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Sample records for secretin

  1. Secretin and autism: a basic morphological study about the distribution of secretin in the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köves, Katalin; Kausz, Mária; Reser, Diana; Illyés, György; Takács, József; Heinzlmann, Andrea; Gyenge, Eszter; Horváth, Károly

    2004-12-15

    For the first time, the relationship between secretin and autism has been demonstrated by one of us. Intravenous administration of secretin in autistic children caused a fivefold higher pancreaticobiliary fluid secretion than in healthy ones and, at least in some of the patients, better mental functions were reported after the secretin test. Because the precise localization of secretin in the brain is still not completely known, the abovementioned observation led us to map secretin immunoreactivity in the nervous system of several mammalian species. In the present work, the distribution of secretin immunoreactivity in cat and human nervous systems was compared with that of rats using an immunohistochemical approach. Secretin immunoreactivity was observed in the following brain structures of both humans and in colchicine-treated rats: (1) Purkinje cells in the cerebellar cortex; (2) central cerebellar nuclei; (3) pyramidal cells in the motor cortex; and (4) primary sensory neurons. Additionally, secretin immnoreactive cells were observed in the human hippocampus and amygdala and in third-order sensory neurons of the rat auditory system. In cats, secretin was only observed in the spinal ganglia. Our findings support the view that secretin is not only a gastrointestinal peptide but that it is also a neuropeptide. Its presence or the lack of its presence may have a role in the development of behavioral disorders.

  2. Secretin radioimmunoassay using 125I-6-tyrosyl-secretin (6TS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raptis, S.; Leitze, M.; Schlegel, W.; Pfeiffer, E.F.

    1975-01-01

    In radioimmunological determination of secretin difficulties are caused by the following two problems: firstly, in raising potent antibodies, and secondly in satisfactory labeling. All secretin RIAs described in the literature were carried out with traditional synthetic secretin (Young, Lazarus, Chisholm and Atkinson 1968; Boden and Chey 1973; Holohan, Murphy, Buchanan and Elmore 1973; Boehm, Lee and Chey 1974). Our study describes the development of an assay with sufficient sensitivity to measure circulating immunoreactive secretin in human blood, by using 125 I-6-TS, which is a product of Schwarz and Mann/USA (SM). (orig.) [de

  3. Production of antibodies against secretin and their use for radioimmunoassay of secretin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groetzki, C.

    1980-01-01

    Synthetic thyroglobulin was bonded to bovine albunia and thyroglobulin according to the principle of the carbodiimide condensation reaction. 16 rabbits were immunized with these conjugates and with unconjugated secretin. Secretin labelling with 125 I was carried out by the chloramin-T method. The tracer has a specific activity of 15.45 mCi/mg. A secretin RIA was developed using the double antibody method. The sensitivity of the system could be raised by variation of the specific activity of the tracer and optimisation of the incubation parameters. Antisera were compared. The titers of secretin/bovine albumine conjugate antisera were similar to the antisera against secretin thyroglobulin conjugate. The sensitivity of the standard curves was higher for secretin/bovine albumin conjugate antisera than for thyroglobulin conjugate antisera. Two antisera were tested for specificity. The detection threshold of antiserum S 5 IX was 12,43 pmol/l while the 50% intercept was at 55.45 pmol/l. This antiserum is particularly suitable for a secretin RIA. (orig./MS)

  4. Plasma levels of secretin in man and dogs: validation of a secretin radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rayford, P.L.; Curtis, P.J.; Fender, H.R.; Thompson, J.C.

    1976-01-01

    We have developed and validated a secretin radioimmunoassay that is sufficiently sensitive to measure circulating levels of secretion in the plasma of man and dogs. At a final dilution of 1 : 50,000, the antibody bound 30 percent to 40 percent of radioiodinated ( 125 I) 6-tyrosyl synthetic secretin. Pure natural porcine secretin was used as a reference standard and a linear dose-response curve was generated with 10 to 1,000 pg. of the polypeptide. Little or no cross-reactivity was found when graded doses of other gastrointestinal polypeptides were assayed in the radioimmunoassay and immunoreactive secretin (IRS) in volumes of serum up to 300 μl could be measured accurately. Mean basal levels of IRS in the peripheral plasma of 22 normal human subjects was 216 +- 11.8 pg. per milliliter, in the peripheral plasma of dogs was 154 +- 6.1 pg. per milliliter, and in the portal plasma of dogs was 283 +- 22.2 pg. per milliliter. Basal IRS levels in portal plasma were significantly higher than in peripheral plasma (p < 0.05). In studies on the release of secretin in three normal human subjects, the mean basal level of secretin in peripheral plasma was 124 +- 8 pg. per milliliter. This level was increased to 137 +- 6, 137 +- 7, 149 +- 9, and 169 +- 10 pg. per milliliter during duodenal acidification with 0.15, 0.30, 0.77, and 1.25 mEq. 0.1N HCl per minute. The secretin response was related to the amount of acid used to irrigate the duodenum. In six dogs mean basal levels of secretin in the portal vein were 438 +- 102 pg. per milliliter. Secretin levels were significantly elevated above basal (p < 0.05) at 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 minutes during irrigation of the duodenum with 0.1N HCl and remained elevated for 5 and 10 minutes after duodenal acidification

  5. Insulin release by glucagon and secretin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod, Hans; Andreu, D; Thams, P

    1988-01-01

    Secretin and glucagon potentiate glucose-induced insulin release. We have compared the effects of secretin and glucagon with that of four hybrid molecules of the two hormones on insulin release and formation of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in isolated mouse pancreatic islets. All six peptides potentiated...... the release of insulin at 10 mM D-glucose, and their effects were indistinguishable with respect to the dynamics of release, dose-response relationship, and glucose dependency. However, measurements of cAMP accumulation in the presence of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (10(-4) M...... potentiating effects of secretin and glucagon on glucose-induced insulin release, their modes of action may be different....

  6. Origin of secretin receptor precedes the advent of tetrapoda: evidence on the separated origins of secretin and orexin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice K V Tam

    Full Text Available At present, secretin and its receptor have only been identified in mammals, and the origin of this ligand-receptor pair in early vertebrates is unclear. In addition, the elusive similarities of secretin and orexin in terms of both structures and functions suggest a common ancestral origin early in the vertebrate lineage. In this article, with the cloning and functional characterization of secretin receptors from lungfish and X. laevis as well as frog (X. laevis and Rana rugulosa secretins, we provide evidence that the secretin ligand-receptor pair has already diverged and become highly specific by the emergence of tetrapods. The secretin receptor-like sequence cloned from lungfish indicates that the secretin receptor was descended from a VPAC-like receptor prior the advent of sarcopterygians. To clarify the controversial relationship of secretin and orexin, orexin type-2 receptor was cloned from X. laevis. We demonstrated that, in frog, secretin and orexin could activate their mutual receptors, indicating their coordinated complementary role in mediating physiological processes in non-mammalian vertebrates. However, among the peptides in the secretin/glucagon superfamily, secretin was found to be the only peptide that could activate the orexin receptor. We therefore hypothesize that secretin and orexin are of different ancestral origins early in the vertebrate lineage.

  7. Secretin-radioimmunoassay, physiology and pathophysiology in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haecki, W.H.

    1978-01-01

    Production of antibodies to secretin for radioimmunoassay is straightforward. Secretin is iodinated by weak oxydation with lactoperoxydase and subsequent purification by ionexchange chromatography (Sephadex C25). The specific activity of fresh label is between 650 and 900 mCi x mol -6 . The label is highly purified and may be used in radioimmunoassay for several months. In order to eliminate plasma interference sepharose-beads with covalently coupled secretin antibodies are used to produce secretin-free standard plasma samples. Delay in the separation of plasma from fresh blood samples can lead to erronous results, even to falsely elevated secretin levels. - Duo-denal acidification only leads to physiological increases of secretin plasma levels. This may happen by intraduodenal instillation of acid, or by an acidic oral drink, or to a lesser extent after a meal. Secretin is distributed throughout the plasma volume and has a short halflife of around 3 minutes. Impaired release of secretin is found in children with coeliac disease. The role of secretin in peptic ulcer however is not clear. Chronic pancreatitis and renal insufficiency are without effect on plasma secretin levels. (orig.) [de

  8. Activation of Supraoptic Oxytocin Neurons by Secretin Facilitates Social Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, Yuki; Yoshida, Masahide; Takashima, Akihide; Takanami, Keiko; Yoshida, Shoma; Nishimori, Katsuhiko; Nishijima, Ichiko; Sakamoto, Hirotaka; Yamagata, Takanori; Onaka, Tatsushi

    2017-02-01

    Social recognition underlies social behavior in animals, and patients with psychiatric disorders associated with social deficits show abnormalities in social recognition. Oxytocin is implicated in social behavior and has received attention as an effective treatment for sociobehavioral deficits. Secretin receptor-deficient mice show deficits in social behavior. The relationship between oxytocin and secretin concerning social behavior remains to be determined. Expression of c-Fos in oxytocin neurons and release of oxytocin from their dendrites after secretin application were investigated. Social recognition was examined after intracerebroventricular or local injection of secretin, oxytocin, or an oxytocin receptor antagonist in rats, oxytocin receptor-deficient mice, and secretin receptor-deficient mice. Electron and light microscopic immunohistochemical analysis was also performed to determine whether oxytocin neurons extend their dendrites into the medial amygdala. Supraoptic oxytocin neurons expressed the secretin receptor. Secretin activated supraoptic oxytocin neurons and facilitated oxytocin release from dendrites. Secretin increased acquisition of social recognition in an oxytocin receptor-dependent manner. Local application of secretin into the supraoptic nucleus facilitated social recognition, and this facilitation was blocked by an oxytocin receptor antagonist injected into, but not outside of, the medial amygdala. In the medial amygdala, dendrite-like thick oxytocin processes were found to extend from the supraoptic nucleus. Furthermore, oxytocin treatment restored deficits of social recognition in secretin receptor-deficient mice. The results of our study demonstrate that secretin-induced dendritic oxytocin release from supraoptic neurons enhances social recognition. The newly defined secretin-oxytocin system may lead to a possible treatment for social deficits. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  9. Does secretin add value in pediatric magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trout, Andrew T.; Podberesky, Daniel J.; Serai, Suraj D.; Towbin, Alexander J.; Ren, Yan; Altaye, Mekebib

    2013-01-01

    Secretin - a hormone that stimulates pancreatic exocrine secretion - is described to improve visualization of the pancreatic duct by magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP). In our pediatric practice, however, we have not observed substantial benefit with the use of secretin. To determine whether secretin dilates and improves visualization of the pancreatic duct in pediatric MRCP. Retrospective evaluation of secretin-enhanced MRCPs performed over a 15-month period. One reviewer measured the pancreatic duct pre- and post-secretin and two reviewers, blinded to the administration of secretin, assessed image quality and subjective duct visibility. Similar assessments of the biliary tree served as internal controls. We reviewed 20 MRCPs in 17 children. Following secretin administration, there was a small (0.3 mm) but statistically significant increase in pancreatic duct diameter (P = 0.002) and small (<0.2 mm) but significant increase in intrahepatic bile duct diameter (P = 0.0104). On subjective review, there was no significant difference in image quality or duct visibility based on the administration of secretin. Secretin induces dilatation of the pancreatic duct but the value of that effect in pediatric MRCP is suspect given the small change in duct diameter and the lack of improvement in image quality and duct visibility. (orig.)

  10. Secretin, its discovery, and the introduction of the hormone concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik; de Muckadell, O B

    2000-01-01

    . The isolation and subsequent synthesis of secretin in the 1960s prepared the way for immunological techniques. Radioimmuno assays in the 1970s enabled demonstration of a direct endocrine role of secretin. Cloning and molecular hybridisation in the 1990s identified production site structure, precursor...

  11. Retardation of gastric emptying of solid food by secretin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleibeuker, J.H.; Beekhuis, H.; Piers, D.A.; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, O.B.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of secretin at nearly physiologic plasma concentrations on the gastric emptying rate of solid food was studied in 12 healthy men. A /sup 99m/Tc colloid-labeled pancake was used as the test meal. The gastric emptying rate was measured during 1 h using a dual-headed gamma-camera, and was expressed as the half-time of the emptying curve. To prevent endogenous secretin release, 400 mg of cimetidine was given before the meal. Subjects were studied under three conditions: (1) during infusion of saline; (2) during continuous infusion of secretin, 6.6 pmol/kg.h; and (3) during three intermittent 10-min periods of secretin infusion, 7.6 pmol/kg.h during each period. Both continuous and intermittent infusion of secretin increased half-emptying time, by 133% and 55%, respectively. The plasma secretin concentration in condition 1 was 0.8 pM; plateau concentration in condition 2 was 9.8 pM; and integrated mean concentration in condition 3 was 4.8 pM. It is concluded that secretin at approximately physiologic plasma concentrations retards gastric emptying of solid food in humans.

  12. Secretin receptor involvement in prion-infected cells and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Tomohiro; Nishizawa, Keiko; Oguma, Ayumi; Nishimura, Yuki; Sakasegawa, Yuji; Teruya, Kenta; Nishijima, Ichiko; Doh-ura, Katsumi

    2015-07-08

    The cellular mechanisms behind prion biosynthesis and metabolism remain unclear. Here we show that secretin signaling via the secretin receptor regulates abnormal prion protein formation in prion-infected cells. Animal studies demonstrate that secretin receptor deficiency slightly, but significantly, prolongs incubation time in female but not male mice. This gender-specificity is consistent with our finding that prion-infected cells are derived from females. Therefore, our results provide initial insights into the reasons why age of disease onset in certain prion diseases is reported to occur slightly earlier in females than males. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of dynamic MRCP after secretin stimulation for biliopancreatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohhigashi, Seiji; Nishio, Takeki; Watanabe, Fumihiko; Haradome, Hiroki; Doi, Osamu

    2000-01-01

    Both pancreaticobiliary maljunction and pancreatogastrostomy after pancreatoduodenectomy were analyzed to assess the utility of dynamic MRCP after secretin stimulation. Dynamic MRCP obtained every 60 seconds for 15 minutes after secretin administration revealed the bile and pancreatic fluid kinetics. Calculating the intensity value from the MR images allowed objective estimation of the bile and pancreatic fluid kinetics. Thus, this study demonstrated that dynamic MRCP after secretin stimulation was significantly useful in evaluating not only the morphologic features in pancreaticobiliary maljunction but also pancreatic exocrine function after resection of the pancreas. (author)

  14. Secretin enhances [14C]erythritol clearance in unanesthetized dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, M.H.; Baker, A.L.; Dhorajiwala, J.; Moossa, A.R.

    1982-01-01

    To determine the effect of secretin infusion on clearance of inert markers into bile, unanesthetized dogs fitted with Thomas cannulas received continuous infusions of [ 14 C]erythritol and [ 3 H]inulin throughout study. Taurocholic acid administered sequentially at 9.0, 20.0, and 40.0 mumol/min enhanced [ 14 C]erythritol clearance, and GIH secretin (3 units/min) administered along with TCA (40.0 mumol/min) increased [ 14 C]erythritol clearance from 4.9 +/- 1.2 ml/10 min to 6.8 +/- 1.3 ml/10 min (P less than 0.001), but simultaneously measured [ 3 H]inulin clearance was unaltered. Secretin alone also increased [ 14 C]erythritol clearance but did not alter [ 3 H]inulin clearance. The increase in [ 14 C]erythritol clearance per unit increase in bile flow was less during secretin infusion than TCA. Thus, secretin increases [ 14 C]erythritol transport through restricted channels, probably distal to the canaliculi. [ 14 C]Erythritol may not be an accurate marker for canalicular bile flow in dogs during secretin infusion

  15. Functional MR-pancreatography with secretin - a comparison of imaging quality and diagnostic value pre and post secretin in the same patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmberger, H.; Hellerhoff, K.; Ruell, T.; Brandt, C.; Gerhardt, P.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to assess imaging improvement and diagnostic value of secretin stimulated MR-pancreatography (MRP) compared to conventional MRP. Materials and Methods: 50 patients were studied with a 1.0 T system using a single-shot-TSE sequence (RARE). Imaging quality and diameter of the different parts of the pancreatic tract and diagnoses were monitored before and after secretin. Results: The visualization of the normal main pancreatic duct (MPD) was improved significantly in head, body and tail. Side branches were not depicted at all. Even in chronic pancreatitis a significant improvement of imaging quality could be observed, but only in patients without duct dilation before secretin. In advanced disease with duct dilation, secretin stimulation provided no further diagnostic improvement. Conclusions: In conclusion, secretin increases the diagnostic value of MRP especially in patients with normal or non-dilated native MPD and may help to avoid unnecessary invasive procedures such as ERCP. (orig.) [de

  16. Radioselenium pancreozymin-secretin test as a clinical test for pancreatic exocrine function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shichiri, M.; Etani, N.; Yoshida, M.; Harano, Y.; Hoshi, M.; Shigeta, Y.; Abe, H.

    1975-01-01

    The appearance of radioselenium in the protein fraction of duodenal aspirates has been studied after an intravenous injection of 75 Se-selenomethionine. The continuous flow of pancreatic juice was stimulated by pancreozymin at 120 minutes and by secretin at 140 minutes. A good distinction between normal subjects and patients with pancreatic disease was obtained by measuring 75 Se-radioactivity in the protein fraction of duodenal aspirates; either cumulative radioactivity during the combined 80-minute post-pancreozymin-secretin period, or maximum 75 Se-specific activity during the postsecretin period was used as an index. The test presented here might be a useful and sufficiently reliable method for detecting abnormal pancreatic exocrine function. This test can be performed along with the conventional pancreozymin-secretin test, serum enzyme response to pancreozymin and secretin, and pancreatic scintiscanning

  17. Actions of vasoactive intestinal peptide and secretin on chief cells prepared from guinea pig stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutliff, V.E.; Raufman, J.P.; Jensen, R.T.; Gardner, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide and secretin increased cellular cAMP and pepsinogen secretion in dispersed chief cells from guinea pig gastric mucosa. With each peptide there was a close correlation between the dose-response curve for changes in cellular cAMP and that for changes in pepsinogen secretion. Vasoactive intestinal peptide- (10-28) and secretin- (5-27) had no agonist activity and antagonized the actions of vasoactive intestinal peptide and secretin on cellular cAMP and pepsinogen secretion. Studies of binding of 125 I-vasoactive intestinal peptide and of 125 -secretin indicated that gastric chief cells possess four classes of binding sites for vasoactive intestinal peptide and secretin and that occupation of two of these classes of binding sites correlates with the abilities of vasoactive intestinal peptide and secretin to increase cellular cAMP and pepsinogen secretion. What function, in any, is mediated by occupation by the other two classes of binding sites remains to be determined

  18. Lipolytic actions of secretin in mouse adipocytes[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, Revathi; Chow, Billy K. C.

    2014-01-01

    Secretin (Sct), a classical gut hormone, is now known to play pleiotropic functions in the body including osmoregulation, digestion, and feeding control. As Sct has long been implicated to regulate metabolism, in this report, we have investigated a potential lipolytic action of Sct. In our preliminary studies, both Sct levels in circulation and Sct receptor (SctR) transcripts in adipose tissue were upregulated during fasting, suggesting a potential physiological relevance of Sct in regulating lipolysis. Using SctR knockout and Sct knockout mice as controls, we show that Sct is able to stimulate lipolysis in vitro in isolated adipocytes dose- and time-dependently, as well as acute lipolysis in vivo. H-89, a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, was found to attenuate lipolytic effects of 1 μM Sct in vitro, while a significant increase in PKA activity upon Sct injection was observed in the adipose tissue in vivo. Sct was also found to stimulate phosphorylation at 660ser of hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) and to bring about the translocation of HSL from cytosol to the lipid droplet. In summary, our data demonstrate for the first time the in vivo and in vitro lipolytic effects of Sct, and that this function is mediated by PKA and HSL. PMID:24273196

  19. Identification of the gate regions in the primary structure of the secretin pIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnuolo, Julian; Opalka, Natacha; Wen, Wesley X; Gagic, Dragana; Chabaud, Elodie; Bellini, Pierdomenico; Bennett, Matthew D; Norris, Gillian E; Darst, Seth A; Russel, Marjorie; Rakonjac, Jasna

    2010-04-01

    Secretins are a family of large bacterial outer membrane channels that serve as exit ports for folded proteins, filamentous phage and surface structures. Despite the large size of their substrates, secretins do not compromise the barrier function of the outer membrane, implying a gating mechanism. The region in the primary structure that forms the putative gate has not previously been determined for any secretin. To identify residues involved in gating the pIV secretin of filamentous bacteriophage f1, we used random mutagenesis of the gene followed by positive selection for mutants with compromised barrier function ('leaky' mutants). We identified mutations in 34 residues, 30 of which were clustered into two regions located in the centre of the conserved C-terminal secretin family domain: GATE1 (that spanned 39 residues) and GATE2 (that spanned 14 residues). An internal deletion constructed in the GATE2 region resulted in a severely leaky phenotype. Three of the four remaining mutations are located in the region that encodes the N-terminal, periplasmic portion of pIV and could be involved in triggering gate opening. Two missense mutations in the 24-residue region that separates GATE1 and GATE2 were also constructed. These mutant proteins were unstable, defective in multimerization and non-functional.

  20. Secretin-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography: value for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heverhagen, J.T.; Burbelko, M.; Schenck zu Schweinsberg, T.; Funke, C.; Wecker, C.; Walthers, E.M.; Rominger, M.

    2007-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography (ERCP) is the morphologic gold standard for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) enables the visualization of not only the pancreatic duct but also the surrounding parenchyma using T2- and T1-weighted sequences before and after the application of a contrast agent. Moreover, it allows the depiction of ductal segments distal to a stenosis or occlusion. However, conventional Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreaticography (MRCP) was not able to achieve accuracy similar to that of ERCP. Despite many technological innovations, such as fast breath-hold acquisitions or respiratory-gated 3D sequences, this drawback could not be overcome. In recent years, secretin-enhanced MRCP has been used for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis. A recent study showed that secretin not only improves the visibility of the pancreatic duct and its side branches but it also enhances the diagnostic accuracy of MRCP. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were improved by the application of secretin. Moreover, the agreement between independent observers increased after the use of secretin. In addition, quantitative post-processing tools have been developed that enable the measurement of the exocrine pancreatic output non-invasively using secretin-enhanced MRCP. These tools facilitate applications, such as functional follow-up after pancreaticogastrostomy and pancreaticogastric anastomoses, evaluation of the functional status of the graft after pancreas transplantation and follow-up of pancreatic drainage procedures and duct disruption. (orig.)

  1. Structural and Functional Insights into the Pilotin-Secretin Complex of the Type II Secretion System

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Shuang; Rehman, Saima; Wang, Xiaohui; Shevchik, Vladimir E.; Pickersgill, Richard W.

    2012-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria secrete virulence factors and assemble fibre structures on their cell surface using specialized secretion systems. Three of these, T2SS, T3SS and T4PS, are characterized by large outer membrane channels formed by proteins called secretins. Usually, a cognate lipoprotein pilot is essential for the assembly of the secretin in the outer membrane. The structures of the pilotins of the T3SS and T4PS have been described. However in the T2SS, the molecular mechanism of this pr...

  2. Combination of secretin and fluvastatin ameliorates the polyuria associated with X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procino, Giuseppe; Milano, Serena; Carmosino, Monica; Barbieri, Claudia; Nicoletti, Maria C; Li, Jian H; Wess, Jürgen; Svelto, Maria

    2014-07-01

    X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (X-NDI) is a disease caused by inactivating mutations of the vasopressin (AVP) type 2 receptor (V2R) gene. Loss of V2R function prevents plasma membrane expression of the AQP2 water channel in the kidney collecting duct cells and impairs the kidney concentration ability. In an attempt to develop strategies to bypass V2R signaling in X-NDI, we evaluated the effects of secretin and fluvastatin, either alone or in combination, on kidney function in a mouse model of X-NDI. The secretin receptor was found to be functionally expressed in the kidney collecting duct cells. Based on this, X-NDI mice were infused with secretin for 14 days but urinary parameters were not altered by the infusion. Interestingly, secretin significantly increased AQP2 levels in the collecting duct but the protein primarily accumulated in the cytosol. Since we previously reported that fluvastatin treatment increased AQP2 plasma membrane expression in wild-type mice, secretin-infused X-NDI mice received a single injection of fluvastatin. Interestingly, urine production by X-NDI mice treated with secretin plus fluvastatin was reduced by nearly 90% and the urine osmolality was doubled. Immunostaining showed that secretin increased intracellular stores of AQP2 and the addition of fluvastatin promoted AQP2 trafficking to the plasma membrane. Taken together, these findings open new perspectives for the pharmacological treatment of X-NDI.

  3. Vasoactive intestinal peptide and secretin: effects of combined and separate intravenous infusions on bile secretion in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyberg, B.; Sonnenfeld, T.; Einarsson, K.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of intravenously administered vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and secretin on bile secretion were studied in 12 patients with complete biliary fistulas. The two peptides were administered both simultaneously and separately. During VIP infusion, bile volume increased by 60%, and during the combined VIP and secretin infursion bile volume increased by another 70%. VIP increased bile bicarbonate concentration by some 30%. Although secretin did not increase the concentration, bicarbonate output increased threefold during secretin infusion but only twofold during VIP infusion. The outputs of bile acids were not significantly affected by the two peptides, whereas the concentration decreased by 40% and 70% after VIP and secretin, respectively. The canalicular bile flow, measured by [ 14 C]erythritol, was unaffected by VIP infusion, whereas secretin alone and the combination of the two peptides increased the canalicular clearance by 80%. The choleretic effect of VIP thus seems to occur only at the ductular level. Secretin exerts its effect at the ductular level and possibly also at the canalicular level. It is concluded that the two peptides have additive effects on the ductular bile flow.. 32 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs

  4. Comparative studies of radioimmunologic serumtrypsin identifications and secretin-pancreozymin probe tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheithauer, R.

    1980-01-01

    In 29 patients with suspicion of a pancreatic disease, parallel to the classic secretin-pancreozymin test, the trypsin concentration was investigated basally and after stimulation by radioimmunological procedures. The basal mean value of the serum trypsin concentration was in those patients with sound pancreas 175 ng BIT/ml with limit values of 90 and 250 ng BIT/ml. The maximum value after stimulation was found in normal and pathologic cases 20 minutes after intravenous secretin administration (S 20), at most one sample earlier or later. The values ranged between 110 and 550 ng BIT/ml. The additional secretin-pancreozymin infusion did not lead to any further results. The quality investigation of the RIA in 9 cultures with 24 test sera showed in the lower measuring range a very high degree of liability (average concentration 188,7 ng BIT/ml) with a calculatory debit of 187,5 with maximum deviations of -17 and +25%, in the medium range they presented a sufficient liability, in high concentration dilution was necessary. The advantage of the tested procedure compared to the technically demanding SP test, i.e. the elimination of the deep sounding of the duodenum, has to be pointed out particularly. The discomfort for the patient is confined to two withdrawals of blood, basally and 20 minutes after exclusive secretin stimulation. (orig./MG) [de

  5. Secretin-stimulated ultrasound estimation of pancreatic secretion in cystic fibrosis validated by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engjom, Trond; Dimcevski, Georg; Tjora, Erling; Wathle, Gaute; Erchinger, Friedemann; Laerum, Birger N.; Gilja, Odd H.; Haldorsen, Ingfrid Salvesen

    2018-01-01

    Secretin-stimulated magnetic resonance imaging (s-MRI) is the best validated radiological modality assessing pancreatic secretion. The purpose of this study was to compare volume output measures from secretin-stimulated transabdominal ultrasonography (s-US) to s-MRI for the diagnosis of exocrine pancreatic failure in cystic fibrosis (CF). We performed transabdominal ultrasonography and MRI before and at timed intervals during 15 minutes after secretin stimulation in 21 CF patients and 13 healthy controls. To clearly identify the subjects with reduced exocrine pancreatic function, we classified CF patients as pancreas-sufficient or -insufficient by secretin-stimulated endoscopic short test and faecal elastase. Pancreas-insufficient CF patients had reduced pancreatic secretions compared to pancreas-sufficient subjects based on both imaging modalities (p < 0.001). Volume output estimates assessed by s-US correlated to that of s-MRI (r = 0.56-0.62; p < 0.001). Both s-US (AUC: 0.88) and s-MRI (AUC: 0.99) demonstrated good diagnostic accuracy for exocrine pancreatic failure. Pancreatic volume-output estimated by s-US corresponds well to exocrine pancreatic function in CF patients and yields comparable results to that of s-MRI. s-US provides a simple and feasible tool in the assessment of pancreatic secretion. (orig.)

  6. Clinical role of secretin loading magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography in the patients undergoing pancreatic resection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Ken; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Yoshida, Muneki; Kakita, Akira [Kitasato Univ., Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-01-01

    We determined factors contributing to increased signal intensity in the reconstructed jejunal loop in patients undergoing pancreatic resection, frequently observed on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography following intravenous injection of secretin (S/MRCP). We also evaluated the possible roles of S/MRCP in assessing the patency of pancreatojejunal anastomosis and the secretory function of the remnant pancreas. Subject were 44 patients undergoing several types of pancreatic resection. Baseline output and response to secretin of the remnant pancreas were measured after surgery. S/MRCP and pancreatic function diagnostant (PFD) tests were conducted preoperatively, and in early and late periods after surgery. Baseline pancreatic output was 1.2{+-}0.7 ml/10-min, and increased after secretin load to a maximum 9.0{+-}6.6 ml/10-min in 10 min. Signal intensity of the jejunal loop increased in 2 patients versus 40 patients (95%) during the early versus late postoperative periods. During the late period, PFD was significantly higher in patients with increased signal intensity than in those without. PFD correlated well with cumulative pancreatic output following secretin loading (r=0.820). A major factor responsible for increased signal intensity in S/MRCP of the jejunal loop was increased pancreatic output. The increase in signal intensity was a definitive sign of patent pancreatojejunal anastomosis. S/MRCP thus seems to have a potential for evaluating the secretory function of the remnant pancreas. (author)

  7. Clinical role of secretin loading magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography in the patients undergoing pancreatic resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Ken; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Yoshida, Muneki; Kakita, Akira

    2002-01-01

    We determined factors contributing to increased signal intensity in the reconstructed jejunal loop in patients undergoing pancreatic resection, frequently observed on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography following intravenous injection of secretin (S/MRCP). We also evaluated the possible roles of S/MRCP in assessing the patency of pancreatojejunal anastomosis and the secretory function of the remnant pancreas. Subject were 44 patients undergoing several types of pancreatic resection. Baseline output and response to secretin of the remnant pancreas were measured after surgery. S/MRCP and pancreatic function diagnostant (PFD) tests were conducted preoperatively, and in early and late periods after surgery. Baseline pancreatic output was 1.2±0.7 ml/10-min, and increased after secretin load to a maximum 9.0±6.6 ml/10-min in 10 min. Signal intensity of the jejunal loop increased in 2 patients versus 40 patients (95%) during the early versus late postoperative periods. During the late period, PFD was significantly higher in patients with increased signal intensity than in those without. PFD correlated well with cumulative pancreatic output following secretin loading (r=0.820). A major factor responsible for increased signal intensity in S/MRCP of the jejunal loop was increased pancreatic output. The increase in signal intensity was a definitive sign of patent pancreatojejunal anastomosis. S/MRCP thus seems to have a potential for evaluating the secretory function of the remnant pancreas. (author)

  8. Non-invasive quantification of pancreatic exocrine function using secretin-stimulated MRCP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punwani, S.; Gillams, A.R.; Lees, W.R.

    2003-01-01

    Our objective was to quantify water volume using magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) sequences and apply this to secretin-stimulated studies with the aim of quantifying pancreatic exocrine function. A commercially available single-shot MRCP sequence was used in conjunction with a body phased-array coil and a 1.5-T MR system. Signal intensity was measured in samples of water, pancreatic, duodenal juice, and secretin-stimulated pancreatic juice. A water phantom was made and MR calculated volumes compared with known water volumes within the phantom. Changes in small intestinal volume in response to secretin were measured in a group of 11 patients with no evidence of pancreatic disease. Changes in water volume were plotted over time. The pancreatic duct diameter before and after secretin was noted and filling defects were sought. All patients also underwent an axial breath-hold T1-weighted gradient-echo sequence and the pancreatic parenchyma was evaluated for size and signal intensity. There was no difference in the signal intensity of the different juice samples. There was excellent correlation between known and calculated MRCP volumes (χ 2 =0.99). All patients demonstrated normal duct morphology on MRCP and normal pancreatic parenchyma on T1-weighted imaging. The mean flow rate in the patient population was 8.1±2.5 ml/s over a median of 7 min (range 5-9 min). The MRCP sequence can be used to measure water volume. Sequential MRCP measurements following secretin permitted calculation of volume change and flow rate. This should prove useful as an indicator of pancreatic exocrine function. (orig.)

  9. Does secretin stimulation add to magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography in characterising pancreatic cystic lesions as side-branch intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purysko, Andrei S.; Gandhi, Namita S.; Veniero, Joseph C.; Walsh, R.M.; Obuchowski, Nancy A.

    2014-01-01

    To assess the value of secretin during magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) in demonstrating communication between cystic lesions and the pancreatic duct to help determine the diagnosis of side-branch intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (SB-IPMN). This is an IRB-approved, HIPAA-compliant retrospective study of 29 SB-IPMN patients and 13 non-IPMN subjects (control) who underwent secretin-enhanced MRCP (s-MRCP). Two readers blinded to the final diagnosis reviewed three randomised image sets: (1) pre-secretin HASTE, (2) dynamic s-MRCP and (3) post-secretin HASTE. Logistic regression, generalised linear models and ROC analyses were used to compare pre- and post-secretin results. There was no significant difference in median scores for the pre-secretin [reader 1: 1; reader 2: 2 (range -2 to 2)] and post-secretin HASTE [reader 1: 1; reader 2: 1 (range -2 to 2)] in the SB-IPMN group (P = 0.14), while the scores were lower for s-MRCP [reader 1: 0.5 (range -2 to 2); reader 2: 0 (range -1 to 2); P = 0.016]. There was no significant difference in mean maximum diameter of SB-IPMN on pre- and post-secretin HASTE, and s-MRCP (P > 0.05). Secretin stimulation did not add to MRCP in characterising pancreatic cystic lesions as SB-IPMN. (orig.)

  10. Santorinicele: secretin-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography findings before and after minor papilla sphincterotomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boninsegna, Enrico; Manfredi, Riccardo; Ventriglia, Anna; Negrelli, Riccardo; Pedrinolla, Beatrice; Mehrabi, Sara; Pozzi Mucelli, Roberto [University of Verona, Department of Radiology - Policlinico G.B. Rossi, Verona (Italy); Gabbrielli, Armando [University of Verona, Department of Medicine - Policlinico G.B. Rossi, Verona (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    To evaluate secretin-enhanced MRCP (S-MRCP) findings of patients with pancreas divisum and Santorinicele, before and after minor papilla sphincterotomy. S-MRCP examinations of 519 patients with suspected pancreatic disease were included. Size of the main pancreatic duct, presence and calibre of Santorinicele were evaluated. Duodenal filling was assessed on dynamic images. After sphincterotomy the same parameters and the clinical findings were re-evaluated. Pancreas divisum was depicted in 55/519 patients (11 %) by MRCP and an additional 26/519 by S-MRCP (total 81/519, 16 %). Santorinicele was detected in 7/81 patients (8.6 %) with pancreas divisum by MRCP and an additional 20/81 by S-MRCP (total 27/81, 33 %). Dorsal duct in patients with Santorinicele was significantly larger in the head compared with patients with only pancreas divisum (p < 0.01), in basal conditions (average 2.4 versus 1.9 mm) and after secretin administration (average 3.0 versus 2.4 mm). Duodenal filling was impaired in 11/27 patients (41 %) with Santorinicele. After sphincterotomy significant reduction in size of Santorinicele (-33 %) and dorsal duct (-17 %), increase of pancreatic juice and symptoms improvement were observed. Secretin administration increases the accuracy of MRCP in detecting Santorinicele and demonstrates the impaired duodenal filling. S-MRCP is useful to assess results of sphincterotomy. (orig.)

  11. Administration of secretin for autism alters dopamine metabolism in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Yoshihiro; Mori, Kenji; Hashimoto, Toshiaki; Miyazaki, Masahito; Nozaki, Satoshi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Kuroda, Yasuhiro; Kagami, Shoji

    2006-03-01

    We evaluated the clinical effects of intravenously administered secretin in 12 children with autism (age range: 4-6 years, median age: 9 years, boy:girl=8:4). In addition, we investigated the association between improvement in symptoms and changes in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) homovanillic acid (HVA),5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid (5-HIAA), and 6R-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-L-biopterin (BH(4)) levels after administration. After administration of secretin, the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) score improved in 7 of the 12 children. However, the score deteriorated in 2 of the 12 children (in the item of 'restricted and repetitive, stereotyped interests and behaviors'). The HVA and BH(4) levels in CSF were increased in all children with improvement in the ADI-R score. In contrast, no patient without the elevation of the BH(4) level showed improvement in the score. These findings suggest that secretin activated metabolic turnover of dopamine in the central nervous system via BH(4), improving symptoms.

  12. Incremental value of secretin-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography in detecting ductal communication in a population with high prevalence of small pancreatic cysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastegar, Neda; Matteoni-Athayde, Luciana G.; Eng, John [Departments of Medicine (Gastroenterology) and Radiology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions (United States); Takahashi, Naoki [Mayo Clinic (United States); Tamm, Eric P. [MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Mortele, Koenraad J. [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (United States); Syngal, Sapna [Dana Farber Cancer Institute (United States); Margolis, Daniel [University of California, Los Angeles (United States); Lennon, Anne Marie; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Goggins, Michael; Canto, Marcia I. [Departments of Medicine (Gastroenterology) and Radiology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions (United States); Kamel, Ihab R., E-mail: ikamel@jhmi.edu [Departments of Medicine (Gastroenterology) and Radiology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •Secretin improved visualization of ductal communication of a cystic pancreatic lesion. •No association between cysts and gender, ethnicity or type of high risk. •Incremental value of secretin could offset the added cost and time. -- Abstract: Purpose: We investigated the incremental diagnostic yield of S-MRCP in a population with high prevalence of small pancreatic cysts. Methods: Standard MRCP protocol was performed with and without secretin using 1.5 T units in subjects undergoing pancreatic screening because of a strong family history of pancreatic cancer as part of the multicenter Cancer of the Pancreas Screening-3 trial (CAPS 3). All studies were reviewed prospectively by two independent readers who recorded the presence and number of pancreatic cysts, the presence of visualized ductal communication before and after secretin, and the degree of confidence in the diagnoses. Result: Of 202 individuals enrolled (mean age 56 years, 46% males), 93 (46%) had pancreatic cysts detected by MRCP, and 64 of the 93 had pre-and post-secretin MRCP images available for comparison. Data from the 128 readings show that 6 (6/128 = 4.7%) had ductal communication visualized only on the secretin studies compared to pre-secretin studies (odds ratio 1.28, p = 0.04). In addition, there was a statistically significant increase in confidence in reporting ductal communication after secretin compared to before secretin (p < 0.0005). Conclusion: At 1.5 T MRI, the use of secretin can improve the visualization of ductal communication of cystic pancreatic lesions.

  13. Incremental value of secretin-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography in detecting ductal communication in a population with high prevalence of small pancreatic cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rastegar, Neda; Matteoni-Athayde, Luciana G.; Eng, John; Takahashi, Naoki; Tamm, Eric P.; Mortele, Koenraad J.; Syngal, Sapna; Margolis, Daniel; Lennon, Anne Marie; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Goggins, Michael; Canto, Marcia I.; Kamel, Ihab R.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •Secretin improved visualization of ductal communication of a cystic pancreatic lesion. •No association between cysts and gender, ethnicity or type of high risk. •Incremental value of secretin could offset the added cost and time. -- Abstract: Purpose: We investigated the incremental diagnostic yield of S-MRCP in a population with high prevalence of small pancreatic cysts. Methods: Standard MRCP protocol was performed with and without secretin using 1.5 T units in subjects undergoing pancreatic screening because of a strong family history of pancreatic cancer as part of the multicenter Cancer of the Pancreas Screening-3 trial (CAPS 3). All studies were reviewed prospectively by two independent readers who recorded the presence and number of pancreatic cysts, the presence of visualized ductal communication before and after secretin, and the degree of confidence in the diagnoses. Result: Of 202 individuals enrolled (mean age 56 years, 46% males), 93 (46%) had pancreatic cysts detected by MRCP, and 64 of the 93 had pre-and post-secretin MRCP images available for comparison. Data from the 128 readings show that 6 (6/128 = 4.7%) had ductal communication visualized only on the secretin studies compared to pre-secretin studies (odds ratio 1.28, p = 0.04). In addition, there was a statistically significant increase in confidence in reporting ductal communication after secretin compared to before secretin (p < 0.0005). Conclusion: At 1.5 T MRI, the use of secretin can improve the visualization of ductal communication of cystic pancreatic lesions

  14. Hypotonic duodenography and secretin-CCK test in the diagnosis of pancreatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukes, P.J.; Rolny, P.; Nilson, A.E.; Gamklou, R.

    1981-01-01

    Sixty-five patients with possible pancreatic disease or long-standing upper abdominal symptoms were examined by means of the secretin-CCK test and hypotonic duodenography. Both examinations were performed after one duodenal intubation. In patients with pancreatitis functional abnomalities were revealed in 85 per cent while the duodenography was abnormal in 43 per cent. In patients with carcinoma, 77 per cent had abnormal exocrine pancreas function and 70 per cent had abnormalities demonstrated at duodenography. The value of the two examinations for assessment of patients with upper abdominal symptoms and pancreatic disease is discussed. (Auth.)

  15. The effects of synthetic human secretin on calcium carbonate solubility in human bile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyrim, K; Vakil, N

    1990-11-01

    This study sought to determine the effects of synthetic human secretin on ionized calcium and carbonate concentrations in human hepatic bile. Five patients with a nasobiliary drain in the right hepatic duct were studied. Three basal samples of bile were collected, each over a 15-minute period. Synthetic human secretin was then infused IV at 0.05 micrograms.kg-1.h-1 for 45 minutes followed by 0.5 micrograms.kg-1.h-1 for 45 minutes. Bile was sampled over 15-minute periods. To document return to baseline conditions, two further samples of bile were obtained over 15-minute periods 2 hours after the infusion was terminated. Bile acid concentration was determined by an enzymatic method; pH and PCO2 were measured with an automated analyzer. Total calcium was determined by inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry and ionized calcium by an ion-specific electrode. Bicarbonate and carbonate concentrations were calculated using Henry's law and the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. The fraction of bile sampled by the catheter was determined by Indocyanin Green recovery at the end of the experiment. Secretin caused an increase in bile flow and bicarbonate output. Bicarbonate concentrations increased from 26 +/- 3 mmol/L to 41 +/- 3 mmol/L (P less than 0.05), and chloride concentrations decreased. Mean bile acid concentrations declined significantly from 14.6 +/- 2 mmol/L to 4.7 +/- 1 mmol/L (P less than 0.05). Ionized calcium concentrations decreased from 0.7 +/- 0.005 mmol/L to 0.5 +/- 0.02 mmol/L (P less than 0.05) while pH increased significantly from 7.44 +/- 0.06 to 7.6 +/- 0.04 (P less than 0.05). Carbonate concentrations increased significantly from 0.15 +/- 0.02 mmol/L to 0.26 +/- 0.03 mmol/L, and the ion product for calcium carbonate increased significantly from 0.099 +/- 0.002 (mmol/L)2 to 0.135 +/- 0.015 (mmol/L)2 (P less than 0.05). Synthetic human secretin augments the ion product of calcium and carbonate in human hepatic bile, increasing the tendency for

  16. Secretin Is an Ineffective Treatment for Pervasive Developmental Disabilities: A Review of 15 Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturmey, Peter

    2005-01-01

    In 1998, Horvath et al. [Horvath, K., Stefanatos, G., Sokolski, K. N., Wachtel, R., Nabors, L., & Tildon, J. T. (1998). Improved social and language skills after secretin administration in patients with autism spectrum disorders. "Journal of the Association of the Academy of Minority Physicians," 9, 9-15] reported an uncontrolled…

  17. Fish genomes provide novel insights into the evolution of vertebrate secretin receptors and their ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, João C R; Félix, Rute C; Trindade, Marlene; Power, Deborah M

    2014-12-01

    The secretin receptor (SCTR) is a member of Class 2 subfamily B1 GPCRs and part of the PAC1/VPAC receptor subfamily. This receptor has long been known in mammals but has only recently been identified in other vertebrates including teleosts, from which it was previously considered to be absent. The ligand for SCTR in mammals is secretin (SCT), an important gastrointestinal peptide, which in teleosts has not yet been isolated, or the gene identified. This study revises the evolutionary model previously proposed for the secretin-GPCRs in metazoan by analysing in detail the fishes, the most successful of the extant vertebrates. All the Actinopterygii genomes analysed and the Chondrichthyes and Sarcopterygii fish possess a SCTR gene that shares conserved sequence, structure and synteny with the tetrapod homologue. Phylogenetic clustering and gene environment comparisons revealed that fish and tetrapod SCTR shared a common origin and diverged early from the PAC1/VPAC subfamily group. In teleosts SCTR duplicated as a result of the fish specific whole genome duplication but in all the teleost genomes analysed, with the exception of tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), one of the duplicates was lost. The function of SCTR in teleosts is unknown but quantitative PCR revealed that in both sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) and tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) transcript abundance is high in the gastrointestinal tract suggesting it may intervene in similar processes to those in mammals. In contrast, no gene encoding the ligand SCT was identified in the ray-finned fishes (Actinopterygii) although it was present in the coelacanth (lobe finned fish, Sarcopterygii) and in the elephant shark (holocephalian). The genes in linkage with SCT in tetrapods and coelacanth were also identified in ray-finned fishes supporting the idea that it was lost from their genome. At present SCTR remains an orphan receptor in ray-finned fishes and it will be of interest in the future to establish why SCT was

  18. Secretin-stimulated MRI characterization of pancreatic morphology and function in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madzak, Adnan; Olesen, Søren Schou; Haldorsen, Ingfrid Salvesen; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Frøkjær, Jens Brøndum

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is characterized by abnormal pancreatic morphology and impaired endocrine and exocrine function. However, little is known about the relationship between pancreatic morphology and function, and also the association with the etiology and clinical manifestations of CP. The aim was to explore pancreatic morphology and function with advanced MRI in patients with CP and healthy controls (HC) METHODS: Eighty-two patients with CP and 22 HC were enrolled in the study. Morphological imaging parameters included pancreatic main duct diameter, gland volume, fat signal fraction and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. Functional secretin-stimulated MRI (s-MRI) parameters included pancreatic secretion (bowel fluid volume) and changes in pancreatic ADC value before and after secretin stimulation. Patients were classified according to the modified Cambridge and M-ANNHEIM classification system and fecal elastase was collected. All imaging parameters differentiated CP patients from HC; however, correlations between morphological and functional parameters in CP were weak. Patients with alcoholic and non-alcoholic etiology had comparable s-MRI findings. Fecal elastase was positively correlated to pancreatic gland volume (r = 0.68, P = 0.0016) and negatively correlated to Cambridge classification (r = -0.35, P pancreatic gland volume was significantly decreased in the severe stages of CP (P = 0.001). S-MRI provides detailed information about pancreatic morphology and function and represents a promising non-invasive imaging method to characterize pancreatic pathophysiology and may enable monitoring of disease progression in patients with CP. Copyright © 2017 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Ion Transport in Human Pancreatic Duct Epithelium, Capan-1 Cells, Is Regulated by Secretin, VIP, Acetylcholine, and Purinergic Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jing; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study was to establish a solid model of polarized epithelium for human pancreatic ducts, where electrical parameters could be measured as indicators of ion transport. Further, we aimed to determine functional expression of several receptors, in particular, puriner...... transport in human pancreatic duct epithelium, Capan-1 cells, is regulated by secretin, VIP, acetylcholine, adenosine, and purinergic P2 receptors; and this human model has a good potential for studies of physiology and pathophysiology of pancreatic duct ion transport....

  20. Diagnosis of mild chronic pancreatitis (Cambridge classification): comparative study using secretin injection-magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic retrograde pancreatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai, Jin-Kan; Suyama, Masafumi; Kubokawa, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Sumio

    2008-02-28

    To investigate the usefulness of secretin injection-MRCP for the diagnosis of mild chronic pancreatitis. Sixteen patients having mild chronic pancreatitis according to the Cambridge classification and 12 control subjects with no abnormal findings on the pancreatogram were examined for the diagnostic accuracy of secretin injection-MRCP regarding abnormal branch pancreatic ducts associated with mild chronic pancreatitis (Cambridge Classification), using endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for comparison. The sensitivity and specificity for abnormal branch pancreatic ducts determined by two reviewers were respectively 55%-63% and 75%-83% in the head, 57%-64% and 82%-83% in the body, and 44%-44% and 72%-76% in the tail of the pancreas. The sensitivity and specificity for mild chronic pancreatitis were 56%-63% and 92%-92%, respectively. Interobserver agreement (kappa statistics) concerning the diagnosis of an abnormal branch pancreatic duct and of mild chronic pancreatitis was good to excellent. Secretin injection-MRCP might be useful for the diagnosis of mild chronic pancreatitis.

  1. The Knockout of Secretin in Cerebellar Purkinje Cells Impairs Mouse Motor Coordination and Motor Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Chung, Sookja Kim; Chow, Billy Kwok Chong

    2014-01-01

    Secretin (SCT) was first considered to be a gut hormone regulating gastrointestinal functions when discovered. Recently, however, central actions of SCT have drawn intense research interest and are supported by the broad distribution of SCT in specific neuronal populations and by in vivo physiological studies regarding its role in water homeostasis and food intake. The direct action of SCT on a central neuron was first discovered in cerebellar Purkinje cells in which SCT from cerebellar Purkinje cells was found to potentiate GABAergic inhibitory transmission from presynaptic basket cells. Because Purkinje neurons have a major role in motor coordination and learning functions, we hypothesize a behavioral modulatory function for SCT. In this study, we successfully generated a mouse model in which the SCT gene was deleted specifically in Purkinje cells. This mouse line was tested together with SCT knockout and SCT receptor knockout mice in a full battery of behavioral tasks. We found that the knockout of SCT in Purkinje neurons did not affect general motor ability or the anxiety level in open field tests. However, knockout mice did exhibit impairments in neuromuscular strength, motor coordination, and motor learning abilities, as shown by wire hanging, vertical climbing, and rotarod tests. In addition, SCT knockout in Purkinje cells possibly led to the delayed development of motor neurons, as supported by the later occurrence of key neural reflexes. In summary, our data suggest a role in motor coordination and motor learning for SCT expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells. PMID:24356714

  2. Secretin Modulates the Postnatal Development of Mouse Cerebellar Cortex Via PKA- and ERK-dependent Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Postnatal development of the cerebellum is critical for its intact function such as motor coordination and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders. We previously reported that deprivation of secretin (SCT from cerebellar Purkinje neurons impaired motor coordination and motor learning function, while leaving the potential role of SCT in cerebellar development to be determined. SCT and its receptor (SCTR were constitutively expressed in the postnatal cerebellum in a temporal and cell-specific manner. Using a SCT knockout mouse model, we provided direct evidence showing altered developmental patterns of Purkinje cells (PCs and granular cells (GCs. SCT deprivation reduced the PC density, impaired the PC dendritic formation, induced accelerated GC migration and potentiated cerebellar apoptosis. Furthermore, our results indicated the involvement of protein kinase A (PKA and extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK signaling pathways in SCT-mediated protective effects against neuronal apoptosis. Results of this study illustrated a novel function of SCT in the postnatal development of cerebellum, emphasizing the necessary role of SCT in cerebellar-related functions.

  3. Effect of secretin and inhibitors of HCO3-/H+ transport on the membrane voltage of rat pancreatic duct cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, I; Pahl, C

    1993-01-01

    depolarized the basolateral membrane voltage, Vbl, by up to 35 mV (n = 37); a half-maximal response was obtained at 3 x 10(-11) mol/l. In unstimulated ducts a decrease in the luminal Cl- concentration (120 to 37 mmol/l) had a marginal effect on Vbl, but after maximal secretin stimulation it evoked a 14 +/- 2......), respectively. The fractional resistance of the basolateral membrane (FRbl) doubled, and the depolarizing responses to changes in bath K+ concentrations (5 to 20 mmol/l) decreased from 22 +/- 1 to 11 +/- 2 mV.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)...

  4. Secretin-stimulated MR cholangio-pancreatography in the evaluation of asymptomatic patients with non-specific pancreatic hyperenzymemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donati, Francescamaria, E-mail: fra.donati@katamail.co [2nd Department of Radiology, Pisa University-Hospital, Via Paradisa 2, I-56124 Pisa (Italy); Boraschi, Piero; Gigoni, Roberto; Salemi, Simonetta [2nd Department of Radiology, Pisa University-Hospital, Via Paradisa 2, I-56124 Pisa (Italy); Faggioni, Lorenzo; Bertucci, Cristina; Cecchi, Claudia; Bartolozzi, Carlo [Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Pisa, Via Rome 67, I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Falaschi, Fabio [2nd Department of Radiology, Pisa University-Hospital, Via Paradisa 2, I-56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: To assess the diagnostic value of secretin-stimulated MRCP (SS-MRCP) compared with conventional MRCP in asymptomatic patients with mild elevations of pancreatic enzymes. Materials and methods: Eighty asymptomatic patients with pancreatic hyperenzymemia underwent MR imaging at 1.5 T-device (Signa EXCITE, GE Healthcare). After the acquisition of axial T1w,T2w sequences, and conventional MRCP, SS-MRCP was performed using a single-slice coronal breath-hold, thick-slab, SSFSE T2w sequence, repeated every 30 s up to 15 min following intravenous injection of secretin (Secrelux, Sanochemia). Results: On the basis of the standards of reference, our final diagnoses were: negative findings (n = 23), pancreas divisum (n = 22), mild chronic pancreatitis (n = 14), inflammatory ampullary stenosis (n = 3), juxtapapillary duodenal diverticulum (n = 1), small cystic lesions (<1 cm) (n = 22; 5/22 cases associated with pancreas divisum). The image quality of SS-MRCP was significantly higher than that of conventional MRCP (p < 0.0001). Standards of reference did not differ significantly from of SS-MRCP findings (p = 0.5), while was statistically different from those of conventional MRCP (p < 0.0001). A significant difference was found between conventional MRCP and SS-MRCP findings (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: In asymptomatic patients with non-specific pancreatic hyperenzymemia SS-MRCP may represent the best non-invasive diagnostic technique, since it gives morphological and functional information.

  5. Secretin-stimulating MRCP in patients with pancreatobiliary maljunction and occult pancreatobiliary reflux: direct demonstration of pancreatobiliary reflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motosugi, Utaroh; Ichikawa, Tomoaki; Araki, Tsutomu [University of Yamanashi, Department of Radiology, Chuo-shi, Yamanashi (Japan); Kitahara, Fumiaki; Sato, Tadashi [University of Yamanashi, First Department of Internal Medicine, Chuo-shi, Yamanashi (Japan); Itakura, Jun; Fujii, Hideki [University of Yamanashi, First Department of Surgery, Chuo-shi, Yamanashi (Japan)

    2007-09-15

    We propose the hypothesis that the enlargement of the common bile duct (CBD) or gallbladder (GB) that is occasionally demonstrated on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) after secretin stimulation is caused by pancreatobiliary reflux. Recently, occult pancreatobiliary reflux (OPR) has been demonstrated in patients without morphological pancreatobiliary maljunction (MPBM). The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of secretin-stimulating MRCP (SMRCP) in the diagnosis of pancreatobiliary reflux. The study included 14 patients with MPBM and 32 patients with a normal pancreatobiliary junction. OPR was evaluated by bile collection and diagnosed in seven of the 32 patients. All the patients underwent SMRCP; the related findings were considered positive when enlargement of the CBD or GB was observed. Positive findings on SMRCP were observed in all MPBM patients. In the patients with normal pancreatobiliary junction, there was significant difference between the mean amylase levels in the patients with positive and negative SMRCP findings (mean, 4,755.7 and 29.7 IU/l). The sensitivity and specificity of SMRCP for diagnosing OPR was 85.7% and 68.0%, respectively. SMRCP provides a non invasive method for excluding PBR and can identify patients who could benefit from bile duct sampling to diagnose OPR. (orig.)

  6. Secretin stimulates HCO3(-) and acetate efflux but not Na+/HCO3(-) uptake in rat pancreatic ducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, I; Christoffersen, B C

    2001-01-01

    to be important in HCO3(-) -transporting epithelia. pHi was measured with BCECF in freshly isolated intralobular ducts. A reduction in extracellular Na+ concentration or application of HOE 694 (1 microM) decreased pHi by 0.1 to 0.6 pH units, demonstrating Na+/H+ exchanger activity. A reduction in extracellular Cl......- concentration or addition of H2DIDS (10 microM) increased pHi by 0.1 to 0.5 pH units, demonstrating Cl-/ HCO(3)- (OH ) exchanger activity. In experimental acidosis, extracellular HCO3(-)/CO2 buffer did not increase the rate of pHi recovery, indicating that provision of HCO3(-) by the Na+/HCO3(-) cotransporter...... was not apparent. Most importantly, Na+/HCO3(-) cotransport was not stimulated by secretin (1 nM). In contrast, in experimental alkalosis the pHi recovery was increased in HCO3(-)/CO2 buffer, possibly due to Na+/HCO3(-) cotransport in the efflux mode. Secretin (1 nM) and carbachol (1 microM) stimulated HCO3...

  7. A major lineage of enteroendocrine cells coexpress CCK, secretin, GIP, GLP-1, PYY, and neurotensin but not somatostatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Kristoffer Lihme; Engelstoft, Maja Storm; Grunddal, Kaare Villum

    2012-01-01

    Enteroendocrine cells such as duodenal cholecystokinin (CCK cells) are generally thought to be confined to certain segments of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and to store and release peptides derived from only a single peptide precursor. In the current study, however, transgenic mice expressing...... enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) under the control of the CCK promoter demonstrated a distribution pattern of CCK-eGFP positive cells that extended throughout the intestine. Quantitative PCR and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry proteomic analyses of isolated, FACS-purified CCK-eGFP-positive...... to coexpress members of a group of functionally related peptides: CCK, secretin, GIP, GLP-1, PYY, and neurotensin, suggesting a potential therapeutic target for the treatment and prevention of diabetes and obesity....

  8. Recombinant outer membrane secretin PilQ(406-770) as a vaccine candidate for serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghi, Fakhri; Peerayeh, Shahin Najar; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Zeighami, Habib

    2012-02-21

    Secretin PilQ is an antigenically conserved outer membrane protein which is present on most meningococci. This protein naturally expressed at high levels and is essential for meningococcal pilus expression at the cell surface. A 1095 bp fragment of C-terminal of secretin pilQ from serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis was cloned into prokaryotic expression vector pET-28a. Recombinant protein was overexpressed with IPTG and affinity-purified by Ni-NTA agarose. BALB/c mice were immunized subcutaneously with purified rPilQ(406-770) mixed with Freund's adjuvant. Serum antibody responses to serogroups A and B N. meningitidis whole cells or purified rPilQ(406-770) and functional activity of antibodies were determined by ELISA and SBA, respectively. The output of rPilQ(406-770) was approximately 50% of the total bacterial proteins. Serum IgG responses were significantly increased in immunized group with PilQ(406-770) mixed with Freund's adjuvant in comparison with control groups. Antisera produced against rPilQ(406-770) demonstrated strong surface reactivity to serogroups A and B N. meningitidis tested by whole-cell ELISA. Surface reactivity to serogroup B N. meningitidis was higher than serogroup A. The sera from PilQ(406-770) immunized animals were strongly bactericidal against serogroups A and B. These results suggest that rPilQ(406-770) is a potential vaccine candidate for serogroup B N. meningitidis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Automatic gallbladder segmentation using combined 2D and 3D shape features to perform volumetric analysis in native and secretin-enhanced MRCP sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloger, Oliver; Bülow, Robin; Tönnies, Klaus; Völzke, Henry

    2017-11-24

    We aimed to develop the first fully automated 3D gallbladder segmentation approach to perform volumetric analysis in volume data of magnetic resonance (MR) cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) sequences. Volumetric gallbladder analysis is performed for non-contrast-enhanced and secretin-enhanced MRCP sequences. Native and secretin-enhanced MRCP volume data were produced with a 1.5-T MR system. Images of coronal maximum intensity projections (MIP) are used to automatically compute 2D characteristic shape features of the gallbladder in the MIP images. A gallbladder shape space is generated to derive 3D gallbladder shape features, which are then combined with 2D gallbladder shape features in a support vector machine approach to detect gallbladder regions in MRCP volume data. A region-based level set approach is used for fine segmentation. Volumetric analysis is performed for both sequences to calculate gallbladder volume differences between both sequences. The approach presented achieves segmentation results with mean Dice coefficients of 0.917 in non-contrast-enhanced sequences and 0.904 in secretin-enhanced sequences. This is the first approach developed to detect and segment gallbladders in MR-based volume data automatically in both sequences. It can be used to perform gallbladder volume determination in epidemiological studies and to detect abnormal gallbladder volumes or shapes. The positive volume differences between both sequences may indicate the quantity of the pancreatobiliary reflux.

  10. The Inner Membrane Protein PilG Interacts with DNA and the Secretin PilQ in Transformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan A Frye

    Full Text Available Expression of type IV pili (Tfp, filamentous appendages emanating from the bacterial surface, is indispensable for efficient neisserial transformation. Tfp pass through the secretin pore consisting of the membrane protein PilQ. PilG is a polytopic membrane protein, conserved in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, that is required for the biogenesis of neisserial Tfp. PilG null mutants are devoid of pili and non-competent for transformation. Here, recombinant full-length, truncated and mutated variants of meningococcal PilG were overexpressed, purified and characterized. We report that meningococcal PilG directly binds DNA in vitro, detected by both an electromobility shift analysis and a solid phase overlay assay. PilG DNA binding activity was independent of the presence of the consensus DNA uptake sequence. PilG-mediated DNA binding affinity was mapped to the N-terminus and was inactivated by mutation of residues 43 to 45. Notably, reduced meningococcal transformation of DNA in vivo was observed when PilG residues 43 to 45 were substituted by alanine in situ, defining a biologically significant DNA binding domain. N-terminal PilG also interacted with the N-terminal region of PilQ, which previously was shown to bind DNA. Collectively, these data suggest that PilG and PilQ in concert bind DNA during Tfp-mediated transformation.

  11. Abnormal duodenal [HCO3-] following secretin stimulation develops sooner than endocrine insufficiency in minimal change chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelley, Joshua R; Gordon, Stuart R; Gardner, Timothy B

    2012-04-01

    Direct pancreatic function tests (PFTs) are often used to diagnose chronic pancreatitis (CP). We aimed to determine the temporal relationship between an abnormal PFT result, cross-sectional imaging, and clinical symptoms. All patients referred for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and PFT for suspected CP at our medical center from 2008 to 2010 were included. Each subject underwent EUS and PFT on the same day using secretin stimulation. Seventeen patients had duodenal HCO3 values of less than 80 mEq/L and were labeled as abnormal; the 25 other patients had at least 1 duodenal HCO3 values of 80 mEq/L or greater. Patients with abnormal PFTs had more parenchymal (2.0 vs 0.92, P = 0.012), ductal (1.18 vs 0.6, P = 0.036), and total features (3.18 vs 1.52, P = 0.009) than those with normal PFTs on EUS examination. There was no difference in regard to the frequency of abnormal CT scans (25% vs 15%, P = 0.139), diarrhea (67% vs 60%, P = 0.463), fat-soluble vitamin deficiency (33% vs 26%, P = 0.315), or diabetes (10% vs 4%, P = 0.066). Patients with equivocal imaging and abnormally low duodenal HCO3 have more EUS features of CP than do patients with normal duodenal HCO3 values, suggesting that low duodenal HCO3 values are among the first measurable abnormalities in CP.

  12. The Impact of Risk Factors of Chronic Pancreatitis on Secretin Pancreatic Function Testing: Results of a 20-Year Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Darshan; Ketwaroo, Gyanprakash; Freedman, Steven D; Sheth, Sunil G

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of established risk factors on the outcome of secretin pancreatic function testing (sPFT) in patients undergoing work-up for suspected chronic pancreatitis. We completed a retrospective review of patients who underwent sPFT for suspected chronic pancreatitis over 20 years. We compared peak bicarbonate concentrations between groups and completed univariate and multivariate analyses to determine associations between risk factors and positive sPFT results (peak bicarbonate pancreatitis (RAP) and with local complications from acute pancreatitis (AP) (P ≤ 0.05). The bicarbonate concentration in patients with and without other risk factors such as tobacco use, alcohol use, and family history of pancreatitis was not significantly different. Female sex, a history of AP, and a history of RAP were associated with positive sPFT results on univariate analysis (P ≤ 0.05). On multivariate analysis, sex and RAP remained significant. Our study demonstrates that female sex, history of AP and RAP, and AP with local complications are associated with positive sPFT results or lower peak bicarbonate concentration. However, other risk factors do not impact the results of sPFT.

  13. Bringing SASI back: Single session selective arterial secretin injection and transarterial embolization of intrahepatic pancreatic neuroendocrine metastasis in a MEN-1 patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jawad S. Hussain, MD, MS

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available SASI (selective arterial secretin injection is a form of ASVS (arterial stimulation and venous sampling used to localize pancreatic gastrinomas. This report aims to review the protocol for SASI and demonstrate its utility in localizing functional and nonfunctional gastrinomas. Even if a patient has a pancreatic mass and a laboratory profile fitting a specific endocrine syndrome, these may or may not be associated as has been previously demonstrated with adrenal vein sampling. We present a case where a patient underwent simultaneous SASI and bland embolization of a hepatic metastasis to facilitate partial pancreatectomy for Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. Keywords: SASI, ASVS, Gastrinoma, Sampling

  14. The long-term follow up study of acute pancreatitis by means of pancreatic scintigraphy, secretin test and oral glucose tolerance test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Harukuni

    1975-01-01

    Morphologic and functional alternations of the pancreas following acute pancreatitis were studied in 29 patients. At the time of attack a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis had been confirmed by laparotomy in 27 cases, and by clinical picture and by serum amylase levels in 2 cases. The average duration of follow up was 56.3 months. Normal images were obtained in 17 of 29 cases. According to secretin tests, 4 of these had slight to moderately decreased exocrine function; the test were within normal limits. 12 cases with normal image had abnormal oral glucose tolerance curves similar to those fund in mild to moderate diabetes. 10 of the 12 cases with abnormal scintigrams showed decreased isotope uptake in all or part of the pancreas, while 2 showed no uptake at all. These changes were mast apparent in the tail of the pancreas. Ten of the 12 cases with abnormal images had some degree of decreased exocrine function. All 12 had the abnormal GTT curve of diabetes, 4 who had severe diabetes with markedly decreased exocrine function and poor image of the pancreas. In 4 cases the histopathological findings obtained at the time of laparotomy, were shown to be very consistent with the scintigraphic features. It was demonstrated by both scintigraphs and function tests that the alcoholic factor plays a very important role in the prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis resulted in chronic pancreatitis in 4 cases, (14 %) of the remaining 8 cases with abnormal scintigram, it is postulated that the inflamatory process subsided allowing time for cicatrical fibrosis to occur. Follow-up to trace and study of these alternations of the pancreas necessary in future. (Evans, J.)

  15. The long-term follow up study of acute pancreatitis by means of pancreatic scintigraphy, secretin test and oral glucose tolerance test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, H [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Medicine

    1975-03-01

    Morphologic and functional alternations of the pancreas following acute pancreatitis were studied in 29 patients. At the time of attack a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis had been confirmed by laparotomy in 27 cases, and by clinical picture and by serum amylase levels in 2 cases. The average duration of follow up was 56.3 months. Normal images were obtained in 17 of 29 cases. According to secretin tests, 4 of these had slight to moderately decreased exocrine function; the test were within normal limits. 12 cases with normal image had abnormal oral glucose tolerance curves similar to those fund in mild to moderate diabetes. 10 of the 12 cases with abnormal scintigrams showed decreased isotope uptake in all or part of the pancreas, while 2 showed no uptake at all. These changes were mast apparent in the tail of the pancreas. Ten of the 12 cases with abnormal images had some degree of decreased exocrine function. All 12 had the abnormal GTT curve of diabetes, 4 who had severe diabetes with markedly decreased exocrine function and poor image of the pancreas. In 4 cases the histopathological findings obtained at the time of laparotomy, were shown to be very consistent with the scintigraphic features. It was demonstrated by both scintigraphs and function tests that the alcoholic factor plays a very important role in the prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis resulted in chronic pancreatitis in 4 cases, (14 %) of the remaining 8 cases with abnormal scintigram, it is postulated that the inflamatory process subsided allowing time for cicatrical fibrosis to occur. Follow-up to trace and study of these alternations of the pancreas necessary in future.

  16. Quantification of pancreatic exocrine function with secretin-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography: normal values and short-term effects of pancreatic duct drainage procedures in chronic pancreatitis. Initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bali, M.A.; Sztantics, A.; Metens, T.; Matos, C.; Arvanitakis, M.; Delhaye, M.; Deviere, J.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify pancreatic exocrine function in normal subjects and in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) before and after pancreatic duct drainage procedures (PDDP) with dynamic secretin-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) cholangiopancreatography (S-MRCP). Pancreatic exocrine secretions [quantified by pancreatic flow output (PFO) and total excreted volume (TEV)] were quantified twice in ten healthy volunteers and before and after treatment in 20 CP patients (18 classified as severe, one as moderate, and one as mild according to the Cambridge classification). PFO and TEV were derived from a linear regression between MR-calculated volumes and time. In all subjects, pancreatic exocrine fluid volume initially increased linearly with time during secretin stimulation. In controls, the mean PFO and TEV were 6.8 ml/min and 97 ml; intra-individual deviations were 0.8 ml/min and 16 ml. In 10/20 patients with impaired exocrine secretions before treatment, a significant increase of PFO and TEV was observed after treatment (P<0.05); 3/20 patients presented post-procedural acute pancreatitis and a reduced PFO. The S-MRCP quantification method used in the present study is reproducible and provides normal values for PFO and TEV in the range of those obtained from previous published intubation studies. The initial results in CP patients have demonstrated non-invasively a significant short-term improvement of PFO and TEV after PDDP. (orig.)

  17. The effect of moderate sedation on exocrine pancreas function in normal healthy subjects: a prospective, randomized, cross-over trial using the synthetic porcine secretin stimulated Endoscopic Pancreatic Function Test (ePFT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conwell, Darwin L; Zuccaro, Gregory; Purich, Edward; Fein, Seymor; Vanlente, Frederick; Vargo, John; Dumot, John; O'laughlin, Cathy; Trolli, Patricia

    2005-05-01

    We have developed a purely endoscopic collection method for the assessment of pancreatic secretory function (ePFT). The pancreatic secretory effects of sedation medications utilized during endoscopic procedures are not completely known. To study the effect of moderate sedation on the exocrine pancreas gland in a prospective, randomized trial. Healthy volunteers were randomized by computers to one of two treatments (A-no sedation, B-sedation) in period 1 and crossed-over to the other treatment in period 2 with a minimal washout interval of 7 days. Sedation dosage was standardized for each patient based on age, gender and weight from a previously published dosing nomogram. Synthetic porcine secretin (ChiRhoClin, Inc., Burtonsville, Maryland) was used as the pancreatic stimulant. Duodenal fluid samples were aspirated via the endoscope every 5 min for 1 h and sent on ice to our hospital laboratory for the measurement of pancreatic secretory electrolyte concentrations by autoanalyzer. A total of 17 healthy volunteers were enrolled. Sixteen subjects (8 males and 8 females) completed the randomized prospective trial. Median intravenous meperidine and midazolam sedation dose was 62.5 mg and 2.5 mg, respectively. Maximum pancreatic juice flow occurred during the early phase of secretion and maximum bicarbonate concentration occurred during the late phase of secretion. Analysis of the electrolyte composition of the endoscopically collected duodenal drainage fluid revealed a constant cation concentration for both sodium and potassium over the 1 h collection period. The anions, chloride and bicarbonate, exhibited a reciprocal relationship identical to that seen in traditional gastroduodenal tube collection studies. There was no statistical difference observed between the sedation and no sedation groups. The estimated total bicarbonate output (area under curve, AUC) for the sedated and non-sedated groups were 5,017 meq + 724 (range 3,663-6,173) and 5,364 meq +/- 583 (range 4

  18. Effects of pelvic telecobalt irradiation on gonadotropin secretin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfenninger, R.

    1978-01-01

    The pitnitary reaction in women operated according to Wertheim who had menstruated regularly was investigated during telecobalt irradiation. The pitnitary reaction was observed with the aid of the gonadotropin releasing factor. A dose of 25 mcg RH-LH was applied. Releasing factor examinations were carried out before exposure with functioning ovaries, after a dose of 2000 R (i.e., after 10 exposures), and after 6000 R. In the meantime, separate gonadotropin examinations were carried out continuously. A FSH reaction was observed already after 14 days, and the values were raised to almost menopause values. After this, the FSH increased further, while the LH reaction was not observed until much later. The investigation suggests an interrelation between follicle apparatus and FSH, oestrogens and LH. (orig./AJ) [de

  19. Pancreatic duct stenosis: Differential diagnosis between malignant and benign conditions at secretin-enhanced MRCP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boninsegna, Enrico; Manfredi, Riccardo; Negrelli, Riccardo; Avesani, Giacomo; Mehrabi, Sara; Pozzi Mucelli, Roberto

    To define imaging criteria of benign and malignant nature in patients with main pancreatic duct (MPD) stenosis. S-MRCPs of 35 patients with pancreatitis and 14 with adenocarcinoma were evaluated. Adenocarcinoma caused higher prevalence of complete stenosis (14/14-100% vs 17/35-49%), dilated side-branches (14/14-100% vs 18/35-51%) and lower prevalence of duct-penetrating sign (0/14-0% vs 31/35-89%). The number of stenoses was higher in benign conditions (mean 1.4 Vs 1). Upstream MPD diameter was higher in cancer-induced stenoses (4.5 vs 2.9mm). Single complete stenosis with dilated side branches, increased MPD caliber and absent duct-penetrating sign are suggestive of malignancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The value of computerized tomography and sonography in different types of pancreatitis, judged on the basis of a diagnosis previously confirmed by retrograde endoscopic cholangiopancreaticography and the pancreomycin-secretin test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sewing, G.

    1985-01-01

    The blind study described here pointed to a diagnostic superiority of computered tomography, the results of which in chronic pancreatitis were judged to be better than those of sonography, chiefly because of its high sensitivity in the detection of calcified deposits in the pancreas. The values determined, in particular those relating to the specifity of the methods used, were lower than the data given by other authors. From the findings revealed here there was, however, sufficient evidence to confirm that both computered tomography and sonography certainly have their merits as non-invasive methods of morphological examination in the diagnosis of pancreatitis. They should therefore be used, preferably in combined form, prior to any other diagnostic measures that may be more hazardous to the patient. (MBC) [de

  1. GPCR Interaction: 207 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available LP2) and secretin (SecR), and interfaces of GLP2 B Glucagon-like peptide Type 2 GLP2 C Secretin ... SecR Experi...ment SecR does not interact with CTR (calcitonin receptor). 18401761 BRET, FRET NP_004237.1 ...

  2. Sekretin--det første hormon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B

    2002-01-01

    techniques and subsequently synthesised in the 1960s. Radioimmunoassays in the 1970s confirmed the final endocrine role of secretin. Cloning and molecular hybridisation in the 1990s have identified the size of production, precursor, genetic structure, and evolutionary relation to other gastrointestinal...... peptides. In addition, the secretin receptor has been described. In recent years, synthetic secretin has been applied in the functional and structural diagnostics of pancreatic function and in experimental therapy. Although it was the first bioactive substance to be identified as a hormone, our knowledge...

  3. Malabsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that of other children of similar age and gender. This is called failure to thrive . The child ... deficiency Secretin stimulation test Small bowel biopsy Stool culture or culture of small intestine aspirate Stool fat ...

  4. Update on endoscopic pancreatic function testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tyler Stevens; Mansour A Parsi

    2011-01-01

    Hormone-stimulated pancreatic function tests (PFTs) are considered the gold standard for measuring pancreatic exocrine function. PFTs involve the administration of intravenous secretin or cholecystokinin, followed by collection and analysis of pancreatic secretions. Because exocrine function may decline in the earliest phase of pancreatic fibrosis, PFTs are considered accurate for diagnosing chronic pancreatitis. Unfortunately, these potentially valuable tests are infrequently performed except at specialized centers, because they are time consuming and complicated. To overcome these limitations, endoscopic PFT methods have been developed which include aspiration of pancreatic secretions through the suction channel of the endoscope. The secretin endoscopic pancreatic function test (ePFT) involves collection of duodenal aspirates at 15, 30, 45 and 60 min after secretin stimulation. A bicarbonate concentration greater than 80 mmol/L in any of the samples is considered a normal result. The secretin ePFT has demonstrated good sensitivity and specificity compared with various reference standards, including the "Dreiling tube" secretin PFT, endoscopic ultrasound, and surgical histology. Furthermore, a standard autoanalyzer can be used for bicarbonate analysis, which allows the secretin ePFT to be performed at any hospital. The secretin ePFT may complement imaging tests like endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in the diagnosis of early chronic pancreatitis.This paper will review the literature validating the use of ePFT in the diagnosis of exocrine insufficiency and chronic pancreatitis. Newer developments will also be discussed, including the feasibility of combined EUS/ePFT, the use of cholecystokinin alone or in combination with secretin, and the discovery of new protein and lipid pancreatic juice biomarkers which may complement traditionalfluid analysis.

  5. Radioimmunoassay for serotin - methodology, basal and stimulated hormone concentration in plasma of rats, dogs, rabbits and humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittmann, J.K.

    1983-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay for measurement of secretin in the plasma of experimental animals and man has been developed by means of the so-called stripping procedure (pre-treatment of plasma with Quso). The detection limit is about 7 pg/ml at a final dilution of 1:630 000 and an equilibrium constant of 2.1x10 -11 L/M. By means of this system plasma secretin in the species examined can be measured reliably. The coefficients of variation are (percent): The within assay precision (intra-assay) 12, the between assay precision (inter-assay) 23. The median of basal venous plasma secretin are (pg/ml) dog 16, rabbit 0, rat (aorta) 0, rat (porta) 31, man 0. From these studies it is concluded that a) as a consequence of unspecific interference of plasma particles with the secretin RIA-system only a previous removal of these interfering factors leads to reliable test results; should this pre-requisite be neglected falsely too high results are to be expected; b) plasma secretin rises if there is either hydrochloric acid present in the duodenum or if gastric together with food particles reaches the duodenum; c) at least in the dog there may be different molecular species of secretin circulating in the peripherical plasma, however the biological role of these is unknown at present. (orig./TRV) [de

  6. MR cholangiopancreatography in children: feasibility, safety, and initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaney, Lisa; Karmazyn, Boaz; Akisik, M.F.; Jennings, S.G.; Applegate, Kimberly E.

    2008-01-01

    The indications for MR cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) in children, and its safety and findings, might differ from those in adults and are not well described. To investigate the safety, feasibility, and accuracy of MRCP in children. We reviewed all prospective MRCP reports, noting the indication, the use of secretin, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) findings, and patient outcomes. Two readers reviewed each MRCP study by consensus to rate duct visualization and compare pancreatic duct sizes before and after secretin administration (paired t-test). The likelihood of a normal versus an abnormal MRCP study was compared by gender, pancreatitis as the primary indication, secretin use, and whether ERCP was performed (Fisher's exact test), as well as age (t-test). A total of 85 MRCP studies were performed in children (mean age 10.3 years), most commonly for evaluation of pancreatitis (n=47, 55%); 41 (48%) used secretin and 39 (46%) used a negative oral contrast agent. Of the 85 studies, 72 (85%) had excellent image quality and 43 were normal. ERCP was performed after 16 of the 85 MRCP studies (19%); the diagnoses were concordant with those of MRCP in 13 (81%). There were 42 abnormal MRCP studies, and these were more likely to be in girls (P=0.03) and in children who had undergone ERCP (P<0.01). Secretin and the negative oral contrast agent were well-tolerated. Secretin improved duct visualization (P<0.001). MRCP safely and accurately depicted pancreaticobiliary anatomy in children. The use of secretin improved visualization of the pancreatic duct. (orig.)

  7. Evaluation of the marker technique for measurement of exocrine pancreatic secretion rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rune, S.J.; Worning, H.

    1985-01-01

    A secretin-cholecystokinin test was performed in 103 patients, representing both normal and reduced exocrine pancreatic function. The duodenum was intubated with a triple-lumen tube. The gastric and duodenal contents were aspirated separately and sampled in 10-min. periods. An inert, water-soluble marker ( 58 Co-vitamin B 12 dissolved in isotonic saline) was infused at a constant rate into the duodenum. Exocrine panreatic secretion was stimulated by continuous intravenous infusion of secretin for 60 min. and a combination of secretin and cholecystokinin for another 60 min. The total recovery of the infused marker was 80%. The concentration of marker in the aspriate did not vary significantly between consecutive 10-min. periods during the last 20 min. of the secretin stimulation period, or during the last 50 min. of the combined secretin-cholecystokinin stimulation period, indicating a steady secretion rate into the duodenum. By means of the marker, concentrations in the aspirate, the duodenal volumes were calculated and found to vary significantly less than the aspirated volumes. This finding demonstrates that the duodenal volume calculated from the recovery of an inert marker, is a closer estimate of the true volume than that obtained by the usual apsiration technique without a volume indicator

  8. Pancreatic exocrine function testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goff, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    It is important to understand which pancreatic function tests are available and how to interpret them when evaluating patients with malabsorption. Available direct tests are the secretin stimulation test, the Lundh test meal, and measurement of serum or fecal enzymes. Indirect tests assess pancreatic exocrine function by measuring the effect of pancreatic secretion on various nutrients. These include triglycerides labeled with carbon 14, cobalamin labeled with cobalt 57 and cobalt 58, and para-aminobenzoic acid bound to a dipeptide. Of all these tests the secretin stimulation test is the most accurate and reliable if done by experienced personnel. However, the indirect tests are simpler to do and appear to be comparable to the secretin test at detecting pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. These indirect tests are becoming clinically available and clinicians should familiarize themselves with the strengths and weaknesses of each

  9. Formation of a [sup(99m)Tc]polypeptide hormone: characterization and chemical quality control by ampholyte displacement radiochromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundrehagen, E.

    1983-01-01

    Sup(99m)Tc-complexes with the polypeptide hormone secretin in very low concentration were formed by the concentrated hydrochloric acid/vacuum evaporation/gentisic acid method. The sup(99m)Tc-secretin was characterized by a modified ampholyte radiochromatographic procedure, in addition to thin layer chromatography, gel chromatography and paper electrophoresis. High radiochemical purity and specific radioactivity were obtained. In vivo distribution studies were performed, and the conditions necessary for application of [sup(99m)Tc]polypeptides as scintigraphic agents are discussed. (author)

  10. Diagnostic informative value of gastroduodenal regulatory peptides of the blood serum on an empty stomach and after test breakfasts of various compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ablyazov, A.A.; Korot'ko, G.F.

    1992-01-01

    Gastrin, secretin and cholecystokinin were determined by a radioimmunoassay in healthy persons (19) and in patients with peptic ulcer (13) on an empty stomach and after test breakfasts with different nutrients. In the healthy persons the blood concentration of regulatory peptides was lower than in the patients. Breakfasts increased the concentrations of gastrin, secretin and cholecystokinin in the patients much more than in the controls. Some differences in changes of the blood concentration of peptides were noted with regard to a type of test breakfast. However differentiated reactions of the endocrine apparatus of the gastroduodenal complex in response to the breakfasts were not a reliable functional and diagnostic criterion

  11. Expression of receptors for gut peptides in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma and tumour-free pancreas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, C.; Biemond, I.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Verspaget, W.; Lamers, C. B.

    1997-01-01

    Gut hormones that modulate the growth of normal pancreas may also modulate the growth of cancers originating from pancreas. This study visualized and compared the receptors for cholecystokinin (CCK), bombesin (BBS), secretin and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in tumour-free tissue sections of

  12. GPCR Interaction: 199 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ecretin receptor (SecR), and interfaces of VPAC2R B Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide Type 2 VPAC2R C Secret...in ... SecR Experiment SecR does not interact with CTR (calcitonin receptor). 18401761 BRET, FRET NP_003373.2 ...

  13. The effect of pancreatic polypeptide and peptide YY on pancreatic blood flow and pancreatic exocrine secretion in the anesthetized dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeMar, A.R.; Lake, R.; Fink, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    Pancreatic polypeptide (PP) and peptide YY (PYY) are inhibitors of pancreatic exocrine secretion in vivo but not in vitro, which suggests intermediate mechanisms of action. To examine the role of pancreatic blood flow in these inhibitory effects, xenon-133 gas clearance was used to measure pancreatic blood flow while simultaneously measuring pancreatic exocrine secretion. PP or PYY (400 pmol/kg/h) was administered during the intermediate hour of a 3-h secretin (125 ng/kg/h)/cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) (50 ng/kg/h) infusion. Exocrine secretion and pancreatic blood flow during the PP or PYY hours were compared with that observed in the first and third hours of the secretin/CCK-8 infusion. PP and PYY significantly inhibited secretin/CCK-8-induced pancreatic exocrine secretion. In addition, PYY (but not PP) significantly reduced pancreatic blood flow during secretin/CCK-8 stimulation. Nevertheless, there was no correlation between pancreatic blood flow and bicarbonate or protein outputs. It is concluded that changes in pancreatic blood flow do not mediate the inhibitory effects of PP or PYY on the exocrine pancreas

  14. Structure-Function of CD36 and Importance of Fatty Acid Signal Transduction in Fat Metabolism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pepino, M. Y.; Kuda, Ondřej; Samovski, D.; Abumrad, N. A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 34, JULY (2014), s. 281-303 ISSN 0199-9885 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP13-04449P Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : fat taste * chylomicron * VLDL * CCK * secretin * calcium * FA binding * phospholipase * eicosanoid Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 8.359, year: 2014

  15. Assembly of the Type II Secretion System such as Found in Vibrio cholerae Depends on the Novel Pilotin AspS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunstan, Rhys A.; Heinz, Eva; Wijeyewickrema, Lakshmi C.; Pike, Robert N.; Purcell, Anthony W.; Evans, Timothy J.; Praszkier, Judyta; Robins-Browne, Roy M.; Strugnell, Richard A.; Korotkov, Konstantin V.; Lithgow, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    The Type II Secretion System (T2SS) is a molecular machine that drives the secretion of fully-folded protein substrates across the bacterial outer membrane. A key element in the machinery is the secretin: an integral, multimeric outer membrane protein that forms the secretion pore. We show that three distinct forms of T2SSs can be distinguished based on the sequence characteristics of their secretin pores. Detailed comparative analysis of two of these, the Klebsiella-type and Vibrio-type, showed them to be further distinguished by the pilotin that mediates their transport and assembly into the outer membrane. We have determined the crystal structure of the novel pilotin AspS from Vibrio cholerae, demonstrating convergent evolution wherein AspS is functionally equivalent and yet structurally unrelated to the pilotins found in Klebsiella and other bacteria. AspS binds to a specific targeting sequence in the Vibrio-type secretins, enhances the kinetics of secretin assembly, and homologs of AspS are found in all species of Vibrio as well those few strains of Escherichia and Shigella that have acquired a Vibrio-type T2SS. PMID:23326233

  16. History of Hepatic Bile Formation: Old Problems, New Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javitt, Norman B.

    2014-01-01

    Studies of hepatic bile formation reported in 1958 established that it was an osmotically generated water flow. Intravenous infusion of sodium taurocholate established a high correlation between hepatic bile flow and bile acid excretion. Secretin, a hormone that stimulates bicarbonate secretion, was also found to increase hepatic bile flow. The…

  17. New insights into the structure of Class B G protein-coupled receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollenstein, H.; de Graaf, C.; Bortolato, A.; Wang, M-W; Marshall, F.; Stevens, R.C.

    2014-01-01

    The secretin-like (class B) family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are key players in hormonal homeostasis and are interesting drug targets for the treatment of several metabolic disorders (such as type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis, and obesity) and nervous system diseases (such as migraine,

  18. Caffeine Inhibits Fluid Secretion by Interlobular Ducts From Guinea Pig Pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochimaru, Yuka; Yamamoto, Akiko; Nakakuki, Miyuki; Yamaguchi, Makoto; Taniguchi, Ituka; Ishiguro, Hiroshi

    2017-04-01

    Caffeine is contained in coffee, tea, and numerous beverages and foods. We examined the direct effects of caffeine on the physiological function of pancreatic duct cells by using interlobular duct segments isolated from guinea pig pancreas. The rate of fluid secretion was continuously measured by monitoring the luminal volume of isolated duct segments. Changes in intracellular Ca concentration ([Ca]i) were estimated by microfluorometry in ducts loaded with Fura-2. Both secretin-stimulated and acetylcholine (ACh)-stimulated fluid secretions were substantially and reversibly inhibited by relatively low concentrations of caffeine as low as 0.03 mM relevant to blood levels after ingestion of caffeine-containing beverages. Caffeine inhibited ACh-induced elevation of [Ca]i and secretin-induced fluctuation of [Ca]i. Caffeine abolished thapsigargin-induced intracellular Ca release but did not affect the entry of extracellular Ca. Caffeine (0.05 mM) abolished ethanol (1 mM)-induced fluid hypersecretion in secretin-stimulated pancreatic duct. Low concentrations of caffeine directly inhibit pancreatic ductal fluid secretion stimulated by secretin or ACh and also ethanol-induced fluid hypersecretion. The inhibition by caffeine seems to be mediated by the blockade of intracellular Ca mobilization. Daily intake of caffeine may reduce the volume of pancreatic juice secretion.

  19. Effect of irradiation on the canine exocrine pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pieroni, P.L.; Rudick, J.; Adler, M.; Nacchiero, M.; Rybak, B.J.

    1976-01-01

    Effects of irradiation on the pancreas was studied in 6 dogs receiving a dose equivalent to the biologic effect of 4000 R/6 weeks (with a nominal standard dose of 1175 rets) given to patients with Hodgkins disease. After control secretory, histologic and pancreatographic studies, 6 Thomas fistula dogs were subjected to 2400 R tumor dose over two weeks. There was a biphasic response to secretin alone or secretin with cholecystokininpancreozymin. An initial hypersecretion occurred at 2 weeks--volume was increased, but bicarbonate and enzyme output remained unchanged. Thereafter there was a progressive reduction in volume, bicarbonate and enzyme outputs (greater than 90 percent after 3 months). Histology showed early ductal reduplication but with progressive fibrosis, features compatible with chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatic insufficiency may contribute to post-irradiation gastrointestinal symptomatology. Close field irradiation of the pancreas results in actual destruction of the parenchyma

  20. Duodenal endocrine cells in adult coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjölund, K; Alumets, J; Berg, N O; Håkanson, R; Sundler, F

    1979-01-01

    Using immunohistochemical techniques we studied duodenal biopsies from 18 patients with coeliac disease and 24 patients with normal duodenal morphology. We had access to antisera against the following gastrointestinal peptides: cholecystokinin (CCK), gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP), gastrin-17, glucagon-enteroglucagon, motilin, neurotensin, pancreatic peptide (PP), secretin, somatostatin, substance P and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). The somatostatin, GIP, CCK, and glucagon cells were increased in number in coeliac disease. The number of motilin cells was slightly increased, while secretin cells were reduced. Cells storing gastrin-17, substance P, or neurotensin were rare in all patients regardless of diagnosis. No PP immunoreactive cells were found and VIP was localised to neurons only. In biopsies from patients having a mucosa with ridging of villi the number of the various endocrine cell types did not differ from that in the control group. Images Fig. 2 PMID:385455

  1. Pancreatic Exocrine Function Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Berk, J. Edward

    1982-01-01

    It is important to understand which pancreatic function tests are available and how to interpret them when evaluating patients with malabsorption. Available direct tests are the secretin stimulation test, the Lundh test meal, and measurement of serum or fecal enzymes. Indirect tests assess pancreatic exocrine function by measuring the effect of pancreatic secretion on various nutrients. These include triglycerides labeled with carbon 14, cobalamin labeled with cobalt 57 and cobalt 58, and par...

  2. Normal pancreatic exocrine function does not exclude MRI/MRCP chronic pancreatitis findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkaade, Samer; Cem Balci, Numan; Momtahen, Amir Javad; Burton, Frank

    2008-09-01

    Abnormal pancreatic function tests have been reported to precede the imaging findings of chronic pancreatitis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is increasingly accepted as the primary imaging modality for the detection of structural changes of early mild chronic pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate MRI/MRCP findings in patients with symptoms consistent with chronic pancreatitis who have normal Secretin Endoscopic Pancreatic Function test. A retrospective study of 32 patients referred for evaluation of chronic abdominal pain consistent with chronic pancreatitis and reported normal standard abdominal imaging (ultrasound, computed tomography, or MRI). All patients underwent Secretin Endoscopic Pancreatic Function testing and pancreatic MRI/MRCP at our institution. We reviewed the MRI/MRCP images in patients who had normal Secretin Endoscopic Pancreatic Function testing. MRI/MRCP images were assessed for pancreatic duct morphology, gland size, parenchymal signal and morphology, and arterial contrast enhancement. Of the 32 patients, 23 had normal Secretin Endoscopic Pancreatic Function testing, and 8 of them had mild to marked spectrum of abnormal MRI/MRCP findings that were predominantly focal. Frequencies of the findings were as follows: pancreatic duct stricture (n=3), pancreatic duct dilatation (n=3), side branch ectasia (n=4), atrophy (n=5), decreased arterial enhancement (n=5), decreased parenchymal signal (n=1), and cavity formation (n=1). The remaining15 patients had normal pancreatic structure on MRI/MRCP. Normal pancreatic function testing cannot exclude abnormal MRI/MRCP especially focal findings of chronic pancreatitis. Further studies needed to verify significance of these findings and establish MRI/MRCP imaging criteria for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis.

  3. Exocrine pancreatic function in hepatocyte nuclear factor 1β-maturity-onset diabetes of the young (HNF1B-MODY) is only moderately reduced: compensatory hypersecretion from a hypoplastic pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjora, E; Wathle, G; Erchinger, F; Engjom, T; Molven, A; Aksnes, L; Haldorsen, I S; Dimcevski, G; Raeder, H; Njølstad, P R

    2013-08-01

    To examine the exocrine pancreatic function in carriers of the hepatocyte nuclear factor 1β gene (HNF1B) mutation by direct testing. Patients with HNF1B mutations and control subjects were assessed using rapid endoscopic secretin tests and secretin-stimulated magnetic resonance imaging. Seven patients and 25 controls underwent endoscopy, while eight patients and 20 controls had magnetic resonance imaging. Ductal function was assessed according to peak bicarbonate concentrations and acinar function was assessed according to peak digestive enzyme activities in secretin-stimulated duodenal juice. The association of pancreatic exocrine function and diabetes status with pancreatic gland volume was examined. The mean increase in secretin-stimulated duodenal fluid was smaller in patients than controls (4.0 vs 6.4 ml/min; P = 0.003). We found lower ductal function in patients than controls (median peak bicarbonate concentration: 73 vs 116 mEq/L; P function (median peak lipase activity: 6.4 vs 33.5 kU/ml; P = 0.01; median peak elastase activity: 0.056 vs 0.130 U/ml; P = 0.01). Pancreatic fluid volume outputs correlated significantly with pancreatic gland volumes (r² = 0.71, P = 0.008) in patients. The total fluid output to pancreatic gland volume ratios were higher in patients than controls (4.5 vs 1.3 ml/cm³; P = 0.03), suggesting compensatory hypersecretion in the remaining gland. Carriers of the HNF1B mutation have lower exocrine pancreatic function involving both ductal and acinar cells. Compensatory hypersecretion suggests that the small pancreas of HNF1B mutation carriers is attributable to hypoplasia, not atrophy. © 2013 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2013 Diabetes UK.

  4. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography in the diagnosis of pancreas divisum: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, Tarun; Njei, Basile

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to perform a structured meta-analysis of all eligible studies to assess the overall diagnostic use of magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) alone or with secretin enhancement (secretin-enhanced MRCP [S-MRCP]) in the detection of pancreas divisum. Two authors independently performed a comprehensive search of PubMed, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Library from inception to September 2013. Studies were included if they allowed construction of 2 × 2 contingency tables of MRCP and/or S-MRCP compared with criterion standard. DerSimonian-Laird random effect models were used to estimate the pooled sensitivity, specificity, specificity, and quantitative receiver operating characteristics. Of 51 citations, 10 studies with 1474 patients were included. Secretin-enhanced MRCP had a higher overall diagnostic performance than MRCP (S-MRCP: pooled sensitivity, 86% [95% confidence interval (CI), 77%-93%]; specificity, 97% [95% CI, 94%-99%]; and area under the curve, 0.93 ± 0.056 compared with MRCP: sensitivity, 52% [95% CI, 45%-59%]; specificity, 97% [95% CI, 94%-99%]; and area under the curve, 0.76 ± 0.104). Pooled diagnostic odds ratios were 72.19 (95% CI, 5.66-938.8) and 23.39 (95% CI, 7.93-69.02) for S-MRCP and MRCP, respectively. Visual inspection of the funnel plot showed low potential for publication bias. Secretin-enhanced MRCP has a much higher diagnostic accuracy than MRCP and should be preferred for diagnosis of pancreas divisum.

  5. Magnetic resonance hydrometry: non-invasive quantification of the exocrine pancreatic function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heverhagen, J.T.; Battmann, A.; Kirsch, M.; Klose, K.J.; Boehm, D.; Eissele, R.; Wagner, H.J.

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To show the ability of magnetic resonance hydrometry (MRH) to quantify the pancreatic secretion after secretin stimulation in order to distinguish between physiological excretion and reduced output in chronic pancreatitis. Methods: MRH images were acquired in a 1.0-T-clinical scanner using a body-array coil and a heavily T 2 -weighted standard single-shot TSE sequence. Thirty-one patients (14 male/17 female) who routinely underwent ERCP for suspected choledocholithiasis (n = 22), recurring abdominal pain (n = 1), icterus (n = 6) and suspected pancreatitis (n = 2) were included. During the investigation 1 CU/kg BW secretin were administered intravenously. Secreted volume of fluid, start of secretion, achievement of a plateau of secretion and a combined score of these parameters (MRH score) were assessed and evaluated. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for these parameters. Results: 27 patients had no pancreatic pathology, and four suffered from chronic pancreatitis. Patients without pancreatic disorders produced a mean pancreatic fluid volume of 183±86 mL, whereas patients with chronic pancreatitis secreted 61±39 mL. Secretion started after a mean time of 95±94 seconds (no pancreatic impairment) and 62±13 seconds (chronic pancreatitis). The MRH score achieved a high accuracy in the detection of chronic pancreatitis. Conclusions: Our study demonstrated the feasibility of measuring pancreatic output by MRH after stimulation with secretin. Moreover, a distinction between normal secretion and patients with chronic pancreatitis is possible. (orig.) [de

  6. Trypsin radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheithauer, R.; Wolf, F.; Tympner, F.

    1981-01-01

    In 29 patients with suspicion of pancreatic disease standard secretin-pancreozymin-test was performed parallel to trypsin determination by radioimmunoassay before and after stimulation with secretin. Mean serum trypsin in normal subjects was 175 ng BIT/ml (range 90-250), the maximum after stimulation being 20 minutes after secreting injection (range 110-550). Preliminary normal values are 270 ng BIT/ml for basal concentration and 650 ng BIT/ml for 20 min after secretin stimulation. In the group of normals there was no case of misinterpretation. In patients with several pathological parameters (n = 10) basal trypsin concentration was increased in 7 cases, the stimulated value was concordant with the definite diagnosis in every case. Significant advantage for diagnostics was derived in patients having had pancreatic diseases before, however being actually normal with respect to standard diagnostic parameters. All these patients revealed increased trypsin concentrations after stimulation and 50% of them showed increased basal values. Equivocal results were seen in patients with endstage pancreatitis as well as in case of obstruction during reduced secretion. (orig.) [de

  7. Gastrointestinal transit in nonobese diabetic mouse: an animal model of human diabetes type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Salhy, M

    2001-01-01

    Gastrointestinal transit (GI) in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse, an animal model of human diabetes type 1, was examined in animals with short- (duration 1-5 days) and long-term (duration 28-35 days) diabetes. Blood glucose level, serum insulin concentration, and gut neuroendocrine peptide content were also measured. GI was significantly rapid in NOD mice with long-term diabetes (LTD), but was not correlated with blood glucose level, serum insulin concentration, or pancreatic insulin content. GI was correlated with duodenal secretin content, but not with the content of other neuroendocrine peptides in the different segments investigated. Whereas antral vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) content in NOD mice with LTD was significantly higher, colonic VIP was lower in NOD mice with short-term diabetes (STD). In the duodenum, whereas the concentration of secretin in NOD mice with both STD and LTD was lower, the gastrin content was higher. Duodenal somatostatin content in NOD mice with LTD was lower. In colon, the content of galanin in NOD mice with LTD was higher than in controls. The decreased content of secretin may be among the factors that cause rapid GI in NOD mice with LTD. Changes in the antral content of VIP, duodenal somatostatin, and colonic galanin in NOD mice with LTD may cause low intestinal secretion and, together with rapid GI, give rise to diarrhoea, which is a common symptom in diabetes.

  8. Bovine pancreatic polypeptide as an antagonist of muscarinic cholinergic receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, G.Z.; Lu, L.; Qian, J.; Xue, B.G.

    1987-01-01

    In dispersed acini from rat pancreas, it was found that bovine pancreatic polypeptide (BPP) and its C-fragment hexapeptide amide (PP-6), at concentrations of 0.1 and 30 μM, respectively, could significantly inhibit amylase secretion stimulated by carbachol, and this inhibition by BPP was dose dependent. 45 Ca outflux induced by carbachol was also inhibited by BPP or PP-6, but they had no effect on cholecystokinin octapeptide- (CCK-8) or A23187-stimulated 45 Ca outflux. BPP was also capable of displacing the specific binding of [ 3 H]-quinuclidinyl benzilate to its receptors, and it possessed a higher affinity (K/sub i/35nM) than carbachol (K/sub i/ 1.8 μM) in binding with M-receptors. It is concluded from this study that BPP acts as an antagonist of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in rat pancreatic acini. In addition, BPP inhibited the potentiation of amylase secretion caused by the combination of carbachol plus secretin or vasoactive intestinal peptide. This may be a possible explanation of the inhibitory effect of BPP on secretin-induced pancreatic enzyme secretion shown in vivo, since pancreatic enzyme secretion stimulated by secretin under experimental conditions may be the result of potentiation of enzyme release produced by the peptide in combination with a cholinergic stimulant

  9. A new method for 99mTc-labelling of proteins, leucocytes and platelets for nuclear medicine application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundrehagen, E.

    1984-01-01

    A reduced state of 99mTc was obtained by concentrated hydrocloric acid treatment of the 99mTc(VII)/0.15 M NaCl eluate from 99Mo/99mTc generators. Non-acidic reduced state of 99mTc in dry NaCl deposit was obtained by vacuum evaporation of concentrated HCl and water. A monitored vacuum evaporator built for this purpose is presented, as well as methods of formation of various 99mTc-protein and 99mTc-polypeptide complexes. After careful protein precipation or anionic adsorption of pertechnetate and 99mTc-gentisic acid complexes, high radiochemical purities of labelled proteins were demonstrated by gel chromatography studies, radioimmunological methods, radioaffinity testing studies and ampholyte displacement radiochromatography. Preparative methods for 99mTc-plasmin (at pH=2), 99mTc-secretin (at pH=3) and 99mTc-IgG (at pH=4) are presented. The role and the limitations of 99mTc-plasmin for diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis were investigated in experimentally induced jugular vein thrombosis in rabbits. The in vivo distribution of intravenously injected 99mTc-secretin was found to be in correspondance with that of unlabelled secretin. Labelling of platelets and leucoytes from human blood with 99mTc was carried out at pH=7.2. Data for a remarkable high stability of the labelled cells are presented

  10. Assessment of the form and patency of the pancreatic duct by magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Masaya; Takahashi, Tuyoshi; Yoshida, Muneki; Shimada, Ken; Kakita, Akira; Isobe, Yoshinori

    1999-01-01

    There have been no reliable methods for the assessment of the patency of an end-to-side style pancreaticojejunal anastomosis in Whipple procedure. We evaluated the ability of MR-Cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) to assess the form and patency of the pancreatic duct in 181 patients. The pancreatic duct was displayed on MRCP in 70.9% of the patients. The domostrative rate of the pancreatic duct on MRCP and the PFD test were well correlated (p=0.031). Further, we assessed the patency of pancreaticojejunal anastomosis in Whipple procedure by MRCP following a secretin load. It was considered that the pancreatic duct to be patent when pancreatic excretion into the jejunum had increased and/or the ability to display the pancreatic duct had improved on MRCP following an i.v. load of secretin. A secretin-loading MRCP was suggested to be of much help in the assessment of the patency of pancreaticojejunostomy in patients undergoing Whipple procedure for a long-term follow up. (author)

  11. Assessment of the form and patency of the pancreatic duct by magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, Masaya; Takahashi, Tuyoshi; Yoshida, Muneki; Shimada, Ken; Kakita, Akira; Isobe, Yoshinori [Kitasato Univ., Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine

    1999-02-01

    There have been no reliable methods for the assessment of the patency of an end-to-side style pancreaticojejunal anastomosis in Whipple procedure. We evaluated the ability of MR-Cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) to assess the form and patency of the pancreatic duct in 181 patients. The pancreatic duct was displayed on MRCP in 70.9% of the patients. The domostrative rate of the pancreatic duct on MRCP and the PFD test were well correlated (p=0.031). Further, we assessed the patency of pancreaticojejunal anastomosis in Whipple procedure by MRCP following a secretin load. It was considered that the pancreatic duct to be patent when pancreatic excretion into the jejunum had increased and/or the ability to display the pancreatic duct had improved on MRCP following an i.v. load of secretin. A secretin-loading MRCP was suggested to be of much help in the assessment of the patency of pancreaticojejunostomy in patients undergoing Whipple procedure for a long-term follow up. (author)

  12. A Study on the Abnormalities of the Various Endocrine Functions Associated with Chronic Renal Failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Chan Pyo; Kim, Man Woo; Rho, Bang Soo; Jang, Kyung Sik; Lee, Min Hyung; Oh, Hyun Kwan [Chosun University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1982-03-15

    In an attempt to evaluate the various serum hormonal changes in terminal renal failure, the fasting T{sub 4}, T{sub 3}, rT-3, gastrin, secretin prolactin, and aldosterone were measured by radioimmunoassay in 12 patients with chronic renal failure, who were admitted Chosun University Hospital from January to June, 1981. From the analysis the following results were obtained. 1. Mean values of serum hormonal concentration in 10 normal control were as follows: T{sub 4}, 12.93+-2.00 ug/ml; T{sub 3}, 113.0+-28.7 ng/ml; rT{sub 3}, 0.11+-0.10 ng/ml; gastrin, 100.0+-47.1 pg/ml; secretin, 32.46+-11.45 pg/ml; prolactin, 11.0+-3.6 ng/ml; aldosterone 137.0+-58.5 pg/ml. 2. Mean values of serum hormonal concentration in 12 chronic renal failure were as follows; T4, 7.34+-2.43 ug/ml; T3, 71.0+-19.1 ng/ml; reverse T3, 0.38+-0.19 ng/ml; gastrin, 162.5+-40.2 pg/ml; secretin, 107.50+-20.48 pg/ml; prolactin, 34.0+-17.2 ng/ml; aldosterone, 86.5+-19.8 pg/ml. 3. In chronic renal failure group, serum T4, T3, and adosterone level were significantly lower than those of the control group, but serum rT-3, gastrin, secretin and prolactin were significantly higher than those of the control group. 4. In the view of the correlation between serum hormonal concentrations and serum creatine levels in patients with chronic renal failure, rT{sub 3}, gastrin, secretin and prolactin showed increasing tendency (positive correlations), whereas T{sub 4}, T{sub 3} and aldosterone showed decreasing tendency (negative correlations) with increment of serum creatinine levels. And so, we observed the negative correlation between T{sub 3} and rT{sub 3}.

  13. A Study on the Abnormalities of the Various Endocrine Functions Associated with Chronic Renal Failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Chan Pyo; Kim, Man Woo; Rho, Bang Soo; Jang, Kyung Sik; Lee, Min Hyung; Oh, Hyun Kwan

    1982-01-01

    In an attempt to evaluate the various serum hormonal changes in terminal renal failure, the fasting T 4 , T 3 , rT-3, gastrin, secretin prolactin, and aldosterone were measured by radioimmunoassay in 12 patients with chronic renal failure, who were admitted Chosun University Hospital from January to June, 1981. From the analysis the following results were obtained. 1. Mean values of serum hormonal concentration in 10 normal control were as follows: T 4 , 12.93±2.00 ug/ml; T 3 , 113.0±28.7 ng/ml; rT 3 , 0.11±0.10 ng/ml; gastrin, 100.0±47.1 pg/ml; secretin, 32.46±11.45 pg/ml; prolactin, 11.0±3.6 ng/ml; aldosterone 137.0±58.5 pg/ml. 2. Mean values of serum hormonal concentration in 12 chronic renal failure were as follows; T4, 7.34±2.43 ug/ml; T3, 71.0±19.1 ng/ml; reverse T3, 0.38±0.19 ng/ml; gastrin, 162.5±40.2 pg/ml; secretin, 107.50±20.48 pg/ml; prolactin, 34.0±17.2 ng/ml; aldosterone, 86.5±19.8 pg/ml. 3. In chronic renal failure group, serum T4, T3, and adosterone level were significantly lower than those of the control group, but serum rT-3, gastrin, secretin and prolactin were significantly higher than those of the control group. 4. In the view of the correlation between serum hormonal concentrations and serum creatine levels in patients with chronic renal failure, rT 3 , gastrin, secretin and prolactin showed increasing tendency (positive correlations), whereas T 4 , T 3 and aldosterone showed decreasing tendency (negative correlations) with increment of serum creatinine levels. And so, we observed the negative correlation between T 3 and rT 3 .

  14. Function of the minor duodenal papilla in pancreas divisum as determined by duodenoscopy using indigo carmine dye and a pH sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Y; Tsukamoto, Y; Naitoh, Y; Hirooka, Y; Furukawa, T; Nakagawa, H; Hayakawa, T

    1994-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the function of the minor duodenal papilla and to investigate the relationship between the history of acute pancreatitis and individual dorsal pancreatogram findings and the minor papilla function in pancreas divisum. Eight of the 21 patients with PD diagnosed by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography had a history of acute pancreatitis (group A), and 13 patients did not (group B). The reaction of pancreatic juice excreted via the minor papilla was evaluated after intravenous administration of secretin, by observing the repulsion of indigo carmine dye scattered on the surface of the minor papilla. The function of the minor papilla was classified into two types. In 12 patients, all of the pigment on the minor papilla was repelled within 5 min of secretin administration (type I), and in the remaining nine patients it was not (type II). After secretin administration, the pH of the minor papilla surface in type I was significantly higher than that in type II. There was no significant difference between the type I and type II patients in exocrine pancreatic function, as evaluated by a BT-PABA test. In the group A patients, the rate of occurrence of dorsal duct dilation (including changes of the terminal shape) was significantly greater than in the group B patients. The function of the minor papilla in the group A patients was significantly worse than in the group B patients. Outflow obstruction of pancreatic group B patients. Outflow obstruction of pancreatic juice, i.e., "relative stenosis of the minor papilla," was considered to be present in the patients with type II papilla, and, therefore, the patients with type II papilla might suffer from acute pancreatitis resulting from poor drainage of pancreatic juice and excessive pressure in the dorsal duct. The finding that patients with PD have one of two types of minor papilla will be useful for understanding the condition and selecting the therapeutic plan for

  15. The non-flagellar type III secretion system evolved from the bacterial flagellum and diversified into host-cell adapted systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie S Abby

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Type 3 secretion systems (T3SSs are essential components of two complex bacterial machineries: the flagellum, which drives cell motility, and the non-flagellar T3SS (NF-T3SS, which delivers effectors into eukaryotic cells. Yet the origin, specialization, and diversification of these machineries remained unclear. We developed computational tools to identify homologous components of the two systems and to discriminate between them. Our analysis of >1,000 genomes identified 921 T3SSs, including 222 NF-T3SSs. Phylogenomic and comparative analyses of these systems argue that the NF-T3SS arose from an exaptation of the flagellum, i.e. the recruitment of part of the flagellum structure for the evolution of the new protein delivery function. This reconstructed chronology of the exaptation process proceeded in at least two steps. An intermediate ancestral form of NF-T3SS, whose descendants still exist in Myxococcales, lacked elements that are essential for motility and included a subset of NF-T3SS features. We argue that this ancestral version was involved in protein translocation. A second major step in the evolution of NF-T3SSs occurred via recruitment of secretins to the NF-T3SS, an event that occurred at least three times from different systems. In rhizobiales, a partial homologous gene replacement of the secretin resulted in two genes of complementary function. Acquisition of a secretin was followed by the rapid adaptation of the resulting NF-T3SSs to multiple, distinct eukaryotic cell envelopes where they became key in parasitic and mutualistic associations between prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Our work elucidates major steps of the evolutionary scenario leading to extant NF-T3SSs. It demonstrates how molecular evolution can convert one complex molecular machine into a second, equally complex machine by successive deletions, innovations, and recruitment from other molecular systems.

  16. Intracellular mediators of Na+-K+ pump activity in guinea pig pancreatic acinar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hootman, S.R.; Ochs, D.L.; Williams, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    The involvement of Ca 2+ and cyclic nucleotides in neurohormonal regulation of Na + -K + -ATPase (Na + -K + pump) activity in guinea pig pancreatic acinar cells was investigated. Changes in Na+-K+ pump activity elicited by secretagogues were assessed by [3H]ouabain binding and by ouabain-sensitive 86 Rb + uptake. Carbachol (CCh) and cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) each stimulated both ouabain-sensitive 86Rb+ uptake and equilibrium binding of [ 3 H]ouabain by approximately 60%. Secretin increased both indicators of Na+-K+ pump activity by approximately 40% as did forskolin, 8-bromo- and dibutyryl cAMP, theophylline, and isobutylmethylxanthine. Incubation of acinar cells in Ca 2+ -free HEPES-buffered Ringer (HR) with 0.5 mM EGTA reduced the stimulatory effects of CCh and CCK-8 by up to 90% but caused only a small reduction in the effects of secretin, forskolin, and cAMP analogues. In addition, CCh, CCK-8, secretin, and forskolin each stimulated ouabain-insensitive 86Rb+ uptake by acinar cells. The increase elicited by CCh and CCK-8 was greatly reduced in the absence of extracellular Ca 2+ , while that caused by the latter two agents was not substantially altered. The effects of secretagogues on free Ca 2+ levels in pancreatic acinar cells also were investigated with quin-2, a fluorescent Ca 2+ chelator. Basal intracellular Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+ ]i) was 161 nM in resting cells and increased to 713 and 803 nM within 15 s after addition of 100 microM CCh or 10 nM CCK-8, respectively

  17. Functional mapping of PilF and PilQ in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa type IV pilus system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Jason; Tang, Tim; Harvey, Hanjeong; Tammam, Stephanie; Sampaleanu, Liliana; Burrows, Lori L; Howell, P Lynne

    2013-04-30

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses type IV pili (T4P) to interact with the environment and as key virulence factors when acting as an opportunistic pathogen. Assembly of the outer membrane PilQ secretin channel through which the pili are extruded is essential for pilus biogenesis. The P. aeruginosa T4P pilotin, PilF, is required for PilQ outer membrane localization and assembly into secretins and contains six tetratricopeptide (TPR) protein-protein interaction motifs, suggesting that the two proteins interact. In this study, we found that the first four TPR motifs of PilF are sufficient for PilQ outer membrane targeting, oligomerization, and function. Guided by our structure of PilF, site-directed mutagenesis of the protein surface revealed that a hydrophobic groove on the first TPR is required for PilF-mediated PilQ assembly. Deletion of individual domains within PilQ suggests that the N0, KH-like, or secretin domain, but not the C-terminus, interacts with PilF. Purified PilQ was found to pull down PilF from Pseudomonas cell lysates. Together, these data allow us to propose a model for PilF function in the T4P system. PilF interacts directly or indirectly with the PilQ monomer after translocation of both proteins through the inner membrane and acts as a co-chaperone with the Lol system to facilitate transit across the periplasm to the outer membrane. The mechanism of PilQ insertion and assembly, which appears to be independent of the Bam system, remains to be determined.

  18. GenBank blastx search result: AK243269 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243269 J100049H19 L41732.4 ABCLSDA Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus levansucrase precursor (lsd...A), levanase precursor (lsdB), pseudopilin G precursor (lsdG), prepilin peptidase and N-methyl...transferase O (gspO), kinase E (lsdE), LsdF (lsdF), pseudopilin H precursor (lsdH), pseudopilin I precursor (lsd...I), pseudopilin J precursor (lsdJ), LsdL (lsdL), LsdM (lsdM), and LsdN (lsdN)... genes, complete cds; secretin D (lsdD) gene, partial cds; and unknown gene. BCT 6e-26 1 ...

  19. On the regulatory functions of neuropeptide Y (NPY) with respect to vascular resistance and exocrine and endocrine secretion in the pig pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, J J; Orskov, C; Knuhtsen, S

    1989-01-01

    We compared the effects of electrical stimulation of the splanchnic nerves and infusions of neuropeptide Y, noradrenaline or a combination of the two on pancreatic vascular resistance and exocrine and endocrine secretion. For these studies we used isolated perfused pig pancreas with preserved...... splanchnic nerve supply. The exocrine secretion was stimulated with physiological concentrations of secretin and cholecystokinin octapeptide. Noradrenaline and NPY at 10(-8) M both increased pancreatic perfusion pressure. Their effects were additive and similar in magnitude to that of electrical stimulation...

  20. Ernest Henry Starling (1866-1927): the scientist and the man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens H

    2005-01-01

    The pre-eminent achievements of the English physician and physiologist Ernest Henry Starling were his quantitative explanation of the transcapillary transport of fluid, the discovery of the first hormone, secretin, and his formulation of the law of the heart. In some ways Starling was an outsider...... and he was the centre of several scientific and social controversies. However, throughout his life he stressed fundamental scientific attitudes and ideas with remarkable persistence and power, although also balance, and his scientific achievements have stood the test of time....

  1. Outer membrane targeting of Pseudomonas aeruginosa proteins shows variable dependence on the components of Bam and Lol machineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Hanh H; Nickerson, Nicholas N; Lee, Vincent T; Kazimirova, Anastasia; Chami, Mohamed; Pugsley, Anthony P; Lory, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, the Lol and Bam machineries direct the targeting of lipidated and nonlipidated proteins, respectively, to the outer membrane (OM). Using Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains with depleted levels of specific Bam and Lol proteins, we demonstrated a variable dependence of different OM proteins on these targeting pathways. Reduction in the level of BamA significantly affected the ability of the β-barrel membrane protein OprF to localize to the OM, while the targeting of three secretins that are functionally related OM proteins was less affected (PilQ and PscC) or not at all affected (XcpQ). Depletion of LolB affected all lipoproteins examined and had a variable effect on the nonlipidated proteins. While the levels of OprF, PilQ, and PscC were significantly reduced by LolB depletion, XcpQ was unaffected and was correctly localized to the OM. These results suggest that certain β-barrel proteins such as OprF primarily utilize the complete Bam machinery. The Lol machinery participates in the OM targeting of secretins to variable degrees, likely through its involvement in the assembly of lipidated Bam components. XcpQ, but not PilQ or PscC, was shown to assemble spontaneously into liposomes as multimers. This work raises the possibility that there is a gradient of utilization of Bam and Lol insertion and targeting machineries. Structural features of individual proteins, including their β-barrel content, may determine the propensity of these proteins for folding (or misfolding) during periplasmic transit and OM insertion, thereby influencing the extent of utilization of the Bam targeting machinery, respectively. Targeting of lipidated and nonlipidated proteins to the outer membrane (OM) compartment in Gram-negative bacteria involves the transfer across the periplasm utilizing the Lol and Bam machineries, respectively. We show that depletion of Bam and Lol components in Pseudomonas aeruginosa does not lead to a general OM protein translocation defect

  2. Potentiation of glucose-induced insulin release in islets by desHis1[Glu9]glucagon amide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod, Hans; Unson, C G; Merrifield, R B

    1988-01-01

    Glucagon and secretin and some of their hybrid analogs potentiate glucose-induced release of insulin from isolated mouse pancreatic islets. It was recently shown that the synthetic glucagon analog, desHis1[Glu9]glucagon amide, does not stimulate the formation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate...... in the rat hepatocyte membrane, but binds well to the glucagon receptor and is a good competitive antagonist of glucagon. In the present study the effect of this analog on isolated islets was examined. desHis1-[Glu9]glucagon amide at 3 x 10(-7) M, in the presence of 0.01 M D-glucose, increased the release...

  3. Peptide radioimmunoassays in clinical medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geokas, M.C.; Yalow, R.S.; Straus, E.W.; Gold, E.M.

    1982-01-01

    The radioimmunoassay technique, first developed for the determination of hormones, has been applied to many substances of biologic interest by clinical and research laboratories around the world. It has had an enormous effect in medicine and biology as a diagnostic tool, a guide to therapy, and a probe for the fine structure of biologic systems. For instance, the assays of insulin, gastrin, secretin, prolactin, and certain tissue-specific enzymes have been invaluable in patient care. Further refinements of current methods, as well as the emergence of new immunoassay techniques, are expected to enhance precision, specificity, reliability, and convenience of the radioimmunoassay in both clinical and research laboratories

  4. Outer membrane components of the Tad (tight adherence) secreton of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clock, Sarah A; Planet, Paul J; Perez, Brenda A; Figurski, David H

    2008-02-01

    Prokaryotic secretion relies on proteins that are widely conserved, including NTPases and secretins, and on proteins that are system specific. The Tad secretion system in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is dedicated to the assembly and export of Flp pili, which are needed for tight adherence. Consistent with predictions that RcpA forms the multimeric outer membrane secretion channel (secretin) of the Flp pilus biogenesis apparatus, we observed the RcpA protein in multimers that were stable in the presence of detergent and found that rcpA and its closely related homologs form a novel and distinct subfamily within a well-supported gene phylogeny of the entire secretin gene superfamily. We also found that rcpA-like genes were always linked to Aggregatibacter rcpB- or Caulobacter cpaD-like genes. Using antisera, we determined the localization and gross abundances of conserved (RcpA and TadC) and unique (RcpB, RcpC, and TadD) Tad proteins. The three Rcp proteins (RcpA, RcpB, and RcpC) and TadD, a putative lipoprotein, localized to the bacterial outer membrane. RcpA, RcpC, and TadD were also found in the inner membrane, while TadC localized exclusively to the inner membrane. The RcpA secretin was necessary for wild-type abundances of RcpB and RcpC, and TadC was required for normal levels of all three Rcp proteins. TadC abundance defects were observed in rcpA and rcpC mutants. TadD production was essential for wild-type RcpA and RcpB abundances, and RcpA did not multimerize or localize to the outer membrane without the expression of TadD. These data indicate that membrane proteins TadC and TadD may influence the assembly, transport, and/or function of individual outer membrane Rcp proteins.

  5. Removal of the phage-shock protein PspB causes reduction of virulence in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium independently of NRAMP1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallrodt, Inke; Jelsbak, Lotte; Thomsen, Line E.

    2014-01-01

    The phage-shock protein (Psp) system is believed to manage membrane stress in all Enterobacteriaceae and has recently emerged as being important for virulence in several pathogenic species of this phylum. The core of the Psp system consists of the pspA-D operon and the distantly located pspG gene......IV-induced secretin stress. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that removal of PspB reduces virulence in S. Typhimurium independently of host NRAMP1 expression, demonstrating that PspB has roles in intra-host survival distinct from the reported contributions of PspA....

  6. Management of chemotherapy induced diarrhea (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    Diarrhoea is seen with many tumors and following several chemotherapy regimen esp. those containing 5-fluorouracil and high dose folinic acid it causes debility even death, delays cancer treatment, reduces compliance increases cost. It causes dehydration, renal failure volume depletion. Quality of life is worsened and hospitalization may be needed in multifactorial, with secretion; absorption imbalance due to mucosal damage, necrosis or inflammation. Local infection is set up by opportunistic organism and cell necrosis. The large volume of fluid and electrolytes overwhelms colonic absorptive capacity. Agent usually used for treatment is opioids (such as Diphenoxylate / Loperamide]. Bismuth (for inflammatory diarrhea). NSAIDs or alpha 2-agonists. For optimal management, the cause and severity should be assessed and treatment planned. Advice is given about certain dietary restraints and avoidance of some drugs. Fever, infection, dehydration and electrolyte losses are treated, pain relieved. Diphenoxylate / Loperamide (later is more effective; 4 mg, STAT, then 2mg every 4 hours or even 2 hourly) may be used. It is moderately effective in CID. Octreotide is useful in carcinoid. VIPoma, AIDS idiopathic secretary diarrhea, ileostomy, dumping syndrome. It acts directly on epithelial cells to reduce secretin, motilin pancreatic polypeptide. It slows transit time, reduces fluid and electrolyte secretin, increases absorption of electrolytes. It is effective in 5 FU and high dose chemotherapy with a 90% response rates seen after 3 days treatment. High Dose Chemotherapy and total body irradiation - induced diarrhea usually resolves within 72 hours. (author)

  7. Influence of gastric pH modifiers on development of intestinal metaplasia induced by X-irradiation in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Hiromitsu; Okamoto, Taro; Fudaba, Yasuhiro; Ogundigie, P.S.; Ito, Akihiro

    1993-01-01

    The influence of gastric pH on intestinal metaplasia was examined in male Crj:CD(SD) rats. At the age of 5 weeks, animals were irradiated with two 10 Gy doses of X-rays to the gastric region at a 3-day interval (total 20 Gy), and 6 months after irradiation, received either secretin or histamine in silicon tubes for 2 months or had their bilateral submandibular salivary glands removed. The incidences of intestinal metaplasia in the fundus of animals after administration of secretin or histamine, or removal of the salivary glands were reduced, along with the pH values, as compared with values for rats given X-rays alone. In both the pyloric and the fundic gland mucosae, the numbers of alkaline phosphatase (ALP)-positive foci and type B metaplasias (intestinal crypts without Paneth cells) were also significantly decreased (P<0.01). In a second experiment, started six months after irradiation, rats were kept on 1% sodium chloride (NaCl) diet for 6 months. Subsequent removal of salivary glands along with histamine treatment brought about a marked drop in pH and in numbers of ALP-positive foci after three and five days. The present results thus indicated that development and maintenance of intestinal metaplasia can be influenced by a decrease of pH value. (author)

  8. Automated spectrophotometric bicarbonate analysis in duodenal juice compared to the back titration method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erchinger, Friedemann; Engjom, Trond; Gudbrandsen, Oddrun Anita; Tjora, Erling; Gilja, Odd H; Dimcevski, Georg

    2016-01-01

    We have recently evaluated a short endoscopic secretin test for exocrine pancreatic function. Bicarbonate concentration in duodenal juice is an important parameter in this test. Measurement of bicarbonate by back titration as the gold standard method is time consuming, expensive and technically difficult, thus a simplified method is warranted. We aimed to evaluate an automated spectrophotometric method in samples spanning the effective range of bicarbonate concentrations in duodenal juice. We also evaluated if freezing of samples before analyses would affect its results. Patients routinely examined with short endoscopic secretin test suspected to have decreased pancreatic function of various reasons were included. Bicarbonate in duodenal juice was quantified by back titration and automatic spectrophotometry. Both fresh and thawed samples were analysed spectrophotometrically. 177 samples from 71 patients were analysed. Correlation coefficient of all measurements was r = 0.98 (p titration gold standard. This is a major simplification of direct pancreas function testing, and allows a wider distribution of bicarbonate testing in duodenal juice. Extreme values for Bicarbonate concentration achieved by the autoanalyser method have to be interpreted with caution. Copyright © 2016 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier India Pvt Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sorting of an integral outer membrane protein via the lipoprotein-specific Lol pathway and a dedicated lipoprotein pilotin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Séverine; Guilvout, Ingrid; Nickerson, Nicholas N; Pugsley, Anthony P

    2011-05-01

    The lipoprotein PulS is a dedicated chaperone that is required to target the secretin PulD to the outer membrane in Klebsiella or Escherichia coli, and to protect it from proteolysis. Here, we present indirect evidence that PulD protomers do not assemble into the secretin dodecamer before they reach the outer membrane, and that PulS reaches the outer membrane in a soluble heterodimer with the general lipoprotein chaperone LolA. However, we could not find any direct evidence for PulD protomer association with the PulS-LolA heterodimer. Instead, in cells producing PulD and a permanently locked PulS-LolA dimer (in which LolA carries an R43L substitution that prevents lipoprotein transfer to LolB in the outer membrane), LolAR43L was found in the inner membrane, probably still associated with PulS bound to PulD that had been incorrectly targeted because of the LolAR43L substitution. It is speculated that PulD protomers normally cross the periplasm together with PulS bound to LolA but when the latter cannot be separated (due to the mutation in lolA), the PulD protomers form dodecamers that insert into the inner membrane. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Effect of the lectins wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and Ulex europaeus agglutinin (UEA-I) on the alpha-amylase secretion of rat pancreas in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkat, U; Damm, I; Schröder, G; Schmidt, K; Wirth, C; Weber, H; Jonas, L

    1998-05-01

    Lectins are able to bind to cholecystokinin (CCK) receptors and other glycosylated membrane proteins. The lectins wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and Ulex europaeus agglutinin (UEA-I) are used for affinity chromatography to isolate the highly glycosylated CCK-A receptor of pancreatic acinar cells. According to the working hypothesis that lectin binding to the CCK receptor should alter the ligand-receptor interaction, the effect of WGA and UEA-I on CCK-8-induced enzyme secretion was studied on isolated rat pancreatic acini in vitro. In vitro both lectins showed a dosage-dependent inhibition of CCK-8-induced alpha-amylase secretion of acini over 60 min. WGA showed a strong inhibitory effect on amylase secretion, approximately 40%, in vitro. UEA-I caused a smaller, but significant decrease, approximately 20%, in enzyme secretion of isolated acini. Additionally, both lectins inhibited cerulein/secretin- or cerulein-induced pancreatic secretion of rats in vivo, but not after secretin alone. The results are discussed with respect to a possible influence of both lectins on the interaction of CCK or cerulein with the CCK-A receptor.

  11. The inconsistent nature of symptomatic pancreatico-jejunostomy anastomotic strictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirjian, Aram N; Kent, Tara S; Callery, Mark P; Vollmer, Charles M

    2010-01-01

    Background Pancreatico-jejunostomy strictures (PJS) after pancreatiocoduodenectomy (PD) are poorly understood. Methods Patients treated for PJS were identified from all PDs (n =357) performed for all indications in our practice (2002 to 2009). Technical aspects of the original operation, as well as the presentation, management and outcomes of the resultant stricture were assessed. Results Seven patients developed a symptomatic PJS for an incidence of 2%. ‘Soft’ glands and small ducts (≤3 mm) were each present in 3/7 of the original anastomoses. Pancreatic fistula occurred in 6/7. The latency period to stricture presentation averaged 41 months. Diagnosis of PJS was confirmed by secretin magnetic resonance cholangio-pancreatography (MRCP). Therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) was attempted – each unsuccessfully – in four patients. All patients required operative correction of their PJS by takedown/revision of the original pancreatico-jejunal anastomoses (PJA) (n =4) ± a modified Puestow (n =2). One patient's PJS was completely inaccessible due to dense adhesions. Another patient's stricture recurred and was successfully revised with a stricturoplasty. At a mean follow-up of 25 months, all are alive, but only 4/7 are pain free. Conclusion A symptomatic PJS appears to be independent of original pathological, glandular or technical features but pancreatic fistulae may contribute. Secretin MRCP is diagnostically useful, whereas ERCP has been proven to be therapeutically ineffective. Durable resolution of symptoms after surgical revision is unpredictable. PMID:20815857

  12. Low Alcohol and Cigarette Use Is Associated to the Risk of Developing Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Leo, Milena; Leandro, Gioacchino; Singh, Satish K; Mariani, Alberto; Bianco, Margherita; Zuppardo, Raffaella Alessia; Goni, Elisabetta; Rogger, Teresa Marzia; Di Mario, Francesco; Guslandi, Mario; De Cobelli, Francesco; Del Maschio, Alessandro; Testoni, Pier Alberto; Cavestro, Giulia Martina

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of smoking and alcohol intake and pancreas divisum on the risk of developing chronic pancreatitis (CP). Consecutive patients with CP who underwent secretin-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography were compared with consecutive patients without pancreatic disease who underwent secretin-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography for irritable bowel syndrome. We enrolled 145 consecutive CP patients and 103 irritable bowel syndrome patients from 2010 to 2014. In a univariate analysis, statistically significant differences in sex, mean age, and the duration and amount of cigarette and alcohol use were found. Per a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, thresholds for cigarette and alcohol consumption were, respectively, 5.5 cigarettes and 13.5 g daily. In a multivariate analysis, independent risk factors for CP were male sex (odds ratio [OR], 2.05), smoking more than 5.5 cigarettes per day (OR, 2.72), and drinking more than 13.5 g/d (OR, 6.35). In an Italian population, we confirmed smoking and alcohol as cofactors in the development of CP. This study shows that alcohol intake and smoking habits are 2 of the most important risk factors for the development of CP.

  13. VIP and its homologous increase vascular conductance in certain endocrine and exocrine glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffman, L.J.; Connors, J.M.; Hedge, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and related structural homologues on tissue vascular conductances were investigated in anesthetized male rats. VIP, peptide histidine isoleucine (PHI), secretin, growth hormone-releasing factor (GHRF), gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP), or saline was infused intravenously over 4 min. Tissue blood flows were measured during this time by use of 141 Ce-labeled microspheres. Circulating thyrotropin (TSH), triiodothyronine (T 3 ), and thyroxine (T 4 ) levels were determined before and at 20 min and 2 h after treatment. Marked increases in thyroid, pancreatic, and salivary gland vascular Cs occurred during peptide infusion with the order of potency correlating with the degree of structural homology to VIP. PHI and secretin produced maximal increases in vascular Cs, which were the same as those obtained with VIP. Circulating TSH, T 3 , and T 4 levels were not different from values in saline-infused rats after peptide treatments that caused striking increases in thyroid vascular C. These observations indicate that the vascular beds of certain endocrine and exocrine glands are responsive to the vasodilatory action of VIP and related homologues with the order of potency corresponding to the degree of structural homology to VIP. These results are also consistent with the proposal that structural homologues of VIP act at the same vascular receptor as VIP. Alternative, the involvement of different vascular receptors, acting through the same mechanism at a level beyond the receptor site, cannot be excluded

  14. [Effect of different nutritional support on pancreatic secretion in acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achkasov, E E; Pugaev, A V; Nabiyeva, Zh G; Kalachev, S V

    To develop and justify optimal nutritional support in early phase of acute pancreatitis (AP). 140 AP patients were enrolled. They were divided into groups depending on nutritional support: group I (n=70) - early enteral tube feeding (ETF) with balanced mixtures, group II (n=30) - early ETF with oligopeptide mixture, group III (n=40) - total parenteral nutrition (TPN). The subgroups were also isolated depending on medication: A - Octreotide, B - Quamatel, C - Octreotide + Quamatel. Pancreatic secretion was evaluated by using of course of disease, instrumental methods, APUD-system hormone levels (secretin, cholecystokinin, somatostatin, vasointestinal peptide). ETF was followed by pancreas enlargement despite ongoing therapy, while TPN led to gradual reduction of pancreatic size up to normal values. α-amylase level progressively decreased in all groups, however in patients who underwent ETF (I and II) mean values of the enzyme were significantly higher compared with TPN (group III). Secretin, cholecystokinin and vasointestinal peptide were increasing in most cases, while the level of somatostatin was below normal in all groups. Enteral tube feeding (balanced and oligopeptide mixtures) contributes to pancreatic secretion compared with TPN, but this negative impact is eliminated by antisecretory therapy. Dual medication (Octreotide + Quamatel) is more preferable than monotherapy (Octreotide or Quamatel).

  15. MRI assessed pancreatic morphology and exocrine function are associated with disease burden in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madzak, Adnan; Olesen, Søren Schou; Lykke Poulsen, Jakob; Bolvig Mark, Esben; Mohr Drewes, Asbjørn; Frøkjær, Jens Brøndum

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the association between morphological and functional secretin-stimulated MRI parameters with hospitalization, quality of life (QOL), and pain in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP). This prospective cohort study included 82 patients with CP. Data were obtained from clinical information, QOL, and pain as assessed by questionnaires (The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire and modified Brief Pain Inventory short form). Secretin-stimulated MRI morphological parameters included pancreatic gland volume, main pancreatic duct diameter, the modified Cambridge Classification of Duct Abnormality, apparent diffusion coefficient, fat signal fraction, and the pancreatic secretion volume as a functional parameter. The primary outcomes were time to first hospitalization related to the CP, as well as annual hospitalization frequency and duration. The secondary outcomes were pain severity, QOL, and pain interference scores. A main pancreatic duct diameter below 5 mm was associated with reduced time to first hospitalization (hazard ratio=2.06; 95% confidence interval: 1.02-4.17; P=0.043). Pancreatic secretion volume was correlated with QOL (r=0.31; P=0.0072) and pain interference score (r=-0.27; P=0.032), and fecal elastase was also correlated with QOL (r=0.28; P=0.017). However, functional and morphological findings were not related to pain intensity. Advanced pancreatic imaging techniques may be a highly sensitive tool for prognostication and monitoring of disease activity and its consequences.

  16. Morphological and functional correlates of VIP neurons in cerebral cortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magistretti, P.J.; Morrison, J.H.; Shoemaker, W.J.; Bloom, F.E.

    1984-01-01

    Vasoactive Intestinal Polypeptide (VIP) promotes the hydrolysis of 3H-glycogen newly synthesized from 3H-glucose by mouse cortical slices. This effect occurs rapidly, approximately 50% of the maximal effect being reached within one minute. The maximal effect is achieved after 5 minutes and maintained for at least 25 minutes. Furthermore the glycogenolytic effect of VIP is reversible, and pharmacologically specific. Thus several neuropeptides present in cerebral cortex such as cholecystokinin-8, somatostatin-28, somatostatin-14, met-enkephalin, leu-enkephalin, do not affect 3H-glycogen levels. VIP fragments 6-28, 16-28 and 21-28 are similarly inactive. Furthermore, among the peptides which share structural homologies with VIP, such as glucagon, secretin, PHI-27 and Gastric Inhibitory Peptide, only secretin and PHI-27 promote 3H-glycogen hydrolysis, with EC50 of 500 and 300 nM respectively, compared to an EC50 of 25 nM for VIP. Immunohistochemical observations indicate that each VIP-containing bipolar cell is identified with a unique radical cortical volume, which is generally between 15-60 micrograms in diameter and overlaps with the contiguous domains of neighbouring VIP-containing bipolar cells. Thus this set of biochemical and morphological observations support the notion that VIP neurons have the capacity to regulate the availability of energy substrates in cerebral cortex locally, within circumscribed, contiguous, radial domains

  17. Weak cation exchange magnetic beads coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry in screening serum protein markers in osteopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei-Tao; Liang, Bo-Cheng; Shi, Zhen-Yu; Li, Xu-Yun; Li, Chun-Wen; Shi, Xiao-Lin

    2016-01-01

    with m/z 3038 in the SVM model was suggested as Secretin by TagIdent tool. To provide further validation, the secretin levels in serum were analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays that is a competitive inhibition enzyme immunoassay technique for the in vitro quantitative measurement of secretin in human serum.

  18. Drosophila insulin release is triggered by adipose Stunted ligand to brain Methuselah receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delanoue, Renald; Meschi, Eleonora; Agrawal, Neha; Mauri, Alessandra; Tsatskis, Yonit; McNeill, Helen; Léopold, Pierre

    2016-09-30

    Animals adapt their growth rate and body size to available nutrients by a general modulation of insulin-insulin-like growth factor signaling. In Drosophila, dietary amino acids promote the release in the hemolymph of brain insulin-like peptides (Dilps), which in turn activate systemic organ growth. Dilp secretion by insulin-producing cells involves a relay through unknown cytokines produced by fat cells. Here, we identify Methuselah (Mth) as a secretin-incretin receptor subfamily member required in the insulin-producing cells for proper nutrient coupling. We further show, using genetic and ex vivo organ culture experiments, that the Mth ligand Stunted (Sun) is a circulating insulinotropic peptide produced by fat cells. Therefore, Sun and Mth define a new cross-organ circuitry that modulates physiological insulin levels in response to nutrients. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. Direct demonstration of guanine nucleotide sensitive receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide in the anterior lobe of the rat pituitary gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agui, T.; Matsumoto, K.

    1990-01-01

    The vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptors were identified on the membranes from the rat anterior pituitary gland with [ 125 I]VIP. The dissociation constant (Kd) and the maximal binding capacity (Bmax) values were estimated from the competitive inhibition data. The Kd and Bmax values were 1.05 +/- 0.75 nM and 103 +/- 11 fmol/mg protein, respectively. The order of molar potency of related peptides to inhibit [ 125 I]VIP binding was VIP greater than peptide histidine isoleucine (PHI) greater than secretin greater than glucagon. Glucagon was not effective to inhibit the binding. [ 125 I]VIP binding was effectively inhibited by the addition of guanine nucleotides. The order of molar potency to inhibit the binding was Gpp(NH)p greater than GTP greater than GDP greater than GMP greater than ATP. These results directly suggest the coupling of VIP receptors with guanine nucleotide binding proteins in the anterior pituitary gland

  20. Getting from A to B-exploring the activation motifs of the class B adhesion G protein-coupled receptor subfamily G member 4/GPR112

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornelia Peeters, Miriam; Mos, Iris; Lenselink, Eelke B

    2016-01-01

    The adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (ADGRs/class B2 G protein-coupled receptors) constitute an ancient family of G protein-coupled receptors that have recently been demonstrated to play important roles in cellular and developmental processes. Here, we describe a first insight...... into the structure-function relationship of ADGRs using the family member ADGR subfamily G member 4 (ADGRG4)/GPR112 as a model receptor. In a bioinformatics approach, we compared conserved, functional elements of the well-characterized class A and class B1 secretin-like G protein-coupled receptors with the ADGRs. We...... identified several potential equivalent motifs and subjected those to mutational analysis. The importance of the mutated residues was evaluated by examining their effect on the high constitutive activity of the N-terminally truncated ADGRG4/GPR112 in a 1-receptor-1-G protein Saccharomyces cerevisiae...

  1. Colonic mucin secretion related to non-contractile motility in the dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skioedebrand, C.G.; Margulis, A.R.; Hattner, R.S.; Hartmeyer, J.; Stoughton, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    In 8 dogs a colonic pouch with fistula was surgically created. Mucin secretion was measured by washing mucus out of the pouch and then, after a number of chemical steps, by determining the turbidity with spectrophotometry. The movement of tantalum particles insufflated into the canine rectum during periods of absence of contractions was correlated with mucus secretion in the pouch. Correlations were made after parenteral injection of secretin which increased movement of tantalum particles and production of mucin, and after injection of glucagon, which stopped movement of the particles and decreased mucin secretion in the pouch. Movement of tantalum was also observed when the particles were insufflated into the canine rectum on top of an applied layer of water-soluble jelly. (Auth.)

  2. Pancreatitis and carcinoma of the pancreas; some aspects of the pathologic physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    EDMONDSON, H A

    1952-09-01

    The physiological phenomena accompanying pancreatic disease in adults are related to the local and generalized reaction of the body to the blockage and/or leakage of the three enzymes-amylase, lipase and trypsin. The measurements of amylase and lipase in the serum are the most reliable criteria in the diagnosis of acute disease. Related changes may include hypocalcemia, hypopotassemia, hyperlipemia, hyperglycemia and decreased renal function. In chronic pancreatitis, there is less fluctuation in the amounts of the enzymes in the blood. The presence of diabetes mellitus, demonstration of calculi by x-ray, and examination of the stools for excess fat and meat fibers are more important diagnostic guides. In cancer of the pancreas, function tests using secretin stimulation of the gland followed by an examination of the external secretion or determination of the serum amylase have been used with some success.

  3. PANCREATITIS AND CARCINOMA OF THE PANCREAS—Some Aspects of the Pathologic Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, Hugh A.

    1952-01-01

    The physiological phenomena accompanying pancreatic disease in adults are related to the local and generalized reaction of the body to the blockage and/or leakage of the three enzymes—amylase, lipase and trypsin. The measurements of amylase and lipase in the serum are the most reliable criteria in the diagnosis of acute disease. Related changes may include hypocalcemia, hypopotassemia, hyperlipemia, hyperglycemia and decreased renal function. In chronic pancreatitis, there is less fluctuation in the amounts of the enzymes in the blood. The presence of diabetes mellitus, demonstration of calculi by x-ray, and examination of the stools for excess fat and meat fibers are more important diagnostic guides. In cancer of the pancreas, function tests using secretin stimulation of the gland followed by an examination of the external secretion or determination of the serum amylase have been used with some success. PMID:12988052

  4. Occurrence of FSH, inhibin and other hypothalamic-pituitary-intestinal hormones in normal fertility, subfertility, and tumors of human testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, M K; Garde, S V; Sheth, A R

    1995-01-01

    To compare the distribution of peptide hormones in presumably normal human testicular tissues and specimens exhibiting any of five pathologies. Biopsies from patients having testicular malfunctions were prepared as sections and specifically immunohistochemically stained for inhibin, FSH, serotonin, AUP, and oxytocin. Immunocytochemical studies revealed the presence of various hypophysial-pituitary-intestinal hormones, viz., FSH, inhibin, arginine vasopressin (AVP), calcitonin, serotonin, oxytocin, adrenocorticotropin (ACTH), gastrin, secretin, and somatostatin in human testicular biopsies exhibiting normal spermatogenesis, Sertoli-cell-only syndrome, spermatogenic arrest, Leydig cell hyperplasia, Leydig cell tumor, and seminoma. Intensity of immunostaining for all peptides except FSH was stronger in cases of subfertile as compared to normal testis. Intensity of immunostaining with inhibin was maximum in Leydig cell tumor. These regulatory peptides may be involved in the pathophysiology of the testes.

  5. Seven transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor repertoire of gastric ghrelin cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelstoft, Maja S; Park, Won-Mee; Sakata, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms regulating secretion of the orexigenic-glucoregulatory hormone ghrelin remain unclear. Based on qPCR analysis of FACS-purified gastric ghrelin cells, highly expressed and enriched 7TM receptors were comprehensively identified and functionally characterized using in vitro......, ex vivo and in vivo methods. Five Gαs-coupled receptors efficiently stimulated ghrelin secretion: as expected the β1-adrenergic, the GIP and the secretin receptors but surprisingly also the composite receptor for the sensory neuropeptide CGRP and the melanocortin 4 receptor. A number of Gαi....../o-coupled receptors inhibited ghrelin secretion including somatostatin receptors SSTR1, SSTR2 and SSTR3 and unexpectedly the highly enriched lactate receptor, GPR81. Three other metabolite receptors known to be both Gαi/o- and Gαq/11-coupled all inhibited ghrelin secretion through a pertussis toxin-sensitive Gαi...

  6. Distribution and protective function of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP in the retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoya eNakamachi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP, which is found in 27- or 38-amino acid forms, belongs to the VIP/glucagon/secretin family. PACAP and its three receptor subtypes are expressed in neural tissues, with PACAP known to exert a protective effect against several types of neural damage. The retina is considered to be part of the central nervous system, and retinopathy is a common cause of profound and intractable loss of vision. This review will examine the expression and morphological distribution of PACAP and its receptors in the retina, and will summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the protective effect of PACAP against different kinds of retinal damage, such as that identified in association with diabetes, ultraviolet light, hypoxia, optic nerve transection, and toxins. This article will also address PACAP-mediated protective pathways involving retinal glial cells.

  7. Pancreatic exocrine secretion in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, Masataka; Kawanishi, Masahiro; Ohtaki, Megu

    1989-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the effect of A-bombing on pancreatic exocrine secretion in 6 A-bomb survivors (an average age of 57 years) and the age- and sex-matched non-exposed 6 persons (an average age of 58 years). Six A-bomb survivors consisted of: three who had been directly exposed to A-bombing, one who had entered the city within 3 days after bombing, one who had worked in caring for A-bomb survivors, and one who had later entered the city. Caerulein-Secretin test revealed no significant difference in the total secretion of lipase, maximum bicarbonate, amylase output, or lipase output between the exposed and non-exposed groups. The concentration of lipase ten min after stimulation was significantly decreased in the exposed group than the control group. This suggests that radiation may be responsible for abnormality in the ability of pancreatic exocrine secretion. (N.K.)

  8. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) in the pig pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1984-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) in the pig pancreas is localized to nerves, many of which travel along the pancreatic ducts. VIP stimulates pancreatic fluid and bicarbonate secretion like secretin. Electrical vagal stimulation in the pig causes an atropine-resistant profuse secretion...... of bicarbonate-rich pancreatic juice. In an isolated perfused preparation of the pig pancreas with intact vagal nerve supply, electrical vagal stimulation caused an atropine-resistant release of VIP, which accurately parallelled the exocrine secretion of juice and bicarbonate. Perfusion of the pancreas...... with a potent VIP-antiserum inhibited the effect of vagal stimulation on the exocrine secretion. It is concluded, that VIP is responsible for (at least part of) the neurally controlled fluid and bicarbonate secretion from the pig pancreas....

  9. A Novel Method for Pain Relief in Chronic Pancreatitis: an Old Drug in a New Pack: a Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujahari, Aswini Kumar

    2017-12-01

    Most of pain-relieving agents in chronic pancreatitis are nonspecific and unpredictable. Omeprazole induces hypergastrinemia due to reduced gastric acidity. Raised serum gastrin, in turn, modulates to reduce secretin level. Secretin is responsible for secretion of almost 80 % bicarbonate-rich pancreatic juice from the ductular epithelium without affecting enzyme output. It is a prospective randomized study in patients with CT-confirmed chronic pancreatitis. The control group got the standard care and 60 mg of omeprazole twice daily was added to the test group. Absence of pain relief at 14 days was considered as failure. Pain relief, weight gain and any toxic effect of omeprazole were reviewed at 12 months. One hundred thirty-seven cases were included, with an age range of 19 to 72 years. (mean 42.67). The majority of them were alcoholic males. At 2 weeks, pain relief was noted in 47/69(68.1 %) and 63/65(96.96 %) in the control and omeprazole group, respectively. At the end of 1 year, the omeprazole group had greater weight gain (95 %) than the control group (69.5 %). All the pseudocysts in the omeprazole group and most in the control group resolved. No side effect of omeprazole was seen. The high-dose omeprazole (HDO) group of patients had significantly better pain relief in chronic pancreatitis than those treated with conventional therapy. A high number of cases gained weight in the HDO group than the controlled group. No patient had clinical, endoscopic, biochemical, or haematological toxicity of HDO. More studies are necessary.

  10. Anatomic variants of the pancreatic duct and their clinical relevance: an MR-guided study in the general population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buelow, Robin; Thiel, Robert; Thamm, Patrick; Messner, Philip; Hosten, Norbert; Kuehn, Jens-Peter; Simon, Peter; Lerch, Markus M.; Mayerle, Julia; Voelzke, Henry

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the frequency of pancreatic duct (PD) variants and their effect on pancreatic exocrine function in a population-based study using non-invasive secretin-stimulated magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (sMRCP). Nine hundred and ninety-five volunteers, 457 women and 538 men, aged 51.9 ± 13.4 years, underwent navigator-triggered, T2-weighted, 3D turbo spin echo MRCP on a 1.5 T system after 1 unit/kg secretin administration. Two readers evaluated images for PD variants. Pancreatic exocrine function and morphological signs of chronic pancreatitis such as abnormalities of the main PD, side branch dilatation, and pancreatic cysts were evaluated and related to PD variants using a Kruskal-Wallis test and post hoc analysis. Of all sMRCP, 93.2 % were of diagnostic quality. Interobserver reliability for detection of PD variants was found to be kappa 0.752 (95 %CI, 0.733 - 0.771). Normal PD variants were observed in 90.4 % (n = 838/927). Variants of pancreas divisum was identified in 9.6 % (n = 89/927). Abnormalities of the main PD, side branch dilatation, and pancreatic cysts were observed in 2.4 %, 16.6 %, and 27.7 %, respectively, and were not significantly different between pancreas divisum and non-divisum group (P = 0.122; P = 0.152; P = 0.741). There was no association between PD variants and pancreatic exocrine function (P = 0.367). PD variants including pancreas divisum are not associated with morphological signs of chronic pancreatitis or restriction of pancreatic exocrine function. (orig.)

  11. Validations of SCT Methylation as a Hallmark Biomarker for Lung Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Junya; Wistuba, Ignacio; Lam, Stephen; Yatabe, Yasushi; Wang, Yi-Wei; Stastny, Victor; Gao, Boning; Larsen, Jill E; Girard, Luc; Liu, Xiaoyun; Song, Kai; Behrens, Carmen; Kalhor, Neda; Xie, Yang; Zhang, Michael Q; Minna, John D; Gazdar, Adi F

    2016-01-01

    Background The human secretin (SCT) gene encodes secretin, a hormone with limited tissue distribution. Analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) 450K methylation array data indicated that the SCT promoter region is differentially hypermethylated in lung cancer. Our purpose was to validate SCT methylation as a potential cancer biomarker for lung cancer. Methods We analyzed TCGA data, and developed and applied SCT-specific bisulfite DNA sequencing and quantitative methylation specific PCR (qMSP) assays. Results The analyses of TCGA 450K data of 801 samples showed that SCT hypermethylation has an area under curve (AUC) value >0.98 to distinguish lung adenocarcinomas or squamous cell carcinomas from non-malignant lung. We confirmed the highly discriminative SCT methylation by bisulfite sequencing of lung cancer cell lines and normal blood cells. By applying qMSP, we found that SCT hypermethylation was frequently detected in all major subtypes of malignant NSCLC (AUC=0.92, n=108) and SCLC cancers (AUC=0.93, n=40) but less frequently present in lung carcinoids (AUC=0.54, n=20). SCT hypermethylation appeared in lung carcinoma in situ samples during multistage pathogenesis and increased in invasive samples. Further analyses of TCGA 450K data showed that SCT hypermethylation is highly discriminative in most types of other malignant tumors but less frequently present in low-grade malignant tumors. The only normal tissue with high methylation was the placenta. Conclusions Our findings demonstrated that SCT methylation is a highly discriminative biomarker for lung and other malignant tumors, and less frequently present in low-grade malignant tumors including lung carcinoids, and appears at the carcinoma in situ stage. PMID:26725182

  12. Validation of SCT Methylation as a Hallmark Biomarker for Lung Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-An; Ma, Xiaotu; Sathe, Adwait; Fujimoto, Junya; Wistuba, Ignacio; Lam, Stephen; Yatabe, Yasushi; Wang, Yi-Wei; Stastny, Victor; Gao, Boning; Larsen, Jill E; Girard, Luc; Liu, Xiaoyun; Song, Kai; Behrens, Carmen; Kalhor, Neda; Xie, Yang; Zhang, Michael Q; Minna, John D; Gazdar, Adi F

    2016-03-01

    The human secretin gene (SCT) encodes secretin, a hormone with limited tissue distribution. Analysis of the 450k methylation array data in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) indicated that the SCT promoter region is differentially hypermethylated in lung cancer. Our purpose was to validate SCT methylation as a potential biomarker for lung cancer. We analyzed data from TCGA and developed and applied SCT-specific bisulfite DNA sequencing and quantitative methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction assays. The analyses of TCGA 450K data for 801 samples showed that SCT hypermethylation has an area under the curve (AUC) value greater than 0.98 that can be used to distinguish lung adenocarcinomas or squamous cell carcinomas from nonmalignant lung tissue. Bisulfite sequencing of lung cancer cell lines and normal blood cells allowed us to confirm that SCT methylation is highly discriminative. By applying a quantitative methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction assay, we found that SCT hypermethylation is frequently detected in all major subtypes of malignant non-small cell lung cancer (AUC = 0.92, n = 108) and small cell lung cancer (AUC = 0.93, n = 40) but is less frequent in lung carcinoids (AUC = 0.54, n = 20). SCT hypermethylation appeared in samples of lung carcinoma in situ during multistage pathogenesis and increased in invasive samples. Further analyses of TCGA 450k data showed that SCT hypermethylation is highly discriminative in most other types of malignant tumors but less frequent in low-grade malignant tumors. The only normal tissue with a high level of methylation was the placenta. Our findings demonstrated that SCT methylation is a highly discriminative biomarker for lung and other malignant tumors, is less frequent in low-grade malignant tumors (including lung carcinoids), and appears at the carcinoma in situ stage. Copyright © 2015 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Anatomic variants of the pancreatic duct and their clinical relevance: an MR-guided study in the general population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buelow, Robin; Thiel, Robert; Thamm, Patrick; Messner, Philip; Hosten, Norbert; Kuehn, Jens-Peter [University Medicine, Ernst Moritz Arndt University Greifswald, Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Greifswald (Germany); Simon, Peter; Lerch, Markus M.; Mayerle, Julia [University Medicine, Ernst Moritz Arndt University Greifswald, Division of Gastroenterology and Department of Medicine A, Greifswald (Germany); Voelzke, Henry [University Medicine, Ernst Moritz Arndt University Greifswald, Institute for Community Medicine, Greifswald (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    To investigate the frequency of pancreatic duct (PD) variants and their effect on pancreatic exocrine function in a population-based study using non-invasive secretin-stimulated magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (sMRCP). Nine hundred and ninety-five volunteers, 457 women and 538 men, aged 51.9 ± 13.4 years, underwent navigator-triggered, T2-weighted, 3D turbo spin echo MRCP on a 1.5 T system after 1 unit/kg secretin administration. Two readers evaluated images for PD variants. Pancreatic exocrine function and morphological signs of chronic pancreatitis such as abnormalities of the main PD, side branch dilatation, and pancreatic cysts were evaluated and related to PD variants using a Kruskal-Wallis test and post hoc analysis. Of all sMRCP, 93.2 % were of diagnostic quality. Interobserver reliability for detection of PD variants was found to be kappa 0.752 (95 %CI, 0.733 - 0.771). Normal PD variants were observed in 90.4 % (n = 838/927). Variants of pancreas divisum was identified in 9.6 % (n = 89/927). Abnormalities of the main PD, side branch dilatation, and pancreatic cysts were observed in 2.4 %, 16.6 %, and 27.7 %, respectively, and were not significantly different between pancreas divisum and non-divisum group (P = 0.122; P = 0.152; P = 0.741). There was no association between PD variants and pancreatic exocrine function (P = 0.367). PD variants including pancreas divisum are not associated with morphological signs of chronic pancreatitis or restriction of pancreatic exocrine function. (orig.)

  14. The repertoire of G protein-coupled receptors in the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni and the model organism Schmidtea mediterranea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamanian Mostafa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs constitute one of the largest groupings of eukaryotic proteins, and represent a particularly lucrative set of pharmaceutical targets. They play an important role in eukaryotic signal transduction and physiology, mediating cellular responses to a diverse range of extracellular stimuli. The phylum Platyhelminthes is of considerable medical and biological importance, housing major pathogens as well as established model organisms. The recent availability of genomic data for the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni and the model planarian Schmidtea mediterranea paves the way for the first comprehensive effort to identify and analyze GPCRs in this important phylum. Results Application of a novel transmembrane-oriented approach to receptor mining led to the discovery of 117 S. mansoni GPCRs, representing all of the major families; 105 Rhodopsin, 2 Glutamate, 3 Adhesion, 2 Secretin and 5 Frizzled. Similarly, 418 Rhodopsin, 9 Glutamate, 21 Adhesion, 1 Secretin and 11 Frizzled S. mediterranea receptors were identified. Among these, we report the identification of novel receptor groupings, including a large and highly-diverged Platyhelminth-specific Rhodopsin subfamily, a planarian-specific Adhesion-like family, and atypical Glutamate-like receptors. Phylogenetic analysis was carried out following extensive gene curation. Support vector machines (SVMs were trained and used for ligand-based classification of full-length Rhodopsin GPCRs, complementing phylogenetic and homology-based classification. Conclusions Genome-wide investigation of GPCRs in two platyhelminth genomes reveals an extensive and complex receptor signaling repertoire with many unique features. This work provides important sequence and functional leads for understanding basic flatworm receptor biology, and sheds light on a lucrative set of anthelmintic drug targets.

  15. MRCP in the evaluation of pancreaticobiliary disease in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcement, C.M.; Meza, M.P.; Arumanla, S.; Towbin, R.B. [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Dept. of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2001-02-01

    Background. Radiologic assessment of pancreaticobiliary ductal disease (PBDD) in children currently consists of physiologic tests (radionuclide examinations) or invasive anatomic studies (ERCP and PTC). An accurate noninvasive and reproducible examination that can direct the subsequent need for more invasive studies would be helpful in this patient group. Objective. To determine the effectiveness of MRCP as a screening tool for PBBD in the pediatric population. Materials and methods. Over the last year, 33 patients ranging from 7 months to 20 years of age were prospectively evaluated with MRCP on a 1.5 T magnet. One patient was examined twice, several months apart. Thirteen patients had liver transplants. Coronal SPGR and heavily T-2W FSE cross-sectional images were obtained. Standard and oblique 2- to 6-cm-thick slab SSFSE (single-shot fast spin echo) acquisition and 3D MIP reconstruction of 2D FSE images were obtained in the planes of the CBD and pancreatic duct. Nine studies were performed with the patient under sedation with chloral hydrate or nembutal and fentanyl with quiet respiration, and the non-sedated patients were assessed with single breath hold or quiet respiration. Three patients received secretin. MRCP results were correlated with ERCP (9), PTC (7), liver biopsy (13), clinical information (6), surgery (3), and autopsy (2). Results. All 34 studies performed were considered diagnostic. Periportal fluid, proximal bowel fluid, and gallbladder distention did not significantly diminish the diagnostic information in any cases. Motion artifact did not cause serious degradation in image quality. MRCP depicted abnormalities including stones, stricture, intraductal tumor, and extrinsic compression, all of which were confirmed at ERCP, PTC (two unsuccessful in patients with non-dilated ducts by MRCP), surgery, liver biopsy, and autopsy. There were no false-negative examinations. Normal pancreatic studies performed to exclude pancreas divisum were followed

  16. MRCP in the evaluation of pancreaticobiliary disease in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcement, C.M.; Meza, M.P.; Arumanla, S.; Towbin, R.B.

    2001-01-01

    Background. Radiologic assessment of pancreaticobiliary ductal disease (PBDD) in children currently consists of physiologic tests (radionuclide examinations) or invasive anatomic studies (ERCP and PTC). An accurate noninvasive and reproducible examination that can direct the subsequent need for more invasive studies would be helpful in this patient group. Objective. To determine the effectiveness of MRCP as a screening tool for PBBD in the pediatric population. Materials and methods. Over the last year, 33 patients ranging from 7 months to 20 years of age were prospectively evaluated with MRCP on a 1.5 T magnet. One patient was examined twice, several months apart. Thirteen patients had liver transplants. Coronal SPGR and heavily T-2W FSE cross-sectional images were obtained. Standard and oblique 2- to 6-cm-thick slab SSFSE (single-shot fast spin echo) acquisition and 3D MIP reconstruction of 2D FSE images were obtained in the planes of the CBD and pancreatic duct. Nine studies were performed with the patient under sedation with chloral hydrate or nembutal and fentanyl with quiet respiration, and the non-sedated patients were assessed with single breath hold or quiet respiration. Three patients received secretin. MRCP results were correlated with ERCP (9), PTC (7), liver biopsy (13), clinical information (6), surgery (3), and autopsy (2). Results. All 34 studies performed were considered diagnostic. Periportal fluid, proximal bowel fluid, and gallbladder distention did not significantly diminish the diagnostic information in any cases. Motion artifact did not cause serious degradation in image quality. MRCP depicted abnormalities including stones, stricture, intraductal tumor, and extrinsic compression, all of which were confirmed at ERCP, PTC (two unsuccessful in patients with non-dilated ducts by MRCP), surgery, liver biopsy, and autopsy. There were no false-negative examinations. Normal pancreatic studies performed to exclude pancreas divisum were followed

  17. [Clinical significance of the tests used in the diagnosis of pancreatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenti, G; Emanuelli, G

    1976-11-14

    Different methods available for investigating patients for pancreatic disease are discussed. They first include measurement of pancreatic enzymes in biological fluids. Basal amylase and/or lipase in blood are truly diagnostic in acute pancreatitis but their utility is low in chronic pancreatic diseases. Evocative tests have been performed to increase the sensitivity of blood enzyme measurement. The procedure is based on enzyme determination following administration of pancreozymin and secretin, and offers a valuable aid in diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis and cancer of the pancreas. They are capable of discerning pancreatic lesions but are not really discriminatory because similar changes are observed in both diseases. The measurement of urinary enzyme levels in patients with acute pancreatitis is a sensitive indicator of disease. The urinary amylase excretion rises to abnormal levels and persists at significant values for a longer period of time than the serum amylase in acute pancreatitis. The fractional urinary amylase escretion seems to be more sensitive than daily urinary measurement. The pancreatic exocrin function can be assessed by examining the duodenal contents after intravenous administration of pancreozymin and secretin. Different abnormal secretory patterns can be determinated. Total secretory deficiency is observed in patients with obstruction of excretory ducts by tumors of the head of the pancreas and in the end stage of chronic pancreatitis. Low volume with normal bicarbonate and enzyme concentration is another typical pattern seen in neoplastic obstruction of escretory ducts. In chronic pancreatitis the chief defect is the inability of the gland to secrete a juice with a high bicarbonate concentration; but in the advanced stage diminution of enzyme and volume is also evident. Diagnostic procedures for pancreatic diseases include digestion and absorption tests. The microscopic examination and chemical estimation of the fats in stool specimens in

  18. Cell-Penetrating Ability of Peptide Hormones: Key Role of Glycosaminoglycans Clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armelle Tchoumi Neree

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades, the potential usage of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs for the intracellular delivery of various molecules has prompted the identification of novel peptidic identities. However, cytotoxic effects and unpredicted immunological responses have often limited the use of various CPP sequences in the clinic. To overcome these issues, the usage of endogenous peptides appears as an appropriate alternative approach. The hormone pituitary adenylate-cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP38 has been recently identified as a novel and very efficient CPP. This 38-residue polycationic peptide is a member of the secretin/glucagon/growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH superfamily, with which PACAP38 shares high structural and conformational homologies. In this study, we evaluated the cell-penetrating ability of cationic peptide hormones in the context of the expression of cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs. Our results indicated that among all peptides evaluated, PACAP38 was unique for its potent efficiency of cellular uptake. Interestingly, the abilities of the peptides to reach the intracellular space did not correlate with their binding affinities to sulfated GAGs, but rather to their capacity to clustered heparin in vitro. This study demonstrates that the uptake efficiency of a given cationic CPP does not necessarily correlate with its affinity to sulfated GAGs and that its ability to cluster GAGs should be considered for the identification of novel peptidic sequences with potent cellular penetrating properties.

  19. Impaired acid neutralization in the duodenum in pancreatic insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, S K; Russell, R M; Iber, F L

    1979-10-01

    The influence of severe exocrine pancreatic disease on the acid-neutralizing capacity of the duodenum was studied in five patients with pancreatic insufficiency (PI) and six control subjects using duodenal perfusion-marker technique. Hydrochloric acid (0.1 N containing 1% PEG) was infused at constant rates (1.2, 4.5 and 7.0 ml/min) into the duodenum just distal to the duodenal bulb. Samples were aspirated from the tip of the duodenal perfusion tube located at the ligament of Treitz. All samples were analyzed for volume, pH, titrable acidity, PEG and [14C]PEG (gastric marker) determination. Patients with PI demonstrated significantly diminished ability to neutralize various acid loads as compared to controls who virtually completely neutralized acid loads in the range of maximal gastric acid secretion. Exogenous secretin did not significantly improve percent acid neutralized in PI. These data clearly indicate that patients with PI have significantly impaired ability to neutralize even small loads of acid in the duodenum.

  20. Molecular evolution of peptidergic signaling systems in bilaterians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabeau, Olivier; Joly, Jean-Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    Peptide hormones and their receptors are widespread in metazoans, but the knowledge we have of their evolutionary relationships remains unclear. Recently, accumulating genome sequences from many different species have offered the opportunity to reassess the relationships between protostomian and deuterostomian peptidergic systems (PSs). Here we used sequences of all human rhodopsin and secretin-type G protein-coupled receptors as bait to retrieve potential homologs in the genomes of 15 bilaterian species, including nonchordate deuterostomian and lophotrochozoan species. Our phylogenetic analysis of these receptors revealed 29 well-supported subtrees containing mixed sets of protostomian and deuterostomian sequences. This indicated that many vertebrate and arthropod PSs that were previously thought to be phyla specific are in fact of bilaterian origin. By screening sequence databases for potential peptides, we then reconstructed entire bilaterian peptide families and showed that protostomian and deuterostomian peptides that are ligands of orthologous receptors displayed some similarity at the level of their primary sequence, suggesting an ancient coevolution between peptide and receptor genes. In addition to shedding light on the function of human G protein-coupled receptor PSs, this work presents orthology markers to study ancestral neuron types that were probably present in the last common bilaterian ancestor. PMID:23671109

  1. VIP receptors from porcine liver: High yield solubilization in a GTP-insensitive form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voisin, T.; Couvineau, A.; Guijarro, L.; Laburthe, M.

    1990-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptors were solubilized from porcine liver membranes using CHAPS. The binding of 125 I-VIP to solubilized receptors was reversible, saturable and specific. Scatchard analysis indicated the presence of one binding site with a Kd of 6.5 ± 0.3 nM and a Bmax of 1.20 ± 0.15 pmol/mg protein. Solubilized and membrane-bound receptors displayed the same pharmacological profile since VIP and VIP-related peptides inhibited 125 I-VIP binding to both receptor preparations with the same rank order of potency e.g. VIP>helodermin>rat GRF>rat PHI>secretin>human GRF. GTP inhibited 125 I-VIP binding to membrane-bound receptors but not to solubilized receptors supporting functional uncoupling of VIP receptor and G protein during solubilization. Affinity labeling of solubilized and membrane-bound VIP receptors with 125 I-VIP revealed the presence of a single molecular component with Mr 55,000 in both cases. It is concluded that VIP receptors from porcine liver can be solubilized with a good yield, in a GTP-insensitive, G protein-free form. This represents a major advance towards the purification of VIP receptors

  2. Fast MR imaging for evaluating the pancreaticobiliary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takehara, Yasuo

    1999-01-01

    Due to physiological movement clinical MR applications for abdominal organs got off to a very slow start compared to MR imaging of other organs. However, with recent cutting-edge hardware technologies such as high performance gradient systems and phased-array capability, as well as software innovations including short TR fast spoiled gradient recalled acquisition in the steady state (GRASS), snapshot imaging such as single shot fast spin echo sequence (SSFSE) and echo planar imaging (EPI), scan times have been further reduced to make breath-hold imaging clinically viable and to enable semi-fluoroscopic, kinematic imaging recognition. The elimination of physiological motion has contributed to the significant improvement in image quality, or more specifically, the physiological motion that had long been problematic has been turned into a source of physiological information about pancreaticobiliary pathologies. In this article, the author reviewed the current status of fast MR technologies for examining pancreaticobiliary pathologies, stressing the functional and physiological aspects of the corresponding anatomy. The technologies included secretin MRCP, which became a powerful tool when combined with kinematic imaging

  3. Octreotide for the Management of Chylothorax in newborns, case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Saeidi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Chylothorax is the most common cause of pleural effusion in neonates. It is usually idiopathic. Neonatal chylothorax successfully respond to octreotide treatment and can reduce the duration of hospitalization. A number of therapeutic interventions have been used to reduce chyle production and promote resolution of a chylothorax. Initial management typically includes restriction or temporary cessation of enteral feedings. Enteral feedings high in medium-chain triglycerides (MCT or parenteral nutrition may be used. These strategies alone are not successful in all patients. In the last several years, octreotide has become another option for management of patients with chylothorax. octreotide has a number of effects on the gastrointestinal system, including a decrease in splanchnic blood flow and inhibition of serotonin, gastrin, vasoactive intestinal peptide, secretin, motilin, and pancreatic polypeptide. We report an infant who had spontaneous chylothorax with patent ductus arteriosus that was managed primarily as congenital heart disease. Our case was treated successfully with octreotide without the need to insertion of chest tube.

  4. Investigation of PACAP Fragments and Related Peptides in Chronic Retinal Hypoperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werling, Dora; Reglodi, Dora; Kiss, Peter; Toth, Gabor; Szabadfi, Krisztina; Tamas, Andrea; Biro, Zsolt; Atlasz, Tamas

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) has neuroprotective effects in different neuronal and retinal injuries. Retinal ischemia can be effectively modelled by permanent bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO), which causes chronic hypoperfusion-induced degeneration in the entire rat retina. The retinoprotective effect of PACAP 1-38 and VIP is well-established in ischemic retinopathy. However, little is known about the effects of related peptides and PACAP fragments in ischemic retinopathy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential retinoprotective effects of different PACAP fragments (PACAP 4-13, 4-22, 6-10, 6-15, 11-15, and 20-31) and related peptides (secretin, glucagon) in BCCAO-induced ischemic retinopathy. Wistar rats (3-4 months old) were used in the experiment. After performing BCCAO, the right eyes of the animals were treated with PACAP fragments or related peptides intravitreal (100 pM), while the left eyes were injected with saline serving as control eyes. Sham-operated (without BCCAO) rats received the same treatment. Routine histology was performed 2 weeks after the surgery; cells were counted and the thickness of retinal layers was compared. Our results revealed significant neuroprotection by PACAP 1-38 but did not reveal retinoprotective effect of the PACAP fragments or related peptides. These results suggest that PACAP 1-38 has the greatest efficacy in ischemic retinopathy.

  5. A tribute to a scientist extraordinaire - Ernest H. Starling (1866-1927).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanisamy, Vimala; Km, Prathibha

    2015-01-01

    One of the defining moments in the history of medicine came in the year 1902 with the discovery of Secretin, the first hormone to be isolated in the human body. The men credited with this milestone discovery, which went on to revolutionize medicine, are Ernest H. Starling and William M. Bayliss. Their contributions aided the transition of medical practice from empiricism towards rationalism. E.H. Starling introduced the word 'hormone', laying the foundation for the development of Endocrinology as a medical specialty. His extensive research in circulatory physiology including the study of the electric activity of the heart and capillary fluid shift has made his name a mainstay in its study. His interests were varied, where he contributed his scientific bend of mind to the study of different fields of Physiology and his non-conformist ideals to the study of the then prevalent educational system in Great Britain. In lieu with celebrating the 150th birth anniversary of E. H. Starling, a brilliant scientist and an educational reformist, a chronological construe of his academic pursuits and milestone achievements has been presented. One hopes that such recollections serve to inspire and invigorate the scientist inside everyone and also serve as guiding beacons to students and researchers.

  6. First cytoplasmic loop of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor can function at the third cytoplasmic loop position of rhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Takahiro; Tose, Koji; Shichida, Yoshinori

    2008-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are classified into several families based on their amino acid sequences. In family 1, GPCRs such as rhodopsin and adrenergic receptor, the structure-function relationship has been extensively investigated to demonstrate that exposure of the third cytoplasmic loop is essential for selective G protein activation. In contrast, much less is known about other families. Here we prepared chimeric mutants between Gt-coupled rhodopsin and Gi/Go- and Gs-coupled glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor of family 2 and tried to identify the loop region that functions at the third cytoplasmic loop position of rhodopsin. We succeeded in expressing a mutant having the first cytoplasmic loop of GLP-1 receptor and found that this mutant activated Gi and Go efficiently but did not activate Gt. Moreover, the rhodopsin mutant having the first loop of Gs-coupled secretin receptor of family 2 decreased the Gi and Go activation efficiencies. Therefore, the first loop of GLP-1 receptor would share a similar role to the third loop of rhodopsin in G protein activation. This result strongly suggested that different families of GPCRs have maintained molecular architectures of their ancestral types to generate a common mechanism, namely exposure of the cytoplasmic loop, to activate peripheral G protein.

  7. Measurement of human serum parathyroid hormone in disorders of calcium metabolism and during administration of certain gut hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coetzee, J.; Klaff, L.J.; Epstein, S.

    1980-01-01

    A sensitive radio-immunoassay for parathyroid hormone (PTH) using the commercially available antisera AS 211/32 and AS 211/41 has been established. The lower limit of sensitivity of the assay is 0,25 ng/ml. Seventy-nine per cent of normal subjects have PTH levels in the measurable range, with a mean of 0,49 ng/ml (SD more or less 0,26 ng/ml). Only 1 of 9 patients with proven primary hyperparathyroidism had a normal serum PTH value. The mean serum PTH value in this group was 3,0 more or less 0,26 ng/ml, which differed significantly from that in the normal group (P<0,001). The serum PTH level of 33 patients on chronic haemodialysis was uniformly raised, while in 8 patients with hypoparathyroidism PTH levels were undetectable. Patients with malignant disease presented a mixed picture, with raised, normal or undetectable PTH levels. We investigated a possible relationship between the gut hormones, gastrin, secretin and cholecystokininpancreozymin (CCK-PZ) and PTH secretion in human volunteers. No effect was found, although the investigations were conducted over relatively short time periods

  8. Abnormal gastrointestinal endocrine cells in patients with diabetes type 1: relationship to gastric emptying and myoelectrical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Salhy, M; Sitohy, B

    2001-11-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with diabetes are believed to be caused by gastrointestinal dysmotility and secretion/absorption disturbances, and the gut endocrine cells play an important part in regulating these two functions. Studies on animal models of human diabetes type I revealed abnormality in these cells, but it is unknown whether abnormality also occurs in patients with diabetes. Eleven patients with long duration of diabetes type I and organ complications, as well as gastrointestinal symptoms, were studied. Endocrine cells in different segments of the gastrointestinal tract were detected by immunocytochemistry and quantified by computerized image analysis. Gastric emptying was measured by scintigraphy and gastric myoelectric activity was determined by electrogastrography. An abnormal density of gastrointestinal endocrine cells was found in patients with diabetes. This abnormality occurred in all segments of the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract investigated, and included most of the endocrine cell types. The patients showed delayed gastric emptying, which correlated closely with the acute glucose level, but did not correlate with HbA1c. Gastric emptying also correlated closely with the density of duodenal serotonin and secretin cells. The patients exhibited bradygastrias and tachygastrias. These dysrhythmias, however, did not differ significantly from controls. The endocrine cells are the anatomical units responsible for the production of gut hormones, and the change in their density would reflect a change in the capacity of producing these hormones. The abnormality in density of the gastrointestinal endocrine cells may contribute to the development of gastrointestinal dysmotility and the symptoms encountered in patients with diabetes.

  9. Effect of long-term administration of dietary fiber on the exocrine pancreas in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, H; Kasper, H

    1984-08-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats (50--70g) were fed a standard laboratory diet containing 6% dietary fiber substances (diet I), the same diet supplemented with 5% guar (diet II), 10% wheat bran (diet III), or 5% pectin of high (76%) methylic esterification (diet IV), or a fiber-free diet (diet V). After a 6-week feeding period, the body weight of the animals had increased to 300--350g. The common bile duct was then canulated and the exocrine pancreatic function tested under urethane anesthesia (1.5 g/kg body weight). The tested fiber substances had no effect on the basal pancreatic secretion of volume, bicarbonate, lipase, amylase or protein, or on the wet weight and histological appearance of the organ. However, the fiber substances influenced the pancreatic response to maximal exogenous stimulation with secretin (3.0 CU/100 g X hour) and cholecystokinin (0.6 IDU/100 g X hour) and the enzyme content of the gland significantly. Compared with diet V, diet I increased the DNA content of the pancreas and its secretion of bicarbonate and protein, and decreased the protein concentration in the gland. Diet II reduced the pancreatic content of trypsinogen and protein. Diet III decreased the protein content, but increased the bicarbonate secretion, which was also increased by diet IV. -- We conclude that fiber substances influence stimulated secretion and the enzyme content of the pancrease to a varying degree.

  10. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP participates in adipogenesis by activating ERK signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Arsenijevic

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP belongs to the secretin/glucagon/vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP family. Its action can be mediated by three different receptor subtypes: PAC1, which has exclusive affinity for PACAP, and VPAC1 and VPAC2 which have equal affinity for PACAP and VIP. We showed that all three receptors are expressed in 3T3-L1 cells throughout their differentiation into adipocytes. We established the activity of these receptors by cAMP accumulation upon induction by PACAP. Together with insulin and dexamethasone, PACAP induced adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cell line. PACAP increased cAMP production within 15 min upon stimulation and targeted the expression and phosphorylation of MAPK (ERK1/2, strengthened by the ERK1/2 phosphorylation being partially or completely abolished by different combinations of PACAP receptors antagonists. We therefore speculate that ERK1/2 activation is crucial for the activation of CCAAT/enhancer- binding protein β (C/EBPβ.

  11. Somatostatin: a metabolic regulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dileepan, K.N.; Wagle, S.R.

    1985-01-01

    Somatostatin, the hypothalamic release-inhibiting factor, has been found to stimulate gluconeogenesis in rat kidney cortical slices. Stimulation by somatostatin was linear and dose-dependent. Other bioactive peptides such as cholecystokinin, gastro-intestinal peptide, secretin, neurotensin, vasoactive intestinal peptide, pancreatic polypeptide, beta endorphin and substance P did not affect the renal gluconeogenic activity. Somatostatin-induced gluconeogenesis was blocked by phentolamine (alpha adrenergic antagonist) and prazosin (alpha 1 adrenergic antagonist) but not by propranolol (beta adrenergic antagonist) and yohimbine (alpha 2 adrenergic antagonist) suggesting that the effect is via alpha 1 adrenergic stimuli. Studies on the involvement of Ca 2+ revealed that tissue depletion and omission of Ca 2+ from the reaction mixture would abolish the stimulatory effect of somatostatin. Furthermore, somatostatin enhanced the uptake of 45 calcium in renal cortical slices which could be blocked by lanthanum, an inhibitor of Ca 2+ influx. It is proposed that the stimulatory effect of somatostatin on renal gluconeogenesis is mediated by alpha 1 adrenergic receptors, or those which functionally resemble the alpha 1 receptors and that the increased influx of Ca 2+ may be the causative factor for carrying out the stimulus. 88 references

  12. A repetitive probe for FISH analysis of bovine interphase nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cribiu Edmond

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this study was to generate repetitive DNA sequence probes for the analysis of interphase nuclei by fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH. Such probes are useful for the diagnosis of chromosomal abnormalities in bovine preimplanted embryos. Of the seven probes (E1A, E4A, Ba, H1A, W18, W22, W5 that were generated and partially sequenced, five corresponded to previously described Bos taurus repetitive DNA (E1A, E4A, Ba, W18, W5, one probe (W22 shared no homology with other DNA sequences and one (H1A displayed a significant homology with Rattus norvegicus mRNA for secretin receptor transmembrane domain 3. Fluorescent in situ hybridisation was performed on metaphase bovine fibroblast cells and showed that five of the seven probes hybridised most centromeres (E1A, E4A, Ba, W18, W22, one labelled the arms of all chromosomes (W5 and the H1A probe was specific to three chromosomes (ch14, ch20, and ch25. Moreover, FISH with H1A resulted in interpretable signals on interphase nuclei in 88% of the cases, while the other probes yielded only dispersed overlapping signals.

  13. Gastric vagus mediates immobilization-induced hypocalcemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, J; Aou, S; Matsui, H; Hori, T

    1993-09-01

    The involvement of the parasympathetic nervous system in the etiology of stress-induced hypocalcemia was investigated in the rat. Atropine methyl bromide (0.1 and 0.6 mg/kg ip) given 20 min before immobilization (IMB) was observed to suppress the induction of hypocalcemia in a dose-dependent manner. A vagotomy of the bilateral cervical trunks also abolished the IMB-induced hypocalcemia. A vagotomy on either the thyroid/parathyroid branches or the celiac branches had no effect on the IMB-induced hypocalcemia, but a vagotomy on the gastric branches completely abolished it. Pretreatment with either secretin (2 and 6 micrograms/kg ip), an inhibitor of gastrin release, or cimetidine (5 and 10 mg/kg ip), a histamine H2-receptor antagonist, diminished the IMB-induced hypocalcemia. The concentration of serum gastrin increased significantly during IMB. It is thus concluded that the decreased levels of plasma calcium caused by IMB are due to the activation of the vagus innervating the stomach. Gastrin and histamine are also involved as a consequence of the activation of the vagus.

  14. Somatostatin: a metabolic regulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dileepan, K.N.; Wagle, S.R.

    1985-12-23

    Somatostatin, the hypothalamic release-inhibiting factor, has been found to stimulate gluconeogenesis in rat kidney cortical slices. Stimulation by somatostatin was linear and dose-dependent. Other bioactive peptides such as cholecystokinin, gastro-intestinal peptide, secretin, neurotensin, vasoactive intestinal peptide, pancreatic polypeptide, beta endorphin and substance P did not affect the renal gluconeogenic activity. Somatostatin-induced gluconeogenesis was blocked by phentolamine (alpha adrenergic antagonist) and prazosin (alpha/sub 1/ adrenergic antagonist) but not by propranolol (beta adrenergic antagonist) and yohimbine (alpha/sub 2/ adrenergic antagonist) suggesting that the effect is via alpha/sub 1/ adrenergic stimuli. Studies on the involvement of Ca/sup 2 +/ revealed that tissue depletion and omission of Ca/sup 2 +/ from the reaction mixture would abolish the stimulatory effect of somatostatin. Furthermore, somatostatin enhanced the uptake of /sup 45/calcium in renal cortical slices which could be blocked by lanthanum, an inhibitor of Ca/sup 2 +/ influx. It is proposed that the stimulatory effect of somatostatin on renal gluconeogenesis is mediated by alpha/sub 1/ adrenergic receptors, or those which functionally resemble the alpha/sub 1/ receptors and that the increased influx of Ca/sup 2 +/ may be the causative factor for carrying out the stimulus. 88 references.

  15. Gastrointestinal Hormones Induced the Birth of Endocrinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wabitsch, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The physiological studies by British physiologists William Maddock Bayliss and Ernest Henry Starling, at the beginning of the last century, demonstrated the existence of specific messenger molecules (hormones) circulating in the blood that regulate the organ function and physiological mechanisms. These findings led to the concept of endocrinology. The first 2 hormones were secretin, discovered in 1902, and gastrin, discovered in 1905. Both hormones that have been described are produced in the gut. This chapter summarizes the history around the discovery of these 2 hormones, which is perceived as the birth of endocrinology. It is noteworthy that after the discovery of these 2 gastrointestinal hormones, many other hormones were detected outside the gut, and thereafter gut hormones faded from both the clinical and scientific spotlight. Only recently, the clinical importance of the gut as the body's largest endocrine organ producing a large variety of hormones has been realized. Gastrointestinal hormones are essential regulators of metabolism, growth, development and behavior and are therefore the focus of a modern pediatric endocrinologist. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Motor activity of the gallbladder and gastrointestinal tract as determinants of enterohepatic circulation. A scintigraphic and manometric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qvist, N.

    1995-01-01

    The aims of the study were to describe the dynamics of the enterohepatic circulation in relation to gallbladder and gastrointestinal motility in the interdigestive as well as the postprandial period. Furthermore, to investigate the level of circulating cholecystokinin, secretin, pancreatic polypeptide, motilin and bile acids in relation to gallbladder motility and MMC during the interdigestive period. All investigations were carried out on healthy male volunteers aged 18-40 years. The most suitable method for studying various characteristics of the enterohepatic circulation, and especially gallbladder motility in humans, is scintigraphy. It is non-invasive, and allows a continuing dynamic investigation of the partitioning of the radioactive marker between the various compartment. Two entirely different pharmacological substances may be use. HIDA (diethyl-acetanilide-iminodiacetic acid) which is semisynthetic and closely related to lidocaine forms a chelate with 99m Tc for intravenous administration only. The transport of 99m Tc-HIDA across the hepatocyte is a carrier-mediated organic anion pathway, similar to the hepatic handling of bilirubin. Homocholic-acid-taurine (HCAT) is a synthetic bile acid analogue, corresponding to the naturally occurring bile acid cholic acid-taurine. It is marked with 75 Se and is available for peroral use only. The 75 SeHCAT is adsorbed in the same manner as the naturally occurring conjugated trihydroxy bile acids, involving specific carrier systems for absorption and secretion, i.e. with a high first pass extraction and a secretory rate proportional to the blood concentration. (EG) 24 refs

  17. High-dose calcium stimulation test in a case of insulinoma masquerading as hysteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yoshio; Doi, Ryuichiro; Kohno, Yasuhiro; Shimono, Dai; Kuwamura, Naomitsu; Inoue, Koichi; Koshiyama, Hiroyuki; Imamura, Masayuki

    2002-11-01

    It is reported that some cases with insulinoma present with neuropsychiatric symptoms and are often misdiagnosed as psychosis. Here we report a case of insulinoma masquerading as hysteria, whose final diagnosis could be made using high-dose calcium stimulation test. A 28-yr-old woman was referred presenting with substupor, mutism, mannerism, restlessness, and incoherence. Laboratory examinations revealed hypoglycemia (33 mg/dL) and detectable insulin levels (9.7 microU/mL), suggesting the diagnosis of insulinoma. However, neither imaging studies nor selective arterial calcium injection (SACI) test with a conventional dose of calcium (0.025 mEq/kg) indicated the tumor. High-dose calcium injection (0.05 mEq/kg) evoked insulin secretion when injected into superior mesenteric artery. A solitary tumor in the head of the pancreas was resected, and her plasma glucose returned to normal. Postoperatively, iv injection of secretin resulted in a normal response of insulin, which was not found preoperatively. This case suggests the usefulness of the SACI test with high-dose of calcium in the case of insulinoma when the standard dose fails to detect such a tumor.

  18. Evaluation of pancreatic scintigram in the diagnosis of pancreatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takai, Yukihiro; Ueda, Noriyuki; Takasago, Noritsugu; Minemoto, Hiromasa; Namiki, Masayoshi

    1981-01-01

    The classification of accumulative patterns with the pancreatic scintigram findings of chronic pancreatitis and carcinoma of the pancreas were compared with endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) findings and Pancreozymin-Secretin test (P-S test). I) The frequency of pancreatic cancer was 93%, whilst, the chronic pancreatitis was 88% in the abnormal pancreatic scintigram. II) In the scintigram the type II (localyzed defect shadows) of pancreatic cancer was comparatively high and it is proportional to evidence. derived from ERP. Localized diagnostic certainty is helpful, although the two tests are related. The P-S test is only restricted to the carcinoma of head, whilst, scintigram is more useful to detect the carcinoma of the body and tail of the pancreas. III) As for the chronic pancreatitis, there are various accumulative patterns. This is resemblance to that of ERP findings, but in the P-S normal test, it showed discrepancy in part of the result. Particularly, in the type I (slightly generalized low uptake with density silhouette) and type II. Therefore in order to obtain an accurate diagnosis, it is essential to have both the P-S test and scintigram. (author)

  19. Vasoactive intestinal peptide and electrical activity influence neuronal survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenneman, D.E.; Eiden, L.E.

    1986-01-01

    Blockage of electrical activity in dissociated spinal cord cultures results in a significant loss of neurons during a critical period in development. Decreases in neuronal cell numbers and 125 I-labeled tetanus toxin fixation produced by electrical blockage with tetrodotoxin (TTX) were prevented by addition of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) to the nutrient medium. The most effective concentration of VIP was 0.1 nM. At higher concentrations, the survival-enhancing effect of VIP on TTX-treated cultures was attenuated. Addition of the peptide alone had no significant effect on neuronal cell counts or tetanus toxin fixation. With the same experimental conditions, two closely related peptides, PHI-27 (peptide, histidyl-isoleucine amide) and secretin, were found not to increase the number of neurons in TTX-treated cultures. Interference with VIP action by VIP antiserum resulted in neuronal losses that were not significantly different from those observed after TTX treatment. These data indicate that under conditions of electrical blockade a neurotrophic action of VIP on neuronal survival can be demonstrated

  20. What do Cochrane systematic reviews say about interventions for autism spectrum disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyra, Larissa; Rizzo, Luiz Eduardo; Sunahara, Camila Sá; Pachito, Daniela Vianna; Latorraca, Carolina de Oliveira Cruz; Martimbianco, Ana Luiza Cabrera; Riera, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) include autistic disorder, Asperger's disorder and pervasive developmental disorder. The manifestations of ASDs can have an important impact on learning and social functioning that may persist during adulthood. The aim here was to summarize the evidence from Cochrane systematic reviews on interventions for ASDs. Review of systematic reviews, conducted within the Discipline of Evidence-Based Medicine, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo. We included and summarized the results from Cochrane systematic reviews on interventions for ASDs. Seventeen reviews were included. These found weak evidence of benefits from acupuncture, gluten and casein-free diets, early intensive behavioral interventions, music therapy, parent-mediated early interventions, social skill groups, Theory of Mind cognitive model, aripiprazole, risperidone, tricyclic antidepressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI); this last only for adults. No benefits were found for sound therapies, chelating agents, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, omega-3, secretin, vitamin B6/magnesium and SSRI for children. Acupuncture, gluten and casein-free diets, early intensive behavioral interventions, music therapy, parent-mediated early interventions, social skill groups and the Theory of Mind cognitive model seem to have benefits for patients with autism spectrum disorders (very low to low-quality evidence). Aripiprazole, risperidone, tricyclic antidepressants and SSRI (this last only for adults) also showed some benefits, although associated with higher risk of adverse events. Experimental studies to confirm a link between probable therapies and the disease, and then high-quality long-term clinical trials, are needed.

  1. Investigation of PACAP Fragments and Related Peptides in Chronic Retinal Hypoperfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora Werling

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP has neuroprotective effects in different neuronal and retinal injuries. Retinal ischemia can be effectively modelled by permanent bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO, which causes chronic hypoperfusion-induced degeneration in the entire rat retina. The retinoprotective effect of PACAP 1-38 and VIP is well-established in ischemic retinopathy. However, little is known about the effects of related peptides and PACAP fragments in ischemic retinopathy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential retinoprotective effects of different PACAP fragments (PACAP 4-13, 4-22, 6-10, 6-15, 11-15, and 20-31 and related peptides (secretin, glucagon in BCCAO-induced ischemic retinopathy. Wistar rats (3-4 months old were used in the experiment. After performing BCCAO, the right eyes of the animals were treated with PACAP fragments or related peptides intravitreal (100 pM, while the left eyes were injected with saline serving as control eyes. Sham-operated (without BCCAO rats received the same treatment. Routine histology was performed 2 weeks after the surgery; cells were counted and the thickness of retinal layers was compared. Our results revealed significant neuroprotection by PACAP 1-38 but did not reveal retinoprotective effect of the PACAP fragments or related peptides. These results suggest that PACAP 1-38 has the greatest efficacy in ischemic retinopathy.

  2. Difference gel electrophoresis (DiGE) identifies differentially expressed proteins in endoscopically-collected pancreatic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulo, Joao A.; Lee, Linda S.; Banks, Peter A.; Steen, Hanno; Conwell, Darwin L.

    2012-01-01

    Alterations in the pancreatic fluid proteome of individuals with chronic pancreatitis may offer insights into the development and progression of the disease. The endoscopic pancreas function test (ePFT) can safely collect large volumes of pancreatic fluid that are potentially amenable to proteomic analyses using difference gel electrophoresis (DiGE) coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Pancreatic fluid was collected endoscopically using the ePFT method following secretin stimulation from three individuals with severe chronic pancreatitis and three chronic abdominal pain controls. The fluid was processed to minimize protein degradation and the protein profiles of each cohort, as determined by DiGE and LC-MS/MS, were compared. This DiGE-LC-MS/MS analysis reveals proteins that are differentially expressed in chronic pancreatitis compared to chronic abdominal pain controls. Proteins with higher abundance in pancreatic fluid from chronic pancreatitis individuals include: actin, desmoplankin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, SNC73, and serotransferrin. Those of relatively lower abundance include carboxypeptidase B, lipase, alpha-1-antichymotrypsin, alpha-2-macroglobulin, Arp2/3 subunit 4, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and protein disulfide isomerase. Endoscopic collection (ePFT) in tandem with DiGE-LC-MS/MS is a suitable approach for pancreatic fluid proteome analysis, however, further optimization of our protocol, as outlined herein, may improve proteome coverage in future analyses. PMID:21792986

  3. Calcitonin and calcitonin receptor-like receptors: common themes with family B GPCRs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barwell, James; Gingell, Joseph J; Watkins, Harriet A; Archbold, Julia K; Poyner, David R; Hay, Debbie L

    2012-05-01

    The calcitonin receptor (CTR) and calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) are two of the 15 human family B (or Secretin-like) GPCRs. CTR and CLR are of considerable biological interest as their pharmacology is moulded by interactions with receptor activity-modifying proteins. They also have therapeutic relevance for many conditions, such as osteoporosis, diabetes, obesity, lymphatic insufficiency, migraine and cardiovascular disease. In light of recent advances in understanding ligand docking and receptor activation in both the family as a whole and in CLR and CTR specifically, this review reflects how applicable general family B GPCR themes are to these two idiosyncratic receptors. We review the main functional domains of the receptors; the N-terminal extracellular domain, the juxtamembrane domain and ligand interface, the transmembrane domain and the intracellular C-terminal domain. Structural and functional findings from the CLR and CTR along with other family B GPCRs are critically appraised to gain insight into how these domains may function. The ability for CTR and CLR to interact with receptor activity-modifying proteins adds another level of sophistication to these receptor systems but means careful consideration is needed when trying to apply generic GPCR principles. This review encapsulates current thinking in the realm of family B GPCR research by highlighting both conflicting and recurring themes and how such findings relate to two unusual but important receptors, CTR and CLR. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  4. Clinical relevance of radioimmunologic gastrin determination for peptic ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boesl, F.

    1980-01-01

    The clinical validity of the specific and sensitive radioimmunoassay was proved by the verification of the gastrin concentrations (given in the special literature) in the fasting serum of healthy control persons and of defined patient groups: duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer, peptico-jejunal ulcer, chronically atrophic gastritis with and without pernicious anaemia, pyloric stenosis, gastric carcinoma and renal insufficiency. The result of the examinations carried out with a standardised beverage test was that the serum gastric release, which was basally and postprandially increased with respect to healthy control persons, is significantly increased by selective and proximal vagotomy in patients with chronically recurrent duodenal ulcer. Pyloroplasty has no significant influence on the serum gastrin reaction after selective proximal vagotomy. Contrary to that the reduced basal serum gastrin values of patients with Billroth II gastrectomy could not be stimulated by the beverage test. The basal and postprandial hypergastrinaemia existing after selective proximal vagotomy does not change significantly during the first postoperative year. In order to statistically compare such studies the authos suggests the 'integrated overall gastrin release'. Synchronous measurements of insulin and blood-sugar reactions do not give any indication that hypergastrinaemia, induced by selective proximal vagotomy, causes any change of the endocrine pancreatic function. Several own examples illustrate the higher diagnostic value of the secretin provocative and calcium infusion test in cases of the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome and that of the standardised beverage test in antral G-cell hyperplasia. In most cases the glucagon test is not required. (orig./MG) [de

  5. MRI and MRCP of chronic pancreatitis. 1: technique and methods; La valutazione delle pancreatiti croniche con Risonanza Magnetica e colangiopancreatografia con Risonanza Magnetica. Prima parte: aspetti tecnico-metodologici

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laghi, A.; Pavone, P.; Catalano, C.; Panebianco, V.; Luccichenti, G.; Fabiano, S.; Passariello, R. [Rome Univ. La Sapienza, Rome (Italy). Ist. di Radiologia

    1999-10-01

    Until recently, MR examinations of the pancreas were limited by motion artifacts, vascular pulsatility and poor spatial resolution. Today, new techniques have been developed, which allow to overcome these problems and provide additional information such as selective images of biliary and pancreatic ducts and vascular structures. As a complement to baseline sequences, MR cholangiopancreatography images can be acquired, possibly integrated by functional examination after secretin administration. Finally, contrast-enhanced MR angiography opens new perspectives for vascular studies, particularly for the locoregional staging of pancreatic cancer. [Italian] Lo studio del pancreas con risonanza magnetica e' stato fino a pochi anni fa limitato dagli artefatti da movimento, da pulsatilita' vascolare e dalla ridotta risoluzione spaziale. Recentemente sono state sviluppate nuove tecniche che consentono da un lato di risolvere tali problemi e dall'altro di fornire informazioni aggiuntive, quali immagini selettive delle vie biliari e del dotto pancreatico e delle strutture vascolari. Come completamento all'esame di base si possono ottenere immagini di colangiopancreatografia con RM, eventualmente integrate da prove funzionali, rappresentate dall'iniezione di secretina. Infine, le nuove tecniche di angiografia con RM con mdc, nelle quali si effettua un'acquisizione durante la prima fase di passaggio arterioso o venoso dopo introduzione rapida del mdc a livello di una vena periferica, aprono nuove prospettive per lo studio vascolare, in particolare nella stadiazione loco-regionale dei processi neoplastici.

  6. Comparative functional scintigraphic and angiographic examination in pancreas diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendizov, A.; Brilski, V.; Bozhiyanov, A.; Romanova, A.; Mardzhanov, I.; Glavincheva, I.; Meditsinska Akademiya, Sofia

    1979-01-01

    Pancreas scintigraphy with 75 seleno-methionine, pancreocimine-secretine test and selective abdominal angiography was carried out in patients with chronic pancreatitis, pancreas carcinoma and subjects without any pancreas diseases. Scintigraphic changes in pancreas was found in 95,6 per cent of the patients with chronic pancreatitis (136 patients), in 92 per cent of them with pancreas carcinoma (25 patients) and in 53,4 per cent from the subjects without pancreas diseases (30 examined). Pathological changes in pancreatic secretion was found in 93,4 per cent of the patients with chronic pancreatitis (105 patients), in 93,8 per cent of the subjects with pancreas carcinoma (32 patients) and only in 3,9 per cent from the examined without pancreatic diseases. The angiographic examination is informative mainly in case of tumours and cysts of the pancreas. The diagnostic potentialities of the separate methods for pancreas examination were critically assessed. The basic diagnostic problems in pancreas diseases are solved to a great extent with the combined examination with scintigraphy pancreocimine test and angiography (76 patients). (author)

  7. Direct measurement of acid efflux from isolated guinea pig pancreatic ducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hootman, Seth R; Hobbs, Errett C; Luckie, Douglas B

    2005-05-01

    The current studies used the technique of microphysiometry to directly determine the effects of stimulators and inhibitors of pancreatic duct secretion on acid efflux from isolated pancreatic ducts. Main and interlobular ducts were isolated from guinea pig pancreata by collagenase digestion and manual selection. Segments were placed in the chambers of a microphysiometer, which uses a silicon chip-based, light-addressable potentiometric sensor to determine the proton concentration in the superfusing solution. Isolated ducts were superfused with a low buffer capacity Ringer's solution at 37 degrees C and the extracellular acidification rate (EAR) was determined by computer-directed protocols. A survey of potential agonists demonstrated that both secretin and the cholinomimetic, carbachol, dramatically increased EAR, with EC50 of 3 nmol/L and 0.6 mumol/L, respectively. The changes in EAR induced by both secretagogues were rapid, peaking within 4-6 minutes, and then declining to a level below the peak but above basal EAR. The enhanced EAR was maintained for at least 30 minutes in the presence of either secretagogue. More modest increases in EAR were evoked by bombesin, substance P, and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). Cholecystokinin and isoproterenol caused no significant change in pancreatic duct EAR. A combination of amiloride and bafilomycin A1, inhibitors, respectively, of Na/H exchange and of vacuolar type H-ATPase activity, caused a dramatic drop in EAR but did not fully inhibit the increase in EAR elicited by carbachol, suggesting that other mechanisms may contribute to agonist-stimulated EAR of pancreatic ducts. Thus, the results support the use of microphysiometry as a tool to study pancreatic duct physiology and in particular a method to measure acid efflux from the serosal surface.

  8. Comparison of gas clearance and radioactive microspheres for pancreatic blood flow measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeMar, A.R.; Graham, L.S.; Lake, R.; Fink, A.S.

    1989-01-01

    Measurement of pancreatic blood flow (PBF) is technically demanding. Although radiolabeled microspheres are considered the gold standard for PBF assessment, they have practical limitations. In the current study, H 2 and xenon-133 gas clearance techniques were adapted to PBF measurement and compared to radiolabeled microsphere techniques. Simultaneous measurements of PBF were made using either hydrogen or xenon gas washout and radiolabeled microspheres. Measurements were made under basal, vasoconstricted (vasopressin 2U i.v. or nicotine 4 micrograms/kg/h) and stimulated (secretin 125 ng/kg/h or 2 U/kg i.v.) conditions (random order). Mean PBF was 26.9 +/- 5.3, 50.5 +/- 2.3 and 27.6 +/- 5.2 ml/min/100 g basally, 36.9 +/- 8.0, 90.1 +/- 18.9, and 81.7 +/- 14.5 ml/min/100 g in the stimulated state, and 24.2 +/- 7.8, 25.0 +/- 3.5, and 14.9 +/- 7.5 ml/min/100 g in the vasoconstricted state for hydrogen gas clearance, xenon gas clearance, and radiolabeled microspheres, respectively. The H 2 clearance technique resulted in tissue trauma, was complicated by frequent electrode displacement, and correlated poorly (r2 = 0.36, p greater than 0.05) with microsphere values. In contrast, xenon clearance measurement had no apparent effect on the pancreas and correlated well (r2 = 0.83, p less than 0.01) with microsphere data. We conclude that xenon clearance offers an attractive, validated alternative to radiolabeled microspheres for measuring pancreatic blood flow

  9. New advances in cell physiology and pathophysiology of the exocrine pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mössner, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    This review provides some aspects on the physiology of stimulation and inhibition of pancreatic digestive enzyme secretion and the pathophysiology of pancreatic acinar cell function leading to pancreatitis. Cholecystokinin (CCK) stimulates both directly via CCK-A receptors on acinar cells and indirectly via CCK-B receptors on nerves, followed by acetylcholine release, pancreatic enzyme secretion. It is still not known whether CCK-A receptors exist in human acinar cells, in contrast to acinar cells of rodents where CCK-A receptors have been well described. CCK has numerous actions both in the periphery and in the central nervous systems. CCK inhibits gastric motility and regulates satiety. Another major function of CCK is stimulation of gallbladder contraction. This function enables that bile acids act simultaneously with pancreatic lipolytic enzymes. Secretin is a major stimulator of bicarbonate secretion. Trypsinogen is activated by the gut mucosal enzyme enterokinase. The other pancreatic proenzymes are activated by trypsin. Termination of enzyme secretion may be regulated by negative feedback mechanisms via destruction of CCK-releasing peptides by trypsin. Furthermore, the ileum may act as a brake by release of inhibitory hormones such as PYY and somatostatin. In the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis, fusion of zymogen granules with lysosomes leading to intracellular activation of trypsinogen is regarded as an initiation step. This activation of trypsinogen may be caused by the lysosomal enzyme cathepsin B. However, autoactivation of trypsinogen itself may be a possibility in pathogenesis. Autoactivation is enhanced in certain mutations of trypsinogen. Furthermore, an imbalance of protease inhibitors and active proteases may be involved. The role of pancreatic lipolytic enzymes, the role of bicarbonate secretion, and toxic Ca(2+) signals by excessive liberation from the endoplasmic reticulum have to be discussed in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis

  10. Autism, an extreme challenge to integrative medicine. Part 2: medical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Parris M

    2002-12-01

    Autism and allied autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) present myriad behavioral, clinical, and biochemical abnormalities. Parental participation, advanced testing protocols, and eclectic treatment strategies have driven progress toward cure. Behavioral modification and structured education are beneficial but insufficient. Dietary restrictions, including removal of milk and other casein dairy products, wheat and other gluten sources, sugar, chocolate, preservatives, and food coloring are beneficial and prerequisite to benefit from other interventions. Individualized IgG or IgE testing can identify other troublesome foods but not non-immune mediated food sensitivities. Gastrointestinal improvement rests on controlling Candida and other parasites, and using probiotic bacteria and nutrients to correct dysbiosis and decrease gut permeability. Detoxification of mercury and other heavy metals by DMSA/DMPS chelation can have marked benefit. Documented sulfoxidation-sulfation inadequacies call for sulfur-sulfhydryl repletion and other liver p450 support. Many nutrient supplements are beneficial and well tolerated, including dimethylglycine (DMG) and a combination of pyridoxine (vitamin B6) and magnesium, both of which benefit roughly half of ASD cases. Vitamins A, B3, C, and folic acid; the minerals calcium and zinc; cod liver oil; and digestive enzymes, all offer benefit. Secretin, a triggering factor for digestion, is presently under investigation. Immune therapies (pentoxifyllin, intravenous immunoglobulin, transfer factor, and colostrum) benefit selected cases. Long-chain omega-3 fatty acids offer great promise. Current pharmaceuticals fail to benefit the primary symptoms and can have marked adverse effects. Individualized, in-depth clinical and laboratory assessments and integrative parent-physician-scientist cooperation are the keys to successful ASD management.

  11. Adipocyte induced arterial calcification is prevented with sodium thiosulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Neal X., E-mail: xuechen@iupui.edu [Divison of Nephrology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); O’Neill, Kalisha; Akl, Nader Kassis [Divison of Nephrology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Moe, Sharon M. [Divison of Nephrology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Roudebush VA Medical Center, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2014-06-20

    adipocytes exposed to elevated phosphorus can induce calcification of VSMC in a paracrine manner. Sodium thiosulfate inhibited this calcification and decreased the secretin of leptin and VEGF from adipocytes. These results suggest that adipocyte exposure to elevated phosphorus may be a pathogenic factor in calcification observed in the skin in calciphylaxis and other diseases.

  12. Gastrointestinal Endogenous Proteins as a Source of Bioactive Peptides - An In Silico Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Lakshmi A.; Montoya, Carlos A.; Rutherfurd, Shane M.; Moughan, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Dietary proteins are known to contain bioactive peptides that are released during digestion. Endogenous proteins secreted into the gastrointestinal tract represent a quantitatively greater supply of protein to the gut lumen than those of dietary origin. Many of these endogenous proteins are digested in the gastrointestinal tract but the possibility that these are also a source of bioactive peptides has not been considered. An in silico prediction method was used to test if bioactive peptides could be derived from the gastrointestinal digestion of gut endogenous proteins. Twenty six gut endogenous proteins and seven dietary proteins were evaluated. The peptides present after gastric and intestinal digestion were predicted based on the amino acid sequence of the proteins and the known specificities of the major gastrointestinal proteases. The predicted resultant peptides possessing amino acid sequences identical to those of known bioactive peptides were identified. After gastrointestinal digestion (based on the in silico simulation), the total number of bioactive peptides predicted to be released ranged from 1 (gliadin) to 55 (myosin) for the selected dietary proteins and from 1 (secretin) to 39 (mucin-5AC) for the selected gut endogenous proteins. Within the intact proteins and after simulated gastrointestinal digestion, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory peptide sequences were the most frequently observed in both the dietary and endogenous proteins. Among the dietary proteins, after in silico simulated gastrointestinal digestion, myosin was found to have the highest number of ACE-inhibitory peptide sequences (49 peptides), while for the gut endogenous proteins, mucin-5AC had the greatest number of ACE-inhibitory peptide sequences (38 peptides). Gut endogenous proteins may be an important source of bioactive peptides in the gut particularly since gut endogenous proteins represent a quantitatively large and consistent source of protein. PMID:24901416

  13. Gastrointestinal endogenous proteins as a source of bioactive peptides--an in silico study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Lakshmi A; Montoya, Carlos A; Rutherfurd, Shane M; Moughan, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Dietary proteins are known to contain bioactive peptides that are released during digestion. Endogenous proteins secreted into the gastrointestinal tract represent a quantitatively greater supply of protein to the gut lumen than those of dietary origin. Many of these endogenous proteins are digested in the gastrointestinal tract but the possibility that these are also a source of bioactive peptides has not been considered. An in silico prediction method was used to test if bioactive peptides could be derived from the gastrointestinal digestion of gut endogenous proteins. Twenty six gut endogenous proteins and seven dietary proteins were evaluated. The peptides present after gastric and intestinal digestion were predicted based on the amino acid sequence of the proteins and the known specificities of the major gastrointestinal proteases. The predicted resultant peptides possessing amino acid sequences identical to those of known bioactive peptides were identified. After gastrointestinal digestion (based on the in silico simulation), the total number of bioactive peptides predicted to be released ranged from 1 (gliadin) to 55 (myosin) for the selected dietary proteins and from 1 (secretin) to 39 (mucin-5AC) for the selected gut endogenous proteins. Within the intact proteins and after simulated gastrointestinal digestion, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory peptide sequences were the most frequently observed in both the dietary and endogenous proteins. Among the dietary proteins, after in silico simulated gastrointestinal digestion, myosin was found to have the highest number of ACE-inhibitory peptide sequences (49 peptides), while for the gut endogenous proteins, mucin-5AC had the greatest number of ACE-inhibitory peptide sequences (38 peptides). Gut endogenous proteins may be an important source of bioactive peptides in the gut particularly since gut endogenous proteins represent a quantitatively large and consistent source of protein.

  14. Rearrangement of a polar core provides a conserved mechanism for constitutive activation of class B G protein-coupled receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yanting; de Waal, Parker W.; He, Yuanzheng; Zhao, Li-Hua; Yang, Dehua; Cai, Xiaoqing; Jiang, Yi; Melcher, Karsten; Wang, Ming-Wei; Xu, H. Eric

    2017-01-01

    The glucagon receptor (GCGR) belongs to the secretin-like (class B) family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and is activated by the peptide hormone glucagon. The structures of an activated class B GPCR have remained unsolved, preventing a mechanistic understanding of how these receptors are activated. Using a combination of structural modeling and mutagenesis studies, we present here two modes of ligand-independent activation of GCGR. First, we identified a GCGR-specific hydrophobic lock comprising Met-338 and Phe-345 within the IC3 loop and transmembrane helix 6 (TM6) and found that this lock stabilizes the TM6 helix in the inactive conformation. Disruption of this hydrophobic lock led to constitutive G protein and arrestin signaling. Second, we discovered a polar core comprising conserved residues in TM2, TM3, TM6, and TM7, and mutations that disrupt this polar core led to constitutive GCGR activity. On the basis of these results, we propose a mechanistic model of GCGR activation in which TM6 is held in an inactive conformation by the conserved polar core and the hydrophobic lock. Mutations that disrupt these inhibitory elements allow TM6 to swing outward to adopt an active TM6 conformation similar to that of the canonical β2-adrenergic receptor complexed with G protein and to that of rhodopsin complexed with arrestin. Importantly, mutations in the corresponding polar core of several other members of class B GPCRs, including PTH1R, PAC1R, VIP1R, and CRFR1, also induce constitutive G protein signaling, suggesting that the rearrangement of the polar core is a conserved mechanism for class B GPCR activation. PMID:28356352

  15. Differential Requirement of the Extracellular Domain in Activation of Class B G Protein-coupled Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li-Hua; Yin, Yanting; Yang, Dehua; Liu, Bo; Hou, Li; Wang, Xiaoxi; Pal, Kuntal; Jiang, Yi; Feng, Yang; Cai, Xiaoqing; Dai, Antao; Liu, Mingyao; Wang, Ming-Wei; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric

    2016-07-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) from the secretin-like (class B) family are key players in hormonal homeostasis and are important drug targets for the treatment of metabolic disorders and neuronal diseases. They consist of a large N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) and a transmembrane domain (TMD) with the GPCR signature of seven transmembrane helices. Class B GPCRs are activated by peptide hormones with their C termini bound to the receptor ECD and their N termini bound to the TMD. It is thought that the ECD functions as an affinity trap to bind and localize the hormone to the receptor. This in turn would allow the hormone N terminus to insert into the TMD and induce conformational changes of the TMD to activate downstream signaling. In contrast to this prevailing model, we demonstrate that human class B GPCRs vary widely in their requirement of the ECD for activation. In one group, represented by corticotrophin-releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1R), parathyroid hormone receptor (PTH1R), and pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide type 1 receptor (PAC1R), the ECD requirement for high affinity hormone binding can be bypassed by induced proximity and mass action effects, whereas in the other group, represented by glucagon receptor (GCGR) and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R), the ECD is required for signaling even when the hormone is covalently linked to the TMD. Furthermore, the activation of GLP-1R by small molecules that interact with the intracellular side of the receptor is dependent on the presence of its ECD, suggesting a direct role of the ECD in GLP-1R activation. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Rearrangement of a polar core provides a conserved mechanism for constitutive activation of class B G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yanting; de Waal, Parker W; He, Yuanzheng; Zhao, Li-Hua; Yang, Dehua; Cai, Xiaoqing; Jiang, Yi; Melcher, Karsten; Wang, Ming-Wei; Xu, H Eric

    2017-06-16

    The glucagon receptor (GCGR) belongs to the secretin-like (class B) family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and is activated by the peptide hormone glucagon. The structures of an activated class B GPCR have remained unsolved, preventing a mechanistic understanding of how these receptors are activated. Using a combination of structural modeling and mutagenesis studies, we present here two modes of ligand-independent activation of GCGR. First, we identified a GCGR-specific hydrophobic lock comprising Met-338 and Phe-345 within the IC3 loop and transmembrane helix 6 (TM6) and found that this lock stabilizes the TM6 helix in the inactive conformation. Disruption of this hydrophobic lock led to constitutive G protein and arrestin signaling. Second, we discovered a polar core comprising conserved residues in TM2, TM3, TM6, and TM7, and mutations that disrupt this polar core led to constitutive GCGR activity. On the basis of these results, we propose a mechanistic model of GCGR activation in which TM6 is held in an inactive conformation by the conserved polar core and the hydrophobic lock. Mutations that disrupt these inhibitory elements allow TM6 to swing outward to adopt an active TM6 conformation similar to that of the canonical β 2 -adrenergic receptor complexed with G protein and to that of rhodopsin complexed with arrestin. Importantly, mutations in the corresponding polar core of several other members of class B GPCRs, including PTH1R, PAC1R, VIP1R, and CRFR1, also induce constitutive G protein signaling, suggesting that the rearrangement of the polar core is a conserved mechanism for class B GPCR activation. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Motor activity of the gallbladder and gastrointestinal tract as determinants of enterohepatic circulation. A scintigraphic and manometric study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qvist, N. [Odense University Hospital, Dept. of Surgical Gastroenterology and Clinical Physiology, Div. of Nuclear Medicine, Odense (Denmark)

    1995-12-31

    The aims of the study were to describe the dynamics of the enterohepatic circulation in relation to gallbladder and gastrointestinal motility in the interdigestive as well as the postprandial period. Furthermore, to investigate the level of circulating cholecystokinin, secretin, pancreatic polypeptide, motilin and bile acids in relation to gallbladder motility and MMC during the interdigestive period. All investigations were carried out on healthy male volunteers aged 18-40 years. The most suitable method for studying various characteristics of the enterohepatic circulation, and especially gallbladder motility in humans, is scintigraphy. It is non-invasive, and allows a continuing dynamic investigation of the partitioning of the radioactive marker between the various compartment. Two entirely different pharmacological substances may be use. HIDA (diethyl-acetanilide-iminodiacetic acid) which is semisynthetic and closely related to lidocaine forms a chelate with {sup 99m}Tc for intravenous administration only. The transport of {sup 99m}Tc-HIDA across the hepatocyte is a carrier-mediated organic anion pathway, similar to the hepatic handling of bilirubin. Homocholic-acid-taurine (HCAT) is a synthetic bile acid analogue, corresponding to the naturally occurring bile acid cholic acid-taurine. It is marked with {sup 75}Se and is available for peroral use only. The {sup 75}SeHCAT is adsorbed in the same manner as the naturally occurring conjugated trihydroxy bile acids, involving specific carrier systems for absorption and secretion, i.e. with a high first pass extraction and a secretory rate proportional to the blood concentration. (EG) 24 refs.

  18. What do Cochrane systematic reviews say about interventions for autism spectrum disorders?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Lyra

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs include autistic disorder, Asperger’s disorder and pervasive developmental disorder. The manifestations of ASDs can have an important impact on learning and social functioning that may persist during adulthood. The aim here was to summarize the evidence from Cochrane systematic reviews on interventions for ASDs. DESIGN AND SETTING: Review of systematic reviews, conducted within the Discipline of Evidence-Based Medicine, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo. METHODS: We included and summarized the results from Cochrane systematic reviews on interventions for ASDs. RESULTS: Seventeen reviews were included. These found weak evidence of benefits from acupuncture, gluten and casein-free diets, early intensive behavioral interventions, music therapy, parent-mediated early interventions, social skill groups, Theory of Mind cognitive model, aripiprazole, risperidone, tricyclic antidepressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI; this last only for adults. No benefits were found for sound therapies, chelating agents, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, omega-3, secretin, vitamin B6/magnesium and SSRI for children. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture, gluten and casein-free diets, early intensive behavioral interventions, music therapy, parent-mediated early interventions, social skill groups and the Theory of Mind cognitive model seem to have benefits for patients with autism spectrum disorders (very low to low-quality evidence. Aripiprazole, risperidone, tricyclic antidepressants and SSRI (this last only for adults also showed some benefits, although associated with higher risk of adverse events. Experimental studies to confirm a link between probable therapies and the disease, and then high-quality long-term clinical trials, are needed.

  19. Novel tactics for neuroprotection in Parkinson's disease: Role of antibiotics, polyphenols and neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reglodi, Dora; Renaud, Justine; Tamas, Andrea; Tizabi, Yousef; Socías, Sergio B; Del-Bel, Elaine; Raisman-Vozari, Rita

    2017-08-01

    Parkinson's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the degeneration of midbrain nigral dopaminergic neurons. Although its etiology remains unknown, the pathological role of several factors has been highlighted, namely oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, protein misfolding, and mitochondrial dysfunction, in addition to genetic predispositions. The current therapy is mainly symptomatic with l-DOPA aiming to replace dopamine. Novel therapeutic approaches are being investigated with the intention of influencing pathways leading to neuronal death and dysfunction. The present review summarizes three novel approaches, the use of which is promising in pre-clinical studies. Polyphenols have been shown to possess neuroprotective properties on account of their well-established antioxidative and anti-inflammatory actions but also due to their influence on protein misfolding and mitochondrial homeostasis. Within the amazing ancillary effects of antibiotics, their neuroprotective properties against neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory processes are of great interest for the development of effective therapies against Parkinson's disease. Experimental evidence supports the potential of antibiotics as neuroprotective agents, being useful not only to prevent the formation of toxic α-synuclein oligomers but also to ameliorate mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation. Neuropeptides offer another approach with their diverse effects in the nervous system. Among them, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide, a member of the secretin/glucagon superfamily, has several advantageous effects in models of neurodegeneration, namely anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant actions, the combination of which offers a potent protective effect in dopaminergic neurons. Owing to their pleiotropic modes of action, these novel therapeutic candidates have potential in tackling the multidimensional features of Parkinson's disease. Copyright

  20. Gateways to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-04-01

    extract, synthetic human secretin; Taxus, telavancin hydrochloride, telithromycin, temoporfin, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine, teriparatide, testosterone gel, TG-1024, tirapazamine, travoprost, travoprost/timolol; Valdecoxib, valganciclovir hydrochloride, voriconazole; Ximelagatran.

  1. Enteroendocrine cells are specifically marked by cell surface expression of claudin-4 in mouse small intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Nagatake

    Full Text Available Enteroendocrine cells are solitary epithelial cells scattered throughout the gastrointestinal tract and produce various types of hormones, constituting one of the largest endocrine systems in the body. The study of these rare epithelial cells has been hampered by the difficulty in isolating them because of the lack of specific cell surface markers. Here, we report that enteroendocrine cells selectively express a tight junction membrane protein, claudin-4 (Cld4, and are efficiently isolated with the use of an antibody specific for the Cld4 extracellular domain and flow cytometry. Sorted Cld4+ epithelial cells in the small intestine exclusively expressed a chromogranin A gene (Chga and other enteroendocrine cell-related genes (Ffar1, Ffar4, Gpr119, and the population was divided into two subpopulations based on the activity of binding to Ulex europaeus agglutinin-1 (UEA-1. A Cld4+UEA-1- cell population almost exclusively expressed glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide gene (Gip, thus representing K cells, whereas a Cld4+UEA-1+ cell population expressed other gut hormone genes, including glucagon-like peptide 1 (Gcg, pancreatic polypeptide-like peptide with N-terminal tyrosine amide (Pyy, cholecystokinin (Cck, secretin (Sct, and tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1. In addition, we found that orally administered luminal antigens were taken up by the solitary Cld4+ cells in the small intestinal villi, raising the possibility that enteroendocrine cells might also play a role in initiation of mucosal immunity. Our results provide a useful tool for the cellular and functional characterization of enteroendocrine cells.

  2. Duodenal Bulb Mucosa with Hypertrophic Gastric Oxyntic Heterotopia in Patients with Zollinger Ellison Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohan, Emil; Oh, David; Wang, Hank; Hazany, Salar; Ohning, Gordon; Pisegna, Joseph R.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome (ZES) results in hypersecretion of gastric acid (via gastrinoma) leading to peptic ulcers, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. We describe the novel discovery of hypertrophic, heterotopic gastric mucosa in the proximal duodenal bulb in patients with ZES, which we hypothesize results in an increased incidence of postbulbar ulcers in patients with ZES (a mechanism previously unreported). We determined the incidence of the novel finding of duodenal gastric oxyntic hypertrophic heterotopia (GOH) in patients with ZES. Methods. Seven patients with ZES were enrolled. The diagnosis of ZES was established by hypergastrinemia, gastric acid hypersecretion, and a positive secretin test or based on biopsy specimens (evaluated via tissue staining). Basal acid output (BAO) and baseline gastrin secretion were determined by established methods. Endoscopic examinations with methylene blue staining and biopsy of the gastric and duodenal mucosa were conducted in all patients every 3–6 months for an average of 5 years. Results. The duodenal mucosa demonstrated hypertrophic GOH in 5 out of 7 patients with ZES and an intact stomach and duodenum. Biopsies from the bowel mucosa demonstrated patchy replacement of surface epithelium by gastric-type epithelium with hypertrophic oxyntic glands in the lamina propria in 5 patients. Two of the patients had no evidence of GOH in the duodenal bulb. Patients with GOH had an average serum gastrin level of 1245 pg/mL and BAO of 2.92 mEq/hr versus 724 pg/mL and 0.8 mEq/hr in patients without GOH. Conclusions. This study demonstrated the presence of duodenal mucosa with GOH in 5 out of 7 patients with ZES and an intact stomach and duodenum. The presence of hypertrophic and heterotopic gastric mucosa is proposed to result from increased gastrin levels and may contribute to the increased incidence of postbulbar ulcers in these patients. PMID:19587828

  3. Duodenal Bulb Mucosa with Hypertrophic Gastric Oxyntic Heterotopia in Patients with Zollinger Ellison Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Kohan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome (ZES results in hypersecretion of gastric acid (via gastrinoma leading to peptic ulcers, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. We describe the novel discovery of hypertrophic, heterotopic gastric mucosa in the proximal duodenal bulb in patients with ZES, which we hypothesize results in an increased incidence of postbulbar ulcers in patients with ZES (a mechanism previously unreported. We determined the incidence of the novel finding of duodenal gastric oxyntic hypertrophic heterotopia (GOH in patients with ZES. Methods. Seven patients with ZES were enrolled. The diagnosis of ZES was established by hypergastrinemia, gastric acid hypersecretion, and a positive secretin test or based on biopsy specimens (evaluated via tissue staining. Basal acid output (BAO and baseline gastrin secretion were determined by established methods. Endoscopic examinations with methylene blue staining and biopsy of the gastric and duodenal mucosa were conducted in all patients every 3–6 months for an average of 5 years. Results. The duodenal mucosa demonstrated hypertrophic GOH in 5 out of 7 patients with ZES and an intact stomach and duodenum. Biopsies from the bowel mucosa demonstrated patchy replacement of surface epithelium by gastric-type epithelium with hypertrophic oxyntic glands in the lamina propria in 5 patients. Two of the patients had no evidence of GOH in the duodenal bulb. Patients with GOH had an average serum gastrin level of 1245 pg/mL and BAO of 2.92 mEq/hr versus 724 pg/mL and 0.8 mEq/hr in patients without GOH. Conclusions. This study demonstrated the presence of duodenal mucosa with GOH in 5 out of 7 patients with ZES and an intact stomach and duodenum. The presence of hypertrophic and heterotopic gastric mucosa is proposed to result from increased gastrin levels and may contribute to the increased incidence of postbulbar ulcers in these patients.

  4. Role in diuresis of a calcitonin receptor (GPRCAL1 expressed in a distal-proximal gradient in renal organs of the mosquito Aedes aegypti (L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeogsun Kwon

    Full Text Available Evolution of anthropophilic hematophagy in insects resulted in the coordination of various physiological processes for survival. In female mosquitoes, a large blood meal provides proteins for egg production and as a trade-off, rapid elimination of the excess water and solutes (Na(+, Cl(- is critical for maintaining homeostasis and removing excess weight to resume flight and avoid predation. This post-prandial excretion is achieved by the concerted action of multiple hormones. Diuresis and natriuresis elicited by the calcitonin-like diuretic hormone 31 (DH(31 are believed to be mediated by a yet uncharacterized calcitonin receptor (GPRCAL in the mosquito Malpighian tubules (MTs, the renal organs. To contribute knowledge on endocrinology of mosquito diuresis we cloned GPRCAL1 from MT cDNA. This receptor is the ortholog of the DH(31 receptor from Drosophila melanogaster that is expressed in principal cells of the fruit fly MT. Immunofluorescence similarly showed AaegGPRCAL1 is present in MT principal cells in A. aegypti, however, exhibiting an overall gradient-like pattern along the tubule novel for a GPCR in insects. Variegated, cell-specific receptor expression revealed a subpopulation of otherwise phenotypically similar principal cells. To investigate the receptor contribution to fluid elimination, RNAi was followed by urine measurement assays. In vitro, MTs from females that underwent AaegGPRcal1 knock-down exhibited up to 57% decrease in the rate of fluid secretion in response to DH(31. Live females treated with AaegGPRcal1 dsRNA exhibited 30% reduction in fluid excreted after a blood meal. The RNAi-induced phenotype demonstrates the critical contribution of this single secretin-like family B GPCR to fluid excretion in invertebrates and highlights its relevance for the blood feeding adaptation. Our results with the mosquito AaegGPRCAL1 imply that the regulatory function of calcitonin-like receptors for ion and fluid transport in renal organs

  5. Receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide in rat anterior pituitary glands: Localization of binding to lactotropes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanke, I.E.; Rorstad, O.P.

    1990-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) has been implicated as a physiological PRL-releasing factor; however, characterization of VIP receptors on normal pituitaries using radioligand-binding methods has been problematic. In this study we demonstrated specific receptors for VIP in anterior pituitary glands of female rats using HPLC-purified monoiodinated [Tyr(125I)10]VIP. Binding of VIP was reversible, saturable to receptor and radioligand, regulated by guanine nucleotides, and dependent on time and temperature. Scatchard analysis of competitive binding studies indicated high and low affinity binding sites, with equilibrium dissociation constants (Kd) of 0.19 +/- 0.03 and 28 +/- 16 nM, respectively. The corresponding maximum numbers of binding sites were 158 +/- 34 fmol/mg and 11.7 +/- 6.9 pmol/mg. Binding was specific, as peptides with structural homology to VIP were less than 100th as potent as VIP. The rank order of potency of the peptides tested was VIP greater than rat (r) peptide histidine isoleucine = human (h) PHI greater than rGRF greater than bovine GRF = porcine PHI = VIP-(10-28) greater than hGRF greater than secretin greater than apamin greater than glucagon. Radioligand binding was associated primarily with lactotrope-enriched fractions prepared by unit gravity sedimentation of dispersed anterior pituitary cells. VIP stimulated PRL release from cultured rat anterior pituitary cells, with an ED50 of 1 nM. These results, comprising the first identification of specific VIP receptors in normal rat anterior pituitary tissue using radioligand-binding methods, provide additional support for a biological role of VIP in lactotrope function

  6. The significance of pancreatic juice trace-element concentration in chronic pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persigehl, M.; Loeffler, A.; Hoeck, A.

    1979-01-01

    The diagnosis of exocrine pancreas insufficiency in patients with chronic pancreatitis is still not easy. The best-suited method to confirm the diagnosis seems to be the secretin pancreozymin test (SPT). As previous results have shown, the determination of trace elements in the pancreatic juice can improve the diagnostic value of the SPT. During the SPT, the concentrations of Zn, Fe, Rb, Co, Cr, Se, Sb, Cs, Sc and Ag were measured in the duodenal aspirate of 50 patients by instrumental neutron activation analysis. Of the 50 patients, 24 suffered from pancreatic insufficiency in chronic pancreatitis and 26 had no signs of pancreatic insufficiency. Only the concentration of zinc differed significantly in the two groups; the other elements showed a similar behaviour. In patients without disease of the exocrine pancreas the zinc content of the pancreatic juice during the SPT ws 0.46+-0.13μg/ml, whereas in patients with pancreatic insufficiency it was only 0.18+-0.07μg/ml. The corresponding output was 171+-49.3μg zinc in controls and 41+-17.4μg in patients. After stimulation with pancreozymin the concentrations of zinc increased in normal patients to 1.13+-0.14μg/ml and to 0.22+-0.12μg/ml in patients with pancreatic insufficiency. The data demonstrate that the measurement of zinc in the duodenal juice during the SPT improves the diagnostic value of the test and that zinc should also be determined in doubtful cases of pancreatic insufficiency. (author)

  7. Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, Jeremy

    2010-01-07

    Evidence for the efficacy of treatments for autism has improved in recent years. In this systematic review the evidence for both drug and non-drug treatments is appraised and clinical guidance is provided for their use. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of early intensive multidisciplinary intervention programmes in children with autism? What are the effects of dietary interventions in children with autism? What are the effects of drug treatments in children with autism? What are the effects of non-drug treatments in children with autism? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2009 (Clinical evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 30 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: applied behavioural analysis; auditory integration training; Autism Preschool Programme; casein-free diet; chelation; Child's Talk programme; cognitive behavioural therapy; digestive enzymes; EarlyBird programme; facilitated communication; Floortime therapy; gluten-free diet; immunoglobulins; melatonin; memantine; methylphenidate; More Than Words programme; music therapy; olanzapine; omega-3 fish oil; picture exchange communication system; Portage scheme; probiotics; relationship development interventions; risperidone; secretin; selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs); sensory integration training; social stories; social skills training; Son-Rise programme; TEACCH

  8. Nematode and arthropod genomes provide new insights into the evolution of class 2 B1 GPCRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, João C R; Félix, Rute C; Power, Deborah M

    2014-01-01

    Nematodes and arthropods are the most speciose animal groups and possess Class 2 B1 G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Existing models of invertebrate Class 2 B1 GPCR evolution are mainly centered on Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster and a few other nematode and arthropod representatives. The present study reevaluates the evolution of metazoan Class 2 B1 GPCRs and orthologues by exploring the receptors in several nematode and arthropod genomes and comparing them to the human receptors. Three novel receptor phylogenetic clusters were identified and designated cluster A, cluster B and PDF-R-related cluster. Clusters A and B were identified in several nematode and arthropod genomes but were absent from D. melanogaster and Culicidae genomes, whereas the majority of the members of the PDF-R-related cluster were from nematodes. Cluster A receptors were nematode and arthropod-specific but shared a conserved gene environment with human receptor loci. Cluster B members were orthologous to human GCGR, PTHR and Secretin members with which they probably shared a common origin. PDF-R and PDF-R related clusters were present in representatives of both nematodes and arthropods. The results of comparative analysis of GPCR evolution and diversity in protostomes confirm previous notions that C. elegans and D. melanogaster genomes are not good representatives of nematode and arthropod phyla. We hypothesize that at least four ancestral Class 2 B1 genes emerged early in the metazoan radiation, which after the protostome-deuterostome split underwent distinct selective pressures that resulted in duplication and deletion events that originated the current Class 2 B1 GPCRs in nematode and arthropod genomes.

  9. Trimeric form of intracellular ATP synthase subunit β of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans binds human interleukin-1β.

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    Annamari Paino

    Full Text Available Bacterial biofilms resist host defenses and antibiotics partly because of their decreased metabolism. Some bacteria use proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL-1β, as cues to promote biofilm formation and to alter virulence. Although one potential bacterial IL-1β receptor has been identified, current knowledge of the bacterial IL-1β sensing mechanism is limited. In chronic biofilm infection, periodontitis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans requires tight adherence (tad-locus to form biofilms, and tissue destroying active lesions contain more IL-1β than inactive ones. The effect of IL-1β on the metabolic activity of A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilm was tested using alamarBlue™. The binding of IL-1β to A. actinomycetemcomitans cells was investigated using transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry. To identify the proteins which interacted with IL-1β, different protein fractions from A. actinomycetemcomitans were run in native-PAGE and blotted using biotinylated IL-1β and avidin-HRP, and identified using mass spectroscopy. We show that although IL-1β slightly increases the biofilm formation of A. actinomycetemcomitans, it reduces the metabolic activity of the biofilm. A similar reduction was observed with all tad-locus mutants except the secretin mutant, although all tested mutant strains as well as wild type strains bound IL-1β. Our results suggest that IL-1β might be transported into the A. actinomycetemcomitans cells, and the trimeric form of intracellular ATP synthase subunit β interacted with IL-1β, possibly explaining the decreased metabolic activity. Because ATP synthase is highly conserved, it might universally enhance biofilm resistance to host defense by binding IL-1β during inflammation.

  10. The Protective Role of PAC1-Receptor Agonist Maxadilan in BCCAO-Induced Retinal Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaczy, A; Reglodi, D; Somoskeoy, T; Kovacs, K; Lokos, E; Szabo, E; Tamas, A; Atlasz, T

    2016-10-01

    A number of studies have proven that pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is protective in neurodegenerative diseases. Permanent bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) causes severe degeneration in the rat retina. In our previous studies, protective effects were observed with PACAP1-38, PACAP1-27, and VIP but not with their related peptides, glucagon, or secretin in BCCAO. All three PACAP receptors (PAC1, VPAC1, VPAC2) appear in the retina. Molecular and immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that the retinoprotective effects are most probably mainly mediated by the PAC1 receptor. The aim of the present study was to investigate the retinoprotective effects of a selective PAC1-receptor agonist maxadilan in BCCAO-induced retinopathy. Wistar rats were used in the experiment. After performing BCCAO, the right eye was treated with intravitreal maxadilan (0.1 or 1 μM), while the left eye was injected with vehicle. Sham-operated rats received the same treatment. Two weeks after the operation, retinas were processed for standard morphometric and molecular analysis. Intravitreal injection of 0.1 or 1 μM maxadilan caused significant protection in the thickness of most retinal layers and the number of cells in the GCL compared to the BCCAO-operated eyes. In addition, 1 μM maxadilan application was more effective than 0.1 μM maxadilan treatment in the ONL, INL, IPL, and the entire retina (OLM-ILM). Maxadilan treatment significantly decreased cytokine expression (CINC-1, IL-1α, and L-selectin) in ischemia. In summary, our histological and molecular analysis showed that maxadilan, a selective PAC1 receptor agonist, has a protective role in BCCAO-induced retinal degeneration, further supporting the role of PAC1 receptor conveying the retinoprotective effects of PACAP.

  11. Critical Review of Diagnostic Methods Used in Chronic Pancreatic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan T Beck

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a balanced assessment of the various pancreatic function tests and imaging techniques used in the differential diagnosis of chronic pancreatic disease. Function tests that study the digestive capacity of the pancreas (fat absorption of dietary lipids, fluorescein- or radiolabelled fats, bentiromide test, etc have high specificity, but very low sensitivity. This is because 90% of pancreas has to be destroyed before steatorrhea or creatorrhea occurs. Tests that directly measure pancreatic bicarbonate and protein secretion (secretin test, etc are more accurate and may detect pancreatic dysfunction even before anatomical changes occur. Measurement of pancreatic enzymes in serum or urine, or the decreased decline of serum amino acids during their incorporation into pancreatic enzymes, are not sufficiently sensitive or specific to help diagnose pancreatic disease. Sensitive and specific tumour markers are not yet available. Thus screening tests are not cost-effective - if they are negative, they do not exclude pancreatic disease; and if positive, they have to be confirmed by more specific tests. Imaging techniques are the most commonly used methods of investigation. The usefulness of abdominal survey films, barium studies, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP, ultrasonography, computed tomographic scan, magnetic resonance imaging and endoscopic ultrasonography is critically reviewed. Most of the radiological methods can be combined with cytology or biopsy. Histology demonstrating malignancy establishes this diagnosis, but negative biopsies do not exclude malignant tumours. Presently only ERCP and endoscopic ultrasound can diagnose cancers sufficiently early to allow for possible `curative' surgery, and only endoscopic ultrasound is capable to stage tumours for the assessment of resectability.

  12. Removal of the phage-shock protein PspB causes reduction of virulence in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium independently of NRAMP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallrodt, Inke; Jelsbak, Lotte; Thomsen, Line E; Brix, Lena; Lemire, Sébastien; Gautier, Laurent; Nielsen, Dennis S; Jovanovic, Goran; Buck, Martin; Olsen, John E

    2014-06-01

    The phage-shock protein (Psp) system is believed to manage membrane stress in all Enterobacteriaceae and has recently emerged as being important for virulence in several pathogenic species of this phylum. The core of the Psp system consists of the pspA-D operon and the distantly located pspG gene. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium), it has recently been reported that PspA is essential for systemic infection of mice, but only in NRAMP1(+) mice, signifying that attenuation is related to coping with divalent cation starvation in the intracellular environment. In the present study, we investigated the contribution of individual psp genes to virulence of S. Typhimurium. Interestingly, deletion of the whole pspA-D set of genes caused attenuation in both NRAMP1(+) and NRAMP1(-) mice, indicating that one or more of the psp genes contribute to virulence independently of NRAMP1 expression in the host. Investigations of single gene mutants showed that knock out of pspB reduced virulence in both types of mice, while deletion of pspA only caused attenuation in NRAMP1(+) mice, and deletion of pspD had a minor effect in NRAMP1(-) mice, while deletions of either pspC or pspG did not affect virulence. Experiments addressed at elucidating the role of PspB in virulence revealed that PspB is dispensable for uptake to and intracellular replication in cultured macrophages and resistance to complement-induced killing. Furthermore, the Psp system of S. Typhimurium was dispensable during pIV-induced secretin stress. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that removal of PspB reduces virulence in S. Typhimurium independently of host NRAMP1 expression, demonstrating that PspB has roles in intra-host survival distinct from the reported contributions of PspA. © 2014 The Authors.

  13. Obstructed pancreaticojejunostomy partly explains exocrine insufficiency after pancreatic head resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordback, Isto; Parviainen, Mickael; Piironen, Anneli; Räty, Sari; Sand, Juhani

    2007-02-01

    The majority of patients with long-term survival after pancreatic head resection suffer from pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. The objective of this study was to investigate whether this is due to glandular malfunction or obstructed pancreaticojejunal anastomosis. Twenty-six patients (10 M, 16 F, mean age 61 years, range 34-81 years) were re-examined a median of 52 months (range 3-76 months) after pancreatic head resection and end-to-end invaginated pancreaticojejunostomy. Pancreatic exocrine function was measured by fecal elastase-1 assay. The size of the pancreatic remnant, glandular secretion and the flow through the anastomosis were analyzed with secretin-stimulated dynamic magnetic resonance pancreatography (D-MRP). All patients had pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, 24 (92%) of them having severe insufficiency. Eighteen patients (69%) reported moderate to severe diarrhea. Lowest fecal elastase-1 concentrations were associated with the initial diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis or ductal adenocarcinoma, suggesting preoperative primary or secondary chronic pancreatitis as important determinants. The size of the remnant gland did not correlate with the fecal elastase-1 concentrations. D-MRP failed in three patients. Severe glandular malfunctions were found in 7 (30%) of the 23 successful D-MRP examinations. The anastomosis was totally obstructed in 5 patients (22%) or partially obstructed in 6 (26%) but remained perfectly open in 5 patients (22%). The five patients with perfect anastomoses had the highest measured median fecal elastase-1 activity. Although late diarrhea and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency may be partly induced already by the disease treated with resection, at least half may be explained by obstructed anastomosis. To obtain better late functional results, improvements may be required in the surgical techniques.

  14. Comparison of fecal elastase-1 and pancreatic function testing in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wali, Prateek D; Loveridge-Lenza, Beth; He, Zhaoping; Horvath, Karoly

    2012-02-01

    The fecal pancreatic elastase-1 (FE-1) test is considered a simple, noninvasive, indirect measure of pancreatic function. We aimed to evaluate the performance of the FE-1 test compared with the direct pancreatic function test (PFT) with secretin stimulation in children. Data of 70 children (6 months-17 years of age) who had both FE-1 test and PFT were analyzed. The average FE-1 concentration was 403 ± 142 μg/g. Eleven children had concentrations below 200  μg/g, 23 between 201 to 500 μg/g, and 36 were above 500 μg/g. The average pancreatic elastase activity measured on direct stimulation was 49.1 ± 38.6  μmol · min (-1)· ml(-1) and 11 children had activity below the established cutoff (10.5 μmol · min(-1) · ml(-1)). Among the 11 children with pathologic PFT, 7 had normal FE-1, 4 were in the intermediate range (201-500 μg/g), and none were in the low range (g). Among the 59 children with normal direct PFT 11 (19%) had pathologic (g) and 19 (32%) had intermediate FE-1 tests. Twenty-nine children had both normal FE-1 concentration and normal PFT, giving a negative predictive value of 80%. The correlation between pancreatic elastase activity and FE-1 concentration was poor (r = 0.190). The sensitivity of the FE-1 test was found to be 41.7%, whereas the specificity was 49.2%. The positive predictive value of the FE-1 test was only 14%. The FE-1 test is a simple, noninvasive, indirect method; however, ordering physicians should be aware of its limitations. It can give false-positive results and has low sensitivity in children with mild pancreatic insufficiency without cystic fibrosis and in those with isolated pancreatic enzyme deficiencies.

  15. The life, achievements and legacy of a great Canadian investigator: Professor Boris Petrovich Babkin (1877-1950).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Ivan T

    2006-09-01

    The present paper reviews the life and achievements of Professor Boris Petrovich Babkin (MD DSc LLD). History is only worth writing about if it teaches us about the future; therefore, this historical review concludes by describing what today's and future gastrointestinal physiologists could learn from Dr Babkin's life. Dr Babkin was born in Russia in 1877. He graduated with an MD degree from the Military Medical Academy in St Petersburg, Russia, in 1904. Not being attracted to clinical practice, and after some hesitation concerning whether he would continue in history or basic science of medicine, he entered the laboratory of Professor Ivan Petrovich Pavlov. Although he maintained an interest in history, in Pavlov's exciting environment he became fully committed to physiology of the gastrointestinal system. He advanced quickly in Russia and was Professor of Physiology at the University of Odessa. In 1922, he was critical of the Bolshevik revolution, and after a short imprisonment, he was ordered to leave Russia. He was invited with his family by Professor EH Starling (the discoverer of secretin) to his department at University College, London, England. Two years later, he was offered a professorship in Canada at Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia. After contributing there for four years, he joined McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, in 1928 as Research Professor. He remained there for the rest of his career. Between 1940 and 1941, he chaired the Department, and following retirement, he remained as Research Professor. At the invitation of the world-famous neurosurgeon, Wilder Penfield, Dr Babkin continued as Research Fellow in the Department of Neurosurgery until his death in 1950 at age 73. His major achievements were related to establishing the concept of brain-gut-brain interaction and the influence of this on motility, as well as on interface of multiple different cells, nerves and hormones on secretory function. He had a major role in the rediscovery

  16. Is chronic fatigue syndrome an autoimmune disorder of endogenous neuropeptides, exogenous infection and molecular mimicry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staines, Donald R

    2004-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome is a disorder characterised by prolonged fatigue and debility and is mostly associated with post-infection sequelae although ongoing infection is unproven. Immunological aberration is likely and this may prove to be associated with an expanding group of vasoactive neuropeptides in the context of molecular mimicry and inappropriate immunological memory. Vasoactive neuropeptides including vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and pituitary adenylate activating polypeptide (PACAP) belong to the secretin/glucagon superfamily and act as hormones, neurotransmitters, immune modulators and neurotrophes. They are readily catalysed to smaller peptide fragments by antibody hydrolysis. They and their binding sites are immunogenic and are known to be associated with a range of autoimmune conditions. Vasoactive neuropeptides are widely distributed in the body particularly in the central, autonomic and peripheral nervous systems and have been identified in the gut, adrenal gland, reproductive organs, vasculature, blood cells and other tissues. They have a vital role in maintaining vascular flow in organs, and in thermoregulation, memory and concentration. They are co-transmitters for acetylcholine, nitric oxide, endogenous opioids and insulin, are potent immune regulators with primarily anti-inflammatory activity, and have a significant role in protection of the nervous system to toxic assault, promotion of neural development and the maintenance of homeostasis. This paper describes a biologically plausible mechanism for the development of CFS based on loss of immunological tolerance to the vasoactive neuropeptides following infection, significant physical exercise or de novo. It is proposed that release of these substances is accompanied by a loss of tolerance either to them or their receptor binding sites in CFS. Such an occurrence would have predictably serious consequences resulting from compromised function of the key roles these substances perform. All

  17. Superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs – extraordinary and outstanding success of evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazimierz Kochman

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are considered as very diverse and also surprisingly successful structures during the whole evolutionary process, being capable of transducing the different forms of “information” within the cell and also between cells, such as different peptides, lipids, proteins, nucleotides, nucleosides, organic odorants and photons. Complex studies as well as two-dimensional crystallization of rhodopsin, their paradigm, led to the creation of a useful model having a common central core, consisting of seven transmembrane helical domains, which undergoes appropriate structural modification during activation and signal transduction. After the complete delineation of the human genome, which is the apogee of human scientific civilization and culture, it was possible to identify more than 800 human GPCR sequences and in parallel analyze 342 unique functional nonolfactory human GPCR sequences with phylogenetic analyses. These results support, with high bootstrap values, the existence of five main families, named by the authors glutamate, rhodopsin, adhesion, frizzle/taste2, and secretin, forming the GRAFS classification system. Positions of the GPCRs in chromosomal paralogous regions indicate the importance of tetraploidizations or local gene duplication events during their creation. Some families of GPCRs show, however, very little or no similarity in the sequence of amino acid chains. They utilize an enormous number of different domains to bind ligands and to activate the appropriate G-proteins. The delicate tuning of their coupling to G proteins is further regulated by splicing, RNA editing and phosphorylation. A number of GPCRs may also form homodimers or heterodimers with structurally different GPCRs and also with membrane-bound proteins having one transmembrane domain. It should also be stressed that not all GPCRs are strictly faithful to G proteins because growing evidence indicates that they can interact directly

  18. Gastrin-Releasing Peptide and Glucose Metabolism Following Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendharkar, Sayali A; Drury, Marie; Walia, Monika; Korc, Murray; Petrov, Maxim S

    2017-08-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) is a pluripotent peptide that has been implicated in both gastrointestinal inflammatory states and classical chronic metabolic diseases such as diabetes. Abnormal glucose metabolism (AGM) after pancreatitis, an exemplar inflammatory disease involving the gastrointestinal tract, is associated with persistent low-grade inflammation and altered secretion of pancreatic and gut hormones as well as cytokines. While GRP is involved in secretion of many of them, it is not known whether GRP has a role in AGM. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the association between GRP and AGM following pancreatitis. Fasting blood samples were collected to measure GRP, blood glucose, insulin, amylin, glucagon, pancreatic polypeptide (PP), somatostatin, cholecystokinin, gastric-inhibitory peptide (GIP), gastrin, ghrelin, glicentin, glucagon-like peptide-1 and 2, oxyntomodulin, peptide YY (PYY), secretin, vasoactive intestinal peptide, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, and interleukin-6. Modified Poisson regression analysis and linear regression analyses were conducted. Four statistical models were used to adjust for demographic, metabolic, and pancreatitis-related risk factors. A total of 83 individuals after an episode of pancreatitis were recruited. GRP was significantly associated with AGM, consistently in all four models (P -trend < 0.05), and fasting blood glucose contributed 17% to the variance of GRP. Further, GRP was significantly associated with glucagon (P < 0.003), MCP-1 (P < 0.025), and TNF-α (P < 0.025) - consistently in all four models. GRP was also significantly associated with PP and PYY in three models (P < 0.030 for both), and with GIP and glicentin in one model (P = 0.001 and 0.024, respectively). Associations between GRP and other pancreatic and gut hormones were not significant. GRP is significantly increased in patients with AGM after pancreatitis and is associated with increased levels of pro

  19. MRI of the abdomen – how we do it?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zlatanov, Y.; Penkov, M.

    2013-01-01

    slices allowing good spatial resolution. Better suppression of adipose tissue and reduction of the motor artifacts allows better contrast resolution and better quality images. The diagnostic potential of magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography is almost as close to that of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, thereby the need for most diagnostic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is eliminating. Looking to the future, it may be carried out more detailed functional assessment of the organs in the abdomen. Secretin - enhanced cholangiopancreatography provides information for exocrine pancreatic function. Diffusion, MRI perfusion and magnetic resonance elastography is currently used for experimental purposes. In the near future it is expected to become a part of the protocol in special indications

  20. INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipple, G. H.; Stone, H. B.; Bernheim, B. M.

    1913-01-01

    formed in no other way than by the activity of the intestinal mucosa and the growth of the intestinal bacteria. This material after dilution, autolysis, sterilization, and filtration produces a characteristic effect when introduced intravenously. When in toxic doses it causes a profound drop in blood pressure, general collapse, drop in temperature, salivation, vomiting, and profuse diarrhea, which is often blood-stained. Splanchnic congestion is the conspicuous feature at autopsy and shows especially in the villi of the duodenal and jejunal mucosæ. Adrenalin, during this period of low blood pressure and splanchnic congestion, will cause the usual reaction when given intravenously, but applied locally or given intravenously it causes no bleaching of the engorged intestinal mucosa. Secretin is not found in the duodenal loop fluid, and the loop material does not influence the pancreatic secretion. Intraportal injection of the toxic material gives a reaction similar to intravenous injection. Intraperitoneal and subcutaneous injections produce a relatively slow reaction which closely resembles the picture seen in the closed duodenal loop dog. In both cases there is a relatively slow absorption, but the splanchnic congestion and other findings, though less intense, are present in both groups. There seems, therefore, to be no escape from the conclusion that a poisonous substance is formed in this closed duodenal loop which is absorbed from it and causes intoxication and death. Injection of this toxic substance into a normal dog gives intoxication and a reaction more intense but similar to that developing in a closed-loop dog. PMID:19867644

  1. [Review of psychopharmacological treatments in adolescents and adults with autistic disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghdadli, A; Gonnier, V; Aussilloux, C

    2002-01-01

    behaviours. Nevertheless, these studies have used small size sample and have not been replicated. Category II. This category correspond to drugs supposed to be active on neurochemical disturbances found in autism but their target symptoms are not autism specific signs as defined by the ICD 10. Buspirone: This serotonine agonist may have a good impact on emotional disorders and sleeping confusions. Methylphenidate: Most of the current studies about this noradrenergic drug concern children. The results are variable. Paradoxical effects may exist in children with severe mental retardation. Propanolol: Some isolated studies habe reported its efficiency on behavioural disturbances. Clonidine: This adrenergic drug treats efficiently some cases of aggressive behaviour and hyperactivity. Category III. This category contains a wide range of drugs, vitamins or method used in autism after sporadic observations of their positive effects. Secretine: An important improvement has been reported in isolated cases. However, controlled studies in children do not confirm these results. Vitamines B6, B12 and Magnesium: An improvement in socialization and in behavioural disorders have been reported in some cases, but these results are not yet confirmed. Lithium, Carbamazépine, Valproate: Results of some case studies have found it to be efficient in cyclic disorders. Gluten and casein free diet: An improvement of social behaviour have been reported by some parents after these diets. No controlled study has validated this observation. Conclusion - There is no consensus on the use of psychopharmacological treatments in autism. Although there exist many clinical observations, only few controlled studies have validated the efficiency and safety of these treatments. At the present time and until having sufficient studies, drugs are generally limited to severe disorders, for which usual psycho-educational approaches are insufficient.