessment was necessary in psychological and neuropsychological examinations (IOM, 2015 ). The AACN sought to provide independent expert guidance and recommendations concerning the use of validity testing in disability determinations. A panel of contributors to the science of validity testing and its application to the disability process was charged with describing why the disability process for SSA needs improvement, and indicating the necessity for validity testing in disability exams. This work showed how the determination of malingering is a probability proposition, described how different types of validity tests are appropriate, provided evidence concerning non-credible findings in children and low-functioning individuals, and discussed the appropriate evaluation of pain disorders typically seen outside of mental consultations. A scientific plan for validity assessment that additionally protects test security is needed in disability determinations and in research on classification accuracy of disability decisions.

  8. Magnetic Test Performance Capabilities at the Goddard Space Flight Center as Applied to the Global Geospace Science Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Darryl R.

    1997-01-01

    Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility (SMTF) is a historic test facility that has set the standard for all subsequent magnetic test facilities. The SMTF was constructed in the early 1960's for the purpose of simulating geomagnetic and interplanetary magnetic fields. Additionally, the facility provides the capability for measuring spacecraft generated magnetic fields as well as calibrating magnetic attitude control systems and science magnetometers. The SMTF was designed for large, spacecraft level tests and is currently the second largest spherical coil system in the world. The SMTF is a three-axis Braunbek system composed of four coils on each of three orthogonal axes. The largest coils are 12.7 meters (41.6 feet) in diameter. The three-axis Braunbek configuration provides a highly uniform cancellation of the geomagnetic field over the central 1.8 meter (6 foot) diameter primary test volume. Cancellation of the local geomagnetic field is to within +/-0.2 nanotesla with a uniformity of up to 0.001% within the 1.8 meter (6 foot) diameter primary test volume. Artificial magnetic field vectors from 0-60,000 nanotesla can be generated along any axis with a 0.1 nanotesla resolution. Oscillating or rotating field vectors can also be produced about any axis with a frequency of up to 100 radians/second. Since becoming fully operational in July of 1967, the SMTF has been the site of numerous spacecraft magnetics tests. Spacecraft tested at the SMTF include: the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM), Magsat, LANDSAT-D, the Fast Aurora] Snapshot (FAST) Explorer and the Sub-millimeter-Wave-Astronomy Satellite (SWAS) among others. This paper describes the methodology and sequencing used for the Global Geospace Science (GGS) initiative magnetic testing program in the Goddard Space Flight Center's SMTF. The GGS initiative provides an exemplary model of a strict and comprehensive magnetic control program.

  9. Post-Closure Strategy for Use-Restricted Sites on the Nevada National Security Site, Nevada Test and Training Range, and Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvas, A. J. [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States)

    2014-03-26

    The purpose of this Post-Closure Strategy is to provide a consistent methodology for continual evaluation of post-closure requirements for use-restricted areas on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), and Tonopah Test Range (TTR) to consolidate, modify, or streamline the program. In addition, this document stipulates the creation of a single consolidated Post-Closure Plan that will detail the current post-closure requirements for all active use restrictions (URs) and outlines its implementation and subsequent revision. This strategy will ensure effective management and control of the post-closure sites. There are currently over 200 URs located on the NNSS, NTTR, and TTR. Post-closure requirements were initially established in the Closure Report for each site. In some cases, changes to the post-closure requirements have been implemented through addenda, errata sheets, records of technical change, or letters. Post-closure requirements have been collected from these multiple sources and consolidated into several formats, such as summaries and databases. This structure increases the possibility of inconsistencies and uncertainty. As more URs are established and the post-closure program is expanded, the need for a comprehensive approach for managing the program will increase. Not only should the current requirements be obtainable from a single source that supersedes all previous requirements, but the strategy for modifying the requirements should be standardized. This will enable more effective management of the program into the future. This strategy document and the subsequent comprehensive plan are to be implemented under the assumption that the NNSS and outlying sites will be under the purview of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration for the foreseeable future. This strategy was also developed assuming that regulatory control of the sites remains static. The comprehensive plan is not

  10. Memoirs of an Aeronautical Engineer: Flight Tests at Ames Research Center: 1940-1970

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Seth B.

    2002-01-01

    Seth worked over a period of several years to prepare this monograph-collecting information, drafting the text, and finding and selecting the historic photographs. He describes the beginnings of flight research as he knew it at Ames Research Center, recalls numerous World War II programs, relates his experiences with powered-lift aircraft, and concludes with his impressions of two international flight research efforts. His comprehensive collection of large-format photographs of the airplanes and people involved in the various flight activities related in the text constitutes a compelling part of his work.

  11. [Desmopressin testing in children with von Willebrand syndrome in haemostaseologic centers of Saxonia, Saxonia-Anhalt and Thuringia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhn, B; Hofmann, A; Hofmann, K; Sirb, H; Aumann, V; Kentouche, K; Sauerbrey, A; Franke, D; Kuhlisch, E; Knöfler, R

    2009-10-01

    The influence of desmopressin on hemostasis is mediated by the release of von Willebrand factor and of coagulation factor VIII from vascular endothelium. The necessity of testing desmopressin effectiveness on hemostasis is a matter of controversy and the performance of the test is not yet standardized. For this reason the desmopressin tests in 114 children with von Willebrand syndrome (type 1, n=98; type 2A, n=12; type 2M, n=2; type 2N, n=2) carried out in 7 paediatric haemostaseologic centers were retrospectively analyzed. The effectiveness of desmopressin was assessed using defined response criteria. As expected, the test performance showed a wide variation among the centers. In 99 children desmopressin was given intravenously as a short infusion at a dosage ranging from 0.25 to 0.41 microg/kg and in 15 intranasally at an absolute dose of 40 to 300 microg. The points of time for blood taking after desmopressin application ranged from 0.5 to 12 h. The absent desmopressin response in 7 patients (6%) and the partial response in 15 indicate the necessity of testing desmopressin effectiveness before the first therapeutic use. The application of desmopressin was well tolerated by the patients.

  12. Energetic Materials Center Report--Small-Scale Safety and Thermal Testing Evaluation of Butyl Nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Peter C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Energetic Materials Center; Reynolds, John G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Energetic Materials Center

    2013-04-26

    Butyl Nitrate (BN) was examined by Small-Scale Safety and Thermal (SSST) Testing techniques to determine its sensitivity to impact, friction, spark and thermal exposure simulating handling and storage conditions. Under the conditions tested, the BN exhibits thermal sensitivity above 150 °C, and does not exhibit sensitive to impact, friction or spark.

  13. Space and Missile Systems Center Standard: Test Requirements for Ground Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    test levels used in this standard, which should be translated and tailored for the levels and terms of a specific program. The test requirements...should not be confused with the analysis method described here. Bug (software): Common and traditional slang for a defect in software syntax or logic

  14. Do collaborative practical tests encourage student-centered active learning of gross anatomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Rodney A; Cates, Tanya; White, Lloyd; Farchione, Davide

    2016-05-06

    Benefits of collaborative testing have been identified in many disciplines. This study sought to determine whether collaborative practical tests encouraged active learning of anatomy. A gross anatomy course included a collaborative component in four practical tests. Two hundred and seven students initially completed the test as individuals and then worked as a team to complete the same test again immediately afterwards. The relationship between mean individual, team, and difference (between team and individual) test scores to overall performance on the final examination (representing overall learning in the course) was examined using regression analysis. The overall mark in the course increased by 9% with a decreased failure rate. There was a strong relationship between individual score and final examination mark (P learning occurring during the collaborative testing and that weaker students gained the benefit from team marks without significant active learning taking place. This negative outcome may be due to insufficient encouragement of the active learning strategies that were expected to occur during the collaborative testing process. An improved understanding of the efficacy of collaborative assessment could be achieved through the inclusion of questionnaire based data to allow a better interpretation of learning outcomes. Anat Sci Educ 9: 231-237. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  15. Changing resident test ordering behavior: a multilevel intervention to decrease laboratory utilization at an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidyarthi, Arpana R; Hamill, Timothy; Green, Adrienne L; Rosenbluth, Glenn; Baron, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Hospital laboratory test volume is increasing, and overutilization contributes to errors and costs. Efforts to reduce laboratory utilization have targeted aspects of ordering behavior, but few have utilized a multilevel collaborative approach. The study team partnered with residents to reduce unnecessary laboratory tests and associated costs through multilevel interventions across the academic medical center. The study team selected laboratory tests for intervention based on cost, volume, and ordering frequency (complete blood count [CBC] and CBC with differential, common electrolytes, blood enzymes, and liver function tests). Interventions were designed collaboratively with residents and targeted components of ordering behavior, including system changes, teaching, social marketing, academic detailing, financial incentives, and audit/feedback. Laboratory ordering was reduced by 8% cumulatively over 3 years, saving $2 019 000. By involving residents at every stage of the intervention and targeting multiple levels simultaneously, laboratory utilization was reduced and cost savings were sustained over 3 years. © 2014 by the American College of Medical Quality.

  16. [Validation of an observer-based rating set compared to a standardized written psychological test for the diagnosis of depression and anxiety in a university preadmission test center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Stübner, S; de Bruin, J; Neuser, J; Rossaint, R

    2001-06-01

    Depression and anxiety can be a major factor of perioperative stress and might contribute to patients dissatisfaction with medical care if they remain unrecognized. There are several methods to diagnose depression and anxiety like standardized written psychological tests or self report scales. Because these tests are not always suitable for routine use in a busy preadmission test center we evaluated an observer-based rating set for the diagnosis of depression and anxiety. 70 patients of a university hospital preadmission test center were tested with the HADS-D-Test and the observer-based rating set after approval of the institutional review board and written informed consent. Test-data were compared using a logistic regression model and demographic variables were analyzed using t-Test. ANOVA and Pearson correlation. The prevalence of depression in our study population was 11.11% (14.75% in male, 9.76% in female) and the prevalence of anxiety was 7.14% (6.9% in male and 7.32% in female). The correlation between the observer-based rating items and the HADS-D-diagnosis was statistically highly significant. The observer based items "unsteady eye movements" and "general worrisome mood" proved to be especially sensitive for anxiety and the items "sorrowful mood" and "impression of resignation" were sensitive for depression without any influence of the experience of the anesthesiologist. A higher prevalence of depression and anxiety was found in patients with ASA-class III compared to those with ASA-classes I and II while age and type of surgery had no significant influence. Based on our observations depression and anxiety are a relevant factor of preoperative morbidity assessment. Observer-based items are a reliable tool to detect those patients which might need special assistance and therapy in the perioperative period to reduce stress associated with high preexisting levels of depression and anxiety.

  17. Final Report Feasibility Study for the California Wave Energy Test Center (CalWavesm) - Volume #2 - Appendices #16-17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooher, Brendan [Pacific Gas and Electric Company, San Ramon, CA (United States). Applied Technical Services; Toman, William I. [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States). Inst. of Advanced Technology and Public Policy; Davy, Doug M. [CH2M Hill Engineers, Inc., Sacramento, CA (United States); Blakslee, Samuel N. [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States)

    2017-07-31

    The California Wave Energy Test Center (CalWave) Feasibility Study project was funded over multiple phases by the Department of Energy to perform an interdisciplinary feasibility assessment to analyze the engineering, permitting, and stakeholder requirements to establish an open water, fully energetic, grid connected, wave energy test center off the coast of California for the purposes of advancing U.S. wave energy research, development, and testing capabilities. Work under this grant included wave energy resource characterization, grid impact and interconnection requirements, port infrastructure and maritime industry capability/suitability to accommodate the industry at research, demonstration and commercial scale, and macro and micro siting considerations. CalWave Phase I performed a macro-siting and down-selection process focusing on two potential test sites in California: Humboldt Bay and Vandenberg Air Force Base. This work resulted in the Vandenberg Air Force Base site being chosen as the most favorable site based on a peer reviewed criteria matrix. CalWave Phase II focused on four siting location alternatives along the Vandenberg Air Force Base coastline and culminated with a final siting down-selection. Key outcomes from this work include completion of preliminary engineering and systems integration work, a robust turnkey cost estimate, shoreside and subsea hazards assessment, storm wave analysis, lessons learned reports from several maritime disciplines, test center benchmarking as compared to existing international test sites, analysis of existing applicable environmental literature, the completion of a preliminary regulatory, permitting and licensing roadmap, robust interaction and engagement with state and federal regulatory agency personnel and local stakeholders, and the population of a Draft Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Preliminary Application Document (PAD). Analysis of existing offshore oil and gas infrastructure was also performed

  18. Thermal performance evaluation of the Northrop model NSC-01-0732 concentrating solar collector array at outdoor conditions. [Marshall Space Flight Center solar house test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The thermal efficiency of the concentrating, tracking solar collector was tested after ten months of operation at the Marshall Space Flight Center solar house. The test procedures and results are presented.

  19. Security Expertise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    and to reflect on the impact and responsibility of security analysis. In science and technology studies, the study of security politics adds a challenging new case to the agenda of research on expertise and policy. The contributors investigate cases such as academic security studies, security think tanks......, the collaboration between science, anthropology and the military, transnational terrorism, and the ethical consequences of security expertise. Together they challenge our understanding of how expertise works and what consequences it has for security politics and international relations. This book...... will be of particular interest to students of critical security studies, sociology, science and technology studies, and IR/security studies in general....

  20. Computer-aided dispatch--traffic management center field operational test final evaluation plan : WSDOT deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-22

    This document presents the Evaluation Teams plan for conducting the evaluation of the FOT in Washington State. A companion document exists for the evaluation of the Utah deployment. This plan includes the experimental design for testing hypotheses...

  1. Atmospheric Measurements for Flight Test at NASAs Neil A. Armstrong Flight Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teets, Edward H.

    2016-01-01

    Information enclosed is to be shared with students of Atmospheric Sciences, Engineering and High School STEM programs. Information will show the relationship between atmospheric Sciences and aeronautical flight testing.

  2. A History of Full-Scale Aircraft and Rotorcraft Crash Testing and Simulation at NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Boitnott, Richard L.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jones, Lisa E.; Lyle, Karen H.

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarizes 2-1/2 decades of full-scale aircraft and rotorcraft crash testing performed at the Impact Dynamics Research Facility (IDRF) located at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. The IDRF is a 240-ft.-high steel gantry that was built originally as a lunar landing simulator facility in the early 1960's. It was converted into a full-scale crash test facility for light aircraft and rotorcraft in the early 1970 s. Since the first full-scale crash test was preformed in February 1974, the IDRF has been used to conduct: 41 full-scale crash tests of General Aviation (GA) aircraft including landmark studies to establish baseline crash performance data for metallic and composite GA aircraft; 11 full-scale crash tests of helicopters including crash qualification tests of the Bell and Sikorsky Advanced Composite Airframe Program (ACAP) prototypes; 48 Wire Strike Protection System (WSPS) qualification tests of Army helicopters; 3 vertical drop tests of Boeing 707 transport aircraft fuselage sections; and, 60+ crash tests of the F-111 crew escape module. For some of these tests, nonlinear transient dynamic codes were utilized to simulate the impact response of the airframe. These simulations were performed to evaluate the capabilities of the analytical tools, as well as to validate the models through test-analysis correlation. In September 2003, NASA Langley closed the IDRF facility and plans are underway to demolish it in 2007. Consequently, it is important to document the contributions made to improve the crashworthiness of light aircraft and rotorcraft achieved through full-scale crash testing and simulation at the IDRF.

  3. The added value of neuropsychologic tests and structural imaging for the etiologic diagnosis of dementia in italian expert centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geroldi, Cristina; Canu, Elisa; Bruni, Amalia C; Dal Forno, Gloria; Ferri, Raffaele; Gabelli, Carlo; Perri, Roberta; Iapaolo, David; Scarpino, Osvaldo; Sinforiani, Elena; Zanetti, Orazio; Frisoni, Giovanni B

    2008-01-01

    Aim of the study was to assess the added diagnostic value of neuropsychologic tests and structural neuroimaging (computed tomography or magnetic resonance) in the routine clinical assessment of demented patients in Italian expert centers. Nine centers were involved, located across the whole country (3 in Northern, 3 in Central, and 3 in Southern Italy). Diagnostic pathways were tracked for 474 patients with an expert diagnosis of neurodegenerative or vascular dementia (age 76+/-8; 62% females; Mini-Mental State Examination 17.70+/-5.7). The contribution of neuropsychology and structural neuroimaging to diagnosis was estimated as "number needed to test" (NNT), denoting the number of patients who need to undergo such procedures to improve expert diagnosis of 1 unit. Expert physicians reached their diagnosis without resorting to structural imaging examinations and neuropsychologic tests in 93% of Alzheimer disease (AD) and 76% of non-AD dementias. The completion of the extended assessment led to improvement of diagnostic accuracy in both cases: the NNT was 15.3 (95% confidence interval: 10.4-29.1) and 4.1 (3.0 to 6.5) for AD and non-AD diagnoses. The added value of structural imaging and neuropsychologic testing in the routine clinical assessment of demented patients is substantial in both AD and non-AD cases.

  4. Sweat test and cystic fibrosis: overview of test performance at public and private centers in the state of São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servidoni, Maria Fátima; Gomez, Carla Cristina Souza; Marson, Fernando Augusto Lima; Toro, Adyléia Aparecida Dalbo Contrera; Ribeiro, Maria Ângela Gonçalves de Oliveira; Ribeiro, José Dirceu; Ribeiro, Antônio Fernando

    2017-01-01

    The sweat test (ST) measures chloride levels in sweat and is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF). However, the reliability of a ST depends on their being performed by experienced technicians and in accordance with strict guidelines. Our aim was to evaluate how sweat stimulation, sweat collection, and chloride measurement are performed at 14 centers (9 public centers and 5 private centers) that routinely perform STs in the state of São Paulo, which has the highest frequency of CF in Brazil. This was a cross-sectional cohort study, using a standardized questionnaire administered in loco to the staff responsible for conducting STs. No uniformity regarding the procedures was found among the centers. Most centers were noncompliant with the international guidelines, especially regarding the collection of sweat (the samples were insufficient in 10-50% of the subjects tested); availability of stimulation equipment (which was limited at 2 centers); modernity and certification of stimulation equipment (most of the equipment having been used for 3-23 years); and written protocols (which were lacking at 12 centers). Knowledge of ST guidelines was evaluated at only 1 center. Our results show that STs largely deviate from internationally accepted guidelines at the participating centers. Therefore, there is an urgent need for standardization of STs, training of qualified personnel, and acquisition/certification of suitable equipment. These are essential conditions for a reliable diagnosis of CF, especially with the increasing demand due to newborn screening nationwide, and for the assessment of a possible clinical benefit from the use of modulator drugs. O teste do suor (TS) mede os níveis de cloro no suor e é considerado o padrão ouro para o diagnóstico da fibrose cística (FC). Contudo, a confiabilidade do TS depende de sua realização por técnicos experientes e segundo diretrizes rígidas. Nosso objetivo foi avaliar como s

  5. James Webb Space Telescope Integrated Science Instrument Module Thermal Vacuum Thermal Balance Test Campaign at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, Stuart; Comber, Brian (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope is a large infrared telescope with a 6.5-meter primary mirror, designed as a successor to the Hubble Space Telescope when launched in 2018. Three of the four science instruments contained within the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) are passively cooled to their operational temperature range of 36K to 40K with radiators, and the fourth instrument is actively cooled to its operational temperature of approximately 6K. Thermal-vacuum testing of the flight science instruments at the ISIM element level has taken place in three separate highly challenging and extremely complex thermal tests within a gaseous helium-cooled shroud inside Goddard Space Flight Centers Space Environment Simulator. Special data acquisition software was developed for these tests to monitor over 1700 flight and test sensor measurements, track over 50 gradients, component rates, and temperature limits in real time against defined constraints and limitations, and guide the complex transition from ambient to final cryogenic temperatures and back. This extremely flexible system has proven highly successful in safeguarding the nearly $2B science payload during the 3.5-month-long thermal tests. Heat flow measurement instrumentation, or Q-meters, were also specially developed for these tests. These devices provide thermal boundaries o the flight hardware while measuring instrument heat loads up to 600 mW with an estimated uncertainty of 2 mW in test, enabling accurate thermal model correlation, hardware design validation, and workmanship verification. The high accuracy heat load measurements provided first evidence of a potentially serious hardware design issue that was subsequently corrected. This paper provides an overview of the ISIM-level thermal-vacuum tests and thermal objectives; explains the thermal test configuration and thermal balances; describes special measurement instrumentation and monitoring and control software; presents key test thermal results

  6. Ames Research Center Mars/Pathfinder Heat Shield Design Verification ARC-JET Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Huy K.; Hui, Frank; Wercinski, Paul; Cartledge, Alan; Tauber, Mike; Tran, Duoc T.; Chen, Y. K.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Design verification tests were performed on samples representing the aerobrake of the Mars/Pathfinder vehicle. The test specimens consisted of the SLA-561V ablator bonded to the honeycomb structure. The primary objective was to evaluate the ablation materials performance and to measure temperatures within the ablator, at the structural bondline and at the back sheet of the honeycomb structure. Other objectives were to evaluate the effect of ablative repair plug material treatment and voids in the heat shield. A total of 29 models were provided for testing in the Ames 60MW arc-jet facility. Of these, 23 models were flat-faced and six remaining models were curved edge ones, intended to simulate the conditions on the curved rim of the forebody where the maximum shear occurred. Eight sets of test conditions were used. The stagnation point heating rates varied from 47 to 240 W/cm2 and the stagnation pressures from 0.15 to 0.27 atm. (The maximum flight values are 132 W/cm2 and 0.25 atm) The majority of these runs were made at a nominal stagnation pressure of 0.25 atm. Two higher pressure runs were made to check the current (denser) ablation material for spallation, or other forms of thermal stress failure. Over 60% of the flatfaced models yielded good thermocouple data and all produced useful surface recession information. Of the five curved-edge models that were tested, only one gave good data; the remaining ones experienced model-holder failure. The test results can be summarized by noting that no failure of the ablative material was observed on any model. Also, the bondline temperature design limit of 250 C was never reached within an equivalent flight time despite a stagnation point heat load that exceeded the maximum flight value by up to 130%. At heating rates of over 200W/cm2 and stagnation pressures of 0.25 atm, or greater, the average surface recessions exceeded 0.5 cm on some models. The surface roughness increased dramatically at pressures above 0.25 atm and

  7. Summary of Stirling Convertor Testing at NASA Glenn Research Center in Support of Stirling Radioisotope Power System Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schifer, Nicholas A.; Oriti, Salvatore M.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been testing 100 We class, free-piston Stirling convertors for potential use in Stirling Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for space science and exploration missions. Free-piston Stirling convertors are capable of achieving a 38% conversion efficiency, making Stirling attractive for meeting future power system needs in light of the shrinking U.S. plutonium fuel supply. Convertors currently on test include four Stirling Technology Demonstration Convertors (TDCs), manufactured by the Stirling Technology Company (STC), and six Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs), manufactured by Sunpower, Inc. Total hours of operation is greater than 514,000 hours (59 years). Several tests have been initiated to demonstrate the functionality of Stirling convertors for space applications, including: in-air extended operation, thermal vacuum extended operation. Other tests have also been conducted to characterize Stirling performance in anticipated mission scenarios. Data collected during testing has been used to support life and reliability estimates, drive design changes and improve quality, and plan for expected mission scenarios. This paper will provide a summary of convertors tested at NASA GRC and discuss lessons learned through extended testing.

  8. Crash Test of Three Cessna 172 Aircraft at NASA Langley Research Center's Landing and Impact Research Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littell, Justin D.

    2015-01-01

    During the summer of 2015, three Cessna 172 aircraft were crash tested at the Landing and Impact Research Facility (LandIR) at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The three tests simulated three different crash scenarios. The first simulated a flare-to-stall emergency or hard landing onto a rigid surface such as a road or runway, the second simulated a controlled flight into terrain with a nose down pitch on the aircraft, and the third simulated a controlled flight into terrain with an attempt to unsuccessfully recover the aircraft immediately prior to impact, resulting in a tail strike condition. An on-board data acquisition system captured 64 channels of airframe acceleration, along with acceleration and load in two onboard Hybrid II 50th percentile Anthropomorphic Test Devices, representing the pilot and co-pilot. Each test contained different airframe loading conditions and results show large differences in airframe performance. This paper presents test methods used to conduct the crash tests and will summarize the airframe results from the test series.

  9. Photovoltaic power generation field test at Kanagawa Prefectural Disaster Prevention Center (fire station in a standard district); Kanagawaken sogo bosai center taiyoko hatsuden field test jigyo (hyojun chiku no shobosho)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okazaki, H. [Kanagawa Prefectural Government Office, Yokohama (Japan)

    1997-05-30

    Contents of a fiscal 1996 photovoltaic power generation field test at a fire station are reported. The photovoltaic power generation system is installed on the fourth-floor rooftop of the Kanagawa Prefectural Disaster Prevention Center management building, providing a power source for lighting, airconditioning, etc. It is a 35kW plant working on system interconnection, with an array that is an 18-series/36-parallel system facing due south and inclined at an angle of elevation of 30deg. Its applicability and safety were verified, and its effect as a facility power source was evaluated. Materials have been accumulated that will help diffuse the photovoltaic power generating facility in the future. The produced power is used for lighting, etc., in the center, accelerating the useful and effective utilization of energy and the versification of sources of energy that is clean and safe. It will become easier to incorporate photovoltaic systems even at a building designing stage when harmony is sustained between the facility power distribution system and the photovoltaic power generation system and when a system interconnection technique is established provided with an effective and economic system configuration. The center is visited by many people in and out of the prefecture, which indicates that there will be a long-term enlightening effect

  10. CID-720 aircraft Langley Research Center preflight hardware tests: Development, flight acceptance and qualification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pride, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    The testing conducted on LaRC-developed hardware for the controlled impact demonstration transport aircraft is discussed. To properly develop flight qualified crash systems, two environments were considered: the aircraft flight environment with the focus on vibration and temperature effects, and the crash environment with the long pulse shock effects. Also with the large quantity of fuel in the wing tanks the possibility of fire was considered to be a threat to data retrieval and thus fire tests were included in the development test process. The aircraft test successfully demonstrated the performance of the LaRC developed heat shields. Good telemetered data (S-band) was received during the impact and slide-out phase, and even after the aircraft came to rest. The two onboard DAS tape recorders were protected from the intense fire and high quality tape data was recovered. The complete photographic system performed as planned throughout the 40.0 sec of film supply. The four photo power distribution pallets remained in good condition and all ten onboard 16 mm high speed (400 frames/sec) cameras produced good film data.

  11. UAV Research, Operations, and Flight Test at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Gary B.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the projects that have extended NASA Dryden's capabilities in designing, testing, and using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV's). Some of the UAV's have been for Science and experimental applications, some have been for flight research and demonstration purposes, and some have been small UAV's for other customers.

  12. American BRCA Outcomes and Utilization of Testing (ABOUT) study: a pragmatic research model that incorporates personalized medicine/patient-centered outcomes in a real world setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Joanne; Toscano, Michele; Kotchko, Nancy; Friedman, Sue; Schwartz, Marc D; Virgo, Katherine S; Lynch, Kristian; Andrews, James E; Aguado Loi, Claudia X; Bauer, Joseph E; Casares, Carolina; Teten, Rachel Threet; Kondoff, Matthew R; Molina, Ashley D; Abdollahian, Mehrnaz; Brand, Lana; Walker, Gregory S; Sutphen, Rebecca

    2015-02-01

    Research to date regarding identification and management of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC) in the U.S. has been confined primarily to academic center-based studies with limited patient engagement. To begin to understand and address the current gaps and disparities in delivery of services for the appropriate identification and optimal risk management of individuals with HBOC, we designed and have initiated the American BRCA Outcomes and Utilization of Testing (ABOUT) Study. ABOUT relies on a collaborative patient advocacy, academic and industry partnership to recruit and engage U.S. individuals who are at increased risk for HBOC and investigate their experiences, decisions and outcomes. It utilizes an extensive research infrastructure, including an interactive web-based data system and electronic interfaces for secure online participation and automated data exchange. We describe the novel recruitment approach that was designed for collaboration with a national commercial health plan partner to identify all individuals for whom a healthcare provider orders a BRCA test and mail to each individual an invitation to participate and study packet. The study packet contains detailed information about the study, a baseline questionnaire and informed consent for participation in the study, for release of relevant medical and health plan records and for ongoing research engagement. This approach employs patient-reported, laboratory-reported and health plan-reported outcomes and facilitates longitudinal engagement. We believe that the type of innovative methodology and collaborative framework we have developed for ABOUT is an ideal foundation for a patient-powered research network. This approach can make substantial contributions to identifying current and best practices in HBOC, leading to improved strategies for clinical care and optimal health outcomes among individuals with high inherited risk for cancer.

  13. Mailed outreach and facilitated test ordering to promote cholesterol screening in community health centers: A randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persell, Stephen D; Brown, Tiffany; Lee, Ji Young; Henley, Eric; Long, Timothy; Sanchez, Thomas; Knight, Regina

    2017-06-01

    Lipid screening is central to cardiovascular risk assessment. We sought to determine whether a simple mailed outreach message and facilitated test ordering increase cholesterol screening among federally qualified community health center patients with no recent cholesterol screening test performed. Using a patient-randomized controlled trial, we examined the effects of delivering a simple mailed outreach intervention promoting cholesterol testing and facilitated test ordering (without requiring an office visit). Participants were adult patients 50 to 75 years old, with no diagnosed cardiovascular disease or diabetes, and no cholesterol test within 5 years who had received care from community health centers in Illinois and Arizona. The intervention took place in 2014 and was powered to detect a 10% increase in screening due to the intervention. Participants' (n = 480) mean age was 57.5 years, 51.0% were male, and 43.8% were smokers. There was no significant difference between groups in the primary study outcome-completion of total cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol tests or complete lipid panel within 3 months; 32 participants (13.3%) in intervention group versus 26 (10.8%) in control group met the primary outcome, with absolute difference of 2.5 percentage points (95% confidence interval -6.6 to 11.6). This outreach intervention promoting cholesterol screening was ineffective. Interventions that attempt to minimize barriers to cholesterol screening on multiple fronts and that are more compelling to patients are needed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Cyber security

    CERN Document Server

    Voeller, John G

    2014-01-01

    Cyber Security features articles from the Wiley Handbook of Science and Technology for Homeland Security covering topics related to cyber security metrics and measure  and related technologies that meet security needs. Specific applications to web services, the banking and the finance sector, and industrial process control systems are discussed.

  15. Financial security

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Goede, M.; Burgess, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    1. Introduction J. Peter Burgess Part 1: New Security Concepts 2. Civilizational Security Brett Bowden 3. Risk Oliver Kessler 4. Small Arms Keith Krause 5. Critical Human Security Taylor Owen 6. Critical Geopolitics Simon Dalby Part 2: New Security Subjects 7. Biopolitics Michael Dillon 8. Gendered

  16. Lessons Learned (3 Years of H2O2 Propulsion System Testing Efforts at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Gary O.

    2001-01-01

    John C. Stennis Space Center continues to support the Propulsion community in an effort to validate High-Test Peroxide as an alternative to existing/future oxidizers. This continued volume of peroxide test/handling activity at Stennis Space Center (SSC) provides numerous opportunities for the SSC team to build upon previously documented 'lessons learned'. SSC shall continue to strive to document their experience and findings as H2O2 issues surface. This paper is intended to capture all significant peroxide issues that we have learned over the last three years. This data (lessons learned) has been formulated from practical handling, usage, storage, operations, and initial development/design of our systems/facility viewpoint. The paper is intended to be an information type tool and limited in technical rational; therefore, presenting the peroxide community with some issues to think about as the continued interest in peroxide evolves and more facilities/hardware are built. These lessons learned are intended to assist industry in mitigating problems and identifying potential pitfalls when dealing with the requirements for handling high-test peroxide.

  17. Sistem Scoring Conversion TOEFL Paper Based Test (PBT Politeknik Negeri Cilacap Menggunakan Metode User Centered Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahya Vikasari

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sistem komputer interaktif untuk dipakai oleh useruntuk mendukung pekerjannya. User merupakan object yang penting didalam pengembangan dan pembangun sistem. User adalah personal-personal yang terlibat langsung dalam pemakaian aplikasi. Konsep dari UCD adalah user sebagai pusat dari proses pengembangan sistem, dan tujuan/sifat-sifat, konteks dan lingkungan sistem semua didasarkan dari pengalaman pengguna Pembangunan sistem skoring test TOEFL paper based test (PBT di UPT bahasa politeknik negeri cilacapmenggunakan metode UCD. Dengan menggunakan metode UCD sistem dapat   mempermudah dan mempercepat pendaftaran oleh calon pendaftar dengan tampilan antarmuka yang user friendly , mempermudah proses pengelolaan data dan rekap data pendaftar, mempermudah pengkonversian skor TOEFL yang dilakukan secara otomatis, serta  meminimalisir terjadinya kesalahan, duplikasi data dan duplikasi kegiatan.

  18. LTE security

    CERN Document Server

    Forsberg, Dan; Moeller, Wolf-Dietrich

    2010-01-01

    Addressing the security solutions for LTE, a cellular technology from Third Generation Partnership Project (3GPP), this book shows how LTE security substantially extends GSM and 3G security. It also encompasses the architectural aspects, known as SAE, to give a comprehensive resource on the topic. Although the security for SAE/LTE evolved from the security for GSM and 3G, due to different architectural and business requirements of fourth generation systems the SAE/LTE security architecture is substantially different from its predecessors. This book presents in detail the security mechanisms em

  19. The evaluation of drug provocation tests in pediatric allergy clinic: a single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezir, Emine; Erkocoglu, Mustafa; Civelek, Ersoy; Kaya, Aysenur; Azkur, Dilek; Akan, Aysegül; Ozcan, Celal; Toyran, Muge; Ginis, Tayfur; Misirlioglu, Emine Dibek; Kocabas, Can Naci

    2014-01-01

    Drug provocation tests (DPTs) are gold standard to diagnose drug allergy. Our goal was to evaluate the results and safety of diagnostic methods including DPTs during childhood. Between January 2010 and February 2013 DPTs were performed and evaluated, prospectively, in children who attended our pediatric allergy clinic with a suspected drug hypersensitivity reaction. One hundred ninety-eight suspected drug reactions in 175 patients (88 boys and 87 girls) were evaluated. The median age of the subjects at the time of the suspected drug-induced hypersensitivity reaction and at the time of the study was 56 (interquartile range [IQR] = 24-120 months) months and 76 (IQR = 35-149 months) months, respectively. Suspected drugs were beta-lactam antibiotics in 108 cases (54.5%), non-beta-lactam antibiotics in 22 cases (11.1%), and nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs in 52 cases (26.3%). The history was compatible with immediate-type reactions in 69 cases (34.8%). Skin-prick tests were not positive in any of the cases. Intradermal tests were positive in three cases (4%). DPTs were positive in 13 (6.8%) of 191 provocation cases, which were performed with culprit drugs. Our results suggest that a positive clinical history is not enough to make a diagnosis of drug allergy, which highlights the significance of undertaking further diagnostic evaluation especially for DPTs.

  20. Test-retest reliability of the VA National Center for Patient Safety culture questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiner, Brian; Ronconi, Julia M; McKnight, Scott; Young-Xu, Yinong; Mills, Peter D; Watts, Bradley V

    2016-12-01

    Patient safety culture may have a significant influence on safety processes and outcomes. Therefore, it is important to have valid tools to measure patient safety culture in order to identify potential levers for cultural change that could improve patient safety. The 65-item Department of Veterans Affairs Patient Safety Culture Survey (VA PSCS) consists of 14 dimensions and is administered biannually to VA employees. Test-retest reliability of the VA PSCS has not been established. We conducted repeated administrations of the VA PSCS among 28 VA employees. We measured intraclass correlation coefficients for each item and dimension. Test-retest intraclass correlation coefficient values were 0.7 or greater for 13 out of 14 dimensions of the VA PSCS. Employees had difficulty reliably reporting how others feel about patient safety. In general, the VA PSCS survey showed adequate test-retest reliability. Items asking what others think or feel showed lower reliability. Further work is needed to better understand the relationship between safety culture, safety processes and safety outcomes. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  1. HIV prevalence in voluntary counseling and testing centers compared with national HIV serosurvey data in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryarama, Fulgentius; Bunnell, Rebecca E; Montana, Livia; Hladik, Wolfgang; Opio, Alex; Musinguzi, Joshua; Kirungi, Wilford; Waswa-Bright, Laban; Mermin, Jonathan H

    2008-10-01

    To compare HIV prevalence from routine voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) data with a population-based serosurvey in Uganda and to assess the utility of VCT data as a supplemental data source for HIV surveillance. We analyzed HIV testing data from 75,640 unique VCT clients aged 15-59 years collected from August 2004 to January 2005 at 160 VCT sites. We excluded clients who reported illness as the reason for testing. During the same time period, 18,525 adults aged 15-59 years were tested for HIV in the Uganda HIV/AIDS Sero-Behavioral Survey (UHSBS). We compared UHSBS HIV prevalence with age-standardized VCT prevalence, overall and among stand-alone and facility-based VCT sites. HIV prevalence in urban areas was similar overall [UHSBS: 9.7%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 8.6 to 10.7; VCT: 10.1%, CI 9.8 to 10.5] and for both men (UHSBS: 6.3%, CI 4.9 to 7.6; VCT: 7.1, CI 6.6 to 7.5) and women (UHSBS: 12.2%, CI 10.6 to 13.7; VCT: 12.9%, CI 12.3 to 13.4). Urban prevalence from UHSBS (9.7%, CI 8.6 to 10.7), VCT stand-alone sites (10.3% CI 9.8 to 10.8), and VCT sites in health facility settings (10.0%, CI 9.5 to 10.4) was similar. However, in rural areas where VCT coverage is much lower than in urban areas (10% versus 31%), HIV prevalence was much higher among rural VCT clients (8.2%, CI 7.9% to 8.4%) than among rural UHSBS participants (5.2%, CI 4.8% to 5.5%). This resulted in overall higher HIV prevalence among all VCT clients (8.8%, CI 8.7 to 9.1) compared with all survey participants (5.9%, CI 5.6 to 6.2). After excluding clients who give illness as a reason for testing, VCT data may be used without further adjustment to monitor the HIV epidemic among urban Ugandans using either VCT data from stand-alone or health facility-based sites. However, monitoring rural and overall HIV prevalence using VCT data may not be appropriate until the uptake of VCT in rural areas is significantly improved or an adjustment factor is applied.

  2. Fabrication and characterization of MCC (Materials Characterization Center) approved testing material: ATM-10 glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maupin, G.D.; Bowen, W.M.; Daniel, J.L.

    1988-04-01

    The Materials Characterization Center ATM-10 glass represents a reference commercial high-level waste form similar to that which will be produced by the West Valley Nuclear Service Co. Inc., West Valley, New York. The target composition and acceptable range of composition were defined by the sponsor, West Valley Nuclear Service. The ATM-10 glass was produced in accordance with the Pacific Northwest Laboratory QA Manual for License-Related Programs, MCC technical procedures, and MCC QA Plan that were in effect during the course of the work. The method and procedure to be used in the fabrication and characterization of the ATM-10 glass were specified in two run plans for glass preparation and a characterization plan. All of the ATM-10 glass was produced in the form of bars 1.9 /times/ 1.9 /times/ 10 cm nominal size, and 93 g nominal mass. A total of 15 bars of ATM-10 glass weighing 1394 g was produced. The production bars were characterized to determine the mean composition, oxidation state, and microstructure of the ATM-10 product. Table A summarizes the characterization results. The ATM-10 glass meets all specifications. The elemental composition and oxidation state of the glass are within the specifications of the client. Visually, the ATM-10 glass bars appear uniformly glassy and generally without exterior features. Microscopic examination revealed low (less than 2 wt %) concentractions of 3-..mu..m iron-chrome (suspected spinel) crystals and /approximately/0.5-..mu..m ruthenium inclusions scattered randomly throughout the glassy matrix. Closed porosity, with pores ranging in diameter from 5 to 250 ..mu..m, was observed in all samples. 4 refs., 10 figs., 21 tabs.

  3. 6th Annual Homeland Security and Defense Education Summit, Developing an Adaptive Homeland Security Environment

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    6th Annual Homeland Security and Defense Education Summit Developing an Adaptive Homeland Security Environment, Burlington, MA, September 26-28, 2013 2013 Summit Agenda Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Defense and Security In Partnership With Northeastern University, Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency, National Guard Homeland Security Institute, National Homeland Defense Foundation Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Defense and S...

  4. User-centered development and testing of a monitoring system that provides feedback regarding physical functioning to elderly people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vermeulen J

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Joan Vermeulen,1 Jacques CL Neyens,1 Marieke D Spreeuwenberg,1 Erik van Rossum,1,2 Walther Sipers,3 Herbert Habets,3 David J Hewson,4 Luc P de Witte1,2 1School for Public Health and Primary Care (CAPHRI, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands; 2Research Center for Technology in Care, Zuyd University of Applied Sciences, Heerlen, The Netherlands; 3Expertise Center for Elderly Care, Orbis Medical Center, Sittard, The Netherlands; 4Institute Charles Delaunay, Université de Technologie de Troyes, Troyes, France Purpose: To involve elderly people during the development of a mobile interface of a monitoring system that provides feedback to them regarding changes in physical functioning and to test the system in a pilot study. Methods and participants: The iterative user-centered development process consisted of the following phases: (1 selection of user representatives; (2 analysis of users and their context; (3 identification of user requirements; (4 development of the interface; and (5 evaluation of the interface in the lab. Subsequently, the monitoring and feedback system was tested in a pilot study by five patients who were recruited via a geriatric outpatient clinic. Participants used a bathroom scale to monitor weight and balance, and a mobile phone to monitor physical activity on a daily basis for six weeks. Personalized feedback was provided via the interface of the mobile phone. Usability was evaluated on a scale from 1 to 7 using a modified version of the Post-Study System Usability Questionnaire (PSSUQ; higher scores indicated better usability. Interviews were conducted to gain insight into the experiences of the participants with the system. Results: The developed interface uses colors, emoticons, and written and/or spoken text messages to provide daily feedback regarding (changes in weight, balance, and physical activity. The participants rated the usability of the monitoring and feedback system with a mean score of 5

  5. [Chagas disease: screening tests evaluation in a blood military center, prevalence in the French Army].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerleguer, A; Massard, S; Janus, G; Joussemet, M

    2007-12-01

    Chagas disease is a major public health problem in Latin and Central America, 15 to 20 million people are affected and some 100 million is at risk of acquiring Chagas disease. Chagas disease starts to appear in amazonian area and french Guyana. Three kits: Elisa Novagnost (Dade Behring), BioElisa Chagas (Orgentec) et Elisa Cruzi (BioMérieux) were compared using performance panel. Sensibility, reproductibility and specificity (using 40 serum of blood donors who never went to an endemic area) were evaluated. Orgentec assay (recombinant antigens) and BioMérieux assay (whole-epimastigote antigens) performed better than Dade Behring assay. The latter was discarded from the study at this stage. Lack of sensibility seems due to the antigenic composition. Reproductibility and specificity are good for the other two tests. Mixtures of recombinants antigens increased specificity, but sensibility is better using mixtures of whole-epimastigote antigens. For routine blood donor screening both tests must be performed. A prevalence study was done during 11 months on 1570 serum of military blood donors. Despite of a low prevalence (less than 0.7 per thousand), the entire donation from donors who were in the endemic area (7.95% from our whole population) are screened for antibody against Trypanosoma cruzi, with these two assays.

  6. Lewis Research Center's coal-fired, pressurized, fluidized-bed reactor test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobak, J. A.; Rollbuhler, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    A 200-kilowatt-thermal, pressurized, fluidized-bed (PFB) reactor, research test facility was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a NASA-funded project to assess and evaluate the effect of PFB hot-gas effluent on aircraft turbine engine materials that might have applications in stationary-power-plant turbogenerators. Some of the techniques and components developed for this PFB system are described. One of the more important items was the development of a two-in-one, gas-solids separator that removed 95+ percent of the solids in 1600 F to 1900 F gases. Another was a coal and sorbent feed and mixing system for injecting the fuel into the pressurized combustor. Also important were the controls and data-acquisition systems that enabled one person to operate the entire facility. The solid, liquid, and gas sub-systems all had problems that were solved over the 2-year operating time of the facility, which culminated in a 400-hour, hot-gas, turbine test.

  7. NASA Stennis Space Center Integrated System Health Management Test Bed and Development Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Holland, Randy; Coote, David

    2006-01-01

    Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) is a capability that focuses on determining the condition (health) of every element in a complex System (detect anomalies, diagnose causes, prognosis of future anomalies), and provide data, information, and knowledge (DIaK)-not just data-to control systems for safe and effective operation. This capability is currently done by large teams of people, primarily from ground, but needs to be embedded on-board systems to a higher degree to enable NASA's new Exploration Mission (long term travel and stay in space), while increasing safety and decreasing life cycle costs of spacecraft (vehicles; platforms; bases or outposts; and ground test, launch, and processing operations). The topics related to this capability include: 1) ISHM Related News Articles; 2) ISHM Vision For Exploration; 3) Layers Representing How ISHM is Currently Performed; 4) ISHM Testbeds & Prototypes at NASA SSC; 5) ISHM Functional Capability Level (FCL); 6) ISHM Functional Capability Level (FCL) and Technology Readiness Level (TRL); 7) Core Elements: Capabilities Needed; 8) Core Elements; 9) Open Systems Architecture for Condition-Based Maintenance (OSA-CBM); 10) Core Elements: Architecture, taxonomy, and ontology (ATO) for DIaK management; 11) Core Elements: ATO for DIaK Management; 12) ISHM Architecture Physical Implementation; 13) Core Elements: Standards; 14) Systematic Implementation; 15) Sketch of Work Phasing; 16) Interrelationship Between Traditional Avionics Systems, Time Critical ISHM and Advanced ISHM; 17) Testbeds and On-Board ISHM; 18) Testbed Requirements: RETS AND ISS; 19) Sustainable Development and Validation Process; 20) Development of on-board ISHM; 21) Taxonomy/Ontology of Object Oriented Implementation; 22) ISHM Capability on the E1 Test Stand Hydraulic System; 23) Define Relationships to Embed Intelligence; 24) Intelligent Elements Physical and Virtual; 25) ISHM Testbeds and Prototypes at SSC Current Implementations; 26) Trailer

  8. Advanced Stirling Convertor Dual Convertor Controller Testing at NASA Glenn Research Center in the Radioisotope Power Systems System Integration Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugala, Gina M.; Taylor, Linda M.; Bell, Mark E.; Dolce, James L.; Fraeman, Martin; Frankford, David P.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center developed a nonnuclear representation of a Radioisotope Power System (RPS) consisting of a pair of Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs), Dual Convertor Controller (DCC) EMs (engineering models) 2 and 3, and associated support equipment, which were tested in the Radioisotope Power Systems System Integration Laboratory (RSIL). The DCC was designed by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) to actively control a pair of ASCs. The first phase of testing included a Dual Advanced Stirling Convertor Simulator (DASCS), which was developed by JHU/APL and simulates the operation and electrical behavior of a pair of ASCs in real time via a combination of hardware and software. RSIL provides insight into the electrical interactions between a representative radioisotope power generator, its associated control schemes, and realistic electric system loads. The first phase of integration testing included the following spacecraft bus configurations: capacitive, battery, and super-capacitor. A load profile, created based on data from several missions, tested the RPS's and RSIL's ability to maintain operation during load demands above and below the power provided by the RPS. The integration testing also confirmed the DCC's ability to disconnect from the spacecraft when the bus voltage dipped below 22 volts or exceeded 36 volts. Once operation was verified with the DASCS, the tests were repeated with actual operating ASCs. The goal of this integration testing was to verify operation of the DCC when connected to a spacecraft and to verify the functionality of the newly designed RSIL. The results of these tests are presented in this paper.

  9. Heat transfer results and operational characteristics of the NASA Lewis Research Center hot section cascade test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladden, H. J.; Yeh, F. C.; Fronek, D. L.

    1985-03-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center gas turbine hot section test facility has been developed to provide a real-engine environment with well known boundary conditions for the aerothermal performance evaluation/verification of computer design codes. The initial aerothermal research data obtained are presented and the operational characteristics of the facility are discussed. This facility is capable of testing at temperatures and pressures up to 1600 K and 18 atm which corresponds to a vane exit Reynolds number range of 0.5 x 1 million to 2.5 x 1 million based on vane chord. The component cooling air temperature can be independently modulated between 330 and 700 K providing gas-to-coolant temperature ratios similar to current engine application. Research instrumentation of the test components provide conventional pressure and temperature measurements as well as metal temperatures measured by IR-photography. The primary data acquisition mode is steady state through a 704 channel multiplexer/digitizer. The test facility was configured as an annular cascade of full coverage film cooled vanes for the initial series of research tests.

  10. Verification Tools Secure Online Shopping, Banking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Just like rover or rocket technology sent into space, the software that controls these technologies must be extensively tested to ensure reliability and effectiveness. Ames Research Center invented the open-source Java Pathfinder (JPF) toolset for the deep testing of Java-based programs. Fujitsu Labs of America Inc., based in Sunnyvale, California, improved the capabilities of the JPF Symbolic Pathfinder tool, establishing the tool as a means of thoroughly testing the functionality and security of Web-based Java applications such as those used for Internet shopping and banking.

  11. Impact of add-on laboratory testing at an academic medical center: a five year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Louis S; Davis, Scott R; Humble, Robert M; Kulhavy, Jeff; Aman, Dean R; Krasowski, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    Clinical laboratories frequently receive orders to perform additional tests on existing specimens ('add-ons'). Previous studies have examined add-on ordering patterns over short periods of time. The objective of this study was to analyze add-on ordering patterns over an extended time period. We also analyzed the impact of a robotic specimen archival/retrieval system on add-on testing procedure and manual effort. In this retrospective study at an academic medical center, electronic health records from were searched to obtain all add-on orders that were placed in the time period of May 2, 2009 to December 31, 2014. During the time period of retrospective study, 880,359 add-on tests were ordered on 96,244 different patients. Add-on testing comprised 3.3 % of total test volumes. There were 443,411 unique ordering instances, leading to an average of 1.99 add-on tests per instance. Some patients had multiple episodes of add-on test orders at different points in time, leading to an average of 9.15 add-on tests per patient. The majority of add-on orders were for chemistry tests (78.8 % of total add-ons) with the next most frequent being hematology and coagulation tests (11.2 % of total add-ons). Inpatient orders accounted for 66.8 % of total add-on orders, while the emergency department and outpatient clinics had 14.8 % and 18.4 % of total add-on orders, respectively. The majority of add-ons were placed within 8 hours (87.3 %) and nearly all by 24 hours (96.8 %). Nearly 100 % of add-on orders within the emergency department were placed within 8 hours. The introduction of a robotic specimen archival/retrieval unit saved an average of 2.75 minutes of laboratory staff manual time per unique add-on order. This translates to 24.1 hours/day less manual effort in dealing with add-on orders. Our study reflects the previous literature in showing that add-on orders significantly impact the workload of the clinical laboratory. The majority of add-on orders are clinical chemistry

  12. Prevalence and risk factors of Hepatitis C among individuals presenting to HIV testing centers, Hawassa city, Southern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sisay Zufan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV, either alone or in combination with Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV, constitutes a major public health concern. This study was conducted to describe the prevalence and risk factors for HCV infection in people with and without HIV infection. Methods Blood samples and data on socio-demographic and risk factors for HCV infection were collected from consecutive 400 HIV- positive and 400 HIV- negative individuals attending HIV testing centers in Hawassa city, from October to December, 2008. All sera were tested for antibody to HCV infection (anti-HCV using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Sera positive for anti-HCV were further tested for viral ribonucleic acid (RNA levels using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results The rate of anti-HCV positivity was 10.5% in the HIV- infected individuals compared with 6% in the HIV negative group (p = 0.002. HCV-RNA was detected in 9.1% of anti-HCV positive samples and rates were comparable between HIV- infected and HIV- non-infected individuals. There was no significant difference in odds of HCV infection in participants with and without HCV risk factors in either HIV sero-group. Conclusion HIV infected individuals had significantly higher rate of anti-HCV although most of them showed no evidence of viraemia. Hence, while priority should be given for HIV infected patients, testing those with anti-HCV for HCV-RNA remains important.

  13. Results of the Updated NASA Kennedy Space Center 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Operational Acceptance Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbre', Robert E., Jr.; Deker, Ryan K.; Leahy, Frank B.; Huddleston, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    We present here the methodology and results of the Operational Acceptance Test (OAT) performed on the new Kennedy Space Center (KSC) 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP). On day-of-launch (DOL), space launch vehicle operators have used data from the DRWP to invalidate winds in prelaunch loads and trajectory assessments due to the DRWP's capability to quickly identify changes in the wind profile within a rapidly-changing wind environment. The previous DRWP has been replaced with a completely new system, which needs to undergo certification testing before being accepted for use in range operations. The new DRWP replaces the previous three-beam system made of coaxial cables and a copper wire ground plane with a four-beam system that uses Yagi antennae with enhanced beam steering capability. In addition, the new system contains updated user interface software while maintaining the same general capability as the previous system. The new DRWP continues to use the Median Filter First Guess (MFFG) algorithm to generate a wind profile from Doppler spectra at each range gate. DeTect (2015) contains further details on the upgrade. The OAT is a short-term test designed so that end users can utilize the new DRWP in a similar manner to the previous DRWP during mission operations at the Eastern Range in the midst of a long-term certification process. This paper describes the Marshall Space Flight Center Natural Environments Branch's (MSFC NE's) analyses to verify the quality and accuracy of the DRWP's meteorological data output as compared to the previous DRWP. Ultimately, each launch vehicle program has the responsibility to certify the system for their own use.

  14. Couples’ Educational Needs Referred to Ershad and Fazel Health Centers of Tehran for Pre-marriage Tests in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ّFarima Mohammadi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Premarital education is the foundation for the development of couples’ communications, sexual relationships, health and fertility. Therefore, this study was done with the purpose of determining couples’ educational needs referred to Ershad and Fazel health centers of Tehran for pre-marriage tests.Materials and Methods: A Cross Sectional study was conducted among couples who referred to health centers. The sample size was 1672 and the sampling method was convenience.. Demographic data was collected through interview with women based on questionnaires. Then the couples responded to the self-administered educational needs questionnaire. The collected data were entered into SPSS-21 statistical software and analyzed using Chi-Square test.Results: 883 women and 789 men completed the educational needs questionnaire. The mean (SD age of women and men were 27.1 (4.5 and 30.2 (5.3 years respectively. Of all female participants 483 (54.7% and 369 (41.8% of male participants had a bachelor's degree. 97.5% of men and 57.1% of women were employed. The ethnicity of about 72% of participants was Far. Most of the pre-marriage educational needs of men and women were marital health, importance of pre-marriage tests, unintended pregnancy prevention methods, correct marital relationship and prenatal care. 313 (64.6% women and 238 (42.8% men reported the pre-marriage educational class to be very helpful. The educational needs of couples were not different based on education, ethnicity and place of residence.Conclusion: Results of the currents study shows the need for pre-marriage education in all evaluated aspects and the importance of paying attention to it for prospering the pre-marital classes.

  15. National Defense University's Influence on U.S. National Security Policy: Case Study about the Center for the Study of Weapons of Mass Destruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondeau, Ann E.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation touches on a series of events leading to an aspect of United States public policy dealing with weapons of mass destruction (WMD). After exploring the literature that describes the understanding of public policy, this paper uses the case study method to understand why and how a single research center and a particular set of…

  16. Promoting Patient-Centered Counseling to Reduce Use of Low-Value Diagnostic Tests: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Joshua J; Kravitz, Richard L; Jerant, Anthony; Paterniti, Debora A; Bang, Heejung; Williams, Donna; Epstein, Ronald M; Franks, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Low-value diagnostic tests have been included on primary care specialty societies' "Choosing Wisely" Top Five lists. To evaluate the effectiveness of a standardized patient (SP)-based intervention designed to enhance primary care physician (PCP) patient-centeredness and skill in handling patient requests for low-value diagnostic tests. Randomized clinical trial of 61 general internal medicine or family medicine residents at 2 residency-affiliated primary care clinics at an academic medical center in California. Two simulated visits with SP instructors portraying patients requesting inappropriate spinal magnetic resonance imaging for low back pain or screening dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. The SP instructors provided personalized feedback to residents regarding use of 6 patient-centered techniques to address patient concerns without ordering low-value tests. Control group physicians received SP visits without feedback and were emailed relevant clinical guidelines. The primary outcome was whether resident PCPs ordered SP-requested low-value tests during up to 3 unannounced SP clinic visits over 3 to 12 months follow-up, with patients requesting spinal magnetic resonance imaging, screening dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, or headache neuroimaging. Secondary outcomes included PCP patient-centeredness and use of targeted techniques (both coded from visit audiorecordings), and SP satisfaction with the visit (0-10 scale). Of 61 randomized resident PCPs (31 control group and 30 intervention group), 59 had encounters with 155 SPs during follow-up. Compared with control PCPs, intervention PCPs had similar patient-centeredness (Measure of Patient-Centered Communication, 43.9 [95% CI, 42.0 to 45.7] vs 43.7 [95% CI, 41.8 to 45.6], adjusted mean difference, -0.2 [95% CI, -2.9 to 2.5]; P = .90) and used a similar number of targeted techniques (5.4 [95% CI, 4.9 to 5.8] vs 5.4 [95% CI, 4.9 to 5.8] on a 0-9 scale, adjusted mean difference, 0 [95% CI, -0.7 to 0.6]; P = .96

  17. Extravehicular Activity Testing in Analog Environments: Evaluating the Effects of Center of Gravity and Environment on Human Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernhardt, M.L.; Chappell, S.P.

    2009-01-01

    The EVA Physiology, Systems and Performance (EPSP) Project is performing tests in different analog environments to understand human performance during Extravehicular Activity (EVA) with the aim of developing more safe and efficient systems for lunar exploration missions and the Constellation Program. The project is characterizing human EVA performance in studies using several test beds, including the underwater NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) and Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) facilities, JSC fs Partial Gravity Simulator (POGO), and the NASA Reduced Gravity Office (RGO) parabolic flight aircraft. Using these varied testing environments, NASA can gain a more complete understanding of human performance issues related to EVA and the limitations of each testing environment. Tests are focused on identifying and understanding the EVA system factors that affect human performance such as center of gravity (CG), inertial mass, ground reaction forces (GRF), suit weight, and suit pressure. The test results will lead to the development of lunar EVA systems operations concepts and design requirements that optimize human performance and exploration capabilities. METHODS: Tests were conducted in the NBL and during NEEMO missions in the NOAA Aquarius Habitat. A reconfigurable back pack with repositionable mass was used to simulate Perfect, Low, Forward, High, Aft and NASA Baseline CG locations. Subjects performed simulated exploration tasks that included ambulation, kneel and recovery, rock pick-up, and shoveling. Testing using POGO, that simulates partial gravity via pneumatic weight offload system and a similar reconfigurable rig, is underway for a subset of the same tasks. Additionally, test trials are being performed on the RGO parabolic flight aircraft. Subject performance was assessed using a modified Cooper-Harper scale to assess operator compensation required to achieve desired performance. All CG locations are based on the assumption of a

  18. FEMA Disaster Recovery Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This is a search site for FEMA's Disaster Recovery Centers (DRC). A DRC is a readily accessible facility or mobile office set up by FEMA where applicants may go for...

  19. Daptomycin antimicrobial activity tested against methicillin-resistant staphylococci and vancomycin-resistant enterococci isolated in European medical centers (2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watters Amy A

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Daptomycin is a cyclic lipopeptide with potent activity and broad spectrum against Gram-positive bacteria currently used for the treatment of complicated skin and skin structure infections and bacteremia, including right sided endocarditis. We evaluated the in vitro activity of this compound and selected comparator agents tested against clinical strains of staphylococci and enterococci collected in European medical centers in 2005. Methods A total of 4,640 strains from 23 medical centers located in 10 European countries, Turkey and Israel (SENTRY Program platform were tested for susceptibility by reference broth microdilution methods according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines and interpretative criteria. Mueller-Hinton broth was supplemented to 50 mg/L Ca++ for testing daptomycin. Results for oxacillin (methicillin-resistant staphylococci and vancomycin-resistant enterococci were analyzed separately. Results Oxacillin resistance rates among Staphylococcus aureus varied from 2.1% in Sweden to 42.5% in the United Kingdom (UK and 54.7% in Ireland (29.1% overall, while vancomycin resistance rates varied from 0.0% in France, Sweden and Switzerland to 66.7% in the UK and 71.4% in Ireland among Enterococcus faecium (17.9% overall. All S. aureus strains were inhibited at daptomycin MIC of 1 mg/L (MIC50/90, 0.25/0.5 mg/L; 100.0% susceptible and only one coagulase-negative staphylococci strain (0.1% showed an elevated (>1 mg/L daptomycin MIC value (4 mg/L. Among E. faecalis (MIC50/90, 0.5/1 mg/L; 100% susceptible the highest daptomycin MIC value was 2 mg/L; while among E. faecium (MIC50/90, 2/4 mg/L; 100% susceptible the highest MIC result was 4 mg/L. Conclusion Daptomycin showed excellent in vitro activity against staphylococci and enterococci collected in European medical centers in 2005 and resistance to oxacillin, vancomycin or quinupristin/dalfopristin did not compromise its activity overall against these

  20. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 570: Area 9 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Patrick [Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2013-11-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 570: Area 9 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. This complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. The purpose of the CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed.

  1. Random Vibration and Torque Tests of Fasteners Secured With Locking Cable, Room Temperature Vulcanized (RTV) Rubber, and Closed Cell Foam to Support the Launch of STS-82

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, V. H.

    1997-01-01

    During a walkdown of the Space Transportation System (STS) orbiter for the 82nd Space Shuttle flight (STS-82), technicians found several safety cables for bolts with missing or loose ferrules. Typically, two or three bolts are secured with a cable which passes through one of the holes in the head of each bolt and a ferrule is crimped on each end of the cable to prevent it from coming out of the holes. The purpose of the cable is to prevent bolts from rotating should they become untightened. Other bolts are secured with either a locking cable or wire which is covered with RTV and foam. The RTV and foam would have to be removed to inspect for missing or loose ferrules. To determine whether this was necessary, vibration and torque test fixtures and tests were made to determine whether or not bolts with missing or loose ferrules would unloosen. These tests showed they would not, and the RTV and foam was not removed.

  2. Watermarking security

    CERN Document Server

    Bas, Patrick; Cayre, François; Doërr, Gwenaël; Mathon, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    This book explains how to measure the security of a watermarking scheme, how to design secure schemes but also how to attack popular watermarking schemes. This book gathers the most recent achievements in the field of watermarking security by considering both parts of this cat and mouse game. This book is useful to industrial practitioners who would like to increase the security of their watermarking applications and for academics to quickly master this fascinating domain.

  3. Node security

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, Dominic

    2013-01-01

    A practical and fast-paced guide that will give you all the information you need to secure your Node applications.If you are a developer who wishes to secure your Node applications, whether you are already using Node Security in production, or are considering using it for your next project, then this book will enable you to ensure security of your applications. An understanding of JavaScript is a prerequisite, and some experience with Node is recommended, though not required.

  4. A review of IPv6 security concerns

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Heerden, RP

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available . Keywords: ipv6, security, Internet protocols, Internet security Introduction Darrin Miller, Security Researcher, CIAG, Cisco System stated: ?IPv6 makes some things better, other things worse, and most things are just different, but no more or less.... The SANS Internet Storm Center (ISC) and the Cisco Security Intelligence Operations (SIO) didnot report any security issues related to IPv6. However, that doesnot mean that attackers were not performing some reconnaissance and data gathering (Hogg, 2008...

  5. Total sleep time obtained from actigraphy versus sleep logs in an academic sleep center and impact on further sleep testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auger RR

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available R Robert Auger,1,2 Ranji Varghese,1 Michael H Silber,1,3 Nancy L Slocumb1 1Center for Sleep Medicine, 2Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, 3Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA Background: While actigraphy has been deemed ideal for the longitudinal assessment of total sleep time (TST by select groups, endorsement has not been universal and reimbursement is lacking, preventing its widespread use in clinical practice. This study compares longitudinal TST data obtained by actigraphy and logs preceding a clinical evaluation, and secondarily ascertains whether longitudinal TST impacts clinicians' decisions to proceed with further sleep testing. Methods: This was a retrospective, consecutive chart review spanning about 4 months in an academic sleep center. Eighty-four patients wore actigraphs in anticipation of clinical evaluations. Concomitant completion of sleep logs is routinely requested in this setting. Longitudinal TST data available in complete form was reviewed in a blinded fashion among a subset of these patients. A review of text from clinical notes of an expanded cohort with complete actigraphy data (regardless of the degree of completion of logs enabled determination of the frequency and rationale for cancellation of prescheduled sleep testing. Results: Of 84 actigraphy recordings, 90% produced complete data, and 30% produced fully completed logs. Among the subset with both available in complete form, significant mean TST differences were observed on weekends (7.06 ± 2.18 hours versus 8.30 ± 1.93 hours, P = 0.009, but not on weekdays (7.38 ± 1.97 hours versus 7.72 ± 1.62 hours, P = 0.450 for actigraphy and logs, respectively. Further analyses revealed poor agreement between the two measures, with predominantly increased TST estimation with logs. Among those with complete actigraphy data (±logs, testing was cancelled in 11 (15%, eight of whom (73% presented with hypersomnia and three of whom

  6. Daugherty Memorial Assessment Center (DMAC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Daugherty Memorial Assessment Center (DMAC) is a 39,000-square-foot facility that doubles the warfare center's high-secured performance assessment capabilities. DMAC...

  7. Contact Center Manager Administration (CCMA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — CCMA is the server that provides a browser-based tool for contact center administrators and supervisors. It is used to manage and configure contact center resources...

  8. Security Locks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    According to a 2008 "Year in Review" report by Educational Security Incidents, an online repository that collects data on higher education security issues, the total number of security incidents reported at universities and colleges worldwide rose to 173 in 2008, a 24.5 percent increase over 2007. The number of institutions…

  9. The Expanding Context of European and Mediterranean Security: A Joint Project Between the Center for Naval Analyses (CNA) and Centro Militare di Studi Strategici (CeMiSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    November 2006 in Rome , the Center for Naval Analyses (CNA) of Alexandria, Virginia, USA, and the Centro Militare di Studi Strategici (CeMiSS) of the...a military man or junta these days (even though monarchs may wear military uniforms, and Presidents Bouteflika and Mubarak wear mufti). 25 The...being left in anomie in a betwixt and between world when they get to Europe, with its ancient class distinctions. Beyond the problems of the Middle East

  10. Current Performance Characteristics of NASA Langley Research Center's Cockpit Motion Base and Standardized Test Procedure for Future Performance Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, Brandon; Stringer, Mary T.; Hutchinson, Brian K.; Davidson, Paul C.; Gupton, Lawrence E.

    2014-01-01

    This report documents the updated performance characteristics of NASA Langley Research Center's (LaRC) Cockpit Motion Base (CMB) after recent revisions that were made to its inner-loop, feedback control law. The modifications to the control law will be briefly described. The performance of the Cockpit Motion Facility (CMF) will be presented. A short graphical comparison to the previous control law can be found in the appendix of this report. The revised controller will be shown to yield reduced parasitic accelerations with respect to the previous controller. Metrics based on the AGARD Advisory Report No. 144 are used to assess the overall system performance due to its recent control algorithm modification. This report also documents the standardized simulator test procedure which can be used in the future to evaluate potential updates to the control law.

  11. Design and testing of statistical methods to classify the severity of steppage gait based on center of pressure data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi, Nima; Esfahani, Mohammad Hamidi; Farzad, Atousa; Jamshidi, Maya

    2012-09-01

    In this research kinematics parameters derived from ground reaction forces were evaluated to limit differential diagnoses and measure the degree of disabilities during walking among neuropathic subjects. 25 neuropathic subjects affected by drop foot and 20 normal subjects were enrolled in the study. Each subject was tested in average 10±2 times for calculating kinetics parameters derived from ground reaction forces. The results revealed that the center of pressure displacement pattern in sole of foot can be a good index for differential diagnoses and measuring the degree of disabilities. This research can extend the clinical applications of ground reaction force plate and introduce suitable criteria to measure the degree of disability among neuropathic patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Recent Lightning Experiments at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing: From Ball Lightning to Gamma Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uman, M. A.

    2008-12-01

    Recent lightning data and the instrumentation used to acquire it at the UF-FIT International Center for Lightning Research and Testing, located on about 1 square kilometer of flat ground at the Camp Blanding Army National Guard Base in north-central Florida, are discussed. The progress of several on-going studies is reviewed: (1) understanding the physics of the "classical" rocket-and-wire triggering of lightning from natural overhead thunderclouds, (2) attempting to generate ball lightning by allowing triggered-lightning to strike various materials and objects (e.g., tree-trunk sections, pools of salt water, silicon powder), (3) measuring the very close (100 m to 1 km) electric and magnetic fields of natural cloud-to-ground lightning, and (4) probing the relationship between lightning processes and the x-rays and gamma-rays associated with them.

  13. Design and deployment of an elastic network test-bed in IHEP data center based on SDN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Shan; Qi, Fazhi; Chen, Gang

    2017-10-01

    High energy physics experiments produce huge amounts of raw data, while because of the sharing characteristics of the network resources, there is no guarantee of the available bandwidth for each experiment which may cause link congestion problems. On the other side, with the development of cloud computing technologies, IHEP have established a cloud platform based on OpenStack which can ensure the flexibility of the computing and storage resources, and more and more computing applications have been deployed on virtual machines established by OpenStack. However, under the traditional network architecture, network capability can’t be required elastically, which becomes the bottleneck of restricting the flexible application of cloud computing. In order to solve the above problems, we propose an elastic cloud data center network architecture based on SDN, and we also design a high performance controller cluster based on OpenDaylight. In the end, we present our current test results.

  14. Seismic test facilities at the ENEA Casaccia Research Center; Prove sismiche con le tavole vibranti al centro ricerche Enea Casaccia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Canio, G. [ENEA, Divisione Servizi Tecnologici, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    The main experimental facilities for seismic tests at the ENEA C.R. Casaccia laboratories consist of two high performance shake table for three axial seismic tests of structures up to 10 ton mass and 3g acceleration applied at the Center of Gravity at 1m from the base table. The activities are principally devoted to the dynamic characterization and vibration tests for mechanical and aero spatial structures, and the experimental analysis of innovative systems for the seismic isolation and retrofitting of civil, industrial, and historical buildings; together with the seismic tests of sub-structures and scaled mock-ups, in order to evaluate the isolation/dissipation performance of the anti-seismic devices, and the failure modes of the structural parts of the building. [Italian] Le principali attrezzature per le prove sismiche presso i laboratori del C.R. Casaccia consistono di due tavole vibranti triassali per prove su strutture fino a 10t di peso con una accelerazione di 3g applicata al centro di gravita' posto ad 1 m di altezza dal piano della tavola. Le principali attivita' riguardano: (a) test di caratterizzazione dinamica e prove di vibrazioni per strutture meccaniche ed aerospaziali; (b) l'analisi sperimentale di sistemi innovativi per l'isolamento sismico ed il consolidamento di strutture civili, industriali e storico monumentali, e le prove sismiche di elementi strutturali e di modelli in scala per la valutazione della capacita' di dissipazione dei dispositivi antisismici e le modalita' di formazione delle fratture.

  15. Advanced Stirling Convertor Control Unit Testing at NASA Glenn Research Center in the Radioisotope Power Systems System Integration Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugala, Gina M.; Taylor, Linda M.; Kussmaul, Michael; Casciani, Michael; Brown, Gregory; Wiser, Joel

    2017-01-01

    Future NASA missions could include establishing Lunar or Martian base camps, exploring Jupiters moons and travelling beyond where generating power from sunlight may be limited. Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) provide a dependable power source for missions where inadequate sunlight or operational requirements make other power systems impractical. Over the past decade, NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has been supporting the development of RPSs. The Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) utilized a pair of Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASC). While flight development of the ASRG has been cancelled, much of the technology and hardware continued development and testing to guide future activities. Specifically, a controller for the convertor(s) is an integral part of a Stirling-based RPS. For the ASRG design, the controller maintains stable operation of the convertors, regulates the alternating current produced by the linear alternator of the convertor, provides a specified direct current output voltage for the spacecraft, synchronizes the piston motion of the two convertors in order to minimize vibration as well as manage and maintain operation with a stable piston amplitude and hot end temperature. It not only provides power to the spacecraft but also must regulate convertor operation to avoid damage to internal components and maintain safe thermal conditions after fueling. Lockheed Martin Coherent Technologies has designed, developed and tested an Engineering Development Unit (EDU) Advanced Stirling Convertor Control Unit (ACU) to support this effort. GRC used the ACU EDU as part of its non-nuclear representation of a RPS which also consists of a pair of Dual Advanced Stirling Convertor Simulator (DASCS), and associated support equipment to perform a test in the Radioisotope Power Systems System Integration Laboratory (RSIL). The RSIL was designed and built to evaluate hardware utilizing RPS technology. The RSIL provides insight into the electrical

  16. Nuclear Security Futures Scenarios.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Elizabeth James Kistin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Warren, Drake Edward [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hayden, Nancy Kay [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Passell, Howard D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Malczynski, Leonard A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Backus, George A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the scenarios used in strategic futures workshops conducted at Sandia on September 21 and 29, 2016. The workshops, designed and facilitated by analysts in Center 100, used scenarios to enable thought leaders to think collectively about the changing aspects of global nuclear security and the potential implications for the US Government and Sandia National Laboratories.

  17. Secure Cloud Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Kashif Munir; Sellapan Palaniappan

    2013-01-01

    Cloud computing is set of resources and services offered through the Internet. Cloud services are delivered from data centers located throughout the world. Cloud computing facilitates its consumers by providing virtual resources via internet. The biggest challenge in cloud computing is the security and privacy problems caused by its multi-tenancy nature and the outsourcing of infrastructure, sensitive data and critical applications. Enterpri...

  18. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2013-09-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. CAU 105 comprises the following five corrective action sites (CASs): -02-23-04 Atmospheric Test Site - Whitney Closure In Place -02-23-05 Atmospheric Test Site T-2A Closure In Place -02-23-06 Atmospheric Test Site T-2B Clean Closure -02-23-08 Atmospheric Test Site T-2 Closure In Place -02-23-09 Atmospheric Test Site - Turk Closure In Place The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 105 based on the implementation of the corrective actions. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 22, 2012, through May 23, 2013, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites; and in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices.

  19. American Computer Security Industries, Inc., COMPSEC-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-10

    The National Computer Security Center (NSC) examined the security protection mechanisms provide by American Computer Security Industries...against the Computer Security Subsystem interpretation (CSSI). Specifically, the applicable requirements for this evaluation included Identification...NCSC, I and A, DAC, AUD, CSSI, OR, American Computer Security Industries, Inc., COMPSEC-11 USA American Version, release B3.1

  20. Recommendations for Improving Consistency in the Radiation Fields Used During Testing of Radiation Detection Instruments for Homeland Security Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Pibida, L.; Mille, M; Norman, B.

    2013-01-01

    Several measurements and calculations were performed to illustrate the differences that can be observed in the determination of exposure rate or ambient dose equivalent rate used for testing radiation detection systems against consensus standards. The large variations observed support our recommendation that better consistency in the test radiation fields can be achieved by specifying the source activity and testing distance instead of the field strength.

  1. Recommendations for Improving Consistency in the Radiation Fields Used During Testing of Radiation Detection Instruments for Homeland Security Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pibida, L; Mille, M; Norman, B

    2013-01-01

    Several measurements and calculations were performed to illustrate the differences that can be observed in the determination of exposure rate or ambient dose equivalent rate used for testing radiation detection systems against consensus standards. The large variations observed support our recommendation that better consistency in the test radiation fields can be achieved by specifying the source activity and testing distance instead of the field strength.

  2. Post-Graduate Student Performance in "Supervised In-Class" vs. "Unsupervised Online" Multiple Choice Tests: Implications for Cheating and Test Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladyshewsky, Richard K.

    2015-01-01

    This research explores differences in multiple choice test (MCT) scores in a cohort of post-graduate students enrolled in a management and leadership course. A total of 250 students completed the MCT in either a supervised in-class paper and pencil test or an unsupervised online test. The only statistically significant difference between the nine…

  3. Three-Month Test-Retest Reliability of Center of Pressure Motion During Standing Balance in Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajda, Douglas A; Motl, Robert W; Sosnoff, Jacob J

    2016-01-01

    Balance impairment and an increased rate of falls are commonly reported in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). Force platform-generated center of pressure (COP) metrics have previously been recommended as an outcome measure to quantify balance deficits and distinguish between fallers and nonfallers in MS. Information is limited regarding the preservation of postural control in individuals with MS over extended time frames in the absence of an intervention. This report examines the test-retest reliability and magnitude of change of COP motion during standing balance over 3 months. Twenty individuals with MS and a history of falling underwent testing on two occasions 3 months apart in the absence of an intervention. On both occasions, participants completed two 30-second trials of three conditions: eyes open, eyes closed, and eyes open with concurrent cognitive challenge (dual task). Measures of COP area, velocity, and temporal structure were calculated and included in the reliability analysis. The COP metrics displayed fair-to-excellent reliability over 3 months without an intervention. Reliability was maintained across the three commonly used balance conditions. These results offer insight into the reliability of COP measures over a 3-month period in MS and can inform the use of COP metrics for future study design (eg, sample size estimates) and balance outcome assessment during randomized controlled trials and fall-prevention studies in individuals with MS.

  4. Usability test of a hand exoskeleton for activities of daily living: an example of user-centered design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almenara, Maria; Cempini, Marco; Gómez, Cristina; Cortese, Mario; Martín, Cristina; Medina, Josep; Vitiello, Nicola; Opisso, Eloy

    2017-01-01

    (1) To assess a robotic device (Handexos) during the design process with regard to usability, end user satisfaction and safety, (2) to determine whether Handexos can improve the activities of daily living (ADLs) of spinal cord injury (SCI) patients and stroke patients with upper-limb dysfunction. During a 2-year development stage of the device, a total of 37 participants (aged 22-68), 28 clinicians (experts) and nine patients with SCI or stroke (end users) were included in a user-centered design process featuring usability tests. They performed five grasps wearing the device. The assessments were obtained at the end of the session by filling out a questionnaire and making suggestions. The experts' opinion was that the modified device was an improvement over the preliminary version, although this was not reflected in the scores. Whereas end user scores for comfort, grasp, performance and safety were above the sufficiency threshold, the scores for year 2 were lower than those for year 1. The findings demonstrate that although Handexos meets the initial functional requirements and underlines the potential for assisting SCI and post-stroke subjects in ADLs, several aspects such as mechanical complexity and low adaptability to different hand sizes need to be further addressed. Implications for Rehabilitation Wearable robotics devices could improve the activities of daily living in patients with spinal cord injury or stroke. They could be a tool for rehabilitation of the upper limb. Further usability tests to improve this type of tools are recommended.

  5. The reliability test of center-aperture-detection-type magnetically induced super-resolution magneto-optical disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Tanaka, Sayoko; Nakatani, Morio; Sumi, Satoshi; Tanemura, Sakae

    2005-01-01

    The Center Aperture Detection (CAD) type Magnetically Induced Super-resolution (MSR) Magneto-optical Disk is one of method to overcome the limitation of optical resolution. For a reliability of the disk, it is important to investigate the stability of the magneto-static coupling between a readout layer and a recording layer through readout characteristics. In this paper, we tested the reliability of CAD tMSR magneto-optical disk. We used iD PHOTO disk for the CAD MSR magneto-optical disk. In the disk, the data is recorded on land and groove with a track pit of 0.6 μm and a bit length of 0.235 μm, by a method of laser pumped magnetic field modulation with an optical pickup of NA=0.62, λ=650 nm. The reliability was examined by PI error lines under the test condition of 80 °C-90 %RH. There were no considerable changes in read/write characteristics up to with an aging time of 2000 hour. The lifetime of the disk was estimated more than 7000 hour under the condition. By a method of the Arrhenius plots, we assumed that the lifetime of the disk would be more than 100 years under the condition of room temperature. We also confirmed that there were no significant changes in mechanical characteristics of the disks. These results show the disk using magneto-static coupling has sufficient reliability for consumer use.

  6. Using ATCOM to enhance long-range imagery collected by NASA's flight test tracking cameras at Armstrong Flight Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolini, Aaron; Tow, David; Kelmelis, Eric

    2014-06-01

    Located at Edwards Air Force Base, Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC) is NASA's premier site for aeronautical research and operates some of the most advanced aircraft in the world. As such, flight tests for advanced manned and unmanned aircraft are regularly performed there. All such tests are tracked through advanced electro-optic imaging systems to monitor the flight status in real-time and to archive the data for later analysis. This necessitates the collection of imagery from long-range camera systems of fast moving targets from a significant distance away. Such imagery is severely degraded due to the atmospheric turbulence between the camera and the object of interest. The result is imagery that becomes blurred and suffers a substantial reduction in contrast, causing significant detail in the video to be lost. In this paper, we discuss the image processing techniques located in the ATCOM software, which uses a multi-frame method to compensate for the distortions caused by the turbulence.

  7. In Situ Redox Manipulation Proof-of-Principle Test at the Fort Lewis Logistics Center: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermeul, Vincent R.; Williams, Mark D.; Evans, John C.; Szecsody, James E.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Liikala, Terry L.

    2000-10-25

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a proof-of-principle test at the Fort Lewis Logistics Center to determine the feasibility of using the innovative remedial technology In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) to treat groundwater contaminated with dissolved TCE. ISRM creates a permeable treatment zone in the subsurface to remediate redox-sensitive contaminants in groundwater. The permeable treatment zone is created by injecting a chemical reducing agent (sodium dithionite with pH buffers) into the aquifer through a well to chemically reduce the naturally occurring ferric iron in the sediments to ferrous iron. Once the reducing agent has been given sufficient time to react with aquifer sediments, residual chemicals and reaction products are withdrawn through the same well. Redox-sensitive contaminants such as TCE, moving in a dissolved-phase plume through the treatment zone, are destroyed. TCE is degraded via reductive dechlorination within the treatment zone to benign degradation products (acetylene, ehtylene). Analyses of sediment samples collected from post-test boreholes showed a high degree of iron reduction, which confirmed the effectiveness of the treatment zone.

  8. Assessment of a novel group-centered testing schema in an upper-level undergraduate molecular biotechnology course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srougi, Melissa C; Miller, Heather B; Witherow, D Scott; Carson, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Providing students with assignments that focus on critical thinking is an important part of their scientific and intellectual development. However, as class sizes increase, so does the grading burden, prohibiting many faculty from incorporating critical thinking assignments in the classroom. In an effort to continue to provide our students with meaningful critical thinking exercises, we implemented a novel group-centered, problem-based testing scheme. We wanted to assess how performing critical thinking problem sets as group work compares to performing the sets as individual work, in terms of student attitudes and learning outcomes. During two semesters of our recombinant DNA course, students had the same lecture material and similar assessments. In the Fall semester, student learning was assessed by two collaborative take-home exams, followed immediately by individual, closed-book in-class exams on the same content, as well as a final cumulative exam. Student teams on the take-home exams were instructor-assigned, and each team turned in one collaborative exam. In the Spring semester, the control group of students were required to turn in their own individual take-home exams, followed by the in-class exams and final cumulative exam. For the majority of students, learning outcomes were met, regardless of whether they worked in teams. In addition, collaborative learning was favorably received by students and grading was reduced for instructors. These data suggest that group-centered, problem-based learning is a useful model for achievement of student learning outcomes in courses where it would be infeasible to provide feedback on individual critical thinking assignments due to grading volume. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Why SCADA security is NOT like Computer Centre Security

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    Today, the industralized world lives in symbiosis with control systems (aka SCADA systems): it depends on power distribution, oil production, public transport, automatic production lines. While the convenience is at hand, still too many control systems are designed without any security in mind, lack basic security protections, and are not even robust enough to withstand basic attacks. The Stuxnet worm attacking Siemens PLCs in 2010 was another close call. Attackers currently enjoy hacking control systems, and aim to switch lights off. This presentation shall recap the current situation and discuss the differences (or not) between computer center cyber-security and control system cyber-security.

  10. Recommendations for Improving Consistency in the Radiation Fields Used During Testing of Radiation Detection Instruments for Homeland Security Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pibida, L; Mille, M; Norman, B

    2013-01-01

    Several measurements and calculations were performed to illustrate the differences that can be observed in the determination of exposure rate or ambient dose equivalent rate used for testing radiation...

  11. In Situ Redox Manipulation Proof-of-Principle Test at the Fort Lewis Logistics Center: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VR Vermeul; MD Williams; JC Evans; JE Szecsody; BN Bjornstad; TL Liikala

    2000-10-25

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a proof-of-principle test at the Fort Lewis Logistics Center to determine the feasibility of using the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) technology for remediating groundwater contaminated with dissolved trichloroethylene (TCE). ISRM creates a permeable treatment zone in the subsurface to remediate redox-sensitive contaminants in groundwater. The permeable treatment zone is formed by injecting a chemical reducing agent (sodium dithionite with pH buffers) into the aquifer through a well to reduce the naturally occurring ferric iron in the sediments to ferrous iron. Once the reducing agent is injected and given sufficient time to react with aquifer sediments, residual chemicals and reaction products are withdrawn from the aquifer through the same well used for the injection. Redox-sensitive contaminants such as TCE, moving through the treatment zone under natural groundwater flow conditions, are destroyed. TCE is degraded via reductive dechlorination within the ISRM treatment zone to benign degradation products (i.e., acetylene, ethylene). Prior to the proof-of-principle field test, the ISRM technology was successfully demonstrated in laboratory experiments for the reductive dechlorination of dissolved TCE using sediments from the Fort Lewis site. The Logistics Center was placed on the National Priorities List in December 1989 because of TCE contamination in groundwater beneath the site. A Federal Facilities Agreement between the Army, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology became effective in January 1990, and a Record of Decision (ROD) was signed in September 1990. The major components of the ROD included installation of two pump-and-treat systems for the upper aquifer and further investigation of the lower aquifer and other potential sources of contamination. The pump-and-treat systems became operational in August 1995. Fort Lewis asked PNNL to provide

  12. Grid Security

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    The aim of Grid computing is to enable the easy and open sharing of resources between large and highly distributed communities of scientists and institutes across many independent administrative domains. Convincing site security officers and computer centre managers to allow this to happen in view of today's ever-increasing Internet security problems is a major challenge. Convincing users and application developers to take security seriously is equally difficult. This paper will describe the main Grid security issues, both in terms of technology and policy, that have been tackled over recent years in LCG and related Grid projects. Achievements to date will be described and opportunities for future improvements will be addressed.

  13. Securing Hadoop

    CERN Document Server

    Narayanan, Sudheesh

    2013-01-01

    This book is a step-by-step tutorial filled with practical examples which will focus mainly on the key security tools and implementation techniques of Hadoop security.This book is great for Hadoop practitioners (solution architects, Hadoop administrators, developers, and Hadoop project managers) who are looking to get a good grounding in what Kerberos is all about and who wish to learn how to implement end-to-end Hadoop security within an enterprise setup. It's assumed that you will have some basic understanding of Hadoop as well as be familiar with some basic security concepts.

  14. Induction of compulsive-like washing by blocking the feeling of knowing: an experimental test of the security-motivation hypothesis of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamath Markad

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background H. Szechtman and E. Woody (2004 hypothesized that obsessive-compulsive disorder results from a deficit in the feeling of knowing that normally terminates thoughts or actions elicited by security motivation. To test the plausibility of this proposed mechanism, an experiment was conducted to produce an analog of washing in obsessive-compulsive disorder by eliciting a scenario of potential harm and using hypnosis to block changes in internally generated feelings that would normally occur during washing. Results Participants reacted with increased disgust, anxiety, and heart rate to their mental images of contamination and potential danger. As predicted, high but not low hypnotizable participants showed a significant prolongation of washing when change in feelings during washing was blocked hypnotically. Conclusion Results show that blocking the affective signal that is normally generated during security-related behaviors, such as washing, leads to prolonged performance of these behaviors. This finding lends support to the plausibility of the proposed model of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

  15. Profiles of attendees in voluntary counseling and testing centers of a medical college hospital in coastal Karnataka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayarama S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Research Question: What are the socio-demographic profile and risk behavior pattern of seropositive attendees in the voluntary counseling and testing center (VCTC? Study Design: Retrospective study. Setting: VCTC in the outpatient complex of Kasturba Medical College Hospital, Mangalore, Karnataka. Subjects: Records pertaining to all the 539 and 330 seropositive attendees during the years 2005 and 2006, respectively, were included in the study besides data from 2001 onwards in order to assess the time trend of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Study Variables: Age, sex, marital status, religion, educational status, occupation, place of residence and pattern of risk behavior in relation to HIV/AIDS. Statistical Analysis: Analysis was done with SPSS version 11. Statistical test and Chi-square was done, and P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The time trend of VCTC attendees reveals a gradual increase except in 2006 showing a sharp decline. Seropositives were around 20% between 2001 and April 2007 with a sharp increase in 2006, i.e., 33.64%. Male seropositivity constituted 60-63%; 81-91% of seropositive attendees belonged to the age group of 15-50 years; 58-70% were married. Only about 3% were illiterates and 20-25% constituted 6 th -12 th pass-outs. With regard to occupational profile, about 17-27% were housewives, 19-21% were laborers/hotel workers and 7% were entrepreneurs. About 45% were from urban area and nearly one-third hailing from other districts in the border of Karnataka. About 25% were exposed to commercial sex workers; another 21-23% were involved in premarital sex and nearly 38% were indulging in heterosexual activities.

  16. Testing the performance of the local area network of the eastern Libyan control center under the high voltage network expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Abaidi, O.S.; BenDardaf, A.B. [GECOL, Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya)

    2007-07-01

    A local area network (LAN) for a 220 kV Libyan transmission system consisting of 20 substations and a modernized control centre was modelled. Data were collected from the power and substations and sent to the control centre. The LAN consisted of servers, clients, and interfacing tools. Problems facing the network included data collision, shut-downs, and slow-downs. It is also expected that the addition of future substations will continue to cause delays in data transmission. Scenarios modelled in the study included normal conditions, peak conditions, and unusually high levels of activity. Display response, alarms response, and request completion times were optimized. Required total load was defined by the following 3 different components: process loads, loads related to operator activities, and server loads. A simulation processing tool was installed to select variables from planned system data. Operator activity loads were generated automatically. Tools were also developed to measure LAN and server loading performance. Tests were conducted to measure central processing unit (CPU) and disk loading of the servers at specified intervals. It was concluded that the LAN configuration used by the control center will accommodate planned transmission expansion in the region. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Testing alternative explanations for common responses to conceptual questions: An example in the context of center of mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Paula R. L.

    2017-06-01

    In physics education research it has been common to interpret student errors on conceptual questions in topic-specific ways, rather than in terms of general perceptual or reasoning difficulties. This paper examines two alternative accounts for responses to questions related to the concept of center of mass. In one account, difficulties are said to be perceptual in nature; in the other, difficulties are said to be tightly linked to the concepts in question. Hypotheses derived from the former perspective are tested in studies conducted among university students in introductory physics courses. The results do not provide strong support for the perceptual hypothesis; in fact, there is evidence that performance on perception tasks may be influenced by subjects' ideas about the physical scenario. While the results do not provide general support for one perspective versus the other, the paper serves as an illustration of the type of investigation needed to develop the kind of rich representation of student thinking that will allow instructional resources to be most effectively targeted.

  18. National Institute of Justice Center Requirements Definition, Technical Assistance, Agile Test and Evaluation and Cyber Science Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Frantz, Frederick

    2003-01-01

    This task provided for assembly, definition, and completion of technical enhancements in coordination with the National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center -Northeast Region (NLECTC-NE...

  19. MORB Composition in Intra-transform Spreading Centers: A Key Test of Models of Mantle Flow and Melt Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saal, A. E.; Forsyth, D. W.

    2004-12-01

    Models of mantle flow, melt generation and melt transport predict the composition and volume of melts delivered to the base of the crust in a mid-ocean ridge system. Many models can be tuned to match normal crustal thickness and composition, but they differ in predicting how the system behaves when it is perturbed by a transform fault offset. However, this "transform edge effect" or the pattern of along-axis delivery of melt to the crust within a ridge segment can be obscured by along-axis transport of magma within the crust in dikes or long-lived, continuous magma chambers. The advantage of sampling intra-transform spreading centers is that they provide well-defined locations of upwelling and crustal formation in a perturbed part of the system that does not allow along-axis transport of melt in the crust from other parts of the system. The composition of basalts from these settings can thus provide a critical test of mantle flow and melting models. Basalts from both the Garrett and Siqueiros intra-transform settings on the East Pacific Rise (EPR) have primitive composition with very depleted trace element contents, low ratios of very incompatible to moderately incompatible elements, and (230Th/238U) activity ratios ranging from slightly higher to lower than 1 suggesting that the first incompatible-element-rich melts are missing and only the magma from subsequent, shallower melting of an already depleted mantle reaches the intra-transform spreading centers. We have constructed 3-D models of passive mantle flow and melt driven by dynamic pressure gradients and buoyancy using the specific geometry of these two transform settings to predict the resulting composition. We compare the measured trace element and isotopic composition of both the intra-transform and normal segment lavas to those calculated using our model. To minimize the influence of a heterogeneous source, we chose samples from the 9-10 N EPR and Siqueiros with very similar isotopic composition. In

  20. Information security management handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Tipton, Harold F

    2006-01-01

    Access Control Systems and Methodology. Telecommunications and Network Security. Security Management Practices. Application Program Security. Cryptography. Computer, System, and Security Architecture. Operations Security. Business Continuity Planning and Disaster Recovery Planning. Law, Investigation and Ethics. Physical Security.

  1. The Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty and its security implications for the United Kingdom and the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Sironi, Luke

    1998-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The United Kingdom has signed and ratified the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty. The United States signed the treaty in September 1996, and currently the decision on whether to ratify it is pending in the Senate. Key differences reside in the political and objective strategic situations of the United States and the United Kingdom. In the United Kingdom's parliamentary system a single party (or a coalition) makes decisions. The United Stat...

  2. Drones InSecurity

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer, Manuel; Schmeisser, Martin

    2015-01-01

    This project is about testing the security of casual/commercial drones. For this, we tested drones from the company Parrot, but the conclusions apply to all drones based on WiFi controllers. To test drones security, the project was divided in two parts. The first part is stream sniffing. This means capturing the video stream that a drone transmits to its connected user and afterwards reconstructing it, to see the actual video footage. The second part of the project is the hi- jacking of drone...

  3. User-Centered Digital Library Project Phase 2: User Testing with Teachers and Students with Disabilities. Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Babette

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the User-Centered Digital Library Project, conducted by the National Center for Accessible Media (NCAM) at WGBH, was to adapt the Teachers' Domain online digital library to enable teachers and students with disabilities to more readily use the resources in science classrooms. NCAM added accessibility features such as captions and audio…

  4. INFORMATION SYSTEM SECURITY (CYBER SECURITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Siddique Ansari

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract - Business Organizations and Government unequivocally relies on upon data to deal with their business operations. The most unfavorable impact on association is disappointment of friendship, goodness, trustworthiness, legitimacy and probability of data and administrations. There is an approach to ensure data and to deal with the IT framework's Security inside association. Each time the new innovation is made, it presents some new difficulties for the insurance of information and data. To secure the information and data in association is imperative on the grounds that association nowadays inside and remotely joined with systems of IT frameworks. IT structures are inclined to dissatisfaction and security infringement because of slips and vulnerabilities. These slips and vulnerabilities can be brought on by different variables, for example, quickly creating headway, human slip, poor key particulars, poor movement schedules or censuring the threat. Likewise, framework changes, new deserts and new strikes are a huge piece of the time displayed, which helpers augmented vulnerabilities, disappointments and security infringement all through the IT structure life cycle. The business went to the confirmation that it is essentially difficult to ensure a slip free, risk free and secure IT structure in perspective of the disfigurement of the disavowing security parts, human pass or oversight, and part or supplies frustration. Totally secure IT frameworks don't exist; just those in which the holders may have changing degrees of certainty that security needs of a framework are fulfilled do. The key viewpoints identified with security of data outlining are examined in this paper. From the start, the paper recommends pertinent legitimate structure and their duties including open association obligation, and afterward it returns to present and future time, system limits, structure security in business division. At long last, two key inadequacy markers

  5. Strategic information security

    CERN Document Server

    Wylder, John

    2003-01-01

    Introduction to Strategic Information SecurityWhat Does It Mean to Be Strategic? Information Security Defined The Security Professional's View of Information Security The Business View of Information SecurityChanges Affecting Business and Risk Management Strategic Security Strategic Security or Security Strategy?Monitoring and MeasurementMoving Forward ORGANIZATIONAL ISSUESThe Life Cycles of Security ManagersIntroductionThe Information Security Manager's Responsibilities The Evolution of Data Security to Information SecurityThe Repository Concept Changing Job Requirements Business Life Cycles

  6. Coast Guard Acquisitions: Enhanced Oversight of Testing Could Benefit National Security Cutter Program and Future DHS Acquisitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-03

    evaluation ( IOT &E), an event designed to test all critical systems that are necessary for successful operations, in the spring of 2014, after 7 of the 8...based on our January 2016 report on the NSC’s IOT &E event.2 I will address issues related to (1) the results of the NSC’s IOT &E, (2) the Coast Guard’s...NSC is or is not meeting required capabilities and performance metrics. To add important context to our review, we toured the NSC used for IOT &E

  7. Cyber Security as an Emergent Infrastructure (PREPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Internet security market reached $5.1 billion in revenue, according to market researcher IDC. This was a 33% increase over 1999. IDC projected that...Council on Information Age Crime, and the Center for Internet Security . All of these efforts can help strengthen the cyber defense and crime...Activity,” Proc. USENIX Security Symposium (August 2001). 13 Riptech Internet Security Threat Report (January 2002). www.riptech.com. 14 “Attack on

  8. Negative perceptions of hepatitis B vaccination among attendees of an urban free testing center for sexually transmitted infections in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyroud, Lauranne; Hustache, Sarah; Goirand, Laurence; Hauzanneau, Marianne; Epaulard, Olivier

    2017-05-04

    Official French health care policy recommends vaccinations against hepatitis B for all infants and at-risk adults. Attendees at our free testing center for sexually transmitted infections (FTC-STI) routinely express hepatitis B vaccine hesitancy. We aimed in this exposed population to explore the extent of knowledge concerning HBV infection, to quantify HBV vaccine refusal, and to identify the reasons for this refusal. During a 3-month period in 2013, all attendees at the Grenoble FTC-STI were given an anonymous questionnaire exploring their knowledge of hepatitis B, perception of the hepatitis B vaccine, acceptance of free same-day hepatitis B vaccination, and reasons for refusing this offer (where applicable). The questionnaire was completed by 735 attendees (64.7% of those attending during the study period)(59.9% men; age 27.9 ± 9.2). Most respondents identified hepatitis B as a potentially severe, potentially lifelong illness existing in France. Concerning the hepatitis B vaccine, less than 50% totally or mostly agreed that it is safe; when asked whether the vaccine is dangerous, 44.2% answered "I don't know" and 14.0% agreed; when asked whether the vaccine is "not well characterized," 45.0%, answered "I don't know" and 26.5% agreed. When asked whether they mistrust the hepatitis B vaccine or all vaccines in general, 39.0% and 28.9% of those unvaccinated agreed, respectively. Two thirds refused to get vaccinated on the same day. When asked whether they were afraid of the adverse effects of this vaccine, only 18.7% disagreed. Negative perceptions of the hepatitis B vaccine are widespread in this at-risk population. Consequently, a successful communication strategy must reassure this at-risk population of the vaccine's innocuous nature.

  9. The Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing - Europe (CAAT-EU): a transatlantic bridge for the paradigm shift in toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshian, Mardas; Leist, Marcel; Hartung, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing - Europe (CAAT-EU) was founded based collaboration between the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the University of Konstanz. CAAT-EU, housed at the University of Konstanz, will coordinate transatlantic activities to promote humane science in research and education, and participate, as partner or coordinator, in publicly and privately funded European projects. Thomas Hartung will serve as program liaison representing Johns Hopkins University and Marcel Leist as the University of Konstanz liaison. CAAT-EU aims to: 1) Set up transatlantic consortia for international research projects on alternative methods. 2) Establish a CAAT Europe faculty and advisory board composed of sponsor representatives and prominent academics from Europe . 3) Participate in the Transatlantic Think Tank for Toxicology (t4) devoted to conceptual work for the paradigm shift in toxicology. 4) Coordinate a series of information days in Europe on relevant developments in the US, similar to the 2009 series CAAT held in the US on EU issues (one on the 7th Amendment to the EU Cosmetics Directive and one on EU and US chemical regulation). 5) Support ALTEX as the official journal of CAAT and CAAT-EU. 6) Develop strategic projects with sponsors to promote humane science and new toxicology, especially with CAAT faculty members. 7) Develop a joint education program between Johns Hopkins and the University of Konstanz, such as e-courses and the existing Humane Science Certificate program developed by CAAT, a student exchange program, and collaboration with the International Graduate School "Cell-based Characterization of De- and Regeneration" in Konstanz.

  10. Security Bingo

    CERN Multimedia

    Computer Security Team

    2011-01-01

    Want to check your security awareness and win one of three marvellous books on computer security? Just print out this page, mark which of the 25 good practices below you already follow, and send the sheet back to us by 31 October 2011 at either Computer.Security@cern.ch or P.O. Box G19710.   Winners[1] must show that they fulfil at least five good practices in a continuous vertical, horizontal or diagonal row. For details on CERN Computer Security, please consult http://cern.ch/security. I personally…   …am concerned about computer security. …run my computer with an anti-virus software and up-to-date signature files. …lock my computer screen whenever I leave my office. …have chosen a reasonably complex password. …have restricted access to all my files and data. …am aware of the security risks and threats to CERN’s computing facilities. &hell...

  11. ngVLA Key Science Goal 4: Using Pulsars in the Galactic Center as Fundamental Tests of Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Geoffrey C.; Chatterjee, Shami; Cordes, James; Demorest, Paul; Dexter, Jason; Kramer, Michael; Lazio, Joseph; Ransom, Scott; Wharton, Robert; ngVLA Science Working Group 4

    2018-01-01

    Pulsars in the Galactic Center (GC) are important probes of general relativity (GR), star formation, stellar dynamics, stellar evolution, and the interstellar medium. A pulsar in orbit around the massive black hole in the GC, Sgr A*, has the power to provide a high-precision measurement of the black hole mass and spin in a unique regime of GR. It is sufficient to find and time a normal, slowly rotating pulsar in a reasonable orbit, in order to measure the mass of Sgr A* with a precision of 1 solar mass, to test the cosmic censorship conjecture to a precision of 0.1%, and to test the no-hair theorem to a precision of 1%. The pulsar population in the GC on scales from the inner parsec to the edge of the Central Molecular Zone (250 parsecs in diameter) can provide fresh insight into the complex processes at work in this region: the characteristic age distribution of the discovered pulsars will give insight into the star formation history; millisecond pulsars can be used as acceleratormeters to probe the local gravitational potential; the observed dispersion and scattering measures (and their variability) will allow us to probe the distribution, clumpiness and other properties of the central interstellar medium, including characterization of the central magnetic field using Faraday rotation. Proper motions of young pulsars can be used to point back to regions of recent star formation and/or supernova remnants.Despite years of searching, only a handful of pulsars in the central 0.5 degrees are known. This is likely the result of strong interstellar scattering along the line of sight, which broadens individual pulses to greater width than the pulse period. Scattering effects decline as wavelength to the fourth power, implying that we require observation at higher frequencies than are typical for typical pulsar searches. The characteristic steep spectrum of pulsars, however, implies the need for greater instrumental sensitivity at higher frequencies in order to detect and

  12. Major-element geochemistry of the Silent Canyon-Black Mountain peralkaline volcanic centers, northwestern Nevada Test Site: applications to an assessment of renewed volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Bruce M.; Sargent, Kenneth A.

    1979-01-01

    The Silent Canyon and Black Mountain volcanic centers are located in the northern part of the Nevada Test Site. The Silent Canyon volcanic center is a buried cauldron complex of Miocene age (13-15 m.y.). Black Mountain volcanic center is an elliptical-shaped cauldron complex of late Miocene age. The lavas and tuffs of the two centers comprise a subalkaline-peralkaline association. Rock types range from quartz normative subalkaline trachyte and rhyolite to peralkaline comendite. The Gold Flat Member of the Thirsty Canyon Tuff (Black Mountain) is a pantellerite. The major-element geochemistry of the Black Mountain-Silent Canyon volcanic centers differs in the total range and distribution of Si02, contents, the degree of peralkalinity (molecular Na2O+K2O>Al2O3) and in the values of total iron and alumina through the range of rock types. These differences indicate that the suites were unrelated and evolved from differing magma bodies. The Black Mountain volcanic cycle represents a renewed phase of volcanism following cessation of the Timber Mountain-Silent Canyon volcanic cycles. Consequently, there is a small but numerically incalculable probability of recurrence of Black Mountain-type volcanism within the Nevada Test Site region. This represents a potential risk with respect to deep geologic storage of high-level radioactive waste at the Nevada Test Site.

  13. Junos Security

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, Rob; Giecco, Patricio; Eberhard, Timothy; Quinn, James

    2010-01-01

    Junos® Security is the complete and authorized introduction to the new Juniper Networks SRX hardware series. This book not only provides a practical, hands-on field guide to deploying, configuring, and operating SRX, it also serves as a reference to help you prepare for any of the Junos Security Certification examinations offered by Juniper Networks. Network administrators and security professionals will learn how to use SRX Junos services gateways to address an array of enterprise data network requirements -- including IP routing, intrusion detection, attack mitigation, unified threat manag

  14. Secure PVM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunigan, T.H.; Venugopal, N.

    1996-09-01

    This research investigates techniques for providing privacy, authentication, and data integrity to PVM (Parallel Virtual Machine). PVM is extended to provide secure message passing with no changes to the user`s PVM application, or, optionally, security can be provided on a message-by message basis. Diffe-Hellman is used for key distribution of a single session key for n-party communication. Keyed MD5 is used for message authentication, and the user may select from various secret-key encryption algorithms for message privacy. The modifications to PVM are described, and the performance of secure PVM is evaluated.

  15. Computer security

    CERN Document Server

    Gollmann, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    A completely up-to-date resource on computer security Assuming no previous experience in the field of computer security, this must-have book walks you through the many essential aspects of this vast topic, from the newest advances in software and technology to the most recent information on Web applications security. This new edition includes sections on Windows NT, CORBA, and Java and discusses cross-site scripting and JavaScript hacking as well as SQL injection. Serving as a helpful introduction, this self-study guide is a wonderful starting point for examining the variety of competing sec

  16. A Cultural Resources Inventory and Historical Evaluation of the Smoky Atmospheric Nuclear Test, Areas 8, 9, and 10, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Robert C. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Reno, NV (United States); King, Maureen L. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Reno, NV (United States); Beck, Colleen M. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Reno, NV (United States); Falvey, Lauren W. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Reno, NV (United States); Menocal, Tatianna M. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Reno, NV (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This report presents the results of a National Historic Preservation Act Section 106 cultural resources inventory and historical evaluation of the 1957 Smoky atmospheric test location on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The Desert Research Institute (DRI) was tasked to conduct a cultural resources study of the Smoky test area as a result of a proposed undertaking by the Department of Energy Environmental Management. This undertaking involves investigating Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 550 for potential contaminants of concern as delineated in a Corrective Action Investigation Plan. CAU 550 is an area that spatially overlaps portions of the Smoky test location. Smoky, T-2c, was a 44 kt atmospheric nuclear test detonated at 5:30 am on August 31, 1957, on top of a 213.4 m (700 ft) 200 ton tower (T-2c) in Area 8 of the NNSS. Smoky was a weapons related test of the Plumbbob series (number 19) and part of the Department of Defense Exercise Desert Rock VII and VIII. The cultural resources effort involved the development of a historic context based on archival documents and engineering records, the inventory of the cultural resources in the Smoky test area and an associated military trench location in Areas 9 and 10, and an evaluation of the National Register eligibility of the cultural resources. The inventory of the Smoky test area resulted in the identification of structures, features, and artifacts related to the physical development of the test location and the post-test remains. The Smoky test area was designated historic district D104 and coincides with a historic archaeological site recorded as 26NY14794 and the military trenches designed for troop observation, site 26NY14795. Sites 26NY14794 and 26NY14795 are spatially discrete with the trenches located 4.3 km (2.7 mi) southeast of the Smoky ground zero. As a result, historic district D104 is discontiguous and in total it covers 151.4 hectares (374 acres). The Smoky test location, recorded as historic

  17. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick Matthews

    2011-08-01

    CAU 104 comprises the 15 CASs listed below: (1) 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C; (2) 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1; (3) 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site; (4) 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a; (5) 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S); (6) 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S); (7) 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S); (8) 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie; (9) 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie; (10) 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus); (11) 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster); (12) 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth; (13) 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4; (14) 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b; (15) 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 28, 2011, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 104. The releases at CAU 104 consist of surface-deposited radionuclides from 30 atmospheric nuclear tests. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 104 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison

  18. Final report on a cold climate permeable interlocking concrete pavement test facility at the University of New Hampshire Stormwater Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    University of New Hampshire Stormwater Center (UNHSC) completed a two year field verification study of a permeable interlocking concrete pavement (PICP) stormwater management system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cold climate function...

  19. Secure portal.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Cynthia Lee

    2007-09-01

    There is a need in security systems to rapidly and accurately grant access of authorized personnel to a secure facility while denying access to unauthorized personnel. In many cases this role is filled by security personnel, which can be very costly. Systems that can perform this role autonomously without sacrificing accuracy or speed of throughput are very appealing. To address the issue of autonomous facility access through the use of technology, the idea of a ''secure portal'' is introduced. A secure portal is a defined zone where state-of-the-art technology can be implemented to grant secure area access or to allow special privileges for an individual. Biometric technologies are of interest because they are generally more difficult to defeat than technologies such as badge swipe and keypad entry. The biometric technologies selected for this concept were facial and gait recognition. They were chosen since they require less user cooperation than other biometrics such as fingerprint, iris, and hand geometry and because they have the most potential for flexibility in deployment. The secure portal concept could be implemented within the boundaries of an entry area to a facility. As a person is approaching a badge and/or PIN portal, face and gait information can be gathered and processed. The biometric information could be fused for verification against the information that is gathered from the badge. This paper discusses a facial recognition technology that was developed for the purposes of providing high verification probabilities with low false alarm rates, which would be required of an autonomous entry control system. In particular, a 3-D facial recognition approach using Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis is described. Gait recognition technology, based on Hidden Markov Models has been explored, but those results are not included in this paper. Fusion approaches for combining the results of the biometrics would be the next step in realizing

  20. European Security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Bjørn

    Theoretical chapters on "Security", "Organisations" and "Regions," Historical Chapters on "Europe and Its Distinguishing Features" and on "The United Nations," "NATO," "The CSCE/OSCE and the Council of Europe" and "The European Union"......Theoretical chapters on "Security", "Organisations" and "Regions," Historical Chapters on "Europe and Its Distinguishing Features" and on "The United Nations," "NATO," "The CSCE/OSCE and the Council of Europe" and "The European Union"...

  1. Security Studies

    OpenAIRE

    ,

    2005-01-01

    Security Studies has firmly established itself as a leading journal on international security issues. The journal publishes theoretical, historical and policy-oriented articles on the causes and consequences of war, and the sources and conditions of peace. The journal has published articles on balancing vs. bandwagoning, deterrence in enduring rivalries, the Domino theory, nuclear weapons proliferation, civil-military relations, political reforms in China, strategic culture in Asia and the P...

  2. Secure Directories

    OpenAIRE

    Chadwick, David W.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the mechanisms that are needed in order to provide a secure directory service based on the X.500 data model. A brief introduction to the X.500 data model is given followed by an overview of the Lightweight Directory Access Protocol. Security can be provided by three functions: an application level firewall, an authentication mechanism, and an access control scheme. A description of the X.500 and LDAP access control models is presented followed by the authentication method...

  3. Security an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Purpura, Philip P

    2011-01-01

    Section I The History and Profession of SecurityDefinition, Role, and History of Security Security Defined The Contexts of Security The Roles of Security The History of Security Security in an Environment of Threats, Terrorism, and All-Hazards Threats and Hazards Terrorism National Strategies The Profession and Business of Security The Business of Security Professionalism and Security Associations Ethics Regulation of the Security Industry Security Training Higher Education Careers Section II Protecting People and AssetsSecurity Methodology Methodology Defined Security Business Proposals Secur

  4. FOOD SECURITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorina Ardelean

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The assurance of food security at the individual level doesn’t implicitly provide for the one at family level as the concepts of hunger, malnutrition and food insecurity are the steps of the same process of access restricted to a sufficient supply of food. In order to achieve food security at the individual level the following is necessary: ensuring food availability (production, reserve stocks; redistribution of food availability within the country or out through international exchanges; effective access of the population to purchase food consumer goods, by ensuring its effective demand as required. Food security of families (FFS is required for assuring individual food security (IFS, but it is not sufficient because the food available may be unevenly distributed between family members. National food security (NFS corresponds to the possibilities that different countries have to ensure both FFS and IFS without sacrificing other important objectives. Under the name of GAS is defined the global food security which represents permanent access for the entire population of the globe to the necessary food for a healthy and active life.

  5. KSOS System Security Plan. Revision 2. Kernelized Secure Operating System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    1972) j. (Hoare 73b] Hoare, C. A. R., "Proof of a Structured Program: the Sieve of Eratosthenes ", Computer Journal, 15 pp 321-325, (November 1972). k...desire for improved system security permeates every design and implementation decision. 4 Rev 2 KSOS System Security Plan The model of security which...Modula encourages modularization and information hiding, two features which improve the robustness and maintainability of the system. The testing

  6. It-security seen from a user experience perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Niels Raabjerg

    The workshop will explore the possibilities of a user-centered perspective on security. With exceptions, existing research may be criticized for being highly system-centered, focusing on how one may change user behavior to deal with the requirements of security, or on how security aspects can be ......, transparency, participation and democracy. We invite participants to bring forth contributions in this direction....

  7. Procedure for implementing the system of quality management in the testing laboratory of the Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology in Sancti Spiritus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lídice Peraza Cruz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Implementation of Quality Management System in testing laboratories offers the possibility of its accreditation and a frame for cooperation with other organizations, supporting information and experience exchange, as well as standards and procedures harmonization. To improve the performance of the Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology of Sancti Spíritus testing laboratory, assuring technically valid data and results which promote technical competence and credibility of in vitro diagnostics and biological reagents products, a procedure was designed to implement a Quality Management System. This procedure applies Deming´s Quality Cycle and considers all relevant requirements in NC ISO/IEC 17025:2006 “General requirements for the competence of testing and calibration laboratories” and Regulation No. 20 2004 “Good Manufacturing Practices for in vitro Diagnostics” of Center for State Control of Drugs, Equipment and Medical Devices. We recommend an auto evaluation method, designed by authors, to verify quality management system accomplishment.

  8. Using intervention mapping for the development of a targeted secure web-based outreach strategy named SafeFriend, for Chlamydia trachomatis testing in young people at risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theunissen, Kevin A T M; Hoebe, Christian J P A; Crutzen, Rik; Kara-Zaïtri, Chakib; de Vries, Nanne K; van Bergen, Jan E A M; van der Sande, Marianne A B; Dukers-Muijrers, Nicole H T M

    2013-10-22

    Many young people at high risk for Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) are not reached by current sexual health care systems, such as general practitioners and public sexual health care centres (sexually transmitted infection clinics).Ct is the most frequently diagnosed bacterial sexually transmitted infection (STI) among sexually active people and in particular young heterosexuals. Innovative screening strategies are needed to interrupt the transmission of Ct among young people and connect the hidden cases to care. Intervention Mapping (IM), a systematic approach to develop theory- and evidence-based interventions, was used to develop a strategy to target Ct testing towards young people who are currently hidden to care in The Netherlands. Both clinical users (i.e. sexual health care nurses) and public users (i.e., young people at risk for Ct) were closely involved in the IM process. A needs assessment study was carried out using semi-structured interviews among users (N = 21), a literature search and by taking lessons learned from existing screening programmes. Theoretical methods and practical applications to reach high risk young people and influence testing were selected and translated into specific programme components. The IM approach resulted in the development of a secure and web-based outreach Ct screening strategy, named SafeFriend. It is developed to target groups of high-risk young people who are currently hidden to care. Key methods include web-based Respondent Driven Sampling, starting from young Ct positive sexual health care centre clients, to reach and motivate peers (i.e., sex partners and friends) to get tested for Ct. Testing and the motivation of peers were proposed as the desired behavioural outcomes and the Precaution Adoption Process Model was chosen as theoretical framework. End users, i.e., young people and sexual health care nurses were interviewed and included in the development process to increase the success of implementation. IM proved useful

  9. Hydraulic characterization of volcanic rocks in Pahute Mesa using an integrated analysis of 16 multiple-well aquifer tests, Nevada National Security Site, 2009–14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, C. Amanda; Jackson, Tracie R.; Halford, Keith J.; Sweetkind, Donald S.; Damar, Nancy A.; Fenelon, Joseph M.; Reiner, Steven R.

    2017-01-20

    An improved understanding of groundwater flow and radionuclide migration downgradient from underground nuclear-testing areas at Pahute Mesa, Nevada National Security Site, requires accurate subsurface hydraulic characterization. To improve conceptual models of flow and transport in the complex hydrogeologic system beneath Pahute Mesa, the U.S. Geological Survey characterized bulk hydraulic properties of volcanic rocks using an integrated analysis of 16 multiple-well aquifer tests. Single-well aquifer-test analyses provided transmissivity estimates at pumped wells. Transmissivity estimates ranged from less than 1 to about 100,000 square feet per day in Pahute Mesa and the vicinity. Drawdown from multiple-well aquifer testing was estimated and distinguished from natural fluctuations in more than 200 pumping and observation wells using analytical water-level models. Drawdown was detected at distances greater than 3 miles from pumping wells and propagated across hydrostratigraphic units and major structures, indicating that neither faults nor structural blocks noticeably impede or divert groundwater flow in the study area.Consistent hydraulic properties were estimated by simultaneously interpreting drawdown from the 16 multiple-well aquifer tests with an integrated groundwater-flow model composed of 11 well-site models—1 for each aquifer test site. Hydraulic properties were distributed across volcanic rocks with the Phase II Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley Hydrostratigraphic Framework Model. Estimated hydraulic-conductivity distributions spanned more than two orders of magnitude in hydrostratigraphic units. Overlapping hydraulic conductivity ranges among units indicated that most Phase II Hydrostratigraphic Framework Model units were not hydraulically distinct. Simulated total transmissivity ranged from 1,600 to 68,000 square feet per day for all pumping wells analyzed. High-transmissivity zones exceeding 10,000 square feet per day exist near caldera margins and extend

  10. Center for Leadership Development (CLD) Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — The Center for Leadership Development Repository stores various data including policies, procedures, governance, guidance, security, and financial documents of the...

  11. Center for Coastline Security Technology, Year 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    Papers describing this scheme are to be found at ColorLink’s web site: http://www.colorlink.com. If improvements described in the papers are also...Experimental Psychology: Applied, Vol. 7(2) 143- 153, Jun 2001. [6] ISO/IEC JTC1/SC29/WG11, “Call for Proposals on Multi-view Video Coding ( MVC ),” MPEG...technologies have matured sufficiently to make possible new generation of video applications. Multi-view video coding ( MVC ) has begun receiving

  12. DIRAC Security

    CERN Document Server

    Casajús Ramo, A

    2006-01-01

    DIRAC is the LHCb Workload and Data Management System. Based on a service-oriented architecture, it enables generic distributed computing with lightweight Agents and Clients for job execution and data transfers. DIRAC implements a client-server architecture exposing server methods through XML Remote Procedure Call (XML-RPC) protocol. DIRAC is mostly coded in python. DIRAC security infrastructure has been designed to be a completely generic XML-RPC transport over a SSL tunnel. This new security layer is able to handle standard X509 certificates as well as grid-proxies to authenticate both sides of the connection. Serve and client authentication relies over OpenSSL and py-Open SSL, but to be able to handle grid proxies some modifications have been added to those libraries. DIRAC security infrastructure handles authorization and authorization as well as provides extended capabilities like secure connection tunneling and file transfer. Using this new security infrastructure all LHCb users can safely make use o...

  13. Security practices and regulatory compliance in the healthcare industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Juhee; Johnson, M Eric

    2013-01-01

    Securing protected health information is a critical responsibility of every healthcare organization. We explore information security practices and identify practice patterns that are associated with improved regulatory compliance. We employed Ward's cluster analysis using minimum variance based on the adoption of security practices. Variance between organizations was measured using dichotomous data indicating the presence or absence of each security practice. Using t tests, we identified the relationships between the clusters of security practices and their regulatory compliance. We utilized the results from the Kroll/Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society telephone-based survey of 250 US healthcare organizations including adoption status of security practices, breach incidents, and perceived compliance levels on Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, Red Flags rules, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, and state laws governing patient information security. Our analysis identified three clusters (which we call leaders, followers, and laggers) based on the variance of security practice patterns. The clusters have significant differences among non-technical practices rather than technical practices, and the highest level of compliance was associated with hospitals that employed a balanced approach between technical and non-technical practices (or between one-off and cultural practices). Hospitals in the highest level of compliance were significantly managing third parties' breaches and training. Audit practices were important to those who scored in the middle of the pack on compliance. Our results provide security practice benchmarks for healthcare administrators and can help policy makers in developing strategic and practical guidelines for practice adoption.

  14. The Development and Validation of a Spanish Elicited Imitation Test of Oral Language Proficiency for the Missionary Training Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Carrie A.

    2013-01-01

    The Missionary Training Center (MTC), affiliated with the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, needs a reliable and cost effective way to measure the oral language proficiency of missionaries learning Spanish. The MTC needed to measure incoming missionaries' Spanish language proficiency for training and classroom assignment as well as to…

  15. Experimental test of the postulate that continuous columnar pinning centers produce the highest J{sub c}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinstein, Roy [Texas Center for Superconductivity and Advanced Materials, and Physics Department, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5005 (United States)]. E-mail: weinstein@uh.edu; Gandini, Alberto [Texas Center for Superconductivity and Advanced Materials, and Physics Department, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5005 (United States); Sawh, Ravi-Persad [Texas Center for Superconductivity and Advanced Materials, and Physics Department, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5005 (United States); Mayes, Bill [Texas Center for Superconductivity and Advanced Materials, and Physics Department, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5005 (United States); Parks, Drew [Texas Center for Superconductivity and Advanced Materials, and Physics Department, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5005 (United States)

    2004-10-18

    Continuous columnar pinning centers, created by energetic ions, have been usefully studied theoretically and experimentally to investigate vortex physics in high T{sub c} superconductors. However, along the way, in error, their discontinuities have been downplayed, and they have been anointed as the way to produce high J{sub c}.

  16. Normative Data from Rorschach (Exner) and MMPI Tests for Students Assessed in an Alberta Government Youth Assessment Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Laurence E.

    This study was intended to provide descriptive data of the students in the Medicine Hat Youth Assessment Center, (YAC) in terms of psychological variables obtained from the Rorschach and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). The adolescent subjects were 55 males assessed by the MMPI and 63 males and females assessed by the…

  17. Glossary of Computer Security Terms. Version 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-10-21

    40 40 40 0 4w 40 NCSC-TG-004-88 Library No. S-231,238 FOREWORD This publication, "Glossary of Computer Security Terms," is issued by the National... Computer Security Center (NCSC) under the authority of and in accordance with Department of Defense (DoD) Directive 5215.1, " Computer Security Evaluation...r.lw" 73r൝ October 1988Director National Computer Security Center For ole by the Superintendent of Documents, Congresignal Sales Office, U.S

  18. Collective Security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galster, Kjeld

    Collective Security: National Egotism (Abstract) In Danish pre-World War I defence debate the notion of collective security is missing. During the early years of the 19th century, the political work is influenced by a pervasive feeling of rising tension and danger on the continent of Europe......, but while creation of defensive alliances appears unrealistic, new defence laws appearing 1909 show strong resolve to defend Denmark’s status as a neutral power. The Great War proves that these laws provided an adequate tool to be wielded by the politicians actually in office during that conflict. Following...... World War I it is not surprising that a salient feature of the defence debate is aversion against armed conflict. The Wilsonian agenda of a new system of collective security featuring prominently in the peace talks as well as in European debate generally does indeed have ramifications in Danish...

  19. A Security Assessment Methodology for Critical Infrastructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caselli, M.; Kargl, Frank; Hämmerli, Bernhard M.; Lopez, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Interest in security assessment and penetration testing techniques has steadily increased. Likewise, security of industrial control systems (ICS) has become more and more important. Very few methodologies directly target ICS and none of them generalizes the concept of "critical infrastructures

  20. Expansion of genetic testing in the division of functional genomics, research center for bioscience and technology, tottori university from 2000 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Kaori

    2014-03-01

    At the Division of Functional Genomics, Research Center for Bioscience and Technology, Tottori University, we have been making an effort to establish a genetic testing facility that can provide the same screening procedures conducted worldwide. Direct Sequencing of PCR products is the main method to detect point mutations, small deletions and insertions. Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) was used to detect large deletions or insertions. Expansion of the repeat was analyzed for triplet repeat diseases. Original primers were constructed for 41 diseases when the reported primers failed to amplify the gene. Prediction of functional effects of human nsSNPs (PolyPhen) was used for evaluation of novel mutations. From January 2000 to September 2013, a total of 1,006 DNA samples were subjected to genetic testing in the Division of Functional Genomics, Research Center for Bioscience and Technology, Tottori University. The hospitals that requested genetic testing were located in 43 prefectures in Japan and in 11 foreign countries. The genetic testing covered 62 diseases, and mutations were detected in 287 out of 1,006 with an average mutation detection rate of 24.7%. There were 77 samples for prenatal diagnosis. The number of samples has rapidly increased since 2010. In 2013, the next-generation sequencers were introduced in our facility and are expected to provide more comprehensive genetic testing in the near future. Nowadays, genetic testing is a popular and powerful tool for diagnosis of many genetic diseases. Our genetic testing should be further expanded in the future.

  1. Hydrothermal Alteration of Glass from Underground Nuclear Tests: Formation and Transport of Pu-clay Colloids at the Nevada National Security Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavarin, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zhao, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Joseph, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Begg, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Boggs, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dai, Z. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kersting, A. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-05-27

    The testing of nuclear weapons at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), has led to the deposition of substantial quantities of plutonium into the environment. Approximately 2.8 metric tons (3.1×104 TBq) of Pu were deposited in the NNSS subsurface as a result of underground nuclear testing. While 3H is the most abundant anthropogenic radionuclide deposited in the NNSS subsurface (4.7×106 TBq), plutonium is the most abundant from a molar standpoint. The only radioactive elements in greater molar abundance are the naturally occurring K, Th, and U isotopes. 239Pu and 240Pu represent the majority of alpha-emitting Pu isotopes. The extreme temperatures associated with underground nuclear tests and the refractory nature of Pu results in most of the Pu (98%) being sequestered in melted rock, referred to as nuclear melt glass (Iaea, 1998). As a result, Pu release to groundwater is controlled, in large part, by the leaching (or dissolution) of nuclear melt glass over time. The factors affecting glass dissolution rates have been studied extensively. The dissolution of Pu-containing borosilicate nuclear waste glasses at 90ºC has been shown to lead to the formation of dioctahedral smectite colloids. Colloid-facilitated transport of Pu at the NNSS has been observed. Recent groundwater samples collected from a number of contaminated wells have yielded a wide range of Pu concentrations from 0.00022 to 2.0 Bq/L. While Pu concentrations tend to fall below the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) established by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for drinking water (0.56 Bq/L), we do not yet understand what factors limit the Pu concentration or its transport behavior. To quantify the upper limit of Pu concentrations produced as a result of melt glass dissolution and determine the nature of colloids and Pu associations, we performed a 3 year nuclear melt glass dissolution experiment

  2. Privatising Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Mindova-Docheva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article proposes an analysis of the different approaches towards employing the international legal framework in the regulation and oversight of private military and security companies’ operation in armed conflicts and in peace time security systems. It proposes a partnership-based approach for public and private actors aiming at creating and sharing common values under the principles of solidarity, protection of human rights and rule of law. A focus of further research should be the process of shaping those common values.

  3. Auditing Organizational Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Infrastructure • Facilities/Utilities • Natural Disaster • Perimeter • Hacking /Espionage AT/FP: Anti-terrorism/Force protection MOE: Measures of Eectiveness...procedures and capabilities. Security audits can include periodic reviews, testing, post-incident re- ports and lessons learned , performance evaluations and

  4. COMPUTER SECURITY AND SECURITY TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazar Stošić

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing development of computer and communications technology growth and increasing needs and development of information systems security. The problem of security must be approached with greater caution. With the development of computer and communication technologies have developed numerous tools to protect files and other information. A set of tools, procedures, policies and solutions to defend against attacks are collectively referred to as computer network security. It is necessary above all to define and learn about the concepts of attack, risk, threat, vulnerability and asset value. During the design and implementation of information systems should primarily take into account a set of measures to increase security and maintenance at an acceptable level of risk. In any case, there is a need to know the risks in the information system. Sources of potential security problems are challenges and attacks, while the risk relates to the probable outcome and its associated costs due to occurrence of certain events. There are numerous techniques help protect your computer: cryptography, authentication, checked the software, licenses and certificates, valid authorization... This paper explains some of the procedures and potential threats to break into the network and computers as well as potential programs that are used. Guidance and explanation of these programs is not to cause a break-in at someone else's computer, but to highlight the vulnerability of the computer's capabilities.

  5. FEMA Disaster Recovery Centers - KML

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This is a KML file for FEMA's Disaster Recovery Centers (DRC). A DRC is a readily accessible facility or mobile office set up by FEMA where applicants may go for...

  6. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PTSD Awareness About the Website Site Map Content Inventory Accessibility Privacy and Security Updating of Web Site ... Immunizations Flu Vaccination Prevention / Wellness Public Health Weight Management (MOVE!) Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Veterans Canteen ...

  7. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 569: Area 3 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick Matthews; Christy Sloop

    2012-02-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 569 is located in Area 3 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 569 comprises the nine numbered corrective action sites (CASs) and one newly identified site listed below: (1) 03-23-09, T-3 Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Annie, Franklin, George, and Moth); (2) 03-23-10, T-3A Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Harry and Hornet); (3) 03-23-11, T-3B Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Fizeau); (4) 03-23-12, T-3S Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Rio Arriba); (5) 03-23-13, T-3T Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Catron); (6) 03-23-14, T-3V Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Humboldt); (7) 03-23-15, S-3G Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Coulomb-B); (8) 03-23-16, S-3H Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Coulomb-A); (9) 03-23-21, Pike Contamination Area (hereafter referred to as Pike); and (10) Waste Consolidation Site 3A. Because CAU 569 is a complicated site containing many types of releases, it was agreed during the data quality objectives (DQO) process that these sites will be grouped. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each study group. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the DQOs developed on September 26, 2011, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO

  8. About Security Solutions in Fog Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugen Petac

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The key for improving a system's performance, its security and reliability is to have the dataprocessed locally in remote data centers. Fog computing extends cloud computing through itsservices to devices and users at the edge of the network. Through this paper it is explored the fogcomputing environment. Security issues in this area are also described. Fog computing providesthe improved quality of services to the user by complementing shortages of cloud in IoT (Internet ofThings environment. Our proposal, named Adaptive Fog Computing Node Security Profile(AFCNSP, which is based security Linux solutions, will get an improved security of fog node withrich feature sets.

  9. Development and testing of computer software for nursing assessment and care planning at a spinal cord injury center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, E E; Toth, L L; Rogers, S

    1994-08-01

    This paper describes a pilot project using a Macintosh personal computer and customized software to computerize nursing admission assessment and care planning data. The project setting is a 47-bed Spinal Cord Injury Center with two inpatient units and an outpatient department serving approximately 1,000 patients with spinal cord injury at a Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center in northern California. The computer software development, implementation, and evaluation are described. This software (MacNursing) was found to be a low cost, customized approach to computerizing spinal cord injury admission assessment data and care planning which reduces repetitive writing and facilitates continuity of care. Personal computers and this software have provided the mechanism for establishing a spinal cord injury patient database.

  10. Secure Ties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joep de Hart; Frans Knol; Cora Maas - de Waal; Theo Roes

    2002-01-01

    Original title: Zekere banden. Discussions about the Netherlands of today often throw up terms such as 'social cohesion', 'social integration', 'liveability' and 'security'. The Netherlands Institute for Social Research/SCP has carried out a study of this phenomenon and presents the results in

  11. Food security

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridder, M. de

    2011-01-01

    Food security is back on the agenda as a top priority for policy makers. In January 2011, record high food prices resulted in protests in Tunisia, which subsequently led to the spread of the revolutions in other North African and Middle Eastern countries. Although experts have asserted that no

  12. Information Security

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartel, Pieter H.; Suryana Herman, Nanna; Leukfeldt, E.R.; Stol, W.Ph.

    2012-01-01

    Information security is all about the protection of digital assets, such as digital content, personal health records, state secrets etc. These assets can be handled by a party who is authorised to access and control the asset or a party who is not authorised to do so. Authorisation determines who is

  13. Ethnicity, Household Food Security, and Nutrition and Activity Patterns in Families With Preschool Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfour, Lila; Natale, Ruby; Uhlhorn, Susan; Arheart, Kris L; Haney, Kanathy; Messiah, Sarah E

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the relationship between food security and child nutritional intake, sedentary behavior, and body mass index (BMI) and potential moderation by ethnic subgroup membership. Cross-sectional data analysis from baseline data of a preschool intervention trial. Twenty-eight subsidized child care centers in Miami-Dade County, FL. Children ages 2 to 5 (n = 1,211) and their caregivers. The BMI percentile and the following 4 factors (via confirmatory factor analysis): food security, consumption of fruits/vegetables, consumption of unhealthy foods, and sedentary behaviors. Separate linear mixed models tested relationships between food security and main outcome measures with an interaction term to test for possible moderation by ethnicity. Results indicated a significant relationship (P food security and child consumption of fruit/vegetables, consumption of unhealthy foods, and sedentary behavior, but not with BMI percentile. With greater food security, Haitians reported greater consumption of fruit/vegetables and sedentary behavior. With greater food security, Cubans and non-Hispanic whites reported less consumption of unhealthy foods, while Haitians reported greater consumption. Results showed higher food security was associated with higher consumption of fruit/vegetables, consumption of unhealthy foods, and sedentary behavior, but this was moderated by ethnicity. Implications for healthy weight interventions among low-income preschoolers should focus on the importance of food security and tailor intervention strategies for diverse ethnic groups accordingly. Copyright © 2015 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [AVIATION MEDICINE: THEORETICAL CONCEPTS AND FOCAL FUNDAMENTAL AND PRACTICAL ISSUES (for the 80th anniversary of the Research Test Center of Aerospace Medicine and Military Ergonomics)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanko, I M; Pisarev, A A; Vorona, A A; Lapa, V V; Khomenko, M N

    2015-01-01

    The article discloses postulates of theoretical concepts that make the methodological basis for addressing the real-world aviation medicine challenges of humanizing aviator's environment, labor content and means, and health and performance maintenance. Under consideration are focal fundamental and practical issues arising with the technological progress in aviation and dealt with at the AF CRI Research Test Center of Aerospace Medicine and Military Ergonomics.

  15. Opinions about Component Energetic Security

    OpenAIRE

    Elena GOLUMBEANU (GEORGESCU)

    2012-01-01

    Collective security (international) represent the morphological expression of individual security components. According to the Report presented at the United Nations Development Programme, collective security (international) as well as national security, is the expression of seven synergistic dimensions as follows: economic security, food security, environmental security, personal security, community security, political security and individual security. As part of economic security, energy an...

  16. Comparison of Routable Control System Security Approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edgar, Thomas W.; Hadley, Mark D.; Carroll, Thomas E.; Manz, David O.; Winn, Jennifer D.

    2011-06-01

    This document is an supplement to the 'Secure and Efficient Routable Control Systems.' It addressed security in routable control system communication. The control system environment that monitors and manages the power grid historically has utilized serial communication mechanisms. Leased-line serial communication environments operating at 1200 to 9600 baud rates are common. However, recent trends show that communication media such as fiber, optical carrier 3 (OC-3) speeds, mesh-based high-speed wireless, and the Internet are becoming the media of choice. In addition, a dichotomy has developed between the electrical transmission and distribution environments, with more modern communication infrastructures deployed by transmission utilities. The preceding diagram represents a typical control system. The Communication Links cloud supports all of the communication mechanisms a utility might deploy between the control center and devices in the field. Current methodologies used for security implementations are primarily led by single vendors or standards bodies. However, these entities tend to focus on individual protocols. The result is an environment that contains a mixture of security solutions that may only address some communication protocols at an increasing operational burden for the utility. A single approach is needed that meets operational requirements, is simple to operate, and provides the necessary level of security for all control system communication. The solution should be application independent (e.g., Distributed Network Protocol/Internet Protocol [DNP/IP], International Electrotechnical Commission [IEC] C37.118, Object Linking and Embedding for Process Control [OPC], etc.) and focus on the transport layer. In an ideal setting, a well-designed suite of standards for control system communication will be used for vendor implementation and compliance testing. An expected outcome of this effort is an international standard.

  17. Modernization of NASA's Johnson Space Center Chamber: A Payload Transport Rail System to Support Cryogenic Vacuum Optical Testing of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Sam; Homan, Jonathan; Speed, John

    2016-01-01

    NASA is the mission lead for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), the next of the "Great Observatories", scheduled for launch in 2018. It is directly responsible for the integration and test (I&T) program that will culminate in an end-to-end cryo vacuum optical test of the flight telescope and instrument module in Chamber A at NASA Johnson Space Center. Historic Chamber A is the largest thermal vacuum chamber at Johnson Space Center and one of the largest space simulation chambers in the world. Chamber A has undergone a major modernization effort to support the deep cryogenic, vacuum and cleanliness requirements for testing the JWST. This paper describe the challenges of developing, integrating and modifying new payload rails capable of transporting payloads within the thermal vacuum chamber up to 65,000 pounds. Ambient and Cryogenic Operations required to configure for testing will be explained. Lastly review historical payload configurations stretching from the Apollo program era to current James Webb Space Telescope testing.

  18. Noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) in twin pregnancies with treatment of assisted reproductive techniques (ART) in a single center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, YueQiu; Gao, Ya; Lin, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study is to report the performance of noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) in twin pregnancies after the treatment of assisted reproductive technology (ART). Method: In two years period, 565 pregnant women with ART twin pregnancies were prospectively tested by NIPT...

  19. Security Investigation Database (SID)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — Security Investigation & Personnel Security Clearance - COTS personnel security application in a USAID virtualized environement that can support USAID's business...

  20. Security Administration Reports Application

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — Contains SSA Security Reports that allow Information Security Officers (ISOs) to access, review and take appropriate action based on the information contained in the...

  1. Test and Demonstration Assets of New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-03-31

    This document was developed by the Arrowhead Center of New Mexico State University as part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP), funded by a DOE/NNSA grant. The NSPP has three primary components: business incubation, workforce development, and technology demonstration and validation. The document contains a survey of test and demonstration assets in New Mexico available for external users such as small businesses with security technologies under development. Demonstration and validation of national security technologies created by incubator sources, as well as other sources, are critical phases of technology development. The NSPP will support the utilization of an integrated demonstration and validation environment.

  2. Relationship between Food Security with Sugar Level and Blood Pressure in Diabetes Type 2 in Tehran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadam, Seyed Amir Hossein Zehni; Javadi, Maryam; Mohammadpooral, Asghar

    2016-12-01

    Food security has been defined as the "availability, stability, access and utilization of safe foods". Diabetes has been known as one of the biggest health and medical problems throughout the world and is clearly related to lifestyle, and particularly, improper food consumption. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between food security with sugar and blood pressure in patients suffering from type 2 diabetes who refer to diabetes centers in Tehran. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2015 on type 2 diabetes patients in Tehran, Iran. From two diabetes centers in the eastern and southern parts of Tehran, 243 type 2 diabetes patients were selected. Necessary information (demographic and food security information) about all the studied persons was collected using the standard questionnaire verified by US Department of Agriculture (USDA). The data was analyzed by SPSS version 16, statistical comparisons were made using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Chi-square and Tukey tests and a significant level of security (p=0.372). No significant relation was observed between food security and fasting blood pressure, HbA1C, and systolic blood pressure (p>0.05), but there was a significant relationship between food security and diastolic blood pressure (p= 0.030). According to the relationship between diastolic blood pressure and food security and the role of blood pressure in the irreparable diabetic complications, it is recommended to perform appropriate food advice.

  3. Computer Security: the security marathon

    CERN Multimedia

    Computer Security Team

    2014-01-01

    If you believe that “security” is a sprint, that a quick hack is invulnerable, that quick bug fixing is sufficient, that plugging security measures on top of existing structures is good, that once you are secure your life will be easy... then let me convince you otherwise.   An excellent example of this is when the summer students join us at CERN. As the summer period is short, software projects must be accomplished quickly, like a sprint. Rush, rush! But often, this sprint ends with aching muscles. Regularly, these summer students approach us to have their project or web server made visible to the Internet. Regularly, quick security reviews of those web servers diagnose severe underperformance with regards to security: the web applications are flawed or use insecure protocols; the employed software tools, databases or web frameworks are sub-optimal and not adequately chosen for that project; the operating system is non-standard and has never been brought up-to-date; and ...

  4. Homeland Security Affairs Journal, Volume V - 2009: Issue 2, May

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Homeland Security Affairs is the peer-reviewed online journal of the Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Defense and Security (CHDS), providing a forum to propose and debate strategies, policies, and organizational arrangements to strengthen U.S. homeland security. The instructors, participants, alumni, and partners of CHDS represent the leading subject matter experts and practitioners in the field of homeland security. May 2009. This issue of Homeland Security Affairs opens on a...

  5. Homeland Security Affairs Journal, Volume V - 2009: Issue 1, January

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Homeland Security Affairs is the peer-reviewed online journal of the Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Defense and Security (CHDS), providing a forum to propose and debate strategies, policies, and organizational arrangements to strengthen U.S. homeland security. The instructors, participants, alumni, and partners of CHDS represent the leading subject matter experts and practitioners in the field of homeland security. January 2009. In this issue of Homeland Security Affairs we ...

  6. A SECURITY REQUIREMENT QUALITY MEASUREMENT MODEL FOR REDUCING ECOMMERCE SECURITY RISK

    OpenAIRE

    Sen-Tarng Lai

    2014-01-01

    E-commerce is an important business transaction system in the network age. However, the network intrusion, malicious users, virus attack and system security vulnerabilities have continued to threaten the operation of the e-commerce, making e-commerce security encounter serious test. In order to avoid system security flaw and defect caused user great loss, how to reduce e-commerce security risk has become a topic worthy of further exploration. In this paper, the critical security r...

  7. Security system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Mark J.; Kuca, Michal; Aragon, Mona L.

    2016-02-02

    A security system includes a structure having a structural surface. The structure is sized to contain an asset therein and configured to provide a forceful breaching delay. The structure has an opening formed therein to permit predetermined access to the asset contained within the structure. The structure includes intrusion detection features within or associated with the structure that are activated in response to at least a partial breach of the structure.

  8. Hospital security and safety--aloha style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaney, D E

    1991-01-01

    Visitors to Hawaii need not be fazed by concerns that they will be unable to communicate during a medical crisis. Trained IAHSS security officers representing all races and ethnic groups provide friendly, helpful service. The Hawaii Chapter of IAHSS coordinates activities of mutual concern among the nine major medical centers on Oahu and Maui. Hospital security does play an integral role in the activities of the Honolulu Police Department's Council of Police and Private Security (COPPS).

  9. 20 CFR 638.528 - Social Security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Social Security. 638.528 Section 638.528... TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Center Operations § 638.528 Social Security. The Act provides that students are covered by title II of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 401 et seq.) and shall...

  10. Assessment of a novel group‐centered testing schema in an upper‐level undergraduate molecular biotechnology course

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Srougi, Melissa C; Miller, Heather B; Witherow, D. Scott; Carson, Susan

    2013-01-01

    ...‐based testing scheme. We wanted to assess how performing critical thinking problem sets as group work compares to performing the sets as individual work, in terms of student attitudes and learning outcomes...

  11. Noninvasive prenatal testing in routine clinical practice for a high-risk population: Experience from a center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Guijie; Yi, Jianping; Han, Baosheng; Liu, Heng; Guo, Wanru; Shi, Chong; Yin, Lirong

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to summarize the effects of noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) on aneuploidy among high-risk participants in Tangshan Maternal and Children Health Hospital.NIPT or invasive prenatal diagnosis was recommended to patients with a high risk of fetal aneuploidy from February 2013 to February 2014. Patients who exhibited eligibility and applied for NIPT from January 2012 to January 2013 were included in a comparison group. The rates of patients who underwent invasive testing, declined to undergo further testing, and manifested trisomies 21, 18, and 13 were compared between two groups. Follow-up data were obtained from the participants who underwent NIPT from 2013 to 2014.A total of 7223 patients (3018 and 4205 individuals before and after NIPT) were eligible for analysis. After NIPT was introduced in 2013 to 2014, 727 patients (17.3%) underwent invasive testing, 2828 preferred NIPT (67.3%), and 650 declined to undergo further testing (15.5%). A total of 34 cases of trisomies 21, 18, and 13 (0.8%) were found. In 2012 to 2013, 565 patients (18.7%) underwent invasive testing and 2453 declined to undergo further testing (81.3%). A total of 7 cases of trisomies 21, 18, and 13 were documented (0.2%). Of these cases, 24 were found from NIPT and 10 cases were found from invasive testing. The number of participants who declined to undergo further testing significantly decreased after NIPT was introduced (81.3% vs. 15.5%, P NIPT for trisomies 21, 18, and 13 were 100% and 99.9%, respectively. The detection rates of NIPT for trisomies 21, 18, and 13 also significantly increased (0.2% vs. 0.8%, P testing remained unchanged (18.7% vs. 17.3%, P = 0.12). The positive predictive values of NIPT for trisomies 21, 18, and 13 were 100%, 83.3%, and 50.0%, respectively. The false positive rates of NIPT were 0% and 0.04%.With NIPT implementation in clinical practice, the rate of declining a follow-up test among high-risk women was decreased and the detection rate of

  12. Barriers to Pap Smear Test for the Second Time in Women Referring to Health Care Centers in the South of Tehran: A Qualitative Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, Laleh; Dehdari, Tahereh; Hajizadeh, Ebrahim; Shojaeizadeh, Davoud; Abedini, Mehrandokht; Nedjat, Saharnaz

    2017-10-01

    Cervical cancer is a preventable disease with a regular screening program. Many studies have reported a large number of barriers that women had for the first time, but this study decided to find other barriers for the second time pap smear. In this qualitative research, data were gathered through in-depth interviews and expressed through conventional content analysis in the form of constant comparison. The participants were 15 women with family profile at 30 health care centers who lived in the south of Tehran and had done Pap smear for one time but didn't do it for the second time. Three main themes emerged from the analysis of the interviews: negative experiences of the first Pap test were as follows: results of the first time test, readiness for performing the test, getting the test itself, and the site of the first Pap test. Personal barriers to getting the second Pap test were: inattention to time, physical barriers to the second Pap test, and inhibitory beliefs. Perceived social barriers to getting the second Pap test with two sub-themes included social supports and abstract norms. This study provided other barriers about Pap smear including lack of the spouse's support, the role of health care providers and physicians in screening program for early diagnosis in women.

  13. Information security : is your information safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This article characterizes the problem of cyber-terrorism, outlines the Federal government's response to several security-related concerns, and describes the Volpe Center's critical support to this response. The possibility of catastrophic terrorist ...

  14. Modernization of NASA's Johnson Space Center Chamber: A Liquid Nitrogen System to Support Cryogenic Vacuum Optical Testing of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Sammy; Homan, Jonathan; Montz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    NASA is the mission lead for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), the next of the “Great Observatories”, scheduled for launch in 2018. It is directly responsible for the integration and test (I&T) program that will culminate in an end-to-end cryo vacuum optical test of the flight telescope and instrument module in Chamber A at NASA Johnson Space Center. Historic Chamber A is the largest thermal vacuum chamber at Johnson Space Center and one of the largest space simulation chambers in the world. Chamber A has undergone a major modernization effort to support the deep cryogenic, vacuum and cleanliness requirements for testing the JWST. This paper describes the steps performed in efforts to convert the existing the 60’s era Liquid Nitrogen System from a forced flow (pumped) process to a natural circulation (thermo-siphon) process. In addition, the paper will describe the dramatic conservation of liquid nitrogen to support the long duration thermal vacuum testing. Lastly, describe the simplistic and effective control system which results in zero to minimal human inputs during steady state conditions.

  15. Tests of models for parton fragmentation in e e annihilation. [29 GeV center-of-mass energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary, J.W.

    1985-11-01

    We examine the distribution of particles in the three jet events of e e annihilation. The data was collected with the PEP-4/Time Projection Chamber detector at 29 GeV center-of-mass energy at PEP. The experimental distributions are compared to the predictions of several fragmentation models which describe the transition of quarks and gluons into hadrons. In particular, our study emphasizes the three fragmentation models which are currently in widest use: the Lund string model, the Webber cluster model and the independent fragmentation model. These three models each possess different Lorentz frame structures for the distribution of hadron sources relative to the overall event c.m. in three jet events. The Lund string and independent fragmentation models are tuned to describe global event properties of our multihadronic annihilation event sample. This tuned Lund string model provides a good description of the distribution of particles between jet axes in three jet events, while the independent fragmentation model does not. We verify that the failure of the independent fragmentation model is not a consequence of parameter tuning or of model variant. The Webber cluster model, which is untuned, does not describe the absolute particle densities between jets but correctly predicts the ratios of those densities, which are less sensitive to the tuning. These results provide evidence that the sources of hadrons are boosted with respect to the overall center-of-mass in three jet events, with components of motion normal to the jet axes. The distribution of particles close to jet axes provides additional support for this conclusion. 94 refs.

  16. Statistical security for Social Security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soneji, Samir; King, Gary

    2012-08-01

    The financial viability of Social Security, the single largest U.S. government program, depends on accurate forecasts of the solvency of its intergenerational trust fund. We begin by detailing information necessary for replicating the Social Security Administration's (SSA's) forecasting procedures, which until now has been unavailable in the public domain. We then offer a way to improve the quality of these procedures via age- and sex-specific mortality forecasts. The most recent SSA mortality forecasts were based on the best available technology at the time, which was a combination of linear extrapolation and qualitative judgments. Unfortunately, linear extrapolation excludes known risk factors and is inconsistent with long-standing demographic patterns, such as the smoothness of age profiles. Modern statistical methods typically outperform even the best qualitative judgments in these contexts. We show how to use such methods, enabling researchers to forecast using far more information, such as the known risk factors of smoking and obesity and known demographic patterns. Including this extra information makes a substantial difference. For example, by improving only mortality forecasting methods, we predict three fewer years of net surplus, $730 billion less in Social Security Trust Funds, and program costs that are 0.66% greater for projected taxable payroll by 2031 compared with SSA projections. More important than specific numerical estimates are the advantages of transparency, replicability, reduction of uncertainty, and what may be the resulting lower vulnerability to the politicization of program forecasts. In addition, by offering with this article software and detailed replication information, we hope to marshal the efforts of the research community to include ever more informative inputs and to continue to reduce uncertainties in Social Security forecasts.

  17. Cryogenic Testing of the Thermal Vacuum Chamber and Ground Support Equipment for the James Webb Space Telescope in Chamber A at Johnson Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPirro, M.; Homan, J.; Havey, K.; Ousley, W.

    2017-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is the largest cryogenic instrument telescope to be developed for space flight. The telescope will be passively cooled to 50 K and the instrument package will be at 40 K with the mid-infrared instrument at 6 K. The final cryogenic test of the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) and Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) as an assembly (OTE + ISIM OTIS) will be performed in the largest 15 K chamber in the world, Chamber A at Johnson Space Center. The planned duration of this test will be 100 days in the middle of 2017. Needless to say, this ultimate test of OTIS, the cryogenic portion of JWST will be crucial in verifying the end-to-end performance of JWST. A repeat of this test would not only be expensive, but would delay the launch schedule (currently October 2018). Therefore a series of checkouts and verifications of the chamber and ground support equipment were planned and carried out between 2012 and 2016. This paper will provide a top-level summary of those tests, trades in coming up with the test plan, as well as some details of individual issues that were encountered and resolved in the course of testing.

  18. A pilot study: portable out-of-center sleep testing as an early sleep apnea screening tool in acute ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernyshev OY

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Oleg Y Chernyshev,1 David E McCarty,1 Douglas E Moul,2 Cesar Liendo,1 Gloria C Caldito,1 Sai K Munjampalli,1 Roger E Kelley,3 Andrew L Chesson Jr1 1Division of Sleep Medicine, Department of Neurology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center at Shreveport, LA 2Sleep Disorders Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, 3Department of Neurology, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA, USA Introduction: Prompt diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA after acute ischemic stroke (AIS is critical for optimal clinical outcomes, but in-laboratory conventional polysomnograms (PSG are not routinely practical. Though portable out-of-center type III cardiopulmonary sleep studies (out-of-center cardiopulmonary sleep testing [OCST] are widely available, these studies have not been validated in patients who have recently suffered from AIS. We hypothesized that OCST in patients with AIS would yield similar results when compared to conventional PSG. Methods: Patients with AIS had simultaneous type III OCST and PSG studies performed within 72 hours from symptom onset. The accuracy of OCST was compared to PSG using: chi-square tests, receiver operatory characteristic curves, Bland–Altman plot, paired Student's t-test/Wilcoxon signed-rank test, and calculation of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV, and negative predictive value (NPV. Results: Twenty-one out of 23 subjects with AIS (age 61±9.4 years; 52% male; 58% African-American successfully completed both studies (9% technical failure. Nearly all (95% had Mallampati IV posterior oropharynx; the mean neck circumference was 16.8±1.6 in. and the mean body mass index (BMI was 30±7 kg/m2. The apnea hypopnea index (AHI provided by OCST was similar to that provided by PSG (19.8±18.0 vs 22.0±22.7, respectively; P=0.49. On identifying subjects by OCST with an AHI ≥5 on PSG, OCST had the following parameters: sensitivity 100%, specificity 85.7%, PPV 93%, and NPV 100%. On identifying

  19. The QUASAR reproducibility study, Part II: Results from a multi-center Arterial Spin Labeling test-retest study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Esben Thade; Mouridsen, Kim; Golay, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative STAR labeling of Arterial Regions or QUASAR), a method providing user independent quantification of CBF in a large test-retest study across sites from around the world, dubbed "The QUASAR reproducibility study". Altogether, 28 sites located in Asia, Europe and North America participated...

  20. A multi-center field study of two point-of-care tests for circulating Wuchereria bancrofti antigenemia in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnais, Cédric B.; Awaca-Uvon, Naomi-Pitchouna; Bolay, Fatoma K.; Boussinesq, Michel; Fischer, Peter U.; Gankpala, Lincoln; Meite, Aboulaye; Missamou, François; Pion, Sébastien D.

    2017-01-01

    Background The Global Programme to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis uses point-of-care tests for circulating filarial antigenemia (CFA) to map endemic areas and for monitoring and evaluating the success of mass drug administration (MDA) programs. We compared the performance of the reference BinaxNOW Filariasis card test (ICT, introduced in 1997) with the Alere Filariasis Test Strip (FTS, introduced in 2013) in 5 endemic study sites in Africa. Methodology The tests were compared prior to MDA in two study sites (Congo and Côte d'Ivoire) and in three sites that had received MDA (DRC and 2 sites in Liberia). Data were analyzed with regard to % positivity, % agreement, and heterogeneity. Models evaluated potential effects of age, gender, and blood microfilaria (Mf) counts in individuals and effects of endemicity and history of MDA at the village level as potential factors linked to higher sensitivity of the FTS. Lastly, we assessed relationships between CFA scores and Mf in pre- and post-MDA settings. Principal findings Paired test results were available for 3,682 individuals. Antigenemia rates were 8% and 22% higher by FTS than by ICT in pre-MDA and in post-MDA sites, respectively. FTS/ICT ratios were higher in areas with low infection rates. The probability of having microfilaremia was much higher in persons with CFA scores >1 in untreated areas. However, this was not true in post-MDA settings. Conclusions/Significance This study has provided extensive new information on the performance of the FTS compared to ICT in Africa and it has confirmed the increased sensitivity of FTS reported in prior studies. Variability in FTS/ICT was related in part to endemicity level, history of MDA, and perhaps to the medications used for MDA. These results suggest that FTS should be superior to ICT for mapping, for transmission assessment surveys, and for post-MDA surveillance. PMID:28892473

  1. A multi-center field study of two point-of-care tests for circulating Wuchereria bancrofti antigenemia in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnais, Cédric B; Awaca-Uvon, Naomi-Pitchouna; Bolay, Fatoma K; Boussinesq, Michel; Fischer, Peter U; Gankpala, Lincoln; Meite, Aboulaye; Missamou, François; Pion, Sébastien D; Weil, Gary J

    2017-09-01

    The Global Programme to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis uses point-of-care tests for circulating filarial antigenemia (CFA) to map endemic areas and for monitoring and evaluating the success of mass drug administration (MDA) programs. We compared the performance of the reference BinaxNOW Filariasis card test (ICT, introduced in 1997) with the Alere Filariasis Test Strip (FTS, introduced in 2013) in 5 endemic study sites in Africa. The tests were compared prior to MDA in two study sites (Congo and Côte d'Ivoire) and in three sites that had received MDA (DRC and 2 sites in Liberia). Data were analyzed with regard to % positivity, % agreement, and heterogeneity. Models evaluated potential effects of age, gender, and blood microfilaria (Mf) counts in individuals and effects of endemicity and history of MDA at the village level as potential factors linked to higher sensitivity of the FTS. Lastly, we assessed relationships between CFA scores and Mf in pre- and post-MDA settings. Paired test results were available for 3,682 individuals. Antigenemia rates were 8% and 22% higher by FTS than by ICT in pre-MDA and in post-MDA sites, respectively. FTS/ICT ratios were higher in areas with low infection rates. The probability of having microfilaremia was much higher in persons with CFA scores >1 in untreated areas. However, this was not true in post-MDA settings. This study has provided extensive new information on the performance of the FTS compared to ICT in Africa and it has confirmed the increased sensitivity of FTS reported in prior studies. Variability in FTS/ICT was related in part to endemicity level, history of MDA, and perhaps to the medications used for MDA. These results suggest that FTS should be superior to ICT for mapping, for transmission assessment surveys, and for post-MDA surveillance.

  2. A multi-center field study of two point-of-care tests for circulating Wuchereria bancrofti antigenemia in Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric B Chesnais

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Global Programme to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis uses point-of-care tests for circulating filarial antigenemia (CFA to map endemic areas and for monitoring and evaluating the success of mass drug administration (MDA programs. We compared the performance of the reference BinaxNOW Filariasis card test (ICT, introduced in 1997 with the Alere Filariasis Test Strip (FTS, introduced in 2013 in 5 endemic study sites in Africa.The tests were compared prior to MDA in two study sites (Congo and Côte d'Ivoire and in three sites that had received MDA (DRC and 2 sites in Liberia. Data were analyzed with regard to % positivity, % agreement, and heterogeneity. Models evaluated potential effects of age, gender, and blood microfilaria (Mf counts in individuals and effects of endemicity and history of MDA at the village level as potential factors linked to higher sensitivity of the FTS. Lastly, we assessed relationships between CFA scores and Mf in pre- and post-MDA settings.Paired test results were available for 3,682 individuals. Antigenemia rates were 8% and 22% higher by FTS than by ICT in pre-MDA and in post-MDA sites, respectively. FTS/ICT ratios were higher in areas with low infection rates. The probability of having microfilaremia was much higher in persons with CFA scores >1 in untreated areas. However, this was not true in post-MDA settings.This study has provided extensive new information on the performance of the FTS compared to ICT in Africa and it has confirmed the increased sensitivity of FTS reported in prior studies. Variability in FTS/ICT was related in part to endemicity level, history of MDA, and perhaps to the medications used for MDA. These results suggest that FTS should be superior to ICT for mapping, for transmission assessment surveys, and for post-MDA surveillance.

  3. TESTING THE MILLISECOND PULSAR SCENARIO OF THE GALACTIC CENTER GAMMA-RAY EXCESS WITH VERY HIGH ENERGY GAMMA-RAYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Qiang [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01002 (United States); Ioka, Kunihito [Theory Center, Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, KEK, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan)

    2015-04-01

    Recent analyses of Fermi Large Area Telescope data show an extended GeV γ-ray excess on top of the expected diffuse background in the Galactic center region, which can be explained by annihilating dark matter (DM) or a population of millisecond pulsars (MSPs). We propose observations of very high energy (VHE) γ-rays to distinguish the MSP scenario from the DM scenario. GeV γ-ray MSPs should release most of their energy to the relativistic e{sup ±} wind, which will diffuse into the Galaxy and radiate TeV γ-rays through inverse Compton scattering and bremsstrahlung processes. By calculating the spectrum and spatial distribution, we show that such emission is detectable with the next generation VHE γ-ray observatory, the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), under reasonable model parameters. It is essential to search for multi-wavelength counterparts to the GeV γ-ray excess in order to solve this mystery in the high-energy universe.

  4. Network security

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, André

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces the security mechanisms deployed in Ethernet, Wireless-Fidelity (Wi-Fi), Internet Protocol (IP) and MultiProtocol Label Switching (MPLS) networks. These mechanisms are grouped throughout the book according to the following four functions: data protection, access control, network isolation, and data monitoring. Data protection is supplied by data confidentiality and integrity control services. Access control is provided by a third-party authentication service. Network isolation is supplied by the Virtual Private Network (VPN) service. Data monitoring consists of applying

  5. Arctic Security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Nils

    2013-01-01

    The inclusion of China, India, Japan, Singapore and Italy as permanent observers in the Arctic Council has increased the international status of this forum significantly. This chapter aims to explain the background for the increased international interest in the Arctic region through an analysis...... of the general security situation and to identify both the explicit and the implicit agendas of the primary state actors. The region contains all the ingredients for confrontation and conflict but the economical potential for all the parties concerned creates a general interest in dialogue and cooperation...

  6. Phase 4 static tests of the J-97 powered, external augmentor V/STOL model at the NASA, Ames Research Center, November 1983

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    A large-scale, ejector-lift V/STOL Model, powered by a J-97 engine, was tested at the NASA Ames Research Center Outdoor Aerodynamics Research Facility. The model incorporated the external augmentor concept developed by DHC. Since the first test at Ames in 1979, the fuselage augmentor nozzle array has been redesigned with a larger pitch and notched nozzles instead of plain slot nozzles. Thrust augmentation of the ejector as measured at Ames Research Center was lower than that measured in the DHC laboratory. It is believed that this difference is due to the high temperature of the primary jet flow as compared to the DHC blown-down rig. An ejector-lift/vectored thrust configuration was also included in the recent tests. This is an arrangement where the fuselage augmentor is shortened in the chordwise direction and the extra thrust is generated with a vectorable, ventral nozzle. In free air the shortened fuselage augmentor produced the same augmentation as the long augmentor. In ground proximity, at a height of 27 in, and with zero pitch angle, a negative ground effect was measured equal to 6.5 percent of the free-air lift.

  7. Testing a maintenance model for eating disorders in a sample seeking treatment at a tertiary care center: a structural equation modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasca, Giorgio A; Presniak, Michelle D; Demidenko, Natasha; Balfour, Louise; Krysanski, Valerie; Trinneer, Anne; Bissada, Hany

    2011-01-01

    Fairburn et al (Fairburn, CG, Cooper, Z, Shafran, R. Behav Res Ther 2003;41:509-528) proposed additional maintenance mechanisms (ie, interpersonal difficulties, mood intolerance, low self-esteem, and perfectionism) for some individuals with eating disorders in addition to core eating disorder psychopathology (ie, overevaluation of eating, weight, and shape and their control). This is the first study to both elaborate and test this maintenance model as a structural model. Adults seeking treatment of an eating disorder (N = 1451) at a specialized tertiary care center were included in this cross-sectional study. In the first part of the study, diagnostically heterogeneous participants (n = 406) were randomly selected to test a structural model based on the maintenance model. In the second part of the study, remaining participants (n = 1045) were grouped according to eating disorder diagnosis to test for invariance of the structural paths of the final model across diagnoses. Overall, the structural model with core and additional mechanisms fit the data well and, with 1 exception, represented maintenance processes for each of the diagnostic groups. Treatment models based on both core and additional maintenance factors for those seeking therapy at a specialized tertiary care center may result in improved treatment outcomes for these patients with eating disorders. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kippen, Karen Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-08

    For more than 30 years the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has provided the scientific underpinnings in nuclear physics and material science needed to ensure the safety and surety of the nuclear stockpile into the future. In addition to national security research, the LANSCE User Facility has a vibrant research program in fundamental science, providing the scientific community with intense sources of neutrons and protons to perform experiments supporting civilian research and the production of medical and research isotopes. Five major experimental facilities operate simultaneously. These facilities contribute to the stockpile stewardship program, produce radionuclides for medical testing, and provide a venue for industrial users to irradiate and test electronics. In addition, they perform fundamental research in nuclear physics, nuclear astrophysics, materials science, and many other areas. The LANSCE User Program plays a key role in training the next generation of top scientists and in attracting the best graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, and early-career scientists. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) —the principal sponsor of LANSCE—works with the Office of Science and the Office of Nuclear Energy, which have synergistic long-term needs for the linear accelerator and the neutron science that is the heart of LANSCE.

  9. Evidence and the Politics of Deimplementation: The Rise and Decline of the "Counseling and Testing" Paradigm for HIV Prevention at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, David Merritt; Bayer, Ronald; Fairchild, Amy L

    2016-03-01

    In situations of scientific uncertainty, public health interventions, such as counseling for HIV infection, sometimes must be implemented before obtaining evidence of efficacy. The history of HIV counseling and testing, which served as the cornerstone of HIV prevention efforts at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for a quarter of a century, illustrates the influence of institutional resistance on public health decision making and the challenge of de-implementing well-established programs. In 1985, amid uncertainty about the accuracy of the new test for HIV, public health officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and AIDS activists agreed that counseling should always be provided both before and after testing to ensure that patients were tested voluntarily and understood the meaning of their results. As the "exceptionalist" perspective that framed HIV in the early years began to recede, the purpose of HIV test counseling shifted over the next 30 years from emphasizing consent, to providing information, to encouraging behavioral change. With this increasing emphasis on prevention, HIV test counseling faced mounting doubts about whether it "worked." The CDC finally discontinued its preferred test counseling approach in October 2014. Drawing on key informant interviews with current and former CDC officials, behavioral scientists, AIDS activists, and others, along with archival material, news reports, and scientific and governmental publications, we examined the origins, development, and decline of the CDC's "counseling and testing" paradigm for HIV prevention. Disagreements within the CDC emerged by the 1990s over whether test counseling could be justified on the basis of efficacy and cost. Resistance to the prospect of policy change by supporters of test counseling in the CDC, gay activists for whom counseling carried important ethical and symbolic meanings, and community organizations dependent on federal funding made it

  10. Characteristics of Twenty-Nine Aerosol Samplers Tested at U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (2000-2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    polycarbonate membrane type collection filter. The filter where particles are collected is contained on a reel, which automatically advances to the...wetted wall cyclone (or a contactor ) for aerosol collection. The sampler is packaged in a suitcase with a handle for easy carrying. This test was started...wall cyclone ( contactor ). Air enters the contactor through two narrow slits. The unit retains the water in the contactor and does not produce a

  11. Summary of Liquid Oxygen/Hydrogen, Direct Metal Laser Sintering Injector Testing and Evaluation Effort at Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Gregory; Bullard, David B.

    2015-01-01

    The last several years have witnessed a significant advancement in the area of additive manufacturing technology. One area that has seen substantial expansion in application has been laser sintering (or melting) in a powder bed. This technology is often termed 3D printing or various acronyms that may be industry, process, or company specific. Components manufactured via 3D printing have the potential to significantly reduce development and fabrication time and cost. The usefulness of 3D printed components is influenced by several factors such as material properties and surface roughness. This paper details three injectors that were designed, fabricated, and tested in order to evaluate the utility of 3D printed components for rocket engine applications. The three injectors were tested in a hot-fire environment with chamber pressures of approximately 1400 psia. One injector was a 28 element design printed by Directed Manufacturing. The other two injectors were identical 40 element designs printed by Directed Manufacturing and Solid Concepts. All the injectors were swirl-coaxial designs and were subscale versions of a full-scale injector currently in fabrication. The test and evaluation programs for the 28 element and 40 element injectors provided a substantial amount of data that confirms the feasibility of 3D printed parts for future applications. The operating conditions of previously tested, conventionally manufactured injectors were reproduced in the 28 and 40 element programs in order to contrast the performance of each. Overall, the 3D printed injectors demonstrated comparable performance to the conventionally manufactured units. The design features of the aforementioned injectors can readily be implemented in future applications with a high degree of confidence.

  12. Microsoft System Center 2012 R2 compliance management cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Baumgarten, Andreas; Roesner, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Whether you are an IT manager, an administrator, or security professional who wants to learn how Microsoft Security Compliance Manager and Microsoft System Center can help fulfil compliance and security requirements, this is the book for you. Prior knowledge of Microsoft System Center is required.

  13. Performance tests for the NASA Ames Research Center 20 cm x 40 cm oscillating flow wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, W. J.; Giddings, T. A.

    1984-01-01

    An evaluation is presented of initial tests conducted to assess the performance of the NASA Ames 20 cm x 40 cm oscillating flow wind tunnel. The features of the tunnel are described and two aspects of tunnel operation are discussed. The first is an assessment of the steady mainstream and boundary layer flows and the second deals with oscillating mainstream and boundary layer flows. Experimental results indicate that in steady flow the test section mainstream velocity is uniform in the flow direction and in cross section. The freestream turbulence intensity is about 0.2 percent. With minor exceptions the steady turbulent boundary layer generated on the top wall of the test section exhibits the characteristics of a zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer generated on a flat plate. The tunnel was designed to generate sinusoidal oscillating mainstream flows. Experiments confirm that the tunnel produces sinusoidal mainstream velocity variations for the range of frequencies (up to 15 Hz). The results of this study demonstrate that the tunnel essentially produces the flows that it was designed to produce.

  14. Noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) in twin pregnancies with treatment of assisted reproductive techniques (ART) in a single center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yueqiu; Gao, Ya; Lin, Ge; Fu, Meili; Li, Xihong; Yin, Xuyang; Du, Juan; Li, Jing; Li, Wen; Peng, Huanhuan; Yuan, Yuying; Chen, Fang; Jiang, Fuman; Zhang, Hongyun; Lu, Guangxiu; Gong, Fei; Wang, Wei

    2016-07-01

    The objective of the study is to report the performance of noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) in twin pregnancies after the treatment of assisted reproductive technology (ART). In two years period, 565 pregnant women with ART twin pregnancies were prospectively tested by NIPT for screening for trisomy 21 (T21), 18 (T18), and 13 (T13) by sequencing cell-free DNA in maternal plasma. Positive NIPT results were confirmed by karyotyping, while negative results were interviewed after delivery. Pregnant decision based on NIPT and confirmation results was discussed during post-test counseling. In total of 565 cases, NIPT had a failure rate of 0.9% (5/565). Four cases of T21 were identified by NIPT and confirmed by karyotyping, resulting in 100% (95%CI 39.8%-100%) positive predictive value. Among 556 cases with NIPT negative results, 506 cases (91.0%) were confirmed by follow-up of postnatal phenotypes, while 33 cases (5.9%) had adverse pregnant outcomes with unconfirmed reasons because of the lack of cytogenetic samples. The remaining 17 cases (3.1%) refused follow-up. No false negative result was reported. With apparently high positive predictive value and low false positive rate, NIPT has the potential to be used as a good alternative approach of conventional prenatal screening at the first trimester in ART twin pregnancy. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Safeguards and Security progress report, January--December 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.B.; Jaramillo, G.R. (comps.)

    1990-11-01

    From January to December 1989, the Los Alamos Safeguards and Security Research and Development (R D) program carried out the activities described in the first four parts of this report: Science and Technology Base Development, Basic Systems Design, Onsite Test and Evaluation and Facility Support, and International Safeguards. For the most part, these activities were sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Safeguards and Security. Part 1 covers development of the basic technology essential to continuing improvements in the practice of safeguards and security. It includes our computer security R D and the activities of the DOE Center for Computer Security, which provides the basis for encouraging and disseminating this important technology. Part 2 treats activities aimed at developing methods for designing and evaluating safeguards systems, with special emphasis on the integration of the several subsystems into a real safeguards system. Part 3 describes efforts of direct assistance to the DOE and its contractors and includes consultation on materials control and accounting problems, development and demonstration of specialized techniques and instruments, and comprehensive participation in the design and demonstration of advanced safeguards systems. Part 3 also reports a series of training courses in various aspects of safeguards that makes the technology more accessible to those who must apply it. Finally, Part 4 covers international safeguards activities, including both support to the International Atomic Energy Agency and bilateral exchanges. Part 5 reports several safeguards-related activities that have sponsors other than the DOE/OSS. 87 refs., 52 figs.

  16. Longitudinal relation between general well-being and self-esteem : Testing differences for adolescents admitted to secure residential care and after discharge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barendregt, C.S.; Laan, A.J.; Bongers, I.L.; van Nieuwenhuizen, Ch.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the longitudinal relation between general well-being and self-esteem of male adolescents with severe psychiatric disorders. Moreover, the transition out of secure residential care was studied. Adolescents (N = 172) were assessed three times with 6 months between each

  17. 'Lowering the threshold of effective deterrence'-Testing the effect of private security agents in public spaces on crime: A randomized controlled trial in a mass transit system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariel, Barak; Bland, Matthew; Sutherland, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Supplementing local police forces is a burgeoning multibillion-dollar private security industry. Millions of formal surveillance agents in public settings are tasked to act as preventative guardians, as their high visibility presence is hypothesized to create a deterrent threat to potential offenders. Yet, rigorous evidence is lacking. We randomly assigned all train stations in the South West of England that experienced crime into treatment and controls conditions over a six-month period. Treatment consisted of directed patrol by uniformed, unarmed security agents. Hand-held trackers on every agent yielded precise measurements of all patrol time in the stations. Count-based regression models, estimated marginal means and odds-ratios are used to assess the effect of these patrols on crimes reported to the police by victims, as well as new crimes detected by police officers. Outcomes are measured at both specified target locations to which security guards were instructed to attend, as well as at the entire station complexes. Analyses show that 41% more patrol visits and 29% more minutes spent by security agents at treatment compared to control stations led to a significant 16% reduction in victim-generated crimes at the entirety of the stations' complexes, with a 49% increase in police-generated detections at the target locations. The findings illustrate the efficacy of private policing for crime prevention theory.

  18. Brain Painting: usability testing according to the user-centered design in end users with severe motor paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zickler, Claudia; Halder, Sebastian; Kleih, Sonja C; Herbert, Cornelia; Kübler, Andrea

    2013-10-01

    For many years the reestablishment of communication for people with severe motor paralysis has been in the focus of brain-computer interface (BCI) research. Recently applications for entertainment have also been developed. Brain Painting allows the user creative expression through painting pictures. The second, revised prototype of the BCI Brain Painting application was evaluated in its target function - free painting - and compared to the P300 spelling application by four end users with severe disabilities. According to the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), usability was evaluated in terms of effectiveness (accuracy), efficiency (information transfer rate (ITR)), utility metric, subjective workload (National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index (NASA TLX)) and user satisfaction (Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with assistive Technology (QUEST) 2.0 and Assistive Technology Device Predisposition Assessment (ATD PA), Device Form). The results revealed high performance levels (M≥80% accuracy) in the free painting and the copy painting conditions, ITRs (4.47-6.65bits/min) comparable to other P300 applications and only low to moderate workload levels (5-49 of 100), thereby proving that the complex task of free painting did neither impair performance nor impose insurmountable workload. Users were satisfied with the BCI Brain Painting application. Main obstacles for use in daily life were the system operability and the EEG cap, particularly the need of extensive support for adjustment. The P300 Brain Painting application can be operated with high effectiveness and efficiency. End users with severe motor paralysis would like to use the application in daily life. User-friendliness, specifically ease of use, is a mandatory necessity when bringing BCI to end users. Early and active involvement of users and iterative user-centered evaluation enable developers to work toward this goal. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  19. National Center for Combating Terrorism Strategic Plan, September 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2003-09-01

    National Center for Combating Terrorism Strategic Plan is to document the mission, vision, and goals for success; define the build plan; and describe initiatives that support the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Department of Defense, U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Department of Justice, intelligence community, National Governors Association, and other organizations or departments with combating terrorism training, testing, and technology responsibilities.

  20. Development and pilot testing of HIV screening program integration within public/primary health centers providing antenatal care services in Maharashtra, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindoria, Suchitra V; Devkar, Ramesh; Gupta, Indrani; Ranebennur, Virupax; Saggurti, Niranjan; Ramesh, Sowmya; Deshmukh, Dilip; Gaikwad, Sanjeevsingh

    2014-03-26

    The objectives of this paper are: (1) to study the feasibility and relative benefits of integrating the prevention of parent-to-child transmission (PPTCT) component of the National AIDS Control Program with the maternal and child health component of the National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) by offering HIV screening at the primary healthcare level; and (2) to estimate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio to understand whether the costs are commensurate with the benefits. The intervention included advocacy with political, administrative/health heads, and capacity building of health staff in Satara district, Maharashtra, India. The intervention also conducted biannual outreach activities at primary health centers (PHCs)/sub-centers (SCs); initiated facility-based integrated counseling and testing centers (FICTCs) at all round-the-clock PHCs; made the existing FICTCs functional and trained PHC nurses in HIV screening. All "functional" FICTCs were equipped to screen for HIV and trained staff provided counseling and conducted HIV testing as per the national protocol. Data were collected pre- and post- integration on the number of pregnant women screened for HIV, the number of functional FICTCs and intervention costs. Trend analyses on various outcome measures were conducted. Further, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio per pregnant woman screened was calculated. An additional 27% of HIV-infected women were detected during the intervention period as the annual HIV screening increased from pre- to post-intervention (55% to 79%, p < 0.001) among antenatal care (ANC) attendees under the NRHM. A greater increase in HIV screening was observed in PHCs/SCs. The proportions of functional FICTCs increased from 47% to 97% (p < 0.001). Additionally, 93% of HIV-infected pregnant women were linked to anti-retroviral therapy centers; 92% of mother-baby pairs received Nevirapine; and 89% of exposed babies were enrolled for early infant diagnosis. The incremental cost