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  1. APOBEC3 Interference during Replication of Viral Genomes

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    Luc Willems

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Co-evolution of viruses and their hosts has reached a fragile and dynamic equilibrium that allows viral persistence, replication and transmission. In response, infected hosts have developed strategies of defense that counteract the deleterious effects of viral infections. In particular, single-strand DNA editing by Apolipoprotein B Editing Catalytic subunits proteins 3 (APOBEC3s is a well-conserved mechanism of mammalian innate immunity that mutates and inactivates viral genomes. In this review, we describe the mechanisms of APOBEC3 editing during viral replication, the viral strategies that prevent APOBEC3 activity and the consequences of APOBEC3 modulation on viral fitness and host genome integrity. Understanding the mechanisms involved reveals new prospects for therapeutic intervention.

  2. Human Parvovirus B19 Utilizes Cellular DNA Replication Machinery for Viral DNA Replication.

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    Zou, Wei; Wang, Zekun; Xiong, Min; Chen, Aaron Yun; Xu, Peng; Ganaie, Safder S; Badawi, Yomna; Kleiboeker, Steve; Nishimune, Hiroshi; Ye, Shui Qing; Qiu, Jianming

    2017-12-13

    Human parvovirus B19 (B19V) infection of human erythroid progenitor cells (EPCs) induces a DNA damage response and cell cycle arrest at late S phase, which facilitates viral DNA replication. However, it is not clear exactly which cellular factors are employed by this single-stranded DNA virus. Here, we used microarrays to systematically analyze the dynamic transcriptome of EPCs infected with B19V. We found that DNA metabolism, DNA replication, DNA repair, DNA damage response, cell cycle, and cell cycle arrest pathways were significantly regulated after B19V infection. Confocal microscopy analyses revealed that most cellular DNA replication proteins were recruited to the centers of viral DNA replication, but not the DNA repair DNA polymerases. Our results suggest that DNA replication polymerase δ and polymerase α are responsible for B19V DNA replication by knocking down its expression in EPCs. We further showed that although RPA32 is essential for B19V DNA replication and the phosphorylated forms of RPA32 colocalized with the replicating viral genomes, RPA32 phosphorylation was not necessary for B19V DNA replication. Thus, this study provides evidence that B19V uses the cellular DNA replication machinery for viral DNA replication.IMPORTANCE Human parvovirus B19 (B19V) infection can cause transient aplastic crisis, persistent viremia, and pure red-cell aplasia. In fetuses, B19V infection can result in non-immune hydrops fetalis and fetal death. These clinical manifestations of B19V infection are a direct outcome of the death of human erythroid progenitors that host B19V replication. B19V infection induces a DNA damage response that is important for cell cycle arrest at late S phase. Here, we analyzed dynamic changes in cellular gene expression, and found that DNA metabolic processes are tightly regulated during B19V infection. Although genes involved in cellular DNA replication were downregulated overall, the cellular DNA replication machinery was tightly

  3. Replicative Homeostasis: A fundamental mechanism mediating selective viral replication and escape mutation

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    Sallie Richard

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hepatitis C (HCV, hepatitis B (HBV, the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV, and other viruses that replicate via RNA intermediaries, cause an enormous burden of disease and premature death worldwide. These viruses circulate within infected hosts as vast populations of closely related, but genetically diverse, molecules known as "quasispecies". The mechanism(s by which this extreme genetic and antigenic diversity is stably maintained are unclear, but are fundamental to understanding viral persistence and pathobiology. The persistence of HCV, an RNA virus, is especially problematic and HCV stability, maintained despite rapid genomic mutation, is highly paradoxical. This paper presents the hypothesis, and evidence, that viruses capable of persistent infection autoregulate replication and the likely mechanism mediating autoregulation – Replicative Homeostasis – is described. Replicative homeostasis causes formation of stable, but highly reactive, equilibria that drive quasispecies expansion and generates escape mutation. Replicative homeostasis explains both viral kinetics and the enigma of RNA quasispecies stability and provides a rational, mechanistic basis for all observed viral behaviours and host responses. More importantly, this paradigm has specific therapeutic implication and defines, precisely, new approaches to antiviral therapy. Replicative homeostasis may also modulate cellular gene expression.

  4. Chikungunya triggers an autophagic process which promotes viral replication

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    Briant Laurence

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chikungunya Virus (ChikV surprised by a massive re-emerging outbreak in Indian Ocean in 2006, reaching Europe in 2007 and exhibited exceptional severe physiopathology in infants and elderly patients. In this context, it is important to analyze the innate immune host responses triggered against ChikV. Autophagy has been shown to be an important component of the innate immune response and is involved in host defense elimination of different pathogens. However, the autophagic process was recently observed to be hijacked by virus for their own replication. Here we provide the first evidence that hallmarks of autophagy are specifically found in HEK.293 infected cells and are involved in ChikV replication. Methods To test the capacity of ChikV to mobilize the autophagic machinery, we performed fluorescence microscopy experiments on HEK.GFP.LC3 stable cells, and followed the LC3 distribution during the time course of ChikV infection. To confirm this, we performed electron microscopy on HEK.293 infected cells. To test the effect of ChikV-induced-autophagy on viral replication, we blocked the autophagic process, either by pharmacological (3-MA or genetic inhibition (siRNA against the transcript of Beclin 1, an autophagic protein, and analyzed the percentage of infected cells and the viral RNA load released in the supernatant. Moreover, the effect of induction of autophagy by Rapamycin on viral replication was tested. Results The increasing number of GFP-LC3 positive cells with a punctate staining together with the enhanced number of GFP-LC3 dots per cell showed that ChikV triggered an autophagic process in HEK.293 infected cells. Those results were confirmed by electron microscopy analysis since numerous membrane-bound vacuoles characteristic of autophagosomes were observed in infected cells. Moreover, we found that inhibition of autophagy, either by biochemical reagent and RNA interference, dramatically decreases ChikV replication

  5. Carbon monoxide and biliverdin suppress bovine viral diarrhoea virus replication.

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    Ma, Zhiqian; Pu, Fengxing; Zhang, Xiaobin; Yan, Yunhuan; Zhao, Lijuan; Zhang, Angke; Li, Na; Zhou, En-Min; Xiao, Shuqi

    2017-12-01

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) causes significant economic losses to the cattle industry worldwide. Previously, we demonstrated that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) can inhibit BVDV replication via an unknown molecular mechanism. To elucidate the mechanism involved, we assess whether the HO-1 downstream metabolites carbon monoxide (CO), biliverdin (BV) and iron affect BVDV replication. We treated Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells with an exogenous CO donor, CORM-2. We found that CORM-2 but not its inactive form (iCORM-2) inhibited BVDV replication in a dose-dependent and time duration-dependent manner, suggesting a CO-specific mediation of the CORM-2 antiviral effect. Direct incubation of BVDV with high-dose CORM-2 reduced virus titres, suggesting that CORM-2 attenuates BVDV growth by both physically inactivating virus particles in the extracellular environment and affecting intracellular BVDV replication, but mainly via an intracellular mechanism. Exogenous BV treatment, both post-infection and co-incubation with BVDV, inhibited BVDV replication in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that BV has potent antiviral activity against BVDV. Direct incubation of BVDV with BV had no significant effect on virus titres, indicating that BV is not virucidal and attenuates BVDV growth by affecting intracellular BVDV replication. Furthermore, BV was found to affect BVDV penetration but not attachment. However, increased iron via addition of FeCl3 did not interfere with BVDV replication. Collectively, the results of the present study demonstrate that the HO-1 metabolites BV and CO, but not iron, inhibit BVDV replication. These findings not only provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of HO-1 inhibition of BVDV replication but also suggest potential new control measures for future BVDV infection.

  6. Security in a Replicated Metadata Catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Koblitz, B

    2007-01-01

    The gLite-AMGA metadata has been developed by NA4 to provide simple relational metadata access for the EGEE user community. As advanced features, which will be the focus of this presentation, AMGA provides very fine-grained security also in connection with the built-in support for replication and federation of metadata. AMGA is extensively used by the biomedical community to store medical images metadata, digital libraries, in HEP for logging and bookkeeping data and in the climate community. The biomedical community intends to deploy a distributed metadata system for medical images consisting of various sites, which range from hospitals to computing centres. Only safe sharing of the highly sensitive metadata as provided in AMGA makes such a scenario possible. Other scenarios are digital libraries, which federate copyright protected (meta-) data into a common catalogue. The biomedical and digital libraries have been deployed using a centralized structure already for some time. They now intend to decentralize ...

  7. How to securely replicate services (preliminary version)

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    Reiter, Michael; Birman, Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    A method is presented for constructing replicated services that retain their availability and integrity despite several servers and clients being corrupted by an intruder, in addition to others failing benignly. More precisely, a service is replicated by 'n' servers in such a way that a correct client will accept a correct server's response if, for some prespecified parameter, k, at least k servers are correct and fewer than k servers are correct. The issue of maintaining causality among client requests is also addressed. A security breach resulting from an intruder's ability to effect a violation of causality in the sequence of requests processed by the service is illustrated. An approach to counter this problem is proposed that requires that fewer than k servers are corrupt and, to ensure liveness, that k is less than or = n - 2t, where t is the assumed maximum total number of both corruptions and benign failures suffered by servers in any system run. An important and novel feature of these schemes is that the client need not be able to identify or authenticate even a single server. Instead, the client is required only to possess at most two public keys for the service.

  8. Dynamics of viral replication in blood and lymphoid tissues during SIVmac251 infection of macaques

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    Mannioui Abdelkrim

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extensive studies of primary infection are crucial to our understanding of the course of HIV disease. In SIV-infected macaques, a model closely mimicking HIV pathogenesis, we used a combination of three markers -- viral RNA, 2LTR circles and viral DNA -- to evaluate viral replication and dissemination simultaneously in blood, secondary lymphoid tissues, and the gut during primary and chronic infections. Subsequent viral compartmentalization in the main target cells of the virus in peripheral blood during the chronic phase of infection was evaluated by cell sorting and viral quantification with the three markers studied. Results The evolutions of viral RNA, 2LTR circles and DNA levels were correlated in a given tissue during primary and early chronic infection. The decrease in plasma viral load principally reflects a large decrease in viral replication in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT, with viral RNA and DNA levels remaining stable in the spleen and peripheral lymph nodes. Later, during chronic infection, a progressive depletion of central memory CD4+ T cells from the peripheral blood was observed, accompanied by high levels of viral replication in the cells of this subtype. The virus was also found to replicate at this point in the infection in naive CD4+ T cells. Viral RNA was frequently detected in monocytes, but no SIV replication appeared to occur in these cells, as no viral DNA or 2LTR circles were detected. Conclusion We demonstrated the persistence of viral replication and dissemination, mostly in secondary lymphoid tissues, during primary and early chronic infection. During chronic infection, the central memory CD4+ T cells were the major site of viral replication in peripheral blood, but viral replication also occurred in naive CD4+ T cells. The role of monocytes seemed to be limited to carrying the virus as a cargo because there was an observed lack of replication in these cells. These data may have important

  9. Replication-Coupled Recruitment of Viral and Cellular Factors to Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Replication Forks for the Maintenance and Expression of Viral Genomes.

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    Dembowski, Jill A; Dremel, Sarah E; DeLuca, Neal A

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infects over half the human population. Much of the infectious cycle occurs in the nucleus of cells where the virus has evolved mechanisms to manipulate host processes for the production of virus. The genome of HSV-1 is coordinately expressed, maintained, and replicated such that progeny virions are produced within 4-6 hours post infection. In this study, we selectively purify HSV-1 replication forks and associated proteins from virus-infected cells and identify select viral and cellular replication, repair, and transcription factors that associate with viral replication forks. Pulse chase analyses and imaging studies reveal temporal and spatial dynamics between viral replication forks and associated proteins and demonstrate that several DNA repair complexes and key transcription factors are recruited to or near replication forks. Consistent with these observations we show that the initiation of viral DNA replication is sufficient to license late gene transcription. These data provide insight into mechanisms that couple HSV-1 DNA replication with transcription and repair for the coordinated expression and maintenance of the viral genome.

  10. Kinetics of viral replication and local and systemic immune responses in experimental rotavirus infection.

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    Eydelloth, R S; Vonderfecht, S L; Sheridan, J F; Enders, L D; Yolken, R H

    1984-01-01

    Rotavirus-seronegative mice were orally inoculated with murine rotavirus in order to study the kinetics of rotavirus replication and the relationship of viral replication to immunity and disease and to assess the effects of local and systemic antibodies on viral clearance and disease resolution.

  11. Kinetics of viral replication and local and systemic immune responses in experimental rotavirus infection.

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    Eydelloth, R S; Vonderfecht, S L; Sheridan, J F; Enders, L D; Yolken, R H

    1984-06-01

    Rotavirus-seronegative mice were orally inoculated with murine rotavirus in order to study the kinetics of rotavirus replication and the relationship of viral replication to immunity and disease and to assess the effects of local and systemic antibodies on viral clearance and disease resolution.

  12. Plum Pox Virus 6K1 Protein Is Required for Viral Replication and Targets the Viral Replication Complex at the Early Stage of Infection.

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    Cui, Hongguang; Wang, Aiming

    2016-05-15

    The potyviral RNA genome encodes two polyproteins that are proteolytically processed by three viral protease domains into 11 mature proteins. Extensive molecular studies have identified functions for the majority of the viral proteins. For example, 6K2, one of the two smallest potyviral proteins, is an integral membrane protein and induces the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-originated replication vesicles that target the chloroplast for robust viral replication. However, the functional role of 6K1, the other smallest protein, remains uncharacterized. In this study, we developed a series of recombinant full-length viral cDNA clones derived from a Canadian Plum pox virus (PPV) isolate. We found that deletion of any of the short motifs of 6K1 (each of which ranged from 5 to 13 amino acids), most of the 6K1 sequence (but with the conserved sequence of the cleavage sites being retained), or all of the 6K1 sequence in the PPV infectious clone abolished viral replication. The trans expression of 6K1 or the cis expression of a dislocated 6K1 failed to rescue the loss-of-replication phenotype, suggesting the temporal and spatial requirement of 6K1 for viral replication. Disruption of the N- or C-terminal cleavage site of 6K1, which prevented the release of 6K1 from the polyprotein, either partially or completely inhibited viral replication, suggesting the functional importance of the mature 6K1. We further found that green fluorescent protein-tagged 6K1 formed punctate inclusions at the viral early infection stage and colocalized with chloroplast-bound viral replicase elements 6K2 and NIb. Taken together, our results suggest that 6K1 is required for viral replication and is an important viral element of the viral replication complex at the early infection stage. Potyviruses account for more than 30% of known plant viruses and consist of many agriculturally important viruses. The genomes of potyviruses encode two polyproteins that are proteolytically processed into 11 mature

  13. Control of viral replication and transcription by the papillomavirus E8^E2 protein.

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    Dreer, Marcel; van de Poel, Saskia; Stubenrauch, Frank

    2017-03-02

    Human papillomaviruses have adjusted their replication levels to the differentiation state of the infected keratinocyte. PV genomes replicate in undifferentiated cells at low levels and to high levels in differentiated cells. Genome replication requires the viral E1 helicase and the viral E2 transcription/replication activator. The limited replication in undifferentiated cells is predominantly due to the expression of the highly conserved E8^E2 viral repressor protein, which is a fusion between E8 and the C-terminal half of the E2 protein. E8^E2 is a sequence-specific DNA binding protein that inhibits viral gene expression and viral genome replication. The E8 domain is required for repression activities, which are mainly due to the interaction with cellular NCoR/SMRT corepressor complexes. In the case of HPV16, the most carcinogenic HPV type, E8^E2 not only limits genome replication in undifferentiated cells but also productive replication in differentiated epithelium. E8^E2 is expressed from a separate promoter that is controlled by unknown cellular factors and the viral transcription and replication regulators E1, E2 and E8^E2. In summary, E8^E2 is an important negative regulator whose levels may be critical for the outcome of HPV infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Human Papilloma Viral DNA Replicates as a Stable Episome in Cultured Epidermal Keratinocytes

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    Laporta, Robert F.; Taichman, Lorne B.

    1982-06-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) is poorly understood because systems for its growth in tissue culture have not been developed. We report here that cultured human epidermal keratinocytes could be infected with HPV from plantar warts and that the viral DNA persisted and replicated as a stable episome. There were 50-200 copies of viral DNA per cell and there was no evidence to indicate integration of viral DNA into the cellular genome. There was also no evidence to suggest that viral DNA underwent productive replication. We conclude that cultured human epidermal keratinocytes may be a model for the study of certain aspects of HPV biology.

  15. Effects of Interferon-α/β on HBV Replication Determined by Viral Load

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    Tian, Yongjun; Chen, Wen-ling; Ou, Jing-hsiung James

    2011-01-01

    Interferons α and β (IFN-α/β) are type I interferons produced by the host to control microbial infections. However, the use of IFN-α to treat hepatitis B virus (HBV) patients generated sustained response to only a minority of patients. By using HBV transgenic mice as a model and by using hydrodynamic injection to introduce HBV DNA into the mouse liver, we studied the effect of IFN-α/β on HBV in vivo. Interestingly, our results indicated that IFN-α/β could have opposite effects on HBV: they suppressed HBV replication when viral load was high and enhanced HBV replication when viral load was low. IFN-α/β apparently suppressed HBV replication via transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulations. In contrast, IFN-α/β enhanced viral replication by inducing the transcription factor HNF3γ and activating STAT3, which together stimulated HBV gene expression and replication. Further studies revealed an important role of IFN-α/β in stimulating viral growth and prolonging viremia when viral load is low. This use of an innate immune response to enhance its replication and persistence may represent a novel strategy that HBV uses to enhance its growth and spread in the early stage of viral infection when the viral level is low. PMID:21829354

  16. Determining host metabolic limitations on viral replication via integrated modeling and experimental perturbation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa W Birch

    Full Text Available Viral replication relies on host metabolic machinery and precursors to produce large numbers of progeny - often very rapidly. A fundamental example is the infection of Escherichia coli by bacteriophage T7. The resource draw imposed by viral replication represents a significant and complex perturbation to the extensive and interconnected network of host metabolic pathways. To better understand this system, we have integrated a set of structured ordinary differential equations quantifying T7 replication and an E. coli flux balance analysis metabolic model. Further, we present here an integrated simulation algorithm enforcing mutual constraint by the models across the entire duration of phage replication. This method enables quantitative dynamic prediction of virion production given only specification of host nutritional environment, and predictions compare favorably to experimental measurements of phage replication in multiple environments. The level of detail of our computational predictions facilitates exploration of the dynamic changes in host metabolic fluxes that result from viral resource consumption, as well as analysis of the limiting processes dictating maximum viral progeny production. For example, although it is commonly assumed that viral infection dynamics are predominantly limited by the amount of protein synthesis machinery in the host, our results suggest that in many cases metabolic limitation is at least as strict. Taken together, these results emphasize the importance of considering viral infections in the context of host metabolism.

  17. COPI activity coupled with fatty acid biosynthesis is required for viral replication.

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    Sara Cherry

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available During infection by diverse viral families, RNA replication occurs on the surface of virally induced cytoplasmic membranes of cellular origin. How this process is regulated, and which cellular factors are required, has been unclear. Moreover, the host-pathogen interactions that facilitate the formation of this new compartment might represent critical determinants of viral pathogenesis, and their elucidation may lead to novel insights into the coordination of vesicular trafficking events during infection. Here we show that in Drosophila cells, Drosophila C virus remodels the Golgi apparatus and forms a novel vesicular compartment, on the surface of which viral RNA replication takes place. Using genome-wide RNA interference screening, we found that this step in the viral lifecycle requires at least two host encoded pathways: the coat protein complex I (COPI coatamer and fatty acid biosynthesis. Our results integrate, clarify, and extend numerous observations concerning the cell biology of viral replication, allowing us to conclude that the coupling of new cellular membrane formation with the budding of these vesicles from the Golgi apparatus allows for the regulated generation of this new virogenic organelle, which is essential for viral replication. Additionally, because these pathways are also limiting in flies and in human cells infected with the related RNA virus poliovirus, they may represent novel targets for antiviral therapies.

  18. Arrest of Viral Proliferation by Ectopic Copies of Its Cognate Replication Origin

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    Manuel S. Valenzuela

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The initiation step of DNA replication is the crucial determinant of proliferation in all organisms. This step depends on the specific interaction of DNA sequences present at origins of DNA replication and their cognate activators. We wished to explore the hypothesis that the presence of ectopic origin copies may interfere with proper genome duplication. Bacteriophage λ was used as a model system. To this end, the outcome of an infection of an E. coli strain harboring ectopic copies of the λ origin region was analyzed. By measuring the effect on the host growth, viral production, and electro-microscopic visualization of the resulting λ replicative intermediates, we concluded that the ectopic copies had prevented the normal initiation step of λ DNA replication. These results suggest that DNA decoys encoding viral origins could constitute effective tools to specifically arrest viral proliferation.

  19. Intracellular Detection of Viral Transcription and Replication Using RNA FISH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-26

    a different fluorophore. II. Cell culture and infection conditions. Cells must be plated on an appropriate substrate for subsequent microscopy...Only.. Vero cells infected with Ebola virus were fixed in methanol. Viral RNA (red) was detected using a 5 minute RNA FISH incubation with...hybridization buffer containing RNA FISH probes and DAPI. Cells were imaged on a confocal microscope with a 10x air objective (top left), a 20x air objective

  20. Uracil DNA glycosylase BKRF3 contributes to Epstein-Barr virus DNA replication through physical interactions with proteins in viral DNA replication complex.

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    Su, Mei-Tzu; Liu, I-Hua; Wu, Chia-Wei; Chang, Shu-Ming; Tsai, Ching-Hwa; Yang, Pei-Wen; Chuang, Yu-Chia; Lee, Chung-Pei; Chen, Mei-Ru

    2014-08-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BKRF3 shares sequence homology with members of the uracil-N-glycosylase (UNG) protein family and has DNA glycosylase activity. Here, we explored how BKRF3 participates in the DNA replication complex and contributes to viral DNA replication. Exogenously expressed Flag-BKRF3 was distributed mostly in the cytoplasm, whereas BKRF3 was translocated into the nucleus and colocalized with the EBV DNA polymerase BALF5 in the replication compartment during EBV lytic replication. The expression level of BKRF3 increased gradually during viral replication, coupled with a decrease of cellular UNG2, suggesting BKRF3 enzyme activity compensates for UNG2 and ensures the fidelity of viral DNA replication. In immunoprecipitation-Western blotting, BKRF3 was coimmuno-precipitated with BALF5, the polymerase processivity factor BMRF1, and the immediate-early transactivator Rta. Coexpression of BMRF1 appeared to facilitate the nuclear targeting of BKRF3 in immunofluorescence staining. Residues 164 to 255 of BKRF3 were required for interaction with Rta and BALF5, whereas residues 81 to 166 of BKRF3 were critical for BMRF1 interaction in glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown experiments. Viral DNA replication was defective in cells harboring BKRF3 knockout EBV bacmids. In complementation assays, the catalytic mutant BKRF3(Q90L,D91N) restored viral DNA replication, whereas the leucine loop mutant BKRF3(H213L) only partially rescued viral DNA replication, coupled with a reduced ability to interact with the viral DNA polymerase and Rta. Our data suggest that BKRF3 plays a critical role in viral DNA synthesis predominantly through its interactions with viral proteins in the DNA replication compartment, while its enzymatic activity may be supplementary for uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG) function during virus replication. Catalytic activities of both cellular UDG UNG2 and viral UDGs contribute to herpesviral DNA replication. To ensure that the enzyme activity executes at

  1. Uracil DNA Glycosylase BKRF3 Contributes to Epstein-Barr Virus DNA Replication through Physical Interactions with Proteins in Viral DNA Replication Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Mei-Tzu; Liu, I-Hua; Wu, Chia-Wei; Chang, Shu-Ming; Tsai, Ching-Hwa; Yang, Pei-Wen; Chuang, Yu-Chia; Lee, Chung-Pei

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BKRF3 shares sequence homology with members of the uracil-N-glycosylase (UNG) protein family and has DNA glycosylase activity. Here, we explored how BKRF3 participates in the DNA replication complex and contributes to viral DNA replication. Exogenously expressed Flag-BKRF3 was distributed mostly in the cytoplasm, whereas BKRF3 was translocated into the nucleus and colocalized with the EBV DNA polymerase BALF5 in the replication compartment during EBV lytic replication. The expression level of BKRF3 increased gradually during viral replication, coupled with a decrease of cellular UNG2, suggesting BKRF3 enzyme activity compensates for UNG2 and ensures the fidelity of viral DNA replication. In immunoprecipitation-Western blotting, BKRF3 was coimmunoprecipitated with BALF5, the polymerase processivity factor BMRF1, and the immediate-early transactivator Rta. Coexpression of BMRF1 appeared to facilitate the nuclear targeting of BKRF3 in immunofluorescence staining. Residues 164 to 255 of BKRF3 were required for interaction with Rta and BALF5, whereas residues 81 to 166 of BKRF3 were critical for BMRF1 interaction in glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown experiments. Viral DNA replication was defective in cells harboring BKRF3 knockout EBV bacmids. In complementation assays, the catalytic mutant BKRF3(Q90L,D91N) restored viral DNA replication, whereas the leucine loop mutant BKRF3(H213L) only partially rescued viral DNA replication, coupled with a reduced ability to interact with the viral DNA polymerase and Rta. Our data suggest that BKRF3 plays a critical role in viral DNA synthesis predominantly through its interactions with viral proteins in the DNA replication compartment, while its enzymatic activity may be supplementary for uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG) function during virus replication. IMPORTANCE Catalytic activities of both cellular UDG UNG2 and viral UDGs contribute to herpesviral DNA replication. To ensure that the enzyme

  2. Correlative light and electron microscopy enables viral replication studies at the ultrastructural level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellström, Kirsi; Vihinen, Helena; Kallio, Katri; Jokitalo, Eija; Ahola, Tero

    2015-11-15

    Electron microscopy (EM) is a powerful tool to study structural changes within cells caused e.g. by ectopic protein expression, gene silencing or virus infection. Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) has proven to be useful in cases when it is problematic to identify a particular cell among a majority of unaffected cells at the EM level. In this technique the cells of interest are first identified by fluorescence microscopy and then further processed for EM. CLEM has become crucial when studying positive-strand RNA virus replication, as it takes place in nanoscale replication sites on specific cellular membranes. Here we have employed CLEM for Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replication studies both by transfecting viral replication components to cells or by infecting different cell types. For the transfection-based system, we developed an RNA template that can be detected in the cells even in the absence of replication and thus allows exploration of lethal mutations in viral proteins. In infected mammalian and mosquito cells, we were able to find replication-positive cells by using a fluorescently labeled viral protein even in the cases of low infection efficiency. The fluorescent region within these cells was shown to correspond to an area rich in modified membranes. These results show that CLEM is a valuable technique for studying virus replication and membrane modifications at the ultrastructural level. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. (Mechanisms of inhibition of viral replication in plants)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    During the last year we have made a number of important observations in the fields of virology and plant molecular biology. By directly sequencing Tomato Mosaic Virus (ToMV) movement genes, previously undetected sequence alterations common to specific viral strains were found. The difficulty in regenerating transgenic tomato plants containing the Tm-2 gene was overcome. Tobacco plants transformed with Cucumber Mosaic Virus (CMV) are being characterized. Analysis of transgenic tobacco plants expressing CMV coat protein have shown no correlation between coat protein expression and level of resistance. Specific amino acid changes have been found to correlate with CMV resistance breaking and degree of pathogenicity. Satellite RNAs are shown to be too unstable for use as a biological control agent. The aphid transmission domain CMV has been localized to one (or more) of three amino acids; constructs have been made to determine the exact amino acids involved. 15 refs.

  4. Cellular DDX3 regulates Japanese encephalitis virus replication by interacting with viral un-translated regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Ge, Ling-ling; Li, Peng-peng; Wang, Yue; Dai, Juan-juan; Sun, Ming-xia; Huang, Li; Shen, Zhi-qiang; Hu, Xiao-chun; Ishag, Hassan; Mao, Xiang

    2014-01-20

    Japanese encephalitis virus is one of the most common causes for epidemic viral encephalitis in humans and animals. Herein we demonstrated that cellular helicase DDX3 is involved in JEV replication. DDX3 knockdown inhibits JEV replication. The helicase activity of DDX3 is crucial for JEV replication. GST-pulldown and co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that DDX3 could interact with JEV non-structural proteins 3 and 5. Co-immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy analysis confirmed that DDX3 interacts and colocalizes with these viral proteins and viral RNA during the infection. We determined that DDX3 binds to JEV 5' and 3' un-translated regions. We used a JEV-replicon system to demonstrate that DDX3 positively regulates viral RNA translation, which might affect viral RNA replication at the late stage of virus infection. Collectively, we identified that DDX3 is necessary for JEV infection, suggesting that DDX3 might be a novel target to design new antiviral agents against JEV or other flavivirus infections. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Development of replication-competent viral vectors for HIV vaccine delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Christopher L; Picker, Louis J; King, C Richter

    2013-09-01

    To briefly describe some of the replication-competent vectors being investigated for development of candidate HIV vaccines focusing primarily on technologies that have advanced to testing in macaques or have entered clinical trials. Replication-competent viral vectors have advanced to the stage at which decisions can be made regarding the future development of HIV vaccines. The viruses being used as replication-competent vector platforms vary considerably, and their unique attributes make it possible to test multiple vaccine design concepts and also mimic various aspects of an HIV infection. Replication-competent viral vectors encoding simian immunodeficiency virus or HIV proteins can be used to safely immunize macaques, and in some cases, there is evidence of significant vaccine efficacy in challenge protection studies. Several live HIV vaccine vectors are in clinical trials to evaluate immunogenicity, safety, the effect of mucosal delivery, and potential effects of preexisting immunity. A variety of DNA and RNA viruses are being used to develop replication-competent viral vectors for HIV vaccine delivery. Multiple viral vector platforms have proven to be well tolerated and immunogenic with evidence of efficacy in macaques. Some of the more advanced HIV vaccine prototypes based on vesicular stomatitis virus, vaccinia virus, measles virus, and Sendai virus are in clinical trials.

  6. Manipulating 3D-Printed and Paper Models Enhances Student Understanding of Viral Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couper, Lisa; Johannes, Kristen; Powers, Jackie; Silberglitt, Matt; Davenport, Jodi

    2016-01-01

    Understanding key concepts in molecular biology requires reasoning about molecular processes that are not directly observable and, as such, presents a challenge to students and teachers. We ask whether novel interactive physical models and activities can help students understand key processes in viral replication. Our 3D tangible models are…

  7. Replication of an incomplete alfalfa mosaic virus genome in plants transformed with viral replicase genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taschner, P. E.; van der Kuyl, A. C.; Neeleman, L.; Bol, J. F.

    1991-01-01

    RNAs 1 and 2 of alfalfa mosaic virus (AIMV) encode proteins P1 and P2, respectively, both of which have a putative role in viral RNA replication. Tobacco plants were transformed with DNA copies of RNA1 (P1-plants), RNA2 (P2-plants) or a combination of these two cDNAs (P12-plants). All transgenic

  8. Influenza Virus Induces Inflammatory Response in Mouse Primary Cortical Neurons with Limited Viral Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gefei Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike stereotypical neurotropic viruses, influenza A viruses have been detected in the brain tissues of human and animal models. To investigate the interaction between neurons and influenza A viruses, mouse cortical neurons were isolated, infected with human H1N1 influenza virus, and then examined for the production of various inflammatory molecules involved in immune response. We found that replication of the influenza virus in neurons was limited, although early viral transcription was not affected. Virus-induced neuron viability decreased at 6 h postinfection (p.i. but increased at 24 h p.i. depending upon the viral strain. Virus-induced apoptosis and cytopathy in primary cortical neurons were not apparent at 24 h p.i. The mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and type I interferons were upregulated at 6 h and 24 h p.i. These results indicate that the influenza virus induces inflammatory response in mouse primary cortical neurons with limited viral replication. The cytokines released in viral infection-induced neuroinflammation might play critical roles in influenza encephalopathy, rather than in viral replication-induced cytopathy.

  9. Insights into the functional characteristics of geminivirus rolling-circle replication initiator protein and its interaction with host factors affecting viral DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Irum; Choudhury, Nirupam Roy; Tuteja, Narendra

    2015-02-01

    Geminiviruses are DNA viruses that infect several economically important crops, resulting in a reduction in their overall yield. These plant viruses have circular, single-stranded DNA genomes that replicate mainly by a rolling-circle mechanism. Geminivirus infection results in crosstalk between viral and cellular factors to complete the viral life cycle or counteract the infection as part of defense mechanisms of host plants. The geminiviral replication initiator protein Rep is the only essential viral factor required for replication. It is multifunctional and is known to interact with a number of host factors to modulate the cellular environment or to function as a part of the replication machinery. This review provides a holistic view of the research related to the viral Rep protein and various host factors involved in geminiviral DNA replication. Studies on the promiscuous nature of geminiviral satellite DNAs are also reviewed.

  10. Viral DNA replication-dependent DNA damage response activation during BK polyomavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhalen, Brandy; Justice, Joshua L; Imperiale, Michael J; Jiang, Mengxi

    2015-05-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) reactivation is associated with severe human disease in kidney and bone marrow transplant patients. The interplay between viral and host factors that regulates the productive infection process remains poorly understood. We have previously reported that the cellular DNA damage response (DDR) is activated upon lytic BKPyV infection and that its activation is required for optimal viral replication in primary kidney epithelial cells. In this report, we set out to determine what viral components are responsible for activating the two major phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-like kinases (PI3KKs) involved in the DDR: ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase and ATM and Rad3-related (ATR) kinase. Using a combination of UV treatment, lentivirus transduction, and mutant virus infection experiments, our results demonstrate that neither the input virus nor the expression of large T antigen (TAg) alone is sufficient to trigger the activation of ATM or ATR in our primary culture model. Instead, our data suggest that the activation of both the ATM- and ATR-mediated DDR pathways is linked to viral DNA replication. Intriguingly, a TAg mutant virus that is unable to activate the DDR causes substantial host DNA damage. Our study provides insight into how DDRs are activated by polyomaviruses in primary cells with intact cell cycle checkpoints and how the activation might be linked to the maintenance of host genome stability. Polyomaviruses are opportunistic pathogens that are associated with several human diseases under immunosuppressed conditions. BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) affects mostly kidney and bone marrow transplant patients. The detailed replication mechanism of these viruses remains to be determined. We have previously reported that BKPyV activates the host DNA damage response (DDR), a response normally used by the host cell to combat genotoxic stress, to aid its own replication. In this study, we identified that the trigger for DDR activation is viral

  11. Analysis of the viral replication cycle of adenovirus serotype 2 after inactivation by free chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, Aimee M; Shisler, Joanna L; Mariñas, Benito J

    2015-04-07

    Free chlorine is effective at inactivating a wide range of waterborne viral pathogens including human adenovirus (HAdV), but the mechanisms by which free chlorine inactivates HAdV and other human viruses remain to be elucidated. Such advances in fundamental knowledge are key for development of new disinfection technologies and novel sensors to detect infectious viruses in drinking water. We developed and tested a quantitative assay to analyze several steps in the HAdV replication cycle upon increasing free chlorine exposure. We used quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to detect HAdV genomic DNA as a means to quantify attachment and genome replication of untreated and treated virions. Also, we used quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) to quantify the transcription of E1A (first early protein) and hexon mRNA. We compared these replication cycle events to virus inactivation kinetics to determine what stage of the virus replication cycle was inhibited as a function of free chlorine exposure. We observed that adenovirus inactivated at levels up to 99.99% by free chlorine still attached to host cells; however, viral DNA synthesis and early E1A and late hexon gene transcription were inhibited. We conclude that free chlorine exposure interferes with a replication cycle event occurring postbinding but prior to early viral protein synthesis.

  12. An interferon-independent lncRNA promotes viral replication by modulating cellular metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pin; Xu, Junfang; Wang, Yujia; Cao, Xuetao

    2017-11-24

    Viruses regulate host metabolic networks to improve their survival. The molecules that are responsive to viral infection and regulate such metabolic changes are hardly known, but are essential for understanding viral infection. Here we identify a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) that is induced by multiple viruses, but not by type I interferon (IFN-I), and facilitates viral replication in mouse and human cells. In vivo deficiency of lncRNA-ACOD1 (a lncRNA identified by its nearest coding gene Acod1, aconitate decarboxylase 1) significantly attenuates viral infection through IFN-I-IRF3 (interferon regulatory factor 3)-independent pathways. Cytoplasmic lncRNA-ACOD1 directly binds the metabolic enzyme glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT2) near the substrate niche, enhancing its catalytic activity. Recombinant GOT2 protein and its metabolites could rescue viral replication upon lncRNA-ACOD1 deficiency and increase lethality. This work reveals a feedback mechanism of virus-induced lncRNA-mediated metabolic promotion of viral infection and a potential target for developing broad-acting antiviral therapeutics. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  13. Rheum emodin inhibits enterovirus 71 viral replication and affects the host cell cycle environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Ting; Zhang, Li-Ying; Wang, Zeng-Yan; Wang, Yue; Song, Feng-Mei; Zhang, Ya-Hong; Yu, Jing-Hua

    2017-03-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the primary causative agent of recent large-scale outbreaks of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) in Asia. Currently, there are no drugs available for the prevention and treatment of HFMD. In this study, we compared the anti-EV71 activities of three natural compounds, rheum emodin, artemisinin and astragaloside extracted from Chinese herbs Chinese rhubarb, Artemisia carvifolia and Astragalus, respectively, which have been traditionally used for the treatment and prevention of epidemic diseases. Human lung fibroblast cell line MRC5 was mock-infected or infected with EV71, and treated with drugs. The cytotoxicity of the drugs was detected with MTT assay. The cytopathic effects such as cell death and condensed nuclei were morphologically observed. The VP1-coding sequence required for EV71 genome replication was assayed with qRT-PCR. Viral protein expression was analyzed with Western blotting. Viral TCID50 was determined to evaluate EV71 virulence. Flow cytometry analysis of propidium iodide staining was performed to analyze the cell cycle distribution of MRC5 cells. Rheum emodin (29.6 μmol/L) effectively protected MRC5 cells from EV71-induced cytopathic effects, which resulted from the inhibiting viral replication: rheum emodin treatment decreased viral genomic levels by 5.34-fold, viral protein expression by less than 30-fold and EV71 virulence by 0.33107-fold. The fact that inhibition of rheum emodin on viral virulence was much stronger than its effects on genomic levels and viral protein expression suggested that rheum emodin inhibited viral maturation. Furthermore, rheum emodin treatment markedly diminished cell cycle arrest at S phase in MRC5 cells, which was induced by EV71 infection and favored the viral replication. In contrast, neither astragaloside (50 μmol/L) nor artemisinin (50 μmol/L) showed similar anti-EV71 activities. Among the three natural compounds tested, rheum emodin effectively suppressed EV71 viral replication

  14. Dexamethasone treatment decreases replication of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus in Epithelioma papulosum cyprini cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Sun; Lee, Su Jin; Choi, Seung Hyuk; Kang, Yue Jai; Kim, Ki Hong

    2017-05-01

    The expression of Mx1 in EPC cells after treatment with poly(I:C) or infection with viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) was significantly suppressed by treatment with dexamethasone. However, the titer of VHSV did not increase but instead decreased after dexamethasone treatment. This suggests that dexamethasone not only downregulates type I IFN but also affects certain factors that are necessary for VHSV replication. An important effect of HSP90 on replication of RNA viruses and downregulation of HSP90 by glucocorticoids have been reported. In this study, dexamethasone downregulated HSP90α expression in EPC cells that were stimulated with poly(I:C) or infected with VHSV. Furthermore, cells treated with an HSP90 inhibitor, geldanamycin, showed significantly decreased titers of VHSV, suggesting that HSP90 may be an important host component involved in VHSV replication, and HSP90 inhibition might be one of the causes for the observed reduction in viral titer caused by dexamethasone treatment.

  15. Adenovirus-encoding virus-associated RNAs suppress HDGF gene expression to support efficient viral replication.

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    Saki Kondo

    Full Text Available Non-coding small RNAs are involved in many physiological responses including viral life cycles. Adenovirus-encoding small RNAs, known as virus-associated RNAs (VA RNAs, are transcribed throughout the replication process in the host cells, and their transcript levels depend on the copy numbers of the viral genome. Therefore, VA RNAs are abundant in infected cells after genome replication, i.e. during the late phase of viral infection. Their function during the late phase is the inhibition of interferon-inducible protein kinase R (PKR activity to prevent antiviral responses; recently, mivaRNAs, the microRNAs processed from VA RNAs, have been reported to inhibit cellular gene expression. Although VA RNA transcription starts during the early phase, little is known about its function. The reason may be because much smaller amount of VA RNAs are transcribed during the early phase than the late phase. In this study, we applied replication-deficient adenovirus vectors (AdVs and novel AdVs lacking VA RNA genes to analyze the expression changes in cellular genes mediated by VA RNAs using microarray analysis. AdVs are suitable to examine the function of VA RNAs during the early phase, since they constitutively express VA RNAs but do not replicate except in 293 cells. We found that the expression level of hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF significantly decreased in response to the VA RNAs under replication-deficient condition, and this suppression was also observed during the early phase under replication-competent conditions. The suppression was independent of mivaRNA-induced downregulation, suggesting that the function of VA RNAs during the early phase differs from that during the late phase. Notably, overexpression of HDGF inhibited AdV growth. This is the first report to show the function, in part, of VA RNAs during the early phase that may be contribute to efficient viral growth.

  16. Viral hijacking of a replicative helicase loader and its implications for helicase loading control and phage replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hood, Iris V.; Berger, James M.

    2016-05-31

    Replisome assembly requires the loading of replicative hexameric helicases onto origins by AAA+ ATPases. How loader activity is appropriately controlled remains unclear. Here, we use structural and biochemical analyses to establish how an antimicrobial phage protein interferes with the function of theStaphylococcus aureusreplicative helicase loader, DnaI. The viral protein binds to the loader’s AAA+ ATPase domain, allowing binding of the host replicative helicase but impeding loader self-assembly and ATPase activity. Close inspection of the complex highlights an unexpected locus for the binding of an interdomain linker element in DnaI/DnaC-family proteins. We find that the inhibitor protein is genetically coupled to a phage-encoded homolog of the bacterial helicase loader, which we show binds to the host helicase but not to the inhibitor itself. These findings establish a new approach by which viruses can hijack host replication processes and explain how loader activity is internally regulated to prevent aberrant auto-association.

  17. Polycomb repressive complex 2 targets murine cytomegalovirus chromatin for modification and associates with viral replication centers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher G Abraham

    Full Text Available Regulation of viral transcription by chromatin structure has emerged as a fundamental determinant in the establishment of lytic and latent herpesvirus infections. The Polycomb group (PcG of epigenetic repressors promotes heterochromatin formation by trimethylating histone H3 on lysine-27 (H3K27me3 and regulates development, stem cell renewal and differentiation and the cell cycle. These cellular processes are tightly coupled to the molecular switch between lytic and latent herpesvirus infections. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, we observed enrichment of H3K27me3 at the major immediate-early (MIE locus of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV very early following infection of permissive fibroblasts. As lytic replication progressed, we observed a loss of H3K27me3 enrichment concomitant with the appearance of H3K4me3. However, late during infection, as viral replication centers are established, we observed a significant increase in PcG protein association with chromatin. Additionally, in co-immunofluorescence assays using confocal microscopy, we detected strong enrichments for PcG protein within the viral replication compartment, suggesting an association between viral DNA synthesis machinery and PcG proteins. Together, our results suggest a novel, dynamic interaction between PcG epigenetic repressors and MCMV genomes.

  18. Host DNA damage response factors localize to merkel cell polyomavirus DNA replication sites to support efficient viral DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Sabrina H; Wang, Xin; Li, Jing; Buck, Christopher B; You, Jianxin

    2014-03-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates a role for Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) in the development of Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), making MCPyV the first polyomavirus to be clearly associated with human cancer. With the high prevalence of MCPyV infection and the increasing amount of MCC diagnosis, there is a need to better understand the virus and its oncogenic potential. In this study, we examined the relationship between the host DNA damage response (DDR) and MCPyV replication. We found that components of the ATM- and ATR-mediated DDR pathways accumulate in MCPyV large T antigen (LT)-positive nuclear foci in cells infected with native MCPyV virions. To further study MCPyV replication, we employed our previously established system, in which recombinant MCPyV episomal DNA is autonomously replicated in cultured cells. Similar to native MCPyV infection, where both MCPyV origin and LT are present, the host DDR machinery colocalized with LT in distinct nuclear foci. Immunofluorescence in situ hybridization and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation analysis showed that these DDR proteins and MCPyV LT in fact colocalized at the actively replicating MCPyV replication complexes, which were absent when a replication-defective LT mutant or an MCPyV-origin mutant was introduced in place of wild-type LT or wild-type viral origin. Inhibition of DDR kinases using chemical inhibitors and ATR/ATM small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown reduced MCPyV DNA replication without significantly affecting LT expression or the host cell cycle. This study demonstrates that these host DDR factors are important for MCPyV DNA replication, providing new insight into the host machinery involved in the MCPyV life cycle. MCPyV is the first polyomavirus to be clearly associated with human cancer. However, the MCPyV life cycle and its oncogenic mechanism remain poorly understood. In this report, we show that, in cells infected with native MCPyV virions, components of the ATM- and ATR-mediated DDR

  19. The critical protein interactions and structures that elicit growth deregulation in cancer and viral replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Horng D.; May, Andrew P.

    2010-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in biomedicine is to define the critical targets and network interactions that are subverted to elicit growth deregulation in human cells. Understanding and developing rational treatments for cancer requires a definition of the key molecular targets and how they interact to elicit the complex growth deregulation phenotype. Viral proteins provide discerning and powerful probes to understand both how cells work and how they can be manipulated using a minimal number of components. The small DNA viruses have evolved to target inherent weaknesses in cellular protein interaction networks to hijack the cellular DNA and protein replication machinery. In the battle to escape the inevitability of senescence and programmed cell death, cancers have converged on similar mechanisms, through the acquisition and selection of somatic mutations that drive unchecked cellular replication in tumors. Understanding the dynamic mechanisms through which a minimal number of viral proteins promote host cells to undergo unscheduled and pathological replication is a powerful strategy to identify critical targets that are also disrupted in cancer. Viruses can therefore be used as tools to probe the system-wide protein-protein interactions and structures that drive growth deregulation in human cells. Ultimately this can provide a path for developing system context-dependent therapeutics. This review will describe ongoing experimental approaches using viruses to study pathways deregulated in cancer, with a particular focus on viral cellular protein-protein interactions and structures. PMID:21061422

  20. Genome trimming by Borna disease viruses: viral replication control or escape from cellular surveillance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, U; Martin, A; Schwemmle, M; Staeheli, P

    2007-05-01

    Persistence of RNA viruses is frequently associated with non-uniform terminal nucleotide deletions at both ends of the viral genome, which are believed to restrict viral replication and transcription during persistent infection. Borna disease virus (BDV), a negative strand RNA virus with no recognizable acute phase, quickly establishes persistence. We recently demonstrated that the vast majority of BDV genomes and antigenomes possess uniformly trimmed 5' termini, even if the virus is recovered from complementary DNA encoding a hypothetical full-length viral genome. Here we discuss different mechanisms which might lead to the selective 5'-terminal trimming of the BDV genome and subsequent retrieval of the lost genetic information. We further discuss possible benefits of genome trimming in the light of recent findings that terminal RNA structures are recognized by intracellular sensors which trigger innate immunity. We hypothesize that 5'-terminal genome trimming might represent a smart strategy of BDV to evade the antiviral host response.

  1. Hepatitis B virus modulates store-operated calcium entry to enhance viral replication in primary hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica C Casciano

    Full Text Available Many viruses modulate calcium (Ca2+ signaling to create a cellular environment that is more permissive to viral replication, but for most viruses that regulate Ca2+ signaling, the mechanism underlying this regulation is not well understood. The hepatitis B virus (HBV HBx protein modulates cytosolic Ca2+ levels to stimulate HBV replication in some liver cell lines. A chronic HBV infection is associated with life-threatening liver diseases, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, and HBx modulation of cytosolic Ca2+ levels could have an important role in HBV pathogenesis. Whether HBx affects cytosolic Ca2+ in a normal hepatocyte, the natural site of an HBV infection, has not been addressed. Here, we report that HBx alters cytosolic Ca2+ signaling in cultured primary hepatocytes. We used single cell Ca2+ imaging of cultured primary rat hepatocytes to demonstrate that HBx elevates the cytosolic Ca2+ level in hepatocytes following an IP3-linked Ca2+ response; HBx effects were similar when expressed alone or in the context of replicating HBV. HBx elevation of the cytosolic Ca2+ level required extracellular Ca2+ influx and store-operated Ca2+ (SOC entry and stimulated HBV replication in hepatocytes. We used both targeted RT-qPCR and transcriptome-wide RNAseq analyses to compare levels of SOC channel components and other Ca2+ signaling regulators in HBV-expressing and control hepatocytes and show that the transcript levels of these various proteins are not affected by HBV. We also show that HBx regulation of SOC-regulated Ca2+ accumulation is likely the consequence of HBV modulation of a SOC channel regulatory mechanism. In support of this, we link HBx enhancement of SOC-regulated Ca2+ accumulation to Ca2+ uptake by mitochondria and demonstrate that HBx stimulates mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in primary hepatocytes. The results of our study may provide insights into viral mechanisms that affect Ca2+ signaling to regulate viral replication and virus

  2. Infectious bursal disease virus as a replication-incompetent viral vector expressing green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosley, Yung-Yi C; Wu, Ching Ching; Lin, Tsang Long

    2017-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) has been established as a replication-competent viral vector capable of carrying an epitope at multiple loci in the genome. To enhance the safety and increase the insertion capacity of IBDV as a vector, a replication-incompetent IBDV vector was developed in the present study. The feasibility of replacing one of the viral gene loci, including pvp2, vp3, vp1, or the polyprotein vp243, with the sequence of green fluorescent protein (GFP) was explored. A method combining TCID50 and immunoperoxidase monolayer assay (IPMA) determined the most feasible locus for gene replacement to be pvp2. The genomic segment containing gfp at the pvp2 locus was able to be encapsidated into IBDV particles. Furthermore, the expression of GFP in GFP-IBDV infected cells was confirmed by Western blotting and GFP-IBDV particles showed similar morphology and size to that of wildtype IBDV by electron microscopy. By providing the deleted protein in trans in a packaging cell line (pVP2-DF1), replication-incompetent GFP-IBDV particles were successfully plaque-quantified. The gfp sequence from the plaque-forming GFP-IBDV in pVP2-DF1 was confirmed by RT-PCR and sequencing. To our knowledge, GFP-IBDV developed in the present study is the first replication-incompetent IBDV vector which expresses a foreign protein in infected cells without the capability to produce viral progeny. Additionally, such replication-incompetent IBDV vectors could serve as bivalent vaccine vectors for conferring protection against infections with IBDV and other economically important, or zoonotic, avian pathogens.

  3. Factors Associated With the Control of Viral Replication and Virologic Breakthrough in a Recently Infected HIV-1 Controller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker-Sperling, Victoria E; Pohlmeyer, Christopher W; Veenhuis, Rebecca T; May, Megan; Luna, Krystle A; Kirkpatrick, Allison R; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Cox, Andrea L; Carrington, Mary; Bailey, Justin R; Arduino, Roberto C; Blankson, Joel N

    2017-02-01

    HIV-1 controllers are patients who control HIV-1 viral replication without antiretroviral therapy. Control is achieved very early in the course of infection, but the mechanisms through which viral replication is restricted are not fully understood. We describe a patient who presented with acute HIV-1 infection and was found to have an HIV-1 RNA level of HIV-1 infection in some patients without protective HLA alleles and that NK cell responses may contribute to this early control of viral replication. © 2016.

  4. Two separate mechanisms of enforced viral replication balance innate and adaptive immune activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaabani, Namir; Khairnar, Vishal; Duhan, Vikas; Zhou, Fan; Tur, Rita Ferrer; Häussinger, Dieter; Recher, Mike; Tumanov, Alexei V; Hardt, Cornelia; Pinschewer, Daniel; Christen, Urs; Lang, Philipp A; Honke, Nadine; Lang, Karl S

    2016-02-01

    The induction of innate and adaptive immunity is essential for controlling viral infections. Limited or overwhelming innate immunity can negatively impair the adaptive immune response. Therefore, balancing innate immunity separately from activating the adaptive immune response would result in a better antiviral immune response. Recently, we demonstrated that Usp18-dependent replication of virus in secondary lymphatic organs contributes to activation of the innate and adaptive immune responses. Whether specific mechanisms can balance innate and adaptive immunity separately remains unknown. In this study, using lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and replication-deficient single-cycle LCMV vectors, we found that viral replication of the initial inoculum is essential for activating virus-specific CD8(+) T cells. In contrast, extracellular distribution of virus along the splenic conduits is necessary for inducing systemic levels of type I interferon (IFN-I). Although enforced virus replication is driven primarily by Usp18, B cell-derived lymphotoxin beta contributes to the extracellular distribution of virus along the splenic conduits. Therefore, lymphotoxin beta regulates IFN-I induction independently of CD8(+) T-cell activity. We found that two separate mechanisms act together in the spleen to guarantee amplification of virus during infection, thereby balancing the activation of the innate and adaptive immune system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. HIV-1 Tat potently stabilises Mdm2 and enhances viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Rameez; Ronsard, Larance; Lata, Sneh; Trivedi, Shubhendu; Banerjea, Akhil C

    2017-07-11

    Murine double minute 2 (Mdm2) is known to enhance the transactivation potential of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) Tat protein by causing its ubiquitination. However, the regulation of Mdm2 during HIV-1 infection and its implications for viral replication have not been well studied. Here, we show that the Mdm2 protein level increases during HIV-1 infection and this effect is mediated by HIV-1 Tat protein. Tat appears to stabilise Mdm2 at the post-translational level by inducing its phosphorylation at serine-166 position through AKT. Although p53 is one of the key players for Mdm2 induction, Tat-mediated stabilisation of Mdm2 appears to be independent of p53. Moreover, the non-phosphorylatable mutant of Mdm2 (S166A) fails to interact with Tat and shows decreased half-life in the presence of Tat compared with wild-type Mdm2. Furthermore, the non-phosphorylatable mutant of Mdm2 (S166A) is unable to support HIV-1 replication. Thus, HIV-1 Tat appears to stabilise Mdm2, which in turn enhances Tat-mediated viral replication. This study highlights the importance of post-translational modifications of host cellular factors in HIV-1 replication and pathogenesis. © 2017 The Author(s).

  6. Borna disease virus phosphoprotein modulates epigenetic signaling in neurons to control viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnaud, Emilie M; Szelechowski, Marion; Bétourné, Alexandre; Foret, Charlotte; Thouard, Anne; Gonzalez-Dunia, Daniel; Malnou, Cécile E

    2015-06-01

    Understanding the modalities of interaction of neurotropic viruses with their target cells represents a major challenge that may improve our knowledge of many human neurological disorders for which viral origin is suspected. Borna disease virus (BDV) represents an ideal model to analyze the molecular mechanisms of viral persistence in neurons and its consequences for neuronal homeostasis. It is now established that BDV ensures its long-term maintenance in infected cells through a stable interaction of viral components with the host cell chromatin, in particular, with core histones. This has led to our hypothesis that such an interaction may trigger epigenetic changes in the host cell. Here, we focused on histone acetylation, which plays key roles in epigenetic regulation of gene expression, notably for neurons. We performed a comparative analysis of histone acetylation patterns of neurons infected or not infected by BDV, which revealed that infection decreases histone acetylation on selected lysine residues. We showed that the BDV phosphoprotein (P) is responsible for these perturbations, even when it is expressed alone independently of the viral context, and that this action depends on its phosphorylation by protein kinase C. We also demonstrated that BDV P inhibits cellular histone acetyltransferase activities. Finally, by pharmacologically manipulating cellular acetylation levels, we observed that inhibiting cellular acetyl transferases reduces viral replication in cell culture. Our findings reveal that manipulation of cellular epigenetics by BDV could be a means to modulate viral replication and thus illustrate a fascinating example of virus-host cell interaction. Persistent DNA viruses often subvert the mechanisms that regulate cellular chromatin dynamics, thereby benefitting from the resulting epigenetic changes to create a favorable milieu for their latent and persistent states. Here, we reasoned that Borna disease virus (BDV), the only RNA virus known to

  7. SV40 utilizes ATM kinase activity to prevent non-homologous end joining of broken viral DNA replication products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowd, Gregory A; Mody, Dviti; Eggold, Joshua; Cortez, David; Friedman, Katherine L; Fanning, Ellen

    2014-12-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) and cellular DNA replication rely on host ATM and ATR DNA damage signaling kinases to facilitate DNA repair and elicit cell cycle arrest following DNA damage. During SV40 DNA replication, ATM kinase activity prevents concatemerization of the viral genome whereas ATR activity prevents accumulation of aberrant genomes resulting from breakage of a moving replication fork as it converges with a stalled fork. However, the repair pathways that ATM and ATR orchestrate to prevent these aberrant SV40 DNA replication products are unclear. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and Southern blotting, we show that ATR kinase activity, but not DNA-PK(cs) kinase activity, facilitates some aspects of double strand break (DSB) repair when ATM is inhibited during SV40 infection. To clarify which repair factors associate with viral DNA replication centers, we examined the localization of DSB repair proteins in response to SV40 infection. Under normal conditions, viral replication centers exclusively associate with homology-directed repair (HDR) and do not colocalize with non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) factors. Following ATM inhibition, but not ATR inhibition, activated DNA-PK(cs) and KU70/80 accumulate at the viral replication centers while CtIP and BLM, proteins that initiate 5' to 3' end resection during HDR, become undetectable. Similar to what has been observed during cellular DSB repair in S phase, these data suggest that ATM kinase influences DSB repair pathway choice by preventing the recruitment of NHEJ factors to replicating viral DNA. These data may explain how ATM prevents concatemerization of the viral genome and promotes viral propagation. We suggest that inhibitors of DNA damage signaling and DNA repair could be used during infection to disrupt productive viral DNA replication.

  8. SV40 Utilizes ATM Kinase Activity to Prevent Non-homologous End Joining of Broken Viral DNA Replication Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowd, Gregory A.; Mody, Dviti; Eggold, Joshua; Cortez, David; Friedman, Katherine L.; Fanning, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) and cellular DNA replication rely on host ATM and ATR DNA damage signaling kinases to facilitate DNA repair and elicit cell cycle arrest following DNA damage. During SV40 DNA replication, ATM kinase activity prevents concatemerization of the viral genome whereas ATR activity prevents accumulation of aberrant genomes resulting from breakage of a moving replication fork as it converges with a stalled fork. However, the repair pathways that ATM and ATR orchestrate to prevent these aberrant SV40 DNA replication products are unclear. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and Southern blotting, we show that ATR kinase activity, but not DNA-PKcs kinase activity, facilitates some aspects of double strand break (DSB) repair when ATM is inhibited during SV40 infection. To clarify which repair factors associate with viral DNA replication centers, we examined the localization of DSB repair proteins in response to SV40 infection. Under normal conditions, viral replication centers exclusively associate with homology-directed repair (HDR) and do not colocalize with non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) factors. Following ATM inhibition, but not ATR inhibition, activated DNA-PKcs and KU70/80 accumulate at the viral replication centers while CtIP and BLM, proteins that initiate 5′ to 3′ end resection during HDR, become undetectable. Similar to what has been observed during cellular DSB repair in S phase, these data suggest that ATM kinase influences DSB repair pathway choice by preventing the recruitment of NHEJ factors to replicating viral DNA. These data may explain how ATM prevents concatemerization of the viral genome and promotes viral propagation. We suggest that inhibitors of DNA damage signaling and DNA repair could be used during infection to disrupt productive viral DNA replication. PMID:25474690

  9. SV40 utilizes ATM kinase activity to prevent non-homologous end joining of broken viral DNA replication products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory A Sowd

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Simian virus 40 (SV40 and cellular DNA replication rely on host ATM and ATR DNA damage signaling kinases to facilitate DNA repair and elicit cell cycle arrest following DNA damage. During SV40 DNA replication, ATM kinase activity prevents concatemerization of the viral genome whereas ATR activity prevents accumulation of aberrant genomes resulting from breakage of a moving replication fork as it converges with a stalled fork. However, the repair pathways that ATM and ATR orchestrate to prevent these aberrant SV40 DNA replication products are unclear. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and Southern blotting, we show that ATR kinase activity, but not DNA-PK(cs kinase activity, facilitates some aspects of double strand break (DSB repair when ATM is inhibited during SV40 infection. To clarify which repair factors associate with viral DNA replication centers, we examined the localization of DSB repair proteins in response to SV40 infection. Under normal conditions, viral replication centers exclusively associate with homology-directed repair (HDR and do not colocalize with non-homologous end joining (NHEJ factors. Following ATM inhibition, but not ATR inhibition, activated DNA-PK(cs and KU70/80 accumulate at the viral replication centers while CtIP and BLM, proteins that initiate 5' to 3' end resection during HDR, become undetectable. Similar to what has been observed during cellular DSB repair in S phase, these data suggest that ATM kinase influences DSB repair pathway choice by preventing the recruitment of NHEJ factors to replicating viral DNA. These data may explain how ATM prevents concatemerization of the viral genome and promotes viral propagation. We suggest that inhibitors of DNA damage signaling and DNA repair could be used during infection to disrupt productive viral DNA replication.

  10. Replicating viral vectors as HIV vaccines: Summary report from IAVI Sponsored Satellite Symposium, International AIDS Society Conference, July 22, 2007

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koff, W. C.; Parks, C. L.; Berkhout, B.; Ackland, J.; Noble, S.; Gust, I. D.

    2008-01-01

    At the International AIDS Society Conference oil Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention held in Sydney, Australia, in July 2007, the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI) convened a satellite symposium entitled 'Accelerating the Development of Replicating Viral Vectors for AIDS Vaccines.' Its

  11. Replication competent HIV-1 viruses that express intragenomic microRNA reveal discrete RNA-interference mechanisms that affect viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klase, Zachary; Houzet, Laurent; Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2011-11-23

    It remains unclear whether retroviruses can encode and express an intragenomic microRNA (miRNA). Some have suggested that processing by the Drosha and Dicer enzymes might preclude the viability of a replicating retroviral RNA genome that contains a cis-embedded miRNA. To date, while many studies have shown that lentiviral vectors containing miRNAs can transduce mammalian cells and express the inserted miRNA efficiently, no study has examined the impact on the replication of a lentivirus such as HIV-1 after the deliberate intragenomic insertion of a bona fide miRNA. We have constructed several HIV-1 molecular clones, each containing a discrete cellular miRNA positioned in Nef. These retroviral genomes express the inserted miRNA and are generally replication competent in T-cells. The inserted intragenomic miRNA was observed to elicit two different consequences for HIV-1 replication. First, the expression of miRNAs with predicted target sequences in the HIV-1 genome was found to reduce viral replication. Second, in one case, where an inserted miRNA was unusually well-processed by Drosha, this processing event inhibited viral replication. This is the first study to examine in detail the replication competence of HIV-1 genomes that express cis-embedded miRNAs. The results indicate that a replication competent retroviral genome is not precluded from encoding and expressing a viral miRNA.

  12. CRISPR/Cas9-Derived Mutations Both Inhibit HIV-1 Replication and Accelerate Viral Escape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cas9 cleaves specific DNA sequences with the assistance of a programmable single guide RNA (sgRNA. Repairing this broken DNA by the cell’s error-prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ machinery leads to insertions and deletions (indels that often impair DNA function. Using HIV-1, we have now demonstrated that many of these indels are indeed lethal for the virus, but that others lead to the emergence of replication competent viruses that are resistant to Cas9/sgRNA. This unexpected contribution of Cas9 to the development of viral resistance is facilitated by some indels that are not deleterious for viral replication, but that are refractory to recognition by the same sgRNA as a result of changing the target DNA sequences. This observation illustrates two opposite outcomes of Cas9/sgRNA action, i.e., inactivation of HIV-1 and acceleration of viral escape, thereby potentially limiting the use of Cas9/sgRNA in HIV-1 therapy.

  13. A prophage-encoded actin-like protein required for efficient viral DNA replication in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Catriona; Heyer, Antonia; Pfeifer, Eugen; Polen, Tino; Wittmann, Anja; Krämer, Reinhard; Frunzke, Julia; Bramkamp, Marc

    2015-05-26

    In host cells, viral replication is localized at specific subcellular sites. Viruses that infect eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells often use host-derived cytoskeletal structures, such as the actin skeleton, for intracellular positioning. Here, we describe that a prophage, CGP3, integrated into the genome of Corynebacterium glutamicum encodes an actin-like protein, AlpC. Biochemical characterization confirms that AlpC is a bona fide actin-like protein and cell biological analysis shows that AlpC forms filamentous structures upon prophage induction. The co-transcribed adaptor protein, AlpA, binds to a consensus sequence in the upstream promoter region of the alpAC operon and also interacts with AlpC, thus connecting circular phage DNA to the actin-like filaments. Transcriptome analysis revealed that alpA and alpC are among the early induced genes upon excision of the CGP3 prophage. Furthermore, qPCR analysis of mutant strains revealed that both AlpA and AlpC are required for efficient phage replication. Altogether, these data emphasize that AlpAC are crucial for the spatio-temporal organization of efficient viral replication. This is remarkably similar to actin-assisted membrane localization of eukaryotic viruses that use the actin cytoskeleton to concentrate virus particles at the egress sites and provides a link of evolutionary conserved interactions between intracellular virus transport and actin. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Leflunomide/teriflunomide inhibit Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)- induced lymphoproliferative disease and lytic viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilger, Andrea; Plowshay, Julie; Ma, Shidong; Nawandar, Dhananjay; Barlow, Elizabeth A; Romero-Masters, James C; Bristol, Jillian A; Li, Zhe; Tsai, Ming-Han; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Kenney, Shannon C

    2017-07-04

    EBV infection causes mononucleosis and is associated with specific subsets of B cell lymphomas. Immunosuppressed patients such as organ transplant recipients are particularly susceptible to EBV-induced lymphoproliferative disease (LPD), which can be fatal. Leflunomide (a drug used to treat rheumatoid arthritis) and its active metabolite teriflunomide (used to treat multiple sclerosis) inhibit de novo pyrimidine synthesis by targeting the cellular dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, thereby decreasing T cell proliferation. Leflunomide also inhibits the replication of cytomegalovirus and BK virus via both "on target" and "off target" mechanisms and is increasingly used to treat these viruses in organ transplant recipients. However, whether leflunomide/teriflunomide block EBV replication or inhibit EBV-mediated B cell transformation is currently unknown. We show that teriflunomide inhibits cellular proliferation, and promotes apoptosis, in EBV-transformed B cells in vitro at a clinically relevant dose. In addition, teriflunomide prevents the development of EBV-induced lymphomas in both a humanized mouse model and a xenograft model. Furthermore, teriflunomide inhibits lytic EBV infection in vitro both by preventing the initial steps of lytic viral reactivation, and by blocking lytic viral DNA replication. Leflunomide/teriflunomide might therefore be clinically useful for preventing EBV-induced LPD in patients who have high EBV loads yet require continued immunosuppression.

  15. The rolling circle . capsid complex as an intermediate in phi X DNA replication and viral assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koths, K; Dressler, D

    1980-05-10

    Late in the life cycle of the single-stranded DNA phage phi X, the synthesis of positive strand DNA is coupled to the maturation of progeny virions. DNA synthesis and packaging take place in a replication-assembly complex, which we have purified to homogeneity and characterized. The following conclusions can be drawn: 1. The DNA component of the replication-assembly complex is a rolling circle with a single-stranded DNA tail which is less than or equal to genome length. 2. The major protein component of the replication-assembly complex is an intact viral capsid, as shown by gel analysis of 35S-labeled complexes. As replication proceeds at the DNA growing point, the positive strand tail of the rolling circle is displaced directly into the capsid. In addition to the capsid, the complex contains at least 1 molecule of the phi X gene A nicking protein, which appears to be covalently linked to the DNA. 3. The rolling circle . capsid complex can be purified to homogeneity by taking advantage of its uniform sedimentation velocity (35 S) and its uniform density upon equilibrium centrifugation in CsCl (1.50 g/cc). 4. The replication-assembly complex can be visualized in the electron microscope. An electron-dense particle, which has the dimensions of a viral capsid, is observed attached to a rolling circle at the DNA growing point. 5. Hybridization of specific phi X restriction fragments to the deproteinized, single-stranded tails of intact rolling circles has allowed the use of these replicating intermediates to determine both the origin/terminus and the direction of phi X positive strand DNA synthesis. The ends of the rolling circle tails map in the Hae III restriction Fragment Z6b, at the position on the phi X genome at which the gene A endonuclease is known to cut. This result indicates that this endonuclease participates in the "termination" of each round of synthesis by cutting off unit-length viral genomes. 6. Rolling circle . capsid complexes were also isolated from

  16. Aichi Virus Leader Protein Is Involved in Viral RNA Replication and Encapsidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Jun; Nagashima, Shigeo; Taniguchi, Koki

    2003-01-01

    Aichi virus, a member of the family Picornaviridae, encodes a leader (L) protein of 170 amino acids (aa). The Aichi virus L protein exhibits no significant sequence homology to those of other picornaviruses. In this study, we investigated the function of the Aichi virus L protein in virus growth. In vitro translation and cleavage assays indicated that the L protein has no autocatalytic activity and is not involved in polyprotein cleavage. The L-VP0 junction was cleaved by 3C proteinase. Immunoblot analysis showed that the L protein is stably present in infected cells. Characterization of various L mutants derived from an infectious cDNA clone revealed that deletion of 93 aa of the center part (aa 43 to 135), 50 aa of the N-terminal part (aa 4 to 53), or 90 aa of the C-terminal part (aa 74 to 163) abolished viral RNA replication. A mutant (Δ114-163) in which 50 aa of the C-terminal part (aa 114 to 163) were deleted exhibited efficient RNA replication and translation abilities, but the virus yield was 4 log orders lower than that of the wild type. Sedimentation analysis of viral particles generated in mutant Δ114-163 RNA-transfected cells showed that the mutant has a severe defect in the formation of mature virions, but not in that of empty capsids. Thus, the data obtained in this study indicate that the Aichi virus L protein is involved in both viral RNA replication and encapsidation. PMID:14512530

  17. β-Thujaplicinol inhibits hepatitis B virus replication by blocking the viral ribonuclease H activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuan; Cheng, Xiaohong; Cao, Feng; Huang, Ailong; Tavis, John E

    2013-09-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a hepatotropic DNA virus that replicates by reverse transcription. It chronically infects >350 million people and kills about 1 million patients annually. Therapy primarily employs nucleos(t)ide analogs that suppress viral DNA synthesis by the viral reverse transcriptase very well but that rarely cure the infection, so additional therapies are needed. Reverse transcription requires the viral ribonuclease H (RNAseH) to destroy the viral RNA after it has been copied into DNA. We recently produced active recombinant HBV RNAseH and demonstrated that Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) RNAseH antagonists could inhibit the HBV enzyme at a high frequency. Here, we extended these results to β-thujaplicinol, a hydroxylated tropolone which inhibits the HIV RNAseH. β-Thujaplicinol inhibited RNAseHs from HBV genotype D and H in biochemical assays with IC₅₀ values of 5.9±0.7 and 2.3±1.7 μM, respectively. It blocked replication of HBV genotypes A and D in culture by inhibiting the RNAseH activity with an estimated EC₅₀ of ∼5 μM and a CC₅₀ of 10.1±1. 7 μM. Activity of β-thujaplicinol against RNAseH sequences from multiple HBV genotypes implies that if chemical derivatives of β-thujaplicinol with improved efficacy and reduced toxicity can be identified, they would have promise as anti-HBV agents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Human herpesvirus 8-associated neoplasms: the roles of viral replication and antiviral treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Soren; Casper, Corey

    2011-08-01

    In this review, we highlight the importance of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) lytic replication and the potential for antiviral therapies to prevent or treat HHV-8-related neoplasms. Diseases caused by HHV-8 infection include Kaposi sarcoma, multicentric Castleman disease (MCD), and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), which occur primarily in patients with HIV infection. Kaposi sarcoma is the most common AIDS-associated malignancy worldwide. MCD and PEL occur less commonly but, like Kaposi sarcoma, are associated with poor treatment outcomes. Like all herpesviruses, HHV-8 is capable of either latent or lytic infection of cells. Although HHV-8 infection of tumor cells is predominately latent, accumulating data point to the importance of both lytic phase viral gene products and production of infectious virus. Antiviral agents that target herpesvirus DNA synthesis, such as ganciclovir, inhibit HHV-8 lytic replication and can prevent Kaposi sarcoma. Several HIV protease inhibitors may interfere with tumor growth and angiogenesis, and one protease inhibitor, nelfinavir, directly inhibits HHV-8 replication in vitro. Controlled trials are indicated to determine the clinical utility of antiviral suppression of HHV-8 replication, and identify the optimal antiretroviral regimens, for the prevention and treatment of Kaposi sarcoma.

  19. Roles of serine and threonine residues of mumps virus P protein in viral transcription and replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickar, Adrian; Xu, Pei; Elson, Andrew; Li, Zhuo; Zengel, James; He, Biao

    2014-04-01

    Mumps virus (MuV), a paramyxovirus containing a negative-sense nonsegmented RNA genome, is a human pathogen that causes an acute infection with symptoms ranging from parotitis to mild meningitis and severe encephalitis. Vaccination against mumps virus has been effective in reducing mumps cases. However, recently large outbreaks have occurred in vaccinated populations. There is no anti-MuV drug. Understanding replication of MuV may lead to novel antiviral strategies. MuV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase minimally consists of the phosphoprotein (P) and the large protein (L). The P protein is heavily phosphorylated. To investigate the roles of serine (S) and threonine (T) residues of P in viral RNA transcription and replication, P was subjected to mass spectrometry and mutational analysis. P, a 392-amino acid residue protein, has 64 S and T residues. We have found that mutating nine S/T residues significantly reduced and mutating residue T at 101 to A (T101A) significantly enhanced activity in a minigenome system. A recombinant virus containing the P-T101A mutation (rMuV-P-T101A) was recovered and analyzed. rMuV-P-T101A grew to higher titers and had increased protein expression at early time points. Together, these results suggest that phosphorylation of MuV-P-T101 plays a negative role in viral RNA synthesis. This is the first time that the P protein of a paramyxovirus has been systematically analyzed for S/T residues that are critical for viral RNA synthesis. Mumps virus (MuV) is a reemerging paramyxovirus that caused large outbreaks in the United States, where vaccination coverage is very high. There is no anti-MuV drug. In this work, we have systematically analyzed roles of Ser/Thr residues of MuV P in viral RNA synthesis. We have identified S/T residues of P critical for MuV RNA synthesis and phosphorylation sites that are important for viral RNA synthesis. This work leads to a better understanding of viral RNA synthesis as well as to potential novel strategies to

  20. The bovine papillomavirus constitutive enhancer is essential for viral transformation, DNA replication, and the maintenance of latency.

    OpenAIRE

    Vande Pol, S B; Howley, P. M.

    1992-01-01

    Bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV-1) has served as the prototype papillomavirus for the study of viral transcription, DNA replication, and latency. However, no cis essential transcription control regions which are necessary for both transformation and replication of BPV-1 or any other papillomavirus have yet been defined. We have found that BPV-1 mutants with deletions in the long control region were defective for transformation and replication, with the essential region in the 5' long contro...

  1. HIV Exploits Antiviral Host Innate GCN2-ATF4 Signaling for Establishing Viral Replication Early in Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guochun; Santos Rocha, Clarissa; Hirao, Lauren A; Mendes, Erica A; Tang, Yuyang; Thompson, George R; Wong, Joseph K; Dandekar, Satya

    2017-05-02

    Antiviral innate host defenses against acute viral infections include suppression of host protein synthesis to restrict viral protein production. Less is known about mechanisms by which viral pathogens subvert host antiviral innate responses for establishing their replication and dissemination. We investigated early innate defense against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and viral evasion by utilizing human CD4 + T cell cultures in vitro and a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) model of AIDS in vivo Our data showed that early host innate defense against the viral infection involves GCN2-ATF4 signaling-mediated suppression of global protein synthesis, which is exploited by the virus for supporting its own replication during early viral infection and dissemination in the gut mucosa. Suppression of protein synthesis and induction of protein kinase GCN2-ATF4 signaling were detected in the gut during acute SIV infection. These changes diminished during chronic viral infection. HIV replication induced by serum deprivation in CD4 + T cells was linked to the induction of ATF4 that was recruited to the HIV long terminal repeat (LTR) to promote viral transcription. Experimental inhibition of GCN2-ATF4 signaling either by a specific inhibitor or by amino acid supplementation suppressed the induction of HIV expression. Enhancing ATF4 expression through selenium administration resulted in reactivation of latent HIV in vitro as well as ex vivo in the primary CD4 + T cells isolated from patients receiving suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). In summary, HIV/SIV exploits the early host antiviral response through GCN2-ATF4 signaling by utilizing ATF4 for activating the viral LTR transcription to establish initial viral replication and is a potential target for HIV prevention and therapy. IMPORTANCE Understanding how HIV overcomes host antiviral innate defense response in order to establish infection and dissemination is critical for developing prevention and

  2. [Post-herpes simplex encephalitis chorea: Viral replication or immunological mechanism?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benrhouma, H; Nasri, A; Kraoua, I; Klaa, H; Turki, I; Gouider-Khouja, N

    2015-09-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis is a severe neurological condition, whose outcome is improved if treated early with acyclovir. Post-herpes simplex encephalitis with acute chorea has rarely been reported. We report on two observations of children presenting with post-herpes simplex encephalitis with acute chorea, related to two different pathophysiological mechanisms. The first one is an 11-month-old girl developing relapsing herpes simplex encephalitis with chorea due to resumption of viral replication. The second one is a 2-year-old boy with relapsing post-herpes simplex encephalitis acute chorea caused by an immunoinflammatory mechanism. We discuss the different neurological presentations of herpetic relapses, notably those presenting with movement disorders, as well as their clinical, paraclinical, physiopathological, and therapeutic aspects. Post-herpes simplex encephalitis with acute chorea may involve two mechanisms: resumption of viral replication or an immunoinflammatory mechanism. Treatment of post-herpes simplex encephalitis with acute chorea depends on the underlying mechanism, while prevention is based on antiviral treatment of herpes simplex encephalitis with acyclovir at the dose of 20mg/kg/8h for 21 days. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Immunosuppression reactivates viral replication long after resolution of woodchuck hepatitis virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menne, Stephan; Cote, Paul J; Butler, Scott D; Toshkov, Ilia A; Gerin, John L; Tennant, Bud C

    2007-03-01

    Resolution of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is characterized by coordinated humoral and cellular immune responses. Immunity is durable over decades, protecting the host from reinfection and potential activation of residual HBV. Woodchucks infected at birth with woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) cleared viremia and developed antibodies to surface antigen (anti-WHs). Woodchucks became seronegative for anti-WHs 3-6 years later, but in some, WHV DNA was detected in serum, liver, and/or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Those with WHV DNA had increased in vitro cellular immune responses to viral antigens, CD4 and CD8 markers, and Th1-type cytokines, suggesting active WHV-specific T lymphocytes. Immunosuppression for 12 weeks using cyclosporine A in such woodchucks resulted in transient reactivation of WHV replication. Serum of 1 woodchuck that became positive for WHV DNA during immunosuppression was inoculated into WHV-susceptible woodchucks, and a productive infection was demonstrated. The results indicate that after infection durable cellular immunity to WHV is essential for the long-term control of viral replication and is probably maintained by continuous priming from residual virus. These experimental observations demonstrate the potential of immunosuppression to reactivate HBV after resolution of infection.

  4. The logic of DNA replication in double-stranded DNA viruses: insights from global analysis of viral genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazlauskas, Darius; Krupovic, Mart; Venclovas, Česlovas

    2016-06-02

    Genomic DNA replication is a complex process that involves multiple proteins. Cellular DNA replication systems are broadly classified into only two types, bacterial and archaeo-eukaryotic. In contrast, double-stranded (ds) DNA viruses feature a much broader diversity of DNA replication machineries. Viruses differ greatly in both completeness and composition of their sets of DNA replication proteins. In this study, we explored whether there are common patterns underlying this extreme diversity. We identified and analyzed all major functional groups of DNA replication proteins in all available proteomes of dsDNA viruses. Our results show that some proteins are common to viruses infecting all domains of life and likely represent components of the ancestral core set. These include B-family polymerases, SF3 helicases, archaeo-eukaryotic primases, clamps and clamp loaders of the archaeo-eukaryotic type, RNase H and ATP-dependent DNA ligases. We also discovered a clear correlation between genome size and self-sufficiency of viral DNA replication, the unanticipated dominance of replicative helicases and pervasive functional associations among certain groups of DNA replication proteins. Altogether, our results provide a comprehensive view on the diversity and evolution of replication systems in the DNA virome and uncover fundamental principles underlying the orchestration of viral DNA replication. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. The bovine papillomavirus constitutive enhancer is essential for viral transformation, DNA replication, and the maintenance of latency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vande Pol, S B; Howley, P M

    1992-04-01

    Bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV-1) has served as the prototype papillomavirus for the study of viral transcription, DNA replication, and latency. However, no cis essential transcription control regions which are necessary for both transformation and replication of BPV-1 or any other papillomavirus have yet been defined. We have found that BPV-1 mutants with deletions in the long control region were defective for transformation and replication, with the essential region in the 5' long control region corresponding to the previously defined BPV-1 constitutive enhancer (S. B. Vande Pol and P. M. Howley, J. Virol. 64:5420-5429, 1990). BPV-1 mutants deleted of the constitutive enhancer could be complemented in trans by the full-length virally encoded E2 transactivator and replication factor (E2TA) and in cis by the simian virus 40 enhancer. The constitutive enhancer induced the production of E2TA by activating all the major viral early promoters upstream of the E2 open reading frame. Complementation experiments using a temperature-sensitive E2TA mutant indicated that the constitutive enhancer was necessary for the maintenance of viral DNA replication within latently infected cells and implied that viral transcription under the regulation of the constitutive enhancer may be controlled during the cell cycle. The constitutive enhancer is a master regulatory control region for establishing and maintaining BPV-1 latency, and its characteristics reveal some analogies with cell type-specific enhancer elements recognized in the human papillomaviruses.

  6. Calcein represses human papillomavirus 16 E1-E2 mediated DNA replication via blocking their binding to the viral origin of replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Dipon; Smith, Nathan W; Wang, Xu; Richardson, Stacie L; Hartman, Matthew C T; Morgan, Iain M

    2017-08-01

    Human papillomaviruses are causative agents in several human diseases ranging from genital warts to ano-genital and oropharyngeal cancers. Currently only symptoms of HPV induced disease are treated; there are no antivirals available that directly target the viral life cycle. Previously, we determined that the cellular protein TopBP1 interacts with the HPV16 replication/transcription factor E2. This E2-TopBP1 interaction is essential for optimal E1-E2 DNA replication and for the viral life cycle. The drug calcein disrupts the interaction of TopBP1 with itself and other host proteins to promote cell death. Here we demonstrate that calcein blocks HPV16 E1-E2 DNA replication via blocking the viral replication complex forming at the origin of replication. This occurs at non-toxic levels of calcein and demonstrates specificity as it does not block the ability of E2 to regulate transcription. We propose that calcein or derivatives could be developed as an anti-HPV therapeutic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Factors Associated With the Control of Viral Replication and Virologic Breakthrough in a Recently Infected HIV-1 Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria E. Walker-Sperling

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 controllers are patients who control HIV-1 viral replication without antiretroviral therapy. Control is achieved very early in the course of infection, but the mechanisms through which viral replication is restricted are not fully understood. We describe a patient who presented with acute HIV-1 infection and was found to have an HIV-1 RNA level of <100 copies/mL. She did not have any known protective HLA alleles, but significant immune activation of CD8+ T cells and natural killer (NK cells was present, and both cell types inhibited viral replication. Virus cultured from this patient replicated as well in vitro as virus isolated from her partner, a patient with AIDS who was the source of transmission. Virologic breakthrough occurred 9 months after her initial presentation and was associated with an increase in CD4+ T cell activation levels and a significant decrease in NK cell inhibitory capacity. Remarkably, CD8+ T cell inhibitory capacity was preserved and there were no new escape mutations in targeted Gag epitopes. These findings suggest that fully replication-competent virus can be controlled in acute HIV-1 infection in some patients without protective HLA alleles and that NK cell responses may contribute to this early control of viral replication.

  8. Enrichment of Phosphatidylethanolamine in Viral Replication Compartments via Co-opting the Endosomal Rab5 Small GTPase by a Positive-Strand RNA Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Xu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Positive-strand RNA viruses build extensive membranous replication compartments to support replication and protect the virus from antiviral responses by the host. These viruses require host factors and various lipids to form viral replication complexes (VRCs. The VRCs built by Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV are enriched with phosphatidylethanolamine (PE through a previously unknown pathway. To unravel the mechanism of PE enrichment within the TBSV replication compartment, in this paper, the authors demonstrate that TBSV co-opts the guanosine triphosphate (GTP-bound active form of the endosomal Rab5 small GTPase via direct interaction with the viral replication protein. Deletion of Rab5 orthologs in a yeast model host or expression of dominant negative mutants of plant Rab5 greatly decreases TBSV replication and prevents the redistribution of PE to the sites of viral replication. We also show that enrichment of PE in the viral replication compartment is assisted by actin filaments. Interestingly, the closely related Carnation Italian ringspot virus, which replicates on the boundary membrane of mitochondria, uses a similar strategy to the peroxisomal TBSV to hijack the Rab5-positive endosomes into the viral replication compartments. Altogether, usurping the GTP-Rab5-positive endosomes allows TBSV to build a PE-enriched viral replication compartment, which is needed to support peak-level replication. Thus, the Rab family of small GTPases includes critical host factors assisting VRC assembly and genesis of the viral replication compartment.

  9. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus DNA polymerase C terminus is required for nuclear localization and viral DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Guozhong; Krell, Peter J

    2014-09-01

    The DNA polymerase (DNApol) of the baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) is essential for viral DNA replication. The DNApol exonuclease and polymerase domains are highly conserved and are considered functional in DNA replication. However, the role of the DNApol C terminus has not yet been characterized. To identify whether only the exonuclease and polymerase domains are sufficient for viral DNA replication, several DNApol C-terminal truncations were cloned into a dnapol-null AcMNPV bacmid with a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter. Surprisingly, most of the truncation constructs, despite containing both exonuclease and polymerase domains, could not rescue viral DNA replication and viral production in bacmid-transfected Sf21 cells. Moreover, GFP fusions of these same truncations failed to localize to the nucleus. Truncation of the C-terminal amino acids 950 to 984 showed nuclear localization but allowed for only limited and delayed viral spread. The C terminus contains a typical bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) motif at residues 804 to 827 and a monopartite NLS motif at residues 939 to 948. Each NLS, as a GFP fusion peptide, localized to the nucleus, but both NLSs were required for nuclear localization of DNApol. Alanine substitutions in a highly conserved baculovirus DNApol sequence at AcMNPV DNApol amino acids 972 to 981 demonstrated its importance for virus production and DNA replication. Collectively, the data indicated that the C terminus of AcMNPV DNApol contains two NLSs and a conserved motif, all of which are required for nuclear localization of DNApol, viral DNA synthesis, and virus production. The baculovirus DNA polymerase (DNApol) is a highly specific polymerase that allows viral DNA synthesis and hence virus replication in infected insect cells. We demonstrated that the exonuclease and polymerase domains of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) alone are insufficient for viral

  10. Viral DNA Replication Orientation and hnRNPs Regulate Transcription of the Human Papillomavirus 18 Late Promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Liu, Haibin; Ge, Hui; Ajiro, Masahiko; Sharma, Nishi R; Meyers, Craig; Morozov, Pavel; Tuschl, Thomas; Klar, Amar; Court, Donald; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2017-05-30

    The life cycle of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) is tightly linked to keratinocyte differentiation. Although expression of viral early genes is initiated immediately upon virus infection of undifferentiated basal cells, viral DNA amplification and late gene expression occur only in the mid to upper strata of the keratinocytes undergoing terminal differentiation. In this report, we show that the relative activity of HPV18 TATA-less late promoter P811 depends on its orientation relative to that of the origin (Ori) of viral DNA replication and is sensitive to the eukaryotic DNA polymerase inhibitor aphidicolin. Additionally, transfected 70-nucleotide (nt)-long single-strand DNA oligonucleotides that are homologous to the region near Ori induce late promoter activity. We also found that promoter activation in raft cultures leads to production of the late promoter-associated, sense-strand transcription initiation RNAs (tiRNAs) and splice-site small RNAs (spliRNAs). Finally, a cis-acting AAGTATGCA core element that functions as a repressor to the promoter was identified. This element interacts with hnRNP D0B and hnRNP A/B factors. Point mutations in the core prevented binding of hnRNPs and increased the promoter activity. Confirming this result, knocking down the expression of both hnRNPs in keratinocytes led to increased promoter activity. Taking the data together, our study revealed the mechanism of how the HPV18 late promoter is regulated by DNA replication and host factors.IMPORTANCE It has been known for decades that the activity of viral late promoters is associated with viral DNA replication among almost all DNA viruses. However, the mechanism of how DNA replication activates the viral late promoter and what components of the replication machinery are involved remain largely unknown. In this study, we characterized the P811 promoter region of HPV18 and demonstrated that its activation depends on the orientation of DNA replication. Using single

  11. Mutational analysis of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) immediate early protein (IE62) subdomains and their importance in viral replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, Mohamed I., E-mail: mkhalil2@stanford.edu [Departments of Pediatrics and Microbiology & Immunology, Stan ford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Department of Molecular Biology, National Research Centre, El-Buhouth St., Cairo (Egypt); Che, Xibing; Sung, Phillip; Sommer, Marvin H. [Departments of Pediatrics and Microbiology & Immunology, Stan ford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Hay, John [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine and Biomedical Science, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY (United States); Arvin, Ann M. [Departments of Pediatrics and Microbiology & Immunology, Stan ford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2016-05-15

    VZV IE62 is an essential, immediate-early, tegument protein and consists of five domains. We generated recombinant viruses carrying mutations in the first three IE62 domains and tested their influence on VZV replication kinetics. The mutations in domain I did not affect replication kinetics while domain II mutations, disrupting the DNA binding and dimerization domain (DBD), were lethal for VZV replication. Mutations in domain III of the nuclear localization signal (NLS) and the two phosphorylation sites S686A/S722A resulted in slower growth in early and late infection respectively and were associated with IE62 accumulation in the cytoplasm and nucleus respectively. This study mapped the functional domains of IE62 in context of viral infection, indicating that DNA binding and dimerization domain is essential for VZV replication. In addition, the correct localization of IE62, whether nuclear or cytoplasmic, at different points in the viral life cycle, is important for normal progression of VZV replication. - Highlights: • Mutation of IE62 domain I did not affect VZV replication in melanoma cells. • IE62 domain II and III are important for VZV replication in melanoma cells. • Mutations of IE62 domain II (DBD) were lethal for virus replication. • Mutations of IE62 NLS and phosphorylation sites inhibited VZV replication. • NLS and S686A/S722A mutations altered localization of IE62 during early and late infection.

  12. KSHV Targeted Therapy: An Update on Inhibitors of Viral Lytic Replication

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    Natacha Coen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is the causative agent of Kaposi’s sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman’s disease. Since the discovery of KSHV 20 years ago, there is still no standard treatment and the management of virus-associated malignancies remains toxic and incompletely efficacious. As the majority of tumor cells are latently infected with KSHV, currently marketed antivirals that target the virus lytic cycle have shown inconsistent results in clinic. Nevertheless, lytic replication plays a major role in disease progression and virus dissemination. Case reports and retrospective studies have pointed out the benefit of antiviral therapy in the treatment and prevention of KSHV-associated diseases. As a consequence, potent and selective antivirals are needed. This review focuses on the anti-KSHV activity, mode of action and current status of antiviral drugs targeting KSHV lytic cycle. Among these drugs, different subclasses of viral DNA polymerase inhibitors and compounds that do not target the viral DNA polymerase are being discussed. We also cover molecules that target cellular kinases, as well as the potential of new drug targets and animal models for antiviral testing.

  13. A Mouse Model of Zika Virus Sexual Transmission and Vaginal Viral Replication

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    William Weihao Tang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Case reports of Zika virus (ZIKV sexual transmission and genital persistence are mounting. Venereal transmission and genital persistence threaten public health within and beyond the range of ZIKV’s mosquito vectors. In this study, we administered ZIKV into the vaginas of AG129 mice and LysMCre+IFNARfl/fl C57BL/6 mice after hormonal treatments. Mice infected during estrus-like phase were resistant to vaginal infection. In contrast, when infected during diestrus-like phase, AG129 mice succumbed to infection, whereas LysMCre+IFNARfl/fl mice experienced transient illness. Patency of transgenital transmission (TGT in diestrus-like mice was demonstrated by detection of viremia and ZIKV replication in spleen and brain, and viral RNA persisted in vaginal washes as late as 10 days post-infection. In these lethal and sublethal mouse models, this study indicates that intravaginal deposition of ZIKV can cause TGT, hormonal changes in the female reproductive tract (FRT influence transmission, and ZIKV replication persists in the FRT for several days.

  14. [Study of viral replication in HbsAg positive chronic hepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomás Gilabert, J; Galán Navarro, M I; Caballero Morales, T; Maroto Vela, M C; Ruiz Extremera, A; Salmerón Escobar, F J

    1991-03-01

    Viral replication seric markers (VRSM), (BeHAg, BcHAg, and DNA-VHB) and the hepatic tissue BcHAg of thirty four patients suffering from chronic hepatopathies (6 PCH, 18 ACH, and 10 cirrhosis) were investigated. The greatest incidence of RVSM was observed in PCH. The combined study using all the markers demonstrated a positive correlation: DNA-VHB and BeHAg (p less than 0,001); DNA-VHB and BcHAg (p less than 0,001); BeHAg and BcHAg (p less than 0,001). The same result was obtained when comparing BcHAg (n) with the rest of RVSM: DNA-VHB (p less than 0,001), BeHAg (p less than 0,001) and seric BcHAg (p less than 0,01). Patients with a most intense histologic activity according to the Knodell index, presented a higher ratio of positive nuclei for BcHAg. The conclusion is that there is a good correlation amongst replication markers, specially hepatic BcHAg and DNA-VHB.

  15. A Mouse Model of Zika Virus Sexual Transmission and Vaginal Viral Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, William Weihao; Young, Matthew Perry; Mamidi, Anila; Regla-Nava, Jose Angel; Kim, Kenneth; Shresta, Sujan

    2016-12-20

    Case reports of Zika virus (ZIKV) sexual transmission and genital persistence are mounting. Venereal transmission and genital persistence threaten public health within and beyond the range of ZIKV's mosquito vectors. In this study, we administered ZIKV into the vaginas of AG129 mice and LysMCre+IFNARfl/fl C57BL/6 mice after hormonal treatments. Mice infected during estrus-like phase were resistant to vaginal infection. In contrast, when infected during diestrus-like phase, AG129 mice succumbed to infection, whereas LysMCre+IFNARfl/fl mice experienced transient illness. Patency of transgenital transmission (TGT) in diestrus-like mice was demonstrated by detection of viremia and ZIKV replication in spleen and brain, and viral RNA persisted in vaginal washes as late as 10 days post-infection. In these lethal and sublethal mouse models, this study indicates that intravaginal deposition of ZIKV can cause TGT, hormonal changes in the female reproductive tract (FRT) influence transmission, and ZIKV replication persists in the FRT for several days. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Impact of Macrophage Nucleotide Pools on HIV-1 Reverse Transcription, Viral Replication, and the Development of Novel Antiviral Agents

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    Christina Gavegnano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are ubiquitous and represent a significant viral reservoir for HIV-1. Macrophages are nondividing, terminally differentiated cells, which have a unique cellular microenvironment relative to actively dividing T lymphocytes, all of which can impact HIV-1 infection/replication, design of inhibitors targeting viral replication in these cells, emergence of mutations within the HIV-1 genome, and disease progression. Scarce dNTPs drive rNTP incorporation into the proviral DNA in macrophages but not lymphocytes. Furthermore, the efficacy of a ribose-based inhibitor that potently inhibits HIV-1 replication in macrophages, has prompted a reconsideration of the previously accepted dogma that 2′-deoxy-based inhibitors demonstrate effective inhibition of HIV-1 replication. Additionally, higher levels of dUTP and rNTP incorporation in macrophages, and lack of repair mechanisms relative to lymphocytes, provide a further mechanistic understanding required to develop targeted inhibition of viral replication in macrophages. Together, the concentrations of dNTPs and rNTPs within macrophages comprise a distinctive cellular environment that directly impacts HIV-1 replication in macrophages and provides unique insight into novel therapeutic mechanisms that could be exploited to eliminate virus from these cells.

  17. Gefitinib and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate decrease viral replication and cytokine production in dengue virus infected human monocyte cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Anyelo; Valero, Nereida; Mosquera, Jesús; Fuenmayor, Edgard; Alvarez-Mon, Melchor

    2017-12-15

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and nucleotide-binding and oligomerization-domain containing 2 (NOD2) are important in cancer and in microbial recognition, respectively. These molecules trigger intracellular signaling pathways inducing the expression of inflammatory genes by NF-kB translocation. Gefitinib (GBTC) and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) are capable of inhibiting EGFR/NOD2 and NF-kB, respectively. In earlier stages of dengue virus (DENV) infection, monocytes are capable of sustaining viral replication and increasing cytokine production, suggesting that monocyte/macrophages play an important role in early DENV replication. GBTC and PDTC have not been used to modify the pathogenesis of DENV in infected cells. This study was aimed to determine the effect of GBTC and PDTC on viral replication and cytokine production in DENV serotype 2 (DENV2)-infected human monocyte cultures. GBTC and PDTC were used to inhibit EGFR/NOD2 and NF-kB, respectively. Cytokine production was measured by ELISA and viral replication by plaque forming unit assay. Increased DENV2 replication and anti-viral cytokine production (IFN-α/β, TNF-α, IL-12 and IL-18) in infected cultures were found. These parameters were decreased after EGFR/NOD2 or NF-kB inhibitions. The inhibitory effects of GBTC and PDTC on viral replication and cytokine production can be beneficial in the treatment of patients infected by dengue and suggest a possible role of EGFR/NOD2 receptors and NF-kB in dengue pathogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Persistence of frequently transmitted drug-resistant HIV-1 variants can be explained by high viral replication capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingen, Marieke; Wensing, Annemarie M J; Fransen, Katrien; De Bel, Annelies; de Jong, Dorien; Hoepelman, Andy I M; Magiorkinis, Emmanouil; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Lunar, Maja M; Poljak, Mario; Nijhuis, Monique; Boucher, Charles A B

    2014-11-29

    In approximately 10% of newly diagnosed individuals in Europe, HIV-1 variants harboring transmitted drug resistance mutations (TDRM) are detected. For some TDRM it has been shown that they revert to wild type while other mutations persist in the absence of therapy. To understand the mechanisms explaining persistence we investigated the in vivo evolution of frequently transmitted HIV-1 variants and their impact on in vitro replicative capacity. We selected 31 individuals infected with HIV-1 harboring frequently observed TDRM such as M41L or K103N in reverse transcriptase (RT) or M46L in protease. In all these samples, polymorphisms at non-TDRM positions were present at baseline (median protease: 5, RT: 6). Extensive analysis of viral evolution of protease and RT demonstrated that the majority of TDRM (51/55) persisted for at least a year and even up to eight years in the plasma. During follow-up only limited selection of additional polymorphisms was observed (median: 1).To investigate the impact of frequently observed TDRM on the replication capacity, mutant viruses were constructed with the most frequently encountered TDRM as site-directed mutants in the genetic background of the lab strain HXB2. In addition, viruses containing patient-derived protease or RT harboring similar TDRM were made. The replicative capacity of all viral variants was determined by infecting peripheral blood mononuclear cells and subsequently monitoring virus replication. The majority of site-directed mutations (M46I/M46L in protease and M41L, M41L + T215Y and K103N in RT) decreased viral replicative capacity; only protease mutation L90M did not hamper viral replication. Interestingly, most patient-derived viruses had a higher in vitro replicative capacity than the corresponding site-directed mutant viruses. We demonstrate limited in vivo evolution of protease and RT harbouring frequently observed TDRM in the plasma. This is in line with the high in vitro replication capacity of patient

  19. Induction of DNA Damages upon Marek's Disease Virus Infection: Implication in Viral Replication and Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencherit, Djihad; Remy, Sylvie; Le Vern, Yves; Vychodil, Tereza; Bertzbach, Luca D; Kaufer, Benedikt B; Denesvre, Caroline; Trapp-Fragnet, Laëtitia

    2017-12-15

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is a highly contagious alphaherpesvirus that infects chickens and causes a deadly neoplastic disease. We previously demonstrated that MDV infection arrests cells in S phase and that the tegument protein VP22 plays a major role in this process. In addition, expression of VP22 induces double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the cellular DNA, suggesting that DNA damage and the associated cellular response might be favorable for the MDV life cycle. Here, we addressed the role of DNA damage in MDV replication and pathogenesis. We demonstrated that MDV induces DSBs during lytic infection in vitro and in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of infected animals. Intriguingly, we did not observe DNA damage in latently infected MDV-induced lymphoblastoid cells, while MDV reactivation resulted in the onset of DNA lesions, suggesting that DNA damage and/or the resulting DNA damage response might be required for efficient MDV replication and reactivation. In addition, reactivation was significantly enhanced by the induction of DNA damage using a number of chemicals. Finally, we used recombinant viruses to show that VP22 is required for the induction of DNA damage in vivo and that this likely contributes to viral oncogenesis.IMPORTANCE Marek's disease virus is an oncogenic alphaherpesvirus that causes fatal T-cell lymphomas in chickens. MDV causes substantial losses in the poultry industry and is also used in small-animal models for virus-induced tumor formation. DNA damage not only is implicated in tumor development but also aids in the life cycle of several viruses; however, its role in MDV replication, latency, and reactivation remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that MDV induces DNA lesions during lytic replication in vitro and in vivo DNA damage was not observed in latently infected cells; however, it was reinitiated during reactivation. Reactivation was significantly enhanced by the induction of DNA damage. Recombinant viruses that lacked the ability

  20. Orthoretroviral-like prototype foamy virus gag-pol expression is compatible with viral replication

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    Reh Juliane

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foamy viruses (FVs unlike orthoretroviruses express Pol as a separate precursor protein and not as a Gag-Pol fusion protein. A unique packaging strategy, involving recognition of briding viral RNA by both Pol precursor and Gag as well as potential Gag-Pol protein interactions, ensures Pol particle encapsidation. Results Several Prototype FV (PFV Gag-Pol fusion protein constructs were generated to examine whether PFV replication is compatible with an orthoretroviral-like Pol expression. During their analysis, non-particle-associated secreted Pol precursor protein was discovered in extracellular wild type PFV particle preparations of different origin, copurifying in simple virion enrichment protocols. Different analysis methods suggest that extracellular wild type PFV particles contain predominantly mature p85PR-RT and p40IN Pol subunits. Characterization of various PFV Gag-Pol fusion constructs revealed that PFV Pol expression in an orthoretroviral manner is compatible with PFV replication as long as a proteolytic processing between Gag and Pol proteins is possible. PFV Gag-Pol translation by a HIV-1 like ribosomal frameshift signal resulted in production of replication-competent virions, although cell- and particle-associated Pol levels were reduced in comparison to wild type. In-frame fusion of PFV Gag and Pol ORFs led to increased cellular Pol levels, but particle incorporation was only marginally elevated. Unlike that reported for similar orthoretroviral constructs, a full-length in-frame PFV Gag-Pol fusion construct showed wildtype-like particle release and infectivity characteristics. In contrast, in-frame PFV Gag-Pol fusion with C-terminal Gag ORF truncations or non-removable Gag peptide addition to Pol displayed wildtype particle release, but reduced particle infectivity. PFV Gag-Pol precursor fusion proteins with inactivated protease were highly deficient in regular particle release, although coexpression of p71Gag

  1. Illuminating the Sites of Enterovirus Replication in Living Cells by Using a Split-GFP-Tagged Viral Protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schaar, H M; Melia, C E; van Bruggen, J A C; Strating, J R P M; van Geenen, M E D; Koster, A J; Bárcena, M; van Kuppeveld, F J M

    2016-01-01

    Like all other positive-strand RNA viruses, enteroviruses generate new organelles (replication organelles [ROs]) with a unique protein and lipid composition on which they multiply their viral genome. Suitable tools for live-cell imaging of enterovirus ROs are currently unavailable, as recombinant

  2. A combinational CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing approach can halt HIV replication and prevent viral escape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebbink, Robert Jan; de Jong, Dorien C M; Wolters, Femke; Kruse, Elisabeth M; van Ham, Petra M; Wiertz, Emmanuel J H J; Nijhuis, Monique

    2017-01-01

    HIV presents one of the highest evolutionary rates ever detected and combination antiretroviral therapy is needed to overcome the plasticity of the virus population and control viral replication. Conventional treatments lack the ability to clear the latent reservoir, which remains the major obstacle

  3. Temporal order of evolution of DNA replication systems inferred by comparison of cellular and viral DNA polymerases

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    Koonin Eugene V

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The core enzymes of the DNA replication systems show striking diversity among cellular life forms and more so among viruses. In particular, and counter-intuitively, given the central role of DNA in all cells and the mechanistic uniformity of replication, the core enzymes of the replication systems of bacteria and archaea (as well as eukaryotes are unrelated or extremely distantly related. Viruses and plasmids, in addition, possess at least two unique DNA replication systems, namely, the protein-primed and rolling circle modalities of replication. This unexpected diversity makes the origin and evolution of DNA replication systems a particularly challenging and intriguing problem in evolutionary biology. Results I propose a specific succession for the emergence of different DNA replication systems, drawing argument from the differences in their representation among viruses and other selfish replicating elements. In a striking pattern, the DNA replication systems of viruses infecting bacteria and eukaryotes are dominated by the archaeal-type B-family DNA polymerase (PolB whereas the bacterial replicative DNA polymerase (PolC is present only in a handful of bacteriophage genomes. There is no apparent mechanistic impediment to the involvement of the bacterial-type replication machinery in viral DNA replication. Therefore, I hypothesize that the observed, markedly unequal distribution of the replicative DNA polymerases among the known cellular and viral replication systems has a historical explanation. I propose that, among the two types of DNA replication machineries that are found in extant life forms, the archaeal-type, PolB-based system evolved first and had already given rise to a variety of diverse viruses and other selfish elements before the advent of the bacterial, PolC-based machinery. Conceivably, at that stage of evolution, the niches for DNA-viral reproduction have been already filled with viruses replicating with the

  4. Chloroquine and its derivatives exacerbate B19V-associated anemia by promoting viral replication.

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    Claudia Bönsch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An unexpectedly high seroprevalence and pathogenic potential of human parvovirus B19 (B19V have been observed in certain malaria-endemic countries in parallel with local use of chloroquine (CQ as first-line treatment for malaria. The aims of this study were to assess the effect of CQ and other common antimalarial drugs on B19V infection in vitro and the possible epidemiological consequences for children from Papua New Guinea (PNG. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Viral RNA, DNA and proteins were analyzed in different cell types following infection with B19V in the presence of a range of antimalarial drugs. Relationships between B19V infection status, prior 4-aminoquinoline use and anemia were assessed in 200 PNG children <10 years of age participating in a case-control study of severe infections. In CQ-treated cells, the synthesis of viral RNA, DNA and proteins was significantly higher and occurred earlier than in control cells. CQ facilitates B19V infection by minimizing intracellular degradation of incoming particles. Only amodiaquine amongst other antimalarial drugs had a similar effect. B19V IgM seropositivity was more frequent in 111 children with severe anemia (hemoglobin <50 g/L than in 89 healthy controls (15.3% vs 3.4%; P = 0.008. In children who were either B19V IgM or PCR positive, 4-aminoquinoline use was associated with a significantly lower admission hemoglobin concentration. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data strongly suggest that 4-aminoquinoline drugs and their metabolites exacerbate B19V-associated anemia by promoting B19V replication. Consideration should be given for choosing a non-4-aminoquinoline drug to partner artemisinin compounds in combination antimalarial therapy.

  5. Interaction of NCOR/SMRT Repressor Complexes with Papillomavirus E8^E2C Proteins Inhibits Viral Replication.

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    Marcel Dreer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Infections with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV such as HPV16 and 31 can lead to ano-genital and oropharyngeal cancers and HPV types from the beta genus have been implicated in the development of non-melanoma skin cancer. HPV replicate as nuclear extrachromosomal plasmids at low copy numbers in undifferentiated cells. HPV16 and 31 mutants have indicated that these viruses express an E8^E2C protein which negatively regulates genome replication. E8^E2C shares the DNA-binding and dimerization domain (E2C with the essential viral replication activator E2 and the E8 domain replaces the replication/transcription activation domain of E2. The HR-HPV E8 domain is required for inhibiting viral transcription and the replication of the viral origin mediated by viral E1 and E2 proteins. We show now that E8^E2C also limits replication of HPV1, a mu-PV and HPV8, a beta-PV, in normal human keratinocytes. Proteomic analyses identified all NCoR/SMRT corepressor complex components (HDAC3, GPS2, NCoR, SMRT, TBL1 and TBLR1 as co-precipitating host cell proteins for HPV16 and 31 E8^E2C proteins. Co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization experiments revealed that NCoR/SMRT components interact with HPV1, 8, 16 and 31 E8^E2C proteins in an E8-dependent manner. SiRNA knock-down experiments confirm that NCoR/SMRT components are critical for both the inhibition of transcription and HPV origin replication by E8^E2C proteins. Furthermore, a dominant-negative NCoR fragment activates transcription and replication only from HPV16 and 31 wt but not from mutant genomes encoding NCoR/SMRT-binding deficient E8^E2C proteins. In summary, our data suggest that the repressive function of E8^E2C is highly conserved among HPV and that it is mediated by an E8-dependent interaction with NCoR/SMRT complexes. Our data also indicate for the first time that NCoR/SMRT complexes not only are involved in inhibiting cellular and viral transcription but also in controlling the replication

  6. Interaction of NCOR/SMRT Repressor Complexes with Papillomavirus E8^E2C Proteins Inhibits Viral Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreer, Marcel; Fertey, Jasmin; van de Poel, Saskia; Straub, Elke; Madlung, Johannes; Macek, Boris; Iftner, Thomas; Stubenrauch, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Infections with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV) such as HPV16 and 31 can lead to ano-genital and oropharyngeal cancers and HPV types from the beta genus have been implicated in the development of non-melanoma skin cancer. HPV replicate as nuclear extrachromosomal plasmids at low copy numbers in undifferentiated cells. HPV16 and 31 mutants have indicated that these viruses express an E8^E2C protein which negatively regulates genome replication. E8^E2C shares the DNA-binding and dimerization domain (E2C) with the essential viral replication activator E2 and the E8 domain replaces the replication/transcription activation domain of E2. The HR-HPV E8 domain is required for inhibiting viral transcription and the replication of the viral origin mediated by viral E1 and E2 proteins. We show now that E8^E2C also limits replication of HPV1, a mu-PV and HPV8, a beta-PV, in normal human keratinocytes. Proteomic analyses identified all NCoR/SMRT corepressor complex components (HDAC3, GPS2, NCoR, SMRT, TBL1 and TBLR1) as co-precipitating host cell proteins for HPV16 and 31 E8^E2C proteins. Co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization experiments revealed that NCoR/SMRT components interact with HPV1, 8, 16 and 31 E8^E2C proteins in an E8-dependent manner. SiRNA knock-down experiments confirm that NCoR/SMRT components are critical for both the inhibition of transcription and HPV origin replication by E8^E2C proteins. Furthermore, a dominant-negative NCoR fragment activates transcription and replication only from HPV16 and 31 wt but not from mutant genomes encoding NCoR/SMRT-binding deficient E8^E2C proteins. In summary, our data suggest that the repressive function of E8^E2C is highly conserved among HPV and that it is mediated by an E8-dependent interaction with NCoR/SMRT complexes. Our data also indicate for the first time that NCoR/SMRT complexes not only are involved in inhibiting cellular and viral transcription but also in controlling the replication of HPV origins.

  7. Mutations in HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Affect the Errors Made in a Single Cycle of Viral Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abram, Michael E.; Ferris, Andrea L.; Das, Kalyan; Quinoñes, Octavio; Shao, Wei; Tuske, Steven; Alvord, W. Gregory; Arnold, Eddy

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genetic variation in HIV-1 in patients is due to the high rate of viral replication, the high viral load, and the errors made during viral replication. Some of the mutations in reverse transcriptase (RT) that alter the deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP)-binding pocket, including those that confer resistance to nucleoside/nucleotide analogs, affect dNTP selection during replication. The effects of mutations in RT on the spectrum (nature, position, and frequency) of errors made in vivo are poorly understood. We previously determined the mutation rate and the frequency of different types of mutations and identified hot spots for mutations in a lacZα (the α complementing region of lacZ) reporter gene carried by an HIV-1 vector that replicates using wild-type RT. We show here that four mutations (Y115F, M184V, M184I, and Q151M) in the dNTP-binding pocket of RT that had relatively small effects on the overall HIV-1 mutation rate (less than 3-fold compared to the wild type) significantly increased mutations at some specific positions in the lacZα reporter gene. We also show that changes in a sequence that flanks the reporter gene can affect the mutations that arise in the reporter. These data show that changes either in HIV-1 RT or in the sequence of the nucleic acid template can affect the spectrum of mutations made during viral replication. This could, by implication, affect the generation of drug-resistant mutants and immunological-escape mutants in patients. IMPORTANCE RT is the viral enzyme that converts the RNA genome of HIV into DNA. Errors made during replication allow the virus to escape from the host's immune system and to develop resistance to the available anti-HIV drugs. We show that four different mutations in RT which are known to be associated with resistance to anti-RT drugs modestly increased the overall frequency of errors made during viral replication. However, the increased errors were not uniformly distributed; the additional errors

  8. The Ubiquitin-Conjugating System: Multiple Roles in Viral Replication and Infection

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    Arianna Calistri

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Through the combined action of ubiquitinating and deubiquitinating enzymes, conjugation of ubiquitin to a target protein acts as a reversible post-translational modification functionally similar to phosphorylation. Indeed, ubiquitination is more and more recognized as a central process for the fine regulation of many cellular pathways. Due to their nature as obligate intracellular parasites, viruses rely on the most conserved host cell machineries for their own replication. Thus, it is not surprising that members from almost every viral family are challenged by ubiquitin mediated mechanisms in different steps of their life cycle and have evolved in order to by-pass or exploit the cellular ubiquitin conjugating system to maximize their chance to establish a successful infection. In this review we will present several examples of the complex interplay that links viruses and the ubiquitin conjugation machinery, with a special focus on the mechanisms evolved by the human immunodeficiency virus to escape from cellular restriction factors and to exit from infected cells.

  9. Suppression of HTLV-1 replication by Tax-mediated rerouting of the p13 viral protein to nuclear speckles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Vibeke; Pise-Masison, Cynthia A; Sinha-Datta, Uma; Bellon, Marcia; Valeri, Valerio; Washington Parks, Robyn; Cecchinato, Valentina; Fukumoto, Risaku; Nicot, Christophe; Franchini, Genoveffa

    2011-08-11

    Disease development in human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected individuals is positively correlated with the level of integrated viral DNA in T cells. HTLV-1 replication is positively regulated by Tax and Rex and negatively regulated by the p30 and HBZ proteins. In the present study, we demonstrate that HTLV-1 encodes another negative regulator of virus expression, the p13 protein. Expressed separately, p13 localizes to the mitochondria, whereas in the presence of Tax, part of it is ubiquitinated, stabilized, and rerouted to the nuclear speckles. The p13 protein directly binds Tax, decreases Tax binding to the CBP/p300 transcriptional coactivator, and, by reducing Tax transcriptional activity, suppresses viral expression. Because Tax stabilizes its own repressor, these findings suggest that HTLV-1 has evolved a complex mechanism to control its own replication. Further, these results highlight the importance of studying the function of the HTLV-1 viral proteins, not only in isolation, but also in the context of full viral replication.

  10. In vitro anti-reovirus activity of kuraridin isolated from Sophora flavescens against viral replication and hemagglutination

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    Hyung-Jun Kwon

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we evaluated the anti-reovirus activity of kuraridin isolated from the roots of Sophora flavescens. In particular, we focused on whether this property is attributable to direct inhibition of reovirus attachment and/or inhibition of viral replication with the aid of time-of-addition (pre-treatment, simultaneous treatment, and post-treatment experiments. No significant antiviral activity of kuraridin was detected in the pre-treatment assay. In the simultaneous assay, the 50% effective inhibitory concentrations (EC50 of kuraridin were 15.3–176.9 μM against human type 1–3 reoviruses (HRV1–3 and Korean porcine reovirus (PRV. Kuraridin completely blocked binding of viral sigma 1 protein to sialic acids at concentrations lower than 82.5 μM in the hemagglutination inhibition assay. Moreover, kuraridin inhibited HRV1–3 and PRV viral replication with EC50 values of 14.0–62.0 μM. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis disclosed strong suppression of reovirus RNA synthesis at the late stage (18 h of virus replication by kuraridin. The viral yields of kuraridin-treated cells were significantly reduced at 24 h post-infection, compared with DMSO-treated cells. Our results collectively suggest that kuraridin inhibits virus adsorption and replication by inhibiting hemagglutination, viral RNA and protein synthesis and virus shedding, supporting its utility as a viable candidate antiviral drug against reoviruses.

  11. Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) co-infection induced chlamydial persistence/stress does not require viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoborg, Robert V; Borel, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydiae may exist at the site of infection in an alternative replicative form, called the aberrant body (AB). ABs are produced during a viable but non-infectious developmental state termed "persistence" or "chlamydial stress." As persistent/stressed chlamydiae: (i) may contribute to chronic inflammation observed in diseases like trachoma; and (ii) are more resistant to current anti-chlamydial drugs of choice, it is critical to better understand this developmental stage. We previously demonstrated that porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) co-infection induced Chlamydia pecorum persistence/stress in culture. One critical characteristic of persistence/stress is that the chlamydiae remain viable and can reenter the normal developmental cycle when the stressor is removed. Thus, we hypothesized that PEDV-induced persistence would be reversible if viral replication was inhibited. Therefore, we performed time course experiments in which Vero cells were C. pecorum/PEDV infected in the presence of cycloheximide (CHX), which inhibits viral but not chlamydial protein synthesis. CHX-exposure inhibited PEDV replication, but did not inhibit induction of C. pecorum persistence at 24 h post-PEDV infection, as indicated by AB formation and reduced production of infectious EBs. Interestingly, production of infectious EBs resumed when CHX-exposed, co-infected cells were incubated 48-72 h post-PEDV co-infection. These data demonstrate that PEDV co-infection-induced chlamydial persistence/stress is reversible and suggest that this induction (i) does not require viral replication in host cells; and (ii) does not require de novo host or viral protein synthesis. These data also suggest that viral binding and/or entry may be required for this effect. Because the PEDV host cell receptor (CD13 or aminopeptidase N) stimulates cellular signaling pathways in the absence of PEDV infection, we suspect that PEDV co-infection might alter CD13 function and induce the chlamydiae to enter the

  12. Identification of Proteins Bound to Dengue Viral RNA In Vivo Reveals New Host Proteins Important for Virus Replication

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    Stacia L. Phillips

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus is the most prevalent cause of arthropod-borne infection worldwide. Due to the limited coding capacity of the viral genome and the complexity of the viral life cycle, host cell proteins play essential roles throughout the course of viral infection. Host RNA-binding proteins mediate various aspects of virus replication through their physical interactions with viral RNA. Here we describe a technique designed to identify such interactions in the context of infected cells using UV cross-linking followed by antisense-mediated affinity purification and mass spectrometry. Using this approach, we identified interactions, several of them novel, between host proteins and dengue viral RNA in infected Huh7 cells. Most of these interactions were subsequently validated using RNA immunoprecipitation. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA-mediated gene silencing, we showed that more than half of these host proteins are likely involved in regulating virus replication, demonstrating the utility of this method in identifying biologically relevant interactions that may not be identified using traditional in vitro approaches.

  13. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Induced Synthesis of a Novel Viral Factor Mediates Efficient Replication of Genotype-1 Hepatitis E Virus.

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    Vidya P Nair

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis E virus (HEV causes acute hepatitis in many parts of the world including Asia, Africa and Latin America. Though self-limiting in normal individuals, it results in ~30% mortality in infected pregnant women. It has also been reported to cause acute and chronic hepatitis in organ transplant patients. Of the seven viral genotypes, genotype-1 virus infects humans and is a major public health concern in South Asian countries. Sporadic cases of genotype-3 and 4 infection in human and animals such as pigs, deer, mongeese have been reported primarily from industrialized countries. Genotype-5, 6 and 7 viruses are known to infect animals such as wild boar and camel, respectively. Genotype-3 and 4 viruses have been successfully propagated in the laboratory in mammalian cell culture. However, genotype-1 virus replicates poorly in mammalian cell culture and no other efficient model exists to study its life cycle. Here, we report that endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress promotes genotype-1 HEV replication by inducing cap-independent, internal initiation mediated translation of a novel viral protein (named ORF4. Importantly, ORF4 expression and stimulatory effect of ER stress inducers on viral replication is specific to genotype-1. ORF4 protein sequence is mostly conserved among genotype-1 HEV isolates and ORF4 specific antibodies were detected in genotype-1 HEV patient serum. ORF4 interacted with multiple viral and host proteins and assembled a protein complex consisting of viral helicase, RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp, X, host eEF1α1 (eukaryotic elongation factor 1 isoform-1 and tubulinβ. In association with eEF1α1, ORF4 stimulated viral RdRp activity. Furthermore, human hepatoma cells that stably express ORF4 or engineered proteasome resistant ORF4 mutant genome permitted enhanced viral replication. These findings reveal a positive role of ER stress in promoting genotype-1 HEV replication and pave the way towards development of an efficient

  14. A dimeric Rep protein initiates replication of a linear archaeal virus genome: implications for the Rep mechanism and viral replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oke, Muse; Kerou, Melina; Liu, Huanting

    2011-01-01

    an active-site tyrosine and the 5' end of the DNA, releasing a 3' DNA end as a primer for DNA synthesis. The enzyme can also catalyze the joining reaction that is necessary to reseal the DNA hairpin and terminate replication. The dimeric structure points to a simple mechanism through which two closely...

  15. Molecular basis for viral selective replication in cancer cells: activation of CDK2 by adenovirus-induced cyclin E.

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    Pei-Hsin Cheng

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses (Ads with deletion of E1b55K preferentially replicate in cancer cells and have been used in cancer therapies. We have previously shown that Ad E1B55K protein is involved in induction of cyclin E for Ad replication, but this E1B55K function is not required in cancer cells in which deregulation of cyclin E is frequently observed. In this study, we investigated the interaction of cyclin E and CDK2 in Ad-infected cells. Ad infection significantly increased the large form of cyclin E (cyclin EL, promoted cyclin E/CDK2 complex formation and increased CDK2 phosphorylation at the T160 site. Activated CDK2 caused pRb phosphorylation at the S612 site. Repression of CDK2 activity with the chemical inhibitor roscovitine or with specific small interfering RNAs significantly decreased pRb phosphorylation, with concomitant repression of viral replication. Our results suggest that Ad-induced cyclin E activates CDK2 that targets the transcriptional repressor pRb to generate a cellular environment for viral productive replication. This study reveals a new molecular basis for oncolytic replication of E1b-deleted Ads and will aid in the development of new strategies for Ad oncolytic virotherapies.

  16. Neonicotinoid clothianidin adversely affects insect immunity and promotes replication of a viral pathogen in honey bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Prisco, Gennaro; Cavaliere, Valeria; Annoscia, Desiderato; Varricchio, Paola; Caprio, Emilio; Nazzi, Francesco; Gargiulo, Giuseppe; Pennacchio, Francesco

    2013-11-12

    Large-scale losses of honey bee colonies represent a poorly understood problem of global importance. Both biotic and abiotic factors are involved in this phenomenon that is often associated with high loads of parasites and pathogens. A stronger impact of pathogens in honey bees exposed to neonicotinoid insecticides has been reported, but the causal link between insecticide exposure and the possible immune alteration of honey bees remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that the neonicotinoid insecticide clothianidin negatively modulates NF-κB immune signaling in insects and adversely affects honey bee antiviral defenses controlled by this transcription factor. We have identified in insects a negative modulator of NF-κB activation, which is a leucine-rich repeat protein. Exposure to clothianidin, by enhancing the transcription of the gene encoding this inhibitor, reduces immune defenses and promotes the replication of the deformed wing virus in honey bees bearing covert infections. This honey bee immunosuppression is similarly induced by a different neonicotinoid, imidacloprid, but not by the organophosphate chlorpyriphos, which does not affect NF-κB signaling. The occurrence at sublethal doses of this insecticide-induced viral proliferation suggests that the studied neonicotinoids might have a negative effect at the field level. Our experiments uncover a further level of regulation of the immune response in insects and set the stage for studies on neural modulation of immunity in animals. Furthermore, this study has implications for the conservation of bees, as it will contribute to the definition of more appropriate guidelines for testing chronic or sublethal effects of pesticides used in agriculture.

  17. Human polyoma JC virus minor capsid proteins, VP2 and VP3, enhance large T antigen binding to the origin of viral DNA replication: evidence for their involvement in regulation of the viral DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saribas, A Sami; Mun, Sarah; Johnson, Jaslyn; El-Hajmoussa, Mohammad; White, Martyn K; Safak, Mahmut

    2014-01-20

    JC virus (JCV) lytically infects the oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system in a subset of immunocompromized patients and causes the demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. JCV replicates and assembles into infectious virions in the nucleus. However, understanding the molecular mechanisms of its virion biogenesis remains elusive. In this report, we have attempted to shed more light on this process by investigating molecular interactions between large T antigen (LT-Ag), Hsp70 and minor capsid proteins, VP2/VP3. We demonstrated that Hsp70 interacts with VP2/VP3 and LT-Ag; and accumulates heavily in the nucleus of the infected cells. We also showed that VP2/VP3 associates with LT-Ag through their DNA binding domains resulting in enhancement in LT-Ag DNA binding to Ori and induction in viral DNA replication. Altogether, our results suggest that VP2/VP3 and Hsp70 actively participate in JCV DNA replication and may play critical roles in coupling of viral DNA replication to virion encapsidation. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Stearoyl coenzyme A desaturase 1 is associated with hepatitis C virus replication complex and regulates viral replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, LN; Lim, YS; Pham, Long

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) life cycle is tightly regulated by lipid metabolism of host cells. In order to identify host factors involved in HCV propagation, we have recently screened a small interfering RNA (siRNA) library targeting host genes that control lipid metabolism and lipid droplet...... formation using cell culture-grown HCV (HCVcc)-infected cells. We selected and characterized the gene encoding stearoyl coenzyme A (CoA) desaturase 1 (SCD1). siRNA-mediated knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of SCD1 abrogated HCV replication in both subgenomic replicon and Jc1-infected cells, while...... exogenous supplementation of either oleate or palmitoleate, products of SCD1 activity, resurrected HCV replication in SCD1 knockdown cells. SCD1 was coimmunoprecipitated with HCV nonstructural proteins and colocalized with both double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and HCV nonstructural proteins, indicating that SCD1...

  19. The Norovirus NS3 Protein Is a Dynamic Lipid- and Microtubule-Associated Protein Involved in Viral RNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Ben T; Hyde, Jennifer L; Sarvestani, Soroush T; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V; Green, Kim Y; White, Peter A; Mackenzie, Jason M

    2017-02-01

    Norovirus (NoV) infections are a significant health burden to society, yet the lack of reliable tissue culture systems has hampered the development of appropriate antiviral therapies. Here we show that the NoV NS3 protein, derived from murine NoV (MNV), is intimately associated with the MNV replication complex and the viral replication intermediate double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). We observed that when expressed individually, MNV NS3 and NS3 encoded by human Norwalk virus (NV) induced the formation of distinct vesicle-like structures that did not colocalize with any particular protein markers to cellular organelles but localized to cellular membranes, in particular those with a high cholesterol content. Both proteins also showed some degree of colocalization with the cytoskeleton marker β-tubulin. Although the distribution of MNV and NV NS3s were similar, NV NS3 displayed a higher level of colocalization with the Golgi apparatus and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). However, we observed that although both proteins colocalized in membranes counterstained with filipin, an indicator of cholesterol content, MNV NS3 displayed a greater association with flotillin and stomatin, proteins known to associate with sphingolipid- and cholesterol-rich microdomains. Utilizing time-lapse epifluorescence microscopy, we observed that the membrane-derived vesicular structures induced by MNV NS3 were highly motile and dynamic in nature, and their movement was dependent on intact microtubules. These results begin to interrogate the functions of NoV proteins during virus replication and highlight the conserved properties of the NoV NS3 proteins among the seven Norovirus genogroups. Many mechanisms involved in the replication of norovirus still remain unclear, including the role for the NS3 protein, one of seven nonstructural viral proteins, which remains to be elucidated. This study reveals that murine norovirus (MNV) NS3 is intimately associated with the viral replication complex and ds

  20. Replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Hak (Tony); J. Dul (Jan)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractReplication is conducting a study in another case (or population) in order to assess whether a research finding from previous studies can be confirmed. The aim of replication is to assess the generalizability of a theoretical claim and the “research finding” that is (or is not) confirmed

  1. Inefficient viral replication of bovine leukemia virus induced by spontaneous deletion mutation in the G4 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Hironobu; Uchiyama, Jumpei; Nikaido, Sae; Sato, Reiichiro; Sakaguchi, Masahiro; Tsukamoto, Kenji

    2016-10-01

    Enzootic bovine leucosis is caused by bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection, which is highly prevalent in several regions of the world and significantly impacts the livestock industry. In BLV infection, the proviral load in the blood reflects disease progression. Although the BLV genome is highly conserved among retroviruses, genetic variation has been reported. However, the relationship between proviral load and genetic variation is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the changes in proviral load in BLV-infected cattle in Japan and then identified and analysed a BLV strain pvAF967 that had a static proviral load. First, examining the proviral load in the aleukaemic cattle in 2014 and 2015, cow AF967 showed a static proviral load, while the other cows showed significant increases in proviral load. Sequencing the provirus in cow AF967 showed a deletion of 12 nt located in the G4 gene. An in vitro assay system using BLV molecular clone was set up to evaluate viral replication and production. In this in vitro assay, the deletion mutation in the G4 gene resulted in a significant decrease in viral replication and production. In addition, we showed that the deletion mutation did not affect the viral transcriptional activity of Tax protein, which is also important for virus replication. The emergence of strain pvAF967 that showed a static proviral load, combined with other retrovirus evolutionary traits, suggests that some BLV strains may have evolved to be symbiotic with cattle.

  2. Proficient Replication of the Yeast Genome by a Viral DNA Polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stodola, Joseph L; Stith, Carrie M; Burgers, Peter M

    2016-05-27

    DNA replication in eukaryotic cells requires minimally three B-family DNA polymerases: Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ϵ. Pol δ replicates and matures Okazaki fragments on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pol δ is a three-subunit enzyme (Pol3-Pol31-Pol32). A small C-terminal domain of the catalytic subunit Pol3 carries both iron-sulfur cluster and zinc-binding motifs, which mediate interactions with Pol31, and processive replication with the replication clamp proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), respectively. We show that the entire N-terminal domain of Pol3, containing polymerase and proofreading activities, could be effectively replaced by those from bacteriophage RB69, and could carry out chromosomal DNA replication in yeast with remarkable high fidelity, provided that adaptive mutations in the replication clamp PCNA were introduced. This result is consistent with the model that all essential interactions for DNA replication in yeast are mediated through the small C-terminal domain of Pol3. The chimeric polymerase carries out processive replication with PCNA in vitro; however, in yeast, it requires an increased involvement of the mutagenic translesion DNA polymerase ζ during DNA replication. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Long Terminal Repeat Circular DNA as Markers of Active Viral Replication of Human T Lymphotropic Virus-1 in Vivo

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    James M Fox

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Clonal expansion of human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1 infected cells in vivo is well documented. Unlike human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1, HTLV-1 plasma RNA is sparse. The contribution of the “mitotic” spread of HTLV-1 compared with infectious spread of the virus to HTLV-1 viral burden in established infection is uncertain. Since extrachromosomal long terminal repeat (LTR DNA circles are indicators of viral replication in HIV-1 carriers with undetectable plasma HIV RNA, we hypothesised that HTLV-1 LTR circles could indicate reverse transcriptase (RT usage and infectious activity. 1LTR and 2LTR DNA circles were measured in HTLV-1 cell lines and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC of asymptomatic carriers (ACs and patients with HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP or adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL. 1LTR DNA circles were detected in 14/20 patients at a mean of 1.38/100 PBMC but did not differentiate disease status nor correlate with HTLV-1 DNA copies. 2LTR DNA circles were detected in 30/31 patients and at higher concentrations in patients with HTLV-1-associated diseases, independent of HTLV-1 DNA load. In an incident case the 2LTR DNA circle concentration increased 2.1 fold at the onset of HAM/TSP compared to baseline. Detectable and fluctuating levels of HTLV-1 DNA circles in patients indicate viral RT usage and virus replication. Our results indicate HTLV-1 viral replication capacity is maintained in chronic infection and may be associated with disease onset.

  4. Pur-Alpha Induces JCV Gene Expression and Viral Replication by Suppressing SRSF1 in Glial Cells.

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    Ilker Kudret Sariyer

    Full Text Available PML is a rare and fatal demyelinating disease of the CNS caused by the human polyomavirus, JC virus (JCV, which occurs in AIDS patients and those on immunosuppressive monoclonal antibody therapies (mAbs. We sought to identify mechanisms that could stimulate reactivation of JCV in a cell culture model system and targeted pathways which could affect early gene transcription and JCV T-antigen production, which are key steps of the viral life cycle for blocking reactivation of JCV. Two important regulatory partners we have previously identified for T-antigen include Pur-alpha and SRSF1 (SF2/ASF. SRSF1, an alternative splicing factor, is a potential regulator of JCV whose overexpression in glial cells strongly suppresses viral gene expression and replication. Pur-alpha has been most extensively characterized as a sequence-specific DNA- and RNA-binding protein which directs both viral gene transcription and mRNA translation, and is a potent inducer of the JCV early promoter through binding to T-antigen.Pur-alpha and SRSF1 both act directly as transcriptional regulators of the JCV promoter and here we have observed that Pur-alpha is capable of ameliorating SRSF1-mediated suppression of JCV gene expression and viral replication. Interestingly, Pur-alpha exerted its effect by suppressing SRSF1 at both the protein and mRNA levels in glial cells suggesting this effect can occur independent of T-antigen. Pur-alpha and SRSF1 were both localized to oligodendrocyte inclusion bodies by immunohistochemistry in brain sections from patients with HIV-1 associated PML. Interestingly, inclusion bodies were typically positive for either Pur-alpha or SRSF1, though some cells appeared to be positive for both proteins.Taken together, these results indicate the presence of an antagonistic interaction between these two proteins in regulating of JCV gene expression and viral replication and suggests that they play an important role during viral reactivation leading to

  5. Genome-wide analysis of protein-protein interactions and involvement of viral proteins in SARS-CoV replication.

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    Ji'an Pan

    Full Text Available Analyses of viral protein-protein interactions are an important step to understand viral protein functions and their underlying molecular mechanisms. In this study, we adopted a mammalian two-hybrid system to screen the genome-wide intraviral protein-protein interactions of SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV and therefrom revealed a number of novel interactions which could be partly confirmed by in vitro biochemical assays. Three pairs of the interactions identified were detected in both directions: non-structural protein (nsp 10 and nsp14, nsp10 and nsp16, and nsp7 and nsp8. The interactions between the multifunctional nsp10 and nsp14 or nsp16, which are the unique proteins found in the members of Nidovirales with large RNA genomes including coronaviruses and toroviruses, may have important implication for the mechanisms of replication/transcription complex assembly and functions of these viruses. Using a SARS-CoV replicon expressing a luciferase reporter under the control of a transcription regulating sequence, it has been shown that several viral proteins (N, X and SUD domains of nsp3, and nsp12 provided in trans stimulated the replicon reporter activity, indicating that these proteins may regulate coronavirus replication and transcription. Collectively, our findings provide a basis and platform for further characterization of the functions and mechanisms of coronavirus proteins.

  6. Targeting the pseudorabies virus DNA polymerase processivity factor UL42 by RNA interference efficiently inhibits viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Ping; Huang, Li-Ping; Du, Wen-Juan; Wei, Yan-Wu; Wu, Hong-Li; Feng, Li; Liu, Chang-Ming

    2016-08-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a conserved gene-silencing mechanism in which small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) induce the sequence-specific degradation of homologous RNAs. It has been shown to be a novel and effective antiviral therapy against a wide range of viruses. The pseudorabies virus (PRV) processivity factor UL42 can enhance the catalytic activity of the DNA polymerase and is essential for viral replication, thus it may represent a potential drug target of antiviral therapy against PRV infection. Here, we synthesized three siRNAs (siR-386, siR-517, and siR-849) directed against UL42 and determined their antiviral activities in cell culture. We first examined the kinetics of UL42 expression and found it was expressed with early kinetics during PRV replication. We verified that siR-386, siR-517, and siR-849 efficiently inhibited UL42 expression in an in vitro transfection system, thereby validating their inhibitory effects. Furthermore, we confirmed that these three siRNAs induced potent inhibitory effects on UL42 expression after PRV infection, comparable to the positive control siRNA, siR-1046, directed against the PRV DNA polymerase, the UL30 gene product, which is essential for virus replication. In addition, PRV replication was markedly reduced upon downregulation of UL42 expression. These results indicate that UL42-targeted RNAi efficiently inhibits target gene expression and impairs viral replication. This study provides a new clue for the design of an intervention strategy against herpesviruses by targeting their processivity factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Mucosal vaccination with heterologous viral vectored vaccine targeting subdominant SIV accessory antigens strongly inhibits early viral replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Huanbin; Andersson, Anne-Marie Carola; Ragonnaud, Emeline

    2017-01-01

    Conventional HIV T cell vaccine strategies have not been successful in containing acute peak viremia, nor in providing long-term control. We immunized rhesus macaques intramuscularly and rectally using a heterologous adenovirus vectored SIV vaccine regimen encoding normally weakly immunogenic tat...... immune hyperactivation as measured by naïve T cell depletion, Ki-67 and PD-1 expression on T cells. These results indicate that vaccination towards SIV accessory antigens vaccine can provide a level of acute control of SIV replication with a suggestion of beneficial immunological consequences in infected...... animals of unknown long-term significance. In conclusion, our studies demonstrate that a vaccine encoding subdominant antigens not normally associated with virus control can exert a significant impact on acute peak viremia....

  8. Molecular biology of human herpesvirus 8: novel functions and virus-host interactions implicated in viral pathogenesis and replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, Emily; Nicholas, John

    2014-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), also known as Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), is the second identified human gammaherpesvirus. Like its relative Epstein-Barr virus, HHV-8 is linked to B-cell tumors, specifically primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman's disease, in addition to endothelial-derived KS. HHV-8 is unusual in its possession of a plethora of "accessory" genes and encoded proteins in addition to the core, conserved herpesvirus and gammaherpesvirus genes that are necessary for basic biological functions of these viruses. The HHV-8 accessory proteins specify not only activities deducible from their cellular protein homologies but also novel, unsuspected activities that have revealed new mechanisms of virus-host interaction that serve virus replication or latency and may contribute to the development and progression of virus-associated neoplasia. These proteins include viral interleukin-6 (vIL-6), viral chemokines (vCCLs), viral G protein-coupled receptor (vGPCR), viral interferon regulatory factors (vIRFs), and viral antiapoptotic proteins homologous to FLICE (FADD-like IL-1β converting enzyme)-inhibitory protein (FLIP) and survivin. Other HHV-8 proteins, such as signaling membrane receptors encoded by open reading frames K1 and K15, also interact with host mechanisms in unique ways and have been implicated in viral pathogenesis. Additionally, a set of micro-RNAs encoded by HHV-8 appear to modulate expression of multiple host proteins to provide conditions conducive to virus persistence within the host and could also contribute to HHV-8-induced neoplasia. Here, we review the molecular biology underlying these novel virus-host interactions and their potential roles in both virus biology and virus-associated disease.

  9. Scavenger receptor class B member 1 (SCARB1) variants modulate hepatitis C virus replication cycle and viral load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westhaus, Sandra; Deest, Maximilian; Nguyen, Anna T X; Stanke, Frauke; Heckl, Dirk; Costa, Rui; Schambach, Axel; Manns, Michael P; Berg, Thomas; Vondran, Florian W R; Sarrazin, Christoph; Ciesek, Sandra; von Hahn, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    There are numerous coding and non-coding variants in the SCARB1 gene that encodes scavenger receptor class B member 1 (SR-BI), a key receptor for both high density lipoproteins and hepatitis C virus (HCV). Many have been linked to clinical phenotypes, yet their impact on the HCV replication cycle is incompletely understood. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of these variants on the molecular biology and clinical course of HCV. We analyzed key coding non-synonymous as well as non-coding SCARB1 variants using virological in vitro and human genetics approaches. Non-synonymous variants: S112F and T175A have greatly reduced HCV receptor function. When present on the cell surface, these variants are impaired in their ability to interact with HCV E2. Non-coding variants: The G allele in rs3782287 is associated with decreased viral load. Haplotype analysis confirmed these findings and identified haplotype rs3782287 A/rs5888 C as a risk allele associated with increased viral load. We also detected a trend towards lower hepatic SR-BI expression in individuals with the rs3782287 GG genotype associated with low viral load suggesting a potential underlying mechanism. Coding and non-coding genetic SCARB1 variants modulate the HCV replication cycle and possibly clinical features of hepatitis C. These findings underscore the relevance of SR-BI as an HCV receptor and contribute to our understanding of inter-individual variation in HCV infection. The cell surface receptor SR-BI (scavenger receptor class B member 1), is essential for hepatitis C virus (HCV) entry into hepatocytes. Variations in the gene coding this receptor influence infectivity and viral load. We analyzed these variations to gain a better understanding of inter-individual differences over the course of HCV infection. Copyright © 2017 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Host-Pathogen Interactions in Measles Virus Replication and Anti-Viral Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanliang; Qin, Yali; Chen, Mingzhou

    2016-11-16

    The measles virus (MeV) is a contagious pathogenic RNA virus of the family Paramyxoviridae, genus Morbillivirus, that can cause serious symptoms and even fetal complications. Here, we summarize current molecular advances in MeV research, and emphasize the connection between host cells and MeV replication. Although measles has reemerged recently, the potential for its eradication is promising with significant progress in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of its replication and host-pathogen interactions.

  11. Viral replication kinetics and in vitro cytopathogenicity of parental and reassortant strains of bluetongue virus serotype 1, 6 and 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzee, Peter; Van Vuuren, Moritz; Stokstad, Maria; Myrmel, Mette; van Gennip, René G P; van Rijn, Piet A; Venter, Estelle H

    2014-06-25

    Bluetongue virus (BTV), a segmented dsRNA virus, is the causative agent of bluetongue (BT), an economically important viral haemorrhagic disease of ruminants. Bluetongue virus can exchange its genome segments in mammalian or insect cells that have been co-infected with more than one strain of the virus. This process, may potentially give rise to the generation of novel reassortant strains that may differ from parental strains in regards to their phenotypic characteristics. To investigate the potential effects of reassortment on the virus' phenotype, parental as well as reassortant strains of BTV serotype 1, 6, 8, that were derived from attenuated and wild type strains by reverse genetics, were studied in vitro for their virus replication kinetics and cytopathogenicity in mammalian (Vero) cell cultures. The results indicate that genetic reassortment can affect viral replication kinetics, the cytopathogenicity and extent/mechanism of cell death in infected cell cultures. In particular, some reassortants of non-virulent vaccine (BTV-1 and BTV-6) and virulent field origin (BTV-8) demonstrate more pronounced cytopathic effects compared to their parental strains. Some reassortant strains in addition replicated to high titres in vitro despite being composed of genome segments from slow and fast replicating parental strains. The latter result may have implications for the level of viraemia in the mammalian host and subsequent uptake and transmission of reassortant strains (and their genome segments) by Culicoides vectors. Increased rates of CPE induction could further suggest a higher virulence for reassortant strains in vivo. Overall, these findings raise questions in regards to the use of modified-live virus (MLV) vaccines and risk of reassortment in the field. To further address these questions, additional experimental infection studies using insects and/or animal models should be conducted, to determine whether these results have significant implications in vivo

  12. Replication-competent infectious hepatitis B virus vectors carrying substantially sized transgenes by redesigned viral polymerase translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zihua Wang

    Full Text Available Viral vectors are engineered virus variants able to deliver nonviral genetic information into cells, usually by the same routes as the parental viruses. For several virus families, replication-competent vectors carrying reporter genes have become invaluable tools for easy and quantitative monitoring of replication and infection, and thus also for identifying antivirals and virus susceptible cells. For hepatitis B virus (HBV, a small enveloped DNA virus causing B-type hepatitis, such vectors are not available because insertions into its tiny 3.2 kb genome almost inevitably affect essential replication elements. HBV replicates by reverse transcription of the pregenomic (pg RNA which is also required as bicistronic mRNA for the capsid (core protein and the reverse transcriptase (Pol; their open reading frames (ORFs overlap by some 150 basepairs. Translation of the downstream Pol ORF does not involve a conventional internal ribosome entry site (IRES. We reasoned that duplicating the overlap region and providing artificial IRES control for translation of both Pol and an in-between inserted transgene might yield a functional tricistronic pgRNA, without interfering with envelope protein expression. As IRESs we used a 22 nucleotide element termed Rbm3 IRES to minimize genome size increase. Model plasmids confirmed its activity even in tricistronic arrangements. Analogous plasmids for complete HBV genomes carrying 399 bp and 720 bp transgenes for blasticidin resistance (BsdR and humanized Renilla green fluorescent protein (hrGFP produced core and envelope proteins like wild-type HBV; while the hrGFP vector replicated poorly, the BsdR vector generated around 40% as much replicative DNA as wild-type HBV. Both vectors, however, formed enveloped virions which were infectious for HBV-susceptible HepaRG cells. Because numerous reporter and effector genes with sizes of around 500 bp or less are available, the new HBV vectors should become highly useful tools to

  13. Replication-competent infectious hepatitis B virus vectors carrying substantially sized transgenes by redesigned viral polymerase translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zihua; Wu, Li; Cheng, Xin; Liu, Shizhu; Li, Baosheng; Li, Haijun; Kang, Fubiao; Wang, Junping; Xia, Huan; Ping, Caiyan; Nassal, Michael; Sun, Dianxing

    2013-01-01

    Viral vectors are engineered virus variants able to deliver nonviral genetic information into cells, usually by the same routes as the parental viruses. For several virus families, replication-competent vectors carrying reporter genes have become invaluable tools for easy and quantitative monitoring of replication and infection, and thus also for identifying antivirals and virus susceptible cells. For hepatitis B virus (HBV), a small enveloped DNA virus causing B-type hepatitis, such vectors are not available because insertions into its tiny 3.2 kb genome almost inevitably affect essential replication elements. HBV replicates by reverse transcription of the pregenomic (pg) RNA which is also required as bicistronic mRNA for the capsid (core) protein and the reverse transcriptase (Pol); their open reading frames (ORFs) overlap by some 150 basepairs. Translation of the downstream Pol ORF does not involve a conventional internal ribosome entry site (IRES). We reasoned that duplicating the overlap region and providing artificial IRES control for translation of both Pol and an in-between inserted transgene might yield a functional tricistronic pgRNA, without interfering with envelope protein expression. As IRESs we used a 22 nucleotide element termed Rbm3 IRES to minimize genome size increase. Model plasmids confirmed its activity even in tricistronic arrangements. Analogous plasmids for complete HBV genomes carrying 399 bp and 720 bp transgenes for blasticidin resistance (BsdR) and humanized Renilla green fluorescent protein (hrGFP) produced core and envelope proteins like wild-type HBV; while the hrGFP vector replicated poorly, the BsdR vector generated around 40% as much replicative DNA as wild-type HBV. Both vectors, however, formed enveloped virions which were infectious for HBV-susceptible HepaRG cells. Because numerous reporter and effector genes with sizes of around 500 bp or less are available, the new HBV vectors should become highly useful tools to better

  14. Type I interferons suppress viral replication but contribute to T cell depletion and dysfunction during chronic HIV-1 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Liang; Yu, Haisheng; Li, Guangming; Li, Feng; Ma, Jianping; Li, Jingyun; Chi, Liqun; Zhang, Liguo

    2017-01-01

    The direct link between sustained type I interferon (IFN-I) signaling and HIV-1–induced immunopathogenesis during chronic infection remains unclear. Here we report studies using a monoclonal antibody to block IFN-α/β receptor 1 (IFNAR1) signaling during persistent HIV-1 infection in humanized mice (hu-mice). We discovered that, during chronic HIV-1 infection, IFNAR blockade increased viral replication, which was correlated with elevated T cell activation. Thus, IFN-Is suppress HIV-1 replication during the chronic phase but are not essential for HIV-1–induced aberrant immune activation. Surprisingly, IFNAR blockade rescued both total human T cell and HIV-specific T cell numbers despite elevated HIV-1 replication and immune activation. We showed that IFNAR blockade reduced HIV-1–induced apoptosis of CD4+ T cells. Importantly, IFNAR blockade also rescued the function of human T cells, including HIV-1–specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. We conclude that during persistent HIV-1 infection, IFN-Is suppress HIV-1 replication, but contribute to depletion and dysfunction of T cells. PMID:28614789

  15. Why Human Papillomaviruses Activate the DNA Damage Response (DDR) and How Cellular and Viral Replication Persists in the Presence of DDR Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristol, Molly L; Das, Dipon; Morgan, Iain M

    2017-09-21

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) require the activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) in order to undergo a successful life cycle. This activation presents a challenge for the virus and the infected cell: how does viral and host replication proceed in the presence of a DDR that ordinarily arrests replication; and how do HPV16 infected cells retain the ability to proliferate in the presence of a DDR that ordinarily arrests the cell cycle? This raises a further question: why do HPV activate the DDR? The answers to these questions are only partially understood; a full understanding could identify novel therapeutic strategies to target HPV cancers. Here, we propose that the rapid replication of an 8 kb double stranded circular genome during infection creates aberrant DNA structures that attract and activate DDR proteins. Therefore, HPV replication in the presence of an active DDR is a necessity for a successful viral life cycle in order to resolve these DNA structures on viral genomes; without an active DDR, successful replication of the viral genome would not proceed. We discuss the essential role of TopBP1 in this process and also how viral and cellular replication proceeds in HPV infected cells in the presence of DDR signals.

  16. Gag sequence variation in a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transmission cluster influences viral replication fitness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsbers, Esther F.; van Nuenen, Ad C.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Kootstra, Neeltje A.

    2013-01-01

    Three men from a proven homosexual human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission cluster showed large variation in their clinical course of infection. To evaluate the effect of evolution of the same viral variant in these three patients, we analysed sequence variation in the capsid

  17. Aichi Virus 2A Protein Is Involved in Viral RNA Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Jun; Taniguchi, Koki

    2008-01-01

    The Aichi virus 2A protein is not a protease, unlike many other picornavirus 2A proteins, and it is related to a cellular protein, H-rev107. Here, we examined the replication properties of two 2A mutants in Vero cells and a cell-free translation/replication system. In one mutant, amino acids 36 to 126 were replaced with an unrelated amino acid sequence. In the other mutant, the NC motif conserved in the H-rev107 family of proteins was changed to alanine residues. The two mutations abolished virus replication in cells. The mutations affected both negative- and positive-strand synthesis, the defect in positive-strand synthesis being more severe than that in negative-strand synthesis. PMID:18653460

  18. Aichi virus 2A protein is involved in viral RNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Jun; Taniguchi, Koki

    2008-10-01

    The Aichi virus 2A protein is not a protease, unlike many other picornavirus 2A proteins, and it is related to a cellular protein, H-rev107. Here, we examined the replication properties of two 2A mutants in Vero cells and a cell-free translation/replication system. In one mutant, amino acids 36 to 126 were replaced with an unrelated amino acid sequence. In the other mutant, the NC motif conserved in the H-rev107 family of proteins was changed to alanine residues. The two mutations abolished virus replication in cells. The mutations affected both negative- and positive-strand synthesis, the defect in positive-strand synthesis being more severe than that in negative-strand synthesis.

  19. Cytomegalovirus-specific T-cell responses and viral replication in kidney transplant recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sester Urban

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytomegalovirus (CMV seronegative recipients (R- of kidney transplants (KT from seropositive donors (D+ are at higher risk for CMV replication and ganciclovir(GCV-resistance than CMV R(+. We hypothesized that low CMV-specific T-cell responses are associated with increased risk of CMV replication in R(+-patients with D(+ or D(- donors. Methods We prospectively evaluated 73 consecutive KT-patients [48 R(+, 25 D(+R(-] undergoing routine testing for CMV replication as part of a preemptive strategy. We compared CMV-specific interferon-γ (IFN-γ responses of CD4+CD3+ lymphocytes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC using three different antigen preparation (CMV-lysate, pp72- and pp65-overlapping peptide pools using intracellular cytokine staining and flow cytometry. Results Median CD4+ and CD8+T-cell responses to CMV-lysate, pp72- and pp65-overlapping peptide pools were lower in D(+R(- than in R(+patients or in non-immunosuppressed donors. Comparing subpopulations we found that CMV-lysate favored CD4+- over CD8+-responses, whereas the reverse was observed for pp72, while pp65-CD4+- and -CD8+-responses were similar. Concurrent CMV replication in R(+-patients was associated with significantly lower T-cell responses (pp65 median CD4+ 0.00% vs. 0.03%, p = 0.001; CD8+ 0.01% vs. 0.03%; p = 0.033. Receiver operated curve analysis associated CMV-pp65 CD4+ responses of > 0.03% in R(+-patients with absence of concurrent (p = 0.003 and future CMV replication in the following 8 weeks (p = 0.036. GCV-resistant CMV replication occurred in 3 R(+-patients (6.3% with pp65- CD4+ frequencies Conclusion The data suggest that pp65-specific CD4+ T-cells might be useful to identify R(+-patients at increased risk of CMV replication. Provided further corroborating evidence, CMV-pp65 CD4+ responses above 0.03% in PBMCs of KT patients under stable immunosuppression are associated with lower risk of concurrent and future CMV replication during the

  20. Association of Human Papillomavirus 16 E2 with Rad50-Interacting Protein 1 Enhances Viral DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-León, Karen; Wijendra, Kalpanee; Siddiqa, Abida; Pentland, Ieisha; Feeney, Katherine M; Knapman, Alison; Davies, Rachel; Androphy, Elliot J; Parish, Joanna L

    2017-03-01

    Rad50-interacting protein 1 (Rint1) associates with the DNA damage response protein Rad50 during the transition from the S phase to the G2/M phase and functions in radiation-induced G2 checkpoint control. It has also been demonstrated that Rint1 is essential in vesicle trafficking from the Golgi apparatus to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) through an interaction with Zeste-White 10 (ZW10). We have isolated a novel interaction between Rint1 and the human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) transcription and replication factor E2. E2 binds to Rint1 within its ZW10 interaction domain, and we show that in the absence of E2, Rint1 is localized to the ER and associates with ZW10. E2 expression results in a disruption of the Rint1-ZW10 interaction and an accumulation of nuclear Rint1, coincident with a significant reduction in vesicle movement from the ER to the Golgi apparatus. Interestingly, nuclear Rint1 and members of the Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 (MRN) complex were found in distinct E2 nuclear foci, which peaked during mid-S phase, indicating that the recruitment of Rint1 to E2 foci within the nucleus may also result in the recruitment of this DNA damage-sensing protein complex. We show that exogenous Rint1 expression enhances E2-dependent virus replication. Conversely, the overexpression of a truncated Rint1 protein that retains the E2 binding domain but not the Rad50 binding domain acts as a dominant negative inhibitor of E2-dependent HPV replication. Put together, these experiments demonstrate that the interaction between Rint1 and E2 has an important function in HPV replication.IMPORTANCE HPV infections are an important driver of many epithelial cancers, including those within the anogenital and oropharyngeal tracts. The HPV life cycle is tightly regulated and intimately linked to the differentiation of the epithelial cells that it infects. HPV replication factories formed in the nucleus are locations where viral DNA is copied to support virus persistence and amplification of

  1. Experimental depletion of CD8+ cells in acutely SIVagm-Infected African Green Monkeys results in increased viral replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apetrei Cristian

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vivo CD8+ cell depletions in pathogenic SIV infections identified a key role for cellular immunity in controlling viral load (VL and disease progression. However, similar studies gave discordant results in chronically-infected SMs, leading some authors to propose that in natural hosts, SIV replication is independent of cellular immunity. To assess the role of cellular immune responses in the control of SIV replication in natural hosts, we investigated the impact of CD8+ cell depletion during acute SIV infection in AGMs. Results Nine AGMs were infected with SIVagm.sab and were followed up to day 225 p.i. Four were intravenously infused with the cM-T807 antibody on days 0 (50 mg/kg, 6, and 13 (10 mg/kg, respectively post infection (p.i.. CD8+ cells were depleted for up to 28 days p.i. in peripheral blood and LNs in all treated AGMs. Partial CD8+ T cell depletion occurred in the intestine. SIVagm VLs peaked at similar levels in both groups (107-108 RNA copies/ml. However, while VLs were controlled in undepleted AGMs, reaching set-point levels (104-105 RNA copies/ml by day 28 p.i., high VLs (>106 RNA copies/ml were maintained by day 21 p.i. in CD8-depleted AGMs. By day 42 p.i., VLs were comparable between the two groups. The levels of immune activation and proliferation remained elevated up to day 72 p.i. in CD8-depleted AGMs and returned to preinfection levels in controls by day 28 p.i. None of the CD8-depleted animals progressed to AIDS. Conclusion CD8+ cells are responsible for a partial control of postacute viral replication in SIVagm.sab-infected AGMs. In contrast to macaques, the SIVagm-infected AGMs are able to control viral replication after recovery of the CD8+ T cells and avoid disease progression.

  2. Marek's disease virus influences the core gut microbiome of the chicken during the early and late phases of viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perumbakkam, Sudeep; Hunt, Henry D; Cheng, Hans H

    2014-10-01

    Marek's disease (MD) is an important neoplastic disease of chickens caused by the Marek's disease virus (MDV), an oncogenic alphaherpesvirus. In this study, dysbiosis induced by MDV on the core gut flora of chicken was assessed using next generation sequence (NGS) analysis. Total fecal and cecum-derived samples from individual birds were used to estimate the influence of MDV infection on the gut microbiome of chicken. Our analysis shows that MDV infection alters the core gut flora in the total fecal samples relatively early after infection (2-7 days) and in the late phase of viral infection (28-35 days) in cecal samples, corresponding well with the life cycle of MDV. Principle component analyses of total fecal and cecal samples showed clustering at the early and late time points, respectively. The genus Lactobacillus was exclusively present in the infected samples in both total fecal and cecal bird samples. The community colonization of core gut flora was altered by viral infection, which manifested in the enrichment of several genera during the early and late phases of MDV replication. The results suggest a relationship between viral infection and microbial composition of the intestinal tract that may influence inflammation and immunosuppression of T and B cells in the host. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  3. PTB Binds to the 3’ Untranslated Region of the Human Astrovirus Type 8: A Possible Role in Viral Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Hernández, Wendy; Velez-Uriza, Dora; Valdés, Jesús; Vélez-Del Valle, Cristina; Salas-Benito, Juan; Martínez-Contreras, Rebeca; García-Espítia, Matilde; Salas-Benito, Mariana; Vega-Almeida, Tania; De Nova-Ocampo, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    The 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) of human astroviruses (HAstV) consists of two hairpin structures (helix I and II) joined by a linker harboring a conserved PTB/hnRNP1 binding site. The identification and characterization of cellular proteins that interact with the 3′UTR of HAstV-8 virus will help to uncover cellular requirements for viral functions. To this end, mobility shift assays and UV cross-linking were performed with uninfected and HAstV-8-infected cell extracts and HAstV-8 3′UTR probes. Two RNA-protein complexes (CI and CII) were recruited into the 3′UTR. Complex CII formation was compromised with cold homologous RNA, and seven proteins of 35, 40, 45, 50, 52, 57/60 and 75 kDa were cross-linked to the 3′UTR. Supermobility shift assays indicated that PTB/hnRNP1 is part of this complex, and 3′UTR-crosslinked PTB/hnRNP1 was immunoprecipitated from HAstV-8 infected cell-membrane extracts. Also, immunofluorescence analyses revealed that PTB/hnRNP1 is distributed in the nucleus and cytoplasm of uninfected cells, but it is mainly localized perinuclearly in the cytoplasm of HAstV-8 infected cells. Furthermore, the minimal 3′UTR sequences recognized by recombinant PTB are those conforming helix I, and an intact PTB/hnRNP1-binding site. Finally, small interfering RNA-mediated PTB/hnRNP1 silencing reduced synthesis viral genome and virus yield in CaCo2 cells, suggesting that PTB/hnRNP1 is required for HAstV replication. In conclusion, PTB/hnRNP1 binds to the 3′UTR HAstV-8 and is required or participates in viral replication. PMID:25406089

  4. Reactivation of viral replication in anti-HBe positive chronic HBsAg carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard, K; Aldershvile, J; Kryger, Peter

    1990-01-01

    Reactivation of hepatitis B virus replication was investigated in an unselected group of 44 HBV DNA negative, anti-HBe positive chronic HBsAg carriers. Twenty-five patients (54%) were intravenous drug addicts and 7 (16%) were male homosexuals. Sixteen patients had evidence of delta infection...

  5. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus ORF6 gene is essential in viral lytic replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Peng

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV is associated with Kaposis's sarcoma (KS, primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman's disease. KSHV encodes at least 8 open reading frames (ORFs that play important roles in its lytic DNA replication. Among which, ORF6 of KSHV encodes an ssDNA binding protein that has been proved to participate in origin-dependent DNA replication in transient assays. To define further the function of ORF6 in the virus life cycle, we constructed a recombinant virus genome with a large deletion within the ORF6 locus by using a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC system. Stable 293T cells carrying the BAC36 (wild type and BACΔ6 genomes were generated. When monolayers of 293T-BAC36 and 293T-BACΔ6 cells were induced with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA and sodium butyrate, infectious virus was detected from the 293T-BAC36 cell supernatants only and not from the 293T- BACΔ6 cell supernatants. DNA synthesis was defective in 293T-BACΔ6 cells. Expression of ORF6 in trans in BACΔ6-containing cells was able to rescue both defects. Our results provide genetic evidence that ORF6 is essential for KSHV lytic replication. The stable 293T cells carrying the BAC36 and BACΔ6 genomes could be used as tools to investigate the detailed functions of ORF6 in the lytic replication of KSHV.

  6. Reinitiated viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase resumes replication at a reduced rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vilfan, I.D.; Candelli, A.; Hage, S.; Aalto, A.P.; Poranen, M.M.; Bamford, D.H.; Dekker, N.H.

    2008-01-01

    RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRP) form an important class of enzymes that is responsible for genome replication and transcription in RNA viruses and involved in the regulation of RNA interference in plants and fungi. The RdRP kinetics have been extensively studied, but pausing, an important

  7. Functional mapping of regions of the Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis viral genome required for DNA replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, M.; Voeten, J. T.; Goldbach, R. W.; Vlak, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Previous results showed that plasmids containing one of the eight putative origins (ori's) of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) are replicated after transfection into Spodoptera frugiperda cells if essential trans-acting factors are supplied by AcMNPV infection (Kool et al.,

  8. Replication of mycoplasmavirus MVL51 III identification of a progeny viral DNA-protein intermediate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, J.; Maniloff, J.

    1976-01-01

    Intracellular replication of the non-lytic single stranded circular DNA mycoplasmavirus MVL51 has been shown to involve three DNA intermediates: RFI, RFII and SSI. Growth in Eagle's basal medium, rather than richer tryptose medium, has allowed the identification of an intermediate between nascent progeny chromosomes (SSI) and mature virus. This intermediate is a protein associated form of SSI.

  9. Autophagy and Mammalian Viruses: Roles in Immune Response, Viral Replication, and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, P; Münz, C

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is an important cellular catabolic process conserved from yeast to man. Double-membrane vesicles deliver their cargo to the lysosome for degradation. Hence, autophagy is one of the key mechanisms mammalian cells deploy to rid themselves of intracellular pathogens including viruses. However, autophagy serves many more functions during viral infection. First, it regulates the immune response through selective degradation of immune components, thus preventing possibly harmful overactivation and inflammation. Additionally, it delivers virus-derived antigens to antigen-loading compartments for presentation to T lymphocytes. Second, it might take an active part in the viral life cycle by, eg, facilitating its release from cells. Lastly, in the constant arms race between host and virus, autophagy is often hijacked by viruses and manipulated to their own advantage. In this review, we will highlight key steps during viral infection in which autophagy plays a role. We have selected some exemplary viruses and will describe the molecular mechanisms behind their intricate relationship with the autophagic machinery, a result of host-pathogen coevolution. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Up-regulation effect of hepatitis B virus genome A1846T mutation on viral replication and core promoter activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling JIANG

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To evaluate the influence of hepatitis B virus (HBV genome nucleotide A1846T mutation on the viral replication capacity and the transcription activity of HBV core promoter (CP in vitro. Methods  A total of 385 patients with hepatitis B admitted to the 302 Hospital of PLA were enrolled in the study, including 116 with moderate chronic hepatitis B (CHB-M, 123 with severe chronic hepatitis B (CHB-S, and 146 with acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF. Serum HBV DNA was isolated and full-length HBV genome was amplified. The incidence of A1846T was analyzed. Full-length HBV genomes containing 1846T mutation were cloned into pGEM-T easy vector, and the counterpart wild-type 1846A plasmids were obtained by site-directed mutagenesis. The full-length HBV genome was released from recombinant plasmid by BspQ Ⅰ/Sca Ⅰ digestion, and then transfected into HepG2 cells. Secreted HBsAg level and intracellular HBV core particles were measured 72 hours post-transfection to analyze the replication capacity (a 1.0-fold HBV genome model. 1846 mutant and wild-type full-length HBV genomes were extracted to amplify the fragment of HBV CP region, and the dual luciferase reporter of the pGL3-CP was constructed. The luciferase activity was detected 48 hours post-transfection. Results  The incidence of A1846T mutation gradually increased with the severity of hepatitis B, reaching 31.03%, 42.27%, and 55.48% in CHB-M, CHB-S and ACLF patients respectively (P<0.01. The replication capacity of 1846T mutants, level of secreted HBsAg, and transcriptional activity of CP promoter were increased by 320%, 28% and 85% respectively, compared with 1846A wild-type strains. While the more common double mutation A1762T/G1764A in CP region was increased by 67%, 9% and 72% respectively, compared with its counterpart wild-type strains. A1846T had a greater influence on viral replication capacity in vitro. Conclusions A1846T mutation could significantly increase the

  11. Monitoring the determinants of efficient viral replication using Classical Swine Fever Virus-reporter replicons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risager, Peter Christian; Everett, Helen; Crooke, Helen

    2012-01-01

    of the CSFV genome within cells can be achieved using autonomously replicating constructs (replicons) containing a reporter gene that expresses a readily quantifiable enzyme. Here, a newly implemented cloning technique was applied to genome modification of the fulllength CSFV cDNA previously inserted...... into a single-copy bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC). This technique, the Red/ET counter-selection method, is based upon homologous recombination, thus obviating the need for internal restriction sites or complex cloning strategies. Several CSFV replicons with deletions in regions encoding virus structural...... proteins considered non-essential for RNA replication were constructed and these deletions were replaced with an in-frame insertion of the Renilla luciferase (Rluc) sequence. RNA transcripts from these replicons should be translated as a single functional open reading frame. Full-genome cDNAs (~10-12,3 kb...

  12. Interferon regulatory factor-1 protects from fatal neurotropic infection with vesicular stomatitis virus by specific inhibition of viral replication in neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmila Nair

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune system protects cells against invading viral pathogens by the auto- and paracrine action of type I interferon (IFN. In addition, the interferon regulatory factor (IRF-1 can induce alternative intrinsic antiviral responses. Although both, type I IFN and IRF-1 mediate their antiviral action by inducing overlapping subsets of IFN stimulated genes, the functional role of this alternative antiviral action of IRF-1 in context of viral infections in vivo remains unknown. Here, we report that IRF-1 is essential to counteract the neuropathology of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV. IFN- and IRF-1-dependent antiviral responses act sequentially to create a layered antiviral protection program against VSV infections. Upon intranasal infection, VSV is cleared in the presence or absence of IRF-1 in peripheral organs, but IRF-1-/- mice continue to propagate the virus in the brain and succumb. Although rapid IFN induction leads to a decline in VSV titers early on, viral replication is re-enforced in the brains of IRF-1-/- mice. While IFN provides short-term protection, IRF-1 is induced with delayed kinetics and controls viral replication at later stages of infection. IRF-1 has no influence on viral entry but inhibits viral replication in neurons and viral spread through the CNS, which leads to fatal inflammatory responses in the CNS. These data support a temporal, non-redundant antiviral function of type I IFN and IRF-1, the latter playing a crucial role in late time points of VSV infection in the brain.

  13. Retinoid X Receptor α-Dependent HBV Minichromosome Remodeling and Viral Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; He, Song; Guo, Jin-Jun; Peng, Hong; Fan, Jia-Hao; Li, Qing-Ling

    2017-01-01

    The HBV covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) is organized into a minichromosome in the nuclei of infected hepatocytes through interactions with histone and nonhistone proteins. Retinoid X receptor α (RXRα), a liver-enriched nuclear receptor, participates in regulation of HBV replication and transcription through modulation of HBV enhancer 1 and core promoter activity. This study investigated RXRα involvement in HBV cccDNA epigenetic modifications. Quantitative cccDNA chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) was applied to study the recruitment of RXRα, histones, and chromatin-modifying enzymes to HBV minichromosome in HepG2 cells after transfection of the linear HBV genome. RXRα Was found to directly bind to HBV cccDNA; recruitment of RXRα to HBV mini-chromosome paralleled HBV replication, histone recruitment, and histone acetylation in HBVcccDNA. Moreover, RXRα overexpression or knock-down significantly increased or impaired the recruitment of the p300 acetyltransferase to cccDNAminichromosome. Our results confirmed the regulation of RXRα on HBV replication in vitro and demonstrated the modulation of RXRα on HBV cccDNA epigenetics. These findings provide a profound theoretical and experimental basis for late-model antiviral treatment acting on the HBV cccDNA and minichromosome.

  14. Evidence of viral replication in circulating dendritic cells during hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goutagny, Nadège; Fatmi, Ahmed; De Ledinghen, Victor; Penin, François; Couzigou, Patrice; Inchauspé, Geneviève; Bain, Christine

    2003-06-15

    The existence of extrahepatic sites of hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication has been proposed as a mechanism responsible for the poor antiviral immune response found in chronic infection. Dendritic cells (DCs), as unique antigen-presenting cells able to induce a primary immune response, are prime targets of persistent viruses. From 24 blood samples obtained from HCV-seropositive patients, peripheral blood DCs (PBDCs) were purified. HCV genomic sequences were specifically detected by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction in 6 of 24 PBDC pellets, and replicative-strand RNA also was found in 3 of 24 cell purifications. Analysis of the HCV quasi-species distribution in the PBDC population of 1 patient showed the presence of a dominant variant different from that found in plasma with respect to the primary amino-acid sequence and physicochemical profile of the hypervariable region 1 of glycoprotein E2. These data strongly suggest that PBDCs constitute a reservoir in which HCV replication takes place during natural infection.

  15. Genetic Moderation of Stability in Attachment Security from Early Childhood to Age 18 Years: A Replication Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raby, K. Lee; Roisman, Glenn I.; Booth-LaForce, Cathryn

    2015-01-01

    A longstanding question for attachment theory and research is whether genetically based characteristics of the child influence the development of attachment security and its stability over time. This study attempted to replicate and extend recent findings indicating that the developmental stability of attachment security is moderated by oxytocin…

  16. Experimentally-induced immune activation in natural hosts of SIV induces significant increases in viral replication and CD4+ T cell depletion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Ruy M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Chronically SIVagm-infected African green monkeys (AGMs) have a remarkably stable non-pathogenic disease course, with levels of immune activation in chronic SIVagm infection similar to those observed in uninfected monkeys and stable viral loads (VLs) for long periods of time. In vivo administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or an IL-2/diphtheria toxin fusion protein (Ontak) to chronically SIVagm-infected AGMs triggered increases in immune activation and subsequently of viral replication and depletion of intestinal CD4{sup +} T cells. Our study indicates that circulating microbial products can increase viral replication by inducing immune activation and increasing the number of viral target cells, thus demonstrating that immune activation and T cell prolifeation are key factors in AIDS pathogenesis.

  17. Immune responses elicited against rotavirus middle layer protein VP6 inhibit viral replication in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappalainen, Suvi; Pastor, Ana Ruth; Tamminen, Kirsi; López-Guerrero, Vanessa; Esquivel-Guadarrama, Fernando; Palomares, Laura A; Vesikari, Timo; Blazevic, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) is a common cause of severe gastroenteritis (GE) in children worldwide. Live oral RV vaccines protect against severe RVGE, but the immune correlates of protection are not yet clearly defined. Inner capsid VP6 protein is a highly conserved, abundant, and immunogenic RV protein, and VP6-specific mucosal antibodies, especially IgA, have been implicated to protect against viral challenge in mice. In the present study systemic and mucosal IgG and IgA responses were induced by immunizing BALB/c mice intranasally with a combination of recombinant RV VP6 protein (subgroup II [SGII]) and norovirus (NoV) virus-like particles (VLPs) used in a candidate vaccine. Following immunization mice were challenged orally with murine RV strain EDIMwt (SG non-I-non-II, G3P10[16]). In order to determine neutralizing activity of fecal samples, sera, and vaginal washes (VW) against human Wa RV (SGII, G1P1A[8]) and rhesus RV (SGI, G3P5B[3]), the RV antigen production was measured with an ELISA-based antigen reduction neutralization assay. Only VWs of immunized mice inhibited replication of both RVs, indicating heterotypic protection of induced antibodies. IgA antibody depletion and blocking experiments using recombinant VP6 confirmed that neutralization was mediated by anti-VP6 IgA antibodies. Most importantly, after the RV challenge significant reduction in viral shedding was observed in feces of immunized mice. These results suggest a significant role for mucosal RV VP6-specific IgA for the inhibition of RV replication in vitro and in vivo. In addition, these results underline the importance of non-serotype-specific immunity induced by the conserved subgroup-specific RV antigen VP6 in clearance of RV infection. PMID:25424814

  18. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus K8 Is an RNA Binding Protein That Regulates Viral DNA Replication in Coordination with a Noncoding RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongcheng; Wang, Yan; Yuan, Yan

    2018-01-10

    KSHV lytic replication and constant primary infection of fresh cells are crucial for viral tumorigenicity. Virus-encoded b-Zip family protein K8 plays an important role in viral DNA replication in both viral reactivation and de novo infection. The mechanism underlying the functional role of K8 in the viral life cycle is elusive. Here we report that K8 is a RNA binding protein, which also associates with many proteins including other RNA binding proteins. Many K8-involved protein-protein interactions are mediated by RNA. Using a crosslinking and immunoprecipitation (CLIP) procedure combined with high-throughput sequencing, RNAs that are associated with K8 in BCBL-1 cells were identified, that include both viral (PAN, T1.4, T0.7 and etc.) and cellular (MALAT-1, MRP, 7SK and etc.) RNAs. An RNA-binding motif in K8 was defined, and mutation of the motif abolished the ability of K8 binding to many noncoding RNAs as well as viral DNA replication during de novo infection, suggesting that the K8 functions in viral replication are carried out through RNA association. The function of K8 and associated T1.4 RNA was investigated in details and results showed that T1.4 mediates the binding of K8 with ori-Lyt DNA. T1.4-K8 complex physically bound to KSHV ori-Lyt DNA and recruited other proteins and cofactors to assemble replication complex. Depletion of T1.4 abolished the DNA replication in primary infection. These findings provide mechanistic insights into the role of K8 in coordination with T1.4 RNA in regulating KSHV DNA replication during de novo infection.ImportanceGenome wide analyses of the mammalian transcriptome revealed that a large proportion of sequence previously annotated as noncoding region are actually transcribed and give rise to stable RNAs. Emergence of a large number of noncoding RNAs suggests that functional RNA-protein complexes exampled by ribosome or spliceosome are not ancient relics of the last riboorganism but would be well adapted for regulatory role

  19. Reactivation of viral replication in anti-HBe positive chronic HBsAg carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard, K; Aldershvile, J; Kryger, Peter

    1990-01-01

    Reactivation of hepatitis B virus replication was investigated in an unselected group of 44 HBV DNA negative, anti-HBe positive chronic HBsAg carriers. Twenty-five patients (54%) were intravenous drug addicts and 7 (16%) were male homosexuals. Sixteen patients had evidence of delta infection...... and five of the seven male homosexuals had human immunodeficiency virus infection. The patients were followed for 1 to 180 months (median, 24 months) while HBV DNA negative, anti-HBe positive. Reactivation, defined as reappearance of HBV DNA or HBeAg, or both, was detected in six patients corresponding...... to an annual reactivation rate of 5%. Reactivation in four patients was detected by reversion to HBV DNA positivity only, whereas HBeAg/anti-HBe status remained unchanged. Two patients became both HBV DNA and HBeAg positive. None of the patients developed hepatitis-like symptoms and transaminase elevation...

  20. Enhanced viral replication and modulated innate immune responses in infant airway epithelium following H1N1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Candice C; Reader, J Rachel; Gerriets, Joan E; Wang, Theodore T; Harrod, Kevin S; Miller, Lisa A

    2014-07-01

    Influenza is the cause of significant morbidity and mortality in pediatric populations. The contribution of pulmonary host defense mechanisms to viral respiratory infection susceptibility in very young children is poorly understood. As a surrogate to compare mucosal immune responses of infant and adult lungs, rhesus monkey primary airway epithelial cell cultures were infected with pandemic influenza A/H1N1 virus in vitro. Virus replication, cytokine secretion, cell viability, and type I interferon (IFN) pathway PCR array profiles were evaluated for both infant and adult cultures. In comparison with adult cultures, infant cultures showed significantly increased levels of H1N1 replication, reduced alpha interferon (IFN-α) protein synthesis, and no difference in cell death following infection. Age-dependent differences in expression levels of multiple genes associated with the type I IFN pathway were observed in H1N1-infected cultures. To investigate the pulmonary and systemic responses to H1N1 infection in early life, infant monkeys were inoculated with H1N1 by upper airway administration. Animals were monitored for virus and parameters of inflammation over a 14-day period. High H1N1 titers were recovered from airways at day 1, with viral RNA remaining detectable until day 9 postinfection. Despite viral clearance, bronchiolitis and alveolitis persisted at day 14 postinfection; histopathological analysis revealed alveolar septal thickening and intermittent type II pneumocyte hyperplasia. Our overall findings are consistent with the known susceptibility of pediatric populations to respiratory virus infection and suggest that intrinsic developmental differences in airway epithelial cell immune function may contribute to the limited efficacy of host defense during early childhood. To the best of our knowledge, this study represents the first report of intrinsic developmental differences in infant airway epithelial cells that may contribute to the increased

  1. Temperature-dependent innate defense against the common cold virus limits viral replication at warm temperature in mouse airway cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxman, Ellen F; Storer, James A; Fitzgerald, Megan E; Wasik, Bethany R; Hou, Lin; Zhao, Hongyu; Turner, Paul E; Pyle, Anna Marie; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2015-01-20

    Most isolates of human rhinovirus, the common cold virus, replicate more robustly at the cool temperatures found in the nasal cavity (33-35 °C) than at core body temperature (37 °C). To gain insight into the mechanism of temperature-dependent growth, we compared the transcriptional response of primary mouse airway epithelial cells infected with rhinovirus at 33 °C vs. 37 °C. Mouse airway cells infected with mouse-adapted rhinovirus 1B exhibited a striking enrichment in expression of antiviral defense response genes at 37 °C relative to 33 °C, which correlated with significantly higher expression levels of type I and type III IFN genes and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) at 37 °C. Temperature-dependent IFN induction in response to rhinovirus was dependent on the MAVS protein, a key signaling adaptor of the RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs). Stimulation of primary airway cells with the synthetic RLR ligand poly I:C led to greater IFN induction at 37 °C relative to 33 °C at early time points poststimulation and to a sustained increase in the induction of ISGs at 37 °C relative to 33 °C. Recombinant type I IFN also stimulated more robust induction of ISGs at 37 °C than at 33 °C. Genetic deficiency of MAVS or the type I IFN receptor in infected airway cells permitted higher levels of viral replication, particularly at 37 °C, and partially rescued the temperature-dependent growth phenotype. These findings demonstrate that in mouse airway cells, rhinovirus replicates preferentially at nasal cavity temperature due, in part, to a less efficient antiviral defense response of infected cells at cool temperature.

  2. Equine Herpesvirus Type 1 Enhances Viral Replication in CD172a+ Monocytic Cells upon Adhesion to Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laval, Kathlyn; Favoreel, Herman W; Poelaert, Katrien C K; Van Cleemput, Jolien; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2015-11-01

    Equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) is a main cause of respiratory disease, abortion, and encephalomyelopathy in horses. Monocytic cells (CD172a(+)) are the main carrier cells of EHV-1 during primary infection and are proposed to serve as a "Trojan horse" to facilitate the dissemination of EHV-1 to target organs. However, the mechanism by which EHV-1 is transferred from CD172a(+) cells to endothelial cells (EC) remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate EHV-1 transmission between these two cell types. We hypothesized that EHV-1 employs specific strategies to promote the adhesion of infected CD172a(+) cells to EC to facilitate EHV-1 spread. Here, we demonstrated that EHV-1 infection of CD172a(+) cells resulted in a 3- to 5-fold increase in adhesion to EC. Antibody blocking experiments indicated that α4β1, αLβ2, and αVβ3 integrins mediated adhesion of infected CD172a(+) cells to EC. We showed that integrin-mediated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and ERK/MAPK signaling pathways were involved in EHV-1-induced CD172a(+) cell adhesion at early times of infection. EHV-1 replication was enhanced in adherent CD172a(+) cells, which correlates with the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). In the presence of neutralizing antibodies, approximately 20% of infected CD172a(+) cells transferred cytoplasmic material to uninfected EC and 0.01% of infected CD172a(+) cells transmitted infectious virus to neighboring cells. Our results demonstrated that EHV-1 infection induces adhesion of CD172a(+) cells to EC, which enhances viral replication, but that transfer of viral material from CD172a(+) cells to EC is a very specific and rare event. These findings give new insights into the complex pathogenesis of EHV-1. Equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) is a highly prevalent pathogen worldwide, causing frequent outbreaks of abortion and myeloencephalopathy, even in vaccinated horses. After primary replication in the respiratory tract, EHV-1 disseminates

  3. Promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies provide a scaffold for human polyomavirus JC replication and are disrupted after development of viral inclusions in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishido-Hara, Yukiko; Higuchi, Kayoko; Ohara, Sinji; Duyckaerts, Charles; Hauw, Jean-Jacques; Uchihara, Toshiki

    2008-04-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy is a fatal demyelinating disorder due to human polyomavirus JC infection in which there are viral inclusions in enlarged nuclei of infected oligodendrocytes. We report that the pathogenesis of this disease is associated with distinct subnuclear structures known as promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs). Postmortem brain tissues from 5 patients with the disease were examined. Affected cells with enlarged nuclei contained distinct dot-like subnuclear PML-NBs that were immunopositive for PML protein and nuclear body protein Sp100. Major and minor viral capsid proteins and proliferating cell nuclear antigen, an essential component for DNA replication, colocalized with PML-NBs. By in situ hybridization, viral genomic DNA showed dot-like nuclear accumulation, and by electron microscopy, virus-like structures clustered in subnuclear domains, indicating that PML-NBs are the site of viral DNA replication and capsid assembly. Molecules involved in the ubiquitin proteosome pathway (i.e. ubiquitin and small ubiquitin-like modifier 1) did not accumulate in the nuclei with viral inclusions, indicating that cell degeneration may not be dependent on this pathway. When viral progeny production was advanced, PML-NBs were disrupted. These data suggest that: 1) PML-NBs allow for efficient viral propagation by providing scaffolds, 2) disruption of PML-NBs is independent of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, and 3) this disruption probably heralds oligodendrocyte degeneration and the resulting demyelination.

  4. The human adenovirus type 5 E1B 55 kDa protein obstructs inhibition of viral replication by type I interferon in normal human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasdave S Chahal

    Full Text Available Vectors derived from human adenovirus type 5, which typically lack the E1A and E1B genes, induce robust innate immune responses that limit their therapeutic efficacy. We reported previously that the E1B 55 kDa protein inhibits expression of a set of cellular genes that is highly enriched for those associated with anti-viral defense and immune responses, and includes many interferon-sensitive genes. The sensitivity of replication of E1B 55 kDa null-mutants to exogenous interferon (IFN was therefore examined in normal human fibroblasts and respiratory epithelial cells. Yields of the mutants were reduced at least 500-fold, compared to only 5-fold, for wild-type (WT virus replication. To investigate the mechanistic basis of such inhibition, the accumulation of viral early proteins and genomes was compared by immunoblotting and qPCR, respectively, in WT- and mutant-infected cells in the absence or presence of exogenous IFN. Both the concentration of viral genomes detected during the late phase and the numbers of viral replication centers formed were strongly reduced in IFN-treated cells in the absence of the E1B protein, despite production of similar quantities of viral replication proteins. These defects could not be attributed to degradation of entering viral genomes, induction of apoptosis, or failure to reorganize components of PML nuclear bodies. Nor was assembly of the E1B- and E4 Orf6 protein- E3 ubiquitin ligase required to prevent inhibition of viral replication by IFN. However, by using RT-PCR, the E1B 55 kDa protein was demonstrated to be a potent repressor of expression of IFN-inducible genes in IFN-treated cells. We propose that a primary function of the previously described transcriptional repression activity of the E1B 55 kDa protein is to block expression of IFN- inducible genes, and hence to facilitate formation of viral replication centers and genome replication.

  5. Curaxin CBL0100 Blocks HIV-1 Replication and Reactivation through Inhibition of Viral Transcriptional Elongation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime J. Jean

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite combination antiretroviral therapy (cART, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS, predominantly caused by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1, remains incurable. The barrier to a cure lies in the virus' ability to establish a latent infection in HIV/AIDS patients. Unsurprisingly, efforts for a sterilizing cure have focused on the “shock and kill” strategy using latency-reversing agents (LRAs to complement cART in order to eliminate these latent reservoirs. However, this method faces numerous challenges. Recently, the “block and lock” strategy has been proposed. It aims to reinforce a deep state of latency and prevent sporadic reactivation (“blip” of HIV-1 using latency-promoting agents (LPAs for a functional cure. Our studies of curaxin 100 (CBL0100, a small-molecule targeting the facilitates chromatin transcription (FACT complex, show that it blocks both HIV-1 replication and reactivation in in vitro and ex vivo models of HIV-1. Mechanistic investigation elucidated that CBL0100 preferentially targets HIV-1 transcriptional elongation and decreases the occupancy of RNA Polymerase II (Pol II and FACT at the HIV-1 promoter region. In conclusion, CBL0100 is a newly identified inhibitor of HIV-1 transcription that can be used as an LPA in the “block and lock” cure strategy.

  6. The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit E binds to classical swine fever virus NS5A and facilitates viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaofeng; Wang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Qian; Luo, Mingyang; Guo, Huancheng; Gong, Wenjie; Tu, Changchun; Sun, Jinfu

    2017-12-07

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) NS5A protein is a multifunctional protein, playing critical roles in viral RNA replication, translation and assembly. To further explore its functions in viral replication, interaction of NS5A with host factors was assayed using a his-tag "pull down" assay coupled with shotgun LC-MS/MS. Host protein translation initiation factor 3 subunit E was identified as a binding partner of NS5A, and confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization analysis. Overexpression of eIF3E markedly enhanced CSFV genomic replication, viral protein expression and production of progeny virus, and downregulation of eIF3E by siRNA significantly decreased viral proliferation in PK-15 cells. Luciferase reporter assay showed an enhancement of translational activity of the internal ribosome entry site of CSFV by eIF3E and a decrease in cellular translation by NS5A. These data indicate that eIF3E plays an important role in CSFV replication, thereby identifying it as a potential target for inhibition of the virus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Illuminating the Sites of Enterovirus Replication in Living Cells by Using a Split-GFP-Tagged Viral Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Schaar, H M; Melia, C E; van Bruggen, J A C; Strating, J R P M; van Geenen, M E D; Koster, A J; Bárcena, M; van Kuppeveld, F J M

    2016-01-01

    Like all other positive-strand RNA viruses, enteroviruses generate new organelles (replication organelles [ROs]) with a unique protein and lipid composition on which they multiply their viral genome. Suitable tools for live-cell imaging of enterovirus ROs are currently unavailable, as recombinant enteroviruses that carry genes that encode RO-anchored viral proteins tagged with fluorescent reporters have not been reported thus far. To overcome this limitation, we used a split green fluorescent protein (split-GFP) system, comprising a large fragment [strands 1 to 10; GFP(S1-10)] and a small fragment [strand 11; GFP(S11)] of only 16 residues. The GFP(S11) (GFP with S11 fragment) fragment was inserted into the 3A protein of the enterovirus coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), while the large fragment was supplied by transient or stable expression in cells. The introduction of GFP(S11) did not affect the known functions of 3A when expressed in isolation. Using correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM), we showed that GFP fluorescence was detected at ROs, whose morphologies are essentially identical to those previously observed for wild-type CVB3, indicating that GFP(S11)-tagged 3A proteins assemble with GFP(S1-10) to form GFP for illumination of bona fide ROs. It is well established that enterovirus infection leads to Golgi disintegration. Through live-cell imaging of infected cells expressing an mCherry-tagged Golgi marker, we monitored RO development and revealed the dynamics of Golgi disassembly in real time. Having demonstrated the suitability of this virus for imaging ROs, we constructed a CVB3 encoding GFP(S1-10) and GFP(S11)-tagged 3A to bypass the need to express GFP(S1-10) prior to infection. These tools will have multiple applications in future studies on the origin, location, and function of enterovirus ROs. IMPORTANCE Enteroviruses induce the formation of membranous structures (replication organelles [ROs]) with a unique protein and lipid composition specialized for

  8. A complex comprising phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase IIIβ, ACBD3, and Aichi virus proteins enhances phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate synthesis and is critical for formation of the viral replication complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa-Sasaki, Kumiko; Sasaki, Jun; Taniguchi, Koki

    2014-06-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase IIIβ (PI4KB) is a host factor required for the replication of certain picornavirus genomes. We previously showed that nonstructural proteins 2B, 2BC, 2C, 3A, and 3AB of Aichi virus (AiV), a picornavirus, interact with the Golgi protein, acyl-coenzyme A binding domain containing 3 (ACBD3), which interacts with PI4KB. These five viral proteins, ACBD3, PI4KB, and the PI4KB product phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P) colocalize to the AiV RNA replication sites (J. Sasaki et al., EMBO J. 31:754-766, 2012). We here examined the roles of these viral and cellular molecules in the formation of AiV replication complexes. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that treatment of AiV polyprotein-expressing cells with a small interfering RNA targeting ACBD3 abolished colocalization of the viral 2B, 2C, and 3A proteins with PI4KB. A PI4KB-specific inhibitor also prevented their colocalization. Virus RNA replication increased the level of cellular PI4P without affecting that of PI4KB, and individual expression of 2B, 2BC, 2C, 3A, or 3AB stimulated PI4P generation. These results suggest that the viral protein/ACBD3/PI4KB complex plays an important role in forming the functional replication complex by enhancing PI4P synthesis. Of the viral proteins, 3A and 3AB were shown to stimulate the in vitro kinase activity of PI4KB through forming a 3A or 3AB/ACBD3/PI4KB complex, whereas the ACBD3-mediated PI4KB activation by 2B and 2C remains to be demonstrated. The phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase PI4KB is a host factor required for the replication of certain picornavirus genomes. Aichi virus, a picornavirus belonging to the genus Kobuvirus, forms a complex comprising one of the viral nonstructural proteins 2B, 2BC, 2C, 3A, and 3AB, the Golgi protein ACBD3, and PI4KB to synthesize PI4P at the sites for viral RNA replication. However, the roles of this protein complex in forming the replication complex are unknown. This study showed that virus RNA replication

  9. Both cis and trans Activities of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus 3D Polymerase Are Essential for Viral RNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herod, Morgan R; Ferrer-Orta, Cristina; Loundras, Eleni-Anna; Ward, Joseph C; Verdaguer, Nuria; Rowlands, David J; Stonehouse, Nicola J

    2016-08-01

    The Picornaviridae is a large family of positive-sense RNA viruses that contains numerous human and animal pathogens, including foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). The picornavirus replication complex comprises a coordinated network of protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions involving multiple viral and host-cellular factors. Many of the proteins within the complex possess multiple roles in viral RNA replication, some of which can be provided in trans (i.e., via expression from a separate RNA molecule), while others are required in cis (i.e., expressed from the template RNA molecule). In vitro studies have suggested that multiple copies of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) 3D are involved in the viral replication complex. However, it is not clear whether all these molecules are catalytically active or what other function(s) they provide. In this study, we aimed to distinguish between catalytically active 3D molecules and those that build a replication complex. We report a novel nonenzymatic cis-acting function of 3D that is essential for viral-genome replication. Using an FMDV replicon in complementation experiments, our data demonstrate that this cis-acting role of 3D is distinct from the catalytic activity, which is predominantly trans acting. Immunofluorescence studies suggest that both cis- and trans-acting 3D molecules localize to the same cellular compartment. However, our genetic and structural data suggest that 3D interacts in cis with RNA stem-loops that are essential for viral RNA replication. This study identifies a previously undescribed aspect of picornavirus replication complex structure-function and an important methodology for probing such interactions further. Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is an important animal pathogen responsible for foot-and-mouth disease. The disease is endemic in many parts of the world with outbreaks within livestock resulting in major economic losses. Propagation of the viral genome occurs within

  10. Barrier to auto integration factor becomes dephosphorylated during HSV-1 Infection and Can Act as a host defense by impairing viral DNA replication and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamin, Augusta; Thunuguntla, Prasanth; Wicklund, April; Jones, Clinton; Wiebe, Matthew S

    2014-01-01

    BAF (Barrier to Autointegration Factor) is a highly conserved DNA binding protein that senses poxviral DNA in the cytoplasm and tightly binds to the viral genome to interfere with DNA replication and transcription. To counteract BAF, a poxviral-encoded protein kinase phosphorylates BAF, which renders BAF unable to bind DNA and allows efficient viral replication to occur. Herein, we examined how BAF phosphorylation is affected by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection and tested the ability of BAF to interfere with HSV-1 productive infection. Interestingly, we found that BAF phosphorylation decreases markedly following HSV-1 infection. To determine whether dephosphorylated BAF impacts HSV-1 productive infection, we employed cell lines stably expressing a constitutively unphosphorylated form of BAF (BAF-MAAAQ) and cells overexpressing wild type (wt) BAF for comparison. Although HSV-1 production in cells overexpressing wtBAF was similar to that in cells expressing no additional BAF, viral growth was reduced approximately 80% in the presence of BAF-MAAAQ. Experiments were also performed to determine the mechanism of the antiviral activity of BAF with the following results. BAF-MAAAQ was localized to the nucleus, whereas wtBAF was dispersed throughout cells prior to infection. Following infection, wtBAF becomes dephosphorylated and relocalized to the nucleus. Additionally, BAF was associated with the HSV-1 genome during infection, with BAF-MAAAQ associated to a greater extent than wtBAF. Importantly, unphosphorylated BAF inhibited both viral DNA replication and gene expression. For example, expression of two regulatory proteins, ICP0 and VP16, were substantially reduced in cells expressing BAF-MAAAQ. However, other viral genes were not dramatically affected suggesting that expression of certain viral genes can be differentially regulated by unphosphorylated BAF. Collectively, these results suggest that BAF can act in a phosphorylation-regulated manner to impair

  11. Utilization of replication-competent XMRV reporter-viruses reveals severe viral restriction in primary human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Martina Stürzel

    Full Text Available The gammaretrovirus termed xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV was described to be isolated from prostate cancer tissue biopsies and from blood of patients suffering from chronic fatigue syndrome. However, many studies failed to detect XMRV and to verify these disease associations. Data suggesting the contamination of specimens in particular by PCR-based methods and recent reports demonstrating XMRV generation via recombination of two murine leukemia virus precursors raised serious doubts about XMRV being a genuine human pathogen. To elucidate cell tropism of XMRV, we generated replication competent XMRV reporter viruses encoding a green fluorescent protein or a secretable luciferase as tools to analyze virus infection of human cell lines or primary human cells. Transfection of proviral DNAs into LNCaP prostate cancer cells resulted in readily detectably reporter gene expression and production of progeny virus. Inoculation of known XMRV susceptible target cells revealed that these virions were infectious and expressed the reporter gene, allowing for a fast and highly sensitive quantification of XMRV infection. Both reporter viruses were capable of establishing a spreading infection in LNCaP and Raji B cells and could be easily passaged. However, after inoculation of primary human blood cells such as CD4 T cells, macrophages or dendritic cells, infection rates were very low, and a spreading infection was never established. In line with these results we found that supernatants derived from these XMRV infected primary cell types did not contain infectious virus. Thus, although XMRV efficiently replicated in some human cell lines, all tested primary cells were largely refractory to XMRV infection and did not support viral spread. Our results provide further evidence that XMRV is not a human pathogen.

  12. Differential responses of Africanized and European honey bees (Apis mellifera) to viral replication following mechanical transmission or Varroa destructor parasitism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamiduzzaman, Mollah Md; Guzman-Novoa, Ernesto; Goodwin, Paul H; Reyes-Quintana, Mariana; Koleoglu, Gun; Correa-Benítez, Adriana; Petukhova, Tatiana

    2015-03-01

    For the first time, adults and brood of Africanized and European honey bees (Apis mellifera) were compared for relative virus levels over 48 h following Varroa destructor parasitism or injection of V. destructor homogenate. Rates of increase of deformed wing virus (DWV) for Africanized versus European bees were temporarily lowered for 12h with parasitism and sustainably lowered over the entire experiment (48 h) with homogenate injection in adults. The rates were also temporarily lowered for 24h with parasitism but were not affected by homogenate injection in brood. Rates of increase of black queen cell virus (BQCV) for Africanized versus European bees were similar with parasitism but sustainably lowered over the entire experiment with homogenate injection in adults and were similar for parasitism and homogenate injection in brood. Analyses of sac brood bee virus and Israeli acute paralysis virus were limited as detection did not occur after both homogenate injection and parasitism treatment, or levels were not significantly higher than those following control buffer injection. Lower rates of replication of DWV and BQCV in Africanized bees shows that they may have greater viral resistance, at least early after treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. BRD4 Phosphorylation Regulates HPV E2-Mediated Viral Transcription, Origin Replication, and Cellular MMP-9 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shwu-Yuan Wu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Post-translational modification can modulate protein conformation and alter binding partner recruitment within gene regulatory regions. Here, we report that bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4, a transcription co-factor and chromatin regulator, uses a phosphorylation-induced switch mechanism to recruit E2 protein encoded by cancer-associated human papillomavirus (HPV to viral early gene and cellular matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 promoters. Enhanced MMP-9 expression, induced upon keratinocyte differentiation, occurs via BRD4-dependent recruitment of active AP-1 and NF-κB to their target sequences. This is triggered by replacement of AP-1 family members JunB and JunD by c-Jun and by re-localization of NF-κB from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. In addition, BRD4 phosphorylation is critical for E2- and origin-dependent HPV DNA replication. A class of phospho-BRD4-targeting compounds, distinct from the BET bromodomain inhibitors, effectively blocks BRD4 phosphorylation-specific functions in transcription and factor recruitment.

  14. The Novel Anticytomegalovirus Compound AIC246 (Letermovir) Inhibits Human Cytomegalovirus Replication through a Specific Antiviral Mechanism That Involves the Viral Terminase ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldner, Thomas; Hewlett, Guy; Ettischer, Nicole; Ruebsamen-Schaeff, Helga; Zimmermann, Holger; Lischka, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) remains the leading viral cause of birth defects and life-threatening disease in transplant recipients. All approved antiviral drugs target the viral DNA polymerase and are associated with severe toxicity issues and the emergence of drug resistance. Attempts to discover improved anti-HCMV drugs led to the identification of the small-molecular-weight compound AIC246 (Letermovir). AIC246 exhibits outstanding anti-HCMV activity in vitro and in vivo and currently is undergoing a clinical phase IIb trial. The initial mode-of-action studies suggested that the drug acts late in the HCMV replication cycle via a mechanism distinct from that of polymerase inhibitors. Here, we extend our mode-of-action analyses and report that AIC246 blocks viral replication without inhibiting the synthesis of progeny HCMV DNA or viral proteins. The genotyping of mutant viruses that escaped AIC246 inhibition uncovered distinct point mutations in the UL56 subunit of the viral terminase complex. Marker transfer analyses confirmed that these mutations were sufficient to mediate AIC246 resistance. The mapping of drug resistance to open reading frame UL56 suggests that viral DNA processing and/or packaging is targeted by AIC246. In line with this, we demonstrate that AIC246 affects the formation of proper unit-length genomes from viral DNA concatemers and interferes with virion maturation. However, since AIC246-resistant viruses do not exhibit cross-resistance to previously published terminase inhibitors, our data suggest that AIC246 interferes with HCMV DNA cleavage/packaging via a molecular mechanism that is distinct from that of other compound classes known to target the viral terminase. PMID:21752907

  15. The novel anticytomegalovirus compound AIC246 (Letermovir) inhibits human cytomegalovirus replication through a specific antiviral mechanism that involves the viral terminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldner, Thomas; Hewlett, Guy; Ettischer, Nicole; Ruebsamen-Schaeff, Helga; Zimmermann, Holger; Lischka, Peter

    2011-10-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) remains the leading viral cause of birth defects and life-threatening disease in transplant recipients. All approved antiviral drugs target the viral DNA polymerase and are associated with severe toxicity issues and the emergence of drug resistance. Attempts to discover improved anti-HCMV drugs led to the identification of the small-molecular-weight compound AIC246 (Letermovir). AIC246 exhibits outstanding anti-HCMV activity in vitro and in vivo and currently is undergoing a clinical phase IIb trial. The initial mode-of-action studies suggested that the drug acts late in the HCMV replication cycle via a mechanism distinct from that of polymerase inhibitors. Here, we extend our mode-of-action analyses and report that AIC246 blocks viral replication without inhibiting the synthesis of progeny HCMV DNA or viral proteins. The genotyping of mutant viruses that escaped AIC246 inhibition uncovered distinct point mutations in the UL56 subunit of the viral terminase complex. Marker transfer analyses confirmed that these mutations were sufficient to mediate AIC246 resistance. The mapping of drug resistance to open reading frame UL56 suggests that viral DNA processing and/or packaging is targeted by AIC246. In line with this, we demonstrate that AIC246 affects the formation of proper unit-length genomes from viral DNA concatemers and interferes with virion maturation. However, since AIC246-resistant viruses do not exhibit cross-resistance to previously published terminase inhibitors, our data suggest that AIC246 interferes with HCMV DNA cleavage/packaging via a molecular mechanism that is distinct from that of other compound classes known to target the viral terminase.

  16. The Nuclear DNA Sensor IFI16 Acts as a Restriction Factor for Human Papillomavirus Replication through Epigenetic Modifications of the Viral Promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Cigno, Irene; De Andrea, Marco; Borgogna, Cinzia; Albertini, Silvia; Landini, Manuela M; Peretti, Alberto; Johnson, Karen E; Chandran, Bala; Landolfo, Santo; Gariglio, Marisa

    2015-08-01

    The human interferon-inducible IFI16 protein, an innate immune sensor of intracellular DNA, was recently demonstrated to act as a restriction factor for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection by inhibiting both viral-DNA replication and transcription. Through the use of two distinct cellular models, this study provides strong evidence in support of the notion that IFI16 can also restrict human papillomavirus 18 (HPV18) replication. In the first model, an immortalized keratinocyte cell line (NIKS) was used, in which the IFI16 protein was knocked down through the use of small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology and overexpressed following transduction with the adenovirus IFI16 (AdVIFI16) vector. The second model consisted of U2OS cells transfected by electroporation with HPV18 minicircles. In differentiated IFI16-silenced NIKS-HPV18 cells, viral-load values were significantly increased compared with differentiated control cells. Consistent with this, IFI16 overexpression severely impaired HPV18 replication in both NIKS and U2OS cells, thus confirming its antiviral restriction activity. In addition to the inhibition of viral replication, IFI16 was also able to reduce viral transcription, as demonstrated by viral-gene expression analysis in U2OS cells carrying episomal HPV18 minicircles and HeLa cells. We also provide evidence that IFI16 promotes the addition of heterochromatin marks and the reduction of euchromatin marks on viral chromatin at both early and late promoters, thus reducing both viral replication and transcription. Altogether, these results argue that IFI16 restricts chromatinized HPV DNA through epigenetic modifications and plays a broad surveillance role against viral DNA in the nucleus that is not restricted to herpesviruses. Intrinsic immunity is mediated by cellular restriction factors that are constitutively expressed and active even before a pathogen enters the cell. The host nuclear factor IFI16 acts as a sensor

  17. Fluorescent reporter signals, EGFP and DsRed, encoded in HIV-1 facilitate the detection of productively infected cells and cell-associated viral replication levels

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    Kazutaka eTerahara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow cytometric analysis is a reliable and convenient method for investigating molecules at the single cell level. Previously, recombinant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 strains were constructed that express a fluorescent reporter, either enhanced green fluorescent protein or DsRed, which allow the monitoring of HIV-1-infected cells by flow cytometry. The present study further investigated the potential of these recombinant viruses in terms of whether the HIV-1 fluorescent reporters would be helpful in evaluating viral replication based on fluorescence intensity. When primary CD4+ T cells were infected with recombinant viruses, the fluorescent reporter intensity measured by flow cytometry was associated with the level of CD4 downmodulation and Gag p24 expression in infected cells. Interestingly, some HIV-1-infected cells, in which CD4 was only moderately downmodulated, were reporter-positive but Gag p24-negative. Furthermore, when the activation status of primary CD4+ T cells was modulated by T cell receptor-mediated stimulation, we confirmed the preferential viral production upon strong stimulation and showed that the intensity of the fluorescent reporter within a proportion of HIV-1-infected cells was correlated with the viral replication level. These findings indicate that a fluorescent reporter encoded within HIV-1 is useful for the sensitive detection of productively-infected cells at different stages of infection and for evaluating cell-associated viral replication at the single cell level.

  18. The novel immunosuppressive protein kinase C inhibitor sotrastaurin has no pro-viral effects on the replication cycle of hepatitis B or C virus.

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    Thomas von Hahn

    Full Text Available The pan-protein kinase C (PKC inhibitor sotrastaurin (AEB071 is a novel immunosuppressant currently in phase II trials for immunosuppression after solid organ transplantation. Besides T-cell activation, PKC affects numerous cellular processes that are potentially important for the replication of hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV, major blood-borne pathogens prevalent in solid organ transplant recipients. This study uses state of the art virological assays to assess the direct, non-immune mediated effects of sotrastaurin on HBV and HCV. Most importantly, sotrastaurin had no pro-viral effect on either HBV or HCV. In the presence of high concentrations of sotrastaurin, well above those used clinically and close to levels where cytotoxic effects become detectable, there was a reduction of HCV and HBV replication. This reduction is very likely due to cytotoxic and/or anti-proliferative effects rather than direct anti-viral activity of the drug. Replication cycle stages other than genome replication such as viral cell entry and spread of HCV infection directly between adjacent cells was clearly unaffected by sotrastaurin. These data support the evaluation of sotrastaurin in HBV and/or HCV infected transplant recipients.

  19. The Oncogenic Small Tumor Antigen of Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Is an Iron-Sulfur Cluster Protein That Enhances Viral DNA Replication.

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    Tsang, Sabrina H; Wang, Ranran; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Knight, Simon A B; Buck, Christopher B; You, Jianxin

    2015-11-25

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) plays an important role in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). MCPyV small T (sT) antigen has emerged as the key oncogenic driver in MCC carcinogenesis. It has also been shown to promote MCPyV LT-mediated replication by stabilizing LT. The importance of MCPyV sT led us to investigate sT functions and to identify potential ways to target this protein. We discovered that MCPyV sT purified from bacteria contains iron-sulfur (Fe/S) clusters. Electron paramagnetic resonance analysis showed that MCPyV sT coordinates a [2Fe-2S] and a [4Fe-4S] cluster. We also observed phenotypic conservation of Fe/S coordination in the sTs of other polyomaviruses. Since Fe/S clusters are critical cofactors in many nucleic acid processing enzymes involved in DNA unwinding and polymerization, our results suggested the hypothesis that MCPyV sT might be directly involved in viral replication. Indeed, we demonstrated that MCPyV sT enhances LT-mediated replication in a manner that is independent of its previously reported ability to stabilize LT. MCPyV sT translocates to nuclear foci containing actively replicating viral DNA, supporting a direct role for sT in promoting viral replication. Mutations of Fe/S cluster-coordinating cysteines in MCPyV sT abolish its ability to stimulate viral replication. Moreover, treatment with cidofovir, a potent antiviral agent, robustly inhibits the sT-mediated enhancement of MCPyV replication but has little effect on the basal viral replication driven by LT alone. This finding further indicates that MCPyV sT plays a direct role in stimulating viral DNA replication and introduces cidofovir as a possible drug for controlling MCPyV infection. MCPyV is associated with a highly aggressive form of skin cancer in humans. Epidemiological surveys for MCPyV seropositivity and sequencing analyses of healthy human skin suggest that MCPyV may represent a common component of the human skin microbial flora. However, much of the biology of the virus

  20. Influenza A virus encoding secreted Gaussia luciferase as useful tool to analyze viral replication and its inhibition by antiviral compounds and cellular proteins.

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    Nadine Eckert

    Full Text Available Reporter genes inserted into viral genomes enable the easy and rapid quantification of virus replication, which is instrumental to efficient in vitro screening of antiviral compounds or in vivo analysis of viral spread and pathogenesis. Based on a published design, we have generated several replication competent influenza A viruses carrying either fluorescent proteins or Gaussia luciferase. Reporter activity could be readily quantified in infected cultures, but the virus encoding Gaussia luciferase was more stable than viruses bearing fluorescent proteins and was therefore analyzed in detail. Quantification of Gaussia luciferase activity in the supernatants of infected culture allowed the convenient and highly sensitive detection of viral spread, and enzymatic activity correlated with the number of infectious particles released from infected cells. Furthermore, the Gaussia luciferase encoding virus allowed the sensitive quantification of the antiviral activity of the neuraminidase inhibitor (NAI zanamivir and the host cell interferon-inducible transmembrane (IFITM proteins 1-3, which are known to inhibit influenza virus entry. Finally, the virus was used to demonstrate that influenza A virus infection is sensitive to a modulator of endosomal cholesterol, in keeping with the concept that IFITMs inhibit viral entry by altering cholesterol levels in the endosomal membrane. In sum, we report the characterization of a novel influenza A reporter virus, which allows fast and sensitive detection of viral spread and its inhibition, and we show that influenza A virus entry is sensitive to alterations of endosomal cholesterol levels.

  1. Myxoma virus protein M029 is a dual function immunomodulator that inhibits PKR and also conscripts RHA/DHX9 to promote expanded host tropism and viral replication.

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    Masmudur M Rahman

    Full Text Available Myxoma virus (MYXV-encoded protein M029 is a member of the poxvirus E3 family of dsRNA-binding proteins that antagonize the cellular interferon signaling pathways. In order to investigate additional functions of M029, we have constructed a series of targeted M029-minus (vMyx-M029KO and vMyx-M029ID and V5-tagged M029 MYXV. We found that M029 plays a pivotal role in determining the cellular tropism of MYXV in all mammalian cells tested. The M029-minus viruses were able to replicate only in engineered cell lines that stably express a complementing protein, such as vaccinia E3, but underwent abortive or abated infection in all other tested mammalian cell lines. The M029-minus viruses were dramatically attenuated in susceptible host European rabbits and caused no observable signs of myxomatosis. Using V5-tagged M029 virus, we observed that M029 expressed as an early viral protein is localized in both the nuclear and cytosolic compartments in virus-infected cells, and is also incorporated into virions. Using proteomic approaches, we have identified Protein Kinase R (PKR and RNA helicase A (RHA/DHX9 as two cellular binding partners of M029 protein. In virus-infected cells, M029 interacts with PKR in a dsRNA-dependent manner, while binding with DHX9 was not dependent on dsRNA. Significantly, PKR knockdown in human cells rescued the replication defect of the M029-knockout viruses. Unexpectedly, this rescue of M029-minus virus replication by PKR depletion could then be reversed by RHA/DHX9 knockdown in human monocytic THP1 cells. This indicates that M029 not only inhibits generic PKR anti-viral pathways, but also binds and conscripts RHA/DHX9 as a pro-viral effector to promote virus replication in THP1 cells. Thus, M029 is a critical host range and virulence factor for MYXV that is required for replication in all mammalian cells by antagonizing PKR-mediated anti-viral functions, and also conscripts pro-viral RHA/DHX9 to promote viral replication

  2. Myxoma virus protein M029 is a dual function immunomodulator that inhibits PKR and also conscripts RHA/DHX9 to promote expanded host tropism and viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Masmudur M; Liu, Jia; Chan, Winnie M; Rothenburg, Stefan; McFadden, Grant

    2013-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV)-encoded protein M029 is a member of the poxvirus E3 family of dsRNA-binding proteins that antagonize the cellular interferon signaling pathways. In order to investigate additional functions of M029, we have constructed a series of targeted M029-minus (vMyx-M029KO and vMyx-M029ID) and V5-tagged M029 MYXV. We found that M029 plays a pivotal role in determining the cellular tropism of MYXV in all mammalian cells tested. The M029-minus viruses were able to replicate only in engineered cell lines that stably express a complementing protein, such as vaccinia E3, but underwent abortive or abated infection in all other tested mammalian cell lines. The M029-minus viruses were dramatically attenuated in susceptible host European rabbits and caused no observable signs of myxomatosis. Using V5-tagged M029 virus, we observed that M029 expressed as an early viral protein is localized in both the nuclear and cytosolic compartments in virus-infected cells, and is also incorporated into virions. Using proteomic approaches, we have identified Protein Kinase R (PKR) and RNA helicase A (RHA)/DHX9 as two cellular binding partners of M029 protein. In virus-infected cells, M029 interacts with PKR in a dsRNA-dependent manner, while binding with DHX9 was not dependent on dsRNA. Significantly, PKR knockdown in human cells rescued the replication defect of the M029-knockout viruses. Unexpectedly, this rescue of M029-minus virus replication by PKR depletion could then be reversed by RHA/DHX9 knockdown in human monocytic THP1 cells. This indicates that M029 not only inhibits generic PKR anti-viral pathways, but also binds and conscripts RHA/DHX9 as a pro-viral effector to promote virus replication in THP1 cells. Thus, M029 is a critical host range and virulence factor for MYXV that is required for replication in all mammalian cells by antagonizing PKR-mediated anti-viral functions, and also conscripts pro-viral RHA/DHX9 to promote viral replication specifically in myeloid

  3. Early viral replication and induced or constitutive immunity in rainbow trout families with differential resistance to Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV)

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    Purcell, M.K.; LaPatra, S.E.; Woodson, J.C.; Kurath, G.; Winton, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess correlates of innate resistance in rainbow trout full-sibling families that differ in susceptibility to Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). As part of a commercial breeding program, full-sibling families were challenged with IHNV by waterborne exposure at the 1 g size to determine susceptibility to IHNV. Progeny from select families (N = 7 families) that varied in susceptibility (ranging from 32 to 90% cumulative percent mortality (CPM)) were challenged again at the 10 g size by intra-peritoneal injection and overall mortality, early viral replication and immune responses were evaluated. Mortality challenges included 20–40 fish per family while viral replication and immune response studies included 6 fish per family at each time point (24, 48 and 72 h post-infection (hpi)). CPM at the 1 g size was significantly correlated with CPM at the 10 g size, indicating that inherent resistance was a stable trait irrespective of size. In the larger fish, viral load was measured by quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR in the anterior kidney and was a significant predictor of family disease outcome at 48 hpi. Type I interferon (IFN) transcript levels were significantly correlated with an individual's viral load at 48 and 72 hpi, while type II IFN gene expression was significantly correlated with an individual's viral load at 24 and 48 hpi. Mean family type I but not type II IFN gene expression was weakly associated with susceptibility at 72 hpi. There was no association between mean family susceptibility and the constitutive expression of a range of innate immune genes (e.g. type I and II IFN pathway genes, cytokine and viral recognition receptor genes). The majority of survivors from the challenge had detectable serum neutralizing antibody titers but no trend was observed among families. This result suggests that even the most resistant families experienced sufficient levels of viral replication to trigger specific

  4. Viral replication rate regulates clinical outcome and CD8 T cell responses during highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus infection in mice.

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    Yasuko Hatta

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Since the first recorded infection of humans with H5N1 viruses of avian origin in 1997, sporadic human infections continue to occur with a staggering mortality rate of >60%. Although sustained human-to-human transmission has not occurred yet, there is a growing concern that these H5N1 viruses might acquire this trait and raise the specter of a pandemic. Despite progress in deciphering viral determinants of pathogenicity, we still lack crucial information on virus/immune system interactions pertaining to severe disease and high mortality associated with human H5N1 influenza virus infections. Using two human isolates of H5N1 viruses that differ in their pathogenicity in mice, we have defined mechanistic links among the rate of viral replication, mortality, CD8 T cell responses, and immunopathology. The extreme pathogenicity of H5N1 viruses was directly linked to the ability of the virus to replicate rapidly, and swiftly attain high steady-state titers in the lungs within 48 hours after infection. The remarkably high replication rate of the highly pathogenic H5N1 virus did not prevent the induction of IFN-β or activation of CD8 T cells, but the CD8 T cell response was ineffective in controlling viral replication in the lungs and CD8 T cell deficiency did not affect viral titers or mortality. Additionally, BIM deficiency ameliorated lung pathology and inhibited T cell apoptosis without affecting survival of mice. Therefore, rapidly replicating, highly lethal H5N1 viruses could simply outpace and overwhelm the adaptive immune responses, and kill the host by direct cytopathic effects. However, therapeutic suppression of early viral replication and the associated enhancement of CD8 T cell responses improved the survival of mice following a lethal H5N1 infection. These findings suggest that suppression of early H5N1 virus replication is key to the programming of an effective host response, which has implications in treatment of this infection in humans.

  5. DNA-Binding Properties of African Swine Fever Virus pA104R, a Histone-Like Protein Involved in Viral Replication and Transcription.

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    Frouco, Gonçalo; Freitas, Ferdinando B; Coelho, João; Leitão, Alexandre; Martins, Carlos; Ferreira, Fernando

    2017-06-15

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) codes for a putative histone-like protein (pA104R) with extensive sequence homology to bacterial proteins that are implicated in genome replication and packaging. Functional characterization of purified recombinant pA104R revealed that it binds to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) over a wide range of temperatures, pH values, and salt concentrations and in an ATP-independent manner, with an estimated binding site size of about 14 to 16 nucleotides. Using site-directed mutagenesis, the arginine located in pA104R's DNA-binding domain, at position 69, was found to be relevant for efficient DNA-binding activity. Together, pA104R and ASFV topoisomerase II (pP1192R) display DNA-supercoiling activity, although none of the proteins by themselves do, indicating that the two cooperate in this process. In ASFV-infected cells, A104R transcripts were detected from 2 h postinfection (hpi) onward, reaching a maximum concentration around 16 hpi. pA104R was detected from 12 hpi onward, localizing with viral DNA replication sites and being found exclusively in the Triton-insoluble fraction. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown experiments revealed that pA104R plays a critical role in viral DNA replication and gene expression, with transfected cells showing lower viral progeny numbers (up to a reduction of 82.0%), lower copy numbers of viral genomes (-78.3%), and reduced transcription of a late viral gene (-47.6%). Taken together, our results strongly suggest that pA104R participates in the modulation of viral DNA topology, probably being involved in viral DNA replication, transcription, and packaging, emphasizing that ASFV mutants lacking the A104R gene could be used as a strategy to develop a vaccine against ASFV.IMPORTANCE Recently reintroduced in Europe, African swine fever virus (ASFV) causes a fatal disease in domestic pigs, causing high economic losses in affected countries, as no vaccine or treatment is currently

  6. Replication of different clones of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in primary fetal human astrocytes: enhancement of viral gene expression by Nef.

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    Bencheikh, M; Bentsman, G; Sarkissian, N; Canki, M; Volsky, D J

    1999-04-01

    Dementia is a common complication of AIDS which is associated with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of brain macrophages and microglia. Recent studies have shown that astrocytes are also infected in the brain but HIV-1 replication in these cells is restricted. To determine virus specificity of this restriction we tested the expression of 15 HIV-1 molecular clones in primary human fetal astrocytes by infection and DNA transfection. Infection with cell-free viruses was poorly productive and revealed no clone-specific differences. In contrast, transfected cells produced transiently high levels of HIV-1 p24 core antigen, up to 50 nanograms per ml culture supernatant, and nanogram levels of p24 were detected 3-4 weeks after transfection of some viral clones. The average peak expression of HIV-1 in astrocytes varied as a function of viral clone used by a factor of 15 but the differences and the subsequent virus spread did not correlate with the tropism of the viral clones to T cells or macrophages. Functional vif, vpu, and vpr genes were dispensable for virus replication from transfected DNA, but intact nef provided a detectable enhancement of early viral gene expression and promoted maintenance of HIV-1 infection. We conclude that primary astrocytes present no fundamental barriers to moderate expression of different strains of HIV-1 and that the presence of functional Nef is advantageous to virus infection in these cells.

  7. HIV-1 Vpr Accelerates Viral Replication during Acute Infection by Exploitation of Proliferating CD4+ T Cells In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kei; Misawa, Naoko; Iwami, Shingo; Satou, Yorifumi; Matsuoka, Masao; Ishizaka, Yukihito; Ito, Mamoru; Aihara, Kazuyuki; An, Dong Sung; Koyanagi, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    The precise role of viral protein R (Vpr), an HIV-1-encoded protein, during HIV-1 infection and its contribution to the development of AIDS remain unclear. Previous reports have shown that Vpr has the ability to cause G2 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in HIV-1-infected cells in vitro. In addition, vpr is highly conserved in transmitted/founder HIV-1s and in all primate lentiviruses, which are evolutionarily related to HIV-1. Although these findings suggest an important role of Vpr in HIV-1 pathogenesis, its direct evidence in vivo has not been shown. Here, by using a human hematopoietic stem cell-transplanted humanized mouse model, we demonstrated that Vpr causes G2 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis predominantly in proliferating CCR5+ CD4+ T cells, which mainly consist of regulatory CD4+ T cells (Tregs), resulting in Treg depletion and enhanced virus production during acute infection. The Vpr-dependent enhancement of virus replication and Treg depletion is observed in CCR5-tropic but not CXCR4-tropic HIV-1-infected mice, suggesting that these effects are dependent on the coreceptor usage by HIV-1. Immune activation was observed in CCR5-tropic wild-type but not in vpr-deficient HIV-1-infected humanized mice. When humanized mice were treated with denileukin diftitox (DD), to deplete Tregs, DD-treated humanized mice showed massive activation/proliferation of memory T cells compared to the untreated group. This activation/proliferation enhanced CCR5 expression in memory CD4+ T cells and rendered them more susceptible to CCR5-tropic wild-type HIV-1 infection than to vpr-deficient virus. Taken together, these results suggest that Vpr takes advantage of proliferating CCR5+ CD4+ T cells for enhancing viremia of CCR5-tropic HIV-1. Because Tregs exist in a higher cycling state than other T cell subsets, Tregs appear to be more vulnerable to exploitation by Vpr during acute HIV-1 infection. PMID:24339781

  8. Replication competent HIV-1 viruses that express intragenomic microRNA reveal discrete RNA-interference mechanisms that affect viral replication

    OpenAIRE

    Klase Zachary; Houzet Laurent; Jeang Kuan-Teh

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background It remains unclear whether retroviruses can encode and express an intragenomic microRNA (miRNA). Some have suggested that processing by the Drosha and Dicer enzymes might preclude the viability of a replicating retroviral RNA genome that contains a cis-embedded miRNA. To date, while many studies have shown that lentiviral vectors containing miRNAs can transduce mammalian cells and express the inserted miRNA efficiently, no study has examined the impact on the replication o...

  9. Single-cycle viral gene expression, rather than progressive replication and oncolysis, is required for VSV therapy of B16 melanoma.

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    Galivo, F; Diaz, R M; Wongthida, P; Thompson, J; Kottke, T; Barber, G; Melcher, A; Vile, R

    2010-02-01

    A fully intact immune system would be expected to hinder the efficacy of oncolytic virotherapy by inhibiting viral replication. Simultaneously, however, it may also enhance antitumor therapy through initiation of proinflammatory, antiviral cytokine responses at the tumor site. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of a fully intact immune system on the antitumor efficacy of an oncolytic virus. In this respect, injection of oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) into subcutaneous B16ova melanomas in C57Bl/6 mice leads to tumor regression, but it is not associated with viral replicative burst in the tumor. In contrast, intratumoral delivery of VSV induces an acute proinflammatory reaction, which quickly resolves concomitantly with virus clearance. Consistent with the hypothesis that therapy may not be dependent on the ability of VSV to undergo progressive rounds of replication, a single-cycle VSV is equally effective as a fully replication-competent VSV, whereas inactivated viruses do not generate therapy. Even though therapy is dependent on host CD8+ and natural killer cells, these effects are not associated with interferon-gamma-dependent responses against either the virus or tumor. There is, however, a strong correlation between viral gene expression, induction of proinflammatory reaction in the tumor and in vivo therapy. Overall, our results suggest that acute innate antiviral immune response, which rapidly clears VSV from B16ova tumors, is associated with the therapy observed in this model. Therefore, the antiviral immune response to an oncolytic virus mediates an intricate balance between safety, restriction of oncolysis and, potentially, significant immune-mediated antitumor therapy.

  10. CTCF and Rad21 act as host cell restriction factors for Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV lytic replication by modulating viral gene transcription.

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    Da-Jiang Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is a human herpesvirus that causes Kaposi's sarcoma and is associated with the development of lymphoproliferative diseases. KSHV reactivation from latency and virion production is dependent on efficient transcription of over eighty lytic cycle genes and viral DNA replication. CTCF and cohesin, cellular proteins that cooperatively regulate gene expression and mediate long-range DNA interactions, have been shown to bind at specific sites in herpesvirus genomes. CTCF and cohesin regulate KSHV gene expression during latency and may also control lytic reactivation, although their role in lytic gene expression remains incompletely characterized. Here, we analyze the dynamic changes in CTCF and cohesin binding that occur during the process of KSHV viral reactivation and virion production by high resolution chromatin immunoprecipitation and deep sequencing (ChIP-Seq and show that both proteins dissociate from viral genomes in kinetically and spatially distinct patterns. By utilizing siRNAs to specifically deplete CTCF and Rad21, a cohesin component, we demonstrate that both proteins are potent restriction factors for KSHV replication, with cohesin knockdown leading to hundred-fold increases in viral yield. High-throughput RNA sequencing was used to characterize the transcriptional effects of CTCF and cohesin depletion, and demonstrated that both proteins have complex and global effects on KSHV lytic transcription. Specifically, both proteins act as positive factors for viral transcription initially but subsequently inhibit KSHV lytic transcription, such that their net effect is to limit KSHV RNA accumulation. Cohesin is a more potent inhibitor of KSHV transcription than CTCF but both proteins are also required for efficient transcription of a subset of KSHV genes. These data reveal novel effects of CTCF and cohesin on transcription from a relatively small genome that resemble their effects on the cellular

  11. Replicative homeostasis II: Influence of polymerase fidelity on RNA virus quasispecies biology: Implications for immune recognition, viral autoimmunity and other "virus receptor" diseases

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    Sallie Richard

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Much of the worlds' population is in active or imminent danger from established infectious pathogens, while sporadic and pandemic infections by these and emerging agents threaten everyone. RNA polymerases (RNApol generate enormous genetic and consequent antigenic heterogeneity permitting both viruses and cellular pathogens to evade host defences. Thus, RNApol causes more morbidity and premature mortality than any other molecule. The extraordinary genetic heterogeneity defining viral quasispecies results from RNApol infidelity causing rapid cumulative genomic RNA mutation a process that, if uncontrolled, would cause catastrophic loss of sequence integrity and inexorable quasispecies extinction. Selective replication and replicative homeostasis, an epicyclical regulatory mechanism dynamically linking RNApol fidelity and processivity with quasispecies phenotypic diversity, modulating polymerase fidelity and, hence, controlling quasispecies behaviour, prevents this happening and also mediates immune escape. Perhaps more importantly, ineluctable generation of broad phenotypic diversity after viral RNA is translated to protein quasispecies suggests a mechanism of disease that specifically targets, and functionally disrupts, the host cell surface molecules – including hormone, lipid, cell signalling or neurotransmitter receptors – that viruses co-opt for cell entry. This mechanism – "Viral Receptor Disease (VRD" – may explain so-called "viral autoimmunity", some classical autoimmune disorders and other diseases, including type II diabetes mellitus, and some forms of obesity. Viral receptor disease is a unifying hypothesis that may also explain some diseases with well-established, but multi-factorial and apparently unrelated aetiologies – like coronary artery and other vascular diseases – in addition to diseases like schizophrenia that are poorly understood and lack plausible, coherent, pathogenic explanations.

  12. Dual role of TRBP in HIV replication and RNA interference: viral diversion of a cellular pathway or evasion from antiviral immunity?

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    Clerzius Guerline

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Increasing evidence indicates that RNA interference (RNAi may be used to provide antiviral immunity in mammalian cells. Human micro (miRNAs can inhibit the replication of a primate virus, whereas a virally-encoded miRNA from HIV inhibits its own replication. Indirect proof comes from RNAi suppressors encoded by mammalian viruses. Influenza NS1 and Vaccinia E3L proteins can inhibit RNAi in plants, insects and worms. HIV-1 Tat protein and Adenovirus VA RNAs act as RNAi suppressors in mammalian cells. Surprisingly, many RNAi suppressors are also inhibitors of the interferon (IFN-induced protein kinase R (PKR but the potential overlap between the RNAi and the IFN pathways remains to be determined. The link between RNAi as an immune response and the IFN pathway may be formed by a cellular protein, TRBP, which has a dual role in HIV replication and RNAi. TRBP has been isolated as an HIV-1 TAR RNA binding protein that increases HIV expression and replication by inhibiting PKR and by increasing translation of structured RNAs. A recent report published in the Journal of Virology shows that the poor replication of HIV in astrocytes is mainly due to a heightened PKR response that can be overcome by supplying TRBP exogenously. In two recent papers published in Nature and EMBO Reports, TRBP is now shown to interact with Dicer and to be required for RNAi mediated by small interfering (si and micro (miRNAs. The apparent discrepancy between TRBP requirement in RNAi and in HIV replication opens the hypotheses that RNAi may be beneficial for HIV-1 replication or that HIV-1 may evade the RNAi restriction by diverting TRBP from Dicer and use it for its own benefit.

  13. The P2 of Wheat yellow mosaic virus rearranges the endoplasmic reticulum and recruits other viral proteins into replication-associated inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liying; Andika, Ida Bagus; Shen, Jiangfeng; Yang, Di; Chen, Jianping

    2014-06-01

    Viruses commonly modify host endomembranes to facilitate biological processes in the viral life cycle. Infection by viruses belonging to the genus Bymovirus (family Potyviridae) has long been known to induce the formation of large membranous inclusion bodies in host cells, but their assembly and biological roles are still unclear. Immunoelectron microscopy of cells infected with the bymovirus Wheat yellow mosaic virus (WYMV) showed that P1, P2 and P3 are the major viral protein constituents of the membranous inclusions, whereas NIa-Pro (nuclear inclusion-a protease) and VPg (viral protein genome-linked) are probable minor components. P1, P2 and P3 associated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but only P2 was able to rearrange ER and form large aggregate structures. Bioinformatic analyses and chemical experiments showed that P2 is an integral membrane protein and depends on the active secretory pathway to form aggregates of ER membranes. In planta and in vitro assays demonstrated that P2 interacts with P1, P3, NIa-Pro or VPg and recruits these proteins into the aggregates. In vivo RNA labelling using WYMV-infected wheat protoplasts showed that the synthesis of viral RNAs occurs in the P2-associated inclusions. Our results suggest that P2 plays a major role in the formation of membranous compartments that house the genomic replication of WYMV. © 2013 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  14. Major histocompatibility complex class II transactivator CIITA is a viral restriction factor that targets human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 Tax-1 function and inhibits viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Giovanna; Forlani, Greta; Andresen, Vibeke; Turci, Marco; Bertazzoni, Umberto; Franchini, Genoveffa; Poli, Guido; Accolla, Roberto S

    2011-10-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of an aggressive malignancy of CD4+ T lymphocytes. Since the viral transactivator Tax-1 is a major player in T-cell transformation, targeting Tax-1 protein is regarded as a possible strategy to arrest viral replication and to counteract neoplastic transformation. We demonstrate that CIITA, the master regulator of major histocompatibility complex class II gene transcription, inhibits HTLV-1 replication by blocking the transactivating function of Tax-1 both when exogenously transfected in 293T cells and when endogenously expressed by a subset of U937 promonocytic cells. Tax-1 and CIITA physically interact in vivo via the first 108 amino acids of Tax-1 and two CIITA adjacent regions (amino acids 1 to 252 and 253 to 410). Interestingly, only CIITA 1-252 mediated Tax-1 inhibition, in agreement with the fact that CIITA residues from positions 64 to 124 were required to block Tax-1 transactivation. CIITA inhibitory action on Tax-1 correlated with the nuclear localization of CIITA and was independent of the transcription factor NF-YB, previously involved in CIITA-mediated inhibition of Tax-2 of HTLV-2. Instead, CIITA severely impaired the physical and functional interaction of Tax-1 with the cellular coactivators p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF), cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB), and activating transcription factor 1 (ATF1), which are required for the optimal activation of HTLV-1 promoter. Accordingly, the overexpression of PCAF, CREB, and ATF1 restored Tax-1-dependent transactivation of the viral long-terminal-repeat promoter inhibited by CIITA. These findings strongly support our original observation that CIITA, beside increasing the antigen-presenting function for pathogen antigens, acts as an endogenous restriction factor against human retroviruses by blocking virus replication and spreading.

  15. The interaction between endogenous 30S ribosomal subunit protein S11 and Cucumber mosaic virus LS2b protein affects viral replication, infection and gene silencing suppressor activity.

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    Ruilin Wang

    Full Text Available Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV is a model virus for plant-virus protein interaction and mechanism research because of its wide distribution, high-level of replication and simple genome structure. The 2b protein is a multifunctional protein encoded by CMV that suppresses RNA silencing-based antiviral defense and contributes to CMV virulence in host plants. In this report, 12 host proteins were identified as CMV LS2b binding partners using the yeast two-hybrid screen system from the Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA library. Among the host proteins, 30S ribosomal subunit protein S11 (RPS11 was selected for further studies. The interaction between LS2b and full-length RPS11 was confirmed using the yeast two-hybrid system. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BIFC assays observed by confocal laser microscopy and Glutathione S-transferase (GST pull-down assays were used to verify the interaction between endogenous NbRPS11 and viral CMVLS2b both in vivo and in vitro. TRV-based gene silencing vector was used to knockdown NbRPS11 transcription, and immunoblot analysis revealed a decline in infectious viral RNA replication and a decrease in CMV infection in RPS11 down-regulated Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Thus, the knockdown of RPS11 likely inhibited CMV replication and accumulation. The gene silencing suppressor activity of CMV2b protein was reduced by the RPS11 knockdown. This study demonstrated that the function of viral LS2b protein was remarkably affected by the interaction with host RPS11 protein.

  16. Transcription elongation regulator 1 (TCERG1) regulates competent RNA polymerase II-mediated elongation of HIV-1 transcription and facilitates efficient viral replication.

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    Coiras, Mayte; Montes, Marta; Montanuy, Immaculada; López-Huertas, María Rosa; Mateos, Elena; Le Sommer, Caroline; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A; Hernández-Munain, Cristina; Alcamí, José; Suñé, Carlos

    2013-10-28

    Control of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) release from pausing has been proposed as a checkpoint mechanism to ensure optimal RNAPII activity, especially in large, highly regulated genes. HIV-1 gene expression is highly regulated at the level of elongation, which includes transcriptional pausing that is mediated by both viral and cellular factors. Here, we present evidence for a specific role of the elongation-related factor TCERG1 in regulating the extent of HIV-1 elongation and viral replication in vivo. We show that TCERG1 depletion diminishes the basal and viral Tat-activated transcription from the HIV-1 LTR. In support of a role for an elongation mechanism in the transcriptional control of HIV-1, we found that TCERG1 modifies the levels of pre-mRNAs generated at distal regions of HIV-1. Most importantly, TCERG1 directly affects the elongation rate of RNAPII transcription in vivo. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that TCERG1 regulates HIV-1 transcription by increasing the rate of RNAPII elongation through the phosphorylation of serine 2 within the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of RNAPII and suggest a mechanism for the involvement of TCERG1 in relieving pausing. Finally, we show that TCERG1 is required for HIV-1 replication. Our study reveals that TCERG1 regulates HIV-1 transcriptional elongation by increasing the elongation rate of RNAPII and phosphorylation of Ser 2 within the CTD. Based on our data, we propose a general mechanism for TCERG1 acting on genes that are regulated at the level of elongation by increasing the rate of RNAPII transcription through the phosphorylation of Ser2. In the case of HIV-1, our evidence provides the basis for further investigation of TCERG1 as a potential therapeutic target for the inhibition of HIV-1 replication.

  17. Characterization of a Replicating Mammalian Orthoreovirus with Tetracysteine-Tagged μNS for Live-Cell Visualization of Viral Factories.

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    Bussiere, Luke D; Choudhury, Promisree; Bellaire, Bryan; Miller, Cathy L

    2017-11-15

    Within infected host cells, mammalian orthoreovirus (MRV) forms viral factories (VFs), which are sites of viral transcription, translation, assembly, and replication. The MRV nonstructural protein μNS comprises the structural matrix of VFs and is involved in recruiting other viral proteins to VF structures. Previous attempts have been made to visualize VF dynamics in live cells, but due to current limitations in recovery of replicating reoviruses carrying large fluorescent protein tags, researchers have been unable to directly assess VF dynamics from virus-produced μNS. We set out to develop a method to overcome this obstacle by utilizing the 6-amino-acid (CCPGCC) tetracysteine (TC) tag and FlAsH-EDT2 reagent. The TC tag was introduced into eight sites throughout μNS, and the capacity of the TC-μNS fusion proteins to form virus factory-like (VFL) structures and colocalize with virus proteins was characterized. Insertion of the TC tag interfered with recombinant virus rescue in six of the eight mutants, likely as a result of loss of VF formation or important virus protein interactions. However, two recombinant (r)TC-μNS viruses were rescued and VF formation, colocalization with associating virus proteins, and characterization of virus replication were subsequently examined. Furthermore, the rTC-μNS viruses were utilized to infect cells and examine VF dynamics using live-cell microscopy. These experiments demonstrate active VF movement with fusion events as well as transient interactions between individual VFs and demonstrate the importance of microtubule stability for VF fusion during MRV infection. This work provides important groundwork for future in-depth studies of VF dynamics and host cell interactions.IMPORTANCE MRV has historically been used as a model to study the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) Reoviridae family, the members of which infect and cause disease in humans, animals, and plants. During infection, MRV forms VFs that play a critical role in virus

  18. The tyrosine kinase Hck is an inhibitor of HIV-1 replication counteracted by the viral vif protein.

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    Hassaïne, G; Courcoul, M; Bessou, G; Barthalay, Y; Picard, C; Olive, D; Collette, Y; Vigne, R; Decroly, E

    2001-05-18

    The virus infectivity factor (Vif) protein facilitates the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in primary lymphocytes and macrophages. Its action is strongly dependent on the cellular environment, and it has been proposed that the Vif protein counteracts cellular activities that would otherwise limit HIV-1 replication. Using a glutathione S-transferase pull-down assay, we identified that Vif binds specifically to the Src homology 3 domain of Hck, a tyrosine kinase from the Src family. The interaction between Vif and the full-length Hck was further assessed by co-precipitation assays in vitro and in human cells. The Vif protein repressed the kinase activity of Hck and was not itself a substrate for Hck phosphorylation. Within one single replication cycle of HIV-1, Hck was able to inhibit the production and the infectivity of vif-deleted virus but not that of wild-type virus. Accordingly, HIV-1 vif- replication was delayed in Jurkat T cell clones stably expressing Hck. Our data demonstrate that Hck controls negatively HIV-1 replication and that this inhibition is suppressed by the expression of Vif. Hck, which is present in monocyte-macrophage cells, represents the first identified cellular inhibitor of HIV-1 replication overcome by Vif.

  19. Noroviruses Co-opt the Function of Host Proteins VAPA and VAPB for Replication via a Phenylalanine–Phenylalanine-Acidic-Tract-Motif Mimic in Nonstructural Viral Protein NS1/2

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    Broc T. McCune

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Norovirus genus contains important human pathogens, but the role of host pathways in norovirus replication is largely unknown. Murine noroviruses provide the opportunity to study norovirus replication in cell culture and in small animals. The human norovirus nonstructural protein NS1/2 interacts with the host protein VAMP-associated protein A (VAPA, but the significance of the NS1/2-VAPA interaction is unexplored. Here we report decreased murine norovirus replication in VAPA- and VAPB-deficient cells. We characterized the role of VAPA in detail. VAPA was required for the efficiency of a step(s in the viral replication cycle after entry of viral RNA into the cytoplasm but before the synthesis of viral minus-sense RNA. The interaction of VAPA with viral NS1/2 proteins is conserved between murine and human noroviruses. Murine norovirus NS1/2 directly bound the major sperm protein (MSP domain of VAPA through its NS1 domain. Mutations within NS1 that disrupted interaction with VAPA inhibited viral replication. Structural analysis revealed that the viral NS1 domain contains a mimic of the phenylalanine–phenylalanine-acidic-tract (FFAT motif that enables host proteins to bind to the VAPA MSP domain. The NS1/2-FFAT mimic region interacted with the VAPA-MSP domain in a manner similar to that seen with bona fide host FFAT motifs. Amino acids in the FFAT mimic region of the NS1 domain that are important for viral replication are highly conserved across murine norovirus strains. Thus, VAPA interaction with a norovirus protein that functionally mimics host FFAT motifs is important for murine norovirus replication.

  20. The AP-1 binding sites located in the pol gene intragenic regulatory region of HIV-1 are important for viral replication.

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    Laurence Colin

    Full Text Available Our laboratory has previously identified an important intragenic region in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 genome, whose complete functional unit is composed of the 5103 fragment, the DNaseI-hypersensitive site HS7 and the 5105 fragment. These fragments (5103 and 5105 both exhibit a phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA-inducible enhancer activity on the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter. Here, we characterized the three previously identified AP-1 binding sites of fragment 5103 by showing the PMA-inducible in vitro binding and in vivo recruitment of c-Fos, JunB and JunD to this fragment located at the end of the pol gene. Functional analyses demonstrated that the intragenic AP-1 binding sites are fully responsible for the PMA-dependent enhancer activity of fragment 5103. Moreover, infection of T-lymphoid Jurkat and promonocytic U937 cells with wild-type and mutant viruses demonstrated that mutations of the intragenic AP-1 sites individually or in combination altered HIV-1 replication. Importantly, mutations of the three intragenic AP-1 sites led to a decreased in vivo recruitment of RNA polymerase II to the viral promoter, strongly supporting that the deleterious effect of these mutations on viral replication occurs, at least partly, at the transcriptional level. Single-round infections of monocyte-derived macrophages confirmed the importance of intragenic AP-1 sites for HIV-1 infectivity.

  1. The formation and modification of chromatin-like structure of human parvovirus B19 regulate viral genome replication and RNA processing.

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    Xu, Huanzhou; Hao, Sujuan; Zhang, Junmei; Chen, Zhen; Wang, Hanzhong; Guan, Wuxiang

    2017-03-15

    B19 virus (B19V) is a single stranded virus in the genus of Erythroparvovirus in the family of Parvoviridae. One of the limiting steps of B19V infection is the replication of viral genome which affected the alternative processing of its RNA. Minute virus of mice (MVM) and adeno-associated virus (AAV) has been reported to form chromatin-like structure within hours after infection of cells. However, the role of chromatin-like structure is unclear. In the present study, we found that B19V formed chromatin-like structure after 12h when B19V infectious clone was co-transfected with pHelper plasmid to HEK293T cells. Interestingly, the inhibitor of DNA methyl-transferase (5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine, DAC) inhibited not only the formation of chromatin-like structure, but also the replication of the viral genomic DNA. More importantly, the splicing of the second intron at splice acceptor sites (A2-1, and A2-2) were reduced and polyadenylation at (pA)p increased when transfected HEK293T cells were treated with DAC. Our results showed that the formation and modification of chromatin-like structure are a new layer to regulate B19V gene expression and RNA processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Mutagenesis of the yellow fever virus NS2B/3 cleavage site: determinants of cleavage site specificity and effects on polyprotein processing and viral replication.

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    Chambers, T J; Nestorowicz, A; Rice, C M

    1995-03-01

    The determinants of cleavage site specificity of the yellow fever virus (YF) NS3 proteinase for its 2B/3 cleavage site have been studied by using site-directed mutagenesis. Mutations at residues within the GARR decreases S sequence were tested for effects on cis cleavage of an NS2B-3(181) polyprotein during cell-free translation. At the P1 position, only the conservative substitution R-->K exhibited significant levels of cleavage. Conservative and nonconservative substitutions were tolerated at the P1' and P2 positions, resulting in intermediate levels of cleavage. Substitutions at the P3 and P4 positions had no effects on cleavage efficiency in the cell-free assay. Processing at other dibasic sites was studied by using transient expression of a sig2A-5(356) polyprotein. Cleavage at the 2B/3 site was not required for processing at downstream sites. However, increased accumulation of high-molecular-weight viral polyproteins was generally observed for mutations which reduced cleavage efficiency at the 2B/3 site. Several mutations were also tested for their effects on viral replication. Virus was not recovered from substitutions which blocked or substantially reduced cleavage in the cell-free assay, suggesting that efficient cleavage at the 2B/3 site is required for flavivirus replication.

  3. AT excursion: a new approach to predict replication origins in viral genomes by locating AT-rich regions

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    Choi Kwok

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Replication origins are considered important sites for understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in DNA replication. Many computational methods have been developed for predicting their locations in archaeal, bacterial and eukaryotic genomes. However, a prediction method designed for a particular kind of genomes might not work well for another. In this paper, we propose the AT excursion method, which is a score-based approach, to quantify local AT abundance in genomic sequences and use the identified high scoring segments for predicting replication origins. This method has the advantages of requiring no preset window size and having rigorous criteria to evaluate statistical significance of high scoring segments. Results We have evaluated the AT excursion method by checking its predictions against known replication origins in herpesviruses and comparing its performance with an existing base weighted score method (BWS1. Out of 43 known origins, 39 are predicted by either one or the other method and 26 origins are predicted by both. The excursion method identifies six origins not predicted by BWS1, showing that the AT excursion method is a valuable complement to BWS1. We have also applied the AT excursion method to two other families of double stranded DNA viruses, the poxviruses and iridoviruses, of which very few replication origins are documented in the public domain. The prediction results are made available as supplementary materials at 1. Preliminary investigation shows that the proposed method works well on some larger genomes too. Conclusion The AT excursion method will be a useful computational tool for identifying replication origins in a variety of genomic sequences.

  4. Up-regulation of Mcl-1 and Bak by coronavirus infection of human, avian and animal cells modulates apoptosis and viral replication.

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    Yanxin Zhong

    Full Text Available Virus-induced apoptosis and viral mechanisms that regulate this cell death program are key issues in understanding virus-host interactions and viral pathogenesis. Like many other human and animal viruses, coronavirus infection of mammalian cells induces apoptosis. In this study, the global gene expression profiles are first determined in IBV-infected Vero cells at 24 hours post-infection by Affymetrix array, using avian coronavirus infectious bronchitis virus (IBV as a model system. It reveals an up-regulation at the transcriptional level of both pro-apoptotic Bak and pro-survival myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1. These results were further confirmed both in vivo and in vitro, in IBV-infected embryonated chicken eggs, chicken fibroblast cells and mammalian cells at transcriptional and translational levels, respectively. Interestingly, the onset of apoptosis occurred earlier in IBV-infected mammalian cells silenced with short interfering RNA targeting Mcl-1 (siMcl-1, and was delayed in cells silenced with siBak. IBV progeny production and release were increased in infected Mcl-1 knockdown cells compared to similarly infected control cells, while the contrary was observed in infected Bak knockdown cells. Furthermore, IBV infection-induced up-regulation of GADD153 regulated the expression of Mcl-1. Inhibition of the mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK/ERK and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt signaling pathways by chemical inhibitors and knockdown of GADD153 by siRNA demonstrated the involvement of ER-stress response in regulation of IBV-induced Mcl-1 expression. These results illustrate the sophisticated regulatory strategies evolved by a coronavirus to modulate both virus-induced apoptosis and viral replication during its replication cycle.

  5. Up-regulation of Mcl-1 and Bak by coronavirus infection of human, avian and animal cells modulates apoptosis and viral replication.

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    Zhong, Yanxin; Liao, Ying; Fang, Shouguo; Tam, James P; Liu, Ding Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Virus-induced apoptosis and viral mechanisms that regulate this cell death program are key issues in understanding virus-host interactions and viral pathogenesis. Like many other human and animal viruses, coronavirus infection of mammalian cells induces apoptosis. In this study, the global gene expression profiles are first determined in IBV-infected Vero cells at 24 hours post-infection by Affymetrix array, using avian coronavirus infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) as a model system. It reveals an up-regulation at the transcriptional level of both pro-apoptotic Bak and pro-survival myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1). These results were further confirmed both in vivo and in vitro, in IBV-infected embryonated chicken eggs, chicken fibroblast cells and mammalian cells at transcriptional and translational levels, respectively. Interestingly, the onset of apoptosis occurred earlier in IBV-infected mammalian cells silenced with short interfering RNA targeting Mcl-1 (siMcl-1), and was delayed in cells silenced with siBak. IBV progeny production and release were increased in infected Mcl-1 knockdown cells compared to similarly infected control cells, while the contrary was observed in infected Bak knockdown cells. Furthermore, IBV infection-induced up-regulation of GADD153 regulated the expression of Mcl-1. Inhibition of the mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK/ERK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt) signaling pathways by chemical inhibitors and knockdown of GADD153 by siRNA demonstrated the involvement of ER-stress response in regulation of IBV-induced Mcl-1 expression. These results illustrate the sophisticated regulatory strategies evolved by a coronavirus to modulate both virus-induced apoptosis and viral replication during its replication cycle.

  6. Early events in the pathogenesis of foot-and-mouth disease in pigs; identification of oropharyngeal tonsils as sites of primary and sustained viral replication.

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    Carolina Stenfeldt

    Full Text Available A time-course study was performed to elucidate the early events of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV infection in pigs subsequent to simulated natural, intra-oropharyngeal, inoculation. The earliest detectable event was primary infection in the lingual and paraepiglottic tonsils at 6 hours post inoculation (hpi characterized by regional localization of viral RNA, viral antigen, and infectious virus. At this time FMDV antigen was localized in cytokeratin-positive epithelial cells and CD172a-expressing leukocytes of the crypt epithelium of the paraepiglottic tonsils. De novo replication of FMDV was first detected in oropharyngeal swab samples at 12 hpi and viremia occurred at 18-24 hpi, approximately 24 hours prior to the appearance of vesicular lesions. From 12 through 78 hpi, microscopic detection of FMDV was consistently localized to cytokeratin-positive cells within morphologically characteristic segments of oropharyngeal tonsil crypt epithelium. During this period, leukocyte populations expressing CD172a, SLA-DQ class II and/or CD8 were found in close proximity to infected epithelial cells, but with little or no co-localization with viral proteins. Similarly, M-cells expressing cytokeratin-18 did not co-localize with FMDV proteins. Intra-epithelial micro-vesicles composed of acantholytic epithelial cells expressing large amounts of structural and non-structural FMDV proteins were present within crypts of the tonsil of the soft palate during peak clinical infection. These findings inculpate the paraepiglottic tonsils as the primary site of FMDV infection in pigs exposed via the gastrointestinal tract. Furthermore, the continuing replication of FMDV in the oropharyngeal tonsils during viremia and peak clinical infection with no concurrent amplification of virus occurring in the lower respiratory tract indicates that these sites are the major source of shedding of FMDV from pigs.

  7. Early and Strong Immune Responses Are Associated with Control of Viral Replication and Recovery in Lassa Virus-Infected Cynomolgus Monkeys▿

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    Baize, Sylvain; Marianneau, Philippe; Loth, Philippe; Reynard, Stéphanie; Journeaux, Alexandra; Chevallier, Michèle; Tordo, Noël; Deubel, Vincent; Contamin, Hugues

    2009-01-01

    Lassa virus causes a hemorrhagic fever endemic in West Africa. The pathogenesis and the immune responses associated with the disease are poorly understood, and no vaccine is available. We followed virological, pathological, and immunological markers associated with fatal and nonfatal Lassa virus infection of cynomolgus monkeys. The clinical picture was characterized by fever, weight loss, depression, and acute respiratory syndrome. Transient thrombocytopenia and lymphopenia, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, infiltration of mononuclear cells, and alterations of the liver, lungs, and endothelia were observed. Survivors exhibited fewer lesions and a lower viral load than nonsurvivors. Although all animals developed strong humoral responses, antibodies appeared more rapidly in survivors and were directed against GP1, GP2, and NP. Type I interferons were detected early after infection in survivors but only during the terminal stages in fatalities. The mRNAs for CXCL10 (IP-10) and CXCL11 (I-TAC) were abundant in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and lymph nodes from infected animals, but plasma interleukin-6 was detected only in fatalities. In survivors, high activated-monocyte counts were followed by a rise in the total number of circulating monocytes. Activated T lymphocytes circulated in survivors, whereas T-cell activation was low and delayed in fatalities. In vitro stimulation with inactivated Lassa virus induced activation of T lymphocytes from all infected monkeys, but only lymphocytes from survivors proliferated. Thus, early and strong immune responses and control of viral replication were associated with recovery, whereas fatal infection was characterized by major alterations of the blood formula and, in organs, weak immune responses and uncontrolled viral replication. PMID:19297492

  8. Early and strong immune responses are associated with control of viral replication and recovery in lassa virus-infected cynomolgus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baize, Sylvain; Marianneau, Philippe; Loth, Philippe; Reynard, Stéphanie; Journeaux, Alexandra; Chevallier, Michèle; Tordo, Noël; Deubel, Vincent; Contamin, Hugues

    2009-06-01

    Lassa virus causes a hemorrhagic fever endemic in West Africa. The pathogenesis and the immune responses associated with the disease are poorly understood, and no vaccine is available. We followed virological, pathological, and immunological markers associated with fatal and nonfatal Lassa virus infection of cynomolgus monkeys. The clinical picture was characterized by fever, weight loss, depression, and acute respiratory syndrome. Transient thrombocytopenia and lymphopenia, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, infiltration of mononuclear cells, and alterations of the liver, lungs, and endothelia were observed. Survivors exhibited fewer lesions and a lower viral load than nonsurvivors. Although all animals developed strong humoral responses, antibodies appeared more rapidly in survivors and were directed against GP(1), GP(2), and NP. Type I interferons were detected early after infection in survivors but only during the terminal stages in fatalities. The mRNAs for CXCL10 (IP-10) and CXCL11 (I-TAC) were abundant in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and lymph nodes from infected animals, but plasma interleukin-6 was detected only in fatalities. In survivors, high activated-monocyte counts were followed by a rise in the total number of circulating monocytes. Activated T lymphocytes circulated in survivors, whereas T-cell activation was low and delayed in fatalities. In vitro stimulation with inactivated Lassa virus induced activation of T lymphocytes from all infected monkeys, but only lymphocytes from survivors proliferated. Thus, early and strong immune responses and control of viral replication were associated with recovery, whereas fatal infection was characterized by major alterations of the blood formula and, in organs, weak immune responses and uncontrolled viral replication.

  9. Dual role of novel ingenol derivatives from Euphorbia tirucalli in HIV replication: inhibition of de novo infection and activation of viral LTR.

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    Celina M Abreu

    Full Text Available HIV infection is not cleared by antiretroviral drugs due to the presence of latently infected cells that are not eliminated with current therapies and persist in the blood and organs of infected patients. New compounds to activate these latent reservoirs have been evaluated so that, along with HAART, they can be used to activate latent virus and eliminate the latently infected cells resulting in eradication of viral infection. Here we describe three novel diterpenes isolated from the sap of Euphorbia tirucalli, a tropical shrub. These molecules, identified as ingenols, were modified at carbon 3 and termed ingenol synthetic derivatives (ISD. They activated the HIV-LTR in reporter cell lines and human PBMCs with latent virus in concentrations as low as 10 nM. ISDs were also able to inhibit the replication of HIV-1 subtype B and C in MT-4 cells and human PBMCs at concentrations of EC50 0.02 and 0.09 µM respectively, which are comparable to the EC50 of some antiretroviral currently used in AIDS treatment. Control of viral replication may be caused by downregulation of surface CD4, CCR5 and CXCR4 observed after ISD treatment in vitro. These compounds appear to be less cytotoxic than other diterpenes such as PMA and prostratin, with effective dose versus toxic dose TI>400. Although the mechanisms of action of the three ISDs are primarily attributed to the PKC pathway, downregulation of surface receptors and stimulation of the viral LTR might be differentially modulated by different PKC isoforms.

  10. A self-perpetuating repressive state of a viral replication protein blocks superinfection by the same virus.

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    Xiao-Feng Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Diverse animal and plant viruses block the re-infection of host cells by the same or highly similar viruses through superinfection exclusion (SIE, a widely observed, yet poorly understood phenomenon. Here we demonstrate that SIE of turnip crinkle virus (TCV is exclusively determined by p28, one of the two replication proteins encoded by this virus. p28 expressed from a TCV replicon exerts strong SIE to a different TCV replicon. Transiently expressed p28, delivered simultaneously with, or ahead of, a TCV replicon, largely recapitulates this repressive activity. Interestingly, p28-mediated SIE is dramatically enhanced by C-terminally fused epitope tags or fluorescent proteins, but weakened by N-terminal modifications, and it inversely correlates with the ability of p28 to complement the replication of a p28-defective TCV replicon. Strikingly, p28 in SIE-positive cells forms large, mobile punctate inclusions that trans-aggregate a non-coalescing, SIE-defective, yet replication-competent p28 mutant. These results support a model postulating that TCV SIE is caused by the formation of multimeric p28 complexes capable of intercepting fresh p28 monomers translated from superinfector genomes, thereby abolishing superinfector replication. This model could prove to be applicable to other RNA viruses, and offer novel targets for antiviral therapy.

  11. The X gene of adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) is involved in viral DNA replication.

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    Cao, Maohua; You, Hong; Hermonat, Paul L

    2014-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) (type 2) is a popular human gene therapy vector with a long active transgene expression period and no reported vector-induced adverse reactions. Yet the basic molecular biology of this virus has not been fully addressed. One potential gene at the far 3' end of the AAV2 genome, previously referred to as X (nt 3929 to 4393), overlapping the 3' end of the cap gene, has never been characterized, although we did previously identify a promoter just up-stream (p81). Computer analysis suggested that X was involved in replication and transcription. The X protein was identified during active AAV2 replication using a polyclonal antibody against a peptide starting at amino acid 98. Reagents for the study of X included an AAV2 deletion mutant (dl78-91), a triple nucleotide substitution mutant that destroys all three 5' AUG-initiation products of X, with no effect on the cap coding sequence, and X-positive-293 cell lines. Here, we found that X up-regulated AAV2 DNA replication in differentiating keratinocytes (without helper virus, autonomous replication) and in various forms of 293 cell-based assays with help from wild type adenovirus type 5 (wt Ad5) or Ad5 helper plasmid (pHelper). The strongest contribution by X was seen in increasing wt AAV2 DNA replication in keratinocytes and dl78-91 in Ad5-infected X-positive-293 cell lines (both having multi-fold effects). Mutating the X gene in pAAV-RC (pAAV-RC-3Xneg) yielded approximately a ∼33% reduction in recombinant AAV vector DNA replication and virion production, but a larger effect was seen when using this same X-knockout AAV helper plasmid in X-positive-293 cell lines versus normal 293 cells (again, multi-fold). Taken together these data strongly suggest that AAV2 X encodes a protein involved in the AAV life cycle, particularly in increasing AAV2 DNA replication, and suggests that further studies are warranted.

  12. bta-miR-29b attenuates apoptosis by directly targeting caspase-7 and NAIF1 and suppresses bovine viral diarrhea virus replication in MDBK cells.

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    Fu, Qiang; Shi, Huijun; Shi, Mengting; Meng, Luping; Zhang, Hui; Ren, Yan; Guo, Fei; Jia, Bin; Wang, Pengyan; Ni, Wei; Chen, Chuangfu

    2014-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, endogenous, noncoding RNA molecules that serve as powerful regulators of multiple cellular processes, including apoptosis, differentiation, growth, and proliferation. Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) contributes significantly to health-related economic losses in the beef and dairy industries. Although BVDV-induced apoptosis correlates with increased intracellular viral RNA accumulation and with bta-miR-29b (miR-29b) expression upregulation in Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells infected with BVDV strain NADL, the role of miR-29b in regulating BVDV-infection-related apoptosis remains unexplored. Here, we report that miR-29b serves as a new miRNA regulating apoptosis. We showed that miR-29b target sequences were present in the 3' untranslated regions of 2 key apoptosis regulators mRNAs, cysteine aspartases-7 (caspase-7) and nuclear apoptosis-inducing factor 1 (NAIF1). Indeed, upon miRNA overexpression, both mRNA and protein levels of caspase-7 and NAIF1 were decreased. We further found that miR-29b attenuated apoptosis by directly regulating intracellular levels of caspase-7 and NAIF1. Moreover, apoptosis blockage by miR-29b was rescued upon co-infection of MDBK cells with lentiviruses expressing caspase-7 and NAIF1. Importantly, miR-29b decreased BVDV NADL envelope glycoprotein E1 mRNA levels and suppressed viral replication. These studies advance our understanding of the mechanisms of miRNAs in mediating the cells combating viral infections.

  13. Genetic analyses of HIV-1 env sequences demonstrate limited compartmentalization in breast milk and suggest viral replication within the breast that increases with mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Soren; Carlsson, Jacquelyn; Heath, Laura; Bull, Marta E; Shetty, Avinash K; Mutsvangwa, Junior; Musingwini, Georgina; Woelk, Godfrey; Zijenah, Lynn S; Katzenstein, David A; Mullins, James I; Frenkel, Lisa M

    2010-10-01

    The concentration of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is generally lower in breast milk than in blood. Mastitis, or inflammation of the breast, is associated with increased levels of milk HIV-1 and risk of mother-to-child transmission through breastfeeding. We hypothesized that mastitis facilitates the passage of HIV-1 from blood into milk or stimulates virus production within the breast. HIV-1 env sequences were generated from single amplicons obtained from breast milk and blood samples in a cross-sectional study. Viral compartmentalization was evaluated using several statistical methods, including the Slatkin and Maddison (SM) test. Mastitis was defined as an elevated milk sodium (Na(+)) concentration. The association between milk Na(+) and the pairwise genetic distance between milk and blood viral sequences was modeled using linear regression. HIV-1 was compartmentalized within milk by SM testing in 6/17 (35%) specimens obtained from 9 women, but all phylogenetic clades included viral sequences from milk and blood samples. Monotypic sequences were more prevalent in milk samples than in blood samples (22% versus 13%; P = 0.012), which accounted for half of the compartmentalization observed. Mastitis was not associated with compartmentalization by SM testing (P = 0.621), but Na(+) was correlated with greater genetic distance between milk and blood HIV-1 populations (P = 0.041). In conclusion, local production of HIV-1 within the breast is suggested by compartmentalization of virus and a higher prevalence of monotypic viruses in milk specimens. However, phylogenetic trees demonstrate extensive mixing of viruses between milk and blood specimens. HIV-1 replication in breast milk appears to increase with inflammation, contributing to higher milk viral loads during mastitis.

  14. Hsp90 interacts specifically with viral RNA and differentially regulates replication initiation of Bamboo mosaic virus and associated satellite RNA.

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    Ying Wen Huang

    Full Text Available Host factors play crucial roles in the replication of plus-strand RNA viruses. In this report, a heat shock protein 90 homologue of Nicotiana benthamiana, NbHsp90, was identified in association with partially purified replicase complexes from BaMV-infected tissue, and shown to specifically interact with the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR of BaMV genomic RNA, but not with the 3' UTR of BaMV-associated satellite RNA (satBaMV RNA or that of genomic RNA of other viruses, such as Potato virus X (PVX or Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV. Mutational analyses revealed that the interaction occurs between the middle domain of NbHsp90 and domain E of the BaMV 3' UTR. The knockdown or inhibition of NbHsp90 suppressed BaMV infectivity, but not that of satBaMV RNA, PVX, or CMV in N. benthamiana. Time-course analysis further revealed that the inhibitory effect of 17-AAG is significant only during the immediate early stages of BaMV replication. Moreover, yeast two-hybrid and GST pull-down assays demonstrated the existence of an interaction between NbHsp90 and the BaMV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. These results reveal a novel role for NbHsp90 in the selective enhancement of BaMV replication, most likely through direct interaction with the 3' UTR of BaMV RNA during the initiation of BaMV RNA replication.

  15. Extracts from Acacia catechu suppress HIV-1 replication by inhibiting the activities of the viral protease and Tat

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Acacia catechu (Mimosa family) stem bark extracts have been used traditionally as a dietary supplement as well as a folk medicine given its reported anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, hepatoprotective, antioxidant, anti-microbial and anti-tumor activities. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the anti-HIV-1 activity of the extracts from stem bark of A. catechu. Methods The aqueous and 50% ethanolic extracts of A. catechu stem bark were prepared and 50% ethanolic extract was further fractioned by successively partitioning with petroleum ether, chloroform and n-butanol. All the extracts and fractions were evaluated for cytotoxicity and anti-HIV-1 activity using different in vitro assays. The active n-butanol fraction was evaluated for its inhibition against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, integrase, protease, pro-viral genome integration and viral Tat protein mediated transactivation. The effect of n-butanol fraction on the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion in Vk2/E6E7 cells and transepithelial resistance in Caco-2 and HEC-1A cells was investigated. Results The aqueous and 50% ethanolic extracts of A. catechu showed IC50 values of 1.8 ± 0.18 μg/ml and 3.6 ± 0.31 μg/ml, respectively in cell-free virus based assay using TZM-bl cells and HIV-1NL4.3 (X-4 tropic). In the above assay, n-butanol fraction exhibited anti-HIV-1 activity with an IC50 of 1.7 ± 0.12 μg/ml. The n-butanol fraction showed a dose-dependent inhibition against HIV-1NL4.3 infection of the peripheral blood lymphocytes and against HIV-1BaL(R-5-tropic) as well as two different primary viral isolates of HIV-1 infection of TZM-bl cells. The n-butanol fraction demonstrates a potent inhibitory activity against the viral protease (IC50 = 12.9 μg/ml), but not reverse transcriptase or integrase. Further, in Alu-PCR no effect on viral integration was observed. The n-butanol fraction interfered with the Tat-mediated Long Terminal Repeat transactivation in

  16. Contribution of the C-terminal region within the catalytic core domain of HIV-1 integrase to yeast lethality, chromatin binding and viral replication

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    Belhumeur Pierre

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 integrase (IN is a key viral enzymatic molecule required for the integration of the viral cDNA into the genome. Additionally, HIV-1 IN has been shown to play important roles in several other steps during the viral life cycle, including reverse transcription, nuclear import and chromatin targeting. Interestingly, previous studies have demonstrated that the expression of HIV-1 IN induces the lethal phenotype in some strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, we performed mutagenic analyses of the C-terminal region of the catalytic core domain of HIV-1 IN in order to delineate the critical amino acid(s and/or motif(s required for the induction of the lethal phenotype in the yeast strain HP16, and to further elucidate the molecular mechanism which causes this phenotype. Results Our study identified three HIV-1 IN mutants, V165A, A179P and KR186,7AA, located in the C-terminal region of the catalytic core domain of IN that do not induce the lethal phenotype in yeast. Chromatin binding assays in yeast and mammalian cells demonstrated that these IN mutants were impaired for the ability to bind chromatin. Additionally, we determined that while these IN mutants failed to interact with LEDGF/p75, they retained the ability to bind Integrase interactor 1. Furthermore, we observed that VSV-G-pseudotyped HIV-1 containing these IN mutants was unable to replicate in the C8166 T cell line and this defect was partially rescued by complementation with the catalytically inactive D64E IN mutant. Conclusion Overall, this study demonstrates that three mutations located in the C-terminal region of the catalytic core domain of HIV-1 IN inhibit the IN-induced lethal phenotype in yeast by inhibiting the binding of IN to the host chromatin. These results demonstrate that the C-terminal region of the catalytic core domain of HIV-1 IN is important for binding to host chromatin and is crucial for both viral replication and the promotion of

  17. Hepatitis C virus RNA replication depends on specific cis- and trans-acting activities of viral nonstructural proteins.

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    Teymur Kazakov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Many positive-strand RNA viruses encode genes that can function in trans, whereas other genes are required in cis for genome replication. The mechanisms underlying trans- and cis-preferences are not fully understood. Here, we evaluate this concept for hepatitis C virus (HCV, an important cause of chronic liver disease and member of the Flaviviridae family. HCV encodes five nonstructural (NS genes that are required for RNA replication. To date, only two of these genes, NS4B and NS5A, have been trans-complemented, leading to suggestions that other replicase genes work only in cis. We describe a new quantitative system to measure the cis- and trans-requirements for HCV NS gene function in RNA replication and identify several lethal mutations in the NS3, NS4A, NS4B, NS5A, and NS5B genes that can be complemented in trans, alone or in combination, by expressing the NS3-5B polyprotein from a synthetic mRNA. Although NS5B RNA binding and polymerase activities can be supplied in trans, NS5B protein expression was required in cis, indicating that NS5B has a cis-acting role in replicase assembly distinct from its known enzymatic activity. Furthermore, the RNA binding and NTPase activities of the NS3 helicase domain were required in cis, suggesting that these activities play an essential role in RNA template selection. A comprehensive complementation group analysis revealed functional linkages between NS3-4A and NS4B and between NS5B and the upstream NS3-5A genes. Finally, NS5B polymerase activity segregated with a daclatasvir-sensitive NS5A activity, which could explain the synergy of this antiviral compound with nucleoside analogs in patients. Together, these studies define several new aspects of HCV replicase structure-function, help to explain the potency of HCV-specific combination therapies, and provide an experimental framework for the study of cis- and trans-acting activities in positive-strand RNA virus replication more generally.

  18. CD8+ lymphocytes control viral replication in SIVmac239-infected rhesus macaques without decreasing the lifespan of productively infected cells.

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    Nichole R Klatt

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available While CD8+ T cells are clearly important in controlling virus replication during HIV and SIV infections, the mechanisms underlying this antiviral effect remain poorly understood. In this study, we assessed the in vivo effect of CD8+ lymphocyte depletion on the lifespan of productively infected cells during chronic SIVmac239 infection of rhesus macaques. We treated two groups of animals that were either CD8+ lymphocyte-depleted or controls with antiretroviral therapy, and used mathematical modeling to assess the lifespan of infected cells either in the presence or absence of CD8+ lymphocytes. We found that, in both early (day 57 post-SIV and late (day 177 post-SIV chronic SIV infection, depletion of CD8+ lymphocytes did not result in a measurable increase in the lifespan of either short- or long-lived productively infected cells in vivo. This result indicates that the presence of CD8+ lymphocytes does not result in a noticeably shorter lifespan of productively SIV-infected cells, and thus that direct cell killing is unlikely to be the main mechanism underlying the antiviral effect of CD8+ T cells in SIV-infected macaques with high virus replication.

  19. DNA Virus Replication Compartments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Melanie; Speiseder, Thomas; Dobner, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Viruses employ a variety of strategies to usurp and control cellular activities through the orchestrated recruitment of macromolecules to specific cytoplasmic or nuclear compartments. Formation of such specialized virus-induced cellular microenvironments, which have been termed viroplasms, virus factories, or virus replication centers, complexes, or compartments, depends on molecular interactions between viral and cellular factors that participate in viral genome expression and replication and are in some cases associated with sites of virion assembly. These virus-induced compartments function not only to recruit and concentrate factors required for essential steps of the viral replication cycle but also to control the cellular mechanisms of antiviral defense. In this review, we summarize characteristic features of viral replication compartments from different virus families and discuss similarities in the viral and cellular activities that are associated with their assembly and the functions they facilitate for viral replication. PMID:24257611

  20. Proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines - but not interferon-β - produced in response to HSV-2 in primary human genital epithelial cells are associated with viral replication and the presence of the virion host shutoff protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Victor H; Nazli, Aisha; Mossman, Karen L; Kaushic, Charu

    2013-09-01

    It is unknown whether viral replication or viral components that subvert innate responses in other cells, specifically the virion host shutoff (VHS) protein, play a role in determining primary genital epithelial cell (GEC) innate antiviral responses. Cultures of primary female GECs were exposed to wildtype (WT), VHS-deleted (vhsB), or UV-inactivated HSV-2. Antiviral pathway induction was evaluated by measuring nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) translocation by immunofluorescent microscopy. Proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and interferon (IFN) were measured by Luminex or ELISA. Biological activity of IFN-β was evaluated via VSV-GFP bioassay, by blocking secreted IFN-β with neutralizing antibodies and by measuring interferon-stimulated genes by RT-PCR. Proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines were upregulated in primary GECs in response to replication-competent HSV-2, but suppressed in the presence of the VHS protein. In contrast, upregulation of IFN-β depended on viral replication, but was not affected by VHS. However, the IFN-β produced was biologically active and reduced the viral burden. Viral factors such as replication and the presence of the VHS protein play important roles in regulating innate antiviral responses against HSV-2 from primary GECs. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Interference with the production of infectious viral particles and bimodal inhibition of replication are broadly conserved antiviral properties of IFITMs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartour, Kevin; Nguyen, Xuan-Nhi; Appourchaux, Romain; Assil, Sonia; Barateau, Véronique; Bloyet, Louis-Marie; Burlaud Gaillard, Julien; Confort, Marie-Pierre; Escudero-Perez, Beatriz; Gruffat, Henri; Hong, Saw See; Moroso, Marie; Reynard, Olivier; Reynard, Stéphanie; Decembre, Elodie; Ftaich, Najate; Rossi, Axel; Wu, Nannan; Arnaud, Frédérick; Baize, Sylvain; Dreux, Marlène; Gerlier, Denis; Paranhos-Baccala, Glaucia; Volchkov, Viktor; Roingeard, Philippe; Cimarelli, Andrea

    2017-09-01

    IFITMs are broad antiviral factors that block incoming virions in endosomal vesicles, protecting target cells from infection. In the case of HIV-1, we and others reported the existence of an additional antiviral mechanism through which IFITMs lead to the production of virions of reduced infectivity. However, whether this second mechanism of inhibition is unique to HIV or extends to other viruses is currently unknown. To address this question, we have analyzed the susceptibility of a broad spectrum of viruses to the negative imprinting of the virion particles infectivity by IFITMs. The results we have gathered indicate that this second antiviral property of IFITMs extends well beyond HIV and we were able to identify viruses susceptible to the three IFITMs altogether (HIV-1, SIV, MLV, MPMV, VSV, MeV, EBOV, WNV), as well as viruses that displayed a member-specific susceptibility (EBV, DUGV), or were resistant to all IFITMs (HCV, RVFV, MOPV, AAV). The swapping of genetic elements between resistant and susceptible viruses allowed us to point to specificities in the viral mode of assembly, rather than glycoproteins as dominant factors of susceptibility. However, we also show that, contrarily to X4-, R5-tropic HIV-1 envelopes confer resistance against IFITM3, suggesting that viral receptors add an additional layer of complexity in the IFITMs-HIV interplay. Lastly, we show that the overall antiviral effects ascribed to IFITMs during spreading infections, are the result of a bimodal inhibition in which IFITMs act both by protecting target cells from incoming viruses and in driving the production of virions of reduced infectivity. Overall, our study reports for the first time that the negative imprinting of the virion particles infectivity is a conserved antiviral property of IFITMs and establishes IFITMs as a paradigm of restriction factor capable of interfering with two distinct phases of a virus life cycle.

  2. An Epigenetic Compound Library Screen Identifies BET Inhibitors That Promote HSV-1 and -2 Replication by Bridging P-TEFb to Viral Gene Promoters through BRD4.

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    Ke Ren

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The human HSV-1 and -2 are common pathogens of human diseases. Both host and viral factors are involved in HSV lytic infection, although detailed mechanisms remain elusive. By screening a chemical library of epigenetic regulation, we identified bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4 as a critical player in HSV infection. We show that treatment with pan BD domain inhibitor enhanced both HSV infection. Using JQ1 as a probe, we found that JQ1, a defined BD1 inhibitor, acts through BRD4 protein since knockdown of BRD4 expression ablated JQ1 effect on HSV infection. BRD4 regulates HSV replication through complex formation involving CDK9 and RNAP II; whereas, JQ1 promotes HSV-1 infection by allocating the complex to HSV gene promoters. Therefore, suppression of BRD4 expression or inhibition of CDK9 activity impeded HSV infection. Our data support a model that JQ1 enhances HSV infection by switching BRD4 to transcription regulation of viral gene expression from chromatin targeting since transient expression of BRD4 BD1 or BD1/2 domain had similar effect to that by JQ1 treatment. In addition to the identification that BRD4 is a modulator for JQ1 action on HSV infection, this study demonstrates BRD4 has an essential role in HSV infection.

  3. Exosomes from Hepatitis C Infected Patients Transmit HCV Infection and Contain Replication Competent Viral RNA in Complex with Ago2-miR122-HSP90

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodys, Karen; Bala, Shashi; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies targeting receptor-mediated entry of HCV into hepatocytes confer limited therapeutic benefits. Evidence suggests that exosomes can transfer genetic materials between cells; however, their role in HCV infection remains obscure. Here, we show that exosomes isolated from sera of chronic HCV infected patients or supernatants of J6/JFH1-HCV-infected Huh7.5 cells contained HCV RNA. These exosomes could mediate viral receptor-independent transmission of HCV to hepatocytes. Negative sense HCV RNA, indicative of replication competent viral RNA, was present in exosomes of all HCV infected treatment non-responders and some treatment-naïve individuals. Remarkably, HCV RNA was associated with Ago2, HSP90 and miR-122 in exosomes isolated from HCV-infected individuals or HCV-infected Huh7.5 cell supernatants. Exosome-loading with a miR-122 inhibitor, or inhibition of HSP90, vacuolar H+-ATPases, and proton pumps, significantly suppressed exosome-mediated HCV transmission to naïve cells. Our findings provide mechanistic evidence for HCV transmission by blood-derived exosomes and highlight potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:25275643

  4. Assessing Zika virus replication and the development of Zika-specific antibodies after a mid-gestation viral challenge in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierle, Craig J; Fernández-Alarcón, Claudia; Hernandez-Alvarado, Nelmary; Zabeli, Jason C; Janus, Bradley C; Putri, Dira S; Schleiss, Mark R

    2017-01-01

    Primary Zika virus (ZIKV) infections that occur during pregnancy can cause spontaneous abortion and profoundly disrupt fetal development. While the full range of developmental abnormalities associated with congenital Zika syndrome is not yet known, severe cases of the syndrome can present with microcephaly, extensive neurologic and ocular damage, and pronounced joint malformations. Animal models that accurately recapitulate congenital Zika syndrome are urgently needed for vaccine development and for the study of ZIKV pathogenesis. As guinea pigs have successfully been used to model transplacental infections by cytomegalovirus, syphilis, and Listeria monocytogenes, we sought to test whether ZIKV could productively infect guinea pigs and whether viral transmission with attendant fetal pathology would occur after a mid-gestation viral challenge. We found that guinea pig cells supported ZIKV replication in vitro. Experimental infection of non-pregnant animals did not result in overt disease but low-level, detectable viremia was observed. When pregnant guinea pigs were challenged with ZIKV at between 18 and 21 days gestational age, ZIKV was not detected in maternal or pup blood, plasma, or tissues and no significant differences in maternal weight gain or pup size were observed following challenge. Nonetheless, a robust antibody response against ZIKV was detected in both the pups and dams. These results suggest that, while guinea pigs can model aspects of the immune response to ZIKV infection during pregnancy, naturally circulating ZIKV strains are not pathogenic during the pregnancy of immunocompetent guinea pigs and do not interfere with normal pup development.

  5. Assessing Zika virus replication and the development of Zika-specific antibodies after a mid-gestation viral challenge in guinea pigs.

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    Craig J Bierle

    Full Text Available Primary Zika virus (ZIKV infections that occur during pregnancy can cause spontaneous abortion and profoundly disrupt fetal development. While the full range of developmental abnormalities associated with congenital Zika syndrome is not yet known, severe cases of the syndrome can present with microcephaly, extensive neurologic and ocular damage, and pronounced joint malformations. Animal models that accurately recapitulate congenital Zika syndrome are urgently needed for vaccine development and for the study of ZIKV pathogenesis. As guinea pigs have successfully been used to model transplacental infections by cytomegalovirus, syphilis, and Listeria monocytogenes, we sought to test whether ZIKV could productively infect guinea pigs and whether viral transmission with attendant fetal pathology would occur after a mid-gestation viral challenge. We found that guinea pig cells supported ZIKV replication in vitro. Experimental infection of non-pregnant animals did not result in overt disease but low-level, detectable viremia was observed. When pregnant guinea pigs were challenged with ZIKV at between 18 and 21 days gestational age, ZIKV was not detected in maternal or pup blood, plasma, or tissues and no significant differences in maternal weight gain or pup size were observed following challenge. Nonetheless, a robust antibody response against ZIKV was detected in both the pups and dams. These results suggest that, while guinea pigs can model aspects of the immune response to ZIKV infection during pregnancy, naturally circulating ZIKV strains are not pathogenic during the pregnancy of immunocompetent guinea pigs and do not interfere with normal pup development.

  6. Exosomes from hepatitis C infected patients transmit HCV infection and contain replication competent viral RNA in complex with Ago2-miR122-HSP90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukong, Terence N; Momen-Heravi, Fatemeh; Kodys, Karen; Bala, Shashi; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2014-10-01

    Antibodies targeting receptor-mediated entry of HCV into hepatocytes confer limited therapeutic benefits. Evidence suggests that exosomes can transfer genetic materials between cells; however, their role in HCV infection remains obscure. Here, we show that exosomes isolated from sera of chronic HCV infected patients or supernatants of J6/JFH1-HCV-infected Huh7.5 cells contained HCV RNA. These exosomes could mediate viral receptor-independent transmission of HCV to hepatocytes. Negative sense HCV RNA, indicative of replication competent viral RNA, was present in exosomes of all HCV infected treatment non-responders and some treatment-naïve individuals. Remarkably, HCV RNA was associated with Ago2, HSP90 and miR-122 in exosomes isolated from HCV-infected individuals or HCV-infected Huh7.5 cell supernatants. Exosome-loading with a miR-122 inhibitor, or inhibition of HSP90, vacuolar H+-ATPases, and proton pumps, significantly suppressed exosome-mediated HCV transmission to naïve cells. Our findings provide mechanistic evidence for HCV transmission by blood-derived exosomes and highlight potential therapeutic strategies.

  7. Transgenic banana plants expressing small interfering RNAs targeted against viral replication initiation gene display high-level resistance to banana bunchy top virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhawat, Upendra K S; Ganapathi, Thumballi R; Hadapad, Ashok B

    2012-08-01

    The banana aphid-transmitted Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV) is the most destructive viral pathogen of bananas and plantains worldwide. Lack of natural sources of resistance to BBTV has necessitated the exploitation of proven transgenic technologies for obtaining BBTV-resistant banana cultivars. In this study, we have explored the concept of using intron-hairpin-RNA (ihpRNA) transcripts corresponding to viral master replication initiation protein (Rep) to generate BBTV-resistant transgenic banana plants. Two ihpRNA constructs namely ihpRNA-Rep and ihpRNA-ProRep generated using Rep full coding sequence or Rep partial coding sequence together with its 5' upstream regulatory region, respectively, and castor bean catalase intron were successfully transformed into banana embryogenic cells. ihpRNA-Rep- and ihpRNA-ProRep-derived transgenic banana plants, selected based on preliminary screening for efficient reporter gene expression, were completely resistant to BBTV infection as indicated by the absence of disease symptoms after 6 months of viruliferous aphid inoculation. The resistance to BBTV infection was also evident by the inability to detect cDNAs coding for viral coat protein, movement protein and Rep protein by RT-PCR from inoculated transgenic leaf extracts. Southern analysis of the two groups of transgenics showed that ihpRNA transgene was stably integrated into the banana genome. The detection of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) derived from the ihpRNA transgene sequence in transformed BBTV-resistant plants positively established RNA interference as the mechanism underlying the observed resistance to BBTV. Efficient screening of optimal transformants in this vegetatively propagated non-segregating fruit crop ensured that all the transgenic plants assayed were resistant to BBTV infection.

  8. Effective inhibition of HCMV UL49 gene expression and viral replication by oligonucleotide external guide sequences and RNase P

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    Zhang Xin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is a ubiquitous herpesvirus that typically causes asymptomatic infections in healthy individuals but may lead to serious complications in newborns and immunodeficient individuals. The emergence of drug-resistant strains of HCMV has posed a need for the development of new drugs and treatment strategies. Antisense molecules are promising gene-targeting agents for specific regulation of gene expression. External guide sequences (EGSs are oligonucleotides that consist of a sequence complementary to a target mRNA and recruit intracellular RNase P for specific degradation of the target RNA. The UL49-deletion BAC of HCMV was significantly defective in growth in human foreskin fibroblasts. Therefore, UL49 gene may serve as a potential target for novel drug development to combat HCMV infection. In this study, DNA-based EGS molecules were synthesized to target the UL49 mRNA of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV. Results By cleavage activity assessing in vitro, the EGS aimed to the cleavage site 324 nt downstream from the translational initiation codon of UL49 mRNA (i.e. EGS324 was confirmed be efficient to direct human RNase P to cleave the target mRNA sequence. When EGS324 was exogenously administered into HCMV-infected human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs, a significant reduction of ~76% in the mRNA and ~80% in the protein expression of UL49 gene, comparing with the cells transfected with control EGSs. Furthermore, a reduction of about 330-fold in HCMV growth were observed in HCMV-infected HFFs treated with the EGS. Conclusions These results indicated that UL49 gene was essential for replication of HCMV. Moreover, our study provides evidence that exogenous administration of a DNA-based EGS can be used as a potential therapeutic approach for inhibiting gene expression and replication of a human virus.

  9. Effective inhibition of HCMV UL49 gene expression and viral replication by oligonucleotide external guide sequences and RNase P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, WenJun; Li, HongJian; Li, YueQin; Zeng, ZhiFeng; Li, ShiQian; Zhang, Xin; Zou, Yi; Zhou, TianHong

    2010-05-18

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a ubiquitous herpesvirus that typically causes asymptomatic infections in healthy individuals but may lead to serious complications in newborns and immunodeficient individuals. The emergence of drug-resistant strains of HCMV has posed a need for the development of new drugs and treatment strategies. Antisense molecules are promising gene-targeting agents for specific regulation of gene expression. External guide sequences (EGSs) are oligonucleotides that consist of a sequence complementary to a target mRNA and recruit intracellular RNase P for specific degradation of the target RNA. The UL49-deletion BAC of HCMV was significantly defective in growth in human foreskin fibroblasts. Therefore, UL49 gene may serve as a potential target for novel drug development to combat HCMV infection. In this study, DNA-based EGS molecules were synthesized to target the UL49 mRNA of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). By cleavage activity assessing in vitro, the EGS aimed to the cleavage site 324 nt downstream from the translational initiation codon of UL49 mRNA (i.e. EGS324) was confirmed be efficient to direct human RNase P to cleave the target mRNA sequence. When EGS324 was exogenously administered into HCMV-infected human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs), a significant reduction of ~76% in the mRNA and ~80% in the protein expression of UL49 gene, comparing with the cells transfected with control EGSs. Furthermore, a reduction of about 330-fold in HCMV growth were observed in HCMV-infected HFFs treated with the EGS. These results indicated that UL49 gene was essential for replication of HCMV. Moreover, our study provides evidence that exogenous administration of a DNA-based EGS can be used as a potential therapeutic approach for inhibiting gene expression and replication of a human virus.

  10. STAT2 Knockout Syrian Hamsters Support Enhanced Replication and Pathogenicity of Human Adenovirus, Revealing an Important Role of Type I Interferon Response in Viral Control.

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    Karoly Toth

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Human adenoviruses have been studied extensively in cell culture and have been a model for studies in molecular, cellular, and medical biology. However, much less is known about adenovirus replication and pathogenesis in vivo in a permissive host because of the lack of an adequate animal model. Presently, the most frequently used permissive immunocompetent animal model for human adenovirus infection is the Syrian hamster. Species C human adenoviruses replicate in these animals and cause pathology that is similar to that seen with humans. Here, we report findings with a new Syrian hamster strain in which the STAT2 gene was functionally knocked out by site-specific gene targeting. Adenovirus-infected STAT2 knockout hamsters demonstrated an accentuated pathology compared to the wild-type control animals, and the virus load in the organs of STAT2 knockout animals was 100- to 1000-fold higher than that in wild-type hamsters. Notably, the adaptive immune response to adenovirus is not adversely affected in STAT2 knockout hamsters, and surviving hamsters cleared the infection by 7 to 10 days post challenge. We show that the Type I interferon pathway is disrupted in these hamsters, revealing the critical role of interferon-stimulated genes in controlling adenovirus infection. This is the first study to report findings with a genetically modified Syrian hamster infected with a virus. Further, this is the first study to show that the Type I interferon pathway plays a role in inhibiting human adenovirus replication in a permissive animal model. Besides providing an insight into adenovirus infection in humans, our results are also interesting from the perspective of the animal model: STAT2 knockout Syrian hamster may also be an important animal model for studying other viral infections, including Ebola-, hanta-, and dengue viruses, where Type I interferon-mediated innate immunity prevents wild type hamsters from being effectively infected to be used as

  11. STAT2 Knockout Syrian Hamsters Support Enhanced Replication and Pathogenicity of Human Adenovirus, Revealing an Important Role of Type I Interferon Response in Viral Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Karoly; Lee, Sang R; Ying, Baoling; Spencer, Jacqueline F; Tollefson, Ann E; Sagartz, John E; Kong, Il-Keun; Wang, Zhongde; Wold, William S M

    2015-08-01

    Human adenoviruses have been studied extensively in cell culture and have been a model for studies in molecular, cellular, and medical biology. However, much less is known about adenovirus replication and pathogenesis in vivo in a permissive host because of the lack of an adequate animal model. Presently, the most frequently used permissive immunocompetent animal model for human adenovirus infection is the Syrian hamster. Species C human adenoviruses replicate in these animals and cause pathology that is similar to that seen with humans. Here, we report findings with a new Syrian hamster strain in which the STAT2 gene was functionally knocked out by site-specific gene targeting. Adenovirus-infected STAT2 knockout hamsters demonstrated an accentuated pathology compared to the wild-type control animals, and the virus load in the organs of STAT2 knockout animals was 100- to 1000-fold higher than that in wild-type hamsters. Notably, the adaptive immune response to adenovirus is not adversely affected in STAT2 knockout hamsters, and surviving hamsters cleared the infection by 7 to 10 days post challenge. We show that the Type I interferon pathway is disrupted in these hamsters, revealing the critical role of interferon-stimulated genes in controlling adenovirus infection. This is the first study to report findings with a genetically modified Syrian hamster infected with a virus. Further, this is the first study to show that the Type I interferon pathway plays a role in inhibiting human adenovirus replication in a permissive animal model. Besides providing an insight into adenovirus infection in humans, our results are also interesting from the perspective of the animal model: STAT2 knockout Syrian hamster may also be an important animal model for studying other viral infections, including Ebola-, hanta-, and dengue viruses, where Type I interferon-mediated innate immunity prevents wild type hamsters from being effectively infected to be used as animal models.

  12. Hibiscus chlorotic ringspot virus coat protein is essential for cell-to-cell and long-distance movement but not for viral RNA replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengniao Niu

    Full Text Available Hibiscus chlorotic ringspot virus (HCRSV is a member of the genus Carmovirus in the family Tombusviridae. In order to study its coat protein (CP functions on virus replication and movement in kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L., two HCRSV mutants, designated as p2590 (A to G in which the first start codon ATG was replaced with GTG and p2776 (C to G in which proline 63 was replaced with alanine, were constructed. In vitro transcripts of p2590 (A to G were able to replicate to a similar level as wild type without CP expression in kenaf protoplasts. However, its cell-to-cell movement was not detected in the inoculated kenaf cotyledons. Structurally the proline 63 in subunit C acts as a kink for β-annulus formation during virion assembly. Progeny of transcripts derived from p2776 (C to G was able to move from cell-to-cell in inoculated cotyledons but its long-distance movement was not detected. Virions were not observed in partially purified mutant virus samples isolated from 2776 (C to G inoculated cotyledons. Removal of the N-terminal 77 amino acids of HCRSV CP by trypsin digestion of purified wild type HCRSV virions resulted in only T = 1 empty virus-like particles. Taken together, HCRSV CP is dispensable for viral RNA replication but essential for cell-to-cell movement, and virion is required for the virus systemic movement. The proline 63 is crucial for HCRSV virion assembly in kenaf plants and the N-terminal 77 amino acids including the β-annulus domain is required in T = 3 assembly in vitro.

  13. Comparative analysis of seven viral nuclear export signals (NESs reveals the crucial role of nuclear export mediated by the third NES consensus sequence of nucleoprotein (NP in influenza A virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nopporn Chutiwitoonchai

    Full Text Available The assembly of influenza virus progeny virions requires machinery that exports viral genomic ribonucleoproteins from the cell nucleus. Currently, seven nuclear export signal (NES consensus sequences have been identified in different viral proteins, including NS1, NS2, M1, and NP. The present study examined the roles of viral NES consensus sequences and their significance in terms of viral replication and nuclear export. Mutation of the NP-NES3 consensus sequence resulted in a failure to rescue viruses using a reverse genetics approach, whereas mutation of the NS2-NES1 and NS2-NES2 sequences led to a strong reduction in viral replication kinetics compared with the wild-type sequence. While the viral replication kinetics for other NES mutant viruses were also lower than those of the wild-type, the difference was not so marked. Immunofluorescence analysis after transient expression of NP-NES3, NS2-NES1, or NS2-NES2 proteins in host cells showed that they accumulated in the cell nucleus. These results suggest that the NP-NES3 consensus sequence is mostly required for viral replication. Therefore, each of the hydrophobic (Φ residues within this NES consensus sequence (Φ1, Φ2, Φ3, or Φ4 was mutated, and its viral replication and nuclear export function were analyzed. No viruses harboring NP-NES3 Φ2 or Φ3 mutants could be rescued. Consistent with this, the NP-NES3 Φ2 and Φ3 mutants showed reduced binding affinity with CRM1 in a pull-down assay, and both accumulated in the cell nucleus. Indeed, a nuclear export assay revealed that these mutant proteins showed lower nuclear export activity than the wild-type protein. Moreover, the Φ2 and Φ3 residues (along with other Φ residues within the NP-NES3 consensus were highly conserved among different influenza A viruses, including human, avian, and swine. Taken together, these results suggest that the Φ2 and Φ3 residues within the NP-NES3 protein are important for its nuclear export function

  14. Design and validation of small interfering RNA on respiratory syncytial virus M2-2 gene: A potential approach in RNA interference on viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, V K; Atika Aziz, Nur A; Hudu, Shuaibu A; Harmal, Nabil S; Syahrilnizam, A; Jalilian, Farid A; Zamberi, S

    2016-10-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection in infants and young children globally and is a significant pathogen of the elderly and immunocompromised. The M2-2 protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is particularly important in regulation of viral RNA transcription and replication that could be a potential anti-viral candidate against RSV infection. In this study, we designed and validated siRNAs that specifically target the RSV M2-2 gene. Four siRNAs targeting different regions of the M2-2 gene were designed using web tool. In-vitro evaluation of silencing effect was performed by using RSV infected Vero cell line. Viral M2-2 linked GFP recombinant plasmid was co-transfected with non-targeted siRNA, Pooled siRNA, siRNA 1, siRNA 2, siRNA 3 and siRNA 4 using synthetic cationic polymer. The silencing effect of M2-2 gene at the protein level was measured both qualitatively and quantitatively by using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Meanwhile, the silencing effect at the mRNA level was assessed by using RT-qPCR. This study showed that all four designed siRNAs can effectively and efficiently silence M2-2 gene. siRNA 2 showed the highest (98%) silencing effect on protein level and siRNA 4 with 83.1% at the mRNA level. The viral assay showed no significant cytopathic effects observed after 6days post-infection with siRNAs. In conclusion, this study showed the effectiveness of siRNA in silencing M2-2 gene both at the protein and mRNA level which could potentially be used as a novel therapeutic agent in the treatment of RSV infection. However, further study is warranted to investigate the silencing effect of M2-2 protein and inhibition of RSV infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Structure of a herpesvirus nuclear egress complex subunit reveals an interaction groove that is essential for viral replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Kendra E.; Sharma, Mayuri; Mansueto, My Sam; Boeszoermenyi, Andras; Filman, David J.; Hogle, James M.; Wagner, Gerhard; Coen, Donald M.; Arthanari, Haribabu

    2015-01-01

    Herpesviruses require a nuclear egress complex (NEC) for efficient transit of nucleocapsids from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. The NEC orchestrates multiple steps during herpesvirus nuclear egress, including disruption of nuclear lamina and particle budding through the inner nuclear membrane. In the important human pathogen human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), this complex consists of nuclear membrane protein UL50, and nucleoplasmic protein UL53, which is recruited to the nuclear membrane through its interaction with UL50. Here, we present an NMR-determined solution-state structure of the murine CMV homolog of UL50 (M50; residues 1–168) with a strikingly intricate protein fold that is matched by no other known protein folds in its entirety. Using NMR methods, we mapped the interaction of M50 with a highly conserved UL53-derived peptide, corresponding to a segment that is required for heterodimerization. The UL53 peptide binding site mapped onto an M50 surface groove, which harbors a large cavity. Point mutations of UL50 residues corresponding to surface residues in the characterized M50 heterodimerization interface substantially decreased UL50–UL53 binding in vitro, eliminated UL50–UL53 colocalization, prevented disruption of nuclear lamina, and halted productive virus replication in HCMV-infected cells. Our results provide detailed structural information on a key protein–protein interaction involved in nuclear egress and suggest that NEC subunit interactions can be an attractive drug target. PMID:26150520

  16. HLA-B57/B*5801 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 elite controllers select for rare gag variants associated with reduced viral replication capacity and strong cytotoxic T-lymphocyte [corrected] recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Toshiyuki; Brockman, Mark A; Schneidewind, Arne; Lobritz, Michael; Pereyra, Florencia; Rathod, Almas; Block, Brian L; Brumme, Zabrina L; Brumme, Chanson J; Baker, Brett; Rothchild, Alissa C; Li, Bin; Trocha, Alicja; Cutrell, Emily; Frahm, Nicole; Brander, Christian; Toth, Ildiko; Arts, Eric J; Allen, Todd M; Walker, Bruce D

    2009-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) elite controllers (EC) maintain viremia below the limit of commercial assay detection (B57 and the closely related allele B*5801 are particularly associated with enhanced control and recognize the same Gag(240-249) TW10 epitope. The typical escape mutation (T242N) within this epitope diminishes viral replication capacity in chronically infected persons; however, little is known about TW10 epitope sequences in residual replicating viruses in B57/B*5801 EC and the extent to which mutations within this epitope may influence steady-state viremia. Here we analyzed TW10 in a total of 50 B57/B*5801-positive subjects (23 EC and 27 viremic subjects). Autologous plasma viral sequences from both EC and viremic subjects frequently harbored the typical cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL)-selected mutation T242N (15/23 sequences [65.2%] versus 23/27 sequences [85.1%], respectively; P = 0.18). However, other unique mutants were identified in HIV controllers, both within and flanking TW10, that were associated with an even greater reduction in viral replication capacity in vitro. In addition, strong CTL responses to many of these unique TW10 variants were detected by gamma interferon-specific enzyme-linked immunospot assay. These data suggest a dual mechanism for durable control of HIV replication, consisting of viral fitness loss resulting from CTL escape mutations together with strong CD8 T-cell immune responses to the arising variant epitopes.

  17. Species specific inhibition of viral replication using dicer substrate siRNAs (DsiRNAs) targeting the viral nucleoprotein of the fish pathogenic rhabdovirus viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohle, Harry; Lorenzen, Niels; Schyth, Brian Dall

    2011-01-01

    Gene knock down by the use of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) is widely used as a method for reducing the expression of specific genes in eukaryotic cells via the RNA interference pathway. But, the effectivity of siRNA induced gene knock down in cells from fish has in several studies been...... for dicer for the generation of siRNAs targeting the nucleoprotein N gene of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV). This rhabdovirus infects salmonid fish and is responsible for large yearly losses in aquaculture production. Specificity of the DsiRNA is assured in two ways: first, by using...

  18. Low concordance and resistance mutation emergence in the HIV protease gene among circulating and cell-associated viruses at viral replication episodes during darunavir/ritonavir monotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Cornejo, A; Benmarzouk-Hidalgo, O J; Gutierrez-Valencia, A; Ruiz-Valderas, R; Viciana, P; López-Cortés, L F

    2015-01-01

    To assess the changes on the HIV protease gene in plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) compartments during viral replication episodes in patients on boosted-darunavir monotherapy (mtDRV/rtv). A prospective study was carried out in which adult HIV-1-infected patients who started mtDRV/rtv after viral suppression for ≥ 6 months with no major darunavir-related resistance mutations were enrolled. Patients with two consecutive plasma HIV RNA measurements >200 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL were considered as having virological failure (VF), while patients with two consecutive plasma HIV RNA measurements >50 copies/mL without meeting the VF criteria were considered to have virological rebound (VR). HIV protease genotypic profiles from plasma and PBMCs were performed at baseline and at VF and VR episodes. One hundred and fifty patients were included in the study, with overall VF and VR rates of 14% (n=21) and 14.7% (n=22), respectively. No major darunavir resistance mutations were observed in the plasma or PBMC samples. Circulating and cell-associated viruses showed a wild-type protease gene sequence in 54% and 23% of patients, respectively while the remainder patients only harboured minor protease inhibitor-associated mutations. Full concordance between plasma RNA and PBMC DNA protease genotypes was found in 23% of the sequences. No darunavir-related mutations were found in patients with VF or VR, either in plasma or in PBMCs; thus, simplification to mtDRV/rtv does not comprise future antiretroviral treatment options. © 2014 British HIV Association.

  19. A mutation in the DNA polymerase accessory factor of herpes simplex virus 1 restores viral DNA replication in the presence of raltegravir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bin; Yang, Kui; Wills, Elizabeth; Tang, Liang; Baines, Joel D

    2014-10-01

    Previous reports showed that raltegravir, a recently approved antiviral compound that targets HIV integrase, can inhibit the nuclease function of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV terminase) in vitro. In this study, subtoxic levels of raltegravir were shown to inhibit the replication of four different herpesviruses, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), HSV-2, HCMV, and mouse cytomegalovirus, by 30- to 700-fold, depending on the dose and the virus tested. Southern blotting and quantitative PCR revealed that raltegravir inhibits DNA replication of HSV-1 rather than cleavage of viral DNA. A raltegravir-resistant HSV-1 mutant was generated by repeated passage in the presence of 200 μM raltegravir. The genomic sequence of the resistant virus, designated clone 7, contained mutations in 16 open reading frames. Of these, the mutations F198S in unique long region 15 (UL15; encoding the large terminase subunit), A374V in UL32 (required for DNA cleavage and packaging), V296I in UL42 (encoding the DNA polymerase accessory factor), and A224S in UL54 (encoding ICP27, an important transcriptional regulator) were introduced independently into the wild-type HSV-1(F) genome, and the recombinant viruses were tested for raltegravir resistance. Viruses bearing both the UL15 and UL32 mutations inserted within the genome of the UL42 mutant were also tested. While the UL15, UL32, and UL54 mutant viruses were fully susceptible to raltegravir, any virus bearing the UL42 mutation was as resistant to raltegravir as clone 7. Overall, these results suggest that raltegravir may be a valuable therapeutic agent against herpesviruses and the antiviral activity targets the DNA polymerase accessory factor rather than the nuclease activity of the terminase. This paper shows that raltegravir, the antiretrovirus drug targeting integrase, is effective against various herpesviruses. Drug resistance mapped to the herpesvirus DNA polymerase accessory factor, which was an unexpected finding. Copyright © 2014

  20. Influence of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus O/CHN/Mya98/33-P Strain Leader Protein on Viral Replication and Host Innate Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shaodong; Bai, Xingwen; Li, Pinghua; Zhang, Meng; Bao, Huifang; Sun, Pu; Lu, Zengjun; Cao, Yimei; Chen, Yingli; Li, Dong; Fu, Yuanfang; Liu, Zaixin

    2015-09-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) O/CHN/Mya98/33-P strain was isolated from the esophageal-pharyngeal fluid sample of cattle, and was shown to cause persistent infection. Its leader protein contains 200 amino acids with one amino acid deletion, which is upstream and next to the second initiation codon compared with the majority of FMDV Mya98 strains. The FMDV genome includes two initiation codons that can produce two different leader proteins, Lab (from the first AUG) and Lb (from the second AUG). For convenience, the inter-AUG region was named as La. Previously, it was found that a recombinant virus with Lab of FMDV O/CHN/Mya98/33-P strain had higher proliferation efficiency, and better ability to inhibit the host innate immune response. Three full-length infectious cDNA clones-rHN33-Lb, rHN33-La, and rHNGSLX-Lb-containing the FMDV O/CHN/Mya98/33-P strain leader proteins Lb, La, or the FMDV O/GSLX/2010 strain leader protein Lb, respectively, were constructed based on an established infectious clone r-HN rescued from FMDV O/HN/CHN/93 strain. After infecting pig kidney primary cells, rHN33-La showed higher replication efficiency than r-HN, and rHN33-Lb displayed better ability to resist host innate immunity than rHNGSLX-Lb. These results demonstrated that the inter-AUG region of FMDV strain O/CHN/Mya98/33-P leader protein must be involved in increasing viral replication efficiency. Additionally, the Lb of FMDV O/CHN/Mya98/33-P must be involve in increasing its ability to inhibit host innate immune response, and the distinctive amino acids G56 and/or R118 of FMDV leader protein may play essential roles in it.

  1. Expression of an IRF-3 fusion protein and mouse estrogen receptor, inhibits hepatitis C viral replication in RIG-I-deficient Huh 7.5 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Chen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Interferon Regulatory Factor-3 (IRF-3 plays a central role in the induction of interferon (IFN production and succeeding interferon-stimulated genes (ISG expression en route for restraining hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. Here, we established a stable Huh7.5-IRF3ER cell line expressing a fusion protein of IRF-3 and mouse estrogen receptor (ER to examine IFN production and anti-HCV effects of IRF-3 in retinoic acid inducible-gene-I (RIG-I deficient Huh 7.5 cells. Homodimerization of the IRF-3ER fusion protein was detected by Western blotting after treatment with the estrogen receptor agonist 4-hydrotamoxifen (4-HT in Huh7.5-IRF3ER cells. Expression of IFN-α, IFN-β, and their inhibitory effects on HCV replication were demonstrated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Peak expression of IFN-α and IFN-β was achieved 24-hours post 4-HT treatment, coinciding with the appearance of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT proteins. Additionally, HCV viral replication declined in time-dependent fashion. In previous studies, a novel IFN-mediated pathway regulating expression of 1-8U and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein M (hnRNP M inhibited HCV internal ribosomal entry site (IRES-dependent translation. When expression of ISGs such as 1-8U and hnRNP M were measured in 4-HT-treated Huh7.5-IRF3ER cells, both genes were positively regulated by activation of the IRF-3ER fusion protein. In conclusion, the anti-HCV effects of IRF-3ER homodimerization inhibited HCV RNA replication as well as HCV IRES-dependent translation in Huh7.5-IRF3ER cells. The results of this study indicate that IRF-3ER homodimerization is a key step to restore IFN expression in Huh7.5-IRF3ER cells and in achieving its anti-HCV effects.

  2. Experimental infection with the Paderborn isolate of classical swine fever virus in 10-week-old pigs: determination of viral replication kinetics by quantitative RT-PCR, virus isolation and antigen ELISA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uttenthal, Åse; Storgaard, Torben; Oleksiewicz, M.B.

    2003-01-01

    We performed experimental infection in 10-week-old pigs with the Paderborn isolate of classical swine fever virus (CSFV). Despite being epidemiologically linked to the major CSFV outbreak in The Netherlands in 1997, the in vivo replication kinetics of this isolate have to our knowledge not been...... described in detail previously. We found that oronasal infection with 10(4.7) TCID50 produced mortality in three out of five pigs after 29-31 days, and severe clinical symptoms in one out of five pigs, while one out of five pigs exhibited no clinical symptoms. At this infection dose, pigs had viral RNA...... viral RNA in serum for more than 30 days, and exhibited only mild clinical symptoms. We observed an excellent correlation between clinical symptoms and viral RNA loads in serum, while serum antibody levels were low. Clinically affected pigs had up to 1000-fold higher serum viral RNA loads than did pigs...

  3. The intrinsically disordered N-terminal arm of the brome mosaic virus coat protein specifically recognizes the RNA motif that directs the initiation of viral RNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Alexander; Hoover, Haley; Smith, Edward; Clemmer, David E; Kim, Chul-Hyun; Kao, C Cheng

    2018-01-09

    In the brome mosaic virus (BMV) virion, the coat protein (CP) selectively contacts the RNA motifs that regulate translation and RNA replication (Hoover et al., 2016. J. Virol. 90, 7748). We hypothesize that the unstructured N-terminal arm (NTA) of the BMV CP can specifically recognize RNA motifs. Using ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry, we demonstrate that peptides containing the NTA of the CP were found to preferentially bind to an RNA hairpin motif that directs the initiation of BMV RNA synthesis. RNA binding causes the peptide to change from heterogeneous structures to a single family of structures. Fluorescence anisotropy, fluorescence quenching and size exclusion chromatography experiments all confirm that the NTA can specific recognize the RNA motif. The peptide introduced into plants along with BMV virion increased accumulation of the BMV CP and accelerated the rate of minus-strand RNA synthesis. The intrinsically disordered BMV NTA could thus specifically recognize BMV RNAs to affect viral infection. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. GAPDH--a recruits a plant virus movement protein to cortical virus replication complexes to facilitate viral cell-to-cell movement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Kaido

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The formation of virus movement protein (MP-containing punctate structures on the cortical endoplasmic reticulum is required for efficient intercellular movement of Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV, a bipartite positive-strand RNA plant virus. We found that these cortical punctate structures constitute a viral replication complex (VRC in addition to the previously reported aggregate structures that formed adjacent to the nucleus. We identified host proteins that interacted with RCNMV MP in virus-infected Nicotiana benthamiana leaves using a tandem affinity purification method followed by mass spectrometry. One of these host proteins was glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-A (NbGAPDH-A, which is a component of the Calvin-Benson cycle in chloroplasts. Virus-induced gene silencing of NbGAPDH-A reduced RCNMV multiplication in the inoculated leaves, but not in the single cells, thereby suggesting that GAPDH-A plays a positive role in cell-to-cell movement of RCNMV. The fusion protein of NbGAPDH-A and green fluorescent protein localized exclusively to the chloroplasts. In the presence of RCNMV RNA1, however, the protein localized to the cortical VRC as well as the chloroplasts. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay and GST pulldown assay confirmed in vivo and in vitro interactions, respectively, between the MP and NbGAPDH-A. Furthermore, gene silencing of NbGAPDH-A inhibited MP localization to the cortical VRC. We discuss the possible roles of NbGAPDH-A in the RCNMV movement process.

  5. Faster replication and higher expression levels of viral glycoproteins give the vesicular stomatitis virus/measles virus hybrid VSV-FH a growth advantage over measles virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Breton, Camilo; Russell, Luke O J; Russell, Stephen J; Peng, Kah-Whye

    2014-08-01

    VSV-FH is a hybrid vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) with a deletion of its G glycoprotein and encoding the measles virus (MV) fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (H) envelope glycoproteins. VSV-FH infects cells expressing MV receptors and is fusogenic and effective against myeloma xenografts in mice. We evaluated the fusogenic activities of MV and VSV-FH in relationship to the density of receptor on the target cell surface and the kinetics of F and H expression in infected cells. Using a panel of cells expressing increasing numbers of the MV receptor CD46, we evaluated syncytium size in MV- or VSV-FH-infected cells. VSV-FH is not fusogenic at low CD46 density but requires less CD46 for syncytium formation than MV. The size of each syncytium is larger in VSV-FH-infected cells at a specific CD46 density. While syncytium size reached a plateau and did not increase further in MV-infected CHO cells expressing ≥4,620 CD46 copies/cell, there was a corresponding increase in syncytium size with increases in CD46 levels in VSV-FH-infected CD46-expressing CHO (CHO-CD46) cells. Further analysis in VSV-FH-infected cell lines shows earlier and higher expression of F and H mRNAs and protein. However, VSV-FH cytotoxic activity was reduced by pretreatment of the cells with type I interferon. In contrast, the cytopathic effects are not affected in MV-infected cells. In summary, VSV-FH has significant advantages over MV as an oncolytic virus due to its higher viral yield, faster replication kinetics, and larger fusogenic capabilities but should be used in cancer types with defective interferon signaling pathways. We studied the cytotoxic activity of a vesicular stomatitis/measles hybrid virus (VSV-FH), which is superior to that of measles virus (MV), in different cancer cell lines. We determined that viral RNA and protein were produced faster and in higher quantities in VSV-FH-infected cells. This resulted in the formation of larger syncytia, higher production of infectious particles, and

  6. Varicella-Zoster Virus Activates CREB, and Inhibition of the pCREB-p300/CBP Interaction Inhibits Viral Replication In Vitro and Skin Pathogenesis In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Sylvie; Sen, Nandini; Mitton, Bryan; Xiao, Xiangshu; Sakamoto, Kathleen M; Arvin, Ann

    2016-10-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is an alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella upon primary infection and zoster upon reactivation from latency in sensory ganglion neurons. The replication of herpesviruses requires manipulation of cell signaling pathways. Notably, CREB, a factor involved in the regulation of several cellular processes, is activated upon infection of T cells with VZV. Here, we report that VZV infection also induced CREB phosphorylation in fibroblasts and that XX-650-23, a newly identified inhibitor of the phosphorylated-CREB (pCREB) interaction with p300/CBP, restricted cell-cell spread of VZV in vitro CREB phosphorylation did not require the viral open reading frame 47 (ORF47) and ORF66 kinases encoded by VZV. Evaluating the biological relevance of these observations during VZV infection of human skin xenografts in the SCID mouse model of VZV pathogenesis showed both that pCREB was upregulated in infected skin and that treatment with XX-650-23 reduced infectious-virus production and limited lesion formation compared to treatment with a vehicle control. Thus, processes of CREB activation and p300/CBP binding are important for VZV skin infection and may be targeted for antiviral drug development. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a common pathogen that causes chicken pox and shingles. As with all herpesviruses, the infection is acquired for life, and the virus can periodically reactivate from latency. Although VZV infection is usually benign with few or no deleterious consequences, infection can be life threatening in immunocompromised patients. Otherwise healthy elderly individuals who develop zoster as a consequence of viral reactivation are at risk for postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), a painful and long-lasting complication. Current vaccines use a live attenuated virus that is usually safe but cannot be given to many immunodeficient patients and retains the capacity to establish latency and reactivate, causing zoster. Antiviral drugs are effective against

  7. [Inhibition of infectious bursal disease virus replication in chicken embryos by miRNAs delivered by recombinant avian adeno-associated viral vector].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Pengpeng; Wang, Yongjuan; Sun, Huaichang; Zhang, Xinyu; Xia, Xiaoli

    2011-02-01

    We studied the inhibition of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) replication in chicken embryos by recombinant avian adeno-associated virus (AAAV)-delivered VP1- and VP2-specific microRNAs (miRNAs). We co-transfected AAV-293 cells with the VP1- or VP2 gene-specific miRNA expression vector pAITR-RFPmiVP1 or AITR-RFPmiVP2E, AAAV packaging vector pcDNA-ARC and adenovirus helper vector pHelper, resulting in recombinant virus rAAAV-RFPmiVP1 or rAAAV-RFPmiVP2E. We also generated the recombinant viruses rAAAV-RFP (without miRNA expression cassette) and rAAAV-RFPmiVP2con (expressing control miRNA) using the same method as the control purpose. Electron microscopy showed that the recombinant viruses had a typical morphology of AAV. We confirmed the presence of miRNA expression cassette in the recombinant viral genomes by using PCR. Our poly (A)-tailed RT-PCR showed correct expression of the miRNAs in the rAAAV-transduced DF-1 cells. We inoculated the recombinant viruses individually into 8-day-old SPF chicken embryos and then challenged them using Lukert strain IBDV on day 2 after inoculation. Our IBDV titration assay showed that the 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50) of rAAAV-RFP- or rAAAV-RFPmiVP2con-inoculated group was 8.0 log10, whereas the TCID50 of rAAAV-RFPmiVP1-inoculated group decreased to 1.0 and 0.8 log10 on day 3 and 6 after challenge, respectively. Similarly, the TCID50 of rAAAV-RFPmiVP2E-inoculated group decreased to 1.5 and 2.0 log10, respectively. These data suggest that rAAAV can transduce efficiently chicken embryos and the expressed VP1- and VP2-specific miRNAs can inhibit the replication of IBDV efficiently.

  8. Mutagenesis of the yellow fever virus NS2B protein: effects on proteolytic processing, NS2B-NS3 complex formation, and viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, T J; Nestorowicz, A; Amberg, S M; Rice, C M

    1993-11-01

    To study the role of specific regions of the yellow fever virus NS2B protein in proteolytic processing and association with the NS3 proteinase domain, a series of mutations were created in the hydrophobic regions and in a central conserved hydrophilic region proposed as a domain important for NS2B function. The effects of these mutations on cis cleavage at the 2B/3 cleavage site and on processing at other consensus cleavage sites for the NS3 proteinase in the nonstructural region were then characterized by cell-free translation and transient expression in BHK cells. Association between NS2B and the NS3 proteinase domain and the effects of mutations on complex formation were investigated by nondenaturing immunoprecipitation of these proteins expressed in infected cells, by cell-free translation, or by recombinant vaccinia viruses. Mutations within the hydrophobic regions had subtle effects on proteolytic processing, whereas mutations within the conserved domain dramatically reduced cleavage efficiency or abolished all cleavages. The conserved domain of NS2B is also implicated in formation of an NS2B-NS3 complex on the basis of the ability of mutations in this region to eliminate both association of these two proteins and trans-cleavage activity. In addition, mutations which either eliminated proteolytic processing or had no apparent effect on processing were found to abolish recovery of infectious virus following RNA transfection. These results suggest that the conserved region of NS2B is a domain essential for the function of the NS3 proteinase. Hydrophobic regions of NS2B whose structural integrity may not be essential for proteolytic processing may have additional functions during viral replication.

  9. Serine 192 in the tiny RS repeat of the adenoviral L4-33K splicing enhancer protein is essential for function and reorganization of the protein to the periphery of viral replication centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oestberg, Sara, E-mail: sara.ostberg@imbim.uu.se [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, 75123 Uppsala (Sweden); Toermaenen Persson, Heidi, E-mail: heidi.tormanen.persson@imbim.uu.se [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, 75123 Uppsala (Sweden); Akusjaervi, Goeran, E-mail: goran.akusjarvi@imbim.uu.se [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, 75123 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2012-11-25

    The adenovirus L4-33K protein is a key regulator involved in the temporal shift from early to late pattern of mRNA expression from the adenovirus major late transcription unit. L4-33K is a virus-encoded alternative splicing factor, which enhances processing of 3 Prime splice sites with a weak sequence context. Here we show that L4-33K expressed from a plasmid is localized at the nuclear margin of uninfected cells. During an infection L4-33K is relocalized to the periphery of E2A-72K containing viral replication centers. We also show that serine 192 in the tiny RS repeat of the conserved carboxy-terminus of L4-33K, which is critical for the splicing enhancer function of L4-33K, is necessary for the nuclear localization and redistribution of the protein to viral replication sites. Collectively, our results show a good correlation between the activity of L4-33K as a splicing enhancer protein and its localization to the periphery of viral replication centers.

  10. Plant virus replication and movement

    OpenAIRE

    Heinlein, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Inc. Replication and intercellular spread of viruses depend on host mechanisms supporting the formation transport and turnover of functional complexes between viral genomes virus encoded products and cellular factors. To enhance these processes viruses assemble and replicate in membrane associated complexes that may develop into "virus factories" or "viroplasms" in which viral components and host factors required for replication are concentrated. Many plant viruses replicate i...

  11. An A14U Substitution in the 3' Noncoding Region of the M Segment of Viral RNA Supports Replication of Influenza Virus with an NS1 Deletion by Modulating Alternative Splicing of M Segment mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Min; Wang, Pui; Song, Wenjun; Lau, Siu-Ying; Liu, Siwen; Huang, Xiaofeng; Mok, Bobo Wing-Yee; Liu, Yen-Chin; Chen, Yixin; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Chen, Honglin

    2015-10-01

    The NS1 protein of influenza virus has multiple functions and is a determinant of virulence. Influenza viruses with NS1 deletions (DelNS1 influenza viruses) are a useful tool for studying virus replication and can serve as effective live attenuated vaccines, but deletion of NS1 severely diminishes virus replication, hampering functional studies and vaccine production. We found that WSN-DelNS1 viruses passaged in cells consistently adapted to gain an A14U substitution in the 3' noncoding region of the M segment of viral RNA (vRNA) which restored replicative ability. DelNS1-M-A14U viruses cannot inhibit interferon expression in virus infected-cells, providing an essential model for studying virus replication in the absence of the NS1 protein. Characterization of DelNS1-M-A14U virus showed that the lack of NS1 has no apparent effect on expression of other viral proteins, with the exception of M mRNAs. Expression of the M transcripts, M1, M2, mRNA3, and mRNA4, is regulated by alternative splicing. The A14U substitution changes the splicing donor site consensus sequence of mRNA3, altering expression of M transcripts, with M2 expression significantly increased and mRNA3 markedly suppressed in DelNS1-M-A14U, but not DelNS1-M-WT, virus-infected cells. Further analysis revealed that the A14U substitution also affects promoter function during replication of the viral genome. The M-A14U mutation increases M vRNA synthesis in DelNS1 virus infection and enhances alternative splicing of M2 mRNA in the absence of other viral proteins. The findings demonstrate that NS1 is directly involved in influenza virus replication through modulation of alternative splicing of M transcripts and provide strategic information important to construction of vaccine strains with NS1 deletions. Nonstructural protein (NS1) of influenza virus has multiple functions. Besides its role in antagonizing host antiviral activity, NS1 is also believed to be involved in regulating virus replication, but

  12. Transcriptional profiling reveals molecular signatures associated with HIV permissiveness in Th1Th17 cells and identifies peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma as an intrinsic negative regulator of viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Annie; Cleret-Buhot, Aurélie; Zhang, Yuwei; Goulet, Jean-Philippe; Monteiro, Patricia; Gosselin, Annie; DaFonseca, Sandrina; Wacleche, Vanessa Sue; Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Tremblay, Cécile; Ancuta, Petronela

    2013-12-21

    We previously demonstrated that primary Th1Th17 cells are highly permissive to HIV-1, whereas Th1 cells are relatively resistant. Molecular mechanisms underlying these differences remain unknown. Exposure to replication competent and single-round VSV-G pseudotyped HIV strains provide evidence that superior HIV replication in Th1Th17 vs. Th1 cells was regulated by mechanisms located at entry and post-entry levels. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling identified transcripts upregulated (n = 264) and downregulated (n = 235) in Th1Th17 vs. Th1 cells (p-value TNFSF13B, TNFSF25, PTPN13, MAP3K4, LTB, CTSH), transcription (PPARγ, RUNX1, ATF5, ARNTL), apoptosis (FASLG), and HIV infection (CXCR6, FURIN). Differential expression of CXCR6, PPARγ, ARNTL, PTPN13, MAP3K4, CTSH, SERPINB6, PTK2, and ISG20 was validated by RT-PCR, flow cytometry and/or confocal microscopy. The nuclear receptor PPARγ was preferentially expressed by Th1Th17 cells. PPARγ RNA interference significantly increased HIV replication at levels post-entry and prior HIV-DNA integration. Finally, the activation of PPARγ pathway via the agonist Rosiglitazone induced the nuclear translocation of PPARγ and a robust inhibition of viral replication. Thus, transcriptional profiling in Th1Th17 vs. Th1 cells demonstrated that HIV permissiveness is associated with a superior state of cellular activation and limited antiviral properties and identified PPARγ as an intrinsic negative regulator of viral replication. Therefore, triggering PPARγ pathway via non-toxic agonists may contribute to limiting covert HIV replication and disease progression during antiretroviral treatment.

  13. Structure-function relationship of viral cis-acting RNA elements : the role of the OriI and OriR in enterovirus replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooij, Martinus Johannes Maria van

    2007-01-01

    The genus Enterovirus belongs to Picornaviridae, a family of small, non-enveloped, lytic RNA viruses. They contain a single-stranded RNA genome of positive polarity of approximately 7,500 nucleotides. A viral protein VPg is specifically linked to the 5'terminus of the viral RNA. IRES-mediated

  14. The Novel Anticytomegalovirus Compound AIC246 (Letermovir) Inhibits Human Cytomegalovirus Replication through a Specific Antiviral Mechanism That Involves the Viral Terminase ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Goldner, Thomas; Hewlett, Guy; Ettischer, Nicole; Ruebsamen-Schaeff, Helga; Zimmermann, Holger; Lischka, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) remains the leading viral cause of birth defects and life-threatening disease in transplant recipients. All approved antiviral drugs target the viral DNA polymerase and are associated with severe toxicity issues and the emergence of drug resistance. Attempts to discover improved anti-HCMV drugs led to the identification of the small-molecular-weight compound AIC246 (Letermovir). AIC246 exhibits outstanding anti-HCMV activity in vitro and in vivo and currently is u...

  15. APOBEC3G induces a hypermutation gradient: purifying selection at multiple steps during HIV-1 replication results in levels of G-to-A mutations that are high in DNA, intermediate in cellular viral RNA, and low in virion RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathak Vinay K

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Naturally occurring Vif variants that are unable to inhibit the host restriction factor APOBEC3G (A3G have been isolated from infected individuals. A3G can potentially induce G-to-A hypermutation in these viruses, and hypermutation could contribute to genetic variation in HIV-1 populations through recombination between hypermutant and wild-type genomes. Thus, hypermutation could contribute to the generation of immune escape and drug resistant variants, but the genetic contribution of hypermutation to the viral evolutionary potential is poorly understood. In addition, the mechanisms by which these viruses persist in the host despite the presence of A3G remain unknown. Results To address these questions, we generated a replication-competent HIV-1 Vif mutant in which the A3G-binding residues of Vif, Y40RHHY44, were substituted with five alanines. As expected, the mutant was severely defective in an A3G-expressing T cell line and exhibited a significant delay in replication kinetics. Analysis of viral DNA showed the expected high level of G-to-A hypermutation; however, we found substantially reduced levels of G-to-A hypermutation in intracellular viral RNA (cRNA, and the levels of G-to-A mutations in virion RNA (vRNA were even further reduced. The frequencies of hypermutation in DNA, cRNA, and vRNA were 0.73%, 0.12%, and 0.05% of the nucleotides sequenced, indicating a gradient of hypermutation. Additionally, genomes containing start codon mutations and early termination codons within gag were isolated from the vRNA. Conclusion These results suggest that sublethal levels of hypermutation coupled with purifying selection at multiple steps during the early phase of viral replication lead to the packaging of largely unmutated genomes, providing a mechanism by which mutant Vif variants can persist in infected individuals. The persistence of genomes containing mutated gag genes despite this selection pressure indicates that dual

  16. Hepatitis C Virus Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tetsuro

    2017-01-01

    Viruses use synthetic mechanism and organelles of the host cells to facilitate their replication and make new viruses. Host's ATP provides necessary energy. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of liver disease. Like other positive-strand RNA viruses, the HCV genome is thought to be synthesized by the replication complex, which consists of viral- and host cell-derived factors, in tight association with structurally rearranged vesicle-like cytoplasmic membranes. The virus-induced remodeling of subcellular membranes, which protect the viral RNA from nucleases in the cytoplasm, promotes efficient replication of HCV genome. The assembly of HCV particle involves interactions between viral structural and nonstructural proteins and pathways related to lipid metabolisms in a concerted fashion. Association of viral core protein, which forms the capsid, with lipid droplets appears to be a prerequisite for early steps of the assembly, which are closely linked with the viral genome replication. This review presents the recent progress in understanding the mechanisms for replication and assembly of HCV through its interactions with organelles or distinct organelle-like structures.

  17. The TGB1 movement protein of Potato virus X reorganizes actin and endomembranes into the X-body, a viral replication factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilsner, Jens; Linnik, Olga; Wright, Kathryn M; Bell, Karen; Roberts, Alison G; Lacomme, Christophe; Santa Cruz, Simon; Oparka, Karl J

    2012-03-01

    Potato virus X (PVX) requires three virally encoded proteins, the triple gene block (TGB), for movement between cells. TGB1 is a multifunctional protein that suppresses host gene silencing and moves from cell to cell through plasmodesmata, while TGB2 and TGB3 are membrane-spanning proteins associated with endoplasmic reticulum-derived granular vesicles. Here, we show that TGB1 organizes the PVX "X-body," a virally induced inclusion structure, by remodeling host actin and endomembranes (endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi). Within the X-body, TGB1 forms helically arranged aggregates surrounded by a reservoir of the recruited host endomembranes. The TGB2/3 proteins reside in granular vesicles within this reservoir, in the same region as nonencapsidated viral RNA, while encapsidated virions accumulate at the outer (cytoplasmic) face of the X-body, which comprises a highly organized virus "factory." TGB1 is both necessary and sufficient to remodel host actin and endomembranes and to recruit TGB2/3 to the X-body, thus emerging as the central orchestrator of the X-body. Our results indicate that the actin/endomembrane-reorganizing properties of TGB1 function to compartmentalize the viral gene products of PVX infection.

  18. Modification of picornavirus genomic RNA using 'click' chemistry shows that unlinking of the VPg peptide is dispensable for translation and replication of the incoming viral RNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langereis, Martijn A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304823597; Feng, Qian; Nelissen, Frank H T; Virgen-Slane, Richard; van der Heden van Noort, Gerbrand J; Maciejewski, Sonia; Filippov, Dmitri V; Semler, Bert L; van Delft, Floris L; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/156614723

    Picornaviruses constitute a large group of viruses comprising medically and economically important pathogens such as poliovirus, coxsackievirus, rhinovirus, enterovirus 71 and foot-and-mouth disease virus. A unique characteristic of these viruses is the use of a viral peptide (VPg) as primer for

  19. Conserved retinoblastoma protein-binding motif in human cytomegalovirus UL97 kinase minimally impacts viral replication but affects susceptibility to maribavir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chou Sunwen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The UL97 kinase has been shown to phosphorylate and inactivate the retinoblastoma protein (Rb and has three consensus Rb-binding motifs that might contribute to this activity. Recombinant viruses containing mutations in the Rb-binding motifs generally replicated well in human foreskin fibroblasts with only a slight delay in replication kinetics. Their susceptibility to the specific UL97 kinase inhibitor, maribavir, was also examined. Mutation of the amino terminal motif, which is involved in the inactivation of Rb, also renders the virus hypersensitive to the drug and suggests that the motif may play a role in its mechanism of action.

  20. Serotype-specific interactions among functional domains of dengue virus 2 nonstructural proteins (NS) 5 and NS3 are crucial for viral RNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramoto, Tadahisa; Balasubramanian, Anuradha; Choi, Kyung H; Padmanabhan, Radhakrishnan

    2017-06-09

    Four serotypes of mosquito-borne dengue virus (DENV), evolved from a common ancestor, are human pathogens of global significance for which there is no vaccine or antiviral drug available. The N-terminal domain of DENV NS5 has guanylyltransferase and methyltransferase (MTase), and the C-terminal region has the polymerase (POL), all of which are important for 5'-capping and RNA replication. The crystal structure of NS5 shows it as a dimer, but the functional evidence for NS5 dimer is lacking. Our studies showed that the substitution of DENV2 NS5 MTase or POL for DENV4 NS5 within DENV2 RNA resulted in a severe attenuation of replication in the transfected BHK-21 cells. A replication-competent species was evolved with the acquired mutations in the DENV2 and DENV4 NS5 MTase or POL domain or in the DENV2 NS3 helicase domain in the DENV2 chimera RNAs by repeated passaging of infected BHK-21 or mosquito cells. The linker region of seven residues in NS5, rich in serotype-specific residues, is important for the recovery of replication fitness in the chimera RNA. Our results, taken together, provide genetic evidence for a serotype-specific interaction between NS3 and NS5 as well as specific interdomain interaction within NS5 required for RNA replication. Genome-wide RNAseq analysis revealed the distribution of adaptive mutations in RNA quasispecies. Those within NS3 and NS5 are located at the surface and/or within the NS5 dimer interface, providing a functional significance to the crystal structure NS5 dimer. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Interleukin-10 repletion suppresses pro-inflammatory cytokines and decreases liver pathology without altering viral replication in murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV)-infected IL-10 knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang-Feldman, Yajarayma J; Lochhead, G Raymond; Lochhead, Stephanie R; Yu, Cindy; Pomeroy, Claire

    2011-03-01

    To determine the role of interleukin-10 (IL-10) in protecting against the deleterious pro-inflammatory cytokine response to murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV), we studied the impact of IL-10 repletion in MCMV-infected IL-10 knockout (KO) mice. IL-10 KO mice were infected with a sub-lethal dose of MCMV and treated daily with 5 μg of mouse recombinant IL-10 (mrIL-10). Cytokine transcription, viral load, cytokine expression and liver histopathology were assessed in IL-10 treated and untreated mice. mrIL-10 repletion suppressed the exaggerated pro-inflammatory cytokine response observed in IL-10 KO mice (vs. control) both systemically and at the organ level, without affecting viral load. Levels of IFN-γ and TNF-α mRNA in livers of treated mice were ~50-70-fold lower than in untreated mice at day 5 post-infection (p ≤ 0.05). In spleens and sera, levels of IFN-γ and IL-6 were significantly lower in treated mice than in untreated mice at day 5-7 post-infection (p ≤ 0.05). IL-10 blunting of cytokine responses was accompanied by attenuation of inflammation in livers of treated mice. Repletion of IL-10 modulates the exaggerated pro-inflammatory cytokine responses that characterize IL-10 KO mice and protects against liver damage without altering viral load. IL-10 may be useful to control dysregulated pro-inflammatory cytokines responses during CMV infection.

  2. A novel class of anti-HIV agents with multiple copies of enfuvirtide enhances inhibition of viral replication and cellular transmission in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Hsing Chang

    Full Text Available We constructed novel HIV-1 fusion inhibitors that may overcome the current limitations of enfuvirtide, the first such therapeutic in this class. The three prototypes generated by the Dock-and-Lock (DNL technology to comprise four copies of enfuvirtide tethered site-specifically to the Fc end of different humanized monoclonal antibodies potently neutralize primary isolates (both R5-tropic and X4-tropic, as well as T-cell-adapted strains of HIV-1 in vitro. All three prototypes show EC(50 values in the subnanomolar range, which are 10- to 100-fold lower than enfuvirtide and attainable whether or not the constitutive antibody targets HIV-1. The potential of such conjugates to purge latently infected cells was also demonstrated in a cell-to-cell viral inhibition assay by measuring their efficacy to inhibit the spread of HIV-1(LAI from infected human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to Jurkat T cells over a period of 30 days following viral activation with 100 nM SAHA (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid. The IgG-like half-life was not significantly different from that of the parental antibody, as shown by the mean serum concentration of one prototype in mice at 72 h. These encouraging results provide a rationale to develop further novel anti-HIV agents by coupling additional antibodies of interest with alternative HIV-inhibitors via recombinantly-produced, self-assembling, modules.

  3. Luteolin-7-O-Glucoside Present in Lettuce Extracts Inhibits Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Production and Viral Replication by Human Hepatoma Cells in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Xian Cui

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is endemic in Asia and chronic hepatitis B (CHB is a major public health issue worldwide. Current treatment strategies for CHB are not satisfactory as they induce a low rate of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg loss. Extracts were prepared from lettuce hydroponically cultivated in solutions containing glycine or nitrate as nitrogen sources. The lettuce extracts exerted potent anti-HBV effects in HepG2 cell lines in vitro, including significant HBsAg inhibition, HBV replication and transcription inhibition, without exerting cytotoxic effects. When used in combination interferon-alpha 2b (IFNα-2b or lamivudine (3TC, the lettuce extracts synergistically inhibited HBsAg expression and HBV replication. By using differential metabolomics analysis, Luteolin-7-O-glucoside was identified and confirmed as a functional component of the lettuce extracts and exhibited similar anti-HBV activity as the lettuce extracts in vitro. The inhibition rate on HBsAg was up to 77.4%. Moreover, both the lettuce extracts and luteolin-7-O-glucoside functioned as organic antioxidants and, significantly attenuated HBV-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS accumulation. Luteolin-7-O-glucoside also normalized ROS-induced mitochondrial membrane potential damage, which suggests luteolin-7-O-glucoside inhibits HBsAg and HBV replication via a mechanism involving the mitochondria. Our findings suggest luteolin-7-O-glucoside may have potential value for clinical application in CHB and may enhance HBsAg and HBV clearance when used as a combination therapy.

  4. Marek's disease virus protein kinase gene identified within the short unique region of the viral genome is not essential for viral replication in cell culture and vaccine-induced immunity in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, M; Urakawa, T; Hirayama, Y; Miki, N; Yamamoto, M; Zhu, G S; Hirai, K

    1993-07-01

    The open reading frame (ORF) of 1206 bp within the short unique region (Us) of Marek's disease virus type 1 (MDV1) shows significant homology with the herpes simplex virus type 1 US3 gene encoding protein kinase (PK). The lacZ gene of Escherichia coli was inserted within the ORF, designated MDV1-US3, of MDV1 K544 strain DNA by homologous recombination. The plaque-purified recombinant MDV1 stably expressed the beta-galactosidase encoded by the inserted lacZ gene in infected cells and replicated well as the parental K544 strain. Antibodies against both MDV1 antigen and beta-galactosidase were detected in the sera of chickens immunized with recombinant MDV1. Chickens vaccinated with the recombinant MDV1 were protected from challenge with virulent MDV1. The MDV1 US3 gene expressed by a baculovirus vector encoded a 44-kDa protein. Mouse antisera against the 44-kDa protein reacted with two proteins of 44 and 45 kDa in extracts of cells infected with MDV1 but not with MDV types 2 or 3. The PK activity was detected in immune complexes of the anti-44-kDa sera with extracts of cells infected with MDV1 but not with the recombinant MDV1. Thus, PK encoded from the MDV1-US3 is not essential for virus replication in cell culture and vaccine-induced immunity.

  5. Effect of ambient temperature on viral replication and serum antibody titers following administration of a commercial intranasal modified-live infectious bovine rhinotracheitis-parainfluenza-3 virus vaccine to beef cattle housed in high- and moderate-ambient temperature environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissett, Gretchen P; White, Brad J; Anderson, David E; Larson, Robert E; Miesner, Matt D

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of ambient temperature on viral replication and serum antibody titers following administration of an intranasal modified-live infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR)-parainfluenza-3 (PI3) virus vaccine to beef calves housed in high- (> 32°C) and moderate- (21°C) ambient temperature environments. 28 calves (mean weight, 206.8 kg). Calves were randomly allocated to 4 treatment groups (housed outdoors during high ambient temperature with [HAT; n = 10] or without [HAC; 4] vaccination or housed indoors in a moderate ambient temperature with [MAT; 10] or without [MAC; 4] vaccination). Rectal and nasal mucosal temperatures were recorded every 2 hours from 8 AM to 8 PM on days 0 (vaccination) and 1. Nasal swab specimens were obtained on days 0 through 7 for virus isolation. Serum samples were collected on days 0, 7, 14, and 28 for determination of antibody titers. Mean rectal temperature did not differ among the treatment groups. Mean nasal temperature for the HAT group was significantly higher than that for the MAT group at 6, 24, 30, 32, and 38 hours after vaccination. Viable IBR virus was isolated from all vaccinated calves on days 1 through 6. Two weeks after vaccination, vaccinated calves had anti-IBR antibody titers that were significantly greater than those for unvaccinated calves. Mean anti-IBR antibody titers did not differ significantly between the HAT and MAT groups. Results indicated that, following vaccination with an intranasal modified-live IBR-PI3 virus vaccine, IBR viral replication and serum antibody titers did not differ significantly between calves housed in high- and moderate-ambient temperature environments.

  6. Plant virus replication and movement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heinlein, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Replication and intercellular spread of viruses depend on host mechanisms supporting the formation, transport and turnover of functional complexes between viral genomes, virus-encoded products and cellular factors...

  7. The p22 RNA Silencing Suppressor of the Crinivirus Tomato chlorosis virus is Dispensable for Local Viral Replication but Important for Counteracting an Antiviral RDR6-Mediated Response during Systemic Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazmín Landeo-Ríos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Among the components of the RNA silencing pathway in plants, RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs play fundamental roles in antiviral defence. Here, we demonstrate that the Nicotiana benthamiana RDR6 is involved in defence against the bipartite crinivirus (genus Crinivirus, family Closteroviridae Tomato chlorosis virus (ToCV. Additionally, by producing a p22-deficient ToCV infectious mutant clone (ToCVΔp22, we studied the role of this viral suppressor of RNA silencing in viral infection in both wild-type and RDR6-silenced N. benthamiana (NbRDR6i plants. We demonstrate that p22 is dispensable for the replication of ToCV, where RDR6 appears not to have any effect. Furthermore, the finding that ToCV∆p22 systemic accumulation was impaired in wild-type N. benthamiana but not in NbRDR6i plants suggests a role for p22 in counteracting an RDR6-mediated antiviral response of the plant during systemic infection.

  8. Baculovirus VP80 protein and the F-actin cytoskeleton interact and connect the viral replication factory with the nuclear periphery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Martin; Merten, Otto-Wilhelm; Galibert, Lionel; Vlak, Just M; van Oers, Monique M

    2011-06-01

    Recently, we showed that the Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) VP80 protein is essential for the formation of both virion types, budded virus (BV) and occlusion-derived virus (ODV). Deletion of the vp80 gene did not affect assembly of nucleocapsids. However, these nucleocapsids were not able to migrate from the virogenic stroma to the nuclear periphery. In the current paper, we constructed a baculovirus recombinant with enhanced-green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged VP80, allowing visualization of the VP80 distribution pattern during infection. In baculovirus-infected cells, the EGFP-VP80 protein is entirely localized in nuclei, adjacent to the virus-triggered F-actin scaffold that forms a highly organized three-dimensional network connecting the virogenic stroma physically with the nuclear envelope. Interaction between VP80 and host actin was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation. We further showed that VP80 is associated with the nucleocapsid fraction of both BVs and ODVs, typically at one end of the nucleocapsids. In addition, the presence of sequence motifs with homology to invertebrate paramyosin proteins strongly supports a role for VP80 in the polar transport of nucleocapsids to the periphery of the nucleus on their way to the plasma membrane to form BVs and for assembly in the nuclear periphery to form ODVs for embedding in viral occlusion bodies.

  9. Exon level transcriptomic profiling of HIV-1-infected CD4(+ T cells reveals virus-induced genes and host environment favorable for viral replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaël Imbeault

    Full Text Available HIV-1 is extremely specialized since, even amongst CD4(+ T lymphocytes (its major natural reservoir in peripheral blood, the virus productively infects only a small proportion of cells under an activated state. As the percentage of HIV-1-infected cells is very low, most studies have so far failed to capture the precise transcriptomic profile at the whole-genome scale of cells highly susceptible to virus infection. Using Affymetrix Exon array technology and a reporter virus allowing the magnetic isolation of HIV-1-infected cells, we describe the host cell factors most favorable for virus establishment and replication along with an overview of virus-induced changes in host gene expression occurring exclusively in target cells productively infected with HIV-1. We also establish that within a population of activated CD4(+ T cells, HIV-1 has no detectable effect on the transcriptome of uninfected bystander cells at early time points following infection. The data gathered in this study provides unique insights into the biology of HIV-1-infected CD4(+ T cells and identifies genes thought to play a determinant role in the interplay between the virus and its host. Furthermore, it provides the first catalogue of alternative splicing events found in primary human CD4(+ T cells productively infected with HIV-1.

  10. The c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway of a vector insect is activated by virus capsid protein and promotes viral replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhao, Wan; Li, Jing; Luo, Lan; Kang, Le; Cui, Feng

    2017-01-01

    No evidence has shown whether insect-borne viruses manipulate the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway of vector insects. Using a system comprising the plant virus Rice stripe virus (RSV) and its vector insect, the small brown planthopper, we have studied the response of the vector insect’s JNK pathway to plant virus infection. We found that RSV increased the level of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α and decreased the level of G protein Pathway Suppressor 2 (GPS2) in the insect vector. The virus capsid protein competitively bound GPS2 to release it from inhibiting the JNK activation machinery. We confirmed that JNK activation promoted RSV replication in the vector, whereas JNK inhibition caused a significant reduction in virus production and thus delayed the disease incidence of plants. These findings suggest that inhibition of insect vector JNK may be a useful strategy for controling the transmission of plant viruses. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.26591.001 PMID:28716183

  11. Class A scavenger receptor 1 (MSR1 restricts hepatitis C virus replication by mediating toll-like receptor 3 recognition of viral RNAs produced in neighboring cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromichi Dansako

    Full Text Available Persistent infections with hepatitis C virus (HCV may result in life-threatening liver disease, including cirrhosis and cancer, and impose an important burden on human health. Understanding how the virus is capable of achieving persistence in the majority of those infected is thus an important goal. Although HCV has evolved multiple mechanisms to disrupt and block cellular signaling pathways involved in the induction of interferon (IFN responses, IFN-stimulated gene (ISG expression is typically prominent in the HCV-infected liver. Here, we show that Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3 expressed within uninfected hepatocytes is capable of sensing infection in adjacent cells, initiating a local antiviral response that partially restricts HCV replication. We demonstrate that this is dependent upon the expression of class A scavenger receptor type 1 (MSR1. MSR1 binds extracellular dsRNA, mediating its endocytosis and transport toward the endosome where it is engaged by TLR3, thereby triggering IFN responses in both infected and uninfected cells. RNAi-mediated knockdown of MSR1 expression blocks TLR3 sensing of HCV in infected hepatocyte cultures, leading to increased cellular permissiveness to virus infection. Exogenous expression of Myc-MSR1 restores TLR3 signaling in MSR1-depleted cells with subsequent induction of an antiviral state. A series of conserved basic residues within the carboxy-terminus of the collagen superfamily domain of MSR1 are required for binding and transport of dsRNA, and likely facilitate acidification-dependent release of dsRNA at the site of TLR3 expression in the endosome. Our findings reveal MSR1 to be a critical component of a TLR3-mediated pattern recognition receptor response that exerts an antiviral state in both infected and uninfected hepatocytes, thereby limiting the impact of HCV proteins that disrupt IFN signaling in infected cells and restricting the spread of HCV within the liver.

  12. The RNA helicase Lgp2 inhibits TLR-independent sensing of viral replication by retinoic acid-inducible gene-I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenfusser, Simon; Goutagny, Nadege; DiPerna, Gary; Gong, Mei; Monks, Brian G; Schoenemeyer, Annett; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Akira, Shizuo; Fitzgerald, Katherine A

    2005-10-15

    The paramyxovirus Sendai (SV), is a well-established inducer of IFN-alphabeta gene expression. In this study we show that SV induces IFN-alphabeta gene expression normally in cells from mice with targeted deletions of the Toll-IL-1 resistance domain containing adapters MyD88, Mal, Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-beta (TRIF), and TRIF-related adaptor molecule TLR3, or the E3 ubiquitin ligase, TNFR-associated factor 6. This TLR-independent induction of IFN-alphabeta after SV infection is replication dependent and mediated by the RNA helicase, retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I) and not the related family member, melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5. Furthermore, we characterize a RIG-I-like RNA helicase, Lgp2. In contrast to RIG-I or melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5, Lgp2 lacks signaling caspase recruitment and activation domains. Overexpression of Lgp2 inhibits SV and Newcastle disease virus signaling to IFN-stimulated regulatory element- and NF-kappaB-dependent pathways. Importantly, Lgp2 does not prevent TLR3 signaling. Like RIG-I, Lgp2 binds double-stranded, but not single-stranded, RNA. Quantitative PCR analysis demonstrates that Lgp2 is present in unstimulated cells at a lower level than RIG-I, although both helicases are induced to similar levels after virus infection. We propose that Lgp2 acts as a negative feedback regulator of antiviral signaling by sequestering dsRNA from RIG-I.

  13. Host factors involved in chikungunya virus replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholte, Florine Elisabeth Maria

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis the interplay of CHIKV with cellular (host) factors involved in its replication is addressed. An in-depth understanding of the interactions between the viral proteins and those of their host is required for the elucidation of molecular mechanisms underlying viral replication. A

  14. The NS1 Glycoprotein Can Generate Dramatic Antibody-Enhanced Dengue Viral Replication in Normal Out-Bred Mice Resulting in Lethal Multi-Organ Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconar, Andrew K. I.; Martinez, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Antibody-enhanced replication (AER) of dengue type-2 virus (DENV-2) strains and production of antibody-enhanced disease (AED) was tested in out-bred mice. Polyclonal antibodies (PAbs) generated against the nonstructural-1 (NS1) glycoprotein candidate vaccine of the New Guinea-C (NG-C) or NSx strains reacted strongly and weakly with these antigens, respectively. These PAbs contained the IgG2a subclass, which cross-reacted with the virion-associated envelope (E) glycoprotein of the DENV-2 NSx strain, suggesting that they could generate its AER via all mouse Fcγ-receptor classes. Indeed, when these mice were challenged with a low dose (AER/AED. These AER/AED mice developed life-threatening acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), displayed by diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) resulting from i) dramatic interstitial alveolar septa-thickening with mononuclear cells, ii) some hyperplasia of alveolar type-II pneumocytes, iii) copious intra-alveolar protein secretion, iv) some hyaline membrane-covered alveolar walls, and v) DENV-2 antigen-positive alveolar macrophages. These mice also developed meningo-encephalitis, with greater than 90,000-fold DENV-2 AER titers in microglial cells located throughout their brain parenchyma, some of which formed nodules around dead neurons. Their spleens contained infiltrated megakaryocytes with DENV-2 antigen-positive red-pulp macrophages, while their livers displayed extensive necrosis, apoptosis and macro- and micro-steatosis, with DENV-2 antigen-positive Kuppfer cells and hepatocytes. Their infections were confirmed by DENV-2 isolations from their lungs, spleens and livers. These findings accord with those reported in fatal human “severe dengue” cases. This DENV-2 AER/AED was blocked by high concentrations of only the NG-C NS1 glycoprotein. These results imply a potential hazard of DENV NS1 glycoprotein-based vaccines, particularly against DENV strains that contain multiple mutations or genetic recombination within or between their

  15. Grape Seed Proanthocyanidin Inhibits Mucin Synthesis and Viral Replication by Suppression of AP-1 and NF-κB via p38 MAPKs/JNK Signaling Pathways in Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Infected A549 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Woo; Kim, Young Il; Im, Chang-Nim; Kim, Sung Wan; Kim, Su Jin; Min, Seoyeon; Joo, Yong Hoon; Yim, Sung-Vin; Chung, Namhyun

    2017-06-07

    Airway epithelial cells are often infected by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), one of the most common causes of asthma, bronchiolitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and pneumonia. During the infection process, excessive mucins instigate airway inflammation. However, the mechanism underlying RSV-induced airway hyper-responsiveness and inflammation is poorly understood. Furthermore, no reliable vaccines or drugs for antiviral therapy are available. In this study, the effect of the natural compound grape seed proanthocyanidin (GSP) on RSV-infected human airway epithelial cells A549 was evaluated. After pretreatment of the cells with or without exposure to RSV with 5-10 μg GSP/mL, the expression of various mucins (MUC1, MUC2, MUC5AC, MUC5B, and MUC8) was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and Western blotting, as well as confocal microscopy. We found that GSP significantly decreased RSV-induced mucin synthesis at the mRNA and protein levels. In addition, GSP suppressed the RSV-induced signaling pathways, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p38, together with nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and activating protein-1 family members (c-Jun and c-Fos). Concomitantly, GSP inhibited the replication of RSV within A549 cells. Taken together, all our results suggest that GSP could be a potent therapeutic agent to suppress excessive mucus production and viral replication in RSV-induced airway inflammatory disorders.

  16. Viral Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home A-Z Health Topics Viral hepatitis Viral hepatitis > A-Z Health Topics Viral hepatitis (PDF, 90 ... liver. Source: National Cancer Institute Learn more about hepatitis Watch a video. Learn who is at risk ...

  17. Identification of the adenovirus E4orf4 protein binding site on the B55α and Cdc55 regulatory subunits of PP2A: Implications for PP2A function, tumor cell killing and viral replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Z Mui

    Full Text Available Adenovirus E4orf4 protein induces the death of human cancer cells and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Binding of E4orf4 to the B/B55/Cdc55 regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A is required, and such binding inhibits PP2A(B55 activity leading to dose-dependent cell death. We found that E4orf4 binds across the putative substrate binding groove predicted from the crystal structure of B55α such that the substrate p107 can no longer interact with PP2A(B55α. We propose that E4orf4 inhibits PP2A(B55 activity by preventing access of substrates and that at high E4orf4 levels this inhibition results in cell death through the failure to dephosphorylate substrates required for cell cycle progression. However, E4orf4 is expressed at much lower and less toxic levels during a normal adenovirus infection. We suggest that in this context E4orf4 largely serves to recruit novel substrates such as ASF/SF2/SRSF1 to PP2A(B55 to enhance adenovirus replication. Thus E4orf4 toxicity probably represents an artifact of overexpression and does not reflect the evolutionary function of this viral product.

  18. SUMO and KSHV Replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Pei-Ching [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Kung, Hsing-Jien, E-mail: hkung@nhri.org.tw [Institute for Translational Medicine, College of Medical Science and Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); UC Davis Cancer Center, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Division of Molecular and Genomic Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, 35 Keyan Road, Zhunan, Miaoli County 35053, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-29

    Small Ubiquitin-related MOdifier (SUMO) modification was initially identified as a reversible post-translational modification that affects the regulation of diverse cellular processes, including signal transduction, protein trafficking, chromosome segregation, and DNA repair. Increasing evidence suggests that the SUMO system also plays an important role in regulating chromatin organization and transcription. It is thus not surprising that double-stranded DNA viruses, such as Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), have exploited SUMO modification as a means of modulating viral chromatin remodeling during the latent-lytic switch. In addition, SUMO regulation allows the disassembly and assembly of promyelocytic leukemia protein-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs), an intrinsic antiviral host defense, during the viral replication cycle. Overcoming PML-NB-mediated cellular intrinsic immunity is essential to allow the initial transcription and replication of the herpesvirus genome after de novo infection. As a consequence, KSHV has evolved a way as to produce multiple SUMO regulatory viral proteins to modulate the cellular SUMO environment in a dynamic way during its life cycle. Remarkably, KSHV encodes one gene product (K-bZIP) with SUMO-ligase activities and one gene product (K-Rta) that exhibits SUMO-targeting ubiquitin ligase (STUbL) activity. In addition, at least two viral products are sumoylated that have functional importance. Furthermore, sumoylation can be modulated by other viral gene products, such as the viral protein kinase Orf36. Interference with the sumoylation of specific viral targets represents a potential therapeutic strategy when treating KSHV, as well as other oncogenic herpesviruses. Here, we summarize the different ways KSHV exploits and manipulates the cellular SUMO system and explore the multi-faceted functions of SUMO during KSHV’s life cycle and pathogenesis.

  19. SUMO and KSHV Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Ching Chang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Small Ubiquitin-related MOdifier (SUMO modification was initially identified as a reversible post-translational modification that affects the regulation of diverse cellular processes, including signal transduction, protein trafficking, chromosome segregation, and DNA repair. Increasing evidence suggests that the SUMO system also plays an important role in regulating chromatin organization and transcription. It is thus not surprising that double-stranded DNA viruses, such as Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, have exploited SUMO modification as a means of modulating viral chromatin remodeling during the latent-lytic switch. In addition, SUMO regulation allows the disassembly and assembly of promyelocytic leukemia protein-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs, an intrinsic antiviral host defense, during the viral replication cycle. Overcoming PML-NB-mediated cellular intrinsic immunity is essential to allow the initial transcription and replication of the herpesvirus genome after de novo infection. As a consequence, KSHV has evolved a way as to produce multiple SUMO regulatory viral proteins to modulate the cellular SUMO environment in a dynamic way during its life cycle. Remarkably, KSHV encodes one gene product (K-bZIP with SUMO-ligase activities and one gene product (K-Rta that exhibits SUMO-targeting ubiquitin ligase (STUbL activity. In addition, at least two viral products are sumoylated that have functional importance. Furthermore, sumoylation can be modulated by other viral gene products, such as the viral protein kinase Orf36. Interference with the sumoylation of specific viral targets represents a potential therapeutic strategy when treating KSHV, as well as other oncogenic herpesviruses. Here, we summarize the different ways KSHV exploits and manipulates the cellular SUMO system and explore the multi-faceted functions of SUMO during KSHV’s life cycle and pathogenesis.

  20. Intravesicle Isothermal DNA Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Lindsey A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial and viral DNA replication was previously reconstituted in vitro from component parts 1234. Significant advances in building minimal cell-like structures also have been made recently 567. Combining the two approaches would further attempts to build a minimal cell-like structure capable of undergoing evolution by combining membrane encapsulation and genome replication. Towards this end, we attempted to use purified genomic replication protein components from thermophilic bacterial sources to copy strands of DNA isothermally within lipid vesicles. Findings Bacterial replication components (such as helicases and DNA polymerases are compatible with methods for the generation of lipid vesicles. Encapsulation inside phospholipid vesicles does not inhibit the activity of bacterial DNA genome replication machinery. Further the described system is efficient at isothermally amplifying short segments of DNA within phospholipid vesicles. Conclusions Herein we show that bacterial isothermal DNA replication machinery is functional inside of phospholipid vesicles, suggesting that replicating cellular mimics can be built from purified bacterial components.

  1. Novel viral translation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Hilda H T; Jan, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Viral genomes are compact and encode a limited number of proteins. Because they do not encode components of the translational machinery, viruses exhibit an absolute dependence on the host ribosome and factors for viral messenger RNA (mRNA) translation. In order to recruit the host ribosome, viruses have evolved unique strategies to either outcompete cellular transcripts that are efficiently translated by the canonical translation pathway or to reroute translation factors and ribosomes to the viral genome. Furthermore, viruses must evade host antiviral responses and escape immune surveillance. This review focuses on some recent major findings that have revealed unconventional strategies that viruses utilize, which include usurping the host translational machinery, modulating canonical translation initiation factors to specifically enhance or repress overall translation for the purpose of viral production, and increasing viral coding capacity. The discovery of these diverse viral strategies has provided insights into additional translational control mechanisms and into the viral host interactions that ensure viral protein synthesis and replication. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Mutagenesis of the yellow fever virus NS2A/2B cleavage site: effects on proteolytic processing, viral replication, and evidence for alternative processing of the NS2A protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestorowicz, A; Chambers, T J; Rice, C M

    1994-02-15

    The yellow fever virus NS2B-3 proteinase mediates cleavages within the nonstructural region at a consensus sequence defined by G/ARR decreases S/G and also at an alternative site within the NS4A region. To determine the importance of specific residues within the consensus sequence for cleavage at the 2A/2B site, amino acid substitutions were introduced at each of the P4, P3, P2, P1, and P1' positions and the effects on proteolytic processing of a sig2A-5(356) polyprotein were examined using a vaccinia virus-T7 transient expression system. At the P1 and P1' positions, only the conservative substitutions P1:R-->K and P1':S-->G allowed efficient cleavage, suggesting that basic and small aliphatic amino acids are preferred at the P1 and P1' positions, respectively. At the P2 position, a preference for a basic amino acid was observed. In contrast, the P3 and P4 positions tolerated nonconservative substitutions and at P4 both enhancement and reduction in cleavage efficiency was observed. Evidence for cleavage at an alternative site within NS2A, defined by the sequence QK decreases T (NS2A residues 189-191) was obtained. Cleavage at this site, designated at NS2A alpha, is dependent upon an active NS2B-3 proteinase. To examine the effects of reduced cleavage efficiency at the 2A/2B and NS2A alpha cleavage sites on viral replication, mutations at each or both of these sites were incorporated into a full-length YF-17D cDNA template. RNA transcripts containing mutations which abolish cleavage were noninfectious whereas virus was recovered from several clones with mutations allowing partial cleavage at 2A/2B. However, some of these mutants exhibited a small plaque phenotype as well as reductions in RNA-specific infectivity and virus yield.

  3. Origin-independent plasmid replication occurs in vaccinia virus cytoplasmic factories and requires all five known poxvirus replication factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moss Bernard

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Replication of the vaccinia virus genome occurs in cytoplasmic factory areas and is dependent on the virus-encoded DNA polymerase and at least four additional viral proteins. DNA synthesis appears to start near the ends of the genome, but specific origin sequences have not been defined. Surprisingly, transfected circular DNA lacking specific viral sequences is also replicated in poxvirus-infected cells. Origin-independent plasmid replication depends on the viral DNA polymerase, but neither the number of additional viral proteins nor the site of replication has been determined. Results Using a novel real-time polymerase chain reaction assay, we detected a >400-fold increase in newly replicated plasmid in cells infected with vaccinia virus. Studies with conditional lethal mutants of vaccinia virus indicated that each of the five proteins known to be required for viral genome replication was also required for plasmid replication. The intracellular site of replication was determined using a plasmid containing 256 repeats of the Escherichia coli lac operator and staining with an E. coli lac repressor-maltose binding fusion protein followed by an antibody to the maltose binding protein. The lac operator plasmid was localized in cytoplasmic viral factories delineated by DNA staining and binding of antibody to the viral uracil DNA glycosylase, an essential replication protein. In addition, replication of the lac operator plasmid was visualized continuously in living cells infected with a recombinant vaccinia virus that expresses the lac repressor fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein. Discrete cytoplasmic fluorescence was detected in cytoplasmic juxtanuclear sites at 6 h after infection and the area and intensity of fluorescence increased over the next several hours. Conclusion Replication of a circular plasmid lacking specific poxvirus DNA sequences mimics viral genome replication by occurring in cytoplasmic viral factories

  4. Viral encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Tulius T Silva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available While systemic viral infections are exceptionally common, symptomatic viral infections of the brain parenchyma itself are very rare, but a serious neurologic condition. It is estimated that viral encephalitis occurs at a rate of 1.4 cases per 100.000 inhabitants. Geography is a major determinant of encephalitis caused by vector-borne pathogens. A diagnosis of viral encephalitis could be a challenge to the clinician, since almost 70% of viral encephalitis cases are left without an etiologic agent identified. In this review, the most common viral encephalitis will be discussed, with focus on ecology, diagnosis, and clinical management.

  5. Replication Catastrophe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toledo, Luis; Neelsen, Kai John; Lukas, Jiri

    2017-01-01

    Proliferating cells rely on the so-called DNA replication checkpoint to ensure orderly completion of genome duplication, and its malfunction may lead to catastrophic genome disruption, including unscheduled firing of replication origins, stalling and collapse of replication forks, massive DNA...... breakage, and, ultimately, cell death. Despite many years of intensive research into the molecular underpinnings of the eukaryotic replication checkpoint, the mechanisms underlying the dismal consequences of its failure remain enigmatic. A recent development offers a unifying model in which the replication...... checkpoint guards against global exhaustion of rate-limiting replication regulators. Here we discuss how such a mechanism can prevent catastrophic genome disruption and suggest how to harness this knowledge to advance therapeutic strategies to eliminate cancer cells that inherently proliferate under...

  6. Viral marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Bláhová, Adéla

    2012-01-01

    The aim of my thesis is to provide a comprehensive overview of the viral marketing and to analyze selected viral campaigns. There is a description of advantages and disadvantages of this marketing tool. In the end I suggest for which companies viral marketing is an appropriate form of the promotion.

  7. Viral phylodynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik M Volz

    Full Text Available Viral phylodynamics is defined as the study of how epidemiological, immunological, and evolutionary processes act and potentially interact to shape viralphylogenies. Since the coining of the term in 2004, research on viral phylodynamics has focused on transmission dynamics in an effort to shed light on how these dynamics impact viral genetic variation. Transmission dynamics can be considered at the level of cells within an infected host, individual hosts within a population, or entire populations of hosts. Many viruses, especially RNA viruses, rapidly accumulate genetic variation because of short generation times and high mutation rates. Patterns of viral genetic variation are therefore heavily influenced by how quickly transmission occurs and by which entities transmit to one another. Patterns of viral genetic variation will also be affected by selection acting on viral phenotypes. Although viruses can differ with respect to many phenotypes, phylodynamic studies have to date tended to focus on a limited number of viral phenotypes. These include virulence phenotypes, phenotypes associated with viral transmissibility, cell or tissue tropism phenotypes, and antigenic phenotypes that can facilitate escape from host immunity. Due to the impact that transmission dynamics and selection can have on viral genetic variation, viral phylogenies can therefore be used to investigate important epidemiological, immunological, and evolutionary processes, such as epidemic spread[2], spatio-temporal dynamics including metapopulation dynamics[3], zoonotic transmission, tissue tropism[4], and antigenic drift[5]. The quantitative investigation of these processes through the consideration of viral phylogenies is the central aim of viral phylodynamics.

  8. Phosphorylation of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Processivity Factor ORF59 by a Viral Kinase Modulates Its Ability To Associate with RTA and oriLyt

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Maria E.; Purushothaman, Pravinkumar; Rossetto, Cyprian C.; Pari, Gregory S.

    2013-01-01

    ORF59 of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) plays an essential role in viral lytic replication by providing DNA processivity activity to the viral DNA polymerase (ORF9). ORF59 forms a homodimer in the cytoplasm and binds and translocates ORF9 into the nucleus, where it secures ORF9 to the origin of lytic DNA replication (oriLyt) in order to synthesize long DNA fragments during replication. ORF59 binds to oriLyt through an immediate early protein, replication and transcription activator (RTA). Here, we show that viral kinase (ORF36) phosphorylates serines between amino acids 376 and 379 of ORF59 and replacement of the Ser378 residue with alanine significantly impairs phosphorylation. Although mutating these serine residues had no effect on binding between ORF59 and ORF9, viral polymerase, or ORF36, the viral kinase, it significantly reduced the ability of ORF59 to bind to RTA. The results for the mutant in which Ser376 to Ser379 were replaced by alanine showed that both Ser378 and Ser379 contribute to binding to RTA. Additionally, the Ser376, Ser378, and Ser379 residues were found to be critical for binding of ORF59 to oriLyt and its processivity function. Ablation of these phosphorylation sites reduced the production of virion particles, suggesting that phosphorylation is critical for ORF59 activity and viral DNA synthesis. PMID:23678174

  9. Host factors in HIV-1 replication: The good, the bad and the ugly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booiman, T.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of HIV-1 to replicate in its target cells is influenced by numerous host factors that act on different steps of the viral replication cycle. The effects of these host factors on the replication cycle can be cell type specific and they can either support or restrict viral replication.

  10. Database Replication

    CERN Document Server

    Kemme, Bettina

    2010-01-01

    Database replication is widely used for fault-tolerance, scalability and performance. The failure of one database replica does not stop the system from working as available replicas can take over the tasks of the failed replica. Scalability can be achieved by distributing the load across all replicas, and adding new replicas should the load increase. Finally, database replication can provide fast local access, even if clients are geographically distributed clients, if data copies are located close to clients. Despite its advantages, replication is not a straightforward technique to apply, and

  11. Studying the dynamics of coronavirus replicative structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagemeijer, Marne C.; De Haan, Cornelis A M

    2015-01-01

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) generate specialized membrane compartments, which consist of double membrane vesicles connected to convoluted membranes, the so-called replicative structures, where viral RNA synthesis takes place. These sites harbor the CoV replication-transcription complexes (RTCs):

  12. The Viral Polymerase Inhibitor 7-Deaza-2'-C-Methyladenosine Is a Potent Inhibitor of In Vitro Zika Virus Replication and Delays Disease Progression in a Robust Mouse Infection Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zmurko, Joanna; Marques, Rafael E; Schols, Dominique; Verbeken, Erik; Kaptein, Suzanne J F; Neyts, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging flavivirus typically causing a dengue-like febrile illness, but neurological complications, such as microcephaly in newborns, have potentially been linked to this viral infection...

  13. Pemasaran ViralViral Marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Situmorang, James Rianto

    2010-01-01

    Viral marketing is an extremely powerful and effective form of internet marketing. Itis a new form of word-of-mouth through internet. In viral marketing, someone passeson a marketing message to someone else and so on. Viral marketing proposes thatmessages can be rapidly disseminated from consumer to consumer leading to largescale market acceptance. The analogy of a virus is used to described the exponentialdiffusion of information in an electronic environment and should not be confusedwith th...

  14. Rapid and highly fieldable viral diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKnight, Timothy E.

    2016-12-20

    The present invention relates to a rapid, highly fieldable, nearly reagentless diagnostic to identify active RNA viral replication in a live, infected cells, and more particularly in leukocytes and tissue samples (including biopsies and nasal swabs) using an array of a plurality of vertically-aligned nanostructures that impale the cells and introduce a DNA reporter construct that is expressed and amplified in the presence of active viral replication.

  15. Viral hepatitis B- an overview

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1994-08-08

    Aug 8, 1994 ... Hepatitis B e antigen. (HBeAg) is a soluble non-structural, enigmatic antigen which is often detected in the blood of patients infected with replicating HBV which results in massive viral load in the blood. Both HBe and HBc are derived from the same section of HBV DNA but the HBe transcript contains an.

  16. Visualizing viral transport and host infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Kwangmin; Guasto, Jeffrey; Cubillos-Ruiz, Andres; Sullivan, Matthew; Stocker, Roman; MIT Team

    2013-11-01

    A virus is a non-motile infectious agent that can only replicate inside a living host. They consist of a virus-host encounter/adsorption dynamics and subsequently the effectiveness of various tail morphologies for viral infection. Viral transport and the role of viral morphology in host-virus interactions are critical to our understanding of both ecosystem dynamics and human health, as well as to the evolution of virus morphology.

  17. Genetics and Genomics of Cotton Leaf Curl Disease, Its Viral Causal Agents and Whitefly Vector: A Way Forward to Sustain Cotton Fiber Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehboob-ur- Rahman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cotton leaf curl disease (CLCuD after its first epidemic in 1912 in Nigeria, has spread to different cotton growing countries including United States, Pakistan, India, and China. The disease is of viral origin—transmitted by the whitefly Bemisia tabaci, which is difficult to control because of the prevalence of multiple virulent viral strains or related species. The problem is further complicated as the CLCuD causing virus complex has a higher recombination rate. The availability of alternate host crops like tomato, okra, etc., and practicing mixed type farming system have further exaggerated the situation by adding synergy to the evolution of new viral strains and vectors. Efforts to control this disease using host plant resistance remained successful using two gene based-resistance that was broken by the evolution of new resistance breaking strain called Burewala virus. Development of transgenic cotton using both pathogen and non-pathogenic derived approaches are in progress. In future, screening for new forms of host resistance, use of DNA markers for the rapid incorporation of resistance into adapted cultivars overlaid with transgenics and using genome editing by CRISPR/Cas system would be instrumental in adding multiple layers of defense to control the disease—thus cotton fiber production will be sustained.

  18. Viral Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Us FAQs Ask a Question Toll Free Numbers Homeless Veterans Chat VA » Health Care » Viral Hepatitis » Veterans and ... Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury Study Center Homeless Veterans Returning Service Members Rural Veterans Seniors & Aging Veterans ...

  19. Viral Subversion of the Nuclear Pore Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Le Sage

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear pore complex (NPC acts as a selective barrier between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and is responsible for mediating communication by regulating the transport of RNA and proteins. Numerous viral pathogens have evolved different mechanisms to hijack the NPC in order to regulate trafficking of viral proteins, genomes and even capsids into and out of the nucleus thus promoting virus replication. The present review examines the different strategies and the specific nucleoporins utilized during viral infections as a means of promoting their life cycle and inhibiting host viral defenses.

  20. Biogenesis and Dynamics of the Coronavirus Replicative Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemeijer, Marne C.; Rottier, Peter J.M.; de Haan, Cornelis A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Coronaviruses are positive-strand RNA viruses that are important infectious agents of both animals and humans. A common feature among positive-strand RNA viruses is their assembly of replication-transcription complexes in association with cytoplasmic membranes. Upon infection, coronaviruses extensively rearrange cellular membranes into organelle-like replicative structures that consist of double-membrane vesicles and convoluted membranes to which the nonstructural proteins involved in RNA synthesis localize. Double-stranded RNA, presumably functioning as replicative intermediate during viral RNA synthesis, has been detected at the double-membrane vesicle interior. Recent studies have provided new insights into the assembly and functioning of the coronavirus replicative structures. This review will summarize the current knowledge on the biogenesis of the replicative structures, the membrane anchoring of the replication-transcription complexes, and the location of viral RNA synthesis, with particular focus on the dynamics of the coronavirus replicative structures and individual replication-associated proteins. PMID:23202524

  1. Valuable Virality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akpinar, E.; Berger, Jonah

    2017-01-01

    Given recent interest in social media, many brands now create content that they hope consumers will view and share with peers. While some campaigns indeed go “viral,” their value to the brand is limited if they do not boost brand evaluation or increase purchase. Consequently, a key question is how

  2. Viral Gastroenteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help relieve the symptoms of viral gastroenteritis in adults: drinking plenty of liquids such as fruit juices, sports ... as the child is hungry giving infants breast milk or full strength ... solutions Older adults and adults with weak immune systems should also ...

  3. Viral pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragni, M V; Sherman, K E; Jordan, J A

    2010-07-01

    Despite continuous improvement in safety and purity of blood products for individuals with haemophilia, transmissible agents continue to affect individuals with haemophilia. This chapter addresses three viral pathogens with significant clinical impact: HIV, hepatitis C and parvovirus B19. Hepatitis C is the leading cause of chronic hepatitis and the major co-morbid complication of haemophilia treatment. Clinically, asymptomatic intermittent alanine aminotransferase elevation is typical, with biopsy evidence of advanced fibrosis currently in 25%. Current treatment is effective in up to 70%, and many new agents are in development. For those progressing to end-stage liver disease, liver transplantation outcomes are similar to those in non-haemophilia subjects, although pretransplant mortality is higher. HIV infection, the second leading co-morbid condition in haemophilia, is managed as a chronic infection with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). HAART also slows hepatitis C virus (HCV) progression in those with HIV/HCV co-infection. Viral inactivation and recombinant technologies have effectively prevented transfusion-transmitted viral pathogens in haemophilia. Human parvovirus B19 infection, typically associated with anaemia or, rarely severe aplastic crisis, is a non-lipid enveloped virus, for which standard inactivation techniques are ineffective. Thus, nucleic acid testing (NAT) to screen the blood supply for B19 DNA is currently under consideration by the Food and Drug Administration. To the extent, viral inactivation, recombinant, and NAT technologies are available worldwide, and the lifespan for those with haemophilia is approaching that of the normal population. The purpose of this chapter is to provide an update on three clinically significant transfusion-transmitted viral pathogens.

  4. The Cell Cycle Timing of Human Papillomavirus DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinson, Tormi; Henno, Liisi; Toots, Mart; Ustav, Mart; Ustav, Mart

    2015-01-01

    Viruses manipulate the cell cycle of the host cell to optimize conditions for more efficient viral genome replication. One strategy utilized by DNA viruses is to replicate their genomes non-concurrently with the host genome; in this case, the viral genome is amplified outside S phase. This phenomenon has also been described for human papillomavirus (HPV) vegetative genome replication, which occurs in G2-arrested cells; however, the precise timing of viral DNA replication during initial and stable replication phases has not been studied. We developed a new method to quantitate newly synthesized DNA levels and used this method in combination with cell cycle synchronization to show that viral DNA replication is initiated during S phase and is extended to G2 during initial amplification but follows the replication pattern of cellular DNA during S phase in the stable maintenance phase. E1 and E2 protein overexpression changes the replication time from S only to both the S and G2 phases in cells that stably maintain viral episomes. These data demonstrate that the active synthesis and replication of the HPV genome are extended into the G2 phase to amplify its copy number and the duration of HPV genome replication is controlled by the level of the viral replication proteins E1 and E2. Using the G2 phase for genome amplification may be an important adaptation that allows exploitation of changing cellular conditions during cell cycle progression. We also describe a new method to quantify newly synthesized viral DNA levels and discuss its benefits for HPV research.

  5. Going Viral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Christina; Beason-Abmayr, Beth; Eich, Elizabeth; Scott, Jamie; Nichol, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are all around--and within. They replicate inside the cells of living organisms. An estimated 1.6 million to 40 million of them occupy each cubic meter of the air people breathe. The activity described in this article helps students understand how the structure of a virus allows it to infect a specific set of organisms and cell types.…

  6. Glycoprotein 5 of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus strain SD16 inhibits viral replication and causes G2/M cell cycle arrest, but does not induce cellular apoptosis in Marc-145 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, Yang, E-mail: muyang@nwsuaf.edu.cn [Department of Preventive Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A& F University, No. 22 Xinong Road, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Experimental Station of Veterinary Pharmacology and Veterinary Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture of the People' s Republic of China, No. 22 Xinong Road, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Li, Liangliang, E-mail: lifeiyang2007@126.com [Department of Preventive Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A& F University, No. 22 Xinong Road, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Experimental Station of Veterinary Pharmacology and Veterinary Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture of the People' s Republic of China, No. 22 Xinong Road, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Zhang, Beibei, E-mail: diana851218@163.com [Department of Preventive Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A& F University, No. 22 Xinong Road, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Experimental Station of Veterinary Pharmacology and Veterinary Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture of the People' s Republic of China, No. 22 Xinong Road, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Huang, Baicheng, E-mail: hbch228@163.com [Department of Preventive Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A& F University, No. 22 Xinong Road, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Experimental Station of Veterinary Pharmacology and Veterinary Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture of the People' s Republic of China, No. 22 Xinong Road, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Gao, Jiming, E-mail: jimingao2006@163.com [Department of Preventive Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A& F University, No. 22 Xinong Road, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Experimental Station of Veterinary Pharmacology and Veterinary Biotechnology, Ministry of Agriculture of the People' s Republic of China, No. 22 Xinong Road, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); and others

    2015-10-15

    Cell apoptosis is common after infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). PRRSV GP5 has been reported to induce cell apoptosis. To further understand the role of GP5 in PRRSV induced cell apoptosis, we established Marc-145 cell lines stably expressing full-length GP5, GP5{sup Δ84-96} (aa 84-96 deletion), and GP5{sup Δ97-119} (aa 97-119 deletion). Cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, cell apoptosis and virus replication in these cell lines were evaluated. Neither truncated nor full-length GP5 induced cell apoptosis in Marc-145 cells. However, GP5{sup Δ97-119}, but not full-length or GP5{sup Δ84-96}, induced a cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase resulting in a reduction in the growth of Marc-145 cells. Additionally, GP5{sup Δ84-96} inhibited the replication of PRRSV in Marc-145 cells through induction of IFN-β. These findings suggest that PRRSV GP5 is not responsible for inducing cell apoptosis in Marc-145 cells under these experimental conditions; however it has other important roles in virus/host cell biology. - Highlights: • Marc-145 cell lines stable expression PRRSV GP5 or truncated GP5 were constructed. • GP5{sup Δ97-119} expression in Marc-145 cell induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase. • Expression of GP5 and truncated GP5 could not induce Marc-145 cells apoptosis. • PRRSV replication in Marc-145-GP5{sup Δ84-96} was significantly inhibited.

  7. TRAF6 and IRF7 control HIV replication in macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélissa Sirois

    Full Text Available The innate immune system recognizes virus infection and evokes antiviral responses which include producing type I interferons (IFNs. The induction of IFN provides a crucial mechanism of antiviral defense by upregulating interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs that restrict viral replication. ISGs inhibit the replication of many viruses by acting at different steps of their viral cycle. Specifically, IFN treatment prior to in vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection stops or significantly delays HIV-1 production indicating that potent inhibitory factors are generated. We report that HIV-1 infection of primary human macrophages decreases tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6 and virus-induced signaling adaptor (VISA expression, which are both components of the IFN signaling pathway controlling viral replication. Knocking down the expression of TRAF6 in macrophages increased HIV-1 replication and augmented the expression of IRF7 but not IRF3. Suppressing VISA had no impact on viral replication. Overexpression of IRF7 resulted in enhanced viral replication while knocking down IRF7 expression in macrophages significantly reduced viral output. These findings are the first demonstration that TRAF6 can regulate HIV-1 production and furthermore that expression of IRF7 promotes HIV-1 replication.

  8. Spatiotemporally restricted arenavirus replication induces immune surveillance and type I interferon-dependent tumour regression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Halime Kalkavan; Piyush Sharma; Stefan Kasper; Iris Helfrich; Aleksandra A Pandyra; Asmae Gassa; Isabel Virchow; Lukas Flatz; Tim Brandenburg; Sukumar Namineni; Mathias Heikenwalder; Bastian Höchst; Percy A Knolle; Guido Wollmann; Dorothee Von Laer; Ingo Drexler; Jessica Rathbun; Paula M Cannon; Stefanie Scheu; Jens Bauer; Jagat Chauhan; Dieter Häussinger; Gerald Willimsky; Max Löhning; Dirk Schadendorf; Sven Brandau; Martin Schuler; Philipp A Lang; Karl S Lang

    2017-01-01

    ...) preferentially replicate in tumour cells in a variety of murine and human cancer models. Viral replication leads to prolonged local immune activation, rapid regression of localized and metastatic cancers, and long-term disease control...

  9. Murine leukemia virus (MLV replication monitored with fluorescent proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bittner Alexandra

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer gene therapy will benefit from vectors that are able to replicate in tumor tissue and cause a bystander effect. Replication-competent murine leukemia virus (MLV has been described to have potential as cancer therapeutics, however, MLV infection does not cause a cytopathic effect in the infected cell and viral replication can only be studied by immunostaining or measurement of reverse transcriptase activity. Results We inserted the coding sequences for green fluorescent protein (GFP into the proline-rich region (PRR of the ecotropic envelope protein (Env and were able to fluorescently label MLV. This allowed us to directly monitor viral replication and attachment to target cells by flow cytometry. We used this method to study viral replication of recombinant MLVs and split viral genomes, which were generated by replacement of the MLV env gene with the red fluorescent protein (RFP and separately cloning GFP-Env into a retroviral vector. Co-transfection of both plasmids into target cells resulted in the generation of semi-replicative vectors, and the two color labeling allowed to determine the distribution of the individual genomes in the target cells and was indicative for the occurrence of recombination events. Conclusions Fluorescently labeled MLVs are excellent tools for the study of factors that influence viral replication and can be used to optimize MLV-based replication-competent viruses or vectors for gene therapy.

  10. Ribavirin Inhibits Parrot Bornavirus 4 Replication in Cell Culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M B Musser

    Full Text Available Parrot bornavirus 4 is an etiological agent of proventricular dilatation disease, a fatal neurologic and gastrointestinal disease of psittacines and other birds. We tested the ability of ribavirin, an antiviral nucleoside analog with antiviral activity against a range of RNA and DNA viruses, to inhibit parrot bornavirus 4 replication in duck embryonic fibroblast cells. Two analytical methods that evaluate different products of viral replication, indirect immunocytochemistry for viral specific nucleoprotein and qRT-PCR for viral specific phosphoprotein gene mRNA, were used. Ribavirin at concentrations between 2.5 and 25 μg/mL inhibited parrot bornavirus 4 replication, decreasing viral mRNA and viral protein load, in infected duck embryonic fibroblast cells. The addition of guanosine diminished the antiviral activity of ribavirin suggesting that one possible mechanism of action against parrot bornavirus 4 may likely be through inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibition. This study demonstrates parrot bornavirus 4 susceptibility to ribavirin in cell culture.

  11. Viral epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milavetz, Barry I; Balakrishnan, Lata

    2015-01-01

    DNA tumor viruses including members of the polyomavirus, adenovirus, papillomavirus, and herpes virus families are presently the subject of intense interest with respect to the role that epigenetics plays in control of the virus life cycle and the transformation of a normal cell to a cancer cell. To date, these studies have primarily focused on the role of histone modification, nucleosome location, and DNA methylation in regulating the biological consequences of infection. Using a wide variety of strategies and techniques ranging from simple ChIP to ChIP-chip and ChIP-seq to identify histone modifications, nuclease digestion to genome wide next generation sequencing to identify nucleosome location, and bisulfite treatment to MeDIP to identify DNA methylation sites, the epigenetic regulation of these viruses is slowly becoming better understood. While the viruses may differ in significant ways from each other and cellular chromatin, the role of epigenetics appears to be relatively similar. Within the viral genome nucleosomes are organized for the expression of appropriate genes with relevant histone modifications particularly histone acetylation. DNA methylation occurs as part of the typical gene silencing during latent infection by herpesviruses. In the simple tumor viruses like the polyomaviruses, adenoviruses, and papillomaviruses, transformation of the cell occurs via integration of the virus genome such that the virus's normal regulation is disrupted. This results in the unregulated expression of critical viral genes capable of redirecting cellular gene expression. The redirected cellular expression is a consequence of either indirect epigenetic regulation where cellular signaling or transcriptional dysregulation occurs or direct epigenetic regulation where epigenetic cofactors such as histone deacetylases are targeted. In the more complex herpersviruses transformation is a consequence of the expression of the viral latency proteins and RNAs which again can

  12. Replicative Intermediates of Human Papillomavirus Type 11 in Laryngeal Papillomas: Site of Replication Initiation and Direction of Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auborn, K. J.; Little, R. D.; Platt, T. H. K.; Vaccariello, M. A.; Schildkraut, C. L.

    1994-07-01

    We have examined the structures of replication intermediates from the human papillomavirus type 11 genome in DNA extracted from papilloma lesions (laryngeal papillomas). The sites of replication initiation and termination utilized in vivo were mapped by using neutral/neutral and neutral/alkaline two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis methods. Initiation of replication was detected in or very close to the upstream regulatory region (URR; the noncoding, regulatory sequences upstream of the open reading frames in the papillomavirus genome). We also show that replication forks proceed bidirectionally from the origin and converge 180circ opposite the URR. These results demonstrate the feasibility of analysis of replication of viral genomes directly from infected tissue.

  13. Cytoplasmic ATR Activation Promotes Vaccinia Virus Genome Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Postigo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to most DNA viruses, poxviruses replicate their genomes in the cytoplasm without host involvement. We find that vaccinia virus induces cytoplasmic activation of ATR early during infection, before genome uncoating, which is unexpected because ATR plays a fundamental nuclear role in maintaining host genome integrity. ATR, RPA, INTS7, and Chk1 are recruited to cytoplasmic DNA viral factories, suggesting canonical ATR pathway activation. Consistent with this, pharmacological and RNAi-mediated inhibition of canonical ATR signaling suppresses genome replication. RPA and the sliding clamp PCNA interact with the viral polymerase E9 and are required for DNA replication. Moreover, the ATR activator TOPBP1 promotes genome replication and associates with the viral replisome component H5. Our study suggests that, in contrast to long-held beliefs, vaccinia recruits conserved components of the eukaryote DNA replication and repair machinery to amplify its genome in the host cytoplasm.

  14. Viral bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florin, Todd A; Plint, Amy C; Zorc, Joseph J

    2017-01-14

    Viral bronchiolitis is a common clinical syndrome affecting infants and young children. Concern about its associated morbidity and cost has led to a large body of research that has been summarised in systematic reviews and integrated into clinical practice guidelines in several countries. The evidence and guideline recommendations consistently support a clinical diagnosis with the limited role for diagnostic testing for children presenting with the typical clinical syndrome of viral upper respiratory infection progressing to the lower respiratory tract. Management is largely supportive, focusing on maintaining oxygenation and hydration of the patient. Evidence suggests no benefit from bronchodilator or corticosteroid use in infants with a first episode of bronchiolitis. Evidence for other treatments such as hypertonic saline is evolving but not clearly defined yet. For infants with severe disease, the insufficient available data suggest a role for high-flow nasal cannula and continuous positive airway pressure use in a monitored setting to prevent respiratory failure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Tight Junctions Go Viral!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús M. Torres-Flores

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Tight junctions (TJs are highly specialized membrane domains involved in many important cellular processes such as the regulation of the passage of ions and macromolecules across the paracellular space and the establishment of cell polarity in epithelial cells. Over the past few years there has been increasing evidence that different components of the TJs can be hijacked by viruses in order to complete their infectious cycle. Viruses from at least nine different families of DNA and RNA viruses have been reported to use TJ proteins in their benefit. For example, TJ proteins such as JAM-A or some members of the claudin family of proteins are used by members of the Reoviridae family and hepatitis C virus as receptors or co-receptors during their entry into their host cells. Reovirus, in addition, takes advantage of the TJ protein Junction Adhesion Molecule-A (JAM-A to achieve its hematogenous dissemination. Some other viruses are capable of regulating the expression or the localization of TJ proteins to induce cell transformation or to improve the efficiency of their exit process. This review encompasses the importance of TJs for viral entry, replication, dissemination, and egress, and makes a clear statement of the importance of studying these proteins to gain a better understanding of the replication strategies used by viruses that infect epithelial and/or endothelial cells.

  16. Archaeal DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelman, Lori M; Kelman, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication is essential for all life forms. Although the process is fundamentally conserved in the three domains of life, bioinformatic, biochemical, structural, and genetic studies have demonstrated that the process and the proteins involved in archaeal DNA replication are more similar to those in eukaryal DNA replication than in bacterial DNA replication, but have some archaeal-specific features. The archaeal replication system, however, is not monolithic, and there are some differences in the replication process between different species. In this review, the current knowledge of the mechanisms governing DNA replication in Archaea is summarized. The general features of the replication process as well as some of the differences are discussed.

  17. Influence of dendritic cells on viral pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freer, Giulia; Matteucci, Donatella

    2009-07-01

    Although most viral infections cause minor, if any, symptoms, a certain number result in serious illness. Viral disease symptoms result both from direct viral replication within host cells and from indirect immunopathological consequences. Dendritic cells (DCs) are key determinants of viral disease outcome; they activate immune responses during viral infection and direct T cells toward distinct T helper type responses. Certain viruses are able to skew cytokine secretion by DCs inducing and/or downregulating the immune system with the aim of facilitating and prolonging release of progeny. Thus, the interaction of DCs with viruses most often results in the absence of disease or complete recovery when natural functions of DCs prevail, but may lead to chronic illness or death when these functions are outmanoeuvred by viruses in the exploitation of DCs.

  18. Influence of dendritic cells on viral pathogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Freer

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Although most viral infections cause minor, if any, symptoms, a certain number result in serious illness. Viral disease symptoms result both from direct viral replication within host cells and from indirect immunopathological consequences. Dendritic cells (DCs are key determinants of viral disease outcome; they activate immune responses during viral infection and direct T cells toward distinct T helper type responses. Certain viruses are able to skew cytokine secretion by DCs inducing and/or downregulating the immune system with the aim of facilitating and prolonging release of progeny. Thus, the interaction of DCs with viruses most often results in the absence of disease or complete recovery when natural functions of DCs prevail, but may lead to chronic illness or death when these functions are outmanoeuvred by viruses in the exploitation of DCs.

  19. Hepatitis C Virus Replication Depends on Endosomal Cholesterol Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeck, Ina Karen; Lee, Ji-Young; Tabata, Keisuke; Romero-Brey, Inés; Paul, David; Schult, Philipp; Lohmann, Volker; Kaderali, Lars; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2018-01-01

    Similar to other positive-strand RNA viruses, hepatitis C virus (HCV) causes massive rearrangements of intracellular membranes, resulting in a membranous web (MW) composed of predominantly double-membrane vesicles (DMVs), the presumed sites of RNA replication. DMVs are enriched for cholesterol, but mechanistic details on the source and recruitment of cholesterol to the viral replication organelle are only partially known. Here we focused on selected lipid transfer proteins implicated in direct lipid transfer at various endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-membrane contact sites. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown identified several hitherto unknown HCV dependency factors, such as steroidogenic acute regulatory protein-related lipid transfer domain protein 3 (STARD3), oxysterol-binding protein-related protein 1A and -B (OSBPL1A and -B), and Niemann-Pick-type C1 (NPC1), all residing at late endosome and lysosome membranes and required for efficient HCV RNA replication but not for replication of the closely related dengue virus. Focusing on NPC1, we found that knockdown or pharmacological inhibition caused cholesterol entrapment in lysosomal vesicles concomitant with decreased cholesterol abundance at sites containing the viral replicase factor NS5A. In untreated HCV-infected cells, unesterified cholesterol accumulated at the perinuclear region, partially colocalizing with NS5A at DMVs, arguing for NPC1-mediated endosomal cholesterol transport to the viral replication organelle. Consistent with cholesterol being an important structural component of DMVs, reducing NPC1-dependent endosomal cholesterol transport impaired MW integrity. This suggests that HCV usurps lipid transfer proteins, such as NPC1, at ER-late endosome/lysosome membrane contact sites to recruit cholesterol to the viral replication organelle, where it contributes to MW functionality. IMPORTANCE A key feature of the replication of positive-strand RNA viruses is the rearrangement of the host cell

  20. Rat cytomegalovirus replication in the salivary glands is exclusively confined to striated duct cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloover, JS; Hillebrands, JL; de Wit, G; Grauls, G; Rozing, J; Bruggeman, CA; Nieuwenhuis, P

    2000-01-01

    The salivary gland is the preferred organ for cytomegalovirus (CMV) replication and viral persistence. In order to identify the nature of infected cells and to study viral replication in more detail, several experiments were conducted. Using the rat CMV (RCMV) model, acutely infected young adult

  1. HIV/AIDS Vaccine Candidates Based on Replication-Competent Recombinant Poxvirus NYVAC-C-KC Expressing Trimeric gp140 and Gag-Derived Virus-Like Particles or Lacking the Viral Molecule B19 That Inhibits Type I Interferon Activate Relevant HIV-1-Specific B and T Cell Immune Functions in Nonhuman Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Arriaza, Juan; Perdiguero, Beatriz; Heeney, Jonathan L.; Seaman, Michael S.; Montefiori, David C.; Yates, Nicole L.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Ferrari, Guido; Foulds, Kathryn E.; Roederer, Mario; Self, Steven G.; Borate, Bhavesh; Gottardo, Raphael; Phogat, Sanjay; Tartaglia, Jim; Barnett, Susan W.; Burke, Brian; Cristillo, Anthony D.; Weiss, Deborah E.; Lee, Carter; Kibler, Karen V.; Jacobs, Bertram L.; Wagner, Ralf; Ding, Song; Pantaleo, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nonreplicating attenuated poxvirus vector NYVAC expressing clade C(CN54) HIV-1 Env(gp120) and Gag-Pol-Nef antigens (NYVAC-C) showed limited immunogenicity in phase I clinical trials. To enhance the capacity of the NYVAC vector to trigger broad humoral responses and a more balanced activation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, here we compared the HIV-1-specific immunogenicity elicited in nonhuman primates immunized with two replicating NYVAC vectors that have been modified by the insertion of the K1L and C7L vaccinia virus host range genes and express the clade C(ZM96) trimeric HIV-1 gp140 protein or a Gag(ZM96)-Pol-Nef(CN54) polyprotein as Gag-derived virus-like particles (termed NYVAC-C-KC). Additionally, one NYVAC-C-KC vector was generated by deleting the viral gene B19R, an inhibitor of the type I interferon response (NYVAC-C-KC-ΔB19R). An immunization protocol mimicking that of the RV144 phase III clinical trial was used. Two groups of macaques received two doses of the corresponding NYVAC-C-KC vectors (weeks 0 and 4) and booster doses with NYVAC-C-KC vectors plus the clade C HIV-1 gp120 protein (weeks 12 and 24). The two replicating NYVAC-C-KC vectors induced enhanced and similar HIV-1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses, similar levels of binding IgG antibodies, low levels of IgA antibodies, and high levels of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity responses and HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies. Small differences within the NYVAC-C-KC-ΔB19R group were seen in the magnitude of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, the induction of some cytokines, and the neutralization of some HIV-1 isolates. Thus, replication-competent NYVAC-C-KC vectors acquired relevant immunological properties as vaccine candidates against HIV/AIDS, and the viral B19 molecule exerts some control of immune functions. IMPORTANCE It is of special importance to find a safe and effective HIV/AIDS vaccine that can induce strong and broad T cell and humoral immune responses correlating with HIV-1

  2. HIV/AIDS Vaccine Candidates Based on Replication-Competent Recombinant Poxvirus NYVAC-C-KC Expressing Trimeric gp140 and Gag-Derived Virus-Like Particles or Lacking the Viral Molecule B19 That Inhibits Type I Interferon Activate Relevant HIV-1-Specific B and T Cell Immune Functions in Nonhuman Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Arriaza, Juan; Perdiguero, Beatriz; Heeney, Jonathan L; Seaman, Michael S; Montefiori, David C; Yates, Nicole L; Tomaras, Georgia D; Ferrari, Guido; Foulds, Kathryn E; Roederer, Mario; Self, Steven G; Borate, Bhavesh; Gottardo, Raphael; Phogat, Sanjay; Tartaglia, Jim; Barnett, Susan W; Burke, Brian; Cristillo, Anthony D; Weiss, Deborah E; Lee, Carter; Kibler, Karen V; Jacobs, Bertram L; Wagner, Ralf; Ding, Song; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Esteban, Mariano

    2017-05-01

    The nonreplicating attenuated poxvirus vector NYVAC expressing clade C(CN54) HIV-1 Env(gp120) and Gag-Pol-Nef antigens (NYVAC-C) showed limited immunogenicity in phase I clinical trials. To enhance the capacity of the NYVAC vector to trigger broad humoral responses and a more balanced activation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, here we compared the HIV-1-specific immunogenicity elicited in nonhuman primates immunized with two replicating NYVAC vectors that have been modified by the insertion of the K1L and C7L vaccinia virus host range genes and express the clade C(ZM96) trimeric HIV-1 gp140 protein or a Gag(ZM96)-Pol-Nef(CN54) polyprotein as Gag-derived virus-like particles (termed NYVAC-C-KC). Additionally, one NYVAC-C-KC vector was generated by deleting the viral gene B19R, an inhibitor of the type I interferon response (NYVAC-C-KC-ΔB19R). An immunization protocol mimicking that of the RV144 phase III clinical trial was used. Two groups of macaques received two doses of the corresponding NYVAC-C-KC vectors (weeks 0 and 4) and booster doses with NYVAC-C-KC vectors plus the clade C HIV-1 gp120 protein (weeks 12 and 24). The two replicating NYVAC-C-KC vectors induced enhanced and similar HIV-1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses, similar levels of binding IgG antibodies, low levels of IgA antibodies, and high levels of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity responses and HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies. Small differences within the NYVAC-C-KC-ΔB19R group were seen in the magnitude of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, the induction of some cytokines, and the neutralization of some HIV-1 isolates. Thus, replication-competent NYVAC-C-KC vectors acquired relevant immunological properties as vaccine candidates against HIV/AIDS, and the viral B19 molecule exerts some control of immune functions.IMPORTANCE It is of special importance to find a safe and effective HIV/AIDS vaccine that can induce strong and broad T cell and humoral immune responses correlating with HIV-1 protection

  3. Phosphorylation of Large T Antigen Regulates Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, Jason; Wang, Xin; Tsang, Sabrina H. [Department of Microbiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Jiao, Jing [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); You, Jianxin, E-mail: jianyou@mail.med.upenn.edu [Department of Microbiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2014-07-08

    Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV) was recently discovered as a novel human polyomavirus that is associated with ~80% of Merkel Cell Carcinomas. The Large Tumor antigen (LT) is an early viral protein which has a variety of functions, including manipulation of the cell cycle and initiating viral DNA replication. Phosphorylation plays a critical regulatory role for polyomavirus LT proteins, but no investigation of MCPyV LT phosphorylation has been performed to date. In this report mass spectrometry analysis reveals three unique phosphorylation sites: T271, T297 and T299. In vivo replication assays confirm that phosphorylation of T271 does not play a role in viral replication, while modification at T297 and T299 have dramatic and opposing effects on LT’s ability to initiate replication from the viral origin. We test these mutants for their ability to bind, unwind, and act as a functional helicase at the viral origin. These studies provide a framework for understanding how phosphorylation of LT may dynamically regulate viral replication. Although the natural host cell of MCPyV has not yet been established, this work provides a foundation for understanding how LT activity is regulated and provides tools for better exploring this regulation in both natural host cells and Merkel cells.

  4. Phosphorylation of Large T Antigen Regulates Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Diaz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV was recently discovered as a novel human polyomavirus that is associated with ~80% of Merkel Cell Carcinomas. The Large Tumor antigen (LT is an early viral protein which has a variety of functions, including manipulation of the cell cycle and initiating viral DNA replication. Phosphorylation plays a critical regulatory role for polyomavirus LT proteins, but no investigation of MCPyV LT phosphorylation has been performed to date. In this report mass spectrometry analysis reveals three unique phosphorylation sites: T271, T297 and T299. In vivo replication assays confirm that phosphorylation of T271 does not play a role in viral replication, while modification at T297 and T299 have dramatic and opposing effects on LT’s ability to initiate replication from the viral origin. We test these mutants for their ability to bind, unwind, and act as a functional helicase at the viral origin. These studies provide a framework for understanding how phosphorylation of LT may dynamically regulate viral replication. Although the natural host cell of MCPyV has not yet been established, this work provides a foundation for understanding how LT activity is regulated and provides tools for better exploring this regulation in both natural host cells and Merkel cells.

  5. CTL Escape and Viral Fitness in HIV/SIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Sayuri; Matano, Tetsuro

    2011-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses exert a suppressive effect on HIV and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) replication. Under the CTL pressure, viral CTL escape mutations are frequently selected with viral fitness costs. Viruses with such CTL escape mutations often need additional viral genome mutations for recovery of viral fitness. Persistent HIV/SIV infection sometimes shows replacement of a CTL escape mutation with an alternative escape mutation toward higher viral fitness. Thus, multiple viral genome changes under CTL pressure are observed in the chronic phase of HIV/SIV infection. HIV/SIV transmission to HLA/MHC-mismatched hosts drives further viral genome changes including additional CTL escape mutations and reversions under different CTL pressure. Understanding of viral structure/function and host CTL responses would contribute to prediction of HIV evolution and control of HIV prevalence.

  6. The Genomic Replication of the Crenarchaeal Virus SIRV2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Alvarez, Laura

    of the crenarchaeal virus SIRV2, a model among archaeal viruses. SIRV2 was found to employ multiple replication mechanisms, with DNA synthesis starting by a strand-displacement mode that later derived in a rolling-circle replication from a circular intermediate. Interestingly, evidence for a secondary, bidirectional......Archaeal viruses have been found to be remarkably diverse in terms of their morphologies and genomes. But knowledge about their replication cycles and interactions with their hosts is still lacking. The aim of this work was to gain insight about the molecular mechanism of the genomic replication...... mode of replication from the circular intermediate was also found. Surprisingly, analysis of the topology of the viral replication intermediates showed the formation of network-like, large and multimeric replication intermediates. These intermediates are formed since the beginning of replication...

  7. The Ins and Outs of Viral Infection: Keystone Meeting Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara W. Bird

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Newly observed mechanisms for viral entry, assembly, and exit are challenging our current understanding of the replication cycle of different viruses. To address and better understand these mechanisms, a Keystone Symposium was organized in the snowy mountains of Colorado (“The Ins and Outs of Viral Infection: Entry, Assembly, Exit, and Spread”; 30 March–4 April 2014, Beaver Run Resort, Breckenridge, Colorado, organized by Karla Kirkegaard, Mavis Agbandje-McKenna, and Eric O. Freed. The meeting served to bring together cell biologists, structural biologists, geneticists, and scientists expert in viral pathogenesis to discuss emerging mechanisms of viral ins and outs. The conference was organized around different phases of the viral replication cycle, including cell entry, viral assembly and post-assembly maturation, virus structure, cell exit, and virus spread. This review aims to highlight important topics and themes that emerged during the conference.

  8. Statistical security for Social Security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soneji, Samir; King, Gary

    2012-08-01

    The financial viability of Social Security, the single largest U.S. government program, depends on accurate forecasts of the solvency of its intergenerational trust fund. We begin by detailing information necessary for replicating the Social Security Administration's (SSA's) forecasting procedures, which until now has been unavailable in the public domain. We then offer a way to improve the quality of these procedures via age- and sex-specific mortality forecasts. The most recent SSA mortality forecasts were based on the best available technology at the time, which was a combination of linear extrapolation and qualitative judgments. Unfortunately, linear extrapolation excludes known risk factors and is inconsistent with long-standing demographic patterns, such as the smoothness of age profiles. Modern statistical methods typically outperform even the best qualitative judgments in these contexts. We show how to use such methods, enabling researchers to forecast using far more information, such as the known risk factors of smoking and obesity and known demographic patterns. Including this extra information makes a substantial difference. For example, by improving only mortality forecasting methods, we predict three fewer years of net surplus, $730 billion less in Social Security Trust Funds, and program costs that are 0.66% greater for projected taxable payroll by 2031 compared with SSA projections. More important than specific numerical estimates are the advantages of transparency, replicability, reduction of uncertainty, and what may be the resulting lower vulnerability to the politicization of program forecasts. In addition, by offering with this article software and detailed replication information, we hope to marshal the efforts of the research community to include ever more informative inputs and to continue to reduce uncertainties in Social Security forecasts.

  9. Inhibition of Monkeypox virus replication by RNA interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahrling Peter B

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Orthopoxvirus genus of Poxviridae family is comprised of several human pathogens, including cowpox (CPXV, Vaccinia (VACV, monkeypox (MPV and Variola (VARV viruses. Species of this virus genus cause human diseases with various severities and outcome ranging from mild conditions to death in fulminating cases. Currently, vaccination is the only protective measure against infection with these viruses and no licensed antiviral drug therapy is available. In this study, we investigated the potential of RNA interference pathway (RNAi as a therapeutic approach for orthopox virus infections using MPV as a model. Based on genome-wide expression studies and bioinformatic analysis, we selected 12 viral genes and targeted them by small interference RNA (siRNA. Forty-eight siRNA constructs were developed and evaluated in vitro for their ability to inhibit viral replication. Two genes, each targeted with four different siRNA constructs in one pool, were limiting to viral replication. Seven siRNA constructs from these two pools, targeting either an essential gene for viral replication (A6R or an important gene in viral entry (E8L, inhibited viral replication in cell culture by 65-95% with no apparent cytotoxicity. Further analysis with wild-type and recombinant MPV expressing green fluorescence protein demonstrated that one of these constructs, siA6-a, was the most potent and inhibited viral replication for up to 7 days at a concentration of 10 nM. These results emphasis the essential role of A6R gene in viral replication, and demonstrate the potential of RNAi as a therapeutic approach for developing oligonucleotide-based drug therapy for MPV and other orthopox viruses.

  10. Viral and host proteins involved in picornavirus life cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weng Kuo-Feng

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Picornaviruses cause several diseases, not only in humans but also in various animal hosts. For instance, human enteroviruses can cause hand-foot-and-mouth disease, herpangina, myocarditis, acute flaccid paralysis, acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis, severe neurological complications, including brainstem encephalitis, meningitis and poliomyelitis, and even death. The interaction between the virus and the host is important for viral replication, virulence and pathogenicity. This article reviews studies of the functions of viral and host factors that are involved in the life cycle of picornavirus. The interactions of viral capsid proteins with host cell receptors is discussed first, and the mechanisms by which the viral and host cell factors are involved in viral replication, viral translation and the switch from translation to RNA replication are then addressed. Understanding how cellular proteins interact with viral RNA or viral proteins, as well as the roles of each in viral infection, will provide insights for the design of novel antiviral agents based on these interactions.

  11. The importance of lytic and nonlytic immune responses in viral infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wodarz, Dominik; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2002-01-01

    the disease, particularly if the virus replicates at a fast rate. By contrast, if viral cytopathicity is high relative to the replication rate of the virus, then lytic and nonlytic mechanisms can, in principle, resolve the infection independently. We discuss our findings in the context of specific viral...

  12. Replicated Data Management for Mobile Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Douglas, Terry

    2008-01-01

    Managing data in a mobile computing environment invariably involves caching or replication. In many cases, a mobile device has access only to data that is stored locally, and much of that data arrives via replication from other devices, PCs, and services. Given portable devices with limited resources, weak or intermittent connectivity, and security vulnerabilities, data replication serves to increase availability, reduce communication costs, foster sharing, and enhance survivability of critical information. Mobile systems have employed a variety of distributed architectures from client-server

  13. Replication of a chronic hepatitis B virus genotype F1b construct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Sergio; Jiménez, Gustavo; Alarcón, Valentina; Prieto, Cristian; Muñoz, Francisca; Riquelme, Constanza; Venegas, Mauricio; Brahm, Javier; Loyola, Alejandra; Villanueva, Rodrigo A

    2016-03-01

    Genotype F is one of the less-studied genotypes of human hepatitis B virus, although it is widely distributed in regions of Central and South American. Our previous studies have shown that HBV genotype F is prevalent in Chile, and phylogenetic analysis of its full-length sequence amplified from the sera of chronically infected patients identified it as HBV subgenotype F1b. We have previously reported the full-length sequence of a HBV molecular clone obtained from a patient chronically infected with genotype F1b. In this report, we established a system to study HBV replication based on hepatoma cell lines transfected with full-length monomers of the HBV genome. Culture supernatants were analyzed after transfection and found to contain both HBsAg and HBeAg viral antigens. Consistently, fractionated cell extracts revealed the presence of viral replication, with both cytoplasmic and nuclear DNA intermediates. Analysis of HBV-transfected cells by indirect immunofluorescence or immunoelectron microscopy revealed the expression of viral antigens and cytoplasmic viral particles, respectively. To test the functionality of the ongoing viral replication further at the level of chromatinized cccDNA, transfected cells were treated with a histone deacetylase inhibitor, and this resulted in increased viral replication. This correlated with changes posttranslational modifications of histones at viral promoters. Thus, the development of this viral replication system for HBV genotype F will facilitate studies on the regulation of viral replication and the identification of new antiviral drugs.

  14. Replicating viruses for gynecologic cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J W; Kim, M

    2016-01-01

    Despite advanced therapeutic treatments, gynecologic malignancies such as cervical and ovarian cancers are still the top ten leading cause of cancer death among women in South Korea. Thus a novel and innovative approach is urgently needed. Naturally occurring viruses are live, replication-proficient viruses that specifically infect human cancer cells while sparing normal cell counterparts. Since the serendipitous discovery of the naturally oncotropic virus targeting gynecologic cancer in 1920s, various replicating viruses have shown various degrees of safety and efficacy in preclinical or clinical applications for gynecologic cancer therapy. Cellular oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, which are frequently dysregulated in gynecologic malignancies, play an important role in determining viral oncotropism. Published articles describing replicating, oncolytic viruses for gynecologic cancers are thoroughly reviewed. This review outlines the discovery of replication-proficient virus strains for targeting gynecologic malignancies, recent progresses elucidating molecular connections between oncogene/tumor suppressor gene abnormalities and viral oncotropism, and the associated preclinical/clinical implications. The authors would also like to propose future directions in the utility of the replicating viruses for gynecologic cancer therapy.

  15. Involvement of Autophagy in Coronavirus Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Britton

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Coronaviruses are single stranded, positive sense RNA viruses, which induce the rearrangement of cellular membranes upon infection of a host cell. This provides the virus with a platform for the assembly of viral replication complexes, improving efficiency of RNA synthesis. The membranes observed in coronavirus infected cells include double membrane vesicles. By nature of their double membrane, these vesicles resemble cellular autophagosomes, generated during the cellular autophagy pathway. In addition, coronavirus infection has been demonstrated to induce autophagy. Here we review current knowledge of coronavirus induced membrane rearrangements and the involvement of autophagy or autophagy protein microtubule associated protein 1B light chain 3 (LC3 in coronavirus replication.

  16. Phosphorylated STAT5 directly facilitates parvovirus B19 DNA replication in human erythroid progenitors through interaction with the MCM complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganaie, Safder S; Zou, Wei; Xu, Peng; Deng, Xuefeng; Kleiboeker, Steve; Qiu, Jianming

    2017-05-01

    Productive infection of human parvovirus B19 (B19V) exhibits high tropism for burst forming unit erythroid (BFU-E) and colony forming unit erythroid (CFU-E) progenitor cells in human bone marrow and fetal liver. This exclusive restriction of the virus replication to human erythroid progenitor cells is partly due to the intracellular factors that are essential for viral DNA replication, including erythropoietin signaling. Efficient B19V replication also requires hypoxic conditions, which upregulate the signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) pathway, and phosphorylated STAT5 is essential for virus replication. In this study, our results revealed direct involvement of STAT5 in B19V DNA replication. Consensus STAT5-binding elements were identified adjacent to the NS1-binding element within the minimal origins of viral DNA replication in the B19V genome. Phosphorylated STAT5 specifically interacted with viral DNA replication origins both in vivo and in vitro, and was actively recruited within the viral DNA replication centers. Notably, STAT5 interacted with minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex, suggesting that STAT5 directly facilitates viral DNA replication by recruiting the helicase complex of the cellular DNA replication machinery to viral DNA replication centers. The FDA-approved drug pimozide dephosphorylates STAT5, and it inhibited B19V replication in ex vivo expanded human erythroid progenitors. Our results demonstrated that pimozide could be a promising antiviral drug for treatment of B19V-related diseases.

  17. Viral fitness: definitions, measurement, and current insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wargo, Andrew R.; Kurath, Gael

    2012-01-01

    Viral fitness is an active area of research, with recent work involving an expanded number of human, non-human vertebrate, invertebrate, plant, and bacterial viruses. Many publications deal with RNA viruses associated with major disease emergence events, such as HIV-1, influenza virus, and Dengue virus. Study topics include drug resistance, immune escape, viral emergence, host jumps, mutation effects, quasispecies diversity, and mathematical models of viral fitness. Important recent trends include increasing use of in vivo systems to assess vertebrate virus fitness, and a broadening of research beyond replicative fitness to also investigate transmission fitness and epidemiologic fitness. This is essential for a more integrated understanding of overall viral fitness, with implications for disease management in the future.

  18. Norovirus Polymerase Fidelity Contributes to Viral Transmission In Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arias Esteban, Armando; Thorne, Lucy; Ghurburrun, Elsa

    2016-01-01

    Intrahost genetic diversity and replication error rates are intricately linked to RNA virus pathogenesis, with alterations in viral polymerase fidelity typically leading to attenuation during infections in vivo. We have previously shown that norovirus intrahost genetic diversity also influences v...... and that maintaining diversity is important for the establishment of infection. This work supports the hypothesis that the reduced polymerase fidelity of the pandemic GII.4 human norovirus isolates may contribute to their global dominance.......Intrahost genetic diversity and replication error rates are intricately linked to RNA virus pathogenesis, with alterations in viral polymerase fidelity typically leading to attenuation during infections in vivo. We have previously shown that norovirus intrahost genetic diversity also influences...... viral pathogenesis using the murine norovirus model, as increasing viral mutation frequency using a mutagenic nucleoside resulted in clearance of a persistent infection in mice. Given the role of replication fidelity and genetic diversity in pathogenesis, we have now investigated whether polymerase...

  19. DNA replication and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyer, Anne-Sophie; Walter, David; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-01-01

    A dividing cell has to duplicate its DNA precisely once during the cell cycle to preserve genome integrity avoiding the accumulation of genetic aberrations that promote diseases such as cancer. A large number of endogenous impacts can challenge DNA replication and cells harbor a battery of pathways...... to promote genome integrity during DNA replication. This includes suppressing new replication origin firing, stabilization of replicating forks, and the safe restart of forks to prevent any loss of genetic information. Here, we describe mechanisms by which oncogenes can interfere with DNA replication thereby...... causing DNA replication stress and genome instability. Further, we describe cellular and systemic responses to these insults with a focus on DNA replication restart pathways. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of exploiting intrinsic replicative stress in cancer cells for targeted therapy....

  20. Viral persistence, liver disease and host response in Hepatitis C-like virus rat model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trivedi, Sheetal; Murthy, Satyapramod; Sharma, Himanshu

    2018-01-01

    cleavage sites and secondary structures in the viral 5' and 3' UTRs. We used site-directed and random mutagenesis to determine that only the first of the two miR-122 seed sites in viral 5'UTR is required for viral replication and persistence in rats. Next, we used the clone derived virus progeny to infect...

  1. SMC1-mediated intra-S-phase arrest facilitates bocavirus DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yong; Deng, Xuefeng; Cheng, Fang; Li, Yi; Qiu, Jianming

    2013-04-01

    Activation of a host DNA damage response (DDR) is essential for DNA replication of minute virus of canines (MVC), a member of the genus Bocavirus of the Parvoviridae family; however, the mechanism by which DDR contributes to viral DNA replication is unknown. In the current study, we demonstrate that MVC infection triggers the intra-S-phase arrest to slow down host cellular DNA replication and to recruit cellular DNA replication factors for viral DNA replication. The intra-S-phase arrest is regulated by ATM (ataxia telangiectasia-mutated kinase) signaling in a p53-independent manner. Moreover, we demonstrate that SMC1 (structural maintenance of chromosomes 1) is the key regulator of the intra-S-phase arrest induced during infection. Either knockdown of SMC1 or complementation with a dominant negative SMC1 mutant blocks both the intra-S-phase arrest and viral DNA replication. Finally, we show that the intra-S-phase arrest induced during MVC infection was caused neither by damaged host cellular DNA nor by viral proteins but by replicating viral genomes physically associated with the DNA damage sensor, the Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN) complex. In conclusion, the feedback loop between MVC DNA replication and the intra-S-phase arrest is mediated by ATM-SMC1 signaling and plays a critical role in MVC DNA replication. Thus, our findings unravel the mechanism underlying DDR signaling-facilitated MVC DNA replication and demonstrate a novel strategy of DNA virus-host interaction.

  2. SMC1-Mediated Intra-S-Phase Arrest Facilitates Bocavirus DNA Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yong; Deng, Xuefeng; Cheng, Fang; Li, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Activation of a host DNA damage response (DDR) is essential for DNA replication of minute virus of canines (MVC), a member of the genus Bocavirus of the Parvoviridae family; however, the mechanism by which DDR contributes to viral DNA replication is unknown. In the current study, we demonstrate that MVC infection triggers the intra-S-phase arrest to slow down host cellular DNA replication and to recruit cellular DNA replication factors for viral DNA replication. The intra-S-phase arrest is regulated by ATM (ataxia telangiectasia-mutated kinase) signaling in a p53-independent manner. Moreover, we demonstrate that SMC1 (structural maintenance of chromosomes 1) is the key regulator of the intra-S-phase arrest induced during infection. Either knockdown of SMC1 or complementation with a dominant negative SMC1 mutant blocks both the intra-S-phase arrest and viral DNA replication. Finally, we show that the intra-S-phase arrest induced during MVC infection was caused neither by damaged host cellular DNA nor by viral proteins but by replicating viral genomes physically associated with the DNA damage sensor, the Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN) complex. In conclusion, the feedback loop between MVC DNA replication and the intra-S-phase arrest is mediated by ATM-SMC1 signaling and plays a critical role in MVC DNA replication. Thus, our findings unravel the mechanism underlying DDR signaling-facilitated MVC DNA replication and demonstrate a novel strategy of DNA virus-host interaction. PMID:23365434

  3. [Viral superantigens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Us, Dürdal

    2016-07-01

    , expression of endogenous SAgs leads to thymic deletion of responding T cells (bearing Vβ6-9+ TCR) due to self-tolerance induction during the fetal life, and protects the host against future exogenous MMTV infections. The SAg of rabies virus is the N protein found in nucleocapsid structure and stimulates Vβ8+TCR-bearing T cells. The SAg-induced polyclonal activation of T cells leads to turn-off the specific immune response, to enhance the immunopathogenesis and facilitates viral transmission from the initial site of infection (the muscle tissue) to the nerve endings. In case of EBV-associated SAg that activates Vβ13+TCR-bearing T cells, it was detected that the SAg activity was not encoded by EBV itself, but instead was due to the transactivation of HERV-K18 by EBV latent membrane proteins, whose env gene encodes the SAg (Sutkowski, et al. 2001). It has been denoted that EBV-induced SAg expression plays a role in the long-term persistence and latency of virus in memory B cells, in the development of autoimmune diseases and in the oncogenesis mechanisms. The proteins which are identified as SAgs of HIV are Nef and gp120. It is believed that, the massive activation of CD4+ T cells (selectively with Vβ-12+, Vβ-5.3+ and Vβ-18+ TCRs) in early stages of infection and clonal deletion, anergy and apoptosis of bystander T cells in the late stages may be due to SAg property of Nef protein, as well as the other mechanisms. However there are some studies indicating that Nef does not act as a SAg (Lapatschek, et al. 2001). HIV gp120 glycoprotein is a B-cell SAg that binds to VH3-expressing B cell receptors and causes polyclonal B cell activation. In addition, binding of gp120 to IgE on the surface of basophiles and mast cells causes activation of those cells, secretion of high level proinflammatory mediators leading to allergic reactions and tissue damage. In a recent study, the depletion (anergy or deletion) of T cell populations bearing Vβ12+, Vβ13+ and Vβ17+ TCR have been

  4. DNA Damage Reduces the Quality, but Not the Quantity of Human Papillomavirus 16 E1 and E2 DNA Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly L. Bristol

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomaviruses (HPVs are causative agents in almost all cervical carcinomas. HPVs are also causative agents in head and neck cancer, the cases of which are increasing rapidly. Viral replication activates the DNA damage response (DDR pathway; associated proteins are recruited to replication foci, and this pathway may serve to allow for viral genome amplification. Likewise, HPV genome double-strand breaks (DSBs could be produced during replication and could lead to linearization and viral integration. Many studies have shown that viral integration into the host genome results in unregulated expression of the viral oncogenes, E6 and E7, promoting HPV-induced carcinogenesis. Previously, we have demonstrated that DNA-damaging agents, such as etoposide, or knocking down viral replication partner proteins, such as topoisomerase II β binding protein I (TopBP1, does not reduce the level of DNA replication. Here, we investigated whether these treatments alter the quality of DNA replication by HPV16 E1 and E2. We confirm that knockdown of TopBP1 or treatment with etoposide does not reduce total levels of E1/E2-mediated DNA replication; however, the quality of replication is significantly reduced. The results demonstrate that E1 and E2 continue to replicate under genomically-stressed conditions and that this replication is mutagenic. This mutagenesis would promote the formation of substrates for integration of the viral genome into that of the host, a hallmark of cervical cancer.

  5. DNA Damage Reduces the Quality, but Not the Quantity of Human Papillomavirus 16 E1 and E2 DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristol, Molly L; Wang, Xu; Smith, Nathan W; Son, Minkyeong P; Evans, Michael R; Morgan, Iain M

    2016-06-22

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are causative agents in almost all cervical carcinomas. HPVs are also causative agents in head and neck cancer, the cases of which are increasing rapidly. Viral replication activates the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway; associated proteins are recruited to replication foci, and this pathway may serve to allow for viral genome amplification. Likewise, HPV genome double-strand breaks (DSBs) could be produced during replication and could lead to linearization and viral integration. Many studies have shown that viral integration into the host genome results in unregulated expression of the viral oncogenes, E6 and E7, promoting HPV-induced carcinogenesis. Previously, we have demonstrated that DNA-damaging agents, such as etoposide, or knocking down viral replication partner proteins, such as topoisomerase II β binding protein I (TopBP1), does not reduce the level of DNA replication. Here, we investigated whether these treatments alter the quality of DNA replication by HPV16 E1 and E2. We confirm that knockdown of TopBP1 or treatment with etoposide does not reduce total levels of E1/E2-mediated DNA replication; however, the quality of replication is significantly reduced. The results demonstrate that E1 and E2 continue to replicate under genomically-stressed conditions and that this replication is mutagenic. This mutagenesis would promote the formation of substrates for integration of the viral genome into that of the host, a hallmark of cervical cancer.

  6. (Mechanisms of inhibition of viral replication in plants)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    Progress is described concerning genetic mapping CMV movement genes for CMV coat protein in squash and ToMV gene in tomato. These gene products appear to be involved in resistance to squash and tomato mosaic viruses respectively.

  7. [Mechanisms of inhibition of viral replication in plants]. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    Progress is described concerning genetic mapping CMV movement genes for CMV coat protein in squash and ToMV gene in tomato. These gene products appear to be involved in resistance to squash and tomato mosaic viruses respectively.

  8. Mutagenesis in ORF AV2 affects viral replication in Mungbean ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2Plant Molecular Biology Group, International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology,. New Delhi 110 067, India. 3Advanced Centre for Plant Virology, Division of Plant Pathology, ... range, insect vector and genome organization. The genus. Begomovirus comprises whitefly-transmitted geminiviruses that infect ...

  9. Molecular imaging of oncolytic viral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Haddad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses have made their mark on the cancer world as a potential therapeutic option, with the possible advantages of reduced side effects and strengthened treatment efficacy due to higher tumor selectivity. Results have been so promising, that oncolytic viral treatments have now been approved for clinical trials in several countries. However, clinical studies may benefit from the ability to noninvasively and serially identify sites of viral targeting via molecular imaging in order to provide safety, efficacy, and toxicity information. Furthermore, molecular imaging of oncolytic viral therapy may provide a more sensitive and specific diagnostic technique to detect tumor origin and, more importantly, presence of metastases. Several strategies have been investigated for molecular imaging of viral replication broadly categorized into optical and deep tissue imaging, utilizing several reporter genes encoding for fluorescence proteins, conditional enzymes, and membrane protein and transporters. Various imaging methods facilitate molecular imaging, including computer tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, single photon emission CT, gamma-scintigraphy, and photoacoustic imaging. In addition, several molecular probes are used for medical imaging, which act as targeting moieties or signaling agents. This review will explore the preclinical and clinical use of in vivo molecular imaging of replication-competent oncolytic viral therapy.

  10. Viral Skin Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdass, Priya; Mullick, Sahil; Farber, Harold F

    2015-12-01

    In the vast world of skin diseases, viral skin disorders account for a significant percentage. Most viral skin diseases present with an exanthem (skin rash) and, oftentimes, an accompanying enanthem (lesions involving the mucosal membrane). In this article, the various viral skin diseases are explored, including viral childhood exanthems (measles, rubella, erythema infectiosum, and roseola), herpes viruses (herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus, viral zoonotic infections [orf, monkeypox, ebola, smallpox]), and several other viral skin diseases, such as human papilloma virus, hand, foot, and mouth disease, molluscum contagiosum, and Gianotti-Crosti syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification of the determinants of efficient Pestivirus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risager, Peter Christian

    the viral proteins. The replication process in single-stranded RNA viruses of positive polarity requires a particular enzyme, an RNA dependent RNA polymerase, that has no direct counterpart elsewhere in nature. The variable nature of rapidly evolving viral genomes, pose a constant challenge to the host...... virus replication determinants, including a thorough presentation of the viral proteins, and the involvement of these in the infection progress. Part 3, "The manuscripts", includes the papers published and submitted on this work. These describe the outcome of experiments performed during the three years....... Manuscript I is a coauthored paper that describes a summary of the work I have been doing in my thesis dealing with the application of the Red/ET mediated homologous recombination method to modify viral cDNA. For proof of this method, CSFV/BDV chimeric clones were produced and characterized (Submitted paper...

  12. Maintenance of T1 response as induced during PEG-IFNalpha plus ribavirin therapy controls viral replication in genotype-1 patients with chronic hepatitis C La respuesta inmune T1 inducida durante el tratamiento con PEG-IFNα mαs ribavirina controla la replicaciσn viral en pacientes con hepatitis crónica C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Trapero

    2005-07-01

    (1-1,2 g/día durante 48 semanas. Los 28 pacientes (edad media 45 ± 8 años finalizaron el tratamiento y seguimiento: 12 (43% presentaron respuesta viral sostenida (RVS, 13 recidivaron (47% y sólo 3 fueron no respondedores (10%. Se estudiaron 16 controles sanos (edad media de 39 ± 17 años. Se analizó mediante citometría de flujo la producción intracitoplásmica de IL-4, IFNγ y TNFα por los linfocitos T CD8+ en reposo y tras ser estimulados con un ιster de forbol. Anαlisis estadístico: t de Student, test de χ² y ANOVA; se agrupan los pacientes recidivantes y no respondedores para obtener mayor potencia estadística. Resultados: no se encontraron diferencias significativas entre los niveles de citocinas de controles sanos y pacientes con HCC. Al tercer mes de tratamiento, los niveles de IL-4 inducidos tendían a ser menores en los pacientes que obtuvieron una RVS que en el resto de pacientes (0,97 vs. 2,58; p = 0,1; tampoco se encontró significación estadística en relación a los niveles de IIFNγ y de TTNFα. Al final del tratamiento, la producciσn de IIFNγ estimulado fue significativamente mayor en los pacientes que obtuvieron una RVS (20 vs. 8; p < 0,05. Por el contrario, la producción de IL-4 fue mayor en los pacientes no respondedores, aunque estos datos no alcanzaron significación estadística (p < 0,1. No se encontraron diferencias en relación con los niveles de TTNFα (14 vs. 7; p < 0,2. Conclusiones: el mantenimiento de la respuesta inmune tipo T1 durante el tratamiento combinado, medida en función de la síntesis de IIFNγ por los linfocitos T CD8, se asocia con RVS y sugiere el control de la replicaciσn y el aclaramiento posterior de los pacientes infectados con el genotipo 1 del VHC.

  13. The evolution of replicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szathmáry, E

    2000-01-01

    Replicators of interest in chemistry, biology and culture are briefly surveyed from a conceptual point of view. Systems with limited heredity have only a limited evolutionary potential because the number of available types is too low. Chemical cycles, such as the formose reaction, are holistic replicators since replication is not based on the successive addition of modules. Replicator networks consisting of catalytic molecules (such as reflexively autocatalytic sets of proteins, or reproducing lipid vesicles) are hypothetical ensemble replicators, and their functioning rests on attractors of their dynamics. Ensemble replicators suffer from the paradox of specificity: while their abstract feasibility seems to require a high number of molecular types, the harmful effect of side reactions calls for a small system size. No satisfactory solution to this problem is known. Phenotypic replicators do not pass on their genotypes, only some aspects of the phenotype are transmitted. Phenotypic replicators with limited heredity include genetic membranes, prions and simple memetic systems. Memes in human culture are unlimited hereditary, phenotypic replicators, based on language. The typical path of evolution goes from limited to unlimited heredity, and from attractor-based to modular (digital) replicators. PMID:11127914

  14. Lactoferrin for prevention of common viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Hiroyuki; Oda, Hirotsugu; Yamauchi, Koji; Abe, Fumiaki

    2014-11-01

    Although lactoferrin has many biological functions, the host-protective effects against pathogenic microorganisms including bacteria, fungi, and viruses are regarded as one of the most important. Here, we review research on the protective role of lactoferrin administration against common viral infections. Many studies have shown the in vitro antiviral activity of lactoferrin against viral pathogens that cause common infections such as the common cold, influenza, gastroenteritis, summer cold, and herpes, where lactoferrin inhibits mainly viral attachment to the target cells. Recently, studies indicating the in vivo protective effects of lactoferrin by oral administration against common viral infections have been increasing. For instance, norovirus is an extremely important emerging human pathogen that causes a majority of gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide that may be a target candidate for lactoferrin. Lactoferrin consumption reduced the incidence of noroviral gastroenteritis in children and a similar effect was observed in a wide range of ages in a preliminary survey. A recent in vitro study reported that lactoferrin inhibits both cellular attachment of the murine norovirus, a virus closely-related to the human norovirus, and viral replication in the cells by inducing antiviral cytokines interferon (IFN)-α/β. Lactoferrin administration also enhances NK cell activity and Th1 cytokine responses, which lead to protection against viral infections. In conclusion, lactoferrin consumption may protect the host from viral infections through inhibiting the attachment of a virus to the cells, replication of the virus in the cells, and enhancement of systemic immune functions. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Viral and Cellular Genomes Activate Distinct DNA Damage Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Govind A.; O’Shea, Clodagh C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary In response to cellular genome breaks, MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 (MRN) activates a global ATM DNA damage response (DDR) that prevents cellular replication. Here we show that MRN-ATM also has critical functions in defending the cell against DNA viruses. We reveal temporally distinct responses to adenovirus genomes: a critical MRN-ATM DDR that must be inactivated by E1B-55K/E4-ORF3 viral oncoproteins and a global MRN independent ATM DDR to viral nuclear domains that does not impact viral replication. We show that MRN binds to adenovirus genomes and activates a localized ATM response that specifically prevents viral DNA replication. In contrast to chromosomal breaks, ATM activation is not amplified by H2AX across megabases of chromatin to induce global signaling and replicative arrest. Thus, γH2AX foci discriminate ‘self’ and ‘non-self’ genomes and determine if a localized anti-viral or global ATM response is appropriate. This provides an elegant mechanism to neutralize viral genomes without jeopardizing cellular viability. PMID:26317467

  16. Host cell restriction factors that limit transcription and replication of human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Samuel S; Stepp, Wesley H; Stamos, James D; McBride, Alison A

    2017-03-02

    The life cycle of human papillomaviruses (HPV) is tightly regulated by the differentiation state of mucosal and cutaneous keratinocytes. To counteract viral infection, constitutively expressed cellular factors, which are defined herein as restriction factors, directly mitigate viral gene expression and replication. In turn, some HPV gene products target these restriction factors and abrogate their anti-viral effects to establish efficient gene expression and replication programs. Ironically, in certain circumstances, this delicate counterbalance between viral gene products and restriction factors facilitates persistent infection by HPVs. This review serves to recapitulate the current knowledge of nuclear restriction factors that directly affect the HPV infectious cycle. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Viral lysis of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lønborg, C.; Middelboe, M.; Brussaard, C.P.D.

    2013-01-01

    The viral mediated transformation of phytoplankton organic carbon to dissolved forms (“viral shunt”) has been suggested as a major source of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in marine systems. Despite the potential implications of viral activity on the global carbon fluxes, studies investigating

  18. Essential role of Rta in lytic DNA replication of Epstein-Barr virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Guindy, Ayman; Ghiassi-Nejad, Maryam; Golden, Sean; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Miller, George

    2013-01-01

    Two transcription factors, ZEBRA and Rta, switch Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) from the latent to the lytic state. While ZEBRA also plays an obligatory role as an activator of replication, it is not known whether Rta is directly required for replication. Rta is dispensable for amplification of an oriLyt-containing plasmid in a transient-replication assay. Here, we assessed the requirement for Rta in activation of viral DNA synthesis from the endogenous viral genome, a function that has not been established. Initially, we searched for a ZEBRA mutant that supports viral replication but not transcription. We found that Z(S186A), a mutant of ZEBRA unable to activate transcription of Rta or viral genes encoding replication proteins, is competent to bind to oriLyt and to function as an origin recognition protein. Ectopic expression of the six components of the EBV lytic replication machinery failed to rescue replication by Z(S186A). However, addition of Rta to Z(S186A) and the mixture of replication factors activated viral replication and late gene expression. Deletion mutagenesis of Rta indicated that the C-terminal 10 amino acids (aa) were essential for the function of Rta in replication. In vivo DNA binding studies revealed that Rta interacted with the enhancer region of oriLyt. In addition, expression of Rta and Z(S186A) together, but not individually, activated synthesis of the BHLF1 transcript, a lytic transcript required for the process of viral DNA replication. Our findings demonstrate that Rta plays an indispensable role in the process of lytic DNA replication.

  19. Filovirus replication and transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Mühlberger, Elke

    2007-01-01

    The highly pathogenic filoviruses, Marburg and Ebola virus, belong to the nonsegmented negative-sense RNA viruses of the order Mononegavirales. The mode of replication and transcription is similar for these viruses. On one hand, the negative-sense RNA genome serves as a template for replication, to generate progeny genomes, and, on the other hand, for transcription, to produce mRNAs. Despite the similarities in the replication/transcription strategy, filoviruses have evolved structural and fu...

  20. Optical tweezers reveal how proteins alter replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurasiya, Kathy

    acids. We use single molecule DNA stretching to show that the nucleocapsid protein (NC) of the yeast retrotransposon Ty3, which is likely to be an ancestor of HIV NC, has optimal nucleic acid chaperone activity with only a single zinc finger. We also show that the chaperone activity of the ORF1 protein is responsible for successful replication of the mouse LINE-1 retrotransposon. LINE-1 is also 17% of the human genome, where it generates insertion mutations and alters gene expression. Retrotransposons such as LINE-1 and Ty3 are likely to be ancestors of retroviruses such as HIV. Human APOBEC3G (A3G) inhibits HIV-1 replication via cytidine deamination of the viral ssDNA genome, as well as via a distinct deamination-independent mechanism. Efficient deamination requires rapid on-off binding kinetics, but a slow dissociation rate is required for the proposed deaminase-independent mechanism. We resolve this apparent contradiction with a new quantitative single molecule method, which shows that A3G initially binds ssDNA with fast on-off rates and subsequently converts to a slow binding mode. This suggests that oligomerization transforms A3G from a fast enzyme to a slow binding protein, which is the biophysical mechanism that allows A3G to inhibit HIV replication. A complete understanding of the mechanism of A3G-mediated antiviral activity is required to design drugs that disrupt the viral response to A3G, enhance A3G packaging inside the viral core, and other potential strategies for long-term treatment of HIV infection. We use single molecule biophysics to explore the function of proteins involved in bacterial DNA replication, endogenous retrotransposition of retroelements in eukaryotic hosts such yeast and mice, and HIV replication in human cells. Our quantitative results provide insight into protein function in a range of complex biological systems and have wide-ranging implications for human health.

  1. Methamphetamine reduces human influenza A virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Hsiang Chen

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (meth is a highly addictive psychostimulant that is among the most widely abused illicit drugs, with an estimated over 35 million users in the world. Several lines of evidence suggest that chronic meth abuse is a major factor for increased risk of infections with human immunodeficiency virus and possibly other pathogens, due to its immunosuppressive property. Influenza A virus infections frequently cause epidemics and pandemics of respiratory diseases among human populations. However, little is known about whether meth has the ability to enhance influenza A virus replication, thus increasing severity of influenza illness in meth abusers. Herein, we investigated the effects of meth on influenza A virus replication in human lung epithelial A549 cells. The cells were exposed to meth and infected with human influenza A/WSN/33 (H1N1 virus. The viral progenies were titrated by plaque assays, and the expression of viral proteins and cellular proteins involved in interferon responses was examined by Western blotting and immunofluorescence staining. We report the first evidence that meth significantly reduces, rather than increases, virus propagation and the susceptibility to influenza infection in the human lung epithelial cell line, consistent with a decrease in viral protein synthesis. These effects were apparently not caused by meth's effects on enhancing virus-induced interferon responses in the host cells, reducing viral biological activities, or reducing cell viability. Our results suggest that meth might not be a great risk factor for influenza A virus infection among meth abusers. Although the underlying mechanism responsible for the action of meth on attenuating virus replication requires further investigation, these findings prompt the study to examine whether other structurally similar compounds could be used as anti-influenza agents.

  2. Sp100 colocalizes with HPV replication foci and restricts the productive stage of the infectious cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley H Stepp

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We have shown previously that Sp100 (a component of the ND10 nuclear body represses transcription, replication and establishment of incoming human papillomavirus (HPV DNA in the early stages of infection. In this follow up study, we show that Sp100 does not substantially regulate viral infection in the maintenance phase, however at late stages of infection Sp100 interacts with amplifying viral genomes to repress viral processes. We find that Sp100 localizes to HPV16 replication foci generated in primary keratinocytes, to HPV31 replication foci that form in differentiated cells, and to HPV16 replication foci in CIN 1 cervical biopsies. To analyze this further, Sp100 was down regulated by siRNA treatment of differentiating HPV31 containing cells and levels of viral transcription and replication were assessed. This revealed that Sp100 represses viral transcription and replication in differentiated cells. Analysis of Sp100 binding to viral chromatin showed that Sp100 bound across the viral genome, and that binding increased at late stages of infection. Therefore, Sp100 represses the HPV life cycle at both early and late stages of infection.

  3. Effects of cannabinoids and their receptors on viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahamtan, Alireza; Tavakoli-Yaraki, Masoumeh; Rygiel, Tomasz P; Mokhtari-Azad, Talat; Salimi, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Cannabinoids, the active ingredient in marijuana, and their derivatives have received remarkable attention in the last two decades because they can affect tumor growth and metastasis. There is a large body of evidence from in vivo and in vitro models showing that cannabinoids and their receptors influence the immune system, viral pathogenesis, and viral replication. The present study reviews current insights into the role of cannabinoids and their receptors on viral infections. The results reported here indicate that cannabinoids and their receptors have different sequels for viral infection. Although activation or inhibition of cannabinoid receptors in the majority of viral infections are proper targets for development of safe and effective treatments, caution is required before using pharmaceutical cannabinoids as a treatment agent for patients with viral infections. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Oxygen tension level and human viral infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morinet, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.morinet@sls.aphp.fr [Centre des Innovations Thérapeutiques en Oncologie et Hématologie (CITOH), CHU Saint-Louis, Paris (France); Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité Paris, Paris (France); Casetti, Luana [Institut Cochin INSERM U1016, Paris (France); François, Jean-Hugues; Capron, Claude [Institut Cochin INSERM U1016, Paris (France); Laboratoire d' Hématologie, Hôpital Ambroise Paré, Boulogne (France); Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin en Yvelynes, Versailles (France); Pillet, Sylvie [Laboratoire de Bactériologie-Virologie-Hygiène, CHU de Saint-Etienne, Saint-Etienne (France); Université de Lyon et Université de Saint-Etienne, Jean Monnet, GIMAP EA3064, F-42023 Saint-Etienne, Lyon (France)

    2013-09-15

    The role of oxygen tension level is a well-known phenomenon that has been studied in oncology and radiotherapy since about 60 years. Oxygen tension may inhibit or stimulate propagation of viruses in vitro as well as in vivo. In turn modulating oxygen metabolism may constitute a novel approach to treat viral infections as an adjuvant therapy. The major transcription factor which regulates oxygen tension level is hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). Down-regulating the expression of HIF-1α is a possible method in the treatment of chronic viral infection such as human immunodeficiency virus infection, chronic hepatitis B and C viral infections and Kaposi sarcoma in addition to classic chemotherapy. The aim of this review is to supply an updating concerning the influence of oxygen tension level in human viral infections and to evoke possible new therapeutic strategies regarding this environmental condition. - Highlights: • Oxygen tension level regulates viral replication in vitro and possibly in vivo. • Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1α) is the principal factor involved in Oxygen tension level. • HIF-1α upregulates gene expression for example of HIV, JC and Kaposi sarcoma viruses. • In addition to classical chemotherapy inhibition of HIF-1α may constitute a new track to treat human viral infections.

  5. Viral Marketing Past Present Future

    OpenAIRE

    Nessipbekova, Zarina

    2010-01-01

    The work studies the viral marketing. These are past viral campaigns, viral campaigns today, and evaluates their actuality. The work tries to predict the development of viral marketing on the basis of the research done by the author.

  6. DNA intercalator stimulates influenza transcription and virus replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poon Leo LM

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Influenza A virus uses its host transcription machinery to facilitate viral RNA synthesis, an event that is associated with cellular RNA polymerase II (RNAPII. In this study, various RNAPII transcription inhibitors were used to investigate the effect of RNAPII phosphorylation status on viral RNA transcription. A low concentration of DNA intercalators, such as actinomycin D (ActD, was found to stimulate viral polymerase activity and virus replication. This effect was not observed in cells treated with RNAPII kinase inhibitors. In addition, the loss of RNAPIIa in infected cells was due to the shift of nonphosphorylated RNAPII (RNAPIIa to hyperphosphorylated RNAPII (RNAPIIo.

  7. Replicating animal mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. McKinney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replication has been experiencing incredible progress in recent years, and yet little is certain about the mechanism(s used by animal cells to replicate this plasmid-like genome. The long-standing strand-displacement model of mammalian mtDNA replication (for which single-stranded DNA intermediates are a hallmark has been intensively challenged by a new set of data, which suggests that replication proceeds via coupled leading-and lagging-strand synthesis (resembling bacterial genome replication and/or via long stretches of RNA intermediates laid on the mtDNA lagging-strand (the so called RITOLS. The set of proteins required for mtDNA replication is small and includes the catalytic and accessory subunits of DNA polymerase y, the mtDNA helicase Twinkle, the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein, and the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (which most likely functions as the mtDNA primase. Mutations in the genes coding for the first three proteins are associated with human diseases and premature aging, justifying the research interest in the genetic, biochemical and structural properties of the mtDNA replication machinery. Here we summarize these properties and discuss the current models of mtDNA replication in animal cells.

  8. Norovirus Polymerase Fidelity Contributes to Viral Transmission In Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arias Esteban, Armando; Thorne, Lucy; Ghurburrun, Elsa

    2016-01-01

    Intrahost genetic diversity and replication error rates are intricately linked to RNA virus pathogenesis, with alterations in viral polymerase fidelity typically leading to attenuation during infections in vivo. We have previously shown that norovirus intrahost genetic diversity also influences...... viral pathogenesis using the murine norovirus model, as increasing viral mutation frequency using a mutagenic nucleoside resulted in clearance of a persistent infection in mice. Given the role of replication fidelity and genetic diversity in pathogenesis, we have now investigated whether polymerase...... fidelity can also impact virus transmission between susceptible hosts. We have identified a high-fidelity norovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase mutant (I391L) which displays delayed replication kinetics in vivo but not in cell culture. The I391L polymerase mutant also exhibited lower transmission rates...

  9. Human papillomaviruses: A window into the mechanism and regulation of eucaryotic cellular DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broker, T R; Chow, L T

    2001-01-01

    Papillomaviruses are ubiquitous pathogens of humans and other vertebrates. Productive infections lead to hyperproliferative lesions in squamous epithelia from diverse anatomic sites, both cutaneous and mucosal. The 7,900 bp double-stranded, circular DNA genome replicates as extrachromosomal plasmids in the nuclei of infected cells. The productive phase of the HPV infection takes place in differentiated, post-mitotic squamous keratinocytes. However, viral DNA replication requires the host cells to supply much of the replication machinery and substrates. Consequently, these viruses usurp the cellular control mechanisms via protein interactions and provide an excellent model system to investigate cellular processes. This paper summarize our investigations and insight into the virus-host interactions observed in productively infected patient lesions, in a model organotypic culture system of primary human keratinocytes transduced with viral genes, and in a cell-free viral DNA replication system with purified viral and host protein.

  10. Inhibition of HIV-1 replication by balsamin, a ribosome inactivating protein of Momordica balsamina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inderdeep Kaur

    Full Text Available Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs are endowed with several medicinal properties, including antiviral activity. We demonstrate here that the recently identified type I RIP from Momordica balsamina also possesses antiviral activity, as determined by viral growth curve assays and single-round infection experiments. Importantly, this activity is at play even as doses where the RIP has no cytotoxic effect. In addition, balsamin inhibits HIV-1 replication not only in T cell lines but also in human primary CD4(+ T cells. This antiviral compound exerts its activity at a viral replicative step occurring later than reverse-transcription, most likely on viral protein translation, prior to viral budding and release. Finally, we demonstrate that balsamin antiviral activity is broad since it also impedes influenza virus replication. Altogether our results demonstrate that type I RIP can exert a potent anti-HIV-1 activity which paves the way for new therapeutic avenues for the treatment of viral infections.

  11. RNA N6-adenosine methylation (m6A) steers epitranscriptomic control of herpesvirus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fengchun

    2017-01-01

    Latency is a hallmark of all herpesviruses, during which the viral genomes are silenced through DNA methylation and suppressive histone modifications. When latent herpesviruses reactivate to undergo productive lytic replication, the suppressive epigenetic marks are replaced with active ones to allow for transcription of viral genes. Interestingly, by using Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) as a model, we recently demonstrated that the newly transcribed viral RNAs are also subjected to post-transcriptional N6-adenosine methylation (m6A). Blockade of this post-transcriptional event abolishes viral protein expression and halts virion production. We found that m6A modification controls RNA splicing, stability, and protein translation to regulate viral lytic gene expression and replication. Thus, our finding for the first time reveals a critical role of this epitranscriptomic mechanism in the control of herpesviral replication, which shall shed lights on development of novel strategies for the control of herpesviral infection.

  12. An Adenovirus DNA Replication Factor, but Not Incoming Genome Complexes, Targets PML Nuclear Bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Tetsuro; Nagata, Kyosuke; Wodrich, Harald

    2015-11-25

    Promyelocytic leukemia protein nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) are subnuclear domains implicated in cellular antiviral responses. Despite the antiviral activity, several nuclear replicating DNA viruses use the domains as deposition sites for the incoming viral genomes and/or as sites for viral DNA replication, suggesting that PML-NBs are functionally relevant during early viral infection to establish productive replication. Although PML-NBs and their components have also been implicated in the adenoviral life cycle, it remains unclear whether incoming adenoviral genome complexes target PML-NBs. Here we show using immunofluorescence and live-cell imaging analyses that incoming adenovirus genome complexes neither localize at nor recruit components of PML-NBs during early phases of infection. We further show that the viral DNA binding protein (DBP), an early expressed viral gene and essential DNA replication factor, independently targets PML-NBs. We show that DBP oligomerization is required to selectively recruit the PML-NB components Sp100 and USP7. Depletion experiments suggest that the absence of one PML-NB component might not affect the recruitment of other components toward DBP oligomers. Thus, our findings suggest a model in which an adenoviral DNA replication factor, but not incoming viral genome complexes, targets and modulates PML-NBs to support a conducive state for viral DNA replication and argue against a generalized concept that PML-NBs target incoming viral genomes. The immediate fate upon nuclear delivery of genomes of incoming DNA viruses is largely unclear. Early reports suggested that incoming genomes of herpesviruses are targeted and repressed by PML-NBs immediately upon nuclear import. Genome localization and/or viral DNA replication has also been observed at PML-NBs for other DNA viruses. Thus, it was suggested that PML-NBs may immediately sense and target nuclear viral genomes and hence serve as sites for deposition of incoming viral genomes and

  13. Virion-Independent Transfer of Replication-Competent Hepatitis C Virus RNA between Permissive Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Longatti, Andrea; Boyd, Bryan; Chisari, Francis V.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we show that replication-competent subgenomic hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA can be transferred to permissive Huh7 cells, leading to the establishment of viral RNA replication. Further, we show that these events are mediated by exosomes rather than infectious virus particles. If similar events occur in vivo, this could represent a novel, albeit inefficient, mechanism of viral spread and immune escape.

  14. Virion-independent transfer of replication-competent hepatitis C virus RNA between permissive cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longatti, Andrea; Boyd, Bryan; Chisari, Francis V

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we show that replication-competent subgenomic hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA can be transferred to permissive Huh7 cells, leading to the establishment of viral RNA replication. Further, we show that these events are mediated by exosomes rather than infectious virus particles. If similar events occur in vivo, this could represent a novel, albeit inefficient, mechanism of viral spread and immune escape. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Viral Entry into Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Orsogna, Maria R.

    2010-09-01

    Successful viral infection of a healthy cell requires complex host-pathogen interactions. In this talk we focus on the dynamics specific to the HIV virus entering a eucaryotic cell. We model viral entry as a stochastic engagement of receptors and coreceptors on the cell surface. We also consider the transport of virus material to the cell nucleus by coupling microtubular motion to the concurrent biochemical transformations that render the viral material competent for nuclear entry. We discuss both mathematical and biological consequences of our model, such as the formulation of an effective integrodifferential boundary condition embodying a memory kernel and optimal timing in maximizing viral probabilities.

  16. Human Papillomavirus E2 Protein: Linking Replication, Transcription, and RNA Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Sheila V

    2016-10-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) life cycle is tightly linked to differentiation of the infected epithelium. This means that viral proteins must exert control over epithelial gene expression in order to optimize viral production. The HPV E2 protein controls replication, transcription, and viral genome partitioning during the viral infectious life cycle. It consists of a nucleic acid-binding domain and a protein-protein interaction domain separated by a flexible serine and arginine-rich hinge region. Over the last few years, mounting evidence has uncovered an important new role for E2 in viral and cellular RNA processing. This Gem discusses the role of E2 in controlling the epithelial cellular environment and how E2 might act to coordinate late events in the viral replication cycle. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. [Mechanisms for inhibition of retrovirus replication by APOBEC3 family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwatani, Yasumasa

    2011-06-01

    Human cells developed the defense systems against retrovirus infections during the evolutions. These systems include retroviral restrictions by DNA cytidine deaminases of APOBEC3 family (A, B, C, DE, F, G, and H), which are potent factors to block the viral replication by blocking reverse transcription and/or integration and by hypermutating viral cDNA. In case of HIV-1, the viral protein, Vif abrogates the APOBEC3F/G function through specific machinery of ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Without Vif, APOBEC3F/G are incorporated into virus particles and block reverse transcription and/or integration in a newly infected cell. Recent advances in our understanding about biochemical and structure-biological characteristics of the enzymes provide new insights to reveal more detailed molecular mechanisms for anti-retroviral activity by APOBEC3 family. Here I briefly review how APOBEC3 proteins block retrovirus replications, focusing on APOBEC3G.

  18. Eukaryotic DNA Replication Fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgers, Peter M J; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2017-06-20

    This review focuses on the biogenesis and composition of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork, with an emphasis on the enzymes that synthesize DNA and repair discontinuities on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Physical and genetic methodologies aimed at understanding these processes are discussed. The preponderance of evidence supports a model in which DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) carries out the bulk of leading strand DNA synthesis at an undisturbed replication fork. DNA polymerases α and δ carry out the initiation of Okazaki fragment synthesis and its elongation and maturation, respectively. This review also discusses alternative proposals, including cellular processes during which alternative forks may be utilized, and new biochemical studies with purified proteins that are aimed at reconstituting leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis separately and as an integrated replication fork.

  19. Modeling DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Recommends the use of a model of DNA made out of Velcro to help students visualize the steps of DNA replication. Includes a materials list, construction directions, and details of the demonstration using the model parts. (DDR)

  20. Electron microscopic analysis of rotavirus assembly-replication intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudreaux, Crystal E.; Kelly, Deborah F. [Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine and Research Institute, Roanoke, VA (United States); McDonald, Sarah M., E-mail: mcdonaldsa@vtc.vt.edu [Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine and Research Institute, Roanoke, VA (United States); Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia—Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Rotaviruses (RVs) replicate their segmented, double-stranded RNA genomes in tandem with early virion assembly. In this study, we sought to gain insight into the ultrastructure of RV assembly-replication intermediates (RIs) using transmission electron microscopy (EM). Specifically, we examined a replicase-competent, subcellular fraction that contains all known RV RIs. Three never-before-seen complexes were visualized in this fraction. Using in vitro reconstitution, we showed that ~15-nm doughnut-shaped proteins in strings were nonstructural protein 2 (NSP2) bound to viral RNA transcripts. Moreover, using immunoaffinity-capture EM, we revealed that ~20-nm pebble-shaped complexes contain the viral RNA polymerase (VP1) and RNA capping enzyme (VP3). Finally, using a gel purification method, we demonstrated that ~30–70-nm electron-dense, particle-shaped complexes represent replicase-competent core RIs, containing VP1, VP3, and NSP2 as well as capsid proteins VP2 and VP6. The results of this study raise new questions about the interactions among viral proteins and RNA during the concerted assembly–replicase process. - Highlights: • Rotaviruses replicate their genomes in tandem with early virion assembly. • Little is known about rotavirus assembly-replication intermediates. • Assembly-replication intermediates were imaged using electron microscopy.

  1. Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides an overview of EPA's homeland security roles and responsibilities, and links to specific homeland security issues: water security, research, emergency response, recovery, and waste management.

  2. The IFITMs Inhibit Zika Virus Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Savidis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus has emerged as a severe health threat with a rapidly expanding range. The IFITM family of restriction factors inhibits the replication of a broad range of viruses, including the closely related flaviruses West Nile virus and dengue virus. Here, we show that IFITM1 and IFITM3 inhibit Zika virus infection early in the viral life cycle. Moreover, IFITM3 can prevent Zika-virus-induced cell death. These results suggest that strategies to boost the actions and/or levels of the IFITMs might be useful for inhibiting a broad range of emerging viruses.

  3. The Barley stripe mosaic virus γb protein promotes chloroplast-targeted replication by enhancing unwinding of RNA duplexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available RNA viruses encode various RNA binding proteins that function in many steps of viral infection cycles. These proteins function as RNA helicases, methyltransferases, RNA-dependent RNA polymerases, RNA silencing suppressors, RNA chaperones, movement proteins, and so on. Although many of the proteins bind the viral RNA genome during different stages of infection, our knowledge about the coordination of their functions is limited. In this study, we describe a novel role for the Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV γb as an enhancer of αa RNA helicase activity, and we show that the γb protein is recruited by the αa viral replication protein to chloroplast membrane sites of BSMV replication. Mutagenesis or deletion of γb from BSMV resulted in reduced positive strand (+ RNAα accumulation, but γb mutations abolishing viral suppressor of RNA silencing (VSR activity did not completely eliminate genomic RNA replication. In addition, cis- or trans-expression of the Tomato bushy stunt virus p19 VSR protein failed to complement the γb replication functions, indicating that the direct involvement of γb in BSMV RNA replication is independent of VSR functions. These data support a model whereby two BSMV-encoded RNA-binding proteins act coordinately to regulate viral genome replication and provide new insights into strategies whereby double-stranded viral RNA unwinding is regulated, as well as formation of viral replication complexes.

  4. Gravimetric Viral Diagnostics: : QCM Based Biosensors for Early Detection of Viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Afzal, Adeel; Mujahid, Adnan; Schirhagl, Romana; Bajwa, Sadia Z.; Latif, Usman; Feroz, Saima

    2017-01-01

    Viruses are pathogenic microorganisms that can inhabit and replicate in human bodies causing a number of widespread infectious diseases such as influenza, gastroenteritis, hepatitis, meningitis, pneumonia, acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) etc. A majority of these viral diseases are

  5. Rapid transient production in plants by replicating and non-replicating vectors yields high quality functional anti-HIV antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainsbury, Frank; Sack, Markus; Stadlmann, Johannes; Quendler, Heribert; Fischer, Rainer; Lomonossoff, George P

    2010-11-12

    The capacity of plants and plant cells to produce large amounts of recombinant protein has been well established. Due to advantages in terms of speed and yield, attention has recently turned towards the use of transient expression systems, including viral vectors, to produce proteins of pharmaceutical interest in plants. However, the effects of such high level expression from viral vectors and concomitant effects on host cells may affect the quality of the recombinant product. To assess the quality of antibodies transiently expressed to high levels in plants, we have expressed and characterised the human anti-HIV monoclonal antibody, 2G12, using both replicating and non-replicating systems based on deleted versions of Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) RNA-2. The highest yield (approximately 100 mg/kg wet weight leaf tissue) of affinity purified 2G12 was obtained when the non-replicating CPMV-HT system was used and the antibody was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Glycan analysis by mass-spectrometry showed that the glycosylation pattern was determined exclusively by whether the antibody was retained in the ER and did not depend on whether a replicating or non-replicating system was used. Characterisation of the binding and neutralisation properties of all the purified 2G12 variants from plants showed that these were generally similar to those of the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell-produced 2G12. Overall, the results demonstrate that replicating and non-replicating CPMV-based vectors are able to direct the production of a recombinant IgG similar in activity to the CHO-produced control. Thus, a complex recombinant protein was produced with no apparent effect on its biochemical properties using either high-level expression or viral replication. The speed with which a recombinant pharmaceutical with excellent biochemical characteristics can be produced transiently in plants makes CPMV-based expression vectors an attractive option for biopharmaceutical development

  6. Rapid transient production in plants by replicating and non-replicating vectors yields high quality functional anti-HIV antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Sainsbury

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of plants and plant cells to produce large amounts of recombinant protein has been well established. Due to advantages in terms of speed and yield, attention has recently turned towards the use of transient expression systems, including viral vectors, to produce proteins of pharmaceutical interest in plants. However, the effects of such high level expression from viral vectors and concomitant effects on host cells may affect the quality of the recombinant product.To assess the quality of antibodies transiently expressed to high levels in plants, we have expressed and characterised the human anti-HIV monoclonal antibody, 2G12, using both replicating and non-replicating systems based on deleted versions of Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV RNA-2. The highest yield (approximately 100 mg/kg wet weight leaf tissue of affinity purified 2G12 was obtained when the non-replicating CPMV-HT system was used and the antibody was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Glycan analysis by mass-spectrometry showed that the glycosylation pattern was determined exclusively by whether the antibody was retained in the ER and did not depend on whether a replicating or non-replicating system was used. Characterisation of the binding and neutralisation properties of all the purified 2G12 variants from plants showed that these were generally similar to those of the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cell-produced 2G12.Overall, the results demonstrate that replicating and non-replicating CPMV-based vectors are able to direct the production of a recombinant IgG similar in activity to the CHO-produced control. Thus, a complex recombinant protein was produced with no apparent effect on its biochemical properties using either high-level expression or viral replication. The speed with which a recombinant pharmaceutical with excellent biochemical characteristics can be produced transiently in plants makes CPMV-based expression vectors an attractive option for

  7. Viral Haemorrhagic Septicaemia Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Skall, Helle Frank

    2013-01-01

    This chapter covers the genetics (genotypes and serotypes), clinical signs, host species, transmission, prevalence, diagnosis, control and prevention of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus.......This chapter covers the genetics (genotypes and serotypes), clinical signs, host species, transmission, prevalence, diagnosis, control and prevention of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus....

  8. Live Cell Imaging Reveals the Relocation of dsRNA Binding Proteins Upon Viral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Deborah A; Roovers, Elke F; Gouil, Quentin; da Fonseca, Guilherme C; Reis, Rodrigo S; Jackson, Craig; Overall, Robyn L; Fusaro, Adriana F; Waterhouse, Peter M

    2017-06-01

    Viral infection triggers a range of plant responses such as the activation of the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. The double-stranded RNA binding (DRB) proteins DRB3 and DRB4 are part of this pathway and aid in defending against DNA and RNA viruses, respectively. Using live cell imaging, we show that DRB2, DRB3, and DRB5 relocate from their uniform cytoplasmic distribution to concentrated accumulation in nascent viral replication complexes (VRC) that develop following cell invasion by viral RNA. Inactivation of the DRB3 gene in Arabidopsis by T-DNA insertion rendered these plants less able to repress RNA viral replication. We propose a model for the early stages of virus defense in which DRB2, DRB3, and DRB5 are invasion sensors that relocate to nascent VRC, where they bind to viral RNA and inhibit virus replication.

  9. Discovering hidden viral piracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eddo; Kliger, Yossef

    2005-12-01

    Viruses and developers of anti-inflammatory therapies share a common interest in proteins that manipulate the immune response. Large double-stranded DNA viruses acquire host proteins to evade host defense mechanisms. Hence, viral pirated proteins may have a therapeutic potential. Although dozens of viral piracy events have already been identified, we hypothesized that sequence divergence impedes the discovery of many others. We developed a method to assess the number of viral/human homologs and discovered that at least 917 highly diverged homologs are hidden in low-similarity alignment hits that are usually ignored. However, these low-similarity homologs are masked by many false alignment hits. We therefore applied a filtering method to increase the proportion of viral/human homologous proteins. The homologous proteins we found may facilitate functional annotation of viral and human proteins. Furthermore, some of these proteins play a key role in immune modulation and are therefore therapeutic protein candidates.

  10. Replication and Inhibitors of Enteroviruses and Parechoviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lonneke van der Linden

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Enterovirus (EV and Parechovirus genera of the picornavirus family include many important human pathogens, including poliovirus, rhinovirus, EV-A71, EV-D68, and human parechoviruses (HPeV. They cause a wide variety of diseases, ranging from a simple common cold to life-threatening diseases such as encephalitis and myocarditis. At the moment, no antiviral therapy is available against these viruses and it is not feasible to develop vaccines against all EVs and HPeVs due to the great number of serotypes. Therefore, a lot of effort is being invested in the development of antiviral drugs. Both viral proteins and host proteins essential for virus replication can be used as targets for virus inhibitors. As such, a good understanding of the complex process of virus replication is pivotal in the design of antiviral strategies goes hand in hand with a good understanding of the complex process of virus replication. In this review, we will give an overview of the current state of knowledge of EV and HPeV replication and how this can be inhibited by small-molecule inhibitors.

  11. Suppression of Coronavirus Replication by Cyclophilin Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Sasaki

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Coronaviruses infect a variety of mammalian and avian species and cause serious diseases in humans, cats, mice, and birds in the form of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS, feline infectious peritonitis (FIP, mouse hepatitis, and avian infectious bronchitis, respectively. No effective vaccine or treatment has been developed for SARS-coronavirus or FIP virus, both of which cause lethal diseases. It has been reported that a cyclophilin inhibitor, cyclosporin A (CsA, could inhibit the replication of coronaviruses. CsA is a well-known immunosuppressive drug that binds to cellular cyclophilins to inhibit calcineurin, a calcium-calmodulin-activated serine/threonine-specific phosphatase. The inhibition of calcineurin blocks the translocation of nuclear factor of activated T cells from the cytosol into the nucleus, thus preventing the transcription of genes encoding cytokines such as interleukin-2. Cyclophilins are peptidyl-prolyl isomerases with physiological functions that have been described for many years to include chaperone and foldase activities. Also, many viruses require cyclophilins for replication; these include human immunodeficiency virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, and hepatitis C virus. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to the suppression of viral replication differ for different viruses. This review describes the suppressive effects of CsA on coronavirus replication.

  12. H2AX phosphorylation and DNA damage kinase activity are dispensable for herpes simplex virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botting, Carolyn; Lu, Xu; Triezenberg, Steven J

    2016-01-27

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) can establish both lytic and latent infections in humans. The phosphorylation of histone H2AX, a common marker of DNA damage, during lytic infection by HSV-1 is well established. However, the role(s) of H2AX phosphorylation in lytic infection remain unclear. Following infection of human foreskin fibroblasts by HSV-1 or HSV-2, we assayed the phosphorylation of H2AX in the presence of inhibitors of transcription, translation, or viral DNA replication, or in the presence of inhibitors of ATM and ATR kinases (KU-55933 and VE-821, respectively). We also assayed viral replication in fibroblasts in the presence of the kinase inhibitors or siRNAs specific for ATM and ATR, as well as in cell lines deficient for either ATR or ATM. The expression of viral immediate-early and early proteins (including the viral DNA polymerase), but not viral DNA replication or late protein expression, were required for H2AX phosphorylation following HSV-1 infection. Inhibition of ATM kinase activity prevented HSV-stimulated H2AX phosphorylation but had only a minor effect on DNA replication and virus yield in HFF cells. These results differ from previous reports of a dramatic reduction in viral yield following chemical inhibition of ATM in oral keratinocytes or following infection of ATM(-/-) cells. Inhibition of the closely related kinase ATR (whether by chemical inhibitor or siRNA disruption) had no effect on H2AX phosphorylation and reduced viral DNA replication only moderately. During infection by HSV-2, H2AX phosphorylation was similarly dispensable but was dependent on both ATM activity and viral DNA replication. H2AX phosphorylation represents a cell type-specific and virus type-specific host response to HSV infection with little impact on viral infection.

  13. Phosphatidic acid produced by phospholipase D promotes RNA replication of a plant RNA virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiwamu Hyodo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic positive-strand RNA [(+RNA] viruses are intracellular obligate parasites replicate using the membrane-bound replicase complexes that contain multiple viral and host components. To replicate, (+RNA viruses exploit host resources and modify host metabolism and membrane organization. Phospholipase D (PLD is a phosphatidylcholine- and phosphatidylethanolamine-hydrolyzing enzyme that catalyzes the production of phosphatidic acid (PA, a lipid second messenger that modulates diverse intracellular signaling in various organisms. PA is normally present in small amounts (less than 1% of total phospholipids, but rapidly and transiently accumulates in lipid bilayers in response to different environmental cues such as biotic and abiotic stresses in plants. However, the precise functions of PLD and PA remain unknown. Here, we report the roles of PLD and PA in genomic RNA replication of a plant (+RNA virus, Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV. We found that RCNMV RNA replication complexes formed in Nicotiana benthamiana contained PLDα and PLDβ. Gene-silencing and pharmacological inhibition approaches showed that PLDs and PLDs-derived PA are required for viral RNA replication. Consistent with this, exogenous application of PA enhanced viral RNA replication in plant cells and plant-derived cell-free extracts. We also found that a viral auxiliary replication protein bound to PA in vitro, and that the amount of PA increased in RCNMV-infected plant leaves. Together, our findings suggest that RCNMV hijacks host PA-producing enzymes to replicate.

  14. Levels of the E2 interacting protein TopBP1 modulate papillomavirus maintenance stage replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanginakudru, Sriramana, E-mail: skangina@iu.edu [Department of Dermatology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); DeSmet, Marsha, E-mail: mdesmet@iupui.edu [Department of Dermatology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Thomas, Yanique, E-mail: ysthomas@umail.iu.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Morgan, Iain M., E-mail: immorgan@vcu.edu [VCU Philips Institute for Oral Health Research, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Androphy, Elliot J., E-mail: eandro@iu.edu [Department of Dermatology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2015-04-15

    The evolutionarily conserved DNA topoisomerase II beta-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) functions in DNA replication, DNA damage response, and cell survival. We analyzed the role of TopBP1 in human and bovine papillomavirus genome replication. Consistent with prior reports, TopBP1 co-localized in discrete nuclear foci and was in complex with papillomavirus E2 protein. Similar to E2, TopBP1 is recruited to the region of the viral origin of replication during G1/S and early S phase. TopBP1 knockdown increased, while over-expression decreased transient virus replication, without affecting cell cycle. Similarly, using cell lines harboring HPV-16 or HPV-31 genome, TopBP1 knockdown increased while over-expression reduced viral copy number relative to genomic DNA. We propose a model in which TopBP1 serves dual roles in viral replication: it is essential for initiation of replication yet it restricts viral copy number. - Highlights: • Protein interaction study confirmed In-situ interaction between TopBP1 and E2. • TopBP1 present at papillomavirus ori in G1/S and early S phase of cell cycle. • TopBP1 knockdown increased, over-expression reduced virus replication. • TopBP1 protein level change did not influence cell survival or cell cycle. • TopBP1 displaced from papillomavirus ori after initiation of replication.

  15. Security Dilemma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wivel, Anders

    2011-01-01

    What is a security dilemma? What are the consequences of security dilemmas in international politics?......What is a security dilemma? What are the consequences of security dilemmas in international politics?...

  16. Interactions between the Structural Domains of the RNA Replication Proteins of Plant-Infecting RNA Viruses

    OpenAIRE

    O’Reilly, Erin K.; Wang, Zhaohui; French, Roy; Kao, C. Cheng

    1998-01-01

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV), a positive-strand RNA virus, encodes two replication proteins: the 2a protein, which contains polymerase-like sequences, and the 1a protein, with N-terminal putative capping and C-terminal helicase-like sequences. These two proteins are part of a multisubunit complex which is necessary for viral RNA replication. We have previously shown that the yeast two-hybrid assay consistently duplicated results obtained from in vivo RNA replication assays and biochemical assays ...

  17. Psychology, replication & beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Keith R

    2016-06-01

    Modern psychology is apparently in crisis and the prevailing view is that this partly reflects an inability to replicate past findings. If a crisis does exists, then it is some kind of 'chronic' crisis, as psychologists have been censuring themselves over replicability for decades. While the debate in psychology is not new, the lack of progress across the decades is disappointing. Recently though, we have seen a veritable surfeit of debate alongside multiple orchestrated and well-publicised replication initiatives. The spotlight is being shone on certain areas and although not everyone agrees on how we should interpret the outcomes, the debate is happening and impassioned. The issue of reproducibility occupies a central place in our whig history of psychology.

  18. Sensitive detection of viral transcripts in human tumor transcriptomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven-Eric Schelhorn

    Full Text Available In excess of 12% of human cancer incidents have a viral cofactor. Epidemiological studies of idiopathic human cancers indicate that additional tumor viruses remain to be discovered. Recent advances in sequencing technology have enabled systematic screenings of human tumor transcriptomes for viral transcripts. However, technical problems such as low abundances of viral transcripts in large volumes of sequencing data, viral sequence divergence, and homology between viral and human factors significantly confound identification of tumor viruses. We have developed a novel computational approach for detecting viral transcripts in human cancers that takes the aforementioned confounding factors into account and is applicable to a wide variety of viruses and tumors. We apply the approach to conducting the first systematic search for viruses in neuroblastoma, the most common cancer in infancy. The diverse clinical progression of this disease as well as related epidemiological and virological findings are highly suggestive of a pathogenic cofactor. However, a viral etiology of neuroblastoma is currently contested. We mapped 14 transcriptomes of neuroblastoma as well as positive and negative controls to the human and all known viral genomes in order to detect both known and unknown viruses. Analysis of controls, comparisons with related methods, and statistical estimates demonstrate the high sensitivity of our approach. Detailed investigation of putative viral transcripts within neuroblastoma samples did not provide evidence for the existence of any known human viruses. Likewise, de-novo assembly and analysis of chimeric transcripts did not result in expression signatures associated with novel human pathogens. While confounding factors such as sample dilution or viral clearance in progressed tumors may mask viral cofactors in the data, in principle, this is rendered less likely by the high sensitivity of our approach and the number of biological replicates

  19. Viral marketing on the Internet

    OpenAIRE

    Štverák, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Thesis provides an overview of viral marketing. It describes the process by which you can be inspired to implement viral campaign. The thesis includes analysis of specific viral Web project. The aim of this thesis is to create a breakdown of the various components of viral marketing, to establish conditions that should be satisfied for the viral marketing to success, suggesting how to use viral marketing on social network Facebook and evaluate the various components of this service for the pr...

  20. Growing Through Innovation Replicability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hsuan, Juliana; Lévesque, Moren

    2012-01-01

    of growth policies. We use a utility function that considers proxies for both growth and failure potential to uncover the role played in selecting these policies by the economic environment of the targeted market for expansion. Our analysis further reveals the importance of the innovation......We propose a formal model of firm growth through replication that considers the extent of the investment to adapt routines as replication unfolds and the portion of this investment that goes toward innovation in the routines. The use of these two investment constructs brings about four types...

  1. Architecture and regulation of negative-strand viral enzymatic machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranzusch, Philip J; Whelan, Sean P J

    2012-07-01

    Negative-strand (NS) RNA viruses initiate infection with a unique polymerase complex that mediates both mRNA transcription and subsequent genomic RNA replication. For nearly all NS RNA viruses, distinct enzymatic domains catalyzing RNA polymerization and multiple steps of 5' mRNA cap formation are contained within a single large polymerase protein (L). While NS RNA viruses include a variety of emerging human and agricultural pathogens, the enzymatic machinery driving viral replication and gene expression remains poorly understood. Recent insights with Machupo virus and vesicular stomatitis virus have provided the first structural information of viral L proteins, and revealed how the various enzymatic domains are arranged into a conserved architecture shared by both segmented and nonsegmented NS RNA viruses. In vitro systems reconstituting RNA synthesis from purified components provide new tools to understand the viral replicative machinery, and demonstrate the arenavirus matrix protein regulates RNA synthesis by locking a polymerase-template complex. Inhibition of gene expression by the viral matrix protein is a distinctive feature also shared with influenza A virus and nonsegmented NS RNA viruses, possibly illuminating a conserved mechanism for coordination of viral transcription and polymerase packaging.

  2. Liver monocytes and kupffer cells remain transcriptionally distinct during chronic viral infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.D.B. van de Garde (Martijn D.B.); D. Movita (Dowty); Van Der Heide, M. (Marieke); F. Herschke (Florence); De Jonghe, S. (Sandra); L. Gama (Lucio); P.A. Boonstra (André); T. Vanwolleghem (Thomas)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractDue to the scarcity of immunocompetent animal models for chronic viral hepatitis, little is known about the role of the innate intrahepatic immune system during viral replication in the liver. These insights are however fundamental for the understanding of the inappropriate adaptive

  3. Virion-targeted viral inactivation: new therapy against viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okui, N; Kitamura, Y; Kobayashi, N; Sakuma, R; Ishikawa, T; Kitamura, T

    2001-01-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is resistant to all current therapy. Gene therapy is an attractive alternative or additive to current, unsatisfactory AIDS therapy. To develop an antiviral molecule targeting viral integrase (HIV IN), we generated a single-chain antibody, termed scAb, which interacted with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) IN and inhibited virus replication at the integration step when expressed intracellularly. To reduce infectivity from within the virus particles, we made expression plasmids (pC-scAbE-Vpr, pC-scAbE-CA, and pC-scAbE-WXXF), which expressed the anti-HIV IN scAb fused to the N-terminus of HIV-1-associated accessory protein R (Vpr), capsid protein (CA), and specific binding motif to Vpr (WXXF), respectively. All fusion proteins were tagged with a nine-amino acid peptide derived from influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) at the C terminus. The fusion molecules, termed scAbE-Vpr, scAbE-CA, and scAbE-WXXF, interacted specifically with HIV IN immobilized on a nitrocellulose membrane. Immunoblot analysis showed that scAbE-Vpr, scAbE-CA, and scAbE-WXXF were incorporated into the virions produced by cotransfection of 293T cells with HIV-1 infectious clone DNA (pLAI) and pC-scAbE-Vpr, pC-scAbE-WXXF. A multinuclear activation galactosidase indicator (MAGI) assay revealed that the virions released from 293T cells cotransfected with pLAI and pC-scAbE-Vpr, pC-scAbE-WXXF had as little 1000-fold of the infectivity of the control wild-type virions, which were produced from the 293T cells transfected with pLAI alone. Furthermore, the virions produced from the 293T cells cotransfected with pLAI and an scAb expression vector (pC-scAb) showed only 1% of the infectivity of the control HIV-1 in a MAGI assay, although scAb was not incorporated into the virions. In either instance, the total quantity of the progeny virions released from the transfected 293T cells and the patterns of the virion proteins were hardly affected by the presence of

  4. IFITM proteins restrict viral membrane hemifusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The interferon-inducible transmembrane (IFITM protein family represents a new class of cellular restriction factors that block early stages of viral replication; the underlying mechanism is currently not known. Here we provide evidence that IFITM proteins restrict membrane fusion induced by representatives of all three classes of viral membrane fusion proteins. IFITM1 profoundly suppressed syncytia formation and cell-cell fusion induced by almost all viral fusion proteins examined; IFITM2 and IFITM3 also strongly inhibited their fusion, with efficiency somewhat dependent on cell types. Furthermore, treatment of cells with IFN also markedly inhibited viral membrane fusion and entry. By using the Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus envelope and influenza A virus hemagglutinin as models for study, we showed that IFITM-mediated restriction on membrane fusion is not at the steps of receptor- and/or low pH-mediated triggering; instead, the creation of hemifusion was essentially blocked by IFITMs. Chlorpromazine (CPZ, a chemical known to promote the transition from hemifusion to full fusion, was unable to rescue the IFITM-mediated restriction on fusion. In contrast, oleic acid (OA, a lipid analog that generates negative spontaneous curvature and thereby promotes hemifusion, virtually overcame the restriction. To explore the possible effect of IFITM proteins on membrane molecular order and fluidity, we performed fluorescence labeling with Laurdan, in conjunction with two-photon laser scanning and fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM. We observed that the generalized polarizations (GPs and fluorescence lifetimes of cell membranes expressing IFITM proteins were greatly enhanced, indicating higher molecularly ordered and less fluidized membranes. Collectively, our data demonstrated that IFITM proteins suppress viral membrane fusion before the creation of hemifusion, and suggested that they may do so by reducing membrane fluidity and conferring a positive

  5. Anti-HCV RNA Aptamers Targeting the Genomic cis-Acting Replication Element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Berzal-Herranz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV replication is dependent on the existence of several highly conserved functional genomic RNA domains. The cis-acting replication element (CRE, located within the 3' end of the NS5B coding region of the HCV genome, has been shown essential for efficient viral replication. Its sequence and structural features determine its involvement in functional interactions with viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and distant RNA domains of the viral genome. This work reports the use of an in vitro selection strategy to select aptamer RNA molecules against the complete HCV-CRE. After six selection cycles, five potential target sites were identified within this domain. Inhibition assays using a sample of representative aptamers showed that the selected RNAs significantly inhibit the replication (>80% of a subgenomic HCV replicon in Huh-7 cell cultures. These results highlight the potential of aptamer RNA molecules as therapeutic antiviral agents.

  6. Viral pathogenesis in diagrams

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tremblay, Michel; Berthiaume, Laurent; Ackermann, Hans-Wolfgang

    2001-01-01

    .... The 268 diagrams in Viral Pathogenesis in Diagrams were selected from over 800 diagrams of English and French virological literature, including one derived from a famous drawing by Leonardo da Vinci...

  7. Viral Gastroenteritis (Stomach Flu)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Viral gastroenteritis (stomach flu) Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  8. Viral hemorrhagic septicemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batts, William N.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS) is one of the most important viral diseases of finfish worldwide. In the past, VHS was thought to affect mainly rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss reared at freshwater facilities in Western Europe where it was known by various names including Egtved disease and infectious kidney swelling and liver degeneration (Wolf 1988). Today, VHS is known as an important source of mortality for cultured and wild fish in freshwater and marine environments in several regions of the northern hemisphere (Dixon 1999; Gagné et al. 2007; Kim and Faisal 2011; Lumsden et al. 2007; Marty et al. 1998, 2003; Meyers and Winton 1995; Skall et al. 2005b; Smail 1999; Takano et al. 2001). Viral hemorrhagic septicemia is caused by the fish rhabdovirus, viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), a member of the genus Novirhabdovirus of the family Rhabdoviridae

  9. HIV Viral Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chains Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli Sickle Cell Tests Sirolimus Smooth Muscle ... used each time. Will exercise, nutrition, and other lifestyle modifications help decrease my HIV viral load? There ...

  10. Replicated spectrographs in astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Gary J.

    2014-06-01

    As telescope apertures increase, the challenge of scaling spectrographic astronomical instruments becomes acute. The next generation of extremely large telescopes (ELTs) strain the availability of glass blanks for optics and engineering to provide sufficient mechanical stability. While breaking the relationship between telescope diameter and instrument pupil size by adaptive optics is a clear path for small fields of view, survey instruments exploiting multiplex advantages will be pressed to find cost-effective solutions. In this review we argue that exploiting the full potential of ELTs will require the barrier of the cost and engineering difficulty of monolithic instruments to be broken by the use of large-scale replication of spectrographs. The first steps in this direction have already been taken with the soon to be commissioned MUSE and VIRUS instruments for the Very Large Telescope and the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, respectively. MUSE employs 24 spectrograph channels, while VIRUS has 150 channels. We compare the information gathering power of these replicated instruments with the present state of the art in more traditional spectrographs, and with instruments under development for ELTs. Design principles for replication are explored along with lessons learned, and we look forward to future technologies that could make massively-replicated instruments even more compelling.

  11. Replication studies in longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varcasia, O; Garasto, S; Rizza, T

    2001-01-01

    In Danes we replicated the 3'APOB-VNTR gene/longevity association study previously carried out in Italians, by which the Small alleles (less than 35 repeats) had been identified as frailty alleles for longevity. In Danes, neither genotype nor allele frequencies differed between centenarians and 20...

  12. Replication-Fork Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duderstadt, Karl E.; Reyes-Lamothe, Rodrigo; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Sherratt, David J.

    The proliferation of all organisms depends on the coordination of enzymatic events within large multiprotein replisomes that duplicate chromosomes. Whereas the structure and function of many core replisome components have been clarified, the timing and order of molecular events during replication

  13. Treatment of viral encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Renan Barros

    2009-03-01

    Several viruses may cause central nervous system diseases with a broad range of clinical manifestations. The time course of the viral encephalitis can be acute, subacute, or chronic. Pathologically there are encephalitis with direct viral entry into the CNS in which brain parenchyma exhibits neuronal damaging and viral antigens and there are postinfectious autoimmune encephalitis associated with systemic viral infections with brain tissue presenting perivascular aggregation of immune cells and myelin damaging. Some virus affect previously healthy individuals while others produce encephalitis among imunocompromised ones. Factors such evolving lifestyles and ecological changes have had a considerable impact on the epidemiology of some viral encephalitis [e.g. West-Nile virus, and Japanese B virus]. Citomegalovirus and JC virus are examples of infections of the brain that have been seen more frequently because they occur in immunocompromised patients. In the other hand many scientific achievements in neuroimaging, molecular diagnosis, antiviral therapy, immunomodulatory treatments, and neurointensive care have allowed more precise and earlier diagnoses and more efficient treatments, resulting in improved outcomes. In this article, we will present the current drug options in the management of the main acute and chronic viral infection of the central nervous system of immunocompetent and immunocompromised adults, focusing on drugs mechanisms of action, efficacy, and side effects. The early diagnosis and correct management of such diseases can reduce mortality and neurological sequelae; however, even with recent treatment advances, potentially devastating outcomes are still possible.

  14. Identification of Epstein-Barr Virus Replication Proteins in Burkitt’s Lymphoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Traylen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The working model to describe the mechanisms used to replicate the cancer-associated virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is partly derived from comparisons with other members of the Herpes virus family. Many genes within the EBV genome are homologous across the herpes virus family. Published transcriptome data for the EBV genome during its lytic replication cycle show extensive transcription, but the identification of the proteins is limited. We have taken a global proteomics approach to identify viral proteins that are expressed during the EBV lytic replication cycle. We combined an enrichment method to isolate cells undergoing EBV lytic replication with SILAC-labeling coupled to mass-spectrometry and identified viral and host proteins expressed during the OPEN ACCESS Pathogens 2015, 4 740 EBV lytic replication cycle. Amongst the most frequently identified viral proteins are two components of the DNA replication machinery, the single strand DNA binding protein BALF2, DNA polymerase accessory protein BMRF1 and both subunits of the viral ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase enzyme (BORF2 and BaRF1. An additional 42 EBV lytic cycle proteins were also detected. This provides proteomic identification for many EBV lytic replication cycle proteins and also identifies post-translational modifications.

  15. Quercetin inhibits rhinovirus replication in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Shyamala; Faris, Andrea N.; Comstock, Adam T.; Wang, Qiong; Nanua, Suparna; Hershenson, Marc B.; Sajjan, Uma S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Rhinovirus (RV), which is responsible for the majority of common colds, also causes exacerbations in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. So far, there are no drugs available for treatment of rhinovirus infection. We examined the effect of quercetin, a plant flavanol on RV infection in vitro and in vivo. Pretreatment of airway epithelial cells with quercetin decreased Akt phosphosphorylation, viral endocytosis and IL-8 responses. Addition of quercetin 6 h after RV infection (after viral endocytosis) reduced viral load, IL-8 and IFN responses in airway epithelial cells. This was associated with decreased levels of negative and positive strand viral RNA, and RV capsid protein, abrogation of RV-induced eIF4GI cleavage and increased phosphorylation of eIF2α. In mice infected with RV, quercetin treatment decreased viral replication as well as expression of chemokines and cytokines. Quercetin treatment also attenuated RV-induced airway cholinergic hyperresponsiveness. Together, our results suggest that quercetin inhibits RV endocytosis and replication in airway epithelial cells at multiple stages of the RV life cycle. Quercetin also decreases expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and improves lung function in RV-infected mice. Based on these observations, further studies examining the potential benefits of quercetin in the prevention and treatment of RV infection are warranted. PMID:22465313

  16. Biogenesis and architecture of arterivirus replication organelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Hoeven, Barbara; Oudshoorn, Diede; Koster, Abraham J; Snijder, Eric J; Kikkert, Marjolein; Bárcena, Montserrat

    2016-07-15

    All eukaryotic positive-stranded RNA (+RNA) viruses appropriate host cell membranes and transform them into replication organelles, specialized micro-environments that are thought to support viral RNA synthesis. Arteriviruses (order Nidovirales) belong to the subset of +RNA viruses that induce double-membrane vesicles (DMVs), similar to the structures induced by e.g. coronaviruses, picornaviruses and hepatitis C virus. In the last years, electron tomography has revealed substantial differences between the structures induced by these different virus groups. Arterivirus-induced DMVs appear to be closed compartments that are continuous with endoplasmic reticulum membranes, thus forming an extensive reticulovesicular network (RVN) of intriguing complexity. This RVN is remarkably similar to that described for the distantly related coronaviruses (also order Nidovirales) and sets them apart from other DMV-inducing viruses analysed to date. We review here the current knowledge and open questions on arterivirus replication organelles and discuss them in the light of the latest studies on other DMV-inducing viruses, particularly coronaviruses. Using the equine arteritis virus (EAV) model system and electron tomography, we present new data regarding the biogenesis of arterivirus-induced DMVs and uncover numerous putative intermediates in DMV formation. We generated cell lines that can be induced to express specific EAV replicase proteins and showed that DMVs induced by the transmembrane proteins nsp2 and nsp3 form an RVN and are comparable in topology and architecture to those formed during viral infection. Co-expression of the third EAV transmembrane protein (nsp5), expressed as part of a self-cleaving polypeptide that mimics viral polyprotein processing in infected cells, led to the formation of DMVs whose size was more homogenous and closer to what is observed upon EAV infection, suggesting a regulatory role for nsp5 in modulating membrane curvature and DMV formation

  17. Internal conceptual replications do not increase independent replication success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunert, Richard

    2016-10-01

    Recently, many psychological effects have been surprisingly difficult to reproduce. This article asks why, and investigates whether conceptually replicating an effect in the original publication is related to the success of independent, direct replications. Two prominent accounts of low reproducibility make different predictions in this respect. One account suggests that psychological phenomena are dependent on unknown contexts that are not reproduced in independent replication attempts. By this account, internal replications indicate that a finding is more robust and, thus, that it is easier to independently replicate it. An alternative account suggests that researchers employ questionable research practices (QRPs), which increase false positive rates. By this account, the success of internal replications may just be the result of QRPs and, thus, internal replications are not predictive of independent replication success. The data of a large reproducibility project support the QRP account: replicating an effect in the original publication is not related to independent replication success. Additional analyses reveal that internally replicated and internally unreplicated effects are not very different in terms of variables associated with replication success. Moreover, social psychological effects in particular appear to lack any benefit from internal replications. Overall, these results indicate that, in this dataset at least, the influence of QRPs is at the heart of failures to replicate psychological findings, especially in social psychology. Variable, unknown contexts appear to play only a relatively minor role. I recommend practical solutions for how QRPs can be avoided.

  18. Specific regulation of the chemokine response to viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus at the entry site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, Jana; Garcia, Jessica; Ordas, M Camino; Casanova, Isabel; Gonzalez, Antonia; Villena, Alberto; Coll, Julio; Tafalla, Carolina

    2011-05-01

    The fin bases constitute the main portal of rhabdovirus entry into rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and replication in this first site strongly conditions the outcome of the infection. In this context, we studied the chemokine response elicited in this area in response to viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), a rhabdovirus. Among all the rainbow trout chemokine genes studied, only the transcription levels of CK10 and CK12 were significantly upregulated in response to VHSV. As the virus had previously been shown to elicit a much stronger chemokine response in internal organs, we compared the effect of VHSV on the gills, another mucosal site which does not constitute the main site of viral entry or rhabdoviral replication. In this case, a significantly stronger chemokine response was triggered, with CK1, CK3, CK9, and CK11 being upregulated in response to VHSV and CK10 and CK12 being down-modulated by the virus. We then conducted further experiments to understand how these different chemokine responses of mucosal tissues could correlate with their capacity to support VHSV replication. No viral replication was detected in the gills, while at the fin bases, only the skin and the muscle were actively supporting viral replication. Within the skin, viral replication took place in the dermis, while viral replication was blocked within epidermal cells at some point before protein translation. The different susceptibilities of the different skin layers to VHSV correlated with the effect that VHSV has on their capacity to secrete chemotactic factors. Altogether, these results suggest a VHSV interference mechanism on the early chemokine response at its active replication sites within mucosal tissues, a possible key process that may facilitate viral entry.

  19. Enhanced polymerase activity confers replication competence of Borna disease virus in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Andreas; Kugel, Daniela; Schneider, Urs; Staeheli, Peter

    2007-11-01

    We previously showed that mouse adaptation of cDNA-derived Borna disease virus (BDV) strain He/80(FR) was associated exclusively with mutations in the viral polymerase complex. Interestingly, independent mouse adaptation of non-recombinant He/80 was correlated with different alterations in the polymerase and mutations in the viral glycoprotein. We used reverse genetics to demonstrate that changes in the polymerase which improve enzymatic activity represent the decisive host range mutations. The glycoprotein mutations did not confer replication competence in mice, although they slightly improved viral performance if combined with polymerase mutations. Our findings suggest that the viral polymerase restricts the host range of BDV.

  20. HIV-1 Replication and the Cellular Eukaryotic Translation Apparatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Guerrero

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic translation is a complex process composed of three main steps: initiation, elongation, and termination. During infections by RNA- and DNA-viruses, the eukaryotic translation machinery is used to assure optimal viral protein synthesis. Human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1 uses several non-canonical pathways to translate its own proteins, such as leaky scanning, frameshifting, shunt, and cap-independent mechanisms. Moreover, HIV-1 modulates the host translation machinery by targeting key translation factors and overcomes different cellular obstacles that affect protein translation. In this review, we describe how HIV-1 proteins target several components of the eukaryotic translation machinery, which consequently improves viral translation and replication.

  1. High viral load in lymph nodes and latent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in peripheral blood cells of HIV-1-infected chimpanzees.

    OpenAIRE

    Saksela, K; Muchmore, E; Girard, M; Fultz, P; Baltimore, D

    1993-01-01

    We have examined human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in chimpanzees by analyzing HIV-1 DNA and RNA in lymph nodes and peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Like certain asymptomatic HIV-infected persons, these chimpanzees had no detectable viral replication in their PBMCs. However, viral replication and a high viral load were observed in the lymphatic tissue. Despite the absence of viral replication in PBMCs, 1/1,000 to 1/10,000 of the PBMCs contained HIV-1 proviral DNA, and...

  2. Bile acids for viral hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Liu, J; Gluud, C

    2003-01-01

    The viral hepatitides are common causes of liver diseases globally. Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus was reached regarding their usefulness.......The viral hepatitides are common causes of liver diseases globally. Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus was reached regarding their usefulness....

  3. Ultrastructural Characterization of Zika Virus Replication Factories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Cortese

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A global concern has emerged with the pandemic spread of Zika virus (ZIKV infections that can cause severe neurological symptoms in adults and newborns. ZIKV is a positive-strand RNA virus replicating in virus-induced membranous replication factories (RFs. Here we used various imaging techniques to investigate the ultrastructural details of ZIKV RFs and their relationship with host cell organelles. Analyses of human hepatic cells and neural progenitor cells infected with ZIKV revealed endoplasmic reticulum (ER membrane invaginations containing pore-like openings toward the cytosol, reminiscent to RFs in Dengue virus-infected cells. Both the MR766 African strain and the H/PF/2013 Asian strain, the latter linked to neurological diseases, induce RFs of similar architecture. Importantly, ZIKV infection causes a drastic reorganization of microtubules and intermediate filaments forming cage-like structures surrounding the viral RF. Consistently, ZIKV replication is suppressed by cytoskeleton-targeting drugs. Thus, ZIKV RFs are tightly linked to rearrangements of the host cell cytoskeleton.

  4. Ultrastructural Characterization of Zika Virus Replication Factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, Mirko; Goellner, Sarah; Acosta, Eliana Gisela; Neufeldt, Christopher John; Oleksiuk, Olga; Lampe, Marko; Haselmann, Uta; Funaya, Charlotta; Schieber, Nicole; Ronchi, Paolo; Schorb, Martin; Pruunsild, Priit; Schwab, Yannick; Chatel-Chaix, Laurent; Ruggieri, Alessia; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2017-02-28

    A global concern has emerged with the pandemic spread of Zika virus (ZIKV) infections that can cause severe neurological symptoms in adults and newborns. ZIKV is a positive-strand RNA virus replicating in virus-induced membranous replication factories (RFs). Here we used various imaging techniques to investigate the ultrastructural details of ZIKV RFs and their relationship with host cell organelles. Analyses of human hepatic cells and neural progenitor cells infected with ZIKV revealed endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane invaginations containing pore-like openings toward the cytosol, reminiscent to RFs in Dengue virus-infected cells. Both the MR766 African strain and the H/PF/2013 Asian strain, the latter linked to neurological diseases, induce RFs of similar architecture. Importantly, ZIKV infection causes a drastic reorganization of microtubules and intermediate filaments forming cage-like structures surrounding the viral RF. Consistently, ZIKV replication is suppressed by cytoskeleton-targeting drugs. Thus, ZIKV RFs are tightly linked to rearrangements of the host cell cytoskeleton. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Early steps of retrovirus replicative cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saïb Ali

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During the last two decades, the profusion of HIV research due to the urge to identify new therapeutic targets has led to a wealth of information on the retroviral replication cycle. However, while the late stages of the retrovirus life cycle, consisting of virus replication and egress, have been partly unraveled, the early steps remain largely enigmatic. These early steps consist of a long and perilous journey from the cell surface to the nucleus where the proviral DNA integrates into the host genome. Retroviral particles must bind specifically to their target cells, cross the plasma membrane, reverse-transcribe their RNA genome, while uncoating the cores, find their way to the nuclear membrane and penetrate into the nucleus to finally dock and integrate into the cellular genome. Along this journey, retroviruses hijack the cellular machinery, while at the same time counteracting cellular defenses. Elucidating these mechanisms and identifying which cellular factors are exploited by the retroviruses and which hinder their life cycle, will certainly lead to the discovery of new ways to inhibit viral replication and to improve retroviral vectors for gene transfer. Finally, as proven by many examples in the past, progresses in retrovirology will undoubtedly also provide some priceless insights into cell biology.

  6. Oncolytic Replication of E1b-Deleted Adenoviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Hsin Cheng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Various viruses have been studied and developed for oncolytic virotherapies. In virotherapy, a relatively small amount of viruses used in an intratumoral injection preferentially replicate in and lyse cancer cells, leading to the release of amplified viral particles that spread the infection to the surrounding tumor cells and reduce the tumor mass. Adenoviruses (Ads are most commonly used for oncolytic virotherapy due to their infection efficacy, high titer production, safety, easy genetic modification, and well-studied replication characteristics. Ads with deletion of E1b55K preferentially replicate in and destroy cancer cells and have been used in multiple clinical trials. H101, one of the E1b55K-deleted Ads, has been used for the treatment of late-stage cancers as the first approved virotherapy agent. However, the mechanism of selective replication of E1b-deleted Ads in cancer cells is still not well characterized. This review will focus on three potential molecular mechanisms of oncolytic replication of E1b55K-deleted Ads. These mechanisms are based upon the functions of the viral E1B55K protein that are associated with p53 inhibition, late viralmRNAexport, and cell cycle disruption.

  7. Defects in DNA replication hit NK cells and neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, Klaus

    2017-05-01

    Patients who present with unique immunological phenotypes provide an opportunity to better understand defect-driving mutations. In this issue of the JCI, Cottineau and colleagues characterize 5 individuals who exhibited growth restriction, facial deformities, and a history of bacterial and viral infection. Further characterization revealed that these patients were neutropenic and NK cell deficient. These phenotypes were unexpectedly linked to mutations in the gene encoding a subunit of the Go-Ichi-Ni-San (GINS) complex, which is essential for DNA replication prior to cell division. Together, the results of this study lay the groundwork for future studies to explore the role of DNA replication in immune cell generation and function.

  8. Redistribution of Endosomal Membranes to the African Swine Fever Virus Replication Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Cuesta-Geijo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available African swine fever virus (ASFV infection causes endosomal reorganization. Here, we show that the virus causes endosomal congregation close to the nucleus as the infection progresses, which is necessary to build a compact viral replication organelle. ASFV enters the cell by the endosomal pathway and reaches multivesicular late endosomes. Upon uncoating and fusion, the virus should exit to the cytosol to start replication. ASFV remodels endosomal traffic and redistributes endosomal membranes to the viral replication site. Virus replication also depends on endosomal membrane phosphoinositides (PtdIns synthesized by PIKfyve. Endosomes could act as platforms providing membranes and PtdIns, necessary for ASFV replication. Our study has revealed that ASFV reorganizes endosome dynamics, in order to ensure a productive infection.

  9. VIRAL DISEASES IN SEA FISH

    OpenAIRE

    Ivančica Strunjak-Perović; Mato Hacmanjek; Rozelinda Čož-Rakovac; Emin Teskeredžić

    1996-01-01

    Adequate knowledge on fish diseases caused by viruses is still lacking. Up until now, in fish which live their entire life cycle or part of it in the sea, some viral diseases have been determined (lymphoeytis, viral necrosis of crythrocytes, ciravosti cod syndrome, encephalitis, viral hemoragic septichemistry, viral hematopoetic necrosis, viral gusteraca necrosis, chum renviral infection, branchionephritis, rabdociral eel infection). Some of these diseases primarily occur in the freshwater ph...

  10. The anti-obesity drug orlistat reveals anti-viral activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammer, Elisabeth; Nietzsche, Sandor; Rien, Christian; Kühnl, Alexander; Mader, Theresa; Heller, Regine; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Henke, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    The administration of drugs to inhibit metabolic pathways not only reduces the risk of obesity-induced diseases in humans but may also hamper the replication of different viral pathogens. In order to investigate the value of the US Food and Drug Administration-approved anti-obesity drug orlistat in view of its anti-viral activity against different human-pathogenic viruses, several anti-viral studies, electron microscopy analyses as well as fatty acid uptake experiments were performed. The results indicate that administrations of non-cytotoxic concentrations of orlistat reduced the replication of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) in different cell types significantly. Moreover, orlistat revealed cell protective effects and modified the formation of multi-layered structures in CVB3-infected cells, which are necessary for viral replication. Lowering fatty acid uptake from the extracellular environment by phloretin administrations had only marginal impact on CVB3 replication. Finally, orlistat reduced also the replication of varicella-zoster virus moderately but had no significant influence on the replication of influenza A viruses. The data support further experiments into the value of orlistat as an inhibitor of the fatty acid synthase to develop new anti-viral compounds, which are based on the modulation of cellular metabolic pathways.

  11. A New Replicator: A theoretical framework for analysing replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szathmáry Eörs

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Replicators are the crucial entities in evolution. The notion of a replicator, however, is far less exact than the weight of its importance. Without identifying and classifying multiplying entities exactly, their dynamics cannot be determined appropriately. Therefore, it is importance to decide the nature and characteristics of any multiplying entity, in a detailed and formal way. Results Replication is basically an autocatalytic process which enables us to rest on the notions of formal chemistry. This statement has major implications. Simple autocatalytic cycle intermediates are considered as non-informational replicators. A consequence of which is that any autocatalytically multiplying entity is a replicator, be it simple or overly complex (even nests. A stricter definition refers to entities which can inherit acquired changes (informational replicators. Simple autocatalytic molecules (and nests are excluded from this group. However, in turn, any entity possessing copiable information is to be named a replicator, even multicellular organisms. In order to deal with the situation, an abstract, formal framework is presented, which allows the proper identification of various types of replicators. This sheds light on the old problem of the units and levels of selection and evolution. A hierarchical classification for the partition of the replicator-continuum is provided where specific replicators are nested within more general ones. The classification should be able to be successfully applied to known replicators and also to future candidates. Conclusion This paper redefines the concept of the replicator from a bottom-up theoretical approach. The formal definition and the abstract models presented can distinguish between among all possible replicator types, based on their quantity of variable and heritable information. This allows for the exact identification of various replicator types and their underlying dynamics. The most

  12. CD8+ T cells from HLA-B*57 elite suppressors effectively suppress replication of HIV-1 escape mutants

    OpenAIRE

    Pohlmeyer, Christopher W.; Buckheit, Robert W.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Blankson, Joel N.

    2013-01-01

    Background Elite Controllers or Suppressors (ES) are HIV-1 positive individuals who maintain plasma viral loads below the limit of detection of standard clinical assays without antiretroviral therapy. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that the control of viral replication in these patients is due to a strong and specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response. The ability of CD8+ T cells to control HIV-1 replication is believed to be impaired by the development of escape mutations. Surprising...

  13. Security Expertise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    and to reflect on the impact and responsibility of security analysis. In science and technology studies, the study of security politics adds a challenging new case to the agenda of research on expertise and policy. The contributors investigate cases such as academic security studies, security think tanks......, the collaboration between science, anthropology and the military, transnational terrorism, and the ethical consequences of security expertise. Together they challenge our understanding of how expertise works and what consequences it has for security politics and international relations. This book...... will be of particular interest to students of critical security studies, sociology, science and technology studies, and IR/security studies in general....

  14. Inhibition of lentivirus replication by aqueous extracts of Prunella vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauck Cathy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various members of the mint family have been used historically in Chinese and Native American medicine. Many of these same family members, including Prunella vulgaris, have been reported to have anti-viral activities. To further characterize the anti-lentiviral activities of P. vulgaris, water and ethanol extractions were tested for their ability to inhibit equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV replication. Results Aqueous extracts contained more anti-viral activity than did ethanol extracts, displaying potent anti-lentiviral activity against virus in cell lines as well as in primary cell cultures with little to no cellular cytotoxicity. Time-of-addition studies demonstrated that the extracts were effective when added during the first four h of the viral life cycle, suggesting that the botanical constituents were targeting the virion itself or early entry events. Further analysis revealed that the extracts did not destroy EIAV virion integrity, but prevented viral particles from binding to the surface of permissive cells. Modest levels of anti-EIAV activity were also detected when the cells were treated with the extracts prior to infection, indicating that anti-EIAV botanical constituents could interact with both viral particles and permissive cells to interfere with infectivity. Size fractionation of the extract demonstrated that eight of the nine fractions generated from aqueous extracts displayed anti-viral activity. Separation of ethanol soluble and insoluble compounds in the eight active fractions revealed that ethanol-soluble constituents were responsible for the anti-viral activity in one fraction whereas ethanol-insoluble constituents were important for the anti-viral activity in two of the other fractions. In three of the five fractions that lost activity upon sub-fractionation, anti-viral activity was restored upon reconstitution of the fractions, indicating that synergistic anti-viral activity is present in several

  15. [Vasculitis and viral infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Aguilar, N E; Guido Bayardo, R; Vargas Camaño, M E; Compañ González, D; Miranda Feria, A J

    1997-01-01

    Viruses have been implicated in vasculitis. To determine activity of viral infection associated with vasculitis. 17 patients with vasculitis had been in immunological and antiviral antibodies evaluation. Twenty five healthy controls sex and age matched with hematic biometry (BH) and AA. All subjects were negative to HIV and HBV. Viral activity was demonstrated in eight patients; vascular purpura (5), Takayasu disease (1), polyarteritis nodosa (1), erythema nodosum (1). None subject of control group had IgM activity. Antibodies response of IgG in patients were of lesser intensity than in control group. 14 abnormalities in BH were found in patients and 4 in control group. Immune response in patients, measured by lymphocyte subpopulations and circulating immune complexes was abnormal. In conclusion 47% showed viral activity, but the dominant feature was abnormal immune response in 82%.

  16. Modeling Viral Capsid Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    I present a review of the theoretical and computational methodologies that have been used to model the assembly of viral capsids. I discuss the capabilities and limitations of approaches ranging from equilibrium continuum theories to molecular dynamics simulations, and I give an overview of some of the important conclusions about virus assembly that have resulted from these modeling efforts. Topics include the assembly of empty viral shells, assembly around single-stranded nucleic acids to form viral particles, and assembly around synthetic polymers or charged nanoparticles for nanotechnology or biomedical applications. I present some examples in which modeling efforts have promoted experimental breakthroughs, as well as directions in which the connection between modeling and experiment can be strengthened. PMID:25663722

  17. KSHV Rta promoter specification and viral reactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan eGuito

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are obligate intracellular pathogens whose biological success depends upon replication and packaging of viral genomes, and transmission of progeny viruses to new hosts. The biological success of herpesviruses is enhanced by their ability to reproduce their genomes without producing progeny viruses or killing the host cells, a process called latency. Latency permits a herpesvirus to remain undetected in its animal host for decades while maintaining the potential to reactivate, or switch, to a productive life cycle when host conditions are conducive to generating viral progeny. Direct interactions between many host and viral molecules are implicated in controlling herpesviral reactivation, suggesting complex biological networks that control the decision. One viral protein that is necessary and sufficient to switch latent KSHV into the lytic infection cycle is called K-Rta. Rta is a transcriptional activator that specifies promoters by binding direct DNA directly and interacting with cellular proteins. Among these cellular proteins, binding of K-Rta to RBP-Jk is essential for viral reactivation.. In contrast to the canonical model for Notch signaling, RBP-Jk is not uniformly and constitutively bound to the latent KSHV genome, but rather is recruited to DNA by interactions with K-Rta. Stimulation of RBP-Jk DNA binding requires high affinity binding of Rta to repetitive and palindromic CANT DNA repeats in promoters, and formation of ternary complexes with RBP-Jk. However, while K-Rta expression is necessary for initiating KSHV reactivation, K-Rta’s role as the switch is inefficient. Many factors modulate K-Rta’s function, suggesting that KSHV reactivation can be significantly regulated post-Rta expression and challenging the notion that herpesviral reactivation is bistable. This review analyzes rapidly evolving research on KSHV K-Rta to consider the role of K-Rta promoter specification in regulating the progression of KSHV reactivation.

  18. [Viral hepatitis in travellers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Cândida

    2007-01-01

    Considering the geographical asymmetric distribution of viral hepatitis A, B and E, having a much higher prevalence in the less developed world, travellers from developed countries are exposed to a considerable and often underestimated risk of hepatitis infection. In fact a significant percentage of viral hepatitis occurring in developed countries is travel related. This results from globalization and increased mobility from tourism, international work, humanitarian and religious missions or other travel related activities. Several studies published in Europe and North America shown that more than 50% of reported cases of hepatitis A are travel related. On the other hand frequent outbreaks of hepatitis A and E in specific geographic areas raise the risk of infection in these restricted zones and that should be clearly identified. Selected aspects related with the distribution of hepatitis A, B and E are reviewed, particularly the situation in Portugal according to the published studies, as well as relevant clinical manifestations and differential diagnosis of viral hepatitis. Basic prevention rules considering enteric transmitted hepatitis (hepatitis A and hepatitis E) and parenteral transmitted (hepatitis B) are reviewed as well as hepatitis A and B immunoprophylaxis. Common clinical situations and daily practice "pre travel" advice issues are discussed according to WHO/CDC recommendations and the Portuguese National Vaccination Program. Implications from near future availability of a hepatitis E vaccine, a currently in phase 2 trial, are highlighted. Potential indications for travellers to endemic countries like India, Nepal and some regions of China, where up to 30% of sporadic cases of acute viral hepatitis are caused by hepatitis E virus, are considered. Continued epidemiological surveillance for viral hepatitis is essential to recognize and control possible outbreaks, but also to identify new viral hepatitis agents that may emerge as important global health

  19. Immigration and viral hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Suraj; Carballo, Manuel; Feld, Jordan J; Janssen, Harry L A

    2015-08-01

    WHO estimates reveal that the global prevalence of viral hepatitis may be as high as 500 million, with an annual mortality rate of up to 1.3 million individuals. The majority of this global burden of disease is borne by nations of the developing world with high rates of vertical and iatrogenic transmission of HBV and HCV, as well as poor access to healthcare. In 2013, 3.2% of the global population (231 million individuals) migrated into a new host nation. Migrants predominantly originate from the developing countries of the south, into the developed economies of North America and Western Europe. This mass migration of individuals from areas of high-prevalence of viral hepatitis poses a unique challenge to the healthcare systems of the host nations. Due to a lack of universal standards for screening, vaccination and treatment of viral hepatitis, the burden of chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma continues to increase among migrant populations globally. Efforts to increase case identification and treatment among migrants have largely been limited to small outreach programs in urban centers, such that the majority of migrants with viral hepatitis continue to remain unaware of their infection. This review summarizes the data on prevalence of viral hepatitis and burden of chronic liver disease among migrants, current standards for screening and treatment of immigrants and refugees, and efforts to improve the identification and treatment of viral hepatitis among migrants. Copyright © 2015 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Mechanisms of DNA replication termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewar, James M; Walter, Johannes C

    2017-08-01

    Genome duplication is carried out by pairs of replication forks that assemble at origins of replication and then move in opposite directions. DNA replication ends when converging replication forks meet. During this process, which is known as replication termination, DNA synthesis is completed, the replication machinery is disassembled and daughter molecules are resolved. In this Review, we outline the steps that are likely to be common to replication termination in most organisms, namely, fork convergence, synthesis completion, replisome disassembly and decatenation. We briefly review the mechanism of termination in the bacterium Escherichia coli and in simian virus 40 (SV40) and also focus on recent advances in eukaryotic replication termination. In particular, we discuss the recently discovered E3 ubiquitin ligases that control replisome disassembly in yeast and higher eukaryotes, and how their activity is regulated to avoid genome instability.

  1. Chromatin replication and epigenome maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Groth, Anja

    2012-01-01

    initiates, whereas the replication process itself disrupts chromatin and challenges established patterns of genome regulation. Specialized replication-coupled mechanisms assemble new DNA into chromatin, but epigenome maintenance is a continuous process taking place throughout the cell cycle. If DNA...

  2. Viral meningitis and encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuppeny, Misti

    2013-09-01

    Meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges, whereas encephalitis is inflammation of the parenchymal brain tissue. The single distinguishing element between the 2 diagnoses is the altered state of consciousness, focal deficits, and seizures found in encephalitis. Consequently meningoencephalitis is a term used when both findings are present in the patient. Viral meningitis is not necessarily reported as it is often underdiagnosed, whereas encephalitis cases are on the increase in various areas of North America. Improved imaging and viral diagnostics, as well as enhanced neurocritical care management, have improved patient outcomes to date. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Interplay Among Constitutes of Ebola Virus: Nucleoprotein, Polymerase L, Viral Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minchuan; He, Peiming; Su, Jing; Singh, Dadabhai T.; Su, Hailei; Su, Haibin

    Ebola virus is a highly lethal filovirus, claimed thousands of people in its recent outbreak. Seven viral proteins constitute ebola viral structure, and four of them (nucleoprotein (NP), polymerase L, VP35 and VP30) participate majorly in viral replication and transcription. We have elucidated a conformation change of NP cleft by VP35 NP-binding protein domains through superimposing two experimental NP structure images and discussed the function of this conformation change in the replication and transcription with polymerase complex (L, VP35 and VP30). The important roles of VP30 in viral RNA synthesis have also been discussed. A “tapping” model has been proposed in this paper for a better understanding of the interplay among the four viral proteins (NP, polymerase L, VP35 and VP30). Moreover, we have pinpointed some key residue changes on NP (both NP N- and C-terminal) and L between Reston and Zaire by computational studies. Together, this paper provides a description of interactions among ebola viral proteins (NP, L, VP35, VP30 and VP40) in viral replication and transcription, and sheds light on the complex system of viral reproduction.

  4. SAMHD1 restricts herpes simplex virus 1 in macrophages by limiting DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eui Tae; White, Tommy E; Brandariz-Núñez, Alberto; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Weitzman, Matthew D

    2013-12-01

    Macrophages play important roles in host immune defense against virus infection. During infection by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), macrophages acquire enhanced antiviral potential. Restriction of HSV-1 replication and progeny production is important to prevent viral spread, but the cellular mechanisms that inhibit the DNA virus in macrophages are unknown. SAMHD1 was recently identified as a retrovirus restriction factor highly expressed in macrophages. The SAMHD1 protein is expressed in both undifferentiated monocytes and differentiated macrophages, but retroviral restriction is limited to differentiated cells by modulation of SAMHD1 phosphorylation. It is proposed to block reverse transcription of retroviral RNA into DNA by depleting cellular deoxynucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs). Viruses with DNA genomes do not employ reverse transcription during infection, but replication of their viral genomes is also dependent on intracellular dNTP concentrations. Here, we demonstrate that SAMHD1 restricts replication of the HSV-1 DNA genome in differentiated macrophage cell lines. Depleting SAMHD1 in THP-1 cells enhanced HSV-1 replication, while ectopic overexpression of SAMHD1 in U937 cells repressed HSV-1 replication. SAMHD1 did not impact viral gene expression from incoming HSV-1 viral genomes. HSV-1 restriction involved the dNTP triphosphohydrolase activity of SAMHD1 and was partially overcome by addition of exogenous deoxynucleosides. Unlike retroviruses, restriction of HSV-1 was not affected by SAMHD1 phosphorylation status. Our results suggest that SAMHD1 functions broadly to inhibit replication of DNA viruses in nondividing macrophages.

  5. Inclusion bodies are a site of ebolavirus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenen, Thomas; Shabman, Reed S; Groseth, Allison; Herwig, Astrid; Weber, Michaela; Schudt, Gordian; Dolnik, Olga; Basler, Christopher F; Becker, Stephan; Feldmann, Heinz

    2012-11-01

    Inclusion bodies are a characteristic feature of ebolavirus infections in cells. They contain large numbers of preformed nucleocapsids, but their biological significance has been debated, and they have been suggested to be aggregates of viral proteins without any further biological function. However, recent data for other viruses that produce similar structures have suggested that inclusion bodies might be involved in genome replication and transcription. In order to study filovirus inclusion bodies, we fused mCherry to the ebolavirus polymerase L, which is found in inclusion bodies. The resulting L-mCherry fusion protein was functional in minigenome assays and incorporated into virus-like particles. Importantly, L-mCherry fluorescence in transfected cells was readily detectable and distributed in a punctate pattern characteristic for inclusion bodies. A recombinant ebolavirus encoding L-mCherry instead of L was rescued and showed virtually identical growth kinetics and endpoint titers to those for wild-type virus. Using this virus, we showed that the onset of inclusion body formation corresponds to the onset of viral genome replication, but that viral transcription occurs prior to inclusion body formation. Live-cell imaging further showed that inclusion bodies are highly dynamic structures and that they can undergo dramatic reorganization during cell division. Finally, by labeling nascent RNAs using click technology we showed that inclusion bodies are indeed the site of viral RNA synthesis. Based on these data we conclude that, rather than being inert aggregates of nucleocapsids, ebolavirus inclusion bodies are in fact complex and dynamic structures and an important site at which viral RNA replication takes place.

  6. Replication Research and Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travers, Jason C.; Cook, Bryan G.; Therrien, William J.; Coyne, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Replicating previously reported empirical research is a necessary aspect of an evidence-based field of special education, but little formal investigation into the prevalence of replication research in the special education research literature has been conducted. Various factors may explain the lack of attention to replication of special education…

  7. Dissecting virus entry: Replication-independent analysis of virus binding, internalization, and penetration using minimal complementation of β-galactosidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burkard, Christine; Bloyet, Louis Marie; Wicht, Oliver; Van Kuppeveld, Frank J.; Rottier, Peter J M; De Haan, Cornelis A M; Bosch, Berend Jan

    2014-01-01

    Studies of viral entry into host cells often rely on the detection of post-entry parameters, such as viral replication or the expression of a reporter gene, rather than on measuring entry per se. The lack of assays to easily detect the different steps of entry severely hampers the analysis of this

  8. Replication data collection highlights value in diversity of replication attempts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSoto, K Andrew; Schweinsberg, Martin

    2017-03-14

    Researchers agree that replicability and reproducibility are key aspects of science. A collection of Data Descriptors published in Scientific Data presents data obtained in the process of attempting to replicate previously published research. These new replication data describe published and unpublished projects. The different papers in this collection highlight the many ways that scientific replications can be conducted, and they reveal the benefits and challenges of crucial replication research. The organizers of this collection encourage scientists to reuse the data contained in the collection for their own work, and also believe that these replication examples can serve as educational resources for students, early-career researchers, and experienced scientists alike who are interested in learning more about the process of replication.

  9. Who Regulates Whom? An Overview of RNA Granules and Viral Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Poblete-Durán

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available After viral infection, host cells respond by mounting an anti-viral stress response in order to create a hostile atmosphere for viral replication, leading to the shut-off of mRNA translation (protein synthesis and the assembly of RNA granules. Two of these RNA granules have been well characterized in yeast and mammalian cells, stress granules (SGs, which are translationally silent sites of RNA triage and processing bodies (PBs, which are involved in mRNA degradation. This review discusses the role of these RNA granules in the evasion of anti-viral stress responses through virus-induced remodeling of cellular ribonucleoproteins (RNPs.

  10. Anti-viral RNA silencing: do we look like plants ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lecellier Charles-Henri

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The anti-viral function of RNA silencing was first discovered in plants as a natural manifestation of the artificial 'co-suppression', which refers to the extinction of endogenous gene induced by homologous transgene. Because silencing components are conserved among most, if not all, eukaryotes, the question rapidly arose as to determine whether this process fulfils anti-viral functions in animals, such as insects and mammals. It appears that, whereas the anti-viral process seems to be similarly conserved from plants to insects, even in worms, RNA silencing does influence the replication of mammalian viruses but in a particular mode: micro(miRNAs, endogenous small RNAs naturally implicated in translational control, rather than virus-derived small interfering (siRNAs like in other organisms, are involved. In fact, these recent studies even suggest that RNA silencing may be beneficial for viral replication. Accordingly, several large DNA mammalian viruses have been shown to encode their own miRNAs. Here, we summarize the seminal studies that have implicated RNA silencing in viral infection and compare the different eukaryotic responses.

  11. Biochemical principles and inhibitors to interfere with viral capping pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decroly, Etienne; Canard, Bruno

    2017-06-01

    Messenger RNAs are decorated by a cap structure, which is essential for their translation into proteins. Many viruses have developed strategies in order to cap their mRNAs. The cap is either synthetized by a subset of viral or cellular enzymes, or stolen from capped cellular mRNAs by viral endonucleases ('cap-snatching'). Reverse genetic studies provide evidence that inhibition of viral enzymes belonging to the capping pathway leads to inhibition of virus replication. The replication defect results from reduced protein synthesis as well as from detection of incompletely capped RNAs by cellular innate immunity sensors. Thus, it is now admitted that capping enzymes are validated antiviral targets, as their inhibition will support an antiviral response in addition to the attenuation of viral mRNA translation. In this review, we describe the different viral enzymes involved in mRNA capping together with relevant inhibitors, and their biochemical features useful in inhibitor discovery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Cyber security

    CERN Document Server

    Voeller, John G

    2014-01-01

    Cyber Security features articles from the Wiley Handbook of Science and Technology for Homeland Security covering topics related to cyber security metrics and measure  and related technologies that meet security needs. Specific applications to web services, the banking and the finance sector, and industrial process control systems are discussed.

  13. Financial security

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Goede, M.; Burgess, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    1. Introduction J. Peter Burgess Part 1: New Security Concepts 2. Civilizational Security Brett Bowden 3. Risk Oliver Kessler 4. Small Arms Keith Krause 5. Critical Human Security Taylor Owen 6. Critical Geopolitics Simon Dalby Part 2: New Security Subjects 7. Biopolitics Michael Dillon 8. Gendered

  14. Dengue virus replicates and accumulates in Aedes aegypti salivary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raquin, Vincent; Lambrechts, Louis

    2017-07-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an RNA virus transmitted among humans by mosquito vectors, mainly Aedes aegypti. DENV transmission requires viral dissemination from the mosquito midgut to the salivary glands. During this process the virus undergoes several population bottlenecks, which are stochastic reductions in population size that restrict intra-host viral genetic diversity and limit the efficiency of natural selection. Despite the implications for virus transmission and evolution, DENV replication in salivary glands has not been directly demonstrated. Here, we used a strand-specific quantitative RT-PCR assay to demonstrate that negative-strand DENV RNA is produced in Ae. aegypti salivary glands, providing conclusive evidence that viral replication occurs in this tissue. Furthermore, we showed that the concentration of DENV genomic RNA in salivary glands increases significantly over time, indicating that active replication likely replenishes DENV genetic diversity prior to transmission. These findings improve our understanding of the biological determinants of DENV fitness and evolution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. HIV and Viral Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... get some forms of viral hepatitis the same way you get HIV—through unprotected sexual contact and injection drug use. HAV, which causes a short-term but occasionally severe illness, is usually spread when the virus is ingested from contact with ...

  16. Immigration and viral hepatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Sharma (Suraj); M. Carballo (Manuel); J.J. Feld (Jordan J.); H.L.A. Janssen (Harry)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWHO estimates reveal that the global prevalence of viral hepatitis may be as high as 500 million, with an annual mortality rate of up to 1.3 million individuals. The majority of this global burden of disease is borne by nations of the developing world with high rates of vertical and

  17. VIRAL FEVER WITH THROMBOCYTOPENIA

    OpenAIRE

    Shilpa Anand Hakki

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND There is an alarming increase in the incidence of fever with thrombocytopenia especially during monsoon and peri-monsoon period. Infections with protozoa, bacteria and viruses can cause thrombocytopenia with or without disseminated intravascular coagulation. Commonly, dengue, malaria, scrub typhus and other rickettsial infections, meningococci, Leptospira and certain viral infections present as fever with thrombocytopenia. Occasionally, these patients can go on to devel...

  18. Replication Capacity of Viruses from Acute Infection Drives HIV-1 Disease Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selhorst, Philippe; Combrinck, Carina; Ndabambi, Nonkululeko; Ismail, Sherazaan D; Abrahams, Melissa-Rose; Lacerda, Miguel; Samsunder, Natasha; Garrett, Nigel; Abdool Karim, Quarraisha; Abdool Karim, Salim S; Williamson, Carolyn

    2017-04-15

    The viral genotype has been shown to play an important role in HIV pathogenesis following transmission. However, the viral phenotypic properties that contribute to disease progression remain unclear. Most studies have been limited to the evaluation of Gag function in the context of a recombinant virus backbone. Using this approach, important biological information may be lost, making the evaluation of viruses obtained during acute infection, representing the transmitted virus, a more biologically relevant model. Here, we evaluate the roles of viral infectivity and the replication capacity of viruses from acute infection in disease progression in women who seroconverted in the CAPRISA 004 tenofovir microbicide trial. We show that viral replication capacity, but not viral infectivity, correlates with the set point viral load (Spearman r = 0.346; P = 0.045) and that replication capacity (hazard ratio [HR] = 4.52; P = 0.01) can predict CD4 decline independently of the viral load (HR = 2.9; P = 0.004) or protective HLA alleles (HR = 0.61; P = 0.36). We further demonstrate that Gag-Pro is not the main driver of this association, suggesting that additional properties of the transmitted virus play a role in disease progression. Finally, we find that although viruses from the tenofovir arm were 2-fold less infectious, they replicated at rates similar to those of viruses from the placebo arm. This indicates that the use of tenofovir gel did not select for viral variants with higher replication capacity. Overall, this study supports a strong influence of the replication capacity in acute infection on disease progression, potentially driven by interaction of multiple genes rather than a dominant role of the major structural gene gagIMPORTANCE HIV disease progression is known to differ between individuals, and defining which fraction of this variation can be attributed to the virus is important both clinically and epidemiologically. In this study, we show that the replication

  19. LTE security

    CERN Document Server

    Forsberg, Dan; Moeller, Wolf-Dietrich

    2010-01-01

    Addressing the security solutions for LTE, a cellular technology from Third Generation Partnership Project (3GPP), this book shows how LTE security substantially extends GSM and 3G security. It also encompasses the architectural aspects, known as SAE, to give a comprehensive resource on the topic. Although the security for SAE/LTE evolved from the security for GSM and 3G, due to different architectural and business requirements of fourth generation systems the SAE/LTE security architecture is substantially different from its predecessors. This book presents in detail the security mechanisms em

  20. Cathepsin B & L are not required for ebola virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Marzi

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV, family Filoviridae, emerged in 1976 on the African continent. Since then it caused several outbreaks of viral hemorrhagic fever in humans with case fatality rates up to 90% and remains a serious Public Health concern and biothreat pathogen. The most pathogenic and best-studied species is Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV. EBOV encodes one viral surface glycoprotein (GP, which is essential for replication, a determinant of pathogenicity and an important immunogen. GP mediates viral entry through interaction with cellular surface molecules, which results in the uptake of virus particles via macropinocytosis. Later in this pathway endosomal acidification activates the cysteine proteases Cathepsin B and L (CatB, CatL, which have been shown to cleave ZEBOV-GP leading to subsequent exposure of the putative receptor-binding and fusion domain and productive infection. We studied the effect of CatB and CatL on in vitro and in vivo replication of EBOV. Similar to previous findings, our results show an effect of CatB, but not CatL, on ZEBOV entry into cultured cells. Interestingly, cell entry by other EBOV species (Bundibugyo, Côte d'Ivoire, Reston and Sudan ebolavirus was independent of CatB or CatL as was EBOV replication in general. To investigate whether CatB and CatL have a role in vivo during infection, we utilized the mouse model for ZEBOV. Wild-type (control, catB(-/- and catL(-/- mice were equally susceptible to lethal challenge with mouse-adapted ZEBOV with no difference in virus replication and time to death. In conclusion, our results show that CatB and CatL activity is not required for EBOV replication. Furthermore, EBOV glycoprotein cleavage seems to be mediated by an array of proteases making targeted therapeutic approaches difficult.

  1. Continuous de novo generation of spatially segregated hepatitis C virus replication organelles revealed by pulse-chase imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongliang; Tai, Andrew W

    2017-01-01

    Like all positive-sense RNA viruses, hepatitis C virus (HCV) induces host membrane alterations for its replication. In chronically infected cells, it is not known whether these viral replication organelles are being continually resupplied by newly synthesized viral proteins in situ, or whether they are generated de novo. Here we aimed to study temporal events in replication organelles formation and maturation. Here we use pulse-chase labeling in combination with confocal microscopy, correlative light electron microscopy and biochemical methods to identify temporally distinct populations of replication organelles in living cells and study the formation, morphogenesis as well as compositional and functional changes of replication organelles over time. We found that HCV replication organelles are continuously generated de novo at spatially distinct sites from preformed ones. This process is accompanied by accumulated intracellular membrane alteration, increased cholesterol delivery, NS5A phosphorylation, and positive-strand RNA content, and by eventual association with HCV core protein around lipid droplets. Generation of spatially segregated foci requires viral NS5A and the host factors phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase and oxysterol-binding protein, while association of foci with lipid droplets requires cholesterol. Our results reveal that HCV replication organelles are not static structures, but instead are continuously generated and dynamically change in composition and possibly also in function. Hepatitis C virus replication membrane structures are continuously generated at spatially distinct sites. New replication organelles are different in composition, and possibly also in function, compared to old replication organelles. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Prevalence and incidence of bloodborne viral infections among Danish prisoners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christensen, P B; Krarup, H B; Niesters, H G; Norder, H; Georgsen, J

    2000-01-01

    In order to determine the prevalence and incidence of bloodborne viral infections among prisoners, we conducted a prospective study in a Danish medium security prison for males. The prisoners were offered an interview and blood test for hepatitis and human immunodeficiency virus HIV at inclusion as

  3. Immune and viral correlates of "secondary viral control" after treatment interruption in chronically HIV-1 infected patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Van Gulck

    Full Text Available Upon interruption of antiretroviral therapy, HIV-infected patients usually show viral load rebound to pre-treatment levels. Four patients, hereafter referred to as secondary controllers (SC, were identified who initiated therapy during chronic infection and, after stopping treatment, could control virus replication at undetectable levels for more than six months. In the present study we set out to unravel possible viral and immune parameters or mechanisms of this phenomenon by comparing secondary controllers with elite controllers and non-controllers, including patients under HAART. As candidate correlates of protection, virus growth kinetics, levels of intracellular viral markers, several aspects of HIV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell function and HIV neutralizing antibodies were investigated. As expected all intracellular viral markers were lower in aviremic as compared to viremic subjects, but in addition both elite and secondary controllers had lower levels of viral unspliced RNA in PBMC as compared to patients on HAART. Ex vivo cultivation of the virus from CD4+ T cells of SC consistently failed in one patient and showed delayed kinetics in the three others. Formal in vitro replication studies of these three viruses showed low to absent growth in two cases and a virus with normal fitness in the third case. T cell responses toward HIV peptides, evaluated in IFN-γ ELISPOT, revealed no significant differences in breadth, magnitude or avidity between SC and all other patient groups. Neither was there a difference in polyfunctionality of CD4+ or CD8+ T cells, as evaluated with intracellular cytokine staining. However, secondary and elite controllers showed higher proliferative responses to Gag and Pol peptides. SC also showed the highest level of autologous neutralizing antibodies. These data suggest that higher T cell proliferative responses and lower replication kinetics might be instrumental in secondary viral control in the absence of

  4. Neutrophils and viral-induced neurologic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grist, Jonathan J; Marro, Brett; Lane, Thomas E

    2016-06-08

    Infection of the central nervous system (CNS) by neurotropic viruses represents an increasing worldwide problem in terms of morbidity and mortality for people of all ages. Although unique structural features of the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) provide a physical and physiological barrier, a number of neurotropic viruses are able to enter the CNS resulting in a variety of pathological outcomes. Nonetheless, antigen-specific lymphocytes are ultimately able to accumulate within the CNS and contribute to defense by reducing or eliminating the invading viral pathogen. Alternatively, infiltration of activated cells of the immune system may be detrimental, as these cells can contribute to neuropathology that may result in long-term cellular damage or death. More recently, myeloid cells e.g. neutrophils have been implicated in contributing to both host defense and disease in response to viral infection of the CNS. This review highlights recent studies using coronavirus-induced neurologic disease as a model to determine how neutrophils affect effective control of viral replication as well as demyelination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Expression homeostasis during DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voichek, Yoav; Bar-Ziv, Raz; Barkai, Naama

    2016-03-04

    Genome replication introduces a stepwise increase in the DNA template available for transcription. Genes replicated early in S phase experience this increase before late-replicating genes, raising the question of how expression levels are affected by DNA replication. We show that in budding yeast, messenger RNA (mRNA) synthesis rate is buffered against changes in gene dosage during S phase. This expression homeostasis depends on acetylation of H3 on its internal K56 site by Rtt109/Asf1. Deleting these factors, mutating H3K56 or up-regulating its deacetylation, increases gene expression in S phase in proportion to gene replication timing. Therefore, H3K56 acetylation on newly deposited histones reduces transcription efficiency from replicated DNA, complementing its role in guarding genome stability. Our study provides molecular insight into the mechanism maintaining expression homeostasis during DNA replication. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. Host ESCRT proteins are required for bromovirus RNA replication compartment assembly and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Diaz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Positive-strand RNA viruses genome replication invariably is associated with vesicles or other rearranged cellular membranes. Brome mosaic virus (BMV RNA replication occurs on perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum (ER membranes in ~70 nm vesicular invaginations (spherules. BMV RNA replication vesicles show multiple parallels with membrane-enveloped, budding retrovirus virions, whose envelopment and release depend on the host ESCRT (endosomal sorting complexes required for transport membrane-remodeling machinery. We now find that deleting components of the ESCRT pathway results in at least two distinct BMV phenotypes. One group of genes regulate RNA replication and the frequency of viral replication complex formation, but had no effect on spherule size, while a second group of genes regulate RNA replication in a way or ways independent of spherule formation. In particular, deleting SNF7 inhibits BMV RNA replication > 25-fold and abolishes detectable BMV spherule formation, even though the BMV RNA replication proteins accumulate and localize normally on perinuclear ER membranes. Moreover, BMV ESCRT recruitment and spherule assembly depend on different sets of protein-protein interactions from those used by multivesicular body vesicles, HIV-1 virion budding, or tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV spherule formation. These and other data demonstrate that BMV requires cellular ESCRT components for proper formation and function of its vesicular RNA replication compartments. The results highlight growing but diverse interactions of ESCRT factors with many viruses and viral processes, and potential value of the ESCRT pathway as a target for broad-spectrum antiviral resistance.

  7. Regulated transport into the nucleus of herpesviridae DNA replication core proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualtiero, Alvisi; Jans, David A; Camozzi, Daria; Avanzi, Simone; Loregian, Arianna; Ripalti, Alessandro; Palù, Giorgio

    2013-09-16

    The Herpesvirdae family comprises several major human pathogens belonging to three distinct subfamilies. Their double stranded DNA genome is replicated in the nuclei of infected cells by a number of host and viral products. Among the latter the viral replication complex, whose activity is strictly required for viral replication, is composed of six different polypeptides, including a two-subunit DNA polymerase holoenzyme, a trimeric primase/helicase complex and a single stranded DNA binding protein. The study of herpesviral DNA replication machinery is extremely important, both because it provides an excellent model to understand processes related to eukaryotic DNA replication and it has important implications for the development of highly needed antiviral agents. Even though all known herpesviruses utilize very similar mechanisms for amplification of their genomes, the nuclear import of the replication complex components appears to be a heterogeneous and highly regulated process to ensure the correct spatiotemporal localization of each protein. The nuclear transport process of these enzymes is controlled by three mechanisms, typifying the main processes through which protein nuclear import is generally regulated in eukaryotic cells. These include cargo post-translational modification-based recognition by the intracellular transporters, piggy-back events allowing coordinated nuclear import of multimeric holoenzymes, and chaperone-assisted nuclear import of specific subunits. In this review we summarize these mechanisms and discuss potential implications for the development of antiviral compounds aimed at inhibiting the Herpesvirus life cycle by targeting nuclear import of the Herpesvirus DNA replicating enzymes.

  8. G-quadruplex-interacting compounds alter latent DNA replication and episomal persistence of KSHV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madireddy, Advaitha; Purushothaman, Pravinkumar; Loosbroock, Christopher P; Robertson, Erle S; Schildkraut, Carl L; Verma, Subhash C

    2016-05-05

    Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) establishes life-long latent infection by persisting as an extra-chromosomal episome in the infected cells and by maintaining its genome in dividing cells. KSHV achieves this by tethering its epigenome to the host chromosome by latency associated nuclear antigen (LANA), which binds in the terminal repeat (TR) region of the viral genome. Sequence analysis of the TR, a GC-rich DNA element, identified several potential Quadruplex G-Rich Sequences (QGRS). Since quadruplexes have the tendency to obstruct DNA replication, we used G-quadruplex stabilizing compounds to examine their effect on latent DNA replication and the persistence of viral episomes. Our results showed that these G-quadruplex stabilizing compounds led to the activation of dormant origins of DNA replication, with preferential bi-directional pausing of replications forks moving out of the TR region, implicating the role of the G-rich TR in the perturbation of episomal DNA replication. Over time, treatment with PhenDC3 showed a loss of viral episomes in the infected cells. Overall, these data show that G-quadruplex stabilizing compounds retard the progression of replication forks leading to a reduction in DNA replication and episomal maintenance. These results suggest a potential role for G-quadruplex stabilizers in the treatment of KSHV-associated diseases. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Ultrastructure of the replication sites of positive-strand RNA viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harak, Christian; Lohmann, Volker, E-mail: volker_lohmann@med.uni-heidelberg.de

    2015-05-15

    Positive strand RNA viruses replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells and induce intracellular membranous compartments harboring the sites of viral RNA synthesis. These replication factories are supposed to concentrate the components of the replicase and to shield replication intermediates from the host cell innate immune defense. Virus induced membrane alterations are often generated in coordination with host factors and can be grouped into different morphotypes. Recent advances in conventional and electron microscopy have contributed greatly to our understanding of their biogenesis, but still many questions remain how viral proteins capture membranes and subvert host factors for their need. In this review, we will discuss different representatives of positive strand RNA viruses and their ways of hijacking cellular membranes to establish replication complexes. We will further focus on host cell factors that are critically involved in formation of these membranes and how they contribute to viral replication. - Highlights: • Positive strand RNA viruses induce massive membrane alterations. • Despite the great diversity, replication complexes share many similarities. • Host factors play a pivotal role in replication complex biogenesis. • Use of the same host factors by several viruses hints to similar functions.

  10. Visualization and measurement of ATP levels in living cells replicating hepatitis C virus genome RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomomi Ando

    Full Text Available Adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP is the primary energy currency of all living organisms and participates in a variety of cellular processes. Although ATP requirements during viral lifecycles have been examined in a number of studies, a method by which ATP production can be monitored in real-time, and by which ATP can be quantified in individual cells and subcellular compartments, is lacking, thereby hindering studies aimed at elucidating the precise mechanisms by which viral replication energized by ATP is controlled. In this study, we investigated the fluctuation and distribution of ATP in cells during RNA replication of the hepatitis C virus (HCV, a member of the Flaviviridae family. We demonstrated that cells involved in viral RNA replication actively consumed ATP, thereby reducing cytoplasmic ATP levels. Subsequently, a method to measure ATP levels at putative subcellular sites of HCV RNA replication in living cells was developed by introducing a recently-established Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET-based ATP indicator, called ATeam, into the NS5A coding region of the HCV replicon. Using this method, we were able to observe the formation of ATP-enriched dot-like structures, which co-localize with non-structural viral proteins, within the cytoplasm of HCV-replicating cells but not in non-replicating cells. The obtained FRET signals allowed us to estimate ATP concentrations within HCV replicating cells as ∼5 mM at possible replicating sites and ∼1 mM at peripheral sites that did not appear to be involved in HCV replication. In contrast, cytoplasmic ATP levels in non-replicating Huh-7 cells were estimated as ∼2 mM. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate changes in ATP concentration within cells during replication of the HCV genome and increased ATP levels at distinct sites within replicating cells. ATeam may be a powerful tool for the study of energy metabolism during replication of the viral genome.

  11. Three-Dimensional Architecture and Biogenesis of Membrane Structures Associated with Plant Virus Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xuejiao; Cao, Xiuling; Wang, Xueting; Jiang, Jun; Wan, Juan; Laliberté, Jean-François; Zhang, Yongliang

    2018-01-01

    Positive-sense (+) RNA viruses represent the most abundant group of viruses and are dependent on the host cell machinery to replicate. One remarkable feature that occurs after (+) RNA virus entry into cells is the remodeling of host endomembranes, leading to the formation of viral replication factories. Recently, rapid progress in three-dimensional (3D) imaging technologies, such as electron tomography (ET) and focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM), has enabled researchers to visualize the novel membrane structures induced by viruses at high resolution. These 3D imaging technologies provide new mechanistic insights into the viral infection cycle. In this review, we summarize the latest reports on the cellular remodeling that occurs during plant virus infection; in particular, we focus on studies that provide 3D architectural information on viral replication factories. We also outline the mechanisms underlying the formation of these membranous structures and discuss possible future research directions.

  12. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus LANA recruits the DNA polymerase clamp loader to mediate efficient replication and virus persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiming; Tsurimoto, Toshiki; Juillard, Franceline; Li, Lin; Li, Shijun; De León Vázquez, Erika; Chen, She; Kaye, Kenneth

    2014-08-12

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) latently infects tumor cells and persists as a multiple-copy, extrachromosomal, circular episome. To persist, the viral genome must replicate with each cell cycle. The KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) mediates viral DNA replication and persistence, but little is known regarding the underlying mechanisms. We find that LANA recruits replication factor C (RFC), the DNA polymerase clamp [proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)] loader, to drive DNA replication efficiently. Mutated LANA lacking RFC interaction was deficient for LANA-mediated DNA replication and episome persistence. RFC depletion had a negative impact on LANA's ability to replicate and maintain viral DNA in cells containing artificial KSHV episomes or in infected cells, leading to loss of virus. LANA substantially increased PCNA loading onto DNA in vitro and recruited RFC and PCNA to KSHV DNA in cells. These findings suggest that PCNA loading is a rate-limiting step in DNA replication that is incompatible with viral survival. LANA enhancement of PCNA loading permits efficient virus replication and persistence, revealing a previously unidentified mechanism for KSHV latency.

  13. Cowpea mosaic virus 32- and 60-kilodalton replication proteins target and change the morphology of endoplasmic reticulum membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carette, J.E.; Lent, van J.; MacFarlance, S.A.; Wellink, J.E.; Kammen, van A.

    2002-01-01

    Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) replicates in close association with small membranous vesicles that are formed by rearrangements of intracellular membranes. To determine which of the viral proteins are responsible for the rearrangements of membranes and the attachment of the replication complex, we have

  14. Modeling inhomogeneous DNA replication kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel G Gauthier

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic organisms, DNA replication is initiated at a series of chromosomal locations called origins, where replication forks are assembled proceeding bidirectionally to replicate the genome. The distribution and firing rate of these origins, in conjunction with the velocity at which forks progress, dictate the program of the replication process. Previous attempts at modeling DNA replication in eukaryotes have focused on cases where the firing rate and the velocity of replication forks are homogeneous, or uniform, across the genome. However, it is now known that there are large variations in origin activity along the genome and variations in fork velocities can also take place. Here, we generalize previous approaches to modeling replication, to allow for arbitrary spatial variation of initiation rates and fork velocities. We derive rate equations for left- and right-moving forks and for replication probability over time that can be solved numerically to obtain the mean-field replication program. This method accurately reproduces the results of DNA replication simulation. We also successfully adapted our approach to the inverse problem of fitting measurements of DNA replication performed on single DNA molecules. Since such measurements are performed on specified portion of the genome, the examined DNA molecules may be replicated by forks that originate either within the studied molecule or outside of it. This problem was solved by using an effective flux of incoming replication forks at the model boundaries to represent the origin activity outside the studied region. Using this approach, we show that reliable inferences can be made about the replication of specific portions of the genome even if the amount of data that can be obtained from single-molecule experiments is generally limited.

  15. Bile acids for viral hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Liu, J; Gluud, C

    2007-01-01

    Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus has been reached regarding their usefulness.......Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus has been reached regarding their usefulness....

  16. Lycorine reduces mortality of human enterovirus 71-infected mice by inhibiting virus replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Chuan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human enterovirus 71 (EV71 infection causes hand, foot and mouth disease in children under 6 years old and this infection occasionally induces severe neurological complications. No vaccines or drugs are clinical available to control EV71 epidemics. In present study, we show that treatment with lycorine reduced the viral cytopathic effect (CPE on rhabdomyosarcoma (RD cells by inhibiting virus replication. Analysis of this inhibitory effect of lycorine on viral proteins synthesis suggests that lycorine blocks the elongation of the viral polyprotein during translation. Lycorine treatment of mice challenged with a lethal dose of EV71 resulted in reduction of mortality, clinical scores and pathological changes in the muscles of mice, which were achieved through inhibition of viral replication. When mice were infected with a moderate dose of EV71, lycorine treatment was able to protect them from paralysis. Lycorine may be a potential drug candidate for the clinical treatment of EV71-infected patients.

  17. Molecular Studies of HTLV-1 Replication: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L. Martin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 was the first human retrovirus discovered. Studies on HTLV-1 have been instrumental for our understanding of the molecular pathology of virus-induced cancers. HTLV-1 is the etiological agent of an adult T-cell leukemia (ATL and can lead to a variety of neurological pathologies, including HTLV-1-associated-myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. The ability to treat the aggressive ATL subtypes remains inadequate. HTLV-1 replicates by (1 an infectious cycle involving virus budding and infection of new permissive target cells and (2 mitotic division of cells harboring an integrated provirus. Virus replication initiates host antiviral immunity and the checkpoint control of cell proliferation, but HTLV-1 has evolved elegant strategies to counteract these host defense mechanisms to allow for virus persistence. The study of the molecular biology of HTLV-1 replication has provided crucial information for understanding HTLV-1 replication as well as aspects of viral replication that are shared between HTLV-1 and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1. Here in this review, we discuss the various stages of the virus replication cycle—both foundational knowledge as well as current updates of ongoing research that is important for understanding HTLV-1 molecular pathogenesis as well as in developing novel therapeutic strategies.

  18. Dynamics of picornavirus RNA replication within infected cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belsham, Graham; Normann, Preben

    2008-01-01

    Replication of many picornaviruses is inhibited by low concentrations of guanidine. Guanidine-resistant mutants are readily isolated and the mutations map to the coding region for the 2C protein. Using in vitro replication assays it has been determined previously that guanidine blocks the initiat...... replication. Thus, the guanidine-sensitive step in RNA synthesis is important throughout the virus life cycle in cells....... the initiation of negative-strand synthesis. We have now examined the dynamics of RNA replication, measured by quantitative RT-PCR, within cells infected with either swine vesicular disease virus (an enterovirus) or foot-and-mouth disease virus as regulated by the presence or absence of guanidine. Following...... the removal of guanidine from the infected cells, RNA replication occurs after a significant lag phase. This restoration of RNA synthesis requires de novo protein synthesis. Viral RNA can be maintained for at least 72 h within cells in the absence of apparent replication but guanidine-resistant virus can...

  19. Viral Marketing and Academic Institution

    OpenAIRE

    Koktová, Silvie

    2010-01-01

    This bachelor thesis examines modern and constantly developing kind of internet marketing -- the so called viral marketing. It deals with its origin, principle, process, advantages and disadvantages, types of viral marketing and presumptions of creating successful viral campaign. The aim of the theoretical part is especially the understanding of viral marketing as one of the effective instruments of contemporary marketing. In this theoretical part the thesis also elaborates a marketing school...

  20. Efficient replication of recombinant Enterovirus B types, carrying different P1 genes in the coxsackievirus B5 replicative backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Nina; Sävneby, Anna; Gullberg, Maria; Evertsson, Kim; Klingel, Karin; Lindberg, A Michael

    2015-06-01

    Recombination is an important feature in the evolution of the Enterovirus genus. Phylogenetic studies of enteroviruses have revealed that the capsid genomic region (P1) is type specific, while the parts of the genome coding for the non-structural proteins (P2-P3) are species specific. Hence, the genome may be regarded as consisting of two modules that evolve independently. In this study, it was investigated whether the non-structural coding part of the genome in one type could support replication of a virus with a P1 region from another type of the same species. A cassette vector (pCas) containing a full-length cDNA copy of coxsackievirus B5 (CVB5) was used as a replicative backbone. The P1 region of pCas was replaced with the corresponding part from coxsackievirus B3 Nancy (CVB3N), coxsackievirus B6 Schmitt (CVB6S), and echovirus 7 Wallace (E7W), all members of the Enterovirus B species. The replication efficiency after transfection with clone-derived in vitro transcribed RNA was studied and compared with that of pCas. All the recombinant viruses replicated with similar efficiencies and showed threshold cycle (Ct) values, tissue culture infectivity dose 50 %, and plaque-forming unit titers comparable to viruses generated from the pCas construct. In addition to this, a clone without the P1 region was also constructed, and Western Blot and immunofluorescence staining analysis showed that the viral genome could be translated and replicated despite the lack of the structural protein-coding region. To conclude, the replicative backbone of the CVB5 cassette vector supports replication of intraspecies constructs with P1 regions derived from other members of the Enterovirus B species. In addition to this, the replicative backbone can be both translated and replicated without the presence of a P1 region.

  1. SARS-coronavirus replication is supported by a reticulovesicular network of modified endoplasmic reticulum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kèvin Knoops

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Positive-strand RNA viruses, a large group including human pathogens such as SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV, replicate in the cytoplasm of infected host cells. Their replication complexes are commonly associated with modified host cell membranes. Membrane structures supporting viral RNA synthesis range from distinct spherular membrane invaginations to more elaborate webs of packed membranes and vesicles. Generally, their ultrastructure, morphogenesis, and exact role in viral replication remain to be defined. Poorly characterized double-membrane vesicles (DMVs were previously implicated in SARS-CoV RNA synthesis. We have now applied electron tomography of cryofixed infected cells for the three-dimensional imaging of coronavirus-induced membrane alterations at high resolution. Our analysis defines a unique reticulovesicular network of modified endoplasmic reticulum that integrates convoluted membranes, numerous interconnected DMVs (diameter 200-300 nm, and "vesicle packets" apparently arising from DMV merger. The convoluted membranes were most abundantly immunolabeled for viral replicase subunits. However, double-stranded RNA, presumably revealing the site of viral RNA synthesis, mainly localized to the DMV interior. Since we could not discern a connection between DMV interior and cytosol, our analysis raises several questions about the mechanism of DMV formation and the actual site of SARS-CoV RNA synthesis. Our data document the extensive virus-induced reorganization of host cell membranes into a network that is used to organize viral replication and possibly hide replicating RNA from antiviral defense mechanisms. Together with biochemical studies of the viral enzyme complex, our ultrastructural description of this "replication network" will aid to further dissect the early stages of the coronavirus life cycle and its virus-host interactions.

  2. Antisense oligonucleotide inhibition of hepatitis C virus genotype 4 replication in HepG2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omran Moataza H

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C (HCV viral infection is a serious medical problem in Egypt and it has a devastating impact on the Egyptian economy. It is estimated that over 15% of Egyptians are infected by the virus and thus finding a cure for this disease is of utmost importance. Current therapies for hepatitis C virus (HCV genotype 4 with interferon/ribavirin have not been successful and thus the development of alternative therapy for this genotype is disparately needed. Results Although previous studies utilizing viral subgenomic or full cDNA fragments linked to reporter genes transfected into adhered cells or in a cell free system showed promise, demonstration of efficient viral replication was lacking. Thus, we utilized HepG2 cells infected with native HCV RNA genomes in a replication competent system and used antisense phosphorothioate Oligonucleotides (S-ODN against stem loop IIId and the AUG translation start site of the viral polyprotein precursor to monitor viral replication. We were able to show complete arrest of intracellular replication of HCV-4 at 1 uM S-ODN, thus providing a proof of concept for the potential antiviral activity of S-ODN on native genomic replication of HCV genotype 4. Conclusion We have successfully demonstrated that by using two S-ODNs [(S-ODN1 (nt 326–348 and S-ODN-2 (nt 264–282], we were able to completely inhibit viral replication in culture, thus confirming earlier reports on subgenomic constructs and suggesting a potential therapeutic value in HCV type 4.

  3. Viral RNA silencing suppression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hedil, Marcio; Kormelink, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The Bunyaviridae is a family of arboviruses including both plant-and vertebrate-infecting representatives. The Tospovirus genus accommodates plant-infecting bunyaviruses, which not only replicate in their plant host, but also in their inse