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Sample records for secreted beta-amyloid precursor

  1. The prion protein as a receptor for amyloid-beta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessels, Helmut W.; Nguyen, Louis N.; Nabavi, Sadegh; Malinow, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Increased levels of brain amyloid-beta, a secreted peptide cleavage product of amyloid precursor protein (APP), is believed to be critical in the aetiology of Alzheimer's disease. Increased amyloid-beta can cause synaptic depression, reduce the number of spine protrusions (that is, sites of synaptic

  2. Calcium ionophore A23187 specifically decreases the secretion of beta-secretase cleaved amyloid precursor protein during apoptosis in primary rat cortical cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennvik, K; Benedikz, Eirikur; Fastbom, J

    2001-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the degeneration and loss of neurons, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and the accumulation of extracellular senile plaques consisting mainly of beta-amyloid (A beta). A beta is generated from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by sequential beta...

  3. Levels of alpha- and beta-secretase cleaved amyloid precursor protein in the cerebrospinal fluid of Alzheimer's disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennvik, K; Fastbom, J; Blomberg, M

    2000-01-01

    Alternative cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) results in generation and secretion of both soluble APP (sAPP) and beta-amyloid (Abeta). Abeta is the main component of the amyloid depositions in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Using Western blotting, we compared...... the levels of alpha-secretase cleaved sAPP, beta-secretase cleaved sAPP and total sAPP, in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 13 sporadic AD patients and 13 healthy controls. Our findings show significant amounts of beta-secretase cleaved sAPP in CSF. There was no statistically significant difference...... in the levels of beta-secretase cleaved sAPP between AD patients and controls. The levels of alpha-secretase cleaved sAPP and total sAPP were, however, found to be significantly lower in the AD patients than in the controls....

  4. Curcumin decreases amyloid-beta peptide levels by attenuating the maturation of amyloid-beta precursor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Can; Browne, Andrew; Child, Daniel; Tanzi, Rudolph E

    2010-09-10

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease with no cure. The pathogenesis of AD is believed to be driven primarily by amyloid-beta (Abeta), the principal component of senile plaques. Abeta is an approximately 4-kDa peptide generated via cleavage of the amyloid-beta precursor protein (APP). Curcumin is a compound in the widely used culinary spice, turmeric, which possesses potent and broad biological activities, including anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities, chemopreventative effects, and effects on protein trafficking. Recent in vivo studies indicate that curcumin is able to reduce Abeta-related pathology in transgenic AD mouse models via unknown molecular mechanisms. Here, we investigated the effects of curcumin on Abeta levels and APP processing in various cell lines and mouse primary cortical neurons. We show for the first time that curcumin potently lowers Abeta levels by attenuating the maturation of APP in the secretory pathway. These data provide a mechanism of action for the ability of curcumin to attenuate amyloid-beta pathology.

  5. Beta-secretase-cleaved amyloid precursor protein in Alzheimer brain: a morphologic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennvik, Kristina; Bogdanovic, N; Volkmann, Inga

    2004-01-01

    beta-amyloid (Abeta) is the main constituent of senile plaques seen in Alzheimer's disease. Abeta is derived from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) via proteolytic cleavage by proteases beta- and gamma-secretase. In this study, we examined content and localization of beta-secretase-cleaved APP...... the beta-sAPP immunostaining to be stronger and more extensive in gray matter in Alzheimer disease (AD) cases than controls. The axonal beta-sAPP staining was patchy and unevenly distributed for the AD cases, indicating impaired axonal transport. beta-sAPP was also found surrounding senile plaques...

  6. Familial Alzheimer's disease mutations in presenilin 1 do not alter levels of the secreted amyloid-beta protein precursor generated by beta-secretase cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Can; Browne, Andrew; Kim, Doo Yeon; Tanzi, Rudolph E

    2010-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an insidious and progressive disease with a genetically complex and heterogenous etiology. More than 200 fully penetrant mutations in the amyloid beta-protein precursor (APP), presenilin 1 (or PSEN1), and presenilin 2 (PSEN2) have been linked to early-onset familial AD (FAD). 177 PSEN1 FAD mutations have been identified so far and account for more than approximately 80% of all FAD mutations. All PSEN1 FAD mutations can increase the Abeta42:Abeta40 ratio with seemingly different and incompletely understood mechanisms. A recent study has shown that the 286 amino acid N-terminal fragment of APP (N-APP), a proteolytic product of beta-secretase-derived secreted form of APP (sAPPbeta), could bind the death receptor, DR6, and lead to neurodegeneration. Here we asked whether PSEN1 FAD mutations lead to neurodegeneration by modulating sAPPbeta levels. All four different PSEN1 FAD mutations tested (in three mammalian cell lines) did not alter sAPPbeta levels. Therefore PS1 mutations do not appear to contribute to AD pathogenesis via altered production of sAPPbeta.

  7. Ubiquilin 1 modulates amyloid precursor protein trafficking and Abeta secretion.

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    Hiltunen, Mikko; Lu, Alice; Thomas, Anne V; Romano, Donna M; Kim, Minji; Jones, Phill B; Xie, Zhongcong; Kounnas, Maria Z; Wagner, Steven L; Berezovska, Oksana; Hyman, Bradley T; Tesco, Giuseppina; Bertram, Lars; Tanzi, Rudolph E

    2006-10-27

    Ubiquilin 1 (UBQLN1) is a ubiquitin-like protein, which has been shown to play a central role in regulating the proteasomal degradation of various proteins, including the presenilins. We recently reported that DNA variants in UBQLN1 increase the risk for Alzheimer disease, by influencing expression of this gene in brain. Here we present the first assessment of the effects of UBQLN1 on the metabolism of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). For this purpose, we employed RNA interference to down-regulate UBQLN1 in a variety of neuronal and non-neuronal cell lines. We demonstrate that down-regulation of UBQLN1 accelerates the maturation and intracellular trafficking of APP, while not interfering with alpha-, beta-, or gamma-secretase levels or activity. UBQLN1 knockdown increased the ratio of APP mature/immature, increased levels of full-length APP on the cell surface, and enhanced the secretion of sAPP (alpha- and beta-forms). Moreover, UBQLN1 knockdown increased levels of secreted Abeta40 and Abeta42. Finally, employing a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based assay, we show that UBQLN1 and APP come into close proximity in intact cells, independently of the presence of the presenilins. Collectively, our findings suggest that UBQLN1 may normally serve as a cytoplasmic "gatekeeper" that may control APP trafficking from intracellular compartments to the cell surface. These findings suggest that changes in UBQLN1 steady-state levels affect APP trafficking and processing, thereby influencing the generation of Abeta.

  8. Mapping of the gene encoding the. beta. -amyloid precursor protein and its relationship to the Down syndrome region of chromosome 21

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    Patterson, D.; Gardiner, K.; Kao, F.T.; Tanzi, R.; Watkins, P.; Gusella, J.F. (Eleanor Roosevelt Institute for Cancer Research, Denver, CO (USA))

    1988-11-01

    The gene encoding the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein has been assigned to human chromosome 21, as has a gene responsible for at least some cases of familial Alzheimer disease. Linkage studies strongly suggest that the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein and the product corresponding to familial Alzheimer disease are from two genes, or at least that several million base pairs of DNA separate the markers. The precise location of the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein gene on chromosome 21 has not yet been determined. Here the authors show, by using a somatic-cell/hybrid-cell mapping panel, in situ hybridization, and transverse-alternating-field electrophoresis, that the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein gene is located on chromosome 21 very near the 21q21/21q/22 border and probably within the region of chromosome 21 that, when trisomic, results in Down syndrome.

  9. Neurine, an acetylcholine autolysis product, elevates secreted amyloid-beta protein precursor and amyloid-beta peptide levels, and lowers neuronal cell viability in culture: a role in Alzheimer's disease?

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    Tweedie, David; Brossi, Arnold; Chen, DeMoa; Ge, Yuan-Wen; Bailey, Jason; Yu, Qian-Sheng; Kamal, Mohammad A; Sambamurti, Kumar; Lahiri, Debomoy K; Greig, Nigel H

    2006-09-01

    Classical hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are a synaptic loss, cholinergic neuron death, and abnormal protein deposition, particularly of toxic amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta) that is derived from amyloid-beta protein precursor (AbetaPP) by the action of beta- and gamma-secretases. The trigger(s) initiating the biochemical cascades that underpin these hallmarks have yet to be fully elucidated. The typical forebrain cholinergic cell demise associated with AD brain results in a loss of presynaptic cholinergic markers and acetylcholine (ACh). Neurine (vinyl-trimethyl-ammonium hydroxide) is a breakdown product of ACh, consequent to autolysis and is an organic poison found in cadavre brain. The time- and concentration-dependent actions of neurine were assessed in human neuroblastoma (NB, SK-N-SH) cells in culture by quantifying cell viability by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and MTS assay, and AbetaPP and Abeta levels by Western blot and ELISA. NB cells displayed evidence of toxicity to neurine at > or = 3 mg/ml, as demonstrated by elevated LDH levels in the culture media and a reduced cell viability shown by the MTS assay. Using subtoxic concentrations of neurine, elevations in AbetaPP and Abeta1-40 peptide levels were detected in conditioned media samples.

  10. A role for 12/15 lipoxygenase in the amyloid beta precursor protein metabolism.

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    Succol, Francesca; Praticò, Domenico

    2007-10-01

    12/15 Lipoxygenase (12/15LO) protein levels and activity are increased in pathologically affected regions of Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains, compared with controls. Its metabolic products are elevated in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with AD and individuals with mild cognitive impairment, suggesting that this enzyme may be involved early in AD pathogenesis. Herein, we investigate the effect of pharmacologic inhibition of 12/15LO on the amyloid beta precursor protein (APP) metabolism. To this end, we used CHO and N2A cells stably expressing human APP with the Swedish mutant, and two structurally distinct and selective 12/15LO inhibitors, PD146176 and CDC. Our results demonstrated that both drugs dose-dependently reduced Abeta formation without affecting total APP levels. Interestingly, in the same cells we observed a significant reduction in secreted (s)APPbeta and beta-secretase (BACE), but not sAPPalpha and ADAM10 protein levels. Together, these data show for the first time that this enzymatic pathway influences Abeta formation whereby modulating the BACE proteolytic cascade. We conclude that specific pharmacologic inhibition of 12/15LO could represent a novel therapeutic target for treating or preventing AD pathology in humans.

  11. Small heat shock protein HspB8: its distribution in Alzheimer's disease brains and its inhibition of amyloid-beta protein aggregation and cerebrovascular amyloid-beta toxicity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilhelmus, M.M.M.; Boelens, W.C.; Otte-Holler, I.; Kamps, B.; Kusters, B.; Maat-Schieman, M.L.; Waal, R.M.W. de; Verbeek, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by pathological lesions, such as senile plaques (SPs) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), both predominantly consisting of a proteolytic cleavage product of the amyloid-beta precursor protein (APP), the amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta). CAA is also the major

  12. Powerful beneficial effects of benfotiamine on cognitive impairment and beta-amyloid deposition in amyloid precursor protein/presenilin-1 transgenic mice.

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    Pan, Xiaoli; Gong, Neng; Zhao, Jing; Yu, Zhe; Gu, Fenghua; Chen, Jia; Sun, Xiaojing; Zhao, Lei; Yu, Meijing; Xu, Zhiru; Dong, Wenxin; Qin, Yan; Fei, Guoqiang; Zhong, Chunjiu; Xu, Tian-Le

    2010-05-01

    Reduction of glucose metabolism in brain is one of the main features of Alzheimer's disease. Thiamine (vitamin B1)-dependent processes are critical in glucose metabolism and have been found to be impaired in brains from patients with Alzheimer's disease. However, thiamine treatment exerts little beneficial effect in these patients. Here, we tested the effect of benfotiamine, a thiamine derivative with better bioavailability than thiamine, on cognitive impairment and pathology alterations in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease, the amyloid precursor protein/presenilin-1 transgenic mouse. We show that after a chronic 8 week treatment, benfotiamine dose-dependently enhanced the spatial memory of amyloid precursor protein/presenilin-1 mice in the Morris water maze test. Furthermore, benfotiamine effectively reduced both amyloid plaque numbers and phosphorylated tau levels in cortical areas of the transgenic mice brains. Unexpectedly, these effects were not mimicked by another lipophilic thiamine derivative, fursultiamine, although both benfotiamine and fursultiamine were effective in increasing the levels of free thiamine in the brain. Most notably, benfotiamine, but not fursultiamine, significantly elevated the phosphorylation level of glycogen synthase kinase-3alpha and -3beta, and reduced their enzymatic activities in the amyloid precursor protein/presenilin-1 transgenic brain. Therefore, in the animal Alzheimer's disease model, benfotiamine appears to improve the cognitive function and reduce amyloid deposition via thiamine-independent mechanisms, which are likely to include the suppression of glycogen synthase kinase-3 activities. These results suggest that, unlike many other thiamine-related drugs, benfotiamine may be beneficial for clinical Alzheimer's disease treatment.

  13. beta. -Amyloid gene dosage in Alzheimer's disease

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    Murdoch, G H; Manuelidis, L; Kim, J H; Manuelidis, E E

    1988-01-11

    The 4-5 kd amyloid ..beta..-peptide is a major constituent of the characteristic amyloid plaque of Alzheimer's disease. It has been reported that some cases of sporatic Alzheimer's disease are associated with at least a partial duplication of chromosome 21 containing the gene corresponding to the 695 residue precursor of this peptide. To contribute to an understanding of the frequency to such a duplication event in the overall Alzheimer's population, the authors have determined the gene dosage of the ..beta..-amyloid gene in this collection of cases. All cases had a clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's confirmed neuropathologically. Each Alzheimer's case had an apparent normal diploid ..beta..-amyloid gene dosage, while control Down's cases had the expected triploid dosage. Thus partial duplication of chromosome 21 may be a rare finding in Alzheimer's disease. Similar conclusions were just reported in several studies of the Harvard Alzheimer collection.

  14. Organotypic vibrosections from whole brain adult Alzheimer mice (overexpressing amyloid-precursor-protein with the Swedish-Dutch-Iowa mutations as a model to study clearance of beta-amyloid plaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eHumpel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer´s disease is a severe neurodegenerative disorder of the brain, pathologically characterized by extracellular beta-amyloid plaques, intraneuronal Tau inclusions, inflammation, reactive glial cells, vascular pathology and neuronal cell death. The degradation and clearance of beta-amyloid plaques is an interesting therapeutic approach, and the proteases neprilysin (NEP, insulysin and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP are of particular interest. The aim of this project was to establish and characterize a simple in vitro model to study the degrading effects of these proteases. Organoytpic brain vibrosections (120 µm thick were sectioned from adult (9 month old wildtype and transgenic mice (expressing amyloid precursor protein (APP harboring the Swedish K670N/M671L, Dutch E693Q, and Iowa D694N mutations; APP_SDI and cultured for 2 weeks. Plaques were stained by immunohistochemistry for beta-amyloid and Thioflavin S. Our data show that plaques were evident in 2 week old cultures from 9 month old transgenic mice. These plaques were surrounded by reactive GFAP+ astroglia and Iba1+ microglia. Incubation of fresh slices for 2 weeks with 1-0.1-0.01 µg/ml of NEP, insulysin, MMP-2 or MMP-9 showed that NEP, insulysin and MMP-9 markedly degradeded beta-amyloid plaques but only at the highest concentration. Our data provide for the first time a potent and powerful living brain vibrosection model containing a high number of plaques, which allows to rapidly and simply study the degradation and clearance of beta-amyloid plaques in vitro.

  15. Beta-amyloid peptides undergo regulated co-secretion with neuropeptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters.

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    Toneff, Thomas; Funkelstein, Lydiane; Mosier, Charles; Abagyan, Armen; Ziegler, Michael; Hook, Vivian

    2013-08-01

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides are secreted from neurons, resulting in extracellular accumulation of Aβ and neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's disease. Because neuronal secretion is fundamental for the release of neurotransmitters, this study assessed the hypothesis that Aβ undergoes co-release with neurotransmitters. Model neuronal-like chromaffin cells were investigated, and results illustrate regulated, co-secretion of Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) with peptide neurotransmitters (galanin, enkephalin, and NPY) and catecholamine neurotransmitters (dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine). Regulated secretion from chromaffin cells was stimulated by KCl depolarization and nicotine. Forskolin, stimulating cAMP, also induced co-secretion of Aβ peptides with peptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters. These data suggested the co-localization of Aβ with neurotransmitters in dense core secretory vesicles (DCSV) that store and secrete such chemical messengers. Indeed, Aβ was demonstrated to be present in DCSV with neuropeptide and catecholamine transmitters. Furthermore, the DCSV organelle contains APP and its processing proteases, β- and γ-secretases, that are necessary for production of Aβ. Thus, Aβ can be generated in neurotransmitter-containing DCSV. Human IMR32 neuroblastoma cells also displayed regulated secretion of Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) with the galanin neurotransmitter. These findings illustrate that Aβ peptides are present in neurotransmitter-containing DCSV, and undergo co-secretion with neuropeptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters that regulate brain functions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Resveratrol and Amyloid-Beta: Mechanistic Insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongming Jia

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The amyloid-beta (Aβ hypothesis that dyshomeostasis between Aβ production and clearance is a very early, key molecular factor in the etiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD has been proposed and examined in the AD research field. Scientists have focused on seeking natural products or drugs to influence the dynamic equilibrium of Aβ, targeting production and clearance of Aβ. There is emerging evidence that resveratrol (Res, a naturally occurring polyphenol mainly found in grapes and red wine, acts on AD in numerous in vivo and in vitro models. Res decreases the amyloidogenic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP, enhances clearance of amyloid beta-peptides, and reduces Aβ aggregation. Moreover, Res also protects neuronal functions through its antioxidant properties. This review discusses the action of Res on Aβ production, clearance and aggregation and multiple potential mechanisms, providing evidence of the useful of Res for AD treatment.

  17. Metabolic Characterization of Intact Cells Reveals Intracellular Amyloid Beta but Not Its Precursor Protein to Reduce Mitochondrial Respiration

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    Schaefer, Patrick M.; von Einem, Bjoern; Walther, Paul; Calzia, Enrico; von Arnim, Christine A. F.

    2016-01-01

    One hallmark of Alzheimer´s disease are senile plaques consisting of amyloid beta (Aβ), which derives from the processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer´s disease and both Aβ and APP have been reported to affect mitochondrial function in isolated systems. However, in intact cells, considering a physiological localization of APP and Aβ, it is pending what triggers the mitochondrial defect. Thus, the aim of this study was to dissect the impact of APP versus Aβ in inducing mitochondrial alterations with respect to their subcellular localization. We performed an overexpression of APP or beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), increasing APP and Aβ levels or Aβ alone, respectively. Conducting a comprehensive metabolic characterization we demonstrate that only APP overexpression reduced mitochondrial respiration, despite lower extracellular Aβ levels compared to BACE overexpression. Surprisingly, this could be rescued by a gamma secretase inhibitor, oppositionally indicating an Aβ-mediated mitochondrial toxicity. Analyzing Aβ localization revealed that intracellular levels of Aβ and an increased spatial association of APP/Aβ with mitochondria are associated with reduced mitochondrial respiration. Thus, our data provide marked evidence for a prominent role of intracellular Aβ accumulation in Alzheimer´s disease associated mitochondrial dysfunction. Thereby it highlights the importance of the localization of APP processing and intracellular transport as a decisive factor for mitochondrial function, linking two prominent hallmarks of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28005987

  18. Loss of function of ATXN1 increases amyloid beta-protein levels by potentiating beta-secretase processing of beta-amyloid precursor protein.

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    Zhang, Can; Browne, Andrew; Child, Daniel; Divito, Jason R; Stevenson, Jesse A; Tanzi, Rudolph E

    2010-03-19

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease with complex and strong genetic inheritance. Four genes have been established to either cause familial early onset AD (APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2) or to increase susceptibility for late onset AD (APOE). To date approximately 80% of the late onset AD genetic variance remains elusive. Recently our genome-wide association screen identified four novel late onset AD candidate genes. Ataxin 1 (ATXN1) is one of these four AD candidate genes and has been indicated to be the disease gene for spinocerebellar ataxia type 1, which is also a neurodegenerative disease. Mounting evidence suggests that the excessive accumulation of Abeta, the proteolytic product of beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP), is the primary AD pathological event. In this study, we ask whether ATXN1 may lead to AD pathogenesis by affecting Abeta and APP processing utilizing RNA interference in a human neuronal cell model and mouse primary cortical neurons. We show that knock-down of ATXN1 significantly increases the levels of both Abeta40 and Abeta42. This effect could be rescued with concurrent overexpression of ATXN1. Moreover, overexpression of ATXN1 decreased Abeta levels. Regarding the underlying molecular mechanism, we show that the effect of ATXN1 expression on Abeta levels is modulated via beta-secretase cleavage of APP. Taken together, ATXN1 functions as a genetic risk modifier that contributes to AD pathogenesis through a loss-of-function mechanism by regulating beta-secretase cleavage of APP and Abeta levels.

  19. New Insights in the Amyloid-Beta Interaction with Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Spuch

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biochemical and morphological alterations of mitochondria may play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Particularly, mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of amyloid-beta-induced neuronal toxicity in Alzheimer’s disease. The recent emphasis on the intracellular biology of amyloid-beta and its precursor protein (APP has led researchers to consider the possibility that mitochondria-associated and mitochondrial amyloid-beta may directly cause neurotoxicity. Both proteins are known to localize to mitochondrial membranes, block the transport of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins to mitochondria, interact with mitochondrial proteins, disrupt the electron transport chain, increase reactive oxygen species production, cause mitochondrial damage, and prevent neurons from functioning normally. In this paper, we will outline current knowledge of the intracellular localization of amyloid-beta. Moreover, we summarize evidence from AD postmortem brain as well as animal AD models showing that amyloid-beta triggers mitochondrial dysfunction through a number of pathways such as impairment of oxidative phosphorylation, elevation of reactive oxygen species production, alteration of mitochondrial dynamics, and interaction with mitochondrial proteins. Thus, this paper supports the Alzheimer cascade mitochondrial hypothesis such as the most important early events in this disease, and probably one of the future strategies on the therapy of this neurodegenerative disease.

  20. {beta} - amyloid imaging probes

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    Jeong, Jae Min [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Imaging distribution of {beta} - amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease is very important for early and accurate diagnosis. Early trial of the {beta} -amyloid plaques includes using radiolabeled peptides which can be only applied for peripheral {beta} - amyloid plaques due to limited penetration through the blood brain barrier (BBB). Congo red or Chrysamine G derivatives were labeled with Tc-99m for imaging {beta} - amyloid plaques of Alzheimer patient's brain without success due to problem with BBB penetration. Thioflavin T derivatives gave breakthrough for {beta} - amyloid imaging in vivo, and a benzothiazole derivative [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 brought a great success. Many other benzothiazole, benzoxazole, benzofuran, imidazopyridine, and styrylbenzene derivatives have been labeled with F-18 and I-123 to improve the imaging quality. However, [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 still remains as the best. However, short half-life of C-11 is a limitation of wide distribution of this agent. So, it is still required to develop an Tc-99m, F-18 or I-123 labeled agent for {beta} - amyloid imaging agent.

  1. First demonstration of cerebrospinal fluid and plasma A beta lowering with oral administration of a beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 inhibitor in nonhuman primates.

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    Sankaranarayanan, Sethu; Holahan, Marie A; Colussi, Dennis; Crouthamel, Ming-Chih; Devanarayan, Viswanath; Ellis, Joan; Espeseth, Amy; Gates, Adam T; Graham, Samuel L; Gregro, Allison R; Hazuda, Daria; Hochman, Jerome H; Holloway, Katharine; Jin, Lixia; Kahana, Jason; Lai, Ming-tain; Lineberger, Janet; McGaughey, Georgia; Moore, Keith P; Nantermet, Philippe; Pietrak, Beth; Price, Eric A; Rajapakse, Hemaka; Stauffer, Shaun; Steinbeiser, Melissa A; Seabrook, Guy; Selnick, Harold G; Shi, Xiao-Ping; Stanton, Matthew G; Swestock, John; Tugusheva, Katherine; Tyler, Keala X; Vacca, Joseph P; Wong, Jacky; Wu, Guoxin; Xu, Min; Cook, Jacquelynn J; Simon, Adam J

    2009-01-01

    beta-Site amyloid precursor protein (APP)-cleaving enzyme (BACE) 1 cleavage of amyloid precursor protein is an essential step in the generation of the potentially neurotoxic and amyloidogenic A beta 42 peptides in Alzheimer's disease. Although previous mouse studies have shown brain A beta lowering after BACE1 inhibition, extension of such studies to nonhuman primates or man was precluded by poor potency, brain penetration, and pharmacokinetics of available inhibitors. In this study, a novel tertiary carbinamine BACE1 inhibitor, tertiary carbinamine (TC)-1, was assessed in a unique cisterna magna ported rhesus monkey model, where the temporal dynamics of A beta in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma could be evaluated. TC-1, a potent inhibitor (IC(50) approximately 0.4 nM), has excellent passive membrane permeability, low susceptibility to P-glycoprotein transport, and lowered brain A beta levels in a mouse model. Intravenous infusion of TC-1 led to a significant but transient lowering of CSF and plasma A beta levels in conscious rhesus monkeys because it underwent CYP3A4-mediated metabolism. Oral codosing of TC-1 with ritonavir, a potent CYP3A4 inhibitor, twice daily over 3.5 days in rhesus monkeys led to sustained plasma TC-1 exposure and a significant and sustained reduction in CSF sAPP beta, A beta 40, A beta 42, and plasma A beta 40 levels. CSF A beta 42 lowering showed an EC(50) of approximately 20 nM with respect to the CSF [TC-1] levels, demonstrating excellent concordance with its potency in a cell-based assay. These results demonstrate the first in vivo proof of concept of CSF A beta lowering after oral administration of a BACE1 inhibitor in a nonhuman primate.

  2. Amyloidsecretion, generation, and lysosomal sequestration in response to proteasome inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agholme, Lotta; Hallbeck, Martin; Benedikz, Eirikur

    2012-01-01

    , as the autophagosome has been suggested as a site of amyloid-β (Aβ) generation. In this study, we investigated the effect of proteasome inhibition on Aβ accumulation and secretion, as well as the processing of amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) in AβPP(Swe) transfected SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. We show...

  3. Arf6 controls beta-amyloid production by regulating macropinocytosis of the Amyloid Precursor Protein to lysosomes.

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    Tang, Weihao; Tam, Joshua H K; Seah, Claudia; Chiu, Justin; Tyrer, Andrea; Cregan, Sean P; Meakin, Susan O; Pasternak, Stephen H

    2015-07-14

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the deposition of Beta-Amyloid (Aβ) peptides in the brain. Aβ peptides are generated by cleavage of the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) by the β - and γ - secretase enzymes. Although this process is tightly linked to the internalization of cell surface APP, the compartments responsible are not well defined. We have found that APP can be rapidly internalized from the cell surface to lysosomes, bypassing early and late endosomes. Here we show by confocal microscopy and electron microscopy that this pathway is mediated by macropinocytosis. APP internalization is enhanced by antibody binding/crosslinking of APP suggesting that APP may function as a receptor. Furthermore, a dominant negative mutant of Arf6 blocks direct transport of APP to lysosomes, but does not affect classical endocytosis to endosomes. Arf6 expression increases through the hippocampus with the development of Alzheimer's disease, being expressed mostly in the CA1 and CA2 regions in normal individuals but spreading through the CA3 and CA4 regions in individuals with pathologically diagnosed AD. Disruption of lysosomal transport of APP reduces both Aβ40 and Aβ42 production by more than 30 %. Our findings suggest that the lysosome is an important site for Aβ production and that altering APP trafficking represents a viable strategy to reduce Aβ production.

  4. Characterization of amyloid beta peptides from brain extracts of transgenic mice overexpressing the London mutant of human amyloid precursor protein.

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    Pype, Stefan; Moechars, Dieder; Dillen, Lieve; Mercken, Marc

    2003-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is marked by the presence of neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid plaques in the brain of patients. To study plaque formation, we report on further quantitative and qualitative analysis of human and mouse amyloid beta peptides (Abeta) from brain extracts of transgenic mice overexpressing the London mutant of human amyloid precursor protein (APP). Using enzyme-linked immunosorbant assays (ELISAs) specific for either human or rodent Abeta, we found that the peptides from both species aggregated to form plaques. The ratios of deposited Abeta1-42/1-40 were in the order of 2-3 for human and 8-9 for mouse peptides, indicating preferential deposition of Abeta42. We also determined the identity and relative levels of other Abeta variants present in protein extracts from soluble and insoluble brain fractions. This was done by combined immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry (IP/MS). The most prominent peptides truncated either at the carboxyl- or the amino-terminus were Abeta1-38 and Abeta11-42, respectively, and the latter was strongly enriched in the extracts of deposited peptides. Taken together, our data indicate that plaques of APP-London transgenic mice consist of aggregates of multiple human and mouse Abeta variants, and the human variants that we identified were previously detected in brain extracts of AD patients.

  5. Generation of the beta-amyloid peptide and the amyloid precursor protein C-terminal fragment gamma are potentiated by FE65L1.

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    Chang, Yang; Tesco, Giuseppina; Jeong, William J; Lindsley, Loren; Eckman, Elizabeth A; Eckman, Christopher B; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Guénette, Suzanne Y

    2003-12-19

    Members of the FE65 family of adaptor proteins, FE65, FE65L1, and FE65L2, bind the C-terminal region of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Overexpression of FE65 and FE65L1 was previously reported to increase the levels of alpha-secretase-derived APP (APPs alpha). Increased beta-amyloid (A beta) generation was also observed in cells showing the FE65-dependent increase in APPs alpha. To understand the mechanism for the observed increase in both A beta and APPs alpha given that alpha-secretase cleavage of a single APP molecule precludes A beta generation, we examined the effects of FE65L1 overexpression on APP C-terminal fragments (APP CTFs). Our data show that FE65L1 potentiates gamma-secretase processing of APP CTFs, including the amyloidogenic CTF C99, accounting for the ability of FE65L1 to increase generation of APP C-terminal domain and A beta 40. The FE65L1 modulation of these processing events requires binding of FE65L1 to APP and APP CTFs and is not because of a direct effect on gamma-secretase activity, because Notch intracellular domain generation is not altered by FE65L1. Furthermore, enhanced APP CTF processing can be detected in early endosome vesicles but not in endoplasmic reticulum or Golgi membranes, suggesting that the effects of FE65L1 occur at or near the plasma membrane. Finally, although FE65L1 increases APP C-terminal domain production, it does not mediate the APP-dependent transcriptional activation observed with FE65.

  6. Amyloid beta precursor protein regulates male sexual behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Ho; Bonthius, Paul J; Tsai, Houng-Wei; Bekiranov, Stefan; Rissman, Emilie F

    2010-07-28

    Sexual behavior is variable between individuals, ranging from celibacy to sexual addictions. Within normal populations of individual men, ranging from young to middle aged, testosterone levels do not correlate with libido. To study the genetic mechanisms that contribute to individual differences in male sexual behavior, we used hybrid B6D2F1 male mice, which are a cross between two common inbred strains (C57BL/6J and DBA/2J). Unlike most laboratory rodent species in which male sexual behavior is highly dependent upon gonadal steroids, sexual behavior in a large proportion of these hybrid male mice after castration is independent of gonadal steroid hormones and their receptors; thus, we have the ability to discover novel genes involved in this behavior. Gene expression arrays, validation of gene candidates, and transgenic mice that overexpress one of the genes of interest were used to reveal genes involved in maintenance of male sexual behavior. Several genes related to neuroprotection and neurodegeneration were differentially expressed in the hypothalamus of males that continued to mate after castration. Male mice overexpressing the human form of one of these candidate genes, amyloid beta precursor protein (APP), displayed enhanced sexual behavior before castration and maintained sexual activity for a longer duration after castration compared with controls. Our results reveal a novel and unexpected relationship between APP and male sexual behavior. We speculate that declining APP during normal aging in males may contribute to the loss of sexual function.

  7. Caspase activation increases beta-amyloid generation independently of caspase cleavage of the beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesco, Giuseppina; Koh, Young Ho; Tanzi, Rudolph E

    2003-11-14

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) undergoes "alternative" proteolysis mediated by caspases. Three major caspase recognition sites have been identified in the APP, i.e. one at the C terminus (Asp720) and two at the N terminus (Asp197 and Asp219). Caspase cleavage at Asp720 has been suggested as leading to increased production of Abeta. Thus, we set out to determine which putative caspase sites in APP, if any, are cleaved in Chinese hamster ovary cell lines concurrently with the increased Abeta production that occurs during apoptosis. We found that cleavage at Asp720 occurred concurrently with caspase 3 activation and the increased production of total secreted Abeta and Abeta1-42 in association with staurosporine- and etoposide-induced apoptosis. To investigate the contribution of caspase cleavage of APP to Abeta generation, we expressed an APP mutant truncated at Asp720 that mimics APP caspase cleavage at the C-terminal site. This did not increase Abeta generation but, in contrast, dramatically decreased Abeta production in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Furthermore, the ablation of caspase-dependent cleavage at Asp720, Asp197, and Asp219 (by site-directed mutagenesis) did not prevent enhanced Abeta production following etoposide-induced apoptosis. These findings indicate that the enhanced Abeta generation associated with apoptosis does not require cleavage of APP at its C-terminal (Asp720) and/or N-terminal caspase sites.

  8. Reduced amyloidogenic processing of the amyloid beta-protein precursor by the small-molecule Differentiation Inducing Factor-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myre, Michael A; Washicosky, Kevin; Moir, Robert D; Tesco, Giuseppina; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Wasco, Wilma

    2009-04-01

    The detection of cell cycle proteins in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains may represent an early event leading to neurodegeneration. To identify cell cycle modifiers with anti-Abeta properties, we assessed the effect of Differentiation-Inducing Factor-1 (DIF-1), a unique, small-molecule from Dictyostelium discoideum, on the proteolysis of the amyloid beta-protein precursor (APP) in a variety of different cell types. We show that DIF-1 slows cell cycle progression through G0/G1 that correlates with a reduction in cyclin D1 protein levels. Western blot analysis of DIF-treated cells and conditioned medium revealed decreases in the levels of secreted APP, mature APP, and C-terminal fragments. Assessment of conditioned media by sandwich ELISA showed reduced levels of Abeta40 and Abeta42, also demonstrating that treatment with DIF-1 effectively decreases the ratio of Abeta42 to Abeta40. In addition, DIF-1 significantly diminished APP phosphorylation at residue T668. Interestingly, site-directed mutagenesis of APP residue Thr668 to alanine or glutamic acid abolished the effect of DIF-1 on APP proteolysis and restored secreted levels of Abeta. Finally, DIF-1 prevented the accumulation of APP C-terminal fragments induced by the proteasome inhibitor lactacystin, and calpain inhibitor N-acetyl-leucyl-leucyl-norleucinal (ALLN). Our findings suggest that DIF-1 affects G0/G1-associated amyloidogenic processing of APP by a gamma-secretase-, proteasome- and calpain-insensitive pathway, and that this effect requires the presence of residue Thr668.

  9. The Golgi-Localized γ-Ear-Containing ARF-Binding (GGA Proteins Alter AmyloidPrecursor Protein (APP Processing through Interaction of Their GAE Domain with the Beta-Site APP Cleaving Enzyme 1 (BACE1.

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    Bjoern von Einem

    Full Text Available Proteolytic processing of amyloidprecursor protein (APP by beta-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1 is the initial step in the production of amyloid beta (Aβ, which accumulates in senile plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Essential for this cleavage is the transport and sorting of both proteins through endosomal/Golgi compartments. Golgi-localized γ-ear-containing ARF-binding (GGA proteins have striking cargo-sorting functions in these pathways. Recently, GGA1 and GGA3 were shown to interact with BACE1, to be expressed in neurons, and to be decreased in AD brain, whereas little is known about GGA2. Since GGA1 impacts Aβ generation by confining APP to the Golgi and perinuclear compartments, we tested whether all GGAs modulate BACE1 and APP transport and processing. We observed decreased levels of secreted APP alpha (sAPPα, sAPPβ, and Aβ upon GGA overexpression, which could be reverted by knockdown. GGA-BACE1 co-immunoprecipitation was impaired upon GGA-GAE but not VHS domain deletion. Autoinhibition of the GGA1-VHS domain was irrelevant for BACE1 interaction. Our data suggest that all three GGAs affect APP processing via the GGA-GAE domain.

  10. Towards Alzheimer's beta-amyloid vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel, D; Solomon, B

    2001-01-01

    Beta-amyloid pathology, the main hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD), has been linked to its conformational status and aggregation. We recently showed that site-directed monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) towards the N-terminal region of the human beta-amyloid peptide bind to preformed beta-amyloid fibrils (Abeta), leading to disaggregation and inhibition of their neurotoxic effect. Here we report the development of a novel immunization procedure to raise effective anti-aggregating amyloid beta-protein (AbetaP) antibodies, using as antigen filamentous phages displaying the only EFRH peptide found to be the epitope of these antibodies. Due to the high antigenicity of the phage no adjuvant is required to obtain high affinity anti-aggregating IgG antibodies in animals model, that exhibit identity to human AbetaP. Such antibodies are able to sequester peripheral AbetaP, thus avoiding passage through the blood brain barrier (BBB) and, as recently shown in a transgenic mouse model, to cross the BBB and dissolve already formed beta-amyloid plaques. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to use as a vaccine a self-anti-aggregating epitope displayed on a phage, and this may pave the way to treat abnormal accumulation-peptide diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease or other amyloidogenic diseases. Copyright 2001 The International Association for Biologicals.

  11. Lithium chloride increases the production of amyloid-beta peptide independently from its inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyt, Christine; Kienlen-Campard, Pascal; Leroy, Karelle; N'Kuli, Francisca; Courtoy, Pierre J; Brion, Jean-Pierre; Octave, Jean-Noël

    2005-09-30

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) is able to phosphorylate tau at many sites that are found to be phosphorylated in paired helical filaments in Alzheimer disease. Lithium chloride (LiCl) efficiently inhibits GSK3 and was recently reported to also decrease the production of amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta) from its precursor, the amyloid precursor protein. Therefore, lithium has been proposed as a combined therapeutic agent, inhibiting both the hyperphosphorylation of tau and the production of Abeta. Here, we demonstrate that the inhibition of GSK3 by LiCl induced the nuclear translocation of beta-catenin in Chinese hamster ovary cells and rat cultured neurons, in which a decrease in tau phosphorylation was observed. In both cellular models, a nontoxic concentration of LiCl increased the production of Abeta by increasing the beta-cleavage of amyloid precursor protein, generating more substrate for an unmodified gamma-secretase activity. SB415286, another GSK3 inhibitor, induced the nuclear translocation of beta-catenin and slightly decreased Abeta production. It is concluded that the LiCl-mediated increase in Abeta production is not related to GSK3 inhibition.

  12. Natural Modulators of Amyloid-Beta Precursor Protein Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Can; Tanzi, Rudolph E.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease and the primary cause of dementia, with no cure currently available. The pathogenesis of AD is believed to be primarily driven by Aβ, the principal component of senile plaques. Aβ is an ~4 kDa peptide generated from the amyloidprecursor protein (APP) through proteolytic secretases. Natural products, particularly those utilized in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), have a long history alleviating common clinical disorders, including dementia. However, the cell/molecular pathways mediated by these natural products are largely unknown until recently when the underlying molecular mechanisms of the disorders begin to be elucidated. Here, the mechanisms with which natural products modulate the pathogenesis of AD are discussed, in particular, by focusing on their roles in the processing of APP. PMID:22998566

  13. BETASCAN: probable beta-amyloids identified by pairwise probabilistic analysis.

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    Allen W Bryan

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Amyloids and prion proteins are clinically and biologically important beta-structures, whose supersecondary structures are difficult to determine by standard experimental or computational means. In addition, significant conformational heterogeneity is known or suspected to exist in many amyloid fibrils. Recent work has indicated the utility of pairwise probabilistic statistics in beta-structure prediction. We develop here a new strategy for beta-structure prediction, emphasizing the determination of beta-strands and pairs of beta-strands as fundamental units of beta-structure. Our program, BETASCAN, calculates likelihood scores for potential beta-strands and strand-pairs based on correlations observed in parallel beta-sheets. The program then determines the strands and pairs with the greatest local likelihood for all of the sequence's potential beta-structures. BETASCAN suggests multiple alternate folding patterns and assigns relative a priori probabilities based solely on amino acid sequence, probability tables, and pre-chosen parameters. The algorithm compares favorably with the results of previous algorithms (BETAPRO, PASTA, SALSA, TANGO, and Zyggregator in beta-structure prediction and amyloid propensity prediction. Accurate prediction is demonstrated for experimentally determined amyloid beta-structures, for a set of known beta-aggregates, and for the parallel beta-strands of beta-helices, amyloid-like globular proteins. BETASCAN is able both to detect beta-strands with higher sensitivity and to detect the edges of beta-strands in a richly beta-like sequence. For two proteins (Abeta and Het-s, there exist multiple sets of experimental data implying contradictory structures; BETASCAN is able to detect each competing structure as a potential structure variant. The ability to correlate multiple alternate beta-structures to experiment opens the possibility of computational investigation of prion strains and structural heterogeneity of amyloid

  14. Increased KPI containing amyloid precursor protein in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilin, Orit; Karussis, Dimitrios M; Korczyn, Amos D; Gurwitz, David; Aronovich, Ramona; Mizrachi-Kol, Rachel; Chapman, Joab

    2007-04-16

    Amyloid precursor protein can be translated from three alternatively spliced mRNAs. We measured levels of amyloid precursor protein isoforms containing the Kunitz protease inhibitor domain (KPIAPP), and amyloid precursor protein without the Kunitz protease inhibitor domain (KPIAPP) in brain homogenates of acute experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice. At the preclinical phase of the disease, both KPIAPP and KPIAPP levels were significantly higher in homogenates from brains of autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice, whereas at the acute phase of the disease only KPIAPP remained significantly elevated compared with controls. At the recovery phase, no differences were observed between the groups. The early and isoform-specific elevation of KPIAPP in autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice suggests a possible role for amyloid precursor protein in the immune response mediating the disease.

  15. Regulation of amyloid precursor protein processing by its KFERQ motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Seon; Kim, Dong-Hou; Yoon, Seung-Yong

    2016-06-01

    Understanding of trafficking, processing, and degradation mechanisms of amyloid precursor protein (APP) is important because APP can be processed to produce β-amyloid (Aβ), a key pathogenic molecule in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we found that APP contains KFERQ motif at its C-terminus, a consensus sequence for chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) or microautophagy which are another types of autophagy for degradation of pathogenic molecules in neurodegenerative diseases. Deletion of KFERQ in APP increased C-terminal fragments (CTFs) and secreted N-terminal fragments of APP and kept it away from lysosomes. KFERQ deletion did not abolish the interaction of APP or its cleaved products with heat shock cognate protein 70 (Hsc70), a protein necessary for CMA or microautophagy. These findings suggest that KFERQ motif is important for normal processing and degradation of APP to preclude the accumulation of APP-CTFs although it may not be important for CMA or microautophagy. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(6): 337-342].

  16. Inhibition of Alzheimer amyloid {beta} aggregation by polyvalent trehalose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, Yoshiko; You, Chouga [School of Materials Science, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan); Ohnishi, Reiko [Department of Molecular Design and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)], E-mail: miuray@jaist.ac.jp

    2008-04-15

    A glycopolymer carrying trehalose was found to suppress the formation of amyloid fibrils from the amyloid {beta} peptide (1-42) (A{beta}), as evaluated by thioflavin T assay and atomic force microscopy. Glycopolymers carrying sugar alcohols also changed the aggregation properties of A{beta}, and the inhibitory effect depended on the type of sugar and alkyl side chain. Neutralization activity was confirmed by in vitro assay using HeLa cells. The glycopolymer carrying trehalose strongly inhibited amyloid formation and neutralized cytotoxicity.

  17. Characterization of the beta amyloid precursor protein-like gene in the central nervous system of the crab Chasmagnathus. Expression during memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fustiñana, Maria Sol; Ariel, Pablo; Federman, Noel; Freudenthal, Ramiro; Romano, Arturo

    2010-09-01

    Human β-amyloid, the main component in the neuritic plaques found in patients with Alzheimer's disease, is generated by cleavage of the β-amyloid precursor protein. Beyond the role in pathology, members of this protein family are synaptic proteins and have been associated with synaptogenesis, neuronal plasticity and memory, both in vertebrates and in invertebrates. Consolidation is necessary to convert a short-term labile memory to a long-term and stable form. During consolidation, gene expression and de novo protein synthesis are regulated in order to produce key proteins for the maintenance of plastic changes produced during the acquisition of new information. Here we partially cloned and sequenced the beta-amyloid precursor protein like gene homologue in the crab Chasmagnathus (cappl), showing a 37% of identity with the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster homologue and 23% with Homo sapiens but with much higher degree of sequence similarity in certain regions. We observed a wide distribution of cappl mRNA in the nervous system as well as in muscle and gills. The protein localized in all tissues analyzed with the exception of muscle. Immunofluorescence revealed localization of cAPPL in associative and sensory brain areas. We studied gene and protein expression during long-term memory consolidation using a well characterized memory model: the context-signal associative memory in this crab species. mRNA levels varied at different time points during long-term memory consolidation and correlated with cAPPL protein levels cAPPL mRNA and protein is widely distributed in the central nervous system of the crab and the time course of expression suggests a role of cAPPL during long-term memory formation.

  18. Hyperforin prevents beta-amyloid neurotoxicity and spatial memory impairments by disaggregation of Alzheimer's amyloid-beta-deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinamarca, M C; Cerpa, W; Garrido, J; Hancke, J L; Inestrosa, N C

    2006-11-01

    The major protein constituent of amyloid deposits in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta). In the present work, we have determined the effect of hyperforin an acylphloroglucinol compound isolated from Hypericum perforatum (St John's Wort), on Abeta-induced spatial memory impairments and on Abeta neurotoxicity. We report here that hyperforin: (1) decreases amyloid deposit formation in rats injected with amyloid fibrils in the hippocampus; (2) decreases the neuropathological changes and behavioral impairments in a rat model of amyloidosis; (3) prevents Abeta-induced neurotoxicity in hippocampal neurons both from amyloid fibrils and Abeta oligomers, avoiding the increase in reactive oxidative species associated with amyloid toxicity. Both effects could be explained by the capacity of hyperforin to disaggregate amyloid deposits in a dose and time-dependent manner and to decrease Abeta aggregation and amyloid formation. Altogether these evidences suggest that hyperforin may be useful to decrease amyloid burden and toxicity in AD patients, and may be a putative therapeutic agent to fight the disease.

  19. Fetzima (levomilnacipran), a drug for major depressive disorder as a dual inhibitor for human serotonin transporters and beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Syed Mohd Danish; Shaikh, Sibhghatulla; Khan, Mahiuddin; Biswas, Deboshree; Hameed, Nida; Shakil, Shazi

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacological management of Major Depressive Disorder includes the use of serotonin reuptake inhibitors which targets serotonin transporters (SERT) to increase the synaptic concentrations of serotonin. Beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme-1 (BACE-1) is responsible for amyloid β plaque formation. Hence it is an interesting target for Alzheimer's disease (AD) therapy. This study describes molecular interactions of a new Food and Drug Administration approved antidepressant drug named 'Fetzima' with BACE-1 and SERT. Fetzima is chemically known as levomilnacipran. The study has explored a possible link between the treatment of Depression and AD. 'Autodock 4.2' was used for docking study. The free energy of binding (ΔG) values for 'levomilnacipran-SERT' interaction and 'levomilnacipran-BACE1' interaction were found to be -7.47 and -8.25 kcal/mol, respectively. Levomilnacipran was found to interact with S438, known to be the most important amino acid residue of serotonin binding site of SERT during 'levomilnacipran-SERT' interaction. In the case of 'levomilnacipran-BACE1' interaction, levomilnacipran interacted with two very crucial aspartic acid residues of BACE-1, namely, D32 and D228. These residues are accountable for the cleavage of amyloid precursor protein and the subsequent formation of amyloid β plaques in AD brain. Hence, Fetzima (levomilnacipran) might act as a potent dual inhibitor of SERT and BACE-1 and expected to form the basis of a future dual therapy against depression and AD. It is an established fact that development of AD is associated with Major Depressive Disorder. Therefore, the design of new BACE-1 inhibitors based on antidepressant drug scaffolds would be particularly beneficial.

  20. A single amino acid difference between the intracellular domains of amyloid precursor protein and amyloid-like precursor protein 2 enables induction of synaptic depression and block of long-term potentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trillaud-Doppia, Emilie; Paradis-Isler, Nicolas; Boehm, Jannic

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is initially characterized as a disease of the synapse that affects synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity. While amyloid-beta and tau have been traditionally implicated in causing AD, recent studies suggest that other factors, such as the intracellular domain of the amyloid-precursor protein (APP-ICD), can also play a role in the development of AD. Here, we show that the expression of APP-ICD induces synaptic depression, while the intracellular domain of its homolog amyloid-like precursor protein 2 (APLP2-ICD) does not. We are able to show that this effect by APP-ICD is due to a single alanine vs. proline difference between APP-ICD and APLP2-ICD. The alanine in APP-ICD and the proline in APLP2-ICD lie directly behind a conserved caspase cleavage site. Inhibition of caspase cleavage of APP-ICD prevents the induction of synaptic depression. Finally, we show that the expression of APP-ICD increases and facilitates long-term depression and blocks induction of long-term potentiation. The block in long-term potentiation can be overcome by mutating the aforementioned alanine in APP-ICD to the proline of APLP2. Based on our results, we propose the emergence of a new APP critical domain for the regulation of synaptic plasticity and in consequence for the development of AD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Characterization of the beta amyloid precursor protein-like gene in the central nervous system of the crab Chasmagnathus. Expression during memory consolidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fustiñana Maria

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human β-amyloid, the main component in the neuritic plaques found in patients with Alzheimer's disease, is generated by cleavage of the β-amyloid precursor protein. Beyond the role in pathology, members of this protein family are synaptic proteins and have been associated with synaptogenesis, neuronal plasticity and memory, both in vertebrates and in invertebrates. Consolidation is necessary to convert a short-term labile memory to a long-term and stable form. During consolidation, gene expression and de novo protein synthesis are regulated in order to produce key proteins for the maintenance of plastic changes produced during the acquisition of new information. Results Here we partially cloned and sequenced the beta-amyloid precursor protein like gene homologue in the crab Chasmagnathus (cappl, showing a 37% of identity with the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster homologue and 23% with Homo sapiens but with much higher degree of sequence similarity in certain regions. We observed a wide distribution of cappl mRNA in the nervous system as well as in muscle and gills. The protein localized in all tissues analyzed with the exception of muscle. Immunofluorescence revealed localization of cAPPL in associative and sensory brain areas. We studied gene and protein expression during long-term memory consolidation using a well characterized memory model: the context-signal associative memory in this crab species. mRNA levels varied at different time points during long-term memory consolidation and correlated with cAPPL protein levels Conclusions cAPPL mRNA and protein is widely distributed in the central nervous system of the crab and the time course of expression suggests a role of cAPPL during long-term memory formation.

  2. Glycation induces formation of amyloid cross-beta structure in albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouma, Barend; Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M J; Wu, Ya-Ping; Brünjes, Bettina; Posthuma, George; Kranenburg, Onno; de Groot, Philip G; Voest, Emile E; Gebbink, Martijn F B G

    2003-10-24

    Amyloid fibrils are components of proteinaceous plaques that are associated with conformational diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, and familial amyloidosis. Amyloid polypeptides share a specific quarternary structure element known as cross-beta structure. Commonly, fibrillar aggregates are modified by advanced glycation end products (AGE). In addition, AGE formation itself induces protein aggregation. Both amyloid proteins and protein-AGE adducts bind multiligand receptors, such as receptor for AGE, CD36, and scavenger receptors A and B type I, and the serine protease tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA). Based on these observations, we hypothesized that glycation induces refolding of globular proteins, accompanied by formation of cross-beta structure. Using transmission electron microscopy, we demonstrate here that glycated albumin condensates into fibrous or amorphous aggregates. These aggregates bind to amyloid-specific dyes Congo red and thioflavin T and to tPA. In contrast to globular albumin, glycated albumin contains amino acid residues in beta-sheet conformation, as measured with circular dichroism spectropolarimetry. Moreover, it displays cross-beta structure, as determined with x-ray fiber diffraction. We conclude that glycation induces refolding of initially globular albumin into amyloid fibrils comprising cross-beta structure. This would explain how glycated ligands and amyloid ligands can bind to the same multiligand "cross-beta structure" receptors and to tPA.

  3. Development and characterization of a TAPIR-like mouse monoclonal antibody to amyloid-beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Hara, Hideo; Makifuchi, Takao; Tabira, Takeshi

    2008-06-01

    Tissue amyloid plaque immuno-reactive (TAPIR) antibody was better related to the effect of immunotherapy in Alzheimer's disease (AD) than ELISA antibody. Here we used a hybridoma technique to develop a TAPIR-like anti-human amyloid-beta (Abeta) mouse monoclonal antibody. The obtained monoclonal antibody, 3.4A10, was an IgG2b isotype and recognized N-terminal portion of Abeta1-42 without binding denatured or native amyloid-beta protein precursor. It had higher affinity to Abeta1-42 than to Abeta1-40 by Biacore affinity analysis and stained preferably the peripheral part of senile plaques and recognized the plaque core less than 4G8. It inhibited the Abeta1-42 fibril formation as well as degraded pre-aggregated Abeta1-42 peptide in a thioflavin T fluorescence spectrophotometry assay. The in vivo studies showed that 3.4A10 treatment decreased amyloid burden compared to the control group and significantly reduced Abeta42 levels rather than Abeta40 levels in brain lysates as well as the Abeta*56 oligomer (12mer) in TBS fraction of the brain lysates. 3.4A10 entered brain and decorated some plaques, which is surrounded by more Iba1-positive microglia. 3.4A10 therapy did not induce lymphocytic infiltration and obvious increase in microhemorrhage. We conclude that 3.4A10 is a TAPIR-like anti-human amyloid monoclonal antibody, and has a potential of therapeutic application for AD.

  4. Chaperones ameliorate beta cell dysfunction associated with human islet amyloid polypeptide overexpression.

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    Lisa Cadavez

    Full Text Available In type 2 diabetes, beta-cell dysfunction is thought to be due to several causes, one being the formation of toxic protein aggregates called islet amyloid, formed by accumulations of misfolded human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP. The process of hIAPP misfolding and aggregation is one of the factors that may activate the unfolded protein response (UPR, perturbing endoplasmic reticulum (ER homeostasis. Molecular chaperones have been described to be important in regulating ER response to ER stress. In the present work, we evaluate the role of chaperones in a stressed cellular model of hIAPP overexpression. A rat pancreatic beta-cell line expressing hIAPP exposed to thapsigargin or treated with high glucose and palmitic acid, both of which are known ER stress inducers, showed an increase in ER stress genes when compared to INS1E cells expressing rat IAPP or INS1E control cells. Treatment with molecular chaperone glucose-regulated protein 78 kDa (GRP78, also known as BiP or protein disulfite isomerase (PDI, and chemical chaperones taurine-conjugated ursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA or 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA, alleviated ER stress and increased insulin secretion in hIAPP-expressing cells. Our results suggest that the overexpression of hIAPP induces a stronger response of ER stress markers. Moreover, endogenous and chemical chaperones are able to ameliorate induced ER stress and increase insulin secretion, suggesting that improving chaperone capacity can play an important role in improving beta-cell function in type 2 diabetes.

  5. Anti-amyloid treatments in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapra, Mamta; Kim, Kye Y

    2009-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease is one of the most challenging threats to the healthcare system in society. One of the main characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology is formation of amyloid plaques from accumulation of amyloid beta peptide. The therapeutic agents that are currently available for AD including acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AchEIs) and the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist are focused on improving the symptoms and do not revert the progression of the disease. This limitation coupled with the burgeoning increase in the prevalence of AD and resultant impact on healthcare economics calls for more substantial treatments for AD. According to the leading amyloid hypothesis, cleavage of amyloid precursor protein to release amyloid beta peptide is the critical event in pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Recently treatment strategies have been focused on modifying the formation, clearance and accumulation of neurotoxic amyloid beta peptide. This article reviews different therapeutic approaches that have been investigated to target amyloid beta ranging from secretase modulators, antiaggregation agents to amyloid immunotherapy. Authors review the different novel drugs which are in clinical trials.

  6. Intracellular trafficking of the β-secretase and processing of amyloid precursor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Pei; Chia, Pei Zhi Cheryl; Chia, Cheryl; Gleeson, Paul A

    2011-09-01

    The main component of the amyloid plaques found in the brains of those with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a polymerized form of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) and is considered to play a central role in the pathogenesis of this neurodegenerative disorder. Aβ is derived from the proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Beta site APP-cleaving enzyme, BACE1 (also known as β-secretase) is a membrane-bound aspartyl protease responsible for the initial step in the generation of Aβ peptide and is thus a prime target for therapeutic intervention. Substantive evidence now indicates that the processing of APP by BACE1 is regulated by the intracellular sorting of the enzyme and, moreover, perturbations in these intracellular trafficking pathways have been linked to late-onset AD. In this review, we highlight the recent advances in the understanding of the regulation of the intracellular sorting of BACE1 and APP and illustrate why the trafficking of these cargos represent a key issue for understanding the membrane-mediated events associated with the generation of the neurotoxic Aβ products in AD. Copyright © 2011 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Blood-brain barrier dysfunction and amyloid precursor protein accumulation in microvascular compartment following ischemia-reperfusion brain injury with 1-year survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluta, R

    2003-01-01

    This study examined the late microvascular consequences of brain ischemia due to cardiac arrest in rats. In reacted vibratome sections scattered foci of extravasated horseradish peroxidase were noted throughout the brain and did not appear to be restricted to any specific area of brain. Ultrastructural investigation of leaky sites frequently presented platelets adhering to the endothelium of venules and capillaries. Endothelial cells demonstrated pathological changes with evidence of perivascular astrocytic swelling. At the same time, we noted C-terminal of amyloid precursor protein/beta-amyloid peptide (CAPP/betaA) deposits in cerebral blood vessels, with a halo of CAPP/betaA immunoreactivity in the surrounding parenchyma suggested diffusion of CAPP/betaA out of the vascular compartment. Changes predominated in the hippocampus, cerebral and entorhinal cortex, corpus callosum, thalamus, basal ganglia and around the lateral ventricles. These data implicate delayed abnormal endothelial function of vessels following ischemia-reperfusion brain injury as a primary event in the pathogenesis of the recurrent cerebral infarction.

  8. Lowering beta-amyloid levels rescues learning and memory in a Down syndrome mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J Netzer

    Full Text Available beta-amyloid levels are elevated in Down syndrome (DS patients throughout life and are believed to cause Alzheimer's disease (AD in adult members of this population. However, it is not known if beta-amyloid contributes to intellectual disability in younger individuals. We used a gamma-secretase inhibitor to lower beta-amyloid levels in young mice that model DS. This treatment corrected learning deficits characteristic of these mice, suggesting that beta-amyloid-lowering therapies might improve cognitive function in young DS patients.

  9. Beta-amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice that harbor diffuse A beta deposits but do not form plaques show increased ischemic vulnerability: role of inflammation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koistinaho, M.; Kettunen, M. I.; Goldsteins, G.; Keinänen, R.; Salminen, A.; Ort, Michael; Bureš, Jan; Liu, D.; Kauppinen, R. A.; Higgins, L. S.; Koistinaho, J.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 99, č. 3 (2002), s. 1610-1615 ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/00/1656 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : Beta-amyloid * Alzheimer disease * brain ischemia Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 10.701, year: 2002

  10. Amyloid fibril formation from sequences of a natural beta-structured fibrous protein, the adenovirus fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolopoulou, Katerina; Schoehn, Guy; Forge, Vincent; Forsyth, V Trevor; Riekel, Christian; Hernandez, Jean-François; Ruigrok, Rob W H; Mitraki, Anna

    2005-01-28

    Amyloid fibrils are fibrous beta-structures that derive from abnormal folding and assembly of peptides and proteins. Despite a wealth of structural studies on amyloids, the nature of the amyloid structure remains elusive; possible connections to natural, beta-structured fibrous motifs have been suggested. In this work we focus on understanding amyloid structure and formation from sequences of a natural, beta-structured fibrous protein. We show that short peptides (25 to 6 amino acids) corresponding to repetitive sequences from the adenovirus fiber shaft have an intrinsic capacity to form amyloid fibrils as judged by electron microscopy, Congo Red binding, infrared spectroscopy, and x-ray fiber diffraction. In the presence of the globular C-terminal domain of the protein that acts as a trimerization motif, the shaft sequences adopt a triple-stranded, beta-fibrous motif. We discuss the possible structure and arrangement of these sequences within the amyloid fibril, as compared with the one adopted within the native structure. A 6-amino acid peptide, corresponding to the last beta-strand of the shaft, was found to be sufficient to form amyloid fibrils. Structural analysis of these amyloid fibrils suggests that perpendicular stacking of beta-strand repeat units is an underlying common feature of amyloid formation.

  11. Conformational changes of the amyloid beta-peptide (1-40) adsorbed on solid surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giacomelli, CE; Norde, W

    2005-01-01

    The conformational change of the 39-43 residues of the amyloid beta-peptide (A beta) toward a beta-sheet enriched state promotes self-aggregation of the peptide molecules and constitutes the major peptide component of the amyloid plaques in Alzheimer patients. The crucial question behind the

  12. Conformational changes of the amyloid beta-peptide (1-40) adsorbed on solid surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giacomelli, C.E.; Norde, W.

    2005-01-01

    The conformational change of the 39-43 residues of the amyloid beta -peptide (A beta) toward a beta -sheet enriched state promotes self-aggregation of the peptide molecules and constitutes the major peptide component of the amyloid plaques in Alzheimer patients. The crucial question behind the

  13. Beta-amyloid and cholinergic neurons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležal, Vladimír; Kašparová, Jana

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 28, 3-4 (2003), s. 499-506 ISSN 0364-3190 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/01/0283; GA AV ČR IAA5011206 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : cholinergic neurons * AlzheimerŽs disease * beta-amyloid Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.511, year: 2003

  14. Trehalose Alters Subcellular Trafficking and the Metabolism of the Alzheimer-associated Amyloid Precursor Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tien, Nguyen T; Karaca, Ilker; Tamboli, Irfan Y; Walter, Jochen

    2016-05-13

    The disaccharide trehalose is commonly considered to stimulate autophagy. Cell treatment with trehalose could decrease cytosolic aggregates of potentially pathogenic proteins, including mutant huntingtin, α-synuclein, and phosphorylated tau that are associated with neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we demonstrate that trehalose also alters the metabolism of the Alzheimer disease-related amyloid precursor protein (APP). Cell treatment with trehalose decreased the degradation of full-length APP and its C-terminal fragments. Trehalose also reduced the secretion of the amyloid-β peptide. Biochemical and cell biological experiments revealed that trehalose alters the subcellular distribution and decreases the degradation of APP C-terminal fragments in endolysosomal compartments. Trehalose also led to strong accumulation of the autophagic marker proteins LC3-II and p62, and decreased the proteolytic activation of the lysosomal hydrolase cathepsin D. The combined data indicate that trehalose decreases the lysosomal metabolism of APP by altering its endocytic vesicular transport. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Adrenocorticotropin, beta-endorphin, and beta-lipotropin in normal thyroid and lung: possible implications for ectopic hormone secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, J A; Funder, J W; Tracy, K; Morgan, F J; Campbell, D J; Lewis, P; Hearn, M T

    1982-12-01

    The expression of the proopiomelanocortin (POMC) gene by normal lung and thyroid was examined by measurement of the content of ACTH, beta-lipotropin (beta LPH), and beta-endorphin (beta EP) in porcine lung and thyroid tissue. Acid extracts of normal porcine lung and thyroid tissue each contained appreciable amounts of immunoreactive (ir) ACTH, ir-beta LPH, and ir-beta EP. The content of ir-beta LPH in both tissues exceeded by severalfold, on a molar basis, the content of ir-ACTH and ir-beta EP, suggesting that the common precursor POMC was processed predominantly to peptides other than ir-ACTH and ir-beta EP. A porcine thyroid extract (Calcitare, porcine calcitonin, Armour) showed equivalent levels of beta EP-like immunoreactivity and bioactivity, measured by opiate radioreceptor assay; in contrast, ACTH-like bioactivity, measured by rat zona fasciculata steroidogenesis, was only 4% of ACTH-like immunoreactivity. On reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography, Calcitare showed multiple peaks of ACTH-like immunoreactivity, one of which coeluted with porcine ACTH-(1-39), and two much smaller peaks of beta EP-like immunoreactivity, of which the smaller coeluted with porcine beta EP. These data suggest that both lung and thyroid gland synthesize POMC, which in normal tissue is usually predominantly processed to species other than ACTH and beta EP. Ectopic secretion of ACTH and beta EP by lung and thyroid neoplasms may thus represent the loss of a system(s) normally responsible for processing the precursor beyond ACTH and beta EP.

  16. Kinetically controlled thermal response of beta2-microglobulin amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasahara, Kenji; Naiki, Hironobu; Goto, Yuji

    2005-09-23

    Calorimetric measurements were carried out using a differential scanning calorimeter in the temperature range from 10 to 120 degrees C for characterizing the thermal response of beta2-microglobulin amyloid fibrils. The thermograms of amyloid fibril solution showed a remarkably large decrease in heat capacity that was essentially released upon the thermal unfolding of the fibrils, in which the magnitude of negative heat capacity change was not explicable in terms of the current accessible surface area model of protein structural thermodynamics. The heat capacity-temperature curve of amyloid fibrils prior to the fibril unfolding exhibited an unusual dependence on the fibril concentration and the heating rate. Particularly, the heat needed to induce the thermal response was found to be linearly dependent on the heating rate, indicating that its thermal response is under a kinetic control and precluding the interpretation in terms of equilibrium thermodynamics. Furthermore, amyloid fibrils of amyloid beta peptides also exhibited a heating rate-dependent exothermic process before the fibril unfolding, indicating that the kinetically controlled thermal response may be a common phenomenon to amyloid fibrils. We suggest that the heating rate-dependent negative change in heat capacity is coupled to the association of amyloid fibrils with characteristic hydration pattern.

  17. Soluble beta-amyloid precursor protein is related to disease progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Steinacker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Biomarkers of disease progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS could support the identification of beneficial drugs in clinical trials. We aimed to test whether soluble fragments of beta-amyloid precursor protein (sAPPα and sAPPß correlated with clinical subtypes of ALS and were of prognostic value. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a cross-sectional study including patients with ALS (N = 68 with clinical follow-up data over 6 months, Parkinson's disease (PD, N = 20, and age-matched controls (N = 40, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF levels of sAPPα a, sAPPß and neurofilaments (NfH(SMI35 were measured by multiplex assay, Progranulin by ELISA. CSF sAPPα and sAPPß levels were lower in ALS with a rapidly-progressive disease course (p = 0.03, and p = 0.02 and with longer disease duration (p = 0.01 and p = 0.01, respectively. CSF NfH(SMI35 was elevated in ALS compared to PD and controls, with highest concentrations found in patients with rapid disease progression (p<0.01. High CSF NfH(SMI3 was linked to low CSF sAPPα and sAPPß (p = 0.001, and p = 0.007, respectively. The ratios CSF NfH(SMI35/CSF sAPPα,-ß were elevated in patients with fast progression of disease (p = 0.002 each. CSF Progranulin decreased with ongoing disease (p = 0.04. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides new CSF candidate markers associated with progression of disease in ALS. The data suggest that a deficiency of cellular neuroprotective mechanisms (decrease of sAPP is linked to progressive neuro-axonal damage (increase of NfH(SMI35 and to progression of disease.

  18. AMYPdb: A database dedicated to amyloid precursor proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delamarche Christian

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Misfolding and aggregation of proteins into ordered fibrillar structures is associated with a number of severe pathologies, including Alzheimer's disease, prion diseases, and type II diabetes. The rapid accumulation of knowledge about the sequences and structures of these proteins allows using of in silico methods to investigate the molecular mechanisms of their abnormal conformational changes and assembly. However, such an approach requires the collection of accurate data, which are inconveniently dispersed among several generalist databases. Results We therefore created a free online knowledge database (AMYPdb dedicated to amyloid precursor proteins and we have performed large scale sequence analysis of the included data. Currently, AMYPdb integrates data on 31 families, including 1,705 proteins from nearly 600 organisms. It displays links to more than 2,300 bibliographic references and 1,200 3D-structures. A Wiki system is available to insert data into the database, providing a sharing and collaboration environment. We generated and analyzed 3,621 amino acid sequence patterns, reporting highly specific patterns for each amyloid family, along with patterns likely to be involved in protein misfolding and aggregation. Conclusion AMYPdb is a comprehensive online database aiming at the centralization of bioinformatic data regarding all amyloid proteins and their precursors. Our sequence pattern discovery and analysis approach unveiled protein regions of significant interest. AMYPdb is freely accessible 1.

  19. Calcium-dependent and -independent binding of the pentraxin serum amyloid P component to glycosaminoglycans and amyloid proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, B; Sørensen, I J; Nybo, Mads

    1997-01-01

    precursor protein beta2M was observed. This binding was also enhanced at slightly acid pH, most pronounced at pH 5.0. The results of this study indicate that SAP can exhibit both Ca2(+)-dependent and -independent binding to ligands involved in amyloid fibril formation and that the binding is enhanced under...... and beta2M) by ELISA. An increase in the dose-dependent binding of SAP to heparan sulfate, AA-protein and beta2M was observed as the pH decreased from 8.0 to 5.0. Furthermore, a lower, but significant Ca2(+)-independent binding of SAP to heparan sulfate, dermatan sulfate, AA protein and the amyloid...

  20. Stereoselective determination of amino acids in beta-amyloid peptides and senile plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsén, G; Bergquist, J; Westlind-Danielsson, A; Josefsson, B

    2001-06-01

    A novel method for the determination of the enantiomeric composition of peptides is presented. In this paper, the focus has been on beta-amyloid peptides from deceased Alzheimer's disease patients. The peptides are hydrolyzed using mineral acid. The free amino acids are derivatized with the chiral reagent (+)- or (-)-1-(9-anthryl)-2-propyl chloroformate and subsequently separated using micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) and detected using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection. The high separation efficiency of the MEKC-LIF system, yielding approximately 1 million theoretical plates/m for most amino acids, facilitates the simultaneous chiral determination of nine amino acids. The samples that have been analyzed were standard 1-40 beta-amyloid peptides, in vitro precipitated beta-amyloid fibrils, and human senile plaque samples.

  1. PEGylated nanoparticles bind to and alter amyloid-beta peptide conformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brambilla, Davide; Verpillot, Romain; Le Droumaguet, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the polyethylene glycol (PEG) corona of long-circulating polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) favors interaction with the amyloid-beta (Aß(1-42)) peptide both in solution and in serum. The influence of PEGylation of poly(alkyl cyanoacrylate) and poly(lactic acid) NPs on the int......We have demonstrated that the polyethylene glycol (PEG) corona of long-circulating polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) favors interaction with the amyloid-beta (Aß(1-42)) peptide both in solution and in serum. The influence of PEGylation of poly(alkyl cyanoacrylate) and poly(lactic acid) NPs...

  2. Evidence for novel beta-sheet structures in Iowa mutant beta-amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tycko, Robert; Sciarretta, Kimberly L; Orgel, Joseph P R O; Meredith, Stephen C

    2009-07-07

    Asp23-to-Asn mutation within the coding sequence of beta-amyloid, called the Iowa mutation, is associated with early onset, familial Alzheimer's disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, in which patients develop neuritic plaques and massive vascular deposition predominantly of the mutant peptide. We examined the mutant peptide, D23N-Abeta40, by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. D23N-Abeta40 forms fibrils considerably faster than the wild-type peptide (k = 3.77 x 10(-3) min(-1) and 1.07 x 10(-4) min(-1) for D23N-Abeta40 and the wild-type peptide WT-Abeta40, respectively) and without a lag phase. Electron microscopy shows that D23N-Abeta40 forms fibrils with multiple morphologies. X-ray fiber diffraction shows a cross-beta pattern, with a sharp reflection at 4.7 A and a broad reflection at 9.4 A, which is notably smaller than the value for WT-Abeta40 fibrils (10.4 A). Solid-state NMR measurements indicate molecular level polymorphism of the fibrils, with only a minority of D23N-Abeta40 fibrils containing the in-register, parallel beta-sheet structure commonly found in WT-Abeta40 fibrils and most other amyloid fibrils. Antiparallel beta-sheet structures in the majority of fibrils are indicated by measurements of intermolecular distances through (13)C-(13)C and (15)N-(13)C dipole-dipole couplings. An intriguing possibility exists that there is a relationship between the aberrant structure of D23N-Abeta40 fibrils and the unusual vasculotropic clinical picture in these patients.

  3. Nasal administration of amyloid-beta peptide decreases cerebral amyloid burden in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiner, H L; Lemere, C A; Maron, R

    2000-01-01

    Progressive cerebral deposition of amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide, an early and essential feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD), is accompanied by an inflammatory reaction marked by microgliosis, astrocytosis, and the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Mucosal administration of disease-implicated ......Progressive cerebral deposition of amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide, an early and essential feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD), is accompanied by an inflammatory reaction marked by microgliosis, astrocytosis, and the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Mucosal administration of disease...... cerebral Abeta deposition, suggesting a novel mucosal immunological approach for the treatment and prevention of AD....

  4. [Development of anti-Alzheimer's disease drug based on beta-amyloid hypothesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Hachiro

    2010-04-01

    Currently, there are five anti-Alzheimer's disease drugs approved. These are tacrine, donepezil, rivastigmine, galantamine, and memantine. The mechanism of the first four drugs is acetylcholinesterase inhibition, while memantine is an NMDA-receptor antagonist. However, these drugs do not cure Alzheimer's, but are only symptomatic treatments. Therefore, a cure for Alzheimer's disease is truly needed. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by cognitive deficits. The cause of the disease is not well understood, but research indicates that the aggregation of beta-amyloid is the fundamental cause. This theory suggests that beta-amyloid aggregation causes neurotoxicity. Therefore, development of the next anti-Alzheimer's disease drug is based on the beta-amyloid theory. We are now studying natural products, such as mulberry leaf extracts and curcumin derivatives, as potential cure for Alzheimer's disease. In this report, we describe some data about these natural products and derivatives.

  5. The metabolic enhancer piracetam ameliorates the impairment of mitochondrial function and neurite outgrowth induced by beta-amyloid peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, C; Ungerer, I; Lipka, U; Kirr, S; Schütt, T; Eckert, A; Leuner, K; Müller, W E

    2010-05-01

    beta-Amyloid peptide (Abeta) is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease by initiating a cascade of events from mitochondrial dysfunction to neuronal death. The metabolic enhancer piracetam has been shown to improve mitochondrial dysfunction following brain aging and experimentally induced oxidative stress. We used cell lines (PC12 and HEK cells) and murine dissociated brain cells. The protective effects of piracetam in vitro and ex vivo on Abeta-induced impairment of mitochondrial function (as mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production), on secretion of soluble Abeta and on neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells were investigated. Piracetam improves mitochondrial function of PC12 cells and acutely dissociated brain cells from young NMRI mice following exposure to extracellular Abeta(1-42). Similar protective effects against Abeta(1-42) were observed in dissociated brain cells from aged NMRI mice, or mice transgenic for mutant human amyloid precursor protein (APP) treated with piracetam for 14 days. Soluble Abeta load was markedly diminished in the brain of those animals after treatment with piracetam. Abeta production by HEK cells stably transfected with mutant human APP was elevated by oxidative stress and this was reduced by piracetam. Impairment of neuritogenesis is an important consequence of Abeta-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and Abeta-induced reduction of neurite growth in PC12 cells was substantially improved by piracetam. Our findings strongly support the concept of improving mitochondrial function as an approach to ameliorate the detrimental effects of Abeta on brain function.

  6. Amyloid precursor protein secretases as therapeutic targets for traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Loane, David J; Pocivavsek, Ana; Moussa, Charbel E-H; Thompson, Rachel; Matsuoka, Yasuji; Faden, Alan I; Rebeck, G William; Burns, Mark P

    2009-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides, found in Alzheimer’s disease brain, accumulate rapidly after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in both humans and animals. Here we show that blocking either β- or γ-secretase, enzymes required for production of Aβ from amyloid precursor protein (APP), can ameliorate motor and cognitive deficits and reduce cell loss after experimental TBI in mice. Thus, APP secretases are promising targets for treatment of TBI.

  7. Minocycline does not affect amyloid beta phagocytosis by human microglial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Familian, Atoosa; Eikelenboom, Piet; Veerhuis, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Activated microglia accumulate in amyloid beta (Abeta) plaques containing amyloid associated factors SAP and C1q in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain. Microglia are involved in AD pathogenesis by promoting Abeta plaque formation and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. On the other hand,

  8. Microglia kill amyloid-beta1-42 damaged neurons by a CD14-dependent process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bate, Clive; Veerhuis, Robert; Eikelenboom, Piet; Williams, Alun

    2004-01-01

    Activated microglia are closely associated with neuronal damage in Alzheimer's disease. In the present study, neurons exposed to low concentrations of amyloid-beta1-42, a toxic fragment of the amyloid-beta protein, were killed by microglia in a process that required cell-cell contact. Pre-treating

  9. alpha7 Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor knockout selectively enhances ethanol-, but not beta-amyloid-induced neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fiebre, Nancyellen C; de Fiebre, Christopher M

    2005-01-03

    The alpha7 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has been implicated as a potential site of action for two neurotoxins, ethanol and the Alzheimer's disease related peptide, beta-amyloid. Here, we utilized primary neuronal cultures of cerebral cortex from alpha7 nAChR null mutant mice to examine the role of this receptor in modulating the neurotoxic properties of subchronic, "binge" ethanol and beta-amyloid. Knockout of the alpha7 nAChR gene selectively enhanced ethanol-induced neurotoxicity in a gene dosage-related fashion. Susceptibility of cultures to beta-amyloid induced toxicity, however, was unaffected by alpha7 nAChR gene null mutation. Further, beta-amyloid did not inhibit the binding of the highly alpha7-selective radioligand, [(125)I]alpha-bungarotoxin. On the other hand, in studies in Xenopus oocytes ethanol efficaciously inhibited alpha7 nAChR function. These data suggest that alpha7 nAChRs modulate the neurotoxic effects of binge ethanol, but not the neurotoxicity produced by beta-amyloid. It is hypothesized that inhibition of alpha7 nAChRs by ethanol provides partial protection against the neurotoxic properties of subchronic ethanol.

  10. A Drosophila gene encoding a protein resembling the human β-amyloid protein precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, D.R.; Martin-Morris, L.; Luo, L.; White, K.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have isolated genomic and cDNA clones for a Drosophila gene resembling the human β-amyloid precursor protein (APP). This gene produces a nervous system-enriched 6.5-kilobase transcript. Sequencing of cDNAs derived from the 6.5-kilobase transcript predicts an 886-amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide contains a putative transmembrane domain and exhibits strong sequence similarity to cytoplasmic and extracellular regions of the human β-amyloid precursor protein. There is a high probability that this Drosophila gene corresponds to the essential Drosophila locus vnd, a gene required for embryonic nervous system development

  11. Alzheimer's disease amyloid-beta links lens and brain pathology in Down syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliet A Moncaster

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS, trisomy 21 is the most common chromosomal disorder and the leading genetic cause of intellectual disability in humans. In DS, triplication of chromosome 21 invariably includes the APP gene (21q21 encoding the Alzheimer's disease (AD amyloid precursor protein (APP. Triplication of the APP gene accelerates APP expression leading to cerebral accumulation of APP-derived amyloid-beta peptides (Abeta, early-onset AD neuropathology, and age-dependent cognitive sequelae. The DS phenotype complex also includes distinctive early-onset cerulean cataracts of unknown etiology. Previously, we reported increased Abeta accumulation, co-localizing amyloid pathology, and disease-linked supranuclear cataracts in the ocular lenses of subjects with AD. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that related AD-linked Abeta pathology underlies the distinctive lens phenotype associated with DS. Ophthalmological examinations of DS subjects were correlated with phenotypic, histochemical, and biochemical analyses of lenses obtained from DS, AD, and normal control subjects. Evaluation of DS lenses revealed a characteristic pattern of supranuclear opacification accompanied by accelerated supranuclear Abeta accumulation, co-localizing amyloid pathology, and fiber cell cytoplasmic Abeta aggregates (approximately 5 to 50 nm identical to the lens pathology identified in AD. Peptide sequencing, immunoblot analysis, and ELISA confirmed the identity and increased accumulation of Abeta in DS lenses. Incubation of synthetic Abeta with human lens protein promoted protein aggregation, amyloid formation, and light scattering that recapitulated the molecular pathology and clinical features observed in DS lenses. These results establish the genetic etiology of the distinctive lens phenotype in DS and identify the molecular origin and pathogenic mechanism by which lens pathology is expressed in this common chromosomal disorder. Moreover, these findings confirm increased Abeta

  12. Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid Beta and Tau Concentrations Are Not Modulated by 16 Weeks of Moderate- to High-Intensity Physical Exercise in Patients with Alzheimer Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen Jensen, Camilla; Portelius, Erik; Siersma, Volkert

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Physical exercise may have some effect on cognition in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). However, the underlying biochemical effects are unclear. Animal studies have shown that amyloid beta (Aβ), one of the pathological hallmarks of AD, can be altered with high levels of physical...... of Life, Physical Health and Functional Ability in Alzheimer's Disease: The Effect of Physical Exercise (ADEX) study we analyzed cerebrospinal fluid samples for Aβ species, total tau (t-tau), phosphorylated tau (p-tau) and soluble amyloid precursor protein (sAPP) species. We also assessed the patients...

  13. The proton-pump inhibitor lansoprazole enhances amyloid beta production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiola, Nahuai; Alcalde, Victor; Pujol, Albert; Münter, Lisa-Marie; Multhaup, Gerd; Lleó, Alberto; Coma, Mireia; Soler-López, Montserrat; Aloy, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    A key event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) species in the brain, derived from the sequential cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β- and γ-secretases. Based on a systems biology study to repurpose drugs for AD, we explore the effect of lansoprazole, and other proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs), on Aβ production in AD cellular and animal models. We found that lansoprazole enhances Aβ37, Aβ40 and Aβ42 production and lowers Aβ38 levels on amyloid cell models. Interestingly, acute lansoprazole treatment in wild type and AD transgenic mice promoted higher Aβ40 levels in brain, indicating that lansoprazole may also exacerbate Aβ production in vivo. Overall, our data presents for the first time that PPIs can affect amyloid metabolism, both in vitro and in vivo.

  14. The amyloid precursor-like protein (APLP) gene maps to the long arm of human chromosome 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasco, W.; Tanzi, R.E. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)); Brook, J.D. (Center for Medical Genetics, Nottingham (United Kingdom))

    1993-01-01

    We have recently isolated a cDNA from a mouse brain library that encodes a protein whose predicted amino acid sequence is 42% identical and 64% similar to that of the amyloid [beta] protein precursor (APP; 16). This 653-amino-acid amyloid precursor-like protein (APLP) is similar to APP in overall structure as well as amino acid sequence. The amino acid homologies are particularly strong in three distinct regions of the proteins where the identities are 47, 54, and 56% (16). All three of these regions are also conserved in the Drosophila APP-like gene, APPL (11). Notably, 12 cysteine residues and a N -glyco-sylation site are conserved in the extracellular portion of APLP and APP, and a clathrin-binding domain is conserved in the cytoplasmic domain. The cytoplasmic domain is also conserved in a partial CDNA reported to encode an APP-like gene in rat testes (17), These data suggest that APLP and APP are members of a highly conserved gene family. A panel of DNAs from 31 human-rodent somatic cell lines of known karyotype was digested with EcoR1. These DNAs were then probed with the human APLP cDNA clone and the hybridization pattern was consistent with the assignment of the APLP locus to chromosome 19. 17 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Absence of beta-amyloid in cortical cataracts of donors with and without Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Ralph; Rosandić, Jurja; Montenegro, Gustavo A; Lobato, Elvira; Tresserra, Francisco; Barraquer, Rafael I; Vrensen, Gijs F J M

    2013-01-01

    Eye lenses from human donors with and without Alzheimer's disease (AD) were studied to evaluate the presence of amyloid in cortical cataract. We obtained 39 lenses from 21 postmortem donors with AD and 15 lenses from age-matched controls provided by the Banco de Ojos para Tratamientos de la Ceguera (Barcelona, Spain). For 17 donors, AD was clinically diagnosed by general physicians and for 4 donors the AD diagnosis was neuropathologically confirmed. Of the 21 donors with AD, 6 had pronounced bilateral cortical lens opacities and 15 only minor or no cortical opacities. As controls, 7 donors with pronounced cortical opacities and 8 donors with almost transparent lenses were selected. All lenses were photographed in a dark field stereomicroscope. Histological sections were analyzed using a standard and a more sensitive Congo red protocol, thioflavin staining and beta-amyloid immunohistochemistry. Brain tissue from two donors, one with cerebral amyloid angiopathy and another with advanced AD-related changes and one cornea with lattice dystrophy were used as positive controls for the staining techniques. Thioflavin, standard and modified Congo red staining were positive in the control brain tissues and in the dystrophic cornea. Beta-amyloid immunohistochemistry was positive in the brain tissues but not in the cornea sample. Lenses from control and AD donors were, without exception, negative after Congo red, thioflavin, and beta-amyloid immunohistochemical staining. The results of the positive control tissues correspond well with known observations in AD, amyloid angiopathy and corneas with lattice dystrophy. The absence of staining in AD and control lenses with the techniques employed lead us to conclude that there is no beta-amyloid in lenses from donors with AD or in control cortical cataracts. The inconsistency with previous studies of Goldstein et al. (2003) and Moncaster et al. (2010), both of which demonstrated positive Congo red, thioflavin, and beta-amyloid

  16. Immunotherapy of Alzheimer's disease (AD): from murine models to anti-amyloid beta (Abeta) human monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geylis, Valeria; Steinitz, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The deposition of amyloid beta (Abeta) protein is a key pathological feature in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In murine models of AD, both active and passive immunization against Abeta induce a marked reduction in amyloid brain burden and an improvement in cognitive functions. Preliminary results of a prematurely terminated clinical trial where AD patients were actively vaccinated with aggregated Abeta bear resemblance to those documented in murine models. Passive immunization of AD patients with anti-Abeta antibodies, in particular human antibodies, is a strategy that provides a more cautious management and control of any undesired side effects. Sera of all healthy adults contain anti-Abeta IgG autoimmune antibodies. Hence antigen-committed human B-cells are easily immortalized by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) into anti-Abeta secreting cell lines. Two anti-Abeta human monoclonal antibodies which we recently prepared bind to the N-terminus of Abeta peptide and were shown to stain amyloid plaques in non-fixed brain sections from an AD patient. It is anticipated that specifically selected anti-Abeta human monoclonal antibodies could reduce and inhibit deposits of amyloid in brain while avoiding the cognitive decline that characterizes AD. In the future, this type of antibody may prove to be a promising immune therapy for the disease.

  17. Human amyloid beta protein gene locus: HaeIII RFLP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, J E; Gonzalez-DeWhitt, P A; Fuller, F; Cordell, B; Frossard, P M [California Biotechnology Inc., Mountain View (USA); Tinklenberg, J R; Davies, H D; Eng, L F; Yesavage, J A [Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA (USA)

    1988-07-25

    A 2.2 kb EcoRI-EcoRI fragment from the 5{prime} end of the human amyloid beta protein cDNA was isolated from a human fibroblast cDNA library and subcloned into pGEM3. HaeIII (GGCC) detects 6 invariant bands at 0.5 kb, 1.0 kb, 1.1 kb, 1.3 kb, 1.4 kb and 1.6 kb and a two-allele polymorphism with bands at either 1.9 kb or 2.1 kb. Its frequency was studied in 50 North Americans. Human amyloid beta protein gene mapped to the long arm of chromosome 21 (21q11.2-21q21) by Southern blot analysis of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids. Co-dominant segregation was observed in two families (15 individuals).

  18. Amyloid-degrading ability of nattokinase from Bacillus subtilis natto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ruei-Lin; Lee, Kung-Ta; Wang, Jung-Hao; Lee, Lily Y-L; Chen, Rita P-Y

    2009-01-28

    More than 20 unrelated proteins can form amyloid fibrils in vivo which are related to various diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, prion disease, and systematic amyloidosis. Amyloid fibrils are an ordered protein aggregate with a lamellar cross-beta structure. Enhancing amyloid clearance is one of the targets of the therapy of these amyloid-related diseases. Although there is debate on whether the toxicity is due to amyloids or their precursors, research on the degradation of amyloids may help prevent or alleviate these diseases. In this study, we explored the amyloid-degrading ability of nattokinase, a fibrinolytic subtilisin-like serine protease, and determined the optimal conditions for amyloid hydrolysis. This ability is shared by proteinase K and subtilisin Carlsberg, but not by trypsin or plasmin.

  19. CD147 is a regulatory subunit of the gamma-secretase complex inAlzheimer's disease amyloid beta-peptide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Shuxia; Zhou, Hua; Walian, Peter J.; Jap, Bing K.

    2005-04-06

    {gamma}-secretase is a membrane protein complex that cleaves the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP) within the transmembrane region, following prior processing by {beta}-secretase, producing amyloid {beta}-peptides (A{beta}{sub 40} and A{beta}{sub 42}). Errant production of A{beta}-peptides that substantially increases A{beta}{sub 42} production has been associated with the formation of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease patients. Biophysical and genetic studies indicate that presenilin-1 (Psn-1), which contains the proteolytic active site, and three other membrane proteins, nicastrin (Nct), APH-1, and PEN-2 are required to form the core of the active {gamma}-secretase complex. Here, we report the purification of the native {gamma}-secretase complexes from HeLa cell membranes and the identification of an additional {gamma}-secretase complex subunit, CD147, a transmembrane glycoprotein with two immunoglobulin-like domains. The presence of this subunit as an integral part of the complex itself was confirmed through co-immunoprecipitation studies of the purified protein from HeLa cells and solubilized complexes from other cell lines such as neural cell HCN-1A and HEK293. Depletion of CD147 by RNA interference was found to increase the production of A{beta} peptides without changing the expression level of the other {gamma}-secretase components or APP substrates while CD147 overexpression had no statistically significant effect on amyloid {beta}-peptide production, other {gamma}-secretase components or APP substrates, indicating that the presence of the CD147 subunit within the {gamma}-secretase complex directly down-modulates the production of A{beta}-peptides. {gamma}-secretase was first recognized through its role in the production of the A{beta} peptides that are pathogenic in Alzheimer's disease (AD) (1). {gamma}-secretase is a membrane protein complex with unusual aspartyl protease activity that cleaves a variety of type I membrane proteins

  20. Influence of hydrophobic Teflon particles on the structure of amyloid beta-peptide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giacomelli, C.E.; Norde, W.

    2003-01-01

    The amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) constitutes the major peptide component of the amyloid plaque deposits of Alzheimer's disease in humans. The Abeta changes from a nonpathogenic to a pathogenic conformation resulting in self-aggregation and deposition of the peptide. It has been established that

  1. Tetrahydroxystilbene glucoside modulates amyloid precursor protein processing via activation of AKT-GSK3β pathway in cells and in APP/PS1 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiaomin; Chen, Chen; Xu, Ting; Li, Lin; Zhang, Lan

    2018-01-01

    Alternative splicing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) exon 7 generates the isoforms containing a Kunitz protease inhibitor (KPI) domain. APP-KPI levels in the brain are correlated with amyloid beta (Aβ) production. Here, we determined the effect of Tetrahydroxystilbene glucoside (TSG) on the AKT-GSK3β pathway. We found GSK3β increased APP-KPI inclusion level and interacted with the splicing factor ASF. TSG was intragastrically administered to 5-month-old APP/PS1 transgenic mice for 12 months. We found that the activated the AKT-GSK3β signaling pathway suppressed APP-KPI inclusion. Moreover, TSG treatment attenuated amyloid deposition in APP/PS1 mice. This study demonstrates the neuroprotective effect of TSG on APP expression, suggesting that TSG may be beneficial for AD prevention and treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. PPARgamma agonist curcumin reduces the amyloid-beta-stimulated inflammatory responses in primary astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Mei; Zhao, Yan-Xin; Zhang, Shi; Liu, Gui-Dong; Kang, Wen-Yan; Tang, Hui-Dong; Ding, Jian-Qing; Chen, Sheng-Di

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common age-related neurodegenerative disorder. Accumulating data indicate that astrocytes play an important role in the neuroinflammation related to the pathogenesis of AD. It has been shown that microglia and astrocytes are activated in AD brain and amyloid-beta (Abeta) can increase the expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), interleukin-1, and interleukin-6. Suppressing the inflammatory response caused by activated astrocytes may help to inhibit the development of AD. Curcumin is a major constituent of the yellow curry spice turmeric and proved to be a potential anti-inflammatory drug in arthritis and colitis. There is a low age-adjusted prevalence of AD in India, a country where turmeric powder is commonly used as a culinary compound. Curcumin has been shown to suppress activated astroglia in amyloid-beta protein precursor transgenic mice. The real mechanism by which curcumin inhibits activated astroglia is poorly understood. Here we report that the expression of COX-2 and glial fibrillary acidic protein were enhanced and that of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) was decreased in Abeta(25-35)-treated astrocytes. In line with these results, nuclear factor-kappaB translocation was increased in the presence of Abeta. All these can be reversed by the pretreatment of curcumin. Furthermore, GW9662, a PPARgamma antagonist, can abolish the anti-inflammatory effect of curcumin. These results show that curcumin might act as a PPARgamma agonist to inhibit the inflammation in Abeta-treated astrocytes.

  3. Curcumin Decreases Amyloid-β Peptide Levels by Attenuating the Maturation of AmyloidPrecursor Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Can; Browne, Andrew; Child, Daniel; Tanzi, Rudolph E.

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease with no cure. The pathogenesis of AD is believed to be driven primarily by amyloid-β (Aβ), the principal component of senile plaques. Aβ is an ∼4-kDa peptide generated via cleavage of the amyloidprecursor protein (APP). Curcumin is a compound in the widely used culinary spice, turmeric, which possesses potent and broad biological activities, including anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities, chemopreventative effects, and effects on protein trafficking. Recent in vivo studies indicate that curcumin is able to reduce Aβ-related pathology in transgenic AD mouse models via unknown molecular mechanisms. Here, we investigated the effects of curcumin on Aβ levels and APP processing in various cell lines and mouse primary cortical neurons. We show for the first time that curcumin potently lowers Aβ levels by attenuating the maturation of APP in the secretory pathway. These data provide a mechanism of action for the ability of curcumin to attenuate amyloid-β pathology. PMID:20622013

  4. Quantification of amyloid-beta 40 in cerebrospinal fluid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verwey, N.A.; Veerhuis, R.; Twaalfhoven, H.A.M.; Wouters, D.; Hoozemans, J.J.M.; Bollen, Y.J.M.; Killestein, J.; Bibl, M.; Wiltfang, J.; Hack, C.E.; Scheltens, P.; Blankenstein, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Truncated forms and full-length forms of the amyloid-beta 40 (Aβ40) are key molecules in the pathogenesis of dementia, and are detectable in CSF. Reliable methods to detect these biomarkers in CSF are of great importance for understanding the disease mechanisms and for diagnostic

  5. Short-term effects of beta-amyloid25-35 peptide aggregates on transmitter release in neuromuscular synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Neus; Santafé, Manel M; Tomàs, Marta; Lanuza, Maria A; Tomàs, Josep

    2008-03-01

    The beta-amyloid (AB) peptide25-35 contains the functional domain of the AB precursor protein that is both required for neurotrophic effects in normal neural tissues and is involved in the neurotoxic effects in Alzheimer disease. We demonstrated the presence of the amyloid precursor protein/AB peptide in intramuscular axons, presynaptic motor nerve terminals, terminal and myelinating Schwann cells, and the postsynaptic and subsarcolemmal region in the Levator auris longus muscle of adult rats by immunocytochemistry. Using intracellular recording, we investigated possible short-term functional effects of the AB fragment (0.1-10 micromol/L) on acetylcholine release in adult and newborn motor end plates. We found no change in evoked, spontaneous transmitter release or resting membrane potential of the muscle cells. A previous block of the presynaptic muscarinic receptor subtypes and a previous block or stimulation of protein kinase C revealed no masked effect of the peptide on the regulation of transmitter release. The aggregated form of AB peptide25-35, however, interfered acutely with acetylcholine release (quantal content reduction) when synaptic activity was maintained by electric stimulation. The possible relevance of this inhibition of neurotransmission by AB peptide25-35 to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer remains to be determined.

  6. The effect of simvastatin treatment on the amyloid precursor protein and brain cholesterol metabolism in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoglund, K; Thelen, K M; Syversen, S

    2005-01-01

    During the last years, several clinical studies have been published trying to elucidate the effect of statin treatment on amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing and metabolism of brain cholesterol in Alzheimer's disease (AD) in humans. We present an open biochemical study where 19 patients...... with AD have been treated with simvastatin (20 mg/day) for 12 months. The aim was to further investigate the effect of simvastatin treatment on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of APP processing, AD biomarkers as total tau and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181, brain cholesterol metabolism as well...... as on cognitive decline in patients with AD. Despite biochemical data suggesting that treatment with 20 mg/day of simvastatin for 12 months does affect the brain cholesterol metabolism, we did not find any change in CSF or plasma levels of beta-amyloid (Abeta)(1-42). However, by analysis of APP isoforms, we found...

  7. Beta-amyloid, cholinergní neurony a Alzheimerova choroba

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kašparová, Jana; Doležal, Vladimír

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2002), s. 82-94 ISSN 0009-0557 R&D Projects: GA MZd NF5183; GA ČR GA305/01/0283 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : Alzheimer 's disease * beta-amyloid * cholinergic neurons Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry

  8. Differential regulation of amyloid precursor protein sorting with pathological mutations results in a distinct effect on amyloid-β production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Chen; Wang, Jia-Yi; Wang, Kai-Chen; Liao, Jhih-Ying; Cheng, Irene H

    2014-11-01

    The deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, which is generated from amyloid precursor protein (APP), is the pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Three APP familial AD mutations (D678H, D678N, and H677R) located at the sixth and seventh amino acid of Aβ have distinct effect on Aβ aggregation, but their influence on the physiological and pathological roles of APP remain unclear. We found that the D678H mutation strongly enhances amyloidogenic cleavage of APP, thus increasing the production of Aβ. This enhancement of amyloidogenic cleavage is likely because of the acceleration of APPD678H sorting into the endosomal-lysosomal pathway. In contrast, the APPD678N and APPH677R mutants do not cause the same effects. Therefore, this study indicates a regulatory role of D678H in APP sorting and processing, and provides genetic evidence for the importance of APP sorting in AD pathogenesis. The internalization of amyloid precursor protein (APP) increases its opportunity to be processed by β-secretase and to produce Amyloid-β (Aβ) that causes Alzheimer's disease (AD). We report a pathogenic APPD678H mutant that enhances APP internalization into the endosomal-lysosomal pathway and thus promotes the β-secretase cleavage and Aβ production. This study provides genetic evidence for the importance of APP sorting in AD pathogenesis. © 2014 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  9. Altered β-Amyloid Precursor Protein Isoforms in Mexican Alzheimer’s Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. J. Sánchez-González

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the β-amyloid precursor protein (βAPP isoforms ratio as a risk factor for Alzheimer’s Disease and to assess its relationship with demographic and genetic variables of the disease.

  10. Amyloid precursor protein overexpression depresses excitatory transmission through both presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Ting, Jonathan T.; Kelley, Brooke G.; Lambert, Talley J.; Cook, David G.; Sullivan, Jane M.

    2006-01-01

    Overexpression of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in hippocampal neurons leads to elevated β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) production and consequent depression of excitatory transmission. The precise mechanisms underlying APP-induced synaptic depression are poorly understood. Uncovering these mechanisms could provide insight into how neuronal function is compromised before cell death during the early stages of Alzheimer's disease. Here we verify that APP up-regulation leads to depression of transm...

  11. Schisandrin B protects PC12 cells by decreasing the expression of amyloid precursor protein and vacuolar protein sorting 35★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Mingmin; Mao, Shanping; Dong, Huimin; Liu, Baohui; Zhang, Qian; Pan, Gaofeng; Fu, Zhiping

    2012-01-01

    PC12 cell injury was induced using 20 μM amyloid β-protein 25–35 to establish a model of Alzheimer's disease. The cells were then treated with 5, 10, and 25 μM Schisandrin B. Methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assays and Hoechst 33342 staining results showed that with increasing Schisandrin B concentration, the survival rate of PC12 cells injured by amyloid β-protein 25–35 gradually increased and the rate of apoptosis gradually decreased. Reverse transcription-PCR, immunocytochemical staining and western blot results showed that with increasing Schisandrin B concentration, the mRNA and protein expression of vacuolar protein sorting 35 and amyloid precursor protein were gradually decreased. Vacuolar protein sorting 35 and amyloid precursor protein showed a consistent trend for change. These findings suggest that 5, 10, and 25 μM Schisandrin B antagonizes the cellular injury induced by amyloid β-protein 25–35 in a dose-dependent manner. This may be caused by decreasing the expression of vacuolar protein sorting 35 and amyloid precursor protein. PMID:25745458

  12. Redundancy and divergence in the amyloid precursor protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariati, S Ali M; De Strooper, Bart

    2013-06-27

    Gene duplication provides genetic material required for functional diversification. An interesting example is the amyloid precursor protein (APP) protein family. The APP gene family has experienced both expansion and contraction during evolution. The three mammalian members have been studied quite extensively in combined knock out models. The underlying assumption is that APP, amyloid precursor like protein 1 and 2 (APLP1, APLP2) are functionally redundant. This assumption is primarily supported by the similarities in biochemical processing of APP and APLPs and on the fact that the different APP genes appear to genetically interact at the level of the phenotype in combined knockout mice. However, unique features in each member of the APP family possibly contribute to specification of their function. In the current review, we discuss the evolution and the biology of the APP protein family with special attention to the distinct properties of each homologue. We propose that the functions of APP, APLP1 and APLP2 have diverged after duplication to contribute distinctly to different neuronal events. Our analysis reveals that APLP2 is significantly diverged from APP and APLP1. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The common inhalation anesthetic isoflurane induces caspase activation and increases amyloid beta-protein level in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhongcong; Culley, Deborah J; Dong, Yuanlin; Zhang, Guohua; Zhang, Bin; Moir, Robert D; Frosch, Matthew P; Crosby, Gregory; Tanzi, Rudolph E

    2008-12-01

    An estimated 200 million patients worldwide have surgery each year. Anesthesia and surgery have been reported to facilitate emergence of Alzheimer's disease. The commonly used inhalation anesthetic isoflurane has previously been reported to induce apoptosis, and to increase levels and aggregation of Alzheimer's disease-associated amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) in cultured cells. However, the in vivo relevance has not been addressed. We therefore set out to determine effects of isoflurane on caspase activation and levels of beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme (BACE) and Abeta in naive mice, using Western blot, immunohistochemistry, and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Here we show for the first time that a clinically relevant isoflurane anesthesia (1.4% isoflurane for 2 hours) leads to caspase activation and modest increases in levels of BACE 6 hours after anesthesia in mouse brain. Isoflurane anesthesia induces caspase activation, and increases levels of BACE and Abeta up to 24 hours after anesthesia. Isoflurane may increase BACE levels by reducing BACE degradation. Moreover, the Abeta aggregation inhibitor, clioquinol, was able to attenuate isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation in vivo. Given that transient insults to brain may lead to long-term brain damage, these findings suggest that isoflurane may promote Alzheimer's disease neuropathogenesis and, as such, have implications for use of isoflurane in humans, pending human study confirmation.

  14. Heterologous amyloid seeding: revisiting the role of acetylcholinesterase in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Létitia Jean

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases associated with abnormal protein folding and ordered aggregation require an initial trigger which may be infectious, inherited, post-inflammatory or idiopathic. Proteolytic cleavage to generate vulnerable precursors, such as amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta production via beta and gamma secretases in Alzheimer's Disease (AD, is one such trigger, but the proteolytic removal of these fragments is also aetiologically important. The levels of Abeta in the central nervous system are regulated by several catabolic proteases, including insulysin (IDE and neprilysin (NEP. The known association of human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE with pathological aggregates in AD together with its ability to increase Abeta fibrilization prompted us to search for proteolytic triggers that could enhance this process. The hAChE C-terminal domain (T40, AChE(575-614 is an exposed amphiphilic alpha-helix involved in enzyme oligomerisation, but it also contains a conformational switch region (CSR with high propensity for conversion to non-native (hidden beta-strand, a property associated with amyloidogenicity. A synthetic peptide (AChE(586-599 encompassing the CSR region shares homology with Abeta and forms beta-sheet amyloid fibrils. We investigated the influence of IDE and NEP proteolysis on the formation and degradation of relevant hAChE beta-sheet species. By combining reverse-phase HPLC and mass spectrometry, we established that the enzyme digestion profiles on T40 versus AChE(586-599, or versus Abeta, differed. Moreover, IDE digestion of T40 triggered the conformational switch from alpha- to beta-structures, resulting in surfactant CSR species that self-assembled into amyloid fibril precursors (oligomers. Crucially, these CSR species significantly increased Abeta fibril formation both by seeding the energetically unfavorable formation of amyloid nuclei and by enhancing the rate of amyloid elongation. Hence, these results may offer an explanation

  15. Neuroinflammation and Complexes of 17 beta-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase type 10-Amyloid beta in Alzheimer's Disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krištofíková, Z.; Řípová, D.; Bartoš, A.; Bocková, Markéta; Hegnerová, Kateřina; Říčný, J.; Čechová, L.; Vrajová, M.; Homola, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 2 (2013), s. 165-173 ISSN 1567-2050 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT11225 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Amyloid beta * mitochondrial enzyme * Alzheimer 's disease Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 3.796, year: 2013

  16. The role of mutated amyloid beta 1-42 stimulating dendritic cells in a PDAPP transgenic mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Jia-lin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Amyloid plaque is one of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Anti-beta-amyloid (Aβ immunotherapy is effective in removing brain Aβ, but has shown to be associated with detrimental effects. To avoid severe adverse effects such as meningoencephalitis induced by amyloid beta vaccine with adjuvant, and take advantage of amyloid beta antibody's therapeutic effect on Alzheimer's disease sufficiently, our group has developed a new Alzheimer vaccine with mutated amyloid beta 1-42 peptide stimulating dendritic cells (DC. Our previous work has confirmed that DC vaccine can induce adequate anti-amyloid beta antibody in PDAPP Tg mice safely and efficiently. The DC vaccine can improve impaired learning and memory in the Alzheimer's animal model, and did not cause microvasculitis, microhemorrhage or meningoencephalitis in the animal model. However, the exact mechanism of immunotherapy which reduces Aβ deposition remains unknown. In this report, we studied the mechanism of the vaccine, thinking that this may have implications for better understanding of the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Methods A new Alzheimer vaccine with mutated amyloid beta 1-42 peptide stimulating DC which were obtained from C57/B6 mouse bone marrow was developed. Amyloid beta with Freund's adjuvant was inoculated at the same time to act as positive control. After the treatment was done, the samples of brains were collected, fixed, cut. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to observe the expression of the nuclear hormone liver X receptor (LXR, membrane-bound protein tyrosine phosphatase (CD45, the ATP-binding cassette family of active transporters (ABCA1, receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE, β-site APP-cleaving enzyme (BACE and Aβ in mouse brain tissue. Semi-quantitative analysis was used to defect CA1, CA2, CA3, DG, Rad in hippocampus region and positive neuron in cortex region. Results Aβ was significantly reduced in the

  17. Molecular simulations of beta-amyloid protein near hydrated lipids (PECASE).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Han, Kunwoo (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Ford, David M. (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX)

    2005-12-01

    We performed molecular dynamics simulations of beta-amyloid (A{beta}) protein and A{beta} fragment(31-42) in bulk water and near hydrated lipids to study the mechanism of neurotoxicity associated with the aggregation of the protein. We constructed full atomistic models using Cerius2 and ran simulations using LAMMPS. MD simulations with different conformations and positions of the protein fragment were performed. Thermodynamic properties were compared with previous literature and the results were analyzed. Longer simulations and data analyses based on the free energy profiles along the distance between the protein and the interface are ongoing.

  18. Green-fluorescent protein+ Astrocytes Attach to beta-Amyloid Plaques in an Alzheimer Mouse Model and GFPare Sensitive for Clasmatodendrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eHumpel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is pathologically characterized by beta-amyloid (Aβ plaques and Tau pathology. It is well-established that Aβ plaques are surrounded by reactive astrocytes, highly expressing glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP. In order to study the cellular interaction of reactive astrocytes with Aβ plaques, we crossbred mice overexpressing amyloid precursor protein (APP with the Swedish-Dutch-Iowa mutations (APP-SweDI with mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP under the GFAP-promotor. Three-dimensional confocal microscopy revealed a tight association and intense sprouting of astrocytic fine branched processes towards Aβ plaques in 12 month old mice. In order to study phagocytosis, 110 µm thick brain slices from 12 month old crossbred mice were cultured overnight, however, we found that the GFP fluorescence faded away, distal processes degenerated and a complete loss of astrocytic morphology was seen (clasmatodendrosis. In summary, our data show that GFP+ reactive astrocytes make intense contact with Aβ plaques but these cells are highly vulnerable for degeneration.

  19. Mitochondrion-derived reactive oxygen species lead to enhanced amyloid beta formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leuner, K.; Schutt, T.; Kurz, C.; Eckert, S.H.; Schiller, C.; Occhipinti, A.; Mai, S.; Jendrach, M.; Eckert, G.P.; Kruse, S.E.; Palmiter, R.D.; Brandt, U.; Drose, S.; Wittig, I.; Willem, M.; Haass, C.; Reichert, A.S.; Muller, W.E.

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: Intracellular amyloid beta (Abeta) oligomers and extracellular Abeta plaques are key players in the progression of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). Still, the molecular signals triggering Abeta production are largely unclear. We asked whether mitochondrion-derived reactive oxygen species

  20. Vitamin D receptor is present on the neuronal plasma membrane and is co-localized with amyloid precursor protein, ADAM10 or Nicastrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, Erdinç; Gezen-Ak, Duygu

    2017-01-01

    Our recent study indicated that vitamin D and its receptors are important parts of the amyloid processing pathway in neurons. Yet the role of vitamin D receptor (VDR) in amyloid pathogenesis is complex and all regulations over the production of amyloid beta cannot be explained solely with the transcriptional regulatory properties of VDR. Given that we hypothesized that VDR might exist on the neuronal plasma membrane in close proximity with amyloid precursor protein (APP) and secretase complexes. The present study primarily focused on the localization of VDR in neurons and its interaction with amyloid pathology-related proteins. The localization of VDR on neuronal membranes and its co-localization with target proteins were investigated with cell surface staining followed by immunofluorescence labelling. The FpClass was used for protein-protein interaction prediction. Our results demonstrated the localization of VDR on the neuronal plasma membrane and the co-localization of VDR and APP or ADAM10 or Nicastrin and limited co-localization of VDR and PS1. E-cadherin interaction with APP or the γ-secretase complex may involve NOTCH1, NUMB, or FHL2, according to FpClass. This suggested complex might also include VDR, which greatly contributes to Ca+2 hemostasis with its ligand vitamin D. Consequently, we suggested that VDR might be a member of this complex also with its own non-genomic action and that it can regulate the APP processing pathway in this way in neurons.

  1. GMP-compliant automated synthesis of [{sup 18}F]AV-45 (Florbetapir F 18) for imaging {beta}-amyloid plaques in human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, C.-H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Lin, K.-J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Weng, C.-C. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Hsiao, I.-T. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Ting, Y.-S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Yen, T.-C. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Jan, T.-R. [Department and Graduate Institute of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Skovronsky, Daniel [Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, Inc., Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kung, M.-P. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Wey, S.-P., E-mail: spwey@mail.cgu.edu.t [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China)

    2010-12-15

    We report herein the Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)-compliant automated synthesis of {sup 18}F-labeled styrylpyridine, AV-45 (Florbetapir), a novel tracer for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) plaques in the brain of Alzheimer's disease patients. [{sup 18}F]AV-45 was prepared in 105 min using a tosylate precursor with Sumitomo modules for radiosynthesis under GMP-compliant conditions. The overall yield was 25.4{+-}7.7% with a final radiochemical purity of 95.3{+-}2.2% (n=19). The specific activity of [{sup 18}F]AV-45 reached as high as 470{+-}135 TBq/mmol (n=19). The present studies show that [{sup 18}F]AV-45 can be manufactured under GMP-compliant conditions and could be widely available for routine clinical use.

  2. Pro-domain removal in ASP-2 and the cleavage of the amyloid precursor are influenced by pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austen Brian

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the signatures of Alzheimer's disease is the accumulation of aggregated amyloid protein, Aβ, in the brain. Aβ arises from cleavage of the Amyloid Precursor protein by β and γ secretases, which present attractive candidates for therapeutic targeting. Two β-secretase candidates, ASP-1 and ASP-2, were identified as aspartic proteases, both of which cleave the amyloid precursor at the β-site. These are produced as immature transmembrane proteins containing a pro-segment. Results ASP-2 expressed in HEK293-cells cleaved the Swedish mutant amyloid precursor at different β-sites at different pHs in vitro. Recent reports show that furin cleaves the pro-peptide of ASP-2, whereas ASP-1 undergoes auto-catalysis. We show that purified recombinant ASP-2 cleaves its own pro-peptide at ph 5 but not pH 8.5 as seen by mass spectrometry, electrophoresis and N-terminal sequencing. Conclusion We suggest that ASP-2 processing as well as activity are influenced by pH, and hence the cellular localisation of the protein may have profound effects on the production of Aβ. These factors should be taken into consideration in the design of potential inhibitors for these enzymes.

  3. Spatial distribution of diffuse, primitive, and classic amyloid-beta deposits and blood vessels in the upper laminae of the frontal cortex in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, R A; Cairns, N J; Lantos, P L

    1998-12-01

    The spatial distribution of the diffuse, primitive, and classic amyloid-beta deposits was studied in the upper laminae of the superior frontal gyrus in cases of sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD). Amyloid-beta-stained tissue was counterstained with collagen IV to determine whether the spatial distribution of the amyloid-beta deposits along the cortex was related to blood vessels. In all patients, amyloid-beta deposits and blood vessels were aggregated into distinct clusters and in many patients, the clusters were distributed with a regular periodicity along the cortex. The clusters of diffuse and primitive deposits did not coincide with the clusters of blood vessels in most patients. However, the clusters of classic amyloid-beta deposits coincided with those of the large diameter (>10 microm) blood vessels in all patients and with clusters of small-diameter (upper cortical laminae.

  4. SERUM ANALYSIS OF AMYLOID BETA-PROTEIN 1-40 IN HEALTHY SUBJECTS, AUTISTIC CHILDREN AND ALZHEIMER’S PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijendra K. SINGH

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid beta-protein1-40 (AP40 is a low molecu­lar weight peptide produced throughout life during normal cell metabolism and neurodegenerative diseases. Owing to its neurotrophic and neurotoxic effects, the present study was conducted to evalu­ate serum levels of AP40 in healthy subjects, au­tistic children and Alzheimer’s disease patients. Serum AP40 was measured by enzyme-linked im­munosorbent assay (ELISA. AP40 was signifi­cantly higher in normal children compared to nor­mal older controls, in normal children compared to autistic children, and in autistic children compared to Alzheimer’s patients (p value was less than 0.05 for all groups. This finding suggests an age-re­lated decline of serum AP40 in normal aging, as well as in autism and Alzheimer’s disease. This decline may result from abnormal processing of amyloid beta-protein precursor (APP during nor­mal aging and age-related diseases such as autism in children and Alzheimer’s disease in elderly. Possible explanations for this decline may include age-related increased interactions of AP40 with cytoskeletal proteins for brain tissue deposition, increased serine proteases for APP metabolism or hyperimmune reaction (antibodies to AP40 for removal of circulating AP40. To conclude, the AP40 metabolism declines with normal aging and in addition to its role in Alzheimer’s disease this protein might also be a contributing factor in au­tism.

  5. Phenotypic Screening Identifies Modulators of Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing in Human Stem Cell Models of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip W. Brownjohn

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Human stem cell models have the potential to provide platforms for phenotypic screens to identify candidate treatments and cellular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. Amyloid precursor protein (APP processing and the accumulation of APP-derived amyloid β (Aβ peptides are key processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD. We designed a phenotypic small-molecule screen to identify modulators of APP processing in trisomy 21/Down syndrome neurons, a complex genetic model of AD. We identified the avermectins, commonly used as anthelmintics, as compounds that increase the relative production of short Aβ peptides at the expense of longer, potentially more toxic peptides. Further studies demonstrated that this effect is not due to an interaction with the core γ-secretase responsible for Aβ production. This study demonstrates the feasibility of phenotypic drug screening in human stem cell models of Alzheimer-type dementia, and points to possibilities for indirectly modulating APP processing, independently of γ-secretase modulation. : In this article, Livesey and colleagues perform a phenotypic drug screen in a human stem cell model of Alzheimer's disease. The anthelminthic avermectins are identified as a family of compounds that increase the production of short Aβ peptides over longer more toxic Aβ forms. The effect is analogous to existing γ-secretase modulators, but is independent of the core γ-secretase complex. Keywords: neural stem cells, Alzheimer's disease, phenotypic screening, iPSCs, human neurons, dementia, Down syndrome, amyloid beta, ivermectin, selamectin

  6. Two memory associated genes regulated by amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain ovel insights into the pathogenesis of learning and memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuandong Zheng; Xi Gu; Zhimei Zhong; Rui Zhu; Tianming Gao; Fang Wang

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we employed chromatin immunoprecipitation, a useful method for studying the locations of transcription factors bound to specific DNA regions in specific cells, to investigate amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain binding sites in chromatin DNA from hippocampal neurons of rats, and to screen out five putative genes associated with the learning and memory functions. The promoter regions of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha and glutamate receptor-2 genes were amplified by PCR from DNA products immunoprecipitated by amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay and western blot analysis suggested that the promoter regions of these two genes associated with learning and memory were bound by amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain (in complex form). Our experimental findings indicate that the amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain is involved in the transcriptional regulation of learning- and memory-associated genes in hippocampal neurons. These data may provide new insights into the molecular mechanism underlying the symptoms of progressive memory loss in Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet Is not Related to Beta-Amyloid Deposition: Data from the Women's Healthy Ageing Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, E; Szoeke, C; Dennerstein, L; Campbell, S; Clifton, P

    2018-01-01

    Research has indicated the neuroprotective potential of the Mediterranean diet. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet has shown preventative potential for Alzheimer's disease incidence and prevalence, yet few studies have investigated the impact of Mediterranean diet adherence on the hallmark protein; beta-amyloid. To investigate the association between Mediterranean diet adherence and beta-amyloid deposition in a cohort of healthy older Australian women. This study was a cross-sectional investigation of participants from the longitudinal, epidemiologically sourced Women's Healthy Ageing Project which is a follow-up of the Melbourne Women's Midlife Health Project. Assessments were conducted at the Centre for Medical Research, Royal Melbourne Hospital in Melbourne, Australia. F-18 Florbetaben positron emission tomography scanning was conducted at the Austin Centre for PET in Victoria, Australia. One hundred and eleven Women's Healthy Ageing Project participants were included in the study. Mediterranean diet adherence scores for all participants were calculated from the administration of a validated food frequency questionnaire constructed by the Cancer Council of Victoria. Beta-amyloid deposition was measured using positron emission tomography standardised uptake value ratios. Gamma regression analysis displayed no association between Mediterranean diet adherence and beta-amyloid deposition. This result was consistent across APOE-ε4 +/- cohorts and with the inclusion of covariates such as age, education, body mass index and cognition. This study found no association between adherence to the Mediterranean diet and beta-amyloid deposition in a cohort of healthy Australian women.

  8. A possible island of beta-delayed neutron precursors in heavy nucleus region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li

    1991-01-01

    The possible Beta-Delayed neutron precursors in the elements Tl, Hg, and Au were predicted following a systematic research on the known Beta-Delayed neutron precursors. The masses of the unknown nuclei and neutron emission probabilities were calculated

  9. Cross-linking of cell surface amyloid precursor protein leads to increased β-amyloid peptide production in hippocampal neurons: implications for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefort, Roger; Pozueta, Julio; Shelanski, Michael

    2012-08-01

    The accumulation of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is thought to play a causative role in triggering synaptic dysfunction in neurons, leading to their eventual demise through apoptosis. Aβ is produced and secreted upon sequential cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β-secretases and γ-secretases. However, while Aβ levels have been shown to be increased in the brains of AD patients, little is known about how the cleavage of APP and the subsequent generation of Aβ is influenced, or whether the cleavage process changes over time. It has been proposed that Aβ can bind APP and promote amyloidogenic processing of APP, further enhancing Aβ production. Proof of this idea has remained elusive because a clear mechanism has not been identified, and the promiscuous nature of Aβ binding complicates the task of demonstrating the idea. To work around these problems, we used an antibody-mediated approach to bind and cross-link cell-surface APP in cultured rat primary hippocampal neurons. Here we show that cross-linking of APP is sufficient to raise the levels of Aβ in viable neurons with a concomitant increase in the levels of the β-secretase BACE1. This appears to occur as a result of a sorting defect that stems from the caspase-3-mediated inactivation of a key sorting adaptor protein, namely GGA3, which prevents the lysosomal degradation of BACE1. Together, our data suggest the occurrence of a positive pathogenic feedback loop involving Aβ and APP in affected neurons possibly allowing Aβ to spread to nearby healthy neurons.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of the copper-binding domain of the amyloid precursor protein of Alzheimer’s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Geoffrey K.-W. [Biota Structural Biology Laboratory, St Vincent’s Institute, 9 Princes Street, Fitzroy, Victoria 3065 (Australia); Department of Pathology, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Galatis, Denise; Barnham, Kevin J. [Department of Pathology, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); The Mental Health Research Institute of Victoria, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Polekhina, Galina; Adams, Julian J. [Biota Structural Biology Laboratory, St Vincent’s Institute, 9 Princes Street, Fitzroy, Victoria 3065 (Australia); Masters, Colin L. [Department of Pathology, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); The Mental Health Research Institute of Victoria, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Cappai, Roberto [Department of Pathology, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); The Mental Health Research Institute of Victoria, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Centre for Neuroscience, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Parker, Michael W.; McKinstry, William J., E-mail: wmckinstry@svi.edu.au [Biota Structural Biology Laboratory, St Vincent’s Institute, 9 Princes Street, Fitzroy, Victoria 3065 (Australia)

    2005-01-01

    The binding of Cu{sup 2+} ions to the copper-binding domain of the amyloid precursor protein of Alzheimer’s disease reduces the production of the amyloid β peptide, which is centrally involved in Alzheimer’s disease. Structural studies of the copper-binding domain will provide a basis for structure-based drug design that might prove useful in treating this devastating disease. Alzheimer’s disease is thought to be triggered by production of the amyloid β (Aβ) peptide through proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). The binding of Cu{sup 2+} to the copper-binding domain (CuBD) of APP reduces the production of Aβ in cell-culture and animal studies. It is expected that structural studies of the CuBD will lead to a better understanding of how copper binding causes Aβ depletion and will define a potential drug target. The crystallization of CuBD in two different forms suitable for structure determination is reported here.

  11. The Aggregation Potential of the 1-15-and 1-16-Fragments of the Amyloid beta Peptide and Their Influence on the Aggregation of A beta 40

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shabestari, M.; Plug, T.; Motazacker, M. M.; Meeuwenoord, N. J.; Filippov, D. V.; Meijers, J. C. M.; Huber, M.

    2013-01-01

    The aggregation of amyloid beta (A beta) peptide is important in Alzheimer's disease. Shorter A beta fragments may reduce A beta's cytotoxicity and are used in diagnostics. The aggregation of A beta 16 is controversial; Liu et al. (J. Neurosci. Res. 75:162-171, 2004) and Liao et al. (FEBS Lett.

  12. DNA polymerase-beta is expressed early in neurons of Alzheimer's disease brain and is loaded into DNA replication forks in neurons challenged with beta-amyloid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Copani, Agata; Hoozemans, Jeroen J. M.; Caraci, Filippo; Calafiore, Marco; van Haastert, Elise S.; Veerhuis, Robert; Rozemuller, Annemieke J. M.; Aronica, Eleonora; Sortino, Maria Angela; Nicoletti, Ferdinando

    2006-01-01

    Cultured neurons exposed to synthetic beta-amyloid (Abeta) fragments reenter the cell cycle and initiate a pathway of DNA replication that involves the repair enzyme DNA polymerase-beta (DNA pol-beta) before undergoing apoptotic death. In this study, by performing coimmunoprecipitation experiments

  13. Distribution of precursor amyloid-β-protein messenger RNA in human cerebral cortex: relationship to neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, D.A.; Higgins, G.A.; Young, W.G.; Goldgaber, D.; Gajdusek, D.C.; Wilson, M.C.; Morrison, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) and neuritic plaques (NP), two neuropathological markers of Alzheimer disease, may both contain peptide fragments derived from the human amyloid β protein. However, the nature of the relationship between NFT and NP and the source of the amyloid β proteins found in each have remained unclear. The authors used in situ hybridization techniques to map the anatomical distribution of precursor amyloid-β-protein mRNA in the neocortex of brains from three subjects with no known neurologic disease and from five patients with Alzheimer disease. In brains from control subjects, positively hybridizing neurons were present in cortical regions and layers that contain a high density of neuropathological markers in Alzheimer disease, as well as in those loci that contain NP but few NFT. Quantitative analyses of in situ hybridization patterns within layers III and V of the superior frontal cortex revealed that the presence of high numbers of NFT in Alzheimer-diseased brains was associated with a decrease in the number of positively hybridizing neurons compared to controls and Alzheimer-diseased brains with few NFT. These findings suggest that the expression of precursor amyloid-β-protein mRNA may be a necessary but is clearly not a sufficient prerequisite for NFT formation. In addition, these results may indicate that the amyloid β protein, present in NP in a given region or layer of cortex, is not derived from the resident neuronal cell bodies that express the mRNA for the precursor protein

  14. [Noopept improves the spatial memory and stimulates prefibrillar beta-amyloid(25-35) antibody production in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobkova, N V; Gruden', M A; Samokhin, A N; Medvinskaia, N I; Morozova-Roch, L; Uudasheva, T A; Ostrovskaia, R U; Seredinin, S B

    2005-01-01

    The effects of the novel proline-containing nootropic and neuroprotective dipeptide noopept (GVS-111, N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine ethyl ester) were studied on NMRI mice upon olfactory bulbectomy, which had been previously shown to imitate the main morphological and biochemical signs of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The spatial memory was assessed using the Morris (water maze) test; the immunological status was characterized by ELISA with antibodies to prefibrillar beta-amyloid(25-35), S100b protein, and protofilaments of equine lysozyme, which are the molecular factors involved in the pathogenesis of AD. The control (sham-operated) animals during the Morris test preferred a sector where the safety platform was placed during the learning session. Bulbectomized animals treated with saline failed to recognize this sector, while bulbectomized animals treated with noopept (0.01 mg/kg for 21 days) restored this predominance, thus demonstrating the improvement of the spatial memory. These animals also demonstrated an increase in the level of antibodies to beta-amyloid(25-35)--the effect, which was more pronounced in the sham-operated than in bulbectomized mice. The latter demonstrated a profound decrease of immunological reactivity in a large number of tests. Noopept, stimulating the production of antibodies to beta-amyloid(25-35), can attenuate the well-known neurotoxic effects of beta-amyloid. The obtained data on the mnemotropic and immunostimulant effects noopept are indicative of good prospects for the clinical usage of this drug in the therapy of patients with neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Functional Amyloid Formation within Mammalian Tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a generally insoluble, fibrous cross-beta sheet protein aggregate. The process of amyloidogenesis is associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington disease. We report the discovery of an unprecedented functional mammalian amyloid structure generated by the protein Pmel17. This discovery demonstrates that amyloid is a fundamental nonpathological protein fold utilized by organisms from bacteria to humans. We have found that Pmel17 amyloid templates and accelerates the covalent polymerization of reactive small molecules into melanin-a critically important biopolymer that protects against a broad range of cytotoxic insults including UV and oxidative damage. Pmel17 amyloid also appears to play a role in mitigating the toxicity associated with melanin formation by sequestering and minimizing diffusion of highly reactive, toxic melanin precursors out of the melanosome. Intracellular Pmel17 amyloidogenesis is carefully orchestrated by the secretory pathway, utilizing membrane sequestration and proteolytic steps to protect the cell from amyloid and amyloidogenic intermediates that can be toxic. While functional and pathological amyloid share similar structural features, critical differences in packaging and kinetics of assembly enable the usage of Pmel17 amyloid for normal function. The discovery of native Pmel17 amyloid in mammals provides key insight into the molecular basis of both melanin formation and amyloid pathology, and demonstrates that native amyloid (amyloidin may be an ancient, evolutionarily conserved protein quaternary structure underpinning diverse pathways contributing to normal cell and tissue physiology.

  16. Functional amyloid formation within mammalian tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas M Fowler

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a generally insoluble, fibrous cross-beta sheet protein aggregate. The process of amyloidogenesis is associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington disease. We report the discovery of an unprecedented functional mammalian amyloid structure generated by the protein Pmel17. This discovery demonstrates that amyloid is a fundamental nonpathological protein fold utilized by organisms from bacteria to humans. We have found that Pmel17 amyloid templates and accelerates the covalent polymerization of reactive small molecules into melanin-a critically important biopolymer that protects against a broad range of cytotoxic insults including UV and oxidative damage. Pmel17 amyloid also appears to play a role in mitigating the toxicity associated with melanin formation by sequestering and minimizing diffusion of highly reactive, toxic melanin precursors out of the melanosome. Intracellular Pmel17 amyloidogenesis is carefully orchestrated by the secretory pathway, utilizing membrane sequestration and proteolytic steps to protect the cell from amyloid and amyloidogenic intermediates that can be toxic. While functional and pathological amyloid share similar structural features, critical differences in packaging and kinetics of assembly enable the usage of Pmel17 amyloid for normal function. The discovery of native Pmel17 amyloid in mammals provides key insight into the molecular basis of both melanin formation and amyloid pathology, and demonstrates that native amyloid (amyloidin may be an ancient, evolutionarily conserved protein quaternary structure underpinning diverse pathways contributing to normal cell and tissue physiology.

  17. LINGO-1 promotes lysosomal degradation of amyloid-β protein precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rian de Laat

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sequential proteolytic cleavages of amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP by β-secretase and γ-secretase generate amyloid β (Aβ peptides, which are thought to contribute to Alzheimer's disease (AD. Much of this processing occurs in endosomes following endocytosis of AβPP from the plasma membrane. However, this pathogenic mode of processing AβPP may occur in competition with lysosomal degradation of AβPP, a common fate of membrane proteins trafficking through the endosomal system. Following up on published reports that LINGO-1 binds and promotes the amyloidogenic processing of AβPP we have examined the consequences of LINGO-1/AβPP interactions. We report that LINGO-1 and its paralogs, LINGO-2 and LINGO-3, decrease processing of AβPP in the amyloidogenic pathway by promoting lysosomal degradation of AβPP. We also report that LINGO-1 levels are reduced in AD brain, representing a possible pathogenic mechanism stimulating the generation of Aβ peptides in AD.

  18. The Arctic Alzheimer mutation enhances sensitivity to toxic stress in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennvik, Kristina; Nilsberth, Camilla; Stenh, Charlotte

    2002-01-01

    The E693G (Arctic) mutation of the amyloid precursor protein was recently found to lead to early-onset Alzheimer's disease in a Swedish family. In the present study, we report that the Arctic mutation decreases cell viability in human neuroblastoma cells. The cell viability, as measured by the MTT...... their secretion of beta-secretase cleaved amyloid precursor protein. The enhanced sensitivity to toxic stress in cells with the Arctic mutation most likely contributes to the pathogenic pathway leading to Alzheimer's disease....

  19. Interaction of amyloid inhibitor proteins with amyloid beta peptides: insight from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payel Das

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the detailed mechanism by which proteins such as human αB- crystallin and human lysozyme inhibit amyloid beta (Aβ peptide aggregation is crucial for designing treatment for Alzheimer's disease. Thus, unconstrained, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent have been performed to characterize the Aβ17-42 assembly in presence of the αB-crystallin core domain and of lysozyme. Simulations reveal that both inhibitor proteins compete with inter-peptide interaction by binding to the peptides during the early stage of aggregation, which is consistent with their inhibitory action reported in experiments. However, the Aβ binding dynamics appear different for each inhibitor. The binding between crystallin and the peptide monomer, dominated by electrostatics, is relatively weak and transient due to the heterogeneous amino acid distribution of the inhibitor surface. The crystallin-bound Aβ oligomers are relatively long-lived, as they form more extensive contact surface with the inhibitor protein. In contrast, a high local density of arginines from lysozyme allows strong binding with Aβ peptide monomers, resulting in stable complexes. Our findings not only illustrate, in atomic detail, how the amyloid inhibitory mechanism of human αB-crystallin, a natural chaperone, is different from that of human lysozyme, but also may aid de novo design of amyloid inhibitors.

  20. Sorting by the cytoplasmic domain of the amyloid precursor protein binding receptor SorLA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten S; Gustafsen, Camilla; Madsen, Peder

    2007-01-01

    -formation with the amyloid precursor protein it downregulates generation of Alzheimer's disease-associated Abeta-peptide. The receptor is mainly located in vesicles, suggesting a function in protein sorting and transport. Here we examined SorLA's trafficking using full-length and chimeric receptors and find that its...

  1. Distinct prion-like strains of amyloid beta implicated in phenotypic diversity of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Mark; Appleby, Brian; Safar, Jiri G

    2016-01-01

    Vast evidence on human prions demonstrates that variable disease phenotypes, rates of propagation, and targeting of distinct brain structures are determined by unique conformers (strains) of pathogenic prion protein (PrP(Sc)). Recent progress in the development of advanced biophysical tools that inventory structural characteristics of amyloid beta (Aβ) in the brain cortex of phenotypically diverse Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, revealed unique spectrum of oligomeric particles in the cortex of rapidly progressive cases, implicating these structures in variable rates of propagation in the brain, and in distict disease manifestation. Since only ∼30% of phenotypic diversity of AD can be explained by polymorphisms in risk genes, these and transgenic bioassay data argue that structurally distinct Aβ particles play a major role in the diverse pathogenesis of AD, and may behave as distinct prion-like strains encoding diverse phenotypes. From these observations and our growing understanding of prions, there is a critical need for new strain-specific diagnostic strategies for misfolded proteins causing these elusive disorders. Since targeted drug therapy can induce mutation and evolution of prions into new strains, effective treatments of AD will require drugs that enhance clearance of pathogenic conformers, reduce the precursor protein, or inhibit the conversion of precursors into prion-like states.

  2. Amyloid-β production via cleavage of amyloid-β protein precursor is modulated by cell density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Can; Browne, Andrew; Divito, Jason R; Stevenson, Jesse A; Romano, Donna; Dong, Yuanlin; Xie, Zhongcong; Tanzi, Rudolph E

    2010-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease (AD) is caused by the accumulation of the small peptide, amyloid-β (Aβ), a proteolytic cleavage product of amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP). Aβ is generated through a serial cleavage of AβPP by β- and γ-secretase. Aβ40 and Aβ42 are the two main components of amyloid plaques in AD brains, with Aβ42 being more prone to aggregation. AβPP can also be processed by α-secretase, which cleaves AβPP within the Aβ sequence, thereby preventing the generation of Aβ. Little is currently known regarding the effects of cell density on AβPP processing and Aβ generation. Here we assessed the effects of cell density on AβPP processing in neuronal and non-neuronal cell lines, as well as mouse primary cortical neurons. We found that decreased cell density significantly increases levels of Aβ40, Aβ42, total Aβ, and the ratio of Aβ42: Aβ40. These results also indicate that cell density is a significant modulator of AβPP processing. Overall, these findings carry profound implications for both previous and forthcoming studies aiming to assess the effects of various conditions and genetic/chemical factors, e.g., novel drugs on AβPP processing and Aβ generation in cell-based systems. Moreover, it is interesting to speculate whether cell density changes in vivo may also affect AβPP processing and Aβ levels in the AD brain.

  3. Insulin inhibits amyloid beta-induced cell death in cultured human brain pericytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensink, Annemieke A M; Otte-Höller, Irene; de Boer, Roelie; Bosch, Remko R; ten Donkelaar, Hans J; de Waal, Robert M W; Verbeek, Marcel M; Kremer, Berry

    Amyloid-beta (Abeta) deposition in the cerebral arterial and capillary walls is one of the characteristics of Alzheimer's disease and hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis-Dutch type. In vitro, Abeta1-40, carrying the "Dutch" mutation (DAbeta1-40), induced reproducible degeneration of

  4. Brain-predicted age in Down syndrome is associated with beta amyloid deposition and cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, James H; Annus, Tiina; Wilson, Liam R; Remtulla, Ridhaa; Hong, Young T; Fryer, Tim D; Acosta-Cabronero, Julio; Cardenas-Blanco, Arturo; Smith, Robert; Menon, David K; Zaman, Shahid H; Nestor, Peter J; Holland, Anthony J

    2017-08-01

    Individuals with Down syndrome (DS) are more likely to experience earlier onset of multiple facets of physiological aging. This includes brain atrophy, beta amyloid deposition, cognitive decline, and Alzheimer's disease-factors indicative of brain aging. Here, we employed a machine learning approach, using structural neuroimaging data to predict age (i.e., brain-predicted age) in people with DS (N = 46) and typically developing controls (N = 30). Chronological age was then subtracted from brain-predicted age to generate a brain-predicted age difference (brain-PAD) score. DS participants also underwent [ 11 C]-PiB positron emission tomography (PET) scans to index the levels of cerebral beta amyloid deposition, and cognitive assessment. Mean brain-PAD in DS participants' was +2.49 years, significantly greater than controls (p brain-PAD was associated with the presence and the magnitude of PiB-binding and levels of cognitive performance. Our study indicates that DS is associated with premature structural brain aging, and that age-related alterations in brain structure are associated with individual differences in the rate of beta amyloid deposition and cognitive impairment. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Multiscale Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Beta-Amyloid Interactions with Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Liming; Vaughn, Mark; Cheng, Kelvin

    2012-10-01

    Early events of human beta-amyloid protein interactions with cholesterol-containing membranes are critical to understanding the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to exploring new therapeutic interventions of AD. Atomistic molecular dynamics (AMD) simulations have been extensively used to study the protein-lipid interaction at high atomic resolutions. However, traditional MD simulations are not efficient in sampling the phase space of complex lipid/protein systems with rugged free energy landscapes. Meanwhile, coarse-grained MD (CGD) simulations are efficient in the phase space sampling but suffered from low spatial resolutions and from the fact that the energy landscapes are not identical to those of the AMD. Here, a multiscale approach was employed to simulate the protein-lipid interactions of beta-amyloid upon its release from proteolysis residing in the neuronal membranes. We utilized a forward (AMD to CGD) and reverse (CGD-AMD) strategy to explore new transmembrane and surface protein configuration and evaluate the stabilization mechanisms by measuring the residue-specific protein-lipid or protein conformations. The detailed molecular interactions revealed in this multiscale MD approach will provide new insights into understanding the early molecular events leading to the pathogenesis of AD.

  6. Y682 mutation of amyloid precursor protein promotes endo-lysosomal dysfunction by disrupting APP-SorLA interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Rosario La Rosa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The intracellular transport and localization of amyloid precursor protein (APP are critical determinants of APP processing and β-amyloid peptide production, thus crucially important for the pathophysiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Notably, the C-terminal Y682ENPTY687 domain of APP binds to specific adaptors controlling APP trafficking and sorting in neurons. Mutation on the Y682 residue to glycine (Y682G leads to altered APP sorting in hippocampal neurons that favors its accumulation in intracellular compartments and the release of soluble APPα. Such alterations induce premature aging and learning and cognitive deficits in APP Y682G mutant mice (APPYG/YG. Here, we report that Y682G mutation affects formation of the APP complex with sortilin-related receptor (SorLA, resulting in endo-lysosomal dysfunctions and neuronal degeneration. Moreover, disruption of the APP/SorLA complex changes the trafficking pathway of SorLA, with its consequent increase in secretion outside neurons. Mutations in the SorLA gene are a prognostic factor in AD, and increases in SorLA levels in cerebrospinal fluid are predictive of AD in humans. These results might open new possibilities in comprehending the role played by SorLA in its interaction with APP and in the progression of neuronal degeneration. In addition, they further underline the crucial role played by Y682 residue in controlling APP trafficking in neurons.

  7. Interaction between amyloid beta peptide and an aggregation blocker peptide mimicking islet amyloid polypeptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrollah Rezaei-Ghaleh

    Full Text Available Assembly of amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ into cytotoxic oligomeric and fibrillar aggregates is believed to be a major pathologic event in Alzheimer's disease (AD and interfering with Aβ aggregation is an important strategy in the development of novel therapeutic approaches. Prior studies have shown that the double N-methylated analogue of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP IAPP-GI, which is a conformationally constrained IAPP analogue mimicking a non-amyloidogenic IAPP conformation, is capable of blocking cytotoxic self-assembly of Aβ. Here we investigate the interaction of IAPP-GI with Aβ40 and Aβ42 using NMR spectroscopy. The most pronounced NMR chemical shift changes were observed for residues 13-20, while residues 7-9, 15-16 as well as the C-terminal half of Aβ--that is both regions of the Aβ sequence that are converted into β-strands in amyloid fibrils--were less accessible to solvent in the presence of IAPP-GI. At the same time, interaction of IAPP-GI with Aβ resulted in a concentration-dependent co-aggregation of Aβ and IAPP-GI that was enhanced for the more aggregation prone Aβ42 peptide. On the basis of the reduced toxicity of the Aβ peptide in the presence of IAPP-GI, our data are consistent with the suggestion that IAPP-GI redirects Aβ into nontoxic "off-pathway" aggregates.

  8. Adiponectin is protective against oxidative stress induced cytotoxicity in amyloid-beta neurotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koon-Ho Chan

    Full Text Available Beta-amyloid (Aβ neurotoxicity is important in Alzheimer's disease (AD pathogenesis. Aβ neurotoxicity causes oxidative stress, inflammation and mitochondrial damage resulting in neuronal degeneration and death. Oxidative stress, inflammation and mitochondrial failure are also pathophysiological mechanisms of type 2 diabetes (T(2DM which is characterized by insulin resistance. Interestingly, T(2DM increases risk to develop AD which is associated with reduced neuronal insulin sensitivity (central insulin resistance. We studied the potential protective effect of adiponectin (an adipokine with insulin-sensitizing, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties against Aβ neurotoxicity in human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y transfected with the Swedish amyloid precursor protein (Sw-APP mutant, which overproduced Aβ with abnormal intracellular Aβ accumulation. Cytotoxicity was measured by assay for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH released upon cell death and lysis. Our results revealed that Sw-APP transfected SH-SY5Y cells expressed both adiponectin receptor 1 and 2, and had increased AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK activation and enhanced nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB activation compared to control empty-vector transfected SH-SY5Y cells. Importantly, adiponectin at physiological concentration of 10 µg/ml protected Sw-APP transfected SH-SY5Y cells against cytotoxicity under oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide. This neuroprotective action of adiponectin against Aβ neurotoxicity-induced cytotoxicity under oxidative stress involved 1 AMPK activation mediated via the endosomal adaptor protein APPL1 (adaptor protein with phosphotyrosine binding, pleckstrin homology domains and leucine zipper motif and possibly 2 suppression of NF-κB activation. This raises the possibility of novel therapies for AD such as adiponectin receptor agonists.

  9. The pathogenic implication of abnormal interaction between apolipoprotein E isoforms, amyloid-beta peptides, and sulfatides in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xianlin

    2010-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in the aging population. Prior work has shown that the epsilon4 allele of apolipoprotein E (apoE4) is a major risk factor for "sporadic" AD, which accounts for >99% of AD cases without a defined underlying mechanism. Recently, we have demonstrated that sulfatides are substantially and specifically depleted at the very early stage of AD. To identify the mechanism(s) of sulfatide loss concurrent with AD onset, we have found that: (1) sulfatides are specifically associated with apoE-associated particles in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF); (2) apoE modulates cellular sulfatide levels; and (3) the modulation of sulfatide content is apoE isoform dependent. These findings not only lead to identification of the potential mechanisms underlying sulfatide depletion at the earliest stages of AD but also serve as mechanistic links to explain the genetic association of apoE4 with AD. Moreover, our recent studies further demonstrated that (1) apoE mediates sulfatide depletion in amyloid-beta precursor protein transgenic mice; (2) sulfatides enhance amyloid beta (Abeta) peptides binding to apoE-associated particles; (3) Abeta42 content notably correlates with sulfatide content in CSF; (4) sulfatides markedly enhance the uptake of Abeta peptides; and (5) abnormal sulfatide-facilitated Abeta uptake results in the accumulation of Abeta in lysosomes. Collectively, our studies clearly provide a link between apoE, Abeta, and sulfatides in AD and establish a foundation for the development of effective therapeutic interventions for AD.

  10. Effect of acute ethanol on beta-endorphin secretion from rat fetal hypothalamic neurons in primary cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, D.K.; Minami, S. (Washington State Univ., Pullman (USA))

    1990-01-01

    To characterize the effect of ethanol on the hypothalamic {beta}-endorphin-containing neurons, rat fetal hypothalamic neurons were maintained in primary culture, and the secretion of {beta}-endorphin ({beta}-EP) was determined after ethanol challenges. Constant exposure to ethanol at doses of 6-50 mM produced a dose-dependent increase in basal secretion of {beta}-EP from these cultured cells. These doses of ethanol did not produce any significant effect on cell viability, DNA or protein content. The stimulated secretion of {beta}-EP following constant ethanol exposure is short-lasting. However, intermittent ethanol exposures maintained the ethanol stimulatory action on {beta}-EP secretion for a longer time. The magnitude of the {beta}-EP response to 50 mM ethanol is similar to that of the {beta}-EP response to 56 mM of potassium. Ethanol-stimulated {beta}-EP secretion required extracellular calcium and was blocked by a calcium channel blocker; a sodium channel blocker did not affect ethanol-stimulated secretion. These results suggest that the neuron culture system is a useful model for studying the cellular mechanisms involved in the ethanol-regulated hypothalamic opioid secretion.

  11. Neurodegeneration in Alzheimer Disease: Role of Amyloid Precursor Protein and Presenilin 1 Intracellular Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Nizzari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer disease (AD is a heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorder characterized by (1 progressive loss of synapses and neurons, (2 intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, composed of hyperphosphorylated Tau protein, and (3 amyloid plaques. Genetically, AD is linked to mutations in few proteins amyloid precursor protein (APP and presenilin 1 and 2 (PS1 and PS2. The molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in AD as well as the physiological function of APP are not yet known. A recent theory has proposed that APP and PS1 modulate intracellular signals to induce cell-cycle abnormalities responsible for neuronal death and possibly amyloid deposition. This hypothesis is supported by the presence of a complex network of proteins, clearly involved in the regulation of signal transduction mechanisms that interact with both APP and PS1. In this review we discuss the significance of novel finding related to cell-signaling events modulated by APP and PS1 in the development of neurodegeneration.

  12. The role of beta amyloid in Alzheimer's disease: still a cause of everything or the only one who got caught?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdile, Giuseppe; Fuller, Stephanie; Atwood, Craig S; Laws, Simon M; Gandy, Samuel E; Martins, Ralph N

    2004-10-01

    The beta amyloid (A beta) protein is a key molecule in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The tendency of the A beta peptide to aggregate, its reported neurotoxicity, and genetic linkage studies, have led to a hypothesis of AD pathogenesis that many AD researchers term the amyloid cascade hypothesis. In this hypothesis, an increased production of A beta results in neurodegeneration and ultimately dementia through a cascade of events. In the past 15 years, debate amongst AD researchers has arisen as to whether A beta is a cause or an effect of the pathogenic process. Recent in vitro and in vivo research has consolidated the theory that A beta is the primary cause, initiating secondary events, culminating in the neuropathological hallmarks associated with AD. This research has led to the development of therapeutic agents, currently in human clinical trials, which target A beta.

  13. How ionic strength affects the conformational behavior of human and rat beta amyloids--a computational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeněk Kříž

    Full Text Available Progressive cerebral deposition of amyloid beta occurs in Alzheimers disease and during the aging of certain mammals (human, monkey, dog, bear, cow, cat but not others (rat, mouse. It is possibly due to different amino acid sequences at positions 5, 10 and 13. To address this issue, we performed series of 100 ns long trajectories (each trajectory was run twice with different initial velocity distribution on amyloid beta (1-42 with the human and rat amino acid sequence in three different environments: water with only counter ions, water with NaCl at a concentration of 0.15 M as a model of intracellular Na(+ concentration at steady state, and water with NaCl at a concentration of 0.30 M as a model of intracellular Na(+ concentration under stimulated conditions. We analyzed secondary structure stability, internal hydrogen bonds, and residual fluctuation. It was observed that the change in ionic strength affects the stability of internal hydrogen bonds. Increasing the ionic strength increases atomic fluctuation in the hydrophobic core of the human amyloid, and decreases the atomic fluctuation in the case of rat amyloid. The secondary structure analyses show a stable α-helix part between residues 10 and 20. However, C-terminus of investigated amyloids is much more flexible showing no stable secondary structure elements. Increasing ionic strength of the solvent leads to decreasing stability of the secondary structural elements. The difference in conformational behavior of the three amino acids at position 5, 10 and 13 for human and rat amyloids significantly changes the conformational behavior of the whole peptide.

  14. Amyloid β Is Not the Major Factor Accounting for Impaired Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Mice Overexpressing Amyloid Precursor Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Pan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Adult hippocampal neurogenesis was impaired in several Alzheimer's disease models overexpressing mutant human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP. However, the effects of wild-type hAPP on adult neurogenesis and whether the impaired adult hippocampal neurogenesis was caused by amyloid β (Aβ or APP remained unclear. Here, we found that neurogenesis was impaired in the dentate gyrus (DG of adult mice overexpressing wild-type hAPP (hAPP-I5 compared with controls. However, the adult hippocampal neurogenesis was more severely impaired in hAPP-I5 than that in hAPP-J20 mice, which express similar levels of hAPP mRNA but much higher levels of Aβ. Furthermore, reducing Aβ levels did not affect the number of doublecortin-positive cells in the DG of hAPP-J20 mice. Our results suggested that hAPP was more likely an important factor inhibiting adult neurogenesis, and Aβ was not the major factor affecting neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus of hAPP mice.

  15. X11beta rescues memory and long-term potentiation deficits in Alzheimer's disease APPswe Tg2576 mice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mitchell, Jacqueline C

    2009-12-01

    Increased production and deposition of amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) are believed to be key pathogenic events in Alzheimer\\'s disease. As such, routes for lowering cerebral Abeta levels represent potential therapeutic targets for Alzheimer\\'s disease. X11beta is a neuronal adaptor protein that binds to the intracellular domain of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Overexpression of X11beta inhibits Abeta production in a number of experimental systems. However, whether these changes to APP processing and Abeta production induced by X11beta overexpression also induce beneficial effects to memory and synaptic plasticity are not known. We report here that X11beta-mediated reduction in cerebral Abeta is associated with normalization of both cognition and in vivo long-term potentiation in aged APPswe Tg2576 transgenic mice that model the amyloid pathology of Alzheimer\\'s disease. Overexpression of X11beta itself has no detectable adverse effects upon mouse behaviour. These findings support the notion that modulation of X11beta function represents a therapeutic target for Abeta-mediated neuronal dysfunction in Alzheimer\\'s disease.

  16. High plasma levels of islet amyloid polypeptide in young with new-onset of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan F Paulsson

    Full Text Available AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP is a beta cell hormone secreted together with insulin upon glucose stimulation. IAPP participates in normal glucose regulation, but IAPP is also known for its ability to misfold and form islet amyloid. Amyloid fibrils form through smaller cell toxic intermediates and deposited amyloid disrupts normal islet architecture. Even though IAPP and amyloid formation are much discussed in type 2 diabetes, our aim was to study the significance of IAPP in type 1 diabetes. RESULTS: Plasma IAPP levels in children and adolescents with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes (n = 224 were analysed and concentrations exceeding 100 pmol/L (127.2-888.7 pmol/L were found in 11% (25/224. The IAPP increase did not correlate with C-peptide levels. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Plasma levels of IAPP and insulin deviate in a subpopulation of young with newly-diagnosed type 1 diabetes. The determined elevated levels of IAPP might increase the risk for IAPP misfolding and formation of cell toxic amyloid in beta cells. This finding add IAPP-aggregation to the list over putative pathological factors causing type 1 diabetes.

  17. Amyloid Precursor Proteins Are Dynamically Trafficked and Processed During Neuronal Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna M. Ramaker

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Proteolytic processing of the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP produces beta-amyloid (Aβ peptide fragments that accumulate in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD, but APP may also regulate multiple aspects of neuronal development, albeit via mechanisms that are not well understood. APP is a member of a family of transmembrane glycoproteins expressed by all higher organisms, including two mammalian orthologs (APLP1 and APLP2 that have complicated investigations into the specific activities of APP. By comparison, insects express only a single APP-related protein (APP-Like, or APPL that contains the same protein interaction domains identified in APP. However, unlike its mammalian orthologs, APPL is only expressed by neurons, greatly simplifying an analysis of its functions in vivo. Like APP, APPL is processed by secretases to generate a similar array of extracellular and intracellular cleavage fragments, as well as an Aβ-like fragment that can induce neurotoxic responses in the brain. Exploiting the complementary advantages of two insect models (Drosophila melanogaster and Manduca sexta, we have investigated the regulation of APPL trafficking and processing with respect to different aspects of neuronal development. By comparing the behavior of endogenously expressed APPL with fluorescently tagged versions of APPL and APP, we have shown that some full-length protein is consistently trafficked into the most motile regions of developing neurons both in vitro and in vivo. Concurrently, much of the holoprotein is rapidly processed into N- and C-terminal fragments that undergo bi-directional transport within distinct vesicle populations. Unexpectedly, we also discovered that APPL can be transiently sequestered into an amphisome-like compartment in developing neurons, while manipulations targeting APPL cleavage altered their motile behavior in cultured embryos. These data suggest that multiple mechanisms restrict the bioavailability of the holoprotein to regulate

  18. Numb endocytic adapter proteins regulate the transport and processing of the amyloid precursor protein in an isoform-dependent manner: implications for Alzheimer disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriazis, George A; Wei, Zelan; Vandermey, Miriam; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Xin, Ouyang; Mattson, Mark P; Chan, Sic L

    2008-09-12

    Central to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease is the aberrant processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) to generate amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta), the principle component of amyloid plaques. The cell fate determinant Numb is a phosphotyrosine binding domain (PTB)-containing endocytic adapter protein that interacts with the carboxyl-terminal domain of APP. The physiological relevance of this interaction is unknown. Mammals produce four alternatively spliced variants of Numb that differ in the length of their PTB and proline-rich region. In the current study, we determined the influence of the four human Numb isoforms on the intracellular trafficking and processing of APP. Stable expression of Numb isoforms that differ in the PTB but not in the proline-rich region results in marked differences in the sorting of APP to the recycling and degradative pathways. Neural cells expressing Numb isoforms that lack the insert in the PTB (short PTB (SPTB)) exhibited marked accumulation of APP in Rab5A-labeled early endosomal and recycling compartments, whereas those expressing isoforms with the insertion in the PTB (long PTB (LPTB)) exhibited reduced amounts of cellular APP and its proteolytic derivatives relative to parental control cells. Neither the activities of the beta- and gamma-secretases nor the expression of APP mRNA were significantly different in the stably transfected cells, suggesting that the differential effects of the Numb proteins on APP metabolism is likely to be secondary to altered APP trafficking. In addition, the expression of SPTB-Numb increases at the expense of LPTB-Numb in neuronal cultures subjected to stress, suggesting a role for Numb in stress-induced Abeta production. Taken together, these results suggest distinct roles for the human Numb isoforms in APP metabolism and may provide a novel potential link between altered Numb isoform expression and increased Abeta generation.

  19. Heparan sulfate regulates amyloid precursor protein processing by BACE1, the Alzheimer's β-secretase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholefield, Zoe; Yates, Edwin A.; Wayne, Gareth; Amour, Augustin; McDowell, William; Turnbull, Jeremy E.

    2003-01-01

    Cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by the Alzheimer's β-secretase (BACE1) is a key step in generating amyloid β-peptide, the main component of amyloid plaques. Here we report evidence that heparan sulfate (HS) interacts with β-site APP-cleaving enzyme (BACE) 1 and regulates its cleavage of APP. We show that HS and heparin interact directly with BACE1 and inhibit in vitro processing of peptide and APP substrates. Inhibitory activity is dependent on saccharide size and specific structural characteristics, and the mechanism of action involves blocking access of substrate to the active site. In cellular assays, HS specifically inhibits BACE1 cleavage of APP but not alternative cleavage by α-secretase. Endogenous HS immunoprecipitates with BACE1 and colocalizes with BACE1 in the Golgi complex and at the cell surface, two of its putative sites of action. Furthermore, inhibition of cellular HS synthesis results in enhanced BACE1 activity. Our findings identify HS as a natural regulator of BACE1 and suggest a novel mechanism for control of APP processing. PMID:14530380

  20. Radioiodinated benzimidazole derivatives as single photon emission computed tomography probes for imaging of {beta}-amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui Mengchao [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Key Laboratory of Radiopharmaceuticals, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Ono, Masahiro, E-mail: ono@pharm.kyoto-u.ac.j [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Kimura, Hiroyuki; Kawashima, Hidekazu [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Liu Boli [Key Laboratory of Radiopharmaceuticals, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Saji, Hideo, E-mail: hsaji@pharm.kyoto-u.ac.j [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2011-04-15

    Five iodinated 2-phenyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazole derivatives were synthesized and evaluated as potential probes for {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) plaques. One of the compounds, 4-(6-iodo-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)-N,N-dimethylaniline (12), showed excellent affinity for A{beta}{sub 1-42} aggregates (K{sub i}=9.8 nM). Autoradiography with sections of postmortem Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain revealed that a radioiodinated probe [{sup 125}I]12, labeled A{beta} plaques selectively with low nonspecific binding. Biodistribution experiments with normal mice injected intravenously with [{sup 125}I]12 showed high uptake [4.14 percent injected dose per gram (% ID/g) at 2 min] into and rapid clearance (0.15% ID/g at 60 min) from the brain, which may bring about a good signal-to-noise ratio and therefore achieve highly sensitive detection of A{beta} plaques. In addition, [{sup 125}I]12 labeled amyloid plaques in vivo in an AD transgenic model. The preliminary results strongly suggest that [{sup 125}I]12 bears characteristics suitable for detecting amyloid plaques in vivo. When labeled with {sup 123}I, it may be a useful SPECT imaging agent for A{beta} plaques in the brain of living AD patients.

  1. A hydrogel biosensor for high selective and sensitive detection of amyloid-beta oligomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun LP

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Liping Sun,1 Yong Zhong,1 Jie Gui,1 Xianwu Wang,1 Xiaorong Zhuang,2 Jian Weng1 1Key Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering of Fujian Province, Research Center of Biomedical Engineering of Xiamen, Department of Biomaterials, College of Materials, Xiamen University, 2Department of Neurology, The Affiliated Zhongshan Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen, People’s Republic of China Background: Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive cognitive and memory impairment. It is the most common neurological disease that causes dementia. Soluble amyloid-beta oligomers (AβO in blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF are the pathogenic biomarker correlated with AD. Methods: A simple electrochemical biosensor using graphene oxide/gold nanoparticles (GNPs hydrogel electrode was developed in this study. Thiolated cellular prion protein (PrPC peptide probe was immobilized on GNPs of the hydrogel electrode to construct an AβO biosensor. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was utilized for AβO analysis. Results: The specific binding between AβO and PrPC probes on the hydrogel electrode resulted in an increase in the electron-transfer resistance. The biosensor showed high specificity and sensitivity for AβO detection. It could selectively differentiate AβO from amyloid-beta (Aβ monomers or fibrils. Meanwhile, it was highly sensitive to detect as low as 0.1 pM AβO in artificial CSF or blood plasma. The linear range for AβO detection is from 0.1 pM to 10 nM. Conclusion: This biosensor could be used as a cost-effective tool for early diagnosis of AD due to its high electrochemical performance and bionic structure. Keywords: Alzheimer’s disease, amyloid-beta oligomer, graphene, gold nanoparticles, biosensor

  2. Cationization increases brain distribution of an amyloid-beta protofibril selective F(ab')2 fragment

    OpenAIRE

    Syvänen, Stina; Edén, Desireé; Sehlin, Dag

    2017-01-01

    Antibodies and fragments thereof are, because of high selectivity for their targets, considered as potential therapeutics and biomarkers for several neurological disorders. However, due to their large molecular size, antibodies/fragments do not easily penetrate into the brain. The aim of the present study was to improve the brain distribution via adsorptive-mediated transcytosis of an amyloid-beta (A beta) protofibril selective F(ab')2 fragment (F(ab')2-h158). F(ab')2-h158 was cationized to d...

  3. Cartilage acidic protein 1, a new member of the beta-propeller protein family with amyloid propensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjos, Liliana; Morgado, Isabel; Guerreiro, Marta; Cardoso, João C R; Melo, Eduardo P; Power, Deborah M

    2017-02-01

    Cartilage acidic protein1 (CRTAC1) is an extracellular matrix protein of chondrogenic tissue in humans and its presence in bacteria indicate it is of ancient origin. Structural modeling of piscine CRTAC1 reveals it belongs to the large family of beta-propeller proteins that in mammals have been associated with diseases, including amyloid diseases such as Alzheimer's. In order to characterize the structure/function evolution of this new member of the beta-propeller family we exploited the unique characteristics of piscine duplicate genes Crtac1a and Crtac1b and compared their structural and biochemical modifications with human recombinant CRTAC1. We demonstrate that CRTAC1 has a beta-propeller structure that has been conserved during evolution and easily forms high molecular weight thermo-stable aggregates. We reveal for the first time the propensity of CRTAC1 to form amyloid-like structures, and hypothesize that the aggregating property of CRTAC1 may be related to its disease-association. We further contribute to the general understating of CRTAC1's and beta-propeller family evolution and function. Proteins 2017; 85:242-255. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. T cell precursor migration towards beta 2-microglobulin is involved in thymus colonization of chicken embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunon, D; Kaufman, J; Salomonsen, J

    1990-01-01

    beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) attracts hemopoietic precursors from chicken bone marrow cells in vitro. The cell population responding to beta 2m increases during the second period of thymus colonization, which takes place at days 12-14 of incubation. The precursors from 13.5 day old embryos were...... isolated after migration towards beta 2m in vitro and shown to be able to colonize a 13 day old thymus in ovo, where they subsequently acquire thymocyte markers. In contrast these beta 2m responsive precursors did not colonize embryonic bursa, i.e. differentiate into B lymphocytes. During chicken...... embryogenesis, peaks of beta 2m transcripts and of free beta 2m synthesis can only be detected in the thymus. The peak of free beta 2m synthesis in the thymus and the increase of beta 2m responding bone marrow cells both occur concomitantly with the second wave of thymus colonization in chicken embryo, facts...

  5. Amyloid-beta binds catalase with high affinity and inhibits hydrogen peroxide breakdown.

    OpenAIRE

    Milton, N G

    1999-01-01

    Amyloid-beta (Abeta) specifically bound purified catalase with high affinity and inhibited catalase breakdown of H(2)O(2). The Abeta-induced catalase inhibition involved formation of the inactive catalase Compound II and was reversible. CatalaseAbeta interactions provide rapid functional assays for the cytotoxic domain of Abeta and suggest a mechanism for some of the observed actions of Abeta plus catalase in vitro.

  6. Regulation of Pancreatic Beta Cell Stimulus-Secretion Coupling by microRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan L. S. Esguerra

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Increased blood glucose after a meal is countered by the subsequent increased release of the hypoglycemic hormone insulin from the pancreatic beta cells. The cascade of molecular events encompassing the initial sensing and transport of glucose into the beta cell, culminating with the exocytosis of the insulin large dense core granules (LDCVs is termed “stimulus-secretion coupling.” Impairment in any of the relevant processes leads to insufficient insulin release, which contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D. The fate of the beta cell, when exposed to environmental triggers of the disease, is determined by the possibility to adapt to the new situation by regulation of gene expression. As established factors of post-transcriptional regulation, microRNAs (miRNAs are well-recognized mediators of beta cell plasticity and adaptation. Here, we put focus on the importance of comprehending the transcriptional regulation of miRNAs, and how miRNAs are implicated in stimulus-secretion coupling, specifically those influencing the late stages of insulin secretion. We suggest that efficient beta cell adaptation requires an optimal balance between transcriptional regulation of miRNAs themselves, and miRNA-dependent gene regulation. The increased knowledge of the beta cell transcriptional network inclusive of non-coding RNAs such as miRNAs is essential in identifying novel targets for the treatment of T2D.

  7. Bloodstream Amyloid-beta (1-40) Peptide, Cognition, and Outcomes in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Barallat, Jaume; de Antonio, Marta; Domingo, Mar; Zamora, Elisabet; Vila, Joan; Subirana, Isaac; Gastelurrutia, Paloma; Pastor, M Cruz; Januzzi, James L; Lupón, Josep

    2017-11-01

    In the brain, amyloid-beta generation participates in the pathophysiology of cognitive disorders; in the bloodstream, the role of amyloid-beta is uncertain but may be linked to sterile inflammation and senescence. We explored the relationship between blood levels of amyloid-beta 1-40 peptide (Aβ40), cognition, and mortality (all-cause, cardiovascular, and heart failure [HF]-related) in ambulatory patients with HF. Bloodstream Aβ40 was measured in 939 consecutive patients with HF. Cognition was evaluated with the Pfeiffer questionnaire (adjusted for educational level) at baseline and during follow-up. Multivariate Cox regression analyses and measurements of performance (discrimination, calibration, and reclassification) were used, with competing risk for specific causes of death. Over 5.1 ± 2.9 years, 471 patients died (all-cause): 250 from cardiovascular causes and 131 HF-related. The median Aβ40 concentration was 519.1 pg/mL [Q1-Q3: 361.8-749.9 pg/mL]. The Aβ40 concentration correlated with age, body mass index, renal dysfunction, and New York Heart Association functional class (all P < .001). There were no differences in Aβ40 in patients with and without cognitive impairment at baseline (P = .97) or during follow-up (P = .20). In multivariable analysis, including relevant clinical predictors and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, Aβ40 remained significantly associated with all-cause death (HR, 1.22; 95%CI, 1.10-1.35; P < .001) and cardiovascular death (HR, 1.18; 95%CI, 1.03-1.36; P = .02), but not with HF-related death (HR, 1.13; 95%CI, 0.93-1.37; P = .22). Circulating Aβ40 improved calibration and patient reclassification. Blood levels of Aβ40 are not associated with cognitive decline in HF. Circulating Aβ40 was predictive of mortality and may indicate systemic aging. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Structure of Alzheimer’s disease amyloid precursor protein copper-binding domain at atomic resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Geoffrey Kwai-Wai; Adams, Julian J. [Biota Structural Biology Laboratory, St Vincent’s Institute, 9 Princes Street, Fitzroy, Victoria 3065 (Australia); Cappai, Roberto [Department of Pathology and Centre for Neuroscience, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); The Mental Health Research Institute of Victoria, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Bio21 Institute, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Parker, Michael W., E-mail: mparker@svi.edu.au [Biota Structural Biology Laboratory, St Vincent’s Institute, 9 Princes Street, Fitzroy, Victoria 3065 (Australia); Bio21 Institute, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2007-10-01

    An atomic resolution structure of the copper-binding domain of the Alzheimer’s disease amyloid precursor protein is presented. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease, as its cleavage generates the Aβ peptide that is toxic to cells. APP is able to bind Cu{sup 2+} and reduce it to Cu{sup +} through its copper-binding domain (CuBD). The interaction between Cu{sup 2+} and APP leads to a decrease in Aβ production and to alleviation of the symptoms of the disease in mouse models. Structural studies of CuBD have been undertaken in order to better understand the mechanism behind the process. Here, the crystal structure of CuBD in the metal-free form determined to ultrahigh resolution (0.85 Å) is reported. The structure shows that the copper-binding residues of CuBD are rather rigid but that Met170, which is thought to be the electron source for Cu{sup 2+} reduction, adopts two different side-chain conformations. These observations shed light on the copper-binding and redox mechanisms of CuBD. The structure of CuBD at atomic resolution provides an accurate framework for structure-based design of molecules that will deplete Aβ production.

  9. Natural Amyloid-Beta Oligomers Acutely Impair the Formation of a Contextual Fear Memory in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittelberger, Kara A.; Piazza, Fabrizio; Tesco, Giuseppina; Reijmers, Leon G.

    2012-01-01

    Memory loss is one of the hallmark symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD). It has been proposed that soluble amyloid-beta (Abeta) oligomers acutely impair neuronal function and thereby memory. We here report that natural Abeta oligomers acutely impair contextual fear memory in mice. A natural Abeta oligomer solution containing Abeta monomers, dimers, trimers, and tetramers was derived from the conditioned medium of 7PA2 cells, a cell line that expresses human amyloid precursor protein containing the Val717Phe familial AD mutation. As a control we used 7PA2 conditioned medium from which Abeta oligomers were removed through immunodepletion. Separate groups of mice were injected with Abeta and control solutions through a cannula into the lateral brain ventricle, and subjected to fear conditioning using two tone-shock pairings. One day after fear conditioning, mice were tested for contextual fear memory and tone fear memory in separate retrieval trials. Three experiments were performed. For experiment 1, mice were injected three times: 1 hour before and 3 hours after fear conditioning, and 1 hour before context retrieval. For experiments 2 and 3, mice were injected a single time at 1 hour and 2 hours before fear conditioning respectively. In all three experiments there was no effect on tone fear memory. Injection of Abeta 1 hour before fear conditioning, but not 2 hours before fear conditioning, impaired the formation of a contextual fear memory. In future studies, the acute effect of natural Abeta oligomers on contextual fear memory can be used to identify potential mechanisms and treatments of AD associated memory loss. PMID:22238679

  10. Molecular architecture of human prion protein amyloid: a parallel, in-register beta-structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Nathan J; Sönnichsen, Frank D; McHaourab, Hassane; Surewicz, Witold K

    2007-11-27

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) represent a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases that are associated with conformational conversion of the normally monomeric and alpha-helical prion protein, PrP(C), to the beta-sheet-rich PrP(Sc). This latter conformer is believed to constitute the main component of the infectious TSE agent. In contrast to high-resolution data for the PrP(C) monomer, structures of the pathogenic PrP(Sc) or synthetic PrP(Sc)-like aggregates remain elusive. Here we have used site-directed spin labeling and EPR spectroscopy to probe the molecular architecture of the recombinant PrP amyloid, a misfolded form recently reported to induce transmissible disease in mice overexpressing an N-terminally truncated form of PrP(C). Our data show that, in contrast to earlier, largely theoretical models, the con formational conversion of PrP(C) involves major refolding of the C-terminal alpha-helical region. The core of the amyloid maps to C-terminal residues from approximately 160-220, and these residues form single-molecule layers that stack on top of one another with parallel, in-register alignment of beta-strands. This structural insight has important implications for understanding the molecular basis of prion propagation, as well as hereditary prion diseases, most of which are associated with point mutations in the region found to undergo a refolding to beta-structure.

  11. Oxidative stress and the amyloid beta peptide in Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Cheignon

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is known to play an important role in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases. In particular, it is linked to the etiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, an age-related neurodegenerative disease and the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. Histopathological hallmarks of AD are intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and extracellular formation of senile plaques composed of the amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ in aggregated form along with metal-ions such as copper, iron or zinc. Redox active metal ions, as for example copper, can catalyze the production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS when bound to the amyloid-β (Aβ. The ROS thus produced, in particular the hydroxyl radical which is the most reactive one, may contribute to oxidative damage on both the Aβ peptide itself and on surrounding molecule (proteins, lipids, …. This review highlights the existing link between oxidative stress and AD, and the consequences towards the Aβ peptide and surrounding molecules in terms of oxidative damage. In addition, the implication of metal ions in AD, their interaction with the Aβ peptide and redox properties leading to ROS production are discussed, along with both in vitro and in vivo oxidation of the Aβ peptide, at the molecular level. Keywords: Oxidative stress, Amyloid beta peptide, Metal-ions, Reactive oxygen species, Oxidative damages

  12. Low background and high contrast PET imaging of amyloid-{beta} with [{sup 11}C]AZD2995 and [{sup 11}C]AZD2184 in Alzheimer's disease patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, Anton; Andersson, Jan; Varnaes, Katarina; Halldin, Christer [Karolinska Institutet, Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); Jureus, Anders; Swahn, Britt-Marie; Sandell, Johan; Julin, Per; Svensson, Samuel [AstraZeneca Research and Development, Neuroscience Research and Therapy Area, Soedertaelje (Sweden); Cselenyi, Zsolt; Schou, Magnus; Johnstroem, Peter; Farde, Lars [Karolinska Institutet, Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska Hospital, AstraZeneca Translational Sciences Centre, PET CoE, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Eriksdotter, Maria; Freund-Levi, Yvonne [Karolinska Institutet, Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Jeppsson, Fredrik [AstraZeneca Research and Development, Neuroscience Research and Therapy Area, Soedertaelje (Sweden); Karolinska Institutet, Science for Life Laboratory, Division of Translational Medicine and Chemical Biology, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-04-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate AZD2995 side by side with AZD2184 as novel PET radioligands for imaging of amyloid-{beta} in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In vitro binding of tritium-labelled AZD2995 and AZD2184 was studied and compared with that of the established amyloid-{beta} PET radioligand PIB. Subsequently, a first-in-human in vivo PET study was performed using [{sup 11}C]AZD2995 and [{sup 11}C]AZD2184 in three healthy control subjects and seven AD patients. AZD2995, AZD2184 and PIB were found to share the same binding site to amyloid-{beta}. [{sup 3}H]AZD2995 had the highest signal-to-background ratio in brain tissue from patients with AD as well as in transgenic mice. However, [{sup 11}C]AZD2184 had superior imaging properties in PET, as shown by larger effect sizes comparing binding potential values in cortical regions of AD patients and healthy controls. Nevertheless, probably due to a lower amount of nonspecific binding, the group separation of the distribution volume ratio values of [{sup 11}C]AZD2995 was greater in areas with lower amyloid-{beta} load, e.g. the hippocampus. Both AZD2995 and AZD2184 detect amyloid-{beta} with high affinity and specificity and also display a lower degree of nonspecific binding than that reported for PIB. Overall [{sup 11}C]AZD2184 seems to be an amyloid-{beta} radioligand with higher uptake and better group separation when compared to [{sup 11}C]AZD2995. However, the very low nonspecific binding of [{sup 11}C]AZD2995 makes this radioligand potentially interesting as a tool to study minute levels of amyloid-{beta}. This sensitivity may be important in investigating, for example, early prodromal stages of AD or in the longitudinal study of a disease modifying therapy. (orig.)

  13. Effect of copper (II) ion against elongation behavior of amyloid {beta} fibrils on liposome membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimanouchi, T.; Onishi, R.; Kitaura, N.; Umakoshi, H.; Kuboi, R. [Division of Chemical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka (Japan)

    2012-01-15

    The fibril growth behavior of amyloid {beta} protein (A{beta}) on cell membranes is relating to the progression of Alzheimer's disease. This growth behavior of A{beta} fibrils is sensitively affected by the metal ions, neurotransmitters, or bioreactive substrate. The inhibitory effect of those materials was quantitatively estimated from the viewpoints of ''crystal growth''. In a bulk aqueous solution, copper (II) ion showed the strong inhibitory effect on the growth of A{beta} fibrils. Meanwhile, the addition of a closed-phospholipid bilayer membrane (liposome) could reduce the above inhibitory effect of copper (II) ion. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Levels of amyloid-beta-42 and CSF pressure are directly related in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirinzi, Tommaso; Di Lazzaro, Giulia; Sancesario, Giulia Maria; Colona, Vito Luigi; Scaricamazza, Eugenia; Mercuri, Nicola Biagio; Martorana, Alessandro; Sancesario, Giuseppe

    2017-12-01

    Experimental data suggest that the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamic is involved in the clearance of beta-amyloid, a key event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). At this regard no evidence still exists in vivo. In this study we explored the relationships between CSF pressure and AD pathology, as measured with CSF core biomarkers. We enrolled 16 patients with probable AD and 21 controls, collecting demographics, clinical data, CSF opening pressure and CSF levels of beta-amyloid-42 fragment (Aβ42), total-tau (t-tau), phosphorylated-tau-181 (p-tau), albumin and albumin ratio. Differences between the groups were calculated with non-parametric tests, while correlations among all parameters were separately calculated with Spearman's test in each group. The groups significantly differed in biomarkers' concentration with lower Aβ42, and higher t-tau and p-tau in AD patients. Moreover, CSF pressure was significantly lower in AD group (11.0 ± 2.8 vs. 13.3 ± 3.0 mmHg, p < 0.05) and directly correlated with Aβ42 levels (R = 0.512; p < 0.05), but not with other biomarkers or parameters. No significant correlations emerged for biomarkers in control group. AD patients exhibit low CSF pressure whose values are directly and selectively related to CSF Aβ42 levels. This interesting correlation may confirm in vivo the association between CSF dynamic and beta-amyloid metabolism occurring in AD.

  15. Single-Cell Detection of Secreted Aβ and sAPPα from Human IPSC-Derived Neurons and Astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Mei-Chen; Muratore, Christina R; Gierahn, Todd M; Sullivan, Sarah E; Srikanth, Priya; De Jager, Philip L; Love, J Christopher; Young-Pearse, Tracy L

    2016-02-03

    Secreted factors play a central role in normal and pathological processes in every tissue in the body. The brain is composed of a highly complex milieu of different cell types and few methods exist that can identify which individual cells in a complex mixture are secreting specific analytes. By identifying which cells are responsible, we can better understand neural physiology and pathophysiology, more readily identify the underlying pathways responsible for analyte production, and ultimately use this information to guide the development of novel therapeutic strategies that target the cell types of relevance. We present here a method for detecting analytes secreted from single human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neural cells and have applied the method to measure amyloid β (Aβ) and soluble amyloid precursor protein-alpha (sAPPα), analytes central to Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. Through these studies, we have uncovered the dynamic range of secretion profiles of these analytes from single iPSC-derived neuronal and glial cells and have molecularly characterized subpopulations of these cells through immunostaining and gene expression analyses. In examining Aβ and sAPPα secretion from single cells, we were able to identify previously unappreciated complexities in the biology of APP cleavage that could not otherwise have been found by studying averaged responses over pools of cells. This technique can be readily adapted to the detection of other analytes secreted by neural cells, which would have the potential to open new perspectives into human CNS development and dysfunction. We have established a technology that, for the first time, detects secreted analytes from single human neurons and astrocytes. We examine secretion of the Alzheimer's disease-relevant factors amyloid β (Aβ) and soluble amyloid precursor protein-alpha (sAPPα) and present novel findings that could not have been observed without a single-cell analytical platform. First, we

  16. Quantifying the pattern of beta/A4 amyloid protein distribution in Alzheimer's disease by image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, C V; Clinton, J; Gentleman, S M; Roberts, G W; Royston, M C

    1992-04-01

    We have undertaken a study of the distribution of the beta/A4 amyloid deposited in the cerebral cortex in Alzheimer's disease. Previous studies which have examined the differential distribution of amyloid in the cortex in order to determine the laminar pattern of cortical pathology have not proved to be conclusive. We have developed an alternative method for the solution of this problem. It involves the immunostaining of sections followed by computer-enhanced image analysis. A mathematical model is then used to describe both the amount and the pattern of amyloid across the cortex. This method is both accurate and reliable and also removes many of the problems concerning inter and intra-rater variability in measurement. This method will provide the basis for further quantitative studies on the differential distribution of amyloid in Alzheimer's disease and other cases of dementia where cerebral amyloidosis occurs.

  17. Effect of four medicinal plants on amyloid-beta induced neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y Cells

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adewusi, EA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid-beta peptide (Aß) is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), a neurodegenerative disorder. This study was designed to determine the effect of four medicinal plants used to treat neurodegenerative diseases on Aß...

  18. Plasma Membrane Protein Profiling in Beta-Amyloid-Treated Microglia Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correani, Virginia; Di Francesco, Laura; Mignogna, Giuseppina; Fabrizi, Cinzia; Leone, Stefano; Giorgi, Alessandra; Passeri, Alessia; Casata, Roberto; Fumagalli, Lorenzo; Maras, Bruno; Schininà, M Eugenia

    2017-09-01

    In the responsiveness of microglia to toxic stimuli, plasma membrane proteins play a key role. In this study we treated with a synthetic beta amyloid peptide murine microglial cells metabolically differently labelled with stable isotope amino acids (SILAC). The plasma membrane was selectively enriched by a multi-stage aqueous two-phase partition system. We were able to identify by 1D-LC-MS/MS analyses 1577 proteins, most of them are plasma membrane proteins according to the Gene Ontology annotation. An unchanged level of amyloid receptors in this data set suggests that microglia preserve their responsiveness capability to the environment even after 24-h challenge with amyloid peptides. On the other hand, 14 proteins were observed to change their plasma membrane abundance to a statistically significant extent. Among these, we proposed as reliable biomarkers of the inflammatory microglia phenotype in AD damaged tissues MAP/microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 3 (MARK3), Interferon-induced transmembrane protein 3 (IFITM3), Annexins A5 and A7 (ANXA5, ANXA7) and Neuropilin-1 (NRP1), all proteins known to be involved in the inflammation processes and in microtubule network assembly rate. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Beyond the neurotransmitter-focused approach in treating Alzheimer's disease: drugs targeting beta-amyloid and tau protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panza, Francesco; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Frisardi, Vincenza; Imbimbo, Bruno P; Capurso, Cristiano; D'Introno, Alessia; Colacicco, Anna M; Seripa, Davide; Vendemiale, Gianluigi; Capurso, Antonio; Pilotto, Alberto

    2009-12-01

    Drugs currently used to treat Alzheimer's Disease (AD) have limited therapeutic value and do not affect the main neuropathological hallmarks of the disease, i.e., senile plaques and neurofibrillar tangles. Senile plaques are mainly formed of beta-amyloid (Abeta), a 42-aminoacid peptide. Neurofibrillar tangles are composed of paired helical filaments of hyperphosphorylated tau protein. New, potentially disease-modifying, therapeutic approaches are targeting Abeta and tau protein. Drugs directed against Abeta include active and passive immunization, that have been found to accelerate Abeta clearance from the brain. The most developmentally advanced monoclonal antibody directly targeting Abeta is bapineuzumab, now being studied in a large Phase III clinical trial. Compounds that interfere with proteases regulating Abeta formation from amyloid precursor protein (APP) are also actively pursued. The discovery of inhibitors of beta-secretase, the enzyme that regulates the first step of the amyloidogenic metabolism of APP, has been revealed to be particularly difficult due to inherent medicinal chemistry problems, and only one compound (CTS-21166) has reached clinical testing. Conversely, several compounds that inhibit gamma-secretase, the pivotal enzyme that generates Abeta, have been identified, the most advanced being LY-450139 (semagacestat), now in Phase III clinical development. Compounds that stimulate alpha-secretase, the enzyme responsible for the non-amyloidogenic metabolism of APP, are also being developed, and one of them, EHT-0202, has recently entered Phase II testing. Potent inhibitors of Abeta aggregation have also been identified, and one of such compounds, PBT-2, has provided encouraging neuropsychological results in a recently completed Phase II study. Therapeutic approaches directed against tau protein include inhibitors of glycogen synthase kinase- 3 (GSK-3), the enzyme responsible for tau phosphorylation and tau protein aggregation inhibitors. NP-12

  20. Amyloid-beta induced CA1 pyramidal cell loss in young adult rats is alleviated by systemic treatment with FGL, a neural cell adhesion molecule-derived mimetic peptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola J Corbett

    Full Text Available Increased levels of neurotoxic amyloid-beta in the brain are a prominent feature of Alzheimer's disease. FG-Loop (FGL, a neural cell adhesion molecule-derived peptide that corresponds to its second fibronectin type III module, has been shown to provide neuroprotection against a range of cellular insults. In the present study impairments in social recognition memory were seen 24 days after a 5 mg/15 µl amyloid-beta(25-35 injection into the right lateral ventricle of the young adult rat brain. This impairment was prevented if the animal was given a systemic treatment of FGL. Unbiased stereology was used to investigate the ability of FGL to alleviate the deleterious effects on CA1 pyramidal cells of the amyloid-beta(25-35 injection. NeuN, a neuronal marker (for nuclear staining was used to identify pyramidal cells, and immunocytochemistry was also used to identify inactive glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK3β and to determine the effects of amyloid-beta(25-35 and FGL on the activation state of GSK3β, since active GSK3β has been shown to cause a range of AD pathologies. The cognitive deficits were not due to hippocampal atrophy as volume estimations of the entire hippocampus and its regions showed no significant loss, but amyloid-beta caused a 40% loss of pyramidal cells in the dorsal CA1 which was alleviated partially by FGL. However, FGL treatment without amyloid-beta was also found to cause a 40% decrease in CA1 pyramidal cells. The action of FGL may be due to inactivation of GSK3β, as an increased proportion of CA1 pyramidal neurons contained inactive GSK3β after FGL treatment. These data suggest that FGL, although potentially disruptive in non-pathological conditions, can be neuroprotective in disease-like conditions.

  1. Amyloid beta peptide immunotherapy in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delrieu, J; Ousset, P J; Voisin, T; Vellas, B

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis have led to the development of numerous compounds that might modify the disease process. Amyloid β peptide represents an important molecular target for intervention in Alzheimer's disease. The main purpose of this work is to review immunotherapy studies in relation to the Alzheimer's disease. Several types of amyloid β peptide immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease are under investigation, active immunization and passive administration with monoclonal antibodies directed against amyloid β peptide. Although immunotherapy approaches resulted in clearance of amyloid plaques in patients with Alzheimer's disease, this clearance did not show significant cognitive effect for the moment. Currently, several amyloid β peptide immunotherapy approaches are under investigation but also against tau pathology. Results from amyloid-based immunotherapy studies in clinical trials indicate that intervention appears to be more effective in early stages of amyloid accumulation in particular solanezumab with a potential impact at mild Alzheimer's disease, highlighting the importance of diagnosing Alzheimer's disease as early as possible and undertaking clinical trials at this stage. In both phase III solanezumab and bapineuzumab trials, PET imaging revealed that about a quarter of patients lacked fibrillar amyloid pathology at baseline, suggesting that they did not have Alzheimer's disease in the first place. So a new third phase 3 clinical trial for solanezumab, called Expedition 3, in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and evidence of amyloid burden has been started. Thus, currently, amyloid intervention is realized at early stage of the Alzheimer's disease in clinical trials, at prodromal Alzheimer's disease, or at asymptomatic subjects or at risk to develop Alzheimer's disease and or at asymptomatic subjects with autosomal dominant mutation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Chronic exposure of NG108-15 cells to amyloid beta peptide (A beta(1-42)) abolishes calcium influx via N-type calcium channels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kašparová, Jana; Lisá, Věra; Tuček, Stanislav; Doležal, Vladimír

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 26, 8-9 (2001), s. 1079-1084 ISSN 0364-3190 R&D Projects: GA MZd NF5183 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : amyloid beta peptide * Alzheimer's disease * calcium Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.638, year: 2001

  3. Intracellular serotonin modulates insulin secretion from pancreatic beta-cells by protein serotonylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Paulmann

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available While serotonin (5-HT co-localization with insulin in granules of pancreatic beta-cells was demonstrated more than three decades ago, its physiological role in the etiology of diabetes is still unclear. We combined biochemical and electrophysiological analyses of mice selectively deficient in peripheral tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph1-/- and 5-HT to show that intracellular 5-HT regulates insulin secretion. We found that these mice are diabetic and have an impaired insulin secretion due to the lack of 5-HT in the pancreas. The pharmacological restoration of peripheral 5-HT levels rescued the impaired insulin secretion in vivo. These findings were further evidenced by patch clamp experiments with isolated Tph1-/- beta-cells, which clearly showed that the secretory defect is downstream of Ca(2+-signaling and can be rescued by direct intracellular application of 5-HT via the clamp pipette. In elucidating the underlying mechanism further, we demonstrate the covalent coupling of 5-HT by transglutaminases during insulin exocytosis to two key players in insulin secretion, the small GTPases Rab3a and Rab27a. This renders them constitutively active in a receptor-independent signaling mechanism we have recently termed serotonylation. Concordantly, an inhibition of such activating serotonylation in beta-cells abates insulin secretion. We also observed inactivation of serotonylated Rab3a by enhanced proteasomal degradation, which is in line with the inactivation of other serotonylated GTPases. Our results demonstrate that 5-HT regulates insulin secretion by serotonylation of GTPases within pancreatic beta-cells and suggest that intracellular 5-HT functions in various microenvironments via this mechanism in concert with the known receptor-mediated signaling.

  4. Towards a Pharmacophore for Amyloid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landau, Meytal; Sawaya, Michael R.; Faull, Kym F.; Laganowsky, Arthur; Jiang, Lin; Sievers, Stuart A.; Liu, Jie; Barrio, Jorge R.; Eisenberg, David (UCLA)

    2011-09-16

    Diagnosing and treating Alzheimer's and other diseases associated with amyloid fibers remains a great challenge despite intensive research. To aid in this effort, we present atomic structures of fiber-forming segments of proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease in complex with small molecule binders, determined by X-ray microcrystallography. The fiber-like complexes consist of pairs of {beta}-sheets, with small molecules binding between the sheets, roughly parallel to the fiber axis. The structures suggest that apolar molecules drift along the fiber, consistent with the observation of nonspecific binding to a variety of amyloid proteins. In contrast, negatively charged orange-G binds specifically to lysine side chains of adjacent sheets. These structures provide molecular frameworks for the design of diagnostics and drugs for protein aggregation diseases. The devastating and incurable dementia known as Alzheimer's disease affects the thinking, memory, and behavior of dozens of millions of people worldwide. Although amyloid fibers and oligomers of two proteins, tau and amyloid-{beta}, have been identified in association with this disease, the development of diagnostics and therapeutics has proceeded to date in a near vacuum of information about their structures. Here we report the first atomic structures of small molecules bound to amyloid. These are of the dye orange-G, the natural compound curcumin, and the Alzheimer's diagnostic compound DDNP bound to amyloid-like segments of tau and amyloid-{beta}. The structures reveal the molecular framework of small-molecule binding, within cylindrical cavities running along the {beta}-spines of the fibers. Negatively charged orange-G wedges into a specific binding site between two sheets of the fiber, combining apolar binding with electrostatic interactions, whereas uncharged compounds slide along the cavity. We observed that different amyloid polymorphs bind different small molecules, revealing that a

  5. Amyloid precursor protein and endosomal-lysosomal dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease: inseparable partners in a multifactorial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Ralph A

    2017-07-01

    Abnormalities of the endosomal-lysosomal network (ELN) are a signature feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). These include the earliest known cytopathology that is specific to AD and that affects endosomes and induces the progressive failure of lysosomes, each of which are directly linked by distinct mechanisms to neurodegeneration. The origins of ELN dysfunction and β-amyloidogenesis closely overlap, which reflects their common genetic basis, the established early involvement of endosomes and lysosomes in amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing and clearance, and the pathologic effect of certain APP metabolites on ELN functions. Genes that promote β-amyloidogenesis in AD (APP, PSEN1/2, and APOE4) have primary effects on ELN function. The importance of primary ELN dysfunction to pathogenesis is underscored by the mutations in more than 35 ELN-related genes that, thus far, are known to cause familial neurodegenerative diseases even though different pathogenic proteins may be involved. In this article, I discuss growing evidence that implicates AD gene-driven ELN disruptions as not only the antecedent pathobiology that underlies β-amyloidogenesis but also as the essential partner with APP and its metabolites that drive the development of AD, including tauopathy, synaptic dysfunction, and neurodegeneration. The striking amelioration of diverse deficits in animal AD models by remediating ELN dysfunction further supports a need to integrate APP and ELN relationships, including the role of amyloid-β, into a broader conceptual framework of how AD arises, progresses, and may be effectively therapeutically targeted.-Nixon, R. A. Amyloid precursor protein and endosomal-lysosomal dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease: inseparable partners in a multifactorial disease. © FASEB.

  6. Synthesis of beta alumina from aluminum hydroxide and oxyhydroxide precursors

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Zyl, A

    1993-02-01

    Full Text Available Two aluminium oxyhydroxides, boehmite and pseudoboehmite, and two aluminium hydroxides, bayerite and gibbsite, have been investigated as precursors for the synthesis of the solid electrolyte, beta alumina. Reaction pathways and products have been...

  7. Luteolin Isolated from the Medicinal Plant Elsholtzia rugulosa (Labiatae Prevents Copper-Mediated Toxicity in β-Amyloid Precursor Protein Swedish Mutation Overexpressing SH-SY5Y Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanhua Du

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Luteolin, a 3’,4’,5,7-tetrahydroxyflavone, is a plant flavonoid and pharmacologically active agent that has been isolated from several plant species. In the present study, the effects of luteolin obtained from the medicinal plant Elsholtzia rugulosa and the related mechanisms were examined in an Alzheimer's disease (AD cell model. In this model, copper was used to exacerbate the neurotoxicity in β-amyloid precursor protein Swedish mutation stably overexpressed SH-SY5Y cells (named “APPsw cells” for short. Based on this model, we demonstrated that luteolin increased cell viability, reduced intracellular ROS generation, enhanced the activity of SOD and reversed mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation. Inhibition of caspase-related apoptosis was consistently involved in the neuroprotection afforded by luteolin. Furthermore, it down-regulated the expression of AβPP and lowered the secretion of Aβ1-42. These results indicated that luteolin from the Elsholtzia rugulosa exerted neroprotective effects through mechanisms that decrease AβPP expression, lower Aβ secretion, regulate the redox imbalance, preserve mitochondrial function, and depress the caspase family-related apoptosis.

  8. Reduced amyloidogenic processing of the amyloid β-protein precursor by the small-molecule Differentiation Inducing Factor-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myre, Michael A.; Washicosky, Kevin; Moir, Robert D.; Tesco, Giuseppina; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Wasco, Wilma

    2013-01-01

    The detection of cell cycle proteins in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brains may represent an early event leading to neurodegeneration. To identify cell cycle modifiers with anti-Aβ properties, we assessed the effect of Differentiation-Inducing Factor-1 (DIF-1), a unique, small-molecule from Dictyostelium discoideum, on the proteolysis of the amyloid β-protein precursor (APP) in a variety of different cell types. We show that DIF-1 slows cell cycle progression through G0/G1 that correlates with a reduction in cyclin D1 protein levels. Western blot analysis of DIF-treated cells and conditioned medium revealed decreases in the levels of secreted APP, mature APP, and C-terminal fragments. Assessment of conditioned media by sandwich ELISA showed reduced levels of Aβ40 and Aβ42, also demonstrating that treatment with DIF-1 effectively decreases the ratio of Aβ42 to Aβ40. In addition, DIF-1 significantly diminished APP phosphorylation at residue T668. Interestingly, site-directed mutagenesis of APP residue Thr668 to alanine or glutamic acid abolished the effect of DIF-1 on APP proteolysis and restored secreted levels of Aβ. Finally, DIF-1 prevented the accumulation of APP C-terminal fragments induced by the proteasome inhibitor lactacystin, and calpain inhibitor N-acetyl-leucyl-leucyl-norleucinal (ALLN). Our findings suggest that DIF-1 affects G0/G1-associated amyloidogenic processing of APP by a γ-secretase-, proteasome- and calpain-insensitive pathway, and that this effect requires the presence of residue Thr668. PMID:19154786

  9. Biological markers of amyloid beta-related mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hampel, Harald

    2010-06-01

    Recent research progress has given detailed knowledge on the molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD), which has been translated into an intense, ongoing development of disease-modifying treatments. Most new drug candidates are targeted on inhibiting amyloid beta (Abeta) production and aggregation. In drug development, it is important to co-develop biomarkers for Abeta-related mechanisms to enable early diagnosis and patient stratification in clinical trials, and to serve as tools to identify and monitor the biochemical effect of the drug directly in patients. Biomarkers are also requested by regulatory authorities to serve as safety measurements. Molecular aberrations in the AD brain are reflected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Core CSF biomarkers include Abeta isoforms (Abeta40\\/Abeta42), soluble APP isoforms, Abeta oligomers and beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1). This article reviews recent research advances on core candidate CSF and plasma Abeta-related biomarkers, and gives a conceptual review on how to implement biomarkers in clinical trials in AD.

  10. Biological markers of amyloid beta-related mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hampel, Harald

    2012-02-01

    Recent research progress has given detailed knowledge on the molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD), which has been translated into an intense, ongoing development of disease-modifying treatments. Most new drug candidates are targeted on inhibiting amyloid beta (Abeta) production and aggregation. In drug development, it is important to co-develop biomarkers for Abeta-related mechanisms to enable early diagnosis and patient stratification in clinical trials, and to serve as tools to identify and monitor the biochemical effect of the drug directly in patients. Biomarkers are also requested by regulatory authorities to serve as safety measurements. Molecular aberrations in the AD brain are reflected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Core CSF biomarkers include Abeta isoforms (Abeta40\\/Abeta42), soluble APP isoforms, Abeta oligomers and beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1). This article reviews recent research advances on core candidate CSF and plasma Abeta-related biomarkers, and gives a conceptual review on how to implement biomarkers in clinical trials in AD.

  11. Effect of catalpol on senile plaques and spatial learning and memory ability in amyloid-β protein precursor/presenilin 1 double transgenic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋冲

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether catalpol affects senile plaque formation and spatial learning and memory ability in the amyloid-βprotein precursor/presenilin 1(APP/PS1)double transgenic mice.Methods

  12. A hydrogel biosensor for high selective and sensitive detection of amyloid-beta oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liping; Zhong, Yong; Gui, Jie; Wang, Xianwu; Zhuang, Xiaorong; Weng, Jian

    2018-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive cognitive and memory impairment. It is the most common neurological disease that causes dementia. Soluble amyloid-beta oligomers (AβO) in blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are the pathogenic biomarker correlated with AD. A simple electrochemical biosensor using graphene oxide/gold nanoparticles (GNPs) hydrogel electrode was developed in this study. Thiolated cellular prion protein (PrP C ) peptide probe was immobilized on GNPs of the hydrogel electrode to construct an AβO biosensor. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was utilized for AβO analysis. The specific binding between AβO and PrP C probes on the hydrogel electrode resulted in an increase in the electron-transfer resistance. The biosensor showed high specificity and sensitivity for AβO detection. It could selectively differentiate AβO from amyloid-beta (Aβ) monomers or fibrils. Meanwhile, it was highly sensitive to detect as low as 0.1 pM AβO in artificial CSF or blood plasma. The linear range for AβO detection is from 0.1 pM to 10 nM. This biosensor could be used as a cost-effective tool for early diagnosis of AD due to its high electrochemical performance and bionic structure.

  13. Amyloid-beta aggregates cause alterations of astrocytic metabolic phenotype: impact on neuronal viability

    OpenAIRE

    Allaman, Igor; Gavillet, Mathilde; Bélanger, Mireille; Laroche, Thierry; Viertl, David; Lashuel, Hilal A.; Magistretti, Pierre J.

    2010-01-01

    Amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptides play a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and exert various toxic effects on neurons; however, relatively little is known about their influence on glial cells. Astrocytes play a pivotal role in brain homeostasis, contributing to the regulation of local energy metabolism and oxidative stress defense, two aspects of importance for neuronal viability and function. In the present study, we explored the effects of Abeta peptides on glucose metabolism ...

  14. Quantitative Comparison of Dense-Core Amyloid Plaque Accumulation in AmyloidPrecursor Protein Transgenic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Reichl, John H.; Rao, Eshaan R.; McNellis, Brittany M.; Huang, Eric S.; Hemmy, Laura S.; Forster, Colleen L.; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Borchelt, David R.; Vassar, Robert; Ashe, Karen H.; Zahs, Kathleen R.

    2016-01-01

    There exist several dozen lines of transgenic mice that express human amyloidprecursor protein (AβPP) with Alzheimer’s disease (AD)-linked mutations. AβPP transgenic mouse lines differ in the types and amounts of Aβ that they generate and in their spatiotemporal patterns of expression of Aβ assemblies, providing a toolkit to study Aβ amyloidosis and the influence of Aβ aggregation on brain function. More complete quantitative descriptions of the types of Aβ assemblies present in transgenic mice and in humans during disease progression should add to our understanding of how Aβ toxicity in mice relates to the pathogenesis of AD. Here, we provide a direct quantitative comparison of amyloid plaque burdens and plaque sizes in four lines of AβPP transgenic mice. We measured the fraction of cortex and hippocampus occupied by dense-core plaques, visualized by staining with Thioflavin S, in mice from young adulthood through advanced age. We found that the plaque burdens among the transgenic lines varied by an order of magnitude: at 15 months of age, the oldest age studied, the median cortical plaque burden in 5XFAD mice was already ~4.5 times that of 21-month Tg2576 mice and ~15 times that of 21–24-month rTg9191 mice. Plaque-size distributions changed across the lifespan in a line- and region-dependent manner. We also compared the dense-core plaque burdens in the mice to those measured in a set of pathologically-confirmed AD cases from the Nun Study. Cortical plaque burdens in Tg2576, APPSwePS1ΔE9, and 5XFAD mice eventually far exceeded those measured in the human cohort. PMID:28059792

  15. Quantitative Comparison of Dense-Core Amyloid Plaque Accumulation in Amyloid-β Protein Precursor Transgenic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Reichl, John H; Rao, Eshaan R; McNellis, Brittany M; Huang, Eric S; Hemmy, Laura S; Forster, Colleen L; Kuskowski, Michael A; Borchelt, David R; Vassar, Robert; Ashe, Karen H; Zahs, Kathleen R

    2017-01-01

    There exist several dozen lines of transgenic mice that express human amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) with Alzheimer's disease (AD)-linked mutations. AβPP transgenic mouse lines differ in the types and amounts of Aβ that they generate and in their spatiotemporal patterns of expression of Aβ assemblies, providing a toolkit to study Aβ amyloidosis and the influence of Aβ aggregation on brain function. More complete quantitative descriptions of the types of Aβ assemblies present in transgenic mice and in humans during disease progression should add to our understanding of how Aβ toxicity in mice relates to the pathogenesis of AD. Here, we provide a direct quantitative comparison of amyloid plaque burdens and plaque sizes in four lines of AβPP transgenic mice. We measured the fraction of cortex and hippocampus occupied by dense-core plaques, visualized by staining with Thioflavin S, in mice from young adulthood through advanced age. We found that the plaque burdens among the transgenic lines varied by an order of magnitude: at 15 months of age, the oldest age studied, the median cortical plaque burden in 5XFAD mice was already ∼4.5 times that of 21-month-old Tg2576 mice and ∼15 times that of 21-24-month-old rTg9191 mice. Plaque-size distributions changed across the lifespan in a line- and region-dependent manner. We also compared the dense-core plaque burdens in the mice to those measured in a set of pathologically-confirmed AD cases from the Nun Study. Cortical plaque burdens in Tg2576, APPSwePS1ΔE9, and 5XFAD mice eventually far exceeded those measured in the human cohort.

  16. Sirt1 regulates insulin secretion by repressing UCP2 in pancreatic beta cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Bordone

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Sir2 and insulin/IGF-1 are the major pathways that impinge upon aging in lower organisms. In Caenorhabditis elegans a possible genetic link between Sir2 and the insulin/IGF-1 pathway has been reported. Here we investigate such a link in mammals. We show that Sirt1 positively regulates insulin secretion in pancreatic beta cells. Sirt1 represses the uncoupling protein (UCP gene UCP2 by binding directly to the UCP2 promoter. In beta cell lines in which Sirt1 is reduced by SiRNA, UCP2 levels are elevated and insulin secretion is blunted. The up-regulation of UCP2 is associated with a failure of cells to increase ATP levels after glucose stimulation. Knockdown of UCP2 restores the ability to secrete insulin in cells with reduced Sirt1, showing that UCP2 causes the defect in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Food deprivation induces UCP2 in mouse pancreas, which may occur via a reduction in NAD (a derivative of niacin levels in the pancreas and down-regulation of Sirt1. Sirt1 knockout mice display constitutively high UCP2 expression. Our findings show that Sirt1 regulates UCP2 in beta cells to affect insulin secretion.

  17. Overproduction, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of human Fe65-PTB2 in complex with the amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radzimanowski, Jens [Heidelberg University Biochemistry Center, INF328, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Beyreuther, Konrad [Center for Molecular Biology, University Heidelberg, INF282, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Sinning, Irmgard; Wild, Klemens, E-mail: klemens.wild@bzh.uni-heidelberg.de [Heidelberg University Biochemistry Center, INF328, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2008-05-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), which releases the aggregation-prone amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide and liberates the intracellular domain (AICD) that interacts with various adaptor proteins. The crystallized AICD–Fe65-PTB2 complex is of central importance for APP translocation, nuclear signalling, processing and Aβ generation. Alzheimer’s disease is associated with typical brain deposits (senile plaques) that mainly contain the neurotoxic amyloid β peptide. This peptide results from proteolytic processing of the type I transmembrane protein amyloid precursor protein (APP). During this proteolytic pathway the APP intracellular domain (AICD) is released into the cytosol, where it associates with various adaptor proteins. The interaction of the AICD with the C-terminal phosphotyrosine-binding domain of Fe65 (Fe65-PTB2) regulates APP translocation, signalling and processing. Human AICD and Fe65-PTB2 have been cloned, overproduced and purified in large amounts in Escherichia coli. A complex of Fe65-PTB2 with the C-terminal 32 amino acids of the AICD gave well diffracting hexagonal crystals and data have been collected to 2.1 Å resolution. Initial phases obtained by the molecular-replacement method are of good quality and revealed well defined electron density for the substrate peptide.

  18. Dual role of proapoptotic BAD in insulin secretion and beta cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danial, Nika N; Walensky, Loren D; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Choi, Cheol Soo; Fisher, Jill K; Molina, Anthony J A; Datta, Sandeep Robert; Pitter, Kenneth L; Bird, Gregory H; Wikstrom, Jakob D; Deeney, Jude T; Robertson, Kirsten; Morash, Joel; Kulkarni, Ameya; Neschen, Susanne; Kim, Sheene; Greenberg, Michael E; Corkey, Barbara E; Shirihai, Orian S; Shulman, Gerald I; Lowell, Bradford B; Korsmeyer, Stanley J

    2008-02-01

    The proapoptotic BCL-2 family member BAD resides in a glucokinase-containing complex that regulates glucose-driven mitochondrial respiration. Here, we present genetic evidence of a physiologic role for BAD in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by beta cells. This novel function of BAD is specifically dependent upon the phosphorylation of its BH3 sequence, previously defined as an essential death domain. We highlight the pharmacologic relevance of phosphorylated BAD BH3 by using cell-permeable, hydrocarbon-stapled BAD BH3 helices that target glucokinase, restore glucose-driven mitochondrial respiration and correct the insulin secretory response in Bad-deficient islets. Our studies uncover an alternative target and function for the BAD BH3 domain and emphasize the therapeutic potential of phosphorylated BAD BH3 mimetics in selectively restoring beta cell function. Furthermore, we show that BAD regulates the physiologic adaptation of beta cell mass during high-fat feeding. Our findings provide genetic proof of the bifunctional activities of BAD in both beta cell survival and insulin secretion.

  19. HIV-1 stimulates nuclear entry of amyloid beta via dynamin dependent EEA1 and TGF-β/Smad signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    András, Ibolya E.; Toborek, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Clinical evidence indicates increased amyloid deposition in HIV-1-infected brains, which contributes to neurocognitive dysfunction in infected patients. Here we show that HIV-1 exposure stimulates amyloid beta (Aβ) nuclear entry in human brain endothelial cells (HBMEC), the main component of the blood–brain barrier (BBB). Treatment with HIV-1 and/or Aβ resulted in concurrent increase in early endosomal antigen-1 (EEA1), Smad, and phosphorylated Smad (pSmad) in nuclear fraction of HBMEC. A series of inhibition and silencing studies indicated that Smad and EEA1 closely interact by influencing their own nuclear entry; the effect that was attenuated by dynasore, a blocker of GTP-ase activity of dynamin. Importantly, inhibition of dynamin, EEA1, or TGF-β/Smad effectively attenuated HIV-1-induced Aβ accumulation in the nuclei of HBMEC. The present study indicates that nuclear uptake of Aβ involves the dynamin-dependent EEA1 and TGF-β/Smad signaling pathways. These results identify potential novel targets to protect against HIV-1-associated dysregulation of amyloid processes at the BBB level. - Highlights: • HIV-1 induces nuclear accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ) in brain endothelial cells. • EEA-1 and TGF-Β/Smad act in concert to regulate nuclear entry of Aβ. • Dynamin appropriates the EEA-1 and TGF-Β/Smad signaling. • Dynamin serves as a master regulator of HIV-1-induced nuclear accumulation of Aβ

  20. HIV-1 stimulates nuclear entry of amyloid beta via dynamin dependent EEA1 and TGF-β/Smad signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    András, Ibolya E., E-mail: iandras@med.miami; Toborek, Michal, E-mail: mtoborek@med.miami.edu

    2014-04-15

    Clinical evidence indicates increased amyloid deposition in HIV-1-infected brains, which contributes to neurocognitive dysfunction in infected patients. Here we show that HIV-1 exposure stimulates amyloid beta (Aβ) nuclear entry in human brain endothelial cells (HBMEC), the main component of the blood–brain barrier (BBB). Treatment with HIV-1 and/or Aβ resulted in concurrent increase in early endosomal antigen-1 (EEA1), Smad, and phosphorylated Smad (pSmad) in nuclear fraction of HBMEC. A series of inhibition and silencing studies indicated that Smad and EEA1 closely interact by influencing their own nuclear entry; the effect that was attenuated by dynasore, a blocker of GTP-ase activity of dynamin. Importantly, inhibition of dynamin, EEA1, or TGF-β/Smad effectively attenuated HIV-1-induced Aβ accumulation in the nuclei of HBMEC. The present study indicates that nuclear uptake of Aβ involves the dynamin-dependent EEA1 and TGF-β/Smad signaling pathways. These results identify potential novel targets to protect against HIV-1-associated dysregulation of amyloid processes at the BBB level. - Highlights: • HIV-1 induces nuclear accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ) in brain endothelial cells. • EEA-1 and TGF-Β/Smad act in concert to regulate nuclear entry of Aβ. • Dynamin appropriates the EEA-1 and TGF-Β/Smad signaling. • Dynamin serves as a master regulator of HIV-1-induced nuclear accumulation of Aβ.

  1. Olive Component Oleuropein Promotes β-Cell Insulin Secretion and Protects β-Cells from Amylin Amyloid-Induced Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling; Velander, Paul; Liu, Dongmin; Xu, Bin

    2017-09-26

    Oleuropein, a natural product derived from olive leaves, has reported anti-diabetic functions. However, detailed molecular mechanisms for how it affects β-cell functions remain poorly understood. Here, we present evidence that oleuropein promotes glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in β-cells. The effect is dose-dependent and stimulates the ERK/MAPK signaling pathway. We further demonstrated that oleuropein inhibits the cytotoxicity induced by amylin amyloids, a hallmark feature of type 2 diabetes. We demonstrated that these dual functions are structure-specific: we identified the 3-hydroxytyrosol moiety of oleuropein as the main functional entity responsible for amyloid inhibition, but the novel GSIS function requires the entire structure scaffold of the molecule.

  2. The effects of cysteamine on thyrotropin and immunoreactive beta-endorphin secretion in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millard, W.J.; Sagar, S.M.; Badger, T.M.; Carr, D.B.; Arnold, M.A.; Spindel, E.; Kasting, N.W.; Martin, J.B.

    1983-02-01

    We examined the effects of the thiol agent cysteamine (CSH), which is known to deplete the hypothalamus of immunoreactive somatostatin, on physiological TSH and beta- endorphin secretion in the adult male rat. CSH at doses of 90 and 300 mg/kg CSH produced a rapid decline in plasma TSH, whereas a dose of 30 mg/kg did not alter plasma TSH levels. After the higher doses of CSH, TSH levels in the blood remained lower than control values on day 2, but returned to normal by 1 week. This decrease in TSH within the plasma was not associated with a reduction in hypothalamic TRH concentrations. The TSH response to 500 ng/kg TRH was normal in CSH-treated animals. Blockade of norepinephrine synthesis with diethyldithiocarbamate (500 mg/kg) or fusaric acid (100 mg/kg) inhibited TSH secretion in a manner similar to that of CSH. beta-Endorphin-like immunoreactivity (bet-End-LI) was elevated in the plasma immediately after CSH (300 mg/kg) administration. This was associated with a 58% reduction in anterior pituitary beta-End-LI and no change in hypothalmic beta-End-LI. Plasma beta-End-LI returned to normal on day 2. The increase in plasma beta-End-LI induced by immobilization stress was not compromised by CSH treatment. The observed effects of CSH on both TSH and beta-End-LI are consistent with a reduction in central norepinephrine neurotransmission through the known actin of CSH to inhibit dopamine-beta-hydroxylase. Acute stress may play a role as well in the observed changes in TSH and beta-End-LI secretion.

  3. Synaptic transmission block by presynaptic injection of oligomeric amyloid beta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Herman; Yu, Eunah; Pigino, Gustavo; Hernandez, Alejandro I.; Kim, Natalia; Moreira, Jorge E.; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Llinás, Rodolfo R.

    2009-01-01

    Early Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathophysiology is characterized by synaptic changes induced by degradation products of amyloid precursor protein (APP). The exact mechanisms of such modulation are unknown. Here, we report that nanomolar concentrations of intraaxonal oligomeric (o)Aβ42, but not oAβ40 or extracellular oAβ42, acutely inhibited synaptic transmission at the squid giant synapse. Further characterization of this phenotype demonstrated that presynaptic calcium currents were unaffected. However, electron microscopy experiments revealed diminished docked synaptic vesicles in oAβ42-microinjected terminals, without affecting clathrin-coated vesicles. The molecular events of this modulation involved casein kinase 2 and the synaptic vesicle rapid endocytosis pathway. These findings open the possibility of a new therapeutic target aimed at ameliorating synaptic dysfunction in AD. PMID:19304802

  4. A systematic review of amyloid-beta peptides as putative mediators of the association between affective disorders and Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbasowa, Leda; Heegaard, N. H. H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Affective disorders are associated with an increased occurrence of cognitive deficits and have been linked to cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. The putative molecular mechanisms involved in these associations are however not clear. The aim of this systematic review...... were limited by very low sample numbers. Finally, different assays for amyloid-beta were utilized in the different studies, thus hampering comparisons. Conclusion: To unravel possible risk relations and causalities between affective disorder and Alzheimer's disease and to determine how amyloid...

  5. Recent progress on understanding the mechanisms of amyloid nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatani, Eri; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2018-04-01

    Amyloid fibrils are supramolecular protein assemblies with a fibrous morphology and cross-β structure. The formation of amyloid fibrils typically follows a nucleation-dependent polymerization mechanism, in which a one-step nucleation scheme has widely been accepted. However, a variety of oligomers have been identified in early stages of fibrillation, and a nucleated conformational conversion (NCC) mechanism, in which oligomers serve as a precursor of amyloid nucleation and convert to amyloid nuclei, has been proposed. This development has raised the need to consider more complicated multi-step nucleation processes in addition to the simplest one-step process, and evidence for the direct involvement of oligomers as nucleation precursors has been obtained both experimentally and theoretically. Interestingly, the NCC mechanism has some analogy with the two-step nucleation mechanism proposed for inorganic and organic crystals and protein crystals, although a more dramatic conformational conversion of proteins should be considered in amyloid nucleation. Clarifying the properties of the nucleation precursors of amyloid fibrils in detail, in comparison with those of crystals, will allow a better understanding of the nucleation of amyloid fibrils and pave the way to develop techniques to regulate it.

  6. Co-culture of clonal beta cells with GLP-1 and glucagon-secreting cell line impacts on beta cell insulin secretion, proliferation and susceptibility to cytotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Alastair D; Vasu, Srividya; Moffett, R Charlotte; Flatt, Peter R

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the direct effects on insulin releasing MIN6 cells of chronic exposure to GLP-1, glucagon or a combination of both peptides secreted from GLUTag L-cell and αTC1.9 alpha-cell lines in co-culture. MIN6, GLUTag and αTC1.9 cell lines exhibited high cellular hormone content and release of insulin, GLP-1 and glucagon, respectively. Co-culture of MIN6 cells with GLUTag cells significantly increased cellular insulin content, beta-cell proliferation, insulin secretory responses to a range of established secretogogues and afforded protection against exposure cytotoxic concentrations of glucose, lipid, streptozotocin or cytokines. Benefits of co-culture of MIN6 cells with αTC1.9 alphacells were limited to enhanced beta-cell proliferation with marginal positive actions on both insulin secretion and cellular protection. In contrast, co-culture of MIN6 with GLUTag cells plus αTC1.9 cells, markedly enhanced both insulin secretory responses and protection against beta-cell toxins compared with co-culture with GLUTag cells alone. These data indicate important long-term effects of conjoint GLP-1 and glucagon exposure on beta-cell function. This illustrates the possible functional significance of alpha-cell GLP-1 production as well as direct beneficial effects of dual agonism at beta-cell GLP-1 and glucagon receptors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société française de biochimie et biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  7. Individualized quantification of brain {beta}-amyloid burden: results of a proof of mechanism phase 0 florbetaben PET trial in patients with Alzheimer's disease and healthy controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthel, Henryk; Luthardt, Julia; Becker, Georg; Patt, Marianne; Sattler, Bernhard; Schildan, Andreas; Hesse, Swen; Meyer, Philipp M.; Sabri, Osama [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Hammerstein, Eva; Hartwig, Kristin; Gertz, Hermann-Josef [University of Leipzig, Department of Psychiatry, Leipzig (Germany); Eggers, Birk [Arzneimittelforschung Leipzig GmbH, Leipzig (Germany); Wolf, Henrike [University of Leipzig, Department of Psychiatry, Leipzig (Germany); University of Zurich, Department of Psychiatry, Zurich (Switzerland); Zimmermann, Torsten; Reischl, Joachim; Rohde, Beate; Reininger, Cornelia [Bayer Healthcare, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Complementing clinical findings with those generated by biomarkers - such as {beta}-amyloid-targeted positron emission tomography (PET) imaging - has been proposed as a means of increasing overall accuracy in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Florbetaben ([{sup 18}F]BAY 94-9172) is a novel {beta}-amyloid PET tracer currently in global clinical development. We present the results of a proof of mechanism study in which the diagnostic efficacy, pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of florbetaben were assessed. The value of various quantitative parameters derived from the PET scans as potential surrogate markers of cognitive decline was also investigated. Ten patients with mild-moderate probable AD (DSM-IV and NINCDS-ADRDA criteria) and ten age-matched ({>=} 55 years) healthy controls (HCs) were administered a single dose of 300 MBq florbetaben, which contained a tracer mass dose of < 5 {mu}g. The 70-90 min post-injection brain PET data were visually analysed by three blinded experts. Quantitative assessment was also performed via MRI-based, anatomical sampling of predefined volumes of interest (VOI) and subsequent calculation of standardized uptake value (SUV) ratios (SUVRs, cerebellar cortex as reference region). Furthermore, single-case, voxelwise analysis was used to calculate individual ''whole brain {beta}-amyloid load''. Visual analysis of the PET data revealed nine of the ten AD, but only one of the ten HC brains to be {beta}-amyloid positive (p = 0.001), with high inter-reader agreement (weighted kappa {>=} 0.88). When compared to HCs, the neocortical SUVRs were significantly higher in the ADs (with descending order of effect size) in frontal cortex, lateral temporal cortex, occipital cortex, anterior and posterior cingulate cortices, and parietal cortex (p = 0.003-0.010). Voxel-based group comparison confirmed these differences. Amongst the PET-derived parameters, the Statistical Parametric Mapping-based whole brain

  8. Cerebral amyloid-beta protein accumulation with aging in cotton-top tamarins: a model of early Alzheimer's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemere, Cynthia A; Oh, Jiwon; Stanish, Heather A; Peng, Ying; Pepivani, Imelda; Fagan, Anne M; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu; Westmoreland, Susan V; Mansfield, Keith G

    2008-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common progressive form of dementia in the elderly. Two major neuropathological hallmarks of AD include cerebral deposition of amyloid-beta protein (Abeta) into plaques and blood vessels, and the presence of neurofibrillary tangles in brain. In addition, activated microglia and reactive astrocytes are often associated with plaques and tangles. Numerous other proteins are associated with plaques in human AD brain, including Apo E and ubiquitin. The amyloid precursor protein and its shorter fragment, Abeta, are homologous between humans and non-human primates. Cerebral Abeta deposition has been reported previously for rhesus monkeys, vervets, squirrel monkeys, marmosets, lemurs, cynomologous monkeys, chimpanzees, and orangutans. Here we report, for the first time, age-related neuropathological changes in cotton-top tamarins (CTT, Saguinus oedipus), an endangered non-human primate native to the rainforests of Colombia and Costa Rica. Typical lifespan is 13-14 years of age in the wild and 15-20+ years in captivity. We performed detailed immunohistochemical analyses of Abeta deposition and associated pathogenesis in archived brain sections from 36 tamarins ranging in age from 6-21 years. Abeta plaque deposition was observed in 16 of the 20 oldest tamarins (>12 years). Plaques contained mainly Abeta42, and in the oldest animals, were associated with reactive astrocytes, activated microglia, Apo E, and ubiquitin-positive dystrophic neurites, similar to human plaques. Vascular Abeta was detected in 14 of the 20 aged tamarins; Abeta42 preceded Abeta40 deposition. Phospho-tau labeled dystrophic neurites and tangles, typically present in human AD, were absent in the tamarins. In conclusion, tamarins may represent a model of early AD pathology.

  9. Disrupting beta-amyloid aggregation for Alzheimer disease treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, L D; Soto, C

    2007-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a devastating degenerative disorder for which there is no cure or effective treatment. Although the etiology of Alzheimer's disease is not fully understood, compelling evidence indicates that deposition of aggregates composed by a misfolded form of the amyloid beta peptide (Abeta) is the central event in the disease pathogenesis. Therefore, an attractive therapeutic strategy is to prevent or reverse Abeta misfolding and aggregation. Diverse strategies have been described to identify inhibitors of this process, including screening of libraries of small molecules chemical compounds, rational design of synthetic peptides, assessment of natural Abeta-binding proteins and stimulation of the immune system by vaccination. In this article we describe these different approaches, their principles and their potential strengths and weaknesses. Overall the available data suggest that the development of drugs to interfere with Abeta misfolding and aggregation is a feasible target that hold great promise for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  10. F-box only protein 2 (Fbxo2) regulates amyloid precursor protein levels and processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkin, Graham; Hunt, Jack; Minakawa, Eiko; Sharkey, Lisa; Tipper, Nathan; Tennant, William; Paulson, Henry L

    2014-03-07

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is an integral membrane glycoprotein whose cleavage products, particularly amyloid-β, accumulate in Alzheimer disease (AD). APP is present at synapses and is thought to play a role in both the formation and plasticity of these critical neuronal structures. Despite the central role suggested for APP in AD pathogenesis, the mechanisms regulating APP in neurons and its processing into cleavage products remain incompletely understood. F-box only protein 2 (Fbxo2), a neuron-enriched ubiquitin ligase substrate adaptor that preferentially binds high-mannose glycans on glycoproteins, was previously implicated in APP processing by facilitating the degradation of the APP-cleaving β-secretase, β-site APP-cleaving enzyme. Here, we sought to determine whether Fbxo2 plays a similar role for other glycoproteins in the amyloid processing pathway. We present in vitro and in vivo evidence that APP is itself a substrate for Fbxo2. APP levels were decreased in the presence of Fbxo2 in non-neuronal cells, and increased in both cultured hippocampal neurons and brain tissue from Fbxo2 knock-out mice. The processing of APP into its cleavage products was also increased in hippocampi and cultured hippocampal neurons lacking Fbxo2. In hippocampal slices, this increase in cleavage products was accompanied by a significant reduction in APP at the cell surface. Taken together, these results suggest that Fbxo2 regulates APP levels and processing in the brain and may play a role in modulating AD pathogenesis.

  11. Interhemispheric EEG differences in olfactory bulbectomized rats with different cognitive abilities and brain beta-amyloid levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobkova, Natalia; Vorobyov, Vasily; Medvinskaya, Natalia; Aleksandrova, Irina; Nesterova, Inna

    2008-09-26

    Alterations in electroencephalogram (EEG) asymmetry and deficits in interhemispheric integration of information have been shown in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, no direct evidence of an association between EEG asymmetry, morphological markers in the brain, and cognition was found either in AD patients or in AD models. In this study we used rats with bilateral olfactory bulbectomy (OBX) as one of the AD models and measured their learning/memory abilities, brain beta-amyloid levels and EEG spectra in symmetrical frontal and occipital cortices. One year after OBX or sham-surgery, the rats were tested with the Morris water paradigm and assigned to three groups: sham-operated rats, SO, and OBX rats with virtually normal, OBX(+), or abnormal, OBX(-), learning (memory) abilities. In OBX vs. SO, the theta EEG activity was enhanced to a higher extent in the right frontal cortex and in the left occipital cortex. This produced significant interhemispheric differences in the frontal cortex of the OBX(-) rats and in the occipital cortex of both OBX groups. The beta1 EEG asymmetry in SO was attenuated in OBX(+) and completely eliminated in OBX(-). OBX produced highly significant beta2 EEG decline in the right frontal cortex, with OBX(-)>OBX(+) rank order of strength. The beta-amyloid level, examined by post-mortem immunological DOT-analysis in the cortex-hippocampus samples, was about six-fold higher in OBX(-) than in SO, but significantly less (enhanced by 82% vs. SO) in OBX(+) than in OBX(-). The involvement of the brain mediatory systems in the observed EEG asymmetry differences is discussed.

  12. Alzheimer's disease risk gene CD33 inhibits microglial uptake of amyloid beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griciuc, Ana; Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Parrado, Antonio R; Lesinski, Andrea N; Asselin, Caroline N; Mullin, Kristina; Hooli, Basavaraj; Choi, Se Hoon; Hyman, Bradley T; Tanzi, Rudolph E

    2013-05-22

    The transmembrane protein CD33 is a sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin that regulates innate immunity but has no known functions in the brain. We have previously shown that the CD33 gene is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we observed increased expression of CD33 in microglial cells in AD brain. The minor allele of the CD33 SNP rs3865444, which confers protection against AD, was associated with reductions in both CD33 expression and insoluble amyloid beta 42 (Aβ42) levels in AD brain. Furthermore, the numbers of CD33-immunoreactive microglia were positively correlated with insoluble Aβ42 levels and plaque burden in AD brain. CD33 inhibited uptake and clearance of Aβ42 in microglial cell cultures. Finally, brain levels of insoluble Aβ42 as well as amyloid plaque burden were markedly reduced in APP(Swe)/PS1(ΔE9)/CD33(-/-) mice. Therefore, CD33 inactivation mitigates Aβ pathology and CD33 inhibition could represent a novel therapy for AD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Impact of amyloid imaging on drug development in Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathis, Chester A. [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)], E-mail: mathisca@upmc.edu; Lopresti, Brian J. [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Klunk, William E. [Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2007-10-15

    Imaging agents capable of assessing amyloid-beta (A{beta}) content in vivo in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) subjects likely will be important as diagnostic agents to detect A{beta} plaques in the brain as well as to help test the amyloid cascade hypothesis of AD and as an aid to assess the efficacy of anti-amyloid therapeutics currently under development and in clinical trials. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies of amyloid deposition in human subjects with several A{beta} imaging agents are currently underway. We reported the first PET studies of the carbon 11-labeled thioflavin-T derivative Pittsburgh Compound B in 2004, and this work has subsequently been extended to include a variety of subject groups, including AD patients, mild cognitive impairment patients and healthy controls. The ability to quantify regional A{beta} plaque load in the brains of living human subjects has provided a means to begin to apply this technology as a diagnostic agent to detect regional concentrations of A{beta} plaques and as a surrogate marker of therapeutic efficacy in anti-amyloid drug trials.

  14. Amyloid precursor protein expression is enhanced in human platelets from subjects with Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration: a real-time PCR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignini, Arianna; Morganti, Stefano; Salvolini, Eleonora; Sartini, Davide; Luzzi, Simona; Fiorini, Rosamaria; Provinciali, Leandro; Di Primio, Roberto; Mazzanti, Laura; Emanuelli, Monica

    2013-12-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) represent the most frequent causes of early-onset and late-onset degenerative dementia, respectively. A correct diagnosis entails the choice of appropriate therapies. In this view the present study aimed to identify biomarkers that could improve the differential diagnosis. We recently found an overexpression of platelet amyloid precursor protein (APP) in AD; furthermore, recent studies have suggested the presence of changes in APP processing in FTLD. In this context, we analyzed the mRNA expression level of Total APP (TOT) and APP containing a Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor domain (KPI) in platelets obtained from AD patients, subjects with FTLD, and healthy subjects. In addition, we evaluated the correlation between platelet APP mRNA expression levels and cognitive impairment.Differential gene expression measurements revealed a significant up-regulation of APP TOT and APP KPI in both AD and FTLD patients compared to the controls (being AD/Controls: 1.67 for APP TOT and 1.47 for APP KPI; FTLD/Controls: 1.62 for APP TOT and 1.51 for APP KPI; p < 0.05), although it is interesting to note that in FTLD patients this expression did not correlate with the severity of cognitive impairment.This could be related to a reduced beta-amyloid (Aβ) formation, caused by an alteration of secretase enzymatic activity, even though a post-transcriptional regulation of APP mRNAs in FTLD cannot be excluded.

  15. Amyloid and tau cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosengren Lars

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because of the emerging intersections of HIV infection and Alzheimer's disease, we examined cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarkers related of amyloid and tau metabolism in HIV-infected patients. Methods In this cross-sectional study we measured soluble amyloid precursor proteins alpha and beta (sAPPα and sAPPβ, amyloid beta fragment 1-42 (Aβ1-42, and total and hyperphosphorylated tau (t-tau and p-tau in CSF of 86 HIV-infected (HIV+ subjects, including 21 with AIDS dementia complex (ADC, 25 with central nervous system (CNS opportunistic infections and 40 without neurological symptoms and signs. We also measured these CSF biomarkers in 64 uninfected (HIV- subjects, including 21 with Alzheimer's disease, and both younger and older controls without neurological disease. Results CSF sAPPα and sAPPβ concentrations were highly correlated and reduced in patients with ADC and opportunistic infections compared to the other groups. The opportunistic infection group but not the ADC patients had lower CSF Aβ1-42 in comparison to the other HIV+ subjects. CSF t-tau levels were high in some ADC patients, but did not differ significantly from the HIV+ neuroasymptomatic group, while CSF p-tau was not increased in any of the HIV+ groups. Together, CSF amyloid and tau markers segregated the ADC patients from both HIV+ and HIV- neuroasymptomatics and from Alzheimer's disease patients, but not from those with opportunistic infections. Conclusions Parallel reductions of CSF sAPPα and sAPPβ in ADC and CNS opportunistic infections suggest an effect of CNS immune activation or inflammation on neuronal amyloid synthesis or processing. Elevation of CSF t-tau in some ADC and CNS infection patients without concomitant increase in p-tau indicates neural injury without preferential accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau as found in Alzheimer's disease. These biomarker changes define pathogenetic pathways to brain injury in ADC that differ from those

  16. PB1-F2 influenza A virus protein adopts a beta-sheet conformation and forms amyloid fibers in membrane environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Christophe; Al Bazzal, Ali; Vidic, Jasmina; Février, Vincent; Bourdieu, Christiane; Bouguyon, Edwige; Le Goffic, Ronan; Vautherot, Jean-François; Bernard, Julie; Moudjou, Mohammed; Noinville, Sylvie; Chich, Jean-François; Da Costa, Bruno; Rezaei, Human; Delmas, Bernard

    2010-04-23

    The influenza A virus PB1-F2 protein, encoded by an alternative reading frame in the PB1 polymerase gene, displays a high sequence polymorphism and is reported to contribute to viral pathogenesis in a sequence-specific manner. To gain insights into the functions of PB1-F2, the molecular structure of several PB1-F2 variants produced in Escherichia coli was investigated in different environments. Circular dichroism spectroscopy shows that all variants have a random coil secondary structure in aqueous solution. When incubated in trifluoroethanol polar solvent, all PB1-F2 variants adopt an alpha-helix-rich structure, whereas incubated in acetonitrile, a solvent of medium polarity mimicking the membrane environment, they display beta-sheet secondary structures. Incubated with asolectin liposomes and SDS micelles, PB1-F2 variants also acquire a beta-sheet structure. Dynamic light scattering revealed that the presence of beta-sheets is correlated with an oligomerization/aggregation of PB1-F2. Electron microscopy showed that PB1-F2 forms amorphous aggregates in acetonitrile. In contrast, at low concentrations of SDS, PB1-F2 variants exhibited various abilities to form fibers that were evidenced as amyloid fibers in a thioflavin T assay. Using a recombinant virus and its PB1-F2 knock-out mutant, we show that PB1-F2 also forms amyloid structures in infected cells. Functional membrane permeabilization assays revealed that the PB1-F2 variants can perforate membranes at nanomolar concentrations but with activities found to be sequence-dependent and not obviously correlated with their differential ability to form amyloid fibers. All of these observations suggest that PB1-F2 could be involved in physiological processes through different pathways, permeabilization of cellular membranes, and amyloid fiber formation.

  17. Effects of Amyloid Precursor Protein 17 Peptide on the Protection of Diabetic Encephalopathy and Improvement of Glycol Metabolism in the Diabetic Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Meng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Researchers have proposed that amyloid precursor protein 17 peptide (APP17 peptide, an active fragment of amyloid precursor protein (APP in the nervous system, has therapeutic effects on neurodegeneration. Diabetic encephalopathy (DE is a neurological disease caused by diabetes. Here we use multiple experimental approaches to investigate the effect of APP17 peptide on changes in learning behavior and glycol metabolism in rats. It was found that rats with DE treated by APP17 peptide showed reversed behavioral alternation. The [18F]-FDG-PET images and other results all showed that the APP17 peptide could promote glucose metabolism in the brain of the DE rat model. Meanwhile, the insulin signaling was markedly increased as shown by increased phosphorylation of Akt and enhanced GLUT4 activation. Compared with the DE group, the activities of SOD, GSH-Px, and CAT in the rat hippocampal gyrus were increased, while MDA decreased markedly in the DE + APP17 peptide group. No amyloid plaques in the cortex and the hippocampus were detected in either group, indicating that the experimental animals in the current study were not suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. These results indicate that APP17 peptide could be used to treat DE effectively.

  18. Adrenergic receptors and gastric secretion in dogs. Is a "tonic balance" relationship between vagal and beta 2-adrenergic activity a possibility?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottrup, F; Hovendal, C; Bech, K

    1984-01-01

    The relative influence of adrenergic receptors on gastric acid secretion in the dog stomach with different vagal activity or "tone" is almost unknown. beta-adrenoceptors seem to be most important for the direct effect of adrenergic stimulation on acid secretion. In this study the effects...... acid secretion was not influenced significantly by beta-blockade. Similar dose-response curves were found for non-vagotomized dogs with high beta 2-adrenergic tone and dogs with low vagal tone (vagotomy) after pentagastrin and histamine stimulated acid secretion. This study indicates...... that a counterbalance between beta 2-adrenergic and cholinergic vagal tone exists. A "tonic balance theory" is suggested and is probably involved in the resulting acid secretion after vagotomy....

  19. Ellipsometric Immunosensor for Detection of Amyloid Precursor Protein with a View of Alzheimer's Disease Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexei Nabok

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The detection of amyloid precursor protein isoform 770 (APP770 was achieved with the use of total internal reflection ellipsometry (TIRE in a direct immunoassay format with DE2 monoclonal antibodies raised against the β amyloid peptide 1-16 (Aβ 1-16 which is a part of APP770. DE2 antibodies were immobilised on the surface of gold by electrostatic binding to a layer of (polyallylamine hydrochloride (PAH via an intermediate layer of Protein G molecules. TIRE spectra were recorded after adsorption (binding of every molecular layer in a sequence of PAH, Protein G, DE2, and APP770. A noticeable increase in the adsorbed layer thickness was obtained upon binding of APP770 molecules from its solution of unknown concentration in Complete Medium, a complex mixture containing other proteins. For a purpose of TIRE biosensor calibration, complementary quartz crystal microbalance (QCM measurements were utilised and allowed the evaluation of surface concentrations of DE2 and APP770 of 1.08.1011 cm-2 and 4.73.1012 cm-2, respectively.

  20. Impact of amyloid-beta changes on cognitive outcomes in Alzheimer's disease: analysis of clinical trials using a quantitative systems pharmacology model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerts, Hugo; Spiros, Athan; Roberts, Patrick

    2018-02-02

    Despite a tremendous amount of information on the role of amyloid in Alzheimer's disease (AD), almost all clinical trials testing this hypothesis have failed to generate clinically relevant cognitive effects. We present an advanced mechanism-based and biophysically realistic quantitative systems pharmacology computer model of an Alzheimer-type neuronal cortical network that has been calibrated with Alzheimer Disease Assessment Scale, cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog) readouts from historical clinical trials and simulated the differential impact of amyloid-beta (Aβ40 and Aβ42) oligomers on glutamate and nicotinic neurotransmission. Preclinical data suggest a beneficial effect of shorter Aβ forms within a limited dose range. Such a beneficial effect of Aβ40 on glutamate neurotransmission in human patients is absolutely necessary to reproduce clinical data on the ADAS-Cog in minimal cognitive impairment (MCI) patients with and without amyloid load, the effect of APOE genotype effect on the slope of the cognitive trajectory over time in placebo AD patients and higher sensitivity to cholinergic manipulation with scopolamine associated with higher Aβ in MCI subjects. We further derive a relationship between units of Aβ load in our model and the standard uptake value ratio from amyloid imaging. When introducing the documented clinical pharmacodynamic effects on Aβ levels for various amyloid-related clinical interventions in patients with low Aβ baseline, the platform predicts an overall significant worsening for passive vaccination with solanezumab, beta-secretase inhibitor verubecestat and gamma-secretase inhibitor semagacestat. In contrast, all three interventions improved cognition in subjects with moderate to high baseline Aβ levels, with verubecestat anticipated to have the greatest effect (around ADAS-Cog value 1.5 points), solanezumab the lowest (0.8 ADAS-Cog value points) and semagacestat in between. This could explain the success of many amyloid

  1. Two distinct β-sheet structures in Italian-mutant amyloid-beta fibrils : a potential link to different clinical phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hubin, Ellen; Deroo, Stéphanie; Schierle, Gabriele Kaminksi; Kaminski, Clemens; Serpell, Louise; Subramaniam, Vinod; van Nuland, Nico; Broersen, Kerensa; Raussens, Vincent; Sarroukh, Rabia

    2015-01-01

    Most Alzheimer's disease (AD) cases are late-onset and characterized by the aggregation and deposition of the amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide in extracellular plaques in the brain. However, a few rare and hereditary Aβ mutations, such as the Italian Glu22-to-Lys (E22K) mutation, guarantee the development

  2. Effects of the beta-carbolines, harmane and pinoline, on insulin secretion from isolated human islets of Langerhans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, E Jane; Hudson, Alan L; Parker, Christine A; Morgan, Noel G

    2003-12-15

    It is well known that certain imidazoline compounds can stimulate insulin secretion and this has been attributed to the activation of imidazoline I(3) binding sites in the pancreatic beta-cell. Recently, it has been proposed that beta-carbolines may be endogenous ligands having activity at imidazoline sites and we have, therefore, studied the effects of beta-carbolines on insulin secretion. The beta-carbolines harmane, norharmane and pinoline increased insulin secretion two- to threefold from isolated human islets of Langerhans. The effects of harmane and pinoline were dose-dependent (EC(50): 5 and 25 microM, respectively) and these agents also blocked the inhibitory effects of the potassium channel agonist, diazoxide, on glucose-induced insulin release. Stimulation of insulin secretion by harmane was glucose-dependent but, unlike the imidazoline I(3) receptor agonist efaroxan, it increased the rate of insulin release beyond that elicited by 20 mM glucose (20 mM glucose alone: 253+/-34% vs. basal; 20 mM glucose plus 100 microM harmane: 327+/-15%; P<0.01). Stimulation of insulin secretion by harmane was attenuated by the imidazoline I(3) receptor antagonist KU14R (2 (2-ethyl 2,3-dihydro-2-benzofuranyl)-2-imidazole) and was reduced when islets were treated with efaroxan for 18 h, prior to the addition of harmane. The results reveal that beta-carbolines can potentiate the rate of insulin secretion from human islets and suggest that these agents may be useful prototypes for the development of novel insulin secretagogues.

  3. Correlations between serum levels of beta amyloid, cerebrospinal levels of tau and phospho tau, and delayed response tasks in young and aged cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darusman, Huda Shalahudin; Sajuthi, D; Kalliokoski, O

    2013-01-01

    In an attempt to explore cynomolgus monkeys as an animal model for Alzheimer's disease, the present study focused on the Alzheimer's biomarkers beta amyloid 1-42 (Aβ42 ) in serum, and total tau (t-tau) and phosphorylated tau (p-tau) levels in cerebrospinal fluid.......In an attempt to explore cynomolgus monkeys as an animal model for Alzheimer's disease, the present study focused on the Alzheimer's biomarkers beta amyloid 1-42 (Aβ42 ) in serum, and total tau (t-tau) and phosphorylated tau (p-tau) levels in cerebrospinal fluid....

  4. Einfluß einer In-vitro- und In-vivo-Cholesterol-Modulation in Hirnmembranen auf die zellulären Effekte von Amyloid-beta-Peptid

    OpenAIRE

    Kirsch, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    Die exzessive Bildung und Ablagerung von aggregiertem Amyloid beta-Peptid im Gehirn von Alzheimer Patienten wird allgemein als zentrales Ereignis im Rahmen des Neurodegenerationsprozesses der Alzheimer Demenz betrachtet. Der Amyloid-Stoffwechsel ist dabei in sehr vielfältiger Weise mit dem zellulären Cholesterol-Stoffwechsel verknüpft. Hohe Cholesterolspiegel in spezifischen Membrandomänen wie Lipid-Rafts forcieren sehr wahrscheinlich die zelluläre Produktion als auch die Fibrillogenese von A...

  5. Cellular prion protein expression is not regulated by the Alzheimer's amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Lewis

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence of molecular and cellular links between Alzheimer's disease (AD and prion diseases. The cellular prion protein, PrP(C, modulates the post-translational processing of the AD amyloid precursor protein (APP, through its inhibition of the β-secretase BACE1, and oligomers of amyloid-β bind to PrP(C which may mediate amyloid-β neurotoxicity. In addition, the APP intracellular domain (AICD, which acts as a transcriptional regulator, has been reported to control the expression of PrP(C. Through the use of transgenic mice, cell culture models and manipulation of APP expression and processing, this study aimed to clarify the role of AICD in regulating PrP(C. Over-expression of the three major isoforms of human APP (APP(695, APP(751 and APP(770 in cultured neuronal and non-neuronal cells had no effect on the level of endogenous PrP(C. Furthermore, analysis of brain tissue from transgenic mice over-expressing either wild type or familial AD associated mutant human APP revealed unaltered PrP(C levels. Knockdown of endogenous APP expression in cells by siRNA or inhibition of γ-secretase activity also had no effect on PrP(C levels. Overall, we did not detect any significant difference in the expression of PrP(C in any of the cell or animal-based paradigms considered, indicating that the control of cellular PrP(C levels by AICD is not as straightforward as previously suggested.

  6. Alzheimer’s Disease Risk Gene CD33 Inhibits Microglial Uptake of Amyloid Beta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griciuc, Ana; Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Parrado, Antonio R.; Lesinski, Andrea N.; Asselin, Caroline N.; Mullin, Kristina; Hooli, Basavaraj; Choi, Se Hoon; Hyman, Bradley T.; Tanzi, Rudolph E.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The transmembrane protein CD33 is a sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin that regulates innate immunity but has no known functions in the brain. We have previously shown that the CD33 gene is a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here, we observed increased expression of CD33 in microglial cells in AD brain. The minor allele of the CD33 SNP rs3865444, which confers protection against AD, was associated with reductions in both CD33 expression and insoluble amyloid beta 42 (Aβ42) levels in AD brain. Furthermore, the numbers of CD33-immunoreactive microglia were positively correlated with insoluble Aβ42 levels and plaque burden in AD brain. CD33 inhibited uptake and clearance of Aβ42 in microglial cell cultures. Finally, brain levels of insoluble Aβ42 as well as amyloid plaque burden were markedly reduced in APPSwe/PS1ΔE9/CD33−/− mice. Therefore, CD33 inactivation mitigates Aβ pathology and CD33 inhibition could represent a novel therapy for AD. PMID:23623698

  7. Lactic acid induces aberrant amyloid precursor protein processing by promoting its interaction with endoplasmic reticulum chaperone proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiwen Xiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lactic acid, a natural by-product of glycolysis, is produced at excess levels in response to impaired mitochondrial function, high-energy demand, and low oxygen availability. The enzyme involved in the production of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ of Alzheimer's disease, BACE1, functions optimally at lower pH, which led us to investigate a potential role of lactic acid in the processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Lactic acid increased levels of Aβ40 and 42, as measured by ELISA, in culture medium of human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y, whereas it decreased APP metabolites, such as sAPPα. In cell lysates, APP levels were increased and APP was found to interact with ER-chaperones in a perinuclear region, as determined by co-immunoprecipitation and fluorescence microscopy studies. Lactic acid had only a very modest effect on cellular pH, did increase the levels of ER chaperones Grp78 and Grp94 and led to APP aggregate formation reminiscent of aggresomes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that sustained elevations in lactic acid levels could be a risk factor in amyloidogenesis related to Alzheimer's disease through enhanced APP interaction with ER chaperone proteins and aberrant APP processing leading to increased generation of amyloid peptides and APP aggregates.

  8. secHsp70 as a tool to approach amyloid-β42 and other extracellular amyloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mena, Lorena; Chhangani, Deepak; Fernandez-Funez, Pedro; Rincon-Limas, Diego E

    2017-07-03

    Self-association of amyloidogenic proteins is the main pathological trigger in a wide variety of neurodegenerative disorders. These aggregates are deposited inside or outside the cell due to hereditary mutations, environmental exposures or even normal aging. Cumulative evidence indicates that the heat shock chaperone Hsp70 possesses robust neuroprotection against various intracellular amyloids in Drosophila and mouse models. However, its protective role against extracellular amyloids was largely unknown as its presence outside the cells is very limited. Our recent manuscript in PNAS revealed that an engineered form of secreted Hsp70 (secHsp70) is highly protective against toxicity induced by extracellular deposition of the amyloid-β42 (Aβ42) peptide. In this Extra View article, we extend our analysis to other members of the heat shock protein family. We created PhiC31-based transgenic lines for human Hsp27, Hsp40, Hsp60 and Hsp70 and compared their activities in parallel against extracellular Aβ42. Strikingly, only secreted Hsp70 exhibits robust protection against Aβ42-triggered toxicity in the extracellular milieu. These observations indicate that the ability of secHsp70 to suppress Aβ42 insults is quite unique and suggest that targeted secretion of Hsp70 may represent a new therapeutic approach against Aβ42 and other extracellular amyloids. The potential applications of this engineered chaperone are discussed.

  9. Effects of Capsule Yi -Zhi on learning and memory disorder and beta-amyloid peptide induced neurotoxicity in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUJiang-Ping; WUHang-Yu; LILin

    2004-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effects of Capsule Yi-Zhi (CYZ) on learning and memory disorder and beta-amyloid protein induced neurotoxieity in rats. Methods Various doses of CYZ were administered to Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats for 8 days, twice a day. Then scopolamine hydrobromide (Sco) intraperitoneal injection was performed on each rat and the

  10. A lentiviral sponge for miR-101 regulates RanBP9 expression and amyloid precursor protein metabolism in hippocampal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eBarbato

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegeneration associated with amyloid β (Aβ peptide accumulation, synaptic loss, and memory impairment are pathophysiological features of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Numerous microRNAs regulate amyloid precursor protein (APP expression and metabolism. We previously reported that miR-101 is a negative regulator of APP expression in cultured hippocampal neurons. In this study, a search for predicted APP metabolism-associated miR-101 targets led to the identification of a conserved miR-101 binding site within the 3’ untranslated region (UTR of the mRNA encoding Ran-binding protein 9 (RanBP9. RanBP9 increases APP processing by β-amyloid converting enzyme 1 (BACE1, secretion of soluble APPβ (sAPPβ, and generation of Aβ. MiR-101 significantly reduced reporter gene expression when co-transfected with a RanBP9 3'-UTR reporter construct, while site-directed mutagenesis of the predicted miR-101 target site eliminated the reporter response. To investigate the effect of stable inhibition of miR-101 both in vitro and in vivo, a microRNA sponge was developed to bind miR-101 and derepress its targets. Four tandem bulged miR-101 responsive elements (REs, located downstream of the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP open reading frame and driven by the synapsin promoter, were placed in a lentiviral vector to create the pLSyn-miR-101 sponge. Delivery of the sponge to primary hippocampal neurons significantly increased both APP and RanBP9 expression, as well as sAPPβ levels in the conditioned medium. Importantly, silencing of endogenous RanBP9 reduced sAPPβ levels in miR-101 sponge-containing hippocampal cultures, indicating that miR-101 inhibition may increase amyloidogenic processing of APP by RanBP9. Lastly, the impact of miR-101 on its targets was demonstrated in vivo by intrahippocampal injection of the pLSyn-miR-101 sponge into C57BL6 mice. This study thus provides the basis for studying the consequences of long-term miR-101 inhibition on

  11. Neurofibrillary tangles and the deposition of a beta amyloid peptide with a novel N-terminal epitope in the brains of wild Tsushima leopard cats.

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    James K Chambers

    Full Text Available Beta amyloid (Aβ deposits are seen in aged individuals in many of the mammalian species that possess the same Aβ amino acid sequence as humans. Conversely, neurofibrillary tangles (NFT, the other hallmark lesion of Alzheimer's disease (AD, are extremely rare in these animals. We detected Aβ deposits in the brains of Tsushima leopard cats (Prionailurus bengalensis euptilurus that live exclusively on Tsushima Island, Japan. Aβ42 was deposited in a granular pattern in the neuropil of the pyramidal cell layer, but did not form argyrophilic senile plaques. These Aβ deposits were not immunolabeled with antibodies to the N-terminal of human Aβ. Sequence analysis of the amyloid precursor protein revealed an amino acid substitution at the 7th residue of the Aβ peptide. In a comparison with other mammalian animals that do develop argyrophilic senile plaques, we concluded that the alternative Aβ amino acid sequence displayed by leopard cats is likely to be related to its distinctive deposition pattern. Interestingly, most of the animals with these Aβ deposits also developed NFTs. The distributions of hyperphosphorylated tau-positive cells and the two major isoforms of aggregated tau proteins were quite similar to those seen in Alzheimer's disease. In addition, the unphosphorylated form of GSK-3β colocalized with hyperphosphorylated tau within the affected neurons. In conclusion, this animal species develops AD-type NFTs without argyrophilic senile plaques.

  12. Modeling the Aggregation Propensity and Toxicity of Amyloid-β Variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiwari, Manish Kumar; Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative disorders. Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is directly linked to deposits of amyloid-β (Aβ) derived from the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP), and multiple experimental studies have investigated the aggregation behavior of these amyloids...

  13. Synthesis, Molecular Modelling and Biological Evaluation of Novel Heterodimeric, Multiple Ligands Targeting Cholinesterases and Amyloid Beta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalina Hebda

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cholinesterases and amyloid beta are one of the major biological targets in the search for a new and efficacious treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. The study describes synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of new compounds designed as dual binding site acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Among the synthesized compounds, two deserve special attention—compounds 42 and 13. The former is a saccharin derivative and the most potent and selective acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (EeAChE IC50 = 70 nM. Isoindoline-1,3-dione derivative 13 displays balanced inhibitory potency against acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE (EeAChE IC50 = 0.76 μM, EqBuChE IC50 = 0.618 μM, and it inhibits amyloid beta aggregation (35.8% at 10 μM. Kinetic studies show that the developed compounds act as mixed or non-competitive acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. According to molecular modelling studies, they are able to interact with both catalytic and peripheral active sites of the acetylcholinesterase. Their ability to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB was confirmed in vitro in the parallel artificial membrane permeability BBB assay. These compounds can be used as a solid starting point for further development of novel multifunctional ligands as potential anti-Alzheimer’s agents.

  14. Direct interaction of beta-amyloid with Na,K-ATPase as a putative regulator of the enzyme function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrushanko, Irina Yu.; Mitkevich, Vladimir A.; Anashkina, Anastasia A.; Adzhubei, Alexei A.; Burnysheva, Ksenia M.; Lakunina, Valentina A.; Kamanina, Yulia V.; Dergousova, Elena A.; Lopina, Olga D.; Ogunshola, Omolara O.; Bogdanova, Anna Yu.; Makarov, Alexander A.

    2016-06-01

    By maintaining the Na+ and K+ transmembrane gradient mammalian Na,K-ATPase acts as a key regulator of neuronal electrotonic properties. Na,K-ATPase has an important role in synaptic transmission and memory formation. Accumulation of beta-amyloid (Aβ) at the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease is accompanied by reduction of Na,K-ATPase functional activity. The molecular mechanism behind this phenomenon is not known. Here we show that the monomeric Aβ(1-42) forms a tight (Kd of 3 μM), enthalpy-driven equimolar complex with α1β1 Na,K-ATPase. The complex formation results in dose-dependent inhibition of the enzyme hydrolytic activity. The binding site of Aβ(1-42) is localized in the “gap” between the alpha- and beta-subunits of Na,K-ATPase, disrupting the enzyme functionality by preventing the subunits from shifting towards each other. Interaction of Na,K-ATPase with exogenous Aβ(1-42) leads to a pronounced decrease of the enzyme transport and hydrolytic activity and Src-kinase activation in neuroblastoma cells SH-SY5Y. This interaction allows regulation of Na,K-ATPase activity by short-term increase of the Aβ(1-42) level. However prolonged increase of Aβ(1-42) level under pathological conditions could lead to chronical inhibition of Na,K-ATPase and disruption of neuronal function. Taken together, our data suggest the role of beta-amyloid as a novel physiological regulator of Na,K-ATPase.

  15. Prelysosomal Compartments in the Unconventional Secretion of Amyloidogenic Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Borland

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A mechanistic link between neuron-to-neuron transmission of secreted amyloid and propagation of protein malconformation cytopathology and disease has recently been uncovered in animal models. An enormous interest in the unconventional secretion of amyloids from neurons has followed. Amphisomes and late endosomes are the penultimate maturation products of the autophagosomal and endosomal pathways, respectively, and normally fuse with lysosomes for degradation. However, under conditions of perturbed membrane trafficking and/or lysosomal deficiency, prelysosomal compartments may instead fuse with the plasma membrane to release any contained amyloid. After a brief introduction to the endosomal and autophagosomal pathways, we discuss the evidence for autophagosomal secretion (exophagy of amyloids, with a comparative emphasis on Aβ1–42 and α-synuclein, as luminal and cytosolic amyloids, respectively. The ESCRT-mediated import of cytosolic amyloid into late endosomal exosomes, a known vehicle of transmission of macromolecules between cells, is also reviewed. Finally, mechanisms of lysosomal dysfunction, deficiency, and exocytosis are exemplified in the context of genetically identified risk factors, mainly for Parkinson’s disease. Exocytosis of prelysosomal or lysosomal organelles is a last resort for clearance of cytotoxic material and alleviates cytopathy. However, they also represent a vehicle for the concentration, posttranslational modification, and secretion of amyloid seeds.

  16. Analysis of interleukin (IL)-1 beta and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta-induced signal transduction pathways in IL-2 and TGF-beta secretion and proliferation in the thymoma cell line EL4.NOB-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siese, A; Jaros, P P; Willig, A

    1999-02-01

    In the present study we investigated the interleukin (IL)-1beta and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1)-mediated proliferation, and production of IL-2 and TGF-beta, in the murine T-cell line, EL4.NOB-1. This cell line is resistant to TGF-beta concerning growth arrest but not autoinduction or suppression of IL-1-induced IL-2 production. When cocultured with IL-1beta, TGF-beta showed growth-promoting activity that could be antagonized by adding the phosphatidyl choline-dependent phospholipase C (PC-PLC) inhibitor, D609. Using specific enzyme inhibitors of protein kinases (PK) C and A, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), phospholipase A2 (PLA2), phosphatidylinositol-dependent (PI)-PLC and PC-PLC, we showed that IL-1beta-induced IL-2 synthesis was dependent on all investigated kinases and phospholipases, except PC-PLC. TGF-beta1 was able to inhibit IL-2 synthesis by the activation of PKA and MAPK. The same kinases are involved in TGF-beta autoinduction that is accompanied by a secretion of the active but not the latent growth factor and is antagonized by IL-1beta. Addition of the PI-PLC inhibitor, ET 18OCH3, or the PLA2 inhibitor (quinacrine) alone, resulted in secretion of latent TGF-beta and, in the case of ET 18OCH3, active TGF-beta. These data implicate a role for PI-PLC and PLA2 in the control of latency and secretion. Analysis of specific tyrosine activity and c-Fos expression showed synergistic but no antagonistic effects. These events are therefore not involved in IL- and TGF-beta-regulated IL-2 and TGF-beta production, but might participate in IL-1/TGF-beta-induced growth promotion.

  17. The alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-selective antagonist, methyllycaconitine, partially protects against beta-amyloid1-42 toxicity in primary neuron-enriched cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Shelley E; de Fiebre, Nancy Ellen C; de Fiebre, Christopher M

    2004-10-01

    Studies have suggested that the neuroprotective actions of alpha7 nicotinic agonists arise from activation of receptors and not from the extensive desensitization which rapidly follows activation. Here, we report that the alpha7-selective nicotinic antagonist, methyllycaconitine (MLA), protects against beta-amyloid-induced neurotoxicity; whereas the alpha4beta2-selective antagonist, dihydro-beta-erythroidine, does not. These findings suggest that neuroprotective actions of alpha7-acting agents arise from receptor inhibition/desensitization and that alpha7 antagonists may be useful neuroprotective agents.

  18. Activation of extrasynaptic, but not synaptic, NMDA receptors modifies amyloid precursor protein expression pattern and increases amyloid-ß production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordji, Karim; Becerril-Ortega, Javier; Nicole, Olivier; Buisson, Alain

    2010-11-24

    Calcium is a key mediator controlling essential neuronal functions depending on electrical activity. Altered neuronal calcium homeostasis affects metabolism of amyloid precursor protein (APP), leading to increased production of β-amyloid (Aβ), and contributing to the initiation of Alzheimer's disease (AD). A linkage between excessive glutamate receptor activation and neuronal Aβ release was established, and recent reports suggest that synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDA receptor (NMDAR) activation may have distinct consequences in plasticity, gene regulation, and neuronal death. Here, we report for the first time that prolonged activation of extrasynaptic NMDAR, but not synaptic NMDAR, dramatically increased the neuronal production of Aβ. This effect was preceded by a shift from APP695 to Kunitz protease inhibitory domain (KPI) containing APPs (KPI-APPs), isoforms exhibiting an important amyloidogenic potential. Conversely, after synaptic NMDAR activation, we failed to detect any KPI-APP expression and neuronal Aβ production was not modified. Calcium imaging data showed that intracellular calcium concentration after extrasynaptic NMDAR stimulation was lower than after synaptic activation. This suggests distinct signaling pathways for each pool of receptors. We found that modification of neuronal APP expression pattern triggered by extrasynaptic NMDAR activation was regulated at an alternative splicing level involving calcium-/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV, but overall APP expression remained identical. Finally, memantine dose-dependently inhibited extrasynaptic NMDAR-induced KPI-APPs expression as well as neuronal Aβ release. Altogether, these data suggest that a chronic activation of extrasynaptic NMDAR promotes amyloidogenic KPI-APP expression leading to neuronal Aβ release, representing a causal risk factor for developing AD.

  19. Methyl Salicylate Lactoside Protects Neurons Ameliorating Cognitive Disorder Through Inhibiting Amyloid Beta-Induced Neuroinflammatory Response in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinze; Ma, Xiaowei; Wang, Yu; Chen, Chengjuan; Hu, Min; Wang, Linlin; Fu, Junmin; Shi, Gaona; Zhang, Dongming; Zhang, Tiantai

    2018-01-01

    Neuroinflammatory reactions mediated by microglia and astrocytes have been shown to play a key role in early progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Increased evidences have demonstrated that neurons exacerbate local inflammatory reactions by producing inflammatory mediators and act as an important participant in the pathogenesis of AD. Methyl salicylate lactoside (MSL) is an isolated natural product that is part of a class of novel non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID). In our previous studies, we demonstrated that MSL exhibited therapeutic effects on arthritis-induced mice and suppressed the activation of glial cells. In the current study, we investigated the effects of MSL on cognitive function and neuronal protection induced by amyloid-beta peptides (Aβ) and explored potential underlying mechanisms involved. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin 1 (PS1) double transgenic mice were used to evaluate the effects of MSL through behavioral testing and neuronal degenerative changes. In addition, copper-injured APP Swedish mutation overexpressing SH-SY5Y cells were used to determine the transduction of cyclooxygenase (COX) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. Our results indicated that at an early stage, MSL treatment ameliorated cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration in APP/PS1 mice. Moreover, in an in vitro AD model, MSL treatment protected injured cells by increasing cell viability, improving mitochondrial dysfunction, and decreasing oxidative damage. In addition, MSL inhibited the phosphorylated level of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 MAPK, and suppressed the expression of COX-1/2. As a novel NSAIDs and used for the treatment in early stage of AD, MSL clearly demonstrated cognitive preservation by protecting neurons via a pleiotropic anti-inflammatory effect in the context of AD-associated deficits. Therefore, early treatment of anti-inflammatory therapy may be an effective strategy for treating AD.

  20. Herpes simplex virus dances with amyloid precursor protein while exiting the cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Bin Cheng

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex type 1 (HSV1 replicates in epithelial cells and secondarily enters local sensory neuronal processes, traveling retrograde to the neuronal nucleus to enter latency. Upon reawakening newly synthesized viral particles travel anterograde back to the epithelial cells of the lip, causing the recurrent cold sore. HSV1 co-purifies with amyloid precursor protein (APP, a cellular transmembrane glycoprotein and receptor for anterograde transport machinery that when proteolyzed produces A-beta, the major component of senile plaques. Here we focus on transport inside epithelial cells of newly synthesized virus during its transit to the cell surface. We hypothesize that HSV1 recruits cellular APP during transport. We explore this with quantitative immuno-fluorescence, immuno-gold electron-microscopy and live cell confocal imaging. After synchronous infection most nascent VP26-GFP-labeled viral particles in the cytoplasm co-localize with APP (72.8+/-6.7% and travel together with APP inside living cells (81.1+/-28.9%. This interaction has functional consequences: HSV1 infection decreases the average velocity of APP particles (from 1.1+/-0.2 to 0.3+/-0.1 µm/s and results in APP mal-distribution in infected cells, while interplay with APP-particles increases the frequency (from 10% to 81% motile and velocity (from 0.3+/-0.1 to 0.4+/-0.1 µm/s of VP26-GFP transport. In cells infected with HSV1 lacking the viral Fc receptor, gE, an envelope glycoprotein also involved in viral axonal transport, APP-capsid interactions are preserved while the distribution and dynamics of dual-label particles differ from wild-type by both immuno-fluorescence and live imaging. Knock-down of APP with siRNA eliminates APP staining, confirming specificity. Our results indicate that most intracellular HSV1 particles undergo frequent dynamic interplay with APP in a manner that facilitates viral transport and interferes with normal APP transport and distribution. Such dynamic

  1. Down's Syndrome with Alzheimer's Disease-Like Pathology: What Can It Teach Us about the Amyloid Cascade Hypothesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania M. Bakkar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Down's syndrome (DS, trisomy 21 represents a complex genetic abnormality that leads to pathology in later life that is similar to Alzheimer's disease (AD. We compared two cases of DS with APOE 3/3 genotypes, a similar age at death, and comparable amyloid-beta 42 peptide (A42 burdens in the brain but that differed markedly in the severity of AD-like pathology. One exhibited extensive neurofibrillary pathology whereas the other showed minimal features of this type. Comparable loads of A42 could relate to the cases' similar life-time accumulation of A due to trisomy 21-enhanced metabolism of amyloid precursor protein (APP. The cases' significant difference in AD-like pathology, however, suggests that parenchymal deposition of A42, even when extensive, may not inevitably trigger AD-like tau pathology (though it may be necessary. Thus, these observations of a natural experiment may contribute to understanding the nuances of the amyloid cascade hypothesis of AD pathogenesis.

  2. Amyloid Imaging in Aging and Dementia: Testing the Amyloid Hypothesis In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Rabinovici

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid imaging represents a major advance in neuroscience, enabling the detection and quantification of pathologic protein aggregations in the brain. In this review we survey current amyloid imaging techniques, focusing on positron emission tomography (PET with ^{11}carbon-labelled Pittsburgh Compound-B (11C-PIB, the most extensively studied and best validated tracer. PIB binds specifically to fibrillar beta-amyloid (Aβ deposits, and is a sensitive marker for Aβ pathology in cognitively normal older individuals and patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI and Alzheimer’s disease (AD. PIB-PET provides us with a powerful tool to examine in vivo the relationship between amyloid deposition, clinical symptoms, and structural and functional brain changes in the continuum between normal aging and AD. Amyloid imaging studies support a model in which amyloid deposition is an early event on the path to dementia, beginning insidiously in cognitively normal individuals, and accompanied by subtle cognitive decline and functional and structural brain changes suggestive of incipient AD. As patients progress to dementia, clinical decline and neurodegeneration accelerate and proceed independently of amyloid accumulation. In the future, amyloid imaging is likely to supplement clinical evaluation in selecting patients for anti-amyloid therapies, while MRI and FDG-PET may be more appropriate markers of clinical progression.

  3. Thymosin beta(4 and beta(10 levels in pre-term newborn oral cavity and foetal salivary glands evidence a switch of secretion during foetal development.

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    Sonia Nemolato

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Thymosin beta(4, its sulfoxide, and thymosin beta(10 were detected in whole saliva of human pre-term newborns by reversed-phase high performance chromatography coupled to electrospray ion-trap mass spectrometry. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Despite high inter-individual variability, concentration of beta-thymosins increases with an inversely proportional trend to postmenstrual age (PMA: gestational age plus chronological age after birth reaching a value more than twenty times higher than in adult whole saliva at 190 days (27 weeks of PMA (thymosin beta(4 concentration: more than 2.0 micromol/L versus 0.1 micromol/L. On the other hand, the ratio between thymosin beta(4 and thymosin beta(10 exhibits a constant value of about 4 along all the range of PMA (190-550 days of PMA examined. In order to investigate thymosin beta(4 origin and to better establish the trend of its production as a function of gestational age (GA, immunohistochemical analysis of major and minor salivary glands of different pre-term fetuses were carried out, starting from 84 days (12 weeks of gestational age. Reactive granules were seen in all glands with a maximum of expression around 140-150 days of GA, even though with high inter- and intra-individual variability. In infants and adults reactive granules in acinar cells were not observed, but just a diffuse cytoplasmatic staining in ductal cells. SIGNIFICANCE: This study outlines for the first time that salivary glands during foetal life express and secrete peptides such as beta-thymosins probably involved in the development of the oral cavity and its annexes. The secretion increases from about 12 weeks till to about 21 weeks of GA, subsequently it decreases, almost disappearing in the period of expected date of delivery, when the gland switches towards the secretion of adult specific salivary peptides. The switch observed may be an example of further secretion switches involving other exocrine and endocrine

  4. PET imaging of brain with the {beta}-amyloid probe, [{sup 11}C]6-OH-BTA-1, in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyama, Hiroshi [Fujita Health University, Department of Radiology, Aichi (Japan); National Institutes of Health, Molecular Imaging Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Ye, Daniel; Cohen, Robert M. [National Institutes of Health, Geriatric Psychiatry Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Ichise, Masanori; Liow, Jeih-San; Cai, Lisheng; Musachio, John L.; Hong, Jinsoo; Crescenzo, Mathew; Tipre, Dnyanesh; Lu, Jian-Qiang; Zoghbi, Sami; Vines, Douglass C.; Pike, Victor W.; Innis, Robert B. [National Institutes of Health, Molecular Imaging Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Jacobowitz, David [USUHS, Department of Anatomy, Physiology, and Genetics, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Seidel, Jurgen; Green, Michael V. [National Institutes of Health, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Katada, Kazuhiro [Fujita Health University, Department of Radiology, Aichi (Japan)

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the capacity of [{sup 11}C]6-OH-BTA-1 and positron emission tomography (PET) to quantify {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) plaques in the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). PET imaging was performed with the NIH ATLAS small animal scanner in six elderly transgenic mice (Tg2576; age 22.0{+-}1.8 months; 23.6{+-}2.6 g) overexpressing a mutated form of human {beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP) known to result in the production of A{beta} plaques, and in six elderly wild-type litter mates (age 21.8{+-}1.6 months; 29.5{+-}4.7 g). Dynamic PET scans were performed for 30 min in each mouse under 1% isoflurane inhalation anesthesia after a bolus injection of 13-46 MBq of [{sup 11}C]6-OH-BTA-1. PET data were reconstructed with 3D OSEM. On the coronal PET image, irregular regions of interest (ROIs) were placed on frontal cortex (FR), parietal cortex (PA), striatum (ST), thalamus (TH), pons (PO), and cerebellum (CE), guided by a mouse stereotaxic atlas. Time-activity curves (TACs) (expressed as percent injected dose per gram normalized to body weight: % ID-kg/g) were obtained for FR, PA, ST, TH, PO, and CE. ROI-to-CE radioactivity ratios were also calculated. Following PET scans, sections of mouse brain prepared from anesthetized and fixative-perfused mice were stained with thioflavin-S. TACs for [{sup 11}C]6-OH-BTA-1 in all ROIs peaked early (at 30-55 s), with radioactivity washing out quickly thereafter in both transgenic and wild-type mice. Peak uptake in all regions was significantly lower in transgenic mice than in wild-type mice. During the later part of the washout phase (12-30 min), the mean FR/CE and PA/CE ratios were higher in transgenic than in wild-type mice (1.06{+-}0.04 vs 0.98{+-}0.07, p=0.04; 1.06{+-}0.09 vs 0.93{+-}0.08 p=0.02) while ST/CE, TH/CE, and PO/CE ratios were not. Ex vivo staining revealed widespread A{beta} plaques in cortex, but not in cerebellum of transgenic mice or in any brain regions of wild

  5. Overexpression of amyloid precursor protein increases copper content in HEK293 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suazo, Miriam; Hodar, Christian; Morgan, Carlos; Cerpa, Waldo; Cambiazo, Veronica; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.; Gonzalez, Mauricio

    2009-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a transmembrane glycoprotein widely expressed in mammalian tissues and plays a central role in Alzheimer's disease. However, its physiological function remains elusive. Cu 2+ binding and reduction activities have been described in the extracellular APP135-156 region, which might be relevant for cellular copper uptake and homeostasis. Here, we assessed Cu 2+ reduction and 64 Cu uptake in two human HEK293 cell lines overexpressing APP. Our results indicate that Cu 2+ reduction increased and cells accumulated larger levels of copper, maintaining cell viability at supra-physiological levels of Cu 2+ ions. Moreover, wild-type cells exposed to both Cu 2+ ions and APP135-155 synthetic peptides increased copper reduction and uptake. Complementation of function studies in human APP751 transformed Fre1 defective Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells rescued low Cu 2+ reductase activity and increased 64 Cu uptake. We conclude that Cu 2+ reduction activity of APP facilitates copper uptake and may represent an early step in cellular copper homeostasis.

  6. Beta-human chorionic gonadotropin concentrations in cervicovaginal secretions in preterm delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talip Gül

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate beta-human corionic gonadotropin (β-hCG levels in cervicovaginal secretions as an early marker for preterm delivery.Methods: The study included 55 patients at 25-36 of gestational weeks with preterm delivery risk factors including a history of preterm labor in a previous pregnancy or history of second trimester abortion. Beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG levels of cervicovaginal secretions were measured in all patients by the radioimmunoassay method using a commercial kit.Results: Preterm delivery was observed in 25 patients and 30 patients gave term delivery. No significant differences were found between preterm and term delivery groups in age, gravidity and parity (P>0.05. APGAR scores and anthropometric measurements of newborns were significantly lower in preterm delivery group (P<0.001. Preterm delivery group had significantly higher cervicovaginal β-hCG levels compared with normal controls (94.7±37.7 vs. 35.5±14.8 mIU/ml, respectively, P<0.001. When 75 mIU/ml value of β-hCG level was taken as cut-off value; the sensitivity of the test was found as 76%, specifity 91.6%, positive predictive value 95.0% and negative predictive value as 79.9%.Conclusion: Concentrations of β-hCG in cervicovaginal secretions may be a useful early biochemical marker to detect preterm. Based on β-hCG levels in cervicovaginal secretions a closer follow-up may decrease some complications of preterm delivery. J Clin Exp Invest 2010; 1(1: 16-20

  7. Drosophila egghead encodes a beta 1,4-mannosyltransferase predicted to form the immediate precursor glycosphingolipid substrate for brainiac

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandall, Hans H; Pedersen, Johannes W; Park, Chaeho

    2002-01-01

    -N-acetylglucosamine:beta Man beta 1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (beta 3GlcNAc-transferase) tentatively assigned a key role in biosynthesis of arthroseries glycosphingolipids and forming the trihexosylceramide, GlcNAc beta 1-3Man beta 1-4Glc beta 1-1Cer. In the present study we demonstrate that egghead encodes a Golgi......-located GDP-mannose:beta Glc beta 1,4-mannosyltransferase tentatively assigned a biosynthetic role to form the precursor arthroseries glycosphingolipid substrate for Brainiac, Man beta 1-4Glc beta 1-1Cer. Egghead is unique among eukaryotic glycosyltransferase genes in that homologous genes are limited...

  8. Zn(II)- and Cu(II)-induced non-fibrillar aggregates of amyloid-beta (1-42) peptide are transformed to amyloid fibrils, both spontaneously and under the influence of metal chelators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tõugu, Vello; Karafin, Ann; Zovo, Kairit; Chung, Roger S; Howells, Claire; West, Adrian K; Palumaa, Peep

    2009-09-01

    Aggregation of amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptides is a central phenomenon in Alzheimer's disease. Zn(II) and Cu(II) have profound effects on Abeta aggregation; however, their impact on amyloidogenesis is unclear. Here we show that Zn(II) and Cu(II) inhibit Abeta(42) fibrillization and initiate formation of non-fibrillar Abeta(42) aggregates, and that the inhibitory effect of Zn(II) (IC(50) = 1.8 micromol/L) is three times stronger than that of Cu(II). Medium and high-affinity metal chelators including metallothioneins prevented metal-induced Abeta(42) aggregation. Moreover, their addition to preformed aggregates initiated fast Abeta(42) fibrillization. Upon prolonged incubation the metal-induced aggregates also transformed spontaneously into fibrils, that appear to represent the most stable state of Abeta(42). H13A and H14A mutations in Abeta(42) reduced the inhibitory effect of metal ions, whereas an H6A mutation had no significant impact. We suggest that metal binding by H13 and H14 prevents the formation of a cross-beta core structure within region 10-23 of the amyloid fibril. Cu(II)-Abeta(42) aggregates were neurotoxic to neurons in vitro only in the presence of ascorbate, whereas monomers and Zn(II)-Abeta(42) aggregates were non-toxic. Disturbed metal homeostasis in the vicinity of zinc-enriched neurons might pre-dispose formation of metal-induced Abeta aggregates, subsequent fibrillization of which can lead to amyloid formation. The molecular background underlying metal-chelating therapies for Alzheimer's disease is discussed in this light.

  9. Methyl Salicylate Lactoside Protects Neurons Ameliorating Cognitive Disorder Through Inhibiting Amyloid Beta-Induced Neuroinflammatory Response in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinze; Ma, Xiaowei; Wang, Yu; Chen, Chengjuan; Hu, Min; Wang, Linlin; Fu, Junmin; Shi, Gaona; Zhang, Dongming; Zhang, Tiantai

    2018-01-01

    Neuroinflammatory reactions mediated by microglia and astrocytes have been shown to play a key role in early progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Increased evidences have demonstrated that neurons exacerbate local inflammatory reactions by producing inflammatory mediators and act as an important participant in the pathogenesis of AD. Methyl salicylate lactoside (MSL) is an isolated natural product that is part of a class of novel non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID). In our previous studies, we demonstrated that MSL exhibited therapeutic effects on arthritis-induced mice and suppressed the activation of glial cells. In the current study, we investigated the effects of MSL on cognitive function and neuronal protection induced by amyloid-beta peptides (Aβ) and explored potential underlying mechanisms involved. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin 1 (PS1) double transgenic mice were used to evaluate the effects of MSL through behavioral testing and neuronal degenerative changes. In addition, copper-injured APP Swedish mutation overexpressing SH-SY5Y cells were used to determine the transduction of cyclooxygenase (COX) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. Our results indicated that at an early stage, MSL treatment ameliorated cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration in APP/PS1 mice. Moreover, in an in vitro AD model, MSL treatment protected injured cells by increasing cell viability, improving mitochondrial dysfunction, and decreasing oxidative damage. In addition, MSL inhibited the phosphorylated level of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 MAPK, and suppressed the expression of COX-1/2. As a novel NSAIDs and used for the treatment in early stage of AD, MSL clearly demonstrated cognitive preservation by protecting neurons via a pleiotropic anti-inflammatory effect in the context of AD-associated deficits. Therefore, early treatment of anti-inflammatory therapy may be an effective strategy for treating AD. PMID:29636677

  10. Lost region in amyloid precursor protein (APP) through TALEN-mediated genome editing alters mitochondrial morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yajie; Wu, Fengyi; Pan, Haining; Zheng, Wenzhong; Feng, Chi; Wang, Yunfu; Deng, Zixin; Wang, Lianrong; Luo, Jie; Chen, Shi

    2016-02-29

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition in the brain. Aβ plaques are produced through sequential β/γ cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP), of which there are three main APP isoforms: APP695, APP751 and APP770. KPI-APPs (APP751 and APP770) are known to be elevated in AD, but the reason remains unclear. Transcription activator-like (TAL) effector nucleases (TALENs) induce mutations with high efficiency at specific genomic loci, and it is thus possible to knock out specific regions using TALENs. In this study, we designed and expressed TALENs specific for the C-terminus of APP in HeLa cells, in which KPI-APPs are predominantly expressed. The KPI-APP mutants lack a 12-aa region that encompasses a 5-aa trans-membrane (TM) region and 7-aa juxta-membrane (JM) region. The mutated KPI-APPs exhibited decreased mitochondrial localization. In addition, mitochondrial morphology was altered, resulting in an increase in spherical mitochondria in the mutant cells through the disruption of the balance between fission and fusion. Mitochondrial dysfunction, including decreased ATP levels, disrupted mitochondrial membrane potential, increased ROS generation and impaired mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity, was also found. These results suggest that specific regions of KPI-APPs are important for mitochondrial localization and function.

  11. Origin of life. Primordial genetics: Information transfer in a pre-RNA world based on self-replicating beta-sheet amyloid conformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maury, Carl Peter J

    2015-10-07

    The question of the origin of life on Earth can largely be reduced to the question of what was the first molecular replicator system that was able to replicate and evolve under the presumably very harsh conditions on the early Earth. It is unlikely that a functional RNA could have existed under such conditions and it is generally assumed that some other kind of information system preceded the RNA world. Here, I present an informational molecular system that is stable, self-replicative, environmentally responsive, and evolvable under conditions characterized by high temperatures, ultraviolet and cosmic radiation. This postulated pregenetic system is based on the amyloid fold, a functionally unique polypeptide fold characterized by a cross beta-sheet structure in which the beta strands are arranged perpendicular to the fiber axis. Beside an extraordinary structural robustness, the amyloid fold possesses a unique ability to transmit information by a three-dimensional templating mechanism. In amyloidogenesis short peptide monomers are added one by one to the growing end of the fiber. From the same monomeric subunits several structural variants of amyloid may be formed. Then, in a self-replicative mode, a specific amyloid conformer can act as a template and confer its spatially encoded information to daughter molecular entities in a repetitive way. In this process, the specific conformational information, the spatially changed organization, is transmitted; the coding element is the steric zipper structure, and recognition occurs by amino acid side chain complementarity. The amyloid information system fulfills several basic requirements of a primordial evolvable replicator system: (i) it is stable under the presumed primitive Earth conditions, (ii) the monomeric building blocks of the informational polymer can be formed from available prebiotic compounds, (iii) the system is self-assembling and self-replicative and (iv) it is adaptive to changes in the environment and

  12. [The effect of isoflurane on the secretion of TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta from LPS-stimulated human peripheral blood monocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, W; Enzan, K; Masaki, Y; Kayaba, M; Suzuki, M

    1995-07-01

    The cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-1 secreted from macrophages/monocytes proved to play important roles in the pathogenesis of endotoxemia, severe pancreatitis and other surgical injuries. However, it is still unclear how inhalational anesthetic agents influence the secretion of these cytokines from macrophages/monocytes. We investigated the effects of isoflurane on TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta secretions from human peripheral blood monocytes stimulated by lipopolysaccharide. TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta secretions increased after LPS stimulation and this increase was inhibited by isoflurane in dose-dependent fashion. The inhibitory action of isoflurane disappeared between 1 and 3 hours after stopping isoflurane inhalation. We concluded that isoflurane could inhibit TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta secretions from peripheral blood monocytes stimulated by LPS in a dose-dependent fashion and that the inhibitory action of isoflurane was reversible.

  13. Chronic apocynin treatment attenuates beta amyloid plaque size and microglial number in hAPP(751(SL mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda E Lull

    Full Text Available NADPH oxidase is implicated in neurotoxic microglial activation and the progressive nature of Alzheimer's Disease (AD. Here, we test the ability of two NADPH oxidase inhibitors, apocynin and dextromethorphan (DM, to reduce learning deficits and neuropathology in transgenic mice overexpressing human amyloid precursor protein with the Swedish and London mutations (hAPP(751(SL.Four month old hAPP(751(SL mice were treated daily with saline, 15 mg/kg DM, 7.5 mg/kg DM, or 10 mg/kg apocynin by gavage for four months.Only hAPP(751(SL mice treated with apocynin showed reduced plaque size and a reduction in the number of cortical microglia, when compared to the saline treated group. Analysis of whole brain homogenates from all treatments tested (saline, DM, and apocynin demonstrated low levels of TNFα, protein nitration, lipid peroxidation, and NADPH oxidase activation, indicating a low level of neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in hAPP(751(SL mice at 8 months of age that was not significantly affected by any drug treatment. Despite in vitro analyses demonstrating that apocynin and DM ameliorate Aβ-induced extracellular superoxide production and neurotoxicity, both DM and apocynin failed to significantly affect learning and memory tasks or synaptic density in hAPP(751(SL mice. To discern how apocynin was affecting plaque levels (plaque load and microglial number in vivo, in vitro analysis of microglia was performed, revealing no apocynin effects on beta-amyloid (Aβ phagocytosis, microglial proliferation, or microglial survival.Together, this study suggests that while hAPP(751(SL mice show increases in microglial number and plaque load, they fail to exhibit elevated markers of neuroinflammation consistent with AD at 8 months of age, which may be a limitation of this animal model. Despite absence of clear neuroinflammation, apocynin was still able to reduce both plaque size and microglial number, suggesting that apocynin may have additional

  14. Diagnostic radionuclide imaging of amyloid: biological targeting by circulating human serum amyloid P component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawkins, P.N.; Lavender, J.P.; Myers, M.J.; Pepys, M.B.

    1988-06-25

    The specific molecular affinity of the normal plasma protein, serum amyloid P component (SAP), for all known types of amyloid fibrils was used to develop a new general diagnostic method for in-vivo radionuclide imaging of amyloid deposits. After intravenous injection of /sup 123/I-labelled purified human SAP there was specific uptake into amyloid deposits in all affected patients, 7 with systematic AL amyloid, 5 with AA amyloid, and 2 with ..beta../sub 2/M amyloid, in contrast to the complete absence of any tissue localisation in 5 control subjects. Distinctive high-resolution scintigraphic images, even of minor deposits in the carpal regions, bone marrow, or adrenals, were obtained. This procedure should yield much information on the natural history and the management of amyloidosis, the presence of which has hitherto been confirmed only by biopsy. Clearance and metabolic studies indicated that, in the presence of extensive amyloidosis, the rate of synthesis of SAP was greatly increased despite maintenance of normal plasma levels. Futhermore, once localised to amyloid deposits the /sup 123/I-SAP persisted for long periods and was apparently protected from its normal rapid degradation. These findings shed new light on the pathophysiology of amyloid and may have implications for therapeutic strategies based upon specific molecular targeting with SAP.

  15. Characterization of stimulus-secretion coupling in the human pancreatic EndoC-βH1 beta cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotta E Andersson

    Full Text Available Studies on beta cell metabolism are often conducted in rodent beta cell lines due to the lack of stable human beta cell lines. Recently, a human cell line, EndoC-βH1, was generated. Here we investigate stimulus-secretion coupling in this cell line, and compare it with that in the rat beta cell line, INS-1 832/13, and human islets.Cells were exposed to glucose and pyruvate. Insulin secretion and content (radioimmunoassay, gene expression (Gene Chip array, metabolite levels (GC/MS, respiration (Seahorse XF24 Extracellular Flux Analyzer, glucose utilization (radiometric, lactate release (enzymatic colorimetric, ATP levels (enzymatic bioluminescence and plasma membrane potential and cytoplasmic Ca2+ responses (microfluorometry were measured. Metabolite levels, respiration and insulin secretion were examined in human islets.Glucose increased insulin release, glucose utilization, raised ATP production and respiratory rates in both lines, and pyruvate increased insulin secretion and respiration. EndoC-βH1 cells exhibited higher insulin secretion, while plasma membrane depolarization was attenuated, and neither glucose nor pyruvate induced oscillations in intracellular calcium concentration or plasma membrane potential. Metabolite profiling revealed that glycolytic and TCA-cycle intermediate levels increased in response to glucose in both cell lines, but responses were weaker in EndoC-βH1 cells, similar to those observed in human islets. Respiration in EndoC-βH1 cells was more similar to that in human islets than in INS-1 832/13 cells.Functions associated with early stimulus-secretion coupling, with the exception of plasma membrane potential and Ca2+ oscillations, were similar in the two cell lines; insulin secretion, respiration and metabolite responses were similar in EndoC-βH1 cells and human islets. While both cell lines are suitable in vitro models, with the caveat of replicating key findings in isolated islets, EndoC-βH1 cells have the

  16. Processing of high-molecular-weight form adrenocorticotropin in human adrenocorticotropin-secreting tumor cell line (DMS-79) after transfection of prohormone convertase 1/3 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateno, T; Kato, M; Tani, Y; Yoshimoto, T; Oki, Y; Hirata, Y

    2010-02-01

    Ectopic ACTH-producing tumors preferentially secrete biologically inactive ACTH precursors and ACTH-related fragments. DMS-79 is known to secrete unprocessed high-molecular-weight (HMW) form ACTH. To determine whether prohormone convertase (PC) 1/3 is involved in the abnormal processing of proopiomelanocortin (POMC), we studied whether PC1/3 and 2 genes are expressed in DMS-79, and whether overexpression of PC1/3 gene affects POMC processing pattern. Steady-state mRNA levels of PC1/3 and 2 were determined by real-time RT-PCR. Molecular weights of ACTH-related peptides were determined by chromatographical analyses coupled with ACTH and beta-endorphin (beta-END) radioimmunoassays. PC1/3 gene was transfected into DMS-79 by retrovirus transduction using pMX-IP vector encoding PC1/3 cDNA. The steady-state mRNA levels of PC1/3 and 2 in DMS-79 were lower than those in ACTH-secreting and nonfunctioning pituitary tumors. DMS-79 predominantly secreted HMW form with both ACTH and beta-END immunoreactivities by size-exclusion chromatography. After purification by immunoaffinity chromatography with anti-ACTH antibody, the apparent molecular weight of HMW form ACTH was estimated to be 16 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with silver staining. After retroviral transfection of PC1/3 cDNA into DMS-79 and puromycin selection, PC1/3 stably-expressing cell line (DMS-79T) secreted two immunoreactive ACTH components, a major one coeluting with ACTH(1-39) and a minor one as a HMW form as well as two beta- END immunoreactive components coeluting with beta-lipotropic hormone and beta-END, respectively. Thus, we have established PC1/3 stably-expressing cell line (DMS-79T) capable of proteolytically processing ACTH precursor molecule(s) into mature ACTH and beta-END.

  17. Alkali pH directly activates ATP-sensitive K+ channels and inhibits insulin secretion in beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning Fox, Jocelyn E; Karaman, Gunce; Wheeler, Michael B

    2006-11-17

    Glucose stimulation of pancreatic beta-cells is reported to lead to sustained alkalization, while extracellular application of weak bases is reported to inhibit electrical activity and decrease insulin secretion. We hypothesize that beta-cell K(ATP) channel activity is modulated by alkaline pH. Using the excised patch-clamp technique, we demonstrate a direct stimulatory action of alkali pH on recombinant SUR1/Kir6.2 channels due to increased open probability. Bath application of alkali pH similarly activates native islet beta-cell K(ATP) channels, leading to an inhibition of action potentials, and hyperpolarization of membrane potential. In situ pancreatic perfusion confirms that these cellular effects of alkali pH are observable at a functional level, resulting in decreases in both phase 1 and phase 2 glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Our data are the first to report a stimulatory effect of a range of alkali pH on K(ATP) channel activity and link this to downstream effects on islet beta-cell function.

  18. Liquid Crystal Enabled Early Stage Detection of Beta Amyloid Formation on Lipid Monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadati, Monirosadat [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 USA; Apik, Aslin Izmitli [Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison WI 53706 USA; Armas-Perez, Julio C. [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 USA; Martinez-Gonzalez, Jose [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 USA; Hernandez-Ortiz, Juan P. [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 USA; Departamento de Materiales y Minerales, Facultad de Minas, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Medellín, Calle 75 # 79A-51, Bloque M17 Medellín Colombia; Abbott, Nicholas L. [Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison WI 53706 USA; de Pablo, Juan J. [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 USA; Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA

    2015-09-09

    Liquid crystals (LCs) can serve as sensitive reporters of interfacial events, and this property has been used for sensing of synthetic or biological toxins. Here it is demonstrated that LCs can distinguish distinct molecular motifs and exhibit a specific response to beta-sheet structures. That property is used to detect the formation of highly toxic protofibrils involved in neurodegenerative diseases, where it is crucial to develop methods that probe the early-stage aggregation of amyloidogenic peptides in the vicinity of biological membranes. In the proposed method, the amyloid fibrils formed at the lipid-decorated LC interface can change the orientation of LCs and form elongated and branched structures that are amplified by the mesogenic medium; however, nonamyloidogenic peptides form ellipsoidal domains of tilted LCs. Moreover, a theoretical and computational analysis is used to reveal the underlying structure of the LC, thereby providing a detailed molecular-level view of the interactions and mechanisms responsible for such motifs. The corresponding signatures can be detected at nanomolar concentrations of peptide by polarized light microscopy and much earlier than the ones that can be identified by fluorescence-based techniques. As such, it offers the potential for early diagnoses of neurodegenerative diseases and for facile testing of inhibitors of amyloid formation.

  19. Insulin Resistance as a Link between Amyloid-Beta and Tau Pathologies in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger J. Mullins

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Current hypotheses and theories regarding the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD heavily implicate brain insulin resistance (IR as a key factor. Despite the many well-validated metrics for systemic IR, the absence of biomarkers for brain-specific IR represents a translational gap that has hindered its study in living humans. In our lab, we have been working to develop biomarkers that reflect the common mechanisms of brain IR and AD that may be used to follow their engagement by experimental treatments. We present two promising biomarkers for brain IR in AD: insulin cascade mediators probed in extracellular vesicles (EVs enriched for neuronal origin, and two-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS measures of brain glucose. As further evidence for a fundamental link between brain IR and AD, we provide a novel analysis demonstrating the close spatial correlation between brain expression of genes implicated in IR (using Allen Human Brain Atlas data and tau and beta-amyloid pathologies. We proceed to propose the bold hypotheses that baseline differences in the metabolic reliance on glycolysis, and the expression of glucose transporters (GLUT and insulin signaling genes determine the vulnerability of different brain regions to Tau and/or Amyloid beta (Aβ pathology, and that IR is a critical link between these two pathologies that define AD. Lastly, we provide an overview of ongoing clinical trials that target IR as an angle to treat AD, and suggest how biomarkers may be used to evaluate treatment efficacy and target engagement.

  20. Cholesterol enhances amyloid {beta} deposition in mouse retina by modulating the activities of A{beta}-regulating enzymes in retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiying [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan); Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko, E-mail: k.ohno.oph@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan); Morita, Ikuo [Section of Cellular Physiological Chemistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan)

    2012-08-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cholesterol-treated RPE produces more A{beta} than non-treated RPE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neprilysin expression and activity decreased in cholesterol-treated RPE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {alpha}-Secretase expression and activity decreased in cholesterol-treated RPE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cholesterol-enriched diet induced subRPE deposits in aged mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta} were present in cholesterol-enriched-diet-induced subRPE deposits in aged mice. -- Abstract: Subretinally-deposited amyloid {beta} (A{beta}) is a main contributor of developing age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, the mechanism causing A{beta} deposition in AMD eyes is unknown. Hypercholesterolemia is a significant risk for developing AMD. Thus, we investigated the effects of cholesterol on A{beta} production in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in vitro and in the mouse retina in vivo. RPE cells isolated from senescent (12-month-old) C57BL/6 mice were treated with 10 {mu}g/ml cholesterol for 48 h. A{beta} amounts in culture supernatants were measured by ELISA. Activity and expression of enzymes and proteins that regulate A{beta} production were examined by activity assay and real time PCR. The retina of mice fed cholesterol-enriched diet was examined by transmission electron microscopy. Cholesterol significantly increased A{beta} production in cultured RPE cells. Activities of A{beta} degradation enzyme; neprilysin (NEP) and anti-amyloidogenic secretase; {alpha}-secretase were significantly decreased in cell lysates of cholesterol-treated RPE cells compared to non-treated cells, but there was no change in the activities of {beta}- or {gamma}-secretase. mRNA levels of NEP and {alpha}-secretase (ADAM10 and ADAM17) were significantly lower in cholesterol-treated RPE cells than non-treated cells. Senescent (12-month-old) mice fed cholesterol-enriched chow developed subRPE deposits containing A{beta}, whereas

  1. Flavonoid metabolites reduce tumor necrosis factor‐α secretion to a greater extent than their precursor compounds in human THP‐1 monocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Gesso, Jessica L.; Kerr, Jason S.; Zhang, Qingzhi; Raheem, Saki; Yalamanchili, Sai Krishna; O'Hagan, David; Kay, Colin D.; O'Connell, Maria A.

    2015-01-01

    1 Scope Flavonoids are generally studied in vitro, in isolation, and as unmetabolized precursor structures. However, in the habitual diet, multiple flavonoids are consumed together and found present in the circulation as complex mixtures of metabolites. Using a unique study design, we investigated the potential for singular or additive anti‐inflammatory effects of flavonoid metabolites relative to their precursor structures. 2 Methods and results Six flavonoids, 14 flavonoid metabolites, and 29 combinations of flavonoids and their metabolites (0.1–10 μM) were screened for their ability to reduce LPS‐induced tumor necrosis factor‐α (TNF‐α) secretion in THP‐1 monocytes. One micromolar peonidin‐3‐glucoside, cyanidin‐3‐glucoside, and the metabolites isovanillic acid (IVA), IVA‐glucuronide, vanillic acid‐glucuronide, protocatechuic acid‐3‐sulfate, and benzoic acid‐sulfate significantly reduced TNF‐α secretion when in isolation, while there was no effect on TNF‐α mRNA expression. Four combinations of metabolites that included 4‐hydroxybenzoic acid (4HBA) and/or protocatechuic acid also significantly reduced TNF‐α secretion to a greater extent than the precursors or metabolites alone. The effects on LPS‐induced IL‐1β and IL‐10 secretion and mRNA expression were also examined. 4HBA significantly reduced IL‐1β secretion but none of the flavonoids or metabolites significantly modified IL‐10 secretion. 3 Conclusion This study provides novel evidence suggesting flavonoid bioactivity results from cumulative or additive effects of circulating metabolites. PMID:25801720

  2. Postvagotomy acid secretion and mucosal blood flow during beta-adrenoceptor stimulation and universal chemical sympathectomy in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovendal, C P

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of beta-adrenoceptor stimulation, alpha blockade, and elimination of the adrenergic nerve function on mucosal blood flow and acid secretion in parietal-cell-vagotomized (PCV) gastric fistula dogs. Isoprenaline inhibited pentagastrin-stimulate......The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of beta-adrenoceptor stimulation, alpha blockade, and elimination of the adrenergic nerve function on mucosal blood flow and acid secretion in parietal-cell-vagotomized (PCV) gastric fistula dogs. Isoprenaline inhibited pentagastrin...... to chemical sympathectomy with 6-hydroxy-dopamine, a false neurotransmitter that selectively destroys the adrenergic nerve terminals. Chemical sympathectomy increased the pentagastrin-stimulated gastric acid secretion and stabilized the mucosal blood flow at the level before vagotomy, but with an increased...... ratio between blood flow and acid secretion. One may conclude that the sympathetic nerve system influences gastric function after vagotomy....

  3. Amyloid Precursor Protein Translation Is Regulated by a 3'UTR Guanine Quadruplex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezekiel Crenshaw

    Full Text Available A central event in Alzheimer's disease is the accumulation of amyloid β (Aβ peptides generated by the proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP. APP overexpression leads to increased Aβ generation and Alzheimer's disease in humans and altered neuronal migration and increased long term depression in mice. Conversely, reduction of APP expression results in decreased Aβ levels in mice as well as impaired learning and memory and decreased numbers of dendritic spines. Together these findings indicate that therapeutic interventions that aim to restore APP and Aβ levels must do so within an ideal range. To better understand the effects of modulating APP levels, we explored the mechanisms regulating APP expression focusing on post-transcriptional regulation. Such regulation can be mediated by RNA regulatory elements such as guanine quadruplexes (G-quadruplexes, non-canonical structured RNA motifs that affect RNA stability and translation. Via a bioinformatics approach, we identified a candidate G-quadruplex within the APP mRNA in its 3'UTR (untranslated region at residues 3008-3027 (NM_201414.2. This sequence exhibited characteristics of a parallel G-quadruplex structure as revealed by circular dichroism spectrophotometry. Further, as with other G-quadruplexes, the formation of this structure was dependent on the presence of potassium ions. This G-quadruplex has no apparent role in regulating transcription or mRNA stability as wild type and mutant constructs exhibited equivalent mRNA levels as determined by real time PCR. Instead, we demonstrate that this G-quadruplex negatively regulates APP protein expression using dual luciferase reporter and Western blot analysis. Taken together, our studies reveal post-transcriptional regulation by a 3'UTR G-quadruplex as a novel mechanism regulating APP expression.

  4. Towards Prebiotic Catalytic Amyloids Using High Throughput Screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Friedmann

    Full Text Available Enzymes are capable of directing complex stereospecific transformations and of accelerating reaction rates many orders of magnitude. As even the simplest known enzymes comprise thousands of atoms, the question arises as to how such exquisite catalysts evolved. A logical predecessor would be shorter peptides, but they lack the defined structure and size that are apparently necessary for enzyme functions. However, some very short peptides are able to assemble into amyloids, thereby forming a well-defined tertiary structure called the cross-β-sheet, which bestows unique properties upon the peptides. We have hypothesized that amyloids could have been the catalytically active precursor to modern enzymes. To test this hypothesis, we designed an amyloid peptide library that could be screened for catalytic activity. Our approach, amenable to high-throughput methodologies, allowed us to find several peptides and peptide mixtures that form amyloids with esterase activity. These results indicate that amyloids, with their stability in a wide range of conditions and their potential as catalysts with low sequence specificity, would indeed be fitting precursors to modern enzymes. Furthermore, our approach can be efficiently expanded upon in library size, screening conditions, and target activity to yield novel amyloid catalysts with potential applications in aqueous-organic mixtures, at high temperature and in other extreme conditions that could be advantageous for industrial applications.

  5. FKBP12 regulates the localization and processing of amyloid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-01-27

    Jan 27, 2014 ... One of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease is the presence of insoluble extracellular amyloid plaques. These plaques ... The proteolytic cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) ..... lower sAPPα/sAPPs ratio, which may lead to an increase in ..... spine density in healthy adult mouse brain.

  6. Dermatoxin and phylloxin from the waxy monkey frog, Phyllomedusa sauvagei: cloning of precursor cDNAs and structural characterization from lyophilized skin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tianbao; Walker, Brian; Zhou, Mei; Shaw, Chris

    2005-07-15

    Amphibian skin is a morphologically, biochemically and physiologically complex organ that performs the wide range of functions necessary for amphibian survival. Here we describe the primary structures of representatives of two novel classes of amphibian skin antimicrobials, dermatoxin and phylloxin, from the skin secretion of Phyllomedusa sauvagei, deduced from their respective precursor encoding cDNAs cloned from a lyophilized skin secretion library. A degenerate primer, designed to a highly conserved domain in the 5'-untranslated region of analogous peptide precursor cDNAs from Phyllomedusa bicolor, was employed in a 3'-RACE reaction. Peptides with molecular masses coincident with precursor-deduced mature toxin peptides were identified in LC/MS fractions of skin secretion and primary structures were confirmed by MS/MS fragmentation. This integrated experimental approach can thus rapidly expedite the primary structural characterization of amphibian skin peptides in a manner that circumvents specimen sacrifice whilst preserving robustness of scientific data.

  7. Rising intracellular zinc by membrane depolarization and glucose in insulin-secreting clonal HIT-T15 beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slepchenko, Kira G; Li, Yang V

    2012-01-01

    Zinc (Zn(2+)) appears to be intimately involved in insulin metabolism since insulin secretion is correlated with zinc secretion in response to glucose stimulation, but little is known about the regulation of zinc homeostasis in pancreatic beta-cells. This study set out to identify the intracellular zinc transient by imaging free cytosolic zinc in HIT-T15 beta-cells with fluorescent zinc indicators. We observed that membrane depolarization by KCl (30-60 mM) was able to induce a rapid increase in cytosolic concentration of zinc. Multiple zinc transients of similar magnitude were elicited during repeated stimulations. The amplitude of zinc responses was not affected by the removal of extracellular calcium or zinc. However, the half-time of the rising slope was significantly slower after removing extracellular zinc with zinc chelator CaEDTA, suggesting that extracellular zinc affect the initial rising phase of zinc response. Glucose (10 mM) induced substantial and progressive increases in intracellular zinc concentration in a similar way as KCl, with variation in the onset and the duration of zinc mobilization. It is known that the depolarization of beta-cell membrane is coupled with the secretion of insulin. Rising intracellular zinc concentration may act as a critical signaling factor in insulin metabolism of pancreatic beta-cells.

  8. Specific recognition of the C-terminal end of A beta 42 by a high affinity monoclonal antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Trine Veje; Holm, Arne; Birkelund, Svend

    2009-01-01

    The neurotoxic peptide A beta(42) is derived from the amyloid precursor protein by proteolytic cleavage and is deposited in the brain of patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study we generate a high affinity monoclonal antibody that targets the C-terminal end of A beta(42......) with high specificity. By this is meant that the paratope of the antibody must enclose the C-terminal end of A beta(42) including the carboxy-group of amino acid 42, and not just recognize a linear epitope in the C-terminal part of A beta. This has been accomplished by using a unique antigen construct made...... by the Ligand Presenting Assembly technology (LPA technology). This strategy results in dimeric presentation of the free C-terminal end of A beta(42). The generated Mab A beta1.1 is indeed specific for the C-terminal end of A beta(42) to which it binds with high affinity. Mab A beta1.1 recognizes the epitope...

  9. Tuning the stereo-hindrance of a curcumin scaffold for the selective imaging of the soluble forms of amyloid beta species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuyan; Yang, Jian; Liu, Hongwu; Yang, Jing; Du, Lei; Feng, Haiwei; Tian, Yanli; Cao, Jianqin; Ran, Chongzhao

    2017-11-01

    Amyloid peptides and proteins are associated with the pathologies of numerous diseases. In the progression of a disease, amyloids exist in soluble and insoluble forms, which are the dominant species at different stages of the disease and they have different degrees of toxicity. However, differentiating between the soluble and insoluble forms is very challenging with small molecule probes due to multiple obstacles that need to be overcome. Inspired by the recognition principle of antibodies for sAβ, we hypothesized that the accessibility/tightness of soluble and insoluble amyloids could be utilized to design imaging probes to recognize different amyloid forms and the stereo-hindrance tuning strategy could be used to design imaging probes for selectively detecting the soluble amyloid beta (sAβ) species in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Herein, we demonstrated that tuning the stereo-hindrance of the phenoxy-alkyl chains at the 4-position of a curcumin scaffold could lead to certain selectivity for sAβ over insoluble Aβs (insAβ). Among the designed compounds, CRANAD-102 showed a 68-fold higher affinity for sAβ than for insAβ (7.5 ± 10 nM vs. 505.9 ± 275.9 nM). Moreover, our imaging data indicated that CRANAD-102 was indeed capable of detecting sAβ in vivo using 4 month old APP/PS1 mice, in which sAβ is the predominant species in the brain. In addition, we also demonstrated that CRANAD-102 could be used to monitor the increase in sAβ loading from the ages of 4 months old to 12 months old. We believe that CRANAD-102 can be a useful probe for selectively detecting sAβ species in AD and that our probe designing strategy can be applied to other amyloids and will have tremendous impact on AD drug development and other amyloid research.

  10. The Common Inhalational Anesthetic Sevoflurane Induces Apoptosis and Increases β-Amyloid Protein Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yuanlin; Zhang, Guohua; Zhang, Bin; Moir, Robert D.; Xia, Weiming; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Culley, Deborah J.; Crosby, Gregory; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Xie, Zhongcong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effects of sevoflurane, the most commonly used inhalation anesthetic, on apoptosis and β-amyloid protein (Aβ) levels in vitro and in vivo. Subjects: Naive mice, H4 human neuroglioma cells, and H4 human neuroglioma cells stably transfected to express full-length amyloid precursor protein. Interventions: Human H4 neuroglioma cells stably transfected to express full-length amyloid precursor protein were exposed to 4.1% sevoflurane for 6 hours. Mice received 2.5% sevoflurane for 2 hours. Caspase-3 activation, apoptosis, and Aβ levels were assessed. Results: Sevoflurane induced apoptosis and elevated levels of β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme and Aβ in vitro and in vivo. The caspase inhibitor Z-VAD decreased the effects of sevoflurane on apoptosis and Aβ. Sevoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation was attenuated by the γ-secretase inhibitor L-685,458 and was potentiated by Aβ. These results suggest that sevoflurane induces caspase activation which, in turn, enhances β-site amyloid precursor protein–cleaving enzyme and Aβ levels. Increased Aβ levels then induce further rounds of apoptosis. Conclusions: These results suggest that inhalational anesthetic sevoflurane may promote Alzheimer disease neuropathogenesis. If confirmed in human subjects, it may be prudent to caution against the use of sevoflurane as an anesthetic, especially in those suspected of possessing excessive levels of cerebral Aβ. PMID:19433662

  11. Increased androgen levels in rats impair glucose-stimulated insulin secretion through disruption of pancreatic beta cell mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongdong; Wang, Xiaping; Zhu, Yunxia; Chen, Fang; Sun, Yujie; Han, Xiao

    2015-11-01

    Although insulin resistance is recognized to contribute to the reproductive and metabolic phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), pancreatic beta cell dysfunction plays an essential role in the progression from PCOS to the development of type 2 diabetes. However, the role of insulin secretory abnormalities in PCOS has received little attention. In addition, the precise changes in beta cells and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we therefore attempted to elucidate potential mechanisms involved in beta cell alterations in a rat model of PCOS. Glucose-induced insulin secretion was measured in islets isolated from DHT-treated and control rats. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR), ATP production, and mitochondrial copy number were assayed to evaluate mitochondrial function. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion is significantly decreased in islets from DHT-treated rats. On the other hand, significant reductions are observed in the expression levels of several key genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and in mitochondrial OCR and ATP production in DHT-treated rat islets. Meanwhile, we found that androgens can directly impair beta cell function by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction in vitro in an androgen receptor dependent manner. For the first time, our study demonstrates that increased androgens in female rats can impair glucose-stimulated insulin secretion partly through disruption of pancreatic beta cell mitochondrial function. This work has significance for hyperandrogenic women with PCOS: excess activation of the androgen receptor by androgens may provoke beta cell dysfunction via mitochondrial dysfunction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Preventive immunization of aged and juvenile non-human primates to beta-amyloid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kofler Julia

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immunization against beta-amyloid (Aβ is a promising approach for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, but the optimal timing for the vaccination remains to be determined. Preventive immunization approaches may be more efficacious and associated with fewer side-effects; however, there is only limited information available from primate models about the effects of preclinical vaccination on brain amyloid composition and the neuroinflammatory milieu. Methods Ten non-human primates (NHP of advanced age (18–26 years and eight 2-year-old juvenile NHPs were immunized at 0, 2, 6, 10 and 14 weeks with aggregated Aβ42 admixed with monophosphoryl lipid A as adjuvant, and monitored for up to 6 months. Anti-Aβ antibody levels and immune activation markers were assessed in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid samples before and at several time-points after immunization. Microglial activity was determined by [11C]PK11195 PET scans acquired before and after immunization, and by post-mortem immunohistochemical and real-time PCR evaluation. Aβ oligomer composition was assessed by immunoblot analysis in the frontal cortex of aged immunized and non-immunized control animals. Results All juvenile animals developed a strong and sustained serum anti-Aβ IgG antibody response, whereas only 80 % of aged animals developed detectable antibodies. The immune response in aged monkeys was more delayed and significantly weaker, and was also more variable between animals. Pre- and post-immunization [11C]PK11195 PET scans showed no evidence of vaccine-related microglial activation. Post-mortem brain tissue analysis indicated a low overall amyloid burden, but revealed a significant shift in oligomer size with an increase in the dimer:pentamer ratio in aged immunized animals compared with non-immunized controls (P  Conclusions Our results indicate that preventive Aβ immunization is a safe therapeutic approach lacking adverse CNS immune system

  13. Flavonoid metabolites reduce tumor necrosis factor-α secretion to a greater extent than their precursor compounds in human THP-1 monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Gesso, Jessica L; Kerr, Jason S; Zhang, Qingzhi; Raheem, Saki; Yalamanchili, Sai Krishna; O'Hagan, David; Kay, Colin D; O'Connell, Maria A

    2015-06-01

    Flavonoids are generally studied in vitro, in isolation, and as unmetabolized precursor structures. However, in the habitual diet, multiple flavonoids are consumed together and found present in the circulation as complex mixtures of metabolites. Using a unique study design, we investigated the potential for singular or additive anti-inflammatory effects of flavonoid metabolites relative to their precursor structures. Six flavonoids, 14 flavonoid metabolites, and 29 combinations of flavonoids and their metabolites (0.1-10 μM) were screened for their ability to reduce LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) secretion in THP-1 monocytes. One micromolar peonidin-3-glucoside, cyanidin-3-glucoside, and the metabolites isovanillic acid (IVA), IVA-glucuronide, vanillic acid-glucuronide, protocatechuic acid-3-sulfate, and benzoic acid-sulfate significantly reduced TNF-α secretion when in isolation, while there was no effect on TNF-α mRNA expression. Four combinations of metabolites that included 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (4HBA) and/or protocatechuic acid also significantly reduced TNF-α secretion to a greater extent than the precursors or metabolites alone. The effects on LPS-induced IL-1β and IL-10 secretion and mRNA expression were also examined. 4HBA significantly reduced IL-1β secretion but none of the flavonoids or metabolites significantly modified IL-10 secretion. This study provides novel evidence suggesting flavonoid bioactivity results from cumulative or additive effects of circulating metabolites. © 2015 The Authors. Molecular Nutrition & Food Research published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Detection of Alzheimer's amyloid beta aggregation by capturing molecular trails of individual assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vestergaard, Mun'delanji; Hamada, Tsutomu; Saito, Masato; Yajima, Yoshifumi; Kudou, Monotori; Tamiya, Eiichi; Takagi, Masahiro

    2008-01-01

    Assembly of Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides, in particular Aβ-42 is central to the formation of the amyloid plaques associated with neuro-pathologies such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Molecular assembly of individual Aβ-42 species was observed using a simple fluorescence microscope. From the molecular movements (aka Brownian motion) of the individual peptide assemblies, we calculated a temporal evolution of the hydrodynamic radius (R H ) of the peptide at physiological temperature and pH. The results clearly show a direct relationship between R H of Aβ-42 and incubation period, corresponding to the previously reported peptide's aggregation kinetics. The data correlates highly with in solution-based label-free electrochemical detection of the peptide's aggregation, and Aβ-42 deposited on a solid surface and analysed using atomic force microscopy (AFM). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first analysis and characterisation of Aβ aggregation based on capturing molecular trails of individual assemblies. The technique enables both real-time observation and a semi-quantitative distribution profile of the various stages of Aβ assembly, at microM peptide concentration. Our method is a promising candidate for real-time observation and analysis of the effect of other pathologically-relevant molecules such as metal ions on pathways to Aβ oligomerisation and aggregation. The method is also a promising screening tool for AD therapeutics that target Aβ assembly.

  15. COPS5 (Jab1) protein increases β site processing of amyloid precursor protein and amyloid β peptide generation by stabilizing RanBP9 protein levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongjie; Dey, Debleena; Carrera, Ivan; Minond, Dmitriy; Bianchi, Elisabetta; Xu, Shaohua; Lakshmana, Madepalli K

    2013-09-13

    Increased processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and accumulation of neurotoxic amyloid β peptide (Aβ) in the brain is central to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Therefore, the identification of molecules that regulate Aβ generation is crucial for future therapeutic approaches for AD. We demonstrated previously that RanBP9 regulates Aβ generation in a number of cell lines and primary neuronal cultures by forming tripartite protein complexes with APP, low-density lipoprotein-related protein, and BACE1, consequently leading to increased amyloid plaque burden in the brain. RanBP9 is a scaffold protein that exists and functions in multiprotein complexes. To identify other proteins that may bind RanBP9 and regulate Aβ levels, we used a two-hybrid analysis against a human brain cDNA library and identified COPS5 as a novel RanBP9-interacting protein. This interaction was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation experiments in both neuronal and non-neuronal cells and mouse brain. Colocalization of COPS5 and RanBP9 in the same subcellular compartments further supported the interaction of both proteins. Furthermore, like RanBP9, COPS5 robustly increased Aβ generation, followed by increased soluble APP-β (sAPP-β) and decreased soluble-APP-α (sAPP-α) levels. Most importantly, down-regulation of COPS5 by siRNAs reduced Aβ generation, implying that endogenous COPS5 regulates Aβ generation. Finally, COPS5 levels were increased significantly in AD brains and APΔE9 transgenic mice, and overexpression of COPS5 strongly increased RanBP9 protein levels by increasing its half-life. Taken together, these results suggest that COPS5 increases Aβ generation by increasing RanBP9 levels. Thus, COPS5 is a novel RanBP9-binding protein that increases APP processing and Aβ generation by stabilizing RanBP9 protein levels.

  16. Calcium has a permissive role in interleukin-1beta-induced c-jun N-terminal kinase activation in insulin-secreting cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Størling, Joachim; Zaitsev, Sergei V; Kapelioukh, Iouri L

    2005-01-01

    The c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway mediates IL-1beta-induced apoptosis in insulin-secreting cells, a mechanism relevant to the destruction of pancreatic beta-cells in type 1 and 2 diabetes. However, the mechanisms that contribute to IL-1beta activation of JNK in beta-cells are la...

  17. A kinetic model for beta-amyloid adsorption at the air/solution interface and its implication to the beta-amyloid aggregation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dianlu; Dinh, Kim Lien; Ruthenburg, Travis C; Zhang, Yi; Su, Lei; Land, Donald P; Zhou, Feimeng

    2009-03-12

    At the air/buffer solution interface the kinetics of adsorption of amyloid beta peptide, Abeta(1-42), whose bulk concentration (submicromolar) is more than 2 orders of magnitude lower than that typically used in other in vitro aggregation studies, has been studied using a Langmuir-Blodgett trough. The pressure-time curves exhibit a lag phase, wherein the surface pressure essentially remains at zero, and a rising phase, corresponding to the Abeta adsorption at the interface. The duration of the lag phase was found to be highly dependent on both the Abeta bulk concentration and the solution temperature. A large activation energy (62.2 +/- 4.1 KJ/mol) was determined and the apparent adsorption rate constant was found to be linearly dependent on the Abeta bulk concentration. Attenuated total reflection-IR spectra of the adsorbed Abeta transferred to a solid substrate and circular dichroism measurements of Abeta in the solution layer near the interface reveal that the natively unstructured Abeta in the bulk undergo a conformation change (folding) to mainly the alpha-helical structure. The results suggest that, prior to the adsorption step, an equilibrium between Abeta conformations is established within the subsurface. The kinetic equation derived from this model confirms that the overall Abeta adsorption is kinetically controlled and the apparent rate constant is proportional to the Abeta bulk concentration. This model also indicates that interfaces such as cell membranes and lipid bilayers may facilitate Abeta aggregation/ fibrillation by providing a thin hydrophobic layer adjacent to the interface for the initial A/beta conformation change (misfolding) and accumulation. Such a preconcentration effect offers a plausible explanation of the fact that Abeta fibrillation occurs in vivo at nanomolar concentrations. Another important biological implication from our work is that Abeta misfolding may occur before its adsorption onto a cell membrane. This general kinetic model

  18. The multifaceted nature of amyloid precursor protein and its proteolytic fragments: friends and foes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhan, Hoang S; Chiang, Karen; Koo, Edward H

    2015-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) has occupied a central position in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathophysiology, in large part due to the seminal role of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), a proteolytic fragment derived from APP. Although the contribution of Aβ to AD pathogenesis is accepted by many in the research community, recent studies have unveiled a more complicated picture of APP's involvement in neurodegeneration in that other APP-derived fragments have been shown to exert pathological influences on neuronal function. However, not all APP-derived peptides are neurotoxic, and some even harbor neuroprotective effects. In this review, we will explore this complex picture by first discussing the pleiotropic effects of the major APP-derived peptides cleaved by multiple proteases, including soluble APP peptides (sAPPα, sAPPβ), various C- and N-terminal fragments, p3, and APP intracellular domain fragments. In addition, we will highlight two interesting sequences within APP that likely contribute to this duality in APP function. First, it has been found that caspase-mediated cleavage of APP in the cytosolic region may release a cytotoxic peptide, C31, which plays a role in synapse loss and neuronal death. Second, recent studies have implicated the -YENPTY- motif in the cytoplasmic region as a domain that modulates several APP activities through phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of the first tyrosine residue. Thus, this review summarizes the current understanding of various APP proteolytic products and the interplay among them to gain deeper insights into the possible mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration and AD pathophysiology.

  19. Indirubin-3′-monoxime suppresses amyloid-beta-induced apoptosis by inhibiting tau hyperphosphorylation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-gang Zhang; Xiao-shan Wang; Ying-dong Zhang; Qing Di; Jing-ping Shi; Min Qian; Li-gang Xu; Xing-jian Lin; Jie Lu

    2016-01-01

    Indirubin-3′-monoxime is an effective inhibitor of cyclin-dependent protein kinases, and may play an obligate role in neuronal apopto-sis in Alzheimer’s disease. Here, we found that indirubin-3′-monoxime improved the morphology and increased the survival rate of SH-SY5Y cells exposed to amyloid-beta 25–35 (Aβ25–35), and also suppressed apoptosis by reducing tau phosphorylation at Ser199 and Thr205. Furthermore, indirubin-3′-monoxime inhibited phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β). Our results suggest that in-dirubin-3′-monoxime reduced Aβ25–35-induced apoptosis by suppressing tau hyperphosphorylationvia a GSK-3β-mediated mechanism. Indirubin-3′-monoxime is a promising drug candidate for Alzheimer’s disease.

  20. Cellular and substrate adhesion molecules (integrins) and their ligands in cerebral amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eikelenboom, P.; Zhan, S. S.; Kamphorst, W.; van der Valk, P.; Rozemuller, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Integrins belonging to different subfamilies can be identified immunohistochemically in cerebral amyloid plaques. Monoclonal antibodies against the VLA family beta 1-integrins show staining of the corona of classical amyloid plaques for beta 1, alpha 3 and alpha 6. Immunostaining reveal also the

  1. The Impact of the ‘Austrian’ Mutation of the Amyloid Precursor Protein Transmembrane Helix is Communicated to the Hinge Region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelzer, Walter; Scharnagl, Christina; Leurs, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    The transmembrane helix of the amyloid precursor protein is subject to proteolytic cleavages by γ-secretase at different sites resulting in Aβ peptides of different length and toxicity. A number of point mutations within this transmembrane helix alter the cleavage pattern thus enhancing production...... destabilizes amide hydrogen bonds in the hinge which connects dimerization and cleavage regions. Weaker intrahelical hydrogen bonds at the hinge may enhance helix bending and thereby affect recognition of the transmembrane substrate by the enzyme and/or presentation of its cleavage sites to the catalytic cleft....

  2. Rising Intracellular Zinc by Membrane Depolarization and Glucose in Insulin-Secreting Clonal HIT-T15 Beta Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kira G. Slepchenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc (Zn2+ appears to be intimately involved in insulin metabolism since insulin secretion is correlated with zinc secretion in response to glucose stimulation, but little is known about the regulation of zinc homeostasis in pancreatic beta-cells. This study set out to identify the intracellular zinc transient by imaging free cytosolic zinc in HIT-T15 beta-cells with fluorescent zinc indicators. We observed that membrane depolarization by KCl (30–60 mM was able to induce a rapid increase in cytosolic concentration of zinc. Multiple zinc transients of similar magnitude were elicited during repeated stimulations. The amplitude of zinc responses was not affected by the removal of extracellular calcium or zinc. However, the half-time of the rising slope was significantly slower after removing extracellular zinc with zinc chelator CaEDTA, suggesting that extracellular zinc affect the initial rising phase of zinc response. Glucose (10 mM induced substantial and progressive increases in intracellular zinc concentration in a similar way as KCl, with variation in the onset and the duration of zinc mobilization. It is known that the depolarization of beta-cell membrane is coupled with the secretion of insulin. Rising intracellular zinc concentration may act as a critical signaling factor in insulin metabolism of pancreatic beta-cells.

  3. Inactivation of Nitric Oxide Synthesis Exacerbates the Development of Alzheimer Disease Pathology in APPPS1 Mice (Amyloid Precursor Protein/Presenilin-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes, Diana; Poittevin, Marine; Bonnin, Philippe; Ngkelo, Anta; Kubis, Nathalie; Merkulova-Rainon, Tatyana; Lévy, Bernard I

    2017-07-31

    The epidemiological link between hypertension and Alzheimer disease is established. We previously reported that hypertension aggravates the Alzheimer-like pathology in APPPS1 mice (amyloid precursor protein/presenilin-1, mouse model of Alzheimer disease) with angiotensin II-induced hypertension, in relation with hypertension and nitric oxide deficiency. To provide further insights into the role of nitric oxide in the hypertension-Alzheimer disease cross-talk, we studied the effects of nitric oxide blockade in APPPS1 mice using N (ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) alone or in combination with hydralazine, to normalize blood pressure. Compared with normotensive APPPS1 mice, those with l-NAME-induced hypertension had greater amyloid burden ( P <0.05), increased cortical amyloid angiopathy ( P <0.01), decreased regional microvascular density ( P <0.05), and deficient long-term spatial reference memory ( P <0.001). Blood pressure normalization with hydralazine did not protect APPPS1 mice from l-NAME-induced deterioration except for cortical amyloid angiopathy, linked to hypertension-induced arterial wall remodeling. By testing the cerebrovascular response to hypercapnic breathing, we evidenced early functional impairment of cerebral vasomotor activity in APPPS1 mice. Whereas in control wild-type normotensive mice, carbon dioxide breathing resulted in 15±1.3% increase in the mean blood flow velocity ( P <0.001), paradoxical mild decrease (1.5±0.4%) was recorded in normotensive APPPS1 mice ( P <0.001). Carbon dioxide-induced decrease in mean blood flow velocity was not significantly modified in l-NAME-treated hypertensive APPPS1 mice (2.5±1.2%) and partly reversed to mild vasodilation by hydralazine (3.2±1.5%, P <0.01). These results suggest that impaired nitric oxide bioavailability exacerbates the pathophysiology of Alzheimer disease, essentially impacting amyloid load and cognitive impairment, independently of l-NAME-induced hypertension. Only cerebral

  4. Proposal for novel curcumin derivatives as potent inhibitors against Alzheimer's disease: Ab initio molecular simulations on the specific interactions between amyloid-beta peptide and curcumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Shintaro; Fujimori, Mitsuki; Ishimura, Hiromi; Shulga, Sergiy; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2017-10-01

    Accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in a brain is closely related with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. To suppress the production of Aβ peptides, we propose novel curcumin derivatives and investigate their binding properties with the amyloid precursor protein (APP), using protein-ligand docking as well as ab initio molecular simulations. Our proposed derivative (curcumin XIV) is found to have a large binding energy with APP and interacts strongly with the cleavage site Ala19 by secretase. It is thus expected that curcumin XIV can protect APP from the secretase attack and be a potent inhibitor against the production of Aβ peptides.

  5. Controlling amyloid-beta peptide(1-42) oligomerization and toxicity by fluorinated nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, Ana M; Cardoso, Isabel; Pereira, M Carmo; Coelho, Manuel A N; Saraiva, Maria João; Möhwald, Helmuth; Brezesinski, Gerald

    2010-09-03

    The amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta) is a major fibrillar component of neuritic plaques in Alzheimer's disease brains and is related to the pathogenesis of the disease. Soluble oligomers that precede fibril formation have been proposed as the main neurotoxic species that contributes to neurodegeneration and dementia. We hypothesize that oligomerization and cytotoxicity can be repressed by nanoparticles (NPs) that induce conformational changes in Abeta42. We show here that fluorinated and hydrogenated NPs with different abilities to change Abeta42 conformation influence oligomerization as assessed by atomic force microscopy, immunoblot and SDS-PAGE. Fluorinated NPs, which promote an increase in alpha-helical content, exert an antioligomeric effect, whereas hydrogenated analogues do not and lead to aggregation. Cytotoxicity assays confirmed our hypothesis by indicating that the conformational conversion of Abeta42 into an alpha-helical-enriched secondary structure also has antiapoptotic activity, thereby increasing the viability of cells treated with oligomeric species.

  6. Lack of isoprenoid products raises ex vivo interleukin-1beta secretion in hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frenkel, Joost; Rijkers, Ger T.; Mandey, Saskia H. L.; Buurman, Sandra W. M.; Houten, Sander M.; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Waterham, Hans R.; Kuis, Wietse

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the increased interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) secretion in hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome is due to the accumulation of mevalonate kinase (MK), the substrate of the deficient enzyme, or the lack of its products, the isoprenoid compounds. METHODS:

  7. The kunitz protease inhibitor form of the amyloid precursor protein (KPI/APP) inhibits the proneuropeptide processing enzyme prohormone thiol protease (PTP). Colocalization of KPI/APP and PTP in secretory vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, V Y; Sei, C; Yasothornsrikul, S; Toneff, T; Kang, Y H; Efthimiopoulos, S; Robakis, N K; Van Nostrand, W

    1999-01-29

    Proteolytic processing of proenkephalin and proneuropeptides is required for the production of active neurotransmitters and peptide hormones. Variations in the extent of proenkephalin processing in vivo suggest involvement of endogenous protease inhibitors. This study demonstrates that "protease nexin 2 (PN2)," the secreted form of the kunitz protease inhibitor (KPI) of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), potently inhibited the proenkephalin processing enzyme known as prohormone thiol protease (PTP), with a Ki,app of 400 nM. Moreover, PTP and PN2 formed SDS-stable complexes that are typical of kunitz protease inhibitor interactions with target proteases. In vivo, KPI/APP (120 kDa), as well as a truncated form of KPI/APP that resembles PN2 in apparent molecular mass (110 kDa), were colocalized with PTP and (Met)enkephalin in secretory vesicles of adrenal medulla (chromaffin granules). KPI/APP (110-120 kDa) was also detected in pituitary secretory vesicles that contain PTP. In chromaffin cells, calcium-dependent secretion of KPI/APP with PTP and (Met)enkephalin demonstrated the colocalization of these components in functional secretory vesicles. These results suggest a role for KPI/APP inhibition of PTP in regulated secretory vesicles. In addition, these results are the first to identify an endogenous protease target of KPI/APP, which is developmentally regulated in aging and Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Overexpression of Amyloid Precursor Protein Promotes the Onset of Seborrhoeic Keratosis and is Related to Skin Ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanying; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Leiwei; Zhou, Wenming; Liu, Zhi; Li, Shijun; Lu, Hongguang

    2018-02-28

    Seborrhoeic keratosis is an age-related skin disease. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of age-related Alzheimer's disease. The aim of this study was to elucidate the expression characteristics of APP in seborrhoeic keratosis tissues (n = 50), and explore whether the production of APP is related to the onset of seborrhoeic keratosis and skin ageing, including ultraviolet (UV)-induced ageing, as observed in normal skin (n = 79). The results of immunohistochemistry, Western blotting and quantitative real-time PCR showed that APP and its downstream products (i.e. amyloid-β42) were more highly expressed in seborrhoeic keratosis than in paired adjacent normal skin tissues. In contrast, the expression of its key secretase (i.e. β-secretase1) was generally low. Furthermore, APP expression was higher in UV-exposed than non-exposed skin sites, and expression in the older age group (61-85 years) was greater than that in the younger age group (41-60 years) in seborrhoeic keratosis tissues (pkeratosis and is a marker of skin ageing and UV damage. Further research will elucidate whether therapeutic mitigation of increased levels of APP in the skin might delay the onset of seborrhoeic keratosis and skin ageing.

  9. In vivo neuronal synthesis and axonal transport of Kunitz protease inhibitor (KPI)-containing forms of the amyloid precursor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya, K L; Confaloni, A M; Allinquant, B

    1994-11-01

    We have shown previously that the amyloid precursor protein (APP) is synthesized in retinal ganglion cells and is rapidly transported down the axons, and that different molecular weight forms of the precursor have different developmental time courses. Some APP isoforms contain a Kunitz protease inhibitor (KPI) domain, and APP that lacks the KPI domain is considered the predominant isoform in neurons. We now show that, among the various rapidly transported APPs, a 140-kDa isoform contains the KPI domain. This APP isoform is highly expressed in rapidly growing retinal axons, and it is also prominent in adult axon endings. This 140-kDa KPI-containing APP is highly sulfated compared with other axonally transported isoforms. These results show that APP with the KPI domain is a prominent isoform synthesized in neurons in vivo, and they suggest that the regulation of protease activity may be an important factor during the establishment of neuronal connections.

  10. Amyloid precursor protein regulates migration and metalloproteinase gene expression in prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, Toshiaki; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko [Division of Gene Regulation and Signal Transduction, Research Center for Genomic Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Saitama 350-1241 (Japan); Inoue, Satoshi, E-mail: INOUE-GER@h.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Division of Gene Regulation and Signal Transduction, Research Center for Genomic Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Saitama 350-1241 (Japan); Department of Geriatric Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Department of Anti-Aging Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan)

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • APP knockdown reduced proliferation and migration of prostate cancer cells. • APP knockdown reduced expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes. • APP overexpression promoted LNCaP cell migration. • APP overexpression increased expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes. - Abstract: Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a type I transmembrane protein, and one of its processed forms, β-amyloid, is considered to play a central role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease. We previously showed that APP is a primary androgen-responsive gene in prostate cancer and that its increased expression is correlated with poor prognosis for patients with prostate cancer. APP has also been implicated in several human malignancies. Nevertheless, the mechanism underlying the pro-proliferative effects of APP on cancers is still not well-understood. In the present study, we explored a pathophysiological role for APP in prostate cancer cells using siRNA targeting APP (siAPP). The proliferation and migration of LNCaP and DU145 prostate cancer cells were significantly suppressed by siAPP. Differentially expressed genes in siAPP-treated cells compared to control siRNA-treated cells were identified by microarray analysis. Notably, several metalloproteinase genes, such as ADAM10 and ADAM17, and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related genes, such as VIM, and SNAI2, were downregulated in siAPP-treated cells as compared to control cells. The expression of these genes was upregulated in LNCaP cells stably expressing APP when compared with control cells. APP-overexpressing LNCaP cells exhibited enhanced migration in comparison to control cells. These results suggest that APP may contribute to the proliferation and migration of prostate cancer cells by modulating the expression of metalloproteinase and EMT-related genes.

  11. Effects of exendin-4 on glucose tolerance, insulin secretion, and beta-cell proliferation depend on treatment dose, treatment duration and meal contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakawa, Masayuki; Ebato, Chie; Mita, Tomoya; Hirose, Takahisa; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Fujitani, Yoshio; Watada, Hirotaka

    2009-01-01

    Beta-cell proliferation is regulated by various metabolic demands including peripheral insulin resistance, obesity, and hyperglycemia. In addition to enhancement of glucose-induced insulin secretion, agonists for glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) stimulate proliferation and inhibit apoptosis of beta-cells, thereby probably preserve beta-cell mass. To evaluate the beta-cell preserving actions of GLP-1R agonists, we assessed the acute and chronic effects of exendin-4 on beta-cell proliferation, mass and glucose tolerance in C57BL/6J mice under various conditions. Short-term administration of high-dose exendin-4 transiently stimulated beta-cell proliferation. Comparative transcriptomic analysis showed upregulation of IGF-1 receptor and its downstream effectors in islets. Treatment of mice with exendin-4 daily for 4 weeks (long-term administration) and feeding high-fat diet resulted in significant inhibition of weight gain and improvement of glucose tolerance with reduced insulin secretion and beta-cell mass. These findings suggest that long-term GLP-1 treatment results in insulin sensitization of peripheral organs, rather than enhancement of beta-cell proliferation and function, particularly when animals are fed high-fat diet. Thus, the effects of exendin-4 on glucose tolerance, insulin secretion, and beta-cell proliferation largely depend on treatment dose, duration of treatment and meal contents. While GLP-1 enhances proliferation of beta-cells in some diabetic mice models, our results suggest that GLP-1 stimulates beta-cell growth only when expansion of beta-cell mass is required to meet metabolic demands.

  12. Effects of exendin-4 on glucose tolerance, insulin secretion, and beta-cell proliferation depend on treatment dose, treatment duration and meal contents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arakawa, Masayuki; Ebato, Chie; Mita, Tomoya [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Hirose, Takahisa [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Center for Therapeutic Innovations in Diabetes, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Kawamori, Ryuzo [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Center for Therapeutic Innovations in Diabetes, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Center for Beta Cell Biology and Regeneration, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Sportology Center, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Fujitani, Yoshio, E-mail: fujitani@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Center for Therapeutic Innovations in Diabetes, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Watada, Hirotaka, E-mail: hwatada@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Medicine, Metabolism and Endocrinology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Sportology Center, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2009-12-18

    Beta-cell proliferation is regulated by various metabolic demands including peripheral insulin resistance, obesity, and hyperglycemia. In addition to enhancement of glucose-induced insulin secretion, agonists for glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) stimulate proliferation and inhibit apoptosis of beta-cells, thereby probably preserve beta-cell mass. To evaluate the beta-cell preserving actions of GLP-1R agonists, we assessed the acute and chronic effects of exendin-4 on beta-cell proliferation, mass and glucose tolerance in C57BL/6J mice under various conditions. Short-term administration of high-dose exendin-4 transiently stimulated beta-cell proliferation. Comparative transcriptomic analysis showed upregulation of IGF-1 receptor and its downstream effectors in islets. Treatment of mice with exendin-4 daily for 4 weeks (long-term administration) and feeding high-fat diet resulted in significant inhibition of weight gain and improvement of glucose tolerance with reduced insulin secretion and beta-cell mass. These findings suggest that long-term GLP-1 treatment results in insulin sensitization of peripheral organs, rather than enhancement of beta-cell proliferation and function, particularly when animals are fed high-fat diet. Thus, the effects of exendin-4 on glucose tolerance, insulin secretion, and beta-cell proliferation largely depend on treatment dose, duration of treatment and meal contents. While GLP-1 enhances proliferation of beta-cells in some diabetic mice models, our results suggest that GLP-1 stimulates beta-cell growth only when expansion of beta-cell mass is required to meet metabolic demands.

  13. Lycopene and beta-carotene induce growth inhibition and proapoptotic effects on ACTH-secreting pituitary adenoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália F Haddad

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenomas comprise approximately 10-15% of intracranial tumors and result in morbidity associated with altered hormonal patterns, therapy and compression of adjacent sella turcica structures. The use of functional foods containing carotenoids contributes to reduce the risk of chronic diseases such as cancer and vascular disorders. In this study, we evaluated the influence of different concentrations of beta-carotene and lycopene on cell viability, colony formation, cell cycle, apoptosis, hormone secretion, intercellular communication and expression of connexin 43, Skp2 and p27(kip1 in ACTH-secreting pituitary adenoma cells, the AtT20 cells, incubated for 48 and 96 h with these carotenoids. We observed a decrease in cell viability caused by the lycopene and beta-carotene treatments; in these conditions, the clonogenic ability of the cells was also significantly decreased. Cell cycle analysis revealed that beta-carotene induced an increase of the cells in S and G2/M phases; furthermore, lycopene increased the proportion of these cells in G0/G1 while decreasing the S and G2/M phases. Also, carotenoids induced apoptosis after 96 h. Lycopene and beta-carotene decreased the secretion of ACTH in AtT20 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Carotenoids blocked the gap junction intercellular communication. In addition, the treatments increased the expression of phosphorylated connexin43. Finally, we also demonstrate decreased expression of S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2 and increased expression of p27(kip1 in carotenoid-treated cells. These results show that lycopene and beta-carotene were able to negatively modulate events related to the malignant phenotype of AtT-20 cells, through a mechanism that could involve changes in the expression of connexin 43, Skp2 and p27(kip1; and suggest that these compounds might provide a novel pharmacological approach to the treatment of Cushing's disease.

  14. Differentiating the Influences of Aging and Adiposity on Brain Weights, Levels of Serum and Brain Cytokines, Gastrointestinal Hormones, and Amyloid Precursor Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, William A; Abrass, Christine K; Hansen, Kim M

    2016-01-01

    Aging and obesity exert important effects on disease. Differentiating these effects is difficult, however, because weight gain often accompanies aging. Here, we used a nested design of aged, calorically restricted, and refed rats to measure changes in brain and blood levels of cytokines and gastrointestinal hormones, brain amyloid precursor protein levels, and brain and body weights. By comparing groups and using path analysis, we found divergent influences of chronological aging versus body weight, our main findings being (i) changes in whole brain weight and serum macrophage colony-stimulating factor levels correlated better with body weight than with chronological aging, (ii) a decrease in brain cytokines and brain plasminogen activator inhibitor levels correlated better with chronological aging than with body weight, (iii) serum erythropoietin levels were influenced by both body weight and aging, (iv) serum plasminogen activator inhibitor, serum cytokines, and brain tumor necrosis factor were not influenced by aging or body weight, and (v) brain amyloid precursor protein more closely related to body weight and serum levels of gastrointestinal hormones than to brain weight, chronological aging, or cytokines. These findings show that although aging and body weight interact, their influences are distinct not only among various cytokines and hormones but also between the central nervous system and the peripheral tissue compartments. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Gerontological Society of America 2014.

  15. Astrocytic expression of the Alzheimer's disease beta-secretase (BACE1) is stimulus-dependent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartlage-Rübsamen, Maike; Zeitschel, Ulrike; Apelt, Jenny

    2003-01-01

    The beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme (BACE1) is a prerequisite for the generation of beta-amyloid peptides, which give rise to cerebrovascular and parenchymal beta-amyloid deposits in the brain of Alzheimer's disease patients. BACE1 is neuronally expressed in the brains of humans and experimental...... paradigms studied. In contrast, BACE1 expression by reactive astrocytes was evident in chronic but not in acute models of gliosis. Additionally, we observed BACE1-immunoreactive astrocytes in proximity to beta-amyloid plaques in the brains of aged Tg2576 mice and Alzheimer's disease patients....

  16. Reducing the Levels of Akt Activation by PDK1 Knock-in Mutation Protects Neuronal Cultures against Synthetic Amyloid-Beta Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaobin Yang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The Akt kinase has been widely assumed for years as a key downstream effector of the PI3K signaling pathway in promoting neuronal survival. This notion was however challenged by the finding that neuronal survival responses were still preserved in mice with reduced Akt activity. Moreover, here we show that the Akt signaling is elevated in the aged brain of two different mice models of Alzheimer Disease. We manipulate the rate of Akt stimulation by employing knock-in mice expressing a mutant form of PDK1 (phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 with reduced, but not abolished, ability to activate Akt. We found increased membrane localization and activity of the TACE/ADAM17 α-secretase in the brain of the PDK1 mutant mice with concomitant TNFR1 processing, which provided neurons with resistance against TNFα-induced neurotoxicity. Opposite to the Alzheimer Disease transgenic mice, the PDK1 knock-in mice exhibited an age-dependent attenuation of the unfolding protein response, which protected the mutant neurons against endoplasmic reticulum stressors. Moreover, these two mechanisms cooperatively provide the mutant neurons with resistance against amyloid-beta oligomers, and might singularly also contribute to protect these mice against amyloid-beta pathology.

  17. Modeling Cerebrovascular Pathophysiology in Amyloid-β Metabolism using Neural-Crest-Derived Smooth Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Cheung

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: There is growing recognition of cerebrovascular contributions to neurodegenerative diseases. In the walls of cerebral arteries, amyloid-beta (Aβ accumulation is evident in a majority of aged people and patients with cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Here, we leverage human pluripotent stem cells to generate vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs from neural crest progenitors, recapitulating brain-vasculature-specific attributes of Aβ metabolism. We confirm that the lipoprotein receptor, LRP1, functions in our neural-crest-derived SMCs to mediate Aβ uptake and intracellular lysosomal degradation. Hypoxia significantly compromises the contribution of SMCs to Aβ clearance by suppressing LRP1 expression. This enabled us to develop an assay of Aβ uptake by using the neural crest-derived SMCs with hypoxia as a stress paradigm. We then tested several vascular protective compounds in a high-throughput format, demonstrating the value of stem-cell-based phenotypic screening for novel therapeutics and drug repurposing, aimed at alleviating amyloid burden. : The contribution of blood vessel pathologies to neurodegenerative disorders is relatively neglected, partly due to inadequate human tissues for research. By using human stem cells, Cheung et al. establish a method of generating vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs from neural crest progenitors, the primary precursors that give rise to brain blood vessels. These stem-cell-derived SMCs display defective amyloid processing under chronic hypoxia, a phenomenon well documented in the cerebral vasculatures of aged people and patients with Alzheimer’s disease.

  18. Cellular demise and inflammatory microglial activation during beta-amyloid toxicity are governed by Wnt1 and canonical signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Zhao Zhong; Li, Faqi; Maiese, Kenneth

    2007-06-01

    Initially described as a modulator of embryogenesis for a number of organ systems, Wnt1 has recently been linked to the development of several neurodegenerative disorders, none being of greater significance than Alzheimer's disease. We therefore examined the ability of Wnt1 to oversee vital pathways responsible for cell survival during beta-amyloid (Abeta1-42) exposure. Here we show that Wnt1 is critical for protection in the SH-SY5Y neuronal cell line against genomic DNA degradation, membrane phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure, and microglial activation, since these neuroprotective attributes of Wnt1 are lost during gene silencing of Wnt1 protein expression. Intimately tied to Wnt1 protection is the presence and activation of Akt1. Pharmacological inhibition of the PI 3-K pathway or gene silencing of Akt1 expression can abrogate the protective capacity of Wnt1. Closely aligned with Wnt1 and Akt1 are the integrated canonical pathways of synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) and beta-catenin. Through Akt1 dependent pathways, Wnt1 phosphorylates GSK-3beta and maintains beta-catenin integrity to insure its translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus to block apoptosis. Our work outlines a highly novel role for Wnt1 and its integration with Akt1, GSK-3beta, and beta-catenin to foster neuronal cell survival and repress inflammatory microglial activation that can identify new avenues of therapy against neurodegenerative disorders.

  19. Behavior of beta-Amyloid 1-16 at the Air-Water Interface at Varying pH by Nonlinear Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Miller, A. E.; Petersen, P. B.; Hollars, C. H.; Saykally, R. J.; Heyda, Jan; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 23 (2011), s. 5873-5880 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA ČR GA203/08/0114 Grant - others:NSF(US) 0650950 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : beta-amyloid * air /water interface * SHG spectroscopy * molecular dynamics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.946, year: 2011

  20. Antagonizing beta-amyloid peptide neurotoxicity of the anti-aging fungus Ganoderma lucidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Cora Sau-Wan; Yu, Man-Shan; Yuen, Wai-Hung; So, Kwok-Fai; Zee, Sze-Yong; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung

    2008-01-23

    Ganoderma lucidum (Leyss. ex Fr.) Karst. (Lingzhi) is a medicinal fungus used clinically in many Asian countries to promote health and longevity. Synaptic degeneration is another key mode of neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent studies have shown the loss of synaptic density proteins in each individual neuron during the progression of AD. It was recently reported that beta-amyloid (Abeta) could cause synaptic dysfunction and contribute to AD pathology. In this study, we reported that aqueous extract of G. lucidum significantly attenuated Abeta-induced synaptotoxicity by preserving the synaptic density protein, synaptophysin. In addition, G. lucidum aqueous extract antagonized Abeta-triggered DEVD cleavage activities in a dose-dependent manner. Further studies elucidated that phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase, c-Jun, and p38 MAP kinase was attenuated by G. lucidum in Abeta-stressed neurons. Taken together, the results prove a hypothesis that anti-aging G. lucidum can prevent harmful effects of the exterminating toxin Abeta in AD.

  1. The nicotinic alpha7 acetylcholine receptor agonist ssr180711 is unable to activate limbic neurons in mice overexpressing human amyloid-beta1-42

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soderman, A.; Spang-Thomsen, Mogens; Hansen, H.

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that amyloid-beta1-42 (Abeta1-42) binds to the nicotinergic alpha7 acetylcholine receptor (alpha7 nAChR) and that the application of Abeta1-42 to cells inhibits the function of the alpha7 nAChR. The in vivo consequences of the pharmacological activation of the alp...

  2. Multisite tyrosine phosphorylation of the N-terminus of Mint1/X11α by Src kinase regulates the trafficking of amyloid precursor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, Christopher J R; Black, Hannah L; Andrews, Katie L; Davenport, Elizabeth C; Conboy, Michael; Chawla, Sangeeta; Dowle, Adam A; Ashford, David; Thomas, Jerry R; Evans, Gareth J O

    2016-05-01

    Mint/X11 is one of the four neuronal trafficking adaptors that interact with amyloid precursor protein (APP) and are linked with its cleavage to generate β-amyloid peptide, a key player in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. How APP switches between adaptors at different stages of the secretory pathway is poorly understood. Here, we show that tyrosine phosphorylation of Mint1 regulates the destination of APP. A canonical SH2-binding motif ((202) YEEI) was identified in the N-terminus of Mint1 that is phosphorylated on tyrosine by C-Src and recruits the active kinase for sequential phosphorylation of further tyrosines (Y191 and Y187). A single Y202F mutation in the Mint1 N-terminus inhibits C-Src binding and tyrosine phosphorylation. Previous studies observed that co-expression of wild-type Mint1 and APP causes accumulation of APP in the trans-Golgi. Unphosphorylatable Mint1 (Y202F) or pharmacological inhibition of Src reduced the accumulation of APP in the trans-Golgi of heterologous cells. A similar result was observed in cultured rat hippocampal neurons where Mint1(Y202F) permitted the trafficking of APP to more distal neurites than the wild-type protein. These data underline the importance of the tyrosine phosphorylation of Mint1 as a critical switch for determining the destination of APP. The regulation of amyloid precursor protein (APP) trafficking is poorly understood. We have discovered that the APP adapter, Mint1, is phosphorylated by C-Src kinase. Mint1 causes APP accumulation in the trans-Golgi network, whereas inhibition of Src or mutation of Mint1-Y202 permits APP recycling. The phosphorylation status of Mint1 could impact on the pathological trafficking of APP in Alzheimer's disease. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Society for Neurochemistry.

  3. Apolipoprotein E Regulates Amyloid Formation within Endosomes of Pigment Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume van Niel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of toxic amyloid oligomers is a key feature in the pathogenesis of amyloid-related diseases. Formation of mature amyloid fibrils is one defense mechanism to neutralize toxic prefibrillar oligomers. This mechanism is notably influenced by apolipoprotein E variants. Cells that produce mature amyloid fibrils to serve physiological functions must exploit specific mechanisms to avoid potential accumulation of toxic species. Pigment cells have tuned their endosomes to maximize the formation of functional amyloid from the protein PMEL. Here, we show that ApoE is associated with intraluminal vesicles (ILV within endosomes and remain associated with ILVs when they are secreted as exosomes. ApoE functions in the ESCRT-independent sorting mechanism of PMEL onto ILVs and regulates the endosomal formation of PMEL amyloid fibrils in vitro and in vivo. This process secures the physiological formation of amyloid fibrils by exploiting ILVs as amyloid nucleating platforms.

  4. Molecular mechanism of the intramembrane cleavage of the β-carboxyl terminal fragment of amyloid precursor protein by γ-secretase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maho eMorishima-Kawashima

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid β-protein (Aβ plays a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease, the most common age-associated neurodegenerative disorder. Aβ is generated through intramembrane proteolysis of the β-carboxyl terminal fragment (βCTF of β-amyloid precursor protein (APP by γ-secretase. The initial cleavage by γ-secretase occurs in the membrane/cytoplasm boundary of the βCTF, liberating the APP intracellular domain (AICD. The remaining βCTFs, which are truncated at the C-terminus (longer Aβs, are then cropped sequentially in a stepwise manner, predominantly at three residue intervals, to generate Aβ. There are two major Aβ product lines which generate Aβ40 and Aβ42 with concomitant release of three and two tripeptides, respectively. Additionally, many alternative cleavages occur, releasing peptides with three to six residues. These modulate the Aβ product lines and define the species and quantity of Aβ generated. Here, we review our current understanding of the intramembrane cleavage of the βCTF by γ-secretase, which may contribute to the future goal of developing an efficient therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer’s disease.

  5. Beta-amyloid-induced cholinergic denervation correlates with enhanced nitric oxide synthase activity in rat cerebral cortex: Reversal by NMDA receptor blockade : Reversal by NMDA receptor blockade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O’Mahony, S.; Harkany, T.; Ábrahám, I.; Jong, G.I. de; Varga, J.L.; Zarándi, M.; Penke, B.; Nyakas, C.; Luiten, P.G.M.; Leonard, B.E.

    1998-01-01

    Ample experimental evidence indicates that acute beta-amyloid infusion into the nucleus basalis of rats elicits abrupt degeneration of the magnocellular cholinergic neurons projecting to the cerebral cortex, In fact, involvement of a permanent Ca2+ overload, partially via N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)

  6. Tributyltin alters secretion of interleukin 1 beta from human immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Shyretha; Whalen, Margaret

    2015-08-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) has been used as a biocide in industrial applications such as wood preservation, antifouling paint and antifungal agents. Owing to its many uses, it contaminates the environment and has been found in human blood samples. Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that promotes cell growth, tissue repair and immune response regulation. Produced predominately by both monocytes and macrophages, IL-1β appears to increase the invasiveness of certain tumors. This study shows that TBT modifies the secretion of IL-1β from increasingly reconstituted preparations of human immune cells. IL-1β secretion was examined after 24-, 48-h or 6-day exposures to TBT in highly enriched human natural killer (NK) cells, monocyte-depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MD-PBMCs), PBMCs, granulocytes and a preparation combining both PBMCs and granulocytes (PBMCs+granulocytes). TBT altered IL-1β secretion from all of the cell preparations. The 200 nM concentration of TBT normally blocked the secretion of IL-1β, whereas lower concentrations (usually 5-50 nM) elevated secretion of IL-1β. Examination of the signaling pathway(s) responsible for the elevated secretion of IL-1β was carried out in MD-PBMCs. Pathways examined were IL-1β processing (Caspase-1), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB). Results indicated that MAPK pathways (p44/42 and p38) appear to be the targets of TBT that lead to increased IL-1β secretion from immune cells. These results from human immune cells show IL-1β dysregulation by TBT is occurring ex vivo. Thus, the potential for in vivo effects on pro-inflammatory cytokine levels may possibly be a consequence of TBT exposures. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Gene expression profiling in the stress control brain region hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus reveals a novel gene network including Amyloid beta Precursor Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deussing Jan M

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pivotal role of stress in the precipitation of psychiatric diseases such as depression is generally accepted. This study aims at the identification of genes that are directly or indirectly responding to stress. Inbred mouse strains that had been evidenced to differ in their stress response as well as in their response to antidepressant treatment were chosen for RNA profiling after stress exposure. Gene expression and regulation was determined by microarray analyses and further evaluated by bioinformatics tools including pathway and cluster analyses. Results Forced swimming as acute stressor was applied to C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice and resulted in sets of regulated genes in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN, 4 h or 8 h after stress. Although the expression changes between the mouse strains were quite different, they unfolded in phases over time in both strains. Our search for connections between the regulated genes resulted in potential novel signalling pathways in stress. In particular, Guanine nucleotide binding protein, alpha inhibiting 2 (GNAi2 and Amyloid β (A4 precursor protein (APP were detected as stress-regulated genes, and together with other genes, seem to be integrated into stress-responsive pathways and gene networks in the PVN. Conclusions This search for stress-regulated genes in the PVN revealed its impact on interesting genes (GNAi2 and APP and a novel gene network. In particular the expression of APP in the PVN that is governing stress hormone balance, is of great interest. The reported neuroprotective role of this molecule in the CNS supports the idea that a short acute stress can elicit positive adaptational effects in the brain.

  8. Drp1 guarding of the mitochondrial network is important for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic beta cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, Florian; Schultz, Julia; Waterstradt, Rica; Baltrusch, Simone, E-mail: simone.baltrusch@med.uni-rostock.de

    2016-06-10

    Mitochondria form a tubular network in mammalian cells, and the mitochondrial life cycle is determined by fission, fusion and autophagy. Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) has a pivotal role in these processes because it alone is able to constrict mitochondria. However, the regulation and function of Drp1 have been shown to vary between cell types. Mitochondrial morphology affects mitochondrial metabolism and function. In pancreatic beta cells mitochondrial metabolism is a key component of the glucose-induced cascade of insulin secretion. The goal of the present study was to investigate the action of Drp1 in pancreatic beta cells. For this purpose Drp1 was down-regulated by means of shDrp1 in insulin-secreting INS1 cells and mouse pancreatic islets. In INS1 cells reduced Drp1 expression resulted in diminished expression of proteins regulating mitochondrial fusion, namely mitofusin 1 and 2, and optic atrophy protein 1. Diminished mitochondrial dynamics can therefore be assumed. After down-regulation of Drp1 in INS1 cells and spread mouse islets the initially homogenous mitochondrial network characterised by a moderate level of interconnections shifted towards high heterogeneity with elongated, clustered and looped mitochondria. These morphological changes were found to correlate directly with functional alterations. Mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP generation were significantly reduced in INS1 cells after Drp1down-regulation. Finally, a significant loss of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was demonstrated in INS1 cells and mouse pancreatic islets. In conclusion, Drp1 expression is important in pancreatic beta cells to maintain the regulation of insulin secretion. -- Highlights: •Down-regulation of Drp1 in INS1 cells reduces mitochondrial fusion protein expression. •Mitochondrial membrane potential in INS1 cells is diminished after Drp1 down-regulation. •Mitochondria become elongated after down-regulation of Drp1 in beta cells. •Down-regulation of

  9. Imaging characteristic of dual-phase 18F-florbetapir (AV-45/Amyvid) PET for the concomitant detection of perfusion deficits and beta-amyloid deposition in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Kun-Ju; Hsiao, Ing-Tsung; Hsieh, Chia-Ju; Wey, Shiaw-Pyng; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Hsu, Jung-Lung; Huang, Chin-Chang; Huang, Kuo-Lun

    2016-01-01

    We investigated dual-phase 18 F-florbetapir (AV-45/Amyvid) PET imaging for the concomitant detection of brain perfusion deficits and beta-amyloid deposition in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and in cognitively healthy controls (HCs). A total of 82 subjects (24 AD patients, 44 MCI patients and 14 HCs) underwent both dual-phase 18 F-AV-45 PET and MRI imaging. Dual-phase dynamic PET imaging consisted of (1) five 1-min scans obtained 1 - 6 min after tracer injection (perfusion 18 F-AV-45 imaging, pAV-45), and (2) ten 1-min scans obtained 50 - 60 min after tracer injection (amyloid 18 F-AV-45 imaging). Amyloid-negative MCI/AD patients were excluded. Volume of interest analysis and statistical parametric mapping of pAV-45 and 18 F-AV-45 images were performed to investigate the perfusion deficits and the beta-amyloid burden in the three study groups. The associations between Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores and global perfusion deficits and amyloid deposition were investigated with linear and segmental linear correlation analyses. HCs generally had normal pAV-45 findings, whereas perfusion deficits were evident in the hippocampus, and temporal, parietal and middle frontal cortices in both MCI and AD patients. The motor-sensory cortex was relatively preserved. MMSE scores in the entire study cohort were significantly associated with the degree of perfusion impairment as assessed by pAV-45 imaging (r = 0.5156, P < 0.0001). 18 F-AV-45 uptake was significantly higher in AD patients than in the two other study groups. However, the correlation between MMSE scores and 18 F-AV-45 uptake in MCI patients was more of a binary phenomenon and began in MCI patients with MMSE score 23.14 when 18 F-AV-45 uptake was higher and MMSE score lower than in patients with early MCI. Amyloid deposition started in the precuneus and the frontal and temporal regions in early MCI, ultimately reaching the maximum burden in advanced

  10. Melanosomal formation of PMEL core amyloid is driven by aromatic residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hee, Jia Shee; Mitchell, Susan M; Liu, Xinran; Leonhardt, Ralf M

    2017-03-08

    PMEL is a pigment cell protein that forms physiological amyloid in melanosomes. Many amyloids and/or their oligomeric precursors are toxic, causing or contributing to severe, incurable diseases including Alzheimer's and prion diseases. Striking similarities in intracellular formation pathways between PMEL and various pathological amyloids including Aβ and PrP Sc suggest PMEL is an excellent model system to study endocytic amyloid. Learning how PMEL fibrils assemble without apparent toxicity may help developing novel therapies for amyloid diseases. Here we identify the critical PMEL domain that forms the melanosomal amyloid core (CAF). An unbiased alanine-scanning screen covering the entire region combined with quantitative electron microscopy analysis of the full set of mutants uncovers numerous essential residues. Many of these rely on aromaticity for function suggesting a role for π-stacking in melanosomal amyloid assembly. Various mutants are defective in amyloid nucleation. This extensive data set informs the first structural model of the CAF and provides insights into how the melanosomal amyloid core forms.

  11. Prevalence of cerebral amyloid pathology in persons without dementia: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, W.J.; Ossenkoppele, R.; Knol, D.L.; Tijms, B.M.; Scheltens, P.J.; Verhey, F.R.J.; Visser, P.J.; Aalten, P.; Aarsland, D.; Alcolea, D.; Alexander, M.; Almdahl, I.S.; Arnold, S.E.; Baldeiras, I.; Barthel, H.; Berckel, B.N. van; Bibeau, K.; Blennow, K.; Brooks, D.J.; Buchem, M.A. van; Camus, V.; Cavedo, E.; Chen, K.; Chetelat, G.; Cohen, A.D.; Drzezga, A.; Engelborghs, S.; Fagan, A.M.; Fladby, T.; Fleisher, A.S.; Flier, W.M. van der; Ford, L.; Forster, S.; Fortea, J.; Foskett, N.; Frederiksen, K.S.; Freund-Levi, Y.; Frisoni, G.B.; Froelich, L.; Gabryelewicz, T.; Gill, K.D.; Gkatzima, O.; Gomez-Tortosa, E.; Gordon, M.F.; Grimmer, T.; Hampel, H.; Hausner, L.; Hellwig, S.; Herukka, S.K.; Hildebrandt, H.; Ishihara, L.; Ivanoiu, A.; Jagust, W.J.; Johannsen, P.; Kandimalla, R.; Kapaki, E.; Klimkowicz-Mrowiec, A.; Klunk, W.E.; Kohler, S.; Koglin, N.; Kornhuber, J.; Kramberger, M.G.; Laere, K. Van; Landau, S.M.; Lee, D.Y.; Leon, M.; Lisetti, V.; Lleo, A.; Madsen, K.; Maier, W.; Marcusson, J.; Mattsson, N.; Mendonca, A. de; Meulenbroek, O.V.; Meyer, P.T.; Mintun, M.A.; Mok, V.; Molinuevo, J.L.; Mollergard, H.M.; Morris, J.C.; Mroczko, B.; Mussele, S. Van der; Na, D.L.; Newberg, A.; Nordberg, A.; Nordlund, A.; Novak, G.P.; Paraskevas, G.P.; Parnetti, L.; Perera, G.; Peters, O.; Popp, J.; Prabhakar, S.; Rabinovici, G.D.; Ramakers, I.H.; Rami, L.; Oliveira, C.R.; Rinne, J.O.; Rodrigue, K.M.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, E.; Verbeek, M.M.; et al.,

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Cerebral amyloid-beta aggregation is an early pathological event in Alzheimer disease (AD), starting decades before dementia onset. Estimates of the prevalence of amyloid pathology in persons without dementia are needed to understand the development of AD and to design prevention

  12. α-Iso-cubebene exerts neuroprotective effects in amyloid beta stimulated microglia activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun Young; Park, Se Jin; Park, Nan Jeong; Joo, Woo Hong; Lee, Sang-Joon; Choi, Young-Whan

    2013-10-25

    Schisandra chinensis is commonly used for food and as a traditional remedy for the treatment of neuronal disorders. However, it is unclear which component of S. chinensis is responsible for its neuropharmacological effects. To answer this question, we isolated α-iso-cubebene, a dibenzocyclooctadiene lignin, from S. chinensis and determined if it has any anti-neuroinflammatory and neuroprotective properties against amyloid β-induced neuroinflammation in microglia. Microglia that are stimulated by amyloid β increased their production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the enzymatic activity of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). We found this was all inhibited by α-iso-cubebene. Consistent with these results, α-iso-cubebene inhibited the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and MMP-9 in amyloid β-stimulated microglia. Subsequent mechanistic studies revealed that α-iso-cubebene inhibited the phosphorylation and degradation of IκB-α, the phosphorylation and transactivity of NF-κB, and the phosphorylation of MAPK in amyloid β-stimulated microglia. These results suggest that α-iso-cubebene impairs the amyloid β-induced neuroinflammatory response of microglia by inhibiting the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. Importantly, α-iso-cubebene can provide critical neuroprotection for primary cortical neurons against amyloid β-stimulated microglia-mediated neurotoxicity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing that α-iso-cubebene can provide neuroprotection against, and influence neuroinflammation triggered by, amyloid β activation of microglia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of beta blockade on gastric acid secretion and changes in gastric mucosal blood flow before and after parietal cell vagotomy in dogs and man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovendal, C P; Bech, K; Bekker, C

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the present study was, in paired experiments in dogs, to examine the effect of beta-receptor blockade on gastric acid secretion and mucosal blood flow before and after parietal cell vagotomy (PCV). The secretory response to pentagastrin was reduced after vagotomy. beta-Adrenergic block......The aim of the present study was, in paired experiments in dogs, to examine the effect of beta-receptor blockade on gastric acid secretion and mucosal blood flow before and after parietal cell vagotomy (PCV). The secretory response to pentagastrin was reduced after vagotomy. beta...

  14. Dual role of proapoptotic BAD in insulin secretion and beta cell survival

    OpenAIRE

    Danial, Nika N.; Walensky, Loren D.; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Choi, Cheol Soo; Fisher, Jill K.; Molina, Anthony J. A.; Datta, Sandeep Robert; Pitter, Kenneth L.; Bird, Gregory H.; Wikstrom, Jakob D.; Deeney, Jude T.; Robertson, Kirsten; Morash, Joel; Kulkarni, Ameya; Neschen, Susanne

    2008-01-01

    The proapoptotic BCL-2 family member BAD resides in a glucokinase-containing complex that regulates glucose-driven mitochondrial respiration. Here, we present genetic evidence of a physiologic role for BAD in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by beta cells. This novel function of BAD is specifically dependent upon the phosphorylation of its BH3 sequence, previously defined as an essential death domain. We highlight the pharmacologic relevance of phosphorylated BAD BH3 by using cell-permeab...

  15. Lycopene and Beta-Carotene Induce Growth Inhibition and Proapoptotic Effects on ACTH-Secreting Pituitary Adenoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite de Oliveira, Felipe; Soares, Nathália; de Mattos, Rômulo Medina; Hecht, Fábio; Dezonne, Rômulo Sperduto; Vairo, Leandro; Goldenberg, Regina Coeli dos Santos; Gomes, Flávia Carvalho Alcântara; de Carvalho, Denise Pires; Gadelha, Mônica R.; Nasciutti, Luiz Eurico; Miranda-Alves, Leandro

    2013-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas comprise approximately 10–15% of intracranial tumors and result in morbidity associated with altered hormonal patterns, therapy and compression of adjacent sella turcica structures. The use of functional foods containing carotenoids contributes to reduce the risk of chronic diseases such as cancer and vascular disorders. In this study, we evaluated the influence of different concentrations of beta-carotene and lycopene on cell viability, colony formation, cell cycle, apoptosis, hormone secretion, intercellular communication and expression of connexin 43, Skp2 and p27kip1 in ACTH-secreting pituitary adenoma cells, the AtT20 cells, incubated for 48 and 96 h with these carotenoids. We observed a decrease in cell viability caused by the lycopene and beta-carotene treatments; in these conditions, the clonogenic ability of the cells was also significantly decreased. Cell cycle analysis revealed that beta-carotene induced an increase of the cells in S and G2/M phases; furthermore, lycopene increased the proportion of these cells in G0/G1 while decreasing the S and G2/M phases. Also, carotenoids induced apoptosis after 96 h. Lycopene and beta-carotene decreased the secretion of ACTH in AtT20 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Carotenoids blocked the gap junction intercellular communication. In addition, the treatments increased the expression of phosphorylated connexin43. Finally, we also demonstrate decreased expression of S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2) and increased expression of p27kip1 in carotenoid-treated cells. These results show that lycopene and beta-carotene were able to negatively modulate events related to the malignant phenotype of AtT-20 cells, through a mechanism that could involve changes in the expression of connexin 43, Skp2 and p27kip1; and suggest that these compounds might provide a novel pharmacological approach to the treatment of Cushing’s disease. PMID:23667519

  16. Direct exposure of guinea pig CNS to human luteinizing hormone increases cerebrospinal fluid and cerebral beta amyloid levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahjoepramono, Eka J; Wijaya, Linda K; Taddei, Kevin; Bates, Kristyn A; Howard, Matthew; Martins, Georgia; deRuyck, Karl; Matthews, Paul M; Verdile, Giuseppe; Martins, Ralph N

    2011-01-01

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) has been shown to alter the metabolism of beta amyloid (Aβ), a key protein in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. While LH and components required for LH receptor signalling are present in the brain, their role in the CNS remains unclear. In vitro, LH has been shown to facilitate neurosteroid production and alter Aβ metabolism. However, whether LH can directly modulate cerebral Aβ levels in vivo has not previously been studied. In this study, we investigated the effect of chronic administration of LH to the guinea pig CNS on cerebral Aβ levels. Gonadectomised male animals were administered, via cortical placement, either placebo or LH slow-release pellets. At 14 and 28 days after treatment, animals were sacrificed. Brain, plasma and CSF were collected and Aβ levels measured via ELISA. Levels of the Aβ precursor protein (APP) and the neurosteroidogenic enzyme cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) were also assayed. An increase in CSF Aβ40 levels was observed 28 days following treatment. These CSF data also reflected changes in Aβ40 levels observed in brain homogenates. No change was observed in plasma Aβ40 levels but APP and its C-terminal fragments (APP-CTF) were significantly increased in response to LH exposure. Protein expression of P450scc was increased after 28 days of LH exposure, suggesting activation of the LH receptor. These data indicate that direct exposure of guinea pig CNS to LH results in altered brain Aβ levels, perhaps due to altered APP expression/metabolism. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Intracellular accumulation of amyloid-beta - a predictor for synaptic dysfunction and neuron loss in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Bayer

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite of long-standing evidence that beta-amyloid (Aβ peptides have detrimental effects on synaptic function, the relationship between Aβ, synaptic and neuron loss is largely unclear. During the last years there is growing evidence that early intraneuronal accumulation of Aβ peptides is one of the key events leading to synaptic and neuronal dysfunction. Many studies have been carried out using transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD which have been proven to be valuable model system in modern AD research. The present review discusses the impact of intraneuronal Aβ accumulation on synaptic impairment and neuron loss and provides an overview of currently available AD mouse models showing these pathological alterations.

  18. Red mold rice ameliorates impairment of memory and learning ability in intracerebroventricular amyloid beta-infused rat by repressing amyloid beta accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chun-Lin; Kuo, Tzong-Fu; Wang, Jyh-Jye; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2007-11-01

    Amyloid beta (Abeta) peptide related to the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD) damaged neurons and further resulted in dementia. Monascus-fermented red mold rice (RMR), a traditional Chinese medicine as well as health food, includes monacolins (with the same function as statins) and multifunctional metabolites. In this study, ethanol extract of RMR (RE) was used to evaluate neuroprotection against Abeta40 neurotoxicity in PC12 cells. Furthermore, the effects of dietary administration of RMR on memory and learning abilities are confirmed in an animal model of AD rats infused with Abeta40 into the cerebral ventricle. During continuous Abeta40 infusion for 28 days, the rats of test groups were administered RMR or lovastatin. Memory and learning abilities were evaluated in the water maze and passive avoidance tasks. After sacrifice, cerebral cortex and hippocampus were collected for the examination of AD risk factors. The in vitro results clearly indicate that RE provides stronger neuroprotection in rescuing cell viability as well as repressing inflammatory response and oxidative stress. RMR administration potently reverses the memory deficit in the memory task. Abeta40 infusion increases acetylcholinesterase activity, reactive oxygen species, and lipid peroxidation and decreases total antioxidant status and superoxide dismutase activity in brain, but these damages were potently reversed by RMR administration, and the protection was more significant than that with lovastatin administration. The protection provided by RMR is able to prevent Abeta fibrils from being formed and deposited in hippocampus and further decrease Abeta40 accumulation, even though Abeta40 solution was infused into brain continuously. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Structure activity relationship study of curcumin analogues toward the amyloid-beta aggregation inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Hitoshi; Nikaido, Yuri; Nakadate, Mamiko; Ise, Satomi; Konno, Hiroyuki

    2014-12-15

    Inhibition of the amyloid β aggregation process could possibly prevent the onset of Alzheimer's disease. In this article, we report a structure-activity relationship study of curcumin analogues for anti amyloid β aggregation activity. Compound 7, the ideal amyloid β aggregation inhibitor in vitro among synthesized curcumin analogues, has not only potent anti amyloid β aggregation effects, but also water solubility more than 160 times that of curcumin. In addition, new approaches to improve water solubility of curcumin-type compounds are proposed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Selective inhibition of phosphodiesterases 4, 5 and 9 induces HSP20 phosphorylation and attenuates amyloid beta 1-42 mediated cytotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Cameron, Ryan T.; Whiteley, Ellanor; Day, Jon P.; Parachikova, Anna I.; Baillie, George S.

    2017-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors are currently under evaluation as agents that may facilitate the improvement of cognitive impairment associated with Alzheimer's disease. Our aim was to determine whether inhibitors of PDEs 4, 5 and 9 could alleviate the cytotoxic effects of amyloid beta 1?42 (A?1?42) via a mechanism involving the small heatshock protein HSP20. We show that inhibition of PDEs 4, 5 and 9 but not 3 induces the phosphorylation of HSP20 which, in turn, increases the colocalisati...

  1. FKBP immunophilins and Alzheimer's disease: A chaperoned affair

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-07-08

    Jul 8, 2011 ... FKBP immunophilins and Alzheimer's disease: A chaperoned affair. Weihuan Cao Mary ... Keywords. Alzheimer's disease; amyloid precursor protein; beta amyloid; FKBP; FK506; immunophilins; tau ... 43 | Issue 1. March 2018.

  2. Normotensive sodium loading in conscious dogs: Regulation of renin secretion during beta receptor blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bie, Peter; Mølstrøm, Simon; Wamberg, Søren

    2009-01-01

    Cl (20 micromol/kg/min for 180 min, NaLoad) during regular or low-sodium diet (0.03 mmol/kg/d, LowNa) with and without metoprolol (2 mg/kg plus 0.9 mg/kg/h). Vasopressin V2 receptors were blocked by Otsuka compound OPC31260 to facilitate clearance measurements. Body fluid volume was maintained by servo-controlled...... that in this setting, renin secretion and renin-dependent sodium excretion are controlled by via the renal nerves and therefore eliminated or reduced by blocking the action of norepinephrine on the juxtaglomerular cells with the beta1-receptor antagonist metoprolol. This was tested in conscious dogs by infusion of Na...... irrespective of diet. In conclusion, PRC depended on dietary sodium and beta1-adrenergic control as expected; however, the acute sodium-driven decrease in PRC at constant MAP and GFR was unaffected by beta1-receptor blockade demonstrating that renin may be regulated without changes in MAP, GFR, or beta1...

  3. Lycopene attenuates Aβ1-42 secretion and its toxicity in human cell and Caenorhabditis elegans models of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Mao, Liuqun; Xing, Huanhuan; Xu, Lei; Fu, Xiang; Huang, Liyingzi; Huang, Dongling; Pu, Zhijun; Li, Qinghua

    2015-11-03

    Growing evidence suggests concentration of lycopene was reduced in plasma of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). Lycopene, a member of the carotenoid family, has been identified as an antioxidant to attenuate oxidative damage and has neuroprotective role in several AD models. However, whether lycopene is involved in the pathogenesis of AD and molecular underpinnings are elusive. In this study, we found that lycopene can significantly delay paralysis in the Aβ1-42-transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans strain GMC101. Lycopene treatment reduced Aβ1-42 secretion in SH-SY5Y cells overexpressing the Swedish mutant form of human β-amyloid precursor protein (APPsw). Next, we found lycopene can down-regulate expression level of β-amyloid precursor protein(APP) in APPsw cells. Moreover, lycopene treatment can not change endogenous reactive oxygen species level and apoptosis in APPsw cells. However, lycopene treatment protected against H2O2-induced oxidative stress and copper-induced damage in APPsw cells. Collectively, our data support that elevated lycopene contributes to the lower pathogenesis of AD. Our findings suggest that increasing lycopene in neurons may be a novel approach to attenuate onset and development of AD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Classic beta-amyloid deposits cluster around large diameter blood vessels rather than capillaries in sporadic Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Richard A

    2006-11-01

    Various hypotheses could explain the relationship between beta-amyloid (Abeta) deposition and the vasculature in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Amyloid deposition may reduce capillary density, affect endothelial cells of blood vessels, result in diffusion from blood vessels, or interfere with the perivascular clearance mechanism. Hence, the spatial pattern of the classic ('cored') type of Abeta deposit was studied in the upper laminae (I,II/III) of the superior frontal gyrus in nine cases of sporadic AD (SAD). Sections were immunostained with antibodies against Abeta and with collagen IV to study the relationships between the spatial distribution of the classic deposits and the blood vessel profiles. Both the classic deposits and blood vessel profiles were distributed in clusters. In all cases, there was a positive spatial correlation between the clusters of the classic deposits and the larger diameter (>10 microm) blood vessel profiles and especially the vertically penetrating arterioles. In only 1 case, was there a significant spatial correlation between the clusters of the classic deposits and the smaller diameter (upper laminae of the frontal cortex. This aggregation could result from diffusion of proteins from blood vessels or from overloading the system of perivascular clearance from the brain.

  5. A subcutaneous cellular implant for passive immunization against amyloid-β reduces brain amyloid and tau pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathuilière, Aurélien; Laversenne, Vanessa; Astolfo, Alberto; Kopetzki, Erhard; Jacobsen, Helmut; Stampanoni, Marco; Bohrmann, Bernd; Schneider, Bernard L; Aebischer, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    Passive immunization against misfolded toxic proteins is a promising approach to treat neurodegenerative disorders. For effective immunotherapy against Alzheimer's disease, recent clinical data indicate that monoclonal antibodies directed against the amyloid-β peptide should be administered before the onset of symptoms associated with irreversible brain damage. It is therefore critical to develop technologies for continuous antibody delivery applicable to disease prevention. Here, we addressed this question using a bioactive cellular implant to deliver recombinant anti-amyloid-β antibodies in the subcutaneous tissue. An encapsulating device permeable to macromolecules supports the long-term survival of myogenic cells over more than 10 months in immunocompetent allogeneic recipients. The encapsulated cells are genetically engineered to secrete high levels of anti-amyloid-β antibodies. Peripheral implantation leads to continuous antibody delivery to reach plasma levels that exceed 50 µg/ml. In a proof-of-concept study, we show that the recombinant antibodies produced by this system penetrate the brain and bind amyloid plaques in two mouse models of the Alzheimer's pathology. When encapsulated cells are implanted before the onset of amyloid plaque deposition in TauPS2APP mice, chronic exposure to anti-amyloid-β antibodies dramatically reduces amyloid-β40 and amyloid-β42 levels in the brain, decreases amyloid plaque burden, and most notably, prevents phospho-tau pathology in the hippocampus. These results support the use of encapsulated cell implants for passive immunotherapy against the misfolded proteins, which accumulate in Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Amyloid-beta transporter expression at the blood-CSF barrier is age-dependent

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    Pascale Crissey L

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Age is the major risk factor for many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD. There is an accumulation of amyloid-beta peptides (Aβ in both the AD brain and the normal aging brain. Clearance of Aβ from the brain occurs via active transport at the blood-brain barrier (BBB and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB. With increasing age, the expression of the Aβ efflux transporters is decreased and the Aβ influx transporter expression is increased at the BBB, adding to the amyloid burden in the brain. Expression of the Aβ transporters at the choroid plexus (CP epithelium as a function of aging was the subject of this study. Methods This project investigated the changes in expression of the Aβ transporters, the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1, P-glycoprotein (P-gp, LRP-2 (megalin and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE at the BCSFB in Brown-Norway/Fischer rats at ages 3, 6, 9, 12, 20, 30 and 36 months, using real time RT-PCR to measure transporter mRNA expression, and immunohistochemistry (IHC to measure transporter protein in isolated rat CP. Results There was an increase in the transcription of the Aβ efflux transporters, LRP-1 and P-gp, no change in RAGE expression and a decrease in LRP-2, the CP epithelium influx transporter, at the BCSFB with aging. Decreased Aβ42 concentration in the CP, as measured by quantitative IHC, was associated with these Aβ transporter alterations. Conclusions Age-dependent alterations in the CP Aβ transporters are associated with a decrease in Aβ42 accumulation in the CP, and are reciprocal to the changes seen in these transporters at the BBB, suggesting a possible compensatory role for the BCSFB in Aβ clearance in aging.

  7. Effects of cerebrovascular disease on amyloid precursor protein metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid

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    Rosengren Lars

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease (AD and cerebrovascular disease (CVD including chronic small vessel disease of the brain (SVD are the most frequent causes of dementia. AD is associated with metabolism of amyloid precursor protein (APP and low levels of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ X-42 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. CVD and SVD are established risk factors for AD, brain white matter lesions (WML are established surrogate markers for SVD and are also associated with reduced CSF AβX-42. A cohort survey was performed to examine whether SVD or acute CVD affects APP metabolism and to explore a potential association between WML and APP metabolism in two groups; cognitively impaired patients, subjective and mild (SCI and MCI and stroke patients. Through measurements of CSF APP metabolite levels in patients with a wide range of WML volumes, this study aimed to determine how SVD influences APP metabolism. Methods Sixty-three patients were included: 37 with subjective cognitive impairment (SCI or mild cognitive impairment (MCI without stroke, and 26 after acute stroke. Chronic and acute WML volume and infarct volume were determined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI post-scan processing, and CSF levels of α- and β-cleaved soluble APP (sAPP-α and sAPP-β, AβX-38, AβX-40 and AβX-42 were determined. The Mann-Whitney test was used to compare the patient groups. Chronic and acute WML volumes, infarct volume, age, and sex were used as predictors for CSF biomarker levels in linear regression analysis. Results CSF levels of sAPP-α and sAPP-β were strongly correlated (r = 0.95, p p p p ≤ 0.005; p ≤ 0.01; p ≤ 0.01; p ≤ 0.05; p ≤ 0.05 respectively, but not with acute WML or infarct volumes. Conclusions Lower CSF levels of sAPP-α and sAPP-β in the stroke group than in the SCI/MCI group and an inverse correlation with chronic WML indicate that ischemia lowers the levels of CSF sAPP metabolites and suggests that APP axonal transport or

  8. Monomeric Amyloid Beta Peptide in Hexafluoroisopropanol Detected by Small Angle Neutron Scattering.

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    Bo Zhang-Haagen

    Full Text Available Small proteins like amyloid beta (Aβ monomers are related to neurodegenerative disorders by aggregation to insoluble fibrils. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS is a nondestructive method to observe the aggregation process in solution. We show that SANS is able to resolve monomers of small molecular weight like Aβ for aggregation studies. We examine Aβ monomers after prolonged storing in d-hexafluoroisopropanol (dHFIP by using SANS and dynamic light scattering (DLS. We determined the radius of gyration from SANS as 1.0±0.1 nm for Aβ1-40 and 1.6±0.1 nm for Aβ1-42 in agreement with 3D NMR structures in similar solvents suggesting a solvent surface layer with 5% increased density. After initial dissolution in dHFIP Aβ aggregates sediment with a major component of pure monomers showing a hydrodynamic radius of 1.8±0.3 nm for Aβ1-40 and 3.2±0.4 nm for Aβ1-42 including a surface layer of dHFIP solvent molecules.

  9. Efficient production and secretion of bovine beta-lactoglobulin by Lactobacillus casei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazebrouck, Stéphane; Pothelune, Laetitia; Azevedo, Vasco; Corthier, Gérard; Wal, Jean-Michel; Langella, Philippe

    2007-04-06

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are attractive tools to deliver therapeutic molecules at the mucosal level. The model LAB Lactococcus lactis has been intensively used to produce and deliver such heterologous proteins. However, compared to recombinant lactococci, lactobacilli offer some advantages such as better survival in the digestive tract and immunomodulatory properties. Here, we compared different strategies to optimize the production of bovine beta-lactoglobulin (BLG), a major cow's milk allergen, in the probiotic strain Lactobacillus casei BL23. Using a nisin-inducible plasmid system, we first showed that L. casei BL23 strain could efficiently secrete a reporter protein, the staphylococcal nuclease (Nuc), with the lactococcal signal peptide SPUsp45 fused to its N-terminus. The fusion of SPUsp45 failed to drive BLG secretion but led to a 10-fold increase of intracellular BLG production. Secretion was significantly improved when the synthetic propeptide LEISSTCDA (hereafter called LEISS) was added to the N-terminus of the mature moiety of BLG. Secretion rate of LEISS-BLG was 6-fold higher than that of BLG alone while intracellular production reached then about 1 mg/L of culture. The highest yield of secretion was obtained by using Nuc as carrier protein. Insertion of Nuc between LEISS and BLG resulted in a 20-fold increase in BLG secretion, up to 27 microg/L of culture. Furthermore, the lactococcal nisRK regulatory genes were integrated into the BL23 chromosome. The nisRK insertion allowed a decrease of BLG synthesis in uninduced cultures while BLG production increased by 50% after nisin induction. Moreover, modification of the induction protocol led to increase the proportion of soluble BLG to around 74% of the total BLG production. BLG production and secretion in L. casei were significantly improved by fusions to a propeptide enhancer and a carrier protein. The resulting recombinant strains will be further tested for their ability to modulate the immune response

  10. Structural and optical characterization of Eu3+ doped beta-Ga2O3 nanoparticles using a liquid-phase precursor method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moung-O; Kang, Bongkyun; Yoon, Daeho

    2013-08-01

    Eu3+ doped beta-Ga2O3 and non-doped beta-Ga2O3 nanoparticles were synthesized at 800 degrees C using a liquid-phase precursor (LPP) method, with different annealing times and Eu3+ ion concentrations. Eu3+ doped beta-Ga2O3 nanoparticles showed broad XRD peaks, revealing a second phase compared with the non-doped beta-Ga2O3 nanoparticles. The cathode luminescence (CL) spectra of beta-Ga2O3 and Eu3+ doped beta-Ga2O3 nanoparticles showed a broad band emission (300-500 nm) of imperfection and two component emissions. The luminescence quenching properties of Eu3+ dopant ion concentration appeared gradually beyond 5 mol% in our investigation.

  11. A practical method for screening for beta-galactosidase secreting microbial colonies Método prático de triagem de colônias de microrganismos secretoras de beta-galactosidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriana S. Barreto

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbial colonies were replicated on YNB® agar plates overlaid with soft agar containing the glucose-oxidase/peroxidase (BIOTROL® system. The pink color developed around the colonies was the result of the reaction of the glucose generated by the extracellular hydrolysis of lactose by beta-galactosidase, indicating secretion of this enzyme. This method proved to be very convenient for testing hundreds of colonies grown on agar plates for beta-galactosidase secretion by microbial cells.Colônias microbianas foram replicadas na superfície de ágar YNB® contendo lactose, recoberta com uma camada de ágar semi-sólido contendo o sistema glicose-oxidase/peroxidase (BIOTROL®. Coloração rosa foi desenvolvida ao redor das colônias como resultado da reação de glicose gerada pela hidrólise extracelular de lactose pela beta-galactosidase, indicando secreção da enzima pelo microrganismo.

  12. Beta-structures in fibrous proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajava, Andrey V; Squire, John M; Parry, David A D

    2006-01-01

    The beta-form of protein folding, one of the earliest protein structures to be defined, was originally observed in studies of silks. It was then seen in early studies of synthetic polypeptides and, of course, is now known to be present in a variety of guises as an essential component of globular protein structures. However, in the last decade or so it has become clear that the beta-conformation of chains is present not only in many of the amyloid structures associated with, for example, Alzheimer's Disease, but also in the prion structures associated with the spongiform encephalopathies. Furthermore, X-ray crystallography studies have revealed the high incidence of the beta-fibrous proteins among virulence factors of pathogenic bacteria and viruses. Here we describe the basic forms of the beta-fold, summarize the many different new forms of beta-structural fibrous arrangements that have been discovered, and review advances in structural studies of amyloid and prion fibrils. These and other issues are described in detail in later chapters.

  13. Edaravone Attenuates the Proinflammatory Response in Amyloid-β-Treated Microglia by Inhibiting NLRP3 Inflammasome-Mediated IL-1β Secretion

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    Hong-Mei Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Microglial activation is an important pathological feature in the brains of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD, and amyloid-β (Aβ peptides play a crucial role in microglial activation. In addition, edaravone (EDA was recently shown to suppress oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokine production in APPswePS1dE9 (APP/PS1 mice. However, the mechanism by which EDA inhibits the Aβ-induced proinflammatory response in microglia is poorly understood. Methods: The mitochondrial membrane potential (∆ψm was evaluated using JC-1 staining. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS and mitochondrial ROS levels were detected using CM-H2DCFDA and MitoSOXTM Red, respectively. The levels of CD11b, NLRP3, pro-caspase-1 and manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD-2 were observed by western blotting, and the levels of interleukin-1beta (IL-1β in culture supernatants were quantified using an ELISA kit. Results: Aβ induced microglia activation and mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, mitochondrial dysfunction was associated with ROS accumulation and activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. Importantly, Aβ induced activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, leading to caspase-1 activation and IL-1β release in microglia. Moreover, EDA obviously attenuated the depolarization of ∆ψm, reduced mitochondria-derived ROS production and increased SOD-2 activity, resulting in the suppression of NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated IL-1β secretion in Aβ-treated microglia. Conclusion: EDA is a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant and exhibits anti-inflammatory effects on Aβ-treated microglia.

  14. Quantification of beta A4 protein deposition in the medial temporal lobe: a comparison of Alzheimer's disease and senile dementia of the Lewy body type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentleman, S M; Williams, B; Royston, M C; Jagoe, R; Clinton, J; Perry, R H; Ince, P G; Allsop, D; Polak, J M; Roberts, G W

    1992-08-03

    The distribution of beta-amyloid protein (beta A4) was examined in the medial temporal lobes from cases of Alzheimer's disease (AD) (n = 13), senile dementia of Lewy body type (SDLT) (n = 12) and age matched controls (n = 9). Using a previously described image analysis technique the extent of beta A4 pathology was determined in ten distinct anatomical sites within the medial temporal lobe. AD and SDLT cases contained very similar amounts of beta A4 in the areas sampled and both contained significantly more beta A4 than the age matched controls, particularly in the dentate and parahippocampal gyri. The similarity of the beta A4 load in the two conditions is in contrast to reported differences in the number of neurofibrillary tangles which can be observed. It is suggested that AD and SDLT represent a spectrum of pathology which centres around the aberrant processing of the beta A4 precursor protein.

  15. Genetic engineering combined with deep UV resonance Raman spectroscopy for structural characterization of amyloid-like fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikirzhytski, Vitali; Topilina, Natalya I; Higashiya, Seiichiro; Welch, John T; Lednev, Igor K

    2008-05-07

    Elucidating the structure of the cross-beta core in large amyloid fibrils is a challenging problem in modern structural biology. For the first time, a set of de novo polypeptides was genetically engineered to form amyloid-like fibrils with similar morphology and yet different strand length. Differential ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy allowed for separation of the spectroscopic signatures of the highly ordered beta-sheet strands and turns of the fibril core. The relationship between Raman frequencies and Ramachandran dihedral angles of the polypeptide backbone indicates the nature of the beta-sheet and turn structural elements.

  16. Chronic treatment with amyloid beta(1-42) inhibits non-cholinergic high-affinity choline transport in NG108-15 cells through protein kinase C signaling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nováková, Jana; Mikasová, Lenka; Machová, Eva; Lisá, Věra; Doležal, Vladimír

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 1062, č. 1-2 (2005), s. 101-110 ISSN 0006-8993 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5011206; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Grant - others:Lipidiet(XE) QLK1-CT-2002-00172 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : choline transporter * beta-amyloid * protein kinase C Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.296, year: 2005

  17. Contribution of Kunitz protease inhibitor and transmembrane domains to amyloid precursor protein homodimerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Khalifa, N; Tyteca, D; Courtoy, P J; Renauld, J C; Constantinescu, S N; Octave, J N; Kienlen-Campard, P

    2012-01-01

    The two major isoforms of the human amyloid precursor protein (APP) are APP695 and APP751. They differ by the insertion of a Kunitz-type protease inhibitor (KPI) sequence in the extracellular domain of APP751. APP-KPI isoforms are increased in Alzheimer's disease brains, and they could be associated with disease progression. Recent studies have shown that APP processing to Aβ is regulated by homodimerization, which involves both extracellular and juxtamembrane/transmembrane (JM/TM) regions. Our aim is to understand the mechanisms controlling APP dimerization and the contribution of the ectodomain and JM/TM regions to this process. We used bimolecular fluorescence complementation approaches coupled to fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis to measure the dimerization level of different APP isoforms and APP C-terminal fragments (C99) mutated in their JM/TM region. APP751 was found to form significantly more homodimers than APP695. Mutation of dimerization motifs in the TM domain of APP or C99 did not significantly affect fluorescence complementation. These findings indicate that the KPI domain plays a major role in APP dimerization. They set the basis for further investigation of the relation between dimerization, metabolism and function of APP. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. An intracellular threonine of amyloidprecursor protein mediates synaptic plasticity deficits and memory loss.

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    Franco Lombino

    Full Text Available Mutations in AmyloidPrecursor Protein (APP and BRI2/ITM2b genes cause Familial Alzheimer and Danish Dementias (FAD/FDD, respectively. APP processing by BACE1, which is inhibited by BRI2, yields sAPPß and ß-CTF. ß-CTF is cleaved by gamma-secretase to produce Aß. A knock-in mouse model of FDD, called FDDKI, shows deficits in memory and synaptic plasticity, which can be attributed to sAPPß/ß-CTF but not Aß. We have investigated further the pathogenic function of ß-CTF focusing on Thr(668 of ß-CTF because phosphorylation of Thr(668 is increased in AD cases. We created a knock-in mouse bearing a Thr(668Ala mutation (APP(TA mice that prevents phosphorylation at this site. This mutation prevents the development of memory and synaptic plasticity deficits in FDDKI mice. These data are consistent with a role for the carboxyl-terminal APP domain in the pathogenesis of dementia and suggest that averting the noxious role of Thr(668 is a viable therapeutic strategy for human dementias.

  19. Suppression of amyloid beta A11 antibody immunoreactivity by vitamin C: possible role of heparan sulfate oligosaccharides derived from glypican-1 by ascorbate-induced, nitric oxide (NO)-catalyzed degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fang; Cappai, Roberto; Ciccotosto, Giuseppe D; Svensson, Gabriel; Multhaup, Gerd; Fransson, Lars-Åke; Mani, Katrin

    2011-08-05

    Amyloid β (Aβ) is generated from the copper- and heparan sulfate (HS)-binding amyloid precursor protein (APP) by proteolytic processing. APP supports S-nitrosylation of the HS proteoglycan glypican-1 (Gpc-1). In the presence of ascorbate, there is NO-catalyzed release of anhydromannose (anMan)-containing oligosaccharides from Gpc-1-nitrosothiol. We investigated whether these oligosaccharides interact with Aβ during APP processing and plaque formation. anMan immunoreactivity was detected in amyloid plaques of Alzheimer (AD) and APP transgenic (Tg2576) mouse brains by immunofluorescence microscopy. APP/APP degradation products detected by antibodies to the C terminus of APP, but not Aβ oligomers detected by the anti-Aβ A11 antibody, colocalized with anMan immunoreactivity in Tg2576 fibroblasts. A 50-55-kDa anionic, sodium dodecyl sulfate-stable, anMan- and Aβ-immunoreactive species was obtained from Tg2576 fibroblasts using immunoprecipitation with anti-APP (C terminus). anMan-containing HS oligo- and disaccharide preparations modulated or suppressed A11 immunoreactivity and oligomerization of Aβ42 peptide in an in vitro assay. A11 immunoreactivity increased in Tg2576 fibroblasts when Gpc-1 autoprocessing was inhibited by 3-β[2(diethylamino)ethoxy]androst-5-en-17-one (U18666A) and decreased when Gpc-1 autoprocessing was stimulated by ascorbate. Neither overexpression of Gpc-1 in Tg2576 fibroblasts nor addition of copper ion and NO donor to hippocampal slices from 3xTg-AD mice affected A11 immunoreactivity levels. However, A11 immunoreactivity was greatly suppressed by the subsequent addition of ascorbate. We speculate that temporary interaction between the Aβ domain and small, anMan-containing oligosaccharides may preclude formation of toxic Aβ oligomers. A portion of the oligosaccharides are co-secreted with the Aβ peptides and deposited in plaques. These results support the notion that an inadequate supply of vitamin C could contribute to late onset AD

  20. Chemokines, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 and stromal cell-derived factor-1{alpha}, suppress amyloid {beta}-induced neurotoxicity

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    Raman, Dayanidhi; Milatovic, Snjezana-Zaja [Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Milatovic, Dejan [Department of Pediatrics/Pediatric Toxicology, Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Splittgerber, Ryan [Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Fan, Guo-Huang [Department of Neurobiology and Neurotoxicology, Meharry Medical College, Nashville, TN 37221 (United States); Richmond, Ann, E-mail: ann.richmond@vanderbilt.edu [VA Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by a progressive cognitive decline and accumulation of neurotoxic oligomeric peptides amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}). Although the molecular events are not entirely known, it has become evident that inflammation, environmental and other risk factors may play a causal, disruptive and/or protective role in the development of AD. The present study investigated the ability of the chemokines, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) and stromal cell-derived factor-1{alpha} (SDF-1{alpha}), the respective ligands for chemokine receptors CXCR2 and CXCR4, to suppress A{beta}-induced neurotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. Pretreatment with MIP-2 or SDF-1{alpha} significantly protected neurons from A{beta}-induced dendritic regression and apoptosis in vitro through activation of Akt, ERK1/2 and maintenance of metalloproteinase ADAM17 especially with SDF-1{alpha}. Intra-cerebroventricular (ICV) injection of A{beta} led to reduction in dendritic length and spine density of pyramidal neurons in the CA1 area of the hippocampus and increased oxidative damage 24 h following the exposure. The A{beta}-induced morphometric changes of neurons and increase in biomarkers of oxidative damage, F{sub 2}-isoprostanes, were significantly inhibited by pretreatment with the chemokines MIP-2 or SDF-1{alpha}. Additionally, MIP-2 or SDF-1{alpha} was able to suppress the aberrant mislocalization of p21-activated kinase (PAK), one of the proteins involved in the maintenance of dendritic spines. Furthermore, MIP-2 also protected neurons against A{beta} neurotoxicity in CXCR2-/- mice, potentially through observed up regulation of CXCR1 mRNA. Understanding the neuroprotective potential of chemokines is crucial in defining the role for their employment during the early stages of neurodegeneration. -- Research highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neuroprotective ability of the chemokines MIP2 and CXCL12 against A{beta} toxicity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MIP

  1. Bace1 activity impairs neuronal glucose metabolism: rescue by beta-hydroxybutyrate and lipoic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Findlay

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Glucose hypometabolism and impaired mitochondrial function in neurons have been suggested to play early and perhaps causative roles in Alzheimer’s disease (AD pathogenesis. Activity of the aspartic acid protease, beta-site amyloid precursor protein (APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1, responsible for beta amyloid peptide generation, has recently been demonstrated to modify glucose metabolism. We therefore examined, using a human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y cell line, whether increased BACE1 activity is responsible for a reduction in cellular glucose metabolism. Overexpression of active BACE1, but not a protease-dead mutant BACE1, protein in SH-SY5Y cells reduced glucose oxidation and the basal oxygen consumption rate, which was associated with a compensatory increase in glycolysis. Increased BACE1 activity had no effect on the mitochondrial electron transfer process but was found to diminish substrate delivery to the mitochondria by inhibition of key mitochondrial decarboxylation reaction enzymes. This BACE1 activity-dependent deficit in glucose oxidation was alleviated by the presence of beta hydroxybutyrate or α-lipoic acid. Consequently our data indicate that raised cellular BACE1 activity drives reduced glucose oxidation in a human neuronal cell line through impairments in the activity of specific tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes. Because this bioenergetic deficit is recoverable by neutraceutical compounds we suggest that such agents, perhaps in conjunction with BACE1 inhibitors, may be an effective therapeutic strategy in the early-stage management or treatment of AD.

  2. [Clinical Laboratory Test Using Proteomics: The Usefulness of Proteomic Techniques for Amyloid Typing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasaki, Masayoshi; Obayashi, Konen; Ando, Yukio

    2015-08-01

    Amyloidosis is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by the deposition of amyloid fibrils. To diagnose amyloidosis, it is important to detect amyloid deposits and identify the amyloid precursor protein in specimens, such as tissues and serum. Mass spectrometry is a powerful tool to measure the molecular weight and identify the protein. Recently, mass spectrometries such as liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry and surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry, have made a contribution to amyloid typing. In the paper, we describe the usefulness of mass spectrometric analyses for the typing of amyloidosis.

  3. Analysis of a compartmental model of amyloid beta production, irreversible loss and exchange in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbert, Donald L; Patterson, Bruce W; Bateman, Randall J

    2015-03-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides, and in particular Aβ42, are found in senile plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease. A compartmental model of Aβ production, exchange and irreversible loss was recently developed to explain the kinetics of isotope-labeling of Aβ peptides collected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) following infusion of stable isotope-labeled leucine in humans. The compartmental model allowed calculation of the rates of production, irreversible loss (or turnover) and short-term exchange of Aβ peptides. Exchange of Aβ42 was particularly pronounced in amyloid plaque-bearing participants. In the current work, we describe in much greater detail the characteristics of the compartmental model to two distinct audiences: physician-scientists and biokineticists. For physician-scientists, we describe through examples the types of questions the model can and cannot answer, as well as correct some misunderstandings of previous kinetic analyses applied to this type of isotope labeling data. For biokineticists, we perform a system identifiability analysis and a sensitivity analysis of the kinetic model to explore the global and local properties of the model. Combined, these analyses motivate simplifications from a more comprehensive physiological model to the final model that was previously presented. The analyses clearly demonstrate that the current dataset and compartmental model allow determination with confidence a single 'turnover' parameter, a single 'exchange' parameter and a single 'delay' parameter. When combined with CSF concentration data for the Aβ peptides, production rates may also be obtained. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Restoring Mitochondrial Function: A Small Molecule-mediated Approach to Enhance Glucose Stimulated Insulin Secretion in Cholesterol Accumulated Pancreatic beta cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asalla, Suman; Girada, Shravan Babu; Kuna, Ramya S.; Chowdhury, Debabrata; Kandagatla, Bhaskar; Oruganti, Srinivas; Bhadra, Utpal; Bhadra, Manika Pal; Kalivendi, Shasi Vardhan; Rao, Swetha Pavani; Row, Anupama; Ibrahim, A.; Ghosh, Partha Pratim; Mitra, Prasenjit

    2016-06-01

    Dyslipidemia, particularly the elevated serum cholesterol levels, aggravate the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes. In the present study we explored the relationship between fasting blood sugar and serum lipid parameters in human volunteers which revealed a significant linear effect of serum cholesterol on fasting blood glucose. Short term feeding of cholesterol enriched diet to rodent model resulted in elevated serum cholesterol levels, cholesterol accumulation in pancreatic islets and hyperinsulinemia with modest increase in plasma glucose level. To explore the mechanism, we treated cultured BRIN-BD11 pancreatic beta cells with soluble cholesterol. Our data shows that cholesterol treatment of cultured pancreatic beta cells enhances total cellular cholesterol. While one hour cholesterol exposure enhances insulin exocytosis, overnight cholesterol accumulation in cultured pancreatic beta cells affects cellular respiration, and inhibits Glucose stimulated insulin secretion. We further report that (E)-4-Chloro-2-(1-(2-(2,4,6-trichlorophenyl) hydrazono) ethyl) phenol (small molecule M1) prevents the cholesterol mediated blunting of cellular respiration and potentiates Glucose stimulated insulin secretion which was abolished in pancreatic beta cells on cholesterol accumulation.

  5. Developing injectable immunoglobulins to treat cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinitz, Michael

    2008-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a devastating disorder, clinically characterized by a comprehensive cognitive decline. The novel strategy of anti-amyloid-beta immunotherapy has been suggested following encouraging results obtained in murine models of Alzheimer's disease, in non-human primates, and in small-scale clinical trials. To examine the choice between active or passive anti-amyloid-beta immunization and the choice of the molecule to which the immune machinery should be targeted, which are central issues in future immune therapy of Alzheimer's disease. Research into the new area of Alzheimer's disease immune therapy is primarily based on in vivo and in vitro studies of murine models of Alzheimer's disease. The studies are hence limited to defined genetic deficiencies. In humans, infusion of anti-amyloid-beta antibodies is considered a safer approach than active anti-amyloid-beta vaccination. Alzheimer's-disease-protective anti-amyloid-beta monoclonal antibodies should target specific epitopes within the amyloid beta(1 42) peptide, avoiding possibly harmful binding to the ubiquitous normal amyloid precursor protein. Since Alzheimer's disease immunotherapy requires repeated infusion of antibodies over a prolonged period of time, Alzheimer's disease patients will tolerate such antibodies provided the latter are exclusively of human origin. Human monoclonal antibodies that correspond to ubiquitous anti-amyloid-beta, present in all healthy humans, might bear important protective characteristics.

  6. Imaging characteristic of dual-phase {sup 18}F-florbetapir (AV-45/Amyvid) PET for the concomitant detection of perfusion deficits and beta-amyloid deposition in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Kun-Ju; Hsiao, Ing-Tsung; Hsieh, Chia-Ju; Wey, Shiaw-Pyng; Yen, Tzu-Chen [Linkou Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and University, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences and Healthy Aging Research Center, Taoyuan (China); Hsu, Jung-Lung [Linkou Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Section of Dementia and Cognitive Impairment, Department of Neurology, Taoyuan (China); Taipei Medical University, Graduate Institute of Humanities in Medicine, Taipei (China); Huang, Chin-Chang; Huang, Kuo-Lun [Linkou Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and University, Department of Neurology, Taoyuan (China)

    2016-07-15

    We investigated dual-phase {sup 18}F-florbetapir (AV-45/Amyvid) PET imaging for the concomitant detection of brain perfusion deficits and beta-amyloid deposition in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and in cognitively healthy controls (HCs). A total of 82 subjects (24 AD patients, 44 MCI patients and 14 HCs) underwent both dual-phase {sup 18}F-AV-45 PET and MRI imaging. Dual-phase dynamic PET imaging consisted of (1) five 1-min scans obtained 1 - 6 min after tracer injection (perfusion {sup 18}F-AV-45 imaging, pAV-45), and (2) ten 1-min scans obtained 50 - 60 min after tracer injection (amyloid {sup 18}F-AV-45 imaging). Amyloid-negative MCI/AD patients were excluded. Volume of interest analysis and statistical parametric mapping of pAV-45 and {sup 18}F-AV-45 images were performed to investigate the perfusion deficits and the beta-amyloid burden in the three study groups. The associations between Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores and global perfusion deficits and amyloid deposition were investigated with linear and segmental linear correlation analyses. HCs generally had normal pAV-45 findings, whereas perfusion deficits were evident in the hippocampus, and temporal, parietal and middle frontal cortices in both MCI and AD patients. The motor-sensory cortex was relatively preserved. MMSE scores in the entire study cohort were significantly associated with the degree of perfusion impairment as assessed by pAV-45 imaging (r = 0.5156, P < 0.0001). {sup 18}F-AV-45 uptake was significantly higher in AD patients than in the two other study groups. However, the correlation between MMSE scores and {sup 18}F-AV-45 uptake in MCI patients was more of a binary phenomenon and began in MCI patients with MMSE score 23.14 when {sup 18}F-AV-45 uptake was higher and MMSE score lower than in patients with early MCI. Amyloid deposition started in the precuneus and the frontal and temporal regions in early MCI, ultimately

  7. Biofilm inhibitors that target amyloid proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Diego; Sanabria-Valentín, Edgardo; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto

    2013-01-24

    Bacteria establish stable communities, known as biofilms, that are resistant to antimicrobials. Biofilm robustness is due to the presence of an extracellular matrix, which for several species-among them Bacillus subtilis-includes amyloid-like protein fibers. In this work, we show that B. subtilis biofilms can be a simple and reliable tool for screening of molecules with antiamyloid activity. We identified two molecules, AA-861 and parthenolide, which efficiently inhibited biofilms by preventing the formation of amyloid-like fibers. Parthenolide also disrupted pre-established biofilms. These molecules also impeded the formation of biofilms of other bacterial species that secrete amyloid proteins, such as Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli. Furthermore, the identified molecules decreased the conversion of the yeast protein New1 to the prion state in a heterologous host, indicating the broad range of activity of the molecules. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Gray matter network disruptions and amyloid beta in cognitively normal adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tijms, Betty M; Kate, Mara Ten; Wink, Alle Meije; Visser, Pieter Jelle; Ecay, Mirian; Clerigue, Montserrat; Estanga, Ainara; Garcia Sebastian, Maite; Izagirre, Andrea; Villanua, Jorge; Martinez Lage, Pablo; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Scheltens, Philip; Sanz Arigita, Ernesto; Barkhof, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    Gray matter networks are disrupted in Alzheimer's disease (AD). It is unclear when these disruptions start during the development of AD. Amyloid beta 1-42 (Aβ42) is among the earliest changes in AD. We studied, in cognitively healthy adults, the relationship between Aβ42 levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and single-subject cortical gray matter network measures. Single-subject gray matter networks were extracted from structural magnetic resonance imaging scans in a sample of cognitively healthy adults (N = 185; age range 39-79, mini-mental state examination >25, N = 12 showed abnormal Aβ42 level and for 90 anatomical areas. Associations between continuous Aβ42 CSF levels and single-subject cortical gray matter network measures were tested. Smoothing splines were used to determine whether a linear or nonlinear relationship gave a better fit to the data. Lower Aβ42 CSF levels were linearly associated at whole brain level with lower connectivity density, and nonlinearly with lower clustering values and higher path length values, which is indicative of a less-efficient network organization. These relationships were specific to medial temporal areas, precuneus, and the middle frontal gyrus (all p levels can be related to gray matter networks disruptions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Transthyretin protects against A-beta peptide toxicity by proteolytic cleavage of the peptide: a mechanism sensitive to the Kunitz protease inhibitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Costa

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the deposition of amyloid beta-peptide (A-Beta in the brain. Transthyretin (TTR is a tetrameric protein of about 55 kDa mainly produced in the liver and choroid plexus of the brain. The known physiological functions of TTR are the transport of thyroid hormone T(4 and retinol, through binding to the retinol binding protein. TTR has also been established as a cryptic protease able to cleave ApoA-I in vitro. It has been described that TTR is involved in preventing A-Beta fibrilization, both by inhibiting and disrupting A-Beta fibrils, with consequent abrogation of toxicity. We further characterized the nature of the TTR/A-Beta interaction and found that TTR, both recombinant or isolated from human sera, was able to proteolytically process A-Beta, cleaving the peptide after aminoacid residues 1, 2, 3, 10, 13, 14,16, 19 and 27, as determined by mass spectrometry, and reversed phase chromatography followed by N-terminal sequencing. A-Beta peptides (1-14 and (15-42 showed lower amyloidogenic potential than the full length counterpart, as assessed by thioflavin binding assay and ultrastructural analysis by transmission electron microscopy. A-Beta cleavage by TTR was inhibited in the presence of an alphaAPP peptide containing the Kunitz Protease Inhibitor (KPI domain but not in the presence of the secreted alphaAPP derived from the APP isoform 695 without the KPI domain. TTR was also able to degrade aggregated forms of A-Beta peptide. Our results confirmed TTR as a protective molecule in AD, and prompted A-Beta proteolysis by TTR as a protective mechanism in this disease. TTR may prove to be a useful therapeutic agent for preventing or retarding the cerebral amyloid plaque formation implicated in AD pathology.

  10. No association of cortical amyloid load and EEG connectivity in older people with subjective memory complaints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Teipel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in functional connectivity of cortical networks have been observed in resting-state EEG studies in healthy aging as well as preclinical and clinical stages of AD. Little information, however, exists on associations between EEG connectivity and cortical amyloid load in people with subjective memory complaints. Here, we determined the association of global cortical amyloid load, as measured by florbetapir-PET, with functional connectivity based on the phase-lag index of resting state EEG data for alpha and beta frequency bands in 318 cognitively normal individuals aged 70–85 years with subjective memory complaints from the INSIGHT-preAD cohort. Within the entire group we did not find any significant associations between global amyloid load and phase-lag index in any frequency band. Assessing exclusively the subgroup of amyloid-positive participants, we found enhancement of functional connectivity with higher global amyloid load in the alpha and a reduction in the beta frequency bands. In the amyloid-negative participants, higher amyloid load was associated with lower connectivity in the low alpha band. However, these correlations failed to reach significance after controlling for multiple comparisons. The absence of a strong amyloid effect on functional connectivity may represent a selection effect, where individuals remain in the cognitively normal group only if amyloid accumulation does not impair cortical functional connectivity.

  11. An X11alpha/FSBP complex represses transcription of the GSK3beta gene promoter.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lau, Kwok-Fai

    2010-08-04

    X11alpha is a neuronal adaptor protein that interacts with the amyloid precursor protein (APP) through a centrally located phosphotyrosine binding domain to inhibit the production of Abeta peptide that is deposited in Alzheimer\\'s disease brains. X11alpha also contains two C-terminal postsynaptic density-95, large discs, zona occludens 1 (PDZ) domains, and we show here that through its PDZ domains, X11alpha interacts with a novel transcription factor, fibrinogen silencer binding protein. Moreover, we show that an X11alpha\\/fibrinogen silencer binding protein complex signals to the nucleus to repress glycogen synthase kinase-3beta promoter activity. Glycogen synthase kinase-3beta is a favoured candidate kinase for phosphorylating tau in Alzheimer\\'s disease. Our findings show a new function for X11alpha that may impact on Alzheimer\\'s disease pathogenesis.

  12. Amyloid-Beta Induced Changes in Vesicular Transport of BDNF in Hippocampal Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Seifert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurotrophin brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is an important growth factor in the CNS. Deficits in transport of this secretory protein could underlie neurodegenerative diseases. Investigation of disease-related changes in BDNF transport might provide insights into the cellular mechanism underlying, for example, Alzheimer’s disease (AD. To analyze the role of BDNF transport in AD, live cell imaging of fluorescently labeled BDNF was performed in hippocampal neurons of different AD model systems. BDNF and APP colocalized with low incidence in vesicular structures. Anterograde as well as retrograde transport of BDNF vesicles was reduced and these effects were mediated by factors released from hippocampal neurons into the extracellular medium. Transport of BDNF was altered at a very early time point after onset of human APP expression or after acute amyloid-beta(1-42 treatment, while the activity-dependent release of BDNF remained unaffected. Taken together, extracellular cleavage products of APP induced rapid changes in anterograde and retrograde transport of BDNF-containing vesicles while release of BDNF was unaffected by transgenic expression of mutated APP. These early transport deficits might lead to permanently impaired brain functions in the adult brain.

  13. Nef exosomes isolated from the plasma of individuals with HIV-associated dementia (HAD) can induce Aβ(1-42) secretion in SH-SY5Y neural cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mahfuz B; Lang, Michelle J; Huang, Ming-Bo; Raymond, Andrea; Bond, Vincent C; Shiramizu, Bruce; Powell, Michael D

    2016-04-01

    In the era of combined antiretroviral therapy (CART), many of the complications due to HIV-1 infection have diminished. One exception is HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND). HAND is a spectrum of disorders in cognitive function that ranges from asymptomatic disease to severe dementia (HAD). The milder form of HAND has actually remained the same or slightly increased in prevalence in the CART era. Even in individuals who have maintained undetectable HIV RNA loads, viral proteins such as Nef and Tat can continue to be expressed. In this report, we show that Nef protein and nef messenger RNA (mRNA) are packaged into exosomes that remain in circulation in patients with HAD. Plasma-derived Nef exosomes from patients with HAD have the ability to interact with the neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y and deliver nef mRNA. The mRNA can induce expression of Nef in target cells and subsequently increase expression and secretion of beta-amyloid (Aβ) and Aβ peptides. Increase secretion of amyloid peptide could contribute to cognitive impairment seen in HAND.

  14. Amyloid Beta and Tau as Alzheimer's Disease Blood Biomarkers: Promise From New Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lue, Lih-Fen; Guerra, Andre; Walker, Douglas G

    2017-07-01

    The utility of the levels of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide and tau in blood for diagnosis, drug development, and assessment of clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease (AD) has not been established. The lack of availability of ultra-sensitive assays is one critical issue that has impeded progress. The levels of Aβ species and tau in plasma and serum are much lower than levels in cerebrospinal fluid. Furthermore, plasma or serum contain high levels of assay-interfering factors, resulting in difficulties in the commonly used singulex or multiplex ELISA platforms. In this review, we focus on two modern immune-complex-based technologies that show promise to advance this field. These innovative technologies are immunomagnetic reduction technology and single molecule array technology. We describe the technologies and discuss the published studies using these technologies. Currently, the potential of utilizing these technologies to advance Aβ and tau as blood-based biomarkers for AD requires further validation using already collected large sets of samples, as well as new cohorts and population-based longitudinal studies.

  15. Gold Nanoparticles and Microwave Irradiation Inhibit Beta-Amyloid Amyloidogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastus Neus

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Peptide-Gold nanoparticles selectively attached to β-amyloid protein (Aβ amyloidogenic aggregates were irradiated with microwave. This treatment produces dramatic effects on the Aβ aggregates, inhibiting both the amyloidogenesis and the restoration of the amyloidogenic potential. This novel approach offers a new strategy to inhibit, locally and remotely, the amyloidogenic process, which could have application in Alzheimer’s disease therapy. We have studied the irradiation effect on the amyloidogenic process in the presence of conjugates peptide-nanoparticle by transmission electronic microscopy observations and by Thioflavine T assays to quantify the amount of fibrils in suspension. The amyloidogenic aggregates rather than the amyloid fibrils seem to be better targets for the treatment of the disease. Our results could contribute to the development of a new therapeutic strategy to inhibit the amyloidogenic process in Alzheimer’s disease.

  16. Chirality and chiroptical properties of amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzwolak, Wojciech

    2014-09-01

    Chirality of amyloid fibrils-linear beta-sheet-rich aggregates of misfolded protein chains-often manifests in morphological traits such as helical twist visible in atomic force microscopy and in chiroptical properties accessible to vibrational circular dichroism (VCD). According to recent studies the relationship between molecular chirality of polypeptide building blocks and superstructural chirality of amyloid fibrils may be more intricate and less deterministic than previously assumed. Several puzzling experimental findings have put into question earlier intuitive ideas on: 1) the bottom-up chirality transfer upon amyloidogenic self-assembly, and 2) the structural origins of chiroptical properties of protein aggregates. For example, removal of a single amino acid residue from an amyloidogenic all-L peptide was shown to reverse handedness of fibrils. On the other hand, certain types of amyloid aggregates revealed surprisingly strong VCD spectra with the sign and shape dependent on the conditions of fibrillation. Hence, microscopic and chiroptical studies have highlighted chirality as one more aspect of polymorphism of amyloid fibrils. This brief review is intended to outline the current state of research on amyloid-like fibrils from the perspective of their structural and superstructural chirality and chiroptical properties. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Influence of scan duration on the accuracy of {beta}-amyloid PET with florbetaben in patients with Alzheimer's disease and healthy volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiepolt, Solveig; Barthel, Henryk; Butzke, Daniel; Hesse, Swen; Patt, Marianne; Sabri, Osama [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Gertz, Hermann-Josef [University of Leipzig, Department of Psychiatry, Leipzig (Germany); Reininger, Cornelia [Bayer Pharma AG, Global Clinical Development, Berlin (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    Florbetaben is a {beta}-amyloid-targeted PET tracer with significant potential for augmenting the toolbox in the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In dementia imaging, shortening of scan duration may simplify future clinical use. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the effect of scan duration on diagnostic accuracy. PET scans obtained from 25 AD patients and 25 healthy volunteers (HVs) were analysed. In each subject, scans of three different durations (5, 10 and 20 min; all starting 90 min after injection) were obtained, randomized, and visually assessed by three experts blinded to the subject's identity and group affiliation. Presence/absence of {beta}-amyloid and diagnostic confidence (0-100 %) were scored, and 10 % of the scans were re-read. Further, randomly selected datasets of ten AD patients and ten HVs were quantified using an established VOI-based approach and using a voxel-based approach. The sensitivity and specificity of the blinded read were 80 % and 96 %, respectively, for all scan durations. Diagnostic confidence was high (97 {+-} 6 %, 97 {+-} 6 % and 95 {+-} 8 % for the 20-min, 10-min and 5-min scans, respectively; n.s.), as was interreader agreement (kappa{sub 20} {sub min} = 0.94, kappa{sub 10} {sub min} = 0.94, kappa{sub 5} {sub min} = 0.89; n.s.). Intrareader agreement was highest for the 20-min scan (kappa = 1.00) and lower for the 10-min scan (kappa = 0.71) and 5-min scan (kappa = 0.80; p = 0.002 and 0.003 vs. the 20-min scan). For all scan durations, composite SUVRs (Cohen's d effect size 4.5, 3.9 and 4.8 for the 5-min, 10-min and 20-min scans; p < 0.0001 each) and individual brain volumes affected by {beta}-amyloid (Cohen's d effect size 1.6, 1.8 and 2.0 for the 5-min, 10-min and 20-min scans; p < 0.005 each) were significantly higher in AD patients than in HVs. Reduction in scan duration did not relevantly affect the accuracy of florbetaben PET scans in discriminating between AD patients

  18. Treatment of amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S Y; Pepys, M B; Hawkins, P N

    1995-08-01

    has been recently reported. Serum amyloid P component scans show regression of associated visceral amyloidosis. This surgical form of gene therapy holds much promise for patients with familial amyloid polyneuropathy and has been widely adopted. The only other form of amyloidosis in which the supply of the fibril precursor protein can be sharply reduced is beta 2M amyloidosis in long-term hemodialysis patients. Renal transplantation lowers the plasma concentration of beta 2M to normal levels and is associated with rapid improvement of the osteoarticular symptoms. Preliminary observations suggest that the beta 2M amyloid deposits also can regress in some patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  19. Massive accumulation of luminal protease-deficient axonal lysosomes at Alzheimer's disease amyloid plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowrishankar, Swetha; Yuan, Peng; Wu, Yumei; Schrag, Matthew; Paradise, Summer; Grutzendler, Jaime; De Camilli, Pietro; Ferguson, Shawn M

    2015-07-14

    Through a comprehensive analysis of organellar markers in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease, we document a massive accumulation of lysosome-like organelles at amyloid plaques and establish that the majority of these organelles reside within swollen axons that contact the amyloid deposits. This close spatial relationship between axonal lysosome accumulation and extracellular amyloid aggregates was observed from the earliest stages of β-amyloid deposition. Notably, we discovered that lysosomes that accumulate in such axons are lacking in multiple soluble luminal proteases and thus are predicted to be unable to efficiently degrade proteinaceous cargos. Of relevance to Alzheimer's disease, β-secretase (BACE1), the protein that initiates amyloidogenic processing of the amyloid precursor protein and which is a substrate for these proteases, builds up at these sites. Furthermore, through a comparison between the axonal lysosome accumulations at amyloid plaques and neuronal lysosomes of the wild-type brain, we identified a similar, naturally occurring population of lysosome-like organelles in neuronal processes that is also defined by its low luminal protease content. In conjunction with emerging evidence that the lysosomal maturation of endosomes and autophagosomes is coupled to their retrograde transport, our results suggest that extracellular β-amyloid deposits cause a local impairment in the retrograde axonal transport of lysosome precursors, leading to their accumulation and a blockade in their further maturation. This study both advances understanding of Alzheimer's disease brain pathology and provides new insights into the subcellular organization of neuronal lysosomes that may have broader relevance to other neurodegenerative diseases with a lysosomal component to their pathology.

  20. Obesity in aging exacerbates blood-brain barrier disruption, neuroinflammation, and oxidative stress in the mouse hippocampus: effects on expression of genes involved in beta-amyloid generation and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Toth, Peter; Sosnowska, Danuta; Gautam, Tripti; Mitschelen, Matthew; Koller, Akos; Szalai, Gabor; Sonntag, William E; Ungvari, Zoltan; Csiszar, Anna

    2014-10-01

    There is growing evidence that obesity has deleterious effects on the brain and cognitive function in the elderly population. However, the specific mechanisms through which aging and obesity interact to promote cognitive decline remain unclear. To test the hypothesis that aging exacerbates obesity-induced cerebromicrovascular damage and neuroinflammation, we compared young (7 months) and aged (24 months) high fat diet-fed obese C57BL/6 mice. Aging exacerbated obesity-induced systemic inflammation and blood-brain barrier disruption, as indicated by the increased circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines and increased presence of extravasated immunoglobulin G in the hippocampus, respectively. Obesity-induced blood-brain barrier damage was associated with microglia activation, upregulation of activating Fc-gamma receptors and proinflammatory cytokines, and increased oxidative stress. Treatment of cultured primary microglia with sera derived from aged obese mice resulted in significantly more pronounced microglia activation and oxidative stress, as compared with treatment with young sera. Serum-induced activation and oxidative stress were also exacerbated in primary microglia derived from aged animals. Hippocampal expression of genes involved in regulation of the cellular amyloid precursor protein-dependent signaling pathways, beta-amyloid generation, and the pathogenesis of tauopathy were largely unaffected by obesity in aged mice. Collectively, obesity in aging is associated with a heightened state of systemic inflammation, which exacerbates blood-brain barrier disruption. The resulting neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in the mouse hippocampus likely contribute to the significant cognitive decline observed in aged obese animals. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Peptides of presenilin-1 bind the amyloid precursor protein ectodomain and offer a novel and specific therapeutic approach to reduce ß-amyloid in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewji, Nazneen N; Singer, S Jonathan; Masliah, Eliezer; Rockenstein, Edward; Kim, Mihyun; Harber, Martha; Horwood, Taylor

    2015-01-01

    β-Amyloid (Aβ) accumulation in the brain is widely accepted to be critical to the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Current efforts at reducing toxic Aβ40 or 42 have largely focused on modulating γ-secretase activity to produce shorter, less toxic Aβ, while attempting to spare other secretase functions. In this paper we provide data that offer the potential for a new approach for the treatment of AD. The method is based on our previous findings that the production of Aβ from the interaction between the β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) and Presenilin (PS), as part of the γ-secretase complex, in cell culture is largely inhibited if the entire water-soluble NH2-terminal domain of PS is first added to the culture. Here we demonstrate that two small, non-overlapping water-soluble peptides from the PS-1 NH2-terminal domain can substantially and specifically inhibit the production of total Aβ as well as Aβ40 and 42 in vitro and in vivo in the brains of APP transgenic mice. These results suggest that the inhibitory activity of the entire amino terminal domain of PS-1 on Aβ production is largely focused in a few smaller sequences within that domain. Using biolayer interferometry and confocal microscopy we provide evidence that peptides effective in reducing Aβ give a strong, specific and biologically relevant binding with the purified ectodomain of APP 695. Finally, we demonstrate that the reduction of Aβ by the peptides does not affect the catalytic activities of β- or γ-secretase, or the level of APP. P4 and P8 are the first reported protein site-specific small peptides to reduce Aβ production in model systems of AD. These peptides and their derivatives offer new potential drug candidates for the treatment of AD.

  2. Peptides of presenilin-1 bind the amyloid precursor protein ectodomain and offer a novel and specific therapeutic approach to reduce ß-amyloid in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazneen N Dewji

    Full Text Available β-Amyloid (Aβ accumulation in the brain is widely accepted to be critical to the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Current efforts at reducing toxic Aβ40 or 42 have largely focused on modulating γ-secretase activity to produce shorter, less toxic Aβ, while attempting to spare other secretase functions. In this paper we provide data that offer the potential for a new approach for the treatment of AD. The method is based on our previous findings that the production of Aβ from the interaction between the β-amyloid precursor protein (APP and Presenilin (PS, as part of the γ-secretase complex, in cell culture is largely inhibited if the entire water-soluble NH2-terminal domain of PS is first added to the culture. Here we demonstrate that two small, non-overlapping water-soluble peptides from the PS-1 NH2-terminal domain can substantially and specifically inhibit the production of total Aβ as well as Aβ40 and 42 in vitro and in vivo in the brains of APP transgenic mice. These results suggest that the inhibitory activity of the entire amino terminal domain of PS-1 on Aβ production is largely focused in a few smaller sequences within that domain. Using biolayer interferometry and confocal microscopy we provide evidence that peptides effective in reducing Aβ give a strong, specific and biologically relevant binding with the purified ectodomain of APP 695. Finally, we demonstrate that the reduction of Aβ by the peptides does not affect the catalytic activities of β- or γ-secretase, or the level of APP. P4 and P8 are the first reported protein site-specific small peptides to reduce Aβ production in model systems of AD. These peptides and their derivatives offer new potential drug candidates for the treatment of AD.

  3. Bone morphogenetic protein 4 inhibits insulin secretion from rodent beta cells through regulation of calbindin1 expression and reduced voltage-dependent calcium currents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Gitte L.; Jacobsen, Maria L. B.; Wendt, Anna

    2015-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Type 2 diabetes is characterised by progressive loss of pancreatic beta cell mass and function. Therefore, it is of therapeutic interest to identify factors with the potential to improve beta cell proliferation and insulin secretion. Bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) expression...

  4. Potential Natural Products for Alzheimer’s Disease: Targeted Search Using the Internal Ribosome Entry Site of Tau and AmyloidPrecursor Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Chieh Tasi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of the amyloid precursor protein (APP and the hyperphosphorylation of the tau protein are vital in the understanding of the cause of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. As a consequence, regulation of the expression of both APP and tau proteins is one important approach in combating AD. The APP and tau proteins can be targeted at the levels of transcription, translation and protein structural integrity. This paper reports the utilization of a bi-cistronic vector containing either APP or tau internal ribosome entry site (IRES elements flanked by β-galactosidase gene (cap-dependent and secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP (cap-independent to discern the mechanism of action of memantine, an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA receptor antagonist. Results indicate that memantine could reduce the activity of both the APP and tau IRES at a concentration of ~10 μM (monitored by SEAP activity without interfering with the cap-dependent translation as monitored by the β-galactosidase assay. Western blot analysis of the tau protein in neuroblastoma (N2A and rat hippocampal cells confirmed the halting of the expression of the tau proteins. We also employed this approach to identify a preparation named NB34, extracts of Boussingaultia baselloides (madeira-vine fermented with Lactobacillus spp., which can function similarly to memantine in both IRES of APP and Tau. The water maze test demonstrated that NB34 could improve the spatial memory of a high fat diet induced neurodegeneration in apolipoprotein E-knockout (ApoE−/− mice. These results revealed that the bi-cistronic vector provided a simple, and effective platform in screening and establishing the mechanistic action of potential compounds for the treatment and management of AD.

  5. [Effects of grain-sized moxibustion on learning and memory ability and amyloid deposition of transgenic Alzheimer's disease mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing; Chu, Jia-Mei; Gao, Ling-Ai; Zhang, Yong-Sheng; Bao, Ye-Hua

    2014-02-01

    To observe the effect of grain-sized moxibustion at "Xinshu" (BL 15) and "Shenshu" (BL 23) on memory-learning ability and amyloid deposition in transgenic Alzheimer's disease (AD) mice. seventeen amyloid precursor protein (APP)/presenilin (PS)1 (APP+/PS 1+) double transgenic 6799 mice aged 3-4 weeks were randomly divided into model group (n = 9) and moxibustion group (n = 8). Nine wide-type (C 57 BL/6 J) female mice were used as the normal control group. Moxibustion (ignited grain-sized moxa cone) was applied to bilateral "Xinshu" (BL 15) and "Shenshu" (BL 23) for about 30 s, once a day for 9 courses (10 days constitute a therapeutic course, with 2 days' break between every two courses). Morris water maze tests were performed to detect the mice's learning-memory ability. The alterations of beta-amyloid deposition (number of the positive plaques) in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus were detected by using an imaging analysis system following Congo red staining of the cerebral tissue sections. Compared with the normal group, the average escape latency of place navigation tests was significantly increased (P memory ability after moxibustion. Results of Congo red staining of the cerebral tissue showed that there were many irregular, uneven staining positive plaques in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of AD mice in the model group. Compared with the model group, the positive plaque numbers in both cerebral cortex and hippocampus were considerably reduced in the moxibustion group (P memory ability and restrain the formation of amyloid deposition in AD mice.

  6. Massive accumulation of luminal protease-deficient axonal lysosomes at Alzheimer’s disease amyloid plaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowrishankar, Swetha; Yuan, Peng; Wu, Yumei; Schrag, Matthew; Paradise, Summer; Grutzendler, Jaime; De Camilli, Pietro; Ferguson, Shawn M.

    2015-01-01

    Through a comprehensive analysis of organellar markers in mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease, we document a massive accumulation of lysosome-like organelles at amyloid plaques and establish that the majority of these organelles reside within swollen axons that contact the amyloid deposits. This close spatial relationship between axonal lysosome accumulation and extracellular amyloid aggregates was observed from the earliest stages of β-amyloid deposition. Notably, we discovered that lysosomes that accumulate in such axons are lacking in multiple soluble luminal proteases and thus are predicted to be unable to efficiently degrade proteinaceous cargos. Of relevance to Alzheimer’s disease, β-secretase (BACE1), the protein that initiates amyloidogenic processing of the amyloid precursor protein and which is a substrate for these proteases, builds up at these sites. Furthermore, through a comparison between the axonal lysosome accumulations at amyloid plaques and neuronal lysosomes of the wild-type brain, we identified a similar, naturally occurring population of lysosome-like organelles in neuronal processes that is also defined by its low luminal protease content. In conjunction with emerging evidence that the lysosomal maturation of endosomes and autophagosomes is coupled to their retrograde transport, our results suggest that extracellular β-amyloid deposits cause a local impairment in the retrograde axonal transport of lysosome precursors, leading to their accumulation and a blockade in their further maturation. This study both advances understanding of Alzheimer’s disease brain pathology and provides new insights into the subcellular organization of neuronal lysosomes that may have broader relevance to other neurodegenerative diseases with a lysosomal component to their pathology. PMID:26124111

  7. The Alzheimer's disease-associated amyloid beta-protein is an antimicrobial peptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie J Soscia

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The amyloid beta-protein (Abeta is believed to be the key mediator of Alzheimer's disease (AD pathology. Abeta is most often characterized as an incidental catabolic byproduct that lacks a normal physiological role. However, Abeta has been shown to be a specific ligand for a number of different receptors and other molecules, transported by complex trafficking pathways, modulated in response to a variety of environmental stressors, and able to induce pro-inflammatory activities.Here, we provide data supporting an in vivo function for Abeta as an antimicrobial peptide (AMP. Experiments used established in vitro assays to compare antimicrobial activities of Abeta and LL-37, an archetypical human AMP. Findings reveal that Abeta exerts antimicrobial activity against eight common and clinically relevant microorganisms with a potency equivalent to, and in some cases greater than, LL-37. Furthermore, we show that AD whole brain homogenates have significantly higher antimicrobial activity than aged matched non-AD samples and that AMP action correlates with tissue Abeta levels. Consistent with Abeta-mediated activity, the increased antimicrobial action was ablated by immunodepletion of AD brain homogenates with anti-Abeta antibodies.Our findings suggest Abeta is a hitherto unrecognized AMP that may normally function in the innate immune system. This finding stands in stark contrast to current models of Abeta-mediated pathology and has important implications for ongoing and future AD treatment strategies.

  8. Aluminum complexing enhances amyloid beta protein penetration of blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, William A; Niehoff, Michael L; Drago, Denise; Zatta, Paolo

    2006-10-20

    A significant co-morbidity of Alzheimer's disease and cerebrovascular impairment suggests that cerebrovascular dysregulation is an important feature of dementia. Amyloid beta protein (Abeta), a relevant risk factor in Alzheimer's disease, has neurotoxic properties and is thought to play a critical role in the cognitive impairments. Previously, we demonstrated that the 42mer of Abeta (Abeta42) complexed with aluminum (Al-Abeta42) is much more cytotoxic than non-complexed Abeta42. The level of Abeta in the brain is a balance between synthesis, degradation, and fluxes across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In the present paper, we determined whether complexing with aluminum affected the ability of radioactively iodinated Abeta to cross the in vivo BBB. We found that the rates of uptake of Al-Abeta42 and Abeta42 were similar, but that Al-Abeta42 was sequestered by brain endothelial cells much less than Abeta42 and so more readily entered the parenchymal space of the brain. Al-Abeta42 also had a longer half-life in blood and had increased permeation at the striatum and thalamus. Brain-to-blood transport was similar for Al-Abeta42 and Abeta42. In conclusion, complexing with aluminum affects some aspects of blood-to-brain permeability so that Al-Abeta42 would have more ready access to brain cells than Abeta42.

  9. Clinical and cost implications of amyloid beta detection with amyloid beta positron emission tomography imaging in early Alzheimer's disease - the case of florbetapir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornberger, John; Bae, Jay; Watson, Ian; Johnston, Joe; Happich, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging helps estimate Aβ neuritic plaque density in patients with cognitive impairment who are under evaluation for Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study aims to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the Aβ-PET scan as an adjunct to standard diagnostic assessment for diagnosis of AD in France, using florbetapir as an example. A state-transition probability analysis was developed adopting the French Health Technology Assessment (HTA) perspective per guidance. Parameters included test characteristics, rate of cognitive decline, treatment effect, costs, and quality of life. Additional scenarios assessed the validity of the analytical framework, including: (1) earlier evaluation/treatment; (2) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as a comparator; and (3) use of other diagnostic procedures. Outputs included differences in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), costs, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs). All benefits and costs were discounted for time preferences. Sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the robustness of findings and key influencers of outcomes. Aβ-PET used as an adjunct to standard diagnostic assessment increased QALYs by 0.021 years and 10 year costs by €470 per patient. The ICER was €21,888 per QALY gained compared to standard diagnostic assessment alone. When compared with CSF, Aβ-PET costs €24,084 per QALY gained. In other scenarios, Aβ-PET was consistently cost-effective relative to the commonly used affordability threshold (€40,000 per QALY). Over 95% of simulations in the sensitivity analysis were cost-effective. Aβ-PET is projected to affordably increase QALYs from the French HTA perspective per guidance over a range of clinical scenarios, comparators, and input parameters.

  10. Native human serum amyloid P component is a single pentamer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Inge Juul; Andersen, Ove; Nielsen, EH

    1995-01-01

    Serum amyloid P component (SAP) and C-reactive protein (CRP) are members of the pentraxin protein family. SAP is the precursor protein to amyloid P component present in all forms of amyloidosis. The prevailing notion is that SAP in circulation has the form of a double pentameric molecule (decamer...... by rocket immunoelectrophoresis and electron microscopy. Thus, electron micrographs of purified SAP showed a predominance of decamers. However, the decamer form of SAP reversed to single pentamers when purified SAP was incorporated into SAP-depleted serum....

  11. Near-infrared fluorescence molecular imaging of amyloid beta species and monitoring therapy in animal models of Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueli; Tian, Yanli; Zhang, Can; Tian, Xiaoyu; Ross, Alana W.; Moir, Robert D.; Sun, Hongbin; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Moore, Anna; Ran, Chongzhao

    2015-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) molecular imaging has been widely applied to monitoring therapy of cancer and other diseases in preclinical studies; however, this technology has not been applied successfully to monitoring therapy for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Although several NIRF probes for detecting amyloid beta (Aβ) species of AD have been reported, none of these probes has been used to monitor changes of Aβs during therapy. In this article, we demonstrated that CRANAD-3, a curcumin analog, is capable of detecting both soluble and insoluble Aβ species. In vivo imaging showed that the NIRF signal of CRANAD-3 from 4-mo-old transgenic AD (APP/PS1) mice was 2.29-fold higher than that from age-matched wild-type mice, indicating that CRANAD-3 is capable of detecting early molecular pathology. To verify the feasibility of CRANAD-3 for monitoring therapy, we first used the fast Aβ-lowering drug LY2811376, a well-characterized beta-amyloid cleaving enzyme-1 inhibitor, to treat APP/PS1 mice. Imaging data suggested that CRANAD-3 could monitor the decrease in Aβs after drug treatment. To validate the imaging capacity of CRANAD-3 further, we used it to monitor the therapeutic effect of CRANAD-17, a curcumin analog for inhibition of Aβ cross-linking. The imaging data indicated that the fluorescence signal in the CRANAD-17–treated group was significantly lower than that in the control group, and the result correlated with ELISA analysis of brain extraction and Aβ plaque counting. It was the first time, to our knowledge, that NIRF was used to monitor AD therapy, and we believe that our imaging technology has the potential to have a high impact on AD drug development. PMID:26199414

  12. A beta2-microglobulin cleavage variant fibrillates at near-physiological pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corlin, Dorthe B; Johnsen, Christina K; Nissen, Mogens H

    2009-01-01

    Beta2-microglobulin (beta2m) deposits as amyloid in dialysis-related amyloidosis (DRA), predominantly in joints. The molecular mechanisms underlying the amyloidogenicity of beta2m are still largely unknown. In vitro, acidic conditions, pH ... several days. Here, we show that amyloid fibrils are generated in less than an hour when a cleavage variant of beta2m--found in the circulation of many dialysis patients--is exposed to pH levels (pH 6.6) occurring in joints during inflammation. Aggregation and fibrillation, including seeding effects...... with intact, native beta2m were studied by Thioflavin T fluorescence spectroscopy, turbidimetry, capillary electrophoresis, and electron microscopy. We conclude that a biologically relevant variant of beta2m is amyloidogenic at slightly acidic pH. Also, only a very small amount of preformed fibrils...

  13. Complement activation by the amyloid proteins A beta peptide and beta 2-microglobulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Mads; Nielsen, E H; Svehag, S E

    1999-01-01

    component nor heparan sulfate did significantly alter the A beta-induced CA. The results indicate that not only fibrillar A beta but also oligomers of, in particular, beta 2M from patients with dialysis-associated amyloidosis are capable of inducing CA at supra-physiological concentrations....

  14. Identification of a Bacillus subtilis secretion mutant using a beta-galactosidase screening procedure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobs, M F; Borchert, T V; Kontinen, V P

    1995-01-01

    High-level synthesis of exportable beta-galactosidase (LacZ) fusion proteins in Bacillus subtilis results in a lethal phenotype, and has been suggested as a tool for the selection of secretion mutants. We tested a plasmid-based, inducible lacZ fusion gene system for this purpose, but frequent...... mutations in cis, which reduced expression of the fusion gene, forced abandonment of the induction-selection strategy. Instead, after modification of the indicator plasmid, a screening procedure for increased basal LacZ activity levels was adopted. This led to the identification of a conditional B. subtilis...

  15. Increased secretion of insulin and proliferation of islet {beta}-cells in rats with mesenteric lymph duct ligation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagino, Ko; Yokozawa, Junji; Sasaki, Yu; Matsuda, Akiko; Takeda, Hiroaki [Department of Gastroenterology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan); Kawata, Sumio, E-mail: Sumio_Kawata@pref.hyogo.lg.jp [Department of Gastroenterology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan); Hyogo Prefectural Nishinomiya Hospital, 13-9 Rokutanji-cho, Nishinomiya 662-0918 (Japan)

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insulin secretion was increased during the OGTT or IVGTT in mesenteric lymph duct-ligated rats. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proliferation of islet {beta}-cells was upregulated in lymph duct-ligated rats. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mesenteric lymph duct flow has a role in glucose metabolism. -- Abstract: Background and aims: It has been suggested that intestinal lymph flow plays an important role in insulin secretion and glucose metabolism after meals. In this study, we investigated the influence of ligation of the mesenteric lymph duct on glucose metabolism and islet {beta}-cells in rats. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats (10 weeks old) were divided into two groups: one underwent ligation of the mesenteric lymph duct above the cistern (ligation group), and the other underwent a sham operation (sham group). After 1 and 2 weeks, fasting plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, triglyceride, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and the active form of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) were measured. At 2 weeks after the operation, the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) were performed. After the rats had been sacrificed, the insulin content of the pancreas was measured and the proliferation of {beta}-cells was assessed immunohistochemically using antibodies against insulin and Ki-67. Results: During the OGTT, the ligation group showed a significant decrease in the plasma glucose concentration at 120 min (p < 0.05) and a significant increase in the plasma insulin concentration by more than 2-fold at 15 min (p < 0.01). On the other hand, the plasma GIP concentration was significantly decreased at 60 min (p < 0.01) in the ligated group, while the active form of GLP-1 showed a significantly higher level at 90 min (1.7-fold; p < 0.05) and 120 min (2.5-fold; p < 0.01). During the IVGTT, the plasma insulin concentration in the ligation group was significantly higher at 2

  16. The signaling cascades of Ganoderma lucidum extracts in stimulating non-amyloidogenic protein secretion in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinweha, Sirinthorn; Wanikiat, Payong; Sanvarinda, Yupin; Supavilai, Porntip

    2008-12-19

    Ganoderma lucidum (GL) is a medicinal mushroom that possesses various pharmacological properties which are also documented in the ancient reports where GL is praised for its effects on the promotion of health and longevity. In this study, we have investigated the effect of GL mycelia extracts on the non-amyloidogenic protein secretion (sAPPalpha) and the amyloid precursor protein (APP) expression in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. In order to characterize the signaling pathway which mediates GL-enhanced sAPPalpha secretion, we used inhibitors of nerve growth factor (NGF) signaling pathways, phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K), phospholipase Cgamma1 (PLCgamma1), protein kinase C (PKC) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), to block GL-mediated sAPPalpha secretion as well as ERK1/2 and PKC activation by using Western blot analysis. Our results provided for the first time evidence that GL mycelia extracts increased APP expression and promoted sAPPalpha secretion. In addition, GL extracts activated ERK1/2 and PKC phosphorylation. The complex signaling cascades of PI3K and ERK may be responsible for GL-mediated sAPPalpha secretion.

  17. Chronic cladribine administration increases amyloid beta peptide generation and plaque burden in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal D Hayes

    Full Text Available The clinical uses of 2-chloro-2'-deoxyadenosine (2-CDA or cladribine which was initially prescribed to patients with hematological and lymphoid cancers is now extended to treat patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. Previous data has shown that 2-CDA has high affinity to the brain and readily passes through the blood brain barrier reaching CSF concentrations 25% of that found in plasma. However, whether long-term administration of 2-CDA can lead to any adverse effects in patients or animal models is not yet clearly known.Here we show that exposure of 2-CDA to CHO cells stably expressing wild-type APP751 increased generation and secretion of amyloid β peptide (Aβ in to the conditioned medium. Interestingly, increased Aβ levels were noticed even at non-toxic concentrations of 2-CDA. Remarkably, chronic treatment of APdE9 mice, a model of Alzheimer's disease with 2-CDA for 60 days increased amyloid plaque burden by more than 1-fold. Increased Aβ generation appears to result from increased turnover of APP as revealed by cycloheximide-chase experiments. Additionally, surface labeling of APP with biotin and immunoprecipitation of surface labeled proteins with anti-biotin antibody also indicated increased APP at the cell surface in 2-CDA treated cells compared to controls. Increased turnover of APP by 2-CDA in turn might be a consequence of decreased protein levels of PIN 1, which is known to regulate cis-trans isomerization and phosphorylation of APP. Most importantly, like many other oncology drugs, 2-CDA administration led to significant delay in acquiring a reward-based learning task in a T maze paradigm.Taken together, these data provide compelling evidence for the first time that chronic 2-CDA administration can increase amyloidogenic processing of APP leading to robustly increased plaque burden which may be responsible for the observed deficits in learning skills. Thus chronic treatment of mice with 2-CDA can have deleterious effects in vivo.

  18. Toll-like receptor triggered dendritic cell maturation and IL-12 secretion are necessary to overcome T-cell inhibition by glioma-associated TGF-beta2.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grauer, O.M.; Poschl, P.; Lohmeier, A.; Adema, G.J.; Bogdahn, U.

    2007-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are able to secrete large amounts of immunosuppressive cytokines like transforming growth factor beta 2 (TGF-beta2) and regularly escape from immune surveillance. Many strategies have been developed to induce potent anti-glioma responses, among those the use of dendritic cells (DC)

  19. A carrier for non-covalent delivery of functional beta-galactosidase and antibodies against amyloid plaques and IgM to the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gobinda Sarkar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Therapeutic intervention of numerous brain-associated disorders currently remains unrealized due to serious limitations imposed by the blood-brain-barrier (BBB. The BBB generally allows transport of small molecules, typically <600 daltons with high octanol/water partition coefficients, but denies passage to most larger molecules. However, some receptors present on the BBB allow passage of cognate proteins to the brain. Utilizing such receptor-ligand systems, several investigators have developed methods for delivering proteins to the brain, a critical requirement of which involves covalent linking of the target protein to a carrier entity. Such covalent modifications involve extensive preparative and post-preparative chemistry that poses daunting limitations in the context of delivery to any organ. Here, we report creation of a 36-amino acid peptide transporter, which can transport a protein to the brain after routine intravenous injection of the transporter-protein mixture. No covalent linkage of the protein with the transporter is necessary. APPROACH: A peptide transporter comprising sixteen lysine residues and 20 amino acids corresponding to the LDLR-binding domain of apolipoprotein E (ApoE was synthesized. Transport of beta-galactosidase, IgG, IgM, and antibodies against amyloid plques to the brain upon iv injection of the protein-transporter mixture was evaluated through staining for enzyme activity or micro single photon emission tomography (micro-SPECT or immunostaining. Effect of the transporter on the integrity of the BBB was also investigated. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The transporter enabled delivery to the mouse brain of functional beta-galactosidase, human IgG and IgM, and two antibodies that labeled brain-associated amyloid beta plaques in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest the transporter is able to transport most or all proteins to the brain without the need for chemically linking the

  20. An Alzheimer Disease-linked Rare Mutation Potentiates Netrin Receptor Uncoordinated-5C-induced Signaling That Merges with Amyloid β Precursor Protein Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yuichi; Toyama, Yuka; Kusakari, Shinya; Nawa, Mikiro; Matsuoka, Masaaki

    2016-06-03

    A missense mutation (T835M) in the uncoordinated-5C (UNC5C) netrin receptor gene increases the risk of late-onset Alzheimer disease (AD) and also the vulnerability of neurons harboring the mutation to various insults. The molecular mechanisms underlying T835M-UNC5C-induced death remain to be elucidated. In this study, we show that overexpression of wild-type UNC5C causes low-grade death, which is intensified by an AD-linked mutation T835M. An AD-linked survival factor, calmodulin-like skin protein (CLSP), and a natural ligand of UNC5C, netrin1, inhibit this death. T835M-UNC5C-induced neuronal cell death is mediated by an intracellular death-signaling cascade, consisting of death-associated protein kinase 1/protein kinase D/apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1)/JNK/NADPH oxidase/caspases, which merges at ASK1 with a death-signaling cascade, mediated by amyloid β precursor protein (APP). Notably, netrin1 also binds to APP and partially inhibits the death-signaling cascade, induced by APP. These results may provide new insight into the amyloid β-independent pathomechanism of AD. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Platelet amyloid precursor protein isoform expression in Alzheimer's disease: evidence for peripheral marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignini, A; Sartini, D; Morganti, S; Nanetti, L; Luzzi, S; Provinciali, L; Mazzanti, L; Emanuelli, M

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive cognitive and memory decline. Among peripheral markers of AD, great interest has been focused on the amyloid precursor protein (APP). In this regard, platelets represent an important peripheral source of APP since it has been demonstrated that the three major isoforms, that are constituted of 770, 751 and 695 aa residues, are inserted in the membrane of resting platelets. APP 751 and APP 770 contain a Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor domain (APP KPI) and APP 695 lacks this domain. To address this issue, we first examined the platelet APP isoform mRNAs prospectively as biomarker for the diagnosis of AD by means of real-time quantitative PCR, and then evaluated the correlation between APP mRNA expression levels and cognitive impairment of enrolled subjects. Differential gene expression measurements in the AD patient group (n=18) revealed a significant up-regulation of APP TOT (1.52-fold), APP KPI (1.32-fold), APP 770 (1.33-fold) and APP 751 (1.26-fold) compared to controls (n=22). Moreover, a statistically significant positive correlation was found between APP mRNA levels (TOT, KPI, 770 and 751) and cognitive impairment. Since AD definitive diagnosis still relies on pathological evaluation at autopsy, the present results are consistent with the hypothesis that platelet APP could be considered a potential reliable peripheral marker for studying AD and could contribute to define a signature for the presence of AD pathology.

  2. Development of transgenic rats producing human β-amyloid precursor protein as a model for Alzheimer's disease: Transgene and endogenous APP genes are regulated tissue-specifically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Anthony WS

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease (AD is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder that affects a large and growing number of elderly individuals. In addition to idiopathic disease, AD is also associated with autosomal dominant inheritance, which causes a familial form of AD (FAD. Some instances of FAD have been linked to mutations in the β-amyloid protein precursor (APP. Although there are numerous mouse AD models available, few rat AD models, which have several advantages over mice, have been generated. Results Fischer 344 rats expressing human APP driven by the ubiquitin-C promoter were generated via lentiviral vector infection of Fischer 344 zygotes. We generated two separate APP-transgenic rat lines, APP21 and APP31. Serum levels of human amyloid-beta (Aβ40 were 298 pg/ml for hemizygous and 486 pg/ml for homozygous APP21 animals. Serum Aβ42 levels in APP21 homozygous rats were 135 pg/ml. Immunohistochemistry in brain showed that the human APP transgene was expressed in neurons, but not in glial cells. These findings were consistent with independent examination of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP in the brains of eGFP-transgenic rats. APP21 and APP31 rats expressed 7.5- and 3-times more APP mRNA, respectively, than did wild-type rats. Northern blots showed that the human APP transgene, driven by the ubiquitin-C promoter, is expressed significantly more in brain, kidney and lung compared to heart and liver. A similar expression pattern was also seen for the endogenous rat APP. The unexpected similarity in the tissue-specific expression patterns of endogenous rat APP and transgenic human APP mRNAs suggests regulatory elements within the cDNA sequence of APP. Conclusion This manuscript describes the generation of APP-transgenic inbred Fischer 344 rats. These are the first human AD model rat lines generated by lentiviral infection. The APP21 rat line expresses high levels of human APP and could be a useful model for AD. Tissue

  3. Nanoparticles and amyloid systems: A fatal encounter?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abel, Bernd [Leibniz Institute of Surface Modification, Chemical Department, Permoserstr. 15, D-04318 Leipzig, Germany and Wilhelm-Ostwald-Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Linnéstr. 3, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany)

    2014-10-06

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are used in many products of our daily life, however, there has been concern that they may also be harmful to human health. Recently NPs have been found to accelerate the fibrillation kinetics of amyloid systems. In the past this has been preliminarily attributed to a nucleation effect. Nanoparticle surfaces and interfaces appear to limit the degrees of freedom of amyloid systems (i.e., peptides and proteins) due to a phase space constraint such that rapid cross-beta structures are formed faster than without interface interactions and in turn fibril formation is enhanced significantly. Here we explore if lipid bilayers in the form of liposomes (140nm) also accelerate fibril formation for amyloid systems. We have investigated a fragment NNFGAIL of the Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) in contact with 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPhPC) liposomes in aqueous solution. We found that the lipid bilayer vesicles do accelerate fibril formation in time-resolved off-line detected atomic force microscopy experiments. Characteristic Thioflavine-T fluorescence on the same structures verify that the structures consist of aggregated peptides in a typical cross-β-structure arrangement.

  4. Protein Folding and Aggregation into Amyloid: The Interference by Natural Phenolic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Stefani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid aggregation is a hallmark of several degenerative diseases affecting the brain or peripheral tissues, whose intermediates (oligomers, protofibrils and final mature fibrils display different toxicity. Consequently, compounds counteracting amyloid aggregation have been investigated for their ability (i to stabilize toxic amyloid precursors; (ii to prevent the growth of toxic oligomers or speed that of fibrils; (iii to inhibit fibril growth and deposition; (iv to disassemble preformed fibrils; and (v to favor amyloid clearance. Natural phenols, a wide panel of plant molecules, are one of the most actively investigated categories of potential amyloid inhibitors. They are considered responsible for the beneficial effects of several traditional diets being present in green tea, extra virgin olive oil, red wine, spices, berries and aromatic herbs. Accordingly, it has been proposed that some natural phenols could be exploited to prevent and to treat amyloid diseases, and recent studies have provided significant information on their ability to inhibit peptide/protein aggregation in various ways and to stimulate cell defenses, leading to identify shared or specific mechanisms. In the first part of this review, we will overview the significance and mechanisms of amyloid aggregation and aggregate toxicity; then, we will summarize the recent achievements on protection against amyloid diseases by many natural phenols.

  5. Comparison of the amyloid pore forming properties of rat and human Alzheimer’s beta-amyloid peptide 1-42: Calcium imaging data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coralie Di Scala

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The data here consists of calcium imaging of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells treated with the calcium-sensitive dye Fluo-4AM and then incubated with nanomolar concentrations of either human or rat Alzheimer’s β-amyloid peptide Aβ1-42. These data are both of a qualitative (fluorescence micrographs and semi-quantitative nature (estimation of intracellular calcium concentrations of cells probed by Aβ1-42 peptides vs. control untreated cells. Since rat Aβ1-42 differs from its human counterpart at only three amino acid positions, this comparative study is a good assessment of the specificity of the amyloid pore forming assay. The interpretation of this dataset is presented in the accompanying study “Broad neutralization of calcium-permeable amyloid pore channels with a chimeric Alzheimer/Parkinson peptide targeting brain gangliosides” [1].

  6. Turnover of amyloid precursor protein family members determines their nuclear signaling capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersbacher, Manuel T; Goodger, Zoë V; Trutzel, Annette; Bundschuh, Diana; Nitsch, Roger M; Konietzko, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) as well as its homologues, APP-like protein 1 and 2 (APLP1 and APLP2), are cleaved by α-, β-, and γ-secretases, resulting in the release of their intracellular domains (ICDs). We have shown that the APP intracellular domain (AICD) is transported to the nucleus by Fe65 where they jointly bind the histone acetyltransferase Tip60 and localize to spherical nuclear complexes (AFT complexes), which are thought to be sites of transcription. We have now analyzed the subcellular localization and turnover of the APP family members. Similarly to AICD, the ICD of APLP2 localizes to spherical nuclear complexes together with Fe65 and Tip60. In contrast, the ICD of APLP1, despite binding to Fe65, does not translocate to the nucleus. In addition, APLP1 predominantly localizes to the plasma membrane, whereas APP and APLP2 are detected in vesicular structures. APLP1 also demonstrates a much slower turnover of the full-length protein compared to APP and APLP2. We further show that the ICDs of all APP family members are degraded by the proteasome and that the N-terminal amino acids of ICDs determine ICD degradation rate. Together, our results suggest that different nuclear signaling capabilities of APP family members are due to different rates of full-length protein processing and ICD proteasomal degradation. Our results provide evidence in support of a common nuclear signaling function for APP and APLP2 that is absent in APLP1, but suggest that APLP1 has a regulatory role in the nuclear translocation of APP family ICDs due to the sequestration of Fe65.

  7. Protein folding pathology in domestic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruys, Erik

    2004-10-01

    Fibrillar proteins form structural elements of cells and the extracellular matrix. Pathological lesions of fibrillar microanatomical structures, or secondary fibrillar changes in globular proteins are well known. A special group concerns histologically amorphous deposits, amyloid. The major characteristics of amyloid are: apple green birefringence after Congo red staining of histological sections, and non-branching 7-10 nm thick fibrils on electron microscopy revealing a high content of cross beta pleated sheets. About 25 different types of amyloid have been characterised. In animals, AA-amyloid is the most frequent type. Other types of amyloid in animals represent: AIAPP (in cats), AApoAI, AApoAII, localised AL-amyloid, amyloid in odontogenic or mammary tumors and amyloid in the brain. In old dogs Abeta and in sheep APrPsc-amyloid can be encountered. AA-amyloidosis is a systemic disorder with a precursor in blood, acute phase serum amyloid A (SAA). In chronic inflammatory processes AA-amyloid can be deposited. A rapid crystallization of SAA to amyloid fibrils on small beta-sheeted fragments, the 'amyloid enhancing factor' (AEF), is known and the AEF has been shown to penetrate the enteric barrier. Amyloid fibrils can aggregate from various precursor proteins in vitro in particular at acidic pH and when proteolytic fragments are formed. Molecular chaperones influence this process. Tissue data point to amyloid fibrillogenesis in lysosomes and near cell surfaces. A comparison can be made of the fibrillogenesis in prion diseases and in enhanced AA-amyloidosis. In the reactive form, acute phase SAA is the supply of the precursor protein, whereas in the prion diseases, cell membrane proteins form a structural source. Abeta-amyloid in brain tissue of aged dogs showing signs of dementia forms a canine counterpart of senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (ccSDAT) in man. Misfolded proteins remain potential food hazards. Developments concerning prevention of amyloidogenesis

  8. Clinical observations with AN-1792 using TAPIR analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hock, Christoph; Nitsch, Roger M

    2005-01-01

    Clinical observations with AN-1792 using tissue amyloid plaque immunoreactivity (TAPIR) analyses established for the first time evidence in humans that antibodies against beta-amyloid-related epitopes are capable of slowing progression in Alzheimer's disease. Antibodies derived upon TAPIR assay selection may specifically target the pathologic neoepitopes of aggregated A beta species present in amyloid plaques and some of their aggregated, protofibrillar and low molecular weight oligomeric precursors. We briefly summarize here how the proof of concept was established and why it provides the basis for a potential cure for Alzheimer's disease. Copyright 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. The GLP-1 analogue liraglutide improves first-phase insulin secretion and maximal beta-cell secretory capacity over 14 weeks of therapy in subjects with Type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsbad, Sten; Vilsbøll, Tina; Brock, Birgitte

    Aims: We investigated the clinical effect of liraglutide, a long- acting GLP-1 analogue, on insulin secretion in Type 2 diabetes. Methods: Thirty-nine subjects (28 completed) from a randomised trial received a hyperglycaemic clamp (20 mM) with intravenous arginine stimulation, and an insulin...... group. Conclusion: In subjects with Type 2 diabetes, 14 weeks’ once-daily liraglutide (1.25 and 1.9 mg/day) markedly improves beta-cell function, significantly increases first-phase insulin secretion and maximal beta-cell secretory capacity....

  10. Calumenin interacts with serum amyloid P component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorum, H; Jacobsen, Christian; Honoré, Bent

    2000-01-01

    We recently reported the identification of human calumenin, a novel Ca(2+) binding, transformation-sensitive and secreted protein [Vorum et al. (1998) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1386, 121-131; Vorum et al. (1999) Exp. Cell Res. 248, 473-481] belonging to the family of multiple EF-hand proteins...... with calumenin in the presence of Ca(2+). Amino acid sequencing identified this protein as serum amyloid P component (SAP). Furthermore, we verified and characterized the calumenin-SAP interaction by the surface plasmon resonance technique. The findings indicate that calumenin may participate...... in the immunological defense system and could be involved in the pathological process of amyloidosis that leads to formation of amyloid deposits seen in different types of tissues. Udgivelsesdato: 2000-Jan-14...

  11. Bioassay-Guided Isolation of Neuroprotective Compounds from Uncaria rhynchophylla against Beta-Amyloid-Induced Neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Yan-Fang; Lin, Zhi-Xiu; Mao, Qing-Qiu; Hu, Zhen; Zhao, Ming; Che, Chun-Tao; Ip, Siu-Po

    2012-01-01

    Uncaria rhynchophylla is a component herb of many Chinese herbal formulae for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Previous study in our laboratory has demonstrated that an ethanol extract of Uncaria rhynchophylla ameliorated cognitive deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease induced by D-galactose. However, the active ingredients of Uncaria rhynchophylla responsible for the anti-Alzheimer's disease activity have not been identified. This study aims to identify the active ingredients of Uncaria rhynchophylla by a bioassay-guided fractionation approach and explore the acting mechanism of these active ingredients by using a well-established cellular model of Alzheimer's disease, beta-amyloid- (Aβ-) induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells. The results showed that six alkaloids, namely, corynoxine, corynoxine B, corynoxeine, isorhynchophylline, isocorynoxeine, and rhynchophylline were isolated from the extract of Uncaria rhynchophylla. Among them, rhynchophylline and isorhynchophylline significantly decreased Aβ-induced cell death, intracellular calcium overloading, and tau protein hyperphosphorylation in PC12 cells. These results suggest that rhynchophylline and isorhynchophylline are the major active ingredients responsible for the protective action of Uncaria rhynchophylla against Aβ-induced neuronal toxicity, and their neuroprotective effect may be mediated, at least in part, by inhibiting intracellular calcium overloading and tau protein hyperphosphorylation.

  12. Bidirectional Regulation of Amyloid Precursor Protein-Induced Memory Defects by Nebula/DSCR1: A Protein Upregulated in Alzheimer's Disease and Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jillian L; Zhang, Shixing; Chang, Karen T

    2015-08-12

    Aging individuals with Down syndrome (DS) have an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD), a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by impaired memory. Memory problems in both DS and AD individuals usually develop slowly and progressively get worse with age, but the cause of this age-dependent memory impairment is not well understood. This study examines the functional interactions between Down syndrome critical region 1 (DSCR1) and amyloid-precursor protein (APP), proteins upregulated in both DS and AD, in regulating memory. Using Drosophila as a model, we find that overexpression of nebula (fly homolog of DSCR1) initially protects against APP-induced memory defects by correcting calcineurin and cAMP signaling pathways but accelerates the rate of memory loss and exacerbates mitochondrial dysfunction in older animals. We report that transient upregulation of Nebula/DSCR1 or acute pharmacological inhibition of calcineurin in aged flies protected against APP-induced memory loss. Our data suggest that calcineurin dyshomeostasis underlies age-dependent memory impairments and further imply that chronic Nebula/DSCR1 upregulation may contribute to age-dependent memory impairments in AD in DS. Most Down syndrome (DS) individuals eventually develop Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like dementia, but mechanisms underlying this age-dependent memory impairment remain poorly understood. This study examines Nebula/Down syndrome critical region 1 (DSCR1) and amyloid-precursor protein (APP), proteins upregulated in both DS and AD, in regulating memory. We uncover a previously unidentified role for Nebula/DSCR1 in modulating APP-induced memory defects during aging. We show that upregulation of Nebula/DSCR1, an inhibitor of calcineurin, rescues APP-induced memory defects in young flies but enhances memory loss of older flies. Excitingly, transient Nebula/DSCR1 overexpression or calcineurin inhibition in aged flies ameliorates APP-mediated memory problems. These results

  13. Data on amyloid precursor protein accumulation, spontaneous physical activity, and motor learning after traumatic brain injury in the triple-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer׳s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Kishimoto

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This data article contains supporting information regarding the research article entitled “Traumatic brain injury accelerates amyloid-β deposition and impairs spatial learning in the triple-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer׳s disease” (H. Shishido, Y. Kishimoto, N. Kawai, Y. Toyota, M. Ueno, T. Kubota, Y. Kirino, T. Tamiya, 2016 [1]. Triple-transgenic (3×Tg-Alzheimer׳s disease (AD model mice exhibited significantly poorer spatial learning than sham-treated 3×Tg-AD mice 28 days after traumatic brain injury (TBI. Correspondingly, amyloid-β (Aβ deposition within the hippocampus was significantly greater in 3×Tg-AD mice 28 days after TBI. However, data regarding the short-term and long-term influences of TBI on amyloid precursor protein (APP accumulation in AD model mice remain limited. Furthermore, there is little data showing whether physical activity and motor learning are affected by TBI in AD model mice. Here, we provide immunocytochemistry data confirming that TBI induces significant increases in APP accumulation in 3×Tg-AD mice at both 7 days and 28 days after TBI. Furthermore, 3×Tg-AD model mice exhibit a reduced ability to acquire conditioned responses (CRs during delay eyeblink conditioning compared to sham-treated 3×Tg-AD model mice 28 days after TBI. However, physical activity and motor performance are not significantly changed in TBI-treated 3×Tg-AD model mice.

  14. Feleucins: Novel Bombinin Precursor-Encoded Nonapeptide Amides from the Skin Secretion of Bombina variegata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Bai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The first amphibian skin antimicrobial peptide (AMP to be identified was named bombinin, reflecting its origin from the skin of the European yellow-bellied toad (Bombina variegata. Bombinins and their related peptides, the bombinin Hs, were subsequently reported from other bombinid toads. Molecular cloning of bombinin-encoding cDNAs from skin found that bombinins and bombinin Hs were coencoded on the same precursor proteins. Here, we report the molecular cloning of two novel cDNAs from a skin secretion-derived cDNA library of B. variegata whose open-reading frames each encode a novel bombinin (GIGGALLNVGKVALKGLAKGLAEHFANamide and a C-terminally located single copy of a novel nonapeptide (FLGLLGGLLamide or FLGLIGSLLamide. These novel nonapeptides were named feleucin-BV1 and feleucin-BV2, respectively. The novel bombinin exhibited 89% identity to homologues from the toads, B. microdeladigitora and B. maxima. The feleucins exhibited no identity with any amphibian AMP archived in databases. Synthetic feleucins exhibited a weak activity against Staphylococcus aureus (128–256 mg/L but feleucin-BV1 exhibited a synergistic action with the novel bombinin. The present report clearly demonstrates that the skin secretions of bombinid toads continue to represent a source of peptides of novel structure that could provide templates for the design of therapeutics.

  15. Prelysosomal Compartments in the Unconventional Secretion of Amyloidogenic Seeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borland, Helena; Vilhardt, Frederik

    2017-01-01

    . The ESCRT-mediated import of cytosolic amyloid into late endosomal exosomes, a known vehicle of transmission of macromolecules between cells, is also reviewed. Finally, mechanisms of lysosomal dysfunction, deficiency, and exocytosis are exemplified in the context of genetically identified risk factors......, mainly for Parkinson's disease. Exocytosis of prelysosomal or lysosomal organelles is a last resort for clearance of cytotoxic material and alleviates cytopathy. However, they also represent a vehicle for the concentration, posttranslational modification, and secretion of amyloid seeds....

  16. Loss of Function of ATXN1 Increases Amyloid β-Protein Levels by Potentiating β-Secretase Processing of β-Amyloid Precursor Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Can; Browne, Andrew; Child, Daniel; DiVito, Jason R.; Stevenson, Jesse A.; Tanzi, Rudolph E.

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease with complex and strong genetic inheritance. Four genes have been established to either cause familial early onset AD (APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2) or to increase susceptibility for late onset AD (APOE). To date ∼80% of the late onset AD genetic variance remains elusive. Recently our genome-wide association screen identified four novel late onset AD candidate genes. Ataxin 1 (ATXN1) is one of these four AD candidate genes and has been indicated to be the disease gene for spinocerebellar ataxia type 1, which is also a neurodegenerative disease. Mounting evidence suggests that the excessive accumulation of Aβ, the proteolytic product of β-amyloid precursor protein (APP), is the primary AD pathological event. In this study, we ask whether ATXN1 may lead to AD pathogenesis by affecting Aβ and APP processing utilizing RNA interference in a human neuronal cell model and mouse primary cortical neurons. We show that knock-down of ATXN1 significantly increases the levels of both Aβ40 and Aβ42. This effect could be rescued with concurrent overexpression of ATXN1. Moreover, overexpression of ATXN1 decreased Aβ levels. Regarding the underlying molecular mechanism, we show that the effect of ATXN1 expression on Aβ levels is modulated via β-secretase cleavage of APP. Taken together, ATXN1 functions as a genetic risk modifier that contributes to AD pathogenesis through a loss-of-function mechanism by regulating β-secretase cleavage of APP and Aβ levels. PMID:20097758

  17. Regulation of pro-adrenocorticotropin-endorphin synthesis and secretion in cultured neonatal rat anterior pituitary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, S.M.; Mains, R.E. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1987-08-01

    Previous work demonstrated that newborn rat anterior pituitary corticotropes display processing patterns for pro-ACTH/endorphin that are different from the adult. The synthesis and release of beta-endorphin-related peptides was examined in dispersed cell and explant cultures of newborn anterior pituitary to investigate corticotrope development further. The temporal pattern of pro-ACTH/endorphin processing differed significantly from adult rat melanotropes and AtT-20 cells. While pro-ACTH/endorphin processing begins within 30 min of synthesis in adult melanotropes and AtT-20 cells, pulse-labeling of newborn corticotropes in culture indicated that pro-ACTH/endorphin remained uncleaved for at least 90 min after synthesis. With further incubation, there was a decrease in radioactivity associated with the precursor and an equivalent rise in the radioactivity associated with beta-endorphin and beta-lipotropin. However, unprocessed precursor still remained in the cultured newborn anterior pituitary cells after a 25-h chase. Although intact pro-ACTH/endorphin from newborn corticotropes was very long-lived, the precursor did undergo oligosaccharide maturation and became endoglycosidase H resistant within 1 h after synthesis. Similar to the adult, pro-ACTH/endorphin synthesis was doubled in cultures of newborn anterior pituitary chronically treated with 10 nM CRF resulting in a 3- to 4-fold stimulation of secretion over the basal rate. However, unlike the AtT-20 cell or adult rat corticotrope, the proteolytic processing of pro-ACTH/endorphin in the newborn corticotrope was altered by chronic secretagogue treatment; less pro-ACTH/endorphin was converted to beta-endorphin in secretagogue-treated corticotropes than in controls. Thus processing of pro-ACTH/endorphin in the corticotrope is not mature by birth and can be regulated by chronic CRF treatment.

  18. Regulation of pro-adrenocorticotropin-endorphin synthesis and secretion in cultured neonatal rat anterior pituitary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, S.M.; Mains, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    Previous work demonstrated that newborn rat anterior pituitary corticotropes display processing patterns for pro-ACTH/endorphin that are different from the adult. The synthesis and release of beta-endorphin-related peptides was examined in dispersed cell and explant cultures of newborn anterior pituitary to investigate corticotrope development further. The temporal pattern of pro-ACTH/endorphin processing differed significantly from adult rat melanotropes and AtT-20 cells. While pro-ACTH/endorphin processing begins within 30 min of synthesis in adult melanotropes and AtT-20 cells, pulse-labeling of newborn corticotropes in culture indicated that pro-ACTH/endorphin remained uncleaved for at least 90 min after synthesis. With further incubation, there was a decrease in radioactivity associated with the precursor and an equivalent rise in the radioactivity associated with beta-endorphin and beta-lipotropin. However, unprocessed precursor still remained in the cultured newborn anterior pituitary cells after a 25-h chase. Although intact pro-ACTH/endorphin from newborn corticotropes was very long-lived, the precursor did undergo oligosaccharide maturation and became endoglycosidase H resistant within 1 h after synthesis. Similar to the adult, pro-ACTH/endorphin synthesis was doubled in cultures of newborn anterior pituitary chronically treated with 10 nM CRF resulting in a 3- to 4-fold stimulation of secretion over the basal rate. However, unlike the AtT-20 cell or adult rat corticotrope, the proteolytic processing of pro-ACTH/endorphin in the newborn corticotrope was altered by chronic secretagogue treatment; less pro-ACTH/endorphin was converted to beta-endorphin in secretagogue-treated corticotropes than in controls. Thus processing of pro-ACTH/endorphin in the corticotrope is not mature by birth and can be regulated by chronic CRF treatment

  19. Decreased rhythmic GABAergic septal activity and memory-associated theta oscillations after hippocampal amyloid-beta pathology in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villette, Vincent; Poindessous-Jazat, Frédérique; Simon, Axelle; Léna, Clément; Roullot, Elodie; Bellessort, Brice; Epelbaum, Jacques; Dutar, Patrick; Stéphan, Aline

    2010-08-18

    The memory deficits associated with Alzheimer's disease result to a great extent from hippocampal network dysfunction. The coordination of this network relies on theta (symbol) oscillations generated in the medial septum. Here, we investigated in rats the impact of hippocampal amyloid beta (Abeta) injections on the physiological and cognitive functions that depend on the septohippocampal system. Hippocampal Abeta injections progressively impaired behavioral performances, the associated hippocampal theta power, and theta frequency response in a visuospatial recognition test. These alterations were associated with a specific reduction in the firing of the identified rhythmic bursting GABAergic neurons responsible for the propagation of the theta rhythm to the hippocampus, but without loss of medial septal neurons. Such results indicate that hippocampal Abeta treatment leads to a specific functional depression of inhibitory projection neurons of the medial septum, resulting in the functional impairment of the temporal network.

  20. Spatial patterns of brain amyloid-beta burden and atrophy rate associations in mild cognitive impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tosun, Duygu; Schuff, Norbert; Mathis, Chester A.; Jagust, William; Weiner, Michael W.; Saradha, A.; Abdi, Herve; Abdulkadir, Ahmed; Abeliovich, Asa; Abellan van Kan, Gabor; Abner, Erin; Acharya, Deepa; Agrusti, Antonella; Agyemang, Alex; Ahdidan, Jamila; Ahmed, Shiek; Ahn, Jae Eun; Aisen, Paul; Aksu, Yaman; Al-Akhras, Mousa; Alarcon, Marcelo; Alberca, Roman; Alexander, Gene; Alexander, Daniel; Alin, Aylin; Almeida, Fabio; Amlien, Inge; Anand, Shyam; Anderson, Dallas; Andrew, Marilee; Angersbach, Steve; Anjum, Ayesha; Aoyama, Eiji; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Armor, Tom; Arnold, Steven; Arunagiri, Vidhya; Asatryan, Albert; Ashe-McNalley, Cody; Ashiga, Hirokazu; Assareh, Arezoo; Le Page, Aurelie; Avants, Brian; Avinash, Gopal; Aviv, Richard; Awasthi, Sukrati; Ayan-Oshodi, Mosun; Babic, Tomislav; Baek, Young; Bagci, Ulas; Bai, Shuyang; Baird, Geoffrey; Baker, John; Banks, Sarah; Bard, Jonathan; Barnes, Josephine; Bartlett, Jonathan; Bartzokis, George; Barua, Neil; Bauer, Corinna; Bayley, Peter; Beck, Irene; Becker, James; Becker, J. Alex; Beckett, Laurel; Bednar, Martin; Beg, Mirza Faisal; Bek, Stephan; Belaroussi, Boubakeur; Belmokhtar, Nabil; Bernard, Charlotte; Bertram, Lars; Bhaskar, Uday; Biffi, Alessandro; Bigler, Erin; Bilgic, Basar; Bishop, Courtney; Bittner, Daniel; Black, Ronald; Bogorodzki, Piotr; Bokde, Arun; Bonner-Jackson, Aaron; Boppana, Madhu; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Bowes, Mike; Bowman, DuBois; Bowman, Gene; Braskie, Meredith; Braunewell, Karl; Breitner, Joihn; Bresell, Anders; Brewer, James; Brickman, Adam; Britschgi, Markus; Broadbent, Steve; Brogren, Jacob; Brooks, David; Browndyke, Jeffrey; Brunton, Simon; Buchert, Ralph; Buchsbaum, Monte; Buckley, Chris; Buerger, Katharina; Burger, Cyrill; Burnham, Samantha; Burns, Jeffrey; Burton, David; Butman, John; Cabeza, Rafael; Cairns, Nigel; Callhoff, Johanna; Calvini, Piero; Cantillon, Marc; Capella, Heraldo; Carbotti, Angela; Cardona-Sanclemente, Luis Eduardo; Carle, Adam; Carmasin, Jeremy; Carranza-Ath, Fredy; Casabianca, Jodi; Casanova, Ramon; Cash, David; Cedarbaum, Jesse; Cella, Massimo; Celsis, Pierre; Chanu, Pascal; Chao, Linda; Charil, Arnaud; Chemali, Zeina; Chen, Rong; Chen, Jake; Chen, Gennan; Chen, Wei; Chen, Kewei; Chen, Shuzhong; Chen, Minhua; Cheng, Wei-Chen; Cherkas, Yauheniya; Chertkow, Howard; Cheung, Charlton; Cheung, Vinci; Chiang, Gloria; Chiba, Koji; Chin, Simon; Chisholm, Jane; Cho, Youngsang; Choe, John; Choubey, Suresh; Chowbina, Sudhir; Christensen, Anette Luther; Clark, David; Clark, Chris; Clarkson, Matt; Clayton, David; Clunie, David; Coen, Michael; Coimbra, Alexandre; Compton, David; Coppola, Giovanni; Coulin, Samuel; Cover, Keith S.; Crane, Paul; Crans, Gerald; Croop, Robert; Crowther, Daniel; Crum, William; Cui, Yue; Curry, Charles; Curtis, Steven; Cutter, Gary; Daiello, Lori; Dake, Michael; Dale, Anders; Daliri, Mohammad Reza; Damato, Vito Domenico; Darby, Eveleen; Darkner, Sune; Davatzikos, Christos; Dave, Jay; David, Renaud; DavidPrakash, Bhaskaran; Davidson, Julie; de Bruijne, Marleen; de Meyer, Geert; de Nunzio, Giorgio; Decarli, Charles; Dechairo, Bryan; DeDuck, Kristina; Dehghan, Hossein; Dejkam, Arsalan; Delfino, Manuel; Della Rosa, Pasquale Anthony; Dellavedova, Luca; Delpassand, Ebrahim; Delrieu, Julien; DeOrchis, Vincent; Depy Carron, Delphine; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Devanand, Davangere; Devanarayan, Viswanath; DeVous, Michael; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Bradford, Dickerson; Ding, Xiaobo; Dinov, Ivo; Dobson, Howard; Dodge, Hiroko; Donohue, Michael; Dore, Vincent; Dorflinger, Ernest; Dowling, Maritza; Duan, Xujun; Dubal, Dena; Duchesne, Simon; Duff, Kevin; Dukart, Jrgen; Durazzo, Timothy; Dykstra, Kevin; Earl, Nancy; Edula, Goutham; Ekin, Ahmet; Elcoroaristizabal, Xabier; Emahazion, Tesfai; Engelman, Corinne; Epstein, Noam; Erten-Lyons, Deniz; Eskildsen, Simon; Falcone, Guido; Fan, Lingzhong; Fan, Yong; Farahibozorg, Seyedehrezvan; Farb, Norman; Farnum, Michael; Farrer, Lindsay; Farzan, Ali; Faux, Noel; Feldman, Betsy; Feldman, Howard; Feldman, Susan; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Fernandes, Michel; Fernandez, Elsa; Ferrarini, Luca; Ferreira, Manuel Joao; Ferrer, Eugene; Figurski, Michal; Filipovych, Roman; Fillit, Howard; Finch, Stephen; Finlay, Daniel; Fiot, Jean-Baptiste; Flenniken, Derek; Fletcher, P. Thomas; Fletcher, Evan; Flynn Longmire, Crystal; Focke, Niels; Forman, Mark; Forsythe, Alan; Fox, Steven; Fox-Bosetti, Sabrina; Francis, Alexander L.; Franco-Villalobos, Conrado; Franko, Edit; Freeman, Stefanie; Friedrich, Christoph M.; Friesenhahn, Michel; Frings, Lars; Frisoni, Giovanni; Fritzsche, Klaus; Fujimoto, Yoko; Fujiwara, Ken; Fullerton, Terence; Furney, Simon; Gallins, Paul; Galvin, Ben; Gamst, Anthony; Gan, Ke; Garcia, Maria Teresa; Garg, Gaurav; Gaser, Christian; Gastineau, Edward; Gauthier, Serge; Gavett, Brandon; Gavidia, Giovana; Gazdzinski, Stefan; Ge, Qi; Ge, Tian; Gemme, Gianluca; Geraci, Joseph; Ghassabi, Zeinab; Gieschke, Ronald; Gil, Juan E.; Gill, Ryan; Gitelman, Darren; Gleason, Carey; Glymour, M. Maria; Godbey, Michael; Goghari, Vina; Gold, Michael; Goldberg, Terry; Goldman, Jennifer; Gomeni, Roberto; Gong, Shangwenyan; Gonzales, Celedon; Goodro, Robert; Gordon, Brian; Gore, Chris; Gorriz, Juan Manuel; Grachev, Igor; Grandey, Emily; Grasela, Thaddeus; Gratt, Jeremy; Gray, Katherine; Greenberg, Barry; Gregg, Keith; Gregory, Erik; Greicius, Michael; Greve, Douglas; Grill, Joshua; Gross, Alden; Gross, Alan; Guignot, Isabelle; Guo, Jeffrey; Guo, Qimiao; Guo, Hongbin; Guo, Lianghao; Habeck, Christian; Hai, Yizhen; Haight, Thaddeus; Hammarstrom, Per; Hampel, Harald; Han, Duke; Han, Jian; Han, Tony; Hanif, Muhammad; Hanna, Yousef; Hardy, Peter; Harvey, Danielle; Hasan, Md Kamrul; Hayashi, Toshihiro; Hazart, Aurelien; He, Huiguang; He, Yong; Head, Denise; Heckemann, Rolf; Heidebrink, Judith; Henderson, David; Henrard, Sebastien; Herholz, Karl; Hernandez, Monica; Herskovits, A. Zara; Hess, Christopher; Hildenbrand, Maike; Hobart, Jeremy; Hoffman, John; Holder, Daniel; Hollingworth, Paul; Holmes, Robin; Honigberg, Lee; Hoppin, Jack; Hou, Yangyang; Hsu, Ailing; Hsu, Wei-Wen; Hu, Xiaolan; Hu, Zhiwei; Hu, William; Huang, Juebin; Huang, Chien-Chih; Huang, Chingwen; Huang, Shuai; Huang, Yifan; Huang, Fude; Huang, Chun-Jung; Huang, Shu-Pang; Hubbard, Rebecca; Huentelman, Matthew; Hui, Shen; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen; Hurko, Orest; Hurt, Stephen; Huyck, Susan; Hwang, Scott; Hyun, JungMoon; Ifeachor, Emmanuel; Iglesias, Martina; Ikari, Yasuhiko; Ikonomidou, Vasiliki; Imani, Farzin; Immermann, Fred; Inlow, Mark; Inoue, Lurdes; Insel, Philip; Irizarry, Michael; Irungu, Benson mwangi; Ishibashi, Taro; Ishii, Kenji; Ismail, Sara; Ismail, Shahina; Ito, Kaori; Iturria-Medina, Yasser; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Jacobson, Mark; Jacqmin, Philippe; Jafari, Aria; Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh; Jaffe, Carl; Jara, Hernan; Jasperse, Bas; Jedynak, Bruno; Jefferson, Angela; Jennings, J. Richard; Jessen, Walter; Jia, Fucang; Jiang, Tianzi; Jing, Huang; Johnson, Julene; Johnson, Sterling; Johnson, David K.; Jones, Richard; Juengling, Freimut; Juh, Rahyeong; Julin, Per; Kadish, Bill; Kahle-Wrobleski, Kristin; Kallam, Hanimi Reddy; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Kaneko, Tomoki; Kaneta, Tomohiro; Kang, Ju Hee; Karageorgiou, Elissaios; Karantzoulis, Stella; Karlawish, Jason; Katz, Elyse; Kaushik, Sandeep S.; Kauwe, John; Kawakami, Hirofumi; Kazimipoor, Borhan; Kelleher, Thomas; Kennedy, Richard; Kerchner, Geoffrey; Kerrouche, Nacer; Khalil, Iya; Khalil, Andre; Killeen, Neil; Killiany, Ron; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Heeyoung; Kim, Ana; Kim, Yeonhee; Kim, Hyoungkyu; Kim, Seongkyun; Kim, Hyewon; Kimberg, Daniel; Kimura, Tokunori; King, Richard; Kirby, Justin; Kirsch, Wolff; Klimas, Michael; Kline, Richard; Kling, Mitchel; Klopfenstein, Erin; Koikkalainen, Juha; Kokomoor, Anders; Kolasny, Anthony; Koppel, Jeremy; Korolev, Igor; Kotran, Nickolas; Kouassi, Alex; Kowalczyk, Adam; Kozma, Lynn; Krams, Michael; Kratzer, Martina; Kuceyeski, Amy; Kuhn, Felix Pierre; Kumar, Sreedhar; Kuo, Hsun Ting; Kuo, Julie; Kurosawa, Ken; Kwon, Oh Hun; Labrish, Catherine; Laforet, Genevieve; Lai, Song; Lakatos, Anita; Lam, On Ki; Lampron, Antoine; Landau, Susan; Landen, Jaren; Lane, Richard; Langbaum, Jessica; Langford, Dianne; Lanius, Vivian; Laxamana, Joel; Le, Trung; Leahy, Richard; Lee, Jong-Min; Lee, Vita; Lee, Joseph H.; Lee, Grace; Lee, Dongsoo; Lee, Noah; Lefkimmiatis, Stamatis; Lemaitre, Herve; Lenfant, Pierre; Lenz, Robert; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie; Lester, Gayle; Levey, Allan; Li, Shi-jiang; Li, Shanshan; Li, Wenjun; Li, Chin-Shang; Li, Xiaodong; Li, Rui; Li, Ming; Li, Lexin; Li, Jinhe; Li, Yi; Li, Quanzheng; Li, Gang; Liang, Kuchang; Liang, Peipeng; Liang, Lichen; Liao, Yuan-Lin; Lin, Ling-chih; Lin, Lan; Lin, Mingkuan; Lin, Ai-Ling; Liu, Songling; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Tianming; Liu, Meijie; Liu, Xiuwen; Liu, Li; Liu, Honggang; Liu, Pu; Liu, Tao; Liu, Sophia; Liu, Dazhong; Lo, Raymond; Lobanov, Victor; Loewenstein, David; Logovinsky, Veronika; Long, Xiaojing; Long, Ziyi; Looi, Jeffrey; Lu, Po-Haong; Lukic, Ana; Lull, Juan J.; Luo, Xiongjian; Lynch, John; Ma, Lei; Mackin, Scott; Mada, Marius; Magda, Sebastian; Maglio, Silvio; Maikusa, Norihide; Mak, Henry Ka-Fung; Malave, Vicente; Maldjian, Joseph; Mandal, Pravat; Mangin, Jean-Francois; Manjon, Jose; Mantri, Ninad; Manzour, Amir; Marambaud, Philippe; Marchewka, Artur; Marek, Kenneth; Markind, Samuel; Marshall, Gad; Martinez Torteya, Antonio; Mather, Mara; Mathis, Chester; Matoug, Sofia; Matsuo, Yoshiyuki; Mattei, Peter; Matthews, Dawn; McArdle, John; McCarroll, Steven; McEvoy, Linda; McGeown, William; McGonigle, John; McIntyre, John; McLaren, Donald; McQuail, Joseph; Meadowcroft, Mark; Meda, Shashwath; Mehta, Nirav; Melie-Garcia, Lester; Melrose, Rebecca; Mendonca, Brian; Menendez, Manuel; Meredith, Jere; Merrill, David; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Metti, Andrea; Meyer, Carsten; Mez, Jesse; Mickael, Guedj; Miftahof, Roustem; Mikhno, Arthur; Miller, David; Millikin, Colleen; Min, Ye; Mirza, Mubeena; Mistridis, Panagiota; Mitchell, Meghan; Mitsis, Effie; Mohan, Ananth; Moore, Dana; Moradi Birgani, Parmida; Moratal, David; Morimoto, Bruce; Mormino, Elizabeth; Mortamet, Benedicte; Moscato, Pablo; Mueller, Kathyrne; Mueller, Susanne; Mueller, Notger; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Mulder, Emma; Murayama, Shigeo; Murphy, Michael; Murray, Brian; Musiek, Erik; Myers, Amanda; Najafi, Shahla; Nazarparvar, Babak; Nazeri, Arash; Nettiksimmons, Jasmine; Neu, Scott; Ng, Yen-Bee; Nguyen, Nghi; Nguyen Xuan, Tuong; Nichols, Thomas; Nicodemus, Kristin; Niecko, Timothy; Nielsen, Casper; Notomi, Keiji; Nutakki, Gopi Chand; O'Bryant, Sid; O'Neil, Alison; Obisesan, Thomas; Oh, Dong Hoon; Oh, Joonmi; Okonkwo, Ozioma; Olde Rikkert, Marcel; Olmos, Salvador; Ortner, Marion; Ostrowitzki, Susanne; Oswald, Annahita; Ott, Brian; Ourselin, Sebastien; Ouyang, Gaoxiang; Paiva, Renata; Pan, Zhifang; Pande, Yogesh; Pardo, Jose; Pardoe, Heath; Park, Hyunjin; Park, Lovingly; Park, Moon Ho; Park, Sang hyun; Park, Kee Hyung; Park, Sujin; Parsey, Ramin; Parveen, Riswana; Paskavitz, James; Patel, Yogen; Patil, Manasi; Pawlak, Mikolaj; Payoux, Pierre; Pearson, Jim; Peavy, Guerry; Pell, Gaby; Peng, Yahong; Pennec, Xavier; Pepin, Jean louis; Perea, Rodrigo; Perneczky, Robert; Petitti, Diana; Petrella, Jeffrey; Peyrat, Jean-Marc; Pezoa, Jorge; Pham, Chi-Tuan; Phillips, Justin; Phillips, Nicole; Pierson, Ronald; Piovezan, Mauro; Podhorski, Adam; Pollari, Mika; Pontecorvo, Michael; Poppenk, Jordan; Posner, Holly; Potkin, Steven; Potter, Guy; Potter, Elizabeth; Poulin, Stephane; Prasad, Gautam; Prenger, Kurt; Prince, Jerry; Priya, Anandh; Puchakayala, Shashidhar Reddy; Qiu, Ruolun; Qiu, Anqi; Qiu, Wendy; Qualls, Constance Dean; Rabie, Huwaida; Rajeesh, Rajeesh; Rallabandi, V. P. Subramanyam; Ramage, Amy; Randolph, Christopher; Rao, Anil; Rao, Divya; Raubertas, Richard; Ray, Debashis; Razak, Hana; Redolfi, Alberto; Reed, Bruce; Reid, Andrew; Reilhac, Anthonin; Reinsberger, Claus; Restrepo, Lucas; Retico, Alessandra; Richards, John; Riddle, William; Ries, Michele; Rincon, Mariano; Rischall, Matt; Rizk-Jackson, Angela; Robieson, Weining; Rocha-Rego, Vanessa; Rogalski, Emily; Rogers, Elizabeth; Rojas, Ignacio; Rojas Balderrama, Javier; Romero, Klaus; Rorden, Chris; Rosand, Jonathan; Rosen, Allyson; Rosen, Ori; Rosenberg, Paul; Ross, David; Roubini, Eli; Rousseau, François; Rowe, Christopher; Rubin, Daniel; Rubright, Jonathan; Ruiz, Agustin; Rusinek, Henry; Ryan, Laurie; Saad, Ahmed; Sabbagh, Marway; Sabuncu, Mert; Sachs, Michael; Sadeghi, Ali; Said, Yasmine; Saint-Aubert, Laure; Sakata, Muneyuki; Salat, David; Salmon, David; Salter, Hugh; Samwald, Matthias; Sanchez, Luciano; Sanders, Elizabeth; Sanjo, Nobuo; Sarnel, Haldun; Sato, Hajime; Sato, Shinji; Saumier, Daniel; Savio, Alexandre; Sawada, Ikuhisa; Saykin, Andrew; Schaffer, J. David; Scharre, Douglas; Schegerin, Marc; Schlosser, Gretchen; Schmand, Ben; Schmansky, Nick; Schmidt, Mark; Schmidt-Wilcke, Tobias; Schneider, Lon; Schramm, Hauke; Schuerch, Markus; Schwartz, Eben; Schwartz, Craig; Schwarz, Adam; Seethamraju, Ravi; Seixas, Flavio; Selnes, Per; Senjem, Matthew; Senlin, Wang; Seo, Sang Won; Sethuraman, Gopalan; Sevigny, Jeffrey; Sfikas, Giorgos; Sghedoni, Roberto; Shah, Said Khalid; Shahbaba, Babak; Shams, Soheil; Shattuck, David; Shaw, Leslie; Sheela, Jaba; Shen, Weijia; Shen, Qian; Shera, David; Sherman, John; Sherva, Richard; Shi, Feng; Shukla, Vinay; Shuler, Catherine; Shulman, Joshua; Siegel, Rene; Siemers, Eric; Silveira, Margarida; Silver, Michael; Silverman, Daniel; Sim, Ida; Simmons, Andy; Simoes, Rita; Simon, Melvin; Simpson, Ivor; Singh, Simer Preet; Singh, Nikhil; Siuciak, Judy; Sjogren, Niclas; Skinner, Jeannine; Skup, Martha; Small, Gary; Smith, Michael; Smith, Benjamin; Smith, Charles; Smyth, Timothy; Snow, Sarah; Soares, Holly; Soldea, Octavian; Solomon, Paul; Solomon, Alan; Som, Subhojit; Song, Changhong; Song, Mingli; Sosova, Iveta; Soudah, Eduardo; Soydemir, Melih; Spampinato, Maria Vittoria; Spenger, Christian; Sperling, Reisa; Spiegel, Rene; Spies, Lothar; Squarcia, Sandro; Squire, Larry; Staff, Roger; Stern, Yaakov; Straw, Jack; Stricker, Nikki; Strittmatter, Stephen; Stühler, Elisabeth; Styren, Scot; Subramanian, Vijayalakshmi; Sugishita, Morihiro; Sukkar, Rafid; Sun, Jia; Sun, Ying; Sun, Yu; Sundell, Karen; Suri, Muhammad; Suzuki, Akiyuki; Svetnik, Vladimir; Swan, Melanie; Takahasi, Tetsuhiko; Takeuchi, Tomoko; Tanaka, Shoji; Tanchi, Chaturaphat; Tancredi, Daniel; Tao, Wenwen; Tao, Dacheng; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Teng, Edmond; Terlizzi, Rita; Thames, April; Thiele, Frank; Thomas, Benjamin; Thomas, Ronald; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Wesley; Thornton-Wells, Tricia; Thorvaldsson, Valgeir; Thurfjell, Lennart; Titeux, Laurence; Tokuda, Takahiko; Toledo, Juan B.; Tolli, Tuomas; Toma, Ahmed; Tomita, Naoki; Toro, Roberto; Torrealdea, Patxi; Tousian, Mona; Toussaint, Paule; Toyoshiba, Hiroyoshi; Tractenberg, Rochelle E.; Trittschuh, Emily; Trojanowski, John; Truran, Diana; Tsechpenakis, Gavriil; Tucker-Drob, Elliot; Tufail, Ahsan; Tung, Joyce; Turken, And; Ueda, Yoji; Ullrich, Lauren; Umadevi Venkataraju, Kannan; Umar, Nisser; Uzunbas, Gokhan; van de Nes, Joseph; van der Brug, Marcel; van Horn, John; van Leemput, Koen; van Train, Kenneth; van Zeeland, Ashley; Vasanawala, Minal; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Verwaerde, Philippe; Videbaek, Charlotte; Vidoni, Eric; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Visser, Pieter Jelle; Vitolo, Ottavio; Vounou, Maria; Wade, Sara; Walhovd, Kristine B.; Wan, Hong; Wang, Huanli; Wang, Yongmei Michelle; Wang, Yalin; Wang, Angela; Wang, Lei; Wang, Yue; Wang, Xu; Wang, Ze; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Tiger; Wang, Alex; Wang, Huali; Wang, Li-San; Wang, Wei; Wang, Li; Ward, Michael; Warfield, Simon; Waring, Stephen; Watanabe, Toshiyuki; Webb, David; Wei, Lili; Weiner, Michael; Wen, Shu-Hui; Wenjing, Li; Wenzel, Fabian; Westlye, Lars T.; Whitcher, Brandon; Whitlow, Christopher; Whitwell, Jennifer; Wilhelmsen, Kirk; Williams, David; Wilmot, Beth; Wimsatt, Matt; Wingo, Thomas; Wiste, Heather; Wolfson, Tanya; Wolke, Ira; Wolz, Robin; Woo, Jongwook; Woo, Ellen; Woods, Lynn; Worth, Andrew; Worth, Eric; Wouters, Hans; Wu, Teresa; Wu, Yi-Gen; Wu, Liang; Wu, Xiaoling; Wyman, Bradley; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Xiao, Guanghua; Xiao, Liu; Xie, Sharon; Xu, Shunbin; Xu, Ye; Xu, Yi-Zheng; Xu, Guofan; Xu, Jun; Yamane, Tomohiko; Yamashita, Fumio; Yan, Yunyi; Yan, Pingkun; Yang, Eric; Yang, Jinzhong; Yang, Qing X.; Yang, Zijiang; Yang, Guang; Yang, Zhitong; Yang, Wenlu; Ye, Liang; Ye, Byoung Seok; Ye, Jieping; Ye, Jong; Yee, Laura; Yesavage, Jerome; Ying, Song; Yoo, Bongin; Young, Jonathan; Yu, Shiwei; Yu, Dongchuan; Yuan, Guihong; Yuan, Kai; Yushkevich, Paul; Zaborszky, Laszlo; Zagorodnov, Vitali; Zagorski, Michael; Zawadzki, Rezi; Zeitzer, Jamie; Zelinski, Elizabeth; Zhang, Kurt; Zhang, Huixiong; Zhang, Tianhao; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Linda; Zhang, Lijun; Zhang, Zhiguo; Zhao, Qinying; Zhao, Jim; Zhao, Peng; Zhen, Xiantong; Zheng, Yuanjie; Zhijun, Yao; Zhou, Bin; Zhou, Sheng; Zhu, Wen; Zhu, Hongtu; Zhu, Wanlin; Zilka, Samantha; Zito, Giancarlo; Zou, Heng

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid-β accumulation in the brain is thought to be one of the earliest events in Alzheimer's disease, possibly leading to synaptic dysfunction, neurodegeneration and cognitive/functional decline. The earliest detectable changes seen with neuroimaging appear to be amyloid-β accumulation detected by

  1. Amyloid Precursor Protein and Proinflammatory Changes Are Regulated in Brain and Adipose Tissue in a Murine Model of High Fat Diet-Induced Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, Kendra L.; Floden, Angela M.; Adhikari, Ramchandra; Golovko, Mikhail Y.; Combs, Colin K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Middle age obesity is recognized as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD) although a mechanistic linkage remains unclear. Based upon the fact that obese adipose tissue and AD brains are both areas of proinflammatory change, a possible common event is chronic inflammation. Since an autosomal dominant form of AD is associated with mutations in the gene coding for the ubiquitously expressed transmembrane protein, amyloid precursor protein (APP) and recent evidence demonstrates increased APP levels in adipose tissue during obesity it is feasible that APP serves some function in both disease conditions. Methodology/Principal Findings To determine whether diet-induced obesity produced proinflammatory changes and altered APP expression in brain versus adipose tissue, 6 week old C57BL6/J mice were maintained on a control or high fat diet for 22 weeks. Protein levels and cell-specific APP expression along with markers of inflammation and immune cell activation were compared between hippocampus, abdominal subcutaneous fat and visceral pericardial fat. APP stimulation-dependent changes in macrophage and adipocyte culture phenotype were examined for comparison to the in vivo changes. Conclusions/Significance Adipose tissue and brain from high fat diet fed animals demonstrated increased TNF-α and microglial and macrophage activation. Both brains and adipose tissue also had elevated APP levels localizing to neurons and macrophage/adipocytes, respectively. APP agonist antibody stimulation of macrophage cultures increased specific cytokine secretion with no obvious effects on adipocyte culture phenotype. These data support the hypothesis that high fat diet-dependent obesity results in concomitant pro-inflammatory changes in brain and adipose tissue that is characterized, in part, by increased levels of APP that may be contributing specifically to inflammatory changes that occur. PMID:22276186

  2. Interleukins 1alpha and 1beta secreted by some melanoma cell lines strongly reduce expression of MITF-M and melanocyte differentiation antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholmanskikh, Olga; van Baren, Nicolas; Brasseur, Francis; Ottaviani, Sabrina; Vanacker, Julie; Arts, Nathalie; van der Bruggen, Pierre; Coulie, Pierre; De Plaen, Etienne

    2010-10-01

    We report that melanoma cell lines expressing the interleukin-1 receptor exhibit 4- to 10-fold lower levels of mRNA of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF-M) when treated with interleukin-1beta. This effect is NF-kappaB and JNK-dependent. MITF-M regulates the expression of melanocyte differentiation genes such as MLANA, tyrosinase and gp100, which encode antigens recognized on melanoma cells by autologous cytolytic T lymphocytes. Accordingly, treating some melanoma cells with IL-1beta reduced by 40-100% their ability to activate such antimelanoma cytolytic T lymphocytes. Finally, we observed large amounts of biologically active IL-1alpha or IL-1beta secreted by two melanoma cell lines that did not express MITF-M, suggesting an autocrine MITF-M downregulation. We estimate that approximately 13% of melanoma cell lines are MITF-M-negative and secrete IL-1 cytokines. These results indicate that the repression of melanocyte-differentiation genes by IL-1 produced by stromal cells or by tumor cells themselves may represent an additional mechanism of melanoma immune escape.

  3. Amyloid beta inhibits olfactory bulb activity and the ability to smell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynaldo Alvarado-Martínez

    Full Text Available Early olfactory dysfunction has been consistently reported in both Alzheimer's disease (AD and in transgenic mice that reproduce some features of this disease. In AD transgenic mice, alteration in olfaction has been associated with increased levels of soluble amyloid beta protein (Aβ as well as with alterations in the oscillatory network activity recorded in the olfactory bulb (OB and in the piriform cortex. However, since AD is a multifactorial disease and transgenic mice suffer a variety of adaptive changes, it is still unknown if soluble Aβ, by itself, is responsible for OB dysfunction both at electrophysiological and behavioral levels. Thus, here we tested whether or not Aβ directly affects OB network activity in vitro in slices obtained from mice and rats and if it affects olfactory ability in these rodents. Our results show that Aβ decreases, in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, the network activity of OB slices at clinically relevant concentrations (low nM and in a reversible manner. Moreover, we found that intrabulbar injection of Aβ decreases the olfactory ability of rodents two weeks after application, an effect that is not related to alterations in motor performance or motivation to seek food and that correlates with the presence of Aβ deposits. Our results indicate that Aβ disrupts, at clinically relevant concentrations, the network activity of the OB in vitro and can trigger a disruption in olfaction. These findings open the possibility of exploring the cellular mechanisms involved in early pathological AD as an approach to reduce or halt its progress.

  4. Toxic β-Amyloid (Aβ) Alzheimer's Ion Channels: From Structure to Function and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussinov, Ruth

    2012-02-01

    Full-length amyloid beta peptides (Aβ1-40/42) form neuritic amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and are implicated in AD pathology. Recent biophysical and cell biological studies suggest a direct mechanism of amyloid beta toxicity -- ion channel mediated loss of calcium homeostasis. Truncated amyloid beta fragments (Aβ11-42 and Aβ17-42), commonly termed as non-amyloidogenic are also found in amyloid plaques of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in the preamyloid lesions of Down's syndrome (DS), a model system for early onset AD study. Very little is known about the structure and activity of these smaller peptides although they could be key AD and DS pathological agents. Using complementary techniques of explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, atomic force microscopy (AFM), channel conductance measurements, cell calcium uptake assays, neurite degeneration and cell death assays, we have shown that non-amyloidogenic Aβ9-42 and Aβ17-42 peptides form ion channels with loosely attached subunits and elicit single channel conductances. The subunits appear mobile suggesting insertion of small oligomers, followed by dynamic channel assembly and dissociation. These channels allow calcium uptake in APP-deficient cells and cause neurite degeneration in human cortical neurons. Channel conductance, calcium uptake and neurite degeneration are selectively inhibited by zinc, a blocker of amyloid ion channel activity. Thus truncated Aβ fragments could account for undefined roles played by full length Aβs and provide a novel mechanism of AD and DS pathology. The emerging picture from our large-scale simulations is that toxic ion channels formed by β-sheets are highly polymorphic, and spontaneously break into loosely interacting dynamic units (though still maintaining ion channel structures as imaged with AFM), that associate and dissociate leading to toxic ion flux. This sharply contrasts intact conventional gated ion channels that consist of tightly

  5. The Kunitz-protease inhibitor domain in amyloid precursor protein reduces cellular mitochondrial enzymes expression and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Li-Min; Lim, Mei-Li; Wong, Boon-Seng

    2013-08-09

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a prominent feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and this can be contributed by aberrant metabolic enzyme function. But, the mechanism causing this enzymatic impairment is unclear. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is known to be alternatively spliced to produce three major isoforms in the brain (APP695, APP751, APP770). Both APP770 and APP751 contain the Kunitz Protease Inhibitory (KPI) domain, but the former also contain an extra OX-2 domain. APP695 on the other hand, lacks both domains. In AD, up-regulation of the KPI-containing APP isoforms has been reported. But the functional contribution of this elevation is unclear. In the present study, we have expressed and compared the effect of the non-KPI containing APP695 and the KPI-containing APP751 on mitochondrial function. We found that the KPI-containing APP751 significantly decreased the expression of three major mitochondrial metabolic enzymes; citrate synthase, succinate dehydrogenase and cytochrome c oxidase (COX IV). This reduction lowers the NAD(+)/NADH ratio, COX IV activity and mitochondrial membrane potential. Overall, this study demonstrated that up-regulation of the KPI-containing APP isoforms is likely to contribute to the impairment of metabolic enzymes and mitochondrial function in AD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Methods for labeling .beta.-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrio, Jorge R.; Petric, Andrej; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Small, Gary W.; Cole, Gregory M.; Huang, Sung-Cheng

    2001-01-01

    A method for labeling .beta.-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in vivo and in vitro, comprises contacting a compound of formula (I): ##STR1## with mammalian tissue. In formula (I), R.sub.1 is selected from the group consisting of --C(O)-alkyl, --C(O)-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --C(O)O-alkyl, --C(O)O-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --C.dbd.C(CN).sub.2 -alkyl, --C.dbd.C(CN).sub.2 -alkylenyl-R.sub.4 , ##STR2## R.sub.4 is a radical selected from the group consisting of alkyl, substituted alkyl, aryl and substituted aryl; R.sub.5, is a radical selected from the group consisting of --NH.sub.2, --OH, --SH, --NH-alkyl, --NHR.sub.4, --NH-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --O-alkyl, --O-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --S-alkyl, and --S-alkylenyl-R.sub.4 ; R.sub.6 is a radical selected from the group consisting of --CN, --COOH, --C(O)O-alkyl, --C(O)O-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --C(O)-alkyl, --C(O)-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --C(O)-halogen, --C(O)NH , --C(O)NH-alkyl, --C(O)NH-alkylenyl-R.sub.4 ; R.sub.7 is a radical selected from the group consisting of O, NH, and S; and R.sub.8 is N, O or S. R.sub.2 and R.sub.3 are each independently selected from the group consisting of alkyl and alkylenyl-R.sub.10, wherein R.sub.10 is selected from the group consisting of --OH, --OTs, halogen, spiperone, spiperone ketal and spiperone-3-yl. Alternatively, R.sub.2 and R.sub.3 together form a heterocyclic ring, optionally substituted with at least one radical selected from the group consisting of alkyl, alkoxy, OH, OTs, halogen, alkylenyl-R.sub.10, carbonyl, spiperone, spiperone ketal and spiperone-3-yl. In the compounds of formula (I), one or more of the hydrogen, halogen or carbon atoms can, optionally, be replaced with a radiolabel.

  7. Compositions for labeling .beta.-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrio, Jorge R [Agoura Hills, CA; Petric, Andrej [Ljubljana, SI; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar [Los Angeles, CA; Small, Gary W [Los Angeles, CA; Cole, Gregory M [Santa Monica, CA; Huang, Sung-Cheng [Sherman Oaks, CA

    2008-03-11

    Compositions useful for labeling .beta.-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles are provided. The compositions comprises compounds of formula (I): ##STR00001## wherein R.sub.1 is selected from the group consisting of --C(O)-alkyl, --C(O)-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --C(O)O-alkyl, --C(O)O-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --C.dbd.C(CN).sub.2-alkyl, --C.dbd.C(CN).sub.2-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, ##STR00002## wherein R.sub.4 is a radical selected from the group consisting of alkyl, substituted alkyl, aryl and substituted aryl; R.sub.5 is a radical selected from the group consisting of --NH.sub.2, --OH, --SH, --NH-alkyl, --NHR.sub.4, --NH-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --O-alkyl, --O-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --S-alkyl, and --S-alkylenyl-R.sub.4; R.sub.6 is a radical selected from the group consisting of --CN, --COOH, --C(O)O-alkyl, --C(O)O-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --C(O)-alkyl, --C(O)-alkylenyl-R.sub.4, --C(O)-halogen, --C(O)NH-alkyl, --C(O)NH-alkylenyl-R.sub.4 and --C(O)NH.sub.2; R.sub.7 is a radical selected from the group consisting of O, NH, and S; and R.sub.8 is N, O or S; and R.sub.2 is selected from the group consisting of alkyl and alkylenyl-R.sub.10 and R.sub.3 is alkylenyl-R.sub.10, wherein R.sub.10 is selected from the group consisting of --OH, --OTs, halogen, spiperone, spiperone ketal, and spiperone-3-yl, or R.sub.2 and R.sub.3 together form a heterocyclic ring, optionally substituted with at least one radical selected from the group consisting of alkyl, alkoxy, OH, OTs, halogen, alkyl-R.sub.10, carbonyl, spiperone, spiperone ketal and spiperone-3-yl, and further wherein one or more of the hydrogen, halogen or carbon atoms are optionally replaced with a radiolabel.

  8. Pleomorphic copper coordination by Alzheimer's disease amyloid-beta peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Simon C; Noble, Christopher J; Masters, Colin L; Hanson, Graeme R; Barnham, Kevin J

    2009-01-28

    Numerous conflicting models have been proposed regarding the nature of the Cu(2+) coordination environment of the amyloid beta (Abeta) peptide, the causative agent of Alzheimer's disease. This study used multifrequency CW-EPR spectroscopy to directly resolve the superhyperfine interactions between Cu(2+) and the ligand nuclei of Abeta, thereby avoiding ambiguities associated with introducing point mutations. Using a library of Abeta16 analogues with site-specific (15)N-labeling at Asp1, His6, His13, and His14, numerical simulations of the superhyperfine resonances delineated two independent 3N1O Cu(2+) coordination modes, {N(a)(D1), O, N(epsilon)(H6), N(epsilon)(H13)} (component Ia) and {N(a)(D1), O, N(epsilon)(H6), N(epsilon)(H14)} (component Ib), between pH 6-7. A third coordination mode (component II) was identified at pH 8.0, and simulation of the superhyperfine resonances indicated a 3N1O coordination sphere involving nitrogen ligation by His6, His13, and His14. No differences were observed upon (17)O-labeling of the phenolic oxygen of Tyr10, confirming it is not a key oxygen ligand in the physiological pH range. Hyperfine sublevel correlation (HYSCORE) spectroscopy, in conjunction with site-specific (15)N-labeling, provided additional support for the common role of His6 in components Ia and Ib, and for the assignment of a {O, N(epsilon)(H6), N(epsilon)(H13), N(epsilon)(H14)} coordination sphere to component II. HYSCORE studies of a peptide analogue with selective (13)C-labeling of Asp1 revealed (13)C cross-peaks characteristic of equatorial coordination by the carboxylate oxygen of Asp1 in component Ia/b coordination. The direct resolution of Cu(2+) ligand interactions, together with the key finding that component I is composed of two distinct coordination modes, provides valuable insight into a range of conflicting ligand assignments and highlights the complexity of Cu(2+)/Abeta interactions.

  9. Protection against β-amyloid neurotoxicity by a non-toxic endogenous N-terminal β-amyloid fragment and its active hexapeptide core sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest, Kelly H; Alfulaij, Naghum; Arora, Komal; Taketa, Ruth; Sherrin, Tessi; Todorovic, Cedomir; Lawrence, James L M; Yoshikawa, Gene T; Ng, Ho-Leung; Hruby, Victor J; Nichols, Robert A

    2018-01-01

    High levels (μM) of beta amyloid (Aβ) oligomers are known to trigger neurotoxic effects, leading to synaptic impairment, behavioral deficits, and apoptotic cell death. The hydrophobic C-terminal domain of Aβ, together with sequences critical for oligomer formation, is essential for this neurotoxicity. However, Aβ at low levels (pM-nM) has been shown to function as a positive neuromodulator and this activity resides in the hydrophilic N-terminal domain of Aβ. An N-terminal Aβ fragment (1-15/16), found in cerebrospinal fluid, was also shown to be a highly active neuromodulator and to reverse Aβ-induced impairments of long-term potentiation. Here, we show the impact of this N-terminal Aβ fragment and a shorter hexapeptide core sequence in the Aβ fragment (Aβcore: 10-15) to protect or reverse Aβ-induced neuronal toxicity, fear memory deficits and apoptotic death. The neuroprotective effects of the N-terminal Aβ fragment and Aβcore on Aβ-induced changes in mitochondrial function, oxidative stress, and apoptotic neuronal death were demonstrated via mitochondrial membrane potential, live reactive oxygen species, DNA fragmentation and cell survival assays using a model neuroblastoma cell line (differentiated NG108-15) and mouse hippocampal neuron cultures. The protective action of the N-terminal Aβ fragment and Aβcore against spatial memory processing deficits in amyloid precursor protein/PSEN1 (5XFAD) mice was demonstrated in contextual fear conditioning. Stabilized derivatives of the N-terminal Aβcore were also shown to be fully protective against Aβ-triggered oxidative stress. Together, these findings indicate an endogenous neuroprotective role for the N-terminal Aβ fragment, while active stabilized N-terminal Aβcore derivatives offer the potential for therapeutic application. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  10. Rational heterodoxy: cholesterol reformation of the amyloid doctrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castello, Michael A; Soriano, Salvador

    2013-01-01

    According to the amyloid cascade hypothesis, accumulation of the amyloid peptide Aβ, derived by proteolytic processing from the amyloid precursor protein (APP), is the key pathogenic trigger in Alzheimer's disease (AD). This view has led researchers for more than two decades and continues to be the most influential model of neurodegeneration. Nevertheless, close scrutiny of the current evidence does not support a central pathogenic role for Aβ in late-onset AD. Furthermore, the amyloid cascade hypothesis lacks a theoretical foundation from which the physiological generation of Aβ can be understood, and therapeutic approaches based on its premises have failed. We present an alternative model of neurodegeneration, in which sustained cholesterol-associated neuronal distress is the most likely pathogenic trigger in late-onset AD, directly causing oxidative stress, inflammation and tau hyperphosphorylation. In this scenario, Aβ generation is part of an APP-driven adaptive response to the initial cholesterol distress, and its accumulation is neither central to, nor a requirement for, the initiation of the disease. Our model provides a theoretical framework that places APP as a regulator of cholesterol homeostasis, accounts for the generation of Aβ in both healthy and demented brains, and provides suitable targets for therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Methods to uncover an antibody epitope in the KPI domain of Alzheimer's amyloid precursor protein for immunohistochemistry in human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, E; Pearson, R C; Parkinson, D

    1999-11-15

    A novel polyclonal antibody (Ab993), specific for a KPI domain epitope of APP, was characterised for use in immunoprecipitation, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Conditioned medium from NTera2/D1 cells was used for immunoprecipitation and Western blots. Paraffin-embedded human brain sections were used for immunohistochemistry. The antibody recognised KPI-containing APP on Western blots after standard solubilisation but immunoprecipitation of soluble APP required reduction with 2-mercaptoethanol followed by alkylation of reduced sulphydryl bonds with sodium iodoacetate. Immunohistochemical staining of human brain sections was significantly enhanced by this pre-treatment. Microwaving of sections also increased immunolabelling, by a mechanism that was additive to reduction and alkylation. Incubation in 80% formic acid did not confer any enhancement of immunoreactivity. Ab993, applied with the methods reported here, is expected to be valuable in investigations of the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease to determine the source of the beta-amyloid peptide.

  12. Accumulation of Exogenous Amyloid-Beta Peptide in Hippocampal Mitochondria Causes Their Dysfunction: A Protective Role for Melatonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Rosales-Corral

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid-beta (Aβ pathology is related to mitochondrial dysfunction accompanied by energy reduction and an elevated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Monomers and oligomers of Aβ have been found inside mitochondria where they accumulate in a time-dependent manner as demonstrated in transgenic mice and in Alzheimer’s disease (AD brain. We hypothesize that the internalization of extracellular Aβ aggregates is the major cause of mitochondrial damage and here we report that following the injection of fibrillar Aβ into the hippocampus, there is severe axonal damage which is accompanied by the entrance of Aβ into the cell. Thereafter, Aβ appears in mitochondria where it is linked to alterations in the ionic gradient across the inner mitochondrial membrane. This effect is accompanied by disruption of subcellular structure, oxidative stress, and a significant reduction in both the respiratory control ratio and in the hydrolytic activity of ATPase. Orally administrated melatonin reduced oxidative stress, improved the mitochondrial respiratory control ratio, and ameliorated the energy imbalance.

  13. Amyloid PET in European and North American cohorts; and exploring age as a limit to clinical use of amyloid imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiotis, Konstantinos [Karolinska Institutet, Department of NVS, Center for Alzheimer Research, Translational Alzheimer Neurobiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Carter, Stephen F. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of NVS, Center for Alzheimer Research, Translational Alzheimer Neurobiology, Stockholm (Sweden); University of Manchester, Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, Institute of Brain, Behaviour and Mental Health, Manchester (United Kingdom); Farid, Karim [Karolinska Institutet, Department of NVS, Center for Alzheimer Research, Translational Alzheimer Neurobiology, Stockholm (Sweden); APHP, Hotel-Dieu Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Savitcheva, Irina [Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Department of Radiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Nordberg, Agneta [Karolinska Institutet, Department of NVS, Center for Alzheimer Research, Translational Alzheimer Neurobiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Collaboration: for the Diagnostic Molecular Imaging (DiMI) network and the Alzheimer' s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    2015-09-15

    Several radiotracers that bind to fibrillar amyloid-beta in the brain have been developed and used in various patient cohorts. This study aimed to investigate the comparability of two amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) tracers as well as examine how age affects the discriminative properties of amyloid PET imaging. Fifty-one healthy controls (HCs), 72 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 90 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) from a European cohort were scanned with [11C]Pittsburgh compound-B (PIB) and compared with an age-, sex- and disease severity-matched population of 51 HC, 72 MCI and 84 AD patients from a North American cohort who were scanned with [18F]Florbetapir. An additional North American population of 246 HC, 342 MCI and 138 AD patients with a Florbetapir scan was split by age (55-75 vs 76-93 y) into groups matched for gender and disease severity. PET template-based analyses were used to quantify regional tracer uptake. The mean regional uptake patterns were similar and strong correlations were found between the two tracers across the regions of interest in HC (ρ = 0.671, p = 0.02), amyloid-positive MCI (ρ = 0.902, p < 0.001) and AD patients (ρ = 0.853, p < 0.001). The application of the Florbetapir cut-off point resulted in a higher proportion of amyloid-positive HC and a lower proportion of amyloid-positive AD patients in the older group (28 and 30 %, respectively) than in the younger group (19 and 20 %, respectively). These results illustrate the comparability of Florbetapir and PIB in unrelated but matched patient populations. The role of amyloid PET imaging becomes increasingly important with increasing age in the diagnostic assessment of clinically impaired patients. (orig.)

  14. Amyloid PET in European and North American cohorts; and exploring age as a limit to clinical use of amyloid imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiotis, Konstantinos; Carter, Stephen F.; Farid, Karim; Savitcheva, Irina; Nordberg, Agneta

    2015-01-01

    Several radiotracers that bind to fibrillar amyloid-beta in the brain have been developed and used in various patient cohorts. This study aimed to investigate the comparability of two amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) tracers as well as examine how age affects the discriminative properties of amyloid PET imaging. Fifty-one healthy controls (HCs), 72 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 90 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) from a European cohort were scanned with [11C]Pittsburgh compound-B (PIB) and compared with an age-, sex- and disease severity-matched population of 51 HC, 72 MCI and 84 AD patients from a North American cohort who were scanned with [18F]Florbetapir. An additional North American population of 246 HC, 342 MCI and 138 AD patients with a Florbetapir scan was split by age (55-75 vs 76-93 y) into groups matched for gender and disease severity. PET template-based analyses were used to quantify regional tracer uptake. The mean regional uptake patterns were similar and strong correlations were found between the two tracers across the regions of interest in HC (ρ = 0.671, p = 0.02), amyloid-positive MCI (ρ = 0.902, p < 0.001) and AD patients (ρ = 0.853, p < 0.001). The application of the Florbetapir cut-off point resulted in a higher proportion of amyloid-positive HC and a lower proportion of amyloid-positive AD patients in the older group (28 and 30 %, respectively) than in the younger group (19 and 20 %, respectively). These results illustrate the comparability of Florbetapir and PIB in unrelated but matched patient populations. The role of amyloid PET imaging becomes increasingly important with increasing age in the diagnostic assessment of clinically impaired patients. (orig.)

  15. Fibronectin regulates the activation of THP-1 cells by TGF-beta1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, A C; Fu, L

    2001-03-01

    To determine how fibronectin regulates the immunomodulatory effects of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta on THP-1 cells. THP-1 monocytic cell line. THP-1 cells were primed for 48 h in the presence or absence of 250 pM TGF-beta1. Assays or assessments carried out, together with statistical test applied. We found that adherence to fibronectin dramatically modulates the effects of TGF-beta1 on the human monocytic cell line THP-1. TGF-beta did not significantly affect constitutive interleukin (IL)-8 secretion or IL-1beta-induced IL-8 secretion from suspended cells. In contrast, TGF-beta stimulated IL-8 secretion as well as augmented IL-1beta-induced IL-8 secretion from adherent cells. The differential effects of TGF-beta1 on IL-8 secretion from suspended and adherent cells could not be explained by differences in IL-1 receptor antagonist production. The effects of fibronectin on TGF-beta1 induced IL-8 secretion from THP-1 cells were mimicked by adhesion to immobilized anti-a4beta1 integrin antibody and to a fibronectin fragment containing the CS-1 domain. These results indicate that alpha4beta1-mediated adhesion to fibronectin may play a key role during inflammation by profoundly influencing the effects of TGF-beta1 on monocytes.

  16. N-Benzylhydroxylamine addition to beta-aryl enoates. Enantioselective synthesis of beta-aryl-beta-amino acid precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibi; Liu

    2000-10-19

    Chiral Lewis acid catalyzed N-benzylhydroxylamine addition to pyrrolidinone-derived enoates afforded beta-aryl-beta-amino acid derivatives in high enantiomeric purity with moderate to very good chemical efficiency.

  17. A sensitive and selective electrochemical biosensor for the determination of beta-amyloid oligomer by inhibiting the peptide-triggered in situ assembly of silver nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Y

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Yun Xing,1,2 Xiao-Zhen Feng,2 Lipeng Zhang,1 Jiating Hou,2 Guo-Cheng Han,2 Zhencheng Chen2 1Henan Province of Key Laboratory of New Optoelectronic Functional Materials, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Anyang Normal University, Anyang, 2School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin, Guangxi, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Soluble beta-amyloid (Aβ oligomer is believed to be the most important toxic species in the brain of Alzheimer’s disease (AD patients. Thus, it is critical to develop a simple method for the selective detection of Aβ oligomer with low cost and high sensitivity. In this paper, we report an electrochemical method for the detection of Aβ oligomer with a peptide as the bioreceptor and silver nanoparticle (AgNP aggregates as the redox reporters. This strategy is based on the conversion of AgNP-based colorimetric assay into electrochemical analysis. Specifically, the peptide immobilized on the electrode surface and presented in solution triggered together the in situ formation of AgNP aggregates, which produced a well-defined electrochemical signal. However, the specific binding of Aβ oligomer to the immobilized peptide prevented the in situ assembly of AgNPs. As a result, a poor electrochemical signal was observed. The detection limit of the method was found to be 6 pM. Furthermore, the amenability of this method for the analysis of Aβ oligomer in serum and artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF samples was demonstrated. Keywords: electrochemical biosensors, Alzheimer’s disease, beta-amyloid oligomer, peptide, silver nanoparticles

  18. Measuring phospholipase D activity in insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cells and insulin-responsive muscle cells and adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzolli, Rosanna; Huang, Ping; Teng, Shuzhi; Hughes, William E

    2009-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is an enzyme producing phosphatidic acid and choline through hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine. The enzyme has been identified as a member of a variety of signal transduction cascades and as a key regulator of numerous intracellular vesicle trafficking processes. A role for PLD in regulating glucose homeostasis is emerging as the enzyme has recently been identified in events regulating exocytosis of insulin from pancreatic beta-cells and also in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake through controlling GLUT4 vesicle exocytosis in muscle and adipose tissue. We present methodologies for assessing cellular PLD activity in secretagogue-stimulated insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cells and also insulin-stimulated adipocyte and muscle cells, two of the principal insulin-responsive cell types controlling blood glucose levels.

  19. Quantification of gamma-secretase modulation differentiates inhibitor compound selectivity between two substrates Notch and amyloid precursor protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Ting

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deposition of amyloid-β protein (Aβ is a major pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Aβ is generated from γ-secretase cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP. In addition to APP, γ-secretase also cleaves other type I integral membrane proteins, including the Notch receptor, a key molecule involved in embryonic development. Results To explore selective γ-secretase inhibitors, a combination of five methods was used to systematically determine these inhibitors' profiles on the γ-secretase cleavage of APP and Notch. When two potent γ-secretase inhibitors, compound E (cpd E and DAPT, were used in a conventional in vitro γ-secretase activity assay, cpd E completely blocked Aβ generation from the cleavage of substrate APP C100, but only had a minor effect on Notch cleavage and NICD generation. Next, cpd E and DAPT were applied to HEK293 cells expressing a truncated Notch substrate NotchΔE. Both cpd E and DAPT were more potent in blocking Aβ generation than NICD generation. Third, a reporter construct was created that carried the NICD targeting promoter with three Su(H binding sequences followed by the luciferase gene. We found that the inhibition of NICD generation by cpd E and DAPT was consistent with the reduced expression of luciferase gene driven by this Notch targeting promoter. Fourth, levels of "Notch-Aβ-like" (Nβ* peptide derived from two previously reported chimeric APP with its transmembrane domain or the juxtamembrane portion replaced by the Notch sequence were quantified. Measurement of Nβ* peptides by ELISA confirmed that EC50's of cpd E were much higher for Nβ* than Aβ. Finally, the expression levels of Notch target gene her6 in cpd E or DAPT-treated zebrafish were correlated with the degree of tail curvature due to defective somitogenesis, a well characterized Notch phenotype in zebrafish. Conclusion Our ELISA-based quantification of Aβ and Nβ* in combination with the test in

  20. Partial structure of the phylloxin gene from the giant monkey frog, Phyllomedusa bicolor: parallel cloning of precursor cDNA and genomic DNA from lyophilized skin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tianbao; Gagliardo, Ron; Walker, Brian; Zhou, Mei; Shaw, Chris

    2005-12-01

    Phylloxin is a novel prototype antimicrobial peptide from the skin of Phyllomedusa bicolor. Here, we describe parallel identification and sequencing of phylloxin precursor transcript (mRNA) and partial gene structure (genomic DNA) from the same sample of lyophilized skin secretion using our recently-described cloning technique. The open-reading frame of the phylloxin precursor was identical in nucleotide sequence to that previously reported and alignment with the nucleotide sequence derived from genomic DNA indicated the presence of a 175 bp intron located in a near identical position to that found in the dermaseptins. The highly-conserved structural organization of skin secretion peptide genes in P. bicolor can thus be extended to include that encoding phylloxin (plx). These data further reinforce our assertion that application of the described methodology can provide robust genomic/transcriptomic/peptidomic data without the need for specimen sacrifice.

  1. Ellagic acid promotes A{beta}42 fibrillization and inhibits A{beta}42-induced neurotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Ying [Department of Histology and Embryology, College of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); Yang, Shi-gao; Du, Xue-ting; Zhang, Xi; Sun, Xiao-xia; Zhao, Min [Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); Sun, Gui-yuan, E-mail: sungy2004@sohu.com [Department of Histology and Embryology, College of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Liu, Rui-tian, E-mail: rtliu@tsinghua.edu.cn [Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2009-12-25

    Smaller, soluble oligomers of {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) play a critical role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Selective inhibition of A{beta} oligomer formation provides an optimum target for AD therapy. Some polyphenols have potent anti-amyloidogenic activities and protect against A{beta} neurotoxicity. Here, we tested the effects of ellagic acid (EA), a polyphenolic compound, on A{beta}42 aggregation and neurotoxicity in vitro. EA promoted A{beta} fibril formation and significant oligomer loss, contrary to previous results that polyphenols inhibited A{beta} aggregation. The results of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Western blot displayed more fibrils in A{beta}42 samples co-incubated with EA in earlier phases of aggregation. Consistent with the hypothesis that plaque formation may represent a protective mechanism in which the body sequesters toxic A{beta} aggregates to render them harmless, our MTT results showed that EA could significantly reduce A{beta}42-induced neurotoxicity toward SH-SY5Y cells. Taken together, our results suggest that EA, an active ingredient in many fruits and nuts, may have therapeutic potential in AD.

  2. Neuronal Store-Operated Calcium Entry and Mushroom Spine Loss in Amyloid Precursor Protein Knock-In Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Wu, Lili; Pchitskaya, Ekaterina; Zakharova, Olga; Saito, Takashi; Saido, Takaomi; Bezprozvanny, Ilya

    2015-09-30

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common reason for elderly dementia in the world. We proposed that memory loss in AD is related to destabilization of mushroom postsynaptic spines involved in long-term memory storage. We demonstrated previously that stromal interaction molecule 2 (STIM2)-regulated neuronal store-operated calcium entry (nSOC) in postsynaptic spines play a key role in stability of mushroom spines by maintaining activity of synaptic Ca(2+)/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII). Furthermore, we demonstrated previously that the STIM2-nSOC-CaMKII pathway is downregulated in presenilin 1 M146V knock-in (PS1-M146V KI) mouse model of AD, leading to loss of hippocampal mushroom spines in this model. In the present study, we demonstrate that hippocampal mushroom postsynaptic spines are also lost in amyloid precursor protein knock-in (APPKI) mouse model of AD. We demonstrated that loss of mushroom spines occurs as a result of accumulation of extracellular β-amyloid 42 in APPKI culture media. Our results indicate that extracellular Aβ42 acts by overactivating mGluR5 receptor in APPKI neurons, leading to elevated Ca(2+) levels in endoplasmic reticulum, compensatory downregulation of STIM2 expression, impaired synaptic nSOC, and reduced CaMKII activity. Pharmacological inhibition of mGluR5 or overexpression of STIM2 rescued synaptic nSOC and prevented mushroom spine loss in APPKI hippocampal neurons. Our results indicate that downregulation of synaptic STIM2-nSOC-CaMKII pathway causes loss of mushroom synaptic spines in both presenilin and APPKI mouse models of AD. We propose that modulators/activators of this pathway may have a potential therapeutic value for treatment of memory loss in AD. Significance statement: A direct connection between amyloid-induced synaptic mushroom spine loss and neuronal store-operated calcium entry pathway is shown. These results provide strong support for the calcium hypothesis of neurodegeneration and further validate the synaptic

  3. Positive evolutionary selection of an HD motif on Alzheimer precursor protein orthologues suggests a functional role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklós, István; Zádori, Zoltán

    2012-02-01

    HD amino acid duplex has been found in the active center of many different enzymes. The dyad plays remarkably different roles in their catalytic processes that usually involve metal coordination. An HD motif is positioned directly on the amyloid beta fragment (Aβ) and on the carboxy-terminal region of the extracellular domain (CAED) of the human amyloid precursor protein (APP) and a taxonomically well defined group of APP orthologues (APPOs). In human Aβ HD is part of a presumed, RGD-like integrin-binding motif RHD; however, neither RHD nor RXD demonstrates reasonable conservation in APPOs. The sequences of CAEDs and the position of the HD are not particularly conserved either, yet we show with a novel statistical method using evolutionary modeling that the presence of HD on CAEDs cannot be the result of neutral evolutionary forces (pHD motif is underrepresented in the proteomes of all species of the animal kingdom. Position migration can be explained by high probability occurrence of multiple copies of HD on intermediate sequences, from which only one is kept by selective evolutionary forces, in a similar way as in the case of the "transcription binding site turnover." CAED of all APP orthologues and homologues are predicted to bind metal ions including Amyloid-like protein 1 (APLP1) and Amyloid-like protein 2 (APLP2). Our results suggest that HDs on the CAEDs are most probably key components of metal-binding domains, which facilitate and/or regulate inter- or intra-molecular interactions in a metal ion-dependent or metal ion concentration-dependent manner. The involvement of naturally occurring mutations of HD (Tottori (D7N) and English (H6R) mutations) in early onset Alzheimer's disease gives additional support to our finding that HD has an evolutionary preserved function on APPOs.

  4. Quantification of beta-cell function during IVGTT in Type II and non-diabetic subjects: assessment of insulin secretion by mathematical methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjems, L L; Vølund, A; Madsbad, Sten

    2001-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We compared four methods to assess their accuracy in measuring insulin secretion during an intravenous glucose tolerance test in patients with Type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus and with varying beta-cell function and matched control subjects. METHODS: Eight control...... subjects and eight Type II diabetic patients underwent an intravenous glucose tolerance test with tolbutamide and an intravenous bolus injection of C-peptide to assess C-peptide kinetics. Insulin secretion rates were determined by the Eaton deconvolution (reference method), the Insulin SECretion method...... (ISEC) based on population kinetic parameters as well as one-compartment and two-compartment versions of the combined model of insulin and C-peptide kinetics. To allow a comparison of the accuracy of the four methods, fasting rates and amounts of insulin secreted during the first phase (0-10 min...

  5. Chemical Kinetics for Bridging Molecular Mechanisms and Macroscopic Measurements of Amyloid Fibril Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaels, Thomas C T; Šarić, Anđela; Habchi, Johnny; Chia, Sean; Meisl, Georg; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M; Knowles, Tuomas P J

    2018-04-20

    Understanding how normally soluble peptides and proteins aggregate to form amyloid fibrils is central to many areas of modern biomolecular science, ranging from the development of functional biomaterials to the design of rational therapeutic strategies against increasingly prevalent medical conditions such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. As such, there is a great need to develop models to mechanistically describe how amyloid fibrils are formed from precursor peptides and proteins. Here we review and discuss how ideas and concepts from chemical reaction kinetics can help to achieve this objective. In particular, we show how a combination of theory, experiments, and computer simulations, based on chemical kinetics, provides a general formalism for uncovering, at the molecular level, the mechanistic steps that underlie the phenomenon of amyloid fibril formation.

  6. Chemical Kinetics for Bridging Molecular Mechanisms and Macroscopic Measurements of Amyloid Fibril Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Šarić, Anđela; Habchi, Johnny; Chia, Sean; Meisl, Georg; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2018-04-01

    Understanding how normally soluble peptides and proteins aggregate to form amyloid fibrils is central to many areas of modern biomolecular science, ranging from the development of functional biomaterials to the design of rational therapeutic strategies against increasingly prevalent medical conditions such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. As such, there is a great need to develop models to mechanistically describe how amyloid fibrils are formed from precursor peptides and proteins. Here we review and discuss how ideas and concepts from chemical reaction kinetics can help to achieve this objective. In particular, we show how a combination of theory, experiments, and computer simulations, based on chemical kinetics, provides a general formalism for uncovering, at the molecular level, the mechanistic steps that underlie the phenomenon of amyloid fibril formation.

  7. Neurodegenerative cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers tau and amyloid beta predict functional, quality of life, and neuropsychological outcomes after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joswig, Holger; Korte, Wolfgang; Früh, Severin; Epprecht, Lorenz; Hildebrandt, Gerhard; Fournier, Jean-Yves; Stienen, Martin Nikolaus

    2018-04-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers might be useful in predicting outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). It was the aim to determine whether tau and amyloid beta CSF concentrations predict functional, health-related quality of life (hrQoL), and neuropsychological outcomes after aSAH. Ventricular CSF was obtained from n = 24 aSAH patients at admission (D0), day 2 (D2), and day 6 (D6). CSF total (t)Tau, phosphorylated (p)Tau (181P) , and amyloid beta (1-40 and 1-42) (Aβ40/Aβ42) levels were compared between patients with favorable and unfavorable functional (modified Rankin Scale (mRS)), hrQoL (Euro-Qol (EQ-5D)), and neuropsychological outcomes at 3 (3 m) and 12 months (12 m). Patients with unfavorable functional (mRS 4-6) and hrQoL outcome (EQ-5D z-score ≤ - 1.0) at 3 and 12 m had higher CSF tTau/pTau and lower Aβ40/Aβ42 at D0, D2, and D6 with varying degrees of statistical significance. In terms of predicting neuropsychological outcome, CSF pTau showed a statistically significant correlation with the z-scores of executive function (r = - 0.7486, p = 0.008), verbal memory (r = - 0.8101, p = 0.002), attention (r = - 0.6498, p = 0.030), and visuospatial functioning (r = - 0.6944, p = 0.017) at 3 m. At 12 m, CSF pTau had statistically significant correlations with the z-scores of verbal memory (r = - 0.7473, p = 0.008) and visuospatial functioning (r = - 0.6678, p = 0.024). In conclusion, higher tTau/pTau and lower Aβ40/Aβ42 CSF levels predict unfavorable long-term functional and hrQoL outcomes. Neuropsychological deficits correlate with increased CSF tTau and pTau concentrations.

  8. The soluble transcobalamin receptor (sCD320) is present in cerebrospinal fluid and correlates to dementia-related biomarkers tau proteins and amyloid-beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abuyaman, Omar; Nexo, Ebba

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cellular uptake of vitamin B12 (B12) demands binding of the vitamin to transcobalamin (TC) and recognition of TC-B12 (holoTC) by the receptor CD320. Recently, we identified a soluble form of CD320 (sCD320) in human plasma. Here we present data on the occurrence of this soluble receptor...... phospho-tau (181P) (p-tau), total tau (t-tau) and amyloid-beta 1-42 (Aβ) (n = 177) employing commercial ELISA kits (Innogenetics Company). Size exclusion chromatography was performed on a Superdex 200 column. RESULTS: The median sCD320 concentration in CSF (14 pmol/L) is around five times lower than...

  9. Protein kinase C involvement in the acetylcholine release reduction induced by amyloid-beta(25-35) aggregates on neuromuscular synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomàs, Marta; Garcia, Neus; Santafé, Manuel M; Lanuza, Maria; Tomàs, Josep

    2009-01-01

    Using intracellular recording of the diaphragm muscle of adult rats, we have investigated the short-term functional effects of amyloid-beta (Abeta(25-35) peptide aggregates on the modulation of acetylcholine (ACh) release and the involvement of protein kinase C (PKC). The non-aggregated form of this peptide does not change the evoked and spontaneous transmitter release parameters on the neuromuscular synapse. However, the aggregated form of Abeta(25-35) acutely interferes with evoked quantal ACh release (approximately 40% reduction) when synaptic activity in the ex vivo neuromuscular preparation is maintained by low frequency (1 Hz) electrical stimulation. This effect is partially dependent on the activity of PKC that may have a permissive action. The end result of Abeta(25-35) is in opposition to the PKC-dependent maintenance effect on ACh release manifested in active synapses.

  10. Bioassay-Guided Isolation of Neuroprotective Compounds from Uncaria rhynchophylla against Beta-Amyloid-Induced Neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Fang Xian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Uncaria rhynchophylla is a component herb of many Chinese herbal formulae for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Previous study in our laboratory has demonstrated that an ethanol extract of Uncaria rhynchophylla ameliorated cognitive deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease induced by D-galactose. However, the active ingredients of Uncaria rhynchophylla responsible for the anti-Alzheimer’s disease activity have not been identified. This study aims to identify the active ingredients of Uncaria rhynchophylla by a bioassay-guided fractionation approach and explore the acting mechanism of these active ingredients by using a well-established cellular model of Alzheimer’s disease, beta-amyloid- (Aβ- induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells. The results showed that six alkaloids, namely, corynoxine, corynoxine B, corynoxeine, isorhynchophylline, isocorynoxeine, and rhynchophylline were isolated from the extract of Uncaria rhynchophylla. Among them, rhynchophylline and isorhynchophylline significantly decreased Aβ-induced cell death, intracellular calcium overloading, and tau protein hyperphosphorylation in PC12 cells. These results suggest that rhynchophylline and isorhynchophylline are the major active ingredients responsible for the protective action of Uncaria rhynchophylla against Aβ-induced neuronal toxicity, and their neuroprotective effect may be mediated, at least in part, by inhibiting intracellular calcium overloading and tau protein hyperphosphorylation.

  11. Other Species in the Aqueous Environment of a Peptide Can Invert its Intrinsic Solvated Polyproline II/Beta Propensity: Implications for Amyloid Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirkin, Noemi G; Krimm, Samuel

    2016-02-02

    As we have previously shown, the predominance of the polyproline II conformation in the circular dichroism spectra of aqueous polypeptides is related to its lower energy than that of the beta conformation. In order to test whether this is still the case in the presence of additional components in the medium, we have calculated the energy difference between these two conformations in an alanine-dipeptide/twelve-water system without and with the addition of an HCl molecule. We find in the latter case that the beta conformer is of lower energy than the polyproline II. Energy profiles near the minima in both cases also permit conclusions about the relative entropies of these structures. These results emphasize the importance of considering the peptide-plus-medium state as the relevant entity in determining the structural properties of such systems. Such an inversion could be relevant to the formation of amyloid and could thus lead to new strategies for studying its role in the development of neurodegenerative diseases. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Octylphenol (OP) alters the expression of members of the amyloid protein family in the hypothalamus of the snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina serpentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudeau, Vance L; Chiu, Suzanne; Kennedy, Sean W; Brooks, Ronald J

    2002-03-01

    The gonadal estrogen estradiol-17beta (E(2)) is important for developing and regulating hypothalamic function and many aspects of reproduction in vertebrates. Pollutants such as octylphenol (OP) that mimic the actions of estrogens are therefore candidate endocrine-disrupting chemicals. We used a differential display strategy (RNA-arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction) to isolate partial cDNA sequences of neurotransmitter, developmental, and disease-related genes that may be regulated by OP or E(2) in the snapping turtle Chelydra serpentina serpentina hypothalamus. Hatchling and year-old male snapping turtles were exposed to a 10 ng/mL nominal concentration of waterborne OP or E(2) for 17 days. One transcript [421 base pairs (bp)] regulated by OP and E(2) was 93% identical to human APLP-2. APLP-2 and the amyloid precursor protein (APP) regulate neuronal differentiation and are also implicated in the genesis of Alzheimer disease in humans. Northern blot analysis determined that the turtle hypothalamus contains a single APLP-2 transcript of 3.75 kb in length. Exposure to OP upregulated hypothalamic APLP-2 mRNA levels 2-fold (p < 0.05) in month-old and yearling turtles. E(2) did not affect APLP-2 mRNA levels in hatchlings but stimulated a 2-fold increase (p < 0.05) in APLP-2 mRNA levels in yearling males. The protein beta-amyloid, a selectively processed peptide derived from APP, is also involved in neuronal differentiation, and accumulation of this neurotoxic peptide causes neuronal degeneration in the brains of patients with Alzheimer disease. Therefore, we also sought to determine the effects of estrogens on the expression of beta-amyloid. Using homology cloning based on known sequences, we isolated a cDNA fragment (474 bp) from turtle brain with 88% identity to human APP. Northern blot analysis determined that a single 3.5-kb transcript was expressed in the turtle hypothalamus. Waterborne OP also increased the expression of hypothalamic APP after 35 days of

  13. Activation of transmembrane bile acid receptor TGR5 stimulates insulin secretion in pancreatic {beta} cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Divya P.; Rajagopal, Senthilkumar; Mahavadi, Sunila [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA (United States); Mirshahi, Faridoddin [Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA (United States); Grider, John R. [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA (United States); Murthy, Karnam S., E-mail: skarnam@vcu.edu [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA (United States); Sanyal, Arun J., E-mail: asanyal@mcvh-vcu.edu [Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA (United States)

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer G protein coupled receptor TGR5 is expressed in mouse and human islets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGR5 is coupled to activation of Gs and Ca{sup 2+} release via cAMP/Epac/PLC-{epsilon} pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of TGR5 by bile salts and selective ligands causes insulin secretion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGR5 could be a potential therapeutic target to treat diabetes. -- Abstract: Bile acids act as signaling molecules and stimulate the G protein coupled receptor, TGR5, in addition to nuclear farnesoid X receptor to regulate lipid, glucose and energy metabolism. Bile acid induced activation of TGR5 in the enteroendocrine cells promotes glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) release, which has insulinotropic effect in the pancreatic {beta} cells. In the present study, we have identified the expression of TGR5 in pancreatic {beta} cell line MIN6 and also in mouse and human pancreatic islets. TGR5 selective ligands, oleanolic acid (OA) and INT-777 selectively activated G{alpha}{sub s} and caused an increase in intracellular cAMP and Ca{sup 2+}. OA and INT-777 also increased phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis and the increase was blocked by NF449 (a selective G{alpha}{sub s} inhibitor) or (U73122) (PI hydrolysis inhibitor). OA, INT-777 and lithocholic acid increased insulin release in MIN6 and human islets and the increase was inhibited by treatment with NF449, (U73122) or BAPTA-AM (chelator of calcium), but not with myristoylated PKI (PKA inhibitor), suggesting that the release is dependent on G{sub s}/cAMP/Ca{sup 2+} pathway. 8-pCPT-2 Prime -O-Me-cAMP, a cAMP analog, which activates Epac, but not PKA also stimulated PI hydrolysis. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the TGR5 expressed in the pancreatic {beta} cells regulates insulin secretion and highlights the importance of ongoing therapeutic strategies targeting TGR5 in the control of glucose homeostasis.

  14. Induction of insulin secretion in engineered liver cells by nitric oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özcan Sabire

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus results from an autoimmune destruction of the pancreatic beta cells, which produce insulin. The lack of insulin leads to chronic hyperglycemia and secondary complications, such as cardiovascular disease. The currently approved clinical treatments for diabetes mellitus often fail to achieve sustained and optimal glycemic control. Therefore, there is a great interest in the development of surrogate beta cells as a treatment for type 1 diabetes. Normally, pancreatic beta cells produce and secrete insulin only in response to increased blood glucose levels. However in many cases, insulin secretion from non-beta cells engineered to produce insulin occurs in a glucose-independent manner. In the present study we engineered liver cells to produce and secrete insulin and insulin secretion can be stimulated via the nitric oxide pathway. Results Expression of either human insulin or the beta cell specific transcription factors PDX-1, NeuroD1 and MafA in the Hepa1-6 cell line or primary liver cells via adenoviral gene transfer, results in production and secretion of insulin. Although, the secretion of insulin is not significantly increased in response to high glucose, treatment of these engineered liver cells with L-arginine stimulates insulin secretion up to three-fold. This L-arginine-mediated insulin release is dependent on the production of nitric oxide. Conclusion Liver cells can be engineered to produce insulin and insulin secretion can be induced by treatment with L-arginine via the production of nitric oxide.

  15. MAK33 antibody light chain amyloid fibrils are similar to oligomeric precursors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Hora

    Full Text Available Little structural information is available so far on amyloid fibrils consisting of immunoglobulin light chains. It is not understood which features of the primary sequence of the protein result in fibril formation. We report here MAS solid-state NMR studies to identify the structured core of κ-type variable domain light chain fibrils. The core contains residues of the CDR2 and the β-strands D, E, F and G of the native immunoglobulin fold. The assigned core region of the fibril is distinct in comparison to the core identified in a previous solid-state NMR study on AL-09 by Piehl at. al, suggesting that VL fibrils can adopt different topologies. In addition, we investigated a soluble oligomeric intermediate state, previously termed the alternatively folded state (AFS, using NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. The NMR oligomer spectra display a high degree of similarity when compared to the fibril spectra, indicating a high structural similarity of the two aggregation states. Based on comparison to the native state NMR chemical shifts, we suggest that fibril formation via domain-swapping seems unlikely. Moreover, we used our results to test the quality of different amyloid prediction algorithms.

  16. Chromogranin B and Secretogranin II in transgenic mice overexpressing human APP751 with the London (V717I) and Swedish (K670M/N671L) mutations and in Alzheimer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Michael; Prokesch, Manuela; Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Windisch, Manfred; Stridsberg, Mats; Mahata, Sushil K; Kirchmair, Rudolf; Wietzorrek, Georg; Knaus, Hans-Günther; Jellinger, Kurt; Humpel, Christian; Marksteiner, Josef

    2008-03-01

    Chromogranin B and secretogranin II are major soluble constituents of large dense core vesicles of presynaptic structures and have been found in neuritic plaques of Alzheimer patients. We examined the distribution and expression of these peptides in both transgenic mice over expressing human amyloid-beta protein precursor APP751 with the London (V717I) and Swedish (K670M/N671L) mutations and in human post-mortem brain. In transgenic mice, the number of amyloid-beta plaques and chromogranin immunopositive plaques increased from 6 to 12 months. About 60% of amyloid-beta plaques were associated with chromogranin B and about 40% with secretogranin II. Chromogranin immunoreactivity appeared mainly as swollen dystrophic neurites. Neither synaptophysin- nor glial fibrillary acidic protein- immunoreactivity was expressed in chromogranin immunoreactive structures at any timepoint. Density of chromogranin peptides in hippocampal structures did not change in transgenic animals at any timepoint, even though animals had a poorer performance in the Morris water maze task. In conclusion, our findings in transgenic animals partly resembled findings in Alzheimer patients. Chromogranin peptides were associated with amyloid-beta plaques, but were not reduced in specific brain areas as previously reported by our group. Therefore specific changes of chromogranin peptides observed in Alzheimer patients can be related to amyloid-beta pathology only.

  17. Effect of four medicinal plants on Amyloid-β induced neurotoxicity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amyloid-beta peptide (Aâ) is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), a neurodegenerative disorder. This study was designed to determine the effect of four medicinal plants used to treat neurodegenerative diseases on Aâ-induced cell death. Cytotoxicity of the ethanol extracts of the plants was ...

  18. Reduction of β-amyloid accumulation by reticulon 3 in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Wataru; Oda, Akiko; Motoki, Kazumi; Hattori, Kotaro; Itoh, Masayuki; Yuasa, Shigeki; Konishi, Yoshihiro; Shin, Ryong-Woon; Tamaoka, Akira; Ogino, Koichi

    2013-02-01

    Inhibition of the β-secretase, BACE1, which cleaves amyloid precursor protein (APP) to produce β-amyloid protein (Aβ), is thought to be a feasible therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer's disease. Reticulon (RTN) proteins such as RTN3 have been identified as membrane proteins that interact with BACE1 and inhibit its Aβ-generating activity. In this study, we investigated whether RTN3 can regulate Aβ production in vivo, using transgenic (Tg) mice expressing APP with Swedish and London mutations (APP Tg mice) and those expressing RTN3; the latter mice showed ~1.4-fold higher expression levels of RTN3 protein in the cerebral cortex than non-Tg controls. We analyzed the brains of single APP Tg and double APP/RTN3 Tg mice at the age of approximately 15 months. The levels of secreted APP-β, a direct BACE1 cleavage product of APP, in Tris-soluble fraction were considerably reduced in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of APP/RTN3 Tg mice relative to those in APP Tg mice. Immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that Aβ burden and plaques were significantly (by approximately 50%) decreased in both the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of double Tg mice compared to APP Tg mice. Furthermore, the levels of guanidine-soluble Aβ40 and Aβ42 in these brain regions of APP/RTN3 Tg mice were relatively lower than those in APP Tg mice. These findings indicate that even a small increase in RTN3 expression exerts suppressive effects on amyloidogenic processing of APP and Aβ accumulation through modulation of BACE1 activity in vivo, and suggest that induction of RTN3 might be an effective therapeutic strategy against Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Ex-vivo in-vitro inhibition of lipopolysaccharide stimulated tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1 beta secretion in human whole blood by extractum urticae dioicae foliorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obertreis, B; Ruttkowski, T; Teucher, T; Behnke, B; Schmitz, H

    1996-04-01

    An extract of Urtica dioica folium (IDS 23, Rheuma-Hek), monographed positively for adjuvant therapy of rheumatic diseases and with known effects in partial inhibition of prostaglandin and leukotriene synthesis in vitro, was investigated with respect to effects of the extract on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in human whole blood of healthy volunteers. In the assay system used, LPS stimulated human whole blood showed a straight increase of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) secretion reaching maximum concentrations within 24 h following a plateau and slight decrease up to 65 h, respectively. The concentrations of these cytokines was strongly positively correlated with the number of monocytes/macrophages of each volunteer. TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta concentration after LPS stimulation was significantly reduced by simultaneously given IDS 23 in a strictly dose dependent manner. At time 24 h these cytokine concentrations were reduced by 50.8% and 99.7%, respectively, using the highest test IDS 23 assay concentration of 5 mg/ml (p flavonoides such as caffeic malic acid, caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, quercetin and rutin did not influence LPS stimulated TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta and IL-6 secretion in tested concentrations up to 5 x 10(-5) mol/l. These further findings on the pharmacological mechanism of action of Urticae dioica folia may explain the positive effects of this extract in the treatment of rheumatic diseases.

  20. In vitro secretion profiles of interleukin (IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF alpha after selective infection with Escherichia coli in human fetal membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maida-Claros Rolando

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chorioamniotic membranes infection is a pathologic condition in which an abnormal secretion of proinflammatory cytokines halts fetal immune tolerance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the functional response of human chorioamniotic membranes, as well as the individual contribution of the amnion and choriodecidua after stimulation with Escherichia coli, a pathogen associated with preterm labor. Methods Explants of chorioamniotic membranes from 10 women (37–40 weeks of gestation were mounted and cultured in a Transwell system, which allowed us to test the amnion and choriodecidua compartments independently. Escherichia coli (1 × 10 6 CFU/mL was added to either the amniotic or the choriodecidual regions or both; after a 24-h incubation, the secretion of IL-1beta, IL-6, TNFalpha, IL-8, and IL-10 in both compartments was measured using a specific ELISA. Data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance. Results After stimulation with Escherichia coli, the choriodecidua compartment showed an increase in the secretion of IL-1beta (21-fold, IL-6 (2-fold, IL-8 (6-fold, and IL-10 (37-fold, regardless of which side of the membrane was stimulated; TNFalpha secretion augmented (22-fold also but only when the stimulus was applied simultaneously to both sides. When the amnion was stimulated directly, the level of IL-1beta (13-fold rose significantly; however, the increase in IL-8 secretion was larger (20-fold, regardless of the primary site of infection. TNFalpha secretion in the amnion compartment rose markedly only when Escherichia coli was simultaneously applied to both sides. Conclusion Selective stimulation of fetal membranes with Escherichia coli results in a differential production of IL-1beta, IL-6, TNFalpha, IL-8, and IL-10. These tissues were less responsive when the amnion side was stimulated. This is in agreement with the hypothesis that the choriodecidua may play a primary role during an ascending

  1. Transcriptional regulation of human FE65, a ligand of Alzheimer's disease amyloid precursor protein, by Sp1.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Yu, Hoi-Tin

    2010-03-01

    FE65 is a neuronal-enriched adaptor protein that binds to the Alzheimer\\'s disease amyloid precursor protein (APP). FE65 forms a transcriptionally active complex with the APP intracellular domain (AICD). The precise gene targets for this complex are unclear but several Alzheimer\\'s disease-linked genes have been proposed. Additionally, evidence suggests that FE65 influences APP metabolism. The mechanism by which FE65 expression is regulated is as yet unknown. To gain insight into the regulatory mechanism, we cloned a 1.6 kb fragment upstream of the human FE65 gene and found that it possesses particularly strong promoter activity in neurones. To delineate essential regions in the human FE65 promoter, a series of deletion mutants were generated. The minimal FE65 promoter was located between -100 and +5, which contains a functional Sp1 site. Overexpression of the transcription factor Sp1 potentiates the FE65 promoter activity. Conversely, suppression of the FE65 promoter was observed in cells either treated with an Sp1 inhibitor or in which Sp1 was knocked down. Furthermore, reduced levels of Sp1 resulted in downregulation of endogenous FE65 mRNA and protein. These findings reveal that Sp1 plays a crucial role in transcriptional control of the human FE65 gene.

  2. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy: diagnosis and potential therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Stewart A; Patel, Ranish K; Lutsep, Helmi L

    2018-06-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is characterized by the pathologic deposition of amyloid-beta within cortical and leptomeningeal arteries, arterioles, capillaries and, in rare cases, the venules of the brain. It is often associated with the development of lobar intracerebral hemorrhages (ICHs) but may cause other neurologic symptoms or be asymptomatic. Magnetic resonance imaging characteristics, such as lobar microbleeds, support a diagnosis of CAA and assist with hemorrhage risk assessments. Immunosuppressants are used to treat rarer inflammatory forms of CAA. For the more common forms of CAA, the use of antihypertensive medications can prevent ICH recurrence while the use of antithrombotics may increase hemorrhage risk. Anti-amyloid approaches to treatment have not yet been investigated in phase 3 trials. Areas covered: A literature search was conducted using MEDLINE on the topics of imaging, biomarkers, ICH prevention and treatment trials in CAA, focusing on its current diagnosis and management and opportunities for future therapeutic approaches. Expert commentary: There is likely a significant unrecognized burden of CAA in the elderly population. Continued research efforts to discover biomarkers that allow the early diagnosis of CAA will enhance the opportunity to develop treatment interventions.

  3. Data supporting beta-amyloid dimer structural transitions and protein–lipid interactions on asymmetric lipid bilayer surfaces using MD simulations on experimentally derived NMR protein structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Y. Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This data article supports the research article entitled “Maximally Asymmetric Transbilayer Distribution of Anionic Lipids Alters the Structure and interaction with Lipids of an Amyloidogenic Protein Dimer Bound to the Membrane Surface” [1]. We describe supporting data on the binding kinetics, time evolution of secondary structure, and residue-contact maps of a surface-absorbed beta-amyloid dimer protein on different membrane surfaces. We further demonstrate the sorting of annular and non-annular regions of the protein/lipid bilayer simulation systems, and the correlation of lipid-number mismatch and surface area per lipid mismatch of asymmetric lipid membranes.

  4. Iron overload accelerates neuronal amyloid-β production and cognitive impairment in transgenic mice model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerril-Ortega, Javier; Bordji, Karim; Fréret, Thomas; Rush, Travis; Buisson, Alain

    2014-10-01

    Iron dyshomeostasis is proving increasingly likely to be involved in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD); yet, its mechanism is not well understood. Here, we investigated the AD-related mechanism(s) of iron-sulfate exposure in vitro and in vivo, using cultured primary cortical neurons and APP/PS1 AD-model mice, respectively. In both systems, we observed iron-induced disruptions of amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing, neuronal signaling, and cognitive behavior. Iron overload increased production of amyloidogenic KPI-APP and amyloid beta. Further, this APP misprocessing was blocked by MK-801 in vitro, suggesting the effect was N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) dependent. Calcium imaging confirmed that 24 hours iron exposure led to disrupted synaptic signaling by augmenting GluN2B-containing NMDAR expression-GluN2B messenger RNA and protein levels were increased and promoting excessing extrasynaptic NMDAR signaling. The disrupted GluN2B expression was concurrent with diminished expression of the splicing factors, sc35 and hnRNPA1. In APP/PS1 mice, chronic iron treatment led to hastened progression of cognitive impairment with the novel object recognition discrimination index, revealing a deficit at the age of 4 months, concomitant with augmented GluN2B expression. Together, these data suggest iron-induced APP misprocessing and hastened cognitive decline occur through inordinate extrasynaptic NMDAR activation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Traditional Chinese Nootropic Medicine Radix Polygalae and Its Active Constituent Onjisaponin B Reduce β-Amyloid Production and Improve Cognitive Impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohang; Cui, Jin; Yu, Yang; Li, Wei; Hou, Yujun; Wang, Xin; Qin, Dapeng; Zhao, Cun; Yao, Xinsheng; Zhao, Jian; Pei, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Decline of cognitive function is the hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD), regardless of the pathological mechanism. Traditional Chinese medicine has been used to combat cognitive impairments and has been shown to improve learning and memory. Radix Polygalae (RAPO) is a typical and widely used herbal medicine. In this study, we aimed to follow the β-amyloid (Aβ) reduction activity to identify active constituent(s) of RAPO. We found that Onjisaponin B of RAPO functioned as RAPO to suppress Aβ production without direct inhibition of β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) and γ-secretase activities. Our mechanistic study showed that Onjisaponin B promoted the degradation of amyloid precursor protein (APP). Further, oral administration of Onjisaponin B ameliorated Aβ pathology and behavioral defects in APP/PS1 mice. Taken together, our results indicate that Onjisaponin B is effective against AD, providing a new therapeutic agent for further drug discovery.

  6. APP processing and the APP-KPI domain involvement in the amyloid cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez-González, M; Pérez-Pinera, P; Martínez-Rivera, M; Calatayud, M T; Blázquez Menes, B

    2005-01-01

    Alternative APP mRNA splicing can generate isoforms of APP containing a Kunitz protease inhibitor (KPI) domain. KPI is one of the main serine protease inhibitors. Protein and mRNA KPI(+)APP levels are elevated in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain and are associated with increased amyloid beta deposition. In the last years increasing evidence on multiple points in the amyloid cascade where KPI(+)APP is involved has been accumulated, admitting an outstanding position in the pathogenesis of AD to the KPI domain. This review focuses on the APP processing, the molecular activity of KPI and its physiological and pathological roles and the KPI involvement in the amyloid cascade through the nerve growth factor, the lipoprotein receptor-related protein, the tumor necrosis factor-alpha converting enzyme and the Notch1 protein.

  7. Infundibular neurons of the human hypothalamus simultaneously reactive with antisera against endorphins, ACTH, MSH and beta-LPH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugnon, C; Bloch, B; Lenys, D; Fellmann, D

    1979-06-27

    In man, discrete neurons of the infundibular (arcuate) nucleus contain compounds that can be stained with anti-endorphin (alpha and beta), anti-ACTH, anti-MSH (alpha and beta) and anti-beta-LPH immune sera (I.S.). In the fetus, certain neurons stain with anti-beta-endorphin or anti((17--39)ACTH starting from the 11th week of fetal life. At the ultrastructural level, these neurons contain elementary granules that are immunoreactive with anti-beta-endorphin. In the adult, neurons immunoreactive with anti-beta-endorphin are found in the infundibular nucleus. Their axonal fibers terminate around blood vessels in the neurovascular zone and in the pituitary stalk, or establish contacts with non-immunoreactive perikarya of the infundibular nucleus. These neurons can be stained with anti(17--39)ACTH and anti-beta-endorphin I.S. The most reactive are also stained moderately with anti-alpha-MSH, anti-beta-MSH, anti-beta-LPH, anti-alpha-endorphin, or anti(1--24)ACTH I.S. These results indicate that, in man, compound(s) identical with or immunologically related to endorphins, beta-LPH, ACTH and MSH are secreted by certain hypothalamic neurons. These agents probably originate from a common precursor molecula similar to the so-called pro-opiocortin.

  8. Alterations in gene expression in mutant amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice lacking Niemann-Pick type C1 protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahua Maulik

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick type C (NPC disease, a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused mostly by mutation in NPC1 gene, is pathologically characterized by the accumulation of free cholesterol in brain and other tissues. This is accompanied by gliosis and loss of neurons in selected brain regions, including the cerebellum. Recent studies have shown that NPC disease exhibits intriguing parallels with Alzheimer's disease, including the presence of neurofibrillary tangles and increased levels of amyloid precursor protein (APP-derived β-amyloid (Aβ peptides in vulnerable brain neurons. To evaluate the role of Aβ in NPC disease, we determined the gene expression profile in selected brain regions of our recently developed bigenic ANPC mice, generated by crossing APP transgenic (Tg mice with heterozygous Npc1-deficient mice. The ANPC mice exhibited exacerbated neuronal and glial pathology compared to other genotypes [i.e., APP-Tg, double heterozygous (Dhet, Npc1-null and wild-type mice]. Analysis of expression profiles of 86 selected genes using real-time RT-PCR arrays showed a wide-spectrum of alterations in the four genotypes compared to wild-type controls. The changes observed in APP-Tg and Dhet mice are limited to only few genes involved mostly in the regulation of cholesterol metabolism, whereas Npc1-null and ANPC mice showed alterations in the expression profiles of a number of genes regulating cholesterol homeostasis, APP metabolism, vesicular trafficking and cell death mechanism in both hippocampus and cerebellum compared to wild-type mice. Intriguingly, ANPC and Npc1-null mice, with some exceptions, exhibited similar changes, although more genes were differentially expressed in the affected cerebellum than the relatively spared hippocampus. The altered gene profiles were found to match with the corresponding protein levels. These results suggest that lack of Npc1 protein can alter the expression profile of selected transcripts as well as proteins, and

  9. Destruction of α-synuclein based amyloid fibrils by a low temperature plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakas, Erdinc; Munyanyi, Agatha; Greene, Lesley; Laroussi, Mounir

    2010-10-01

    Amyloid fibrils are ordered beta-sheet aggregates that are associated with a number of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer and Parkinson. At present, there is no cure for these progressive and debilitating diseases. Here we report initial studies that indicate that low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma can break amyloid fibrils into smaller units in vitro. The plasma was generated by the "plasma pencil," a device capable of emitting a long, low temperature plasma plume/jet. This avenue of research may facilitate the development of a plasma-based medical treatment.

  10. Destruction of α-synuclein based amyloid fibrils by a low temperature plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakas, Erdinc; Laroussi, Mounir; Munyanyi, Agatha; Greene, Lesley

    2010-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are ordered beta-sheet aggregates that are associated with a number of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer and Parkinson. At present, there is no cure for these progressive and debilitating diseases. Here we report initial studies that indicate that low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma can break amyloid fibrils into smaller units in vitro. The plasma was generated by the 'plasma pencil', a device capable of emitting a long, low temperature plasma plume/jet. This avenue of research may facilitate the development of a plasma-based medical treatment.

  11. Feasibility and acceptance of simultaneous amyloid PET/MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuetz, Lisa; Tiepolt, Solveig; Werner, Peter; Jochimsen, Thies; Rullmann, Michael; Sattler, Bernhard; Patt, Marianne; Barthel, Henryk; Lobsien, Donald; Fritzsch, Dominik; Hoffmann, Karl-Titus; Schroeter, Matthias L.; Villringer, Arno; Berrouschot, Joerg; Saur, Dorothee; Classen, Joseph; Hesse, Swen; Sabri, Osama; Gertz, Hermann-Josef

    2016-01-01

    Established Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarker concepts classify into amyloid pathology and neuronal injury biomarkers, while recent alternative concepts classify into diagnostic and progression AD biomarkers. However, combined amyloid positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) offers the chance to obtain both biomarker category read-outs within one imaging session, with increased patient as well as referrer convenience. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate this matter for the first time. 100 subjects (age 70 ± 10 yrs, 46 female), n = 51 with clinically defined mild cognitive impairment (MCI), n = 44 with possible/probable AD dementia, and n = 5 with frontotemporal lobe degeneration, underwent simultaneous [ 18 F]florbetaben or [ 11 C]PIB PET/MRI (3 Tesla Siemens mMR). Brain amyloid load, mesial temporal lobe atrophy (MTLA) by means of the Scheltens scale, and other morphological brain pathologies were scored by respective experts. The patients/caregivers as well as the referrers were asked to assess on a five-point scale the convenience related to the one-stop-shop PET and MRI approach. In three subjects, MRI revealed temporal lobe abnormalities other than MTLA. According to the National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer's Association classification, the combined amyloid-beta PET/MRI evaluation resulted in 31 %, 45 %, and 24 % of the MCI subjects being categorized as ''MCI-unlikely due to AD'', ''MCI due to AD-intermediate likelihood'', and ''MCI due to AD-high likelihood'', respectively. 50 % of the probable AD dementia patients were categorized as ''High level of evidence of AD pathophysiological process'', and 56 % of the possible AD dementia patients as ''Possible AD dementia - with evidence of AD pathophysiological process''. With regard to the International Working Group 2 classification, 36 subjects had both positive

  12. Feasibility and acceptance of simultaneous amyloid PET/MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuetz, Lisa; Tiepolt, Solveig; Werner, Peter; Jochimsen, Thies; Rullmann, Michael; Sattler, Bernhard; Patt, Marianne; Barthel, Henryk [Leipzig University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Lobsien, Donald; Fritzsch, Dominik; Hoffmann, Karl-Titus [Leipzig University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Leipzig (Germany); Schroeter, Matthias L.; Villringer, Arno [Leipzig University Hospital and Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Day Clinic for Cognitive Neurology, Leipzig (Germany); Leipzig University Hospital, IFB Adiposity Diseases, Leipzig (Germany); Berrouschot, Joerg [Clinical Centre Altenburger Land, Altenburg (Germany); Saur, Dorothee; Classen, Joseph [Leipzig University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Leipzig (Germany); Hesse, Swen; Sabri, Osama [Leipzig University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Leipzig University Hospital, IFB Adiposity Diseases, Leipzig (Germany); Gertz, Hermann-Josef [Leipzig University Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Leipzig (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Established Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarker concepts classify into amyloid pathology and neuronal injury biomarkers, while recent alternative concepts classify into diagnostic and progression AD biomarkers. However, combined amyloid positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) offers the chance to obtain both biomarker category read-outs within one imaging session, with increased patient as well as referrer convenience. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate this matter for the first time. 100 subjects (age 70 ± 10 yrs, 46 female), n = 51 with clinically defined mild cognitive impairment (MCI), n = 44 with possible/probable AD dementia, and n = 5 with frontotemporal lobe degeneration, underwent simultaneous [{sup 18}F]florbetaben or [{sup 11}C]PIB PET/MRI (3 Tesla Siemens mMR). Brain amyloid load, mesial temporal lobe atrophy (MTLA) by means of the Scheltens scale, and other morphological brain pathologies were scored by respective experts. The patients/caregivers as well as the referrers were asked to assess on a five-point scale the convenience related to the one-stop-shop PET and MRI approach. In three subjects, MRI revealed temporal lobe abnormalities other than MTLA. According to the National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer's Association classification, the combined amyloid-beta PET/MRI evaluation resulted in 31 %, 45 %, and 24 % of the MCI subjects being categorized as ''MCI-unlikely due to AD'', ''MCI due to AD-intermediate likelihood'', and ''MCI due to AD-high likelihood'', respectively. 50 % of the probable AD dementia patients were categorized as ''High level of evidence of AD pathophysiological process'', and 56 % of the possible AD dementia patients as ''Possible AD dementia - with evidence of AD pathophysiological process''. With regard to the International Working Group 2 classification, 36 subjects had both

  13. GM1 Ganglioside Inhibits β-Amyloid Oligomerization Induced by Sphingomyelin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Amaro, Mariana; Šachl, Radek; Aydogan, Gokcan; Mikhalyov, I.; Vácha, R.; Hof, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 32 (2016), s. 9411-9415 ISSN 1433-7851 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : amyloid beta-peptides * Alzheimer's disease * diffusion coefficients Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 11.994, year: 2016

  14. PiB fails to map amyloid deposits in cerebral cortex of aged dogs with canine cognitive dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fast, Rikke; Rodell, Anders; Gjedde, Albert

    2013-01-01

    to the understanding of AD. However, the sensitivity of the biomarker Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) to the presence of Aβ in humans and in other mammalian species is in doubt. To test the sensitivity and assess the distribution of Aβ in dog brain, we mapped the brains of dogs with signs of CCD (n = 16) and a control......]PiB in the cerebellum, compared to the cerebral cortex. Retention in the cerebellum is at variance with evidence from brains of humans with AD. To confirm the lack of sensitivity, we stained two dog brains with the immunohistochemical marker 6E10, which is sensitive to the presence of both Aβ and Aβ precursor protein......Dogs with Canine Cognitive Dysfunction (CCD) accumulate amyloid beta (Aβ) in the brain. As the cognitive decline and neuropathology of these old dogs share features with Alzheimer's disease (AD), the relation between Aβ and cognitive decline in animal models of cognitive decline is of interest...

  15. Elucidation of amyloid beta-protein oligomerization mechanisms: discrete molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanc, B; Betnel, M; Cruz, L; Bitan, G; Teplow, D B

    2010-03-31

    Oligomers of amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) play a central role in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Of the two predominant Abeta alloforms, Abeta(1-40) and Abeta(1-42), Abeta(1-42) is more strongly implicated in the disease. We elucidated the structural characteristics of oligomers of Abeta(1-40) and Abeta(1-42) and their Arctic mutants, [E22G]Abeta(1-40) and [E22G]Abeta(1-42). We simulated oligomer formation using discrete molecular dynamics (DMD) with a four-bead protein model, backbone hydrogen bonding, and residue-specific interactions due to effective hydropathy and charge. For all four peptides under study, we derived the characteristic oligomer size distributions that were in agreement with prior experimental findings. Unlike Abeta(1-40), Abeta(1-42) had a high propensity to form paranuclei (pentameric or hexameric) structures that could self-associate into higher-order oligomers. Neither of the Arctic mutants formed higher-order oligomers, but [E22G]Abeta(1-40) formed paranuclei with a similar propensity to that of Abeta(1-42). Whereas the best agreement with the experimental data was obtained when the charged residues were modeled as solely hydrophilic, further assembly from spherical oligomers into elongated protofibrils was induced by nonzero electrostatic interactions among the charged residues. Structural analysis revealed that the C-terminal region played a dominant role in Abeta(1-42) oligomer formation whereas Abeta(1-40) oligomerization was primarily driven by intermolecular interactions among the central hydrophobic regions. The N-terminal region A2-F4 played a prominent role in Abeta(1-40) oligomerization but did not contribute to the oligomerization of Abeta(1-42) or the Arctic mutants. The oligomer structure of both Arctic peptides resembled Abeta(1-42) more than Abeta(1-40), consistent with their potentially more toxic nature.

  16. Amyloid cascade hypothesis: Pathogenesis and therapeutic strategies in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barage, Sagar H; Sonawane, Kailas D

    2015-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease is an irreversible, progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Various therapeutic approaches are being used to improve the cholinergic neurotransmission, but their role in AD pathogenesis is still unknown. Although, an increase in tau protein concentration in CSF has been described in AD, but several issues remains unclear. Extensive and accurate analysis of CSF could be helpful to define presence of tau proteins in physiological conditions, or released during the progression of neurodegenerative disease. The amyloid cascade hypothesis postulates that the neurodegeneration in AD caused by abnormal accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ) plaques in various areas of the brain. The amyloid hypothesis has continued to gain support over the last two decades, particularly from genetic studies. Therefore, current research progress in several areas of therapies shall provide an effective treatment to cure this devastating disease. This review critically evaluates general biochemical and physiological functions of Aβ directed therapeutics and their relevance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Behavioural problems and personality change related to cerebral amyloid angiopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahr, Maximilian; Connemann, Bernhard J; Schönfeldt-Lecuona, Carlos

    2012-11-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) belongs to the group of amyloidoses that are characterized by the deposition of insoluble and tissue-damaging amyloid proteins. Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage is the common clinical presentation of CAA resulting from the degenerative effect of beta amyloid on the cerebral vascular system. Though CAA is rather a neurological disease psychiatric symptoms can occur and even dominate the clinical picture. A case report is presented in order to illustrate the association between CAA and psychiatric symptoms. We report the case of a 54-year-old female patient with radiologic references to a probable CAA and mild cognitive impairment who developed behavioural difficulties and personality change that necessitated a psychiatric treatment. Psychiatric symptoms were most likely due to CAA. CAA can be associated with psychiatric symptoms and hence should be considered in the treatment of elderly patients with behavioural problems or personality changes. Diagnostic neuroimaging and examination of cerebrospinal fluid is recommended. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Cdk5 inhibitory peptide (CIP inhibits Cdk5/p25 activity induced by high glucose in pancreatic beta cells and recovers insulin secretion from p25 damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Li Zheng

    Full Text Available Cdk5/p25 hyperactivity has been demonstrated to lead to neuron apoptosis and degenerations. Chronic exposure to high glucose (HG results in hyperactivity of Cdk5 and reduced insulin secretion. Here, we set out to determine whether abnormal upregulation of Cdk5/p25 activity may be induced in a pancreatic beta cell line, Min6 cells. We first confirmed that p25 were induced in overexpressed p35 cells treated with HG and increased time course dependence. Next, we showed that no p25 was detected under short time HG stimulation (4-12 hrs, however was detectable in the long exposure in HG cells (24 hrs and 48 hrs. Cdk5 activity in the above cells was much higher than low glucose treated cells and resulted in more than 50% inhibition of insulin secretion. We confirmed these results by overexpression of p25 in Min6 cells. As in cortical neurons, CIP, a small peptide, inhibited Cdk5/p25 activity and restored insulin secretion. The same results were detected in co-infection of dominant negative Cdk5 (DNCdk5 with p25. CIP also reduced beta cells apoptosis induced by Cdk5/p25. These studies indicate that Cdk5/p25 hyperactivation deregulates insulin secretion and induces cell death in pancreatic beta cells and suggests that CIP may serve as a therapeutic agent for type 2 diabetes.

  19. Molecular cloning of skin peptide precursor-encoding cDNAs from tibial gland secretion of the Giant Monkey Frog, Phyllomedusa bicolor (Hylidae, Anura).

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Enrico; Clark, Valerie C; Shaw, Chris; Bininda-Emonds, Olaf R P

    2012-12-01

    The skins of phyllomedusine frogs have long been considered as being tremendously rich sources of bioactive peptides. Previous studies of both peptides and cloning of their precursor encoding cDNAs have relied upon methanolic skin extracts or the dissected skins of recently deceased specimens and have not considered the different glands in isolation. We therefore focused our attention on the tibial gland of the Giant Monkey Frog, Phyllomedusa bicolor and constructed a cDNA library from the skin secretion that was obtained via mechanical stimulation of this macrogland. Using shotgun cloning, four precursors encoding host-defense peptides were identified: two archetypal dermaseptins, a phyllokinin and a phylloseptin that is new for this species but has been recently described from the Waxy Monkey Leaf Frog, Phyllomedusa sauvagii. Our study is the first to report defensive peptides specifically isolated from anuran tibial glands, confirming the hypothesis that these glands also contribute to chemical defense. Moreover, the discovery of novel compounds for this otherwise very well characterized species suggests that this largely neglected gland might possess a different cocktail of secretions from glands elsewhere in the same animal. We will also discuss some evolutionary implications of our findings with respect to the adaptive plasticity of secretory glands. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. IMPY, a potential {beta}-amyloid imaging probe for detection of prion deposits in scrapie-infected mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, P.-J. [INSERM, U619, F-37000 Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais, F-37000 Tours (France); IFR135, F-37000 Tours (France); Bernard, Serge [IFR135, F-37000 Tours (France); INRA, UR1282, IASP, 37380 Nouzilly (France)], E-mail: bernard@tours.inra.fr; Sarradin, Pierre [INRA, UR1282, IASP, 37380 Nouzilly (France); Vergote, Jackie [INSERM, U619, F-37000 Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais, F-37000 Tours (France); IFR135, F-37000 Tours (France); Barc, Celine [INRA, UR1282, IASP, 37380 Nouzilly (France); Chalon, Sylvie [INSERM, U619, F-37000 Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais, F-37000 Tours (France); IFR135, F-37000 Tours (France); Kung, M.-P.; Kung, Hank F. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Guilloteau, Denis [INSERM, U619, F-37000 Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais, F-37000 Tours (France); IFR135, F-37000 Tours (France)

    2008-02-15

    Introduction: A potential single-photon emission computed tomography imaging agent for labeling of A{beta} plaques of Alzheimer's disease, IMPY (2-(4'-dimethylaminophenyl)-6-iodo-imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine), would be effective in detection of prion amyloid deposits in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). Methods: In vitro autoradiographic studies were carried out with [{sup 125}I]IMPY on brain sections from scrapie-infected mice and age-matched controls. Competition study was performed to evaluate the prion deposit binding specificity with nonradioactive IMPY. Results: Binding of [{sup 125}I]IMPY was observed in infected brain sections, while on age-matched control brain sections, there was no or very low labeling. Prion deposit binding was confirmed by histoblots with prion protein-specific monoclonal antibody 2D6. In the presence of nonradioactive IMPY, the binding of [{sup 125}I]IMPY was significantly inhibited in all regions studied. Conclusions: These findings indicate that IMPY can detect the prion deposits in vitro in scrapie-infected mice. Labeled with {sup 123}I, this ligand may be useful to quantitate prion deposit burdens in TSEs by in vivo imaging.

  1. Uncaria rhynchophylla, a Chinese medicinal herb, has potent antiaggregation effects on Alzheimer's beta-amyloid proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Hironori; Iwasaki, Koh; Furukawa, Katsutoshi; Seki, Takashi; He, Mei; Maruyama, Masahiro; Tomita, Naoki; Kudo, Yukitsuka; Higuchi, Makoto; Saido, Takaomi C; Maeda, Sumihiro; Takashima, Akihiko; Hara, Masahiko; Ohizumi, Yasushi; Arai, Hiroyuki

    2006-08-01

    Because the deposition of beta-amyloid protein (Abeta) is a consistent pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains, inhibition of Abeta generation, prevention of Abeta fibril formation, or destabilization of preformed Abeta fibrils would be attractive therapeutic strategies for the treatment of AD. We examined the effects of several medicinal herbs used in traditional Chinese medical formulae on the formation and destabilization of Abeta fibrils by using the thioflavin T binding assay, atomic force microscopic imaging, and electrophoresis. Our study demonstrates that several of these herbs have potent inhibitory effects on fibril formation of both Abeta(1-40) and Abeta(1-42) in concentration-dependent manners; in particular, Uncaria rhynchophylla inhibited Abeta aggregation most intensively. Significant destabilization of preformed Abeta(1-40) and Abeta(1-42) fibrils was also induced by Uncaria rhynchophylla as well as some other herb extracts. Three-dimensional HPLC analysis indicated that the water extract of this herb contains several different chemical compounds, including oxindole and indol alkaloids, which have been regarded as neuroprotective. Our results suggest that Uncaria rhynchophylla has remarkably inhibitory effects on the regulation of Abeta fibrils, and we conclude that this medicinal herb could have the potency to be a novel therapeutic agent to prevent and/or cure AD.

  2. Adrenergic effects on secretion of amylase from the rat salivary glands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier; Nexø, Ebba

    1988-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of adrenergic agents on secretion of amylase from the salivary glands in vivo. Saliva was collected from the distal oesophagus in conscious rats. Adrenaline increased the concentration of amylase in saliva and serum significantly. The res......The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of adrenergic agents on secretion of amylase from the salivary glands in vivo. Saliva was collected from the distal oesophagus in conscious rats. Adrenaline increased the concentration of amylase in saliva and serum significantly....... The result of infusion of alpha- and beta-adrenergic antagonists as well as noradrenaline and isoproterenol showed that secretion of salivary amylase is predominantly mediated by stimulation of beta-adrenergic receptors, especially of the beta 1-subtype. Investigation of the isoenzyme pattern in saliva......, pancreatic juice and serum demonstrated that the major component in serum is salivary amylase. This study has shown that beta-adrenergic agents stimulate secretion of amylase from the salivary glands in rats. Though the secretion is mainly exocrine small amounts of amylase is found in serum, which seems...

  3. Is Verbal Episodic Memory in Elderly with Amyloid Deposits Preserved Through Altered Neuronal Function?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossenkoppele, R.; Madison, C.; Oh, H.; Wirth, M.; van Berckel, B.N.M.; Jagust, W.J.

    2014-01-01

    A potential mechanism that enables intellectual preservation in cognitively normal elderly that harbor beta-amyloid (Aβ) pathology is heightened cerebral glucose metabolism. To investigate cross-sectional inter-relationships between Aβ, glucose metabolism, and cognition, 81 subjects (mean age: 75±7

  4. miR-200a-3p promotes β-Amyloid-induced neuronal apoptosis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Qi-Shun Zhang

    2017-07-20

    Jul 20, 2017 ... through down-regulation of SIRT1 in Alzheimer's disease. QI-SHUN ... purpose of this study was to examine whether miR-200a-3p regulated ... miR-29b-1 can modulate b-site amyloid precursor protein- ... multiple important cellular processes, including cell meta- .... Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA).

  5. The Alzheimer's Amyloid-Degrading Peptidase, Neprilysin: Can We Control It?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Nalivaeva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The amyloid cascade hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD postulates that accumulation in the brain of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ is the primary trigger for neuronal loss specific to this pathology. In healthy brain, Aβ levels are regulated by a dynamic equilibrium between Aβ release from the amyloid precursor protein (APP and its removal by perivascular drainage or by amyloid-degrading enzymes (ADEs. During the last decade, the ADE family was fast growing, and currently it embraces more than 20 members. There are solid data supporting involvement of each of them in Aβ clearance but a zinc metallopeptidase neprilysin (NEP is considered as a major ADE. NEP plays an important role in brain function due to its role in terminating neuropeptide signalling and its decrease during ageing or after such pathologies as hypoxia or ischemia contribute significantly to the development of AD pathology. The recently discovered mechanism of epigenetic regulation of NEP by the APP intracellular domain (AICD opens new avenues for its therapeutic manipulation and raises hope for developing preventive strategies in AD. However, consideration needs to be given to the diverse physiological roles of NEP. This paper critically evaluates general biochemical and physiological functions of NEP and their therapeutic relevance.

  6. AFM-based force spectroscopy measurements of mature amyloid fibrils of the peptide glucagon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, M. D.; Hovgaard, M. B.; Mamdouh, W.

    2008-01-01

    We report on the mechanical characterization of individual mature amyloid fibrils by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS). These self-assembling materials, formed from the 29-residue amphiphatic peptide hormone glucagon, were found to display...... a reversible elastic behaviour. Based on AFM morphology and SMFS studies, we suggest that the observed elasticity is due to a force-induced conformational transition which is reversible due to the beta-helical conformation of protofibrils, allowing a high degree of extension. The elastic properties...... of such mature fibrils contribute to their high stability, suggesting that the internal hydrophobic interactions of amyloid fibrils are likely to be of fundamental importance in the assembly of amyloid fibrils and therefore for the understanding of the progression of their associated pathogenic disorders...

  7. Human beta-cell precursors mature into functional insulin-producing cells in an immunoisolation device: implications for diabetes cell therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Hee; Hao, Ergeng; Savinov, Alexei Y; Geron, Ifat; Strongin, Alex Y; Itkin-Ansari, Pamela

    2009-04-15

    Islet transplantation is limited by the need for chronic immunosuppression and the paucity of donor tissue. As new sources of human beta-cells are developed (e.g., stem cell-derived tissue), transplanting them in a durable device could obviate the need for immunosuppression, while also protecting the patient from any risk of tumorigenicity. Here, we studied (1) the survival and function of encapsulated human beta-cells and their progenitors and (2) the engraftment of encapsulated murine beta-cells in allo- and autoimmune settings. Human islets and human fetal pancreatic islet-like cell clusters were encapsulated in polytetrafluorethylene devices (TheraCyte) and transplanted into immunodeficient mice. Graft survival and function was measured by immunohistochemistry, circulating human C-peptide levels, and blood glucose levels. Bioluminescent imaging was used to monitor encapsulated neonatal murine islets. Encapsulated human islet-like cell clusters survived, replicated, and acquired a level of glucose responsive insulin secretion sufficient to ameliorate hyperglycemia in diabetic mice. Bioluminescent imaging of encapsulated murine neonatal islets revealed a dynamic process of cell death followed by regrowth, resulting in robust long-term allograft survival. Further, in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of type I diabetes, encapsulated primary beta-cells ameliorated diabetes without stimulating a detectable T-cell response. We demonstrate for the first time that human beta-cells function is compatible with encapsulation in a durable, immunoprotective device. Moreover, our study suggests that encapsulation of beta-cells before terminal differentiation will be a successful approach for new cell-based therapies for diabetes, such as those derived from stem cells.

  8. Apolipoproteins E and J interfere with amyloid-beta uptake by primary human astrocytes and microglia in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, S.D.; Nielsen, H.M.; Blankenstein, M.A.; Eikelenboom, P.; Veerhuis, R.

    2014-01-01

    Defective clearance of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) from the brain is considered a strong promoter in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Astrocytes and microglia are important mediators of Aβ clearance and Aβ aggregation state and the presence of amyloid associated proteins (AAPs), such as

  9. BACE1 elevation engendered by GGA3 deletion increases β-amyloid pathology in association with APP elevation and decreased CHL1 processing in 5XFAD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, WonHee; Ma, Liang; Lomoio, Selene; Willen, Rachel; Lombardo, Sylvia; Dong, Jinghui; Haydon, Philip G; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2018-02-02

    β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the production of amyloid beta (Aβ), the toxic peptide that accumulates in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Our previous studies have shown that the clathrin adaptor Golgi-localized γ-ear-containing ARF binding protein 3 (GGA3) plays a key role in the trafficking of BACE1 to lysosomes, where it is normally degraded. GGA3 depletion results in BACE1 stabilization both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, levels of GGA3 are reduced and inversely related to BACE1 levels in post-mortem brains of AD patients. In order to assess the effect of GGA3 deletion on AD-like phenotypes, we crossed GGA3 -/- mice with 5XFAD mice. BACE1-mediated processing of APP and the cell adhesion molecule L1 like protein (CHL1) was measured as well as levels of Aβ42 and amyloid burden. In 5XFAD mice, we found that hippocampal and cortical levels of GGA3 decreased while BACE1 levels increased with age, similar to what is observed in human AD brains. GGA3 deletion prevented age-dependent elevation of BACE1 in GGA3KO;5XFAD mice. We also found that GGA3 deletion resulted in increased hippocampal levels of Aβ42 and amyloid burden in 5XFAD mice at 12 months of age. While levels of BACE1 did not change with age and gender in GGAKO;5XFAD mice, amyloid precursor protein (APP) levels increased with age and were higher in female mice. Moreover, elevation of APP was associated with a decreased BACE1-mediated processing of CHL1 not only in 12 months old 5XFAD mice but also in human brains from subjects affected by Down syndrome, most likely due to substrate competition. This study demonstrates that GGA3 depletion is a leading candidate mechanism underlying elevation of BACE1 in AD. Furthermore, our findings suggest that BACE1 inhibition could exacerbate mechanism-based side effects in conditions associated with APP elevation (e.g. Down syndrome) owing to impairment of BACE1-mediated processing of CHL1

  10. Surface Mediated Self-Assembly of Amyloid Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhraai, Zahra

    2015-03-01

    Amyloid fibrils have been considered as causative agents in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, type II diabetes and amyloidosis. Amyloid fibrils form when proteins or peptides misfold into one dimensional crystals of stacked beta-sheets. In solution, amyloid fibrils form through a nucleation and growth mechanism. The rate limiting nucleation step requires a critical concentration much larger than those measured in physiological conditions. As such the exact origins of the seeds or oligomers that result in the formation of fully mature fibrils in the body remain topic intense studies. It has been suggested that surfaces and interfaces can enhance the fibrillization rate. However, studies of the mechanism and kinetics of the surface-mediated fibrillization are technologically challenging due to the small size of the oligomer and protofibril species. Using smart sample preparation technique to dry the samples after various incubation times we are able to study the kinetics of fibril formation both in solution and in the vicinity of various surfaces using high-resolution atomic force microscopy. These studies elucidate the role of surfaces in catalyzing amyloid peptide formation through a nucleation-free process. The nucleation free self-assembly is rapid and requires much smaller concentrations of peptides or proteins. We show that this process resembles diffusion limited aggregation and is governed by the peptide adhesion rate, two -dimensional diffusion of the peptides on the surface, and preferential interactions between the peptides. These studies suggest an alternative pathway for amyloid formation may exist, which could lead to new criteria for disease prevention and alternative therapies. Research was partially supported by a seed grant from the National Institute of Aging of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) under Award Number P30AG010124 (PI: John Trojanowski) and the University of Pennsylvania.

  11. Acute Exposure to a Precursor of Advanced Glycation End Products Induces a Dual Effect on the Rat Pancreatic Islet Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Elmhiri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Chronic diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide. Advanced glycation end products, known as AGEs, are a major risk factor for diabetes onset and maintenance. Methylglyoxal (MG, a highly reactive metabolite of glucose, is a precursor for the generation of endogenous AGEs. Methods. In this current study we incubated in vitro pancreatic islets from adult rats in absence or presence of MG (10 μmol/l with different concentrations of glucose and different metabolic components (acetylcholine, epinephrine, potassium, forskolin, and leucine. Results. Different effects of MG on insulin secretion were evidenced. In basal glucose stimulation (5.6 mM, MG induced a significant (P<0.05 increase of insulin secretion. By contrast, in higher glucose concentrations (8.3 mM and 16.7 mM, MG significantly inhibited insulin secretion (P<0.05. In the presence of potassium, forskolin, and epinephrine, MG enhanced insulin secretion (P<0.05, while when it was incubated with acetylcholine and leucine, MG resulted in a decrease of insulin secretion (P<0.05. Conclusion. We suggest that MG modulates the secretion activity of beta-cell depending on its level of stimulation by other metabolic factors. These results provide insights on a dual acute effect of MG on the pancreatic cells.

  12. Amyloid precursor protein is required for normal function of the rod and cone pathways in the mouse retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Ho

    Full Text Available Amyloid precursor protein (APP is a transmembrane glycoprotein frequently studied for its role in Alzheimer's disease. Our recent study in APP knockout (KO mice identified an important role for APP in modulating normal neuronal development in the retina. However the role APP plays in the adult retina and whether it is required for vision is unknown. In this study we evaluated the role of APP in retinal function and morphology comparing adult wildtype (WT and APP-KO mice. APP was expressed on neuronal cells of the inner retina, including horizontal, cone bipolar, amacrine and ganglion cells in WT mice. The function of the retina was assessed using the electroretinogram and although the rod photoreceptor responses were similar in APP-KO and WT mice, the post-photoreceptor, inner retinal responses of both the rod and cone pathways were reduced in APP-KO mice. These changes in inner retinal function did not translate to a substantial change in visual acuity as assessed using the optokinetic response or to changes in the gross cellular structure of the retina. These findings indicate that APP is not required for basic visual function, but that it is involved in modulating inner retinal circuitry.

  13. Calcium binding to beta-2-microglobulin at physiological pH drives the occurrence of conformational changes which cause the protein to precipitate into amorphous forms that subsequently transform into amyloid aggregates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhdeep Kumar

    Full Text Available Using spectroscopic, calorimetric and microscopic methods, we demonstrate that calcium binds to beta-2-microglobulin (β2m under physiological conditions of pH and ionic strength, in biological buffers, causing a conformational change associated with the binding of up to four calcium atoms per β2m molecule, with a marked transformation of some random coil structure into beta sheet structure, and culminating in the aggregation of the protein at physiological (serum concentrations of calcium and β2m. We draw attention to the fact that the sequence of β2m contains several potential calcium-binding motifs of the DXD and DXDXD (or DXEXD varieties. We establish (a that the microscopic aggregation seen at physiological concentrations of β2m and calcium turns into actual turbidity and visible precipitation at higher concentrations of protein and β2m, (b that this initial aggregation/precipitation leads to the formation of amorphous aggregates, (c that the formation of the amorphous aggregates can be partially reversed through the addition of the divalent ion chelating agent, EDTA, and (d that upon incubation for a few weeks, the amorphous aggregates appear to support the formation of amyloid aggregates that bind to the dye, thioflavin T (ThT, resulting in increase in the dye's fluorescence. We speculate that β2m exists in the form of microscopic aggregates in vivo and that these don't progress to form larger amyloid aggregates because protein concentrations remain low under normal conditions of kidney function and β2m degradation. However, when kidney function is compromised and especially when dialysis is performed, β2m concentrations probably transiently rise to yield large aggregates that deposit in bone joints and transform into amyloids during dialysis related amyloidosis.

  14. Current concepts on selected plant secondary metabolites with promising inhibitory effects against enzymes linked to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, I Erdogan

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has become one of the deadliest diseases for human beings with special incidence in elderly population. It is a progressive neurodegenerative disease and the most prevalent cause of dementia. The neuropathology of AD has not been fully elucidated yet, however, cholinergic hypothesis is the most accepted theory nowadays, resulting from the cholinergic deficit emerging in the brains of AD patients. Shortage of the neurotransmitters, acetylcholine and butyrylcholine has been demonstrated, and therefore, inhibition of the enzymes; acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) that break down acetylcholine and butyrylcholine has become a standard approach for AD treatment. However, cholinesterase inhibitors are only effective in symptomatic treatment and have